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Sample records for 5-hole pressure probe

  1. Calibration and Flight Results for the Ares I-X 5-Hole Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Brandon, Jay M.

    2011-01-01

    Flight and calibration results are presented for the Ares I-X 5-hole probe. The probe is calibrated by using a combination of wind tunnel, CFD, and other numerical modeling techniques. This is then applied to the probe flight data and comparisons are made between the vanes and 5-hole probe. Using this and other data it is shown the probe was corrupted by water rendering that measurement unreliable.

  2. Pressure measuring probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, George C., Jr. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    The invention is a probe for measuring changes in pressure in a high velocity fluid stream over and adjacent to the surface of an object. The probe is formed of an exterior housing having a closed pressure chamber in which a piezoelectric pressure transducer is mounted. An open connector tube having a probe tip passes a portion of the fluid stream into the closed pressure chamber; any change of pressure within, which requires a settling-time to appear in the closed pressure chamber, is inversely proportional to the cross-sectional area of the connector tube. A cooling chamber formed around the pressure chamber is connected to a source of cooling fluid by means of inlet and outlet tubes.

  3. Circumferential pressure probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Harlan K. (Inventor); Moore, Thomas C. (Inventor); Fantl, Andrew J. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A probe for measuring circumferential pressure inside a body cavity is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, a urodynamic pressure measurement probe for evaluating human urinary sphincter function is disclosed. Along the length of the probe are disposed a multiplicity of deformable wall sensors which typically comprise support tube sections with flexible side wall areas. These are arranged along the length of the probe in two areas, one just proximal to the tip for the sensing of fluid pressure inside the bladder, and five in the sensing section which is positioned within the urethra at the point at which the urinary sphincter constricts to control the flow of urine. The remainder of the length of the probe comprises multiple rigid support tube sections interspersed with flexible support tube sections in the form of bellows to provide flexibility.

  4. Water cooled static pressure probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagen, Nicholas T. (Inventor); Eves, John W. (Inventor); Reece, Garland D. (Inventor); Geissinger, Steve L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved static pressure probe containing a water cooling mechanism is disclosed. This probe has a hollow interior containing a central coolant tube and multiple individual pressure measurement tubes connected to holes placed on the exterior. Coolant from the central tube symmetrically immerses the interior of the probe, allowing it to sustain high temperature (in the region of 2500 F) supersonic jet flow indefinitely, while still recording accurate pressure data. The coolant exits the probe body by way of a reservoir attached to the aft of the probe. The pressure measurement tubes are joined to a single, larger manifold in the reservoir. This manifold is attached to a pressure transducer that records the average static pressure.

  5. Miniature, Cooled Pressure-Measuring Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, George C., Jr.; Eves, John W.; White, David R.

    1994-01-01

    Probe designed to reduce settling time dramatically. Pressure-sensing transducer mounted in probe and connected to tip by short tube having cross-sectional area substantially smaller than conventional connecting tubes. Probe includes stainless-steel cylindrical exterior housing holding closed pressure chamber in which piezoelectric pressure transducer mounted. Open connecting tube passes portion of high-velocity, high-temperature fluid stream into closed pressure chamber. Any change of pressure in sampled stream propagates into closed pressure chamber with settling time inversely proportional to cross-sectional area of connecting tube. Cooling chamber formed around pressure chamber connected to source of water or other cooling fluid via inlet and outlet tubes.

  6. A piezo-bar pressure probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friend, W. H.; Murphy, C. L.; Shanfield, I.

    1967-01-01

    Piezo-bar pressure type probe measures the impact velocity or pressure of a moving debris cloud. It measures pressures up to 200,000 psi and peak pressures may be recorded with a total pulse duration between 5 and 65 musec.

  7. High pressure optical combustion probe

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, S.D.; Richards, G.A.

    1995-06-01

    The Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center has developed a combustion probe for monitoring flame presence and heat release. The technology involved is a compact optical detector of the OH radical`s UV fluorescence. The OH Monitor/Probe is designed to determine the flame presence and provide a qualitative signal proportional to the flame intensity. The probe can be adjusted to monitor a specific volume in the combustion zone to track spatial fluctuations in the flame. The probe is capable of nanosecond time response and is usually slowed electronically to fit the flame characteristics. The probe is a sapphire rod in a stainless steel tube which may be inserted into the combustion chamber and pointed at the flame zone. The end of the sapphire rod is retracted into the SS tube to define a narrow optical collection cone. The collection cone may be adjusted to fit the experiment. The fluorescence signal is collected by the sapphire rod and transmitted through a UV transmitting, fused silica, fiber optic to the detector assembly. The detector is a side window photomultiplier (PMT) with a 310 run line filter. A Hamamatsu photomultiplier base combined with a integral high voltage power supply permits this to be a low voltage device. Electronic connections include: a power lead from a modular DC power supply for 15 VDC; a control lead for 0-1 volts to control the high voltage level (and therefore gain); and a lead out for the actual signal. All low voltage connections make this a safe and easy to use device while still delivering the sensitivity required.

  8. Dynamic Pressure Probes Developed for Supersonic Flow-Field Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porro, A. Robert

    2001-01-01

    A series of dynamic flow-field pressure probes were developed for use in large-scale supersonic wind tunnels at the NASA Glenn Research Center. These flow-field probes include pitot and static pressure probes that can capture fast-acting flow-field pressure transients occurring on a millisecond timescale. The pitot and static probes can be used to determine local Mach number time histories during a transient event. The flow-field pressure probe contains four major components: 1) Static pressure aerodynamic tip; 2) Pressure-sensing cartridge assembly; 3) Pitot pressure aerodynamic tip; 4) Mounting stem. This modular design allows for a variety of probe tips to be used for a specific application. Here, the focus is on flow-field pressure measurements in supersonic flows, so we developed a cone-cylinder static pressure tip and a pitot pressure tip. Alternatively, probe tips optimized for subsonic and transonic flows could be used with this design. The pressure-sensing cartridge assembly allows the simultaneous measurement of steady-state and transient pressure which allows continuous calibration of the dynamic pressure transducer.

  9. A short static-pressure probe design for supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinckney, S. Z.

    1975-01-01

    A static-pressure probe design concept was developed which has the static holes located close to the probe tip and is relatively insensitive to probe angle of attack and circumferential static hole location. Probes were constructed with 10 and 20 deg half-angle cone tips followed by a tangent conic curve section and a tangent cone section of 2, 3, or 3.5 deg, and were tested at Mach numbers of 2.5 and 4.0 and angles of attack up to 12 deg. Experimental results indicate that for stream Mach numbers of 2.5 and 4.0 and probe angle of attack within + or - 10 deg, values of stream static pressure can be determined from probe calibration to within about + or - 4 percent. If the probe is aligned within about 7 deg of the flow experimental results indicated, the stream static pressures can be determined to within 2 percent from probe calibration.

  10. Sensor failure detection and management scheme for pressure probes using Kalman filtering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, N. Shantha

    1995-06-01

    For high performance, high angle of attack fighter aircraft, accurate and high fidelity airdata parameters are crucial for the flight control system. At high angle of attack, where small changes in angle of attack can greatly influence aerodynamic properties of the aircraft, the problem of flight control augmentation is extremely complicated. In this flight regime, it is critical that accurate measurements of airdata parameters including angle of attack, angle of sideslip and dynamic pressure are made available for use by the flight augmentation system. But at high angle of attack, it is difficult to measure airdata accurately using conventional intrusive sensing devices, because of upstream vortices and flow separation. To overcome this difficulty, a non-intrusive Flush Airdata Sensing system (FADS) has been developed. The FADS is a simple hardware item with the basic fixture being a hemispherical or conical cap mounted at the nose of the fuselage. A number of small holes are drilled around the cap in annular rings. The pressure at each hole is measured by pressure transducers and related to airdata parameters by a non-linear aerodynamic model derived from potential flow. A 7-hole pressure probe, proposed by the DLR for implementation on an advanced experimental fighter aircraft for airdata measurements at high angle of attack, has redundant measurements in angle of attack, angle of side slip and dynamic pressure to ensure control system augmentation at high angle of attack, in spite of some pressure sensor failure or malfunctioning. Such a system requires an algorithm which detects pressure sensor failure and performs fault management in real time. In this report, a concept for an algorithm using a recursive Kalman filtering technique has been proposed and developed. The algorithm is tested on a 5 hole pressure probe which is used in experimental flights of C-160 Transall aircraft.

  11. Single-Tip Probe Senses Pressure Or Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimarchi, Paul

    1993-01-01

    Single-tip probe designed for use in supersonic wind tunnel switched to sense pressure or temperature measurements nearly simultaneous at that point. Includes small valve like valves used in bicycle and automotive tires, called "Schraeder valve". Tire valve opened or closed by push rod and solenoid. In open position, flow past thermocouple enables measurements of temperature. In closed position, flow blocked and pressure in probe backs up to pressure transducer.

  12. High-Resolution NMR Probe for Experiments at High Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, L.; Reiner, C.; Jonas, J.

    A 300 MHz high-resolution, high-pressure NMR probe which operates in the pressure range of 1 bar to 9 kbar at temperatures of -30 to 100°C is described. Specialized novel design features of the probe are discussed and test spectra showing resolution better than 1 Hz (<3.0 × 10 -9) for 8 mm samples are presented. Potential biochemical applications of this probe are illustrated by experiments dealing with the pressure-induced unfolding of hen egg white lysozyme.

  13. A stagnation pressure probe for droplet-laden air flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, S. N. B.; Leonardo, M.; Ehresman, C. M.

    1985-01-01

    It is often of interest in a droplet-laden gas flow to obtain the stagnation pressure of both the gas phase and the mixture. A flow-decelerating probe (TPF), with separate, purged ports for the gas phase and the mixture and with a bleed for accumulating liquid at the closed end, has been developed. Measurements obtained utilizing the TPF in a nearly isothermal air-water droplet mixture flow in a smooth circular pipe under various conditions of flow velocity, pressure, liquid concentration and droplet size are presented and compared with data obtained under identical conditions with a conventional, gas phase stagnation pressure probe (CSP). The data obtained with the CSP and TPF probes are analyzed to determine the applicability of the two probes in relation to the multi-phase characteristics of the flow and the geometry of the probe.

  14. Miniature Flow-Direction/Pitot-Static Pressure Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, George C., Jr.; Coombs, David S.; Eves, John W.; Price, Howard E.; Vasquez, Peter

    1989-01-01

    Precision flow-direction/pitot-static pressure probes, ranging from 0.035 to 0.090 inch (0.89 to 2.29 mm) in outside diameter, successfully fabricated and calibrated for use in Langley 20-inch Mach 6 Tunnel. Probes simultaneously measure flow direction and static and pitot pressures in flow fields about configurations in hypersonic flow at temperatures up to 500 degree F (260 degree C).

  15. Pressure probe and hot-film probe rsponses to acoustic excitation in mean flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, T. L.; Jones, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to compare the relative responses of a hot-film probe and a pressure probe positioned in a flow duct carrying mean flow and progressive acoustic waves. The response of each probe was compared with that of a condenser-type microphone flush mounted in the duct wall for flow Mach numbers up to about 0.5. The response of the pressure probe was less than that of the flush-mounted microphone by not more than about 2.1 dB at the highest centerline Mach number. This decreased response of the probe can likely be attributed to flow-induced impedance changes at the probe sensor orifices. The response of the hot-film probe, expressed in terms of fluctuating pressure, was greater than that of the flush-mounted microphone by as much as 6.0 dB at the two higher centerline Mach numbers. Removal of the contribution from fluctuating temperature in the hot-film analytical model greatly improved the agreement between the two transducer responses.

  16. Probing Hydrogen Diffusion under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bove, L. E.; Klotz, S.; Strassle, T.; Saitta, M.

    2012-12-01

    The study of the microscopic mechanism governing hydrogen and hydrogen-based liquids (as water, ammonia and methane) diffusion is crucial for a variety of scientific issues spanning most of natural sciences. As an example, characterizing hydrogen diffusion in a confined medium, like in porous systems or zeolites, is fundamental in problems relating to environment, hydrogen storage and industrial applications [1]. The presence of water diffusion in the minerals of the Earth's mantle have strong incidence on the processes governing volcanic eruptions and intermediate-depth seismicity. As last example, knowing in details the microscopic dynamics of hydrogen-based simple liquids under extreme conditions is essential in order to interpret observations and develop models of planet interiors [2]. On the other hand, water and other simple hydrogen-based liquids have always been key systems in the development of modern condensed-matter physics, because of their simple electronic structure and the peculiar properties deriving from the hydrogen-bond network. Their high compressibility and chemical reactivity have made these systems very challenging to study experimentally under static high P-T conditions. In the last few years, a large effort has been undertaken by several groups around the world [2] to extend the static and dynamic techniques to high temperatures and pressures, a program in which our group has been actively involved [3-6]. However, while the structure of water and other hydrogenated liquids of geological interest, is now known up to almost 20 GPa, the study of their transport properties greatly lags behind. We have recently developed a new large-volume gasket-anvil ensemble for the Paris-Edinburgh press based on a novel toroidal design [7], which allows to perform quasi elastic neutron scattering measurements on hydrogen based liquids up to one order of magnitude higher pressures (5 GPa) respect to what was achievable with standard methods [8]. The large

  17. Acoustics of the piezo-electric pressure probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutt, G. S.

    1974-01-01

    Acoustical properties of a piezoelectric device are reported for measuring the pressure in the plasma flow from an MPD arc. A description and analysis of the acoustical behavior in a piezoelectric probe is presented for impedance matching and damping. The experimental results are presented in a set of oscillographic records.

  18. Design of a Dual-Pressure Port Penetration Probe for Pore Pressure Measurements in Ocean Drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, H.; Flemings, P. B.; Germaine, J. T.; Chartier, M.

    2004-12-01

    We are building a tapered probe to measure pore pressure and hydraulic properties in low permeability sediments within boreholes. To minimize the time required for measurement we are using two pressure ports: one close to the narrow diameter tip and one on the large-diameter shaft. In-situ pore pressure is estimated within a short time by a two-point intersection method using the pressure dissipation recorded at the two pressure ports. A parametric study is presented to evaluate how possible changes in the probe geometry affects pore pressure dissipation at the pressure ports. The Strain Path Method (SPM) and a total stress soil model (MIT-T1) are used to predict the initial undrained pore pressure response upon insertion of series of hypothetical geometries. Uncoupled-isotropic consolidation is applied to simulate the subsequent excess pore pressure dissipation. The modeled response to insertion in normally consolidated Boston Blue Clay includes the following. Decreasing the length of the thin probe or increasing the diameter of the large shaft results in more rapid two-point intersection and a higher pressure at the two-point intersection. If the second pressure port is placed on the face of the tapered section, instead of the larger-diameter shaft, the intersection time is reduced. We are striving for a tool geometry that generates a consistent two-point intersection time that occurs as rapidly as possible in a range of soil properties.

  19. Probing matter at extreme Gbar pressures at the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Kritcher, A. L.; Doeppner, T.; Swift, D.; Hawreliak, J.; Collins, G.; Nilsen, J.; Bachmann, B.; Dewald, E.; Strozzi, D.; Felker, S.; Landen, O. L.; Jones, O.; Thomas, C.; Hammer, J.; Keane, C.; Lee, H. J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Rothman, S.; Chapman, D.; Kraus, D.; Neumayer, P.; Falcone, R. W.

    2013-12-04

    Here we describe a platform to measure the material properties, specifically the equation of state and electron temperature, at pressures of 100 Mbar to a Gbar at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In our experiments we launch spherically convergent shock waves into solid CH, CD, or diamond samples using a hohlraum radiation drive, in an indirect drive laser geometry. X-ray radiography is applied to measure the shock speed and infer the mass density profile, enabling determination of the material pressure and Hugoniot equation of state. X-ray scattering is applied to measure the electron temperature through probing of the electron velocity distribution via Doppler broadening.

  20. Uncertainty of Five-Hole Probe Measurements. [of total flow pressure, static pressure, and flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichert, Bruce A.; Wendt, Bruce J.

    1994-01-01

    A new algorithm for five-hole probe calibration and data reduction using a non-nulling technique was developed, verified, and reported earlier (Wendt and Reichert, 1993). The new algorithm's simplicity permits an analytical treatment of the propagation of uncertainty in five-hole probe measurement. The objectives of the uncertainty analysis are to quantify the uncertainty of five-hole probe results (e.g., total pressure, static pressure, and flow direction) and to determine the dependence of the result uncertainty on the uncertainty of all underlying experimental and calibration measurands. This study outlines a general procedure that other researchers may use to determine five-hole probe result uncertainty and provides guidance for improving the measurement technique.

  1. Compact cantilever force probe for plasma pressure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Nedzelskiy, I. S.; Silva, C.; Fernandes, H.; Duarte, P.; Varandas, C. A. F.

    2007-12-15

    A simple, compact cantilever force probe (CFP) has been developed for plasma pressure measurements. It is based on the pull-in phenomenon well known in microelectromechanical-system electrostatic actuators. The probe consists of a thin (25 {mu}m) titanium foil cantilever (38 mm of length and 14 mm of width) and a fixed electrode separated by a 0.75 mm gap. The probe is shielded by brass box and enclosed into boron nitride housing with a 9 mm diameter window for exposing part of cantilever surface to the plasma. When the voltage is applied between the cantilever and the electrode, an attractive electrostatic force is counterbalanced by cantilever restoring spring force. At some threshold (pull-in) voltage the system becomes unstable and the cantilever abruptly pulls toward the fixed electrode until breakdown occurs between them. The threshold voltage is sensitive to an additional externally applied force, while a simple detection of breakdown occurrence can be used to measure that threshold voltage value. The sensitivity to externally applied forces obtained during calibration is 0.28 V/{mu}N (17.8 V/Pa for pressure). However, the resolution of the measurements is {+-}0.014 mN ({+-}0.22 Pa) due to the statistical scattering in measured pull-in voltages. The diagnostic temporal resolution is {approx}10 ms, being determined by the dynamics of pull-in process. The probe has been tested in the tokamak ISTTOK edge plasma, and a plasma force of {approx}0.07 mN (plasma pressure {approx}1.1 Pa) has been obtained near the leading edge of the limiter. This value is in a reasonable agreement with the estimations using local plasma parameters measured by electrical probes. The use of the described CFP is limited by a heat flux of Q{approx}10{sup 6} W/m{sup 2} due to uncontrollable rise of the cantilever temperature ({delta}T{approx}20 deg. C) during CFP response time.

  2. Probing matter at extreme Gbar pressures at the NIF

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kritcher, A. L.; Doeppner, T.; Swift, D.; Hawreliak, J.; Collins, G.; Nilsen, J.; Bachmann, B.; Dewald, E.; Strozzi, D.; Felker, S.; et al

    2013-12-04

    Here we describe a platform to measure the material properties, specifically the equation of state and electron temperature, at pressures of 100 Mbar to a Gbar at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In our experiments we launch spherically convergent shock waves into solid CH, CD, or diamond samples using a hohlraum radiation drive, in an indirect drive laser geometry. X-ray radiography is applied to measure the shock speed and infer the mass density profile, enabling determination of the material pressure and Hugoniot equation of state. X-ray scattering is applied to measure the electron temperature through probing of the electron velocitymore » distribution via Doppler broadening.« less

  3. Low pressure characteristics of the multipole resonance probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Oberrath, Jens

    2014-10-01

    The term ``Active plasma resonance spectroscopy'' (APRS) denotes a class of related techniques which utilize, for diagnostic purposes, the natural ability of plasmas to resonate on or near the electron plasma frequency ωpe. The basic idea dates back to the early days of discharge physics but has recently found renewed interest as an approach to industry-compatible plasma diagnostics: A radio frequent signal (in the GHz range) is coupled into the plasma via an antenna or probe, the spectral response is recorded (with the same or another antenna or probe), and a mathematical model is used to determine plasma parameters like the electron density or the electron temperature. When the method is applied to low pressure plasmas (of a few Pa and lower), kinetic effects must be accounted for in the mathematical model. This contribution studies a particular realization of the APRS scheme, the geometrically and electrically symmetric Multipole Resonance Probe (MRP). It is shown that the resonances of the MRP exhibit a residual damping in the limit p --> 0 which cannot be explained by Ohmic dissipation but only by kinetic effects. Supported by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) in the framework of the PluTO project.

  4. An improved static probe design. [for in-stream pressure measurement in supersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinckney, S. Z.

    1974-01-01

    A new static probe design is described in which the static holes are located much closer to the tip than in conventional probes. The new probe shows promise for use in some situations where conventional probes become highly inaccurate. An additional advantage of the new design is that, when used in static pressure survey rakes, the probes can be located much closer together than in conventional designs and still ensure that disturbances from neighboring probe tips do not affect the static readings.

  5. Electric probe investigations of microwave generated, atmospheric pressure, plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Porteanu, H. E.; Kuehn, S.; Gesche, R.

    2010-07-15

    We examine the applicability of the Langmuir-type of characterization for atmospheric pressure plasma jets generated in a millimeter-size cavity microwave resonator at 2.45 GHz. Wide range I-V characteristics of helium, argon, nitrogen, air and oxygen are presented for different gas fluxes, distances probe-resonator, and microwave powers. A detailed analysis is performed for the fine variation in the current around the floating potential. A simplified theory specially developed for this case is presented, considering the ionic and electronic saturation currents and the floating potential. Based on this theory, we conclude that, while the charge carrier density depends on gas flow, distance to plasma source, and microwave absorbed power, the electron temperature is quite independent of these parameters. The resulting plasma parameters for helium, argon, and nitrogen are presented.

  6. Electron probe microanalysis for high pressure minerals investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentiev, Y. G.; Sobolev, N. V.; Korolyuk, V. N.; Usova, L. V.

    2007-12-01

    In the early 1968 in Siberian Branch of the Academy of Sciences of USSR, Novosibirsk, electron probe microanalyzer MS-46 was installed and started to operate for high pressure minerals EPMA investigation. In collaboration with Geophysical Laboratory of Carnegie Institution (Drs. F.R. Boyd, F. Schairer) a set of standards for silicates analysis was developed. Technique for quantitative analysis was developed (Lavrentiev et al., 1974, Zavodsk. Lab., v. 40, p. 657-661) and applied for the first in the USSR analyses of pyropes, associated with Siberian diamonds both as inclusions and xenoliths of diamondiferous peridotites (Sobolev et al., 1969, Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR, v. 188, p. 1141-1143; v. 189, p. 162-165). As a result of that research, unique Cr-rich subcalcic pyropes with high knorringite content were found in diamond-bearing kimberlites only and new mineralogical criteria for diamond exploration were developed (Sobolev 1971, Geol. Geofiz., v. 12, p. 70-80) which are still in use worldwide. Further development of electron probe instruments (JXA-5A, Camebax Micro, JXA-8100) and computers, as well as development of analysis technique led to creation of large analytical database. In another field of EPMA - determination of small concentrations of elements - for the first time importance of 0.01-0.3% Na2O admixtures in garnets (Sobolev, Lavrentiev, 1971, Contrib. Min. Petr., v. 31, p. 1-12) and K2O in clinopyroxenes (Sobolev et al., 1970, Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR, v. 192, p. 1349-1352) were demonstrated. Since then, determination of sodium content in EPMA of garnets and potassium in pyroxenes became a routine technique. Last generation analyzer (JXA-8100) provided record results down to 6 ppm in detection limit of Ni in pyropes (Lavrentiev et al., Rus. Geol. Geophys., 2006, v. 47, p. 1090-1093). As a result, application of EPMA for single mineral geothermometry (currently based mainly on PIXE method) becomes possible.

  7. Hot-film static-pressure probe for surveying flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, G. C., Jr.; Weinstein, L. M.

    1981-01-01

    A static pressure probe employing hot-film sensors has been developed for the rapid measurement of the static pressure fields surrounding analytic shapes in hypersonic flows. The hot-film probe is a modification of the standard static pressure probe, consisting of a front hot-film sensor operated as a resistance thermometer, a rear sensor operated at an overheat ratio of 1.5 to 1.8 and a small sonic orifice installed inside the tubing of a conventional device. The probe has been calibrated in helium and air over a range of temperatures and pressures in a bell jar apparatus, with a repeatability of the data to within + or - 0.015 mm Hg. Comparative tests of the hot-film and conventional static pressure probes in a hypersonic helium wind tunnel at Mach 20 and various Reynolds numbers have indicated the settling time of the hot-film probe to be on the order of milliseconds, as compared with 30 sec for the conventional probe. The pressures measured by the two probes were found to be within 10% of each other. Although the hot-film probe makes flow-field static pressure surveys more practical in blowdown hypersonic wind tunnels, viscous and flow angle effects still must be assessed under the conditions of use.

  8. Pressure Probe Designs for Dynamic Pressure Measurements in a Supersonic Flow Field. [conducted in the Glenn Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porro, A. Robert

    2001-01-01

    A series of dynamic flow field pressure probes were developed for use in large-scale supersonic wind tunnels at NASA Glenn Research Center. These flow field probes include pitot, static, and five-hole conical pressure probes that are capable of capturing fast acting flow field pressure transients that occur on a millisecond time scale. The pitot and static probes can be used to determine local Mach number time histories during a transient event. The five-hole conical pressure probes are used primarily to determine local flow angularity, but can also determine local Mach number. These probes were designed, developed, and tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center. They were also used in a NASA Glenn 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) test program where they successfully acquired flow field pressure data in the vicinity of a propulsion system during an engine compressor stall and inlet unstart transient event. Details of the design, development, and subsequent use of these probes are discussed in this report.

  9. A High-Pressure, High-Resolution NMR Probe for Experiments at 500 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, Lance; Yu, Aimee; Reiner, Carl; Jonas, Jiri

    1998-07-01

    A novel high-pressure, high-resolution NMR probe is described which operates at a frequency of 500 MHz. The design features an alternative RF coil (8 mm sample tube) for high frequency, sensitivity, probe power, and resolution (< 3.0 × 10-9). The probe is capable of pressures to at least 5 kbar over a temperature range of -30 to 80°C, and has a double-tuned1H/2H circuit which can tune at1H frequencies of either 300 or 500 MHz. The sensitivity of the 300-MHz circuit is over twice that of previous 10-mm high-pressure NMR probe designs, while at 500 MHz the sensitivity is nearly five times that of previous 300-MHz pressure probes. Potential biochemical applications are demonstrated by 2D NOESY spectra of a Troponin C mutant.

  10. Application of Langmuir Probe Method to the Atmospheric Pressure Discharge Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, Hiroto; Matsumura, Yasuhiro; Nakano, Ken

    2008-12-31

    The heat balance model in the probe tip applied to atmospheric pressure plasma is constructed. Considering the natural convective heat loss, the limitation of plasma density for probe application to such a plasma is estimated. The rough limit is about n{sub e} = 10{sup 18} m{sup -3}. Four kind of materials (Cu, SUS, W, Al) are used for probe tips, and are tested in DC atmospheric pressure discharge. Heat conductivity is found to be a more important property than melting point in design of probes in high pressure discharge. DC atmospheric pressure discharge plasma parameters are obtained with our test probes. Obtained density is the order of 10{sup 17} m{sup -3} and does not contradict with the above density limitation. Change of space potential in air/Ar plasma is also confirmed.

  11. Properties of contact pressure induced by manually operated fiber-optic probes.

    PubMed

    Bregar, Maksimilijan; Cugmas, Blaž; Naglic, Peter; Hartmann, Daniela; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan; Bürmen, Miran

    2015-12-01

    We assess the properties of contact pressure applied by manually operated fiber-optic probes as a function of the operator, probe contact area, and sample stiffness. First, the mechanical properties of human skin sites with different skin structures, thicknesses, and underlying tissues were studied by in vivo indentation tests. According to the obtained results, three different homogeneous silicone skin phantoms were created to encompass the observed range of mechanical properties. The silicon phantoms were subsequently used to characterize the properties of the contact pressure by 10 experienced probe operators employing fiber-optic probes with different contact areas. A custom measurement system was used to collect the time-lapse of diffuse reflectance and applied contact pressure. The measurements were characterized by a set of features describing the transient and steady-state properties of the contact pressure and diffuse reflectance in terms of rise time, optical coupling, average value, and variability. The average applied contact pressure and contact pressure variability were found to significantly depend on the probe operator, probe contact area, and surprisingly also on the sample stiffness. Based on the presented results, we propose a set of practical guidelines for operators of manual probes. PMID:26720880

  12. Evaluation of water cooled supersonic temperature and pressure probes for application to 1366 K flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagen, Nicholas; Seiner, John M.

    1990-01-01

    Water cooled supersonic probes are developed to investigate total pressure, static pressure, and total temperature in high-temperature jet plumes and thereby determine the mean flow properties. Two probe concepts, designed for operation at up to 1366 K in a Mach 2 flow, are tested on a water cooled nozzle. The two probe designs - the unsymmetric four-tube cooling configuration and the symmetric annular cooling design - take measurements at 755, 1089, and 1366 K of the three parameters. The cooled total and static pressure readings are found to agree with previous test results with uncooled configurations. The total-temperature probe, however, is affected by the introduction of water coolant, and effect which is explained by the increased heat transfer across the thermocouple-bead surface. Further investigation of the effect of coolant on the temperature probe is proposed to mitigate the effect and calculate more accurate temperatures in jet plumes.

  13. Pressure as a probe of the physics of relaxor ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    SAMARA,GEORGE A.

    2000-01-25

    Pressure studies have provided new insights into the physics of compositionally-disordered ABO{sub 3} oxide relaxors. Specifically, results will be presented and discussed on a pressure-induced ferroelectric-to-relaxer crossover phenomenon, the continuous evolution of the energetic and dynamics of the relaxation process, and the interplay between pressure and electric field in determining the dielectric response.

  14. Probe systems for measuring static pressure and turbulence intensity in fluid streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for measuring time-averaged static or ambient pressure and turbulence intensity in a turbulent stream are discussed. The procedure involves placing a plurality of probes in the stream. Each probe responds in a different manner to characteristics of the fluid stream, preferably as a result of having varying cross sections. The responses from the probes are used to eliminate unwanted components in the measured quantities for accurate determination of selected characteristics.

  15. Toroids as NMR detectors in metal pressure probes and in flow systems

    DOEpatents

    Rathke, Jerome W.

    1991-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance probe to measure the properties of a sample under high pressure conditions. The apparatus employs a free standing, elongated toroidal coil as the RF transmitter and receiver.

  16. Development of Dynamic Flow Field Pressure Probes Suitable for Use in Large Scale Supersonic Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porro, A. Robert

    2000-01-01

    A series of dynamic flow field pressure probes were developed for use in large-scale supersonic wind tunnels at NASA Glenn Research Center. These flow field probes include pitot, static, and five-hole conical pressure probes that are capable of capturing fast acting flow field pressure transients that occur on a millisecond time scale. The pitot and static probes can be used to determine local Mach number time histories during a transient event. The five-hole conical pressure probes are used primarily to determine local flow angularity, but can also determine local Mach number. These probes were designed, developed, and tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center. They were also used in a NASA Glenn 10-by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) test program where they successfully acquired flow field pressure data in the vicinity of a propulsion system during an engine compressor staff and inlet unstart transient event. Details of the design, development, and subsequent use of these probes are discussed in this report.

  17. Mach-Number Measurement with Laser and Pressure Probes in Humid Supersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, G. C.

    2008-01-01

    Mach-number measurements using a nonintrusive optical technique, laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA), are compared to pressure probes in humid supersonic airflow. The two techniques agree well in dry flow (-35 C dew point), but LITA measurements show about five times larger fractional change in Mach number than that of the pressure-probe when water is purposefully introduced into the flow. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed.

  18. Evaluation of water cooled supersonic temperature and pressure probes for application to 2000 F flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagen, Nicholas T.; Seiner, John M.

    1990-01-01

    The development of water cooled supersonic probes used to study high temperature jet plumes is addressed. These probes are: total pressure, static pressure, and total temperature. The motivation for these experiments is the determination of high temperature supersonic jet mean flow properties. A 3.54 inch exit diameter water cooled nozzle was used in the tests. It is designed for exit Mach 2 at 2000 F exit total temperature. Tests were conducted using water cooled probes capable of operating in Mach 2 flow, up to 2000 F total temperature. Of the two designs tested, an annular cooling method was chosen as superior. Data at the jet exit planes, and along the jet centerline, were obtained for total temperatures of 900 F, 1500 F, and 2000 F, for each of the probes. The data obtained from the total and static pressure probes are consistent with prior low temperature results. However, the data obtained from the total temperature probe was affected by the water coolant. The total temperature probe was tested up to 2000 F with, and without, the cooling system turned on to better understand the heat transfer process at the thermocouple bead. The rate of heat transfer across the thermocouple bead was greater when the coolant was turned on than when the coolant was turned off. This accounted for the lower temperature measurement by the cooled probe. The velocity and Mach number at the exit plane and centerline locations were determined from the Rayleigh-Pitot tube formula.

  19. Calibration of seven-hole pressure probes for use in fluid flows with large angularity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilliac, Gregory G.

    1989-01-01

    Described here is the calibration of a non-nulling, conical, seven-hole pressure probe over a large range of flow onset angles. The calibration procedure is based on the use of differential pressures to determine the three components of velocity. The method allows determination of the flow angle to within 0.5 deg and velocity magnitude to approximately 1.0 percent. Also included is an examination of the factors which limit the use of the probe, a description of the measurement chain, an error analysis, and a typical experimental result. In addition, a new general analytical model of pressure probe behavior is described and the validity of the model is demonstrated by comparing it with experimentally measured calibration data for a three-hole yaw meter and a seven-hole probe.

  20. Characterization of laser-driven shock waves in solids using a fiber optic pressure probe

    SciTech Connect

    Cranch, Geoffrey A.; Lunsford, Robert; Grun, Jacob; Weaver, James; Compton, Steve; May, Mark; Kostinski, Natalie

    2013-11-08

    Measurement of laser-driven shock wave pressure in solid blocks of polymethyl methacrylate is demonstrated using fiber optic pressure probes. Three probes based on a fiber Fabry–Perot, fiber Bragg grating, and interferometric fiber tip sensor are tested and compared. Shock waves are generated using a high-power laser focused onto a thin foil target placed in close proximity to the test blocks. The fiber Fabry–Perot sensor appears capable of resolving the shock front with a rise time of 91 ns. As a result, the peak pressure is estimated, using a separate shadowgraphy measurement, to be 3.4 GPa.

  1. High pressure as a probe of the solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruoff, Arthur L.

    1994-07-01

    It is a great pleasure and honor to receive the Percy Williams Bridgman Award. Henry Eyring, my Ph.D. advisor, instilled in me a desire to unravel the secrets of nature in the chemical and physical world. He continued what my mother had begun. From my father I learned the virtue and satisfaction of hard work. In reading Percy Bridgman's The Physics of High Pressure [1] after I came to Cornell, I became intrigued by the high-pressure variable, so I owe much to him. I received valuable assistance and encouragement from George Kennedy and Harry Drickamer (the first winner of the Bridgman Award) and later from Alvin Van Valkenburg (a co-inventor with three others of the diamond anvil cell). Most importantly, I received encouragement from my wife, Enid Seaton Ruoff, to carry out what is sometimes the arduous pursuit of science—a pursuit that involves long working hours—and I want especially to thank her.

  2. Magnetic and Pressure Probes on the HyperV Contoured Coaxial Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messer, S.; Case, A.; Brockington, S.; Bomgardner, R.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Elton, R.

    2008-11-01

    Magnetic and pressure data from several contoured-gap coaxial railguns is presented. These plasma guns use an injected plasma annulus and shaped inner and outer electrodes to mitigate the blow-by instability. Passive magnetic probes and photodiodes search for evidence of the blow-by instability and azimuthal asymmetries. Stagnation pressure and velocity are compared for different size guns and for different driving voltages and currents.

  3. Fast pressure probe measurements of a high-velocity plasma plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messer, S.; Case, A.; Bomgardner, R.; Phillips, M.; Witherspoon, F. D.

    2009-06-01

    This article reports measurements of stagnation pressure on a contoured coaxial gun, now installed at the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment [R. Ellis et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 055704 (2005)]. The impact of the plasma on the stationary probe is consistent with adiabatic compression and supersonic flow. Measured pressure signals are consistent with a shock traveling at 110 km/s and a following flow with speed of 90 km/s. At late times, the pressure profile is consistent with an adiabatically expanding plasma that fills the vacuum chamber.

  4. Using x-rays to probe high pressure behavior at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, W. L.

    2011-12-01

    As we move into the next 50 years of high-pressure studies of the Earth, researchers continue to push the envelope in terms of reaching higher pressures while being able to characterize samples using a suite of techniques. To answer questions regarding our planet's interior and fundamentally bring the study of the deep Earth on par with surface studies, we need in-situ high P-T studies by TEM-like crystallography above 100 GPa, SEM-like composition probe in 3D, EELS-like probe for electronic, oxidation and bonding properties, and imaging and 3D tomography with optical sharpness, but orders of magnitude higher resolution. We will explore developments of these new types of high pressure nanoprobes, and how the use of nanoscale x-ray probes can also help overcome several key limitations in ultrahigh-pressure science and technology, namely the resolution of multiple samples, stress gradients, and crystal domains in the sub-μm-size, multimegabar pressure regime of diamond anvil cells. A review of the progress of the past half century of diamond anvil cells and x-rays will be discussed.

  5. An Experimental Evaluation of the Performance of Two Combination Pitot Pressure Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arend, David J.; Saunders, John D.

    2009-01-01

    Experimental tests have been completed which recorded the ability of two combination steady state and high response time varying Pitot probe designs to accurately measure steady stagnation pressure at a single location in a flow field. Tests were conducted of double-barreled and coannular Prati probes in a 3.5 in. diameter free jet probe calibration facility from Mach 0.1 to 0.9. Geometric symmetry and pitch (-40 deg to 40 deg) and yaw (0 deg to 40 deg) angle actuation were used to fully evaluate the probes. These tests revealed that the double-barreled configuration induced error in its steady state measurement at zero incidence that increased consistently with jet Mach number to 1.1 percent at Mach 0.9. For all Mach numbers, the double-barreled probe nulled at a pitch angle of approximately 7.0 deg and provided inconsistent measurements when yawed. The double-barreled probe provided adequate measurements via both its steady state and high response tubes (within +/- 0.15 percent accuracy) over unacceptable ranges of biased pitch and inconsistent yaw angles which varied with Mach number. By comparison, the coannular probe provided accurate measurements (at zero incidence) for all jet Mach numbers as well as over a flow angularity range which varied from +/- 26.0 deg at Mach 0.3 deg to +/- 14.0 deg at Mach 0.9. Based on these results, the Prati probe is established as the preferred design. Further experimental tests are recommended to document the frequency response characteristics of the Prati probe.

  6. A multi-probe thermophoretic soot sampling system for high-pressure diffusion flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Alex M.; Gülder, Ömer L.

    2016-05-01

    Optical diagnostics and physical probing of the soot processes in high pressure combustion pose challenges that are not faced in atmospheric flames. One of the preferred methods of studying soot in atmospheric flames is in situ thermophoretic sampling followed by transmission electron microscopy imaging and analysis for soot sizing and morphology. The application of this method of sampling to high pressures has been held back by various operational and mechanical problems. In this work, we describe a rotating disk multi-probe thermophoretic soot sampling system, driven by a microstepping stepper motor, fitted into a high-pressure chamber capable of producing sooting laminar diffusion flames up to 100 atm. Innovative aspects of the sampling system design include an easy and precise control of the sampling time down to 2.6 ms, avoidance of the drawbacks of the pneumatic drivers used in conventional thermophoretic sampling systems, and the capability to collect ten consecutive samples in a single experimental run. Proof of principle experiments were performed using this system in a laminar diffusion flame of methane, and primary soot diameter distributions at various pressures up to 10 atm were determined. High-speed images of the flame during thermophoretic sampling were recorded to assess the influence of probe intrusion on the flow field of the flame.

  7. A multi-probe thermophoretic soot sampling system for high-pressure diffusion flames.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Alex M; Gülder, Ömer L

    2016-05-01

    Optical diagnostics and physical probing of the soot processes in high pressure combustion pose challenges that are not faced in atmospheric flames. One of the preferred methods of studying soot in atmospheric flames is in situ thermophoretic sampling followed by transmission electron microscopy imaging and analysis for soot sizing and morphology. The application of this method of sampling to high pressures has been held back by various operational and mechanical problems. In this work, we describe a rotating disk multi-probe thermophoretic soot sampling system, driven by a microstepping stepper motor, fitted into a high-pressure chamber capable of producing sooting laminar diffusion flames up to 100 atm. Innovative aspects of the sampling system design include an easy and precise control of the sampling time down to 2.6 ms, avoidance of the drawbacks of the pneumatic drivers used in conventional thermophoretic sampling systems, and the capability to collect ten consecutive samples in a single experimental run. Proof of principle experiments were performed using this system in a laminar diffusion flame of methane, and primary soot diameter distributions at various pressures up to 10 atm were determined. High-speed images of the flame during thermophoretic sampling were recorded to assess the influence of probe intrusion on the flow field of the flame. PMID:27250464

  8. Behavior of plant plasma membranes under hydrostatic pressure as monitored by fluorescent environment-sensitive probes.

    PubMed

    Roche, Yann; Klymchenko, Andrey S; Gerbeau-Pissot, Patricia; Gervais, Patrick; Mély, Yves; Simon-Plas, Françoise; Perrier-Cornet, Jean-Marie

    2010-08-01

    We monitored the behavior of plasma membrane (PM) isolated from tobacco cells (BY-2) under hydrostatic pressures up to 3.5kbar at 30 degrees C, by steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy using the newly introduced environment-sensitive probe F2N12S and also Laurdan and di-4-ANEPPDHQ. The consequences of sterol depletion by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin were also studied. We found that application of hydrostatic pressure led to a marked decrease of hydration as probed by F2N12S and to an increase of the generalized polarization excitation (GPex) of Laurdan. We observed that the hydration effect of sterol depletion was maximal between 1 and 1.5 kbar but was much less important at higher pressures (above 2 kbar) where both parameters reached a plateau value. The presence of a highly dehydrated gel state, insensitive to the sterol content, was thus proposed above 2.5 kbar. However, the F2N12S polarity parameter and the di-4-ANEPPDHQ intensity ratio showed strong effect on sterol depletion, even at very high pressures (2.5-3.5 kbar), and supported the ability of sterols to modify the electrostatic properties of membrane, notably its dipole potential, in a highly dehydrated gel phase. We thus suggested that BY-2 PM undergoes a complex phase behavior in response to the hydrostatic pressure and we also emphasized the role of phytosterols to regulate the effects of high hydrostatic pressure on plant PM. PMID:20381451

  9. Development of a scanning nanopipette probe microscope for fine processing using atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimatsu, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Hiromitsu; Nakamura, Atsushi; Ogino, Akihisa; Nagatsu, Masaaki; Iwata, Futoshi

    2016-08-01

    We developed a novel technique for fine material processing based on a localized atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) using a scanning probe microscope equipped with a nanopipette. Using a nanopipette — a tapered glass capillary with an aperture of sub-micrometer diameter — as a nozzle makes it possible to localize the discharge area of the APPJ for fine surface processing. The nanopipette can also be used as a probe for a scanning probe microscope operated with shear-force feedback control, which is capable of positioning the pipette edge in the vicinity of material surfaces for APPJ processing and imaging of the processed surface. Sub-micrometer holes and line patterns were successfully processed on a photoresist film. It was possible to control the size of the processed patterns by varying the applied pulse voltage and the distance between the pipette and the surface.

  10. Pressure-Induced Glass Transition Probed via the Mobility of Coumarin 1 Fluorescent Molecule.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Marco

    2016-05-12

    The route to form a glass is generally achieved upon cooling where the slowing down might be interpreted as the trapping of molecules in potential wells. On the other hand, isothermal compression induces a glassy state by modifying the molecular packing ending in jamming. Here, we focus on how isothermal compression perturbs the mobility of a probe molecule in three different host liquids up to the pressure-induced glass transition. By use of the fluorescence recovery technique, the diffusion of the fluorescent molecule Coumarin 1 (C1) is measured in poly(propylene glycol) (PPG-1000M and -2700M), in the fragile van der Waals propylene carbonate (PC), and in hydrogen-bonded methanol and ethanol. High pressures up to 6 GPa are obtained with a diamond anvil cell. In PC at a pressure ∼1.3 GPa close to the glass-transition pressure, the diffusion coefficient of C1 follows an Arrhenius behavior with an ∼5 orders of magnitude increase of the diffusive time. No decoupling from the Stokes-Einstein equation is noticed. A similar exponential behavior is measured in ethanol and methanol but extended to different pressure ranges up to 2.5 and 6.2 GPa, respectively. In PPG-1000M a decoupling from the Stokes-Einstein relation is observed between 0.3 and 0.8 GPa that could be related to a modification of the interaction between polymer segments and the probe molecule. These results might indicate that interaction between probe and dynamic heterogeneities become less important under applied pressure, unlike in the temperature-induced glass transition. PMID:27110923

  11. Dipyrenylphosphatidylcholines as membrane fluidity probes. Pressure and temperature dependence of the intramolecular excimer formation rate.

    PubMed Central

    Sassaroli, M; Vauhkonen, M; Somerharju, P; Scarlata, S

    1993-01-01

    We have measured the pressure dependence of the intramolecular excimer formation rate, K(p), for di-(1'-pyrenedecanoyl)-phosphatidylcholine (dipy10PC) probes in single-component lipid multilamellar vesicles (MLV) as a function of temperature. Apparent volumes of activation (V(a)) for intramolecular excimer formation are obtained from the slopes of plots of log K(p) versus P. For liquid-crystalline saturated lipid MLV (DMPC and DPPC), these plots are linear and yield a unique V(a) at each temperature, whereas for unsaturated lipids (POPC and DOPC) they are curvilinear and V(a) appears to decrease with pressure. The isothermal pressure induced phase transition is marked by an abrupt drop in the values of K(p). The pressure to temperature equivalence values, dPm/dT, estimated from the midpoint of the transitions, are 47.0, 43.5, and 52.5 bar degree C-1 for DMPC, DPPC, and POPC, respectively. In liquid-crystalline DMPC, V(a) decreases linearly as a function of temperature, with a coefficient -dVa/dT = 0.65 +/- 0.11 ml degree C-1 mol-1. Using a modified free volume model of diffusion, we show that this value corresponds to the thermal expansivity of DMPC. Both the apparent energy and entropy of activation, Ea and delta Sa, increase with pressure in DMPC, whereas both decrease in POPC and DOPC. This difference is attributed to the sensitivity of the dynamics and/or packing of the dipy10PC probes to the location of the cis-double bonds in the chains of the unsaturated host phospholipids. Finally, the atmospheric pressure values of Ea and delta Sa for the four host MLV examined are shown to be linearly related. The relevance of this finding with respect to the structure of the excimers formed by the dipy10PC probes is briefly discussed. PMID:8431538

  12. Temperature and pressure effects on capacitance probe cryogenic liquid level measurement accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Lawrence G.; Haberbusch, Mark

    1993-01-01

    The inaccuracies of liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen level measurements by use of a coaxial capacitance probe were investigated as a function of fluid temperatures and pressures. Significant liquid level measurement errors were found to occur due to the changes in the fluids dielectric constants which develop over the operating temperature and pressure ranges of the cryogenic storage tanks. The level measurement inaccuracies can be reduced by using fluid dielectric correction factors based on measured fluid temperatures and pressures. The errors in the corrected liquid level measurements were estimated based on the reported calibration errors of the temperature and pressure measurement systems. Experimental liquid nitrogen (LN2) and liquid hydrogen (LH2) level measurements were obtained using the calibrated capacitance probe equations and also by the dielectric constant correction factor method. The liquid levels obtained by the capacitance probe for the two methods were compared with the liquid level estimated from the fluid temperature profiles. Results show that the dielectric constant corrected liquid levels agreed within 0.5 percent of the temperature profile estimated liquid level. The uncorrected dielectric constant capacitance liquid level measurements deviated from the temperature profile level by more than 5 percent. This paper identifies the magnitude of liquid level measurement error that can occur for LN2 and LH2 fluids due to temperature and pressure effects on the dielectric constants over the tank storage conditions from 5 to 40 psia. A method of reducing the level measurement errors by using dielectric constant correction factors based on fluid temperature and pressure measurements is derived. The improved accuracy by use of the correction factors is experimentally verified by comparing liquid levels derived from fluid temperature profiles.

  13. Confined H2O molecules as local probes of pressure-induced amorphisation in faujasite.

    PubMed

    Catafesta, Jadna; Alabarse, Frederico; Levelut, Claire; Isambert, Aude; Hébert, Philippe; Kohara, Shinji; Maurin, David; Bantignies, Jean-Louis; Cambon, Olivier; Creff, Gaëlle; Roy, Pascale; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Hammouda, Tahar; Andrault, Denis; Haines, Julien

    2014-06-28

    Confined H2O molecules act as local probes for depressurization phenomena during the pressure induced amorphisation of faujasite NaX at which the OH stretching frequency first decreases and then increases almost to its room pressure value upon further compression. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis provides evidence that amorphisation corresponds to a collapse of the structure around hydrated sodium cations with strong distortion of the secondary building units (double six-membered rings, sodalite cages). Both the use of guest molecules as local probes in far- and mid-infrared spectroscopy, where we correlate intermolecular water H bonding vibrations and internal mode behaviour under confinement, and PDF analysis could be of great use to study the mechanical behaviour of other hydrated materials. PMID:24816994

  14. Could Nano-Structured Materials Enable the Improved Pressure Vessels for Deep Atmospheric Probes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, D.; Fuentes, A.; Bienstock, B.; Arnold, J. O.

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the use of Nano-Structured Materials to enable pressure vessel structures for deep atmospheric probes is shown. The topics include: 1) High Temperature/Pressure in Key X-Environments; 2) The Case for Use of Nano-Structured Materials Pressure Vessel Design; 3) Carbon based Nanomaterials; 4) Nanotube production & purification; 5) Nanomechanics of Carbon Nanotubes; 6) CNT-composites: Example (Polymer); 7) Effect of Loading sequence on Composite with 8% by volume; 8) Models for Particulate Reinforced Composites; 9) Fullerene/Ti Composite for High Strength-Insulating Layer; 10) Fullerene/Epoxy Composite for High Strength-Insulating Layer; 11) Models for Continuous Fiber Reinforced Composites; 12) Tensile Strength for Discontinuous Fiber Composite; 13) Ti + SWNT Composites: Thermal/Mechanical; 14) Ti + SWNT Composites: Tensile Strength; and 15) Nano-structured Shell for Pressure Vessels.

  15. Embedded optical probes for simultaneous pressure and temperature measurement of materials in extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, R. L.; Rodriguez, G.; Gibson, L. L.; Dattelbaum, D. M.; Stevens, G. D.; Grover, M.; Lalone, B. M.; Udd, E.

    2014-05-01

    We present recent efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to develop sensors for simultaneous, in situ pressure and temperature measurements under dynamic conditions by using an all-optical fiber-based approach. While similar tests have been done previously in deflagration-to-detonation tests (DDT), where pressure and temperature were measured to 82 kbar and 400°C simultaneously, here we demonstrate the use of embedded fiber grating sensors to obtain high temporal resolution, in situ pressure measurements in inert materials. We present two experimental demonstrations of pressure measurements: (1) under precise shock loading from a gas-gun driven plate impact and (2) under high explosive driven shock in a water filled vessel. The system capitalizes on existing telecom components and fast transient digitizing recording technology. It operates as a relatively inexpensive embedded probe (single-mode 1550 nm fiber-based Bragg grating) that provides a continuous fast pressure record during shock and/or detonation. By applying well-controlled shock wave pressure profiles to these inert materials, we study the dynamic pressure response of embedded fiber Bragg gratings to extract pressure amplitude of the shock wave and compare our results with particle velocity wave profiles measured simultaneously.

  16. Embedded optical probes for simultaneous pressure and temperature measurement of materials in extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, Richard; Rodriguez, George; Gibson, Lee; Dattelbaum, Dana; Udd, Eric

    2013-06-01

    We present a new technique for simultaneous, in situ pressure and temperature measurements under dynamic conditions by using an all-optical fiber-based approach. While similar tests have been done previously in deflagration-to-detonation tests (DDT), where pressure and temperature were measured to 82 kbar and 400 °C simultaneously, here we demonstrate the use of embedded fiber grating sensors to obtain high temporal resolution in situ pressure measurements in inert materials under precise shock loading from a gas-gun driven plate impact. The system capitalizes on existing telecom components and fast transient digitizing recording technology. It operates as a relatively inexpensive embedded probe (single-mode 1550 nm fiber-based Bragg grating - FBG) that provides a continuous fast pressure record during shock and/or detonation. Fiber Bragg grating sensors have predictable thermal and mechanical response properties with pressure spectrally shifting the reflectance peak at λ = 1550 nm to the blue and temperature shifting the peak to the red. By applying well-controlled steady shock wave pressure profiles to soft materials such as PMMA, we study the dynamic pressure response of embedded fiber Bragg gratings to extract pressure amplitude of the shock wave and compare our results with in situ particle velocity wave profiles measured simultaneously.

  17. Signal Analysis and Waveform Reconstruction of Shock Waves Generated by Underwater Electrical Wire Explosions with Piezoelectric Pressure Probes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haibin; Zhang, Yongmin; Han, Ruoyu; Jing, Yan; Wu, Jiawei; Liu, Qiaojue; Ding, Weidong; Qiu, Aici

    2016-01-01

    Underwater shock waves (SWs) generated by underwater electrical wire explosions (UEWEs) have been widely studied and applied. Precise measurement of this kind of SWs is important, but very difficult to accomplish due to their high peak pressure, steep rising edge and very short pulse width (on the order of tens of μs). This paper aims to analyze the signals obtained by two kinds of commercial piezoelectric pressure probes, and reconstruct the correct pressure waveform from the distorted one measured by the pressure probes. It is found that both PCB138 and Müller-plate probes can be used to measure the relative SW pressure value because of their good uniformities and linearities, but none of them can obtain precise SW waveforms. In order to approach to the real SW signal better, we propose a new multi-exponential pressure waveform model, which has considered the faster pressure decay at the early stage and the slower pressure decay in longer times. Based on this model and the energy conservation law, the pressure waveform obtained by the PCB138 probe has been reconstructed, and the reconstruction accuracy has been verified by the signals obtained by the Müller-plate probe. Reconstruction results show that the measured SW peak pressures are smaller than the real signal. The waveform reconstruction method is both reasonable and reliable. PMID:27110789

  18. Signal Analysis and Waveform Reconstruction of Shock Waves Generated by Underwater Electrical Wire Explosions with Piezoelectric Pressure Probes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haibin; Zhang, Yongmin; Han, Ruoyu; Jing, Yan; Wu, Jiawei; Liu, Qiaojue; Ding, Weidong; Qiu, Aici

    2016-01-01

    Underwater shock waves (SWs) generated by underwater electrical wire explosions (UEWEs) have been widely studied and applied. Precise measurement of this kind of SWs is important, but very difficult to accomplish due to their high peak pressure, steep rising edge and very short pulse width (on the order of tens of μs). This paper aims to analyze the signals obtained by two kinds of commercial piezoelectric pressure probes, and reconstruct the correct pressure waveform from the distorted one measured by the pressure probes. It is found that both PCB138 and Müller-plate probes can be used to measure the relative SW pressure value because of their good uniformities and linearities, but none of them can obtain precise SW waveforms. In order to approach to the real SW signal better, we propose a new multi-exponential pressure waveform model, which has considered the faster pressure decay at the early stage and the slower pressure decay in longer times. Based on this model and the energy conservation law, the pressure waveform obtained by the PCB138 probe has been reconstructed, and the reconstruction accuracy has been verified by the signals obtained by the Müller-plate probe. Reconstruction results show that the measured SW peak pressures are smaller than the real signal. The waveform reconstruction method is both reasonable and reliable. PMID:27110789

  19. Langmuir probe diagnostics of an atmospheric pressure, vortex-stabilized nitrogen plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B. R.; Kelly, H.

    2012-09-15

    Langmuir probe measurements in an atmospheric pressure direct current (dc) plasma jet are reported. Sweeping probes were used. The experiment was carried out using a dc non-transferred arc torch with a rod-type cathode and an anode of 5 mm diameter. The torch was operated at a nominal power level of 15 kW with a nitrogen flow rate of 25 Nl min{sup -1}. A flat ion saturation region was found in the current-voltage curve of the probe. The ion saturation current to a cylindrical probe in a high-pressure non local thermal equilibrium (LTE) plasma was modeled. Thermal effects and ionization/recombination processes inside the probe perturbed region were taken into account. Averaged radial profiles of the electron and heavy particle temperatures as well as the electron density were obtained. An electron temperature around 11 000 K, a heavy particle temperature around 9500 K and an electron density of about 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} m{sup -3}, were found at the jet centre at 3.5 mm downstream from the torch exit. Large deviations from kinetic equilibrium were found throughout the plasma jet. The electron and heavy particle temperature profiles showed good agreement with those reported in the literature by using spectroscopic techniques. It was also found that the temperature radial profile based on LTE was very close to that of the electrons. The calculations have shown that this method is particularly useful for studying spraying-type plasma jets characterized by electron temperatures in the range 9000-14 000 K.

  20. Theoretical derivation and calibration technique of a hemispherical-tipped, five-hole probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kjelgaard, Scott O.

    1988-01-01

    A technique is presented for the calibration of a hemispherical tipped 0.125 inch diameter 5-hole probe. The derivation of equations from the potential flow over a sphere relating the flow angle and velocity to pressure differentials measured by the probe is presented. The technique for acquiring the calibration data and the technique used to calculate the calibration coefficients are presented. The accuracy of the probe in both the uniform calibration flow field and the nonuniform flow field over a 75 degree swept delta wing is discussed.

  1. Estimation of the turbulent boundary layer pressure wavenumber-frequency spectrum using a fixed probe pair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, Gopal P.; Cannon, Mark R.

    1990-01-01

    The turbulent boundary layer (TBL) pressure fluctuations represent a dominant source of aircraft interior noise during cruise. The wavenumber-frequency characteristics of the TBL pressure field become important when determining its coupling with the aircraft structure and the resulting sound radiation into the interior of the aircraft. A technique is presented to estimate the TBL pressure wavenumber-frequency spectrum using a fixed probe pair consisting of two microphones. Flight test data from the McDonnel Douglas Ultra High Bypass Demonstrator aircraft were used to estimate the TBL pressure wavenumber-frequency spectra. These data were compared with selected wall pressure prediction models based on the existing wind tunnel data. The estimated in-flight spectral levels for the Demonstrator aircraft were in good agreement with the TBL wall pressure prediction models in the medium wavenumber range. The estimated TBL wavenumber spectral levels were found to be on the higher side in the low wavenumber region when compared with the predicted levels.

  2. PIONEER VENUS 2 MULTI-PROBE PARACHUTE TESTS IN VAB PRIOR TO ATTACHING PRESSURE VESSEL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A parachute system, designed to carry an instrument-laden probe down through the dense atmosphere of torrid, cloud-shrouded Venus, was tested in KSC's Vehicle Assembly Building. The tests are in preparation for a Pioneer multi-probe mission to Venus scheduled for launch from KSC in 1978. Full-scale (12-foot diameter) parachutes with simulated pressure vessels weighing up to 45 pounds were dropped from heights of up to 450 feet tot he floor of the VAB where the impact was cushioned by a honeycomb cardboard impact arrestor. The VAB offers an ideal, wind-free testing facility at no additional construction cost and was used for similar tests of the parachute system for the twin Viking spacecraft scheduled for launch toward Mars in August.

  3. Pulse pressure waveform estimation using distension profiling with contactless optical probe.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Tânia; Santos, Inês; Oliveira, Tatiana; Vaz, Pedro; Pereira, Telmo; Santos, Helder; Pereira, Helena; Correia, Carlos; Cardoso, João

    2014-11-01

    The pulse pressure waveform has, for long, been known as a fundamental biomedical signal and its analysis is recognized as a non-invasive, simple, and resourceful technique for the assessment of arterial vessels condition observed in several diseases. In the current paper, waveforms from non-invasive optical probe that measures carotid artery distension profiles are compared with the waveforms of the pulse pressure acquired by intra-arterial catheter invasive measurement in the ascending aorta. Measurements were performed in a study population of 16 patients who had undergone cardiac catheterization. The hemodynamic parameters: area under the curve (AUC), the area during systole (AS) and the area during diastole (AD), their ratio (AD/AS) and the ejection time index (ETI), from invasive and non-invasive measurements were compared. The results show that the pressure waveforms obtained by the two methods are similar, with 13% of mean value of the root mean square error (RMSE). Moreover, the correlation coefficient demonstrates the strong correlation. The comparison between the AUCs allows the assessment of the differences between the phases of the cardiac cycle. In the systolic period the waveforms are almost equal, evidencing greatest clinical relevance during this period. Slight differences are found in diastole, probably due to the structural arterial differences. The optical probe has lower variability than the invasive system (13% vs 16%). This study validates the capability of acquiring the arterial pulse waveform with a non-invasive method, using a non-contact optical probe at the carotid site with residual differences from the aortic invasive measurements. PMID:25169470

  4. Spatial resolution and downwash velocity corrections for multiple-hole pressure probes in complex flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ligrani, P. M.; Baun, L. R.; Singer, B. A.

    1989-01-01

    Correction schemes for finite spatial resolution and induced downwash velocity are presented which have application to the measurement of complex three-dimensional flow fields using five-hole angle-type pressure probes. In the study, induced downwash velocity is assumed to be proportional to the transverse gradients of streamwise velocity. The present correction schemes are validated by application to flows including vortices embedded within turbulent boundary layers and flows in a curved channel with 1.27-cm width, a 40-to-1 aspect ratio, and 59.7 cm of convex surface curvature.

  5. Pressure probe study of the water relations of Phycomyces blakesleeanus sporangiophores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.; Ortega, J. K.; Shropshire, W. Jr

    1987-01-01

    The physical characteristics which govern the water relations of the giant-celled sporangiophore of Phycomyces blakesleeanus were measured with the pressure probe technique and with nanoliter osmometry. These properties are important because they govern water uptake associated with cell growth and because they may influence expansion of the sporangiophore wall. Turgor pressure ranged from 1.1 to 6.6 bars (mean = 4.1 bars), and was the same for stage I and stage IV sporangiophores. Sporangiophore osmotic pressure averaged 11.5 bars. From the difference between cell osmotic pressure and turgor pressure, the average water potential of the sporangiophore was calculated to be about -7.4 bars. When sporangiophores were submerged under water, turgor remained nearly constant. We propose that the low cell turgor pressure is due to solutes in the cell wall solution, i.e., between the cuticle and the plasma membrane. Membrane hydraulic conductivity averaged 4.6 x 10(-6) cm s-1 bar-1, and was significantly greater in stage I sporangiophores than in stage IV sporangiophores. Contrary to previous reports, the sporangiophore is separated from the supporting mycelium by septa which prevent bulk volume flow between the two regions. The presence of a wall compartment between the cuticle and the plasma membrane results in anomalous osmosis during pressure clamp measurements. This behavior arises because of changes in solute concentration as water moves into or out of the wall compartment surrounding the sporangiophore. Theoretical analysis shows how the equations governing transient water flow are altered by the characteristics of the cell wall compartment.

  6. Pressure probe study of the water relations of Phycomyces blakesleeanus sporangiophores.

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, D J; Ortega, J K; Shropshire, W

    1987-01-01

    The physical characteristics which govern the water relations of the giant-celled sporangiophore of Phycomyces blakesleeanus were measured with the pressure probe technique and with nanoliter osmometry. These properties are important because they govern water uptake associated with cell growth and because they may influence expansion of the sporangiophore wall. Turgor pressure ranged from 1.1 to 6.6 bars (mean = 4.1 bars), and was the same for stage I and stage IV sporangiophores. Sporangiophore osmotic pressure averaged 11.5 bars. From the difference between cell osmotic pressure and turgor pressure, the average water potential of the sporangiophore was calculated to be about -7.4 bars. When sporangiophores were submerged under water, turgor remained nearly constant. We propose that the low cell turgor pressure is due to solutes in the cell wall solution, i.e., between the cuticle and the plasma membrane. Membrane hydraulic conductivity averaged 4.6 x 10(-6) cm s-1 bar-1, and was significantly greater in stage I sporangiophores than in stage IV sporangiophores. Contrary to previous reports, the sporangiophore is separated from the supporting mycelium by septa which prevent bulk volume flow between the two regions. The presence of a wall compartment between the cuticle and the plasma membrane results in anomalous osmosis during pressure clamp measurements. This behavior arises because of changes in solute concentration as water moves into or out of the wall compartment surrounding the sporangiophore. Theoretical analysis shows how the equations governing transient water flow are altered by the characteristics of the cell wall compartment. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 PMID:11536570

  7. Adsorption of 2-propanol on ice probed by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Newberg, John T.; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2015-08-18

    The interaction of 2-propanol with ice was examined via ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS), a surface sensitive technique that probes the adsorbed 2-propanol directly with submonolayer resolution. Isothermal uptake experiments were performed on vapor deposited ice at 227 K in the presence of the equilibrium water vapor pressure of 0.05 Torr and 2-propanol partial pressures ranging from 5 × 10-5 to 2 × 10-3 Torr. The C 1s APXPS spectra of adsorbed 2-propanol showed two characteristic peaks associated with the COH alcohol group and CMe methyl groups in a 1 : 2 ratio, respectively. Coverage increased with 2-propanol partial pressure and followed first order Langmuir kinetics with a Langmuir constant of K = 6.3 × 103 Torr-1. The 1 : 2 ratio of COH : CMe remained constant with increasing coverage, indicating there is no chemical reaction upon adsorption. The observed Langmuir kinetics using APXPS is consistent with previous observations of other small chain alcohols via indirect adsorption methods using, e.g., Knudsen cell and coated wall flow tube reactors.

  8. Adsorption of 2-propanol on ice probed by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Newberg, John T.; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2015-08-18

    The interaction of 2-propanol with ice was examined via ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS), a surface sensitive technique that probes the adsorbed 2-propanol directly with submonolayer resolution. Isothermal uptake experiments were performed on vapor deposited ice at 227 K in the presence of the equilibrium water vapor pressure of 0.05 Torr and 2-propanol partial pressures ranging from 5 × 10-5 to 2 × 10-3 Torr. The C 1s APXPS spectra of adsorbed 2-propanol showed two characteristic peaks associated with the COH alcohol group and CMe methyl groups in a 1 : 2 ratio, respectively. Coverage increased with 2-propanol partialmore » pressure and followed first order Langmuir kinetics with a Langmuir constant of K = 6.3 × 103 Torr-1. The 1 : 2 ratio of COH : CMe remained constant with increasing coverage, indicating there is no chemical reaction upon adsorption. The observed Langmuir kinetics using APXPS is consistent with previous observations of other small chain alcohols via indirect adsorption methods using, e.g., Knudsen cell and coated wall flow tube reactors.« less

  9. Predicting physical stability in pressurized metered dose inhalers via dwell and instantaneous force colloidal probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    D'Sa, Dexter; Chan, Hak-Kim; Chrzanowski, Wojciech

    2014-09-01

    Colloidal probe microscopy (CPM) is a quantitative predictive tool, which can offer insight into particle behavior in suspension pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs). Although CPM instantaneous force measurements, which involve immediate retraction of the probe upon sample contact, can provide information on inter-particle attractive forces, they lack the ability to appropriately imitate all critical particle pMDI interactions (e.g., particle re-dispersion after prolonged pMDI storage). In this paper, two novel dwell force techniques - indentation and deflection dwell - were employed to mimic long-term particle interactions present in pMDIs, using particles of various internal structures and a model liquid propellant (2H,3H perfluoropentane) as a model system. Dwell measurements involve particle contact for an extended period of time. In deflection dwell mode the probe is held at a specific position, while in indentation dwell mode the probe is forced into the sample with a constant force for the entirety of the contact time. To evaluate the applicability of CPM to predict actual pMDI physical stability, inter-particle force measurements were compared with qualitative and quantitative bulk pMDI measurement techniques (visual quality and light scattering). Measured instantaneous attractive (snap-in) and adhesive (max-pull) forces decreased as a function of increasing surface area, while adhesive forces measured by indentation dwell decreased as a function of dwell contact time for particles containing voids. Instantaneous force measurements provided information on the likelihood of floccule formation, which was predictive of partitioning rates, while indentation dwell force measurements were predictive of formulation re-dispersibility after prolonged storage. Dwell force measurements provide additional information on particle behavior within a pMDI not obtainable via instantaneous measurements. PMID:25058596

  10. Problems affecting the fidelity of pressure measuring instruments for planetary probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    Determination is made of the nature and magnitude of surface-related effects that cause errors in pressure measuring instruments, with special reference being made to instruments intended for use in planetary probes. The interaction of gases with clean surfaces of metals likely to be used as gage construction materials was studied. Special emphasis was placed on the adsorption, chemical reaction, and electron-induced desorption processes. The results indicated that all metals tested were subject to surface processes which would degrade gage fidelity. It was also found, however, that the formation of inert adsorbed layers on these metal surfaces, such as carbon on platinum, greatly reduced or eliminated these effects. This process, combined with a system design which avoids contact between reactive gases and hot filaments, appears to offer the most promising solution to the gage fidelity problem.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging compatibility testing of intracranial pressure probes. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Williams, E J; Bunch, C S; Carpenter, T A; Downey, S P; Kendall, I V; Czosnyka, M; Pickard, J D; Martin, J; Menon, D K

    1999-10-01

    There is increasing recognition that magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and spectroscopy may provide important information in the assessment of patients with acute brain injury. However, optimum care of the acutely head injured patient requires monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP). Although many monitoring modalities have been integrated into commercially available MR-compatible systems, there have been no reports of commonly used intraparenchymal ICP sensors in an MR environment. The authors describe the use of an ICP micromanometer probe in an MR environment, with a fiberoptic connection that interfaces the probe with a commercially available MR-compatible monitoring system. Phantom studies were performed to demonstrate the safety and compatibility of the modified MR system at 0.5 tesla. The safety of the device was assessed in relation to its interaction with the static, gradient, and radiofrequency fields used in MR imaging. The MR compatibility was documented by demonstrating that its performance was unaffected by the operation of imaging sequences and by showing that there was no degradation of the diagnostic quality of imaging data obtained during ICP monitoring. PMID:10507397

  12. Coaxial probe and apparatus for measuring the dielectric spectra of high pressure liquids and supercritical fluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung B.; Smith, Richard L.; Inomata, Hiroshi; Arai, Kunio

    2000-11-01

    A probe and apparatus were developed for measuring the dielectric spectra (complex permittivity) of high pressure liquids and supercritical fluid mixtures. The probe consisted a 2.2 mm semirigid coaxial cable that was cut off flat and mounted into a high pressure tube. The apparatus for measuring complex permittivity consisted of the dielectric probe, cell, densimeter, piston for varying the system density at constant composition, and magnetic pump for agitation and recirculation, all of which were housed in a constant temperature air bath. The probe is simple, robust, inexpensive, and further, its design allows for quick connection to high pressure systems. Probe accuracy is estimated to be ±0.5 in ɛ' and ±0.5 in ɛ″ from 200 MHz to 18 GHz based on replicate measurements of calibration and 2σ deviations over the interval. Dielectric spectra were measured over the 200 MHz-20 GHz range for methanol+carbon dioxide mixture at 323.2 K and a pressures up to 18 MPa.

  13. Probing the Hydrogen Sublattice of FeHx with High-Pressure Neutron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, C. A.; Guthrie, M.; Boehler, R.; Somayazulu, M.; Fei, Y.; Molaison, J.; dos Santos, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    The combination of seismic, cosmochemical, and mineral physics observations have revealed that Earth's iron-rich core must contain some light elements, such as hydrogen, carbon, oxygen, silicon, and/or sulfur. Therefore, understanding the influence of these light elements on the structural, thermoelastic, and electronic properties of iron is important for constraining the composition of this remote layer of the Earth and, in turn, providing constraints on planetary differentiation and core formation models. The high-pressure structural and magnetic properties of iron hydride (FeHx) have previously been studied using synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Such experiments revealed that the double hexagonal close-packed (dhcp) structure of FeHx is stable above a pressure of ~5 GPa and up to at least 80 GPa at 300 K [1]. In addition, dhcp-FeHx is ferromagnetic at low-pressures, but undergoes a magnetic collapse around 22 GPa [2]. X-ray experiments provide valuable insight into the properties of FeHx, but such techniques are largely sensitive to the iron component because it is difficult to detect the hydrogen sublattice with x-rays. Therefore, neutron diffraction has been used to investigate metastable FeHx, which is formed by quenching the high-pressure phase to liquid nitrogen temperatures and probing the sample at ambient pressure [3]. However, such neutron experiments have been limited to formation pressures below 10 GPa, and cannot be performed at ambient temperature. Here we present the first in-situ investigation of FeHx at 300 K using high-pressure neutron diffraction experiments performed at the Spallation Neutrons and Pressure Diffractometer (SNAP) instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In order to achieve pressures of ~50 GPa, we loaded iron samples with a hydrogen gas pressure medium into newly designed large-volume panoramic diamond-anvil cells (DACs) for neutron diffraction experiments [4; 5]. We

  14. Intra-Tissue Pressure Measurement in Ex Vivo Liver Undergoing Laser Ablation with Fiber-Optic Fabry-Perot Probe.

    PubMed

    Tosi, Daniele; Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano; Duraibabu, Dinesh Babu; Poeggel, Sven; Leen, Gabriel; Lewis, Elfed

    2016-01-01

    We report the first-ever intra-tissue pressure measurement performed during 1064 nm laser ablation (LA) of an ex vivo porcine liver. Pressure detection has been performed with a biocompatible, all-glass, temperature-insensitive Extrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometry (EFPI) miniature probe; the proposed methodology mimics in-vivo treatment. Four experiments have been performed, positioning the probe at different positions from the laser applicator tip (from 0.5 mm to 5 mm). Pressure levels increase during ablation time, and decrease with distance from applicator tip: the recorded peak parenchymal pressure levels range from 1.9 kPa to 71.6 kPa. Different pressure evolutions have been recorded, as pressure rises earlier in proximity of the tip. The present study is the first investigation of parenchymal pressure detection in liver undergoing LA: the successful detection of intra-tissue pressure may be a key asset for improving LA, as pressure levels have been correlated to scattered recurrences of tumors by different studies. PMID:27092504

  15. Intra-Tissue Pressure Measurement in Ex Vivo Liver Undergoing Laser Ablation with Fiber-Optic Fabry-Perot Probe

    PubMed Central

    Tosi, Daniele; Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano; Duraibabu, Dinesh Babu; Poeggel, Sven; Leen, Gabriel; Lewis, Elfed

    2016-01-01

    We report the first-ever intra-tissue pressure measurement performed during 1064 nm laser ablation (LA) of an ex vivo porcine liver. Pressure detection has been performed with a biocompatible, all-glass, temperature-insensitive Extrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometry (EFPI) miniature probe; the proposed methodology mimics in-vivo treatment. Four experiments have been performed, positioning the probe at different positions from the laser applicator tip (from 0.5 mm to 5 mm). Pressure levels increase during ablation time, and decrease with distance from applicator tip: the recorded peak parenchymal pressure levels range from 1.9 kPa to 71.6 kPa. Different pressure evolutions have been recorded, as pressure rises earlier in proximity of the tip. The present study is the first investigation of parenchymal pressure detection in liver undergoing LA: the successful detection of intra-tissue pressure may be a key asset for improving LA, as pressure levels have been correlated to scattered recurrences of tumors by different studies. PMID:27092504

  16. Laser-Doppler acoustic probing of granular media with in-depth property gradient and varying pore pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Bodet, L.; Dhemaied, A.; Mourgues, R.; Tournat, V.; Rejiba, F.

    2012-05-24

    Non-contacting ultrasonic techniques recently proved to be efficient in the physical modeling of seismic-wave propagation at various application scales, as for instance in the context of geological analogue and seismic modeling. An innovative experimental set-up is proposed here to perform laser-Doppler acoustic probing of unconsolidated granular media with varying pore pressures. The preliminary experiments presented here provide reproducible results and exploitable data, thus validating both the proposed medium preparation and pressure gradient generation procedure.

  17. Measurement of effective sheath width around cutoff probe in low-pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D. W.; Oh, W. Y.; You, S. J. Kim, J. H.; Chang, H. Y.

    2014-05-15

    Previous studies indicated that the measurement results of microwave probes can be improved by applying the adequate sheath width to their measurement models, and consequently the sheath width around the microwave probe tips has become very important information for microwave probe diagnostics. In this paper, we propose a method for measuring the argon plasma sheath width around the cutoff probe tips by applying the circuit model to the cutoff probe phase spectrum. The measured sheath width of the cutoff probe was found to be in good agreement with the floated sheath width calculated from the Child-Langmuir sheath law. The physical reasons for a discrepancy between the two measurements are also discussed.

  18. Measurement of effective sheath width around cutoff probe in low-pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D. W.; You, S. J.; Kim, J. H.; Chang, H. Y.; Oh, W. Y.

    2014-05-01

    Previous studies indicated that the measurement results of microwave probes can be improved by applying the adequate sheath width to their measurement models, and consequently the sheath width around the microwave probe tips has become very important information for microwave probe diagnostics. In this paper, we propose a method for measuring the argon plasma sheath width around the cutoff probe tips by applying the circuit model to the cutoff probe phase spectrum. The measured sheath width of the cutoff probe was found to be in good agreement with the floated sheath width calculated from the Child-Langmuir sheath law. The physical reasons for a discrepancy between the two measurements are also discussed.

  19. Probe electrospray ionization (PESI) mass spectrometry with discontinuous atmospheric pressure interface (DAPI).

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Kenzo; Usmanov, Dilshadbek T; Chen, Lee Chuin; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Mandal, Mridul K; Saha, Subhrakanti

    2015-01-01

    Probe electrospray ionization (PESI) using a 0.2 mm outside diameter titanium wire was performed and the generated ions were introduced into the mass spectrometer via a discontinuous atmospheric pressure interface using a pinch valve. Time-lapse PESI mass spectra were acquired by gradually increasing delay time for the pinch valve opening with respect to the start of each electrospray event when a high voltage was applied. The opening time of the pinch valve was 20 ms. Time-resolved PESI mass spectra showed marked differences for 10 mM NaCl, 10(-5) M gramicidin S and insulin in H(2)O/CH(3)OH/CH(3)COOH/CH(3)COONH(4) (65/35/1) with and without the addition of 10 mM CH(3)COONH(4). This was ascribed to the pH change of the liquid attached to the needle caused by electrochemical reactions taking place at the interface between the metal probe and the solution. NaCl cluster ions appeared only after the depletion of analytes. For the mixed solution of 10(-5) M cytochrome c, insulin, and gramicidin S in H(2)O/CH(3)OH/CH(3)COOH (65/35/1), a sequential appearance of analyte ions in the order of cytochrome c→insulin→gramicidin S was observed. The present technique was applied to three narcotic samples; methamphetamine, morphine and codeine. Limits of detection for these compounds were 10 ppb in H(2)O/CH(3)OH (1/1) for the single sampling with a pinch valve opening time of 200 ms. PMID:26307713

  20. Does Rebound Tonometry Probe Misalignment Modify Intraocular Pressure Measurements in Human Eyes?

    PubMed Central

    Beasley, Ian G.; Laughton, Deborah S.; Coldrick, Benjamin J.; Drew, Thomas E.; Sallah, Marium; Davies, Leon N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To examine the influence of positional misalignments on intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement with a rebound tonometer. Methods. Using the iCare rebound tonometer, IOP readings were taken from the right eye of 36 healthy subjects at the central corneal apex (CC) and compared to IOP measures using the Goldmann applanation tonometer (GAT). Using a bespoke rig, iCare IOP readings were also taken 2 mm laterally from CC, both nasally and temporally, along with angular deviations of 5 and 10 degrees, both nasally and temporally to the visual axis. Results. Mean IOP ± SD, as measured by GAT, was 14.7 ± 2.5 mmHg versus iCare tonometer readings of 17.4 ± 3.6 mmHg at CC, representing an iCare IOP overestimation of 2.7 ± 2.8 mmHg (P < 0.001), which increased at higher average IOPs. IOP at CC using the iCare tonometer was not significantly different to values at lateral displacements. IOP was marginally underestimated with angular deviation of the probe but only reaching significance at 10 degrees nasally. Conclusions. As shown previously, the iCare tonometer overestimates IOP compared to GAT. However, IOP measurement in normal, healthy subjects using the iCare rebound tonometer appears insensitive to misalignments. An IOP underestimation of <1 mmHg with the probe deviated 10 degrees nasally reached statistical but not clinical significance levels. PMID:24073330

  1. A fast-response aspirating probe for measurements of total temperature and pressure in transonic cryogenic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, W.-F.; Rosson, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    A newly developed, 3-mm-diam, dual hot-wire aspirating probe was used to measure the time-resolved stagnation temperature and pressure in a transonic cryogenic wind tunnel. The probe consists of two coplanar constant temperature hot wires at different overheat ratios operating in a 1.5-mm-diam channel with a choked exit. Thus, the constant Mach number flow by the wires is influenced only by free-stream stagnation temperature and pressure. Diffusion of the free-stream Mach number to a lower value in the channel reduces the dynamic drag on the hot-wire. Frequency response of the present design is dc to 20 kHz. The probe was used to measure the unsteady wake shed from an oscillating airfoil tested in the 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel at NASA-Langley Research Center. The hot-wire lasted for more than ten hours before breaking, proving the ruggedness of the probe and the usefulness of the technique in a high dynamic pressure, transonic cryogenic wind tunnel. Typical data obtained from the experiment are presented after reduction to stagnation pressure and temperature.

  2. Probing the energy levels of perovskite solar cells via Kelvin probe and UV ambient pressure photoemission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Harwell, J R; Baikie, T K; Baikie, I D; Payne, J L; Ni, C; Irvine, J T S; Turnbull, G A; Samuel, I D W

    2016-07-20

    The field of organo-lead halide perovskite solar cells has been rapidly growing since their discovery in 2009. State of the art devices are now achieving efficiencies comparable to much older technologies like silicon, while utilising simple manufacturing processes and starting materials. A key parameter to consider when optimising solar cell devices or when designing new materials is the position and effects of the energy levels in the materials. We present here a comprehensive study of the energy levels present in a common structure of perovskite solar cell using an advanced macroscopic Kelvin probe and UV air photoemission setup. By constructing a detailed map of the energy levels in the system we are able to predict the importance of each layer to the open circuit voltage of the solar cell, which we then back up through measurements of the surface photovoltage of the cell under white illumination. Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of air photoemission and Kelvin probe contact potential difference measurements as a method of identifying the factors contributing to the open circuit voltage in a solar cell, as well as being an excellent way of probing the physics of new materials. PMID:27384817

  3. Potential, Pressure and Density Fluctuation Measurements on the Rentor Tokamak Using AN Ion Beam Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravia, Eduardo

    A Heavy Ion Beam Probe Diagnostic System with dual energy analyzers was used to measure potential, pressure and density fluctuations in RENTOR. The main advantage of the system is the capability to measure directly the correlation length of the fluctuations by varying the primary beam injection conditions. Broadband density and potential spectra obtained in these experiments are characteristics of turbulent plasmas, with most of the power concentrated in the low part of the spectrum, below 100 kHz. The spectra fall off as f^{rm -n}, where the power-index n is approximately 3.5. The density fluctuation levels n/n are about 10% and they are independent of the plasma radius. Pressure and density fluctuations in RENTOR scale approximately like 3rho_ {rm s}/L_{rm p}~ 0.06, except for points near the plasma center. This is in agreement with the scaling observed in other small and medium tokamak experiments. Strong potential fluctuations were measured all across the plasma with levels nearly ten times larger than the corresponding n/n values. These results agree with the prediction that e~{phi }/k_{rm B}T _{rm e} > n/n in the resistive-MHD rippling mode theory developed by Thayer and Diamond. An rms value for the poloidal correlation length l_{rm c} ~sigma_{rm k}^ {-1} of about 5 mm is obtained for sample points in the plasma interior. The total particle flux across the field lines due to electrostatic fluctuations was estimated at 3 times 10 ^{19} particles/sec, which yields an estimate for the particle confinement time of tau_{rm p}~ 2 ms. Similarly, the total heat loss rate due to fluctuations was estimated at 12 times 10 ^{20} eV/sec, which gives an energy confinement time of tau_{rm E}~ 1 ms. The results clearly indicate that the particle and energy losses in RENTOR due to electrostatic fluctuations of the plasma account for a very significant part of the limited plasma confinement. The results of the experiments performed in this thesis have demonstrated the

  4. Influence of Oxygen Partial Pressure on the Fermi Level of ZnO Films Investigated by Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ting; Zhang, Hai-Feng

    2012-12-01

    The influence of oxygen partial pressure on the Fermi level of ZnO films prepared by pulsed laser deposition is investigated. The contact potential difference of the ZnO films fabricated under various oxygen partial pressures is studied systematically using Kelvin probe force microscopy. The Fermi level shifted by 0.35 eV as oxygen partial pressure increased. This indicates a significant change in the electronic structure and energy balance in ZnO films. This fact provides a consistent explanation that the changes in carrier concentration, resistivity and mobility of ZnO films are attributed to oxygen vacancy induced shift of the Fermi level.

  5. High Reynolds Number Effects on Multi-Hole Probes and Hot Wire Anemometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Smith, A.; Gerry, G.; Kauffman, W.

    1995-01-01

    The paper reports on the results from an experimental investigation of the response of multi-hole and hot wire probes at high flow Reynolds numbers (Re approx. 10(exp 6)). The limited results available in literature for 5-hole probes are restricted to Re approx. 10(exp 4). The experiment aims to investigate the probe response (in terms of dimensionless pressure ratios, characterizing pitch, and yaw angles and the total and static pressures) at high Re values and to gauge their effect on the calculated velocity vector. Hot wire calibrations were also undertaken with a parametric variation of the flow pressure, velocity and temperature. Different correction and calibration schemes are sought to be tested against the acquired data set. The data is in the analysis stage at the present time. The test provided good benchmark quality data that can be used to test future calibration and testing methods.

  6. Pilot model expansion tunnel test flow properties obtained from velocity, pressure, and probe measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friesen, W. J.; Moore, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Velocity-profile, pitot-pressure, and supplemental probe measurements were made at the nozzle exist of an expansion tunnel (a modification to the Langley pilot model expansion tube) for a nozzle net condition of a nitrogen test sample with a velocity of 4.5 km/sec and a density 0.005 times the density of nitrogen at standard conditions, both with the nozzle initially immersed in a helium atmosphere and with the nozzle initially evacuated. The purpose of the report is to present the results of these measurements and some of the physical properties of the nitrogen test sample which can be inferred from the measured results. The main conclusions reached are that: the velocity profiles differ for two nozzle conditions; regions of the flow field can be found where the velocity is uniform to within 5 percent and constant for several hundred microseconds; the velocity of the nitrogen test sample is reduced due to passage through the nozzle; and the velocity profiles do not significantly reflect the large variations which occur in the inferred density profiles.

  7. Thin-layer chromatography and mass spectrometry coupled using proximal probe thermal desorption with electrospray or atmospheric pressure chemica lionization

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2010-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure proximal probe thermal desorption sampling method coupled with secondary ionization by electrospray or atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was demonstrated for the mass spectrometric analysis of a diverse set of compounds (dyestuffs, pharmaceuticals, explosives and pesticides) separated on various high-performance thin-layer chromatography plates. Line scans along or through development lanes on the plates were carried out by moving the plate relative to a stationary heated probe positioned close to or just touching the stationary phase surface. Vapors of the compounds thermally desorbed from the surface were drawn into the ionization region of a combined electrospray ionization/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source where they merged with reagent ions and/or charged droplets from a corona discharge or an electrospray emitter and were ionized. The ionized components were then drawn through the atmospheric pressure sampling orifice into the vacuum region of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer and detected using full scan, single ion monitoring, or selected reaction monitoring mode. Studies of variable parameters and performance metrics including the proximal probe temperature, gas flow rate into the ionization region, surface scan speed, read-out resolution, detection limits, and surface type are discussed.

  8. Osmotic pressure probe of actin-myosin hydration changes during ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Highsmith, S; Duignan, K; Cooke, R; Cohen, J

    1996-01-01

    Osmotic stress in the 0.5-5 x 10(6) dyne/cm2 range was used to perturb the hydration of actin-myosin-ATP intermediates during steady-state hydrolysis. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) (1000 to 4000 Da), in the 1 to 10 wt% range, which does not cause protein precipitation, did not significantly affect the apparent KM or the Vmax for MgATP hydrolysis by myosin subfragment 1 (S1) alone, nor did it affect the value for the phosphate burst. Consistent with the kinetic data, osmotic stress did not affect nucleotide-induced changes in the fluorescence intensities of S1 tryptophans or of fluorescein attached to Cys-707. The accessibility of the fluorescent ATP analog, epsilon ADP, to acrylamide quenching was also unchanged. These data suggest that none of the steps in the ATP hydrolysis cycle involve substantial hydration changes, which might occur for the opening or closing of the ATP site or of other crevices in the S1 structure. In contrast, KM for the interaction of S1.MgADP.Pi with actin decreased tenfold in this range of osmotic pressure, suggesting that formation of actin.S1.MgADP.Pi involves net dehydration of the proteins. The dehydration volume increases as the size of the PEG is increased, as expected for a surface-excluded osmolyte. The measured dehydration volume for the formation of actin.S1.MgADP.Pi was used to estimate the surface area of the binding interface. This estimate was consistent with the area determined from the atomic structures of actin and myosin, indicating that osmotic stress is a reliable probe of actin.myosin.ATP interactions. The approach developed here should be useful for determining osmotic stress and excluded volume effects in situ, which are much larger than those of typical in vitro conditions. PMID:8744320

  9. Comparison between Langmuir probe and microwave autointerferometry measurements at intermediate pressure in an argon surface wave discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseau, A.; Teboul, E.; Bechu, S.

    2005-10-15

    This paper is devoted to the validation of Langmuir probe technique by microwave autointerferometry in a surface wave discharge at medium pressure (from 0.1 up to 10 Torr). Temperatures of neutrals, obtained from Rayleigh scattering, and electrons, given by double probe measurements, have been used to estimate the mean free path and the sheath length. Hence, the number of collisions in the sheath has been obtained. We have verified that two different phenomena occur in the sheath, while the pressure increases. These phenomena are depicted, in literature, as two different coefficients used to modify the value of the noncollisional current of Laframboise. Coefficients given by various authors have been investigated with accuracy knowing the number of collisions in the sheath. Very good agreements are obtained between Zakrzewski and Kopiczynski theory and autointerferometry measurements which are unaffected by collisional phenomena.

  10. High-pressure magnetic state of MnP probed by means of muon-spin rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasanov, R.; Amato, A.; Bonfà, P.; Guguchia, Z.; Luetkens, H.; Morenzoni, E.; De Renzi, R.; Zhigadlo, N. D.

    2016-05-01

    We report a detailed muon-spin rotation study of the pressure evolution of the magnetic order in the manganese-based pnictide MnP, which has been recently found to undergo a superconducting transition under pressure once the magnetic ground state is suppressed. Using the muon as a volume sensitive local magnetic probe, we identify a ferromagnetic state as well as two incommensurate helical states (with propagation vectors Q aligned along the crystallographic c and b directions, respectively) which transform into each other through first-order phase transitions as a function of pressure and temperature. Our data suggest that the magnetic state from which superconductivity develops at higher pressures is an incommensurate helical phase.

  11. Effects of geometric variables on the performance of a probe for direct measurement of free-steam stagnation pressure in supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Couch, L. M.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted at Mach numbers of 1.41, 1.83, and 2.20 to determine the effects of parametric variations in the height of the pitot-tube center line from the probe surface and in the radius of the surface curvature on the pressure recovery of a probe designed to measure the free-stream stagnation pressure. The probe consists of a pitot tube mounted on the surface of a curved cylinder of circular cross section. The pitot tube senses the pressure of the stream tube which has been slowed by isentropic compression along the curved surface. Pressure recovery, greater than or equal to 99.8 percent of the free-stream stagnation pressure, was obtained for a wide range both of angle of attack and of yaw for probes satisfying the predetermined optimum design criteria.

  12. Measurement of vapor pressures and heats of sublimation of dicarboxylic acids using atmospheric solids analysis probe mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Emily A; Greaves, John; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2012-06-21

    Vapor pressures of low volatility compounds are important parameters in several atmospheric processes, including the formation of new particles and the partitioning of compounds between the gas phase and particles. Understanding these processes is critical for elucidating the impacts of aerosols on climate, visibility, and human health. Dicarboxylic acids are an important class of compounds in the atmosphere for which reported vapor pressures often vary by more than an order of magnitude. In this study, atmospheric solids analysis probe mass spectrometry (ASAP-MS), a relatively new atmospheric pressure ionization technique, is applied for the first time to the measurement of vapor pressures and heats of sublimation of a series of dicarboxylic acids. Pyrene was also studied because its vapor pressures and heat of sublimation are relatively well-known. The heats of sublimation measured using ASAP-MS were in good agreement with published values. The vapor pressures, assuming an evaporation coefficient of unity, were typically within a factor of ∼3 lower than published values made at similar temperatures for most of the acids. The underestimation may be due to diffusional constraints resulting from evaporation at atmospheric pressure. However, this study establishes that ASAP-MS is a promising new technique for such measurements. PMID:22432524

  13. New mass measurement method of aerosol particle using vibrating probe particle controlled by radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariyama, Tatsuo; Takaya, Yasuhiro; Miyoshi, Takashi

    2005-11-01

    Aerosol particles with sub-micro meter size inhaled into respiratory systems cause serious damage to human body. In order to evaluate the health effects of the particles, classification methods of the particles with size and mass are needed. Several measurement methods of the particle size are established. However, conventional mass measurement methods are not enough to measure the particles with sub- pico gram. We propose a new mass measurement method of the aerosol particles based on laser trapping. In this method, an optically trapped silica particle is used as a measuring probe particle. The probe particle is trapped at a beam waist of the focused laser light and is forced to vibrate by deflecting the beam waist using AOD. The vibrating probe particle has a resonance frequency because it is governed by the spring-mass-damper system. When an aerosol particle is attached to the probe particle, the resonance frequency shifts according to the increase of the total mass. The mass of the aerosol particle can be measured from the shift of the resonance frequency. Experimentally, it is confirmed that the probe particle is governed by the spring-mass-damper system and has a resonance frequency. When a silica fine particle of 3pg in mass used as an aerosol particle is attached to the probe particle, the resonance frequency shift occurs as expected in the dynamic system and the fine particle mass can be measured based on the proposed method.

  14. Pressure as a probe of the physics of ABO{sub 3} relaxor ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    SAMARA,GEORGE A.

    2000-02-14

    Results on a variety of mixed ABO{sub 3} oxides have revealed a pressure-induced ferroelectric-to-relaxor crossover and the continuous evolution of the energetics and dynamics of the relaxation process with increasing pressure. These common features have suggested a mechanism for the crossover phenomenon in terms of a large decrease in the correlation length for dipolar interactions with pressure--a unique property of soft mode or highly polarizable host lattices. The pressure effects as well as the interplay between pressure and dc biasing fields are illustrated for some recent results on PZN-9.5 PT,PMN and PLZT 6/65/35.

  15. Computational study on reliability of sheath width measurement by the cutoff probe in low pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.-W.; You, S.-J.; Kim, J.-H.; Seong, D.-J.; Chang, H.-Y.; Oh, W.-Y.

    2015-11-01

    Recently, the technique for measurement of the sheath width by using the cutoff probe and its equivalent circuit model was proposed and conducted experimentally. In this study, we investigate the reliability of this technique based on the computational simulation. The simulation of three-dimensional Finite-Difference Time-Domain reproduces the transmission spectrum of the cutoff probe with an input parameter of sheath width. We measure the sheath width by using the circuit model and calculate the discrepancy between them under various input plasma densities and sheath widths. The results show the acceptable discrepancy under all of the conditions we studied (the largest discrepancy is about 45%). This indicates that the technique for measurement of sheath width around the floating tip of cutoff probe is robust and reliable. A shorter version of this contribution is due to be published in PoS at: 1st EPS conference on Plasma Diagnostics

  16. Characterization of phosphorus segregation in neutron-irradiated pressure vessel steels by atom probe field ion microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.K.; Jayaram, R.; Russell, K.F.

    1995-04-01

    An atom probe field ion microscopy characterization of A533B and Russian VVER 440 and 1000 pressure vessel steels has been performed to determine the phosphorus coverage of grain and lath boundaries. Field ion micrographs of grain and lath boundaries have revealed that they are decorated with a semi-continuous film of discrete brightly-imaging precipitates that were identified as molybdenum carbonitride precipitates. In addition, extremely high phosphorus levels were measured at the boundaries. The phosphorus segregation was found to be confined to an extremely narrow region indicative of monolayer-type segregation. The phosphorus coverages determined from the atom probe results of the unirradiated materials were in excellent agreement with predictions based on McLean`s equilibrium model of grain boundary segregation. The boundary phosphorus coverage of a neutron-irradiated weld material was significantly higher than that observed in the unirradiated material.

  17. Note: On the use of Rogowski coils as current probes for atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges.

    PubMed

    Biganzoli, I; Barni, R; Riccardi, C

    2013-01-01

    A wide bandwidth current probe based on a Rogowski coil was proposed to work down to the nanosecond time scale. It was then used to record the discharge current pulses that characterize the streamer regime of the plasma in a dielectric barrier discharge device. Indeed such plasmas are often made up of intermittent and highly localized structures such as streamers or microdischarges. Characteristics and performances of the probes are discussed together with a few results concerning their application to investigate dielectric barrier discharges and the temporal structure of different pulses of the electrical current. PMID:23387707

  18. Pressure-induced amorphizations of silica analogues: A probe of the relationship between order and disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Hammack, W.S.

    1993-02-01

    Purpose of these of high pressure investigations is to determine the relationship between order and disorder in amorphous materials using high pressure techniques were used. High pressure x-ray diffraction, electron transmission microscopy, and Raman scattering. Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) at Ithaca was used to measure x-ray diffraction patterns using Energy-Dispersive X-ray Diffraction. It was shown that the structural ordering in pressure-amorphized solids can be described as defects in curved-space. High-resolution transmissions electron microscopy showed that pressure-amorphized alpha-quartz lacks periodicity at the atomic level. Study of a silicate mineral shows that pressure-induced amorphizations occur because of an impeded phase transition.

  19. Modeling positive ion current to a planar probe in low-pressure electronegative discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, T. H.

    2009-06-15

    A fluid model is utilized to describe the plasma-sheath boundary for a negatively biased planar probe immersed in electronegative plasmas. The model equations are solved on the scale of the electron Debye length and calculate the spatial distributions of electric potential, velocity, and density of positive ions in front of the probe. The position of sheath edge, the positive ion velocity at sheath edge (the Bohm velocity), and the positive ion flux collected by the probe are determined and compared with analytic (or scaling) formulas. Effects of control parameters on the Bohm velocity, the sheath thickness, and on the positive ion flux are investigated. A larger thermal motion of negative ions causes the Bohm velocity to increase, the sheath to increase, and the positive ion flux collected by the probe to increase. An increase in collision causes the Bohm velocity to decrease and the sheath to decrease resulting in a decrease in the positive ion flux. An increase in electronegativity causes both the Bohm velocity and the sheath thickness to decrease, resulting in an increase in the positive ion flux. As the value of the non-neutrality parameter q increases, the Bohm velocity and the sheath thickness are found to decrease, and the positive ion flux collected by the probe increases. The behavior of the positive ion flux entering the sheath is discussed as functions of control parameters. A careful comparison of theoretical positive ion flux with the experimental flux can allow us to obtain the electronegativity, the plasma ionization rate (q), and the collision parameter ({delta})

  20. Probing microscopic material properties inside simulated membranes through spatially resolved three-dimensional local pressure fields and surface tensions

    PubMed Central

    Kasson, Peter M.; Hess, Berk; Lindahl, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Cellular lipid membranes are spatially inhomogeneous soft materials. Materials properties such as pressure and surface tension thus show important microscopic-scale variation that is critical to many biological functions. We present a means to calculate pressure and surface tension in a 3D-resolved manner within molecular-dynamics simulations and show how such measurements can yield important insight. We also present the first corrections to local virial and pressure fields to account for the constraints typically used in lipid simulations that otherwise cause problems in highly oriented systems such as bilayers. Based on simulations of an asymmetric bacterial ion channel in a POPC bilayer, we demonstrate how 3D-resolved pressure can probe for both short-range and long-range effects from the protein on the membrane environment. We also show how surface tension is a sensitive metric for inter-leaflet equilibrium and can be used to detect even subtle imbalances between bilayer leaflets in a membrane-protein simulation. Since surface tension is known to modulate the function of many proteins, this effect is an important consideration for predictions of ion channel function. We outline a strategy by which our local pressure measurements, which we make available within a version of the GROMACS simulation package, may be used to design optimally equilibrated membrane-protein simulations. PMID:23318532

  1. Pressure/temperature fluid cell apparatus for the neutron powder diffractometer instrument: Probing atomic structure in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsiu-Wen; Fanelli, Victor R.; Reiche, Helmut M.; Larson, Eric; Taylor, Mark A.; Xu, Hongwu; Zhu, Jinlong; Siewenie, Joan; Page, Katharine

    2014-12-01

    This contribution describes a new local structure compatible gas/liquid cell apparatus for probing disordered materials at high pressures and variable temperatures in the Neutron Powder Diffraction instrument at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory. The new sample environment offers choices for sample canister thickness and canister material type. Finite element modeling is utilized to establish maximum allowable working pressures of 414 MPa at 15 K and 121 MPa at 600 K. High quality atomic pair distribution function data extraction and modeling have been demonstrated for a calibration standard (Si powder) and for supercritical and subcritical CO2 measurements. The new sample environment was designed to specifically target experimental studies of the local atomic structures involved in geologic CO2 sequestration, but will be equally applicable to a wide variety of energy applications, including sorption of fluids on nano/meso-porous solids, clathrate hydrate formation, catalysis, carbon capture, and H2 and natural gas uptake/storage.

  2. Probing Spin-Orbit Coupling and Interlayer Coupling in Atomically Thin Molybdenum Disulfide Using Hydrostatic Pressure.

    PubMed

    Dou, Xiuming; Ding, Kun; Jiang, Desheng; Fan, Xiaofeng; Sun, Baoquan

    2016-01-26

    In two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides, both spin-orbit coupling and interlayer coupling play critical roles in the electronic band structure and are desirable for the potential applications in spin electronics. Here, we demonstrate the pressure characteristics of the exciton absorption peaks (so-called excitons A, B and C) in monolayer, bilayer, and trilayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) by studying the reflectance spectra under hydrostatic pressure and performing the electronic band structure calculations based on density functional theory to account for the experimental observations. We find that the valence band maximum splitting at the K point in monolayer MoS2, induced by spin-orbit coupling, remains almost unchanged with increasing pressure applied up to 3.98 GPa, indicating that the spin-orbit coupling is insensitive to the pressure. For bilayer and trilayer MoS2, however, the splitting shows an increase with increasing pressure due to the pressure-induced strengthening of the interlayer coupling. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical calculations. Moreover, the exciton C is identified to be the interband transition related to the van Hove singularity located at a special point which is approximately 1/4 of the total length of Γ-K away from the Γ point in the Brillouin zone. PMID:26745440

  3. Laser-driven phase transitions in aqueous colloidal gold nanoparticles under high pressure: picosecond pump-probe study.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Shuichi; Katayama, Tetsuro; Setoura, Kenji; Strasser, Michael; Uwada, Takayuki; Miyasaka, Hiroshi

    2016-02-14

    Pump-probe transient extinction spectroscopy was used to analyze 355 nm picosecond laser heating-induced phenomena in 60 nm-diameter aqueous gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) under a high pressure of 60 MPa. Kinetic spectroscopy revealed that a supercritical layer surrounding the AuNP nucleated with a lifetime of approximately 1 ns during its dynamic expansion and decay for a fluence of 19.6 mJ cm(-2). Moreover, in the post-mortem transmission electron micrographs we observed a number of fragments, a small percentage of size-reduced cores, and erupted particles among the intact particles after 60 shots, suggesting that evaporation occurred under laser illumination. The particle temperature calculation indicated that evaporation begins with a liquid droplet AuNP surrounded by a supercritical layer at temperatures below the boiling point of gold. By applying high pressure, we obtained a clear picture of the evaporation event, which was not possible at ambient pressure because bubble formation caused particle temperatures to rise uncontrollably. In this study, we shed light on the critical role of the supercritical layer formed around the AuNP under high pressure during laser-induced evaporation. PMID:26812175

  4. Structural Plasticity of Staphylococcal Nuclease Probed by Perturbation with Pressure and pH

    PubMed Central

    Kitahara, Ryo; Hata, Kazumi; Maeno, Akihiro; Akasaka, Kazuyuki; Chimenti, Michael; Bertrand Garcia-Moreno, E; Schroer, Martin A.; Jeworrek, Christoph; Tolan, Metin; Winter, Roland; Roche, Julien; Roumestand, Christian; de Guillen, Karine Montet; Royer, Catherine A.

    2012-01-01

    The ionization of internal groups in proteins can trigger conformational change. Despite this being the structural basis of most biological energy transduction, these processes are poorly understood. SAXS and NMR spectroscopy experiments at ambient and high hydrostatic pressure were used to examine how the presence and ionization of Lys-66, buried in the hydrophobic core of a stabilized variant of staphylococcal nuclease, affect conformation and dynamics. NMR spectroscopy at atmospheric pressure showed previously that the neutral Lys-66 affects slow conformational fluctuations globally, whereas the effects of the charged form are localized to the region immediately surrounding position 66. Ab initio models from SAXS data suggest that when Lys-66 is charged the protein expands, which is consistent with results from NMR spectroscopy. The application of moderate pressure (< 2 kbar) at pH values where Lys-66 is normally neutral at ambient pressure left most of the structure unperturbed but produced significant non-linear changes in chemical shifts in the helix where Lys-66 is located. Above 2 kbar pressure at these pH values the protein with Lys-66 unfolded cooperatively adopting a relatively compact, albeit random structure according to Kratky analysis of the SAXS data. In contrast, at low pH and high pressure the unfolded state of the variant with Lys-66 is more expanded than that of the reference protein. The combined global and local view of the structural reorganization triggered by ionization of the internal Lys-66 reveals more detectable changes than were previously suggested by NMR spectroscopy at ambient pressure. PMID:21254234

  5. Influence of probe pressure on the diffuse correlation spectroscopy blood flow signal: extra-cerebral contributions.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Rickson C; Schenkel, Steven S; Minkoff, David L; Lu, Xiangping; Favilla, Christopher G; Vora, Patrick M; Busch, David R; Chandra, Malavika; Greenberg, Joel H; Detre, John A; Yodh, A G

    2013-07-01

    A pilot study explores relative contributions of extra-cerebral (scalp/skull) versus brain (cerebral) tissues to the blood flow index determined by diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS). Microvascular DCS flow measurements were made on the head during baseline and breath-holding/hyperventilation tasks, both with and without pressure. Baseline (resting) data enabled estimation of extra-cerebral flow signals and their pressure dependencies. A simple two-component model was used to derive baseline and activated cerebral blood flow (CBF) signals, and the DCS flow indices were also cross-correlated with concurrent Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound (TCD) blood velocity measurements. The study suggests new pressure-dependent experimental paradigms for elucidation of blood flow contributions from extra-cerebral and cerebral tissues. PMID:23847725

  6. Pressure as a probe of the glassy state of ferroelectrics with random site disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Samara, G.A.; Hansen, L.V.

    1998-03-10

    Results on lanthanum-modified lead zirconate-titanates (PLZTs) have revealed a pressure-induced crossover from a normal ferroelectric to a relaxor state and the continuous evolution of the dynamics and energetics of the relaxation process. This crossover appears to be a general feature of soft mode ferroelectrics with random site dipolar impurities or polar nanodomains and results from a large decrease in the correlation radius among polar nanodomains -- a unique property of soft mode ferroelectrics.

  7. pH dependence of the dissociation of multimeric hemoglobin probed by high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Bispo, Jose A C; Santos, Jose L R; Landini, Gustavo F; Goncalves, Juliana M; Bonafe, Carlos F S

    2007-02-01

    We investigated the thermodynamic features of the classic alkaline dissociation of multimeric hemoglobin (3.1 MDa) from Glossoscolex paulistus (Annelidea) using high hydrostatic pressure. Light scattering measurements up to microscopic thermodynamic equilibrium indicated a high pH dependency of dissociation and association. Electron microscopy and gel filtration corroborated these findings. The volume change of dissociation decreased in absolute values from -48.0 mL/mol of subunit at pH 6.0 to -19.2 mL/mol at pH 9.0, suggesting a lack of protein interactions under alkaline conditions. Concomitantly, an increase in pH reduced the Gibbs free energy of dissociation from 37.7 to 27.5 kJ/mol of subunit. The stoichiometry of proton release calculated from the pressure-induced dissociation curves was +0.602 mol of H(+)/mol of subunit. These results provide a direct quantification of proton participation in stabilizing the aggregated state of the hemoglobin, and contribute to our understanding of protein-protein interactions and of the surrounding conditions that modulate the process of aggregation. PMID:17046147

  8. Pressure tuning of anisotropy barrier in Fe8 SMMs probed using high frequency EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirunavukkuarasu, Komalavalli; Beedle, Christopher; Tozer, Stanley; Hill, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Single-molecule magnets (SMMs) are spin systems with large spin ground state where quantum phenomena such as tunneling of magnetization via a considerable anisotropy barrier manifest. One such SMM that has been extensively studied is [Fe8O2(OH)12(tacn)6]Br8.9H2O, also known as Fe8, with a giant spin ground state of S=10. The eight Fe atoms bridged by the ligands form a butterfly structure where six Fe atoms have spins up and two spins down in the simplest model. This structure in fact gives rise to geometrical spin frustration effects within the cluster. By varying the interaction between the spins, manipulation of quantum tunneling in SMMs may be achieved. Typically, the manipulation of spin interactions is realized using chemical methods. As an alternative approach, we employ high pressure to induce changes in the ligand-field environment of the Fe atoms. In this presentation, the pressure-dependent changes in the anisotropy barrier in single crystal Fe8 SMMs investigated by high frequency electron paramagnetic resonance measurements will be discussed.

  9. Probing f(R) gravity with PLANCK data on cluster pressure profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Martino, I.; De Laurentis, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Capozziello, S.

    2015-04-01

    Analytical f(R)-gravity models introduce Yukawa-like corrections to the Newtonian potential in the weak field limit. These models can explain the dynamics of galaxies and cluster of galaxies without requiring dark matter. To test the model, we have computed the pressure profile of 579 X-ray galaxy clusters assuming the gas is in hydrostatic equilibrium within the potential well of the modified gravitational potential. We have compared those profiles with the ones measured in the foreground cleaned SMICA released by the Planck Collaboration. Our results show that Extended Theories of Gravity explain the dynamics of self-gravitating systems at cluster scales and represent an alternative to dark matter haloes.

  10. Probing of the hydrogen melting line at high pressures by dynamic compression

    SciTech Connect

    Grinenko, A; Gericke, D; Glenzer, S H; Vorberger, J

    2008-06-09

    We investigate the capabilities of dynamic compression by intense heavy ion beams to yield information about the high pressure phases of hydrogen. Employing ab initio simulations and experimental data, a new wide range equation of state for hydrogen that covers solid, fluid, gas and plasma phases has been constructed for our hydrodynamic simulations. The results show that the melting line up to its maximum as well as the transition from the molecular fl fluid to the fully ionized, metallic phase can be tested with the beam parameters available at the upcoming FAIR facility at GSI-Darmstadt. Using the structural information from the ab initio simulations, we also demonstrate that x-ray scattering is capable of extracting the information about the structure and the dissociation state.

  11. A generalized model for probing frictional characteristics of pressure-driven liquid microflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Suman; Das, Tamal; Chattoraj, Shubhasish

    2007-11-01

    In this article, a fundamental model was postulated to capture the influences of microfabrication characteristics on the frictional behavior of pressure-driven liquid microflows through a detailed analysis of the underlined surface effects that effectively link up these two strongly correlated aspects. For theoretical analysis, a continuum-based generalized formalism was derived for critically assessing the competing aspects of the stick-slip influences of the surface roughness elements, the randomness related to the spontaneous production, size distribution and coverage of the nanobubble layers, and the consequent apparent slip mechanisms due to hydrophobic interactions. Uncertainties pertaining to surface texture were accounted for by employing a stochastic version of the Navier-Stokes equation. The theoretical formulation was simultaneously validated with the data obtained from indigenous experiments and other benchmark studies reported in the literature and excellent quantitative trends in this regard were obtained for all cases.

  12. Pressure/temperature fluid cell apparatus for the neutron powder diffractometer instrument: Probing atomic structure in situ

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Hsiu -Wen; Fanelli, Victor R.; Reiche, Helmut M.; Larson, Eric; Taylor, Mark A.; Xu, Hongwu; Zhu, Jinlong; Siewenie, Joan; Page, Katharine

    2014-12-01

    This contribution describes a new local structure compatible gas/liquid cell apparatus for probing disordered materials at high pressures and variable temperatures in the Neutron Powder Diffraction instrument at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory. The new sample environment offers choices for sample canister thickness and canister material type. Finite element modeling is utilized to establish maximum allowable working pressures of 414 MPa at 15 K and 121 MPa at 600 K. High quality atomic pair distribution function data extraction and modeling have been demonstrated for a calibration standard (Si powder) and for supercritical and subcritical CO2measurements. Asmore » a result, the new sample environment was designed to specifically target experimental studies of the local atomic structures involved in geologic CO2 sequestration, but will be equally applicable to a wide variety of energy applications, including sorption of fluids on nano/meso-porous solids, clathrate hydrate formation, catalysis, carbon capture, and H2 and natural gas uptake/storage.« less

  13. Pressure/temperature fluid cell apparatus for the neutron powder diffractometer instrument: Probing atomic structure in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hsiu-Wen; Fanelli, Victor R.; Reiche, Helmut M.; Larson, Eric; Taylor, Mark A.; Siewenie, Joan; Xu, Hongwu; Zhu, Jinlong; Page, Katharine

    2014-12-15

    This contribution describes a new local structure compatible gas/liquid cell apparatus for probing disordered materials at high pressures and variable temperatures in the Neutron Powder Diffraction instrument at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory. The new sample environment offers choices for sample canister thickness and canister material type. Finite element modeling is utilized to establish maximum allowable working pressures of 414 MPa at 15 K and 121 MPa at 600 K. High quality atomic pair distribution function data extraction and modeling have been demonstrated for a calibration standard (Si powder) and for supercritical and subcritical CO{sub 2} measurements. The new sample environment was designed to specifically target experimental studies of the local atomic structures involved in geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration, but will be equally applicable to a wide variety of energy applications, including sorption of fluids on nano/meso-porous solids, clathrate hydrate formation, catalysis, carbon capture, and H{sub 2} and natural gas uptake/storage.

  14. Onset of condensation effects as detected by total pressure probes in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    Total pressure probes mounted in the test section of a 0.3 meter transonic cryogenic tunnel were used to detect the onset of condensation effects for free stream Mach numbers of 0.50, 0.75, 0.85, and 0.95 and for total pressure between one and five atmospheres. The amount of supercooling was found to be about 3 K and suggests that condensation was occurring on pre-existing liquid nitrogen droplets resulting from incomplete evaporation of the liquid nitrogen injected to cool the tunnel. The liquid nitrogen injection process presently being used for the 0.3 m tunnel was found to result in a wide spectrum of droplet sizes being injected into the flow. Since the relatively larger droplets took much more time to evaporate than the more numerous smaller droplets, the larger ones reached the test section first as the tunnel operating temperature was reduced. However, condensation effects in the test section were not immediately measurable because there was not a sufficient number of the larger droplets to have an influence on the thermodynamics of the flow.

  15. Pressure/temperature fluid cell apparatus for the neutron powder diffractometer instrument: probing atomic structure in situ.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiu-Wen; Fanelli, Victor R; Reiche, Helmut M; Larson, Eric; Taylor, Mark A; Xu, Hongwu; Zhu, Jinlong; Siewenie, Joan; Page, Katharine

    2014-12-01

    This contribution describes a new local structure compatible gas/liquid cell apparatus for probing disordered materials at high pressures and variable temperatures in the Neutron Powder Diffraction instrument at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory. The new sample environment offers choices for sample canister thickness and canister material type. Finite element modeling is utilized to establish maximum allowable working pressures of 414 MPa at 15 K and 121 MPa at 600 K. High quality atomic pair distribution function data extraction and modeling have been demonstrated for a calibration standard (Si powder) and for supercritical and subcritical CO2 measurements. The new sample environment was designed to specifically target experimental studies of the local atomic structures involved in geologic CO2 sequestration, but will be equally applicable to a wide variety of energy applications, including sorption of fluids on nano/meso-porous solids, clathrate hydrate formation, catalysis, carbon capture, and H2 and natural gas uptake/storage. PMID:25554335

  16. Multiplying probe for accurate power measurements on an RF driven atmospheric pressure plasma jet applied to the COST reference microplasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beijer, P. A. C.; Sobota, A.; van Veldhuizen, E. M.; Kroesen, G. M. W.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper a new multiplying probe for measuring the power dissipated in a miniature capacitively coupled, RF driven, atmospheric pressure plasma jet (μAPPJ—COST Reference Microplasma Jet—COST RMJ) is presented. The approach aims for substantially higher accuracy than provided by traditionally applied methods using bi-directional power meters or commercially available voltage and current probes in conjunction with digitizing oscilloscopes. The probe is placed on a miniature PCB and designed to minimize losses, influence of unknown elements, crosstalk and variations in temperature. The probe is designed to measure powers of the order of magnitude of 0.1-10 W. It is estimated that it measures power with less than 2% deviation from the real value in the tested power range. The design was applied to measure power dissipated in COST-RMJ running in helium with a small addition of oxygen.

  17. Characterization of low-pressure microwave and radio frequency discharges in oxygen applying optical emission spectroscopy and multipole resonance probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steves, Simon; Styrnoll, Tim; Mitschker, Felix; Bienholz, Stefan; Nikita, Bibinov; Awakowicz, Peter

    2013-11-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and multipole resonance probe (MRP) are adopted to characterize low-pressure microwave (MW) and radio frequency (RF) discharges in oxygen. In this context, both discharges are usually applied for the deposition of permeation barrier SiOx films on plastic foils or the inner surface of plastic bottles. For technological reasons the MW excitation is modulated and a continuous wave (cw) RF bias is used. The RF voltage produces a stationary low-density plasma, whereas the high-density MW discharge is pulsed. For the optimization of deposition process and the quality of the deposited barrier films, plasma conditions are characterized using OES and MRP. To simplify the comparison of applied diagnostics, both MW and RF discharges are studied separately in cw mode. The OES and MRP diagnostic methods complement each other and provide reliable information about electron density and electron temperature. In the MW case, electron density amounts to ne = (1.25 ± 0.26) × 1017 m-3, and kTe to 1.93 ± 0.20 eV, in the RF case ne = (6.8 ± 1.8)×1015 m-3 and kTe = 2.6 ± 0.35 eV. The corresponding gas temperatures are 760±40 K and 440±20 K.

  18. The multipole resonance probe: A concept for simultaneous determination of plasma density, electron temperature, and collision rate in low-pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lapke, M.; Mussenbrock, T.; Brinkmann, R. P.

    2008-08-04

    A diagnostic concept is presented which enables the simultaneous determination of plasma density, electron temperature, and collision rate in low-pressure gas discharges. The proposed method utilizes a radio-frequency driven probe of particular spherical design which is immersed in the plasma to excite a family of spatially bounded surface resonances. An analysis of the measured absorption spectrum S({omega}) of the probe provides information on the distribution of the plasma in its vicinity, from which the values of the plasma parameters can be inferred. In its simplest realization, the probe consists of two dielectrically shielded, conducting hemispheres, which are symmetrically driven by an radio-frequency source, and the excited resonances can be classified as multipole fields, which allows an analytical evaluation of the measured signal. The proposed method is robust, calibration free, economical, and can be used for ideal and reactive plasmas alike.

  19. Plasma Streamwise Vortex Generators in an Adverse Pressure Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Christopher; Corke, Thomas; Thomas, Flint

    2013-11-01

    A wind tunnel experiment was conducted to compare plasma streamwise vortex generators (PSVGs) and passive vortex generators (VGs). These devices were installed on a wing section by which the angle of attack could be used to vary the streamwise pressure gradient. The experiment was performed for freestream Mach numbers 0.1-0.2. Three-dimensional velocity components were measured using a 5-hole Pitot probe in the boundary layer. These measurements were used to quantify the production of streamwise vorticity and the magnitude of the reorientation term from the vorticity transport equation. The effect of Mach number, pressure gradient, operating voltage, and electrode length was then investigated for the PSVGs. The results indicate that the PSVGs could easily outperform the passive VGs and provide a suitable alternative for flow control.

  20. Ram Pressure Stripping of the Large Magellanic Cloud's Disk as a Probe of the Milky Way's Circumgalactic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Munier; Besla, Gurtina; Bryan, Greg; Putman, Mary; van der Marel, Roeland P.; Tonnesen, Stephanie

    2015-12-01

    Recent observations have constrained the orbit and structure of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), implying a well-constrained pericentric passage about the Milky Way (MW) ˜50 Myr ago. In this scenario, the LMC’s gaseous disk has recently experienced stripping, suggesting the extent of its HI disk directly probes the medium in which it is moving. From the observed stellar and HI distributions of the system we find evidence of a truncated gas profile along the windward “leading edge” of the LMC disk, despite a far more extended stellar component. We explore the implications of this ram pressure stripping signature, using both analytic prescriptions and full three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the LMC. Our simulations can match the radial extent of the LMC’s leading (windward) edge only in scenarios where the MW CGM density at pericentric passage is {n}p(R=48.2+/- 5 {{kpc}})={1.1}-.45+.44× {10}-4 {{cm}}{}-3. The implied pericentric density proves to be insensitive to both the broader CGM and temperature profiles, thus providing a model-independent constraint on the local gas density. This result imposes an important constraint on the density profile of the MW’s CGM at 50 kpc, and thus also on the total baryon content of the MW. From our work, assuming a β-profile valid to ˜rvir, we infer a total diffuse CGM mass M(300\\{{kpc}})=2.7+/- 1.4× {10}10{M}⊙ or approximately 15% of a {10}12{M}⊙ MW’s baryonic mass budget.

  1. Combined single crystal polarized XAFS and XRD at high pressure: probing the interplay between lattice distortions and electronic order at multiple length scales in high T c cuprates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fabbris, G.; Hücker, M.; Gu, G. D.; Tranquada, J. M.; Haskel, D.

    2016-07-14

    Some of the most exotic material properties derive from electronic states with short correlation length (~10-500 Å), suggesting that the local structural symmetry may play a relevant role in their behavior. In this study, we discuss the combined use of polarized x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray diffraction at high pressure as a powerful method to tune and probe structural and electronic orders at multiple length scales. Besides addressing some of the technical challenges associated with such experiments, we illustrate this approach with results obtained in the cuprate La1.875Ba0.125CuO4, in which the response of electronic order to pressure can onlymore » be understood by probing the structure at the relevant length scales.« less

  2. Combined single crystal polarized XAFS and XRD at high pressure: Probing the interplay between lattice distortions and electronic order at multiple length scales in high Tc cuprates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fabbris, G.; Hucker, M.; Gu, G. D.; Tranquada, J. M.; Haskel, D.

    2016-06-30

    Some of the most exotic material properties derive from electronic states with short correlation length (~10-500 Å), suggesting that the local structural symmetry may play a relevant role in their behavior. In this study, we discuss the combined use of polarized x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray diffraction at high pressure as a powerful method to tune and probe structural and electronic orders at multiple length scales. Besides addressing some of the technical challenges associated with such experiments, we illustrate this approach with results obtained in the cuprate La1.875Ba0.125CuO4, in which the response of electronic order to pressure can onlymore » be understood by probing the structure at the relevant length scales.« less

  3. Non-invasive probe diagnostic method for electron temperature and ion current density in atmospheric pressure plasma jet source

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Cheol; Kim, Yu-Sin; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Moon, Jun-Hyeon; Chung, Chin-Wook; Kim, Yunjung; Cho, Guangsup

    2015-08-15

    The electrical probe diagnostics are very hard to be applied to atmospheric plasmas due to severe perturbation by the electrical probes. To overcome this, the probe for measuring electron temperature and ion current density is indirectly contacted with an atmospheric jet source. The plasma parameters are obtained by using floating harmonic analysis. The probe is mounted on the quartz tube that surrounds plasma. When a sinusoidal voltage is applied to a probe contacting on a quartz tube, the electrons near the sheath at dielectric tube are collected and the probe current has harmonic components due to probe sheath nonlinearity. From the relation of the harmonic currents and amplitude of the sheath voltage, the electron temperature near the wall can be obtained with collisional sheath model. The electron temperatures and ion current densities measured at the discharge region are in the ranges of 2.7–3.4 eV and 1.7–5.2 mA/cm{sup 2} at various flow rates and input powers.

  4. Atom probe tomography characterization of neutron irradiated surveillance samples from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, P. D.; Miller, M. K.; Powers, K. A.; Nanstad, R. K.

    2016-03-01

    Surveillance samples of a low copper (nominally 0.05 wt.% Cu) forging and a higher copper (0.23 wt.% Cu) submerged arc weld from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel have been characterized by atom probe tomography (APT) after exposure to three levels of neutron irradiation, i.e., fluences of 1.7, 3.6 and 5.8 × 1023 n.m-2 (E > 1 MeV), and inlet temperatures of ∼289 °C (∼552 °F). As no copper-enriched precipitates were observed in the low copper forging, and the measured copper content in the ferrite matrix was 0.04± <0.01 at.% Cu, after neutron irradiation to a fluence of 1.7 × 1023 n.m-3, this copper level was below the solubility limit. A number density of 2 × 1022 m-3 of Ni-, Mn- Si-enriched precipitates with an equivalent radius of gyration of 1.7 ± 0.4 nm were detected in the sample. However, Cu-, Ni-, Mn-enriched precipitates were observed in specimens cut from different surveillance specimens from the same forging material in which the overall measured copper level was 0.08± <0.01 at.% (fluence of 3.6 × 1023 n.m-3) and 0.09± <0.01 at.% Cu (fluence of 5.8 × 1023 n.m-3). Therefore, these slightly higher copper contents were above the solubility limit of Cu under these irradiation conditions. A best fit of all the composition data indicated that the size and number density of the Cu-enriched precipitates increased slightly in both size and number density by additional exposure to neutron irradiation. High number densities of Cu-enriched precipitates were observed in the higher Cu submerged arc weld for all irradiated conditions. The size and number density of the precipitates in the welds were higher than in the same fluence forgings. Some Cu-enriched precipitates were found to have Ni-, Mn- Si-, and P-enriched regions on their surfaces suggesting a preferential nucleation site. Atom maps revealed P, Ni, and Mn segregation to, and preferential precipitation of, Cu-enriched precipitates over the surface of a grain boundary in the low fluence

  5. Atom probe tomography characterization of neutron irradiated surveillance samples from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Edmondson, Philip D.; Miller, Michael K.; Powers, Kathy A.; Nanstad, Randy K.

    2015-12-29

    Surveillance samples of a low copper (nominally 0.05 wt.% Cu) forging and a higher copper (0.23 wt.% Cu) submerged arc weld from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel have been characterized by atom probe tomography (APT) after exposure to three levels of neutron irradiation, i.e., fluences of 1.7, 3.6 and 5.8 × 1023 n.m–2 (E > 1 MeV), and inlet temperatures of ~289 °C (~552 °F). As no copper-enriched precipitates were observed in the low copper forging, and the measured copper content in the ferrite matrix was 0.04± <0.01 at.% Cu, after neutron irradiation to a fluence of 1.7more » × 1023 n.m–3, this copper level was below the solubility limit. A number density of 2 × 1022 m–3 of Ni–, Mn– Si-enriched precipitates with an equivalent radius of gyration of 1.7 ± 0.4 nm were detected in the sample. However, Cu-, Ni-, Mn-enriched precipitates were observed in specimens cut from different surveillance specimens from the same forging material in which the overall measured copper level was 0.08± <0.01 at.% (fluence of 3.6 × 1023 n.m–3) and 0.09± <0.01 at.% Cu (fluence of 5.8 × 1023 n.m–3). Therefore, these slightly higher copper contents were above the solubility limit of Cu under these irradiation conditions. A best fit of all the composition data indicated that the size and number density of the Cu-enriched precipitates increased slightly in both size and number density by additional exposure to neutron irradiation. High number densities of Cu-enriched precipitates were observed in the higher Cu submerged arc weld for all irradiated conditions. The size and number density of the precipitates in the welds were higher than in the same fluence forgings. Some Cu-enriched precipitates were found to have Ni-, Mn- Si-, and P-enriched regions on their surfaces suggesting a preferential nucleation site. Furthermore, atom maps revealed P, Ni, and Mn segregation to, and preferential precipitation of, Cu-enriched precipitates over the surface of a grain

  6. Atom probe tomography characterization of neutron irradiated surveillance samples from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, Philip D.; Miller, Michael K.; Powers, Kathy A.; Nanstad, Randy K.

    2015-12-29

    Surveillance samples of a low copper (nominally 0.05 wt.% Cu) forging and a higher copper (0.23 wt.% Cu) submerged arc weld from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel have been characterized by atom probe tomography (APT) after exposure to three levels of neutron irradiation, i.e., fluences of 1.7, 3.6 and 5.8 × 1023 n.m–2 (E > 1 MeV), and inlet temperatures of ~289 °C (~552 °F). As no copper-enriched precipitates were observed in the low copper forging, and the measured copper content in the ferrite matrix was 0.04± <0.01 at.% Cu, after neutron irradiation to a fluence of 1.7 × 1023 n.m–3, this copper level was below the solubility limit. A number density of 2 × 1022 m–3 of Ni–, Mn– Si-enriched precipitates with an equivalent radius of gyration of 1.7 ± 0.4 nm were detected in the sample. However, Cu-, Ni-, Mn-enriched precipitates were observed in specimens cut from different surveillance specimens from the same forging material in which the overall measured copper level was 0.08± <0.01 at.% (fluence of 3.6 × 1023 n.m–3) and 0.09± <0.01 at.% Cu (fluence of 5.8 × 1023 n.m–3). Therefore, these slightly higher copper contents were above the solubility limit of Cu under these irradiation conditions. A best fit of all the composition data indicated that the size and number density of the Cu-enriched precipitates increased slightly in both size and number density by additional exposure to neutron irradiation. High number densities of Cu-enriched precipitates were observed in the higher Cu submerged arc weld for all irradiated conditions. The size and number density of the precipitates in the welds were higher than in the same fluence forgings. Some Cu-enriched precipitates were found to have Ni-, Mn- Si-, and P-enriched regions on their surfaces suggesting a preferential nucleation site. Furthermore, atom maps revealed P, Ni, and Mn

  7. Measurement of hydraulic properties in deep lake sediments using a tethered pore pressure probe: Applications in the Hamilton Harbour, western Lake Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, F. Edwin; Rudolph, David L.; Frape, Shaun K.

    1997-08-01

    Estimates of groundwater seepage flux in lake bottom sediments require knowledge of the hydraulic gradient at the sediment-surface water interface and the hydraulic conductivity of the lake-bottom materials. In deep waters, in situ measurement of these parameters can be accomplished through the use of piezometer probes lowered and monitored remotely from a surface vessel. In this research work a new tethered piezometer probe was developed and tested for use in collecting hydraulic property data in deep-lake bottom sediments. The probe uses a variable-reluctance transducer to measure the differential sediment pore pressure between two ports spaced 100 cm apart. The dissipation of pore pressure transients that develop during rapid emplacement of the probe were extrapolated in time to estimate equilibrium hydraulic gradients. In addition, various data analysis techniques were evaluated for determining sediment hydraulic conductivity and specific storage through interpretation of the pore-pressure dissipation data. The probe was used to estimate groundwater seepage in the bottom sediments of the Hamilton Harbour, at the western end of Lake Ontario. Upward gradients were measured at nine locations within the harbor ranging from 0.010 to 0.425 and a downward gradient of -0.015 was recorded at one site along the harbor's eastern boundary. Hydraulic conductivities determined from pore-pressure dissipation over time ranged from 6.9 × 10-9to 4.8 × 10-7 m/s. Specific storage values ranged from 0.08 to 0.19 m-1. Calculated average linear seepage velocities ranged from 4.3 × 10-8 to -8.5 × 10-9 m/s. The groundwater contribution to the harbor through the deeper, fine-grained sediments was estimated to be 9.1 × 10-2 m3/s, or 2.9 × 106 m3/yr. This represents approximately 1.0% of the harbor basin's total volume, 15% of precipitation's contribution, 1.2% of the contribution of surface inflows (excluding the Burlington ship canal) and 0.22% of the total surface outflow passing

  8. Using “Tender” x-ray ambient pressure x-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy as a direct probe of solid-liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Axnanda, Stephanus; Crumlin, Ethan J.; Mao, Baohua; Rani, Sana; Chang, Rui; Karlsson, Patrik G.; Edwards, Mårten O. M.; Lundqvist, Måns; Moberg, Robert; Ross, Phil; Hussain, Zahid; Liu, Zhi

    2015-05-07

    We report a new method to probe the solid-liquid interface through the use of a thin liquid layer on a solid surface. An ambient pressure XPS (AP-XPS) endstation that is capable of detecting high kinetic energy photoelectrons (7 keV) at a pressure up to 110 Torr has been constructed and commissioned. Additionally, we have deployed a “dip & pull” method to create a stable nanometers-thick aqueous electrolyte on platinum working electrode surface. Combining the newly constructed AP-XPS system, “dip & pull” approach, with a “tender” X-ray synchrotron source (2 keV–7 keV), we are able to access the interface between liquid and solid dense phases with photoelectrons and directly probe important phenomena occurring at the narrow solid-liquid interface region in an electrochemical system. Using this approach, we have performed electrochemical oxidation of the Pt electrode at an oxygen evolution reaction (OER) potential. Under this potential, we observe the formation of both Pt²⁺ and Pt⁴⁺ interfacial species on the Pt working electrode in situ. We believe this thin-film approach and the use of “tender” AP-XPS highlighted in this study is an innovative new approach to probe this key solid-liquid interface region of electrochemistry.

  9. Using “Tender” x-ray ambient pressure x-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy as a direct probe of solid-liquid interface

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Axnanda, Stephanus; Crumlin, Ethan J.; Mao, Baohua; Rani, Sana; Chang, Rui; Karlsson, Patrik G.; Edwards, Mårten O. M.; Lundqvist, Måns; Moberg, Robert; Ross, Phil; et al

    2015-05-07

    We report a new method to probe the solid-liquid interface through the use of a thin liquid layer on a solid surface. An ambient pressure XPS (AP-XPS) endstation that is capable of detecting high kinetic energy photoelectrons (7 keV) at a pressure up to 110 Torr has been constructed and commissioned. Additionally, we have deployed a “dip & pull” method to create a stable nanometers-thick aqueous electrolyte on platinum working electrode surface. Combining the newly constructed AP-XPS system, “dip & pull” approach, with a “tender” X-ray synchrotron source (2 keV–7 keV), we are able to access the interface between liquidmore » and solid dense phases with photoelectrons and directly probe important phenomena occurring at the narrow solid-liquid interface region in an electrochemical system. Using this approach, we have performed electrochemical oxidation of the Pt electrode at an oxygen evolution reaction (OER) potential. Under this potential, we observe the formation of both Pt²⁺ and Pt⁴⁺ interfacial species on the Pt working electrode in situ. We believe this thin-film approach and the use of “tender” AP-XPS highlighted in this study is an innovative new approach to probe this key solid-liquid interface region of electrochemistry.« less

  10. Using “Tender” X-ray Ambient Pressure X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy as A Direct Probe of Solid-Liquid Interface

    PubMed Central

    Axnanda, Stephanus; Crumlin, Ethan J.; Mao, Baohua; Rani, Sana; Chang, Rui; Karlsson, Patrik G.; Edwards, Mårten O. M.; Lundqvist, Måns; Moberg, Robert; Ross, Phil; Hussain, Zahid; Liu, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    We report a new method to probe the solid-liquid interface through the use of a thin liquid layer on a solid surface. An ambient pressure XPS (AP-XPS) endstation that is capable of detecting high kinetic energy photoelectrons (7 keV) at a pressure up to 110 Torr has been constructed and commissioned. Additionally, we have deployed a “dip & pull” method to create a stable nanometers-thick aqueous electrolyte on platinum working electrode surface. Combining the newly constructed AP-XPS system, “dip & pull” approach, with a “tender” X-ray synchrotron source (2 keV–7 keV), we are able to access the interface between liquid and solid dense phases with photoelectrons and directly probe important phenomena occurring at the narrow solid-liquid interface region in an electrochemical system. Using this approach, we have performed electrochemical oxidation of the Pt electrode at an oxygen evolution reaction (OER) potential. Under this potential, we observe the formation of both Pt2+ and Pt4+ interfacial species on the Pt working electrode in situ. We believe this thin-film approach and the use of “tender” AP-XPS highlighted in this study is an innovative new approach to probe this key solid-liquid interface region of electrochemistry. PMID:25950241

  11. Using “Tender” X-ray Ambient Pressure X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy as A Direct Probe of Solid-Liquid Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axnanda, Stephanus; Crumlin, Ethan J.; Mao, Baohua; Rani, Sana; Chang, Rui; Karlsson, Patrik G.; Edwards, Mårten O. M.; Lundqvist, Måns; Moberg, Robert; Ross, Phil; Hussain, Zahid; Liu, Zhi

    2015-05-01

    We report a new method to probe the solid-liquid interface through the use of a thin liquid layer on a solid surface. An ambient pressure XPS (AP-XPS) endstation that is capable of detecting high kinetic energy photoelectrons (7 keV) at a pressure up to 110 Torr has been constructed and commissioned. Additionally, we have deployed a “dip & pull” method to create a stable nanometers-thick aqueous electrolyte on platinum working electrode surface. Combining the newly constructed AP-XPS system, “dip & pull” approach, with a “tender” X-ray synchrotron source (2 keV-7 keV), we are able to access the interface between liquid and solid dense phases with photoelectrons and directly probe important phenomena occurring at the narrow solid-liquid interface region in an electrochemical system. Using this approach, we have performed electrochemical oxidation of the Pt electrode at an oxygen evolution reaction (OER) potential. Under this potential, we observe the formation of both Pt2+ and Pt4+ interfacial species on the Pt working electrode in situ. We believe this thin-film approach and the use of “tender” AP-XPS highlighted in this study is an innovative new approach to probe this key solid-liquid interface region of electrochemistry.

  12. Pollution Probe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chant, Donald A.

    This book is written as a statement of concern about pollution by members of Pollution Probe, a citizens' anti-pollution group in Canada. Its purpose is to create public awareness and pressure for the eventual solution to pollution problems. The need for effective government policies to control the population explosion, conserve natural resources,…

  13. Probing and modeling of pressure-induced coordination transformation in borate glasses: Inelastic x-ray scattering study at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung Keun; Eng, Peter J.; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Shu, Jinfu

    2008-12-01

    Here, we report on the in situ synchrotron inelastic x-ray scattering spectra of Na-borate glasses at high pressure up to 25 GPa. The pressure-induced boron coordination transformation from B[3] to B[4] is linear with pressure characterized by a single value of (∂B[3]/∂P)T . Previous studies of Li-borate and pure-borate glasses show a nonlinear transformation with multiple (∂B[3]/∂P)T values for different pressure ranges, revealing the important role cation field strength plays in densification and pressure-induced structural changes. Considering the distribution of the energy difference between low- and high-pressure states (Δɛ) in the energy landscape and the variance of the ratio Δɛ to its pressure gradient (∂Δɛ/∂P)T as a measure of network flexibility with pressure, an amorphous system with a large variance in Δɛ at 1 atm and/or a small (∂Δɛ/∂P)T may undergo a gradual coordination transformation (e.g., Na borates). In contrast, a system with the opposite behavior (e.g., Li borates) undergoes an abrupt coordination transformation. The results and concepts of this study thus can shed light on opportunities to study the effect of composition on the nature of densification in low- z oxide and other archetypal glasses and melts.

  14. The dependence on geomagnetic conditions and solar wind dynamic pressure of the spatial distributions of EMIC waves observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikin, A. A.; Zhang, J.-C.; Smith, C. W.; Spence, H. E.; Torbert, R. B.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2016-05-01

    A statistical examination on the spatial distributions of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves observed by the Van Allen Probes against varying levels of geomagnetic activity (i.e., AE and SYM-H) and dynamic pressure has been performed. Measurements taken by the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science for the first full magnetic local time (MLT) precession of the Van Allen Probes (September 2012-June 2014) are used to identify over 700 EMIC wave events. Spatial distributions of EMIC waves are found to vary depending on the level of geomagnetic activity and solar wind dynamic pressure. EMIC wave events were observed under quiet (AE ≤ 100 nT, 325 wave events), moderate (100 nT < AE ≤ 300 nT, 218 wave events), and disturbed (AE > 300 nT, 228 wave events) geomagnetic conditions and are primarily observed in the prenoon sector (~800 < MLT ≤ ~1100) at L ≈ 5.5 during quiet activity times. As AE increases to disturbed levels, the peak occurrence rates shift to the afternoon sector (1200 < MLT ≤ 1800) between L = 4 and L = 6. A majority of EMIC wave events (~56%) were observed during nonstorm times (defined by SYM-H). Consistent with the quiet AE levels, nonstorm EMIC waves are observed in the prenoon sector. EMIC waves observed through the duration of a geomagnetic storm are primarily located in the afternoon sector. High solar wind pressure (Pdyn > 3 nPa) correlates to mostly afternoon EMIC wave observations.

  15. High-sensitivity nuclear magnetic resonance at Giga-Pascal pressures: a new tool for probing electronic and chemical properties of condensed matter under extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Meier, Thomas; Haase, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is one of the most important techniques for the study of condensed matter systems, their chemical structure, and their electronic properties. The application of high pressure enables one to synthesize new materials, but the response of known materials to high pressure is a very useful tool for studying their electronic structure and developing theories. For example, high-pressure synthesis might be at the origin of life; and understanding the behavior of small molecules under extreme pressure will tell us more about fundamental processes in our universe. It is no wonder that there has always been great interest in having NMR available at high pressures. Unfortunately, the desired pressures are often well into the Giga-Pascal (GPa) range and require special anvil cell devices where only very small, secluded volumes are available. This has restricted the use of NMR almost entirely in the past, and only recently, a new approach to high-sensitivity GPa NMR, which has a resonating micro-coil inside the sample chamber, was put forward. This approach enables us to achieve high sensitivity with experiments that bring the power of NMR to Giga-Pascal pressure condensed matter research. First applications, the detection of a topological electronic transition in ordinary aluminum metal and the closing of the pseudo-gap in high-temperature superconductivity, show the power of such an approach. Meanwhile, the range of achievable pressures was increased tremendously with a new generation of anvil cells (up to 10.1 GPa), that fit standard-bore NMR magnets. This approach might become a new, important tool for the investigation of many condensed matter systems, in chemistry, geochemistry, and in physics, since we can now watch structural changes with the eyes of a very versatile probe. PMID:25350694

  16. On-probe atmospheric pressure thermal desorption-ESI-MS for the analysis of volatile analytes or volatile pryolysis products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An on-probe pyrolyzer has been constructed and interfaced with desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry (MS) for the rapid analysis of non-volatile pyrolysis products. The detection and analysis of non-volatile pyrolysis products of peptides, proteins and the synthetic polymer pol...

  17. Probing and modeling of pressure-induced coordination transformation in borate glasses: Inelastic x-ray scattering study at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung Keun; Eng, Peter J.; Mao, Ho-kwang; Shu, Jinfu

    2009-01-15

    Here, we report on the in situ synchrotron inelastic x-ray scattering spectra of Na-borate glasses at high pressure up to 25 GPa. The pressure-induced boron coordination transformation from {sup [3]}B to {sup [4]}B is linear with pressure characterized by a single value of ({partial_derivative}{sup [3]}B/{partial_derivative}P){sub T}. Previous studies of Li-borate and pure-borate glasses show a nonlinear transformation with multiple ({partial_derivative}{sup [3]}B/{partial_derivative}P){sub T} values for different pressure ranges, revealing the important role cation field strength plays in densification and pressure-induced structural changes. Considering the distribution of the energy difference beween low- and high-pressure states ({Delta}{var_epsilon}) in the energy landscape and the variance of the ratio {Delta}{var_epsilon} to its pressure gradient ({partial_derivative}{Delta}{var_epsilon}/{partial_derivative}P){sub T} as a measure of network flexibility with pressure, an amorphous system with a large variance in {Delta}{var_epsilon} at 1 atm and/or a small ({partial_derivative}{Delta}{var_epsilon}/{partial_derivative}P){sub T} may undergo a gradual coordination transformation (e.g., Na borates). In contrast, a system with the opposite behavior (e.g., Li borates) undergoes an abrupt coordination transformation. The results and concepts of this study thus can shed light on opportunities to study the effect of composition on the nature of densification in low-z oxide and other archetypal glasses and melts.

  18. Pressure effects on the proximal heme pocket in myoglobin probed by Raman and near-infrared absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Galkin, O; Buchter, S; Tabirian, A; Schulte, A

    1997-01-01

    The influence of high pressure on the heme protein conformation of myoglobin in different ligation states is studied using Raman spectroscopy over the temperature range from 30 to 295 K. Photostationary experiments monitoring the oxidation state marker bands demonstrate the change of rebinding rate with pressure. While frequency changes of vibrational modes associated with rigid bonds of the porphyrin ring are <1 cm(-1), we investigate a significant shift of the iron-histidine mode to higher frequency with increasing pressure (approximately 3 cm(-1) for deltaP = 190 MPa in Mb). The observed frequency shift is interpreted structurally as a conformational change affecting the tilt angle between the heme plane and the proximal histidine and the out-of-plane iron position. Independent evidence for iron motion comes from measurements of the redshift of band III in the near-infrared with pressure. This suggests that at high pressure the proximal heme pocket and the protein are altered toward the bound state conformation, which contributes to the rate increase for CO binding. Raman spectra of Mb and photodissociated MbCO measured at low temperature and variable pressure further support changes in protein conformation and are consistent with glasslike properties of myoglobin below 160 K. PMID:9370469

  19. A revised and unified pressure-clamp/relaxation theory for studying plant cell water relations with pressure probes: in-situ determination of cell volume for calculation of volumetric elastic modulus and hydraulic conductivity.

    PubMed

    Knipfer, T; Fei, J; Gambetta, G A; Shackel, K A; Matthews, M A

    2014-10-21

    The cell-pressure-probe is a unique tool to study plant water relations in-situ. Inaccuracy in the estimation of cell volume (νo) is the major source of error in the calculation of both cell volumetric elastic modulus (ε) and cell hydraulic conductivity (Lp). Estimates of νo and Lp can be obtained with the pressure-clamp (PC) and pressure-relaxation (PR) methods. In theory, both methods should result in comparable νo and Lp estimates, but this has not been the case. In this study, the existing νo-theories for PC and PR methods were reviewed and clarified. A revised νo-theory was developed that is equally valid for the PC and PR methods. The revised theory was used to determine νo for two extreme scenarios of solute mixing between the experimental cell and sap in the pressure probe microcapillary. Using a fully automated cell-pressure-probe (ACPP) on leaf epidermal cells of Tradescantia virginiana, the validity of the revised theory was tested with experimental data. Calculated νo values from both methods were in the range of optically determined νo (=1.1-5.0nL) for T. virginiana. However, the PC method produced a systematically lower (21%) calculated νo compared to the PR method. Effects of solute mixing could only explain a potential error in calculated νo of <3%. For both methods, this discrepancy in νo was almost identical to the discrepancy in the measured ratio of ΔV/ΔP (total change in microcapillary sap volume versus corresponding change in cell turgor) of 19%, which is a fundamental parameter in calculating νo. It followed from the revised theory that the ratio of ΔV/ΔP was inversely related to the solute reflection coefficient. This highlighted that treating the experimental cell as an ideal osmometer in both methods is potentially not correct. Effects of non-ideal osmotic behavior by transmembrane solute movement may be minimized in the PR as compared to the PC method. PMID:24907672

  20. Pressure and temperature response of Poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) in aqueous solution probed with Raman microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cariker, Coleman; Schulte, Alfons

    2015-03-01

    Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) is a thermo-responsive hydrogel that exists in a hydrated state beneath its lower critical solution temperature (LCST) near 305 K. Above this temperature water is expelled by the polymer as it undergoes a coil to globule collapse. High pressure is an important variable as it influences the strength of hydrogen bonding and can destabilize hydrophic contacts. We present results from optical imaging on a micron scale and Raman spectroscopic measurements as a function of temperature (295 - 315 K) and hydrostatic pressure (0.1 - 400 MPa). Samples consisted of 25% PNIPAM in aqueous solution in micro-capillaries with 100 micron cross section. Our experiments reveal differences in the spatial evolution of the phase change across the temperature and pressure transitions. These are corroborated by bond specific and hydration changes observed in the Raman spectra.

  1. Ring Current Pressure Estimation withRAM-SCB using Data Assimilation and VanAllen Probe Flux Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinez, H. C.; Yu, Y.; Henderson, M. G.; Larsen, B.; Jordanova, V.

    2015-12-01

    Capturing and subsequently modeling the influence of tail plasma injections on the inner magnetosphere is particularly important for understanding the formation and evolution of Earth's ring current. In this study, the ring current distribution is estimated with the Ring Current-Atmosphere Interactions Model with Self-Consistent Magnetic field (RAM-SCB) using, for the first time, data assimilation techniques and particle flux data from the Van Allen Probes. The state of the ring current within the RAM-SCB is corrected via an ensemble based data assimilation technique by using proton flux from one of the Van Allen Probes, to capture the enhancement of ring current following an isolated substorm event on July 18 2013. The results show significant improvement in the estimation of the ring current particle distributions in the RAM-SCB model, leading to better agreement with observations. This newly implemented data assimilation technique in the global modeling of the ring current thus provides a promising tool to better characterize the effect of substorm injections in the near-Earth regions. The work is part of the Space Hazards Induced near Earth by Large, Dynamic Storms (SHIELDS) project in Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  2. Using AFM to probe the complexation of DNA with anionic lipids mediated by Ca(2+): the role of surface pressure.

    PubMed

    Luque-Caballero, Germán; Martín-Molina, Alberto; Sánchez-Treviño, Alda Yadira; Rodríguez-Valverde, Miguel A; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel A; Maldonado-Valderrama, Julia

    2014-04-28

    Complexation of DNA with lipids is currently being developed as an alternative to classical vectors based on viruses. Most of the research to date focuses on cationic lipids owing to their spontaneous complexation with DNA. Nonetheless, recent investigations have revealed that cationic lipids induce a large number of adverse effects on DNA delivery. Precisely, the lower cytotoxicity of anionic lipids accounts for their use as a promising alternative. However, the complexation of DNA with anionic lipids (mediated by cations) is still in early stages and is not yet well understood. In order to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying the complexation of anionic lipids and DNA we proposed a combined methodology based on the surface pressure-area isotherms, Gibbs elasticity and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). These techniques allow elucidation of the role of the surface pressure in the complexation and visualization of the interfacial aggregates for the first time. We demonstrate that the DNA complexes with negatively charged model monolayers (DPPC/DPPS 4 : 1) only in the presence of Ca(2+), but is expelled at very high surface pressures. Also, according to the Gibbs elasticity plot, the complexation of lipids and DNA implies a whole fluidisation of the monolayer and a completely different phase transition map in the presence of DNA and Ca(2+). AFM imaging allows identification for the first time of specific morphologies associated with different packing densities. At low surface coverage, a branched net like structure is observed whereas at high surface pressure fibers formed of interfacial aggregates appear. In summary, Ca(2+) mediates the interaction between DNA and negatively charged lipids and also the conformation of the ternary system depends on the surface pressure. Such observations are important new generic features of the interaction between DNA and anionic lipids. PMID:24668321

  3. Revealing substructures of H4 and H5 hole traps in p-type InP using Laplace deep-level transient spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwich, R.; Mani, A. A.

    2010-08-01

    New substructures of H4 and H5 hole traps have been revealed using Laplace deep-level transient spectroscopy. Our measurements show that the hole traps H4 and H5 can have at least three components for each. Moreover, the activation energies are deduced and the microscopic nature of these substructures is discussed.

  4. Revealing substructures of H4 and H5 hole traps in p-type InP using Laplace deep-level transient spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Darwich, R.; Mani, A. A.

    2010-08-15

    New substructures of H4 and H5 hole traps have been revealed using Laplace deep-level transient spectroscopy. Our measurements show that the hole traps H4 and H5 can have at least three components for each. Moreover, the activation energies are deduced and the microscopic nature of these substructures is discussed.

  5. A measurement system analysis with design of experiments: Investigation of the adhesion performance of a pressure sensitive adhesive with the probe tack test.

    PubMed

    Michaelis, Marc; Leopold, Claudia S

    2015-12-30

    The tack of a pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) is not an inherent material property and strongly depends on the measurement conditions. Following the concept of a measurement system analysis (MSA), influencing factors of the probe tack test were investigated by a design of experiments (DoE) approach. A response surface design with 38 runs was built to evaluate the influence of detachment speed, dwell time, contact force, adhesive film thickness and API content on tack, determined as the maximum of the stress strain curve (σmax). It could be shown that all investigated factors have a significant effect on the response and that the DoE approach allowed to detect two-factorial interactions between the dwell time, the contact force, the adhesive film thickness and the API content. Surprisingly, it was found that tack increases with decreasing and not with increasing adhesive film thickness. PMID:26428630

  6. Probing pH and pressure effects on the apomyoglobin heme pocket with the 2'-(N,N-dimethylamino)-6-naphthoyl-4-trans-cyclohexanoic acid fluorophore.

    PubMed Central

    Sire, O; Alpert, B; Royer, C A

    1996-01-01

    The environmentally sensitive fluorophore 2'-(N,N-dimethylamino)-6-naphthoyl-4-trans-cyclohexanoic acid (DANCA) has been used to probe the apomyoglobin heme pocket. The unexpected polarity of this domain is generally interpreted as arising from dynamic dipolar relaxation of the peptide dipoles surrounding the heme pocket. In the present work we reexamine the photophysical properties of DANCA in a variety of solvents and complexed with apomyoglobin (apoMb) to further probe the heme pocket environment as a function of external solvent conditions. Absorption and excitation spectra in a number of solvents are consistent with the well-known pi*<--pi (LE) and pi*<--n (CT) electronic absorption transitions observed for naphthylamine derivatives. Dual emission is also a well-documented property of such derivatives. Based on the time scale of the heterogeneity in the decay of the DANCA fluorophore observed in a series of solvents, we propose that the emission properties of DANCA in apoMb are not uniquely attributable to dynamic relaxation events, but also reflect dual emission from both a long-lived, red CT state and the shorter-lived, blue LE state. The pH studies in the range of pH 5-9 of the emission properties of DANCA in apoMb support this hypothesis. They also suggest a specific interaction of DANCA with one or both of the pocket histidyl residues, which leads to a drastic static quenching and red shift of the bound DANCA fluorescence upon protonation. Similar effects are observed with increasing pressure, indicating that these two perturbations alter the DANCA-apoMb complex in a similar fashion. The pressure-induced form of the protein is distinct both energetically and structurally from the previously characterized acid intermediate, in that it is populated above pH 5 and retains a significant degree of integrity of the heme pocket. PMID:8744328

  7. Paramagnetic defects as probes for the study of ferroelastic phase transition in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malovichko, G.; Grachev, V.; Andreev, V.; Nachal'Naya, T.

    It was found by optical polarization microscopy and the EPR study that lithium niobate and tantalate crystals undergo irreversible lattice changes under anisotropic hydrostatic compression. Regions having different cell orientations were registered. The observed changes were explained in terms of "strain switching" of ferroelastic domains. Possible sequence of phase transitions in these crystals (Pm3m<->R (3) over bar3 c<->R 3 c) and the symmetry of the condensed soft modes ( R-25 and Gamma(15) , correspondingly) were obtained by the analysis of the Gibbs free energy under external pressure.

  8. Different urea stoichiometries between the dissociation and denaturation of tobacco mosaic virus as probed by hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jose L R; Aparicio, Ricardo; Joekes, Inés; Silva, Jerson L; Bispo, Jose A C; Bonafe, Carlos F S

    2008-05-01

    Viruses are very efficient self-assembly structures, but little is understood about the thermodynamics governing their directed assembly. At higher levels of pressure or when pressure is combined with urea, denaturation occurs. For a better understanding of such processes, we investigated the apparent thermodynamic parameters of dissociation and denaturation by assuming a steady-state condition. These processes can be measured considering the decrease of light scattering of a viral solution due to the dissociation process, and the red shift of the fluorescence emission spectra, that occurs with the denaturation process. We determined the apparent urea stoichiometry considering the equilibrium reaction of TMV dissociation and subunit denaturation, which furnished, respectively, 1.53 and 11.1 mol of urea/mol of TMV subunit. The denaturation and dissociation conditions were arrived in a near reversible pathway, allowing the determination of thermodynamic parameters. Gel filtration HPLC, electron microscopy and circular dichroism confirmed the dissociation and denaturation processes. Based on spectroscopic results from earlier papers, the calculation of the apparent urea stoichiometry of dissociation and denaturation of several other viruses resulted in similar values, suggesting a similar virus-urea interaction among these systems. PMID:18367310

  9. Indoor seismology by probing the Earth's interior by using sound velocity measurements at high pressures and temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Baosheng; Liebermann, Robert C.

    2007-01-01

    The adiabatic bulk (KS) and shear (G) moduli of mantle materials at high pressure and temperature can be obtained directly by measuring compressional and shear wave velocities in the laboratory with experimental techniques based on physical acoustics. We present the application of the current state-of-the-art experimental techniques by using ultrasonic interferometry in conjunction with synchrotron x radiation to study the elasticity of olivine and pyroxenes and their high-pressure phases. By using these updated thermoelasticity data for these phases, velocity and density profiles for a pyrolite model are constructed and compared with radial seismic models. We conclude that pyrolite provides an adequate explanation of the major seismic discontinuities at 410- and 660-km depths, the gradient in the transition zone, as well as the velocities in the lower mantle, if the uncertainties in the modeling and the variations in different seismic models are considered. The characteristics of the seismic scaling factors in response to thermal anomalies suggest that anticorrelations between bulk sound and shear wave velocities, as well as the large positive density anomalies observed in the lower mantle, cannot be explained fully without invoking chemical variations. PMID:17485673

  10. Indoor seismology by probing the Earth interior by using sound velocity measurements at high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Li,B.; Liebermann, R.

    2007-01-01

    The adiabatic bulk (K S) and shear (G) moduli of mantle materials at high pressure and temperature can be obtained directly by measuring compressional and shear wave velocities in the laboratory with experimental techniques based on physical acoustics. We present the application of the current state-of-the-art experimental techniques by using ultrasonic interferometry in conjunction with synchrotron x radiation to study the elasticity of olivine and pyroxenes and their high-pressure phases. By using these updated thermoelasticity data for these phases, velocity and density profiles for a pyrolite model are constructed and compared with radial seismic models. We conclude that pyrolite provides an adequate explanation of the major seismic discontinuities at 410- and 660-km depths, the gradient in the transition zone, as well as the velocities in the lower mantle, if the uncertainties in the modeling and the variations in different seismic models are considered. The characteristics of the seismic scaling factors in response to thermal anomalies suggest that anticorrelations between bulk sound and shear wave velocities, as well as the large positive density anomalies observed in the lower mantle, cannot be explained fully without invoking chemical variations.

  11. Indoor seismology by probing the Earth's interior by using sound velocity measurements at high pressures and temperatures.

    PubMed

    Li, Baosheng; Liebermann, Robert C

    2007-05-29

    The adiabatic bulk (K(S)) and shear (G) moduli of mantle materials at high pressure and temperature can be obtained directly by measuring compressional and shear wave velocities in the laboratory with experimental techniques based on physical acoustics. We present the application of the current state-of-the-art experimental techniques by using ultrasonic interferometry in conjunction with synchrotron x radiation to study the elasticity of olivine and pyroxenes and their high-pressure phases. By using these updated thermoelasticity data for these phases, velocity and density profiles for a pyrolite model are constructed and compared with radial seismic models. We conclude that pyrolite provides an adequate explanation of the major seismic discontinuities at 410- and 660-km depths, the gradient in the transition zone, as well as the velocities in the lower mantle, if the uncertainties in the modeling and the variations in different seismic models are considered. The characteristics of the seismic scaling factors in response to thermal anomalies suggest that anticorrelations between bulk sound and shear wave velocities, as well as the large positive density anomalies observed in the lower mantle, cannot be explained fully without invoking chemical variations. PMID:17485673

  12. Pressure/temperature fluid cell apparatus for the neutron powder diffractometer instrument: Probing atomic structure in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hsiu -Wen; Fanelli, Victor R.; Reiche, Helmut M.; Larson, Eric; Taylor, Mark A.; Xu, Hongwu; Zhu, Jinlong; Siewenie, Joan; Page, Katharine

    2014-12-01

    This contribution describes a new local structure compatible gas/liquid cell apparatus for probing disordered materials at high pressures and variable temperatures in the Neutron Powder Diffraction instrument at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory. The new sample environment offers choices for sample canister thickness and canister material type. Finite element modeling is utilized to establish maximum allowable working pressures of 414 MPa at 15 K and 121 MPa at 600 K. High quality atomic pair distribution function data extraction and modeling have been demonstrated for a calibration standard (Si powder) and for supercritical and subcritical CO2measurements. As a result, the new sample environment was designed to specifically target experimental studies of the local atomic structures involved in geologic CO2 sequestration, but will be equally applicable to a wide variety of energy applications, including sorption of fluids on nano/meso-porous solids, clathrate hydrate formation, catalysis, carbon capture, and H2 and natural gas uptake/storage.

  13. Kinetic of solute clustering in neutron irradiated ferritic model alloys and a French pressure vessel steel investigated by atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meslin, E.; Radiguet, B.; Pareige, P.; Barbu, A.

    2010-04-01

    The embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels under neutron irradiation is partly due to the formation of solute clusters. To gain more insight into their formation mechanisms, ferritic model alloys (low copper Fe-0.08 at.% Cu, Fe-0.09 Cu-1.1 Mn-0.7 Ni (at.%), and a copper free Fe-1.1 Mn-0.7 Ni (at.%)) and a French 16MND5 reactor pressure vessel steel, were irradiated in a test reactor at two fluxes of 0.15 and 9 × 10 17 n( E> 1 MeV) m -2 s -1 and at increasing doses from 0.18 to 1.3 × 10 24 n( E> 1 MeV) m -2. Atom probe tomography analyses revealed that nanometer-size solute clusters were formed during irradiation in all the materials, even in the copper free Fe-1.1 Mn-0.7 Ni (at.%) alloy. It should be noted that solute segregation in a low-Ni ferritic material was never reported before in absence of the highly insoluble copper impurity. The manganese and nickel segregation is suggested to result from a radiation-induced mechanism.

  14. Probe assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Avera, C.J.

    1981-01-06

    A hand-held probe assembly, suitable for monitoring a radioactive fibrinogen tracer, is disclosed comprising a substantially cylindrically shaped probe handle having an open end. The probe handle is adapted to be interconnected with electrical circuitry for monitoring radioactivity that is sensed or detected by the probe assembly. Mounted within the probe handle is a probe body assembly that includes a cylindrically shaped probe body inserted through the open end of the probe handle. The probe body includes a photomultiplier tube that is electrically connected with a male connector positioned at the rearward end of the probe body. Mounted at the opposite end of the probe body is a probe head which supports an optical coupler therewithin. The probe head is interconnected with a probe cap which supports a detecting crystal. The probe body assembly, which consists of the probe body, the probe head, and the probe cap is supported within the probe handle by means of a pair of compressible o-rings which permit the probe assembly to be freely rotatable, preferably through 360*, within the probe handle and removable therefrom without requiring any disassembly.

  15. On the use of the double floating probe method to infer the difference between the electron and the heavy particles temperatures in an atmospheric pressure, vortex-stabilized nitrogen plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Prevosto, L. Mancinelli, B. R.; Kelly, H.

    2014-05-15

    Sweeping double probe measurements in an atmospheric pressure direct current vortex-stabilized plasma jet are reported (plasma conditions: 100 A discharge current, N{sub 2} gas flow rate of 25 Nl/min, thoriated tungsten rod-type cathode, copper anode with 5 mm inner diameter). The interpretation of the double probe characteristic was based on a generalization of the standard double floating probe formulae for non-uniform plasmas coupled to a non-equilibrium plasma composition model. Perturbations caused by the current to the probe together with collisional and thermal processes inside the probe perturbed region were taken into account. Radial values of the average electron and heavy particle temperatures as well as the electron density were obtained. The calculation of the temperature values did not require any specific assumption about a temperature relationship between different particle species. An electron temperature of 10 900 ± 900 K, a heavy particle temperature of 9300 ± 900 K, and an electron density of about 3.5 × 10{sup 22} m{sup −3} were found at the jet centre at 3.5 mm downstream from the torch exit. Large deviations from kinetic equilibrium were found toward the outer border of the plasma jet. These results showed good agreement with those previously reported by the authors by using a single probe technique. The calculations have shown that this method is particularly useful for studying spraying-type plasma torches operated at power levels of about 15 kW.

  16. Properties of Broezel static probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gašparovič, Peter; Semrád, Karol; Cúttová, Miroslava

    2016-03-01

    The properties of flat static probe designed by Broezel and used in sailplanes are investigated for its planned use in low speed tunnel. Both the numerical CFD model and experiment in low speed wind tunnel confirm yaw insensitivity of the static pressure measured by the probe. The results indicate that the probe is sufficiently accurate for its planned use in wind tunnel measurements.

  17. High temperature probe

    DOEpatents

    Swan, Raymond A.

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature probe for sampling, for example, smokestack fumes, and is able to withstand temperatures of 3000.degree. F. The probe is constructed so as to prevent leakage via the seal by placing the seal inside the water jacket whereby the seal is not exposed to high temperature, which destroys the seal. The sample inlet of the probe is also provided with cooling fins about the area of the seal to provide additional cooling to prevent the seal from being destroyed. Also, a heated jacket is provided for maintaining the temperature of the gas being tested as it passes through the probe. The probe includes pressure sensing means for determining the flow velocity of an efficient being sampled. In addition, thermocouples are located in various places on the probe to monitor the temperature of the gas passing there through.

  18. Infrared absorption by molecular gases as a probe of nanoporous silica xerogel and molecule-surface collisions: Low-pressure results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vander Auwera, J.; Ngo, N. H.; El Hamzaoui, H.; Capoen, B.; Bouazaoui, M.; Ausset, P.; Boulet, C.; Hartmann, J.-M.

    2013-10-01

    Transmission spectra of gases confined (but not adsorbed) within the pores of a 1.4-cm-thick silica xerogel sample have been recorded between 2.5 and 5 μm using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. This was done for pure CO, CO2, N2O, H2O, and CH4 at room temperature and pressures of a few hectopascals. Least-squares fits of measured absorption lines provide the optical-path lengths within the confined (LC) and free (LF) gas inside the absorption cell and the half width at half maximum ΓC of the lines of the confined gases. The values of LC and LF retrieved using numerous transitions of all studied species are very consistent. Furthermore, LC is in satisfactory agreement with values obtained from independent measurements, thus showing that reliable information on the open porosity volume can be retrieved from an optical experiment. The values of ΓC, here resulting from collisions of the molecules with the inner surfaces of the xerogel pores, are practically independent of the line for each gas and inversely proportional to the square root of the probed-molecule molar mass. This is a strong indication that, for the studied transitions, a single collision of a molecule with a pore surface is sufficient to change its rotational state. A previously proposed simple model, used for the prediction of the line shape, leads to satisfactory agreement with the observations. It also enables a determination of the average pore size, bringing information complementary to that obtained from nitrogen adsorption porosimetry.

  19. Single-Cell Metabolite Profiling of Stalk and Glandular Cells of Intact Trichomes with Internal Electrode Capillary Pressure Probe Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Taiken; Wada, Hiroshi; Morita, Satoshi; Erra-Balsells, Rosa; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Nonami, Hiroshi

    2016-03-15

    In this report, we developed the pressure probe electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry with internal electrode capillary (IEC-PPESI-MS) which enables high spatial-resolution cell sampling, precise postsampling manipulation, and high detection sensitivity. Using this technique, a comparative in situ single-cell metabolite profiling of stalk and glandular cells, the two adjacent cell types comprising a trichome unit in tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum L.), were performed to clarify the extent of metabolic differentiation between two cell types as well as among different types of trichomes. Owing to high sensitivity of the system, less than a picoliter cell sap from a single stalk cell sufficiently yielded a number of peaks of amino acids, organic acids, carbohydrates, and flavonoids. The minimal cell sap removal from a stalk cell without severe disturbance of trichome structure enabled sequential analysis of adjacent glandular cell on the same trichome, which showed the presence of striking differences in metabolite compositions between two adjacent cell types. Comparison among different types of trichome also revealed significant variations in metabolite profiles, particularly in flavonoids and acyl sugars compositions. Some metabolites were found only in specific cell types or particular trichome types. Although extensive metabolomics analysis of glandular cells of tomato trichomes has been previously documented, this is the first report describing cell-to-cell variations in metabolite compositions of stalk and glandular cells as well as in different trichome types. Further application of this technique may provide new insights into distinct metabolism in plant cells displaying variations in shape, size, function and physicochemical properties. PMID:26845634

  20. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, W.S.; O'Rourke, P.E.

    1994-08-02

    A support structure is described bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe. 3 figs.

  1. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, William S.; O'Rourke, Patrick E.

    1994-01-01

    A support structure bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe.

  2. Dynamic, in vivo, real-time detection of retinal oxidative status in a model of elevated intraocular pressure using a novel, reversibly responsive, profluorescent nitroxide probe.

    PubMed

    Rayner, Cassie L; Gole, Glen A; Bottle, Steven E; Barnett, Nigel L

    2014-12-01

    Changes to the redox status of biological systems have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of disorders including cancer, Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury and neurodegeneration. In times of metabolic stress e.g. ischaemia/reperfusion, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production overwhelms the intrinsic antioxidant capacity of the cell, damaging vital cellular components. The ability to quantify ROS changes in vivo, is therefore essential to understanding their biological role. Here we evaluate the suitability of a novel reversible profluorescent probe containing a redox-sensitive nitroxide moiety (methyl ester tetraethylrhodamine nitroxide, ME-TRN), as an in vivo, real-time reporter of retinal oxidative status. The reversible nature of the probe's response offers the unique advantage of being able to monitor redox changes in both oxidizing and reducing directions in real time. After intravitreal administration of the ME-TRN probe, we induced ROS production in rat retina using an established model of complete, acute retinal ischaemia followed by reperfusion. After restoration of blood flow, retinas were imaged using a Micron III rodent fundus fluorescence imaging system, to quantify the redox-response of the probe. Fluorescent intensity declined during the first 60 min of reperfusion. The ROS-induced change in probe fluorescence was ameliorated with the retinal antioxidant, lutein. Fluorescence intensity in non-Ischemia eyes did not change significantly. This new probe and imaging technology provide a reversible and real-time response to oxidative changes and may allow the in vivo testing of antioxidant therapies of potential benefit to a range of diseases linked to oxidative stress. PMID:25447708

  3. Pressure-induced amorphizations of silica analogues: A probe of the relationship between order and disorder. Progress report, August 1, 1992--July 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hammack, W.S.

    1993-02-01

    Purpose of these of high pressure investigations is to determine the relationship between order and disorder in amorphous materials using high pressure techniques were used. High pressure x-ray diffraction, electron transmission microscopy, and Raman scattering. Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) at Ithaca was used to measure x-ray diffraction patterns using Energy-Dispersive X-ray Diffraction. It was shown that the structural ordering in pressure-amorphized solids can be described as defects in curved-space. High-resolution transmissions electron microscopy showed that pressure-amorphized alpha-quartz lacks periodicity at the atomic level. Study of a silicate mineral shows that pressure-induced amorphizations occur because of an impeded phase transition.

  4. High hydrostatic pressure can probe the effects of functionally related ligands on the quaternary structures of the chaperonins GroEL and GroES.

    PubMed

    Panda, M; Ybarra, J; Horowitz, P M

    2001-03-01

    We investigated the effects of high hydrostatic pressure in the range of 1--3 kilobars on tetradecameric GroEL, heptameric GroES, and the GroEL-GroES complex. Unlike GroEL monomers formed by urea dissociation, which can be reassembled back to the tetradecamer, the pressure-dissociated monomers do not reassemble readily. This indicates an alteration of their native structures, an example of conformational drift. Pressure versus time profiles and kinetics of the dissociation of both GroEL and GroES at fixed pressures were monitored by light scattering. Unlike GroEL, GroES monomers do reassociate readily. Reaction conditions were varied by adding ATP, Mg(2+), ADP, AMP-PNP, and KCl. At any individual pressure, the dissociation process is governed by both thermodynamics and kinetics. This leads to the decrease in the yield of monomers at lower pressures. In the presence of Mg(2+) and KCl, GroEL is stable up to 3 kilobars. The presence of either ATP or ADP but not AMP-PNP leads to GroEL dissociation at lower pressures. Interestingly, the GroEL-GroES complex is very stable in the range of 1--2.5 kilobars. However, the addition of ADP destabilizes the complex, which dissociates completely at 1.5 kilobars. The results are rationalized in terms of different degrees of cooperativity between individual monomers and heptameric rings in the GroEL tetradecamer. Such allosteric interactions leading to the alteration of quaternary structure of GroEL in the absence of chemical denaturants are important in understanding the mechanism of chaperonin-assisted protein folding by the GroEL-GroES system. PMID:11085994

  5. Probe Follower for Moving Blood Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazer, R. E.; Andrews, T. W.

    1985-01-01

    Probes track vessel expansion and contraction with minimal perturbation. Nozzle back-pressure changes at cuff on blood vessel basis for monitoring position of probe in blood vessel. Fluidic amplifiers use signals to control three-axis servo that centers measuring probe between sensing-nozzle pairs at cuff.

  6. Pressure-assisted cold denaturation of hen egg white lysozyme: the influence of co-solvents probed by hydrogen exchange nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Vogtt, K; Winter, R

    2005-08-01

    COSY proton nuclear magnetic resonance was used to measure the exchange rates of amide protons of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) in the pressure-assisted cold-denatured state and in the heat-denatured state. After dissolving lysozyme in deuterium oxide buffer, labile protons exchange for deuterons in such a way that exposed protons are substituted rapidly, whereas "protected" protons within structured parts of the protein are substituted slowly. The exchange rates k obs were determined for HEWL under heat treatment (80 degrees C) and under high pressure conditions at low temperature (3.75 kbar, -13 degrees C). Moreover, the influence of co-solvents (sorbitol, urea) on the exchange rate was examined under pressure-assisted cold denaturation conditions, and the corresponding protection factors, P, were determined. The exchange kinetics upon heat treatment was found to be a two-step process with initial slow exchange followed by a fast one, showing residual protection in the slow-exchange state and P-factors in the random-coil-like range for the final temperature-denatured state. Addition of sorbitol (500 mM) led to an increase of P-factors for the pressure-assisted cold denatured state, but not for the heat-denatured state. The presence of 2 M urea resulted in a drastic decrease of the P-factors of the pressure-assisted cold denatured state. For both types of co-solvents, the effect they exert appears to be cooperative, i.e., no particular regions within the protein can be identified with significantly diverse changes of P-factors. PMID:16082458

  7. Radial theory of the ion current onto a probe in a low-pressure plasma with allowance for volume ionization and collisions with neutrals

    SciTech Connect

    Sysun, V. I.; Ignakhin, V. S.

    2011-04-15

    The ion current onto a spherical or cylindrical probe is analyzed in the cold-ion approximation with allowance for ionization and collisions with neutrals. An expression for the ion density that takes into account both ionization and collision in the finite-size perturbed region is derived. The current-voltage characteristics for the dimensionless parameters r{sub p}/{lambda}{sub D} = 0.0001-10, {lambda}{sub i}/{lambda}{sub D} = 0.01 - {infinity}, and z{lambda}{sub D}/(kT{sub e}/M){sup 1/2} = 0-5 are determined by numerically solving Poisson's equation, and the corresponding approximate expressions are obtained.

  8. Optical probe

    DOEpatents

    Hencken, Kenneth; Flower, William L.

    1999-01-01

    A compact optical probe is disclosed particularly useful for analysis of emissions in industrial environments. The instant invention provides a geometry for optically-based measurements that allows all optical components (source, detector, rely optics, etc.) to be located in proximity to one another. The geometry of the probe disclosed herein provides a means for making optical measurements in environments where it is difficult and/or expensive to gain access to the vicinity of a flow stream to be measured. Significantly, the lens geometry of the optical probe allows the analysis location within a flow stream being monitored to be moved while maintaining optical alignment of all components even when the optical probe is focused on a plurality of different analysis points within the flow stream.

  9. Cobra Probes Containing Replaceable Thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, John; Redding, Adam

    2007-01-01

    A modification of the basic design of cobra probes provides for relatively easy replacement of broken thermocouples. Cobra probes are standard tube-type pressure probes that may also contain thermocouples and that are routinely used in wind tunnels and aeronautical hardware. They are so named because in side views, they resemble a cobra poised to attack. Heretofore, there has been no easy way to replace a broken thermocouple in a cobra probe: instead, it has been necessary to break the probe apart and then rebuild it, typically at a cost between $2,000 and $4,000 (2004 prices). The modified design makes it possible to replace the thermocouple, in minimal time and at relatively low cost, by inserting new thermocouple wire in a tube.

  10. Wake flowfields for Jovian probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, C. D.; Hair, L. M.

    1980-01-01

    The wake flow field developed by the Galileo probe as it enters the Jovian atmosphere was modeled. The wake produced by the probe is highly energetic, yielding both convective and radiative heat inputs to the base of the probe. A component mathematical model for the inviscid near and far wake, the viscous near and far wake, and near wake recirculation zone was developed. Equilibrium thermodynamics were used for both the ablation and atmospheric species. Flow fields for three entry conditions were calculated. The near viscous wave was found to exhibit a variable axial pressure distribution with the neck pressure approximately three times the base pressure. Peak wake flow field temperatures were found to be in proportion to forebody post shock temperatures.

  11. Conductivity Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air.

    The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air.

    The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  12. High-temperature superconducting radiofrequency probe for magnetic resonance imaging applications operated below ambient pressure in a simple liquid-nitrogen cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Simon; Ginefri, Jean-Christophe; Poirier-Quinot, Marie; Darrasse, Luc

    2013-05-01

    The present work investigates the joined effects of temperature and static magnetic field on the electrical properties of a 64 MHz planar high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coil, in order to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) applications with a moderate decrease of the HTS coil temperature (THTS). Temperature control is provided with accuracy better than 0.1 K from 80 to 66 K by regulating the pressure of the liquid nitrogen bath of a dedicated cryostat. The actual temperature of the HTS coil is obtained using a straightforward wireless method that eliminates the risks of coupling electromagnetic interference to the HTS coil and of disturbing the static magnetic field by DC currents near the region of interest. The resonance frequency ( f0) and the quality factor (Q) of the HTS coil are measured as a function of temperature in the 0-4.7 T field range with parallel and orthogonal orientations relative to the coil plane. The intrinsic HTS coil sensitivity and the detuning effect are then analyzed from the Q and f0 data. In the presence of the static magnetic field, the initial value of f0 in Earth's field could be entirely recovered by decreasing THTS, except for the orthogonal orientation above 1 T. The improvement of Q by lowering THTS was substantial. From 80 to 66 K, Q was multiplied by a factor of 6 at 1.5 T in orthogonal orientation. In parallel orientation, the maximum measured improvement of Q from 80 K to 66 K was a factor of 2. From 80 to 66 K, the improvement of the RF sensitivity relative to the initial value at the Earth's field and ambient pressure was up to 4.4 dB in parallel orientation. It was even more important in orthogonal orientation and continued to increase, up to 8.4 dB, at the maximum explored field of 1.5 T. Assuming that the noise contributions from the RF receiver are negligible, the SNR improvement using enhanced HTS coil cooling in NMR experiments was extracted from Q measurements either

  13. Polystyrene as a model system to probe the impact of ambient gas chemistry on polymer surface modifications using remote atmospheric pressure plasma under well-controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Bartis, Elliot A J; Luan, Pingshan; Knoll, Andrew J; Hart, Connor; Seog, Joonil; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S

    2015-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was used to treat polystyrene (PS) films under remote conditions where neither the plume nor visible afterglow interacts with the film surface. Carefully controlled conditions were achieved by mounting the APPJ inside a vacuum chamber interfaced to a UHV surface analysis system. PS was chosen as a model system as it contains neither oxygen nor nitrogen, has been extensively studied, and provides insight into how the aromatic structures widespread in biological systems are modified by atmospheric plasma. These remote treatments cause negligible etching and surface roughening, which is promising for treatment of sensitive materials. The surface chemistry was measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to evaluate how ambient chemistry, feed gas chemistry, and plasma-ambient interaction impact the formation of specific moieties. A variety of oxidized carbon species and low concentrations of NOx species were measured after APPJ treatment. In the remote conditions used in this work, modifications are not attributed to short-lived species, e.g., O atoms. It was found that O3 does not correlate with modifications, suggesting that other long-lived species such as singlet delta oxygen or NOx are important. Indeed, surface-bound NO3 was observed after treatment, which must originate from gas phase NOx as neither N nor O are found in the pristine film. By varying the ambient and feed gas chemistry to produce O-rich and O-poor conditions, a possible correlation between the oxygen and nitrogen composition was established. When oxygen is present in the feed gas or ambient, high levels of oxidation with low concentrations of NO3 on the surface were observed. For O-poor conditions, NO and NO2 were measured, suggesting that these species contribute to the oxidation process, but are easily oxidized when oxygen is present. That is, surface oxidation limits and competes with surface nitridation. Overall, surface oxidation takes place easily

  14. Mechanosensitive membrane probes.

    PubMed

    Dal Molin, Marta; Verolet, Quentin; Soleimanpour, Saeideh; Matile, Stefan

    2015-04-13

    This article assembles pertinent insights behind the concept of planarizable push-pull probes. As a response to the planarization of their polarized ground state, a red shift of their excitation maximum is expected to report on either the disorder, the tension, or the potential of biomembranes. The combination of chromophore planarization and polarization contributes to various, usually more complex processes in nature. Examples include the color change of crabs or lobsters during cooking or the chemistry of vision, particularly color vision. The summary of lessons from nature is followed by an overview of mechanosensitive organic materials. Although often twisted and sometimes also polarized, their change of color under pressure usually originates from changes in their crystal packing. Intriguing exceptions include the planarization of several elegantly twisted phenylethynyl oligomers and polymers. Also mechanosensitive probes in plastics usually respond to stretching by disassembly. True ground-state planarization in response to molecular recognition is best exemplified with the binding of thoughtfully twisted cationic polythiophenes to single- and double-stranded oligonucleotides. Molecular rotors, en vogue as viscosity sensors in cells, operate by deplanarization of the first excited state. Pertinent recent examples are described, focusing on λ-ratiometry and intracellular targeting. Complementary to planarization of the ground state with twisted push-pull probes, molecular rotors report on environmental changes with quenching or shifts in emission rather than absorption. The labeling of mechanosensitive channels is discussed as a bioengineering approach to bypass the challenge to create molecular mechanosensitivity and use biological systems instead to sense membrane tension. With planarizable push-pull probes, this challenge is met not with twistome screening, but with "fluorescent flippers," a new concept to insert large and bright monomers into oligomeric

  15. Direct screening of tobacco indicators in urine and saliva by Atmospheric Pressure Solid Analysis Probe coupled to quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (ASAP-MS-Q-TOF-).

    PubMed

    Carrizo, Daniel; Nerín, Isabel; Domeño, Celia; Alfaro, Pilar; Nerín, Cristina

    2016-05-30

    A new screening method has been explored for direct analysis of tobacco smoke biomarkers in biological matrices (i.e., saliva and urine). Single run analysis using Atmospheric pressure Solid Analysis Probe (ASAP) and high resolution mass spectrometry with quadrupole and time of flight detector has been applied directly to some biological samples (i.e., urine and saliva), providing a fast, efficient and sensitive method of identification. The method has been applied to saliva and urine samples from heavy tobacco smokers for exposure studies. Nicotine itself, nicotine metabolites (i.e., cotinine, trans-3'-hydroxycotinine, nicotine-N-glucuronide) and other related tobacco smoke toxic compounds (i.e., NNK 4-[methyl(nitroso)amino]-1-(3-pyridinyl)-1-butanone, anatabine) were found in the analyzed samples. The identification of compounds was confirmed by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography with MS-triple quadrupole detector after sample treatment. Different temporal trends and biomarkers behavior have been found in time series related samples. Both methods are compared for screening of these biological matrices. PMID:26950902

  16. Effect of changes in intra-abdominal pressure on diameter, cross-sectional area, and distensibility of the lower esophageal sphincter of healthy dogs as determined by use of an endoscopic functional luminal imaging probe.

    PubMed

    Mayhew, Philipp D; Pitt, Kathryn A; Steffey, Michele A; Culp, William T N; Kass, Philip H; Marks, Stanley L

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) on morphology and compliance of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) by use of impedance planimetry in healthy dogs and to quantify the effect of changes in IAP. ANIMALS 7 healthy, purpose-bred sexually intact male hound-cross dogs. PROCEDURES Dogs were anesthetized, and cross-sectional area (CSA), minimal diameter (MD), LES length, LES volume, and distensibility index (DI) of the LES were evaluated by use of an endoscopic functional luminal imaging probe. For each dog, measurements were obtained before (baseline) and after creation of a pneumoperitoneum at an IAP of 4, 8, and 15 mm Hg. Order of the IAPs was determined by use of a randomization software program. RESULTS CSA and MD at 4 and 8 mm Hg were not significantly different from baseline measurements; however, CSA and MD at 15 mm Hg were both significantly greater than baseline measurements. The LES length and LES volume did not differ significantly from baseline measurements at any IAP. The DI differed inconsistently from the baseline measurement but was not substantially affected by IAP. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Pneumoperitoneum created with an IAP of 4 or 8 mm Hg did not significantly alter LES morphology in healthy dogs. Pneumoperitoneum at an IAP of 15 mm Hg caused a significant increase in CSA and MD of the LES. Compliance of the LES as measured by the DI was not greatly altered by pneumoperitoneum at an IAP of up to 15 mm Hg. PMID:27463542

  17. Study of alternative probe technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A number of implied technologies for a deep probe mission was examined; i.e., one that would provide the capability to scientifically examine planetary atmospheres at the 1000 bar level. Conditions imposed by current Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus atmospheric models were considered. The major thrust of the measurements was to determine lower atmosphere composition, even to trace constituents of one part per billion. Two types of instruments having the necessary accuracy to meet the science objectives were considered and integrated into a deep probe configuration. One deep probe option that resulted was identified as a Minimum Technology Development approach. The significant feature of this option is that only three technology developments are required to enable the mission, i.e., (1) science instrument development, (2) advanced data processing, and (3) external high pressure/thermal insulation. It is concluded that a probe designed for a Jupiter mission could, with minor changes, be used for a Saturn or Uranus mission.

  18. Water-Cooled Total-Temperature Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagen, Nicholas T.; Reece, Garland D.

    1992-01-01

    Water-cooled supersonic total-pressure, static-pressure, and total-temperature probes developed to study high-temperature jet plumes. Total-temperature probe tested up to 2,000 degrees F incorporates annular cooling system up to thermocouple lead. Lead extends into test chamber to sense temperature of supersonic external flow. Design novel and significant. Applicable in development of jet engines and in research on fast flows of hot gases.

  19. Mach flow angularity probes for scramjet engine flow path diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Jalbert, P.A.; Hiers, R.S. Jr.

    1993-12-31

    Mach-flow angularity (MFA) probes were developed for use in scramjet flow path probe rakes. Prototype probes were fabricated to demonstrate the assembly processes (numerical control machining, furnace brazing, and electron beam welding). Tests of prototype probes confirmed the thermal durability margins and life cycle. Selected probes were calibrated in air at Mach numbers from 1.75 to 6.0. Acceptance criteria for the production probes stressed thermal durability and pressure (and, consequently, Mach number) measurement quality. This new water-cooled MFA probe has 0.397-cm shaft diameter and is capable of withstanding heat fluxes of 2.724 kW/sq cm.

  20. Small rocket tornado probe

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    A (less than 1 lb.) paper rock tornado probe was developed and deployed in an attempt to measure the pressure, temperature, ionization, and electric field variations along a trajectory penetrating a tornado funnel. The requirements of weight and materials were set by federal regulations and a one-meter resolution at a penetration velocity of close to Mach 1 was desired. These requirements were achieved by telemetering a strain gage transducer for pressure, micro size thermister and electric field, and ionization sensors via a pulse time telemetry to a receiver on board an aircraft that digitizes a signal and presents it to a Z80 microcomputer for recording on mini-floppy disk. Recording rate was 2 ms for 8 channels of information that also includes telemetry rf field strength, magnetic field for orientation on the rocket, zero reference voltage for the sensor op amps as well as the previously mentioned items also. The absolute pressure was recorded. Tactically, over 120 h were flown in a Cessna 210 in April and May 1981, and one tornado was encountered. Four rockets were fired at this tornado, missed, and there were many equipment problems. The equipment needs to be hardened and engineered to a significant degree, but it is believed that the feasibility of the probe, tactics, and launch platform for future tornado work has been proven. The logistics of thunderstorm chasing from a remote base in New Mexico is a major difficulty and reliability of the equipment another. Over 50 dummy rockets have been fired to prove trajectories, stability, and photographic capability. Over 25 electronically equipped rockets have been fired to prove sensors transmission, breakaway connections, etc. The pressure recovery factor was calibrated in the Air Force Academy blow-down tunnel. There is a need for more refined engineering and more logistic support.

  1. Preston Probe Calibrations at High Reynolds Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smits, Alexander J.

    1998-01-01

    The overall goal of the research effort is to study the performance of two Preston probes designed by NASA Langley Research Center across an unprecedented range of Reynolds number (based on friction velocity and probe diameter), and perform an accurate calibration over the same Reynolds number range. Using the Superpipe facility in Princeton, two rounds of experiments were performed. In each round of experiments for each Reynolds number, the pressure gradient, static pressure from the Preston probes and the total pressure from the Preston probes were measured. In the first round, 3 Preston probes having outer diameters of 0.058 inches, 0.083 inches and 0.203 inches were tested over a large range of pipe Reynolds numbers. Two data reduction methods were employed: first, the static pressure measured on the Preston probe was used to calculate P (modified Preston probe configuration), and secondly, the static pressure measured at the reference pressure tap was used to calculate P (un-modified Preston probe configuration). For both methods, the static pressure was adjusted to correspond with the static pressure at the Preston probe tip using the pressure gradient. The measurements for Preston probes with diameters of 0.058 inches, and 0.083 inches respectively were performed in the test pipe before it was polished a second time. Therefore, the measurements at high pipe Reynolds numbers may have been affected by roughness. In the second round of experiments the 0.058 inches and 0.083 inches diameter, un-modified probes were tested after the pipe was polished and prepared to ensure that the surface was smooth. The average velocity was estimated by assuming that the connection between the centerline velocity and the average velocity was known, and by using a Pitot tube to measure the centerline velocity. A preliminary error estimate suggests that it is possible to introduce a 1% to 2% error in estimating the average velocity using this approach. The evidence on the errors

  2. Instrument measures dynamic pressure fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coats, J. W.; Penko, P. E.; Reshotko, M.

    1977-01-01

    Pressure probe instrument, incorporating "infinite line" principle, can be used to remotely measure dynamic pressure fluctuations in hot high-pressure environemnts too severe for sensors. System is designed and can be utilized for measurements in core of operating turbofan engine.

  3. Ice-Borehole Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto; Carsey, Frank; Lane, Arthur; Engelhardt, Herman

    2006-01-01

    An instrumentation system has been developed for studying interactions between a glacier or ice sheet and the underlying rock and/or soil. Prior borehole imaging systems have been used in well-drilling and mineral-exploration applications and for studying relatively thin valley glaciers, but have not been used for studying thick ice sheets like those of Antarctica. The system includes a cylindrical imaging probe that is lowered into a hole that has been bored through the ice to the ice/bedrock interface by use of an established hot-water-jet technique. The images acquired by the cameras yield information on the movement of the ice relative to the bedrock and on visible features of the lower structure of the ice sheet, including ice layers formed at different times, bubbles, and mineralogical inclusions. At the time of reporting the information for this article, the system was just deployed in two boreholes on the Amery ice shelf in East Antarctica and after successful 2000 2001 deployments in 4 boreholes at Ice Stream C, West Antarctica, and in 2002 at Black Rapids Glacier, Alaska. The probe is designed to operate at temperatures from 40 to +40 C and to withstand the cold, wet, high-pressure [130-atm (13.20-MPa)] environment at the bottom of a water-filled borehole in ice as deep as 1.6 km. A current version is being outfitted to service 2.4-km-deep boreholes at the Rutford Ice Stream in West Antarctica. The probe (see figure) contains a sidelooking charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera that generates both a real-time analog video signal and a sequence of still-image data, and contains a digital videotape recorder. The probe also contains a downward-looking CCD analog video camera, plus halogen lamps to illuminate the fields of view of both cameras. The analog video outputs of the cameras are converted to optical signals that are transmitted to a surface station via optical fibers in a cable. Electric power is supplied to the probe through wires in the cable at a

  4. Temperature Correction in Probe Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutsev, S. A.

    2015-09-01

    This work is devoted to experimental investigations of a decaying plasma using Langmuir probes. The gas pressure, the discharge current, and the moment of afterglow were selected to obtain probe characteristics in collisionless, intermediate, and drifting regimes of motion of charged particles. The manner in which the shape of the volt- ampere characteristics changes on passage from the collisionless motion to diffusion motion has been shown. A detailed analysis has been made of the source of errors arising when orbital-motion formulas or the logarithmic-operation method are applied to processing of the probe curves. It has been shown that neglect of collisions of charged particles in the probe layer leads to an ion-density value overstated more than three times, an electron-temperature value overstated two times, and an ion temperature overstated three to nine times. A model of interaction of charged particles in the probe layer has been proposed for correction of the procedure of determining temperature. Such an approach makes it possible to determine the space-charge layer in the probe, and also the value of the self-consistent field. The use of the developed procedures gives good agreement between experimental and theoretical results.

  5. Shock wave diagnostics using fluorescent dye probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banishev, Alexandr; Christensen, James; Dlott, Dana

    2015-06-01

    Fluorescent probes are highly developed, and have found increasing use in a wide variety of applications. We have studied shock compression of various materials with embedded dye probes used as high speed probes of pressure and temperature. Under the right conditions, dye emission can be used to make a map of the pressure distribution in shocked microstructured materials with high time (1 ns) and space (1 micrometer) resolution. In order to accomplish this goal, we started by studying shock compression of PMMA polymer with rhodamine 6G dye (R6G), as a function of shock pressure and shock duration. We observed the shock-induced spectral redshift and the shock-induced intensity loss. We investigated the fundamental mechanisms of R6G response to pressure. We showed that the time response of a dye probe is limited by its photophysical behavior under shock. We developed superemissive ultrafast dye probes by embedding R6G in a silica nanoparticle. More recently, we have searched for dye probes that have better responses. For instance, we have found that the dye Nile Red embedded in the right polymer matrix has 1.7 times larger pressure-induced redshift than R6G.

  6. Note: Refined possibilities for plasma probe diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masherov, P. E.; Riaby, V. A.; Abgaryan, V. K.

    2016-08-01

    In an earlier publication, the ion mass determination technique was proposed using the Langmuir probe measurement results for low-pressure Maxwellian plasmas and their analysis, based on the Bohm effect and the Child-Boguslavsky-Langmuir (CBL) probe sheath model, allowing for probe sheath thickness and ion mass evaluations after the Bohm coefficient CBCyl ≈ 1.13 for cylindrical probes had been determined. In the present study, the step-front sheath model, being physically closer to the reality of gas discharge plasmas, was considered in order to correct the CBL sheath model results. At this stage, more real Bohm coefficient (CBCyl ≈ 1.23) for cylindrical probes was found to provide a more reliable method of probe sheath thickness and ion mass determination.

  7. Note: Refined possibilities for plasma probe diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Masherov, P E; Riaby, V A; Abgaryan, V K

    2016-08-01

    In an earlier publication, the ion mass determination technique was proposed using the Langmuir probe measurement results for low-pressure Maxwellian plasmas and their analysis, based on the Bohm effect and the Child-Boguslavsky-Langmuir (CBL) probe sheath model, allowing for probe sheath thickness and ion mass evaluations after the Bohm coefficient CBCyl ≈ 1.13 for cylindrical probes had been determined. In the present study, the step-front sheath model, being physically closer to the reality of gas discharge plasmas, was considered in order to correct the CBL sheath model results. At this stage, more real Bohm coefficient (CBCyl ≈ 1.23) for cylindrical probes was found to provide a more reliable method of probe sheath thickness and ion mass determination. PMID:27587177

  8. Thrust Vector Control using movable probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalleri, Robert; Tiarn, Weihnurng; Readey, Harvey

    1990-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine if movable probes or struts positioned in the nozzle can be used to provide Thrust Vector Control of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster. The study employed CFD to determine estimates of the shock standoff distance from the probe. An empirical correlation was used to construct the shock shape and the pressure distribution generated by the probe. The TVC performance for a single and multiple number of probes was then used to determine requirements for a maximum thrust angle offset of 7.5 degrees. Consideration was given to what materials would be suitable for the probe and if active cooling is required. Based on the performance analysis and thermal requirements, a Probe Thrust Vector Control (PTVC) system was sized. Indications are that a PTVC system weight is in the 1500 1bm weight range, compared to the existing weight of 7500 1bm for the SRB nozzle gimble system.

  9. Long duration ash probe

    DOEpatents

    Hurley, John P.; McCollor, Don P.; Selle, Stanley J.

    1994-01-01

    A long duration ash probe includes a pressure shell connected to a port in a combustor with a sample coupon mounted on a retractable carriage so as to retract the sample coupon within the pressure shell during sootblowing operation of the combustor. A valve mounted at the forward end of the pressure shell is selectively closeable to seal the sample coupon within the shell, and a heating element in the shell is operable to maintain the desired temperature of the sample coupon while retracted within the shell. The carriage is operably mounted on a pair of rails within the shell for longitudinal movement within the shell. A hollow carrier tube connects the hollow cylindrical sample coupon to the carriage, and extends through the carriage and out the rearward end thereof. Air lines are connected to the rearward end of the carrier tube and are operable to permit coolant to pass through the air lines and thence through the carrier tube to the sample coupon so as to cool the sample coupon.

  10. Long duration ash probe

    DOEpatents

    Hurley, J.P.; McCollor, D.P.; Selle, S.J.

    1994-07-26

    A long duration ash probe includes a pressure shell connected to a port in a combustor with a sample coupon mounted on a retractable carriage so as to retract the sample coupon within the pressure shell during soot blowing operation of the combustor. A valve mounted at the forward end of the pressure shell is selectively closeable to seal the sample coupon within the shell, and a heating element in the shell is operable to maintain the desired temperature of the sample coupon while retracted within the shell. The carriage is operably mounted on a pair of rails within the shell for longitudinal movement within the shell. A hollow carrier tube connects the hollow cylindrical sample coupon to the carriage, and extends through the carriage and out the rearward end thereof. Air lines are connected to the rearward end of the carrier tube and are operable to permit coolant to pass through the air lines and thence through the carrier tube to the sample coupon so as to cool the sample coupon. 8 figs.

  11. Single molecule probes of membrane structure: orientation of BODIPY probes in DPPC as a function of probe structure.

    PubMed

    Armendariz, Kevin P; Huckabay, Heath A; Livanec, Philip W; Dunn, Robert C

    2012-03-21

    Single molecule fluorescence measurements have recently been used to probe the orientation of fluorescent lipid analogs doped into lipid films at trace levels. Using defocused polarized total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (PTIRF-M), these studies have shown that fluorophore orientation responds to changes in membrane surface pressure and composition, providing a molecular level marker of membrane structure. Here we extend those studies by characterizing the single molecule orientations of six related BODIPY probes doped into monolayers of DPPC. Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers transferred at various surface pressures are used to compare the response from fluorescent lipid analogs in which the location of the BODIPY probe is varied along the length of the acyl chain. For each BODIPY probe location along the chain, comparisons are made between analogs containing phosphocholine and smaller fatty acid headgroups. Together these studies show a general propensity of the BODIPY analogs to insert into membranes with the BODIPY probe aligned along the acyl chains or looped back to interact with the headgroups. For all BODIPY probes studied, a bimodal orientation distribution is observed which is sensitive to surface pressure, with the population of BODIPY probes aligned along the acyl chains increasing with elevated surface pressure. Trends in the single molecule orientations for the six analogs reveal a configuration where optimal placement of the BODIPY probe within the acyl chain maximizes its sensitivity to the surrounding membrane structure. These results are discussed in terms of balancing the effects of headgroup association with acyl chain length in designing the optimal placement of the BODIPY probe. PMID:22322157

  12. Ion orbits in a cylindrical Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Taccogna, Francesco; Longo, Savino; Capitelli, Mario

    2006-04-15

    It has been suggested that in weakly collisional sheaths, potential wells and barriers could appear due to ion-neutral momentum and charge transfer collisions. These can cause the presence of repulsed and trapped ions in the region surrounding a negatively biased Langmuir probe, invalidating the commonly used orbital-motion-limited theory of ion current. This is still an open question concerning also the charging and shielding of dust grains, and at present, no fully self-consistent treatment exists. For this reason, a particle-in-cell/test-particle Monte Carlo simulation of the dynamics of an argon plasma in the region surrounding an attracting cylindrical probe at medium gas pressure has been developed. The results of the present simulation for different probe potentials and discharge pressures demonstrate the complex structure of electric potential around the probe and the failure of collisionless theories.

  13. Hydrodynamic ultrasonic probe

    DOEpatents

    Day, Robert A.; Conti, Armond E.

    1980-01-01

    An improved probe for in-service ultrasonic inspection of long lengths of a workpiece, such as small diameter tubing from the interior. The improved probe utilizes a conventional transducer or transducers configured to inspect the tubing for flaws and/or wall thickness variations. The probe utilizes a hydraulic technique, in place of the conventional mechanical guides or bushings, which allows the probe to move rectilinearly or rotationally while preventing cocking thereof in the tube and provides damping vibration of the probe. The probe thus has lower friction and higher inspection speed than presently known probes.

  14. Computational comparative study of microwave probes for plasma density measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D. W.; You, S. J.; Kim, J. H.; Chang, H. Y.; Oh, W. Y.

    2016-06-01

    A microwave probe is known to be a suitable method to measure plasma density, even in the processing condition and is widely used in various environments of low-temperature processing plasmas. Various types of microwave probes have been researched and developed to measure the precise plasma density. Extensive research has been conducted to investigate each probes characteristic responding to the plasma parameters (plasma density, electron temperature, pressure, sheath width, and so forth) based on both experiments and simulations. However, a comparative study elucidating the relative characteristics of each probe has not been completed yet, despite the wide applications of the probes in processing plasma. We conduct a comparative study among the microwave probes using the numerical method of three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulation. In this study, the microwave probes are compared by investigating the precision of plasma density measurement under a comprehensive range of plasma parameters (plasma density, pressure, and sheath width).

  15. Atmospheric Probe Model: Construction and Wind Tunnel Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, Jerald M.

    1998-01-01

    The material contained in this document represents a summary of the results of a low speed wind tunnel test program to determine the performance of an atmospheric probe at low speed. The probe configuration tested consists of a 2/3 scale model constructed from a combination of hard maple wood and aluminum stock. The model design includes approximately 130 surface static pressure taps. Additional hardware incorporated in the baseline model provides a mechanism for simulating external and internal trailing edge split flaps for probe flow control. Test matrix parameters include probe side slip angle, external/internal split flap deflection angle, and trip strip applications. Test output database includes surface pressure distributions on both inner and outer annular wings and probe center line velocity distributions from forward probe to aft probe locations.

  16. Fluorescent probes for shock compression spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banishev, Alexandr; Christensen, James; Dlott, Dana

    We have demonstrated the capability of using Rhodamine 6G dye as an ultrafast emission probe in high-speed shock compression of condensed matter. The ultimate time response of the probe, which functions as a high-speed pressure sensor, is limited by fundamental photophysical processes such as radiative rates, internal conversion rates and intersystem crossing rates. The time response has been greatly improved by encapsulating the dye in silica nano or microparticles. This probe was used to observed nanosecond viscoelastic shock compression of a polymer (PMMA), and has been used to monitor the response of individual grains of sand to high-speed impact.

  17. Arterial compliance probe for local blood pulse wave velocity measurement.

    PubMed

    Nabeel, P M; Joseph, Jayaraj; Sivaprakasam, Mohanasankar

    2015-08-01

    Arterial compliance and vessel wall dynamics are significant in vascular diagnosis. We present the design of arterial compliance probes for measurement of local pulse wave velocity (PWV). Two designs of compliance probe are discussed, viz (a) a magnetic plethysmograph (MPG) based probe, and (b) a photoplethysmograph (PPG) based probe. The ability of the local PWV probes to consistently capture carotid blood pulse waves is verified by in-vivo trials on few volunteers. The probes could reliably perform repeatable measurements of local PWV from carotid artery along small artery sections less than 20 mm. Further, correlation between the measured values of local PWV using probes and various measures of blood pressure (BP) was also investigated. The study indicates that such arterial compliance probes have strong potential in cuff less BP monitoring. PMID:26737589

  18. Improved Probe for Evaluating Compaction of Mold Sand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overfelt, Ruel A.; Bakhtiyarov, Sayavur I.

    2008-01-01

    A nominally stationary tubular probe denoted a telescopic probe has been developed as an improved alternative to a prior movable probe used to evaluate the local degree of compaction of mold sand. The probe is inserted vertically to a desired depth in a sand-filled molding flask and the back pressure at the given rate of flow of air is recorded as a measure of the degree of partial impermeability and, hence, of the degree of compaction of sand in the vicinity of the probe tip.

  19. NASA SMART Probe: Breast Cancer Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, Robert W.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    There is evidence in breast cancer and other malignancies that the physiologic environment within a tumor correlates with clinical outcome. We are developing a unique percutaneous Smart Probe to be used at the time of needle biopsy of the breast. The Smart Probe will simultaneously measure multiple physiologic parameters within a breast tumor. Direct and indirect measurements of tissue oxygen levels, blood flow, pH, and tissue fluid pressure will be analyzed in real-time. These parameters will be interpreted individually and collectively by innovative neural network techniques using advanced intelligent software. The goals are 1) develop a pecutaneous Smart Probe with multiple sensor modalities and applying advanced Information Technologies to provide real time diagnostic information of the tissue at tip of the probe, 2) test the percutaneous Smart Probe in women with benign and malignant breast masses who will be undergoing surgical biopsy, 3) correlate probe sensor data with benign and malignant status of breast masses, 4) determine whether the probe can detect physiologic differences within a breast tumor, and its margins, and in adjacent normal breast tissue, 5) correlate probe sensor data with known prognostic factors for breast caner, including tumor size, tumor grade, axillary lymph node metastases, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor status.

  20. Tensiometer, drive probe for use with environmental testing equipment, and methods of inserting environmental testing equipment into a sample

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2005-07-26

    A method of inserting a tensiometer into a sample, comprises providing a drive probe configured to be engaged by direct push equipment; supporting a porous member from the drive probe; and driving the drive probe into the sample using a cone penetrometer. A tensiometer comprises a drive probe configured to be engaged by direct push equipment or a cone penetrometer; a porous member supported by the drive probe; and a pressure sensor in pressure sensing relation to the porous member.

  1. Galileo Probe Battery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dagarin, B. P.; Taenaka, R. K.; Stofel, E. J.

    1997-01-01

    The conclusions of the Galileo probe battery system are: the battery performance met mission requirements with margin; extensive ground-based and flight tests of batteries prior to probe separation from orbiter provided good prediction of actual entry performance at Jupiter; and the Li-SO2 battery was an important choice for the probe's main power.

  2. Neptune Polar Orbiter with Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bienstock, Bernard; Atkinson, David; Baines, Kevin; Mahaffy, Paul; Steffes, Paul; Atreya, Sushil; Stern, Alan; Wright, Michael; Willenberg, Harvey; Smith, David; Frampton, Robert; Sichi, Steve; Peltz, Leora; Masciarelli, James; VanCleve, Jeffey

    2005-01-01

    The giant planets of the outer solar system divide into two distinct classes: the gas giants Jupiter and Saturn, which consist mainly of hydrogen and helium; and the ice giants Uranus and Neptune, which are believed to contain significant amounts of the heavier elements oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon and sulfur. Detailed comparisons of the internal structures and compositions of the gas giants with those of the ice giants will yield valuable insights into the processes that formed the solar system and, perhaps, other planetary systems. By 2012, Galileo, Cassini and possibly a Jupiter Orbiter mission with microwave radiometers, Juno, in the New Frontiers program, will have yielded significant information on the chemical and physical properties of Jupiter and Saturn. A Neptune Orbiter with Probes (NOP) mission would deliver the corresponding key data for an ice giant planet. Such a mission would ideally study the deep Neptune atmosphere to pressures approaching and possibly exceeding 1000 bars, as well as the rings, Triton, Nereid, and Neptune s other icy satellites. A potential source of power would be nuclear electric propulsion (NEP). Such an ambitious mission requires that a number of technical issues be investigated, however, including: (1) atmospheric entry probe thermal protection system (TPS) design, (2) probe structural design including seals, windows, penetrations and pressure vessel, (3) digital, RF subsystem, and overall communication link design for long term operation in the very extreme environment of Neptune's deep atmosphere, (4) trajectory design allowing probe release on a trajectory to impact Neptune while allowing the spacecraft to achieve a polar orbit of Neptune, (5) and finally the suite of science instruments enabled by the probe technology to explore the depths of the Neptune atmosphere. Another driving factor in the design of the Orbiter and Probes is the necessity to maintain a fully operational flight system during the lengthy transit time

  3. Characterization of probe contact effects on diffuse reflectance spectroscopy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reistad, Nina; Mayjonade, Mallory; Ahadi, Aylin; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) is a rapid, non-invasive optical method widely adopted to gain diagnostic information of tissue. The most flexible approach to this method is a fiber-optic contact-probe used with a spectroscopy system. A challenge of this method is that the external pressure brought by the probe can significantly affect the tissue optical properties as well as the light coupling into the probe, and thus influence the collected DRS-spectrum. In this study we investigate and characterize the effect of probe pressure on DRS-spectra obtained with a calibrated loaded-spring system used with a fiber optic probe in the range (400 - 1600) nm. A multilayer FE-model of the indentation is developed to get a better insight of the distribution of pressure and stresses inside the skin under indentation.

  4. Heat pipe cooled probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, C. J. (Inventor); Couch, L. M.

    1984-01-01

    The basic heat pipe principle is employed to provide a self-contained passively cooled probe that may be placed into a high temperature environment. The probe consists of an evaporator region of a heat pipe and a sensing instrument. Heat is absorbed as the working fluid evaporates in the probe. The vapor is transported to the vapor space of the condenser region. Heat is dissipated from the condenser region and fins causing condensation of the working fluid, which returns to the probe by gravity and the capillary action of the wick. Working fluid, wick and condenser configurations and structure materials can be selected to maintain the probe within an acceptable temperature range.

  5. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Shimon; Chemla, Daniel S.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Botkin, David

    1995-01-01

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample.

  6. Traversing probe system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, Douglas N.; Stevens, Richard H.; Woodall, Harold C.

    1977-01-01

    This invention comprises a rotatable annular probe-positioner which carries at least one radially disposed sensing probe, such as a Pitot tube having a right-angled tip. The positioner can be coaxially and rotatably mounted within a compressor casing or the like and then actuated to orient the sensing probe as required to make measurements at selected stations in the annulus between the positioner and compressor casing. The positioner can be actuated to (a) selectively move the probe along its own axis, (b) adjust the yaw angle of the right-angled probe tip, and (c) revolve the probe about the axis common to the positioner and casing. A cam plate engages a cam-follower portion of the probe and normally rotates with the positioner. The positioner includes a first-motor-driven ring gear which effects slidable movement of the probe by rotating the positioner at a time when an external pneumatic cylinder is actuated to engage the cam plate and hold it stationary. When the pneumatic cylinder is not actuated, this ring gear can be driven to revolve the positioner and thus the probe to a desired circumferential location about the above-mentioned common axis. A second motor-driven ring gear included in the positioner can be driven to rotate the probe about its axis, thus adjusting the yaw angle of the probe tip. The positioner can be used in highly corrosive atmosphere, such as gaseous uranium hexafluoride.

  7. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, S.; Chemla, D.S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Botkin, D.

    1995-05-16

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method is described for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample. 6 Figs.

  8. Electrical resistivity probes

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex; Faybishenko, Boris A.; Solbau, Ray D.

    2003-10-21

    A miniaturized electrical resistivity (ER) probe based on a known current-voltage (I-V) electrode structure, the Wenner array, is designed for local (point) measurement. A pair of voltage measuring electrodes are positioned between a pair of current carrying electrodes. The electrodes are typically about 1 cm long, separated by 1 cm, so the probe is only about 1 inch long. The electrodes are mounted to a rigid tube with electrical wires in the tube and a sand bag may be placed around the electrodes to protect the electrodes. The probes can be positioned in a borehole or on the surface. The electrodes make contact with the surrounding medium. In a dual mode system, individual probes of a plurality of spaced probes can be used to measure local resistance, i.e. point measurements, but the system can select different probes to make interval measurements between probes and between boreholes.

  9. Measuring Intracranial Pressure And Volume Noninvasively

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    1994-01-01

    Ultrasonic technique eliminates need to drill into brain cavity. Intracranial dynamics instrument probes cranium ultrasonically to obtain data for determination of intracranial pressure (ICP) and pressure-volume index (PVI). Instrument determines sensitivity of skull to changes in pressure and by use of mechanical device to exert external calibrated pressure on skull. By monitoring volume of blood flowing into jugular vein, one determines change of volume of blood in cranial system. By measuring response of skull to increasing pressure (where pressure increased by tilting patient known amount) and by using cranial blood pressure, one determines intial pressure in cerebrospinal fluid. Once PVI determined, ICP determined.

  10. Functional probes for scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Yukio; Akiyama, Kotone; Hamada, Masayuki; Eguchi, Toyoaki; An, Toshu; Fujikawa, Yasunori; Sakurai, Toshio

    2008-03-01

    Inspite of importance of the probe in scanning probe microscopy (SPM), little attention was paid for the SPM probes for most of the measurements of SPM. We developed sharp metal-tip cantilevers with a typical curvature radius better than 5nm using focused ion beam (FIB) suitable for Kelvin probe force microscopy (KFM)^1. We obtained atomically resolved KFM images with an energy resolution less than 3meV with the probe^2. We also developed a glass-coated tungsten tip for synchrotron radiation-scanning tunneling microscopy with the FIB method^3 and obtained elementally resolved images in a resolution less than 20nm^4. We are now developing a precise atomic force microscope (AFM) lithography^5 with the FIB-milled tip attached to a quartz tuning fork controlled by noncontact AFM. We will present recent results of our AFM lithography, such as an Au line with a width of 20˜30 nm and characters drawn with Au nano dots on a Si surface. 1 K. Akiyama et al., RSI 76, 033705 (2005) 2 T. Eguchi, K. Akiyama et al., PRL 93, 266102 (2004) 3 K. Akiyama et al., RSI 76, 083711 (2005) 4 T. Eguchi, K. Akiyama et al., APL 89, 243119 (2006) 5 K. Akiyama et al., JP 61, 22 (2007).

  11. Periodontal probing: a review.

    PubMed

    Al Shayeb, Kwthar Nassar A; Turner, Wendy; Gillam, David G

    2014-08-01

    Periodontal probes are the main instruments that are used to assess the status of the periodontium, either for screening purposes or to evaluate periodontal changes throughout the treatment process. With increased knowledge and understanding of periodontal disease, the probes have evolved from a unidimensional manual shape into a more sophisticated computerised instrument. This is due to the need to increase the accuracy and reproducibility of readings and to improve efficiency (time, effort, money). Each probe has characteristic features that makes it unique and, in some cases, specific and limited to use. The aim of this paper is to present a brief introduction to periodontal disease and the methodology of measuring it, followed by probing limitations. The paper will also discuss the methodology of reducing probing error, examiner calibration and probing reproducibility. PMID:25198634

  12. Probing the pairing symmetry in the over-doped Fe-based superconductor Ba0.35Rb0.65Fe2As2 as a function of hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guguchia, Z.; Khasanov, R.; Bukowski, Z.; von Rohr, F.; Medarde, M.; Biswas, P. K.; Luetkens, H.; Amato, A.; Morenzoni, E.

    2016-03-01

    We report muon spin rotation experiments on the magnetic penetration depth λ and the temperature dependence of λ-2 in the over-doped Fe-based high-temperature superconductor (Fe-HTS) Ba1 -xRbxFe2As2 (x = 0.65) studied at ambient and under hydrostatic pressures up to p =2.3 GPa. We find that in this system λ-2(T ) is best described by d -wave scenario. This is in contrast to the case of the optimally doped x =0.35 system which is known to be a nodeless s+--wave superconductor. This suggests that the doping induces the change of the pairing symmetry from s+- to d wave in Ba1 -xRbxFe2As2 . In addition, we find that the d -wave order parameter is robust against pressure, suggesting that d is the common and dominant pairing symmetry in over-doped Ba1 -xRbxFe2As2 . Application of pressure of p =2.3 GPa causes a decrease of λ (0) by less than 5 % , while at optimal doping x =0.35 a significant decrease of λ (0) was reported. The superconducting transition temperature Tc as well as the gap to Tc ratio 2 Δ /kBTc show only a modest decrease with pressure. By combining the present data with those previously obtained for optimally doped system x =0.35 and for the end member x = 1, we conclude that the SC gap symmetry as well as the pressure effects on the SC quantities strongly depend on the Rb doping level. These results are discussed in the light of the putative Lifshitz transition, i.e., a disappearance of the electron pockets in the Fermi surface of Ba1 -xRbxFe2As2 upon hole doping.

  13. Titan Probe navigation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vijayaraghavan, A.; Wood, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    In the proposed Cassini mission, a combined Saturn Orbiter/Titan Probe spacecraft will be launched from the Space Shuttle to arrive at Saturn around 2002, by means of a delta-VEGA trajectory. After Saturn-orbit insertion and a pericrone raise maneuver, the probe will be released to enter the Titan atmosphere and impact onto its surface. During its descent phase and impact onto Titan, the probe will maintain radio contact with the orbiter. Since the Titan-probe experimental phase lasts for only about four hours, probe-orbiter geometry and probe-delivery accuracy are critical to successful completion of this part of the mission. From a preliminary navigation analysis for probe delivery accuracy, it seems feasible to deliver the probe within 50 km (1-sigma value) of the desired aim-point in the Titan B-plane. The covariance study, however, clearly indicates the need for optical data, in addition to radio metric data. A Monte Carlo study indicates that a Delta-V capability of 98 m/sec for trajectory correction maneuvers will be sufficient to cover 99 percent of all contingencies during the segment from Saturn-orbit insertion to Titan-probe release.

  14. Radio frequency-compensated Langmuir probe with auxiliary double probes

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Se-Jin; Oh, Seung-Ju; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2010-09-15

    A radio frequency (rf) compensation design using auxiliary double probes connected in parallel with a main measurement probe was developed for Langmuir probe diagnostics. This probe structure can reduce the sheath impedance of the main probe. In our probe design, the sheath capacitance of the probe can be increased and its sheath resistance can be decreased with increasing dc bias differential voltage between the auxiliary double probes. The I-V characteristic curve and electron energy distribution functions measured by our probe system had sufficient rf compensation performance in inductively coupled plasmas.

  15. Radio frequency-compensated Langmuir probe with auxiliary double probes.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se-Jin; Oh, Seung-Ju; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2010-09-01

    A radio frequency (rf) compensation design using auxiliary double probes connected in parallel with a main measurement probe was developed for Langmuir probe diagnostics. This probe structure can reduce the sheath impedance of the main probe. In our probe design, the sheath capacitance of the probe can be increased and its sheath resistance can be decreased with increasing dc bias differential voltage between the auxiliary double probes. The I-V characteristic curve and electron energy distribution functions measured by our probe system had sufficient rf compensation performance in inductively coupled plasmas. PMID:20886976

  16. Wide-range dynamic pressure sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J.; Lane, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Transducer measures pressure by sensing the damping of a vibrating diaphragm immersed in the atmosphere to be measured. Improved sensor can be included in rugged, lightweight package for use aboard aircraft, meteorological vehicles, and space probes.

  17. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Normal blood pressure is important for proper blood flow to the body’s organs and tissues. The force of the blood on the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both as the heart ...

  18. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Normal blood pressure is important for proper blood flow to the body’s organs and tissues. The force of the blood on the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both ...

  19. F-16XL Basic Airplane Model in the BART

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    4% F-16XL model in BART. Model configuration is the basic airplane, with air dams and missiles. Tests in the tunnel included surface pressures, 5 hole probe, and on and off surface flow visualization.

  20. Note: The expansion of possibilities for plasma probe diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masherov, P. E.; Riaby, V. A.; Abgaryan, V. K.

    2016-05-01

    The determination of ion mass for low-pressure Maxwellian plasmas has been proposed. It can be done using Langmuir probe measurements and the Bohm formula for the ion current density to a floating probe, due to this formula's reliance on ion mass. This goal was achieved by accurate measurements of xenon plasma parameters in the inductive discharge at pressure p = 2 ṡ 10-3 Torr using the Plasma Sensors VGPS-12 probe station with the cylindrical Langmuir probes. The analysis of measurement data showed that in these conditions, the Bohm effect was valid with engineering-level precision, resulting in the experimental Bohm coefficient CBCyl ≈ 1.13 for cylindrical probes.

  1. Note: The expansion of possibilities for plasma probe diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Masherov, P E; Riaby, V A; Abgaryan, V K

    2016-05-01

    The determination of ion mass for low-pressure Maxwellian plasmas has been proposed. It can be done using Langmuir probe measurements and the Bohm formula for the ion current density to a floating probe, due to this formula's reliance on ion mass. This goal was achieved by accurate measurements of xenon plasma parameters in the inductive discharge at pressure p = 2 ⋅ 10(-3) Torr using the Plasma Sensors VGPS-12 probe station with the cylindrical Langmuir probes. The analysis of measurement data showed that in these conditions, the Bohm effect was valid with engineering-level precision, resulting in the experimental Bohm coefficient CBCyl ≈ 1.13 for cylindrical probes. PMID:27250479

  2. Fiber optic probe for light scattering measurements

    DOEpatents

    Nave, Stanley E.; Livingston, Ronald R.; Prather, William S.

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic probe and a method for using the probe for light scattering analyses of a sample. The probe includes a probe body with an inlet for admitting a sample into an interior sample chamber, a first optical fiber for transmitting light from a source into the chamber, and a second optical fiber for transmitting light to a detector such as a spectrophotometer. The interior surface of the probe carries a coating that substantially prevents non-scattered light from reaching the second fiber. The probe is placed in a region where the presence and concentration of an analyte of interest are to be detected, and a sample is admitted into the chamber. Exciting light is transmitted into the sample chamber by the first fiber, where the light interacts with the sample to produce Raman-scattered light. At least some of the Raman-scattered light is received by the second fiber and transmitted to the detector for analysis. Two Raman spectra are measured, at different pressures. The first spectrum is subtracted from the second to remove background effects, and the resulting sample Raman spectrum is compared to a set of stored library spectra to determine the presence and concentration of the analyte.

  3. Fiber optic probe for light scattering measurements

    DOEpatents

    Nave, S.E.; Livingston, R.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1993-01-01

    This invention is comprised of a fiber optic probe and a method for using the probe for light scattering analyses of a sample. The probe includes a probe body with an inlet for admitting a sample into an interior sample chamber, a first optical fiber for transmitting light from a source into the chamber, and a second optical fiber for transmitting light to a detector such as a spectrophotometer. The interior surface of the probe carries a coating that substantially prevents non-scattered light from reaching the second fiber. The probe is placed in a region where the presence and concentration of an analyte of interest are to be detected, and a sample is admitted into the chamber. Exciting light is transmitted into the sample chamber by the first fiber, where the light interacts with the sample to produce Raman-scattered light. At least some of the Raman- scattered light is received by the second fiber and transmitted to the detector for analysis. Two Raman spectra are measured, at different pressures. The first spectrum is subtracted from the second to remove background effects, and the resulting sample Raman spectrum is compared to a set of stored library spectra to determine the presence and concentration of the analyte.

  4. Formative Assessment Probes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberle, Francis; Keeley, Page

    2008-01-01

    Formative assessment probes can be effective tools to help teachers build a bridge between students' initial ideas and scientific ones. In this article, the authors describe how using two formative assessment probes can help teachers determine the extent to which students make similar connections between developing a concept of matter and a…

  5. Magnetically driven filament probe.

    PubMed

    Schmid, A; Herrmann, A; Rohde, V; Maraschek, M; Müller, H W

    2007-05-01

    A radially movable probe has been developed for studies of filamentary transport in ASDEX Upgrade during edge localized modes (ELMs) by means of Langmuir tips and magnetic pickup coils. The probe is permanently installed at the low field side in the ASDEX Upgrade vacuum vessel and is not subject to limitations in probe size, as, for example, probes on a shared manipulator are. The probe is moved by a magnetic drive, which allows for easy installation in the vessel, and has moderate machine requirements, as it will only require an electric feedthrough and an external power supply. The drive gives a linear motion with a radial range of 5 cm within 50 ms, where range and velocity can be largely scaled according to experimental requirements. The probe has been installed in the outer midplane of the ASDEX Upgrade vessel, where ELM filaments are expected to have their maximum amplitude. Filaments are coherent substructures within an ELM, carrying a fraction of the ELM released energy towards the wall. The new probe allows to measure the structure of these filaments, in particular, parameters such as filament rotation (by time delay measurements) and size (by peak width analysis). Activating the drive moves the probe from a safe position behind the limiter to a position in front of the limiters, i.e., exposes the Langmuir pins to the scrape-off layer plasma. PMID:17552815

  6. PDV Probe Alignment Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Whitworth, T L; May, C M; Strand, O T

    2007-10-26

    This alignment technique was developed while performing heterodyne velocimetry measurements at LLNL. There are a few minor items needed, such as a white card with aperture in center, visible alignment laser, IR back reflection meter, and a microscope to view the bridge surface. The work was performed on KCP flyers that were 6 and 8 mils wide. The probes used were Oz Optics manufactured with focal distances of 42mm and 26mm. Both probes provide a spot size of approximately 80?m at 1550nm. The 42mm probes were specified to provide an internal back reflection of -35 to -40dB, and the probe back reflections were measured to be -37dB and -33dB. The 26mm probes were specified as -30dB and both measured -30.5dB. The probe is initially aligned normal to the flyer/bridge surface. This provides a very high return signal, up to -2dB, due to the bridge reflectivity. A white card with a hole in the center as an aperture can be used to check the reflected beam position relative to the probe and launch beam, and the alignment laser spot centered on the bridge, see Figure 1 and Figure 2. The IR back reflection meter is used to measure the dB return from the probe and surface, and a white card or similar object is inserted between the probe and surface to block surface reflection. It may take several iterations between the visible alignment laser and the IR back reflection meter to complete this alignment procedure. Once aligned normal to the surface, the probe should be tilted to position the visible alignment beam as shown in Figure 3, and the flyer should be translated in the X and Y axis to reposition the alignment beam onto the flyer as shown in Figure 4. This tilting of the probe minimizes the amount of light from the bridge reflection into the fiber within the probe while maintaining the alignment as near normal to the flyer surface as possible. When the back reflection is measured after the tilt adjustment, the level should be about -3dB to -6dB higher than the probes

  7. Probe shapes that measure time-averaged streamwise momentum and cross-stream turbulence intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for directly measuring the time-averaged streamwise momentum in a turbulent stream use a probe which has total head response which varies as the cosine-squared of the angle of incidence. The probe has a nose with a slight indentation on its front face for providing the desired response. The method of making the probe incorporates unique design features. Another probe may be positioned in a side-by-side relationship to the first probe to provide a direct measurement of the total pressure. The difference between the two pressures yields the sum of the squares of the cross-stream components of the turbulence level.

  8. Pioneer Jupiter orbiter probe mission 1980, probe description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defrees, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The adaptation of the Saturn-Uranus Atmospheric Entry Probe (SUAEP) to a Jupiter entry probe is summarized. This report is extracted from a comprehensive study of Jovian missions, atmospheric model definitions and probe subsystem alternatives.

  9. Mission Trades to Explore Saturn with Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balint, Tibor; Cutts, James; Kolawa, Elizabeth

    To understand the formation of our solar system, the National Research Council in its 2003 Decadal Survey (NRC DS) for Solar System Exploration (SSE), and NASA in its 2006 SSE Roadmap identified mission concepts for the in situ exploration of the giant planets, namely potential probe missions to Jupiter and Saturn. In response, NASA's upcoming 2008 New Frontiers Announcement of Opportunity (AO) is expected to include Saturn among the exploration targets. Our experience with the Galileo probe to Jupiter, the only mission to date to enter a giant planet, highlighted significant technology items, with a special focus on thermal protection system (TPS) performance. Similarly, a medium class, cost capped, probe mission to Saturn is expected to introduce further mission architecture and technology challenges. This paper will provide an overview of typical mission architecture trades for a Saturn multi-probe concept, addressing the impact of trajectory options; operating scenarios through mission phases in support of a not-obvious power system design for the carrier and the probes, using solar panels and batteries; communication options; and key enabling technologies for the probes that could be used on the deceleration and descent modules. While some of the probe technologies could be considered destination specific (e.g,. the highly dense carbon phenolic ablative TPS material for giant planets entries), others could be used at planetary destinations with significant atmospheres (e.g., thermal management and pressure mitigation on future Venus probes), or at exploration targets with extreme environments, as addressed in the 2007 NASA report on extreme environment technologies for planetary exploration.

  10. Measurement of electron density using reactance cutoff probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, K. H.; You, S. J.; Kim, D. W.; Na, B. K.; Seo, B. H.; Kim, J. H.; Seong, D. J.; Chang, H. Y.

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a new measurement method of electron density using the reactance spectrum of the plasma in the cutoff probe system instead of the transmission spectrum. The highly accurate reactance spectrum of the plasma-cutoff probe system, as expected from previous circuit simulations [Kim et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 131502 (2011)], was measured using the full two-port error correction and automatic port extension methods of the network analyzer. The electron density can be obtained from the analysis of the measured reactance spectrum, based on circuit modeling. According to the circuit simulation results, the reactance cutoff probe can measure the electron density more precisely than the previous cutoff probe at low densities or at higher pressure. The obtained results for the electron density are presented and discussed for a wide range of experimental conditions, and this method is compared with previous methods (a cutoff probe using the transmission spectrum and a single Langmuir probe).

  11. Pressure Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... may form. Pressure sores are also called bedsores, pressure ulcers and decubitus ulcers. Symptoms What are the symptoms ... do to help pressure sores heal: Relieving the pressure that caused the sore Treating the sore itself Improving nutrition and other conditions to help the sore heal ...

  12. Research study of pressure instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoogenboom, L.; Hull-Allen, G.

    1984-01-01

    To obtain a more vibration resistant pressure sensor for use on the Space Shuttle Main Engine, a proximity probe based, diaphragm type pressure sensor breadboard was developed. A fiber optic proximity probe was selected as the sensor. In combination with existing electronics, a thermal stability evaluation of the entire probe system was made. Based upon the results, a breadboard design of the pressure sensor and electronics was made and fabricated. A brief series of functional experiments was made with the breadboard to calibrate, thermally compensate, and linearize its response. In these experiments, the performance obtained in the temperature range of -320 F (liquid N2) to +200 F was comparable to that of the strain gage based sensor presently in use on the engine. In tests at NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), after some time at or near liquid nitrogen temperatures, the sensor output varied over the entire output range. These large spurious signals were attributed to condensation of air in the sensing gap. In the next phase of development of this sensor, an evaluation of fabrication techniques toward greater thermal and mechanical stability of the fiber probe assembly must be made. In addition to this, a positive optics to metal seal must be developed to withstand the pressure that would result from a diaphragm failure.

  13. Focus: DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-11-01

    Progress in the development of DNA probes for the identification and quantitation of specific genetic sequences in biological samples is reviewed. Current research efforts in the development of DNA probes for the diagnosis of a wide variety of bacterial, viral, and other infectious diseases, such as herpes simplex and cytomegalovirus, and inherited genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis and sickle cell anemia are discussed. Progress in development of DNA probe assays for cancer diagnosis, detection of Salmonella food poisoning, tissue typing (detection of histocompatibility antigens), mutagen screening, and animal diseases, among other applications is included.

  14. ALEX neutral beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Pourrezaei, K.

    1982-01-01

    A neutral beam probe capable of measuring plasma space potential in a fully 3-dimensional magnetic field geometry has been developed. This neutral beam was successfully used to measure an arc target plasma contained within the ALEX baseball magnetic coil. A computer simulation of the experiment was performed to refine the experimental design and to develop a numerical model for scaling the ALEX neutral beam probe to other cases of fully 3-dimensional magnetic field. Based on this scaling a 30 to 50 keV neutral cesium beam probe capable of measuring space potential in the thermal barrier region of TMX Upgrade was designed.

  15. Foldable polymers as probes

    DOEpatents

    Li, Alexander D. Q.; Wang, Wei

    2007-07-03

    Disclosed herein are novel probes, which can be used to detect and identify target molecules of interest in a sample. The disclosed probes can be used to monitor conformational changes induced by molecular recognition events in addition to providing signaling the presence and/or identity of a target molecule. Methods, including solid phase synthesis techniques, for making probe molecules that exhibit changes in their optical properties upon target molecule binding are described in the disclosure. Also disclosed herein are novel chromophore moieties, which have tailored fluorescent emission spectra.

  16. Foldable polymers as probes

    DOEpatents

    Li, Alexander D. Q.; Wang, Wei

    2009-07-07

    Disclosed herein are novel probes, which can be used to detect and identify target molecules of interest in a sample. The disclosed probes can be used to monitor conformational changes induced by molecular recognition events in addition to providing signaling the presence and/or identity of a target molecule. Methods, including solid phase synthesis techniques, for making probe molecules that exhibit changes in their optical properties upon target molecule binding are described in the disclosure. Also disclosed herein are novel chromophore moieties, which have tailored fluorescent emission spectra.

  17. Chemical sensing flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Laguna, George R.; Peter, Frank J.; Butler, Michael A.

    1999-01-01

    A new chemical probe determines the properties of an analyte using the light absorption of the products of a reagent/analyte reaction. The probe places a small reaction volume in contact with a large analyte volume. Analyte diffuses into the reaction volume. Reagent is selectively supplied to the reaction volume. The light absorption of the reaction in the reaction volume indicates properties of the original analyte. The probe is suitable for repeated use in remote or hostile environments. It does not require physical sampling of the analyte or result in significant regent contamination of the analyte reservoir.

  18. Chemical sensing flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Laguna, G.R.; Peter, F.J.; Butler, M.A.

    1999-02-16

    A new chemical probe determines the properties of an analyte using the light absorption of the products of a reagent/analyte reaction. The probe places a small reaction volume in contact with a large analyte volume. Analyte diffuses into the reaction volume. Reagent is selectively supplied to the reaction volume. The light absorption of the reaction in the reaction volume indicates properties of the original analyte. The probe is suitable for repeated use in remote or hostile environments. It does not require physical sampling of the analyte or result in significant regent contamination of the analyte reservoir. 7 figs.

  19. BEAM CONTROL PROBE

    DOEpatents

    Chesterman, A.W.

    1959-03-17

    A probe is described for intercepting a desired portion of a beam of charged particles and for indicating the spatial disposition of the beam. The disclosed probe assembly includes a pair of pivotally mounted vanes moveable into a single plane with adjacent edges joining and a calibrated mechanical arrangement for pivoting the vancs apart. When the probe is disposed in the path of a charged particle beam, the vanes may be adjusted according to the beam current received in each vane to ascertain the dimension of the beam.

  20. Functional Probes for Scanning Probe Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Kotone; Eguchi, Toyoaki; An, Toshu; Fujikawa, Yasunori; Hasegawa, Yukio; Sakurai, Toshio

    2007-03-01

    For superior performance of scanning probe microscopy, we are working to fabricate functional probes. For Kelvin probe force microscopy, we fabricated a metal-tip cantilever by attaching a thin metal wire to a regular Si cantilever and milling it by focused ion beam (FIB)^1. By using the W tip with a curvature radius of 3.5 nm, we obtained the potential profile of Ge/Si(105) surface in atomic resolution with the energy resolution better than 3 meV^2. For synchrotron-radiation-light-irradiated scanning tunneling microscopy which aims at atomically resolved elemental analysis, we fabricated a glass-coated W tip using FIB^3. It is found that the glass coating blocks the unwanted secondary electrons, which come from large area of the sample, by a factor of 40 with respect to the case no coating. Using the tip to detect the electrons emitted just below the tip, we obtained element specific images with a spatial resolution better than 20 nm under the photo irradiation whose energy is just above the adsorption edge of the element^4. 1 K. Akiyama et al., RSI 76, 033705 (2005) 2 T. Eguchi, K. Akiyama et al., PRL 93, 266102 (2004) 3 K. Akiyama et al., RSI 76, 083711 (2005) 4 T. Eguchi, K. Akiyama et al., APL, in press

  1. New video probe sees gas pipe abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, P. )

    1992-04-01

    This paper reports that initial results indicate the PLS 3000 pipeline inspection system can significantly reduce the time and cost required to locate and repair leaks in low-pressure natural gas distribution system without interrupting the flow of gas. The system uses a sealed miniature color TV probe into live low-pressure piping to see the leak and other piping problems, such as water infiltration, pipe distortions, structural cracks, broken or misaligned service connections and the presence of foreign matter. The camera is housed in a sealed stainless steel probe that is 1.96-in in diameter and 5.7-in. long. It can travel up to 6000 linear ft in 3- 4- and 6-in piping from a single 3-ft by 5-ft excavation. The probe enters the pipe through a patented Easy Dual Access fitting. The fitting allows the technician to cut into the pipe, remove the coupon and insert the camera probe under sealed conditions. At the conclusion of the examination, the technician seals the access hole with a gasketed steel band clamp.

  2. Technology for Entry Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutts, James A.; Arnold, James; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Kolawa, Elizabeth; Munk, Michelle; Wercinski, Paul; Laub, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph describing technologies for entry probes is presented. The topics include: 1) Entry Phase; 2) Descent Phase; 3) Long duration atmospheric observations; 4) Survivability at high temperatures; and 5) Summary.

  3. An Ultrasonographic Periodontal Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.

    2010-02-01

    Periodontal disease, commonly known as gum disease, affects millions of people. The current method of detecting periodontal pocket depth is painful, invasive, and inaccurate. As an alternative to manual probing, an ultrasonographic periodontal probe is being developed to use ultrasound echo waveforms to measure periodontal pocket depth, which is the main measure of periodontal disease. Wavelet transforms and pattern classification techniques are implemented in artificial intelligence routines that can automatically detect pocket depth. The main pattern classification technique used here, called a binary classification algorithm, compares test objects with only two possible pocket depth measurements at a time and relies on dimensionality reduction for the final determination. This method correctly identifies up to 90% of the ultrasonographic probe measurements within the manual probe's tolerance.

  4. Probing the Release of Shocked Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polsin, D. N.; McCoy, C. A.; Gregor, M. C.; Boehly, T. R.; Sangster, T. C.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Celliers, P. M.

    2014-10-01

    The behavior of shocked material as it releases to lower pressures is important for equation-of-state experiments and inertial confinement fusion research. We present results of experiments that used a 10-ps, 266-nm probe beam to image the release plumes of various target materials shocked to multi-megabar pressures by the OMEGA EP laser. Simultaneous VISAR (velocity interferometer system for any reflector) measurements provide the initial shocked state from which these materials release. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  5. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    1992-01-01

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases.

  6. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1992-12-22

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases. 6 figs.

  7. Reflections on Electric Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braithwaite, Nicholas

    2007-10-01

    One of the more immediate temptations for an experimental plasma physicist is to insert some kind of refractory, conducting material into a plasma, as a simple means of probing its charge composition. Irvine Langmuir tried it in the 1920s and was one of the first to develop an electrical probe method in his early work on electrical discharge plasmas. There are now numerous variations on the theme including planar, cylindrical and spherical geometry with single, double and triple probes. There are also probes that resonate, propagate and reciprocate. Some probes are electrostatic and others are electromagnetic; some are effectively wireless; most absorb but some emit. All types can be used in steady and transient plasmas, while special schemes have been devised for RF plasmas, using passive and active compensation. Magnetised plasmas pose further challenges. Each configuration is accompanied by assumptions that constrain both their applicability and the analytical methods that translate the measured currents and voltages variously into charge densities, space potentials, particle fluxes, energy distributions and measures of collisionality. This talk will take a broad look at the options and opportunities for electric probes, principally in the environment of non-equilibrium plasma.

  8. Pneumatic Proboscis Heat-Flow Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zacny, Kris; Hedlund, Magnus; Mumm, Eric; Shasho, Jeffrey; Chu, Philip; Kumar, Nishant

    2013-01-01

    Heat flow is a fundamental property of a planet, and provides significant constraints on the abundance of radiogenic isotopes, the thermal evolution and differentiation history, and the mechanical properties of the lithosphere. Heat-flow measurements are also essential in achieving at least four of the goals set out by the National Research Council for future lunar exploration. The heat-flow probe therefore directly addresses the goal of the Lunar Geophysical Network, which is to understand the interior structure and composition of the Moon. A key challenge for heat flow measurement is to install thermal sensors to the depths approximately equal to 3 m that are not influenced by the diurnal, annual, and longer-term fluctuations of the surface thermal environment. In addition, once deployed, the heat flow probe should cause little disturbance to the thermal regime of the surrounding regolith. A heat-flow probe system was developed that has two novel features: (1) it utilizes a pneumatic (gas) approach, excavates a hole by lofting the lunar soil out of the hole, and (2) deploys the heat flow probe, which utilizes a coiled up tape as a thermal probe to reach greater than 3-meter depth. The system is a game-changer for small lunar landers as it exhibits extremely low mass, volume, and simple deployment. The pneumatic system takes advantage of the helium gas used for pressurizing liquid propellant of the lander. Normally, helium is vented once the lander is on the surface, but it can be utilized for powering pneumatic systems. Should sufficient helium not be available, a simple gas delivery system may be taken specifically for the heat flow probe. Either way, the pneumatic heat flow probe system would be much lighter than other systems that entirely rely on the electrical power of the lander.

  9. Pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    O'Byrne, Deborah

    2016-04-13

    My nursing experience is in acute care. Acute medical nurses are well placed to assess skin integrity, identify patients at risk of pressure ulcer development, and commence appropriate interventions to prevent or treat pressure ulcers. PMID:27073966

  10. Pressure Sores

    MedlinePlus

    Pressure sores are areas of damaged skin caused by staying in one position for too long. They ... wheelchair, or are unable to change your position. Pressure sores can cause serious infections, some of which ...

  11. Magnetic fluctuations and possible formation of a spin-singlet cluster under pressure in the heavy-fermion spinel LiV2O4 probed by 7Li and 51V NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Hikaru; Kato, Yusuke; Yoshimura, Masahiro; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Itoh, Masayuki; Niitaka, Seiji; Takagi, Hidenori

    2015-07-01

    7Li and 51V NMR measurements up to 9.8 GPa have been made to elucidate local magnetic properties of a heavy-fermion spinel oxide LiV2O4 which undergoes a metal-insulator transition above ˜7 GPa. The temperature T and pressure P dependences of the 7Li and 51V Knight shifts and the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rates 1 /T1 show that in the metallic phase, there is a crossover from a high-T region with weak ferromagnetic fluctuations to a low-T one with antiferromagnetic (AFM) fluctuations. The AFM fluctuations are enhanced below 20 K and 1.5 GPa, where a heavy Fermi-liquid state with the modified Korringa relation is formed. The evolution of the magnetic fluctuations is discussed from the aspect of the competition among several magnetic interactions. Above PMI˜6.7 GPa, we find the coexistence of metallic and insulating phases due to the first-order metal-insulator transition. The 7Li and 51V NMR spectra coming from the insulating phase have T -independent small Knight shifts and 7(1 /T1 ) with the thermally activated T dependence, indicating the formation of a spin-singlet cluster. We propose a model of a spin-singlet tetramer as discussed in geometrically frustrated materials.

  12. Piezometer-probe technology for geotechnical investigations in coastal and deep-ocean environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, R.H.; Burns, J.T.; Lipkin, J.; Percival, C.M.

    1983-01-01

    Three multisensor piezometer probes were developed and field tested for use in coastal (shallow water) fine-grained Marine soils. Offshore sites were investigated in the Mississippi Delta. Pore water pressure measurements were determined at several depths below the sea floor using both absolute and differential pressure sensors placed in a four inch diameter probe. Pressure sensors were hard-wired to nearby platforms where signals were conditioned and analog recording devices monitored pore water pressure changes in the marine soils. Pore water pressures were monitored for several months. Two single sensor piezometer probes, eight millimeters in diameter, were developed for deep-ocean investigations. These probes use differential pressure sensors and were tested in a hyperbaric chamber pressurized to 55 MPa (8000 psi). Testing was performed for a period of five weeks under high hydrostatic pressure with the probes inserted in reconstituted illitic marine soil. Small differential pore water pressures responded to both mechanically and thermally generated forcing functions. During shallow water investigations and simulated deep-ocean pressure tests, the sensors exhibited excellent sensitivity and stability. These developments in piezometer probe technology provide a means of assessing important geotechnical parameters of fine-grained seabed deposits.

  13. Pressure Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-01-01

    EPIC is Electronic Pressure Indicating Controller produced by North American Manufacturing Company. It is a high-sensitivity device for improving combustion efficiency in industrial furnaces that interprets a signal from a pressure transducer on a furnace and regulates furnace pressure accordingly. A controller can provide savings of from five to 25 percent of an industrial user's annual furnace fuel bill.

  14. Barometric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of alterations in barometric pressure on human beings are described. Human tolerances for gaseous environments and low and high barometric pressure are discussed, including effects on specific areas, such as the ear, lungs, teeth, and sinuses. Problems due to trapped gas within the body, high dynamic pressures on the body, and blasts are also considered.

  15. New tip design and shock wave pattern of electrohydraulic probes for endoureteral lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Vorreuther, R

    1993-02-01

    A new tip design of a 3.3F electrohydraulic probe for endoureteral lithotripsy was evaluated in comparison to a regular probe. The peak pressure, as well as the slope of the shock front, depend solely on the voltage. Increasing the capacity leads merely to broader pulses. A laser-like short high-pressure pulse has a greater impact on stone disintegration than a corresponding broader low-pressure pulse of the same energy. Using the regular probe, only positive pressures were obtained. Pressure distribution around the regular tip was approximately spherical, whereas the modified probe tip "beamed" the shock wave to a great extent. In addition, a negative-pressure half-cycle was added to the initial positive peak pressure, which resulted in a higher maximal pressure amplitude. The directed shock wave had a greater depth of penetration into a model stone. Thus, the ability of the new probe to destroy harder stones especially should be greater. The trauma to the ureter was reduced when touching the wall tangentially. No difference in the effect of the two probes was seen when placing the probe directly on the mucosa. PMID:8481720

  16. Model for resonant plasma probe.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Johnson, William Arthur; Hebner, Gregory Albert; Jorgenson, Roy E.; Coats, Rebecca Sue

    2007-04-01

    This report constructs simple circuit models for a hairpin shaped resonant plasma probe. Effects of the plasma sheath region surrounding the wires making up the probe are determined. Electromagnetic simulations of the probe are compared to the circuit model results. The perturbing effects of the disc cavity in which the probe operates are also found.

  17. Cavitation pressure in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbert, Eric; Balibar, Sébastien; Caupin, Frédéric

    2006-10-01

    We investigate the limiting mechanical tension (negative pressure) that liquid water can sustain before cavitation occurs. The temperature dependence of this quantity is of special interest for water, where it can be used as a probe of a postulated anomaly of its equation of state. After a brief review of previous experiments on cavitation, we describe our method which consists in focusing a high amplitude sound wave in the bulk liquid, away from any walls. We obtain highly reproducible results, allowing us to study in detail the statistics of cavitation, and to give an accurate definition of the cavitation threshold. Two independent pressure calibrations are performed. The cavitation pressure is found to increase monotonically from -26MPa at 0°C to -17MPa at 80°C . While these values lie among the most negative pressures reported in water, they are still far away from the cavitation pressure expected theoretically and reached in the experiment by Angell and his group [Zheng , Science 254, 829 (1991)] (around -120MPa at 40°C ). Possible reasons for this discrepancy are considered.

  18. Particle Probe Investigations on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Justin; James, R. W.; Lopez, M.; Nolan, S.; Page, E. L.; Schlank, C.; Stutzman, B. S.; Zuniga, J.

    2012-10-01

    A small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) has been constructed at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL) to utilize the reputed high densities at low pressure (.01 T) [1], in high temperature and density diagnostic development for future laboratory investigations. With the initial construction phase complete, HPX has produced its first plasmas. Efforts to develop and enhance the high temperature and density (10^13 cm-3 and higher) helicon plasmas at low pressures (.01 T) reported by Toki, Shinohara, et. al. continue. Currently, particle probes to measure plasmas' temperatures and densities, necessary to discern the plasma mode transitions, are in development. Construction of independent mach and triple probes for single point surface investigations are underway and once installed, they will be followed by a triple probe array to produce a more comprehensive density and surface view. Progress on the construction and findings of these probes on HPX will be reported.

  19. Convective heat flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, J.C.; Hardee, H.C.; Striker, R.P.

    1984-01-09

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packet-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  20. Convective heat flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, James C.; Hardee, Harry C.; Striker, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packer-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  1. Surgical force detection probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Roberts, Paul; Scott, Charles; Prass, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The development progress of a precision electro-mechanical instrument which allows the detection and documentation of the forces and moment applied to human tissue during surgery (under actual operation room conditions), is reported. The pen-shaped prototype probe which measures 1/2 inch in diameter and 7 inches in length was fabricated using an aerodynamic balance. The aerodynamic balance, a standard wind tunnel force and moment sensing transducer, measures the forces and the moments transmitted through the surgeon's hand to the human tissue during surgery. The prototype probe which was fabricated as a development tool was tested successfully. The final version of the surgical force detection probe will be designed based on additional laboratory tests in order to establish the full scale loads. It is expected that the final product will require a simplified aerodynamic balance with two or three force components and one moment component with lighter full scale loads. A signal conditioner was fabricated to process and display the outputs from the prototype probe. This unit will be interfaced with a PC-based data system to provide automatic data acquisition, data processing, and graphics display. The expected overall accuracy of the probe is better than one percent full scale.

  2. Effectiveness of a Wedge Probe to Measure Sonic Boom Signatures in a Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Elmiligui, Alaa A.

    2013-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) to determine the effectiveness of a wedge probe to measure sonic boom pressure signatures compared to a slender conical probe. A generic business jet model at a constant angle of attack and at a single model to probe separation distance was used to generate a sonic boom signature. Pressure signature data were acquired with both the wedge probe and a slender conical probe for comparison. The test was conducted at a Mach number of 2.0 and a free-stream unit Reynolds number of 2 million per foot. The results showed that the wedge probe was not effective in measuring the sonic boom pressure signature of the aircraft model in the supersonic wind tunnel. Data plots and a discussion of the results are presented. No tabulated data or flow visualization photographs are included.

  3. Measurement of Air Flow Characteristics Using Seven-Hole Cone Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Timothy T.

    1997-01-01

    The motivation for this work has been the development of a wake survey system. A seven-hole probe can measure the distribution of static pressure, total pressure, and flow angularity in a wind tunnel environment. The author describes the development of a simple, very efficient algorithm to compute flow properties from probe tip pressures. Its accuracy and applicability to unsteady, turbulent flow are discussed.

  4. Effects of a Rotating Aerodynamic Probe on the Flow Field of a Compressor Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, Jan

    2008-01-01

    An investigation of distortions of the rotor exit flow field caused by an aerodynamic probe mounted in the rotor is described in this paper. A rotor total pressure Kiel probe, mounted on the rotor hub and extending up to the mid-span radius of a rotor blade channel, generates a wake that forms additional flow blockage. Three types of high-response aerodynamic probes were used to investigate the distorted flow field behind the rotor. These probes were: a split-fiber thermo-anemometric probe to measure velocity and flow direction, a total pressure probe, and a disk probe for in-flow static pressure measurement. The signals acquired from these high-response probes were reduced using an ensemble averaging method based on a once per rotor revolution signal. The rotor ensemble averages were combined to construct contour plots for each rotor channel of the rotor tested. In order to quantify the rotor probe effects, the contour plots for each individual rotor blade passage were averaged into a single value. The distribution of these average values along the rotor circumference is a measure of changes in the rotor exit flow field due to the presence of a probe in the rotor. These distributions were generated for axial flow velocity and for static pressure.

  5. Probing of Elastic Properties and Texture of Transparent Solids with sub-μm and μm-Resolution at Mbar Pressures Using Picosecond Laser Ultrasonic Interferometry: H2O Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerr, A.; Nikitin, S. M.; Chigarev, N.; Raetz, S.; Kuriakose, M.; Tournat, V.; Bulou, A.; Gasteau, D.; Castagnede, B.; Gusev, V. E.; Lomonosov, A.

    2015-12-01

    Elastic properties of silicates, oxides and other transparent materials, especially their single crystal elastic moduli, texture and its evolution upon compression at Mbar pressures is a subject of continuous interest in geo- and planetary sciences. Picosecond laser ultrasonic technique was earlier proposed to measure elastic moduli of materials compressed in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) [1]. Recently the applications of picosecond laser ultrasonic interferometry have been extended to evaluation of spatially inhomogeneous samples |2]. In this communication we report characterization by this technique of a transparent polycrystalline sample (H2O ice) compressed in a DAC to ~1 Mbar. The method is suitable for measurements in multi-Mbar region due to a high in-depth resolution approaching 300 nm and limited by the used signal processing. In an inhomogeneous medium the transient reflectivity signal obtained by this technique contains at each time instance the information on the parameters of the medium in the spatial position of laser-generated picosecond acoustic pulse corresponding to this moment of time. The lateral resolution is defined by focusing of the laser radiation which can approach ≤1 μm if advanced focusing methods are applied. Here we present results of examination of characteristic features of micro-crystallinity of H2O ice at P up to 840 kbar by two-dimensional imaging based on this technique which provides, in addition, for each spatial position the value of elastic modulus of the sample material along the DAC axis [2]. A significant elastic anisotropy of H2O ice was recognised, its degree evaluated, and compared with the earlier experimental and theoretical data. Feasibility of extension to a three-dimensional imaging of texture (including information on orientation of crystallites or their groups) as well as its evolution upon further compression in a DAC is discussed. The method can be applied to any transparent compounds (silicates, oxides) or

  6. Multispectral imaging probe

    SciTech Connect

    Sandison, David R.; Platzbecker, Mark R.; Descour, Michael R.; Armour, David L.; Craig, Marcus J.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    1999-01-01

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector.

  7. Multispectral imaging probe

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, D.R.; Platzbecker, M.R.; Descour, M.R.; Armour, D.L.; Craig, M.J.; Richards-Kortum, R.

    1999-07-27

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector. 8 figs.

  8. Particle-in-cell Simulation of Langmuir Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iza, Felipe

    2005-10-01

    Ion kinetics in the sheath and pre-sheath of planar and cylindrical probes has been studied by means of 1-dimensional (1d3v) particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision simulations. Collisionless and collisional regimes are considered and simulation results (floating potentials and the ion saturation currents) are compared with available theories. As pressure increases, the ion velocity at the sheath edge decreases below the Bohm velocity (uB). For planar probes, this velocity is ˜ uB(1+5λDe/λi) where λDe is the Debye length at the sheath edge and λi the ion mean free path. Although ionization can be neglected in the sheath region, it plays a key role in determining the voltage across the presheath. For planar probes and Maxwellian electrons, this voltage increases rapidly for electron temperatures below ˜2eV. For cylindrical probes, however, the voltage across the presheath can be drastically reduced by the geometrical increase of current density as ions approach the probe. At low pressure, simulation results lie between the Laframboise and the ABR theories. As pressure increases, however, collisions and ionization in the presheath becomes critical in determining the ion flux to the probe at a given bias voltage.

  9. Pioneer III Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Looking more like surgeons, these technicians wearing 'cleanroom' attire inspect the Pioneer III probe before shipping it to Cape Canaveral, Florida. Pioneer III was launched on December 6, 1958 aboard a Juno II rocket at the Atlantic Missile Range, Cape Canaveral, Florida. The mission objectives were to measure the radiation intensity of the Van Allen radiation belt, test long range communication systems, the launch vehicle and other subsystems. The Juno II failed to reach proper orbital escape velocity. The probe re-entered the Earth's atmosphere on December 7th ending its brief mission.

  10. Viscous Effects on Impact Probes in a Subsonic Rarified Gas Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, E. D.; Schaaf, S. A.

    1951-01-01

    The problem of time response of pressure gaging systems used with low density flows has been discussed in Ref ]4, and the effect of outgassing on pressure magnitudes was indicated in the same reference. Briefly, gases or vapors adhering to the internal walls of the pressure gaging system behave like gas sources and produce a pressure rise in the gage system which has no relation to the external flow. The effect can also occur in the reverse direction, with "in-gassing" or the action of an effective sink in the gage system as gases entering through the probe orifice are adsorbed to the walls. For given surface conditions, the magnitude of the pressure error to be expected due to out-gassing depends on the dimensions of the probe system. In the present tests, it was desirable to use the smallest possible probe to yield the lowest possible Reynolds number. The lower limit on size was fixed by outgassing effects, evaluated by the following procedure. 2.0 PROCEDURE The pumping system was adjusted to give a pressure, measured at the reservoir, of 9 microns Hg with no flow into the wind tunnel. The upstream metering valve was then opened and the air flow rate adjusted to give a pressure of 100 microns in the reservoir under steady flow conditions, The pressure read by one of the impact tubes, inserted into the flow, was measured. The upstream metering valve was then closed rapid)y, and the reservoir pressure, p0, and the impact probe pressure, Pj, were measured simultaneously at definite time intervals. Another probe was inserted into the flow and the procedure repeated, until the pressure-time data had been obtained for each probe investigated. The results for a series of tests Involving probe Nos.l, 2 and 3 are shown on HYD 2616 300 RESULTS From HYD 2616, It is clear that the smallest probe (No.3) requires the longest time to reach equilibrium. After a sufficient time has elapsed (about 180 seconds), this probe read the same, within the accuracy of measurement, as the

  11. Visual probes and methods for placing visual probes into subsurface areas

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Don T.; Erickson, Eugene E.; Casper, William L.; Everett, David M.

    2004-11-23

    Visual probes and methods for placing visual probes into subsurface areas in either contaminated or non-contaminated sites are described. In one implementation, the method includes driving at least a portion of a visual probe into the ground using direct push, sonic drilling, or a combination of direct push and sonic drilling. Such is accomplished without providing an open pathway for contaminants or fugitive gases to reach the surface. According to one implementation, the invention includes an entry segment configured for insertion into the ground or through difficult materials (e.g., concrete, steel, asphalt, metals, or items associated with waste), at least one extension segment configured to selectively couple with the entry segment, at least one push rod, and a pressure cap. Additional implementations are contemplated.

  12. Cervical Neoplasia Probe Control

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1997-01-24

    This software, which consists of a main executive and several subroutines, performs control of the optics, image acquisition, and Digital Signal Processing (DSP) of this image, of an optical based medical instrument that performs fluoresence detection of precancerous lesions (neoplasia) of the human cervix. The hardware portion of this medical instrument is known by the same name Cervical Neoplasia Probe (CNP)

  13. Endocavity Ultrasound Probe Manipulators.

    PubMed

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Schäfer, Felix; Huang, Chien-Ming; Zuo, Yihe; Petrisor, Doru; Han, Misop

    2013-06-01

    We developed two similar structure manipulators for medical endocavity ultrasound probes with 3 and 4 degrees of freedom (DoF). These robots allow scanning with ultrasound for 3-D imaging and enable robot-assisted image-guided procedures. Both robots use remote center of motion kinematics, characteristic of medical robots. The 4-DoF robot provides unrestricted manipulation of the endocavity probe. With the 3-DoF robot the insertion motion of the probe must be adjusted manually, but the device is simpler and may also be used to manipulate external-body probes. The robots enabled a novel surgical approach of using intraoperative image-based navigation during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), performed with concurrent use of two robotic systems (Tandem, T-RALP). Thus far, a clinical trial for evaluation of safety and feasibility has been performed successfully on 46 patients. This paper describes the architecture and design of the robots, the two prototypes, control features related to safety, preclinical experiments, and the T-RALP procedure. PMID:24795525

  14. Ultrasonic search wheel probe

    DOEpatents

    Mikesell, Charles R.

    1978-01-01

    A device is provided for reducing internal reflections from the tire of an ultrasonic search wheel probe or from within the material being examined. The device includes a liner with an anechoic chamber within which is an ultrasonic transducer. The liner is positioned within the wheel and includes an aperture through which the ultrasonic sound from the transducer is directed.

  15. The Phoenix Pluto Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunning, George R.; Spapperi, Jeff; Wilkinson, Jeffrey P.; Eldred, Jim; Labij, Dennis; Strinni, Meredith

    1990-01-01

    A design proposal for an unmanned probe to Pluto is presented. The topics covered include: (1) scientific instrumentation; (2) mission management, planning, and costing; (3) power and propulsion system; (4) structural subsystem; (5) command, control, and communication; and (6) attitude and articulation control.

  16. Laboratory plasma probe studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heikkila, W. J.

    1975-01-01

    Diagnostic experiments performed in a collisionless plasma using CO2 as the working gas are described. In particular, simultaneous measurements that have been performed by means of Langmuir- and RF-probes are presented. A resonance occurring above the parallel resonance in the frequency characteristic of a two electrode system is interpreted as being due to the resonant excitation of electroacoustic waves.

  17. Probing the Solar System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, John

    2013-01-01

    Humans have always had the vision to one day live on other planets. This vision existed even before the first person was put into orbit. Since the early space missions of putting humans into orbit around Earth, many advances have been made in space technology. We have now sent many space probes deep into the Solar system to explore the planets and…

  18. Experimenting with Temperature Probes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Wolff-Michael

    1989-01-01

    Presented are four activities which are designed to familiarize children with the multiple uses of computers and help them learn about heat and temperature using temperature probes. Included are the tempering effect of water, heat capacity, caloric content of foods, and weather. Hardware and software are discussed. (CW)

  19. Endocavity Ultrasound Probe Manipulators

    PubMed Central

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Schäfer, Felix; Huang, Chien-Ming; Zuo, Yihe; Petrisor, Doru; Han, Misop

    2014-01-01

    We developed two similar structure manipulators for medical endocavity ultrasound probes with 3 and 4 degrees of freedom (DoF). These robots allow scanning with ultrasound for 3-D imaging and enable robot-assisted image-guided procedures. Both robots use remote center of motion kinematics, characteristic of medical robots. The 4-DoF robot provides unrestricted manipulation of the endocavity probe. With the 3-DoF robot the insertion motion of the probe must be adjusted manually, but the device is simpler and may also be used to manipulate external-body probes. The robots enabled a novel surgical approach of using intraoperative image-based navigation during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), performed with concurrent use of two robotic systems (Tandem, T-RALP). Thus far, a clinical trial for evaluation of safety and feasibility has been performed successfully on 46 patients. This paper describes the architecture and design of the robots, the two prototypes, control features related to safety, preclinical experiments, and the T-RALP procedure. PMID:24795525

  20. The interface between probe and skin in noninvasive glucose sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kexin; Qiu, Qingjun; Wang, Wenbo; Jiang, Jingying

    2003-10-01

    Non-invasive blood glucose sensing often employs contact measurement, that is, the optical probe directly contacts the skin to reduce specular reflection. The contact pressure and the variation of skin temperature therefore contribute much to interference incurred by the internal structure and composition change of the detecting part. In this paper, we are going to discuss the influence of contact pressure between fiberoptic probe and skin as well as heat transfer on spectral measurement. A through investigation is made on approaches to eliminate these factors for both contact and non-contact measurement.

  1. Electromagnetic treatment of the multipole resonance probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapke, Martin; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2009-10-01

    We present an electromagnetic model of the ``multipole resonance probe'' (MRP)-- a diagnostic concept which enables the simultaneous determination of plasma density, electron temperature, and collision rate in low-pressure gas discharges. The MRP is a radio-frequency driven probe of particular spherical design. In an idealized version the probe consists of two dielectrically shielded, conducting hemispheres. Driven by a radio-frequency source, the hemispheres are powered symmetrically. An analysis of the absorption spectrum shows a multitude of resonances, which allows for an analytical evaluation of the measured signal. The signal provides information on the distribution of the plasma in the probe's vicinity, from which the values of electron density, electron temperature and collision rate can be inferred. In this contribution the MRP will be modeled electromagnetically. Based on a comparision between full electromagnetic and electrostatic treatment, we show that a previously presented electrostatic treatment [1] was well justified.[4pt] [1] M.Lapke et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 93, 051502 (2008)

  2. EDITORIAL: Probing the nanoworld Probing the nanoworld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Mervyn

    2009-10-01

    In nanotechnology, it is the unique properties arising from nanometre-scale structures that lead not only to their technological importance but also to a better understanding of the underlying science. Over the last twenty years, material properties at the nanoscale have been dominated by the properties of carbon in the form of the C60 molecule, single- and multi-wall carbon nanotubes, nanodiamonds, and recently graphene. During this period, research published in the journal Nanotechnology has revealed the amazing mechanical properties of such materials as well as their remarkable electronic properties with the promise of new devices. Furthermore, nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanorods, and nanowires from metals and dielectrics have been characterized for their electronic, mechanical, optical, chemical and catalytic properties. Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has become the main characterization technique and atomic force microscopy (AFM) the most frequently used SPM. Over the past twenty years, SPM techniques that were previously experimental in nature have become routine. At the same time, investigations using AFM continue to yield impressive results that demonstrate the great potential of this powerful imaging tool, particularly in close to physiological conditions. In this special issue a collaboration of researchers in Europe report the use of AFM to provide high-resolution topographical images of individual carbon nanotubes immobilized on various biological membranes, including a nuclear membrane for the first time (Lamprecht C et al 2009 Nanotechnology 20 434001). Other SPM developments such as high-speed AFM appear to be making a transition from specialist laboratories to the mainstream, and perhaps the same may be said for non-contact AFM. Looking to the future, characterisation techniques involving SPM and spectroscopy, such as tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, could emerge as everyday methods. In all these advanced techniques, routinely available probes will

  3. Pressure Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Pressure Systems, Inc.'s DPT 6400 is a system designed to increase productivity in industrial processes where there is a need for making multiple pressure measurements quickly and with high accuracy. It is applicable in controlling industrial processes in plants that are being upgraded to automated status. In order to automate such plants the pressures at the many loops must be measured, converted to digital information and transmitted to the plant's process control computer. The DPT 6400 serves that function. By employing solid-state pressure sensing transducers whose errors are automatically corrected by a microprocessor, it is capable of highly accurate pressure measurements. Basic DPT 6400 has 64 channels, but the system can be expanded to 256 channels by the addition of "slave" units.

  4. Molecular probes for cardiovascular imaging.

    PubMed

    Liang, Grace; Nguyen, Patricia K

    2016-08-01

    Molecular probes provide imaging signal and contrast for the visualization, characterization, and measurement of biological processes at the molecular level. These probes can be designed to target the cell or tissue of interest and must be retained at the imaging site until they can be detected by the appropriate imaging modality. In this article, we will discuss the basic design of molecular probes, differences among the various types of probes, and general strategies for their evaluation of cardiovascular disease. PMID:27189171

  5. Heavy ion beam probing

    SciTech Connect

    Hickok, R L

    1980-07-01

    This report consists of the notes distributed to the participants at the IEEE Mini-Course on Modern Plasma Diagnostics that was held in Madison, Wisconsin in May 1980. It presents an overview of Heavy Ion Beam Probing that briefly describes the principles and discuss the types of measurements that can be made. The problems associated with implementing beam probes are noted, possible variations are described, estimated costs of present day systems, and the scaling requirements for large plasma devices are presented. The final chapter illustrates typical results that have been obtained on a variety of plasma devices. No detailed calculations are included in the report, but a list of references that will provide more detailed information is included.

  6. Molecular inversion probe assay.

    PubMed

    Absalan, Farnaz; Ronaghi, Mostafa

    2007-01-01

    We have described molecular inversion probe technologies for large-scale genetic analyses. This technique provides a comprehensive and powerful tool for the analysis of genetic variation and enables affordable, large-scale studies that will help uncover the genetic basis of complex disease and explain the individual variation in response to therapeutics. Major applications of the molecular inversion probes (MIP) technologies include targeted genotyping from focused regions to whole-genome studies, and allele quantification of genomic rearrangements. The MIP technology (used in the HapMap project) provides an efficient, scalable, and affordable way to score polymorphisms in case/control populations for genetic studies. The MIP technology provides the highest commercially available multiplexing levels and assay conversion rates for targeted genotyping. This enables more informative, genome-wide studies with either the functional (direct detection) approach or the indirect detection approach. PMID:18025701

  7. Probing Massive Star Cluster Formation with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kelsey

    2015-08-01

    Observationally constraining the physical conditions that give rise to massive star clusters has been a long-standing challenge. Now with the ALMA Observatory coming on-line, we can finally begin to probe the birth environments of massive clusters in a variety of galaxies with sufficient angular resolution. In this talk I will give an overview of ALMA observations of galaxies in which candidate proto-super star cluster molecular clouds have been identified. These new data probe the physical conditions that give rise to super star clusters, providing information on their densities, pressures, and temperatures. In particular, the observations indicate that these clouds may be subject to external pressures of P/k > 108 K cm-3, which is consistent with the prevalence of optically observed adolescent super star clusters in interacting galaxy systems and other high pressure environments. ALMA observations also enable an assessement of the molecular cloud chemical abundances in the regions surrounding super star clusters. Molecular clouds associated with existing super star clusters are strongly correlated with HCO+ emission, but appear to have relatively low ratio of CO/HCO+ emission compared to other clouds, indicating that the super star clusters are impacting the molecular abundances in their vicinity.

  8. Fast Langmuir probe sweeping circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Milnes, K.A.; Ehlers, K.W.; Leung, K.N.; Owren, H.M.; Williams, M.D.

    1980-06-01

    An inexpensive, simple, and fast Langmuir probe sweeping circuit is presented. This sweeper completes a probe trace in 1.4 ms and has a maximum probe current capability of 5 A. It is suitable for pulsemode plasma operation with density greater than 10/sup 12/ ions/cm/sup 3/.

  9. Scanning Probe Microscopy and Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesendanger, Roland

    1994-09-01

    Preface; List of acronyms; Introduction; Part I. Experimental Methods and Theoretical Background of Scanning Probe Microscopy and Spectroscopy: 1. Scanning tunnelling microscopy; 2. Scanning force microscopy; 3. Related scanning probe techniques; Part II. Applications of Scanning Probe Microscopy and Spectroscopy: 4. Condensed matter physics; 5. Chemistry; 6. Organic materials; 7. Metrology and standards; 8. Nanotechnology; References; Index.

  10. Droplet monitoring probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baughman, J. R.; Thys, P. C.

    1973-01-01

    A droplet monitoring system is disclosed for analysis of mixed-phase fluid flow in development of gas turbines. The system uses a probe comprising two electrical wires spaced a known distance apart and connected at one end to means for establishing a dc potential between the wires. A drop in the fluid stream momentarily contacting both wires simultaneously causes and electrical signal which is amplified, detected and counted.

  11. Space Probe Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Managed by Marshall Space Flight Center, the Space Tug was a reusable multipurpose space vehicle designed to transport payloads to different orbital inclinations. Utilizing mission-specific combinations of its three primary modules (crew, propulsion, and cargo) and a variety of supplementary kits, the Space Tug was capable of numerous space applications. This 1970 artist's concept depicts the Tug's propulsion module launching a space probe into lunar orbit.

  12. Cosmological probes of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rassat, Anais Marie Melanie

    This Thesis is concerned with two cosmological probes of linear gravity. The first relates to Large Scale Structure (LSS) in the Universe, probed by galaxy surveys. The second to temperature anisotropics of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), probed by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Map (WMAP). Both probe the matter and dark energy distributions in the Universe and can be used to test general relativity. The first part of this Thesis (Chapters 2 to 4) is concerned with the analysis of galaxy clustering in redshift space. The second part (Chapters 5 to 7) is concerned with the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect using LSS-CMB cross-correlations. Chapter 1 introduces the cosmological theory and overviews the subsequent chapters. Chapter 2 gives a review of recent results from the 2 Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) and its Redshift Survey (2MRS). It includes work published in Erdogdu (a) et al. (2006) and Erdogdu (b) et al. (2006). Chapter 3 quantifies the clustering of 2MRS galaxies in redshift space. Chapter 4 uses results from Chapter 3 to constrain cosmological parameters. A selection of work from Chapters 3 and 4 will shortly become available in Rassat et al. (2008), entitled 'Redshift Space Analysis of 2MRS'. Chapter 5 overviews the late-time Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect (ISW) and cross- correlations between the LSS and the CMB. Chapter 6 is also published in Rassat et al. (2007), entitled "Cross-correlation of 2MASS and WMAP3: Implications for the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect". It investigates a detection of the ISW effect and correlations which may affect statistical isotropy in the CMB ('Axis of Evil'). Chapter 7 uses the ISW effect to forecast constraints on dark energy parameters and general modifications of general relativity for the next generation of galaxy surveys, particularly the Dark UNiverse Explorer (DUNE) and the Dark Energy Survey (DES). Chapter 8 presents the overall conclusions of this Thesis. Chapter 9 discusses possible extensions to

  13. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, D.; Weiss, S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Salmeron, M.; Chemla, D.S.

    1994-01-01

    The authors have developed a general technique which combines the temporal resolution of ultrafast laser spectroscopy with the spatial resolution of scanned probe microscopy (SPM). Using this technique with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), they have obtained simultaneous 2 ps time resolution and 50 {angstrom} spatial resolution. This improves the time resolution currently attainable with STM by nine orders of magnitude. The potential of this powerful technique for studying ultrafast dynamical phenomena on surfaces with atomic resolution is discussed.

  14. Gravity Probe B Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The space vehicle Gravity Probe B (GP-B) is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. In this photograph, engineer Gary Reynolds is inspecting the inside of the probe neck during probe thermal repairs. GP-B is scheduled for launch in April 2004 and managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Leese, Gravity Probe B, Stanford University)

  15. Phoenix Conductivity Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 49, or the 49th Martian day of the mission (July 14, 2008), shows thermal and electrical conductivity probe on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Robotic Arm.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. Galileo probe relay receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prouty, D. A.; Von Der Embse, U. A.

    1982-01-01

    For the Jovian mission, the data link from the Galileo probe to the orbiter uses suppressed-carrier Manchester encoded BPSK modulation and is protected with R = 1/2, K = 7 convolutional coding. The receiver closes the link by acquiring, tracking, and demodulating the data. It has to operate in a highly stressed environment with severe frequency offset, frequency rate, wind gust, and antenna spin conditions. Salient features are described and breadboard test data presented.

  17. Icing Sensor Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, Edward; Kok, Gregory L.

    2002-01-01

    Aircraft icing is a serious safety problem for the general aviation and some commuter transport airplanes. There has been tremendous growth in the commuter aviation industry in the last few years, Since these type of aircraft generally operate at lower altitudes they consequently spend a far greater proportion of their time operating in icing conditions. For the past thirty years airborne and ground based facilities have relied primarily on two types of cloud physics instrumentation to measure the characteristics of icing clouds: hot wire liquid water content probes and laser based particle sizing probes for the measurement of water droplet size. The instrumentation is severely limited by the technology that was developed during the 1970's and is quite large in size. The goal of this research is to develop one instrument with a wide bandwidth, better response time, higher resolution, user selectability, and small and lightweight. NASA Glenn Research Center, Droplet Measurement Technology, and Meteorology Society of Canada have developed a collaborative effort to develop such an instrument. This paper describes the development and test results of the prototype Icing Sensor Probe.

  18. Einstein Inflationary Probe (EIP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2004-01-01

    I will discuss plans to develop a concept for the Einstein Inflation Probe: a mission to detect gravity waves from inflation via the unique signature they impart to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. A sensitive CMB polarization satellite may be the only way to probe physics at the grand-unified theory (GUT) scale, exceeding by 12 orders of magnitude the energies studied at the Large Hadron Collider. A detection of gravity waves would represent a remarkable confirmation of the inflationary paradigm and set the energy scale at which inflation occurred when the universe was a fraction of a second old. Even a strong upper limit to the gravity wave amplitude would be significant, ruling out many common models of inflation, and pointing to inflation occurring at much lower energy, if at all. Measuring gravity waves via the CMB polarization will be challenging. We will undertake a comprehensive study to identify the critical scientific requirements for the mission and their derived instrumental performance requirements. At the core of the study will be an assessment of what is scientifically and experimentally optimal within the scope and purpose of the Einstein Inflation Probe.

  19. Nanoscale thermal probing

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yanan; Wang, Xinwei

    2012-01-01

    Nanoscale novel devices have raised the demand for nanoscale thermal characterization that is critical for evaluating the device performance and durability. Achieving nanoscale spatial resolution and high accuracy in temperature measurement is very challenging due to the limitation of measurement pathways. In this review, we discuss four methodologies currently developed in nanoscale surface imaging and temperature measurement. To overcome the restriction of the conventional methods, the scanning thermal microscopy technique is widely used. From the perspective of measuring target, the optical feature size method can be applied by using either Raman or fluorescence thermometry. The near-field optical method that measures nanoscale temperature by focusing the optical field to a nano-sized region provides a non-contact and non-destructive way for nanoscale thermal probing. Although the resistance thermometry based on nano-sized thermal sensors is possible for nanoscale thermal probing, significant effort is still needed to reduce the size of the current sensors by using advanced fabrication techniques. At the same time, the development of nanoscale imaging techniques, such as fluorescence imaging, provides a great potential solution to resolve the nanoscale thermal probing problem. PMID:22419968

  20. [Individual pressure tolerance--a "target" pressure?].

    PubMed

    Bogdănici, C; Vancea, P P

    1999-01-01

    In literature there are many meanings for the limit between normal and pathological intraocular pressure: "normative pressure", "critic pressure", "individual tolerance pressure" and "target pressure". The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that these terms are synonymous. PMID:10756882

  1. Kinetic Description of the Impedance Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberrath, Jens; Lapke, Martin; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2011-10-01

    Active plasma resonance spectroscopy is a well known diagnostic method. Many concepts of this method are theoretically investigated and realized as a diagnostic tool, one of which is the impedance probe (IP). The application of such a probe in plasmas with pressures of a few Pa raises the question whether kinetic effects have to be taken into account or not. To address this question a kinetic model is necessary. A general kinetic model for an electrostatic concept of active plasma spectroscopy was presented by R.P. Brinkmann and can be used to describe the multipole resonance probe (MRP). In principle the IP is interpretable as a special case of the MRP in lower order. Thus, we are able to describe the IP by the kinetic model of the MRP. Based on this model we derive a solution to investigate the influence of kinetic effects to the resonance behavior of the IP. Active plasma resonance spectroscopy is a well known diagnostic method. Many concepts of this method are theoretically investigated and realized as a diagnostic tool, one of which is the impedance probe (IP). The application of such a probe in plasmas with pressures of a few Pa raises the question whether kinetic effects have to be taken into account or not. To address this question a kinetic model is necessary. A general kinetic model for an electrostatic concept of active plasma spectroscopy was presented by R.P. Brinkmann and can be used to describe the multipole resonance probe (MRP). In principle the IP is interpretable as a special case of the MRP in lower order. Thus, we are able to describe the IP by the kinetic model of the MRP. Based on this model we derive a solution to investigate the influence of kinetic effects to the resonance behavior of the IP. The authors acknowledge the support by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) via the Ruhr University Research School and the Federal Ministry of Education and Research in frame of the PluTO project.

  2. Pressure Drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Mike Lawson briefly discussed pressure drop for aerospace applications and presented short stories about adventures experienced while working at NASA and General Dynamics, including exposure to technologies like the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart and the SWME.

  3. Peer Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... and behaviors. This is often positive — it's human nature to listen to and learn from other people ... Responding to peer pressure is part of human nature — but some people are more likely to give ...

  4. Pressure sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Mee, David K.; Ripley, Edward B.; Nienstedt, Zachary C.; Nienstedt, Alex W.; Howell, Jr., Layton N.

    2015-09-29

    Disclosed is a passive, in-situ pressure sensor. The sensor includes a sensing element having a ferromagnetic metal and a tension inducing mechanism coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The tension inducing mechanism is operable to change a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal based on a change in pressure in the sensing element. Changes in pressure are detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal when subjected to an alternating magnetic field caused by the change in the tensile stress. The sensing element is embeddable in a closed system for detecting pressure changes without the need for any penetrations of the system for power or data acquisition by detecting changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

  5. Comparative evaluation of probing depth and clinical attachment level using a manual probe and Florida probe

    PubMed Central

    Kour, Amandeep; Kumar, Ashish; Puri, Komal; Khatri, Manish; Bansal, Mansi; Gupta, Geeti

    2016-01-01

    Background: To compare and evaluate the intra- and inter-examiner efficacy and reproducibility of the first-generation manual (Williams) probe and the third-generation Florida probe in terms of measuring pocket probing depth (PD) and clinical attachment level (CAL). Materials and Methods: Forty subjects/4000 sites were included in this comparative, cross-sectional study. Group- and site-wise categorizations were done. Based on gingival index, PD, and CAL, patients were divided into four groups, i.e., periodontally healthy, gingivitis, mild to moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis. Further, based on these parameters, a total of 4000 sites, with 1000 sites in each category randomly selected from these 40 patients, were taken. Full mouth PD and CAL measurements were recorded with two probes, by Examiner 1 and on Ramfjord teeth by Examiner 2. Results: Full mouth and Ramfjord teeth group- and site-wise PD obtained with the manual probe by both the examiners were statistically significantly deeper than that obtained with the Florida probe. The full mouth and Ramfjord teeth mean CAL measurement by Florida probe was higher as compared to manual probe in mild to moderate periodontitis group and sites, whereas in severe periodontitis group and sites, manual probe recorded higher CAL as compared to Florida probe. Conclusion: Mean PD and CAL measurements were deeper with the manual probe as compared to the Florida probe in all the groups and sites, except for the mild-moderate periodontitis group and sites where the CAL measurements with the manual probe were less than the Florida probe. Manual probe was more reproducible and showed less interexaminer variability as compared to the Florida probe. PMID:27563204

  6. PRESSURE TRANSDUCER

    DOEpatents

    Sander, H.H.

    1959-10-01

    A pressure or mechanical force transducer particularly adaptable to miniature telemetering systems is described. Basically the device consists of a transistor located within a magnetic field adapted to change in response to mechanical force. The conduction characteristics of the transistor in turn vary proportionally with changes in the magnetic flux across the transistor such that the output (either frequency of amplitude) of the transistor circuit is proportional to mechanical force or pressure.

  7. Pressure regulator

    DOEpatents

    Ebeling, Jr., Robert W.; Weaver, Robert B.

    1979-01-01

    The pressure within a pressurized flow reactor operated under harsh environmental conditions is controlled by establishing and maintaining a fluidized bed of uniformly sized granular material of selected density by passing the gas from the reactor upwardly therethrough at a rate sufficient to fluidize the bed and varying the height of the bed by adding granular material thereto or removing granular material therefrom to adjust the backpressure on the flow reactor.

  8. Pressure and Magnetics Measurements of Single and Merged Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messer, S.; Case, A.; Brockington, S.; Bomgardner, R.; Witherspoon, F. D.

    2010-11-01

    We present pressure and magnetic data from both a single full scale coaxial gun and from the merging of jets from several minirailguns. The magnetic probes measure all three components of field, and include an array of probes inside the coaxial gun. Magnetic measurements beyond the muzzle of the gun show the scale of currents trapped in the plasma plume. The pressure probe measures adiabatic stagnation pressure and shows how this quantity decreases with distance from the gun as well as the changes in stagnation pressure through the merge process. Stagnation pressure is influenced by density, temperature, and velocity, and serves as a check on spectroscopic and interferometer measurements. Unlike optical measurements, stagnation pressure is taken at a definite location. These guns are early prototypes of guns to be installed on the Plasma Liner eXperiment at LANL. The jet-merging results are reviewed in the context of what is expected for PLX.

  9. COTS MEMS Flow-Measurement Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redding, Chip; Smith, Floyd A.; Blank, Greg; Cruzan, Charles

    2004-01-01

    As an alternative to conventional tubing instrumentation for measuring airflow, designers and technicians at Glenn Research Center have been fabricating packaging components and assembling a set of unique probes that contain commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) sensor chips. MEMS sensor chips offer some compelling advantages over standard macroscopic measurement devices. MEMS sensor technology has matured through mass production and use in the automotive and aircraft industries. At present, MEMS are the devices of choice for sensors in such applications as tire-pressure monitors, altimeters, pneumatic controls, cable leak detectors, and consumer appliances. Compactness, minimality of power demand, rugged construction, and moderate cost all contribute to making MEMS sensors attractive for instrumentation for future research. Conventional macroscopic flow-measurement instrumentation includes tubes buried beneath the aerodynamic surfaces of wind-tunnel models or in wind-tunnel walls. Pressure is introduced at the opening of each such tube. The pressure must then travel along the tube before reaching a transducer that generates an electronic signal. The lengths of such tubes typically range from 20 ft (approx.= 6 m) to hundreds of feet (of the order of 100 m). The propagation of pressure signals in the tubes damps the signals considerably and makes it necessary to delay measurements until after test rigs have reached steady-state operation. In contrast, a MEMS pressure sensor that generates electronic output can take readings continuously under dynamic conditions in nearly real time. In order to use stainless-steel tubing for pressure measurements, it is necessary to clean many tubes, cut them to length, carefully install them, delicately deburr them, and splice them. A cluster of a few hundred 1/16-in.- (approx.=1.6-mm-) diameter tubes (such clusters are common in research testing facilities) can be several inches (of the order of 10

  10. Carbon granule probe microphone for leak detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.

    1985-02-01

    A microphone which is not subject to corrosion is provided by employing carbon granules to sense sound waves. The granules are packed into a ceramic tube and no diaphragm is used. A pair of electrodes is located in the tube adjacent the carbon granules and are coupled to a sensing circuit. Sound waves cause pressure changes on the carbon granules which results in a change in resistance in the electrical path between the electrodes. This change in resistance is detected by the sensing circuit. The microphone is suitable for use as a leak detection probe in recovery boilers, where it provides reliable operation without corrosion problems associated with conventional microphones.

  11. Probabilistic and Other Neural Nets in Multi-Hole Probe Calibration and Flow Angularity Pattern Recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baskaran, Subbiah; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Noever, David

    1998-01-01

    The use of probabilistic (PNN) and multilayer feed forward (MLFNN) neural networks are investigated for calibration of multi-hole pressure probes and the prediction of associated flow angularity patterns in test flow fields. Both types of networks are studied in detail for their calibration and prediction characteristics. The current formalism can be applied to any multi-hole probe, however the test results for the most commonly used five-hole Cone and Prism probe types alone are reported in this article.

  12. Science Rationale for Jupiter Entry Probe as Part of JIMO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. E.; Spilker, T. R.

    2003-01-01

    A Jupiter atmospheric entry probe as part of JIMO is a cost effective way to address fundamental science questions identified in the National Research Council Solar System Exploration Decadal Survey (SSEDS): New Frontiers in the Solar System, An Integrated Ex- ploration Strategy. Compared to either the cost of an entirely separate Jupiter mission, or the cost of JIMO itself, inclusion of such a probe on JIMO would be cost advantageous. The probe itself could be relatively simple, and could build on the Galileo Probe heritage. The SSEDS specifically identified the distribution of water across the Solar System as a Key Scientific Question. Correspondingly, knowing the water abun dance on Jupiter is fundamental to understanding almost every aspect of the evolution of the early solar nebula. The Galileo Probe obtained the abundance of several key elements in Jupiter's atmosphere, which data have already caused major rethinking of theories of how Jupiter formed and how the early solar nebula evolved. However, because of a combination of circumstances, the global abundance of the key element oxygen, in the form of water, was not obtained. Without knowledge of the jovian water abundance, further progress in understanding Solar System evolution and planet formation will be greatly inhibited. Therefore, quantifying jovian water abundance should be a goal of the very next mission to the jovian system. Such a measurement would be impossible via remote sensing from the JIMO orbiter because of the large distances the JIMO orbiter maintains from Jupiter. A Jupiter atmospheric entry probe as part of JIMO could achieve the fundamental water measurement. In order that a probe avoid repeating the Galileo probe's experience of failing to obtain the jovian water abundance, the probe should go deep, to at least 100 bars pressure. Probes to 100 bars have been accomplished many times in descending to the surface of Venus, and at 100 bars the temperature of the jovian atmosphere is 60

  13. Flexible high-temperature pH probe

    DOEpatents

    Bielawski, John C.; Outwater, John O.; Halbfinger, George P.

    2003-04-22

    A flexible pH probe device is provided for use in hot water and other high temperature environments up to about 590.degree. F. The pH probe includes a flexible, inert tubular probe member, an oxygen anion conducting, solid state electrolyte plug located at the distal end of the tubular member, oxide powder disposed at the distal end of the tubular member; a metal wire extending along the tubular member and having a distal end in contact with the oxide powder so as to form therewith an internal reference electrode; and a compression fitting forming a pressure boundary seal around a portion of the tubular member remote from the distal end thereof. Preferably, the tubular member is made of polytetrafluoroethylene, and the solid state electrolyte plug is made of stabilized zirconia. The flexibility of the probe member enables placement of the electrode into the area of interest, including around corners, into confined areas and the like.

  14. Double Langmuir probe diagnostic of a resonant cavity microwave discharge

    SciTech Connect

    McColl, W.; Brooks, C.; Brake, M.L. )

    1993-07-01

    An Asmussen resonant cavity operating at 2.45 GHz provides the basis for the application of probe theory to a microwave discharge. A double Langmuir probe is inserted into a discharge produced by a microwave resonant cavity. Typical operating pressures range from 0.5 to 50 Torr in helium, with continuous wave microwave powers ranging from 60 to 120 W at 2.45 GHz. Typical probe data indicates electron densities in the range of 10[sup 11]--10[sup 12] cm[sup [minus]3] with electron temperatures of 5 to 20 eV. The probe data is compared with the results of a model based upon the electromagnetics of the discharge.

  15. Embrittlement of RPV steels; An atom probe tomography perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K; Russell, Kaye F

    2007-01-01

    Atom probe tomography has played a key role in the understanding of the embrittlement of neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels through the atomic level characterization of the microstructure. Atom probe tomography has been used to demonstrate the importance of the post weld stress relief treatment in reducing the matrix copper content in high copper alloys, the formation of {approx}-nm-diameter copper-, nickel-, manganese- and silicon-enriched precipitates during neutron irradiation in copper containing RPV steels, and the coarsening of these precipitates during post irradiation heat treatments. Atom probe tomography has been used to detect {approx}2-nm-diameter nickel-, silicon- and manganese-enriched clusters in neutron irradiated low copper and copper free alloys. Atom probe tomography has also been used to quantify solute segregation to, and precipitation on, dislocations and grain boundaries.

  16. PROcess Based Diagnostics PROBE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clune, T.; Schmidt, G.; Kuo, K.; Bauer, M.; Oloso, H.

    2013-01-01

    Many of the aspects of the climate system that are of the greatest interest (e.g., the sensitivity of the system to external forcings) are emergent properties that arise via the complex interplay between disparate processes. This is also true for climate models most diagnostics are not a function of an isolated portion of source code, but rather are affected by multiple components and procedures. Thus any model-observation mismatch is hard to attribute to any specific piece of code or imperfection in a specific model assumption. An alternative approach is to identify diagnostics that are more closely tied to specific processes -- implying that if a mismatch is found, it should be much easier to identify and address specific algorithmic choices that will improve the simulation. However, this approach requires looking at model output and observational data in a more sophisticated way than the more traditional production of monthly or annual mean quantities. The data must instead be filtered in time and space for examples of the specific process being targeted.We are developing a data analysis environment called PROcess-Based Explorer (PROBE) that seeks to enable efficient and systematic computation of process-based diagnostics on very large sets of data. In this environment, investigators can define arbitrarily complex filters and then seamlessly perform computations in parallel on the filtered output from their model. The same analysis can be performed on additional related data sets (e.g., reanalyses) thereby enabling routine comparisons between model and observational data. PROBE also incorporates workflow technology to automatically update computed diagnostics for subsequent executions of a model. In this presentation, we will discuss the design and current status of PROBE as well as share results from some preliminary use cases.

  17. Experimental probes of axions

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Aaron S.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    Experimental searches for axions or axion-like particles rely on semiclassical phenomena resulting from the postulated coupling of the axion to two photons. Sensitive probes of the extremely small coupling constant can be made by exploiting familiar, coherent electromagnetic laboratory techniques, including resonant enhancement of transitions using microwave and optical cavities, Bragg scattering, and coherent photon-axion oscillations. The axion beam may either be astrophysical in origin as in the case of dark matter axion searches and solar axion searches, or created in the laboratory from laser interactions with magnetic fields. This note is meant to be a sampling of recent experimental results.

  18. Vacuum probe surface sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahlava, B. A. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A vacuum probe surface sampler is described for rapidly sampling relatively large surface areas which possess relatively light loading densities of micro-organism, drug particles or the like. A vacuum head with a hollow handle connected to a suitable vacuum source is frictionally attached to a cone assembly terminating in a flared tip adapted to be passed over the surface to be sampled. A fine mesh screen carried by the vacuum head provides support for a membrane filter which collects the microorganisms or other particles. The head assembly is easily removed from the cone assembly without contacting the cone assembly with human hands.

  19. A new algorithm for five-hole probe calibration, data reduction, and uncertainty analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichert, Bruce A.; Wendt, Bruce J.

    1994-01-01

    A new algorithm for five-hole probe calibration and data reduction using a non-nulling method is developed. The significant features of the algorithm are: (1) two components of the unit vector in the flow direction replace pitch and yaw angles as flow direction variables; and (2) symmetry rules are developed that greatly simplify Taylor's series representations of the calibration data. In data reduction, four pressure coefficients allow total pressure, static pressure, and flow direction to be calculated directly. The new algorithm's simplicity permits an analytical treatment of the propagation of uncertainty in five-hole probe measurement. The objectives of the uncertainty analysis are to quantify uncertainty of five-hole results (e.g., total pressure, static pressure, and flow direction) and determine the dependence of the result uncertainty on the uncertainty of all underlying experimental and calibration measurands. This study outlines a general procedure that other researchers may use to determine five-hole probe result uncertainty and provides guidance to improve measurement technique. The new algorithm is applied to calibrate and reduce data from a rake of five-hole probes. Here, ten individual probes are mounted on a single probe shaft and used simultaneously. Use of this probe is made practical by the simplicity afforded by this algorithm.

  20. Flight calibration of compensated and uncompensated pitot-static airspeed probes and application of the probes to supersonic cruise vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, L. D.; Washington, H. P.

    1972-01-01

    Static pressure position error calibrations for a compensated and an uncompensated XB-70 nose boom pitot static probe were obtained in flight. The methods (Pacer, acceleration-deceleration, and total temperature) used to obtain the position errors over a Mach number range from 0.5 to 3.0 and an altitude range from 25,000 feet to 70,000 feet are discussed. The error calibrations are compared with the position error determined from wind tunnel tests, theoretical analysis, and a standard NACA pitot static probe. Factors which influence position errors, such as angle of attack, Reynolds number, probe tip geometry, static orifice location, and probe shape, are discussed. Also included are examples showing how the uncertainties caused by position errors can affect the inlet controls and vertical altitude separation of a supersonic transport.

  1. Probing the Release of Shocked Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polsin, D. N.; Boehly, T. R.; Ivancic, S.; Gregor, M. C.; McCoy, C. A.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Celliers, P. M.

    2015-11-01

    The behavior of shocked material as it releases to lower pressures is important for equation-of-state experiments and inertial confinement fusion research. We present results of experiments that used a 10-ps, 263-nm probe beam to image the release plumes of various target material shocked to multi-megabar pressures by the OMEGA EP laser. One-dimensional streaked x-ray radiography also provided a time-resolved trajectory of the release wave. Simultaneous VISAR (velocity interferometer system for any reflector) measurements provide the initial shocked state from which these materials release. Models for the optical properties of the released material is presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  2. Probing magnons with RIXS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ament, Lucas; Ghiringhelli, Giacomo; Moretti Sala, Marco; Braicovich, Lucio; van den Brink, Jeroen

    2010-03-01

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) at the copper L and M edge can probe single spin-flips, which makes it possible to probe the dispersion of magnetic excitations (for instance magnons) of cuprates such as the high Tc superconductors [1]. The cross section factors into a local, atomic spin flip scattering amplitude and a momentum dependent factor describing the final state excitation. Recently, the single magnon dispersion has been measured and found to coincide with earlier neutron measurements [2]. For the cuprates, these results put RIXS as a technique on the same footing as neutron scattering, opening a new window for experiments on this class of materials. [1] L.J.P. Ament, G. Ghiringhelli, M. Moretti Sala, L. Braicovich, and J. van den Brink, PRL 103, 117003 (2009) [2] L. Braicovich, J. van den Brink, V. Bisogni, M. Moretti Sala, L.J.P. Ament, N.B. Brookes, G.M. De Luca, M. Salluzzo, T. Schmitt, and G. Ghiringhelli, arXiv:0911.0621

  3. Galileo Space Probe News Conference. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) video release presents Part 1 of a press conference regarding the successful entry of the Galileo Space Probe into Jupiter's atmosphere. The press conference panel is comprised of twelve principal investigators and project scientists that oversee the Galileo mission. Among these panelists, William J. O'Neil (Jet Propulsion Lab.) begins the video praising all of the scientists that worked on the orbiter mission. He then presents a visual overview of Galileo's overall mission trajectory and schedule. Marcie Smith (NASA Ames Research Center) then describes the Galileo Probe mission and the overall engineering and data acquisition aspects of the Probe's Jupiter atmospheric entry. Dr. Richard Young (NASA Ames Research Center) follows with a brief scientific overview, describing the measurements of the atmospheric composition as well as the instruments that were used to gather the data. Atmospheric pressure, temperature, density, and radiation levels of Jupiter were among the most important parameters measured. It is explained that these measurements would be helpful in determining among other things, the overall dynamic meteorology of Jupiter. A question and answer period follows the individual presentations. Atmospheric thermal structure, water abundances, wind profiles, radiation, cloud structure, chemical composition, and electricity are among the topics discussed. Parts 2 and 3 of the press conference can be found in document numbers NONP-NASA-VT-2000001074, and NONP-NASA-VT-2000001075.

  4. Claw grip contact probe for flat packs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, J. W., Jr.

    1985-09-01

    A probe device including a unitary body 2 and a sliding plate means 44 for testing and diagnosing multi-lead electrical flat packs. The sliding plate means contains two sets of holes 52 into which are inserted spring-loaded electrical contact probes for making contact with the leads of the electrical flat pack. The unitary body 2 includes comb teeth for orienting the unitary body over the leads of the electrical flat pack, as well as gripping means having hook ends for securely fastening the probe device to the electrical flat pack being tested or diagnosed. The gripping means include an outwardly flared portion against which the sliding plate means exerts inward lateral pressure causing the hook ends to grip underneath the electrical flat pack at each corner thereof to securely clamp it in place. Included in unitary body 2 is at least one threaded hole which is sufficiently large to allow a size 4 to 40 machine screw to pass therethrough.

  5. Monitoring the impact of pressure on the assessment of skin perfusion and oxygenation using a novel pressure device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.; Ho, Thuan; Le, Du; Ghassemi, Pejhman; Nguyen, Thu; Lichy, Alison; Groah, Suzanne

    2013-03-01

    Skin perfusion and oxygenation is easily disrupted by imposed pressure. Fiber optics probes, particularly those spectroscopy or Doppler based, may relay misleading information about tissue microcirculation dynamics depending on external forces on the sensor. Such forces could be caused by something as simple as tape used to secure the fiber probe to the test subject, or as in our studies by the full weight of a patient with spinal cord injury (SCI) sitting on the probe. We are conducting a study on patients with SCI conducting pressure relief maneuvers in their wheelchairs. This study aims to provide experimental evidence of the optimal timing between pressure relief maneuvers. We have devised a wireless pressure-controlling device; a pressure sensor positioned on a compression aluminum plate reads the imposed pressure in real time and sends the information to a feedback system controlling two position actuators. The actuators move accordingly to maintain a preset value of pressure onto the sample. This apparatus was used to monitor the effect of increasing values of pressure on spectroscopic fiber probes built to monitor tissue oxygenation and Doppler probes used to assess tissue perfusion.

  6. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version High Blood Pressure Overview What is blood pressure? Blood pressure is the amount of force that your ... called your blood pressure. What is high blood pressure? High blood pressure (also called hypertension) occurs when your blood ...

  7. Development and Application of Multiple-Probe Scanning Probe Microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, T.; Kubo, O.; Shingaya, Y.; Higuchi, S.; Hasegawa, T.; Jiang, C. S.; Okuda, T.; Kuwahara, Y.; Takami, K.; Aono, M.

    2012-04-03

    the research of advanced materials based on nanoscience and nanotechnology, it is often desirable to measure nanoscale local electrical conductivity at a designated position of a given sample. For this purpose, multiple-probe scanning probe microscopes (MP-SPMs), in which two, three or four scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or atomic force microscope (AFM) probes are operated independently, have been developed. Each probe in an MP-SPM is used not only for observing high-resolution STM or AFM images but also for forming an electrical contact enabling nanoscale local electrical conductivity measurement. The world's first double-probe STM (DP-STM) developed by the authors, which was subsequently modified to a triple-probe STM (TP-STM), has been used to measure the conductivities of one-dimensional metal nanowires and carbon nanotubes and also two-dimensional molecular films. A quadruple-probe STM (QP-STM) has also been developed and used to measure the conductivity of two-dimensional molecular films without the ambiguity of contact resistance between the probe and sample. Moreover, a quadruple-probe AFM (QP-AFM) with four conductive tuning-fork-type self-detection force sensing probes has been developed to measure the conductivity of a nanostructure on an insulating substrate. A general-purpose computer software to control four probes at the same time has also been developed and used in the operation of the QP-AFM. These developments and applications of MP-SPMs are reviewed in this paper.

  8. Theory and calibration of non-nulling seven-hole cone probes for use in complex flow measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, K. N.; Durston, D. A.; Gerner, A. A.

    1982-01-01

    A seven-hole conical pressure probe capable of measuring flow conditions at angles up to 75 deg relative to its axis is described. The theoretical rationale of the seven-hole probe is developed and the calibration procedure outlined. Three-variable third order polynomials are used to represent local values of total pressure, static pressure, Mach number and relative flow angles. These flow conditions can be determined explicitly from measured probe pressures. Flow angles may be determined within 2.5 deg and Mach number within 0.05 with 95% certainty. The probe was calibrated in subsonic compressible and incompressible flows. Results of a calibration of four seven-hole probes are presented.

  9. Variable path length spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    O'Rourke, Patrick E.; McCarty, Jerry E.; Haggard, Ricky A.

    1992-01-01

    A compact, variable pathlength, fiber optic probe for spectrophotometric measurements of fluids in situ. The probe comprises a probe body with a shaft having a polished end penetrating one side of the probe, a pair of optic fibers, parallel and coterminous, entering the probe opposite the reflecting shaft, and a collimating lens to direct light from one of the fibers to the reflecting surface of the shaft and to direct the reflected light to the second optic fiber. The probe body has an inlet and an outlet port to allow the liquid to enter the probe body and pass between the lens and the reflecting surface of the shaft. A linear stepper motor is connected to the shaft to cause the shaft to advance toward or away from the lens in increments so that absorption measurements can be made at each of the incremental steps. The shaft is sealed to the probe body by a bellows seal to allow freedom of movement of the shaft and yet avoid leakage from the interior of the probe.

  10. Understanding of Jupiter's Atmosphere After the Galileo Probe Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Richard E.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Instruments on the Galileo probe measured composition, cloud properties, thermal structure. winds, radiative energy balance, and electrical properties of the Jovian atmosphere. As expected the probe results confirm some expectations about Jupiter's atmosphere, refute others, and raise new questions which still remain unanswered. This talk will concentrate on those aspects of the probe observations which either raised new questions or remain unresolved. The Galileo probe observations of composition and clouds provided some of the biggest surprises of the mission. Helium abundance measured by the probe differed significantly from the remote sensing derivations from Voyager. discrepancy between the Voyager helium abundance determinations for Jupiter and the Galileo probe value have now led to a considerably increased helium determination for Saturn. Global abundance of N in the form of ammonia was observed to be supersolar by approximately the same factor as carbon, in contrast to expectations that C/N would be significantly larger than solar. This has implications for the formation and evolution of Jupiter. The cloud structure was not what was generally anticipated, even though most previous remote sensing results below the uppermost cloud referred to 5 micron hot spots, local regions with reduced cloud opacity. The Galileo probe descended in one of these hot spots. Only a tenuous, presumed ammonium hydrosulfide, cloud was detected, and no significant water cloud or super-solar water abundance was measured. The mixing ratios as a function of depth for the condensibles ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, and water, exhibited no apparent correlation with either condensation levels or with each other, an observation that is still a puzzle, although there are now dynamical models of hot spots which show promise in being able to explain such behavior. Probe tracked zonal winds show that wind magnitude increases with depth to pressures of about 4 bars, with the winds extending to

  11. Understanding of Jupiter's Atmosphere after the Galileo Probe Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor); Young, Richard E.

    2003-01-01

    Instruments on the Galileo probe measured composition, cloud properties, thermal structure, winds, radiative energy balance, and electrical properties of the Jovian atmosphere. As expected the probe results confirm some expectations about Jupiter's atmosphere, refute others, and raise new questions which still remain unanswered. This talk will concentrate on those aspects of the probe observations which either raised new questions or remain unresolved. The Galileo probe observations of composition and clouds provided some of the biggest surprises of the mission. Helium abundance measured by the probe differed significantly from the remote sensing derivations from Voyager. Discrepancy between the Voyager helium abundance determinations for Jupiter and the Galileo probe value have now led to a considerably increased helium determination for Saturn. Global abundance of N in the form of ammonia was observed to be super-solar by approximately the same factor as carbon, in contrast to expectations that C/N would be significantly larger than solar. This has implications for the formation and evolution of Jupiter. The cloud structure was not what was generally anticipated, even though most previous remote sensing results below the uppermost cloud referred to 5 micron hot spots, local regions with reduced cloud opacity. The Galileo probe descended in one of these hot spots. Only a tenuous, presumed ammomium hydrosulfide, cloud was detected, and no significant water cloud or super-solar water abundance was measured. The mixing ratios as a function of depth for the condensibles ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, and water, exhibited no apparent correlation with either condensation levels or with each other, an observation that is still a puzzle, although there are now dynamical models of hot spots which show promise in being able to explain such behavior. Probe tracked zonal winds show that wind magnitude increases with depth to pressures of about 4 bars, with the winds extending to

  12. Pump and probe spectroscopy with continuous wave quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkbride, James M. R.; Causier, Sarah K.; Dalton, Andrew R.; Ritchie, Grant A. D.; Weidmann, Damien

    2014-02-07

    This paper details infra-red pump and probe studies on nitric oxide conducted with two continuous wave quantum cascade lasers both operating around 5 μm. The pump laser prepares a velocity selected population in a chosen rotational quantum state of the v = 1 level which is subsequently probed using a second laser tuned to a rotational transition within the v = 2 ← v = 1 hot band. The rapid frequency scan of the probe (with respect to the molecular collision rate) in combination with the velocity selective pumping allows observation of marked rapid passage signatures in the transient absorption profiles from the polarized vibrationally excited sample. These coherent transient signals are influenced by the underlying hyperfine structure of the pump and probe transitions, the sample pressure, and the coherent properties of the lasers. Pulsed pump and probe studies show that the transient absorption signals decay within 1 μs at 50 mTorr total pressure, reflecting both the polarization and population dephasing times of the vibrationally excited sample. The experimental observations are supported by simulation based upon solving the optical Bloch equations for a two level system.

  13. Analysis of cylindrical Langmuir probe using experiment and different theories

    SciTech Connect

    Hassouba, M. A.; Galaly, A. R.; Rashed, U. M.

    2013-03-15

    Cylindrical probe data have been analyzed using different theories in order to determine some plasma parameters (electron temperature and electron and ion densities). Langmuir probe data are obtained in a cylindrical DC glow discharge in the positive column plasma at argon gas pressures varied from 0.5 to 6 Torr and at constant discharge current equal to 10 mA. The electron density has calculated from the electron current at the space potential and from Orbital Motion Limited (OML) collisionless theory. Ion density has obtained from the OML analysis of the ion saturation currents. In addition, the electron temperature has measured by three different methods using probe and electrons currents. The electron temperature T{sub e}, plasma density n{sub e}, and space potential V{sub s}, have been obtained from the measured single cylindrical probe I-V characteristic curves. The radial distribution of the electron temperature and plasma density along the glow discharge are measured and discussed. Using the collisionless theories by Langmuir cylindrical probe and up to several Torr argon gas pressures the differences between the values of electron temperature and electron and ion densities stay within reasonable error limits.

  14. Heat transfer probe

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Jeffrey I.; Rosengart, Axel J.; Kasza, Ken; Yu, Wenhua; Chien, Tai-Hsin; Franklin, Jeff

    2006-10-10

    Apparatuses, systems, methods, and computer code for, among other things, monitoring the health of samples such as the brain while providing local cooling or heating. A representative device is a heat transfer probe, which includes an inner channel, a tip, a concentric outer channel, a first temperature sensor, and a second temperature sensor. The inner channel is configured to transport working fluid from an inner inlet to an inner outlet. The tip is configured to receive at least a portion of the working fluid from the inner outlet. The concentric outer channel is configured to transport the working fluid from the inner outlet to an outer outlet. The first temperature sensor is coupled to the tip, and the second temperature sensor spaced apart from the first temperature sensor.

  15. Solar Probe Plus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, Adam

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Solar Probe Plus mission is planned to be launched in 2018 to study the upper solar corona with both.in-situ and remote sensing instrumentation. The mission will utilize 6 Venus gravity assist maneuver to gradually lower its perihelion to 9.5 Rs below the expected Alfven pOint to study the sub-alfvenic solar wind that is still at least partially co-rotates with the Sun. The detailed science objectives of this mission will be discussed. SPP will have a strong synergy with The ESA/NASA Solar orbiter mission to be launched a year ahead. Both missions will focus on the inner heliosphere and will have complimentary instrumentations. Strategies to exploit this synergy will be also presented.

  16. New probe of naturalness.

    PubMed

    Craig, Nathaniel; Englert, Christoph; McCullough, Matthew

    2013-09-20

    Any new scalar fields that perturbatively solve the hierarchy problem by stabilizing the Higgs boson mass also generate new contributions to the Higgs boson field-strength renormalization, irrespective of their gauge representation. These new contributions are physical, and in explicit models their magnitude can be inferred from the requirement of quadratic divergence cancellation; hence, they are directly related to the resolution of the hierarchy problem. Upon canonically normalizing the Higgs field, these new contributions lead to modifications of Higgs couplings that are typically great enough that the hierarchy problem and the concept of electroweak naturalness can be probed thoroughly within a precision Higgs boson program. Specifically, at a lepton collider this can be achieved through precision measurements of the Higgs boson associated production cross section. This would lead to indirect constraints on perturbative solutions to the hierarchy problem in the broadest sense, even if the relevant new fields are gauge singlets. PMID:24093250

  17. Trapping and Probing Antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    2013-03-27

    Precision spectroscopy of antihydrogen is a promising path to sensitive tests of CPT symmetry. The most direct route to achieve this goal is to create and probe antihydrogen in a magnetic minimum trap. Antihydrogen has been synthesized and trapped for 1000s at CERN by the ALPHA Collaboration. Some of the challenges associated with achieving these milestones will be discussed, including mixing cryogenic positron and antiproton plasmas to synthesize antihydrogen with kinetic energy less than the trap potential of .5K. Recent experiments in which hyperfine transitions were resonantly induced with microwaves will be presented. The opportunity for gravitational measurements in traps based on detailed studies of antihydrogen dynamics will be described. The talk will conclude with a discussion future antihydrogen research that will use a new experimental apparatus, ALPHA-I.

  18. Nondestructive Test Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Under the Aircraft Structural Integrity program, Langley Research Center invented a device to detect fatigue cracks in aluminum alloy plates. Krautkramer Branson obtained an exclusive license and commercialized a hand-held device, the "CrackFinder," an electromagnetic probe for nondestructive evaluation, used to scan aircraft skins for surface breaks. The technology involves an eddy current, which is an electrical current induced by an alternating magnetic field. The CrackFinder also employs an innovative self-nulling feature, where the device automatically recalibrates to zero so that each flaw detected produces a reading. Compared to conventional testing systems, the CrackFinder is affordable, small, simple to use, and needs no calibration.

  19. Advanced Langmuir Probe (LP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voronka, N. R.; Block, B. P.; Carignan, G. R.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic response of the MK-2 version of the Langmuir probe amplifier was studied. The settling time of the step response is increased by: (1) stray node-to-ground capacitance at series connections between high value feedback resistors; and (2) input capacitance due to the input cable, FET switches, and input source follower. The stray node-to-ground capacitances can be reduced to tolerable levels by elevating the string of feedback resistors above the printing board. A new feedback network was considered, with promising results. The design uses resistances having much lower nominal values, thereby minimizing the effect of stray capacitances. Faster settling times can be achieved by using an operational amplifier having a higher gain-bandwidth product.

  20. Single Probes, Double Probes, and the Structure of Memory Traces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Darryl

    1980-01-01

    Memory for names was queried by single probes consisting of conceptual information about the persons or by double probes combining two single cues. Results were viewed as consistent with Jones's fragmentation hypothesis and with the general class of associative theories of memory. (Author/RD)

  1. Adaptive scanning probe microscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Swartzentruber, B.S.; Bouchard, A.M.; Osbourn, G.C.

    1997-02-01

    This work is comprised of two major sections. In the first section the authors develop multivariate image classification techniques to distinguish and identify surface electronic species directly from multiple-bias scanning tunneling microscope (STM) images. Multiple measurements at each site are used to distinguish and categorize inequivalent electronic or atomic species on the surface via a computerized classification algorithm. Then, comparison with theory or other suitably chosen experimental data enables the identification of each class. They demonstrate the technique by analyzing dual-polarity constant-current topographs of the Ge(111) surface. Just two measurements, negative- and positive-bias topography height, permit pixels to be separated into seven different classes. Labeling four of the classes as adatoms, first-layer atoms, and two inequivalent rest-atom sites, they find excellent agreement with the c(2 x 8) structure. The remaining classes are associated with structural defects and contaminants. This work represents a first step toward developing a general electronic/chemical classification and identification tool for multivariate scanning probe microscopy imagery. In the second section they report measurements of the diffusion of Si dimers on the Si(001) surface at temperatures between room temperature and 128 C using a novel atom-tracking technique that can resolve every diffusion event. The atom tracker employs lateral-positioning feedback to lock the STM probe tip into position above selected atoms with sub-Angstrom precision. Once locked the STM tracks the position of the atoms as they migrate over the crystal surface. By tracking individual atoms directly, the ability of the instrument to measure dynamic events is increased by a factor of {approximately} 1,000 over conventional STM imaging techniques.

  2. Work on Planetary Atmospheres and Planetary Atmosphere Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, Peter

    1999-01-01

    A summary final report of work accomplished is presented. Work was performed in the following areas: (1) Galileo Probe science analysis, (2) Galileo probe Atmosphere Structure Instrument, (3) Mars Pathfinder Atmosphere Structure/Meteorology instrument, (4) Mars Pathfinder data analysis, (5) Science Definition for future Mars missions, (6) Viking Lander data analysis, (7) winds in Mars atmosphere Venus atmospheric dynamics, (8) Pioneer Venus Probe data analysis, (9) Pioneer Venus anomaly analysis, (10) Discovery Venus Probe Titan probe instrument design, and (11) laboratory studies of Titan probe impact phenomena. The work has resulted in more than 10 articles published in archive journals, 2 encyclopedia articles, and many working papers. This final report is organized around the four planets on which there was activity, Jupiter, Mars, Venus, and Titan, with a closing section on Miscellaneous Activities. A major objective was to complete the fabrication, test, and evaluation of the atmosphere structure experiment on the Galileo probe, and to receive, analyze and interpret data received from the spacecraft. The instrument was launched on April 14, 1989. Calibration data were taken for all experiment sensors. The data were analyzed, fitted with algorithms, and summarized in a calibration report for use in analyzing and interpreting data returned from Jupiter's atmosphere. The sensors included were the primary science pressure, temperature and acceleration sensors, and the supporting engineering temperature sensors. Computer programs were written to decode the Experiment Data Record and convert the digital numbers to physical quantities, i.e., temperatures, pressures, and accelerations. The project office agreed to obtain telemetry of checkout data from the probe. Work to extend programs written for use on the Pioneer Venus project included: (1) massive heat shield ablation leading to important mass loss during entry; and (2) rapid planet rotation, which introduced

  3. Characterization of Pressure Distribution in Penetrating Traumatic Brain Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Davidsson, Johan; Risling, Mårten

    2015-01-01

    Severe impacts to the head commonly lead to localized brain damage. Such impacts may also give rise to temporary pressure changes that produce secondary injuries in brain volumes distal to the impact site. Monitoring pressure changes in a clinical setting is difficult; detailed studies into the effect of pressure changes in the brain call for the development and use of animal models. The aim of this study is to characterize the pressure distribution in an animal model of penetrating traumatic brain injuries (pTBI). This data may be used to validate mathematical models of the animal model and to facilitate correlation studies between pressure changes and pathology. Pressure changes were measured in rat brains while subjected to pTBI for a variety of different probe velocities and shapes; pointy, blunt, and flat. Experiments on ballistic gel samples were carried out to study the formation of any temporary cavities. In addition, pressure recordings from the gel experiments were compared to values recorded in the animal experiments. The pTBI generated short lasting pressure changes in the brain tissue; the pressure in the contralateral ventricle (CLV) increased to 8 bar followed by a drop to 0.4 bar when applying flat probes. The pressure changes in the periphery of the probe, in the Cisterna Magna, and the spinal canal, were significantly less than those recorded in the CLV or the vicinity of the skull base. High-speed videos of the gel samples revealed the formation of spherically shaped cavities when flat and spherical probes were applied. Pressure changes in the gel were similar to those recorded in the animals, although amplitudes were lower in the gel samples. We concluded cavity expansion rate rather than cavity size correlated with pressure changes in the gel or brain secondary to probe impact. The new data can serve as validation data for finite element models of the trauma model and the animal and to correlate physical measurements with secondary injuries

  4. Characterization of pressure distribution in penetrating traumatic brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Davidsson, Johan; Risling, Mårten

    2015-01-01

    Severe impacts to the head commonly lead to localized brain damage. Such impacts may also give rise to temporary pressure changes that produce secondary injuries in brain volumes distal to the impact site. Monitoring pressure changes in a clinical setting is difficult; detailed studies into the effect of pressure changes in the brain call for the development and use of animal models. The aim of this study is to characterize the pressure distribution in an animal model of penetrating traumatic brain injuries (pTBI). This data may be used to validate mathematical models of the animal model and to facilitate correlation studies between pressure changes and pathology. Pressure changes were measured in rat brains while subjected to pTBI for a variety of different probe velocities and shapes; pointy, blunt, and flat. Experiments on ballistic gel samples were carried out to study the formation of any temporary cavities. In addition, pressure recordings from the gel experiments were compared to values recorded in the animal experiments. The pTBI generated short lasting pressure changes in the brain tissue; the pressure in the contralateral ventricle (CLV) increased to 8 bar followed by a drop to 0.4 bar when applying flat probes. The pressure changes in the periphery of the probe, in the Cisterna Magna, and the spinal canal, were significantly less than those recorded in the CLV or the vicinity of the skull base. High-speed videos of the gel samples revealed the formation of spherically shaped cavities when flat and spherical probes were applied. Pressure changes in the gel were similar to those recorded in the animals, although amplitudes were lower in the gel samples. We concluded cavity expansion rate rather than cavity size correlated with pressure changes in the gel or brain secondary to probe impact. The new data can serve as validation data for finite element models of the trauma model and the animal and to correlate physical measurements with secondary injuries

  5. Development of Simple Designs of Multitip Probe Diagnostic Systems for RF Plasma Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Naz, M. Y.; Shukrullah, S.; Ghaffar, A.; Rehman, N. U.

    2014-01-01

    Multitip probes are very useful diagnostics for analyzing and controlling the physical phenomena occurring in low temperature discharge plasmas. However, DC biased probes often fail to perform well in processing plasmas. The objective of the work was to deduce simple designs of DC biased multitip probes for parametric study of radio frequency plasmas. For this purpose, symmetric double probe, asymmetric double probe, and symmetric triple probe diagnostic systems and their driving circuits were designed and tested in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) generated by a 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF) source. Using I-V characteristics of these probes, electron temperature, electron number density, and ion saturation current was measured as a function of input power and filling gas pressure. An increasing trend was noticed in electron temperature and electron number density for increasing input RF power whilst a decreasing trend was evident in these parameters when measured against filling gas pressure. In addition, the electron energy probability function (EEPF) was also studied by using an asymmetric double probe. These studies confirmed the non-Maxwellian nature of the EEPF and the presence of two groups of the energetic electrons at low filling gas pressures. PMID:24683326

  6. Development of simple designs of multitip probe diagnostic systems for RF plasma characterization.

    PubMed

    Naz, M Y; Shukrullah, S; Ghaffar, A; Rehman, N U

    2014-01-01

    Multitip probes are very useful diagnostics for analyzing and controlling the physical phenomena occurring in low temperature discharge plasmas. However, DC biased probes often fail to perform well in processing plasmas. The objective of the work was to deduce simple designs of DC biased multitip probes for parametric study of radio frequency plasmas. For this purpose, symmetric double probe, asymmetric double probe, and symmetric triple probe diagnostic systems and their driving circuits were designed and tested in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) generated by a 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF) source. Using I-V characteristics of these probes, electron temperature, electron number density, and ion saturation current was measured as a function of input power and filling gas pressure. An increasing trend was noticed in electron temperature and electron number density for increasing input RF power whilst a decreasing trend was evident in these parameters when measured against filling gas pressure. In addition, the electron energy probability function (EEPF) was also studied by using an asymmetric double probe. These studies confirmed the non-Maxwellian nature of the EEPF and the presence of two groups of the energetic electrons at low filling gas pressures. PMID:24683326

  7. Total pressure averaging in pulsating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. N.; Dudzinski, T. J.; Johnson, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    A number of total-pressure tubes were tested in a non-steady flow generator in which the fraction of period that pressure is a maximum is approximately 0.8, thereby simulating turbomachine-type flow conditions. Most of the tubes indicated a pressure which was higher than the true average. Organ-pipe resonance which further increased the indicated pressure was encountered within the tubes at discrete frequencies. There was no obvious combination of tube diameter, length, and/or geometry variation used in the tests which resulted in negligible averaging error. A pneumatic-type probe was found to measure true average pressure, and is suggested as a comparison instrument to determine whether nonlinear averaging effects are serious in unknown pulsation profiles. The experiments were performed at a pressure level of 1 bar, for Mach number up to near 1, and frequencies up to 3 kHz.

  8. Pressure transducer

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Thomas T.; Roop, Conard J.; Schmidt, Kenneth J.; Gunchin, Elmer R.

    1989-01-01

    A pressure transducer suitable for use in high temperature environments includes two pairs of induction coils, each pair being bifilarly wound together, and each pair of coils connected as opposite arms of a four arm circuit; an electrically conductive target moveably positioned between the coil pairs and connected to a diaphragm such that deflection of the diaphragm causes axial movement of the target and an unbalance in the bridge output.

  9. Pressure transducer

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, T.T.; Roop, C.J.; Schmidt, K.J.; Gunchin, E.R.

    1987-02-13

    A pressure transducer suitable for use in high temperature environments includes two pairs of induction coils, each pair being bifilarly wound together, and each pair of coils connected as opposite arms of a four arm circuit; an electrically conductive target moveably positioned between the coil pairs and connected to a diaphragm such that deflection of the diaphragm causes axial movement of the target and an unbalance in the bridge output. 7 figs.

  10. How does a probe inserted into the discharge influence the plasma structure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, D.; Lishev, St.; Shivarova, A.

    2016-05-01

    Shielding the bias applied to the probe by the sheath formed around it and determination of parameters of unperturbed plasmas are in the basis of the probe diagnostics. The results from a two-dimensional model of a discharge with a probe inserted in it show that the probe influences the spatial distribution of the plasma parameters in the entire discharge. The increase (although slight) in the electron temperature, due to the increased losses of charged particles on the additional wall in the discharge (mainly the probe holder), leads to redistribution of the plasma density and plasma potential, as shown by the results obtained at the floating potential of the probe. The deviations due to the bias applied to the probe tip are stronger in the ion saturation region of the probe characteristics. The pattern of the spatial redistribution of the plasma parameters advances together with the movement of the probe deeper in the discharge. Although probe sheaths and probe characteristics resulting from the model are shown, the study does not aim at discussions on the theories for determination of the plasma density from the ion saturation current. Regardless of the modifications in the plasma behavior in the entire discharge, the deviations of the plasma parameters at the position of the probe tip and, respectively, the uncertainty which should be added as an error when the accuracy of the probe diagnostics is estimated do not exceed 10%. Consequently, the electron density and temperature obtained, respectively, at the position of the plasma potential on the probe characteristics and from its transition region are in reasonable agreement with the results from the model of the discharge without a probe. Being in the scope of research on a source of negative hydrogen ions with the design of a matrix of small radius inductive discharges, the model is specified for a low-pressure hydrogen discharge sustained in a small-radius tube.

  11. Magnetic circuitry mutual coupling probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, P. L.

    1972-01-01

    Development of magnetic probe for nondestructive testing of multilayer printed circuit boards to determine existence of opens or shorts is reported. Components of probe are described and procedures for operation are discussed. Two illustrations are provided to show magnetic circuits and principles of operation.

  12. Synergy Between probes and Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Richard E.

    2005-01-01

    There are many ways in which the science return from a planetary mission is considerably enhanced by interactions between entry probes and a mission orbiter. Mission configuration aspects that are desirable include delivery of entry probes by the orbiter, and communication between probe and orbiter. Both of these mission aspects could greatly enhance access to key scientific sites that might not otherwise be accessible using delivery from say, a flyby, or employing direct communication from probes to Earth. Examples for Venus and Jupiter will be discussed. A second class of orbiter-probe interaction could better be termed direct probe-orbiter science collaboration. That would include, determining the global context of the entry probe sites from the orbiter, obtaining ground truth from the probe for remote sensing observations from the orbiter, observing the global and vertical distribution of key atmospheric trace species, and measuring the global and vertical distribution of clouds and winds. The importance of each of these items will be illustrated by particular examples.

  13. Time-resolved measurement of plasma parameters by means of triple probe.

    PubMed

    Qayyum, A; Ahmad, N; Ahmad, S; Deeba, Farah; Ali, Rafaqat; Hussain, S

    2013-12-01

    Triple Langmuir probe (TLP) diagnostic system with its necessary driving circuit is developed and successfully applies for time-resolved measurement of plasma parameters in the negative glow region of pulsating-dc discharge. This technique allows the instantaneous measurement of electron temperature [T_], electron number density [n_] as well as plasma fluctuations without any voltage or frequency sweep. In TLP configuration two probes are differentially biased and serve as a floating symmetric double probe whereas the third probe is simply floating into plasma to measure floating potential as a function of time and thus incorporates the effect of plasma fluctuations. As an example of the application to time-dependent plasmas, basic plasma parameters such as floating potential, electron temperature, and electron number density in low pressure air discharge are determined as a function of time for different fill pressure. The results demonstrate temporal evolution of plasma parameters and thus plasma generation progression for different fill pressures. PMID:24387429

  14. FRET study of G-quadruplex forming fluorescent oligonucleotide probes at the lipid monolayer interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiatkowska, Angelika; Kosman, Joanna; Juskowiak, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Spectral properties and G-quadruplex folding ability of fluorescent oligonucleotide probes at the cationic dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB) monolayer interface are reported. Two oligonucleotides, a 19-mer bearing thrombin binding aptamer sequence and a 21-mer with human telomeric sequence, were end-labeled with fluorescent groups (FAM and TAMRA) to give FRET probes F19T and F21T, respectively. The probes exhibited abilities to fold into a quadruplex structure and to bind metal cations (Na+ and K+). Fluorescence spectra of G-quadruplex FRET probes at the monolayer interface are reported for the first time. Investigations included film balance measurements (π-A isotherms) and fluorescence spectra recording using a fiber optic accessory interfaced with a spectrofluorimeter. The effect of the presence of DODAB monolayer, metal cations and the surface pressure of monolayer on spectral behavior of FRET probes were examined. Adsorption of probe at the cationic monolayer interface resulted in the FRET signal enhancement even in the absence of metal cations. Variation in the monolayer surface pressure exerted rather modest effect on the spectral properties of probes. The fluorescence energy transfer efficiency of monolayer adsorbed probes increased significantly in the presence of sodium or potassium ion in subphase, which indicated that the probes retained their cation binding properties when adsorbed at the monolayer interface.

  15. Electrophoresis-mass spectrometry probe

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, B.D.; Fought, E.R.

    1987-11-10

    The invention involves a new technique for the separation of complex mixtures of chemicals, which utilizes a unique interface probe for conventional mass spectrometers which allows the electrophoretically separated compounds to be analyzed in real-time by a mass spectrometer. This new chemical analysis interface, which couples electrophoresis with mass spectrometry, allows complex mixtures to be analyzed very rapidly, with much greater specificity, and with greater sensitivity. The interface or probe provides a means whereby large and/or polar molecules in complex mixtures to be completely characterized. The preferred embodiment of the probe utilizes a double capillary tip which allows the probe tip to be continually wetted by the buffer, which provides for increased heat dissipation, and results in a continually operating interface which is more durable and electronically stable than the illustrated single capillary tip probe interface. 8 figs.

  16. Electrophoresis-mass spectrometry probe

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Fought, Eric R.

    1987-01-01

    The invention involves a new technique for the separation of complex mixtures of chemicals, which utilizes a unique interface probe for conventional mass spectrometers which allows the electrophoretically separated compounds to be analyzed in real-time by a mass spectrometer. This new chemical analysis interface, which couples electrophoresis with mass spectrometry, allows complex mixtures to be analyzed very rapidly, with much greater specificity, and with greater sensitivity. The interface or probe provides a means whereby large and/or polar molecules in complex mixtures to be completely characterized. The preferred embodiment of the probe utilizes a double capillary tip which allows the probe tip to be continually wetted by the buffer, which provides for increased heat dissipation, and results in a continually operating interface which is more durable and electronically stable than the illustrated single capillary tip probe interface.

  17. Thiol Reactive Probes and Chemosensors

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hanjing; Chen, Weixuan; Cheng, Yunfeng; Hakuna, Lovemore; Strongin, Robert; Wang, Binghe

    2012-01-01

    Thiols are important molecules in the environment and in biological processes. Cysteine (Cys), homocysteine (Hcy), glutathione (GSH) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) play critical roles in a variety of physiological and pathological processes. The selective detection of thiols using reaction-based probes and sensors is very important in basic research and in disease diagnosis. This review focuses on the design of fluorescent and colorimetric probes and sensors for thiol detection. Thiol detection methods include probes and labeling agents based on nucleophilic addition and substitution, Michael addition, disulfide bond or Se-N bond cleavage, metal-sulfur interactions and more. Probes for H2S are based on nucleophilic cyclization, reduction and metal sulfide formation. Thiol probe and chemosensor design strategies and mechanism of action are discussed in this review. PMID:23202239

  18. Rotating concave eddy current probe

    DOEpatents

    Roach, Dennis P.; Walkington, Phil; Rackow, Kirk A.; Hohman, Ed

    2008-04-01

    A rotating concave eddy current probe for detecting fatigue cracks hidden from view underneath the head of a raised head fastener, such as a buttonhead-type rivet, used to join together structural skins, such as aluminum aircraft skins. The probe has a recessed concave dimple in its bottom surface that closely conforms to the shape of the raised head. The concave dimple holds the probe in good alignment on top of the rivet while the probe is rotated around the rivet's centerline. One or more magnetic coils are rigidly embedded within the probe's cylindrical body, which is made of a non-conducting material. This design overcomes the inspection impediment associated with widely varying conductivity in fastened joints.

  19. Blood pressure measurement

    MedlinePlus

    Diastolic blood pressure; Systolic blood pressure; Blood pressure reading; Measuring blood pressure ... or your health care provider will wrap the blood pressure cuff snugly around your upper arm. The ...

  20. Blood pressure measurement

    MedlinePlus

    Diastolic blood pressure; Systolic blood pressure; Blood pressure reading; Measuring blood pressure ... your health care provider will wrap the blood pressure cuff snugly around your upper arm. The lower ...

  1. Blood Pressure Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: High Blood Pressure Blood Pressure Quiz Past Issues / Fall 2011 Table of Contents ... About High Blood Pressure / Treatment: Types of Blood Pressure Medications / Blood Pressure Quiz Fall 2011 Issue: Volume 6 Number ...

  2. Understanding Blood Pressure Readings

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Understanding Blood Pressure Readings Updated:Aug 17,2016 Blood pressure is typically ... Your doctor should evaluate unusually low blood pressure readings. How is high blood pressure diagnosed? Your healthcare ...

  3. Nanoprobe measurements of materials at megabar pressures.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Ding, Y.; Yang, W.; Liu, W.; Cai, Z.; Kung, J.; Shu, J.; Hemley, R. J.; Mao, W. L.; Mao, H.; Carnegie Inst.; National Cheng Kung Univ.; Stanford Univ.; SLAC National Accelerator Lab.

    2010-01-01

    The use of nanoscale x-ray probes overcomes several key limitations in the study of materials up to multimegabar (> 200) pressures, namely, the spatial resolution of measurements of multiple samples, stress gradients, and crystal domains in micron to submicron size samples in diamond-anvil cells. Mixtures of Fe, Pt, and W were studied up to 282 GPa with 250-600 nm size synchrotron x-ray absorption and diffraction probes. The probes readily resolve signals from individual materials, between sample and gasket, and peak pressures, in contrast to the 5-{micro}m-sized x-ray beams that are now becoming routine. The use of nanoscale x-ray beams also enables single-crystal x-ray diffraction studies in nominally polycrystalline samples at ultrahigh pressures, as demonstrated in measurements of (Mg,Fe)SiO{sub 3} postperovskite. These capabilities have potential for driving a push toward higher maximum pressures and further miniaturization of high-pressure devices, in the process advancing studies at extreme conditions.

  4. Nanoscale Hot-Wire Probes for Boundary-Layer Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedjojuwono, Ken T.; Herring, Gregory C.

    2003-01-01

    Hot-wire probes having dimensions of the order of nanometers have been proposed for measuring temperatures (and possibly velocities) in boundary-layer flows at spatial resolutions much finer and distances from walls much smaller than have been possible heretofore. The achievable resolutions and minimum distances are expected to be of the order of tens of nanometers much less than a typical mean free path of a molecule and much less than the thickness of a typical flow boundary layer in air at standard temperature and pressure. An additional benefit of the small scale of these probes is that they would perturb the measured flows less than do larger probes. The hot-wire components of the probes would likely be made from semiconducting carbon nanotubes or ropes of such nanotubes. According to one design concept, a probe would comprise a single nanotube or rope of nanotubes laid out on the surface of an insulating substrate between two metallic wires. According to another design concept, a nanotube or rope of nanotubes would be electrically connected and held a short distance away from the substrate surface by stringing it between two metal electrodes. According to a third concept, a semiconducting nanotube or rope of nanotubes would be strung between the tips of two protruding electrodes made of fully conducting nanotubes or ropes of nanotubes. The figure depicts an array of such probes that could be used to gather data at several distances from a wall. It will be necessary to develop techniques for fabricating the probes. It will also be necessary to determine whether the probes will be strong enough to withstand the aerodynamic forces and impacts of micron-sized particles entrained in typical flows of interest.

  5. Five-Hole Flow Angle Probe Calibration for the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonsalez, Jose C.; Arrington, E. Allen

    1999-01-01

    A spring 1997 test section calibration program is scheduled for the NASA Glenn Research Center Icing Research Tunnel following the installation of new water injecting spray bars. A set of new five-hole flow angle pressure probes was fabricated to properly calibrate the test section for total pressure, static pressure, and flow angle. The probes have nine pressure ports: five total pressure ports on a hemispherical head and four static pressure ports located 14.7 diameters downstream of the head. The probes were calibrated in the NASA Glenn 3.5-in.-diameter free-jet calibration facility. After completing calibration data acquisition for two probes, two data prediction models were evaluated. Prediction errors from a linear discrete model proved to be no worse than those from a full third-order multiple regression model. The linear discrete model only required calibration data acquisition according to an abridged test matrix, thus saving considerable time and financial resources over the multiple regression model that required calibration data acquisition according to a more extensive test matrix. Uncertainties in calibration coefficients and predicted values of flow angle, total pressure, static pressure. Mach number. and velocity were examined. These uncertainties consider the instrumentation that will be available in the Icing Research Tunnel for future test section calibration testing.

  6. Active Dynamic Frictional Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steimel, Joshua; Aragones, Juan; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2015-03-01

    In biological systems there are a myriad of interactions occurring instantaneously and these interactions can vary drastically in the strength of the interaction, the speed at which this interaction occurs, and the duration of the interaction. When multiple interactions occur any of these factors can determine which particular interaction is dominant. However, currently it is extremely difficult to measure binding affinity, Kon, and Koff rates in a relatively high throughput manner. Here we propose a novel and versatile system that will be able to detect differences in binding affinity of wide range of transient interactions and will be able to extract the relevant time scales of these interactions. Our system will utilize ferromagnetic particles that can be easily functionalized with a receptor of interest and the substrate will be coated in the corresponding ligand. A rotating magnetic field will cause particles, henceforth referred to as rollers, to rotate and this rotational motion will be converted into translational motion via the effective frictional force induced by interaction that is being probed. By measuring the translation of the rollers to a baseline, where only hydrodynamic friction occurs, we can measure the relative strength of the interactions. We can also potentially measure kinetic information by changing the frequency at which the magnetic field rotates, since changing the frequency at which the bead rotates is akin to changing the time allowed for bond formation. We will measure a wide range of interaction including ionic, metal-ion coordination, IgG-Protein A complex, and biotin-streptavidin complex.

  7. Gravity Probe B Encapsulated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In this photo, the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) space vehicle is being encapsulated atop the Delta II launch vehicle. The GP-B is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Launched April 20, 2004 , the GP-B program was managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Underwood, Lockheed Martin Corporation).

  8. Scanning probe nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinelli, F.; Menozzi, C.; Baschieri, P.; Facci, P.; Pingue, P.

    2010-02-01

    The present paper reports on a novel lithographic approach at the nanoscale level, which is based on scanning probe microscopy (SPM) and nanoimprint lithography (NIL). The experimental set-up consists of an atomic force microscope (AFM) operated via software specifically developed for the purpose. In particular, this software allows one to apply a predefined external load for a given lapse of time while monitoring in real-time the relative distance between the tip and the sample as well as the normal and lateral force during the embossing process. Additionally, we have employed AFM tips sculptured by means of focused ion beam in order to create indenting tools of the desired shape. Anti-sticking layers can also be used to functionalize the tips if one needs to investigate the effects of different treatments on the indentation and de-molding processes. The lithographic capabilities of this set-up are demonstrated on a polystyrene NIL-patterned sample, where imprinted features have been obtained upon using different normal load values for increasing time intervals, and on a thermoplastic polymer film, where the imprint process has been monitored in real-time.

  9. Stellar Occultation Probe of Triton's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, James L.

    1998-01-01

    The goals of this research were (i) to better characterize Triton's atmospheric structure by probing a region not well investigated by Voyager and (ii) to begin acquiring baseline data for an investigation of the time evolution of the atmosphere which will set limits on the thermal conductivity of the surface and the total mass of N2 in the atmosphere. Our approach was to use observations (with the Kuiper Airborne Observatory) of a stellar occultation by Triton that was predicted to occur on 1993 July 10. As described in the attached reprint, we achieved these objectives through observation of this occultation and a subsequent one with the KAO in 1995. We found new results about Triton's atmospheric structure from the analysis of the two occultations observed with the KAO and ground-based data. These stellar occultation observations made both in the visible and infrared, have good spatial coverage of Triton including the first Triton central-flash observations, and are the first data to probe the 20-100 km altitude level on Triton. The small-planet light curve model of Elliot and Young (AJ 103, 991-1015) was generalized to include stellar flux refracted by the far limb, and then fitted to the data. Values of the pressure, derived from separate immersion and emersion chords, show no significant trends with latitude indicating that Triton's atmosphere is spherically symmetric at approximately 50 km altitude to within the error of the measurements. However, asymmetry observed in the central flash indicates the atmosphere is not homogeneous at the lowest levels probed (approximately 20 km altitude). From the average of the 1995 occultation data, the equivalent-isothermal temperature of the atmosphere is 47 +/- 1 K and the atmospheric pressure at 1400 km radius (approximately 50 km altitude) is 1.4 +/- 0.1 microbar. Both of these are not consistent with a model based on Voyager UVS and RSS observations in 1989 (Strobel et al, Icarus 120, 266-289). The atmospheric

  10. Method and apparatus for simultaneously measuring temperature and pressure

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, Tomas B.; Haugen, Gilbert R.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for simultaneously measuring temperature and pressure in a class of crystalline materials having anisotropic thermal coefficients and having a coefficient of linear compression along the crystalline c-axis substantially the same as those perpendicular thereto. Temperature is determined by monitoring the fluorescence half life of a probe of such crystalline material, e.g., ruby. Pressure is determined by monitoring at least one other fluorescent property of the probe that depends on pressure and/or temperature, e.g., absolute fluorescent intensity or frequency shifts of fluorescent emission lines.

  11. Possible concepts for an in situ Saturn probe mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coustenis, Athena; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Mousis, Olivier; Atkinson, David H.; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Reh, Kim R.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Atreya, Sushil; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Cavalie, Thibault; Colaprete, Anthony; Gautier, Daniel; Guillot, Tristan; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Marty, Bernard; Morse, Andy; Sims, Jon; Spilker, Tom; Spilker, Linda

    2014-05-01

    In situ exploration of Saturn's atmosphere would bring insights in two broad themes: the formation history of our solar system and the processes at play in planetary atmospheres. The science case for in situ measurements at Saturn are developed in [1] and two companion abstracts (see Mousis et al., and Atkinson et al.). They are summarized here. Measurements of Saturn's bulk chemical and isotopic composition would place important constraints on the volatile reservoirs in the protosolar nebula and hence on the formation mechanisms. An in situ probe, penetrating from the upper atmosphere (μbar level) into the convective weather layer to a minimum depth of 10 bar, would also contribute to our knowledge of Saturn's atmospheric structure, dynamics, composition, chemistry and cloud-forming processes. Different mission architectures are envisaged, all based on an entry probe that would descend through Saturn's stratosphere and troposphere under parachute down to a minimum of 10 bars [1]. Future studies will focus on the trade-offs between science return and the added design complexity of a probe that could operate at pressures larger than 10 bars. Accelerometry measurements may also be performed during the entry phase in the higher part of the stratosphere prior to starting measurements under parachute. A carrier system would be required to deliver the probe along its interplanetary trajectory to the desired atmospheric entry point at Saturn. The entry site would be carefully selected. Three possible mission configurations are currently under study (with different risk/cost trades): • Configuration 1: Probe + Carrier. After probe delivery, the carrier would follow its path and be destroyed during atmospheric entry, but could perform pre-entry science. The carrier would not be used as a radio relay, but the probe would transmit its data to the ground system via a direct-to-Earth (DTE) RF link; • Configuration 2: Probe + Carrier/Relay. The probe would detach from the

  12. Calibration of Langmuir probes against microwaves and plasma oscillation probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Francis F.; Evans, John D.; Zawalski, Wade

    2012-10-01

    The use of Langmuir probes for measuring plasma density is subject to uncertainty because the theories commonly used to interpret the data give widely differing results. This is especially troublesome in partially ionized plasmas used, for instance, in the semiconductor industry, since no existing theory adequately treats the case when there are a few collisions between ions and neutral atoms. In this work, plasma densities measured by microwave interferometry and plasma-oscillation probes are compared with those from probe data analyzed with Langmuir's orbital motion limited (OML) theory, the Allen-Boyd-Reynolds (ABR) theory and the Bernstein-Rabinowitz-Laframboise (BRL) theory. It is found that ABR underestimates and BRL overestimates the density, the problems being the neglect of ion orbiting in ABR and the effect of ion-neutral collisions in BRL. The best theory is either OML or the geometric mean between the ABR and BRL results. For thicker probes, other methods are suggested.

  13. Micro-Particles as Electrostatic Probes for Plasma Sheath Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Wolter, Matthias; Haass, Moritz; Ockenga, Taalke; Kersten, Holger; Blazec, Joseph; Basner, Ralf

    2008-09-07

    An interesting aspect in the research of complex (dusty) plasmas is the experimental study of the interaction of micro-particles of different sizes with the surrounding plasma for diagnostic purpose. In the plasma micro-disperse particles are negatively charged and confined in the sheath. The particles are trapped by an equilibrium of gravity, electric field force and ion drag force. From the behavior, local electric fields can be determined, e.g. particles are used as electrostatic probes. In combination with additional measurements of the plasma parameters with Langmuir probes and thermal probes as well as by comparison with an analytical sheath model, the structure of the sheath can be described. In the present work we focus on the behavior of micro-particles of different sizes and several plasma parameters e.g. the gas pressure and the rf-power.

  14. Galileo probe forebody thermal protection - Benchmark heating environment calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, A.; Nicolet, W. E.

    1981-01-01

    Solutions are presented for the aerothermal heating environment for the forebody heatshield of candidate Galileo probe. Entry into both the nominal and cool-heavy model atmospheres were considered. Solutions were obtained for the candidate heavy probe with a weight of 310 kg and a lighter probe with a weight of 290 kg. In the flowfield analysis, a finite difference procedure was employed to obtain benchmark predictions of pressure, radiative and convective heating rates, and the steady-state wall blowing rates. Calculated heating rates for entry into the cool-heavy model atmosphere were about 60 percent higher than those predicted for the entry into the nominal atmosphere. The total mass lost for entry into the cool-heavy model atmosphere was about 146 kg and the mass lost for entry into the nominal model atmosphere was about 101 kg.

  15. Iterative Calculation of Plasma Density from a Cylindrical Probe Characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhenfeng; Lu, Wenqi

    2013-08-01

    A novel method is proposed for treating cylindrical probe characteristics to obtain plasma density. The method consists of exponential extrapolation of the transitional part of the I-V curve to the floating potential for the ion saturation current, other than the existing theories which use the ion branch, and an iterative sheath thickness correction procedure for improved accuracy. The method was tested by treating Langmuir probe I-V characteristics obtained from inductively coupled Ar discharges at various pressures, and comparing the present results with those deduced by existing theories. It was shown that the plasma densities obtained by the present method are in good agreement with those calculated by the Allen-Boyd-Reynolds (ABR) theory, suggesting the effectiveness of the proposed method. Without need of manual setting and adjustment of fitting parameters, the method may be suitable for automatic and real time processing of probe characteristics.

  16. Optic probe for semiconductor characterization

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.; Hambarian, Artak

    2008-09-02

    Described herein is an optical probe (120) for use in characterizing surface defects in wafers, such as semiconductor wafers. The optical probe (120) detects laser light reflected from the surface (124) of the wafer (106) within various ranges of angles. Characteristics of defects in the surface (124) of the wafer (106) are determined based on the amount of reflected laser light detected in each of the ranges of angles. Additionally, a wafer characterization system (100) is described that includes the described optical probe (120).

  17. Saturn orbiter dual probe mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudd, R. P.

    1978-01-01

    The described Saturn orbiter dual probe mission and spacecraft combines three systems into a multi-purpose Saturn exploration package. The spacecraft consists of: (1) Saturn orbiter; (2) Saturn probe; and (3) Titan probe or lander. This single spacecraft provides the capability to conduct in situ measurements of the Saturn and Titan atmospheres, and, possibly the Titan surface, as well as a variety of remote sensing measurements. The remote sensing capabilities will be used to study the surfaces, interiors and environments of Saturn's satellites, the rings of Saturn, Saturn's magnetosphere, and synoptic properties of Saturn's atmosphere.

  18. ESA Venus Entry Probe Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vandenBerg, M. L.; Falkner, P.; Phipps, A.; Underwood, J. C.; Lingard, J. S.; Moorhouse, J.; Kraft, S.; Peacock, A.

    2005-01-01

    The Venus Entry Probe is one of ESA s Technology Reference Studies (TRS). The purpose of the Technology Reference Studies is to provide a focus for the development of strategically important technologies that are of likely relevance for future scientific missions. The aim of the Venus Entry Probe TRS is to study approaches for low cost in-situ exploration of Venus and other planetary bodies with a significant atmosphere. In this paper, the mission objectives and an outline of the mission concept of the Venus Entry Probe TRS are presented.

  19. Atmospheric probes: needs and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Tobias

    2004-02-01

    There is only one Rosetta Stone in the Solar System; it's in the British Museum. We cannot understand the inner planets by simply studying the Earth, nor can we apprehend the giants by examining only Jupiter. Despite the stunning successes of previous probes to Venus and the Galileo probe to Jupiter, our knowledge of the atmospheres of even these two planets remains tantalizingly incomplete. We must therefore return to Venus and consider the challenge of exploring all of the outer planets with a family of identical probes, a project that could commemorater the vision of multiple worlds championed by Giordano Bruno.

  20. Floating Potential Probe Langmuir Probe Data Reduction Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, Thomas L.; Minow, Joseph I.

    2002-01-01

    During its first five months of operations, the Langmuir Probe on the Floating Potential Probe (FPP) obtained data on ionospheric electron densities and temperatures in the ISS orbit. In this paper, the algorithms for data reduction are presented, and comparisons are made of FPP data with ground-based ionosonde and Incoherent Scattering Radar (ISR) results. Implications for ISS operations are detailed, and the need for a permanent FPP on ISS is examined.

  1. Fiberoptic probe and system for spectral measurements

    DOEpatents

    Dai, S.; Young, J.P.

    1998-10-13

    A fused fiberoptic probe, a system, method and embodiments thereof for conducting spectral measurements are disclosed. The fused fiberoptic probe comprises a probe tip having a specific geometrical configuration, an exciting optical fiber and at least one collection optical fiber fused within a housing, preferably silica. The specific geometrical configurations in which the probe tip can be shaped include a slanted probe tip with an angle greater than 0{degree}, an inverted cone-shaped probe tip, and a lens head. 12 figs.

  2. Fiberoptic probe and system for spectral measurements

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng; Young, Jack P.

    1998-01-01

    A fused fiberoptic probe, a system, method and embodiments thereof for conducting spectral measurements are disclosed. The fused fiberoptic probe comprises a probe tip having a specific geometrical configuration, an exciting optical fiber and at least one collection optical fiber fused within a housing, preferrably silica. The specific geometrical configurations in which the probe tip can be shaped include a slanted probe tip with an angle greater than 0.degree., an inverted cone-shaped probe tip, and a lens head.

  3. Integrated microfluidic probe station.

    PubMed

    Perrault, C M; Qasaimeh, M A; Brastaviceanu, T; Anderson, K; Kabakibo, Y; Juncker, D

    2010-11-01

    The microfluidic probe (MFP) consists of a flat, blunt tip with two apertures for the injection and reaspiration of a microjet into a solution--thus hydrodynamically confining the microjet--and is operated atop an inverted microscope that enables live imaging. By scanning across a surface, the microjet can be used for surface processing with the capability of both depositing and removing material; as it operates under immersed conditions, sensitive biological materials and living cells can be processed. During scanning, the MFP is kept immobile and centered over the objective of the inverted microscope, a few micrometers above a substrate that is displaced by moving the microscope stage and that is flushed continuously with the microjet. For consistent and reproducible surface processing, the gap between the MFP and the substrate, the MFP's alignment, the scanning speed, the injection and aspiration flow rates, and the image capture need all to be controlled and synchronized. Here, we present an automated MFP station that integrates all of these functionalities and automates the key operational parameters. A custom software program is used to control an independent motorized Z stage for adjusting the gap, a motorized microscope stage for scanning the substrate, up to 16 syringe pumps for injecting and aspirating fluids, and an inverted fluorescence microscope equipped with a charge-coupled device camera. The parallelism between the MFP and the substrate is adjusted using manual goniometer at the beginning of the experiment. The alignment of the injection and aspiration apertures along the scanning axis is performed using a newly designed MFP screw holder. We illustrate the integrated MFP station by the programmed, automated patterning of fluorescently labeled biotin on a streptavidin-coated surface. PMID:21133501

  4. Integrated microfluidic probe station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrault, C. M.; Qasaimeh, M. A.; Brastaviceanu, T.; Anderson, K.; Kabakibo, Y.; Juncker, D.

    2010-11-01

    The microfluidic probe (MFP) consists of a flat, blunt tip with two apertures for the injection and reaspiration of a microjet into a solution—thus hydrodynamically confining the microjet—and is operated atop an inverted microscope that enables live imaging. By scanning across a surface, the microjet can be used for surface processing with the capability of both depositing and removing material; as it operates under immersed conditions, sensitive biological materials and living cells can be processed. During scanning, the MFP is kept immobile and centered over the objective of the inverted microscope, a few micrometers above a substrate that is displaced by moving the microscope stage and that is flushed continuously with the microjet. For consistent and reproducible surface processing, the gap between the MFP and the substrate, the MFP's alignment, the scanning speed, the injection and aspiration flow rates, and the image capture need all to be controlled and synchronized. Here, we present an automated MFP station that integrates all of these functionalities and automates the key operational parameters. A custom software program is used to control an independent motorized Z stage for adjusting the gap, a motorized microscope stage for scanning the substrate, up to 16 syringe pumps for injecting and aspirating fluids, and an inverted fluorescence microscope equipped with a charge-coupled device camera. The parallelism between the MFP and the substrate is adjusted using manual goniometer at the beginning of the experiment. The alignment of the injection and aspiration apertures along the scanning axis is performed using a newly designed MFP screw holder. We illustrate the integrated MFP station by the programmed, automated patterning of fluorescently labeled biotin on a streptavidin-coated surface.

  5. Gravity Probe B Assembled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In this photo, the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) space vehicle is being assembled at the Sunnyvale, California location of the Lockheed Martin Corporation. The GP-B is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Launched April 20, 2004 , the GP-B program was managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Underwood, Lockheed Martin Corporation).

  6. Evaluation of a flow direction probe and a pitot-static probe on the F-14 airplane at high angles of attack and sideslip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    The measurement performance of a hemispherical flow-angularity probe and a fuselage-mounted pitot-static probe was evaluated at high flow angles as part of a test program on an F-14 airplane. These evaluations were performed using a calibrated pitot-static noseboom equipped with vanes for reference flow direction measurements, and another probe incorporating vanes but mounted on a pod under the fuselage nose. Data are presented for angles of attack up to 63, angles of sideslip from -22 deg to 22 deg, and for Mach numbers from approximately 0.3 to 1.3. During maneuvering flight, the hemispherical flow-angularity probe exhibited flow angle errors that exceeded 2 deg. Pressure measurements with the pitot-static probe resulted in very inaccurate data above a Mach number of 0.87 and exhibited large sensitivities with flow angle.

  7. Minimally invasive prostate cancer detection test using FISH probes

    PubMed Central

    Tinawi-Aljundi, Rima; Knuth, Shannon T; Gildea, Michael; Khal, Joshua; Hafron, Jason; Kernen, Kenneth; Di Loreto, Robert; Aurich-Costa, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The ability to test for and detect prostate cancer with minimal invasiveness has the potential to reduce unnecessary prostate biopsies. This study was conducted as part of a clinical investigation for the development of an OligoFISH® probe panel for more accurate detection of prostate cancer. Materials and methods One hundred eligible male patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound biopsies were enrolled in the study. After undergoing digital rectal examination with pressure, voided urine was collected in sufficient volume to prepare at least two slides using ThinPrep. Probe panels were tested on the slides, and 500 cells were scored when possible. From the 100 patients recruited, 85 had more than 300 cells scored and were included in the clinical performance calculations. Results Chromosomes Y, 7, 10, 20, 6, 8, 16, and 18 were polysomic in most prostate carcinoma cases. Of these eight chromosomes, chromosomes 7, 16, 18, and 20 were identified as having the highest clinical performance as a fluorescence in situ hybridization test and used to manufacture the fluorescence in situ hybridization probe panels. The OligoFISH® probes performed with 100% analytical specificity. When the OligoFISH® probes were compared with the biopsy results for each individual, the test results highly correlated with positive and negative prostate biopsy pathology findings, supporting their high specificity and accuracy. Probes for chromosomes 7, 16, 18, and 20 showed in the receiver operator characteristics analysis an area under the curve of 0.83, with an accuracy of 81% in predicting the biopsy result. Conclusion This investigation demonstrates the ease of use with high specificity, high predictive value, and accuracy in identifying prostate cancer in voided urine after digital rectal examination with pressure. The test is likely to have positive impact on clinical practice and advance approaches to the detection of prostate cancer. Further evaluation is warranted. PMID

  8. Mass Spectrometry for Planetary Probes: Past, Present and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, Hasso B.; Harpold, Dan N.; Jamieson, Brian G.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric entry probes present a unique opportunity for performing quantitative analysis of extra-terrestrial atmospheres in cases where remote sensing alone may not be sufficient and measurements with balloons or aircraft is not practical. An entry probe can provide a complete vertical profile of atmospheric parameters including chemical composition, which cannot be obtained with most other techniques. There are, however, unique challenges associated with building instruments for an entry probe, as compared to orbiters, landers, or rovers. Conditions during atmospheric entry are extreme, there are inherent time constraints due to the short duration of the experiment, and the instrument experiences rapid environmental changes in temperature and pressure as it descends. In addition, there are resource limitations, i.e. mass, power, size and bandwidth. Finally, the demands on the instrument design are determined in large part by conditions (pressure, temperature, composition) unique to the particular body under study, and as a result there is no one-size-fits-all instrument for an atmospheric probe. Many of these requirements can be more easily met by miniaturizing the probe instrument. Our experience building mass spectrometers for atmospheric entry probes leads us to believe that the time is right for a fundamental change in the way spaceflight mass spectrometers are built. The emergence over the past twenty years of Micro-electro- mechanical Systems (MEMS), utilizing lithographic semiconductor fabrication techniques to produce instrument systems in miniature, holds great promise for application to spaceflight mass spectrometry. A highly miniaturized, high performance and low-power mass spectrometer would be an enormous benefit to future entry probe missions, allowing, for example, parallel measurements (e.g., multiple simultaneous gas chromatographic analyses and direct atmospheric leaks.) Such an instrument would also enable mass spectrometry on board small

  9. Total-pressure averaging in pulsating flows.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. N.; Dudzinski, T. J.; Johnson, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    A number of total-pressure tubes were tested in a nonsteady flow generator in which the fraction of period that pressure is a maximum is approximately 0.8, thereby simulating turbomachine-type flow conditions. Most of the tubes indicated a pressure which was higher than the true average. Organ-pipe resonance which further increased the indicated pressure was encountered with the tubes at discrete frequencies. There was no obvious combination of tube diameter, length, and/or geometry variation used in the tests which resulted in negligible averaging error. A pneumatic-type probe was found to measure true average pressure and is suggested as a comparison instrument to determine whether nonlinear averaging effects are serious in unknown pulsation profiles.

  10. Transpiring purging access probe for particulate laden or hazardous environments

    SciTech Connect

    VanOsdol, John G

    2013-12-03

    An access probe for remote-sensing access through a viewing port, viewing volume, and access port into a vessel. The physical boundary around the viewing volume is partially formed by a porous sleeve lying between the viewing volume and a fluid conduit. In a first mode of operation, a fluid supplied to the fluid conduit encounters the porous sleeve and flows through the porous material to maintain the viewing volume free of ash or other matter. When additional fluid force is needed to clear the viewing volume, the pressure of the fluid flow is increased sufficiently to slidably translate the porous sleeve, greatly increasing the flow into the viewing volume. The porous sleeve is returned to position by an actuating spring. The access probe thereby provides for alternate modes of operation based on the pressure of an actuating fluid.

  11. Apparatus for Leak Testing Pressurized Hoses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, Steve D. (Inventor); Garrison, Steve G. (Inventor); Gant, Bobby D. (Inventor); Palmer, John R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A hose-attaching apparatus for leak-testing a pressurized hose may include a hose-attaching member. A bore may extend through the hose-attaching member. An internal annular cavity may extend coaxially around the bore. At least one of a detector probe hole and a detector probe may be connected to the internal annular cavity. At least a portion of the bore may have a diameter which is at least one of substantially equal to and less than a diameter of a hose to be leak-tested.

  12. Using A Wireless In Situ Probe To Monitor Subglacial Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, J. K.; Martinez, K.

    2010-12-01

    The Glacsweb system (http://envisense.org/glacsweb/) has been installed in two glaciers; Briksdalsbreen, Norway and Skalafellsjökull, Iceland. These are valley glaciers which show evidence of subglacial deformation in the foreland, with flutes and push moraines. Briksdalsbreen was calving into a glacial lake. This advanced 390m between 1987-1996 and then retreated over 460m between 1996 and 2008. Skalafellsjökull is landbased with a similar (but smaller scale) pattern of recent glacier marginal. Micro-sensors housed within the Glacsweb probes (0.16m long) measured water pressure, probe deformation, resistance, tilt and probe temperature within the ice or till. These data were recorded at a number of times during the day, and transmitted to a base station located on the glacier surface. Probe and meteorological data were sent once a day to a local mains powered computer, where it was forwarded to a web server in the UK. At Briksdalsbreen this operated from August 2004 to August 2006, and at Skalafellsjökull, it operated from August 2008 onwards (with periods when the system was disconnected). We compare the subglacial processes recorded throughout the year at the two sites. In particular, changes in water pressure, case stress, till water contents and till temperatures.

  13. The Radiation Belt Storm Probes

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Radiation Belt Storm Probe mission (RBSP) will explore the Van Allen Radiation Belts in the Earth's magnetosphere. The charge particles in these regions can be hazardous to both spacecraft and ...

  14. A three dimensional probe positioner

    SciTech Connect

    Intrator, T.; Sun, X.; Furno, I.; Dorf, L.; Lapenta, G.

    2008-10-15

    In order to sort out the physics that is important in many plasma experiments, data in three dimensions (3D) are becoming necessary. Access to the usual cylindrical vacuum vessel is typically restricted to radially or axially insertable probes that can pivot. The space that can be explored usually has significant restrictions either because probe travel must be along a travel path, or a 'wobbly' probe positioner requires one to map between a moveable coordinate system and a preferred laboratory coordinate system. This could for example introduce errors in measurements of vector quantities such as magnetic field or flow. We describe the design and implementation of a 3D probe positioner that slides in two dimensions on a double O-ring seal and radially inserts along the third dimension. The net result is that a 3D space can be explored in a laboratory Cartesian reference frame.

  15. Monitoring probe for groundwater flow

    DOEpatents

    Looney, B.B.; Ballard, S.

    1994-08-23

    A monitoring probe for detecting groundwater migration is disclosed. The monitor features a cylinder made of a permeable membrane carrying an array of electrical conductivity sensors on its outer surface. The cylinder is filled with a fluid that has a conductivity different than the groundwater. The probe is placed in the ground at an area of interest to be monitored. The fluid, typically saltwater, diffuses through the permeable membrane into the groundwater. The flow of groundwater passing around the permeable membrane walls of the cylinder carries the conductive fluid in the same general direction and distorts the conductivity field measured by the sensors. The degree of distortion from top to bottom and around the probe is precisely related to the vertical and horizontal flow rates, respectively. The electrical conductivities measured by the sensors about the outer surface of the probe are analyzed to determine the rate and direction of the groundwater flow. 4 figs.

  16. Monitoring probe for groundwater flow

    DOEpatents

    Looney, Brian B.; Ballard, Sanford

    1994-01-01

    A monitoring probe for detecting groundwater migration. The monitor features a cylinder made of a permeable membrane carrying an array of electrical conductivity sensors on its outer surface. The cylinder is filled with a fluid that has a conductivity different than the groundwater. The probe is placed in the ground at an area of interest to be monitored. The fluid, typically saltwater, diffuses through the permeable membrane into the groundwater. The flow of groundwater passing around the permeable membrane walls of the cylinder carries the conductive fluid in the same general direction and distorts the conductivity field measured by the sensors. The degree of distortion from top to bottom and around the probe is precisely related to the vertical and horizontal flow rates, respectively. The electrical conductivities measured by the sensors about the outer surface of the probe are analyzed to determine the rate and direction of the groundwater flow.

  17. The measurement error analysis when a pitot probe is used in supersonic air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, XiWen; Hao, PengFei; Yao, ZhaoHui

    2011-04-01

    Pitot probes enable a simple and convenient way of measuring mean velocity in air flow. The contrastive numerical simulation between free supersonic airflow and pitot tube at different positions in supersonic air flow was performed using Navier-Stokes equations, the ENN scheme with time-dependent boundary conditions (TDBC) and the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. The physical experimental results including pitot pressure and shadowgraph are also presented. Numerical results coincide with the experimental data. The flow characteristics of the pitot probe on the supersonic flow structure show that the measurement gives actually the total pressure behind the detached shock wave by using the pitot probe to measure the total pressure. The measurement result of the distribution of the total pressure can still represent the real free jet flow. The similar features of the intersection and reflection of shock waves can be identified. The difference between the measurement results and the actual ones is smaller than 10%. When the pitot probe is used to measure the region of L=0-4 D, the measurement is smaller than the real one due to the increase of the shock wave strength. The difference becomes larger where the waves intersect. If the pitot probe is put at L=8 D-10 D, where the flow changes from supersonic to subsonic, the addition of the pitot probe turns the original supersonic flow region subsonic and causes bigger measurement errors.

  18. The navigation of space probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fliegel, H. F.; Ohandley, D. A.; Zielenbach, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    A new navigational method combining electronic measurement procedures and celestial mechanics makes it possible to conduct a space probe very close to a desired point in the neighborhood of a remote planet. Approaches for the determination of the position of the space probe in space are discussed, giving attention to the effects of errors in the employed data. The application of the navigational methods in a number of space missions is also considered.

  19. Apparatus Translates Crossed-Laser-Beam Probe Volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Gregory C.; South, Bruce W.; Exton, Reginald J.

    1994-01-01

    Optomechanical apparatus translates probe volume of crossed-beam laser velocimeter or similar instrument while maintaining optical alignment of beams. Measures velocity, pressure, and temperature of flowing gas at several locations. Repeated tedious realignments no longer necessary. Designed to accommodate stimulated-Raman-gain spectrometer for noninvasive measurement of local conditions in flowing gas in supersonic wind tunnel. Applicable to other techniques like coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy involving use of laser beams crossed at small angles (10 degrees or less).

  20. The Interstellar Heliopause Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyngvi, A.; Falkner, P.; Peacock, A.

    The Interstellar Heliopause Probe (IHP) is one of four Technology Reference Missions (TRM) introduced by the Planetary Exploration Studies Section of the Science Payload & Advanced Concepts Office (SCI-A) at ESA. The overall purpose of the TRMs is to focus the development of strategically important technologies of likely relevance to future science missions. This is accomplished through the study of several technologically demanding and scientifically interesting missions, which are currently not part of the ESA science programme. The TRM baseline uses small satellites (< 200kg), with highly miniaturized and highly integrated payload suites. The motivation for this is to use low resource spacecraft in a phased approach, which will reduce the risk and cost, compared to a single, high resource mission. Equipped with a Highly Integrated Payload Suite (HIPS) the IHP will answer scientific questions concerning the nature of the interstellar medium, how the interstellar medium affects our solar system and how the solar system impacts the interstellar medium. The HIPS, which is a standard element in all TRMs miniaturize through resource reduction, by using miniaturized components and sensors, and by sharing common structures and payload functionality. To achieve the scientific requirements of the mission the spacecraft is to leave the solar system as close to the heliosphere nose as possible and reach a distance of 200 AU from the Sun within 25 years. The requirement of all TRMs is to use a Souyz-Fregat version 2B or equivalent low cost launch vehicle. With this constraint no current propulsion system is capable of delivering the necessary mass to the final destination. Technologies are therefore needed to enable this mission. The current alternatives are using nuclear propulsion, either with radioisotope or reactor power system or solar sailing. All these alternatives are currently being investigated. Other challenges exist as well such as designing a communication link

  1. Pressure Monitoring Using Hybrid fs/ps Rotational CARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kearney, Sean P.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of gas-phase pressure measurements at kHz-rates using fs/ps rotational CARS. Femtosecond pump and Stokes pulses impulsively prepare a rotational Raman coherence, which is then probed by a high-energy 6-ps pulse introduced at a time delay from the Raman preparation. Rotational CARS spectra were recorded in N2 contained in a room-temperature gas cell for pressures from 0.1 to 3 atm and probe delays ranging from 10-330 ps. Using published self-broadened collisional linewidth data for N2, both the spectrally integrated coherence decay rate and the spectrally resolved decay were investigated as means for detecting pressure. Shot-averaged and single-laser-shot spectra were interrogated for pressure and the accuracy and precision as a function of probe delay and cell pressure are discussed. Single-shot measurement accuracies were within 0.1 to 6.5% when compared to a transducer values, while the precision was generally between 1% and 6% of measured pressure for probe delays of 200 ps or more, and better than 2% as the delay approached 300 ps. A byproduct of the pressure measurement is an independent but simultaneous measurement of the gas temperature.

  2. Enthalpy probe measurements in AEDC`s arc-heated test facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Carver, D.B.; Fryer, J.M.

    1995-08-01

    The Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) has recently demonstrated a new probe for measurement of enthalpy within the free jet of its arc-heated test units. The probe, developed under contract by SPARTA, Inc., is a steady-state device that uses the conservation of mass principle to define total enthalpy of the flow that enters the probe. Dual sonic orifices are used to meter the flow. A heat exchanger between the orifices reduces the energy so that the total temperature can be measured at the entrance to the second orifice. Plenum pressures are measured at the entrance to each orifice. Equating the flow rates through each orifice makes it possible to solve for the unknown - the total enthalpy entering the probe. Bonded foil technology is the innovation that permitted a steady-state probe to be developed; the probe`s intricate cooling passages provided protection from the harsh thermal environment. The probe has been successfully demonstrated at a stagnation pressure of 15 atm and total enthalpy of 2,700 Btu/lbm. The paper includes design concepts, operating principles, and a presentation of test results.

  3. High pressure magnetic resonance imaging with metallic vessels.

    PubMed

    Han, Hui; Ouellette, Matthew; MacMillan, Bryce; Goora, Frederic; MacGregor, Rodney; Green, Derrick; Balcom, Bruce J

    2011-12-01

    High pressure measurements in most scientific fields rely on metal vessels given the superior tensile strength of metals. We introduce high pressure magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements with metallic vessels. The developed MRI compatible metallic pressure vessel concept is very general in application. Macroscopic physical systems are now amenable to spatially resolved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study at variable pressure and temperature. Metallic pressure vessels not only provide inherently high tensile strengths and efficient temperature control, they also permit optimization of the MRI RF probe sensitivity. An MRI compatible pressure vessel is demonstrated with a rock core holder fabricated using non-magnetic stainless steel. Water flooding through a porous rock under pressure is shown as an example of its applications. High pressure NMR spectroscopy plays an indispensable role in several science fields. This work will open new vistas of study for high pressure material science MRI and MR. PMID:21962929

  4. Waveguide Calibrator for Multi-Element Probe Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sommerfeldt, Scott D.; Blotter, Jonathan D.

    2007-01-01

    A calibrator, referred to as the spider design, can be used to calibrate probes incorporating multiple acoustic sensing elements. The application is an acoustic energy density probe, although the calibrator can be used for other types of acoustic probes. The calibrator relies on the use of acoustic waveguide technology to produce the same acoustic field at each of the sensing elements. As a result, the sensing elements can be separated from each other, but still calibrated through use of the acoustic waveguides. Standard calibration techniques involve placement of an individual microphone into a small cavity with a known, uniform pressure to perform the calibration. If a cavity is manufactured with sufficient size to insert the energy density probe, it has been found that a uniform pressure field can only be created at very low frequencies, due to the size of the probe. The size of the energy density probe prevents one from having the same pressure at each microphone in a cavity, due to the wave effects. The "spider" design probe is effective in calibrating multiple microphones separated from each other. The spider design ensures that the same wave effects exist for each microphone, each with an indivdual sound path. The calibrator s speaker is mounted at one end of a 14-cm-long and 4.1-cm diameter small plane-wave tube. This length was chosen so that the first evanescent cross mode of the plane-wave tube would be attenuated by about 90 dB, thus leaving just the plane wave at the termination plane of the tube. The tube terminates with a small, acrylic plate with five holes placed symmetrically about the axis of the speaker. Four ports are included for the four microphones on the probe. The fifth port is included for the pre-calibrated reference microphone. The ports in the acrylic plate are in turn connected to the probe sensing elements via flexible PVC tubes. These five tubes are the same length, so the acoustic wave effects are the same in each tube. The

  5. Particle Probe Investigations on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Justin; James, R. W.; Nolan, S.; Page, E. J.; Romano, B.; Zuniga, J.; Schlank, C.; Lopez, M.; Karama, J.; Duke-Tinson, O.; Stutzman, B. S.

    2013-10-01

    Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab(CGAPL) has constructed a Helicon Plasma Experiment. Plasmas will be used in high-temperature and -density diagnostic development for future lab investigations of fusion-grade plasma. Efforts to develop and enhance high temperature and density (1013cm-3 and up) helicon plasmas at low pressures (.01T) reported by Toki et al., continue. HPX will integrate a 32-channel National Instruments DAQ(Data Acquisition) board, designed to digitize data from tests. With LabView as the programing language, CGAPL will take samples at 12bits of precision at 2MS/s to create a Graphical User Interface (GUI). The GUI will control experimental variables (one or several concurrent tests) and monitor systems during data collection. Data collection will be conducted with particle probes, currently under construction. Probes, used to discern the plasma mode transitions, will measure plasma particle velocity, temperature, density and floating potential at different regimes. Once independent triple and mach probes for surface point investigations are installed, a triple probe array to produce a more comprehensive density and surface view will follow. Progress on development of GUI and construction of probes will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY12.

  6. Work on Planetary Atmospheres and Planetary Atmosphere Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, Peter

    1999-01-01

    A summary final report of work accomplished is presented. Work was performed in the following areas: (1) Galileo Probe science analysis, (2) Galileo probe Atmosphere Structure Instrument, (3) Mars Pathfinder Atmosphere Structure/Meteorology instrument, (4) Mars Pathfinder data analysis, (5) Science Definition for future Mars missions, (6) Viking Lander data analysis, (7) winds in Mars atmosphere Venus atmospheric dynamics, (8) Pioneer Venus Probe data analysis, (9) Pioneer Venus anomaly analysis, (10) Discovery Venus Probe Titan probe instrument design, and (11) laboratory studies of Titan probe impact phenomena. The work has resulted in more than 10 articles published in archive journals, 2 encyclopedia articles, and many working papers. This final report is organized around the four planets on which there was activity, Jupiter, Mars, Venus, and Titan, with a closing section on Miscellaneous Activities. A major objective was to complete the fabrication, test, and evaluation of the atmosphere structure experiment on the Galileo probe, and to receive, analyze and interpret data received from the spacecraft. The instrument was launched on April 14, 1989. Calibration data were taken for all experiment sensors. The data were analyzed, fitted with algorithms, and summarized in a calibration report for use in analyzing and interpreting data returned from Jupiter's atmosphere. The sensors included were the primary science pressure, temperature and acceleration sensors, and the supporting engineering temperature sensors. Computer programs were written to decode the Experiment Data Record and convert the digital numbers to physical quantities, i.e., temperatures, pressures, and accelerations. The project office agreed to obtain telemetry of checkout data from the probe. Work to extend programs written for use on the Pioneer Venus project included: (1) massive heat shield ablation leading to important mass loss during entry; and (2) rapid planet rotation, which introduced

  7. Simulation of Europa's relief formation and melting probe's movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erokhina, Olga; Butenko, Anton; Chumachenko, Eugene

    Nowadays planetary bodies’ studies are of the great interest. First of all, such space objects are the icy moons of the giant planets like Jupiter and Saturn. Of particular interest is the relatively smooth Europa’s surface that is covered by a bands system, valleys, and ridges. To study the planetary icy body in future space missions, one of the problems to solve is the problem of design of a special device, capable to penetrate through the ice, as well as the choice of the landing site of this probe. To select possible landing site analysis of the Europa’s surface relief formation is studied. This analysis showed that the compression, extending, shearing, and bending can influence on some arbitrarily separated section of Europe’s icy surface. The computer simulation with finite element method (FEM) was performed to see, what types of defects could arise from such effects. Also the problem of melting probe movement through the ice is considered: how the probe will move in low gravity and low atmospheric pressure; whether the hole formed in the ice will be closed when the probe penetrates far enough or not; what is the influence of the probe’s characteristics on the melting process; what would be the order of magnitude of the penetration velocity. This study explores the technique based on elasto-plastic theory and so-called “solid water” theory to estimate the melting velocity and to study the melting process. Based on this technique, several cases of melting probe motion are considered, the velocity of the melting probe is estimated, the influence of different factors are studied and discussed, and an easy way to optimize the parameters of the probe is proposed.

  8. Probe Measurements in the H-mode Pedestal Region in the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodner, G. M.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Thome, K. E.; Thompson, D. S.

    2014-10-01

    In near-unity aspect ratio Pegasus discharges, Ohmic heating and high-field-side fueling together trigger an L-H mode transition in both limited and diverted configurations. H-mode plasmas are predicted to exhibit pedestals in both the pressure and current density profiles. Operation at A ~ 1 allows for the use of local magnetic and Langmuir probes in the pedestal region. A current pedestal is routinely observed in Pegasus H-mode plasmas, but not in L-mode plasmas or during ELMs. Conventionally, edge pedestal measurements are observed in the edge pressure profile. A triple Langmuir probe has recently been installed in order to investigate the structure of the edge pressure pedestal in Pegasus H-mode discharges and complement the current density profile measurements. Local density and temperature measurements will be collected using the triple Langmuir probe at varying spatial locations to identify edge pressure profiles. These pressure profiles will be measured in both the L-mode and H-mode regimes. The triple probe will additionally be used to observe the turbulence levels before, during, and after the L-H mode transition. Complete density and temperature profiles including the pedestal will be obtained using a combination of Langmuir probe and Thomson scattering measurements. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  9. Increased intracranial pressure

    MedlinePlus

    Increased intracranial pressure is a rise in the pressure inside the skull that can result from or cause brain injury. ... Increased intracranial pressure can be due to a rise in pressure of the cerebrospinal fluid. This is ...

  10. Low Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Low Blood Pressure Updated:Aug 30,2016 To know if you ... to learn more about blood pressure . If my blood pressure stays around 85/55, do I have a ...

  11. Probing the Probes: Fitness Factors For Small Molecule Tools

    PubMed Central

    Workman, Paul; Collins, Ian

    2010-01-01

    Chemical probes for interrogating biological processes are of considerable current interest. Cell permeable small molecule tools have a major role in facilitating the functional annotation of the human genome, understanding both physiological and pathological processes, and validating new molecular targets. To be valuable, chemical tools must satisfy necessary criteria and recent publications have suggested objective guidelines for what makes a useful chemical probe. Although recognizing that such guidelines may be valuable, we caution against overly restrictive rules that may stifle innovation in favor of a “fit-for-purpose” approach. Reviewing the literature and providing examples from the cancer field, we recommend a series of “fitness factors” to be considered when assessing chemical probes. We hope this will encourage innovative chemical biology research while minimizing the generation of poor quality and misleading biological data, thus increasing understanding of the particular biological area, to the benefit of basic research and drug discovery. PMID:20609406

  12. Using electrical resistance probes for moisture determination in switchgrass windrows

    SciTech Connect

    Chesser Jr., G. D.; Davis, J. D.; Purswell, J. L.; Lemus, R.

    2011-08-01

    Determining moisture levels in windrowed biomass is important for both forage producers and researchers. Energy crops such as switchgrass have been troublesome when using the standard methods set for electrical resistance meters. The objectives of this study were to i) develop the methodologies needed to measure MC in switchgrass using electrical resistance meters, ii) to determine the effects of pressure and probe orientation on MC measurement and iii) to generate MC calibration equations for electrical resistance meters using switchgrass in the senescence growth stage. Two meters (Meter 1, Farmex HT-PRO; Meter 2, Delmhorst F-2000) were selected based on commercial availability. A forage compression apparatus was designed and constructed with on-farm materials and methods to provide a simple system of applying pressure achievable by any forage producer or researcher in the field. Two trials were performed to test four levels of moisture contents (10, 20, 30, and 40%), five pressures (0, 1.68, 3.11, 4.55, 6.22 kN/m 2; 0, 35, 65, 95, 130 lb/ft 2), and two probe orientations (axial and transverse) in a 4x5x2 factorial design. Results indicated that meter accuracy increased as pressure increased. Regression models accounted for 91% and 81% of the variation for Meter 1 and Meter 2 at a pressure of 4.55 kN/m 2 (95 lb/ft 2) and a transverse probe orientation. Calibration equations were developed for both meters to improve moisture measurement accuracy for farmers and researchers in the field.

  13. Data analysis of P sub T/P sub S noseboom probe testing on F100 engine P680072 at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foote, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    Results from the altitude testing of a P sub T/P sub S noseboom probe on the F100 engine are discused. The results are consistent with sea level test results. The F100 engine altitude test verified automatic downmatch with the engine pressure ratio control, and backup control inlet case static pressure demonstrated sufficient accuracy for backup control fuel flow scheduling. The production P6 probe measured Station 6 pressures accurately for both undistorted and distorted inlet airflows.

  14. Nanofabrication using near-field optical probes

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Euan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    Nanofabrication using near-field optical probes is an established technique for rapid prototyping and automated maskless fabrication of nanostructured devices. In this review, we present the primary types of near-field probes and their physical processing mechanisms. Highlights of recent developments include improved resolution by optimizing the probe shape, incorporation of surface plasmonics in probe design, broader use in biological and magnetic storage applications, and increased throughput using probe arrays as well as high speed writing and patterning. PMID:22713756

  15. Miniature probes for use in gas turbine testing. [component reliability measuring instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glawe, G. E.; Krause, L. N.

    1974-01-01

    Several examples of miniature probes (null type as well as fixed position) are presented which have proved useful in aircraft and space power systems component testing and are applicable to automotive gas turbine testing. These probes are used to determine component or system performance from the measurement of gas temperature as well as total and static pressure, and flow direction. Detailed drawings of the sensors are presented along with experimental data covering the flow characteristics over the range of intended use.

  16. Hand-held survey probe

    DOEpatents

    Young, Kevin L [Idaho Falls, ID; Hungate, Kevin E [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-02-23

    A system for providing operational feedback to a user of a detection probe may include an optical sensor to generate data corresponding to a position of the detection probe with respect to a surface; a microprocessor to receive the data; a software medium having code to process the data with the microprocessor and pre-programmed parameters, and making a comparison of the data to the parameters; and an indicator device to indicate results of the comparison. A method of providing operational feedback to a user of a detection probe may include generating output data with an optical sensor corresponding to the relative position with respect to a surface; processing the output data, including comparing the output data to pre-programmed parameters; and indicating results of the comparison.

  17. Automated robotic equipment for ultrasonic inspection of pressurizer heater wells

    DOEpatents

    Nachbar, Henry D.; DeRossi, Raymond S.; Mullins, Lawrence E.

    1993-01-01

    A robotic device for remotely inspecting pressurizer heater wells is provided which has the advantages of quickly, precisely, and reliably acquiring data at reasonable cost while also reducing radiation exposure of an operator. The device comprises a prober assembly including a probe which enters a heater well, gathers data regarding the condition of the heater well and transmits a signal carrying that data; a mounting device for mounting the probe assembly at the opening of the heater well so that the probe can enter the heater well; a first motor mounted on the mounting device for providing movement of the probe assembly in an axial direction; and a second motor mounted on the mounting device for providing rotation of the probe assembly. This arrangement enables full inspection of the heater well to be carried out.

  18. A study of the vent pipe for the gravity probe-B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoshaug, R. N.

    1982-01-01

    The Gravity Probe B experiment to test Einstein's relativity theory is a possible Space Shuttle project. Cooling of the gyroscopes and thrusting of the Probe into a zero-drag environment is accomplished by vaporizing liquid helium and venting the gas from the Probe through a nozzle system. In order to avoid malfunctioning of this cooling-thruster system, the pressure difference across the vent pipe-thruster system must be maintained to be less than the vapor pressure of liquid helium at the given temperature. This study investigated helium gas flow through the vent pipe for various configurations, mass flow rates, and pipe diameters. In addition, pertinent properties of both liquid and gaseous helium were investigated. It was observed that helical coiling of the pipe about the Dewar caused less frictional drag and less pressure change than did sharp pipe bending. Also, for various flow rates and nozzle throat area sizes, the system would malfunction for a given bath temperature.

  19. In-flight comparisons of boundary-layer and wake measurement probes for incompressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mertaugh, L. J., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The results are presented of in-flight comparisons of a number of boundary-layer and wake measurement probes suitable for low-speed flight-test investigations. The tested boundary-layer probes included a traversing total-pressure probe and a hot-film probe mounted on an internally-mounted drive mechanism, a curved and a straight boundary-layer rake, and a traversing hot-film probe with an externally-mounted drive mechanism. The wake measuring devices included a traversing, self-aligning probe, a wake rake, and an integrating wake rate. The boundary-layer data are compared with a common reference velocity profile and comments given regarding the accuracy of the static-pressure and total-pressure measurements. Discussions on the various calibration presentations used with hot-wire and hot-film sensors and various aspects of improving the accuracy of hot-film sensor results are given in the appendix of this report.

  20. Pancreas tumor interstitial pressure catheter measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieskoski, Michael D.; Gunn, Jason; Marra, Kayla; Trembly, B. Stuart; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    This paper highlights the methodology in measuring interstitial pressure in pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumors. A Millar Mikrotip pressure catheter (SPR-671) was used in this study and a system was built to amplify and filter the output signal for data collection. The Millar pressure catheter was calibrated prior to each experiment in a water column at 37°C, range of 0 to 60 inH2O (112 mmHg), resulting in a calibration factor of 33 mV / 1 inH2O. The interstitial pressures measured in two orthotopically grown pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor were 57 mmHg and 48 mmHg, respectively. Verteporfin uptake into the pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor was measured using a probe-based experimental dosimeter.

  1. Reduced pressure quenching oil and distortion

    SciTech Connect

    Asada, S.; Ogino, M.

    1996-12-31

    Cooling process observed in a quenching oil`s cooling curve determination by JIS silver probe method, has been divided into three stages, vapor blanket stage, boiling stage and convection stage. Under reduced pressure vaporization is accelerated and extend the vapor blanket stage which shift the position of boiling stage the fastest of cooling speed among the cooling process toward low temperature side. Taking advantage of this behavior in quenching under reduced pressure, it is possible to improve quench hardenability by controlling reduced pressure. Vapor pressure of quenching oil increases under very high vacuum and accelerates vapor blanket formation and covers the material with more vapor blanket, resulting in reduction of cooling speed. Excessive vapor blanket covering the material will lead to partially uneven quenching of the treated material caused by uneven conditions by partial decomposition. Making vapor blanket distribution more even and to optimize uniform coating condition enables to prevent heat treatment distortion caused by uneven quenching conditions.

  2. Sagnac interferometry as a probe to the commutation relation of a macroscopic quantum mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Ran; Gong Xuefei; Pei Shouyong; Luo Ziren; Lau, Y. K.

    2010-09-15

    Single photon Sagnac interferometry as a probe to macroscopic quantum mechanics is considered at the theoretical level. For a freely moving macroscopic quantum mirror susceptible to radiation pressure force inside a Sagnac interferometer, a careful analysis of the input-output relation reveals that the particle spectrum readout at the bright and dark ports encode information concerning the noncommutativity of position and momentum of the macroscopic mirror. A feasible experimental scheme to probe the commutation relation of a macroscopic quantum mirror is outlined to explore the possible frontier between classical and quantum regimes. In the Appendix, the case of Michelson interferometry as a feasible probe is also sketched.

  3. F-18 SRA closeup of nose cap showing Advanced L-Probe Air Data Integration experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This L-shaped probe mounted on the forward fuselage of a modified F-18 Systems Research Aircraft was the focus of an air data collection experiment flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Advanced L-Probe Air Data Integration (ALADIN) experiment focused on providing pilots with angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip information as well as traditional airspeed and altitude data from a single system. For the experiment, the probes--one mounted on either side of the F-18's forward fuselage--were hooked to a series of four transducers, which relayed pressure measurements to an on-board research computer.

  4. Interexaminer reliability of the assessment of clinical furcation parameters as related to different probes.

    PubMed

    Eickholz, P; Steinbrenner, H; Lenhard, M; Marquardt, M; Holle, R

    1999-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the interexaminer reliability of the assessment of clinical furcation diagnosis. Horizontal attachment level (PAL-H) measurements were obtained by 3 examiners in 6 molars in each of 10 patients with advanced periodontitis. In each patient, 3 molars were examined using a 3 mm incrementally marked Nabers probe, and 3 molars were examined using a pressure-calibrated plastic probe (TPS). Assignment of the probe was random, and the schedule of examiners was changed for each patient. Clinical assessments were validated by intrasurgical measurements in 6 patients. Sixty molars with 152 furcations were investigated. Multifactorial analysis of variance revealed that PAL-H measurements were significantly influenced by examiner and furcation location, whereas type of probe and schedule of examination had no influence. The overall intraclass correlation coefficient was r = 0.695. The difference between clinical and intrasurgical PAL-H assessment was influenced by examiner and location but not by type of probe. Approximately 70% of the total variance of PAL-H measurements was due to the variance of true values, whereas 30% of the variance may be explained by interexaminer and intraexaminer variance. The pressure-calibrated TPS probe failed to increase the interexaminer reliability of PAL-H measurements when compared to a Nabers probe. PMID:10102744

  5. Evaluation of ion collection area in Faraday probes

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Daniel L.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2010-06-15

    A Faraday probe with three concentric rings was designed and fabricated to assess the effect of gap width and collector diameter in a systematic study of the diagnostic ion collection area. The nested Faraday probe consisted of two concentric collector rings and an outer guard ring, which enabled simultaneous current density measurements on the inner and outer collectors. Two versions of the outer collector were fabricated to create gaps of 0.5 and 1.5 mm between the rings. Distribution of current density in the plume of a low-power Hall thruster ion source was measured in azimuthal sweeps at constant radius from 8 to 20 thruster diameters downstream of the exit plane with variation in facility background pressure. A new analytical technique is proposed to account for ions collected in the gap between the Faraday probe collector and guard ring. This method is shown to exhibit excellent agreement between all nested Faraday probe configurations, and to reduce the magnitude of integrated ion beam current to levels consistent with Hall thruster performance analyses. The technique is further studied by varying the guard ring bias potential with a fixed collector bias potential, thereby controlling ion collection in the gap. Results are in agreement with predictions based on the proposed analytical technique. The method is applied to a past study comparing the measured ion current density profiles of two Faraday probe designs. These findings provide new insight into the nature of ion collection in Faraday probe diagnostics, and lead to improved accuracy with a significant reduction in measurement uncertainty.

  6. Evaluation of ion collection area in Faraday probes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Daniel L; Gallimore, Alec D

    2010-06-01

    A Faraday probe with three concentric rings was designed and fabricated to assess the effect of gap width and collector diameter in a systematic study of the diagnostic ion collection area. The nested Faraday probe consisted of two concentric collector rings and an outer guard ring, which enabled simultaneous current density measurements on the inner and outer collectors. Two versions of the outer collector were fabricated to create gaps of 0.5 and 1.5 mm between the rings. Distribution of current density in the plume of a low-power Hall thruster ion source was measured in azimuthal sweeps at constant radius from 8 to 20 thruster diameters downstream of the exit plane with variation in facility background pressure. A new analytical technique is proposed to account for ions collected in the gap between the Faraday probe collector and guard ring. This method is shown to exhibit excellent agreement between all nested Faraday probe configurations, and to reduce the magnitude of integrated ion beam current to levels consistent with Hall thruster performance analyses. The technique is further studied by varying the guard ring bias potential with a fixed collector bias potential, thereby controlling ion collection in the gap. Results are in agreement with predictions based on the proposed analytical technique. The method is applied to a past study comparing the measured ion current density profiles of two Faraday probe designs. These findings provide new insight into the nature of ion collection in Faraday probe diagnostics, and lead to improved accuracy with a significant reduction in measurement uncertainty. PMID:20590238

  7. Dynamic light scattering homodyne probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V. (Inventor); Cannell, David S. (Inventor); Smart, Anthony E. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An optical probe for analyzing a sample illuminated by a laser includes an input optical fiber operably connectable to the laser where the input optical fiber has an entrance end and an exit end. The probe also includes a first beam splitter where the first beam splitter is adapted to transmit an alignment portion of a light beam from the input fiber exit end and to reflect a homodyning portion of the light beam from the input fiber. The probe also includes a lens between the input fiber exit end and the first beam splitter and a first and a second output optical fiber, each having an entrance end and an exit end, each exit end being operably connectable to respective optical detectors. The probe also includes a second beam splitter which is adapted to reflect at least a portion of the reflected homodyning portion into the output fiber entrance ends and to transmit light from the laser scattered by the sample into the entrance ends.

  8. Probing the atmosphere with infrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posmentier, E. S.; Donn, W. L.

    1969-01-01

    Recent studies are reported which have contributed to the knowledge of atmospheric structure and have established the practicality of infrasonic techniques for probing the atmosphere to heights of 120 km or more. Observations of a few types of infrasound are reviewed, and the theories used to account for the infrasound propagation and the deduced atmospheric structures are discussed.

  9. A fluorescent probe for ecstasy.

    PubMed

    Masseroni, D; Biavardi, E; Genovese, D; Rampazzo, E; Prodi, L; Dalcanale, E

    2015-08-18

    A nanostructure formed by the insertion in silica nanoparticles of a pyrene-derivatized cavitand, which is able to specifically recognize ecstasy in water, is presented. The absence of effects from interferents and an efficient electron transfer process occurring after complexation of ecstasy, makes this system an efficient fluorescent probe for this popular drug. PMID:26166808

  10. Samara Probe For Remote Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, James D.

    1989-01-01

    Imaging probe descends through atmosphere of planet, obtaining images of ground surface as it travels. Released from aircraft over Earth or from spacecraft over another planet. Body and single wing shaped like samara - winged seed like those of maple trees. Rotates as descends, providing panoramic view of terrain below. Radio image obtained by video camera to aircraft or spacecraft overhead.

  11. SUB-SLAB PROBE INSTALLATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sub-slab sampling has become an integral part of vapor intrusion investigations. It is now recommended in guidance documents developed by EPA and most states. A method for sub-slab probe installation was devised in 2002, presented at conferences through 2005, and finally docume...

  12. Wind measurements by electromagnetic probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susko, Michael

    1988-01-01

    The emerging technology of electromagnetic probing of the atmosphere to measure winds used in a space vehicle ascent winds load calculations is presented. The frequency range, altitude, and resolution for the following probes are presented: lidars, microwave radars, and clear-air Doppler radars (popularly known as wind profilers). The electromagnetic probing of the atmosphere by clear-air radars and lasers is the new technology to supplement balloon-borne wind sensors used to determine ascent wind loads of space vehicles. The electromagnetic probes measure the wind velocity using the Doppler effect. This is the radar technology used in MSFC's Radar Wind Profiler, and is similar to the technology used in conventional Doppler systems except that the frequency is generally lower, antenna is bigger, and dwell time much longer. Designed for unattended and automated instrumentation in providing measurements of the wind in the troposphere, the profiler employs Doppler radar technology and is currently being put in operation at NASA Kennedy Space Center, Florida.

  13. Health. CEM Probe, January 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billington, Roy

    The importance of health and its relationship to personal and community life are explored in this issue of PROBE. Designed to acquaint British secondary school youth with topical problems, the series contains discussion and case studies of national and world issues, followed by questions for student discussion and research. Nine chapters comprise…

  14. NASA Smart Surgical Probe Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, Robert W.; Andrews, Russell J.; Jeffrey, Stefanie S.; Guerrero, Michael; Papasin, Richard; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Information Technologies being developed by NASA to assist astronaut-physician in responding to medical emergencies during long space flights are being employed for the improvement of women's health in the form of "smart surgical probe". This technology, initially developed for neurosurgery applications, not only has enormous potential for the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer, but broad applicability to a wide range of medical challenges. For the breast cancer application, the smart surgical probe is being designed to "see" a suspicious lump, determine by its features if it is cancerous, and ultimately predict how the disease may progress. A revolutionary early breast cancer detection tool based on this technology has been developed by a commercial company and is being tested in human clinical trials at the University of California at Davis, School of Medicine. The smart surgical probe technology makes use of adaptive intelligent software (hybrid neural networks/fuzzy logic algorithms) with the most advanced physiologic sensors to provide real-time in vivo tissue characterization for the detection, diagnosis and treatment of tumors, including determination of tumor microenvironment and evaluation of tumor margins. The software solutions and tools from these medical applications will lead to the development of better real-time minimally-invasive smart surgical probes for emergency medical care and treatment of astronauts on long space flights.

  15. CNP. Cervical Neoplasia Probe Control

    SciTech Connect

    Vargo, T.

    1995-05-17

    This software, which consists of a main executive and several subroutines, performs control of the optics, image acquisition, and Digital Signal Processing (DSP) of this image, of an optical based medical instrument that performs fluoresence detection of precancerous lesions (neoplasia) of the human cervix. The hardware portion of this medical instrument is known by the same name Cervical Neoplasia Probe (CNP)

  16. OCR Pace on Probes Quickens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2011-01-01

    In the 21 months since U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan stood on an iconic bridge in Selma, Alabama, and pledged to aggressively combat discrimination in the nation's schools, federal education officials have launched dozens of new probes in school districts and states that reach into civil rights issues that previously received little, if…

  17. Piston cylinder cell for high pressure ultrasonic pulse echo measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepa, M. W.; Ridley, C. J.; Kamenev, K. V.; Huxley, A. D.

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasonic techniques such as pulse echo, vibrating reed, or resonant ultrasound spectroscopy are powerful probes not only for studying elasticity but also for investigating electronic and magnetic properties. Here, we report on the design of a high pressure ultrasonic pulse echo apparatus, based on a piston cylinder cell, with a simplified electronic setup that operates with a single coaxial cable and requires sample lengths of mm only. The design allows simultaneous measurements of ultrasonic velocities and attenuation coefficients up to a pressure of 1.5 GPa. We illustrate the performance of the cell by probing the phase diagram of a single crystal of the ferromagnetic superconductor UGe2.

  18. Piston cylinder cell for high pressure ultrasonic pulse echo measurements.

    PubMed

    Kepa, M W; Ridley, C J; Kamenev, K V; Huxley, A D

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasonic techniques such as pulse echo, vibrating reed, or resonant ultrasound spectroscopy are powerful probes not only for studying elasticity but also for investigating electronic and magnetic properties. Here, we report on the design of a high pressure ultrasonic pulse echo apparatus, based on a piston cylinder cell, with a simplified electronic setup that operates with a single coaxial cable and requires sample lengths of mm only. The design allows simultaneous measurements of ultrasonic velocities and attenuation coefficients up to a pressure of 1.5 GPa. We illustrate the performance of the cell by probing the phase diagram of a single crystal of the ferromagnetic superconductor UGe2. PMID:27587156

  19. Nucleic acid probes in diagnostic medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberry, Phillip A.

    1991-01-01

    The need for improved diagnostic procedures is outlined and variations in probe technology are briefly reviewed. A discussion of the application of probe technology to the diagnosis of disease in animals and humans is presented. A comparison of probe versus nonprobe diagnostics and isotopic versus nonisotopic probes is made and the current state of sequence amplification is described. The current market status of nucleic acid probes is reviewed with respect to their diagnostic application in human and veterinary medicine. Representative product examples are described and information on probes being developed that offer promise as future products is discussed.

  20. Langmuir probe measurements of weakly collisional electropositive RF discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Paul; Dyson, Anthony; Allen, John E.

    2001-05-01

    We report on Langmuir probe measurements of low-pressure (0.1-20 Pa) electropositive plasmas in an RF discharge at 13.56 MHz. From the probe I-V characteristic it is found that the electron density inferred from the ion current in the ion saturation region using radial motion (Allen, Boyd and Reynolds, ABR) theory can be up to one-half that obtained directly from the electron current at the plasma potential. The reduction in the ion current is attributed to orbital motion (OM) of the ions and also to a small number of ion-neutral collisions in the presheath. We show that if a sufficiently large probe is chosen so as to minimize the OM effects then the collisional theory developed by Shih and Levi (1971) can be used to give an appropriate correction factor over a narrow pressure range. The corrected electron density is found to agree with the knee current value to typically 10% for Ar, N2 and Kr plasmas.

  1. Flexible Cryogenic Temperature and Liquid-Level Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberbusch, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Lightweight, flexible probes have been developed for measuring temperatures at multiple locations in tanks that contain possibly pressurized cryogenic fluids. If the fluid in a given tank is subcritical (that is, if it consists of a liquid and its vapor), then in one of two modes of operation, the temperature measurements made by a probe of this type can be used to deduce the approximate level of the liquid. The temperature sensors are silicon diodes located at intervals along a probe. If the probe is to be used to measure a temperature gradient along a given axis in the tank, then the probe must be mounted along that axis. In the non-liquid-level-sensing temperature-measurement mode, a constant small electric current is applied to each diode and the voltage across the diode . a known function of the current and temperature . is measured as an indication of its temperature. For the purpose of this measurement, "small electric current" signifies a current that is not large enough to cause a significant increase in the measured temperature. More specifically, the probe design calls for a current of 10 A, which, in the cryogenic temperature range of interest, generates heat at a rate of only about 0.01 mW per diode. In the liquid-level-sensing mode, one applies a larger current (30 mA) to each diode so as to heat each diode appreciably (with a power of about 36 mW in the temperature range of interest). Because the liquid cools the diode faster than does the vapor, the temperature of the diode is less when diode is immersed in the liquid than when it is above the surface of the liquid. Thus, the temperature (voltage) reading from each diode can be used to determine whether the liquid level is above or below the diode, and one can deduce that the liquid level lies between two adjacent diodes, the lower one of which reads a significantly lower temperature. The aforementioned techniques for measuring temperature and deducing liquid level are not new. What is new here are

  2. Flexible Cryogenic Temperature and Liquid-Level Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberbusch, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Lightweight, flexible probes have been developed for measuring temperatures at multiple locations in tanks that contain possibly pressurized cryogenic fluids. If the fluid in a given tank is subcritical (that is, if it consists of a liquid and its vapor), then in one of two modes of operation, the temperature measurements made by a probe of this type can be used to deduce the approximate level of the liquid. The temperature sensors are silicon diodes located at intervals along a probe. If the probe is to be used to measure a temperature gradient along a given axis in the tank, then the probe must be mounted along that axis. In the temperature-measurement mode, a constant small electric current is applied to each diode and the voltage across the diode a known function of the current and temperature is measured as an indication of its temperature. For the purpose of this measurement, small electric current signifies a current that is not large enough to cause a significant increase in the measured temperature. More specifically, the probe design calls for a current of 10 A, which, in the cryogenic temperature range of interest, generates heat at a rate of only about 0.01 mW per diode. In the liquid-level-sensing mode, one applies a larger current (30 mA) to each diode so as to heat each diode appreciably (with a power of about 36 mW in the temperature range of interest). Because the liquid cools the diode faster than does the vapor, the temperature of the diode is less when the diode is immersed in the liquid than when it is above the surface of the liquid. Thus, the temperature (voltage) reading from each diode can be used to determine whether the liquid level is above or below the diode, and one can deduce that the liquid level lies between two adjacent diodes, the lower one of which reads a significantly lower temperature. The aforementioned techniques for measuring temperature and deducing liquid level are not new. What is new here are the designs of the probes

  3. Langmuir probe measurements in a VHF dielectric plasma etcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorf, Leonid; Ramaswamy, Kartik; Collins, Ken; Merry, Walter

    2008-10-01

    Langmuir probe (LP) measurements in a realistic VHF CCP discharge are complicated by a number of factors, such as absence of a well-defined DC ground reference and unpredictable behavior of standard electronic components at VHF. The VHF source can produce plasma very efficiently; therefore, to reach the same plasma density, VHF discharges require lower power than HF discharges. Nevertheless, even at low source power (˜100--200W with Ne<= 10^10 cm-3), RF potential in a VHF CCP discharge can be large, especially compared to that in an ICP discharge with similar parameters. Uncompensated RF potential distorts both electron and ion parts of the measured V-I characteristic, resulting in unrealistic plasma parameters. Here, we present preliminary results of our work to develop a LP system suitable for measurements in a 162 MHz dielectric plasma etcher. The probe design employs many previously developed RF compensation techniques. Furthermore, all electronic components of the probe and the measuring circuit were characterized using a network analyzer to select adequate values. The probe was used to study the effects of magnetic field, input power, pressure, and other operating conditions on electron and ion density profiles. Electron temperature was found to be in the range of 1.8 -- 3.5 eV, and the shape of ion saturation curve was found to be in agreement with OML theory.

  4. Optical Pressure-Temperature Sensor for a Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, John; Korman, Valentin; Gregory, Don

    2008-01-01

    A compact sensor for measuring temperature and pressure in a combusti on chamber has been proposed. The proposed sensor would include two optically birefringent, transmissive crystalline wedges: one of sapph ire (Al2O3) and one of magnesium oxide (MgO), the optical properties of both of which vary with temperature and pressure. The wedges wou ld be separated by a vapor-deposited thin-film transducer, which wou ld be primarily temperaturesensitive (in contradistinction to pressur e- sensitive) when attached to a crystalline substrate. The sensor w ould be housed in a rugged probe to survive the extreme temperatures and pressures in a combustion chamber.

  5. Synergy Between Entry Probes and Orbiters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Richard E.

    2005-01-01

    We identify two catagories of probe-orbiter interactions which benefit the science return from a particular mission. The first category is termed "Mission Design Aspects". This category is meant to describe those aspects of the mission design involving the orbiter that affect the science return from the probe(s). The second category of probe-orbiter interaction is termed "Orbiter-Probe Science Interactions", and is meant to include interactions between oribter and probe(s) that directly involve science measurements made from each platform. Two mission related aspects of probe-orbiter interactions are delivery of a probe(s) to the entry site(s) by an orbiter, and communication between each probe and the orbiter. We consider four general probe-orbiter science interactions that greatly enhance, or in certain cases are essential for, the mission science return. The four topics are, global context of the probe entry site(s), ground truth for remote sensing observations of an orbiter, atmospheric composition measurements, and wind measurements.

  6. Dynamics of plasma flow formation in a pulsed accelerator operating at a constant pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baimbetov, F. B.; Zhukeshov, A. M.; Amrenova, A. U.

    2007-01-01

    Features in the dynamics of plasma flow formation at a constant pressure in a pulsed coaxial accelerator have been studied. The temperature and density of electrons in a plasma bunch have been determined using a probe technique.

  7. CTU Optical probes for liquid phase detection in the 1000 MW steam turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolovratník, Michal; Bartoš, Ondřej

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce the measurement capacity of a new generation of CTU's optical probes to determine the liquid phase distribution in steam turbines and other energy systems. At the same time the paper presents the first part of the results concerning output wetness achieved through the use of experimental research performed with the probes in a new low pressure (LP) part of the steam turbine 1000MW in the Temelin nuclear power plant (ETE). Two different probes were used. A small size extinction probe with a diameter of 25mm which was developed for measuring in a wider range of turbines in comparison with the previous generation with a diameter of 50mm. The second probe used was a photogrammetric probe developed to observe the coarse droplets. This probe is still under development and this measurement was focused on verifying the capabilities of the probe. The data processing technique is presented together with yielded examples of the wetness distribution along the last blade of the 1000MW steam turbine. The experimental measurement was done in cooperation with Doosan Škoda Power s.r.o. (DSP).

  8. Effect of Reynolds Number and Mach Number on flow angularity probe sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. A.; Adcock, J. B.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary calibrations were performed on nine flow angularity probes in the Langley 7- by 10-Foot High-Speed Tunnel (7 x 10 HST) and the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (0.3-m TCT). These probes will be used in surveying the test section flows of the National Transonic Facility (NTF). The probes used in this study have a pyramid head with five pressure orifices. The calibrations consisted of both isolated probe measurements and rake-mounted multiprobe measurements that covered a range of subsonic Mach numbers up to 0.90 and Reynolds numbers per foot up to 40 X 10 to the 6th power. The preliminary calibration in the 7 x 10 HST included testing the probes both individually and in a rake. The 0.3-m TCT calibration tested two probes singly at varying Reynolds numbers. The results from these tests include Mach number, Reynolds number, and rake-mounting effects. The results of these tests showed probe sensitivity to be slightly affected by Mach number. At Reynolds numbers per foot above 10 x 10 to the 6th power, the probe did not exhibit a Reynolds number sensitivity.

  9. Dealing with Peer Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Dealing With Peer Pressure KidsHealth > For Kids > Dealing With Peer Pressure ... Let's talk about how to handle it. Defining Peer Pressure Peers influence your life, even if you ...

  10. Intracranial pressure monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... head. The monitor senses the pressure inside the skull and sends measurements to a recording device. ... are 3 ways to monitor pressure in the skull (intracranial pressure). INTRAVENTRICULAR CATHETER The intraventricular catheter is ...

  11. Skin (Pressure) Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Skin dryness Next Topic Sleep problems Skin (pressure) sores A skin or pressure sore develops when the blood supply to an ... is bedridden or always in a wheelchair puts pressure on the same places much of the time. ...

  12. High blood pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000468.htm High blood pressure To use the sharing features on ... body. Hypertension is the term used to describe high blood pressure. Blood pressure readings are given as ...

  13. High blood pressure medicines

    MedlinePlus

    Hypertension - medicines ... blood vessel diseases. You may need to take medicines to lower your blood pressure if lifestyle changes ... blood pressure to the target level. WHEN ARE MEDICINES FOR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE USED Most of the ...

  14. Intracranial pressure monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ICP monitoring; CSF pressure monitoring ... There are 3 ways to monitor pressure in the skull (intracranial pressure). INTRAVENTRICULAR CATHETER The intraventricular catheter is the most accurate monitoring method. To insert an intraventricular catheter, a ...

  15. High blood pressure - infants

    MedlinePlus

    National High Blood Pressure Education Program Working Group on High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents. The fourth report on the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of high blood pressure in children and adolescents. Pediatrics . ...

  16. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Nearly 1 in 3 American adults has high ... weight. How Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you ...

  17. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... normal blood pressure 140/90 or higher is high blood pressure Between 120 and 139 for the top number, ... prehypertension. Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it. High ...

  18. Preventing Pressure Sores

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Experts \\ Preventing Pressure Sores Topics Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 Spinal Cord Injury 101 The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury ... The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Preventing Pressure Sores Preventing Pressure Sores Transition from Hospital to ...

  19. Free-stream static pressure measurements in the Longshot hypersonic wind tunnel and sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossir, Guillaume; Van Hove, Bart; Paris, Sébastien; Rambaud, Patrick; Chazot, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    The performance of fast-response slender static pressure probes is evaluated in the short-duration, cold-gas, VKI Longshot hypersonic wind tunnel. Free-stream Mach numbers range between 9.5 and 12, and unit Reynolds numbers are within 3-10 × 106/m. Absolute pressure sensors are fitted within the probes, and an inexpensive calibration method, suited to low static pressure environments (200-1000 Pa), is described. Transfer functions relating the probe measurements p w to the free-stream static pressure p ∞ are established for the Longshot flow conditions based on numerical simulations. The pressure ratios p w / p ∞ are found to be close to unity for both laminar and turbulent boundary layers. Weak viscous effects characterized by small viscous interaction parameters {bar{χ }}<1.5 are confirmed experimentally for probe aspect ratios of L/ D > 16.5 by installing multiple pressure sensors in a single probe. The effect of pressure orifice geometry is also evaluated experimentally and found to be negligible for either straight or chamfered holes, 0.6-1 mm in diameter. No sensitivity to probe angle of attack could be evidenced for α < 0.33°. Pressure measurements are compared to theoretical predictions assuming an isentropic nozzle flow expansion. Significant deviations from this ideal case and the Mach 14 contoured nozzle design are uncovered. Validation of the static pressure measurements is obtained by comparing shock wave locations on Schlieren photographs to numerical predictions using free-stream properties derived from the static pressure probes. While these results apply to the Longshot wind tunnel, the present methodology and sensitivity analysis can guide similar investigations for other hypersonic test facilities.

  20. Flight-test results from two total temperature probes for air-data measurements up to 2014 K (3625 R)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nugent, J.; Sakamoto, G. M.; Webb, L. D.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental temperature probe package containing a fluidic oscillator temperature probe and a shielded thermocouple temperature probe was tested during several X-15 flights. The X-15 flights provided greatly varying test conditions, including a wide range of rapidly changing total temperatures and Mach numbers which extended from subsonic to hypersonic speeds. Within restricted ranges of free-stream Mach number, free-stream unit weight flow, and local stagnation pressure, both probes yielded ramp outputs of temperature parallel to ramp inputs of free-stream total temperature. Within these ranges both probes were used to determine total temperature in the Mach 6 temperature environment. Because ambient temperature was known, both probes were used to estimate velocity and Mach number.

  1. Overview of Probe-based Storage Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Ci Hui; Wen, Jing; Gong, Si Di; Peng, Yuan Xiu

    2016-07-01

    The current world is in the age of big data where the total amount of global digital data is growing up at an incredible rate. This indeed necessitates a drastic enhancement on the capacity of conventional data storage devices that are, however, suffering from their respective physical drawbacks. Under this circumstance, it is essential to aggressively explore and develop alternative promising mass storage devices, leading to the presence of probe-based storage devices. In this paper, the physical principles and the current status of several different probe storage devices, including thermo-mechanical probe memory, magnetic probe memory, ferroelectric probe memory, and phase-change probe memory, are reviewed in details, as well as their respective merits and weakness. This paper provides an overview of the emerging probe memories potentially for next generation storage device so as to motivate the exploration of more innovative technologies to push forward the development of the probe storage devices.

  2. Further capacitive imaging experiments using modified probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiaokang; Li, Zhen; Yan, An; Li, Wei; Chen, Guoming; Hutchins, David A.

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, capacitive imaging (CI) is growing in popularity within the NDE communities, as it has the potential to test materials and structures for defects that are not easily tested by other techniques. In previous work, The CI technique has been successfully used on a various types of materials, including concrete, glass/carbon fibre composite, steel, etc. In such CI experiments, the probes are normally with symmetric or concentric electrodes etched onto PCBs. In addition to these conventional coplanar PCB probes, modified geometries can be made and they can lead to different applications. A brief overview of these modified probes, including high resolution surface imaging probe, combined CI/eddy current probe, and CI probe using an oscilloscope probe as the sensing electrode, is presented in this work. The potential applications brought by these probes are also discussed.

  3. Overview of Probe-based Storage Technologies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Ci Hui; Wen, Jing; Gong, Si Di; Peng, Yuan Xiu

    2016-12-01

    The current world is in the age of big data where the total amount of global digital data is growing up at an incredible rate. This indeed necessitates a drastic enhancement on the capacity of conventional data storage devices that are, however, suffering from their respective physical drawbacks. Under this circumstance, it is essential to aggressively explore and develop alternative promising mass storage devices, leading to the presence of probe-based storage devices. In this paper, the physical principles and the current status of several different probe storage devices, including thermo-mechanical probe memory, magnetic probe memory, ferroelectric probe memory, and phase-change probe memory, are reviewed in details, as well as their respective merits and weakness. This paper provides an overview of the emerging probe memories potentially for next generation storage device so as to motivate the exploration of more innovative technologies to push forward the development of the probe storage devices. PMID:27456500

  4. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2014-04-29

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  5. Developing MR probes for molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Michael T; Chan, Kannie W Y

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging plays an important role in the era of personalized medicine, especially with recent advances in magnetic resonance (MR) probes. While the first generation of these probes focused on maximizing contrast enhancement, a second generation of probes has been developed to improve the accumulation within specific tissues or pathologies, and the newest generation of agents is also designed to report on changes in physiological status and has been termed "smart" agents. This represents a paradigm switch from the previously commercialized gadolinium and iron oxide probes to probes with new capabilities, and leads to new challenges as scanner hardware needs to be adapted for detecting these probes. In this chapter, we highlight the unique features for all five different categories of MR probes, including the emerging chemical exchange saturation transfer, (19)F, and hyperpolarized probes, and describe the key physical properties and features motivating their design. As part of this comparison, the strengths and weaknesses of each category are discussed. PMID:25287693

  6. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2013-04-30

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  7. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Jesse D.; Sulchek, Todd A.; Feigin, Stuart C.

    2012-07-10

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  8. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Jesse D.; Sulchek, Todd A.; Feigin, Stuart C.

    2010-04-06

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  9. Particle Pressures in Fluidized Beds. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, C.S.; Rahman, K.; Jin, C.

    1996-09-01

    This project studies the particle pressure, which may be thought of as the force exerted by the particulate phase of a multiphase mixture, independently of that exerted by other phases. The project is divided into two parts, one concerning gas and the other liquid fluidized beds. Previous work on gas fluidized beds had suggested that the particle pressures are generated by bubbling action. Thus, for these gas fluidized bed studies, the particle pressure is measured around single bubbles generated in 2-D fluidized beds, using special probes developed especially for this purpose. Liquid beds are immune from bubbling and the particle pressures proved too small to measure directly. However, the major interest in particle pressures in liquid beds lies in their stabilizing effect that arises from the effective elasticity (the derivative of the particle pressure with respect to the void fraction): they impart to the bed. So rather than directly measure the particle pressure, we inferred the values of the elasticity from measurements of instability growth in liquid beds the inference was made by first developing a generic stability model (one with all the normally modeled coefficients left undetermined)and then working backwards to determine the unknown coefficients, including the elasticity.

  10. Particle pressures in fluidized beds. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, C.S.; Rahman, K.; Jin, C.

    1996-09-01

    This project studies the particle pressure, which may be thought of as the force exerted by the particulate phase of a multiphase mixture, independently of that exerted by other phases. The project is divided into two parts, one concerning gas and the other liquid fluidized beds. Previous work on gas fluidized beds had suggested that the particle pressures are generated by bubbling action. Thus, for these gas fluidized bed studies, the particle pressure is measured around single bubbles generated in 2-D fluidized beds, using special probes developed especially for this purpose. Liquid beds are immune from bubbling and the particle pressures proved too small to measure directly. However, the major interest in particle pressures in liquid beds lies in their stabilizing effect that arises from the effective elasticity (the derivative of the particle pressure with respect to the void fraction), they impart to the bed. So rather than directly measure the particle pressure, the authors inferred the values of the elasticity from measurements of instability growth in liquid beds; the inference was made by first developing a generic stability model (one with all the normally modeled coefficients left undetermined) and then working backwards to determine the unknown coefficients, including the elasticity.

  11. Optically Levitated Microspheres as a Probe for New Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rider, Alexander; Moore, David; Blakemore, Charles; Lu, Marie; Gratta, Giorgio

    2016-03-01

    We are developing novel techniques to probe new interactions at micron distances using optically levitated dielectric microspheres. Levitated microspheres are an ideal probe for short-range interactions because they are suspended using the radiation pressure at the focus of a laser beam, which means that the microspheres can be precisely manipulated and isolated from the surrounding environment at high vacuum. We have performed a search for unknown charged particles bound within the bulk of the microspheres. Currently, we are searching for the presence of a Chameleon field postulated to explain the presence of dark energy in the universe. In the future we plan to use optically levitated microspheres to search for micron length-scale gravity like interactions that could couple between a microsphere and another mass. We will present resent results from these experiments and plans for future searches for new interactions.

  12. Flush-mounted probe diagnostics for argon glow discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liang Cao, Jinxiang; Liu, Yu; Wang, Jian; Du, Yinchang; Zheng, Zhe; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Pi; Zhang, Jin; Li, Xiao; Qin, Yongqiang; Zhao, Liang

    2014-09-15

    A comparison is made between plasma parameters measured by a flush-mounted probe (FP) and a cylindrical probe (CP) in argon glow discharge plasma. Parameters compared include the space potential, the plasma density, and the effective electron temperature. It is found that the ion density determined by the FP agrees well with the electron density determined by the CP in the quasi-neutral plasma to better than 10%. Moreover, the space potential and effective electron temperature calculated from electron energy distribution function measured by the FP is consistent with that measured by the CP over the operated discharge current and pressure ranges. These results present the FP can be used as a reliable diagnostic tool in the stable laboratory plasma and also be anticipated to be applied in other complicated plasmas, such as tokamaks, the region of boundary-layer, and so on.

  13. Design Strategies for Bioorthogonal Smart Probes

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Peyton; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2014-01-01

    Bioorthogonal chemistry has enabled the selective labeling and detection of biomolecules in living systems. Bioorthogonal smart probes, which become fluorescent or deliver imaging or therapeutic agents upon reaction, allow for the visualization of biomolecules or targeted delivery even in the presence of excess unreacted probe. This review discusses the strategies used in the development of bioorthogonal smart probes and highlights the potential of these probes to further our understanding of biology. PMID:25315039

  14. High-pressure neutron scattering of Prussian blue analogue magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajerowski, Daniel

    Pressure sensitive magnetism is known to be useful in sensors, and while applications tend to use metallic alloys, molecule based magnets (MBMs) have been shown to have large inverse magnetostrictive (IMS) response. A promising group of MBMs are the Prussian blue analogues (PBAs), in which magnetic ordering can be tuned by external stimuli such as light, electric field, and pressure. Previously, high pressure neutron scattering of nickel hexacyanochromate hydrate has shown direct evidence for isomerization of the cyanide linkage with applied pressure. Other probes have suggested a similar effect in iron hexacyanochromate hydrate, although there has yet to be direct crystallographic evidence. Neutron diffraction is sensitive to organic elements, even while in the presence of metals, and we have performed experiments above 1 GPa to look for linkage isomerism in iron hexacyanochromate. These results are supported by bulk probes and calculations.

  15. Developing a nanoscale pressure sensor utilizing the Plasmon Ruler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Alex; Carroll, David

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a novel method for detecting pressure by utilizing the Plasmon Ruler; the effect by which the frequency of light scattered by a nanoparticle (NP) is red shifted when brought into close proximity with another NP. This distance dependent phenomenon is leveraged by a film/NP architecture, wherein silver NPs are suspended above a silver film by a polymer spacing layer. As the fluid pressure above the rigid substrate is increased, the polymer layer is compressed and the NP height is decreased, leading to a measurable redshift in the plasmon resonance frequency. Thus, by factoring in the strength of the polymer film's restoring force we can determine the pressure being applied. These devices were constructed onto fiber optic wires, which allow us to probe the device using the evanescent field from light inside the glass core. This naturally leads to in vivo medical applications, such as inter-compartment or inter-cranial pressure sensing via the inserted fiber optic probe.

  16. Fabrication of molecular tension probes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Bae; Fujii, Rika

    2016-01-01

    A unique bioluminescent imaging probe is introduced for illuminating molecular tension appended by protein-protein interactions (PPIs) of interest. A full-length luciferase is sandwiched between two proteins of interest via minimal flexible linkers. The ligand-activated PPIs append intramolecular tension to the sandwiched luciferase, boosting or dropping the enzymatic activity in a quantitative manner. This method guides construction of a new lineage of bioassays for determining molecular tension appended by ligand-activated PPIs. The summary of the method is: •Molecular tension appended by protein-protein interactions (PPI) is visualized with a luciferase.•Estrogen activities are quantitatively illuminated with the molecular tension probes.•Full-length Renilla luciferase enhances the optical intensities after bending by PPI. PMID:27222821

  17. Underwater probing with laser radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carswell, A. I.; Sizgoric, S.

    1975-01-01

    Recent advances in laser and electro optics technology have greatly enhanced the feasibility of active optical probing techniques aimed at the remote sensing of water parameters. This paper describes a LIDAR (laser radar) that has been designed and constructed for underwater probing. The influence of the optical properties of water on the general design parameters of a LIDAR system is considered. Discussion of the specific details in the choice of the constructed LIDAR is given. This system utilizes a cavity dumped argon ion laser transmitter capable of 50 watt peak powers, 10 nanosecond pulses and megahertz pulse repetition rates at 10 different wavelengths in the blue green region of the spectrum. The performance of the system, in proving various types of water, is demonstrated by summarizing the results of initial laboratory and field experiments.

  18. Metalloprotein-based MRI probes

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yuri; Jasanoff, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Metalloproteins have long been recognized as key determinants of endogenous contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of biological subjects. More recently, both natural and engineered metalloproteins have been harnessed as biotechnological tools to probe gene expression, enzyme activity, and analyte concentrations by MRI. Metalloprotein MRI probes are paramagnetic and function by analogous mechanisms to conventional gadolinium or iron oxide-based MRI contrast agents. Compared with synthetic agents, metalloproteins typically offer worse sensitivity, but the possibilities of using protein engineering and targeted gene expression approaches in conjunction with metalloprotein contrast agents are powerful and sometimes definitive strengths. This review summarizes theoretical and practical aspects of metalloprotein-based contrast agents, and discusses progress in the exploitation of these proteins for molecular imaging applications. PMID:23376346

  19. Fabrication of molecular tension probes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Bae; Fujii, Rika

    2016-01-01

    A unique bioluminescent imaging probe is introduced for illuminating molecular tension appended by protein–protein interactions (PPIs) of interest. A full-length luciferase is sandwiched between two proteins of interest via minimal flexible linkers. The ligand-activated PPIs append intramolecular tension to the sandwiched luciferase, boosting or dropping the enzymatic activity in a quantitative manner. This method guides construction of a new lineage of bioassays for determining molecular tension appended by ligand-activated PPIs. The summary of the method is: • Molecular tension appended by protein–protein interactions (PPI) is visualized with a luciferase. • Estrogen activities are quantitatively illuminated with the molecular tension probes. • Full-length Renilla luciferase enhances the optical intensities after bending by PPI. PMID:27222821

  20. Revisiting the Galileo Probe results by a stretched atmospheric mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Janssen, Michael A.

    2015-11-01

    The Juno spacecraft will arrive at Jupiter in the late 2016. One of its major scientific target is to measure the deep water abundance through its Microwave Radiometer (MWR). Prior to the arrival of Juno, the only observation of the weather layer of Jupiter was the Galileo probe (Niemann et al. 1996; Wong et al. 2004), which returned puzzling results. In contrast to the detected 2 - 5 times enrichment of CH4, NH3 and H2S with respect to the solar values, the amount of water was severely subsolar. Three dimensional modeling (Showman & Dowling 2000) shows that dynamic dry downdrafts could create a huge trough in the material surface, such that air flowing through the hot spots undergoes a temporary increase in pressure by a factor of 2, though it is still too small to explain the Galileo probe results. Inspired by the 3D modeling result, we constructed a stretched atmospheric model to parameterize the alteration of the thermodynamic state of air parcel by dynamics. In our model, an air parcel is initially in its equilibrium condensation state and later has been dynamically stretched to higher pressure modeled by a multiplicative factor S. When S=1, the atmosphere is unaltered by dynamics, representing the equilibrium condensation model. We found that, when S=4, the mixing ratios of H2O, NH3 and H2S match all observations coming from the Galileo probe site. Thus, this stretch parameter provides a continuous representation of dynamic processes from the equilibrium condensation model to the Galileo probe results. We also show that the strength of stretch (S) can be retrieved from Juno/MWR limb darkening observations.

  1. Improved double planar probe data analysis technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ghim, Young-chul; Hershkowitz, Noah

    2009-03-15

    Plasma electron number density and ion number density in a dc multidipole weakly collisional Ar plasma are measured with a single planar Langmuir probe and a double planar probe, respectively. A factor of two discrepancy between the two density measurements is resolved by applying Sheridan's empirical formula [T. E. Sheridan, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3084 (2000)] for sheath expansion to the double probe data.

  2. PROBE: Empowering the Individual (A Case Study).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towns, Kathryn; And Others

    The Potential Reentry Opportunities in Business and Education (PROBE) counseling and referral system is intended to help single parents and displaced homemakers gain greater control over their own lives, careers, and futures. PROBE began in 1975 as a campus-based program at Pennsylvania State University and became community based in 1977. PROBE,…

  3. Outer planet probe missions, designs and science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colin, L.

    1978-01-01

    The similarities and differences of atmosphere entry probe mission designs and sciences appropriate to certain solar system objects, are reviewed. Candidate payloads for Saturn and Titan probes are suggested. Significant supporting research and technology efforts are required to develop mission-peculiar technology for probe exploration of the Saturnian system.

  4. Fiber-Optic Probe For Laser Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, Dana H.; Mcalister, Kenneth W.; Gunter, William D., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Size and weight of optics reduced considerably. Proposed fiber-optic probe in laser velocimeter smaller (and, therefore, lighter in weight and more maneuverable) than previous probe. Proposed configuration is product of calculations and experiments showing virtual waists serve same purpose. Laser-velocimeter lens brought close to transfer lenses to focus on virtual waists, thereby shortening probe head considerably.

  5. Distance Probes of Dark Energy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, A. G.; Padmanabhan, N.; Aldering, G.; Allen, S. W.; Baltay, C.; Cahn, R. N.; D' Andrea, C. B.; Dalal, N.; Dawson, K. S.; Denney, K. D.; et al

    2015-03-15

    We present the results from the Distances subgroup of the Cosmic Frontier Community Planning Study (Snowmass 2013). This document summarizes the current state of the field as well as future prospects and challenges. In addition to the established probes using Type Ia supernovae and baryon acoustic oscillations, we also consider prospective methods based on clusters, active galactic nuclei, gravitational wave sirens and strong lensing time delays.

  6. Study of a wideband probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, P., Jr.; Salwen, H.

    1972-01-01

    The design of an experiment to measure communication characteristics of wideband satellite-to-ground links is reported. Of special concern are the effects of rainstorms and atmospheric turbulence on path attenuation and phase fluctuation. Multi-tone and pulse probing are considered. A multi-tone technique which is a modification of ATS-5 and ATS-F hardware is recommended. Data extraction and data processing techniques and key hardware requirements for the experiment are reviewed.

  7. Information gains from cosmological probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandis, S.; Seehars, S.; Refregier, A.; Amara, A.; Nicola, A.

    2016-05-01

    In light of the growing number of cosmological observations, it is important to develop versatile tools to quantify the constraining power and consistency of cosmological probes. Originally motivated from information theory, we use the relative entropy to compute the information gained by Bayesian updates in units of bits. This measure quantifies both the improvement in precision and the `surprise', i.e. the tension arising from shifts in central values. Our starting point is a WMAP9 prior which we update with observations of the distance ladder, supernovae (SNe), baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), and weak lensing as well as the 2015 Planck release. We consider the parameters of the flat ΛCDM concordance model and some of its extensions which include curvature and Dark Energy equation of state parameter w. We find that, relative to WMAP9 and within these model spaces, the probes that have provided the greatest gains are Planck (10 bits), followed by BAO surveys (5.1 bits) and SNe experiments (3.1 bits). The other cosmological probes, including weak lensing (1.7 bits) and {H0} measures (1.7 bits), have contributed information but at a lower level. Furthermore, we do not find any significant surprise when updating the constraints of WMAP9 with any of the other experiments, meaning that they are consistent with WMAP9. However, when we choose Planck15 as the prior, we find that, accounting for the full multi-dimensionality of the parameter space, the weak lensing measurements of CFHTLenS produce a large surprise of 4.4 bits which is statistically significant at the 8 σ level. We discuss how the relative entropy provides a versatile and robust framework to compare cosmological probes in the context of current and future surveys.

  8. System design of the Pioneer Venus spacecraft. Volume 5: Probe vehicle studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolte, L. J.; Stephenson, D. S.

    1973-01-01

    A summary of the key issues and studies conducted for the Pioneer Venus spacecraft and the resulting probe designs are presented. The key deceleration module issues are aerodynamic configuration and heat shield material selection. The design and development of the pressure vessel module are explained. Thermal control and science integration of the pressure vessel module are explained. The deceleration module heat shield, parachute and separation/despin are reported. The Thor/Delta and Atlas/Centaur baseline descriptions are provided.

  9. Pressure and Temperature Sensitive Paint Measurements on Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, John

    1999-01-01

    Luminescent molecular probes imbedded in a polymer binder form a temperature or pressure paint. On excitation by light of the proper wavelength, the luminescence, which is quenched either thermally or by oxygen, is detected by a camera or photodetector. From the detected luminescent intensity, temperature and pressure can be determined. The basic photophysics, calibration, accuracy and time response of luminescent paints is described followed by applications in wind tunnels and in rotating machinery.

  10. Instrument for near infrared emission spectroscopic probing of human fingertips in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaiken, J.; Deng, Bin; Bussjager, Rebecca J.; Shaheen, George; Rice, David; Stehlik, Dave; Fayos, John

    2010-03-01

    We present instrumentation for probing of volar side fingertip capillary beds with free space coupled near infrared light while collecting Raman, Rayleigh, and Mie scattered light as well as fluorescence. Fingertip skin capillary beds are highly vascularized relative to other tissues and present a desirable target for noninvasive probing of blood. But human hands and fingers in particular are also highly idiosyncratic body parts requiring specific apparatus to allow careful and methodical spectoscopic probing. The apparatus includes means for precise and reproducible placement of the tissues relative to the optical aperture. Appropriate means are provided for applying and maintaining pressure to keep surface tissues immobile during experiments while obtaining the desired blood content and flow. Soft matter, e.g., skin, extrudes into the aperture in response to any applied pressure, e.g., to keep the tissue in registration with the optical system, so the position, contact area, pressure, and force are continuously measured and recorded to produce feedback for an actuator applying force and to discern the compliance of the test subject. The compliance strongly affects the reliability of the measurement and human factors must be adequately managed in the case of in vivo probing. The apparatus produces reproducible observations and measurements that allow consistent probing of the tissues of a wide range of skin types.

  11. Cone-Probe Rake Design and Calibration for Supersonic Wind Tunnel Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Won, Mark J.

    1999-01-01

    A series of experimental investigations were conducted at the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) to calibrate cone-probe rakes designed to measure the flow field on 1-2% scale, high-speed wind tunnel models from Mach 2.15 to 2.4. The rakes were developed from a previous design that exhibited unfavorable measurement characteristics caused by a high probe spatial density and flow blockage from the rake body. Calibration parameters included Mach number, total pressure recovery, and flow angularity. Reference conditions were determined from a localized UPWT test section flow survey using a 10deg supersonic wedge probe. Test section Mach number and total pressure were determined using a novel iterative technique that accounted for boundary layer effects on the wedge surface. Cone-probe measurements were correlated to the surveyed flow conditions using analytical functions and recursive algorithms that resolved Mach number, pressure recovery, and flow angle to within +/-0.01, +/-1% and +/-0.1deg , respectively, for angles of attack and sideslip between +/-8deg. Uncertainty estimates indicated the overall cone-probe calibration accuracy was strongly influenced by the propagation of measurement error into the calculated results.

  12. Research on the Sensing Performance of the Tuning Fork-Probe as a Micro Interaction Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fengli; Li, Xide

    2015-01-01

    The shear force position system has been widely used in scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) and recently extended into the force sensing area. The dynamic properties of a tuning fork (TF), the core component of this system, directly determine the sensing performance of the shear positioning system. Here, we combine experimental results and finite element method (FEM) analysis to investigate the dynamic behavior of the TF probe assembled structure (TF-probe). Results from experiments under varying atmospheric pressures illustrate that the oscillation amplitude of the TF-probe is linearly related to the quality factor, suggesting that decreasing the pressure will dramatically increase the quality factor. The results from FEM analysis reveal the influences of various parameters on the resonant performance of the TF-probe. We compared numerical results of the frequency spectrum with the experimental data collected by our recently developed laser Doppler vibrometer system. Then, we investigated the parameters affecting spatial resolution of the SNOM and the dynamic response of the TF-probe under longitudinal and transverse interactions. It is found that the interactions in transverse direction is much more sensitive than that in the longitudinal direction. Finally, the TF-probe was used to measure the friction coefficient of a silica–silica interface. PMID:26404310

  13. Research on the Sensing Performance of the Tuning Fork-Probe as a Micro Interaction Sensor.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fengli; Li, Xide

    2015-01-01

    The shear force position system has been widely used in scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) and recently extended into the force sensing area. The dynamic properties of a tuning fork (TF), the core component of this system, directly determine the sensing performance of the shear positioning system. Here, we combine experimental results and finite element method (FEM) analysis to investigate the dynamic behavior of the TF probe assembled structure (TF-probe). Results from experiments under varying atmospheric pressures illustrate that the oscillation amplitude of the TF-probe is linearly related to the quality factor, suggesting that decreasing the pressure will dramatically increase the quality factor. The results from FEM analysis reveal the influences of various parameters on the resonant performance of the TF-probe. We compared numerical results of the frequency spectrum with the experimental data collected by our recently developed laser Doppler vibrometer system. Then, we investigated the parameters affecting spatial resolution of the SNOM and the dynamic response of the TF-probe under longitudinal and transverse interactions. It is found that the interactions in transverse direction is much more sensitive than that in the longitudinal direction. Finally, the TF-probe was used to measure the friction coefficient of a silica-silica interface. PMID:26404310

  14. Free-radical probes for functional in vivo EPR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, S.; Krishna, M. C.

    2007-02-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) is one of the recent functional imaging modalities that can provide valuable in vivo physiological information on its own merit and aids as a complimentary imaging technique to MRI and PET of tissues especially with respect to in vivo pO II (oxygen partial pressure), redox status and pharmacology. EPR imaging mainly deals with the measurement of distribution and in vivo dynamics and redox changes using special nontoxic paramagnetic spin probes that can be infused into the object of investigation. These spin probes should be characterized by simple EPR spectra, preferably with narrow EPR lines. The line width should be reversibly sensitive to the concentration of in vivo pO II with a linear dependence. Several non-toxic paramagnetic probes, some particulate and insoluble and others water-soluble and infusible (by intravenous or intramuscular injection) have been developed which can be effectively used to quantitatively assess tissue redox status, and tumor hypoxia. Quantitative assessment of the redox status of tissue in vivo is important in investigating oxidative stress, and that of tissue pO II is very important in radiation oncology. Other areas in which EPR imaging and oxymetry may help are in the investigation of tumorangiogenesis, wound healing, oxygenation of tumor tissue by the ingestion of oxygen-rich gases, etc. The correct choice of the spin probe will depend on the modality of measurement (whether by CW or time-domain EPR imaging) and the particular physiology interrogated. Examples of the available spin probes and some EPR imaging applications employing them are presented.

  15. Energy-Based Tetrahedron Sensor for High-Temperature, High-Pressure Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, Kent L.; Sommerfeldt, Scott D.; Blotter, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    An acoustic energy-based probe has been developed that incorporates multiple acoustic sensing elements in order to obtain the acoustic pressure and three-dimensional acoustic particle velocity. With these quantities, the user can obtain various energy-based quantities, including acoustic energy density, acoustic intensity, and acoustic impedance. In this specific development, the probe has been designed to operate in an environment characterized by high temperatures and high pressures as is found in the close vicinity of rocket plumes. Given these capabilities, the probe is designed to be used to investigate the acoustic conditions within the plume of a rocket engine or jet engine to facilitate greater understanding of the noise generation mechanisms in those plumes. The probe features sensors mounted inside a solid sphere. The associated electronics for the probe are contained within the sphere and the associated handle for the probe. More importantly, the design of the probe has desirable properties that reduce the bias errors associated with determining the acoustic pressure and velocity using finite sum and difference techniques. The diameter of the probe dictates the lower and upper operating frequencies for the probe, where accurate measurements can be acquired. The current probe design implements a sphere diameter of 1 in. (2.5 cm), which limits the upper operating frequency to about 4.5 kHz. The sensors are operational up to much higher frequencies, and could be used to acquire pressure data at higher frequencies, but the energy-based measurements are limited to that upper frequency. Larger or smaller spherical probes could be designed to go to lower or higher frequency range

  16. Atmospheric entry probes for outer planet exploration. Outer planet entry probe technical summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The use of unmanned space probes for investigating the conditions existing on and around the outer planets of the solar system is discussed. The subjects included in the report are: (1) the design of a common entry probe for outer planet missions, (2) the significant trades related to the development of a common probe design, (3) the impact of bus selection on probe design, (4) the impact of probe requirements on bus modifications, and (5) the key technology elements recommended for advanced development. Drawings and illustrations of typical probes are included to show the components and systems used in the space probes.

  17. Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Information Page Synonym(s): Hydrocephalus - Normal Pressure Table ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus? Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is an abnormal ...

  18. Confusion about Pressure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuethe, Dean O.

    1991-01-01

    Listed are errors students make by accepting misconceptions about pressure and precautions teachers might take to avoid fostering those misconceptions. Misconceptions discussed include pressure as a measure of energy per unit volume, fluid flow only from high to low pressure, and the lack of pressures lower than a vacuum. (CW)

  19. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. High Blood Pressure What Is High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a common disease in ... the heart, kidneys, brain, and eyes. Types of High Blood Pressure There are two main types of high blood ...

  20. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Description of High Blood Pressure Español High blood pressure is a common disease ... defines high blood pressure severity levels. Stages of High Blood Pressure in Adults Stages Systolic (top number) Diastolic (bottom ...