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Sample records for 5-ht4 receptor mediating

  1. Anorexia induced by activation of serotonin 5-HT4 receptors is mediated by increases in CART in the nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Alexandra; Conductier, Grégory; Manrique, Christine; Bouras, Constantin; Berta, Philippe; Hen, René; Charnay, Yves; Bockaert, Joël; Compan, Valérie

    2007-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a growing concern in mental health, often inducing death. The potential neuronal deficits that may underlie abnormal inhibitions of food intake, however, remain largely unexplored. We hypothesized that anorexia may involve altered signaling events within the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a brain structure involved in reward. We show here that direct stimulation of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) 4 receptors (5-HT4R) in the NAc reduces the physiological drive to eat and increases CART (cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript) mRNA levels in fed and food-deprived mice. It further shows that injecting 5-HT4R antagonist or siRNA-mediated 5-HT4R knockdown into the NAc induced hyperphagia only in fed mice. This hyperphagia was not associated with changes in CART mRNA expression in the NAc in fed and food-deprived mice. Results include that 5-HT4R control CART mRNA expression into the NAc via a cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. Considering that CART may interfere with food- and drug-related rewards, we tested whether the appetite suppressant properties of 3,4-N-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) involve the 5-HT4R. Using 5-HT4R knockout mice, we demonstrate that 5-HT4R are required for the anorectic effect of MDMA as well as for the MDMA-induced enhancement of CART mRNA expression in the NAc. Directly injecting CART peptide or CART siRNA into the NAc reduces or increases food consumption, respectively. Finally, stimulating 5-HT4R- and MDMA-induced anorexia were both reduced by injecting CART siRNA into the NAc. Collectively, these results demonstrate that 5-HT4R-mediated up-regulation of CART in the NAc triggers the appetite-suppressant effects of ecstasy. PMID:17913892

  2. Rapid Anxiolytic Effects of a 5-HT4 Receptor Agonist Are Mediated by a Neurogenesis-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Mendez-David, Indira; David, Denis J; Darcet, Flavie; Wu, Melody V; Kerdine-Römer, Saadia; Gardier, Alain M; Hen, René

    2014-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) display a delayed onset of action of several weeks. Past work in naive rats showed that 5-HT4 receptor agonists had rapid effects on depression-related behaviors and on hippocampal neurogenesis. We decided to investigate whether 5-HT4 receptor stimulation was necessary for the effects of SSRIs in a mouse model of anxiety/depression, and whether hippocampal neurogenesis contributed to these effects. Using the mouse corticosterone model of anxiety/depression, we assessed whether chronic treatment with a 5-HT4 receptor agonist (RS67333, 1.5 mg/kg/day) had effects on anxiety- and depression-related behaviors, as well as on hippocampal neurogenesis in comparison with chronic fluoxetine treatment (18 mg/kg/day). Then, using our anxiety/depression model combined with ablation of hippocampal neurogenesis, we investigated whether neurogenesis was necessary for the behavioral effects of subchronic (7 days) or chronic (28 days) RS67333 treatment. We also assessed whether a 5-HT4 receptor antagonist (GR125487, 1 mg/kg/day) could prevent the behavioral and neurogenic effects of fluoxetine. Chronic treatment with RS67333, similar to fluoxetine, induced anxiolytic/antidepressant-like activity and stimulated adult hippocampal neurogenesis, specifically facilitating maturation of newborn neurons. However, unlike fluoxetine, anxiolytic effects of RS67333 were already present after 7 days and did not require hippocampal neurogenesis. Chronic treatment with GR125487 prevented both anxiolytic/antidepressant-like and neurogenic effects of fluoxetine, indicating that 5-HT4 receptor activation is necessary for these effects of SSRIs. 5-HT4 receptor stimulation could represent an innovative and rapid onset therapeutic approach to treat depression with comorbid anxiety. PMID:24287720

  3. Serotonin 5-HT4 receptors and forebrain cholinergic system: receptor expression in identified cell populations.

    PubMed

    Peñas-Cazorla, Raúl; Vilaró, M Teresa

    2015-11-01

    Activation of serotonin 5-HT4 receptors has pro-cognitive effects on memory performance. The proposed underlying neurochemical mechanism is the enhancement of acetylcholine release in frontal cortex and hippocampus elicited by 5-HT4 agonists. Although 5-HT4 receptors are present in brain areas related to cognition, e.g., hippocampus and cortex, the cellular localization of the receptors that might modulate acetylcholine release is unknown at present. We have analyzed, using dual label in situ hybridization, the cellular localization of 5-HT4 receptor mRNA in identified neuronal populations of the rat basal forebrain, which is the source of the cholinergic innervation to cortex and hippocampus. 5-HT4 receptor mRNA was visualized with isotopically labeled oligonucleotide probes, whereas cholinergic, glutamatergic, GABAergic and parvalbumin-synthesizing neurons were identified with digoxigenin-labeled oligonucleotide probes. 5-HT4 receptor mRNA was not detected in the basal forebrain cholinergic cell population. In contrast, basal forebrain GABAergic, parvalbumin synthesizing, and glutamatergic cells contained 5-HT4 receptor mRNA. Hippocampal and cortical glutamatergic neurons also express this receptor. These results indicate that 5-HT4 receptors are not synthesized by cholinergic cells, and thus would be absent from cholinergic terminals. In contrast, several non-cholinergic cell populations within the basal forebrain and its target hippocampal and cortical areas express these receptors and are thus likely to mediate the enhancement of acetylcholine release elicited by 5-HT4 agonists. PMID:25183542

  4. Conformational state of human cardiac 5-HT(4(g)) receptors influences the functional effects of polyclonal anti-5-HT(4) receptor antibodies.

    PubMed

    Di Scala, Emmanuella; Rose, Stéphanie; Hérault, Olivier; Argibay, Jorge; Cosnay, Pierre; Bozon, Véronique

    2007-04-01

    The functional effects of the anti-G21V antibody directed against the second extracellular loop of human heart 5-HT(4) receptors can differ when the receptors are expressed in different cell lines. Here, we extend these studies to show variation in the responses of 5-HT(4(g)) receptors to the antibody within the same expression system. In a previous report no effect of the anti-G21V antibodies had been shown upon 5-HT(4(g)) receptors expressed in CHO cells. Here the same antibodies alone or when added before 5-HT had a functional "inverse-agonist like" effect upon 5-HT(4(g)) receptors expressed in a separate line of CHO cells. Although these CHO cells showed a lower efficacy of cAMP production evoked by 5-HT than the previous report they express a similar h5-HT(4(g)) receptor density. Inhibition of either phosphodiesterases or Gi proteins had no effect upon the action of the antibody. Conformational states of the 5-HT(4) receptor and/or equilibrium between different states of receptors may then determine the functional effect of antibodies against this receptor. PMID:17222392

  5. The 5-HT4 receptor: molecular cloning and pharmacological characterization of two splice variants.

    PubMed Central

    Gerald, C; Adham, N; Kao, H T; Olsen, M A; Laz, T M; Schechter, L E; Bard, J A; Vaysse, P J; Hartig, P R; Branchek, T A

    1995-01-01

    Molecular cloning efforts have provided primary amino acid sequence and signal transduction data for a large collection of serotonin receptor subtypes. These include five 5-HT1-like receptors, three 5-HT2 receptors, one 5-HT3 receptor, two 5-HT5 receptors, one 5-HT6 receptor and one 5-HT7 receptor. Molecular biological information on the 5-HT4 receptor is notably absent from this list. We now report the cloning of the pharmacologically defined 5-HT4 receptor. Using degenerate oligonucleotide primers, we identified a rat brain PCR fragment which encoded a '5-HT receptor-like' amino acid sequence. The corresponding full length cDNA was isolated from a rat brain cDNA library. Transiently expressed in COS-7 cells, this receptor stimulates adenylyl cyclase activity and is sensitive to the benzamide derivative cisapride. The response is also blocked by ICS-205930. Interestingly, we isolated two splice variants of the receptor, 5-HT4L and 5-HT4S, differing in the length and sequence of their C-termini. In rat brain, the 5-HT4S transcripts are restricted to the striatum, but the 5-HT4L transcripts are expressed throughout the brain, except in the cerebellum where it was barely detectable. In peripheral tissues, differential expression was also observed in the atrium of the heart where only the 5-HT4S isoform was detectable. Images PMID:7796807

  6. Familial Risk for Major Depression is Associated with Lower Striatal 5-HT4 Receptor Binding

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Karine; Torstensen, Eva; Holst, Klaus K.; Haahr, Mette E.; Knorr, Ulla; Frokjaer, Vibe G.; Brandt-Larsen, Malene; Iversen, Pernille; Fisher, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The 5-HT4 receptor provides a novel potential target for antidepressant treatment. No studies exist to elucidate the 5-HT4 receptor’s in vivo distribution in the depressed state or in populations that may display trait markers for major depression disorder (MDD). The aim of this study was to determine whether familial risk for MDD is associated with cerebral 5-HT4 receptor binding as measured with [11C]SB207145 brain PET imaging. Familial risk is the most potent risk factor of MDD. Methods: We studied 57 healthy individuals (mean age 36 yrs, range 20–86; 21 women), 26 of which had first-degree relatives treated for MDD. Results: We found that having a family history of MDD was associated with lower striatal 5-HT4 receptor binding (p = 0.038; in individuals below 40 years, p = 0.013). Further, we found evidence for a “risk-dose effect” on 5-HT4 receptor binding, since the number of first-degree relatives with a history of MDD binding correlated negatively with 5-HT4 receptor binding in both the striatum (p = 0.001) and limbic regions (p = 0.012). Conclusions: Our data suggest that the 5-HT4 receptor is involved in the neurobiological mechanism underlying familial risk for depression, and that lower striatal 5-HT4 receptor binding is associated with increased risk for developing MDD. The finding is intriguing considering that the 5-HT4 receptor has been suggested to be an effective target for antidepressant treatment. PMID:25522384

  7. Two transmembrane Cys residues are involved in 5-HT4 receptor dimerization.

    PubMed

    Berthouze, Magali; Rivail, Lucie; Lucas, Alexandre; Ayoub, Mohammed A; Russo, Olivier; Sicsic, Sames; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Berque-Bestel, Isabelle; Jockers, Ralf; Lezoualc'h, Frank

    2007-05-11

    The 5-HT(4) receptor (5-HT(4)R) belongs to the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family and is of considerable interest for the development of new drugs to treat gastrointestinal diseases and memory disorders. The 5-HT(4)R exists as a constitutive dimer but its molecular determinants are still unknown. Using co-immunoprecipitation and Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET) techniques, we show here that 5-HT(4)R homodimerization but not 5-HT(4)R-beta(2) adrenergic receptor (beta(2)AR) heterodimerization is largely decreased under reducing conditions suggesting the participation of disulfide bonds in 5-HT(4)R dimerization. Molecular modeling and protein docking experiments identified four cysteine (Cys) residues potentially involved in the dimer interface through intramolecular or intermolecular disulfide bonds. We show that disulfide bridges between Cys112 and Cys145 located within TM3 and TM4, respectively, are of critical importance for 5-HT(4)R dimer formation. Our data suggest that two disulfide bridges between two transmembrane Cys residues are involved in the dimerization interface of a GPCR. PMID:17379184

  8. Regulation of the amyloid precursor protein ectodomain shedding by the 5-HT4 receptor and Epac.

    PubMed

    Robert, Sylvain; Maillet, Marjorie; Morel, Eric; Launay, Jean-Marie; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Mercken, Luc; Lezoualc'h, Frank

    2005-02-14

    The serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT4) receptor is of potential interest for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease because it increases memory and learning. In this study, we investigated the effect of zinc metalloprotease inhibitors on the amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing induced by the serotonin 5-HT4 receptor in vitro. We show that secretion of the non-amyloidogenic form of APP, sAPPalpha induced by the 5-HT4(e) receptor isoform was not due to a general boost of the constitutive secretory pathway but rather to its specific effect on alpha-secretase activity. Although the h5-HT4(e) receptor increased IP3 production, inhibition of PKC did not modify its effect on sAPPalpha secretion. In addition, we found that alpha secretase activity is regulated by the cAMP-regulated guanine nucleotide exchange factor, Epac and the small GTPase Rac. PMID:15710402

  9. The action of SDZ 205,557 at 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT3 and 5-HT4) receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Eglen, R. M.; Alvarez, R.; Johnson, L. G.; Leung, E.; Wong, E. H.

    1993-01-01

    1. The interaction of the novel antagonist, SDZ 205,557 (2-methoxy-4-amino-5-chloro benzoic acid 2-(diethylamino) ethyl ester), at 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptors has been assessed in vitro and in vivo. 2. In guinea-pig hippocampus and in the presence of 0.4 microM 5-carboxamidotryptamine, 5-HT4-mediated stimulation of adenylyl cyclase was competitively antagonized by SDZ 205,557, with a pA2 value of 7.5, and a Schild slope of 0.81. In rat carbachol-contracted oesophagus, 5-HT4-receptor mediated relaxations were surmountably antagonized by SDZ 205,557 with a similar pA2 value (7.3). This value was agonist-independent with the exception of (R)-zacopride, against which a significantly lower value (6.4) was observed. 3. In functional studies of 5-HT3 receptors, SDZ 205,557 exhibited an affinity of 6.2 in guinea-pig ileum compared with 6.9 at binding sites labelled by [3H]-quipazine in NG108-15 cells. In the anaesthetized, vagotomized micropig, SDZ 205,557 produced only a transient blockade of 5-HT4-mediated tachycardia. This contrasted with tropisetron, which was active for over 60 min after administration. The half-lives for the inhibitory responses of SDZ 205,557 and tropisetron were 23 and 116 min, respectively. 4. In conclusion, SDZ 205,557 has similar affinity for 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptors. The apparent selectivity observed in guinea-pig is due to the atypical nature of the 5-HT3 receptor in this species. The short duration of action of this novel antagonist may complicate its use in vivo. SDZ 205,557 should, therefore, be used with appropriate caution in studies defining the 5-HT4 receptor. PMID:8448587

  10. 3D Pharmacophore, hierarchical methods, and 5-HT4 receptor binding data.

    PubMed

    Varin, Thibault; Saettel, Nicolas; Villain, Jonathan; Lesnard, Aurelien; Dauphin, François; Bureau, Ronan; Rault, Sylvain

    2008-10-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine subtype-4 (5-HT(4)) receptors have stimulated considerable interest amongst scientists and clinicians owing to their importance in neurophysiology and potential as therapeutic targets. A comparative analysis of hierarchical methods applied to data from one thousand 5-HT(4) receptor-ligand binding interactions was carried out. The chemical structures were described as chemical and pharmacophore fingerprints. The definitions of indices, related to the quality of the hierarchies in being able to distinguish between active and inactive compounds, revealed two interesting hierarchies with the Unity (1 active cluster) and pharmacophore fingerprints (4 active clusters). The results of this study also showed the importance of correct choice of metrics as well as the effectiveness of a new alternative of the Ward clustering algorithm named Energy (Minimum E-Distance method). In parallel, the relationship between these classifications and a previously defined 3D 5-HT(4) antagonist pharmacophore was established. PMID:18821249

  11. Discovery and pharmacological profile of new hydrophilic 5-HT(4) receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Brudeli, Bjarne; Navaratnarajah, Mirusha; Andressen, Kjetil Wessel; Manfra, Ornella; Moltzau, Lise Román; Nilsen, Nils Olav; Levy, Finn Olav; Klaveness, Jo

    2014-09-15

    The synthesis and pharmacological data of some new and potent hydrophilic 5-HT4 receptor antagonists are described. Propanediol derivative 25 was identified as a potent antagonist with low affinity for the hERG potassium channel and promising pharmacokinetics. PMID:25149506

  12. Inhibitory activity of antibodies against the human atrial 5-HT(4)receptor.

    PubMed

    Sallé, L; Eftekhari, P; Aupart, M; Cosnay, P; Hoebeke, J; Argibay, J A

    2001-03-01

    Antibodies directed against the second extracellular loop of G protein-coupled receptors have been shown to exert "agonist-like" activities. In order to test the hypothesis that this is a general phenomenon, antibodies were raised in rabbits against a synthetic peptide corresponding to the second extracellular loop of the newly sequenced human cardiac 5-HT(4)receptor. The antibodies were affinity-purified and shown to recognize the 5-HT(4)receptor in immunoblots of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the receptor. The antibodies had no intrinsic effect but could depress the activation of L -type calcium channel induced by serotonin in human atrial cells. This antagonist-like effect was exerted both by intact IgG and by Fab fragments. These results are physiologically important since it has been shown that the 5-HT(4)receptor could be a target for autoantibodies in mothers at risk of giving birth to children with neonatal atrio-ventricular block. PMID:11181010

  13. 5-HT4 and 5-HT2 receptors antagonistically influence gap junctional coupling between rat auricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Derangeon, Mickaël; Bozon, Véronique; Defamie, Norah; Peineau, Nicolas; Bourmeyster, Nicolas; Sarrouilhe, Denis; Argibay, Jorge A; Hervé, Jean-Claude

    2010-01-01

    5-hydroxytryptamine-4 (5-HT(4)) receptors have been proposed to contribute to the generation of atrial fibrillation in human atrial myocytes, but it is unclear if these receptors are present in the hearts of small laboratory animals (e.g. rat). In this study, we examined presence and functionality of 5-HT(4) receptors in auricular myocytes of newborn rats and their possible involvement in regulation of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC, responsible for the cell-to-cell propagation of the cardiac excitation). Western-blotting assays showed that 5-HT(4) receptors were present and real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that 5-HT(4b) was the predominant isoform. Serotonin (1 microM) significantly reduced cAMP concentration unless a selective 5-HT(4) inhibitor (GR113808 or ML10375, both 1 microM) was present. Serotonin also reduced the amplitude of L-type calcium currents and influenced the strength of GJIC without modifying the phosphorylation profiles of the different channel-forming proteins or connexins (Cxs), namely Cx40, Cx43 and Cx45. GJIC was markedly increased when serotonin exposure occurred in presence of a 5-HT(4) inhibitor but strongly reduced when 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2B) receptors were inhibited, showing that activation of these receptors antagonistically regulated GJIC. The serotoninergic response was completely abolished when 5-HT(4), 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2B) were simultaneously inhibited. A 24 h serotonin exposure strongly reduced Cx40 expression whereas Cx45 was less affected and Cx43 still less. In conclusion, this study revealed that 5-HT(4) (mainly 5-HT(4b)), 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2B) receptors coexisted in auricular myocytes of newborn rat, that 5-HT(4) activation reduced cAMP concentration, I(Ca)(L) and intercellular coupling whereas 5-HT(2A) or 5-HT(2B) activation conversely enhanced GJIC. PMID:19615378

  14. Chronic activation of 5-HT4 receptors or blockade of 5-HT6 receptors improve memory performances.

    PubMed

    Quiedeville, Anne; Boulouard, Michel; Hamidouche, Katia; Da Silva Costa-Aze, Virginie; Nee, Gerald; Rochais, Christophe; Dallemagne, Patrick; Fabis, Frédéric; Freret, Thomas; Bouet, Valentine

    2015-10-15

    5-HT4 and 5-HT6 serotonergic receptors are located in brain structures involved in memory processes. Neurochemical and behavioural studies have demonstrated that acute activation of 5-HT4 receptors (5-HT4R) or blockade of 5-HT6 receptors (5-HT6R) improves memory. To evaluate the potential of these two receptors as targets in the treatment of memory disorders encountered in several situations (ageing, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, etc.), it is necessary to assess whether their beneficial effects occur after chronic administration, and if such treatment induces adverse effects. The goal of this study was to assess the effects of chronic 5-HT4R or 5-HT6R modulation on recognition memory, and to observe the possible manifestation of side effects (modification of weight gain, locomotor activity or exploratory behaviour, etc.). Mice were treated for 14 days with a 5-HT4R partial agonist (RS-67333) or a 5-HT6R antagonist (SB-271046) at increasing doses. Memory performances, locomotor activity, and exploration were assessed. Both chronic 5-HT4R activation and 5-HT6R blockade extended memory traces in an object recognition test, and were not associated with any adverse effects in the parameters assessed. Chronic modulation of one or both of these receptors thus seems promising as a potential strategy for the treatment memory deficits. PMID:26187692

  15. High trait aggression in men is associated with low 5-HT levels, as indexed by 5-HT4 receptor binding.

    PubMed

    da Cunha-Bang, Sofi; Mc Mahon, Brenda; Fisher, Patrick MacDonald; Jensen, Peter Steen; Svarer, Claus; Knudsen, Gitte Moos

    2016-04-01

    Impulsive aggression has commonly been associated with a dysfunction of the serotonin (5-HT) system: many, but not all, studies point to an inverse relationship between 5-HT and aggression. As cerebral 5-HT4 receptor (5-HT4R) binding has recently been recognized as a proxy for stable brain levels of 5-HT, we here test the hypothesis in healthy men and women that brain 5-HT levels, as indexed by cerebral 5-HT4R, are inversely correlated with trait aggression and impulsivity. Sixty-one individuals (47 men) underwent positron emission tomography scanning with the radioligand [(11)C]SB207145 for quantification of brain 5-HT4R binding. The Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BPAQ) and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale were used for assessment of trait aggression and trait impulsivity. Among male subjects, there was a positive correlation between global 5-HT4R and BPAQ total score (P = 0.037) as well as BPAQ physical aggression (P = 0.025). No main effect of global 5-HT4R on trait aggression or impulsivity was found in the mixed gender sample, but there was evidence for sex interaction effects in the relationship between global 5-HT4R and BPAQ physical aggression. In conclusion we found that low cerebral 5-HT levels, as indexed by 5-HT4R binding were associated with high trait aggression in males, but not in females. PMID:26772668

  16. Effects of the 5-HT4 receptor agonist, cisapride, on neuronally evoked responses in human bladder, urethra, and ileum.

    PubMed

    Kullmann, F Aura; Kurihara, Ryoko; Ye, Lan; Wells, Grace I; McKenna, David G; Burgard, Edward C; Thor, Karl B

    2013-06-01

    This study evaluated the effects of a 5-HT4 agonist, cisapride, on neuronally evoked smooth muscle responses in bladder, urethra and ileum and compared these effects with those of an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, distigmine. Electrical field stimulation (EFS) was applied to human bladder and ileum smooth muscle strips from human organ transplant donors and to urethral strips from prostatectomy patients, to evoke neuronally mediated smooth muscle responses. EFS induced contractions in bladder and mixed responses, consisting of contractions and relaxations, in urethra and ileum. Relaxations were mediated by nitric oxide while contractions were partially cholinergic (i.e. atropine sensitive). This atropine sensitive component amounted to~95% in bladder and ~75% in ileum, and it was enhanced by distigmine in a concentration dependent manner (0.1-3 μM; ~100-600% increase in bladder and ~50-250% increase in ileum). Cisapride (0.0003-1 μM) also enhanced bladder contractions (~75-100% increase) but had no effect on urethral contractions or relaxations, and modestly enhanced ileum contractions (~10-40% increase). Facilitatory effects of cisapride were reversed by the specific 5-HT4 receptor antagonist, SB-203186 (3 μM), but were resistant to repeated washing in the bladder. These data indicate that 5-HT4 receptor agonists enhanced EFS-induced contractions in bladder and ileum without an effect on urethra and suggest that it may be possible to enhance bladder activity with a dose of cisapride that is at, or below, those producing gastrointestinal (GI) effects. Although distigmine's maximal facilitation of bladder and GI tract function was greater than that of cisapride, at clinically relevant concentrations cisapride showed much greater efficacy. PMID:23511063

  17. Polyclonal antibody effects on the human cardiac 5-HT4(e) receptors depend upon the expression system.

    PubMed

    Di Scala, Emmanuella; Rose, Stéphanie; Hérault, Olivier; Argibay, Jorge; Cosnay, Pierre; Bozon, Véronique

    2004-01-01

    The initial objective of this work was to examine the effects of an antibody (Anti-G21V) directed against the second extracellular loop of human heart 5-HT4 receptors expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The antibody anti-G21V had no effect upon either basal cAMP-or 5-HT-evoked increases in cAMP in CHO cells, whereas it had shown an agonist-like effect in COS-7 cells. Analysis of agonist fractions of h5-HT4(e) receptors in CHO and COS-7 cells revealed that equilibrium constant could underlie the different responses of the receptor toward the anti-G21V antibody. Therefore, different expression systems could give rise to functional differences in 5-HT4 receptor behavior. PMID:15512847

  18. An in vitro investigation of the cardiovascular effects of the 5-HT(4) receptor selective agonists, velusetrag and TD-8954.

    PubMed

    Beattie, D T; Higgins, D L; Ero, M P; Amagasu, S M; Vickery, R G; Kersey, K; Hopkins, A; Smith, J A M

    2013-01-01

    The 5-HT(4) receptor agonists, and gastrointestinal (GI) prokinetic agents, cisapride and tegaserod, lack selectivity for the 5-HT(4) receptor. Cisapride is a potent human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) potassium channel inhibitor while cisapride and tegaserod have significant affinity for 5-HT(1) and 5-HT(2) receptor subtypes. Marketing of both compounds was discontinued due to cardiovascular concerns (cardiac arrhythmias with cisapride and ischemic events with tegaserod). The reported association of tegaserod with ischemia has been postulated to involve coronary artery constriction or augmentation of platelet aggregation. This in vitro study investigated the effects of two of the new generation of highly selective 5-HT(4) receptor agonists, velusetrag and TD-8954, on canine, porcine and human coronary artery tone, human platelet aggregation and hERG potassium channel conductance. No significant off-target actions of velusetrag or TD-8954 were identified in these, and prior, studies. While cisapride inhibited potently the hERG channel currents, tegaserod failed to affect platelet aggregation, and had only a small contractile effect on the canine coronary artery at high concentrations. Tegaserod inhibited the 5-HT-induced contractile response in the porcine coronary artery. New generation 5-HT(4) receptor agonists hold promise for the treatment of patients suffering from GI motility disorders with a reduced cardiovascular risk. PMID:23201772

  19. Does Cisapride, as a 5HT(4) Receptor Agonist, Aggravate the Severity of TNBS-Induced Colitis in Rat?

    PubMed

    Motavallian, Azadeh; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Rabbani, Mohammad; Mahzouni, Parvin; Andalib, Sasan; Abed, Alireza; Babavalian, Mohammad Reza

    2012-01-01

    There is a pressing need for research that will lead to the reveal of targets designed to analyse the possible pathways for the treatment of IBD. Because of the probable involvement of serotonin in inflammatory conditions of intestine and the important role of 5HT(4) receptors in GI function, the investigation of the role of 5HT(4) receptors in the pathogenesis of IBD will be interesting. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of cisapride, a 5HT(4) receptor agonist, in trinitrobenzenesulfonic-acid-(TNBS) induced rat colitis. Two hours subsequent to induction of colitis using TNBS in rats, cisapride (2 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p); 4 mg/kg, orally (p.o)) and dexamethasone (1 mg/kg, i.p; 2 mg/kg, p.o) were administrated for 6 days. Animals were thereafter euthanized; macroscopic, histological, and biochemical assessments and ELISA test were carried out on distal colon samples. Our data showed that dexamethasone treatment (i.p, p.o) significantly decreased macroscopic and microscopic damage and also biochemical markers, but there were no significant differences in aforementioned parameters between cisapride (i.p or p.o) and TNBS-treated rats. It can be deduced that because the severity of colitis produced by TNBS is massive (through various pathways), cisapride could not bring about more colitis damages through 5HT(4) receptors. Based on the present study further researches are required for investigating the exact roles of 5HT(4) receptors in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. PMID:22888336

  20. The influence of 5-HT2 and 5-HT4 receptor antagonists to modify drug induced disinhibitory effects in the mouse light/dark test

    PubMed Central

    Costall, Brenda; Naylor, Robert J

    1997-01-01

    when administered alone to modify behaviour in the light/dark test indicates an absence of an endogenous 5-HT tone at the 5-HT2 and 5-HT4 receptors and (b) the enhancement by the 5-HT2 receptor antagonists and attenuation by the 5-HT4 receptor antagonists of drug-induced disinhibition indicates a plurality of 5-HT receptor involvement in the mediation of drug-induced disinhibitory profiles in the mouse. PMID:9401775

  1. Activation of 5-HT4 receptors facilitates neurogenesis from transplanted neural stem cells in the anastomotic ileum.

    PubMed

    Goto, Kei; Kawahara, Isao; Inada, Hiroyuki; Misawa, Hiromi; Kuniyasu, Hiroki; Nabekura, Junich; Takaki, Miyako

    2016-01-01

    An orally administered serotonin-4 (5-HT4) receptor agonist, mosapride citrate (MOS), promotes enteric neurogenesis in anastomoses after gut surgery. We performed gut surgery and transplanted 2 × 10(5) neural stem cells (NSCs) from the embryonic central nervous system after marking them with the cell linker, PKH26. We found that neurons differentiated from transplanted NSCs (PKH [+]) and newborn enteric neurons differentiated from mobilized (host) NSCs (YFP [+]) in the deep granulation tissue of the anastomotic ileum. MOS significantly increased the number of PKH (+) and YFP (+) neurons by 2.5-fold (P < 0.005) (n = 4). The distribution patterns of PKH (+) neurons and YFP (+) neurons were similar along the depth of the anastomosis. A 5-HT4 receptor antagonist, SB-207266, abolished these effects of MOS (n = 4). Our results indicate that neurogenesis from transplanted NSCs is potentiated by activation of 5-HT4 receptors. Thus, a combination of drug administration and cell transplantation could be more beneficial than cell transplantation alone in treating Hirschsprung's disease and related disorders. PMID:26335766

  2. Synergistic effect between 5-HT4 receptor agonist and phosphodiesterase 4-inhibitor in releasing acetylcholine in pig gastric circular muscle in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Romain A; Van Colen, Inge; Pauwelyn, Vicky; De Maeyer, Joris H

    2016-06-15

    5-HT4 receptor agonists have a gastroprokinetic effect by facilitating acetylcholine release from cholinergic nerves innervating gastrointestinal smooth muscle. The role of phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4 in the signal transduction pathway of the 5-HT4 receptors located on the cholinergic neurons towards the circular muscle layer in pig stomach was investigated by analysis of acetylcholine release. Circular muscle strips were prepared from pig proximal stomach and tritium outflow, induced by electrical field stimulation, was studied as a marker for acetylcholine release after incubation with [(3)H]-choline. The PDE4-inhibitor roflumilast concentration-dependently (0.1-1µM) enhanced the facilitating effect of a submaximally effective concentration of the 5-HT4 receptor agonist prucalopride (0.01µM) on electrically induced acetylcholine release. Roflumilast (0.3µM) enhanced acetylcholine release per se but in the combined presence of roflumilast and prucalopride, acetylcholine release was enhanced more than the sum of the effect of the 2 compounds alone. The 5-HT4 receptor agonist velusetrag concentration-dependently (0.01-0.1µM) enhanced acetylcholine release; the effect of the minimally effective concentration (0.01µM) was significantly enhanced by 1µM of the PDE4-inhibitor rolipram, again to a level higher than the sum of the effect of the 2 compounds alone. The synergistic effect between 5-HT4 receptor agonists and PDE4-inhibitors demonstrates that the intracellular pathway of the 5-HT4 receptors located on cholinergic neurons towards pig gastric circular muscle is controlled by PDE4. Combining a 5-HT4 receptor agonist with a PDE4-inhibitor might thus enhance its gastroprokinetic effect. PMID:27060014

  3. Evaluation in Monkey of Two Candidate PET Radioligands, [11C]RX-1 and [18F]RX-2, for Imaging Brain 5-HT4 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    LOHITH, TALAKAD G.; XU, RONG; TSUJIKAWA, TETSUYA; MORSE, CHERYL L.; ANDERSON, KACEY B.; GLADDING, ROBERT L.; ZOGHBI, SAMI S.; FUJITA, MASAHIRO; INNIS, ROBERT B.; PIKE, VICTOR W.

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin subtype-4 (5-HT4) receptor, which is known to be involved physiologically in learning and memory, and pathologically in Alzheimer’s disease, anxiety and other neuropsychiatric disorders – has few radioligands readily available for imaging in vivo. We have previously reported two novel 5-HT4 receptor radioligands, namely [methoxy-11C](1-butylpiperidin-4-yl)methyl 4-amino-3-methoxybenzoate; [11C]RX-1) and the [18F]3-fluoromethoxy analog ([18F]RX-2), and in this study we evaluated them by PET in rhesus monkey. Brain scans were performed at baseline, receptor preblock or displacement conditions using SB 207710, a 5-HT4 receptor antagonist, on the same day for [11C]RX-1 and on different days for [18F]RX-2. Specific-to-nondisplaceable ratio (BPND) was measured with the simplified reference tissue model from all baseline scans. To determine specific binding, total distribution volume (VT) was also measured in some monkeys by radiometabolite-corrected arterial input function after ex vivo inhibition of esterases from baseline and blocked scans. Both radioligands showed moderate to high peak brain uptake of radioactivity (2–6 SUV). Regional BPND values were in the rank order of known 5-HT4 receptor distribution with a trend for higher BPND values from [18F]RX-2. One-tissue compartmental model provided good fits with well identified VT values for both radioligands. In the highest 5-HT4 receptor density region, striatum, 50–60% of total binding was specific. The VT in receptor-poor cerebellum reached stable values by about 60 min for both radioligands indicating little influence of radiometabolites on brain signal. In conclusion, both [11C]RX-1 and [18F]RX-2 showed positive attributes for PET imaging of brain 5-HT4 receptors, validating the radioligand design strategy. PMID:25088028

  4. Effects of ginger constituents on the gastrointestinal tract: role of cholinergic M3 and serotonergic 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptors.

    PubMed

    Pertz, Heinz H; Lehmann, Jochen; Roth-Ehrang, René; Elz, Sigurd

    2011-07-01

    The herbal drug ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) may be effective for treating nausea, vomiting, and gastric hypomotility. In these conditions, cholinergic M (3) receptors and serotonergic 5-HT (3) and 5-HT (4) receptors are involved. The major chemical constituents of ginger are [6]-gingerol, [8]-gingerol, [10]-gingerol, and [6]-shogaol. We studied the interaction of [6]-gingerol, [8]-gingerol, [10]-gingerol (racemates), and [6]-shogaol with guinea pig M (3) receptors, guinea pig 5-HT (3) receptors, and rat 5-HT (4) receptors. In whole segments of guinea pig ileum (bioassay for contractile M (3) receptors), [6]-gingerol, [8]-gingerol, [10]-gingerol, and [6]-shogaol slightly but significantly depressed the maximal carbachol response at an antagonist concentration of 10 µM. In the guinea pig myenteric plexus preparation (bioassay for contractile 5-HT (3) receptors), 5-HT maximal responses were depressed by [10]-gingerol from 93 ± 3 % to 65 ± 6 % at an antagonist concentration of 3 µM and to 48 ± 3 % at an antagonist concentration of 5 µM following desensitization of 5-HT (4) receptors and blockade of 5-HT (1) and 5-HT (2) receptors. [6]-Shogaol (3 µM) induced depression to 61 ± 3 %. In rat esophageal tunica muscularis mucosae (bioassay for relaxant 5-HT (4) receptors), [6]-gingerol, [8]-gingerol, [10]-gingerol, and [6]-shogaol (2-6.3 µM) showed no agonist effects. The maximal 5-HT response remained unaffected in the presence of the compounds. It is concluded that the efficiency of ginger in reducing nausea and vomiting may be based on a weak inhibitory effect of gingerols and shogaols at M (3) and 5-HT (3) receptors. 5-HT (4) receptors, which play a role in gastroduodenal motility, appear not to be involved in the action of these compounds. PMID:21305447

  5. Effect of nucleus accumbens shell 5-HT4 receptors on the impairment of ACPA-induced emotional memory consolidation in male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Khodayar, Ebrahim; Oryan, Shahrbanoo; Nasehi, Mohammad; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-02-01

    The present study investigates the effects of 5-HT4 receptors of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell on the impairment of emotional memory consolidation induced by cannabinoid CB1 receptor stimulation. The elevated plus maze test-retest paradigm was used to assess memory in adult male Wistar rats. Intra-NAc shell administration of ACPA (selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist 0.006 µg/rat) and RS23597 (5-HT4 receptor antagonist 0.01 µg/rat), immediately after training, decreased emotional memory consolidation, suggesting a drug-induced amnesia, whereas post-training intra-NAc shell microinjections of RS67333 (5-HT4 receptor agonist 0.016 µg/rat) increased emotional memory consolidation. Interestingly, RS67333 exerted a dual effect on ACPA-induced behaviors, potentiating and restoring amnesia caused by the subthreshold and effective doses of ACPA, respectively. However, neither RS23597 nor AM251 (CB1 receptor antagonist 30, 60 and 120 ng/rat) affected emotional memory consolidation. Nonetheless, a subthreshold dose of AM251 (120 ng/rat) reversed the amnesia induced by ACPA (0.006 µg/rat) and RS23597 (0.01 µg/rat). None of the above doses altered the locomotor activity. In conclusion, our results suggest that the NAc-shell 5-HT4 receptors are involved in the modulation of ACPA-induced amnesia. PMID:26340366

  6. Exploration of the ligand binding site of the human 5-HT4 receptor by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular modeling

    PubMed Central

    Mialet, Jeanne; Dahmoune, Yamina; Lezoualc'h, Frank; Berque-Bestel, Isabelle; Eftekhari, Pierre; Hoebeke, Johan; Sicsic, Sames; Langlois, Michel; Fischmeister, Rodolphe

    2000-01-01

    Among the five human 5-HT4 (h5-HT4) receptor isoforms, the h5-HT4(a) receptor was studied with a particular emphasis on the molecular interactions involved in ligand binding. For this purpose, we used site-directed mutagenesis of the transmembrane domain. Twelve mutants were constructed with a special focus on the residue P4.53 of helix IV which substitutes in h5-HT4 receptors the highly conserved S residue among the rhodopsin family receptors. The mutated receptors were transiently expressed in COS-7 cells.Ligand binding or competition studies with two h5-HT4 receptor agonists, serotonin and ML10302 and two h5-HT4 receptor antagonists, [3H]-GR113808 and ML10375 were performed on wild type and mutant receptors. Functional activity of the receptors was evaluated by measuring the ability of serotonin to stimulate adenylyl cyclase.Ligand binding experiments revealed that [3H]-GR113808 did not bind to mutants P4.53A, S5.43A, F6.51A, Y7.43A and to double mutant F6.52V/N6.55L. On the other hand mutations D3.32N, S5.43A and Y7.43A appeared to promote a dramatic decrease of h5-HT4(a) receptor functional activity. From these studies, S5.43 and Y7.43 clearly emerged as common anchoring sites to antagonist [3H]-GR113808 and to serotonin.According to these results, we propose ligand-receptor complex models with serotonin and [3H]-GR113808. For serotonin, three interaction points were selected including ionic interaction with D3.32, a stabilizing interaction of this ion pair by Y7.43 and a hydrogen bond with S5.43. [3H]-GR113808 was also docked, based on the same type of interactions with S5.43 and D3.32: the proposed model suggested a possible role of P4.53 in helix IV structure allowing the involvement of a close hydrophobic residue, W4.50, in a hydrophobic pocket for hydrophobic interactions with the indole ring of [3H]-GR113808. PMID:10821780

  7. Synthesis, structure-affinity relationships, and radiolabeling of selective high-affinity 5-HT4 receptor ligands as prospective imaging probes for positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rong; Hong, Jinsoo; Morse, Cheryl L; Pike, Victor W

    2010-10-14

    In a search for high-affinity receptor ligands that might serve for development as radioligands for the imaging of brain 5-HT(4) receptors in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET), structural modifications were made to the high-affinity 5-HT(4) antagonist (1-butylpiperidin-4-yl)methyl 8-amino-7-iodo-2,3-dihydrobenzo[b][1,4]dioxine-5-carboxylate (1, SB 207710). These modifications were made mainly on the aryl side of the ester bond to permit possible rapid labeling of the carboxylic acid component with a positron emitter, either carbon-11 (t(1/2) = 20.4 min) or fluorine-18 (t(1/2) = 109.7 min), and included (i) replacement of the iodine atom with a small substituent such as nitrile, methyl, or fluoro, (ii) methylation of the 8-amino group, (iii) opening of the dioxan ring, and (iv) alteration of the length of the N-alkyl goup. High-affinity ligands were discovered for recombinant human 5-HT(4) receptors with amenability to labeling with a positron emitter and potential for development as imaging probes. The ring-opened radioligand, (([methoxy-(11)C]1-butylpiperidin-4-yl)methyl 4-amino-3-methoxybenzoate; [(11)C]13), showed an especially favorable array of properties for future evaluation as a PET radioligand for brain 5-HT(4) receptors. PMID:20812727

  8. Synthesis, Structure-affinity Relationships and Radiolabeling of Selective High-affinity 5-HT4 Receptor Ligands as Prospective Imaging Probes for PET

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rong; Hong, Jinsoo; Morse, Cheryl L.; Pike, Victor W.

    2010-01-01

    In a search for high-affinity receptor ligands that might serve for development as radioligands for the imaging of brain 5-HT4 receptors in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET), structural modifications were made to the high-affinity 5-HT4 antagonist, (1-butylpiperidin-4-yl)methyl 8-amino-7-iodo-2,3-dihydrobenzo[b][1,4]dioxine-5-carboxylate (1, SB 207710). These modifications were made mainly on the aryl side of the ester bond to permit possible rapid labeling of the carboxylic acid component with a positron-emitter, either carbon-11 (t1/2 = 20.4 min) or fluorine-18 (t1/2 = 109.7 min), and included, i) replacement of the iodine atom with a small substituent such as nitrile, methyl or fluoro, ii) methylation of the 8-amino group, iii) opening of the dioxan ring, and iv) alteration of the length of the N-alkyl goup. High-affinity ligands were discovered for recombinant human 5-HT4 receptors with amenability to labeling with a positron-emitter and potential for development as imaging probes. The ring-opened radioligand, (([methoxy-11C]1-butylpiperidin-4-yl)methyl 4-amino-3-methoxybenzoate; [11C]13), showed an especially favorable array of properties for future evaluation as a PET radioligand for brain 5-HT4 receptors. PMID:20812727

  9. Agonist-like activity of antibodies directed against the second extracellular loop of the human cardiac serotonin 5-HT4(e) receptor in transfected COS-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Bozon, V; Di Scala, E; Eftekhari, P; Hoebeke, J; Lezoualc'h, F; Fischmeister, R; Argibay, J

    2002-01-01

    We have previously reported that antipeptide antibodies directed against the second extracellular loop of the cardiac h5-HT4 receptor could block the activation of the L-type Ca channel in human atrial cardiomyocytes. In this paper we investigate the immunological and physiological activity of these antibodies, in a cell system expressing a larger amount of receptors than the atrial cells. The recombinant receptor was expressed at the surface of COS-7 cells under an active form (serotonin, EC50 = 1.81 x 10(-7) M), at a high level (375 +/- 25 fmol receptor/mg total protein) and was able to bind a specific ligand (GR113808) with a high affinity (Kd = 0.28 +/- 0.05 nM). In this system, the same anti-peptide antibodies used for the cardiac cells induced an "agonist-like" effect on the recombinant h5-HT4 receptor. These results are in line with those shown for others G-protein coupled receptors, as adrenoreceptors. In addition, this work showed that the effect of the antibodies is not only dependent on the epitopic region recognised but also on the molecular density and/or the cellular environment of the target receptors. Finally, our results support the hypothesis that the h5-HT4 receptor could be a new target for autoantibodies in patients with atrial arrhythmia. PMID:12448792

  10. Synthesis and structure-activity relationship studies in serotonin 5-HT4 receptor ligands based on a benzo[de][2,6]naphthridine scaffold.

    PubMed

    Castriconi, Federica; Paolino, Marco; Giuliani, Germano; Anzini, Maurizio; Campiani, Giuseppe; Mennuni, Laura; Sabatini, Chiara; Lanza, Marco; Caselli, Gianfranco; De Rienzo, Francesca; Menziani, Maria Cristina; Sbraccia, Maria; Molinari, Paola; Costa, Tommaso; Cappelli, Andrea

    2014-07-23

    A small series of serotonin 5-HT4 receptor ligands has been designed from flexible 2-methoxyquinoline compounds 7a,b by applying the conformational constraint approach. Ligands 7a,b and the corresponding conformationally constrained analogues 8a-g were synthesized and their interactions with the 5-HT4 receptor were examined by measuring both binding affinity and the ability to promote or inhibit receptor-G protein coupling. Ester derivative 7a and conformationally constrained compound 8b were demonstrated to be the most interesting compounds showing a nanomolar 5-HT4R affinity similar to that shown by reference ligands cisapride (1) and RS-23,597-190 (4). The result was rationalized by docking studies in term of high similarity in the binding modalities of flexible 7a and conformationally constrained 8b. The intrinsic efficacy of some selected ligands was determined by evaluating the receptor-G protein coupling and the results obtained demonstrated that the nature and the position of substituents play a critical role in the interaction of these ligands with their receptor. PMID:24871995

  11. Behavioral effects of D3 receptor inhibition and 5-HT4 receptor activation on animals undergoing chronic cannabinoid exposure during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Abboussi, Oualid; Said, Nadia; Fifel, Karim; Lakehayli, Sara; Tazi, Abdelouahhab; El Ganouni, Soumaya

    2016-04-01

    Chronic exposure to cannabinoids during adolescence results in long-lasting behavioral deficits that match some symptomatologic aspects of schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to investigate the reversibility of the emotional and the cognitive effects of chronic exposure to cannabinoids during adolescence, via subsequent modulation of the serotoninergic 5-HT4 and dopaminergic D3 receptors. RS67333 as a 5-HT4 agonist and U-99194A as a D3 antagonist were administered separately at 1 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg, and in combination at 0.5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg to adult animals undergoing chronic treatment with the synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (1 mg/kg) during adolescence. Animals were tested for anxiety-like behavior and episodic-like memory in the open field and novel object recognition tests respectively 30 minutes after the last drug administration. Chronic WIN55,212-2 treated animals exhibited a lasting disruption of episodic memory and increased anxiety levels. The effect on episodic-like memory were partially restored by acute administration of RS67333 and U-99194A and completely by administration of both drugs in combination at lower doses. However, only RS67333 (20 mg/kg) improved the anxiogenic-like effect of WIN55,212-2. These findings give further support that chronic exposure to cannabinoids during adolescence may be used as an animal model for schizophrenia, and highlight D3 and 5-HT4 receptors as potential targets for an enhanced treatment of the cognitive aspect of this disease. PMID:26497809

  12. Mosapride, a selective serotonin 5-HT4 receptor agonist, and alogliptin, a selective dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, exert synergic effects on plasma active GLP-1 levels and glucose tolerance in mice.

    PubMed

    Nonogaki, Katsunori; Kaji, Takao

    2015-12-01

    Pharmacologic stimulation of serotonin 5-HT4 receptors increased plasma active glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels independent of feeding, and that pharmacologic stimulation of 5-HT4 receptors and pharmacologic inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 exerted synergic effects on plasma active GLP-1 levels and glucose tolerance in mice. PMID:26497774

  13. Cisapride, a selective serotonin 5-HT4-receptor agonist, inhibits voltage-dependent K(+) channels in rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Won; Li, Hongliang; Kim, Han Sol; Shin, Sung Eun; Jung, Won-Kyo; Ha, Kwon-Soo; Han, Eun-Taek; Hong, Seok-Ho; Choi, Il-Whan; Park, Won Sun

    2016-09-23

    We investigated the effect of cisapride, a selective serotonin 5-HT4-receptor agonist, on voltage-dependent K(+) (Kv) channels using freshly isolated smooth muscle cells from the coronary arteries of rabbits. The amplitude of Kv currents was reduced by cisapride in a concentration-dependent manner, with an IC50 value of 6.77 ± 6.01 μM and a Hill coefficient of 0.51 ± 0.18. The application of cisapride shifted the steady-state inactivation curve toward a more negative potential, but had no significant effect on the steady-state activation curve. This suggested that cisapride inhibited the Kv channel in a closed state by changing the voltage sensitivity of Kv channels. The application of another selective serotonin 5-HT4-receptor agonist, prucalopride, did not affect the basal Kv current and did not alter the inhibitory effect of cisapride on Kv channels. From these results, we concluded that cisapride inhibited vascular Kv current in a concentration-dependent manner by shifting the steady-state inactivation curve, independent of its own function as a selective serotonin 5-HT4-receptor agonist. PMID:27569285

  14. Chronic 5-HT4 receptor agonist treatment restores learning and memory deficits in a neuroendocrine mouse model of anxiety/depression.

    PubMed

    Darcet, Flavie; Gardier, Alain M; David, Denis J; Guilloux, Jean-Philippe

    2016-03-11

    Cognitive disturbances are often reported as serious invalidating symptoms in patients suffering from major depression disorders (MDD) and are not fully corrected by classical monoaminergic antidepressant drugs. If the role of 5-HT4 receptor agonists as cognitive enhancers is well established in naïve animals or in animal models of cognitive impairment, their cognitive effects in the context of stress need to be examined. Using a mouse model of anxiety/depression (CORT model), we reported that a chronic 5-HT4 agonist treatment (RS67333, 1.5mg/kg/day) restored chronic corticosterone-induced cognitive deficits, including episodic-like, associative and spatial learning and memory impairments. On the contrary, a chronic monoaminergic antidepressant drug treatment with fluoxetine (18mg/kg/day) only partially restored spatial learning and memory deficits and had no effect in the associative/contextual task. These results suggest differential mechanisms underlying cognitive effects of these drugs. Finally, the present study highlights 5-HT4 receptor stimulation as a promising therapeutic mechanism to alleviate cognitive symptoms related to MDD. PMID:26850572

  15. Differences in the Control of Secondary Peristalsis in the Human Esophagus: Influence of the 5-HT4 Receptor versus the TRPV1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chih-Hsun; Lei, Wei-Yi; Hung, Jui-Sheng; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Orr, William C.; Fabio, Pace; Chen, Chien-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Acute administration of 5-hydroxytryptamine4 (5-HT4) receptor agonist, mosapride or esophageal infusion of the transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor-1 (TRPV1) agonist capsaicin promotes secondary peristalsis. We aimed to investigate whether acute esophageal instillation of capsaicin-containing red pepper sauce or administration of mosapride has different effects on the physiological characteristics of secondary peristalsis. Methods Secondary peristalsis was induced with mid-esophageal air injections in 14 healthy subjects. We compared the effects on secondary peristalsis subsequent to capsaicin-containing red pepper sauce (pure capsaicin, 0.84 mg) or 40 mg oral mosapride. Results The threshold volume for generating secondary peristalsis during slow air distensions was significantly decreased with capsaicin infusion compared to mosapride (11.6 ± 1.0 vs. 14.1 ± 0.8 mL, P = 0.02). The threshold volume required to produce secondary peristalsis during rapid air distension was also significantly decreased with capsaicin infusion (4.6 ± 0.5 vs. 5.2 ± 0.6 mL, P = 0.02). Secondary peristalsis was noted more frequently in response to rapid air distension after capsaicin infusion than mosapride (80% [60–100%] vs. 65% [5–100%], P = 0.04). Infusion of capsaicin or mosapride administration didn’t change any parameters of primary or secondary peristalsis. Conclusions Esophageal infusion with capsaicin-containing red pepper sauce suspension does create greater mechanosensitivity as measured by secondary peristalsis than 5-HT4 receptor agonist mosapride. Capsaicin-sensitive afferents appear to be more involved in the sensory modulation of distension-induced secondary peristalsis. PMID:27438088

  16. A Hybrid Structural Approach to Analyze Ligand Binding by the Serotonin Type 4 Receptor (5-HT4)*

    PubMed Central

    Padayatti, Pius S.; Wang, Liwen; Gupta, Sayan; Orban, Tivadar; Sun, Wenyu; Salom, David; Jordan, Steven R.; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Chance, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Hybrid structural methods have been used in recent years to understand protein-protein or protein-ligand interactions where high resolution crystallography or NMR data on the protein of interest has been limited. For G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), high resolution structures of native structural forms other than rhodopsin have not yet been achieved; gaps in our knowledge have been filled by creative crystallography studies that have developed stable forms of receptors by multiple means. The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) is a key GPCR-based signaling molecule affecting many physiological manifestations in humans ranging from mood and anxiety to bowel function. However, a high resolution structure of any of the serotonin receptors has not yet been solved. Here, we used structural mass spectrometry along with theoretical computations, modeling, and other biochemical methods to develop a structured model for human serotonin receptor subtype 4(b) in the presence and absence of its antagonist GR125487. Our data confirmed the overall structure predicted by the model and revealed a highly conserved motif in the ligand-binding pocket of serotonin receptors as an important participant in ligand binding. In addition, identification of waters in the transmembrane region provided clues as to likely paths mediating intramolecular signaling. Overall, this study reveals the potential of hybrid structural methods, including mass spectrometry, to probe physiological and functional GPCR-ligand interactions with purified native protein. PMID:23378516

  17. The peptidic antidepressant spadin interacts with prefrontal 5-HT(4) and mGluR(2) receptors in the control of serotonergic function.

    PubMed

    Moha ou Maati, Hamid; Bourcier-Lucas, Céline; Veyssiere, Julie; Kanzari, Ameni; Heurteaux, Catherine; Borsotto, Marc; Haddjeri, Nasser; Lucas, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the mechanism of action of spadin, a putative fast-acting peptidic antidepressant (AD) and a functional blocker of the K(+) TREK-1 channel, in relation with the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC)-dorsal raphé (DRN) serotonergic (5-HT) neurons connectivity. Spadin increased 5-HT neuron firing rate by 113%, an augmentation abolished after electrolytic lesion of the mPFC. Among the few receptor subtypes known to modulate TREK-1, the stimulation of 5-HT4 receptors and the blockade of mGluR2/3 ones both activated 5-HT impulse flow, effects also suppressed by mPFC lesion. The combination of spadin with the 5-HT4 agonist RS 67333 paradoxically reduced 5-HT firing, an effect reversed by acutely administering the 5-HT1A agonist flesinoxan. It also had a robust synergetic effect on the expression of Zif268 within the DRN. Together, these results strongly suggest that 5-HT neurons underwent a state of depolarization block, and that the mechanisms underlying the influences exerted by spadin and RS 67333 are additive and independent from each other. In contrast, the mGluR2/3 antagonist LY 341495 occluded the effect of spadin, showing that it likely depends on mPFC TREK-1 channels coupled to mGluR2/3 receptors. These in vivo electrophysiological data were confirmed by in vitro Ca(2+) cell imaging performed in cultured cortical neurons. Altogether, our results indicate that spadin, as a natural compound, constitutes a very good candidate to explore the "glutamatergic path" of fast-acting AD research. In addition, they provide the first evidence of 5-HT depolarization block, showing that the combination of 5-HT activators for strategies of AD augmentation should be performed with extreme caution. PMID:25233810

  18. Design, synthesis, and pharmacological evaluation of multitarget-directed ligands with both serotonergic subtype 4 receptor (5-HT4R) partial agonist and 5-HT6R antagonist activities, as potential treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Yahiaoui, Samir; Hamidouche, Katia; Ballandonne, Céline; Davis, Audrey; de Oliveira Santos, Jana Sopkova; Freret, Thomas; Boulouard, Michel; Rochais, Christophe; Dallemagne, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    5-HT4 receptor (5-HT4R) activation and blockade of the 5-HT6 receptor (5-HT6R) are known to enhance the release of numerous neurotransmitters whose depletion is implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Furthermore, 5-HT4R agonists seem to favor production of the neurotrophic soluble amyloid protein precursor alpha (sAPPα). Consequently, combining 5-HT4R agonist/5-HT6R antagonist activities in a single chemical compound would constitute a novel approach able to display both a symptomatic and disease-modifying effect in AD. Seventeen novel derivatives of RS67333 (1) were synthesized and evaluated as potential dual-target compounds. Among them, four agents showed nanomolar and submicromolar affinities toward 5-HT4R and 5-HT6R, respectively; one of them, 7m, was selected on the basis of its in vitro affinity (Ki5-HT4R = 5.3 nM, Ki5-HT6R = 219 nM) for further in vivo experiments, where 7m showed an antiamnesic effect in the mouse at 1 mg/kg ip. PMID:27266998

  19. Anxiolytic-like actions of the selective 5-HT4 receptor antagonists SB 204070A and SB 207266A in rats.

    PubMed

    Kennett, G A; Bright, F; Trail, B; Blackburn, T P; Sanger, G J

    1997-01-01

    The highly selective 5-HT4 receptor antagonists, SB 204070A (0.001-0.1 mg/kg s.c., 30 min pretest) and SB 207266A (0.01, 1 and 10 mg/kg p.o., 1 hr pre-test), increased time spent in social interaction without affecting locomotor activity, in a rat 15 min social interaction test under high light, unfamiliar conditions. At 1 and 10 mg/kg s.c., SB 204070A was no longer active. These results are consistent with the profile expected of anxiolytic treatments in this procedure. In a rat 5 min elevated x-maze test, SB 204070A (0.01 and 1 mg/kg s.c., 30 min pre-test) significantly increased the percentage of time spent on the open arms. SB 204070A (0.01 mg/kg s.c.) and SB 207266A (1 mg/kg p.o., 1 hr pre-test) also increased percentage entries to the open arms. Neither compound affected locomotion at any dose tested in the procedure. The effects of both compounds in this procedure are also consistent with anxiolysis. Neither SB 204070A (0.1 or 1 mg/kg s.c., 30 min pre-test) nor SB 207266A (0.1 or 1 mg/kg p.o., 1 hr pre-test) affected either unpunished or punished responding, in a rat Geller-Seifter conflict model of anxiety. The maximal efficacy of both SB 204070A and SB 207266A in the rat social interaction test was similar to that of the benzodiazepine anxiolytic chlordiazepoxide (5 mg/kg s.c. or p.o.) used as a positive control, but was considerably less in the elevated x-maze procedure. The results suggest that 5-HT4 receptor antagonists may have modest anxiolytic-like actions in rats. PMID:9225297

  20. Synthesis and Structure-Affinity Relationships of Selective High-Affinity 5-HT4 Receptor Antagonists: Application to the Design of New Potential Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) Tracers

    PubMed Central

    Dubost, Emmanuelle; Dumas, Noé; Fossey, Christine; Magnelli, Rosa; Butt-Gueulle, Sabrina; Ballandonne, Céline; Caignard, Daniel H.; Dulin, Fabienne; de-Oliveira Santos, Jana Sopkova; Millet, Philippe; Charnay, Yves; Rault, Sylvain; Cailly, Thomas; Fabis, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    The work described herein aims at finding new potential ligands for the brain imaging of 5-HT4 receptors using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Starting from the non-substituted phenanthridine compound 4a exhibiting a Ki value of 51 nM on 5-HT4R, we explored structure-affinity in this series. We found that substitution in position 4 of the tricycle with a fluorine atom gave the best result. Introduction of an additional nitrogen atom inside the tricyclic framework led to increase both the affinity and the selectivity for 5-HT4R suggesting the design of the antagonist 4v exhibiting a high affinity of 0.04 nM. Several iodinated analogues were then synthesized as potential SPECT tracers. The iodinated compound 11d was able to displace the reference radioiodinated 5-HT4R antagonist (1-butylpiperidin-4-yl)methyl-8-amino-7-iodo[123I]-2,3-dihydrobenzo[b][1,4]dioxine-5-carboxylate ([123I]1, [123I]SB 207710) both in vitro and in vivo in brain. Compound 11d was radiolabeled with [125I]iodine, providing a potential SPECT candidate for brain imaging of 5-HT4R. PMID:23102207

  1. Randomized clinical trial: effect of the 5-HT4 receptor agonist revexepride on reflux parameters in patients with persistent reflux symptoms despite PPI treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tack, J; Zerbib, F; Blondeau, K; des Varannes, S B; Piessevaux, H; Borovicka, J; Mion, F; Fox, M; Bredenoord, A J; Louis, H; Dedrie, S; Hoppenbrouwers, M; Meulemans, A; Rykx, A; Thielemans, L; Ruth, M

    2015-01-01

    Background Approximately, 20–30% of patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) experience persistent symptoms despite treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). These patients may have underlying dysmotility; therefore, targeting gastric motor dysfunction in addition to acid inhibition may represent a new therapeutic avenue. The aim of this study was to assess the pharmacodynamic effect of the prokinetic agent revexepride (a 5-HT4 receptor agonist) in patients with GERD who have persistent symptoms despite treatment with a PPI. Methods This was a phase II, exploratory, multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-group study in patients with GERD who experienced persistent symptoms while taking a stable dose of PPIs (http://ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01370863). Patients were randomized to either revexepride (0.5 mg, three times daily) or matching placebo for 4 weeks. Reflux events and associated characteristics were assessed by pH/impedance monitoring and disease symptoms were assessed using electronic diaries and questionnaires. Key Results In total, 67 patients were enrolled in the study. There were no significant differences between study arms in the number, the mean proximal extent or the bolus clearance times of liquid-containing reflux events. Changes from baseline in the number of heartburn, regurgitation, and other symptom events were minimal for each treatment group and no clear trends were observed. Conclusions & Inferences No clear differences were seen in reflux parameters between the placebo and revexepride groups. PMID:25530111

  2. Synthesis and SAR of Imidazo[1,5-a]pyridine derivatives as 5-HT4 receptor partial agonists for the treatment of cognitive disorders associated with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nirogi, Ramakrishna; Mohammed, Abdul Rasheed; Shinde, Anil K; Bogaraju, Narsimha; Gagginapalli, Shankar Reddy; Ravella, Srinivasa Rao; Kota, Laxman; Bhyrapuneni, Gopinadh; Muddana, Nageswara Rao; Benade, Vijay; Palacharla, Raghava Chowdary; Jayarajan, Pradeep; Subramanian, Ramkumar; Goyal, Vinod Kumar

    2015-10-20

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease which has a higher prevalence and incidence in older people. The need for improved AD therapies is unmet. The 5-hydroxytryptamine4 receptor (5-HT4R) partial agonists may be of benefit for both the symptomatic and disease-modifying treatment of cognitive disorders associated with AD. Herein, we report the design, synthesis and SAR of imidazo[1,5-a] pyridine derivatives as 5-HT4R partial agonists. The focused SAR, optimization of ADME properties resulted the discovery of compound 5a as potent, selective, brain penetrant 5-HT4 partial agonist as a lead compound with good ADME properties and efficacy in both symptomatic and disease modifying animal models of cognition. PMID:26363507

  3. A protein tyrosine kinase receptor, c-RET signaling pathway contributes to the enteric neurogenesis induced by a 5-HT4 receptor agonist at an anastomosis after transection of the gut in rodents.

    PubMed

    Goto, Kei; Kawahara, Isao; Kuniyasu, Hiroki; Takaki, Miyako

    2015-07-01

    We previously reported that a serotonin 4 (5-HT4) receptor agonist, mosapride citrate (MOS), increased the number of c-RET-positive cells and levels of c-RET mRNA in gel sponge implanted in the necks of rats. The 5-HT4 receptor is a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) coupled to G protein Gs-cAMP cascades. We investigated the possibility that 5-HT4 receptor activation induced c-RET activation and/or PKA activation by elevating cAMP levels. Rodents were orally administered MOS by adding it to drinking water for 2 weeks after enteric nerve circuit insult via gut transection and anastomosis, together with the RET inhibitors withaferin A (WA) and RPI-1 or the PKA inhibitor H89. We then examined PGP9.5-positive cells in the newly formed granulation tissue at the anastomotic site. MOS significantly increased the number of new neurons, but not when co-administered with WA or RPI-1. Co-administration of H89 failed to alter MOS-induced increases in neurogenesis. In conclusion, the c-RET signaling pathway contributes to enteric neurogenesis facilitated by MOS, though the contribution of PKA activation seems unlikely. PMID:25850922

  4. Novel multitarget-directed ligands (MTDLs) with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory and serotonergic subtype 4 receptor (5-HT4R) agonist activities as potential agents against Alzheimer's disease: the design of donecopride.

    PubMed

    Rochais, Christophe; Lecoutey, Cédric; Gaven, Florence; Giannoni, Patrizia; Hamidouche, Katia; Hedou, Damien; Dubost, Emmanuelle; Genest, David; Yahiaoui, Samir; Freret, Thomas; Bouet, Valentine; Dauphin, François; Sopkova de Oliveira Santos, Jana; Ballandonne, Céline; Corvaisier, Sophie; Malzert-Fréon, Aurélie; Legay, Remi; Boulouard, Michel; Claeysen, Sylvie; Dallemagne, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we describe the synthesis and in vitro evaluation of a novel series of multitarget-directed ligands (MTDL) displaying both nanomolar dual-binding site (DBS) acetylcholinesterase inhibitory effects and partial 5-HT4R agonist activity, among which donecopride was selected for further in vivo evaluations in mice. The latter displayed procognitive and antiamnesic effects and enhanced sAPPα release, accounting for a potential symptomatic and disease-modifying therapeutic benefit in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25793650

  5. Modulation of cannabinoid signaling by hippocampal 5-HT4 serotonergic system in fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Nasehi, Mohammad; Farrahizadeh, Maryam; Ebrahimi-Ghiri, Mohaddeseh; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-09-01

    Behavioral studies have suggested a key role for the cannabinoid system in the modulation of conditioned fear memory. Likewise, much of the literature has revealed that the serotonergic system affects Pavlovian fear conditioning and extinction. A high level of functional overlap between the serotonin and cannabinoid systems has also been reported. To clarify the interaction between the hippocampal serotonin (5-HT4) receptor and the cannabinoid CB1 receptor in the acquisition of fear memory, the effects of 5-HT4 agents, arachidonylcyclopropylamide (ACPA; CB1 receptor agonist), and the combined use of these drugs on fear learning were studied in a fear conditioning task in adult male NMRI mice. Pre-training intraperitoneal administration of ACPA (0.1 mg/kg) decreased the percentage of freezing time in both context- and tone-dependent fear conditions, suggesting impairment of the acquisition of fear memory. Pre-training, intra-hippocampal (CA1) microinjection of RS67333, a 5-HT4 receptor agonist, at doses of 0.1 and 0.2 or 0.2 µg/mouse impaired contextual and tone fear memory, respectively. A subthreshold dose of RS67333 (0.005 µg/mouse) did not alter the ACPA response in either condition. Moreover, intra-CA1 microinjection of RS23597 as a 5-HT4 receptor antagonist did not alter context-dependent fear memory acquisition, but it did impair tone-dependent fear memory acquisition. However, a subthreshold dose of the RS23597 (0.01 µg/mouse) potentiated ACPA-induced fear memory impairment in both conditions. Therefore, we suggest that the blockade of hippocampal 5-HT4 serotonergic system modulates cannabinoid signaling induced by the activation of CB1 receptors in conditioned fear. PMID:27296273

  6. Evidence for 5-HT7 receptors mediating relaxation of human colonic circular smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Nicolaas H; Briejer, Michel R; Van Bergen, Patrick J E; Akkermans, Louis M A; Schuurkes, Jan A J

    1999-01-01

    5-HT4 receptors mediate relaxation of human colon circular muscle. However, after 5-HT4 receptor blockade (SB 204070 10 nM), 5-HT still induced a relaxation (pEC50 6.3). 5-HT4 receptors were sufficiently blocked, as the curves to 5-HT obtained in the presence of 10 and 100 nM SB 204070 were indistinguishable. This 5-HT-induced relaxation was tetrodotoxin-insensitive, indicative of a smooth muscle relaxant 5-HT receptor. This, and the rank order of potency (5-CT=5-MeOT=5-HT) suggested involvement of 5-HT1 or 5-HT7 receptors. Mesulergine, a 5-HT7 receptor antagonist at nanomolar concentrations, and a 5-HT1 receptor antagonist at micromolar concentrations, competitively antagonized the 5-HT-induced relaxation (pKB 8.3) and antagonized the relaxation to 5-CT. Methysergide antagonized the 5-HT-induced relaxation (pA2 7.6). It is concluded that the profile of the smooth muscle inhibitory 5-HT receptor resembles that of the 5-HT7 receptor. These data provide the first evidence for functional human 5-HT7 receptors. PMID:10556917

  7. Delivery of enteric neural progenitors with 5-HT4 agonist-loaded nanoparticles and thermosensitive hydrogel enhances cell proliferation and differentiation following transplantation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Ryo; Cheng, Lily S; Graham, Hannah K; Nagy, Nandor; Belkind-Gerson, Jaime; Mattheolabakis, George; Amiji, Mansoor M; Goldstein, Allan M

    2016-05-01

    Cell therapy offers an innovative approach for treating enteric neuropathies. Postnatal gut-derived enteric neural stem/progenitor cells (ENSCs) represent a potential autologous source, but have a limited capacity for proliferation and neuronal differentiation. Since serotonin (5-HT) promotes enteric neuronal growth during embryonic development, we hypothesized that serotonin receptor agonism would augment growth of neurons from transplanted ENSCs. Postnatal ENSCs were isolated from 2 to 4 week-old mouse colon and cultured with 5-HT4 receptor agonist (RS67506)-loaded liposomal nanoparticles. ENSCs were co-cultured with mouse colon explants in the presence of RS67506-loaded (n = 3) or empty nanoparticles (n = 3). ENSCs were also transplanted into mouse rectum in vivo with RS67506-loaded (n = 8) or blank nanoparticles (n = 4) confined in a thermosensitive hydrogel, Pluronic F-127. Neuronal density and proliferation were analyzed immunohistochemically. Cultured ENSCs gave rise to significantly more neurons in the presence of RS67506-loaded nanoparticles. Similarly, colon explants had significantly increased neuronal density when RS67506-loaded nanoparticles were present. Finally, following in vivo cell delivery, co-transplantation of ENSCs with 5-HT4 receptor agonist-loaded nanoparticles led to significantly increased neuronal density and proliferation. We conclude that optimization of postnatal ENSCs can support their use in cell-based therapies for neurointestinal diseases. PMID:26922325

  8. 5-Hydroxytryptamine 4(a) receptor expressed in Sf9 cells is palmitoylated in an agonist-dependent manner.

    PubMed Central

    Ponimaskin, E G; Schmidt, M F; Heine, M; Bickmeyer, U; Richter, D W

    2001-01-01

    The mouse 5-hydroxytryptamine 4(a) receptor [5-HT(4(a))] was expressed with a baculovirus system in insect cells and analysed for acylation. [(3)H]Palmitic acid was effectively incorporated into 5-HT(4(a)) and label was sensitive to the treatment with reducing agents indicating a thioester-type bond. Analysis of protein-bound fatty acids revealed that 5-HT(4(a)) contains predominantly palmitic acid. Treatment of infected Sf9 (Spodoptera frugiperda) cells with BIMU8 [(endo-N-8-methyl-8-azabicyclo[3.2.1]oct-3-yl)-2,3-dehydro-2-oxo-3-(prop-2-yl)-1H-benzimid-azole-1-carboxamide], a 5-HT(4) receptor-selective agonist, generated a dose-dependent increase in [(3)H]palmitate incorporation into 5-HT(4(a)) with an EC(50) of approx. 10 nM. The change in receptor labelling after stimulation with agonist was receptor-specific and did not result from general metabolic effects. We also used both pulse labelling and pulse-chase labelling to address the dynamics of 5-HT(4(a)) palmitoylation. Incorporation studies revealed that the rate of palmitate incorporation was increased approx. 3-fold after stimulation with agonist. Results of pulse-chase experiments show that activation with BIMU8 promoted the release of radiolabel from 5-HT(4(a)), thereby reducing the levels of receptor-bound palmitate to approximately one-half. Taken together, our results demonstrate that palmitoylation of 5-HT(4(a)) is a reversible process and that stimulation of 5-HT(4(a)) with agonist increases the turnover rate for receptor-bound palmitate. This provides evidence for a regulated cycling of receptor-bound palmitate and suggests a functional role for palmitoylation/depalmitoylation in 5-hydroxytryptamine-mediated signalling. PMID:11171060

  9. 5-Amino-6-chloro-N-[(1-isobutylpiperidin-4-yl)methyl]-2-methylimidazo[1,2-alpha]pyridine-8-carboxamide (CJ-033,466), a novel and selective 5-hydroxytryptamine4 receptor partial agonist: pharmacological profile in vitro and gastroprokinetic effect in conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Tadayoshi; Ochi, Yasuo; Suzuki, Keiko; Saito, Toshiyuki; Sugie, Yutaka; Sakakibara, Minoru

    2008-04-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors and dopamine(2) (D(2)) receptor modulate gastrointestinal motility. Gastroprokinetic agents that act on several 5-HT receptor subtypes and/or D(2) receptors are used clinically. Although the 5-HT(4) receptor is known to mediate the gastroprokinetic effects of these agents, the absence of highly selective 5-HT(4) receptor agonists has made it difficult to confirm the physiological consequences of selective 5-HT(4) receptor stimulation. In this study, we report the in vitro pharmacological profiles and the in vivo gastroprokinetic effects of 5-amino-6-chloro-N-[(1-isobutylpiperidin-4-yl)methyl]-2-methylimidazo[1,2-alpha]pyridine-8-carboxamide (CJ-033,466), a novel, potent, and selective 5-HT(4) partial agonist. Compared with preceding 5-HT(4) agonists such as cisapride, mosapride, and tegaserod, CJ-033,466 had a superior in vitro profile, with nanomolar agonistic activities for the 5-HT(4) receptor and 1000-fold greater selectivity for the 5-HT(4) receptor over other 5-HT and D(2) receptors. In vivo studies in conscious dogs showed that CJ-033,466 dose-dependently stimulated gastric antral motility in both the fasted and postprandial states at the same dose range and that it was 30 times more potent than cisapride. Furthermore, CJ-033,466 accelerated the gastric emptying rate in a gastroparesis dog model at the minimally effective dose established in the gastric motility study. In conclusion, CJ-033,466 is a potent and highly selective 5-HT(4) agonist that stimulates physiologically coordinated gastric motility, and it has no activity on other 5-HT receptor subtypes and D(2) receptors. Therefore, CJ-033,466 could be used to treat gastroparesis, providing better gastroprokinetics and reduced side effects mediated by the other receptors. PMID:18198343

  10. Serotonin 1A and Serotonin 4 Receptors: Essential Mediators of the Neurogenic and Behavioral Actions of Antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Benjamin Adam; Mendez-David, Indira; Faye, Charlène; David, Sylvain André; Pierz, Kerri A; Gardier, Alain M; Hen, René; David, Denis J

    2016-02-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the mostly widely used treatment for major depressive disorders and also are prescribed for several anxiety disorders. However, similar to most antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors suffer from two major problems: They only show beneficial effects after 2 to 4 weeks and only about 33% of patients show remission to first-line treatment. Thus, there is a considerable need for development of more effective antidepressants. There is a growing body of evidence supporting critical roles of 5-HT1A and 5-HT4 receptor subtypes in mediating successful depression treatments. In addition, appropriate activation of these receptors may be associated with a faster onset of the therapeutic response. This review will examine the known roles of 5-HT1A and 5-HT4 receptors in mediating both the pathophysiology of depression and anxiety and the treatment of these mood disorders. At the end of the review, the role of these receptors in the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis will also be discussed. Ultimately, we propose that novel antidepressant drugs that selectively target these serotonin receptors could be developed to yield improvements over current treatments for major depressive disorders. PMID:25488850

  11. Serotonin 1A and Serotonin 4 Receptors: Essential Mediators of the Neurogenic and Behavioral Actions of Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Benjamin Adam; Mendez-David, Indira; Faye, Charlène; David, Sylvain André; Pierz, Kerri A.; Gardier, Alain M.; Hen, René; David, Denis J.

    2016-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the mostly widely used treatment for major depressive disorders and also are prescribed for several anxiety disorders. However, similar to most antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors suffer from two major problems: They only show beneficial effects after 2 to 4 weeks and only about 33% of patients show remission to first-line treatment. Thus, there is a considerable need for development of more effective antidepressants. There is a growing body of evidence supporting critical roles of 5-HT1A and 5-HT4 receptor subtypes in mediating successful depression treatments. In addition, appropriate activation of these receptors may be associated with a faster onset of the therapeutic response. This review will examine the known roles of 5-HT1A and 5-HT4 receptors in mediating both the pathophysiology of depression and anxiety and the treatment of these mood disorders. At the end of the review, the role of these receptors in the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis will also be discussed. Ultimately, we propose that novel antidepressant drugs that selectively target these serotonin receptors could be developed to yield improvements over current treatments for major depressive disorders. PMID:25488850

  12. Characterization of the 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors mediating contraction in the pig isolated intravesical ureter

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Medardo; Barahona, María Victoria; Simonsen, Ulf; Recio, Paz; Rivera, Luis; Martínez, Ana Cristina; García-Sacristán, Albino; Orensanz, Luis M; Prieto, Dolores

    2003-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and to characterize the 5-HT receptors involved in 5-HT responses in the pig intravesical ureter. 5-HT (0.01–10 μM) concentration-dependently increased the tone of intravesical ureteral strips, whereas the increases in phasic contractions were concentration-independent. The 5-HT2 receptor agonist α-methyl 5-HT, mimicked the effect on tone whereas weak or no response was obtained with 5-CT, 8-OH-DPAT, m-chlorophenylbiguanide and RS 67333, 5-HT1, 5-HT1A, 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptor agonists, respectively. 5-HT did not induce relaxation of U46619-contracted ureteral preparations. Pargyline (100 μM), a monoaminooxidase A/B activity inhibitor, produced leftward displacements of the concentration-response curves for 5-HT. 5-HT-induced tone was reduced by the 5-HT2 and 5-HT2A receptor antagonists ritanserine (0.1 μM) and spiperone (0.2 μM), respectively. However, 5-HT contraction was not antagonized by cyanopindolol (2 μM), SDZ–SER 082 (1 μM), Y-25130 (1 μM) and GR 113808 (0.1 μM), which are respectively, 5-HT1A/1B, 5-HT2B/2C, 5-HT3, and 5-HT4 selective receptor antagonists. Removal of the urothelium did not modify 5-HT-induced contractions. Blockade of neuronal voltage-activated sodium channels, α-adrenergic receptors and adrenergic neurotransmission with tetrodotoxin (1 μM), phentolamine (0.3 μM) and guanethidine (10 μM), respectively, reduced the contractions to 5-HT. However, physostigmine (1 μM), atropine (0.1 μM) and suramin (30 μM), inhibitors of cholinesterase activity, muscarinic- and purinergic P2-receptors, respectively, failed to modify the contractions to 5-HT. These results suggest that 5-HT increases the tone of the pig intravesical ureter through 5-HT2A receptors located at the smooth muscle. Part of the 5-HT contraction is indirectly mediated via noradrenaline release from sympathetic nerves. PMID:12522083

  13. Ozone Exposure Alters Serotonin and Serotonin Receptor Expression in the Developing Lung

    PubMed Central

    Van Winkle, Laura S.

    2013-01-01

    Ozone, a pervasive environmental pollutant, adversely affects functional lung growth in children. Animal studies demonstrate that altered lung development is associated with modified signaling within the airway epithelial mesenchymal trophic unit, including mediators that can change nerve growth. We hypothesized that ozone exposure alters the normal pattern of serotonin, its transporter (5-HTT), and two key receptors (5-HT2A and 5-HT4), a pathway involved in postnatal airway neural, epithelial, and immune processes. We exposed monkeys to acute or episodic ozone during the first 2 or 6 months of life. There were three exposure groups/age: (1) filtered air, (2) acute ozone challenge, and (3) episodic ozone + acute ozone challenge. Lungs were prepared for compartment-specific qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and stereology. Airway epithelial serotonin immunopositive staining increased in all exposure groups with the most prominent in 2-month midlevel and 6-month distal airways. Gene expression of 5-HTT, 5-HT2AR, and 5-HT4R increased in an age-dependent manner. Overall expression was greater in distal compared with midlevel airways. Ozone exposure disrupted both 5-HT2AR and 5-HT4R protein expression in airways and enhanced immunopositive staining for 5-HT2AR (2 months) and 5-HT4R (6 months) on smooth muscle. Ozone exposure increases serotonin in airway epithelium regardless of airway level, age, and exposure history and changes the spatial pattern of serotonin receptor protein (5-HT2A and 5-HT4) and 5-HTT gene expression depending on compartment, age, and exposure history. Understanding how serotonin modulates components of reversible airway obstruction exacerbated by ozone exposure sets the foundation for developing clinically relevant therapies for airway disease. PMID:23570994

  14. Receptor-mediated mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Osamu; Murakawa, Tomokazu; Nishida, Kazuhiko; Otsu, Kinya

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria are essential organelles that supply ATP through oxidative phosphorylation to maintain cellular homeostasis. Extrinsic or intrinsic agents can impair mitochondria, and these impaired mitochondria can generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) as byproducts, inducing cellular damage and cell death. The quality control of mitochondria is essential for the maintenance of normal cellular functions, particularly in cardiomyocytes, because they are terminally differentiated. Accumulation of damaged mitochondria is characteristic of various diseases, including heart failure, neurodegenerative disease, and aging-related diseases. Mitochondria are generally degraded through autophagy, an intracellular degradation system that is conserved from yeast to mammals. Autophagy is thought to be a nonselective degradation process in which cytoplasmic proteins and organelles are engulfed by isolation membrane to form autophagosomes in eukaryotic cells. However, recent studies have described the process of selective autophagy, which targets specific proteins or organelles such as mitochondria. Mitochondria-specific autophagy is called mitophagy. Dysregulation of mitophagy is implicated in the development of chronic diseases including neurodegenerative diseases, metabolic diseases, and heart failure. In this review, we discuss recent progress in research on mitophagy receptors. PMID:27021519

  15. Characterization of putative 5-HT7 receptors mediating tachycardia in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Villalón, Carlos M; Heiligers, Jan P C; Centurión, David; De Vries, Peter; Saxena, Pramod R

    1997-01-01

    , sumatriptan (30, 100 and 300 μg kg−1) and indorenate (300 and 1000 μg kg−1) or the 5-HT4 receptor (partial) agonist cisapride (300 and 1000 μg kg−1) were devoid of effects on feline heart rate per se and failed to modify significantly 5-HT-induced tachycardic responses. Based upon the above rank order of agonist potency, the failure of sumatriptan, indorenate or cisapride to produce cardioacceleration and the blockade by a series of drugs showing high affinity for the cloned 5-ht7 receptor, the present results indicate that the 5-HT receptor mediating tachycardia in the cat is operationally similar to other putative 5-HT7 receptors mediating vascular and non-vascular responses (e.g. relaxation of the rabbit femoral vein, canine external carotid and coronary arteries, rat systemic vasculature and guinea-pig ileum). Since these responses represent functional correlates of the 5-ht7 gene product, the 5-HT7 receptor appellation is reinforced. Therefore, the present experimental model, which is not complicated by the presence of other 5-HT receptors, can be utilized to characterize and develop new drugs with potential agonist and antagonist properties at functional 5-HT7 receptors. PMID:9249256

  16. The 5-hydroxytryptamine4 receptor enables differentiation of informational content and encoding in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Twarkowski, Hannah; Hagena, Hardy; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2016-07-01

    Long-term synaptic plasticity, represented by long-term depression (LTD) and long-term potentiation (LTP) comprise cellular processes that enable memory. Neuromodulators such as serotonin regulate hippocampal function, and the 5-HT4 -receptor contributes to processes underlying cognition. It was previously shown that in the CA1-region, 5-HT4 -receptors regulate the frequency-response relationship of synaptic plasticity: patterned afferent stimulation that has no effect on synaptic strength (i.e., a θm-frequency), will result in LTP or LTD, when given in the presence of a 5-HT4 -agonist, or antagonist, respectively. Here, we show that in the dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3 regions of freely behaving rats, pharmacological manipulations of 5-HT4 -receptors do not influence responses generated at θm-frequencies, but activation of 5-HT4 -receptors prevents persistent LTD in mossy fiber (mf)-CA3, or perforant path-DG synapses. Furthermore, the regulation by 5-HT4 -receptors of LTP is subfield-specific: 5-HT4 -receptor-activation prevents mf-CA3-LTP, but does not strongly affect DG-potentiation. These data suggest that 5-HT4 -receptor activation prioritises information encoding by means of LTP in the DG and CA1 regions, and suppresses persistent information storage in mf-CA3 synapses. Thus, 5-HT4 -receptors serve to shape information storage across the hippocampal circuitry and specify the nature of experience-dependent encoding. © 2016 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26800645

  17. Allergic sensitization modifies the pulmonary expression of 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Córdoba-Rodríguez, Guadalupe; Vargas, Mario H; Ruiz, Víctor; Carbajal, Verónica; Campos-Bedolla, Patricia; Mercadillo-Herrera, Paulina; Arreola-Ramírez, José Luis; Segura-Medina, Patricia

    2016-03-01

    There is mounting evidence that 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) plays a role in asthma. However, scarce information exists about the pulmonary expression of 5-HT receptors and its modification after allergic sensitization. In the present work, we explored the expression of 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A, 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-ht5a, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors in lungs from control and sensitized guinea pigs through qPCR and Western blot. In control animals, mRNA from all receptors was detectable in lung homogenates, especially from 5-HT2A and 5-HT4 receptors. Sensitized animals had decreased mRNA expression of 5-HT2A and 5-HT4 receptors and increased that of 5-HT7 receptor. In contrast, they had increased protein expression of 5-HT2A receptor in bronchial epithelium and of 5-HT4 receptor in lung parenchyma. The degree of airway response to the allergic challenge was inversely correlated with mRNA expression of the 5-HT1A receptor. In summary, our results showed that major 5-HT receptor subtypes are constitutively expressed in the guinea pig lung, and that allergic sensitization modifies the expression of 5-HT2A, 5-HT4, and 5-HT7 receptors. PMID:26657047

  18. Galectin-4-mediated transcytosis of transferrin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Perez Bay, Andres E.; Schreiner, Ryan; Benedicto, Ignacio; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Some native epithelia, for example, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and kidney proximal tubule (KPT), constitutively lack the basolateral sorting adaptor AP-1B; this results in many basolateral plasma membrane proteins being repositioned to the apical domain, where they perform essential functions for their host organs. We recently reported the underlying apical polarity reversal mechanism: in the absence of AP-1B-mediated basolateral sorting, basolateral proteins are shuttled to the apical plasma membrane through a transcytotic pathway mediated by the plus-end kinesin KIF16B. Here, we demonstrate that this apical transcytotic pathway requires apical sorting of basolateral proteins, which is mediated by apical signals and galectin-4. Using RPE and KPT cell lines, and AP-1B-knockdown MDCK cells, we show that mutation of the N-glycan linked to N727 in the basolateral marker transferrin receptor (TfR) or knockdown of galectin-4 inhibits TfR transcytosis to apical recycling endosomes and the apical plasma membrane, and promotes TfR lysosomal targeting and subsequent degradation. Our results report a new role of galectins in basolateral to apical epithelial transcytosis. PMID:25179596

  19. Comparative analyses of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Ishii, Shoichi; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi; Kagawa, Nao; Katoh, Kazutaka

    2015-06-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator that activates G protein-coupled LPA receptors to exert fundamental cellular functions. Six LPA receptor genes have been identified in vertebrates and are classified into two subfamilies, the endothelial differentiation genes (edg) and the non-edg family. Studies using genetically engineered mice, frogs, and zebrafish have demonstrated that LPA receptor-mediated signaling has biological, developmental, and pathophysiological functions. Computational analyses have also identified several amino acids (aa) critical for LPA recognition by human LPA receptors. This review focuses on the evolutionary aspects of LPA receptor-mediated signaling by comparing the aa sequences of vertebrate LPA receptors and LPA-producing enzymes; it also summarizes the LPA receptor-dependent effects commonly observed in mouse, frog, and fish. PMID:25732591

  20. Co-receptors are dispensable for tethering receptor-mediated phagocytosis of apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Park, B; Lee, J; Moon, H; Lee, G; Lee, D-H; Cho, J Hoon; Park, D

    2015-01-01

    During efferocytosis, phagocytic cells recognize dying cells by receptors binding to ligands specifically exposed on apoptotic cells. Multiple phagocytic receptors and some of their signaling pathways have been identified. However, the downstream pathways of tethering receptors that secure apoptotic cells remain elusive. It is generally assumed that tethering receptors induce signaling to mediate engulfment via interacting with co-receptors or other engulfment receptors located nearby. However, it is poorly understood whether co-receptors for tethering receptors exist during efferocytosis, and, if they do, whether they are indispensable for this process. Here, we address this issue using glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored annexin A5 (Anxa5-GPI), an artificial tethering receptor without a putative co-receptor. Phagocytes expressing Anxa5-GPI exhibited enhanced binding of apoptotic cells, resulting in promoted ingestion of apoptotic cells in a phosphatidylserine-dependent manner. Anxa5-GPI-induced phagocytosis of apoptotic cells relied on the known cytoskeletal engulfment machinery but partially depended on the Elmo-Dock-Rac module or the integrin pathway. In addition, Anxa5-GPI-mediated efferocytosis provoked anti-inflammatory responses. Taken together, our work suggests that co-receptors are dispensable for tethering receptor-induced efferocytosis and that tethering receptors mediate the engulfment of apoptotic cells through multiple engulfment signaling pathways. PMID:26018733

  1. Co-receptors are dispensable for tethering receptor-mediated phagocytosis of apoptotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, B; Lee, J; Moon, H; Lee, G; Lee, D-H; Hoon Cho, J; Park, D

    2015-01-01

    During efferocytosis, phagocytic cells recognize dying cells by receptors binding to ligands specifically exposed on apoptotic cells. Multiple phagocytic receptors and some of their signaling pathways have been identified. However, the downstream pathways of tethering receptors that secure apoptotic cells remain elusive. It is generally assumed that tethering receptors induce signaling to mediate engulfment via interacting with co-receptors or other engulfment receptors located nearby. However, it is poorly understood whether co-receptors for tethering receptors exist during efferocytosis, and, if they do, whether they are indispensable for this process. Here, we address this issue using glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored annexin A5 (Anxa5-GPI), an artificial tethering receptor without a putative co-receptor. Phagocytes expressing Anxa5-GPI exhibited enhanced binding of apoptotic cells, resulting in promoted ingestion of apoptotic cells in a phosphatidylserine-dependent manner. Anxa5-GPI-induced phagocytosis of apoptotic cells relied on the known cytoskeletal engulfment machinery but partially depended on the Elmo-Dock-Rac module or the integrin pathway. In addition, Anxa5-GPI-mediated efferocytosis provoked anti-inflammatory responses. Taken together, our work suggests that co-receptors are dispensable for tethering receptor-induced efferocytosis and that tethering receptors mediate the engulfment of apoptotic cells through multiple engulfment signaling pathways. PMID:26018733

  2. The receptor subunits generating NMDA receptor mediated currents in oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Burzomato, Valeria; Frugier, Guillaume; Pérez-Otaño, Isabel; Kittler, Josef T; Attwell, David

    2010-01-01

    NMDA receptors have been shown to contribute to glutamate-evoked currents in oligodendrocytes. Activation of these receptors damages myelin in ischaemia, in part because they are more weakly blocked by Mg2+ than are most neuronal NMDA receptors. This weak Mg2+ block was suggested to reflect an unusual subunit composition including the NR2C and NR3A subunits. Here we expressed NR1/NR2C and triplet NR1/NR2C/NR3A recombinant receptors in HEK cells and compared their currents with those of NMDA-evoked currents in rat cerebellar oligodendrocytes. NR1/NR2C/3A receptors were less blocked by 2 mm Mg2+ than were NR1/NR2C receptors (the remaining current was 30% and 18%, respectively, of that seen without added Mg2+) and showed less channel noise, suggesting a smaller single channel conductance. NMDA-evoked currents in oligodendrocytes showed a Mg2+ block (to 32%) similar to that observed for NR1/NR2C/NR3A and significantly different from that for NR1/NR2C receptors. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed interactions between NR1, NR2C and NR3A subunits in a purified myelin preparation from rat brain. These data are consistent with NMDA-evoked currents in oligodendrocytes reflecting the activation of receptors containing NR1, NR2C and NR3A subunits. PMID:20660562

  3. Design of a serotonin 4 receptor radiotracer with decreased lipophilicity for single photon emission computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Fresneau, Nathalie; Dumas, Noé; Tournier, Benjamin B; Fossey, Christine; Ballandonne, Céline; Lesnard, Aurélien; Millet, Philippe; Charnay, Yves; Cailly, Thomas; Bouillon, Jean-Philippe; Fabis, Frédéric

    2015-04-13

    With the aim to develop a suitable radiotracer for the brain imaging of the serotonin 4 receptor subtype (5-HT4R) using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), we synthesized and evaluated a library of di- and triazaphenanthridines with lipophilicity values which were in the range expected to favour brain penetration, and which demonstrated specific binding to the target of interest. Adding additional nitrogen atoms to previously described phenanthridine ligands exhibiting a high unspecific binding, we were able to design a radioiodinated compound [(125)I]14. This compound exhibited a binding affinity value of 0.094 nM toward human 5-HT4R and a high selectivity over other serotonin receptor subtypes (5-HTR). In vivo SPECT imaging studies and competition experiments demonstrated that the decreased lipophilicity (in comparison with our previously reported compounds 4 and 5) allowed a more specific labelling of the 5-HT4R brain-containing regions. PMID:25778994

  4. Multiscale Modeling of Virus Entry via Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin

    2012-11-01

    Virus infections are ubiquitous and remain major threats to human health worldwide. Viruses are intracellular parasites and must enter host cells to initiate infection. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is the most common entry pathway taken by viruses, the whole process is highly complex and dictated by various events, such as virus motions, membrane deformations, receptor diffusion and ligand-receptor reactions, occurring at multiple length and time scales. We develop a multiscale model for virus entry through receptor-mediated endocytosis. The binding of virus to cell surface is based on a mesoscale three dimensional stochastic adhesion model, the internalization (endocytosis) of virus and cellular membrane deformation is based on the discretization of Helfrich Hamiltonian in a curvilinear space using Monte Carlo method. The multiscale model is based on the combination of these two models. We will implement this model to study the herpes simplex virus entry into B78 cells and compare the model predictions with experimental measurements.

  5. Receptor Complex Mediated Regulation of Symplastic Traffic.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Yvonne; Faulkner, Christine

    2016-05-01

    Plant receptor kinases (RKs) and receptor proteins (RPs) are involved in a plethora of cellular processes, including developmental decisions and immune responses. There is increasing evidence that plasmodesmata (PD)-localized RKs and RPs act as nexuses that perceive extracellular signals and convey them into intra- and intercellular responses by regulating the exchange of molecules through PD. How RK/RP complexes regulate the specific and nonspecific traffic of molecules through PD, and how these receptors are specifically targeted to PD, have been elusive but underpin comprehensive understanding of the function and regulation of the symplast. In this review we gather the current knowledge of RK/RP complex function at PD and how they might regulate intercellular traffic. PMID:26655263

  6. NMDA Receptors Mediate Synaptic Competition in Culture

    PubMed Central

    She, Kevin; Craig, Ann Marie

    2011-01-01

    Background Activity through NMDA type glutamate receptors sculpts connectivity in the developing nervous system. This topic is typically studied in the visual system in vivo, where activity of inputs can be differentially regulated, but in which individual synapses are difficult to visualize and mechanisms governing synaptic competition can be difficult to ascertain. Here, we develop a model of NMDA-receptor dependent synaptic competition in dissociated cultured hippocampal neurons. Methodology/Principal Findings GluN1 -/- (KO) mouse hippocampal neurons lacking the essential NMDA receptor subunit were cultured alone or cultured in defined ratios with wild type (WT) neurons. The absence of functional NMDA receptors did not alter neuron survival. Synapse development was assessed by immunofluorescence for postsynaptic PSD-95 family scaffold and apposed presynaptic vesicular glutamate transporter VGlut1. Synapse density was specifically enhanced onto minority wild type neurons co-cultured with a majority of GluN1 -/- neighbour neurons, both relative to the GluN1 -/- neighbours and relative to sister pure wild type cultures. This form of synaptic competition was dependent on NMDA receptor activity and not conferred by the mere physical presence of GluN1. In contrast to these results in 10% WT and 90% KO co-cultures, synapse density did not differ by genotype in 50% WT and 50% KO co-cultures or in 90% WT and 10% KO co-cultures. Conclusions/Significance The enhanced synaptic density onto NMDA receptor-competent neurons in minority coculture with GluN1 -/- neurons represents a cell culture paradigm for studying synaptic competition. Mechanisms involved may include a retrograde ‘reward’ signal generated by WT neurons, although in this paradigm there was no ‘punishment’ signal against GluN1 -/- neurons. Cell culture assays involving such defined circuits may help uncover the rules and mechanisms of activity-dependent synaptic competition in the developing nervous

  7. Regulation and ontogeny of subtypes of muscarinic receptors and muscarinic receptor-mediated

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.

    1989-01-01

    The densities of total and M1 muscarinic receptors were measured using the muscarinic receptor antagonists {sup 3}H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and {sup 3}H-pirenzepine, respectively. Thus, the difference between the density of {sup 3}H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and {sup 3}H-pirenzepine binding sites represents the density of M2 sites. In addition, there is no observable change in either acetylcholine-stimulated phosphoinositide breakdown (suggested to be an M1 receptor-mediated response) or in carbachol-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation (suggested to be an M2 receptor-mediated response) in slices of cortex+dorsal hippocampus following chronic atropine administration. In other experiments, it has been shown that the M1 and M2 receptors in rat cortex have different ontogenetic profiles. The M2 receptor is present at adult levels at birth, while the M1 receptor develops slowly from low levels at postnatal week 1 to adult levels at postnatal week 3. The expression of acetylcholine-stimulated phosphoinositide breakdown parallels the development of M1 receptors, while the development of carbachol-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation occurs abruptly between weeks 2 and 3 postnatally.

  8. Expression of Serotonin Receptors in the Colonic Tissue of Chronic Diarrhea Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Tong; Qiu, Juanjuan; Wan, Jiajia; Wang, Fengyun; Tang, Xudong; Guo, Huishu

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: This study aimed to investigate the difference among the expression of serotonin receptors (5-HT3, 5-HT4, and 5-HT7 receptors) in colonic tissue of chronic diarrhea rats. Materials and Methods: A rat model of chronic diarrhea was established by lactose diet. The expression of 5-HT3, 5-HT4, and 5-HT7 receptors in the colonic tissue was detected using immunohistochemistry, real-time PCR and Western blotting techniques. Results: There is no significant difference on the protein expression of 5-HT3 receptor between the normal group and the chronic diarrhea model group. The mRNA expression of 5-HT3 receptor in the chronic diarrhea model group was significantly lower than that in the normal group (n = 10; P < 0.01). The protein and mRNA expression of 5-HT4 receptor in the chronic diarrhea model group were significantly higher than those in the normal group (n = 10; P < 0.05, P < 0.01). On the contrary, the protein and mRNA expressions of 5-HT7 receptor in the chronic diarrhea model group were significantly decreased compared with the normal group (n = 10; P < 0.01, P < 0.01). Conclusions: The results suggested the receptors of 5-HT4 and 5-HT7 may be involved in inducing diarrhea by lactose diet. PMID:27184643

  9. Targeted gene delivery via N-acetylglucosamine receptor mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bijay; Maharjan, Sushila; Kim, You-Kyoung; Jiang, Tai; Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Kang, Sang-Kee; Cho, Myung-Haing; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Cho, Chong-Su

    2014-11-01

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis is a promising approach of gene delivery into the target cells via receptor-ligand interaction. Vimentins at the cell surface are recently known to bind N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) residue, therefore, the cell surfaces of vimentin-expressing cells could be targeted by using the GlcNAc residue as a specific ligand for receptor-mediated gene delivery. Here, we have developed polymeric gene delivery vectors, based on poly(ethylene oxide)(PEO) and poly(aspartamide), namely poly[(aspartamide)(diethylenetriamine)]-b-[PEO-(GlcNAc)] (PADPG) and poly[(aspartamide)(diethylenetriamine)]-b-[PEO] (PADP) to elucidate the efficiency of GlcNAc ligand for gene delivery through receptor mediated endocytosis. To determine the efficiency of these polymeric vectors for specific gene delivery, the DNA condensation ability of PADPG and PADP and the subsequent formation of polymeric nanoparticles were confirmed by gel retardation assay and transmission electron microscopy respectively. Both PADPG and PADP had lower cytotoxicity than polyethylenimine 25 K (PEI 25 K). However, their transfection efficiency was comparatively lower than PEI 25 K due to hydrophilic property of PEO in the vectors. To observe the stability of polymeric nanoparticles, the transfection of PADPG and PADP was carried out in the presence of serum. Favorably, the interfering effect of serum on the transfection efficiency of PADPG and PADP was also very low. Finally, when the cell specificity of these polymeric vectors was investigated, PADPG had high gene transfection in vimentin-expressing cells than vimentin-deficiency cells. The high transfection efficiency of PADPG was attributed to the GlcNAc in the polymeric vector which interact specifically with vimentin in the cells for the receptor-mediated endocytosis. The competitive inhibition assay further proved the receptor-mediated endocytosis of PADPG. Thus, this study demonstrates that conjugation of GlcNAc is an effective and rational

  10. Synthesis and biological evaluation of positron emission tomography radiotracers targeting serotonin 4 receptors in brain: [18F]MNI-698 and [18F]MNI-699.

    PubMed

    Caillé, Fabien; Morley, Thomas J; Tavares, Adriana Alexandre S; Papin, Caroline; Twardy, Nicole M; Alagille, David; Lee, H Sharon; Baldwin, Ronald M; Seibyl, John P; Barret, Olivier; Tamagnan, Gilles D

    2013-12-01

    Two new benzodioxane derivatives were synthesized as candidates to image the serotonin 4 receptors by positron emission tomography (PET) and radiolabeled with fluorine-18 via a two-step procedure. Competition binding assays demonstrated that MNI-698 and MNI-699 had sub-nanomolar binding affinities against rat striatal 5-HT4 receptors (Ki of 0.20 and 0.07 nM, respectively). PET imaging in rhesus monkey showed that the regional brain distribution of [(18)F]MNI-698 and [(18)F]MNI-699 were consistent with the known densities of 5-HT4 in brain. [(18)F]MNI-698 and [(18)F]MNI-699 are among the first fluorine-18 radiotracers developed for imaging the 5-HT4 receptors in vivo and are currently under preclinical investigation in primates for future human use. PMID:24157369

  11. Dopamine receptor-mediated regulation of neuronal "clock" gene expression.

    PubMed

    Imbesi, M; Yildiz, S; Dirim Arslan, A; Sharma, R; Manev, H; Uz, T

    2009-01-23

    Using a transgenic mice model (i.e. "clock" knockouts), clock transcription factors have been suggested as critical regulators of dopaminergic behaviors induced by drugs of abuse. Moreover, it has been shown that systemic administration of psychostimulants, such as cocaine and methamphetamine regulates the striatal expression of clock genes. However, it is not known whether dopamine receptors mediate these regulatory effects of psychostimulants at the cellular level. Primary striatal neurons in culture express dopamine receptors as well as clock genes and have been successfully used in studying dopamine receptor functioning. Therefore, we investigated the role of dopamine receptors on neuronal clock gene expression in this model using specific receptor agonists. We found an inhibitory effect on the expression of mClock and mPer1 genes with the D2-class (i.e. D2/D3) receptor agonist quinpirole. We also found a generalized stimulatory effect on the expression of clock genes mPer1, mClock, mNPAS2 (neuronal PAS domain protein 2), and mBmal1 with the D1-class (i.e. D1) receptor agonist SKF38393. Further, we tested whether systemic administration of dopamine receptor agonists causes similar changes in striatal clock gene expression in vivo. We found quinpirole-induced alterations in mPER1 protein levels in the mouse striatum (i.e. rhythm shift). Collectively, our results indicate that the dopamine receptor system may mediate psychostimulant-induced changes in clock gene expression. Using striatal neurons in culture as a model, further research is needed to better understand how dopamine signaling modulates the expression dynamics of clock genes (i.e. intracellular signaling pathways) and thereby influences neuronal gene expression, neuronal transmission, and brain functioning. PMID:19017537

  12. Retinoic Acid-mediated Nuclear Receptor Activation and Hepatocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bushue, Nathan; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Due to their well-known differentiation and apoptosis-inducing abilities, retinoic acid (RA) and its analogs have strong anti-cancer efficacy in human cancers. However, in vivo RA is a liver mitogen. While speculation has persisted that RA-mediated signaling is likely involved in hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration, direct evidence is still required. Findings in support of this proposition include observations that a release of retinyl palmitate (the precursor of RA) occurs in liver stellate cells following liver injury. Nevertheless, the biological action of this released vitamin A is virtually unknown. More likely is that the released vitamin A is converted to RA, the biological form, and then bound to a specific receptor (retinoid x receptor; RXRα), which is most abundantly expressed in the liver. Considering the mitogenic effects of RA, the RA-activated RXRα would likely then influence hepatocyte proliferation and liver tissue repair. At present, the mechanism by which RA stimulates hepatocyte proliferation is largely unknown. This review summarizes the activation of nuclear receptors (peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α, pregnane x receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and farnesoid x receptor) in an RXRα dependent manner to induce hepatocyte proliferation, providing a link between RA and its proliferative role.

  13. GABAA receptor-mediated neurotransmission: Not so simple after all.

    PubMed

    Knoflach, Frédéric; Hernandez, Maria-Clemencia; Bertrand, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    GABAA receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that form a fundamental component of inhibitory neurotransmission in the central and peripheral nervous systems. However, since the initial recordings of inhibitory electrical activity of neurons in response to GABA, these receptors have been found to play a more complex role and can, under some circumstances, function in an excitatory manner. This has been demonstrated via electrophysiological recordings conducted in both mature and developing neurons from different brain regions, as well as in various subcellular locations such as dendritic and axonal membranes. The balance between the inhibitory and excitatory effects mediated by GABAA receptor activation depends not only on multiple factors that govern the equilibrium of the transmembrane chloride gradient, but also on bicarbonate concentration. Moreover, electrophysiological and fluorescence measurements have revealed that a spatial distribution of the chloride gradient exists within neurons, which locally influences the effects mediated by GABAA receptor activation. In recent years, it has also become apparent that intra-neuronal chloride concentration is partially regulated by cation-chloride co-transporters (CCCs), in particular NKCC1 and KCC2. The aim of the present commentary is to discuss, in light of the latest findings, potential implications of the tight spatial and temporal regulation of chloride equilibrium in health and disease, as well as its relevance for the therapeutic effects of molecules acting at GABAA receptors. PMID:27002180

  14. Presynaptic adenosine A2A receptors dampen cannabinoid CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of corticostriatal glutamatergic transmission

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, S G; Gonçalves, F Q; Marques, J M; Tomé, Â R; Rodrigues, R J; Nunes-Correia, I; Ledent, C; Harkany, T; Venance, L; Cunha, R A; Köfalvi, A

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Both cannabinoid CB1 and adenosine A2A receptors (CB1 receptors and A2A receptors) control synaptic transmission at corticostriatal synapses, with great therapeutic importance for neurological and psychiatric disorders. A postsynaptic CB1−A2A receptor interaction has already been elucidated, but the presynaptic A2A receptor-mediated control of presynaptic neuromodulation by CB1 receptors remains to be defined. Because the corticostriatal terminals provide the major input to the basal ganglia, understanding the interactive nature of converging neuromodulation on them will provide us with novel powerful tools to understand the physiology of corticostriatal synaptic transmission and interpret changes associated with pathological conditions. Experimental Approach Pharmacological manipulation of CB1 and A2A receptors was carried out in brain nerve terminals isolated from rats and mice, using flow synaptometry, immunoprecipitation, radioligand binding, ATP and glutamate release measurement. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were made in horizontal corticostriatal slices. Key Results Flow synaptometry showed that A2A receptors were extensively co-localized with CB1 receptor-immunopositive corticostriatal terminals and A2A receptors co-immunoprecipitated CB1 receptors in these purified terminals. A2A receptor activation decreased CB1 receptor radioligand binding and decreased the CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of high-K+-evoked glutamate release in corticostriatal terminals. Accordingly, A2A receptor activation prevented CB1 receptor-mediated paired-pulse facilitation and attenuated the CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of synaptic transmission in glutamatergic synapses of corticostriatal slices. Conclusions and Implications Activation of presynaptic A2A receptors dampened CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of corticostriatal terminals. This constitutes a thus far unrecognized mechanism to modulate the potent CB1 receptor-mediated presynaptic

  15. The Serotonin-6 Receptor as a Novel Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Hyung-Mun

    2011-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is an important neurotransmitter that is found in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. 5-HT mediates its diverse physiological responses through 7 different 5-HT receptor families: 5-HT1, 5-HT2, 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-HT5, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors. Among them, the 5-HT6 receptor (5-HT6R) is the most recently cloned serotonin receptor and plays important roles in the central nervous system (CNS) and in the etiology of neurological diseases. Compared to other 5-HT receptors, the 5-HT6R has been considered as an attractive CNS therapeutic target because it is expressed exclusively in the CNS and has no known isoforms. This review evaluates in detail the role of the 5-HT6R in the physiology and pathophysiology of the CNS and the potential usefulness of 5-HT6R ligands in the development of therapeutic strategies for the treatment of CNS disorders. Preclinical studies provide support for the use of 5-HT6R ligands as promising medications to treat the cognitive dysfunction associated with Alzheimer's disease, obesity, depression, and anxiety. PMID:22355260

  16. Cerebellar vermis H₂ receptors mediate fear memory consolidation in mice.

    PubMed

    Gianlorenço, A C L; Riboldi, A M; Silva-Marques, B; Mattioli, R

    2015-02-01

    Histaminergic fibers are present in the molecular and granular layers of the cerebellum and have a high density in the vermis and flocullus. Evidence supports that the cerebellar histaminergic system is involved in memory consolidation. Our recent study showed that histamine injections facilitate the retention of an inhibitory avoidance task, which was abolished by pretreatment with an H2 receptor antagonist. In the present study, we investigated the effects of intracerebellar post training injections of H1 and H2 receptor antagonists as well as the selective H2 receptor agonist on fear memory consolidation. The cerebellar vermi of male mice were implanted with guide cannulae, and after three days of recovery, the inhibitory avoidance test was performed. Immediately after a training session, animals received a microinjection of the following histaminergic drugs: experiment 1, saline or chlorpheniramine (0.016, 0.052 or 0.16 nmol); experiment 2, saline or ranitidine (0.57, 2.85 or 5.07 nmol); and experiment 3, saline or dimaprit (1, 2 or 4 nmol). Twenty-four hours later, a retention test was performed. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's tests. Animals microinjected with chlorpheniramine did not show any behavioral effects at the doses that we used. Intra-cerebellar injection of the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine inhibited, while the selective H2 receptor agonist dimaprit facilitated, memory consolidation, suggesting that H2 receptors mediate memory consolidation in the inhibitory avoidance task in mice. PMID:25524412

  17. Purinergic Receptors: Key Mediators of HIV-1 Infection and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Swartz, Talia H; Dubyak, George R; Chen, Benjamin K

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) causes a chronic infection that afflicts more than 30 million individuals worldwide. While the infection can be suppressed with potent antiretroviral therapies, individuals infected with HIV-1 have elevated levels of inflammation as indicated by increased T cell activation, soluble biomarkers, and associated morbidity and mortality. A single mechanism linking HIV-1 pathogenesis to this inflammation has yet to be identified. Purinergic receptors are known to mediate inflammation and have been shown to be required for HIV-1 infection at the level of HIV-1 membrane fusion. Here, we review the literature on the role of purinergic receptors in HIV-1 infection and associated inflammation and describe a role for these receptors as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26635799

  18. Purinergic Receptors: Key Mediators of HIV-1 Infection and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Talia H.; Dubyak, George R.; Chen, Benjamin K.

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) causes a chronic infection that afflicts more than 30 million individuals worldwide. While the infection can be suppressed with potent antiretroviral therapies, individuals infected with HIV-1 have elevated levels of inflammation as indicated by increased T cell activation, soluble biomarkers, and associated morbidity and mortality. A single mechanism linking HIV-1 pathogenesis to this inflammation has yet to be identified. Purinergic receptors are known to mediate inflammation and have been shown to be required for HIV-1 infection at the level of HIV-1 membrane fusion. Here, we review the literature on the role of purinergic receptors in HIV-1 infection and associated inflammation and describe a role for these receptors as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26635799

  19. Cell-Surface Receptors Transactivation Mediated by G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Cattaneo, Fabio; Guerra, Germano; Parisi, Melania; De Marinis, Marta; Tafuri, Domenico; Cinelli, Mariapia; Ammendola, Rosario

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven transmembrane-spanning proteins belonging to a large family of cell-surface receptors involved in many intracellular signaling cascades. Despite GPCRs lack intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity, tyrosine phosphorylation of a tyrosine kinase receptor (RTK) occurs in response to binding of specific agonists of several such receptors, triggering intracellular mitogenic cascades. This suggests that the notion that GPCRs are associated with the regulation of post-mitotic cell functions is no longer believable. Crosstalk between GPCR and RTK may occur by different molecular mechanism such as the activation of metalloproteases, which can induce the metalloprotease-dependent release of RTK ligands, or in a ligand-independent manner involving membrane associated non-receptor tyrosine kinases, such as c-Src. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are also implicated as signaling intermediates in RTKs transactivation. Intracellular concentration of ROS increases transiently in cells stimulated with GPCR agonists and their deliberated and regulated generation is mainly catalyzed by enzymes that belong to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase family. Oxidation and/or reduction of cysteine sulfhydryl groups of phosphatases tightly controls the activity of RTKs and ROS-mediated inhibition of cellular phosphatases results in an equilibrium shift from the non-phosphorylated to the phosphorylated state of RTKs. Many GPCR agonists activate phospholipase C, which catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bis-phosphate to produce inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate and diacylglicerol. The consequent mobilization of Ca2+ from endoplasmic reticulum leads to the activation of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms. PKCα mediates feedback inhibition of RTK transactivation during GPCR stimulation. Recent data have expanded the coverage of transactivation to include Serine/Threonine kinase receptors and Toll-like receptors. Herein, we

  20. Of pheromones and kairomones: what receptors mediate innate emotional responses?

    PubMed

    Fortes-Marco, Lluis; Lanuza, Enrique; Martinez-Garcia, Fernando

    2013-09-01

    Some chemicals elicit innate emotionally laden behavioral responses. Pheromones mediate sexual attraction, parental care or agonistic confrontation, whereas predators' kairomones elicit defensive behaviors in their preys. This essay explores the hypothesis that the detection of these semiochemicals relies on highly specific olfactory and/or vomeronasal receptors. The V1R, V2R, and formyl-peptide vomeronasal receptors bind their ligands in highly specific and sensitive way, thus being good candidates for pheromone- or kairomone-detectors (e.g., secreted and excreted proteins, peptides and lipophilic volatiles). The olfactory epithelium also expresses specific receptors, for example trace amine-associated receptors (TAAR) and guanylyl cyclase receptors (GC-D and other types), some of which bind kairomones and putative pheromones. However, most of the olfactory neurons express canonical olfactory receptors (ORs) that bind many ligands with different affinity, being not suitable for mediating responses to pheromones and kairomones. In this respect, trimethylthiazoline (TMT) is considered a fox-derived kairomone for mice and rats, but it seems to be detected by canonical ORs. Therefore, we have reassessed the kairomonal nature of TMT by analyzing the behavioral responses of outbred (CD1) and inbred mice (C57BL/J6) to TMT. Our results confirm that both mouse strains avoid TMT, which increases immobility in C57BL/J6, but not CD1 mice. However, mice of both strains sniff at TMT throughout the test and show no trace of TMT-induced contextual conditioning (immobility or avoidance). This suggests that TMT is not a kairomone but, similar to a loud noise, in high concentrations it induces aversion and stress as unspecific responses to a strong olfactory stimulation. PMID:23904448

  1. The Role of Hippocampal 5HT3 Receptors in Harmaline-Induced Memory Deficit

    PubMed Central

    Nasehi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The plethora of studies indicated that there is a cross talk relationship between harmaline and serotonergic (5-HT) system on cognitive and non-cognitive behaviors. Thus, the purpose of this study is to assess the effects of hippocampal 5-HT4 receptor on memory acquisition deficit induced by harmaline. Methods: Harmaline was injected peritoneally, while 5-HT4 receptor agonist (RS67333) and antagonist (RS23597-190) were injected intra-hippocampal. A single-trial step-down passive avoidance, open field and tail flick tasks were used for measurement of memory, locomotor activity and pain responses, respectively. Results: The data revealed that pre-training injection of higher dose of harmaline (1 mg/kg), RS67333 (0.5 ng/mouse) and RS23597-190 (0.5 ng/mouse) decreased memory acquisition process in the adult mice. Moreover, concurrent pre-training administration of subthreshold dose of RS67333 (0.005 ng/mouse) or RS23597-190 (0.005 ng/mouse) with subthreshold dose of harmaline (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) intensify impairment of memory acquisition. All above interventions did not change locomotion and tail flick behaviors. Discussion: The results demonstrated that the synergistic effect between both hippocampal 5-HT4 receptor agonist and antagonist with impairment of memory acquisition induced by harmaline, indicating a modulatory effect for hippocampal 5HT4 receptor on Harmaline induced amnesia. PMID:26904173

  2. H-Ras regulation of TRAIL death receptor mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun-Jie; Bozza, William P.; Di, Xu; Zhang, Yaqin; Hallett, William; Zhang, Baolin

    2014-01-01

    TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis through the death receptors (DRs) 4 and/or 5 expressed on the cell surface. Multiple clinical trials are underway to evaluate the antitumor activity of recombinant human TRAIL and agonistic antibodies to DR4 or DR5. However, their therapeutic potential is limited by the high frequency of cancer resistance. Here we provide evidence demonstrating the role of H-Ras in TRAIL receptor mediated apoptosis. By analyzing the genome wide mRNA expression data of the NCI60 cancer cell lines, we found that H-Ras expression was consistently upregulated in TRAIL-resistant cell lines. By contrast, no correlation was found between TRAIL sensitivity and K-Ras expression levels or their mutational profiles. Notably, H-Ras upregulation associated with a surface deficiency of TRAIL death receptors. Selective inhibition of H-Ras activity in TRAIL-resistant cells restored the surface expression of both DR4 and DR5 without changing their total protein levels. The resulting cells became highly susceptible to both TRAIL and agonistic DR5 antibody, whereas K-Ras inhibition had little or no effect on TRAIL-induced apoptosis, indicating H-Ras plays a distinct role in the regulation of TRAIL death receptors. Further studies are warranted to determine the therapeutic potential of H-Ras-specific inhibitors in combination with TRAIL receptor agonists. PMID:25026275

  3. TRPA1 receptors mediate environmental irritant-induced meningeal vasodilatation

    PubMed Central

    Kunkler, Phillip Edward; Ballard, Carrie Jo; Oxford, Gerry Stephen; Hurley, Joyce Harts

    2010-01-01

    The TRPA1 receptor is a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family of ion channels expressed in nociceptive neurons. TRPA1 receptors are targeted by pungent compounds from mustard and garlic and environmental irritants such as formaldehyde and acrolein. Ingestion or inhalation of these chemical agents causes irritation and burning in the nasal and oral mucosa and respiratory lining. Headaches have been widely reported to be induced by inhalation of environmental irritants, but it is unclear how these agents produce headache. Stimulation of trigeminal neurons releases CGRP and substance P and induces neurogenic inflammation associated with the pain of migraine. Here we test the hypothesis that activation of TRPA1 receptors are the mechanistic link between environmental irritants and peptide mediated neurogenic inflammation. Known TRPA1 agonists and environmental irritants stimulate CGRP release from dissociated rat trigeminal ganglia neurons and this release is blocked by a selective TRPA1 antagonist, HC-030031. Further, TRPA1 agonists and environmental irritants increase meningeal blood flow following intranasal administration. Prior dural application of the CGRP antagonist, CGRP8–37, or intranasal or dural administration of HC-030031, blocks the increases in blood flow elicited by environmental irritants. Together these results demonstrate that TRPA1 receptor activation by environmental irritants stimulates CGRP release and increases cerebral blood flow. We suggest that these events contribute to headache associated with environmental irritants. PMID:21075522

  4. Hemoglobin Uptake by Paracoccidioides spp. Is Receptor-Mediated

    PubMed Central

    Bailão, Elisa Flávia Luiz Cardoso; Parente, Juliana Alves; Pigosso, Laurine Lacerda; de Castro, Kelly Pacheco; Fonseca, Fernanda Lopes; Silva-Bailão, Mirelle Garcia; Báo, Sônia Nair; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Hernandez, Orville; McEwen, Juan G.; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Iron is essential for the proliferation of fungal pathogens during infection. The availability of iron is limited due to its association with host proteins. Fungal pathogens have evolved different mechanisms to acquire iron from host; however, little is known regarding how Paracoccidioides species incorporate and metabolize this ion. In this work, host iron sources that are used by Paracoccidioides spp. were investigated. Robust fungal growth in the presence of the iron-containing molecules hemin and hemoglobin was observed. Paracoccidioides spp. present hemolytic activity and have the ability to internalize a protoporphyrin ring. Using real-time PCR and nanoUPLC-MSE proteomic approaches, fungal growth in the presence of hemoglobin was shown to result in the positive regulation of transcripts that encode putative hemoglobin receptors, in addition to the induction of proteins that are required for amino acid metabolism and vacuolar protein degradation. In fact, one hemoglobin receptor ortholog, Rbt5, was identified as a surface GPI-anchored protein that recognized hemin, protoporphyrin and hemoglobin in vitro. Antisense RNA technology and Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation were used to generate mitotically stable Pbrbt5 mutants. The knockdown strain had a lower survival inside macrophages and in mouse spleen when compared with the parental strain, which suggested that Rbt5 could act as a virulence factor. In summary, our data indicate that Paracoccidioides spp. can use hemoglobin as an iron source most likely through receptor-mediated pathways that might be relevant for pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:24831516

  5. Receptor-mediated mitophagy in yeast and mammalian systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Sakakibara, Kaori; Chen, Quan; Okamoto, Koji

    2014-07-01

    Mitophagy, or mitochondria autophagy, plays a critical role in selective removal of damaged or unwanted mitochondria. Several protein receptors, including Atg32 in yeast, NIX/BNIP3L, BNIP3 and FUNDC1 in mammalian systems, directly act in mitophagy. Atg32 interacts with Atg8 and Atg11 on the surface of mitochondria, promoting core Atg protein assembly for mitophagy. NIX/BNIP3L, BNIP3 and FUNDC1 also have a classic motif to directly bind LC3 (Atg8 homolog in mammals) for activation of mitophagy. Recent studies have shown that receptor-mediated mitophagy is regulated by reversible protein phosphorylation. Casein kinase 2 (CK2) phosphorylates Atg32 and activates mitophagy in yeast. In contrast, in mammalian cells Src kinase and CK2 phosphorylate FUNDC1 to prevent mitophagy. Notably, in response to hypoxia and FCCP treatment, the mitochondrial phosphatase PGAM5 dephosphorylates FUNDC1 to activate mitophagy. Here, we mainly focus on recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the activation of receptor-mediated mitophagy and the implications of this catabolic process in health and disease. PMID:24903109

  6. The phosphatidylserine receptor TIM-4 does not mediate direct signaling.

    PubMed

    Park, Daeho; Hochreiter-Hufford, Amelia; Ravichandran, Kodi S

    2009-02-24

    Engulfment of apoptotic cells is an active process coordinated by receptors on phagocytes and ligands on apoptotic cells [1]. Phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) is a key ligand on apoptotic cells, and recently three PtdSer recognition receptors have been identified, namely, TIM-4, BAI1, and Stabilin-2 [1-6]. Whereas BAI1 is dependent on the ELMO1/Dock180/Rac signaling module, and Stablilin-2 appears to use the intracellular adaptor GULP [2, 3, 7], little is known about how TIM-4 transduces signals downstream of PtdSer recognition [8]. To test the role of known engulfment signaling pathways in TIM-4-mediated engulfment, we used a combination of dominant-negative mutants, knockdown of specific signaling proteins, and knockout cell lines. TIM-4 appears to be largely independent of the two known engulfment signaling pathways [7, 9-17], yet the TIM-4-mediated uptake is inhibited by cytoskeleton disrupting drugs. Remarkably, a version of TIM-4 lacking its cytoplasmic tail promoted corpse uptake via PtdSer recognition. Moreover, replacement of the transmembrane region of TIM-4 with a glycophosphatidylinositol anchor still promoted engulfment comparable to wild-type TIM-4. Thus, the transmembrane region and cytoplasmic tail of TIM-4 are dispensable for apoptotic cell engulfment, and we propose that TIM-4 is a PtdSer tethering receptor without any direct signaling of its own. PMID:19217291

  7. Discovery and SAR of N-(1-((substituted piperidin-4-yl)methyl)-3-methoxypiperidin-4-yl)-2-methoxybenzamide derivatives: 5-Hydroxytryptamine receptor 4 agonist as a potent prokinetic agent.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Sang; Im, Weonbin; Choi, Sunghak; Park, Sook Jin; Jung, Jun Min; Baek, Ki Seon; Son, Han Pyo; Sharma, Satyasheel; Kim, In Su; Jung, Young Hoon

    2016-02-15

    A series of novel benzamide derivatives, altering the 4-fluorophenylalkyl moiety in cisapride, were synthesized as 5-HT4 receptor agonists, and SAR of these analogs was examined on in vitro and in vivo prokinetic activities. These compounds were synthesized for high 5-HT4 receptor binding affinities and low hERG affinities. Several types of analogs were obtained and screened for 5-HT4 binding, hERG blocking, agonism, and gastric emptying assessment. Among the analogues, compound 23g showed promising results compared with the other analogs with respect to gastric emptying rates in rats. Therefore, we suggest that it may be a clinical candidate for the development of a potent prokinetic agent to treat GI disorders. PMID:26761776

  8. Bombesin receptor-mediated imaging and cytotoxicity: review and current status

    PubMed Central

    Sancho, Veronica; Di Florio, Alessia; Moody, Terry W.; Jensen, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    The three mammalian bombesin (Bn) receptors (gastrin-releasing peptide [GRP] receptor, neuromedin B [NMB] receptor, BRS-3) are one of the classes of G protein-coupled receptors that are most frequently over-express/ectopically expressed by common, important malignancies. Because of the clinical success of somatostatin receptor-mediated imaging and cytotoxicity with neuroendocrine tumors, there is now increasing interest in pursuing a similar approach with Bn receptors. In the last few years then have been more than 200 studies in this area. In the present paper, the in vitro and in vivo results, as well as results of human studies from many of these studies are reviewed and the current state of Bn receptor-mediated imaging or cytotoxicity is discussed. Both Bn receptor-mediated imaging studies as well as Bn receptor-mediated tumoral cytotoxic studies using radioactive and non-radioactive Bn-based ligands are covered. PMID:21034419

  9. Regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated synaptic responses by GABAB receptors in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Robin A; Manuel, Nick A; Bulters, Diederick O; Cobb, Stuart R; Davies, Ceri H

    2001-01-01

    Both GABAB and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) influence hippocampal-dependent mnemonic processing. Here the possibility of a direct interaction between GABAB receptors and mAChR-mediated synaptic responses has been studied using intracellular recording in rat hippocampal slices. The GABAB receptor agonist(−)-baclofen (5–10 μm) depressed an atropine-sensitive slow EPSP (EPSPM) and occluded the GABAB-receptor-mediated IPSP (IPSPB) which preceded it. These inhibitory effects were accompanied by postsynaptic hyperpolarization (9 ± 2 mV) and a reduction in cell input resistance (12 ± 3 %). The selective GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 55845A (1 μm) fully reversed the depressant effects of (−)-baclofen (5–10 μm) such that in the combined presence of (−)-baclofen and CGP 55845A the EPSPM was 134 ± 21 % of control. (−)-Baclofen (5–10 μm) caused a small (28 ± 11 %) inhibition of carbachol-induced (3.0 μm) postsynaptic depolarizations and increases in input resistance. CGP 55845A (1 μm) alone caused an increase in the amplitude of the EPSPM (253 ± 74 % of control) and blocked the IPSPB that preceded it. In contrast, the selective GABA uptake inhibitor NNC 05–0711 (10 μm) increased the amplitude of the IPSPB by 141 ± 38 % and depressed the amplitude of the EPSPM by 58 ± 10 %. This inhibition was abolished by CGP 55845A (1 μm). Taken together these data provide good evidence that synaptically released GABA activates GABAB receptors that inhibit mAChR-mediated EPSPs in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurones. The mechanism of inhibition may involve both pre- and postsynaptic elements. PMID:11559773

  10. NMDA receptors mediate calcium accumulation in myelin during chemical ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Micu, I; Jiang, Q; Coderre, E; Ridsdale, A; Zhang, L; Woulfe, J; Yin, X; Trapp, B D; McRory, J E; Rehak, R; Zamponi, G W; Wang, W; Stys, P K

    2006-02-23

    Central nervous system myelin is a specialized structure produced by oligodendrocytes that ensheaths axons, allowing rapid and efficient saltatory conduction of action potentials. Many disorders promote damage to and eventual loss of the myelin sheath, which often results in significant neurological morbidity. However, little is known about the fundamental mechanisms that initiate myelin damage, with the assumption being that its fate follows that of the parent oligodendrocyte. Here we show that NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate) glutamate receptors mediate Ca2+ accumulation in central myelin in response to chemical ischaemia in vitro. Using two-photon microscopy, we imaged fluorescence of the Ca2+ indicator X-rhod-1 loaded into oligodendrocytes and the cytoplasmic compartment of the myelin sheath in adult rat optic nerves. The AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid)/kainate receptor antagonist NBQX completely blocked the ischaemic Ca2+ increase in oligodendroglial cell bodies, but only modestly reduced the Ca2+ increase in myelin. In contrast, the Ca2+ increase in myelin was abolished by broad-spectrum NMDA receptor antagonists (MK-801, 7-chlorokynurenic acid, d-AP5), but not by more selective blockers of NR2A and NR2B subunit-containing receptors (NVP-AAM077 and ifenprodil). In vitro ischaemia causes ultrastructural damage to both axon cylinders and myelin. NMDA receptor antagonism greatly reduced the damage to myelin. NR1, NR2 and NR3 subunits were detected in myelin by immunohistochemistry and immunoprecipitation, indicating that all necessary subunits are present for the formation of functional NMDA receptors. Our data show that the mature myelin sheath can respond independently to injurious stimuli. Given that axons are known to release glutamate, our finding that the Ca2+ increase was mediated in large part by activation of myelinic NMDA receptors suggests a new mechanism of axo-myelinic signalling. Such a mechanism may represent a

  11. Receptor-mediated endocytosis and brain delivery of therapeutic biologics.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Guangqing; Gan, Liang-Shang

    2013-01-01

    Transport of macromolecules across the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) requires both specific and nonspecific interactions between macromolecules and proteins/receptors expressed on the luminal and/or the abluminal surfaces of the brain capillary endothelial cells. Endocytosis and transcytosis play important roles in the distribution of macromolecules. Due to the tight junction of BBB, brain delivery of traditional therapeutic proteins with large molecular weight is generally not possible. There are multiple pathways through which macromolecules can be taken up into cells through both specific and nonspecific interactions with proteins/receptors on the cell surface. This review is focused on the current knowledge of receptor-mediated endocytosis/transcytosis and brain delivery using the Angiopep-2-conjugated system and the molecular Trojan horses. In addition, the role of neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) in regulating the efflux of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) from brain to blood, and approaches to improve the pharmacokinetics of therapeutic biologics by generating Fc fusion proteins, and increasing the pH dependent binding affinity between Fc and FcRn, are discussed. PMID:23840214

  12. [Glutamate receptor-mediated retinal neuronal injury in experimental glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong-Feng; Yang, Xiong-Li

    2016-08-25

    Glaucoma, the second leading cause of blindness, is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by optic nerve degeneration related to apoptotic death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). In the pathogenesis of RGC death following the onset of glaucoma, functional changes of glutamate receptors are commonly regarded as important risk factors. During the past several years, we have explored the mechanisms underlying RGC apoptosis and retinal Müller cell reactivation (gliosis) in a rat chronic ocular hypertension (COH) model. We demonstrated that elevated intraocular pressure in COH rats may induce changes of various signaling pathways, which are involved in RGC apoptosis by modulating glutamate NMDA and AMPA receptors. Moreover, we also demonstrated that over-activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR I) by excessive extracellular glutamate in COH rats could contribute to Müller cell gliosis by suppressing Kir4.1 channels. In this review, incorporating our results, we discuss glutamate receptor- mediated RGC apoptosis and Müller cell gliosis in experimental glaucoma. PMID:27546508

  13. Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis and Brain Delivery of Therapeutic Biologics

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Guangqing

    2013-01-01

    Transport of macromolecules across the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) requires both specific and nonspecific interactions between macromolecules and proteins/receptors expressed on the luminal and/or the abluminal surfaces of the brain capillary endothelial cells. Endocytosis and transcytosis play important roles in the distribution of macromolecules. Due to the tight junction of BBB, brain delivery of traditional therapeutic proteins with large molecular weight is generally not possible. There are multiple pathways through which macromolecules can be taken up into cells through both specific and nonspecific interactions with proteins/receptors on the cell surface. This review is focused on the current knowledge of receptor-mediated endocytosis/transcytosis and brain delivery using the Angiopep-2-conjugated system and the molecular Trojan horses. In addition, the role of neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) in regulating the efflux of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) from brain to blood, and approaches to improve the pharmacokinetics of therapeutic biologics by generating Fc fusion proteins, and increasing the pH dependent binding affinity between Fc and FcRn, are discussed. PMID:23840214

  14. The mechanisms of HAMP-mediated signaling in transmembrane receptors.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Hedda U; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw; Mondéjar, Laura García; Hulko, Michael; Hantke, Klaus; Martin, Jörg; Schultz, Joachim E; Zeth, Kornelius; Lupas, Andrei N; Coles, Murray

    2011-03-01

    HAMP domains mediate signal transduction in over 7500 enzyme-coupled receptors represented in all kingdoms of life. The HAMP domain of the putative archaeal receptor Af1503 has a parallel, dimeric, four-helical coiled coil structure, but with unusual core packing, related to canonical packing by concerted axial rotation of the helices. This has led to the gearbox model for signal transduction, whereby the alternate packing modes correspond to signaling states. Here we present structures of a series of Af1503 HAMP variants. We show that substitution of a conserved small side chain within the domain core (A291) for larger residues induces a gradual transition in packing mode, involving both changes in helix rotation and bundle shape, which are most prominent at the C-terminal, output end of the domain. These are correlated with activity and ligand response in vitro and in vivo by incorporating Af1503 HAMP into mycobacterial adenylyl cyclase assay systems. PMID:21397188

  15. VEGF receptors mediate hypoxic remodeling of adult ovine carotid arteries.

    PubMed

    Adeoye, Olayemi O; Bouthors, Vincent; Hubbell, Margaret C; Williams, James M; Pearce, William J

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies suggest that VEGF contributes to hypoxic remodeling of arterial smooth muscle, although hypoxia produces only transient increases in VEGF that return to normoxic levels despite sustained changes in arterial structure and function. To explore how VEGF might contribute to long-term hypoxic vascular remodeling, this study explores the hypothesis that chronic hypoxia produces sustained increases in smooth muscle VEGF receptor density that mediate long-term vascular effects of hypoxia. Carotid arteries from adult sheep maintained at sea level or altitude (3,820 m) for 110 days were harvested and denuded of endothelium. VEGF levels were similar in chronically hypoxic and normoxic arteries, as determined by immunoblotting. In contrast, VEGF receptor levels were significantly increased by 107% (VEGF-R1) and 156% (VEGF-R2) in hypoxic compared with normoxic arteries. In arteries that were organ cultured 24 h with 3 nM VEGF, VEGF replicated effects of hypoxia on abundances of smooth muscle α actin (SMαA), myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), and MLC20 and the effects of hypoxia on colocalization of MLC20 with SMαA, as measured via confocal microscopy. VEGF did not replicate the effects of chronic hypoxia on colocalization of MLCK with SMαA or MLCK with MLC20, suggesting that VEGF's role in hypoxic remodeling is highly protein specific, particularly for contractile protein organization. VEGF effects in organ culture were inhibited by VEGF receptor blockers vatalinib (240 nM) and dasatinib (6.3 nM). These findings support the hypothesis that long-term upregulation of VEGF receptors help mediate sustained effects of hypoxia on the abundance and colocalization of contractile proteins in arterial smooth muscle. PMID:25038104

  16. Crosstalk between purinergic receptors and lipid mediators in leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Mariana M; Canetti, Cláudio; Coutinho-Silva, Robson

    2016-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a neglected tropical disease affecting millions of people around the world caused by organisms of the genus Leishmania. Parasite escape mechanisms of the immune system confer the possibility of resistance and dissemination of the disease. A group of molecules that has become a target for Leishmania survival strategies are lipid mediators. Among them, leukotriene B4 (LTB4) has been described as a pro-inflammatory molecule capable of activating cells of the immune system to combat Leishmania. In an opposite way, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a lipid mediator described as a deactivator of macrophages and neutrophils. The balance of these two molecules can be generated by extracellular nucleotides, such as adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine (Ado), which activate the purinergic receptors system. Herein, we discuss the role of extracellular nucleotides and the resulting balance of LTB4 and PGE2 in Leishmania fate, survival or death. PMID:27595742

  17. Drosophila Ryanodine Receptors Mediate General Anesthesia by Halothane

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shuying; Sandstrom, David J.; Smith, Harold E.; High, Brigit; Marsh, Jon W.; Nash, Howard A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although in vitro studies have identified numerous possible targets, the molecules that mediate the in vivo effects of volatile anesthetics remain largely unknown. The mammalian ryanodine receptor (Ryr) is a known halothane target, and we hypothesized that it has a central role in anesthesia. Methods Gene function of the Drosophila Ryr (dRyr) was manipulated in the whole body or in specific tissues using a collection of mutants and transgenes, and responses to halothane were measured with a reactive climbing assay. Cellular responses to halothane were studied using Ca2+ imaging and patch clamp electrophysiology. Results Halothane potency strongly correlates with dRyr gene copy number, and missense mutations in regions known to be functionally important in mammalian Ryrs gene cause dominant hypersensitivity. Tissue-specific manipulation of dRyr shows that expression in neurons and glia, but not muscle, mediates halothane sensitivity. In cultured cells, halothane-induced Ca2+ efflux is strictly dRyr-dependent, suggesting a close interaction between halothane and dRyr. Ca2+ imaging and electrophysiology of Drosophila central neurons reveal halothane-induced Ca2+ flux that is altered in dRyr mutants and correlates with strong hyperpolarization. Conclusions In Drosophila, neurally-expressed dRyr mediates a substantial proportion of halothane's anesthetic effects in vivo, is potently activated by halothane in vitro, and activates an inhibitory conductance. Our results provide support for Ryr as an important mediator of immobilization by volatile anesthetics. PMID:23254148

  18. Transient receptor potential-like channels mediate metabotropic glutamate receptor EPSCs in rat dopamine neurones.

    PubMed

    Bengtson, C Peter; Tozzi, Alessandro; Bernardi, Giorgio; Mercuri, Nicola B

    2004-03-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels form cationic channels activated by diverse factors including mechanical stimuli, changes in osmolarity, pH and temperature, as well as the exogenous irritant, capsaicin. Metabotropic glutamate receptors have also recently been linked to TRP channel activation in neurones of the substantia nigra, hippocampus and cerebellum, suggesting a novel role for such channels in synaptic communication via endogenous neurotransmitters. We tested this for dopamine neurones in rat brain slices by characterizing the current-voltage relationship and pharmacology of EPSCs mediated by group I metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 1 (mGluR1). Slow inward currents (273 +/- 35 pA peak amplitude, 381 +/- 25 ms latency, holding potential (V(h)) =-73 mV) representing evoked mGluR1 EPSCs were isolated in the presence of antagonists of AMPA, NMDA, GABA(A), GABA(B), muscarinic and glycine receptors. CPCCOEt (100 microM), an mGluR1 antagonist, blocked the residual EPSC in all recordings. mGluR1-activated EPSCs reversed polarity near -10 mV, consistent with the involvement of a cationic channel. Extracellular application of the non-selective TRP channel blockers SKF 96365, flufenamic acid and ruthenium red caused reversible inhibition of mGluR1-activated EPSCs. These characteristics parallel those of mGluR1 activation with an agonist and indicate the involvement of a TRP-like channel in mGluR1-mediated EPSCs. PMID:14724196

  19. Estrogen receptor- and aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated activities of a coal-tar creosote

    SciTech Connect

    Fielden, M.R.; Wu, Z.F.; Sinal, C.J.; Jury, H.H.; Bend, J.R.; Hammond, G.L.; Zacharewski, T.R.

    2000-05-01

    A coal-tar creosote was examined for estrogen receptor (ER)- and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated activity using a battery of mechanistically based assays. In vitro, creosote was found to bind to the mouse ER, bind to the human sex hormone-binding globulin, and elicit partial agonist activity in reporter gene assays in transiently transfected MCF-7 cells. Based on competitive binding to the mouse ER, creosote contains approximately 165 mg/L of estradiol-equivalents. Creosote effectively transformed the AhR in vitro and induced a Cyplal-regulated luciferase reporter gene in transiently transfected Hepa 1c1c7 cells. Based on dose-response curves, creosote contains approximately 730 mg/L of dioxin-equivalents. Creosote did not exhibit any AhR-mediated antiestrogenic activity in vitro. In vivo, creosote significantly induced liver pentoxyresorufin O-depentylation and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylation (EROD) in a dose-dependent manner in ovariectomized (OVX) ICR mice, but did not increase uterine weight wet or vaginal cornification, due possibly to AhR-mediated antiestrogenic activity. In OVX DBA/2 mice, a strain less responsive to AhR ligands, creosote induced liver EROD to a lesser extent, but still did not show an increase in uterine wet weight or vaginal cornification. These results demonstrate that coal-tar creosote exhibits AhR- and ER-mediated activity in vitro, but its dioxinlike activity may suppress estrogenic responses in vivo.

  20. Ionotropic Chemosensory Receptors Mediate the Taste and Smell of Polyamines

    PubMed Central

    Üçpunar, Habibe K.; Svensson, Thomas; Quillery, Elsa; Gompel, Nicolas; Ignell, Rickard; Grunwald Kadow, Ilona C.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to find and consume nutrient-rich diets for successful reproduction and survival is fundamental to animal life. Among the nutrients important for all animals are polyamines, a class of pungent smelling compounds required in numerous cellular and organismic processes. Polyamine deficiency or excess has detrimental effects on health, cognitive function, reproduction, and lifespan. Here, we show that a diet high in polyamine is beneficial and increases reproductive success of flies, and we unravel the sensory mechanisms that attract Drosophila to polyamine-rich food and egg-laying substrates. Using a combination of behavioral genetics and in vivo calcium imaging, we demonstrate that Drosophila uses multisensory detection to find and evaluate polyamines present in overripe and fermenting fruit, their favored feeding and egg-laying substrate. In the olfactory system, two coexpressed ionotropic receptors (IRs), IR76b and IR41a, mediate the long-range attraction to the odor. In the gustatory system, multimodal taste sensation by IR76b receptor and GR66a bitter receptor neurons is used to evaluate quality and valence of the polyamine providing a mechanism for the fly’s high attraction to polyamine-rich and sweet decaying fruit. Given their universal and highly conserved biological roles, we propose that the ability to evaluate food for polyamine content may impact health and reproductive success also of other animals including humans. PMID:27145030

  1. Ionotropic Chemosensory Receptors Mediate the Taste and Smell of Polyamines.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Ashiq; Zhang, Mo; Üçpunar, Habibe K; Svensson, Thomas; Quillery, Elsa; Gompel, Nicolas; Ignell, Rickard; Grunwald Kadow, Ilona C

    2016-05-01

    The ability to find and consume nutrient-rich diets for successful reproduction and survival is fundamental to animal life. Among the nutrients important for all animals are polyamines, a class of pungent smelling compounds required in numerous cellular and organismic processes. Polyamine deficiency or excess has detrimental effects on health, cognitive function, reproduction, and lifespan. Here, we show that a diet high in polyamine is beneficial and increases reproductive success of flies, and we unravel the sensory mechanisms that attract Drosophila to polyamine-rich food and egg-laying substrates. Using a combination of behavioral genetics and in vivo calcium imaging, we demonstrate that Drosophila uses multisensory detection to find and evaluate polyamines present in overripe and fermenting fruit, their favored feeding and egg-laying substrate. In the olfactory system, two coexpressed ionotropic receptors (IRs), IR76b and IR41a, mediate the long-range attraction to the odor. In the gustatory system, multimodal taste sensation by IR76b receptor and GR66a bitter receptor neurons is used to evaluate quality and valence of the polyamine providing a mechanism for the fly's high attraction to polyamine-rich and sweet decaying fruit. Given their universal and highly conserved biological roles, we propose that the ability to evaluate food for polyamine content may impact health and reproductive success also of other animals including humans. PMID:27145030

  2. Odorant receptor-mediated sperm activation in disease vector mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Pitts, R. Jason; Liu, Chao; Zhou, Xiaofan; Malpartida, Juan C.; Zwiebel, Laurence J.

    2014-01-01

    Insects, such as the malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, depend upon chemoreceptors to respond to volatiles emitted from a range of environmental sources, most notably blood meal hosts and oviposition sites. A subset of peripheral signaling pathways involved in these insect chemosensory-dependent behaviors requires the activity of heteromeric odorant receptor (OR) ion channel complexes and ligands for numerous A. gambiae ORs (AgOrs) have been identified. Although AgOrs are expressed in nonhead appendages, studies characterizing potential AgOr function in nonolfactory tissues have not been conducted. In the present study, we explore the possibility that AgOrs mediate responses of spermatozoa to endogenous signaling molecules in A. gambiae. In addition to finding AgOr transcript expression in testes, we show that the OR coreceptor, AgOrco, is localized to the flagella of A. gambiae spermatozoa where Orco-specific agonists, antagonists, and other odorant ligands robustly activate flagella beating in an Orco-dependent process. We also demonstrate Orco expression and Orco-mediated activation of spermatozoa in the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti. Moreover, we find Orco localization in testes across distinct insect taxa and posit that OR-mediated responses in spermatozoa may represent a general characteristic of insect reproduction and an example of convergent evolution. PMID:24550284

  3. Review article: serotonin receptors and transporters -- roles in normal and abnormal gastrointestinal motility.

    PubMed

    Gershon, M D

    2004-11-01

    The gut is the only organ that can display reflexes and integrative neuronal activity even when isolated from the central nervous system. This activity can be triggered by luminal stimuli that are detected by nerves via epithelial intermediation. Epithelial enterochromaffin cells act as sensory transducers that activate the mucosal processes of both intrinsic and extrinsic primary afferent neurones through their release of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). Intrinsic primary afferent neurones are present in both the submucosal and myenteric plexuses. Peristaltic and secretory reflexes are initiated by submucosal intrinsic primary afferent neurones, which are stimulated by 5-HT acting at 5-HT(1P) receptors. 5-HT acting at 5-HT4 receptors enhances the release of transmitters from their terminals and from other terminals in prokinetic reflex pathways. Signalling to the central nervous system is predominantly 5-HT3 mediated, although serotonergic transmission within the enteric nervous system and the activation of myenteric intrinsic primary afferent neurones are also 5-HT3 mediated. The differential distribution of 5-HT receptor subtypes makes it possible to use 5-HT3 antagonists and 5-HT4 agonists to treat intestinal discomfort and motility. 5-HT3 antagonists alleviate the nausea and vomiting associated with cancer chemotherapy and the discomfort from the bowel in irritable bowel syndrome; however, because 5-HT-mediated fast neurotransmission within the enteric nervous system and the stimulation of mucosal processes of myenteric intrinsic primary afferent neurones are 5-HT3 mediated, 5-HT3 antagonists tend to be constipating and should be used only when pre-existing constipation is not a significant component of the problem to be treated. In contrast, 5-HT4 agonists, such as tegaserod, are safe and effective in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome with constipation and chronic constipation. They do not stimulate nociceptive extrinsic nerves nor initiate peristaltic and

  4. NFAT regulates calcium-sensing receptor-mediated TNF production

    SciTech Connect

    abdullah, huda ismail; Pedraza, Paulina L.; Hao, Shoujin; Rodland, Karin D.; McGiff, John C.; Ferreri, Nicholas R.

    2006-05-01

    Because nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) has been implicated in TNF production as well as osmoregulation and salt and water homeostasis, we addressed whether calcium-sensing receptor (CaR)-mediated TNF production in medullary thick ascending limb (mTAL) cells was NFAT dependent. TNF production in response to addition of extracellular Ca2+ (1.2 mM) was abolished in mTAL cells transiently transfected with a dominant-negative CaR construct (R796W) or pretreated with the phosphatidylinositol phospholipase C (PI-PLC) inhibitor U-73122. Cyclosporine A (CsA), an inhibitor of the serine/threonine phosphatase calcineurin, and a peptide ligand, VIVIT, that selectively inhibits calcineurin-NFAT signaling, also prevented CaR-mediated TNF production. Increases in calcineurin activity in cells challenged with Ca2+ were inhibited after pretreatment with U-73122 and CsA, suggesting that CaR activation increases calcineurin activity in a PI-PLC-dependent manner. Moreover, U-73122, CsA, and VIVIT inhibited CaR-dependent activity of an NFAT construct that drives expression of firefly luciferase in transiently transfected mTAL cells. Collectively, these data verify the role of calcineurin and NFAT in CaR-mediated TNF production by mTAL cells. Activation of the CaR also increased the binding of NFAT to a consensus oligonucleotide, an effect that was blocked by U-73122 and CsA, suggesting that a calcineurin- and NFAT-dependent pathway increases TNF production in mTAL cells. This mechanism likely regulates TNF gene transcription as U-73122, CsA, and VIVIT blocked CaR-dependent activity of a TNF promoter construct. Elucidating CaR-mediated signaling pathways that regulate TNF production in the mTAL will be crucial to understanding mechanisms that regulate extracellular fluid volume and salt balance.

  5. Serotonin Receptor 2B Mediates Mechanical Hyperalgesia by Regulating Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1.

    PubMed

    Su, Yeu-Shiuan; Chiu, Yuan-Yi; Lin, Shih-Yuan; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Sun, Wei-Hsin

    2016-05-01

    Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)], an inflammatory mediator, contributes to inflammatory pain. The presence of multiple 5-HT subtype receptors on peripheral and central nociceptors complicates the role of 5-HT in pain. Previously, we found that 5-HT2B/2C antagonist could block 5-HT-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. However, the types of neurons or circuits underlying this effect remained unsolved. Here, we demonstrate that the Gq/11-phospholipase Cβ-protein kinase Cε (PKCε) pathway mediated by 5-HT2B is involved in 5-HT-induced mechanical hyperalgesia in mice. Administration of a transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonist inhibited the 5-HT-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. 5-HT injection enhanced 5-HT- and capsaicin-evoked calcium signals specifically in isolectin B4 (IB4)-negative neurons; signals were inhibited by a 5-HT2B/2C antagonist and PKCε blocker. Thus, 5-HT2B mediates 5-HT-induced mechanical hyperalgesia by regulating TRPV1 function. PMID:26635025

  6. The androgen receptor mediates antiapoptotic function in myometrial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Li, Y; Morin, D; Plymate, S; Lye, S; Dong, X

    2014-01-01

    During pregnancy, myometrial phenotype is programmed into three characteristic stages referred to as the early proliferative, the midterm hypertrophic, and the late contractile stage. Increased myometrial growth in the early and midterm of pregnancy involves a complex process of cell proliferation, antiapoptosis and differentiation. We have previously demonstrated that the androgen receptor (AR) is required for myometrial cell proliferation by modulating IGF-1 signaling during early pregnancy. Here, we report that AR also exerts its antiapoptotic function in human myometrial cells. Enhanced AR expression protects, whereas AR silencing sensitizes myometrial cells to both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic stimuli. AR agonist inhibits, whereas AR antagonist induces myometrial cells to undergo apoptotic cell death. Gene microarray analysis confirms that the central functions of AR in myometrial cells are to regulate cell cycling and apoptosis through three major gene groups involving the epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling, RNA splicing and DNA repair processes. AR mediates its antiapoptotic function through two distinct pathways. In the receptor-dependent pathway, AR is required for the expression of several protein factors within the EGF signaling pathway. Through the PI3K/Akt pathway, AR enhances the expression of the antiapoptotic protein Mcl-1. In the ligand-dependent pathway, AR agonist triggers the activation of Src kinase, which in turn phosphorylates STAT3 to increase Mcl-1 expression. We conclude from these results that the AR signaling exerts antiapoptotic function in myometrial cells, further supporting its key role in programming of myometrial phenotype. PMID:25032861

  7. Retromer-Mediated Trafficking of Transmembrane Receptors and Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Stine C.; Siupka, Piotr; Nielsen, Morten S.

    2015-01-01

    Transport between the endoplasmatic reticulum, the Golgi-network, the endo-lysosomal system and the cell surface can be categorized as anterograde or retrograde, describing traffic that goes forward or backward, respectively. Traffic going from the plasma membrane to endosomes and lysosomes or the trans-Golgi network (TGN) constitutes the major retrograde transport routes. Several transmembrane proteins undergo retrograde transport as part of a recycling mechanism that contributes to reutilization and maintenance of a steady-state protein localization. In addition, some receptors are hijacked by exotoxins and used for entry and intracellular transport. The physiological relevance of retrograde transport cannot be overstated. Retrograde trafficking of the amyloid precursor protein determines the distribution between organelles, and hence the possibility of cleavage by γ-secretase. Right balancing of the pathways is critical for protection against Alzheimer’s disease. During embryonic development, retrograde transport of Wntless to the TGN is essential for the following release of Wnt from the plasma membrane. Furthermore, overexpression of Wntless has been linked to oncogenesis. Here, we review relevant aspects of the retrograde trafficking of mammalian transmembrane receptors and transporters, with focus on the retromer-mediated transport between endosomes and the TGN. PMID:26154780

  8. Retromer-Mediated Trafficking of Transmembrane Receptors and Transporters.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Stine C; Siupka, Piotr; Nielsen, Morten S

    2015-01-01

    Transport between the endoplasmatic reticulum, the Golgi-network, the endo-lysosomal system and the cell surface can be categorized as anterograde or retrograde, describing traffic that goes forward or backward, respectively. Traffic going from the plasma membrane to endosomes and lysosomes or the trans-Golgi network (TGN) constitutes the major retrograde transport routes. Several transmembrane proteins undergo retrograde transport as part of a recycling mechanism that contributes to reutilization and maintenance of a steady-state protein localization. In addition, some receptors are hijacked by exotoxins and used for entry and intracellular transport. The physiological relevance of retrograde transport cannot be overstated. Retrograde trafficking of the amyloid precursor protein determines the distribution between organelles, and hence the possibility of cleavage by γ-secretase. Right balancing of the pathways is critical for protection against Alzheimer's disease. During embryonic development, retrograde transport of Wntless to the TGN is essential for the following release of Wnt from the plasma membrane. Furthermore, overexpression of Wntless has been linked to oncogenesis. Here, we review relevant aspects of the retrograde trafficking of mammalian transmembrane receptors and transporters, with focus on the retromer-mediated transport between endosomes and the TGN. PMID:26154780

  9. Hepatoprotective actions of melatonin: Possible mediation by melatonin receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mathes, Alexander M

    2010-01-01

    Melatonin, the hormone of darkness and messenger of the photoperiod, is also well known to exhibit strong direct and indirect antioxidant properties. Melatonin has previously been demonstrated to be a powerful organ protective substance in numerous models of injury; these beneficial effects have been attributed to the hormone’s intense radical scavenging capacity. The present report reviews the hepatoprotective potential of the pineal hormone in various models of oxidative stress in vivo, and summarizes the extensive literature showing that melatonin may be a suitable experimental substance to reduce liver damage after sepsis, hemorrhagic shock, ischemia/reperfusion, and in numerous models of toxic liver injury. Melatonin’s influence on hepatic antioxidant enzymes and other potentially relevant pathways, such as nitric oxide signaling, hepatic cytokine and heat shock protein expression, are evaluated. Based on recent literature demonstrating the functional relevance of melatonin receptor activation for hepatic organ protection, this article finally suggests that melatonin receptors could mediate the hepatoprotective actions of melatonin therapy. PMID:21182223

  10. Reversal of endogenous dopamine receptor silencing in pituitary cells augments receptor-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Al-Azzawi, Haneen; Yacqub-Usman, Kiren; Richardson, Alan; Hofland, Leo J; Clayton, Richard N; Farrell, William E

    2011-02-01

    Dopamine (DA)-agonist targeting of the DA D(2) receptor (D2R) in prolactinomas is the first-line treatment choice for suppression of prolactin and induction of tumor shrinkage. Resistance to DA agonists seems to be related to receptor number. Using the MMQ and GH3 pituitary cell lines, that either do or do not express D2R, respectively, we explored the epigenetic profile associated with the presence or absence of D2R in these cells lines. These studies led us to explore pharmacological strategies designed to restore receptor expression and thereby potentially augment DA agonist-mediated apoptosis. We show in GH3 cells that the D2R harbors increased CpG island-associated methylation and enrichment for histone H3K27me3. Conversely, MMQ cells and normal pituitaries show enrichment for H3K9Ac and barely detectable H3K27me3. Coculture of GH3 cells with the demethylating agent zebularine and the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A was responsible for a decrease in CpG island methylation and enrichment for the histone H3K9Ac mark. In addition, challenge of GH3 cells with zebularine alone or coculture with both agents led to expression of endogenous D2R in these cells. Induced expression D2R in GH3 cells was associated with a significant increase in apoptosis indices to challenge with either DA or bromocriptine. Specificity of a receptor-mediated response was established in coincubations with specific D2R antagonist and siRNA approaches in GH3 cell and D2R expressing MMQ cell lines. These studies point to the potential efficacy of combined treatment with epigenetic drugs and DA agonists for the medical management of different pituitary tumor subtypes, resistant to conventional therapies. PMID:21177832

  11. ZINC-INDUCED EGF RECEPTOR SIGNALING REQUIRES SRC-MEDIATED PHOSPHORYLATION OF THE EGF RECEPTOR ON TYROSINE 845 (Y845)

    EPA Science Inventory

    ZINC-INDUCED EGF RECEPTOR SIGNALING REQUIRES Src-MEDIATED PHOSPHORYLATION OF THE EGF RECEPTOR ON TYROSINE 845 (Y845)
    Weidong Wu1, Lee M. Graves2, Gordon N. Gill3 and James M. Samet4 1Center for Environmental Medicine and Lung Biology; 2Department of Pharmacology, University o...

  12. Scavenger Receptor Mediates Systemic RNA Interference in Ticks

    PubMed Central

    Aung, Kyaw Min; Boldbaatar, Damdinsuren; Umemiya-Shirafuji, Rika; Liao, Min; Xuenan, Xuan; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Linggatong Galay, Remil; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Fujisaki, Kozo

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference is an efficient method to silence gene and protein expressions. Here, the class B scavenger receptor CD36 (SRB) mediated the uptake of exogenous dsRNAs in the induction of the RNAi responses in ticks. Unfed female Haemaphysalis longicornis ticks were injected with a single or a combination of H. longicornis SRB (HlSRB) dsRNA, vitellogenin-1 (HlVg-1) dsRNA, and vitellogenin receptor (HlVgR) dsRNA. We found that specific and systemic silencing of the HlSRB, HlVg-1, and HlVgR genes was achieved in ticks injected with a single dsRNA of HlSRB, HlVg-1, and HlVgR. In ticks injected first with HlVg-1 or HlVgR dsRNA followed 96 hours later with HlSRB dsRNA (HlVg-1/HlSRB or HlVgR/HlSRB), gene silencing of HlSRB was achieved in addition to first knockdown in HlVg-1 or HlVgR, and prominent phenotypic changes were observed in engorgement, mortality, and hatchability, indicating that a systemic and specific double knockdown of target genes had been simultaneously attained in these ticks. However, in ticks injected with HlSRB dsRNA followed 96 hours later with HlVg-1 or HlVgR dsRNAs, silencing of HlSRB was achieved, but no subsequent knockdown in HlVgR or HlVg-1 was observed. The Westernblot and immunohistochemical examinations revealed that the endogenous HlSRB protein was fully abolished in midguts of ticks injected with HlSRB/HlVg-1 dsRNAs but HlVg-1 was normally expressed in midguts, suggesting that HlVg-1 dsRNA-mediated RNAi was fully inhibited by the first knockdown of HlSRB. Similarly, the abolished localization of HlSRB protein was recognized in ovaries of ticks injected with HlSRB/HlVgR, while normal localization of HlVgR was observed in ovaries, suggesting that the failure to knock-down HlVgR could be attributed to the first knockdown of HlSRB. In summary, we demonstrated for the first time that SRB may not only mediate the effective knock-down of gene expression by RNAi but also play essential roles for systemic RNAi of ticks. PMID:22145043

  13. AMPA receptor desensitization is the determinant of AMPA receptor mediated excitotoxicity in purified retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong H; Mueller, Brett H; McGrady, Nolan R; Ma, Hai-Ying; Yorio, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    The ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGLuR) have been hypothesized to play a role in neuronal pathogenesis by mediating excitotoxic death. Previous studies on iGluR in the retina have focused on two broad classes of receptors: NMDA and non-NMDA receptors including the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic receptor (AMPAR) and kainate receptor. In this study, we examined the role of receptor desensitization on the specific excitotoxic effects of AMPAR activation on primary retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Purified rat RGCs were isolated from postnatal day 4-7 Sprague-Dawley rats. Calcium imaging was used to identify the functionality of the AMPARs and selectivity of the s-AMPA agonist. Phosphorylated CREB and ERK1/2 expression were performed following s-AMPA treatment. s-AMPA excitotoxicity was determined by JC-1 mitochondrial membrane depolarization assay, caspase 3/7 luciferase activity assay, immunoblot analysis for α-fodrin, and Live (calcein AM)/Dead (ethidium homodimer-1) assay. RGC cultures of 98% purity, lacking Iba1 and GFAP expression were used for the present studies. Isolated prenatal RGCs expressed calcium permeable AMPAR and s-AMPA (100 μM) treatment of cultured RGCs significantly increased phosphorylation of CREB but not that of ERK1/2. A prolonged (6 h) AMPAR activation in purified RGCs using s-AMPA (100 μM) did not depolarize the RGC mitochondrial membrane potential. In addition, treatment of cultured RGCs with s-AMPA, both in the presence and absence of trophic factors (BDNF and CNTF), did not increase caspase 3/7 activities or the cleavage of α-fodrin (neuronal apoptosis marker), as compared to untreated controls. Lastly, a significant increase in cell survival of RGCs was observed after s-AMPA treatment as compared to control untreated RGCs. However, preventing the desensitization of AMPAR with the treatment with either kainic acid (100 μM) or the combination of s-AMPA and cyclothiazide (50 μM) significantly reduced cell

  14. Identification and Expression Analysis of Putative Chemosensory Receptor Genes in Microplitis mediator by Antennal Transcriptome Screening

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan-Ning; Peng, Yong; Lu, Zi-Yun; Dhiloo, Khalid Hussain; Gu, Shao-Hua; Li, Rui-Jun; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Zhang, Yong-Jun; Guo, Yu-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Host-seeking, ovipositional behavior and mating of insects are controlled mainly by odor perception through sensory organs such as antennae. Antennal chemoreception is extremely important for insect survival. Several antennal chemosensory receptors are involved in mediating the odor detection in insects, especially the odorant receptors (ORs) and ionotropic receptors (IRs), to ensure the specificity of the olfactory sensory neuron responses. In the present study, we identified the chemosensory receptor gene repertoire of the parasitoid wasp Microplitis mediator, a generalist endoparasitoid that infests more than 40 types of Lepidopterous larvae and is widely distributed in the Palaearctic region. By transcriptome sequencing of male and female antennae we identified 60 candidate odorant receptors, six candidate ionotropic receptors and two gustatory receptors in M. mediator. The full-length sequences of these putative chemosensory receptor genes were obtained by using the rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR (RACE-PCR) method. We also conducted reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) combined with real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) for investigating the expression profiles of these chemosensory receptor genes in olfactory and non-olfactory tissues. The tissue- and sex-biased expression patterns may provide insights into the roles of the chemosensory receptor in M. mediator. Our findings support possible future study of the chemosensory behavior of M. mediator at the molecular level. PMID:26078716

  15. Neonatal Fc receptor promotes immune complex-mediated glomerular disease.

    PubMed

    Olaru, Florina; Luo, Wentian; Suleiman, Hani; St John, Patricia L; Ge, Linna; Mezo, Adam R; Shaw, Andrey S; Abrahamson, Dale R; Miner, Jeffrey H; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2014-05-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) is a major regulator of IgG and albumin homeostasis systemically and in the kidneys. We investigated the role of FcRn in the development of immune complex-mediated glomerular disease in mice. C57Bl/6 mice immunized with the noncollagenous domain of the α3 chain of type IV collagen (α3NC1) developed albuminuria associated with granular capillary loop deposition of exogenous antigen, mouse IgG, C3 and C5b-9, and podocyte injury. High-resolution imaging showed abundant IgG deposition in the expanded glomerular basement membrane, especially in regions corresponding to subepithelial electron dense deposits. FcRn-null and -humanized mice immunized with α3NC1 developed no albuminuria and had lower levels of serum IgG anti-α3NC1 antibodies and reduced glomerular deposition of IgG, antigen, and complement. Our results show that FcRn promotes the formation of subepithelial immune complexes and subsequent glomerular pathology leading to proteinuria, potentially by maintaining higher serum levels of pathogenic IgG antibodies. Therefore, reducing pathogenic IgG levels by pharmacologic inhibition of FcRn may provide a novel approach for the treatment of immune complex-mediated glomerular diseases. As proof of concept, we showed that a peptide inhibiting the interaction between human FcRn and human IgG accelerated the degradation of human IgG anti-α3NC1 autoantibodies injected into FCRN-humanized mice as effectively as genetic ablation of FcRn, thus preventing the glomerular deposition of immune complexes containing human IgG. PMID:24357670

  16. Neonatal Fc Receptor Promotes Immune Complex–Mediated Glomerular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Olaru, Florina; Luo, Wentian; Suleiman, Hani; St. John, Patricia L.; Ge, Linna; Mezo, Adam R.; Shaw, Andrey S.; Abrahamson, Dale R.; Miner, Jeffrey H.

    2014-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) is a major regulator of IgG and albumin homeostasis systemically and in the kidneys. We investigated the role of FcRn in the development of immune complex–mediated glomerular disease in mice. C57Bl/6 mice immunized with the noncollagenous domain of the α3 chain of type IV collagen (α3NC1) developed albuminuria associated with granular capillary loop deposition of exogenous antigen, mouse IgG, C3 and C5b-9, and podocyte injury. High-resolution imaging showed abundant IgG deposition in the expanded glomerular basement membrane, especially in regions corresponding to subepithelial electron dense deposits. FcRn-null and -humanized mice immunized with α3NC1 developed no albuminuria and had lower levels of serum IgG anti-α3NC1 antibodies and reduced glomerular deposition of IgG, antigen, and complement. Our results show that FcRn promotes the formation of subepithelial immune complexes and subsequent glomerular pathology leading to proteinuria, potentially by maintaining higher serum levels of pathogenic IgG antibodies. Therefore, reducing pathogenic IgG levels by pharmacologic inhibition of FcRn may provide a novel approach for the treatment of immune complex–mediated glomerular diseases. As proof of concept, we showed that a peptide inhibiting the interaction between human FcRn and human IgG accelerated the degradation of human IgG anti-α3NC1 autoantibodies injected into FCRN-humanized mice as effectively as genetic ablation of FcRn, thus preventing the glomerular deposition of immune complexes containing human IgG. PMID:24357670

  17. Thyrotropin modulates receptor-mediated processing of the atrial natriuretic peptide receptor in cultured thyroid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Y.L.; Burman, K.D.; Lahiri, S.; Abdelrahim, M.M.; D'Avis, J.C.; Wartofsky, L. )

    1991-03-01

    In a prior study of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binding to cultured thyroid cells, we reported that at 4 C, more than 95% of bound ANP is recovered on cell membranes, with negligible ANP internalization observed. Since ANP binding was inhibited by TSH, we have further studied TSH effects on postbinding ANP processing to determine whether this phenomenon reflects enhanced endocytosis of the ANP-receptor complex. An ANP chase study was initiated by binding (125I) ANP to thyroid cells at 4 C for 2 h, followed by incubation at 37 C. ANP processing was then traced by following 125I activity at various time intervals in three fractions: cell surface membranes, incubation medium, and inside the cells. Radioactivity released into medium represented processed ANP rather than ANP dissociated from surface membranes, since prebound (125I)ANP could not be competitively dissociated by a high concentration of ANP (1 mumol/L) at 37 C. Chase study results showed that prebound ANP quickly disappeared from cell membranes down to 34% by 30 min. Internalized ANP peaked at 10 min, with 21% of initial prebound ANP found inside the cells. At the same time, radioactivity recovered in incubation medium sharply increased between 10-30 min from 8% to 52%. Preincubation of cells with chloroquine (which blocks degradation of the ANP-receptor complex by inhibiting lysosomal hydrolase) caused a 146% increase in internalized (125I)ANP by 30 min (39% compared to 15% control), while medium radioactivity decreased from 52% to 16%, suggesting that processing of the receptor complex is mediated via lysosomal enzymes. In chase studies employing cells pretreated with chloroquine, TSH stimulated the internalization rate of ANP-receptor complex. By 30 min, TSH significantly reduced the membrane-bound ANP, and the decrease was inversely correlated to the increase in internalized radioactivity.

  18. Anti-nociception mediated by a κ opioid receptor agonist is blocked by a δ receptor agonist

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, A M W; Roberts, K W; Pradhan, A A; Akbari, H A; Walwyn, W; Lutfy, K; Carroll, F I; Cahill, C M; Evans, C J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The opioid receptor family comprises four structurally homologous but functionally distinct sub-groups, the μ (MOP), δ (DOP), κ (KOP) and nociceptin (NOP) receptors. As most opioid agonists are selective but not specific, a broad spectrum of behaviours due to activation of different opioid receptors is expected. In this study, we examine whether other opioid receptor systems influenced KOP-mediated antinociception. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We used a tail withdrawal assay in C57Bl/6 mice to assay the antinociceptive effect of systemically administered opioid agonists with varying selectivity at KOP receptors. Pharmacological and genetic approaches were used to analyse the interactions of the other opioid receptors in modulating KOP-mediated antinociception. KEY RESULTS Etorphine, a potent agonist at all four opioid receptors, was not anti-nociceptive in MOP knockout (KO) mice, although etorphine is an efficacious KOP receptor agonist and specific KOP receptor agonists remain analgesic in MOP KO mice. As KOP receptor agonists are aversive, we considered KOP-mediated antinociception might be a form of stress-induced analgesia that is blocked by the anxiolytic effects of DOP receptor agonists. In support of this hypothesis, pretreatment with the DOP antagonist, naltrindole (10 mg·kg−1), unmasked etorphine (3 mg·kg−1) antinociception in MOP KO mice. Further, in wild-type mice, KOP-mediated antinociception by systemic U50,488H (10 mg·kg−1) was blocked by pretreatment with the DOP agonist SNC80 (5 mg·kg−1) and diazepam (1 mg·kg−1). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Systemic DOP receptor agonists blocked systemic KOP antinociception, and these results identify DOP receptor agonists as potential agents for reversing stress-driven addictive and depressive behaviours mediated through KOP receptor activation. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles

  19. Estrogen Receptor α Regulates Dlx3-Mediated Osteoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Ho; Oh, Kyo-Nyeo; Han, Younho; Choi, You Hee; Lee, Kwang-Youl

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ER-α), which is involved in bone metabolism and breast cancer, has been shown to have transcriptional targets. Dlx3 is essential for the skeletal development and plays an important role in osteoblast differentiation. Various osteogenic stimulators and transcription factors can induce the protein expression of Dlx3. However, the regulatory function of ER-α in the Dlx3 mediated osteogenic process remains unknown. Therefore, we investigated the regulation of Dlx3 and found that ER-α is a positive regulator of Dlx3 transcription in BMP2-induced osteoblast differentiation. We also found that ER-α interacts with Dlx3 and increases its transcriptional activity and DNA binding affinity. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the regulation of Dlx3 activity by ER-α is independent of the ligand (estradiol) binding domain. These results indicate that Dlx3 is a novel target of ER-α, and that ER-α regulates the osteoblast differentiation through modulation of Dlx3 expression and/or interaction with Dlx3. PMID:26674964

  20. Protease-activated receptors mediate crosstalk between coagulation and fibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    McEachron, Troy A; Pawlinski, Rafal; Richards, Kristy L; Church, Frank C; Mackman, Nigel

    2010-12-01

    The coagulation and fibrinolytic systems contribute to malignancy by increasing angiogenesis, tumor growth, tumor invasion, and tumor metastasis. Oncogenic transformation increases the expression of tissue factor (TF) that results in local generation of coagulation proteases and activation of protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 and PAR-2. We compared the PAR-dependent expression of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 in 2 murine mammary adencocarcinoma cell lines: metastatic 4T1 cells and nonmetastatic 67NR cells. 4T1 cells expressed TF, PAR-1 and PAR-2 whereas 67NR cells expressed TF and PAR-1. We also silenced PAR-1 or PAR-2 expression in the 4T1 cells. We discovered 2 distinct mechanisms for PAR-dependent expression of uPA and PAI-1. First, we found that factor Xa or thrombin activation of PAR-1 led to a rapid release of stored intracellular uPA into the culture supernatant. Second, thrombin transactivation of a PAR-1/PAR-2 complex resulted in increases in PAI-1 mRNA and protein expression. Cells lacking PAR-2 failed to express PAI-1 in response to thrombin and factor Xa did not activate the PAR-1/PAR-2 complex. Our results reveal how PAR-1 and PAR-2 on tumor cells mediate crosstalk between coagulation and fibrinolysis. PMID:20736455

  1. Protease-activated receptors mediate crosstalk between coagulation and fibrinolysis

    PubMed Central

    McEachron, Troy A.; Pawlinski, Rafal; Richards, Kristy L.; Church, Frank C.

    2010-01-01

    The coagulation and fibrinolytic systems contribute to malignancy by increasing angiogenesis, tumor growth, tumor invasion, and tumor metastasis. Oncogenic transformation increases the expression of tissue factor (TF) that results in local generation of coagulation proteases and activation of protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 and PAR-2. We compared the PAR-dependent expression of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 in 2 murine mammary adencocarcinoma cell lines: metastatic 4T1 cells and nonmetastatic 67NR cells. 4T1 cells expressed TF, PAR-1 and PAR-2 whereas 67NR cells expressed TF and PAR-1. We also silenced PAR-1 or PAR-2 expression in the 4T1 cells. We discovered 2 distinct mechanisms for PAR-dependent expression of uPA and PAI-1. First, we found that factor Xa or thrombin activation of PAR-1 led to a rapid release of stored intracellular uPA into the culture supernatant. Second, thrombin transactivation of a PAR-1/PAR-2 complex resulted in increases in PAI-1 mRNA and protein expression. Cells lacking PAR-2 failed to express PAI-1 in response to thrombin and factor Xa did not activate the PAR-1/PAR-2 complex. Our results reveal how PAR-1 and PAR-2 on tumor cells mediate crosstalk between coagulation and fibrinolysis. PMID:20736455

  2. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor ERRγ Regulates Hepatic CB1 Receptor-Mediated Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yoon Seok; Lee, Ji-Min; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Yong-Soo; Kim, Ki-Sun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Jina; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, In-Kyu; Kim, Seong Heon; Cho, Sung Jin; Jeong, Won-Il; Lee, Chul-Ho; Harris, Robert A.; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), a stress inducible hepatokine, is synthesized in the liver and plays important roles in glucose and lipid metabolism. However, the mechanism of hepatic cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression is largely unknown. Results Activation of the hepatic CB1 receptor by arachidonyl-2’-chloroethylamide (ACEA), a CB1 receptor selective agonist, significantly increased FGF21 gene expression. Overexpression of estrogen-related receptor (ERR) γ increased FGF21 gene expression and secretion both in hepatocytes and mice, whereas knockdown of ERRγ decreased ACEA-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Moreover, ERRγ, but not ERRα and ERRβ, induced FGF21 gene promoter activity. In addition, deletion and mutation analysis of the FGF21 promoter identified a putative ERRγ-binding motif (AGGTGC, a near-consensus response element). A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed direct binding of ERRγ to the FGF21 gene promoter. Finally, GSK5182, an ERRγ inverse agonist, significantly inhibited hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Conclusion Based on our data, we conclude that ERRγ plays a key role in hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression and secretion. PMID:27455076

  3. Discovery and pharmacological profile of new 1H-indazole-3-carboxamide and 2H-pyrrolo[3,4-c]quinoline derivatives as selective serotonin 4 receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Furlotti, Guido; Alisi, Maria Alessandra; Apicella, Claudia; Capezzone de Joannon, Alessandra; Cazzolla, Nicola; Costi, Roberta; Cuzzucoli Crucitti, Giuliana; Garrone, Beatrice; Iacovo, Alberto; Magarò, Gabriele; Mangano, Giorgina; Miele, Gaetano; Ombrato, Rosella; Pescatori, Luca; Polenzani, Lorenzo; Rosi, Federica; Vitiello, Marco; Di Santo, Roberto

    2012-11-26

    Since the discovery of the serotonin 4 receptor (5-HT(4)R), a large number of receptor ligands have been studied. The safety concerns and the lack of market success of these ligands have mainly been attributed to their lack of selectivity. In this study we describe the discovery of N-[(4-piperidinyl)methyl]-1H-indazole-3-carboxamide and 4-[(4-piperidinyl)methoxy]-2H-pyrrolo[3,4-c]quinoline derivatives as new 5-HT(4)R ligands endowed with high selectivity over the serotonin 2A receptor and human ether-a-go-go-related gene potassium ion channel. Within these series, two molecules (11 ab and 12 g) were identified as potent and selective 5-HT(4)R antagonists with good in vitro pharmacokinetic properties. These compounds were evaluated for their antinociceptive action in two analgesia animal models. 12 g showed a significant antinociceptive effect in both models and is proposed as an interesting lead compound as a 5-HT(4)R antagonist with analgesic action. PMID:23043420

  4. Brain serotonin 4 receptor binding is associated with the cortisol awakening response.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Gustav R; Fisher, Patrick M; Dyssegaard, Agnete; McMahon, Brenda; Holst, Klaus K; Lehel, Szabolcs; Svarer, Claus; Jensen, Peter S; Knudsen, Gitte M; Frokjaer, Vibe G

    2016-05-01

    Serotonin signalling is considered critical for an appropriate and dynamic adaptation to stress. Previously, we have shown that prefrontal serotonin transporter (SERT) binding is positively associated with the cortisol awakening response (CAR) (Frokjaer et al., 2013), which is an index of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis output dynamics. Here, we investigated in healthy individuals if cerebral serotonin 4 receptor (5-HT4r) binding, reported to be a proxy for serotonin levels, is associated with CAR. Thirty healthy volunteers (25 males, age range 20-56 years) underwent 5-HT4r PET imaging with [(11)C]-SB207145, genotyping of the SERT-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), and performed serial home sampling of saliva (5 time points from 0 to 60min from awakening) to assess CAR. The association between 5-HT4r binding in 4 regions of interest (prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, pallidostriatum, and hippocampus) and CAR was tested using multiple linear regression with adjustment for age and 5-HTTLPR genotype. Finally, an exploratory voxel-based analysis of the association was performed. CAR was negatively associated with 5-HT4r binding in pallidostriatum (p=0.01), prefrontal cortex (p=0.03), and anterior cingulate cortex (p=0.002), respectively, but showed no association in hippocampus. The results remained significant when taking into account other potentially relevant covariates. In conclusion, our finding reinforces an association between HPA-axis function and serotonin signaling in vivo in humans. We suggest that higher synaptic serotonin concentration, here indexed by lower 5-HT4r binding, supports HPA-axis dynamics, which in healthy volunteers is reflected by a robust CAR. PMID:26894483

  5. Targeting receptor-mediated endocytotic pathways with nanoparticles: rationale and advances

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shi; Olenyuk, Bogdan Z.; Okamoto, Curtis T.; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F.

    2012-01-01

    Targeting of drugs and their carrier systems by using receptor-mediated endocytotic pathways was in its nascent stages 25 years ago. In the intervening years, an explosion of knowledge focused on design and synthesis of nanoparticulate delivery systems as well as elucidation of the cellular complexity of what was previously-termed receptor-mediated endocytosis has now created a situation when it has become possible to design and test the feasibility of delivery of highly specific nanoparticle drug carriers to specific cells and tissue. This review outlines the mechanisms governing the major modes of receptor-mediated endocytosis used in drug delivery and highlights recent approaches using these as targets for in vivo drug delivery of nanoparticles. The review also discusses some of the inherent complexity associated with the simple shift from a ligand-drug conjugate versus a ligand-nanoparticle conjugate, in terms of ligand valency and its relationship to the mode of receptor-mediated internalization. PMID:23026636

  6. The melatonin-MT1 receptor axis modulates mutant huntingtin-mediated toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Sirianni, Ana; Pei, Zhijuan; Cormier, Kerry; Smith, Karen; Jiang, Jiying; Zhou, Shuanhu; Wang, Hui; Zhao, Rong; Yano, Hiroko; Kim, Jeong Eun; Li, Wei; Kristal, Bruce S.; Ferrante, Robert J.; Friedlander, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Melatonin mediates neuroprotection in several experimental models of neurodegeneration. It is not yet known, however, whether melatonin provides neuroprotection in genetic models of Huntington’s disease (HD). We report that melatonin delays disease onset and mortality in a transgenic mouse model of HD. Moreover, mutant huntingtin (htt)-mediated toxicity in cells, mice, and humans is associated with loss of the type 1 melatonin receptor (MT1). We observe high levels of MT1 receptor in mitochondria from the brains of wild-type mice but much less in brains from HD mice. Moreover, we demonstrate that melatonin inhibits mutant htt-induced caspase activation and preserves MT1 receptor expression. This observation is critical, since melatonin-mediated protection is dependent upon the presence and activation of the MT1 receptor. In summary, we delineate a pathologic process whereby mutant htt-induced loss of the mitochondrial MT1 receptor enhances neuronal vulnerability and potentially accelerates the neurodegenerative process. PMID:21994366

  7. Tc-99m-galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin: in vivo characterization of receptor-mediated binding to hepatocyctes

    SciTech Connect

    Vera, D.R.; Krohn, K.A.; Stadalnik, R.C.; Scheibe, P.O.

    1984-04-01

    The biodistribution and kinetics of a receptor-binding hepatic radiopharmaceutical, Tc-99m-galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin (Tc-NGA), were investigated using mammalian and avian models. The radiopharmaceutical exhibited four significant features associated with receptor-mediated binding at the hepatocyte membrane in mammals: (a) high tissue specificity, (b) high molecular specificity, (c) affinity-dependent uptake, and (d) dose-dependent uptake. Diminished hepatic uptake by the avian model illustrated low nonspecific binding. The kinetic sensitivity to ligand-receptor affinity and stoichiometry illustrated the principal feature of receptor-binding radiopharmaceuticals, namely, quantitative assessment of tissue function based upon the biochemical interaction of a ligand and its specific receptor.

  8. Cardiomyocyte ryanodine receptor degradation by chaperone-mediated autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Pedrozo, Zully; Torrealba, Natalia; Fernández, Carolina; Gatica, Damian; Toro, Barbra; Quiroga, Clara; Rodriguez, Andrea E.; Sanchez, Gina; Gillette, Thomas G.; Hill, Joseph A.; Donoso, Paulina; Lavandero, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Time for primary review: 15 days Aims Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is a selective mechanism for the degradation of soluble cytosolic proteins bearing the sequence KFERQ. These proteins are targeted by chaperones and delivered to lysosomes where they are translocated into the lysosomal lumen and degraded via the lysosome-associated membrane protein type 2A (LAMP-2A). Mutations in LAMP2 that inhibit autophagy result in Danon disease characterized by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The ryanodine receptor type 2 (RyR2) plays a key role in cardiomyocyte excitation–contraction and its dysfunction can lead to cardiac failure. Whether RyR2 is degraded by CMA is unknown. Methods and results To induce CMA, cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were treated with geldanamycin (GA) to promote protein degradation through this pathway. GA increased LAMP-2A levels together with its redistribution and colocalization with Hsc70 in the perinuclear region, changes indicative of CMA activation. The inhibition of lysosomes but not proteasomes prevented the loss of RyR2. The recovery of RyR2 content after incubation with GA by siRNA targeting LAMP-2A suggests that RyR2 is degraded via CMA. In silico analysis also revealed that the RyR2 sequence harbours six KFERQ motifs which are required for the recognition Hsc70 and its degradation via CMA. Our data suggest that presenilins are involved in RyR2 degradation by CMA. Conclusion These findings are consistent with a model in which oxidative damage of the RyR2 targets it for turnover by presenilins and CMA, which could lead to removal of damaged or leaky RyR2 channels. PMID:23404999

  9. SMRT isoforms mediate repression and anti-repression of nuclear receptor heterodimers.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J D; Umesono, K; Evans, R M

    1996-01-01

    Transcriptional repression represents an important component in the regulation of cell differentiation and oncogenesis mediated by nuclear hormone receptors. Hormones act to relieve repression, thus allowing receptors to function as transcriptional activators. The transcriptional corepressor SMRT was identified as a silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors. SMRT is highly related to another corepressor, N-CoR, suggesting the existence of a new family of receptor-interacting proteins. We demonstrate that SMRT is a ubiquitous nuclear protein that interacts with unliganded receptor heterodimers in mammalian cells. Furthermore, expression of the receptor-interacting domain of SMRT acts as an antirepressor, suggesting the potential importance of splicing variants as modulators of thyroid hormone and retinoic acid signaling. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8755515

  10. Opioid Receptors Mediate Direct Predictive Fear Learning: Evidence from One-Trial Blocking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Sindy; McNally, Gavan P.

    2007-01-01

    Pavlovian fear learning depends on predictive error, so that fear learning occurs when the actual outcome of a conditioning trial exceeds the expected outcome. Previous research has shown that opioid receptors, including [mu]-opioid receptors in the ventrolateral quadrant of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (vlPAG), mediate such predictive fear…

  11. Inhibition of pattern recognition receptor-mediated inflammation by bioactive phytochemicals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emerging evidence reveals that pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs), Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain proteins (NODs) mediate both infection-induced and sterile inflammation by recognizing pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and endogenous molecules...

  12. Ionotropic glutamate receptors mediate OFF responses in light-adapted ON bipolar cells

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Ji-Jie; Gao, Fan; Wu, Samuel M.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that photoreceptor synaptic inputs to depolarizing bipolar cells (DBCs or ON bipolar cells) are mediated by mGluR6 receptors and those to hyperpolarizing bipolar cells (HBCs or OFF bipolar cells) are mediated by AMPA/kainate receptors. Here we show that in addition to mGluR6 receptors which mediate the sign-inverting, depolarizing light responses, subpopulations of cone-dominated and rod/cone mixed DBCs use GluR4 AMPA receptors to generate a transient sign-preserving OFF response under light adapted conditions. These AMPA receptors are located at the basal junctions postsynaptic to rods and they are silent under dark-adapted conditions, as tonic glutamate release in darkness desensitizes these receptors. Light adaptation enhances rod-cone coupling and thus allows cone photocurrents with an abrupt OFF depolarization to enter the rods. The abrupt rod depolarization triggers glutamate activation of unoccupied AMPA receptors, resulting in a transient OFF response in DBCs. It has been widely accepted that the DNQX-sensitive, OFF transient responses in retinal amacrine cells and ganglion cells are mediated exclusively by HBCs. Our results suggests that this view needs revision as AMPA receptors in subpopulations of DBCs are likely to significantly contribute to the DNQX-sensitive OFF transient responses in light-adapted third- and higher-order visual neurons. PMID:22842089

  13. Dopamine D1 receptor inhibition of NMDA receptor currents mediated by tyrosine kinase-dependent receptor trafficking in neonatal rat striatum

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Huaxia; Gibb, Alasdair J

    2008-01-01

    NMDA receptors are of particular importance in the control of synaptic strength and integration of synaptic activity. Dopamine receptor modulation of NMDA receptors in neonatal striatum may influence the efficacy of synaptic transmission in the cortico-striatal pathway and if so, this modulation will affect the behaviour of the basal ganglia network. Here, we show that in acute brain slices of neonatal (P7) rat striatum the dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF-82958 significantly decreases NMDA receptor currents in patch-clamp whole-cell recordings. This inhibition is not abolished by application of a G protein inhibitor (GDP-β-S) or irreversible G protein activator (GTP-γ-S) suggesting a G protein-independent mechanism. In addition, intracellular application of protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors (lavendustin A or PP2) abolished D1 inhibition of NMDA currents. In contrast, in older animals (P28) D1 receptor activation produces a potentiation of the NMDA response which suggests there is a developmental switch in D1 modulation of striatal NMDA receptors. Single-channel recordings show that direct D1 receptor inhibition of NMDA receptors cannot be observed in isolated membrane patches. We hypothesize that D1 inhibition in whole-cell recordings from neonatal rats may be mediated by a change in NMDA receptor trafficking. Consistent with this hypothesis, intracellular application of a dynamin inhibitory peptide (QVPSRPNRAP) abolished D1 inhibition of NMDA receptor currents. We therefore conclude that a tyrosine kinase-dependent alteration of NMDA receptor trafficking underlies D1 dopamine receptor-mediated down-regulation of NMDA receptor currents in medium spiny neurons of neonatal rat striatum. PMID:18703578

  14. DEPENDENCE OF PPAR LIGAND-INDUCED MAPK SIGNALING ON EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR TRANSACTIVATION HEPARIN-BINDING EGF CLEAVAGE MEDIATES ZINC-INDUCED EGF RECEPTOR PHOSPHORYLATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear hormone receptors that function as ligand-activated transcription factors regulating lipid metabolism and homeostasis. In addition to their ability to regulate PPAR-mediated gene transcription, PPARalpha and gamma li...

  15. Steroid receptor coactivator-1 mediates estrogenic actions to prevent body weight gain in female mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha) expressed by hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin and steroidogenic factor-1 neurons largely mediates the antiobesity effects of estrogens in females. However, the critical molecular events that are coupled to ERalpha and mediate estrogenic effects on energy balance rem...

  16. Glutamate mediates the function of melanocortin receptor 4 on sim1 neurons in body weight regulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R) is a well-established mediator of body weight homeostasis. However, the neurotransmitter(s) that mediate MC4R function remain largely unknown; as a result, little is known about the second-order neurons of the MC4R neural pathway. Single-minded 1 (Sim1)-expressing ...

  17. Alteration of enteric monoamines with monoamine receptors and colonic dysmotility in 6-hydroxydopamine-induced Parkinson's disease rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Li, Yun; Liu, Chenzhe; Fan, Ruifang; Wang, Ping; Zheng, Lifei; Hong, Feng; Feng, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yue; Li, Lisheng; Zhu, Jinxia

    2015-08-01

    Constipation is common in Parkinson's disease (PD), in which monoamines (dopamine [DA], norepinephrine [NE], and 5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) play an important role. Rats microinjected with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the bilateral substantia nigra (SN) exhibit constipation, but the role of monoamines and their receptors is not clear. In the present study, colonic motility, monoamine content, and the expression of monoamine receptors were examined using strain gauge force transducers, ultraperformance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, immunofluorescence, and Western blot. The 6-OHDA rats displayed a significant reduction in dopaminergic neurons in the SN and a decreased time on rota-rod test and a marked decrease in daily fecal production and fecal water content. The amplitude of colonic spontaneous contraction was obviously decreased in 6-OHDA rats. Blocking D1-like receptor and β3-adrenoceptor (β3-AR) significantly reduced the inhibition of DA and NE on the colonic motility, respectively, whereas the 5-HT and 5-HT4 receptor agonists promoted the colonic motility. Moreover, DA content was increased in the colonic muscularis externa of 6-OHDA rats. The protein expression of β3-ARs was notably upregulated, but 5-HT4 receptors were significantly decreased in the colonic muscularis externa of 6-OHDA rats. We conclude that enhanced DA and β3-ARs and decreased 5-HT4 receptors may be contributed to the colonic dysmotility and constipation observed in 6-OHDA rats. PMID:25766133

  18. Synthesis and evaluation of novel serotonin 4 receptor radiotracers for single photon emission computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lalut, Julien; Tournier, Benjamin B; Cailly, Thomas; Lecoutey, Cédric; Corvaisier, Sophie; Davis, Audrey; Ballandonne, Céline; Since, Marc; Millet, Philippe; Fabis, Frédéric; Dallemagne, Patrick; Rochais, Christophe

    2016-06-30

    Despite its implication in several physiological and pathological processes the serotonin subtype-4 receptor (5-HT4R) has seen limited effort for the development of radiolabeling agent especially concerning single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Bearing an ester function, the available ligands are rapidly susceptible to hydrolysis which limits their use in vivo. In this study the synthesis of iodinated benzamide and ketone analogs were described. Their affinity for the 5-HT4R and their lipophilicity were evaluated and the most promising derivatives were evaluated ex vivo for their binding to the receptor and for their ability to displace the reference ligand [(125)I]-SB207710. PMID:27060761

  19. Mechanisms of Biased β-Arrestin-Mediated Signaling Downstream from the Cannabinoid 1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Peraza, Francheska; Ahn, Kwang H.; Nogueras-Ortiz, Carlos; Mungrue, Imran N.; Mackie, Ken; Kendall, Debra A.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of G protein-coupled receptors results in multiple waves of signaling that are mediated by heterotrimeric G proteins and the scaffolding proteins β-arrestin 1/2. Ligands can elicit full or subsets of cellular responses, a concept defined as ligand bias or functional selectivity. However, our current understanding of β-arrestin-mediated signaling is still very limited. Here we provide a comprehensive view of β-arrestin-mediated signaling from the cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R). By using a signaling biased receptor, we define the cascades, specific receptor kinases, and molecular mechanism underlying β-arrestin-mediated signaling: We identify the interaction kinetics of CB1R and β-arrestin 1 during their endocytic trafficking as directly proportional to its efficacy. Finally, we demonstrate that signaling results in the control of genes clustered around prosurvival and proapoptotic functions among others. Together, these studies constitute a comprehensive description of β-arrestin-mediated signaling from CB1Rs and suggest modulation of receptor endocytic trafficking as a therapeutic approach to control β-arrestin-mediated signaling. PMID:27009233

  20. Mechanisms of Biased β-Arrestin-Mediated Signaling Downstream from the Cannabinoid 1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Peraza, Francheska; Ahn, Kwang H; Nogueras-Ortiz, Carlos; Mungrue, Imran N; Mackie, Ken; Kendall, Debra A; Yudowski, Guillermo A

    2016-06-01

    Activation of G protein-coupled receptors results in multiple waves of signaling that are mediated by heterotrimeric G proteins and the scaffolding proteins β-arrestin 1/2. Ligands can elicit full or subsets of cellular responses, a concept defined as ligand bias or functional selectivity. However, our current understanding of β-arrestin-mediated signaling is still very limited. Here we provide a comprehensive view of β-arrestin-mediated signaling from the cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R). By using a signaling biased receptor, we define the cascades, specific receptor kinases, and molecular mechanism underlying β-arrestin-mediated signaling: We identify the interaction kinetics of CB1R and β-arrestin 1 during their endocytic trafficking as directly proportional to its efficacy. Finally, we demonstrate that signaling results in the control of genes clustered around prosurvival and proapoptotic functions among others. Together, these studies constitute a comprehensive description of β-arrestin-mediated signaling from CB1Rs and suggest modulation of receptor endocytic trafficking as a therapeutic approach to control β-arrestin-mediated signaling. PMID:27009233

  1. USP17 is required for clathrin mediated endocytosis of epidermal growth factor receptor

    PubMed Central

    Jaworski, Jakub; de la Vega, Michelle; Fletcher, Sarah J.; McFarlane, Cheryl; Greene, Michelle K.; Smyth, Andrew W.; Van Schaeybroeck, Sandra; Johnston, James A.; Scott, Christopher J.; Rappoport, Joshua Z.; Burrows, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Previously we have shown that expression of the deubiquitinating enzyme USP17 is required for cell proliferation and motility. More recently we reported that USP17 deubiquitinates RCE1 isoform 2 and thus regulates the processing of ‘CaaX’ motif proteins. Here we now show that USP17 expression is induced by epidermal growth factor and that USP17 expression is required for clathrin mediated endocytosis of epidermal growth factor receptor. In addition, we show that USP17 is required for the endocytosis of transferrin, an archetypal substrate for clathrin mediated endocytosis, and that USP17 depletion impedes plasma membrane recruitment of the machinery required for clathrin mediated endocytosis. Thus, our data reveal that USP17 is necessary for epidermal growth factor receptor and transferrin endocytosis via clathrin coated pits, indicate this is mediated via the regulation of the recruitment of the components of the endocytosis machinery and suggest USP17 may play a general role in receptor endocytosis. PMID:25026282

  2. Estrogen receptor-associated proteins: possible mediators of hormone-induced transcription.

    PubMed

    Halachmi, S; Marden, E; Martin, G; MacKay, H; Abbondanza, C; Brown, M

    1994-06-01

    The estrogen receptor is a transcription factor which, when bound to estradiol, binds DNA and regulates expression of estrogen-responsive genes. A 160-kilodalton estrogen receptor-associated protein, ERAP160, was identified that exhibits estradiol-dependent binding to the receptor. Mutational analysis of the receptor shows that its ability to activate transcription parallels its ability to bind ERAP160. Antiestrogens are unable to promote ERAP160 binding and can block the estrogen-dependent interaction of the receptor and ERAP160 in a dose-dependent manner. This evidence suggests that ERAP160 may mediate estradiol-dependent transcriptional activation by the estrogen receptor. Furthermore, the ability of antiestrogens to block estrogen receptor-ERAP160 complex formation could account for their therapeutic effects in breast cancer. PMID:8197458

  3. MFR, a Putative Receptor Mediating the Fusion of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Saginario, Charles; Sterling, Hyacinth; Beckers, Cornelius; Kobayashi, Ruji; Solimena, Michele; Ullu, Elisabetta; Vignery, Agnès

    1998-01-01

    We had previously identified a macrophage surface protein whose expression is highly induced, transient, and specific, as it is restricted to actively fusing macrophages in vitro and in vivo. This protein is recognized by monoclonal antibodies that block macrophage fusion. We have now purified this protein and cloned its corresponding cDNA. This protein belongs to the superfamily of immunoglobulins and is similar to immune antigen receptors such as the T-cell receptor, B-cell receptor, and viral receptors such as CD4. We have therefore named this protein macrophage fusion receptor (MFR). We show that the extracellular domain of MFR prevents fusion of macrophages in vitro and therefore propose that MFR belongs to the fusion machinery of macrophages. MFR is identical to SHPS-1 and BIT and is a homologue of P84, SIRPα, and MyD-1, all of which have been recently cloned and implicated in cell signaling and cell-cell interaction events. PMID:9774638

  4. Nicotine impairs cyclooxygenase-2-dependent kinin-receptor-mediated murine airway relaxations

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yuan Cardell, Lars-Olaf

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: Cigarette smoke induces local inflammation and airway hyperreactivity. In asthmatics, it worsens the symptoms and increases the risk for exacerbation. The present study investigates the effects of nicotine on airway relaxations in isolated murine tracheal segments. Methods: Segments were cultured for 24 h in the presence of vehicle, nicotine (10 μM) and/or dexamethasone (1 μM). Airway relaxations were assessed in myographs after pre-contraction with carbachol (1 μM). Kinin receptors, cyclooxygenase (COX) and inflammatory mediator expressions were assessed by real-time PCR and confocal-microscopy-based immunohistochemistry. Results: The organ culture procedure markedly increased bradykinin- (selective B{sub 2} receptor agonist) and des-Arg{sup 9}-bradykinin- (selective B{sub 1} receptor agonist) induced relaxations, and slightly increased relaxation induced by isoprenaline, but not that induced by PGE{sub 2}. The kinin receptor mediated relaxations were epithelium-, COX-2- and EP2-receptor-dependent and accompanied by drastically enhanced mRNA levels of kinin receptors, as well as inflammatory mediators MCP-1 and iNOS. Increase in COX-2 and mPGES-1 was verified both at mRNA and protein levels. Nicotine selectively suppressed the organ-culture-enhanced relaxations induced by des-Arg{sup 9}-bradykinin and bradykinin, at the same time reducing mPGES-1 mRNA and protein expressions. α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor inhibitors α-bungarotoxin and MG624 both blocked the nicotine effects on kinin B{sub 2} receptors, but not those on B{sub 1}. Dexamethasone completely abolished kinin-induced relaxations. Conclusion: It is tempting to conclude that a local inflammatory process per se could have a bronchoprotective component by increasing COX-2 mediated airway relaxations and that nicotine could impede this safety mechanism. Dexamethasone further reduced airway inflammation together with relaxations. This might contribute to the steroid resistance seen in

  5. Drosophila Lipophorin Receptors Recruit the Lipoprotein LTP to the Plasma Membrane to Mediate Lipid Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, Míriam; Mejía-Morales, John E.; Culi, Joaquim

    2015-01-01

    Lipophorin, the main Drosophila lipoprotein, circulates in the hemolymph transporting lipids between organs following routes that must adapt to changing physiological requirements. Lipophorin receptors expressed in developmentally dynamic patterns in tissues such as imaginal discs, oenocytes and ovaries control the timing and tissular distribution of lipid uptake. Using an affinity purification strategy, we identified a novel ligand for the lipophorin receptors, the circulating lipoprotein Lipid Transfer Particle (LTP). We show that specific isoforms of the lipophorin receptors mediate the extracellular accumulation of LTP in imaginal discs and ovaries. The interaction requires the LA-1 module in the lipophorin receptors and is strengthened by a contiguous region of 16 conserved amino acids. Lipophorin receptor variants that do not interact with LTP cannot mediate lipid uptake, revealing an essential role of LTP in the process. In addition, we show that lipophorin associates with the lipophorin receptors and with the extracellular matrix through weak interactions. However, during lipophorin receptor-mediated lipid uptake, LTP is required for a transient stabilization of lipophorin in the basolateral plasma membrane of imaginal disc cells. Together, our data suggests a molecular mechanism by which the lipophorin receptors tether LTP to the plasma membrane in lipid acceptor tissues. LTP would interact with lipophorin particles adsorbed to the extracellular matrix and with the plasma membrane, catalyzing the exchange of lipids between them. PMID:26121667

  6. Gq-coupled receptors as mechanosensors mediating myogenic vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    y Schnitzler, Michael Mederos; Storch, Ursula; Meibers, Simone; Nurwakagari, Pascal; Breit, Andreas; Essin, Kirill; Gollasch, Maik; Gudermann, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Despite the central physiological function of the myogenic response, the underlying signalling pathways and the identity of mechanosensors in vascular smooth muscle (VSM) are still elusive. In contrast to present thinking, we show that membrane stretch does not primarily gate mechanosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels, but leads to agonist-independent activation of Gq/11-coupled receptors, which subsequently signal to TRPC channels in a G protein- and phospholipase C-dependent manner. Mechanically activated receptors adopt an active conformation, allowing for productive G protein coupling and recruitment of β-arrestin. Agonist-independent receptor activation by mechanical stimuli is blocked by specific antagonists and inverse agonists. Increasing the AT1 angiotensin II receptor density in mechanically unresponsive rat aortic A7r5 cells resulted in mechanosensitivity. Myogenic tone of cerebral and renal arteries is profoundly diminished by the inverse angiotensin II AT1 receptor agonist losartan independently of angiotensin II (AII) secretion. This inhibitory effect is enhanced in blood vessels of mice deficient in the regulator of G-protein signalling-2. These findings suggest that Gq/11-coupled receptors function as sensors of membrane stretch in VSM cells. PMID:18987636

  7. G protein-coupled receptors: extranuclear mediators for the non-genomic actions of steroids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Liu, Yi; Cao, Ji-Min

    2014-01-01

    Steroids hormones possess two distinct actions, a delayed genomic effect and a rapid non-genomic effect. Rapid steroid-triggered signaling is mediated by specific receptors localized most often to the plasma membrane. The nature of these receptors is of great interest and accumulated data suggest that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are appealing candidates. Increasing evidence regarding the interaction between steroids and specific membrane proteins, as well as the involvement of G protein and corresponding downstream signaling, have led to identification of physiologically relevant GPCRs as steroid extranuclear receptors. Examples include G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) for estrogen, membrane progestin receptor for progesterone, G protein-coupled receptor family C group 6 member A (GPRC6A) and zinc transporter member 9 (ZIP9) for androgen, and trace amine associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) for thyroid hormone. These receptor-mediated biological effects have been extended to reproductive development, cardiovascular function, neuroendocrinology and cancer pathophysiology. However, although great progress have been achieved, there are still important questions that need to be answered, including the identities of GPCRs responsible for the remaining steroids (e.g., glucocorticoid), the structural basis of steroids and GPCRs' interaction and the integration of extranuclear and nuclear signaling to the final physiological function. Here, we reviewed the several significant developments in this field and highlighted a hypothesis that attempts to explain the general interaction between steroids and GPCRs. PMID:25257522

  8. G-protein mediates voltage regulation of agonist binding to muscarinic receptors: effects on receptor-Na/sup +/ channel interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen-Armon, M.; Garty, H.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1988-01-12

    The authors previous experiments in membranes prepared from rat heart and brain led them to suggest that the binding of agonist to the muscarinic receptors and to the Na/sup +/ channels is a coupled event mediated by guanine nucleotide binding protein(s) (G-protein(s)). These in vitro findings prompted us to employ synaptoneurosomes from brain stem tissue to examine (i) the binding properties of (/sup 3/H) acetylcholine at resting potential and under depolarization conditions in the absence and presence of pertussis toxin; (ii) the binding of (/sup 3/H)batrachotoxin to Na/sup +/ channel(s) in the presence of the muscarinic agonists; and (iii) muscarinically induced /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake in the presence and absence of tetrodotoxin, which blocks Na/sup +/ channels. The findings indicate that agonist binding to muscarinic receptors is voltage dependent, that this process is mediated by G-protein(s), and that muscarinic agonists induce opening of Na/sup +/channels. The latter process persists even after pertussis toxin treatment, indicating that it is not likely to be mediated by pertussis toxin sensitive G-protein(s). The system with its three interacting components-receptor, G-protein, and Na/sup +/ channel-is such that at resting potential the muscarinic receptor induces opening of Na/sup +/ channels; this property may provide a possible physiological mechanism for the depolarization stimulus necessary for autoexcitation or repetitive firing in heart or brain tissues.

  9. In silico modelling of prostacyclin and other lipid mediators to nuclear receptors reveal novel thyroid hormone receptor antagonist properties.

    PubMed

    Perez Diaz, Noelia; Zloh, Mire; Patel, Pryank; Mackenzie, Louise S

    2016-01-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2) is a key mediator involved in cardiovascular homeostasis, acting predominantly on two receptor types; cell surface IP receptor and cytosolic peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) β/δ. Having a very short half-life, direct methods to determine its long term effects on cells is difficult, and little is known of its interactions with nuclear receptors. Here we used computational chemistry methods to investigate the potential for PGI2, beraprost (IP receptor agonist), and GW0742 (PPARβ/δ agonist), to bind to nuclear receptors, confirmed with pharmacological methods. In silico screening predicted that PGI2, beraprost, and GW0742 have the potential to bind to different nuclear receptors, in particular thyroid hormone β receptor (TRβ) and thyroid hormone α receptor (TRα). Docking analysis predicts a binding profile to residues thought to have allosteric control on the TR ligand binding site. Luciferase reporter assays confirmed that beraprost and GW0742 display TRβ and TRα antagonistic properties; beraprost IC50 6.3×10(-5)mol/L and GW0742 IC50 4.9×10(-6)mol/L. Changes to triiodothyronine (T3) induced vasodilation of rat mesenteric arteries measured on the wire myograph were measured in the presence of the TR antagonist MLS000389544 (10(-5)mol/L), beraprost (10(-5)mol/L) and GW0742 (10(-5)mol/L); all significantly inhibited T3 induced vasodilation compared to controls. We have shown that both beraprost and GW0742 exhibit TRβ and TRα antagonist behaviour, and suggests that PGI2 has the ability to affect the long term function of cells through binding to and inactivating thyroid hormone receptors. PMID:26686607

  10. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1-induced CCR2B receptor desensitization mediated by the G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2

    PubMed Central

    Aragay, A. M.; Mellado, M.; Frade, J. M. R.; Martin, A. M.; Jimenez-Sainz, M. C.; Martinez-A, C.; Mayor, F.

    1998-01-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) is a member of the chemokine cytokine family, whose physiological function is mediated by binding to the CCR2 and CCR4 receptors, which are members of the G protein-coupled receptor family. MCP-1 plays a critical role in both activation and migration of leukocytes. Rapid chemokine receptor desensitization is very likely essential for accurate chemotaxis. In this report, we show that MCP-1 binding to the CCR2 receptor in Mono Mac 1 cells promotes the rapid desensitization of MCP-1-induced calcium flux responses. This desensitization correlates with the Ser/Thr phosphorylation of the receptor and with the transient translocation of the G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2, also called β-adrenergic kinase 1 or βARK1) to the membrane. We also demonstrate that GRK2 and the uncoupling protein β-arrestin associate with the receptor, forming a macromolecular complex shortly after MCP-1 binding. Calcium flux responses to MCP-1 in HEK293 cells expressing the CCR2B receptor were also markedly reduced upon cotransfection with GRK2 or the homologous kinase GRK3. Nevertheless, expression of the GRK2 dominant-negative mutant βARK-K220R did not affect the initial calcium response, but favored receptor response to a subsequent challenge by agonists. The modulation of the CCR2B receptor by GRK2 suggests an important role for this kinase in the regulation of monocyte and lymphocyte response to chemokines. PMID:9501202

  11. EphB3 receptors function as dependence receptors to mediate oligodendrocyte cell death following contusive spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Tsenkina, Y; Ricard, J; Runko, E; Quiala- Acosta, M M; Mier, J; Liebl, D J

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that EphB3 receptors mediate oligodendrocyte (OL) cell death in the injured spinal cord through dependence receptor mechanism. OLs in the adult spinal cord express EphB3 as well as other members of the Eph receptor family. Spinal cord injury (SCI) is associated with tissue damage, cellular loss and disturbances in EphB3-ephrinB3 protein balance acutely (days) after the initial impact creating an environment for a dependence receptor-mediated cell death to occur. Genetic ablation of EphB3 promotes OL survival associated with increased expression of myelin basic protein and improved locomotor function in mice after SCI. Moreover, administration of its ephrinB3 ligand to the spinal cord after injury also promotes OL survival. Our in vivo findings are supported by in vitro studies showing that ephrinB3 administration promotes the survival of both oligodendroglial progenitor cells and mature OLs cultured under pro-apoptotic conditions. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates a novel dependence receptor role of EphB3 in OL cell death after SCI, and supports further development of ephrinB3-based therapies to promote recovery. PMID:26469970

  12. The Ionotropic Receptors IR21a and IR25a mediate cool sensing in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Lina; Klein, Mason; Svec, Kathryn V; Budelli, Gonzalo; Chang, Elaine C; Ferrer, Anggie J; Benton, Richard; Samuel, Aravinthan DT; Garrity, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Animals rely on highly sensitive thermoreceptors to seek out optimal temperatures, but the molecular mechanisms of thermosensing are not well understood. The Dorsal Organ Cool Cells (DOCCs) of the Drosophila larva are a set of exceptionally thermosensitive neurons critical for larval cool avoidance. Here, we show that DOCC cool-sensing is mediated by Ionotropic Receptors (IRs), a family of sensory receptors widely studied in invertebrate chemical sensing. We find that two IRs, IR21a and IR25a, are required to mediate DOCC responses to cooling and are required for cool avoidance behavior. Furthermore, we find that ectopic expression of IR21a can confer cool-responsiveness in an Ir25a-dependent manner, suggesting an instructive role for IR21a in thermosensing. Together, these data show that IR family receptors can function together to mediate thermosensation of exquisite sensitivity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13254.001 PMID:27126188

  13. Mineralocorticoid receptor mediated liposomal delivery system for targeted induction of apoptosis in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Priyanka; Banerjee, Rajkumar; Narayan, Kumar Pranav

    2016-02-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) are nuclear hormone receptors that are ubiquitously present in all cell types and are known to mediate distinct physiological functions like regulating Na(+) and K(+) balance and water excretion. MRs are linked to cell proliferation and can be exploited for the targeted control of cell mass in cancer. The present study is aimed towards extending the concept of using MR ligand spironolactone for selective delivery of genes in cancer cells. The lipoplex (SP) has shown MR mediated targeted transfections as indicated by receptor down-regulation studies using MR antagonists and siRNA. SP-targeted delivery of genes resulted in apoptosis in cell-specific manner while free drug was found to be cytotoxic irrespective of the cancerous or non-cancerous nature. In conclusion, this study presents MR as a target for efficiently delivering anticancer genes and thereby treating cancer through MR-mediated pathway. PMID:26620075

  14. The Ionotropic Receptors IR21a and IR25a mediate cool sensing in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ni, Lina; Klein, Mason; Svec, Kathryn V; Budelli, Gonzalo; Chang, Elaine C; Ferrer, Anggie J; Benton, Richard; Samuel, Aravinthan Dt; Garrity, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Animals rely on highly sensitive thermoreceptors to seek out optimal temperatures, but the molecular mechanisms of thermosensing are not well understood. The Dorsal Organ Cool Cells (DOCCs) of the Drosophila larva are a set of exceptionally thermosensitive neurons critical for larval cool avoidance. Here, we show that DOCC cool-sensing is mediated by Ionotropic Receptors (IRs), a family of sensory receptors widely studied in invertebrate chemical sensing. We find that two IRs, IR21a and IR25a, are required to mediate DOCC responses to cooling and are required for cool avoidance behavior. Furthermore, we find that ectopic expression of IR21a can confer cool-responsiveness in an Ir25a-dependent manner, suggesting an instructive role for IR21a in thermosensing. Together, these data show that IR family receptors can function together to mediate thermosensation of exquisite sensitivity. PMID:27126188

  15. Involvement of 5-HT₃ and 5-HT₄ receptors in the regulation of circadian clock gene expression in mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Natsumi; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Okada, Kazuya; Aoki, Kazuyuki; Imanishi, Takuma; Yoshida, Daisuke; Ishikawa, Ryosuke; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2014-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that 5-HT receptors play a critical role in the expression of clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the main circadian oscillator in hamsters. The contributions of 5-HT-receptor subtypes in the intestine, where they are expressed at high concentrations, are however not yet clarified. The 5-HT synthesis inhibitor, p-chlorophenylalanine, attenuated the daily rhythm of Per1 and Per2 gene expression in the intestine. Injection of 5-HT and agonists of the 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptors increased Per1/Per2 expression and decreased Bmal1 expression in a dose-dependent manner. Although treatment with antagonists of 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 alone did not affect clock gene expression, co-injection of these antagonists with 5-HT blocked the 5-HT-induced changes in clock gene expression. Increased tissue levels of 5-HT due to treatment with the antidepressants clomipramine and fluvoxamine did not affect clock gene expression. The present results suggest that the 5-HT system in the small intestine may play a critical role in regulating circadian rhythms through 5-HT3/5-HT4-receptor activation. PMID:24492464

  16. G-1-activated membrane estrogen receptors mediate increased contractility of the human myometrium.

    PubMed

    Maiti, K; Paul, J W; Read, M; Chan, E C; Riley, S C; Nahar, P; Smith, R

    2011-06-01

    Estrogens are key mediators of increased uterine contractility at labor. We sought to determine whether membrane-associated estrogen receptors, such as the recently described seven-transmembrane receptor G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30), mediated some of this effect. Using human myometrium obtained at term cesarean section before or after the onset of labor, we demonstrated the presence of GPR30 mRNA and protein using quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. GPR30 receptor was localized to the cell membrane and often colocalized with calveolin-1. Using the specific estrogen membrane receptor agonist G-1 and myometrial explants, we showed that membrane receptor activation led to phosphorylation of MAPK and the actin-modifying small heat shock protein 27. Using myometrial strips incubated with G-1 or vehicle we demonstrated that estrogen membrane receptor activation increased the myometrial contractile response to oxytocin. These data suggest that activation of the plasma membrane estrogen receptor GPR30 likely participates in the physiology of the human myometrium during pregnancy and identifies it as a potential target to modify uterine activity. PMID:21427217

  17. Dimerization mediated through a leucine zipper activates the oncogenic potential of the met receptor tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, G A; Park, M

    1993-01-01

    Oncogenic activation of the met (hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor) receptor tyrosine kinase involves a genomic rearrangement that generates a hybrid protein containing tpr-encoded sequences at its amino terminus fused directly to the met-encoded receptor kinase domain. Deletion of Tpr sequences abolishes the transforming ability of this protein, implicating this region in oncogenic activation. We demonstrate, by site-directed mutagenesis and coimmunoprecipitation experiments, that a leucine zipper motif within Tpr mediates dimerization of the tpr-met product and is essential for the transforming activity of the met oncogene. By analogy with ligand-stimulated activation of receptor tyrosine kinases, we propose that constitutive dimerization mediated by a leucine zipper motif within Tpr is responsible for oncogenic activation of the Met kinase. The possibility that this mechanism of activation represents a paradigm for a class of receptor tyrosine kinase oncogenes activated by DNA rearrangement is discussed. Images PMID:8413267

  18. Nuclear Receptor Cofactors in PPARγ-Mediated Adipogenesis and Adipocyte Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Emily; Kuhn, Peter; Xu, Wei

    2007-01-01

    Transcriptional cofactors are integral to the proper function and regulation of nuclear receptors. Members of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) family of nuclear receptors are involved in the regulation of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. They modulate gene transcription in response to a wide variety of ligands, a process that is mediated by transcriptional coactivators and corepressors. The mechanisms by which these cofactors mediate transcriptional regulation of nuclear receptor function are still being elucidated. The rapidly increasing array of cofactors has brought into focus the need for a clear understanding of how these cofactors interact in ligand- and cell-specific manners. This review highlights the differential effects of the assorted cofactors regulating the transcriptional action of PPARγ and summarizes the recent advances in understanding the physiological functions of corepressors and coactivators. PMID:17389765

  19. Regulation of the LPA2 Receptor Signaling through the Carboxyl-Terminal Tail-Mediated Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fang-Tsyr; Lai, Yun-Ju

    2008-01-01

    While it is well known that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) mediates diverse physiological and pathophysiological responses through the activation of G protein-coupled LPA receptors, the specificity and molecular mechanisms by which different LPA receptors mediate these biological responses remain largely unknown. Recent identification of several PDZ proteins and zinc finger proteins that interact with the carboxyl-terminal tail of the LPA2 receptor provides a considerable progress towards the understanding of the mechanisms how the LPA2 receptor specifically mediates LPA signaling pathways. These findings have led to the proposal that there are at least two distinct protein interaction motifs present in the carboxyl terminus of the LPA2 receptor. Together, these data provide a new concept that the efficiency and specificity of the LPA2 receptor-mediated signal transduction can be achieved through the cross-regulation between the classical G protein-activated signaling cascades and the interacting partner-mediated signaling pathways. PMID:18501721

  20. Nucleus accumbens μ-opioid receptors mediate social reward.

    PubMed

    Trezza, Viviana; Damsteegt, Ruth; Achterberg, E J Marijke; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J

    2011-04-27

    Positive social interactions are essential for emotional well-being and proper behavioral development of young individuals. Here, we studied the neural underpinnings of social reward by investigating the involvement of opioid neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in social play behavior, a highly rewarding social interaction in adolescent rats. Intra-NAc infusion of morphine (0.05-0.1 μg) increased pinning and pouncing, characteristic elements of social play behavior in rats, and blockade of NAc opioid receptors with naloxone (0.5 μg) prevented the play-enhancing effects of systemic morphine (1 mg/kg, s.c.) administration. Thus, stimulation of opioid receptors in the NAc was necessary and sufficient for morphine to increase social play. Intra-NAc treatment with the selective μ-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala(2),N-MePhe(4),Gly(5)-ol]enkephalin (DAMGO) (0.1-10 ng) and the μ-opioid receptor antagonist Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH(2) (CTAP) (0.3-3 μg) increased and decreased social play, respectively. The δ-opioid receptor agonist DPDPE ([D-Pen(2),D-Pen(5)]-enkephalin) (0.3-3 μg) had no effects, whereas the κ-opioid receptor agonist U69593 (N-methyl-2-phenyl-N-[(5R,7S,8S)-7-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)-1-oxaspiro[4.5]dec-8-yl]acetamide) (0.01-1 μg) decreased social play. Intra-NAc treatment with β-endorphin (0.01-1 μg) increased social play, but met-enkephalin (0.1-5 μg) and the enkephalinase inhibitor thiorphan (0.1-1 μg) were ineffective. DAMGO (0.1-10 ng) increased social play after infusion into both the shell and core subregions of the NAc. Last, intra-NAc infusion of CTAP (3 μg) prevented the development of social play-induced conditioned place preference. These findings identify NAc μ-opioid receptor stimulation as an important neural mechanism for the attribution of positive value to social interactions in adolescent rats. Altered NAc μ-opioid receptor function may underlie social impairments in psychiatric disorders such as autism

  1. Receptor mediated mineralocorticoid action in alga cell mutants.

    PubMed

    Mirshahi, M; Mirshahi, A; Nato, A; Agarwal, M K

    1992-12-21

    The multiplication of Chlamydomonas cells can be arrested by the spirolactone derivative RU 26752 and this is fully reversible by the natural hormone aldosterone. Continuous growth in the presence of RU 26752 led to the isolation of a population subsequently resistant to the action of mineralocortoid analogues, due possibly to the selection of mutant cells. Immunophotochemical evidence is provided for a 52 kDa protein that possesses functional steroid and DNA binding domains. Alga cells therefore appear to respond to steroid hormones in a manner similar to the mammalian systems, possibly via a receptor that may represent a pygmy ancestor of the latter day steroid receptor superfamily. PMID:1334844

  2. Testin, a novel binding partner of the calcium-sensing receptor, enhances receptor-mediated Rho-kinase signalling

    SciTech Connect

    Magno, Aaron L.; Ingley, Evan; Brown, Suzanne J.; Conigrave, Arthur D.; Ratajczak, Thomas; Ward, Bryan K.

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} A yeast two-hybrid screen revealed testin bound to the calcium-sensing receptor. {yields} The second zinc finger of LIM domain 1 of testin is critical for interaction. {yields} Testin bound to a region of the receptor tail important for cell signalling. {yields} Testin and receptor interaction was confirmed in mammalian (HEK293) cells. {yields} Overexpression of testin enhanced receptor-mediated Rho signalling in HEK293 cells. -- Abstract: The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) plays an integral role in calcium homeostasis and the regulation of other cellular functions including cell proliferation and cytoskeletal organisation. The multifunctional nature of the CaR is manifested through ligand-dependent stimulation of different signalling pathways that are also regulated by partner binding proteins. Following a yeast two-hybrid library screen using the intracellular tail of the CaR as bait, we identified several novel binding partners including the focal adhesion protein, testin. Testin has not previously been shown to interact with cell surface receptors. The sites of interaction between the CaR and testin were mapped to the membrane proximal region of the receptor tail and the second zinc-finger of LIM domain 1 of testin, the integrity of which was found to be critical for the CaR-testin interaction. The CaR-testin association was confirmed in HEK293 cells by coimmunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy studies. Ectopic expression of testin in HEK293 cells stably expressing the CaR enhanced CaR-stimulated Rho activity but had no effect on CaR-stimulated ERK signalling. These results suggest an interplay between the CaR and testin in the regulation of CaR-mediated Rho signalling with possible effects on the cytoskeleton.

  3. PSD-93 MEDIATES TYROSINE-PHOSPHORYLATION OF THE N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yuko; Tao, Yuan-Xiang; Su, Qingning; Johns, Roger A

    2009-01-01

    Src family protein kinases (SFKs)-mediated tyrosine-phosphorylation regulates N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor synaptic function. Some members of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family of proteins bind to both SFKs and NMDA receptors, but it is unclear whether the MAGUK family of proteins is required for SFKs-mediated tyrosine-phosphorylation of the NMDA receptors. Here, we showed by co-immunoprecipitation that PSD-93, a member of the MAGUK family of proteins, interacts with the NMDA receptor subunits NR2A and NR2B as well as with Fyn, a member of the SFKs, in mouse cerebral cortex. Using a biochemical fractionation approach to isolate subcellular compartments revealed that the expression of Fyn, but not of other members of the SFKs (Lyn, Src, and Yes), was significantly decreased in synaptosomal membrane fractions derived from the cerebral cortex of PSD-93 knockout mice. Interestingly, we found that PSD-93 disruption causes reduction of tyrosine-phosphorylated NR2A and NR2B in the same fraction. Moreover, PSD-93 deletion markedly blocked the SFKs-mediated increase in tyrosine-phosphorylated NR2A and NR2B through the protein kinase C pathway after induction with 4β-PMA in cultured cortical neurons. Our findings indicate that PSD-93 appears to mediate tyrosine-phosphorylation of the NMDA receptors and synaptic localization of Fyn. PMID:18423999

  4. Glucocorticoid receptor-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase in skeletal muscle cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, Stephen R.; Thomas, John W.; Banner, Carl; Vitkovic, Ljubisa; Konagaya, Masaaki

    1987-01-01

    The regulation by glucocorticoids of glutamine synthetase in L6 muscle cells in culture is studied. Glutamine synthetase activity was strikingly enhanced by dexamethasone. The dexamethasone-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase activity was blocked by RU38486, a glucocorticoid antagonist, indicating the involvement of intracellular glucocorticoid receptors in the induction process. RU38486 alone was without effect. Northern blot analysis revealed that dexamethasone-mediated enhancement of glutamine synthetase activity involves increased levels of glutamine synthetase mRNA. Glucocorticoids regulate the expression of glutamine synthetase mRNA in cultured muscle cells via interaction with intracellular receptors. Such regulation may be relevant to control of glutamine production by muscle.

  5. Studies of the cAMP mediated aggregation in Dictyostelium discoideum: receptor mediated activation of the adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Theibert, W.E.A.B.

    1985-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum, a eukaryotic amoeba of the cellular slime mold family, provides an interesting paradigm in developmental biology. During development, hundreds of thousands of cells aggregate to form a multicellular aggregate. Aggregation is mediated by chemotaxis and chemical signaling. Waves of adenosine 3'-5' cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) propagate through the monolayer and provide transient gradients for chemotaxis. The author has used a reversible inhibitor of the cAMP signaling response to demonstrate that adaptation to cAMP is independent of the activation of the adenylate cyclase and therefore is not caused by the rise in intracellular cAMP. Next, it is shown that adenosine inhibits the cAMP signaling response. Inhibition is rapid, reversible, and depends on the cAMP stimulus concentration. Then the specificity of the cAMP receptors which mediates signaling is determined and compared with the receptors which mediate chemotaxis, the cGMP response, and cAMP binding antagonism. The cAMP surface receptor has been identified by photoaffinity labeling intact cells with (/sup 32/P)-8-N/sub 3/-cAMP using an ammonium sulfate binding stabilization technique. The photoactivated ligand specifically labels a polypeptide, localized to the membrane fraction, which migrates as a closely spaced doublet on SDS Page.

  6. TRPV1 receptors mediate particulate matter-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Agopyan, N; Head, J; Yu, S; Simon, S A

    2004-03-01

    Exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) is a world-wide health problem mainly because it produces adverse cardiovascular and respiratory effects that frequently result in morbidity. Despite many years of epidemiological and basic research, the mechanisms underlying PM toxicity remain largely unknown. To understand some of these mechanisms, we measured PM-induced apoptosis and necrosis in normal human airway epithelial cells and sensory neurons from both wild-type mice and mice lacking TRPV1 receptors using Alexa Fluor 488-conjugated annexin V and propidium iodide labeling, respectively. Exposure of environmental PMs containing residual oil fly ash and ash from Mount St. Helens was found to induce apoptosis, but not necrosis, as a consequence of sustained calcium influx through TRPV1 receptors. Apoptosis was completely prevented by inhibiting TRPV1 receptors with capsazepine or by removing extracellular calcium or in sensory neurons from TRPV1(-/-) mice. Binding of either one of the PMs to the cell membrane induced a capsazepine-sensitive increase in cAMP. PM-induced apoptosis was augmented upon the inhibition of PKA. PKA inhibition on its own also induced apoptosis, thereby suggesting that this pathway may be endogenously protective against apoptosis. In summary, it was found that inhibiting TRPV1 receptors prevents PM-induced apoptosis, thereby providing a potential mechanism to reduce their toxicity. PMID:14633515

  7. Beta-receptor-mediated increase in venous return in humans.

    PubMed

    Leenen, F H; Reeves, R A

    1987-08-01

    To assess the involvement of beta 1- and beta 2-receptors in the regulation of venous return in humans, changes in left ventricular end-diastolic (LVED) dimension were determined during beta-receptor stimulation either by exogenous catecholamines or by increased endogenous sympathetic activity after hydralazine, after placebo and during nonselective versus beta 1-selective blockade. Taking changes in heart rate and LV emptying into account, the three beta-agonists (isoproterenol, terbutaline, and epinephrine) as well as hydralazine increased venous return as inferred from LVED dimension. After hydralazine, nonselective and beta 1-selective blockade were equally effective in blunting the increases in venous return, in heart rate, and in positive inotropic response. Beta 1-Selective blockade did not affect the increase in heart rate caused by epinephrine and partially inhibited the positive inotropic effect and the increase in venous return. Nonselective blockade not only blocked the increase in venous return owing to epinephrine but actually led to a decrease, as evidenced by a decrease in LVED dimension despite the marked bradycardia and high afterload with this combination. The present findings in healthy humans indicate that stimulation of both beta 1- and beta 2-receptors increases venous return, heart rate, and myocardial contractility. Beta 1-Receptors appear to predominate in the response to neuronal sympathetic activity. PMID:2825941

  8. Heterogeneity and probabilistic binding contributions to receptor-mediated cell detachment kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Saterbak, A; Kuo, S C; Lauffenburger, D A

    1993-01-01

    Biospecific cell adhesion is mediated by receptor-ligand bonds. Early theoretical work presented a deterministic analysis of receptor-mediated cell attachment and detachment for a homogeneous cell population. However, initial comparison of a deterministic framework to experimental detachment profiles of model "cells" (antibody-coated latex beads) did not show qualitative or quantitative agreement (Cozens-Roberts, C., D.A. Lauffenburger, and J.A. Quinn. 1990. Biophys. J. 58:857-872). Hence, we determine the contributions of population heterogeneity and probabilistic binding to the detachment behavior of this experimental system which was designed to minimize experimental and theoretical complications. This work also corrects an error in the numerical solution of the probabilistic model of receptor-mediated cell attachment and detachment developed previously (Cozens-Roberts, C., D.A. Lauffenburger, and J.A. Quinn. 1990. Biophys J. 58:841-856). Measurement of the population distribution of the number of receptors per bead has enabled us to explicitly consider the effect of receptor number heterogeneity within the cell-surface contact area. A deterministic framework that incorporates receptor number heterogeneity qualitatively and quantitatively accounts in large part for the model cell detachment data. Using measured and estimated parameter values for the model cell system, we estimate that about 90% of the observed kinetic detachment behavior originates from heterogeneity effects, while about 10% is due to probabilistic binding effects. In general, these relative contributions may differ for other systems. PMID:8396454

  9. Comparison of lentiviral and sleeping beauty mediated αβ T cell receptor gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Field, Anne-Christine; Vink, Conrad; Gabriel, Richard; Al-Subki, Roua; Schmidt, Manfred; Goulden, Nicholas; Stauss, Hans; Thrasher, Adrian; Morris, Emma; Qasim, Waseem

    2013-01-01

    Transfer of tumour antigen-specific receptors to T cells requires efficient delivery and integration of transgenes, and currently most clinical studies are using gamma retroviral or lentiviral systems. Whilst important proof-of-principle data has been generated for both chimeric antigen receptors and αβ T cell receptors, the current platforms are costly, time-consuming and relatively inflexible. Alternative, more cost-effective, Sleeping Beauty transposon-based plasmid systems could offer a pathway to accelerated clinical testing of a more diverse repertoire of recombinant high affinity T cell receptors. Nucleofection of hyperactive SB100X transposase-mediated stable transposition of an optimised murine-human chimeric T cell receptor specific for Wilm's tumour antigen from a Sleeping Beauty transposon plasmid. Whilst transfer efficiency was lower than that mediated by lentiviral transduction, cells could be readily enriched and expanded, and mediated effective target cells lysis in vitro and in vivo. Integration sites of transposed TCR genes in primary T cells were almost randomly distributed, contrasting the predilection of lentiviral vectors for transcriptionally active sites. The results support exploitation of the Sleeping Beauty plasmid based system as a flexible and adaptable platform for accelerated, early-phase assessment of T cell receptor gene therapies. PMID:23840834

  10. Opioid receptors mediate direct predictive fear learning: Evidence from one-trial blocking

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Sindy; McNally, Gavan P.

    2007-01-01

    Pavlovian fear learning depends on predictive error, so that fear learning occurs when the actual outcome of a conditioning trial exceeds the expected outcome. Previous research has shown that opioid receptors, including μ-opioid receptors in the ventrolateral quadrant of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (vlPAG), mediate such predictive fear learning. Four experiments reported here used a within-subject one-trial blocking design to study whether opioid receptors mediate a direct or indirect action of predictive error on Pavlovian association formation. In Stage I, rats were trained to fear conditioned stimulus (CS) A by pairing it with shock. In Stage II, CSA and CSB were co-presented once and co-terminated with shock. Two novel stimuli, CSC and CSD, were also co-presented once and co-terminated with shock in Stage II. The results showed one-trial blocking of fear learning (Experiment 1) as well as one-trial unblocking of fear learning when Stage II training employed a higher intensity footshock than was used in Stage I (Experiment 2). Systemic administrations of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (Experiment 3) or intra-vlPAG administrations of the selective μ-opioid receptor antagonist CTAP (Experiment 4) prior to Stage II training prevented one-trial blocking. These results show that opioid receptors mediate the direct actions of predictive error on Pavlovian association formation. PMID:17404385

  11. Comparison of Lentiviral and Sleeping Beauty Mediated αβ T Cell Receptor Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Field, Anne-Christine; Vink, Conrad; Gabriel, Richard; Al-Subki, Roua; Schmidt, Manfred; Goulden, Nicholas; Stauss, Hans; Thrasher, Adrian; Morris, Emma; Qasim, Waseem

    2013-01-01

    Transfer of tumour antigen-specific receptors to T cells requires efficient delivery and integration of transgenes, and currently most clinical studies are using gamma retroviral or lentiviral systems. Whilst important proof-of-principle data has been generated for both chimeric antigen receptors and αβ T cell receptors, the current platforms are costly, time-consuming and relatively inflexible. Alternative, more cost-effective, Sleeping Beauty transposon-based plasmid systems could offer a pathway to accelerated clinical testing of a more diverse repertoire of recombinant high affinity T cell receptors. Nucleofection of hyperactive SB100X transposase-mediated stable transposition of an optimised murine-human chimeric T cell receptor specific for Wilm’s tumour antigen from a Sleeping Beauty transposon plasmid. Whilst transfer efficiency was lower than that mediated by lentiviral transduction, cells could be readily enriched and expanded, and mediated effective target cells lysis in vitro and in vivo. Integration sites of transposed TCR genes in primary T cells were almost randomly distributed, contrasting the predilection of lentiviral vectors for transcriptionally active sites. The results support exploitation of the Sleeping Beauty plasmid based system as a flexible and adaptable platform for accelerated, early-phase assessment of T cell receptor gene therapies. PMID:23840834

  12. Dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton mediates receptor cross talk: An emerging concept in tuning receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, Pieta K.; Batista, Facundo D.

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence implicates the actin cytoskeleton in the control of receptor signaling. This may be of particular importance in the context of immune receptors, such as the B cell receptor, where dysregulated signaling can result in autoimmunity and malignancy. Here, we discuss the role of the actin cytoskeleton in controlling receptor compartmentalization, dynamics, and clustering as a means to regulate receptor signaling through controlling the interactions with protein partners. We propose that the actin cytoskeleton is a point of integration for receptor cross talk through modulation of protein dynamics and clustering. We discuss the implication of this cross talk via the cytoskeleton for both ligand-induced and low-level constitutive (tonic) signaling necessary for immune cell survival. PMID:26833785

  13. Hypothyroidism affects D2 receptor-mediated breathing without altering D2 receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Schlenker, Evelyn H; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Schultz, Harold D

    2014-03-01

    Bromocriptine depressed ventilation in air and D2 receptor expression in the nucleus tractus solitaries (NTS) in male hypothyroid hamsters. Here we postulated that in age-matched hypothyroid female hamsters, the pattern of D2 receptor modulation of breathing and D2 receptor expression would differ from those reported in hypothyroid males. In females hypothyroidism did not affect D2 receptor protein levels in the NTS, carotid bodies or striatum. Bromocriptine, but not carmoxirole (a peripheral D2 receptor agonist), increased oxygen consumption and body temperature in awake air-exposed hypothyroid female hamsters and stimulated their ventilation before and following exposure to hypoxia. Carmoxirole depressed frequency of breathing in euthyroid hamsters prior to, during and following hypoxia exposures and stimulated it in the hypothyroid hamsters following hypoxia. Although hypothyroidism did not affect expression of D2 receptors, it influenced central D2 modulation of breathing in a disparate manner relative to euthyroid hamsters. PMID:24434437

  14. Knockdown of microplitis mediator odorant receptor involved in the sensitive detection of two chemicals.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke-Ming; Ren, Li-Yan; Zhang, Yong-Jun; Wu, Kong-Ming; Guo, Yu-Yuan

    2012-03-01

    Odorant receptors are thought to play critical roles in the perception of chemosensory stimuli by insects. The primary method to address the functions of odorant receptors in insects is to use in vitro binding assays between the receptors and potential chemical stimuli. We injected MmedOrco dsRNA into the abdominal cavity of a braconid wasp, Microplitis mediator, and assayed for expression of this gene 72 h after treatment (RNAi). Quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated that the level of mRNA expression in MmedOrco dsRNA-treated M. mediator was significantly reduced (>90%) when compared with water-treated controls. Furthermore, electroantennogram (EAG) responses of M. mediator to two chemical attractants, nonanal and farnesene, were also reduced significantly (~70%) in RNAi-treated M. mediator when compared to controls. RNAi-treated M. mediator also responded by walking/flying at a lower rate to both chemicals when compared with controls in a Y-tube olfactometer bioassay, which provides direct evidence that MmedOrco plays an important role in perception of nonanal and farnesene in M. mediator. PMID:22402893

  15. Thyroid hormone receptor can modulate retinoic acid-mediated axis formation in frog embryogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Banker, D E; Eisenman, R N

    1993-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptor acts as a hormone-dependent transcriptional transactivator and as a transcriptional repressor in the absence of thyroid hormone. Specifically, thyroid hormone receptor can repress retinoic acid-induced gene expression through interactions with retinoic acid receptor. (Retinoic acid is a potent teratogen in the frog Xenopus laevis, acting at early embryonic stages to interfere with the formation of anterior structures. Endogenous retinoic acid is thought to act in normal anterior-posterior axis formation.) We have previously shown that thyroid hormone receptor RNA (alpha isotype) is expressed and polysome-associated during Xenopus embryogenesis preceding thyroid gland maturation and endogenous thyroid hormone production (D. E. Banker, J. Bigler, and R. N. Eisenman, Mol. Cell. Biol. 11:5079-5089, 1991). To determine whether thyroid hormone receptor might influence the effects of retinoic acid in early frog development, we have examined the results of ectopic thyroid hormone receptor expression on retinoic acid teratogenesis. We demonstrate that microinjections of full-length thyroid hormone receptor RNA protect injected embryos from retinoic acid teratogenesis. DNA binding is apparently essential to this protective function, as truncated thyroid hormone receptors, lacking DNA-binding domains but including hormone-binding and dimerization domains, do not protect from retinoic acid. We have shown that microinjections of these dominant-interfering thyroid hormone receptors, as well as anti-thyroid hormone receptor antibodies, increase retinoic acid teratogenesis in injected embryos, presumably by inactivating endogenous thyroid hormone receptor. This finding suggests that endogenous thyroid hormone receptors may act to limit retinoic acid sensitivity. On the other hand, after thyroid hormone treatment, ectopic thyroid hormone receptor mediates teratogenesis that is indistinguishable from the dorsoanterior deficiencies produced in retinoic acid

  16. Receptors, Mediators, and Mechanisms Involved in Bacterial Sepsis and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Van Amersfoort, Edwin S.; Van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Kuiper, Johan

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial sepsis and septic shock result from the overproduction of inflammatory mediators as a consequence of the interaction of the immune system with bacteria and bacterial wall constituents in the body. Bacterial cell wall constituents such as lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycans, and lipoteichoic acid are particularly responsible for the deleterious effects of bacteria. These constituents interact in the body with a large number of proteins and receptors, and this interaction determines the eventual inflammatory effect of the compounds. Within the circulation bacterial constituents interact with proteins such as plasma lipoproteins and lipopolysaccharide binding protein. The interaction of the bacterial constituents with receptors on the surface of mononuclear cells is mainly responsible for the induction of proinflammatory mediators by the bacterial constituents. The role of individual receptors such as the toll-like receptors and CD14 in the induction of proinflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules is discussed in detail. In addition, the roles of a number of other receptors that bind bacterial compounds such as scavenger receptors and their modulating role in inflammation are described. Finally, the therapies for the treatment of bacterial sepsis and septic shock are discussed in relation to the action of the aforementioned receptors and proteins. PMID:12857774

  17. Monitoring ligand-mediated internalization of G protein-coupled receptor as a novel pharmacological approach.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Shin'ichi; Setoguchi, Shingo; Hirasawa, Akira; Tsujimoto, Gozoh

    2006-12-01

    Agonist activation of a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) results in the redistribution of the receptor protein away from the cell surface into internal cellular compartments through a process of endocytosis known as internalization. Visualization of receptor internalization has become experimentally practicable by using fluorescent reagents such as green fluorescent protein (GFP). In this study, we examined whether the ligand-mediated internalization of a GPCR can be exploited for pharmacological evaluations. We acquired fluorescent images of cells expressing GFP-labeled GPCRs and evaluated the ligand-mediated internalization quantitatively by image processing. Using beta2-adrenoceptor and vasopressin V1a receptor as model GPCRs that couple to Gs and Gq, respectively, we first examined whether these GFP-tagged GPCRs exhibited appropriate pharmacology. The rank order of receptor internalization potency for a variety of agonists and antagonists specific to each receptor corresponded well with that previously observed in ligand binding studies. In addition to chemical ligand-induced internalization, this cell-based fluorescence imaging system successfully monitored the internalization of the proton-sensing GPCR TDAG8, and that of the free fatty acid-sensitive GPCR GPR120. The results show that monitoring receptor internalization can be a useful approach for pharmacological characterization of GPCRs and in fishing for ligands of orphan GPCRs. PMID:16978657

  18. Hypotensive effects of ghrelin receptor agonists mediated through a novel receptor

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, Brid; Kosari, Samin; Pustovit, Ruslan V; Sartor, Daniela M; Ferens, Dorota; Ban, Kung; Baell, Jonathan; Nguyen, Trung V; Rivera, Leni R; Brock, James A; Furness, John B

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Some agonists of ghrelin receptors cause rapid decreases in BP. The mechanisms by which they cause hypotension and the pharmacology of the receptors are unknown. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effects of ligands of ghrelin receptors were investigated in rats in vivo, on isolated blood vessels and on cells transfected with the only molecularly defined ghrelin receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHSR1a). KEY RESULTS Three agonists of GHSR1a receptors, ulimorelin, capromorelin and CP464709, caused a rapid decrease in BP in the anaesthetized rat. The effect was not reduced by either of two GHSR1a antagonists, JMV2959 or YIL781, at doses that blocked effects on colorectal motility, in vivo. The rapid hypotension was not mimicked by ghrelin, unacylated ghrelin or the unacylated ghrelin receptor agonist, AZP531. The early hypotension preceded a decrease in sympathetic nerve activity. Early hypotension was not reduced by hexamethonium or by baroreceptor (sino-aortic) denervation. Ulimorelin also relaxed isolated segments of rat mesenteric artery, and, less potently, relaxed aorta segments. The vascular relaxation was not reduced by JMV2959 or YIL781. Ulimorelin, capromorelin and CP464709 activated GHSR1a in transfected HEK293 cells at nanomolar concentrations. JMV2959 and YIL781 both antagonized effects in these cells, with their pA2 values at the GHSR1a receptor being 6.55 and 7.84. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results indicate a novel vascular receptor or receptors whose activation by ulimorelin, capromorelin and CP464709 lowered BP. This receptor is activated by low MW GHSR1a agonists, but is not activated by ghrelin. PMID:24670149

  19. G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase-mediated Phosphorylation Regulates Post-endocytic Trafficking of the D2 Dopamine Receptor*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Namkung, Yoon; Dipace, Concetta; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Sibley, David R.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the role of G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK)-mediated phosphorylation in agonist-induced desensitization, arrestin association, endocytosis, and intracellular trafficking of the D2 dopamine receptor (DAR). Agonist activation of D2 DARs results in rapid and sustained receptor phosphorylation that is solely mediated by GRKs. A survey of GRKs revealed that only GRK2 or GRK3 promotes D2 DAR phosphorylation. Mutational analyses resulted in the identification of eight serine/threonine residues within the third cytoplasmic loop of the receptor that are phosphorylated by GRK2/3. Simultaneous mutation of these eight residues results in a receptor construct, GRK(-), that is completely devoid of agonist-promoted GRK-mediated receptor phosphorylation. We found that both wild-type (WT) and GRK(-) receptors underwent a similar degree of agonist-induced desensitization as assessed using [35S]GTPγS binding assays. Similarly, both receptor constructs internalized to the same extent in response to agonist treatment. Furthermore, using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assays to directly assess receptor association with arrestin3, we found no differences between the WT and GRK(-) receptors. Thus, phosphorylation is not required for arrestin-receptor association or agonist-induced desensitization or internalization. In contrast, when we examined recycling of the D2 DARs to the cell surface, subsequent to agonist-induced endocytosis, the GRK(-) construct exhibited less recycling in comparison with the WT receptor. This impairment appears to be due to a greater propensity of the GRK(-) receptors to down-regulate once internalized. In contrast, if the receptor is highly phosphorylated, then receptor recycling is promoted. These results reveal a novel role for GRK-mediated phosphorylation in regulating the post-endocytic trafficking of a G protein-coupled receptor. PMID:19332542

  20. Regulation of T cell receptor complex-mediated signaling by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifications.

    PubMed

    Friend, Samantha F; Deason-Towne, Francina; Peterson, Lisa K; Berger, Allison J; Dragone, Leonard L

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational protein modifications are a dynamic method of regulating protein function in response to environmental signals. As with any cellular process, T cell receptor (TCR) complex-mediated signaling is highly regulated, since the strength and duration of TCR-generated signals governs T cell development and activation. While regulation of TCR complex-mediated signaling by phosphorylation has been well studied, regulation by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifiers is still an emerging area of investigation. This review will examine how ubiquitin, E3 ubiquitin ligases, and other ubiquitin-like modifications such as SUMO and NEDD8 regulate TCR complex-mediated signaling. PMID:25628960

  1. Regulation of T cell receptor complex-mediated signaling by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifications

    PubMed Central

    Friend, Samantha F; Deason-Towne, Francina; Peterson, Lisa K; Berger, Allison J; Dragone, Leonard L

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational protein modifications are a dynamic method of regulating protein function in response to environmental signals. As with any cellular process, T cell receptor (TCR) complex-mediated signaling is highly regulated, since the strength and duration of TCR-generated signals governs T cell development and activation. While regulation of TCR complex-mediated signaling by phosphorylation has been well studied, regulation by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifiers is still an emerging area of investigation. This review will examine how ubiquitin, E3 ubiquitin ligases, and other ubiquitin-like modifications such as SUMO and NEDD8 regulate TCR complex-mediated signaling. PMID:25628960

  2. Chronic alcohol remodels prefrontal neurons and disrupts NMDA receptor-mediated fear extinction encoding

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Andrew; Fitzgerald, Paul J.; MacPherson, Kathryn P.; DeBrouse, Lauren; Colacicco, Giovanni; Flynn, Shaun M.; Masneuf, Sophie; Pleil, Kristen E.; Li, Chia; Marcinkiewcz, Catherine A.; Kash, Thomas L.; Gunduz-Cinar, Ozge; Camp, Marguerite

    2012-01-01

    Alcoholism is frequently co-morbid with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) but it is unclear how alcohol impacts neural circuits mediating recovery from trauma. We found that chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) impaired fear extinction and remodeled the dendritic arbor of medial prefrontal cortical (mPFC) neurons in mice. CIE impaired extinction encoding by infralimbic (IL) mPFC neurons in vivo, and functionally downregulated burst-mediating NMDA GluN1 receptors. These findings suggest alcohol may increase risk for trauma-related anxiety disorders by disrupting mPFC-mediated extinction of fear. PMID:22941108

  3. Scavenger receptor-mediated endocytosis by sinusoidal cells in rat bone marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffroy, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Endocytosis of serum albumin by sinusoidal endothelial cells in rat bone marrow was investigated initially at the ultrastructural level with subsequent biochemical investigation of the specificity mediating this event. Bovine serum albumin adsorbed to 20nm colloidal gold particles (AuBSA) was chosen as the electron microscopic probe. Morphological data strongly suggested that a receptor was involved in uptake of AuBSA. Confirmation of receptor involvement in the uptake of AuBSA by marrow sinusoidal endothelial cells was achieved utilizing an in situ isolated hind limb perfusion protocol in conjunction with unlabeled, radiolabeled, and radio-/colloidal gold labeled probes. The major findings of competition and saturation experiments were: (1) endocytosis of AuBSA was mediated by a receptor for modified/treated serum albumin; (2) endocytosis of formaldehyde-treated serum albumin was mediated by a binding site which may be the same or closely related to the site responsible for the uptake of AuBSA; and (3) endocytosis of native untreated albumin was not mediated by receptor and probably represents fluid-phase pinocitosis.

  4. Decreased motility of the lower esophageal sphincter in a rat model of gastroesophageal reflux disease may be mediated by reductions of serotonin and acetylcholine signaling.

    PubMed

    Saegusa, Yayoi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Muto, Shuichi; Oridate, Nobuhiko; Nakagawa, Koji; Sadakane, Chiharu; Nahata, Miwa; Harada, Yumi; Iizuka, Mizuki; Hattori, Tomohisa; Asaka, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    To elucidate the altered function of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), we evaluated the motility proximal to LES using force transducers, contraction and relaxation responses to neurotransmitters in LES strips, and gene expression of neurotransmitter receptors in GERD rats. Force transducers were applied to the proximal LES, and contraction of the LES was monitored during free moving. In addition, LES was isolated from sham-operated and GERD rats to investigate the LES function in an organ bath, and to determine gene expression. The in vivo motility proximal to LES (% motility index) in conscious rats was decreased by atropine treatment and increased by cisapride (5-HT(4) receptor agonist) treatment. Acetylcholine- and serotonin (5-HT)-induced LES contraction and sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxation in LES strips of GERD rats markedly decreased compared to sham-operated rats. The mRNA expressions of 5-HT(4) and muscarinic acetylcholine 3 receptors were significantly reduced in esophageal LES strips of GERD rats compared with sham-operated rats. Intraperitoneal administration of cisapride improves the erosive damage in the esophagus in GERD rats. It is suggested that the reduction of 5-HT-induced contraction in LES strips in GERD rats may be partly due to the decrease in 5-HT(4)-receptor activation. The reduction of LES function may be due to the decrease in neurotransmitters signal transduction, leading to the deterioration of histopathological damage in GERD. PMID:21532161

  5. Delivery of liposomes into cultured KB cells via folate receptor-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, R J; Low, P S

    1994-02-01

    Folic acid was covalently conjugated to 66-nm liposomes via spacers of various lengths in an attempt to target the liposomes to KB cells expressing folate receptors. Spacers of short and intermediate lengths were unable to mediate association of folate-conjugated liposomes with receptor-bearing cells, however, use of a 250 A polyethyleneglycol spacer (PEG, M(r) approximately 3350) permitted avid uptake of the liposomes at approximately 2.5 x 10(5) sites/cell. The binding of folate-PEG liposomes to KB cells could be competitively inhibited by excess free folate or by antiserum against the folate receptor, demonstrating the interaction is mediated by the cell surface folate-binding protein. Following binding, cell-associated folate-PEG liposomes were internalized by folate-receptor-mediated endocytosis at 37 degrees C but not at 4 degrees C. These folate-PEG liposomes show potential for delivering large quantities of low molecular weight compounds nondestructively into folate receptor-bearing cells. PMID:8106354

  6. Expression of folate receptors in nasopharyngeal and laryngeal carcinoma and folate receptor-mediated endocytosis by molecular targeted nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Xie, M; Zhang, H; Xu, Y; Liu, T; Chen, S; Wang, J; Zhang, T

    2013-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry and an immunofluorescence technique was used to detect folate receptor expression in tissue samples and cell lines of head and neck squamous carcinoma, including 20 tissue samples of nasopharyngeal carcinoma, 16 tissue samples of laryngeal carcinoma, and HNE-1, HNE-2, CNE-1, CNE-2, SUNE-1, 5–8F, and Hep-2 cell lines. Iron staining, electron microscopy, and magnetic resonance imaging were used to observe endocytosis of folate-conjugated cisplatin-loaded magnetic nanoparticles (CDDP-FA-ASA-MNP) in cultured cells and transplanted tumors. As shown by immunohistochemistry, 83.3% (30/36) of the head and neck squamous carcinomas expressed the folate receptor versus none in the control group (0/24). Only the HNE-1 and Hep-2 cell lines expressed the folate receptor, and the other five cell lines did not. Endocytosis of CDDP-FA-ASA-MNP was seen in HNE-1 and Hep-2 cells by iron staining and electron microscopy. A similar result was seen in transplanted tumors in nude mice. Magnetic resonance imaging showed low signal intensity of HNE-1 cells and HNE-1 transplanted tumors on T2-weighted images after uptake of CDDP-FA-ASA-MNP, and this was not seen in CNE-2 transplanted tumors. In conclusion, head and neck squamous carcinoma cell strongly expressed the folate receptor, while normal tissue did not. The folate receptor can mediate endocytosis of folate-conjugated anticancer nanomedicines, and lays the foundation for molecular targeted treatment of cancer. PMID:23874095

  7. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors mediate donepezil-induced oligodendrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Osamu; Arai, Masaaki; Dateki, Minori; Ogata, Toru; Uchida, Ryuji; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Takishima, Kunio

    2015-12-01

    Oligodendrocytes are the myelin-forming cells of the central nervous system (CNS). Failure of myelin development and oligodendrocyte loss results in serious human disorders, including multiple sclerosis. Here, we show that donepezil, an acetlycholinesterase inhibitor developed for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, can stimulate oligodendrocyte differentiation and maturation of neural stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells without affecting proliferation or cell viability. Transcripts for essential myelin-associated genes, such as PLP, MAG, MBP, CNPase, and MOG, in addition to transcription factors that regulate oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination, were rapidly increased after treatment with donepezil. Furthermore, luciferase assays confirmed that both MAG and MBP promoters display increased activity upon donepezil-induced oligodendrocytes differentiation, suggesting that donepezil increases myelin gene expression mainly through enhanced transcription. We also found that the increase in the number of oligodendrocytes observed following donepezil treatment was significantly inhibited by the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonist mecamylamine, but not by the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist scopolamine. Moreover, donepezil-induced myelin-related gene expression was suppressed by mecamylamine at both the mRNA and protein level. These results suggest that donepezil stimulates oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelin-related gene expression via nAChRs in neural stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. We show that donepezil, a drug for the treatment of Alzheimer disease, can stimulate oligodendrocyte differentiation and maturation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. Transcripts for essential myelin-associated genes, such as PLP, MAG, MBP, CNPase and MOG in addition to transcripton factors that regulate oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination were rapidly increased after treatment with donepezil

  8. Tracking Progesterone Receptor-Mediated Actions in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, Todd P.; Lange, Carol A.

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian steroid hormones contribute to breast cancer initiation and progression primarily through the actions of their nuclear transcription factors, the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and progesterone receptors (PRs). These receptors are important drivers of the luminal A and B subtypes of breast cancer, where estrogen-blocking drugs have been effective endocrine therapies for patients with these tumors. However, many patients do not respond, or become resistant to treatment. When endocrine therapies fail, the luminal subtypes of breast cancer are more difficult to treat because these subtypes are among the most heterogeneous in terms of mutation diversity and gene expression profiles. Recent evidence suggests that progestin and PR actions may be important drivers of luminal breast cancers. Clinical trial data has demonstrated that hormone replacement therapy with progestins drives invasive breast cancer and results in greater mortality. PR transcriptional activity is dependent upon cross-talk with growth factor signaling pathways that alter PR phosphorylation, acetylation, or SUMOylation as mechanisms for regulating PR target gene selection required for increased cell proliferation and survival. Site-specific PR phosphorylation is the primary driver of gene-selective PR transcriptional activity. However, PR phosphorylation and heightened transcriptional activity is coupled to rapid PR protein degradation; the range of active PR detected in tumors is likely to be dynamic. Thus, PR target gene signatures may provide a more accurate means of tracking PR’s contribution to tumor progression rather than standard clinical protein-based (IHC) assays. Further development of antiprogestin therapies should be considered along side antiestrogens and aromatase inhibitors. PMID:24291072

  9. Mediators, Receptors, and Signalling Pathways in the Anti-Inflammatory and Antihyperalgesic Effects of Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, John L.; Cripps, Allan W.; Smith, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture has been used for millennia to treat allergic diseases including both intermittent rhinitis and persistent rhinitis. Besides the research on the efficacy and safety of acupuncture treatment for allergic rhinitis, research has also investigated how acupuncture might modulate immune function to exert anti-inflammatory effects. A proposed model has previously hypothesized that acupuncture might downregulate proinflammatory neuropeptides, proinflammatory cytokines, and neurotrophins, modulating transient receptor potential vallinoid (TRPV1), a G-protein coupled receptor which plays a central role in allergic rhinitis. Recent research has been largely supportive of this model. New advances in research include the discovery of a novel cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway activated by acupuncture. A chemokine-mediated proliferation of opioid-containing macrophages in inflamed tissues, in response to acupuncture, has also been demonstrated for the first time. Further research on the complex cross talk between receptors during inflammation is also helping to elucidate the mediators and signalling pathways activated by acupuncture. PMID:26339274

  10. EP4 prostanoid receptor-mediated vasodilatation of human middle cerebral arteries

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Richard J; Murdoch, Colin E; Ali, Mozam; Purbrick, Stuart; Ravid, Rivka; Baxter, Gordon S; Tilford, Nick; Sheldrick, Robert L G; Clark, Kenneth L; Coleman, Robert A

    2004-01-01

    Dilatation of the cerebral vasculature is recognised to be involved in the pathophysiology of migraine. Furthermore, elevated levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) occur in the blood, plasma and saliva of migraineurs during an attack, suggestive of a contributory role. In the present study, we have characterised the prostanoid receptors involved in the relaxation and contraction of human middle cerebral arteries in vitro. In the presence of indomethacin (3 μM) and the TP receptor antagonist GR32191 (1 μM), PGE2 was found to relax phenylephrine precontracted cerebral arterial rings in a concentration-dependent manner (mean pEC50 8.0±0.1, n=5). Establishment of a rank order of potency using the EP4>EP2 agonist 11-deoxy PGE1, and the EP2>EP4 agonist PGE1-OH (mean pEC50 of 7.6±0.1 (n=6) and 6.4±0.1 (n=4), respectively), suggested the presence of functional EP4 receptors. Furthermore, the selective EP2 receptor agonist butaprost at concentrations <1 μM failed to relax the tissues. Blockade of EP4 receptors with the EP4 receptor antagonists AH23848 and EP4A caused significant rightward displacements in PGE2 concentration–response curves, exhibiting pA2 and pKB values of 5.7±0.1, n=3, and 8.4, n=3, respectively. The IP receptor agonists iloprost and cicaprost relaxed phenylephrine precontracted cerebral arterial rings (mean pEC50 values 8.3±0.1 (n=4) and 8.1±0.1 (n=9), respectively). In contrast, the DP and FP receptor agonists PGD2 and PGF2α failed to cause appreciable relaxation or contraction at concentrations of up to 30 μM. In the absence of phenylephrine contraction and GR32191, the TP receptor agonist U46619 caused concentration-dependent contraction of cerebral artery (mean pEC50 7.4±0.3, n=3). These data demonstrate the presence of prostanoid EP4 receptors mediating PGE2 vasodilatation of human middle cerebral artery. IP receptors mediating relaxation and TP receptors mediating contraction were also functionally demonstrated. PMID:14744815

  11. Protease Activated Receptor-1 (PAR-1) Mediated Platelet Aggregation is Dependant on Clopidogrel Response

    PubMed Central

    Kreutz, Rolf P.; Breall, Jeffrey A.; Kreutz, Yvonne; Owens, Janelle; Lu, Deshun; Bolad, Islam; von der Lohe, Elisabeth; Sinha, Anjan; Flockhart, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Clopidogrel inhibits ADP mediated platelet aggregation through inhibition of the P2Y12 receptor by its active metabolite. Thrombin induces platelet aggregation by binding to protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1), and inhibition of PAR-1 has been evaluated in patients treated with clopidogrel to reduce ischemic events after acute coronary syndromes. Residual PAR-1 mediated platelet aggregation may be dependent on extent of clopidogrel response. Material and Methods Platelet aggregation was measured in 55 patients undergoing elective PCI at 16-24 hours after 600mg clopidogrel loading dose by light transmittance aggregometry using ADP 20μM and thrombin receptor agonist peptide (TRAP) at 15 μM and 25 μM as agonists. Genomic DNA was genotyped for common CYP2C19 variants. Results Increasing quartiles of 20 μM ADP induced platelet aggregation after clopidogrel loading were associated with increasing levels of TRAP mediated platelet aggregation. Patients in the highest quartile (clopidogrel non-responders) of post treatment ADP aggregation had significantly higher TRAP mediated aggregation than the patients in the lowest quartile (clopidogrel responders) [TRAP 15 μM: 79.6±5% vs. 69.5±8%, p<0.001]. Conclusions Non-responders to clopidogrel show increased residual platelet aggregation induced by TRAP, whereas clopidogrel responders exhibit attenuated response to TRAP. Addition of PAR-1 antiplatelet drugs may be most effective in patients with reduced clopidogrel response and high residual TRAP mediated platelet aggregation. PMID:22459907

  12. Orphan nuclear receptor oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) plays a key role in hepatic cannabinoid receptor type 1-mediated induction of CYP7A1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaochen; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Ji-Min; Park, Seung Bum; Jeong, Won-Il; Kim, Seong Heon; Lee, In-Kyu; Lee, Chul-Ho; Chiang, John Y L; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2015-09-01

    Bile acids are primarily synthesized from cholesterol in the liver and have important roles in dietary lipid absorption and cholesterol homoeostasis. Detailed roles of the orphan nuclear receptors regulating cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the rate-limiting enzyme in bile acid synthesis, have not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, we report that oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) is a novel transcriptional regulator of CYP7A1 expression. Activation of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 receptor) signalling induced ERRγ-mediated transcription of the CYP7A1 gene. Overexpression of ERRγ increased CYP7A1 expression in vitro and in vivo, whereas knockdown of ERRγ attenuated CYP7A1 expression. Deletion analysis of the CYP7A1 gene promoter and a ChIP assay revealed an ERRγ-binding site on the CYP7A1 gene promoter. Small heterodimer partner (SHP) inhibited the transcriptional activity of ERRγ and thus regulated CYP7A1 expression. Overexpression of ERRγ led to increased bile acid levels, whereas an inverse agonist of ERRγ, GSK5182, reduced CYP7A1 expression and bile acid synthesis. Finally, GSK5182 significantly reduced hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated induction of CYP7A1 expression and bile acid synthesis in alcohol-treated mice. These results provide the molecular mechanism linking ERRγ and bile acid metabolism. PMID:26348907

  13. NPY/Y1 receptor-mediated vasoconstrictory and proliferative effects in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Crnkovic, S; Egemnazarov, B; Jain, P; Seay, U; Gattinger, N; Marsh, L M; Bálint, Z; Kovacs, G; Ghanim, B; Klepetko, W; Schermuly, R T; Weissmann, N; Olschewski, A; Kwapiszewska, G

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Pulmonary arteries (PAs) are innervated, but little is known about the role of neuronal axis in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Here, we have examined the role of the neuropeptide Y (NPY) and its Y1 receptor in PH pathogenesis. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH NPY was localized by immunofluorescence. Expression of NPY and Y1 receptor were determined by quantitative PCR. Cellular response to NPY stimulation was assessed by Western blotting, thymidine incorporation and calcium imaging. Wire myography and isolated perfused mouse lung were applied to study pulmonary vasoactive effects of NPY. Selective receptor antagonists were used to assess the contribution of receptor subtypes in mediating NPY effects. KEY RESULTS Samples from PH patients showed increased NPYergic innervation within the PA wall and higher Y1 receptor expression, compared with donors. However, NPY levels were unchanged in both PA and serum. In the chronic hypoxic mouse model, Y1 receptor were up-regulated, while expression of both NPY and Y1 receptor was increased in the lungs of monocrotaline and SU5416-hypoxia rats. On a functional level, NPY acutely increased intracellular calcium levels and enhanced vasoconstriction of lung vessels preconstricted with adrenaline. Furthermore, NPY stimulated proliferation of human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells and activated p38 and PKD pathways. Correspondingly, higher phosphorylation of PKD was observed in remodelled vessels from PH patients. The selective Y1 receptor antagonist, BIBO 3304, concentration-dependently inhibited vasoconstrictive and proliferative effects of NPY. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS NPY and Y1 receptor are possible mediators of both vasoconstriction and pulmonary vascular remodelling in PH. PMID:24779394

  14. Neurobiology of microglial action in CNS injuries: receptor-mediated signaling mechanisms and functional roles

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoming; Liou, Anthony K.F.; Leak, Rehana K.; Xu, Mingyue; An, Chengrui; Suenaga, Jun; Shi, Yejie; Gao, Yanqin; Zheng, Ping; Chen, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Microglia are the first line of immune defense against central nervous system (CNS) injuries and disorders. These highly plastic cells play dualistic roles in neuronal injury and recovery and are known for their ability to assume diverse phenotypes. A broad range of surface receptors are expressed on microglia and mediate microglial ‘On’ or ‘Off’ responses to signals from other host cells as well as invading microorganisms. The integrated actions of these receptors result in tightly regulated biological functions, including cell mobility, phagocytosis, the induction of acquired immunity, and trophic factor/inflammatory mediator release. Over the last few years, significant advances have been made towards deciphering the signaling mechanisms related to these receptors and their specific cellular functions. In this review, we describe the current state of knowledge of the surface receptors involved in microglial activation, with an emphasis on their engagement of distinct functional programs and their roles in CNS injuries. It will become evident from this review that microglial homeostasis is carefully maintained by multiple counterbalanced strategies, including, but not limited to, ‘On’ and ‘Off’ receptor signaling. Specific regulation of theses microglial receptors may be a promising therapeutic strategy against CNS injuries. PMID:24923657

  15. DAPK1 Interaction with NMDA Receptor NR2B Subunits Mediates Brain Damage in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Weihong; Xu, Xin; Peng, Lisheng; Zhong, Xiaofen; Zhang, Wenfeng; Soundarapandian, Mangala M.; Balel, Cherine; Wang, Manqi; Jia, Nali; Zhang, Wen; Lew, Frank; Chan, Sic Lung; Chen, Yanfang; Lu, Youming

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors constitute a major subtype of glutamate receptors at extra-synaptic sites that link multiple intracellular catabolic processes responsible for irreversible neuronal death. Here, we report that cerebral ischemia recruits death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1) into the NMDA receptor NR2B protein complex in the cortex of adult mice. DAPK1 directly binds with the NMDA receptor NR2B C-terminal tail consisting of amino acid 1292–1304 (NR2BCT). A constitutively active DAPK1 phosphorylates NR2B subunit at Ser-1303 and in turn enhances the NR1/NR2B receptor channel conductance. Genetic deletion of DAPK1 or administration of NR2BCT that uncouples an activated DAPK1 from an NMDA receptor NR2B subunit in vivo in mice blocks injurious Ca2+ influx through NMDA receptor channels at extrasynaptic sites and protects neurons against cerebral ischemic insults. Thus, DAPK1 physically and functionally interacts with the NMDA receptor NR2B subunit at extra-synaptic sites and this interaction acts as a central mediator for stroke damage. PMID:20141836

  16. Implications of purinergic receptor-mediated intracellular calcium transients in neural differentiation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purinergic receptors participate, in almost every cell type, in controlling metabolic activities and many physiological functions including signal transmission, proliferation and differentiation. While most of P2Y receptors induce transient elevations of intracellular calcium concentration by activation of intracellular calcium pools and forward these signals as waves which can also be transmitted into neighboring cells, P2X receptors produce calcium spikes which also include activation of voltage-operating calcium channels. P2Y and P2X receptors induce calcium transients that activate transcription factors responsible for the progress of differentiation through mediators including calmodulin and calcineurin. Expression of P2X2 as well as of P2X7 receptors increases in differentiating neurons and glial cells, respectively. Gene expression silencing assays indicate that these receptors are important for the progress of differentiation and neuronal or glial fate determination. Metabotropic receptors, mostly P2Y1 and P2Y2 subtypes, act on embryonic cells or cells at the neural progenitor stage by inducing proliferation as well as by regulation of neural differentiation through NFAT translocation. The scope of this review is to discuss the roles of purinergic receptor-induced calcium spike and wave activity and its codification in neurodevelopmental and neurodifferentiation processes. PMID:23414261

  17. Allosteric modulation of sigma-1 receptors by SKF83959 inhibits microglia-mediated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhuang; Li, Linlang; Zheng, Long-Tai; Xu, Zhihong; Guo, Lin; Zhen, Xuechu

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that sigma-1 receptor orthodox agonists can inhibit neuroinflammation. SKF83959 (3-methyl-6-chloro-7,8-hydroxy-1-[3-methylphenyl]-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine), an atypical dopamine receptor-1 agonist, has been recently identified as a potent allosteric modulator of sigma-1 receptor. Here, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of SKF83959 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV2 microglia. Our results indicated that SKF83959 significantly suppressed the expression/release of the pro-inflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and inhibited the generation of reactive oxygen species. All of these responses were blocked by selective sigma-1 receptor antagonists (BD1047 or BD1063) and by ketoconazole (an inhibitor of enzyme cytochrome c17 to inhibit the synthesis of endogenous dehydroepiandrosterone, DHEA). Additionally, we found that SKF83959 promoted the binding activity of DHEA with sigma-1 receptors, and enhanced the inhibitory effects of DHEA on LPS-induced microglia activation in a synergic manner. Furthermore, in a microglia-conditioned media system, SKF83959 inhibited the cytotoxicity of conditioned medium generated by LPS-activated microglia toward HT-22 neuroblastoma cells. Taken together, our study provides the first evidence that allosteric modulation of sigma-1 receptors by SKF83959 inhibits microglia-mediated inflammation. SKF83959 is a potent allosteric modulator of sigma-1 receptor. Our results indicated that SKF83959 enhanced the activity of endogenous dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in a synergic manner, and inhibited the activation of BV2 microglia and the expression/release of the pro-inflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). PMID:26031312

  18. Hippocampus NMDA receptors selectively mediate latent extinction of place learning.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Jarid; Gabriele, Amanda; Packard, Mark G

    2016-09-01

    Extinction of maze learning may be achieved with or without the animal performing the previously acquired response. In typical "response extinction," animals are given the opportunity to make the previously acquired approach response toward the goal location of the maze without reinforcement. In "latent extinction," animals are not given the opportunity to make the previously acquired response and instead are confined to the previous goal location without reinforcement. Previous evidence indicates that the effectiveness of these protocols may depend on the type of memory being extinguished. Thus, one aim of the present study was to further examine the effectiveness of response and latent extinction protocols across dorsolateral striatum (DLS)-dependent response learning and hippocampus-dependent place learning tasks. In addition, previous neural inactivation experiments indicate a selective role for the hippocampus in latent extinction, but have not investigated the precise neurotransmitter mechanisms involved. Thus, the present study also examined whether latent extinction of place learning might depend on NMDA receptor activity in the hippocampus. In experiment 1, adult male Long-Evans rats were trained in a response learning task in a water plus-maze, in which animals were reinforced to make a consistent body-turn response to reach an invisible escape platform. Results indicated that response extinction, but not latent extinction, was effective at extinguishing memory in the response learning task. In experiment 2, rats were trained in a place learning task, in which animals were reinforced to approach a consistent spatial location containing the hidden escape platform. In experiment 2, animals also received intra-hippocampal infusions of the NMDA receptor antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphopentanoic acid (AP5; 5.0 or 7.5 ug/0.5 µg) or saline vehicle immediately before response or latent extinction training. Results indicated that both extinction protocols were

  19. GSG1L suppresses AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission and uniquely modulates AMPA receptor kinetics in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xinglong; Mao, Xia; Lussier, Marc P.; Hutchison, Mary Anne; Zhou, Liang; Hamra, F. Kent; Roche, Katherine W.; Lu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-mediated synaptic transmission is a key mechanism for synaptic plasticity. In the brain, AMPARs assemble with a number of auxiliary subunits, including TARPs, CNIHs and CKAMP44, which are important for AMPAR forward trafficking to synapses. Here we report that the membrane protein GSG1L negatively regulates AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission. Overexpression of GSG1L strongly suppresses, and GSG1L knockout (KO) enhances, AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission. GSG1L-dependent regulation of AMPAR synaptic transmission relies on the first extracellular loop domain and its carboxyl-terminus. GSG1L also speeds up AMPAR deactivation and desensitization in hippocampal CA1 neurons, in contrast to the effects of TARPs and CNIHs. Furthermore, GSG1L association with AMPARs inhibits CNIH2-induced slowing of the receptors in heterologous cells. Finally, GSG1L KO rats have deficits in LTP and show behavioural abnormalities in object recognition tests. These data demonstrate that GSG1L represents a new class of auxiliary subunit with distinct functional properties for AMPARs. PMID:26932439

  20. Inhibition of the production of mediators of inflammation by corticosteroids is a glucocorticoid receptor-mediated process

    PubMed Central

    Dijk, A. P. M. van; Tak, C. J. A. M.; Wilson, J. H. P.; Zijlstra, F. J.

    1996-01-01

    In order to find an explanation for corticosteroid resistance we assessed whether inhibition by dexamethasone (DEX) of the stimulated production of TNF-∝, IL-6, PGE2 and LTB4 by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNC) depends on binding to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and whether it is determined by the number or the affinity of the GR of these cells. GR number and affinity of MNC were determined by means of a whole cell DEX binding assay. MNC were incubated with DEX and LPS or A23187 in the absence or presence of RU486, a potent steroid antagonist. DEX caused a concentration dependent inhibition of TNF-∝, IL-6 and PGE2 production but had no effect on LTB4 production. RU486 significantly blocked the effect of DEX, but no correlations were found between the inhibition of mediator release and the Kd or receptor number. PMID:18475705

  1. Potentiation of NMDA receptor-mediated transmission in striatal cholinergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Manfred J; Schulz, Jan M; Kelsch, Wolfgang; Oorschot, Dorothy E; Reynolds, John N J

    2015-01-01

    Pauses in the tonic firing of striatal cholinergic interneurons (CINs) emerge during reward-related learning in response to conditioning of a neutral cue. We have previously reported that augmenting the postsynaptic response to cortical afferents in CINs is coupled to the emergence of a cell-intrinsic afterhyperpolarization (AHP) underlying pauses in tonic activity. Here we investigated in a bihemispheric rat-brain slice preparation the mechanisms of synaptic plasticity of excitatory afferents to CINs and the association with changes in the AHP. We found that high frequency stimulation (HFS) of commissural corticostriatal afferents from the contralateral hemisphere induced a robust long-term depression (LTD) of postsynaptic potentials (PSP) in CINs. Depression of the PSP of smaller magnitude and duration was observed in response to HFS of the ipsilateral white matter or cerebral cortex. In Mg(2+)-free solution HFS induced NMDA receptor-dependent potentiation of the PSP, evident in both the maximal slope and amplitude of the PSP. The increase in maximal slope corroborates previous findings, and was blocked by antagonism of either D1-like dopamine receptors with SCH23390 or D2-like dopamine receptors with sulpiride during HFS in Mg(2+)-free solution. Potentiation of the slower PSP amplitude component was due to augmentation of the NMDA receptor-mediated potential as this was completely reversed on subsequent application of the NMDA receptor antagonist AP5. HFS similarly potentiated NMDA receptor currents isolated by blockade of AMPA/kainate receptors with CNQX. The plasticity-induced increase in the slow PSP component was directly associated with an increase in the subsequent AHP. Thus plasticity of cortical afferent synapses is ideally suited to influence the cue-induced firing dynamics of CINs, particularly through potentiation of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission. PMID:25914618

  2. Dual intracellular signaling pathways mediated by the human cannabinoid CB1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Calandra, B; Portier, M; Kernéis, A; Delpech, M; Carillon, C; Le Fur, G; Ferrara, P; Shire, D

    1999-06-25

    It has long been established that the cannabinoid CB1 receptor transduces signals through a pertussis toxin-sensitive Gi/Go inhibitory pathway. Although there have been reports that the cannabinoid CB1 receptor can also mediate an increase in cyclic AMP levels, in most cases the presence of an adenylyl cyclase costimulant or the use of very high amounts of agonist was necessary. Here, we present evidence for dual coupling of the cannabinoid CB receptor to the classical pathway and to a pertussis toxin-insensitive adenylyl cyclase stimulatory pathway initiated with low quantities of agonist in the absence of any costimulant. Treatment of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the cannabinoid CB1 receptor with the cannabinoid CP 55,940, {(-)-cis-3-[2-hydroxy-4-(1,1-dimethylheptyl)phenyl]-trans-4-(3-hyd roxypropyl) cyclohexan-1-ol} resulted in cyclic AMP accumulation in a dose-response manner, an accumulation blocked by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor-specific antagonist SR 141716A, {N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-me thyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide hydrochloride}. In CHO cells coexpressing the cannabinoid CB1 receptor and a cyclic AMP response element (CRE)-luciferase reporter gene system, CP 55,940 induced luciferase expression by a pathway blocked by the protein kinase A inhibitor N-[2-(p-bromocinnamylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide hydrochloride (H-89). Under the same conditions the peripheral cannabinoid CB2 receptor proved to be incapable of inducing cAMP accumulation or luciferase activity. This incapacity allowed us to study the luciferase activation mediated by CB /CB2 chimeric constructs, from which we determined that the first and second internal loop regions of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor were involved in transducing the pathway leading to luciferase gene expression. PMID:10422789

  3. Anandamide, an endogenous cannabimimetic eicosanoid, binds to the cloned human cannabinoid receptor and stimulates receptor-mediated signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Felder, C C; Briley, E M; Axelrod, J; Simpson, J T; Mackie, K; Devane, W A

    1993-01-01

    Arachidonylethanolamide (anandamide), a candidate endogenous cannabinoid ligand, has recently been isolated from porcine brain and displayed cannabinoid-like binding activity to synaptosomal membrane preparations and mimicked cannabinoid-induced inhibition of the twitch response in isolated murine vas deferens. In this study, anandamide and several congeners were evaluated as cannabinoid agonists by examining their ability to bind to the cloned cannabinoid receptor, inhibit forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation, inhibit N-type calcium channels, and stimulate one or more functional second messenger responses. Synthetic anandamide, and all but one congener, competed for [3H]CP55,940 binding to plasma membranes prepared from L cells expressing the rat cannabinoid receptor. The ability of anandamide to activate receptor-mediated signal transduction was evaluated in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the human cannabinoid receptor (HCR, termed CHO-HCR cells) and compared to control CHO cells expressing the muscarinic m5 receptor (CHOm5 cells). Anandamide inhibited forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation in CHO-HCR cells, but not in CHOm5 cells, and this response was blocked with pertussis toxin. N-type calcium channels were inhibited by anandamide and several active congeners in N18 neuroblastoma cells. Anandamide stimulated arachidonic acid and intracellular calcium release in both CHOm5 and CHO-HCR cells and had no effect on the release of inositol phosphates or phosphatidylethanol, generated after activation of phospholipase C and D, respectively. Anandamide appears to exhibit the essential criteria required to be classified as a cannabinoid/anandamide receptor agonist and shares similar nonreceptor effects on arachidonic acid and intracellular calcium release as other cannabinoid agonists. PMID:8395053

  4. The chemokine receptor CCX-CKR mediates effective scavenging of CCL19 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Comerford, Iain; Milasta, Sandra; Morrow, Valerie; Milligan, Graeme; Nibbs, Robert

    2006-07-01

    The chemokines CCL19, CCL21 and CCL25, by signalling through the receptors CCR7 or CCR9, play critical roles in leukocyte homing. They also bind another heptahelical surface protein, CCX-CKR. CCX-CKR cannot couple to typical chemokine receptor signalling pathways or mediate chemotaxis, and its function remains unclear. We have proposed that it controls chemokine bioavailability. Here, using transfected HEK293 cells, we have shown that both CCX-CKR and CCR7 mediate rapid CCL19 internalisation upon initial chemokine exposure. However, internalised CCL19 was more efficiently retained and degraded after uptake via CCX-CKR. More importantly, CCR7 rapidly became refractory for CCL19 uptake, but the sequestration activity of CCX-CKR was enhanced. These properties endowed CCX-CKR with an impressive ability to mediate progressive sequestration and degradation of large quantities of CCL19, and conversely, prevented CCR7-expressing cells from extensively altering their chemokine environment. These differences may be linked to the routes of endocytosis used by these receptors. CCX-CKR, unlike CCR7, was not critically dependent on beta-arrestins or clathrin-coated pits. However, over-expression of caveolin-1, which stabilises caveolae, blocked CCL19 uptake by CCX-CKR while having no impact on other chemokine receptors, including CCR7. These data predict that CCX-CKR scavenges extracellular chemokines in vivo to modify responses through CCR7. PMID:16791897

  5. The Wedelolactone Derivative Inhibits Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Breast, Endometrial, and Ovarian Cancer Cells Growth

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Defeng; Lin, Tzu-Hua; Cheng, Max A.; Chen, Lu-Min; Chang, Chawnshang; Yeh, Shuyuan

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen and estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated signaling pathways play important roles in the etiology and progression of human breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. Attenuating ER activities by natural products and their derivatives is a relatively practical strategy to control and reduce breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer risk. Here, we found 3-butoxy-1,8,9-trihydroxy-6H-benzofuro[3,2-c]benzopyran-6-one (BTB), a new derivative of wedelolactone, could effectively inhibit the 17-estradiol (E2)-induced ER transactivation and suppress the growth of breast cancer as well as endometrial and ovarian cancer cells. Our results indicate that 2.5 μM BTB effectively suppresses ER-positive, but not ER-negative, breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, our data indicate that BTB can modulate ER transactivation and suppress the expression of E2-mediated ER target genes (Cyclin D1, E2F1, and TERT) in the ER-positive MCF-7, Ishikawa, and SKOV-3 cells. Importantly, this BTB mediated inhibition of ER activity is selective since BTB does not suppress the activities of other nuclear receptors, including glucocorticoid receptor and progesterone receptor, suggesting that BTB functions as a selective ER signaling inhibitor with the potential to treat breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. PMID:25221777

  6. 5-HT2 receptors mediate functional modulation of GABAa receptors and inhibitory synaptic transmissions in human iPS-derived neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haitao; Hu, Lingli; Liu, Chunhua; Su, Zhenghui; Wang, Lihui; Pan, Guangjin; Guo, Yiping; He, Jufang

    2016-01-01

    Neural progenitors differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) hold potentials for treating neurological diseases. Serotonin has potent effects on neuronal functions through multiple receptors, underlying a variety of neural disorders. Glutamate and GABA receptors have been proven functional in neurons differentiated from iPS, however, little is known about 5-HT receptor-mediated modulation in such neuronal networks. In the present study, human iPS were differentiated into cells possessing featured physiological properties of cortical neurons. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording was used to examine the involvement of 5-HT2 receptors in functional modulation of GABAergic synaptic transmission. We found that serotonin and DOI (a selective agonist of 5-HT2A/C receptor) reversibly reduced GABA-activated currents, and this 5-HT2A/C receptor mediated inhibition required G protein, PLC, PKC, and Ca2+ signaling. Serotonin increased the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs), which could be mimicked by α-methylserotonin, a 5-HT2 receptor agonist. In contrast, DOI reduced both frequency and amplitude of mIPSCs. These findings suggested that in iPS-derived human neurons serotonin postsynaptically reduced GABAa receptor function through 5-HT2A/C receptors, but presynaptically other 5-HT2 receptors counteracted the action of 5-HT2A/C receptors. Functional expression of serotonin receptors in human iPS-derived neurons provides a pre-requisite for their normal behaviors after grafting. PMID:26837719

  7. IL12-mediated sensitizing of T-cell receptor-dependent and -independent tumor cell killing.

    PubMed

    Braun, Matthias; Ress, Marie L; Yoo, Young-Eun; Scholz, Claus J; Eyrich, Matthias; Schlegel, Paul G; Wölfl, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    Interleukin 12 (IL12) is a key inflammatory cytokine critically influencing Th1/Tc1-T-cell responses at the time of initial antigen encounter. Therefore, it may be exploited for cancer immunotherapy. Here, we investigated how IL12, and other inflammatory cytokines, shape effector functions of human T-cells. Using a defined culture system, we followed the gradual differentiation and function of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells from their initial activation as naïve T cells through their expansion phase as early memory cells to full differentiation as clonally expanded effector T cells. The addition of IL12 8 days after the initial priming event initiated two mechanistically separate events: First, IL12 sensitized the T-cell receptor (TCR) for antigen-specific activation, leading to an approximately 10-fold increase in peptide sensitivity and, in consequence, enhanced tumor cell killing. Secondly, IL12 enabled TCR/HLA-independent activation and cytotoxicity: this "non-specific" effect was mediated by the NK cell receptor DNAM1 (CD226) and dependent on ligand expression of the target cells. This IL12 regulated, DNAM1-mediated killing is dependent on src-kinases as well as on PTPRC (CD45) activity. Thus, besides enhancing TCR-mediated activation, we here identified for the first time a second IL12 mediated mechanism leading to activation of a receptor-dependent killing pathway via DNAM1. PMID:27622043

  8. Asymmetrical Macromolecular Complex Formation of Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor 2 (LPA2) Mediates Gradient Sensing in Fibroblasts*

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Aixia; Moon, Changsuk; Zhang, Weiqiang; Sinha, Chandrima; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Arora, Kavisha; Wang, Xusheng; Yue, Junming; Parthasarathi, Kaushik; Heil-Chapdelaine, Rick; Tigyi, Gabor; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.

    2014-01-01

    Chemotactic migration of fibroblasts toward growth factors relies on their capacity to sense minute extracellular gradients and respond to spatially confined receptor-mediated signals. Currently, mechanisms underlying the gradient sensing of fibroblasts remain poorly understood. Using single-particle tracking methodology, we determined that a lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) gradient induces a spatiotemporally restricted decrease in the mobility of LPA receptor 2 (LPA2) on chemotactic fibroblasts. The onset of decreased LPA2 mobility correlates to the spatial recruitment and coupling to LPA2-interacting proteins that anchor the complex to the cytoskeleton. These localized PDZ motif-mediated macromolecular complexes of LPA2 trigger a Ca2+ puff gradient that governs gradient sensing and directional migration in response to LPA. Disruption of the PDZ motif-mediated assembly of the macromolecular complex of LPA2 disorganizes the gradient of Ca2+ puffs, disrupts gradient sensing, and reduces the directional migration of fibroblasts toward LPA. Our findings illustrate that the asymmetric macromolecular complex formation of chemoattractant receptors mediates gradient sensing and provides a new mechanistic basis for models to describe gradient sensing of fibroblasts. PMID:25542932

  9. Tonic GABAA Receptor-Mediated Inhibition in the Rat Dorsal Motor Nucleus of the Vagus

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Type A γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptors expressed in the dorsal motor nucleus of vagus (DMV) critically regulate the activity of vagal motor neurons and, by inference, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Two types of GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition have been identified in the brain, represented by phasic (Iphasic) and tonic (Itonic) inhibitory currents. The hypothesis that Itonic regulates neuron activity was tested in the DMV using whole cell patch-clamp recordings in transverse brain stem slices from rats. An Itonic was present in a subset of DMV neurons, which was determined to be mediated by different receptors than those mediating fast, synaptic currents. Preapplication of tetrodotoxin significantly decreased the resting Itonic amplitude in DMV neurons, suggesting that most of the current was due to action potential (AP)–dependent GABA release. Blocking GABA transport enhanced Itonic and multiple GABA transporters cooperated to regulate Itonic. The Itonic was composed of both a gabazine-insensitive component that was nearly saturated under basal conditions and a gabazine-sensitive component that was activated when extracellular GABA concentration was elevated. Perfusion of THIP (10 μM) significantly increased Itonic amplitude without increasing Iphasic amplitude. The Itonic played a major role in determining the overall excitability of DMV neurons by contributing to resting membrane potential and AP frequency. Our results indicate that Itonic contributes to DMV neuron membrane potential and activity and is thus an important regulator of vagally mediated GI function. PMID:20018836

  10. Asymmetrical macromolecular complex formation of lysophosphatidic acid receptor 2 (LPA2) mediates gradient sensing in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ren, Aixia; Moon, Changsuk; Zhang, Weiqiang; Sinha, Chandrima; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Arora, Kavisha; Wang, Xusheng; Yue, Junming; Parthasarathi, Kaushik; Heil-Chapdelaine, Rick; Tigyi, Gabor; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2014-12-26

    Chemotactic migration of fibroblasts toward growth factors relies on their capacity to sense minute extracellular gradients and respond to spatially confined receptor-mediated signals. Currently, mechanisms underlying the gradient sensing of fibroblasts remain poorly understood. Using single-particle tracking methodology, we determined that a lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) gradient induces a spatiotemporally restricted decrease in the mobility of LPA receptor 2 (LPA2) on chemotactic fibroblasts. The onset of decreased LPA2 mobility correlates to the spatial recruitment and coupling to LPA2-interacting proteins that anchor the complex to the cytoskeleton. These localized PDZ motif-mediated macromolecular complexes of LPA2 trigger a Ca(2+) puff gradient that governs gradient sensing and directional migration in response to LPA. Disruption of the PDZ motif-mediated assembly of the macromolecular complex of LPA2 disorganizes the gradient of Ca(2+) puffs, disrupts gradient sensing, and reduces the directional migration of fibroblasts toward LPA. Our findings illustrate that the asymmetric macromolecular complex formation of chemoattractant receptors mediates gradient sensing and provides a new mechanistic basis for models to describe gradient sensing of fibroblasts. PMID:25542932

  11. NOP receptor mediates anti-analgesia induced by agonist-antagonist opioids.

    PubMed

    Gear, R W; Bogen, O; Ferrari, L F; Green, P G; Levine, J D

    2014-01-17

    Clinical studies have shown that agonist-antagonist opioid analgesics that produce their analgesic effect via action on the kappa-opioid receptor, produce a delayed-onset anti-analgesia in men but not women, an effect blocked by co-administration of a low dose of naloxone. We now report the same time-dependent anti-analgesia and its underlying mechanism in an animal model. Using the Randall-Selitto paw-withdrawal assay in male rats, we found that nalbuphine, pentazocine, and butorphanol each produced analgesia during the first hour followed by anti-analgesia starting at ∼90min after administration in males but not females, closely mimicking its clinical effects. As observed in humans, co-administration of nalbuphine with naloxone in a dose ratio of 12.5:1 blocked anti-analgesia but not analgesia. Administration of the highly selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69593 produced analgesia without subsequent anti-analgesia, and confirmed by the failure of the selective kappa antagonist nor-binaltorphimine to block nalbuphine-induced anti-analgesia, indicating that anti-analgesia is not mediated by kappa-opioid receptors. We therefore tested the role of other receptors in nalbuphine anti-analgesia. Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (NOP) and sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptors were chosen on the basis of their known anti-analgesic effects and receptor binding studies. The selective NOP receptor antagonists, JTC801, and J-113397, but not the sigma receptor antagonist, BD 1047, antagonized nalbuphine anti-analgesia. Furthermore, the NOP receptor agonist NNC 63-0532 produced anti-analgesia with the same delay in onset observed with the three agonist-antagonists, but without producing preceding analgesia and this anti-analgesia was also blocked by naloxone. These results strongly support the suggestion that clinically used agonist-antagonists act at the NOP receptor to produce anti-analgesia. PMID:24188792

  12. Receptor interconversion model of hormone action. 3. Estrogen receptor mediated repression of reporter gene activity in A431 cells.

    PubMed

    Nag, A; Park, I; Krust, A; Smith, R G

    1990-03-20

    The chicken estrogen receptor exists in three interconvertible forms, two of which bind estradiol with high affinity and one which lacks the capacity to bind estradiol. Interconversion is regulated by reactions involving ATP/Mg2+. By cotransfecting into A431 cells estrogen receptor cDNA in an expression vector together with the pA2 (-821/-87) tk-CAT vitellogenin construct, we demonstrate that constitutive expression of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) activity can be regulated either by selection of ligand or by modifying phosphorylation reactions in the recipient cells. In the presence of estrogen receptors, constitutive expression of CAT activity is inhibited in three situations: (i) in the absence of an estrogenic ligand; (ii) in the presence of an anti-estrogen; and (iii) in the presence of an estrogenic ligand together with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). Estrogen receptor mediated repression of constitutive CAT activity is not observed with the pA2 (-331/-87) tk-CAT construct, indicating that DNA sequences required for repression are located between -821 and -331 base pairs upstream of the transcription initiation site. PMID:2346742

  13. Dopamine D3 Receptors Mediate the Discriminative Stimulus Effects of Quinpirole in Free-Feeding Rats

    PubMed Central

    Baladi, Michelle G.; Newman, Amy H.

    2010-01-01

    The discriminative stimulus effects of dopamine (DA) D3/D2 receptor agonists are thought to be mediated by D2 receptors. To maintain responding, access to food is often restricted, which can alter neurochemical and behavioral effects of drugs acting on DA systems. This study established stimulus control with quinpirole in free-feeding rats and tested the ability of agonists to mimic and antagonists to attenuate the effects of quinpirole. The same antagonists were studied for their ability to attenuate quinpirole-induced yawning and hypothermia. DA receptor agonists apomorphine and lisuride, but not amphetamine and morphine, occasioned responding on the quinpirole lever. The discriminative stimulus effects of quinpirole were attenuated by the D3 receptor-selective antagonist N-{4-[4-(2,3-dichlorophenyl)-piperazin-1-yl]-trans-but-2-enyl}-4-pyridine-2-yl-benzamide HCl (PG01037) and the nonselective D3/D2 receptor antagonist raclopride, but not by the D2 receptor-selective antagonist 3-[4-(4-chlorophenyl)-4-hydroxypiperidin-1-yl]methyl-1H-indole (L-741,626); the potencies of PG01037 and raclopride to antagonize this effect of quinpirole paralleled their potencies to antagonize the ascending limb of the quinpirole yawning dose-response curve (thought to be mediated by D3 receptors). L-741,626 selectively antagonized the descending limb of the quinpirole yawning dose-response curve, and both L-741,626 and raclopride, but not PG01037, antagonized the hypothermic effects of quinpirole (thought to be mediated by D2 receptors). Food restriction (10 g/day/7 days) significantly decreased quinpirole-induced yawning without affecting the quinpirole discrimination. Many discrimination studies on DA receptor agonists use food-restricted rats; together with those studies, the current experiment using free-feeding rats suggests that feeding conditions affecting the behavioral effects of direct-acting DA receptor agonists might also have an impact on the effects of indirect

  14. Only high-affinity receptors for interleukin 2 mediate internalization of ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, A.M.; Harford, J.B.; Svetlik, P.B.; Leonard, W.L.; Depper, J.M.; Waldmann, T.A.; Greene, W.C.; Klausner, R.D.

    1986-03-01

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptors are expressed on activated T cells and in select T-cell leukemias. Recently, it has been demonstrated that at least two classes of receptor for IL-2 exist with markedly different affinities for ligand. All known biological actions of IL-2 have been correlated with occupancy of high-affinity sites; the function of the low-affinity sites remains unknown. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is the primary means of internalization of cell-surface receptors and their ligands. The internalization of IL-2 bound to high- and low-affinity receptor sites was studied in a human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected human T-cell leukemia cell line and in a cloned murine cytotoxic T-cell line (CTLL). Internalization of IL-2 occurred only when bound to high-affinity sites. In addition, an anti-receptor antibody (anti-Tac), which binds equally well to high- and low-affinity sites, demonstrated no detectable internalization. The implications of these findings as they relate to IL-2 receptor structure and function are discussed.

  15. Adipocyte glucocorticoid receptors mediate fat-to-brain signaling.

    PubMed

    de Kloet, Annette D; Krause, Eric G; Solomon, Matia B; Flak, Jonathan N; Scott, Karen A; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Myers, Brent; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M; Woods, Stephen C; Seeley, Randy J; Herman, James P

    2015-06-01

    Stress-related (e.g., depression) and metabolic pathologies (e.g., obesity) are important and often co-morbid public health concerns. Here we identify a connection between peripheral glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling originating in fat with the brain control of both stress and metabolism. Mice with reduced adipocyte GR hypersecrete glucocorticoids following acute psychogenic stress and are resistant to diet-induced obesity. This hypersecretion gives rise to deficits in responsiveness to exogenous glucocorticoids, consistent with reduced negative feedback via adipocytes. Increased stress reactivity occurs in the context of elevated hypothalamic expression of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis-excitatory neuropeptides and in the absence of altered adrenal sensitivity, consistent with a central cite of action. Our results identify a novel mechanism whereby activation of the adipocyte GR promotes peripheral energy storage while inhibiting the HPA axis, and provide functional evidence for a fat-to-brain regulatory feedback network that serves to regulate not just homeostatic energy balance but also responses to psychogenic stimuli. PMID:25808702

  16. Intracellular Zinc Modulates Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor-mediated Calcium Release.

    PubMed

    Woodier, Jason; Rainbow, Richard D; Stewart, Alan J; Pitt, Samantha J

    2015-07-10

    Aberrant Zn(2+) homeostasis is a hallmark of certain cardiomyopathies associated with altered contractile force. In this study, we addressed whether Zn(2+) modulates cardiac ryanodine receptor gating and Ca(2+) dynamics in isolated cardiomyocytes. We reveal that Zn(2+) is a high affinity regulator of RyR2 displaying three modes of operation. Picomolar free Zn(2+) concentrations potentiate RyR2 responses, but channel activation is still dependent on the presence of cytosolic Ca(2+). At concentrations of free Zn(2+) >1 nm, Zn(2+) is the main activating ligand, and the dependence on Ca(2+) is removed. Zn(2+) is therefore a higher affinity activator of RyR2 than Ca(2+). Millimolar levels of free Zn(2+) were found to inhibit channel openings. In cardiomyocytes, consistent with our single channel results, we show that Zn(2+) modulates both the frequency and amplitude of Ca(2+) waves in a concentration-dependent manner and that physiological levels of Zn(2+) elicit Ca(2+) release in the absence of activating levels of cytosolic Ca(2+). This highlights a new role for intracellular Zn(2+) in shaping Ca(2+) dynamics in cardiomyocytes through modulation of RyR2 gating. PMID:26041778

  17. Intracellular Zinc Modulates Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor-mediated Calcium Release*

    PubMed Central

    Woodier, Jason; Rainbow, Richard D.; Stewart, Alan J.; Pitt, Samantha J.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant Zn2+ homeostasis is a hallmark of certain cardiomyopathies associated with altered contractile force. In this study, we addressed whether Zn2+ modulates cardiac ryanodine receptor gating and Ca2+ dynamics in isolated cardiomyocytes. We reveal that Zn2+ is a high affinity regulator of RyR2 displaying three modes of operation. Picomolar free Zn2+ concentrations potentiate RyR2 responses, but channel activation is still dependent on the presence of cytosolic Ca2+. At concentrations of free Zn2+ >1 nm, Zn2+ is the main activating ligand, and the dependence on Ca2+ is removed. Zn2+ is therefore a higher affinity activator of RyR2 than Ca2+. Millimolar levels of free Zn2+ were found to inhibit channel openings. In cardiomyocytes, consistent with our single channel results, we show that Zn2+ modulates both the frequency and amplitude of Ca2+ waves in a concentration-dependent manner and that physiological levels of Zn2+ elicit Ca2+ release in the absence of activating levels of cytosolic Ca2+. This highlights a new role for intracellular Zn2+ in shaping Ca2+ dynamics in cardiomyocytes through modulation of RyR2 gating. PMID:26041778

  18. Catecholamine receptors differentially mediate impulsive choice in the medial prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Pardey, Margery C; Kumar, Natasha N; Goodchild, Ann K; Cornish, Jennifer L

    2013-02-01

    Impulsivity is characteristic of several mental health disorders and is largely mediated by the prefrontal cortex subregions: the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). Dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) are known to modulate activity of the prefrontal cortex, however their direct role in impulsive choice is not known. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of microinjecting DA or NE compounds in the mPFC or OFC on impulsive choice as measured by a delayed reinforcement (DR) task in male Wistar Kyoto rats. Following training in the DR task, rats were pretreated with DA D(1) and D(2) receptor antagonists (SCH23390 3 μg/side, raclopride 3 or 6 μg/side) or NE α(1) and α(2) receptor agonists (phenylephrine 0.1 or 0.3 μg/side, guanfacine 1 or 3 μg/side, respectively) into the mPFC or OFC and the effect on impulsive behavior was assessed. Pretreatment with raclopride into the mPFC or OFC significantly increased impulsive choice, however only pretreatment with SCH23390 into the mPFC, and not the OFC, significantly increased impulsive choice. Pretreatment with the NE receptor agonists had no effect on impulsive choice. This study suggests that DA receptors, but not NE receptors, differentially mediate impulsive choice in sub-regions of the prefrontal cortex. PMID:23135240

  19. Receptor-Mediated Drug Delivery to Macrophages in Chemotherapy of Leishmaniasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Amitabha; Chaudhuri, Gautam; Arora, Sunil K.; Sehgal, Shobha; Basu, Sandip K.

    1989-05-01

    Methotrexate coupled to maleylated bovine serum albumin was taken up efficiently through the ``scavenger'' receptors present on macrophages and led to selective killing of intracellular Leishmania mexicana amazonensis amastigotes in cultured hamster peritoneal macrophages. The drug conjugate was nearly 100 times as effective as free methotrexate in eliminating the intracellular parasites. Furthermore, in a model of experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis in hamsters, the drug conjugate brought about more than 90% reduction in the size of footpad lesions within 11 days. In contrast, the free drug at a similar concentration did not significantly affect lesion size. These studies demonstrate the potential of receptor-mediated drug delivery in the therapy of macrophage-associated diseases.

  20. [Molecular physiology of receptor mediated endocytosis and its role in overcoming multidrug resistance].

    PubMed

    Severin, E S; Posypanova, G A

    2011-06-01

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis plays important role in the selective uptake of proteins at the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells. Endocytosis regulates many processes of cell signalling by controlling the number of functional receptors on the cell surface. The article reviews the mechanism of clathrin-dependent endocytosis and the possibility of using this phenomenon for the targeted delivery of drugs. Use of certain proteins as targeting component of drug delivery systems can significantly improve the selectivity of this drug, as well as to overcome the multidrug resistance of cells resulting from the activity of the ABC-transporters. PMID:21874867

  1. Protein kinase C regulates tonic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition in the hippocampus and thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Bright, Damian P; Smart, Trevor G

    2013-01-01

    Tonic inhibition mediated by extrasynaptic GABAA receptors (GABAARs) is an important regulator of neuronal excitability. Phosphorylation by protein kinase C (PKC) provides a key mode of regulation for synaptic GABAARs underlying phasic inhibition; however, less attention has been focused on the plasticity of tonic inhibition and whether this can also be modulated by receptor phosphorylation. To address this issue, we used whole-cell patch clamp recording in acute murine brain slices at both room and physiological temperatures to examine the effects of PKC-mediated phosphorylation on tonic inhibition. Recordings from dentate gyrus granule cells in the hippocampus and dorsal lateral geniculate relay neurons in the thalamus demonstrated that PKC activation caused downregulation of tonic GABAAR-mediated inhibition. Conversely, inhibition of PKC resulted in an increase in tonic GABAAR activity. These findings were corroborated by experiments on human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing recombinant α4β2δ GABAARs, which represent a key extrasynaptic GABAAR isoform in the hippocampus and thalamus. Using bath application of low GABA concentrations to mimic activation by ambient neurotransmitter, we demonstrated a similar inhibition of receptor function following PKC activation at physiological temperature. Live cell imaging revealed that this was correlated with a loss of cell surface GABAARs. The inhibitory effects of PKC activation on α4β2δ GABAAR activity appeared to be mediated by direct phosphorylation at a previously identified site on the β2 subunit, serine 410. These results indicate that PKC-mediated phosphorylation can be an important physiological regulator of tonic GABAAR-mediated inhibition. PMID:24102973

  2. Roles of OA1 octopamine receptor and Dop1 dopamine receptor in mediating appetitive and aversive reinforcement revealed by RNAi studies

    PubMed Central

    Awata, Hiroko; Wakuda, Ryo; Ishimaru, Yoshiyasu; Matsuoka, Yuji; Terao, Kanta; Katata, Satomi; Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Hamanaka, Yoshitaka; Noji, Sumihare; Mito, Taro; Mizunami, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Revealing reinforcing mechanisms in associative learning is important for elucidation of brain mechanisms of behavior. In mammals, dopamine neurons are thought to mediate both appetitive and aversive reinforcement signals. Studies using transgenic fruit-flies suggested that dopamine neurons mediate both appetitive and aversive reinforcements, through the Dop1 dopamine receptor, but our studies using octopamine and dopamine receptor antagonists and using Dop1 knockout crickets suggested that octopamine neurons mediate appetitive reinforcement and dopamine neurons mediate aversive reinforcement in associative learning in crickets. To fully resolve this issue, we examined the effects of silencing of expression of genes that code the OA1 octopamine receptor and Dop1 and Dop2 dopamine receptors by RNAi in crickets. OA1-silenced crickets exhibited impairment in appetitive learning with water but not in aversive learning with sodium chloride solution, while Dop1-silenced crickets exhibited impairment in aversive learning but not in appetitive learning. Dop2-silenced crickets showed normal scores in both appetitive learning and aversive learning. The results indicate that octopamine neurons mediate appetitive reinforcement via OA1 and that dopamine neurons mediate aversive reinforcement via Dop1 in crickets, providing decisive evidence that neurotransmitters and receptors that mediate appetitive reinforcement indeed differ among different species of insects. PMID:27412401

  3. Roles of OA1 octopamine receptor and Dop1 dopamine receptor in mediating appetitive and aversive reinforcement revealed by RNAi studies.

    PubMed

    Awata, Hiroko; Wakuda, Ryo; Ishimaru, Yoshiyasu; Matsuoka, Yuji; Terao, Kanta; Katata, Satomi; Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Hamanaka, Yoshitaka; Noji, Sumihare; Mito, Taro; Mizunami, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Revealing reinforcing mechanisms in associative learning is important for elucidation of brain mechanisms of behavior. In mammals, dopamine neurons are thought to mediate both appetitive and aversive reinforcement signals. Studies using transgenic fruit-flies suggested that dopamine neurons mediate both appetitive and aversive reinforcements, through the Dop1 dopamine receptor, but our studies using octopamine and dopamine receptor antagonists and using Dop1 knockout crickets suggested that octopamine neurons mediate appetitive reinforcement and dopamine neurons mediate aversive reinforcement in associative learning in crickets. To fully resolve this issue, we examined the effects of silencing of expression of genes that code the OA1 octopamine receptor and Dop1 and Dop2 dopamine receptors by RNAi in crickets. OA1-silenced crickets exhibited impairment in appetitive learning with water but not in aversive learning with sodium chloride solution, while Dop1-silenced crickets exhibited impairment in aversive learning but not in appetitive learning. Dop2-silenced crickets showed normal scores in both appetitive learning and aversive learning. The results indicate that octopamine neurons mediate appetitive reinforcement via OA1 and that dopamine neurons mediate aversive reinforcement via Dop1 in crickets, providing decisive evidence that neurotransmitters and receptors that mediate appetitive reinforcement indeed differ among different species of insects. PMID:27412401

  4. Alpha-2 adrenergic receptor-mediated inhibition of thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Christopher J.; Tupone, Domenico; Cano, Georgina; Morrison, Shaun F.

    2013-01-01

    Alpha2-adrenergic receptor (α2-AR) agonists have been use as anti-hypertensive agents, in the management of drug withdrawal, and as sedative analgesics. Since α2-AR agonists also influence the regulation of body temperature, we explored their potential as antipyretic agents. This study delineates the central neural substrate for the inhibition of rat brown adipose tissue (BAT) and shivering thermogenesis by α2-AR agonists. Nanoinjection of the α2-AR agonist, clonidine (1.2 nmol), into the rostral raphe pallidus (rRPa) inhibited BAT sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and BAT thermogenesis. Subsequent nanoinjection of the α2-AR antagonist, idazoxan (6nmol) into the rRPa reversed the clonidine-evoked inhibition of BAT SNA and BAT thermogenesis. Systemic administration of the α2-AR agonists, dexmedetomidine (25ug/kg, iv) or clonidine (100ug/kg, iv) inhibited shivering EMGs, BAT SNA and BAT thermogenesis effects that were reversed by nanoinjection of idazoxan (6nmol) into the rRPa. Dexmedetomidine (100µg/kg, ip) prevented and reversed lipopolysaccharide (10µg/kg ip)-evoked thermogenesis in free-behaving rats. Cholera toxin subunit b retrograde tracing from rRPa and pseudorabies virus transynaptic retrograde tracing from BAT combined with immunohistochemistry for catecholaminergic biosynthetic enzymes revealed the ventrolateral medulla as the source of catecholaminergic input to the rRPa and demonstrated that these catecholaminergic neurons are synaptically connected to BAT. Photostimulation of VLM neurons expressing of the PRSx8-ChR2-mCherry lentiviral vector inhibited BAT SNA via activation of α2-ARs in the rRPa. These results indicate a potent inhibition of BAT and shivering thermogenesis by α2-AR activation in the rRPa, and suggest a therapeutic potential of α2-AR agonists for reducing potentially-lethal elevations in body temperature during excessive fever. PMID:23365239

  5. Opposite function of dopamine D1 and NMDA receptors in striatal cannabinoid-mediated signaling

    PubMed Central

    Daigle, Tanya L.; Wetsel, William C.; Caron, Marc G.

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that the cannabinoid and dopamine systems interact at various levels to regulate basal ganglia function. While it is well known that acute administration of cannabinoids to mice can modify dopamine-dependent behaviors, an understanding of the intraneuronal signaling pathways employed by these agents in the striatum is not well understood. Here we use knockout (KO) mouse models to examine the regulation of striatal ERK1/2 signaling by behaviorally relevant doses of cannabinoids. This cellular pathway has been implicated as a central mediator of drug reward and synaptic plasticity. In C57BL/6J mice, acute administration of cannabinoid agonists, HU-210 and Δ9-THC, promotes a dose- and time-dependent decrease in the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in dorsal striatum. Co-administration of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) antagonist AM251 with HU-210 prevents ERK1/2 inactivation, indicating a requirement for activation of this receptor. In dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) KO animals treated with HU-210, the magnitude of the HU-210-dependent decrease in striatal ERK1/2 signaling is greater than in wild-type controls. In contrast, the HU-210 administration to NMDA receptor knockdown mice (NR1-Kd) was ineffective at promoting striatal ERK1/2 inactivation. Genetic deletion of other potential ERK1/2 mediators, the dopamine D2 receptors (D2R)s or βarrestin-1 or -2, did not affect HU-210-induced modulation of ERK1/2 signaling in the striatum. These results support the hypothesis that dopamine D1 receptors and NMDA receptors act in an opposite manner to regulate striatal CB1R signal transduction. PMID:22034973

  6. Evidence for 5-HT1-like receptor-mediated vasoconstriction in human pulmonary artery.

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, M. R.; Clayton, R. A.; Templeton, A. G.; Morecroft, I.

    1996-01-01

    1. The 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors mediating contraction of human isolated pulmonary artery rings were investigated. Responses to the agonists 5-carboximidotryptamine (5-CT, non-selective 5-HT1 agonist), sumatriptan (5-HT1D-like receptor agonist), 5-HT and 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT, 5-HT1A receptor agonist) were studied. Responses to 5-HT and sumatriptan in the presence of the antagonists, methiothepin (non-selective 5-HT1+2-receptor antagonist), ketanserin (5-HT2A receptor antagonist) and the novel antagonist, GR55562 (5-HT1D receptor antagonist) were also studied. 2. All agonists contracted human pulmonary artery ring preparations in the following order of potency 5-CT > 5-HT = sumatriptan > 8-OH-DPAT. Maximum responses to 5-HT, 5-CT and sumatriptan were not significantly different. 3. Methiothepin 1 nM and 10 nM, but not 0.1 nM reduced the maximum contractile responses to 5-HT but did not alter tissue sensitivity to 5-HT. Methiothepin 0.1 nM, 1 nM and 10 nM had a similar effect on responses to sumatriptan. 4. The 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ketanserin (10 nM, 100 nM and 1 microM) also reduced the maximum contractile response to both 5-HT and sumatriptan without affecting tissue sensitivity to these agonists. 5. The novel 5-HT1D receptor antagonist, GR55562, inhibited responses to 5-HT and sumatriptan in a true competitive fashion. 6. The results suggest that the human pulmonary artery has a functional population of 5-HT1D-like receptors which are involved in the contractile response to 5-HT. PMID:8886409

  7. Involvement of the 5-HT(1A) receptor in the anti-immobility effects of fluvoxamine in the forced swimming test and mouse strain differences in 5-HT(1A) receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Yumi; Furutani, Sachiko; Kajiwara, Yoshinobu; Hirano, Kazufumi; Yamada, Shizuo; Tagawa, Noriko; Kobayashi, Yoshiharu; Hotta, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Jun

    2010-03-10

    We previously demonstrated the presence of strain differences in baseline immobility time and sensitivity to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluvoxamine in five strains of mice (ICR, ddY, C57BL, DBA/2 and BALB/c mice). Furthermore, variations in serotonin (5-HT) transporter binding in the brain were strongly related to strain differences in baseline immobility and sensitivity to fluvoxamine. In the present study, we examined the involvement of the 5-HT(1A) receptor in anti-immobility effects in DBA/2 mice, which show high sensitivity to fluvoxamine. The anti-immobility effects of fluvoxamine in DBA/2 mice were inhibited by the 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-(2-pyridinyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide (WAY 100635). However, the 5-HT(1B) receptor antagonist 3-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]-4-hydroxy-N-[4-(4-pyridinyl)phenyl]benzamide (GR55562), the 5-HT(2) receptor antagonist 6-methyl-1-(methylethyl)-ergoline-8beta-carboxylic acid 2-hydroxy-1-methylpropyl ester (LY 53857), the 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist ondansetron and the 5-HT(4) receptor antagonist 4-amino-5-chloro-2-methoxy-benzoic acid 2-(diethylamino)ethyl ester (SDZ 205,557) did not influence the anti-immobility effects of fluvoxamine in DBA/2 mice. These results suggest that fluvoxamine-induced antidepressant-like effects in DBA/2 mice are mediated by the 5-HT(1A) receptor. We analyzed 5-HT(1A) receptor binding in the brains of five strains of mice. Strain differences in 5-HT(1A) receptor binding were observed. 5-HT(1A) receptor binding in brain was not correlated with baseline immobility time in the five strains of mice examined. These results suggest that, although the anti-immobility effects of fluvoxamine in DBA/2 mice are mediated by the 5-HT(1A) receptor, strain differences in 5-HT(1A) receptor binding are not related to variation in immobility time and responses to fluvoxamine. PMID:19958758

  8. RAGE mediates a novel proinflammatory axis: a central cell surface receptor for S100/calgranulin polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, M A; Drury, S; Fu, C; Qu, W; Taguchi, A; Lu, Y; Avila, C; Kambham, N; Bierhaus, A; Nawroth, P; Neurath, M F; Slattery, T; Beach, D; McClary, J; Nagashima, M; Morser, J; Stern, D; Schmidt, A M

    1999-06-25

    S100/calgranulin polypeptides are present at sites of inflammation, likely released by inflammatory cells targeted to such loci by a range of environmental cues. We report here that receptor for AGE (RAGE) is a central cell surface receptor for EN-RAGE (extracellular newly identified RAGE-binding protein) and related members of the S100/calgranulin superfamily. Interaction of EN-RAGEs with cellular RAGE on endothelium, mononuclear phagocytes, and lymphocytes triggers cellular activation, with generation of key proinflammatory mediators. Blockade of EN-RAGE/RAGE quenches delayed-type hypersensitivity and inflammatory colitis in murine models by arresting activation of central signaling pathways and expression of inflammatory gene mediators. These data highlight a novel paradigm in inflammation and identify roles for EN-RAGEs and RAGE in chronic cellular activation and tissue injury. PMID:10399917

  9. Silencing Mediator of Retinoid and Thyroid Hormone Receptors (SMRT) regulates glucocorticoid action in adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Emont, Margo P.; Mantis, Stelios; Kahn, Jonathan H.; Landeche, Michael; Han, Xuan; Sargis, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Local modulation of glucocorticoid action in adipocytes regulates adiposity and systemic insulin sensitivity. However, the specific cofactors that mediate glucocorticoid receptor (GR) action in adipocytes remain unclear. Here we show that the silencing mediator of retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT) is recruited to GR in adipocytes and regulates ligand-dependent GR function. Decreased SMRT expression in adipocytes in vivo increases expression of glucocorticoid-responsive genes. Moreover, adipocytes with decreased SMRT expression exhibit altered glucocorticoid regulation of lipolysis. We conclude that SMRT regulates the metabolic functions of GR in adipocytes in vivo. Modulation of GR-SMRT interactions in adipocytes represents a novel approach to control the local degree of glucocorticoid action and thus influence adipocyte metabolic function. PMID:25766503

  10. Bradykinin as a pain mediator: receptors are localized to sensory neurons, and antagonists have analgesic actions

    SciTech Connect

    Steranka, L.R.; Manning, D.C.; DeHaas, C.J.; Ferkany, J.W.; Borosky, S.A.; Connor, J.R.; Vavrek, R.J.; Stewart, J.M.; Snyder, S.H.

    1988-05-01

    Autoradiographic studies localize (/sup 3/H)bradykinin receptor binding sites to the substantia gelatinosa, dorsal root, and a subset of small cells in both the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia of the guinea pig. (/sup 3/H)Bradykinin labeling is also observed over myocardinal/coronary visceral afferent fibers. The localization of (/sup 3/H)bradykinin receptors to nociceptive pathways supports a role for bradykinin in pain mediation. Several bradkykinin antagonists block bradykinin-induced acute vascular pain in the rat. The bradykinin antagonists also relieve bradykinin- and urate-induced hyperalgesia in the rat paw. These results indicate that bradykinin is a physiologic mediator of pain and that bradykinin antagonists have analgesic activity in both acute and chronic pain models.

  11. Modeling of cell adhesion and deformation mediated by receptor-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Golestaneh, Amirreza F; Nadler, Ben

    2016-04-01

    The current work is devoted to studying adhesion and deformation of biological cells mediated by receptors and ligands in order to enhance the existing models. Due to the sufficient in-plane continuity and fluidity of the phospholipid molecules, an isotropic continuum fluid membrane is proposed for modeling the cell membrane. The developed constitutive model accounts for the influence of the presence of receptors on the deformation and adhesion of the cell membrane through the introduction of spontaneous area dilation. Motivated by physics, a nonlinear receptor-ligand binding force is introduced based on charge-induced dipole interaction. Diffusion of the receptors on the membrane is governed by the receptor-ligand interaction via Fick's Law and receptor-ligand interaction. The developed model is then applied to study the deformation and adhesion of a biological cell. The proposed model is used to study the role of the material, binding, spontaneous area dilation and environmental properties on the deformation and adhesion of the cell. PMID:26093646

  12. New Insights into VacA Intoxication Mediated through Its Cell Surface Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Yahiro, Kinnosuke; Hirayama, Toshiya; Moss, Joel; Noda, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), a major cause of gastroduodenal diseases, produces VacA, a vacuolating cytotoxin associated with gastric inflammation and ulceration. The C-terminal domain of VacA plays a crucial role in receptor recognition on target cells. We have previously identified three proteins (i.e., RPTPα, RPTPβ, and LRP1) that serve as VacA receptors. These receptors contribute to the internalization of VacA into epithelial cells, activate signal transduction pathways, and contribute to cell death and gastric ulceration. In addition, other factors (e.g., CD18, sphingomyelin) have also been identified as cell-surface, VacA-binding proteins. Since we believe that, following interactions with its host cell receptors, VacA participates in events leading to disease, a better understanding of the cellular function of VacA receptors may provide valuable information regarding the mechanisms underlying the pleiotropic actions of VacA and the pathogenesis of H. pylori-mediated disease. In this review, we focus on VacA receptors and their role in events leading to cell damage. PMID:27187473

  13. New Insights into VacA Intoxication Mediated through Its Cell Surface Receptors.

    PubMed

    Yahiro, Kinnosuke; Hirayama, Toshiya; Moss, Joel; Noda, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), a major cause of gastroduodenal diseases, produces VacA, a vacuolating cytotoxin associated with gastric inflammation and ulceration. The C-terminal domain of VacA plays a crucial role in receptor recognition on target cells. We have previously identified three proteins (i.e., RPTPα, RPTPβ, and LRP1) that serve as VacA receptors. These receptors contribute to the internalization of VacA into epithelial cells, activate signal transduction pathways, and contribute to cell death and gastric ulceration. In addition, other factors (e.g., CD18, sphingomyelin) have also been identified as cell-surface, VacA-binding proteins. Since we believe that, following interactions with its host cell receptors, VacA participates in events leading to disease, a better understanding of the cellular function of VacA receptors may provide valuable information regarding the mechanisms underlying the pleiotropic actions of VacA and the pathogenesis of H. pylori-mediated disease. In this review, we focus on VacA receptors and their role in events leading to cell damage. PMID:27187473

  14. Augmentation of Antigen Receptor–mediated Responses by Histamine H1 Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Banu, Yasmin; Watanabe, Takeshi

    1999-01-01

    Histamine is considered one of the important mediators of immediate hypersensitivity and inflammation, and acts via G protein–coupled receptors. Here, we report that histamine may affect antigen receptor–mediated immune responses of T and B cells via a signal(s) from histamine H1 receptors (H1Rs). Histamine exhibited enhancing effects on the in vitro proliferative responses of anti-CD3ε– or anti-IgM–stimulated spleen T and B cells, respectively, at the culture condition that the fetal calf serum was dialyzed before culture and c-kit–positive cells were depleted from the spleen cells. In studies of histamine H1R knockout mice, H1R-deficient T cells had low proliferative responses to anti-CD3ε cross-linking or antigen stimulation in vitro. B cells from H1R-deficient mice were also affected, demonstrating low proliferative responses to B cell receptor cross-linking. Antibody production against trinitrophenyl-Ficoll was reduced in H1R-deficient mice. Other aspects of T and B cell function were normal in the H1R knockout mice. H1R-deficient T and B cells showed normal responses upon stimulation with interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, CD40 ligand, CD40 ligand plus IL-4, and lipopolysaccharide. Collectively, these results imply that the signal generated by histamine through H1R augments antigen receptor–mediated immune responses, suggesting cross-talk between G protein–coupled receptors and antigen receptor–mediated signaling. PMID:9989982

  15. Glucocorticoid receptor mediated the propofol self-administration by dopamine D1 receptor in nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Wu, Binbin; Liang, Yuyuan; Dong, Zhanglei; Chen, Zhichuan; Zhang, Gaolong; Lin, Wenxuan; Wang, Sicong; Wang, Benfu; Ge, Ren-Shan; Lian, Qingquan

    2016-07-22

    Propofol, a widely used anesthetic, can cause addictive behaviors in both human and experimental animals. In the present study, we examined the involvement of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling in the molecular process by which propofol may cause addiction. The propofol self-administration model was established by a fixed ratio 1 (FR1) schedule of reinforced dosing over successive 14days in rats. On day 15, the rats were treated with dexamethasone, a GR agonist (10-100μg/kg), or RU486, a GR antagonist (10-100μg/kg) at 1h prior to the last training. The animal behaviors were recorded automatically by the computer. The expression of dopamine D1 receptor in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) was examined by Western blot and the concentrations of plasma corticosterone were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To further examine the specificity of GR in the process, mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist, spironolactone, and dexamethasone plus MR agonist, aldosterone, were also tested. Administration of dexamethasone (100μg/kg) or RU486 (⩾10mg/kg) significantly attenuated the rate of propofol maintained active nose-poke responses and infusions, which were accompanied by reductions in both plasma corticosterone level and the expression of D1 receptor in the NAc. Neither spironolactone alone nor dexamethasone combined with aldosterone affected the propofol-maintaining self-administrative behavior, indicating GR, but not MR, modulates the propofol reward in rats. In addition, neither the food-maintaining sucrose responses under FR1 schedule nor the locomotor activity was affected by any doses of dexamethasone or RU486 tested. These findings provide evidence that GR signaling may play an important role in propofol reward. PMID:27126557

  16. Receptor-mediated uptake of low density lipoprotein stimulates bile acid synthesis by cultured rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Junker, L.H.; Davis, R.A. )

    1989-12-01

    The cellular mechanisms responsible for the lipoprotein-mediated stimulation of bile acid synthesis in cultured rat hepatocytes were investigated. Adding 280 micrograms/ml of cholesterol in the form of human or rat low density lipoprotein (LDL) to the culture medium increased bile acid synthesis by 1.8- and 1.6-fold, respectively. As a result of the uptake of LDL, the synthesis of (14C)cholesterol from (2-14C)acetate was decreased and cellular cholesteryl ester mass was increased. Further studies demonstrated that rat apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich high density lipoprotein (HDL) both stimulated bile acid synthesis 1.5-fold, as well as inhibited the formation of (14C)cholesterol from (2-14C)acetate. Reductive methylation of LDL blocked the inhibition of cholesterol synthesis, as well as the stimulation of bile acid synthesis, suggesting that these processes require receptor-mediated uptake. To identify the receptors responsible, competitive binding studies using 125I-labeled apoE-free LDL and 125I-labeled apoE-rich HDL were performed. Both apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich HDL displayed an equal ability to compete for binding of the other, suggesting that a receptor or a group of receptors that recognizes both apolipoproteins is involved. Additional studies show that hepatocytes from cholestyramine-treated rats displayed 2.2- and 3.4-fold increases in the binding of apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich HDL, respectively. These data show for the first time that receptor-mediated uptake of LDL by the liver is intimately linked to processes activating bile acid synthesis.

  17. Cannabinoid type 1 receptor availability in the amygdala mediates threat processing in trauma survivors.

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, Robert H; Huang, Yiyun; Corsi-Travali, Stefani; Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Lin, Shu-fei; Henry, Shannan; Potenza, Marc N; Piomelli, Daniele; Carson, Richard E; Neumeister, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    Attentional bias to threat is a key endophenotype that contributes to the chronicity of trauma-related psychopathology. However, little is known about the neurobiology of this endophenotype and no known in vivo molecular imaging study has been conducted to evaluate candidate receptor systems that may be implicated in this endophenotype or the phenotypic expression of trauma-related psychopathology that comprises threat (ie, re-experiencing, avoidance, and hyperarousal) and loss (ie, emotional numbing, depression/dysphoria, generalized anxiety) symptomatology. Using the radioligand [(11)C]OMAR and positron emission tomography (PET), we evaluated the relationship between in vivo cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) receptor availability in the amygdala, and performance on a dot-probe measure of attentional bias to threat, and clinician interview-based measures of trauma-related psychopathology. The sample comprised adults presenting with a broad spectrum of trauma-related psychopathology, ranging from nontrauma-exposed, psychiatrically healthy adults to trauma-exposed adults with severe trauma-related psychopathology. Results revealed that increased CB1 receptor availability in the amygdala was associated with increased attentional bias to threat, as well as increased severity of threat, but not loss, symptomatology; greater peripheral anandamide levels were associated with decreased attentional bias to threat. A mediation analysis further suggested that attentional bias to threat mediated the relationship between CB1 receptor availability in the amygdala and severity of threat symptomatology. These data substantiate a key role for compromised endocannabinoid function in mediating both the endophenotypic and phenotypic expression of threat symptomatology in humans. They further suggest that novel pharmacotherapies that target the CB1 system may provide a more focused, mechanism-based approach to mitigating this core aspect of trauma-related psychopathology. PMID

  18. Cannabinoid Type 1 Receptor Availability in the Amygdala Mediates Threat Processing in Trauma Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Pietrzak, Robert H; Huang, Yiyun; Corsi-Travali, Stefani; Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Lin, Shu-fei; Henry, Shannan; Potenza, Marc N; Piomelli, Daniele; Carson, Richard E; Neumeister, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Attentional bias to threat is a key endophenotype that contributes to the chronicity of trauma-related psychopathology. However, little is known about the neurobiology of this endophenotype and no known in vivo molecular imaging study has been conducted to evaluate candidate receptor systems that may be implicated in this endophenotype or the phenotypic expression of trauma-related psychopathology that comprises threat (ie, re-experiencing, avoidance, and hyperarousal) and loss (ie, emotional numbing, depression/dysphoria, generalized anxiety) symptomatology. Using the radioligand [11C]OMAR and positron emission tomography (PET), we evaluated the relationship between in vivo cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) receptor availability in the amygdala, and performance on a dot-probe measure of attentional bias to threat, and clinician interview-based measures of trauma-related psychopathology. The sample comprised adults presenting with a broad spectrum of trauma-related psychopathology, ranging from nontrauma-exposed, psychiatrically healthy adults to trauma-exposed adults with severe trauma-related psychopathology. Results revealed that increased CB1 receptor availability in the amygdala was associated with increased attentional bias to threat, as well as increased severity of threat, but not loss, symptomatology; greater peripheral anandamide levels were associated with decreased attentional bias to threat. A mediation analysis further suggested that attentional bias to threat mediated the relationship between CB1 receptor availability in the amygdala and severity of threat symptomatology. These data substantiate a key role for compromised endocannabinoid function in mediating both the endophenotypic and phenotypic expression of threat symptomatology in humans. They further suggest that novel pharmacotherapies that target the CB1 system may provide a more focused, mechanism-based approach to mitigating this core aspect of trauma-related psychopathology. PMID:24820537

  19. GRK2 Protein-mediated Transphosphorylation Contributes to Loss of Function of μ-Opioid Receptors Induced by Neuropeptide FF (NPFF2) Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Moulédous, Lionel; Froment, Carine; Dauvillier, Stéphanie; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Zajac, Jean-Marie; Mollereau, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) interacts with specific receptors to modulate opioid functions in the central nervous system. On dissociated neurons and neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) transfected with NPFF receptors, NPFF acts as a functional antagonist of μ-opioid (MOP) receptors by attenuating the opioid-induced inhibition of calcium conductance. In the SH-SY5Y model, MOP and NPFF2 receptors have been shown to heteromerize. To understand the molecular mechanism involved in the anti-opioid activity of NPFF, we have investigated the phosphorylation status of the MOP receptor using phospho-specific antibody and mass spectrometry. Similarly to direct opioid receptor stimulation, activation of the NPFF2 receptor by [d-Tyr-1-(NMe)Phe-3]NPFF (1DMe), an analog of NPFF, induced the phosphorylation of Ser-377 of the human MOP receptor. This heterologous phosphorylation was unaffected by inhibition of second messenger-dependent kinases and, contrarily to homologous phosphorylation, was prevented by inactivation of Gi/o proteins by pertussis toxin. Using siRNA knockdown we could demonstrate that 1DMe-induced Ser-377 cross-phosphorylation and MOP receptor loss of function were mediated by the G protein receptor kinase GRK2. In addition, mass spectrometric analysis revealed that the phosphorylation pattern of MOP receptors was qualitatively similar after treatment with the MOP agonist Tyr-d-Ala-Gly (NMe)-Phe-Gly-ol (DAMGO) or after treatment with the NPFF agonist 1DMe, but the level of multiple phosphorylation was more intense after DAMGO. Finally, NPFF2 receptor activation was sufficient to recruit β-arrestin2 to the MOP receptor but not to induce its internalization. These data show that NPFF-induced heterologous desensitization of MOP receptor signaling is mediated by GRK2 and could involve transphosphorylation within the heteromeric receptor complex. PMID:22375000

  20. GRK2 protein-mediated transphosphorylation contributes to loss of function of μ-opioid receptors induced by neuropeptide FF (NPFF2) receptors.

    PubMed

    Moulédous, Lionel; Froment, Carine; Dauvillier, Stéphanie; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Zajac, Jean-Marie; Mollereau, Catherine

    2012-04-13

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) interacts with specific receptors to modulate opioid functions in the central nervous system. On dissociated neurons and neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) transfected with NPFF receptors, NPFF acts as a functional antagonist of μ-opioid (MOP) receptors by attenuating the opioid-induced inhibition of calcium conductance. In the SH-SY5Y model, MOP and NPFF(2) receptors have been shown to heteromerize. To understand the molecular mechanism involved in the anti-opioid activity of NPFF, we have investigated the phosphorylation status of the MOP receptor using phospho-specific antibody and mass spectrometry. Similarly to direct opioid receptor stimulation, activation of the NPFF(2) receptor by [D-Tyr-1-(NMe)Phe-3]NPFF (1DMe), an analog of NPFF, induced the phosphorylation of Ser-377 of the human MOP receptor. This heterologous phosphorylation was unaffected by inhibition of second messenger-dependent kinases and, contrarily to homologous phosphorylation, was prevented by inactivation of G(i/o) proteins by pertussis toxin. Using siRNA knockdown we could demonstrate that 1DMe-induced Ser-377 cross-phosphorylation and MOP receptor loss of function were mediated by the G protein receptor kinase GRK2. In addition, mass spectrometric analysis revealed that the phosphorylation pattern of MOP receptors was qualitatively similar after treatment with the MOP agonist Tyr-D-Ala-Gly (NMe)-Phe-Gly-ol (DAMGO) or after treatment with the NPFF agonist 1DMe, but the level of multiple phosphorylation was more intense after DAMGO. Finally, NPFF(2) receptor activation was sufficient to recruit β-arrestin2 to the MOP receptor but not to induce its internalization. These data show that NPFF-induced heterologous desensitization of MOP receptor signaling is mediated by GRK2 and could involve transphosphorylation within the heteromeric receptor complex. PMID:22375000

  1. Slitrk5 Mediates BDNF-Dependent TrkB Receptor Trafficking and Signaling.

    PubMed

    Song, Minseok; Giza, Joanna; Proenca, Catia C; Jing, Deqiang; Elliott, Mark; Dincheva, Iva; Shmelkov, Sergey V; Kim, Jihye; Schreiner, Ryan; Huang, Shu-Hong; Castrén, Eero; Prekeris, Rytis; Hempstead, Barbara L; Chao, Moses V; Dictenberg, Jason B; Rafii, Shahin; Chen, Zhe-Yu; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique; Lee, Francis S

    2015-06-22

    Recent studies in humans and in genetic mouse models have identified Slit- and NTRK-like family (Slitrks) as candidate genes for neuropsychiatric disorders. All Slitrk isotypes are highly expressed in the CNS, where they mediate neurite outgrowth, synaptogenesis, and neuronal survival. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these functions are not known. Here, we report that Slitrk5 modulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-dependent biological responses through direct interaction with TrkB receptors. Under basal conditions, Slitrk5 interacts primarily with a transsynaptic binding partner, protein tyrosine phosphatase δ (PTPδ); however, upon BDNF stimulation, Slitrk5 shifts to cis-interactions with TrkB. In the absence of Slitrk5, TrkB has a reduced rate of ligand-dependent recycling and altered responsiveness to BDNF treatment. Structured illumination microscopy revealed that Slitrk5 mediates optimal targeting of TrkB receptors to Rab11-positive recycling endosomes through recruitment of a Rab11 effector protein, Rab11-FIP3. Thus, Slitrk5 acts as a TrkB co-receptor that mediates its BDNF-dependent trafficking and signaling. PMID:26004511

  2. Localization of endothelin ETA and ETB receptor-mediated constriction in the renal microcirculation of rats.

    PubMed Central

    Endlich, K; Hoffend, J; Steinhausen, M

    1996-01-01

    1. The aim of the study was to visualize endothelin-1 (ET-1)-mediated constriction in renal vessels of cortical and juxtamedullary glomeruli in the split hydronephrotic rat kidney in vivo and to functionally characterize the ET receptor subtypes involved. 2. ET-1 (10(-9) M) constricted preglomerular vessels (by 6-18%) and efferent arterioles (by 11-13%), and decreased glomerular blood flow (GBF, by 55%) of cortical and juxtamedullary glomeruli. 3. The ETA antagonist BQ-123 (10(-6) M), as well as the ETB antagonist BQ-788 (2 x 10(-7) M) and IRL 1038 (10(-6) M), shifted the concentration-response curve of GBF for ET-1 to the right by one order of magnitude. While BQ-123 antagonized ET-1 constriction only in preglomerular vessels, BQ-788 and IRL 1038 were effective both in preglomerular vessels and efferent arterioles. 4. The ETB agonist IRL 1620 (10(-8) M) reduced GBF by 50% and constricted efferent arterioles (by 20-33%) about two times more than preglomerular vessels (by 6-14%). 5. Our results suggest that in renal cortical and juxtamedullary vessels of rats, ET-1-induced preglomerular vasoconstriction is mediated by ETA and ETB receptors, while efferent vasoconstriction is predominantly mediated by ETB receptors, which might have important consequences for the regulation of glomerular filtration pressure by ET. PMID:8951723

  3. The orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner mediates male infertility induced by diethylstilbestrol in mice

    PubMed Central

    Volle, David H.; Decourteix, Mélanie; Garo, Erwan; McNeilly, Judy; Fenichel, Patrick; Auwerx, Johan; McNeilly, Alan S.; Schoonjans, Kristina; Benahmed, Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    Studies in rodents have shown that male sexual function can be disrupted by fetal or neonatal administration of compounds that alter endocrine homeostasis, such as the synthetic nonsteroidal estrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES). Although the molecular basis for this effect remains unknown, estrogen receptors likely play a critical role in mediating DES-induced infertility. Recently, we showed that the orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner (Nr0b2), which is both a target gene and a transcriptional repressor of estrogen receptors, controls testicular function by regulating germ cell entry into meiosis and testosterone synthesis. We therefore hypothesized that some of the harmful effects of DES on testes could be mediated through Nr0b2. Here, we present data demonstrating that Nr0b2 deficiency protected mice against the negative effects of DES on testis development and function. During postnatal development, Nr0b2-null mice were resistant to DES-mediated inhibition of germ cell differentiation, which may be the result of interference by Nr0b2 with retinoid signals that control meiosis. Adult Nr0b2-null male mice were also protected against the effects of DES; however, we suggest that this phenomenon was due to the removal of the repressive effects of Nr0b2 on steroidogenesis. Together, these data demonstrate that Nr0b2 plays a critical role in the pathophysiological changes induced by DES in the mouse testis. PMID:19884658

  4. Cloning and expression profile of ionotropic receptors in the parasitoid wasp Microplitis mediator (Hymenoptera: Braconidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Shan-Ning; Peng, Yong; Lu, Zi-Yun; Dhiloo, Khalid Hussain; Zheng, Yao; Shan, Shuang; Li, Rui-Jun; Zhang, Yong-Jun; Guo, Yu-Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Ionotropic receptors (IRs) mainly detect the acids and amines having great importance in many insect species, representing an ancient olfactory receptor family in insects. In the present work, we performed RNAseq of Microplitis mediator antennae and identified seventeen IRs. Full-length MmedIRs were cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis of the Hymenoptera IRs revealed that ten MmedIR genes encoded "antennal IRs" and seven encoded "divergent IRs". Among the IR25a orthologous groups, two genes, MmedIR25a.1 and MmedIR25a.2, were found in M. mediator. Gene structure analysis of MmedIR25a revealed a tandem duplication of IR25a in M. mediator. The tissue distribution and development specific expression of the MmedIR genes suggested that these genes showed a broad expression profile. Quantitative gene expression analysis showed that most of the genes are highly enriched in adult antennae, indicating the candidate chemosensory function of this family in parasitic wasps. Using immunocytochemistry, we confirmed that one co-receptor, MmedIR8a, was expressed in the olfactory sensory neurons. Our data will supply fundamental information for functional analysis of the IRs in parasitoid wasp chemoreception. PMID:27208597

  5. Posttranslational Modification of HOIP Blocks Toll-Like Receptor 4-Mediated Linear-Ubiquitin-Chain Formation

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, James; Rodgers, Mary A.; Shi, Mude; Amatya, Rina; Hostager, Bruce; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Linear ubiquitination is an atypical posttranslational modification catalyzed by the linear-ubiquitin-chain assembly complex (LUBAC), containing HOIP, HOIL-1L, and Sharpin. LUBAC facilitates NF-κB activation and inflammation upon receptor stimulation by ligating linear ubiquitin chains to critical signaling molecules. Indeed, linear-ubiquitination-dependent signaling is essential to prevent pyogenic bacterial infections that can lead to death. While linear ubiquitination is essential for intracellular receptor signaling upon microbial infection, this response must be measured and stopped to avoid tissue damage and autoimmunity. While LUBAC is activated upon bacterial stimulation, the mechanisms regulating LUBAC activity in response to bacterial stimuli have remained elusive. We demonstrate that LUBAC activity itself is downregulated through ubiquitination, specifically, ubiquitination of the catalytic subunit HOIP at the carboxyl-terminal lysine 1056. Ubiquitination of Lys1056 dynamically altered HOIP conformation, resulting in the suppression of its catalytic activity. Consequently, HOIP Lys1056-to-Arg mutation led not only to persistent LUBAC activity but also to prolonged NF-κB activation induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide-mediated Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) stimulation, whereas it showed no effect on NF-κB activation induced by CD40 stimulation. This study describes a novel posttranslational regulation of LUBAC-mediated linear ubiquitination that is critical for specifically directing TLR4-mediated NF-κB activation. PMID:26578682

  6. Regulation of retinoid mediated cholesterol efflux involves liver X receptor activation in mouse macrophages.

    PubMed

    Manna, Pulak R; Sennoune, Souad R; Martinez-Zaguilan, Raul; Slominski, Andrzej T; Pruitt, Kevin

    2015-08-14

    Removal of cholesterol from macrophage-derived foam cells is a critical step to the prevention of atherosclerotic lesions. We have recently demonstrated the functional importance of retinoids in the regulation of the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein that predominantly mediates the intramitochondrial transport of cholesterol in target tissues. In the present study, treatment of mouse macrophages with retinoids, particularly all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) and 9-cis RA, resulted in increases in cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein AI (Apo-A1). Activation of the PKA pathway by a cAMP analog, (Bu)2cAMP, markedly augmented retinoid mediated cholesterol efflux. Macrophages overexpressing hormone-sensitive lipase increased the hydrolysis of cholesteryl esters and concomitantly enhanced the efficacy of retinoic acid receptor and liver X receptor (LXR) ligands on StAR and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) protein levels. RAs elevated StAR promoter activity in macrophages, and an increase in StAR levels augmented cholesterol efflux to Apo-A1, suggesting retinoid-mediated efflux of cholesterol involves enhanced oxysterol production. Further studies revealed that retinoids activate the LXR regulated genes, sterol receptor-element binding protein-1c and ABCA1. These findings provide insights into the regulatory events in which retinoid signaling effectively enhances macrophage cholesterol efflux and indicate that retinoid therapy may have important implications in limiting and/or regressing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. PMID:26119689

  7. Direct interaction and functional coupling between human 5-HT6 receptor and the light chain 1 subunit of the microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B-LC1).

    PubMed

    Kim, Soon-Hee; Kim, Dong Hyuk; Lee, Kang Ho; Im, Sun-Kyoung; Hur, Eun-Mi; Chung, Kwang Chul; Rhim, Hyewhon

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) receptors of type 6 (5-HT6R) play important roles in mood, psychosis, and eating disorders. Recently, a growing number of studies support the use of 5-HT6R-targeting compounds as promising drug candidates for treating cognitive dysfunction associated with Alzheimer's disease. However, the mechanistic linkage between 5-HT6R and such functions remains poorly understood. By using yeast two-hybrid, GST pull-down, and co-immunoprecipitation assays, here we show that human 5-HT6R interacts with the light chain 1 (LC1) subunit of MAP1B protein (MAP1B-LC1), a classical microtubule-associated protein highly expressed in the brain. Functionally, we have found that expression of MAP1B-LC1 regulates serotonin signaling in a receptor subtype-specific manner, specifically controlling the activities of 5-HT6R, but not those of 5-HT4R and 5-HT7R. In addition, we have demonstrated that MAP1B-LC1 increases the surface expression of 5-HT6R and decreases its endocytosis, suggesting that MAP1B-LC1 is involved in the desensitization and trafficking of 5-HT6R via a direct interaction. Together, we suggest that signal transduction pathways downstream of 5-HT6R are regulated by MAP1B, which might play a role in 5-HT6R-mediated signaling in the brain. PMID:24614691

  8. Direct Interaction and Functional Coupling between Human 5-HT6 Receptor and the Light Chain 1 Subunit of the Microtubule-Associated Protein 1B (MAP1B-LC1)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soon-Hee; Kim, Dong Hyuk; Lee, Kang Ho; Im, Sun-Kyoung; Hur, Eun-Mi; Chung, Kwang Chul; Rhim, Hyewhon

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) receptors of type 6 (5-HT6R) play important roles in mood, psychosis, and eating disorders. Recently, a growing number of studies support the use of 5-HT6R-targeting compounds as promising drug candidates for treating cognitive dysfunction associated with Alzheimer’s disease. However, the mechanistic linkage between 5-HT6R and such functions remains poorly understood. By using yeast two-hybrid, GST pull-down, and co-immunoprecipitation assays, here we show that human 5-HT6R interacts with the light chain 1 (LC1) subunit of MAP1B protein (MAP1B-LC1), a classical microtubule-associated protein highly expressed in the brain. Functionally, we have found that expression of MAP1B-LC1 regulates serotonin signaling in a receptor subtype-specific manner, specifically controlling the activities of 5-HT6R, but not those of 5-HT4R and 5-HT7R. In addition, we have demonstrated that MAP1B-LC1 increases the surface expression of 5-HT6R and decreases its endocytosis, suggesting that MAP1B-LC1 is involved in the desensitization and trafficking of 5-HT6R via a direct interaction. Together, we suggest that signal transduction pathways downstream of 5-HT6R are regulated by MAP1B, which might play a role in 5-HT6R-mediated signaling in the brain. PMID:24614691

  9. Discrimination between NL1- and NL2-Mediated Nuclear Localization of the Glucocorticoid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Savory, Joanne G. A.; Hsu, Brian; Laquian, Ian R.; Giffin, Ward; Reich, Terry; Haché, Robert J. G.; Lefebvre, Yvonne A.

    1999-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) cycles between a free liganded form that is localized to the nucleus and a heat shock protein (hsp)-immunophilin-complexed, unliganded form that is usually localized to the cytoplasm but that can also be nuclear. In addition, rapid nucleocytoplasmic exchange or shuttling of the receptor underlies its localization. Nuclear import of liganded GR is mediated through a well-characterized sequence, NL1, adjacent to the receptor DNA binding domain and a second, uncharacterized motif, NL2, that overlaps with the ligand binding domain. In this study we report that rapid nuclear import (half-life [t1/2] of 4 to 6 min) of agonist- and antagonist-treated GR and the localization of unliganded, hsp-associated GRs to the nucleus in G0 are mediated through NL1 and correlate with the binding of GR to pendulin/importin α. By contrast, NL2-mediated nuclear transfer of GR occurred more slowly (t1/2 = 45 min to 1 h), was agonist specific, and appeared to be independent of binding to importin α. Together, these results suggest that NL2 mediates the nuclear import of GR through an alternative nuclear import pathway. Nuclear export of GR was inhibited by leptomycin B, suggesting that the transfer of GR to the cytoplasm is mediated through the CRM1-dependent pathway. Inhibition of GR nuclear export by leptomycin B enhanced the nuclear localization of both unliganded, wild-type GR and hormone-treated NL1− GR. These results highlight that the subcellular localization of both liganded and unliganded GRs is determined, at least in part, by a flexible equilibrium between the rates of nuclear import and export. PMID:9891038

  10. Transferrin protein nanospheres: a nanoplatform for receptor-mediated cancer cell labeling and gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Michael A.; Spurlin, Tighe A.; Tona, Alessandro; Elliott, John T.; Halter, Michael; Plant, Anne L.

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents preliminary results on the use of transferrin protein nanospheres (TfpNS) for targeting cancer cells in vitro. Protein nanospheres represent an easily prepared and modifiable nanoplatform for receptor-specific targeting, molecular imaging and gene delivery. Rhodamine B isothiocyanate conjugated TfpNS (RBITC-TfpNS) show significantly enhanced uptake in vitro in SK-MEL-28 human malignant melanoma cells known to overexpress transferrin receptors compared to controls. RBITCTfpNS labeling of the cancer cells is due to transferrin receptor-mediated uptake, as demonstrated by competitive inhibition with native transferrin. Initial fluorescence microscopy studies indicate GFP plasmid can be transfected into melanoma cells via GFP plasmid encapsulated by TfpNS.