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Sample records for 5-mw rcs-based short-pulse

  1. A 1- to 5-MW, RCS-based, short-pulse spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y. Chae, Y.C.; Crosbie, E.

    1997-06-01

    Two accelerator configurations, the linac/compressor ring scheme and the linac/RCS scheme, are commonly used to provide the proton beam power for a short-pulse spallation neutron source. In one configuration, a full-power linac provides the beam power and a compressor ring shortens the pulse length from 1-ms down to 1 {micro}s. In the other, rapid cycling synchrotrons (RCSs) provide the beam power and also shorten the pulse length. A feasibility study of a staged approach to a 5-MW proton source utilizing RCS technology, allowing intermediate operation at 1 MW, was performed at ANL and is presented in this paper. This study is complementary to a study in progress at ORNL based on a linac and an accumulator ring. The 1-MW facility consists of a 400-MeV injector linac that delivers 0.5-mA time-averaged current, a synchrotron that accelerates the beam to 2 GeV at a 30-Hz rate, and two neutron-generating target stations. In the second phase, the 2-GeV beam is accelerated to 10 GeV by a larger RCS, increasing the facility beam power to 5 MW.

  2. Numerical studies of startup scenarios in a 1.5 MW, 110 GHz gyrotron operating in short pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsyn, Oleksandr; Nusinovich, Gregory; Antonsen, Thomas, Jr.; Tax, David; Temkin, Richard; Ireap, University Of Maryland Collaboration; Psfc, Massachusetts Institute Of Technology Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    Megawatt class gyrotrons operate in very high-order modes which form a very dense spectrum. In order to excite the operating mode in the presence of many competitors and drive it to the nominal operating point, careful control of the gyrotron's startup is necessary. Our studies are focused on the startup scenarios of the 110 GHz MIT gyrotron designed for operation at 1.5 MW power level in short pulses. Nominal parameters of the electron beam are: 96 kV, 42 A and orbital-to-axial velocity ratio α = 1.4. Previous numerical studies of the startup of this gyrotron had shown that at low voltages (at about 62 kV), first, the high-frequency TE23,6 mode was excited and then, at higher voltages (at about 74 kV), it was replaced by the desired TE22,6 mode. However, during a series of recent experiments at MIT it was shown that instead of the TE23,6 mode a low-frequency TE21,6 mode was excited during the voltage rise and persisted up to a voltage of 70 kV. In this work the authors make an attempt to simulate and explain this result with the help of self-consistent time-dependent code MAGY.

  3. Short pulse neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M.

    2016-08-02

    Short pulse neutron generators are described herein. In a general embodiment, the short pulse neutron generator includes a Blumlein structure. The Blumlein structure includes a first conductive plate, a second conductive plate, a third conductive plate, at least one of an inductor or a resistor, a switch, and a dielectric material. The first conductive plate is positioned relative to the second conductive plate such that a gap separates these plates. A vacuum chamber is positioned in the gap, and an ion source is positioned to emit ions in the vacuum chamber. The third conductive plate is electrically grounded, and the switch is operable to electrically connect and disconnect the second conductive plate and the third conductive plate. The at least one of the resistor or the inductor is coupled to the first conductive plate and the second conductive plate.

  4. SHORT PULSE STRETCHER

    DOEpatents

    Branum, D.R.; Cummins, W.F.

    1962-12-01

    >A short pulse stretching circuit capable of stretching a short puise to enable it to be displayed on a relatively slow sweeping oscilloscope is described. Moreover, the duration of the pulse is increased by charging a capacitor through a diode and thereafter discharging the capacitor at such time as is desired. In the circuit the trigger pulse alone passes through a delay line, whereas the main signal passes through the diode only, and results in over-all circuit losses which are proportional to the low losses of the diode only. (AEC)

  5. Demonstration of 5MW PAFC power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Usami, Yutaka; Takae, Toshio

    1996-12-31

    Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Technology Research Association, established in May 1991 by Japanese 10 electric power and 4 gas companies, started a new project in 1991 FY, with the object of PAFC realization and aiming the development of 5MW- class PAFC. power plant for urban energy center and 1 MW- class power plant for onsite use. This project is carried out as 6 years plan jointly with New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization. The targets of the project are to evaluate and resolve the development task, such as a high reliability, compactness and cost reduction throughout the engineering, manufacturing and field testing of PAFC power plants. PAC tests and power generating test operations of 5MW plant were completed in 1994. Conducting the 2 years continuous operations and studies since 1995, the plant operational performance, system control characteristics, waste heat recovery and environmental advantage will be demonstrated.

  6. Development of a 5 MW reference gearbox for offshore wind turbines: 5 MW reference gearbox

    SciTech Connect

    Nejad, Amir Rasekhi; Guo, Yi; Gao, Zhen; Moan, Torgeir

    2015-07-27

    This paper presents detailed descriptions, modeling parameters and technical data of a 5MW high-speed gearbox developed for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory offshore 5MW baseline wind turbine. The main aim of this paper is to support the concept studies and research for large offshore wind turbines by providing a baseline gearbox model with detailed modeling parameters. This baseline gearbox follows the most conventional design types of those used in wind turbines. It is based on the four-point supports: two main bearings and two torque arms. The gearbox consists of three stages: two planetary and one parallel stage gears. The gear ratios among the stages are calculated in a way to obtain the minimum gearbox weight. The gearbox components are designed and selected based on the offshore wind turbine design codes and validated by comparison to the data available from large offshore wind turbine prototypes. All parameters required to establish the dynamic model of the gearbox are then provided. Moreover, a maintenance map indicating components with high to low probability of failure is shown. The 5 MW reference gearbox can be used as a baseline for research on wind turbine gearboxes and comparison studies. It can also be employed in global analysis tools to represent a more realistic model of a gearbox in a coupled analysis.

  7. Extremely short pulses via resonantly induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radeonychev, Y. V.; Polovinkin, V. A.; Kocharovskaya, O.

    2011-07-01

    We study a novel method to produce extremely short pulses of radiation in a resonant medium via induced transparency by means of adiabatic periodic modulation of atomic transition frequencies by far-off-resonant laser field, which causes linear Stark splitting of atomic energy levels resulting in partial transparency of an optically deep medium and drastic spectral modification of an incident resonant radiation. We find the regimes where the output spectrum corresponds to extremely short pulses and discuss several possible experimental realizations of generation of attosecond pulses in Li2+ ions and femtosecond pulses in atomic hydrogen with commercially available facilities.

  8. GSFC short pulse radar, JONSWAP-75

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, D. M.; Walton, W. T.; Eckerman, J.; Kutz, R. L.; Dombrowski, M.; Kalshoven, J. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    In September 1975, the Goddard Space Flight Center operated a short pulse radar during ocean wave measuring experiments off the coast of West Germany in the North Sea. The experiment was part of JONSWAP-75. The radar system and operations during the experiment are described along with examples of data.

  9. Short-pulse photolytic iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, Ralph F.; Harris, Melvin; Anderson, Brian T.; Hager, Gordon D.

    2000-08-01

    A compact, short pulse photolytic iodine laser (PIL) system designed for use as a source in Raman conversion experiments is described. The single-shot, flashlamp-pumped laser outputs 10 Joules in a 3 microsecond(s) FWHM pulse at a wavelength of 1.315 micrometer and uses n-C3F7I as the renewable laser fuel. Laser design and performance characteristics are presented.

  10. An Ultra-Short Pulsed Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomerantz, Ishay; McCary, Eddie; Meadows, Alexander R.; Arefiev, Alexey; Bernstein, Aaron C.; Chester, Clay; Cortez, Jose; Donovan, Michael E.; Dyer, Gilliss; Gaul, Erhard W.; Hamilton, David; Kuk, Donghoon; Lestrade, Arantxa; Wang, Chunhua; Ditmire, Todd; Hegelich, Manuel B.

    2014-10-01

    We report on a novel compact laser-driven neutron source with unprecedented short pulse duration (<50 ps) and high flux (>1018 neutrons/cm2/s), an order of magnitude higher than any existing source. In our experiments, high-energy electron jets are generated from thin (<1 μm) plastic targets irradiated by a petawatt laser. These intense electron beams are employed to generate neutrons from a metal converter. Our method opens venues for enhancing neutron radiography contrast, conducting time-resolved neutron-damage studies at their characteristic evolution time-scales and for creating astrophysical conditions of heavy element synthesis in the laboratory.

  11. Thomson scattering in short pulse laser experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, E. G.; Rose, S. J.

    2012-08-15

    Thomson scattering is well used as a diagnostic in many areas of high energy density physics. In this paper, we quantitatively demonstrate the practicality of using Thomson scattering as a diagnostic of short-pulse laser-plasma experiments in the regime, where the plasmas probed are at solid density and have temperatures of many hundreds of eV using a backlighter produced with an optical laser. This method allows a diagnosis both spatially and temporally of the density and temperature distributions in high energy density laser-plasma interactions which is independent from, and would act as a useful complement to, the existing spectroscopic methods.

  12. The 1.5 MW wind turbine of tomorrow

    SciTech Connect

    De Wolff, T.J.; Sondergaard, H.

    1996-12-31

    The Danish company Nordtank is one of the pioneers within the wind turbine industry. Since 1981 Nordtank has installed worldwide more than 2300 wind turbine generators with a total name plate capacity that is exceeding 350 MW. This paper will describe two major wind turbine technology developments that Nordtank has accomplished during the last year: Site Optimization of Nordtank wind turbines: Nordtank has developed a flexible design concept for its WTGs in the 500/600 kW range, in order to offer the optimal WTG solution for any given site and wind regime. Nordtank`s 1.5 MW wind turbine: In September 1995, Nordtank was the first company to install a commercial 1.5 NM WTG. This paper will document the development process, the design as well as operations of the Nordtank 1.5 MW WTG.

  13. Short-pulse laser interactions with disordered materials and liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Phinney, L.M.; Goldman, C.H.; Longtin, J.P.; Tien, C.L.

    1995-12-31

    High-power, short-pulse lasers in the picosecond and subpicosecond range are utilized in an increasing number of technologies, including materials processing and diagnostics, micro-electronics and devices, and medicine. In these applications, the short-pulse radiation interacts with a wide range of media encompassing disordered materials and liquids. Examples of disordered materials include porous media, polymers, organic tissues, and amorphous forms of silicon, silicon nitride, and silicon dioxide. In order to accurately model, efficiently control, and optimize short-pulse, laser-material interactions, a thorough understanding of the energy transport mechanisms is necessary. Thus, fractals and percolation theory are used to analyze the anomalous diffusion regime in random media. In liquids, the thermal aspects of saturable and multiphoton absorption are examined. Finally, a novel application of short-pulse laser radiation to reduce surface adhesion forces in microstructures through short-pulse laser-induced water desorption is presented.

  14. The 5 MW for solar-chemistry development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, J. T.

    1981-11-01

    The US-DOE, 5MW solar Central Receiver Test Facility (CRTF) operates to develop and proof-test high efficiency solar receivers and collectors (heliostats) for applications such as electricity generation and process heating. The capabilities of CRTF for solar chemical process development studies are described and related to chemical reactant heating rates. A Sun Fuels program is planned to demonstrate a process for upgrading both nonrenewable and renewable feedstocks into conventional fuels. To additionally benefit from the high intensity light source, studies on the direct solar pyrolysis of metal halides and carbonyls to produce high purity, high value metals are recommended.

  15. 5 MW pulsed spallation neutron source, Preconceptual design study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report describes a self-consistent base line design for a 5 MW Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (PSNS). It is intended to establish feasibility of design and as a basis for further expanded and detailed studies. It may also serve as a basis for establishing project cost (30% accuracy) in order to intercompare competing designs for a PSNS not only on the basis of technical feasibility and technical merit but also on the basis of projected total cost. The accelerator design considered here is based on the objective of a pulsed neutron source obtained by means of a pulsed proton beam with average beam power of 5 MW, in {approx} 1 {mu}sec pulses, operating at a repetition rate of 60 Hz. Two target stations are incorporated in the basic facility: one for operation at 10 Hz for long-wavelength instruments, and one operating at 50 Hz for instruments utilizing thermal neutrons. The design approach for the proton accelerator is to use a low energy linear accelerator (at 0.6 GeV), operating at 60 Hz, in tandem with two fast cycling booster synchrotrons (at 3.6 GeV), operating at 30 Hz. It is assumed here that considerations of cost and overall system reliability may favor the present design approach over the alternative approach pursued elsewhere, whereby use is made of a high energy linear accelerator in conjunction with a dc accumulation ring. With the knowledge that this alternative design is under active development, it was deliberately decided to favor here the low energy linac-fast cycling booster approach. Clearly, the present design, as developed here, must be carried to the full conceptual design stage in order to facilitate a meaningful technology and cost comparison with alternative designs.

  16. A 5 MW TRIGA reactor design for radioisotope production

    SciTech Connect

    Veca, Anthony R.; Whittemore, William L.

    1994-07-01

    The production and preparation of commercial-scale quantities of radioisotopes has become an important activity as their medical and industrial applications continue to expand. There are currently various large multipurpose research reactors capable of producing ample quantities of radioisotopes. These facilities, however, have many competing demands placed upon them by a wide variety of researchers and scientific programs which severely limit their radioisotope production capability. A demonstrated need has developed for a simpler reactor facility dedicated to the production of radioisotopes on a commercial basis. This smaller, dedicated reactor could provide continuous fission and activation product radioisotopes to meet commercial requirements for the foreseeable future. The design of a 5 MW TRIGA reactor facility, upgradeable to 10 MW, dedicated to the production of industrial and medical radioisotopes is discussed. A TRIGA reactor designed specifically for this purpose with its demonstrated long core life and simplicity of operation would translate into increased radioisotope production. As an example, a single TRIGA could supply the entire US needs for Mo-99. The facility is based on the experience gained by General Atomics in the design, installation, and construction of over 60 other TRIGAs over the past 35 years. The unique uranium-zirconium hydride fuel makes TRIGA reactors inexpensive to build and operate, reliable in their simplicity, highly flexible due to unique passive safety, and environmentally friendly because of minimal power requirements and long-lived fuel. (author)

  17. Medical applications of ultra-short pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B M; Marion, J E

    1999-06-08

    The medical applications for ultra short pulse lasers (USPLs) and their associated commercial potential are reviewed. Short pulse lasers offer the surgeon the possibility of precision cutting or disruption of tissue with virtually no thermal or mechanical damage to the surrounding areas. Therefore the USPL offers potential improvement to numerous existing medical procedures. Secondly, when USPLs are combined with advanced tissue diagnostics, there are possibilities for tissue-selective precision ablation that may allow for new surgeries that cannot at present be performed. Here we briefly review the advantages of short pulse lasers, examine the potential markets both from an investment community perspective, and from the view. of the technology provider. Finally nominal performance and cost requirements for the lasers, delivery systems and diagnostics and the present state of development will be addressed.

  18. Cylindrical short-pulse Child-Langmuir law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Wee Shing

    2005-10-01

    Laser-driven short pulses have been prevalently used in photo-injectors to produce extremely high current densities. If the pulse length of the short-pulse current is less than the transit time across the gap, the space-charge-limiting (SCL) current density of the electron beam exceeds that of the classical long-pulse limit as given by the Child-Langmuir (CL) Law. The 1D short-pulse CL law for a planar electrode has been derived with verification from PIC simulation [1]. The extension to the 2D and 3D models of the short-pulse CL law has also been presented recently [2]. In the long pulse limit, the 2D and 3D CL laws for both planar and cylindrical diodes have also been developed [3]. In this paper, we will present the 1D and 2D short-pulse CL law in the coaxial cylinder configuration for both convergent and divergent flows. The analytical results will be compared with 2D PIC simulation results. [1] 'Ag'ust Valfells et. al. , ``Effects of pulse-length and emitter area in virtual cathode formation in electron guns'', Phys. Plasmas 9, 2377 (2002). [2] W. S. Koh and L. K. Ang, "Two-dimensional Short-Pulse Chid-Langmuir Law", The 32nd International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS), N05CH37707, 3P38, pp. 298 (2005).[3] W. S. Koh, et. al., Three-dimensional Child-Langmuir law for hot electron emission, Phys. Plasmas 12, 053107 (2005). Email: elkang@ntu.edu.sg

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPACT PHOTO-INJECTOR WITH RFFOCUSING LENS FOR SHORT PULSE ELECTRON SOURCE APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Grabenhofer, Alexander; Eaton, Douglas W.

    2013-09-01

    For development of compact ultrafast electron source system, we are currently designing a short-pulse RF-gun with RF focusing structure by means of a series of comprehensive modeling analysis processes. EM design of a 2.5 cell resonant cavity with input coupler, acceleration dynamics of photo-emitted electron bunch, EM design of RF-lens with input coupler, and phasespace analysis of focused electron bunch are systematically examined with multi-physics simulators. All the features of the 2.856 GHz cavity geometry were precisely engineered for acceleration energies ranging from 100 keV to 500 keV (safety limited) to be powered by our 5 MW S-band klystron. The klystron (Thales TH2163) and modulator system (ScandiNova K1 turnkey system) were successfully installed and tested. Performance tests of the klystron system show peak output power > 5 MW, as per operation specifications. At the quasi-relativistic energies, the electron source is capable of generating 100fC – 1 pC electron bunch with pulse duration close to 30 fs – 1 ps and transverse size of a few hundred microns. PIC simulations have shown that the electron bunch undergoes fast RF acceleration, rapidly reaching the desired energies, which can be controlled by tuning RF injection phase and input driving power. It has been shown that it is possible to also focus/compress the bunch longitudinally using a RF-lens, which would allow us to control the temporal resolution of the system as well. While our primary analysis has been performed on a 2.5 cell design, we are also looking into half-cell (single cavity) design that is expected to provide the same range of beam energy with a simple configuration.

  20. Fiber Laser Front Ends for High Energy, Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J; Messerly, M; Phan, H; Siders, C; Beach, R; Barty, C

    2007-06-21

    We are developing a fiber laser system for short pulse (1-10ps), high energy ({approx}1kJ) glass laser systems. Fiber lasers are ideal for these systems as they are highly reliable and enable long term stable operation.

  1. Short Pulse Experimental Capability at the Nike Laser Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, J. L.; Chan, Y.; Gardner, J.; Giuliani, J.; Karasik, M.; Kehne, D.; Mostovych, A.; Obenschain, S.; Velikovich, A.; Schmitt, A.; Serlin, V.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Metzler, N.; Smyth, Z.; Terrell, S.

    2004-11-01

    Recent simulations demonstrated high gain for direct drive pellets compressed by a laser pulse incorporating a short pulse prior to the main pulse. Theoretical work has also shown that a short prepulse can create a tailored density profile that reduces the initial instability growth due to laser imprinting. A new short pulse (0.35-0.75 ns FWHM)is being added to the Nike KrF laser system to facilitate hydrodynamic experiments with short prepulses. This capability has been incorporated into the initial stages of the laser system and the propagation of these pulses through the angularly multiplexed amplifiers is being studied. Measurements of pulse shape and energy will be compared to simulations using the KrF physics code Orestes for the next to last amplifier of the laser system, the 20 cm x 20 cm e-beam pumped laser cell. The effects of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) upon individual output pulses will be also discussed.

  2. Application of Yb:YAG short pulse laser system

    DOEpatents

    Erbert, Gaylen V.; Biswal, Subrat; Bartolick, Joseph M.; Stuart, Brent C.; Crane, John K.; Telford, Steve; Perry, Michael D.

    2004-07-06

    A diode pumped, high power (at least 20W), short pulse (up to 2 ps), chirped pulse amplified laser using Yb:YAG as the gain material is employed for material processing. Yb:YAG is used as the gain medium for both a regenerative amplifier and a high power 4-pass amplifier. A single common reflective grating optical device is used to both stretch pulses for amplification purposes and to recompress amplified pulses before being directed to a workpiece.

  3. PHASE NOISE COMPARISON OF SHORT PULSE LASER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Shukui Zhang; Stephen Benson; John Hansknecht; David Hardy; George Neil; Michelle D. Shinn

    2006-08-27

    This paper describes phase noise measurements of several different laser systems that have completely different gain media and configurations including a multi-kW free-electron laser. We will focus on state-of-the-art short pulse lasers, especially drive lasers for photocathode injectors. Phase noise comparison of the FEL drive laser, electron beam and FEL laser output also will be presented.

  4. Phase Noise Comparision of Short Pulse Laser Systems

    SciTech Connect

    S. Zhang; S. V. Benson; J. Hansknecht; D. Hardy; G. Neil; Michelle D. Shinn

    2006-12-01

    This paper describes the phase noise measurement on several different mode-locked laser systems that have completely different gain media and configurations including a multi-kW free-electron laser. We will focus on the state of the art short pulse lasers, especially the drive lasers for photocathode injectors. A comparison between the phase noise of the drive laser pulses, electron bunches and FEL pulses will also be presented.

  5. Modeling and simulation of ultra-short pulse amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflaum, Christoph; Hartmann, Rainer; Rahimi, Zhabiz

    2016-03-01

    Ultra-short pulses with high average power are required for a variety of technical and medical applications. Single, multi-pass, and regenerative amplifiers are used, in order to increase the power of ultra-short lasers. Typical laser crystals for such amplifiers include Ti:Sapphire or Yb:YAG laser crystals. Difficulties in the amplification of ultra-short pulses include gain narrowing effects and dispersion effects in the laser crystal. In particular, these complications arise, when a pulse stretcher is needed before amplification of the laser beam. We present a technique to model and simulate the amplification of ultra-short pulses. This technique allows to model both gain narrowing effects and decrease of beam quality caused by amplification of the laser beam. This requires a detailed 3-dimensional simulation of population inversion. Gain narrowing effects are taken into account by analyzing the gain of the spectrum of the laser beam. It is important to distinguish amplifiers with one or only two passes and a regenerative amplifier. These two different kind of amplifiers are modeled by different approaches. A regenerative amplifier is modeled by a set of time dependent rate equations. However, a single pass amplifier is modeled by a set of spatial dependent rate equations. In both cases, a system of rate equations arises from spectral discretization of the laser beam. Detailed simulation results are presented.

  6. Electromagnetic Pulses at Short-Pulse Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Jr., C G; Throop, A; Eder, D; Kimbrough, J

    2007-08-28

    Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) is a known issue for short-pulse laser facilities, and will also be an issue for experiments using the advanced radiographic capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The ARC diagnostic uses four NIF beams that are compressed to picosecond durations for backlighting ignition capsules and other applications. Consequently, we are working to understand the EMP due to high-energy (MeV) electrons escaping from targets heated by short-pulse lasers. Our approach is to measure EMP in the Titan short-pulse laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and to employ that data to establish analysis and simulation capabilities. We have installed a wide variety of probes inside and outside the Titan laser chamber. We have high-frequency B-dots and D-dots, a photodiode, and fast current-viewing and integrating current transformers. The probe outputs are digitized by 10 and 20 Gsample/s oscilloscopes. The cables and oscilloscopes are well shielded to reduce noise. Our initial measurement campaign has yielded data useful mainly from hundreds of MHz to several GHz. We currently are supplementing our high-frequency probes with lower-frequency ones to obtain better low-frequency data. In order to establish analysis and simulation capabilities we are modeling the Titan facility using various commercial and LLNL numerical electromagnetic codes. We have simulated EMP generation by having a specified number of electrons leave the target and strike the chamber wall and other components in the chamber. This short impulse of electrons has a corresponding broad spectrum, exciting high-frequency structure in the resulting EMP. In this paper, we present results of our initial measurement campaign and comparisons between the measurements and simulations.

  7. Electromagnetic Pulses at Short-Pulse Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C G; Throop, A; Eder, D; Kimbrough, J

    2008-02-04

    Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) is a known issue for short-pulse laser facilities, and will also be an issue for experiments using the advanced radiographic capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The ARC diagnostic uses four NIF beams that are compressed to picosecond durations for backlighting ignition capsules and other applications. Consequently, we are working to understand the EMP due to high-energy (MeV) electrons escaping from targets heated by short-pulse lasers. Our approach is to measure EMP in the Titan short-pulse laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and to employ that data to establish analysis and simulation capabilities. We have installed a wide variety of probes inside and outside the Titan laser chamber. We have high-frequency B-dot and D-dot probes, a photodiode, and fast current-viewing and integrating current transformers. The probe outputs are digitized by 10 and 20 Gsample/s oscilloscopes. The cables and oscilloscopes are well shielded to reduce noise. Our initial measurement campaign has yielded data useful mainly from several hundreds of MHz to several GHz. We currently are supplementing our high-frequency probes with lower-frequency ones to obtain better low-frequency data. In order to establish analysis and simulation capabilities we are modeling the Titan facility using various commercial and LLNL numerical electromagnetics codes. We have simulated EMP generation by having a specified number of electrons leave the target and strike the chamber wall and other components in the chamber. This short impulse of electrons has a correspondingly broad spectrum, exciting high-frequency structure in the resulting EMP. In this paper, we present results of our initial measurement campaign and comparisons between the measurements and simulations.

  8. High-repetition-rate short-pulse gas discharge.

    PubMed

    Tulip, J; Seguin, H; Mace, P N

    1979-09-01

    A high-average-power short-pulse gas discharge is described. This consists of a volume-preionized transverse discharge of the type used in gas lasers driven by a Blumlein energy storage circuit. The Blumlein circuit is fabricated from coaxial cable, is pulse-charged from a high-repetition-rate Marx-bank generator, and is switched by a high-repetition-rate segmented rail gap. The operation of this discharge under conditions typical of rare-gas halide lasers is described. A maximum of 900 pps was obtained, giving a power flow into the discharge of 30 kW. PMID:18699678

  9. Ultra-short pulse propagation in complex optical systems.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Ulrike; Zeitner, Uwe; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2005-05-16

    In application of ultra-short laser pulses the pulse parameters have to be controlled accurately. Hence the manipulation of the propagation behavior of ultra-short pulses requires for specially designed optics. We have developed a tool for the simulation of ultra-short laser pulse propagation through complex real optical systems based on a combination of ray-tracing and wave optical propagation methods. For the practical implementation of the approach two commercially available software packages have been linked together, which are ZEMAX and Virtual Optics Lab. The focussing properties of different lenses will be analyzed and the results are demonstrated. PMID:19495292

  10. Ultra short pulse generation and reshaping using highly nonlinear fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, S.; Namiki, S.; Inoue, T.; Oguri, A.; Akutsu, T.; Shinozaki, J.; Ozeki, Y.; Takasaka, S.; Igarashi, K.; Sakano, M.; Yagi, T.

    2005-11-01

    We experimentally investigate the generation of a low-noise ultra short pulse train from 40GHz to160GHz by using Comb-like profiled fiber (CPF) for adiabatic soliton conversion and compression. Highly nonlinear fibers allow us to reduce total length of CPF as well as to utilize Kerr effect in the fiber effectively. We demonstrate generations of 160GHz soliton train of 750fs, the compression to 500fs of 40GHz externally-modulated pulse with wideband tunability over 30nm. Then we apply the CPF pulse compression technique to achieve the programmable repetition tunability from 5 to 500 MHz in low pedestral 300fs pulse train generation.

  11. Short-Pulse Laser-Matter Computational Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Town, R; Tabak, M

    2004-11-02

    For three days at the end of August 2004, 55 plasma scientists met at the Four Points by Sheraton in Pleasanton to discuss some of the critical issues associated with the computational aspects of the interaction of short-pulse high-intensity lasers with matter. The workshop was organized around the following six key areas: (1) Laser propagation/interaction through various density plasmas: micro scale; (2) Anomalous electron transport effects: From micro to meso scale; (3) Electron transport through plasmas: From meso to macro scale; (4) Ion beam generation, transport, and focusing; (5) ''Atomic-scale'' electron and proton stopping powers; and (6) K{alpha} diagnostics.

  12. Development of short pulse soft x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Da Silva, L.B.; MacGowan, B.J.; Koch, J.A.; Mrowka, S.; Matthews, D.L.; Eder, D.; London, R.

    1993-02-01

    X-ray lasers with pulse duration shorter than 20 ps allow the possibility of imaging laser produced plasmas with {mu}m resolution. In addition, the high peak brightness of these new sources will allow us to study nonlinear optics in the xuv region. In this paper we will describe our efforts to produce collisionally pumped short pulse x-ray lasers. Initial results, which have produced {approximately} 45 ps (FWHM) x-ray lasers, using a double pulse irradiation technique are presented along with a discussion of the prospects for reducing the pulse width.

  13. Industrial beam delivery system for ultra-short pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funck, Max C.; Wedel, Björn; Kayander, Ilya; Niemeyer, Jörg

    2015-03-01

    Beam delivery systems are an integral part of industrial laser equipment. Separating laser source and application fiber optic beam delivery is employed wherever great flexibility is required. And today, fiber optic beam delivery of several kW average power is available for continuous wave operation using multimode step index fibers with core diameters of several 100 μm. However, during short-pulse or even ultra-short pulse laser operation step index fibers fail due to high power density levels and nonlinear effects such as self-focusing and induced scattering. Hollow core photonic crystal fibers (HC-PCF) are an alternative to traditional fibers featuring light propagation mostly inside a hollow core, enabling high power handling and drastically reduced nonlinear effects. These fibers have become available during the past decade and are used in research but also for fiber laser systems and exhibit a growing popularity. We report on using HC-PCF fibers and their integration into an industrial beam delivery package comparable to today's fiber optic standards and will discuss power handling, beam quality and efficiency as well as future prospects of this technology. In a preliminary industrial beam delivery setup 300 fs pulses at 100 W average power could be delivered.

  14. A Bright Neutron Source Driven by a Short Pulse Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Markus

    2012-10-01

    Neutrons are a unique tool to alter and diagnose material properties, and to exciting nuclear reactions, for many applications. Accelerator based spallation sources provide high neutron fluxes for research, but there is a growing need for more compact sources with higher peak brightness, whether fast or moderated neutrons. Intense lasers promise such as source, readily linkable to other experimental facilities, or deployable outside a laboratory setting. We present experimental results on the first short-pulse laser-driven neutron source powerful enough for radiography. A novel laser-driven ion acceleration mechanism (Breakout Afterburner), operating in the relativistic transparency regime, is used. Based on the mechanism's advantages, a laser-driven deuteron beam is used to achieve a new record in laser-neutron production, in numbers, energy and directionality. This neutron beam is a highly directional pulse < 1 ns at ˜ 1 cm from the target, with a flux > 40/2̂, and thus suitable for imaging applications with high temporal resolution. The beam contained, for the first time, neutrons with energies of up to 150 MeV. Thus using short pulse lasers, it is now possible to use the resulting hard x-rays and neutrons of different energies to radiograph an unknown object and to determine its material composition. Our data matches the simulated data for our test samples.

  15. Short pulse generation by laser slicing at NSLSII

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, L.; Blednykh, A.; Guo, W.; Krinsky, S.; Li, Y.; Shaftan, T.; Tchoubar, O.; Wang, G.; Willeke, F.; Yang, L.

    2011-03-28

    We discuss an upgrade R&D project for NSLSII to generate sub-pico-second short x-ray pulses using laser slicing. We discuss its basic parameters and present a specific example for a viable design and its performance. Since the installation of the laser slicing system into the storage ring will break the symmetry of the lattice, we demonstrate it is possible to recover the dynamical aperture to the original design goal of the ring. There is a rapid growth of ultrafast user community interested in science using sub-pico-second x-ray pulses. In BNL's Short Pulse Workshop, the discussion from users shows clearly the need for a sub-pico-second pulse source using laser slicing method. In the proposal submitted following this workshop, NSLS team proposed both hard x-ray and soft x-ray beamlines using laser slicing pulses. Hence there is clearly a need to consider the R&D efforts of laser slicing short pulse generation at NSLSII to meet these goals.

  16. Making relativistic positrons using ultraintense short pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Hui; Wilks, S. C.; Bonlie, J. D.; Chen, S. N.; Cone, K. V.; Elberson, L. N.; Price, D. F.; Schneider, M. B.; Shepherd, R.; Stafford, D. C.; Tommasini, R.; Van Maren, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Gregori, G.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Myatt, J.

    2009-12-15

    This paper describes a new positron source using ultraintense short pulse lasers. Although it has been theoretically studied since the 1970s, the use of lasers as a valuable new positron source was not demonstrated experimentally until recent years, when the petawatt-class short pulse lasers were developed. In 2008 and 2009, in a series of experiments performed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a large number of positrons were observed after shooting a millimeter thick solid gold target. Up to 2x10{sup 10} positrons/s ejected at the back of approximately millimeter thick gold targets were detected. The targets were illuminated with short (approx1 ps) ultraintense (approx1x10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses. These positrons are produced predominantly by the Bethe-Heitler process and have an effective temperature of 2-4 MeV, with the distribution peaking at 4-7 MeV. The angular distribution of the positrons is anisotropic. For a wide range of applications, this new laser-based positron source with its unique characteristics may complement the existing sources based on radioactive isotopes and accelerators.

  17. Making Relativistic Positrons Using Ultra-Intense Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Wilks, S; Bonlie, J; Chen, C; Chen, S; Cone, K; Elberson, L; Gregori, G; Liang, E; Price, D; Van Maren, R; Meyerhofer, D D; Mithen, J; Murphy, C V; Myatt, J; Schneider, M; Shepherd, R; Stafford, D; Tommasini, R; Beiersdorfer, P

    2009-08-24

    This paper describes a new positron source produced using ultra-intense short pulse lasers. Although it has been studied in theory since as early as the 1970s, the use of lasers as a valuable new positron source was not demonstrated experimentally until recent years, when the petawatt-class short pulse lasers were developed. In 2008 and 2009, in a series of experiments performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a large number of positrons were observed after shooting a millimeter thick solid gold target. Up to 2 x 10{sup 10} positrons per steradian ejected out the back of {approx}mm thick gold targets were detected. The targets were illuminated with short ({approx}1 ps) ultra-intense ({approx}1 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses. These positrons are produced predominantly by the Bethe-Heitler process, and have an effective temperature of 2-4 MeV, with the distribution peaking at 4-7 MeV. The angular distribution of the positrons is anisotropic. For a wide range of applications, this new laser based positron source with its unique characteristics may complements the existing sources using radioactive isotopes and accelerators.

  18. Modelling hot electron generation in short pulse target heating experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sircombe, N. J.; Hughes, S. J.

    2013-11-01

    Target heating experiments planned for the Orion laser facility, and electron beam driven fast ignition schemes, rely on the interaction of a short pulse high intensity laser with dense material to generate a flux of energetic electrons. It is essential that the characteristics of this electron source are well known in order to inform transport models in radiation hydrodynamics codes and allow effective evaluation of experimental results and forward modelling of future campaigns. We present results obtained with the particle in cell (PIC) code EPOCH for realistic target and laser parameters, including first and second harmonic light. The hot electron distributions are characterised and their implications for onward transport and target heating are considered with the aid of the Monte-Carlo transport code THOR.

  19. Stimulated brillouin backscatter of a short-pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkel, D.E.; Williams, E.A.; Berger, R.L.

    1994-11-03

    Stimulated Brillouin backscattering (SBBS) from a short-pulse laser, where the pulse length is short compared to the plasma length, is found to be qualitatively different than in the long pulse regime, where the pulse length is long compared to the plasma length. We find that after an initial transient of order the laser pulse length transit time, the instability reaches a steady state in the variables x{prime} = x {minus} V{sub g}t, t{prime} = t, where V{sub g} is the pulse group velocity. In contrast, SBBS in a long pulse can be absolutely unstable and grows indefinitely, or until nonlinearities intervene. We find that the motion of the laser pulse induces Doppler related effects that substantially modify the backscattered spectrum at higher intensities, where the instability is strongly coupled (i.e. , has a growth rate large compared to the ion acoustic frequency).

  20. Ultra-short Pulse Laser Structuring of Molding Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Daniel; Richter, Lars

    The machining of highly filled abrasive polymer plastics in injection molding processes determines high resistant tools in the industrial production. One of the most important points is a long durability of the molding tools to reduce the costs of production. Thus, the adhesion force and abrasion will be reduced with the help of defined surface properties. To achieve appropriate surface conditions, an ultra-short pulse laser is used for a micro structuring. Additional a laser polishing of the micro-structured surfaces to optimize the frictional properties is presented. This paper shows the research results of investigations on the laser modification of steel surfaces, to generate high-quality and wear-resistant surfaces for injection molding tools.

  1. Short-pulse laser removal of organic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Craig T.

    2000-08-01

    A major problem in the regular maintenance of aerospace systems is the removal of paint and other protective coatings from surfaces without polluting the atmosphere or endangering workers. Recent research has demonstrated that many organic coatings can be removed from surfaces efficiently using short laser pulses without the use of any chemical agents. The lasers employed in this study were repetitively-pulsed neodymium YAG devices operating at 1064 nm (15 - 30 ns, 10 - 20 Hz). The efficiency of removal can be cast in terms of an effective heat of ablation, Q* (kJ of laser energy incident per g of paint removed), although, for short pulses, the mechanism of removal is believed to be dominated more by thermo- mechanical or shock effects than by photo-ablation. Q* data were collected as a function of pulse fluence for several paint types. For many paint types, there was a fairly sharp threshold fluence per pulse near 1 J/cm2, above which Q* values dropped to levels which were a factor of four lower than those observed for long- pulse or continuous laser ablation of paint. In this regime, the coating is removed in fairly large particles or, in the case of one paint, the entire thickness of the coating was removed over the exposed area in one pulse. Hardware for implementing short-pulse laser paint stripping in the field is under development and will be highlighted in the presentation. Practical paint stripping rates achieved using the prototype hardware are presented for several paint types.

  2. Voyager 0.2-lbf thruster valve assembly short pulse test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    The short pulse width testing completed on the Voyager 0.2-lbf thruster value assemblies (T/VA's) and the disassembly and inspection of T/VA S/N 020 is reported. The purpose for performing the short pulse width testing on Voyager 0.2-lbf thruster valve assemblies (T/VA's) was to determine: (1) impulse bit versus electrical pulse width; (2) impulse bit variations versus electrical pulse width; and (3) whether the short pulses decrease thruster life.

  3. Overview of LANL short-pulse ion acceleration activities

    SciTech Connect

    Flippo, Kirk A.; Schmitt, Mark J.; Offermann, Dustin; Cobble, James A.; Gautier, Donald; Kline, John; Workman, Jonathan; Archuleta, Fred; Gonzales, Raymond; Hurry, Thomas; Johnson, Randall; Letzring, Samuel; Montgomery, David; Reid, Sha-Marie; Shimada, Tsutomu; Gaillard, Sandrine A.; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Bussman, Michael; Kluge, Thomas; Cowan, Thomas E.; Rassuchine, Jenny M.; Lowenstern, Mario E.; Mucino, J. Eduardo; Gall, Brady; Korgan, Grant; Malekos, Steven; Adams, Jesse; Bartal, Teresa; Chawla, Surgreev; Higginson, Drew; Beg, Farhat; Nilson, Phil; Mac Phee, Andrew; Le Pape, Sebastien; Hey, Daniel; Mac Kinnon, Andy; Geissel, Mattias; Schollmeier, Marius; Stephens, Rich

    2009-12-02

    An overview of Los Alamos National Laboratory's activities related to short-pulse ion acceleration is presented. LANL is involved is several projects related to Inertial Confinement Fusion (Fast Ignition) and Laser-Ion Acceleration. LANL has an active high energy X-ray backlighter program for radiographing ICF implosions and other High Energy Density Laboratory Physics experiments. Using the Trident 200TW laser we are currently developing high energy photon (>10 keV) phase contrast imaging techniques to be applied on Omega and the NIF. In addition we are engaged in multiple programs in laser ion acceleration to boost the ion energies and efficiencies for various potential applications including Fast Ignition, active material interrogation, and medical applications. Two basic avenues to increase ion performance are currently under study: one involves ultra-thin targets and the other involves changing the target geometry. We have recently had success in boosting proton energies above 65 MeV into the medical application range. Highlights covered in the presentation include: The Trident Laser System; X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging for ICF and HEDLP; Improving TNSA Ion Acceleration; Scaling Laws; Flat Targets; Thin Targets; Cone Targets; Ion Focusing;Trident; Omega EP; Scaling Comparisons; and, Conclusions.

  4. Photoconductive Semiconductor Switch Technology for Short Pulse Electromagnetics and Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Denison, Gary J.; Helgeson, Wesley D.; Hjalmarson, Harold P.; Loubriel, Guillermo M.; Mar, Alan; O'Malley, Martin W.; Zutavern, Fred J.

    1999-08-05

    High gain photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS) are being used to produce high power electromagnetic pulses foc (1) compact, repetitive accelerators, (2) ultra-wide band impulse sources, (3) precision gas switch triggers, (4) optically-activated firesets, and (5) high power optical pulse generation and control. High power, sub-nanosecond optical pulses are used for active optical sensors such as compact optical radars and range-gated hallistic imaging systems. Following a brief introduction to high gain PCSS and its general applications, this paper will focus on PCSS for optical pulse generation and control. PCSS technology can be employed in three distinct approaches to optical pulse generation and control: (1) short pulse carrier injection to induce gain-switching in semiconductor lasers, (2) electro-optical Q-switching, and (3) optically activated Q-switching. The most significant PCSS issues for these applications are switch rise time, jitter, and longevity. This paper will describe both the requirements of these applications and the most recent results from PCSS technology. Experiments to understand and expand the limitations of high gain PCSS will also be described.

  5. Airborne profiling of ice thickness using a short pulse radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickers, R. S.; Heighway, J. E.; Gedney, R.

    1973-01-01

    The acquisition and interpretation of ice thickness data from a mobile platform has for some time been a goal of the remote sensing community. Such data, once obtainable, is of value in monitoring the changes in ice thickness over large areas, and in mapping the potential hazards to traffic in shipping lanes. Measurements made from a helicopter-borne ice thickness profiler of ice in Lake Superior, Lake St. Clair and the St. Clair river as part of NASA's program to develop an ice information system are described. The profiler described is a high resolution, non-imaging, short pulse radar, operating at a carrier frequency of 2.7 GHz. The system can resolve reflective surfaces separated by as little as 10 cm. and permits measurement of the distance between resolvable surfaces with an accuracy of about 1 cm. Data samples are given for measurements both in a static (helicopter hovering), and a traverse mode. Ground truth measurements taken by an ice auger team traveling with the helicopter are compared with the remotely sensed data and the accuracy of the profiler is discussed based on these measurements.

  6. Studying the mechanism of micromachining by short pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadag, Shiva

    The semiconductor materials like Si and the transparent dielectric materials like glass and quartz are extensively used in optoelectronics, microelectronics, and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) industries. The combination of these materials often go hand in hand for applications in MEMS such as in chips for pressure sensors, charge coupled devices (CCD), and photovoltaic (PV) cells for solar energy generation. The transparent negative terminal of the solar cell is made of glass on one surface of the PV cell. The positive terminal (cathode) on the other surface of the solar cell is made of silicon with a glass negative terminal (anode). The digital watches and cell phones, LEDs, micro-lens, optical components, and laser optics are other examples for the application of silicon and or glass. The Si and quartz are materials extensively used in CCD and LED for digital cameras and CD players respectively. Hence, three materials: (1) a semiconductor silicon and transparent dielectrics,- (2) glass, and (3) quartz are chosen for laser micromachining as they have wide spread applications in microelectronics industry. The Q-switched, nanosecond pulsed lasers are most extensively used for micro-machining. The nanosecond type of short pulsed laser is less expensive for the end users than the second type, pico or femto, ultra-short pulsed lasers. The majority of the research work done on these materials (Si, SiO 2, and glass) is based on the ultra-short pulsed lasers. This is because of the cut quality, pin point precision of the drilled holes, formation of the nanometer size microstructures and fine features, and minimally invasive heat affected zone. However, there are many applications such as large surface area dicing, cutting, surface cleaning of Si wafers by ablation, and drilling of relatively large-sized holes where some associated heat affected zone due to melting can be tolerated. In such applications the nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of materials is very

  7. High Average Power, High Energy Short Pulse Fiber Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    Messerly, M J

    2007-11-13

    Recently continuous wave fiber laser systems with output powers in excess of 500W with good beam quality have been demonstrated [1]. High energy, ultrafast, chirped pulsed fiber laser systems have achieved record output energies of 1mJ [2]. However, these high-energy systems have not been scaled beyond a few watts of average output power. Fiber laser systems are attractive for many applications because they offer the promise of high efficiency, compact, robust systems that are turn key. Applications such as cutting, drilling and materials processing, front end systems for high energy pulsed lasers (such as petawatts) and laser based sources of high spatial coherence, high flux x-rays all require high energy short pulses and two of the three of these applications also require high average power. The challenge in creating a high energy chirped pulse fiber laser system is to find a way to scale the output energy while avoiding nonlinear effects and maintaining good beam quality in the amplifier fiber. To this end, our 3-year LDRD program sought to demonstrate a high energy, high average power fiber laser system. This work included exploring designs of large mode area optical fiber amplifiers for high energy systems as well as understanding the issues associated chirped pulse amplification in optical fiber amplifier systems.

  8. Proton acceleration from short pulse lasers interacting with ultrathin foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, George; McGuffey, Christopher; Thomas, Alec; Krushelnick, Karl; Beg, Farhat

    2015-11-01

    Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations using 50 nm Si3N4 and DLC foils are compared to published experimental data of proton acceleration from ultra-thin foils (<1 μm) irradiated by short pulse lasers (30-50 fs), and some underlying physics issues pertinent to proton acceleration have been addressed. 2D particle-in-cell simulations show that the maximum proton energy scales as I2/3, stronger than Target Normal Sheath Acceleration for thick foils (>1 μm), which is typically between I1/3 and I1/2. Published experimental data were found to depend primarily on the laser energy and scale as E2/3. The different scaling laws for thick (>1 μm) and ultra-thin (<1 μm) foils are explained qualitatively as transitioning from Target Normal Sheath Acceleration to more advanced acceleration schemes such as Radiation-Induced Transparency and Radiation Pressure Acceleration regimes. This work was performed with the support of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under grant FA9550-14-1-0282.

  9. Studying the mechanism of micromachining by short pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadag, Shiva

    The semiconductor materials like Si and the transparent dielectric materials like glass and quartz are extensively used in optoelectronics, microelectronics, and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) industries. The combination of these materials often go hand in hand for applications in MEMS such as in chips for pressure sensors, charge coupled devices (CCD), and photovoltaic (PV) cells for solar energy generation. The transparent negative terminal of the solar cell is made of glass on one surface of the PV cell. The positive terminal (cathode) on the other surface of the solar cell is made of silicon with a glass negative terminal (anode). The digital watches and cell phones, LEDs, micro-lens, optical components, and laser optics are other examples for the application of silicon and or glass. The Si and quartz are materials extensively used in CCD and LED for digital cameras and CD players respectively. Hence, three materials: (1) a semiconductor silicon and transparent dielectrics,- (2) glass, and (3) quartz are chosen for laser micromachining as they have wide spread applications in microelectronics industry. The Q-switched, nanosecond pulsed lasers are most extensively used for micro-machining. The nanosecond type of short pulsed laser is less expensive for the end users than the second type, pico or femto, ultra-short pulsed lasers. The majority of the research work done on these materials (Si, SiO 2, and glass) is based on the ultra-short pulsed lasers. This is because of the cut quality, pin point precision of the drilled holes, formation of the nanometer size microstructures and fine features, and minimally invasive heat affected zone. However, there are many applications such as large surface area dicing, cutting, surface cleaning of Si wafers by ablation, and drilling of relatively large-sized holes where some associated heat affected zone due to melting can be tolerated. In such applications the nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of materials is very

  10. Computational Design of Short Pulse Laser Driven Iron Opacity Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Madison E.; London, Richard A.; Goluoglu, Sedat; Whitley, Heather D.

    2015-11-01

    Opacity is a critical parameter in the transport of radiation in systems such as inertial confinement fusion capsules and stars. The resolution of current disagreements between solar models and helioseismological observations would benefit from experimental validation of theoretical opacity models. Short pulse lasers can be used to heat targets to higher temperatures and densities than long pulse lasers and pulsed power machines, thus potentially enabling access to emission spectra at conditions relevant to solar models. In order to ensure that the relevant plasma conditions are accessible and that an emission measurement is practical, we use computational design of experiments to optimize the target characteristics and laser conditions. Radiation-hydrodynamic modeling, using HYDRA, is used to investigate the effects of modifying laser irradiance, target dimensions, and dopant dilution on the plasma conditions and emission of an iron opacity target. Several optimized designs reaching temperatures and densities relevant to the radiative zone of the sun will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC.

  11. Adaptive optics for ultra short pulsed lasers in UHV environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deneuville, Francois; Ropert, Laurent; Sauvageot, Paul; Theis, Sébastien

    2015-02-01

    ISP SYSTEM has developed an electro-mechanical deformable mirror compatible with Ultra High Vacuum environment, suitable for ultra short pulsed lasers. The design of the MD-AME deformable mirror is based on force application on numerous locations. μ-AME actuators are driven by stepper motors, and their patented special design allows controlling the force with a very high accuracy. Materials and assembly method have been adapted to UHV constraints and the performances were evaluated on a first application for a beam with a diameter of 250mm. A Strehl ratio above 0.9 was reached for this application. Optical aberrations up to Zernike order 5 can be corrected with a very low residual error as for standard MD-AME mirror. Amplitude can reach up to several hundreds of μm for low order corrections. Hysteresis is lower than 0.1% and linearity better than 99%. Contrary to piezo-electric actuators, the μ-AME actuators avoid print-through effects and they permit to keep the mirror shape stable even unpowered, providing a high resistance to electro-magnetic pulses. The deformable mirror design allows changing easily an actuator or even the membrane if needed, in order to improve the facility availability. They are designed for circular, square or elliptical aperture from 30mm up to 500mm or more, with incidence angle from 0° to 45°. They can be equipped with passive or active cooling for high power lasers with high repetition rate.

  12. A high current, short pulse electron source for wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Ching-Hung.

    1992-01-01

    Design studies for the generation of a high current, short pulse electron source for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator are presented. An L-band laser photocathode rf gun cavity is designed using the computer code URMEL to maximize the electric field on the cathode surface for fixed frequency and rf input power. A new technique using a curved incoming laser wavefront to minimize the space charge effect near the photocathode is studied. A preaccelerator with large iris to minimize wakefield effects is used to boost the drive beam to a useful energy of around 20 MeV for wakefield acceleration experiments. Focusing in the photocathode gun and the preaccelerator is accomplished with solenoids. Beam dynamics simulations throughout the preaccelerator are performed using particle simulation codes TBCI-SF and PARMELA. An example providing a useful set of operation parameters for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator is given. The effects of the sagitta of the curved beam and laser amplitude and timing jitter effects are discussed. Measurement results of low rf power level bench tests and a high power test for the gun cavity are presented and discussed.

  13. A high current, short pulse electron source for wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Ching-Hung

    1992-12-31

    Design studies for the generation of a high current, short pulse electron source for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator are presented. An L-band laser photocathode rf gun cavity is designed using the computer code URMEL to maximize the electric field on the cathode surface for fixed frequency and rf input power. A new technique using a curved incoming laser wavefront to minimize the space charge effect near the photocathode is studied. A preaccelerator with large iris to minimize wakefield effects is used to boost the drive beam to a useful energy of around 20 MeV for wakefield acceleration experiments. Focusing in the photocathode gun and the preaccelerator is accomplished with solenoids. Beam dynamics simulations throughout the preaccelerator are performed using particle simulation codes TBCI-SF and PARMELA. An example providing a useful set of operation parameters for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator is given. The effects of the sagitta of the curved beam and laser amplitude and timing jitter effects are discussed. Measurement results of low rf power level bench tests and a high power test for the gun cavity are presented and discussed.

  14. Plasmas and Short-Pulse, High-Intensity Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Thomas

    1999-11-01

    Many of the applications of short-pulse, high-intensity laser systems, including coherent UV and X-ray generation, compact particle accelerators, and non-perturbative nonlinear optics as well as the study of laser-matter interaction physics, require large intensity-interaction length products. In recent years, plasma structures resulting from the hydrodynamic evolution of laser-produced plasma filaments have proven to be attractive media for guiding pulses with peak powers approaching the terawatt level over lengths many times the vacuum Rayleigh range. The hydrodynamics of plasma waveguides have been characterized using time- and space-resolved interferometry measurements of electron density profiles. The laser-driven ionization and heating phase of the plasma filament creation is followed by hot electron driven plasma expansion. Density profiles suitable for optical guiding develop within the first few hundred picoseconds after plasma creation, during which rapid cooling occurs. At longer times the plasma expansion closely follows that of a cylindrical blast wave, with further cooling due to expansion work. The observed guided intensity profiles of end-coupled and tunnel-coupled pulses compare favorably with calculations of the quasi-bound waveguide modes based on the measured electron density profiles. Time- and space-resolved electron density measurements of a laser-driven concentric implosion were also performed. The implosion is the result of the interaction of a second laser pulse with an existing plasma waveguide. The two-pulse absorption and ionization significantly exceed that due to a single pulse of the same total energy. The author would like to acknowledge the significant contributions of Prof. Howard M. Milchberg to the work being presented.

  15. SLIM, Short-pulse Technology for High Gradient Induction Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Arntz, Floyd; Kardo-Sysoev, A.; Krasnykh, A.; /SLAC

    2008-12-16

    A novel short-pulse concept (SLIM) suited to a new generation of a high gradient induction particle accelerators is described herein. It applies advanced solid state semiconductor technology and modern microfabrication techniques to a coreless induction method of charged particle acceleration first proven on a macro scale in the 1960's. Because this approach avoids use of magnetic materials there is the prospect of such an accelerator working efficiently with accelerating pulses in the nanosecond range and, potentially, at megahertz pulse rates. The principal accelerator section is envisioned as a stack of coreless induction cells, the only active element within each being a single, extremely fast (subnanosecond) solid state opening switch: a Drift Step Recovery Diode (DSRD). Each coreless induction cell incorporates an electromagnetic pulse compressor in which inductive energy developed within a transmission-line feed structure over a period of tens of nanoseconds is diverted to the acceleration of the passing charge packet for a few nanoseconds by the abrupt opening of the DSRD switch. The duration of this accelerating output pulse--typically two-to-four nanoseconds--is precisely determined by a microfabricated pulse forming line connected to the cell. Because the accelerating pulse is only nanoseconds in duration, longitudinal accelerating gradients approaching 100 MeV per meter are believed to be achievable without inciting breakdown. Further benefits of this approach are that, (1) only a low voltage power supply is required to produce the high accelerating gradient, and, (2) since the DSRD switch is normally closed, voltage stress is limited to a few nanoseconds per period, hence the susceptibility to hostile environment conditions such as ionizing radiation, mismatch (e.g. in medical applications the peak beam current may be low), strong electromagnetic noise levels, etc is expected to be minimal. Finally, we observe the SLIM concept is not limited to linac

  16. A 10-GeV, 5-MW proton source for a muon-muon collider

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.; Chae, Y.; Crosbie, E.; Friedsam, H.; Harkay, K.; Horan, D.; Kustom, R.; Lessner, E.; McDowell, W.; McGhee, D.; Moe, H.; Nielsen, R.; Norek, G.; Peterson, K.; Qian, Y.; Thompson, K.; White, M.

    1996-05-01

    The performance parameters of a proton source which produces the required flux of muons for a 2-TeV on 2-TeV muon collider are: a beam energy of 10 GeV, a repetition rate of 30 Hz, two bunches per pulse with 5{times}10{sup 13} protons per bunch, and an rms bunch length of 3 nsec (1). Aside from the bunch length requirement, these parameters are identical to those of a 5-MW proton source for a spallation neutron source based on a 10-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) (2). The 10-GeV synchrotron uses a 2-GeV accelerator system as its injector, and the 2-GeV RCS is an extension of a feasibility study for a 1-MW spallation source described elsewhere (3{endash}9). A study for the 5-MW spallation source was performed for ANL site-specific geometrical requirements. Details are presented for a site-independent proton source suitable for the muon collider utilizing the results of the 5-MW spallation source study. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Space Debris-de-Orbiting by Vaporization Impulse using Short Pulse Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Early, J; Bibeau, C; Claude, P

    2003-09-16

    Space debris constitutes a significant hazard to low earth orbit satellites and particularly to manned spacecraft. A quite small velocity decrease from vaporization impulses is enough to lower the perigee of the debris sufficiently for atmospheric drag to de-orbit the debris. A short pulse (picosecond) laser version of the Orion concept can accomplish this task in several years of operation. The ''Mercury'' short pulse Yb:S-FAP laser being developed at LLNL for laser fusion is appropriate for this task.

  18. Short pulse fiber lasers mode-locked by carbon nanotubes and graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Shinji; Martinez, Amos; Xu, Bo

    2014-12-01

    One and two dimensional forms of carbon, carbon nanotubes and graphene, have interesting and useful, not only electronic but also photonic, properties. For fiber lasers, they are very attractive passive mode lockers for ultra-short pulse generation, since they have saturable absorption with inherently fast recovery time (<1 ps). In this paper, we review the photonic properties of graphene and CNT and our recent works on fabrication of fiber devices and applications to ultra-short pulse mode-locked fiber lasers.

  19. Comparison of synchrotron and accumulator scenarios for a 5-MW Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Blumberg, L.; Luccio, A.; Ruggiero, A.G.; Steenberg, A. van

    1996-07-01

    This paper reports conceptual design studies of a site-independent 5 MW Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (PSNS) conducted by an interdepartmental study group at Brookhaven National Laboratory. First, a scenario based on the use of a 600 MeV Linac followed by two fast cycling 3.6 GeV Synchrotrons was investigated. Then we studied an Accumulator with two options: (1) a 1.25 GeV normal conducting Linac followed by two Accumulator Rings, and (2) a 2.4 GeV superconducting Linac followed by a single Accumulator Ring.

  20. Raft River 5MW power plant: A small binary power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitbeck, J. F.; Dibello, E. G.; Walrath, L. F.

    1982-06-01

    The Raft River 5MW power plant is a binary cycle pilot plant. The system uses isobutane in a dual boiling cycle. This cycle was selected because the well field and temperatures were not well known at the time of cycle selection, and therefore, a boiling cycle was desirable. The dual boiling features provides about 15 to 20% more power and makes the output less sensitive to changes in geothermal temperature changes than a single boiler system. The plant design was based upon a 290F geothermal fluid temperature at the inlet to the plant and has a gross nominal generator rating of 5MW; however, actual output will vary according to ambient wet bulb temperatures over a range from 4.4MW to 6.2MW with the actual plant inlet temperature of 278F being obtained. The plant is supplied by three production wells. Geothermal fluid boost pumps within the plant inlet provide the pressure necessary to overcome plant pressure drop and return the fluid to the two injection sites.

  1. Design of Electron Gun for 1.5 MW, 140 GHz Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Udaybir; Kumar, Nitin; Purohit, L. P.; Sinha, A. K.

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents the design of the triode type electron gun for a 140 GHz, 1.5 MW gyrotron with the transverse to the axial velocity ratio of the beam 1.4 and the transverse velocity spread 1.28%. The operating mode of the gyrotron is TE24,8 and it is operated in the fundamental harmonic. The analytic trade-off equations for the electron gun design have been used to estimate the initial gun parameters. The electron trajectory tracing program has been used to optimize the electron gun design. The parametric dependences of modulating anode voltage, beam voltage and cathode magnetic field on the beam quality has also been studied.

  2. Definition of a 5MW/61.5m wind turbine blade reference model.

    SciTech Connect

    Resor, Brian Ray

    2013-04-01

    A basic structural concept of the blade design that is associated with the frequently utilized %E2%80%9CNREL offshore 5-MW baseline wind turbine%E2%80%9D is needed for studies involving blade structural design and blade structural design tools. The blade structural design documented in this report represents a concept that meets basic design criteria set forth by IEC standards for the onshore turbine. The design documented in this report is not a fully vetted blade design which is ready for manufacture. The intent of the structural concept described by this report is to provide a good starting point for more detailed and targeted investigations such as blade design optimization, blade design tool verification, blade materials and structures investigations, and blade design standards evaluation. This report documents the information used to create the current model as well as the analyses used to verify that the blade structural performance meets reasonable blade design criteria.

  3. NREL Establishes a 1.5-MW Wind Turbine Test Platform for Research Partnerships (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    Research turbine supports sustained technology development. For more than three decades, engineers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) have worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program and industry partners to advance wind energy technology, improve wind turbine performance, and reduce the cost of energy. Although there have been dramatic increases in performance and drops in the cost of wind energy-from $0.80 per kilowatt-hour to between $0.06 and $0.08 per kilowatt-hour-the goal of the DOE Wind Program is to further increase performance and reduce the cost of energy for land-based systems so that wind energy can compete with natural gas by 2020. In support of the program's research and development (R and D) efforts, NREL has constructed state-of-the-art facilities at the NWTC where industry partners, universities, and other DOE laboratories can conduct tests and experiments to further advance wind technology. The latest facility to come online is the DOE-GE 1.5-MW wind turbine test platform. Working with DOE, NREL purchased and installed a GE 1.5-MW wind turbine at the NWTC in 2009. Since then, NREL engineers have extensively instrumented the machine, conducted power performance and full-system modal tests, and collected structural loads measurements to obtain baseline characterization of the turbine's power curve, vibration characteristics, and fatigue loads in the uniquely challenging NWTC inflow environment. By successfully completing a baseline for the turbine's performance and structural response, NREL engineers have established a test platform that can be used by industry, university, and DOE laboratory researchers to test wind turbine control systems and components. The new test platform will also enable researchers to acquire the measurements needed to develop and validate wind turbine models and improve design codes.

  4. An Overview of High Energy Short Pulse Technology for Advanced Radiography of Laser Fusion Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, C J; Key, M; Britten, J; Beach, R; Beer, G; Brown, C; Bryan, S; Caird, J; Carlson, T; Crane, J; Dawson, J; Erlandson, A C; Fittinghoff, D; Hermann, M; Hoaglan, C; Iyer, A; Jones, L; Jovanovic, I; Komashko, A; Landen, O; Liao, Z; Molander, W; Mitchell, A; Moses, E; Nielsen, N; Nguyen, H; Nissen, J; Payne, S; Pennington, D; Risinger, L; Rushford, M; Skulina, K; Spaeth, M; Stuart, B; Tietbohl, G; Wattellier, B

    2004-06-18

    The technical challenges and motivations for high-energy, short-pulse generation with NIF-class, Nd:glass laser systems are reviewed. High energy short pulse generation (multi-kilojoule, picosecond pulses) will be possible via the adaptation of chirped pulse amplification laser techniques on the NIF. Development of meter-scale, high efficiency, high-damage-threshold final optics is a key technical challenge. In addition, deployment of HEPW pulses on NIF is constrained by existing laser infrastructure and requires new, compact compressor designs and short-pulse, fiber-based, seed-laser systems. The key motivations for high energy petawatt pulses on NIF is briefly outlined and includes high-energy, x-ray radiography, proton beam radiography, proton isochoric heating and tests of the fast ignitor concept for inertial confinement fusion.

  5. Defocusing complex short-pulse equation and its multi-dark-soliton solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Bao-Feng; Ling, Liming; Zhu, Zuonong

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a complex short-pulse equation of both focusing and defocusing types, which governs the propagation of ultrashort pulses in nonlinear optical fibers. It can be viewed as an analog of the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation in the ultrashort-pulse regime. Furthermore, we construct the multi-dark-soliton solution for the defocusing complex short-pulse equation through the Darboux transformation and reciprocal (hodograph) transformation. One- and two-dark-soliton solutions are given explicitly, whose properties and dynamics are analyzed and illustrated.

  6. Measurement of lake ice thickness with a short-pulse radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. W.; Mueller, R. A.; Schertler, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of lake ice thickness were made during March 1975 at the Straits of Mackinac by using a short-pulse radar system aboard an all-terrain vehicle. These measurements were compared with ice thicknesses determined with an auger. Over 25 sites were explored which had ice thicknesses in the range 29 to 60 cm. The maximum difference between radar and auger measurements was less than 9.8 percent. The magnitude of the error was less than + or - 3.5 cm. The NASA operating short-pulse radar system used in monitoring lake ice thickness from an aircraft is also described.

  7. Design and analysis of a 5-MW vertical-fluted-tube condenser for geothermal applications

    SciTech Connect

    Llewellyn, G.H.

    1982-03-01

    The design and analysis of an industtial-sized vertical-fluted-tube condenser. The condenser is used to condense superheated isobutane vapor discharged from a power turbine in a geothermal test facility operated for the US Department of Energy. The 5-MW condenser has 1150 coolant tubes in a four-pass configuration with a total heat transfer area of 725 m/sup 2/ (7800 ft/sup 2/). The unit is being tested at the Geothermal Components Test Facility in the Imperial Valley of East Mesa, California. The condenser design is based on previous experimental research work done at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory on condensing refrigerants on a wide variety of single vertical tubes. Condensing film coefficients obtained on the high-performance vertical fluted tubes in condensing refrigerants are as much as seven times greater than those obtained with vertical smooth tubes that have the same diameter and length. The overall heat transfer performance expected from the fluted tube condenser is four to five times the heat transfer obtained from the identical units employing smooth tubes. Fluted tube condensers also have other direct applications in the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) program in condensing ammonia, in the petroleum industry in condensing light hydrocarbons, and in the air conditioning and refrigeration industry in condensing fluorocarbon vapors.

  8. Turbulence effects on a full-scale 2.5 MW horizontal axis wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorro, Leonardo; Lee, Seung-Jae; Olsen, David; Milliren, Chris; Marr, Jeff; Arndt, Roger; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2012-11-01

    Power fluctuations and fatigue loads are among the most significant problems that wind turbines face throughout their lifetime. Turbulence is the common driving mechanism that triggers instabilities on these quantities. We investigate the complex response of a full-scale 2.5 MW wind turbine under nearly neutral thermal stratification. The study is performed in the EOLOS Wind Energy Research Field Station of the University of Minnesota. An instrumented 130 meter meteorological tower located upstream of a Clipper Liberty C96 wind turbine is used to characterize the turbulent flow and atmospheric conditions right upstream of the wind turbine. High resolution and synchronous measurements of the wind velocity, turbine power and strain at the tower foundation are used to determine the scale-to-scale interaction between flow and the wind turbine. The structure of the fluctuating turbine power and instantaneous stresses are studied in detail. Important insights about the role of turbulent and coherent motions as well as strong intermittent gusts will be discussed. Funding was provided by Department of Energy DOE (DE-EE0002980) and Xcel Energy through the Renewable Development Fund (grant RD3-42).

  9. Target designs for the Brookhaven National Laboratory 5-MW pulsed spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.; Powell, J.R.

    1996-03-01

    A feasibility study of a compact high power density target for a spallation neutron source was under-taken. The target arrangement consists primarily of heavy metal, with appropriate cooling passages. A high intensity proton beam of intermediate energy is directed at the target, where it interacts with the heavy metal nuclei. The subsequent spallation reactions produce several neutrons per proton resulting in an intense neutron source. The proton beam is assumed to havean energy of 5 MW, and to be cyclic with a repetition rate of 10Hz and 50Hz. The study was divided into two broad sections. First, an analysis of preliminary target designs was undertaken to ensure the overall feasibility of the concepts involved in the design and eventual construction of such a high power density target. Second, two proposed target designs, based on the first set of analyses, are investigated in more detail. Special care is taken to ensure that the neutron fluxes in the moderator are at the desired level no material compatibility problems exist,and the target is able to operate in a reliable and safe manner. Several target materials, coolant types, and target arrangements are investigated in the first section. The second section concentrates on a single target material and geometric arrangement. However, several structural material choices continue to be investigated with the aim of minimizing the effects of structural heating, and associated thermally induced stresses. In the final section the conclusions of this preliminary study are summarized.

  10. Control system for 5 MW neutral beam ion source for SST1

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, G.B.; Onali, Raja; Sharma, Vivek; Suresh, S.; Tripathi, V.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Singh, N.P.; Thakkar, Dipal; Gupta, L.N.; Singh, M.J.; Patel, P.J.; Chakraborty, A.K.; Baruah, U.K.; Mattoo, S.K.

    2006-01-15

    This article describes the control system for a 5 MW ion source of the NBI (neutral beam injector) for steady-state superconducting tokamak-1 (SST-1). The system uses both hardware and software solutions. It comprises a DAS (data acquisition system) and a control system. The DAS is used to read the voltage and current signals from eight filament heater power supplies and 24 discharge power supplies. The control system is used to adjust the filament heater current in order to achieve an effective control on the discharge current in the plasma box. The system consists of a VME (Verse Module Eurocard) system and C application program running on a VxWorks{sup TM} real-time operating system. A PID (proportional, integral, and differential) algorithm is used to control the filament heater current. Experiments using this system have shown that the discharge current can be controlled within 1% accuracy for a PID loop time of 20 ms. Response of the control system to the pressure variation of the gas in the chamber has also been studied and compared with the results obtained from those of an uncontrolled system. The present approach increases the flexibility of the control system. It not only eases the control of the plasma but also allows an easy changeover to various operation scenarios.

  11. Plasma structures observed in gas breakdown using a 1.5 MW, 110 GHz pulsed gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Hidaka, Yoshiteru; Choi, E. M.; Mastovsky, I.; Shapiro, M. A.; Sirigiri, J. R.; Temkin, R. J.; Edmiston, G. F.; Neuber, A. A.; Oda, Y.

    2009-05-15

    Regular two-dimensional plasma filamentary arrays have been observed in gas breakdown experiments using a pulsed 1.5 MW, 110 GHz gyrotron. The gyrotron Gaussian output beam is focused to an intensity of up to 4 MW/cm{sup 2}. The plasma filaments develop in an array with a spacing of about one quarter wavelength, elongated in the electric field direction. The array was imaged using photodiodes, a slow camera, which captures the entire breakdown event, and a fast camera with a 6 ns window. These diagnostics demonstrate the sequential development of the array propagating back toward the source. Gases studied included air, nitrogen, SF{sub 6}, and helium at various pressures. A discrete plasma array structure is observed at high pressure, while a diffuse plasma is observed at lower pressure. The propagation speed of the ionization front for air and nitrogen at atmospheric pressure for 3 MW/cm{sup 2} was found to be of the order of 10 km/s.

  12. Reduced-order FSI simulation of NREL 5 MW wind turbine in atmospheric boundary layer turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta-Mena, Javier; Campbell, Robert; Lavely, Adam; Jha, Pankaj

    2015-11-01

    A partitioned fluid-structure interaction (FSI) solver based on an actuator-line method solver and a finite-element modal-dynamic structural solver is used to evaluate the effect of blade deformation in the presence of a day-time, moderately convective atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The solver components were validated separately and the integrated solver was partially validated against FAST. An overview of the solver is provided in addition to results of the validation study. A finite element model of the NREL 5 MW rotor was developed for use in the present simulations. The effect of blade pitching moment and the inherent bend/twist coupling of the rotor blades are assessed for both uniform inflow and the ABL turbulence cases. The results suggest that blade twisting in response to pitching moment and the bend/twist coupling can have a significant impact on rotor out-of-plane bending moment and power generated for both the uniform inflow and the ABL turbulence cases.

  13. Short Pulse High Brightness X-ray Production with the PLEIADES Thomson Scattering Source

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S G; Barty, C P J; Betts, S M; Brown, W J; Crane, J K; Cross, R R; Fittinghoff, D N; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Kuba, J; LaSage, G P; Rosenzweig, J B; Slaughter, D R; Springer, P T; Tremaine, A M

    2003-07-01

    We describe PLEIADES, a compact, tunable, high-brightness, ultra-short pulse, Thomson x-ray source. The peak brightness of the source is expected to exceed 10{sup 20} photons/s/0.1% bandwidth/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}. Initial results are reported and compared to theoretical calculations.

  14. Ultra-short pulse laser deep drilling of C/SiC composites in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunhui; Zhang, Litong; Liu, Yongsheng; Cheng, Guanghua; Zhang, Qing; Hua, Ke

    2013-06-01

    Ultra-short pulse laser machining is an important finishing technology for high hardness materials. In this study, it demonstrated that the ultra-short pulse laser can be used to drill the film cooling holes and square holes in aero-engine turbine blades made of C/SiC composites. Both the edges and bottoms of the drilling holes are covered with small particles. The following factors have a great effect on drilling holes according to this work: (1) circular holes can be processed only at a relative small helical lines spacing. (2) With the increase of laser scanning speed, the depth of holes reduces while the diameter rarely changes. (3) Through the holes of high aspect ratio can be obtained via high processing power.

  15. Pulse-forming-line based on-chip short pulse generator.

    PubMed

    Zou, Huan; Wang, Haiyang

    2015-04-01

    A traditional pulse generation circuit based on the pulse-forming-line (PFL) is implemented in a commercial 0.13 μm digital CMOS technology. A meandered on-chip coplanar waveguide is used as the PFL, and CMOS transistor is used as switch in the Cadence Spectre simulation. The circuit sample is fabricated and tested. Pulses of ∼170 ps durations and 120-200 mV amplitudes are obtained when the power supply is tuned from 1.2 V to 2 V. The results show that the traditional PFL based circuit can be implemented in standard CMOS technology for on-chip short pulse generation. Furthermore, the PFL circuits significantly extend the short pulse generation capabilities of CMOS technology. PMID:25933879

  16. Pulse-forming-line based on-chip short pulse generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Huan; Wang, Haiyang

    2015-04-01

    A traditional pulse generation circuit based on the pulse-forming-line (PFL) is implemented in a commercial 0.13 μm digital CMOS technology. A meandered on-chip coplanar waveguide is used as the PFL, and CMOS transistor is used as switch in the Cadence Spectre simulation. The circuit sample is fabricated and tested. Pulses of ˜170 ps durations and 120-200 mV amplitudes are obtained when the power supply is tuned from 1.2 V to 2 V. The results show that the traditional PFL based circuit can be implemented in standard CMOS technology for on-chip short pulse generation. Furthermore, the PFL circuits significantly extend the short pulse generation capabilities of CMOS technology.

  17. SHORT-PULSE ELECTROMAGNETIC TRANSPONDER FOR HOLE-TO-HOLE USE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, David L.; Watts, Raymond D.; Bramsoe, Erik

    1983-01-01

    Hole-to-hole observations were made through nearly 20 m of granite using an electromagnetic transponder (an active reflector) in one borehole and a single-hole short-pulse radar in another. The transponder is inexpensive, operationally simple, and effective in extending the capability of a short-pulse borehole radar system to allow hole-to-hole operation without requiring timing cables. A detector in the transponder senses the arrival of each pulse from the radar. Each pulse detection triggers a kilovolt-amplitude pulse for retransmission. The transponder 'echo' may be stronger than that of a passive reflector by a factor of as much as 120 db. The result is an increase in range capability by a factor which depends on attenuation in the medium and hole-to-hole wavepath geometry.

  18. Chromium carbide thin films deposited by ultra-short pulse laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teghil, R.; Santagata, A.; De Bonis, A.; Galasso, A.; Villani, P.

    2009-06-01

    Pulsed laser deposition performed by a laser with a pulse duration of 250 fs has been used to deposit films from a Cr 3C 2 target. Due to the different processes involved in the laser ablation when it is performed by an ultra-short pulse source instead of a conventional short pulse one, it has been possible to obtain in vacuum films containing only one type of carbide, Cr 3C 2, as shown by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. On the other hand, Cr 3C 2 is not the only component of the films, since a large amount of amorphous carbon is also present. The films, deposited at room temperature, are amorphous and seem to be formed by the coalescence of a large number of particles with nanometric size. The film composition can be explained in terms of thermal evaporation from particles ejected from the target.

  19. Feasibility study on a short-pulsed IR wavelength for effective calculus fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun Wook

    2015-05-01

    Laser-induced lithotripsy has been used for a minimally-invasive surgery to treat kidney-stone disease associated with urinary obstruction. A short-pulsed Tm:YAG laser (λ = 2.01 µm) was developed to improve fragmentation efficiency and was evaluated with a Ho:YAG laser (λ = 2.12 μm) as to its ablation feature and mass removal rate. Application of a train of sub-microsecond pulses with a lower energy at a frequency of 500 Hz created multiple events of cavitation that accompanied strong acoustic transients. During Tm:YAG irradiation, both high light absorption and secondary photomechanical impacts readily fragmented the calculus into small pieces (< 3 mm) and removed them 130 times faster than photothermal Ho:YAG lithotripsy. The proposed short-pulsed Tm:YAG approach may be an effective lithotripter for treating calculus disease.

  20. Precision short-pulse damage test station utilizing optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanovic, I; Brown, C; Wattellier, B; Nielsen, N; Molander, W; Stuart, B; Pennington, D; Barty, C J

    2004-03-22

    The next generation of high-energy petawatt (HEPW)-class lasers will utilize multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings for pulse compression, due to their high efficiency and high damage threshold for picosecond pulses. The peak power of HEPW lasers will be determined by the aperture and damage threshold of the final dielectric grating in the pulse compressor and final focusing optics. We have developed a short-pulse damage test station for accurate determination of the damage threshold of the optics used on future HEPW lasers. Our damage test station is based on a highly stable, high-beam-quality optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier (OPCPA) operating at 1053 nm at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. We present the design of our OPCPA system pumped by a commercial Q-switched pump laser and the results of the full system characterization. Initial short-pulse damage experiments in the far field using our system have been performed.

  1. Broadening of ultra-short pulses propagating through weak-to-strong oceanic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Lu, Lu; Zhang, Pengfei; Fan, Chengyu; Ji, Xiaoling

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the new approach of correlation function of the complex phase perturbed by oceanic turbulence is shown. Based on this new approach, the general formula of the two-frequency mutual coherence function (MCF) of ultra-short pulses in oceanic turbulence is derived. Using a temporal moments approach and combining with this new formula for the MCF, the analytical expression for the pulse width is deduced. Besides, the quantity of Rytov variance σR2 in oceanic turbulence is obtained, which is widely used as a measure of the strength of turbulence. In particular, the on-axis relative pulse broadening and turbulent effective coefficient of ultra-short pulses (i.e., femtosecond-picosecond regime) propagating through oceanic turbulence are investigated.

  2. Simulation studies of vapor bubble generation by short-pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, P.; London, R.A.; Strauss, M.

    1997-10-26

    Formation of vapor bubbles is characteristic of many applications of short-pulse lasers in medicine. An understanding of the dynamics of vapor bubble generation is useful for developing and optimizing laser-based medical therapies. To this end, experiments in vapor bubble generation with laser light deposited in an aqueous dye solution near a fiber-optic tip have been performed. Numerical hydrodynamic simulations have been developed to understand and extrapolate results from these experiments. Comparison of two-dimensional simulations with the experiment shows excellent agreement in tracking the bubble evolution. Another regime of vapor bubble generation is short-pulse laser interactions with melanosomes. Strong shock generation and vapor bubble generation are common physical features of this interaction. A novel effect of discrete absorption by melanin granules within a melanosome is studied as a possible role in previously reported high Mach number shocks.

  3. Electron acceleration in relativistic plasma waves generated by a single frequency short-pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Coverdale, C.A.; Darrow, C.B.; Decker, C.D.; Mori, W.B.; Tzeng, K.C., Clayton, C.E.; Marsh, K.A.; Joshi, C.

    1995-04-27

    Experimental evidence for the acceleration of electrons in a relativistic plasma wave generated by Raman forward scattering (SRS-F) of a single-frequency short pulse laser are presented. A 1.053 {mu}m, 600 fsec, 5 TW laser was focused into a gas jet with a peak intensity of 8{times}10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. At a plasma density of 2{times}10{sup 19} cm{sup {minus}3}, 2 MeV electrons were detected and their appearance was correlated with the anti-Stokes laser sideband generated by SRS-F. The results are in good agreement with 2-D PIC simulations. The use of short pulse lasers for making ultra-high gradient accelerators is explored.

  4. Nonlinear wave interactions between short pulses of different spatio-temporal extents

    PubMed Central

    Sivan, Y.; Rozenberg, S.; Halstuch, A.; Ishaaya, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    We study the nonlinear wave interactions between short pulses of different spatio-temporal extents. Unlike the well-understood mixing of quasi-monochromatic waves, this configuration is highly non-intuitive due to the complex coupling between the spatial and temporal degrees of freedom of the interacting pulses. We illustrate the process intuitively with transitions between different branches of the dispersion curves and interpret it in terms of spectral exchange between the interacting pulses. We verify our interpretation with an example whereby a spectrally-narrow pulse “inherits” the wide spectrum of a pump pulse centered at a different wavelength, using exact numerical simulations, as well as a simplified coupled mode analysis and an asymptotic analytical solution. The latter also provides a simple and intuitive quantitative interpretation. The complex wave mixing process studied here may enable flexible spatio-temporal shaping of short pulses and is the starting point of the study of more complicated systems. PMID:27381552

  5. Time-dependent directionality of cooperative emission after short pulse excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedberg, Richard; Manassah, Jamal T.

    2008-09-01

    Cooperative emission from a sphere of N two-level atoms excited by a short pulse is shown to have a time-dependent angular distribution, with the possibility of reversal in the dominant direction of emission. This is a result of the different values of the frequency shifts and decay rates associated with the various collective eigenmodes of the atomic system obtained in a scalar photon model.

  6. Short-pulse laser-produced plasma from C60 molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Wuelker, Cornelius; Theobald, Wolfgang; Ouw, Donald; Schaefer, Fritz P.; Chichkov, Boris N.

    1995-05-01

    The first experimental observations of a plasma produced in a vapor of C60 molecules with a high-intensity subpicosecond KrF laser (6x10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}) are reported. It differs from a plasma created in an ordinary carbon preplasma by reaching much higher ionization stages under the same experimental conditions. This remarkable property of C60 molecules (and other clusters) opens new prospects for short-pulse driven X-ray lasers.

  7. Superconducting Cavity Design for Short-Pulse X-Rays at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    G.J. Waldschmidt, R. Nassiri, G. Cheng, R.A. Rimmer, H. Wang

    2011-03-01

    Superconducting cavities have been analyzed for the short-pulse x-ray (SPX) project at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Due to the strong damping requirements in the APS storage ring, single-cell superconducting cavities have been designed. The geometry has been optimized for lower-order and higher-order mode damping, reduced peak surface magnetic fields, and compact size. The integration of the cavity assembly, with dampers and waveguide input coupler, into a cryomodule will be discussed.

  8. Assessment and Mitigation of Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Impacts at Short-pulse Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Jr., C G; Bond, E; Clancy, T; Dangi, S; Eder, D C; Ferguson, W; Kimbrough, J; Throop, A

    2010-02-04

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be impacted by electromagnetic pulse (EMP) during normal long-pulse operation, but the largest impacts are expected during short-pulse operation utilizing the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC). Without mitigation these impacts could range from data corruption to hardware damage. We describe our EMP measurement systems on Titan and NIF and present some preliminary results and thoughts on mitigation.

  9. Assessment and Mitigation of Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Impacts at Short-pulse Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Jr., C G; Bond, E; Clancy, T; Dangi, S; Eder, D C; Ferguson, W; Kimbrough, J; Throop, A

    2009-10-02

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be impacted by electromagnetic pulse (EMP) during normal long-pulse operation, but the largest impacts are expected during short-pulse operation utilizing the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC). Without mitigation these impacts could range from data corruption to hardware damage. We describe our EMP measurement systems on Titan and NIF and present some preliminary results and thoughts on mitigation.

  10. Time of flight emission spectroscopy of laser produced nickel plasma: Short-pulse and ultrafast excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Smijesh, N.; Chandrasekharan, K.; Joshi, Jagdish C.; Philip, Reji

    2014-07-07

    We report the experimental investigation and comparison of the temporal features of short-pulse (7 ns) and ultrafast (100 fs) laser produced plasmas generated from a solid nickel target, expanding into a nitrogen background. When the ambient pressure is varied in a large range of 10⁻⁶Torr to 10²Torr, the plume intensity is found to increase rapidly as the pressure crosses 1 Torr. Time of flight (TOF) spectroscopy of emission from neutral nickel (Ni I) at 361.9 nm (3d⁹(²D) 4p → 3d⁹(²D) 4s transition) reveals two peaks (fast and slow species) in short-pulse excitation and a single peak in ultrafast excitation. The fast and slow peaks represent recombined neutrals and un-ionized neutrals, respectively. TOF emission from singly ionized nickel (Ni II) studied using the 428.5 nm (3p⁶3d⁸(³P) 4s→ 3p⁶3d⁹ 4s) transition shows only a single peak for either excitation. Velocities of the neutral and ionic species are determined from TOF measurements carried out at different positions (i.e., at distances of 2 mm and 4 mm, respectively, from the target surface) on the plume axis. Measured velocities indicate acceleration of neutrals and ions, which is caused by the Coulomb pull of the electrons enveloping the plume front in the case of ultrafast excitation. Both Coulomb pull and laser-plasma interaction contribute to the acceleration in the case of short-pulse excitation. These investigations provide new information on the pressure dependent temporal behavior of nickel plasmas produced by short-pulse and ultrafast laser pulses, which have potential uses in applications such as pulsed laser deposition and laser-induced nanoparticle generation.

  11. All-solid-state repetitive semiconductor opening switch-based short pulse generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhenjie; Hao, Qingsong; Hu, Long; Su, Jiancang; Liu, Guozhi

    2009-09-01

    The operating characteristics of a semiconductor opening switch (SOS) are determined by its pumping circuit parameters. SOS is still able to cut off the current when pumping current duration falls to the order of tens of nanoseconds and a short pulse forms simultaneously in the output load. An all-solid-state repetitive SOS-based short pulse generator (SPG100) with a three-level magnetic pulse compression unit was successfully constructed. The generator adopts magnetic pulse compression unit with metallic glass and ferrite cores, which compresses a 600 V, 10 μs primary pulse into short pulse with forward pumping current of 825 A, 60 ns and reverse pumping current of 1.3 kA, 30 ns. The current is sent to SOS in which the reverse pumping current is interrupted. The generator is capable of providing a pulse with the voltage of 120 kV and duration of 5-6 ns while output load being 125 Ω. The highest repetition rate is up to 1 kHz.

  12. Measuring the energy of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) in a short pulse laser amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliev, Marin; Adams, Daniel; Greco, Michael; Meier, Amanda; Squier, Jeff; Durfee, Charles

    2010-10-01

    In high-gain pulsed laser amplifiers, amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) tends to limit the gain in single stage fiber amplifiers. Even if ASE is not strong enough to deplete the gain of the amplifier, it still contributes strongly to a low-intensity background output in the amplified signal. The intensity contrast between the amplified short pulse and this background ASE pedestal can be measured with third-order autocorrelation, but this method cannot be used to completely specify the ASE's energy, which is distributed over many nanoseconds. We have developed a novel method that allows us to determine the energy and the spectrum of the ASE. We use a cross polarized wave (XPW) generating crystal such as BaF2 to ``clean up'' the ASE from the short pulse(SP). The input pulse (SP and ASE) and the cross-polarized signal are passed through a birefringent crystal such as sapphire. The relative group velocity difference along each crystal axis results in a delay between both channels. After passing through a polarizer, an interferogram is obtained in a spectrometer. This interferogram results from interference of the XPW pulse with the short-pulse content of the amplifier output, with a background of the ASE spectrum. Fourier analysis yields both the ASE energy and its spectrum.

  13. Short-pulse, compressed ion beams at the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, P. A.; Barnard, J. J.; Davidson, R. C.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E. P.; Grote, D.; Ji, Q.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Persaud, A.; Waldron, W. L.; Schenkel, T.

    2016-05-01

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, with 1-mm beam spot size within 2.5 ns full-width at half maximum. The ion kinetic energy is 1.2 MeV. To enable the short pulse duration and mm-scale focal spot radius, the beam is neutralized in a 1.5-meter-long drift compression section following the last accelerator cell. A short-focal-length solenoid focuses the beam in the presence of the volumetric plasma that is near the target. In the accelerator, the line-charge density increases due to the velocity ramp imparted on the beam bunch. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including select topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Below the transition to melting, the short beam pulses offer an opportunity to study the multi-scale dynamics of radiation-induced damage in materials with pump-probe experiments, and to stabilize novel metastable phases of materials when short-pulse heating is followed by rapid quenching. First experiments used a lithium ion source; a new plasma-based helium ion source shows much greater charge delivered to the target.

  14. Ultra-short pulsed laser tissue ablation using focused laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaunich, Megan K.; Raje, Shreya; Mitra, Kunal; Grace, Michael S.; Fahey, Molly; Spooner, Greg

    2008-02-01

    Short pulse lasers are used for a variety of therapeutic applications in medicine. Recently ultra-short pulse lasers have gained prominence due to the reduction in collateral thermal damage to surrounding healthy tissue during tissue ablation. In this paper, ultra-short pulsed laser ablation of mouse skin tissue is analyzed by assessing the extent of damage produced due to focused laser beam irradiation. The laser used for this study is a fiber-based desktop laser (Raydiance, Inc.) having a wavelength of 1552 nm and a pulse width of 1.3 ps. The laser beam is focused on the sample surface to a spot size on the order of 10 microns, thus producing high peak intensity necessary for precise clean ablation. A parametric study is performed on in vitro mouse tissue specimens and live anaesthetized mice with mammary tumors through variation of laser parameters such as time-averaged laser power, repetition rate, laser scanning rate and irradiation time. Radial temperature distribution is measured using thermal camera to analyze the heat affected zone. Temperature measurements are performed to assess the peak temperature rise attained during ablation. A detailed histological study is performed using frozen section technique to observe the nature and extent of laser-induced damages.

  15. All-solid-state repetitive semiconductor opening switch-based short pulse generator.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhenjie; Hao, Qingsong; Hu, Long; Su, Jiancang; Liu, Guozhi

    2009-09-01

    The operating characteristics of a semiconductor opening switch (SOS) are determined by its pumping circuit parameters. SOS is still able to cut off the current when pumping current duration falls to the order of tens of nanoseconds and a short pulse forms simultaneously in the output load. An all-solid-state repetitive SOS-based short pulse generator (SPG100) with a three-level magnetic pulse compression unit was successfully constructed. The generator adopts magnetic pulse compression unit with metallic glass and ferrite cores, which compresses a 600 V, 10 mus primary pulse into short pulse with forward pumping current of 825 A, 60 ns and reverse pumping current of 1.3 kA, 30 ns. The current is sent to SOS in which the reverse pumping current is interrupted. The generator is capable of providing a pulse with the voltage of 120 kV and duration of 5-6 ns while output load being 125 Omega. The highest repetition rate is up to 1 kHz. PMID:19791935

  16. A new high intensity and short-pulse molecular beam valve.

    PubMed

    Yan, B; Claus, P F H; van Oorschot, B G M; Gerritsen, L; Eppink, A T J B; van de Meerakker, S Y T; Parker, D H

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we report on the design and performance of a new home-built pulsed gas valve, which we refer to as the Nijmegen Pulsed Valve (NPV). The main output characteristics include a short pulse width (as short as 20 μs) combined with operating rates up to 30 Hz. The operation principle of the NPV is based on the Lorentz force created by a pulsed current passing through an aluminum strip located within a magnetic field, which opens the nozzle periodically. The amplitude of displacement of the opening mechanism is sufficient to allow the use of nozzles with up to 1.0 mm diameter. To investigate the performance of the valve, several characterizations were performed with different experimental methods. First, a fast ionization gauge was used to measure the beam intensity of the free jet emanating from the NPV. We compare free jets from the NPV with those from several other pulsed valves in current use in our laboratory. Results showed that a high intensity and short pulse-length beam could be generated by the new valve. Second, the NPV was tested in combination with a skimmer, where resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization combined with velocity map imaging was used to show that the NPV was able to produce a pulsed molecular beam with short pulse duration (~20 μs using 0.1% NO/He at 6 bars) and low rotational temperature (~1 K using 0.5% NO/Ar at 6 bars). Third, a novel two-point pump-probe method was employed which we label double delay scan. This method allows a full kinematic characterization of the molecular beam, including accurate speed ratios at different temporal positions. It was found that the speed ratio was maximum (S = 50 using 0.1% NO/He at 3 bars) at the peak position of the molecular beam and decreased when it was on the leading or falling edge. PMID:23464190

  17. Parallel PIC Simulations of Short-Pulse High Intensity Laser Plasma Interactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasinski, B. F.; Still, C. H.; Langdon, A. B.

    2001-10-01

    We extend our previous simulations of high intensity short pulse laser plasma interactions footnote B. F. Lasinski, A. B. Langdon, S. P. Hatchett, M. H. Key, and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 6, 2041 (1999); S. C. Wilks and W. L. Kruer, IEEE Journal of Quantum Electronics 11, 1954 (1997). to 3D and to much larger systems in 2D using our new, modern, 3D, electromagnetic, fully relativistic, massively parallel PIC code. We study the generation of hot electrons and energetic ions and the associated complex phenomena. Laser light filamentation and the formation of high static magnetic fields are described.

  18. Theory of suppressing avalanche process of carrier in short pulse laser irradiated dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Hongxiang; Zu, Xiaotao; Zheng, WG; Yuan, XD; Xiang, Xia; Sun, Kai; Gao, Fei

    2014-05-28

    A theory for controlling avalanche process of carrier during short pulse laser irradiation is proposed. We show that avalanche process of conduction band electrons (CBEs) is determined by the occupation number of phonons in dielectrics. The theory provides a way to suppress avalanche process and a direct judgment for the contribution of avalanche process and photon ionization process to the generation of CBEs. The obtained temperature dependent rate equation shows that the laser induced damage threshold of dielectrics, e.g., fused silica, increase nonlinearly with the decreases of temperature. Present theory predicts a new approach to improve the laser induced damage threshold of dielectrics.

  19. Large-amplitude plasma wave generation with a high-intensity short-pulse beat wave.

    PubMed

    Walton, B; Najmudin, Z; Wei, M S; Marle, C; Kingham, R J; Krushelnick, K; Dangor, A E; Clarke, R J; Poulter, M J; Hernandez-Gomez, C; Hawkes, S; Neely, D; Collier, J L; Danson, C N; Fritzler, S; Malka, V

    2002-12-15

    A short-pulse laser beat wave scheme for advanced particle accelerator applications is examined. A short, intense (3-ps, >10(18)-W cm(-2)) two-frequency laser pulse is produced by use of a modified chirped-pulse amplification scheme and is shown to produce relativistic plasma waves during interactions with low-density plasmas. The generation of plasma waves was observed by measurement of forward Raman scattering. Resonance was found to occur at an electron density many times that expected, owing to ponderomotive displacement of plasma within the focal region. PMID:18033483

  20. Application of short pulsed laser systems for micro-scale processing.

    SciTech Connect

    Jared, Bradley Howell

    2010-03-01

    The relatively recent development of short (nsec) and ultra-short (fsec) pulsed laser systems has introduced process capabilities which are particularly suited for micro-manufacturing applications. Micrometer feature resolutions and minimal heat affected zones are commonly cited benefits, although unique material interactions also prove attractive for many applications. A background of short and ultra-short pulsed laser system capabilities and material interactions will be presented for micro-scale processing. Processing strengths and limitations will be discussed and demonstrated within the framework of applications related to micro-machining, material surface modifications, and fundamental material science research.

  1. Advanced concepts for high-power, short-pulse CO2 laser development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Daniel F.; Hasson, Victor; von Bergmann, Hubertus; Chen, Yu-hsin; Schmitt-Sody, A.; Penano, Joseph R.

    2016-06-01

    Ultra-short pulse lasers are dominated by solid-state technology, which typically operates in the near-infrared. Efforts to extend this technology to longer wavelengths are meeting with some success, but the trend remains that longer wavelengths correlate with greatly reduced power. The carbon dioxide (CO2) laser is capable of delivering high energy, 10 micron wavelength pulses, but the gain structure makes operating in the ultra-short pulse regime difficult. The Naval Research Laboratory and Air Force Research Laboratory are developing a novel CO2 laser designed to deliver ~1 Joule, ~1 picosecond pulses, from a compact gain volume (~2x2x80 cm). The design is based on injection seeding an unstable resonator, in order to achieve high energy extraction efficiency, and to take advantage of power broadening. The unstable resonator is seeded by a solid state front end, pumped by a custom built titanium sapphire laser matched to the CO2 laser bandwidth. In order to access a broader range of mid infrared wavelengths using CO2 lasers, one must consider nonlinear frequency multiplication, which is non-trivial due to the bandwidth of the 10 micron radiation.

  2. Strip Velocity Measurements for Gated X-Ray Imagers Using Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, P. W.; Cardenas, M.; Griffin, M.; Mead, A.; Silbernagel, C. T.; Bell, P.; Haque, S. H.

    2013-09-01

    Strip velocity measurements of gated X-ray imagers are presented using an ultra-short pulse laser. Obtaining time-resolved X-ray images of inertial confinement fusion shots presents a difficult challenge. One diagnostic developed to address this challenge is the gated X-ray imagers. The gated X-ray detectors (GXDs) developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory use a microchannel plate (MCP) coated with a gold strip line, which serves as a photocathode. GXDs are used with an array of pinholes, which image onto various parts of the GXD image plane. As the pulse sweeps over the strip lines, it creates a time history of the event with consecutive images. In order to accurately interpret the timing of the images obtained using the GXDs, it is necessary to measure the propagation of the pulse over the strip line. The strip velocity was measured using a short pulse laser with a pulse duration of approximately 1-2 ps. The 200nm light from the laser is used to illuminate the GXD MCP. The laser pulse is split and a retroreflective mirror is used to delay one of the legs. By adjusting the distance to the mirror, one leg is temporally delayed compared to the reference leg. The retroreflective setup is calibrated using a streak camera with a 1 ns full sweep. Resolution of 0.5 mm is accomplished to achieve a temporal resolution of ~5 ps on the GXD strip line.

  3. GINGER simulations of short-pulse effects in the LEUTL FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Fawley, W.M.

    2001-07-01

    While the long-pulse, coasting beam model is often used in analysis and simulation of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron lasers (FELs), many current SASE demonstration experiments employ relatively short electron bunches whose pulse length is on the order of the radiation slippage length. In particular, the low-energy undulator test line (LEUTL) FEL at the Advanced Photon Source has recently lased and nominally saturated in both visible and near-ultraviolet wavelength regions with a sub-ps pulse length that is somewhat shorter than the total slippage length in the 22-m undulator system. In this paper we explore several characteristics of the short pulse regime for SASE FELs with the multidimensional, time-dependent simulation code GINGER, concentrating on making a direct comparison with the experimental results from LEUTL. Items of interest include the radiation gain length, pulse energy, saturation position, and spectral bandwidth. We address the importance of short-pulse effects when scaling the LEUTL results to proposed x-ray FELs and also briefly discuss the possible importance of coherent spontaneous emission at startup.

  4. Inequivalence of Phase and Time Delay in High Harmonic Generation with Short Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Dian; Pi, Liangwen; Starace, Anthony

    2016-05-01

    When mixing two (or more) laser pulses, the phase difference and the time delay are two crucial parameters. For long pulses, the relative phase and the time delay are equivalent: for example, cos(ω1 t) + cos(ω2 t + ϕ) = cos(ω1 t) + cos [ω2(t + ϕ /ω2) ] , i.e. in the extreme case of infinitely long pulses, the phase ϕ can be viewed as a time delay ϕ /ω2 between the two pulses. However, for ultra short pulses, this equivalence breaks down: the carrier-envelope phase can't be viewed as equivalent to a time delay between two pulse envelopes. Our quantum simulations show that the inequivalence of the phase and the time delay in short pulses can result in significantly different high-order harmonic generation spectra, with up to an order of magnitude difference in intensity and up to about 10 harmonic orders of difference in cutoff energy. Further analysis shows the underlying physics of such difference. Exposing this inequivalence directly for the first time, our work provides new insights into pulse shaping and related issues for both experimentalists and theorists. This work was supported in part by NSF Grant No. PHYS-1505492.

  5. Microwave short-pulse bed-level detector. Annual report, January 1-December 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Balanis, C.A.; Delauder, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    A short-pulse microwave system for measuring the bed-level within a fluidized-bed combustor, has been designed, built, and laboratory tested on static beds. The system is a short-pulse radar which operates in the frequency region of 6.75 to 10.95 GHz as a time-domain measurement system. Laboratory measurements of static bed-levels, for smooth and corrugated surfaces of metal plates and limestone sand, agree to an average of 2.0% of the actual heights. Additionally, the system was tested with a dielectric thermal protector, which did not compromise the accuracy of the measurements. Analytical models have been formulated to provide insight into the operation of the system on a wide range of simulated targets without the necessity of performing expensive and difficult laboratory experiments. Two formulations have been used to describe electromagnetic scattering by a rough surface as a function of frequency: the space harmonic model and the physical optics model. A reconstruction technique has been devised which uses the scattering models and the spectrum of the transmitted pulse to synthesize the reflected pulse. The data generated by the models compare well to previously published data and to experimental results.

  6. Transient thermal and nonthermal electron and phonon relaxation after short-pulsed laser heating of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Giri, Ashutosh; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2015-12-07

    Several dynamic thermal and nonthermal scattering processes affect ultrafast heat transfer in metals after short-pulsed laser heating. Even with decades of measurements of electron-phonon relaxation, the role of thermal vs. nonthermal electron and phonon scattering on overall electron energy transfer to the phonons remains unclear. In this work, we derive an analytical expression for the electron-phonon coupling factor in a metal that includes contributions from equilibrium and nonequilibrium distributions of electrons. While the contribution from the nonthermal electrons to electron-phonon coupling is non-negligible, the increase in the electron relaxation rates with increasing laser fluence measured by thermoreflectance techniques cannot be accounted for by only considering electron-phonon relaxations. We conclude that electron-electron scattering along with electron-phonon scattering have to be considered simultaneously to correctly predict the transient nature of electron relaxation during and after short-pulsed heating of metals at elevated electron temperatures. Furthermore, for high electron temperature perturbations achieved at high absorbed laser fluences, we show good agreement between our model, which accounts for d-band excitations, and previous experimental data. Our model can be extended to other free electron metals with the knowledge of the density of states of electrons in the metals and considering electronic excitations from non-Fermi surface states.

  7. Characteristics of High Energy Ka and Bremsstrahlung Sources Generated by Short Pulse Petawatt Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H; Izumi, N; Key, M H; Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Patel, P K; Phillips, T W; Zhang, B B

    2004-04-13

    We have measured the characteristics of high energy K{alpha} sources created with the Vulcan Petawatt laser at RAL and the JanUSP laser at LLNL. High energy x-ray backlighters will be essential for radiographing High-Energy-Density Experimental Science (HEDES) targets for NIF projects especially to probe implosions and high areal density planar samples. Hard K{alpha} x-ray photons are created through relativistic electron plasma interactions in the target material after irradiation by short pulse high intensity lasers. For our Vulcan experiment, we employed a CsI scintillator/CCD camera for imaging and a CCD camera for single photon counting. We measured the Ag K{alpha} source (22 keV) size using a pinhole array and the K{alpha} flux using a single photon counting method. We also radiographed a high Z target using the high energy broadband x-rays generated from these short pulse lasers. This paper will present results from these experiments.

  8. Comparison of short-pulsed and long-pulsed 532 nm lasers in the removal of freckles.

    PubMed

    Vejjabhinanta, Voraphol; Elsaie, Mohamed L; Patel, Shalu S; Patel, Asha; Caperton, Caroline; Nouri, Keyvan

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of the 532 nm long-pulsed laser (10 ms) with that of the 532 nm short-pulsed laser (10 ns) for freckle removal. Currently, the gold standard for treatment is the short-pulsed laser. Recently, several long-pulsed lasers have been introduced for both hair removal and the treatment of freckles. To our investigative team's knowledge, no controlled experiments have been performed to compare the safety and efficacy of long-pulsed versus short-pulsed lasers for the treatment of freckles. This was a 4-week trial, and all patients had three freckles that were randomly allocated to be treated with short-pulse laser, long-pulse laser, or to receive no treatment (control). All patients had three freckles that were randomly selected to be treated with short-pulse 532 nm Medlite IV laser (10 n, 1 J/cm(2)), or long-pulse 532 nm Aura laser (10 ms, 1 J/cm(2)) or to remain as a control (no treatment). The laser treatment was only performed once, followed by a 1-day and a 1-month follow-up visit. Freckle size was determined by a novel surface area measurement technique that was created by our research staff. The study included 17 sets of freckles (three in each set). All of the lesions which received the short-pulsed laser treatment had immediate whitening of the lesions, which turned into dry scabs the next day. None of the freckles treated in the long-pulsed group or control group developed immediate whitening or scabs. No blisters or ulcers developed. The average pain score in the short-pulsed laser group was 2-3 out of 10, while it was 0 out of 10 in the long-pulsed laser group. All scabs that developed in the short-pulsed laser group fell off between days 6 and 12 (average 8 days). The outcome of this study verified the appropriate treatment of freckles. The study confirmed that when the same energy settings, short-pulsed laser is the more effective laser treatment regimen (when compared with the long-pulsed laser

  9. Short-Pulse Laser Sintering of Multilayer Hard Metal Coatings: Structure and Wear Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharanzhevskiy, Evgeny; Ipatov, Alexey; Nikolaeva, Irina; Zakirova, Raushaniya

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports on the phase composition and properties of multilayer hard metal coatings deposited on steel by a process variant of Selective laser melting (SLM). The process is based on layer-wise short-pulse laser sintering of high-dispersive WC-Co powder on a steel substrate. High temperature in the molten zone and chemical interaction with the substrate explain high level of adhesion strength between the coating and the substrate. The technique allows obtaining both high quality hard-metal multilayer gradient coatings with thickness up to 200 μm, density near to the theoretical density (TD), hardness up to 21 GPa and complex 3D objects by layer-wise powder based process such as SLM.

  10. Monochromatic short pulse laser produced ion beam using a compact passive magnetic device

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S. N.; Gauthier, M.; Higginson, D. P.; Dorard, S.; Marquès, J.-R.; Fuchs, J.; Mangia, F.; Atzeni, S.; Riquier, R.; CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon

    2014-04-15

    High-intensity laser accelerated protons and ions are emerging sources with complementary characteristics to those of conventional sources, namely high charge, high current, and short bunch duration, and therefore can be useful for dedicated applications. However, these beams exhibit a broadband energy spectrum when, for some experiments, monoenergetic beams are required. We present here an adaptation of conventional chicane devices in a compact form (10 cm × 20 cm) which enables selection of a specific energy interval from the broadband spectrum. This is achieved by employing magnetic fields to bend the trajectory of the laser produced proton beam through two slits in order to select the minimum and maximum beam energy. The device enables a production of a high current, short duration source with a reproducible output spectrum from short pulse laser produced charged particle beams.

  11. Fluctuations of energy density of short-pulse optical radiation in the turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Banakh, V A; Smalikho, I N

    2014-09-22

    Fluctuations of energy density of short-pulse optical radiation in the turbulent atmosphere have been studied based on numerical solution of the parabolic wave equation for the complex spectral amplitude of the wave field by the split-step method. It has been shown that under conditions of strong optical turbulence, the relative variance of energy density fluctuations of pulsed radiation of femtosecond duration becomes much less than the relative variance of intensity fluctuations of continuous-wave radiation. The spatial structure of fluctuations of the energy density with a decrease of the pulse duration becomes more large-scale and homogeneous. For shorter pulses the maximal value of the probability density distribution of energy density fluctuations tends to the mean value of the energy density. PMID:25321700

  12. Ion Beams in Short-Pulse, High Intensity Laser Matter Interactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasinski, B. F.; Langdon, A. B.; Still, C. H.; Tabak, M.; Town, R. P. J.; Kruer, W. L.; Wilks, S. C.; Welch, D. R.

    2002-11-01

    Experiments on the interaction of short pulse high intensity lasers with thin foils have produced intense ion beams with surprisingly good emittance. We report on explicit PIC and hybrid particle-fluid simulations motivated by these experiments. In addition, we study the focusing of these beams and their possible collective effects. The LSP code footnote D. R. Welch, et al, Nucl. Inst. Meth. Phys. Res. A 242, 134 (2001). uses a direct implicit particle-in-cell algorithm in 2 or 3 dimensions to solve for the beam particles and the background particles are treated as a fluid. Implications for the fast ignitor concept footnote M. Tabak, et al, Phys. Plasmas 1, 1626 (1994). in which energetic fast particles transport energy to the high-density compressed fuel will be discussed.

  13. Ignition and Growth Modeling of Short Pulse Duration Shock Initiation Experiments on HNS IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Craig; Chidester, Steven

    2013-06-01

    Short pulse duration shock initiation experiments on 1.60 g/cm3 density (92% TMD) HNS IV have been reported by Schwarz, Bowden et al., Dudley et al., Goveas et al., Greenaway et al., and others. This flyer threshold velocity for detonation/failure data plus measured unreacted HNS Hugoniot data and detonation cylinder test product expansion data were used as the experimental basis for the development of an Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for the shock initiation of HNS IV. The resulting Ignition and Growth HNS IV model parameters yielded good overall agreement with all of this experimental data. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.: Explosive, HNS IV, shock to detonation transition, Ignition and Growth: 82.33.Vx, 82.40.Fp.

  14. Epithermal Neutron Source for Neutron Resonance Spectroscopy (NRS) using High Intensity, Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Higginson, D P; McNaney, J M; Swift, D C; Bartal, T; Hey, D S; Pape, S L; Mackinnon, A; Mariscal, D; Nakamura, H; Nakanii, N; Beg, F N

    2010-04-22

    A neutron source for neutron resonance spectroscopy (NRS) has been developed using high intensity, short pulse lasers. This measurement technique will allow for robust measurements of interior ion temperature of laser-shocked materials and provide insight into equation of state (EOS) measurements. The neutron generation technique uses protons accelerated by lasers off of Cu foils to create neutrons in LiF, through (p,n) reactions with {sup 7}Li and {sup 19}F. The distribution of the incident proton beam has been diagnosed using radiochromic film (RCF). This distribution is used as the input for a (p,n) neturon prediction code which is compared to experimentally measured neutron yields. From this calculation, a total fluence of 1.8 x 10{sup 9} neutrons is infered, which is shown to be a reasonable amount for NRS temperature measurement.

  15. Characterization of a novel, short pulse laser-driven neutron sourcea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, D.; Falk, K.; Guler, N.; Deppert, O.; Devlin, M.; Favalli, A.; Fernandez, J. C.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Haight, R.; Hamilton, C. E.; Hegelich, B. M.; Johnson, R. P.; Merrill, F.; Schaumann, G.; Schoenberg, K.; Schollmeier, M.; Shimada, T.; Taddeucci, T.; Tybo, J. L.; Wender, S. A.; Wilde, C. H.; Wurden, G. A.; Roth, M.

    2013-05-01

    We present a full characterization of a short pulse laser-driven neutron source. Neutrons are produced by nuclear reactions of laser-driven ions deposited in a secondary target. The emission of neutrons is a superposition of an isotropic component into 4π and a forward directed, jet-like contribution, with energies ranging up to 80 MeV. A maximum flux of 4.4 × 109 neutrons/sr has been observed and used for fast neutron radiography. On-shot characterization of the ion driver and neutron beam has been done with a variety of different diagnostics, including particle detectors, nuclear reaction, and time-of-flight methods. The results are of great value for future optimization of this novel technique and implementation in advanced applications.

  16. Characterization of a novel, short pulse laser-driven neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, D.; Falk, K.; Guler, N.; Devlin, M.; Favalli, A.; Fernandez, J. C.; Gautier, D. C.; Haight, R.; Hamilton, C. E.; Hegelich, B. M.; Johnson, R. P.; Merrill, F.; Schoenberg, K.; Shimada, T.; Taddeucci, T.; Tybo, J. L.; Wender, S. A.; Wilde, C. H.; Wurden, G. A.; Deppert, O.; and others

    2013-05-15

    We present a full characterization of a short pulse laser-driven neutron source. Neutrons are produced by nuclear reactions of laser-driven ions deposited in a secondary target. The emission of neutrons is a superposition of an isotropic component into 4π and a forward directed, jet-like contribution, with energies ranging up to 80 MeV. A maximum flux of 4.4 × 10{sup 9} neutrons/sr has been observed and used for fast neutron radiography. On-shot characterization of the ion driver and neutron beam has been done with a variety of different diagnostics, including particle detectors, nuclear reaction, and time-of-flight methods. The results are of great value for future optimization of this novel technique and implementation in advanced applications.

  17. Status of the Short-Pulse X-ray Project at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Nassiri, A; Berenc, T G; Borland, M; Brajuskovic, B; Bromberek, D J; Carwardine, J; Decker, G; Emery, L; Fuerst, J D; Grelick, A E; Horan, D; Kaluzny, J; Lenkszus, F; Lill, R M; Liu, J; Ma, H; Sajaev, V; Smith, T L; Stillwell, B K; Waldschmidt, G J; Wu, G; Yang, B X; Yang, Y; Zholents, A; Byrd, J M; Doolittle, L R; Huang, G; Cheng, G; Ciovati, G; Dhakal, P; Eremeev, G V; Feingold, J J; Geng, R L; Henry, J; Kneisel, P; Macha, K; Mammosser, J D; Matalevich, J; Palczewski, A D; Rimmer, R A; Wang, H; Wilson, K M; Wiseman, M; Li, Z; Xiao, L

    2012-07-01

    The Advanced Photon Source Upgrade (APS-U) Project at Argonne will include generation of short-pulse x-rays based on Zholents deflecting cavity scheme. We have chosen superconducting (SC) cavities in order to have a continuous train of crabbed bunches and flexibility of operating modes. In collaboration with Jefferson Laboratory, we are prototyping and testing a number of single-cell deflecting cavities and associated auxiliary systems with promising initial results. In collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we are working to develop state-of-the-art timing, synchronization, and differential rf phase stability systems that are required for SPX. Collaboration with Advanced Computations Department at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is looking into simulations of complex, multi-cavity geometries with lower- and higher-order modes waveguide dampers using ACE3P. This contribution provides the current R&D status of the SPX project.

  18. High power, short pulses ultraviolet laser for the development of a new x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Meixler, L.; Nam, C.H.; Robinson, J.; Tighe, W.; Krushelnick, K.; Suckewer, S.; Goldhar, J.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.

    1989-04-01

    A high power, short pulse ultraviolet laser system (Powerful Picosecond-Laser) has been developed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) as part of experiments designed to generate shorter wavelength x-ray lasers. With the addition of pulse compression and a final KrF amplifier the laser output is expected to have reached 1/3-1/2 TW (10/sup 12/ watts) levels. The laser system, particularly the final amplifier, is described along with some initial soft x-ray spectra from laser-target experiments. The front end of the PP-Laser provides an output of 20--30 GW (10/sup 9/ watts) and can be focussed to intensities of /approximately/10/sup 16/ W/cm/sup 2/. Experiments using this output to examine the effects of a prepulse on laser-target interaction are described. 19 refs., 14 figs.

  19. Osteoblast behavior on various ultra short pulsed laser deposited surface coatings.

    PubMed

    Qu, Chengjuan; Myllymaa, Sami; Prittinen, Juha; Koistinen, Arto P; Lappalainen, Reijo; Lammi, Mikko J

    2013-04-01

    Ultra short pulsed laser deposition technique was utilized to create amorphous diamond, alumina and carbon nitride, and two different titania coatings on silicon wafers, thus producing five different surface deposited films with variable physico-chemical properties. The surface characterizations, including the roughness, the contact angle and the zeta potential measurements were performed before we tested the growth properties of human osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells on these surfaces (three separate experiments). The average roughness and hydrophobicity were the highest on titania-deposited surfaces, while carbon nitride was the most hydrophilic one. Osteoblasts on all surfaces showed a flattened, spread-out morphology, although on amorphous diamond the cell shape appeared more elongated than on the other surfaces. On rough titania, the area covered by the osteoblasts was smaller than on the other ones. Cell proliferation assay did not show any statistically significant differences. PMID:23827623

  20. Two-color short-pulse laser altimeter measurements of ocean surface backscatter.

    PubMed

    Abshire, J B; McGarry, J F

    1987-04-01

    The timing and correlation properties of pulsed laser backscatter from the ocean surface have been measured with a two-color short-pulse laser altimeter. The Nd: YAG laser transmitted 70-and 35-ps wide pulses simultaneously at 532 and 355 nm at nadir, and the time-resolved returns were recorded by a receiver with 800-ps response time. The time-resolved backscatter measured at both 330- and 1291-m altitudes showed little pulse broadening due to the submeter laser spot size. The differential delay of the 355- and 532-nm backscattered waveforms were measured with a rms error of ~75 ps. The change in aircraft altitudes also permitted the change in atmospheric pressure to be estimated by using the two-color technique. PMID:20454319

  1. Focal spot measurement in ultra-intense ultra-short pulse laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lanqin; Peng, Hansheng; Zhou, Kainan; Wang, Xiaodong; Wang, Xiao; Zeng, Xiaoming; Zhu, Qihua; Huang, Xiaojun; Wei, Xiaofeng; Ren, Huan

    2005-06-01

    A peak power of 286-TW Ti:sapphire laser facility referred to as SILEX-I was successfully built at China Academy of Engineering Physics, for a pulse duration of 30 fs in a three-stage Ti:sapphire amplifier chain based on chirped-pulse amplification. The beam have a wavefront distortion of 0.63μm PV and 0.09μm RMS, and the focal spot with an f/2.2 OAP is 5.7μm, to our knowledge, this is the best far field obtained for high-power ultra-short pulse laser systems with no deformable mirror wavefront correction. The peak focused intensity of ~1021W /cm2 were expected.

  2. The thermoelastic basis of short pulsed laser ablation of biological tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Itzkan, I; Albagli, D; Dark, M L; Perelman, L T; von Rosenberg, C; Feld, M S

    1995-01-01

    Strong evidence that short-pulse laser ablation of biological tissues is a photomechanical process is presented. A full three-dimensional, time-dependent solution to the thermoelastic wave equation is compared to the results of experiments using an interferometric surface monitor to measure thermoelastic expansion. Agreement is excellent for calibrations performed on glass and on acrylic at low laser fluences. For cortical bone, the measurements agree well with the theoretical predictions once optical scattering is included. The theory predicts the presence of the tensile stresses necessary to rupture the tissue during photomechanical ablation. The technique is also used to monitor the ablation event both before and after material is ejected. PMID:7892208

  3. Two-dimensional electromagnetic Child-Langmuir law of a short-pulse electron flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S. H.; Tai, L. C.; Liu, Y. L.; Ang, L. K.; Koh, W. S.

    2011-02-15

    Two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations were performed to study the effect of the displacement current and the self-magnetic field on the space charge limited current density or the Child-Langmuir law of a short-pulse electron flow with a propagation distance of {zeta} and an emitting width of W from the classical regime to the relativistic regime. Numerical scaling of the two-dimensional electromagnetic Child-Langmuir law was constructed and it scales with ({zeta}/W) and ({zeta}/W){sup 2} at the classical and relativistic regimes, respectively. Our findings reveal that the displacement current can considerably enhance the space charge limited current density as compared to the well-known two-dimensional electrostatic Child-Langmuir law even at the classical regime.

  4. Polarimetric, Ka-band, combined, short-pulse scatterometer, and radiometer system for platform application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakelyan, Artashes K.; Alaverdyan, Eduard R.; Arakelyan, Arsen A.; Darbinyan, Sargis A.; Hambaryan, Astghik K.; Hambaryan, Vardan K.; Karyan, Vanik V.; Ogannesyan, Gagik G.; Poghosyan, Nubar G.; Smolin, Aleksander I.

    2005-05-01

    In this paper Ka-band (37GHz), dual polarization, combined short-pulse scatterometer-radiometer is described, for short distance remote sensing of bare soil and land snow cover and for simultaneous and coincident measurements of observed media microwave reflective and emissive characteristics, under laboratory-control conditions. Developed system is set on a mobile bogie moving on the height of 6.5m along a stationary platform of 26m of length. It allows carry out polarimetric (vv, vh, hh, hv), simultaneous and coincident microwave active-passive measurements of observed surface (soil, soil vegetation, snow and water surface) parameters at angles of incidence from the while of 0-60o.

  5. All-reflective, highly accurate polarization rotator for high-power short-pulse laser systems.

    PubMed

    Keppler, S; Hornung, M; Bödefeld, R; Kahle, M; Hein, J; Kaluza, M C

    2012-08-27

    We present the setup of a polarization rotating device and its adaption for high-power short-pulse laser systems. Compared to conventional halfwave plates, the all-reflective principle using three zero-phase shift mirrors provides a higher accuracy and a higher damage threshold. Since plan-parallel plates, e.g. these halfwave plates, generate postpulses, which could lead to the generation of prepulses during the subsequent laser chain, the presented device avoids parasitic pulses and is therefore the preferable alternative for high-contrast applications. Moreover the device is easily scalable for large beam diameters and its spectral reflectivity can be adjusted by an appropriate mirror coating to be well suited for ultra-short laser pulses. PMID:23037123

  6. Chirp-free ultra-short pulses in complex nonlinear optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiance; Liang, Jianchu; Cao, Jianzhong; Song, Jinxiang; Cai, Zebin

    2016-04-01

    Chirp-free ultra-short pulses propagating in optical fiber with complex parameters are investigated for the first time. The existence condition for such chirp-free ultrashort pulses is that the imaginary parts of the nonlinear terms, i.e., the nonlinear absorption coefficient (a2i), nonlinear dispersion coefficient (a4i) and imaginary Raman coefficient (a2i) fulfill a linear relationship a2i = a4i ω = -2/3 a5i ω . Bight solitons can stably propagate in such complex nonlinear optical fiber. It is found that the single Jacobi elliptic function solutions have two free parameters while hybrid Jacobi elliptic function solutions have only one free parameter.

  7. Heating Mechanisms in Short-Pulse Laser-Driven Cone Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.

    2006-01-27

    The fast ignitor is a modern approach to laser fusion that uses a short-pulse laser to initiate thermonuclear burn. In its simplest form the laser launches relativistic electrons that carry its energy to a precompressed fusion target. Cones have been used to give the light access to the dense target core through the low-density ablative cloud surrounding it. Here the ANTHEM implicit hybrid simulation model shows that the peak ion temperatures measured in recent cone target experiments arose chiefly from return current joule heating, mildly supplemented by relativistic electron drag. Magnetic fields augment this heating only slightly, but capture hot electrons near the cone surface and force the hot electron stream into filaments.

  8. Heating mechanisms in short-pulse laser-driven cone targets.

    PubMed

    Mason, R J

    2006-01-27

    The fast ignitor is a modern approach to laser fusion that uses a short-pulse laser to initiate thermonuclear burn. In its simplest form the laser launches relativistic electrons that carry its energy to a precompressed fusion target. Cones have been used to give the light access to the dense target core through the low-density ablative cloud surrounding it. Here the ANTHEM implicit hybrid simulation model shows that the peak ion temperatures measured in recent cone target experiments arose chiefly from return current joule heating, mildly supplemented by relativistic electron drag. Magnetic fields augment this heating only slightly, but capture hot electrons near the cone surface and force the hot electron stream into filaments. PMID:16486715

  9. Monochromatic short pulse laser produced ion beam using a compact passive magnetic device.

    PubMed

    Chen, S N; Gauthier, M; Higginson, D P; Dorard, S; Mangia, F; Riquier, R; Atzeni, S; Marquès, J-R; Fuchs, J

    2014-04-01

    High-intensity laser accelerated protons and ions are emerging sources with complementary characteristics to those of conventional sources, namely high charge, high current, and short bunch duration, and therefore can be useful for dedicated applications. However, these beams exhibit a broadband energy spectrum when, for some experiments, monoenergetic beams are required. We present here an adaptation of conventional chicane devices in a compact form (10 cm × 20 cm) which enables selection of a specific energy interval from the broadband spectrum. This is achieved by employing magnetic fields to bend the trajectory of the laser produced proton beam through two slits in order to select the minimum and maximum beam energy. The device enables a production of a high current, short duration source with a reproducible output spectrum from short pulse laser produced charged particle beams. PMID:24784604

  10. Experimental approach to interaction physics challenges of the shock ignition scheme using short pulse lasers.

    PubMed

    Goyon, C; Depierreux, S; Yahia, V; Loisel, G; Baccou, C; Courvoisier, C; Borisenko, N G; Orekhov, A; Rosmej, O; Labaune, C

    2013-12-01

    An experimental program was designed to study the most important issues of laser-plasma interaction physics in the context of the shock ignition scheme. In the new experiments presented in this Letter, a combination of kilojoule and short laser pulses was used to study the laser-plasma coupling at high laser intensities for a large range of electron densities and plasma profiles. We find that the backscatter is dominated by stimulated Brillouin scattering with stimulated Raman scattering staying at a limited level. This is in agreement with past experiments using long pulses but laser intensities limited to 2×10(15)  W/cm2, or short pulses with intensities up to 5×10(16)  W/cm2 as well as with 2D particle-in-cell simulations. PMID:24476284

  11. The evolution of ultra-intense, short-pulse lasers in underdense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, C.D.; Mori, W.B.; Tzeng, K.C.

    1995-11-03

    The propagation of short-pulse lasers through underdense plasmas at ultra-high intensities (I {>=}10{sup 19}W/cm) is examined. The pulse evolution is found to be significantly different than it is for moderate intensities. Rather than beam breakup from self-modulation, Raman forward scattering and laser hose instabilities the behavior is dominated by leading edge erosion. A differential equation which describes local pump depletion is derived and used to analyze the formation and evolution of the erosion. This pulse erosion is demonstrated with one dimensional particle in cell (PIC) simulations. In addition, two dimensional simulations are presented which show pulse erosion along with other effects such as channeling and diffraction.

  12. An imaging proton spectrometer for short-pulse laser plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Hazi, A; van Maren, R; Chen, S; Fuchs, J; Gauthier, M; Pape, S L; Rygg, J R; Shepherd, R

    2010-05-11

    Ultra intense short pulse laser pulses incident on solid targets can generate energetic protons. In additions to their potentially important applications such as in cancer treatments and proton fast ignition, these protons are essential to understand the complex physics of intense laser plasma interaction. To better characterize these laser-produced protons, we designed and constructed a novel, spatially imaging proton spectrometer that will not only measure proton energy distribution with high resolution, but also provide its angular characteristics. The information obtained from this spectrometer compliments those from commonly used diagnostics including radiochromic film packs, CR39 nuclear track detectors, and non-imaging magnetic spectrometers. The basic characterizations and sample data from this instrument are presented.

  13. High Energy, Short Pulse Fiber Injection Lasers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J W; Messerly, M J; Phan, H H; Crane, J K; Beach, R J; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2008-09-10

    A short pulse fiber injection laser for the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This system produces 100 {micro}J pulses with 5 nm of bandwidth centered at 1053 nm. The pulses are stretched to 2.5 ns and have been recompressed to sub-ps pulse widths. A key feature of the system is that the pre-pulse power contrast ratio exceeds 80 dB. The system can also precisely adjust the final recompressed pulse width and timing and has been designed for reliable, hands free operation. The key challenges in constructing this system were control of the signal to noise ratio, dispersion management and managing the impact of self phase modulation on the chirped pulse.

  14. A short pulse, free running, Nd : YAG laser for the cleaning of stone cultural heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzinghi, Piero; Margheri, Fabrizio

    2003-09-01

    This paper presents a Nd : YAG laser operating in free running (FR) regime, with a pulse duration (20 μs) shorter than conventional systems (>200 μs), mainly developed for applications in laser cleaning of stones, especially for the restoration of cultural heritage. The system was also optimized to achieve high energy and low divergence, for easy coupling with optical fibers. The unusual pulse temporal regime induces a spiky behavior of the laser output which could also help in the application. Details on the technologies for the flashlamps power supplies, including the discharge circuits needed to achieve the short pulses, are given. Application trials on artworks and artificial samples are also discussed. Results show that the intermediate pulse duration avoids the mechanical damage induced by the photomechanical effect of Q-switch lasers and the thermal damage, as superficial melting, usually induced by long pulse FR lasers.

  15. Short Pulse Laser Absorption and Energy Partition at Relativistic Laser Intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, R; Chen, H; Ping, Y; Dyer, G; Wilks, S; Chung, H; Kemp, A; Hanson, S; Widmann, K; Fournier, K; Faenov, A; Pikuz, T; Niles, A; Beiersdorfer, P

    2007-02-27

    We have performed experiments at the COMET and Calisto short pulse laser facilities to make the first comprehensive measurements of the laser absorption and energy partition in solid targets heated with an ultrashort laser pulse focused to relativistic laser intensities (>10 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}). The measurements show an exceedingly high absorption for P polarized laser-target interactions above 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Additionally, the hot electron population is observed to markedly increase at the same intensity range. An investigation of the relaxation process was initiated u using time sing time-resolved K{sub {alpha}} spectroscopy. Measurements of the time time-resolved K{sub {alpha}} radiation suggest a 10-20 ps relativistic electron relaxation time. However modeling difficulties of these data are apparent and a more detailed investigation on this subject matter is warranted.

  16. Certain considerations in aperture synthesis of ultrawideband/short-pulse radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyman, Ehud; Melamed, Timor

    1994-04-01

    We consider certain characteristics of the radiation from collimated, ultrawideband short-pulse aperture distributions. It is shown that an efficient radiation must account for the multifrequency nature of the field. Two alternative schemes for wideband aperture synthesis of an impulse-like radiation pattern are examined. The first, entitled the 'iso-width aperture,' utilizes only temporal shaping of the excitation pulse. In the other, the 'iso-diffracting aperture,' we suggest source shaping in space-time so that all the frequency components in the field have the same collimation distance. The 'iso-diffracting' scheme yields higher directivity and more efficient pulsed radiation. Explicit examples for the pulsed source distribution and for the pulsed radiation patterns are presented, parametrized, and contrasted.

  17. Detection limits of organic compounds achievable with intense, short-pulse lasers.

    PubMed

    Miles, Jordan; De Camillis, Simone; Alexander, Grace; Hamilton, Kathryn; Kelly, Thomas J; Costello, John T; Zepf, Matthew; Williams, Ian D; Greenwood, Jason B

    2015-06-21

    Many organic molecules have strong absorption bands which can be accessed by ultraviolet short pulse lasers to produce efficient ionization. This resonant multiphoton ionization scheme has already been exploited as an ionization source in time-of-flight mass spectrometers used for environmental trace analysis. In the present work we quantify the ultimate potential of this technique by measuring absolute ion yields produced from the interaction of 267 nm femtosecond laser pulses with the organic molecules indole and toluene, and gases Xe, N2 and O2. Using multiphoton ionization cross sections extracted from these results, we show that the laser pulse parameters required for real-time detection of aromatic molecules at concentrations of one part per trillion in air and a limit of detection of a few attomoles are achievable with presently available commercial laser systems. The potential applications for the analysis of human breath, blood and tissue samples are discussed. PMID:25929227

  18. Hot-electron surface retention in intense short-pulse laser-matter interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.; Dodd, E.S.; Albright, B.J.

    2005-07-01

    Implicit hybrid plasma simulations predict that a significant fraction of the energy deposited into hot electrons can be retained near the surface of targets with steep density gradients illuminated by intense short-pulse lasers. This retention derives from the lateral transport of heated electrons randomly emitted in the presence of spontaneous magnetic fields arising near the laser spot, from geometric effects associated with a small hot-electron source, and from E fields arising in reaction to the ponderomotive force. Below the laser spot hot electrons are axially focused into a target by the B fields, and can filament in moderate Z targets by resistive Weibel-like instability, if the effective background electron temperature remains sufficiently low. Carefully engineered use of such retention in conjunction with ponderomotive density profile steepening could result in a reduced hot-electron range that aids fast ignition. Alternatively, such retention may disturb a deeper deposition needed for efficient radiography and backside fast ion generation.

  19. Plasma channel charging by an intense short pulse laser and ion Coulomb explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, V.K.; Taguchi, T.; Liu, C.S.

    2005-04-15

    The combined effects of relativistic self-focusing and the expulsion of electrons by the ponderomotive force of a radially focused laser create an ion channel, depleted of electrons, of radius r{sub 0}{approx}c/{omega}{sub p}, where {omega}{sub p} is the electron plasma frequency. This charging process takes place on plasma period, {omega}{sub p}{sup -1}, time scale. The Coulomb explosion of the channel accelerates ions to several hundreds of keV energy in about an ion plasma period, constituting an important ion acceleration mechanism by short pulse intense laser. In the case of a deuterium-tritium plasma, the accelerated ions can produce fusion energy with an efficiency of {approx}0.5%.

  20. Control of Brillouin short-pulse seed amplification by chirping the pump pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, G.; Spatschek, K. H.

    2015-04-15

    Seed amplification via Brillouin backscattering of a long pump pulse is considered. Similar to Raman amplification, several obstructive effects may occur during short-pulse Brillouin amplification. One is the spontaneous Raman backscattering of the pump before interacting with the seed. Preforming the plasma and/or chirping the pump will reduce unwanted pump backscattering. Optimized regions for low-loss pump propagation were proposed already in conjunction with Raman seed amplification. Hence, the influence of the chirp of the pump during Brillouin interaction with the seed becomes important and will be considered here. Both, the linear as well as the nonlinear evolution phases of the seed caused by Brillouin amplification under the action of a chirped pump are investigated. The amplification rate as well as the seed profiles are presented as function of the chirping rate. Also the dependence of superradiant scaling rates on the chirp parameter is discussed.

  1. Transient Scattering from Bodies of Revolution with Applications in Short-Pulse Reflector Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Allen Tan-Sen

    This dissertation studies the transient scattering from bodies of revolution (BOR). The work presents two distinct integral formulations for analyzing a wide variety of BOR configurations, numerous scattering examples to better understand the transient scattering phenomena, and two reflector antennas geometries suitable for ultra-wideband radar applications. The March-on-Time (MOT) method and an Inverse Discrete Fourier Transform (IDFT) method are both examined and fully developed to determine their capabilities in analyzing a wide variety of BOR configurations. The IDFT approach is ultimately selected over the MOT for our particular applications. This method transforms the transient scattering problem into the frequency domain where a Moment Method formulation with entire-domain basis functions then determines the equivalent surface currents induced on the scatterer. Once the electromagnetic field radiated by these currents are computed in the frequency domain, they are returned back to the time domain using Fast-Fourier Transform (FFT) techniques. The IDFT analysis technique is used to examine the transient scattering behavior of representative scatterers. Many scatterer geometries are considered, among them perfect conductors, dielectric bodies, dielectric-coated conductors, and multi-body scatterers. The edge diffraction behavior of perfectly conducting scatterers, as well as the scattering characteristics of dielectric spheres made of different dielectric constants and lossy materials, are also studied. Other examples considered are metal scatterers coated with a layer of lossy dispersive material. The last part of this work pertains to the design of reflector antennas for short-pulse radiation. Its main objective is to present representative single- and dual -reflector antennas capable of radiating a collimated user -specified short pulse in the far-zone region. The double -Gaussian time pulse serves as the desired radiated waveform in this section of the

  2. Transient Self-Amplified Cerenkov Radiation with a Short Pulse Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, B R; Blackfield, D T; Camacho, J F

    2009-01-22

    An analytic and numerical examination of the slow wave Cerenkov free electron maser is presented. We consider the steady state amplifier configuration as well as operation in the selfamplified spontaneous emission (SASE) regime. The linear theory is extended to include electron beams that have a parabolic radial density inhomogeneity. Closed form solutions for the dispersion relation and modal structure of the electromagnetic field are determined in this inhomogeneous case. To determine the steady state response, a macro-particle approach is used to develop a set of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations for the amplitude and phase of the electromagnetic wave, which are solved in conjunction with the particle dynamical equations to determine the response when the system is driven as an amplifier with a time harmonic source. We then consider the case in which a fast rise time electron beam is injected into a dielectric loaded waveguide. In this case, radiation is generated by SASE, with the instability seeded by the leading edge of the electron beam. A pulse of radiation is produced, slipping behind the leading edge of the beam due to the disparity between the group velocity of the radiation and the beam velocity. Short pulses of microwave radiation are generated in the SASE regime and are investigated using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The nonlinear dynamics are significantly more complicated in the transient SASE regime when compared with the steady state amplifier model due to the slippage of the radiation with respect to the beam. As strong self-bunching of the electron beam develops due to SASE, short pulses of superradiant emission develop with peak powers significantly larger than the predicted saturated power based on the steady state amplifier model. As these superradiant pulses grow, their pulse length decreases and forms a series of soliton-like pulses. Comparisons between the linear theory, macro-particle model, and PIC simulations are

  3. Optical coherence tomography in material deformation by using short pulse laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eun Seo; Kwak, Wooseop; Shin, Yongjin; Kim, Youngseop; Jung, Woonggyu; Ahn, Yeh-Chan; Chen, Zhongping; Jeong, Eun Joo; Kim, Chang-Seok

    2008-02-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of OCT imaging for the investigation of samples, which are processed by the short pulse laser. The use of short pulse lasers in various material processing have provided the advantages such as a high peak power and a small heat affected zone over conventional methods based on mechanical treatment. However, due to the improper application of the lasers, the unwanted surface or structural deformation of materials and the thermal damages around an irradiation spot can be caused. Thus, the real-time monitoring/evaluation of laser processing performance in-situ is needed to prevent the excessive deformation of the material and to determine optimal processing conditions. As a standard method to investigation of the material processing by using the lasers, the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) or the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation of a physically cleaved surface is used although sample damages are given during the cleaving and polishing process. In this paper, we utilized the OCT advantages such as high resolution and non-invasive investigation to evaluate the laser processing performance. OCT images for the deformation monitoring of the ABS plastic present correlation with images obtained from conventional investigation methods. OCT images of the maxillary bone clearly show the difference in the pit formation of the biological sample at different irradiation conditions. We prove the potential of OCT for the evaluation of laser-processed various samples. Integrating OCT system into a laser processing system, we can visualize the effect of laser-based treatments in clinical and industrial fields.

  4. An overview of LLNL high-energy short-pulse technology for advanced radiography of laser fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barty, C. P. J.; Key, M.; Britten, J.; Beach, R.; Beer, G.; Brown, C.; Bryan, S.; Caird, J.; Carlson, T.; Crane, J.; Dawson, J.; Erlandson, A. C.; Fittinghoff, D.; Hermann, M.; Hoaglan, C.; Iyer, A.; Jones, L., II; Jovanovic, I.; Komashko, A.; Landen, O.; Liao, Z.; Molander, W.; Mitchell, S.; Moses, E.; Nielsen, N.; Nguyen, H.-H.; Nissen, J.; Payne, S.; Pennington, D.; Risinger, L.; Rushford, M.; Skulina, K.; Spaeth, M.; Stuart, B.; Tietbohl, G.; Wattellier, B.

    2004-12-01

    The technical challenges and motivations for high-energy, short-pulse generation with NIF and possibly other large-scale Nd : glass lasers are reviewed. High-energy short-pulse generation (multi-kilojoule, picosecond pulses) will be possible via the adaptation of chirped pulse amplification laser techniques on NIF. Development of metre-scale, high-efficiency, high-damage-threshold final optics is a key technical challenge. In addition, deployment of high energy petawatt (HEPW) pulses on NIF is constrained by existing laser infrastructure and requires new, compact compressor designs and short-pulse, fibre-based, seed-laser systems. The key motivations for HEPW pulses on NIF is briefly outlined and includes high-energy, x-ray radiography, proton beam radiography, proton isochoric heating and tests of the fast ignitor concept for inertial confinement fusion.

  5. Dynamometer Testing of Samsung 2.5MW Drivetrain: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-311

    SciTech Connect

    Wallen, R.

    2011-02-01

    SHI's prototype 2.5 MW wind turbine drivetrain was tested at the NWTC 2.5 MW dynamometer test facility over the course of 4 months between December 2009 and March 2010. This successful testing campaign allowed SHI to validate performance, safety, control tuning, and reliability in a controlled environment before moving to full-scale testing and subsequent introduction of a commercial product into the American market.

  6. RBF neural network based PI pitch controller for a class of 5-MW wind turbines using particle swarm optimization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Poultangari, Iman; Shahnazi, Reza; Sheikhan, Mansour

    2012-09-01

    In order to control the pitch angle of blades in wind turbines, commonly the proportional and integral (PI) controller due to its simplicity and industrial usability is employed. The neural networks and evolutionary algorithms are tools that provide a suitable ground to determine the optimal PI gains. In this paper, a radial basis function (RBF) neural network based PI controller is proposed for collective pitch control (CPC) of a 5-MW wind turbine. In order to provide an optimal dataset to train the RBF neural network, particle swarm optimization (PSO) evolutionary algorithm is used. The proposed method does not need the complexities, nonlinearities and uncertainties of the system under control. The simulation results show that the proposed controller has satisfactory performance. PMID:22738782

  7. Observation of large arrays of plasma filaments in air breakdown by 1.5-MW 110-GHz gyrotron pulses.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Yoshiteru; Choi, E M; Mastovsky, I; Shapiro, M A; Sirigiri, J R; Temkin, R J

    2008-01-25

    We report the observation of two-dimensional plasma filamentary arrays with more than 100 elements generated during breakdown of air at atmospheric pressure by a focused Gaussian beam from a 1.5-MW, 110-GHz gyrotron operating in 3-micros pulses. Each element is a plasma filament elongated in the electric field direction and regularly spaced about one-quarter wavelength apart in the plane perpendicular to the electric field. The development of the array is explained as a result of diffraction of the beam around the filaments, leading to the sequential generation of high intensity spots, at which new filaments are created, about a quarter wavelength upstream from each existing filament. Electromagnetic wave simulations corroborate this explanation and show very good correlation to the observed pattern of filaments. PMID:18232990

  8. Observation of Large Arrays of Plasma Filaments in Air Breakdown by 1.5-MW 110-GHz Gyrotron Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Hidaka, Yoshiteru; Choi, E. M.; Mastovsky, I.; Shapiro, M. A.; Sirigiri, J. R.; Temkin, R. J.

    2008-01-25

    We report the observation of two-dimensional plasma filamentary arrays with more than 100 elements generated during breakdown of air at atmospheric pressure by a focused Gaussian beam from a 1.5-MW, 110-GHz gyrotron operating in 3-{mu}s pulses. Each element is a plasma filament elongated in the electric field direction and regularly spaced about one-quarter wavelength apart in the plane perpendicular to the electric field. The development of the array is explained as a result of diffraction of the beam around the filaments, leading to the sequential generation of high intensity spots, at which new filaments are created, about a quarter wavelength upstream from each existing filament. Electromagnetic wave simulations corroborate this explanation and show very good correlation to the observed pattern of filaments.

  9. Mitigation of Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Effects from Short-Pulse Lasers and Fusion Neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Eder, D C; Throop, A; Brown, Jr., C G; Kimbrough, J; Stowell, M L; White, D A; Song, P; Back, N; MacPhee, A; Chen, H; DeHope, W; Ping, Y; Maddox, B; Lister, J; Pratt, G; Ma, T; Tsui, Y; Perkins, M; O'Brien, D; Patel, P

    2009-03-06

    Our research focused on obtaining a fundamental understanding of the source and properties of EMP at the Titan PW(petawatt)-class laser facility. The project was motivated by data loss and damage to components due to EMP, which can limit diagnostic techniques that can be used reliably at short-pulse PW-class laser facilities. Our measurements of the electromagnetic fields, using a variety of probes, provide information on the strength, time duration, and frequency dependence of the EMP. We measure electric field strengths in the 100's of kV/m range, durations up to 100 ns, and very broad frequency response extending out to 5 GHz and possibly beyond. This information is being used to design shielding to mitigate the effects of EMP on components at various laser facilities. We showed the need for well-shielded cables and oscilloscopes to obtain high quality data. Significant work was invested in data analysis techniques to process this data. This work is now being transferred to data analysis procedures for the EMP diagnostics being fielded on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In addition to electromagnetic field measurements, we measured the spatial and energy distribution of electrons escaping from targets. This information is used as input into the 3D electromagnetic code, EMSolve, which calculates time dependent electromagnetic fields. The simulation results compare reasonably well with data for both the strength and broad frequency bandwidth of the EMP. This modeling work required significant improvements in EMSolve to model the fields in the Titan chamber generated by electrons escaping the target. During dedicated Titan shots, we studied the effects of varying laser energy, target size, and pulse duration on EMP properties. We also studied the effect of surrounding the target with a thick conducting sphere and cube as a potential mitigation approach. System generated EMP (SGEMP) in coaxial cables does not appear to be a significant at Titan. Our results

  10. Experimental Results on the First Short Pulse Laser Driven Neutron Source Powerful Enough For Applications In Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guler, Nevzat

    2012-10-01

    Short pulse laser driven neutron source can be a compact and relatively cheap way to produce neutrons with energies in excess of 10 MeV. It is based on short pulse laser driven ions interacting with a converter material to produce neutrons via separation or breakup mechanisms. Previous research on the short pulse laser driven ion acceleration has mainly concentrated on surface acceleration mechanisms, which typically yield isotropic emission of neutrons from the converter. Recent experiments performed with a high contrast laser at TRIDENT facility at LANL demonstrated laser driven ion acceleration mechanism based on the concept of relativistic transparency. This produced an intense beam of high energy (up to 80 MeV) deuterons directed into a Be converter to produce a forward peaked neutron flux with a record yield, on the order of 4.4x10^9 n/sr. The produced neutron beam had a pulse duration less than a nanosecond and an energy range between 2-80 MeV, peaking around 12 MeV. The neutrons in the energy range of 2.5 to 15 MeV were selected by the gated neutron imager to radiograph tungsten blocks of different thicknesses. We will present the results from the two acceleration mechanisms and the first short pulse laser generated neutron radiograph.

  11. Characterization of radiochromic film scanning techniques used in short-pulse-laser ion acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Joseph S.; Flippo, Kirk A.; Gaillard, Sandrine A.

    2008-10-15

    Radiochromic film (RCF) is increasingly being used as a detector for proton beams from short-pulse laser-matter interaction experiments using the RCF imaging spectroscope technique. The community has traditionally used inexpensive flatbed scanners to digitize and analyze the data, as opposed to more expensive and time-consuming microdensitometers (MicroDs). Often, the RCF densities in some regions exceed an optical density (OD) of 3. Flatbed scanners are generally limited to a maximum OD of {approx}3. Because of the high exposure density, flatbed scanners may yield data that are not reliable due to light scatter and light diffusion from areas of low density to areas of high density. This happens even when the OD is slightly above 1. We will demonstrate the limitations of using flatbed scanners for this type of radiographic media and characterize them compared to measurements made using a MicroD. A technique for cross characterizing both systems using a diffuse densitometer with a NIST wedge will also be presented.

  12. Acceleration of neutral atoms in strong short-pulse laser fields.

    PubMed

    Eichmann, U; Nubbemeyer, T; Rottke, H; Sandner, W

    2009-10-29

    A charged particle exposed to an oscillating electric field experiences a force proportional to the cycle-averaged intensity gradient. This so-called ponderomotive force plays a major part in a variety of physical situations such as Paul traps for charged particles, electron diffraction in strong (standing) laser fields (the Kapitza-Dirac effect) and laser-based particle acceleration. Comparably weak forces on neutral atoms in inhomogeneous light fields may arise from the dynamical polarization of an atom; these are physically similar to the cycle-averaged forces. Here we observe previously unconsidered extremely strong kinematic forces on neutral atoms in short-pulse laser fields. We identify the ponderomotive force on electrons as the driving mechanism, leading to ultrastrong acceleration of neutral atoms with a magnitude as high as approximately 10(14) times the Earth's gravitational acceleration, g. To our knowledge, this is by far the highest observed acceleration on neutral atoms in external fields and may lead to new applications in both fundamental and applied physics. PMID:19865167

  13. Highly-charged heavy-ion production with short pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, G.; Bitmire, T.; Perry, M.; Anderson, O.; Kuehl, T.

    1998-01-27

    This MathCAD document describes a possible approach using a PW -class short pulse laser to form a useful number (10{sup 12}) of high and uniform charge state ions with low ion temperature (<< 100 eV) and low momentum spread ({delta}p{sub z}/p, < 10{sup -4} ) for injection into heavy-ion fusion accelerators. As a specific example, we consider here Xenon{sup +26}, which has an ionization energy E{sub i} {approximately} 860 eV for the 26th electron, and a significantly higher ionization potential of 1500 eV for the 27th electron because of the M-shell jump. The approach considered here may be used for other ion species as well. The challenge is not simply to produce high charge states with a laser (the ITEP group [Sharkov] have used long pulse CO{sub 2} lasers to create many charge states of chromium up to helium-like Cr{sup +25} by collisional ionization at high Te), nor just to create such high charge states more selectively by field (tunneling) ionization at higher intensities and shorter pulses. Rather, the challenge is to create a selected uniform high charge state, in useful numbers, while keeping the ion temperature and momentum spread small, and avoiding subsequent loss of ion charge state due to recombination and charge-exchange with background gas atoms during extraction into a useful low emittance beam.

  14. Large-scale atomistic simulations of surface nanostructuring by short pulse laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chengping; Shugaev, Maxim; Zhigilei, Leonid

    2015-03-01

    The availability of petascale supercomputing resources has expanded the range of research questions that can be addressed in the simulations and, in particular, enabled large-scale atomistic simulations of short pulse laser nanostructuring of metal surfaces. A series of simulations performed for systems consisting of 108 - 109 atoms is used in this study to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the generation of complex multiscale surface morphology and microstructure. At low laser fluence, just below the spallation threshold, a concurrent occurrence of fast laser melting, dynamic relaxation of laser-induced stresses, and rapid cooling and resolidification of the transiently melted surface region is found to produce a sub-surface porous region covered by a nanocrystalline layer. At higher laser fluences, in the spallation and phase explosion regimes, the material disintegration and ejection driven by the relaxation of laser-induced stresses and/or explosive release of vapor leads to the formation of complex surface morphology that can only be studied in billion-atom simulations. The first result from a billion atom simulation of surface nanostructuring performed on Titan will be discussed in the presentation. Financial support is provided by NSF (DMR-0907247 and CMMI-1301298) and AFOSR (FA9550-10-1-0541). Computational support is provided by the OLCF (MAT048) and NSF XSEDE (TG-DMR110090).

  15. Fiber Laser Front Ends for High-Energy Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J W; Liao, Z M; Mitchell, S; Messerly, M; Beach, R; Jovanovic, I; Brown, C; Payne, S A; Barty, C J

    2005-01-18

    We are developing an all fiber laser system optimized for providing input pulses for short pulse (1-10ps), high energy ({approx}1kJ) glass laser systems. Fiber lasers are ideal solutions for these systems as they are highly reliable and once constructed they can be operated with ease. Furthermore, they offer an additional benefit of significantly reduced footprint. In most labs containing equivalent bulk laser systems, the system occupies two 4'x8' tables and would consist of 10's if not a 100 of optics which would need to be individually aligned and maintained. The design requirements for this application are very different those commonly seen in fiber lasers. High energy lasers often have low repetition rates (as low as one pulse every few hours) and thus high average power and efficiency are of little practical value. What is of high value is pulse energy, high signal to noise ratio (expressed as pre-pulse contrast), good beam quality, consistent output parameters and timing. Our system focuses on maximizing these parameters sometimes at the expense of efficient operation or average power. Our prototype system consists of a mode-locked fiber laser, a compressed pulse fiber amplifier, a ''pulse cleaner'', a chirped fiber Bragg grating, pulse selectors, a transport fiber system and a large flattened mode fiber amplifier. In our talk we will review the system in detail and present theoretical and experimental studies of critical components. We will also present experimental results from the integrated system.

  16. Facial resurfacing using a high-energy, short-pulse carbon dioxide laser.

    PubMed

    Goodman, G J

    1996-08-01

    Facial skin resurfacing is now possible using short-pulse, high-energy carbon dioxide (CO2) lasers. The laser utilized in this particular paper is the Ultra-pulse CO2 laser. The Ultra-pulse laser represents the first CO2 laser able to vaporize tissue in a single pulse with the use of a large spot size. This laser utilizes the principles of selective photothermolysis. The high-power pulses are completed in less than the thermal relaxation time of skin, estimated to be less than 1 millisecond. This translates into rapid vaporization of tissue with little heat conduction to surrounding tissues. It also should allow a reproducibility of results between practitioners with set parameters not possible with previous CO2 lasers. Clinically, this laser is useful for the removal of skin lesions, and the resurfacing of areas of sun damage, wrinkles and scars. The immediate haemostasis and excellent visibility allows for precise vaporization of abnormal tissue. Rapid and pain-free wound healing is usual. The complication rate would appear to compare very favourably with dermabrasion and chemical peeling techniques. PMID:8771864

  17. Exploring polygon scanner head capabilities for ultra-short pulse laser texturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mincuzzi, G.; Fleureau, M.; Faucon, M.; Kling, R.

    2016-03-01

    The combination of both, fast beam scanning systems and high repetition rate, high average power lasers, represents an interesting technological solution for surface texturing by Ultra-Short Pulses Laser to gain a foothold into industrial environment for commercial purposes. Nevertheless unwanted thermal effects are expected when the average power exceeds some tens of W. An interesting strategy for a reliable heat management would consists of texturing surfaces with a low fluence values (slightly higher than the ablation threshold) and utilising a polygon scanning head which is able to deflect the laser beam with unprecedented speed. Here we show that over stainless steel, it is possible to obtain different surface textures (in particular ripples, micro grooves and spikes) by utilising a 2 MHz femtosecond laser jointly with a fast and accurate polygonal scanner head at relatively low fluence (0.11 J·cm-2). The evolution of the Laser induced surface structures morphology is shown when varying the scan speed between 25 m·s-1 and 90 m·s-1. Two different wavelengths have been utilised for the process λ= 1030 nm and λ = 515 nm and the difference of the results obtained have been highlighted. Moreover, a full structures morphology characterization by SEM has been carried out for all the textured surfaces. Finally, by increasing the number of successive surface scans is possible to tailor the surface reflectivity. As a result an average reflectivity value of < 5% over the visible range has been extracted from a blackened stainless steel surface.

  18. A short-pulse mode for the SPHINX LTD Z-pinch driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Almeida, Thierry; Lassalle, Francis; Zucchini, Frederic; Loyen, Arnaud; Morell, Alain; Chuvatin, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    The SPHINX machine is a 6MA, 1 μs, LTD Z-pinch driver at CEA Gramat (France) and primarily used for studying radiation effects. Different power amplification concepts were examined in order to reduce the current rise time without modifying the generator discharge scheme, including the Dynamic Load Current Multiplier (DLCM) proposed by Chuvatin. A DLCM device, capable of shaping the current pulse without reducing the rise time, was developed at CEA. This device proved valuable for isentropic compression experiments in cylindrical geometry. Recently, we achieved a short pulse operation mode by inserting a vacuum closing switch between the DLCM and the load. The current rise time was reduced to ~300 ns. We explored the use of a reduced-height wire array for the Dynamic Flux Extruder in order to improve the wire array compression rate and increase the efficiency of the current transfer to the load. These developments are presented. Potential benefits of these developments for future Z pinch experiments are discussed.

  19. Compensation of nonlinear phase shifts with third-order dispersion in short-pulse fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shian; Kuznetsova, Lyuba; Chong, Andy; Wise, Frank

    2005-06-27

    We show that nonlinear phase shifts and third-order dispersion can compensate each other in short-pulse fiber amplifiers. This compen-sation can be exploited in any implementation of chirped-pulse amplification, with stretching and compression accomplished with diffraction gratings, single-mode fiber, microstructure fiber, fiber Bragg gratings, etc. In particular, we consider chirped-pulse fiber amplifiers at wavelengths for which the fiber dispersion is normal. The nonlinear phase shift accumulated in the amplifier can be compensated by the third-order dispersion of the combination of a fiber stretcher and grating compressor. A numerical model is used to predict the compensation, and experimental results that exhibit the main features of the calculations are presented. In the presence of third-order dispersion, an optimal nonlinear phase shift reduces the pulse duration, and enhances the peak power and pulse contrast compared to the pulse produced in linear propagation. Contrary to common belief, fiber stretchers can perform as well or better than grating stretchers in fiber amplifiers, while offering the major practical advantages of a waveguide medium. PMID:19498473

  20. Lattice Boltzmann method for short-pulsed laser transport in a multi-layered medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2015-04-01

    We construct a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for transient radiative transfer in one-dimensional multi-layered medium with distinct refractive index in each layer. The left boundary is irradiated normally by a short-pulsed laser. The Fresnel interfaces conditions, which incorporate reflection and refraction, are used at the boundaries and the interfaces. Based on the Fresnel's law and Snell's law, the interfacial intensity formulas are introduced. The collimated and diffuse intensities are treated individually. At a transient time step, the collimated component is first solved by LBM and then embedded into the transient radiative transfer equation as a source term. To keep the consistency of the directions in all the layers, angular interpolation of the intensities at the interfaces is adopted. The transient radiative transfer in a two-layer medium is first investigated, and the time-resolved results are validated by comparing with those by the Monte Carlo method (MCM). Of particular interest, the angular intensities along the slab at different times are presented to illustrate a variety of interesting phenomena, and the discontinuous nature of the intensity at the interfaces is discussed. The effects of various parameters on the time-resolved signals are examined.

  1. Proton acceleration from high-contrast short pulse lasers interacting with sub-micron thin foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G. M.; McGuffey, C.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical study complemented with published experimental data of proton acceleration from sub-micron (thickness < 1 μm) foils irradiated by ultra-high contrast ( >1010 ) short pulse lasers is presented. The underlying physics issues pertinent to proton acceleration are addressed using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. For laser energy ɛ≤4 J (intensity I ≤5 ×1020 W/cm 2 ), simulation predictions agree with experimental data, both exhibiting scaling superior to Target Normal Sheath Acceleration's model. Anomalous behavior was observed for ɛ>4 J ( I >5 ×1020 W/cm 2 ), for which the measured maximum proton energies were much lower than predicted by scaling and these simulations. This unexpected behavior could not be explained within the frame of the model, and we conjecture that pre-pulses preceding the main pulse by picoseconds may be responsible. If technological issues can be resolved, energetic proton beams could be generated for a wide range of applications such as nuclear physics, radiography, and medical science.

  2. Large-scale massively parallel atomistic simulations of short pulse laser interaction with metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chengping; Zhigilei, Leonid; Computational Materials Group Team

    2014-03-01

    Taking advantage of petascale supercomputing architectures, large-scale massively parallel atomistic simulations (108-109 atoms) are performed to study the microscopic mechanisms of short pulse laser interaction with metals. The results of the simulations reveal a complex picture of highly non-equilibrium processes responsible for material modification and/or ejection. At low laser fluences below the ablation threshold, fast melting and resolidification occur under conditions of extreme heating and cooling rates resulting in surface microstructure modification. At higher laser fluences in the spallation regime, the material is ejected by the relaxation of laser-induced stresses and proceeds through the nucleation, growth and percolation of multiple voids in the sub-surface region of the irradiated target. At a fluence of ~ 2.5 times the spallation threshold, the top part of the target reaches the conditions for an explosive decomposition into vapor and small droplets, marking the transition to the phase explosion regime of laser ablation. The dynamics of plume formation and the characteristics of the ablation plume are obtained from the simulations and compared with the results of time-resolved plume imaging experiments. Financial support for this work was provided by NSF (DMR-0907247 and CMMI-1301298) and AFOSR (FA9550-10-1-0541). Computational support was provided by the OLCF (MAT048) and XSEDE (TG-DMR110090).

  3. Investigation of energy partitioning from Leopard short-pulse laser interactions in mass limited targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, B.; Sawada, H.; Yabuuchi, T.; McLean, H.; Patel, P.; Beg, F.

    2013-10-01

    The energy distribution in the interaction of a high-intensity, short-pulse laser with a mass limited target was investigated by simultaneously collecting x-ray and particle data. The Leopard laser system at the Nevada Terawatt Facility delivered 15 J of energy in a 350 fs pulse duration. With a beam spot size limited to within 8 μm, the target interaction achieved a peak intensity of 1019 W/cm2 at 20° incidence. The size of the Cu foil targets was varied from 2-20 μm in thickness and from 50 by 50 μm to 2000 by 2000 μm in surface area. A Bragg crystal x-ray spectrometer and a spherical crystal imager were used to measure 7.5-9.5 keV x-rays and 8.05 keV monochromatic x-ray images respectively. The escaping electrons and protons in the rear were monitored with a magnet-based electron spectrometer and radiochromic film. Preliminary results show both a decrease of the K β/K α ratio and a stronger He α emission for smaller sized targets, less than 250 by 250 μm. The detailed analyses of the K α images and particle data will be presented.

  4. Theoretical analysis of saturation and limit cycles in short pulse FEL oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Piovella, N.; Chaix, P.; Jaroszynski, D.

    1995-12-31

    We derive a model for the non linear evolution of a short pulse oscillator from low signal up to saturation in the small gain regime. This system is controlled by only two independent parameters: cavity detuning and losses. Using a closure relation, this model reduces to a closed set of 5 non linear partial differential equations for the EM field and moments of the electron distribution. An analysis of the linearised system allows to define and calculate the eigenmodes characterising the small signal regime. An arbitrary solution of the complete nonlinear system can then be expanded in terms of these eigenmodes. This allows interpreting various observed nonlinear behaviours, including steady state saturation, limit cycles, and transition to chaos. The single mode approximation reduces to a Landau-Ginzburg equation. It allows to obtain gain, nonlinear frequency shift, and efficiency as functions of cavity detuning and cavity losses. A generalisation to two modes allows to obtain a simple description of the limit cycle behaviour, as a competition between these two modes. An analysis of the transitions to more complex dynamics is also given. Finally, the analytical results are compared to the experimental data from the FELIX experiment.

  5. The Short-Pulse X-ray Facility at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Linda; Evans, Paul

    2013-05-01

    The Short-Pulse X-ray (SPX) Facility will extend time-resolved x-ray scattering and spectroscopy to the picosecond time scale while retaining the powerful characteristics of synchrotron radiation, i.e., user-controlled continuous tunability of energy, polarization, and bandwidth combined with exquisite x-ray energy and pulse-length stability over a wide energy range. Experiments at the SPX facility will produce 1-ps stroboscopic snapshots of molecular rotations, molecular excited-state transient structures, stress/strain wave propagation, magnetic domain wall dynamics, phase transitions, and the coupling between electronic, vibrational, and magnetic degrees of freedom in condensed matter systems. Time-resolved studies of transient dynamics will be possible with simultaneous picosecond time resolution and picometer structural precision for a variety of atomic, molecular, supramolecular, nanoscale, and bulk material systems. Pump-probe experiments using high-average-power, sub-picosecond, high-repetition-rate laser systems will make efficient use of the MHz x-ray rates of the SPX. Five end stations for x-ray scattering, diffraction, spectroscopy, imaging, and microscopy can be developed as part of the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade project. The Advanced Photon Source is an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Dept of Energy Office of Science by Argonne National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  6. Creation of Pure Frozen Gas Targets for Ion Acceleration using Short Pulse Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCary, Edward; Stehr, Florian; Jiao, Xuejing; Quevedo, Hernan; Franke, Philip; Agustsson, Ronald; Oshea, Finn; Berry, Robert; Chao, Dennis; Woods, Kayley; Gautier, Donald; Letzring, Sam; Hegelich, Bjorn

    2015-11-01

    A system for shooting interchangeable frozen gas targets was developed at the University of Texas and will be tested at Los Alamos National Lab. A target holder which can hold up to five substrates used for target growing was cryogenically cooled to temperatures below 14 K. The target substrates consist of holes with diameters ranging from 15 μm-500 μm and TEM grids with micron scale spacing, across which films of ice are frozen by releasing small amounts of pure gas molecules directly into the vacuum target chamber. Frozen gas targets comprised of simple molecules like methane and single element gasses like hydrogen and deuterium will provide novel target configuations that will be compared with laser plasma interaction simulations. The targets will be shot with the ultra-intense short-pulse Trident laser. Accelerated ion spectra will be characterized using a Thomson Parabola with magnetic field strength of 0.92T and electric field strength of 30kV. Hydrogen targets will be additionally characterized using stacks of copper which become activated upon exposure to energetic protons resulting in a beta decay signal which be imaged on electron sensitive imaging plates to provide an energy spectrum and spacial profile of the proton beam. Details of target creation and pre-shot characterization will be presented.

  7. Monitoring a 5 MW offshore wind energy converter—Condition parameters and triangulation based extraction of modal parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häckell, Moritz W.; Rolfes, Raimund

    2013-10-01

    The test field alpha ventus is the first operating German offshore parks for wind energy. Twelve Wind Energy Converters (WECs) of the 5 MW-class are installed, both, for commercial and research reasons. Due to upcoming mass production and uncertainties in loads and behaviour, monitoring the foundation of these structures was desired. Two goals addressed are the extraction of modal parameters for model validation and the estimation of condition parameters to allow a hypothesis of the system's state. In a first step the largedatabase is classified by Environmental and Operational Conditions (EOCs) through affinity propagation which is a new approach for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) on wind turbines. Further, system identification through data driven stochastic subspace identification (SSI) is performed. A new, automated approach called triangulation-based extraction of modal parapeters (TEMP), using stability diagrams, is a key focus of the presented research. Finally, extraction of condition parameters for tower accelerations classified by EOCs, based on covariance driven SSI and Vector Auto-Regressive (VAR) Models, is performed for several observation periods from one to 16 weeks. These parameters and their distributions provide a base line for long term observations.

  8. Upgraded Waveguide Components for New 1.2 and 1.5 MW Gyrotrons on the DIII-D Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelov, Y. A.; Doane, J. L.; Cengher, M.; Lohr, J.; Ponce, D.

    2012-10-01

    The present gyrotron system on the DIII-D tokamak comprises 110 GHz gyrotrons in the 1 MW class with designed pulse lengths of 10 s. The system is being upgraded with two types of depressed collector gyrotrons producing 1.2 MW at 110 GHz and 1.5 MW at 117.5 GHz, for which waveguide components having higher power ratings will be required. New power monitors and polarizers have been designed and fabricated, which are capable of operating for 10 s pulses at the higher power levels. This presentation reports an analysis of the component heat loading to obtain a thermal equilibrium. Using this equilibrium, a stress strain analysis was performed to calculate life expectancies. The calculations take into account the temperature dependence of the heat transfer coefficient in the component coolant channels. Although the high heat load components required upgrading, the waveguide lines themselves have adequate margins for the expected power and pulse length. A summary of the thermal capabilities of other components will also be presented.

  9. Conceptual moderator studies for the Spallation Neutron Source short-pulse second target station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallmeier, F. X.; Lu, W.; Riemer, B. W.; Zhao, J. K.; Herwig, K. W.; Robertson, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    Candidate moderator configurations for a short-pulse second target station (STS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have been identified using a global optimizer framework built around the MCNPX particle transport code. Neutron brightness metrics were selected as the figure-of-merit. We assumed that STS would use one out of six proton pulses produced by an SNS accelerator upgraded to operate at 1.3 GeV proton energy, 2.8 MW power and 60 Hz repetition rate. The simulations indicate that the peak brightness can be increased by a factor of 5 and 2.5 on a per proton pulse basis compared to the SNS first target station for both coupled and decoupled para-hydrogen moderators, respectively. Additional increases by factors of 3 and 2 were demonstrated for coupled and decoupled moderators, respectively, by reducing the area of neutron emission from 100 × 100 mm2 to 20 × 20 mm2. This increase in brightness has the potential to translate to an increase of beam intensity at the instruments' sample positions even though the total neutron emission of the smaller moderator is less than that of the larger. This is especially true for instruments with small samples (beam dimensions). The increased fluxes in the STS moderators come at accelerated poison and de-coupler burnout and higher radiation-induced material damage rates per unit power, which overall translate into lower moderator lifetimes. A first effort was undertaken to group decoupled moderators into a cluster collectively positioning them at the peak neutron production zone in the target and having a three-port neutron emission scheme that complements that of a cylindrical coupled moderator.

  10. Generation of high-energy (>15 MeV) neutrons using short pulse high intensity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, G. M.; Davis, J.; Petrova, Tz. B.; Higginson, D. P.; McNaney, J. M.; McGuffey, C.; Qiao, B.; Beg, F. N.

    2012-09-15

    A roadmap is suggested and demonstrated experimentally for the production of high-energy (>15 MeV) neutrons using short pulse lasers. Investigation with a 3D Monte Carlo model has been employed to quantify the production of energetic neutrons. Numerical simulations have been performed for three nuclear reactions, d(d,n){sup 3}He, {sup 7}Li(d,n){sup 8}Be, and {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be, driven by monoenergetic ion beams. Quantitative estimates for the driver ion beam energy and number have been made and the neutron spectra and yield in the ion propagation direction have been evaluated for various incident ion energies. In order to generate neutron fluence above a detection limit of 10{sup 6} neutrons/sr, either {approx}10{sup 10} protons with energy 20-30 MeV or comparable amount of deuterons with energy 5-10 MeV are required. Experimental verification of the concept with deuterons driven by the Titan laser (peak intensity 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, pulse duration of 9 ps, wavelength 1.05 {mu}m, and energy of 360 J) is provided with the generation of neutrons with energy of up to 18 MeV from {sup 7}Li(d,n){sup 8}Be reactions. Future research will focus on optimized schemes for ion acceleration for production of high-energy neutrons, which will involve efficient target design, laser parameter optimization, and converter material.

  11. K-(alpha) Radiography at 20-100 keV Using Short-Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H S; Chambers, D; Clarke, R; Eagleton, R; Giraldez, E; Goldsack, T; Heathcote, R; Izumi, N; Key, M; King, J; Koch, J; Landen, O L; Mackinnon, A; Nikroo, A; Patel, P; Pasley, J; Remington, B; Robey, H; Snavely, R; Steinman, D; Stephenson, R; Stoeckl, C; Storm, M; Tabak, M; Theobald, W; Town, R J

    2005-08-29

    X-ray radiography is an important tool for diagnosing and imaging planar and convergent hydrodynamics phenomena for laser experiments. Until now, hydrodynamics experiments at Omega and NIF utilize E{sub x-ray} < 9 keV backlighter x-rays emitted by thermal plasmas. However, future experiments will need to diagnose larger and denser targets and will require x-ray probes of energies from 20-100 keV and possibly up to 1 MeV. Hard K-{alpha} x-ray photons can be created through high-energy electron interactions in the target material after irradiation by petawatt-class high-intensity-short-pulse lasers with > 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. We have performed several experiments on the JanUSP, and the Vulcan 100TW, and Vulcan Petawatt lasers to understand K-{alpha} sources and to test radiography concepts. 1-D radiography using an edge-on foil and 2-D radiography using buried wires and cone-fiber targets were tested. We find that 1-D thin edge-on foils can have imaging resolution better than 10 {micro}m. Micro volume targets produce bright sources with measured conversion efficiency from laser energy to x-ray photons of {approx} 1 x 10{sup -5}. This level of conversion may not be enough for 2-D point projection radiography. A comparison of our experimental measurements of small volume sources with the LSP/PIC simulation show similar K-{alpha} creation profiles but discrepancy in absolute yields.

  12. Short-pulse laser amplification and saturation using stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, E. S.; Ren, J.; Kwan, T. J. T.; Schmitt, M. J.; Lundquist, P. B.; Sarkisyan, S.; Nelson-Melby, E.

    2010-11-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental work has focused on using backward-stimulated Raman scattering (BSRS) in plasmas as a means of laser pulse amplification and compression [1,2,3]. We present initial computational and experimental work on SRS amplification in a capillary-discharge generated Xe plasma. The experimental set-up uses a 200 ps pump pulse with an 800 nm wavelength seeded by a 100 fs pulse from a broadband source and counter-propagates the pulses through a plasma of length 1 cm and diameter 0.1 cm. Results from initial experiments characterizing the plasma and on short-pulse amplification will be presented. Additionally, we present results from calculations using pF3d [4], and discuss the role of SRS saturation and determine the possible significance of electron trapping with a model implemented in pF3d [5]. [1] G. Shvets, N. J. Fisch, A. Pukhov, and J. Meyer-ter-Vehn, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81 4879 (1998). [2] V. M. Malkin, G. Shvets, and N. J. Fisch, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 4448 (1999). [3] R. K. Kirkwood, E. Dewald, and C. Niemann, et al., Phys. Plasmas 14 113109 (2007). [4] R. L. Berger, B. F. Lasinski, T. B. Kaiser, et al., Phys. Fluids B 5 2243 (1993). [5] H. X. Vu, D. F. DuBois, and B. Bezzerides, Phys. Plasmas 14 012702 (2007). Supported by US DOE and LANS, LLC under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. LA-UR-10-04787

  13. Conceptual moderator studies for the Spallation Neutron Source short-pulse second target station.

    PubMed

    Gallmeier, F X; Lu, W; Riemer, B W; Zhao, J K; Herwig, K W; Robertson, J L

    2016-06-01

    Candidate moderator configurations for a short-pulse second target station (STS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have been identified using a global optimizer framework built around the MCNPX particle transport code. Neutron brightness metrics were selected as the figure-of-merit. We assumed that STS would use one out of six proton pulses produced by an SNS accelerator upgraded to operate at 1.3 GeV proton energy, 2.8 MW power and 60 Hz repetition rate. The simulations indicate that the peak brightness can be increased by a factor of 5 and 2.5 on a per proton pulse basis compared to the SNS first target station for both coupled and decoupled para-hydrogen moderators, respectively. Additional increases by factors of 3 and 2 were demonstrated for coupled and decoupled moderators, respectively, by reducing the area of neutron emission from 100 × 100 mm(2) to 20 × 20 mm(2). This increase in brightness has the potential to translate to an increase of beam intensity at the instruments' sample positions even though the total neutron emission of the smaller moderator is less than that of the larger. This is especially true for instruments with small samples (beam dimensions). The increased fluxes in the STS moderators come at accelerated poison and de-coupler burnout and higher radiation-induced material damage rates per unit power, which overall translate into lower moderator lifetimes. A first effort was undertaken to group decoupled moderators into a cluster collectively positioning them at the peak neutron production zone in the target and having a three-port neutron emission scheme that complements that of a cylindrical coupled moderator. PMID:27370444

  14. Cutting and drilling of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) by 70W short pulse nanosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeschke, Peter; Stolberg, Klaus; Bastick, Stefan; Ziolkowski, Ewa; Roehner, Markus; Suttmann, Oliver; Overmeyer, Ludger

    2014-02-01

    Continuous carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) are recognized as having a significant lightweight construction potential for a wide variety of industrial applications. However, a today`s barrier for a comprehensive dissemination of CFRP structures is the lack of economic, quick and reliable manufacture processes, e.g. the cutting and drilling steps. In this paper, the capability of using pulsed disk lasers in CFRP machining is discussed. In CFRP processing with NIR lasers, carbon fibers show excellent optical absorption and heat dissipation, contrary to the plastics matrix. Therefore heat dissipation away from the laser focus into the material is driven by heat conduction of the fibres. The matrix is heated indirectly by heat transfer from the fibres. To cut CFRP, it is required to reach the melting temperature for thermoplastic matrix materials or the disintegration temperature for thermoset systems as well as the sublimation temperature of the reinforcing fibers simultaneously. One solution for this problem is to use short pulse nanosecond lasers. We have investigated CFRP cutting and drilling with such a laser (max. 7 mJ @ 10 kHz, 30 ns). This laser offers the opportunity of wide range parameter tuning for systematic process optimization. By applying drilling and cutting operations based on galvanometer scanning techniques in multi-cycle mode, excellent surface and edge characteristics in terms of delamination-free and intact fiber-matrix interface were achieved. The results indicate that nanosecond disk laser machining could consequently be a suitable tool for the automotive and aircraft industry for cutting and drilling steps.

  15. Characteristics of long-pulse and short-pulse spallation-source targets

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.; Powell, J.

    1996-03-01

    Generation of sharp neutron pulses is the desired output of a pulsed spallation neutron source (PSNS). These pulses should be approximately 10 {mu}s. wide at half maximum, and preserve as much of the original flux as possible. A proposed PSNS has been designed to operate at an average proton beam power of 5 MW. The PSNS consists of a heavy metal target, surrounded by a reflector, and a selection of moderators. The moderators are connected to beam tubes in which the neutrons are transported to the experimental stations. Reflectors are generally made of good moderating material, in which neutrons leaking from the target are slowed down by elastic scattering, prior to moderation. It is proposed to investigate the possibility of using reflectors which slow neutrons down by inelastic scattering rather than elastic scattering. In a purely inelastic scattering medium neutron pulses leaking from the heavy metal target will tend to preserve their original shape in both energy and time. We will examine the effect of different reflectors and proton pulse lengths on the neutron pulses in the moderators. This study will be carried out using a simple target configuration. In this way effects introduced by complicated target arrangements can be avoided. All the analyses presented in this paper were carried out using the LAHET code system (LCS). This code system consists of two major modules: (1) LAHET, a modified version of the HETC intranuclear cascade code for evaluations above 20 MeV, and (2) HMCNP, a modified version of the well known MCNP transport code for calculations from 20 MeV down to thermal energies. Both modules employ a combinatorial surface/cell specification of the problem geometry which permits modeling of the target configurations with minimal approximations. In addition, HMCNP employs nuclear data from the ENDF/B files in essentially unapproximated point-wise form which avoid the complications associated with generation of group cross sections.

  16. New insights on the interaction between atmospheric flow and a full-scale 2.5 MW wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorro, L. P.; Lee, S.; Olsen, D.; Milliren, C.; Marr, J.; Arndt, R.; Sotiropoulos, F.

    2012-12-01

    Power fluctuations and fatigue loads are among the most significant problems that wind turbines face throughout their lifetime. Atmospheric turbulence is the common driving mechanism that triggers instabilities on these quantities. Reducing the effects of the fluctuating flow on wind turbines is quite challenging due to the wide variety of length scales present in the boundary layer flow. Each group of these scales, which range from the order of a millimeter to kilometer and larger, plays a characteristic and distinctive role on the performance and structural reliability of wind turbines. This study seeks to contribute toward the understanding on the complex scale-to-scale interaction between wind turbine and flow turbulence. Novel insights into the physical mechanisms that govern the flow/turbine interaction will be discussed. To tackle the problem, we investigate the unsteady behavior of a full-scale 2.5 MW wind turbine under nearly neutral thermal stratification. The study is performed in the Eolos Wind Energy Research Field Station of the University of Minnesota. An instrumented 130 meter meteorological tower located upstream of a Clipper Liberty C96 wind turbine is used to characterize the turbulent flow and atmospheric conditions right upstream of the wind turbine. High resolution and synchronous measurements of the approach wind velocity at several heights, turbine power and strain at the tower foundation are used to determine the scale-to-scale interaction between flow and the wind turbine performance and its physical structure. The spectral distribution of the fluctuating turbine power and instantaneous stresses will be discussed in detail. Characteristic length scales playing a key role on the dynamics of the wind turbine as well as the distinctive effects of flow coherent motions and strong intermittent gusts will also be addressed. Funding was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-EE0002980) and Xcel Energy through the Renewable Development Fund

  17. Instability of outer tip vortices for a 2.5 MW wind turbine: integrating snow PIV with LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Yang, Xiaolei; Hong, Jiarong; Barone, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Recent field experiments conducted around a 2.5 MW wind turbine using super-large-scale PIV (SLPIV) using natural snow particles have revealed tip vortex cores (visualized as areas devoid of snowflakes) of complex shape, consisting of both round and elongated void patterns. Here we employ large-eddy simulation to elucidate the structure and dynamics of the complex tip vortices identified experimentally. The LES is shown to reproduce vortex cores in remarkable agreement with the SLPIV results, essentially capturing all vortex core patterns observed in the field in the tip shear layer. We show that the stretched elongated vortex cores observed in 2D planes are the footprints of a second set of counter-rotating spiral vortices that emanates along the tip shear layer immediately downwind of the blades and is intertwined with the tip vortices. We argue that this large-scale instability is of centrifugal type since the mean flow characteristics in the outer tip shear layer resemble those of the Taylor-Couette flow. This study highlights the feasibility of employing snow voids to visualize tip vortices and demonstrates the enormous potential of integrating SLPIV with LES as a powerful tool for gaining novel insights into the wakes of utility scale wind turbines. This work was supported by Department of Energy DOE (DE-EE0002980, DE-EE0005482 and DE-AC04-94AL85000), Sandia National Laboratories and NSF Career Award (NSF-CBET-1454259) for Jiarong Hong. Computational resources were provided by SNL and MSI.

  18. Multidisciplinary Design Optimization for Glass-Fiber Epoxy-Matrix Composite 5 MW Horizontal-Axis Wind-Turbine Blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Arakere, G.; Pandurangan, B.; Sellappan, V.; Vallejo, A.; Ozen, M.

    2010-11-01

    A multi-disciplinary design-optimization procedure has been introduced and used for the development of cost-effective glass-fiber reinforced epoxy-matrix composite 5 MW horizontal-axis wind-turbine (HAWT) blades. The turbine-blade cost-effectiveness has been defined using the cost of energy (CoE), i.e., a ratio of the three-blade HAWT rotor development/fabrication cost and the associated annual energy production. To assess the annual energy production as a function of the blade design and operating conditions, an aerodynamics-based computational analysis had to be employed. As far as the turbine blade cost is concerned, it is assessed for a given aerodynamic design by separately computing the blade mass and the associated blade-mass/size-dependent production cost. For each aerodynamic design analyzed, a structural finite element-based and a post-processing life-cycle assessment analyses were employed in order to determine a minimal blade mass which ensures that the functional requirements pertaining to the quasi-static strength of the blade, fatigue-controlled blade durability and blade stiffness are satisfied. To determine the turbine-blade production cost (for the currently prevailing fabrication process, the wet lay-up) available data regarding the industry manufacturing experience were combined with the attendant blade mass, surface area, and the duration of the assumed production run. The work clearly revealed the challenges associated with simultaneously satisfying the strength, durability and stiffness requirements while maintaining a high level of wind-energy capture efficiency and a lower production cost.

  19. Modeling target bulk heating resulting from ultra-intense short pulse laser irradiation of solid density targets

    SciTech Connect

    Antici, P.; INRS-EMT, Varennes, Québec; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via E. Fermi, 40-00044 Frascati; LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau ; Gremillet, L.; Grismayer, T.; Audebert, P.; Mančic, A.; Fuchs, J.; Borghesi, M.; Cecchetti, C. A.

    2013-12-15

    Isochoric heating of solid-density matter up to a few tens of eV is of interest for investigating astrophysical or inertial fusion scenarios. Such ultra-fast heating can be achieved via the energy deposition of short-pulse laser generated electrons. Here, we report on experimental measurements of this process by means of time- and space-resolved optical interferometry. Our results are found in reasonable agreement with a simple numerical model of fast electron-induced heating.

  20. Pulse shaping effects on weld porosity in laser beam spot welds : contrast of long- & short- pulse welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, Chad M.; Perricone, Matthew J.; Faraone, Kevin M.; Norris, Jerome T.

    2007-10-01

    Weld porosity is being investigated for long-pulse spot welds produced by high power continuous output lasers. Short-pulse spot welds (made with a pulsed laser system) are also being studied but to a much small extent. Given that weld area of a spot weld is commensurate with weld strength, the loss of weld area due to an undefined or unexpected pore results in undefined or unexpected loss in strength. For this reason, a better understanding of spot weld porosity is sought. Long-pulse spot welds are defined and limited by the slow shutter speed of most high output power continuous lasers. Continuous lasers typically ramp up to a simmer power before reaching the high power needed to produce the desired weld. A post-pulse ramp down time is usually present as well. The result is a pulse length tenths of a second long as oppose to the typical millisecond regime of the short-pulse pulsed laser. This study will employ a Lumonics JK802 Nd:YAG laser with Super Modulation pulse shaping capability and a Lasag SLS C16 40 W pulsed Nd:YAG laser. Pulse shaping will include square wave modulation of various peak powers for long-pulse welds and square (or top hat) and constant ramp down pulses for short-pulse welds. Characterization of weld porosity will be performed for both pulse welding methods.

  1. Chitinolytic Streptomyces vinaceusdrappus S5MW2 isolated from Chilika lake, India enhances plant growth and biocontrol efficacy through chitin supplementation against Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Yandigeri, Mahesh S; Malviya, Nityanand; Solanki, Manoj Kumar; Shrivastava, Pooja; Sivakumar, G

    2015-08-01

    A chitinolytic actinomycete Streptomyces vinaceusdrappus S5MW2 was isolated from water sample of Chilika lake, India and identified using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. It showed in vitro antifungal activity against the sclerotia producing pathogen Rhizoctonia solani in a dual culture assay and by chitinase enzyme production in a chitin supplemented minimal broth. Moreover, isolate S5MW2 was further characterized for biocontrol (BC) and plant growth promoting features in a greenhouse experiment with or without colloidal chitin (CC). Results of greenhouse experiment showed that CC supplementation with S5MW2 showed a significant growth of tomato plants and superior disease reduction as compared to untreated control and without CC treated plants. Moreover, higher accumulation of chitinase also recovered in the CC supplemented plants. Significant effect of CC also concurred with the Analysis of Variance of greenhouse parameters. These results show that the a marine antagonist S5MW2 has BC efficiency against R. solani and chitinase enzyme played important role in plant resistance. PMID:25982747

  2. Compact Short-Pulsed Electron Linac Based Neutron Sources for Precise Nuclear Material Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, M.; Tagi, K.; Matsuyama, D.; Fujiwara, T.; Dobashi, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Harada, H.

    2015-10-01

    An X-band (11.424GHz) electron linac as a neutron source for nuclear data study for the melted fuel debris analysis and nuclear security in Fukushima is under development. Originally we developed the linac for Compton scattering X-ray source. Quantitative material analysis and forensics for nuclear security will start several years later after the safe settlement of the accident is established. For the purpose, we should now accumulate more precise nuclear data of U, Pu, etc., especially in epithermal (0.1-10 eV) neutrons. Therefore, we have decided to modify and install the linac in the core space of the experimental nuclear reactor "Yayoi" which is now under the decommission procedure. Due to the compactness of the X-band linac, an electron gun, accelerating tube and other components can be installed in a small space in the core. First we plan to perform the time-of-flight (TOF) transmission measurement for study of total cross sections of the nuclei for 0.1-10 eV energy neutrons. Therefore, if we adopt a TOF line of less than 10m, the o-pulse length of generated neutrons should be shorter than 100 ns. Electronenergy, o-pulse length, power, and neutron yield are ~30 MeV, 100 ns - 1 micros, ~0.4 kW, and ~1011 n/s (~103 n/cm2/s at samples), respectively. Optimization of the design of a neutron target (Ta, W, 238U), TOF line and neutron detector (Ce:LiCAF) of high sensitivity and fast response is underway. We are upgrading the electron gun and a buncher to realize higher current and beam power with a reasonable beam size in order to avoid damage of the neutron target. Although the neutron flux is limited in case of the X-band electron linac based source, we take advantage of its short pulse aspect and availability for nuclear data measurement with a short TOF system. First, we form a tentative configuration in the current experimental room for Compton scattering in 2014. Then, after the decommissioning has been finished, we move it to the "Yayoi" room and perform

  3. Return current and proton emission from wire targets interacting with an intense short pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beg, Farhat

    2004-05-01

    One of the important characteristics of short pulse high intensity laser-solid interactions is the generation of energetic charged particles, which result from the very efficient conversion of laser energy into hot electrons. Since the electrons in the electric field of the laser have relativistic quiver motions, the temperature of the hot electron distribution of the plasma produced at such extreme intensities can become very high. A large number of hot electrons (1013-1014) having an average energy of the order of 1-2 MeV can be generated as intensities exceed 1019 Wcm-2. Since the resulting beam current exceeds the Alfvén limit, a neutralizing return current of cold plasma electrons moving in the opposite direction is produced. Another source of return current is that due to the escape of very energetic electrons from the target, which then creates a large electrostatic potential due to charge separation. These return currents can cause significant ohmic heating. In addition escaping electrons establish the large electrostatic fields, accelerating a large number of protons from the target with energies of 10's of MeV. The experiments reported here were performed at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory with the VULCAN laser facility at intensity greater than 5 x1019 Wcm-2 on wire targets. In some shots an additional wire or foil was placed nearby. The laser was blocked by the main wire target so that no laser light reached the additional wire or foil. Three main observations were made: (i) a Z-pinch was driven in the wire due to the return current, (ii) optical transition radiation (OTR) at 2w was generated and (iii) energetic proton emission was observed. The wire targets were observed to be ohmically heated and were m=0 unstable. The OTR emission is likely due to electron bunches accelerated by the ponderomotive force of the laser. The proton emission was in a form of thin disk perpendicular to the wire and centered on the wire at the laser focus. Proton

  4. Measuring 8–250 ps short pulses using a high-speed streak camera on kilojoule, petawatt-class laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, J.; Jaanimagi, P. A.; Boni, R.; Bromage, J.; Hill, E.

    2013-07-15

    Short-pulse measurements using a streak camera are sensitive to space-charge broadening, which depends on the pulse duration and shape, and on the uniformity of photocathode illumination. An anamorphic-diffuser-based beam-homogenizing system and a space-charge-broadening calibration method were developed to accurately measure short pulses using an optical streak camera. This approach provides a more-uniform streak image and enables one to characterize space-charge-induced pulse-broadening effects.

  5. Heat generation caused by ablation of dental restorative materials with an ultra short pulse laser (USPL) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Andreas; Wehry, Richard; Brede, Olivier; Frentzen, Matthias; Schelle, Florian

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess heat generation in dental restoration materials following laser ablation using an Ultra Short Pulse Laser (USPL) system. Specimens of phosphate cement (PC), ceramic (CE) and composite (C) were used. Ablation was performed with an Nd:YVO4 laser at 1064 nm and a pulse length of 8 ps. Heat generation during laser ablation depended on the thickness of the restoration material. A time delay for temperature increase was observed in the PC and C group. Employing the USPL system for removal of restorative materials, heat generation has to be considered.

  6. Multi-charged heavy ion acceleration from the ultra-intense short pulse laser system interacting with the metal target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiuchi, M.; Sakaki, H.; Maeda, S.; Sagisaka, A.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Pikuz, T.; Faenov, A.; Ogura, K.; Kanasaki, M.; Matsukawa, K.; Kusumoto, T.; Tao, A.; Fukami, T.; Esirkepov, T.; Koga, J.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Shimomura, T.; Tanoue, M.; Nakai, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Sakai, S.; Tamura, J.; Nishio, K.; Sako, H.; Kando, M.; Yamauchi, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kondo, K.

    2014-02-01

    Experimental demonstration of multi-charged heavy ion acceleration from the interaction between the ultra-intense short pulse laser system and the metal target is presented. Al ions are accelerated up to 12 MeV/u (324 MeV total energy). To our knowledge, this is far the highest energy ever reported for the case of acceleration of the heavy ions produced by the <10 J laser energy of 200 TW class Ti:sapphire laser system. Adding to that, thanks to the extraordinary high intensity laser field of ˜1021 W cm-2, the accelerated ions are almost fully stripped, having high charge to mass ratio (Q/M).

  7. Optical and electrical properties of SnO2 thin films after ultra-short pulsed laser annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scorticati, D.; Illiberi, A.; Römer, G. R. B. E.; Bor, T.; Ogieglo, W.; Klein Gunnewiek, M.; Lenkferink, A.; Otto, C.; Skolski, J. Z. P.; Grob, F.; de Lange, D. F.; Huis in't Veld, A. J.

    2013-09-01

    Ultra-short pulsed laser sources, with pulse durations in the ps and fs regime, are commonly exploited for cold ablation. However, operating ultra-short pulsed laser sources at fluence levels well below the ablation threshold allows for fast and selective thermal processing. The latter is especially advantageous for the processing of thin films. A precise control of the heat affected zone, as small as tens of nanometers, depending on the material and laser conditions, can be achieved. It enables the treatment of the upper section of thin films with negligible effects on the bulk of the film and no thermal damage of sensitive substrates below. By applying picosecond laser pulses, the optical and electrical properties of 900 nm thick SnO2 films, grown by an industrial CVD process on borofloat®-glass, were modified. The treated films showed a higher transmittance of light in the visible and near infra-red range, as well as a slightly increased electrical sheet resistance. Changes in optical properties are attributed to thermal annealing, as well as to the occurrence of Laser- Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSSs) superimposed on the surface of the SnO2 film. The small increase of electrical resistance is attributed to the generation of laser induced defects introduced during the fast heating-quenching cycle of the film. These results can be used to further improve the performance of SnO2-based electrodes for solar cells and/or electronic devices.

  8. Short-pulse Er:YAG laser increases bond strength of composite resin to sound and eroded dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cersosimo, Maria Cecília Pereira; Matos, Adriana Bona; Couto, Roberta Souza D.'Almeida; Marques, Márcia Martins; de Freitas, Patricia Moreira

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the influence of the irradiation with a short-pulse Er:YAG laser on the adhesion of composite resin to sound and eroded dentin (SD and ED). Forty-six samples of occlusal dentine, obtained from human molars, had half of their surface protected, while the other half was submitted to erosive cycles. Afterward, 23 samples were irradiated with Er:YAG laser, resulting in four experimental groups: SD, sound irradiated dentine (SID-Er:YAG, 50 μs, 2 Hz, 80 mJ, and 12.6 J/cm2), ED, and eroded irradiated dentin (EID-erosion + Er:YAG laser). A self-etching adhesive system was used, and then cylinders of composite resin were prepared. A microshear bond strength test was performed after 24 h storage (n=20). The morphology of SD and ED, with or without Er:YAG laser irradiation, was evaluated under scanning electron microscopy (n=3). Bond strength values (MPa) were subjected to analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test. Statistically significant differences were found among the experimental groups: SD (9.76±3.39 B), SID (12.77±5.09 A), ED (5.12±1.72 D), and EID (7.62±3.39 C). Even though erosion reduces the adhesion to dentin, the surface irradiation with a short-pulse Er:YAG laser increases adhesion to both ED and SD.

  9. Temporal and spatial temperature distribution in the glabrous skin of rats induced by short-pulse CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Pen-Li; Hsu, Shu-Shen; Tsai, Meng-Li; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Wang, An-Bang; Yen, Chen-Tung

    2012-11-01

    Pain is a natural alarm that aids the body in avoiding potential danger and can also present as an important indicator in clinics. Infrared laser-evoked potentials can be used as an objective index to evaluate nociception. In animal studies, a short-pulse laser is crucial because it completes the stimulation before escape behavior. The objective of the present study was to obtain the temporal and spatial temperature distributions in the skin caused by the irradiation of a short-pulse laser. A fast speed infrared camera was used to measure the surface temperature caused by a CO2 laser of different durations (25 and 35 ms) and power. The measured results were subsequently implemented with a three-layer finite element model to predict the subsurface temperature. We found that stratum corneum was crucial in the modeling of fast temperature response, and escape behaviors correlated with predictions of temperature at subsurface. Results indicated that the onset latency and duration of activated nociceptors must be carefully considered when interpreting physiological responses evoked by infrared irradiation.

  10. Impact of Pre-Plasma on Fast Electron Generation and Transport from Short Pulse High Intensity Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peebles, J.; McGuffey, C.; Krauland, C.; Jarrott, L. C.; Sorokovikova, A.; Qiao, B.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Park, J.; Link, A.; Chen, H.; McLean, H. S.; Wagner, C.; Minello, V.; McCary, E.; Meadows, A.; Spinks, M.; Gaul, E.; Dyer, G.; Hegelich, B. M.; Martinez, M.; Donovan, M.; Ditmire, T.

    2014-10-01

    We present the results and analysis from recent short pulse laser matter experiments using the Texas Petawatt Laser to study the impact of pre-plasma on fast electron generation and transport. The experimental setup consisted of 3 separate beam elements: a main, high intensity, short pulse beam for the interaction, a secondary pulse of equal intensity interacting with a separate thin foil target to generate protons for side-on proton imaging and a third, low intensity, wider beam to generate a varied scale length pre-plasma. The main target consisted of a multilayer planar Al foil with a buried Cu fluor layer. The electron beam was characterized with multiple diagnostics, including several bremsstrahlung spectrometers, magnetic electron spectrometers and Cu-K α imaging. The protons from the secondary target were used to image the fields on the front of the target in the region of laser plasma interaction. Features seen in the interaction region by these protons will be presented along with characteristics of the generated electron beam. This work performed under the auspices of the US DOE under Contracts DE-FOA-0000583 (FES, NNSA).

  11. Molecular hydrogen density measurements of short-pulse, high-density fuelling from a molecular cluster injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundberg, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.

    2012-01-01

    A molecular cluster injector (MCI) has been developed to provide short-pulse, high-density fuelling for the lithium tokamak experiment (LTX). Using an electron-beam fluorescence method, the molecular density profiles produced by the injector are measured with sub-cm spatial resolution. The system, which is cryogenically cooled to promote the formation of molecular clusters, demonstrates a significant increase in molecular density relative to room-temperature supersonic gas injectors. The transient characteristics of short pulses (3-5 ms) are measured with 250 µs temporal resolution, and the jet shock structure is found to evolve significantly on that time scale. Supplemental measurements with a pressure transducer validate the electron-beam measurements. The measured density profiles are consistent with supersonic flows suitable for producing substantial populations of molecular clusters. The measured densities and flow rates are appropriate for high-density fuelling of LTX plasmas. The MCI will be used to investigate the physics of molecular cluster fuelling of LTX plasmas.

  12. Determination of mean surface position and sea state from the radar return of a short-pulse satellite altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrick, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    Using the specular point theory of scatter from a very rough surface, the average backscatter cross section per unit area per radar cell width is derived for a cell located at a given height above the mean sea surface. This result is then applied to predict the average radar cross section observed by a short-pulse altimeter as a function of time for two modes of operation: pulse-limited and beam-limited configurations. For a pulse-limited satellite altimeter, a family of curves is calculated showing the distortion of the leading edge of the receiver output signal as a function of sea state (i.e., wind speed). A signal processing scheme is discussed that permits an accurate determination of the mean surface position--even in high seas--and, as a by-product, the estimation of the significant seawave height (or wind speed above the surface). Comparison of these analytical results with experimental data for both pulse-limited and beam-limited operation lends credence to the model. Such a model should aid in the design of short-pulse altimeters for accurate determination of the geoid over the oceans, as well as for the use of such altimeters for orbital sea-state monitoring.

  13. A design study for photon diagnostics for the APS storage ring short-pulse x-ray source.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, B. X.; Lumpkin, A. H.; Landahl, E. C.; Dufresne, E. M.

    2008-01-01

    A short x-ray pulse source based on the crab cavity scheme proposed by Zholents is being developed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Photon diagnostics that visualize the electron bunches with transverse momentum chirp and verify the performance of the short x-ray pulse are required. We present a design study for the imaging diagnostics inside and outside of the crab cavity zone, utilizing both x-ray and visible synchrotron radiation. The diagnostics outside of the crab cavity zone will be used to map out stable operation parameters of the storage ring with crab cavities and to perform single-bunch, single- pass imaging of the chirped bunch, which facilitates optimizing the performance of the short-pulse source without disturbing other users around the ring.

  14. Remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and sea state from satellites using short-pulse multicolor laser altimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.; Tsai, B. M.; Abshire, J. B.

    1983-01-01

    Short pulse multicolor laser ranging systems are currently being developed for satellite ranging applications. These systems use Q-switched pulsed lasers and streak tube cameras to provide timing accuracies approaching a few picoseconds. Satellite laser ranging systems was used to evaluate many important geophysical phenomena such as fault motion, polar motion and solid earth tides, by measuring the orbital perturbations of retroreflector equipped satellites. Some existing operational systems provide range resolution approaching a few millimeters. There is currently considerable interest in adapting these highly accurate systems for use as airborne and satellite based altimeters. Potential applications include the measurement of sea state, ground topography and atmospheric pressure. This paper reviews recent progress in the development of multicolor laser altimeters for use in monitoring sea state and atmospheric pressure.

  15. 20-100 keV K(alpha) X-Ray Source Generation by Short Pulse High Intensity Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H-S; Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Phillips, T W; Goldsack, T

    2003-08-22

    We are studying the feasibility of utilizing K{alpha} x-ray sources in the range of 20 to 100 keV as a backlighters for imaging various stages of implosions and high areal density planar samples driven by the NIF laser facility. The hard x-ray K{alpha} sources are created by relativistic electron plasma interactions in the target material after a radiation by short pulse high intensity lasers. In order to understand K{alpha} source characteristics such as production efficiency and brightness as a function of laser parameters, we have performed experiments using the 10 J, 100 fs JanUSP laser. We utilized single-photon counting spectroscopy and x-ray imaging diagnostics to characterize the K{alpha} source. We find that the K{alpha} conversion efficiency from the laser energy is {approx} 3 x 10{sup -4}.

  16. Remote profiling of lake ice using an S-band short pulse radar aboard an all-terrain vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. W.; Mueller, R. A.; Schertler, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    An airborne short-pulse radar system to measure ice thickness was designed. The system supported an effort to develop an all-weather Great Lakes Ice Information System to aid in extending the winter navigation season. Experimental studies into the accuracy and limitations of the system are described. A low power version was operated from an all-terrain vehicle on the Straits of Mackinac during March 1975. The vehicle allowed rapid surveying of large areas and eliminated the ambiguity in location between the radar system and the ground truth ice auger team. It was also possible to the effects of snow cover, surface melt water, pressure ridging, and ice type upon the accuracy of the system. Over 25 sites were explored which had ice thicknesses from 29 to 60 cm. The maximum radar overestimate was 9.8 percent, while the maximum underestimate was 6.6 percent. The average error of the 25 measurements was 0.1 percent.

  17. Remote profiling of lake ice thickness using a short pulse radar system aboard a C-47 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. W.; Heighway, J. E.; Shook, D. F.; Jirberg, R. J.; Vickers, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    Design and operation of short pulse radar systems for use in ice thickness measurement are described. Two ice profiling systems were tested, an S system which used either random noise or continous wave modulation at 2.8 GHz and a less powerful C band system which operated at 6.0 GHz and did not have random noise modulation. Flight altitudes of 4,000 feet were used, but the S band system was usable at 7,000 feet allowing flights in poor weather conditions. A minimum ice thickness of four inches is required for measurement, while the thickest ice measured was 36 inches. System accuracy is plus or minus one inch.

  18. Investigating short-pulse shock initiation in HMX-based explosives with reactive meso-scale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, H. K.; Tarver, C. M.; Reaugh, J. E.; May, C. M.

    2014-05-01

    We performed reactive meso-scale simulations of short-pulse experiments to study the influence of flyer velocity and pore structure on shock initiation of LX-10 (95wt% HMX, 5wt% Viton A). Our calculations show that the reaction evolution fit a power law relationship in time and increases with increasing porosity, decreasing pore size, and increasing flyer velocity. While heterogeneous shock initiation modes, dependent on hot spot mechanisms, are predicted at lower flyer velocities, mixed heterogeneous-homogeneous shock initiation modes, less dependent on hot spots, are predicted at higher velocities. These studies are important because they enable the development of predictive shock initiation models that incorporate complex microstructure and can be used to optimize performance-safety characteristics of explosives.

  19. Multi-charged heavy ion acceleration from the ultra-intense short pulse laser system interacting with the metal target.

    PubMed

    Nishiuchi, M; Sakaki, H; Maeda, S; Sagisaka, A; Pirozhkov, A S; Pikuz, T; Faenov, A; Ogura, K; Kanasaki, M; Matsukawa, K; Kusumoto, T; Tao, A; Fukami, T; Esirkepov, T; Koga, J; Kiriyama, H; Okada, H; Shimomura, T; Tanoue, M; Nakai, Y; Fukuda, Y; Sakai, S; Tamura, J; Nishio, K; Sako, H; Kando, M; Yamauchi, T; Watanabe, Y; Bulanov, S V; Kondo, K

    2014-02-01

    Experimental demonstration of multi-charged heavy ion acceleration from the interaction between the ultra-intense short pulse laser system and the metal target is presented. Al ions are accelerated up to 12 MeV/u (324 MeV total energy). To our knowledge, this is far the highest energy ever reported for the case of acceleration of the heavy ions produced by the <10 J laser energy of 200 TW class Ti:sapphire laser system. Adding to that, thanks to the extraordinary high intensity laser field of ∼10(21) W cm(-2), the accelerated ions are almost fully stripped, having high charge to mass ratio (Q/M). PMID:24593609

  20. On the study of pulse evolution in ultra-short pulse mode-locked fiber lasers by numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Thomas; Ortaç, Bülend; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2007-06-25

    In this contribution we highlight several aspects concerning the numerical simulation of ultra-short pulse mode-locked fiber lasers by a non-distributed model. We show that for fixed system parameters multiple attractors are accessible by different initial conditions especially in the transient region between different mode-locking regimes. The reduction of multiple attractors stabilizing from different quantum noise fields to a single solution by gain ramping is demonstrated. Based on this analysis and model, different regimes of mode-locking obtained by varying the intra-cavity dispersion and saturation energy of the gain fiber are revised and it is shown that a regime producing linearly chirped parabolic pulses known from self-similar evolution is embedded in the wave-breaking free mode-locking regime. PMID:19547154

  1. High-power Waveguide Dampers for the Short-Pulse X-Ray Project at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Waldschmidt, G J; Liu, J; Middendorf, M E; Nassiri, A; Smith, T L; Wu, G; Henry, J; Mammosser, J D; Rimmer, R A; Wiseman, M

    2012-07-01

    High-power waveguide dampers have been designed and prototyped for the Short-Pulse X-ray (SPX) cavities at the Advanced Photon Source. The cavities will operate at 2.815 GHz and utilize the TM110 dipole mode. As a result, higher-order (HOM) and lower-order mode (LOM) in-vacuum dampers have been designed to satisfy the demanding broadband damping requirements in the APS storage ring. The SPX single-cell cavity consists of two WR284 waveguides for damping the HOMs and one WR284 waveguide for primarily damping the LOM where up to 2kW will be dissipated in the damping material. The damper designs and high-power experimental results will be discussed in this paper.

  2. Fast fabrication of super-hydrophobic surfaces on polypropylene by replication of short-pulse laser structured molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekesi, J.; Kaakkunen, J. J. J.; Michaeli, W.; Klaiber, F.; Schoengart, M.; Ihlemann, J.; Simon, P.

    2010-06-01

    A new two-step method, facilitating the rapid generation of super-hydrophobic surface structures via parallel laser processing followed by a replica generation by injection molding is reported. A self-made fused silica-based diffractive optical element (DOE) is applied to distribute the laser energy into a 25×25 dot matrix. This DOE is used as a transmission mask for surface ablation of metal molds, applying short-pulse UV laser pulses. In a subsequent process step, replicas of the processed stamp are produced by variothermal injection molding, enabling the mass production of the surface pattern on plastics parts. The resulting topography facilitates a super-hydrophobic behavior of the fabricated components.

  3. Multi-soliton, multi-breather and higher order rogue wave solutions to the complex short pulse equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Liming; Feng, Bao-Feng; Zhu, Zuonong

    2016-07-01

    In the present paper, we are concerned with the general analytic solutions to the complex short pulse (CSP) equation including soliton, breather and rogue wave solutions. With the aid of a generalized Darboux transformation, we construct the N-bright soliton solution in a compact determinant form, the N-breather solution including the Akhmediev breather and a general higher order rogue wave solution. The first and second order rogue wave solutions are given explicitly and analyzed. The asymptotic analysis is performed rigorously for both the N-soliton and the N-breather solutions. All three forms of the analytical solutions admit either smoothed-, cusped- or looped-type ones for the CSP equation depending on the parameters. It is noted that, due to the reciprocal (hodograph) transformation, the rogue wave solution to the CSP equation can be a smoothed, cusponed or a looped one, which is different from the rogue wave solution found so far.

  4. The new methods of treatment for age-related macular degeneration using the ultra-short pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Yumiko; Awazu, Kunio; Suzuki, Sachiko; Ohshima, Tetsuro; Sawa, Miki; Sakaguchi, Hirokazu; Tano, Yasuo; Ohji, Masahito

    2007-02-01

    The non-invasive methods of treatments have been studying for the improvement of quality of life (QOL) of patients undergoing treatment. A photodynamic therapy (PDT) is one of the non-invasive treatments. PDT is the methods of treatment using combination of a laser and a photosensitizer. PDT has few risks for patients. Furthermore, PDT enables function preservation of a disease part. PDT has been used for early cancer till now, but in late years it is applied for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is one of the causes of vision loss in older people. However, PDT for AMD does not produce the best improvement in visual acuity. The skin photosensivity by an absorption characteristic of a photosensitizer is avoided. We examined new PDT using combination of an ultra-short pulsed laser and indocyanine green (ICG).

  5. Simulation of the short pulse effects in the start-up from noise in high-gain FELS

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, S.J.; Kim, K.J.

    1995-12-31

    The spatio-temporal evolution of high-gain free electron lasers from noise is investigated by 1-D simulation calculation. To understand the discrepancy between the experimental result and theoretical prediction of the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), the strong slippage effect in the short pulse electron beam and the coherent bunched beam effect are considered. When the length over which the electron density varies significantly is comparable or smaller than the FEL wavelength, the initial noise level would be increased due to the enhanced coherence between electrons. With a proper computer modeling of the start-up from noise including the energy spread, the overall performance and characteristics of SASE are studied. This work will be helpful to increase the credibility of the simulation calculation to predict the SASE performance in all wave-length regions.

  6. High performance compact magnetic spectrometers for energetic ion and electron measurement in ultra intense short pulse laser solid interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Link, A; van Maren, R; Patel, P; Shepherd, R; Wilks, S C; Beiersdorfer, P

    2008-05-08

    Ultra intense short pulse lasers incident on solid targets can generate relativistic electrons that then accelerate energetic protons and ions. These fast electrons and ions can effectively heat the solid target, beyond the region of direct laser interaction, and are vital to realizing the fast ignition concept. To study these energetic ions and electrons produced from the laser-target interactions, we have developed a range of spectrometers that can cover a large energy range (from less than 0.1 MeV to above 100 MeV). They are physically compact and feature high performance and low cost. We will present the basic design of these spectrometers and their test results from recent laser experiments.

  7. Method for determining the position, angle and other injection parameters of a short pulsed beam in the Brookhaven AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C.; Ahrens, L.

    1985-01-01

    As part of the effort to improve the monitoring of the injection process at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), we have developed a beam diagnostics package which processes the signals from the plates of a pick-up electrode (PUE) located near the injection region of the AGS and provides measurements of the position and angle (with respect to the equilibrium orbit) of the injected beam at the stripping foil where the incident H/sup -/ beam is converted into protons. In addition the package provides measurements of the tune and chromaticity of the AGS at injection, and a measurement of the momentum spread of the injected beam. Since these parameters are obtained for a short-pulsed beam at injection we shall refer to the diagnostics package as PIP which stands for Pulsed Injection Parameters.

  8. Self-consistent particle-in-cell modelling of short pulse absorption and transport for high energy density physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay, M. G.; Arber, T. D.; Sircombe, N. J.

    2016-03-01

    In order for detailed, solid density particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations to run within a reasonable time frame, novel approaches to modelling high density material must be employed. For the purposes of modelling high intensity, short pulse laser-plasma interactions, however, these approaches must be consistent with retaining a full PIC model in the low-density laser interaction region. By replacing the standard Maxwell field solver with an electric field update based on a simplified Ohm's law in regions of high electron density, it is possible to access densities at and above solid without being subject to the standard grid and time step constraints. Such a model has recently been implemented in the PIC code EPOCH. We present the initial results of a detailed two-dimensional simulation performed to compare the adapted version of the code with recent experimental results from the Orion laser facility.

  9. An analysis of short pulse and dual frequency radar techniques for measuring ocean wave spectra from satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.

    1980-01-01

    Scanning beam microwave radars were used to measure ocean wave directional spectra from satellites. In principle, surface wave spectral resolution in wave number can be obtained using either short pulse (SP) or dual frequency (DF) techniques; in either case, directional resolution obtains naturally as a consequence of a Bragg-like wave front matching. A four frequency moment characterization of backscatter from the near vertical using physical optics in the high frequency limit was applied to an analysis of the SP and DF measurement techniques. The intrinsic electromagnetic modulation spectrum was to the first order in wave steepness proportional to the large wave directional slope spectrum. Harmonic distortion was small and was a minimum near 10 deg incidence. NonGaussian wave statistics can have an effect comparable to that in the second order of scattering from a normally distributed sea surface. The SP technique is superior to the DF technique in terms of measurement signal to noise ratio and contrast ratio.

  10. A rapidly-tuned, short-pulse-length, high-repetition-rate CO{sub 2} laser for IR dial

    SciTech Connect

    Zaugg, T.; Thompson, D.; Leland, W.T.; Busch, G.

    1997-08-01

    Analysis of noise sources in Differential Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) in the infrared region of the spectrum indicates that the signal-to-noise ratio for direct detection can be improved if multiple-wavelength, short-pulse-length beams are transmitted and received at high repetition rates. Atmospheric effects can be minimized, albedo can be rapidly scanned, and uncorrelated speckle can be acquired at the maximum possible rate. A compact, rugged, RF-excited waveguide laser can produce 15 nanosecond pulses at a 100 kHz rate with sufficient energy per pulse to reach the speckle limit of the signal-to-noise ratio. A high-repetition-rate laser has been procured and will be used to verify these signal and noise scaling relationships at high repetition rates. Current line-tuning devices are mechanical and are capable of switching lines at a rate up to a few hundred Hertz. Acousto-optic modulators, deflectors or tunable filters can be substituted for these mechanical devices in the resonator of a CO{sub 2} laser and used to rapidly line-tune the laser across the 9 and 10 micron bands at a rate as high as 100 kHz. Several configurations for line tuning using acousto-optic and electro-optic devices with and without gratings are presented. The merits of and constraints on each design are also discussed. A pair of large aperture, acousto-optic deflectors has been purchased and the various line-tuning designs will be evaluated in a conventional, glass tube, CO{sub 2} laser, with a view to incorporation into the high-repetition-rate, waveguide laser. A computer model of the dynamics of an RF-excited, short-pulse-length, high-repetition-rate waveguide laser has been developed. The model will be used to test the consequences of various line-tuning designs.

  11. Field and photo-emission in a short-pulse, high-charge Cesium telluride RF photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski, Eric E.

    A new high-charge RF gun is now operating at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The 1.5 cell 1.3 GHz gun uses a Cesium telluride photocathode driven with a 248 nm laser to provide short-pulse, high charge electron beams for the new 75 MeV drive beamline. The high-gradient RF gun (peak field on the cathode > 80MV/m) is a key piece of the facility upgrade. The large Cs2Te photocathode (diameter > 30 mm) was fabricated in-house. The photo-injector will be used to generate high-charge, short pulse, single bunches (Q > 100 nC) and bunch-trains (Q > 1000 nC) for wakefield experiments, typically involving dielectric-loaded accelerating structures. Details of the photocathode fabrication process and the results of associated diagnostic measurements are presented, including QE measurements and work function measurements performed with a Kelvin probe. Fieldemitted dark current from the Cs2Te cathode was measured during RF conditioning and characterized. Fowler-Nordheim plots of the data are presented and compared to similar measurements made using a copper cathode in the initial phase of conditioning. The results for cesium telluride exhibited non-linear regions within the Fowler-Nordheim plots similar to previous experimental results for other p-type semiconductors. Results of quantum efficiency (QE) studies are presented with the cathode operating in both single and bunch-train modes. QE uniformity and lifetime studies are presented. During commissioning, the cesium telluride photocathode produced bunch-charge of 100 nC, breaking the previous record. No evidence of bunch-train position-dependence of QE was found when generating four-bunch trains with total charge up to 200 nC.

  12. Pulse compression below 40fs at 1μm: The first step towards a short-pulse, high-energy beam line at LULI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaowei; Zou, Jiping; Martin, Luc; Simon, Francois; Lopez-Martens, Rodrigo; Audebert, Patrick

    2010-08-01

    We present the upgrading project ELFIE (Equipement Laser de Forte Intensité et Energie) based on the "100TW" mixed Nd:glass CPA laser system at 1μm at LULI, which includes an energy enhancement and the development of a short-pulse, high-energy, good temporal contrast beam line (50fs/5J). We report the first experimental step towards the short-pulse, high-energy beam line: spectral broadening above 60nm from 7nm and temporal pulse compression below 40fs from 300fs at 1μm through a Krypton-filled hollow fiber compressor.

  13. Cooperation Reliability Testing of the Clipper Windpower Liberty 2.5 MW Turbine: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-210

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, S.

    2012-05-01

    Clipper Windpower (CWP) has developed the Liberty 2.5 MW wind turbine. The development, manufacturing, and certification process depends heavily on being able to validate the full-scale system design and performance under load in both an accredited structural test facility and through accredited field testing. CWP requested that DOE/ NREL upgrade blade test capabilities to perform a scope of work including structural testing of the C-96 blade used on the CWP Liberty turbine. This funds-in CRADA was developed to upgrade NREL blade test capability, while enabling certification testing of the C-96 blade through the facility and equipment upgrades. NREL shared resource funds were used to develop hardware necessary to structurally attach a large wind turbine to the test stand at the NWTC. Participant funds-in monies were used for developing the test program.

  14. Direct laser acceleration of electron by an ultra intense and short-pulsed laser in under-dense plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y. Y.; Gu, Y. J.; Zhu, Z.; Li, X. F.; Ban, H. Y.; Kong, Q.; Kawata, S.

    2011-05-15

    Direct laser acceleration (DLA) of electron by an ultra intense and short-pulsed laser interacting with under-dense plasma is investigated based on 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. A high-density electron beam is generated by the laser longitudinal ponderomotive force. Although the total number of DLA electrons is significantly smaller than the number of electrons trapped in the bubble, the total charge of high-energy DLA electrons (E>800MeV) reaches 67 pC/{mu}m. It is found that the electron beam occurs in a two-stage acceleration, i.e., accelerated in vacuum by the laser directly soon after a DLA process in plasma. The beam is accelerated violently with effective acceleration gradient in 100 GeV/cm. The energy spectrum of electrons presents a Maxwellian distribution with the highest energy of about 3.1 GeV. The dependence of maximum electron energy and electric quantity with laser intensity, laser width, pulse duration, and initial plasma density are also studied.

  15. Spectroscopy of Neutrons Generated Through Nuclear Reactions with Light Ions in Short-Pulse Laser-Interaction Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckl, C.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Schroder, W. U.

    2015-11-01

    Neutron and charged-particle production has been studied in OMEGA EP laser-driven light-ion reactions including D-D fusion, D-9Be fusion, and 9Be(D,n)10B processes at deuteron energies from 1 to a few MeV. The energetic deuterons are produced in a primary target, which is irradiated with one short-pulse (10-ps) beam with energies of up to 1.25 kJ focused at the target front surface. Charged particles from the backside of the target create neutrons and ions through nuclear reactions in a secondary target placed closely behind the primary interaction target. Angle-dependent yields and spectra of the neutrons generated in the secondary target are measured using scintillator-photomultiplier-based neutron time-of-flight detectors and nuclear activation samples. A Thomson parabola is used to measure the spectra of the primary and secondary charged particles. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and DE-FC02-04ER54789.

  16. FY05 LDRD Final ReportTime-Resolved Dynamic Studies using Short Pulse X-Ray Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A; Dunn, J; van Buuren, T; Budil, K; Sadigh, B; Gilmer, G; Falcone, R; Lee, R; Ng, A

    2006-02-10

    Established techniques must be extended down to the ps and sub-ps time domain to directly probe product states of materials under extreme conditions. We used short pulse ({le} 1 ps) x-ray radiation to track changes in the physical properties in tandem with measurements of the atomic and electronic structure of materials undergoing fast laser excitation and shock-related phenomena. The sources included those already available at LLNL, including the picosecond X-ray laser as well as the ALS Femtosecond Phenomena beamline and the SSRL based sub-picosecond photon source (SPPS). These allow the temporal resolution to be improved by 2 orders of magnitude over the current state-of-the-art, which is {approx} 100 ps. Thus, we observed the manifestations of dynamical processes with unprecedented time resolution. Time-resolved x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and x-ray scattering were used to study phase changes in materials with sub-picosecond time resolution. These experiments coupled to multiscale modeling allow us to explore the physics of materials in high laser fields and extreme non-equilibrium states of matter. The ability to characterize the physical and electronic structure of materials under extreme conditions together with state-of-the-art models and computational facilities will catapult LLNL's core competencies into the scientific world arena as well as support its missions of national security and stockpile stewardship.

  17. Investigation of Stimulated Raman Scattering Using Short-Pulse Diffraction Limited Laser Beam near the Instability Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, J. L.; Montgomery, D. S.; Yin, L.; Flippo, K. A.; Albright, B. J.; Johnson, R. P.; Shimada, T.; Rose, H. A.; Rousseaux, C.; Tassin, V.; Baton, S. D.; Amiranoff, F.; Hardin, R. A.

    2008-11-01

    Short pulse laser plasma interaction experiments using diffraction limited beams provide an excellent platform to investigate the fundamental physics of Stimulated Raman (SRS) and Stimulated Brillouin (SBS) Scattering. Detailed understanding of these laser plasma instabilities impacts the current inertial confinement fusion ignition designs and could potentially impact fast ignition when higher energy lasers are used with longer pulse durations ( > 1 kJ and > 1 ps). Using short laser pulses, experiments can be modeled over the entire interaction time of the laser using PIC codes to validate our understanding. Experiments have been conducted at the Trident laser and the LULI to investigate SRS near the threshold of the instability using 527 and 1064 nm laser light respectively with 1.5 -- 3 ps pulses. In the case of both experiments, the interaction beam was focused into a pre-ionized He gasjet plasma. Measurements of the reflectivity as a function of intensity and k?D were completed at the Trident laser. At LULI, a 300 fs Thomson scattering probe is used to directly measure the density fluctuations of the driven electron plasma and ion acoustic waves. Details of the experimental results will be presented.

  18. SiO2-glass drilling by short-pulse CO2 laser with controllable pulse-tail energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Takuya; Watanabe, Miyu; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2016-03-01

    We developed a longitudinally excited CO2 laser that produces a short laser pulse with the almost same spike-pulse energy of about 0.8 mJ and the controllable pulse-tail energy of 6.33-23.08 mJ. The laser was very simple and consisted of a 45-cm-long alumina ceramic pipe with an inner diameter of 9 mm, a pulse power supply, a step-up transformer, a storage capacitance and a spark-gap switch. The dependence of SiO2 glass drilling on the fluence and the number was investigated by four types of short-pulse CO2 lasers. In this work, the effective short laser pulse with the spike pulse energy of 0.8 mJ for SiO2 glass drilling was the laser pulse with the pulse tail energy of 19.88 mJ, and produces the drilling depth per the fluence of 124 μm/J/cm2.

  19. Production of neutrons up to 18 MeV in high-intensity, short-pulse laser matter interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Higginson, D. P.; McNaney, J. M.; Swift, D. C.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Patel, P. K.; Petrov, G. M.; Davis, J.; Frenje, J. A.; Jarrott, L. C.; Tynan, G.; Beg, F. N.; Kodama, R.; Nakamura, H.; Lancaster, K. L.

    2011-10-15

    The generation of high-energy neutrons using laser-accelerated ions is demonstrated experimentally using the Titan laser with 360 J of laser energy in a 9 ps pulse. In this technique, a short-pulse, high-energy laser accelerates deuterons from a CD{sub 2} foil. These are incident on a LiF foil and subsequently create high energy neutrons through the {sup 7}Li(d,xn) nuclear reaction (Q = 15 MeV). Radiochromic film and a Thomson parabola ion-spectrometer were used to diagnose the laser accelerated deuterons and protons. Conversion efficiency into protons was 0.5%, an order of magnitude greater than into deuterons. Maximum neutron energy was shown to be angularly dependent with up to 18 MeV neutrons observed in the forward direction using neutron time-of-flight spectrometry. Absolutely calibrated CR-39 detected spectrally integrated neutron fluence of up to 8 x 10{sup 8} n sr{sup -1} in the forward direction.

  20. Transition from interpulse to afterglow plasmas driven by repetitive short-pulse microwaves in a multicusp magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Shail; Sahu, Debaprasad; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2012-08-15

    In the power-off phase, plasmas generated by repetitive short-pulse microwaves in a multicusp magnetic field show a transitive nature from interpulse to afterglow as a function of pulse duration t{sub w} = 20-200 {mu}s. The ionized medium can be driven from a highly non equilibrium to an equilibrium state inside the pulses, thereby dictating the behavior of the plasma in the power-off phase. Compared to afterglows, interpulse plasmas observed for t{sub w} < 50 {mu}s are characterized by a quasi-steady-state in electron density that persists for {approx} 20-40 {mu}s even after the end of the pulse and has a relatively slower decay rate ({approx} 4.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}) of the electron temperature, as corroborated by optical measurements. The associated electron energy probability function indicates depletion in low energy electrons which appear at higher energies just after the end of the pulse. The transition occurs at t{sub w} {approx} 50 {mu}s as confirmed by time evolution of integrated electron numbers densities obtained from the distribution function.

  1. Scanning electron microscopy and thermal characteristics of dentin ablated by a short-pulse XeCl excimer laser.

    PubMed

    Neev, J; Stabholtz, A; Liaw, L H; Torabinejad, M; Fujishige, J T; Ho, P D; Berns, M W

    1993-01-01

    The interaction of a short pulse XeCl excimer laser radiation with human dentin was investigated. The dependence of surface temperatures and temperature gradients into the treated teeth on laser parameters such as fluence (0.5J/cm2-7J/cm2), pulse repetition rate (1Hz-35Hz), and spot size (0.004cm2-0.12cm2) was studied. Additionally, the effect of fluence and pulse repetition rate on dentin microstructure was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It is demonstrated that this "cold ablation" excimer laser can result in significant thermal modification in the dentin surfaces. Changes include the formation of melted dentin grains, which uniformly cover the surface and the exposed dentin tubules. Maximum temperatures of the ablated surfaces, however, remained relatively low at most laser parameters used. Also, the immediate neighborhood of the root canal was essentially undisturbed at most laser parameters. These observations suggest that with the appropriate choice of parameters XeCl lasers can be effective in producing surface structures that may prove useful in enhancing bond strength or other applications in dentistry, without exposing tooth pulp to significant temperature elevation. PMID:8515674

  2. Numerical simulation of high-power virtual-cathode reflex triode driven by repetitive short pulse electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Yovchev, I.G.; Spassovsky, I.P.; Nikolov, N.A.; Dimitrov, D.P.; Messina, G.; Raimondi, P.; Barroso, J.J.; Correa, R.A.

    1996-06-01

    A virtual-cathode reflex triode is investigated by numerical simulations. A trapezoidal in shape voltage pulse with an amplitude of 300 kV is applied to the solid cathode of the device to drive the cathode negative. The electron beam-to-microwave power conversion efficiency {epsilon}, calculated for the pulse flat top with a duration {tau}{sub ft} = 1.2 ns is approximately the same (about 1.5--2%) as well as for a long flat top ({tau}{sub ft} = 4 ns). The simulations show a 10--15% increase of {epsilon} at {tau}{sub ft} shortening to 0.6 ns. However, this occurs when the anode mesh transparency is high (80--90%). Considerable enhancement of the efficiency (about four times) for {tau}{sub ft} = 0.6 ns has been calculated if the cathode side surface is brought near to the anode tube (from {approx}0.5% at cathode radius R{sub c} = 1.6 cm to {approx}2% at R{sub c} = 3.8 cm). The obtained results would find an application for the design of virtual-cathode reflex triode devices driven by a short pulse and high repetition rate electron gun.

  3. Measurements of plasma-wave generation using a short-pulse high-intensity laser beat wave

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, B.; Najmudin, Z.; Wei, M.S.; Marle, C.; Kingham, R.J.; Krushelnick, K.; Dangor, A.E.; Clarke, R.J.; Poulter, M. J.; Hernandez-Gomez, C.; Hawkes, S.; Neely, D.; Collier, J.L.; Danson, C.N.; Fritzler, S.; Malka, V.

    2006-01-15

    Experiments to examine the generation of relativistic plasma waves via a high-intensity short-pulse beat-wave scheme are described in detail. The pulse stretcher of the Vulcan chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) laser system was modified to produce two frequency, 3 ps pulses focusable to intensities up to 10{sup 18} W cm{sup -2}. Short high-intensity pulses were used to avoid limitations to the plasma-wave amplitude due to the modulational instability. Two experiments were undertaken, at 3 and 10 TW, with the generation of plasma waves diagnosed by measuring the sidebands produced in the spectrum of the forward scattered beam. A resonance in the sideband signal was observed for an initial plasma density higher than expected for the given beat frequency. This resonance shift can be attributed to transverse ponderomotive expulsion of plasma electrons from the laser focal region. A monotonically increasing background was also observed, which was due to nonresonant cross-phase modulation.

  4. Coaxial short pulsed laser

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, M.A.; Davies, T.J.

    1975-08-01

    This invention relates to a laser system of rugged design suitable for use in a field environment. The laser itself is of coaxial design with a solid potting material filling the space between components. A reservoir is employed to provide a gas lasing medium between an electrode pair, each of which is connected to one of the coaxial conductors. (auth)

  5. Precise ablation of dental hard tissues with ultra-short pulsed lasers. Preliminary exploratory investigation on adequate laser parameters.

    PubMed

    Bello-Silva, Marina Stella; Wehner, Martin; Eduardo, Carlos de Paula; Lampert, Friedrich; Poprawe, Reinhart; Hermans, Martin; Esteves-Oliveira, Marcella

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the possibility of introducing ultra-short pulsed lasers (USPL) in restorative dentistry by maintaining the well-known benefits of lasers for caries removal, but also overcoming disadvantages, such as thermal damage of irradiated substrate. USPL ablation of dental hard tissues was investigated in two phases. Phase 1--different wavelengths (355, 532, 1,045, and 1,064 nm), pulse durations (picoseconds and femtoseconds) and irradiation parameters (scanning speed, output power, and pulse repetition rate) were assessed for enamel and dentin. Ablation rate was determined, and the temperature increase measured in real time. Phase 2--the most favorable laser parameters were evaluated to correlate temperature increase to ablation rate and ablation efficiency. The influence of cooling methods (air, air-water spray) on ablation process was further analyzed. All parameters tested provided precise and selective tissue ablation. For all lasers, faster scanning speeds resulted in better interaction and reduced temperature increase. The most adequate results were observed for the 1064-nm ps-laser and the 1045-nm fs-laser. Forced cooling caused moderate changes in temperature increase, but reduced ablation, being considered unnecessary during irradiation with USPL. For dentin, the correlation between temperature increase and ablation efficiency was satisfactory for both pulse durations, while for enamel, the best correlation was observed for fs-laser, independently of the power used. USPL may be suitable for cavity preparation in dentin and enamel, since effective ablation and low temperature increase were observed. If adequate laser parameters are selected, this technique seems to be promising for promoting the laser-assisted, minimally invasive approach. PMID:22565342

  6. Study of energy partitioning in mass limited targets using the 50 TW Leopard short-pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Brandon; Sawada, Hiroshi; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Yabuuchi, Toshinori; Chen, Hui; Park, J.-B.; McClean, Harry; Patel, Prav; Beg, Farhat

    2014-10-01

    Mass limited Cu targets were used to study the energy distribution in the interaction of an ultra-intense, short-pulse laser by measuring characteristic x-rays and energetic particles. At the Nevada Terawatt Facility, Leopard delivered 15 J to an 8 μm spot size in a 350 fs pulse, achieving a peak intensity of 1019 W/cm2 at 20° incidence. The 2 μm thick Cu foil targets varied in size from 1 mm2 to 75 μm by 60 μm. A spherical crystal imager and a Bragg crystal x-ray spectrometer were used to measure 8.05 keV monochromatic x-ray images and 7.5-9.5 keV x-rays respectively. A magnet-based electron spectrometer in the rear monitored escaping electrons. Results show a decrease in the absolute yield of both escaped electrons and Cu K-shell x-rays as targets sizes are reduced, while He α emission remains nearly constant. In the smallest target, a bulk temperature of about 150 eV was inferred from the ratio of K β to K α. The interaction of the Leopard laser with the targets was simulated with 2-D implicit Particle-in-cell code PICLS. Comparisons of the simulation and experiment will be presented. This work was supported by the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science under Fusion Science Center, and the National Nuclear Security Administration under cooperative agreements DE-FC52-06NA27616 and DE-NA0002075. T.Y. was supported by Japan/U.S. Cooperation.

  7. Analysis of the short-pulsed CO2 laser ablation process for optimizing the processing performance for cutting bony tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrwald, Markus; Burgner, Jessica; Platzek, Christoph; Feldmann, Claus; Raczkowsky, Jörg; Wörn, Heinz

    2010-02-01

    Recently we established an experimental setup for robot-assisted laser bone ablation using short-pulsed CO2 laser. Due to the comparable low processing speed of laser bone ablation the application in surgical interventions is not yet feasible. In order to optimize this ablation process, we conducted a series of experiments to derive parameters for a discrete process model. After applying single and multiple laser pulses with varying intensity onto bone, the resulting craters were measured using a confocal microscope in 3D. The resulting ablation volumes were evaluated by applying Gaussian function fitting. We then derived a logarithmic function for the depth prediction of laser ablation on bone. In order to increase the ablation performance we conducted experiments using alternate fluids replacing the water spray: pure glycerin, glycerin/water mixture, acids and bases. Because of the higher boiling point of glycerin compared to water we had expected deeper craters through the resulting higher temperatures. Experimental results showed that glycerin or a glycerin/water mix do not have any effect on the depth of the ablation craters. Additionally applying the acid or base on to the ablation site does only show minor benefits compared to water. Furthermore we preheated the chemicals with a low energy pulse prior to the ablation pulse, which also showed no effect. However, applying a longer soaking time of the chemicals induced nearly a doubling of the ablation depth in some cases. Furthermore with this longer soaking time, carbonization at the crater margins does not occur as is observed when using conventionally water spray.

  8. Transmission line based short pulse generation circuits in a 0.13 μm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Huan; Geng, Yongtao; Wang, Pingshan

    2011-02-01

    A few traditional pulse forming circuits are implemented and compared in a commercial 0.13 μm digital CMOS technology. Standard on-chip transmission lines are used as pulse forming lines (PFLs), while CMOS transistors are used as switches. The shortest output pulses of these circuits are analyzed and compared through Cadence Spectre simulations. All the CMOS circuits are fabricated in the commercial technology. Pulses of ˜170 ps durations and 120-400 mV amplitudes are obtained when the power supply is tuned from 1.2 to 2 V. The results show that these traditional PFL based circuits can be implemented in standard CMOS technology for high power short pulse generations. Furthermore, the PFL circuits significantly extend the short pulse generation capabilities of CMOS technologies.

  9. Enhancing caries resistance with a short-pulsed CO2 9.3-μm laser: a laboratory study (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechmann, Peter; Rechmann, Beate M.; Groves, William H.; Le, Charles; Rapozo-Hilo, Marcia L.; Featherstone, John D. B.

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this laboratory study was to test whether irradiation with a new 9.3µm microsecond short-pulsed CO2-laser enhances enamel caries resistance with and without additional fluoride applications. 101 human enamel samples were divided into 7 groups. Each group was treated with different laser parameters (Carbon-dioxide laser, wavelength 9.3µm, 43Hz pulse-repetition rate, pulse duration between 3μs to 7μs (1.5mJ/pulse to 2.9mJ/pulse). Using a pH-cycling model and cross-sectional microhardness testing determined the mean relative mineral loss delta Z (∆Z) for each group. The pH-cycling was performed with or without additional fluoride. The CO2 9.3μm short-pulsed laser energy rendered enamel caries resistant with and without additional fluoride use.

  10. Small Gas Bubble Experiment for Mitigation of Cavitation Damage and Pressure Waves in Short-pulse Mercury Spallation Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Felde, David K; Sangrey, Robert L; Abdou, Ashraf A; West, David L; Shea, Thomas J; Hasegawa, Shoichi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Naoe, Dr. Takashi; Farny, Dr. Caleb H.; Kaminsky, Andrew L

    2014-01-01

    Populations of small helium gas bubbles were introduced into a flowing mercury experiment test loop to evaluate mitigation of beam-pulse induced cavitation damage and pressure waves. The test loop was developed and thoroughly tested at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) prior to irradiations at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research Center (LANSCE-WNR) facility. Twelve candidate bubblers were evaluated over a range of mercury flow and gas injection rates by use of a novel optical measurement technique that accurately assessed the generated bubble size distributions. Final selection for irradiation testing included two variations of a swirl bubbler provided by Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) collaborators and one orifice bubbler developed at SNS. Bubble populations of interest consisted of sizes up to 150 m in radius with achieved gas void fractions in the 10^-5 to 10^-4 range. The nominal WNR beam pulse used for the experiment created energy deposition in the mercury comparable to SNS pulses operating at 2.5 MW. Nineteen test conditions were completed each with 100 pulses, including variations on mercury flow, gas injection and protons per pulse. The principal measure of cavitation damage mitigation was surface damage assessment on test specimens that were manually replaced for each test condition. Damage assessment was done after radiation decay and decontamination by optical and laser profiling microscopy with damaged area fraction and maximum pit depth being the more valued results. Damage was reduced by flow alone; the best mitigation from bubble injection was between half and a quarter that of flow alone. Other data collected included surface motion tracking by three laser Doppler vibrometers (LDV), loop wall dynamic strain, beam diagnostics for charge and beam profile assessment, embedded hydrophones and pressure sensors, and sound measurement by a suite of conventional and contact microphones.

  11. Generation of a Periodic Series of High-Power Ultra-Short Pulses in a Gyro-TWT with a Bleachable Cyclotron Absorber in the Feedback Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilkov, M. N.; Ginzburg, N. S.; Denisov, G. G.; Zotova, I. V.; Sergeev, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of forming a periodic series of ultra-short pulses, which has a peak power exceeding significantly the radiation power in stationary regimes, in a gyroresonance traveling-wave tube (gyro-TWT) with a bleachable cyclotron absorber in the feedback circuit. The mechanism of pulsed generation is similar to the method of passive mode locking, which is used widely in laser physics.

  12. Fiber Bragg Grating Temperature Sensors in a 6.5-MW Generator Exciter Bridge and the Development and Simulation of Its Thermal Model

    PubMed Central

    de Morais Sousa, Kleiton; Probst, Werner; Bortolotti, Fernando; Martelli, Cicero; da Silva, Jean Carlos Cardozo

    2014-01-01

    This work reports the thermal modeling and characterization of a thyristor. The thyristor is used in a 6.5-MW generator excitation bridge. Temperature measurements are performed using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. These sensors have the benefits of being totally passive and immune to electromagnetic interference and also multiplexed in a single fiber. The thyristor thermal model consists of a second order equivalent electric circuit, and its power losses lead to an increase in temperature, while the losses are calculated on the basis of the excitation current in the generator. Six multiplexed FBGs are used to measure temperature and are embedded to avoid the effect of the strain sensitivity. The presented results show a relationship between field current and temperature oscillation and prove that this current can be used to determine the thermal model of a thyristor. The thermal model simulation presents an error of 1.5 °C, while the FBG used allows for the determination of the thermal behavior and the field current dependence. Since the temperature is a function of the field current, the corresponding simulation can be used to estimate the temperature in the thyristors. PMID:25198007

  13. Fiber Bragg grating temperature sensors in a 6.5-MW generator exciter bridge and the development and simulation of its thermal model.

    PubMed

    de Morais Sousa, Kleiton; Probst, Werner; Bortolotti, Fernando; Martelli, Cicero; da Silva, Jean Carlos Cardozo

    2014-01-01

    This work reports the thermal modeling and characterization of a thyristor. The thyristor is used in a 6.5-MW generator excitation bridge. Temperature measurements are performed using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. These sensors have the benefits of being totally passive and immune to electromagnetic interference and also multiplexed in a single fiber. The thyristor thermal model consists of a second order equivalent electric circuit, and its power losses lead to an increase in temperature, while the losses are calculated on the basis of the excitation current in the generator. Six multiplexed FBGs are used to measure temperature and are embedded to avoid the effect of the strain sensitivity. The presented results show a relationship between field current and temperature oscillation and prove that this current can be used to determine the thermal model of a thyristor. The thermal model simulation presents an error of 1.5 °C, while the FBG used allows for the determination of the thermal behavior and the field current dependence. Since the temperature is a function of the field current, the corresponding simulation can be used to estimate the temperature in the thyristors. PMID:25198007

  14. Directional spectra of ocean waves from microwave backscatter: A physical optics solution with application to the short-pulse and two-frequency measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.

    1979-01-01

    Two simple microwave radar techniques that are potentially capable of providing routine satellite measurements of the directional spectrum of ocean waves were developed. One technique, the short pulse technique, makes use of very short pulses to resolve ocean surface wave contrast features in the range direction; the other technique, the two frequency correlation technique makes use of coherency in the transmitted waveform to detect the large ocean wave contrast modulation as a beat or mixing frequency in the power backscattered at two closely separated microwave frequencies. A frequency domain analysis of the short pulse and two frequency systems shows that the two measurement systems are essentially duals; they each operate on the generalized (three frequency) fourth-order statistical moment of the surface transfer function in different, but symmetrical ways, and they both measure the same directional contrast modulation spectrum. A three dimensional physical optics solution for the fourth-order moment was obtained for backscatter in the near vertical, specular regime, assuming Gaussian surface statistics.

  15. Experimental Characterization of a Grid-Loss Event on a 2.5-MW Dynamometer Using Advanced Operational Modal Analysis: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Helsen, J.; Weijtjens, W.; Guo, Y.; Keller, J.; McNiff, B.; Devriendt, C.; Guillaume, P.

    2015-02-01

    This paper experimentally investigates a worst case grid loss event conducted on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) drivetrain mounted on the 2.5MW NREL dynamic nacelle test-rig. The GRC drivetrain has a directly grid-coupled, fixed speed asynchronous generator. The main goal is the assessment of the dynamic content driving this particular assess the dynamic content of the high-speed stage of the GRC gearbox. In addition to external accelerometers, high frequency sampled measurements of strain gauges were used to assess torque fluctuations and bending moments both at the nacelle main shaft and gearbox high-speed shaft (HSS) through the entire duration of the event. Modal analysis was conducted using a polyreference Least Squares Complex Frequency-domain (pLSCF) modal identification estimator. The event driving the torsional resonance was identified. Moreover, the pLSCF estimator identified main drivetrain resonances based on a combination of acceleration and strain measurements. Without external action during the grid-loss event, a mode shape characterized by counter phase rotation of the rotor and generator rotor determined by the drivetrain flexibility and rotor inertias was the main driver of the event. This behavior resulted in significant torque oscillations with large amplitude negative torque periods. Based on tooth strain measurements of the HSS pinion, this work showed that at each zero-crossing, the teeth lost contact and came into contact with the backside flank. In addition, dynamic nontorque loads between the gearbox and generator at the HSS played an important role, as indicated by strain gauge-measurements.

  16. Coaxial-type water load for measuring high voltage, high current and short pulse of a compact Marx system for a high power microwave source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jaeeun; Kim, Jung-ho; Park, Sang-duck; Yoon, Moohyun; Park, Soo Yong; Choi, Do Won; Shin, Jin Woo; So, Joon Ho

    2009-11-01

    A coaxial-type water load was used to measure the voltage output from a Marx generator for a high power microwave source. This output had a rise time of 20 ns, a pulse duration of a few hundred ns, and an amplitude up to 500 kV. The design of the coaxial water load showed that it is an ideal resistive divider and can also accurately measure a short pulse. Experiments were performed to test the performance of the Marx generator with the calibrated coaxial water load.

  17. High-peak-power, short-pulse-width, LD end-pumped, passively Q-switched Nd:YAG 946 nm laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Renpeng; Yu, Xin; Ma, Yufei; Li, Xudong; Chen, Deying; Yu, Junhua

    2012-10-01

    High-peak-power, short-pulse-width diode pumped 946 nm Nd:YAG laser in passively Q-switching operation with Cr4+:YAG is reported. The highest average output power reaches 3.4 W using the Cr4+:YAG with initial transmissivity T0=95%. When the T0=90% Cr4+:YAG is employed, the maximum peak power of 31.4 kW with a pulse width of 8.3 ns at 946 nm is generated.

  18. An electrohydrodynamics model for non-equilibrium electron and phonon transport in metal films after ultra-short pulse laser heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jun; Li, Nianbei; Yang, Ronggui

    2015-06-01

    The electrons and phonons in metal films after ultra-short pulse laser heating are in highly non-equilibrium states not only between the electrons and the phonons but also within the electrons. An electrohydrodynamics model consisting of the balance equations of electron density, energy density of electrons, and energy density of phonons is derived from the coupled non-equilibrium electron and phonon Boltzmann transport equations to study the nonlinear thermal transport by considering the electron density fluctuation and the transient electric current in metal films, after ultra-short pulse laser heating. The temperature evolution is calculated by the coupled electron and phonon Boltzmann transport equations, the electrohydrodynamics model derived in this work, and the two-temperature model. Different laser pulse durations, film thicknesses, and laser fluences are considered. We find that the two-temperature model overestimates the electron temperature at the front surface of the film and underestimates the damage threshold when the nonlinear thermal transport of electrons is important. The electrohydrodynamics model proposed in this work could be a more accurate prediction tool to study the non-equilibrium electron and phonon transport process than the two-temperature model and it is much easier to be solved than the Boltzmann transport equations.

  19. Dynamics of shock waves and cavitation bubbles in bilinear elastic-plastic media, and the implications to short-pulsed laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brujan, E.-A.

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of shock waves and cavitation bubbles generated by short laser pulses in water and elastic-plastic media were investigated theoretically in order to get a better understanding of their role in short-pulsed laser surgery. Numerical simulations were performed using a spherical model of bubble dynamics which include the elastic-plastic behaviour of the medium surrounding the bubble, compressibility, viscosity, density and surface tension. Breakdown in water produces a monopolar acoustic signal characterized by a compressive wave. Breakdown in an elastic-plastic medium produces a bipolar acoustic signal, with a leading positive compression wave and a trailing negative tensile wave. The calculations revealed that consideration of the tissue elasticity is essential to describe the bipolar shape of the shock wave emitted during optical breakdown. The elastic-plastic response of the medium surrounding the bubble leads to a significant decrease of the maximum size of the cavitation bubble and pressure amplitude of the shock wave emitted during bubble collapse, and shortening of the oscillation period of the bubble. The results are discussed with respect to collateral damage in short-pulsed laser surgery.

  20. Design of the 1.5 MW, 30-96 MHz ultra-wideband 3 dB high power hybrid coupler for Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) heating in fusion grade reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Rana Pratap; Kumar, Sunil; Kulkarni, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    Design and developmental procedure of strip-line based 1.5 MW, 30-96 MHz, ultra-wideband high power 3 dB hybrid coupler has been presented and its applicability in ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) in tokamak is discussed. For the high power handling capability, spacing between conductors and ground need to very high. Hence other structural parameters like strip-width, strip thickness coupling gap, and junction also become large which can be gone upto optimum limit where various constrains like fabrication tolerance, discontinuities, and excitation of higher TE and TM modes become prominent and significantly deteriorates the desired parameters of the coupled lines system. In designed hybrid coupler, two 8.34 dB coupled lines are connected in tandem to get desired coupling of 3 dB and air is used as dielectric. The spacing between ground and conductors are taken as 0.164 m for 1.5 MW power handling capability. To have the desired spacing, each of 8.34 dB segments are designed with inner dimension of 3.6 × 1.0 × 40 cm where constraints have been significantly realized, compensated, and applied in designing of 1.5 MW hybrid coupler and presented in paper.

  1. Design of the 1.5 MW, 30-96 MHz ultra-wideband 3 dB high power hybrid coupler for Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) heating in fusion grade reactor.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Rana Pratap; Kumar, Sunil; Kulkarni, S V

    2016-01-01

    Design and developmental procedure of strip-line based 1.5 MW, 30-96 MHz, ultra-wideband high power 3 dB hybrid coupler has been presented and its applicability in ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) in tokamak is discussed. For the high power handling capability, spacing between conductors and ground need to very high. Hence other structural parameters like strip-width, strip thickness coupling gap, and junction also become large which can be gone upto optimum limit where various constrains like fabrication tolerance, discontinuities, and excitation of higher TE and TM modes become prominent and significantly deteriorates the desired parameters of the coupled lines system. In designed hybrid coupler, two 8.34 dB coupled lines are connected in tandem to get desired coupling of 3 dB and air is used as dielectric. The spacing between ground and conductors are taken as 0.164 m for 1.5 MW power handling capability. To have the desired spacing, each of 8.34 dB segments are designed with inner dimension of 3.6 × 1.0 × 40 cm where constraints have been significantly realized, compensated, and applied in designing of 1.5 MW hybrid coupler and presented in paper. PMID:26827337

  2. A short pulse (7 micros FWHM) and high repetition rate (dc-5 kHz) cantilever piezovalve for pulsed atomic and molecular beams.

    PubMed

    Irimia, Daniel; Dobrikov, Dimitar; Kortekaas, Rob; Voet, Han; van den Ende, Daan A; Groen, Wilhelm A; Janssen, Maurice H M

    2009-11-01

    In this paper we report on the design and operation of a novel piezovalve for the production of short pulsed atomic or molecular beams. The high speed valve operates on the principle of a cantilever piezo. The only moving part, besides the cantilever piezo itself, is a very small O-ring that forms the vacuum seal. The valve can operate continuous (dc) and in pulsed mode with the same drive electronics. Pulsed operation has been tested at repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The static deflection of the cantilever, as mounted in the valve body, was measured as a function of driving field strength with a confocal microscope. The deflection and high speed dynamical response of the cantilever can be easily changed and optimized for a particular nozzle diameter or repetition rate by a simple adjustment of the free cantilever length. Pulsed molecular beams with a full width at half maximum pulse width as low as 7 micros have been measured at a position 10 cm downstream of the nozzle exit. This represents a gas pulse with a length of only 10 mm making it well matched to for instance experiments using laser beams. Such a short pulse with 6 bar backing pressure behind a 150 microm nozzle releases about 10(16) particles/pulse and the beam brightness was estimated to be 4x10(22) particles/(s str). The short pulses of the cantilever piezovalve result in a much reduced gas load in the vacuum system. We demonstrate operation of the pulsed valve with skimmer in a single vacuum chamber pumped by a 520 l/s turbomolecular pump maintaining a pressure of 5x10(-6) Torr, which is an excellent vacuum to have the strong and cold skimmed molecular beam interact with laser beams only 10 cm downstream of the nozzle to do velocity map slice imaging with a microchannel-plate imaging detector in a single chamber. The piezovalve produces cold and narrow (Delta v/v=2%-3%) velocity distributions of molecules seeded in helium or neon at modest backing pressures of only 6 bar. The low gas load of the

  3. A short pulse (7 {mu}s FWHM) and high repetition rate (dc-5kHz) cantilever piezovalve for pulsed atomic and molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Irimia, Daniel; Dobrikov, Dimitar; Kortekaas, Rob; Voet, Han; Janssen, Maurice H. M.; Ende, Daan A. van den; Groen, Wilhelm A.

    2009-11-15

    In this paper we report on the design and operation of a novel piezovalve for the production of short pulsed atomic or molecular beams. The high speed valve operates on the principle of a cantilever piezo. The only moving part, besides the cantilever piezo itself, is a very small O-ring that forms the vacuum seal. The valve can operate continuous (dc) and in pulsed mode with the same drive electronics. Pulsed operation has been tested at repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The static deflection of the cantilever, as mounted in the valve body, was measured as a function of driving field strength with a confocal microscope. The deflection and high speed dynamical response of the cantilever can be easily changed and optimized for a particular nozzle diameter or repetition rate by a simple adjustment of the free cantilever length. Pulsed molecular beams with a full width at half maximum pulse width as low as 7 {mu}s have been measured at a position 10 cm downstream of the nozzle exit. This represents a gas pulse with a length of only 10 mm making it well matched to for instance experiments using laser beams. Such a short pulse with 6 bar backing pressure behind a 150 {mu}m nozzle releases about 10{sup 16} particles/pulse and the beam brightness was estimated to be 4x10{sup 22} particles/(s str). The short pulses of the cantilever piezovalve result in a much reduced gas load in the vacuum system. We demonstrate operation of the pulsed valve with skimmer in a single vacuum chamber pumped by a 520 l/s turbomolecular pump maintaining a pressure of 5x10{sup -6} Torr, which is an excellent vacuum to have the strong and cold skimmed molecular beam interact with laser beams only 10 cm downstream of the nozzle to do velocity map slice imaging with a microchannel-plate imaging detector in a single chamber. The piezovalve produces cold and narrow ({Delta}v/v=2%-3%) velocity distributions of molecules seeded in helium or neon at modest backing pressures of only 6 bar. The low gas

  4. A short pulse (7 μs FWHM) and high repetition rate (dc-5kHz) cantilever piezovalve for pulsed atomic and molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irimia, Daniel; Dobrikov, Dimitar; Kortekaas, Rob; Voet, Han; van den Ende, Daan A.; Groen, Wilhelm A.; Janssen, Maurice H. M.

    2009-11-01

    In this paper we report on the design and operation of a novel piezovalve for the production of short pulsed atomic or molecular beams. The high speed valve operates on the principle of a cantilever piezo. The only moving part, besides the cantilever piezo itself, is a very small O-ring that forms the vacuum seal. The valve can operate continuous (dc) and in pulsed mode with the same drive electronics. Pulsed operation has been tested at repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The static deflection of the cantilever, as mounted in the valve body, was measured as a function of driving field strength with a confocal microscope. The deflection and high speed dynamical response of the cantilever can be easily changed and optimized for a particular nozzle diameter or repetition rate by a simple adjustment of the free cantilever length. Pulsed molecular beams with a full width at half maximum pulse width as low as 7 μs have been measured at a position 10 cm downstream of the nozzle exit. This represents a gas pulse with a length of only 10 mm making it well matched to for instance experiments using laser beams. Such a short pulse with 6 bar backing pressure behind a 150 μm nozzle releases about 1016 particles/pulse and the beam brightness was estimated to be 4×1022 particles/(s str). The short pulses of the cantilever piezovalve result in a much reduced gas load in the vacuum system. We demonstrate operation of the pulsed valve with skimmer in a single vacuum chamber pumped by a 520 l/s turbomolecular pump maintaining a pressure of 5×10-6 Torr, which is an excellent vacuum to have the strong and cold skimmed molecular beam interact with laser beams only 10 cm downstream of the nozzle to do velocity map slice imaging with a microchannel-plate imaging detector in a single chamber. The piezovalve produces cold and narrow (Δv /v=2%-3%) velocity distributions of molecules seeded in helium or neon at modest backing pressures of only 6 bar. The low gas load of the cantilever

  5. Effect of pulse slippage on density transition-based resonant third-harmonic generation of short-pulse laser in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Vishal; Kant, Niti

    2016-08-01

    The resonant third-harmonic generation of a self-focusing laser in plasma with a density transition was investigated. Because of self-focusing of the fundamental laser pulse, a transverse intensity gradient was created, which generated a plasma wave at the fundamental wave frequency. Phase matching was satisfied by using a Wiggler magnetic field, which provided additional angular momentum to the third-harmonic photon to make the process resonant. An enhancement was observed in the resonant third-harmonic generation of an intense short-pulse laser in plasma embedded with a magnetic Wiggler with a density transition. A plasma density ramp played an important role in the self-focusing, enhancing the third-harmonic generation in plasma. We also examined the effect of the Wiggler magnetic field on the pulse slippage of the third-harmonic pulse in plasma. The pulse slippage was due to the group-velocity mismatch between the fundamental and third-harmonic pulses.

  6. Study of silver K{alpha} and bremsstrahlung radiation from short-pulse laser-matter interactions with applications for x-ray radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Westover, B.; Beg, F. N.; MacPhee, A.; Chen, C.; Hey, D.; Maddox, B.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B.; Ma, T.

    2010-08-15

    Measurements of K{alpha} radiation yield and x-ray bremsstrahlung emission from thin-foil silver targets are presented. The targets were irradiated by a short pulse laser with intensities from 5x10{sup 16} to 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} at 40 ps. Single hit charge-coupled device detectors, differential filter-stack detectors, and a crystal spectrometer were used to investigate the angular distribution of the K{alpha} and bremsstrahlung x-rays. This study is the first to use a broadband detector to estimate the absolute numbers of K{alpha} photons and to determine K{alpha} to bremsstrahlung ratios. The relevance of this work in the context of x-ray diffraction and x-ray radiography is discussed.

  7. Diode-pumped short pulse passively Q-switched 912 nm Nd:GdVO4/Cr:YAG laser at high repetition rate operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F.; Yu, X.; Wang, C.; Yan, R. P.; Li, X. D.; Gao, J.; Zhang, Z. H.; Yu, J. H.

    2010-06-01

    A diode-end-pumped passively Q-switched 912 nm Nd:GdVO4/Cr:YAG laser is demonstrated for the first time. In a concave-piano cavity, pulsed 912 nm laser performance is investigated using two kinds of Cr:YAG crystal with different unsaturated transmission ( T U) of 95% and 90% at 912 nm as the saturable absorbers. When the T U = 90% Cr:YAG is used, as much as 2.6 W average output power for short pulsed 912 nm laser is achieved at an absorbed pump power of 34.0 W, corresponding to an optical efficiency of 7.6% and a slope efficiency of 20.3%. Moreover, 10.5 ns duration pulses and up to 2.3 kW peak power is obtained at the repetition rate around 81.6 kHz.

  8. Stable High-Brightness Electron Beam System with a Photocathode RF Gun for Short Pulse X-Ray Generation by Thomson Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Fumio; Yang, Jinfeng; Yorozu, Masafumi; Okada, Yasuhiro; Yanagida, Tatsuya; Endo, Akira

    2002-03-01

    A high-brightness electron accelerator system with a photocathode RF gun and an all-solid stable laser for the photocathode was installed, and a commissioning test was performed to generate short-pulse X-ray beams by the Thomson scattering method. Electron energy was boosted by a linear accelerator (linac) up to 14 MeV. Energy dispersion of the electron beams was measured to be 0.7% (rms). The normalized emittance of the electron beam was 4 πmm-mrad with a 0.4 nC bunch charge. The electron beam size at the interaction point, where the electron beams and high peak power laser light interacted, was measured to be 100 μm (rms). Good stability in the spatial and temporal domains was also obtained.

  9. Short pulse-width gain-switched Ho:YAG ceramic laser at ∼2.09  μm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianing; Liu, QiYao; Shen, Deyuan; Zhang, Jian; Tang, Dingyuan; Chen, Hao

    2016-03-10

    This paper presents a short pulse-width gain-switched Ho:YAG ceramic laser at 2089 nm resonantly pumped by a homemade Q-switched Tm:fiber laser at ∼1908  nm. We generated stable pulses of 44-103 ns duration and 0.13-2 kW peak power at 20 kHz of pulse repetition frequency when the incident pump pulse energy increased from ∼0.1 to 0.3 mJ. We also obtained an average output power of 1.76 W under an incident pump power of 6 W, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 41.8%. Finally, this paper discusses the prospects to further improve the results with even a shorter pulse-width and higher peak power. PMID:26974778

  10. The nonlinear interplay between Raman scattering, self-focusing, and hosing of intense short-pulse lasers propagating in an underdense plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeng, Kuo-Cheng

    1998-11-01

    Understanding the propagation of short-pulse high intensity lasers through Rayleigh lengths of underdense plasma is essential for the successful development of laser-plasma accelerator schemes and the fast ignitor fusion concept. When short-pulse lasers propagate through underdense plasmas they are susceptible to a wide range of instabilities, including Raman scattering, spot size self-modulation, relativistic self-focusing, and hosing. Furthermore, the highly nonlinear interplay between these instabilities leads to the generation of relativistic plasma waves which can wave break, generating kA's of relativistic electrons with energies up to ≈100 MeV. To unravel this complex interplay of instabilities, we use a fully relativistic parallelized particle-in-cell code. The simulations show that for parameters relevant to several ongoing laser-plasma accelerator experiments that significant laser absorption occurs within Rayleigh length distances, that Raman scattering and plasma heating can suppress self-focusing and ponderomotive blowout, and that the final nonlinear state of the pulses is dominated by a long wavelength hosing instability. The simulations also provide details of the characteristics of the accelerated electrons including, the self-trapping mechanism, their maximum energy, energy spread and emittance. The simulations show that the maximum energy can exceed simple dephasing estimates in agreement with recent experimental observations. This work was done in collaboration with R.G.Hemker, B.J.Duda, W.B.Mori and T.Katsouleas Work supported by DOE grants DE-FG-03-92-ER40727 and DE-FG-03-98-DP00211, LLNL contract W-7405-ENG-48, and NSF grant DMS-9722121. *Currently at Capital Management Sciences, Los Angeles

  11. Investigation of damage threshold of ion beam deposited oxide thin film optics for high-peak-power short-pulse lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald Dummer, Ann M.; Brizuela, Fernando; Duskis, Charissa; Luther, Brad; Larotonda, Miguel; Rocca, Jorge J.; George, Jason; Kohli, Sandeep; McCurdy, Pat; Menoni, Carmen S.

    2004-09-01

    In this work we report on the damage threshold of ion beam deposited oxide films designed for high peak power short pulse laser systems. Single layers of ZrO2, SiO2, Al2O3, TiO2, and Ta2O5 and multilayers of Al2O 3/TiO2, SiO2/Ta2O5, and SiO2/ZrO2 were grown on polished borosilicate glass substrates using ion beam sputter deposition. Deposition conditions were optimized to yield fully oxidized films as determined from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Damage threshold testing was performed using an amplified Ti:Sapphire laser producing a train of 120 picosecond pulses at a wavelength of 800 nm. The laser output was focused with a lens to generate fluences ranging from 0.1 to 24 J/cm2. The highest damage threshold of 15.4 J/cm2 was measured for a single layer film of SiO2. The damage threshold of high reflectance and anti-reflection multilayer coatings fabricated for 800 nm applications was evaluated using the same procedure as for the single layer films. Highest damage thresholds of 2.5 and 3.5 J/cm2 were measured for a 6-pair ZrO2/SiO2 high reflectance coating and a 5 layer anti-reflection coating of the same materials.

  12. Effect of pulse to pulse interactions on ultra-short pulse laser drilling of steel with repetition rates up to 10 MHz.

    PubMed

    Finger, Johannes; Reininghaus, Martin

    2014-07-28

    We report on the effect of pulse to pulse interactions during percussion drilling of steel using high power ps-laser radiation with repetition rates of up to 10 MHz and high average powers up to 80 W. The ablation rate per pulse is measured as a function of the pulse repetition rate for four fluences ranging from 500 mJ/cm2 up to 1500 mJ/cm2. For every investigated fluence an abrupt increase of the ablation rate per pulse is observed at a distinctive repetition rate. The onset repetition rate for this effect is strongly dependent on the applied pulse fluence. The origin of the increase of the ablation rate is attributed to the emergence of a melt based ablation processes, as Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM) images show the occurrence of melt ejected material surrounding the drilling holes. A semi empirical model based on classical heat conduction including heat accumulation as well as pulse-particle interactions is applied to enable quantitative conclusions on the origin of the observed data. In agreement with previous studies, the acquired data confirm the relevance of these two effects for the fundamental description of materials processing with ultra-short pulsed laser radiation at high repetition rates and high average power. PMID:25089496

  13. The Influence of High-Power Ion Beams and High-Intensity Short-Pulse Implantation of Ions on the Properties of Ceramic Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabyshev, A. V.; Konusov, F. V.; Pavlov, S. K.; Remnev, G. E.

    2016-02-01

    The paper is focused on the study of the structural, electrical and optical characteristics of the ceramic silicon carbide before and after irradiation in the regimes of the high-power ion beams (HPIB) and high-intensity short-pulse implantation (HISPI) of carbon ions. The dominant mechanism of transport of charge carriers, their type and the energy spectrum of localized states (LS) of defects determining the properties of SiC were established. Electrical and optical characteristics of ceramic before and after irradiation are determined by the biographical and radiation defects whose band gap (BG) energy levels have a continuous energetic distribution. A dominant p-type activation component of conduction with participation of shallow acceptor levels 0.05-0.16 eV is complemented by hopping mechanism of conduction involving the defects LS with a density of 1.2T017-2.4T018 eV-Am-3 distributed near the Fermi level.The effect of radiation defects with deep levels in the BG on properties change dominates after HISPI. A new material with the changed electronic structure and properties is formed in the near surface layer of SiC after the impact of the HPIB.

  14. Short pulse photoemission from a dispenser cathode under the 2nd, 3rd and 4th harmonics of a picosecond Nd: YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblond, B.

    1992-06-01

    We present new results concerning the photoemissive properties of a standard thermionic dispenser cathode, B type, a porous tungsten matrix impregnated with barium calcium aluminate, 5 BaO-3 CaO, 2 Al 2O 3, working in ultra-short pulses at a temperature far below the measurable thermoemission threshold thanks to a picosecond frequency doubled-tripled or quadrupled Nd: YAG laser delivering 35 ps pulses and a continuous electrical accelerating field applied to the cathode plane surface. Our experiments have shown that the maximum emitted charge in each current pulse corresponds to the maximum available superficial charge of the cathode and that the emitted charge is proportional to the illuminated surface area. The quantum yield values measured at low laser energy are about: η = 2.5 × 10 -5, η = 1 × 10 -4 and η = 3.5 × 10 -4 at the three photon energies h̵ω 3 = 2.34 eV, h̵ω 3 = 3.51 EV andh̵ω 4 = 4.68 eV respectively. Poisoning effectsdue to some residual gas molecules like O 2-H 2O existing in the vacuum cell modify the composition of the surface Ba-O monolayer and are at the origin of a decrease of the photoemitted current about 3.6% per hour. Heating slightly and permanently the cathode permits to limit these effects.

  15. Free-electron laser at the TESLA Test Facility at DESY: toward a tunable short-pulsed soft x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerth, Christopher

    2001-12-01

    A high peak current, low emittance, short pulse electron beam can produce intense, laser-like radiation in a single pass through a long periodic magnetic structure. The construction of such free-electron lasers (FELs) based on self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) has become feasible by recent advances in accelerator technologies. Since SASE FELs do not require any optical components they are promising sources for the generation of intense, sub- picosecond laser pulses which are continuously tunable over a wide wavelength range in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and X-ray region. In the first phase of the VUV-FEL (phase I) at the TESLA Test Facility at DESY, SASE was achieved for the first time in the VUV at wavelengths between 80 and 180 nm. The concept of the VUV FEL at DESY and first experimental results are presented. The second phase of the TESLA Test Facility (phase II), which includes an increase of the electron beam energy to 1 GeV, aims at the construction of a SASE FEL operating in the soft X-ray region. An overview of the current status and the activities toward a soft X-ray FEL user facility is given.

  16. High-resolution measurements of the spatial and temporal evolution of megagauss magnetic fields created in intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Gourab Singh, Prashant Kumar; Adak, Amitava; Lad, Amit D.; Kumar, G. Ravindra

    2014-01-15

    A pump-probe polarimetric technique is demonstrated, which provides a complete, temporally and spatially resolved mapping of the megagauss magnetic fields generated in intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions. A normally incident time-delayed probe pulse reflected from its critical surface undergoes a change in its ellipticity according to the magneto-optic Cotton-Mouton effect due to the azimuthal nature of the ambient self-generated megagauss magnetic fields. The temporal resolution of the magnetic field mapping is typically of the order of the pulsewidth, limited by the laser intensity contrast, whereas a spatial resolution of a few μm is achieved by this optical technique. High-harmonics of the probe can be employed to penetrate deeper into the plasma to even near-solid densities. The spatial and temporal evolution of the megagauss magnetic fields at the target front as well as at the target rear are presented. The μm-scale resolution of the magnetic field mapping provides valuable information on the filamentary instabilities at the target front, whereas probing the target rear mirrors the highly complex fast electron transport in intense laser-plasma interactions.

  17. K{sub α} and bremsstrahlung x-ray radiation backlighter sources from short pulse laser driven silver targets as a function of laser pre-pulse energy

    SciTech Connect

    Jarrott, L. C.; Mariscal, D.; McGuffey, C.; Beg, F. N.; Kemp, A. J.; Divol, L.; Chen, C.; Hey, D.; Maddox, B.; Hawreliak, J.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B.; MacPhee, A.; Westover, B.; Suggit, M.; Wei, M. S.

    2014-03-15

    Measurements of silver K-shell and bremsstrahlung emission from thin-foil laser targets as a function of laser prepulse energy are presented. The silver targets were chosen as a potential 22 keV backlighter source for the National Ignition Facility Experiments. The targets were irradiated by the Titan laser with an intensity of 8 × 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} with 40 ps pulse length. A secondary nanosecond timescale laser pulse with controlled, variable energy was used to emulate the laser prepulse. Results show a decrease in both K{sub α} and bremsstrahlung yield with increasing artificial prepulse. Radiation hydrodynamic modeling of the prepulse interaction determined that the preplasma and intact target fraction were different in the three prepulse energies investigated. Interaction of the short pulse laser with the resulting preplasma and target was then modeled using a particle-in-cell code PSC which explained the experimental results. The relevance of this work to future Advanced Radiographic Capability laser x-ray backlighter sources is discussed.

  18. Comparison of silver nanoparticles confined in nanoporous silica prepared by chemical synthesis and by ultra-short pulsed laser ablation in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szegedi, Á.; Popova, M.; Valyon, J.; Guarnaccio, A.; De Stefanis, A.; De Bonis, A.; Orlando, S.; Sansone, M.; Teghil, R.; Santagata, A.

    2014-10-01

    Hexagonally ordered mesoporous silica materials, MCM-41 and SBA-15, have been synthesized and loaded with Ag nanoparticles, utilizing both chemical synthesis and ultra-short pulsed laser ablation in liquid. In laser ablation, a silver target, immersed in aqueous suspension of ordered mesoporous silica SBA-15, was irradiated by ultra-short laser pulses to generate silver nanoparticles. For comparison, samples of similar silver contents were prepared either by incorporating silver into the SBA-15 during a hydrothermal synthesis or by introducing silver in MCM-41 by template ion-exchange. Samples were characterized by XRD, N2 physisorption, TEM and UV-vis spectroscopy. All preparations contained significant amount of 5-50 nm size silver agglomerates on the outer surface of the silica particles. The laser ablation process did not cause significant destruction of the SBA-15 structure and metallic silver (Ag0) nanoparticles were mainly generated. It is demonstrated that by laser ablation in aqueous silica suspension smaller and more uniform metallic silver particles can be produced and loaded on the surface of the silica support than by synthesis procedures. Catalytic properties of the samples have been tested in the total oxidation of toluene. Because of its favorable Ag dispersity, the Ag/SBA-15 catalyst, generated by the laser ablation method, had better catalytic stability and, relative to its Ag load, higher activity than the conventional Ag/SBA-15 preparations.

  19. Ultra-short pulse generator

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1993-12-28

    An inexpensive pulse generating circuit is disclosed that generates ultra-short, 200 picosecond, and high voltage 100 kW, pulses suitable for wideband radar and other wideband applications. The circuit implements a nonlinear transmission line with series inductors and variable capacitors coupled to ground made from reverse biased diodes to sharpen and increase the amplitude of a high-voltage power MOSFET driver input pulse until it causes non-destructive transit time breakdown in a final avalanche shock wave diode, which increases and sharpens the pulse even more. 5 figures.

  20. Ultra-short pulse generator

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1993-01-01

    An inexpensive pulse generating circuit is disclosed that generates ultra-short, 200 picosecond, and high voltage 100 kW, pulses suitable for wideband radar and other wideband applications. The circuit implements a nonlinear transmission line with series inductors and variable capacitors coupled to ground made from reverse biased diodes to sharpen and increase the amplitude of a high-voltage power MOSFET driver input pulse until it causes non-destructive transit time breakdown in a final avalanche shockwave diode, which increases and sharpens the pulse even more.

  1. The effects of short pulse laser surface cleaning on porosity formation and reduction in laser welding of aluminium alloy for automotive component manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlShaer, A. W.; Li, L.; Mistry, A.

    2014-12-01

    Laser welding of aluminium alloys typically results in porosity in the fusion zones, leading to poor mechanical and corrosion performances. Mechanical and chemical cleaning of surfaces has been used previously to remove contaminants for weld joint preparations. However, these methods are slow, ineffective (e.g. due to hydrogen trapping) or lead to environmental hazards. This paper reports the effects of short pulsed laser surface cleaning on porosity formation and reduction in laser welding of AC-170PX (AA6014) aluminium sheets (coated with Ti/Zr and lubricated using a dry lubricant AlO70) with two types of joints: fillet edge and flange couch, using an AA4043 filler wire for automotive component assembly. The effect of laser cleaning on porosity reduction during laser welding using a filler wire has not been reported before. In this work, porosity and weld fusion zone geometry were examined prior to and after laser cleaning. The nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser cleaning was found to reduce porosity significantly in the weld fusion zones. For the fillet edge welds, porosity was reduced to less than 0.5% compared with 10-80% without laser cleaning. For flange couch welds, porosity was reduced to 0.23-0.8% with laser cleaning from 0.7% to 4.3% without laser cleaning. This has been found to be due to the elimination of contaminations and oxide layers that contribute to the porosity formation. The laser cleaning is based on thermal ablation. This research focuses on porosity reduction in laser welding of aluminium alloy. Weld quality was investigated for two joints, fillet edge and flange couch joints. The effect of laser cleaning on porosity reduction after welding was investigated. It was found that laser cleaning reduced porosity less than 1% in both joints. Weld dimensions and strength were evaluated and discussed for both types of joints.

  2. Experimental characterization and atomistic modeling of interfacial void formation and detachment in short pulse laser processing of metal surfaces covered by solid transparent overlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Eaman T.; Shugaev, Maxim V.; Wu, Chengping; Lin, Zhibin; Matsumoto, Hisashi; Conneran, Maria; Kleinert, Jan; Hainsey, Robert F.; Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    2016-04-01

    The short pulse laser interaction with metal surfaces covered by solid transparent overlayers is investigated in experiments and atomistic simulations, with a particular aim of revealing the mechanisms responsible for structural modification of the metal-overlayer interfacial regions. Experimental characterization of Al-silica targets modified by single-pulse laser irradiation with the pulse duration of 10 ps reveals the transitions from the generation of extended interfacial voids with internal nanoscale surface roughness to the partial detachment of the overlayer from the metal substrate, and to the cracking/chipping or complete removal of the overlayer as the laser fluence increases. The mechanisms responsible for the appearance, growth, and percolation of the interfacial voids leading to the detachment of the overlayer from the metal substrate are investigated in a large-scale atomistic simulation. The results of the simulation demonstrate that the processes of nucleation and growth of the interfacial voids are driven by the dynamic relaxation of laser-induced stresses proceeding simultaneously with rapid phase transformations and temperature variation in the interfacial region. The growth and coalescence of the interfacial voids results in the formation of liquid bridges connecting the overlayer and the metal substrate, whereas solidification of the transient liquid structures produced by the breakup of the liquid bridges may be responsible for the formation of the nanoscale roughness of the interfacial voids observed in experiments. Computational analysis of the effect of preexisting interfacial voids reveals a complex dynamic picture of the initial expansion and subsequent compaction of the surface region of the metal substrate and suggests a possible scenario for the formation of voids below the metal-overlayer interface.

  3. Generation of energetic (>15 MeV) neutron beams from proton- and deuteron-driven nuclear reactions using short pulse lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G. M.; Higginson, D. P.; Davis, J.; Petrova, Tz B.; McGuffey, C.; Qiao, B.; Beg, F. N.

    2013-10-01

    A roadmap is proposed for the production of high-energy (>15 MeV) neutrons using short pulse lasers. Different approaches are suggested for the two limiting cases of small (E1 ≪ Q) and large (E1 ≫ Q) projectile energies E1 depending on the Q-value of the nuclear reaction. The neutron fluence from many converter materials is evaluated for two projectiles: protons and deuterons. We found profound differences between proton- and deuteron-driven reactions with regard to both converter material and generated neutron fluence. The optimum converter material for deuteron-driven reactions is low-Z elements such as Li and Be, while for proton-driven reactions the converter material is not critical. For a projectile energy of 50 MeV the deuteron-driven reactions are two orders of magnitude more efficient compared to the proton-driven reactions. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations have been performed for laser pulses with peak intensity 3 × 1020 W cm-2, pulse duration 40 fs, spot size 5 µm and energy 3 J interacting with ultrathin (0.1 µm) CD foil. The calculated deuteron beam is highly directional along the laser propagation direction with maximum energy of 45 MeV. The interaction of the deuteron beam with a lithium converter and the production of neutrons is modeled using a Monte Carlo code. The computed neutron spectra show that a forward directed neutron beam is generated with an opening angle of ˜1 sr, maximum energy of 60 MeV and a fluence in the forward direction 1.8 × 108 n sr-1, ˜20% of which are with energy above 15 MeV.

  4. Atomistic simulation study of short pulse laser interactions with a metal target under conditions of spatial confinement by a transparent overlayer

    SciTech Connect

    Karim, Eaman T.; Shugaev, Maxim; Wu, Chengping; Zhigilei, Leonid V.; Lin, Zhibin; Hainsey, Robert F.

    2014-05-14

    The distinct characteristics of short pulse laser interactions with a metal target under conditions of spatial confinement by a solid transparent overlayer are investigated in a series of atomistic simulations. The simulations are performed with a computational model combining classical molecular dynamics (MD) technique with a continuum description of the laser excitation, electron-phonon equilibration, and electronic heat transfer based on two-temperature model (TTM). Two methods for incorporation of the description of a transparent overlayer into the TTM-MD model are designed and parameterized for Ag-silica system. The material response to the laser energy deposition is studied for a range of laser fluences that, in the absence of the transparent overlayer, covers the regimes of melting and resolidification, photomechanical spallation, and phase explosion of the overheated surface region. In contrast to the irradiation in vacuum, the spatial confinement by the overlayer facilitates generation of sustained high-temperature and high-pressure conditions near the metal-overlayer interface, suppresses the generation of unloading tensile wave, decreases the maximum depth of melting, and prevents the spallation and explosive disintegration of the surface region of the metal target. At high laser fluences, when the laser excitation brings the surface region of the metal target to supercritical conditions, the confinement prevents the expansion and phase decomposition characteristic for the vacuum conditions leading to a gradual cooling of the hot compressed supercritical fluid down to the liquid phase and eventual solidification. The target modification in this case is limited to the generation of crystal defects and the detachment of the metal target from the overlayer.

  5. High average power, high energy 1.55 μm ultra-short pulse laser beam delivery using large mode area hollow core photonic band-gap fiber.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiang; Mielke, Michael; Booth, Timothy

    2011-01-17

    We demonstrate high average power, high energy 1.55 μm ultra-short pulse (<1 ps) laser delivery using helium-filled and argon-filled large mode area hollow core photonic band-gap fibers and compare relevant performance parameters. The ultra-short pulse laser beam-with pulse energy higher than 7 μJ and pulse train average power larger than 0.7 W-is output from a 2 m long hollow core fiber with diffraction limited beam quality. We introduce a pulse tuning mechanism of argon-filled hollow core photonic band-gap fiber. We assess the damage threshold of the hollow core photonic band-gap fiber and propose methods to further increase pulse energy and average power handling. PMID:21263632

  6. 5MW Raft River Facility Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Whitbeck, J.F.

    1980-12-01

    Located in Northern California In Lake and Sonoma Counties about 90 miles north of San Francisco, Pacific Gas and Electric Company's (PG and E's) The Geysers Power Plant, which has at present fourteen units in service with a net generating capacity of 798MW, is the largest geothermal development in the world. Eight additional PG and E units now in construction, design, and planning will add 720MW of additional capacity by 1986. Figure 1 shows the location of this project and the locations of the existing and future units. This paper discusses evolution of Geysers Unit 18 through resource and project planning, licensing, design, and what is expected during construction, and startup. While many of the experiences are unique to The Geysers units, some could be applicable to other geothermal developments. This unit is one of a series of 110MW units of standardized design which are being developed to reduce the cost and improve schedules. Construction has just commenced, and it is expected to be in commercial operation in October 1982.

  7. 5-MW Toronto HALT (Hydrate Addition at Low Temperature) pilot plant testing: Test results: Part 1-A. [Hydrate addition at low temperature for the removal of SO/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, M.; College, J.; Forsythe, R.; Kerivan, D.; Lee, K.; Herbert, R.; Kanary, D.

    1988-12-01

    ''Hydrate Addition at Low Temperature'' of HALT is a dry calcium- based hydrate injection process for the removal of SO/sub 2/ from flue gases off a sulfur bearing fuel. In this process the hydrate is pneumatically conveyed and injected into the flue gas stream as a dry particulate. The flue gas is cooled downstream of the hydrate injection location by spraying the gas with a stream finely atomized water droplets. The water is atomized into a fine spray mist by using air under pressure as the atomizing fluid. The spray nozzles are specially designed. A 5MW pilot HALT was designed, constructed and operated to demonstrate the viability of the HALT process. The unit was designed to use a baghouse for particulate removal. A rented ESP was used for a pre-scheduled test period for comparison with the baghouse. Tests were conducted to cover all of the following variables: humidification, stoichiometric ratio, approach temperature, flue gas velocity, inlet flue gas SO/sub 2/ concentration, and inlet flue gas temperature. Solids samples of hydrates disposal and ESP waste solids were chemically analyzed and are reported. Hydrate samples were analyzed for particle size distribution and surface area. A two month long duration test operating 24 hours/day was successfully concluded. EPA leachate tests were conducted on the solids waste. Corrosion tests were conducted on coupons installed in the baghouse. 79 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Production of silver-silica core-shell nanocomposites using ultra-short pulsed laser ablation in nanoporous aqueous silica colloidal solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santagata, A.; Guarnaccio, A.; Pietrangeli, D.; Szegedi, Á.; Valyon, J.; De Stefanis, A.; De Bonis, A.; Teghil, R.; Sansone, M.; Mollica, D.; Parisi, G. P.

    2015-05-01

    Ultra-short pulsed laser ablation of materials in liquid has been demonstrated to be a versatile technique for nanoparticles production. In a previous paper, it has been described, for the first time, how by laser ablation in a liquid system, silver nanoparticles can be loaded onto SBA-15 and MCM-41 supports which show promising catalytic properties for the oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). The aim of the present research is to demonstrate the formation of stable silver-silica core-shell nanoparticles by direct laser ablation (Ti:Sa; 800 nm pulse duration: 120 fs repetition rate: 1 kHz, pulse energy: 3.6 mJ, fluence: 9 J cm  -  2) of a Ag target submerged in a static colloidal solution of MCM-41 or SBA-15 silica nanoporous materials. In previous studies, it was discovered that a side and negligible product of the laser ablation process of silver performed in water-silica systems, could be related to the formation of silver-silica core-shell nanoparticles. In order to emphasize this side process some modifications to the laser ablation experimental set-up were performed. Among these, the most important one, in order to favor the production of the core-shell systems, was to keep the liquid silica suspension firm. The laser generated nanomaterials were then analyzed using TEM morphologic characterization. By UV-vis absorption spectra the observed features have been related to components of the colloidal solution as well as to the number of the incident laser pulses. In this manner characterizations on both the process and the resulting suspension have been performed. Significant amount of small sized silver-silica core-shell nanoparticles have been detected in the studied systems. The size distribution, polydispersivity, UV-vis plasmonic bands and stability of the produced silver-silica core-shell nanocomposites have been related to the extent of damage induced in the nanoporous silica structure during the ablation procedure adopted

  9. Emittance of short-pulsed high-current ion beams formed from the plasma of the electron cyclotron resonance discharge sustained by high-power millimeter-wave gyrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Razin, S. Zorin, V.; Izotov, I.; Sidorov, A.; Skalyga, V.

    2014-02-15

    We present experimental results on measuring the emittance of short-pulsed (≤100 μs) high-current (80–100 mA) ion beams of heavy gases (Nitrogen, Argon) formed from a dense plasma of an ECR source of multiply charged ions (MCI) with quasi-gas-dynamic mode of plasma confinement in a magnetic trap of simple mirror configuration. The discharge was created by a high-power (90 kW) pulsed radiation of a 37.5-GHz gyrotron. The normalized emittance of generated ion beams of 100 mA current was (1.2–1.3) π mm mrad (70% of ions in the beams). Comparing these results with those obtained using a cusp magnetic trap, it was concluded that the structure of the trap magnetic field lines does not exert a decisive influence on the emittance of ion beams in the gas-dynamic ECR source of MCI.

  10. Emittance of short-pulsed high-current ion beams formed from the plasma of the electron cyclotron resonance discharge sustained by high-power millimeter-wave gyrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Razin, S; Zorin, V; Izotov, I; Sidorov, A; Skalyga, V

    2014-02-01

    We present experimental results on measuring the emittance of short-pulsed (≤100 μs) high-current (80-100 mA) ion beams of heavy gases (Nitrogen, Argon) formed from a dense plasma of an ECR source of multiply charged ions (MCI) with quasi-gas-dynamic mode of plasma confinement in a magnetic trap of simple mirror configuration. The discharge was created by a high-power (90 kW) pulsed radiation of a 37.5-GHz gyrotron. The normalized emittance of generated ion beams of 100 mA current was (1.2-1.3) π mm mrad (70% of ions in the beams). Comparing these results with those obtained using a cusp magnetic trap, it was concluded that the structure of the trap magnetic field lines does not exert a decisive influence on the emittance of ion beams in the gas-dynamic ECR source of MCI. PMID:24593354

  11. Emittance of short-pulsed high-current ion beams formed from the plasma of the electron cyclotron resonance discharge sustained by high-power millimeter-wave gyrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razin, S.; Zorin, V.; Izotov, I.; Sidorov, A.; Skalyga, V.

    2014-02-01

    We present experimental results on measuring the emittance of short-pulsed (≤100 μs) high-current (80-100 mA) ion beams of heavy gases (Nitrogen, Argon) formed from a dense plasma of an ECR source of multiply charged ions (MCI) with quasi-gas-dynamic mode of plasma confinement in a magnetic trap of simple mirror configuration. The discharge was created by a high-power (90 kW) pulsed radiation of a 37.5-GHz gyrotron. The normalized emittance of generated ion beams of 100 mA current was (1.2-1.3) π mm mrad (70% of ions in the beams). Comparing these results with those obtained using a cusp magnetic trap, it was concluded that the structure of the trap magnetic field lines does not exert a decisive influence on the emittance of ion beams in the gas-dynamic ECR source of MCI.

  12. Enhancing caries resistance in occlusal fissures with a short-pulsed CO2 9.6-μm laser: an in vitro pH-cycling study, preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charland, Daniel; Fulton, Crystal; Rechmann, Beate; Hewko, Mark; Featherstone, John; Choo-Smith, Lin-P'ing; Rechmann, Peter

    2011-03-01

    Treatment of occlusal surfaces with a short-pulsed CO2 9.6 μm wavelength laser has previously been proposed as a method for caries prevention. A sample of 20 extracted human molars were measured before and after demineralizationremineralization pH-cycling with ICDAS II visual inspection, DIAGNOdent, quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF), SoproLife in daylight and blue light-induced fluorescence mode, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and polarized Raman spectroscopy (PRS). Per tooth, one fissure was subjected to laser treatment using a short-pulsed CO2 laser at 9.6 μm wavelength with a fluence of 3.5 J/cm2, 20 Hz pulse repetition rate, 20 μs pulse duration, angulated handpiece, and focus diameter of 600 μm, while the other fissure was left untreated as control. The teeth were subjected to a demineralization-remineralization pH-cycling for 9 days. Cross-sectional micro-hardness testing was done as a gold standard to compare results with findings from the other detection methods used. Due to the small sample size reported, the trend observed was that laser treated fissures demonstrated a smaller relative mineral loss ▵Z than the controls. QLF findings followed a similar trend. Using a rotary catheter probe, OCT measurements were acquired from the various fissures to generate circularly mapped OCT depth images. PRS measurements of parallel- and cross-polarized spectra were acquired with a Raman microscope system. Preliminary OCT images showed differences in the initial air-tooth interface, with PRS results indicating a change in the surface property along with biochemical alterations after pH-cycling. Following pH-cycling, an increase in the OCT subsurface light backscattering intensity in the control fissures was observed compared to the laser test fissures. Porphyrin based fluorescence methods like DIAGNOdent and SoproLife, respectively demonstrated only additional light scattering due to the demineralization process.

  13. Prospects for the diagnosis of electron-ion temperature equilibration rates of warm dense matter by ultra-short pulse hard X-ray diffraction with an X-ray free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo Gareta, J. J.; Riley, D.

    2006-10-01

    Ultra-short pulse kiloelectronvolt X-ray diffraction with an X-ray free electron laser and its potential for the diagnosis of electron-ion equilibration rates of warm dense matter are evaluated. A simple experimental configuration is suggested for the generation and subsequent probing of warm dense aluminium with the TESLA X-ray free electron laser. Differential scattering cross-sections are computed in an approximate manner with Thomas-Fermi form factors and tabular ion-ion static structure factors of one-component plasmas, inclusive of electron screening and degeneracy. This requires simulation of the sample, for which we use a hydrodynamic code featuring the Sesame equation of state, Thomas-Fermi ionisation and cold solid opacities (for the calculation of energy deposition). The effect of electron-ion equilibration rate on the evolution of the diffraction pattern on a picosecond time-scale is investigated. Finally, the signal level expected from experiment is estimated, indicating that measurements with good angular-resolution are possible.

  14. Plasma mirrors for short pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Yanovksy, V.P.; Perry, M.D.; Brown, C.G.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.

    1997-06-11

    We show experimentally and theoretically that plasmas created by a sufficiently (1014 1015 2 short (<500 fs) intense W/cm ) laser pulse on the surface of dielectric material act as nearly perfect mirrors: reflecting p to 90% of the incident radiation with a wavefront quality equal to that of the initial solid surface.

  15. Short pulse photoemission from a dispenser cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeret, H.; Boussoukaya, M.; Chehab, R.; Leblond, B.; Le Duff, J.

    1991-03-01

    Pulsed photoemission in the picosecond regime has been obtained from a standard thermionic dispenser cathode (WBaCa) at temperatures below the measurable thermoemission threshold. A picosecond Nd : YAG mode locked laser has been used at both green and UV light. Micropulse charges up to 0.5 nC have been measured on a wideband coaxial pickup located behind the anode. They correspond to an electron saturation limit from an approximately 20 mm 2 illuminated cathode area with a surface field of 3 MV/m. The effective cathode efficiency at small laser energies, defined as the number of electrons impinging on the coaxial pickup divided by the number of photons impinging on the cathode, is about 2 × 10 -5.

  16. Ultra short pulse reconstruction software: GROG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galletti, M.; Galimberti, M.; Giulietti, D.; Curcio, A.

    2016-07-01

    A new algorithmic method based on the 1D Conjugate Gradient Minimization Method, is presented. The purpose is, analyzing experimental FROG/GRENOUILLE traces, to accurately retrieve intensity and phase both in temporal and spectral domain so as to completely characterize an Ultra Short High Power laser pulse. This algorithm shows important features in the reconstruction of many different pulse classes. The employment of this algorithm also permits the inclusion of material response function present in the FROG/GRENOUILLE set-up.

  17. Long pulse production from short pulses

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, J.S.

    1994-08-02

    A method of producing a long output pulse from a short pump pulse is disclosed, using an elongated amplified fiber having a doped core that provides an amplifying medium for light of one color when driven into an excited state by light of a shorter wavelength and a surrounding cladding. A seed beam of the longer wavelength is injected into the core at one end of the fiber and a pump pulse of the shorter wavelength is injected into the cladding at the other end of the fiber. The counter-propagating seed beam and pump pulse will produce an amplified output pulse having a time duration equal to twice the transit time of the pump pulse through the fiber plus the length of the pump pulse. 3 figs.

  18. Long pulse production from short pulses

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-01-01

    A method of producing a long output pulse (SA) from a short pump pulse (P), using an elongated amplified fiber (11) having a doped core (12) that provides an amplifying medium for light of one color when driven into an excited state by light of a shorter wavelength and a surrounding cladding 13. A seed beam (S) of the longer wavelength is injected into the core (12) at one end of the fiber (11) and a pump pulse (P) of the shorter wavelength is injected into the cladding (13) at the other end of the fiber (11). The counter-propagating seed beam (S) and pump pulse (P) will produce an amplified output pulse (SA) having a time duration equal to twice the transit time of the pump pulse (P) through the fiber (11) plus the length of the pump pulse (P).

  19. Short pulse C-band Doppler scatterometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakelyan, Artashes K.; Hambaryan, Astghik K.; Smolin, Aleksander I.; Karyan, Vanik V.; Hovhannesyan, Gagik G.; Alaverdyan, Eduard R.; Arakelyan, Arsen A.; Hambaryan, Vardan K.

    2005-05-01

    In this paper C-band (~5.75GHz), dual polarization, Doppler scatterometer is developed, for short distance remote sensing of water surface microwave reflective and spectrum characteristics simultaneous and coincident measurements, under laboratory-control conditions. Developed system will be set on a mobile bogie moving on the height of 6.5m along a stationary platform of 32m of length. It will allow carry out polarimetric (vv, vh, hh, hv), simultaneous and coincident microwave active measurements of pool water surface parameters at angles of incidence from the while of 0-40o.

  20. Fiber Optic Solutions for Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R; Dawson, J; Liao, Z; Jovanovic, I; Wattellier, B; Payne, S; Barty, C P

    2003-01-29

    For applications requiring high beam quality radiation from efficient, compact and rugged sources, diffraction limited fiber lasers are ideal, and to date have been demonstrated at average CW power levels exceeding 100 W with near diffraction limited: output. For conventional single-core step-index single-mode fibers, this power level represents the sealing limit because of nonlinear and laser damage considerations. Higher average powers would exceed nonlinear process thresholds such as the Raman and stimulated Brillouin scattering limit, or else damage the fiber due to the high intensity level in the fiber's core. The obvious way to increase the average power capability of fibers is to increase the area of their core. Simply expanding the core dimensions of the fiber allows a straightforward power sealing due to enhanced nonlinear and power handling characteristics that scale directly with the core area. Femtosecond, chirped-pulse, fiber lasers with pulse energies greater than 1mJ have been demonstrated in the literature [2] using this technique. This output energy was still limited by the onset of stimulated Raman scattering. We have pursued an alternative and complimentary approach which is to reduce the intensity of light propagating in the core by distributing it more evenly across the core area via careful design of the refractive index profile [3]. We have also sought to address the primary issue that results from scaling the core. The enhanced power handling capability comes at the expense of beam quality, as increasing the core diameter in standard step index fibers permits multiple transverse modes to lase simultaneously. Although this problem of multimode operation can be mitigated to some extent by appropriately designing the fiber's waveguide structure, limitations such as bend radius loss, sensitivity to thermally induced perturbations of the waveguide structure, and refractive index control, all become more stringent as the core diameter grows, limiting the extent to which the core diameter can be grown and still ensure single mode operation from the fiber. The large flattened mode fiber addresses some of these limitations and enables a new approach to single transverse mode operation of large mode area (LMA) fibers, providing a route to high average powers exceeding 1 kW from a single aperture in a Strehi-ratio-optimizing fiat-topped output beam.

  1. Short-pulse electromagnetics for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felsen, Leopold B.; Vecchi, G.; Carin, Lawrence; Bertoni, H. L.

    1991-08-01

    Recent developments make it possible to radiate and coherently detect electromagnetic pulses consisting of a few half-cycles of a sine wave having a period on the order of 10 ps. The antennas involved are compact, typically consisting of conducting films on thin dielectric substrates having lateral dimensions of about 2 cm. Short, broadband pulse technology can be used for position sensing, object identification, and for monitoring the state of an object. Such target interrogation may have application to robotics. This possibility is explored here, and an example of the dependence of the scattered pulse on the internal state of an object is presented. The short electromagnetic pulses (SEP) permit position sensing of objects with spatial resolution on the order of 1 mm. They also permit identification of objects and the monitoring of their state. This follows because, depending on its size, shape, and the materials from which it is constructed, an object will exhibit a series of resonant frequencies at which it strongly reflects electromagnetic waves of harmonic time dependence. When illuminated by SEP, having frequency content spread over a wide bandwidth, these resonances will be excited. The resonances appear in the late-time tail of the scattered pulse. This late-time response is almost independent of the orientation of the object, and can therefore be used for identification. For targets that involve conducting bodies with aperture coupling to internal cavities the externally observed resonances can be especially useful in monitoring changes in the internal structure. The illustrative example demonstrating this aspect involves a slit- coupled closed shell with an internal load. If the shell and load are good conductors it is shown that the resulting high-Q resonances are highly sensitive to changes in the locatio of the load.

  2. Short pulse free electron laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Schlitt, Leland G.; Szoke, Abraham

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for amplification of a laser pulse in a free electron laser amplifier where the laser pulse duration may be a small fraction of the electron beam pulse duration used for amplification. An electron beam pulse is passed through a first wiggler magnet and a short laser pulse to be amplified is passed through the same wiggler so that only the energy of the last fraction, f, (f<1) of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplifying the laser pulse. After suitable delay of the electron beam, the process is repeated in a second wiggler magnet, a third, . . . , where substantially the same fraction f of the remainder of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplification of the given short laser pulse in each wiggler magnet region until the useful electron beam energy is substantially completely consumed by amplification of the laser pulse.

  3. Preface to the Special Issue on short pulse fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delavaux, Jean-Marc P.; Grelu, Philippe; Pu, Wang; Ilday, Fatih Ömer

    2014-12-01

    In the last two decades the fiber laser has evolved from a laboratory curiosity to a viable tool in an increasing number of applications in such diverse areas as material processing, atmospheric monitoring, high energy physics, medicine, telecommunications, and defense. The reasons for the growing acceptance of fiber lasers lie in the combination of their many attractive features. Indeed, fiber lasers are together power efficient, compact, light weight, versatile and reliable. Initially, the development of fiber laser technology was led to challenge the dominance of well entrenched solid state lasers used in the lucrative manufacturing industry. Traditionally, the emission wavelength band of interest was mostly limited to the near infrared (NIR) region (i.e. from 1 to 1.6 μm). More recently, extensive fiber laser R&D advances have extended the laser applications to a broader spectrum, from the ultra violet (UV) to the mid-infrared (Mid-IR) wavelength region, and investigated the specific advantages associated with different pulse widths, from ns to fs, and different operating regimes.

  4. Phase conjugation in short pulse megajoule class lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Eimerl, D.; Chernyak, V.M.; Pergament, M.I.; Smirnov, R.V.; Sokolov, V.I.

    1995-12-31

    The main goal of this report is to analyze the feasibility to use phase conjugation (PC) in Megajoule class lasers for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). Phase conjugation has the potential for relieving the fabrication requirements to any optical elements and for compensation of residual thermooptical distortions. The key problems for phase conjugation are the dynamic range over which phase conjugation operates efficiently, the reflected energy limit, the effect of the laser light bandwidth, and the possibility to mount PC subsystem into a real megajoule laser. Analytical results of possibility of use of classical stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) mirror and based on nonlinear crystal phase conjugator in ICF laser are presented.

  5. Development of a short pulsed solid propellant plasma thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guman, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    The experimental results are summarized that were obtained in the development of a Teflon solid propellant pulsed plasma thruster. The feasibility was established of storing and feeding solid propellant in the form of an open circular loop into an operational thruster. This technique was verified to be practical by feeding over 20 inches of Teflon into a micro-thruster over an accumulated life test of 1858 hours. High energy density capacitors were evaluated under vacuum conditions when the capacitor is coupled directly to a plasma thruster. Numerous early capacitor failures were encountered. It was concluded that essentially all of the failures encountered in a vacuum environment are due to an internal electrical breakdown that will occur inside a capacitor that is not truly hermetically sealed. A steady input power significantly in excess of 130 watts can safely be tolerated if heat conduction can be provided to a sink whose temperature is about 16 C. A vacuum life test of the capacitor bank was carried out while discharging into a milli-lb. (milli-Newton) type pulsed plasma thruster. More than 1500 hours of vacuum testing of this milli-Newton type system has been accumulated without any capacitor problems. Recommendations are made for future capacitor designs.

  6. Positron Creation Using the TITAN Short Pulse Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Wilks, S. C.; Liang, E.; Myatt, J.; Cone, K.; Elberson, L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Schneider, M.; Shepherd, R.; Stafford, D.; Tommasini, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2008-11-01

    Using ultra-intense lasers to generate positrons was theorized some time ago[1] and demonstrated in principle in two previous experiments[2] where small numbers of positrons were measured. Recently, new experiments were performed on the LLNL Titan laser to study positron creation, where the laser pulse length, pre-plasma condition, target material and thickness were varied. Using newly built positron spectrometers, copious positron production was observed with good signal-to-background ratio. Hot electron spectra (out to 100 MeV) and bremsstrahlung photons were measured simultaneously to further constrain models for the experiment. This talk will present detailed experimental results and their comparison with theory and previous experimental data. [1] Shearer et al, PRA,(1973);Liang, AIP Conf. Proc.(1994); Shkolnikov et al, APL,(1997), Liang, Wilks and Tabak, PRL(1998); Nakashima and Takabe, PoP,(2002); Myatt et al,PRE (2008).[2] Cowan et al, LPB(1999); Gahn et al, APL(1998)

  7. Short pulse dynamics in a linear cavity fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razukov, Vadim A.; Melnikov, Leonid A.

    2016-04-01

    New suitable numerical scheme is proposed for simulation of dynamics of oppositely running pulses in a fiber laser with linear cavity. The proposed model allows to include various temporal and spatial effects which affect the laser dynamics. The pulse evolution in the fiber cavity with perfect reflectors at the fiber ends with accounting of fiber group velocity dispersion and self-phase modulation is demonstrated.

  8. Computational modeling of ultra-short-pulse ablation of enamel

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.A.; Bailey, D.S.; Young, D.A.

    1996-02-29

    A computational model for the ablation of tooth enamel by ultra-short laser pulses is presented. The role of simulations using this model in designing and understanding laser drilling systems is discussed. Pulses of duration 300 sec and intensity greater than 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} are considered. Laser absorption proceeds via multi-photon initiated plasma mechanism. The hydrodynamic response is calculated with a finite difference method, using an equation of state constructed from thermodynamic functions including electronic, ion motion, and chemical binding terms. Results for the ablation efficiency are presented. An analytic model describing the ablation threshold and ablation depth is presented. Thermal coupling to the remaining tissue and long-time thermal conduction are calculated. Simulation results are compared to experimental measurements of the ablation efficiency. Desired improvements in the model are presented.

  9. Ultra-Short Pulsed Laser Engineered Metal-Glass Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalmashonak, Andrei; Seifert, Gerhard; Abdolvand, Amin

    Glasses and other dielectrics containing metallic nanoparticles are very promising materials for applications in optoelectronics due to their unique linear and non-linear optical properties. These properties are dominated by the strong surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the metal nanoparticles. The SPR occurs when the electron and light waves couple with each other at a metal-dielectric interface. These are regarded as the collective oscillation of the nanoparticle (NP) electrons.

  10. Short pulse photoemission from LaB 6-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblond, B.; Kuznetsov, G.; Batazova, M.

    1996-02-01

    Experimental results obtained in picosecond regime with new LaB 6 compounds are presented and compared to LaB 6 monocrystal <100>. Quantum yield values up to 6.8 × 10 -4 are obtained by using the fourth harmonic of a ND:YAG laser. The lifetime of these classical thermionic cathodes can be improved by heating the photocathode just below the thermoemission threshold. Measurements are performed to verify the temperature effects on this parameter. Effects of pressure in the experimental cell on the lifetime of the photocathode are also given.

  11. Short-pulse, high-intensity lasers at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A.J.; Roberts, J.P.; Rodriguez, G.; Fulton, R.D.; Kyrala, G.A.; Schappert, G.T.

    1994-03-01

    Advances in ultrafast lasers and optical amplifiers have spurred the development of terawatt-class laser systems capable of delivering focal spot intensities approaching 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. At these extremely high intensities, the optical field strength is more than twenty times larger than the Bohr electric field, permitting investigations of the optical properties of matter in a previously unexplored regime. The authors describe two laser systems for high intensity laser interaction experiments: The first is a terawatt system based on amplification of femtosecond pulses in XeCl which yields 250 mJ in 275 fs and routinely produces intensifies on target in excess of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}. The second system is based on chirped pulse amplification of 100-fs pulses in Ti:sapphire.

  12. Characterization of short-pulse laser driven neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Katerina; Jung, Daniel; Guler, Nevzat; Deppert, Oliver; Devlin, Matthew; Fernandez, J. C.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Haight, R. C.; Hegelich, B. M.; Henzlova, Daniela; Ianakiev, K. D.; Iliev, Metodi; Johnson, R. P.; Merrill, F. E.; Schaumann, G.; Schoenberg, K.; Shimada, T.; Taddeucci, T. N.; Tybo, J. L.; Wagner, F.; Wender, S. A.; Wurden, G. A.; Favalli, Andrea; Roth, Markus

    2014-10-01

    We present a full spectral characterization of a novel laser driven neutron source, which employed the Break Out Afterburner ion acceleration mechanism. Neutrons were produced by nuclear reactions of the ions deposited on Be or Cu converters. We observed neutrons at energies up to 150 MeV. The neutron spectra were measured by five neutron time-of-flight detectors at various positions and distances from the source. The nTOF detectors observed that emission of neutrons is a superposition of an isotropic component peaking at 3.5--5 MeV resulting from nuclear reactions in the converter and a directional component at 25--70 MeV, which was a product of break-up reaction of the forward moving deuterons. Energy shifts due to geometrical effects in BOA were also observed.

  13. SLIM, Short-pulse Technology for High Gradient Induction Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, A.; Kardo-Sysoev, A.; Arntz, F.; /Diversified Tech., Bedford

    2009-12-09

    The conclusions of this paper are: (1) The gradient of the SLIM-based technology is believed to be achievable in the same range as it is for the gradient of a modern rf-linac technology ({approx}100 MeV per meter). (2) The SLIM concept is based on the nsec TEM pulse mode operation with no laser or rf systems. (3) Main components of SLIM are not stressed while the energy is pumped into the induction system. Components can accept the hard environment conditions such as a radiation dose, mismatch, hard electromagnetic nose level, etc. Only for several nanoseconds the switch is OFF and produces a stress in the induction system. At that time, the delivery of energy to the beam takes place. (4) The energy in the induction system initially is storied in the magnetic field when the switch is ON. That fact makes another benefit: a low voltage power supplies can be used. The reliability of a lower voltage power supply is higher and they are cheaper. (5) The coreless SLIM concept offers to work in the MHz range of repetition rate. The induction system has the high electric efficiency (much higher than the DWA). (6) The array of lined up and activated SLIM cells is believed to be a solid state structure of novel accelerating technology. The electron-hole plasma in the high power solid state structure is precisely controlled by the electromagnetic process of a pulsed power supply.

  14. Correlated states of a quantum oscillator acted by short pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manko, O. V.

    1993-01-01

    Correlated squeezed states for a quantum oscillator are constructed based on the method of quantum integrals of motion. The quantum oscillator is acted upon by short duration pulses. Three delta-kickings of frequency are used to model the pulses' dependence upon the time aspects of the frequency of the oscillator. Additionally, the correlation coefficient and quantum variances of operations of coordinates and momenta are written in explicit form.

  15. Phase effects in double ionization by strong short pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckhardt, Bruno; Prauzner-Bechcicki, Jakub S.; Sacha, Krzysztof; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2010-05-01

    We consider double ionization induced by strong single cycle pulses within quantum calculations of a reduced dimensionality model. Changes in the phase relation between the wave and the envelope affect the total ionization yield as well as the characteristics in the distribution of the outgoing momenta.

  16. Short Pulse Laser Production of Diamond Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, P.S.; Stuart, B.C.; Dinh, L.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; McLean, W.; Perry, M.D.

    1998-03-20

    The use of diamond thin films has the potential for major impact in many industrial and scientific applications. These include heat sinks for electronics, broadband optical sensors, windows, cutting tools, optical coatings, laser diodes, cold cathodes, and field emission displays. Attractive properties of natural diamond consist of physical hardness, high tensile yield strength, chemical inertness, low coefficient of friction, high thermal conductivity, and low electrical conductivity. Unfortunately, these properties are not completely realized in currently produced diamond thin films. Chemical vapor deposition, in its many forms, has been the most successful to this point in producing crystalline diamond films microns to millimeters in thickness which are made up of closely packed diamond crystals microns in physical dimension. However, high purity films are difficult to realize due to the use of hydrogen in the growth process which becomes included in the film matrix. These impurities are manifest in film physical properties which are inferior to those of pure crystalline diamond. In addition, the large density of grain boundaries due to the polycrystalline nature of the films reduce the films' diamond-like character. Finally, substrates must be heated to several hundred degrees Celsius which is not suitable for many materials. Pulsed laser deposition is attractive due to its ability to produce high purity films-limited only by the purity of the target. For diamond film production, high purity carbon can be ablated directly by lasers and deposited as thin films at ambient temperatures. However, lasers currently in use generally deliver long (>10 ns) pulses, and the generally explosive nature of laser ablation, in addition to the desired single-atom or single-ion carbon, liberates significant amounts of carbon clusters (C{sub n} where n=2-30) and macroscopic particles (> 1-10 pm) of carbon. These carbon particles interrupt the ordered deposition of crystalline diamond, forming undesirable grain boundaries and rough surfaces that are difficult to polish. In addition, PLD generated films tend to be ''amorphous'' or nanocrystalline with no observable long-range order, but still possessing physical properties which are diamond-like in some approximation. This has given rise to the term ''diamond-like carbon'' when referring to these PLD-produced, amorphous carbon films. Growth rates for PLD have been prohibitively slow until recently with the advent of high average power, high rep-rate lasers.

  17. Ultra-short pulse propagation in multi-level media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clader, B. David

    We consider the propagation of short, intense laser pulses through media consisting of two-level and three-level atoms. We derive the coupled Maxwell-Bloch (MB) equations, which describe such propagation. Many different physical situations have been studied by analyzing various limiting cases of these equations. Most of the recent work has relied on steady-state or adiabatic assumptions to simplify the analysis of the MB equations. However rapid progress has been made in recent years in developing analytic solution techniques that do not require these simplifications, such as BAcklund transformations, inverse scattering methods, and Darboux transformations. We use the Backlund solution method, to derive soliton solutions to the MB equations for various physical situations of interest in multi-level media. In addition we examine the experimental applicability of the exact solutions by numerically integrating the MB equations for more physically realistic pulse shapes and media preparations that may not permit analytic solutions. In two-level inverted gain media, we derive a pulse solution with group velocity exceeding the speed of light in vacuum (fast light). Numerical results confirm that such a pulse can exhibit fractional peak advances exceeding one pulse width despite spontaneous instabilites such as superfluorescence and stimulated instabilities related to the McCall-Hahn area theorem. In three-level Λ type media we derive soliton solutions for two pulses propagating through a medium prepared in an arbitrary mixed-state of the two ground states. We include a tunable parameter in the solutions that allows one to vary the medium between completely mixed state and completely pure-state superpositions known as "phaseonium". This flexibility allows one to study the interplay between stimulated Raman scattering, electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), self induced transparency (SIT), and pulse matching. Past results have indicated that asymptotic pulse propagation is always dominated by EIT type propagation when considering two-pulse propagation in phaseonium. Our results indicate that only for pure-state phaseonium does EIT behavior dominate. When one considers mixed state superpositions of the two ground states, termed "mixonium," asymptotic EIT dominance is replaced with SIT behavior. We show how the area theorem of self-induced transparency appears to govern propagation in both the two and three-level cases.

  18. Short-pulse Laser Capability on the Mercury Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbers, C; Armstrong, P; Bayramian, A; Barty, C J; Bibeau, C; Britten, J; Caird, J; Campbell, R; Chai, B; Crane, J; Cross, R; Erlandson, A; Fei, Y; Freitas, B; Jovanovic, I; Liao, Z; Molander, B; Schaffers, K; Stuart, B; Sutton, S; Ladran, T; Telford, S; Thelin, P; Utterback, E

    2006-06-22

    Applications using high energy ''petawatt-class'' laser drivers operating at repetition rates beyond 0.01 Hz are only now being envisioned. The Mercury laser system is designed to operate at 100 J/pulse at 10 Hz. We investigate the potential of configuring the Mercury laser to produce a rep-rated, ''petawatt-class'' source. The Mercury laser is a prototype of a high energy, high repetition rate source (100 J, 10 Hz). The design of the Mercury laser is based on the ability to scale in energy through scaling in aperture. Mercury is one of several 100 J, high repetition rate (10 Hz) lasers sources currently under development (HALNA, LUCIA, POLARIS). We examine the possibility of using Mercury as a pump source for a high irradiance ''petawatt-class'' source: either as a pump laser for an average power Ti:Sapphire laser, or as a pump laser for OPCPA based on YCa{sub 4}O(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} (YCOB), ideally producing a source approaching 30 J /30 fs /10 Hz--a high repetition rate petawatt. A comparison of the two systems with nominal configurations and efficiencies is shown in Table 1.

  19. Plasma mirrors for short pulse KrF lasers.

    PubMed

    Gilicze, Barnabás; Barna, Angéla; Kovács, Zsolt; Szatmári, Sándor; Földes, István B

    2016-08-01

    It is demonstrated for the first time that plasma mirrors can be successfully applied for KrF laser systems. High reflectivity up to 70% is achieved by optimization of the beam quality on the plasma mirror. The modest spectral shift and the good reflected beam quality allow its applicability for high power laser systems for which a new arrangement is suggested. PMID:27587094

  20. Short-pulse high intensity laser thin foil interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audebert, Patrick

    2003-10-01

    The technology of ultrashort pulse laser generation has progressed to the point that optical pulses larger than 10 J, 300 fs duration or shorter are routinely produced. Such pulses can be focused to intensities exceeding 10^18 W/cm^2. With high contrast pulses, these focused intensities can be used to heat solid matter to high temperatures with minimal hydrodynamic expansion, producing an extremely high energy-density state of matter for a short period of time. This high density, high temperature plasma can be studied by x-ray spectroscopy. We have performed experiments on thin foils of different elements under well controlled conditions at the 100 Terawatt laser at LULI to study the characteristics X-ray emission of laser heated solids. To suppress the ASE effect, the laser was frequency doubled. S-polarized light with a peak intensity of 10^19W/cm^2 was used to minimize resonance absorption. To decrease the effect of longitudinal temperature gradients very thin (800 μ) aluminum foil targets were used. We have also studied the effect of radial gradient by limiting the measured x-ray emission zone using 50μ or 100μ pinhole on target. The spectra, in the range 7-8Å, were recorded using a conical crystal spectrometer coupled to a 800 fs resolution streak camera. A Fourier Domain Interferometry (FDI) of the back of the foil was also performed providing a measurement of the hydrodynamic expansion as function of time for each shot. To simulate the experiment, we used the 1D hydrodynamic code FILM with a given set of plasma parameter (ρ, Te) as initial conditions. The X-ray emission was calculated by post processing hydrodynamic results with a collisional-radiative model which uses super-configuration average atomic data. The simulation reproduces the main features of the experimental time resolved spectrum.

  1. Laser zona dissection using short-pulse ultraviolet lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neev, Joseph; Tadir, Yona; Ho, Peter D.; Whalen, William E.; Asch, Richardo H.; Ord, Teri; Berns, Michael W.

    1992-06-01

    The interaction of pulsed ultraviolet radiation with the zona pellucida of human oocytes which had failed to fertilize in standard IVF cycles, was investigated. Two lasers were studied: a 100 ps pulsed Nd:YAG with a nonlinear crystal emitting light at 266 nm, and a 15 ns XeCl excimer laser with 308 nm radiation. Incisions in the zona were made by aiming the beam tangentially to the oocyte. The results indicate superior, high precision performance by the excimer laser creating trenches as narrow as 1 micrometers and as shallow as 1 micrometers . The incision size was found to be sensitive to the laser's energy and to the position of the microscope's objective focal plane, but relatively insensitive to the laser pulse repetition rate. Once the minimum spot size was defined by the system parameters, the laser beam was used to curve out any desired zona shape. This laser microsurgery technique as applied to partial zone dissection or zona drilling could prove very useful as a high-precision, non-contact method for treatments of low fertilization rate and for enhancing embryo implantation rates in patients undergoing IVF treatments.

  2. Picosecond lasers: the next generation of short-pulsed lasers.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Joshua R; Kaufman, Joely; Metelitsa, Andrea I; Green, Jeremy B

    2014-12-01

    Selective photothermolysis, first discussed in the context of targeted microsurgery in 1983, proposed that the optimal parameters for specific thermal damage rely critically on the duration over which energy is delivered to the tissue. At that time, nonspecific thermal damage had been an intrinsic limitation of all commercially available lasers, despite efforts to mitigate this by a variety of compensatory cooling mechanisms. Fifteen years later, experimental picosecond lasers were first reported in the dermatological literature to demonstrate greater efficacy over their nanosecond predecessors in the context of targeted destruction of tattoo ink. Within the last 4 years, more than a decade after those experiments, the first commercially available cutaneous picosecond laser unit became available (Cynosure, Westford, Massachusetts), and several pilot studies have demonstrated its utility in tattoo removal. An experimental picosecond infrared laser has also recently demonstrated a nonthermal tissue ablative capability in soft tissue, bone, and dentin. In this article, we review the published data pertaining to dermatology on picosecond lasers from their initial reports to the present as well as discuss forthcoming technology. PMID:25830248

  3. Optical ablation by high-power short-pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B.C.; Feit, M.D.; Herman, S.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Shore, B.W.; Perry, M.D.

    1996-02-01

    Laser-induced damage threshold measurements were performed on homogeneous and multilayer dielectrics and gold-coated optics at 1053 and 526 nm for pulse durations {tau} ranging from 140 fs to 1 ns. Gold coatings were found, both experimentally and theoretically, to be limited to 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} in the subpicosecond range for 1053-nm pulses. In dielectrics, we find qualitative differences in the morphology of damage and a departure from the diffusion-dominated {tau}{sup 1/2} scaling that indicate that damage results from plasma formation and ablation for {tau}{le}10 ps and from conventional heating and melting for {tau}{approx_gt}50 ps. A theoretical model based on electron production by multiphoton ionization, joule heating, and collisional (avalanche) ionization is in quantitative agreement with both the pulse-width and the wavelength scaling of experimental results. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  4. Relativistic Positron Creation Using Ultra-Intense Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Wilks, S; Bonlie, J; Liang, E; Myatt, J; Price, D; Meyerhofer, D; Beiersdorfer, P

    2008-08-25

    We measure up to 2 x 10{sup 10} positrons per steradian ejected out the back of {approx}mm thick gold targets when illuminated with short ({approx} 1 ps) ultra-intense ({approx} 1 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses. Positrons produced predominately by the Bethe-Heitler process and have an effective temperature of 2-4 MeV, with the distribution peaking at 4-7 MeV. The angular distribution of the positrons is anisotropic. The measurements indicate the laser produced, relativistic positron densities ({approx} 10{sup 16} positrons/cm{sup 3}) are the highest ever created in the laboratory.

  5. Distinguishing Raman from strongly coupled Brillouin amplification for short pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qing; Barth, Ido; Edwards, Matthew R.; Mikhailova, Julia M.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-05-01

    Plasma-based amplification by strongly coupled Brillouin scattering has recently been suggested for the compression of a short seed laser to ultrahigh intensities in sub-quarter-critical-density plasmas. However, by employing detailed spectral analysis of particle-in-cell simulations in the same parameter regime, we demonstrate that, in fact, Raman backscattering amplification is responsible for the growth and compression of the high-intensity, leading spike, where most of the energy compression occurs, while the ion mode only affects the low-intensity tail of the amplified pulse. The critical role of the initial seed shape is identified. A number of subtleties in the numerical simulations are also pointed out.

  6. Plasma mirrors for short pulse KrF lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilicze, Barnabás; Barna, Angéla; Kovács, Zsolt; Szatmári, Sándor; Földes, István B.

    2016-08-01

    It is demonstrated for the first time that plasma mirrors can be successfully applied for KrF laser systems. High reflectivity up to 70% is achieved by optimization of the beam quality on the plasma mirror. The modest spectral shift and the good reflected beam quality allow its applicability for high power laser systems for which a new arrangement is suggested.

  7. Cross sections for short pulse single and double ionization ofhelium

    SciTech Connect

    Palacios, Alicia; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C. William

    2007-11-27

    In a previous publication, procedures were proposed for unambiguously extracting amplitudes for single and double ionization from a time-dependent wavepacket by effectively propagating for an infinite time following a radiation pulse. Here we demonstrate the accuracy and utility of those methods for describing two-photon single and one-photon double ionization of helium. In particular it is shown how narrow features corresponding to autoionizing states are easily resolved with these methods.

  8. Laser fusion neutron source employing compression with short pulse lasers

    DOEpatents

    Sefcik, Joseph A; Wilks, Scott C

    2013-11-05

    A method and system for achieving fusion is provided. The method includes providing laser source that generates a laser beam and a target that includes a capsule embedded in the target and filled with DT gas. The laser beam is directed at the target. The laser beam helps create an electron beam within the target. The electron beam heats the capsule, the DT gas, and the area surrounding the capsule. At a certain point equilibrium is reached. At the equilibrium point, the capsule implodes and generates enough pressure on the DT gas to ignite the DT gas and fuse the DT gas nuclei.

  9. Ultra-short pulses to signal neuronal growth cone machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Manoj; Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Andres, Rosa; Cormack, Iain G.; Artigas, David; Soriano, Eduardo; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2007-02-01

    Measurable change in the sensory motor machinery of growth cones are induced by non contact femtosecond laser. The focused laser beam with an average power of 3 mW was positioned at some distance away from the closest fillopodia of cortical neurons from primary cell cultures (mice E15). By identifying a set of preliminary parameters we were able to statistically analyze the phenomenological behavior of the fillopodia and classify the effects different conditions of laser light has on the growth cone. Results show that fillopodia become significantly biased towards the focused femtosecond laser light. The same experiment performed with continuous wave (CW) produced results which were indistinguishable from the case where there is no laser light present (placebo condition) indicating no clear effects of the CW laser light on the fillopodia at a distance. These findings show the potential for ultrashort pulsed light to become a new type of pathfinding cue for neuronal growth cones.

  10. Using short pulse lasers to drive X-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, J

    2009-07-27

    Nearly four decades ago H-like and He-like resonantly photo-pumped laser schemes were proposed for producing X-ray lasers. However, demonstrating these schemes in the laboratory has proved to be elusive. One challenge has been the difficulty of finding an adequate resonance between a strong pump line and a line in the laser plasma that drives the laser transition. Given a good resonance, a second challenge has been to create both the pump and laser plasma in close proximity so as to allow the pump line to transfer its energy to the laser material. With the advent of the X-FEL at LCLS we now have a tunable X-ray laser source that can be used to replace the pump line in previously proposed laser schemes and allow researchers to study the physics and feasibility of photo-pumped laser schemes. In this paper we model the Na-pumped Ne X-ray laser scheme that was proposed and studied many years ago by replacing the Na He-{alpha} pump line at 1127 eV with the X-FEL at LCLS. We predict gain on the 4f - 3d transition at 231 {angstrom}. We also examine the feasibility of photo-pumping He-like V and lasing on the 4f - 3d transition at 38.7 {angstrom}, which would be within the water-window. In addition we look at the possibility of photo-pumping Ne-like Fe and creating gain on the 4d - 3p transition at 53 {angstrom} and the 3p - 3s transition at 255 {angstrom}.

  11. Characterization of short pulse laser-produced plasmas at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory ultra short-pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, R.; Price, D.; White, W.; Osterheld, A.; Walling, R.; Goldstein, W.; Stewart, R.; Gordan, S.

    1993-07-14

    The K-shell emission from porous aluminum targets is used to infer the density and temperature of plasmas created with 800 nm and 400 nm, 140 fs laser light. The laser beam is focused to a minimum spot size of 5 {mu}m with 800 nm light and 3 {mu}m with 400 nm light, producing a normal incidence peak intensity of 10{sup 18} Watts/cm{sup 2}. A new 800 fs x-ray streak camera is used to study the broadband x-ray emission. The time resolved and time integrated x-ray emission implies substantial differences between the porous target and the flat target temperature.

  12. Engineering aspects of the application of structural materials in the 5 MW-ESS-mercury-target

    SciTech Connect

    Guttek, B.

    1996-06-01

    A main problem of the ESS-Hg-target development and the design of the components of its primary Hg-circuit is the choice of structural materials. As designing, calculations and experiments with elected materials take time and are very costy, a preview on their successful application has to be done before as detailed as possible. One aspect on this is to have the knowledge of characteristics values of the structural material candidates under the occuring mechanical and thermal loads, irradiation, corrosion and erosion. Another point is the technology of engineering concerning the manufacturing, welding, surface treatment, and quality control of such parts and components under the demand to reach maximum lifetime.

  13. Aerodynamic and Structural Design of MultiMW Wind Turbine Blades beyond 5MW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillmer, B.; Borstelmann, T.; Schaffarczyk, P. A.; Dannenberg, L.

    2007-07-01

    A unified approach was taken to the design of wind-turbine blades for multiMW machines up to 10 MW. Using input from standard existing machines, three baseline versions were designed. Then - after up-scaling - using the aero-elastic code FLEX5 a typical extreme load case was selected. As a result, weights seem to increase more than might be expected by an empirical law deduced from statistical data. However, some further investigations are needed, e. g. buckling and fatigue analyses. The authors regard the method developed here as a useful approach for pre-design investigation. One important aspect seems to be the need for high-quality GRPs, with admissible strength of more than 120 MPa.

  14. 1.5 MW turbine installation at NREL's NWTC on Aug. 21

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-05-29

    Generating 20 percent of the nation's electricity from clean wind resources will require more and bigger wind turbines. NREL is installing two large wind turbines at the National Wind Technology Center to examine some of the industry's largest machines and address issues to expand wind energy on a commercial scale.

  15. Definition of a 5-MW Reference Wind Turbine for Offshore System Development

    SciTech Connect

    Jonkman, J.; Butterfield, S.; Musial, W.; Scott, G.

    2009-02-01

    This report describes a three-bladed, upwind, variable-speed, variable blade-pitch-to-feather-controlled multimegawatt wind turbine model developed by NREL to support concept studies aimed at assessing offshore wind technology.

  16. Triple-junction amorphous silicon alloy PV manufacturing plant of 5 MW annual capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Guha, S.; Yang, J.; Banerjee, A.

    1997-12-31

    A spectral-splitting, triple-junction a-Si alloy solar cell processor has been designed, built and optimized. A roll-to-roll process has been used to deposit two layers of back reflector, a triple-cell structure with nine layers of a-Si and a-SiGe alloys and a single layer of antireflection coating consecutively on a half-a-mile roll of stainless steel. The coated web is next slabbed and processed to make a variety of products. The design of the machine and processes used incorporate several key features developed for improving cell efficiency. In order to reduce manufacturing cost, higher deposition rates and thinner cells than are used in R and D have been used. The back reflector also consists of Al/ZnO rather than Ag/ZnO. Large-scale production has begun, and products are being shipped for a wide range of applications.

  17. Over 0.5 MW green laser from sub-nanosecond giant pulsed microchip laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lihe; Taira, Takunori

    2016-03-01

    A sub-nanosecond green laser with laser head sized 35 × 35 × 35 mm3 was developed from a giant pulsed microchip laser for laser processing on organic superconducting transistor with a flexible substrate. A composite monolithic Y3Al5O12 (YAG) /Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG/YAG crystal was designed for generating giant pulsed 1064 nm laser. A fibercoupled 30 W laser diode centered at 808 nm was used with pump pulse duration of 245 μs. The 532 nm green laser was obtained from a LiB3O5 (LBO) crystal with output energy of 150 μJ and pulse duration of 268 ps. The sub-nanosecond green laser is interesting for 2-D ablation patterns.

  18. Experimental results for a 1.5 MW, 110 GHz gyrotron oscillator with reduced mode competition

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, E.M.; Marchewka, C.D.; Mastovsky, I.; Sirigiri, J.R.; Shapiro, M.A.; Temkin, R.J.

    2006-02-15

    A new result from a 110 GHz gyrotron at MIT is reported with an output power of 1.67 MW and an efficiency of 42% when operated at 97 kV and 41 A for 3 {mu}s pulses in the TE{sub 22,6} mode. These results are a major improvement over results obtained with an earlier cavity design, which produced 1.43 MW of power at 37% efficiency. These new results were obtained using a cavity with a reduced output taper angle and a lower ohmic loss when compared with the earlier cavity. The improved operation is shown experimentally to be the result of reduced mode competition from the nearby TE{sub 19,7} mode. The reduced mode competition agrees well with an analysis of the startup scenario based on starting current simulations. The present results should prove useful in planning long pulse and CW versions of the 110 GHz gyrotron.

  19. Experimental investigation of a relativistic magnetron with diffraction output on a repetitive short pulse generator

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Zi-cheng; Sun, Xiao-liang; Liu, Yong-gui

    2014-04-15

    An experimental investigation of a relativistic Magnetron with Diffraction Output (MDO) on a short voltage pulse generator, which has maximum repetition rate of 100 Hz and plateau of 2.5 ns, is detailed in this paper. Compared to the conversional solid cathode, a direct Density Modulation Cathode is capable for desired microwave radiation. When applied voltage is 200 kV and axial magnetic field is ∼0.12 T, the MDO radiates 120 MW of microwave with 2.3 GHz of central frequency. Power conversion efficiency reaches 22%. Pulse duration is 3 ns. At repetition rates of 50 Hz and 100 Hz, output microwave powers range from 90 MW to 120 MW. Life time is up to 10{sup 4} shots.

  20. Generation and focusing of short pulse high intensity laser accelerated protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foord, Mark E.

    2011-10-01

    Much progress has recently been reported in generating MeV energy protons from intense laser-matter interactions, having potential applications in areas such as radiography, oncology, and ion-proton beam fast ignition. Experiments were conducted on the sub-ps LANL Trident laser, where we systematically investigated proton focusing and conversion efficiency from curved surface targets in both open and closed cone-shaped target geometries. We clearly show that the focusing is strongly affected by the electric fields in the beam, bending the trajectories near the axis. We also find that in the cone geometry, a sheath electric field effectively ``channels'' the proton beam through the cone tip, substantially improving the beam focusing properties. The far-field energy and angular distribution of the proton beam were measured using a mesh that images the beam onto a RCF detector. For the cone-shaped targets using a 300 μm-radius curved surface foil, a 60 μm diameter proton spot was determined. Proton generation and focusing were modeled using 2-D hybrid PIC simulations, which compared well with RCF data. The proton conversion efficiency varied strongly with the target geometry. Simulations indicate this is due to that charge flow on the structure and the coupling to the hot electrons and electric fields in the plasma. Work performed under US DOE contract DE-AC52-07NA27344

  1. Energy transport in short-pulse-laser-heated targets measured using extreme ultraviolet laser backlighting.

    PubMed

    Wilson, L A; Tallents, G J; Pasley, J; Whittaker, D S; Rose, S J; Guilbaud, O; Cassou, K; Kazamias, S; Daboussi, S; Pittman, M; Delmas, O; Demailly, J; Neveu, O; Ros, D

    2012-08-01

    The accurate characterization of thermal electron transport and the determination of heating by suprathermal electrons in laser driven solid targets are both issues of great importance to the current experiments being performed at the National Ignition Facility, which aims to achieve thermonuclear fusion ignition using lasers. Ionization, induced by electronic heat conduction, can cause the opacity of a material to drop significantly once bound-free photoionization is no longer energetically possible. We show that this drop in opacity enables measurements of the transmission of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) laser pulses at 13.9 nm to act as a signature of the heating of thin (50 nm) iron layers with a 50-nm thick parylene-N (CH) overlay irradiated by 35-fs pulses at irradiance 3×10(16) Wcm(-2). Comparing EUV transmission measurements at different times after irradiation to fluid code simulations shows that the target is instantaneously heated by hot electrons (with approximately 10% of the laser energy), followed by thermal conduction with a flux limiter of ≈0.05. PMID:23005868

  2. Validation of short-pulse-laser-based measurement setup for absolute spectral irradiance responsivity calibration.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Michaela; Nevas, Saulius; Sperling, Armin

    2014-05-01

    This paper describes the validation process of mode-locked lasers in the "tunable lasers in photometry" (TULIP) setup at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) regarding spectral irradiance responsivity calibrations. Validation has been carried out in the visible spectral range, 400-700 nm, with two different photometer heads and in the long wavelength range, 690-780 nm, with a filtered radiometer. A comparison of the results against those from two different validated measurement setups has been carried out for validation. For the visible spectral range, the comparison is conducted against the data obtained from a lamp-based monochromator setup for spectral irradiance responsivity calibrations and against the photometric values (integral quantity) measured at the photometric bench setup of PTB. For the long wavelength range, comparisons against results from two different lamp-based monochromator measurement setups were made. Additionally, the effect of different radiation bandwidths on interference oscillations has been determined for a filter radiometer without a diffuser. A procedure for the determination of the optimum bandwidth of the setup for the respective measurement device is presented. PMID:24921865

  3. Spectral broadening induced by intense ultra-short pulse in 4H–SiC crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun-hua, Xu; Teng-fei, Yan; Gang, Wang; Wen-jun, Wang; Jing-kui, Liang; Xiao-long, Chen

    2016-06-01

    We report the observation of spectral broadening induced by 200 femtosecond laser pulses with the repetition rate of 1 kHz at the wavelength of 532 nm in semi-insulating 4H–SiC single crystals. It is demonstrated that the full width at half maximum of output spectrum increases linearly with the light propagation length and the peak power density, reaching a maximum 870 cm‑1 on a crystal of 19 mm long under an incident laser with a peak power density of 60.1 GW/cm2. Such spectral broadening can be well explained by the self-phase modulation model which correlates time-dependent phase change of pulses to intensity-dependent refractive index. The nonlinear refractive index n 2 is estimated to be 1.88×10‑15 cm2/W. The intensity-dependent refractive index is probably due to both the nonlinear optical polarizability of the bound electrons and the increase of free electrons induced by the two-photon absorption process. Super continuum spectra could arise as crystals are long enough to induce the self-focusing effect. The results show that SiC crystals may find applications in spectral broadening of high power lasers. Project supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2014AA041402) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51272276 and 51322211).

  4. Forward voltage short-pulse technique for measuring high power laser array junction temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows, Byron L. (Inventor); Amzajerdian, Frazin (Inventor); Barnes, Bruce W. (Inventor); Baker, Nathaniel R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of measuring the temperature of the P-N junction within the light-emitting region of a quasi-continuous-wave or pulsed semiconductor laser diode device. A series of relatively short and low current monitor pulses are applied to the laser diode in the period between the main drive current pulses necessary to cause the semiconductor to lase. At the sufficiently low current level of the monitor pulses, the laser diode device does not lase and behaves similar to an electronic diode. The voltage across the laser diode resulting from each of these low current monitor pulses is measured with a high degree of precision. The junction temperature is then determined from the measured junction voltage using their known linear relationship.

  5. Integrated modelling framework for short pulse high energy density physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sircombe, N. J.; Hughes, S. J.; Ramsay, M. G.

    2016-03-01

    Modelling experimental campaigns on the Orion laser at AWE, and developing a viable point-design for fast ignition (FI), calls for a multi-scale approach; a complete description of the problem would require an extensive range of physics which cannot realistically be included in a single code. For modelling the laser-plasma interaction (LPI) we need a fine mesh which can capture the dispersion of electromagnetic waves, and a kinetic model for each plasma species. In the dense material of the bulk target, away from the LPI region, collisional physics dominates. The transport of hot particles generated by the action of the laser is dependent on their slowing and stopping in the dense material and their need to draw a return current. These effects will heat the target, which in turn influences transport. On longer timescales, the hydrodynamic response of the target will begin to play a role as the pressure generated from isochoric heating begins to take effect. Recent effort at AWE [1] has focussed on the development of an integrated code suite based on: the particle in cell code EPOCH, to model LPI; the Monte-Carlo electron transport code THOR, to model the onward transport of hot electrons; and the radiation hydrodynamics code CORVUS, to model the hydrodynamic response of the target. We outline the methodology adopted, elucidate on the advantages of a robustly integrated code suite compared to a single code approach, demonstrate the integrated code suite's application to modelling the heating of buried layers on Orion, and assess the potential of such experiments for the validation of modelling capability in advance of more ambitious HEDP experiments, as a step towards a predictive modelling capability for FI.

  6. Ion Acceleration from Pure Frozen Gas Targets using Short Pulse Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCary, Edward; Stehr, Florian; O'Shea, Finn; Jiao, Xuejing; Agustsson, Ronald; Berry, Robert; Chao, Dennis; Gautier, Donald; Letzring, Samuel; Quevedo, Hernan; Woods, Kaley; Hegelich, Bjorn

    2014-10-01

    A system for shooting interchangeable frozen gas ice targets was developed and tested on the Trident laser system at Los Alamos National Lab. A target holder which could hold up to five substrates used for target growing was cryogenically cooled to temperatures below 14 K. The target substrates consisted of holes with diameters ranging from 15 μm-500 μm and TEM grids with micron scale spacing, across which films of ice were frozen by releasing small amounts of pure gas molecules directly into the vacuum target chamber. The thickness of the ice targets was determined by using alpha spectroscopy. Accelerated ion spectra were characterized using a Thomson Parabola with magnetic field strength of 0.92 T and electric field strength of 30kV and radio-chromic film stacks. Hydrogen targets were additionally characterized using stacks of copper which became activated upon exposure to energetic protons resulting in a beta decay signal. The beta decay was imaged on electron sensitive imaging plates to provide an energy spectrum and spacial profile of the proton beam. Results of the interchangeable, laser-based ion accelerator will be presented. Work Supported by NIH grant.

  7. Analysis of short pulse laser altimetry data obtained over horizontal path

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Im, K. E.; Tsai, B. M.; Gardner, C. S.

    1983-01-01

    Recent pulsed measurements of atmospheric delay obtained by ranging to the more realistic targets including a simulated ocean target and an extended plate target are discussed. These measurements are used to estimate the expected timing accuracy of a correlation receiver system. The experimental work was conducted using a pulsed two color laser altimeter.

  8. Electrical short pulses generation using a resonant tunneling diode nonlinear transmission line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essimbi, B. Z.; Jäger, D.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, the generation of short electrical pulses based on nonlinear active wave propagation effects along the resonant tunneling diode transmission line is studied. The principle of operation is discussed and it is shown by computer experiments that an input rectangular pulse as well as a sinusoidal input signal can be converted into a set of output spikes, suitable for A/D conversion at millimeter wave frequencies.

  9. Raman Based Dispersive Systems for Short Pulse Generation and Optical Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyoncu, Salih Kagan

    Spatiotemporal dispersive systems have been widely utilized for nonlinear optics and optical signal processing applications. This thesis is dedicated to the investigation of dispersive and nonlinear properties of optical fibers, temporal dispersion for real time operation and spatially dispersed pulse shaping systems. In particular, this thesis is focused on Raman based dispersive systems based on such promising techniques as dispersion management, photonic time stretching and space-to-wavelength mapping for synchronous pulse generation and all-optical RF arbitrary waveform generation incorporated with mature MEMS technology. The first part of this thesis discusses a novel technique of using dispersion managed system for synchronous first and second order pulsed Raman lasers that can achieve frequency spacing of up to 1000 cm-1, which are widely utilized for CARS microscopy applications. In particular, I focus on analytical and numerical analysis of pulsed stability derived for Raman lasers by using dispersion-managed telecom fibers and pumping at near 1530 nm telecom wavelengths. I show the evolution of the first and second order Stokes signals at the output for different peak pump power and the net anomalous dispersion combinations. I determine the stability condition for dispersion-managed synchronous Raman lasers up to second order. In the second part of the thesis, the noise performance of the amplified time stretched systems is investigated. Amplified time stretched systems enabling real time applications such as high-speed analog-to-digital converters, RF arbitrary waveform generation and dispersive imaging are performance limited by the noise cumulated in the system. In particular, I analyze the noise performance and hence the effective number of bits (ENOB) performance of time stretch ADCs with distributed and lumped amplifications. I estimate that distributed amplification in time stretch system with >10GHz analog bandwidth exhibit up to 16dB higher SNR corresponding to ˜2.5 bit higher resolution. The last part of the thesis introduces a novel technique of using MEMS based digital micro mirror technology as a digital spatial light modulator for fast programmable all-optical RF arbitrary waveform generation. In particular, the detailed procedure is described and the analytical modeling that discusses the limits of the proposed technique in terms achievable temporal resolution, repetition rate, modulation index and the rise/fall times of the final waveform is calculated as figure of merit. Experimental generation of square and sawtooth waveforms is demonstrated as a proof-of concept. By using the state of the art MEMS technology arbitrary waveforms up to 1GHz rate and reconfigurable in ˜30micros are achievable.

  10. Research on High-Intensity Picosecond Pump Laser in Short Pulse Optical Parametric Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xue; Peng, Yu-Jie; Wang, Jiang-Feng; Lu, Xing-Hua; Ouyang, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Jia-Lin; Jiang, You-En; Fan, Wei; Li, Xue-Chun

    2013-01-01

    A 527 nm pump laser generating 1.7 mJ energy with peak power of more than 0.12 GW is demonstrated. The theoretical simulation result shows that it has 106 gain in the picosecond-pump optical parametric chirped pulse amplification when the pump laser peak power is 0.1 GW and the intensity is more than 5 GW/cm2, and that it can limit the parametric fluorescence in the picosecond time scale of pump duration. The pump laser system adopts a master-oscillator power amplifier, which integrates a more than 30 pJ fiber-based oscillator with a 150 μJ regenerative amplifier and a relay-imaged four-pass diode-pump Nd glass amplifier to generate a 1 Hz top hat spatial beam and about 14 ps temporal Guassian pulse with <2% pulse-to-pulse energy stability. The output energy of the power amplifier is limited to 4 mJ for B-integral concern, and the frequency doubling efficiency can reach 65% with input intensity 10 GW/cm2.

  11. A high-charge and short-pulse RF photocathode gun for wake-field acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, W.; Li, X.; Conde, M.; Power, J.; Schoessow, P.

    1998-02-01

    In this paper we present a design report on 1-1/2 cell, L-Band RF photocathode gun which is capable of generating and accelerating electron beams with peak currents >10 kA. We address several critical issues of high-current RF photoinjectors such as longitudinal space charge effect, and transverse emittance growth. Unlike conventional short electron pulse generation, this design does not require magnetic pulse compression. Based on numerical simulations using SUPERFISH and PARMELA, this design will produce 100 nC beam at 18 MeV with r.m.s. bunch length 1.25 mm and normalized transverse emittance 108 mm mrad. Applications of this source beam for wake-field acceleration are also discussed.

  12. RF photoinjector development for a short-pulse, hard x-ray Thomson scattering source

    SciTech Connect

    Le Sage, G P; Anderson, S G; Cowan, T E; Crane, J K; Ditmire, T; Rosenzweig, J B

    2000-08-15

    An important motivation in the development of the next generation x-ray light sources is to achieve picosecond and sub-ps pulses of hard x-rays for dynamic studies of a variety of physical, chemical and biological processes. Present hard x-ray sources are either pulse-width or intensity limited, which allows ps-scale temporal resolution only for signal averaging of highly repetitive processes. A much faster and brighter hard x-ray source is being developed at LLNL, based on Thomson scattering of fs-laser pulses by a relativistic electron beam, which will enable x-ray characterization of the transient structure of a sample in a single shot. Experimental and diagnostic techniques relevant to the development of next generation sources including the Linac Coherent Light Source can be tested with the Thomson scattering hard x-ray source. This source will combine an RF photoinjector with a 100 MeV S-band linac. The photoinjector and linac also provide an ideal test-bed for examining space-charge induced emittance growth effects. A program of beam dynamics and diagnostic experiments are planned in parallel with Thomson source development. Our experimental progress and future plans will be discussed.

  13. Laser-induced resonance states as dynamic suppressors of ionization in high-frequency short pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Barash, Danny; Orel, Ann E.; Baer, Roi

    2000-01-01

    An adiabatic-Floquet formalism is used to study the suppression of ionization in short laser pulses. In the high-frequency limit the adiabatic equations involve only the pulse envelope where transitions are purely ramp effects. For a short-ranged potential having a single-bound state we show that ionization suppression is caused by the appearance of a laser-induced resonance state, which is coupled by the pulse ramp to the ground state and acts to trap ionizing flux. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  14. Hydrodynamic model for ultra-short pulse ablation of hard dental tissue

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.A.; Bailey, D.S.; Young, D.A.; Alley, W.E.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Neev, J.

    1996-02-29

    A computational model for the ablation of tooth enamel by ultra-short laser pulses is presented. The role of simulations using this model in designing and understanding laser drilling systems is discussed. Pulses of duration 300 fsec and intensity greater than 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} are considered. Laser absorption proceeds via multi-photon initiated plasma mechanism. The hydrodynamic response is calculated with a finite difference method, using an equation of state constructed from thermodynamic functions including electronic, ion motion, and chemical binding terms. Results for the ablation efficiency are presented. An analytic model describing the ablation threshold and ablation depth is presented. Thermal coupling to the remaining tissue and long-time thermal conduction are calculated. Simulation results are compared to experimental measurements of the ablation efficiency. Desired improvements in the model are presented.

  15. Focusing of short-pulse high-intensity laser-accelerated proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartal, Teresa; Foord, Mark E.; Bellei, Claudio; Key, Michael H.; Flippo, Kirk A.; Gaillard, Sandrine A.; Offermann, Dustin T.; Patel, Pravesh K.; Jarrott, Leonard C.; Higginson, Drew P.; Roth, Markus; Otten, Anke; Kraus, Dominik; Stephens, Richard B.; McLean, Harry S.; Giraldez, Emilio M.; Wei, Mingsheng S.; Gautier, Donald C.; Beg, Farhat N.

    2012-02-01

    Recent progress in generating high-energy (>50MeV) protons from intense laser-matter interactions (1018-1021Wcm-2 refs , , , , , , ) has opened up new areas of research, with applications in radiography, oncology, astrophysics, medical imaging, high-energy-density physics, and ion-proton beam fast ignition. With the discovery of proton focusing with curved surfaces, rapid advances in these areas will be driven by improved focusing technologies. Here we report on the first investigation of the generation and focusing of a proton beam using a cone-shaped target. We clearly show that the focusing is strongly affected by the electric fields in the beam in both open and enclosed (cone) geometries, bending the trajectories near the axis. Also in the cone geometry, a sheath electric field effectively `channels' the proton beam through the cone tip, substantially improving the beam focusing properties. These results agree well with particle simulations and provide the physics basis for many future applications.

  16. Control and ultra-short pulse generation in stimulated Raman backscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škorić, Miloš M.; Nikolić, Ljubomir; Hadžievski, Ljupčo; Batani, Dimitri; Ishiguro, Seiji; Mima, Kunioki

    2016-03-01

    A stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) is a great concern for laser fusion, causing an energy and symmetry loss and target preheating. In particular, for dominating backward- SRS (BRS), a complexity of nonlinear saturation was revealed. Recently, to develop lasers at multi-exawatts and beyond, relevant to high-energy physics, a proposed Raman amplification based on BRS met a restrictive operation window. Here, we stress BRS generics that due to a nonlinear frequency shift (relativistic/trapping effect), it nonlinearly saturates with intermittent pulsations. A “break up” of Manley-Rowe invariants explains a non-steady saturation. Further, a coherent pulsation BRS regime is proposed for femto-sec pulse generation in a thin exploding foil plasma, with parameter scalings investigated by analytics and particle simulations.

  17. Diagnostics of high-brightness short-pulse lasers and the plasmas they generate

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrala, G.A.; Fulton, R.D.; Cobble, J.A.; Schappert, G.T.; Taylor, A.J.

    1994-02-01

    The properties of a laser influence the interaction of the intense laser light with materials. The authors will describe some of the diagnostics that they have implemented at the Los Alamos Bright Source to correlate the changes in the x-ray spectrum and temporal history of a laser generated silicon plasmas with the changes of the incident XeCl laser light. One property is of special interest, the existence of a short prepulse. They find that the prepulse enhances the generation of the x-rays from a later pulse.

  18. Nuclear Material Detection by One-Short-Pulse-Laser-Driven Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Favalli, Andrea; Aymond, F.; Bridgewater, Jon S.; Croft, Stephen; Deppert, O.; Devlin, Matthew James; Falk, Katerina; Fernandez, Juan Carlos; Gautier, Donald Cort; Gonzales, Manuel A.; Goodsell, Alison Victoria; Guler, Nevzat; Hamilton, Christopher Eric; Hegelich, Bjorn Manuel; Henzlova, Daniela; Ianakiev, Kiril Dimitrov; Iliev, Metodi; Johnson, Randall Philip; Jung, Daniel; Kleinschmidt, Annika; Koehler, Katrina Elizabeth; Pomerantz, Ishay; Roth, Markus; Santi, Peter Angelo; Shimada, Tsutomu; Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas; Taddeucci, Terry Nicholas; Wurden, Glen Anthony; Palaniyappan, Sasikumar; McCary, E.

    2015-01-28

    Covered in the PowerPoint presentation are the following areas: Motivation and requirements for active interrogation of nuclear material; laser-driven neutron source; neutron diagnostics; active interrogation of nuclear material; and, conclusions, remarks, and future works.

  19. Continuous-time discretized-space approach to modeling short-pulse propagation and scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tijhuis, A. G.

    With the examples given in the paper, the author has described the building blocks for a new way of using integral equations to model the propagation and scattering of transient electromagnetic waves. Of each example, generalizations to more complicated scattering problems have already been realized. Mentioned in particular is the application of the marching-on in frequency method to the two dimensional transient scattering by conducting and dielectric obstacles. Applications to layered media include the excitation of a horizontally stratified dielectric slab by a point source and the excitation of a cylindrically symmetric borehole by a line or ring source. The next challenge is to combine these ideas so that realistic configurations can be handled.

  20. Short pulse duration shock initiation experiments plus ignition and growth modeling on Composition B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Chadd M.; Tarver, Craig M.

    2014-05-01

    Composition B (63% RDX, 36% TNT, 1% wax) is still a widely used energetic material whose shock initiation characteristics are necessary to understand. It is now possible to shock initiate Composition B and other secondary explosives at diameters well below their characteristic failure diameters for unconfined self-sustaining detonation. This is done using very high velocity, very thin, small diameter flyer plates accelerated by electric or laser power sources. Recently experimental detonation versus failure to detonate threshold flyer velocity curves for Composition B using several KaptonTM flyer thicknesses and diameters were measured. Flyer plates with diameters of 2 mm successfully detonated Composition B, which has a nominal failure diameter of 4.3 mm. The shock pressures required for these initiations are greater than the Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) pressure in self-sustaining Composition B detonation waves. The initiation process is two-dimensional, because both rear and side rarefactions can affect the shocked Composition B reaction rates. The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for Composition B is extended to yield accurate simulations of this new threshold velocity data for various flyer thicknesses.

  1. Material processing with ultra-short pulse lasers working in 2μm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voisiat, B.; Gaponov, D.; Gečys, P.; Lavoute, L.; Silva, M.; Hideur, A.; Ducros, N.; Račiukaitis, G.

    2015-03-01

    New wavelengths of laser radiation are of interest for material processing. Results of application of the all-fiber ultrashort pulsed laser emitting in 2 µm range, manufactured by Novae, are presented. Average output power was 4.35 W in a single-spatial-mode beam centered at the 1950 nm wavelength. Pulses duration was 40 ps, and laser operated at 4.2 MHz pulse repetition rate. This performance corresponded to 25 kW of pulse peak power and almost 1 µJ in pulse energy. Material processing was performed using three different focusing lenses (100, 30 and 18 mm) and mechanical stages for the workpiece translation. 2 µm laser radiation is strongly absorbed by some polymers. Swelling of PMMA surface was observed for scanning speed above 5 mm/s using the average power of 3.45 W focused with the 30 mm lens. When scanning speed was reduced below 4 mm/s, ablation of PMMA took place. The swelling of PMMA is a consequence of its melting due to absorbed laser power. Therefore, experiments on butt welding of PMMA and overlapping welding of PMMA with other polymers were performed. Stable joint was achieved for the butt welding of two PMMA blocks with thickness of 5 mm. The laser was used to cut a Kapton film on a paper carrier with the same set-up as previous. The cut width depended on the cutting speed and focusing optics. A perfect cut with a width of 11 µm was achieved at the translation speed of 60 mm/s.

  2. Compact energy selector for use with intense, short-pulse laser produced proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazi, Andrew; Chen, Hui; Perez, Frederic; Marley, Edward; Park, Jaebum; Williams, Jackson; Vassura, Laura; Fuchs, Julien; Chen, Sophia; Shepherd, Ronnie

    2012-10-01

    Irradiation of thin solid targets with short, intense laser pulses produces energetic charged particles. The proton and ion beams generated from such laser-plasma interactions have several attractive features, but usually exhibit a broad energy distribution extending up to tens of MeV. However for some applications, such as energy-loss measurements in plasmas or injection into high-energy accelerators, quasi-mono energetic beams are preferred [1]. We have designed, built and tested a small (9 x 7 x 5 cm^3) energy selector for use with laser-produced proton beams in beam-plasma interaction experiments that utilize multiple laser beams. The device uses permanent magnets in a dipole configuration, with a fixed entrance aperture and an adjustable exit slit to select a narrow portion of the broad energy distribution in the beam. The energy selector was tested in a recent experiment at the Titan laser at Livermore. Sample data from the experiment and simulations of the device's characteristics will be presented. [4pt] [1] T. Toncian, et al., ``Ultrafast Laser--Driven Microlens to Focus and Energy-Select Mega--Electron Volt Protons,'' Science, 312, 410 (2006).

  3. A short-pulse K(a)-band instrumentation radar for foliage attenuation measurements.

    PubMed

    Puranen, Mikko; Eskelinen, Pekka

    2008-10-01

    A portable K(a)-band instrumentation radar for foliage attenuation measurements has been designed. It uses direct dielectric resonator oscillator multiplier pulse modulation giving a half power pulse width of 17 ns. The dual conversion scalar receiver utilizes either a digital storage oscilloscope in envelope detection format or a special gated comparator arrangement providing 1 m resolution and associated led seven segment display for data analysis. The calibrated dynamic range is better than 37 dB with an equivalent noise floor of 0.005 dBsm at 25 m test range distance. First experiments indicate an effective beamwidth close to 1 degree. The total weight is below 5 kg and the unit can be mounted on a conventional photographic tripod. Power is supplied from a 12 V/6 A h sealed lead acid battery giving an operating time in excess of 10 h. PMID:19044750

  4. Engineering studies related to geodetic and oceanographic remote sensing using short pulsed techniques. [using laser probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Theoretical basis is presented for a feasibility study of measuring global ocean surface current pattern from satellites and aircraft. The analysis is supported by some preliminary laboratory experiments. Since the ultimate goal is to establish an operational routine for monitoring the global current pattern, a nondisturbing remote sensing device using a laser probe was developed. Detailed construction of the measuring system and the results of some preliminary observations are also presented.

  5. Longitudinally excited CO2 laser with tail-free short pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Dobashi, Kazuma; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2014-11-01

    We developed a longitudinally excited CO2 laser with a tail-free short laser pulse. In a discharge tube, two structures were researched. One is a shingle scheme that is constituted of a 45 cm-long discharge tube. Another is a tandem that is constituted of two 30 cm-long discharge tubes connected with an intermediate electrode were used. In gas media, CO2- rich mixture (CO2: N2= 20: 1) was used to reduce a laser pulse tail. The laser system did not require expensive and scarce helium. A fast discharge (<1 μs) in a low gas pressure (<1.8 kPa) produced a tail-free laser pulse with the pulse width of about 100 ns. The single scheme produced an output energy of 4.7 mJ by a charging voltage of -36.3 kV, and the tandem scheme produced an output energy of 9.3 mJ by a charging voltage of -25.2 kV. The tandem scheme produced higher spike pulse by lower voltage than the single scheme. Therefore, the tandem scheme will be effective in longitudinally excited CO2 lasers with simple and compact designs.

  6. Development of high damage threshold optics for petawatt-class short-pulse lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Brent C.; Perry, Michael D.; Boyd, Robert D.; Britten, Jerald A.; Shore, Bruce W.; Feit, Michael D.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.

    1995-04-01

    We report laser-induced damage threshold measurements on pure and multilayer dielectrics and gold-coated optics at 1053 and 526 nm for pulse durations, (tau) , ranging from 140 fs to 1 ns. Damage thresholds of gold coatings are limited to 500 mJ/cm2 in the subpicosecond range from 1053-nm pulses. In dielectrics, qualitative differences in the morphology of damage and a departure from the diffusion-dominated (tau) 1/2 scaling indicate that damage results from plasma formation and ablation for (tau) 50 ps. A theoretical model based on electron production via multiphoton ionization, Joule heating, and collisional (avalanche) ionization is in quantitative agreement with both the pulsewidth and wavelength scaling of experimental results.

  7. Mesoscale Laser Processing using Excimer and Short-Pulse Ti: Sapphire Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Shirk, M D; Rubenchik, A M; Gilmer, G H; Stuart, B C; Armstrong, J P; Oberhelman, S K; Baker, S L; Nikitin, A J; Mariella, R P

    2003-07-28

    Targets to study high-energy density physics and inertial confinement fusion processes have very specific and precise tolerances that are pushing the state-of-the-art in mesoscale microsculpting technology. A significant effort is required in order to advance the capabilities to make these targets with very challenging geometries. Ultrashort pulsed (USP) Ti:Sapphire lasers and excimer lasers are proving to be very effective tools in the fabrication of the very small pieces that make up these targets. A brief description of the dimensional and structural requirements of these pieces will be presented, along with theoretical and experimental results that demonstrate to what extent these lasers are achieving the desired results, which include sub-{mu}m precision and RMS surface values well below 100 nm. This work indicates that excimer lasers are best at sculpting the polymer pieces and that the USP lasers work quite well on metal and aerogel surfaces, especially for those geometries that cannot be produced using diamond machining and where material removal amounts are too great to do with focused ion beam milling in a cost effective manner. In addition, the USP laser may be used as part of the procedure to fill target capsules with fusion fuel, a mixture of deuterium and tritium, without causing large perturbations on the surface of the target by keeping holes drilled through 125 {micro}m of beryllium below 5 {micro}m in diameter.

  8. Short-pulse cross-phase modulation in an electromagnetically-induced-transparency medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feizpour, Amir; Dmochowski, Greg; Steinberg, Aephraim M.

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) has been proposed as a way to greatly enhance cross-phase modulation, with the possibility of leading to few-photon-level optical nonlinearities [Schmidt and Imamoglu, Opt. Lett. 21, 1936 (1996), 10.1364/OL.21.001936]. This enhancement grows as the transparency window width, ΔEIT, is narrowed. Decreasing ΔEIT, however, has been shown to increase the response time of the nonlinear medium. This suggests that, for a given pulse duration, the nonlinearity would diminish once the window width became narrower than this pulse bandwidth. We show that this is not the case: the peak phase shift saturates but does not decrease. We show that in the regimes of most practical interest—narrow EIT windows perturbed by short signal pulses—the enhancement offered by EIT is not only in the magnitude of the nonlinear phase shift but also in its increased duration. That is, for the case of signal pulses much shorter (temporally) than the inverse EIT bandwidth, the narrow window serves to prolong the effect of the passing signal pulse, leading to an integrated phase shift that grows linearly with 1 /ΔEIT ; this continued growth of the integrated phase shift improves the detectability of the phase shift, in principle, without bound. For many purposes, it is this detectability which is of more interest than the absolute magnitude of the peak phase shift. We present analytical expressions based on a linear time-invariant model that accounts for the temporal behavior of the cross-phase modulation for several parameter ranges of interest. We conclude that in order to optimize the detectability of the EIT-based cross-phase shift, one should use the narrowest possible EIT window and a signal pulse that is as broadband as the excited-state linewidth and detuned by half a linewidth.

  9. Short pulse multi-frequency phase-based time delay estimation.

    PubMed

    Assous, Said; Hopper, Clare; Lovell, Mike; Gunn, Dave; Jackson, Peter; Rees, John

    2010-01-01

    An approach for time delay estimation, based on phase difference detection, is presented. A multiple-frequency short continuous wave pulse is used to solve the well-known phase ambiguity problem when the maximum distance exceeds a full wavelength. Within an unambiguous range defined with the lowest frequency difference between components, the corresponding phase difference is unique and any distance within this range can be determined. Phase differences between higher frequency components are used to achieve a finer resolution. The concept will be presented and the effectiveness of the approach will be investigated through theoretical and practical examples. The method will be validated using underwater acoustic measurements, simulating noisy environments, demonstrating resolutions better than a 50th of a wavelength, even in the presence of high levels (-5 dB) of additive Gaussian noise. Furthermore, the algorithm is simple to use and can be easily implemented, being based on phase detection using the discrete Fourier transform. PMID:20058978

  10. Laser ion acceleration and neutron source in short-pulse solid- nanoparticle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishihara, K.; Watari, T.; Matsukado, K.; Sekine, T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Takagi, M.; Satoh, N.; Kawashima, T.; Kan, H.

    2016-03-01

    We propose both an efficient neutron source and an extremely high energy proton source using solid CD and CH nano-particles, respectively, irradiated by an intense laser light. With a use of 3-d PIC simulations, we obtain an optimum CD radius for a neutron source, 250 nm and required laser field of a=eE/mωc ≈ 2, which results in D-D reaction rate of <σv> = 2x10-16 cm3/s, corresponding to an effective deuteron temperature of 500 keV to 1MeV. Reduction of neutron yield by pre-expansion is discussed. In a range of a ≈100, laser radiation pressure surrounding the particles accelerates electrons in the forward direction. Protons following the electrons become directional high energy, for example, proton energy of 450 MeV is obtained within 130 fs in CH particle interaction with 700 nm in radius. More than 10% of total protons in CH-particles are accelerated forward. Proton energy continuously increases with time and with the increase of particle size and the direction is also collimated with time.

  11. Ultra-Intense Short-Pulse Pair Creation Using the Texas Petawatt Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Edison; Henderson, Alexander; Clarke, Taylor; Taylor, Devin; Chaguine, Petr; Serratto, Kristina; Riley, Nathan; Dyer, Gilliss; Donovan, Michael; Ditmire, Todd

    2013-10-01

    We report results from the 2012 pair creation experiment using the Texas Petawatt Laser. Up to 1011 positrons per steradian were detected using 100 Joule pulses from the Texas Petawatt Laser to irradiate gold targets, with peak laser intensities up to 1.9 × 1021W/cm2 and pulse durations as short as 130 fs. Positron-to-electron ratios exceeding 20% were measured on some shots. The positron energy, positron yield per unit laser energy, and inferred positron density are significantly higher than those reported in previous experiments. This confirms that, for a given laser energy, higher intensity and shorter pulses irradiating thicker targets are more favorable for pair creation. Narrow-band high-energy positrons up to 23 MeV were observed from thin targets. Supported by DOE Grant DE-SC-0001481 and Rice FIF.

  12. Short pulse cold plasma treatment reduces Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7 on almonds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contamination of dry nuts, including almonds is a food safety concern. A nonthermal method for reducing or eliminating is a desirable tool for producers and processors. Cold plasma is a novel antimicrobial intervention that can eliminate foodborne pathogens on produce. A key consideration for any tr...

  13. Short-pulse actively Q-switched Er:YAG lasers.

    PubMed

    Ottaway, David J; Harris, Lachlan; Veitch, Peter J

    2016-07-11

    We report the shortest duration pulses obtained to date from an actively Q-switched Er:YAG laser pumped by a low spectral and spatial brightness laser diode. The 14.5 ns, 6 mJ pulses were obtained using a 1470 nm laser diode end-pumped co-planar folded zigzag slab architecture. We also present an analytical model that accurately predicts the pulse energy-duration product achievable from virtually all Q-switched Er:YAG lasers and high repetition rate quasi-three-level Q-switched lasers in general. PMID:27410810

  14. A compact, short-pulse laser for near-field, range-gated imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zutavern, F.J.; Helgeson, W.D.; Loubriel, G.M.; Yates, G.J.; Gallegos, R.A.; McDonald, T.E.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes a compact laser, which produces high power, wide-angle emission for a near-field, range-gated, imaging system. The optical pulses are produced by a 100 element laser diode array (LDA) which is pulsed with a GaAs, photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS). The LDA generates 100 ps long, gain-switched, optical pulses at 904 nm when it is driven with 3 ns, 400 A, electrical pulses from a high gain PCSS. Gain switching is facilitated with this many lasers by using a low impedance circuit to drive an array of lasers, which are connected electrically in series. The total optical energy produced per pulse is 10 microjoules corresponding to a total peak power of 100 kW. The entire laser system, including prime power (a nine volt battery), pulse charging, PCSS, and LDA, is the size of a small, hand-held flashlight. System lifetime, which is presently limited by the high gain PCSS, is an active area of research and development. Present limitations and potential improvements will be discussed. The complete range-gated imaging system is based on complementary technologies: high speed optical gating with intensified charge coupled devices (ICCD) developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and high gain, PCSS-driven LDAs developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The system is designed for use in highly scattering media such as turbid water or extremely dense fog or smoke. The short optical pulses from the laser and high speed gating of the ICCD are synchronized to eliminate the back-scattered light from outside the depth of the field of view (FOV) which may be as short as a few centimeters. A high speed photodiode can be used to trigger the intensifier gate and set the range-gated FOV precisely on the target. The ICCD and other aspects of the imaging system are discussed in a separate paper.

  15. A short-pulse X-ray beamline for spectroscopy and scattering.

    PubMed

    Reininger, R; Dufresne, E M; Borland, M; Beno, M A; Young, L; Evans, P G

    2014-09-01

    Experimental facilities for picosecond X-ray spectroscopy and scattering based on RF deflection of stored electron beams face a series of optical design challenges. Beamlines designed around such a source enable time-resolved diffraction, spectroscopy and imaging studies in chemical, condensed matter and nanoscale materials science using few-picosecond-duration pulses possessing the stability, high repetition rate and spectral range of synchrotron light sources. The RF-deflected chirped electron beam produces a vertical fan of undulator radiation with a correlation between angle and time. The duration of the X-ray pulses delivered to experiments is selected by a vertical aperture. In addition to the radiation at the fundamental photon energy in the central cone, the undulator also emits the same photon energy in concentric rings around the central cone, which can potentially compromise the time resolution of experiments. A detailed analysis of this issue is presented for the proposed SPXSS beamline for the Advanced Photon Source. An optical design that minimizes the effects of off-axis radiation in lengthening the duration of pulses and provides variable X-ray pulse duration between 2.4 and 16 ps is presented. PMID:25178012

  16. Robust Short-Pulse, High-Peak-Power Laser Transmitter for Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Malcolm W.

    2009-01-01

    We report on a pulsed fiber based master oscillator power amplifier laser at 1550 nm to support moderate data rates with high peak powers in a compact package suitable for interplanetary optical communications. To accommodate pulse position modulation, the polarization maintaining laser transmitter generates pulses from 0.1 to 1 ns with variable duty cycle over a pulse repetition frequency range of 10 to 100 MHz.

  17. Computational modeling of stress transient and bubble evolution in short-pulse laser irradiated melanosome particles

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, M.; Amendt, P.A.; London, R.A.; Maitland, D.J.; Glinsky, M.E.; Lin, C.P.; Kelly, M.W.

    1997-03-04

    Objective is to study retinal injury by subnanosecond laser pulses absorbed in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. The absorption centers in the RPE cell are melanosomes of order 1 {mu}m radius. Each melanosome includes many melanin particles of 10-15 nm radius, which are the local absorbers of the laser light and generate a discrete structure of hot spots. This work use the hydrodynamic code LATIS (LAser-TISsue interaction modeling) and a water equation of state to first simulate the small melanin particle of 15 nm responsible for initiating the hot spot and the pressure field. A average melanosome of 1 {mu}m scale is next simulated. Supersonic shocks and fast vapor bubbles are generated in both cases: the melanin scale and the melanosome scale. The hot spot induces a shock wave pressure than with a uniform deposition of laser energy. It is found that an absorption coefficient of 6000 -8000 cm{sup -1} can explain the enhanced shock wave emitted by the melanosome. An experimental and theoretical effort should be considered to identify the mechanism for generating shock wave enhancement.

  18. Broadband short pulse measurement by autocorrelation with a sum-frequency generation set-up

    SciTech Connect

    Glotin, F.; Jaroszynski, D.; Marcouille, O.

    1995-12-31

    Previous spectral and laser pulse length measurements carried out on the CLIO FEL at wavelength {lambda}=8.5 {mu}m suggested that very short light pulses could be generated, about 500 fs wide (FWHM). For these measurements a Michelson interferometer with a Te crystal, as a non-linear detector, was used as a second order autocorrelation device. More recent measurements in similar conditions have confirmed that the laser pulses observed are indeed single: they are not followed by other pulses distant by the slippage length N{lambda}. As the single micropulse length is likely to depend on the slippage, more measurements at different wavelengths would be useful. This is not directly possible with our actual interferometer set-up, based on a phase-matched non-linear crystal. However, we can use the broadband non-linear medium provided by one of our users` experiments: Sum-Frequency Generation over surfaces. With such autocorrelation set-up, interference fringes are no more visible, but this is largely compensated by the frequency range provided. First tests at 8 {mu}m have already been performed to validate the technic, leading to results similar to those obtained with our previous Michelson set-up.

  19. Generation of strong pulsed magnetic fields using a compact, short pulse generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanuka, D.; Efimov, S.; Nitishinskiy, M.; Rososhek, A.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2016-04-01

    The generation of strong magnetic fields (˜50 T) using single- or multi-turn coils immersed in water was studied. A pulse generator with stored energy of ˜3.6 kJ, discharge current amplitude of ˜220 kA, and rise time of ˜1.5 μs was used in these experiments. Using the advantage of water that it has a large Verdet constant, the magnetic field was measured using the non-disturbing method of Faraday rotation of a polarized collimated laser beam. This approach does not require the use of magnetic probes, which are sensitive to electromagnetic noise and damaged in each shot. It also avoids the possible formation of plasma by either a flashover along the conductor or gas breakdown inside the coil caused by an induced electric field. In addition, it was shown that this approach can be used successfully to investigate the interesting phenomenon of magnetic field enhanced diffusion into a conductor.

  20. Gas breakdown driven by L band short-pulse high-power microwave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi-Ming; Yuan, Cheng-Wei; Qian, Bao-Liang

    2012-12-01

    High power microwave (HPM) driven gas breakdown is a major factor in limiting the radiation and transmission of HPM. A method that HPM driven gas breakdown could be obtained by changing the aperture of horn antenna is studied in this paper. Changing the effective aperture of horn antenna can adjust the electric field in near field zone, leading to gas breakdown. With this method, measurements of air and SF6 breakdowns are carried out on a magnetically insulated transmission-line oscillators, which is capable of generating HPM with pulse duration of 30 ns, and frequency of 1.74 GHz. The typical breakdown waveforms of air and SF6 are presented. Besides, the breakdown field strengths of the two gases are derived at different pressures. It is found that the effects of air and SF6 breakdown on the transmission of HPM are different: air breakdown mainly shortens the pulse width of HPM while SF6 breakdown mainly reduces the peak output power of HPM. The electric field threshold of SF6 is about 2.4 times larger than that of air. These differences suggest that gas properties have a great effect on the transmission characteristic of HPM in gases.

  1. Theory of multiphoton ionization of atoms by strong, short pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kulander, K.C.

    1987-07-10

    A numerical technique for investigating the behavior of many electron atoms in intense laser fields is presented. A description of the method is followed by results of an illustrative, application to helium for a number of wavelengths and intensities. A discussion of high order ionization dynamics for this system based on these calculations is provided. 10 refs.

  2. All-optical short pulse translation through cross-phase modulation in a VO₂ thin film.

    PubMed

    Fardad, Shima; Das, Susobhan; Salandrino, Alessandro; Breckenfeld, Eric; Kim, Heungsoo; Wu, Judy; Hui, Rongqing

    2016-01-15

    VO2 is a promising material for reconfigurable photonic devices due to the ultrafast changes in electronic and optical properties associated with its dielectric-to-metal phase transition. Based on a fiber-optic, pump-probe setup at 1550 nm wavelength window, and by varying the pump-pulse duration, we show that the material phase transition is primarily caused by the pump-pulse energy. For the first time, we demonstrate that the instantaneous optical phase modulation of probe during pump leading edge can be utilized to create short optical pulses at probe wavelength, through optical frequency discrimination. This circumvents the impact of long recovery time well known for the phase transition of VO2. PMID:26766683

  3. Investigation of short pulse effects in IR FELs and new simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgekar, Vivek; Berden, Giel; Brunken, Marco; Casper, Lars; Genz, Harald; Grigore, Maria; Heßler, Christoph; Khodyachykh, Sergiy; Richter, Achim; van der Meer, Alex F. G.

    2003-07-01

    The Darmstadt IR FEL is designed to generate wavelengths between 3 and 10 μm and driven by the superconducting electron linear accelerator. The pulsed electron beam has a peak current of 2.7 A leading to a small signal gain of 5%. Currently, investigations of the energy transfer process inside the undulator are performed using the 1D time-dependent simulation code FAST1D-OSC. We present simulation results for the power vs. different desynchronization and tapering parameters as well as a comparison with experimental data from the S-DALINAC IR-FEL. Furthermore, a compact autocorrelation system assuring a background-free measurement of the optical pulse length is described. In a first test experiment at FELIX, the autocorrelator has been tested at wavelengths 5.7⩽λ⩽9.0 μm. The frequency doubling in a 2 mm-long ZnGeP 2-crystal resulted in a time resolution of 300 fs and a conversion efficiency of 5%.

  4. Propagation of intense short-pulse laser in homogeneous near-critical density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habara, H.; Nakaguchi, S.; Uematsu, Y.; Baton, S. D.; Chen, S. N.; Fuchs, J.; Iwawaki, T.; MacDonald, M.; Nazarov, W.; Rousseaux, C.; Tanaka, K. A.

    2016-05-01

    Ultra intense laser light propagation in a homogeneous overdense plasma was investigated using a plastic foam target filling a polyimide tube. Laser propagation into overdense plasma was measured via Doppler red shift of the reflected laser light from the moving plasma at 0.3-0.4 of speed of light. We also observed strongly collimated electron beam possibly caused by the magnetic field surrounding the plasma channel, and high energy X-rays emitted via synchrotron radiation by the oscillating electrons inside the channel. These features imply that UIL propagates inside the overdense plasma as predicted in PIC calculation, and are very important for direct irradiation scheme of fast ignition.

  5. Heating of thin foils with a relativistic-intensity short-pulse laser.

    PubMed

    Audebert, P; Shepherd, R; Fournier, K B; Peyrusse, O; Price, D; Lee, R; Springer, P; Gauthier, J-C; Klein, L

    2002-12-23

    K-shell x-ray spectroscopy of sub-100 nm Al foils irradiated by high contrast, spatially uniform, 150 fs, Ilambda (2)=2 x 10(18) W microm(2)/cm(2), laser pulses is obtained with 500 fs time resolution. Two distinct phases occur: At /=500 fs the resonance transitions dominate. Initial satellites arise from a large area, high density, low temperature (approximately 100 eV) plasma created by fast electrons. Thus, contrary to predictions, a short, high intensity laser incident on a thin foil does not create a uniform, hot dense plasma. PMID:12484827

  6. Ultrafast electron kinetics in short pulse laser-driven dense hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Zastrau, U.; Sperling, P.; Fortmann-Grote, C.; Bornath, T.; Bredow, R.; Doppner, T.; Fennel, T.; Fletcher, L. B.; Forster, E.; Gode, S.; Gregori, G.; Harmand, M.; Hilbert, V.; Laarmann, T.; Lee, H. J.; Ma, T.; Meiwes-Broer, K. H.; Mithen, J. P.; Murphy, C. D.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Neumayer, P.; Przystawik, A.; Skruszewicz, S.; Tiggesbaumker, J.; Toleikis, S.; White, T. G.; Glenzer, S. H.; Redmer, R.; Tschentscher, T.

    2015-09-25

    Dense cryogenic hydrogen is heated by intense femtosecond infrared laser pulses at intensities of ${10}^{15}-{10}^{16}\\;$ W cm–2. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict that this heating is limited to the skin depth, causing an inhomogeneously heated outer shell with a cold core and two prominent temperatures of about $25$ and $40\\;\\mathrm{eV}$ for simulated delay times up to $+70\\;\\mathrm{fs}$ after the laser pulse maximum. Experimentally, the time-integrated emitted bremsstrahlung in the spectral range of 8–18 nm was corrected for the wavelength-dependent instrument efficiency. The resulting spectrum cannot be fit with a single temperature bremsstrahlung model, and the best fit is obtained using two temperatures of about 13 and $30\\;$eV. The lower temperatures in the experiment can be explained by missing energy-loss channels in the simulations, as well as the inclusion of hot, non-Maxwellian electrons in the temperature calculation. In conclusion, we resolved the time-scale for laser-heating of hydrogen, and PIC results for laser–matter interaction were successfully tested against the experiment data.

  7. Ultrafast electron kinetics in short pulse laser-driven dense hydrogen

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zastrau, U.; Sperling, P.; Fortmann-Grote, C.; Becker, A.; Bornath, T.; Bredow, R.; Doppner, T.; Fennel, T.; Fletcher, L. B.; Forster, E.; et al

    2015-09-25

    Dense cryogenic hydrogen is heated by intense femtosecond infrared laser pulses at intensities ofmore » $${10}^{15}-{10}^{16}\\;$$ W cm–2. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict that this heating is limited to the skin depth, causing an inhomogeneously heated outer shell with a cold core and two prominent temperatures of about $25$ and $$40\\;\\mathrm{eV}$$ for simulated delay times up to $$+70\\;\\mathrm{fs}$$ after the laser pulse maximum. Experimentally, the time-integrated emitted bremsstrahlung in the spectral range of 8–18 nm was corrected for the wavelength-dependent instrument efficiency. The resulting spectrum cannot be fit with a single temperature bremsstrahlung model, and the best fit is obtained using two temperatures of about 13 and $$30\\;$$eV. The lower temperatures in the experiment can be explained by missing energy-loss channels in the simulations, as well as the inclusion of hot, non-Maxwellian electrons in the temperature calculation. In conclusion, we resolved the time-scale for laser-heating of hydrogen, and PIC results for laser–matter interaction were successfully tested against the experiment data.« less

  8. Control of mixed-state quantum systems by a train of short pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugny, D.; Keller, A.; Atabek, O.; Daems, D.; Dion, C. M.; Guérin, S.; Jauslin, H. R.

    2005-09-01

    A density matrix approach is developed for the control of a mixed-state quantum system using a time-dependent external field such as a train of pulses. This leads to the definition of a target density matrix constructed in a reduced Hilbert space as a specific combination of the eigenvectors of a given observable through weighting factors related to the initial statistics of the system. A train of pulses is considered as a possible strategy to reach this target. An illustration is given by considering the laser control of molecular alignment and orientation in thermal equilibrium.

  9. Particle characteristics of different materials after ultra-short pulsed laser (USPL) irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Joerg; Schelle, Florian; Kowalczyk, Philip; Frentzen, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    The exposition of nanoparticles caused by laser application in dental health care is an open discussion. Based on the fact that nanoparticles can penetrate through the mucosa, the knowledge about particle characteristics after irradiation with an USPL is of high importance. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the particle characteristics, especially the size of the ablated debris after USPL irradiation. The irradiation was carried out with an USP Nd:YVO4 laser with a center wavelength of 1064 nm. Based on the pulse duration of 8 ps and a pulse repetition rate of 500 kHz the laser emits an average power of 9 W. The materials investigated were dental tissues and dental restorative materials (composite and amalgam), ceramic and different metals (gold and aluminium). The samples were irradiated with a power density in the order of 300 GW/cm2 at distances of 5, 10, 15, and 20 mm. The debris was collected on an object plate. SEM pictures were used for analysis of the ablation debris. Depending on the irradiated material, we observed different kinds of structures: vitreous, flocculent, and pellet-like. The mean particle sizes were 10 x 10 up to 30 x 30 μm2. In addition, a cluster of ablated matter (nanometer range) distributed over the whole irradiated area was found. With increasing distances the cluster structure reduced from multi-layer to mono-layer clusters. Particle sizes in the micrometer and nanometer range were found after irradiation with an USPL. The nanoparticles create a cluster structure which is influenced by increasing distances.

  10. Electrophysical and optophysical properties of air ionized by a short pulse of fast electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagin, Iu. P.; Stal', N. L.; Khokhlov, V. D.; Chernoiarskii, A. A.

    A method for solving the nonstationary kinetic equation of electron deceleration is developed which is based on the multigroup approximation. The electron distribution function in air ionized by nonstationary sources of primary electrons is determined, and the avalanche formation of secondary electrons is considered. Theoretical and experimental results are presented on the time dependence of the air luminescence intensity in two spectral intervals, one including the 391.4 nm N2(+) band and the other including the 337.1 nm N2 band, for different values of gas pressure under the effect of a short beam of electrons with energies of 100 keV.

  11. Compression and acceleration of high-energy electron beam by intense short pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Shigeo; Miyazaki, Shuji; Kikuchi, Takashi

    2005-10-01

    A generation of a high-density electron bunch is investigated. In order to compress a pre-accelerated electron bunch, we employ a laser of a TEM10 mode + TEM01 mode. This laser has a circle-shaped intensity distribution in transverse, and the pre-accelerated electrons are confined by the transverse ponderomotive force in transverse. A laser longitudinal electric field accelerates the pre-accelerated electrons further in longitudinal^[1]. At the parameter values of a0=10, λ=0.8 μm, w0=20λ, Lz=10λ, and γi=7, the maximum electron energy is about 400 MeV. Here a0 is the dimensionless value of the laser amplitude, λ is the laser wavelength, w0 is the laser spot size, Lz is the pulse length and γi is the relativistic factor of the pre-accelerated electrons. The electrons accelerated are compressed into a length of about 10λ from the original size of 150λ. Our analytical study also shows that if the laser intensity and pre-accelerated electrons are in relativistic, the electron energy is proportional to a0. This scaling law agrees well with the simulation results. [1] S. Miyazaki, S. Kawata, Q. Kong, et al., J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 38, pp. 1665-1673 (2005).

  12. Optical damage performance measurements of multilayer dielectric gratings for high energy short pulse lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessi, D.; Carr, C. W.; Negres, R. A.; Hackel, R. P.; Stanion, K. A.; Cross, D. A.; Guss, G.; Nissen, J. D.; Luthi, R.; Fair, J. E.; Britten, J. A.; Haefner, C.

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the laser damage resistance of multilayer dielectric (MLD) diffraction gratings used in the pulse compressors for high energy, high peak power laser systems such as the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) Petawatt laser on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Our study includes measurements of damage threshold and damage density (ρ(Φ)) with picosecond laser pulses at 1053 nm under relevant operational conditions. Initial results indicate that sparse defects present on the optic surface from the manufacturing processes are responsible for damage initiation at laser fluences below the damage threshold indicated by the standard R-on-1 test methods, as is the case for laser damage with nanosecond pulse durations. As such, this study supports the development of damage density measurements for more accurate predictions on the damage performance of large area optics.

  13. Novel plasma-based frequency upshift methods for short pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wilks, S.C. ); Dawson, J.M.; Mori, W.B. . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-06-04

    We discuss various novel methods of frequency upshifting short ({le} 1 picosecond) pulses of laser light. All of these methods make use of either the sudden creation of a plasma or relativistic plasma waves. The first method discussed is known as photon acceleration. This method makes use of the fact that a laser pulse moving in a plasma can be thought of as a packet of photons, each possessing an effective mass of m{sub {gamma}} = {h bar}{omega}{sub pe}/c{sup 2} and moving with the group velocity of the laser pulse. These photons experience a force acting on them when in the presence of a gradient in the plasma density. By using a relativistic plasma wave (i.e., a moving density gradient) traveling with the photons, the energy of the photons (thus the frequency) can be continuously increased. We then discuss the sudden creation of a plasma in a region where there exists an electromagnetic wave. This results in a frequency shift of the wave. A similar method is the creation of an ionization front moving near the speed of light, whereby the interaction of this plasma front with an EM wave also results in a frequency upshift of the original wave. 21 refs.

  14. Gas breakdown driven by L band short-pulse high-power microwave

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yiming; Yuan Chengwei; Qian Baoliang

    2012-12-15

    High power microwave (HPM) driven gas breakdown is a major factor in limiting the radiation and transmission of HPM. A method that HPM driven gas breakdown could be obtained by changing the aperture of horn antenna is studied in this paper. Changing the effective aperture of horn antenna can adjust the electric field in near field zone, leading to gas breakdown. With this method, measurements of air and SF{sub 6} breakdowns are carried out on a magnetically insulated transmission-line oscillators, which is capable of generating HPM with pulse duration of 30 ns, and frequency of 1.74 GHz. The typical breakdown waveforms of air and SF{sub 6} are presented. Besides, the breakdown field strengths of the two gases are derived at different pressures. It is found that the effects of air and SF{sub 6} breakdown on the transmission of HPM are different: air breakdown mainly shortens the pulse width of HPM while SF{sub 6} breakdown mainly reduces the peak output power of HPM. The electric field threshold of SF{sub 6} is about 2.4 times larger than that of air. These differences suggest that gas properties have a great effect on the transmission characteristic of HPM in gases.

  15. Satellite and Opacity Effects on Resonance Line Shapes Produced from Short-Pulse Laser Heated Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, R; Audebert, P; Chen, H-K; Fournier, K B; Peyreusse, O; Moon, S; Lee, R W; Price, D; Klein, L; Gauthier, J C; Springer, P

    2002-12-03

    We measure the He-like, time-resolved emission from thin foils consisting of 250 {angstrom} of carbon-250 {angstrom} of aluminum and 500 {angstrom} aluminum illuminated with a 150 fs laser pulse at an intensity of 1 x 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Dielectronic satellite contributions to the 1s{sup 2}-1s2p({sup 1}P), 1s{sup 2}-1s3p({sup 1}P), and 1s{sup 2}1s4p({sup 1}P) line intensities are modeled using the configuration averaged code AVERROES and is found to be significant for all three resonance lines. The contribution of opacity broadening is inferred from the data and found to be significant only in the 1s{sup 2}-1s2p({sup 1}P).

  16. Development of short pulse laser driven micro-hohlraums as a source of EUV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krushelnick, Karl; Batson, Thomas; McKelvey, Andrew; Raymond, Anthony; Thomas, Alec; Yanovsky, Victor; Nees, John; Maksimchuk, Anatoly

    2015-11-01

    Experiments at large scale laser facilities such as NIF allow the radiativ properties of dens, high-temperature matter to be studied at previously unreachable regime, but are limited by cost and system availability. A scaled system using a short laser pulses and delivering energy to much smaller hohlraum could be capable of reaching comparable energy densities by depositing the energy in a much smaller volume before ablation of the wall material closes the cavit. The laser is tightl focused through the cavity and then expands to illuminate the wall. Experiments were performe using the Hercules Ti:Sapphire laser system at Michiga. Targets include cavities machined in bulk material using low laser power, and then shot in situ with a single full power pulse as well as micron scale pre-fabricate target. Spectral characteristics were measured using a soft X-ray spectromete, K-alpha x-ray imaging system and a filtered photo cathode array. Scalings of the radiation temperature were made for variations in the hohlraum cavit, the pulse duration as well as the focusing conditions. Proof of principle time resolved absorption spectroscopy experiments were also performe. These sources may allow opacity and atomic physics measurements with plasma an radiation temperatures comparable to much larger hohlraums, but with much higher repetition rate and in a university scale laboratory. We acknowledge funding from DTRA grant HDTRA1-11-1-0066.

  17. ePLAS code improvements for short pulse laser-matter interaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, R. J.; Ambrosiano, J.; Atchison, W.; Faehl, R.; Henderson, D.; Kirkpatrick, R.; Barnes, D.

    2009-11-01

    We detail new features for ePLAS, a 2D implicit/hybrid simulation model in use for Fast Ignition. The hybrid/PIC code tracks laser light with ponderomotive force, depositing at critical into relativistic hot particle electrons, while pulling cold collisional, return-current Van Leer fluid electrons through fluid ions by means of self-consistent Implicit Momentfootnotetext{R. J. Mason, J. Comp. Phys. {71,} 429 (1987).} E- and B-fields. The new features include: a 1D formulation for light absorption studies with generalized {E- and B-} fields, multiple laser beams, real EOS data from analytic models or the Sesame tables, K/α imaging, generalized cold electron elevation to hots, particle ions for fast ion fusion, improved graphical options, and new Linux and Mac OS X implementations. The focus of the talk is code enhancements.

  18. Manipulating mammalian cell by phase transformed titanium surface fabricated through ultra-short pulsed laser synthesis.

    PubMed

    Chinnakkannu Vijayakumar, Sivaprasad; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2016-01-15

    Developing cell sensitive indicators on interacting substrates that allows specific cell manipulation by a combination of physical, chemical or mechanical cues is a challenge for current biomaterials. Hence, various fabrication approaches have been created on a variety of substrates to mimic or create cell specific cues. However, to achieve cell specific cues a multistep process or a post-chemical treatment is often necessitated. So, a simple approach without any chemical or biological treatment would go a long way in developing bio-functionalized substrates to effectively modulate cell adhesion and interaction. The present investigation is aimed to study the manipulative activity induced by phase transformed titanium surface. An ultra-short laser is used to fabricate the phase transformed titanium surface where a polymorphic titanium oxide phases with titanium monoxide (TiO), tri-titanium oxide (Ti3O) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) have been synthesized on commercially pure titanium. Control over oxide phase transformed area was demonstrated via a combination of laser scanning time (laser pulse interaction time) and laser pulse widths (laser pulse to pulse separation time). The interaction of phase transformed titanium surface with NIH3T3 fibroblasts and MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells developed a new bio-functionalized platforms on titanium based biomaterials to modulate cell migration and adhesion. The synthesized phase transformed titanium surface on the whole appeared to induce directional cues for cell migration with unique preferential cell adhesion unseen by other fabrication approaches. The precise bio-functionalization controllability exhibited during fabrication offers perceptible edge for developing a variety of smart bio-medical devices, implants and cardiovascular stents where the need in supressing specific cell adhesion and proliferation is of great demand. PMID:26546983

  19. Longitudinal injection scheme using short pulse kicker for small aperture electron storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiba, M.; Böge, M.; Marcellini, F.; Saá Hernández, Á.; Streun, A.

    2015-02-01

    Future light sources aim at achieving a diffraction limited photon beam both in the horizontal and vertical planes. High gradient quadrupoles and strong chromaticity correction sextupoles in a corresponding ultra-low emittance ring may restrict the physical and dynamic aperture of the storage ring such that off-axis injection and accumulation may become impossible. We propose a longitudinal injection scheme, i.e., injecting an electron bunch onto the closed orbit with a time offset with respect to the circulating bunches. The temporal separation enables a pulsed dipole kicker to situate the injected bunch transversely on-axis without disturbing the circulating bunches if the pulse length is shorter than the bunch spacing. The injected bunch is finally merged to a circulating bunch through synchrotron radiation damping. We present the scheme in detail and its application to the lattice of the MAX IV 3 GeV storage ring. The requirements and feasibility of the pulsed dipole kicker are also discussed.

  20. Cavity Optical Pulse Extraction: ultra-short pulse generation as seeded Hawking radiation

    PubMed Central

    Eilenberger, Falk; Kabakova, Irina V.; de Sterke, C. Martijn; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Pertsch, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We show that light trapped in an optical cavity can be extracted from that cavity in an ultrashort burst by means of a trigger pulse. We find a simple analytic description of this process and show that while the extracted pulse inherits its pulse length from that of the trigger pulse, its wavelength can be completely different. Cavity Optical Pulse Extraction is thus well suited for the development of ultrashort laser sources in new wavelength ranges. We discuss similarities between this process and the generation of Hawking radiation at the optical analogue of an event horizon with extremely high Hawking temperature. Our analytic predictions are confirmed by thorough numerical simulations. PMID:24060831

  1. Energy coupling in short pulse laser solid interactions and its impact for space debris removal.

    PubMed

    Neely, David; Allott, Ric; Bingham, Bob; Collier, John; Greenhalgh, Justin; Michaelis, Max; Phillips, Jonathan; Phipps, Claude R; McKenna, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Significant advances have been made over the last decade to improve the performance, efficiency, and contrast of high peak and average power laser systems, driven by their use in a wide variety of fields, from the industrial to the scientific. As the contrast of the lasers has improved, interactions with contrasts of 1012 are now routinely undertaken. At such high contrasts, there is negligible preplasma formation and the ionized surface layer created by subpicosecond-duration pulses typically forms a highly reflective "plasma mirror" capable of reflecting between 70% and 90% of the incident energy. Although such interactions are of significant interest for applications such as harmonic source production and to enable the underlying physics to be studied, their low absorption can limit their usefulness for applications such as space debris removal. PMID:25402936

  2. Analysis of neon soft x-ray spectra from short-pulse laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Abare, A.C.; Keane, C.J.; Crane, J.K.; DaSilva, L.B.; Lee, R.W.; Perry, M.D.; Falcone, R.W.

    1993-04-01

    We report preliminary results from the analysis of streaked soft x-ray neon spectra obtained from the interaction of a picosecond Nd:glass laser with a gas jet target. In these experiments streaked spectra show prompt harmonic emission followed by longer time duration soft x-ray line emission. The majority of the line emission observed was found to originate from Li- and Be-like Ne and the major transitions in the observed spectra have been identified. Li-like emission lines were observed to decay faster in time than Be-like transitions, suggesting that recombination is taking place. Line ratios of n=4-2 and n=3-2 transitions supported the view that these lines were optically thin and thick, respectively. The time history of Li-like Ne 2p-4d and 2p-3d lines is in good agreement with a simple adiabatic expansion model coupled to a time dependent collisional-radiative code. Further x-ray spectroscopic analysis is underway which is aimed at diagnosing plasma conditions and assessing the potential of this recombining neon plasma as a quasi-steady-state recombination x-ray laser medium.

  3. Development of high damage threshold optics for petawatt-class short-pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B.C.; Perry, M.D.; Boyd, R.D.

    1995-02-22

    The authors report laser-induced damage threshold measurements on pure and multilayer dielectrics and gold-coated optics at 1053 and 526 nm for pulse durations, {tau}, ranging from 140 fs to 1 ns. Damage thresholds of gold coatings are limited to 500 mJ/cm{sup 2} in the subpicosecond range for 1053-nm pulses. In dielectrics, qualitative differences in the morphology of damage and a departure from the diffusion-dominated {tau}1/2 scaling indicate that damage results from plasma formation and ablation for {tau}{le}10 ps and from conventional melting and boiling for {tau}>50 ps. A theoretical model based on electron production via multiphoton ionization, Joule heating, and collisional (avalanche) ionization is in quantitative agreement with both the pulsewidth and wavelength scaling of experimental results.

  4. Heat accumulation effects in short-pulse multi-pass cutting of carbon fiber reinforced plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, T. V.; Freitag, C.; Komlenok, M. S.; Onuseit, V.; Weber, R.; Graf, T.; Konov, V. I.

    2015-09-01

    The formation of a matrix evaporation zone (MEZ) in carbon fiber reinforced plastics during multi-pass laser cutting with picosecond laser pulses is studied for a wide range of pulse frequencies (fp = 10-800 kHz) and feed rates (vf = 0.002-10 m/s). Three regimes of the formation of the MEZ are found and related with different heat accumulation effects: (i) small MEZ (<2 μm) with negligible heat accumulation, (ii) moderate-size MEZ (up to a few hundred microns) determined by heat accumulation between pulses, and (iii) large MEZ (up to a few millimeters) caused by heat accumulation between scans. The dependence of the size of the MEZ on the number of scans and the scan frequency was studied to distinguish the two heat accumulation effects (between pulses and between scans), which occur on different time-scales. A diagram to illustrate the boundaries between the three regimes of the formation of the MEZ as a function of feed rate and pulse frequency is proposed as a promising base for further studies and as a useful tool to optimize the processing parameters in practice.

  5. Short-pulse fiber lasers mode-locked by carbon nanotube and graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Shinji; Set, Sze Y.; Xu, Bo

    2014-09-01

    We review the optical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene and describe how those properties have been used for the implementation of various nonlinear fiber optic applications. Early studies on the optical properties of CNTs in the late 90s revealed that these materials exhibit high third order susceptibility and a broadband saturable absorption with a sub-picosecond response time. Recent discovery of similar nonlinear optical properties in graphene attracts much attention in this field. Such ultrafast, highly nonlinear optical response means that they can be employed for noise suppression and for the mode-locking of fiber lasers, and in addition, their high third order nonlinearity holds great promise for the implementation of various other nonlinear fiber optic devices such as wavelength converters based on four wave mixing. In this paper, we will discuss the various methods that have been considered thus far for the integration of CNTs and graphene in optical systems and highlight the advantages and limitations of using the saturable absorption of CNTs and graphene for the passive mode-locking of fiber lasers, and the current status of CNT and graphene saturable absorbers in the state of art fiber laser technologies.

  6. An ultra short pulse reconstruction software applied to the GEMINI high power laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galletti, Mario; Galimberti, Marco; Hooker, Chris; Chekhlov, Oleg; Tang, Yunxin; Bisesto, Fabrizio Giuseppe; Curcio, Alessandro; Anania, Maria Pia; Giulietti, Danilo

    2016-09-01

    The GRENOUILLE traces of Gemini pulses (15 J, 30 fs, PW, shot per 20 s) were acquired in the Gemini Target Area PetaWatt at the Central Laser Facility (CLF), Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). A comparison between the characterizations of the laser pulse parameters made using two different types of algorithms: Video Frog and GRenouille/FrOG (GROG), was made. The temporal and spectral parameters came out to be in great agreement for the two kinds of algorithms. In this experimental campaign it has been showed how GROG, the developed algorithm, works as well as VideoFrog algorithm with the PetaWatt pulse class.

  7. Physics of giant electromagnetic pulse generation in short-pulse laser experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poyé, A.; Hulin, S.; Bailly-Grandvaux, M.; Dubois, J.-L.; Ribolzi, J.; Raffestin, D.; Bardon, M.; Lubrano-Lavaderci, F.; D'Humières, E.; Santos, J. J.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we describe the physical processes that lead to the generation of giant electromagnetic pulses (GEMPs) at powerful laser facilities. Our study is based on experimental measurements of both the charging of a solid target irradiated by an ultra-short, ultra-intense laser and the detection of the electromagnetic emission in the GHz domain. An unambiguous correlation between the neutralization current in the target holder and the electromagnetic emission shows that the source of the GEMP is the remaining positive charge inside the target after the escape of fast electrons accelerated by the ultra-intense laser. A simple model for calculating this charge in the thick target case is presented. From this model and knowing the geometry of the target holder, it becomes possible to estimate the intensity and the dominant frequencies of the GEMP at any facility.

  8. Physics of giant electromagnetic pulse generation in short-pulse laser experiments.

    PubMed

    Poyé, A; Hulin, S; Bailly-Grandvaux, M; Dubois, J-L; Ribolzi, J; Raffestin, D; Bardon, M; Lubrano-Lavaderci, F; D'Humières, E; Santos, J J; Nicolaï, Ph; Tikhonchuk, V

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we describe the physical processes that lead to the generation of giant electromagnetic pulses (GEMPs) at powerful laser facilities. Our study is based on experimental measurements of both the charging of a solid target irradiated by an ultra-short, ultra-intense laser and the detection of the electromagnetic emission in the GHz domain. An unambiguous correlation between the neutralization current in the target holder and the electromagnetic emission shows that the source of the GEMP is the remaining positive charge inside the target after the escape of fast electrons accelerated by the ultra-intense laser. A simple model for calculating this charge in the thick target case is presented. From this model and knowing the geometry of the target holder, it becomes possible to estimate the intensity and the dominant frequencies of the GEMP at any facility. PMID:25974601

  9. Investigation on offset frequency locking system for a short-pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Rui; Li, Qi; Xue, Kai; Wang, Qi

    2009-07-01

    Offset frequency locking is widely applied in laser detection, frequency stabilization of lasers, laser accurate measurement and laser spectroscopy. In the paper, an offset frequency locking system based on Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) is designed and applied for cavity-dumped CO2 waveguide laser with two channels and common electrodes. A scheme for all-digital frequency discriminator in the system is described in the paper. The frequency discriminating precision of single pulse is improved by designing a high speed counter which could count both the rising edges and falling edges of signals. The multi-pulse discrimination and the high probability mean filtering algorithm are used to further improve the discriminating precision. At the same time, the algorithm of variable step length and segmental approximation is used to improve the speed and precision of frequency modulation. The experimental results show that with the method of multi-pulse discrimination the beat frequency is stabilized within +/-10MHz.

  10. Blue luminescent silicon nanocrystals prepared by short pulsed laser ablation in liquid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švrček, Vladimir; Kondo, Michio

    2009-09-01

    The pulsed laser processing in liquid media is an attractive alternative to produce room temperature luminescent silicon nanocrystals (Si-ncs). We report on a blue luminescent Si-ncs preparation by using nanosecond pulsed laser (Nd:YAG, KrF excimer) processing in transparent polymer and water. The Si-ncs fabrication is assured by ablation of crystalline silicon target immersed in liquids. During the processing and following aging in liquids, oxide based liquid media, induce shell formation around fresh nanocrystals that provides a natural and stable form of surface passivation. The stable room temperature blue-photoluminescent Si-ncs are prepared with maxima located around ˜440 nm with corresponding optical band gap around ˜2.8 eV (˜430 nm). Due to the reduction of surface defects, the Si-ncs preparation in water, leads to a narrowing of full-width-half-maxima of the photoluminescence spectra.

  11. Saturation of stimulated Raman scattering in short-pulse laser amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, E. S.; Ren, J.; Kwan, T. J. T.; Schmitt, M. J.; Lundquist, P.; Sarkisyan, S.; Nelson-Melby, E.

    2011-10-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental work has focused on using stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in plasmas as a means of laser pulse amplification and compression as an alternative to the CPA technique. Initial experiments have demonstrated the amplification and compression of laser pulses in plasma to an unfocused intensity of ~1016 W/cm2. However, the amplification saturated and was accompanied by deleterious spatial and temporal incoherence, and the reasons for this incoherence are not well understood. In this presentation, we will show results from recent particle-in-cell simulations using the LSP code and discuss several factors leading to the gain saturation and the importance of electron trapping. An understanding of the saturation process can lead to models for use in 3-wave calculations and subsequent experimental designs that avoid competing instabilities. We will discuss these results in the context of plasma channels with electron temperatures of ~0.75 eV, electron densities of ~1019 cm-3, and channel lengths >1 mm. Supported under the U.S. DOE by LANS, LLC under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. LA-UR-11-03808.

  12. Optimization of gas utilization efficiency for short-pulsed electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Izotov, I V; Skalyga, V A; Zorin, V G

    2012-02-01

    Numerical analysis of (6)He atoms utilizing efficiency in the ion source with powerful gyrotron heating is performed in present work using zero-dimensional balanced model of ECR discharge in a magnetic trap. Two ways of creation of ion source with high gas utilization efficiency (up to 60%-90%) are suggested. PMID:22380189

  13. Optimization of gas utilization efficiency for short-pulsed electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Izotov, I. V.; Skalyga, V. A.; Zorin, V. G.

    2012-02-15

    Numerical analysis of {sup 6}He atoms utilizing efficiency in the ion source with powerful gyrotron heating is performed in present work using zero-dimensional balanced model of ECR discharge in a magnetic trap. Two ways of creation of ion source with high gas utilization efficiency (up to 60%-90%) are suggested.

  14. Ultra-wideband short-pulse radar with range accuracy for short range detection

    SciTech Connect

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T; Pankonin, Jeffrey; Heintzleman, Richard E; Kinzie, Nicola Jean; Popovic, Zorana P

    2014-10-07

    An ultra-wideband (UWB) radar transmitter apparatus comprises a pulse generator configured to produce from a sinusoidal input signal a pulsed output signal having a series of baseband pulses with a first pulse repetition frequency (PRF). The pulse generator includes a plurality of components that each have a nonlinear electrical reactance. A signal converter is coupled to the pulse generator and configured to convert the pulsed output signal into a pulsed radar transmit signal having a series of radar transmit pulses with a second PRF that is less than the first PRF.

  15. Engineering studies related to geodetic and oceanographic remote sensing using short pulse techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, L. S.; Brown, G. S.; Hayne, G. S.

    1973-01-01

    For the Skylab S-193 radar altimeter, data processing flow charts and identification of calibration requirements and problem areas for defined S-193 altimeter experiments are presented. An analysis and simulation of the relationship between one particular S-193 measurement and the parameter of interest for determining the sea surface scattering cross-section are considered. For the GEOS-C radar altimeter, results are presented for system analyses pertaining to signal-to-noise ratio, pulse compression threshold behavior, altimeter measurement variance characteristics, desirability of onboard averaging, tracker bandwidth considerations, and statistical character of the altimeter data in relation to harmonic analysis properties of the geodetic signal.

  16. Comparison of Single Event Transients Generated by Short Pulsed X-Rays, Lasers and Heavy Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoza, David; LaLumondiere, Stephen D.; Tockstein, Michael A.; Brewe, Dale L.; Wells, Nathan P.; Koga, Rokutaro; Gaab, K. M.; Lotshaw, William T.; Moss, Steven C.

    2014-12-01

    We report an experimental study of the transients generated by pulsed x-rays, heavy ions, and different laser wavelengths in a Si p-i-n photodiode. We compare the charge collected by all of the excitation methods to determine the equivalent LET for pulsed x-rays relative to heavy ions. Our comparisons show that pulsed x-rays from synchrotron sources can generate a large range of equivalent LET and generate transients similar to those excited by laser pulses and heavy ion strikes. We also look at how the pulse width of the transients changes for the different excitation methods. We show that the charge collected with pulsed x-rays is greater than expected as the x-ray photon energy increases. Combined with their capability of focusing to small spot sizes and of penetrating metallization, pulsed x-rays are a promising new tool for high resolution screening of SEE susceptibility

  17. Short pulse laser stretcher-compressor using a single common reflective grating

    DOEpatents

    Erbert, Gaylen V.; Biswal, Subrat; Bartolick, Joseph M.; Stuart, Brent C.; Telford, Steve

    2004-05-25

    The present invention provides an easily aligned, all-reflective, aberration-free pulse stretcher-compressor in a compact geometry. The stretcher-compressor device is a reflective multi-layer dielectric that can be utilized for high power chirped-pulse amplification material processing applications. A reflective grating element of the device is constructed: 1) to receive a beam for stretching of laser pulses in a beam stretcher beam path and 2) to also receive stretched amplified pulses to be compressed in a compressor beam path through the same (i.e., common) reflective multilayer dielectric diffraction grating. The stretched and compressed pulses are interleaved about the grating element to provide the desired number of passes in each respective beam path in order to achieve the desired results.

  18. High Energy K(alpha) Radiography Using High-intensity, Short-pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H; Izumi, N; Key, M H; King, J A; Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Patel, P K; Price, D F; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Snavely, R A; Tabak, M; Town, R J; Wickersham, J E; Stoeckl, C; Storm, M; Theobald, W; Chambers, D M; Eagelton, R; Goldsack, T; Clarke, R J; Heathcote, R; Giraldez, E; Nikroo, A; Steinman, D A; Stephens, R B; Zhang, B B

    2005-11-16

    We have performed experiments using Callisto, the Vulcan 100 TW and the Vulcan Petawatt high intensity lasers to understand the characteristics of high energy, K{alpha} x-ray sources and to implement workable radiography solutions at 20-100 keV. Our measurements show that the K{alpha} size from a simple foil target is larger than 60 {micro}m, far larger than the experiment resolution requirement. The total K{alpha} yield is independent of target thicknesses verifying that refluxing plays a major role in photon generation. Smaller radiating volumes emit brighter K{alpha} radiation. 1-D radiography experiments using small-edge-on foils resolved 10 {micro}m features with high contrast. We tested a variety of small volume 2-D point sources such as cones, wires, and embedded wires, measuring photon yields and comparing our measurements with predictions from hybrid-PIC LSP simulations. In addition to high-energy, high-resolution backlighters, future experiments will also need imaging detectors and diagnostic tools that are workable in the 20-100 keV energy range. An initial look at some of these detector issues is also presented.

  19. Intense short-pulse lasers irradiating wire and hollow plasma fibers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, C T; He, X T; Chew, L Y

    2011-03-15

    When an intense laser pulse irradiates a solid-density foil target, electrons produced at the relativistic critical density can be accelerated to relativistic energy by the ponderomotive force. When a plasma fiber is attached to the back of the foil, the produced relativistic electrons are guided to propagate along the fiber for a long distance, because the high-current electron beam induces strong radial electric fields in the fiber. Transport and heating of intense laser-driven relativistic electrons in both wire and hollow plasma fibers are compared theoretically and numerically. We found that the coupling efficiency from the laser to the plasma fiber depends on the fiber structure. Because of the enhanced return currents in the wire fiber, the temperature in the wire fiber is higher than that in the hollow fiber. PMID:21403730

  20. Laser-fired contact formation on metallized and passivated silicon wafers under short pulse durations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavan, Ashwin S.

    The objective of this work is to develop a comprehensive understanding of the physical processes governing laser-fired contact (LFC) formation under microsecond pulse durations. Primary emphasis is placed on understanding how processing parameters influence contact morphology, passivation layer quality, alloying of Al and Si, and contact resistance. In addition, the research seeks to develop a quantitative method to accurately predict the contact geometry, thermal cycles, heat and mass transfer phenomena, and the influence of contact pitch distance on substrate temperatures in order to improve the physical understanding of the underlying processes. Finally, the work seeks to predict how geometry for LFCs produced with microsecond pulses will influence fabrication and performance factors, such as the rear side contacting scheme, rear surface series resistance and effective rear surface recombination rates. The characterization of LFC cross-sections reveals that the use of microsecond pulse durations results in the formation of three-dimensional hemispherical or half-ellipsoidal contact geometries. The LFC is heavily alloyed with Al and Si and is composed of a two-phase Al-Si microstructure that grows from the Si wafer during resolidification. As a result of forming a large three-dimensional contact geometry, the total contact resistance is governed by the interfacial contact area between the LFC and the wafer rather than the planar contact area at the original Al-Si interface within an opening in the passivation layer. By forming three-dimensional LFCs, the total contact resistance is significantly reduced in comparison to that predicted for planar contacts. In addition, despite the high energy densities associated with microsecond pulse durations, the passivation layer is well preserved outside of the immediate contact region. Therefore, the use of microsecond pulse durations can be used to improve device performance by leading to lower total contact resistances while preserving the passivation layer. A mathematical model was developed to accurately predict LFC geometry over a wide range of processing parameters by accounting for transient changes in Al and Si alloy composition within the LFC. Since LFC geometry plays a critical role in device performance, an accurate method to predict contact geometry is an important tool that can facilitate further process development. Dimensionless analysis was also conducted to evaluate the relative importance of heat and mass transfer mechanisms. It is shown that convection plays a dominant role in the heat and mass transfer within the molten pool. Due to convective mass transfer, the contacts are heavily doped with Al and Si within 10 is after contact formation, which contributes to the entire resolidified region behaving as the electrically active LFC. The validated model is also used to determine safe operating regimes during laser processing to avoid excessively high operating temperatures. By maintaining processing temperatures below a critical temperature threshold, the onset of liquid metal expulsion and loss of alloying elements can be avoided. The process maps provide a framework that can be used to tailor LFC geometry for device fabrication. Finally, using various geometric relationships for the rear side contacting scheme for photovoltaic devices, it is shown that by employing hemispherical contacts, the number of LFCs required on the rear side can be reduced 75% while doubling the pitch distance and increasing the passivation fraction. Reducing the number of backside contacts required can have a noteworthy impact of manufacturing throughput. In addition, the analytical models suggest that device performance can be maintained at levels comparable to those achieved for planar contacts when producing three-dimensional contacts. The materials and electrical characterization results, device simulations, and design considerations presented in this thesis indicate that by forming three-dimensional LFCs, performance levels of Si-based photovoltaic devices can be maintained while greatly enhancing manufacturing efficiency. The research lays a solid foundation for future development of the LFC process with microsecond pulse durations and indicates that device fabrication employing this method is a critical step moving forward.

  1. Wavelength and Intensity Dependence of Short Pulse Laser Xenon Double Ionization between 500 and 2300 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Gingras, G.; Tripathi, A.; Witzel, B.

    2009-10-23

    The wavelength and intensity dependence of xenon ionization with 50 fs laser pulses has been studied using time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We compare the ion yield distribution of singly and doubly charged xenon with the Perelomov-Popov-Terent'ev (PPT) theory, Perelomov, Popov, and Terent'ev, Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 50, 1393 (1966) [Sov. Phys. JETP 23, 924 (1966)], in the regime between 500 and 2300 nm. The intensity dependence for each wavelength is measured in a range between 1x10{sup 13} and 1x10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. The Xe{sup +}-ion signal is in good agreement with the PPT theory at all used wavelengths. In addition we demonstrate that ionic 5s5p{sup 6} {sup 2}S state is excited by an electron impact excitation process and contributes to the nonsequential double ionization process.

  2. Mode-filtered large-core fiber for short-pulse delivery with reduced nonlinear effects

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sucbei; Liu, Gangjun; Chen, Zhongping

    2012-01-01

    We present a large-core fiber (LCF) with a reduced nonlinear property for a single-mode beam delivery of intense ultrashort pulses. A tapered-fiber mode filter was fabricated in an LCF with the core diameter decreased from 20 μm to 6 μm at the tapered waist region surrounded by index-matched liquid. By the tapered geometry, the high-order mode was rejected so that our mode-filtered LCF acted as a single-mode fiber despite the multimode property of the original LCF. It has been found that this fiber class is suitable for applications, such as an endoscopic multiphoton microscope, that demand a flexible short-distance (<4 m) delivery medium of ultrashort pulses. PMID:21886211

  3. ELI-Beamlines: development of next generation short-pulse laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rus, B.; Bakule, P.; Kramer, D.; Naylon, J.; Thoma, J.; Green, J. T.; Antipenkov, R.; Fibrich, M.; Novák, J.; Batysta, F.; Mazanec, T.; Drouin, M. A.; Kasl, K.; Baše, R.; Peceli, D.; Koubíková, L.; Trojek, P.; Boge, R.; Lagron, J. C.; Vyhlídka, Å.; Weiss, J.; Cupal, J.,; Hřebíček, J.; Hříbek, P.; Durák, M.; Polan, J.; Košelja, M.; Korn, G.; Horáček, M.; Horáček, J.; Himmel, B.; Havlíček, T.; Honsa, A.; Korouš, P.; Laub, M.; Haefner, C.; Bayramian, A.; Spinka, T.; Marshall, C.; Johnson, G.; Telford, S.; Horner, J.; Deri, B.; Metzger, T.; Schultze, M.; Mason, P.; Ertel, K.; Lintern, A.; Greenhalgh, J.; Edwards, C.; Hernandez-Gomez, C.; Collier, J.; Ditmire, T.,; Gaul, E.; Martinez, M.; Frederickson, C.; Hammond, D.; Malato, C.; White, W.; Houžvička, J.

    2015-05-01

    Overview of the laser systems being built for ELI-Beamlines is presented. The facility will make available high-brightness multi-TW ultrashort laser pulses at kHz repetition rate, PW 10 Hz repetition rate pulses, and kilojoule nanosecond pulses for generation of 10 PW peak power. The lasers will extensively employ the emerging technology of diode-pumped solid-state lasers (DPSSL) to pump OPCPA and Ti:sapphire broadband amplifiers. These systems will provide the user community with cutting-edge laser resources for programmatic research in generation and applications of high-intensity X-ray sources, in particle acceleration, and in dense-plasma and high-field physics.

  4. Development of a short pulse Ne-like x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.C.; Cauble, R.C.; Celliers, P.; Da Silva, L.B.; Nilsen, J.; Wan, A.S.

    1995-06-01

    We are developing techniques to shorten the time duration of neon-like x-ray Iners while maintaining their high brightness in order to optimize, their usefulness as a plasma diagnostic. Adjusting the duration of the pump laser pulse is shown to directly influence the duration of neon-like x-ray laser transitions. Using slab targets, multiple 100 ps pulses and traveling wave geometry we have shortened the duration of lasing transitions down to 45 ps for both the neon-like germanium and yttrium x-ray lasers. However for the neon-like yttrium laser the intensity of short duration pulses are down two orders of magnitude from the long duration pulses because of limitations of the driving laser. We are presently looking at curved targets and pulse shaping in order to more efficiently pump the Ne-like x-ray laser system and increase the output intensity of the lasing lines. The relative merits of using the germanium x-ray laser at 196 {Angstrom} compared to the yttrium x-ray laser at 155 {Angstrom} are discussed.

  5. INTERMITTENT EXPOSURE OF RATS TO 2450 MHZ MICROWAVES AT 2.5 MW CM SQ: BEHAVIORAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Long-Evans male adult rats were intermittently exposed for 14 weeks to continuous wave (CW) 2450-MHz microwaves at an average power density of 2.5 mW/sq. cm. The mean specific absorption rate was 0.70 W/kg (plus or minus 0.02 SEM). The rats were exposed 7 h/day, 7 days/week in a ...

  6. Functional Conceptual Design Criteria - 5-MW/sub e/ salt-gradient solar pond power plant at Great Salt Lake

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.M.; Barnhart, J.S.; Cavola, R.G.; Drost, M.K.; Hauser, S.G.; Johnson, B.M.

    1983-08-01

    The purpose of this solar pond plant facility would be to provide valid data on the cost, operation, and reliability of salt-gradient solar ponds as a means of producing power. A general facility description is given which includes design code requirements, site selection, site characteristics, and site-specific design requirements. Functional requirements discussed include: civil-structural; mechanical; electrical; and control, instrumentation and alarms. Occupational and environmental safety, security, and quality assurance are also discussed.

  7. Tamper to delay motion and decrease ionization of a sample during short pulse x-ray imaging

    DOEpatents

    London, Richard A.; Szoke; Abraham , Hau-Riege; Stefan P. , Chapman; Henry N.

    2007-06-26

    A system for x-ray imaging of a small sample comprising positioning a tamper so that it is operatively connected to the sample, directing short intense x-ray pulses onto the tamper and the sample, and detecting an image from the sample. The tamper delays the explosive motion of the sample during irradiation by the short intense x-ray pulses, thereby extending the time to obtain an x-ray image of the original structure of the sample.

  8. Note: A short-pulse high-intensity molecular beam valve based on a piezoelectric stack actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Abeysekera, Chamara; Joalland, Baptiste; Shi, Yuanyuan; Kamasah, Alexander; Oldham, James M.; Suits, Arthur G.

    2014-11-15

    Solenoid and piezoelectric disk valves, which are widely used to generate molecular beam pulses, still suffer from significant restrictions, such as pulse durations typically >50 μs, low repetition rates, and limited gas flows and operational times. Much of this arises owing to the limited forces these actuators can achieve. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a new pulsed valve based on a high-force piezoelectric stack actuator. We show here that operation with pulse durations as low as 20 μs and repetition rates up to 100 Hz can be easily achieved by operating the valve in conjunction with a commercial fast high-voltage switch. We outline our design and demonstrate its performance with molecular beam characterization via velocity map ion imaging.

  9. Spatially and Temporally Resolved Atomic Oxygen Measurements in Short Pulse Discharges by Two Photon Laser Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lempert, Walter; Uddi, Mruthunjaya; Mintusov, Eugene; Jiang, Naibo; Adamovich, Igor

    2007-10-01

    Two Photon Laser Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) is used to measure time-dependent absolute oxygen atom concentrations in O2/He, O2/N2, and CH4/air plasmas produced with a 20 nanosecond duration, 20 kV pulsed discharge at 10 Hz repetition rate. Xenon calibrated spectra show that a single discharge pulse creates initial oxygen dissociation fraction of ˜0.0005 for air like mixtures at 40-60 torr total pressure. Peak O atom concentration is a factor of approximately two lower in fuel lean (φ=0.5) methane/air mixtures. In helium buffer, the initially formed atomic oxygen decays monotonically, with decay time consistent with formation of ozone. In all nitrogen containing mixtures, atomic oxygen concentrations are found to initially increase, for time scales on the order of 10-100 microseconds, due presumably to additional O2 dissociation caused by collisions with electronically excited nitrogen. Further evidence of the role of metastable N2 is demonstrated from time-dependent N2 2^nd Positive and NO Gamma band emission spectroscopy. Comparisons with modeling predictions show qualitative, but not quantitative, agreement with the experimental data.

  10. Increased efficiency of short-pulse laser-generated proton beams from novel flat-top cone targetsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flippo, K. A.; d'Humières, E.; Gaillard, S. A.; Rassuchine, J.; Gautier, D. C.; Schollmeier, M.; Nürnberg, F.; Kline, J. L.; Adams, J.; Albright, B.; Bakeman, M.; Harres, K.; Johnson, R. P.; Korgan, G.; Letzring, S.; Malekos, S.; Renard-LeGalloudec, N.; Sentoku, Y.; Shimada, T.; Roth, M.; Cowan, T. E.; Fernández, J. C.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2008-05-01

    Ion-driven fast ignition (IFI) may have significant advantages over electron-driven FI due to the potentially large reduction in the amount of energy required for the ignition beam and the laser driver. Recent experiments at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Trident facility employing novel Au flat-top cone targets have produced a fourfold increase in laser-energy to ion-energy efficiency, a 13-fold increase in the number of ions above 10MeV, and a few times increase in the maximum ion energy compared to Au flat-foil targets. Compared to recently published scaling laws, these gains are even greater. If the efficiency scales with intensity in accordance to flat-foil scaling, then, with little modification, these targets can be used to generate the pulse of ions needed to ignite thermonuclear fusion in the fast ignitor scheme. A proton energy of at least 30MeV was measured from the flat-top cone targets, and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations show that the maximum cutoff energy may be as high as 40-45MeV at modest intensity of 1×1019W/cm2 with 20J in 600fs. Simulations indicate that the observed energy and efficiency increase can be attributed to the cone target's ability to guide laser light into the neck to produce hot electrons and transport these electrons to the flat-top of the cone where they can be heated to much higher temperatures, creating a hotter, denser sheath. The PIC simulations also elucidate the critical parameters for obtaining superior proton acceleration such as the dependence on laser contrast/plasma prefill, as well as longitudinal and transverse laser pointing, and cone geometry. These novel cones have the potential to revolutionize inertial confinement fusion target design and fabrication via their ability to be mass produced. In addition, they could have an impact on the general physics community studying basic electron and radiation transport phenomena or as better sources of particle beams to study equations of state and warm dense matter, or for hadron therapy, as new radioisotope generators, or for compact proton radiography sources.

  11. Structuring by field enhancement of glass, Ag, Au, and Co thin films using short pulse laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmeanu, M.; Zamfirescu, M.; Rusen, L.; Luculescu, C.; Moldovan, A.; Stratan, A.; Dabu, R.

    2009-12-01

    Single pulse laser ablation of glass, Ag, Au, and Co thin films was experimentally investigated with a laser pulse width of 400 ps at a wavelength of 532 nm both in the far and near fields. In the far-field regime, the electromagnetic field results from a focused laser beam, while the near-field regime is realized by a combination of the focused laser beam incident on a spherical colloidal particle. For the near-field experiments we have used polystyrene colloidal particles of 700 nm diameter self-assembled or spin coated on top of the surfaces. Laser fluences applied are in the range of 0.01-10 J/cm2. The diameter and the morphologies of the ablated holes were investigated by optical microscopy, profilometry, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The dependence of the shape of the holes reflects the fluence regime and the thermophysical properties, i.e., melting temperature and thermal diffusivity of the surfaces involved in the experiments. We give quantitative data about the fluence threshold, diameter, and depth ablation dependence for the far and near fields and discuss their values with respect to the enhancement factor of the intensity of the electromagnetic field due to the use of the colloidal particles. Theoretical estimations of the intensity enhancement were done using the finite-difference time-domain method by using the RSOFT software. The application of near fields allows structuring of the surfaces with structure dimension in the order of 100 nm and even below.

  12. Increased Efficiency of Short-Pulse Laser Generated Proton Beams from Novel Flat-Top Cone Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flippo, Kirk

    2007-11-01

    Ion-driven Fast Ignition (IFI) may have significant advantages over electron-driven FI (EFI) due to a large reduction in the ignitor beam and laser driver energy requirements. Recent experiments at the LANL Trident facility, using novel flat-top cones made by Nanolabz in Reno Nevada, have yielded a 4 fold increase in laser-ion conversion efficiency, a 13 fold increase in the number of ions above 10 MeV, and a two fold increase in the maximum proton energy as compared to Au flat-foil targets. If efficiencies scale with intensity, in accordance with flat-foils, then IFI would have an even bigger advantage over EFI. At a modest intensity of 10^19 W/cm^2 with 20 Joules in 600 fs protons with at least 30 MeV were observed from the cone targets. Particle in Cell (PIC) simulations show that the maximum cutoff energy could have been as high as 40 MeV. The simulations indicate that the observed energy and efficiency increase can be attributed to the cone's ability guide and focus the laser, allowing more laser-light to be absorbed into the electrons. The cone's geometry then funnels the electrons to the flat-top. The small size also limits the number of electrons, allowing more to be heated to high temperatures, creating a hotter, denser sheath. The PIC simulations elucidate the critical parameters in obtaining superior proton acceleration such as the dependence on laser contrast/preplasma-fill and longitudinal and transverse laser pointing. In addition, these cones have the potential to revolutionize ICF target design and fabrication via mass production.

  13. Mechanism and influencing factors on critical pulse width of oil-immersed polymer insulators under short pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Liang Li, Rui; Zheng, Lei; Su, Jian Cang; Cheng, Jie; Yu, Bin Xiong; Wu, Xiao Long; Zhang, Xi Bo; Pan, Ya Feng; Zeng, Bo

    2015-04-15

    The critical pulse width (τ{sub c}) is a pulse width at which the surface flashover threshold (E{sub f}) is equal to the bulk breakdown threshold (E{sub BD}) for liquid-polymer composite insulation systems, which is discovered by Zhao et al. [Annual Report Conference on Electrical Insulation and Dielectric Phenomena (IEEE Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation Society, Shenzhen, China, 2013), Vol. 2, pp. 854–857]. In this paper, the mechanism of τ{sub c} is interpreted in perspective of the threshold and the time delay (t{sub d}) of surface flashover and bulk breakdown, respectively. It is found that two changes appear as the pulse width decreases which are responsible for the existence of τ{sub c}: (1) E{sub BD} is lower than E{sub f}; (2) t{sub d} of bulk breakdown is shorter than t{sub d} of surface flashover. In addition, factors which have influences on τ{sub c} are investigated, such as the dielectric type, the insulation length, the dielectric thickness, the dielectrics configuration, the pulse number, and the liquid purity. These influences of factors are generalized as three types if τ{sub c} is expected to increase: (1) factors causing E{sub BD} to decrease, such as increasing the pulse number or employing a dielectric of lower E{sub BD}; (2) factors causing E{sub f} to increase, such as complicating the insulator's configuration or increasing the liquid purity; (3) factors causing E{sub BD} and E{sub f} to increase together, but E{sub f} increases faster than E{sub BD}, such as decreasing the dielectric thickness or the insulation length. With the data in references, all the three cases are verified experimentally. In the end, a general method based on τ{sub c} for solid insulation design is presented and the significance of τ{sub c} on solid insulation design and on solid demolition are discussed.

  14. Structuring by field enhancement of glass, Ag, Au, and Co thin films using short pulse laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Ulmeanu, M.; Zamfirescu, M.; Rusen, L.; Luculescu, C.; Moldovan, A.; Stratan, A.; Dabu, R.

    2009-12-01

    Single pulse laser ablation of glass, Ag, Au, and Co thin films was experimentally investigated with a laser pulse width of 400 ps at a wavelength of 532 nm both in the far and near fields. In the far-field regime, the electromagnetic field results from a focused laser beam, while the near-field regime is realized by a combination of the focused laser beam incident on a spherical colloidal particle. For the near-field experiments we have used polystyrene colloidal particles of 700 nm diameter self-assembled or spin coated on top of the surfaces. Laser fluences applied are in the range of 0.01-10 J/cm{sup 2}. The diameter and the morphologies of the ablated holes were investigated by optical microscopy, profilometry, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The dependence of the shape of the holes reflects the fluence regime and the thermophysical properties, i.e., melting temperature and thermal diffusivity of the surfaces involved in the experiments. We give quantitative data about the fluence threshold, diameter, and depth ablation dependence for the far and near fields and discuss their values with respect to the enhancement factor of the intensity of the electromagnetic field due to the use of the colloidal particles. Theoretical estimations of the intensity enhancement were done using the finite-difference time-domain method by using the RSOFT software. The application of near fields allows structuring of the surfaces with structure dimension in the order of 100 nm and even below.

  15. Detection of calculus by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) using an ultra-short pulse laser system (USPL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelle, F.; Brede, O.; Krueger, S.; Oehme, B.; Dehn, C.; Frentzen, M.; Braun, A.

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the detection of calculus by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). The study was performed with an Nd:YVO4 laser, emitting pulses with a duration of 8 ps at a wavelength of 1064 nm. A repetition rate of 500 kHz at an average power of 5 W was used. Employing a focusing lense, intensities of the order of 1011 W/cm2 were reached on the tooth surface. These high intensities led to the generation of a plasma. The light emitted by the plasma was collimated into a fibre and then analyzed by an echelle spectroscope in the wavelength region from 220 nm - 900 nm. A total number of 15 freshly extracted teeth was used for this study. For each tooth the spectra of calculus and cementum were assessed separately. Comprising all single measurements median values were calculated for the whole spectrum, leading to two specific spectra, one for calculus and one for cementum. For further statistical analysis 28 areas of interest were defined as wavelength regions, in which the signal strength differed regarding the material. In 7 areas the intensity of the calculus spectrum differed statistically significant from the intensity of the cementum spectrum (p < 0.05). Thus it can be concluded that Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy is well suited as method for a reliable diagnostic of calculus. Further studies are necessary to verify that LIBS is a minimally invasive method allowing a safe application in laser-guided dentistry.

  16. Three-dimensional dynamics of breakout afterburner ion acceleration using high-contrast short-pulse laser and nanoscale targets.

    PubMed

    Yin, L; Albright, B J; Bowers, K J; Jung, D; Fernández, J C; Hegelich, B M

    2011-07-22

    Breakout afterburner (BOA) laser-ion acceleration has been demonstrated for the first time in the laboratory. In the BOA, an initially solid-density target undergoes relativistically induced transparency, initiating a period of enhanced ion acceleration. First-ever kinetic simulations of the BOA in three dimensions show that the ion beam forms lobes in the direction orthogonal to laser polarization and propagation. Analytic theory presented for the electron dynamics in the laser ponderomotive field explains how azimuthal symmetry breaks even for a symmetric laser intensity profile; these results are consistent with recent experiments at the Trident laser facility. PMID:21867015

  17. Temporal compression of cw diode-laser output into short pulses with cesium-vapor group-velocity dispersion.

    PubMed

    Choi, K; Menders, J; Ross, D; Korevaar, E

    1993-11-15

    Using a technique similar to chirped pulse compression, we have compressed the 50-mW cw output of a diode laser into pulses of greater than 500-mW peak power and less than 400-ps duration. By applying a small current modulation to the diode, we induced a small wavelength modulation in the vicinity of the 6s(1/2)-to-6p(3/2) cesium resonance transition at 852 nm. Group-velocity dispersion on propagation through a cesium vapor cell then led to pulse compression. We developed a simple model to make predictions of output pulse shapes by using different modulation waveforms. PMID:19829441

  18. Three-Dimensional Dynamics of Breakout Afterburner Ion Acceleration Using High-Contrast Short-Pulse Laser and Nanoscale Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Bowers, K. J.; Jung, D.; Fernández, J. C.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2011-07-01

    Breakout afterburner (BOA) laser-ion acceleration has been demonstrated for the first time in the laboratory. In the BOA, an initially solid-density target undergoes relativistically induced transparency, initiating a period of enhanced ion acceleration. First-ever kinetic simulations of the BOA in three dimensions show that the ion beam forms lobes in the direction orthogonal to laser polarization and propagation. Analytic theory presented for the electron dynamics in the laser ponderomotive field explains how azimuthal symmetry breaks even for a symmetric laser intensity profile; these results are consistent with recent experiments at the Trident laser facility.

  19. X-ray characterization of short-pulse laser illuminated hydrogen storage alloys having very high performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daido, Hiroyuki; Abe, Hiroshi; Shobu, Takahisa; Shimomura, Takuya; Tokuhira, Shinnosuke; Takenaka, Yusuke; Furuyama, Takehiro; Nishimura, Akihiko; Uchida, Hirohisa; Ohshima, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen storage alloys become more and more important in the fields of electric energy production and stage and automobiles such as Ni-MH batteries. The vacancies introduced in hydrogen absorption alloy by charged particle beams were found to be positive effect on the increase in the initial hydrogen absorption reaction rate in the previous study. The initial reaction rates of hydrogen absorption and desorption of the alloy are one of the important performances to be improved. Here, we report on the characterization of the hydrogen absorption reaction rate directly illuminated by a femtosecond and nanosecond lasers instead of particle beam machines. A laser illuminates the whole surface sequentially on a tip of a few cm square LaNi4.6Al0.4 alloy resulting in significant improvement in the hydrogen absorption reaction rate. For characterization of the surface layer, we perform an x-ray diffraction experiment using a monochromatized intense x-ray beam from SPring-8 synchrotoron machine.

  20. Laser prepulse induced plasma channel formation in air and relativistic self focusing of an intense short pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ashok; Dahiya, Deepak; Sharma, A. K.

    2011-02-15

    An analytical formalism is developed and particle-in-cell simulations are carried out to study plasma channel formation in air by a two pulse technique and subsequent relativistic self focusing of the third intense laser through it. The first prepulse causes tunnel ionization of air. The second pulse heats the plasma electrons and establishes a prolonged channel. The third pulse focuses under the combined effect of density nonuniformity of the channel and relativistic mass nonlinearity. A channel with 20% density variation over the spot size of the third pulse is seen to strongly influence relativistic self focusing at normalized laser amplitude {approx}0.4-1. In deeper plasma channels, self focusing is less sensitive to laser amplitude variation. These results are reproduced in particle-in-cell simulations. The present treatment is valid for millimeter range plasma channels.

  1. Transmission of 1064 nm laser radiation during ablation with an ultra-short pulse laser (USPL) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelle, Florian; Meister, Jörg; Oehme, Bernd; Frentzen, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    During ablation of oral hard tissue with an USPL system a small amount of the incident laser power does not contribute to the ablation process and is being transmitted. Partial transmission of ultra-short laser pulses could potentially affect the dental pulp. The aim of this study was to assess the transmission during ablation and to deduce possible risks for the patient. The study was performed with an Nd:YVO4 laser, emitting pulses with a duration of 8 ps at a wavelength of 1064 nm. A repetition rate of 500 kHz and an average power of 9 W were chosen to achieve high ablation efficiency. A scanner system created square cavities with an edge length of 1 mm. Transmission during ablation of mammoth ivory and dentin slices with a thickness of 2 mm and 5 mm was measured with a power meter, placed directly beyond the samples. Effects on subjacent blood were observed by ablating specimens placed in contact to pork blood. In a separate measurement the temperature increase during ablation was monitored using an infrared camera. The influence of transmission was assessed by tuning down the laser to the corresponding power and then directly irradiating the blood. Transmission during ablation of 2 mm specimens was about 7.7% (ivory) and 9.6% (dentin) of the incident laser power. Ablation of specimens directly in contact to blood caused coagulation at longer irradiation times (t~18s). Direct irradiation of blood with the transmitted power provoked bubbling and smoke formation. Temperature measurements identified heat generation as the main reason for the observed coagulation.

  2. Hard-tissue drilling by short-pulse CO2 laser with controllable pulse-tail energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Sasaki, Tatsufumi; Yamamoto, Takuya; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2016-02-01

    We developed a longitudinally excited CO2 laser that produces a short laser pulse with the almost same spike-pulse energy of about 0.8 mJ and the controllable pulse-tail energy of 0-21.26 mJ. The laser was very simple and consisted of a 45-cm-long alumina ceramic pipe with an inner diameter of 9 mm, a pulse power supply, a step-up transformer, a storage capacitance and a spark-gap switch. In single-shot irradiation using these laser pulses, the dependence of the drilling depth of dry ivory samples on the fluence was investigated. The drilling depth increased with the fluence in the same laser pulse waveform. In this work, the effective short laser pulse for the hard tissue drilling was the laser pulse with the spike pulse energy of 0.87 mJ and the pulse tail energy of 6.33 mJ that produced the drilling depth of 28.1 μm at the fluence of 3.48 J/cm2 and the drilling depth per the fluence of 7.27 μm/J/cm2.

  3. Nonlinear and three-dimensional theory for cross-magnetic field propagation of short-pulse lasers in underdense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, C.; Mori, W. B.

    2004-05-01

    The nonlinear and finite spot size effects for short laser pulses propagating in a plasma across a constant magnetic field (ordinary and extraordinary modes) have been studied. Starting from a fluid Lagrangian for magnetized plasmas with immobile ions, we derive the envelope equation for the laser and also the equation for the plasma wake in a three-dimensional geometry. The derived equations reveal that the external magnetic field reduces the strength of ponderomotive self-focusing, causes astigmatic self-focusing, and leads to the possibility of deflecting a short and narrow laser pulse in a magnetized plasma.

  4. Generation of single-crystalline domain in nano-scale silicon pillars by near-field short pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In, Jung Bin; Xiang, Bin; Hwang, David J.; Ryu, Sang-Gil; Kim, Eunpa; Yoo, Jae-Hyuck; Dubon, Oscar; Minor, Andrew M.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.

    2014-01-01

    We observe laser-induced grain morphology change in silicon nanopillars under a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) environment. We couple the TEM with a near-field scanning optical microscopy pulsed laser processing system. This novel combination enables immediate scrutiny on the grain morphologies that the pulsed laser irradiation produces. We find unusual transformation of the tip of the amorphous or polycrystalline silicon pillar into a single crystalline domain via melt-mediated crystallization. On the basis of the three-dimensional finite difference simulation result and the dark field TEM data, we propose that the creation of the distinct single crystalline tip originates from the dominant grain growth initiated at the apex of the non-planar liquid-solid interface. Our microscopic observation provides a fundamental basis for laser-induced conversion of amorphous nanostructures into coarse-grained crystals.

  5. The effect of erbium hydride on the conversion efficiency to accelerated protons from ultra-short pulse laser irradiated foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offermann, Dustin Theodore

    This thesis work explores, experimentally, the potential gains in the conversion efficiency from ultra-intense laser light to proton beams using erbium hydride coatings. For years, it has been known that contaminants at the rear surface of an ultra-intense laser irradiated thin foil will be accelerated to multi-MeV. Inertial Confinement Fusion fast ignition using proton beams as the igniter source requires of about 10 16 protons with an average energy of about 3MeV. This is far more than the 1012 protons available in the contaminant layer. Target designs must include some form of a hydrogen rich coating that can be made thick enough to support the beam requirements of fast ignition. Work with computer simulations of thin foils suggest the atomic mass of the non-hydrogen atoms in the surface layer has a strong affect on the conversion efficiency to protons. For example, the 167amu erbium atoms will take less energy away from the proton beam than a coating using carbon with a mass of 12amu. A pure hydrogen coating would be ideal, but technologically is not feasible at this time. In the experiments performed for my thesis, ErH 3 coatings on 5mum gold foils are compared with typical contaminants which are approximately equivalent to CH 1.7. It will be shown that there was a factor of 1.25 +/- 0.19 improvement in the conversion efficiency for protons above 3MeV using erbium hydride using the Callisto laser. Callisto is a 10J per pulse, 800nm wavelength laser with a pulse duration of 200fs and can be focused to a peak intensity of about 5 x 1019W/cm2. The total number of protons from either target type was on the order of 1010. Furthermore, the same experiment was performed on the Titan laser, which has a 500fs pulse duration, 150J of energy and can be focused to about 3 x 1020W/cm 2. In this experiment 1012 protons were seen from both erbium hydride and contaminants on 14mum gold foils. Significant improvements were also observed but possibly because of the depletion of hydrogen in the contaminant layer case.

  6. Modulation instability and short-pulse generation in media with relaxing Kerr nonlinearity and high self-steepening

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotovskii, I O; Korobko, D A; Lapin, V A

    2014-01-31

    The modulation instability in waveguides with high Kerr nonlinearity, characterised by a delayed nonlinear response, has been investigated with allowance for the self-steepening parameter and third-order dispersion. General expressions for the modulation gain are obtained. The influence of the waveguide parameters on the gain is analysed. It is shown that the joint effect of the delayed nonlinear response and negative nonlinearity dispersion leads to an increase in the modulation gain. The relations obtained are confirmed by numerical simulation. The results of this study can be used to design compact generators of high-frequency pulse trains. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  7. Amplification of an Ultra Short Pulse Laser by Stimulated Raman Scattering in a Low density Plasma Relevant to Pulse Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkwood, R K; Dewald, E L; Niemann, C; Meezan, N B; Wilks, S C; Price, D W; Landen, O L; Wurtele, J; Charman, A E; Lindberg, R; Fisch, N J; Malkin, V M; Valeo, E O

    2006-02-08

    Experiments are described in which a 1mJ, 1ps, 1200 nm probe laser beam is amplified by interaction with an intersecting 350 J, 1ns, 1054 nm pump beam in a low density ({approx} 9 x 10{sup 24}/m{sup 3}) plasma. The transmission of the probe beam is observed to be enhanced by >{approx} 25 x when the plasma is near the resonant density for stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), as compared with measured transmissions at wavelengths just above the resonant value. The amplification is observed to increase rapidly with increases in both pump intensity and plasma density.

  8. Combined passive detection and ultrafast active imaging of cavitation events induced by short pulses of high-intensity ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Gateau, Jérôme; Aubry, Jean-François; Pernot, Mathieu; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickaël

    2011-03-01

    The activation of natural gas nuclei to induce larger bubbles is possible using short ultrasonic excitations of high amplitude, and is required for ultrasound cavitation therapies. However, little is known about the distribution of nuclei in tissues. Therefore, the acoustic pressure level necessary to generate bubbles in a targeted zone and their exact location are currently difficult to predict. To monitor the initiation of cavitation activity, a novel all-ultrasound technique sensitive to single nucleation events is presented here. It is based on combined passive detection and ultrafast active imaging over a large volume using the same multi-element probe. Bubble nucleation was induced using a focused transducer (660 kHz, f-number = 1) driven by a high-power electric burst (up to 300 W) of one to two cycles. Detection was performed with a linear array (4 to 7 MHz) aligned with the single-element focal point. In vitro experiments in gelatin gel and muscular tissue are presented. The synchronized passive detection enabled radio-frequency data to be recorded, comprising high-frequency coherent wave fronts as signatures of the acoustic emissions linked to the activation of the nuclei. Active change detection images were obtained by subtracting echoes collected in the unnucleated medium. These indicated the appearance of stable cavitating regions. Because of the ultrafast frame rate, active detection occurred as quickly as 330 μs after the high-amplitude excitation and the dynamics of the induced regions were studied individually. PMID:21429844

  9. Isochoric heating of reduced-mass targets in short pulse laser experiments at 0.53 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baton, Sophie; Audebert, Patrick; Koenig, Michel; Perez, Frederic; Chahid, Makhlad; Rousseaux, Christophe; Gremillet, Laurent; Lefebvre, Erik; Rassuchine, Jenny; Cowan, Tom; Gaillard, Sandrine; Shepperd, Ronnie; Flippo, Kirk

    2008-11-01

    Recent works have shown the possibility to heat isochorically mass limited targets by using the electron refluxing. We report on experiment performed at the 100 TW LULI laser facility dedicated to the study of fast electron transport in multilayer reduced mass targets. The targets were composed of 0.2V/5Cu/5Al μm and varied from 300 to 50 μm in diameter. They were irradiated by a 300 ps laser pulse at 1.057 μm and 0.53 μm that delivered I˜2x10^19 W/cm^2 and I˜10^19 W/cm^2 respectively to form a warm dense plasma. Emission from the rear side was observed using K-alpha spectroscopy and imaging diagnostics. Spectra including the Al and Cu-K-alpha, and Al He-like emissions show changes as a function of total mass. The data obtained from all diagnostics (K-alpha spectroscopy and imagers on the rear side and the transverse side) show a different behavior depending on the incident wavelength.

  10. Transverse characteristics of short-pulse laser-produced ion beams: a study of the acceleration dynamics.

    PubMed

    Brambrink, E; Schreiber, J; Schlegel, T; Audebert, P; Cobble, J; Fuchs, J; Hegelich, M; Roth, M

    2006-04-21

    We report on first measurements of the transverse characteristics of laser-produced energetic ion beams in direct comparison to results for laser accelerated proton beams. The experiments show the same low emittance for ion beams as already found for protons. Additionally, we demonstrate that the divergence is influenced by the charge over mass ratio of the accelerated species. From these observations we deduced scaling laws for the divergence of ions as well as the temporal evolution of the ion source size. PMID:16712164

  11. Experimental characterization of a strongly coupled solid density plasma generated in a short-pulse laser target interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gregori, G; Hansen, S B; Key, M H; King, J; Mackinnon, A J; Park, H; Patel, P K; Shepard, R; Snavely, R A; Wilks, S C; Glenzer, S H

    2005-03-17

    We have measured high resolution copper K{alpha} spectra from a picosecond high intensity laser produced plasma. By fitting the shape of the experimental spectra with a self-consistent-field model which includes all the relevant line shifts from multiply ionized atoms, we are able to infer time and spatially averaged electron temperatures (T{sub e}) and ionization state (Z) in the foil. Our results show increasing values for T{sub e} and Z when the overall mass of the target is reduced. In particular, we measure temperatures in excess of 200 eV with Z {approx} 13-14. For these conditions the ion-ion coupling constant is {Lambda}{sub ii} {approx} 8-9, thus suggesting the achievement of a strongly coupled plasma regime.

  12. X-ray spectroscopic technique for energetic electron transport studies in short-pulse laser/plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Tutt, T.E.

    1994-12-01

    When a solid target is irradiated by a laser beam, the material is locally heated to a high temperature and a plasma forms. The interaction of the laser with plasma can produce energetic electrons. By observing the behavior of these {open_quotes}hot{close_quotes} electrons, we hope to obtain a better understanding of Laser/Plasma Interactions. In this work we employ a layered-fluorescer technique to study the transport, and therefore the energetics, of the electrons. The plasma forms on a thin foil of metallic Pd which is bonded to thin layer of metallic Sn. Electrons formed from the plasma penetrate first the Pd and then the Sn. In both layers the energetic electrons promote inner (K) shell ionization of the metallic atoms which leads to the emission of characteristic K{sub {alpha}} x-rays of the fluorescers. By recording the x-ray spectrum emitted by the two foils, we can estimate the energy-dependent range of the electrons and their numbers.

  13. Ultra-short-pulsed laser-machined nanogratings of laser-induced periodic surface structures on thin molybdenum layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scorticati, Davide; Römer, Gert-Willem; de Lange, Dirk Frederik; Huis in't Veld, Bert

    2012-01-01

    Large areas of regular diffraction nanogratings were produced consisting of so-called laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on thin molybdenum layers (<400 nm) deposited on a borosilicate glass substrate. The aim was to produce these structures without ablating nor cracking the molybdenum layer. Ultra short laser pulses were applied using a focused Gaussian beam profile. Processing parameters such as laser fluence, pulse overlap, number of overscans, repetition frequency, wavelength and polarization were varied to study the effect on periodicity, height, and especially regularity of the obtained LIPSS. It was found that a careful choice of the correct laser parameters is required to avoid detrimental mechanical stresses, cracking, and delamination during the laser processing of the layer in order to remain in its correct range of ductility as well as to ensure regular LIPSS. A possible photovoltaic application of these nanogratings could be found in texturing of thin film cells to enhance light trapping mechanisms.

  14. Ultra-fast Movies Resolve Ultra-short Pulse Laser Ablation and Bump Formation on Thin Molybdenum Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domke, Matthias; Rapp, Stephan; Huber, Heinz

    For the monolithic serial interconnection of CIS thin film solar cells, 470 nm molybdenum films on glass substrates must be separated galvanically. The single pulse ablation with a 660 fs laser at a wavelength of 1053 nm is investigated in a fluence regime from 0.5 to 5.0 J/cm2. At fluences above 2.0 J/cm2 bump and jet formation can be observed that could be used for creating microstructures. For the investigation of the underlying mechanisms of the laser ablation process itself as well as of the bump or jet formation, pump probe microscopy is utilized to resolve the transient ablation behavior.

  15. Impact of pre-plasma on fast electron generation and transport from short pulse, high intensity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peebles, J.; McGuffey, C.; Krauland, C. M.; Jarrott, L. C.; Sorokovikova, A.; Wei, M. S.; Park, J.; Chen, H.; McLean, H. S.; Wagner, C.; Spinks, M.; Gaul, E. W.; Dyer, G.; Hegelich, B. M.; Martinez, M.; Donovan, M.; Ditmire, T.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-01-01

    Previous experiments and modeling examining the impact of an underdense, pre-formed plasma in laser-plasma interactions have shown that the fast electrons are generated with energies higher than predicted by ponderomotive scaling [4, 3-14]. We report on experiments using the Texas Petawatt high intensity (150 fs, 1.5  ×  1020 W cm-2) laser pulse, which were conducted to examine the mechanism for accelerating these high energy electrons. These experiments gauge the impact a controlled low density pre-formed plasma has on electron generation with a shorter time scale than previous experiments, 150-180 fs. Electron temperatures measured via magnetic spectrometer on experiment were found to be independent of preformed plasma. Supplemental computational results using 1D PIC simulations predict that super-ponderomotive electrons are generated inside a potential well in the pre-plasma [1]. However, while the potential well is established around 150 fs, the electrons require at least an additional 50 fs to be trapped and heated inside it.

  16. Superconducting Multi-Cell Deflecting Cavity for Short-Pulse X-Ray Generation at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    G.J. Waldschmidt, L.H. Morrison, R. Nassiri, R.A. Rimmer, K. Tian, H. Wang

    2009-05-01

    A superconducting multi-cell cavity for the production of short x-ray pulses at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) has been explored as an alternative to a single-cell cavity design in order to improve the packing factor and potentially reduce the number of high-power RF systems and low-level RF controls required. The cavity will operate at 2815 MHz in the APS storage ring and will require heavy damping of parasitic modes to maintain stable beam operation. Novel on-cell dampers, attached directly to the cavity body, have been utilized by taking advantage of the magnetic field null on the equatorial plane in order to enhance damping. Design issues and simulation results will be discussed.

  17. Generation of relativistic ions, electrons and positrons in high-intensity short-pulse laser-solid interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Matthew; Allan, Peter; Brown, Colin; Hobbs, Lauren; James, Steven; Oades, Kevin; Hoarty, David; Chen, Hui

    2012-10-01

    The newly-commissioned Orion laser facility at AWE Aldermaston can deliver intense (10^21 W/cm^2), short (0.6 ps) laser pulses at 1φ (1 μ m) and 3x10^20 W/cm^2 at 2φ with pulse contrasts of 10^7 and 10^13, respectively, in addition to ten 3φ, 500 J long-pulse (˜ns) beams. All can be delivered to target synchronized to ˜20 ps. We report on the production and characterization of multi-MeV protons, ions, positrons and electrons at the Orion facility using 500 J, 0.6 ps, 1φ pulses and 100 J, 0.6 ps, 2φ pulses onto both thin (20 μ m) and thick (1 mm) gold targets. Laser intensities were scanned from 10^19 to 10^21 W/cm^2 by altering pulse energy and length while maintaining a consistent focal spot size of 10 μ. Particle energies were recorded by use of a magnetic and a Thomson spectrometer, with X-ray emissions imaged using a time-integrating pinhole camera in addition to time-integrating crystal spectrometers. The implications for future experiments such as investigations into electron transport mechanisms and proton heating are briefly discussed.

  18. Endodontic applications of short pulsed FR Nd:YAG dental laser: treatment of dystrophic calcification: a clinical trial report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Robert H., II

    1992-06-01

    Formation of dystrophic calcification deposits within the root canal of a tooth, have historically been difficult clinical endodontic complications. Presently, removal of such tissue, mineralized through the deposition of calcareous materials in a root canal (a 'calcified canal'), remains resistant to conventional endodontic techniques. The subsequent treatment primarily involves undesirable surgical procedures and/or loss of the tooth. Described in this clinical trial is a technique using free running (RF) pulsed, Nd:YAG laser energy to ablate hard calcified tissue which obstructed mechanical access of the root canal and root apex--a technique employed after conventional endodontic methods failed. This paper discusses the 'plasma' effect, 'spallation', canal illumination and transillumination using the helium-neon (HeNe) aiming beam. A free running pulsed, FR Nd:YAG dental laser was successfully used at 20 pulses per second and 1.75 watts to photovaporize and photodisrupt enough calcified tissue obstruction, to allow a conventional endodontic file to pass the canal blockage, and access the root apex. This clinical trial achieved the immediate, short term objective of endodontic hard tissue removal via photovaporization and photodisruption. The pulsed FR Nd:YAG dental laser used as described in this clinical report appears to be a very safe and very effective technique; offers a treatment alternative to traditional therapy that suggests high patient acceptance; and is significantly less stressful for the doctor and staff than traditional treatment options. Long-term, controlled scientific and clinical studies are necessary to establish the safety and efficacy of both the helium-neon energy for visualization and the low- watt pulsed FR Nd:YAG energy for photovaporization and photodisruption of hard calcified tissue within the root canal. Research is especially needed to understand the effects of low- watt, pulsed FR, Nd:YAG laser on the activity of osteoclasts and odontoclasts and identify risks for developing external and/or internal resorption after intracanal application of pulsed FR Nd:YAG laser energy.

  19. Combined passive detection and ultrafast active imaging of cavitation events induced by short pulses of high-intensity ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Gateau, Jérôme; Aubry, Jean-François; Pernot, Mathieu; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickaël

    2011-01-01

    The activation of natural gas nuclei to induce larger bubbles is possible using short ultrasonic excitations of high amplitude, and is required for ultrasound cavitation therapies. However, little is known about the distribution of nuclei in tissues. Therefore, the acoustic pressure level necessary to generate bubbles in a targeted zone and their exact location are currently difficult to predict. In order to monitor the initiation of cavitation activity, a novel all-ultrasound technique sensitive to single nucleation events is presented here. It is based on combined passive detection and ultrafast active imaging over a large volume and with the same multi-element probe. Bubble nucleation was induced with a focused transducer (660kHz, f#=1) driven by a high power (up to 300 W) electric burst of one to two cycles. Detection was performed with a linear array (4–7MHz) aligned with the single-element focal point. In vitro experiments in gelatin gel and muscular tissue are presented. The synchronized passive detection enabled radio-frequency data to be recorded, comprising high-frequency coherent wave fronts as signatures of the acoustic emissions linked to the activation of the nuclei. Active change detection images were obtained by subtracting echoes collected in the unucleated medium. These indicated the appearance of stable cavitating regions. Thanks to the ultrafast frame rate, active detection occurred as soon as 330 μs after the high amplitude excitation and the dynamics of the induced regions were studied individually. PMID:21429844

  20. Mechanism and influencing factors on critical pulse width of oil-immersed polymer insulators under short pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Su, Jian Cang; Li, Rui; Zeng, Bo; Cheng, Jie; Zheng, Lei; Yu, Bin Xiong; Wu, Xiao Long; Zhang, Xi Bo; Pan, Ya Feng

    2015-04-01

    The critical pulse width (τc) is a pulse width at which the surface flashover threshold (Ef) is equal to the bulk breakdown threshold (EBD) for liquid-polymer composite insulation systems, which is discovered by Zhao et al. [Annual Report Conference on Electrical Insulation and Dielectric Phenomena (IEEE Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation Society, Shenzhen, China, 2013), Vol. 2, pp. 854-857]. In this paper, the mechanism of τc is interpreted in perspective of the threshold and the time delay (td) of surface flashover and bulk breakdown, respectively. It is found that two changes appear as the pulse width decreases which are responsible for the existence of τc: (1) EBD is lower than Ef; (2) td of bulk breakdown is shorter than td of surface flashover. In addition, factors which have influences on τc are investigated, such as the dielectric type, the insulation length, the dielectric thickness, the dielectrics configuration, the pulse number, and the liquid purity. These influences of factors are generalized as three types if τc is expected to increase: (1) factors causing EBD to decrease, such as increasing the pulse number or employing a dielectric of lower EBD; (2) factors causing Ef to increase, such as complicating the insulator's configuration or increasing the liquid purity; (3) factors causing EBD and Ef to increase together, but Ef increases faster than EBD, such as decreasing the dielectric thickness or the insulation length. With the data in references, all the three cases are verified experimentally. In the end, a general method based on τc for solid insulation design is presented and the significance of τc on solid insulation design and on solid demolition are discussed.

  1. Production of dense vapor targets for laser-plasma interaction studies with intense, ultra-short pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, P.R.; Eder, D.C.; Guethlein, G.; Stewart, R.E.; Young, P.E.

    1993-03-19

    The technique of laser-induced ablation of thin films from glass slide substrates has been investigated as a candidate vapor target production method for studies of both tunneling-driven x-ray/xuv recombination lasers and relativistic propagation using intense, ultra-short laser pulses. It is shown by simultaneous two-wavelength interferometry that particle densities of order 10{sup 19}/cm{sup 3} are readily achieved and that some intrinsic ionization accompanies the plume formation. Absorption measurements with both 100 picosecond and 125 femtosecond pulses are consistent with observed edge velocities near 10{sup 6} cm/sec. The level of ionization driven by the intense 125 femtosecond laser pulse has been coarsely estimated. Averaged estimates from spectral blue shifting of spectra transmitted through the plume are consistently lower than those obtained from evaluation of saturation intensity thresholds based on the sequential nonresonant optical field ionization (OFI) process.

  2. Non-filamentated ultra-intense and ultra-short pulse fronts in three-dimensional Raman seed amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, G.; Spatschek, K. H.

    2014-05-15

    Ultra-intense and ultra-short laser pulses may be generated up to the exawatt-zetawatt regime due to parametric processes in plasmas. The minimization of unwanted plasma processes leads to operational limits which are discussed here with respect to filamentation. Transverse filamentation, which originally was derived for plane waves, is being investigated for seed pulse propagation in the so called π-pulse limit. A three-dimensional (3D) three-wave-interaction model is the basis of the present investigation. To demonstrate the applicability of the three-wave-interaction model, the 1D pulse forms are compared with those obtained from 1D particle in cell and Vlasov simulations. Although wave-breaking may occur, the kinetic simulations show that the leading pumped pulse develops a form similar to that obtained from the three-wave-interaction model. In the main part, 2D and 3D filamentation processes of (localized) pulses are investigated with the three-wave-interaction model. It is shown that the leading pulse front can stay filamentation-free, whereas the rear parts show transverse modulations.

  3. Microscopic Deformation of Tungsten Surfaces by High Energy and High Flux Helium/Hydrogen Particle Bombardment with Short Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokitani, Masayuki; Yoshida, Naoaki; Tokunaga, Kazutoshi; Sakakita, Hajime; Kiyama, Satoru; Koguchi, Haruhisa; Hirano, Yoichi; Masuzaki, Suguru

    The neutral beam injection facility in the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology was used to irradiate a polycrystalline tungsten specimen with high energy and high flux helium and hydrogen particles. The incidence energy and flux of the beam shot were 25 keV and 8.8 × 1022 particles/m2 s, respectively. The duration of each shot was approximately 30 ms, with 6 min intervals between each shot. Surface temperatures over 1800 K were attained. In the two cases of helium irradiation, total fluence of either 1.5 × 1022 He/m2 or 4.0 × 1022 He/m2 was selected. In the former case, large sized blisters with diameter of 500 nm were densely observed. While, the latter case, the blisters were disappeared and fine nanobranch structures appeared instead. Cross-sectional observations using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) with the focused ion beam (FIB) technique were performed. According to the TEM image, after irradiation with a beam shot of total fluence 4.0 × 1022 He/m2 , there were very dense fine helium bubbles in the tungsten of sizes 1-50 nm. As the helium bubbles grew the density of the tungsten matrix drastically decreased as a result of void swelling. These effects were not seen in hydrogen irradiation case.

  4. Laser self-mixing sensor to monitor in situ the penetration depth during short pulse laser drilling of metal targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzapesa, Francesco P.; Ancona, Antonio; Sibillano, Teresa; De Lucia, Francesco; Dabbicco, Maurizio; Lugarà, Pietro Mario; Scamarcio, Gaetano

    2011-05-01

    Direct real-time measurements of the penetration depth during laser micromachining has been demonstrated by developing a novel ablation sensor based on laser diode feedback interferometry. Percussion drilling experiments have been performed by focusing a 120-ps pulsed fiber laser onto metallic targets with different thermal conductivity. In-situ monitoring of the material removal rate was achieved by coaxially aligning the beam probe with the ablating laser. The displacement of the ablation front was revealed with sub-micrometric resolution by analyzing the sawtooth-like induced modulation of the interferometric signal out of the detector system.

  5. Third harmonic generation of a short pulse laser in a plasma density ripple created by a machining beam

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C. S.; Tripathi, V. K.

    2008-02-15

    An intense machining laser beam, impinged on a gas jet target, causes space periodic ionization of the gas and heats the electrons. The nonuniform plasma pressure leads to atomic density redistribution. When, after a suitable time delay, a second more intense laser pulse is launched along the periodicity wave vector q-vector, a plasma density ripple n{sub q} is instantly created, leading to resonant third harmonic generation when q=4{omega}{sub p}{sup 2}/(3{omega}c{gamma}{sub 0}), where {omega}{sub p} is the plasma frequency, {omega} is the laser frequency, and {gamma}{sub 0} is the electron Lorentz factor. The third harmonic is produced through the beating of ponderomotive force induced second harmonic density oscillations and the quiver velocity of electrons at the fundamental. The relativistic mass nonlinearity plays no role in resonant coupling. The energy conversion efficiency scales as the square of plasma density and square of depth of density ripple, and is {approx}0.2% for normalized laser amplitude a{sub o}{approx}1 in a plasma of 1% critical density with 20% density ripple. The theory explains several features of a recent experiment.

  6. Fiber Laser Replacement for Short Pulse Ti:Sapphire Oscillators -- Scalable Mode Locking to Record Pulse Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J W; Messerly, M J; An, J

    2006-02-14

    We have investigated fiber-based lasers that mode-lock via three nonlinear mechanisms: pulse evolution, bend loss, and tunneling. Experiments with nonlinear pulse evolution proved especially promising; we report here a fiber laser that produces 25 nJ, sub-200 fs pulses, an energy that is 60% higher than previous reports. Experiments with nonlinear bend loss were inconclusive; though bend-loss data show that the effect exits, we were not able to use the phenomenon to lock a laser. New models suggest that nonlinear tunneling could provide an alternate path.

  7. Part 2: Ultra-short pulse laser patterning of very thin indium tin oxide on glass substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonnell, C.; Milne, D.; Chan, H.; Rostohar, D.; O'Connor, G. M.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate selective patterning of ultra-thin 20 nm Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) thin films on glass substrates, using 343, 515, and 1030 nm femtosecond (fs), and 1030 nm picoseconds (ps) laser pulses. An ablative removal mechanism is observed for all wavelengths at both femtosecond and picoseconds time-scales. The absorbed threshold fluence values were determined to be 12.5 mJ cm-2 at 343 nm, 9.68 mJ cm-2 at 515 nm, and 7.50 mJ cm-2 at 1030 nm for femtosecond and 9.14 mJ cm-2 at 1030 nm for picosecond laser exposure. Surface analysis of ablated craters using atomic force microscopy confirms that the selective removal of the film from the glass substrate is dependent on the applied fluence. Film removal is shown to be primarily through ultrafast lattice deformation generated by an electron blast force. The laser absorption and heating process was simulated using a two temperature model (TTM). The predicted surface temperatures confirm that film removal below 1 J cm-2 to be predominately by a non-thermal mechanism.

  8. Status of the Short-Pulse X-ray Project (SPX) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS)

    SciTech Connect

    Nassiri, R; Berenc, G; Borland, M; Bromberek, D J; Chae, Y -C; Decker, G; Emery, L; Fuerst, J D; Grelick, A E; Horan, D; Lenkszus, F; Lill, R M; Sajaev, V; Smith, T L; Waldschmidt, G J; Wu, G; Yang, B X; Zholents, A; Byrd, J M; Doolittle, L R; Huang, G; Cheng, G; Ciovati, G; Henry, J; Kneisel, P; Mammosser, J D; Rimmer, R A; Turlington, L

    2011-03-01

    The Advanced Photon Source Upgrade project (APS-U) at Argonne includes implementation of Zholents’* deflecting cavity scheme for production of short x-ray pulses. This is a joint project between Argonne National Laboratory, Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This paper describes performance characteristics of the proposed source and technical issues related to its realization. Ensuring stable APS storage ring operation requires reducing quality factors of these modes by many orders of magnitude. These challenges reduce to those of the design of a single-cell SC cavity that can achieve the desired operating deflecting fields while providing needed damping of all these modes. The project team is currently prototyping and testing several promising designs for single-cell cavities with the goal of deciding on a winning design in the near future. Here

  9. BEHAVIORAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF CHRONIC 2,450-MHZ MICROWAVE IRRADIATION OF THE RAT AT 0.5 MW/CM SQ

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adult male Long-Evans rats were intermittently exposed to 2450 MHz CW microwaves at an average power density of 0.5 mW/sq. cm. for 90 days. The resulting SAR was 0.14 W/kg (range 0.11 to 0.18 W/kg). The animals were exposed 7 h/day, 7 days/wk, for a total of 630 h in a monopole-a...

  10. Feasibility study for SOFC-GT hybrid locomotive power: Part I. Development of a dynamic 3.5 MW SOFC-GT FORTRAN model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Andrew S.; Brouwer, Jacob; Samuelsen, G. Scott

    2012-09-01

    This work presents the development of a dynamic SOFC-GT hybrid system model applied to a long-haul freight locomotive in operation. Given the expectations of the rail industry, the model is used to develop a preliminary analysis of the proposed system's operational capability on conventional diesel fuel as well as natural gas and hydrogen as potential fuels in the future. It is found that operation of the system on all three of these fuels is feasible with favorable efficiencies and reasonable dynamic response. The use of diesel fuel reformate in the SOFC presents a challenge to the electrochemistry, especially as it relates to control and optimization of the fuel utilization in the anode compartment. This is found to arise from the large amount of carbon monoxide in diesel reformate that is fed to the fuel cell, limiting the maximum fuel utilization possible. This presents an opportunity for further investigations into carbon monoxide electrochemical oxidation and/or system integration studies where the efficiency of the fuel reformer can be balanced against the needs of the SOFC.

  11. Rupture processes of the 2012 September 5 Mw 7.6 Nicoya, Costa Rica earthquake constrained by improved geodetic and seismological observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chengli; Zheng, Yong; Xiong, Xiong; Wang, Rongjiang; López, Allan; Li, Jun

    2015-10-01

    On 2012 September 5, the anticipated interplate thrust earthquake ruptured beneath the Nicoya peninsula in northwestern Costa Rica close to the Middle America trench, with a magnitude Mw 7.6. Extensive co-seismic observations were provided by dense near-field strong ground motion, Global Positioning Systems (GPS) networks and teleseismic recordings from global seismic networks. The wealthy data sets available for the 2012 Mw 7.6 Nicoya earthquake provide a unique opportunity to investigate the details of the rupture process of this earthquake. By implementing a non-linear joint inversion with high-rate GPS waveform, more static GPS offsets, strong-motion data and teleseismic body waveform, we obtained a robust and accurate rupture model of the 2012 Mw 7.6 Nicoya earthquake. The earthquake is dominantly a pure thrust component with a maximum slip of 3.5 m, and the main large slip patch is located below the hypocentre, spanning ˜50 km along dip and ˜110 km along strike. The static stress drop is about 3.4 MPa. The total seismic moment of our preferred model is 3.46 × 1020 N m, which gives Mw = 7.6. Due to the fast rupture velocity, most of the seismic moment was released within 70 s. The largest slip patch directly overlaps the interseismic locked region identified by geodetic observations and extends downdip to the intersection with the upper plate Moho. We also find that there is a complementary pattern between the distribution of aftershocks and the co-seismic rupture; most aftershocks locate in the crust of the upper plate and are possibly induced by the stress change caused by the large slip patch.

  12. Room temperature optical anisotropy of a LaMnO{sub 3} thin-film induced by ultra-short pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Munkhbaatar, Purevdorj; Kim, Jin Seung; Myung-Whun, Kim; Marton, Zsolt; Lee, Ho Nyung; Tsermaa, Baatarchuluun; Choi, Woo Seok; Seo, Sung S. Ambrose; Nakagawa, Naoyuki; Hwang, Harold Y.

    2015-03-02

    We observed ultra-short laser pulse-induced transient optical anisotropy in a LaMnO{sub 3} thin film. The anisotropy was induced by laser pulse irradiation with a fluence of less than 0.1 mJ/cm{sup 2} at room temperature. The transmittance and reflectance showed strong dependence on the polarization states of the pulses. For parallel and perpendicular polarization states, there exists a difference of approximately 0.2% for transmittance and 0.05% for reflectance at 0.3 ps after the irradiation with a pump pulse, respectively. The theoretical values for optical transmittance and reflectance with an assumption of an orbital ordering of 3d e{sub g} electrons in Mn{sup 3+} ions showed good agreement with the experimental results, demonstrating that the transient optical anisotropy in LaMnO{sub 3} thin film is due to the photo-induced symmetry-breaking of orbital ordering in excited states.

  13. Design of a high charge (10-100 nC) and short pulse (2-5 ps) RF photocathode gun for wakefield acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, W.; Li, X.; Conde, M.; Power, J.; Schoessow, P.

    1999-07-01

    In this paper we present a design report on a 1-1/2 cell, L Band RF photocathode gun that is capable of generating and accelerating electron beams with peak currents >10 kA. We have performed simulation for bunch intensities in the range of 10-100 nC with peak axial electrical field at the photocathode of 30-100 MV/m. Unlike conventional short electron pulse generation, this design does not require magnetic pulse compression. Based on numerical simulations using SUPERFISH and PARMELA, this design will produce 20-100 nC beam at 18 MeV with rms bunch length 0.6-1.25 mm and normalized transverse emittance 30-108 mm mrad. Applications of this beam for wakefield acceleration is also discussed.

  14. Above scaling short-pulse ion acceleration from flat foil and ``Pizza-top Cone'' targets at the Trident laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flippo, Kirk; Hegelich, B. Manuel; Cort Gautier, D.; Johnson, J. Randy; Kline, John L.; Shimada, Tsutomu; Fernández, Juan C.; Gaillard, Sandrine; Rassuchine, Jennifer; Le Galloudec, Nathalie; Cowan, Thomas E.; Malekos, Steve; Korgan, Grant

    2006-10-01

    Ion-driven Fast Ignition (IFI) has certain advantages over electron-driven FI due to a possible large reduction in the amount of energy required. Recent experiments at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Trident facility have yielded ion energies and efficiencies many times in excess of recent published scaling laws, leading to even more potential advantages of IFI. Proton energies in excess of 35 MeV have been observed from targets produced by the University of Nevada, Reno - dubbed ``Pizza-top Cone'' targets - at intensities of only 1x10^19 W/cm^2 with 20 joules in 600 fs. Energies in excess of 24 MeV were observed from simple flat foil targets as well. The observed energies, above any published scaling laws, are attributed to target production, preparation, and shot to shot monitoring of many laser parameters, especially the laser ASE prepulse level and laser pulse duration. The laser parameters are monitored in real-time to keep the laser in optimal condition throughout the run providing high quality, reproducible shots.

  15. Three-dimensional dynamics of break-out afterburner ion acceleration using high-contrast short-pulse laser and nano-scale targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Jung, D.; Bowers, K. J.; Fernandez, J. C.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2010-11-01

    Ultra-intense laser interaction with solid density carbon targets is examined in 3D VPIC simulations. It is shown that a linearly polarized laser pulse at >10^20 W/cm^2 intensity will turn a solid density, nm-scale target relativistically transparent and begin an epoch of dramatic acceleration of ions. Called the Break-Out-Afterburner (BOA) [L. Yin, et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 056706 (2007)], this mechanism leads to order-of-magnitude greater ion energy and beam currents. The BOA lasts until the electron density in the expanding target reduces to the non-relativistic critical density. A striking feature of the BOA mechanism is that the ion beam symmetry is broken, with the production of lobes in the direction orthogonal to the laser polarization and propagation directions, along which the highest ion beam energy is observed. These ion beam lobes have been measured on recent Trident experiments. An analytic theory for the production of ion beam lobes has been obtained and has been shown to be in good agreement with simulations. Moreover, other features of the BOA, e.g., the existence of an optimal target thickness for given laser and target density and the propagation of light and heavy ion species at comparable speed have been demonstrated in simulations and experiments.

  16. Multifunctional gold nanorods for selective plasmonic photothermal therapy in pancreatic cancer cells using ultra-short pulse near-infrared laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Patino, Tania; Mahajan, Ujjwal; Palankar, Raghavendra; Medvedev, Nikolay; Walowski, Jakob; Münzenberg, Markus; Mayerle, Julia; Delcea, Mihaela

    2015-03-12

    Gold nanorods (AuNRs) have attracted considerable attention in plasmonic photothermal therapy for cancer treatment by exploiting their selective and localized heating effect due to their unique photophysical properties. Here we describe a strategy to design a novel multifunctional platform based on AuNRs to: (i) specifically target the adenocarcinoma MUC-1 marker through the use of the EPPT-1 peptide, (ii) enhance cellular uptake through a myristoylated polyarginine peptide (MPAP) and (iii) selectively induce cell death by ultra-short near infrared laser pulses. We used a biotin-avidin based approach to conjugate EPPT-1 and MPAP to AuNRs. Dual-peptide (EPPT-1+MPAP) labelled AuNRs showed a significantly higher uptake by pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells when compared to their single peptide or avidin conjugated counterparts. In addition, we selectively induced cell death by ultra-short near infrared laser pulses in small target volumes (∼1 μm3), through the creation of plasmonic nanobubbles that lead to the destruction of a local cell environment. Our approach opens new avenues for conjugation of multiple ligands on AuNRs targeting cancer cells and tumors and it is relevant for plasmonic photothermal therapy. PMID:25721177

  17. Short pulse width UV laser at 355 nm based on pulse LD side-pumped ceramic Nd:YAG and BBO electro-optical Q-switched

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Y.; Chen, X. M.; Lu, B. L.; Ren, Z. Y.; Bai, J. T.

    2012-02-01

    355 nm UV laser was obtained with a pulse width of less than 5 ns and a peak power at megawatt level by adopting the 808 nm pulse laser diode (LD) side-pumped ceramic Nd:YAG and BBO crystal electrooptical Q-switched. The single-pulse energy was measured to be 24.3 mJ with 4.86 ns pulse width and 5.11 MW peak power at a repetition rate of 1Hz under a 120 A pump current. Using a volume of beam splitting mirrors, wavelength outputs at 1064, 532, and 355 nm pulse laser was obtained simultaneously with a respective average output power of 656.6, 357.1, and 260.5 mW, the beam quality factor M 2 are ( M {/x - 1064 2} = 5.83, M {/y - 1064 2} = 5.61), ( M {/x - 532 2} = 4.25, M {/y - 532 2} = 4.08) and ( M {/x - 355 2} = 6.32, M {/y - 355 2} = 6.15), corresponding to a conversion efficiency at 11% from 1064 to 355 nm.

  18. Pulse shape measurements using single shot-frequency resolved optical gating for high energy (80 J) short pulse (600 fs) laser

    SciTech Connect

    Palaniyappan, S.; Johnson, R.; Shimada, T.; Gautier, D. C.; Letzring, S.; Offermann, D. T.; Fernandez, J. C.; Shah, R. C.; Jung, D.; Hegelich, B. M.; Hoerlein, R.

    2010-10-15

    Relevant to laser based electron/ion accelerations, a single shot second harmonic generation frequency resolved optical gating (FROG) system has been developed to characterize laser pulses (80 J, {approx}600 fs) incident on and transmitted through nanofoil targets, employing relay imaging, spatial filter, and partially coated glass substrates to reduce spatial nonuniformity and B-integral. The device can be completely aligned without using a pulsed laser source. Variations of incident pulse shape were measured from durations of 613 fs (nearly symmetric shape) to 571 fs (asymmetric shape with pre- or postpulse). The FROG measurements are consistent with independent spectral and autocorrelation measurements.

  19. Multifunctional gold nanorods for selective plasmonic photothermal therapy in pancreatic cancer cells using ultra-short pulse near-infrared laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patino, Tania; Mahajan, Ujjwal; Palankar, Raghavendra; Medvedev, Nikolay; Walowski, Jakob; Münzenberg, Markus; Mayerle, Julia; Delcea, Mihaela

    2015-03-01

    Gold nanorods (AuNRs) have attracted considerable attention in plasmonic photothermal therapy for cancer treatment by exploiting their selective and localized heating effect due to their unique photophysical properties. Here we describe a strategy to design a novel multifunctional platform based on AuNRs to: (i) specifically target the adenocarcinoma MUC-1 marker through the use of the EPPT-1 peptide, (ii) enhance cellular uptake through a myristoylated polyarginine peptide (MPAP) and (iii) selectively induce cell death by ultra-short near infrared laser pulses. We used a biotin-avidin based approach to conjugate EPPT-1 and MPAP to AuNRs. Dual-peptide (EPPT-1 + MPAP) labelled AuNRs showed a significantly higher uptake by pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells when compared to their single peptide or avidin conjugated counterparts. In addition, we selectively induced cell death by ultra-short near infrared laser pulses in small target volumes (~1 μm3), through the creation of plasmonic nanobubbles that lead to the destruction of a local cell environment. Our approach opens new avenues for conjugation of multiple ligands on AuNRs targeting cancer cells and tumors and it is relevant for plasmonic photothermal therapy.Gold nanorods (AuNRs) have attracted considerable attention in plasmonic photothermal therapy for cancer treatment by exploiting their selective and localized heating effect due to their unique photophysical properties. Here we describe a strategy to design a novel multifunctional platform based on AuNRs to: (i) specifically target the adenocarcinoma MUC-1 marker through the use of the EPPT-1 peptide, (ii) enhance cellular uptake through a myristoylated polyarginine peptide (MPAP) and (iii) selectively induce cell death by ultra-short near infrared laser pulses. We used a biotin-avidin based approach to conjugate EPPT-1 and MPAP to AuNRs. Dual-peptide (EPPT-1 + MPAP) labelled AuNRs showed a significantly higher uptake by pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells when compared to their single peptide or avidin conjugated counterparts. In addition, we selectively induced cell death by ultra-short near infrared laser pulses in small target volumes (~1 μm3), through the creation of plasmonic nanobubbles that lead to the destruction of a local cell environment. Our approach opens new avenues for conjugation of multiple ligands on AuNRs targeting cancer cells and tumors and it is relevant for plasmonic photothermal therapy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Size distribution histograms of the hydrodynamic diameter and ζ-potential of functionalized and CTAB stabilized AuNRs. Characterization of TR-AV functionalized AuNRs after 48 h at 4 °C. The ζ-potential of TR-AV functionalized AuNRs and CTAB stabilized AuNRs. The ζ-potential of peptide-conjugated AuNRs in water. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00114e

  20. Infrared Luminescence at 1010 nm and 1500 nm in LiNbO3:Er3+ Excitted by Short Pulse Radiation at 980 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokanyan, E. P.; Demirkhanyan, G. G.; Steveler, E.; Rinnert, H.; Aillerie, M.

    Luminescence of LiNbO3:Er3+ crystal at a wavelength of 1010 nm and 1500 nm under pulsed excitation of different power at a wavelength of 980 nm are experimentally and theoretically studied. It is revealed, that the main part of the absorbed energy gives rise to the luminescence at 1500 nm. Considered concentrations of Er3+ impurity ions allow to exclude cooperative processes in the impurity subsystem. The experimental results are interpreted in the framework of a three electronic levels system, assuming that the population of the higher lasing level 4I13/2 in the crystal under study is caused by relaxation processes from the excited level. It is shown that for obtaining of a laser radiation at about 1500 nm one can effectively use a pulse-pumping at 980 nm with a power density in a range of 50 ÷ 60 MW/cm2.

  1. Multiline short-pulse solid-state seeded carbon dioxide laser for extreme ultraviolet employing multipass radio frequency excited slab amplifier.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Krzysztof M; Ohta, Takeshi; Suganuma, Takashi; Fujimoto, Junichi; Mizoguchi, Hakaru

    2013-03-15

    In this Letter we describe in more detail a solid-state seeded, nanosecond pulse, multiline CO(2) oscillator designed and built for the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) laser-produced-plasma (LPP) source. Our oscillator featured quantum cascade laser seeders, a diffraction-type seed beam combiner, and a radio-frequency-discharge-excited, diffusion-cooled, slab-waveguide CO(2) gain cell in a compact multipass regenerative amplifier configuration. The oscillator generated pulses of exceptional stability in terms of envelope, energy, and spectrum. Excellent stability of output was achieved without any additional techniques. The output spectrum consisted of two laser lines of a 00(0)1-10(0)0 band of a CO(2) molecule, P20 and P22, with a target of four lines P18-P24. The pulse duration was electronically adjustable between 11 and 35 ns at a repetition frequency from a few hertz to hundreds of kilohertz. Electronic adjustment of the pulse duration was achieved by relative timing offsets of individual seeders, opening an avenue to a range of on-line adjustments of pulse shape and spectral content timing. The jitter-tolerant operation allows for easy synchronization with an external event, such as a droplet target in an EUV LPP source. A resistance to parasitic seeding of more than 40 dB was recorded. The oscillator produced up to 20 W of average output power at a repetition rate of 100 kHz in a near-diffraction-limited beam of M(2)<1.3 and a pointing stability below 50 μrad. PMID:23503247

  2. Formation of upconversion nanoparticles of 18%Yb:1%Er:NAYF4 by ultra-short pulse laser ablation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemini, Laura; Hernandez, Marie-Caroline; Kling, Rainer

    2016-03-01

    Pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) is nowadays gaining popularity as innovative, reliable and efficient technique to produce high-purity nanoparticles (NPs) of many inorganic and organic materials. In this context, attention has been recently focused on luminescent up-conversion NPs (UCNPs) which, being characterized by sharp emission bands in ultraviolet (UV)-to-near-infrared (NIR) range upon NIR irradiation, are in fact of great interest in many biological and biomedical applications. Moreover, with respect to organic dyes NPs and quantum dots, UCNPs show less toxicity, increased chemical stability, long-lifetime decays and lack of photo-bleaching. Our research focuses on generation of UCNPs of rare earth lanthanide-doped crystalline material, namely 18%Yb:1%Er:NAYF4, by PLAL in water. It is well known that optical properties of NPs strongly depend on their features, as for instance size and shape, which in turn may be controlled by laser ablation parameters. Therefore, two different laser sources are used for the ablation processes in order to find the set of laser parameter, i.e. pulse duration, laser fluence and repetition rate, for which the luminescence of UPNPs is optimized: (i) Amplitude Satsuma HP3 system: 330 fs pulse duration, 1030 wavelength and (ii) Eolite Hegoa system: 50 ps pulse duration, 1030 nm wavelength. UCNPs are finally characterized by spectrophotometer analyses to define emission range and intensity under NIR light and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to determine their size and shape.

  3. Amplification of an ultra short pulse laser by stimulated Raman scattering of a 1ns pulse in a low density plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkwood, R K; Dewald, E; Niemann, C; Meezan, N; Wilks, S C; Price, D W; Landen, O L; Wurtele, J; Charman, A E; Lindberg, R; Fisch, N J; Malkin, V M; Valeo, E O

    2007-10-08

    Experiments are described in which a 1mJ, 1ps, 1200 nm seed laser beam is amplified by interaction with an intersecting 350 J, 1ns, 1054 nm pump beam in a low density (1 x 10{sup 19}/cm{sup 3}) plasma. The transmission of the seed beam is observed to be enhanced by > {approx} 25 x when the plasma is near the resonant density for stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), compared to measured transmissions at wavelengths just below the resonant value. The amplification is observed to increase rapidly with increases in both pump intensity and plasma density.

  4. Room temperature optical anisotropy of a LaMnO3 thin-film induced by ultra-short pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Munkhbaatar, Purevdorj; Marton, Zsolt; Tsermaa, Bataarchuluun; Choi, Woo Seok; Seo, Sung Seok A.; Kim, Jin Seung; Nakagawa, Naoyuki; Hwang, H. Y.; Lee, Ho Nyung; Myung-Whun, Kim

    2015-03-04

    Ultra-short laser pulse induced optical anisotropy of LaMnO3 thin films grown on SrTiO3 substrates were observed by irradiation with a femto-second laser pulse with the fluence of less than 0.1 mJ/cm2 at room temperature. The transmittance and reflectance showed different intensities for different polarization states of the probe pulse after pump pulse irradiation. The theoretical optical transmittance and re ectance that assumed an orbital ordering of the 3d eg electrons in Mn3+ ions resulted in an anisotropic time dependent changes similar to those obtained from the experimental results, suggesting that the photo-induced optical anisotropy of LaMnO3 is a result of photo-induced symmetry breaking of the orbital ordering for an optically excited state.

  5. Room temperature optical anisotropy of a LaMnO3 thin-film induced by ultra-short pulse laser

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Munkhbaatar, Purevdorj; Marton, Zsolt; Tsermaa, Bataarchuluun; Choi, Woo Seok; Seo, Sung Seok A.; Kim, Jin Seung; Nakagawa, Naoyuki; Hwang, H. Y.; Lee, Ho Nyung; Myung-Whun, Kim

    2015-03-04

    Ultra-short laser pulse induced optical anisotropy of LaMnO3 thin films grown on SrTiO3 substrates were observed by irradiation with a femto-second laser pulse with the fluence of less than 0.1 mJ/cm2 at room temperature. The transmittance and reflectance showed different intensities for different polarization states of the probe pulse after pump pulse irradiation. The theoretical optical transmittance and re ectance that assumed an orbital ordering of the 3d eg electrons in Mn3+ ions resulted in an anisotropic time dependent changes similar to those obtained from the experimental results, suggesting that the photo-induced optical anisotropy of LaMnO3 is a result ofmore » photo-induced symmetry breaking of the orbital ordering for an optically excited state.« less

  6. 58 mJ burst containing ultra-short pulses with homogenous energy level from an Yb-doped fiber amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitkopf, Sven; Klenke, Arno; Gottschall, Thomas; Otto, Hans-Jürgen; Jauregui, Cesar; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    There is a great interest in obtaining laser pulses with a high average power as well as high pulse energies. Continuously pulsed systems face many problems to satisfy those requirements, independent on the amplifier concept. While many applications such as electron beam characterization and free-electron-laser seeding need high pulse energies at high repetition rates, they only need those laser pulses for a certain amount of time. Therefore, it is not necessary to run a laser system with continuous pulses at those parameters and a so-called burst mode might be sufficient and even essential in such cases. We report on a CPA-laser system, based on a large pitch fiber as a main-amplifier delivering bursts containing ultra-short, highly-energetic pulses. The burst rate is set to 20Hz, while each burst contains 2000 pulses at a pulse-repetition-rate of 10MHz and with a pulse-duration of 700fs. Hence the duty cycle D is 0.4%. To achieve a homogeneous pulse energy level between 27μJ and 31μJ after the compression, the main amplifier is pumped with a very high power of 1.6kW in a burst-mode (D=10%). By using an acousto-optical modulator (AOM) after the main-amp fiber, the residual output before and after the burst is removed to suppress ASE and any underground-pulses around the amplified burst. The limitations that could be observed during this experiment were mainly due to mode instabilities, which were detectable even on a very short time scale of a few hundred μs using a high speed camera.

  7. Theoretical study of cw to short pulse conversion in an active cw-injected ring cavity with a Yb3+:YAG amplifier.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhiyun; Bourdet, Gilbert L

    2007-05-10

    The short laser pulse generated from an active cw-injected ring cavity with Yb3+:YAG crystal, which is treated as the homogeneously broadened amplifier, is studied theoretically. Based on the derived results, the impacts of the amplifier length, the seeding laser intensity and frequency, the pump intensity, the efficiency of the acousto-optic modulator (AOM), and the frequency shift generated by the AOM on the performance of the laser pulse are analyzed. PMID:17446920

  8. Propagation In Matter Of Currents Of Relativistic Electrons Beyond The Alfven Limit, Produced In Ultra-High-Intensity Short-Pulse Laser-Matter Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batani, D.; Baton, S. D.; Manclossi, M.; Amiranoff, F.; Koenig, M.; Santos, J. J.; Martinolli, E.; Gremillet, L.; Popescu, H.; Antonicci, A.; Rousseaux, C.; Rabec Le Gloahec, M.; Hall, T.; Malka, V.; Cowan, T. E.; Stephens, R.; Key, M.; King, J.; Freeman, R.

    2004-12-01

    This paper reports the results of several experiments performed at the LULI laboratory (Palaiseau, France) concerning the propagation of large relativistic currents in matter from ultra-high-intensity laser pulse interaction with target. We present our results according to the type of diagnostics used in the experiments: 1) Kα emission and Kα imaging, 2) study of target rear side emission in the visible region, 3) time resolved optical shadowgraphy.

  9. Experimental Demonstration of the Effectiveness of Electromagnetically Induced Transparency for Enhancing Cross-Phase Modulation in the Short-Pulse Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmochowski, Greg; Feizpour, Amir; Hallaji, Matin; Zhuang, Chao; Hayat, Alex; Steinberg, Aephraim M.

    2016-04-01

    We present an experiment using a sample of laser-cooled Rb atoms to show that cross-phase modulation schemes continue to benefit from electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) even as the transparency window is made narrower than the signal bandwidth (i.e., for signal pulses much shorter than the response time of the EIT system). Addressing concerns that narrow EIT windows might not prove useful for such applications, we show that while the peak phase shift saturates in this regime, it does not drop, and the time-integrated effect continues to scale inversely with EIT window width. This integrated phase shift is an important figure of merit for tasks such as the detection of single-photon-induced cross-phase shifts. Only when the window width approaches the system's dephasing rate γ does the peak phase shift begin to decrease, leading to an integrated phase shift that peaks when the window width is equal to 4 γ .

  10. Experimental Demonstration of the Effectiveness of Electromagnetically Induced Transparency for Enhancing Cross-Phase Modulation in the Short-Pulse Regime.

    PubMed

    Dmochowski, Greg; Feizpour, Amir; Hallaji, Matin; Zhuang, Chao; Hayat, Alex; Steinberg, Aephraim M

    2016-04-29

    We present an experiment using a sample of laser-cooled Rb atoms to show that cross-phase modulation schemes continue to benefit from electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) even as the transparency window is made narrower than the signal bandwidth (i.e., for signal pulses much shorter than the response time of the EIT system). Addressing concerns that narrow EIT windows might not prove useful for such applications, we show that while the peak phase shift saturates in this regime, it does not drop, and the time-integrated effect continues to scale inversely with EIT window width. This integrated phase shift is an important figure of merit for tasks such as the detection of single-photon-induced cross-phase shifts. Only when the window width approaches the system's dephasing rate γ does the peak phase shift begin to decrease, leading to an integrated phase shift that peaks when the window width is equal to 4γ. PMID:27176519

  11. Short pulse generation from a flashlamp-pumped rhodamine 6G ring dye laser using the colliding pulse mode-locking technique

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.

    1987-01-01

    The colliding pulse mode-locking (CPM) technique has been applied to a flashlamp-pumped rhodamine 6G dye laser to reliably generate pulses of <1.5 ps. Pulse evolution in the ring cavity has been studied by examining the pulse characteristics at various parts of the pulse train using a Photochron II streak camera. The measured pulse durations in the ring cavity were found to be detector-limited and were shorter than those generated in a linear cavity. The shortest pulses were observed to evolve toward the end of the --600-ns long mode-locked train.

  12. Ultrafast and short pulse optical nonlinearities of meso-tetrakis-(2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-N,N,N-trimethyl-4-aniliniumyl) porphyrin and its metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siji Narendran, N. K.; Soman, Rahul; Sankar, Pranitha; Arunkumar, Chellaiah; Chandrasekharan, K.

    2015-11-01

    Among the various classes of Nonlinear Optical chromophores, porphyrins appear to have exclusive characteristics that make them superior to other compounds as optical materials. Here we report the experimental analysis on the nonlinear optical properties of a new series of porphyrins, meso-tetrakis(2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-N,N,N-trimethyl-4-aniliniumyl) porphyrin and its central metal substitutions using Z-scan technique under nanosecond (532 nm, 7 ns) and femtosecond (800 nm, 100 fs) excitations. The compounds were found to exhibit two photon absorption assisted excited state absorption in the nanosecond regime and effective three photon absorption in the femtosecond regime. The third-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities (χ(3)) were of the order 10-11 esu and are compared through degenerate four wave mixing (DFWM). The compounds showed good optical limiting behavior in both femtosecond and nanosecond regimes which find applications in laser safety. The structure property relationship has been established with the support of Electrostatic Surface Potential (ESP) mapping.

  13. A tuneable ultra-compact high-power, ultra-short pulsed, bright gamma-ray source based on bremsstrahlung radiation from laser-plasma accelerated electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Cipiccia, S.; Wiggins, S. M.; Shanks, R. P.; Islam, M. R.; Vieux, G.; Issac, R. C.; Brunetti, E.; Ersfeld, B.; Welsh, G. H.; Anania, M. P.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Maneuski, D.; Shea, V. O.; Lemos, N. R. C.; Bendoyro, R. A.; Dias, J. M.; Bourgeois, N.; Ibbotson, T. P. A.; and others

    2012-03-15

    The laser driven plasma wakefield accelerator is a very compact source of high energy electrons. When the quasi-monoenergetic beam from these accelerators passes through dense material, high energy bremsstrahlung photons are emitted in a collimated beam with high flux. We show how a source based on this emission process can produce more than 10{sup 9} photons per pulse with a mean energy of 10 MeV. We present experimental results that show the feasibility of this method of producing high energy photons and compare the experimental results with GEANT4 Montecarlo simulations, which also give the scaling required to evaluate its suitability as method to produce radioisotopes via photo-nuclear reactions or for imaging applications.

  14. Enhancement of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) Detection limit using a low-pressure and short-pulse laser-induced plasma process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen Zhen; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Kuwahara, Masakazu; Yan, Jun Jie; Liu, Ji Ping

    2013-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technology is an appealing technique compared with many other types of elemental analysis because of the fast response, high sensitivity, real-time, and noncontact features. One of the challenging targets of LIBS is the enhancement of the detection limit. In this study, the detection limit of gas-phase LIBS analysis has been improved by controlling the pressure and laser pulse width. In order to verify this method, low-pressure gas plasma was induced using nanosecond and picosecond lasers. The method was applied to the detection of Hg. The emission intensity ratio of the Hg atom to NO (IHg/INO) was analyzed to evaluate the LIBS detection limit because the NO emission (interference signal) was formed during the plasma generation and cooling process of N2 and O2 in the air. It was demonstrated that the enhancement of IHg/INO arose by decreasing the pressure to a few kilopascals, and the IHg/INO of the picosecond breakdown was always much higher than that of the nanosecond breakdown at low buffer gas pressure. Enhancement of IHg/INO increased more than 10 times at 700 Pa using picosecond laser with 35 ps pulse width. The detection limit was enhanced to 0.03 ppm (parts per million). We also saw that the spectra from the center and edge parts of plasma showed different features. Comparing the central spectra with the edge spectra, IHg/INO of the edge spectra was higher than that of the central spectra using the picosecond laser breakdown process. PMID:24160875

  15. Enhanced performance of an EUV light source (λ = 84 nm) using short-pulse excitation of a windowless dielectric barrier discharge in neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carman, R. J.; Kane, D. M.; Ward, B. K.

    2010-01-01

    The electrical and optical characteristics of a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) based neon excimer lamp generating output in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral range (λ = 84 nm) have been investigated experimentally. We report a detailed comparison of lamp performance for both pulsed and sinusoidal voltage excitation waveforms, using otherwise identical operating conditions. The results show that pulsed voltage excitation yields a ~50% increase in the overall electrical to EUV conversion efficiency compared with sinusoidal waveforms, when operating in the pressure range 500-900 mbar. Pulsed operation allows greater control of parameters associated with the temporal evolution of the EUV pulse shapes (risetime, instantaneous peak power). The Ne DBD based source is also found to be highly monochromatic with respect to its spectral output from the second continuum band at λ ~ 84 nm (5 nm FWHM). This continuum band dominates the spectral emission over the wavelength range 30-550 nm. Lamp performance; as measured by the overall EUV output energy, electrical to EUV conversion efficiency and spectral purity at λ ~ 84 nm; improves with increasing gas pressure up to p = 900 mbar.

  16. Comparison of ablation mechanisms at low fluence for ultrashort and short-pulse laser exposure of very thin molybdenum films on glass.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pinaki Das; O'Connor, Gerard M

    2016-03-20

    Complete removal of a loosely adhered very thin molybdenum film from a glass substrate is investigated for both femtosecond and nanosecond lasers at different wavelengths. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy confirm that ablation of the molybdenum film by femtosecond pulses occurs close to the damage threshold fluence, creating minimal damage to the substrate. This is in contrast to nanosecond laser processing where significant substrate damage at the equivalent damage threshold fluence is observed. Simulations predict a two-stage mechanical buckling mechanism in the femtosecond case. Out-of-plane thermal expansion first results in a tensile expansion of molybdenum film from the glass substrate; this locally delaminated film is then buckled by a subsequent compressive stress, leading to thin film spallation. Ablation by nanosecond laser pulses behaves differently. The appreciable heat diffusion length (∼700  nm) in molybdenum, observed for the nanosecond case, results in an increased thermal expansion of the glass. The thermally induced stress generated by the molten glass creates a delaminated area, which "pushes" the compressed film away from the substrate. These findings are relevant to future selective laser patterning of very thin molybdenum layers. PMID:27140542

  17. A short pulse of mechanical force induces gene expression and growth in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts via an ERK 1/2 pathway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, Jason P.; Pooran, Milad; Li, Chai-Fei; Luzzio, Chris; Hughes-Fulford, Millie

    2003-01-01

    Physiological mechanical loading is crucial for maintenance of bone integrity and architecture. We have calculated the strain caused by gravity stress on osteoblasts and found that 4-30g corresponds to physiological levels of 40-300 microstrain. Short-term gravity loading (15 minutes) induced a 15-fold increase in expression of growth-related immediate early gene c-fos, a 5-fold increase in egr-1, and a 3-fold increase in autocrine bFGF. The non-growth-related genes EP-1, TGF-beta, and 18s were unaffected by gravity loading. Short-term physiological loading induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2) phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner with maximum phosphorylation saturating at mechanical loading levels of 12g (p < 0.001) with no effect on total ERK. The phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was unaffected by mechanical force. g-Loading did not activate P38 MAPK or c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Additionally, a gravity pulse resulted in the localization of phosphorylated ERK 1/2 to the nucleus; this did not occur in unloaded cells. The induction of c-fos was inhibited 74% by the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 (p < 0.001) but was not affected by MEK1 or p38 MAPK-specific inhibitors. The long-term consequence of a single 15-minute gravity pulse was a 64% increase in cell growth (p < 0.001). U0126 significantly inhibited gravity-induced growth by 50% (p < 0.001). These studies suggest that short periods of physiological mechanical stress induce immediate early gene expression and growth in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts primarily through an ERK 1/2-mediated pathway.

  18. 5-MW Toronto HALT (Hydrate Addition at Low Temperature) pilot plant testing: Appendices: Part 1-B. [Hydrate addition at low temperture for the removal of SO/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, M.; College, J.; Forsythe, R.; Lee, K.; Herbert, R.; Kanary, D.

    1988-12-01

    ''Hydrate Addition at Low Temperature'' or HALT is a dry calcium-based hydrate injection process for the removal of SO/sub 2/ from flue gases off a sulfur bearing fuel. In this process the hydrate is pneumatically conveyed and injected into the flue gas stream as a dry particulate. The flue gas is cooled downstream of the hydrate injection location by spraying the gas with a stream of finely atomized water droplets. The water is atomized into a fine spray mist by using air under pressure as the atomizing fluid. The waste product from this process is the dry disposable solids which differ considerably from the wet cake solids obtained from a wet FGD process. This report contains appendices of pilot plant testing in the following areas: (a) figures (data as collected at 10 minute intervals), and inlet SO/sub 2/, O/sub 2/, and gas temperature variations, (b) raw data (sample), (c) solids analysis (hydrate, baghouse solids, and ESP Solids), (d) selected analytical methods on (1) microtrac procedure, (2) BET surface area measurement, (3) DuPont photometric SO/sub 2/ analyzer, and (e) corrosion test data.

  19. Status, Operation, and Extension of the ECRH System at ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, D.; Stober, J.; Leuterer, F.; Monaco, F.; Müller, S.; Münich, M.; Rapson, C. J.; Reich, M.; Schubert, M.; Schütz, H.; Treutterer, W.; Zohm, H.; Thumm, M.; Scherer, T.; Meier, A.; Gantenbein, G.; Jelonnek, J.; Kasparek, W.; Lechte, C.; Plaum, B.; Goodman, T.; Litvak, A. G.; Denisov, G. G.; Chirkov, A.; Zapevalov, V.; Malygin, V.; Popov, L. G.; Nichiporenko, V. O.; Myasnikov, V. E.; Tai, E. M.; Solyanova, E. A.; Malygin, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    The upgraded electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) system at ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) has been routinely used with eight gyrotrons during the last experimental campaign. A further upgrade will replace the existing system of four short-pulse (140 GHz, 2 s, 500 kW) gyrotrons. The final goal is to have around 6.5-7 MW at 140 GHz (or 5.5 MW at 105 GHz) from eight units available in the plasma during the whole AUG discharge (10 s). The system operates at 140 and 105 GHz with X2, O2 and X3 schemes. For B > 3 T also an ITER-like O1-scenario can be run using the 105 GHz option. Four of the eight launching antennas are capable of fast poloidal movements necessary for real-time control of the location of power deposition.

  20. Plasma physics applications to intense radiation sources, pulsed power and space physics. Short pulse ultra intense laser-plasma interaction experiment. Final report, 1 January 1990-31 May 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Sudan, R.N.

    1993-05-31

    Intense bright x-ray sources from dense z-pinch and x-pinch plasmas are being investigated for photo-pumping x-ray laser media. Crossed Aluminum wire X-pinches with mass line density up to hundreds of micrograms per centimeter have been imploded by up to 600 kA current for 40 ns using a 0.5 TW pulsed power generator. High density bright spots are observed. Soft x-ray spectroscopy was used to infer plasma density of up to approx. 10 to the 20th power per cubic cm and temperature of 100 -300 eV. The optimum mass loading for different ionization stages of Aluminum ions was examined. Parallel wire z-pinches yielded both lower density up to approx. 10(19)cm-3, and lower temperatures (70 - 200 eV), than the X-pinch plasmas.

  1. Tunable error-free optical frequency conversion of a 4ps optical short pulse over 25 nm by four-wave mixing in a polarisation-maintaining optical fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morioka, T.; Kawanishi, S.; Saruwatari, M.

    1994-05-01

    Error-free, tunable optical frequency conversion of a transform-limited 4.0 ps optical pulse signalis demonstrated at 6.3 Gbit/s using four-wave mixing in a polarization-maintaining optical fibre. The process generates 4.0-4.6 ps pulses over a 25nm range with time-bandwidth products of 0.31-0.43 and conversion power penalties of less than 1.5 dB.

  2. X-ray measurements at high-power lasers. Relative conversion efficiencies of short pulse laser light into K X-ray radiation in medium to high Z elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, C. I.; Indelicato, P.; Gumberidze, A.; Holland, G. E.; Seely, J. F.; Hudson, L. T.; Henins, A.; Audebert, P.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Tabakhoff, E.; Brambrink, E.

    2009-03-01

    Conversion efficiencies of laser light into K x-ray radiation are used to characterize laser-solid interactions e.g. in measurements with back-lighter targets in Inertial Confinement Fusion research or in ultra short x-ray science where ultra short laser pulses are used to create x-rays for investigation of dynamic processes. In our measurements we observed high energy (few tens of keV) K x-ray radiation of element pairs created upon impact of a 1 ps, 100 J laser pulse on the target surface. The high-energy electrons created in this interaction ionise and excite the target material. We have used high purity alloy foils of Pd and Ag, as well as In and Sn and crystals of CsI and rare earth molybdates as target materials. Both constituents of these targets were simultaneously excited in one shot. The K x-ray radiation was dispersed and detected with the LCS (LULI Crystal Spectrometer), a Cauchois-type cylindrically bent transmission-crystal spectrometer. Measuring ratios in the x-ray spectra permits determination of relative conversion efficiencies for pairs of elements under identical laser-target interaction conditions.

  3. Endodontic applications of a short pulsed FR Nd:YAG dental laser: photovaporization of extruded pulpal tissue following traumatic fractures of two maxillary central incisors--a clinical trial repor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Robert H., II

    1992-06-01

    Historically, many techniques have been attempted in the search for a satisfactory and consistent treatment of inflamed, painful, hyperemic pulpal tissue. Present techniques attempting to achieve profound local anesthesia in such tissue, have not been satisfactory. Local anesthesia techniques acceptable to the patient with painful hyperemic pulpal tissue, has eluded previous technology. The subsequent treatment of hyperemic tissue without sufficient anesthesia primarily involves undesirable invasive mechanical/surgical procedures. Described in this clinical trial is a technique using free running (FR) pulsed, Nd:YAG laser energy to ablate soft tooth pulpal tissue--a technique employed after conventional endodontic methods failed. A free running pulsed, FR Nd:YAG dental laser was successfully used at 20 pulses per second and 1.25 watts to photovaporize endodontic pulpal tissue (pulpectomy) to allow a conventional endodontic file to extirpate the remaining soft tissue remnants and access the root apex. Also described in this paper is the 'hot-tip' effect of contact fiber laser surgery. This clinical trial achieved the immediate, short term objective of endodontic soft tissue removal via photovaporization, without pain reported by the patient. The pulsed FR Nd:YAG dental laser used as described in this clinical report appears to be a very safe and very effective technique; offers a treatment alternative to traditional therapy that suggests high patient acceptance; and is significantly less stressful for the doctor and staff than traditional treatment options. Long-term, controlled scientific and clinical studies are necessary to establish the safety and efficacy of both the helium-neon energy for visualization and the low-watt pulsed FR Nd:YAG energy for photovaporization of soft endodontic pulpal tissue within the root canal. Research is especially needed to understand the effects of a low-watt, pulsed FR, Nd:YAG laser on the activity of osteoclasts and odontoclasts and identify risks for developing external and/or internal resorption after intracanal application of pulsed FR Nd:YAG laser energy.

  4. ESS SC Linac Design Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdinand, Robin

    2002-12-01

    The ESS project (European Spallation Source) aims to produce high power beams for condensed matter studies. One option consists in having both H+ and H- beams. They have to be accelerated and guided to the different spallation targets. Beam power up to 5 MW at 50 Hz plus 5 MW at 16.2/3 Hz, will be delivered on respectively the Short Pulse Target Station and the Long Pulse Target Station. Two 50 mA H- branches are funnelled with one 100 mA H+ beam at around 20 MeV. A chopper line between two RFQs and DTLs constitutes the H- front end. The H+ front end is composed of one RFQ and one DTL. After the funnel, the two species are transported through the same linac up to 1.334 GeV. This common part is composed of a SDTL and a CCL from 20 to 185 MeV and followed by a SuperConducting Linac (SCL) to reach the final energy. Up to recently (ESS Volume III 1996), a NC version of the linac had been extensively studied and constituted the reference option. However, given the fantastic progresses made on SC technology and the many potential advantages, a SC alternative was developed. We concentrate on this option.

  5. Multi-megawatt 110 GHz ECH system for the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Callis, R.W.; Lohr, J.; O`Neill, R.C.; Ponce, D.; Prater, R.

    1997-11-01

    Two 110 GHz gyrotrons with nominal output power of 1 MW each have been installed on the DIII-D tokamak. The first 110 GHz gyrotron built by Gycom has a nominal rating of 1 MW and a 2s pulse length, with the pulse length being determined by the maximum temperature allowed on the edge cooled boron nitride window. This gyrotron was first operated into the DIII-D tokamak in late 1996. The second gyrotron was built by Communications and Power Industries (CPI) was commissioned during the spring of 1997. The CPI gyrotron uses a double disc FC-75 cooled sapphire window which has a pulse length rating of 0.8s at 1 MW, 2s at 0.5 MW and 10s at 0.2 MW. Both gyrotrons are connected to the tokamak by a low-loss-windowless evacuated transmission line using circular corrugated waveguide for propagation in the HE(11) mode. Using short pulse lengths to avoid breakdown inside the air filled waveguide, the microwave beam has been measured inside the DIII-D vacuum vessel using a paper target and an IR camera. The resultant microwave beam was found to be well focused with a spot size of approximately 8 cm. The beam can be steered poloidially from the center to the outer edge of the plasma. The initial operation of the Gycom gyrotron with about 0.5 MW delivered to a low density plasma for 0.5 s showed good central electron heating, with peak temperature in excess of 10 keV. A third gyrotron, being built by CPI, will be installed later this year. Progress with the first CPI tube will also be discussed and future plans for the ECH installation and physics experiments will be presented.

  6. Radiation analysis of the CIT (Compact Ignition Tokamak) pellet injector system and its impact on personnel access

    SciTech Connect

    Selcow, E.C.; Stevens, P.N.; Gomes, I.C.; Gomes, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    Conceptual design of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is near completion. This short-pulse ignition experiment is planned to follow the operations of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The high neutron wall loadings, /approximately/4-5 MW/m/sup 2/, associated with the operation of this device require that neutronics-related issues be considered in the overall system design. Radiation shielding is required for the protection of device components and personnel. A close-in igloo shield has been designed around the periphery of the tokamak structure, and the entire experiment is housed in a circular test cell facility with a radius of /approximately/12 m. The most critical radiation concern in the CIT design process relates to the numerous penetrations in the device. This paper discusses the impact of a major penetration on the design and operations of the CIT pellet injection system. The pellet injector is a major component, which has a line-of-sight penetration through the igloo and test cell wall. All current options for maintenance of the injector require personnel access. A nuclear analysis has been performed to determine the feasibility of hands-on access. Results indicate that personnel access to the pellet injector glovebox is possible. 10 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. ECH Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Temkin, Richard

    2014-12-24

    Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) is needed for plasma heating, current drive, plasma stability control, and other applications in fusion energy sciences research. The program of fusion energy sciences supported by U. S. DOE, Office of Science, Fusion Energy Sciences relies on the development of ECH technology to meet the needs of several plasma devices working at the frontier of fusion energy sciences research. The largest operating ECH system in the world is at DIII-D, consisting of six 1 MW, 110 GHz gyrotrons capable of ten second pulsed operation, plus two newer gyrotrons. The ECH Technology Development research program investigated the options for upgrading the DIII-D 110 GHz ECH system. Options included extending present-day 1 MW technology to 1.3 – 1.5 MW power levels or developing an entirely new approach to achieve up to 2 MW of power per gyrotron. The research consisted of theoretical research and designs conducted by Communication and Power Industries of Palo Alto, CA working with MIT. Results of the study would be validated in a later phase by research on short pulse length gyrotrons at MIT and long pulse / cw gyrotrons in industry. This research follows a highly successful program of development that has led to the highly reliable, six megawatt ECH system at the DIII-D tokamak. Eventually, gyrotrons at the 1.5 megawatt to multi-megawatt power level will be needed for heating and current drive in large scale plasmas including ITER and DEMO.

  8. Status and System Performance for the DIII-D ECH System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cengher, M.; Lohr, J.; Gorelov, Y. A.; Ponce, D.; Prater, R.; Moeller, C. P.

    2014-10-01

    The electron cyclotron heating (ECH) capabilities on DIII-D are being steadily updated, leading to increased experimental flexibility and high reliability of the system. A 110 GHz depressed collector gyrotron in the 1.0 MW class was installed and is being tested and conditioned to longer pulse length. A second depressed collector gyrotron is operational in addition to the four 110 GHz, 1 MW gyrotrons. A new design depressed collector gyrotron in the 1.5 MW class, operating at 117.5 GHz, is expected to be installed during 2015 following rework to address a high voltage standoff problem. This tube will operate in the TE20,9 mode and has achieved 1.8 MW for short pulses during factory testing. The individual power generated at the gyrotrons and the power injected into the tokamak are measured on a shot-to-shot basis for the present year, with calibration based on the measured linearity between the injected power and the gyrotron cavity loading. The individual average injected powers into the plasma are between 520 and 760 kW. The line transmission coefficient including the waveguide line and the MOU is between -1.04 dB and -1.43 dB. Work supported by the US Department of Energy DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  9. The RF power system for the SNS linac

    SciTech Connect

    Tallerico, P.J.; Reass, W.A.

    1998-12-31

    The initial goal of the SNS project is to produce a 1 MW average beam of protons with short pulse lengths onto a neutron-producing target. The objective of the SNS RF system is to generate 117 MW peak of pulsed 805 MHz microwave power with an accelerated beam pulse length of 1.04 ms at a 60 Hz repetition rate. The power system must be upgradeable in peak power to deliver 2 MW average power to the neutron target. The RF system also requires about 3 MW peak of RF power at 402.5 MHz, but that system is not discussed here. The design challenge is to produce an RF system at minimum cost, that is very reliable and economical to operate. The combination of long pulses and high repetition rates make conventional solutions, such as the pulse transformer and transmission line method, very expensive. The klystron, with a modulating anode, and 1.5 MW of peak output power is the baseline RF amplifier, an 56 are required in the baseline design. The authors discuss four power system configurations that are the candidates for the design. The baseline design is a floating-deck modulating anode system. A second power system being investigated is the fast-pulsed power supply, that can be turned on and off with a rise time of under 0.1 ms. This could eliminate the need for a modulator, and drastically reduce the energy storage requirements. A third idea is to use a pulse transformer with a series IGBT switch and a bouncer circuit on the primary side, as was done for the TESLA modulator. A fourth method is to use a series IGBT switch at high voltage, and not use a pulse transformer. The authors discuss the advantages and problems of these four types of power systems, but they emphasize the first two.

  10. Radiation analysis of the CIT (Compact Ignition Tokamak) pellet injector system and its impact on personnel access

    SciTech Connect

    Selcow, E.C.; Stevens, P.N.; Gomes, I.C.; Gomes, L.M.

    1988-08-01

    The conceptual design of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is nearing completion. The CIT is a short-pulse ignition experiment, which is planned to follow the operations of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The high neutron wall loadings, 4--5 MW/m/sup 2/, associated with the operation of this device require that neutronics-related issues be considered in the overall system design. Radiation shielding is required for the protection of device components as well as personnel. A close-in igloo shield has been designed around the periphery of the tokamak structure, and the entire experiment is housed in a circular test cell facility that has a radius of 12 m. The most critical radiation concerns in the CIT design process relate to the numerous penetrations in the device. This report discusses the impact of a major penetration on the design and operation of the pellet injection system in the CIT. The pellet injector is a major component, and it has a line-of-sight penetration through the igloo and test cell wall. All current options for maintenance of the injector require hands-on-access. A nuclear analysis has been performed to establish the feasibility of hands-on-access. A coupled Monte Carlo/discrete-ordinates methodology was used to perform the analysis. This problem is characterized by deep penetration and streaming with very large length-to-diameter ratios. Results from this study indicate that personnel access to the pellet injector glovebox is possible. 14 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. ECH by FEL and gyrotron sources on the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Stallard, B.W.; Turner, W.C.; Allen, S.L.; Byers, J.A.; Felker, B.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Ferguson, S.W.; Hooper, E.G.; Thomassen, K.I.; Throop, A.L. ); Makowski, M.A. )

    1990-08-09

    The Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) at LLNL is studying the physics of intense pulse ECH is a high-density tokamak plasma using a microwave FEL. Related technology development includes the FEL, a windowless quasi-optical transmission system, and other microwave components. Initial plasma experiments have been carried out at 140 GHz with single rf pulses generated using the ETA-II accelerator and the ELF wiggler. Peak power levels up to 0.2 GW and pulse durations up to 10 ns were achieved for injection into the plasma using as untapered wiggler. FEL pulses were transmitted over 33 m from the FEL to MTX using six mirrors mounted in a 50-cm-diam evacuated pipe. Measurements of the microwave beam and transmission through the plasma were carried out. For future rapid pulse experiments at high average power (4 GW peak power, 5kHz pulse rate, and {bar P} > 0.5 MW) using the IMP wiggler with tapered magnetic field, a gyrotron (140 GHz, 400 kW cw or up to 1 MW short pulse) is being installed to drive the FEL input or to directly heat the tokamak plasma at full gyrotron power. Quasi-optic techniques will be used to couple the gyrotron power. For direct plasma heating, the gyrotron will couple into the existing mirror transport system. Using both sources of rf generation, experiments are planned to investigate intense pulse absorption and tokamak physics, such as the ECH of a pellet-fueled plasma and plasma control using localized heating. 12 refs., 9 figs.

  12. Modeling of Ultra-Short Soliton Propagation in Deterministic and Stochastic Nonlinear Cubic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, Levent

    We study the short pulse dynamics in the deterministic and stochastic environment in this thesis. The integrable short pulse equation is a modelling equation for ultra-short pulse propagation in the infrared range in the optical fibers. We investigate the numerical proof for the exact solitary solution of the short pulse equation. Moreover, we demonstrate that the short pulse solitons approximate the solution of the Maxwell equation numerically. Our numerical experiments prove the particle-like behaviour of the short pulse solitons. Furthermore, we derive a short pulse equation in the higher order. A stochastic counterpart of the short pulse equation is also derived through the use of the multiple scale expansion method for more realistic situations where stochastic perturbations in the dispersion are present. We numerically show that the short pulse solitary waves persist even in the presence of the randomness. The numerical schemes developed demonstrate that the statistics of the coarse-graining noise of the short pulse equation over the slow scale, and the microscopic noise of the nonlinear wave equation over the fast scale, agree to fairly good accuracy.

  13. Integration of LHCD system with SST1 machine and its high power rf performance in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, P. K.; Ambulkar, K. K.; Dalakoti, S.; Parmar, P. R.; Virani, C. G.; Thakur, A. L.

    2014-02-01

    A 2.0 MW CW lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system based on 3.7 GHz klystron sources, is in advanced stage of commissioning, which would drive and sustain plasma current, non-inductively, in superconducting steadystate tokamak (SST1) for long pulse operation. Four klystrons, each rated for 0.5 MW CW rf power, delivers 2.0 MW of rf power to four layer of the LHCD system, which finally feeds the rf power to grill antenna. The antenna system along with vacuum window and vacuum transmission line is successfully integrated on the machine. Its vacuum and pressurization compatibility has been successfully established. To validate the high power performance of LHCD system for SST1 machine, stage-wise commissioning of LHCD system in staggered manner is planned. It has been envisaged that LHCD power may be gradually increased initially, since full power may not be required during the initial phases of SST1 plasma operation. Also if the system is integrated in steps or in phases, then integration issues, as well as high power operational issues, if any, can be addressed, attended and handled in a simpler way before integrating all the layers to the grill antenna. To begin with, one klystron is connected to one layer, out of four layers, which energizes a quarter of the grill antenna. Gradually, the rf power and its pulse length is increased to validate high power performance of the system. Arcing and reflections are observed as rf power is gradually increased. The problems are analysed and after taking appropriate remedial action the system performance is improved for operation up to 160kW. Several trains of short pulses are launched in SST1 vacuum vessel for rf conditioning of the LHCD system. Normally, reflections are high when power is launched in vacuum; therefore the pulse length is restricted up to 100 milliseconds. The high power performance of this layer, connected with grill antenna is validated by launching high power microwaves in vacuum vessel of SST1 machine

  14. Grid Simulator for Testing MW-Scale Wind Turbines at NREL (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Gevorgian, V.; McDade, M.; Wallen, R.; Mendoza, I.; Shirazi, M.

    2011-05-01

    As described, an initiative by NREL to design and construct a 9-MVA grid simulator to operate with the existing 2.5 MW and new upcoming 5-MW dynamometer facilities will fulfill this role and bring many potential benefits to the U.S. wind industry with the ultimate goal of reducing wind energy integration costs.

  15. Progress on Converting a NIF Quad to Eight, Petawatt Beams for Advanced Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, J K

    2009-10-19

    We are converting a quad of NIF beamlines into eight, short-pulse (1-50 ps), petawatt-class beams for advanced radiography and fast ignition experiments. This paper describes progress toward completing this project.

  16. Measurements of electron and proton heating temperatures from extreme-ultraviolet light images at 68 eV in petawatt laser experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Peimin; Zhang, B.; Key, M. H.; Hatchett, S. P.; Barbee, T.; Freeman, R. R.; Akli, K.; Hey, D.; King, J. A.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Snavely, R. A.; Stephens, R. B.

    2006-11-15

    A 68 eV extreme-ultraviolet light imaging diagnostic measures short pulse isochoric heating by electrons and protons in petawatt laser experiments. Temperatures are deduced from the absolute intensities and comparison with modeling using a radiation hydrodynamics code.

  17. Energy and Technology Review, November 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Poggio, A.J.; Crawford, R.; Gleason, K.; Hendry, D.P.; Sanford, N.M.; Taft, S.O.

    1988-01-01

    This review by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory contains papers related to: cratering phenomenology revealed through discrete-element modeling; high-intensity short-pulse lasers; localized transmission of wave energy; and evidence of localized wave transmission.

  18. Progress on converting a NIF quad to eight, petawatt beams for advanced radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, J. K.; Tietbohl, G.; Arnold, P.; Bliss, E. S.; Boley, C.; Britten, G.; Brunton, G.; Clark, W.; Dawson, J. W.; Fochs, S.; Hackel, R.; Haefner, C.; Halpin, J.; Heebner, J.; Henesian, M.; Hermann, M.; Hernandez, J.; Kanz, V.; McHale, B.; McLeod, J. B.; Nguyen, H.; Phan, H.; Rushford, M.; Shaw, B.; Shverdin, M.; Sigurdsson, R.; Speck, R.; Stolz, C.; Trummer, D.; Wolfe, J.; Wong, J. N.; Siders, G. C.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2010-08-01

    We are converting a quad of NIF beamlines into eight, short-pulse (1-50 ps), petawatt-class beams for advanced radiography and fast ignition experiments. This paper describes progress toward completing this project.

  19. Optical chirped beam amplification and propagation

    DOEpatents

    Barty, Christopher P.

    2004-10-12

    A short pulse laser system uses dispersive optics in a chirped-beam amplification architecture to produce high peak power pulses and high peak intensities without the potential for intensity dependent damage to downstream optical components after amplification.

  20. Reduction and analysis of data collected during the electromagnetic tornado experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davisson, L. D.

    1976-01-01

    Techniques for data processing and analysis are described to support tornado detection by analysis of radio frequency interference in various frequency bands, and sea state determination from short pulse radar measurements. Activities include: strip chart recording of tornado data; the development and implementation of computer programs for digitalization and analysis of the data; data reduction techniques for short pulse radar data, and the simulation of radar returns from the sea surface by computer models.