Science.gov

Sample records for 4th generation fluoroquinolones

  1. Bifrost: A 4th Generation Launch Architecture Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrschneider, R. R.; Young, D.; St.Germain, B.; Brown, N.; Crowley, J.; Maatsch, J.; Olds, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    A 4th generation launch architecture is studied for the purpose of drastically reducing launch costs and hence enabling new large mass missions such as space solar power and human exploration of other planets. The architecture consists of a magnetic levitation launch tube placed on the equator with the exit end elevated to approximately 20 km. Several modules exist for sending manned and unmanned payloads into Earth orbit. Analysis of the launch tube operations, launch trajectories, module aerodynamics, propulsion modules, and system costs are presented. Using the hybrid logistics module, it is possible to place payloads into low Earth orbit for just over 100 per lb.

  2. JLab CW Cryomodules for 4th Generation Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, Robert; Bundy, Richard; Cheng, Guangfeng; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Clemens, William; Daly, Edward; Henry, James; Hicks, William; Kneisel, Peter; Manning, Stephen; Manus, Robert; Marhauser, Frank; Preble, Joseph; Reece, Charles; Smith, Karl; Stirbet, Mircea; Turlington, Larry; Wang, Haipeng; Wilson, Katherine

    2008-01-23

    Fourth generation light sources hold the prospect of unprecedented brightness and optical beam quality for a wide range of scientific applications. Many of the proposed new facilities will rely on large superconducting radio frequency (SRF) based linacs to provide high energy, low emittance CW electron beams. For high average power applications there is a growing acceptance of energy recovery linac (ERL) technology as the way to support large recirculating currents with modest RF power requirements. CW SRF and high current ERLs are two core competencies at Jefferson Lab. JLab has designed and built a number of CW cryomodules of several different types starting with the original CEBAF design, with variations for higher current in the two generations of JLab’s free-electron laser (FEL), through two intermediate prototypes to the final high-performance module for the 12 GeV upgrade. Each of these represent fully engineered and tested configurations with a variety of specifications that could be considered for possible use in fourth generation light sources. Furthermore JLab has been actively pursuing advanced concepts for highcurrent high-efficiency cryomodules for next generation ERL based FEL’s. These existing and proposed designs span the range from about 1mA single-pass to over 100 mA energy recovered current capability. Specialized configurations also exist for high-current non-energy recovered sections such as the injector region where very high RF power is required. We discuss the performance parameters of these existing and proposed designs and their suitability to different classes of fourth generation light sources.

  3. TID Test Results for 4th Generation iPad(TradeMark)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guertin, S. M.; Allen, G. R.; McClure, S. S.; LaBel, K. A.

    2013-01-01

    TID testing of 4th generation iPads is reported. Of iPad subsystems, results indicate that the charging circuitry and display drivers fail at lowest TID levels. Details of construction are investigated for additional testing of components.

  4. The 4th Generation Light Source at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Benson; George Biallas; James Boyce; Donald Bullard; James Coleman; David Douglas; H. Dylla; Richard Evans; Pavel Evtushenko; Albert Grippo; Christopher Gould; Joseph Gubeli; David Hardy; Carlos Hernandez-Garcia; Kevin Jordan; John Klopf; Steven Moore; George Neil; Thomas Powers; Joseph Preble; Daniel Sexton; Michelle D. Shinn; Christopher Tennant; Richard Walker; Shukui Zhang; Gwyn Williams

    2007-04-25

    A number of "Grand Challenges" in Science have recently been identified in reports from The National Academy of Sciences, and the U.S. Dept. of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences. Many of these require a new generation of linac-based light source to study dynamical and non-linear phenomena in nanoscale samples. In this paper we present a summary of the properties of such light sources, comparing them with existing sources, and then describing in more detail a specific source at Jefferson Lab. Importantly, the JLab light source has developed some novel technology which is a critical enabler for other new light sources.

  5. The 4th generation light source at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, S.; Biallas, G.; Boyce, J.; Bullard, D.; Coleman, J.; Douglas, D.; Dylla, F.; Evans, R.; Evtushenko, P.; Grippo, A.; Gould, C.; Gubeli, J.; Hardy, D.; Hernandez-Garcia, C.; Jordan, K.; Klopf, J. M.; Moore, W.; Neil, G.; Powers, T.; Preble, J.; Sexton, D.; Shinn, M.; Tennant, C.; Walker, R.; Zhang, S.; Williams, G. P.

    2007-11-01

    A number of "Grand Challenges" in Science have recently been identified in reports from The National Academy of Sciences, and the US Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences. Many of these require a new generation of linac-based light source to study dynamical and non-linear phenomena in nanoscale samples. In this paper we present a summary of the properties of such light sources, comparing them with existing sources, and then describing in more detail a specific source at Jefferson Lab (JLab). Importantly, the JLab light source has developed some novel technology which is a critical enabler for other new light sources.

  6. Design of a Nb3Sn Magnet for a 4th Generation ECR Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Prestemon, S,; Trillaud, F.; Caspi, S.; Ferracin, P.; Sabbi, G. L.; Lyneis, C. M.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D. S.; Hafalia, R.

    2008-08-17

    The next generation of Electron Cyclotron Resonant (ECR) ion sources are expected to operate at a heating radio frequency greater than 40 GHz. The existing 3rd generation systems, exemplified by the state of the art system VENUS, operate in the 10-28 GHz range, and use NbTi superconductors for the confinement coils. The magnetic field needed to confine the plasma scales with the rf frequency, resulting in peak fields on the magnets of the 4th generation system in excess of 10 T. High field superconductors such as Nb{sub 3}Sn must therefore be considered. The magnetic design of a 4th. generation ECR ion source operating at an rf frequency of 56 GHz is considered. The analysis considers both internal and external sextupole configurations, assuming commercially available Nb{sub 3}Sn material properties. Preliminary structural design issues are discussed based on the forces and margins associated with the coils in the different configurations, leading to quantitative data for the determination of a final magnet design.

  7. Quark masses and mixings in the RS1 model with a condensing 4th generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, A. E. Cárcamo; Dib, Claudio O.; Neill, Nicolás A.; Zerwekh, Alfonso R.

    2012-02-01

    We study the hierarchy of quark masses and mixings in a model based on a 5-dimensional spacetime with constant curvature of Randall-Sundrum type with two branes, where the Electroweak Symmetry Breaking is caused dynamically by the condensation of a 4th generation of quarks, due to underlying physics from the 5D bulk and the first KK gluons. We first study the hierarchy of quark masses and mixings that can be obtained from purely adjusting the profile localizations, finding that realistic masses are not reproduced unless non trivial hierarchies of underlying 4-fermion interactions from the bulk are included. Then we study global U(1) symmetries that can be imposed in order to obtain non-symmetric modified Fritzsch-like textures in the mass matrices that reproduce reasonably well quark masses and CKM mixings.

  8. Conditions for the generation of cytotoxic CD4(+) Th cells that enhance CD8(+) CTL-mediated tumor regression.

    PubMed

    Li, Kunyu; Baird, Margaret; Yang, Jianping; Jackson, Chris; Ronchese, Franca; Young, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    Adoptive cell therapies (ACTs) using tumor-reactive T cells have shown clinical benefit and potential for cancer treatment. While the majority of the current ACT are focused on using CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), others have shown that the presence of tumor-reactive CD4(+) T helper (Th) cells can greatly enhance the anti-tumor activity of CD8(+) CTL. However, difficulties in obtaining adequate numbers of CD4(+) Th cells through in vitro expansion can limit the application of CD4 Th cells in ACT. This study aims to optimize the culture conditions for mouse CD4 T cells to provide basic information for animal studies of ACT using CD4 T cells. Taking advantage of the antigen-specificity of CD4(+) Th cells from OT-II transgenic mice, we examined different methodologies for generating antigen-specific CD4(+) Th1 cells in vitro. We found that cells grown in complete advanced-DMEM/F12 medium supplemented with low-dose IL-2 and IL-7 induced substantial cell expansion. These Th cells were Th1-like, as they expressed multiple Th1-cytokines and exhibited antigen-specific cytotoxicity. In addition co-transfer of these CD4(+) Th1-like cells with CD8(+) CTL significantly enhanced tumor regression, leading to complete cure in 80% of mice bearing established B16-OVA. These observations indicate that the CD4(+) Th1-like cells generated using the method we optimized are functionally active to eliminate their target cells, and can also assist CD8(+) CTL to enhance tumor regression. The findings of this study provide valuable data for further research into in vitro expansion of CD4(+) Th1-like cells, with potential applications to cancer treatment involving ACT. PMID:27588200

  9. Conditions for the generation of cytotoxic CD4+ Th cells that enhance CD8+ CTL-mediated tumor regression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kunyu; Baird, Margaret; Yang, Jianping; Jackson, Chris; Ronchese, Franca; Young, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapies (ACTs) using tumor-reactive T cells have shown clinical benefit and potential for cancer treatment. While the majority of the current ACT are focused on using CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), others have shown that the presence of tumor-reactive CD4+ T helper (Th) cells can greatly enhance the anti-tumor activity of CD8+ CTL. However, difficulties in obtaining adequate numbers of CD4+ Th cells through in vitro expansion can limit the application of CD4 Th cells in ACT. This study aims to optimize the culture conditions for mouse CD4 T cells to provide basic information for animal studies of ACT using CD4 T cells. Taking advantage of the antigen-specificity of CD4+ Th cells from OT-II transgenic mice, we examined different methodologies for generating antigen-specific CD4+ Th1 cells in vitro. We found that cells grown in complete advanced-DMEM/F12 medium supplemented with low-dose IL-2 and IL-7 induced substantial cell expansion. These Th cells were Th1-like, as they expressed multiple Th1-cytokines and exhibited antigen-specific cytotoxicity. In addition co-transfer of these CD4+ Th1-like cells with CD8+ CTL significantly enhanced tumor regression, leading to complete cure in 80% of mice bearing established B16-OVA. These observations indicate that the CD4+ Th1-like cells generated using the method we optimized are functionally active to eliminate their target cells, and can also assist CD8+ CTL to enhance tumor regression. The findings of this study provide valuable data for further research into in vitro expansion of CD4+ Th1-like cells, with potential applications to cancer treatment involving ACT. PMID:27588200

  10. A laboratory model of post-Newtonian gravity with high power lasers and 4th generation light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregori, G.; Levy, M. C.; Wadud, M. A.; Crowley, B. J. B.; Bingham, R.

    2016-04-01

    Using the post-Newtonian formalism of gravity, we attempt to calculate the x-ray Thomson scattering cross section of electrons that are accelerated in the field of a high intensity optical laser. We show that our results are consistent with previous calculations, suggesting that the combination of high power laser and 4th generation light sources may become a powerful platform to test models exploring high order corrections to the Newtonian gravity.

  11. [Antidepressives of the 3rd, 4th and 5th generation].

    PubMed

    Svestka, J

    1994-02-01

    Antidepressants are classified into five generations. Preparations of the first generation affect various neurotransmitter systems and are therefore associated with many undesirable effects (e.g. tricyclic antidepressants, maprotiline). The second generation of antidepressants is already devoid of anticholinergic action and their adrenolytic and antihistaminic effects are weaker (e.g. mianserine, mirtazapine, trazodone). The antidepressant action of preparations of the third generation is mediated only by one of the three main neurotransmitter systems for depression (5-HT, noradrenaline, dopamine) and does not affect muscarine, histamine and adrenergic cerebral systems (e.g. SSRI, ipsapirone, viloxazine, reboxetine, bupropione). Recently antidepressants of the fourth generation were synthetized which influence only the serotonin, and noradrenaline or dopamine system (e.g. milnacipran, befloxatone). The fifth generation of antidepressants foresees the exclusive action on 5-HT, noradrenaline and dopamine systems of the CNS in varying ratios (e.g. venlafaxine, cericlamine). PMID:8174184

  12. Design of Hanford Site 4th Generation Multi Function Corrosion Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    NORMAN, E.C.

    2000-08-30

    This document describes the design of the fourth-generation corrosion monitoring system scheduled to be installed in DST 241-AN-104 early in fiscal year 2001. A fourth-generation multi-function corrosion monitoring system has been designed for installation into a DST in the 241-AN farm at the Hanford Site in FY 2001. Improvements and upgrades from the third-generation system (installed in 241-AN-105) that have been incorporated into the fourth-generation system include: Addition of a built-in water lance to assist installation of probe into tanks with a hard crust layer at the surface of the waste; and Improvement of the electrode mounting apparatus used to attach the corrosion monitoring electrodes to the stainless steel probe body (new design simplifies probe assembly/wiring). These new features improve on the third-generation design and yield a system that is easier to fabricate and install, provides for a better understanding of the relationship between corrosion and other tank operating parameters, and optimizes the use of the riser that houses the probe in the tank.

  13. The ARC-EN-CIEL French 4th Generation Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Bruni, C.; Couprie, M. E.; Chubar, O.; Loulergue, A.; Nahon, L.; Carre, B.; Garzella, D.; Labat, M.; Lambert, G.; Monot, P.; Jablonka, M.; Meot, F.; Ortega, J. M.; Nutarelli, D.

    2007-01-19

    ARC-EN-CIEL (Accelerator-Radiation Complex for Enhanced Coherent Intense Extended Light) proposal is based on a CW 1 GeV superconducting linear accelerator delivering high charge, subpicosecond, low emittance electron bunches with a high repetition rate (1 kHz). The FEL uses High Harmonics Generation in gases in a High Gain Harmonic Generation scheme, leading to a rather compact solution. The radiation extends down to 0.8 nm with the non-linear harmonics and reproduces the good longitudinal and transverse coherence of the harmonics generated in gas. Optional beam loops, foreseen to increase the beam current or the energy, will accommodate infrared CSR source, femtosecond undulator sources in the VUV and X-ray ranges, and a FEL oscillator in the 10 nm range. An important synergy is expected between accelerator and laser communities, in particular for electron plasma acceleration tests.

  14. Rare decays of the Z and the standard model, 4th generation, and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Weiler, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    Several issues in rare decays of the Z are addressed. The rate for flavor-changing Z decay grows as the fourth power of the fermion masses internal to the quantum loop, and so offers a window to the existence of ultraheavy (m > M{sub W}) fermions. In the standard model, with three generations, BR(Z {yields} bs) < 10{sup -7} and BR(Z{yields}tc)<10{sup -13}. With four generations, BR(Z {yields} bb{sub 4}) may be as large as 10{sup -5} if m{sub b4} < M{sub Z}; and similarly for BR(Z {yields} N{sub 4}v), where N{sub 4} is the possibly heavy fourth generation neutrino. In supersymmetric and other two Higgs doublet models, BR(Z {yields} tc) may be as large as 5 {times} 10{sup -6} in the three generation scheme. With minimal supersymmetry, the reaction Z {yields} H{gamma} is guaranteed to go, with a parameter-dependent branching ratio of 10{sup -6 {plus minus} 3}. With mirror fermions or exotic E{sub 6} fermions, the branching ratios for Z {yields} ct (70 GeV), Z {yields} {mu}{tau}, and Z {yields} bb{sub 4} (70 GeV) are typically 10{sup -4}, 10{sup -4}, and 10{sup -3} respectively, clearly measurable at LEP. Depending on unknown quark masses, the Z may mix with vector (b{sub 4}{bar b}{sub 4}) and the W may mix with vector (t{bar b}) or (t{bar s}). CP violating asymmetries in flavor-changing Z decay are immeasurably small in the standard model, but may be large in supersymmetric and other nonstandard models. 28 refs.

  15. Negative Delta-Rho in the "standard Model" from 4TH-GENERATION Bound States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Richard Thomas, III

    The possible consequences of heavy fourth-generation "vector meson" bound states, formed by the exchange of the Higgs boson, are discussed within the context of the Standard Model with either one or two Higgs doublets. It is suggested that such bound states could make negative contributions to the rho parameter, thereby loosening the perturbative constraint upon the mass of the top quark (our model would permit rm m_{t} to be as large as 365 GeV in the one Higgs doublet scenario, for example) and/or the masses, mass splittings, and other characteristics of a potential fourth generation of heavy fermions. In the two Higgs doublet scenario, the contributions to the rho parameter coming solely from the scalar sector are also considered. It is found in that scenario that the way fermions couple to the Higgs doublets crucially determines whether or not one can have a heavy (>150 GeV) top quark, a light ( <80 GeV) charged scalar and/or rare "monojet" Z decays such as Z to Nnu _tau, where N is the fourth-generation neutral lepton.

  16. Laboratory Astrophysics with High Power Lasers and 4th Generation Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregori, Gianluca

    2013-10-01

    The combination of high power optical lasers and free electron lasers operating at short wavelength (in the x-ray regime) has opened new avenues for laboratory astrophysics, where exotic states of matter can now be generated and probed with high accuracy. We will review a few examples of recent experiments performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) free electron laser operating in Stanford (CA), but also discuss future applications. We will focus our discussion on the following three examples: 1) Laboratory analogues of white dwarf envelopes and the physics of strongly coupled plasmas near crystallization; 2) scaled laboratory experiments to investigate magnetized and radiative shocks; and 3) possible proposals for testing strong gravity analogues using x-ray Thomson scattering. This work was partially the European Research Council under the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme.

  17. 4th Annual SATN Conference 2011: Curriculum Transformation at Universities of Technology: Towards Development of New Generation Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mthembu, T.

    2012-01-01

    The South African Technology Network (SATN) would like to thank the Editor of the "South African Journal of Higher Education" (SAJHE) for the opportunity to publish papers read at the 4th Annual SATN Conference that was hosted by Central University of Technology and held in Bloemfontein in November 2011. The journal makes it possible for…

  18. Use of fluoroquinolones and third-generation cephalosporins in the emergency department: an 11-year survey.

    PubMed

    Montassier, Emmanuel; Corvec, Stephane; Hardouin, Jean-Benoit; Potel, Gilles; Batard, Eric

    2014-12-01

    Fluoroquinolones and third-generation cephalosporins are particularly prone to select bacterial resistance to antibiotics. We aimed to assess the temporal trends of antibiotic use in the emergency department adults unit of an academic hospital between 2002 and 2012. Antibiotic use was converted in defined daily doses (DDD). The total antibiotic consumption tended to decrease, from 53.1±8.5 to 48.6±11.9 DDD/1000 patient visits (estimate decrease per year, -0.9±0.5 DDD/1000 visits, P=0.07). Use of third-generation cephalosporins increased significantly, from 9.7% of total antibiotic use to 22.6% (estimate per year, 1.2±0.2%, P<0.0001), whereas use of fluoroquinolones decreased from 19.5 to 12.3% (estimate per year, -0.7±0.2%, P<0.003). Given their ability to select bacterial resistance, especially extended-spectrum β-lactamases, particular attention should be paid to increasing use of third-generation cephalosporins in the emergency department. PMID:24487125

  19. 2.5 Gbps clock data recovery using 1/4th-rate quadricorrelator frequency detector and skew-calibrated multi-phase clock generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tontisirin, S.; Tielert, R.

    2006-09-01

    A Gb/s clock and data recovery (CDR) circuit using 1/4th-rate digital quadricorrelator frequency detector and skew-calibrated multi-phase voltage-controlled oscillator is presented. With 1/4th-rate clock architecture, the coil-free oscillator can have lower operation frequency providing sufficient low-jitter operation. Moreover, it is an inherent 1-to-4 DEMUX. The skew calibration scheme is applied to reduce phase offset in multi-phase clock generator. The CDR with frequency detector can have small loop bandwidth, wide pull-in range and can operate without the need for a local reference clock. This 1/4th-rate CDR is implemented in standard 0.18 μm CMOS technology. It has an active area of 0.7 mm2 and consumes 100 mW at 1.8 V supply. The CDR has low jitter operation in a wide frequency range from 1-2.25 Gb/s. Measurement of Bit-Error Rate is less than 10-12 for 2.25 Gb/s incoming data 27-1 PRBS, jitter peak-to-peak of 0.7 unit interval (UI) modulation at 10 MHz.

  20. Comparative clinical study of conjunctival toxicities of newer generation fluoroquinolones without the influence of preservatives

    PubMed Central

    Park, Han Sang; Lee, Jun Hun; Kim, Hong Kyun

    2015-01-01

    AIM To compare the conjunctival epithelial toxicities of three newer-generation fluoroquinolones without preservatives. METHODS In a prospective, randomized, double blind comparative study, 47 eyes of 47 patients with a primary pterygium were enrolled, and divided randomly into three groups (levofloxacin 0.5%, gatifloxacin 0.3%, and moxifloxacin 0.5%). After pterygium surgery with the same conjunctival autograft technique, each patient maintained a regimen with a randomly assigned fluoroquinolone eye drop. Patients were examined every other day after surgery until the epithelium had completely healed. Photos were taken and used to measure the area of residual epithelial defects. Conjunctival healing time and speed (initial defect area/healing time (mm2/d) compared in each group using Kruskal-Wallis tests. RESULTS There were no significant differences in mean age, gender, and conjunctival defect size of the donor site between these groups. However, the mean of conjunctival healing time and speed were statistically different in each group. The mean of conjunctival epithelial healing time was 8.93±2.69d (levofloxacin group), 10.31±2.96d (gatifloxacin group), and 13.50±4.10d (moxifloxacin group), P=0.006. The mean conjuctival epithelial healing speed was 6.18±1.39 mm2/d (levofloxacin group), 5.52±1.68 mm2/d (gatifloxacin group), and 4.40±1.30 mm2/d (moxifloxacin group), P=0. 003. CONCLUSION Without the influence of preservatives, levofloxacin and gatifloxacin might be less toxic to the regeneration of conjunctival epithelial cells and cause a faster conjunctival wound healing relative to moxifloxacin. PMID:26682177

  1. Fluoroquinolone and Third-Generation-Cephalosporin Resistance among Hospitalized Patients with Urinary Tract Infections Due to Escherichia coli: Do Rates Vary by Hospital Characteristics and Geographic Region?

    PubMed

    Bidell, Monique R; Palchak, Melissa; Mohr, John; Lodise, Thomas P

    2016-05-01

    This analysis of nearly 10,000 hospital-associated urinary tract infection (UTI) episodes due to Escherichia coli showed that fluoroquinolone and third-generation-cephalosporin resistance rates were 34.5% and 8.6%, respectively; the rate of concurrent resistance to both agents was 7.3%. Fluoroquinolone resistance rates exceeded 25% regardless of geographic location or hospital characteristics. The findings suggest that fluoroquinolones should be reserved and third-generation cephalosporins be used with caution as empirical agents for hospitalized patients with UTIs due to E. coli. PMID:26926640

  2. Third and fourth generation fluoroquinolone antibacterials: a systematic review of safety and toxicity profiles.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Joana; Alves, Gilberto; Fortuna, Ana; Falcão, Amilcar

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, several third and fourth generation fluoroquinolones (FQs) have been approved for clinical use. These new agents exhibit a more potent and broader-spectrum antibacterial activity and improved pharmacokinetic properties in comparison to the earlier FQs. Although new FQs are generally safe and well tolerated, moderate-to-severe toxicity events have been reported for some of them, leading to their restriction, suspension or even withdrawal from the market. The most common FQ-related adverse effects (AEs) are usually mild and involve the gastrointestinal tract (e.g. nausea and diarrhea) and the central nervous system (e.g. headache and dizziness). Uncommon, but severe AEs (e.g. arthropathy, QTc interval prolongation, dysglycaemia and phototoxicity) and idiosyncratic reactions (e.g. hepatitis and hemolytic anemia) have also been reported and will be discussed throughout this paper. The evidence currently available suggests that AEs can be inherent to the FQ class or can be associated with a particular chemical moiety of the molecular structure of each FQ, thus varying in frequency, severity and nature. The main goal of this review is to provide a systematic evaluation of safety and tolerability data of the newer FQs with emphasis on those currently marketed. PMID:24410307

  3. Efficient 2(nd) and 4(th) harmonic generation of a single-frequency, continuous-wave fiber amplifier.

    PubMed

    Sudmeyer, Thomas; Imai, Yutaka; Masuda, Hisashi; Eguchi, Naoya; Saito, Masaki; Kubota, Shigeo

    2008-02-01

    We demonstrate efficient cavity-enhanced second and fourth harmonic generation of an air-cooled, continuous-wave (cw), single-frequency 1064 nm fiber-amplifier system. The second harmonic generator achieves up to 88% total external conversion efficiency, generating more than 20-W power at 532 nm wavelength in a diffraction-limited beam (M(2) < 1.05). The nonlinear medium is a critically phase-matched, 20-mm long, anti-reflection (AR) coated LBO crystal operated at 25 degrees C. The fourth harmonic generator is based on an AR-coated, Czochralski-grown beta-BaB(2)O(4) (BBO) crystal optimized for low loss and high damage threshold. Up to 12.2 W of 266-nm deep-UV (DUV) output is obtained using a 6-mm long critically phase-matched BBO operated at 40 degrees C. This power level is more than two times higher than previously reported for cw 266-nm generation. The total external conversion efficiency from the fundamental at 1064 nm to the fourth harmonic at 266 nm is >50%. PMID:18542230

  4. BEAM DYNAMICS STUDIES OF A HIGH-REPETITION RATE LINAC-DRIVER FOR A 4TH GENERATION LIGHT SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ventturini, M.; Corlett, J.; Emma, P.; Papadopoulos, C.; Penn, G.; Placidi, M.; Qiang, J.; Reinsch, M.; Sannibale, F.; Steier, C.; Sun, C.; Wells, R.

    2012-05-18

    We present recent progress toward the design of a super-conducting linac driver for a high-repetition rate FEL-based soft x-ray light source. The machine is designed to accept beams generated by the APEX photo-cathode gun operating with MHz-range repetition rate and deliver them to an array of SASE and seeded FEL beamlines. We review the current baseline design and report results of beam dynamics studies.

  5. Testing quantum mechanics in non-Minkowski space-time with high power lasers and 4th generation light sources

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, B. J. B.; Bingham, R.; Evans, R. G.; Gericke, D. O.; Landen, O. L.; Murphy, C. D.; Norreys, P. A.; Rose, S. J.; Tschentscher, Th; Wang, C. H.-T; Wark, J. S.; Gregori, G.

    2012-01-01

    A common misperception of quantum gravity is that it requires accessing energies up to the Planck scale of 1019 GeV, which is unattainable from any conceivable particle collider. Thanks to the development of ultra-high intensity optical lasers, very large accelerations can be now the reached at their focal spot, thus mimicking, by virtue of the equivalence principle, a non Minkowski space-time. Here we derive a semiclassical extension of quantum mechanics that applies to different metrics, but under the assumption of weak gravity. We use our results to show that Thomson scattering of photons by uniformly accelerated electrons predicts an observable effect depending upon acceleration and local metric. In the laboratory frame, a broadening of the Thomson scattered x ray light from a fourth generation light source can be used to detect the modification of the metric associated to electrons accelerated in the field of a high power optical laser. PMID:22768381

  6. Gas dynamics and heat transfer in a packed pebble-bed reactor for the 4th generation nuclear energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulmohsin, Rahman

    -AlOx-Al junctions, we show that, despite excellent temperature stability, temperature fluctuations induce observable critical current fluctuations. Particularly, becuase 1/ f critical current noise has decreased with improved fabrication techniques in recent years, it is important to understand and eliminate this additional noise source. Next, we introduce a numerical method of calculating the mean square flux noise F2 from independently fluctuating spins on the surface of thin-film loops of arbitrary geometry. By reciprocity, F2 is proportional to Br2 , where B(r) is the magnetic field generated by a circulating current around the loop and r varies over the loop surface. By discretizing the loop nonuniformly, we efficiently and accurately compute the current distribution and resulting magnetic field, which may vary rapidly across the loop. We use this method to compute F2 in a number of scenarios in which we systematically vary physical parameters of the loop. We compare our simulations to an earlier analytic result predicting that F2 ∝ R/W in the limit where the loop radius R is much greater than the linewidth W. We further show that the previously neglected contribution of edge spins to F2 is significant---even dominant---in narrow-linewidth loops. To calculate theoretical dephasing rates in qubits, we consider flux noise with a spectral density Sphi( f) = A2/ (f/1 Hz) alpha, where A is of the order of 1 muphi 0 Hz--1/2 and 0.6 ≤ alpha ≤ 1.2; applied flux, our calculations of the dependence of the pure dephasing time tau φ Ramsey and echo pulse sequences on alpha for fixed A show that tauφ decreases rapidly as alpha is reduced. We find that tauφ is relatively insensitive to the noise bandwidth, f1 ≤ f ≤ f2 for all alpha provided the ultraviolet cutoff frequency f2 > 1/tauφ. We calculate the ratio tauφ,E/tau φ, R of the echo (E) and Ramsey (R) sequences, and the dependence of the decay function on alpha and f2. We investigate the case in which S phi(f0) is fixed

  7. A prototype for computer management of petroleum data and generation of maps and sections using 4th dimension{sup {trademark}}

    SciTech Connect

    French, D.E.; McBane, J.D.

    1996-06-01

    A commercial relational database program available for Macintosh and Windows-based computers known as 4th Dimension, has been adapted for use as a tool for storage, manipulation, and presentation of petroleum industry data. The database organization, input and output layouts, and manipulation routines are collectively referred to as WellFile4. Well data, land-survey data, production statistics, and stratigraphic information can be entered into the database from the keyboard or by importing files purchased from data vendors. The data can then be organized into files that can be searched and sorted based upon user-defined criteria. Selected subsets of data can be printed in various custom report formats. A graphics-editing module, 4D Draw, is used to generate maps, cross sections, and borehole-completion profiles. Maps can incorporate well-header information, formation tops, isopach values, or production data. Production data can also be presented as a bubble map. Maps can also include data selected from tables generated by a spreadsheet module, 4D Calc. Seismic-time values can be treated with appropriate velocity functions using the spreadsheet to derive depth values for posting to the base map. Structural or stratigraphic cross sections can be generated by selecting wells or seismic shot points from a map, and vertical exaggeration can be determined by the user. Maps can be modified extensively by the user before printing or plotting, and can be saved as a document that can be opened by other programs. Production statistics can be compiled based upon location, stratigraphic interval, or other criteria into a single set of data and presented as a chart or table. These can be printed or saved as a text file for use by other spreadsheet or chart-generation programs.

  8. The 4th Thermodynamic Principle?

    SciTech Connect

    Montero Garcia, Jose de la Luz; Novoa Blanco, Jesus Francisco

    2007-04-28

    It should be emphasized that the 4th Principle above formulated is a thermodynamic principle and, at the same time, is mechanical-quantum and relativist, as it should inevitably be and its absence has been one of main the theoretical limitations of the physical theory until today.We show that the theoretical discovery of Dimensional Primitive Octet of Matter, the 4th Thermodynamic Principle, the Quantum Hexet of Matter, the Global Hexagonal Subsystem of Fundamental Constants of Energy and the Measurement or Connected Global Scale or Universal Existential Interval of the Matter is that it is possible to be arrived at a global formulation of the four 'forces' or fundamental interactions of nature. The Einstein's golden dream is possible.

  9. Fluoroquinolone resistance in Campylobacter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli are common in animals because of the use of fluoroquinolones as therapeutic agents in animal husbandry, particularly in chickens and other poultry. Campylobacter is a commensal in poultry, and therefore, poultry and poultry products are the...

  10. 17. 4th floor roof, view south, 4th and 5th floor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. 4th floor roof, view south, 4th and 5th floor setback to left and atrium structure to right - Sheffield Farms Milk Plant, 1075 Webster Avenue (southwest corner of 166th Street), Bronx, Bronx County, NY

  11. Trace analysis of quinolone and fluoroquinolone antibiotics from wastewaters by liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yang; Chang, Hong; Jia, Ai; Hu, Jianying

    2008-12-19

    A sensitive liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry method, combined with solid-phase extraction and a weak cation exchange cartridge cleanup, was established for twenty quinolone and fluoroquinolone antibiotics (pipemidic acid, flerofloxacin, ofloxacin, pefloxacin, enoxacin, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, danofloxacin, enrofloxacin, lomefloxacin, difloxacin, sarafloxacin, gatifloxacin, sparfloxacin, moxifloxacin, cinoxacin, oxolinic acid, nalidixic acid, flumequine, and piromidic acid) in influent, effluent, and river waters. For the various water matrices considered, the overall recoveries were from 64% to 127% except for piromidic acid (27-33%), and no obvious matrix effect was observed. The method detection limits for the twenty target antibiotics in the influent, effluent, and surface water samples were 1.6-50 ng/L, 0.6-50 ng/L, and 0.8-50 ng/L, respectively. This method was applied to analyze residual quinolone and fluoroquinolone antibiotics in wastewater and surface water samples from Beijing, China. Eight antibiotics (12 (pipemidic acid)-1208 ng/L (ofloxacin)) were detected in wastewater, and seven (1.3 (lomefloxacin)-535 ng/L (ofloxacin)) were detected in surface water samples. Gatifloxacin, a 4th generation fluoroquinolone antibiotic, was detected for the first time in influent (111 ng/L), effluent (56 ng/L), and river water (16-42 ng/L). PMID:19007934

  12. Photohaptenic properties of fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Tokura, Y; Nishijima, T; Yagi, H; Furukawa, F; Takigawa, M

    1996-11-01

    Although quinolone antibacterial agents have both phototoxicity and photoallergenicity, the latter's potency has been poorly investigated compared with the former's. Some of the photoallergic chemicals serve as photohaptens, which lead to T-cell-mediated immune reactions after photobinding to protein by UVA radiation. We examined the photohaptenic potential of fluoroquinolones, including lomefloxacin (LFLX), ciplofloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin, fleroxacin, enoxacin and sparfloxacin (SPFX). The absorption spectra of the quinolones were altered by UVA irradiation, with an exception of SPFX that seems to be photostable toward UVA. Bovine serum albumin and murine epidermal cells were coupled with these fluoroquinolones other than SPFX by exposure to UVA. Subcutaneous inoculation of fluoroquinolone-photomodified epidermal cells induced and elicited a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction in mice. However, epidermal cells incubated with LFLX without UVA exposure also induced and elicited a significant hypersensitivity reaction to a lesser degree than LFLX-photomodified epidermal cells. Furthermore, there was cross-reactivity between LFLX-photomodified epidermal cells and simply LFLX-incubated cells. This suggests that cells can be weakly modified with LFLX even in the dark and that UVA irradiation promotes this modification. Our study demonstrated that fluoroquinolones have photohaptenic properties to which their photoallergenicity is probably ascribed. PMID:8931383

  13. Fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Wolfson, J S; Hooper, D C

    1989-01-01

    The fluoroquinolones, a new class of potent orally absorbed antimicrobial agents, are reviewed, considering structure, mechanisms of action and resistance, spectrum, variables affecting activity in vitro, pharmacokinetic properties, clinical efficacy, emergence of resistance, and tolerability. The primary bacterial target is the enzyme deoxyribonucleic acid gyrase. Bacterial resistance occurs by chromosomal mutations altering deoxyribonucleic acid gyrase and decreasing drug permeation. The drugs are bactericidal and potent in vitro against members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, Haemophilus spp., and Neisseria spp., have good activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and staphylococci, and (with several exceptions) are less potent against streptococci and have fair to poor activity against anaerobic species. Potency in vitro decreases in the presence of low pH, magnesium ions, or urine but is little affected by different media, increased inoculum, or serum. The effects of the drugs in combination with a beta-lactam or aminoglycoside are often additive, occasionally synergistic, and rarely antagonistic. The agents are orally absorbed, require at most twice-daily dosing, and achieve high concentrations in urine, feces, and kidney and good concentrations in lung, bone, prostate, and other tissues. The drugs are efficacious in treatment of a variety of bacterial infections, including uncomplicated and complicated urinary tract infections, bacterial gastroenteritis, and gonorrhea, and show promise for therapy of prostatitis, respiratory tract infections, osteomyelitis, and cutaneous infections, particularly when caused by aerobic gram-negative bacilli. Fluoroquinolones have also proved to be efficacious for prophylaxis against travelers' diarrhea and infection with gram-negative bacilli in neutropenic patients. The drugs are effective in eliminating carriage of Neisseria meningitidis. Patient tolerability appears acceptable, with gastrointestinal or central nervous

  14. Laboratory survey of fluoroquinolone activity.

    PubMed

    Bellido, F; Pechère, J C

    1989-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones are active against a wide variety of bacteria. The antibacterial spectra of fluoroquinolones encompass staphylococci, Bacillus species, and Corynebacterium species implicated in infections of the immunocompromised host; Enterobacteriaceae; most intestinal pathogens; and many gram-negative organisms commonly causing nosocomial infections. Haemophilus influenzae, Haemophilus ducreyi, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Branhamella catarrhalis are highly susceptible to this class of drugs. Because of their ability to penetrate into phagocytes, fluoroquinolones have been tested against intracellular pathogens: Legionella species, Rickettsia conorii, Rickettsia rickettsii, and Brucella melitensis are very sensitive; Chlamydia trachomatis and the mycoplasmas are borderline; and some antimycobacterial activities deserve further investigation. Species that are generally resistant include Pseudomonas maltophilia, Pseudomonas cepacia, Pseudomonas pseudomallei, Alcaligenes species, Nocardia species, Bordetella bronchiseptica, and most anaerobes. PMID:2672262

  15. Hypersensitivity to fluoroquinolones

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Tahia D.; Ariza, Adriana; Palomares, Francisca; Montañez, María I.; Salas, María; Martín-Serrano, Angela; Fernández, Rubén; Ruiz, Arturo; Blanca, Miguel; Mayorga, Cristobalina; Torres, María J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although fluoroquinolones (FQs) are generally well-tolerated antibiotics, increasing numbers of hypersensitivity reactions have been reported. These can be evaluated in vitro by basophil activation tests (BATs); however, sensitivity is not optimal. Many factors could influence sensitivity such as basophil activation markers. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of 2 different activations markers, CD63 and CD203c, on the sensitivity of BAT to FQ. We studied 17 patients with immediate allergic reactions to FQ. BAT was performed with moxifloxacin and ciprofloxacin using CD193 (CCR3) for basophil selection and CD203c or CD63 as activation markers. Stimulation with ciprofloxacin induced a significantly higher expression of CD63 in ciprofloxacin-allergic patients compared to moxifloxacin-allergic patients (P = 0.002). In patients allergic to moxifloxacin with anaphylactic shock, we have observed an increase in the percentage of cells that upregulate CD203c, whereas patients with anaphylaxis preferentially upregulate CD63. The best sensitivity–specificity was obtained using a cutoff of 3 and the culprit FQ, using CD203c for moxifloxacin-allergic patients (sensitivity = 36.4%; specificity = 94.4%), and CD63 for ciprofloxacin-allergic patients (sensitivity = 83.3%; specificity = 88.9%). A negative correlation was found between the upregulation of CD63 and CD203c and the time interval between the reaction occurrence and the performance of the test (Spearman r = −0.446; P < 0.001 for CD63 and Spearman r = −0.386; P < 0.001 for CD203c). The performance of BAT for FQ allergy must be optimized for each drug, taking into account possible differences in the stimulation mechanism that leads to the upregulation of different activation markers. PMID:27281069

  16. In vitro potency and efficacy favor later generation fluoroquinolones for treatment of canine and feline Escherichia coli uropathogens in the United States.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqiang; Boothe, Dawn M; Jin, Yaping; Thungrat, Kamoltip

    2013-02-01

    Information regarding in vitro activity of newer fluoroquinolones (FQs) is limited despite increasing resistance in canine or feline pathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli). This study describes in vitro potency and efficacy toward E. coli of seven FQs grouped according to similarities in chemical structure: enrofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, orbifloxacin (first-group), levofloxacin, marbofloxacin (second-group) and pradofloxacin, moxifloxacin (third-group; latest S, S-pyrrolidino-piperidine at C-7). Potency measures included minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) (geometric mean MIC, MIC(50), MIC(90)); and mutant prevention concentration (MPC) for FQ susceptible isolates only. In vitro efficacy measures included relative susceptibility (MIC(BP-S):MIC) or resistance (MIC:MIC(BP-R)) and mutant selection window (MSW) (MPC:MIC). For enrofloxacin susceptible isolates, mean MIC (μg/ml) was least for each third-group drug and ciprofloxacin and greatest for enrofloxacin and orbifloxacin (P = 0.006). For enrofloxacin susceptible isolates, MPC were below MIC:MIC(BP-R) and least for pradofloxacin (0.29 ± 0.16 μg/ml) and greatest for enrofloxacin (1.55 ± 0.55 μg/ml) (P = 0.006). MSW was least for pradofloxacin (55 ± 30) and greatest for ciprofloxacin (152 ± 76) (P = 0.0024). MIC(BP-S):MIC was greatest (P = 0.025) for pradofloxacin (190.1 ± 0.61) and least for enrofloxacin (23.53 ± 0.83). For FQ susceptible isolates, FQs MIC:MIC(BP-R) may serve as a surrogate for MPC. Because in vitro efficacy was greatest for pradofloxacin; it might be preferred for treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs) associated with FQ susceptible E. coli uropathogens. PMID:23136054

  17. Gyrase Mutations Are Associated with Variable Levels of Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Karen R.; Franke, Molly F.; Kaur, Devinder; Sloutsky, Alex; Mitnick, Carole D.; Murray, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Molecular diagnostics that rapidly and accurately predict resistance to fluoroquinolone drugs and especially later-generation agents promise to improve treatment outcomes for patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and prevent the spread of disease. Mutations in the gyr genes are known to confer most fluoroquinolone resistance, but knowledge about the effects of gyr mutations on susceptibility to early- versus later-generation fluoroquinolones and about the role of mutation-mutation interactions is limited. Here, we sequenced the full gyrA and gyrB open reading frames in 240 multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis strains and quantified their ofloxacin and moxifloxacin MIC by testing growth at six concentrations for each drug. We constructed a multivariate regression model to assess both the individual mutation effects and interactions on the drug MICs. We found that gyrB mutations contribute to fluoroquinolone resistance both individually and through interactions with gyrA mutations. These effects were statistically significant. In these clinical isolates, several gyrA and gyrB mutations conferred different levels of resistance to ofloxacin and moxifloxacin. Consideration of gyr mutation combinations during the interpretation of molecular test results may improve the accuracy of predicting the fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype. Further, the differential effects of gyr mutations on the activity of early- and later-generation fluoroquinolones requires further investigation and could inform the selection of a fluoroquinolone for treatment. PMID:26763957

  18. Gyrase Mutations Are Associated with Variable Levels of Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Farhat, Maha R; Jacobson, Karen R; Franke, Molly F; Kaur, Devinder; Sloutsky, Alex; Mitnick, Carole D; Murray, Megan

    2016-03-01

    Molecular diagnostics that rapidly and accurately predict resistance to fluoroquinolone drugs and especially later-generation agents promise to improve treatment outcomes for patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and prevent the spread of disease. Mutations in the gyr genes are known to confer most fluoroquinolone resistance, but knowledge about the effects of gyr mutations on susceptibility to early- versus later-generation fluoroquinolones and about the role of mutation-mutation interactions is limited. Here, we sequenced the full gyrA and gyrB open reading frames in 240 multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis strains and quantified their ofloxacin and moxifloxacin MIC by testing growth at six concentrations for each drug. We constructed a multivariate regression model to assess both the individual mutation effects and interactions on the drug MICs. We found that gyrB mutations contribute to fluoroquinolone resistance both individually and through interactions with gyrA mutations. These effects were statistically significant. In these clinical isolates, several gyrA and gyrB mutations conferred different levels of resistance to ofloxacin and moxifloxacin. Consideration of gyr mutation combinations during the interpretation of molecular test results may improve the accuracy of predicting the fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype. Further, the differential effects of gyr mutations on the activity of early- and later-generation fluoroquinolones requires further investigation and could inform the selection of a fluoroquinolone for treatment. PMID:26763957

  19. Systemic use of fluoroquinolone in children

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo-Han; Kim, Eun Young

    2013-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones are an important class of antibiotics that are widely used in adult patients because of their broad spectrum of activity, good tissue penetration, and oral bioavailability. However, fluoroquinolone use in children is limited because juvenile animals developed arthropathy in previous experiments on fluoroquinolone use. Indications for fluoroquinolone use in patients younger than 18 years, as stated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, include treatment of complicated urinary tract infections and postexposure treatment for inhalation anthrax. In Korea, the systemic use of fluoroquinolones has not been approved in children younger than 18 years. Although concerns remain regarding the adverse musculoskeletal effects of fluoroquinolones in children, their use in the pediatric population has increased in many circumstances. While pediatricians should be aware of the indications and adverse effects of fluoroquinolones, recent studies have shown that the risk for musculoskeletal complications in children did not significantly increase following fluoroquinolone treatment. In addition, fluoroquinolones may be particularly helpful in treating multidrug-resistant infections that have not responded to standard antibiotic therapy in immunocompromised patients. In the present article, we provide an updated review on the safety and current recommendations for using fluoroquinolones in children. PMID:23741232

  20. [Resistance to fluoroquinolone among Klebsiella spp strains producing extended-spectrum betalactamases isolated from urine].

    PubMed

    Tlamçani, Z; Ellaia, K; Benomar, A; Kabbaj, H; Alaoui, Ae; Seffar, M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the frequency of resistance to fluoroquinolones in extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBLs) Klebsiella spp isolated from urines of consulting and hospitalized patients in Rabat Specialities Hospital. A retrospective survey was made over 3 years (2006-2008). Two hundred ant fifty three patients presented with confirmed urinary tractus infection (UTI). Klebsiella spp was the etiologic agent in 28% (72/253) of reported UTI. Among them, 86% of Klebsiella pneumoniae and 14% of Klebsiella oxytoca. The frequency of Klebsiella spp resistance to fluoroquinolones was 33% and to third generation cephalosporins was 35%. Thirteen Klebsiella spp strains were producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase witch corresponds to 18% of all the klebsiella. The extended-spectrum beta-lactamase strains with resistance to fluoroquinolones were 85% (11/13) or 15 % of all klebsiella (11/72). None of those strains was resistant to imipenem. In conclusions resistance of enterobacteries such as Klebsiella spp to fluoroquinolones is becoming worrying among consulting and hospitalized patients. Eleven strains multiresistant (ESBL + resistance to fluoroquinolones), isolated probably because of plasmids carrying genes of ESBL and fluoroquinolones resistances. This increasingly frequent resistance mechanism should lead to a more careful use of first line fluoroquinolones for UTI. PMID:19789127

  1. European Code against Cancer, 4th Edition: Tobacco and cancer.

    PubMed

    Leon, Maria E; Peruga, Armando; McNeill, Ann; Kralikova, Eva; Guha, Neela; Minozzi, Silvia; Espina, Carolina; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Tobacco use, and in particular cigarette smoking, is the single largest preventable cause of cancer in the European Union (EU). All tobacco products contain a wide range of carcinogens. The main cancer-causing agents in tobacco smoke are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines, aromatic amines, aldehydes, and certain volatile organic compounds. Tobacco consumers are also exposed to nicotine, leading to tobacco addiction in many users. Cigarette smoking causes cancer in multiple organs and is the main cause of lung cancer, responsible for approximately 82% of cases. In 2012, about 313,000 new cases of lung cancer and 268,000 lung cancer deaths were reported in the EU; 28% of adults in the EU smoked tobacco, and the overall prevalence of current use of smokeless tobacco products was almost 2%. Smokeless tobacco products, a heterogeneous category, are also carcinogenic but cause a lower burden of cancer deaths than tobacco smoking. One low-nitrosamine product, snus, is associated with much lower cancer risk than other smokeless tobacco products. Smoking generates second-hand smoke (SHS), an established cause of lung cancer, and inhalation of SHS by non-smokers is still common in indoor workplaces as well as indoor public places, and more so in the homes of smokers. Several interventions have proved effective for stopping smoking; the most effective intervention is the use of a combination of pharmacotherapy and behavioural support. Scientific evidence leads to the following two recommendations for individual action on tobacco in the 4th edition of the European Code Against Cancer: (1) "Do not smoke. Do not use any form of tobacco"; (2) "Make your home smoke-free. Support smoke-free policies in your workplace". PMID:26272517

  2. Fluoroquinolone-induced Achilles tendinitis.

    PubMed

    Tam, P K; Ho, Carmen T K

    2014-12-01

    We report a case of Achilles tendinitis after intake of ciprofloxacin for treatment of respiratory tract infection. Fluoroquinolone-induced tendinopathy is an uncommon but increasingly recognised adverse effect of this antibiotic class. Most of the cases occur in the Achilles tendon and may lead to tendon rupture. Possible predisposing risk factors include use of steroid, patients with renal impairment or renal transplant, old age, and being an athlete. The drug should be stopped once this condition is suspected. Symptomatic treatment should be given and orthopaedic referral is desirable if tendon rupture occurs. PMID:25488035

  3. Prulifloxacin: a new antibacterial fluoroquinolone.

    PubMed

    Prats, Guillem; Rossi, Vilma; Salvatori, Enrica; Mirelis, Beatriz

    2006-02-01

    In the last few years, the antimicrobial activity, efficacy and relative safety of fluoroquinolones have made them attractive for the treatment of community-acquired and nosocomial infections. Prulifloxacin is a new fluoroquinolone antibacterial agent with a broad spectrum of activity against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria. Prulifloxacin is available for oral use, and after absorption is metabolized in to the active form, ulifloxacin. It exhibits good penetration in target tissues and a long elimination half-life, allowing once-daily administration. A number of randomized, controlled clinical trials carried out in Europe demonstrated the efficacy of prulifloxacin in the treatment of urinary tract (acute uncomplicated and complicated) and respiratory tract infections (acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis), in comparison with the most widely used drugs such as ciprofloxacin, co-amoxiclav and pefloxacin. Prulifloxacin was generally well tolerated. The most frequent adverse reactions observed in clinical trials were gastric pain, diarrhea, nausea and skin rash. This review focuses on the characteristics of prulifloxacin, summarizing the relevant preclinical and clinical data. PMID:16441207

  4. 4th International Plant Biomechanics Conference Proceedings (Abstracts)

    SciTech Connect

    Frank W. Telewski; Lothar H. Koehler; Frank W. Ewers

    2003-07-20

    The 4th International Plant Biomechanics Conference facilitated an interdisciplinary exchange between scientists, engineers, and educators addressing the major questions encountered in the field of Plant Biomechanics. Subjects covered by the conference include: Evolution; Ecology; Mechanoreception; Cell Walls; Genetic Modification; Applied Biomechanics of Whole Plants, Plant Products, Fibers & Composites; Fluid Dynamics; Wood & Trees; Fracture Mechanics; Xylem Pressure & Water Transport; Modeling; and Introducing Plant Biomechanics in Secondary School Education.

  5. Activities of newer fluoroquinolones against Shigella sonnei.

    PubMed Central

    John, J F; Atkins, L T; Maple, P A; Bratoeva, M

    1992-01-01

    The activities of six fluoroquinolones were determined for 117 separate strains of Shigella sonnei. The order of increasing activity (MICs for 90% of strains tested) was enoxacin (0.25 micrograms/ml), temafloxacin (0.032 micrograms/ml), sparfloxacin (0.016 micrograms/ml), CI-960 (0.008 micrograms/ml), ciprofloxacin (0.008 micrograms/ml), and PD-131628-2 (0.008 micrograms/ml). These data, along with results of killing and mutational rate studies, showed that all six fluoroquinolones were highly inhibitory against S. sonnei and five fluoroquinolones were rapidly and persistently bactericidal. PMID:1444317

  6. Fluoroquinolone antibiotics and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Telfer, Stephen J

    2014-09-01

    Exposure to fluoroquinolone antibiotics is postulated as a risk factor for subsequent development of type 2 diabetes. It is hypothesized that fluoroquinolones induce an intracellular magnesium deficit that can lead to insulin resistance. A temporal correlation is reported between the rate of outpatient prescription of quinolones and the incidence of diabetes during the period 1980-2011 with a lag of approximately two years (R(2)=0.86, P<10(-9)). The increase in incidence of diabetes after 1990 and the recent decrease in the number of new cases are both reflected in the fluoroquinolone prescription rates. A geographical correlation is reported (adj. R(2)=0.7, P<0.0001) between rates of increase in prevalence of diabetes in each U.S. state and a model using only local rates of outpatient fluoroquinolone prescription, local rates of increase in the prevalence of obesity, and local rates of population growth as predictor variables. Prescription rates of non-quinolone antibiotics correlated less well with the local rates of increase in prevalence of diabetes. The data are consistent with fluoroquinolone exposure predisposing an individual to develop diabetes with a probability that strongly depends upon factors that also lead to an increase in obesity. According to the hypothesis, much of the increase in the incidence of type 2 diabetes in the U.S. from 1990 to the present can be attributed to fluoroquinolone exposure. PMID:24947193

  7. A 95 GHz, 4th harmonic gyro-oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Hargreaves, T.A.; Scheitrum, G.P.; Bemis, T.; Higgins, L.

    1994-12-31

    There is currently an interest in medium power ({approximately}100 kW), compact 95 GHz amplifiers for future radar applications. Size, weight, and efficiency are critical for airborne applications. Litton has been investigating a 4th harmonic, 4-cavity gyro-amplifier. The key to success of the amplifier is the axis-encircling electron beam from a new type of electron gun, the advanced center post (ACP) gun. Gun simulations incorporating the actual magnetic field and thermal velocity spread in the emitted electrons show that axial velocity spreads of less than 2% are attainable, which is significantly better than other gun concepts. The amplifier utilizes coaxial-magnetron-type cavities operating in the {pi} mode. In this cavity, vanes extend nearly down to the electron beam`s outside diameter. The majority of the RF stored energy in the system is in the coaxial cavity, so that the resonant frequency and quality factor of each coaxial magnetron cavity may be adjusted by varying only the coaxial cavity. Several components are being tested individually. To test the cavity design, a 4th harmonic oscillator based on a coaxial magnetron cavity has been designed. Results of the oscillator testing will be presented.

  8. Impacts of a Discussion-Based Academic Language Program on Classroom Interactions in 4th through 7th Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRusso, Maria; Jones, Stephanie M.; Kim, Ha Yeon; Kim, James; Donovan, Suzanne; Snow, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an exploratory analysis of treatment-control differences in the quality of classroom interactions in 4th through 7th grade urban classrooms. Word Generation (WG) is a research-based academic language program for middle school students designed to teach novel vocabulary and literacy through language arts, math, science, and…

  9. Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Enteric Bacteria in Sub-Saharan Africa: Clones, Implications and Research Needs

    PubMed Central

    Chattaway, Marie A.; Aboderin, Aaron O.; Fashae, Kayode; Okoro, Chinyere K.; Opintan, Japheth A.; Okeke, Iruka N.

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones came into widespread use in African countries in the early 2000s, after patents for the first generation of these drugs expired. By that time, quinolone antibacterial agents had been used intensively worldwide and resistant lineages of many bacterial species had evolved. We sought to understand which Gram negative enteric pandemic lineages have been reported from Africa, as well as the nature and transmission of any indigenous resistant clones. A systematic review of articles indexed in the Medline and AJOL literature databases was conducted. We report on the findings of 43 eligible studies documenting local or pandemic fluoroquinolone-resistant enteric clones in sub-Sahara African countries. Most reports are of invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella and Escherichia coli lineages and there have been three reports of cholera outbreaks caused by fluoroquinolone-resistant Vibrio cholerae O1. Fluoroquinolone-resistant clones have also been reported from commensals and animal isolates but there are few data for non-Enterobacteriaceae and almost none for difficult-to-culture Campylobacter spp. Fluoroquinolone-resistant lineages identified in African countries were universally resistant to multiple other classes of antibacterial agents. Although as many as 972 non-duplicate articles refer to fluoroquinolone resistance in enteric bacteria from Africa, most do not report on subtypes and therefore information on the epidemiology of fluoroquinolone-resistant clones is available from only a handful of countries in the subcontinent. When resistance is reported, resistance mechanisms and lineage information is rarely investigated. Insufficient attention has been given to molecular and sequence-based methods necessary for identifying and tracking resistant clones in Africa and more research is needed in this area. PMID:27148238

  10. Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Enteric Bacteria in Sub-Saharan Africa: Clones, Implications and Research Needs.

    PubMed

    Chattaway, Marie A; Aboderin, Aaron O; Fashae, Kayode; Okoro, Chinyere K; Opintan, Japheth A; Okeke, Iruka N

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones came into widespread use in African countries in the early 2000s, after patents for the first generation of these drugs expired. By that time, quinolone antibacterial agents had been used intensively worldwide and resistant lineages of many bacterial species had evolved. We sought to understand which Gram negative enteric pandemic lineages have been reported from Africa, as well as the nature and transmission of any indigenous resistant clones. A systematic review of articles indexed in the Medline and AJOL literature databases was conducted. We report on the findings of 43 eligible studies documenting local or pandemic fluoroquinolone-resistant enteric clones in sub-Sahara African countries. Most reports are of invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella and Escherichia coli lineages and there have been three reports of cholera outbreaks caused by fluoroquinolone-resistant Vibrio cholerae O1. Fluoroquinolone-resistant clones have also been reported from commensals and animal isolates but there are few data for non-Enterobacteriaceae and almost none for difficult-to-culture Campylobacter spp. Fluoroquinolone-resistant lineages identified in African countries were universally resistant to multiple other classes of antibacterial agents. Although as many as 972 non-duplicate articles refer to fluoroquinolone resistance in enteric bacteria from Africa, most do not report on subtypes and therefore information on the epidemiology of fluoroquinolone-resistant clones is available from only a handful of countries in the subcontinent. When resistance is reported, resistance mechanisms and lineage information is rarely investigated. Insufficient attention has been given to molecular and sequence-based methods necessary for identifying and tracking resistant clones in Africa and more research is needed in this area. PMID:27148238

  11. Overexpression of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi recA gene confers fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli DH5α.

    PubMed

    Yassien, M A M; Elfaky, M A

    2015-11-01

    A spontaneous fluoroquinolone-resistant mutant (STM1) was isolated from its parent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) clinical isolate. Unlike its parent isolate, this mutant has selective resistance to fluoroquinolones without any change in its sensitivity to various other antibiotics. DNA gyrase assays revealed that the fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype of the STM1 mutant did not result from alteration of the fluoroquinolone sensitivity of the DNA gyrase isolated from it. To study the mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance, a genomic library from the STM1 mutant was constructed in Escherichia coli DH5α and two recombinant plasmids were obtained. Only one of these plasmids (STM1-A) conferred the selective fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype to E. coli DH5α. The chromosomal insert from STM1-A, digested with EcoRI and HindIII restriction endonucleases, produced two DNA fragments and these were cloned separately into pUC19 thereby generating two new plasmids, STM1-A1 and STM1-A2. Only STM1-A1 conferred the selective fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype to E. coli DH5α. Sequence and subcloning analyses of STM1-A1 showed the presence of an intact RecA open reading frame. Unlike that of the wild-type E. coli DH5α, protein analysis of a crude STM1-A1 extract showed overexpression of a 40 kDa protein. Western blotting confirmed the 40 kDa protein band to be RecA. When a RecA PCR product was cloned into pGEM-T and introduced into E. coli DH5α, the STM1-A11 subclone retained fluoroquinolone resistance. These results suggest that overexpression of RecA causes selective fluoroquinolone resistance in E. coli DH5α. PMID:26375447

  12. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Breastfeeding and cancer.

    PubMed

    Scoccianti, Chiara; Key, Timothy J; Anderson, Annie S; Armaroli, Paola; Berrino, Franco; Cecchini, Michele; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Leitzmann, Michael; Norat, Teresa; Powers, Hilary; Schüz, Joachim; Wiseman, Martin; Romieu, Isabelle

    2015-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer in women, and incidence rates have been rising in European Union (EU) countries over recent decades due in part to a sharp decline in breastfeeding practices. Evidence for a protective association between breastfeeding and the risk of breast cancer at all ages is convincing, and modest protective relationships between breastfeeding and the risk of endometrial and ovarian cancers have been suggested. The reduction in breast cancer risk is estimated at 2% for an increase of 5 months of lifetime breastfeeding. The longer women breastfeed, the more they are protected against breast cancer. In addition, breastfeeding is associated with several health benefits for both the mother and the breastfed child. Taking all this evidence into account, the 4th edition of the European Code against Cancer recommends: "Breastfeeding reduces the mother's cancer risk. If you can, breastfeed your baby". PMID:26116994

  13. Special Issue: 4th International Workshop on Space Radiation (IWSRR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    This special issue of the journal "Radiation and Environmental Biophysics" contains 20 peer-reviewed papers contributed by leading space radiation researcher's world-wide attending the 4th IWSRR. Manuscripts cover a broad range of topics ranging from radiation environments and transport in shielding and planetary surfaces to new results in understanding the biological effects of protons and high-charge and energy (HZE) nuclei on the risk of cancer, and degenerative diseases such as central nervous system effects, heart disease, and cataracts. The issue provides a snapshot of the state-of-the-art of the research in this field, demonstrating both the important results gathered in the past few years with experiments at accelerators, and the need for more research to quantify the risk and develop countermeasures.

  14. [Time--the 4th dimision in medicine and psychotherapy].

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Günther

    2003-01-01

    Time is presented as well in his historical meaning and as 4th dimension in its medical and psychotherapeutic context. In this medical and psychotherapeutic process it has an important function and is a variable of a process procedure. The difference between "kairos" = (the right point of time) and "chronos" = (the period of time) is historically meanful. The subjective experienced time is as well emphasized by the development of time in the relation to the development of the "self" as in the subjective experience of time in medical and psychotherapeutic situations. There are also changed conceptions and understandings of time running parallel to the development of nature sciences. The importance of time is explained for the medical practice and the meeting with the patient--especially for chronic diseases. The connection of confidence and time is particularly emphasized in the systemic approach. PMID:12764877

  15. The Epilepsy Foundation's 4th Biennial Epilepsy Pipeline Update Conference.

    PubMed

    French, Jacqueline A; Schachter, Steven C; Sirven, Joseph; Porter, Roger

    2015-05-01

    On June 5 and 6, 2014, the Epilepsy Foundation held its 4th Biennial Epilepsy Pipeline Update Conference, an initiative of the Epilepsy Therapy Project, which showcased the most promising epilepsy innovations from health-care companies and academic laboratories dedicated to pioneering and advancing drugs, biologics, technologies, devices, and diagnostics for epilepsy. Speakers and attendees included emerging biotech and medical technology companies, major pharmaceutical and device companies, as well as investigators and innovators at the cutting-edge of epilepsy. The program included panel discussions on collaboration between small and large companies, how to get products in need of funding to the marketplace, who is currently funding epilepsy and CNS innovation, and how the NIH facilitates early-stage drug development. Finally, the conference featured the third annual "Shark Tank" competition. The presentations are summarized in this paper, which is followed by a compilation of the meeting poster abstracts. PMID:25922152

  16. Methods for analysis of fluoroquinolones in biological fluids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods for analysis of 10 selected fluoroquinolone antibiotics in biological fluids are reviewed. Approaches for sample preparation, detection methods, limits of detection and quantitation and recovery information are provided for both single analyte and multi-analyte fluoroquinolone methods....

  17. Fluoroquinolone-induced gene transfer in multidrug-resistant Salmonella

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fluoroquinolones are broad spectrum antibiotics that inhibit bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase activity. Bacterial exposure to fluoroquinolones can cause DNA damage and induce a bacterial SOS response to stimulate repair of damaged DNA. Certain prophages (integrated in bacterial chromosomes) ...

  18. 77 FR 39172 - Safety Zone: Skagway Harbor, Skagway, AK for 4th of July Fireworks

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone: Skagway Harbor, Skagway, AK for 4th of July... 4th of July Fireworks display. Persons desiring to transit within this safety zone must contact the... Inlet for the City of Skagway, Alaska, sponsored 4th of July fireworks display. A no-action...

  19. 76 FR 37649 - Safety Zone; Northern California Annual Fireworks Events, July 4th Fireworks Display

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; Northern California Annual Fireworks Events, July 4th Fireworks Display AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard will enforce safety zone for the annual July 4th Fireworks Display (Tahoe City 4th of...

  20. PREFACE: 4th International Symposium on Functional Materials (ISFM2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shu; Sekino, Tohru; Tanaka, Shun-ichiro; Sato, Tsugio; Lu, Li; Xue, Dongfeng

    2012-01-01

    The 4th International Symposium on Functional Materials (ISFM2011) was held in Sendai, Japan, on 2-6 August 2011. This Special Issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS) consists of partial manuscripts which were presented at ISFM2011. Advanced materials have experienced a dramatic increase in demand for research, development and applications. The aim of the International Symposium on Functional Materials (ISFM) was to provide an overview of the present status with historical background and to foresee future trends in the field of functional materials. The 4th symposium, ISFM 2011, covered a wide variety of topics within state-of-the-art advanced materials science and technology, and focused especially on four major categories including: Environmental Materials, Electronic Materials, Energy Materials and Biomedical Materials. As you know, a massive earthquake and the Tsunami that followed occurred near the Tohoku region on 11 March 2011. After the earthquake, although there were many difficulties in continuing to organize the symposium, we received warm encouragement from many researchers and societies, especially from the members of the International Advisory Committee and Organizing Committee, so that ISFM2011 could be held on schedule. We are honored that ISFM2011 was the first formal international academic conference held in the Tohoku area of Japan after the 11 March earthquake. About 140 participants from 14 countries took part in the ISFM2011 symposium, which included five plenary talks by world-leading scientists, 32 invited talks, and many oral and poster presentations. We are delighted to see that many researchers are interested in the synthesis and the properties as well as the applications of functional materials. Many fruitful and exciting research achievements were presented in the symposium. We believe that this symposium provided a good chance for scientists to communicate and exchange opinions with each other. We would also like to

  1. Managing haemophilia for life: 4th Haemophilia Global Summit.

    PubMed

    Astermark, J; Dolan, G; Hilberg, T; Jiménez-Yuste, V; Laffan, M; Lassila, R; Lobet, S; Martinoli, C; Perno, C-F

    2014-07-01

    The 4th Haemophilia Global Summit was held in Potsdam, Germany, in September 2013 and brought together an international faculty of haemophilia experts and delegates from multidisciplinary backgrounds. The programme was designed by an independent Scientific Steering Committee of haemophilia experts and explored global perspectives in haemophilia care, discussing practical approaches to the optimal management of haemophilia now and in the future. The topics outlined in this supplement were selected by the Scientific Steering Committee for their relevance and potential to influence haemophilia care globally. In this supplement from the meeting, Jan Astermark reviews current understanding of risk factors for the development of inhibitory antibodies and discusses whether this risk can be modulated and minimized. Factors key to the improvement of joint health in people with haemophilia are explored, with Carlo Martinoli and Víctor Jiménez-Yuste discussing the utility of ultrasound for the early detection of haemophilic arthropathy. Other aspects of care necessary for the prevention and management of joint disease in people with haemophilia are outlined by Thomas Hilberg and Sébastian Lobet, who highlight the therapeutic benefits of physiotherapy and sports therapy. Riitta Lassila and Carlo-Federico Perno describe current knowledge surrounding the risk of transmission of infectious agents via clotting factor concentrates. Finally, different types of extended half-life technology are evaluated by Mike Laffan, with a focus on the practicalities and challenges associated with these products. PMID:24924596

  2. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Diet and cancer.

    PubMed

    Norat, Teresa; Scoccianti, Chiara; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Anderson, Annie; Berrino, Franco; Cecchini, Michele; Espina, Carolina; Key, Tim; Leitzmann, Michael; Powers, Hilary; Wiseman, Martin; Romieu, Isabelle

    2015-12-01

    Lifestyle factors, including diet, have long been recognised as potentially important determinants of cancer risk. In addition to the significant role diet plays in affecting body fatness, a risk factor for several cancers, experimental studies have indicated that diet may influence the cancer process in several ways. Prospective studies have shown that dietary patterns characterised by higher intakes of fruits, vegetables, and whole-grain foods, and lower intakes of red and processed meats and salt, are related to reduced risks of death and cancer, and that a healthy diet can improve overall survival after diagnosis of breast and colorectal cancers. There is evidence that high intakes of fruit and vegetables may reduce the risk of cancers of the aerodigestive tract, and the evidence that dietary fibre protects against colorectal cancer is convincing. Red and processed meats increase the risk of colorectal cancer. Diets rich in high-calorie foods, such as fatty and sugary foods, may lead to increased calorie intake, thereby promoting obesity and leading to an increased risk of cancer. There is some evidence that sugary drinks are related to an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. Taking this evidence into account, the 4th edition of the European Code against Cancer recommends that people have a healthy diet to reduce their risk of cancer: they should eat plenty of whole grains, pulses, vegetables and fruits; limit high-calorie foods (foods high in sugar or fat); avoid sugary drinks and processed meat; and limit red meat and foods high in salt. PMID:26164653

  3. Rapid evolution of fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli in Nigeria is temporally associated with fluoroquinolone use

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance has necessitated fluoroquinolone use but little is known about the selective forces and resistance trajectory in malaria-endemic settings, where selection from the antimalarial chloroquine for fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria has been proposed. Methods Antimicrobial resistance was studied in fecal Escherichia coli isolates in a Nigerian community. Quinolone-resistance determining regions of gyrA and parC were sequenced in nalidixic acid resistant strains and horizontally-transmitted quinolone-resistance genes were sought by PCR. Antimicrobial prescription practices were compared with antimicrobial resistance rates over a period spanning three decades. Results Before 2005, quinolone resistance was limited to low-level nalixidic acid resistance in fewer than 4% of E. coli isolates. In 2005, the proportion of isolates demonstrating low-level quinolone resistance due to elevated efflux increased and high-level quinolone resistance and resistance to the fluoroquinolones appeared. Fluoroquinolone resistance was attributable to single nucleotide polymorphisms in quinolone target genes gyrA and/or parC. By 2009, 35 (34.5%) of isolates were quinolone non-susceptible with nine carrying gyrA and parC SNPs and six bearing identical qnrS1 alleles. The antimalarial chloroquine was heavily used throughout the entire period but E. coli with quinolone-specific resistance mechanisms were only detected in the final half decade, immediately following the introduction of the fluoroquinolone antibacterial ciprofloxacin. Conclusions Fluoroquinolones, and not chloroquine, appear to be the selective force for fluoroquinolone-resistant fecal E. coli in this setting. Rapid evolution to resistance following fluoroquinolone introduction points the need to implement resistant containment strategies when new antibacterials are introduced into resource-poor settings with high infectious disease burdens. PMID:22060770

  4. PREFACE: 4th International Hadron Physics Conference (TROIA'14)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dağ, Hüseyin; Erkol, Güray; Küçükarslan, Ayşe; Özpineci, Altuğ

    2014-11-01

    The 4th International Conference on Hadron Physics, TROIA'14, was held at Canakkale, Turkey on 1-5 July 2014. Ozyegin University, Middle East Technical University, Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Turkish Atomic Energy Authority and HadronPhysics2 Consortium sponsored the conference. It aimed at bringing together the experts and the young scientists working on experimental and theoretical hadron physics. About 50 participants from 10 countries attended the conference. The topics covered included: . Chiral Perturbation Theory . QCD Sum Rules . Effective Field Theory . Exotic Hadrons . Hadron Properties from Lattice QCD . Experimental Results and Future Perspectives . Hadronic Distribution Amplitudes The conference presentations were organized such that the morning sessions contained invited talks and afternoon sessions were devoted to contributed talks. The speakers of the invited talks were: C. Alexandrou, A. Gal, L. Tolos, J.R. Pelaez and M. Schindler. We had also guest speakers D. A. Demir and T. Senger. The conference venue was a resort hotel around Canakkale. As a social program, a guided full-day excursion to the excavation site of the ancient Troia town and Assos was organized. We believe that this conference provided a medium for young scientists and experts in the field to effectively communicate and share ideas. We would like to express our sincere thanks to supporting agencies and to all participants for their contributions and stimulating discussions. We are also grateful to the Scientific Secretary, Bora Işıldak, and all other members of the Organizing Committee for their patience and efforts. 30.10.2014 The Editors

  5. European Code against Cancer, 4th Edition: Cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Armaroli, Paola; Villain, Patricia; Suonio, Eero; Almonte, Maribel; Anttila, Ahti; Atkin, Wendy S; Dean, Peter B; de Koning, Harry J; Dillner, Lena; Herrero, Rolando; Kuipers, Ernst J; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris; Minozzi, Silvia; Paci, Eugenio; Regula, Jaroslaw; Törnberg, Sven; Segnan, Nereo

    2015-12-01

    In order to update the previous version of the European Code against Cancer and formulate evidence-based recommendations, a systematic search of the literature was performed according to the methodology agreed by the Code Working Groups. Based on the review, the 4th edition of the European Code against Cancer recommends: "Take part in organized cancer screening programmes for: Bowel cancer (men and women); Breast cancer (women); Cervical cancer (women)." Organized screening programs are preferable because they provide better conditions to ensure that the Guidelines for Quality Assurance in Screening are followed in order to achieve the greatest benefit with the least harm. Screening is recommended only for those cancers where a demonstrated life-saving effect substantially outweighs the potential harm of examining very large numbers of people who may otherwise never have, or suffer from, these cancers, and when an adequate quality of the screening is achieved. EU citizens are recommended to participate in cancer screening each time an invitation from the national or regional screening program is received and after having read the information materials provided and carefully considered the potential benefits and harms of screening. Screening programs in the European Union vary with respect to the age groups invited and to the interval between invitations, depending on each country's cancer burden, local resources, and the type of screening test used For colorectal cancer, most programs in the EU invite men and women starting at the age of 50-60 years, and from then on every 2 years if the screening test is the guaiac-based fecal occult blood test or fecal immunochemical test, or every 10 years or more if the screening test is flexible sigmoidoscopy or total colonoscopy. Most programs continue sending invitations to screening up to the age of 70-75 years. For breast cancer, most programs in the EU invite women starting at the age of 50 years, and not before the age

  6. Urban Infrasound Observations - Examples from July 4th 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComas, S.; Hayward, C.; Golden, P.; McKenna, M.; Simpson, C.

    2012-12-01

    , the Heroy Building Rooftop Array, is a two-element 30m line on a single rooftop. Large-scale fireworks displays in Dallas on 4 July 2012 provided an opportunity to identify and characterize known signals in an urban setting. The identified events were associated with one of these fireworks displays about 2 km from the arrays. Signals from these sources were used to tune processing parameters for an automatic coherent detection process, Progressive Multichannel Correlation Method (PMCC). PMCC was then used to scan the data for all possible firework sources in the urban environment and determine temporal, back azimuth, apparent velocity, and frequency information about the sources. The signal frequencies seen were 10-80 Hz and documented the details of the nearly 30 minute firework show. The resulting PMCC analysis showed potential to effectively identify other, lower frequency sources in the urban environment. These data were also is used to characterize the noise environment. Significant roof-to-roof noise differences may be related to the building configurations and mechanical equipment, as well as the interactions of the winds with the structures. During the evening of July 4th , additional ground deployed infrasound gauges provided a comparison of free surface and rooftop measurements. Permission to publish was granted by Director, Geotechnical and Structures Laboratory.

  7. 75 FR 34636 - Safety Zone; Jameson Beach 4th of July Fireworks Display

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Jameson Beach 4th of July Fireworks Display... temporary safety zone in the navigable waters of Lake Tahoe, for the Jameson Beach 4th of July Fireworks... has a substantial direct effect on State or local governments and would either preempt State law...

  8. 75 FR 34639 - Safety Zone; Reedville July 4th Celebration, Cockrell's Creek, Reedville, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ... Celebration, Cockrell's Creek, Reedville, VA in the Federal Register (75 FR 26157). We received no comments on... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Reedville July 4th Celebration, Cockrell's... the Reedville July 4th Celebration event. This action is intended to restrict vessel traffic...

  9. 76 FR 37650 - Safety Zone; 4th of July Festival Berkeley Marina Fireworks Display Berkeley, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; 4th of July Festival Berkeley Marina... Berkeley Pier, Berkeley, CA in support of the 4th of July Festival Berkeley Marina Fireworks Display... used in the fireworks display. Background and Purpose The City of Berkeley Marina will sponsor the...

  10. 75 FR 26157 - Safety Zone; Reedville July 4th Celebration, Cockrell's Creek, Reedville, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Reedville July 4th Celebration, Cockrell's..., VA in support of the Reedville July 4th Celebration event. This action is intended to restrict...

  11. Science Content Courses: Workshop in Food Chemistry for 4th Grade School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaiyapechara, S.; Dong, F. M.

    2004-01-01

    A science content course in food chemistry was offered as a 4-day summer workshop from 1999 to 2001 to 4th grade school teachers in the Seattle School District. The objectives of the workshop were to increase the teachers' knowledge of food science, to perform simple experiments that could be used in the 4th grade classroom, and to help the…

  12. 75 FR 35649 - Safety Zone; Northern California Annual Fireworks Events, July 4th Fireworks Display

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-23

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; Northern California Annual Fireworks Events, July 4th Fireworks Display AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard will enforce the Tahoe City 4th of July Fireworks Display safety zone, from 9 a.m. through 10...

  13. The Effects of Cooperative Learning Strategies on Vocabulary Skills of 4th Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilen, Didem; Tavil, Zekiye Müge

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the effects of cooperative learning strategies on the vocabulary skills of 4th grade students. The study was also designed to ascertain the attitudes of the students in the experimental group towards cooperative learning. Out of 96 4th grade students enrolled in the private school where the study took…

  14. The school nutrition program's role in weight management of 4th grade elementary students

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We are attempting to uncover the school nutrition program's role in weight management of 4th grade elementary students. Data was collected within a time frame for the food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) set at two months at the WT Cheney Elementary School and South Wood Elementary for 4th grade stud...

  15. Fluoroquinolone Resistance among Clonal Complex 1 Group B Streptococcus Strains.

    PubMed

    Neemuchwala, Alefiya; Teatero, Sarah; Patel, Samir N; Fittipaldi, Nahuel

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone resistance in group B Streptococcus is increasingly being reported worldwide. Here, we correlated fluoroquinolone resistance with mutations in gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes, identified by mining whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data of 190 clonal complex 1 group B Streptococcus strains recovered from patients with invasive diseases in North America. We report a high prevalence of fluoroquinolone resistance (12%) among GBS strains in our collection. Our approach is the first step towards accurate prediction of fluoroquinolone resistance from WGS data in this opportunistic pathogen. PMID:27559344

  16. Fluoroquinolone Resistance among Clonal Complex 1 Group B Streptococcus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Teatero, Sarah; Patel, Samir N.

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone resistance in group B Streptococcus is increasingly being reported worldwide. Here, we correlated fluoroquinolone resistance with mutations in gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes, identified by mining whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data of 190 clonal complex 1 group B Streptococcus strains recovered from patients with invasive diseases in North America. We report a high prevalence of fluoroquinolone resistance (12%) among GBS strains in our collection. Our approach is the first step towards accurate prediction of fluoroquinolone resistance from WGS data in this opportunistic pathogen. PMID:27559344

  17. Efficient Recovery of Fluoroquinolone-Susceptible and Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Escherichia coli Strains From Frozen Samples

    PubMed Central

    Lautenbach, Ebbing; Santana, Evelyn; Lee, Abby; Tolomeo, Pam; Black, Nicole; Babson, Andrew; Perencevich, Eli N.; Harris, Anthony D.; Smith, Catherine A.; Maslow, Joel

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the rate of recovery of fluoroquinolone-resistant and fluoroquinolone-susceptible Escherichia coli isolates from culture of frozen perirectal swab samples compared with the results for culture of the same specimen before freezing. Recovery rates for these 2 classes of E. coli were 91% and 83%, respectively. The majority of distinct strains recovered from the initial sample were also recovered from the frozen sample. The strains that were not recovered were typically present only in low numbers in the initial sample. These findings emphasize the utility of frozen surveillance samples. PMID:18279070

  18. Efficient recovery of fluoroquinolone-susceptible and fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli strains from frozen samples.

    PubMed

    Lautenbach, Ebbing; Santana, Evelyn; Lee, Abby; Tolomeo, Pam; Black, Nicole; Babson, Andrew; Perencevich, Eli N; Harris, Anthony D; Smith, Catherine A; Maslow, Joel

    2008-04-01

    We assessed the rate of recovery of fluoroquinolone-resistant and fluoroquinolone-susceptible Escherichia coli isolates from culture of frozen perirectal swab samples compared with the results for culture of the same specimen before freezing. Recovery rates for these 2 classes of E. coli were 91% and 83%, respectively. The majority of distinct strains recovered from the initial sample were also recovered from the frozen sample. The strains that were not recovered were typically present only in low numbers in the initial sample. These findings emphasize the utility of frozen surveillance samples. PMID:18279070

  19. Clostridium difficile: emergence of hypervirulence and fluoroquinolone resistance.

    PubMed

    Razavi, B; Apisarnthanarak, A; Mundy, L M

    2007-10-01

    Clostridium difficile is a well-known cause of sporadic and healthcare-associated diarrhea. Multihospital outbreaks due to a single strain and outbreaks associated with antibiotic selective pressure, especially clindamycin, have been well documented. Severe cases and fatalities from C. difficile are uncommon. The recent global emergence of a hypervirulent strain containing binary toxin (Toxinotype III ribotype 027), with or without deletion in a regulatory gene (tcdC gene), together with high-level resistance to third generation fluoroquinolones, has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Although the defective regulatory gene locus is associated with increased toxin production in vitro, the in vivo significance of this mutation and of the binary toxin remains undefined. To date, treatment strategies have not evolved in response to the emergence of this hypervirulaent strain. We provide a critical, quantitative summary of the evolving clinical and molecular epidemiology of C. difficile along with implications relevant to future treatment strategies. PMID:17885732

  20. The 1992 4th NASA SERC Symposium on VLSI Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Sterling R.

    1992-01-01

    Papers from the fourth annual NASA Symposium on VLSI Design, co-sponsored by the IEEE, are presented. Each year this symposium is organized by the NASA Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) at the University of Idaho and is held in conjunction with a quarterly meeting of the NASA Data System Technology Working Group (DSTWG). One task of the DSTWG is to develop new electronic technologies that will meet next generation electronic data system needs. The symposium provides insights into developments in VLSI and digital systems which can be used to increase data systems performance. The NASA SERC is proud to offer, at its fourth symposium on VLSI design, presentations by an outstanding set of individuals from national laboratories, the electronics industry, and universities. These speakers share insights into next generation advances that will serve as a basis for future VLSI design.

  1. Global Fluoroquinolone Resistance Epidemiology and Implictions for Clinical Use

    PubMed Central

    Dalhoff, Axel

    2012-01-01

    This paper on the fluoroquinolone resistance epidemiology stratifies the data according to the different prescription patterns by either primary or tertiary caregivers and by indication. Global surveillance studies demonstrate that fluoroquinolone resistance rates increased in the past years in almost all bacterial species except S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae, causing community-acquired respiratory tract infections. However, 10 to 30% of these isolates harbored first-step mutations conferring low level fluoroquinolone resistance. Fluoroquinolone resistance increased in Enterobacteriaceae causing community acquired or healthcare associated urinary tract infections and intraabdominal infections, exceeding 50% in some parts of the world, particularly in Asia. One to two-thirds of Enterobacteriaceae producing extended spectrum β-lactamases were fluoroquinolone resistant too. Furthermore, fluoroquinolones select for methicillin resistance in Staphylococci. Neisseria gonorrhoeae acquired fluoroquinolone resistance rapidly; actual resistance rates are highly variable and can be as high as almost 100%, particularly in Asia, whereas resistance rates in Europe and North America range from <10% in rural areas to >30% in established sexual networks. In general, the continued increase in fluoroquinolone resistance affects patient management and necessitates changes in some guidelines, for example, treatment of urinary tract, intra-abdominal, skin and skin structure infections, and traveller's diarrhea, or even precludes the use in indications like sexually transmitted diseases and enteric fever. PMID:23097666

  2. An Assessment of 4th, 8th, and 11th Grade Students' Knowledge Related to Marine Science and Natural Resource Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Michael J.; Koch, Helmut

    In an effort to contribute information for science teachers and curriculum developers in Maine, this study generated base line data on 4th, 8th, and 11th grade students' knowledge of marine science and natural resources principles in relation to the Gulf of Maine. Five concept maps representing 15 major content principles were developed. Two…

  3. Risk Factors for Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Ocular Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Junsung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To identify the risk factors associated with fluoroquinolone resistance in patients undergoing cataract surgery. Methods A total of 1,125 patients (1,125 eyes) who underwent cataract surgery at Veterans Health Service Medical Center from May 2011 to July 2012 were enrolled in this study. Conjunctival cultures were obtained from the patients on the day of surgery before instillation of any ophthalmic solutions. The medical records of patients with positive coagulase negative staphylococcus (CNS) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) cultures were reviewed to determine factors associated with fluoroquinolone resistance. Results Of 734 CNS and S. aureus cultures, 175 (23.8%) were resistant to ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, or moxifloxacin. Use of fluoroquinolone within 3 months and within 1 year before surgery, topical antibiotic use other than fluoroquinolone, systemic antibiotic use, recent hospitalization, ocular surgery, intravitreal injection and use of eyedrops containing benzalkonium chloride were significantly more frequent in resistant isolates than in susceptible isolates. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, ocular surgery (odds ratio [OR], 8.457), recent hospitalization (OR, 6.646) and use of fluoroquinolone within 3 months before surgery (OR, 4.918) were significant predictors of fluoroquinolone resistance, along with intravitreal injection (OR, 2.976), systemic antibiotic use (OR, 2.665), use of eyedrops containing benzalkonium chloride (OR, 2.323), use of fluoroquinolone within 1 year before surgery (OR, 1.943) and topical antibiotic use other than fluoroquinolone (OR, 1.673). Conclusions Recent topical fluoroquinolone use, hospitalization and ocular surgery were significantly associated with fluoroquinolone resistance in CNS and S. aureus isolates from ocular culture. PMID:25646055

  4. Fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter species and the withdrawal of fluoroquinolones from use in poultry: a public health success story.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Jennifer M; Chiller, Tom M; Powers, John H; Angulo, Frederick J

    2007-04-01

    Campylobacter species cause 1.4 million infections each year in the United States. Fluoroquinolones (e.g., ciprofloxacin) are commonly used in adults with Campylobacter infection and other infections. Fluoroquinolones (e.g., enrofloxacin) are also used in veterinary medicine. Human infections with fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter species have become increasingly common and are associated with consumption of poultry. These findings, along with other data, prompted the US Food and Drug Administration to propose the withdrawal of fluoroquinolone use in poultry in 2000. A lengthy legal hearing concluded with an order to withdraw enrofloxacin from use in poultry (effective in September 2005). Clinicians are likely to continue to encounter patients with fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter infection and other enteric infection because of the continued circulation of fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter species in poultry flocks and in persons returning from foreign travel who have acquired a fluoroquinolone-resistant enteric infection while abroad. Judicious use of fluoroquinolones and other antimicrobial agents in human and veterinary medicine is essential to preserve the efficacy of these important chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:17342653

  5. 18. DETAILED OFFSHORE VIEW OF 4TH TEE, LOOKING NORTHWEST, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. DETAILED OFFSHORE VIEW OF 4TH TEE, LOOKING NORTHWEST, SHOWING TRANSITION FROM WOOD BENTS TO CONCRETE BENTS - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  6. 29. VIEW OF 4TH FLOOR'S TELEPHONE RACKS WITH CABLE TRAYS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. VIEW OF 4TH FLOOR'S TELEPHONE RACKS WITH CABLE TRAYS ABOVE. THESE ARE NEWER APPARATUS AND NOT ORIGINAL. - Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Company Building, 1519 Franklin Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  7. 16. 4th floor roof, view west, north side of setback ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. 4th floor roof, view west, north side of setback to left and delivery stair bulkhead to right - Sheffield Farms Milk Plant, 1075 Webster Avenue (southwest corner of 166th Street), Bronx, Bronx County, NY

  8. 4th Annual DOE-ERSP PI Meeting: Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2009-03-01

    This contains abstracts from the 2009 Annual Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) Principal Investigators (PI) Meeting. The ERSP seeks to advance fundamental science to understand, predict, and mitigate the impacts of environmental contamination from past nuclear weapons production and provide a scientific basis for the long-term stewardship of nuclear waste disposal. These ambitious goals cannot be achieved by any one project alone. Therefore, ERSP funds a combination of research programs at the DOE national laboratories, individual projects at universities and federal agencies, and large long(er)-term field site research. Integration of these activities to advance the ERSP goals is a constant challenge, but made significantly simpler by bringing together all funded ERSP researchers once a year to discuss the very latest research results. It is at these meetings where new ideas and/or scientific advancements in support of ERSP goals can be discussed and openly debated among all PIs in the program. The ERSP thrives, in part, on the new ideas, concepts, scientific connections, and collaborations generated as a result of these meetings. The annual PI Meeting is very much a working meeting with three major goals: (1) to provide opportunities for scientific interaction among the ERSP scientists, a critical element for the program; (2) to provide the ERSP program staff with an opportunity to evaluate the progress of each program and project; and (3) to showcase the ERSP to interested parties within DOE and within other federal agencies In addition to program managers from within OBER, there will be representatives from other offices within DOE and other federal agencies in attandance at the meeting.

  9. Physics Computing '92: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groot, Robert A.; Nadrchal, Jaroslav

    1993-04-01

    * Ordered Particle Simulations for Serial and MIMD Parallel Computers * "NOLP" -- Program Package for Laser Plasma Nonlinear Optics * Algorithms to Solve Nonlinear Least Square Problems * Distribution of Hydrogen Atoms in Pd-H Computed by Molecular Dynamics * A Ray Tracing of Optical System for Protein Crystallography Beamline at Storage Ring-SIBERIA-2 * Vibrational Properties of a Pseudobinary Linear Chain with Correlated Substitutional Disorder * Application of the Software Package Mathematica in Generalized Master Equation Method * Linelist: An Interactive Program for Analysing Beam-foil Spectra * GROMACS: A Parallel Computer for Molecular Dynamics Simulations * GROMACS Method of Virial Calculation Using a Single Sum * The Interactive Program for the Solution of the Laplace Equation with the Elimination of Singularities for Boundary Functions * Random-Number Generators: Testing Procedures and Comparison of RNG Algorithms * Micro-TOPIC: A Tokamak Plasma Impurities Code * Rotational Molecular Scattering Calculations * Orthonormal Polynomial Method for Calibrating of Cryogenic Temperature Sensors * Frame-based System Representing Basis of Physics * The Role of Massively Data-parallel Computers in Large Scale Molecular Dynamics Simulations * Short-range Molecular Dynamics on a Network of Processors and Workstations * An Algorithm for Higher-order Perturbation Theory in Radiative Transfer Computations * Hydrostochastics: The Master Equation Formulation of Fluid Dynamics * HPP Lattice Gas on Transputers and Networked Workstations * Study on the Hysteresis Cycle Simulation Using Modeling with Different Functions on Intervals * Refined Pruning Techniques for Feed-forward Neural Networks * Random Walk Simulation of the Motion of Transient Charges in Photoconductors * The Optical Hysteresis in Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon * Diffusion Monte Carlo Analysis of Modern Interatomic Potentials for He * A Parallel Strategy for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Polar Liquids on

  10. Physics Computing '92: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groot, Robert A.; Nadrchal, Jaroslav

    1993-04-01

    * Ordered Particle Simulations for Serial and MIMD Parallel Computers * "NOLP" -- Program Package for Laser Plasma Nonlinear Optics * Algorithms to Solve Nonlinear Least Square Problems * Distribution of Hydrogen Atoms in Pd-H Computed by Molecular Dynamics * A Ray Tracing of Optical System for Protein Crystallography Beamline at Storage Ring-SIBERIA-2 * Vibrational Properties of a Pseudobinary Linear Chain with Correlated Substitutional Disorder * Application of the Software Package Mathematica in Generalized Master Equation Method * Linelist: An Interactive Program for Analysing Beam-foil Spectra * GROMACS: A Parallel Computer for Molecular Dynamics Simulations * GROMACS Method of Virial Calculation Using a Single Sum * The Interactive Program for the Solution of the Laplace Equation with the Elimination of Singularities for Boundary Functions * Random-Number Generators: Testing Procedures and Comparison of RNG Algorithms * Micro-TOPIC: A Tokamak Plasma Impurities Code * Rotational Molecular Scattering Calculations * Orthonormal Polynomial Method for Calibrating of Cryogenic Temperature Sensors * Frame-based System Representing Basis of Physics * The Role of Massively Data-parallel Computers in Large Scale Molecular Dynamics Simulations * Short-range Molecular Dynamics on a Network of Processors and Workstations * An Algorithm for Higher-order Perturbation Theory in Radiative Transfer Computations * Hydrostochastics: The Master Equation Formulation of Fluid Dynamics * HPP Lattice Gas on Transputers and Networked Workstations * Study on the Hysteresis Cycle Simulation Using Modeling with Different Functions on Intervals * Refined Pruning Techniques for Feed-forward Neural Networks * Random Walk Simulation of the Motion of Transient Charges in Photoconductors * The Optical Hysteresis in Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon * Diffusion Monte Carlo Analysis of Modern Interatomic Potentials for He * A Parallel Strategy for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Polar Liquids on

  11. Fluoroquinolone-Associated Tendinopathy: Does Levofloxacin Pose the Greatest Risk?

    PubMed

    Bidell, Monique R; Lodise, Thomas P

    2016-06-01

    Fluoroquinolone antibiotics recently have gained increased national attention due to safety concerns. A well-described and serious adverse event associated with receipt of fluoroquinolones is tendinitis and tendon rupture. These tendon injuries can result in long-term sequelae, including chronic pain and mobility restrictions, and may warrant surgery. Due to the severity of these adverse events, a black box warning is included in the product labeling of all fluoroquinolones. In light of the mounting concerns surrounding fluoroquinolone-associated toxicities, the purpose of this clinical review is to provide a comprehensive summary of the risk of tendinopathy associated with levofloxacin, one of the most widely prescribed antibiotics in the United States, across in vitro, animal, and clinical studies, relative to other antibiotics. As part of this review, clinical presentation and onset, proposed mechanisms, patient-specific risk factors, and management of fluoroquinolone-induced tendon injury are summarized. Data were obtained from a comprehensive PubMed literature search and a review of U.S. Food and Drug Administration documents. Although tendinopathy is considered a fluoroquinolone class-wide toxicity, data from in vitro studies, animal studies, patient-level analyses, and large national and international surveillance reports suggest that levofloxacin, as well as its parent compound ofloxacin, possess higher propensities to cause tendon damage relative to other fluoroquinolones. Risk with ofloxacin and levofloxacin appears to be exposure dependent, with higher doses and longer durations being most commonly associated with tendinopathy. Other well-described patient risk factors for fluoroquinolone-associated tendinopathy include older age (older than 60 yrs), receipt of concomitant corticosteroid therapy, presence of renal dysfunction, and history of solid organ transplantation. Given widespread use of levofloxacin across patient care settings, knowledge of both

  12. Systematically frameshifting by deletion of every 4th or 4th and 5th nucleotides during mitochondrial transcription: RNA self-hybridization regulates delRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    In mitochondria, secondary structures punctuate post-transcriptional RNA processing. Recently described transcripts match the human mitogenome after systematic deletions of every 4th, respectively every 4th and 5th nucleotides, called delRNAs. Here I explore predicted stem-loop hairpin formation by delRNAs, and their associations with delRNA transcription and detected peptides matching their translation. Despite missing 25, respectively 40% of the nucleotides in the original sequence, del-transformed sequences form significantly more secondary structures than corresponding randomly shuffled sequences, indicating biological function, independently of, and in combination with, previously detected delRNA and thereof translated peptides. Self-hybridization decreases delRNA abundances, indicating downregulation. Systematic deletions of the human mitogenome reveal new, unsuspected coding and structural informations. PMID:27018206

  13. 75 FR 38721 - Safety Zone; Munising 4th of July Fireworks, South Bay, Lake Superior, Munising, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Munising 4th of July Fireworks, South Bay... is intended to restrict vessels from a portion of South Bay during the Munising 4th of July Fireworks... from hazards associated with the Munising 4th of July Fireworks display. Based on the explosive...

  14. 75 FR 34369 - Safety Zones; City of Chicago's July 4th Celebration Fireworks, Lake Michigan, Chicago, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... Chicago's July 4th Celebration Fireworks, Chicago, Illinois in the Federal Register (75 FR 22330). We... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zones; City of Chicago's July 4th Celebration... associated with the City of Chicago's July 4th Celebration Fireworks. The Captain of the Port, Sector...

  15. 75 FR 34379 - Safety Zone; Mackinac Island 4th of July Fireworks, Lake Huron, Mackinac Island, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Mackinac Island 4th of July Fireworks, Lake... intended to restrict vessels from a portion of Lake Huron during the Mackinac Island 4th of July Fireworks... with the Mackinac Island 4th of July fireworks display. The fireworks display will occur between 9:45...

  16. 75 FR 38718 - Safety Zone; Sault Sainte Marie 4th of July Fireworks, St. Mary's River, Sault Sainte Marie, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Sault Sainte Marie 4th of July Fireworks... the Sault Sainte Marie 4th of July Fireworks display, July ] 4, 2010. This temporary safety zone is... with the Sault Sainte Marie 4th of July Fireworks display. The fireworks display is planned to...

  17. Fluoroquinolones in the treatment of bronchopulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Matthew; Smyth, Alan

    2012-12-01

    Fluoroquinolones are commonly used to treat lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. These patients are susceptible to lung infection with common bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus and Haemophilus influenzae, but are also prone to infection by opportunistic bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The good oral bioavailability and broad antimicrobial spectrum of activity, including antipseudomonal properties, make this class of antimicrobial attractive. We review the evidence assessing the use of fluoroquinolones in the context of preventing and eradicating early lung infection and in managing chronic lung infection and pulmonary exacerbations. The safety of fluoroquinolones and the use of newer agents in the class are also discussed. PMID:22968160

  18. Torsades de pointes associated with fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Owens, Robert C; Ambrose, Paul G

    2002-05-01

    Recent attention has been called to the interpretation of studies of antiinfective agents demonstrating effects on the QTc interval. It seems that the effects of many of these agents on the QTc interval are small, but in some patient populations, these drugs may cause morbidity and mortality related to TdP. It would be beneficial to researchers and clinicians alike for the FDA to standardize the types of studies designed to assess the QTc interval prolongation potential of a drug, methodologies, and interpretation criteria. To this end, it would increase the efficiency of the drug-approval process, give regulatory agencies and clinicians guidance, and increase patient safety. In summary we congratulate Dr. Frothingham for attempting to address the challenging issue of postmarketing safety surveillance. A critical review of his analysis of fluoroquinolone-associated TdP as well as other data on this potentially life-threatening adverse event support the following conclusions: Information from spontaneous reports is generally useful as an early warning system for excess adverse events, but reporting rates are not synonymous with incidence rates. The deficiencies of Dr. Frothingham's analysis lead to serious questions regarding the validity of both the numerators and denominators used in the incidence calculations (e.g., exclusion of European results, use ot extrapolated outpatient prescriptions, failure to account for inpatient versus outpatient utilization, failure to apply the appropriate statistical test to a rarely occurring, adverse event) and call into question conclusions about the relative risk of TdP with different fluoroquinolones. The association between which of the fluoroquinolones was administered to high-risk patients, which is important in the multiple-hit hypothesis, remains nebulous (e.g., failure to separate cases by route of drug administration and failure to identify which fluoroquinolones were given to patients with electrolyte abnormalities

  19. Emergence of fluoroquinolone-resistant Neisseria meningitidis--Minnesota and North Dakota, 2007-2008.

    PubMed

    2008-02-22

    Meningoccocal disease causes substantial morbidity and mortality; approximately 10% of cases are fatal. Among those who survive, 10%-15% have long-term sequelae. Nasopharyngeal carriage of Neisseria meningitidis is a precursor to disease; however, the majority of carriers do not develop disease. Household and other close contacts of persons with meningococcal disease have a higher risk for carriage and therefore invasive disease. These persons should receive antibiotic chemoprophylaxis to eliminate nasopharyngeal carriage of N. meningitidis as soon as possible. The rate of secondary disease for close contacts is highest immediately after onset of disease in the index patient; secondary cases rarely occur after 14 days. Ciprofloxacin, a second-generation fluoroquinolone, is an effective single-dose oral chemoprophylaxis agent. Although isolated cases of ciprofloxacin-resistant meningoccocal disease have been described in Argentina, Australia, China, France, India, and Spain, resistance has not been reported in North America. This report describes a cluster of three cases of fluoroquinolone-resistant meningococcal disease that occurred among residents of the border area of North Dakota and Minnesota during January 2007-January 2008. The first of these cases was epidemiologically linked and had closely related molecular features to a 2006 case of fluoroquinolone-susceptible meningococcal disease that occurred in the same geographic region. Until further notice, ciprofloxacin should not be used for chemoprophylaxis of close contacts of persons with meningococcal disease in selected counties in North Dakota and Minnesota. Ceftriaxone, rifampin, and azithromycin are alternative agents. PMID:18288075

  20. Relationship of quantitative structure and pharmacokinetics in fluoroquinolone antibacterials

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Die; Xu, Wei-Ren; Liu, Chang-Xiao

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study the relationship between quantitative structure and pharmacokinetics (QSPkR) of fluoroquinolone antibacterials. METHODS: The pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of oral fluoroquinolones were collected from the litera-ture. These pharmacokinetic data were averaged, 19 compounds were used as the training set, and 3 served as the test set. Genetic function approximation (GFA) module of Cerius2 software was used in QSPkR analysis. RESULTS: A small volume and large polarizability and surface area of substituents at C-7 contribute to a large area under the curve (AUC) for fluoroquinolones. Large polarizability and small volume of substituents at N-1 contribute to a long half life elimination. CONCLUSION: QSPkR models can contribute to some fluoroquinolones antibacterials with excellent pharmacokinetic properties. PMID:17552035

  1. Process Test Plan for 4TH Generation Hanford Corrosion Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    NORMAN, E.C.

    2000-06-20

    Instrumentation and cabinets for the 241-AN-107 and 241-AN-102 corrosion monitoring systems will be upgraded in FY 2000. The bulk of the field work involved in this task will involve placement of the corrosion monitoring data collection hardware closer to the risers that house the existing corrosion probes. This will be accomplished by placing a new climate controlled cabinet by the risers containing corrosion probes on these two tanks (one cabinet per tank). Once installed the systems will feed data back to a centralized corrosion monitoring station in the 241-AN-271 instrument building. The upgraded systems will be operated under the bounds of this Process Test Plan (PTP) for six principle reasons. These reasons were established prior to installing the original systems in 1997 (241-AN-107) and 1998 (241-AN-102). They are as follows: (1) Acquire corrosion data on the waste in 241-AN-107 and 241-AN-102. (2) Provide supporting data to the site's Integrity Assessment program. (3) Demonstrate that corrosion monitoring by evaluation of electrochemical noise data is possible in waste tank systems, particularly with regard to the detection of general corrosion and (if present) pitting and stress corrosion cracking. (4) Demonstrate the durability of the design of the corrosion monitoring equipment. (5) Extend tank life and reduce annual operations cost. (6) Provide basis to control corrosion in double shell tanks though the use of direct corrosion monitoring rather than waste sampling and analysis. The designs of the existing corrosion probes in 241-AN-107 and 241-AN-102 were reviewed and documented prior to the original installation activities in 1997 and 1998. Initial programmatic documentation for Hanford's corrosion monitoring program was also established prior to the original installation activities.

  2. Towards 4th generation biomaterials: a covalent hybrid polymer-ormoglass architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachot, N.; Mateos-Timoneda, M. A.; Planell, J. A.; Velders, A. H.; Lewandowska, M.; Engel, E.; Castaño, O.

    2015-09-01

    Hybrid materials are being extensively investigated with the aim of mimicking the ECM microenvironment to develop effective solutions for bone tissue engineering. However, the common drawbacks of a hybrid material are the lack of interactions between the scaffold's constituents and the masking of its bioactive phase. Conventional hybrids often degrade in a non-homogeneous manner and the biological response is far from optimal. We have developed a novel material with strong interactions between constituents. The bioactive phase is directly exposed on its surface mimicking the structure of the ECM of bone. Here, polylactic acid electrospun fibers have been successfully and reproducibly coated with a bioactive organically modified glass (ormoglass, Si-Ca-P2 system) covalently. In comparison with the pure polymeric mats, the fibers obtained showed improved hydrophilicity and mechanical properties, bioactive ion release, exhibited a nanoroughness and enabled good cell adhesion and spreading after just one day of culture (rMSCs and rEPCs). The fibers were coated with different ormoglass compositions to tailor their surface properties (roughness, stiffness, and morphology) by modifying the experimental parameters. Knowing that cells modulate their behavior according to the exposed physical and chemical signals, the development of this instructive material is a valuable advance in the design of functional regenerative biomaterials.Hybrid materials are being extensively investigated with the aim of mimicking the ECM microenvironment to develop effective solutions for bone tissue engineering. However, the common drawbacks of a hybrid material are the lack of interactions between the scaffold's constituents and the masking of its bioactive phase. Conventional hybrids often degrade in a non-homogeneous manner and the biological response is far from optimal. We have developed a novel material with strong interactions between constituents. The bioactive phase is directly exposed on its surface mimicking the structure of the ECM of bone. Here, polylactic acid electrospun fibers have been successfully and reproducibly coated with a bioactive organically modified glass (ormoglass, Si-Ca-P2 system) covalently. In comparison with the pure polymeric mats, the fibers obtained showed improved hydrophilicity and mechanical properties, bioactive ion release, exhibited a nanoroughness and enabled good cell adhesion and spreading after just one day of culture (rMSCs and rEPCs). The fibers were coated with different ormoglass compositions to tailor their surface properties (roughness, stiffness, and morphology) by modifying the experimental parameters. Knowing that cells modulate their behavior according to the exposed physical and chemical signals, the development of this instructive material is a valuable advance in the design of functional regenerative biomaterials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04275e

  3. Porting LEON3FT/GRLIB to 4th Generation Flash-Based Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Jan; Habinc, Sandi; Prinetto, Paolo; Trotta, Pascal

    2015-09-01

    Cobham Gaisler develops the LEON3FT SPARC V8 fault-tolerant microprocessor that is available both as IP cores part of an IP library (GRLIB) that allows users to design their own custom system-on-chip (SoC) designs, and also as part of ready-made designs and devices. Cobham Gaisler has recently added support for Microsemi IGLOO2, and experimental support for Microsemi radiation-tolerant RTG4, devices to GRLIB.

  4. FIB–SEM tomography of 4th generation PWA 1497 superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Ziętara, Maciej Kruk, Adam Gruszczyński, Adam Czyrska-Filemonowicz, Aleksandra

    2014-01-15

    The effect of creep deformation on the microstructure of the PWA 1497 single crystal Ni-base superalloy developed for turbine blade applications was investigated. The aim of the present study was to characterize quantitatively a superalloy microstructure and subsequent development of rafted γ′ precipitates in the PWA 1497 during creep deformation at 982 °C and 248 MPa up to rupture. The PWA1497 microstructure was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and FIB–SEM electron tomography. The 3D reconstruction of the PWA1497 microstructure is presented and discussed. - Highlights: • The microstructure of PWA1497 superalloy was examined using FIB–SEM tomography. • In case of modern single crystal superalloys, measurements of A{sub A} are adequate for V{sub V}. • During creep the γ channel width increases from 65 to 193 nm for ruptured specimen. • Tomography is a useful technique for quantitative studies of material microstructure.

  5. Injector Beam Dynamics for a High-Repetition Rate 4th-Generation Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Papadopoulos, C. F.; Corlett, J.; Emma, P.; Filippetto, D.; Penn, G.; Qiang, J.; Reinsch, M.; Sannibale, F.; Steier, C.; Venturini, M.; Wells, R.

    2013-05-20

    We report on the beam dynamics studies and optimization methods for a high repetition rate (1 MHz) photoinjector based on a VHF normal conducting electron source. The simultaneous goals of beamcompression and reservation of 6-dimensional beam brightness have to be achieved in the injector, in order to accommodate a linac driven FEL light source. For this, a parallel, multiobjective optimization algorithm is used. We discuss the relative merits of different injector design points, as well as the constraints imposed on the beam dynamics by technical considerations such as the high repetition rate.

  6. Towards 4th generation biomaterials: a covalent hybrid polymer-ormoglass architecture.

    PubMed

    Sachot, N; Mateos-Timoneda, M A; Planell, J A; Velders, A H; Lewandowska, M; Engel, E; Castaño, O

    2015-10-01

    Hybrid materials are being extensively investigated with the aim of mimicking the ECM microenvironment to develop effective solutions for bone tissue engineering. However, the common drawbacks of a hybrid material are the lack of interactions between the scaffold's constituents and the masking of its bioactive phase. Conventional hybrids often degrade in a non-homogeneous manner and the biological response is far from optimal. We have developed a novel material with strong interactions between constituents. The bioactive phase is directly exposed on its surface mimicking the structure of the ECM of bone. Here, polylactic acid electrospun fibers have been successfully and reproducibly coated with a bioactive organically modified glass (ormoglass, Si-Ca-P2 system) covalently. In comparison with the pure polymeric mats, the fibers obtained showed improved hydrophilicity and mechanical properties, bioactive ion release, exhibited a nanoroughness and enabled good cell adhesion and spreading after just one day of culture (rMSCs and rEPCs). The fibers were coated with different ormoglass compositions to tailor their surface properties (roughness, stiffness, and morphology) by modifying the experimental parameters. Knowing that cells modulate their behavior according to the exposed physical and chemical signals, the development of this instructive material is a valuable advance in the design of functional regenerative biomaterials. PMID:26332471

  7. Improving Social Interaction among 4th Grade Students through Social Skills Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunleavy, Shannon; Karwowski, Sandra; Shudes-Eitel, Jennifer

    This action research project implemented a program for improving social skills in order to establish positive interaction among 4th grade students at a northern Chicago suburban school. Social skills deficiency was documented through behavior checklists and referrals, teacher observations and student reflection. Teachers reported that low incomes,…

  8. Relationships between Grade Levels, Personal Factors, and Instructional Variation among 4th-12th Grade Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Jacquelyn M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to investigate relationships between grade levels, personal factors of teachers, and instructional variety used by 4th-12th grade teachers in Kern County, California. The population under investigation included 2,844 teachers. 235 elementary, middle school/junior high, and secondary teachers…

  9. 77 FR 56208 - Filing Dates for the Kentucky Special Election in the 4th Congressional District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION Filing Dates for the Kentucky Special Election in the 4th Congressional District AGENCY: Federal Election Commission. ACTION: Notice of filing dates for special election. SUMMARY: Kentucky has scheduled a...

  10. Reading Development and Achievement of 4th-Grade Hmong Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahowald, Megan; Loughnane, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Researchers and practitioners alike have noted that Hmong students in the United States do not achieve as well as their monolingual peers and other bilingual students. The current mixed-methods study is designed to describe reading development and achievement of 4th-grade Hmong students in one large, urban school district. This study explores the…

  11. MAIN GATE, INTERSECTION OF 4TH AVE (200 NORTH) AND N ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MAIN GATE, INTERSECTION OF 4TH AVE (200 NORTH) AND N STREET (895 EAST), SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW LOOKING EAST THROUGH MAIN CEMETERY GATE TO CEMETERY'S MAIN STREET, REPHOTOGRAPH OF HISTORIC SHIPLER PHOTO # 18276, UTAH STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY COLLECTION. - Salt Lake City Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  12. Polarimetric Microwave Emission from Snow Surface: 4th Strokes Component Analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of ice on the polarimetric 4th Stokes component observations is investigated using WindSat data over Antarctica. The difference in the magnitude of the signal observed during (July 2003) and summer (February 2004) months is investigated using a second harmonic sine function of the azimuth...

  13. 33 CFR 165.166 - Safety Zone: Macy's July 4th Fireworks, East River, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety Zone: Macy's July 4th Fireworks, East River, NY. 165.166 Section 165.166 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Specific Regulated Navigation...

  14. 33 CFR 165.166 - Safety Zone: Macy's July 4th Fireworks, East River, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR 165.23 apply. (2) No vessels, except the Staten Island Ferries, will be allowed to transit the... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety Zone: Macy's July 4th... OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND...

  15. 33 CFR 165.166 - Safety Zone: Macy's July 4th Fireworks, East River, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR 165.23 apply. (2) No vessels, except the Staten Island Ferries, will be allowed to transit the... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety Zone: Macy's July 4th... OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND...

  16. 33 CFR 165.166 - Safety Zone: Macy's July 4th Fireworks, East River, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR 165.23 apply. (2) No vessels, except the Staten Island Ferries, will be allowed to transit the... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety Zone: Macy's July 4th... OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND...

  17. 33 CFR 165.166 - Safety Zone: Macy's July 4th Fireworks, East River, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CFR 165.23 apply. (2) No vessels, except the Staten Island Ferries, will be allowed to transit the... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety Zone: Macy's July 4th... OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND...

  18. 94. VIEW OF PILINGS ON SOUTHEAST SIDE, WITH 4TH TEE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    94. VIEW OF PILINGS ON SOUTHEAST SIDE, WITH 4TH TEE IN THE BACKGROUND, FACING WEST-SOUTHWEST FROM SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE TACKLE BOX. RAMP OF PIER EXTENSION IS VISIBLE ON RIGHT - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  19. 20. TYPICAL VIEW OF FRONT WINDOWS FROM 4TH TO 9TH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. TYPICAL VIEW OF FRONT WINDOWS FROM 4TH TO 9TH FLOOR WITH WHITE GLAZED TERRA COTTA SILL AND HEADERS. MULLIONS ARE ORANGE BROWN BRICKS LIKE THE WALLS. BRICKS ARE IN FLEMISH BOND PATTERN. - Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Company Building, 1519 Franklin Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  20. Using 4th order Runge-Kutta method for solving a twisted Skyrme string equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadi, Miftachul; Anderson, Malcolm; Husein, Andri

    2016-03-01

    We study numerical solution, especially using 4th order Runge-Kutta method, for solving a twisted Skyrme string equation. We find numerically that the value of minimum energy per unit length of vortex solution for a twisted Skyrmion string is 20.37 × 1060 eV/m.

  1. 77 FR 39408 - Safety Zone; Buffalo July 4th Fireworks, Lake Erie, Buffalo, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Buffalo July 4th Fireworks, Lake Erie, Buffalo, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard...

  2. Assessment of an Engineering Technology Outreach Program for 4th-7th Grade Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dell, Elizabeth M.; Christman, Jeanne; Garrick, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a workshop led by female Engineering Technology students, with support from female faculty, to provide an introduction to Engineering Technology to 4th-7th grade girls through a series of interactive laboratory experiments. This outreach program was developed to improve attitudes towards science and engineering in middle…

  3. 75 FR 33170 - Safety Zone; City of Martinez 4th of July Fireworks, Martinez, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; City of Martinez 4th of July Fireworks, Martinez, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone for the launching of fireworks being sponsored by the City of...

  4. 4th level of 1945 warehouse indicating drag conveyor. From here ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4th level of 1945 warehouse indicating drag conveyor. From here screenings were pumped from the elevator leg to this conveyor. The grains were ground, then conveyed back down to the first floor for bagging. - Stewart Company Grain Elevator, 16 West Carson Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  5. 11. 4TH FLOOR, HOTEL SOAP LINE No. 6 TO NORTHEAST, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. 4TH FLOOR, HOTEL SOAP LINE No. 6 TO NORTHEAST, WITH WRAPPER (LEFT), PRESS (CENTER), AND CUTTER (RIGHT, BEHIND CHUTE); BUCKET CONVEYOR AT RIGHT MOVED WASTE FROM PRESS TO 5TH FLOOR FOR RE-MANUFACTURE - Colgate & Company Jersey City Plant, Building No. B-14, 54-58 Grand Street, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  6. Nonantibiotic Effects of Fluoroquinolones in Mammalian Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Badal, Sujan; Her, Yeng F.; Maher, L. James

    2015-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones (FQ) are powerful broad-spectrum antibiotics whose side effects include renal damage and, strangely, tendinopathies. The pathological mechanisms underlying these toxicities are poorly understood. Here, we show that the FQ drugs norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and enrofloxacin are powerful iron chelators comparable with deferoxamine, a clinically useful iron-chelating agent. We show that iron chelation by FQ leads to epigenetic effects through inhibition of α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases that require iron as a co-factor. Three dioxygenases were examined in HEK293 cells treated with FQ. At sub-millimolar concentrations, these antibiotics inhibited jumonji domain histone demethylases, TET DNA demethylases, and collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylases, leading to accumulation of methylated histones and DNA and inhibition of proline hydroxylation in collagen, respectively. These effects may explain FQ-induced nephrotoxicity and tendinopathy. By the same reasoning, dioxygenase inhibition by FQ was predicted to stabilize transcription factor HIF-1α by inhibition of the oxygen-dependent hypoxia-inducible transcription factor prolyl hydroxylation. In dramatic contrast to this prediction, HIF-1α protein was eliminated by FQ treatment. We explored possible mechanisms for this unexpected effect and show that FQ inhibit HIF-1α mRNA translation. Thus, FQ antibiotics induce global epigenetic changes, inhibit collagen maturation, and block HIF-1α accumulation. We suggest that these mechanisms explain the classic renal toxicities and peculiar tendinopathies associated with FQ antibiotics. PMID:26205818

  7. Nonantibiotic Effects of Fluoroquinolones in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Badal, Sujan; Her, Yeng F; Maher, L James

    2015-09-01

    Fluoroquinolones (FQ) are powerful broad-spectrum antibiotics whose side effects include renal damage and, strangely, tendinopathies. The pathological mechanisms underlying these toxicities are poorly understood. Here, we show that the FQ drugs norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and enrofloxacin are powerful iron chelators comparable with deferoxamine, a clinically useful iron-chelating agent. We show that iron chelation by FQ leads to epigenetic effects through inhibition of α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases that require iron as a co-factor. Three dioxygenases were examined in HEK293 cells treated with FQ. At sub-millimolar concentrations, these antibiotics inhibited jumonji domain histone demethylases, TET DNA demethylases, and collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylases, leading to accumulation of methylated histones and DNA and inhibition of proline hydroxylation in collagen, respectively. These effects may explain FQ-induced nephrotoxicity and tendinopathy. By the same reasoning, dioxygenase inhibition by FQ was predicted to stabilize transcription factor HIF-1α by inhibition of the oxygen-dependent hypoxia-inducible transcription factor prolyl hydroxylation. In dramatic contrast to this prediction, HIF-1α protein was eliminated by FQ treatment. We explored possible mechanisms for this unexpected effect and show that FQ inhibit HIF-1α mRNA translation. Thus, FQ antibiotics induce global epigenetic changes, inhibit collagen maturation, and block HIF-1α accumulation. We suggest that these mechanisms explain the classic renal toxicities and peculiar tendinopathies associated with FQ antibiotics. PMID:26205818

  8. Fluoroquinolones in children: update of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bacci, Caterina; Galli, Luisa; de Martino, Maurizio; Chiappini, Elena

    2015-10-01

    The use of fluoroquinolones (FQ), antibiotics, which have excellent pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics and a broad spectrum of action, has increased dramatically in recent years, both in adults and children. Numerous safety and efficacy data are now available on FQ use in children, particularly regarding the treatment of complicated infections of the urinary tract, typhoid fever, pneumonia, acute external otitis, acute media otitis, meningoencephalitis, sepsis in neutropenic children and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), though sometimes studies have the limitations that they were conducted in selected populations, such as children with cystic fibrosis. Despite available safety data are encouraging, there is still an open debate on the toxicity of this class of antibiotics on weight-bearing joints in children. Not being able to exclude the possibility that, in rare cases, this event is likely to occur, their use in children should be limited to cases where the cost-benefit has been carefully examined, for example, in the case of sepsis or other severe infections from multi-resistant bacteria and not responsive to other classes of drugs. Furthermore, considering the increased use of FQ in children, it is possible that there is an increase in the incidence of infections from resistant germs (such as Escherichia coli, and pneumococci), as occurred in adults. In order to limit the diffusion of resistance, a judicious and appropriate use of this class of drugs is recommended. PMID:26099190

  9. THE FIRST LASING OF 193 NM SASE, 4TH HARMONIC HGHG AND ESASE AT THE NSLS SDL.

    SciTech Connect

    WANG, X.J.; SHEN Y.; WATANABE, T.; MURPHY, J.B.; ROSE, J.; TSANG, T.

    2006-08-28

    The first lasing of three types of single-pass high-gain FELs, SASE at 193 nm, 4th harmonic HGHG at 199 nm and ESASE at the Source Development Lab (SDL) of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is reported. The saturation of 4th harmonic HGHG and ESASE FELs was observed. We also observed the spectral broadening and instability of the 4th harmonic HGHG.

  10. Fluoroquinolone antibiotics: an emerging class of environmental micropollutants.

    PubMed

    Van Doorslaer, Xander; Dewulf, Jo; Van Langenhove, Herman; Demeestere, Kristof

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this review paper is to provide a comprehensive overview of different chemical and environmental aspects concerning fluoroquinolone antibiotics as emerging contaminants. A literature survey has been performed based on 204 papers from 1998 to mid-2013, resulting in a dataset consisting out of 4100 data points related to physical-chemical properties, environmental occurrence, removal efficiencies, and ecotoxicological data. In a first part, an overview is given on relevant physical-chemical parameters to better understand the behavior of fluoroquinolones during wastewater treatment and in the environment. Secondly, the route of these antibiotics after their application in both human and veterinary surroundings is discussed. Thirdly, the occurrence of fluoroquinolone residues is discussed for different environmental matrices. The final part of this review provides a tentative risk assessment of fluoroquinolone compounds and their transformation products in surface waters by means of hazard quotients. Overall, this review shows that fluoroquinolone antibiotics have a wide spread use and that their behavior during wastewater treatment is complex with an incomplete removal. As a result, it is observed that these biorecalcitrant compounds are present in different environmental matrices at potentially hazardous concentrations for the aquatic environment. The latter calls for actions on both the consumption as well as the wastewater treatment aspect to diminish the discharge of these biological active compounds. PMID:25226071

  11. Spontaneous bilateral patellar tendon rupture: case report and review of fluoroquinolone-induced tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Bárbara; Campos, Pedro; Barros, André; Karmali, Samir; Gonçalves, Ricardo

    2016-07-01

    The present case emphasizes the importance of adhering to strict indications when prescribing fluoroquinolones. Although rare, drug-induced tendinopathy is not confined to fluoroquinolones. The patient's and physician's awareness should be increased to reduce fluoroquinolones-associated morbidity, particularly in patients with previously described risk factors. PMID:27386128

  12. 11th National Meeting of Organic Chemistry and 4th Meeting of Therapeutic Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Maria Emília; Araújo, Maria João; do Vale, Maria Luísa; Andrade, Paula B.; Branco, Paula; Gomes, Paula; Moreira, Rui; Pinho e Melo, Teresa M.V.D.; Freitas, Victor

    2016-01-01

    For the first time under the auspices of Sociedade Portuguesa de Química, the competences of two important fields of Chemistry are brought together into a single event, the 11st National Organic Chemistry Meeting and the the 4th National Medicinal Chemistry Meeting, to highlight complementarities and to promote new synergies. Abstracts of plenary lectures, oral communications, and posters presented during the meeting are collected in this report. PMID:27102166

  13. 11(th) National Meeting of Organic Chemistry and 4(th) Meeting of Therapeutic Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Maria Emília; Araújo, Maria João; do Vale, Maria Luísa; Andrade, Paula B; Branco, Paula; Gomes, Paula; Moreira, Rui; Pinho E Melo, Teresa M V D; Freitas, Victor

    2016-01-01

    For the first time under the auspices of Sociedade Portuguesa de Química, the competences of two important fields of Chemistry are brought together into a single event, the 11st National Organic Chemistry Meeting and the the 4th National Medicinal Chemistry Meeting, to highlight complementarities and to promote new synergies. Abstracts of plenary lectures, oral communications, and posters presented during the meeting are collected in this report. PMID:27102166

  14. 10. 4TH FLOOR, HOTEL SOAP LINE No. 6 TO SOUTHWEST, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. 4TH FLOOR, HOTEL SOAP LINE No. 6 TO SOUTHWEST, WITH AUTOMATIC CUTTER (LEFT), PRESS (CENTER), AND WRAPPER (RIGHT); LARGE CHUTE AT CENTER FROM 5TH FLOOR BINS TO 3RD FLOOR SOAP MILLS; OVERHEAD AND FLOOR (LOWER RIGHT) FINISHED GOODS CONVEYORS TO G BLOCK (HAER NO. NJ-71-NN) - Colgate & Company Jersey City Plant, Building No. B-14, 54-58 Grand Street, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  15. Recombinagenic and mutagenic activities of fluoroquinolones in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Thomé, Simone; Bizarro, Cassiane Rosa; Lehmann, Mauricio; de Abreu, Bianca Regina Ribas; de Andrade, Heloisa Helena Rodrigues; Cunha, Kênya Silva; Dihl, Rafael Rodrigues

    2012-02-18

    Fluoroquinolones are widely used in human and in veterinary medicine due to their broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. They act by inhibiting type II DNA topoisomerases (gyrase and topoisomerase IV). Because of the sequence homology between prokaryotic and eukaryotic topoisomerases II, fluoroquinolones can pose a hazard to eukaryotic cells. However, published information concerning the genotoxic profiles of these drugs in vivo is sparse and inconsistent. We have assessed the activities of three fluoroquinolones, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin and norfloxacin, in the Drosophila melanogaster Somatic Mutation and Recombination Test (SMART) and measured their mutagenic and recombinagenic potentials. Norfloxacin was non-genotoxic. Ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin induced significant increases in spot frequencies in trans-heterozygous flies. To test the roles of somatic recombination and mutation in the observed genotoxicity, balancer-heterozygous flies were also analyzed. Ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin were preferential inducers of homologous recombination in proliferative cells, an event linked to loss of heterozygosity. PMID:22142834

  16. Spectrofluorimetric determination of fluoroquinolones in pharmaceutical preparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulu, Sevgi Tatar

    2009-02-01

    Simple, rapid and highly sensitive spectrofluorimetric method is presented for the determination of four fluoroquinolone (FQ) drugs, ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, norfloxacin and moxifloxacin in pharmaceutical preparations. Proposed method is based on the derivatization of FQ with 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan (NBD-Cl) in borate buffer of pH 9.0 to yield a yellow product. The optimum experimental conditions have been studied carefully. Beer's law is obeyed over the concentration range of 23.5-500 ng mL -1 for ciprofloxacin, 28.5-700 ng mL -1 for enoxacin, 29.5-800 ng mL -1 for norfloxacin and 33.5-1000 ng mL -1 for moxifloxacin using NBD-Cl reagent, respectively. The detection limits were found to be 7.0 ng mL -1 for ciprofloxacin, 8.5 ng mL -1 for enoxacin, 9.2 ng mL -1 for norfloxacin and 9.98 ng mL -1 for moxifloxacin, respectively. Intra-day and inter-day relative standard deviation and relative mean error values at three different concentrations were determined. The low relative standard deviation values indicate good precision and high recovery values indicate accuracy of the proposed methods. The method is highly sensitive and specific. The results obtained are in good agreement with those obtained by the official and reference method. The results presented in this report show that the applied spectrofluorimetric method is acceptable for the determination of the four FQ in the pharmaceutical preparations. Common excipients used as additives in pharmaceutical preparations do not interfere with the proposed method.

  17. BET 2: Do fluoroquinolones increase the incidence of tendinopathy?

    PubMed

    Baombe, Janos P; Ford, Rebecca

    2016-07-01

    A shortcut review of the literature was carried out to establish whether the use of fluoroquinolones was associated with an increased risk of tendinopathy in adult patients. 10 trials were found to be directly relevant to the three-part question. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of these papers are tabulated. The clinical bottom line is that there is an association between the use of fluoroquinolones and a broad range of tendinopathies. PMID:27330182

  18. SOS response and its regulation on the fluoroquinolone resistance

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Ting-Ting; Kang, Hai-Quan; Ma, Ping; Li, Peng-Peng; Huang, Lin-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria can survive fluoroquinolone antibiotics (FQs) treatment by becoming resistant through a genetic change—mutation or gene acquisition. The SOS response is widespread among bacteria and exhibits considerable variation in its composition and regulation, which is repressed by LexA protein and derepressed by RecA protein. Here, we take a comprehensive review of the SOS gene network and its regulation on the fluoroquinolone resistance. As a unique survival mechanism, SOS may be an important factor influencing the outcome of antibiotic therapy in vivo. PMID:26807413

  19. Can astronomy enhance UNESCO World Heritage recognition? The paradigm of 4th Dynasty Egyptian pyramids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmonte, Juan Antonio

    2015-08-01

    The pyramids of Egypt, notably those of the 4th Dinasty as Giza, have always be considered an unmistikable part of human world heritage as the only surviving wonders of the Ancient World. Their majesty, technical hability and innovative character have always beeen considered as representative of ancient Egyptian ingenuity. However, past and present fringe theories about the pyramids and astronomy have always polluted the role of our discipline in the design, construction and symbolism of these impressive monuments. This is indeed unfear. Fortunately, things have started to change in the last couple of decades and now astronomy is interpreted as a neccessary tool for the correct interpretation of the astral eschatology present in the 5th and 6th Dynasty Texts of the Pyramids. Although the pyramid complexes of the 4th Dynasty are mute, there is however recent research showing that a strong astral symbolism could be hidden in many aspects of the complex architecture and in the design of these exceptional monuments. This idea comes from several hints obtained not only from planning and construction, but also from epigraphy and the analysis of celestial and local landscapes. Chronology also plays a most relevant role on this. The pyramid complexes of the 4th Dynasty at Meidum, Dahshur, Giza and Abu Rowash -- all of which enjoy UNESCO World Heritage recognition -- willl be scrutinized. As a consequence, we will show how astronomy can certainly enhance the face value of these extraordinary monuments as a definitive proof of the ancient Egyptian quest for Ma'at, i.e. their perennial obsesion for Cosmic Order.

  20. Proceedings of the 4th International Conference and Exhibition: World Congress on Superconductivity, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, Kumar (Editor); Burnham, Calvin (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The papers presented at the 4th International Conference Exhibition: World Congress on Superconductivity held at the Marriott Orlando World Center, Orlando, Florida, are contained in this document and encompass the research, technology, applications, funding, political, and social aspects of superconductivity. Specifically, the areas covered included: high-temperature materials; thin films; C-60 based superconductors; persistent magnetic fields and shielding; fabrication methodology; space applications; physical applications; performance characterization; device applications; weak link effects and flux motion; accelerator technology; superconductivity energy; storage; future research and development directions; medical applications; granular superconductors; wire fabrication technology; computer applications; technical and commercial challenges, and power and energy applications.

  1. miR-155 Inhibition Sensitizes CD4+ Th Cells for TREG Mediated Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Rust, Werner; Labhart, Paul; Alexiadis, Vassili; Becker, Christian; Hafner, Mathias; Weith, Andreas; Lenter, Martin C.; Jonuleit, Helmut; Schmitt, Edgar; Mennerich, Detlev

    2009-01-01

    Background In humans and mice naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (nTregs) are a thymus-derived subset of T cells, crucial for the maintenance of peripheral tolerance by controlling not only potentially autoreactive T cells but virtually all cells of the adaptive and innate immune system. Recent work using Dicer-deficient mice irrevocably demonstrated the importance of miRNAs for nTreg cell-mediated tolerance. Principal Findings DNA-Microarray analyses of human as well as murine conventional CD4+ Th cells and nTregs revealed a strong up-regulation of mature miR-155 (microRNA-155) upon activation in both populations. Studying miR-155 expression in FoxP3-deficient scurfy mice and performing FoxP3 ChIP-Seq experiments using activated human T lymphocytes, we show that the expression and maturation of miR-155 seem to be not necessarily regulated by FoxP3. In order to address the functional relevance of elevated miR-155 levels, we transfected miR-155 inhibitors or mature miR-155 RNAs into freshly-isolated human and mouse primary CD4+ Th cells and nTregs and investigated the resulting phenotype in nTreg suppression assays. Whereas miR-155 inhibition in conventional CD4+ Th cells strengthened nTreg cell-mediated suppression, overexpression of mature miR-155 rendered these cells unresponsive to nTreg cell-mediated suppression. Conclusion Investigation of FoxP3 downstream targets, certainly of bound and regulated miRNAs revealed the associated function between the master regulator FoxP3 and miRNAs as regulators itself. miR-155 is shown to be crucially involved in nTreg cell mediated tolerance by regulating the susceptibility of conventional human as well as murine CD4+ Th cells to nTreg cell-mediated suppression. PMID:19777054

  2. Proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on Tritium Effects in Plasma Facing Components

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Causey

    1999-02-01

    The 4th International Workshop on Tritium Effects in Plasma Facing Components was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 14-15, 1998. This workshop occurs every two years, and has previously been held in Livermore/California, Nagoya/Japan, and the JRC-Ispra Site in Italy. The purpose of the workshop is to gather researchers involved in the topic of tritium migration, retention, and recycling in materials used to line magnetic fusion reactor walls and provide a forum for presentation and discussions in this area. This document provides an overall summary of the workshop, the workshop agenda, a summary of the presentations, and a list of attendees.

  3. The ratio of 2nd to 4th digit length: a new predictor of disease predisposition?

    PubMed

    Manning, J T; Bundred, P E

    2000-05-01

    The ratio between the length of the 2nd and 4th digits is: (a) fixed in utero; (b) lower in men than in women; (c) negatively related to testosterone and sperm counts; and (d) positively related to oestrogen concentrations. Prenatal levels of testosterone and oestrogen have been implicated in infertility, autism, dyslexia, migraine, stammering, immune dysfunction, myocardial infarction and breast cancer. We suggest that 2D:4D ratio is predictive of these diseases and may be used in diagnosis, prognosis and in early life-style interventions which may delay the onset of disease or facilitate its early detection. PMID:10859702

  4. Proceedings of the 4th International Conference and Exhibition: World Congress on Superconductivity, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, Kumar (Editor); Burnham, Calvin (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This document contains papers presented at the 4th International Conference Exhibition: World Congress on Superconductivity held June 27-July 1, 1994 in Orlando, Florida. These documents encompass research, technology, applications, funding, political, and social aspects of superconductivity. The areas covered included: high-temperature materials; thin films; C-60 based superconductors; persistent magnetic fields and shielding; fabrication methodology; space applications; physical applications; performance characterization; device applications; weak link effects and flux motion; accelerator technology; superconductivity energy; storage; future research and development directions; medical applications; granular superconductors; wire fabrication technology; computer applications; technical and commercial challenges; and power and energy applications.

  5. Multi-Dimensional Asymptotically Stable 4th Order Accurate Schemes for the Diffusion Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abarbanel, Saul; Ditkowski, Adi

    1996-01-01

    An algorithm is presented which solves the multi-dimensional diffusion equation on co mplex shapes to 4th-order accuracy and is asymptotically stable in time. This bounded-error result is achieved by constructing, on a rectangular grid, a differentiation matrix whose symmetric part is negative definite. The differentiation matrix accounts for the Dirichlet boundary condition by imposing penalty like terms. Numerical examples in 2-D show that the method is effective even where standard schemes, stable by traditional definitions fail.

  6. Spiritual Health Scale 2011: Defining and Measuring 4th Dimension of Health

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Neera; Chaturvedi, SK; Nandan, Deoki

    2011-01-01

    In the midst of physical comforts provided by the unprecedented developments in all spheres of life, the humanity is at cross roads and looking at something beyond these means. Spirituality has now been identified globally as an important aspect for providing answers to many questions related to health and happiness. The World Health Organization is also keen at looking beyond physical, mental and social dimensions of the health, and the member countries are actively exploring the 4th Dimension of the health i.e. the spiritual health and its impact on the overall health and happiness of an individual. National Institute of Health and Family Welfare (NIHFW), realized this need and initiated a research study in this direction. In this study, an effort was made to define this 4th Dimension of health from a common worldly person's perspective and measure it. 3 Domains, 6 Constructs and 27 Determinants of spiritual health were identified through a scientific process. A statistically reliable and valid Spiritual Health Scale (SHS 2011) containing 114 items has been developed. Construct validity and test- retest reliability has been established for urban educated adult population. The scale is first of its kind in the world to measure the spiritual health of a common worldly person, which is devoid of religious and cultural bias. Its items have universal applicability. PMID:22279257

  7. Computational aspects of the nonlinear normal mode initialization of the GLAS 4th order GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navon, I. M.; Bloom, S. C.; Takacs, L.

    1984-01-01

    Using the normal modes of the GLAS 4th Order Model, a Machenhauer nonlinear normal mode initialization (NLNMI) was carried out for the external vertical mode using the GLAS 4th Order shallow water equations model for an equivalent depth corresponding to that associated with the external vertical mode. A simple procedure was devised which was directed at identifying computational modes by following the rate of increase of BAL sub M, the partial (with respect to the zonal wavenumber m) sum of squares of the time change of the normal mode coefficients (for fixed vertical mode index) varying over the latitude index L of symmetric or antisymmetric gravity waves. A working algorithm is presented which speeds up the convergence of the iterative Machenhauer NLNMI. A 24 h integration using the NLNMI state was carried out using both Matsuno and leap-frog time-integration schemes; these runs were then compared to a 24 h integration starting from a non-initialized state. The maximal impact of the nonlinear normal mode initialization was found to occur 6-10 hours after the initial time.

  8. PREFACE: 4th International Conference on Mathematical Modeling in Physical Sciences (IC-MSquare2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachos, Dimitrios; Vagenas, Elias C.

    2015-09-01

    The 4th International Conference on Mathematical Modeling in Physical Sciences (IC-MSQUARE) took place in Mykonos, Greece, from Friday 5th June to Monday 8th June 2015. The Conference was attended by more than 150 participants and hosted about 200 oral, poster, and virtual presentations. There were more than 600 pre-registered authors. The 4th IC-MSQUARE consisted of different and diverging workshops and thus covered various research fields where Mathematical Modeling is used, such as Theoretical/Mathematical Physics, Neutrino Physics, Non-Integrable Systems, Dynamical Systems, Computational Nanoscience, Biological Physics, Computational Biomechanics, Complex Networks, Stochastic Modeling, Fractional Statistics, DNA Dynamics, Macroeconomics etc. The scientific program was rather intense as after the Keynote and Invited Talks in the morning, three parallel oral and one poster session were running every day. However, according to all attendees, the program was excellent with a high quality of talks creating an innovative and productive scientific environment for all attendees. We would like to thank the Keynote Speaker and the Invited Speakers for their significant contribution to IC-MSQUARE. We also would like to thank the Members of the International Advisory and Scientific Committees as well as the Members of the Organizing Committee.

  9. Crime rates and sedentary behavior among 4th grade Texas school children

    PubMed Central

    Brown, H Shelton; Pérez, Adriana; Mirchandani, Gita G; Hoelscher, Deanna M; Kelder, Steven H

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Although per capita crime has generally fallen over the period which coincides with the obesity epidemic, it has not fallen uniformly across communities. It also has not fallen enough to allay fears on the part of parents. Over the past 30 years, technological changes have made the indoor alternatives to playing outside, where children are more vulnerable to criminal activity, more enjoyable (cable TV, video games, and the internet) and comfortable (the spread of air conditioning to low income neighborhoods). We determined whether indoor sedentary behavior patterns are associated with community crime statistics. 4th graders in the U.S. are typically 9 or 10 years old. Methods We used data from the 2004–2005 Texas School Physical Activity and Nutrition (SPAN) survey linked with U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics data for the years 2000 through 2005 and Texas State data on sexual offenders. The probability-based sample included a total of 7,907 children in grade four. Multistage probability sampling weights were used. The dependent variables included were hours of TV watching, video game playing, computer use and total indoor sedentary behavior after school. Incremental Relative Rates were computed for community crime rates including robberies, all violent crimes, murders, assaults, property crimes, rapes, burglaries, larcenies and motor vehicle thefts as well as for sexual offenders living in the neighborhood. The neighborhood refers to the areas where the students at each school live. In the case of sexual offenders, sexual offenders per capita are estimated using the per capita rate in the zip code of the school attended; all other crime statistics are estimated by the crimes per capita in the police department jurisdiction covering the school attended. After controlling for sex, age, and African-American and Hispanic, cross-sectional associations were determined using multivariate Poisson regression

  10. Crystal structure and stability of gyrase-fluoroquinolone cleaved complexes from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Blower, Tim R; Williamson, Benjamin H; Kerns, Robert J; Berger, James M

    2016-02-16

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infects one-third of the world's population and in 2013 accounted for 1.5 million deaths. Fluoroquinolone antibacterials, which target DNA gyrase, are critical agents used to halt the progression from multidrug-resistant tuberculosis to extensively resistant disease; however, fluoroquinolone resistance is emerging and new ways to bypass resistance are required. To better explain known differences in fluoroquinolone action, the crystal structures of the WT Mtb DNA gyrase cleavage core and a fluoroquinolone-sensitized mutant were determined in complex with DNA and five fluoroquinolones. The structures, ranging from 2.4- to 2.6-Å resolution, show that the intrinsically low susceptibility of Mtb to fluoroquinolones correlates with a reduction in contacts to the water shell of an associated magnesium ion, which bridges fluoroquinolone-gyrase interactions. Surprisingly, the structural data revealed few differences in fluoroquinolone-enzyme contacts from drugs that have very different activities against Mtb. By contrast, a stability assay using purified components showed a clear relationship between ternary complex reversibility and inhibitory activities reported with cultured cells. Collectively, our data indicate that the stability of fluoroquinolone/DNA interactions is a major determinant of fluoroquinolone activity and that moieties that have been appended to the C7 position of different quinolone scaffolds do not take advantage of specific contacts that might be made with the enzyme. These concepts point to new approaches for developing quinolone-class compounds that have increased potency against Mtb and the ability to overcome resistance. PMID:26792525

  11. Breakthrough in cardiac arrest: reports from the 4th Paris International Conference.

    PubMed

    Kudenchuk, Peter J; Sandroni, Claudio; Drinhaus, Hendrik R; Böttiger, Bernd W; Cariou, Alain; Sunde, Kjetil; Dworschak, Martin; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Deye, Nicolas; Friberg, Hans; Laureys, Steven; Ledoux, Didier; Oddo, Mauro; Legriel, Stéphane; Hantson, Philippe; Diehl, Jean-Luc; Laterre, Pierre-Francois

    2015-12-01

    Jean-Luc Diehl The French Intensive Care Society organized on 5th and 6th June 2014 its 4th "Paris International Conference in Intensive Care", whose principle is to bring together the best international experts on a hot topic in critical care medicine. The 2014 theme was "Breakthrough in cardiac arrest", with many high-quality updates on epidemiology, public health data, pre-hospital and in-ICU cares. The present review includes short summaries of the major presentations, classified into six main chapters: Epidemiology of CA Pre-hospital management Post-resuscitation management: targeted temperature management Post-resuscitation management: optimizing organ perfusion and metabolic parameters Neurological assessment of brain damages Public healthcare. PMID:26380990

  12. The 4th annual European League Against Rheumatism congress in Lisbon: a personal perspective

    PubMed Central

    Wollheim, Frank A

    2004-01-01

    The 4th annual European League Against Rheumatism congress, held in Lisbon, 18–21 June 2003, had a record turnout of more than 8600 delegates and the abstract submissions increased to 2600. A heat wave and a somewhat substandard venue hampered some of the activities, notably the poster sessions. The scientific program was comprehensive and of a high class, and it was organized in 10–12 parallel sessions. The European League Against Rheumatism standing committees are expanding their activities and stimulating European cooperation (e.g. by creating databases and guidelines, and by starting research programs). The standing committees presented several areas where European cooperative work is in progress. Advances in drug therapy were a prominent theme and were well presented. Commercialism remains a problem for this meeting as for other similar large meetings, where satellite symposia surround the scientific program of the congress and often duplicate this. PMID:14979931

  13. FAST DISPLACEMENT PROBABILITY PROFILE APPROXIMATION FROM HARDI USING 4TH-ORDER TENSORS.

    PubMed

    Barmpoutis, Angelos; Vemuri, Baba C; Forder, John R

    2008-05-14

    Cartesian tensor basis have been widely used to approximate spherical functions. In Medical Imaging, tensors of various orders have been used to model the diffusivity function in Diffusion-weighted MRI data sets. However, it is known that the peaks of the diffusivity do not correspond to orientations of the underlying fibers and hence the displacement probability profiles should be employed instead. In this paper, we present a novel representation of the probability profile by a 4(th) order tensor, which is a smooth spherical function that can approximate single-fibers as well as multiple-fiber structures. We also present a method for efficiently estimating the unknown tensor coefficients of the probability profile directly from a given high-angular resolution diffusion-weighted (HARDI) data set. The accuracy of our model is validated by experiments on synthetic and real HARDI datasets from a fixed rat spinal cord. PMID:20046536

  14. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Alcohol drinking and cancer.

    PubMed

    Scoccianti, Chiara; Cecchini, Michele; Anderson, Annie S; Berrino, Franco; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Espina, Carolina; Key, Timothy J; Leitzmann, Michael; Norat, Teresa; Powers, Hilary; Wiseman, Martin; Romieu, Isabelle

    2015-12-01

    Alcohol consumption is the third leading risk factor for disease and mortality in Europe. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monographs provide strengthened evidence that the consumption of alcoholic beverages is causally associated with cancers of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, oesophagus, liver, colorectum and female breast, even for low and moderate alcohol intakes. The risk of cancer increases in a dose-dependent manner, and the higher the amount of alcohol consumed, the higher the risk of developing cancer. Several biological mechanisms explain the carcinogenicity of alcohol; among them, ethanol and its genotoxic metabolite acetaldehyde play a major role. Taking all this evidence into account, a recommendation of the 4th edition of the European Code against Cancer (ECAC) is: "If you drink alcohol of any type, limit your intake. Not drinking alcohol is better for cancer prevention." PMID:26115567

  15. General Chemistry Collection for Students (CD-ROM), Abstract of Special Issue 16, 4th Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-07-01

    The General Chemistry Collection contains both new and previously published JCE Software programs that are intended for use by introductory-level chemistry students. These peer-reviewed programs for Macintosh and for Windows are available on a single CD-ROM for convenient distribution to and access by students, and the CD may be adopted for students to purchase as they would a textbook. General Chemistry Collection covers a broad range of topics providing students with interesting information, tutorials, and simulations that will be useful to them as they study chemistry for the first time. There are 22 programs included in the General Chemistry Collection 4th Edition. Their titles and the general chemistry topics they cover are listed in Table 1. Features in This Edition General Chemistry Collection, 4th edition includes:

    • Lessons for Introductory Chemistry and INQUAL-S, two new programs not previously published by JCE Software (abstracts appear below)
    • Writing Electron Dot Structures (1) and Viscosity Measurement: A Virtual Experiment for Windows (2), two programs published individually by JCE Software
    • Periodic Table Live! LE, a limited edition of Periodic Table Live!, 2nd Edition (3) (this replaces Chemistry Navigator (4) and Illustrated Periodic Table (5))
    • Many of the programs from previous editions (6)1
    Hardware and Software Requirements System requirements are given in Table 2. Some programs have additional requirements. See the individual program abstracts at JCE Online, or documentation included on the CD-ROM for more specific information. Licensing and Discounts for Adoptions The General Chemistry Collection is intended for use by individual students. Institutions and faculty members may adopt General Chemistry Collection 4th Edition as they would a textbook. We can arrange for CDs to be packaged with laboratory manuals or other course materials or to be sold for direct distribution to students through the campus

  16. Report on the 4th International IUPAP Women in Physics Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Cynthia

    2011-10-01

    Stellenbosch, South Africa was the site of the 4^th International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) International Conference on Women in Physics, which took place on April 5^th-8^th. This conference brought together the diverse contributions of 250 female physicist attendees from nearly 60 countries worldwide to dissect the challenges faced by female physicists worldwide and to propose strategies to attract and retain more girls and women to the field. Having served as a member of the U.S. Delegation, I will discuss the resolutions reached and highlight the most important results of Global Survey of Physicists, where nearly 15,000 physicists shine light on how gender affects their lives and careers.

  17. SOS Response Induces Persistence to Fluoroquinolones in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Dörr, Tobias; Lewis, Kim; Vulić, Marin

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria can survive antibiotic treatment without acquiring heritable antibiotic resistance. We investigated persistence to the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin in Escherichia coli. Our data show that a majority of persisters to ciprofloxacin were formed upon exposure to the antibiotic, in a manner dependent on the SOS gene network. These findings reveal an active and inducible mechanism of persister formation mediated by the SOS response, challenging the prevailing view that persisters are pre-existing and formed purely by stochastic means. SOS-induced persistence is a novel mechanism by which cells can counteract DNA damage and promote survival to fluoroquinolones. This unique survival mechanism may be an important factor influencing the outcome of antibiotic therapy in vivo. PMID:20011100

  18. Structure-Activity Relationship of Fluoroquinolones Against K. pneumoniae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-hong; Zhang, Rui-zhou; Cheng, Xin-lu; Yang, Xiang-dong

    2007-04-01

    The structure-activity relationship of fluoroquinolones, which show anti-K. pneumoniae activity, was studied by using principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). The PCA results showed that the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy, energy difference between the highest occupied and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, dipole moment, net atomic charge on atom I, molecular polarizability, partition coefficient and molecular refractivity of these compounds are responsible for the separation between high-activity and low-activity groups. The HCA results were similar to those obtained with PCA. By using the chemometric results, four synthetic compounds were analyzed through PCA and HCA, and three of them are proposed as active molecules against K. pneumoniae which is consistent with the results of clinical experiments. The methodologies of PCA and HCA provide a reliable rule for classifying new fluoroquinolones with anti-K. pneumoniae activity.

  19. Report of the 4th World Climate Research Programme International Conference on Reanalyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Rixen, Michel; van Oevelen, Peter; Asrar, Ghassem; Compo, Gilbert; Onogi, Kazutoshi; Simmons, Adrian; Trenberth, Kevin; Behringer, Dave; Bhuiyan, Tanvir Hossain; Capps, Shannon; Chaudhuri, Ayan; Chen, Junye; Chen, Linling; Colasacco-Thumm, Nicole; Escobar, Maria Gabriela; Ferguson, Craig R.; Ishibashi, Toshiyuki; Liberato, Margarida L. R.; Meng, Jesse; Molod, Andrea; Poli, Paul; Roundy, Joshua; Willett, Kate; Wollen, Jack

    2012-01-01

    The 4th WCRP International Conference on Reanalyses provided an opportunity for the international community to review and discuss the observational and modelling research, as well as process studies and uncertainties associated with reanalysis of the Earth System and its components. Characterizing the uncertainty and quality of reanalyses is a task that reaches far beyond the international community of producers, and into the interdisciplinary research community, especially those using reanalysis products in their research and applications. Reanalyses have progressed greatly even in the last 5 years, and newer ideas, projects and data are coming forward. While reanalysis has typically been carried out for the individual domains of atmosphere, ocean and land, it is now moving towards coupling using Earth system models. Observations are being reprocessed and they are providing improved quality for use in reanalysis. New applications are being investigated, and the need for climate reanalyses is as strong as ever. At the heart of it all, new investigators are exploring the possibilities for reanalysis, and developing new ideas in research and applications. Given the many centres creating reanalyses products (e.g. ocean, land and cryosphere research centres as well as NWP and atmospheric centers), and the development of new ideas (e.g. families of reanalyses), the total number of reanalyses is increasing greatly, with new and innovative diagnostics and output data. The need for reanalysis data is growing steadily, and likewise, the need for open discussion and comment on the data. The 4th Conference was convened to provide a forum for constructive discussion on the objectives, strengths and weaknesses of reanalyses, indicating potential development paths for the future.

  20. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Medical exposures, including hormone therapy, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Friis, Søren; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Espina, Carolina; Auvinen, Anssi; Straif, Kurt; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    The 4th edition of the European Code against Cancer recommends limiting - or avoiding when possible - the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) because of the increased risk of cancer, nevertheless acknowledging that prescription of HRT may be indicated under certain medical conditions. Current evidence shows that HRT, generally prescribed as menopausal hormone therapy, is associated with an increased risk of cancers of the breast, endometrium, and ovary, with the risk pattern depending on factors such as the type of therapy (oestrogen-only or combined oestrogen-progestogen), duration of treatment, and initiation according to the time of menopause. Carcinogenicity has also been established for anti-neoplastic agents used in cancer therapy, immunosuppressants, oestrogen-progestogen contraceptives, and tamoxifen. Medical use of ionising radiation, an established carcinogen, can provide major health benefits; however, prudent practices need to be in place, with procedures and techniques providing the needed diagnostic information or therapeutic gain with the lowest possible radiation exposure. For pharmaceutical drugs and medical radiation exposure with convincing evidence on their carcinogenicity, health benefits have to be balanced against the risks; potential increases in long-term cancer risk should be considered in the context of the often substantial and immediate health benefits from diagnosis and/or treatment. Thus, apart from HRT, no general recommendations on reducing cancer risk were given for carcinogenic drugs and medical radiation in the 4th edition of European Code against Cancer. It is crucial that the application of these measures relies on medical expertise and thorough benefit-risk evaluation. This also pertains to cancer-preventive drugs, and self-medication with aspirin or other potential chemopreventive drugs is strongly discouraged because of the possibility of serious, potentially lethal, adverse events. PMID:26390952

  1. Food-based Science Curriculum Increases 4(th) Graders Multidisciplinary Science Knowledge.

    PubMed

    Hovland, Jana A; Carraway-Stage, Virginia G; Cela, Artenida; Collins, Caitlin; Díaz, Sebastián R; Collins, Angelo; Duffrin, Melani W

    2013-10-01

    Health professionals and policymakers are asking educators to place more emphasis on food and nutrition education. Integrating these topics into science curricula using hand-on, food-based activities may strengthen students' understanding of science concepts. The Food, Math, and Science Teaching Enhancement Resource (FoodMASTER) Initiative is a compilation of programs aimed at using food as a tool to teach mathematics and science. Previous studies have shown that students experiencing the FoodMASTER curriculum were very excited about the activities, became increasingly interested in the subject matter of food, and were able to conduct scientific observations. The purpose of this study was to: 1) assess 4(th) graders food-related multidisciplinary science knowledge, and 2) compare gains in food-related science knowledge after implementation of an integrated, food-based curriculum. During the 2009-2010 school year, FoodMASTER researchers implemented a hands-on, food-based intermediate curriculum in eighteen 4(th) grade classrooms in Ohio (n=9) and North Carolina (n=9). Sixteen classrooms in Ohio (n=8) and North Carolina (n=8), following their standard science curricula, served as comparison classrooms. Students completed a researcher-developed science knowledge exam, consisting of 13 multiple-choice questions administered pre- and post-test. Only subjects with pre- and post-test scores were entered into the sample (Intervention n=343; Control n=237). No significant differences were observed between groups at pre-test. At post-test, the intervention group scored (9.95±2.00) significantly higher (p=.000) than the control group (8.84±2.37) on a 13-point scale. These findings suggest the FoodMASTER intermediate curriculum is more effective than a standard science curriculum in increasing students' multidisciplinary science knowledge related to food. PMID:25152539

  2. Food-based Science Curriculum Increases 4th Graders Multidisciplinary Science Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Hovland, Jana A.; Carraway-Stage, Virginia G.; Cela, Artenida; Collins, Caitlin; Díaz, Sebastián R.; Collins, Angelo; Duffrin, Melani W.

    2013-01-01

    Health professionals and policymakers are asking educators to place more emphasis on food and nutrition education. Integrating these topics into science curricula using hand-on, food-based activities may strengthen students’ understanding of science concepts. The Food, Math, and Science Teaching Enhancement Resource (FoodMASTER) Initiative is a compilation of programs aimed at using food as a tool to teach mathematics and science. Previous studies have shown that students experiencing the FoodMASTER curriculum were very excited about the activities, became increasingly interested in the subject matter of food, and were able to conduct scientific observations. The purpose of this study was to: 1) assess 4th graders food-related multidisciplinary science knowledge, and 2) compare gains in food-related science knowledge after implementation of an integrated, food-based curriculum. During the 2009–2010 school year, FoodMASTER researchers implemented a hands-on, food-based intermediate curriculum in eighteen 4th grade classrooms in Ohio (n=9) and North Carolina (n=9). Sixteen classrooms in Ohio (n=8) and North Carolina (n=8), following their standard science curricula, served as comparison classrooms. Students completed a researcher-developed science knowledge exam, consisting of 13 multiple-choice questions administered pre- and post-test. Only subjects with pre- and post-test scores were entered into the sample (Intervention n=343; Control n=237). No significant differences were observed between groups at pre-test. At post-test, the intervention group scored (9.95±2.00) significantly higher (p=.000) than the control group (8.84±2.37) on a 13-point scale. These findings suggest the FoodMASTER intermediate curriculum is more effective than a standard science curriculum in increasing students’ multidisciplinary science knowledge related to food. PMID:25152539

  3. Fluoroquinolone-gyrase-DNA complexes: two modes of drug binding.

    PubMed

    Mustaev, Arkady; Malik, Muhammad; Zhao, Xilin; Kurepina, Natalia; Luan, Gan; Oppegard, Lisa M; Hiasa, Hiroshi; Marks, Kevin R; Kerns, Robert J; Berger, James M; Drlica, Karl

    2014-05-01

    DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV control bacterial DNA topology by breaking DNA, passing duplex DNA through the break, and then resealing the break. This process is subject to reversible corruption by fluoroquinolones, antibacterials that form drug-enzyme-DNA complexes in which the DNA is broken. The complexes, called cleaved complexes because of the presence of DNA breaks, have been crystallized and found to have the fluoroquinolone C-7 ring system facing the GyrB/ParE subunits. As expected from x-ray crystallography, a thiol-reactive, C-7-modified chloroacetyl derivative of ciprofloxacin (Cip-AcCl) formed cross-linked cleaved complexes with mutant GyrB-Cys(466) gyrase as evidenced by resistance to reversal by both EDTA and thermal treatments. Surprisingly, cross-linking was also readily seen with complexes formed by mutant GyrA-G81C gyrase, thereby revealing a novel drug-gyrase interaction not observed in crystal structures. The cross-link between fluoroquinolone and GyrA-G81C gyrase correlated with exceptional bacteriostatic activity for Cip-AcCl with a quinolone-resistant GyrA-G81C variant of Escherichia coli and its Mycobacterium smegmatis equivalent (GyrA-G89C). Cip-AcCl-mediated, irreversible inhibition of DNA replication provided further evidence for a GyrA-drug cross-link. Collectively these data establish the existence of interactions between the fluoroquinolone C-7 ring and both GyrA and GyrB. Because the GyrA-Gly(81) and GyrB-Glu(466) residues are far apart (17 Å) in the crystal structure of cleaved complexes, two modes of quinolone binding must exist. The presence of two binding modes raises the possibility that multiple quinolone-enzyme-DNA complexes can form, a discovery that opens new avenues for exploring and exploiting relationships between drug structure and activity with type II DNA topoisomerases. PMID:24497635

  4. Fluoroquinolone Therapy in Staphylococcus aureus Infections: Where Do We Stand?

    PubMed Central

    Gade, Neeta D; Qazi, Mohiuddin S

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The study aimed to evaluate the utility of various commonly used fluoroquinolones against Staphylococcus aureus isolates. Materials and Methods: A total of 250 isolates of S. aureus were studied from different clinical specimens like blood, pus, wound swabs, sputum, ear swabs, and body fluids between November 2009 and December 2011. All the isolates were tested for their susceptibility to fluoroquinolones and other antimicrobial agents by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method using criteria of standard zone of inhibition. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) detection was done by cefoxitin disk diffusion method. The MRSA isolates were tested for minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) to vancomycin by E-test strips. All the MRSA strains were sent to National Staphylococcal Phage-typing Centre, Maulana Azad Medical College, New Delhi for phage typing. Results: A total of 107 strains of S. aureus (42.8%) were detected as MRSA. Multidrug resistance was observed among the MRSA strains more commonly than among the MSSA stains. Among the fluoroquinolones, maximum resistance in MRSA was seen to ciprofloxacin (92.5%), followed by ofloxacin (80.4%). None of the S. aureus isolates showed resistance to vancomycin and linezolid. The MICs of vancomycin for the MRSA tested ranged from 0.5 to 2 μg/ml. Phage typing pattern of 107 MRSA isolates revealed that 37 (34.6%) MRSA isolates were nontypeable and 70 (65.4%) were typeable. Conclusion: Ciprofloxacin can no longer be used in empirical therapy against MRSA infections. Use of other members of fluoroquinolone should be limited only to those strains that show laboratory confirmation of their susceptibility. Vancomycin remains the drug of choice to treat MRSA infections. PMID:24701103

  5. Gatifloxacin, gemifloxacin, and moxifloxacin: the role of 3 newer fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Saravolatz, Louis D; Leggett, James

    2003-11-01

    Gatifloxacin, gemifloxacin, and moxifloxacin are the newest fluoroquinolones and show excellent in vitro activity against a wide variety of respiratory tract pathogens, many gram-negative aerobic organisms, and Bacteroides fragilis. These agents may be administered as oral and/or intravenous formulations with excellent bioavailability. The pharmacodynamics of these 3 new fluoroquinolones is more favorable than that of levofloxacin or ciprofloxacin for Streptococcus pneumoniae. All 3 agents are approved for the treatment of acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis and community-acquired pneumonia. In addition, gatifloxacin and moxifloxacin are approved for the treatment of sinusitis. The toxicity of these 3 agents appears to be similar to that of the other fluoroquinolones in terms of gastrointestinal and central nervous system disturbances. All 3 agents have a low risk of phototoxicity, but gemifloxacin is associated with an increased risk of skin rash that is not a photoreaction. These agents can be useful for treatment of bacterial respiratory tract infections in patients who are allergic to beta-lactams, but caution must be exercised to avoid the potential for selection of widespread resistance, which may occur with indiscriminate use. PMID:14557966

  6. PREFACE: 4th International Conference on Safe Production and Use of Nanomaterials (Nanosafe2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tardif, F.; Damlencourt, J.-F.; Schuster, F.; Gaultier, V.

    2015-05-01

    This volume contains a collection of contributions presented at the 4th International Conference on Safe Production and Use of Nanomaterials (NANOSAFE 2014) held in Grenoble, France, from 18th to 20th November 2014. The issues of fast progress in the field of Nanosafety are up to the potential benefits that nanotechnology can bring to mankind. Making more efficient - more sustainable - easier to share mineral resources, increasing the yields of new energy technologies, enabling drugs that act selectively and locally are just few examples of the wide range of nanomaterial applications that currently benefit humanity. Nevertheless, the dynamic development of nanomaterials requires the adhesion from the general public who rightly demand major progresses in Nanosafety as a prerequisite. This is our exciting responsibility and challenge! Following the successful outcome of the three past international conferences on safe production and use of nanomaterials: Nanosafe 2008, 2010 and 2012, the organizing committee has the pleasure to welcoming you again to Minatec, Grenoble with some of the most famous specialists in the field. This year, two new topics have been added dealing with the "New Application of Nanomaterials" and "Nano-responsible Development" in addition to the usual issues addressed in previous Nanosafe conferences such as Expology, Detection and Characterization, Toxicology, Environmental Interactions, Nanomaterials Release, Life Cycle Analysis, Regulation and Standardization, Risk Management. The debates in 2012 proved highly successful so this formula has been kept in 2014 with 3 round tables: Nano-Responsible Development, Risks and Benefits for the Environment, Toxicology Progress. In this 4th edition, there were more than 330 registered participants from 28 different countries including 160 oral presentation covering the whole Nanosafety issues in 12 sessions, satellite workshops and round tables. This high number of participants makes this edition one of

  7. Cutting orientations for non-complex parts in 4th axis machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman Zahid, M. N.; Case, K.; Watts, D. M.

    2016-02-01

    The application of Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) machining for Rapid Manufacturing processes (CNC-RM) exploits the innate potential of 4th axis machining. The use of an indexer allows the workpiece to be rotated to various orientations which directly increased the region accessible to the cutting tool. However, in order to avoid thin webs and preserve tool life, cutting must be executed with a minimum of three orientations even for geometrically simple parts. Recent findings have suggested the separation of cutting orientations into roughing and finishing operations. Thus, the selection of orientations in finishing processes becomes more flexible and independent. This study was conducted to identify the effects of using a minimum of two cutting orientations in finishing operations for CNC-RM applications. This method is only applicable for non-complex parts where all the features can be machined from two directions. The results of the study illustrate the positive effects of minimizing the number of orientations. Despite improvement in machining operations, the complexity in defining the cutting orientations was also reduced.

  8. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Ionising and non-ionising radiation and cancer.

    PubMed

    McColl, Neil; Auvinen, Anssi; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Espina, Carolina; Erdmann, Friederike; de Vries, Esther; Greinert, Rüdiger; Harrison, John; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Ionising radiation can transfer sufficient energy to ionise molecules, and this can lead to chemical changes, including DNA damage in cells. Key evidence for the carcinogenicity of ionising radiation comes from: follow-up studies of the survivors of the atomic bombings in Japan; other epidemiological studies of groups that have been exposed to radiation from medical, occupational or environmental sources; experimental animal studies; and studies of cellular responses to radiation. Considering exposure to environmental ionising radiation, inhalation of naturally occurring radon is the major source of radiation in the population - in doses orders of magnitude higher than those from nuclear power production or nuclear fallout. Indoor exposure to radon and its decay products is an important cause of lung cancer; radon may cause approximately one in ten lung cancers in Europe. Exposures to radon in buildings can be reduced via a three-step process of identifying those with potentially elevated radon levels, measuring radon levels, and reducing exposure by installation of remediation systems. In the 4th Edition of the European Code against Cancer it is therefore recommended to: "Find out if you are exposed to radiation from naturally high radon levels in your home. Take action to reduce high radon levels". Non-ionising types of radiation (those with insufficient energy to ionise molecules) - including extremely low-frequency electric and magnetic fields as well as radiofrequency electromagnetic fields - are not an established cause of cancer and are therefore not addressed in the recommendations to reduce cancer risk. PMID:26126928

  9. PREFACE: 4th National Conference on Processing and Characterization of Materials (NCPCM 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-02-01

    This volume contains selected full length technical papers amongst forty oral presentations made in the 4th National Conference on Processing and Characterization of Materials (NCPCM 2014), NIT Rourkela, Rourkela, Odisha, India, December 5 - 6, 2014. The first conference of the NCPCM series was held at the same place in December 2011. Seeing the enthusiasm of the participants, it was decided to organize such conference in Rourkela every year. The basic idea was to establish a periodical national forum for multi-scale approaches in processing and characterization of materials in the eastern part of India. The conference NCPCM 2014 has successfully carried the tradition of previous conferences; more than fifty participants from twenty different organizations across India have registered. The conference was consisted of six technical sessions of about fifty contributory talks along with three keynote lectures. A metallography contest was also organized during the event. Out of these, thirty four best peer-reviewed contributions are published in this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. We would like to thank all the contributors, members of the organizing committee, session chairs as well as colleagues and students who helped with the preparation of the conference and, particularly, with the preparation of this volume. We convey our heartiest gratitude to the sponsors and advertisers for their contribution.

  10. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: 12 ways to reduce your cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Schüz, Joachim; Espina, Carolina; Villain, Patricia; Herrero, Rolando; Leon, Maria E; Minozzi, Silvia; Romieu, Isabelle; Segnan, Nereo; Wardle, Jane; Wiseman, Martin; Belardelli, Filippo; Bettcher, Douglas; Cavalli, Franco; Galea, Gauden; Lenoir, Gilbert; Martin-Moreno, Jose M; Nicula, Florian Alexandru; Olsen, Jørgen H; Patnick, Julietta; Primic-Zakelj, Maja; Puska, Pekka; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Wiestler, Otmar; Zatonski, Witold

    2015-12-01

    This overview describes the principles of the 4th edition of the European Code against Cancer and provides an introduction to the 12 recommendations to reduce cancer risk. Among the 504.6 million inhabitants of the member states of the European Union (EU28), there are annually 2.64 million new cancer cases and 1.28 million deaths from cancer. It is estimated that this cancer burden could be reduced by up to one half if scientific knowledge on causes of cancer could be translated into successful prevention. The Code is a preventive tool aimed to reduce the cancer burden by informing people how to avoid or reduce carcinogenic exposures, adopt behaviours to reduce the cancer risk, or to participate in organised intervention programmes. The Code should also form a base to guide national health policies in cancer prevention. The 12 recommendations are: not smoking or using other tobacco products; avoiding second-hand smoke; being a healthy body weight; encouraging physical activity; having a healthy diet; limiting alcohol consumption, with not drinking alcohol being better for cancer prevention; avoiding too much exposure to ultraviolet radiation; avoiding cancer-causing agents at the workplace; reducing exposure to high levels of radon; encouraging breastfeeding; limiting the use of hormone replacement therapy; participating in organised vaccination programmes against hepatitis B for newborns and human papillomavirus for girls; and participating in organised screening programmes for bowel cancer, breast cancer, and cervical cancer. PMID:26164654

  11. 4th-International Symposium on Ultrafast Surface Science - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hrvoje Petek

    2005-01-26

    The 4-th International Symposium on Ultrafast Surface Dynamics (UDS4) was held at the Telluride Summer Research Center on June 22-27, 2003. The International Organizing Committee consisting of Hrvoje Petek (USA), Xiaoyang Zhu (USA), Pedro Echenique (Spain) and Maki Kawai (Japan) brought together a total of 51 participants 16 of whom were from Europe, 10 from Japan, and 25 from the USA. The focus of the conference was on ultrafast electron or light induced processes at well-defined surfaces. Ultrafast surface dynamics concerns the transfer of charge and energy at solid surfaces on the femtosecond time scale. These processes govern rates of fundamental steps in surface reactions, interfacial electron transfer in molecular electronics, and relaxation in spin transport. Recent developments in femtosecond laser technology make it possible to measure by a variety of nonlinear optical techniques directly in the time domain the microscopic rates underlying these interfacial processes. Parallel progress in scanning probe microscopy makes it possible at a single molecular level to perform the vibrational and electronic spectroscopy measurements, to induce reactions with tunneling electrons, and to observe their outcome. There is no doubt that successful development in the field of ultrafast surface dynamics will contribute to many important disciplines.

  12. Continuum Kinetic Plasma Modeling Using a Conservative 4th-Order Method with AMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogman, Genia; Colella, Phillip

    2012-10-01

    When the number of particles in a Debye sphere is large, a plasma can be accurately represented by a distribution function, which can be treated as a continuous incompressible fluid in phase space. In the most general case the evolution of such a distribution function is described by the 6D Boltzmann-Maxwell partial differential equation system. To address the challenges associated with solving a 6D hyperbolic governing equation, a simpler 3D Vlasov-Poisson system is considered. A 4th-order accurate Vlasov-Poisson model has been developed in one spatial and two velocity dimensions. The governing equation is cast in conservation law form and is solved with a finite volume representation. Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is used to allow for efficient use of computational resources while maintaining desired levels of resolution. The model employs a flux limiter to remedy non-physical effects such as numerical dispersion. The model is tested on the two-stream, beam-plasma, and Dory-Guest-Harris instabilities. All results are compared with linear theory.

  13. Project ASTRO: Local Coalitions for Bringing Astronomers to 4th - 9th Grade Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    1998-05-01

    We report on Project ASTRO, an NSF and NASA funded program that now links professional and amateur astronomers with local 4th through 9th grade teachers in 10 sites around the country. Each site matches and trains about 20-25 astronomer-teacher partnerships per year, focusing on hands-on, age-appropriate activities, demonstrations of the scientific method, as well as family and community outreach. Over 10,000 copies of the project's 813-page UNIVERSE AT YOUR FINGERTIPS resource and activity notebook (published by the A.S.P) are now in use in educational institututions around the world. The project's HOW-TO-MANUAL is being used as a practical guide to establishing astronomer-teacher partnerships where no formal ASTRO site exists, and a 12-minute video explaining and demonstrating the project is also available. In each of the ten sites, a coalition of educational and scientific institutions is assisting the project with in-kind donations, publicity, personnel, training, materials, etc. We are conducting an experiment (at the behest of NSF) to see to what degree the sites can become self-supporting over time. (One site, in Salt Lake City, has already received full funding from a local foundation.) We will discuss the progress of the project and will have a variety of sample materials available, including our annotated catalog of national astronomy and space science education projects (see associated URL).

  14. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Ultraviolet radiation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Greinert, Rüdiger; de Vries, Esther; Erdmann, Friederike; Espina, Carolina; Auvinen, Anssi; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is part of the electromagnetic spectrum emitted naturally from the sun or from artificial sources such as tanning devices. Acute skin reactions induced by UVR exposure are erythema (skin reddening), or sunburn, and the acquisition of a suntan triggered by UVR-induced DNA damage. UVR exposure is the main cause of skin cancer, including cutaneous malignant melanoma, basal-cell carcinoma, and squamous-cell carcinoma. Skin cancer is the most common cancer in fair-skinned populations, and its incidence has increased steeply over recent decades. According to estimates for 2012, about 100,000 new cases of cutaneous melanoma and about 22,000 deaths from it occurred in Europe. The main mechanisms by which UVR causes cancer are well understood. Exposure during childhood appears to be particularly harmful. Exposure to UVR is a risk factor modifiable by individuals' behaviour. Excessive exposure from natural sources can be avoided by seeking shade when the sun is strongest, by wearing appropriate clothing, and by appropriately applying sunscreens if direct sunlight is unavoidable. Exposure from artificial sources can be completely avoided by not using sunbeds. Beneficial effects of sun or UVR exposure, such as for vitamin D production, can be fully achieved while still avoiding too much sun exposure and the use of sunbeds. Taking all the scientific evidence together, the recommendation of the 4th edition of the European Code Against Cancer for ultraviolet radiation is: "Avoid too much sun, especially for children. Use sun protection. Do not use sunbeds." PMID:26096748

  15. 4th annual primary care ethics conference: ethics education and lifelong learning

    PubMed Central

    Spicer, John; McKenzie-Edwards, Emma; Misselbrook, David

    2014-01-01

    Primary care ethics is a field of study that has recently found new life, with calls to establish the relevance of ethical discussion in general practice, to gather a body of literature and to carve out an intellectual space for primary care on the academic landscape of bioethics. In this report, we reflect on the key strands of the 4th primary care ethics conference held at the Royal Society of Medicine, on a theme of ethics education and lifelong learning: first, to produce insights that have relevance for policy and practice; and second, to illustrate the idea that not only is ethics relevant in primary care, but primary care is relevant in medical ethics. Core themes included the advantages and disadvantages of prescriptive ways of doing ethics in education, ethical reflection and potential risk to professional status, the need to deal with societal change and to take on board the insights gained from empirical work, whether this is about different kinds of fatherhood, or work on the causes of moral distress in healthcare workers. PMID:25949739

  16. A Teaching Model for Scaffolding 4th Grade Students' Scientific Explanation Writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hsiu-Ting; Wang, Kuo-Hua

    2014-08-01

    Improving students scientific explanations is one major goal of science education. Both writing activities and concept mapping are reported as effective strategies for enhancing student learning of science. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a teaching model, named the DCI model, which integrates a Descriptive explanation writing activity, Concept mapping, and an Interpretive explanation writing activity, is introduced in a 4th grade science class to see if it would improve students' scientific explanations and understanding. A quasi-experimental design, including a non-randomized comparison group and a pre- and post-test design, was adopted for this study. An experimental group of 25 students were taught using the DCI teaching model, while a comparison group received a traditional lecture teaching. A rubric and content analysis was used to assess students' scientific explanations. The independent sample t test was used to measure difference in conceptual understanding between the two groups, before and after instruction. Then, the paired t test analysis was used to understand the promotion of the DCI teaching model. The results showed that students in the experimental group performed better than students in the comparison group, both in scientific concept understanding and explanation. Suggestions for using concept mapping and writing activities (the DCI teaching model) in science classes are provided in this study.

  17. Need for Specific Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Lessons for 4th and 5th Graders

    PubMed Central

    Bea, Jennifer W.; Jacobs, Laurel; Waits, Juanita; Hartz, Vern; Martinez, Stephanie H.; Standfast, Rebecca D.; Farrell, Vanessa A.; Bawden, Margine; Whitmer, Evelyn; Misner, Scottie

    2015-01-01

    Objective Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) is linked to obesity. We hypothesized that school-based nutrition education would decrease SSB consumption. Design Self-selected interventional cohort with random selection for pre and post measurements Setting Arizona SNAP-Ed eligible schools Participants Randomly selected (9%) 4th and 5th grade classroom students Intervention The University of Arizona Nutrition Network (UANN) provided general nutrition education training and materials to teachers, to be delivered to their students. The UANN administered behavioral questionnaires to students in both Fall and Spring. Main Outcome Measure(s) Change in SSB consumption Analyses Descriptive statistics were computed for student demographics and beverage consumption on the day prior to testing. Paired t-tests evaluated change in classroom averages. Linear regression assessed potential correlates of SSB consumption. Results Fall mean SSB consumption was 1.1 (±0.2) times; mean milk and water intake were 1.6 (±0.2) and 5.2 (±0.7) times, respectively. Beverage consumption increased (3.2%) in springtime, with increased SSBs (14.4%) accounting for the majority (p=0.006). Change in SSB consumption was negatively associated with baseline SSB and water consumption, but positively associated with baseline milk fat (p≤0.05). Conclusions and Implications The results suggest the need for beverage specific education to encourage children to consume more healthful beverages in warmer weather. PMID:25239840

  18. Multiwavelength Analysis of a Moving Type-IV Radio Burst on 4th March 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veluchamy, V.; Chen, Y.; Feng, S.; Du, G.; Song, H.; Kong, X.

    2015-12-01

    We performed a multiwavelength analysis of a moving Type-IV radio burst on 4th march 2012. The Type-IV radio burst is observed between 10:39 - 11:00 UT in the frequency range of 300 - 20 MHz. From the radio heliographic observation, the radio source of the type-IV burst is traced and their sky plane speed is estimated as ~ 370 km/s. A plasmoid structure is ejected during the impulsive phase of the flare, at the same time of the type-IV burst and the structure is clearly observed at SDO/AIA 131 Å channel. From this, we find that the radio source moves with the plasmoid. The high brightness temperature profile in the range of 108 - 109 K and the moderate polarization between -50 - 30 % supports the plasma emission mechanism. Further the differential emission measure (DEM) analysis will be carried out and their results will be presented to provide more evidence of the emission mechanism.

  19. Crystal structure and stability of gyrase–fluoroquinolone cleaved complexes from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Benjamin H.; Kerns, Robert J.; Berger, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infects one-third of the world’s population and in 2013 accounted for 1.5 million deaths. Fluoroquinolone antibacterials, which target DNA gyrase, are critical agents used to halt the progression from multidrug-resistant tuberculosis to extensively resistant disease; however, fluoroquinolone resistance is emerging and new ways to bypass resistance are required. To better explain known differences in fluoroquinolone action, the crystal structures of the WT Mtb DNA gyrase cleavage core and a fluoroquinolone-sensitized mutant were determined in complex with DNA and five fluoroquinolones. The structures, ranging from 2.4- to 2.6-Å resolution, show that the intrinsically low susceptibility of Mtb to fluoroquinolones correlates with a reduction in contacts to the water shell of an associated magnesium ion, which bridges fluoroquinolone–gyrase interactions. Surprisingly, the structural data revealed few differences in fluoroquinolone–enzyme contacts from drugs that have very different activities against Mtb. By contrast, a stability assay using purified components showed a clear relationship between ternary complex reversibility and inhibitory activities reported with cultured cells. Collectively, our data indicate that the stability of fluoroquinolone/DNA interactions is a major determinant of fluoroquinolone activity and that moieties that have been appended to the C7 position of different quinolone scaffolds do not take advantage of specific contacts that might be made with the enzyme. These concepts point to new approaches for developing quinolone-class compounds that have increased potency against Mtb and the ability to overcome resistance. PMID:26792525

  20. Terbium-sensitized luminescence screening method for fluoroquinolones in beef serum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enrofloxacin is one of only two fluoroquinolone antibiotics approved for use in cattle in the U.S. Microbial screening methods commonly used for monitoring veterinary drug residues are not sensitive or selective for fluoroquinolones. In this work, a luminescence-based screening assay was developed...

  1. Humoral immunity and CD4+ Th1 cells are both necessary for a fully protective immune response upon secondary infection with Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    Vitry, Marie-Alice; Hanot Mambres, Delphine; De Trez, Carl; Akira, Shizuo; Ryffel, Bernhard; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Muraille, Eric

    2014-04-15

    Brucella spp are intracellular bacteria that cause brucellosis, one of the most common zoonoses in the world. Given the serious medical consequences of this disease, a safe and effective human vaccine is urgently needed. Efforts to develop this vaccine have been hampered by our lack of understanding of what constitutes a protective memory response against Brucella. In this study, we characterize the cells and signaling pathways implicated in the generation of a protective immune memory response following priming by the injection of heat-killed or live Brucella melitensis 16M. Using a panel of gene-deficient mice, we demonstrated that during a secondary recall response, both the Brucella-specific humoral response and CD4+ Th1 cells must act together to confer protective immunity in the spleen to B. melitensis infection. Humoral protective immunity is induced by the inoculation of both heat-killed and live bacteria, and its development does not require T cells, MyD88/IL-12p35 signaling pathways, or an activation-induced deaminase-mediated isotype switch. In striking contrast, the presence of memory IFN-γ-producing CD4+ Th1 cells requires the administration of live bacteria and functional MyD88/IL-12p35 pathways. In summary, our work identifies several immune markers closely associated with protective immune memory and could help to define a rational strategy to obtain an effective human vaccine against brucellosis. PMID:24646742

  2. The Neumann system for the 4th-order eigenvalue problem and constraint flows of the coupled KdV-type equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ye; Gu, Zhuquan; Liu, Yafeng

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, the Neumann system for the 4th-order eigenvalue problem Ly = (∂4+ q∂2+∂2 q+ ip∂+ i∂ p+ y = Λy) has been given. By means of the Neumann constraint condition, the perfect constraint set Γ and the relations between the potentials { q, p, r} and the eigenvector y are obtained. Then, based on the Euler-Lagrange function and Legendre transformations, a reasonable Jacobi-Ostrogradsky coordinate system has been found, which can be equal to the real Hamiltonian canonical coordinate system in R 8 N . Using Cao's method and Moser's constraint manifold, the Lax pairs of the evolution equation hierarchy with the 4th-order eigenvalue problems are nonlinearized. So a new finite-dimensional integrable Hamilton system on the constraint submanifold R 8 N-4 is generated. Moreover, the solutions of the evolution equations for the infinite-dimensional soliton systems are obtained by the involutive flow of the finite-dimensional completely integrable systems.

  3. Resistance to fluoroquinolones and methicillin in ophthalmic isolates of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from companion animals

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min-Hee; Chae, Min-Joo; Yoon, Jang-Won; Lee, So-Young; Yoo, Jong-Hyun; Park, Hee-Myung

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to fluoroquinolones and methicillin was determined for 49 ophthalmic isolates of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from dogs with and without ophthalmic disease. Resistance was observed for ciprofloxacin (40.8%), ofloxacin (38.8%), enrofloxacin (38.8%), levofloxacin (34.7%), and moxifloxacin (4.1%). Eighteen isolates, 16 of which were resistant to oxacillin, were mecA-positive. Nine of the 16 oxacillin-resistant mecA-positive S. pseudintermedius isolates were resistant to more than one fluoroquinolone and 2 isolates were resistant to 5 fluoroquinolones. The frequency of mecA gene occurrence and fluoroquinolone resistance was twice as high among S. pseudintermedius isolates derived from dogs with ophthalmic disease compared with isolates for dogs without ophthalmic disease. The high prevalence of methicillin and fluoroquinolone resistance in S. pseudintermedius from dogs with ophthalmic disease is a concern. PMID:24982521

  4. Resistance to fluoroquinolones and methicillin in ophthalmic isolates of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from companion animals.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Hee; Chae, Min-Joo; Yoon, Jang-Won; Lee, So-Young; Yoo, Jong-Hyun; Park, Hee-Myung

    2014-07-01

    Resistance to fluoroquinolones and methicillin was determined for 49 ophthalmic isolates of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from dogs with and without ophthalmic disease. Resistance was observed for ciprofloxacin (40.8%), ofloxacin (38.8%), enrofloxacin (38.8%), levofloxacin (34.7%), and moxifloxacin (4.1%). Eighteen isolates, 16 of which were resistant to oxacillin, were mecA-positive. Nine of the 16 oxacillin-resistant mecA-positive S. pseudintermedius isolates were resistant to more than one fluoroquinolone and 2 isolates were resistant to 5 fluoroquinolones. The frequency of mecA gene occurrence and fluoroquinolone resistance was twice as high among S. pseudintermedius isolates derived from dogs with ophthalmic disease compared with isolates for dogs without ophthalmic disease. The high prevalence of methicillin and fluoroquinolone resistance in S. pseudintermedius from dogs with ophthalmic disease is a concern. PMID:24982521

  5. Growth and development in preterm infants receiving fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Martell, M; de Ben, S; Weinberger, M; Beltrami, G

    1996-01-01

    Growth and development were followed in 7 preterm newborn infants who received fluoroquinolones in the neonatal period. Quinolones were used as a "life saving" therapy in cases of sepsis caused by bacterial agents sensitive only to these drugs. Two other groups of neonates matched for gender, birth weight and gestational age served as controls. Although the quinolone group had more severe illness, no statistically significant differences were observed in growth and development between the groups. No osteoarticular problems or joint deformities were observed in the quinolone group. Therefore, quinolones could be a therapeutic option for newborns with sepsis caused by multiply resistant organisms. PMID:8827579

  6. Improved fluoroquinolone detection in ELISA through engineering of a broad-specific single-chain variable fragment binding simultaneously to 20 fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Wen, Kai; Nölke, Greta; Schillberg, Stefan; Wang, Zhanhui; Zhang, Suxia; Wu, Congming; Jiang, Haiyang; Meng, Hui; Shen, Jianzhong

    2012-07-01

    Fluoroquinolones (FQs) are a group of synthetic, broad-spectrum antibacterial agents. Due to its extensive use in animal industry and aquaculture, residues of these antibiotics and the emergence of bacteria resistant to FQs have become a major public health issue. To prepare a generic antibody capable of recognizing nearly all FQs, a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) was generated from the murine hybridoma cells C49H1 producing a FQ-specific monoclonal antibody. This scFv was characterized by indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ciELISA), and it showed identical binding properties to parental monoclonal antibody: it was capable of recognizing 17 of 20 targeted FQs below maximum residue limits, except for sarafloxacin (SAR), difloxacin (DIF), and trovafloxacin (TRO) which are highly concerned members in the FQs family. In order to broaden the specificity of this scFv to SAR and its analogues (DIF and TRO), protein homology modeling and antibody-ligands docking analysis were employed to identify the potential key amino acid residues involved in hapten antibody. A mutagenesis phage display library was generated by site directed mutagenesis randomizing five aminoacid residues in the third heavy-chain complementarity determining region. After one round of panning against biotinylated norfloxacin (NOR) and four rounds of panning against biotinylated SAR, scFv variants we screened showed up to 10-fold improved IC(50) against SAR, DIF, and TRO in ciELISA while the specificity against other FQs was fully retained. PMID:22549819

  7. PREFACE: 4th International Workshop on Statistical Physics and Mathematics for Complex Systems (SPMCS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Alexandre; Abe, Sumiyoshi; Li, Wei

    2015-04-01

    This volume contains 24 contributed papers presented at the 4th International Workshop on Statistical Physics and Mathematics for Complex Systems (SPMCS) held during October 12-16, 2014 in Yichang, China. Each paper was peer-reviewed by at least one referee chosen from a distinguished international panel. The previous three workshops of this series were organized in 2008, 2010, and 2012, in Le Mans, France, Wuhan, China, and Kazan, Russia, respectively. The SPMCS international workshop series is destined mainly to communicate and exchange research results and information on the fundamental challenges and questions in the vanguard of statistical physics, thermodynamics and mathematics for complex systems. More specifically, the topics of interest touch, but are not limited to, the following: • Fundamental aspects in the application of statistical physics and thermodynamics to complex systems and their modeling • Finite size and non-extensive system • Fluctuation theorems and equalities, quantum thermodynamics • Variational principle for random dynamics • Fractal geometry, fractional mathematics More than 50 participants from 7 countries participated in SPMCS-2014. 35 oral contributions were presented at the workshop. We would like to take this opportunity to thank the members of the Scientific Program Committee, many of whom acted as reviewers of the papers and responded promptly. We would also like to thank the organizing committee, the session chairs, the technicians and the students for the smooth running of the whole workshop. Thanks also go to China Three Gorges University who provided generous support for the conference venue, as well as exquisite refreshments for the tea breaks. The workshop was also partially supported by Central China Normal University and the Programme of Introducing Talents of Discipline to Universities under grant NO. B08033. Special thanks are due to Ms Juy Zhu who has done excellent editing work with great effort.

  8. 4th International Conference on Energy and Environment 2013 (ICEE 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Chandan Kumar; Shamsuddin, Abd Halim Bin; Ahmad, Ibrahim Bin; Desa, Mohamed Nor Bin Mohamed; Din, Norashidah Bte Md; Bte Mohd, Lariyah; Hamid, Nasri A.; See, Ong Hang; Hafiz Nagi, Farrukh; Yong, Lee Choon; Pasupuleti, Jagadeesh; Mei, Goh Su; Abdullah, Fairuz Bin; Satgunam, Meenaloshini

    2013-06-01

    The 4th International Conference on Energy & Environment 2013 (ICEE2013) was organized by the Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN) to provide a platform for creating and sharing ideas among engineers, researchers, scientists, industrialists and students in sustainable green energy and technologies. The theme 'Shaping a Sustainable Future through Advancement in Green Energy Technology' is in line with the University's vision to be a leading global energy university that shapes a sustainable future. The general scopes of the conference are renewable energy, smart grid, green technology, energy policies and economics, sustainable green energy and environment, sustainable education, international cooperation and innovation and technology transfer. Five international keynote speakers delivered their speeches in specialized areas of green energy technology and sustainability. In addition, the conference highlights several special parallel sessions by notable invited presenters in their niche areas, which are: Hybrid Energy Power Quality & Distributed Energy Smart Grid Nuclear Power & Technologies Geohazard Management Greener Environment for Sustainability Advances in Computational Fluid Dynamics The research papers presented in ICEE2013 are included in this volume of IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science (EES). EES is abstracted and indexed in SCOPUS, GeoBase, GeoRef, Compendex, Inspec, Chemical Abstracts Service, NASA Astrophysics Data System, and International Nuclear Information System (INIS). With the comprehensive programme outline, the organizing committee hopes that the ICEE2013 was a notable intellectual sharing session for the research and academic community in Malaysia and regionally. The organizing committee expresses gratitude to the ICEE2013 delegates for their great support and contributions to the event.

  9. PREFACE: 4th International Conference on: Preservation and Conservation Issues in Digital Printing and Digital Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricker, A.; Green, P.

    2010-04-01

    These conference proceedings contain the written papers of the contributions presented at the 4th International Conference on: Preservation and Conservation Issues in Digital Printing and Digital Photography. The conference was held at the Institute of Physics, London, UK on 27th-28th May 2010. Previous conferences in this series took place in 2000, 2003 and 2006. The aim of this conference series is to inform those responsible for the preservation of digitally printed materials about developments in digital photography and printing technologies. We aim to examine progress in research on inks and substrates and their significance for conservation and preservation issues and techniques. We also hope to develop links between related industries and the conservation/preservation world. Research areas explored in this conference include current developments and future trends in digital printing and photographic technologies; the effect of environmental, storage and salvage conditions on the durability of digital prints and photographs; image processing techniques; image permanence considerations and standards for fastness, permanence and the role of scanning and file formats. We would like to thank all participants for their contribution to the conference programme and these proceedings. Our thanks go to Ms C. Gu and Mr M. Sandy for chairing conference sessions. We are also grateful to Dawn Stewart and the Institute of Physics Conference Team for their invaluable support and assistance in arranging the conference and reception. Finally we would like to extend our thanks to the Society of Imaging Science and Technology (IS&T) for their sponsorship support. The Editors Acknowledgements Conference Organising Committee: Ms A Fricker and Dr. P Green (London College of Communication, University of the Arts London). Proceedings edited and compiled by Ms A Fricker and Dr. P Green.

  10. The Ratio of 2nd to 4th Digit Length in Korean Alcohol-dependent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Han, Changwoo; Bae, Hwallip; Lee, Yu-Sang; Won, Sung-Doo; Kim, Dai Jin

    2016-01-01

    Objective The ratio of 2nd to 4th digit length (2D:4D) is a sexually dimorphic trait. Men have a relatively shorter second digit than fourth digit. This ratio is thought to be influenced by higher prenatal testosterone level or greater sensitivity to androgen. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between alcohol dependence and 2D:4D in a Korean sample and whether 2D:4D can be a biologic marker in alcohol dependence. Methods In this study, we recruited 87 male patients with alcohol dependence from the alcohol center of one psychiatric hospital and 52 healthy male volunteers who were all employees in the same hospital as controls. We captured images of the right and left hands of patients and controls using a scanner and extracted data with a graphics program. We measured the 2D:4D of each hand and compared the alcohol dependence group with the control group. We analyzed these ratios using an independent-samples t-test. Results The mean 2D:4D of patients was 0.934 (right hand) and 0.942 (left hand), while the mean 2D:4D of controls was 0.956 (right hand) and 0.958 (left hand). Values for both hands were significantly lower for patients than controls (p<0.001, right hand; p=0.004, left hand). Conclusion Patients who are alcohol dependent have a significantly lower 2D:4D than controls, similar to the results of previous studies, which suggest that a higher prenatal testosterone level in the gonadal period is related to alcoholism. Furthermore, 2D:4D is a possible predictive marker of alcohol dependence. PMID:27121425

  11. Learning Natural Selection in 4th Grade with Multi-Agent-Based Computational Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickes, Amanda Catherine; Sengupta, Pratim

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate how elementary school students develop multi-level explanations of population dynamics in a simple predator-prey ecosystem, through scaffolded interactions with a multi-agent-based computational model (MABM). The term "agent" in an MABM indicates individual computational objects or actors (e.g., cars), and these agents obey simple rules assigned or manipulated by the user (e.g., speeding up, slowing down, etc.). It is the interactions between these agents, based on the rules assigned by the user, that give rise to emergent, aggregate-level behavior (e.g., formation and movement of the traffic jam). Natural selection is such an emergent phenomenon, which has been shown to be challenging for novices (K16 students) to understand. Whereas prior research on learning evolutionary phenomena with MABMs has typically focused on high school students and beyond, we investigate how elementary students (4th graders) develop multi-level explanations of some introductory aspects of natural selection—species differentiation and population change—through scaffolded interactions with an MABM that simulates predator-prey dynamics in a simple birds-butterflies ecosystem. We conducted a semi-clinical interview based study with ten participants, in which we focused on the following: a) identifying the nature of learners' initial interpretations of salient events or elements of the represented phenomena, b) identifying the roles these interpretations play in the development of their multi-level explanations, and c) how attending to different levels of the relevant phenomena can make explicit different mechanisms to the learners. In addition, our analysis also shows that although there were differences between high- and low-performing students (in terms of being able to explain population-level behaviors) in the pre-test, these differences disappeared in the post-test.

  12. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Environment, occupation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Espina, Carolina; Straif, Kurt; Friis, Søren; Kogevinas, Manolis; Saracci, Rodolfo; Vainio, Harri; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    People are exposed throughout life to a wide range of environmental and occupational pollutants from different sources at home, in the workplace or in the general environment - exposures that normally cannot be directly controlled by the individual. Several chemicals, metals, dusts, fibres, and occupations have been established to be causally associated with an increased risk of specific cancers, such as cancers of the lung, skin and urinary bladder, and mesothelioma. Significant amounts of air pollutants - mainly from road transport and industry - continue to be emitted in the European Union (EU); an increased occurrence of lung cancer has been attributed to air pollution even in areas below the EU limits for daily air pollution. Additionally, a wide range of pesticides as well as industrial and household chemicals may lead to widespread human exposure, mainly through food and water. For most environmental pollutants, the most effective measures are regulations and community actions aimed at reducing and eliminating the exposures. Thus, it is imperative to raise awareness about environmental and occupational carcinogens in order to motivate individuals to be proactive in advocating protection and supporting initiatives aimed at reducing pollution. Regulations are not homogeneous across EU countries, and protective measures in the workplace are not used consistently by all workers all the time; compliance with regulations needs to be continuously monitored and enforced. Therefore, the recommendation on Environment and Occupation of the 4th edition of the European Code against Cancer, focusing on what individuals can do to reduce their cancer risk, reads: "In the workplace, protect yourself against cancer-causing substances by following health and safety instructions." PMID:26164655

  13. Using Inquiry-Based Instruction to Teach Research Methods to 4th-Grade Students in an Urban Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamm, Ellen M.; Cullen, Rebecca; Ciaravino, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    When a college professor who teaches research methods to graduate education students was approached by a local public urban elementary school to help them teach research skills to 4th-graders, it was thought that the process would be simple--take what we did at the college level and differentiate it for the childhood classroom. This article will…

  14. 75 FR 34374 - Safety Zone; Stockton Ports Baseball Club/City of Stockton, 4th of July Fireworks Display...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Stockton Ports Baseball Club/City of... Ports Baseball Club and the City of Stockton will sponsor the Stockton Ports Baseball Club/City of... Ports Baseball Club/City of Stockton 4th of July Fireworks Display, Stockton, CA. (a) Location....

  15. 78 FR 23869 - Safety Zone; Redwood City 4th of July Fireworks Show; Port of Redwood City, Redwood City, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ..., telephone 202-366-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4. Public Meeting We do not plan to hold public meetings on this proposed... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Redwood City 4th of July Fireworks...

  16. 78 FR 39998 - Safety Zone; Grand Haven 4th of July Fireworks; Grand River; Grand Haven, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ...-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Grand Haven 4th of July Fireworks; Grand... a State, local, or tribal government, in the aggregate, or by the private sector of...

  17. Examining General and Specific Factors in the Dimensionality of Oral Language and Reading in 4th-10th Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foorman, Barbara R.; Koon, Sharon; Petscher, Yaacov; Mitchell, Alison; Truckenmiller, Adrea

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore dimensions of oral language and reading and their influence on reading comprehension in a relatively understudied population--adolescent readers in 4th through 10th grades. The current study employed latent variable modeling of decoding fluency, vocabulary, syntax, and reading comprehension so as to…

  18. 78 FR 23866 - Safety Zone; Crescent City 4th of July Fireworks; Crescent City Harbor, Crescent City, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice... public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4. Public Meeting We... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Crescent City 4th of July...

  19. 75 FR 35294 - Safety Zone; Marquette 4th of July Fireworks, Marquette Harbor, Lake Superior, Marquette, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-22

    ...The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone on Marquette Harbor, Lake Superior, Marquette, MI. This zone is intended to restrict vessels from a portion of Marquette Harbor during the Marquette 4th of July Fireworks display. This temporary safety zone is necessary to protect spectators and vessels from the hazards associated with a firework...

  20. 78 FR 39606 - Safety Zone; City of Menominee 4th of July Fireworks, Green Bay, Menominee, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking TFR Temporary Final Rule A. Regulatory... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; City of Menominee 4th of July Fireworks... that may result in the expenditure by a State, local, or tribal government, in the aggregate, or by...

  1. 76 FR 38015 - Safety Zones; July 4th Weekend Fireworks Displays Within the Captain of the Port St. Petersburg...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zones; July 4th Weekend Fireworks Displays Within... under Executive Order 13132, Federalism, if it has a substantial direct effect on State or local governments and would either preempt State law or impose a substantial direct cost of compliance on them....

  2. Teacher Implementation of Reform-Based Mathematics and Implications for Algebra Readiness: A Qualitative Study of 4th Grade Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sher, Stephen Korb

    2011-01-01

    This study looked at 4th grade classrooms to see "how" teachers implement NCTM standards-based or reform-based mathematics instruction and then analyzed it for the capacity to improve students' "algebra readiness." The qualitative study was based on classroom observations, teacher and administrator interviews, and teacher surveys. The study took…

  3. Proceedings of the International Conference on Educational Data Mining (EDM) (4th, Eindhoven, the Netherlands, July 6-8, 2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pechenizkiy, Mykola; Calders, Toon; Conati, Cristina; Ventura, Sebastian; Romero, Cristobal; Stamper, John

    2011-01-01

    The 4th International Conference on Educational Data Mining (EDM 2011) brings together researchers from computer science, education, psychology, psychometrics, and statistics to analyze large datasets to answer educational research questions. The conference, held in Eindhoven, The Netherlands, July 6-9, 2011, follows the three previous editions…

  4. Comparing Science Learning among 4th-, 5th-, and 6th-Grade Students: STS versus Textbook-Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yager, Robert E.; Choi, AeRan; Yager, Stuart O.; Akcay, Hakan

    2009-01-01

    Fifteen 4th-, 5th-, and 6th-grade teachers from five school districts each taught two sections of science--one with a Science-Technology-Society (STS) approach and the other with a more traditional textbook approach in which basic science concepts were the major organizers. Local, current, and personally relevant issues provided the context and…

  5. Characterization of HCV Specific CD4+Th17 Immunity in Recurrent Hepatitis C Induced Liver Allograft Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Basha, H. Ilias; Subramanian, Vijay; Seetharam, A.; Nath, D.S.; Ramachandran, S.; Anderson, C.D.; Shenoy, S.; Chapman, W.C.; Crippin, J.S.; Mohanakumar, T.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) recurrence with accelerated fibrosis following orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is a universal phenomenon. To evaluate mechanisms contributing to HCV induced allograft fibrosis/cirrhosis, we investigated HCV specific CD4+Th17 cells and their induction in OLT recipients with recurrence utilizing 51 HCV+ OLT recipients, 15 healthy controls and 9 HCV- OLT recipients. Frequency of HCV specific CD4+ Tcells secreting IFN-γ, IL-17 and IL-10 was analyzed by ELISpot. Serum cytokines and chemokines were analyzed by LUMINEX. Recipients with recurrent HCV induced allograft inflammation and fibrosis/cirrhosis demonstrated a significant increase in frequency of HCV specific CD4+Th17 cells. Increased pro-inflammatory mediators (IL-17, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1), decreased IFN-γ, and increased IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10 levels were identified. OLT recipients with allograft inflammation and fibrosis/cirrhosis demonstrated increased frequency of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) that inhibited HCV specific CD4+Th1 but not Th17 cells. This suggests that recurrent HCV infection in OLT recipients induces an inflammatory milieu characterized by increased IL-6, IL-1β and decreased IFN-γ which facilitates induction of HCV specific CD4+Th17 cells. These cells are resistant to suppression by Tregs and may mediate an inflammatory cascade leading to cirrhosis in OLT recipients following HCV recurrence. PMID:21446979

  6. 77 FR 39422 - Eighth Coast Guard District Annual Safety Zones; Niceville July 4th Fireworks Show; Boggy Bayou...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Eighth Coast Guard District Annual Safety Zones; Niceville July 4th Fireworks Show; Boggy Bayou; Niceville, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard will enforce a Safety Zone for the Niceville July...

  7. 75 FR 38723 - Safety Zone; St. Ignace 4th of July Fireworks, East Moran Bay, Lake Huron, St. Ignace, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; St. Ignace 4th of July Fireworks, East Moran Bay, Lake Huron, St. Ignace, MI AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone on East Moran Bay, Lake Huron, St....

  8. 76 FR 72957 - 4th Annual Trauma Spectrum Conference: Bridging the Gap Between Research and Clinical Practice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health 4th Annual Trauma Spectrum Conference: Bridging the Gap Between Research and Clinical Practice of Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury: Prevention... Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury: Prevention, Diagnosis, Treatment and Recovery for the Iraq...

  9. Impact of a Health and Media Literacy Curriculum on 4th-Grade Girls: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Heidi A.; Damico, Amy M.; Rodgers, Shannon

    2004-01-01

    Recent research indicates that young girls are preoccupied with their body size and that the media may be a contributing factor. This study aimed to discover the impact of an interdisciplinary media literacy intervention curriculum on 4th-grade girls in an urban elementary school. The authors developed and implemented a series of lessons that…

  10. Native American Students' Understanding of Geologic Time Scale: 4th-8th Grade Ojibwe Students' Understanding of Earth's Geologic History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nam, Younkyeong; Karahan, Engin; Roehrig, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    Geologic time scale is a very important concept for understanding long-term earth system events such as climate change. This study examines forty-three 4th-8th grade Native American--particularly Ojibwe tribe--students' understanding of relative ordering and absolute time of Earth's significant geological and biological events. This study also…

  11. The Influence of Neighborhood Density and Word Frequency on Phoneme Awareness in 2nd and 4th Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Tiffany P.; Bowles, Ryan P.; Catts, Hugh W.; Storkel, Holly L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that two lexical characteristics--neighborhood density and word frequency--interact to influence performance on phoneme awareness tasks. Methods: Phoneme awareness was examined in a large, longitudinal dataset of 2nd and 4th grade children. Using linear logistic test model, the relation…

  12. Communicating Science to Impact Learning? A Phenomenological Inquiry into 4th and 5th Graders' Perceptions of Science Information Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelmez Burakgazi, Sevinc; Yildirim, Ali; Weeth Feinstein, Noah

    2016-01-01

    Rooted in science education and science communication studies, this study examines 4th and 5th grade students' perceptions of science information sources (SIS) and their use in communicating science to students. It combines situated learning theory with uses and gratifications theory in a qualitative phenomenological analysis. Data were gathered…

  13. Biofilm and fluoroquinolone resistance of canine Escherichia coli uropathogenic isolates

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli is the most common uropathogen involved in urinary tract infection (UTI). Virulence of strains may differ, and may be enhanced by antimicrobial resistance and biofilm formation, resulting in increased morbidity and recurrent infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro biofilm forming capacity of E. coli isolates from dogs with UTI, by using fluorescent in situ hybridization, and its association with virulence genes and antimicrobial resistance. Findings The proportion of biofilm-producing isolates significantly increased with the length of incubation time (P < 0.05). Biofilm production was significantly associated with fluoroquinolone resistance at all incubation time points and was independent of the media used (P < 0.05). Biofilm production was not associated with cnf1, hly, pap and sfa genes (P > 0.05), but was significantly associated with afa, aer and the β-lactamase genes (P < 0.05). Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing significant association between biofilm production and fluoroquinolone resistance in E. coli isolates from dogs with UTI. Biofilm formation may contribute to UTI treatment failure in dogs, through the development of bacterial reservoirs inside bladder cells, allowing them to overcome host immune defenses and to establish recurrent infections. PMID:25099929

  14. Analysis of Mechanism-Based Inhibition of CYP 3A4 by a Series of Fluoroquinolone Antibacterial Agents.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Akiko; Takakusa, Hideo; Kimura, Takako; Inoue, Shin-Ichi; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki; Ando, Osamu

    2016-10-01

    A series of fluoroquinolone compounds (compounds 1-9), which contain a common quinolone scaffold, inactivated the metabolic activity of CYP3A. The purpose of this study was to identify mechanism-based inhibition (MBI) among these fluoroquinolone compounds by metabolite profiling to elucidate the association of the substructure and MBI potential. Reversibility of MBI after incubation with potassium ferricyanide differed among the test compounds. Representative quasi-irreversible inhibitors form a metabolite-intermediate (MI) complex with the heme of CYP3A4 according to absorption analysis. Metabolite profiling identified the cyclopropane ring-opened metabolites from representative irreversible inhibitors, suggesting irreversible binding of the carbon-centered radical species with CYP3A4. On the other hand, the oxime form of representative quasi-irreversible inhibitors was identified, suggesting generation of a nitroso intermediate that could form the MI complex. Metabolites of compound 10 with a methyl group at the carbon atom at the root of the amine moiety of compound 8 include the oxime form, but compound 10 did not show quasi-irreversible inhibition. The docking study with CYP3A4 suggested that a methyl moiety introduced at the carbon atom at the root of the primary amine disrupts formation of the MI complex between the heme and the nitroso intermediate because of steric hindrance. This study identified substructures of fluoroquinolone compounds associated with the MBI mechanism; introduction of substituted groups inducing steric hindrance with the heme of P450 can prevent formation of an MI complex. Our series of experiments may be broadly applicable to prevention of MBI at the drug discovery stage. PMID:27469000

  15. PREFACE: 4th Global Conference on Materials Science and Engineering (CMSE 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruda, H. E.; Khotsianovsky, A.

    2015-12-01

    IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering is publishing a volume of conference proceedings that contains a selection of papers presented at the 4th Global Conference on Materials Science and Engineering (CMSE 2015), which is an annual event that started in 2012. CMSE 2015, technically supported by the Institute of Applied Physics and Materials Engineering of University of Macau, organized by Wuhan Advance Materials Society, was successfully held at the University of Macau-new campus located on Hengqin Island from August 3rd-6th, 2015. It aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and scholars to exchange and share their experience and research results on all aspects of Materials Science and Engineering, and to discuss the practical challenges encountered and the solutions adopted. Macau, one of the two special administrative regions of the People's Republic of China, where East meets West, turned out to be an ideal meeting place for domestic and overseas participants of this annual international conference. The conference program included keynote presentations, special sessions, oral and poster contributions. From several hundred submissions, 52 of the most promising and mainstream, IOP-relevant, contributions were included in this volume. The submissions present original ideas or results of general significance, supported by clear reasoning, compelling evidence and methods, theories and practices relevant to the research. The authors state clearly the problems and the significance of their research to theory and practice. Being a successful conference, this event gathered more than 200 qualified and high-level researchers and experts from over 40 countries, including 10 keynote speakers from 6 countries, which created a good platform for worldwide researchers and engineers to enjoy the academic communication. Taking advantage of this opportunity, we would like to thank all participants of this conference, and particularly the

  16. FOREWORD: 4th International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems (NCMIP2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-10-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to the scientific contributions presented during the 4th International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems, NCMIP 2014 (http://www.farman.ens-cachan.fr/NCMIP_2014.html). This workshop took place at Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan, on May 23, 2014. The prior editions of NCMIP also took place in Cachan, France, firstly within the scope of ValueTools Conference, in May 2011 (http://www.ncmip.org/2011/), and secondly at the initiative of Institut Farman, in May 2012 and May 2013, (http://www.farman.ens-cachan.fr/NCMIP_2012.html), (http://www.farman.ens-cachan.fr/NCMIP_2013.html). The New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems (NCMIP) Workshop focused on recent advances in the resolution of inverse problems. Indeed, inverse problems appear in numerous scientific areas such as geophysics, biological and medical imaging, material and structure characterization, electrical, mechanical and civil engineering, and finances. The resolution of inverse problems consists of estimating the parameters of the observed system or structure from data collected by an instrumental sensing or imaging device. Its success firstly requires the collection of relevant observation data. It also requires accurate models describing the physical interactions between the instrumental device and the observed system, as well as the intrinsic properties of the solution itself. Finally, it requires the design of robust, accurate and efficient inversion algorithms. Advanced sensor arrays and imaging devices provide high rate and high volume data; in this context, the efficient resolution of the inverse problem requires the joint development of new models and inversion methods, taking computational and implementation aspects into account. During this one-day workshop, researchers had the opportunity to bring to light and share new techniques and results in the field of inverse problems. The topics of the

  17. Mutant Prevention Concentrations for Single-Step Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Mutants of Wild-Type, Efflux-Positive, or ParC or GyrA Mutation-Containing Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Heather J.; Walters, Michael; Hisanaga, Tamiko; Zhanel, George G.; Hoban, Daryl J.

    2004-01-01

    Three fluoroquinolone-susceptible and five fluoroquinolone-resistant (two with ParC Ser79Phe mutations, one with a GyrA Ser81Phe mutation, and two that were efflux positive) Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates were exposed to one, two, four, eight, and sixteen times the MICs of ciprofloxacin, gatifloxacin, gemifloxacin, levofloxacin, and moxifloxacin. Mutational frequencies were calculated at each multiple of the MIC for which growth was observed. Mutant prevention concentrations (MPCs) and the multiple of the MIC at the MPC (MPMIC) were evaluated. All resulting mutants were sequenced for quinolone resistance-determining region changes in GyrA and ParC and were evaluated for reserpine-sensitive efflux. The MPC order was generally ciprofloxacin > levofloxacin > gatifloxacin > moxifloxacin > gemifloxacin. The MPMIC order varied depending on the genetic constitution of the original isolates from which the mutants were generated. For those mutants created from fluoroquinolone-susceptible isolates (those that had wild-type ParC and GyrA and were efflux negative), the MPMIC order was ciprofloxacin = moxifloxacin > gemifloxacin > levofloxacin > gatifloxacin. The MPMICs of each fluoroquinolone for mutants created from isolates with a ParC mutation (with wild-type GyrA and efflux negative) were similar. A similar occurrence was observed with the mutants created from the efflux-positive isolates (with wild-type ParC and GyrA). The MPMIC order for the mutants created from the isolate with a GyrA mutation (with wild-type ParC and efflux negative) was ciprofloxacin = gemifloxacin > levofloxacin = moxifloxacin > gatifloxacin. Gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, and moxifloxacin may be intrinsically more able to prevent the development of resistance by fluoroquinolone-susceptible isolates, isolates that are efflux positive, or isolates that carry a GyrA mutation. However, once a ParC mutation is present, the MPC increases dramatically for all fluoroquinolones. PMID:15388458

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) study of the 4th generation prototype of a continuous flow Ventricular Assist Device (VAD).

    PubMed

    Song, Xinwei; Wood, Houston G; Olsen, Don

    2004-04-01

    The continuous flow ventricular assist device (VAD) is a miniature centrifugal pump, fully suspended by magnetic bearings, which is being developed for implantation in humans. The CF4 model is the first actual prototype of the final design product. The overall performances of blood flow in CF4 have been simulated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software: CFX, which is commercially available from ANSYS Inc. The flow regions modeled in CF4 include the inlet elbow, the five-blade impeller, the clearance gap below the impeller, and the exit volute. According to different needs from patients, a wide range of flow rates and revolutions per minute (RPM) have been studied. The flow rate-pressure curves are given. The streamlines in the flow field are drawn to detect stagnation points and vortices that could lead to thrombosis. The stress is calculated in the fluid field to estimate potential hemolysis. The stress is elevated to the decreased size of the blood flow paths through the smaller pump, but is still within the safe range. The thermal study on the pump, the blood and the surrounding tissue shows the temperature rise due to magnetoelectric heat sources and thermal dissipation is insignificant. CFD simulation proved valuable to demonstrate and to improve the performance of fluid flow in the design of a small size pump. PMID:15179847

  19. Fluoroquinolone Use in a Child Associated with Development of Osteochondritis Dissecans

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, John; Shea, Kevin; Oxford, Julia; Carey, James

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Several etiological theories have been proposed for the development of osteochondritis dissecans. Cartilage toxicity after fluoroquinolone use has been well documented in vitro. We present a case report of a 10-year-old child who underwent a prolonged 18-month course of ciprofloxacin therapy for chronic urinary tract infections. This patient later developed an osteochondritis dissecans lesion of the medial femoral condyle. We hypothesize that the fluoroquinolone therapy disrupted normal endochondral ossification, resulting in development of osteochondritis dissecans. The etiology of osteochondritis dissecans is still unclear, and this case describes an association between fluoroquinolone use and osteochondritis dissecans development. PMID:25228675

  20. Oral fluoroquinolone use and serious arrhythmia: bi-national cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Svanström, Henrik; Melbye, Mads; Pasternak, Björn; Hviid, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate if oral fluoroquinolone use is associated with an increased risk of serious arrhythmia. Design Bi-national cohort study, linking register data on filled prescriptions, cases of serious arrhythmia, and patient characteristics. Setting Denmark, 1997-2011; Sweden, 2006-13. Participants The study cohort was derived from a source population of all Danish and Swedish adults, aged 40 to 79 years. 909 656 courses of fluoroquinolone use (ciprofloxacin 82.6%, norfloxacin 12.1%, ofloxacin 3.2%, moxifloxacin 1.2%, and other fluoroquinolones 0.9%) and 909 656 courses of penicillin V use, matched 1:1 on propensity score, were included. Main outcome measure The main outcome was risk of serious arrhythmia (fatal and non-fatal), comparing courses of fluoroquinolone use with courses of penicillin V use (an antibiotic with no pro-arrhythmic effect). The risk period of interest was current use, defined as days 0-7 of treatment. Subgroup analyses were conducted according to country, sex, age, underlying cardiovascular disease, concomitant use of drugs known to increase the risk of torsades de pointes, fluoroquinolone type, and levels of arrhythmia risk score. Results 144 cases of serious arrhythmia occurred during follow-up, 66 among current fluoroquinolone users (incidence rate 3.4 per 1000 person years) and 78 among current penicillin users (4.0 per 1000 person years); comparing oral fluoroquinolone treatment with penicillin V, the rate ratio was 0.85 (95% confidence interval 0.61 to 1.18). Compared with penicillin V, the absolute risk difference was −13 (95% confidence interval −35 to 16) cases of serious arrhythmia per 1 000 000 courses of fluoroquinolones. The risk of serious arrhythmia was not statistically significantly increased in any of the subgroups, including analyses by fluoroquinolone type. Conclusions Contrary to previous reports, oral fluoroquinolone treatment was not associated with an increased risk of serious arrhythmia in the

  1. Fluorescence characteristic study of the ternary complex of fluoroquinolone antibiotics and cobalt (II) with ATP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shuqing; Zhang, Wujuan; Chen, Xingguo; Hu, Zhide; Hooper, Martin; Hooper, Beveley; Zhao, Zhengfeng

    2001-05-01

    The results from the measurement of the fluorescence spectra of fluoroquinolone antibiotics including ofloxacin (OF), norfloxacin (NOR) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) complexed with cobalt (II) and ATP give information concerning the antibiotics-nucleotide interactions. From the fluorescence spectral data, it appears that the fluoroquinolone antibiotic cannot directly complex with ATP but indirectly complex with cobalt (II), which is playing an intermediary role. The interaction of fluoroquinolone antibiotic with the nucleotide occurs mainly through the phosphate group. The conclusion offers a more complete mechanism, which is important for understanding the interaction of these drugs with DNA.

  2. Molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolones modulation on corneal fibroblast motility.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tsan-Chi; Tsai, Tzu-Yun; Chang, Shu-Wen

    2016-04-01

    Topical fluoroquinolones are widely used to prevent ocular infections after ophthalmic surgery. However, they have been shown to affect the corneal cell motility, whose mechanism remains indefinite. The purpose of this study was to investigate how fluoroquinolones affect corneal stromal cell motility. Human corneal fibroblasts (HCFs) were incubated in ciprofloxacin (CIP), levofloxacin (LEV), or moxifloxacin (MOX) at 0, 10, 50, and 100 μg/ml for up to 3 days. Effect of CIP, LEV, or MOX on HCF migration was monitored using migration assay. HCF viability was determined by WST-1 assay. Expression of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), paxillin (PXN), and their phosphorylated forms were analyzed by immunoblotting. Binding affinity between FAK and PXN was determined by co-immunoprecipitation. Our results revealed that CIP and MOX, but not LEV, noticeably retarded HCF migration. HCF proliferation was significantly reduced by CIP (38.2%), LEV (29.5%), and MOX (21.3%), respectively (p = 0.002). CIP and MOX suppressed the phosphorylation of PXN at tyrosines (10.2 ± 4.3%, p < 0.001; 11.7 ± 2.4%, p < 0.001, respectively), including tyrosine 118 (33.3 ± 5.2%, p < 0.001; 34.0 ± 4.4%, p < 0.001, respectively). CIP and MOX diminished the binding affinity between FAK and PXN (8.2 ± 1.8%, p < 0.001; 9.0 ± 4.5%, p < 0.001, respectively). Nevertheless, tyrosine dephosphorylation and FAK dissociation of PXN were not found in LEV-treated HCFs. None of these fluoroquinolones affect phosphorylation of FAK-Y397. We conclude that CIP and MOX, but not LEV, might delay corneal fibroblast migration via interfering with recruitment of PXN to focal adhesions and dephosphorylation of PXN at the tyrosines. PMID:26546726

  3. PREFACE: The 4th Symposium on the Mechanics of Slender Structures (MoSS2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Dengqing; Kaczmarczyk, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains papers presented at the 4th Symposium on the Mechanics of Slender Structures (MoSS2013) run under the auspices of the Institute of Physics Applied Mechanics Group and hosted by Harbin Institute of Technology (China) from 7-9 January 2013. The conference has been organized in collaboration with the Technical Committee on Vibration and Sound of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and follows a one day seminar on Ropes, Cables, Belts and Chains: Theory and Applications and the MoSS2006 symposium held at the University of Northampton (UK) in 2004 and 2006, respectively, the MoSS2008 symposium held at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (USA) in 2008 and the MoSS2010 symposium hosted by Mondragon University and held in San Sebastian (Spain) in 2010. The remit of the Symposium on the Mechanics of Slender Structures series involves a broad range of scientific areas. Applications of slender structures include terrestrial, marine and space systems. Moving elastic elements such as ropes, cables, belts and tethers are pivotal components of many engineering systems. Their lengths often vary when the system is in operation. The applications include vertical transportation installations and, more recently, space tether propulsion systems. Traction drive elevator installations employ ropes and belts of variable length as a means of suspension, and also for the compensation of tensile forces over the traction sheave. In cranes and mine hoists, cables and ropes are subject to length variation in order to carry payloads. Tethers experiencing extension and retraction are important components of offshore and marine installations, as well as being proposed for a variety of different space vehicle propulsion systems based on different applications of momentum exchange and electrodynamic interactions with planetary magnetic fields. Furthermore, cables and slender rods are used extensively in civil engineering

  4. PREFACE: 4th Workshop on Theory, Modelling and Computational Methods for Semiconductors (TMCSIV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomić, Stanko; Probert, Matt; Migliorato, Max; Pal, Joydeep

    2014-06-01

    These conference proceedings contain the written papers of the contributions presented at the 4th International Conference on Theory, Modelling and Computational Methods for Semiconductor materials and nanostructures. The conference was held at the MediaCityUK, University of Salford, Manchester, UK on 22-24 January 2014. The previous conferences in this series took place in 2012 at the University of Leeds, in 2010 at St William's College, York and in 2008 at the University of Manchester, UK. The development of high-performance computer architectures is finally allowing the routine use of accurate methods for calculating the structural, thermodynamic, vibrational, optical and electronic properties of semiconductors and their hetero- and nano-structures. The scope of this conference embraces modelling, theory and the use of sophisticated computational tools in semiconductor science and technology, where there is substantial potential for time-saving in R&D. Theoretical approaches represented in this meeting included: Density Functional Theory, Semi-empirical Electronic Structure Methods, Multi-scale Approaches, Modelling of PV devices, Electron Transport, and Graphene. Topics included, but were not limited to: Optical Properties of Quantum Nanostructures including Colloids and Nanotubes, Plasmonics, Magnetic Semiconductors, Photonic Structures, and Electronic Devices. This workshop ran for three days, with the objective of bringing together UK and international leading experts in the theoretical modelling of Group IV, III-V and II-VI semiconductors, as well as students, postdocs and early-career researchers. The first day focused on providing an introduction and overview of this vast field, aimed particularly at students, with several lectures given by recognized experts in various theoretical approaches. The following two days showcased some of the best theoretical research carried out in the UK in this field, with several contributions also from representatives of

  5. A selected review of abstracts from the 4th Quadrennial Meeting of the World Federation of Neuro-Oncology.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Marc C

    2014-03-01

    The 4th Quadrennial Meeting of the World Federation of Neuro-Oncology (WFNO), San Francisco, CA, USA, 21-24 November 2013 The 4th Quadrennial Meeting of the World Federation of Neuro-Oncology (WFNO) was the largest neuro-oncology meeting that meets once every 4 years and brings together clinicians and scientists from all parts of the world whose focus is on new brain cancer clinical trials and research primarily pertaining to gliomas. The WFNO 2013 meeting included 1 education day, 2.5 days of presentation, 13 sunrise sessions, one town hall meeting, one mini-symposium, 130 oral presentations and 900 abstracts. This short meeting review highlights select adult clinical abstracts presented at WFNO 2013 that will only in part encompass the contents of a large and multifaceted meeting. PMID:25055016

  6. Transfer of a CD4+ Th1 cell line to nude mice effects clearance of Rhodococcus equi from the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Kanaly, S T; Hines, S A; Palmer, G H

    1996-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi, and intracellular respiratory pathogen, causes sever e granulomatous pneumonia in humans with AIDS and in young horses. Pulmonary clearance of R. equi requires functional CD4+ T cells and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) expression from bronchial lymph node cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether R. equi-specific CD4+ Th1 cells could effect clearance of R. equi from the lung. Adoptive transfer of a clearance of R. equi from the lungs. In contrast, mice transfused with a R. equi-specific CD4+ Th2 cell line expressed interleukin-4 but not IFN-gamma mRNA, failed to clear pulmonary infection, and developed granulomas in the lung. Control mice, which did not receive cells, did not produce IFN-gamma or interleukin-4 and developed small pulmonary granulomas. These results clearly show that a Th1 response is sufficient to effect pulmonary clearance of R. equi. PMID:8606068

  7. Safety profile of grepafloxacin compared with other fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Stahlmann, R; Schwabe, R

    1997-12-01

    Preclinical investigations with grepafloxacin showed that its toxicological profile is similar to that of other fluoroquinolones. The photosensitizing effect of grepafloxacin was relatively weak and similar to that of ciprofloxacin. Grepafloxacin did not cause convulsions in mice when administered in conjunction with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug fenbufen. Intravenous injection of grepafloxacin caused transient dysrhythmias in rabbits at a dosage of 10 mg/kg and ventricular tachycardia at 30 mg/kg iv. Joint cartilage lesions were found in juvenile dogs after iv treatment with 100 mg/kg daily. Plasma concentrations (19-24 mg/L) under these conditions were approximately ten times above a therapeutic level. Data derived from patients who had been treated with grepafloxacin in phase II and phase III multiple-dose studies (400 mg, n = 1069; 600 mg, n = 925) were available for an analysis of the patients' tolerance of the drug. The most common adverse events observed for the 400 mg and 600 mg treatments during these studies were gastrointestinal reactions, such as nausea (11% and 15%, respectively), vomiting (1% and 6%) and diarrhoea (3% and 4%). In both groups a considerable number of patients (9% and 17%) reported an unpleasant taste; this was less common in the pooled controls (1%) after treatment with drugs such as doxycycline, ciprofloxacin, amoxycillin or cefixime. Headache occurred in 4% (400 mg) and 5% (600 mg) and insomnia in 1% (400 mg) or 2% (600 mg) of the patients. Similar incidences were found for photosensitivity (1% and 2%, respectively) and for rash (1% and 2%) in the 400 mg and 600 mg groups. So far, tolerance of the new compound seems to be similar to that of other fluoroquinolones. However, incidences of nausea, vomiting and unpleasant taste were rather high during the first clinical trials, particularly after treatment with 600 mg daily. Further data are necessary for a sound evaluation of the tolerance of grepafloxacin. PMID:9484877

  8. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel structural hybrids of benzofuroxan derivatives and fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Chugunova, Elena; Akylbekov, Nurgali; Bulatova, Adelya; Gavrilov, Nikolai; Voloshina, Alexandra; Kulik, Natalia; Zobov, Vladimir; Dobrynin, Alexey; Syakaev, Victor; Burilov, Alexander

    2016-06-30

    A series of novel hybrids based on benzofuroxan derivatives and fluoroquinolones (4a-d-6a-d) have been synthesized. Unexpectedly, the reactions have resulted in salt products formation during the hydrolysis of benzofuroxans by water molecules being present in the solvent instead of usual substitution products. All the compounds have been screened for antimicrobial and toxic activities. All resulting compounds retain high activity characteristic for fluoroquinolones. Many of the salts based on benzofuroxans and fluoroquinolones have higher activity than starting fluoroquinolones against Bacillus cereus 8035. Among the screened compounds, the compound 4d has shown the best antibacterial activity against B. cereus 8035, 8 times higher than the original Lomefloxacin (MBC value 1.5 μg/mL). PMID:27061980

  9. Fluoroquinolone Resistance Does Not Impose a Cost on the Fitness of Clostridium difficile In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wasels, François; Kuehne, Sarah A.; Cartman, Stephen T.; Barbanti, Fabrizio; Minton, Nigel P.; Mastrantonio, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Point mutations conferring resistance to fluoroquinolones were introduced in the gyr genes of the reference strain Clostridium difficile 630. Only mutants with the substitution Thr-82→Ile in GyrA, which characterizes the hypervirulent epidemic clone III/027/NAP1, were resistant to all fluoroquinolones tested. The absence of a fitness cost in vitro for the most frequent mutations detected in resistant clinical isolates suggests that resistance will be maintained even in the absence of antibiotic pressure. PMID:25534738

  10. Colonization with Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli among Nursing Home Residents and Its Relationship to Fluoroquinolone Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Maslow, Joel N.; Lautenbach, Ebbing; Glaze, Thomas; Bilker, Warren; Johnson, James R.

    2004-01-01

    In a cross-sectional fecal prevalence survey involving 49 residents of a Veterans Affairs nursing home, 59% of subjects were colonized with extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC), 22% were colonized with adhesin-positive E. coli, and 51% were colonized with fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli. Among 80 unique isolates, adhesins correlated negatively and aerobactin correlated positively with fluoroquinolone resistance. PMID:15328142

  11. The use of fluoroquinolones in neutropenic patients--analysis of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, E; Potgieter, P; Davey, P; Norrby, S R

    1994-07-01

    The fluoroquinolones have been extensively used in the neutropenic patient. When fluoroquinolone monotherapy was used as prophylaxis, frequently for extended periods, the rate of adverse effect of ciprofloxacin (6.9%) ofloxacin (11.6%) and norfloxacin (5.5%) were significantly lower than those of the comparator agents--co-trimoxazole, vancomycin and polymycin. Rash and gastrointestinal upset were the commonest adverse effects associated with the fluoroquinolones. When used as monotherapy for bacterial infections, often intravenously and in high dosages, the cumulative rate of adverse effects caused by the fluoroquinolones (12.6%) was similar to that caused by the comparator agents (10.3%), but significantly higher than reported for non-neutropenic patients (6.4%) and for prophylactic use. The main adverse events were also rashes (15.4%) and gastrointestinal upset (6.1%). When fluoroquinolones were used as therapy of bacterial infections in combination with other agents, the incidence of adverse events was 14.9%, which was similar to the comparator agents (13.5%). Adverse events were also similar except that nephrotoxicity was commonest with comparator combinations (4.0%). The data suggest that fluoroquinolone prophylaxis in neutropenic patients, even for prolonged periods, is safer than the comparator agents, but is associated with more frequent adverse events than in non-neutropenic patients. Fluoroquinolone therapy, frequently with high dosages, is associated with similar rate of adverse events as the comparator agents. When used in combination with the other antibiotics, fluoroquinolones are as safe as the comparator agents. PMID:7961217

  12. Molecular Characterization of Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Carmen; Tirado-Vélez, José Manuel; Calatayud, Laura; Tubau, Fe; Garmendia, Junkal; Ardanuy, Carmen; Marti, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a common cause of respiratory infections in adults, who are frequently treated with fluoroquinolones. The aims of this study were to characterize the genotypes of fluoroquinolone-resistant NTHi isolates and their mechanisms of resistance. Among 7,267 H. influenzae isolates collected from adult patients from 2000 to 2013, 28 (0.39%) were ciprofloxacin resistant according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) criteria. In addition, a nalidixic acid screening during 2010 to 2013 detected five (0.23%) isolates that were ciprofloxacin susceptible but nalidixic acid resistant. Sequencing of their quinolone resistance-determining regions and genotyping by pulse-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing of the 25 ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates available and all 5 nalidixic acid-resistant isolates were performed. In the NTHi isolates studied, two mutations producing changes in two GyrA residues (Ser84, Asp88) and/or two ParC residues (Ser84, Glu88) were associated with increased fluoroquinolone MICs. Strains with one or two mutations (n = 15) had ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin MICs of 0.12 to 2 μg/ml, while those with three or more mutations (n = 15) had MICs of 4 to 16 μg/ml. Long persistence of fluoroquinolone-resistant strains was observed in three chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. High genetic diversity was observed among fluoroquinolone-resistant NTHi isolates. Although fluoroquinolones are commonly used to treat respiratory infections, the proportion of resistant NTHi isolates remains low. The nalidixic acid disk test is useful for detecting the first changes in GyrA or in GyrA plus ParC among fluoroquinolone-susceptible strains that are at a potential risk for the development of resistance under selective pressure by fluoroquinolone treatment. PMID:25385097

  13. Observational Cohort Study of Pregnancy Outcome after First-Trimester Exposure to Fluoroquinolones

    PubMed Central

    Wacker, Evelin; Meister, Reinhard; Panse, Mary; Weber-Schoendorfer, Corinna; Oppermann, Marc; Schaefer, Christof

    2014-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones are avoided during pregnancy due to developmental toxicity in animals. The aim of this study was to assess the fetal risk after intrauterine fluoroquinolone exposure. We performed an observational study of a prospectively ascertained cohort of pregnant women exposed to a fluoroquinolone during the first trimester. Pregnancy outcomes were compared to those of a cohort exposed to neither fluoroquinolones nor teratogenic or fetotoxic drugs. The outcomes evaluated were major birth defects (structural abnormalities of medical, surgical, or cosmetic relevance), spontaneous abortion, and elective termination of pregnancy. Pregnancy outcomes of 949 women with fluoroquinolone treatment were compared with those of 3,796 nonexposed controls. Neither the rate of major birth defects (2.4%; adjusted odds ratio [ORadj], 0.91; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.6 to 1.5) nor the risk of spontaneous abortion (adjusted hazard ratio [HRadj], 1.01; 95% CI, 0.8 to 1.3) was increased. However, there was a nonsignificant increase in major birth defects after exposure to moxifloxacin (6/93, 6.5%; crude odds ratio [ORcrude], 2.40; 95% CI, 0.8 to 5.6). Neither a critical exposure time window within the first trimester nor a specific pattern of birth defects was demonstrated for any of the fluoroquinolones. The rate of electively terminated pregnancies was increased among the fluoroquinolone-exposed women (HRadj, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.7). The gestational ages at delivery and birth weights did not differ between groups. Our study did not detect an increased risk of spontaneous abortion or major birth defects. These reassuring findings support the recommendation to allow fluoroquinolone use in early pregnancy in selected cases. After the use of moxifloxacin, a detailed fetal ultrasound examination should be considered. PMID:24841264

  14. Emergence of Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Haemophilus influenzae Strains among Elderly Patients but Not among Children▿

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Shin-ichi; Ohkoshi, Yasuo; Sato, Kiyoshi; Fujii, Nobuhiro

    2008-01-01

    We screened 457 Haemophilus influenzae strains isolated in Japan during 2002 to 2004 and identified 12 fluoroquinolone-resistant strains (2.6%). The resistant strains were divided into three genotypes (eight, three, and one of each type). These were isolated from patients over 58 years of age. Several fluoroquinolone-resistant clones appeared to have invaded the population of elderly patients in a particular area, Sapporo city. PMID:17977993

  15. Study on three-dimensional fluorescent spectral characteristics of fluoroquinolones in varying media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhihong; Huang, Zuyun; Cai, Ruxiu

    2000-08-01

    Behaviors of fluoroquinolones in varying media were observed by employing their intrinsic fluorescence. Spectral characteristics in reversed micelles (Aerosol OT/ n-octane) were compared with those in aqueous solution and micelles (sodium dodecyl sulfonate). Those differences in interactions between fluoroquinolones and the various media were clearly illustrated by three-dimensional fluorescent spectra. The influences of other environmental factors on spectral characteristics (pH, SDS concentration, etc.) were also investigated.

  16. Something going on in Milan: a review of the 4th International PhD Student Cancer Conference.

    PubMed

    Segré, C

    2010-01-01

    The 4th International PhD Student Cancer Conference was held at the IFOM-IEO-Campus in Milan from 19-21 May 2010 http://www.semm.it/events_researchPast.phpThe Conference covered many topics related to cancer, from basic biology to clinical aspects of the disease. All attendees presented their research, by either giving a talk or presenting a poster. This conference is an opportunity to introduce PhD students to top cancer research institutes across Europe.THE CORE PARTICIPANTING INSTITUTES INCLUDED: European School of Molecular Medicine (SEMM)-IFOM-IEO Campus, MilanBeatson Institute for Cancer Research (BICR), GlasgowCambridge Research Institute (CRI), Cambridge, UKMRC Gray Institute of Radiation Biology (GIROB), OxfordLondon Research Institute (LRI), LondonPaterson Institute for Cancer Research (PICR), ManchesterThe Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI), Amsterdam'You organizers have crushed all my prejudices towards Italians. Congratulations, I enjoyed the conference immensely!' Even if it might have sounded like rudeness for sure this was supposed to be a genuine compliment (at least, that's how we took it), also considering that it was told by a guy who himself was the fusion of two usually antithetical concepts: fashion style and English nationality.The year 2010 has marked an important event for Italian research in the international scientific panorama: the European School of Molecular Medicine (SEMM) had the honour to host the 4th International PhD Student Cancer Conference, which was held from 19-21 May 2010 at the IFOM-IEO-Campus (http://www.semm.it/events_researchPast.php) in Milan.The conference was attended by more than one hundred students, coming from a selection of cutting edge European institutes devoted to cancer research. The rationale behind it is the promotion of cooperation among young scientists across Europe to debate about science and to exchange ideas and experiences. But that is not all, it is also designed for PhD students to get in touch

  17. Quantitative comparison of the convulsive activity of combinations of twelve fluoroquinolones with five nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jahye; Ohtani, Hisakazu; Tsujimoto, Masayuki; Sawada, Yasufumi

    2009-01-01

    Concomitant administration of certain fluoroquinolone antimicrobials and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents (NSAIDs) induces serious convulsion in humans. There are differences in convulsive activity among fluoroquinolones and in the potentiation of fluoroquinolone-induced convulsion among NSAIDs, but a comprehensive, quantitative comparison has not been carried out. This study evaluates the inhibitory effects of twelve fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, fleroxacin, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, lomefloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, pazufloxacin, prulifloxacin, sparfloxacin, and tosufloxacin) alone or in the presence of an NSAID (4-biphenylacetic acid, diclofenac sodium, loxoprofen, lornoxicam or zaltoprofen) on the GABA(A) receptor binding of [(3)H]muscimol in an in vitro study using mice synaptic plasma membrane. The rank order of inhibitory effects of the fluoroquinolones was prulifloxacin asymptotically equal to norfloxacin > ciprofloxacin > or = enoxacin > gatifloxacin > or = ofloxacin asymptotically equal to tosufloxacin asymptotically equal to lomefloxacin > levofloxacin > or = sparfloxacin > or = pazufloxacin asymptotically equal to fleroxacin. 4-Biphenylacetic acid most potently enhanced the inhibitory effects of the fluoroquinolones, while zaltoprofen, loxoprofen, lornoxicam and diclofenac had essentially no effect. The clinical risk of convulsion for each combination was estimated using a pharmacodynamic model based on receptor occupancy using the in vitro data set obtained and pharmacokinetic parameters in humans collected from the literature. The combinations of 4-biphenylacetic acid with prulifloxacin and enoxacin were concluded to be the most hazardous. PMID:19430173

  18. Fluoroquinolones and Tendinopathy: A Guide for Athletes and Sports Clinicians and a Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Trevor; Cook, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Context: Fluoroquinolone antibiotics have been used for several decades and are effective antimicrobials. Despite their usefulness as antibiotics, a growing body of evidence has accumulated in the peer-reviewed literature that shows fluoroquinolones can cause pathologic lesions in tendon tissue (tendinopathy). These adverse effects can occur within hours of commencing treatment and months after discontinuing the use of these drugs. In some cases, fluoroquinolone usage can lead to complete rupture of the tendon and substantial subsequent disability. Objective: To discuss the cause, pharmacology, symptoms, and epidemiology of fluoroquinolone-associated tendinopathy and to discuss the clinical implications with respect to athletes and their subsequent physiotherapy. Data Sources: We searched MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL), Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), and SPORTDiscus databases for available reports of fluoroquinolone-related tendinopathy (tendinitis, tendon pain, or rupture) published from 1966 to 2012. Search terms were fluoroquinolones or quinolones and tendinopathy, adverse effects, and tendon rupture. Included studies were written in or translated into English. Non—English–language and non-English translations of abstracts from reports were not included (n = 1). Study Selection: Eligible studies were any available reports of fluoroquinolone-related tendinopathy (tendinitis, tendon pain, or rupture). Both animal and human histologic studies were included. Any papers not focusing on the tendon-related side effects of fluoroquinolones were excluded (n = 71). Data Extraction: Data collected included any cases of fluoroquinolone-related tendinopathy, the particular tendon affected, type of fluoroquinolone, dosage, and concomitant risk factors. Any data outlining the adverse histologic effects of fluoroquinolones also were collected. Data Synthesis: A total of 175 papers, including 89 case reports and 8

  19. Induction of prophages by fluoroquinolones in Streptococcus pneumoniae: implications for emergence of resistance in genetically-related clones.

    PubMed

    López, Elena; Domenech, Arnau; Ferrándiz, María-José; Frias, Maria João; Ardanuy, Carmen; Ramirez, Mario; García, Ernesto; Liñares, Josefina; de la Campa, Adela G

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae has increased worldwide by the spread of a few clones. Fluoroquinolone resistance occurs mainly by alteration of their intracellular targets, the type II DNA topoisomerases, which is acquired either by point mutation or by recombination. Increase in fluoroquinolone-resistance may depend on the balance between antibiotic consumption and the cost that resistance imposes to bacterial fitness. In addition, pneumococcal prophages could play an important role. Prophage induction by fluoroquinolones was confirmed in 4 clinical isolates by using Southern blot hybridization. Clinical isolates (105 fluoroquinolone-resistant and 160 fluoroquinolone-susceptible) were tested for lysogeny by using a PCR assay and functional prophage carriage was studied by mitomycin C induction. Fluoroquinolone-resistant strains harbored fewer inducible prophages (17/43) than fluoroquinolone-susceptible strains (49/70) (P = 0.0018). In addition, isolates of clones associated with fluoroquinolone resistance [CC156 (3/25); CC63 (2/20), and CC81 (1/19)], had lower frequency of functional prophages than isolates of clones with low incidence of fluoroquinolone resistance [CC30 (4/21), CC230 (5/20), CC62 (9/21), and CC180 (21/30)]. Likewise, persistent strains from patients with chronic respiratory diseases subjected to fluoroquinolone treatment had a low frequency of inducible prophages (1/11). Development of ciprofloxacin resistance was tested with two isogenic strains, one lysogenic and the other non-lysogenic: emergence of resistance was only observed in the non-lysogenic strain. These results are compatible with the lysis of lysogenic isolates receiving fluoroquinolones before the development of resistance and explain the inverse relation between presence of inducible prophages and fluoroquinolone-resistance. PMID:24718595

  20. Caldecott 4th bore tunnel project: influence of ground water flows and inflows triggered by tectonic fault zones?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhuber, G.; G. Neuhuber1, W. Klary1, A. Nitschke1, B. Thapa2, Chris Risden3, T. Crampton4, D. Zerga5

    2011-12-01

    The 4th Bore is a highway tunnel on California State Route 24 currently under construction. The 4th Bore is undertaken by the California State Department of Transportation (CALTRANS) and the Contra Costa County Transportation Commission (CCTC) to alleviate traffic congestion on SR24 connecting the cities of Oakland and Orinda in the San Francisco East Bay Area. The cost for the 4th Bore is estimated at $ 390.8 Mill. The 3,249 ft long 4th Bore tunnel will have excavated dimensions of approximately 40 ft height and 49 ft width. A total of 7 cross passages will run between the 3rd and the new 4th bore. Geology and Hydrogeology: The project is located in the Oakland Berkeley Hills of the SF Bay Area. The Caldecott Tunnels lie within the easterly assemblage of the Hayward fault zone province which consists of a sequence of sedimentary and volcanic rocks that accumulated in the interval between about 16 and 8.4 Ma (Miocene). The basal rocks of these Tertiary deposits consist of deep marine basin sediments of the Monterey Group. These rocks are overlain uncomfortably by an interbedded sequence of terrestrial sediments (Orinda Formation) and volcanic rocks (Moraga Formation). The Tertiary rocks have been folded into large amplitude, NW trending folds that are cut by N trending strike and slip faults. The SF Bay Region, which is crossed by 4 major faults (San Gregorio, San Andreas, Hayward, and Calaveras), is considered one of the more seismically active regions of the world. The active Hayward fault lies 0.9mi to the west of the Caldecott Tunnels and is the closest major fault to the project area. The tunnel is at the moment under top heading construction: West Portal (360ft) and East Portal (1,968.5ft). While major faults typically influence groundwater flow, characterization of such influences is extremely difficult because of the heterogeneity of the hydraulic systems and the different lithological parameters and influences. Four major inactive fault zones striking

  1. Production of IL-16 correlates with CD4+ Th1 inflammation and phosphorylation of axonal cytoskeleton in multiple sclerosis lesions

    PubMed Central

    Skundric, Dusanka S; Cai, Juan; Cruikshank, William W; Gveric, Djordje

    2006-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a central nervous system-specific autoimmune, demyelinating and neurodegenerative disease. Infiltration of lesions by autoaggressive, myelin-specific CD4+Th1 cells correlates with clinical manifestations of disease. The cytokine IL-16 is a CD4+ T cell-specific chemoattractant that is biased towards CD4+ Th1 cells. IL-16 precursor is constitutively expressed in lymphocytes and during CD4+ T cell activation; active caspase-3 cleaves and releases C-terminal bioactive IL-16. Previously, we used an animal model of MS to demonstrate an important role for IL-16 in regulation of autoimmune inflammation and subsequent axonal damage. This role of IL-16 in MS is largely unexplored. Here we examine the regulation of IL-16 in relation to CD4+ Th1 infiltration and inflammation-related changes of axonal cytoskeleton in MS lesions. Methods We measured relative levels of IL-16, active caspase-3, T-bet, Stat-1 (Tyr 701), and phosphorylated NF(M+H), in brain and spinal cord lesions from MS autopsies, using western blot analysis. We examined samples from 39 MS cases, which included acute, subacute and chronic lesions, as well as adjacent, normal-appearing white and grey matter. All samples were taken from patients with relapsing remitting clinical disease. We employed two-color immunostaining and confocal microscopy to identify phenotypes of IL-16-containing cells in frozen tissue sections from MS lesions. Results We found markedly increased levels of pro- and secreted IL-16 (80 kD and 22 kD, respectively) in MS lesions compared to controls. Levels of IL-16 peaked in acute, diminished in subacute, and were elevated again in chronic active lesions. Compared to lesions, lower but still appreciable IL-6 levels were measured in normal-appearing white matter adjacent to active lesions. Levels of IL-16 corresponded to increases in active-caspase-3, T-bet and phosphorylated Stat-1. In MS lesions, we readily observed IL-16 immunoreactivity confined to

  2. 4th Quarter Transportation Report FY 2014: Radioactive Waste Shipments to and from the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS)

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, Louis

    2014-12-02

    This report satisfies the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) commitment to prepare a quarterly summary report of radioactive waste shipments to and from the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at Area 5. There were no shipments sent for offsite treatment and returned to the NNSS this quarter. There was one shipment of two drums sent for offsite treatment and disposal. This report summarizes the 4th quarter of Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW) shipments. This report also includes annual summaries for FY 2014.

  3. Fluoroquinolone Resistance Mechanisms of Shigella flexneri Isolated in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Azmi, Ishrat J.; Khajanchi, Bijay K.; Akter, Fatema; Hasan, Trisheeta N.; Shahnaij, Mohammad; Akter, Mahmuda; Banik, Atanu; Sultana, Halima; Hossain, Mohammad A.; Ahmed, Mohammad K.; Faruque, Shah M.; Talukder, Kaisar A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence and mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance in Shigella species isolated in Bangladesh and to compare with similar strains isolated in China. Methods A total of 3789 Shigella isolates collected from Clinical Microbiology Laboratory of icddr,b, during 2004–2010 were analyzed for antibiotic susceptibility. Analysis of plasmids, plasmid-mediated quinolone-resistance genes, PFGE, and sequencing of genes of the quinolone-resistance-determining regions (QRDR) were conducted in representative strains isolated in Bangladesh and compared with strains isolated in Zhengding, China. In addition, the role of efflux-pump was studied by using the efflux-pump inhibitor carbonyl cyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP). Results Resistance to ciprofloxacin in Shigella species increased from 0% in 2004 to 44% in 2010 and S. flexneri was the predominant species. Of Shigella spp, ciprofloxacin resistant (CipR) strains were mostly found among S. flexneri (8.3%), followed by S. sonnei (1.5%). Within S. flexneri (n = 2181), 14.5% were resistance to ciprofloxacin of which serotype 2a was predominant (96%). MIC of ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, and ofloxacin were 6–32 mg/L, 8–32 mg/L, and 8–24 mg/L, respectively in S. flexneri 2a isolates. Sequencing of QRDR genes of resistant isolates showed double mutations in gyrA gene (Ser83Leu, Asp87Asn/Gly) and single mutation in parC gene (Ser80Ile). A difference in amino acid substitution at position 87 was found between strains isolated in Bangladesh (Asp87Asn) and China (Asp87Gly) except for one. A novel mutation at position 211 (His→Tyr) in gyrA gene was detected only in the Bangladeshi strains. Susceptibility to ciprofloxacin was increased by the presence of CCCP indicating the involvement of energy dependent active efflux pumps. A single PFGE type was found in isolates from Bangladesh and China suggesting their genetic relatedness. Conclusions Emergence of fluoroquinolone resistance in Shigella

  4. Proceedings of the 4th Conference on Aerospace Materials, Processes, and Environmental Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, D. E. (Editor); Stanley, D. C. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    The next millennium challenges us to produce innovative materials, processes, manufacturing, and environmental technologies that meet low-cost aerospace transportation needs while maintaining US leadership. The pursuit of advanced aerospace materials, manufacturing processes, and environmental technologies supports the development of safer, operational, next-generation, reusable, and expendable aeronautical and space vehicle systems. The Aerospace Materials, Processes, and Environmental Technology Conference (AMPET) provided a forum for manufacturing, environmental, materials, and processes engineers, scientists, and managers to describe, review, and critically assess advances in these key technology areas.

  5. Electrochemiluminescence of terbium (III)-two fluoroquinolones-sodium sulfite system in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shi-lv; Ding, Fen; Liu, Yu; Zhao, Hui-chun

    2006-05-01

    The electrochemiluminescence (ECL) of Tb 3+-enoxacin-Na 2SO 3 system (ENX system) and Tb 3+-ofloxacin-Na 2SO 3 system (OFLX system) in aqueous solution is reported. ECL is generated by the oxidation of Na 2SO 3, which is enhanced by Tb 3+-fluoroquinolone (FQ) complex. The ECL intensity peak versus potential corresponds to oxidation of Na 2SO 3, and the ECL emission spectra (the peaks are at 490, 545, 585 and 620 nm) match the characteristic emission spectrum of Tb 3+, indicating that the emission is from the excited state of Tb 3+. The mechanism of ECL is proposed and the difference of ECL intensity between ENX system and OFLX system is explained. Conditions for ECL emission were optimized. The linear range of ECL intensity versus concentrations of pharmaceuticals is 2.0 × 10 -10-8.0 × 10 -7 mol l -1 for ENX and 6.0 × 10 -10-6.0 × 10 -7 mol l -1 for OFLX, respectively. A theoretical limit of detection is 5.4 × 10 -11 mol l -1 for ENX and 1.6 × 10 -10 mol l -1 for OFLX, respectively. The ECL was satisfactorily applied to the determination of the two FQs in dosage form and urine sample.

  6. Sunlight-induced degradation of fluoroquinolones in wastewater effluent: Photoproducts identification and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Sturini, Michela; Speltini, Andrea; Maraschi, Federica; Pretali, Luca; Ferri, Elida Nora; Profumo, Antonella

    2015-09-01

    The photodegradation of Ciprofloxacin (CIP), Enrofloxacin (ENR), Danofloxacin (DAN), Marbofloxacin (MAR) and Levofloxacin (LEV), five widely used fluoroquinolones (FQs), was studied in urban WWTP secondary effluent, under solar light. The degradation profiles and the kinetic constants were determined at the micrograms per litre levels (20-50 μg L(-1)). The photo-generated products were identified by high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). The toxicity of the photoproducts was assessed by Vibrio fischeri light emission inhibition assay performed on irradiated and not-irradiated FQs solutions, at environmentally significant concentrations. Attention was focused on the evaluation of the photoproducts contribution to the overall biotoxic effect of these emerging pollutants. Data from chronic exposure experiments (24-48 h) were primarily considered. Results confirmed the major usefulness of chronic toxicity data with respect to the acute assay ones and proved the not negligible biotoxicity of the FQs photodegradation products. PMID:25966937

  7. Collaborative interactions between type 2 innate lymphoid cells and antigen-specific CD4+ Th2 cells exacerbate murine allergic airway diseases with prominent eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Lee, Jee-Boong; Chen, Chun-Yu; Hershey, Gurjit K Khurana; Wang, Yui-Hsi

    2015-04-15

    Type-2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) and the acquired CD4(+) Th2 and Th17 cells contribute to the pathogenesis of experimental asthma; however, their roles in Ag-driven exacerbation of chronic murine allergic airway diseases remain elusive. In this study, we report that repeated intranasal rechallenges with only OVA Ag were sufficient to trigger airway hyperresponsiveness, prominent eosinophilic inflammation, and significantly increased serum OVA-specific IgG1 and IgE in rested mice that previously developed murine allergic airway diseases. The recall response to repeated OVA inoculation preferentially triggered a further increase of lung OVA-specific CD4(+) Th2 cells, whereas CD4(+) Th17 and ILC2 cell numbers remained constant. Furthermore, the acquired CD4(+) Th17 cells in Stat6(-/-)/IL-17-GFP mice, or innate ILC2s in CD4(+) T cell-ablated mice, failed to mount an allergic recall response to OVA Ag. After repeated OVA rechallenge or CD4(+) T cell ablation, the increase or loss of CD4(+) Th2 cells resulted in an enhanced or reduced IL-13 production by lung ILC2s in response to IL-25 and IL-33 stimulation, respectively. In return, ILC2s enhanced Ag-mediated proliferation of cocultured CD4(+) Th2 cells and their cytokine production, and promoted eosinophilic airway inflammation and goblet cell hyperplasia driven by adoptively transferred Ag-specific CD4(+) Th2 cells. Thus, these results suggest that an allergic recall response to recurring Ag exposures preferentially triggers an increase of Ag-specific CD4(+) Th2 cells, which facilitates the collaborative interactions between acquired CD4(+) Th2 cells and innate ILC2s to drive the exacerbation of a murine allergic airway diseases with an eosinophilic phenotype. PMID:25780046

  8. Correlation of different phenotypic drug susceptibility testing methods for four fluoroquinolones in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Coeck, Nele; de Jong, Bouke C.; Diels, Maren; de Rijk, Pim; Ardizzoni, Elisa; Van Deun, Armand; Rigouts, Leen

    2016-01-01

    Background Molecular resistance testing fails to explain all fluoroquinolone resistance, with a continued need for a suitable rapid phenotypic drug susceptibility testing method. Objective To evaluate the optimal method for phenotypic fluoroquinolone susceptibility testing. Methods Using Löwenstein–Jensen medium, Middlebrook 7H11 agar, BACTEC-MGIT 960 and the resazurin microtitre plate assay, we determined susceptibility to fluoroquinolones in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and investigated cross-resistance between ofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin. We compared MICs of all four fluoroquinolones for 91 strains on Löwenstein–Jensen (as the gold standard) with their MICs in resazurin plates, and with ofloxacin susceptibility at a single concentration in MGIT and on 7H11 agar, in addition to sequencing of the gyrAB genes. Results and conclusions Applying a cut-off of 2 mg/L ofloxacin, 1 mg/L levofloxacin and 0.5 mg/L moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin in all methods, some discordance between solid medium and MGIT methods was observed, yet this tended to be explained by MICs around the cut-off. The high discordance between Löwenstein–Jensen (LJ) and resazurin plates suggests that the currently applied cut-offs for all fluoroquinolones in the resazurin method should decrease and minor changes in colour (from blue to purple) be considered as meaningful. High-level resistance in all assays to all drugs correlated well with the presence of gyrA mutations, in support of recent findings that fluoroquinolone resistance should be tested at different concentrations, as patients with lower levels of resistance may continue to benefit from high-dose fluoroquinolone-based therapy. PMID:26851609

  9. Proceedings of the 4th Workshop of Young Researchers in Astronomy & Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgács-Dajka, E.

    2006-09-01

    Preface: It is a great pleasure for the Organizers to present the proceedings already the Fourth Workshop of Young Researchers in Astronomy & Astrophysics. Six years ago the Organizers of the first meeting of these conference series declared that their intention is to begin a long-lasting tradition of such biennial conference series where the young postgraduate scientists can meet each other as well as with senior scholars on the wide fields of astronomy & astrophysics, and they can present their results, getting important experiences in presentation oral lectures. And, of course, vice versa this is a great possibility for the senior astronomers and astrophysicists to know the new generation, and form new connections.I am glad to say that the idea became successful. On the present, fourth meeting almost 50 lectures -- which covers many areas of astrophysics and related topics from solar physics to cosmology -- was presented by the young researchers affiliated to all those Hungarian scientific institutes, where astronomy and/or astrophysics are studied. It is a new and happily sequel, that a lot of hungarian young researchers who are working abroad came back to Hungary for a while to present their science. Like a bridge between the generation, a significant part of the lecturers are already not PhD students. They are mainly postdoctoral researchers who attended on the first conferences as young scientists, but feel theirself young in their hearts, and return back from meetings to meetings due to their nice memories. They are highly welcomed in the future, too. Furthermore, last, but not least I mention, that as a manifestation of the great honour of the senior generations to the young scientists several leading Hungarian experts of the different fields kindly accepted our invitation to present invited lectures on their research topics. The above mentiond topics of the present conference were as follows: Solar physics, Space Physics, Celestial Mechanics

  10. Direct Optofluidic Measurement of the Lipid Permeability of Fluoroquinolones

    PubMed Central

    Cama, Jehangir; Schaich, Michael; Al Nahas, Kareem; Hernández-Ainsa, Silvia; Pagliara, Stefano; Keyser, Ulrich F.

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying drug permeability across lipid membranes is crucial for drug development. In addition, reduced membrane permeability is a leading cause of antibiotic resistance in bacteria, and hence there is a need for new technologies that can quantify antibiotic transport across biological membranes. We recently developed an optofluidic assay that directly determines the permeability coefficient of autofluorescent drug molecules across lipid membranes. Using ultraviolet fluorescence microscopy, we directly track drug accumulation in giant lipid vesicles as they traverse a microfluidic device while exposed to the drug. Importantly, our measurement does not require the knowledge of the octanol partition coefficient of the drug – we directly determine the permeability coefficient for the specific drug-lipid system. In this work, we report measurements on a range of fluoroquinolone antibiotics and find that their pH dependent lipid permeability can span over two orders of magnitude. We describe various technical improvements for our assay, and provide a new graphical user interface for data analysis to make the technology easier to use for the wider community. PMID:27604156