Science.gov

Sample records for 50ka dc-current interruption

  1. Current Zero Missing Phenomena caused by D.C. Current which Flows from Shunt Reactor at the Ground Fault and its Interruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Takayuki; Eto, Atsushi; Koshizuka, Tadashi; Nishiwaki, Susumu; Kudo, Kietsu; Matsushita, Kozo; Hosokawa, Osamu

    At substations where shunt reactors are installed, when a ground fault occurs near the reactor, d.c. current flows from the reactor to the fault point. There are cases where circuit breakers installed near the reactor interrupt only the d.c. current from the reactor with long arcing times. In those cases, attention should be paid to the damage of the contacts. This paper shows the investigation of the d.c. current interrupting performance for the 550kV one-break SF6 gas circuit breaker. In the range of some hundreds amperes, the d.c. arc voltages with long arcing times of the 550kV one-break circuit breaker were measured. The d.c. current waveform and arcing time at the d.c. current interruption by 550kV one-break circuit breaker in the 500kV cable system were calculated. Interrupting test circuit for the d.c. current interruption was constructed in the high power laboratory. From the interrupting test results, it was made clear that the circuit breaker had a good interrupting performance after the d.c. current interruptions.

  2. DC current monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canter, Stanley (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A non-intrusive DC current monitor is presented which emulates the theoretical operation of an AC transformer. A conductor, carrying the current to be measured, acts as the primary of a DC current transformer. This current is passed through the center of a secondary coil, and core positioned thereabout, and produces a magnetic flux which induces a current in the secondary proportional to the current flowing in the primary. Means are provided to periodically reset the transformer core such that the measurement inaccuracies associated with core saturation are obviated. A reset current is caused to periodically flow through the secondary coil which produces a magnetic flux oppositely polarized to the flux created by the current in the primary, thus allowing ongoing measurements to be made.

  3. A ˜50 ka record of monsoonal variability in the Darjeeling foothill region, eastern Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Ruby; Bera, Subir; Sarkar, Anindya; Paruya, Dipak Kumar; Yao, Yi-Feng; Li, Cheng-Sen

    2015-04-01

    Pollen, phytoliths and δ 13C signatures of soil organic matter from two fluvial sedimentary sequences of the Darjeeling foothill region, eastern Himalayas are used to portray palaeoclimatic oscillations and their impact on regional plant communities over the last ˜50 ka. Quantitative palaeoclimate estimation using coexistence approach on pollen data and other proxies indicate significant oscillations in precipitation during the late part of MIS 3 (46.4-25.9 ka), early and middle part of MIS 2 (25.9-15.6 ka), and 5.4 to 3.5 ka. Middle to late MIS 3 (ca 46.4-31 ka.) was characterized by a comparatively low monsoonal activity and slightly higher temperature than that during ca 31 ka onwards. Simultaneous expansion of deciduous trees and chloridoid grasses also imply a drier and warmer phase. Between 31 and 22.3 ka (late MIS 3 to mid-MIS 2), higher precipitation and a slightly cooler temperature led to an increase in evergreen elements over deciduous taxa and wet-loving panicoid grasses over dry-loving chloridoid grasses than earlier. After ca 22.3 ka, shrinking of forest cover, expansion of C4 chloridoid grasses, Asteraceae and Cheno-ams in the vegetation with lowering of temperature and precipitation characterized the onset of the LGM which continued till 18.3 ka. End of the LGM is manifested by a restoration in the forest cover and in the temperature and precipitation regime. Later, during 5.4 to 4.3 ka, a strong monsoonal activity supported a dense moist evergreen forest cover that subsequently declined during 4.3 to 3.5 ka. A further increase in deciduous elements and non-arboreals might be a consequence of reduced precipitation and higher temperature during this phase. A comparison between monsoonal rainfall, MAT and palaeoatmospheric CO2 with floral dynamics since last ˜50 ka indicates that these fluctuations in plant succession were mainly driven by monsoonal variations.

  4. DC current measurement utilizing a resonant magnetically actuated piezoresistive microcantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guiming; Zhao, Libo; Jiang, Zhuangde; Xu, Longqi; Zhao, Yulong; Wang, Jiuhong; Wang, Xiaopo; Liu, Zhigang

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a novel current sensor by using a resonant piezoresistive microcantilever combined with magnetic actuation for the first time. An actuation power of several microwatts was necessary for stable self-oscillation. The sensor measured the DC current by obtaining the electrothermally induced resonant frequency shift of the microcantilever as a result of the Joule heating dissipated when the DC current flowed through the Wheatstone bridge on the microcantilever. Two theoretical models were established between the microcantilever's resonant frequency and the square of the DC current. The experimental results showed that the accuracy in the range of 0.5-5 mA (apart from 0.5 mA) using the two models was 2.60% and 1.00% with correlation coefficient value R > 0.999 in both cases, respectively. The current sensitivity of the sensor was about -3.983 Hz mA-2 in the range of 0.5-5 mA. To maintain stable results, the sensor chip should be sealed in vacuum and integrated into an oven-control system.

  5. Principle, advantages and disadvantages of a dc Current Transformer (DCCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanes, J. T.; Verkooijen, H.

    1990-10-01

    The operation and different possible designs of a dc Current Transformer (DCCT) for the measurement of large currents are studied. The principles of peak detection and synchronous detection are outlined, and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. The designs of excitation coil, excitation filter, synchronous detector, proportional integration control, and output filter are presented. The resolution of the measuring system is mainly determined by the material of the transformer core and by the quality factor of the excitation filter. For an optimal result the transformer has to function as a comparator.

  6. Schooling, Interrupted

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCapua, Andrea; Smathers, Will; Tang, Lixing Frank

    2007-01-01

    As the ranks of English language learners swell in the United States, the number of students with interrupted formal education (SIFE) is on the rise. In 2004-05, New York City schools estimated that 10 percent of their English language learners were students with interrupted schooling. According to the New York State Department of Education,

  7. 14C ages and activity for the past 50 ka at Volcán Galeras, Colombia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banks, N.G.; Calvache, V.M.L.; Williams, S.N.

    1997-01-01

    Volcán Galeras is the southernmost Colombian volcano with well-recorded historic activity. The volcano is part of a large and complex volcanic center upon which 400,000 people live. Historic activity has centered on a small-volume cone inside the youngest of several large amphitheaters that breach the west flank of the volcano, away from the city of Pasto (population 300,000). Lava flows (SiO2 between 54.6 and 64.7 wt.%) have dominated activity for more than 1 Ma, but explosive events have also occurred. Joint studies by volcanologists from Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Argentina, and the United States produced 24 new14C ages and more than 100 stratigraphic sections to interpret the past 50 ka of activity at Galeras, including sector collapse events. The youngest collapse event truncated 12.8 ka lava flows and may have occurred as recently as 8 to 10 ka. Tephra-fall material rapidly thins and becomes finer away from the vent area. The only widespread marker in the < 10 ka section is a biotite-bearing tephra deposited between 4.1 and 4.5 ka from a source south of Galeras. It separates cryoturbated from largely undisturbed layers on Galeras, and thus dates a stratigraphic horizon which is useful in the interpretation of other volcanoes and geotectonics in the equatorial Andes. Pyroclastic flows during the past 50 ka have been small to moderate in volume, but they have left numerous thin deposits on the north and east flanks where lava flows have been impeded by crater and amphitheater walls. Many of the pyroclastic-flow deposits are lithic rich, with fines and clasts so strongly altered by hydrothermal action before eruption that they, as well as the sector collapse deposits, resemble waste dumps of leached cappings from disseminated sulfide deposits more than volcanogenic deposits. This evidence of a long-lived hydrothermal system indicates susceptibility to mass failure and explosive events higher than expected for a volcano built largely by lava flows and modest Vulcanian eruptions. Photographs, written accounts, and our study document historic north and east flank pyroclastic flows as far as 10 km from the summit; however, none have left recognizable deposits in Pasto for more than 40 ka.

  8. 14C ages and activity for the past 50 ka at Volcán Galeras, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, N. G.; Calvache V, M. L.; Williams, S. N.

    1997-05-01

    Volcán Galeras is the southernmost Colombian volcano with well-recorded historic activity. The volcano is part of a large and complex volcanic center upon which 400,000 people live. Historic activity has centered on a small-volume cone inside the youngest of several large amphitheaters that breach the west flank of the volcano, away from the city of Pasto (population 300,000). Lava flows (SiO 2 between 54.6 and 64.7 wt.%) have dominated activity for more than 1 Ma, but explosive events have also occurred. Joint studies by volcanologists from Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Argentina, and the United States produced 24 new 14C ages and more than 100 stratigraphic sections to interpret the past 50 ka of activity at Galeras, including sector collapse events. The youngest collapse event truncated 12.8 ka lava flows and may have occurred as recently as 8 to 10 ka. Tephra-fall material rapidly thins and becomes finer away from the vent area. The only widespread marker in the < 10 ka section is a biotite-bearing tephra deposited between 4.1 and 4.5 ka from a source south of Galeras. It separates cryoturbated from largely undisturbed layers on Galeras, and thus dates a stratigraphic horizon which is useful in the interpretation of other volcanoes and geotectonics in the equatorial Andes. Pyroclastic flows during the past 50 ka have been small to moderate in volume, but they have left numerous thin deposits on the north and east flanks where lava flows have been impeded by crater and amphitheater walls. Many of the pyroclastic-flow deposits are lithic rich, with fines and clasts so strongly altered by hydrothermal action before eruption that they, as well as the sector collapse deposits, resemble waste dumps of leached cappings from disseminated sulfide deposits more than volcanogenic deposits. This evidence of a long-lived hydrothermal system indicates susceptibility to mass failure and explosive events higher than expected for a volcano built largely by lava flows and modest Vulcanian eruptions. Photographs, written accounts, and our study document historic north and east flank pyroclastic flows as far as 10 km from the summit; however, none have left recognizable deposits in Pasto for more than 40 ka.

  9. A critique of the chronometric evidence for hominid fossils: I. Africa and the Near East 500-50 ka.

    PubMed

    Millard, Andrew R

    2008-06-01

    The chronometric dating evidence for all hominid fossils from Africa and the Near East that have previously been dated to 500-50 ka is critically assessed using the concept of chronometric hygiene, and these dates are revised using Bayesian statistical analyses where possible. Sixteen relevant hominid sites lacking chronometric evidence are briefly discussed. Chronometric evidence from 37 sites is assessed in detail. The dates for many hominid fossils are poorly constrained, with a number dated by comparisons of faunal assemblages-a method that does not have good chronological resolution for much of the last million years. For sites with stratigraphic sequences of dates, it is generally possible to refine the dating, but in some cases, the revised chronology is less precise than previous chronologies. Fossils over 200 ka in age tend to be poorly dated, but for the last 200 kyr, dating is better due to the availability of electron-spin-resonance and thermoluminescence dating. Consideration of the chronologies favored by the proponents of the out-of-Africa and multiregional hypotheses of human evolution shows their selectivity. The chronological assessment of the fossils here is compatible with either hypothesis. If evolutionary schemes that do not rely on the morphology of the hominid fossils to decide the sequence of fossils are to be built, then further dating is required, alongside full publication of existing dates. PMID:18201747

  10. Eolian depositional phases during the past 50 ka and inferred climate variability for the Pampean Sand Sea, western Pampas, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripaldi, Alfonsina; Forman, Steven L.

    2016-05-01

    The Pampean Sand Sea, which occurs from the Argentinian Pampas to the eastern Andean piedmont, hosts presently stabilized dune fields spanning the late Quaternary. This study integrates previous results and presents new geomorphic, stratigraphic, sedimentological, and chronologic data for nineteen >2 m-thick eolian successions for the San Luis paleo-dune field, western Pampas, to better constrain the depositional history. Six eolian depositional phases are identified spanning the past 50 ka, interposed with paleosols and/or bounded by erosive surfaces. Age control was from 61 OSL ages of small aliquots of quartz grains from eolian stratigraphic units. The inferred timing of eolian phases are at ca. 70 ± 10 yr, 190 ± 20 yr, 12 to 1 ka, 22 to 17 ka, 29 to 24 ka, and 40 to 32 ka. A maximum span for periods of pedogenesis at ca. 12 to 17 ka, 22 to 24 ka, and 29 to 32 ka was provided by bounding OSL ages, which broadly overlap with high stands of pluvial lakes and glacier advances in the central Andes. We infer that the added precipitation may reflect expansion of the Southern Hemisphere monsoon, associated with Northern Hemisphere Heinrich events, leading to episodes of significantly wetter conditions (>350 mm MAP) to at least 35° S. Most of the Holocene (12 ka to 0.8 ka) was characterized by sand sheet deposit under drier than present conditions (100-450 mm MAP), associated with Monte-type vegetation (shrub steppe). The latest two eolian depositional phases, occurred at ca. 190 and 70 yr ago, during the historic period with European settlement and are related to anthropogenic landscape disturbance, though the youngest phase was concomitant with 1930s drought. Wet conditions dominated since ca. AD 1970 with new lakes and rivers forming across this eolian terrain; an incongruous environmental response in reference to drier conditions for most of the Holocene.

  11. Variability of Western Pacific Warm Pool Rainfall since 50 ka BP: Lithologic and Isotopic Perspectives from Lake Matano, Central Sulawesi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicaksono, S. A.; Russell, J. M.; Bijaksana, S.; Noren, A. J.; Wattrus, N. J.; Vogel, H.

    2012-12-01

    We use multiple paleohydrological proxies applied to the sedimentary record of Lake Matano (2°29.1'S 121°20'E), central Sulawesi, Indonesia, to understand the mechanisms controlling long-term variations of the Australian-Indonesian Monsoon (AIM) and Western Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP) convection during the past 50 ka. Lithogenic tracers of surface runoff, including magnetic susceptibility and XRF-derived iron counts, are high during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 2/Last Glacial Maximum as well as during millennial-scale northern hemisphere cold events (e.g. the Younger Dryas and Heinrich events), indicating a wetter climate during these northern hemisphere stadials. These events appear in antiphase to dry conditions in mainland Asia, reconstructed by oxygen isotopic analyses of Chinese speleothems, demonstrating antiphasing between the AIM (our record) and the East Asian Summer Monsoon (Chinese speleothems) at both orbital and millennial timescales. At the orbital band, this antiphasing is likely due to the influence of changing seasonal insolation on the global summer monsoons, northern hemisphere ice sheet expansion, and associated shifts in the mean latitudinal position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone. Interestingly, our data indicates that MIS2 was far wetter than the late Holocene, despite similar austral summer insolation at these times. The strikingly wet MIS2 signal in our proxy data compared to MIS1 and MIS3 suggests that the climate in this region is strongly sensitive to glacial forcings, likely related to changes in WPWP convection driven by greenhouse gas forcing and ice-volume induced atmospheric circulation changes. To better understand the connection between WPWP convection, water vapor transport, and AIM strength at orbital timescales, we also investigate hydrogen isotopic ratios of terrestrial higher plant leaf waxes (δDwax) in Lake Matano's sediments. Assuming that δDwax records the δD of past precipitation, which may be related to the intensity of WPWP convection, we hypothesize that periods of strong convection covary with intervals of high surface runoff. Comparison of our lithologic and isotopic proxies of terrestrial paleohydrology, including nearby Lake Towuti, with regional proxy data will also help constrain the boundary between wet and dry events in the WPWP during the northern hemisphere stadials.

  12. Marine sediments and Beryllium-10 record of the geomagnetic moment variations of the 20-50ka interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ménabréaz, L.; Thouveny, N.; Bourles, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    To better constrain the Earth's dipole moment changes at the time of the Laschamp and Mono Lake excursions, we reconstructed the cosmogenic nuclide 10Be production variations in the atmosphere using authigenic 10Be/9Be records measured along two marine sediment sequences from the north-east Atlantic (Portuguese margin) and west-equatorial Pacific (Papua-New Guinea margin) oceans. These two records evidence an almost doubling of the 10Be production at ~41 ka, thus assignable to the geomagnetic dipole low associated to the Laschamp excursion. The compilation of authigenic 10Be/9Be marine records provides a stack which indicates that the global 10Be production rates at 41 ka were enhanced by a ~1.5 factor compared to the average over the 20-50 ka interval. The comparison of this authigenic 10Be/9Be marine stack with the Greenland 10Be flux record (smoothed by 1000-year averaging) evidences a good coherency of the timing and amplitude of 10Be production recorded at high, mid and low latitudes. This confirms that the 10Be overproduction signal has a global significance, as expected from a geomagnetic dipole moment loss. The calibration of the 10Be/9Be stack using absolute virtual dipole moment values provides an independent tool to reconstruct geomagnetic dipole moment variations. This allows computing the loss rate leading to the Laschamp dipole minimum (~ -1.5 x 1022 A.m2.ka-1), which constitutes an interesting criterion to assess the loss rate of the historical field. In constrast with relative paleointensity records and absolute paleointensity data sets, the absence of significant cosmogenic enhancement at the age of 34 ka suggests that the Mono Lake dipole low was not sufficient to trigger a significant cosmogenic overproduction. This demonstrates that if the Mono lake excursion really occurred at that time, the duration and amplitude of the dipole weakening were very limited compared to that of the Laschamp. The 10Be overproduction quantified in this study constitutes a reliable basis to calibrate radiocarbon production and in situ cosmogenic nuclides production. For example, it can help to understand the atmospheric 14C concentration variations, recorded near 41 ka and near 34 ka in Δ 14C series. The 10Be production peak linked to the Laschamp dipole low can be used as a global tie point for correlation of high-resolution paleoclimatic series obtained from high quality archives. This study is funded through the MAG-ORB project ANR- 09-BLAN-0053-01.

  13. Generation of DC currents by ICRF near fields in the Scrape-off Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngadjeu, A.; Faudot, E.; Colas, L.; Heuraux, S.; Gunn, J.; Kubič, M.

    2011-08-01

    DC currents flowing along magnetic field lines connected to powered ICRF antennas have been observed experimentally. Negative current is collected on the powered ICRF antenna structure, while positive current is collected by magnetically connected Langmuir probes. Models based upon a double probe configuration are tested with the 2D electrostatic PIC code OOPIC and the 2D fluid code SEM. These models can be excited in a symmetrical (two electrode in antiphase) or an asymmetrical way (one electrode). Transverse RF currents can be exchanged with surrounding flux tubes. Simulations show that only "asymmetric" drive can draw net DC currents. As in experiments, they are negative on the "driven" electrode and positive on the grounded one. An electrostatic and low frequency analytical model explains how DC current is produced. The perpendicular width of current structures L⊥ depends on the parallel length L//.

  14. Sensitivity enhancement of a microcantilever based DC current sensor by using its torsional modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guiming; Zhao, Libo; Jiang, Zhuangde; Xu, Longqi; Hu, Yingjie; Zhao, Yulong; Liu, Zhigang

    2014-12-01

    This paper investigated the current sensitivity of a resonant sensor based on a magnetically actuated piezoresistive microcantilever in different resonant modes, which were the first flexural mode and the first and second torsional modes. The sensor was based on the idea of measuring the electrothermally induced resonance frequency shift as a result of the Joule heating dissipated when the DC current flowed through the Wheatstone bridge on the microcantilever. Two theoretical models between the microcantilever’s resonance frequency and the square of the applied DC current for the sensor operating under the flexural and torsional modes were established. From the experimental results, it can be seen that the current sensitivity of the first torsional mode is an order of magnitude greater than the first flexural mode, but less than that of the second torsional mode. In addition, the effect of the DC current’s direction on the measured results should be taken into account before detecting the DC current.

  15. DC current distribution mapping system of the solar panels using a HTS-SQUID gradiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Shingo; Kasuya, Syohei; Mawardi Saari, Mohd; Sakai, Kenji; Kiwa, Toshihiko; Tsukamoto, Akira; Adachi, Seiji; Tanabe, Keiichi; Tsukada, Keiji

    2014-05-01

    Solar panels are expected to play a major role as a source of sustainable energy. In order to evaluate solar panels, non-destructive tests, such as defect inspections and response property evaluations, are necessary. We developed a DC current distribution mapping system of the solar panels using a High Critical Temperature Superconductor Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (HTS-SQUID) gradiometer with ramp edge type Josephson junctions. Two independent components of the magnetic fields perpendicular to the panel surface (∂Bz/∂x, ∂Bz/∂y) were detected. The direct current of the solar panel is visualized by calculating the composition of the two signal components, the phase angle, and mapping the DC current vector. The developed system can evaluate the uniformity of DC current distributions precisely and may be applicable for defect detection of solar panels.

  16. Linking the10Be continental record of Lake Baikal to marine and ice archives of the last 50 ka: Implication for the global dust-aerosol input

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aldahan, A.; Possnert, G.; Peck, J.; King, J.; Colman, S.

    1999-01-01

    We present here a 10Be profile from the continental sediments of Lake Baikal (the world's largest fresh water lake), which, for the first time, shows the ??? 40 ka 10Be enhancement and a pattern that strongly matches those from the marine and ice records for the last 50 ka. This finding provides a new horizon for global and regional correlation of continental archives. Additionally, our VADM-predicted 10Be production confirms and further strengthens a common global cause (geomagnetic field intensity) for the change in atmospheric 10Be over the last 50 ka. We also show that most of the 10Be inventory to the lake has been provided by riverine input, but with a significant addition from direct precipitation and dust-aerosol fallout. We estimate a higher dust-aerosol contribution of 10Be during the Holocene and interstadial stage 3 (22-50 ka) as compared with the glacial period (12-22 ka). Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Operation of the DC current transformer intensity monitors at FNAL during run II

    SciTech Connect

    Crisp, J.; Fellenz, B.; Heikkinen, D.; Ibrahim, M.A.; Meyer, T.; Vogel, G.; /Fermilab

    2012-01-01

    Circulating beam intensity measurements at FNAL are provided by five DC current transformers (DCCT), one per machine. With the exception of the DCCT in the Recycler, all DCCT systems were designed and built at FNAL. This paper presents an overview of both DCCT systems, including the sensor, the electronics, and the front-end instrumentation software, as well as their performance during Run II.

  18. Operation of the DC Current Transformer intensity monitors at FNAL during Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisp, J.; Fellenz, B.; Heikkinen, D.; Ibrahim, M. A.; Meyer, T.; Vogel, G.

    2012-01-01

    Circulating beam intensity measurements at FNAL are provided by five DC current transformers (DCCT), one per machine. With the exception of the DCCT in the Recycler, all DCCT systems were designed and built at FNAL. This paper presents an overview of both DCCT systems, including the sensor, the electronics, and the front-end instrumentation software, as well as their performance during Run II.

  19. Investigation of DC current injection effect on the microwave characteristics of HTS YBCO microstrip resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurgaliev, T.; Blagoev, B.; Mateev, E.; Neshkov, L.; Strbik, V.; Uspenskaya, L.; Nedkov, I.; Chromik, Š.

    2014-03-01

    The DC current injection effect from a ferromagnetic (FM) La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) to a high temperature superconducting (HTS) Y1Ba2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) thin film was investigated by the microwave surface impedance measurements in a FM/HTS structure, formed as a microstrip resonator for improving the sensitivity of the experiments. The quality factor and the resonance frequency of this structure were found to strongly depend on the current strength, injected from the LSMO electrode into the HTS microstrip electrode. The magnetic penetration depth and the quasiparticle conductivity of the HTS component were determined to increase under DC current injection process, which in all probability stimulated breaking of Cooper pairs and led to a decrease of the superfluid concentration and an increase of the normal fluid concentration without significantly affecting the relaxation time of the quasiparticles.

  20. SIM regional comparison of ac-dc current transfer difference SIM.EM-K12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lillo, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    The ac-dc current transfer difference identified as SIM.EM.K-12 began in July 2010 and was completed in September 2012. Six NMIs in the SIM region and one NMI in the AFRIMET region took part: NRC (Canada), NIST (United States of America), CENAM (Mexico), INTI (Argentina), UTE (Uruguay), INMETRO (Brazil) and NIS (Egypt). The comparisons were proposed to assess the measurement capabilities in ac-dc current transfer difference of the participants NMIs. The ac-dc current transfer differences of the travelling standard had been measured at 10 mA and 5 A at 10 Hz, 55 Hz, 1 kHz, 10 kHz, 20 kHz, 50 kHz and 100 kHz. The test points were selected to link the results with the equivalent CCEM Key Comparisons (CCEM-K12), through three NMIs participating in both SIM and CCEM key comparisons (INTI, NRC and NIST). The report shows the degree of equivalence in the SIM region and also the degree of equivalence with the corresponding CCEM reference value. The results of all participants support the values and uncertainties of the applicable CMC entries for ac-dc current transfer difference in the Key Comparison Database held at the BIPM. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  1. Vortex domain structures and dc current dependence of magneto-resistances in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hong-Xiang; Lu, Qing-Feng; Zhao, Su-Fen; Zhang, Xie-Qun; Feng, Jia-Feng; Han, Xiu-Feng

    2004-09-01

    Microfabrication and the magneto-transport characteristics of the magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with a spin-valve-type structure of Ta (5nm)/Ni79Fe21 (25nm)/Ir22Mn78 (12nm)/Co75Fe25 (4nm)/Al(0.8nm) oxide/Co75Fe25 (4nm)/Ni79Fe21 (20nm)/Ta(5nm) were investigated in this paper. A series of experimental data measured with a MTJ was used to verify a magnon-assisted tunnelling model and theory. Furthermore, a micromagnetics simulation shows that the butterfly-like vortex domain structures can be formed under a current-induced Oersted field, which decreases the net magnetization values of the ferromagnetic electrodes under a large dc current (i.e., in high voltage regimes). It is one of the main reasons for the tunnel magnetoresistance ratios to decrease significantly at high voltage biasing.

  2. Orbital and millennial-scale variability in the southernmost reaches of the South American summer monsoon during the last 50 ka BP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiessi, C. M.; Govin, A.; Mulitza, S.; Campos, M. D.

    2013-05-01

    The South American summer monsoon (SASM) and its related features (e.g., the South Atlantic Convergence Zone) deliver most of the precipitation for the Amazon and La Plata basins, the two largest drainage systems in South America. Marine, cave and lake records mainly from equatorial and tropical South America show that the strength of the SASM fluctuated on orbital and millennial time-scales, with a strong SASM during periods of high austral summer insolation. On millennial time-scales, precipitation in tropical South America to the south of the equator was increased during periods of a weak Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. Nevertheless, there is an almost complete lack of information about changes in precipitation in the subtropics and mid-latitudes of South America. This area comprises the transition from the southernmost reaches of the SASM to the semi-arid northern Patagonia, and is highly sensitive to changes in precipitation because: (i) it mainly receives precipitation during austral summer (related to the SASM); and (ii) it shows a steep gradient in total annual precipitation (going from ca. 1000 mm/yr around 30oS to ca. 200 mm/yr around 40oS). Here we present recently acquired data from the terrigenous fraction of marine sediment core GeoB6308-3 (39.30oS / 53.97oW / 3620 m water depth / 793 cm long) collected off southeastern South America. Our age model is based on 18 14C AMS ages while information about changes in continental climate comes from bulk sediment major element (i.e., Ca, Fe, Al, Si, Ti, K) proportions and Nd isotopes. The core recorded the last ca. 50 ka BP and its terrigenous sediment fraction shows a typical Central-West Argentinean / Patagonian isotopic signature. Through X-ray fluorescence scanning we were able to produce a record with mean temporal resolution of 35 yr. In our presentation, we will discuss changes in the southernmost reaches of the SASM and compare it to other records from South and Central America with the aim of contributing to a more comprehensive understanding of precipitation variability in the Americas during the last ca. 50 ka BP.

  3. Interruptions disrupt reading comprehension.

    PubMed

    Foroughi, Cyrus K; Werner, Nicole E; Barragán, Daniela; Boehm-Davis, Deborah A

    2015-06-01

    Previous research suggests that being interrupted while reading a text does not disrupt the later recognition or recall of information from that text. This research is used as support for Ericsson and Kintsch's (1995) long-term working memory (LT-WM) theory, which posits that disruptions while reading (e.g., interruptions) do not impair subsequent text comprehension. However, to fully comprehend a text, individuals may need to do more than recognize or recall information that has been presented in the text at a later time. Reading comprehension often requires individuals to connect and synthesize information across a text (e.g., successfully identifying complex topics such as themes and tones) and not just make a familiarity-based decision (i.e., recognition). The goal for this study was to determine whether interruptions while reading disrupt reading comprehension when the questions assessing comprehension require participants to connect and synthesize information across the passage. In Experiment 1, interruptions disrupted reading comprehension. In Experiment 2, interruptions disrupted reading comprehension but not recognition of information from the text. In Experiment 3, the addition of a 15-s time-out prior to the interruption successfully removed these negative effects. These data suggest that the time it takes to process the information needed to successfully comprehend text when reading is greater than that required for recognition. Any interference (e.g., an interruption) that occurs during the comprehension process may disrupt reading comprehension. This evidence supports the need for transient activation of information in working memory for successful text comprehension and does not support LT-WM theory. PMID:25867225

  4. The California Current System as a transmitter of millennial scale climate change on the northeastern Pacific margin from 10 to 50 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. A.; Hendy, I. L.; Pak, D. K.

    2015-09-01

    A high-resolution record of δ18O and Mg/Ca-based temperatures spanning 10-50 ka has been reconstructed from the Vancouver margin of the northeastern Pacific Ocean (MD02-2496) from two planktonic foraminiferal species, Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (s.) and Globigerina bulloides. While δ18Ocalcite appears synchronous with Dansgaard-Oeschger Interstadials throughout the record, millennial scale variability in sea surface temperatures and reconstructed δ18Oseawater are frequently out of phase with Greenland climate. Changes in water mass characteristics such as δ18Ocalcite and enriched δ15N events apparently responded to millennial-scale climate change during Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS 3), such that negative δ18Ocalcite excursions coincided with heavier δ15N. These water mass characteristic shifts are suggestive of the presence of surface water advected from the Eastern Tropical North Pacific by relative strengthening of the California Undercurrent (CUC) bringing warm, salty tropical waters poleward. The linkage between the strength of the CUC on the NE Pacific margin and millennial-scale climate change may be related to increased sea surface heights off Central America as the Intertropical Convergence Zone shifted northward in response to changes in North Atlantic Ocean circulation. Poor correlations between proxies exist through late MIS 3 into MIS 2. Ice sheet growth could have disrupted the linkage between CUC and the NE Pacific margin as the Laurentide Ice sheet disrupted atmospheric circulation and the Cordilleran Ice Sheet increasingly influenced regional paleoceanography.

  5. Development and interrupting tests on 250KV 8KA HVDC circuit breaker

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuyama, S.; Arimatsu, K.; Hirata, K.; Kato, Y.; Yoshioka, Y.

    1985-09-01

    This paper describes the circuit and component selections, development and equivalent circuit test results on an HVDC circuit breaker for an HVDC transmission line. A puffer type SF/sub 6/ gas interrupter for AC circuit breakers is utilized for interrupting DC current with injection of high-frequency inverse current from a commutating capacitor precharged to HVDC line voltage. Also, the effectiveness of application of the HVDC breaker to an HVDC system with two parallel transmission lines is demonstrated through the EMTP simulation.

  6. Superconducting NbN Coplanar Switch Driven by DC Current for CMB Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordier, G.; Cammilleri, V. D.; Bélier, B.; Bleurvacq, N.; Ghribi, A.; Piat, M.; Tartari, A.; Zannoni, M.

    2014-09-01

    The next generations of cosmic microwave background (CMB) instruments will be dedicated to the detection and characterisation of CMB B-modes. To measure this tiny signal, instruments need to control and minimise systematics. Signal modulation is one way to achieve such a control. New generation of focal planes will include the entire detection chain on chip. In this context, we present a superconducting coplanar switch driven by DC current. It consists of a superconducting micro-bridge which commutes between its on (superconducting) and off (normal metal) states, depending on the amplitude of the current injection. To be effective, we have to use a high normal state resistivity superconducting material with a gap frequency higher than the frequencies of operation (millimeter waves). Several measurements were made at low temperature on NbN and yielded very high resistivities. Preliminary results of components dc behavior is shown. Thanks to its low power consumption, fast modulation and low weight, this component is a perfect candidate for future CMB space missions.

  7. Radiolaria and pollen records from 0 to 50 ka at ODP Site 1233: Continental and marine climate records from the Southeast Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pisias, N.G.; Heusser, L.; Heusser, C.; Hostetler, S.W.; Mix, A.C.; Weber, M.

    2006-01-01

    Site 1233 drilled during Leg 202 of the Ocean Drilling Program provides a detailed record of marine and continental climate change in the Southeast Pacific and South American continent. Splits from over 500 samples taken at 20 cm intervals for quantitative analysis of radiolarian and pollen populations yield a temporal resolution of 200-400 years. In each sample, 39 pollen taxa and 40 radiolarian species and genera were evaluated. Age control is provided by 25 AMS 14C dates [Lamy, F., Kaiser, J., Ninnemann, U., Hebbeln, D., Arz, H.W., Stoner, J., 2004. Science 304, 1959-1962]. Multivariate statistical analyses of these data allow us to conclude the following: (1) During the past 50 ka, the region of the central Chile coast is not directly influenced by polar water from the Antarctic region. (2) Changes in ocean conditions off central Chile during this time interval primarily reflect north-south shifts in the position of the South Pacific transition zone. (3) Changes in Chilean vegetation reflect comparable latitudinal shifts in precipitation and the position of the southern westerlies. (4) The first canonical variate of radiolarian and pollen records extracted from Site 1233 are remarkably similar to each other as well as to temperature records from the Antarctic, which suggests that marine and continental climate variability in the region is tightly coupled at periods longer than 3000 years. (5) The phase coupling of these climate records, which lead variations of continental erosion based on iron abundance at the same site, are consistent with a hypothesis that erosion is linked to relatively long (i.e, few thousand years) response times of the Patagonian ice sheet, and thus is not a direct indicator of regional climate. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Miscarriage: A Dream Interrupted

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trepal, Heather C.; Semivan, Suzanne Gibson; Caley-Bruce, Mary

    2005-01-01

    Pregnancy is a developmental task that requires women to become accustomed to inherent and sometimes profound biological, somatic, and psychological changes. When pregnancy is interrupted by miscarriage, it may become a pivotal crisis point in the development of a woman's maternal identity as well as an issue in family development. This manuscript…

  9. Final report on key comparison CCEM-K12: AC-DC current transfer standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budovsky, Ilya

    2012-01-01

    The circulation of the travelling standards in the CIPM key comparison CCEM-K12 of AC-DC current transfer difference began in March 2005 and was completed in April 2007. The travelling standards were lost on their way from the last participant to the pilot laboratory. Since, prior to their disappearance, the travelling standards exhibited exceptional stability, the CCEM Working Group on Low-Frequency Quantities decided in June 2008 to accept the results of the comparison as valid without the final measurement by the pilot laboratory. The AC-DC transfer differences of the travelling standards have been measured at 10 mA and 5 A, and at the frequencies 10 Hz, 55 Hz, 1 kHz, 10 kHz, 20 kHz, 50 kHz and 100 kHz. The key comparison reference values were calculated as the weighted means of the results of the National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) with independent realizations of primary standards and low reported uncertainties. The degrees of equivalence relative to the key comparison reference values, as well as between pairs of NMIs, have been determined for the measurement points and show very good agreement. All but three of the calculated degrees of equivalence relative to the key comparison reference values are within the limits of the expanded uncertainties. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  10. Impact of quasi-dc currents on three-phase distribution transformer installations

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, B.W.; Barnes, P.R. ); Tesche, F.M. , Dallas, TX ); Schafer, D.A. )

    1992-06-01

    This report summarizes a series of tests designed to determine the response of quasi-dc currents on three-phase power distribution transformers for electric power systems. In general, if the dc injection is limited to the primary side of a step-down transformer, significant harmonic distortion is noted and an increase in the reactive power demand results. For dc injection on the secondary (load) side of the step-down transformer the harmonic content at the secondary side is quite high and saturation occurs with a relatively low level of dc injection; however, the reactive power demand is significantly lower. These tests produced no apparent damage to the transformers. Transformer damage is dependent on the duration of the dc excitation, the level of the excitation, and on thermal characteristics of the transfer. The transformer response time is found to be much shorter than seen in power transformer tests at lower dc injection levels. This shorter response time suggests that the response time is strongly dependent on the injected current levels, and that higher levels of dc injection for shorter durations could produce very high reactive power demands and harmonic distortion within a few tenths of a second. The added reactive power load could result in the blowing of fuses on the primary side of the transformer for even moderate dc injection levels, and neutral currents are quite large under even low-level dc injection. This smoking neutral'' results in high-level harmonic injection into equipment via the neutral and in possible equipment failure.

  11. Adversary Sequence Interruption Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1985-11-15

    PC EASI is an IBM personal computer or PC-compatible version of an analytical technique for measuring the effectiveness of physical protection systems. PC EASI utilizes a methodology called Estimate of Adversary Sequence Interruption (EASI) which evaluates the probability of interruption (PI) for a given sequence of adversary tasks. Probability of interruption is defined as the probability that the response force will arrive before the adversary force has completed its task. The EASI methodology is amore » probabilistic approach that analytically evaluates basic functions of the physical security system (detection, assessment, communications, and delay) with respect to response time along a single adversary path. It is important that the most critical scenarios for each target be identified to ensure that vulnerabilities have not been overlooked. If the facility is not overly complex, this can be accomplished by examining all paths. If the facility is complex, a global model such as Safeguards Automated Facility Evaluation (SAFE) may be used to identify the most vulnerable paths. PC EASI is menu-driven with screen forms for entering and editing the basic scenarios. In addition to evaluating PI for the basic scenario, the sensitivities of many of the parameters chosen in the scenario can be analyzed. These sensitivities provide information to aid the analyst in determining the tradeoffs for reducing the probability of interruption. PC EASI runs under the Micro Data Base Systems'' proprietary database management system Knowledgeman. KMAN provides the user environment and file management for the specified basic scenarios, and KGRAPH the graphical output of the sensitivity calculations. This software is not included. Due to errors in release 2 of KMAN, PC EASI will not execute properly; release 1.07 of KMAN is required.« less

  12. A regional overview of the last glacial period in the temperate NE Atlantic: varying paleoproductivity centers over the last 50 ka BP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penaud, Aurélie; Eynaud, Frédérique; Ganne, Axelle

    2015-04-01

    Recent palynological investigations carried out in the eastern Gulf of Cadiz (MD99-2339 core) over MIS 3 enable to consider dinoflagellate cyst assemblage patterns over the last 50 ka BP through a compilation of 6 cores from the NE subtropical Atlantic to the Northern Bay of Biscay (also including cores MD95-2042, MD95-2043, MD04-2805CQ, VK03-58bis). Dinocyst signals depict hydrological front latitudinal shifts over the last glacial and associated sea-surface consequences regarding past regimes of primary productivity. We show here new data clearly evidencing subtropical latitudes of Cadiz as being as productive areas over the last glacial as recorded today in the septentrional part of the Bay of Biscay, especially between GI 8 and GI 12. We especially focus on dinocyst-species Lingulodinium machaerophorum relative abundances and absolute concentrations that we first evidence as a powerful tool to reconstruct and discuss productivity shifts through time in the temperate North Atlantic. This spatio-temporal synthesis bring important evidences of fast migrating paleoproductiviy centers from the last glacial period to present, implying also large consequences on the biological pump through time. Regarding this specific session, 5 of the 6 cores discussed here were retrieved by the R/V Marion Dufresne through 3 different cruises: Core MD99-2339 (35.89°N, 7.53°W, 1170m water depth, 18.54m long) was retrieved in a contouritic field in the oriental part of the Gulf of Cadiz by the oceanographic R/V Marion Dufresne during the 1999 International Marine Global Change Studies V (IMAGES V) cruise (Labeyrie, Jansen and Cortijo, 2003). Cores MD95-2042 (37°48'N, 10°10'W, 3146m water depth, 39.56m long) and MD95-2043 (36°8.6'N, 2°37.3'W, 1841m water depth, 36m long) were retrieved from the SW Iberian margin and the central Alboran Sea, respectively, by the oceanographic R/V Marion Dufresne during the 1995 IMAGES I cruise (Bassinot and Labeyrie, 1996). Core MD04-2805 CQ (34.52°N, 7.02°W, 859m water depth, 7.72m long) was retrieved 40 km off the Moroccan coast by the oceanographic R/V Marion Dufresne during the 2004 PRIVILEGE cruise.

  13. A comparison of human versus virtual interruptions.

    PubMed

    Nees, Michael A; Fortna, Anjali

    2015-01-01

    Although a wealth of research has examined the effects of virtual interruptions, human-initiated interruptions are common in many work settings. An experiment compared performance on a primary data-entry task during human-initiated (human) versus computer-initiated (virtual) interruptions. Participants completed blocks of trials that featured either an interruption from a computer or an interruption from a human experimenter. The timing of the onset of the interruptions was also varied across trials. Human interruptions resulted in much shorter interruption lags. No significant differences were observed for the number of correct responses on the primary task for human versus virtual interruptions, but interruptions that occurred later in the task sequence resulted in fewer mistakes. The social aspect of human interruptions may have attenuated interruption lags in that condition, and it is possible that virtual interruptions may permit people greater temporal flexibility in managing their engagement with interruptions. PMID:25537689

  14. Oceanic density fronts steering bottom-current induced sedimentation deduced from a 50 ka contourite-drift record and numerical modeling (off NW Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanebuth, Till J. J.; Zhang, Wenyan; Hofmann, Antonia L.; Löwemark, Ludvig A.; Schwenk, Tilmann

    2015-03-01

    How the various bottom-near hydrographic and sedimentary processes control the formation of contourite drifts, i.e. of bottom-current related confined deep-sea depocenters, usually remains widely speculative. This study uses a transect of six sediment cores and a sediment echosounder profile across a whole contourite system off NW Spain to address the sediment dynamics responsible for the depositional pattern. This "mounded patch"-type contourite drift (18 km long, 20 km wide) with a 150-m deep channel (moat) has formed around an 800-m high structural obstacle. Deposition on the contourite drift in the past was characterized by alternating calm and high-energy bottom-flow conditions. Calm conditions (Last Glacial period: 27-17 cal ka BP; late Holocene times: <4 cal ka BP) led to slightly current-influenced deposition of fine-grained sediments (10 μm) in the entire basin. This regime was interrupted by periods of short-lasting waxing-and-waning high-energy conditions (D/O events during Marine Isotope Stage 3; the Deglacial/early Holocene time interval at 17-4 cal ka BP), resulting in the deposition of coarse sediments (70 μm). Process-based numerical modeling demonstrates that pulse-like oceanic density fronts traveling within the transition zone of two water masses (Labrador Sea Water, Mediterranean Outflow Water) provide a powerful mechanism for contouritic deposition, rather than the core of a water mass itself. These gravity-driven density fronts lead to local re-suspension of sands stored inside the drift's moat and to subsequent upward transport towards the drift's crest. Here, the oceanic density fronts produce additional km-scale eddies. These migrating eddies provide an efficient mechanism for further widespread sediment re-distribution. In comparison with paleoceanographic reconstructions, a downward migration or expansion of the Mediterranean Outflow Water by about 300 m led most probably to such temporary contouritic sand deposition. We finally propose a conceptual model to explain how seafloor obstacles redirect and perturbate bottom currents. This model proposes not only a sharp contact between two water masses but also the transition zone between those as an important high-energy regime, offering oceanic density fronts a travel medium. These fronts are strong enough to distribute fine sands across highly pronounced seabed topography. On the respective time scale, the moat itself seems to act as the main source for those sands, making a remote source and a long-distance sediment transport unnecessary.

  15. Global interrupt and barrier networks

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E; Heidelberger, Philip; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Takken, Todd E.

    2008-10-28

    A system and method for generating global asynchronous signals in a computing structure. Particularly, a global interrupt and barrier network is implemented that implements logic for generating global interrupt and barrier signals for controlling global asynchronous operations performed by processing elements at selected processing nodes of a computing structure in accordance with a processing algorithm; and includes the physical interconnecting of the processing nodes for communicating the global interrupt and barrier signals to the elements via low-latency paths. The global asynchronous signals respectively initiate interrupt and barrier operations at the processing nodes at times selected for optimizing performance of the processing algorithms. In one embodiment, the global interrupt and barrier network is implemented in a scalable, massively parallel supercomputing device structure comprising a plurality of processing nodes interconnected by multiple independent networks, with each node including one or more processing elements for performing computation or communication activity as required when performing parallel algorithm operations. One multiple independent network includes a global tree network for enabling high-speed global tree communications among global tree network nodes or sub-trees thereof. The global interrupt and barrier network may operate in parallel with the global tree network for providing global asynchronous sideband signals.

  16. MgB2 cylindrical superconducting shielding for cryogenic measurement applications: a case study on DC current transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arpaia, P.; Ballarino, A.; Giunchi, G.; Montenero, G.

    2014-04-01

    A method for designing cylindrical hollow superconducting shields for cryogenic measurement devices operating in background fields of 1 T is proposed. The shield design is based on MgB2 composite, manufactured by the reactive Mg liquid infiltration process [1]. The MgB2 composite allows low-cost shields with good mechanical resistance to be realized easily. The geometrical design is benchmarked by the experimental characterization at 4.2 K. A design case study for the shield of a cryogenic DC current transformer is reported. Design results show a shielding efficiency of 70% for both the axial and radial components, with prospective measurement accuracy up to 10 ppm on 100 kA.

  17. An architecture for intelligent task interruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, D. D.; Narayan, Srini

    1990-01-01

    In the design of real time systems the capability for task interruption is often considered essential. The problem of task interruption in knowledge-based domains is examined. It is proposed that task interruption can be often avoided by using appropriate functional architectures and knowledge engineering principles. Situations for which task interruption is indispensable, a preliminary architecture based on priority hierarchies is described.

  18. DC current induced metal-insulator transition in epitaxial Sm0.6Nd0.4NiO3/LaAlO3 thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haoliang; Luo, Zhenlin; Yang, Yuanjun; Yun, Yu; Yang, Mengmeng; Meng, Dechao; Wang, Haibo; Hu, Sixia; Bao, Jun; Lu, Yalin; Gao, Chen

    2014-05-01

    The metal-insulator transition (MIT) in strong correlated electron materials can be induced by external perturbation in forms of thermal, electrical, optical, or magnetic fields. We report on the DC current induced MIT in epitaxial Sm0.6Nd0.4NiO3 (SNNO) thin film deposited by pulsed laser deposition on (001)-LaAlO3 substrate. It was found that the MIT in SNNO film not only can be triggered by thermal, but also can be induced by DC current. The TMI of SNNO film decreases from 282 K to 200 K with the DC current density increasing from 0.003 × 109 A•m-2 to 4.9 × 109 A•m-2. Based on the resistivity curves measured at different temperatures, the MIT phase diagram has been successfully constructed.

  19. Impact of quasi-dc currents on three-phase distribution transformer installations. Power Systems Technology Program

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, B.W.; Barnes, P.R.; Tesche, F.M.; Schafer, D.A.

    1992-06-01

    This report summarizes a series of tests designed to determine the response of quasi-dc currents on three-phase power distribution transformers for electric power systems. In general, if the dc injection is limited to the primary side of a step-down transformer, significant harmonic distortion is noted and an increase in the reactive power demand results. For dc injection on the secondary (load) side of the step-down transformer the harmonic content at the secondary side is quite high and saturation occurs with a relatively low level of dc injection; however, the reactive power demand is significantly lower. These tests produced no apparent damage to the transformers. Transformer damage is dependent on the duration of the dc excitation, the level of the excitation, and on thermal characteristics of the transfer. The transformer response time is found to be much shorter than seen in power transformer tests at lower dc injection levels. This shorter response time suggests that the response time is strongly dependent on the injected current levels, and that higher levels of dc injection for shorter durations could produce very high reactive power demands and harmonic distortion within a few tenths of a second. The added reactive power load could result in the blowing of fuses on the primary side of the transformer for even moderate dc injection levels, and neutral currents are quite large under even low-level dc injection. This ``smoking neutral`` results in high-level harmonic injection into equipment via the neutral and in possible equipment failure.

  20. Investigating Interruptions: Implications for Flightdeck Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latorella, Kara A.

    1999-01-01

    A fundamental aspect of multiple task management is attending to new stimuli and integrating associated task requirements into an ongoing task set; this is "interruption management" (IM). Anecdotal evidence and field studies indicate the frequency and consequences of interruptions, however experimental investigations of mechanisms influencing IM are scarce. Interruptions on commercial flightdecks are numerous, of various forms, and have been cited as contributing factors in many aviation incident and accident reports. This research grounds an experimental investigation of flightdeck interruptions in a proposed IM stage model. This model organizes basic research, identifies influencing mechanisms, and suggests appropriate dependent measures for IM. Fourteen airline pilots participated in a flightdeck simulation experiment to investigate the general effects of performing an interrupting task and interrupted procedure, and the effects of specific task factors: (1) modality; (2) embeddedness, or goal-level, of an interruption; (3) strength of association, or coupling-strength, between interrupted tasks; (4) semantic similarity; and (5) environmental stress. General effects of interruptions were extremely robust. All individual task factors significantly affected interruption management, except "similarity." Results extend the Interruption Management model, and are interpreted for their implications for interrupted flightdeck performance and intervention strategies for mitigating their effects on the flightdeck.

  1. Microwave polarization angle study of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron system under dc current bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Muhammad-Zahir; Liu, Han-Chun; Heimbeck, Martin S.; Everitt, Henry O.; Wegscheider, Werner; Mani, Ramesh G.

    Microwave-induced magnetoresistance oscillations followed by the vanishing resistance states are a prime representation of non-equilibrium transport phenomena in two-dimensional electron systems (2DES). The effect of a dc current bias on the nonlinear response of 2DES with microwave polarization angle under magnetic field is a subject of interest. Here, we have studied the effect of various dc current bias on microwave radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in a high mobility 2DES. Further, we systematically investigate the effect of the microwave polarization angle on the magneto-resistance oscillations at two different frequencies 152.78 GHz and 185.76 GHz. This study aims to better understand the effects of both dc current and microwave polarization angle in the GaAs/AlGaAs system, both of which modify the observed magneto-transport properties DOE-BES, Mat'l. Sci. & Eng. Div., DE-SC0001762; ARO W911NF-14-2-0076; ARO W911NF-15-1-0433.

  2. Executing application function calls in response to an interrupt

    DOEpatents

    Almasi, Gheorghe; Archer, Charles J.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Gooding, Thomas M.; Heidelberger, Philip; Parker, Jeffrey J.

    2010-05-11

    Executing application function calls in response to an interrupt including creating a thread; receiving an interrupt having an interrupt type; determining whether a value of a semaphore represents that interrupts are disabled; if the value of the semaphore represents that interrupts are not disabled: calling, by the thread, one or more preconfigured functions in dependence upon the interrupt type of the interrupt; yielding the thread; and if the value of the semaphore represents that interrupts are disabled: setting the value of the semaphore to represent to a kernel that interrupts are hard-disabled; and hard-disabling interrupts at the kernel.

  3. Opportunistic Interruptions: Interactional Vulnerabilities Deriving from Linearization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, David R.

    2005-01-01

    Speaking involves "linearizing" a message into a string of words. This process leaves us vulnerable to being interrupted in such a way that the aborted turn is a misrepresentation of the intended message. Further, because we linearize our messages in standard ways, we are recurrently vulnerable to interruptions at particular turn-construction…

  4. Interrupted Visual Searches Reveal Volatile Search Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Y. Jeremy; Jiang, Yuhong V.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated memory from interrupted visual searches. Participants conducted a change detection search task on polygons overlaid on scenes. Search was interrupted by various disruptions, including unfilled delay, passive viewing of other scenes, and additional search on new displays. Results showed that performance was unaffected by…

  5. Power links with Ireland -- Excitation of turbine-generator shaft torsional vibrations by variable frequency currents superimposed on DC currents in asynchronous HVDC links

    SciTech Connect

    Hammons, T.J.; Tay, B.W.; Kok, K.L.

    1995-08-01

    The paper describes an in-depth analysis of excitation of shaft torsional vibrations in steam-turbine-generator-exciter shafts in close proximity to HVDC converter stations by variable-frequency ripple currents superimposed on the DC currents in asynchronous Links. It extends earlier work to include an in depth analysis of system scaling factors for harmonic currents impressed on generators in Northern Ireland by an inverter and to investigate the phenomena for possible torsional vibrations in the generators by the Link. Frequencies at which shaft torsional vibrations would be excited by modulation product harmonics in 50Hz/50Hz asynchronous Links as a function of deviation in system frequency is reviewed. Relative noncharacteristic current levels for 50Hz/50Hz connectors are illustrated assuming ripple currents at the inverter which gives realistic harmonic voltages in a twelve-pulse bridge. The paper then shows that torques in machines in multi-machine networks may be estimated by proportioning HVDC link harmonic disturbance current appropriately to each machine at risk. It is concluded that variable-frequency ripple currents superimposed on the DC current in asynchronous links can excite sympathetic torsional vibrations in turbine-generator-exciter shafts.

  6. Stressing of turbine-generator-exciter shafts by variable-frequency currents superimposed on DC currents in asynchronous HVDC links and following disturbances at converter stations

    SciTech Connect

    Hammons, T.J.; Bremner, J.J. )

    1994-09-01

    Ripple currents on the DC side of both HVDC synchronous and asynchronous. Links together with cleared HVDC and AC system disturbances can excite in some circumstances onerous torsional vibrations in large steam generator shafts. The problem has assumed importance in recent months on account of the HVDC Link between Scotland and Northern Ireland going ahead, on account of the proposed Eire/Wales Link, and because AC/DC/AC couplers are to be installed extensively to interconnect the East and West European Grid Systems. This paper discusses and analyses excitation of shaft torsional vibrations in steam turbine-generator-exciter shafts in close proximity to HVDC converter stations by (1) variable-frequency ripple currents superimposed on the DC currents in asynchronous Links, and (2) disturbances at bi-polar converter stations. The time response and tables show that for the systems studied variable-frequency ripple currents superimposed on the DC current in asynchronous Links can excite shaft torsional vibrations, the very small noncharacteristic currents could result in onerous shaft torques which might damage the machine, and that DC line faults at converter stations in close proximity of steam turbine-generator units can excite onerous turbine-generator shaft torsional response. Detailed simulation of the HVDC converter and generator is necessary for precise assessments of shaft torsional response following HVDC converter station faults. 500MW, 660MW, 1000MW and 1300MW machines are considered in the analyses that are made.

  7. Checklist interruption and resumption: A linguistic study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linde, Charlotte; Goguen, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    This study forms part of a project investigating the relationships among the formal structure of aviation procedures, the ways in which the crew members are taught to execute them, and the ways in which thet are actually performed in flight. Specifically, this report examines the interactions between the performance of checklists and interruptions, considering both interruptions by radio communications and by other crew members. The data consists of 14 crews' performance of a full mission simulation of a higher ratio of checklist speech acts to all speech acts within the span of the performance of the checklist. Further, it is not number of interruptions but length of interruptions which is associated with crew performance quality. Use of explicit holds is also associated with crew performance.

  8. Fast interrupt platform for extended DOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duryea, T. W.

    1995-01-01

    Extended DOS offers the unique combination of a simple operating system which allows direct assess to the interrupt tables, 32 bit protected mode access to a 4096 MByte address space, and the use of industry standard C compilers. The drawback is that fast interrupt handling requires both 32 bit and 16 bit versions of each real-time process interrupt handler to avoid mode switches on the interrupts. A set of tools has been developed which automates the process of transforming the output of a standard 32 bit C compiler to 16 bit interrupt code which directly handles the real mode interrupts. The entire process compiles one set of source code via a make file, which boosts productivity by making the management of the compile-link cycle very simple. The software components are in the form of classes written mostly in C. A foreground process written as a conventional application which can use the standard C libraries can communicate with the background real-time classes via a message passing mechanism. The platform thus enables the integration of high performance real-time processing into a conventional application framework.

  9. Fast interrupt platform for extended DOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duryea, T. W.

    1995-01-01

    Extended DOS offers the unique combination of a simple operating system which allows direct access to the interrupt tables, 32 bit protected mode access to 4096 MByte address space, and the use of industry standard C compilers. The drawback is that fast interrupt handling requires both 32 bit and 16 bit versions of each real-time process interrupt handler to avoid mode switches on the interrupts. A set of tools has been developed which automates the process of transforming the output of a standard 32 bit C compiler to 16 bit interrupt code which directly handles the real mode interrupts. The entire process compiles one set of source code via a make file, which boosts productivity by making the management of the compile-link cycle very simple. The software components are in the form of classes written mostly in C. A foreground process written as a conventional application which can use the standard C libraries can communicate with the background real-time classes via a message passing mechanism. The platform thus enables the integration of high performance real-time processing into a conventional application framework.

  10. Control algorithm for the inverter fed induction motor drive with DC current feedback loop based on principles of the vector control

    SciTech Connect

    Vuckovic, V.; Vukosavic, S. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper brings out a control algorithm for VSI fed induction motor drives based on the converter DC link current feedback. It is shown that the speed and flux can be controlled over the wide speed and load range quite satisfactorily for simpler drives. The base commands of both the inverter voltage and frequency are proportional to the reference speed, but each of them is further modified by the signals derived from the DC current sensor. The algorithm is based on the equations well known from the vector control theory, and is aimed to obtain the constant rotor flux and proportionality between the electrical torque, the slip frequency and the active component of the stator current. In this way, the problems of slip compensation, Ri compensation and correction of U/f characteristics are solved in the same time. Analytical considerations and computer simulations of the proposed control structure are in close agreement with the experimental results measured on a prototype drive.

  11. Detection of DC currents and resistance measurements in longitudinal spin Seebeck effect experiments on Pt/YIG and Pt/NFO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Daniel; Kuschel, Timo; Meyer, Sibylle; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.; Shen, Liming; Gupta, Arunava; Schmalhorst, Jan-Michael; Reiss, Günter

    2016-05-01

    In this work we investigated thin films of the ferrimagnetic insulators Y 3Fe5O12 and NiFe2O4 capped with thin Pt layers in terms of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE). The electric response detected in the Pt layer under an out-of-plane temperature gradient can be interpreted as a pure spin current converted into a charge current via the inverse spin Hall effect. Typically, the transverse voltage is the quantity investigated in LSSE measurements (in the range of μV). Here, we present the directly detected DC current (in the range of nA) as an alternative quantity. Furthermore, we investigate the resistance of the Pt layer in the LSSE configuration. We found an influence of the test current on the resistance. The typical shape of the LSSE curve varies for increasing test currents.

  12. Vacuum interrupters and thyratrons as opening switches

    SciTech Connect

    Honig, E.M.

    1981-01-01

    The clear advantages of inductive storage for large scale energy storage applications are creating an increasing interest in the research and development of the opening switches required. Opening switches for single-shot inductive transfers have received considerable attention and are fairly well advanced. The problem addressed by this workshop of high power opening switches for high repetition rate applications is much more severe, however, and may well require a major research and development effort. Two candidates for such an opening switch, the triggered vacuum interrupter and the magnetically quenched thyratron, are discussed. By electrically retriggering the discharge in the vacuum interrupter between pulses, the dependence on mechanical motion is eliminated. This should enable repetition rate operation at 10 to 15 kHz while still maintaining the vacuum interrupter's proven interrupting performance of tens of kiloamps at tens of kilovolts. The magnetically quenched thyratron, on the other hand, uses a cross magnetic field to raise the switch impedance by decreasing the electron mobility and driving the discharge into an arc chute wall where it is quenched. Successful interruptions of 1 kA at 15 kV and 100 A at 50 kV after conduction for 10 ..mu..s have been demonstrated by previous researchers. Work at Los Alamos is directed toward understanding the basic mechanisms involved and increasing the switch ratings, particularly the conduction time.

  13. User requirements for interruption management in mobile communications in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Talsma, Bernd G; Solvoll, Terje; Hartvigsen, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    In hospitals, mobile communication devices increase the occurrence of inappropriate interruptions during clinical task performance. These interruptions have been related to decreased quality of clinical care. User requirements were elicited using a scenario based approach. The results present insights into user requirements for an interruption management system for hospitals. Hospital workflow protocols were identified as a major source of interruptions. Many suggestions for managing these interruptions related to improving workflow using IT. We have shown that even though the hospital is an exceptionally demanding environment, the user requirements for interruption management concur with earlier findings in the broader fields of context aware interruption management and computer supported cooperative work. PMID:23920869

  14. Interruption as a test of the user-computer interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreifeldt, J. G.; Mccarthy, M. E.

    1981-01-01

    In order to study the effects different logic systems might have on interrupted operation, an algebraic calculator and a reverse polish notation calculator were compared when trained users were interrupted during problem entry. The RPN calculator showed markedly superior resistance to interruption effects compared to the AN calculator although no significant differences were found when the users were not interrupted. Causes and possible remedies for interruption effects are speculated. It is proposed that because interruption is such a common occurrence, it be incorporated into comparative evaluation tests of different logic system and control/display system and that interruption resistance be adopted as a specific design criteria for such design.

  15. IRF6 Sequencing in Interrupted Clefting.

    PubMed

    Cuddapah, Sanmati R; Kominek, Selma; Grant, John H; Robin, Nathaniel H

    2016-05-01

    In a retrospective review of patients seen at the University of Alabama at Birmingham Cleft and Craniofacial Center, four patients with rare interrupted clefting were identified who had undergone genetic testing. Each of these patients had a typical cleft lip, with intact hard palate and cleft of the soft palate. Given this picture of mixed clefting, IRF6 sequencing was done and was negative for mutations in all four patients. As genetic testing for single-gene mutations and exome sequencing become clinically available, it may be possible to identify novel mutations responsible for this previously unreported type of interrupted clefting. PMID:26090788

  16. DC current induced metal-insulator transition in epitaxial Sm{sub 0.6}Nd{sub 0.4}NiO{sub 3}/LaAlO{sub 3} thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Haoliang; CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 ; Luo, Zhenlin Yang, Yuanjun; Yang, Mengmeng; Wang, Haibo; Hu, Sixia; Bao, Jun; National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory and School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 ; Yun, Yu; Meng, Dechao; Lu, Yalin; Gao, Chen; CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026; National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory and School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026

    2014-05-15

    The metal-insulator transition (MIT) in strong correlated electron materials can be induced by external perturbation in forms of thermal, electrical, optical, or magnetic fields. We report on the DC current induced MIT in epitaxial Sm{sub 0.6}Nd{sub 0.4}NiO{sub 3} (SNNO) thin film deposited by pulsed laser deposition on (001)-LaAlO{sub 3} substrate. It was found that the MIT in SNNO film not only can be triggered by thermal, but also can be induced by DC current. The T{sub MI} of SNNO film decreases from 282 K to 200 K with the DC current density increasing from 0.003 × 10{sup 9} A•m{sup −2} to 4.9 × 10{sup 9} A•m{sup −2}. Based on the resistivity curves measured at different temperatures, the MIT phase diagram has been successfully constructed.

  17. Interrupted monitoring of a stochastic process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, E.

    1977-01-01

    Normative strategies are developed for tasks where the pilot must interrupt his monitoring of a stochastic process in order to attend to other duties. Results are given as to how characteristics of the stochastic process and the other tasks affect the optimal strategies. The optimum strategy is also compared to the strategies used by subjects in a pilot experiment.

  18. Isolated sleep paralysis elicited by sleep interruption.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, T; Miyasita, A; Sasaki, Y; Inugami, M; Fukuda, K

    1992-06-01

    We elicited isolated sleep paralysis (ISP) from normal subjects by a nocturnal sleep interruption schedule. On four experimental nights, 16 subjects had their sleep interrupted for 60 minutes by forced awakening at the time when 40 minutes of nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep had elapsed from the termination of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in the first or third sleep cycle. This schedule produced a sleep onset REM period (SOREMP) after the interruption at a high rate of 71.9%. We succeeded in eliciting six episodes of ISP in the sleep interruptions performed (9.4%). All episodes of ISP except one occurred from SOREMP, indicating a close correlation between ISP and SOREMP. We recorded verbal reports about ISP experiences and recorded the polysomnogram (PSG) during ISP. All of the subjects with ISP experienced inability to move and were simultaneously aware of lying in the laboratory. All but one reported auditory/visual hallucinations and unpleasant emotions. PSG recordings during ISP were characterized by a REM/W stage dissociated state, i.e. abundant alpha electroencephalographs and persistence of muscle atonia shown by the tonic electromyogram. Judging from the PSG recordings, ISP differs from other dissociated states such as lucid dreaming, nocturnal panic attacks and REM sleep behavior disorders. We compare some of the sleep variables between ISP and non-ISP nights. We also discuss the similarities and differences between ISP and sleep paralysis in narcolepsy. PMID:1621022

  19. Protection Against Brief Interruptions Of Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casad, Theodore A.

    1989-01-01

    Rotating standby power system compensates for brief interruptions in commercial power supply. System furnishes few cycles of alternating current from its stored rotational energy. Protects equipment vulnerable to brief losses of power; for example, prevents computers from erroneously suppressing or adding bits to data being handled at moment of power failure.

  20. Testing Of Choiced Ceramics Cutting Tools At Irregular Interrupted Cut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyncl, Ladislav; Malotová, Šárka; Nováček, Pavel; Nicielnik, Henryk; Šoková, Dagmar; Hemžský, Pavel; Pitela, David; Holubjak, Jozef

    2015-12-01

    This article discusses the test of removable ceramic cutting inserts during machining irregular interrupted cut. Tests were performed on a lathe, with the preparation which simulated us the interrupted cut. By changing the number of plates mounted in a preparation it simulate us a regular or irregular interrupted cut. When with four plates it was regular interrupted cut, the remaining three variants were already irregular cut. It was examined whether it will have the irregular interrupted cutting effect on the insert and possibly how it will change life of inserts during irregular interrupted cut (variable delay between shocks).

  1. Interruptions in the wild: Development of a sociotechnical systems model of interruptions in the emergency department through a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Werner, Nicole E; Holden, Richard J

    2015-11-01

    Interruptions are unavoidable in the "interrupt driven" Emergency Department (ED). A critical review and synthesis of the literature on interruptions in the ED can offer insight into the nature of interruptions in complex real-world environments. Fifteen empirical articles on interruptions in the ED were identified through database searches. Articles were reviewed, critiqued, and synthesized. There was little agreement and several gaps in conceptualizing sociotechnical system factors, process characteristics, and interruption outcomes. While multiple outcomes of interruptions were mentioned, few were measured, and the relationship between multiple outcomes was rarely assessed. Synthesizing the literature and drawing on ergonomic concepts, we present a sociotechnical model of interruptions in complex settings that motivates new directions in research and design. The model conceptualizes interruptions as a process, not a single event, that occurs within and is shaped by an interacting socio-technical system and that results in a variety of interrelated outcomes. PMID:26154223

  2. Interrupted Binary Mass Transfer in Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, Nathan W. C.; Geller, Aaron M.; Toonen, Silvia

    2016-02-01

    Binary mass transfer (MT) is at the forefront of some of the most exciting puzzles of modern astrophysics, including SNe Ia, gamma-ray bursts, and the formation of most observed exotic stellar populations. Typically, the evolution is assumed to proceed in isolation, even in dense stellar environments such as star clusters. In this paper, we test the validity of this assumption via the analysis of a large grid of binary evolution models simulated with the SeBa code. For every binary, we calculate analytically the mean time until another single or binary star comes within the mean separation of the mass-transferring binary, and compare this timescale to the mean time for stable MT to occur. We then derive the probability for each respective binary to experience a direct dynamical interruption. The resulting probability distribution can be integrated to give an estimate for the fraction of binaries undergoing MT that are expected to be disrupted as a function of the host cluster properties. We find that for lower-mass clusters (≲ {10}4 {M}⊙ ), on the order of a few to a few tens of percent of binaries undergoing MT are expected to be interrupted by an interloping single, or more often binary, star, over the course of the cluster lifetime, whereas in more massive globular clusters we expect \\ll 1% to be interrupted. Furthermore, using numerical scattering experiments performed with the FEWBODY code, we show that the probability of interruption increases if perturbative fly-bys are considered as well, by a factor ˜2.

  3. Analysis of variable-frequency currents superimposed on DC currents in asynchronous HVDC Links in stressing turbine-generator-exciter shafts

    SciTech Connect

    Hammons, T.J.; Bremner, J.J.

    1995-03-01

    Ripple currents on the DC side of both HVDC asynchronous and synchronous Links can excite in some circumstances onerous torsional vibrations in large steam generator shafts. The problem has assumed importance in recent months on account of the HVDC Link between Scotland and Northern Ireland going ahead, on account of the proposed Eire/Wales Link, because AC/DC/AC couplers are to be installed to interconnect the East and West European Grid Systems, and because resonances have been observed on machines in close proximity to AC/DCIAC couplers and HVDC Links. This paper discusses and analyses excitation of shaft torsional vibrations in steam turbine-generator-exciter shafts in close proximity to HVDC converter stations by variable-frequency ripple currents superimposed on DC currents in asynchronous Links. It presents technical knowledge not arranged for convenient reference heretofore in studying possible excitation of turbine-generator-v/ exciter shaft torsional vibrations by non-characteristic HVDC converter harmonic currents if a machine should be considered to be at risk. Shaft torques in multi-machine networks are evaluated by proportioning HVDC Link disturbance currents to each machine at risk using system network data, generator data and fault analysis data considering frequency dependence of the system parameters. This scaling factor is calculated for different scenarios of system operation and load. Equivalent circuits for the synchronous generator are employed appropriately to correlate HVDC Link disturbance current impressed on the generator stator with s state torque excitation from which magnitude of turbine-generator-exciter shaft torque is deduced.

  4. Determining the Overall Impact of Interruptions during Online Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinharay, Sandip; Wan, Ping; Whitaker, Mike; Kim, Dong-In; Zhang, Litong; Choi, Seung W.

    2014-01-01

    With an increase in the number of online tests, interruptions during testing due to unexpected technical issues seem unavoidable. For example, interruptions occurred during several recent state tests. When interruptions occur, it is important to determine the extent of their impact on the examinees' scores. There is a lack of research on this…

  5. Assessing Individual-Level Impact of Interruptions during Online Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinharay, Sandip; Wan, Ping; Choi, Seung W.; Kim, Dong-In

    2015-01-01

    With an increase in the number of online tests, the number of interruptions during testing due to unexpected technical issues seems to be on the rise. For example, interruptions occurred during several recent state tests. When interruptions occur, it is important to determine the extent of their impact on the examinees' scores. Researchers such as…

  6. Interruptions and Distractions in Healthcare: Review and Reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, A. Joy; Karsh, Ben-Tzion

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare settings can be hectic, demanding, time-constrained environments. Within these environments, health care professionals (HCP) are expected to perform tasks that often require their undivided attention. However, HCPs are frequently interrupted, which can distract their attention and add to the complexity of their work. That said, not all interruptions are bad; many interruptions are essential to the patient care process and provide HCPs with necessary information. This paper systematically reviews the peer-reviewed literature on interruptions in healthcare settings to determine the state of the science and to identify gaps. It then provides a complex sociotechnical systems approach to understanding interruptions in healthcare. PMID:20378621

  7. Hybrid high direct current circuit interrupter

    DOEpatents

    Rockot, J.H.; Mikesell, H.E.; Jha, K.N.

    1998-08-11

    A device and a method are disclosed for interrupting very high direct currents (greater than 100,000 amperes) and simultaneously blocking high voltages (greater than 600 volts). The device utilizes a mechanical switch to carry very high currents continuously with low loss and a silicon controlled rectifier (SCR) to bypass the current around the mechanical switch while its contacts are separating. A commutation circuit, connected in parallel with the SCR, turns off the SCR by utilizing a resonant circuit to divert the SCR current after the switch opens. 7 figs.

  8. Hybrid high direct current circuit interrupter

    DOEpatents

    Rockot, Joseph H. (N. Huntingdon, PA); Mikesell, Harvey E. (McMurray, PA); Jha, Kamal N. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1998-01-01

    A device and a method for interrupting very high direct currents (greater than 100,000 amperes) and simultaneously blocking high voltages (greater than 600 volts). The device utilizes a mechanical switch to carry very high currents continuously with low loss and a silicon controlled rectifier (SCR) to bypass the current around the mechanical switch while its contacts are separating. A commutation circuit, connected in parallel with the SCR, turns off the SCR by utilizing a resonant circuit to divert the SCR current after the switch opens.

  9. Nanosecond photolytic interruption of bacteriorhodopsin photocycle

    PubMed Central

    Bazhenov, V.; Schmidt, P.; Atkinson, G. H.

    1992-01-01

    The molecular processes comprising the room temperature bacteriorhodopsin (BR) photocycle are examined through the properties of the photo-induced reverse reaction, K-590 + hν → BR-570 (K → BR). Two sequential pumping pulses, each of 10-ns duration, are used, respectively, to initiate the photocycle via the forward BR-570 + hν → K-590 (BR → K) reaction (532 nm) and to photolytically interrupt the thermal BR photocycle after a 20-ns delay via K → BR (620-700 nm). The ground-state BR-570 population, monitored by 633-nm absorption 200 μs after the photocycle begins, provides a quantitative measure of the efficiency with which K → BR interrupts the photocycle to reform BR-570. The quantum yield (Φ) for K → BR is found to be 1.6 ± 0.1 times larger than that for BR → K which, when compared to a Φ of 0.64 for BR → K, suggests that Φ for K → BR is ≈ 1.0. The significance of such a high efficiency K → BR reaction with respect to mechanistic descriptions of the BR photocycle is discussed. PMID:19431837

  10. Interrupting the Interruption: Neoliberalism and the Challenges of an Antiracist School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meshulam, Assaf; Apple, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    The article examines a US public elementary bilingual, multicultural school that attempts to interrupt the reproduction of existing relations of dominance and subordination across a variety of differences. The school's experiences illuminate the complex reality of schools as a site of struggle and compromise between at times contradictory

  11. Interrupting the Interruption: Neoliberalism and the Challenges of an Antiracist School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meshulam, Assaf; Apple, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    The article examines a US public elementary bilingual, multicultural school that attempts to interrupt the reproduction of existing relations of dominance and subordination across a variety of differences. The school's experiences illuminate the complex reality of schools as a site of struggle and compromise between at times contradictory…

  12. Pulsed interrupter and method of operation

    DOEpatents

    Drake, Joel Lawton; Kratz, Robert

    2015-06-09

    Some embodiments provide interrupter systems comprising: a first electrode; a second electrode; a piston movably located at a first position and electrically coupled with the first and second electrodes establishing a closed state, the piston comprises an electrical conductor that couples with the first and second electrodes providing a conductive path; an electromagnetic launcher configured to, when activated, induce a magnetic field pulse causing the piston to move away from the electrical coupling with the first and second electrodes establishing an open circuit between the first and second electrodes; and a piston control system comprising a piston arresting system configured to control a deceleration of the piston following the movement of the piston induced by the electromagnetic launcher such that the piston is not in electrical contact with at least one of the first electrode and the second electrode when in the open state.

  13. Interrupting Intergenerational Cycles of Maternal Obesity.

    PubMed

    Gillman, Matthew W

    2016-01-01

    Factors operating in the preconception and prenatal periods, such as maternal obesity, excessive gestational weight gain and gestational diabetes, predict a substantial fraction of childhood obesity as well as lifelong adverse health consequences in the mother. These periods may lend themselves to successful intervention to reduce such risk factors because parents may be especially willing to change behavior if it confers health advantages to their children. If effective interventions started before or during pregnancy can be maintained after birth, they have the potential to lower the risk of both maternal obesity in the next pregnancy and obesity in the growing child, thus helping to interrupt maternal and child intergenerational vicious cycles of obesity, diabetes and related cardiometabolic health consequences. While this paradigm is appealing, challenges include determining the magnitude, causality and modifiability of these risk factors, and quantifying any adverse consequences of intervention. PMID:27088333

  14. Operational Failures and Interruptions in Hospital Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Anita L; Spear, Steven J

    2006-01-01

    Objective To describe the work environment of hospital nurses with particular focus on the performance of work systems supplying information, materials, and equipment for patient care. Data Sources Primary observation, semistructured interviews, and surveys of hospital nurses. Study Design We sampled a cross-sectional group of six U.S. hospitals to examine the frequency of work system failures and their impact on nurse productivity. Data Collection We collected minute-by-minute data on the activities of 11 nurses. In addition, we conducted interviews with six of these nurses using questions related to obstacles to care. Finally, we created and administered two surveys in 48 nursing units, one for nurses and one for managers, asking about the frequency of specific work system failures. Principal Findings Nurses we observed experienced an average of 8.4 work system failures per 8-hour shift. The five most frequent types of failures, accounting for 6.4 of these obstacles, involved medications, orders, supplies, staffing, and equipment. Survey questions asking nurses how frequently they experienced these five categories of obstacles yielded similar frequencies. For an average 8-hour shift, the average task time was only 3.1 minutes, and in spite of this, nurses were interrupted mid-task an average of eight times per shift. Conclusions Our findings suggest that nurse effectiveness can be increased by creating improvement processes triggered by the occurrence of work system failures, with the goal of reducing future occurrences. Second, given that nursing work is fragmented and unpredictable, designing processes that are robust to interruption can help prevent errors. PMID:16704505

  15. High-capacity single-pressure SF6 interrupters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostron, J. R.; Berkebile, L. E.; Spindle, H. E.

    1983-05-01

    A high voltage, single pressure, SF6 interrupter with an interrupting capability of 120 kA at 145 kV with a continuous current rating of 5000 A and an interrupting time of 1.5 cycles or less was developed. A second objective of 100 kA at 242 kV was added during the project. Mathematical models were used to extrapolate design requirements from existing data for 63 and 80 kA. Two model puffers, one liquid and the other gas, were designed and tested to obtain data at 100 kA. An interrupter, optimized on the basis of total prospective breaker cost, was designed using the mathematical models. A study was made of the construction materials to operate under the high stress conditions in this interrupter. Existing high speed movies of high current arcs under double flow conditions were analyzed to obtain more information for modeling the interrupter. The optimized interrupter design was built and tested. The interrupting capability confirmed calculations of predicted performance near current zero; however, the dielectric strength after interrupting these high current arcs was not adequate for the 145-kV or the 242-kV ratings.

  16. 34 CFR 650.35 - May fellowship tenure be interrupted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false May fellowship tenure be interrupted? 650.35 Section... POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION JACOB K. JAVITS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM What Conditions Must be Met By Fellows? § 650.35 May fellowship tenure be interrupted? (a) An institution of higher education...

  17. 34 CFR 650.35 - May fellowship tenure be interrupted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false May fellowship tenure be interrupted? 650.35 Section... POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION JACOB K. JAVITS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM What Conditions Must be Met By Fellows? § 650.35 May fellowship tenure be interrupted? (a) An institution of higher education...

  18. Career Interruptions and Subsequent Earnings: A Reexamination Using Swedish Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, James W.; Edin, Per-Anders; Sundstrom, Marianne; Vroman, Susan B.

    1999-01-01

    Cross-sectional and panel estimations of Swedish data reveal that different types of career interruptions have different effects on wages, varying by gender. Therefore, human capital depreciation does not entirely account for the negative effect of career interruptions on subsequent wages. (SK)

  19. 43 CFR 3481.4 - Temporary interruption in coal severance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Temporary interruption in coal severance... LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) COAL EXPLORATION AND MINING OPERATIONS RULES General Provisions § 3481.4 Temporary interruption in coal severance....

  20. 14 CFR 135.417 - Mechanical interruption summary report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mechanical interruption summary report. 135... Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.417 Mechanical interruption summary report. Each... unscheduled stop or diversion from a route, caused by known or suspected mechanical difficulties...

  1. 14 CFR 91.1417 - CAMP: Mechanical interruption summary report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false CAMP: Mechanical interruption summary... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1417 CAMP: Mechanical interruption summary report. Each program manager who maintains program aircraft under a CAMP must mail or deliver, before the end of the 10th...

  2. 14 CFR 91.1417 - CAMP: Mechanical interruption summary report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false CAMP: Mechanical interruption summary... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1417 CAMP: Mechanical interruption summary report. Each program manager who maintains program aircraft under a CAMP must mail or deliver, before the end of the 10th...

  3. 14 CFR 91.1417 - CAMP: Mechanical interruption summary report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false CAMP: Mechanical interruption summary... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1417 CAMP: Mechanical interruption summary report. Each program manager who maintains program aircraft under a CAMP must mail or deliver, before the end of the 10th...

  4. 14 CFR 91.1417 - CAMP: Mechanical interruption summary report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false CAMP: Mechanical interruption summary... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1417 CAMP: Mechanical interruption summary report. Each program manager who maintains program aircraft under a CAMP must mail or deliver, before the end of the 10th...

  5. 14 CFR 135.417 - Mechanical interruption summary report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mechanical interruption summary report. 135... Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.417 Mechanical interruption summary report. Each... unscheduled stop or diversion from a route, caused by known or suspected mechanical difficulties...

  6. 14 CFR 91.1417 - CAMP: Mechanical interruption summary report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false CAMP: Mechanical interruption summary... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1417 CAMP: Mechanical interruption summary report. Each program... route, caused by known or suspected mechanical difficulties or malfunctions that are not required to...

  7. 43 CFR 3481.4 - Temporary interruption in coal severance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Temporary interruption in coal severance... LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) COAL EXPLORATION AND MINING OPERATIONS RULES General Provisions § 3481.4 Temporary interruption in coal severance....

  8. 43 CFR 3481.4 - Temporary interruption in coal severance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Temporary interruption in coal severance... LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) COAL EXPLORATION AND MINING OPERATIONS RULES General Provisions § 3481.4 Temporary interruption in coal severance....

  9. 43 CFR 3481.4 - Temporary interruption in coal severance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Temporary interruption in coal severance... LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) COAL EXPLORATION AND MINING OPERATIONS RULES General Provisions § 3481.4 Temporary interruption in coal severance....

  10. 34 CFR 650.35 - May fellowship tenure be interrupted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... allow a fellow to interrupt study for a period not to exceed 12 months, but only if the interruption of... from the institution and supportive of the fellow's academic program; and (2) Approved by the... POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION JACOB K. JAVITS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM What Conditions Must be...

  11. 34 CFR 650.35 - May fellowship tenure be interrupted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... allow a fellow to interrupt study for a period not to exceed 12 months, but only if the interruption of... from the institution and supportive of the fellow's academic program; and (2) Approved by the... POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION JACOB K. JAVITS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM What Conditions Must be...

  12. 34 CFR 650.35 - May fellowship tenure be interrupted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... allow a fellow to interrupt study for a period not to exceed 12 months, but only if the interruption of... from the institution and supportive of the fellow's academic program; and (2) Approved by the... POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION JACOB K. JAVITS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM What Conditions Must be...

  13. Aggregation Kinetics of Interrupted Polyglutamine Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Robert H.; Murphy, Regina M.

    2011-01-01

    Abnormally expanded polyglutamine domains are associated with at least nine neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntingtons disease. Expansion of the glutamine region facilitates aggregation of the impacted protein, and aggregation has been linked to neurotoxicity. Studies of synthetic peptides have contributed substantially to our understanding of the mechanism of aggregation, because the underlying biophysics of polyglutamine-mediated association can be probed independent of their context within a larger protein. In this report, interrupting residues were inserted into polyglutamine peptides (Q20), and the impact on conformational and aggregation properties was examined. A peptide with 2 alanine residues formed laterally-aligned fibrillar aggregates which were similar to the uninterrupted Q20 peptide. Insertion of 2 proline residues resulted in soluble, nonfibrillar aggregates, which did not mature into insoluble aggregates. In contrast, insertion of a ?-turn template DPG rapidly accelerated aggregation and resulted in a fibrillar aggregate morphology with little lateral alignment between fibrils. These results are interpreted to indicate that (a) long-range nonspecific interactions lead to the formation of soluble oligomers, while maturation of oligomers into fibrils requires conformational conversion, and (b) that soluble oligomers dynamically interact with each other, while insoluble aggregates are relatively inert. Kinetic analysis revealed that the increase in aggregation caused by the DPG insert is inconsistent with the nucleation-elongation mechanism of aggregation featuring a monomeric ?-sheet nucleus. Rather, the data support a mechanism of polyglutamine aggregation by which monomers associate into soluble oligomers, which then undergo slow structural rearrangement to form sedimentable aggregates. PMID:21821045

  14. Interrupted Stellar Encounters in Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geller, Aaron M.; Leigh, Nathan W. C.

    2015-07-01

    Strong encounters between single stars and binaries play a pivotal role in the evolution of star clusters. Such encounters can also dramatically modify the orbital parameters of binaries, exchange partners in and out of binaries, and are a primary contributor to the rate of physical stellar collisions in star clusters. Often, these encounters are studied under the approximation that they happen quickly enough and within a small enough volume to be considered isolated from the rest of the cluster. In this paper, we study the validity of this assumption through the analysis of a large grid of single-binary and binary-binary scattering experiments. For each encounter we evaluate the encounter duration, and compare this with the expected time until another single or binary star will join the encounter. We find that for lower-mass clusters, similar to typical open clusters in our Galaxy, the percent of encounters that will be “interrupted” by an interloping star or binary may be 20%-40% (or higher) in the core, though for typical globular clusters we expect ≲1% of encounters to be interrupted. Thus, the assumption that strong encounters occur in relative isolation breaks down for certain clusters. Instead, many strong encounters develop into more complex “mini-clusters,” which must be accounted for in studying, for example, the internal dynamics of star clusters, and the physical stellar collision rate.

  15. The Effect of Interruptions on Part 121 Air Carrier Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damos, Diane L.

    1998-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the relative priorities of various events and activities by examining the probability that a given activity was interrupted by a given event. The analysis will begin by providing frequency of interruption data by crew position (captain versus first officer) and event type. Any differences in the pattern of interruptions between the first officers and the captains will be explored and interpreted in terms of standard operating procedures. Subsequent data analyses will focus on comparing the frequency of interruptions for different types of activities and for the same activities under normal versus emergency conditions. Briefings and checklists will receive particular attention. The frequency with which specific activities are interrupted under multiple- versus single-task conditions also will be examined; because the majority of multiple-task data were obtained under laboratory conditions, LOFT-type tapes offer a unique opportunity to examine concurrent task performance under 'real-world' conditions. A second purpose of this study is to examine the effects of the interruptions on performance. More specifically, when possible, the time to resume specific activities will be compared to determine if pilots are slower to resume certain types of activities. Errors in resumption or failures to resume specific activities will be noted and any patterns in these errors will be identified. Again, particular attention will be given to the effects of interruptions on the completion of checklists and briefings. Other types of errors and missed events (i.e., the crew should have responded to the event but did not) will be examined. Any methodology using interruptions to examine task prioritization must be able to identify when an interruption has occurred and describe the ongoing activities that were interrupted. Both of these methodological problems are discussed In detail in the following section,

  16. Servicing a globally broadcast interrupt signal in a multi-threaded computer

    SciTech Connect

    Attinella, John E.; Davis, Kristan D.; Musselman, Roy G.; Satterfield, David L.

    2015-12-29

    Methods, apparatuses, and computer program products for servicing a globally broadcast interrupt signal in a multi-threaded computer comprising a plurality of processor threads. Embodiments include an interrupt controller indicating in a plurality of local interrupt status locations that a globally broadcast interrupt signal has been received by the interrupt controller. Embodiments also include a thread determining that a local interrupt status location corresponding to the thread indicates that the globally broadcast interrupt signal has been received by the interrupt controller. Embodiments also include the thread processing one or more entries in a global interrupt status bit queue based on whether global interrupt status bits associated with the globally broadcast interrupt signal are locked. Each entry in the global interrupt status bit queue corresponds to a queued global interrupt.

  17. Interrupt-based Phase-locked Frequency Multiplier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method aud system utilize a processor's digital timer and two interrupts to form a frequency multiplier. The first internipt's processing time window is definable by a first uumber of counts C(sub 1), of the digital timer while the second interrupt's processing time window is definable by a second number of counts C(sub 2) of the digital timer. A count value CV utilized by the systedmethod is based on a desired frequency multiplier N(sub 1), the timer clock rate, and the tiole required for one cycle of an input signal. The first interrupt is triggered upon completion of one cycle ofthe input sigual at which point the processing time window associated therewith begins. The second interrupt is triggered each time the timer's overflow signal is generated at which point the processing time window associated with the second interrupt begins. During the occurrence of the second interrupt's processing. the count value CV is modified to maintain the first interrupt's processing time window approximately centered between two of the second internipt's processing time windows.

  18. The time-course of recovery from interruption during reading: eye movement evidence for the role of interruption lag and spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Cane, James E; Cauchard, Fabrice; Weger, Ulrich W

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments examined how interruptions impact reading and how interruption lags and the reader's spatial memory affect the recovery from such interruptions. Participants read paragraphs of text and were interrupted unpredictably by a spoken news story while their eye movements were monitored. Time made available for consolidation prior to responding to the interruption did not aid reading resumption. However, providing readers with a visual cue that indicated the interruption location did aid task resumption substantially in Experiment 2. Taken together, the findings show that the recovery from interruptions during reading draws on spatial memory resources and can be aided by processes that support spatial memory. Practical implications are discussed. PMID:22540847

  19. Undulator interruption in high-gain free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.

    1997-10-01

    The effect of interrupting an undulator on the performance of high-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) is evaluated by analyzing 1-D Maxwell-Vlasov equations. It is found that the effect is small for a reasonable length of the interruptions for FEL parameters envisaged for short wavelength self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE). Since the interruptions provide valuable space for quadrupoles and diagnostics, and at the same time permit a greater flexibility in mechanical design, the result of this paper is encouraging for construction of long undulator magnets required for SASE.

  20. Interruption costs, customer satisfaction and expectations for service reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, M.J.; Suddeth, B.N.; Vardell, T.; Vojdani, A.

    1996-05-01

    This paper summarizes results of a comprehensive study of the economic value of electric service carried out by Duke Power Company in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute. In the study, customer interruption costs were estimated for generation, transmission and distribution outages of differencing lengths occurring under varying circumstances. Interruption costs for momentary outages and voltage disturbances are also reported. In addition to these economic indicators of customer value of service, customer expectations for service reliability and power quality and their satisfaction with the service currently offered are reported. Statistical methods and procedures used in estimating interruption costs are described.

  1. Railgun power supply system utilizing traction motors and vacuum interrupters

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, W.M.; Parker, J.V.; Thullen, P.

    1985-01-01

    A railgun power supply has been designed that utilizes traction motors, vacuum interrupters and pulse transformers. An assembly of 28 traction motors, which store approximately 75 MJ, energize the primary windings of three pulse transformers at a peak current of 50 kA. At peak current an array of vacuum interrupters disconnects the transformer primary windings and forces the current to flow in the secondary windings. The secondary windings are connected directly to the railgun and require no opening switches. By staging the vacuum interrupter openings, a 1 MA to 1.3 MA ramped current waveform can be delivered to the railgun.

  2. Strategies for preventing distractions and interruptions in the OR.

    PubMed

    Clark, Gregory J

    2013-06-01

    Stakeholders in the automotive industry, airline industry, and anesthesia profession have identified critical periods of time in which distractions and interruptions of normal processes can have devastating effects. Just as reducing distractions improves safety in an automobile or airplane cockpit, limiting distractions and interruptions during critical times in the perioperative setting can increase patient safety. We assessed perioperative nurses and identified what they perceived as critical phases of nursing care. We also worked with our anesthesia partners to address their concerns about interruptions during the administration of nerve blocks. The perioperative nurses at our hospital initiated strategies to reduce distractions or interruptions to their practice at critical points, and, in collaboration with surgical committee members, we developed strategies to reduce or eliminate distractions for anesthesia professionals during the preoperative administration of nerve blocks and to eliminate distractions for the RN circulator and scrub person during the final counts. PMID:23722034

  3. Resistance Welder Using 480-Vac Ground-Fault Interrupter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, Steven W.; Kroy, Ralph E.; Macfarlane, Douglas I.

    1989-01-01

    Use of ground-fault interrupters in 480-Vac power supplies of portable resistance welding machines proposed. Enhances safety and quality of welds by detecting damage in long power cable to portable resistance welder.

  4. Surveillance of hazardous substances releases due to system interruptions, 2002.

    PubMed

    Orr, Maureen F; Ruckart, Perri Zeitz

    2007-04-11

    The Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES) system collected information on 9014 acute hazardous substance releases in 15 participating states in 2002. There were 3749 fixed-facility manufacturing events, of which 2100 involved "interruptions" to normal processing and 1649 "comparisons" that did not involve interruption. Equipment failure (69%) or intentional acts (20%) were the main root factor. Many events occurred in October and November in three states (Texas, Louisiana, and New Jersey), in three manufacturing industries (industrial and miscellaneous chemicals; petroleum refining; and plastics, synthetics, and resins). In interruption events, the substance categories most often released were mixtures, other inorganic substances, and volatile organic compounds and those most often causing injury were acids, chlorine, bases, and ammonia. Comparison events resulted in more acutely injured persons (408 versus 59) and more evacuees (11,318 versus 335) than interruption events and therefore may receive more public health attention. Because of the large number of interruption events, targeted prevention activities, including management of change procedures, lessons-learned implementation, process hazards analysis, and appropriate protection for workers could be economically advantageous and improve environmental quality. Efforts should focus on the identified areas of greater occurrence. The relationship of weather and equipment failure with interruption events needs further investigation. PMID:16920261

  5. The Effect of Interruption Duration and Demand on Resuming Suspended Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monk, Christopher A.; Trafton, J. Gregory; Boehm-Davis, Deborah A.

    2008-01-01

    The time to resume task goals after an interruption varied depending on the duration and cognitive demand of interruptions, as predicted by the memory for goals model (Altmann & Trafton, 2002). Three experiments using an interleaved tasks interruption paradigm showed that longer and more demanding interruptions led to longer resumption times in a…

  6. Reconstruction of interrupted SAR imagery for persistent surveillance change detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojanovic, Ivana; Karl, W. C.; Novak, Les

    2012-05-01

    In this paper we apply a sparse signal recovery technique for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image formation from interrupted phase history data. Timeline constraints imposed on multi-function modern radars result in interrupted SAR data collection, which in turn leads to corrupted imagery that degrades reliable change detection. In this paper we extrapolate the missing data by applying the basis pursuit denoising algorithm (BPDN) in the image formation step, effectively, modeling the SAR scene as sparse. We investigate the effects of regular and random interruptions on the SAR point spread function (PSF), as well as on the quality of both coherent (CCD) and non-coherent (NCCD) change detection. We contrast the sparse reconstruction to the matched filter (MF) method, implemented via Fourier processing with missing data set to zero. To illustrate the capabilities of the gap-filling sparse reconstruction algorithm, we evaluate change detection performance using a pair of images from the GOTCHA data set.

  7. Recanalization of the intentionally interrupted inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Arpit H; Wakefield, Thomas W; Williams, David M

    2015-09-01

    Intentional interruption of the inferior vena cava with caval ligation and a Mobin-Uddin filter was once commonly used to prevent recurrent pulmonary emboli and was associated with significant mortality and morbidity, including a high incidence of post-thrombotic syndrome. Recanalization of an intentionally interrupted inferior vena cava has been rarely described in literature and is commonly considered futile. We describe two patients with post-thrombotic syndrome as a late complication of caval ligation and a thrombosed Mobin-Uddin filter, with significant and sustained improvement after endovascular recanalization. PMID:24680239

  8. Fundamentals of interruption in vacuum. Eighth progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, A N; Childs, S E

    1980-05-30

    In analyzing the behavior of a vacuum arc during interruption , a mathematical model has been set up to describe the events occurring in the interelectrode gap during interruption. The reliability of the results obtained using such a model depends on the accuracy of the initial assumptions made in setting up the model equations. Previous results obtained from the model analysis were compared to experimental data and it was found that there was a discrepancy close to current zero. To improve our model results some of the original model assumptions have been reconsidered in order to make the model more closely represent the physical reality of a vacuum arc.

  9. The Needs of Others: Gender and Sleep Interruptions for Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgard, Sarah A.

    2011-01-01

    Received wisdom, some sociological theory and a handful of qualitative studies suggest that the "night shift" of caregiving work that interrupts sleep is a burden borne disproportionately by women. However, there is no broadly representative evidence to substantiate claims about who takes the night shift in contemporary American households.…

  10. 38 CFR 21.5078 - Interruption to conserve entitlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Interruption to conserve entitlement. 21.5078 Section 21.5078 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-Vietnam Era Veterans' Educational Assistance...

  11. 38 CFR 21.5078 - Interruption to conserve entitlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interruption to conserve entitlement. 21.5078 Section 21.5078 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-Vietnam Era Veterans' Educational Assistance...

  12. Multi-megampere current interruption from explosive deformation of conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Goforth, J.H.; Williams, A.H.; Marsh, S.P.

    1985-01-01

    Two approaches for using explosives to interrupt current flowing in solid conductors are described. One concept uses explosives to extrude the switch conductor into thin regions that fuse due to current in the switch. A preliminary scaling law is presented. The second approach employs dielectric jets to sever current carrying conductors. A feasibility experiment and an improved design are described.

  13. Teaching Spontaneous Communication in Natural Settings through Interrupted Behavior Chains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Pam; Goetz, Lori

    1988-01-01

    The article describes the use of interrupted behavior chains to teach communication skills in natural settings with autistic students. Empirical and theoretical bases for the training strategy are explained as are specific procedures for implementing the strategy. Implications of the strategy for classroom organization and service delivery are…

  14. Effect of unloading time on interrupted creep in copper

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, H.D. . School of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    The effect of unloading time on the interrupted creep behavior of polycrystalline copper specimens was investigated over the temperature range 298--773 K. Up to 553 K, cyclic creep acceleration could be explained in terms of deformation and hardening using a dislocation glide model with recovery during unloading being due to dislocation climb. At higher temperatures, recrystallization effects probably influence behavior.

  15. 14 CFR 121.705 - Mechanical interruption summary report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mechanical interruption summary report. 121... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Records and Reports § 121.705 Mechanical... known or suspected mechanical difficulties or malfunctions that are not required to be reported...

  16. Institutional Narcissism, Arrogant Organization Disorder and Interruptions in Organizational Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godkin, Lynn; Allcorn, Seth

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to present an alternative approach to diagnosing behavioral barriers to organizational learning. Design/methodology/approach: The paper juxtaposes interruptions in organizational learning with characteristics of narcissism and arrogant organization disorder. Psychoanalytically informed theory and DSM-IV criteria are…

  17. Toy Modification Note: Build It Yourself Battery Interrupter. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderheiden, Gregg C.; Brandenburg, S.

    This toy modification note presents illustrated instructions on how to build a battery interrupter that permits on/off control of battery-operated toys without modification of the toys themselves. The device allows for a separate control switch which can be custom designed to fit a handicapped user's needs. Information on the construction and use…

  18. Institutional Narcissism, Arrogant Organization Disorder and Interruptions in Organizational Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godkin, Lynn; Allcorn, Seth

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to present an alternative approach to diagnosing behavioral barriers to organizational learning. Design/methodology/approach: The paper juxtaposes interruptions in organizational learning with characteristics of narcissism and arrogant organization disorder. Psychoanalytically informed theory and DSM-IV criteria are

  19. 14 CFR 121.705 - Mechanical interruption summary report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mechanical interruption summary report. 121... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Records and Reports § 121.705 Mechanical... known or suspected mechanical difficulties or malfunctions that are not required to be reported...

  20. Distribution of AGG interruption patterns within nine world populations

    PubMed Central

    Yrigollen, Carolyn M.; Sweha, Stefan; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Zhou, Lili; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Fernandez-Carvajal, Isabel; Faradz, Sultana MH; Amiri, Khaled; Shaheen, Huda; Polli, Roberta; Murillo-Bonilla, Luis; Silva Arevalo, Gabriel de Jesus; Cogram, Patricia; Murgia, Alessandra; Tassone, Flora

    2014-01-01

    Summary The CGG trinucleotide repeat within the FMR1 gene is associated with multiple clinical disorders, including fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome, fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency, and fragile X syndrome. Differences in the distribution and prevalence of CGG repeat length and of AGG interruption patterns have been reported among different populations and ethnicities. In this study we characterized the AGG interruption patterns within 3,065 normal CGG repeat alleles from nine world populations including Australia, Chile, United Arab Emirates, Guatemala, Indonesia, Italy, Mexico, Spain, and United States. Additionally, we compared these populations with those previously reported, and summarized the similarities and differences. We observed significant differences in AGG interruption patterns. Frequencies of longer alleles, longer uninterrupted CGG repeat segments and alleles with greater than 2 AGG interruptions varied between cohorts. The prevalence of fragile X syndrome and FMR1 associated disorders in various populations is thought to be affected by the total length of the CGG repeat and may also be influenced by the AGG distribution pattern. Thus, the results of this study may be important in considering the risk of fragile X-related conditions in various populations. PMID:25606365

  1. 30 CFR 18.48 - Circuit-interrupting devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Circuit-interrupting devices. 18.48 Section 18.48 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design Requirements §...

  2. 30 CFR 18.48 - Circuit-interrupting devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Circuit-interrupting devices. 18.48 Section 18.48 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design Requirements §...

  3. Prediction of DC current flow between the Otjiwarongo and Katima Mulilo regions, using 3D DC resistivity forward modelling and magnetotelluric and audio-magnetotelluric data recorded during SAMTEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Share, P.; Jones, A. G.; Muller, M. R.; Miensopust, M. P.; Khoza, D. T.; Fourie, S.; Webb, S. J.; Thunehed, H.

    2009-12-01

    SAMTEX (Southern African Magnetotelluric Experiment) is a multinational project initiated in 2003 to study the regional-scale electrical conductivity substructure of southern Africa and to infer from it the tectonic processes involved in the formation and deformation of the southern African subcontinental lithosphere. As an additional opportunistic component to SAMTEX, audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) data were acquired during the most recent phase of the experiment (Phase IV) to investigate the local-scale conductivity substructure in the Otjiwarongo and Katima Mulilo regions (northern and north-eastern Namibia), where in future the installation of high-voltage direct current (HVDC) earth electrodes will commence. Both of the AMT surveys are situated close to the edge of the orogenic Neo-Proterozoic Ghanzi-Chobe/Damara belts (collectively termed the Damara Mobile Belt, DMB), which represents in part the collision between the Congo and Kalahari cratons during the amalgamation of South Gondwana. Previous studies using magnetotellurics (MT), magnetometer arrays and geomagnetic observatory data all point to the existence of a highly conductive mid-crustal zone which correlates well with the spatial location of the DMB. Preliminary modelling of the Otjiwarongo AMT data confirms the existence of a high conductive zone at mid-crustal depths (10-15 km), whereas in Katima Mulilo insufficient penetration of electromagnetic energy in the AMT frequency band, due to conductive sediment cover, prevents information being obtained of the conductivity at mid-crustal depths. However, at Katima Mulilo there are sparser broadband MT (BBMT) and long period MT (LMT) measurements that can be incorporated. The high conductivity of the DMB is explained by the presence of conductive materials (graphites, sulphides). In contrast, the lithospheric structure of the neighbouring Archaean cratons, the Congo and Kalahari, are generally found to be electrically resistive and therefore it is hypothesized that the return path of DC current, flowing along the path of least resistance between the two electrodes, is most likely to lie somewhere within, or in the vicinity of, the DMB. To obtain a better understanding of the current flow we propose using geological information, previous results of studies of the conductivity of the DMB and surrounding regions and 2D and 3D inversion results from the AMT and MT data recorded during SAMTEX in northern Botswana and Namibia, as input to a 3D DC resistivity forward modelling code, and to try to predict the return path that the DC current will follow.

  4. The long-term costs of career interruptions.

    PubMed

    Ketsche, Patricia G; Branscomb, Lisette

    2003-01-01

    This article is based on a study that analyzed the long-term salary implications of career choices made by healthcare administrators. The study used a cohort of graduates from a single health administration program; these individuals had comparable levels of human capital at the outset of their careers. We estimated the effect of periods of part-time employment and job interruptions--voluntary and involuntary--on long-term salary progression. We also estimated the impact of other career choices, such as membership in a professional organization or the decision to relocate. After controlling for these choices, we estimated the residual effect of gender on salary. We found that voluntary interruptions had a greater effect on long-term salary growth than did involuntary interruptions of the same length or periods of part-time employment. Individuals evaluating options for balancing career and family constraints should understand the long-term cost of choosing a career interruption rather than part-time employment during periods of heightened responsibilities outside the workplace. Healthcare administrators should also be educated about the positive association between professional memberships and career advancement to make informed decisions about participation in such organizations. Surprisingly, after controlling for all choice variables, gender had no measurable effect on long-term salary growth. Half of those who indicated a voluntary interruption for dependent care reasons preferred part-time or flexible-hour work if it had been available. These results suggest that a pool of healthcare administrators might compete for positions if more part-time opportunities were available. PMID:12592867

  5. Reversible harmless interruption of testicular blood supply in the ram

    SciTech Connect

    van Vliet, J.; De Ruiter-Bootsma, A.L.; Oei, Y.H.; Hoekstra, A.; De Rooij, D.G.; Wensing, C.J.

    1987-03-01

    An effective method of interrupting testicular blood flow temporarily and repeatedly in the ram has been developed. Blockade of flow has been achieved mechanically by an inflatable occluder placed around the testicular artery at the level of the spermatic cord. The effect of the blockade on total testicular blood supply was investigated using Doppler flowmetry and a percutaneous Xenon-133 injection method. With both approaches, the blood flow changes after inflation or deflation of the occluders could be estimated satisfactorily. A substantial decrease of testicular blood flow was achieved in eight of the 10 testes with inflated occluders. However, there were indications that in the remaining two testes blockade of the arterial flow was not complete. After deflation of the occluders, blood flow was restored rapidly and completely in all testes. Macro- and microscopic examinations revealed no long-term damage to the testis after blood flow interruptions lasting 30 or 60 minutes.

  6. Modification of seizure disorders: the interruption of behavioral chains.

    PubMed Central

    Zlutnick, S; Mayville, W J; Moffat, S

    1975-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of interruption and differential reinforcement on seizures in children. Seizures were conceptualized as the terminal link in a behavioral chain, resulting in a strategy aimed at identifying and modifying behaviors that reliably preceded the seizure climax. Seizure frequency was reduced in four of five subjects, whereas the frequency of preseizure behavior was reduced in only three subjects. Parents and school personnel were successfully used as change agents. PMID:1141076

  7. Estimating Subglottal Pressure via Airflow Interruption with Auditory Masking

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Matthew R.; Jiang, Jack J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Current noninvasive measurement of subglottal pressure using airflow interruption often produces inconsistent results due to the elicitation of audio-laryngeal reflexes. Auditory feedback could be considered as a means of ensuring measurement accuracy and precision. The purpose of this study was to determine if auditory masking could be used with the airflow interruption system to improve intrasubject consistency. Study Design A prerecorded sample of subject phonation was played on a loop over headphones during the trials with auditory masking. This provided subjects with a target pitch and blocked out distracting ambient noise created by the airflow interrupter. Methods Subglottal pressure was noninvasively measured using the airflow interruption system. Thirty subjects, divided into two equal groups, performed ten trials without auditory masking and ten trials with auditory masking. Group one performed the normal trials first, followed by the trials with auditory masking. Group two performed the auditory masking trials first, followed by the normal trials. Results Intrasubject consistency was improved by adding auditory masking, resulting in a decrease in average intrasubject standard deviation from 0.93 ± 0.51 to 0.47 ± 0.22 cmH2O (p < .001). Conclusions Auditory masking can be used effectively to combat audio-laryngeal reflexes and aid subjects in maintaining constant glottal configuration and frequency, thereby increasing intrasubject consistency when measuring subglottal pressure. By considering auditory feedback, a more reliable method of measurement was developed. This method could be employed by clinicians, as reliable, immediately available values of subglottal pressure are useful in evaluating laryngeal health and monitoring treatment progress. PMID:18538988

  8. Vocal interruptions in dyadic communication as a function of speech and social anxiety.

    PubMed

    Natale, M; Entin, E; Jaffe, J

    1979-06-01

    Interruptions have been defined as a breach of the "turn-taking" contract in interpersonal communication. The relation between a speaker's personality and his or her propensity to interrupt was examined in 30-min unstructured conversations for 36 dyads (12 male, 12 female, and 12 mixed sex). The following predictions were made: (a) Interruptive behavior is inversely related to speech anxiety and positively related to confidence as a speaker; (b) interruptive behavior is inversely related to social anxiety (avoidance-distress; fear of negative evaluation). A stepwise multiple regression analysis was performed, controlling for the systematic effects of sex, the conversational partner's personality and amount of speech, and the speaker's use of back-channel responses. These hypotheses were confirmed for rate of total interruptions and rate of successful interruptions, for percentage of successful interruptions, and for mean duration of interruptions; the results withstood cross-validation analysis. PMID:490308

  9. Interruption Phenomenon in Intermediate-Frequency Vacuum Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yuan; Wu, Jianwen

    2016-03-01

    In the condition of the 3 mm gap, experiments for 360 Hz intermediate-frequency vacuum arc are carried out in interrupters with the diameters being 41 mm and with the contact materials being CuCr50 and Cu-W-WC alloy respectively. The results indicate that the contacts material is closely related to the breaking capacity of the vacuum interrupters and characteristics of an intermediate-frequency vacuum arc. For contacts with the same diameter, the breaking capacity of CuCr50 is better than that of Cu-W-WC. When the current fails to be interrupted, the arcs overflow the gap and present irregular performances in the first half wave. Consequently a voltage spike appears. More macroscopic metal droplets can be seen in the arc column between CuCr50 contacts because of the lower melting point. It is observed that the droplet emission is much more severe during arc reignition than that in the first half wave. It is much more conspicuous that the high frequency arc voltage noises appear in Cu-W-WC contacts when the vacuum arcs reignite, for higher temperature and stronger electronic emission ability of Cu-W-WC contacts. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51377007), Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20131102130006), and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China

  10. Interruption of the Tower of London Task: Support for a Goal-Activation Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgetts, Helen M.; Jones, Dylan M.

    2006-01-01

    Unexpected interruptions introduced during the execution phase of simple Tower of London problems incurred a time cost when the interrupted goal was retrieved, and this cost was exacerbated the longer the goal was suspended. Furthermore, time taken to retrieve goals was greater following a more complex interruption, indicating the processing…

  11. Interruption Management in the Intensive Care Unit: Predicting Resumption Times and Assessing Distributed Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grundgeiger, Tobias; Sanderson, Penelope; MacDougall, Hamish G.; Venkatesh, Balasubramanian

    2010-01-01

    Interruptions are frequent in many work domains. Researchers in health care have started to study interruptions extensively, but their studies usually do not use a theoretically guided approach. Conversely, researchers conducting theoretically rich laboratory studies on interruptions have not usually investigated how effectively their findings…

  12. Interruption of the Tower of London Task: Support for a Goal-Activation Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgetts, Helen M.; Jones, Dylan M.

    2006-01-01

    Unexpected interruptions introduced during the execution phase of simple Tower of London problems incurred a time cost when the interrupted goal was retrieved, and this cost was exacerbated the longer the goal was suspended. Furthermore, time taken to retrieve goals was greater following a more complex interruption, indicating the processing

  13. "Just a Minute..."--Managing Interruptions in the Junior School Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varley, Helen M.; Busher, Hugh

    1989-01-01

    Presents information concerning the range of external interruptions experienced by junior high school teachers. Examines the ways in which interruptions become disruptions. Provides suggestions on how to manage these interruptions and discusses the difference between "proactive" and "reactive" class management. Finds that size of school has the…

  14. No evidence of relation between working memory and perception of interrupted speech in young adults.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Naveen K; Knapp, Andrea N

    2015-08-01

    Understanding interrupted speech requires top-down linguistic and cognitive restoration mechanisms. To investigate the relation between working memory (WM) and perception of interrupted speech, 20 young adults were asked to recognize sentences interrupted at 2 Hz, 8 Hz, and a combination of 2 and 8 Hz. WM was measured using automated reading and operation span tasks. Interestingly, the results presented here revealed no statistical relation between any of the interrupted speech recognition scores and WM scores. This finding is in agreement with previous findings that suggest greater reliance on linguistic factors relative to cognitive factors during perception of interrupted speech. PMID:26328740

  15. High-capacity single-pressure SF/sub 6/ interrupters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rostron, J R; Berkebile, L E; Spindle, H E

    1983-05-01

    The object of this project was to design and develop a high-voltage, single-pressure, SF/sub 6/ interrupter with an interrupting capability of 120 kA at 145 kV with a continuous current rating of 5000 A and an interrupting time of 1.5 cycles or less. A second objective of 100 kA at 242 kV was added during the project. Mathematical models were used to extrapolate design requirements from existing data for 63 and 80 kA. Two model puffers, one liquid and the other gas, were designed and tested to obtain data at 100 kA. An interrupter, optimized on the basis of total prospective breaker cost, was designed using the mathematical models. A study was made of the construction materials to operate under the high-stress conditions in this interrupter. Existing high-speed movies of high-current arcs under double-flow conditions were analyzed to obtain more information for modeling the interrupter. The optimized interrupter design was built and tested. The interrupting capability confirmed calculations of predicted performance near current zero; however, the dielectric strength after interrupting these high-current arcs was not adequate for the 145-kV or the 242-kV ratings. The dielectric strength was reduced by hot gases flowing out of the interrupter. Valuable data have been obtained for modeling the SF/sub 6/ puffer interrupter for high currents.

  16. What Interrupts Suicide Attempts in Men: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Player, Michael J.; Proudfoot, Judy; Fogarty, Andrea; Whittle, Erin; Spurrier, Michael; Shand, Fiona; Christensen, Helen; Hadzi-Pavlovic, Dusan; Wilhelm, Kay

    2015-01-01

    Despite higher rates of suicide in men, there is a dearth of research examining the perspectives and experiences of males at risk of suicide, particularly in terms of understanding how interventions can be tailored to men’s specific needs. The current study aimed to examine factors assisting, complicating or inhibiting interventions for men at risk, as well as outlining the roles of family, friends and others in male suicide prevention. Thirty-five male suicide survivors completed one-to-one interviews, and forty-seven family and friends of male suicide survivors participated in eight focus groups. Thematic analysis revealed five major themes: (1) development of suicidal behaviours tends to follow a common path associated with specific types of risk factors (disrupted mood, unhelpful stoic beliefs and values, avoidant coping strategies, stressors), (2) men at risk of suicide tend to systematically misinterpret changes in their behaviour and thinking, (3) understanding mood and behavioural changes in men enables identification of opportunities to interrupt suicide progression, (4) distraction, provision of practical and emotional supports, along with professional intervention may effectively interrupt acute risk of harm, and (5) suicidal ideation may be reduced through provision of practical help to manage crises, and helping men to focus on obligations and their role within families. Findings suggest that interventions for men at risk of suicidal behaviours need to be tailored to specific risk indicators, developmental factors, care needs and individuals’ preferences. To our knowledge this is the first qualitative study to explore the experiences of both suicidal men and their family/friends after a suicide attempt, with the view to improve understanding of the processes which are effective in interrupting suicide and better inform interventions for men at risk. PMID:26090794

  17. Efficient system interrupt concept design at the microprogramming level

    SciTech Connect

    Fakharzadeh, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    Over the past decade the demand for high speed super microcomputers has been tremendously increased. To satisfy this demand many high speed 32-bit microcomputers have been designed. However, the currently available 32-bit systems do not provide an adequate solution to many highly demanding problems such as in multitasking, and in interrupt driven applications, which both require context switching. Systems for these purposes usually incorporate sophisticated software. In order to be efficient, a high end microprocessor based system must satisfy stringent software demands. Although these microprocessors use the latest technology in the fabrication design and run at a very high speed, they still suffer from insufficient hardware support for such applications. All too often, this lack also is the premier cause of execution inefficiency. In this dissertation a micro-programmable control unit and operation unit is considered in an advanced design. An automaton controller is designed for high speed micro-level interrupt handling. Different stack models are designed for the single task and multitasking environment. The stacks are used for storage of various components of the processor during the interrupt calls, procedure calls, and task switching. A universal (as an example seven port) register file is designed for high speed parameter passing, and intertask communication in the multitasking environment. In addition, the register file provides a direct path between ALU and the peripheral data which is important in real-time control applications. The overall system is a highly parallel architecture, with no pipeline and internal cache memory, which allows the designer to be able to predict the processor's behavior during the critical times.

  18. Evaluation of auditory and visual feedback for airflow interruption

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Matthew R.; Rieves, Adam L.; Surender, Ketan; Devine, Erin E.; Jiang, Jack J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Clinical application of mechanical interruption methods for measuring aerodynamic parameters has been hindered by relatively high intrasubject variability. To improve intrasubject reliability, we evaluated the effect of auditory and visual feedback on subject performance when measuring aerodynamic parameters with the airflow interrupter. Methods Eleven subjects performed four sets of ten trials with the airflow interrupter: no feedback (control); auditory feedback (tone matching subject’s F0 played over headphones); visual feedback (real-time feedback of sound pressure level, frequency, and airflow); and combined auditory and visual feedback. Task order was varied across subjects. The effect of each feedback method on mean and coefficient of variation (CV) of subglottal pressure (Ps), mean flow rate (MFR), and laryngeal airway resistance (RL; Ps/MFR) compared to control trials was determined using paired t-tests. Feedback methods were compared against each other using one-way repeated measures analysis of variance. Results Each feedback method significantly decreased the CV of RL compared to control trials (auditory: p=0.005; visual: p=0.008; combined: p<0.001). Auditory (p=0.011) and combined feedback (p=0.026) also decreased the CV of MFR. Mean MFR was significantly higher during trials with visual feedback compared to auditory feedback. Conclusions Each feedback method improved intrasubject consistency when measuring RL. Feedback appeared to have a greater effect on MFR than Ps. While there is no clear optimal feedback method, each is preferable to not providing any feedback during trials. Evaluating new methods of visual feedback to further improve MFR and thus RL measurement would be valuable. PMID:23280384

  19. What Interrupts Suicide Attempts in Men: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Player, Michael J; Proudfoot, Judy; Fogarty, Andrea; Whittle, Erin; Spurrier, Michael; Shand, Fiona; Christensen, Helen; Hadzi-Pavlovic, Dusan; Wilhelm, Kay

    2015-01-01

    Despite higher rates of suicide in men, there is a dearth of research examining the perspectives and experiences of males at risk of suicide, particularly in terms of understanding how interventions can be tailored to men's specific needs. The current study aimed to examine factors assisting, complicating or inhibiting interventions for men at risk, as well as outlining the roles of family, friends and others in male suicide prevention. Thirty-five male suicide survivors completed one-to-one interviews, and forty-seven family and friends of male suicide survivors participated in eight focus groups. Thematic analysis revealed five major themes: (1) development of suicidal behaviours tends to follow a common path associated with specific types of risk factors (disrupted mood, unhelpful stoic beliefs and values, avoidant coping strategies, stressors), (2) men at risk of suicide tend to systematically misinterpret changes in their behaviour and thinking, (3) understanding mood and behavioural changes in men enables identification of opportunities to interrupt suicide progression, (4) distraction, provision of practical and emotional supports, along with professional intervention may effectively interrupt acute risk of harm, and (5) suicidal ideation may be reduced through provision of practical help to manage crises, and helping men to focus on obligations and their role within families. Findings suggest that interventions for men at risk of suicidal behaviours need to be tailored to specific risk indicators, developmental factors, care needs and individuals' preferences. To our knowledge this is the first qualitative study to explore the experiences of both suicidal men and their family/friends after a suicide attempt, with the view to improve understanding of the processes which are effective in interrupting suicide and better inform interventions for men at risk. PMID:26090794

  20. Interruptions of nurses' activities and patient safety: an integrative literature review1

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Cintia; Avelar, Ariane Ferreira Machado; Pedreira, Mavilde da Luz Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to identify characteristics related to the interruption of nurses in professional practice, as well as to assess the implications of interruptions for patient safety. METHOD: integrative literature review. The following databases were searched: Pubmed/Medline, LILACS, SciELO and Cochrane Library, using the descriptors interruptions and patient safety. An initial date was not established, but the final date was December 31, 2013. A total of 29 papers met the inclusion criteria. RESULTS: all the papers included describe interruptions as a harmful factor for patient safety. Data analysis revealed three relevant categories: characteristics of interruptions, implications for patient safety, and interventions to minimize interruptions. CONCLUSION: interruptions favor the occurrence of errors in the health field. Therefore, there is a need for further studies to understand such a phenomenon and its effects on clinical practice. PMID:25806646

  1. Noradrenergic control of cognition: global attenuation and an interrupt function.

    PubMed

    David Johnson, J

    2003-05-01

    It is hypothesized that tonic central noradrenergic activity provides global attenuation, and this system's phasic reactions support an interrupt function. Under normal conditions, these functions enhance vigilance and orienting. Their absence during REM sleep allow greater spontaneous and associative activity and the merging of separate experiences in dreams. An abnormal diminishing of these functions during waking may result in the lack of control and inattentiveness seen in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. On the other hand, excessive noradrenergic activity may facilitate the occurrence of panic attacks as these functions undermine processes which normally moderate anxiety. PMID:12710903

  2. Models for interrupted monitoring of a stochastic process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, E.

    1977-01-01

    As computers are added to the cockpit, the pilot's job is changing from of manually flying the aircraft, to one of supervising computers which are doing navigation, guidance and energy management calculations as well as automatically flying the aircraft. In this supervisorial role the pilot must divide his attention between monitoring the aircraft's performance and giving commands to the computer. Normative strategies are developed for tasks where the pilot must interrupt his monitoring of a stochastic process in order to attend to other duties. Results are given as to how characteristics of the stochastic process and the other tasks affect the optimal strategies.

  3. Series and parallel arc-fault circuit interrupter tests.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jay; Fresquez, Armando J.; Gudgel, Bob; Meares, Andrew

    2013-07-01

    While the 2011 National Electrical Code%C2%AE (NEC) only requires series arc-fault protection, some arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI) manufacturers are designing products to detect and mitigate both series and parallel arc-faults. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has extensively investigated the electrical differences of series and parallel arc-faults and has offered possible classification and mitigation solutions. As part of this effort, Sandia National Laboratories has collaborated with MidNite Solar to create and test a 24-string combiner box with an AFCI which detects, differentiates, and de-energizes series and parallel arc-faults. In the case of the MidNite AFCI prototype, series arc-faults are mitigated by opening the PV strings, whereas parallel arc-faults are mitigated by shorting the array. A range of different experimental series and parallel arc-fault tests with the MidNite combiner box were performed at the Distributed Energy Technologies Laboratory (DETL) at SNL in Albuquerque, NM. In all the tests, the prototype de-energized the arc-faults in the time period required by the arc-fault circuit interrupt testing standard, UL 1699B. The experimental tests confirm series and parallel arc-faults can be successfully mitigated with a combiner box-integrated solution.

  4. Interrupting the transmission of wild polioviruses with vaccines: immunological considerations.

    PubMed Central

    Ghendon, Y.; Robertson, S. E.

    1994-01-01

    In 1988 the World Health Assembly set the goal of global poliomyelitis eradication by the year 2000. Substantial progress has been made, and 143 countries reported no poliomyelitis cases associated with the wild virus in 1993. This article reviews the immunological considerations relevant to interrupting the transmission of wild polioviruses with vaccines. Although serum immunity prevents poliomyelitis in the individual, it is local immunity that is important in preventing the transmission of polioviruses in the community. Natural infection and vaccination with oral polioviruses vaccine (OPV) produce local immunity in the intestine and the nasopharynx in about 70-80% of individuals. In contrast, inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) produces local intestinal immunity in only 20-30% of the individuals. With either vaccine, however, a substantial proportion of the immunized population can transmit the wild virus. Moreover, although serum immunity is long-lasting, limited data suggest that local immunity may not be as persistent. To interrupt the transmission of wild polioviruses efforts should be made to achieve and sustain high levels of poliovirus vaccine coverage. Recent outbreaks show that wild poliovirus poses a risk for unimmunized individuals, even when overall coverage levels are high. Delivery of poliovirus vaccine to hard-to-reach populations will be of increasing importance as countries progress toward the final stages of poliomyelitis eradication. The immunization status of persons from poliomyelitis-free countries should be updated prior to travel to poliomyelitis-endemic areas. PMID:7867144

  5. Left atrial thrombus formation after brief interruption of rivaroxaban.

    PubMed

    Turner, Matthew; Solarz, David

    2016-01-01

    Every year, nearly 250000 atrial fibrillation patients require temporary interruption of anticoagulation therapy for invasive procedures, acute illness, or bleeding events. Rivaroxaban is an oral anticoagulant that works by inhibiting factor Xa leading to a blockage of thrombin production, which inhibits platelet aggregation and thrombus formation. As with other anticoagulants, there is an increased risk of a thrombotic event occurring when rivaroxaban therapy is temporarily interrupted (TI) or prematurely discontinued. The 30-day rate of stroke or systemic embolism for rivaroxaban TI is 0.36%. Possible factors for higher than expected rates of embolic events include a prothrombotic perioperative environment among patients having TI for surgery and a prothrombotic environment associated with TI due to bleeding. The ROCKET AF study showed that there was no detectable difference in the risk of stroke and systemic embolism for participants treated with rivaroxaban vs warfarin undergoing TI. Another analysis suggested that the risk for stroke from TI is probably higher in the rivaroxaban group with 3 to 30 days discontinuation. Alternative anticoagulation therapy such as bridging should always be considered when stopping rivaroxaban. PMID:26081413

  6. The interrupted power law and the size of shadow banking.

    PubMed

    Fiaschi, Davide; Kondor, Imre; Marsili, Matteo; Volpati, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Using public data (Forbes Global 2000) we show that the asset sizes for the largest global firms follow a Pareto distribution in an intermediate range, that is "interrupted" by a sharp cut-off in its upper tail, where it is totally dominated by financial firms. This flattening of the distribution contrasts with a large body of empirical literature which finds a Pareto distribution for firm sizes both across countries and over time. Pareto distributions are generally traced back to a mechanism of proportional random growth, based on a regime of constant returns to scale. This makes our findings of an "interrupted" Pareto distribution all the more puzzling, because we provide evidence that financial firms in our sample should operate in such a regime. We claim that the missing mass from the upper tail of the asset size distribution is a consequence of shadow banking activity and that it provides an (upper) estimate of the size of the shadow banking system. This estimate-which we propose as a shadow banking index-compares well with estimates of the Financial Stability Board until 2009, but it shows a sharper rise in shadow banking activity after 2010. Finally, we propose a proportional random growth model that reproduces the observed distribution, thereby providing a quantitative estimate of the intensity of shadow banking activity. PMID:24728096

  7. Interrupting Sitting Time with Regular Walks Attenuates Postprandial Triglycerides.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, M; Edamoto, K; Kidokoro, T; Yanaoka, T; Kashiwabara, K; Takahashi, M; Burns, S

    2016-02-01

    We compared the effects of prolonged sitting with the effects of sitting interrupted by regular walking and the effects of prolonged sitting after continuous walking on postprandial triglyceride in postmenopausal women. 15 participants completed 3 trials in random order: 1) prolonged sitting, 2) regular walking, and 3) prolonged sitting preceded by continuous walking. During the sitting trial, participants rested for 8 h. For the walking trials, participants walked briskly in either twenty 90-sec bouts over 8 h or one 30-min bout in the morning (09:00-09:30). Except for walking, both exercise trials mimicked the sitting trial. In each trial, participants consumed a breakfast (08:00) and lunch (11:00). Blood samples were collected in the fasted state and at 2, 4, 6 and 8 h after breakfast. The serum triglyceride incremental area under the curve was 15 and 14% lower after regular walking compared with prolonged sitting and prolonged sitting after continuous walking (4.73±2.50 vs. 5.52±2.95 vs. 5.50±2.59 mmol/L∙8 h respectively, main effect of trial: P=0.023). Regularly interrupting sitting time with brief bouts of physical activity can reduce postprandial triglyceride in postmenopausal women. PMID:26509374

  8. Immunological biomarkers predict HIV-1 viral rebound after treatment interruption

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Jacob; Hoffmann, Matthias; Pace, Matthew; Williams, James P.; Thornhill, John; Hamlyn, Elizabeth; Meyerowitz, Jodi; Willberg, Chris; Koelsch, Kersten K.; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Fisher, Martin; Kinloch, Sabine; Cooper, David A.; Schechter, Mauro; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Fidler, Sarah; Babiker, Abdel; Weber, Jonathan; Kelleher, Anthony D.; Phillips, Rodney E.; Frater, John

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of HIV-1 infection with antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the weeks following transmission may induce a state of ‘post-treatment control' (PTC) in some patients, in whom viraemia remains undetectable when ART is stopped. Explaining PTC could help our understanding of the processes that maintain viral persistence. Here we show that immunological biomarkers can predict time to viral rebound after stopping ART by analysing data from a randomized study of primary HIV-1 infection incorporating a treatment interruption (TI) after 48 weeks of ART (the SPARTAC trial). T-cell exhaustion markers PD-1, Tim-3 and Lag-3 measured prior to ART strongly predict time to the return of viraemia. These data indicate that T-cell exhaustion markers may identify those latently infected cells with a higher proclivity to viral transcription. Our results may open new avenues for understanding the mechanisms underlying PTC, and eventually HIV-1 eradication. PMID:26449164

  9. Immunological biomarkers predict HIV-1 viral rebound after treatment interruption.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Jacob; Hoffmann, Matthias; Pace, Matthew; Williams, James P; Thornhill, John; Hamlyn, Elizabeth; Meyerowitz, Jodi; Willberg, Chris; Koelsch, Kersten K; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Fisher, Martin; Kinloch, Sabine; Cooper, David A; Schechter, Mauro; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Fidler, Sarah; Babiker, Abdel; Weber, Jonathan; Kelleher, Anthony D; Phillips, Rodney E; Frater, John

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of HIV-1 infection with antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the weeks following transmission may induce a state of 'post-treatment control' (PTC) in some patients, in whom viraemia remains undetectable when ART is stopped. Explaining PTC could help our understanding of the processes that maintain viral persistence. Here we show that immunological biomarkers can predict time to viral rebound after stopping ART by analysing data from a randomized study of primary HIV-1 infection incorporating a treatment interruption (TI) after 48 weeks of ART (the SPARTAC trial). T-cell exhaustion markers PD-1, Tim-3 and Lag-3 measured prior to ART strongly predict time to the return of viraemia. These data indicate that T-cell exhaustion markers may identify those latently infected cells with a higher proclivity to viral transcription. Our results may open new avenues for understanding the mechanisms underlying PTC, and eventually HIV-1 eradication. PMID:26449164

  10. Possible Interruption of Malaria Transmission, Highland Kenya, 2007–2008

    PubMed Central

    Riedesel, Melissa A.; Magak, Ng’wena G.; Lindblade, Kim A.; Menge, David M.; Hodges, James S.; Vulule, John M.; Akhwale, Willis

    2009-01-01

    Highland areas where malaria transmission is unstable are targets for malaria elimination because transmission decreases to low levels during the dry season. In highland areas of Kipsamoite and Kapsisiywa, Kenya (population ≈7,400 persons), annual household indoor residual spraying with a synthetic pyrethroid was performed starting in 2005, and artemether/lumefantrine was implemented as first-line malaria treatment in October 2006. During April 2007–March 2008, no microscopy-confirmed cases of malaria occurred at the sites. In 4 assessments of asymptomatic persons during May 2007–April 2008, a total of <0.3% of persons were positive for asexual Plasmodium falciparum by microscopy or PCR at any time, and none were positive by PCR at the last 2 sample collections. Our findings show that in such areas, interruption and eventual elimination of malaria transmission may be achievable with widespread annual indoor residual spraying of households and artemisinin combination therapy. PMID:19961670

  11. Platelet count kinetics following interruption of antiretroviral treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zetterberg, Eva; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Baker, Jason V.; Somboonwit, Charurut; Llibre, Josep M.; Palfreeman, Adrian; Chini, Maria; Lundgren, Jens D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the mechanisms of platelet kinetics in the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMART) study that demonstrated excess mortality with CD4 guided episodic antiretroviral therapy (ART) drug conservation compared with continuous treatment viral suppression. Follow-up analyses of stored plasma samples demonstrated increased activation of both inflammatory and coagulation pathways after stopping ART. Design SMART patients from sites that determined platelets routinely. Methods Platelet counts were retrospectively collected from 2206 patients from visits at study entry, and during follow-up. D-dimer levels were measured at study entry, month 1, and 2. Results Platelet levels decreased in the drug conservation group following randomization, but remained stable in the viral suppression group [median (IQR) decline from study entry to month 4: −24 000/µl (−54 000 to 4000) vs. 3000 (−22 000 to 24 000), respectively, P < 0.0001)] and the rate of developing thrombocytopenia (<100 000/µl) was significantly higher in the drug conservation vs. the viral suppression arm (unadjusted drug conservation/viral suppression [HR (95%CI) = 1.8 (1.2–2.7)]. The decline in platelet count among drug conservation participants on fully suppressive ART correlated with the rise in D-dimer from study entry to either month 1 or 2 (r = −0.41; P = 0.02). Among drug conservation participants who resumed ART 74% recovered to their study entry platelet levels. Conclusion Interrupting ART increases the risk of thrombocytopenia, but reinitiation of ART typically reverses it. Factors contributing to declines in platelets after interrupting ART may include activation of coagulation pathways or HIV-1 replication itself. The contribution of platelets in HIV-related procoagulant activity requires further study. PMID:23018440

  12. A systematic review of the psychological literature on interruption and its patient safety implications

    PubMed Central

    Magrabi, Farah; Coiera, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    Objective To understand the complex effects of interruption in healthcare. Materials and methods As interruptions have been well studied in other domains, the authors undertook a systematic review of experimental studies in psychology and human–computer interaction to identify the task types and variables influencing interruption effects. Results 63 studies were identified from 812 articles retrieved by systematic searches. On the basis of interruption profiles for generic tasks, it was found that clinical tasks can be distinguished into three broad types: procedural, problem-solving, and decision-making. Twelve experimental variables that influence interruption effects were identified. Of these, six are the most important, based on the number of studies and because of their centrality to interruption effects, including working memory load, interruption position, similarity, modality, handling strategies, and practice effect. The variables are explained by three main theoretical frameworks: the activation-based goal memory model, prospective memory, and multiple resource theory. Discussion This review provides a useful starting point for a more comprehensive examination of interruptions potentially leading to an improved understanding about the impact of this phenomenon on patient safety and task efficiency. The authors provide some recommendations to counter interruption effects. Conclusion The effects of interruption are the outcome of a complex set of variables and should not be considered as uniformly predictable or bad. The task types, variables, and theories should help us better to identify which clinical tasks and contexts are most susceptible and assist in the design of information systems and processes that are resilient to interruption. PMID:21946236

  13. Discourse Markers in Turn-Initial Positions in Interruptive Speech in a Malaysian Radio Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nor, Siti Nurbaya Mohd

    2012-01-01

    Discourse markers play significant roles in any spoken interaction. This research examines the functions of the discourse markers (DMs) well, now and and used as turn-initial interruptive devices in a Malaysian radio discourse. Using Schegloff's (2002) framework of what constitutes an interruption in turn-taking and previous studies on the…

  14. Effects of Modality on Interrupted Flight Deck Performance: Implications for Data Link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latorella, Kara A.

    1997-01-01

    Externally-imposed tasks frequently interrupt ongoing task performance in the commercial flight deck. While normally managed without consequence, basic research as well as aviation accident and incident investigations show that interruptions can negatively affect performance and safety. This research investigates the influence of interruption and interrupted task modality on pilot performance in a simulated commercial flight deck. Fourteen current commercial airline pilots performed approach scenarios in a fixed-base flight simulator. Air traffic control instructions, conveyed either aurally or visually (via a data link system) interrupted a visual task (obtaining information from the Flight Management System) and an auditory task (listening to the automated terminal information service recording). Some results confirm the hypothesized performance advantage of cross-modality conditions, more compelling nature of auditory interruptions, and interruption-resistance of auditory ongoing tasks. However, taken together, results suggest the four interaction conditions had different effects on pilot performance. These results have implications for the design of data link systems, and for facilitating interruption management through interface design, aiding, and training programs.

  15. Resistance to the impact of interruptions during multitasking by healthy adults and dysexecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Law, Anna S; Logie, Robert H; Pearson, David G; Cantagallo, Anna; Moretti, Eva; Dimarco, Francesca

    2004-07-01

    Two experiments (one with healthy adult volunteers and the other with controls and dysexecutive patients) assessed the impact of interruptions on a novel test of multitasking. The test involved switching repeatedly between four tasks (block construction, bead threading, paper folding, alphabetical searching) over a 10 min period. In Experiment 1, there were four groups of 20 healthy participants. One group attempted multitasking with no interruption, a second group was interrupted early in the test, a third group late in the test and a fourth group was interrupted both early and late. Interruption involved carrying out a fifth, unexpected task for a period of 1 min before returning to the four main tasks. There was no difference in multitasking performance between the groups. In Experiment 2 the participants were seven dysexecutive patients and 14 age-matched controls. A repeated measures approach was employed to assess the impact of two interruptions (early and late) for both groups. Contrary to predictions, the patients as well as controls were resistant to the effects of interruptions, despite their clearly impaired multitasking performance. These results suggest that the ability to deal with interruptions may be separable from the ability to organise and execute multiple tasks within a limited time frame. PMID:15222971

  16. Towards a Politics of Interruption: High School Design as Politically Relevant Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stovall, David

    2007-01-01

    The following essay seeks to highlight the use of engaged qualitative community-based research in education to respond to conditions of structural inequality. As "the politics of interruption", the process of creating neighborhood public high schools is centred in community accountability. Responsibility in this mode "interrupts" the resurgence of…

  17. 33 CFR 159.89 - Power interruption: Type I and II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Power interruption: Type I and II devices. 159.89 Section 159.89 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... interruption: Type I and II devices. A discharge device must be designed so that a momentary loss of...

  18. Causal Inference and the Comparative Interrupted Time Series Design: Findings from Within-Study Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Clair, Travis; Hallberg, Kelly; Cook, Thomas D.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers are increasingly using comparative interrupted time series (CITS) designs to estimate the effects of programs and policies when randomized controlled trials are not feasible. In a simple interrupted time series design, researchers compare the pre-treatment values of a treatment group time series to post-treatment values in order to…

  19. 33 CFR 159.89 - Power interruption: Type I and II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Power interruption: Type I and II devices. 159.89 Section 159.89 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.89 Power interruption: Type I and II devices....

  20. Towards a Hybrid Method to Categorize Interruptions and Activities in Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Brixey, Juliana J.; Robinson, David J.; Johnson, Craig W.; Johnson, Todd R.; Turley, James P.; Patel, Vimla L.; Zhang, Jiajie

    2007-01-01

    Summary Objective Interruptions are known to have a negative impact on activity performance. Understanding how an interruption contributes to human error is limited because there is not a standard method for analyzing and classifying interruptions. Qualitative data are typically analyzed by either a deductive or an inductive method. Both methods have limitations. In this paper a hybrid method was developed that integrates deductive and inductive methods for the categorization of activities and interruptions recorded during an ethnographic study of physicians and registered nurses in a Level One Trauma Center. Understanding the effects of interruptions is important for designing and evaluating informatics tools in particular and for improving healthcare quality and patient safety in general. Method The hybrid method was developed using a deductive a priori classification framework with the provision of adding new categories discovered inductively in the data. The inductive process utilized line-by-line coding and constant comparison as stated in Grounded Theory. Results The categories of activities and interruptions were organized into a three-tiered hierarchy of activity. Validity and reliability of the categories were tested by categorizing a medical error case external to the study. No new categories of interruptions were identified during analysis of the medical error case. Conclusions Findings from this study provide evidence that the hybrid model of categorization is more complete than either a deductive or an inductive method alone. The hybrid method developed in this study provides the methodical support for understanding, analyzing, and managing interruptions and workflow. PMID:17110161

  1. Interruptions and Failure in Higher Education: Evidence from ISEG-UTL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chagas, Margarida; Fernandaes, Graca Leao

    2011-01-01

    Failure in higher education (HE) is the outcome of multiple time-dependent determinants. Interruptions in students' individual school trajectories are one of them, and that is why research on this topic has been attracting much attention these days. From an individual point of view, it is expected that interruptions in school trajectory, whatever…

  2. Execution-Based Model Checking of Interrupt-Based Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drusinsky, Doron; Havelund, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    Execution-based model checking (EMC) is a verification technique based on executing a multi-threaded/multiprocess program repeatedly in a systematic manner in order to explore the different interleavings of the program. This is in contrast to traditional model checking, where a model of a system is analyzed Several execution-based model-checking tools exist at this point, such as for example Verisoft and Java PathFinder. The most common formal specification languages used by EMC tools are un- timed, either just assertions, or linear-time temporal logic (LTL). An alternative verification technique is Runtime Execution Monitoring (REM), which is based on monitor- ing the execution of a program, checking that the execution trace conforms to a requirement specification. The Temporal Rover and DBRover are such tools. They provide a very rich specification language, being an extension of LTL with real-time constraints and time-series. We show how execution-based model checking, combined with runtime execution monitoring, can be used for the verification of a large class of safety critical systems commonly known as interrupt-based systems. The proposed approach is novel in that: (i) it supports model checking of a large class of applications not practically verifiable using conventional EMC tools, (ii) it supports verification of LTL assertions extended with real-time and time-series constraints, and (iii) it supports the verification of custom schedulers.

  3. ICE System: Interruptible control expert system. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vezina, James M.

    1990-01-01

    The Interruptible Control Expert (ICE) System is based on an architecture designed to provide a strong foundation for real-time production rule expert systems. Three principles are adopted to guide the development of ICE. A practical delivery platform must be provided, no specialized hardware can be used to solve deficiencies in the software design. Knowledge of the environment and the rule-base is exploited to improve the performance of a delivered system. The third principle of ICE is to respond to the most critical event, at the expense of the more trivial tasks. Minimal time is spent on classifying the potential importance of environmental events with the majority of the time used for finding the responses. A feature of the system, derived from all three principles, is the lack of working memory. By using a priori information, a fixed amount of memory can be specified for the hardware platform. The absence of working memory removes the dangers of garbage collection during the continuous operation of the controller.

  4. Interrupted time-series analysis: studying trends in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ricky H; Smieliauskas, Fabrice; Pan, I-Wen; Lam, Sandi K

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT Neurosurgery studies traditionally have evaluated the effects of interventions on health care outcomes by studying overall changes in measured outcomes over time. Yet, this type of linear analysis is limited due to lack of consideration of the trend's effects both pre- and postintervention and the potential for confounding influences. The aim of this study was to illustrate interrupted time-series analysis (ITSA) as applied to an example in the neurosurgical literature and highlight ITSA's potential for future applications. METHODS The methods used in previous neurosurgical studies were analyzed and then compared with the methodology of ITSA. RESULTS The ITSA method was identified in the neurosurgical literature as an important technique for isolating the effect of an intervention (such as a policy change or a quality and safety initiative) on a health outcome independent of other factors driving trends in the outcome. The authors determined that ITSA allows for analysis of the intervention's immediate impact on outcome level and on subsequent trends and enables a more careful measure of the causal effects of interventions on health care outcomes. CONCLUSIONS ITSA represents a significant improvement over traditional observational study designs in quantifying the impact of an intervention. ITSA is a useful statistical procedure to understand, consider, and implement as the field of neurosurgery evolves in sophistication in big-data analytics, economics, and health services research. PMID:26621420

  5. Ocular motor anatomy in a case of interrupted saccades.

    PubMed

    Rucker, Janet C; Leigh, R John; Optican, Lance M; Keller, Edward L; Bu Ttner-Ennever, Jean A

    2008-01-01

    Saccades normally place the eye on target with one smooth movement. In late-onset Tay-Sachs (LOTS), intrasaccadic transient decelerations occur that may result from (1) premature omnipause neuron (OPN) re-activation due to malfunction of the latch circuit that inhibits OPNs for the duration of the saccade or (2) premature inhibitory burst neuron (IBN) activation due to fastigial nucleus (FN) dysregulation by the dorsal cerebellar vermis. Neuroanatomic analysis of a LOTS brain was performed. Purkinje cells were absent and gliosis of the granular cell layer was present in the dorsal cerebellar vermis. Deep cerebellar nuclei contained large inclusions. IBNs were present with small inclusions. The sample did not contain the complete OPN region; however, neurons in the OPN region contained massive inclusions. Pathologic findings suggest that premature OPN re-activation and/or inappropriate firing of IBNs may be responsible for interrupted saccades in LOTS. Cerebellar clinical dysfunction, lack of saccadic slowing, and significant loss of cerebellar cells suggest that the second cause is more likely. PMID:18718354

  6. Transient current interruption mechanism in a magnetically delayed vacuum switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Gibson, Jr.; Dougal, Roger A.

    1993-01-01

    The capacity of a magnetically delayed vacuum switch to conduct current depends on the density of plasma injected into the switch. Exceeding the current capacity results in the switch entering a lossy mode of operation characterized by a transient interruption of the main current (opening behavior) and a rapid increase of voltage across the vacuum gap. Streak and framing photographs of the discharge indicate that a decrease of luminosity near the middle of the gap preceeds the transition to the opening phase. The zone of low luminosity propagates toward the cathode. This evidence suggests that the mechanism causing the opening phase is erosion of the background plasma in a manner similar to that in a plasma-opening switch. The resulting ion depletion forces a space-charge-limited conduction mode. The switch inductance maintains a high discharge current even during the space-charge-limited conduction phase, thus producing high internal fields. The high accelerating voltage, in turn, produces electron and ion beams that heat the electrode surfaces. As a result of the heating, jets of electrode vapor issue from the electrodes, either cathode or anode, depending on the selection of electrode materials.

  7. Roads, interrupted dispersal, and genetic diversity in timber rattlesnakes.

    PubMed

    Clark, Rulon W; Brown, William S; Stechert, Randy; Zamudio, Kelly R

    2010-08-01

    Anthropogenic habitat modification often creates barriers to animal movement, transforming formerly contiguous habitat into a patchwork of habitat islands with low connectivity. Roadways are a feature of most landscapes that can act as barriers or filters to migration among local populations. Even small and recently constructed roads can have a significant impact on population genetic structure of some species, but not others. We developed a research approach that combines fine-scale molecular genetics with behavioral and ecological data to understand the impacts of roads on population structure and connectivity. We used microsatellite markers to characterize genetic variation within and among populations of timber rattlesnakes (Crotalus horridus) occupying communal hibernacula (dens) in regions bisected by roadways. We examined the impact of roads on seasonal migration, genetic diversity, and gene flow among populations. Snakes in hibernacula isolated by roads had significantly lower genetic diversity and higher genetic differentiation than snakes in hibernacula in contiguous habitat. Genetic-assignment analyses revealed that interruption to seasonal migration was the mechanism underlying these patterns. Our results underscore the sizeable impact of roads on this species, despite their relatively recent construction at our study sites (7 to 10 generations of rattlesnakes), the utility of population genetics for studies of road ecology, and the need for mitigating effects of roads. PMID:20151984

  8. Current interruption and particle beam generation by a plasma focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerdin, G.; Venneri, F.

    1982-11-01

    Through collaboration with Dr. K. H. Schoenbach of Texas Tech University the plasma focus opening switch (PFOS) was revised to answer basic questions as to utility of the concept. To estimate the plasma temperature and classical resistivity a soft X-ray spectrometer and X-ray pinhole camera were developed. The temperature was estimated from a coronal model to range between 0.4 to 0.5 keV for either a nitrogen or neon impurity (1 to 2%) in deuterium at 3 torr. Strong pinches were observed in pure neon (0.6 torr) with an electron temperature in the same range. The corresponding classical resistance of the pinch is 9 m omega whereas 500 m omega is more consistent with output voltage pulse and current flow at interruption indicating anomalous resistivity is present. A one-dimensional two-fluid computer code has been developed to model anomalous resistivity in the pinch phase and preliminary results are consistent with the snowplow model. The final analysis of the plasma focus particle beam generation experiments was completed and a strong correlation was found for the beam-target model as the mechanism for neutron production in the Illinois plasma focus device.

  9. Balancing eldercare and employment: the role of work interruptions and supportive employers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeungkun; Ingersoll-Dayton, Berit; Kwak, Minyoung

    2013-04-01

    This study investigates pathways by which employed caregivers' stress is related to their work performance appraisal, with particular attention to work interruptions and supportive employers. Based on a nationally representative sample from the 2004 National Long-Term Care Survey (NLTCS), the study focuses on caregivers to older adults who are currently participating in paid employment (N = 652). Results from structural equation modeling indicate that work interruptions mediate the relationship between caregivers' stress and their work performance appraisal. In addition, the support of employers moderates the relationship between employed caregivers' stress and their work interruptions as well as the relationship between their work interruptions and work performance appraisal. These results point to the need for training supervisors and helping them to understand the potential dual effects of their support on employed caregivers' work interruptions and performance. PMID:25474393

  10. Clinical impact of temporary therapy interruptions on anticoagulation control in patients treated with warfarin.

    PubMed

    Boros, Melanie L; Rybarczyk, Amy M; Gallegos, Patrick J; Zimmerman, Jacob P

    2013-01-01

    This retrospective cohort study was completed to describe the impact of short-term therapy interruptions on anticoagulation control in patients receiving warfarin. Patients seen in a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic were included if they were on a stable warfarin dose and then underwent a planned interruption in therapy. Patients were excluded if phytonadione was administered before the interruption or if medications known to interact with warfarin were altered during the interruption. Data were analyzed for 2 groups: (1) patients with a single interruption in therapy (group 1) and (2) patients with a single interruption in therapy plus patients with an extended interruption in therapy (group 2). The primary endpoint was the change in weekly maintenance warfarin dose from preinterruption to postinterruption. Evaluation of 199 patients resulted in 31 interruptions in group 1 and 34 interruptions in group 2. A change in dose was required in 58% of patients in group 1 and 56% of patients in group 2. The mean absolute change in dose was 2.03 ± 2.79 mg (P < 0.003) in group 1 and 1.96 ± 2.72 mg (P < 0.002) in group 2. For the majority of patients, the dose change represented <10% of their preinterruption weekly dose. Of patients requiring a dose change, 50% required an increase in dose. In conclusion, close follow-up is warranted after a warfarin therapy interruption as dose adjustments will likely be needed to regain anticoagulation control and the direction of this dose change cannot be predicted. PMID:23011173

  11. SOHO Mission Interruption Joint NASA/ESA Investigation Board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Contact with the SOlar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft was lost in the early morning hours of June 25, 1998, Eastern Daylight Time (EDT), during a planned period of calibrations, maneuvers, and spacecraft reconfigurations. Prior to this the SOHO operations team had concluded two years of extremely successful science operations. A joint European Space Agency (ESA)/National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) engineering team has been planning and executing recovery efforts since loss of contact with some success to date. ESA and NASA management established the SOHO Mission Interruption Joint Investigation Board to determine the actual or probable cause(s) of the SOHO spacecraft mishap. The Board has concluded that there were no anomalies on-board the SOHO spacecraft but that a number of ground errors led to the major loss of attitude experienced by the spacecraft. The Board finds that the loss of the SOHO spacecraft was a direct result of operational errors, a failure to adequately monitor spacecraft status, and an erroneous decision which disabled part of the on-board autonomous failure detection. Further, following the occurrence of the emergency situation, the Board finds that insufficient time was taken by the operations team to fully assess the spacecraft status prior to initiating recovery operations. The Board discovered that a number of factors contributed to the circumstances that allowed the direct causes to occur. The Board strongly recommends that the two Agencies proceed immediately with a comprehensive review of SOHO operations addressing issues in the ground procedures, procedure implementation, management structure and process, and ground systems. This review process should be completed and process improvements initiated prior to the resumption of SOHO normal operations.

  12. Interrupting Anticoagulation in Patients With Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    Three target-specific oral anticoagulants (TSOACs)—dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban—have been approved by the FDA to reduce the risk of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation; however, no agents are currently approved to reverse the anticoagulant effects of these TSOACs in cases of active bleeding. This review discusses the benefits and risks of these TSOACs from a clinician’s perspective, with a focus on the interruption of treatment for either elective or emergent surgery, monitoring, and reversal of anticoagulation. Available coagulation assays are not ideal for monitoring the effects of TSOACs and do not provide reliable quantitative measurement of their anticoagulant effects. When necessary, activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) may provide qualitative information on dabigatran, and prothrombin time (PT) may provide qualitative assessment of the presence of the factor Xa inhibitors, rivaroxaban and apixaban. Current recommendations for reversal of TSOACs are based largely on limited and sometimes conflicting data from in vitro or in vivo animal models, and clinical experience with these recommendations is also limited. Methods that have been investigated for effectiveness for reversal of the pharmacodynamic effects of the TSOACs include dialysis, activated charcoal, prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC), and recombinant activated factor VII. It is important to note that even within a class of anticoagulant drugs, compounds respond differently to reversal agents; therefore, recommendations for one agent should not be extrapolated to another, even if they are from the same therapeutic class. New antidotes are being explored, including a mouse monoclonal antibody to dabigatran; andexanet alfa, a potential universal factor Xa inhibitor reversal agent; and a synthetic small molecule (PER977) that may be effective for the reversal of factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors. Given the short half-lives of TSOACs, watchful waiting, rather than reversal, may be the best approach in some circumstances. PMID:25516695

  13. Addressing the problem of interruptability in the construction of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Roger A.; Morgenthaler, George W.

    1989-01-01

    Large scale space missions of the near future will depend upon successful multi-launch coordination and construction in the space environment. One of the main challenges is how to accomplish a valid global analysis of a construction project with the intent of improving safety, reducing overall mission cost, and total construction time. These three items are dependent on the interruptability of the project, which is the ability of the project to recover from unplanned interruptions; such as failure of the launch vehicle; sudden, on-orbit, crew illness; or damage from a space debris impact on the partially completed space structure. A new method for addressing and analyzing this type of problem is being developed. The method is called Program Interruptability and Risk Evaluation Technique, or PIRET. PIRET has been developed in order to model and analyze potential interruptability concerns of the construction of the U.S. Space Station Freedom (SSF), although PIRET is applicable to any complex, multi-launch structural assembly. This paper is a progress report on the continuing research of the NASA Center for Space Construction at the University of Colorado, Boulder into this area of space construction interruptability. The paper will define the problem of interruptability, will diagram the PIRET approach to space construction, will share results from a preliminary PIRET analysis of SSF, and will show that PIRET is a useful tool for modelling space construction interruptability.

  14. Effects of age and hearing loss on the intelligibility of interrupted speecha)

    PubMed Central

    Shafiro, Valeriy; Sheft, Stanley; Risley, Robert; Gygi, Brian

    2015-01-01

    How age and hearing loss affect the perception of interrupted speech may vary based on both the physical properties of preserved or obliterated speech fragments and individual listener characteristics. To investigate perceptual processes and interruption parameters influencing intelligibility across interruption rates, participants of different age and hearing status heard sentences interrupted by silence at either a single primary rate (0.5–8 Hz; 25%, 50%, 75% duty cycle) or at an additional concurrent secondary rate (24 Hz; 50% duty cycle). Although age and hearing loss significantly affected intelligibility, the ability to integrate sub-phonemic speech fragments produced by the fast secondary rate was similar in all listener groups. Age and hearing loss interacted with rate with smallest group differences observed at the lowest and highest interruption rates of 0.5 and 24 Hz. Furthermore, intelligibility of dual-rate gated sentences was higher than single-rate gated sentences with the same proportion of retained speech. Correlations of intelligibility of interrupted speech to pure-tone thresholds, age, or measures of working memory and auditory spectro-temporal pattern discrimination were generally low-to-moderate and mostly nonsignificant. These findings demonstrate rate-dependent effects of age and hearing loss on the perception of interrupted speech, suggesting complex interactions of perceptual processes across different time scales. PMID:25698009

  15. Effects of age and hearing loss on the intelligibility of interrupted speech.

    PubMed

    Shafiro, Valeriy; Sheft, Stanley; Risley, Robert; Gygi, Brian

    2015-02-01

    How age and hearing loss affect the perception of interrupted speech may vary based on both the physical properties of preserved or obliterated speech fragments and individual listener characteristics. To investigate perceptual processes and interruption parameters influencing intelligibility across interruption rates, participants of different age and hearing status heard sentences interrupted by silence at either a single primary rate (0.5-8 Hz; 25%, 50%, 75% duty cycle) or at an additional concurrent secondary rate (24 Hz; 50% duty cycle). Although age and hearing loss significantly affected intelligibility, the ability to integrate sub-phonemic speech fragments produced by the fast secondary rate was similar in all listener groups. Age and hearing loss interacted with rate with smallest group differences observed at the lowest and highest interruption rates of 0.5 and 24 Hz. Furthermore, intelligibility of dual-rate gated sentences was higher than single-rate gated sentences with the same proportion of retained speech. Correlations of intelligibility of interrupted speech to pure-tone thresholds, age, or measures of working memory and auditory spectro-temporal pattern discrimination were generally low-to-moderate and mostly nonsignificant. These findings demonstrate rate-dependent effects of age and hearing loss on the perception of interrupted speech, suggesting complex interactions of perceptual processes across different time scales. PMID:25698009

  16. An Assessment of Instant Messaging Interruptions on Knowledge Workers' Task Performance in E-Learning-Based Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansi, Gary R.

    2011-01-01

    The modern workplace environment is filled with interruptions due to the necessity of coworkers to communicate with each other. Studies have revealed that interruptions can disrupt the ability of a knowledge worker to concentrate on a task, which can impact task performance (TP). Communication interruptions are due, in part, to the unavoidable…

  17. Interruption of Onchocerca volvulus transmission in Northern Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Onchocerciasis is caused by Onchocerca volvulus and transmitted by Simulium species (black flies). In the Americas, the infection has been previously described in 13 discrete regional foci distributed among six countries (Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Mexico and Venezuela) where more than 370,000 people are currently considered at risk. Since 2001, disease control in Venezuela has relied on the mass drug administration to the at-risk communities. This report provides empirical evidence of interruption of Onchocerca volvulus transmission by Simulium metallicum in 510 endemic communities from two Northern foci of Venezuela, after 10–12 years of 6-monthly Mectizan® (ivermectin) treatment to all the eligible residents. Methods In-depth entomologic and epidemiologic surveys were serially conducted from 2001–2012 in selected (sentinel and extra-sentinel) communities from the North-central (NC) and North-east (NE) onchocerciasis foci of Venezuela in order to monitor the impact of ivermectin treatment. Results From 2007–2009, entomological indicators in both foci confirmed that 0 out of 112,637 S. metallicum females examined by PCR contained L3 infection in insect heads. The upper bound of the 95% confidence intervals of the infective rate of the vector reached values below 1% by 2009 (NC) and 2012 (NE). Additionally, after 14 (NC) and 22 (NE) rounds of treatment, the seasonal transmission potential (±UL CIs) of S. metallicum was under the critical threshold of 20 L3 per person per season. Serological analysis in school children < 15 years-old demonstrated that 0 out of 6,590 individuals were harboring antibodies to Ov-16. Finally, epidemiological surveys made during 2010 (NC) and 2012 (NE) showed no evidence of microfilariae in the skin and eyes of the population. Conclusions These results meet the WHO criteria for absence of parasite transmission and disease morbidity in these endemic areas which represent 91% of the population previously at-risk in the country. Consequently, the two Northern foci are currently under post-treatment onchocerciasis surveillance status in Venezuela. PMID:24499653

  18. Nested Interrupt Analysis of Low Cost and High Performance Embedded Systems Using GSPN Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Cheng-Min

    Interrupt service routines are a key technology for embedded systems. In this paper, we introduce the standard approach for using Generalized Stochastic Petri Nets (GSPNs) as a high-level model for generating CTMC Continuous-Time Markov Chains (CTMCs) and then use Markov Reward Models (MRMs) to compute the performance for embedded systems. This framework is employed to analyze two embedded controllers with low cost and high performance, ARM7 and Cortex-M3. Cortex-M3 is designed with a tail-chaining mechanism to improve the performance of ARM7 when a nested interrupt occurs on an embedded controller. The Platform Independent Petri net Editor 2 (PIPE2) tool is used to model and evaluate the controllers in terms of power consumption and interrupt overhead performance. Using numerical results, in spite of the power consumption or interrupt overhead, Cortex-M3 performs better than ARM7.

  19. The Role of Prediction In Perception: Evidence From Interrupted Visual Search

    PubMed Central

    Mereu, Stefania; Zacks, Jeffrey M.; Kurby, Christopher A.; Lleras, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies of rapid resumptionan observers ability to quickly resume a visual search after an interruptionsuggest that predictions underlie visual perception. Previous studies showed that when the search display changes unpredictably after the interruption, rapid resumption disappears. This conclusion is at odds with our everyday experience, where the visual system seems to be quite efficient despite continuous changes of the visual scene; however, in the real world, changes can typically be anticipated based on previous knowledge. The present study aimed to evaluate whether changes to the visual display can be incorporated into the perceptual hypotheses, if observers are allowed to anticipate such changes. Results strongly suggest that an interrupted visual search can be rapidly resumed even when information in the display has changed after the interruption, so long as participants not only can anticipate them, but also are aware that such changes might occur. PMID:24820440

  20. Assessment and Treatment of Problem Behavior Occasioned by Interruption of Free-Operant Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Hagopian, Louis P; Bruzek, Jennifer L; Bowman, Lynn G; Jennett, Heather K

    2007-01-01

    The current study describes the assessment and treatment of the problem behavior of 3 individuals with autism for whom initial functional analysis results were inconclusive. Subsequent analyses revealed that the interruption of free-operant behavior using “do” requests (Study 1) as well as “do” and “don't” requests (Study 2) occasioned problem behavior. Initially, treatment involved differential and noncontingent reinforcement without interruption. To make the intervention more sustainable in the natural environment (where interruptions are unavoidable), a two-component multiple-schedule arrangement was used to progressively increase the period of time in which ongoing activities would be interrupted. During generalization sessions, the intervention was applied across a variety of contexts and therapists. PMID:17471795

  1. Functional Interrupts and Destructive Failures from Single Event Effect Testing of Point-Of-Load Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Dakai; Phan, Anthony; Kim, Hak; Swonger, James; Musil, Paul; LaBel, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    We show examples of single event functional interrupt and destructive failure in modern POL devices. The increasing complexity and diversity of the design and process introduce hard SEE modes that are triggered by various mechanisms.

  2. Delays and interruptions in the acute medical unit clerking process: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Thomas D; Mackridge, Adam J; Krska, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Objectives It is recommended that patients are seen within 4?h of arrival in Acute Medical Units in English hospitals. This study explored the frequency and nature of interruptions and delays potentially affecting the duration of the Acute Medical Unit admission process and the quality of care provided. Design The admission process was directly observed for patients admitted to the Acute Medical Unit over four one-week periods, November 2009 to April 2011. Setting UK teaching hospital Acute Medical Unit. Participants Hospital staff n?=?36. Main outcome measures Patient waiting times, duration of clerking, number of interruptions and/or delays. Results Thirty-five doctors and one nurse practitioner were observed admitting 71 medical patients, 48/71 (68%) patients were clerked within 4?h of arrival. A delay and/or interruption affected 49/71 (69%) patients. Sixty-six interruptions were observed in 36/71 (51%) of admissions, of these 19/36 (53%) were interrupted more than once. The grade of doctor had no bearing on the frequency of interruption; however, clerking took significantly longer when interrupted; overall doctors grade ST1 and above were quicker at clerking than foundation doctors. Delays affected 31/71 (44%) of admissions, 14/31 (45%) involved X-rays or ECGs; other causes of delays included problems with equipment and computers. Conclusion Interruptions and delays regularly occurred during the admission process in the study hospital which impacts adversely on patient experience and compliance with the recommended 4-h timeframe, further work is required to assess the impact on patient safety. Data obtained from this observational study were used to guide operational changes to improve the process. PMID:26877881

  3. Investigating membrane and mitochondrial cryobiological responses of HUVEC using interrupted cooling protocols.

    PubMed

    Reardon, Anthony J F; Elliott, Janet A W; McGann, Locksley E

    2015-10-01

    The success of cryopreservation protocols is largely based on membrane integrity assessments after thawing, since membrane integrity can be considered to give an upper limit in assessment of cell viability and the plasma membrane is considered to be a primary site of cryoinjury. However, the exposure of cells to conditions associated with low temperatures can induce injury to cellular structure and function that may not be readily identified by membrane integrity alone. Interrupted cooling protocols (including interrupted slow cooling without a hold time (graded freezing), and interrupted rapid cooling with a hold time (two-step freezing)), can yield important information about cryoinjury by separating the damage that occurs upon cooling to (and possibly holding at) a critical intermediate temperature range from the damage that occurs upon plunging to the storage temperature (liquid nitrogen). In this study, we used interrupted cooling protocols in the absence of cryoprotectant to investigate the progression of damage to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), comparing an assessment of membrane integrity with a mitochondrial polarization assay. Additionally, the membrane integrity response of HUVEC to interrupted cooling was investigated as a function of cooling rate (for interrupted slow cooling) and hold time (for interrupted rapid cooling). A key finding of this work was that under slow cooling conditions which resulted in a large number of membrane intact cells immediately post thaw, mitochondria are predominantly in a non-functional depolarized state. This study, the first to look directly at mitochondrial polarization throughout interrupted cooling profiles and a detailed study of HUVEC response, highlights the complexity of the progression of cell damage, as the pattern and extent of cell injury throughout the preservation process differs by injury site. PMID:26254036

  4. Are interventions to reduce interruptions and errors during medication administration effective?: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Raban, Magdalena Z; Westbrook, Johanna I

    2014-01-01

    Background Medication administration errors are frequent and lead to patient harm. Interruptions during medication administration have been implicated as a potential contributory factor. Objective To assess evidence of the effectiveness of interventions aimed at reducing interruptions during medication administration on interruption and medication administration error rates. Methods In September 2012 we searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group reviews, Google and Google Scholar, and hand searched references of included articles. Intervention studies reporting quantitative data based on direct observations of at least one outcome (interruptions, or medication administration errors) were included. Results Ten studies, eight from North America and two from Europe, met the inclusion criteria. Five measured significant changes in interruption rates pre and post interventions. Four found a significant reduction and one an increase. Three studies measured changes in medication administration error rates and showed reductions, but all implemented multiple interventions beyond those targeted at reducing interruptions. No study used a controlled design pre and post. Definitions for key outcome indicators were reported in only four studies. Only one study reported κ scores for inter-rater reliability and none of the multi-ward studies accounted for clustering in their analyses. Conclusions There is weak evidence of the effectiveness of interventions to significantly reduce interruption rates and very limited evidence of their effectiveness to reduce medication administration errors. Policy makers should proceed with great caution in implementing such interventions until controlled trials confirm their value. Research is also required to better understand the complex relationship between interruptions and error to support intervention design. PMID:23980188

  5. Physicians Interrupted by Mobile Devices in Hospitals: Understanding the Interaction Between Devices, Roles, and Duties

    PubMed Central

    Scholl, Jeremiah; Hartvigsen, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Background A common denominator of modern hospitals is a variety of communication problems. In particular, interruptions from mobile communication devices are a cause of great concern for many physicians. Objective To characterize how interruptions from mobile devices disturb physicians in their daily work. The gathered knowledge will be subsequently used as input for the design and development of a context-sensitive communication system for mobile communications suitable for hospitals. Methods This study adheres to an ethnographic and interpretive field research approach. The data gathering consisted of participant observations, non-structured and mostly ad hoc interviews, and open-ended discussions with a selected group of physicians. Eleven physicians were observed for a total of 135 hours during May and June 2009. Results The study demonstrates to what degree physicians are interrupted by mobile devices in their daily work and in which situations they are interrupted, such as surgery, examinations, and during patients/relatives high-importance level conversations. The participants in the study expected, and also indicated, that wireless phones probably led to more interruptions immediately after their introduction in a clinic, when compared to a pager, but this changed after a short while. The unpleasant feeling experienced by the caller when interrupting someone by calling them differs compared to sending a page message, which leaves it up to the receiver when to return the call. Conclusions Mobile devices, which frequently interrupt physicians in hospitals, are a problem for both physicians and patients. The results from this study contribute to knowledge being used as input for designing and developing a prototype for a context-sensitive communication system for mobile communication suitable for hospitals. We combined these findings with results from earlier studies and also involved actual users to develop the prototype, CallMeSmart. This system intends to reduce such interruptions and at the same time minimize the number of communication devices needed per user. PMID:23470528

  6. Differential effects of traffic sign stimuli upon speeding in school zones following a traffic light interruption.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Bree; Irwin, Julia D; Faulks, Ian J; Chekaluk, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Motorists whose journey has been interrupted by signalized traffic intersections in school zones resume their journey at a faster vehicle speed than motorists who have not been required to stop. Introducing a flashing "check speed" sign 70m after the traffic intersections counteracts this interruptive effect. The present study examined which aspects of a reminder sign are responsible for reducing the speeding behavior of interrupted motorists. When a sign that combines both written text and flashing lights was introduced, interrupted motorists did not speed, traveling on average 0.82km/h below the 40km/h speed limit when measured 100m from traffic intersections. Alternatively, when only the flashing lights were visible the interrupted motorists sped 3.36km/h over the 40km/h speed limit. Similar vehicular speeds were observed when only the written text was visible and when no sign was present (7.67 and 7.49km/h over the 40km/h speed limit, respectively). This indicates that static reminder signs add little value over the absence of a school zone reminder sign; the presence of both cues is necessary to fully offset the interruptive effect. This study also highlights the benefit of using exogenous visual cues in traffic signs to capture drivers' attention. These findings have practical implications for the design and use of traffic signs to increase compliance with posted speed limits. PMID:26545011

  7. Apparatus for and method of testing an electrical ground fault circuit interrupt device

    DOEpatents

    Andrews, Lowell B.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus for testing a ground fault circuit interrupt device includes a processor, an input device connected to the processor for receiving input from an operator, a storage media connected to the processor for storing test data, an output device connected to the processor for outputting information corresponding to the test data to the operator, and a calibrated variable load circuit connected between the processor and the ground fault circuit interrupt device. The ground fault circuit interrupt device is configured to trip a corresponding circuit breaker. The processor is configured to receive signals from the calibrated variable load circuit and to process the signals to determine a trip threshold current and/or a trip time. A method of testing the ground fault circuit interrupt device includes a first step of providing an identification for the ground fault circuit interrupt device. Test data is then recorded in accordance with the identification. By comparing test data from an initial test with test data from a subsequent test, a trend of performance for the ground fault circuit interrupt device is determined.

  8. Apparatus for and method of testing an electrical ground fault circuit interrupt device

    DOEpatents

    Andrews, L.B.

    1998-08-18

    An apparatus for testing a ground fault circuit interrupt device includes a processor, an input device connected to the processor for receiving input from an operator, a storage media connected to the processor for storing test data, an output device connected to the processor for outputting information corresponding to the test data to the operator, and a calibrated variable load circuit connected between the processor and the ground fault circuit interrupt device. The ground fault circuit interrupt device is configured to trip a corresponding circuit breaker. The processor is configured to receive signals from the calibrated variable load circuit and to process the signals to determine a trip threshold current and/or a trip time. A method of testing the ground fault circuit interrupt device includes a first step of providing an identification for the ground fault circuit interrupt device. Test data is then recorded in accordance with the identification. By comparing test data from an initial test with test data from a subsequent test, a trend of performance for the ground fault circuit interrupt device is determined. 17 figs.

  9. Effect of Radiotherapy Interruptions on Survival in Medicare Enrollees With Local and Regional Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fesinmeyer, Megan Dann; Mehta, Vivek; Blough, David; Tock, Lauri; Ramsey, Scott D.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether interruptions in radiotherapy are associated with decreased survival in a population-based sample of head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked database we identified Medicare beneficiaries aged 66 years and older diagnosed with local-regional head-and-neck cancer during the period 1997-2003. We examined claims records of 3864 patients completing radiotherapy for the presence of one or more 5-30-day interruption(s) in therapy. We then performed Cox regression analyses to estimate the association between therapy interruptions and survival. Results: Patients with laryngeal tumors who experienced an interruption in radiotherapy had a 68% (95% confidence interval, 41-200%) increased risk of death, compared with patients with no interruptions. Patients with nasal cavity, nasopharynx, oral, salivary gland, and sinus tumors had similar associations between interruptions and increased risk of death, but these did not reach statistical significance because of small sample sizes. Conclusions: Treatment interruptions seem to influence survival time among patients with laryngeal tumors completing a full course of radiotherapy. At all head-and-neck sites, the association between interruptions and survival is sensitive to confounding by stage and other treatments. Further research is needed to develop methods to identify patients most susceptible to interruption-induced mortality.

  10. Supervisory-level interruption recovery in time-critical control tasks.

    PubMed

    Sasangohar, Farzan; Scott, Stacey D; Cummings, M L

    2014-07-01

    This paper investigates the effectiveness of providing interruption recovery assistance in the form of an interactive visual timeline of historical events on a peripheral display in support of team supervision in time-critical settings. As interruptions can have detrimental effects on task performance, particularly in time-critical work environments, there is growing interest in the design of tools to assist people in resuming their pre-interruption activity. A user study was conducted to evaluate the use of an interactive event timeline that provides assistance to human supervisors in time-critical settings. The study was conducted in an experimental platform that emulated a team of operators and a mission commander performing a time-critical unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) mission. The study results showed that providing interruption assistance enabled people to recover from interruptions faster and more accurately. These results have implications for interface design that could be adopted in similar time-critical environments such as air-traffic control, process control, and first responders. PMID:24581931

  11. Photodiode-based cutting interruption sensor for near-infrared lasers.

    PubMed

    Adelmann, B; Schleier, M; Neumeier, B; Hellmann, R

    2016-03-01

    We report on a photodiode-based sensor system to detect cutting interruptions during laser cutting with a fiber laser. An InGaAs diode records the thermal radiation from the process zone with a ring mirror and optical filter arrangement mounted between a collimation unit and a cutting head. The photodiode current is digitalized with a sample rate of 20 kHz and filtered with a Chebyshev Type I filter. From the measured signal during the piercing, a threshold value is calculated. When the diode signal exceeds this threshold during cutting, a cutting interruption is indicated. This method is applied to sensor signals from cutting mild steel, stainless steel, and aluminum, as well as different material thicknesses and also laser flame cutting, showing the possibility to detect cutting interruptions in a broad variety of applications. In a series of 83 incomplete cuts, every cutting interruption is successfully detected (alpha error of 0%), while no cutting interruption is reported in 266 complete cuts (beta error of 0%). With this remarkable high detection rate and low error rate, the possibility to work with different materials and thicknesses in combination with the easy mounting of the sensor unit also to existing cutting machines highlight the enormous potential for this sensor system in industrial applications. PMID:26974642

  12. Prediction of SFL Interruption Performance from the Results of Arc Simulation during High-Current Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Chul; Lee, Won-Ho; Kim, Woun-Jea

    2015-09-01

    The design and development procedures of SF6 gas circuit breakers are still largely based on trial and error through testing although the development costs go higher every year. The computation cannot cover the testing satisfactorily because all the real processes arc not taken into account. But the knowledge of the arc behavior and the prediction of the thermal-flow inside the interrupters by numerical simulations are more useful than those by experiments due to the difficulties to obtain physical quantities experimentally and the reduction of computational costs in recent years. In this paper, in order to get further information into the interruption process of a SF6 self-blast interrupter, which is based on a combination of thermal expansion and the arc rotation principle, gas flow simulations with a CFD-arc modeling are performed during the whole switching process such as high-current period, pre-current zero period, and current-zero period. Through the complete work, the pressure-rise and the ramp of the pressure inside the chamber before current zero as well as the post-arc current after current zero should be a good criterion to predict the short-line fault interruption performance of interrupters.

  13. The ordnance transfer interrupter: A new type of S & A device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenslade, John T.

    1994-01-01

    A discussion is given in this paper of a new approach to the Safing and Arming of aerospace ordnance systems interconnected by detonation transfer lines, in which the conventional type of S&A device normally used for this purpose is replaced by a relatively simple electro-mechanical switching device, referred to as an 'Interrupter.' In this approach the Interrupter, which is interposed in the transfer line between the system initiator and output device, is completely passive in that it contains no pyrotechnic devices or materials. Being passive (therefore, non-initiating), the Interrupter is much less hazardous to handle and install, as well as being significantly less complex and costly than conventional S&A devices containing EED's and explosive leads. Details are presented relative to the design, development and qualification, by PS/EDD, of an ordnance transfer Interrupter intended for use on a commercial launch missile. This device, which is capable of simultaneously 'switching' multiple detonation transfer lines, incorporates a rod-type rotary barrier with independent transverse apertures for each transfer line. Barrier actuation is bi-modal, i.e., the barrier can be driven from safe-to-arm or from arm-to-safe positions by independent electro-mechanical actuators. The Interrupter described also features visual and remote status monitoring provisions and, in common with range-approved conventional S&A devices, a pre-flight safety locking mechanism functioned by a removable safing key.

  14. An evaluation of interrupted and uninterrupted measurement of vocal stereotypy on perceived treatment outcomes.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Regina A; Kodak, Tiffany

    2014-01-01

    The type of procedure used to measure a target behavior may directly influence the perceived treatment outcomes. In the present study, we examined the influence of different data-analysis procedures on the outcomes of two commonly used treatments on the vocal stereotypy of 2 children with an autism spectrum disorder. In Study 1, we compared an interrupted and uninterrupted data-analysis procedure to measure vocal stereotypy during the implementation of response interruption and redirection (RIRD). The results showed that the interrupted data-analysis procedure overestimated the effectiveness of RIRD. In Study 2, we examined the influence of different data-analysis procedures on the interpretation of the relative effects of 2 different treatments for vocal stereotypy. Specifically, we compared interrupted and uninterrupted data-analysis procedures during the implementation of RIRD and noncontingent reinforcement (NCR) as a treatment for vocal stereotypy. The results showed that, as in Study 1, the interrupted data-analysis procedure overestimated the effectiveness of RIRD; however, this effect was not apparent with NCR. These findings suggest that different types of data analysis can influence the perceived success of a treatment. PMID:24764249

  15. Workflow interruptions, social stressors from supervisor(s) and attention failure in surgery personnel

    PubMed Central

    PEREIRA, Diana; MÜLLER, Patrick; ELFERING, Achim

    2015-01-01

    Workflow interruptions and social stressors among surgery personnel may cause attention failure at work that may increase rumination about work issues during leisure time. The test of these assumptions should contribute to the understanding of exhaustion in surgery personnel and patient safety. Workflow interruptions and supervisor-related social stressors were tested to predict attention failure that predicts work-related rumination during leisure time. One hundred ninety-four theatre nurses, anaesthetists and surgeons from a Swiss University hospital participated in a cross-sectional survey. The participation rate was 58%. Structural equation modelling confirmed both indirect paths from workflow interruptions and social stressors via attention failure on rumination (both p<0.05). An alternative model, assuming the reversed indirect causation—from attention failure via workflow interruptions and social stressors on rumination—could not be empirically supported. Workflow interruptions and social stressors at work are likely to trigger attention failure in surgery personnel. Work redesign and team intervention could help surgery personnel to maintain a high level of quality and patient safety and detach from work related issues to recover during leisure time. PMID:26027706

  16. [Complete repair of the interrupted aortic arch by an anterior approach. Apropos of 9 cases].

    PubMed

    Chambran, P; Planché, C; Bruniaux, J; Lacour-Gayet, F; Binet, J P

    1988-05-01

    Interrupted aortic arch is a duct-dependent heart disease, and this is why the use of prostaglandins E, which keep the ductus arteriosus open to feed the descending aorta, has transformed its formerly sombre prognosis. The authors report the cases of 9 neonates and infants presenting with interrupted aortic arch associated with ventricular septal defect who underwent total repair of the malformations under extracorporeal circulation. Five children were less than 10 years' old. The aortic lesions were of type A in 2 cases (interruption distal to the left subclavian artery) and of type B in 7 cases (interruption between the left carotid and subclavian arteries). In the second group the lesions were of type B1 in 5 cases (without retro-oesophageal right subclavian artery) and of type B2 in 2 cases (right retro-oesophageal artery distal to the interruption). There was one death (11 p. 100). So far, no child has been reoperated upon for residual aortic obstruction or reopened ventricular septal defect. This technique of total repair in one stage, with closure of the ventricular septal defect, seems to be preferable to the two-stage technique in which stage one includes, in addition to aortic arch repair, cerclage of the pulmonary artery, a procedure with numerous disadvantages and a higher overall mortality rate. PMID:3136722

  17. Viral re-suppression and detection of drug resistance following interruption of a suppressive NNRTI-based regimen

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Zoe; Phillips, Andrew; Cohen, Cal; Neuhaus, Jacquie; Baxter, John; Emery, Sean; Hirschel, Bernard; Hullsiek, Kathy Huppler; Stephan, Christoph; Lundgren, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Background Interruption of an NNRTI-regimen is often necessary, but must be performed with caution because NNRTIs have a low genetic barrier to resistance. Limited data exist to guide clinical practice on the best interruption strategy to use. Methods Patients in the drug-conservation arm of SMART who interrupted a fully suppressive NNRTI-regimen were evaluated. From 2003, SMART recommended interruption of an NNRTI by: a staggered-interruption, where the NNRTI was stopped before the NRTIs; or by replacing the NNRTI with another drug before interruption. Simultaneous-interruption of all ARVs was discouraged. Re-suppression rates four-to-eight months after re-initiating NNRTI-therapy were assessed, as was the detection of drug-resistance mutations within two months of the treatment interruption in a subset (N=141). Results Overall, 601/688 (87.4%) patients who re-started an NNRTI achieved viral re-suppression. The adjusted odds ratio (95% CI) for achieving re-suppression was 1.94 (1.02-3.69) for patients with a staggered-interruption and 3.64 (1.37-9.64) for those with a switched-interruption compared to patients with a simultaneous-interruption. At least one NNRTI-mutation was detected in the virus of 16.4% patients with simultaneous-interruption, 12.5% patients with staggered-interruption and 4.2% patients with switched-interruption. Fewer patients with detectable mutations (i.e. 69.2%) achieved HIV-RNA≤400 copies/mL compared to those in whom no mutations were detected (i.e. 86.7%), p=0.05. Conclusions In patients who interrupt a suppressive NNRTI-regimen, the choice of interruption-strategy may influence re-suppression rates when re-starting a similar regimen. NNRTI drug-resistance mutations were observed in a relatively high proportion of patients. These data provide additional support for a staggered- or switched-interruption strategy for NNRTI drugs. PMID:18981767

  18. Growth-interruption-induced low-density InAs quantum dots on GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L. H.; Alloing, B.; Chauvin, N.; Fiore, A.; Patriarche, G.

    2008-10-15

    We investigate the use of growth interruption to obtain low-density InAs quantum dots (QDs) on GaAs. The process was realized by Ostwald-type ripening of a thin InAs layer. It was found that the optical properties of the QDs as a function of growth interruption strongly depend on InAs growth rate. By using this approach, a low density of QDs (4 dots/{mu}m{sup 2}) with uniform size distribution was achieved. As compared to QDs grown without growth interruption, a larger energy separation between the QD confined levels was observed, suggesting a situation closer to the ideal zero-dimensional system. Combining with an InGaAs capping layer such as In-rich QDs enable 1.3 {mu}m emission at 4 K.

  19. Continuum modeling for two-lane traffic flow with consideration of the traffic interruption probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Chuan; Sun, Di-Hua

    2010-12-01

    Considering the effects that the probability of traffic interruption and the friction between two lanes have on the car-following behaviour, this paper establishes a new two-lane microscopic car-following model. Based on this microscopic model, a new macroscopic model was deduced by the relevance relation of microscopic and macroscopic scale parameters for the two-lane traffic flow. Terms related to lane change are added into the continuity equations and velocity dynamic equations to investigate the lane change rate. Numerical results verify that the proposed model can be efficiently used to reflect the effect of the probability of traffic interruption on the shock, rarefaction wave and lane change behaviour on two-lane freeways. The model has also been applied in reproducing some complex traffic phenomena caused by traffic accident interruption.

  20. The role of AGG interruptions in fragile X repeat expansions: a twenty-year perspective

    PubMed Central

    Latham, Gary J.; Coppinger, Justine; Hadd, Andrew G.; Nolin, Sarah L.

    2014-01-01

    In 1994, it was suggested that AGG interruptions affect the stability of the fragile X triplet repeat. Until recently, however, this hypothesis was not explored on a large scale due primarily to the technical difficulty of determining AGG interruption patterns of the two alleles in females. The recent development of a PCR technology that overcomes this difficulty and accurately identifies the number and position of AGGs has led to several studies that examine their influence on repeat stability. Here, we present a historical perspective of relevant studies published during the last 20 years on AGG interruptions and examine those recent publications that have refined risk estimates for repeat instability and full-mutation expansions. PMID:25120560

  1. Current interruption limit and resistance of the self-similar electric arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christen, Thomas; Seeger, Martin

    2005-05-01

    A model for the axially blown cylindrical arc is derived. In contrast to earlier theories, the model is gauge invariant with respect to energy, which is crucial for investigating current interruption. We determine from our model the dependence of the maximum interruptible current rate, (dI/dt)L, on the pressure, on the parallel capacitance, and on the line impedance for an SF6 arc. (dI/dt)L scales, approximately independent of the gas type, with the square root of the pressure. The arc resistance, at current zero with current rate equal to (dI/dt)L, is pressure independent. As a consequence, the arc resistance at current zero can serve as a figure of merit for the interruption performance of gas circuit breakers.

  2. Strategies to reduce interruptions from mobile communication systems in surgical wards.

    PubMed

    Solvoll, Terje; Scholl, Jeremiah

    2008-01-01

    We conducted interviews with two surgeons from the department of gastrointestinal surgery at the University Hospital of North Norway. The results confirmed that interruptions from mobile devices were a problem, especially in surgical theatres, outpatient wards, emergency wards and inpatient rooms. Users in hospitals, especially surgeons and physicians, need a better communication system. Our proposed system would intercept the signals from the existing communication system before they are sent out to the mobile devices. The signals would then be routed through a context-aware system, paired with context information and available rules defined by the doctor, which will decide what to do with the call/page. A single device which integrates both the pager and the phone system, and makes use of context information to control interruptions automatically yet allow the caller to decide whether to interrupt, would be highly appreciated by the users. PMID:18852324

  3. Activation and inhibition of posterior parietal cortex have bi-directional effects on spatial errors following interruptions

    PubMed Central

    Foroughi, Cyrus K.; Blumberg, Eric J.; Parasuraman, Raja

    2015-01-01

    Interruptions to ongoing mental activities are omnipresent in our modern digital world, but the brain networks involved in interrupted performance are not known, nor have the activation of those networks been modulated. Errors following interruptions reflect failures in spatial memory, whose maintenance is supported by a brain network including the right posterior parietal cortex (PPC). The present study therefore used bi-directional transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) of right PPC to examine the neuromodulation of spatial errors following interruptions, as well as performance on another PPC-dependent task, mental rotation. Anodal stimulation significantly reduced the number of interruption-based errors and increased mental rotation accuracy whereas cathodal stimulation significantly increased errors and reduced mental rotation accuracy. The results provide evidence for a causal role of the PPC in the maintenance of spatial representations during interrupted task performance. PMID:25628543

  4. Mediated interruptions of anaesthesia providers using predictions of workload from anaesthesia information management system data.

    PubMed

    Epstein, R H; Dexter, F

    2012-09-01

    Perioperative interruptions generated electronically from anaesthesia information management systems (AIMS) can provide useful feedback, but may adversely affect task performance if distractions occur at inopportune moments. Ideally such interruptions would occur only at times when their impact would be minimal. In this study of AIMS data, we evaluated the times of comments, drugs, fluids and periodic assessments (e.g. electrocardiogram diagnosis and train-of-four) to develop recommendations for the timing of interruptions during the intraoperative period. The 39,707 cases studied were divided into intervals between: 1) enter operating room; 2) induction; 3) intubation; 4) surgical incision; and 5) end surgery. Five-minute intervals of no documentation were determined for each case. The offsets from the start of each interval when >50% of ongoing cases had completed initial documentation were calculated (MIN50). The primary endpoint for each interval was the percentage of all cases still ongoing at MIN50. Results were that the intervals from entering the operating room to induction and from induction to intubation were unsuitable for interruptions confirming prior observational studies of anaesthesia workload. At least 13 minutes after surgical incision was the most suitable time for interruptions with 92% of cases still ongoing. Timing was minimally affected by the type of anaesthesia, surgical facility, surgical service, prone positioning or scheduled case duration. The implication of our results is that for mediated interruptions, waiting at least 13 minutes after the start of surgery is appropriate. Although we used AIMS data, operating room information system data is also suitable. PMID:22934862

  5. Interruptions and resistance: a comparison of medical consultations with family and trained interpreters.

    PubMed

    Leanza, Yvan; Boivin, Isabelle; Rosenberg, Ellen

    2010-06-01

    While working with trained interpreters in health care is strongly recommended, few studies have looked at the subtle differences in communication processes between trained and "ad hoc" interpreters, such as adult family members. Using Habermas' Communicative Action Theory (CAT) which distinguishes between the Lifeworld (contextually grounded experiences) and the System (decontextualized rules), we analysed 16 family practice consultations with interpreters, 10 with a trained interpreter and 6 with a family member. We found clear differences in communication patterns between consultations with a trained interpreter and consultations with a family member as interpreter. In both cases the Lifeworld is frequently interrupted and the outcomes are similar: the Lifeworld is rarely heard and acknowledged by the physician. Physicians interrupt the Voice of the Lifeworld significantly more with a trained interpreter than with a family member. Family members and trained interpreters also interrupt the Voice of the Lifeworld just as much. However, these interruptions differ in their functions (both physicians and interpreters interrupt to keep the interview on track to meet the biomedical goals; family interpreters interrupt to control the agenda). We have identified patients' resistance when physicians ignore their Lifeworld, but this resistance is usually only transmitted by professional interpreters (and not by family interpreters). We identified specific risks of working with family interpreters: imposing their own agenda (vs. the patient's one) and controlling the consultation process. Even if the collaboration with trained interpreters becomes more widespread, work with "ad hoc" interpreters will continue to occur. Therefore, institutions should provide training and organizational support to help physicians and patients to achieve communication in all situations. PMID:20378224

  6. Greater Physiological and Behavioral Effects of Interrupted Stress Pattern Compared to Daily Restraint Stress in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Hetzel, Andrea; Shah, Bijal; Atchley, Derek; Blume, Shannon R.; Padival, Mallika A.; Rosenkranz, J. Amiel

    2014-01-01

    Repeated stress can trigger a range of psychiatric disorders, including anxiety. The propensity to develop abnormal behaviors after repeated stress is related to the severity, frequency and number of stressors. However, the pattern of stress exposure may contribute to the impact of stress. In addition, the anxiogenic nature of repeated stress exposure can be moderated by the degree of coping that occurs, and can be reflected in homotypic habituation to the repeated stress. However, expectations are not clear when a pattern of stress presentation is utilized that diminishes habituation. The purpose of these experiments is to test whether interrupted stress exposure decreases homotypic habituation and leads to greater effects on anxiety-like behavior in adult male rats. We found that repeated interrupted restraint stress resulted in less overall homotypic habituation compared to repeated daily restraint stress. This was demonstrated by greater production of fecal boli and greater corticosterone response to restraint. Furthermore, interrupted restraint stress resulted in a lower body weight and greater adrenal gland weight than daily restraint stress, and greater anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze. Control experiments demonstrated that these effects of the interrupted pattern could not be explained by differences in the total number of stress exposures, differences in the total number of days that the stress periods encompased, nor could it be explained as a result of only the stress exposures after an interruption from stress. These experiments demonstrate that the pattern of stress exposure is a significant determinant of the effects of repeated stress, and that interrupted stress exposure that decreases habituation can have larger effects than a greater number of daily stress exposures. Differences in the pattern of stress exposure are therefore an important factor to consider when predicting the severity of the effects of repeated stress on psychiatric disorders. PMID:25014526

  7. Investigation on X-Radiation for 126 kV Vacuum Interrupters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jing; Liu, Zhiyuan; Geng, Yingsan; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Yingyao

    2016-05-01

    When subjected to high voltages between opened contacts, vacuum interrupters may emit X-rays. In order to ensure that these are of an acceptable level, vacuum interrupters should comply with the limits for X-ray emission and the test procedures to be carried out to verify this based on relevant standards and specifications. In this paper, a comprehensive experimental study has been performed for 126 kV vacuum interrupters used in a transmission system to understand the X-radiation level and its influence by three main parameters, namely applied power-frequency voltage, contact gap and power-frequency voltage conditioning. The radiation instrument is an FJ347 radiometer and the X-radiation dose was measured at the power-frequency test voltage. These tests demonstrated that the X-radiation emission level for a 126 kV vacuum interrupter did not exceed the following: 5 μSv per hour at a rated voltage of 126 kV and 150 μSv per hour at a power-frequency voltage of 230 kV at 1 m distance. The X-radiation dose increased with the applied power-frequency voltage increasing and decreased with the contact gap increasing. The X-radiation dose for 126 kV vacuum interrupters decreased by 57% after the conditioning procedure with a certain power-frequency voltage. During the conditioning procedure, the average value of the X-radiation dose was 4.49 mSv, which means if a professional conditions 180 interrupters per year, it will be safe at the 6.4 m distance. supported by National Key Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (No. 2015CB251002)

  8. Hybrid intervention for type A aortic arch interruption and a giant subclavian artery aneurysm in an adult.

    PubMed

    Oz, Kursad; Erek, Ersin; Yildirim, Aydin

    2016-06-01

    Interrupted aortic arch is a very rare but well-described congenital anomaly. Concomitant presentation of interrupted aortic arch and giant subclavian artery aneurysm is an unusual event in adulthood. To the best of our knowledge, hybrid intervention for type A aortic arch interruption with a giant aneurysm of the subclavian artery is an alternative approach for the management of these concomitant pathologies in adults. PMID:27071339

  9. The effect of a safe zone on nurse interruptions, distractions, and medication administration errors.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Mindy; Schadewald, Diane; Dietrich, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Patient safety is a health care priority. Yet medical errors are ranked the eighth leading cause of death. Medication administration errors (MAEs) often result from multiple environmental and individual factors. This quality improvement initiative adapted a protocol based on airline industry safety measures to decrease nurse distractions and interruptions during medication administration, with the goal of decreasing MAEs. Sources of distractions, interruptions, and MAEs were measured pre and post intervention. Patient satisfaction scores were measured concurrently. Results of this initiative differ from previous studies in which similar interventions reduced both distractions and MAEs. An unexpected finding was dramatically increased patient satisfaction. PMID:25723837

  10. Interruption in the maintenance of compulsive sexual disorder: two case studies.

    PubMed

    Konopacki, W P; Oei, T P

    1988-10-01

    Sexual offenses and disorders are at times compulsive in nature. It is hypothesized that compulsive sexuality is a function of a history of interrupted or frustrated approach behavior. Two case studies involving compulsive features were treated by preventing such interruptions and delays. An A-B-A-B single-case experimental design on one of the two case studies provided some support for the hypothesized relationship. Implications for assessment and treatment are examined and the mechanisms underlying the hypothesized relationship are discussed. PMID:3219064

  11. Interrupted Aortic Arch Type B in A Patient with Cat Eye Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Belangero, Sintia Iole Nogueira; Bellucco, Fernanda Teixeira da Silva; Cernach, Mirlene C. S. P.; Hacker, April M.; Emanuel, Beverly S.; Melaragno, Maria Isabel

    2010-01-01

    We report a patient with cat eye syndrome and interrupted aortic arch type B, a typical finding in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Chromosomal analysis and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) showed a supernumerary bisatellited isodicentric marker chromosome derived from chromosome 22. The segment from 22pter to 22q11.2 in the supernumerary chromosome found in our patient does not overlap with the region deleted in patients with the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. However, the finding of an interrupted aortic arch type B is unusual in CES, although it is a frequent heart defect in the 22q11 deletion syndrome. PMID:19629279

  12. Interrupted aortic arch type B in A patient with cat eye syndrome.

    PubMed

    Belangero, Sintia Iole Nogueira; Bellucco, Fernanda Teixeira da Silva; Cernach, Mirlene C S P; Hacker, April M; Emanuel, Beverly S; Melaragno, Maria Isabel

    2009-05-01

    We report a patient with cat eye syndrome and interrupted aortic arch type B, a typical finding in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Chromosomal analysis and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) showed a supernumerary bisatellited isodicentric marker chromosome derived from chromosome 22. The segment from 22pter to 22q11.2 in the supernumerary chromosome found in our patient does not overlap with the region deleted in patients with the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. However, the finding of an interrupted aortic arch type B is unusual in CES, although it is a frequent heart defect in the 22q11 deletion syndrome. PMID:19629279

  13. 77 FR 66080 - Certain Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters and Products Containing Same

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-01

    ...''). 75 FR 62420 (Oct. 8, 2010). The complaint alleged violations of section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930... COMMISSION Certain Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters and Products Containing Same AGENCY: U.S. International... products containing the same by reason of infringement of certain claims of U.S. Patent Nos....

  14. Assigning Student Leaders: Decreasing Interruptions during Teacher-Led Small-Group Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coles, Jeremy T.; Skinner, Christopher H.; Best, Tiffany L.; Wood, Allison; Luna, Elisa; Adcock, Wes

    2013-01-01

    The authors used a withdrawal design to evaluate an intervention designed to decrease interruptions during small-group instruction in a Kindergarten class. A new rule was put into place; during teacher-led small-group instruction, those not in the small group were required to address questions to designated student leaders, as opposed to…

  15. Acoustic Predictors of Intelligibility for Segmentally Interrupted Speech: Temporal Envelope, Voicing, and Duration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogerty, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Temporal interruption limits the perception of speech to isolated temporal glimpses. An analysis was conducted to determine the acoustic parameter that best predicts speech recognition from temporal fragments that preserve different types of speech information--namely, consonants and vowels. Method: Young listeners with normal hearing…

  16. Interrupted Experiences: Reflection, Listening and "Negativity" in the Practice of Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    This inquiry explores the educative meaning of interruptions or breaks in teacher's experiences by looking at their role in reflection and listening. Reflection and listening are not only two vital and distinct aspects of teaching, but are also interrelated and as such can serve to productively inform one another. In this context, I develop the…

  17. Recognition of temporally interrupted and spectrally degraded sentences with additional unprocessed low-frequency speech

    PubMed Central

    Başkent, Deniz; Chatterjee, Monita

    2010-01-01

    Recognition of periodically interrupted sentences (with an interruption rate of 1.5 Hz, 50% duty cycle) was investigated under conditions of spectral degradation, implemented with a noiseband vocoder, with and without additional unprocessed low-pass filtered speech (cutoff frequency 500 Hz). Intelligibility of interrupted speech decreased with increasing spectral degradation. For all spectral-degradation conditions, however, adding the unprocessed low-pass filtered speech enhanced the intelligibility. The improvement at 4 and 8 channels was higher than the improvement at 16 and 32 channels: 19% and 8%, on average, respectively. The Articulation Index predicted an improvement of 0.09, in a scale from 0 to 1. Thus, the improvement at poorest spectral-degradation conditions was larger than what would be expected from additional speech information. Therefore, the results implied that the fine temporal cues from the unprocessed low-frequency speech, such as the additional voice pitch cues, helped perceptual integration of temporally interrupted and spectrally degraded speech, especially when the spectral degradations were severe. Considering the vocoder processing as a cochlear-implant simulation, where implant users’ performance is closest to 4 and 8-channel vocoder performance, the results support additional benefit of low-frequency acoustic input in combined electric-acoustic stimulation for perception of temporally degraded speech. PMID:20817081

  18. Timing for distribution and interrupt control for the TOPAZ Data Acquisition System

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, H.; Enomoto, R.; Kawabata, S.; Yamauchi, M.; Imanishi, A.; Ishii, T.; Maruyama, K.; Masuda, H.; Okumo, H.; Ukai, K.

    1987-02-01

    In order to provide a standardized control for the data acquisition system for the TOPAZ detector, a Timing Server/Receiver scheme was developed. The entire system is under control of the Interrupt Control Section, which manages an integral operation of the data acquisition system in the FASTBUS environment.

  19. Interrupted Experiences: Reflection, Listening and "Negativity" in the Practice of Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    This inquiry explores the educative meaning of interruptions or breaks in teacher's experiences by looking at their role in reflection and listening. Reflection and listening are not only two vital and distinct aspects of teaching, but are also interrelated and as such can serve to productively inform one another. In this context, I develop the

  20. The Behavior Chain Interruption Strategy: A Review of Research and Discussion of Future Directions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Mark; Grunsell, Julie

    2001-01-01

    A review of 10 studies that utilize the behavior chain interruption strategy (BCIS) to teach communication skills to individuals with severe disabilities found that BCIS has been successfully applied to individuals across a wide range of ages and levels of disability, including learners with multiple disabilities. Generalization concerns are…

  1. Inflow rates and interrupted flow effects on concentrated flow erosion and intake rate in two soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface irrigation is the most widely used irrigation practice world wide, but its water use efficiency is low. Interrupted supply of water to furrows may reduce intake rate (IR) upstream and improve irrigation efficiency in many soils, but has an insignificant effect in others. Similarly, intermitt...

  2. RTtxGap: An android radiobiological tool for compensation of radiotherapy treatment interruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusoff, A. L.; Mohamad, M.; Abdullah, R.; Bhavaraju, V. M. K.; Nik Idris, N. R.

    2016-03-01

    Treatment interruption is not uncommon in radiotherapy. Common reasons for treatment interruption include machine breakdown, holidays and patient severe radiation reactions. Here RTtxGap, an Android application to assist calculations of compensation for treatment gap, is reported. It uses linear quadratic (LQ) model to calculate the biological effective dose (BED) that is used to solve for treatment gap compensations. Solutions are calculated using BED equation, with consideration for tissue proliferation. The accuracy of results has been verified using LQL Equiv software to be accurate within 1%. Five treatment interruption examples were used to illustrate the capability of the software to calculate the treatment compensation schedules. Solving these examples also illustrates the general consensus regarding compensating for unscheduled treatment interruptions, which ultimately involves balancing the BEDs of tumour and organ at risk. In addition to compensation for treatment gap, RTtxGap can also be used to calculate equivalent total dose in 2-Gy fraction (EQD2), to modify treatment schedule and to calculate alternative dose prescriptions having the same isoeffect.

  3. 14 CFR 323.14 - Temporary suspension authority for involuntary interruption of service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Temporary suspension authority for involuntary interruption of service. 323.14 Section 323.14 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY... foreign government, emergency measures, strikes, weather conditions, construction work on airports,...

  4. The Effects of Matched Stimulation and Response Interruption and Redirection on Vocal Stereotypy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Jessica J.; Miguel, Caio F.; Fernand, Jonathan K.; LaBrie, Jillian K.

    2012-01-01

    Stereotypy has been classified as repetitive behavior that does not serve any apparent function. Two procedures that have been found to reduce rates of vocal stereotypy effectively are response interruption and redirection (RIRD) and noncontingent access to matched stimulation (MS). The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effects of…

  5. Relational Identity Making on the Professional Landscape as a Substitute Teacher: Interruptions and Continuities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driedger-Enns, Lynnette M.

    2014-01-01

    This article, which comes out of a research project exploring teaching as intellectual work, focuses specifically on a young woman who worked as a substitute teacher after she graduated from a two-year teacher education program at her local university. For Penny, substitute teaching was an interruption as she shaped a professional life moving…

  6. The Effects of Response Interruption and Redirection and Sertraline on Vocal Stereotypy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miguel, Caio F.; Clark, Kathy; Tereshko, Lisa; Ahearn, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Although response interruption and redirection (RIRD) has been shown to be successful in reducing vocal stereotypy, recent reports have suggested that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may also reduce these behaviors. The purpose of the current investigation was to examine the effects of RIRD with and without sertraline on…

  7. Tracing My Research on Parent Engagement: Working to Interrupt the Story of School as Protectorate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pushor, Debbie

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author makes visible and works to interrupt the story of school as "protectorate." In examining, within this dominant narrative, educators' taken-for-granted assumptions about parents' positioning in relation to the landscape of school, the author presents research on parent engagement that provides those within the field of

  8. Immediate and Subsequent Effects of Response Interruption and Redirection on Targeted and Untargeted Forms of Stereotypy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastrana, Sarah J.; Rapp, John T.; Frewing, Tyla M.

    2013-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that response interruption and redirection (RIRD) decreases immediate engagement in targeted stereotypic behaviors; however, its effects on untargeted stereotypy have not yet been studied, and its effects following removal of treatment are unclear. We evaluated the immediate and subsequent effects of RIRD on targeted…

  9. Evaluation of the Immediate and Subsequent Effects of Response Interruption and Redirection on Vocal Stereotypy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumacher, Brittany I.; Rapp, John T.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated 2 3-component multiple-schedule sequences--a response interruption and redirection (RIRD) treatment sequence and a no-interaction control sequence--using a multielement design. With this design, we were able to evaluate the immediate and subsequent effects of RIRD on 2 participants' vocal stereotypy. For both participants, RIRD…

  10. The Effects of Verbal Operant Training and Response Interruption and Redirection on Appropriate and Inappropriate Vocalizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colon, Candice L.; Ahearn, William H.; Clark, Kathleen M.; Masalsky, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Past research has shown that response interruption and redirection (RIRD) can effectively decrease automatically reinforced motor behavior (Hagopian & Adelinis, 2001). Ahearn, Clark, MacDonald, and Chung (2007) found that a procedural adaptation of RIRD reduced vocal stereotypy and increased appropriate vocalizations for some children, although…

  11. Pardon the Interruption: Enhancing Communication Skills for Students with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayes, Daniel A.; Heath, Amy K.; Williams, Carol; Ganz, Jennifer B.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides teachers and parents with a description of the behavior chain interruption strategy (BCIS), an evidence-based intervention for increasing requesting behaviors in individuals with moderate to severe disabilities. A review of the relevant literature is provided, as well as a description of the behavioral principles that…

  12. Comparison Groups in Short Interrupted Time-Series: An Illustration Evaluating No Child Left Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Manyee; Cook, Thomas D.; Steiner, Peter M.

    2009-01-01

    Interrupted time-series (ITS) are often used to assess the causal effect of a planned or even unplanned shock introduced into an on-going process. The pre-intervention slope is supposed to index the causal counterfactual, and deviations from it in mean, slope or variance are used to indicate an effect. However, a secure causal inference is only…

  13. The Reasons for the Interruption of Vocational Training in Estonian Vocational Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beilmann, Mai; Espenberg, Kerly

    2016-01-01

    Dropping out of school before achieving any qualification is a serious problem both at an individual and societal level. This study provides an insight into the lives of young people who have dropped out or are at a risk of dropping out of vocational schools in Estonia and gives an overview of the reasons behind the interruption of their studies.…

  14. 33 CFR 159.89 - Power interruption: Type I and II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.89 Power interruption: Type I and II devices. A discharge device must be designed so that a momentary loss of power during operation of the device does not allow a discharge that does not meet the requirements in § 159.53....

  15. 33 CFR 159.89 - Power interruption: Type I and II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.89 Power interruption: Type I and II devices. A discharge device must be designed so that a momentary loss of power during operation of the device does not allow a discharge that does not meet the requirements in § 159.53....

  16. 33 CFR 159.89 - Power interruption: Type I and II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.89 Power interruption: Type I and II devices. A discharge device must be designed so that a momentary loss of power during operation of the device does not allow a discharge that does not meet the requirements in § 159.53....

  17. Improving Memory after Interruption: Exploiting Soft Constraints and Manipulating Information Access Cost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Phillip L.; Patrick, John; Waldron, Samuel M.; King, Sophia L.; Patrick, Tanya

    2009-01-01

    Forgetting what one was doing prior to interruption is an everyday problem. The recent soft constraints hypothesis (Gray, Sims, Fu, & Schoelles, 2006) emphasizes the strategic adaptation of information processing strategy to the task environment. It predicts that increasing information access cost (IAC: the time, and physical and mental effort…

  18. Improving Memory after Interruption: Exploiting Soft Constraints and Manipulating Information Access Cost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Phillip L.; Patrick, John; Waldron, Samuel M.; King, Sophia L.; Patrick, Tanya

    2009-01-01

    Forgetting what one was doing prior to interruption is an everyday problem. The recent soft constraints hypothesis (Gray, Sims, Fu, & Schoelles, 2006) emphasizes the strategic adaptation of information processing strategy to the task environment. It predicts that increasing information access cost (IAC: the time, and physical and mental effort

  19. Quantifying the diffusive mass transfer of nonreactive solutes in columns of fractured saprolite using flow interruption

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, O.C.; Jardine, P.M.; Wilson, G.V.; Selim, H.M.

    1996-09-01

    Subsurface transport processes of low-level radioactive contaminants at hazardous waste sites are complex due to a nonuniform distribution of pore regions in heterogeneous media. During transport, contaminant mass is continuously transferred between the various pore regions via hydraulic and concentration gradients. Our objective was to quantify the diffusive mass transfer of a nonreactive solute between the matrix porosity and preferential flow paths in fractured subsurface media. A large, undisturbed soil column (41 cm long by 17 cm diameter) of weathered, fractured shale was acquired from a proposed waste site on the Oak Ridge Reservation in eastern Tennessee. We injected a nonreactive a nonreactive tracer, Br{sup -}, under saturated conditions, interrupting tracer flow for a designated time, and then reinitiating flow. Experiments considered tracer injection and displacement, variations in duration of flow interruption, and variations in flux. Transport of Br{sup -} through the undisturbed medium was characterized by asymmetric breakthrough curves (BTC), indicative of preferential flow coupled with movement into the matrix. Interrupting flow resulted in decreased and increased Br{sup -} concentrations during tracer infusion and displacement, respectively, when flow was reinitiated. More pronounced concentration perturbations were observed at high fluxes and long interrupt durations. These perturbations were driven by solute concentration gradients established between pore regions as a result of preferential flow. 39 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Influence of Gap Distance on Vacuum Arc Characteristics of Cup Type AMF Electrode in Vacuum Interrupters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shaoyong; Xiu, Shixin; Wang, Jimei; Shen, Zhengchao

    2006-11-01

    The greenhouse effect of SF6 is a great concern today. The development of high voltage vacuum circuit breakers becomes more important. The vacuum circuit breaker has minimum pollution to the environment. The vacuum interrupter is the key part of a vacuum circuit breaker. The interrupting characteristics in vacuum and arc-controlling technique are the main problems to be solved for a longer gap distance in developing high voltage vacuum interrupters. To understand the vacuum arc characteristics and provide effective technique to control vacuum arc in a long gap distance, the arc mode transition of a cup-type axial magnetic field electrode is observed by a high-speed charge coupled device (CCD) video camera under different gap distances while the arc voltage and arc current are recorded. The controlling ability of the axial magnetic field on vacuum arc obviously decreases when the gap distance is longer than 40 mm. The noise components and mean value of the arc voltage significantly increase. The effective method for controlling the vacuum arc characteristics is provided by long gap distances based on the test results. The test results can be used as a reference to develop high voltage and large capacity vacuum interrupters.

  1. Rapid Resumption of Interrupted Search Is Independent of Age-Related Improvements in Visual Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lleras, Alejandro; Porporino, Mafalda; Burack, Jacob A.; Enns, James T.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, 7-19-year-olds performed an interrupted visual search task in two experiments. Our question was whether the tendency to respond within 500 ms after a second glimpse of a display (the "rapid resumption" effect ["Psychological Science", 16 (2005) 684-688]) would increase with age in the same way as overall search efficiency. The…

  2. A Unified Framework for Estimating Minimum Detectable Effects for Comparative Short Interrupted Time Series Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Cristofer; Unlu, Fatih

    2014-01-01

    The Comparative Short Interrupted Time Series (C-SITS) design is a frequently employed quasi-experimental method, in which the pre- and post-intervention changes observed in the outcome levels of a treatment group is compared with those of a comparison group where the difference between the former and the latter is attributed to the treatment. The…

  3. Response Interruption and Redirection for Vocal Stereotypy in Children with Autism: A Systematic Replication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassella, Megan Duffy; Sidener, Tina M.; Sidener, David W.; Progar, Patrick R.

    2011-01-01

    This study systematically replicated and extended previous research on response interruption and redirection (RIRD) by assessing instructed responses of a different topography than the target behavior, percentage of session spent in treatment, generalization of behavior reduction, and social validity of the intervention. Results showed that RIRD…

  4. Further Evaluation of Response Interruption and Redirection as Treatment for Stereotypy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahrens, Erin N.; Lerman, Dorothea C.; Kodak, Tiffany; Worsdell, April S.; Keegan, Courtney

    2011-01-01

    The effects of 2 forms of response interruption and redirection (RIRD)--motor RIRD and vocal RIRD--were examined with 4 boys with autism to evaluate further the effects of this intervention and its potential underlying mechanisms. In Experiment 1, the effects of motor RIRD and vocal RIRD on vocal stereotypy and appropriate vocalizations were…

  5. Mitigating Disruptive Effects of Interruptions through Training: What Needs to Be Practiced?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cades, David M.; Boehm-Davis, Deborah A.; Trafton, J. Gregory; Monk, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    It is generally accepted that, with practice, people improve on most tasks. However, when tasks have multiple parts, it is not always clear what aspects of the tasks practice or training should focus on. This research explores the features that allow training to improve the ability to resume a task after an interruption, specifically focusing on…

  6. The Effects of Matched Stimulation and Response Interruption and Redirection on Vocal Stereotypy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Jessica J.; Miguel, Caio F.; Fernand, Jonathan K.; LaBrie, Jillian K.

    2012-01-01

    Stereotypy has been classified as repetitive behavior that does not serve any apparent function. Two procedures that have been found to reduce rates of vocal stereotypy effectively are response interruption and redirection (RIRD) and noncontingent access to matched stimulation (MS). The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effects of

  7. 40 CFR 53.54 - Test for proper sampler operation following power interruptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the AC line electrical power to the sampler 5 times, with durations of 20 seconds, 40 seconds, 2 minutes, 7 minutes, and 20 minutes (respectively), with not less than 10 minutes of normal electrical..., excluding the periods of electrical power interruption. Verify that the elapsed sample time reported by...

  8. 40 CFR 53.54 - Test for proper sampler operation following power interruptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the AC line electrical power to the sampler 5 times, with durations of 20 seconds, 40 seconds, 2 minutes, 7 minutes, and 20 minutes (respectively), with not less than 10 minutes of normal electrical..., excluding the periods of electrical power interruption. Verify that the elapsed sample time reported by...

  9. 40 CFR 53.54 - Test for proper sampler operation following power interruptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the AC line electrical power to the sampler 5 times, with durations of 20 seconds, 40 seconds, 2 minutes, 7 minutes, and 20 minutes (respectively), with not less than 10 minutes of normal electrical..., excluding the periods of electrical power interruption. Verify that the elapsed sample time reported by...

  10. 40 CFR 53.54 - Test for proper sampler operation following power interruptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the AC line electrical power to the sampler 5 times, with durations of 20 seconds, 40 seconds, 2 minutes, 7 minutes, and 20 minutes (respectively), with not less than 10 minutes of normal electrical..., excluding the periods of electrical power interruption. Verify that the elapsed sample time reported by...

  11. 40 CFR 53.54 - Test for proper sampler operation following power interruptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the AC line electrical power to the sampler 5 times, with durations of 20 seconds, 40 seconds, 2 minutes, 7 minutes, and 20 minutes (respectively), with not less than 10 minutes of normal electrical..., excluding the periods of electrical power interruption. Verify that the elapsed sample time reported by...

  12. OCTL Laser Beam Transmission Interruptions due to Aircraft and Predictive Avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, A.; Roberts, W. T.; Kovalik, J. M.; Wright, M. W.

    2012-11-01

    Laser beam transmission from the Optical Communications Telescope Laboratory (OCTL) at Table Mountain, California, is required in order to provide a beacon source for optical link acquisition between spacecraft carrying laser communication terminals and OCTL. The laser transmission must be regulated in order to avoid inadvertent irradiation of overflying aircraft or spacecraft. In this article, we present an analysis and data to determine the frequency and duration of laser transmission interruptions so that future laser communication operations can be planned. A week's worth of aircraft flight-path data in the vicinity of OCTL was obtained from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The FAA data were analyzed, along with simulated Lunar Atmospheric and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft predicted orbital data, in order to determine the frequency of laser transmission interruptions. An upper bound of five interruptions per 15-min period was observed due to aircraft overflights. Under more favorable conditions, a 15-min pass to the LADEE spacecraft could encounter no interruptions due to aircraft. The analysis was corroborated with "ground-truth" measurements at OCTL, using the existing laser safety system sensors and radar, to monitor aircraft that intercept a plus-or-minus 2.5-deg exclusion zone around the boresight axis of the OCTL telescope. The frequency of interruptions obtained from this data was in agreement with the predictions obtained using the FAA data analysis. Furthermore, the ground observation confirmed typical interrupt durations of 3 to 5 s due to overflying aircraft. This sets a lower bound for the fractional duration of the shoot window to be approximately 98 percent. Predictive avoidance (PA) data obtained from the Laser Clearing House (LCH) for approximately one month with the Moon as a target was analyzed. Note that the difference between using the Moon as a target versus simulated LADEE spacecraft orbital data is that the Moon line of sight is continuous from moonrise to moonset, whereas the line of sight to the spacecraft is interrupted due to occultation of the spacecraft by the Moon. The limited LCH data analysis presented indicates that though greater than 90 percent of laser shoot windows can be accessed nearly two-thirds of the time, it can drop to 60 to 90 percent approximately one-third of the time, with a single instance when it dropped to 32 percent.

  13. Measuring the relationship between interruptions, multitasking and prescribing errors in an emergency department: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Raban, Magdalena Z; Walter, Scott R; Douglas, Heather E; Strumpman, Dana; Mackenzie, John; Westbrook, Johanna I

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Interruptions and multitasking are frequent in clinical settings, and have been shown in the cognitive psychology literature to affect performance, increasing the risk of error. However, comparatively less is known about their impact on errors in clinical work. This study will assess the relationship between prescribing errors, interruptions and multitasking in an emergency department (ED) using direct observations and chart review. Methods and analysis The study will be conducted in an ED of a 440-bed teaching hospital in Sydney, Australia. Doctors will be shadowed at proximity by observers for 2 h time intervals while they are working on day shift (between 0800 and 1800). Time stamped data on tasks, interruptions and multitasking will be recorded on a handheld computer using the validated Work Observation Method by Activity Timing (WOMBAT) tool. The prompts leading to interruptions and multitasking will also be recorded. When doctors prescribe medication, type of chart and chart sections written on, along with the patient's medical record number (MRN) will be recorded. A clinical pharmacist will access patient records and assess the medication orders for prescribing errors. The prescribing error rate will be calculated per prescribing task and is defined as the number of errors divided by the number of medication orders written during the prescribing task. The association between prescribing error rates, and rates of prompts, interruptions and multitasking will be assessed using statistical modelling. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval has been obtained from the hospital research ethics committee. Eligible doctors will be provided with written information sheets and written consent will be obtained if they agree to participate. Doctor details and MRNs will be kept separate from the data on prescribing errors, and will not appear in the final data set for analysis. Study results will be disseminated in publications and feedback to the ED. PMID:26463224

  14. Evolution patterns of raltegravir-resistant mutations after integrase inhibitor interruption.

    PubMed

    Canducci, F; Barda, B; Ceresola, E; Spagnuolo, V; Sampaolo, M; Boeri, E; Nozza, S; Cossarin, F; Galli, A; Gianotti, N; Castagna, A; Lazzarin, A; Clementi, M

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to address the evolution of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) mutations resistant to the integrase inhibitor raltegravir after drug interruption. Thirteen HIV-1 infected patients undergoing virological failure due to the selection of raltegravir-resistant variants, who had interrupted raltegravir treatment, were enrolled. For all patients, the virological failure was associated with the selection of variants, with mutations conferring resistance to all of the drugs present in their regimens. Patients were prospectively monitored at baseline (raltegravir interruption) and every 4-24 weeks for clinical, virological and immunological parameters, including HIV-1 viraemia, CD4(+) T-cell counts, and sequence analysis of the HIV-1 integrase sequence. Reversion to the wild-type HIV-1 integrase sequence genotype was observed between 4 and 36 weeks after raltegravir withdrawal in eight out of the 13 patients. Reversion was not observed in three patients. In two patients, reversion was partial at week 24 from raltegravir interruption. These results highlight that in eight out of 13 patients under treatment with raltegravir and experiencing a virological failure, HIV-1 variants harbouring mutations associated with raltegravir resistance become undetectable after drug interruption within a few weeks (in some cases, very rapidly). This occurs under different therapy regimens and in patients receiving 3TC mono-therapy. In the other patients, complete reversion of the integrase sequence is not observed, and either primary or secondary resistance mutations are fixed in the replication competent viral population in vivo also for long time, suggesting that other factors may influence this dynamic process. PMID:20854427

  15. Long-term outcome of patients after a single interruption of antiretroviral therapy: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To describe the long term outcome of patients who interrupted highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) once, identify the variables associated with earlier need to re-start HAART, and the response when therapy was resumed. A retrospective observational cohort of 66 adult patients with HIV-1 infection who interrupted HAART with a CD4+cell count ≥350 cells/μL and undetectable viral load (VL) was performed. The pre-established CD4+ cell count for restarting therapy was 300cells/μL. Cox regression was used to analyse the variables associated with earlier HAART reinitiation. Results The median follow-up was 209 weeks (range, 64–395). Rates of HIV-related or possible HIV-related events were 0.37 (one case of acute retroviral syndrome) and 1.49 per 100 patient-years, respectively. Two patients died after re-starting therapy and having reached undetectable VL. Three patients suffered a sexually transmitted disease while off therapy. Fifty patients (76%) resumed therapy after a median of 97 weeks (range, 17–267). Age, a nadir of CD4+ <250 cells/μL, and a mean VL during interruption of >10,000 copies/ml were independent predictors for earlier re-start. The intention-to-treat success rate of the first HAART resumed regimen was 85.4%. There were no differences by regimen used, nor between regimens that were the same as or different from the one that had been interrupted. Conclusions Our data suggest highly active antiretroviral therapy may be interrupted in selected patients because in these patients, when the HAART is restarted, the viral and clinical response may be achieved. PMID:23095460

  16. The Capability of 500kV Circuit Breaker for Interruption of Short Circuit Current with a Large D.C. Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Takayuki; Eto, Atsushi; Koshizuka, Tadashi; Nishiwaki, Susumu; Kudo, Kietsu; Matsushita, Kozo; Hosokawa, Osamu

    The time constants of the D.C. component of asymmetrical fault current are trend to increase. It is said that interruption capability of gas circuit breaker degrades at asymmetrical current interruption. This paper shows the investigation of the interruption capability of 550kV one-break SF6 gas circuit breaker at asymmetrical current interruption. Interrupting tests of asymmetrical current with time constant 100ms, 150ms were carried out in high power laboratory. At the interrupting tests, arcing time was changed due to the time constant of the D.C. component. From the interrupting test results, arc energy was calculated. Degradation of the interrupting capability at asymmetrical current interruption was investigated by using measured arc energy.

  17. 76 FR 17670 - In the Matter of Certain Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters and Products Containing Same; Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters and Products Containing Same; Notice of... importation of certain ground fault circuit interrupters and products containing the same by reason...

  18. 76 FR 2708 - In the Matter of Certain Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters and Products Containing Same; Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters and Products Containing Same; Notice of... importation of certain ground fault circuit interrupters and products containing the same. The...

  19. 75 FR 70289 - In the Matter of Certain Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters and Products Containing Same; Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters and Products Containing Same; Notice of... importation of certain ground fault circuit interrupters and products containing the same. The...

  20. Use and Outcomes Associated With Bridging During Anticoagulation Interruptions in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Eric D.; Kim, Sunghee; Thomas, Laine; Gersh, Bernard J.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Kowey, Peter R.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Sherwood, Matthew W.; Chang, Paul; Piccini, Jonathan P.; Ansell, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Background— Temporary interruption of oral anticoagulation for procedures is often required, and some propose using bridging anticoagulation. However, the use and outcomes of bridging during oral anticoagulation interruptions in clinical practice are unknown. Methods and Results— The Outcomes Registry for Better Informed Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation (ORBIT-AF) registry is a prospective, observational registry study of US outpatients with atrial fibrillation. We recorded incident temporary interruptions of oral anticoagulation for a procedure, including the use and type of bridging therapy. Outcomes included multivariable-adjusted rates of myocardial infarction, stroke or systemic embolism, major bleeding, cause-specific hospitalization, and death within 30 days. Of 7372 patients treated with oral anticoagulation, 2803 overall interruption events occurred in 2200 patients (30%) at a median follow-up of 2 years. Bridging anticoagulants were used in 24% (n=665), predominantly low-molecular-weight heparin (73%, n=487) and unfractionated heparin (15%, n=97). Bridged patients were more likely to have had prior cerebrovascular events (22% versus 15%; P=0.0003) and mechanical valve replacements (9.6% versus 2.4%; P<0.0001); however, there was no difference in CHA2DS2-VASc scores (scores ≥2 in 94% versus 95%; P=0.5). Bleeding events were more common in bridged than nonbridged patients (5.0% versus 1.3%; adjusted odds ratio, 3.84; P<0.0001). The incidence of myocardial infarction, stroke or systemic embolism, major bleeding, hospitalization, or death within 30 days was also significantly higher in patients receiving bridging (13% versus 6.3%; adjusted odds ratio, 1.94; P=0.0001). Conclusions— Bridging anticoagulation is used in one quarter of anticoagulation interruptions and is associated with higher risk for bleeding and adverse events. These data do not support the use of routine bridging, and additional data are needed to identify best practices concerning anticoagulation interruptions. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01165710. PMID:25499873

  1. Interrupted Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWell, Robert

    1973-01-01

    Article described a project in the electronic music idiom for use in the intermediate grades that was different, that involved no complicated or expensive apparatus, and that showed an interesting relationship between measurement and rhythm. (Author/RK)

  2. Switch contact device for interrupting high current, high voltage, AC and DC circuits

    DOEpatents

    Via, Lester C.; Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Ryan, John M.

    2005-01-04

    A high voltage switch contact structure capable of interrupting high voltage, high current AC and DC circuits. The contact structure confines the arc created when contacts open to the thin area between two insulating surfaces in intimate contact. This forces the arc into the shape of a thin sheet which loses heat energy far more rapidly than an arc column having a circular cross-section. These high heat losses require a dramatic increase in the voltage required to maintain the arc, thus extinguishing it when the required voltage exceeds the available voltage. The arc extinguishing process with this invention is not dependent on the occurrence of a current zero crossing and, consequently, is capable of rapidly interrupting both AC and DC circuits. The contact structure achieves its high performance without the use of sulfur hexafluoride.

  3. Cost of Power Interruptions to Electricity Consumers in the UnitedStates (U.S.)

    SciTech Connect

    Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Eto, Joseph H.

    2006-02-16

    The massive electric power blackout in the northeastern U.S.and Canada on August 14-15, 2003 catalyzed discussions about modernizingthe U.S. electricity grid. Industry sources suggested that investments of$50 to $100 billion would be needed. This work seeks to better understandan important piece of information that has been missing from thesediscussions: What do power interruptions and fluctuations in powerquality (power-quality events) cost electricity consumers? We developed abottom-up approach for assessing the cost to U.S. electricity consumersof power interruptions and power-quality events (referred to collectivelyas "reliability events"). The approach can be used to help assess thepotential benefits of investments in improving the reliability of thegrid. We developed a new estimate based on publicly availableinformation, and assessed how uncertainties in these data affect thisestimate using sensitivity analysis.

  4. Factors associated with interruption of treatment among Pulmonary Tuberculosis patients in Plateau State, Nigeria. 2011

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Luka Mangveep; Hadejia, Idris Suleiman; Nguku, Patrick; Dankoli, Raymond; Waziri, Ndadilnasiya Endie; Akhimien, Moses Obiemen; Ogiri, Samuel; Oyemakinde, Akin; Dalhatu, Ibrahim; Nwanyanwu, Okey; Nsubuga, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nigeria has one of the highest tuberculosis (TB) burdens in the world with estimated incidence of 133 per 100,000 populations. Multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB) is an emerging threat of the TB control in Nigeria caused mainly by incomplete treatment. This study explored factors that affect adherence to treatment among patients undergoing direct observation of TB treatment in Plateau state, Nigeria. Methods Between June and July 2011, we reviewed medical records and interviewed randomly selected pulmonary TB patients in their eighth month of treatment. Information on patients? clinical, socio-demographic and behavioral characteristics was collected using checklist and structured questionnaire for knowledge of treatment duration and reasons for interruption of treatment. We conducted focus group discussions with patients about barriers to treatment adherence. Data were analyzed with Epi Info software. Results Of 378 records reviewed, 229 (61%) patients were male; mean age 37.6 ±13.5 years and 71 (19%) interrupted their treatment. Interruption of treatment was associated with living > 5 km from TB treatment site (AOR: 11.3; CI 95%: 5.7-22.2), lack of knowledge of duration of treatment (AOR: 6.1; CI 95%: 2.8-13.2) and cigarette smoking (AOR: 3.4; CI 95%: 1.5- 8.0). Major reasons for the interruption were lack of transport fare (40%) and feeling well (25%). Focused group discussions revealed unfriendly attitudes of health care workers as barriers to adherence to treatment. Conclusion This study revealed knowledge of the patients on the duration of treatment, distance and health workers attitude as the major determinants of adherent to TB treatment. Training for health care workers on patient education was conducted during routine supportive supervision. PMID:24711884

  5. Before-and-After Study of Interruptions in a Pharmacy Department

    PubMed Central

    Guérin, Aurélie; Caron, Élaine; Lebel, Denis; Bussières, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Background: Few data exist on interruptions in the drug-use process in hospital pharmacies and their effects on patient care. Objective: The primary objective was to compare the hourly number of stimuli received and emitted (i.e., generated) by pharmacists and pharmacy technicians before and after implementation of measures intended to reduce interruptions. The secondary objective was to evaluate the impact of the corrective measures on 4 specific stimuli. Methods: This before-and-after cross-sectional observational study was conducted in the main dispensing area of the pharmacy department of a Canadian university hospital centre. Stimuli received and emitted by pharmacists and pharmacy technicians were counted before (2010) and after (2012) implementation of corrective measures designed to limit interruptions. The effect of corrective measures on targeted stimuli was measured with a t test. Results: Data were collected during a total of 93 randomly scheduled 30-min observation periods: 62 periods in 2010 (n = 2663 stimuli) and 31 periods in 2012 (n = 1217 stimuli). The average hourly stimulus rate (± standard deviation) was unchanged after implementation of corrective measures: 85.9 ± 22.2 in 2010 and 78.5 ± 20.1 in 2012 (p = 0.06). However, a significant decline was observed for many individual stimuli, including the number of face-to-face nonprofessional conversations among pharmacists (4.4 ± 4.2 in 2010 versus 1.2 ± 1.8 in 2012, p = 0.003). Conclusion: Despite the implementation of corrective measures, there was no statistically significant change in the hourly stimulus rates from 2010 to 2012. Other studies are needed to better characterize the nature and repercussions of stimuli, distractions, and interruptions. PMID:23467669

  6. Left Subclavian Artery Perfusion During the Norwood Operation for Interrupted Aortic Arch With Aortic Atresia.

    PubMed

    Maruo, Ayako; Oshima, Yoshihiro; Hasegawa, Tomomi; Matsuhisa, Hironori; Noda, Rei; Iwaki, Ryuma; Matsushima, Shunsuke

    2016-02-01

    The combination of aortic atresia and interrupted aortic arch is a rare condition. We describe a case of Norwood operation for this defect, in which a collateral artery from the descending aorta supplied coronary perfusion. The devised cardiopulmonary bypass technique is discussed, in which the left subclavian artery perfusion was utilized in addition to the cannulation to the descending aorta to secure the cerebral perfusion. PMID:26777937

  7. Interrupted Aortic Arch Associated with Absence of Left Common Carotid Artery: Imaging with MDCT

    SciTech Connect

    Onbas, Omer Olgun, Hasim; Ceviz, Naci; Ors, Rahmi; Okur, Adnan

    2006-06-15

    Interrupted aortic arch (IAA) is a rare severe congenital heart defect defined as complete luminal and anatomic discontinuity between ascending and descending aorta. Although its association with various congenital heart defects has been reported, absence of left common carotid artery (CCA) in patients with IAA has not been reported previously. We report a case of IAA associated with the absence of left CCA which was clearly shown on multidetector-row spiral CT.

  8. Safety Profile of Nifurtimox and Treatment Interruption for Chronic Chagas Disease in Colombian Adults.

    PubMed

    Olivera, Mario Javier; Cucunubá, Zulma M; Álvarez, Carlos Arturo; Nicholls, Rubén Santiago

    2015-12-01

    Nifurtimox (NFX) is one of the approved drugs used to treat Chagas disease. Safety profile studies and models on risk factors for treatment interruption in adults are scarce in Latin America. This study evaluated retrospectively the medical records of adult Chagas disease patients treated with NFX between 2007 and 2012 in Bogotá, Colombia. An accelerated failure time model was used, and associations were expressed as time ratio (TR). In total, 76 adult patients with NFX were included: 60 (79.0%) completed 60 days of treatment, 61 (80.3%) presented adverse drug reactions (ADRs), and 16 (21.0%) required treatment interruption. The predominant symptoms were epigastric pain (23.7%), nauseas (18.4%), sleep disturbances (18.4%), loss of appetite (17.1%), and temporary loss of memory (15.2%). ADRs were classified as mild (64.5%), moderate (30.4%), and severe (5.1%). Time of treatment was significantly longer when presenting ≤ 3 ADRs (TR: 1.78; 95% CI: 1.04-3.03), presence of non-severe ADRs (TR: 6.52; 95% CI: 3.24-13.1), doses of NFX ≤ 8 mg/kg/day (TR: 1.78; 95% CI: 0.90-3.49), and age < 48 years (TR: 1.57; 95% CI: 0.90-2.74). Treatment with NFX in adults caused a high frequency of ADRs, but most of the cases were mild and did not require treatment interruption. Severity and number of ADRs were the main predictors for treatment interruption. PMID:26392162

  9. Safety Profile of Nifurtimox and Treatment Interruption for Chronic Chagas Disease in Colombian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Olivera, Mario Javier; Cucunubá, Zulma M.; Álvarez, Carlos Arturo; Nicholls, Rubén Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Nifurtimox (NFX) is one of the approved drugs used to treat Chagas disease. Safety profile studies and models on risk factors for treatment interruption in adults are scarce in Latin America. This study evaluated retrospectively the medical records of adult Chagas disease patients treated with NFX between 2007 and 2012 in Bogotá, Colombia. An accelerated failure time model was used, and associations were expressed as time ratio (TR). In total, 76 adult patients with NFX were included: 60 (79.0%) completed 60 days of treatment, 61 (80.3%) presented adverse drug reactions (ADRs), and 16 (21.0%) required treatment interruption. The predominant symptoms were epigastric pain (23.7%), nauseas (18.4%), sleep disturbances (18.4%), loss of appetite (17.1%), and temporary loss of memory (15.2%). ADRs were classified as mild (64.5%), moderate (30.4%), and severe (5.1%). Time of treatment was significantly longer when presenting ≤ 3 ADRs (TR: 1.78; 95% CI: 1.04–3.03), presence of non-severe ADRs (TR: 6.52; 95% CI: 3.24–13.1), doses of NFX ≤ 8 mg/kg/day (TR: 1.78; 95% CI: 0.90–3.49), and age < 48 years (TR: 1.57; 95% CI: 0.90–2.74). Treatment with NFX in adults caused a high frequency of ADRs, but most of the cases were mild and did not require treatment interruption. Severity and number of ADRs were the main predictors for treatment interruption. PMID:26392162

  10. Evaluation of Thermal Interruption Capability in SF6 Gas Circuit Breakers with Re-ignition Voltage and its Application to Experimental Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urai, Hajime; Ooshita, Youichi; Koizumi, Makoto; Tsukushi, Masanori

    Thermal interruption characteristics of SF6 gas circuit breakers were investigated by voltage measurements around current zero. We found that re-ignition peak voltage in the case of an interruption failure could effectively indicate the thermal interruption capability. The efficiency of interruption to puffer pressure could also be evaluated by analyzing the dependency of re-ignition peak voltage on puffer pressure. This technique was applied to experimental design based on the Taguchi method. We successfully optimized the balance of the puffer pressure build-up performance and thermal interruption efficiency to puffer pressure. Finally we demonstrated that a small size research circuit breaker with self-blast interrupter was able to successfully clear the 90% short line fault interruption duty corresponding to 50kA rating in the thermal interruption region.

  11. Effects of Light Interruption on Sleep and Viability of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenxing; Zhao, Zhangwu

    2014-01-01

    Light is a very important regulator of the daily sleep rhythm. Here, we investigate the influence of nocturnal light stimulation on Drosophila sleep. Results showed that total daytime sleep was reduced due to a decrease in daytime sleep episode duration caused by discontinuous light stimulation, but sleep was not strongly impacted at nighttime although the discontinuous light stimulation occurred during the scotophase. During a subsequent recovery period without light interruption, the sleep quality of nighttime sleep was improved and of daytime sleep reduced, indicating flies have a persistent response to nocturnal light stimulation. Further studies showed that the discontinuous light stimulation damped the daily rhythm of a circadian light-sensitive protein cryptochrome both at the mRNA and protein levels, which subsequently caused disappearance of circadian rhythm of the core oscillator timeless and decrease of TIMLESS protein at nighttime. These data indicate that the nocturnal light interruption plays an important role in sleep through core proteins CRYTOCHROME and TIMLESS, Moreover, interruption of sleep further impacted reproduction and viability. PMID:25148297

  12. An algorithm used for ventricular fibrillation detection without interrupting chest compression.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongqin; Bisera, Joe; Weil, Max Harry; Tang, Wanchun

    2012-01-01

    Ventricular fibrillation (VF) is the primary arrhythmic event in the majority of patients suffering from sudden cardiac arrest. Attention has been focused on this particular rhythm since it is recognized that prompt therapy, especially electrical defibrillation, may lead to a successful outcome. However, current versions of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) mandate repetitive interruptions of chest compression for rhythm analyses since artifacts produced by chest compression during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) preclude reliable electrocardiographic (ECG) rhythm analysis. Yet, repetitive interruptions in chest compression are detrimental to the success of defibrillation. The capability for rhythm analysis without requiring "hands-off" intervals will allow for more effective resuscitation. In this paper, a novel continuous-wavelet-transformation-based morphology consistency evaluation algorithm was developed for the detection of disorganized VF from organized sinus rhythm (SR) without interrupting the ongoing chest compression. The performance of this method was evaluated on both uncorrupted and corrupted ECG signals recorded from AEDs obtained from out-of-hospital victims of cardiac arrest. A total of 232 patients and 31,092 episodes of either VF or SR were accessed, in which 8195 episodes were corrupted by artifacts produced by chest compressions. We also compared the performance of this method with three other established algorithms, including VF filter, spectrum analysis, and complexity measurement. Even though there was a modest decrease in specificity and accuracy when chest compression artifact was present, the performance of this method was still superior to other reported methods for VF detection during uninterrupted CPR. PMID:21342836

  13. Alert dwell time: introduction of a measure to evaluate interruptive clinical decision support alerts.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Robert B; Burlison, Jonathan D; Baker, Donald K; Hasan, Murad; Robertson, Jennifer; Hartford, Christine; Howard, Scott C; Sablauer, Andras; Hoffman, James M

    2016-04-01

    Metrics for evaluating interruptive prescribing alerts have many limitations. Additional methods are needed to identify opportunities to improve alerting systems and prevent alert fatigue. In this study, the authors determined whether alert dwell time-the time elapsed from when an interruptive alert is generated to when it is dismissed-could be calculated by using historical alert data from log files. Drug-drug interaction (DDI) alerts from 3 years of electronic health record data were queried. Alert dwell time was calculated for 25,965 alerts, including 777 unique DDIs. The median alert dwell time was 8 s (range, 1-4913 s). Resident physicians had longer median alert dwell times than other prescribers (P < 001). The 10 most frequent DDI alerts (n = 8759 alerts) had shorter median dwell times than alerts that only occurred once (P < 001). This metric can be used in future research to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of interruptive prescribing alerts. PMID:26499101

  14. Career interruptions and hours practiced: comparison between young men and women physicians.

    PubMed

    Woodward, C A; Cohen, M L; Ferrier, B M

    1990-01-01

    This study compares current level of workforce participation and number, type and length of career interruptions since entering medical school reported by young men and women physicians. By 10 years from medical school entry, one third of the women studied had taken a maternity/child care leave and 24% had taken time away from their careers for other reasons while only 11% of men had interrupted their careers. The average time taken and reasons given for non-maternity-related career interruption were similar for men and women. Both men and women in the types of medical careers that historically have attracted more women work shorter hours than those in medical career types where women are under-represented. Across career types, women worked shorter hours per week than men and the presence of children further reduced hours of work for women only. Although the women studied are more active professionally than previous generations during their childbearing/rearing years, a considerable gap in the participation level remains. PMID:2311044

  15. Evaluation of Probiotic Survivability in Yogurt Exposed To Cold Chain Interruption

    PubMed Central

    Ferdousi, Rohollah; Rouhi, Millad; Mohammadi, Reza; Mortazavian, Amir Mohamad; Khosravi-Darani, Kianosh; Homayouni Rad, Aziz

    2013-01-01

    In this research, the survival of probiotic microorganisms in yogurts stored at room temperature (cold chain interruption conditions) was studied. Milk inoculated with yogurt bacteria (mixed culture of Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus) and a single probiotic culture (L. acidophilus LA-5 or Bifidobacterium lactis Bb- 12 or L. rhamnosus HN001 or L. paracasei Lpc-37) were incubated till pH of 4.5 was reached. Probiotic yogurts were stored at two different temperatures including cold (control) and room temperatures (5 and 20°C, respectively). Changes in pH decrease, titratable acidity increase and redox potential increase as well as the viability of probiotics per 6 h intervals during an assumptive interrupted cold storage (24 h) were monitored. The survival of probiotics was strongly dependent on the storage temperature and remarkable viability loss occurred in room temperature compared to refrigerated storage. In addition, the survivability was dependent on probiotic strain. Among our experimental strains, B. lactis Bb-12 showed the less resistance to be stored at 20°C (24 h) and referring to the recommended minimum numbers of 107 cfu mL- 1, L. rhamnosus HN001 was the most suitable probiotic strain to be used in probiotic yogurts especially in countries having high possibility of cold chain interruption during storage. PMID:24250681

  16. Children's Avoidance of Interrupting Others' Activities in Requesting Help: Cultural Aspects of Considerateness.

    PubMed

    Ruvalcaba, Omar; Rogoff, Barbara; López, Angélica; Correa-Chávez, Maricela; Gutiérrez, Kris

    2015-01-01

    To be able to collaborate skillfully, people need to coordinate well with others, taking into account how their actions fit with those of their partners. This is a key aspect of an approach to learning called Learning by Observing and Pitching In, hypothesized to be common in many Indigenous-heritage communities of the Americas. This chapter considers cultural values that emphasize considerateness and awareness of how one's actions impact others such as the Mexican cultural value of respeto and cultural differences in children's efforts to avoid interrupting others' activity. US Mexican-heritage children showed more evidence of avoiding interrupting the ongoing activity of an adult when they requested help, compared with European American children from families with extensive schooling experience. Most of the Mexican-heritage children's requests for help that gave evidence of avoiding interruption were made nonverbally, which may facilitate unobtrusive requests. There were no significant differences among children from two US Mexican-heritage backgrounds varying in experience with Western schooling and likely experience with Indigenous-American practices, suggesting that the Mexican cultural value of respeto and associated considerateness is widespread even among US Mexican-heritage families with extensive experience with Western schooling and life in the United States. PMID:26955928

  17. The role of continuous low-frequency harmonicity cues for interrupted speech perception in bimodal hearing.

    PubMed

    Oh, Soo Hee; Donaldson, Gail S; Kong, Ying-Yee

    2016-04-01

    Low-frequency acoustic cues have been shown to enhance speech perception by cochlear-implant users, particularly when target speech occurs in a competing background. The present study examined the extent to which a continuous representation of low-frequency harmonicity cues contributes to bimodal benefit in simulated bimodal listeners. Experiment 1 examined the benefit of restoring a continuous temporal envelope to the low-frequency ear while the vocoder ear received a temporally interrupted stimulus. Experiment 2 examined the effect of providing continuous harmonicity cues in the low-frequency ear as compared to restoring a continuous temporal envelope in the vocoder ear. Findings indicate that bimodal benefit for temporally interrupted speech increases when continuity is restored to either or both ears. The primary benefit appears to stem from the continuous temporal envelope in the low-frequency region providing additional phonetic cues related to manner and F1 frequency; a secondary contribution is provided by low-frequency harmonicity cues when a continuous representation of the temporal envelope is present in the low-frequency, or both ears. The continuous temporal envelope and harmonicity cues of low-frequency speech are thought to support bimodal benefit by facilitating identification of word and syllable boundaries, and by restoring partial phonetic cues that occur during gaps in the temporally interrupted stimulus. PMID:27106322

  18. Enhancing the Simulation Speed of Sensor Network Applications by Asynchronization of Interrupt Service Routines

    PubMed Central

    Joe, Hyunwoo; Woo, Duk-Kyun; Kim, Hyungshin

    2013-01-01

    Sensor network simulations require high fidelity and timing accuracy to be used as an implementation and evaluation tool. The cycle-accurate and instruction-level simulator is the known solution for these purposes. However, this type of simulation incurs a high computation cost since it has to model not only the instruction level behavior but also the synchronization between multiple sensors for their causality. This paper presents a novel technique that exploits asynchronous simulations of interrupt service routines (ISR). We can avoid the synchronization overheads when the interrupt service routines are simulated without preemption. If the causality errors occur, we devise a rollback procedure to restore the original synchronized simulation. This concept can be extended to any instruction-level sensor network simulator. Evaluation results show our method can enhance the simulation speed up to 52% in the case of our experiments. For applications with longer interrupt service routines and smaller number of preemptions, the speedup becomes greater. In addition, our simulator is 2 to 11 times faster than the well-known sensor network simulator. PMID:23966200

  19. Energy expenditure and physical activity in domestic fowl kept on standard and interrupted lighting patterns.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, M G; Jewitt, T R; Anderson, J E

    1988-06-01

    1. The energy expenditure (H) and physical activity of laying hens were measured under lighting regimes of 14L:10D (standard), 2L:10D:2L:10D (interrupted) and (15 X (13 min L:47 min D]: 9D (fragmented). 2. Neither of the intermittent regimes produced a significant change in total daily energy expenditure, although large alterations occurred in the distribution of H between the lighting phases. The absence of change in total H resulted from the combined effects of greater H in the light in the intermittent regimes, greater H in darkness during the interrupted day than at night and slightly greater H at night in the intermittent regimes. 3. Physical activity count, like H, was redistributed over time but, unlike H, was also significantly reduced in total; changes in the energy cost of unit activity, however, were such that no reduction occurred in the total amount of H attributable to activity. 4. In the standard groups, 90% of total activity costs were incurred in the light; in the fragmented-day and interrupted-day groups, respectively, 7% and 55% of total activity costs were incurred in the light periods and 85% and 30% in daytime darkness. 5. In terms of both H and activity, there was clear differentiation between night darkness and subjective-day darkness. 6. Even when the energy cost of activity was excluded, significant differences remained between H at night, H in the light and H in daytime darkness. PMID:3409070

  20. Visual context due to speech-reading suppresses the auditory response to acoustic interruptions in speech

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Jyoti; Pitt, Mark A.; Shahin, Antoine J.

    2014-01-01

    Speech reading enhances auditory perception in noise. One means by which this perceptual facilitation comes about is through information from visual networks reinforcing the encoding of the congruent speech signal by ignoring interfering acoustic signals. We tested this hypothesis neurophysiologically by acquiring EEG while individuals listened to words with a fixed portion of each word replaced by white noise. Congruent (meaningful) or incongruent (reversed frames) mouth movements accompanied the words. Individuals judged whether they heard the words as continuous (illusion) or interrupted (illusion failure) through the noise. We hypothesized that congruent, as opposed to incongruent, mouth movements should further enhance illusory perception by suppressing the auditory cortex's response to interruption onsets and offsets. Indeed, we found that the N1 auditory evoked potential (AEP) to noise onsets and offsets was reduced when individuals experienced the illusion during congruent, but not incongruent, audiovisual streams. This N1 inhibitory effect was most prominent at noise offsets, suggesting that visual influences on auditory perception are instigated to a greater extent during noisy periods. These findings suggest that visual context due to speech-reading disengages (inhibits) neural processes associated with interfering sounds (e.g., noisy interruptions) during speech perception. PMID:25053937

  1. Functional communication training and chained schedules of reinforcement to treat challenging behavior maintained by terminations of activity interruptions.

    PubMed

    Falcomata, Terry S; Roane, Henry S; Muething, Colin S; Stephenson, Kasey M; Ing, Anna D

    2012-09-01

    In this article, the authors evaluated functional communication training (FCT) and a chained schedule of reinforcement for the treatment of challenging behavior exhibited by two individuals diagnosed with Asperger syndrome and autism, respectively. Following a functional analysis with undifferentiated results, the authors demonstrated that challenging behavior was occasioned by interruptions of ongoing activities and maintained by terminations of interruptions. Next, they demonstrated the effectiveness of a treatment consisting of FCT with a chained schedule of reinforcement. Last, they modified the chained schedule procedure to increase ease of implementation and promote toleration of activity interruptions, and academic tasks were incorporated into the treatment. PMID:22327267

  2. Combined Scimitar syndrome and interruption of the inferior vena cava causing mega-azygous and hemiazygous veins.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, S Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Computed tomography angiography detected scimitar syndrome with venous drainage to the inferior vena cava caudal to an interruption of the inferior vena cava in a 48-year-old woman. The hepatic veins drained to the supra-hepatic portion of the inferior vena cava cephalic to the interruption, which was a short area of atresia. Azygous and hemiazygous veins were massively enlarged since they drained the right lung, abdomen viscera exclusive of the liver and lower extremities. Inferior vena cava interruption by a short, focal atresia has not previously been described. The inferior vena cava immediately caudal to the interruption is presumed to remain patent because of the scimitar vein flow. PMID:17879111

  3. Ground fault circuit interrupters and breakers. (Latest citations from the US Patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the design of circuit interrupters and breakers used to protect electric equipment and systems against ground faults. Fabrication methods of ground fault trip devices, indicators and detectors, on-off power control switches, AC and DC power supply circuits, and ground connectors are presented. Interrupters and breakers designed for personal protection are included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  4. Therapeutic and prophylactic vena caval interruption for pulmonary embolism: caval and venous insertion site patency.

    PubMed

    AbuRahma, A F; Robinson, P A; Boland, J P; Cochran, R C; Conley, Y D; Snodgrass, K R; Witsberger, T A; Wood, D J

    1993-11-01

    Although anticoagulation remains the treatment of choice for acute pulmonary embolism, vena caval interruption represents an alternative for patients with contraindications and complications or in whom anticoagulation fails. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of two types of caval interruption devices: the original stainless steel Greenfield filter and the Adams-DeWeese clip. Emphasis has been placed on maintaining caval patency with filters and clips and the patency of the femoral vein vs. the jugular vein after filter insertion. We retrospectively reviewed 161 patients who underwent caval interruption (92 filters and 69 clips) for both therapeutic and prophylactic reasons. The operative mortality and morbidity rates were 0% and 3.3% for filter patients and 8.7% and 2.9% for clip patients; no procedure-related mortalities occurred. The late caval patency rate as documented by duplex ultrasonography/venography was 100% for filter patients and 88% for clip patients (p = 0.011). Seven percent of the filter patients and 20% of the clip patients experienced late limb swelling postoperatively (p = 0.05). The incidence of recurrent late pulmonary embolism was 2.5% in the filter group and 1.9% in the clip group. In the filter group, 10% of patients experienced postoperative thrombosis at the femoral vein insertion site and 0% at the jugular vein insertion site. We found that both devices were effective in preventing pulmonary embolism, the filter provided better caval patency than the clip, and the jugular vein had a better patency than the femoral vein after filter insertion. PMID:8123459

  5. What might interrupt men's suicide? Results from an online survey of men

    PubMed Central

    Shand, Fiona L; Proudfoot, Judy; Player, Michael J; Fogarty, Andrea; Whittle, Erin; Wilhelm, Kay; Hadzi-Pavlovic, Dusan; McTigue, Isabel; Spurrier, Michael; Christensen, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Men are almost two times more likely to die by suicide than women, yet little research has focused on what is required to prevent suicide among men. This paper aims to investigate what factors interrupt suicidal behaviour in men, and to examine differences according to known suicide risk factors. Setting Australia. Participants 251 Australian men aged 18 years and over who had made a suicide attempt 6–18 months prior to completing the survey. Outcomes The survey canvassed the language men use to describe their depression and suicidality, warning signs, barriers to accessing help and what is needed to interrupt a suicide attempt. ORs and χ2 were used to test for differences by age, geographic location and current depression severity. Results Of 299 men screened and eligible to participate, 251 completed all or part of the survey. Participants identified different words and warning signs for depression compared with suicidality. The most commonly endorsed barriers to accessing help were not wanting to burden others (66%) and having isolated themselves (63%). Men overwhelmingly endorsed ‘I thought about the consequences for my family’ as the factor which stopped a suicide attempt (67%). ‘I need support from someone I really trust and respect’ was also strongly endorsed. There were few differences by age, region or depression severity. Conclusions Participants were able to identify signs, albeit often subtle ones, that they were becoming depressed or suicidal. Similarly, most were able to identify active strategies to interrupt this downward spiral. Men wanted others to notice changes in their behaviour, and to approach them without judgement. PMID:26474936

  6. Successful Interruption of Transmission of Onchocerca volvulus in the Escuintla-Guatemala Focus, Guatemala

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Rodrigo J.; Cruz-Ortiz, Nancy; Rizzo, Nidia; Richards, Jane; Zea-Flores, Guillermo; Domínguez, Alfredo; Sauerbrey, Mauricio; Catú, Eduardo; Oliva, Orlando; Richards, Frank O.; Lindblade, Kim A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Elimination of onchocerciasis (river blindness) through mass administration of ivermectin in the six countries in Latin America where it is endemic is considered feasible due to the relatively small size and geographic isolation of endemic foci. We evaluated whether transmission of onchocerciasis has been interrupted in the endemic focus of Escuintla-Guatemala in Guatemala, based on World Health Organization criteria for the certification of elimination of onchocerciasis. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted evaluations of ocular morbidity and past exposure to Onchocerca volvulus in the human population, while potential vectors (Simulium ochraceum) were captured and tested for O. volvulus DNA; all of the evaluations were carried out in potentially endemic communities (PEC; those with a history of actual or suspected transmission or those currently under semiannual mass treatment with ivermectin) within the focus. The prevalence of microfilariae in the anterior segment of the eye in 329 individuals (≥7 years old, resident in the PEC for at least 5 years) was 0% (one-sided 95% confidence interval [CI] 0–0.9%). The prevalence of antibodies to a recombinant O. volvulus antigen (Ov-16) in 6,432 school children (aged 6 to 12 years old) was 0% (one-sided 95% IC 0–0.05%). Out of a total of 14,099 S. ochraceum tested for O. volvulus DNA, none was positive (95% CI 0–0.01%). The seasonal transmission potential was, therefore, 0 infective stage larvae per person per season. Conclusions/Significance Based on these evaluations, transmission of onchocerciasis in the Escuintla-Guatemala focus has been successfully interrupted. Although this is the second onchocerciasis focus in Latin America to have demonstrated interruption of transmission, it is the first focus with a well-documented history of intense transmission to have eliminated O. volvulus. PMID:19333366

  7. Stimulation of three areas of the primary motor cortex interrupts micturition in dogs.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, H; Koga, T

    1992-05-15

    To clarify the area of the motor cortex (M1) in dogs, which corresponds to the cortical area participating in voluntary interruption of micturition in humans, the cortical portions related to the external urethral sphincter were first clarified by recording of somato-sensory evoked potentials, and then systematic cortical stimulation was performed in anesthetized and paralyzed dogs. The hypogastric, pelvic and pudendal nerves innervating the lower urinary tract and rectum were severed to eliminate the secondary reflexes. Five foci were recognized in the cortical potentials evoked after stimulation of the pudendal nerve. These foci existed in the sacral (Sacral-S) and hind leg (Leg-S) areas of the somato-sensory cortex (S1), and in the sacral (Sacral-M), hind leg (Leg-M) and trunk (Abd-M) areas of the M1. Stimulation of the three M1 foci, but not the two S1 foci, provoked centrifugal firings of the pudendal urethral branch. The firings disappeared after cutting of the ipsilateral bulbar pyramis. When the M1 foci were stimulated during the micturition reflex, the reflex discharge of a pelvic vesical branch was interrupted concomitantly with firings of the urethral branch. The interruption was still induced after the pyramidotomy. Pulse train stimulation of these M1 foci reset the cycles (about 2 Hz) in the alternative rhythmic firings of the urethral and vesical branches, which are known to be formed in the pontine micturition center [31,32]. These results suggest that the pyramidal cells in the three M1 foci inhibit the pontine micturition center and concomitantly contract the external urethral sphincter through the pyramidal tract. The possible roles of these M1 foci were discussed. PMID:1613207

  8. Differential radiosensitivity in cultured B-16 melanoma cells following interrupted melanogenesis induced by glucosamine

    SciTech Connect

    Mileo, A.M.; Mattei, E.; Fanuele, M.; Delpino, A.; Ferrini, U. )

    1989-05-01

    The relationship between cell pigmentation and radiosensitivity was investigated in a cell model in which melanogenesis was suppressed by a glycosylation inhibitor. It was found that X-irradiation of melanotic B-16 melanoma cells and their amelanotic counterparts, obtained by glucosamine treatment, showed an inverse correlation between radiosensitivity and melanin contents. Since melanogenesis interruption by glucosamine does not affect the DNA repair capacity of nonpigmented cells, it is likely that intracellular melanins play a role in the relative resistance of pigmented cells to X-irradiation.

  9. The influence of the topology of test circuits on the interrupting performance of circuit breakers

    SciTech Connect

    Schavemaker, P.H.; Sluis, L. van der

    1995-10-01

    High-voltage circuit breakers are tented in the High Power Laboratory where transient recovery voltages (TRVs) are generated by networks consisting of lumped elements. In the IEC and ANSI standards the TRV waveforms are described, but not the topology of the test circuits. This paper compares different direct TRV test circuits which generate the same initial part of the TRV waveform. It is demonstrated that the surge impedance of the TRV test circuit is an important parameter. The different in interrupting performance of the TB in the test circuits with the different surge impedances is caused by the influence of the arc-circuit interaction.

  10. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in a premature baby with interrupted aortic arch and aortopulmonary window.

    PubMed

    Tzifa, Aphrodite; Komnou, Areti; Loggitsi, Dimitra

    2013-10-01

    Aortopulmonary window is a communication between the main pulmonary artery and the ascending aorta in the presence of two separate semilunar valves. The combination of an aortopulmonary window with interrupted aortic arch is rare. We discuss the unique case of an extremely premature infant weighing 1.7 kilograms who underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging as a pre-operative assessment in a high-field open 1.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging system as a one-stop investigation before complete repair. PMID:23137589

  11. Electric Power Interruption Cost Estimates for Individual Industries, Sectors, and U.S. Economy

    SciTech Connect

    Balducci, Patrick J.; Roop, Joseph M.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.; DeSteese, John G.; Weimar, Mark R.

    2002-02-27

    During the last 20 years, utilities and researchers have begun to understand the value in the collection and analysis of interruption cost data. The continued investigation of the monetary impact of power outages will facilitate the advancement of the analytical methods used to measure the costs and benefits from the perspective of the energy consumer. More in-depth analysis may be warranted because of the privatization and deregulation of power utilities, price instability in certain regions of the U.S. and the continued evolution of alternative auxiliary power systems.

  12. 6q21–22 deletion syndrome with interrupted aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Ayumi; Nozaki, Yasuyuki; Minami, Takaomi; Jimbo, Eriko F; Shiraishi, Hirohiko; Yamagata, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial deletion of 6q21–22 has been previously reported in 11 individuals, who presented with intellectual disability, facial dysmorphism, cardiac abnormality, cerebellar hypoplasia and dysplasia of the corpus callosum. Here, we report the first instance of a patient with 6q21–22 deletion presenting with interrupted aortic arch in addition to the previously described clinical signs. Array analysis using Agilent Human genome CGH 180K identified a 13.3-Mb deletion at 6q21–q22.31 (nt. 109885195–123209593).

  13. Understanding the cost of power interruptions to U.S. electricity consumers

    SciTech Connect

    LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Eto, Joseph H.

    2004-09-01

    The massive electric power blackout in the northeastern United States and Canada on August 14-15, 2003 resulted in the U.S. electricity system being called ''antiquated'' and catalyzed discussions about modernizing the grid. Industry sources suggested that investments of $50 to $100 billion would be needed. This report seeks to quantify an important piece of information that has been missing from these discussions: how much do power interruptions and fluctuations in power quality (power-quality events) cost U.S. electricity consumers? Accurately estimating this cost will help assess the potential benefits of investments in improving the reliability of the grid. We develop a comprehensive end-use framework for assessing the cost to U.S. electricity consumers of power interruptions and power-quality events (referred to collectively as ''reliability events''). The framework expresses these costs as a function of: (1) Number of customers by type in a region; (2) Frequency and type of reliability events experienced annually (including both power interruptions and power-quality events) by these customers; (3) Cost of reliability events; and (4) Vulnerability of customers to these events. The framework is designed so that its cost estimate can be improved as additional data become available. Using our framework, we estimate that the national cost of power interruptions is about $80 billion annually, based on the best information available in the public domain. However, there are large gaps in and significant uncertainties about the information currently available. Notably, we were not able to develop an estimate of power-quality events. Sensitivity analysis of some of these uncertainties suggests that the total annual cost could range from less than $30 billion to more than $130 billion. Because of this large range and the enormous cost of the decisions that may be based on this estimate, we encourage policy makers, regulators, and industry to jointly under take the comparatively modest-cost improvements needed in the information used to estimate the cost of reliability events. Specific areas for improvement include: coordinated, nationwide collection of updated information on the cost of reliability events; consistent definition and recording of the duration and frequency of reliability events, including power-quality events; and improved information on the costs of and efforts by consumers to reduce their vulnerability to reliability events.

  14. Mechanism of interrupted saccades in patients with late-onset Tay-Sachs disease.

    PubMed

    Optican, Lance M; Rucker, Janet C; Keller, Edward L; Leigh, R John

    2008-01-01

    In late-onset Tay-Sachs disease (LOTS), saccades are interrupted by one or more transient decelerations. Some saccades reaccelerate and continue on before eye velocity reaches zero, even in darkness. Intervals between successive decelerations are not regularly spaced. Peak decelerations of horizontal and vertical components of oblique saccades in LOTS is more synchronous than those in control subjects. We hypothesize that these decelerations are caused by dysregulation of the fastigial nuclei (FN) of the cerebellum, which fire brain stem inhibitory burst neurons (IBNs). PMID:18718355

  15. An interrupted field time-of-flight (IFTOF) technique in transient photoconductivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasap, S. O.; Polischuk, B.; Dodds, D.

    1990-08-01

    An interrupted field time-of-flight (IFTOF) technique that enables displacement-current-free measurement of the photocurrent in the conventional transient photoconductivity experiment is described and implemented. During the drift of the photoinjected charge carriers across the sample, the applied field is removed at time T1 and reapplied at time T2=T1+ti, where ti is the interruption time. During the interruption period ti, the charge carriers interact with the deep traps so that the recovered photocurrent when the field is reapplied at T2 = T1 + ti indicates the concentration of carriers remaining in the transport band. Although the IFTOF technique has a number of distinct advantages for studying charge trapping and release processes in high-resistivity solids, it has generally not been adopted as a convenient experiment since the sample capacitance results in large displacement currents at switching. The present paper describes a Schering-type bridge network that is excited by a switchable floating high-voltage supply. Recently available high-voltage complementary TMOS transistors were used to switch voltages as high as 500 V. Trigger signals to initiate the various IFTOF events were simply and economically generated from TTL logic gates and IC timers while the required time delays were obtained via clocked digital countdown techniques. The IFTOF method was successfully applied to the examination of hole trapping processes in chlorinated a-Se:0.3%As xeroradiographic-type films for which the conventional TOF measurement indicated essentially trap-free photocurrent. Using the IFTOF technique, it is shown that over a time scale far exceeding the conventional TOF transit time, the photoinjected hole concentration under low field conditions decays almost exponentially with a well-defined trapping time τ. Furthermore, by interrupting the electric field while the photoinjected charge packet is at different locations in the film, it is shown that the IFTOF technique may be used to examine the dependence of the trapping time on the distance into the film. IFTOF is therefore a valuable technique for studying trapping inhomogeneities in amorphous semiconductor films. It is expected that the simple displacement-current-free IFTOF technique described in this paper, with further improvements, may be applied to study charge carrier trapping and release kinetics in a wide variety of high-resistivity solids.

  16. Neutral sheet current interruption and field-aligned current generation by three-dimensional driven reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, T.; Hayashi, T.; Walker, R. J.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    1983-01-01

    Externally-driven reconnection is simulated by solving the magnetohydrodynamic equations in a three-dimensional, tail-like geometry. As reconnection proceeds, the tail current is interrupted locally and field-aligned currents are generated. The field-aligned current flows towards the ionosphere on the morning side and away from the ionosphere in the evening. The field-aligned currents flow in a narrow band at the outer edge of the plasma sheet. Thus, the simulation demonstrates that the nightside substorm current system is a natural consequence of the driven reconnection model.

  17. Interrupted and continuous strip technique for tip surgery during traditional rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Micheli-Pellegrini, V; Ponti, L; Ponti, G; Guidarelli, P

    1996-10-01

    The authors report their experience in corrective surgery of the tip during traditional closed rhinoplasty. After a critical revision of the proposed techniques by other authors, the advantages of the "Doberman's ears" and "Butterfly" are given. The choice of the corrective techniques of the tip next to Tardy's algorithm can use a "sequential criterium" after having used a delivery approach. During rhinoplasty it is possible to perform a system of "progression" from one method to another maintaining or interrupting the cartilaginous arch and having as a goal the increasing or the decreasing of the tip. PMID:9243970

  18. Astronaut Andrew S. W. Thomas, mission specialist, interrupts a Spacehab task to pose for an

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-77 ESC VIEW --- Astronaut Andrew S. W. Thomas, mission specialist, interrupts a Spacehab task to pose for an Electronic Still Camera (ESC) snapshot inside the Spacehab Module onboard the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Endeavour. In upper left is the view port which crew members had used for viewing and photographing operations with the Spartan 207/Inflatable Antenna Experiment (IAE). Thomas has his hand on an aft-bulkhead-mounted locker. The Space Experiment Facility (SEF), designed and managed by the University of Alabama, is just behind his left shoulder.

  19. Hydrogen-Borrowing and Interrupted-Hydrogen-Borrowing Reactions of Ketones and Methanol Catalyzed by Iridium**

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Di; Poole, Darren L; Shotton, Camilla C; Kornahrens, Anne F; Healy, Mark P; Donohoe, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Reported herein is the use of catalytic [{Ir(cod)Cl}2] to facilitate hydrogen-borrowing reactions of ketone enolates with methanol at 65 °C. An oxygen atmosphere accelerates the process, and when combined with the use of a bulky monodentate phosphine ligand, interrupts the catalytic cycle by preventing enone reduction. Subsequent addition of pro-nucleophiles to the reaction mixture allowed a one-pot methylenation/conjugate addition protocol to be developed, which greatly expands the range of products that can be made by this methodology. PMID:25491653

  20. [Robotically and video-assisted thoracoscopic interruption of patent ductus arteriosus].

    PubMed

    Miyaji, Kagami

    2006-07-01

    Over the past decade, video-assisted thoracoscopic techniques have been used in the pediatric population. Recently, the computer-enhanced robotic system has been applied to video-assisted thoracoscopic interruption of patent ductus arteriosus (VATS-PDA). We focused on the utility of a voice-controlled robotic arm (automated endoscope system for optimal positioning: AESOP 3000) in VATS-PDA. Thirteen infants weighing 4.2 approximately 12.6 (mean 6.6) kg underwent robotically assisted VATS-PDA. Robotically assisted VATS-PDA is comparable with closure by means of the conventional video-assisted thoracoscopic technique. PMID:16910511

  1. Interruptions in enteral nutrition delivery in critically ill patients and recommendations for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Melissa L

    2014-08-01

    Malnutrition is common in critically ill patients and is associated with poor outcomes for patients and increased health care spending. Enteral nutrition is the method of choice for nutrition delivery. Enteral nutrition delivery practices vary widely, and underfeeding is widespread in critical care. Interruptions in enteral nutrition due to performance of procedures, positioning, technical issues with feeding accesses, and gastrointestinal intolerance contribute to underfeeding. Strategies such as head-of-bed positioning, use of prokinetic agents, tolerance of higher gastric residual volumes, consideration of postpyloric feeding access, and use of a nutrition support protocol may decrease time spent without nutrition. PMID:25086090

  2. A chemical synthesis of 11-methoxy mitragynine pseudoindoxyl featuring the interrupted Ugi reaction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jimin; Schneekloth, John S; Sorensen, Erik J

    2012-09-01

    A synthesis of 11-methoxy mitragynine pseudoindoxyl, a new member of the mitragynine class of opioid agonists, from a derivative of the Geissman-Waiss lactone is described. An internal attack of an electron-rich aromatic ring on an electrophilic nitrilium ion and a late-stage construction of the functionalized piperidine ring by the method of reductive cyclization are the pivotal transformations; both ring annulations proceed in a highly diastereoselective fashion. The construction of substituted indoxyl frameworks by the interrupted Ugi method offers an attractive alternative to the strategy of oxidatively rearranging indoles. PMID:23878716

  3. A chemical synthesis of 11-methoxy mitragynine pseudoindoxyl featuring the interrupted Ugi reaction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jimin; Schneekloth, John S.

    2013-01-01

    A synthesis of 11-methoxy mitragynine pseudoindoxyl, a new member of the mitragynine class of opioid agonists, from a derivative of the Geissman-Waiss lactone is described. An internal attack of an electron-rich aromatic ring on an electrophilic nitrilium ion and a late-stage construction of the functionalized piperidine ring by the method of reductive cyclization are the pivotal transformations; both ring annulations proceed in a highly diastereoselective fashion. The construction of substituted indoxyl frameworks by the interrupted Ugi method offers an attractive alternative to the strategy of oxidatively rearranging indoles. PMID:23878716

  4. Interrupted genes in extremophilic archaea: mechanisms of gene expression in early organisms.

    PubMed

    Cobucci-Ponzano, Beatrice; Rossi, Mosè; Moracci, Marco

    2006-12-01

    Extremophilic Archaea populate biotopes previously considered inaccessible for life. This feature, and the possibility that they are the extant forms of life closest to the last common ancestor, make these organisms excellent candidates for the study of evolution on Earth and stimulate the exobiological research in planets previously considered totally inhospitable. Among the other aspects of the physiology of these organisms, the study of the molecular genetics of extremophilic Archaea can give hints on how the genetic information is transmitted and propagated in ancient forms of life. We review here the expression of interrupted genes in a recently discovered nanoarchaeon and the mechanisms of reprogrammed genetic decoding in Archaea. PMID:17120127

  5. The effect of interruptions during training on the time to the first trial and race start in Thoroughbred racehorses.

    PubMed

    Bolwell, C F; Rogers, C W; French, N P; Firth, E C

    2013-02-01

    Few studies have investigated the effect of having interruptions during training on future training and racing performance in Thoroughbred racehorses. The aim of this paper was to investigate the effect of having an interruption before the first trial on starting in a trial or a race. A prospective cohort study was used to record the training activity of a cohort of Thoroughbred racehorses, over two racing seasons. Fourteen racehorse trainers recorded information on the distances worked at canter and at fast speeds (<15s/200 m) and provided reasons for horses not training, or for having interruptions (break from training). Trial and racing results were obtained from the New Zealand Thoroughbred Racing online database. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to investigate two outcome measures of performance: (1) time to the first trial and (2) time to the first race. The type of interruption that had occurred before the first trial was the main exposure of interest, and was grouped into: no interruption, voluntary (no known condition or disease present) and involuntary interruptions (due to the presence of a condition or disease). A total of 160/200 (80%) horses started in at least one trial and 100/205 (48%) horses started in at least one race during the study period. The median time to starting in a trial or a race differed significantly (p<0.001) with the type of interruption. The hazard of starting in a trial was lower for horses experiencing voluntary and involuntary interruptions (p<0.001) but there was no association with starting in a race, after adjusting for confounding variables. As age at the start of training increased the hazard of starting in a trial decreased. Horses accumulating longer distances at 15s/200 m had a higher hazard of starting in a trial, whilst horses accumulating fewer events at high speed and fewer trials had a reduced hazard of starting in a race. There was significant clustering at the trainer level for both the outcomes investigated. Interruptions to training had an effect on the time to, and hazard of, a trial but not a race start. The timing of these interruptions may have implications for future racing success and career longevity. PMID:22954462

  6. Feasibility of global measles eradication after interruption of transmission in the Americas.

    PubMed

    de Quadros, Ciro A; Andrus, Jon Kim; Danovaro-Holliday, M Carolina; Castillo-Solrzano, Carlos

    2008-04-01

    Measles is one of the most infectious diseases. Before the introduction of the measles vaccine, nearly all children contracted measles. By the end of the 1980s, most countries of the world had incorporated the measles vaccine into their routine vaccination programs. Globally, some 345,000 deaths due to measles still occur every year. Eradication of measles would play an important role in improving child survival. The goal to eradicate measles from the Americas was set by the Pan-American Sanitary Conference in 1994. Progress to date has been remarkable. Measles is no longer an endemic disease in the Americas and interruption of transmission has been documented in most countries. As of December 2007, 5 years have elapsed since the detection of the last endemic case in Venezuela in November 2002. This experience demonstrates that interruption of measles transmission can be achieved and sustained over a long period of time. Global eradication should be feasible if the appropriate strategies are implemented. Even in a new paradigm in which eradication is not followed by the discontinuation of vaccination, eradication of measles should be a good investment to avoid expensive epidemics and save those children that would potentially die due to infection with the measles virus. It is not only a dream to think that we will see a world free of measles by the year 2015. PMID:18393605

  7. Generalized Negative Reciprocity in the Dictator Game - How to Interrupt the Chain of Unfairness.

    PubMed

    Strang, Sabrina; Grote, Xenia; Kuss, Katarina; Park, Soyoung Q; Weber, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Humans are tremendously sensitive to unfairness. Unfairness provokes strong negative emotional reactions and influences our subsequent decision making. These decisions might not only have consequences for ourselves and the person who treated us unfairly but can even transmit to innocent third persons - a phenomenon that has been referred to as generalized negative reciprocity. In this study we aimed to investigate whether regulation of emotions can interrupt this chain of unfairness. Real allocations in a dictator game were used to create unfair situations. Three different regulation strategies, namely writing a message to the dictator who made an unfair offer, either forwarded or not forwarded, describing a neutral picture and a control condition in which subjects just had to wait for three minutes, were then tested on their ability to influence the elicited emotions. Subsequently participants were asked to allocate money between themselves and a third person. We show that writing a message which is forwarded to the unfair actor is an effective emotion regulation strategy and that those participants who regulated their emotions successfully by writing a message made higher allocations to a third person. Thus, using message writing as an emotion regulation strategy can interrupt the chain of unfairness. PMID:26924557

  8. Phasic and Tonic Pain Differentially Impact the Interruptive Function of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Sinke, Christopher; Schmidt, Katharina; Forkmann, Katarina; Bingel, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    The interruptive effect of painful experimental stimulation on cognitive processes is a well-known phenomenon. This study investigated the influence of pain duration on the negative effects of pain on cognition. Thirty-four healthy volunteers performed a rapid serial visual presentation task (RSVP) in which subjects had to detect (visual detection task) and count the occurrence of a target letter (working memory task) in two separate sessions while being stimulated on the left volar forearm with either short (2 sec) or long (18 sec) painful heat stimuli of equal subjective intensity. The results show that subjects performed significantly worse in the long pain session as indexed by decreased detection and counting performance. Interestingly, this effect on performance was also observed during control trials of the long pain session in which participants did not receive any painful stimulation. Moreover, subjects expected long painful stimulation to have a greater impact on their performance and individual expectation correlated with working memory performance. These findings suggest that not only the length of painful stimulation but also its expected ability to impair cognitive functioning might influence the interruptive function of pain. The exact relevance of expectation for the detrimental effects of pain on cognitive processes needs to be explored in more detail in future studies. PMID:25695254

  9. Phasic and tonic pain differentially impact the interruptive function of pain.

    PubMed

    Sinke, Christopher; Schmidt, Katharina; Forkmann, Katarina; Bingel, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    The interruptive effect of painful experimental stimulation on cognitive processes is a well-known phenomenon. This study investigated the influence of pain duration on the negative effects of pain on cognition. Thirty-four healthy volunteers performed a rapid serial visual presentation task (RSVP) in which subjects had to detect (visual detection task) and count the occurrence of a target letter (working memory task) in two separate sessions while being stimulated on the left volar forearm with either short (2 sec) or long (18 sec) painful heat stimuli of equal subjective intensity. The results show that subjects performed significantly worse in the long pain session as indexed by decreased detection and counting performance. Interestingly, this effect on performance was also observed during control trials of the long pain session in which participants did not receive any painful stimulation. Moreover, subjects expected long painful stimulation to have a greater impact on their performance and individual expectation correlated with working memory performance. These findings suggest that not only the length of painful stimulation but also its expected ability to impair cognitive functioning might influence the interruptive function of pain. The exact relevance of expectation for the detrimental effects of pain on cognitive processes needs to be explored in more detail in future studies. PMID:25695254

  10. Interrupting violence: how the CeaseFire Program prevents imminent gun violence through conflict mediation.

    PubMed

    Whitehill, Jennifer M; Webster, Daniel W; Frattaroli, Shannon; Parker, Elizabeth M

    2014-02-01

    Cities are increasingly adopting CeaseFire, an evidence-based public health program that uses specialized outreach workers, called violence interrupters (VIs), to mediate potentially violent conflicts before they lead to a shooting. Prior research has linked conflict mediation with program-related reductions in homicides, but the specific conflict mediation practices used by effective programs to prevent imminent gun violence have not been identified. We conducted case studies of CeaseFire programs in two inner cities using qualitative data from focus groups with 24 VIs and interviews with eight program managers. Study sites were purposively sampled to represent programs with more than 1 year of implementation and evidence of program effectiveness. Staff with more than 6 months of job experience were recruited for participation. Successful mediation efforts were built on trust and respect between VIs and the community, especially high-risk individuals. In conflict mediation, immediate priorities included separating the potential shooter from the intended victim and from peers who may encourage violence, followed by persuading the parties to resolve the conflict peacefully. Tactics for brokering peace included arranging the return of stolen property and emphasizing negative consequences of violence such as jail, death, or increased police attention. Utilizing these approaches, VIs are capable of preventing gun violence and interrupting cycles of retaliation. PMID:23440488

  11. Effects of Political Conflict Induced Treatment Interruptions on HIV Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Marita; Lurie, Mark N.; Kimaiyo, Sylvester; Kantor, Rami

    2013-01-01

    34 million people worldwide were living with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) by the end of 2010. Despite significant advances in antiretroviral therapy (ART), drug resistance remains a major deterrent to successful, enduring treatment. Unplanned interruptions in ART have negative effects on HIV treatment outcomes including increased morbidity and mortality, as well as development of drug resistance. Treatment interruptions due to political conflicts, not infrequent in resource-limited settings, result in disruptions in health care, infrastructure, or treatment facilities and patient displacement. Such circumstances are ideal bases for ART resistance development, however there is limited awareness of and data available on the association between political conflicts and the development of HIV drug resistance. In this review we identify and discuss this association and review how varying ART half-lives, genetic barriers, different HIV subtypes, and archived resistance can lead to lack of medication effectiveness upon post-conflict resumption of care. Optimized ART stopping strategies as well as infrastructural concerns and stable HIV treatment systems to ensure continuity of care and rapid resumption of care must be addressed in order to mitigate risks of HIV drug resistance development during and after political conflicts. Increased awareness of such associations by clinicians as well as politicians and stakeholders is essential. PMID:23449225

  12. The fallacy of neutrality: the interruption of pregnancy of anencephalic fetus in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Ana Carolina D A Costa E

    2011-10-01

    Those who favor and those who oppose the interruption of pregnancy with anencephalic fetuses answer the question 'what is the right to life?' differently. Those in favor argue that life exists only when it is 'viable'; that is to say, when cerebral activities occur or may occur. Those who oppose it argue that it is not possible to describe 'life' as residing in a particular quality, since life 'exists from conception'. In fact, in both cases, the noun 'life' is being defined by a particular quality, either as 'viable' or as 'existing from the time of conception'. Also, simply saying that 'there is life' cannot count as a neutral answer since those who utter such a sentence employ an unspecified criterion to establish if there is life or not. There are two possible ways to investigate this controversial matter: either we look for a definition of 'life' which is neutral and objective and does not reside in a particular quality or we try to establish whether or not the search for a neutral point of view can lead to a satisfactory answer. In this article we explore the argument against the interruption of pregnancy - as defined above - in order to show 1) the impossibility of establishing a neutral point of view regarding knowledge; 2) the existence of a psychological motivation which justifies the longing for an absolute criterion for the evaluation of human actions. This psychological motivation is analyzed from a Nietzschean perspective. PMID:21929705

  13. Modulation of IL-1β reprogrammes the tumor microenvironment to interrupt oral carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tong; Hong, Yun; Jia, Lihua; Wu, Jie; Xia, Juan; Wang, Juan; Hu, Qinchao; Cheng, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) development is a multistage process includes the normal, dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) stages. Recently, increasing evidence has suggested that the tumor microenvironment (TME) is an integral part of malignant transformation. Exploring certain key node genes in TME for future intervention in dysplasia to interrupt oral carcinogenesis was the primary goal of this research. To achieve this goal, systems biology approaches were first applied to the epithelia and fibroblasts collected at sequential stages in a 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) - induced rat oral carcinogenesis model. Through bioinformatics network construction, IL-1β was identified as one of the key node genes in TME during carcinogenesis. Immunohistochemical staining of human and rat samples demonstrated that IL-1β expression patterns were parallel to the stages of malignant transformation. Silencing IL-1β with lentivirus-delivered shRNA significantly inhibited oral squamous cell carcinoma cell growth both in vivo and in vitro. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that IL-1β may be a chemoprevention target in TME during oral carcinogenesis. Therefore, we targeted IL-1 in the TME by oral mucosal injection of an IL-1 receptor antagonist in 4NQO rats. The results demonstrated that targeting IL-1 could interrupt oral carcinogenesis by reprogramming the TME. PMID:26831400

  14. Importance of envelope modulations during consonants and vowels in segmentally interrupted sentences.

    PubMed

    Fogerty, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    The present study investigated the importance of overall segment amplitude and intrinsic segment amplitude modulation of consonants and vowels to sentence intelligibility. Sentences were processed according to three conditions that replaced consonant or vowel segments with noise matched to the long-term average speech spectrum. Segments were replaced with (1) low-level noise that distorted the overall sentence envelope, (2) segment-level noise that restored the overall syllabic amplitude modulation of the sentence, and (3) segment-modulated noise that further restored faster temporal envelope modulations during the vowel. Results from the first experiment demonstrated an incremental benefit with increasing resolution of the vowel temporal envelope. However, amplitude modulations of replaced consonant segments had a comparatively minimal effect on overall sentence intelligibility scores. A second experiment selectively noise-masked preserved vowel segments in order to equate overall performance of consonant-replaced sentences to that of the vowel-replaced sentences. Results demonstrated no significant effect of restoring consonant modulations during the interrupting noise when existing vowel cues were degraded. A third experiment demonstrated greater perceived sentence continuity with the preservation or addition of vowel envelope modulations. Overall, results support previous investigations demonstrating the importance of vowel envelope modulations to the intelligibility of interrupted sentences. PMID:24606291

  15. The intelligibility of interrupted and temporally altered speech: Effects of context, age, and hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Shafiro, Valeriy; Sheft, Stanley; Risley, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Temporal constraints on the perception of interrupted speech were investigated by comparing the intelligibility of speech that was periodically gated (PG) and subsequently either temporally compressed (PGTC) by concatenating remaining speech fragments or temporally expanded (PGTE) by doubling the silent intervals between speech fragments. Experiment 1 examined the effects of PGTC and PGTE at different gating rates (0.5 -16 Hz) on the intelligibility of words and sentences for young normal-hearing adults. In experiment 2, older normal-hearing (ONH) and older hearing-impaired (OHI) adults were tested with sentences only. The results of experiment 1 indicated that sentences were more intelligible than words. In both experiments, PGTC sentences were less intelligible than either PG or PGTE sentences. Compared with PG sentences, the intelligibility of PGTE sentences was significantly reduced by the same amount for ONH and OHI groups. Temporal alterations tended to produce a U-shaped rate-intelligibility function with a dip at 2-4 Hz, indicating that temporal alterations interacted with the duration of speech fragments. The present findings demonstrate that both aging and hearing loss negatively affect the overall intelligibility of interrupted and temporally altered speech. However, a mild-to-moderate hearing loss did not exacerbate the negative effects of temporal alterations associated with aging. PMID:26827039

  16. Generalized Negative Reciprocity in the Dictator Game – How to Interrupt the Chain of Unfairness

    PubMed Central

    Strang, Sabrina; Grote, Xenia; Kuss, Katarina; Park, Soyoung Q.; Weber, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Humans are tremendously sensitive to unfairness. Unfairness provokes strong negative emotional reactions and influences our subsequent decision making. These decisions might not only have consequences for ourselves and the person who treated us unfairly but can even transmit to innocent third persons – a phenomenon that has been referred to as generalized negative reciprocity. In this study we aimed to investigate whether regulation of emotions can interrupt this chain of unfairness. Real allocations in a dictator game were used to create unfair situations. Three different regulation strategies, namely writing a message to the dictator who made an unfair offer, either forwarded or not forwarded, describing a neutral picture and a control condition in which subjects just had to wait for three minutes, were then tested on their ability to influence the elicited emotions. Subsequently participants were asked to allocate money between themselves and a third person. We show that writing a message which is forwarded to the unfair actor is an effective emotion regulation strategy and that those participants who regulated their emotions successfully by writing a message made higher allocations to a third person. Thus, using message writing as an emotion regulation strategy can interrupt the chain of unfairness. PMID:26924557

  17. Enantiodivergent Synthesis of Bis-Spiropyrrolidines via Sequential Interrupted and Completed (3 + 2) Cycloadditions.

    PubMed

    Conde, Egoitz; Rivilla, Iván; Larumbe, Amaia; Cossío, Fernando P

    2015-12-01

    Both (5R)- and (5S)-1,7-diazaspiro[4.4]nonan-6-ones are obtained via a sequence of interrupted and completed stepwise (3 + 2) cycloadditions between azomethine ylides and π-deficient alkenes. The only source of chirality along the whole process is an enantiopure ferrocenyl pyrrolidine catalytic ligand. When the starting imine incorporates two aryl groups or one aryl group with one electron-releasing substituent, the reaction between the azomethine ylide and the alkene stops at the first step, leading to the corresponding Michael adduct. When imines derived from p-methoxybenzaldehyde are used, the corresponding syn-α-amino-γ-nitro ester is obtained with almost complete enantiocontrol. In contrast, imines derived from benzophenone lead to the corresponding anti analogue. From this interrupted (3 + 2) cycloaddition, cis- and trans-α-amino-γ-lactams can be obtained via hydrogenation of the nitro group followed by in situ cyclization. Imines derived from these latter compounds are the precursors of N-metalated azomethine ylides from which up to four new chiral centers can be generated via completed (3 + 2) cycloaddition reactions with full regio- and diastereocontrol. Cis- and trans-γ-lactams lead to opposite bis-spiropyrrolidine enantiomers. Therefore, both enantiomeric series of spiro compounds can be obtained by means of the same catalytic system. The potential of these rigid, densely substituted homochiral compounds in medicinal chemistry is briefly described. PMID:26439974

  18. A logistic delay differential equation model for Chagas disease with interrupted spraying schedules.

    PubMed

    Spagnuolo, Anna Maria; Shillor, Meir; Kingsland, Lindsey; Thatcher, Andrea; Toeniskoetter, Matthew; Wood, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    This work studies a mathematical model for the dynamics of Chagas disease, a parasitic disease that affects humans and domestic mammals throughout rural areas in Central and South America. It presents a modified version of the model found in Spagnuolo et al. [A model for Chagas disease with controlled spraying, J. Biol. Dyn. 5 (2011), pp. 299-317] with a delayed logistic growth term, which captures an overshoot, beyond the vector carrying capacity, in the total vector population when the blood meal supply is large. It studies the steady states of the system in the case of constant coefficients without spraying, and the analysis shows that for given-averaged parameters, the endemic equilibrium is stable and attracting. The numerical simulations of the model dynamics with time-dependent coefficients are shown when interruptions in the annual insecticide spraying cycles are taken into account. Simulations show that when there are spraying schedule interruptions, spraying may become ineffective when the blood meal supply is large. PMID:22873596

  19. Transgastric endoscopic gastrojejunostomy using holing followed by interrupted suture technique in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Su-Yu; Shi, Hong; Jiang, Sheng-Jun; Wang, Yong-Guang; Lin, Kai; Xie, Zhao-Fei; Liu, Xiao-Jing

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To demonstrate the feasibility and reproducibility of a pure natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) gastrojejunostomy using holing followed by interrupted suture technique using a single endoloop matched with a pair of clips in a non-survival porcine model. METHODS: NOTES gastrojejunostomy was performed on three female domestic pigs as follows: Gastrostomy, selection and retrieval of a free-floating loop of the small bowel into the stomach pouch, hold and exposure of the loop in the gastric cavity using a submucosal inflation technique, execution of a gastro-jejunal mucosal-seromuscular layer approximation using holing followed by interrupted suture technique with endoloop/clips, and full-thickness incision of the loop with a Dual knife. RESULTS: Pure NOTES side-to-side gastrojejunostomy was successfully performed in all three animals. No leakage was identified via methylene blue evaluation following surgery. CONCLUSION: This novel technique for preforming a gastrointestinal anastomosis exclusively by NOTES is technically feasible and reproducible in an animal model but warrants further improvement. PMID:26504508

  20. Fast and interrupted expansion in cyclic void growth in dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Wetering, F. M. J. H.; Brooimans, R. J. C.; Nijdam, S.; Beckers, J.; Kroesen, G. M. W.

    2015-01-01

    Low-pressure acetylene plasmas are able to spontaneously form dust particles. This will result in a dense cloud of solid particles that is levitated in the plasma. The formed particles can grow up to micrometers. We observed a spontaneous interruption in the expansion of the so-called dust void. A dust void is a macroscopic region in the plasma that is free of nanoparticles. The phenomenon is periodical and reproducible. We refer to the expansion interruption as ‘hiccup’. The expanding void is an environment in which a new cycle of dust particle formation can start. At a certain moment in time, this cycle reaches the (sudden) coagulation phase and as a result the void will temporarily shrink. To substantiate this reasoning, the electron density is determined non-intrusively using microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy. Moreover, video imaging of laser light scattering of the dust particles provides their spatial distribution. The emission intensity of a single argon transition is measured similarly. Our results support the aforementioned hypothesis for what happens during the void hiccup. The void dynamics preceding the hiccup are modeled using a simple analytical model for the two dominant forces (ion drag and electric) working on a nanoparticle in a plasma. The model results qualitatively reproduce the measurements.

  1. Cockpit Interruptions and Distractions: An Analysis of ASRS Reports and an Experimental Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dismukes, R. K.; Young, Grant E.; Connors, Mary (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A recent detailed analysis of 107 ASRS incident reports focusing on interruptions and distractions as their primary feature revealed several interesting and surprising findings. Of those tasks that were interfered with, over 40% fell within the category of monitoring; for example, monitoring the autopilot flying the aircraft, monitoring the pilot flying, or monitoring the altimeter or navigation instruments for future action. Surprisingly, over 60% of the tasks that were considered distractions fell under the broad category of communication or conversation. Using these findings, we have developed an experimental paradigm that will help us understand the method by which pilots perform certain monitoring tasks. Specifically, we hope to determine the degree to which pilots rely on internal time mechanisms versus external cues as a means of successfully completing a monitoring task. In addition, we will incorporate a battery of competing aviation type tasks, including communication, to see how these tasks affect the process of monitoring. The long range goal of this research is to find operational solutions that facilitate effective monitoring in the presence of both sudden interruptions and distractions that lead to unintended multiple tasks situations.

  2. An interrupted tensile testing at high strain rates for pure copper bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dongfang, Ma; Danian, Chen; Shanxing, Wu; Huanran, Wang; Yanjun, Hou; Canyuan, Cai

    2010-12-01

    A high-speed tensile facility (HSTF) invented by us was applied to interrupting the tests for pure copper specimen bars controlled locally at different levels of elongation. It was realized to isolate and identify the different stages of the dynamic fracture process of the pure copper specimen bar under impact tension. The results of scanning electron microscopical (SEM) investigation of the recovered pure copper specimens show that the void evolution near the surface of the minimum cross-section of the necking area is more severe than that at the middle of the necking area, which may be connected with the findings discussed by Alves and Jones [J. Mech. Phys. Solids 47, 643 (1999)]. The constitutive models in a certain range of strain determined from the tensile split Hopkinson bar optimized by us were employed and adjusted in numerically simulating the large deformation of the pure copper specimen in the interrupted tensile tests on HSTF. The dependence of the instability strain of thermoviscoplastic materials in simple tension on material parameters delineated by Batra and Wei [Int. J. Impact Eng. 34, 448 (2007)] was inspected in predicting the diffuse necking of the specimen bar. The axisymmetric necking rod model with a central void under static tension presented by Ragab [Eng. Fract. Mech. 71, 1515 (2004)] was extended to predicting the local necking and fracture of the specimen bar under impact tension.

  3. Implementation challenges in the intensive care unit: the why, who and how of daily interruption of sedation

    PubMed Central

    Bosk, Emily A.; Iwashyna, Theodore J.; Krein, Sarah L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Despite strong medical evidence and policy initiatives supporting the use of daily interruption of sedation in mechanically ventilated patients, compliance remains suboptimal. We sought to identify new barriers to daily interruption of sedation. Materials and Methods We conducted 5 focus groups of intensive care unit (ICU) physicians, nurses, and respiratory therapists over a two-month period to identify attitudes, barriers, and motivations to perform a daily interruption of sedation. Each focus group was audiotaped and the transcripts analyzed using qualitative methods to identify recurrent themes. Results There was wide consensus on the importance of daily interruptions of sedation, however practitioners usually performed sedation interruption for 1 of 5 distinct reasons: minimizing the dose of sedation, performing a neurologic exam, facilitating ventilator weaning, reducing ICU length of stay, and assessing patient pain. Participants rarely espoused more than one main reason, and there was no shared understanding of why one might do a DIS. This lack of shared understanding led to different patients being selected and diverse approaches to carrying out the DIS. Conclusions Despite apparent consensus, lack of shared understanding of the rationale for an intervention may lead to divergent practice patterns and failure to implement standardized, evidence-based practice. PMID:22227084

  4. Complete interruption of the aortic arch. 2. Characteristic angiographic features with emphasis on collateral circulation to the descending aorta.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, R B

    1976-01-01

    The angiocardiograms of 17 patients with aortic arch interruption are reviewed to emphasize the variations in arch interruption and origin of the brachiocephalic vessels, and collateral circulation to the descending aorta. Depending on the anatomical type and subtype of arch interruption, collateral flow to the descending aorta in the presence of a stenotic or closed ductus will be dependent on the development of intercostal collaterals and/or the presence of retrograde flow in all brachiocephalic vessels arising from the descending aorta. Familiarity with the potential pathways for collateral circulation may permit differentiation into types and subtypes on chest radiograph. Patients with Type I interruption may have bilateral rib notching if the right subclavian artery originates normally from the innominate artery, but will have rib notching confined to the left side if the origin of the right subclavian artery is aberrant. Type II or Type III interruption patients will have rib notching confined to the right side if the right subclavian has a normal origin, but no rib notching if the origin of the right subclavian artery is aberrant. PMID:1244239

  5. Simulation of SLF Interrupting Performance for CO2 Gas Circuit Breaker based on Serially Connected 3 Arc Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshizuka, Tadashi; Udagawa, Keisuke; Shinkai, Takeshi; Uchii, Toshiyuki; Kawano, Hiromichi

    This paper shows the simulation of SLF interrupting performances for CO2 gas circuit breakers. In the SLF interruption tests using 72kV-CO2 gas model circuit breakers, very large post arc currents were measured. This point is obviously difference between CO2 circuit breaker and SF6 one. To simulate the SLF interrupting performances for the SF6 gas circuit breakers, serially connected 3 arc models were developed. In the arc model, Cassie arc model and two Mayr arc models were serially connected. It was tried to use the arc model to simulate the SLF interrupting performances for CO2 circuit breaker. As a result, it was good agreement with the measurements and simulations. The large post arc currents could be simulated by the arc model. It was shown that the SLF interrupting performance of the CO2 circuit breaker was dependent on the Mayr model simulated around voltage extinction peak. On the other hand, the performance of the SF6 gas circuit breaker was dependent on the Mayr model simulated around current zero. From the result, it proved that most severe SLF condition for the CO2 gas circuit breaker was L75 or L80.

  6. Learning from Accident and Error: Avoiding the Hazards of Workload, Stress, and Routine Interruptions in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, J. Bradley; Rudolph, Jenny W.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a model of how a build-up of interruptions can shift the dynamics of the emergency department (ED) from an adaptive, self-regulating system into a fragile, crisis-prone one. Drawing on case studies of organizational disasters and insights from the theory of high-reliability organizations, the authors use computer simulations to show how the accumulation of small interruptions could have disproportionately large effects in the ED. In the face of a mounting workload created by interruptions, EDs, like other organizational systems, have tipping points, thresholds beyond which a vicious cycle can lead rather quickly to the collapse of normal operating routines and in the extreme to a crisis of organizational paralysis. The authors discuss some possible implications for emergency medicine, emphasizing the potential threat from routine, non-novel demands on EDs and raising the concern that EDs are operating closer to the precipitous edge of crisis as ED crowding exacerbates the problem. PMID:22168187

  7. THE EFFECTS OF VERBAL OPERANT TRAINING AND RESPONSE INTERRUPTION AND REDIRECTION ON APPROPRIATE AND INAPPROPRIATE VOCALIZATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Colón, Candice L; Ahearn, William H; Clark, Kathleen M; Masalsky, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Past research has shown that response interruption and redirection (RIRD) can effectively decrease automatically reinforced motor behavior (Hagopian & Adelinis, 2001). Ahearn, Clark, MacDonald, and Chung (2007) found that a procedural adaptation of RIRD reduced vocal stereotypy and increased appropriate vocalizations for some children, although appropriate vocalizations were not targeted directly. The purpose of the current study was to examine the effects of directly targeting appropriate language (i.e., verbal operant training) on vocal stereotypy and appropriate speech in 3 children with an autism spectrum disorder. The effects of verbal operant (i.e., tact) training were evaluated in a nonconcurrent multiple baseline design across participants. In addition, RIRD was implemented with 2 of the 3 participants to further decrease levels of vocal stereotypy. Verbal operant training alone produced slightly lower levels of stereotypy and increased appropriate vocalizations for all 3 participants; however, RIRD was required to produce acceptably low levels of stereotypy for 2 of the 3 participants. PMID:22403453

  8. Note: A compact three-axis optical force/torque sensor using photo-interrupters.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Chul; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soohyun

    2013-12-01

    By integrating four photo-interrupters in a cross-shaped structure, we developed a compact three-axis optical force/torque (F/T) sensor. The developed sensor has a diameter of 28 mm and a thickness of 7 mm. Despite simplicity and compactness, the experiments with a prototype of the proposed sensor demonstrate notably high accuracy. The RMS errors are 0.5% ± 0.1% of the maximum vertical force in z-axis, 1.9% ± 0.2% of the maximum torque in x-axis, and 2.0% ± 0.3% of the maximum torque in y-axis. It is expected that the proposed sensor allows cost-effective integration of robot systems requiring compact and multi-axis F/T sensors such as a walking assist robot. PMID:24387485

  9. Note: A compact three-axis optical force/torque sensor using photo-interrupters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji-Chul; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soohyun

    2013-12-01

    By integrating four photo-interrupters in a cross-shaped structure, we developed a compact three-axis optical force/torque (F/T) sensor. The developed sensor has a diameter of 28 mm and a thickness of 7 mm. Despite simplicity and compactness, the experiments with a prototype of the proposed sensor demonstrate notably high accuracy. The RMS errors are 0.5% ± 0.1% of the maximum vertical force in z-axis, 1.9% ± 0.2% of the maximum torque in x-axis, and 2.0% ± 0.3% of the maximum torque in y-axis. It is expected that the proposed sensor allows cost-effective integration of robot systems requiring compact and multi-axis F/T sensors such as a walking assist robot.

  10. FURTHER EVALUATION OF RESPONSE INTERRUPTION AND REDIRECTION AS TREATMENT FOR STEREOTYPY

    PubMed Central

    Ahrens, Erin N; Lerman, Dorothea C; Kodak, Tiffany; Worsdell, April S; Keegan, Courtney

    2011-01-01

    The effects of 2 forms of response interruption and redirection (RIRD)motor RIRD and vocal RIRDwere examined with 4 boys with autism to evaluate further the effects of this intervention and its potential underlying mechanisms. In Experiment 1, the effects of motor RIRD and vocal RIRD on vocal stereotypy and appropriate vocalizations were compared for 2 participants. In Experiment 2, the effects of both RIRD procedures on both vocal and motor stereotypy and appropriate vocalizations were compared with 2 additional participants. Results suggested that RIRD was effective regardless of the procedural variation or topography of stereotypy and that vocal RIRD functioned as a punisher. This mechanism was further explored with 1 participant by manipulating the schedule of RIRD in Experiment 3. Results were consistent with the punishment interpretation. PMID:21541130

  11. Motion-induced interruptions and postural equilibrium in linear lateral accelerations.

    PubMed

    Matsangas, P; McCauley, M E; Gehl, G; Kiser, J; Bandstra, A; Blankenship, J; Pierce, E

    2014-01-01

    This study assesses lateral tipping motion-induced interruptions (MIIs) in a simulated motion environment. The objective is to revisit MII occurrence and sway motion relationship by focusing on the frequency and acceleration of the lateral motion stimulus. Results verify that MIIs increase with increasing peak sway acceleration, but the effect of sway frequency is not as clear as that of acceleration. Complex multidirectional motions create more tipping MIIs than unidirectional motion. Research should incorporate acceleration, frequency and motion complexity as factors influencing MII occurrence. To describe a temporary loss of balance without tipping, the term 'probable' MII is introduced. This term fills the gap between the theoretical definition and a human-centred perception of an MII where loss of balance is not a binary phenomenon. The 'probable' MIIs were 16-67% more common than the 'definite' MIIs. The developed mathematical model of MII occurrence versus sway acceleration (amplitude, frequency) approximated the observed MIIs with less than 9% difference. PMID:24646414

  12. Interruption of the inner rotation initiated in isolated electron-driven molecular rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pshenichnyuk, Stanislav A.; Asfandiarov, Nail L.; Kukhta, Alexander V.

    2012-11-01

    An anthracene molecule substituted at the central ring by two aniline moieties able to rotate about the C-N bonds can be considered to be a prototype molecular rotor. Electron attachment into the lowest empty orbitals of this molecule leads to formation of long-lived (microseconds) negative ions. Elimination of a hydrogen molecule from these anions was observed in the gas phase by means of dissociative electron attachment spectroscopy. The experimental findings were interpreted using density functional theory calculations. It was shown that the decay process must be accompanied by formation of a new covalent bond in which one aniline moiety is fixed to the adjacent carbon atom of the anthracene ring. The observed irreversible interruption of the rotational motion could occur in other artificial electron-driven molecular machines provided that suitable atoms approach each other under the rotation.

  13. Interruption of Somatic Embryogenesis in Daucus carota L. by 5-Bromodeoxyuridine

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, John C.; Nessler, Craig; Katterman, Frank

    1989-01-01

    Embryogenic Daucus carota L. cells grown in 9 micromolar 2.4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid are resistant to greater than 5 micromolar 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). In contrast, 5 micromolar BrdU strongly inhibits somatic embryogenesis within 24 hours after transfer of cells to an auxin-free medium. DNA synthesis rates in control and BrdU-treated cultures are rapid and similar; however, the DNA content does not reach levels as great in the presence of BrdU as in control cultures. BrdU substitutes for thymidine in the DNA in 28% of the available sites 48 hours after auxin removal. Following DNA repair, somatic embryogenesis resumes. BrdU DNA incorporation leads to somatic embryogenesis inhibition and provides an alternative to auxin treatment for the interruption of carrot cell culture differentiation. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 7 PMID:16666898

  14. Percept-choice sequences driven by interrupted ambiguous stimuli: a low-level neural model.

    PubMed

    Noest, A J; van Ee, R; Nijs, M M; van Wezel, R J A

    2007-01-01

    Existing neural explanations of spontaneous percept switching under steady viewing of an ambiguous stimulus do not fit the fact that stimulus interruptions cause the same percept to reappear across many ON/OFF cycles. We present a simple neural model that explains the observed behavior and predicts several more complicated percept sequences, without invoking any "high-level" decision making or memory. Percept choice at stimulus onset, which differs fundamentally from standard percept switching, depends crucially on a hitherto neglected interaction between local "shunting" adaptation and a near-threshold neural baseline. Stimulus ON/OFF timing then controls the generation of repeating, alternating, or more complex choice sequences. Our model also explains "priming" versus "habituation" effects on percept choice, reinterprets recent neurophysiological data, and predicts the emergence of hysteresis at the level of percept sequences, with occasional noise-induced sequence "hopping." PMID:17685817

  15. Further evaluation of response interruption and redirection as treatment for stereotypy.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Erin N; Lerman, Dorothea C; Kodak, Tiffany; Worsdell, April S; Keegan, Courtney

    2011-01-01

    The effects of 2 forms of response interruption and redirection (RIRD)-motor RIRD and vocal RIRD-were examined with 4 boys with autism to evaluate further the effects of this intervention and its potential underlying mechanisms. In Experiment 1, the effects of motor RIRD and vocal RIRD on vocal stereotypy and appropriate vocalizations were compared for 2 participants. In Experiment 2, the effects of both RIRD procedures on both vocal and motor stereotypy and appropriate vocalizations were compared with 2 additional participants. Results suggested that RIRD was effective regardless of the procedural variation or topography of stereotypy and that vocal RIRD functioned as a punisher. This mechanism was further explored with 1 participant by manipulating the schedule of RIRD in Experiment 3. Results were consistent with the punishment interpretation. PMID:21541130

  16. The Value of Interrupted Time-Series Experiments for Community Intervention Research

    PubMed Central

    Biglan, Anthony; Ary, Dennis; Wagenaar, Alexander C.

    2015-01-01

    Greater use of interrupted time-series experiments is advocated for community intervention research. Time-series designs enable the development of knowledge about the effects of community interventions and policies in circumstances in which randomized controlled trials are too expensive, premature, or simply impractical. The multiple baseline time-series design typically involves two or more communities that are repeatedly assessed, with the intervention introduced into one community at a time. It is particularly well suited to initial evaluations of community interventions and the refinement of those interventions. This paper describes the main features of multiple baseline designs and related repeated-measures time-series experiments, discusses the threats to internal validity in multiple baseline designs, and outlines techniques for statistical analyses of time-series data. Examples are given of the use of multiple baseline designs in evaluating community interventions and policy changes. PMID:11507793

  17. Brief Therapy Based on Interrupting Ironic Processes: The Palo Alto Model

    PubMed Central

    Rohrbaugh, Michael J.; Shoham, Varda

    2009-01-01

    The model of brief therapy developed by Fisch, Weakland, Watzlawick, and colleagues in Palo Alto is based on identifying and interrupting ironic processes that occur when repeated attempts to solve a problem keep the problem going or make it worse. Formulations of ironic problem-solution loops provide a template for assessment and strategic intervention, indicating where to look to understand what keeps a problem going (look for “more of the same” solution) and what needs to happen for the complaint to be resolved (someone must apply “less of the same” solution). Supporting research is preliminary but suggests this approach may be well suited for change-resistant clients. PMID:19997533

  18. Joint reconstruction of interrupted SAR imagery for persistent surveillance change detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojanovic, Ivana; Novak, Les; Karl, W. C.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper we present a new method for restoring multi-pass synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images containing arbitrary gaps in SAR phase history data. Frequency and aspect gaps in SAR image spectrum manifest themselves as artifacts in the associated SAR imagery. Our approach, which we term LDREG for the (cursive ell);1 difference regularization, jointly processes multi-pass interrupted data using sparse magnitude and sparse magnitude difference constraints, and results in improved quality imagery. We find that the joint processing of LDREG results in coherent change detection gains over independent processing of each data pass. To illustrate the capabilities of LDREG, we evaluate coherent change detection performance using images from the Gotcha SAR.

  19. Optogenetic control of thalamus as a tool for interrupting penicillin induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Yechao Han; Feiqiang Ma; Hongbao Li; Yueming Wang; Kedi Xu

    2015-08-01

    Penicillin epilepsy model, whose discharge resembles that of human absence epilepsy, is one of the most useful acute experimental epilepsy models. Though closed-loop optogenetic strategy of interrupting seizures was proved sufficient to switch off epilepsy by controlling thalamus in the post-lesion partial chronic epilepsy model, doubts still exist in absence epilepsy attenuation through silencing thalamus. Here we directly arrested the thalamus to modulate penicillin-induced absence seizures through pseudorandom responsive stimulation on eNpHR-transfected rats. Our data suggested that the duration of epileptiform bursts under light conditions, compared with no light conditions, did not increase or decrease when modulated specific eNpHR-expressing neurons in thalamus. PMID:26737807

  20. Interruption of vector transmission by native vectors and “the art of the possible”

    PubMed Central

    Salvatella, Roberto; Irabedra, Pilar; Castellanos, Luis G

    2013-01-01

    In a recent article in the Reader’s Opinion, advantages and disadvantages of the certification processes of interrupted Chagas disease transmission (American trypanosomiasis) by native vector were discussed. Such concept, accepted by those authors for the case of endemic situations with introduced vectors, has been built on a long and laborious process by endemic countries and Subregional Initiatives for Prevention, Control and Treatment of Chagas, with Technical Secretariat of the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization, to create a horizon target and goal to concentrate priorities and resource allocation and actions. With varying degrees of sucess, which are not replaceable for a certificate of good practice, has allowed during 23 years to safeguard the effective control of transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi not to hundreds of thousands, but millions of people at risk conditions, truly “the art of the possible.” PMID:24626310

  1. Unplanned antiretroviral treatment interruptions in southern Africa: how should we be managing these?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy is essential for maximising individual treatment outcomes and preventing the development of drug resistance. It is, however, frequently compromised due to predictable, but adverse, scenarios in the countries most severely affected by HIV/AIDS. This paper looks at lessons from three specific crises in southern Africa: the 2008 floods in Mozambique, the ongoing political and economic crisis in Zimbabwe, and the 2007 public sector strike in South Africa. It considers how these crises impacted on the delivery of antiretroviral therapy and looks at some of the strategies employed to mitigate any adverse effects. Based on this it makes recommendations for keeping patients on treatment and limiting the development of drug resistance where treatment interruptions are inevitable. PMID:20356383

  2. Tafazzin knockdown interrupts cell cycle progression in cultured neonatal ventricular fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    He, Quan; Wang, Miao; Harris, Nicole; Han, Xianlin

    2013-11-01

    Mutation of the mitochondrial protein tafazzin causes dilated cardiomyopathy in Barth syndrome. Previous studies have shown that tafazzin knockdown promotes hypertrophy of neonatal cardiac myocytes. The current investigation was designed to show whether tafazzin knockdown affects cardiac fibroblast proliferation and collagen secretion, which contribute to fibrosis in dilated cardiomyopathy. In primary cultures of neonatal ventricular fibroblasts (NVFs) transduced with a tafazzin short hairpin RNA adenovirus, tafazzin knockdown increased production of reactive oxygen species and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and induced protein and DNA synthesis via cell cycle regulators. It also reduced intracellular ATP, activated AMPK, and caused multinucleation, hypertrophy, and enhanced collagen secretion. We concluded that tafazzin knockdown interrupts the NVF cell cycle and this in turn may contribute to fibrosis and dilated cardiomyopathy in Barth syndrome. PMID:23997105

  3. HIV Reactivation from Latency after Treatment Interruption Occurs on Average Every 5-8 Days--Implications for HIV Remission.

    PubMed

    Pinkevych, Mykola; Cromer, Deborah; Tolstrup, Martin; Grimm, Andrew J; Cooper, David A; Lewin, Sharon R; Søgaard, Ole S; Rasmussen, Thomas A; Kent, Stephen J; Kelleher, Anthony D; Davenport, Miles P

    2015-07-01

    HIV infection can be effectively controlled by anti-retroviral therapy (ART) in most patients. However therapy must be continued for life, because interruption of ART leads to rapid recrudescence of infection from long-lived latently infected cells. A number of approaches are currently being developed to 'purge' the reservoir of latently infected cells in order to either eliminate infection completely, or significantly delay the time to viral recrudescence after therapy interruption. A fundamental question in HIV research is how frequently the virus reactivates from latency, and thus how much the reservoir might need to be reduced to produce a prolonged antiretroviral-free HIV remission. Here we provide the first direct estimates of the frequency of viral recrudescence after ART interruption, combining data from four independent cohorts of patients undergoing treatment interruption, comprising 100 patients in total. We estimate that viral replication is initiated on average once every ≈6 days (range 5.1- 7.6 days). This rate is around 24 times lower than previous thought, and is very similar across the cohorts. In addition, we analyse data on the ratios of different 'reactivation founder' viruses in a separate cohort of patients undergoing ART-interruption, and estimate the frequency of successful reactivation to be once every 3.6 days. This suggests that a reduction in the reservoir size of around 50-70-fold would be required to increase the average time-to-recrudescence to about one year, and thus achieve at least a short period of anti-retroviral free HIV remission. Our analyses suggests that time-to-recrudescence studies will need to be large in order to detect modest changes in the reservoir, and that macaque models of SIV latency may have much higher frequencies of viral recrudescence after ART interruption than seen in human HIV infection. Understanding the mean frequency of recrudescence from latency is an important first step in approaches to prolong antiretroviral-free viral remission in HIV. PMID:26133551

  4. Activation and interruption of the reproduction of Varroa destructor is triggered by host signals (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Frey, Eva; Odemer, Richard; Blum, Thomas; Rosenkranz, Peter

    2013-05-01

    The reproductive cycle of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor is closely linked to the development of the honey bee host larvae. Using a within colony approach we introduced phoretic Varroa females into brood cells of different age in order to analyze the capacity of certain stages of the honey bee larva to either activate or interrupt the reproduction of Varroa females. Only larvae within 18 h (worker) and 36 h (drones), respectively, after cell capping were able to stimulate the mite's oogenesis. Therewith we could specify for the first time the short time window where honey bee larvae provide the signals for the activation of the Varroa reproduction. Stage specific volatiles of the larval cuticle are at least part of these activation signals. This is confirmed by the successful stimulation of presumably non-reproducing mites to oviposition by the application of a larval extract into the sealed brood cells. According to preliminary quantitative GC-MS analysis we suggest certain fatty acid ethyl esters as candidate compounds. If Varroa females that have just started with egg formation are transferred to brood cells containing host larvae of an elder stage two-thirds of these mites stopped their oogenesis. This confirms the presence of an additional signal in the host larvae allowing the reproducing mites to adjust their own reproductive cycle to the ontogenetic development of the host. From an adaptive point of view that sort of a stop signal enables the female mite to save resources for a next reproductive cycle if the own egg development is not sufficiently synchronized with the development of the host. The results presented here offer the opportunity to analyze exactly those host stages that have the capacity to activate or interrupt the Varroa reproduction in order to identify the crucial host signals. PMID:23376006

  5. Conduction Disorders in Continuous Versus Interrupted Suturing Technique in Ventricular Septal Defect Surgical Repair

    PubMed Central

    Gholampour-Dehaki, Maziar; Zareh, Asghar; Babaki, Solmaz; Javadikasgari, Hoda

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ventricular septal defects (VSD) is one of the most frequent congenital cardiac malformations and cardiac conduction disorders are still one of the serious postoperative complications in this surgery. Objectives: This study aimed to compare the incidence of conduction disorders with the use of continuous compared to interrupted suturing techniques in VSD surgical repair. Patients and Methods: Previously recorded data of 231 patients who underwent surgical closure of VSD between January 2009 and January 2012 at the Rajaie cardiovascular medical and research center were retrospectively reviewed. VSD surgical repair was performed using continues suturing technique in group A patients (n = 163, 70.6%) and interrupted suturing technique in group B patients (n = 68, 29.4%). Results: The most common concomitant congenital anomaly was Tetralogy of Fallot (27.3%). Twenty-four (10.4%) patients had intraoperative cardiac arrhythmia, including 19 (8.2%) transient and 5 (2.2 %) permanent arrhythmia. During their ICU stay, ventricular arrhythmia and complete heart block were observed in 34 (14.7%) and 5 patients (2.2%), respectively. At the time of the last follow-up, incomplete right bundle branch block (RBBB), complete RBBB, RBBB with left anterior hemi-block, and complete heart block were identified in 84 (36.4%), 42 (18.2%), 29 (12.6%), and 5 patients (2.2%), respectively. The results revealed that group A patients were most likely to have had cardiac arrhythmias during their ICU stay and at the time of last follow-up (P < 0.001), while the intraoperative incidence of cardiac arrhythmia during surgery was not statistically significant between the two groups (P = 0.06). Conclusions: In the absence of any statistical differences in the other risk factors between the two groups, the difference in the incidence of conduction disorders can be attributed to the type of suturing used during the procedure. PMID:26889457

  6. Pituitary stalk interruption syndrome in 59 children: the value of MRI in assessment of pituitary functions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Hu, Yanyan; Li, Guimei; Sun, Xiaojun

    2014-05-01

    Pituitary imaging abnormality is a specific indicator of hypopituitarism. This study involved a retrospective review of 59 children diagnosed with pituitary stalk interruption syndrome (PSIS). Of the 59 eligible patients, 54 were born by breech delivery, and there was a significant difference between numbers of patients with breech and head-presenting birth. In order to discuss the relationship between pituitary functions and delineation of pituitary structure in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a control analysis was carried out in children with PSIS. Fifty-nine children were subdivided into two groups: group I (partial PSIS, 20 cases) and group II (complete PSIS, 39 cases). There was a significantly small anterior pituitary in both groups of PSIS compared with controls (P < 0.001). The incidence of ectopic posterior pituitary (EPP) was significantly higher in group II (P < 0.001). Before and after hormone replacement therapy, pituitary functions were measured and compared with controls. The levels of growth hormone (GH), free thyroxine (FT4), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and cortisol (COR) were significantly lower in group II (P < 0.05). The dosage of levothyroxine sodium in group II was significantly higher than in group I (P < 0.01). Conclusion. On the basis of birth history, breech presentation may a forewarning for subsequent pituitary hormone deficiencies. Grades of MRI can predict occurrence and severity of PSIS, which are also correlated with the levels of the pituitary target hormone deficiencies. Interruption of pituitary stalk and ectopic posterior pituitary both represent important markers of pituitary structure and function. PMID:24257915

  7. Syndrome d'interruption de la tige pituitaire à révélation tardive

    PubMed Central

    Marmouch, Héla; Graja, Samah; Arfa, Sondes; Boubaker, Fadia; Khochtali, Ines

    2016-01-01

    Le syndrome d'interruption de la tige pituitaire est une cause assez fréquente de déficit en hormone de croissance et d'hypopituitarisme souvent révélé pendant la période néonatale et l'enfance. Cette observation illustre les particularités d'une révélation tardive de ce syndrome. Il s'agit d'une patiente âgée de 17ans hospitalisée pour aménorrhée primaire et impubérisme. Elle n'a pas d'antécédent d'incident néonatal. L'examen clinique révèle un retard de croissance sévère. L'hypophysiogramme a montré un hypopituitarisme complet sans diabète insipide. L'imagerie par résonnance magnétique a montré une interruption de la tige pituitaire avec une post hypophyse ectopique. Une malformation rénale a été objectivée, ce qui est en faveur d'une origine congénitale malformative de ce syndrome. Une substitution hormonale a été administrée à cette patiente. Cette forme clinique tardive souligne la nécessité de diagnostic précoce d'impubérisme et/ou de retard de croissance révélant une pathologie à potentiel de gravité important.

  8. Reconstructing paleoenvironmental conditions during the past 50 ka from the biogeochemical record of Laguna Potrok Aike, southern Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, A.; Rosn, P.; Kliem, P.; Ohlendorf, C.; Zolitschka, B.

    2011-12-01

    Total organic carbon (TOC), total inorganic carbon (TIC) and biogenic silica (BSi) assessed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS) are used to reconstruct the environmental history during the past 50kyrs in high resolution from Laguna Potrok Aike. During the Holocene warmer conditions lead to an increased productivity reflected in higher TOC and BSi contents. Calcite precipitation initiated around 9 ka cal. BP probably due to supersaturation induced by lake level lowering. It is assumed that prior to this time period sediments are carbonate-free because high lake-level conditions prevailed. During the Glacial, increased runoff linked to permafrost, precipitation related to stronger cyclonic activity and reduced evaporation have caused higher lake levels. Moreover, during cold glacial conditions lake productivity was low and organic matter mainly of algal or cyanobacterial origin as indicated by generally low TOC and C/N values. During interstadials, such as the Antarctic A-events and the Younger Dryas, TOC contents appear to rise. The glacial C/N ratios and their correlation with TOC concentrations indicate that aquatic moss blooms probably induce these increases in TOC. Aquatic mosses grow if surface water temperatures rise due to warmer climatic conditions and/or development of a lake water stratification. The latter may occur if wind speeds are low and melt water inflow caused higher density gradients. Prevailing permafrost thawing during warmer periods could lead to considerable rises of lake levels, which would contribute to the preservation of organic material. This may explain why higher C/N and TOC values occur at the end of Antarctic A-events. For the uppermost 25 m, the BSi profile shows a high correlation with the TOC profile. In deeper horizons, however, there are indications that the BSi/TOC ratio increased. This part of the record is dominated by mass movement events, which may have supplied nutrients and thus triggered diatom blooms.

  9. One-Stage Repair of an Interrupted Aortic Arch with an Aortopulmonary Window in a Premature Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Bobos, Dimitrios; Kanakis, Meletios A.; Koulouri, Sofia; Giannopoulos, Nicholas M.

    2015-01-01

    Interrupted aortic arch with an aortopulmonary window is a rare congenital entity that is associated with high morbidity and mortality, especially in premature low-birth-weight infants, and the proper timing of surgical correction remains a matter of debate. We present the case of a premature infant weighing 1.6 kg who successfully underwent one stage surgical repair to treat interrupted aortic arch with an aortopulmonary window. The therapeutic management of this patient is described below, and a review of the literature is presented. PMID:26665109

  10. Effect of Growth Interruption on Surface Recombination Velocity in GaInAsSb/AlGaAsSb Heterostructures Grown by Organometallic Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    CA Wang; DA Shiau; D Donetsky; S Anikeev; G Belenky; S Luryi

    2004-04-29

    The effects of growth interruption on the quality of GaInAsSb/AlGaAsSb heterostructures grown by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy are reported. In-situ reflectance monitoring and ex-situ characterization by high-resolution x-ray diffraction, 4K photoluminescence (PL), and time-resolved PL indicate that GaInAsSb is extremely sensitive to growth interruption time as well as the ambient atmosphere during interruption. By optimizing the interruption sequence, surface recombination velocity as low as 20 cm/s was achieved for GaInAsSb/AlGaAsSb double heterostructures.

  11. One-stage neonatal repair of complex aortic arch obstruction or interruption. Recent experience at Texas Children's Hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Hirooka, K; Fraser, C D

    1997-01-01

    The optimal surgical approach for complex aortic coarctation or an interrupted aortic arch with associated intracardiac defects is not universally agreed upon. We reviewed our experience with 18 consecutive patients (10 with coarctation, 8 with interrupted aortic arch) undergoing a 1-stage repair through median sternotomy between September of 1995 and February of 1997. Age at operation ranged from 3 days to 3 months (mean 23 days) and weight ranged from 1,700 g to 5,100 g (mean 3,350 g). Under hypothermic circulatory arrest, the aortic arch was reconstructed using native tissue-tissue anastomoses, and coexisting intracardiac anomalies were repaired by standard techniques. All patients survived the procedure and were ultimately discharged from the hospital. There were 2 late deaths in the interrupted aortic arch group, 1 during reoperation for subaortic stenosis and the other from noncardiac causes 5 months after discharge. Another interrupted aortic arch patient required a Ross-Konno procedure 8 months later. There has been no recoarctation among the 16 survivors. Thus a 1-stage repair for complex aortic arch obstruction in neonates can be accomplished with low operative risk, although long-term outcome is strongly influenced by the presence of subaortic obstruction. PMID:9456485

  12. Synthesis and studies of modified oligonucleotides-directed triple helix formation at the purine-pyrimidine interrupted site.

    PubMed

    Jazouli, Mohamed; Guianvarc'h, Dominique; Bougrin, Khalid; Soufiaoui, Mohamed; Vierling, Pierre; Benhida, Rachid

    2003-01-01

    Triple helix formation is still restricted to oligopurine-oligopyrimidine double stranded DNA target. Herein we focus on our progress achieved in nucleobase and oligonucleotide modifications area to address the chemical challenge to circumvent the recognition of a purine-pyrimidine base pair interruption in an oligopyrimidine-oligopurine DNA sequence. PMID:14565398

  13. Use of Transnational Services to Prevent Treatment Interruption in Tuberculosis-Infected Persons Who Leave the United States

    PubMed Central

    Garnick, Deborah W.; Zuroweste, Edward; Razavi, Moaven; Shepard, Donald S.

    2016-01-01

    A major problem resulting from interrupted tuberculosis (TB) treatment is the development of drug-resistant TB, including multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB), a more deadly and costly-to-treat form of the disease. Global health systems are not equipped to diagnose and treat the current burden of MDR TB. TB-infected foreign visitors and temporary US residents who leave the country during treatment can experience treatment interruption and, thus, are at greater risk for drug-resistant TB. Using epidemiologic and demographic data, we estimated TB incidence among this group, as well as the proportion of patients referred to transnational care–continuity and management services during relocation; each year, ≈2,827 visitors and temporary residents are at risk for TB treatment interruption, 222 (8%) of whom are referred for transnational services. Scale up of transnational services for persons at high risk for treatment interruption is possible and encouraged because of potential health gains and reductions in healthcare costs for the United States and receiving countries. PMID:26886720

  14. Synchronizing Bees With Bloom: Interrupted Incubation and Short-Term Storage of the Alfalfa Pollinator, Megachile rotundata (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interrupting the spring incubation with short-term low-temperature storage of the developing pupae and pharate adult stage of Megachile rotundata (F.) is a useful technique for synchronizing the emergence of these bees with the peak alfalfa bloom. However, low-temperature exposure can be stressful d...

  15. Measuring the Impacts of Community Development Initiatives: A New Application of the Adjusted Interrupted Time-Series Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galster, George; Temkin, Kenneth; Walker, Chris; Sawyer, Noah

    2004-01-01

    The authors contribute to the development of empirical methods for measuring the impacts of place-based local development strategies by introducing the adjusted interrupted time-series (AITS) approach. It estimates a more precise counterfactual scenario, thus offering a stronger basis for drawing causal inferences about impacts. The authors…

  16. Examining the Internal Validity and Statistical Precision of the Comparative Interrupted Time Series Design by Comparison with a Randomized Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St.Clair, Travis; Cook, Thomas D.; Hallberg, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Although evaluators often use an interrupted time series (ITS) design to test hypotheses about program effects, there are few empirical tests of the design's validity. We take a randomized experiment on an educational topic and compare its effects to those from a comparative ITS (CITS) design that uses the same treatment group as the…

  17. 18 CFR 260.9 - Reports by natural gas pipeline companies on service interruptions and damage to facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Reports by natural gas..., NATURAL GAS ACT STATEMENTS AND REPORTS (SCHEDULES) § 260.9 Reports by natural gas pipeline companies on service interruptions and damage to facilities. (a)(1) Every natural gas company must report to...

  18. 18 CFR 260.9 - Reports by natural gas pipeline companies on service interruptions and damage to facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reports by natural gas..., NATURAL GAS ACT STATEMENTS AND REPORTS (SCHEDULES) § 260.9 Reports by natural gas pipeline companies on service interruptions and damage to facilities. (a)(1) Every natural gas company must report to...

  19. Increase in nitrate uptake by soybean plants during interruption of the dark period with low intensity light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raper, C. D. Jr; Vessey, J. K.; Henry, L. T.

    1991-01-01

    Diurnal patterns of net NO3- uptake by nonnodulated soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv. Ransom] plants growing in flowing hydroponic culture at 26 and 16 degrees C root temperatures were measured at hourly intervals during alternate days of a 12-day growth period. Ion chromatography was used to determine removal of NO3- from the culture solution. Day and night periods of 9 and 15 h were used during growth. The night period included two 6-h dark periods and an intervening 3-h period of night interruption by incandescent lamps to effect a long-day photoperiod and repress floral initiation. At both root temperatures, the average specific rates of NO3- uptake were twice as great during the night interruption period as during the day period; they were greater during the day period than during the dark periods; and they were greater during the dark period immediately following the day period than during the later dark period that followed the night interruption. While these average patterns were repetitious among days, measured rates of uptake varied hourly and included intervals of net efflux scattered through the day period and more frequently through the 2 dark periods. Root temperature did not affect the average daily specific rates of uptake or the qualitative relationships among day, dark and night interruption periods of the diurnal cycle.

  20. Perception of interrupted speech: Effects of dual-rate gating on the intelligibility of words and sentencesa

    PubMed Central

    Shafiro, Valeriy; Sheft, Stanley; Risley, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Perception of interrupted speech and the influence of speech materials and memory load were investigated using one or two concurrent square-wave gating functions. Sentences (Experiment 1) and random one-, three-, and five-word sequences (Experiment 2) were interrupted using either a primary gating rate alone (0.5−24 Hz) or a combined primary and faster secondary rate. The secondary rate interrupted only speech left intact after primary gating, reducing the original speech to 25%. In both experiments, intelligibility increased with primary rate, but varied with memory load and speech material (highest for sentences, lowest for five-word sequences). With dual-rate gating of sentences, intelligibility with fast secondary rates was superior to that with single rates and a 25% duty cycle, approaching that of single rates with a 50% duty cycle for some low and high rates. For dual-rate gating of words, the positive effect of fast secondary gating was smaller than for sentences, and the advantage of sentences over word-sequences was not obtained in many dual-rate conditions. These findings suggest that integration of interrupted speech fragments after gating depends on the duration of the gated speech interval and that sufficiently robust acoustic-phonetic word cues are needed to access higher-level contextual sentence information. PMID:21973362

  1. Technical Note: The use of an interrupted-flow centrifugation method to characterise preferential flow in low permeability media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, R. A.; Cuthbert, M. O.; Timms, W.

    2015-01-01

    We present an interrupted-flow centrifugation technique to characterise preferential flow in low permeability media. The method entails a minimum of three phases: centrifuge induced flow, no flow and centrifuge induced flow, which may be repeated several times in order to most effectively characterise multi-rate mass transfer behaviour. In addition, the method enables accurate simulation of relevant in situ total stress conditions during flow by selecting an appropriate centrifugal force level. We demonstrate the utility of the technique for characterising the hydraulic properties of smectite clay dominated core samples. All samples exhibited a non-Fickian tracer breakthrough (early tracer arrival), combined with a decrease in tracer concentration immediately after each period of interrupted-flow. This is indicative of dual (or multi) porosity behaviour, with solute migration predominately via advection during induced flow, and via molecular diffusion (between the preferential flow network(s) and the low hydraulic conductivity domain) during interrupted-flow. Tracer breakthrough curves were simulated using a bespoke dual porosity model with excellent agreement between the data and model output (Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient was >0.97 for all samples). In combination interrupted-flow centrifuge experiments and dual porosity transport modelling are shown to be a powerful method to characterise preferential flow in low permeability media.

  2. When Interrupted Intervention Leads to Failure: A Correlation Study of the Three-Tiered Reading Model in Grades K-2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weis, Beverly Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The three-tiered reading model is a widely practiced instructional scheme that moves students in and out of reading intervention groups during the school year. Though designed to treat students who need extra help learning to read, this interruption of reading interventions may hinder some students' progress. The purpose of this study was to…

  3. Reframing the Conversation about Students with Limited or Interrupted Formal Education: From Achievement Gap to Cultural Dissonance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCapua, Andrea; Marshall, Helaine W.

    2015-01-01

    U.S. schools face increasing pressure to ensure that all students succeed, yet the dropout rate for English learners is alarmingly high, especially for those with limited or interrupted formal schooling (SLIFE). Serving SLIFE can be challenging because they not only need to master language and content but also need to develop literacy skills and…

  4. The Interrupted Time Series as Quasi-Experiment: Three Tests of Significance. A Fortran Program for the CDC 3400 Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sween, Joyce; Campbell, Donald T.

    Computational formulae for the following three tests of significance, useful in the interrupted time series design, are given: (1) a "t" test (Mood, 1950) for the significance of the first post-change observation from a value predicted by a linear fit of the pre-change observations; (2) an "F" test (Walker and Lev, 1953) of the hypothesis that one…

  5. 75 FR 62420 - In the Matter of: Certain Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters and Products Containing Same; Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION In the Matter of: Certain Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters and Products Containing Same; Notice... that information on this matter can be obtained by contacting the Commission's TDD terminal on...

  6. Exploring Relationships between Teachers' Philosophical Beliefs and Practices Relative to Unforeseen Interruptions in Elementary Classroom Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mays, Faye Jeanette

    2012-01-01

    Teachers' knowledge, goals, beliefs, and decision-making activities were explored individually and combined relative to their philosophical beliefs and practices in the elementary classroom setting in response to unforeseen interruptions. Schoenfeld's Theory of Teaching-in-Context and Brown's "The Experimental Mind in…

  7. 18 CFR 260.9 - Reports by natural gas pipeline companies on service interruptions and damage to facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reports by natural gas pipeline companies on service interruptions and damage to facilities. 260.9 Section 260.9 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROVED FORMS, NATURAL GAS ACT STATEMENTS AND REPORTS...

  8. 18 CFR 260.9 - Reports by natural gas pipeline companies on service interruptions and damage to facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reports by natural gas..., NATURAL GAS ACT STATEMENTS AND REPORTS (SCHEDULES) § 260.9 Reports by natural gas pipeline companies on service interruptions and damage to facilities. (a)(1) Every natural gas company must report to...

  9. Use of Transnational Services to Prevent Treatment Interruption in Tuberculosis-Infected Persons Who Leave the United States.

    PubMed

    Tschampl, Cynthia A; Garnick, Deborah W; Zuroweste, Edward; Razavi, Moaven; Shepard, Donald S

    2016-03-01

    A major problem resulting from interrupted tuberculosis (TB) treatment is the development of drug-resistant TB, including multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB), a more deadly and costly-to-treat form of the disease. Global health systems are not equipped to diagnose and treat the current burden of MDR TB. TB-infected foreign visitors and temporary US residents who leave the country during treatment can experience treatment interruption and, thus, are at greater risk for drug-resistant TB. Using epidemiologic and demographic data, we estimated TB incidence among this group, as well as the proportion of patients referred to transnational care-continuity and management services during relocation; each year, ≈2,827 visitors and temporary residents are at risk for TB treatment interruption, 222 (8%) of whom are referred for transnational services. Scale up of transnational services for persons at high risk for treatment interruption is possible and encouraged because of potential health gains and reductions in healthcare costs for the United States and receiving countries. PMID:26886720

  10. Technical Note: The use of an interrupted-flow centrifugation method to characterise preferential flow in low permeability media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, R. A.; Cuthbert, M. O.; Timms, W.

    2015-09-01

    We present an interrupted-flow centrifugation technique to characterise preferential flow in low permeability media. The method entails a minimum of three phases: centrifuge-induced flow, no flow and centrifuge-induced flow, which may be repeated several times in order to most effectively characterise multi-rate mass transfer behaviour. In addition, the method enables accurate simulation of relevant in situ total stress conditions during flow by selecting an appropriate centrifugal force. We demonstrate the utility of the technique for characterising the hydraulic properties of smectite-clay-dominated core samples. All core samples exhibited a non-Fickian tracer breakthrough (early tracer arrival), combined with a decrease in tracer concentration immediately after each period of interrupted flow. This is indicative of dual (or multi-)porosity behaviour, with solute migration predominately via advection during induced flow, and via molecular diffusion (between the preferential flow network(s) and the low hydraulic conductivity domain) during interrupted flow. Tracer breakthrough curves were simulated using a bespoke dual porosity model with excellent agreement between the data and model output (Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient was > 0.97 for all samples). In combination, interrupted-flow centrifuge experiments and dual porosity transport modelling are shown to be a powerful method to characterise preferential flow in low permeability media.

  11. Conditioning the auditory system with continuous vs. interrupted noise of equal acoustic energy: is either exposure more protective?

    PubMed

    Skellett, R A; Cullen, J K; Fallon, M; Bobbin, R P

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that differences exist in the amount of protection provided by prior sound conditioning with continuous vs. interrupted, moderate-level noise. Differences were determined by monitoring the changes that occurred in cubic (2f1-f2) distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) amplitude growth functions subsequent to a traumatizing noise exposure (105 dB SPL, 1.0-2.0 kHz octave band noise presented 24 h per day for 3 days) in guinea pigs which had been conditioned with either continuous (89 dB SPL, 1.0-2.0 kHz octave band noise presented 24 h per day for 11 days) or interrupted noise (95 dB SPL, 1.0-2.0 kHz octave band noise presented on a 6-h 'on'/18-h 'off' schedule for 11 days) of equal acoustic energy. Results suggest that there are significant differences in the degree of protection provided by prior sound conditioning with the continuous and interrupted schedules of moderate-level noise used in this study. Specifically, the interrupted conditioning protocol afforded some degree of protection against the damaging effects of the traumatizing noise exposure, limited to frequencies above the noise exposure band. Conversely, there was a lack of any consistent and sizable protective effect found across the entire test frequency range for the continuous sound conditioning protocol. PMID:9508025

  12. Microsatellite Interruptions Stabilize Primate Genomes and Exist as Population-Specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms within Individual Human Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Ananda, Guruprasad; Hile, Suzanne E.; Breski, Amanda; Wang, Yanli; Kelkar, Yogeshwar; Makova, Kateryna D.; Eckert, Kristin A.

    2014-01-01

    Interruptions of microsatellite sequences impact genome evolution and can alter disease manifestation. However, human polymorphism levels at interrupted microsatellites (iMSs) are not known at a genome-wide scale, and the pathways for gaining interruptions are poorly understood. Using the 1000 Genomes Phase-1 variant call set, we interrogated mono-, di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide repeats up to 10 units in length. We detected ∼26,000–40,000 iMSs within each of four human population groups (African, European, East Asian, and American). We identified population-specific iMSs within exonic regions, and discovered that known disease-associated iMSs contain alleles present at differing frequencies among the populations. By analyzing longer microsatellites in primate genomes, we demonstrate that single interruptions result in a genome-wide average two- to six-fold reduction in microsatellite mutability, as compared with perfect microsatellites. Centrally located interruptions lowered mutability dramatically, by two to three orders of magnitude. Using a biochemical approach, we tested directly whether the mutability of a specific iMS is lower because of decreased DNA polymerase strand slippage errors. Modeling the adenomatous polyposis coli tumor suppressor gene sequence, we observed that a single base substitution interruption reduced strand slippage error rates five- to 50-fold, relative to a perfect repeat, during synthesis by DNA polymerases α, β, or η. Computationally, we demonstrate that iMSs arise primarily by base substitution mutations within individual human genomes. Our biochemical survey of human DNA polymerase α, β, δ, κ, and η error rates within certain microsatellites suggests that interruptions are created most frequently by low fidelity polymerases. Our combined computational and biochemical results demonstrate that iMSs are abundant in human genomes and are sources of population-specific genetic variation that may affect genome stability. The genome-wide identification of iMSs in human populations presented here has important implications for current models describing the impact of microsatellite polymorphisms on gene expression. PMID:25033203

  13. Physical interventions to interrupt or reduce the spread of respiratory viruses: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective To review systematically the evidence of effectiveness of physical interventions to interrupt or reduce the spread of respiratory viruses. Data sources Cochrane Library, Medline, OldMedline, Embase, and CINAHL, without restrictions on language or publication. Data selection Studies of any intervention to prevent the transmission of respiratory viruses (isolation, quarantine, social distancing, barriers, personal protection, and hygiene). A search of study designs included randomised trials, cohort, case-control, crossover, before and after, and time series studies. After scanning of the titles, abstracts and full text articles as a first filter, a standardised form was used to assess the eligibility of the remainder. Risk of bias of randomised studies was assessed for generation of the allocation sequence, allocation concealment, blinding, and follow-up. Non-randomised studies were assessed for the presence of potential confounders and classified as being at low, medium, or high risk of bias. Data synthesis 58 papers of 59 studies were included. The quality of the studies was poor for all four randomised controlled trials and most cluster randomised controlled trials; the observational studies were of mixed quality. Meta-analysis of six case-control studies suggested that physical measures are highly effective in preventing the spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome: handwashing more than 10 times daily (odds ratio 0.45, 95% confidence interval 0.36 to 0.57; number needed to treat=4, 95% confidence interval 3.65 to 5.52), wearing masks (0.32, 0.25 to 0.40; NNT=6, 4.54 to 8.03), wearing N95 masks (0.09, 0.03 to 0.30; NNT=3, 2.37 to 4.06), wearing gloves (0.43, 0.29 to 0.65; NNT=5, 4.15 to 15.41), wearing gowns (0.23, 0.14 to 0.37; NNT=5, 3.37 to 7.12), and handwashing, masks, gloves, and gowns combined (0.09, 0.02 to 0.35; NNT=3, 2.66 to 4.97). The combination was also effective in interrupting the spread of influenza within households. The highest quality cluster randomised trials suggested that spread of respiratory viruses can be prevented by hygienic measures in younger children and within households. Evidence that the more uncomfortable and expensive N95 masks were superior to simple surgical masks was limited, but they caused skin irritation. The incremental effect of adding virucidals or antiseptics to normal handwashing to reduce respiratory disease remains uncertain. Global measures, such as screening at entry ports, were not properly evaluated. Evidence was limited for social distancing being effective, especially if related to risk of exposure—that is, the higher the risk the longer the distancing period. Conclusion Routine long term implementation of some of the measures to interrupt or reduce the spread of respiratory viruses might be difficult. However, many simple and low cost interventions reduce the transmission of epidemic respiratory viruses. More resources should be invested into studying which physical interventions are the most effective, flexible, and cost effective means of minimising the impact of acute respiratory tract infections. PMID:19773323

  14. Role of contact tracing and prevention strategies in the interruption of leprosy transmission.

    PubMed

    Smith, W Cairns S; Aerts, Ann

    2014-03-01

    The global prevalence of leprosy has declined from 5.2 million in the 1980 s to 200,000 today. However, the new case detection rate remains high: over the last 8 years, around 220,000-250,000 people have been diagnosed with leprosy each year. In June 2013, an international meeting was organised by the Novartis Foundation for Sustainable Development in Geneva, Switzerland,2 with the objective of discussing the feasibility of interrupting the transmission of leprosy. The group of physicians, epidemiologists and public health professionals concluded that a successful programme would require early diagnosis and prompt multidrug therapy (MDT) for all patients, tracing and post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) for contacts of patients newly diagnosed with leprosy, improvements in diagnostic tools, as well as strict epidemiological surveillance and response systems to monitor progress. As a follow-up, a second expert group meeting was convened by the Novartis Foundation in January 2014 in Zurich, Switzerland, with the objective of reviewing the evidence for chemoprophylaxis in contacts and high-risk communities. The meeting also considered the definitions of 'contacts' and 'contact tracing', discussed alternative prophylaxis regimens, preliminary findings of operational pilot projects on PEP in Indonesia, as well as the development of diagnostic tools, and identified the priority questions for operational research in leprosy transmission. The meeting outlined how contact tracing and chemoprophylaxis programmes can be implemented to interrupt leprosy transmission. The expert panel reached the following conclusions: Chemoprophylaxis with single-dose rifampicin (SDR) is efficacious in reducing the risk of developing leprosy, although the protective effect appears to be smaller in contacts closer to the index patient than in more distant contacts.3 SDR can be targeted to contacts or implemented as community mass prophylaxis in certain circumstances; the preferred approach depends on local factors, such as the case detection rate, the level of community stigma against leprosy, and the degree of access to healthcare for patients and contacts. Alternative prophylaxis regimens and the role of post-exposure immunoprophylaxis need to be further investigated. Contact tracing combined with PEP across very diverse settings offers protection rates similar to those reported in controlled trials. For high-incidence pockets ('hotspots') or remote or confined high-incidence populations ('hotpops'), blanket administration of PEP may be a better option. Implementation of contact-tracing programmes is feasible and cost-effective, particularly in high-risk groups, but it should be integrated into local healthcare services to ensure their long-term sustainability. Funding and support must be maintained after an initial pilot has finished. New programmes for contact tracing need effective surveillance systems to enable appropriate follow-up and outcome evaluation. The Novartis Foundation and Netherlands Leprosy Relief (NLR) are currently developing and implementing a large international programme to demonstrate the feasibility, acceptability, cost-effectiveness and real-world efficacy of PEP as a strategy to interrupt leprosy transmission, in six pilot projects in Asia, Africa and South America. These new pilot projects will be developed together with the local health authorities, healthcare workers, communities and patients, in order to create local ownership from the outset. The pilots should aim to be scalable and sustainable, and should therefore include an objective outcome assessment. Local ownership ensures that locally appropriate language and definitions of contacts are used in each of the pilots. A test to identify subclinical disease and distinguish M. leprae exposure from infection would facilitate early and appropriate therapy (with PEP or MDT). The identification and validation of new, sensitive biomarkers for M. leprae infection and exposure may allow better targeting of PEP to those contacts at highest risk of developing leprosy. PMID:24974438

  15. Formation, Redox-Controled Preservation, and Interruption of Organic-rich Sapropel S1 sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lange, Gert J.; Hennekam, Rick; Goudeau, Marie-Louise; Filippidi, Amalia

    2015-04-01

    Distinct, organic-rich units (sapropels) occur in Mediterraneran sediments in a repetitive, climate-controled way. Their deposition is thought to be precession-related and to be associated with humid climate conditions. The last humid period from 11 - 5 kyr 14C ago, occurred simultaneous with a sustained circum-Mediterranean wet period. Within that period, the most recent sapropel (S1) formed synchronously between 9.8 and 5.7 14C ky BP at all water depths greater than a few hundred metres. As a consequence of increased fresh water (monsoon) input, surface waters had a reduced salinity and concomitantly the deep (> 1.8 km) eastern Mediterranean Sea was devoid of oxygen during 4,000 years of S1. This has resulted in a differential basin-wide preservation of S1 determined by water depth, as a result of different ventilation/climate-related redox conditions above and below 1.8 km. The end of this period is marked by a basin-wide high sedimentary manganese-oxide peak that represents an abrupt re-ventilation of the deep-water at 5.7 kyr. The sustaining oxic conditions thereafter have resulted in a downward progressing oxidation-front that is not only characterized by the degradation of most organic matter over its active pathway, but also by the built-up of manganese oxide. The latter has resulted in a secondary Mn-peak below the first, upper, ventilation Mn-peak. Apart from the major re-ventilation event at the end of sapropel S1 formation, also other, short-term ventilation events appear to have occurred during its formation, notably the 8.2 ka event. This potentially basin-wide event is particularly noticeable at relatively shallow near-coastal sites of high sedimentation rates. It marks a brief episode of not only re-oxygenated deep water thus reduced preservation, but also decreased primary productivity thus nutrient supply. This 8.2 cal ka BP interruption event is thought to be related to enhanced deep water formation in the Aegean or Adriatic due to a period of sustained cold air fluxes from Polar regions. The amount of precipitation thus stratified water column conditions seems associated with the N.African monsoonal system, whereas deep-water formation, thus disrupture of a stratified water column seems mostly related to the northern borderland climate system. Sapropel formation mechanisms, therefore, are related to a sensitive interplay between N-African monsoonal and northern climate systems. Assessing distinct sub-Milankovitch interruptions and related climate variability are vital for understanding future climate change

  16. Caring Is Not Enough: Teachers' Enactment of Ethical Care for Adolescent Students with Limited or Interrupted Formal Education (SLIFE) in a Newcomer Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hos, Rabia

    2016-01-01

    The educational landscape for schools in the United States is continuing to shift with the arrival of refugee students with limited or interrupted formal education, especially at the secondary schools. As refugee students with limited or interrupted formal education (SLIFE) adjust to schools in the United States, they may experience acculturative…

  17. Protective Factors Interrupting the Continuity from School Bullying to Later Internalizing and Externalizing Problems: A Systematic Review of Prospective Longitudinal Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ttofi, Maria M.; Bowes, Lucy; Farrington, David P.; Lösel, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    A systematic review is presented, based on prospective longitudinal studies, on protective factors that interrupt the continuity from bullying perpetration at school to externalizing problem behaviors later in life; and from bullying victimization to later internalizing problems. Some common factors were established, which seem to interrupt the…

  18. Protective Factors Interrupting the Continuity from School Bullying to Later Internalizing and Externalizing Problems: A Systematic Review of Prospective Longitudinal Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ttofi, Maria M.; Bowes, Lucy; Farrington, David P.; Lsel, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    A systematic review is presented, based on prospective longitudinal studies, on protective factors that interrupt the continuity from bullying perpetration at school to externalizing problem behaviors later in life; and from bullying victimization to later internalizing problems. Some common factors were established, which seem to interrupt the

  19. 41 CFR 301-10.8 - What is my liability if, for personal convenience, I travel by an indirect route or interrupt...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., for personal convenience, I travel by an indirect route or interrupt travel by a direct route? 301-10....8 What is my liability if, for personal convenience, I travel by an indirect route or interrupt travel by a direct route? Your reimbursement will be limited to the cost of travel by a direct route...

  20. 41 CFR 301-10.8 - What is my liability if, for personal convenience, I travel by an indirect route or interrupt...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., for personal convenience, I travel by an indirect route or interrupt travel by a direct route? 301-10....8 What is my liability if, for personal convenience, I travel by an indirect route or interrupt travel by a direct route? Your reimbursement will be limited to the cost of travel by a direct route...

  1. 41 CFR 301-10.8 - What is my liability if, for personal convenience, I travel by an indirect route or interrupt...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., for personal convenience, I travel by an indirect route or interrupt travel by a direct route? 301-10....8 What is my liability if, for personal convenience, I travel by an indirect route or interrupt travel by a direct route? Your reimbursement will be limited to the cost of travel by a direct route...

  2. 41 CFR 301-10.8 - What is my liability if, for personal convenience, I travel by an indirect route or interrupt...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., for personal convenience, I travel by an indirect route or interrupt travel by a direct route? 301-10....8 What is my liability if, for personal convenience, I travel by an indirect route or interrupt travel by a direct route? Your reimbursement will be limited to the cost of travel by a direct route...

  3. 41 CFR 301-10.8 - What is my liability if, for personal convenience, I travel by an indirect route or interrupt...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., for personal convenience, I travel by an indirect route or interrupt travel by a direct route? 301-10....8 What is my liability if, for personal convenience, I travel by an indirect route or interrupt travel by a direct route? Your reimbursement will be limited to the cost of travel by a direct route...

  4. Application of padmounted fault interrupters to single-phase URD systems

    SciTech Connect

    Israel, W.F.

    1995-12-31

    Underground distribution has proven itself to be a highly effective means of eliminating the temporary faults that plague overhead distribution, however, the permanent faults that do occur are often cable or splice failures which are unpredictable, difficult to locate and require a lot of time and expense to repair. One of the ways that the designer seeks to minimize the impact of such events on service reliability is by incorporating an overcurrent protection scheme which removes the faulted section from the rest of the system and contingency scheme which allows isolation of the faulted section and restoration of service in the shortest possible time with a minimal number of switching operations. As a result there has been a continuing interest in the development of devices, equipment, and methods which help to realize the ideals of rapid service restoration and isolation of faults to the smallest segment of the system. Overcurrent protection of the single-phase URD system has, traditionally, been the province of fused cutouts and fused padmounted sectionalizing terminals and switchgear. Recently however, padmounted vacuum fault interrupters, that utilize electronic controls for tripping, have become available from several manufacturers and are beginning to make inroads into this portion of the distribution system. This paper will discuss the characteristics and potential applications of a new product offered by Cooper Power Systems, the Shrubline VFI, which was designed specifically for use in single phase residential underground distribution.

  5. Interruption of Electrical Conductivity of Titanium Dental Implants Suggests a Path Towards Elimination Of Corrosion.

    PubMed

    Pozhitkov, Alex E; Daubert, Diane; Brochwicz Donimirski, Ashley; Goodgion, Douglas; Vagin, Mikhail Y; Leroux, Brian G; Hunter, Colby M; Flemmig, Thomas F; Noble, Peter A; Bryers, James D

    2015-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is an inflammatory disease that results in the destruction of soft tissue and bone around the implant. Titanium implant corrosion has been attributed to the implant failure and cytotoxic effects to the alveolar bone. We have documented the extent of titanium release into surrounding plaque in patients with and without peri-implantitis. An in vitro model was designed to represent the actual environment of an implant in a patient's mouth. The model uses actual oral microbiota from a volunteer, allows monitoring electrochemical processes generated by biofilms growing on implants and permits control of biocorrosion electrical current. As determined by next generation DNA sequencing, microbial compositions in experiments with the in vitro model were comparable with the compositions found in patients with implants. It was determined that the electrical conductivity of titanium implants was the key factor responsible for the biocorrosion process. The interruption of the biocorrosion current resulted in a 4-5 fold reduction of corrosion. We propose a new design of dental implant that combines titanium in zero oxidation state for osseointegration and strength, interlaid with a nonconductive ceramic. In addition, we propose electrotherapy for manipulation of microbial biofilms and to induce bone healing in peri-implantitis patients. PMID:26461491

  6. Life interrupted and life regained? Coping with stroke at a young age.

    PubMed

    Kuluski, Kerry; Dow, Clare; Locock, Louise; Lyons, Renee F; Lasserson, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of disability across the developed world, affecting an increasing number of younger people. In this article, we seek to understand the experience of stroke as a disabling life situation among young people and the strategies that they use to recover and cope. Directed content analysis was conducted from interviews with 17 community-dwelling stroke survivors aged 55 years and younger across the United Kingdom. The sample was drawn from a larger maximum variation sample of stroke survivors. Using the sociological concepts of biographical disruption and biographical repair as a guide, excerpts from the interviews pertaining to aspects of the patients' life that were interrupted, in addition to how they coped with the changes, were selected and analysed. All individuals described an "altered sense of self," a theme that included loss of identity, family disruption, and/or loss of valued activities. Individuals sought to adapt their sense of self by seeking external support, by restoring normality, and/or through positive reflection. Despite the adapted self that emerged, most individuals continued to experience impairments. While young stroke survivors adapt to their illness over time, they continue to experience impairments and disruptions in their personal and work lives. A holistic model of rehabilitation that helps individuals regain the capacity for everyday activities related to work, family life, and leisure can begin to address the emotional ramifications of diseases such as stroke, restore wellness, and work towards minimizing the burden felt by family caregivers and children. PMID:24461569

  7. Framework for evaluating the risks of paralytic poliomyelitis after global interruption of wild poliovirus transmission.

    PubMed Central

    Aylward, R. Bruce; Cochi, Stephen L.

    2004-01-01

    With the interruption of wild poliovirus transmission globally, the need for new policies to deal with the post-certification era will rapidly arise. New policies will be required in four areas: detection and notification of circulating polioviruses; biocontainment of wild, vaccine-derived and attenuated strains of poliovirus; vaccine stockpiles and response mechanisms; and routine immunization against polioviruses. A common understanding of the potential risks of paralytic poliomyelitis in the post-certification period is essential to the development of these policies. Since 2000, there has been increasing international consensus that the risks of paralytic poliomyelitis in the post-certification era fall into two categories: those due to the continued use of the oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) and those due to future improper handling of wild polioviruses. The specific risks within both categories have now been defined, and an understanding of the frequency and potential burden of disease associated with each is rapidly improving. This knowledge and clarity have provided a framework that is already proving valuable for identifying research priorities and discussing potential policy options with national authorities. However, this framework must be regarded as a dynamic tool, requiring regular updating as additional information on these risks becomes available through further scientific research, programmatic work, and policy decisions. PMID:15106299

  8. Interruption of deep brain stimulation of the globus pallidus in primary generalized dystonia.

    PubMed

    Grabli, David; Ewenczyk, Claire; Coelho-Braga, Maria-Clara; Lagrange, Christelle; Fraix, Valerie; Cornu, Philippe; Benabid, Alim-Louis; Vidailhet, Marie; Pollak, Pierre

    2009-12-15

    Stimulation (DBS) of the globus pallidus (GP) is effective to treat generalized dystonia. Little is known about the evolution of dystonia in case of arrest after a long period of stimulation. This study describes the course of dystonia during a 48 hours period without stimulation followed by a 24 hours period after turning ON the stimulator. 14 patients with generalized dystonia treated with bilateral GP DBS for 3 years or more were recruited. Blinded video-based analysis was performed using Burke-Fahn-Marsden scale at (1) baseline (ON stimulation), (2) up to 48 hours after the stimulator was turned OFF, and (3) 24 hours after the stimulator was turned ON. 13 patients completed the 48 hours OFF-stimulation period. The dystonia movement score progressively worsened from 24.3 +/- 13.9 at baseline to 48.9 +/- 19.8 after 48 hours (P < 0.00001). The disability score also worsened from 4.4 +/- 1.2 at baseline to 5.7 +/- 1.5 after 48 hours without stimulation (P < 0.001). When the neurostimulator was turned ON, the dystonia scores returned to baseline level after 10 hours. The interruption of GP DBS in dystonia results in a progressive worsening which is rapidly reversible once the neurostimulator is turned ON. PMID:19908309

  9. Non-hormonal interruption of incessant ovulation as a potential approach for ovarian cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Fathalla, Mahmoud F

    2016-03-01

    Ovarian cancer is a silent killer. There is a need to intensify research efforts on prevention strategies. The causative role of incessant ovulation has been supported by the protective effect of oral hormonal contraceptives. The released follicular fluid in the process of ovulation bathes not only the surface of the ovary but also the fimbrial end of the fallopian tube. Evidence has been accumulating about a fimbrial tubal origin for ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma, and for the potential of opportunistic or elective salpingectomy as an intervention strategy. Alternatively, periodic suppression of ovulation could be beneficial among women who have no need or are not using oral hormonal contraceptives. Rupture of the ovarian follicle releasing the ovum and follicular fluid is a prostaglandin-mediated inflammatory process. It can be stopped by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, leading to pharmacologic production of a luteinized unruptured follicle, simulating a normal non-conception cycle with unaltered steroid patterns/levels and cycle length. Non-hormonal periodic interruption of incessant ovulation could be recommended for women who are at high risk of ovarian cancer, but further research is needed to validate the potential of this approach. PMID:26876699

  10. Critical job events, acute stress, and strain: a multiple interrupted time series.

    PubMed

    Eden, D

    1982-12-01

    A critical job event (CJE) is defined as a time-bounded peak of performance demand made on the individual as an integral part of his job. Though such events are an important source of acute job stress and are amenable to longitudinal study, relevant research has been scant. In the present study, the effects of acute objective stress on subjective stress and on psychological and physiological strain were assessed among 39 first-year nursing students in an interrupted time series with multiple replications. Strain was measured five times, twice in anticipation of CJE interspersed by three low-stress occasions. The CJEs were providing the first comprehensive patient care and the final exam in nursing. A consistently confirmatory pattern of significantly rising and falling strain was found for anxiety, systolic blood pressure, and pulse rate: qualitative overload and serum uric acid changed as predicted four times out of five. CJE research can redress past overemphasis on chronic organizational stress and strengthen causal interpretation. PMID:10257633

  11. On the numerical simulation of the diffuse arc in a vacuum interrupter

    SciTech Connect

    Langlois, Y.; Chapelle, P.; Jardy, A.; Gentils, F.

    2011-06-01

    A 2D two-fluid numerical model is developed for the description of the diffuse arc in a vacuum interrupter under the possible influence of an axial magnetic field (AMF). This model incorporates the energy balance equations for both ions and electrons and takes into account the three components of the self-generated magnetic field. The possibility of both supersonic (at low current density) and subsonic (at high current density) plasma flow regimes is considered. Data from the literature are used to specify the values of the plasma parameters near the cathode, and the boundary conditions on the anode boundary rely on a simplified model of the anode sheath. Simulation results are presented for both ion flow regimes, with special attention to the current and plasma flow features. It is shown that there is always a contraction of the current flow, whereas the dynamics of the ions throughout the interelectrode gap is strongly influenced by their flow regime near the cathode. Finally, the influence of various operating parameters (presence of an AMF, gap length) on the current constriction at the anode is discussed.

  12. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy and acceptability of planned treatment interruptions in HIV-infected children.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Linda; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Hamadache, Djamel; Compagnucci, Alexandra; Penazzato, Martina; Bunupuradah, Torsak; Mazza, Antonio; Ramos, Jose Tomas; Flynn, Jacquie; Rampon, Osvalda; Mellado Pena, Maria Jose; Floret, Daniel; Marczynska, Magdalena; Puga, Ana; Forcat, Silvia; Riault, Yoann; Lallemant, Marc; Castro, Hannah; Gibb, Diana M; Giaquinto, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    There have been no paediatric randomised trials describing the effect of planned treatment interruptions (PTIs) of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on adherence, or evaluating acceptability of such a strategy. In PENTA 11, HIV-infected children were randomised to CD4-guided PTIs (n = 53) or continuous therapy (CT, n = 56). Carers, and children if appropriate, completed questionnaires on adherence to ART and acceptability of PTIs. There was no difference in reported adherence on ART between CT and PTI groups; non-adherence (reporting missed doses over the last 3 days or marking <100 % adherence since the last clinical visit on a visual analogue scale) was 18 % (20/111) and 14 % (12/83) on carer questionnaires in the CT and PTI groups respectively (odds ratios, OR (95 % CI) = 1.04 (0.20, 5.41), ?(2) (1) = 0.003, p = 0.96). Carers in Europe/USA reported non-adherence more often (31/121, 26 %) than in Thailand (1/73, 1 %; OR (95 % CI) = 54.65 (3.68, 810.55), ?(2) (1) = 8.45, p = 0.004). The majority of families indicated they were happy to have further PTIs (carer: 23/36, 64 %; children: 8/13, 62 %), however many reported more clinic visits during PTI were a problem (carer: 15/36, 42 %; children: 6/12, 50 %). PMID:22584916

  13. Safety of anticoagulation with uninterrupted warfarin vs. interrupted dabigatran in patients requiring an implantable cardiac device

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Shivanshu; Muthusamy, Purushothaman; Mowers, Katie L.; Elmouchi, Darryl A.; Finta, Bohuslav; Gauri, Andre J.; Woelfel, Alan K.; Fritz, Timothy D.; Davis, Alan T.

    2016-01-01

    Background The optimal strategy of peri-procedural anticoagulation in patients undergoing permanent cardiac device implantation is controversial. Our objective was to compare the major bleeding and thromboembolic complications in patients managed with uninterrupted warfarin (UW) vs. interrupted dabigatran (ID) during permanent pacemaker (PPM) or implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) implantation. Methods A retrospective cohort study of all eligible patients from July 2011 through January 2012 was performed. UW was defined as patients who had maintained a therapeutic international normalized ratio (INR) on the day of the procedure. ID was defined as stopping dabigatran ≥12 hours prior to the procedure and then resuming after implantation. Major bleeding events included hemothorax, hemopericardium, intracranial hemorrhage, gastrointestinal bleed, epistaxis, or pocket hematoma requiring surgical intervention. Thromboembolic complications included stroke, transient ischemic attack, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, or arterial embolism. Results Of the 133 patients (73.4±11.0 years; 91 males) in the study, 86 received UW and 47 received ID. One (1.2%) patient in the UW group sustained hemopericardium perioperatively and died. In comparison, the ID patients had no complications. As compared to the ID group, the UW group had a higher median CHADS2 score (2 vs. 3, P=0.04) and incidence of Grade 1 pocket hematoma (0% vs. 7%, P=0.09). Neither group developed any thromboembolic complications. Conclusions Major bleeding rates were similar among UW and ID groups. Perioperative ID appears to be a safe anticoagulation strategy for patients undergoing PPM or ICD implantation. PMID:26885486

  14. Interrupted coding sequences in Mycobacterium smegmatis: authentic mutations or sequencing errors?

    PubMed Central

    Deshayes, Caroline; Perrodou, Emmanuel; Gallien, Sebastien; Euphrasie, Daniel; Schaeffer, Christine; Van-Dorsselaer, Alain; Poch, Olivier; Lecompte, Odile; Reyrat, Jean-Marc

    2007-01-01

    Background In silico analysis has shown that all bacterial genomes contain a low percentage of ORFs with undetected frameshifts and in-frame stop codons. These interrupted coding sequences (ICDSs) may really be present in the organism or may result from misannotation based on sequencing errors. The reality or otherwise of these sequences has major implications for all subsequent functional characterization steps, including module prediction, comparative genomics and high-throughput proteomic projects. Results We show here, using Mycobacterium smegmatis as a model species, that a significant proportion of these ICDSs result from sequencing errors. We used a resequencing procedure and mass spectrometry analysis to determine the nature of a number of ICDSs in this organism. We found that 28 of the 73 ICDSs investigated correspond to sequencing errors. Conclusion The correction of these errors results in modification of the predicted amino acid sequences of the corresponding proteins and changes in annotation. We suggest that each bacterial ICDS should be investigated individually, to determine its true status and to ensure that the genome sequence is appropriate for comparative genomics analyses. PMID:17295914

  15. Interruptions improve choice performance in gray jays: prolonged information processing versus minimization of costly errors.

    PubMed

    Waite, Thomas A

    2002-12-01

    Under the assumption that selection favors minimization of costly errors, erroneous choice may be common when its fitness cost is low. According to an adaptive-choice model, this cost depends on the rate at which an animal encounters the choice: the higher this rate, the smaller the cost of choosing a less valuable option. Errors should thus be more common when interruptions to foraging are shorter. A previous experiment supported this prediction: gray jays, Perisoreus canadensis, were more error prone when subjected to shorter delays to access to food rewards. This pattern, though, is also predicted by an attentional-constraints model. Because the subjects were able to inspect the rewards during delays, their improved performance when subjected to longer delays could have been a byproduct of the experimentally prolonged opportunity for information processing. To evaluate this possibility, a follow-up experiment manipulated both delay to access and whether rewards could be inspected during delays. Depriving jays of the opportunity to inspect rewards (using opaque lids) induced only a small, nonsignificant increase in error rate. This effect was independent of length of delay and so the jays' improved performance when subjected to longer delays was not simply a byproduct of prolonged information processing. More definitively, even when the jays were prevented from inspecting rewards during delays, their performance improved when subjected to longer delays. The findings are thus consistent with the adaptive-choice model. PMID:12461598

  16. Improving Malaria Control in West Africa: Interruption of Transmission as a Paradigm Shift

    PubMed Central

    Doumbia, Seydou O.; Ndiaye, Daouda; Koita, Ousmane A.; Diakité, Mahamadou; Nwakanma, Davis; Coulibaly, Mamadou; Traoré, Sekou F.; Keating, Joseph; Milner, Danny A.; Ndiaye, Jean-Louis; Sene, Papa Diogoye; Ahouidi, Ambroise; Dieye, Tandakha N.; Gaye, Oumar; Okebe, Joseph; Ceesay, Serign J.; Ngwa, Alfred; Oriero, Eniyou C.; Konaté, Lassana; Sy, Ngayo; Jawara, Musa; Faye, Ousmane; Kéita, Moussa; Cissé, Moussa; Sogoba, Nafomon; Poudiougou, Belco; Diawara, Sory; Sangaré, Lansana; Coulibaly, Tinzana; Seck, Ibrahima; Abubakar, Ismaela; Gomis, Jules; Mather, Frances J.; Sissako, Aliou; Diarra, Ayouba; Kandeh, Balla; Whalen, Christopher; Moyer, Brian; Nnedu, Obinna; Thiero, Oumar; Bei, Amy K.; Daniels, Rachel; Miura, Kazutoyo; Long, Carole A.; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Duraisingh, Manoj; Muskavitch, Marc A.T.; D’Alessandro, Umberto; Conway, David J.; Volkman, Sarah K.; Valim, Clarissa; Wirth, Dyann F.; Krogstad, Donald J.

    2011-01-01

    With the paradigm shift from the reduction of morbidity and mortality to the interruption of transmission, the focus of malaria control broadens from symptomatic infections in children ≤ 5 years of age to include asymptomatic infections in older children and adults. In addition, as control efforts intensify and the number of interventions increases, there will be decreases in prevalence, incidence and transmission with additional decreases in morbidity and mortality. Expected secondary consequences of these changes include upward shifts in the peak ages for infection (parasitemia) and disease, increases in the ages for acquisition of antiparasite humoral and cellular immune responses and increases in false-negative blood smears and rapid diagnostic tests. Strategies to monitor these changes must include: 1] studies of the entire population (that are not restricted to children ≤ 5 or ≤ 10 years of age), 2] study sites in both cities and rural areas (because of increasing urbanization across sub-Saharan Africa) and 3] innovative strategies for surveillance as the prevalence of infection decreases and the frequency of false-negative smears and rapid diagnostic tests increases. PMID:22142790

  17. Polymethylene-interrupted fatty acids: Biomarkers for native and exotic mussels in the Laurentian Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mezek, Tadej; Sverko, Ed; Ruddy, Martina D.; Zaruk, Donna; Capretta, Alfredo; Hebert, Craig E.; Fisk, Aaron T.; McGoldrick, Daryl J.; Newton, Teresa J.; Sutton, Trent M.; Koops, Marten A.; Muir, Andrew M.; Johnson, Timothy B.; Ebener, Mark P.; Arts, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    Freshwater organisms synthesize a wide variety of fatty acids (FAs); however, the ability to synthesize and/or subsequently modify a particular FA is not universal, making it possible to use certain FAs as biomarkers. Herein we document the occurrence of unusual FAs (polymethylene-interrupted fatty acids; PMI-FAs) in select freshwater organisms in the Laurentian Great Lakes. We did not detect PMI-FAs in: (a) natural seston from Lake Erie and Hamilton Harbor (Lake Ontario), (b) various species of laboratory-cultured algae including a green alga (Scenedesmus obliquus), two cyanobacteria (Aphanizomenon flos-aquae and Synechococystis sp.), two diatoms (Asterionella formosa, Diatoma elongatum) and a chrysophyte (Dinobryon cylindricum) or, (c) zooplankton (Daphnia spp., calanoid or cyclopoid copepods) from Lake Ontario, suggesting that PMI-FAs are not substantively incorporated into consumers at the phytoplankton–zooplankton interface. However, these unusual FAs comprised 4-6% of total fatty acids (on a dry tissue weight basis) of native fat mucket (Lampsilis siliquoidea) and plain pocketbook (L. cardium) mussels and in invasive zebra (Dreissena polymorpha) and quagga (D. bugensis) mussels. We were able to clearly partition Great Lakes' mussels into three separate groups (zebra, quagga, and native mussels) based solely on their PMI-FA profiles. We also provide evidence for the trophic transfer of PMI-FAs from mussels to various fishes in Lakes Ontario and Michigan, further underlining the potential usefulness of PMI-FAs for tracking the dietary contribution of mollusks in food web and contaminant-fate studies.

  18. Acceptability of smartphone technology to interrupt sedentary time in adults with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Christine A; Hoffman, Sara A; Daly, Elyse R; Murillo, Manuel; Iakovlev, Gleb; Spring, Bonnie

    2015-09-01

    Breaking up sitting time with light- or moderate-intensity physical activity may help to alleviate some negative health effects of sedentary behavior, but few studies have examined ways to effectively intervene. This feasibility study examined the acceptability of a new technology (NEAT!) developed to interrupt prolonged bouts (≥20 min) of sedentary time among adults with type 2 diabetes. Eight of nine participants completed a 1-month intervention and agreed that NEAT! made them more conscious of sitting time. Most participants (87.5 %) expressed a desire to use NEAT! in the future. Sedentary time decreased by 8.1 ± 4.5 %, and light physical activity increased by 7.9 ± 5.5 % over the 1-month period. The results suggest that NEAT! is an acceptable technology to intervene on sedentary time among adults with type 2 diabetes. Future studies are needed to examine the use of the technology among larger samples and determine its effects on glucose and insulin levels. PMID:26327936

  19. Interruption of Electrical Conductivity of Titanium Dental Implants Suggests a Path Towards Elimination Of Corrosion

    PubMed Central

    Pozhitkov, Alex E.; Daubert, Diane; Brochwicz Donimirski, Ashley; Goodgion, Douglas; Vagin, Mikhail Y.; Leroux, Brian G.; Hunter, Colby M.; Flemmig, Thomas F.; Noble, Peter A.; Bryers, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is an inflammatory disease that results in the destruction of soft tissue and bone around the implant. Titanium implant corrosion has been attributed to the implant failure and cytotoxic effects to the alveolar bone. We have documented the extent of titanium release into surrounding plaque in patients with and without peri-implantitis. An in vitro model was designed to represent the actual environment of an implant in a patient’s mouth. The model uses actual oral microbiota from a volunteer, allows monitoring electrochemical processes generated by biofilms growing on implants and permits control of biocorrosion electrical current. As determined by next generation DNA sequencing, microbial compositions in experiments with the in vitro model were comparable with the compositions found in patients with implants. It was determined that the electrical conductivity of titanium implants was the key factor responsible for the biocorrosion process. The interruption of the biocorrosion current resulted in a 4–5 fold reduction of corrosion. We propose a new design of dental implant that combines titanium in zero oxidation state for osseointegration and strength, interlaid with a nonconductive ceramic. In addition, we propose electrotherapy for manipulation of microbial biofilms and to induce bone healing in peri-implantitis patients. PMID:26461491

  20. Direct Observation of Intermediates Involved in the Interruption of the Bischler-Napieralski Reaction.

    PubMed

    White, Kolby L; Mewald, Marius; Movassaghi, Mohammad

    2015-08-01

    The first mechanistic investigation of electrophilic amide activation of α,α-disubstituted tertiary lactams and the direct observation of key intermediates by in situ FTIR, (1)H, (13)C, and (19)F NMR in our interrupted Bischler-Napieralski-based synthetic strategy to the aspidosperma alkaloids, including a complex tetracyclic diiminium ion, is discussed. The reactivity of a wide range of pyridines with trifluoromethanesulfonic anhydride was systematically examined, and characteristic IR absorption bands for the corresponding N-trifluoromethanesulfonylated pyridinium trifluoromethanesulfonates were assigned. The reversible formation of diiminium ether intermediates was studied, providing insight into divergent mechanistic pathways as a function of the steric environment of the amide substrate and stoichiometry of reagents. Importantly, when considering base additives during electrophilic amide activation, more hindered α-quaternary tertiary lactams require the use of non-nucleophilic pyridine additives in order to avoid deactivation via a competing desulfonylation reaction. The isolation and full characterization of a tetracyclic iminium trifluoromethanesulfonate provided additional correlation between in situ characterization of sensitive intermediates and isolable compounds involved in this synthetic transformation. PMID:26166404

  1. Dolphins Can Maintain Vigilant Behavior through Echolocation for 15 Days without Interruption or Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Branstetter, Brian K.; Finneran, James J.; Fletcher, Elizabeth A.; Weisman, Brian C.; Ridgway, Sam H.

    2012-01-01

    In dolphins, natural selection has developed unihemispheric sleep where alternating hemispheres of their brain stay awake. This allows dolphins to maintain consciousness in response to respiratory demands of the ocean. Unihemispheric sleep may also allow dolphins to maintain vigilant states over long periods of time. Because of the relatively poor visibility in the ocean, dolphins use echolocation to interrogate their environment. During echolocation, dolphin produce clicks and listen to returning echoes to determine the location and identity of objects. The extent to which individual dolphins are able to maintain continuous vigilance through this active sense is unknown. Here we show that dolphins may continuously echolocate and accurately report the presence of targets for at least 15 days without interruption. During a total of three sessions, each lasting five days, two dolphins maintained echolocation behaviors while successfully detecting and reporting targets. Overall performance was between 75 to 86% correct for one dolphin and 97 to 99% correct for a second dolphin. Both animals demonstrated diel patterns in echolocation behavior. A 15-day testing session with one dolphin resulted in near perfect performance with no significant decrement over time. Our results demonstrate that dolphins can continuously monitor their environment and maintain long-term vigilant behavior through echolocation. PMID:23082170

  2. Analysis of cell cycle shortening and developmental interruption in Dictyostelium discoideum allC RNAi mutants.

    PubMed

    Xue, D M; Hou, L S; Zhang, S R; Chen, N X

    2014-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum allC RNAi mutant cells are motile and aggregate together, but do not undergo further morphological development. The relatively quick growth rate of allC RNAi mutants compared to wild-type D. discoideum results in a shortened mutant cell cycle. However, at present, little is known about the mechanism underlying this phenomenon. Here, we used semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), real-time quantitative RT-PCR, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry to elucidate the phenomenon. We found significant downregulation of myosin II heavy chain, D. discoideum calcium-dependent cell adhesion molecule-1 (DdCAD-1) mRNA, DdCAD-1 protein, D. discoideum mRNA for 14-3-3 and 14-3-3 protein, and type A von Willebrand factor domain-containing protein mRNA in allC RNAi mutants. The results suggest that downregulation of the myosin II heavy chain could be one of key factors causing the developmental interruption and that downregulation of the 14-3-3 protein and the type A von Willebrand factor domain-containing protein mRNA plays an important role in shortening the cell cycle of allC RNAi mutants. PMID:24938606

  3. Transient Response Simulation of Downstream Thermofluid Field in a Gas Circuit Breaker during Current Interruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Hideya; Hamada, Katsuhisa; Uchii, Toshiyuki; Kawano, Hiromichi; Tanaka, Yasunori

    A transient response of SF6 thermofluid field inside the exhaust tube in a Gas Circuit Breaker under high temperature, high pressure and high velocity conditions is analyzed by taking compressible effect and some realistic processes into account related to the available experimental data of GCB test facility. Furthermore, computational simulation is conducted to clarify the effective cooling process of SF6 hot gas flow inside the exhaust tube for transient time to avoid the SF6 hot gas breakdown near exhaust tube exit after the arc current interruption. It is found that the SF6 hot gas flow can be effectively cooled down for the rough inside wall of exhaust tube due to the separation of SF6 hot gas flow from the inside wall and also active mixing with upstream cold gas. The effect of roughness pattern on the real time thermofluid field of SF6 hot gas flow and possible breakdown region are also clarified. Finally, the computed temperature in GCB shows the good agreement with the available experimental data for smooth surface of exhaust tube.

  4. Reduction in Male Suicide Mortality Following the 2006 Russian Alcohol Policy: An Interrupted Time Series Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chamlin, Mitchell B.; Andreev, Evgeny

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We took advantage of a natural experiment to assess the impact on suicide mortality of a suite of Russian alcohol policies. Methods. We obtained suicide counts from anonymous death records collected by the Russian Federal State Statistics Service. We used autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) interrupted time series techniques to model the effect of the alcohol policy (implemented in January 2006) on monthly male and female suicide counts between January 2000 and December 2010. Results. Monthly male and female suicide counts decreased during the period under study. Although the ARIMA analysis showed no impact of the policy on female suicide mortality, the results revealed an immediate and permanent reduction of about 9% in male suicides (Ln ω0 = −0.096; P = .01). Conclusions. Despite a recent decrease in mortality, rates of alcohol consumption and suicide in Russia remain among the highest in the world. Our analysis revealed that the 2006 alcohol policy in Russia led to a 9% reduction in male suicide mortality, meaning the policy was responsible for saving 4000 male lives annually that would otherwise have been lost to suicide. Together with recent similar findings elsewhere, our results suggest an important role for public health and other population level interventions, including alcohol policy, in reducing alcohol-related harm. PMID:24028249

  5. Astaxanthin Inhibits Proliferation of Human Gastric Cancer Cell Lines by Interrupting Cell Cycle Progression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Ha; Park, Jong-Jae; Lee, Beom Jae; Joo, Moon Kyung; Chun, Hoon Jai; Lee, Sang Woo; Bak, Young-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Astaxanthin is a carotenoid pigment that has antioxidant, antitumoral, and anti-inflammatory properties. In this in vitro study, we investigated the mechanism of anticancer effects of astaxanthin in gastric carcinoma cell lines. Methods The human gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines AGS, KATO-III, MKN-45, and SNU-1 were treated with various concentrations of astaxanthin. A cell viability test, cell cycle analysis, and immunoblotting were performed. Results The viability of each cancer cell line was suppressed by astaxanthin in a dose-dependent manner with significantly decreased proliferation in KATO-III and SNU-1 cells. Astaxanthin increased the number of cells in the G0/G1 phase but reduced the proportion of S phase KATO-III and SNU-1 cells. Phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was decreased in an inverse dose-dependent correlation with astaxanthin concentration, and the expression of p27kip-1 increased the KATO-III and SNU-1 cell lines in an astaxanthin dose-dependent manner. Conclusions Astaxanthin inhibits proliferation by interrupting cell cycle progression in KATO-III and SNU-1 gastric cancer cells. This may be caused by the inhibition of the phosphorylation of ERK and the enhanced expression of p27kip-1. PMID:26470770

  6. Contribution of Environmental Surveillance Toward Interruption of Poliovirus Transmission in Nigeria, 2012–2015

    PubMed Central

    Johnson Muluh, Ticha; Hamisu, Abdullahi Walla; Craig, Kehinde; Mkanda, Pascal; Andrew, Etsano; Adeniji, Johnson; Akande, Adefunke; Musa, Audu; Ayodeji, Isiaka; Nicksy, Gumede; Banda, Richard; Tegegne, Sisay G.; Nsubuga, Peter; Oyetunji, Ajiboye; Diop, Ousmane; Vaz, Rui G.; Muhammad, Ado J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cases of paralysis caused by poliovirus have decreased by >99% since the 1988 World Health Assembly's resolution to eradicate polio. The World Health Organization identified environmental surveillance (ES) of poliovirus in the poliomyelitis eradication strategic plan as an activity that can complement acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance. This article summarizes key public health interventions that followed the isolation of polioviruses from ES between 2012 and 2015. Methods. The grap method was used to collect 1.75 L of raw flowing sewage every 2–4 weeks. Once collected, samples were shipped at 4°C to a polio laboratory for concentration. ES data were then used to guide program implementation. Results. From 2012 to 2015, ES reported 97 circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPV2) and 14 wild polioviruses. In 2014 alone, 54 cVDPV type 2 cases and 1 WPV type 1 case were reported. In Sokoto State, 58 cases of AFP were found from a search of 9426 households. A total of 2 252 059 inactivated polio vaccine and 2 460 124 oral polio vaccine doses were administered to children aged <5 year in Borno and Yobe states. Conclusions. This article is among the first from Africa that relates ES findings to key public health interventions (mass immunization campaigns, inactivated polio vaccine introduction, and strengthening of AFP surveillance) that have contributed to the interruption of poliovirus transmission in Nigeria. PMID:26908747

  7. Life interrupted and life regained? Coping with stroke at a young age

    PubMed Central

    Dow, Clare; Locock, Louise; Lyons, Renee F.; Lasserson, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of disability across the developed world, affecting an increasing number of younger people. In this article, we seek to understand the experience of stroke as a disabling life situation among young people and the strategies that they use to recover and cope. Directed content analysis was conducted from interviews with 17 community-dwelling stroke survivors aged 55 years and younger across the United Kingdom. The sample was drawn from a larger maximum variation sample of stroke survivors. Using the sociological concepts of biographical disruption and biographical repair as a guide, excerpts from the interviews pertaining to aspects of the patients’ life that were interrupted, in addition to how they coped with the changes, were selected and analysed. All individuals described an “altered sense of self,” a theme that included loss of identity, family disruption, and/or loss of valued activities. Individuals sought to adapt their sense of self by seeking external support, by restoring normality, and/or through positive reflection. Despite the adapted self that emerged, most individuals continued to experience impairments. While young stroke survivors adapt to their illness over time, they continue to experience impairments and disruptions in their personal and work lives. A holistic model of rehabilitation that helps individuals regain the capacity for everyday activities related to work, family life, and leisure can begin to address the emotional ramifications of diseases such as stroke, restore wellness, and work towards minimizing the burden felt by family caregivers and children. PMID:24461569

  8. HIV Reactivation from Latency after Treatment Interruption Occurs on Average Every 5-8 Days—Implications for HIV Remission

    PubMed Central

    Pinkevych, Mykola; Cromer, Deborah; Tolstrup, Martin; Grimm, Andrew J.; Cooper, David A.; Lewin, Sharon R.; Søgaard, Ole S.; Rasmussen, Thomas A.; Kent, Stephen J.; Kelleher, Anthony D.; Davenport, Miles P.

    2015-01-01

    HIV infection can be effectively controlled by anti-retroviral therapy (ART) in most patients. However therapy must be continued for life, because interruption of ART leads to rapid recrudescence of infection from long-lived latently infected cells. A number of approaches are currently being developed to ‘purge’ the reservoir of latently infected cells in order to either eliminate infection completely, or significantly delay the time to viral recrudescence after therapy interruption. A fundamental question in HIV research is how frequently the virus reactivates from latency, and thus how much the reservoir might need to be reduced to produce a prolonged antiretroviral-free HIV remission. Here we provide the first direct estimates of the frequency of viral recrudescence after ART interruption, combining data from four independent cohorts of patients undergoing treatment interruption, comprising 100 patients in total. We estimate that viral replication is initiated on average once every ≈6 days (range 5.1- 7.6 days). This rate is around 24 times lower than previous thought, and is very similar across the cohorts. In addition, we analyse data on the ratios of different ‘reactivation founder’ viruses in a separate cohort of patients undergoing ART-interruption, and estimate the frequency of successful reactivation to be once every 3.6 days. This suggests that a reduction in the reservoir size of around 50-70-fold would be required to increase the average time-to-recrudescence to about one year, and thus achieve at least a short period of anti-retroviral free HIV remission. Our analyses suggests that time-to-recrudescence studies will need to be large in order to detect modest changes in the reservoir, and that macaque models of SIV latency may have much higher frequencies of viral recrudescence after ART interruption than seen in human HIV infection. Understanding the mean frequency of recrudescence from latency is an important first step in approaches to prolong antiretroviral-free viral remission in HIV. PMID:26133551

  9. Chemical disinfection to interrupt transfer of rhinovirus type 14 from environmental surfaces to hands.

    PubMed Central

    Sattar, S A; Jacobsen, H; Springthorpe, V S; Cusack, T M; Rubino, J R

    1993-01-01

    Rhinoviruses can survive on environmental surfaces for several hours under ambient conditions. Hands can readily become contaminated after contact with such surfaces, and self-inoculation may lead to infection. Whereas hand washing is crucial in preventing the spread of rhinovirus colds, proper disinfection of environmental surfaces may further reduce rhinovirus transmission. In this study, the capacities of Lysol Disinfectant Spray (0.1% o-phenylphenol and 79% ethanol), a domestic bleach (6% sodium hypochlorite diluted to give 800 ppm of free chlorine), a quaternary ammonium-based product (7.05% quaternary ammonium diluted 1:128 in tap water), and a phenol-based product (14.7% phenol diluted 1:256 in tap water) were compared in interrupting the transfer of rhinovirus type 14 from stainless steel disks to fingerpads of human volunteers upon a 10-s contact at a pressure of 1 kg/cm2. Ten microliters of the virus, suspended in bovine mucin (5 mg/ml), was placed on each disk, and the inoculum was dried under ambient conditions; the input number on each disk ranged from 0.5 x 10(5) to 2.1 x 10(6) PFU. The dried virus was exposed to 20 microliters of the test disinfectant. The Lysol spray was able to reduce virus infectivity by > 99.99% after a contact of either 1 or 10 min, and no detectable virus was transferred to fingerpads from Lysol-treated disks. The bleach (800 ppm of free chlorine) reduced the virus titer by 99.7% after a contact time of 10 min, and again no virus was transferred from the disks treated with it.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8390817

  10. Interruption of antiretroviral therapy is associated with increased plasma cystatin C

    PubMed Central

    Mocroft, A; Wyatt, C; Szczech, L; Neuhaus, J; El-Sadr, W; Tracy, R; Kuller, L; Shlipak, M; Angus, B; Klinker, H; Ross, M

    2009-01-01

    Background Cystatin C has been proposed as an alternative marker of renal function. We sought to determine if participants randomized to episodic use of antiretroviral therapy guided by CD4+ count (drug conservation; DC) had altered cystatin C levels compared to those randomised to continuous antiretroviral therapy (viral suppression; VS) in the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy Trial, and to identify factors associated with increased cystatin C. Methods Cystatin C was measured in plasma collected at randomization, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 months after randomization in a random sample of 249 and 250 participants in the DC and VS groups respectively. Logistic regression was used to model the odds of ≥ 0.15 mg/dl increase in cystatin C (1 standard deviation [SD]) in the first month after randomisation, adjusting for demographic and clinical characteristics. Results At randomisation, mean (SD) cystatin C level was 0.99 (0.26 mg/dl) and 1.01 (0.28 mg/dl) in the DC and VS arms respectively (p=0.29). In the first month after randomisation, 21.8% and 10.6% had ≥0.15 mg/dl increase in cystatin C in the DC and VS arm respectively (p=0.0008). The difference in cystatin C between the treatment arms was maintained through 1 year after randomisation. After adjustment, participants in the VS arm had significantly reduced odds of ≥0.15 mg/dl increase in cystatin C in the first month (OR 0.42; 95% CI 0.23–0.74, p=0.0023). Conclusions These results demonstrate that interruption of antiretroviral therapy is associated with an increase in cystatin C, which may reflect worsened renal function. PMID:19050388

  11. Within-season flowering interruptions are common in the water-limited Sky Islands.

    PubMed

    Crimmins, Theresa M; Bertelsen, David C; Crimmins, Michael A

    2014-05-01

    Within-season breaks in flowering have been reported in a wide range of highly variable ecosystems including deserts, tropical forests and high-elevation meadows. A tendency for interruptions in flowering has also been documented in southwestern US "Sky Island" plant communities, which encompass xeric to mesic conditions. Seasonal breaks in flowering have implications for plant reproductive success, population structure, and gene flow as well as resource availability for pollinators and dependent animals. Most reports of multiple within-season flowering events describe only two distinct flowering episodes. In this study, we set out to better quantify distinct within-season flowering events in highly variable Sky Islands plant communities. Across a >1,200 m elevation gradient, we documented a strong tendency for multiple within-season flowering events. In both distinct spring and summer seasons, we observed greater than two distinct within-season flowering in more than 10 % of instances. Patterns were clearly mediated by the different climate factors at work in the two seasons. The spring season, which is influenced by both temperature and precipitation, showed a mixed response, with the greatest tendency for multiple flowering events occurring at mid-elevations and functional types varying in their responses across the gradient. In the summer season, during which flowering across the gradient is limited by localized precipitation, annual plants exhibited the fewest within-season flowering events and herbaceous perennial plants showed the greatest. Additionally, more distinct events occurred at lower elevations. The patterns documented here provide a baseline for comparison of system responses to changing climate conditions. PMID:24122340

  12. Within-season flowering interruptions are common in the water-limited Sky Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crimmins, Theresa M.; Bertelsen, C. David; Crimmins, Michael A.

    2014-05-01

    Within-season breaks in flowering have been reported in a wide range of highly variable ecosystems including deserts, tropical forests and high-elevation meadows. A tendency for interruptions in flowering has also been documented in southwestern US "Sky Island" plant communities, which encompass xeric to mesic conditions. Seasonal breaks in flowering have implications for plant reproductive success, population structure, and gene flow as well as resource availability for pollinators and dependent animals. Most reports of multiple within-season flowering events describe only two distinct flowering episodes. In this study, we set out to better quantify distinct within-season flowering events in highly variable Sky Islands plant communities. Across a >1,200 m elevation gradient, we documented a strong tendency for multiple within-season flowering events. In both distinct spring and summer seasons, we observed greater than two distinct within-season flowering in more than 10 % of instances. Patterns were clearly mediated by the different climate factors at work in the two seasons. The spring season, which is influenced by both temperature and precipitation, showed a mixed response, with the greatest tendency for multiple flowering events occurring at mid-elevations and functional types varying in their responses across the gradient. In the summer season, during which flowering across the gradient is limited by localized precipitation, annual plants exhibited the fewest within-season flowering events and herbaceous perennial plants showed the greatest. Additionally, more distinct events occurred at lower elevations. The patterns documented here provide a baseline for comparison of system responses to changing climate conditions.

  13. Cholestasis Reveals Severe Cortisol Deficiency in Neonatal Pituitary Stalk Interruption Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mauvais, Francois-Xavier; Gonzales, Emmanuel; Davit-Spraul, Anne; Jacquemin, Emmanuel; Brauner, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Cholestasis has been reported during the course of congenital hypothalamic-pituitary deficiency, but crucial information is lacking regarding both its origin and prognosis. We aimed to characterize the course of cholestasis and factors contributing to it in patients with deficiency due to pituitary stalk interruption syndrome (PSIS). Methods We conducted a retrospective single-center, case-cohort study including 16 patients with PSIS diagnosed before one year of age. We collected clinical and biological parameters from medical records and compared the characteristics of the endocrine syndrome in PSIS patients with and without cholestasis. Results 5/16 patients had cholestasis, all with a neonatal onset and multiple hypothalamic-pituitary deficiency. Patients with cholestasis presented with lower Apgar score and higher rate of ophthalmic malformations: 3/5 vs 1/11, p = 0.03 and 5/5 vs 4/11, p = 0.02, respectively. The plasma cortisol level was strongly decreased in patients with cholestasis: 12.4 ng/mL (8–15 ng/mL) vs 79.4 ng/mL (10–210 ng/mL), p = 0.04. Cholestasis resolved within 9 months following hormone supplementation. No development of chronic liver disease was observed during a median follow-up of 9.4 years (range, 1.3–13.3 years). Conclusions Cholestasis is a frequent symptom at presentation of PSIS during the neonatal period that may help earlier diagnosis and that indicates a profound cortisol deficiency. PMID:26829045

  14. Intracellular ice formation in mouse oocytes subjected to interrupted rapid cooling.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Peter; Pinn, Irina L; Kleinhans, F W

    2007-10-01

    The formation of ice crystals within cells (IIF) is lethal. The classical approach to avoiding it is to cool cells slowly enough so that nearly all their supercooled freezable water leaves the cell osmotically before they have cooled to a temperature that permits IIF. An alternative approach is to cool the cell rapidly to just above its ice nucleation temperature, and hold it there long enough to permit dehydration. Then, the cell is cooled rapidly to -70 degrees C or below. This approach, often called interrupted rapid cooling, is the subject of this paper. Mouse oocytes were suspended in 1.5M ethylene glycol (EG)/PBS, rapidly cooled (50 degrees C/min) to -25 degrees C and held for 5, 10, 20, 30, or 40 min before being rapidly cooled (50 degrees C/min) to -70 degrees C. In cells held for 5 min, IIF (flashing) occurred abruptly during the second rapid cool. As the holding period was increased to 10 and 20 min, fewer cells flashed during the cooling and more turned black during warming. Finally, when the oocytes were held 30 or 40 min, relatively few flashed during either cooling or warming. Immediately upon thawing, these oocytes were highly shrunken and crenated. However, upon warming to 20 degrees C, they regained most of their normal volume, shape, and appearance. These oocytes have intact cell membranes, and we refer to them as survivors. We conclude that 30 min at -25 degrees C removes nearly all intracellular freezable water, the consequence of which is that IIF occurs neither during the subsequent rapid cooling to -70 degrees C nor during warming. PMID:17686470

  15. Chronical sleep interruption-induced cognitive decline assessed by a metabolomics method.

    PubMed

    Feng, Li; Wu, Hong-Wei; Song, Guang-Qing; Lu, Cong; Li, Ying-Hui; Qu, Li-Na; Chen, Shan-Guang; Liu, Xin-Min; Chang, Qi

    2016-04-01

    Good sleep is necessary for optimal health, especially for mental health. Insomnia, sleep deprivation will make your ability to learn and memory impaired. Nevertheless, the underlying pathophysiological mechanism of sleep disorders-induced cognitive decline is still largely unknown. In this study, the sleep deprivation of animal model was induced by chronical sleep interruption (CSI), the behavioral tests, biochemical index determinations, and a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based serum metabolic profiling analysis were performed to explore the effects of CSI on cognitive function and the underlying mechanisms. After 14-days CSI, the cognitive function of the mice was evaluated by new objects preference (NOP) task and temporal order judgment (TOJ) task. Serum corticosterone (CORT), and brain Malondialdehyde (MDA), Superoxide Dismutase (SOD), and Catalase (CAT) levels were determined by ELISA kits. Data were analyzed by Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Partial Least Squares project to latent structures-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA), and Student's t-test. We found that the cognitive function of the mice was significantly affected by CSI. Besides, levels of CORT and MDA were higher, and SOD and CAT were lower in CSI mice than those of control. Obvious body weight loss of CSI mice was also observed. Thirteen potential serum biomarkers including choline, valine, uric acid, allantoic acid, carnitines, and retinoids were identified. Affected metabolic pathways involve metabolism of purine, retinoid, lipids, and amino acid. These results showed that CSI can damage the cognitive performance notably. The cognitive decline may ascribe to excessive oxidative stress and a series of disturbed metabolic pathways. PMID:26747207

  16. Evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic HIV vaccines through analytical treatment interruptions

    PubMed Central

    Graziani, Gina M; Angel, Jonathan B

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The development of an effective therapeutic HIV vaccine that induces immunologic control of viral replication, thereby eliminating or reducing the need for antiretroviral therapy (ART), would be of great value. Besides the obvious challenges of developing a therapeutic vaccine that would generate effective, sustained anti-HIV immunity in infected individuals is the issue of how to best assess the efficacy of vaccine candidates. Discussion This review discusses the various outcome measures assessed in therapeutic HIV vaccine clinical trials involving individuals receiving suppressive ART, with a particular focus on the role of analytical treatment interruption (ATI) as a way to assess the virologic control induced by an immunotherapy. This strategy is critical given that there are otherwise no readily available measures to determine the ability of a vaccine-induced immune response to effectively control HIV replication. The various outcome measures that have been used to assess vaccine efficacy in published therapeutic HIV vaccine clinical trials will also be discussed. Outcome measures have included the kinetics of viral rebound, the new viral set point and changes in the size of the viral reservoir. Clinically relevant outcomes such as the CD4 decline, the time to resume therapy or the time to meet the criterion to resume therapy, the proportion of participants who resume therapy and/or the development of clinical symptoms such as acute retroviral syndrome are also measures of vaccine efficacy. Conclusions Given the lack of consistency between therapeutic HIV vaccine trials in how efficacy is assessed, comparing vaccines has been difficult. It would, therefore, be beneficial to determine the most clinically relevant measure for use in future studies. Other recommendations for future clinical trials also include studying compartments in addition to blood and replacing ATIs with single-copy assays in situations in which the use of an ATI is not ideal. PMID:26561337

  17. Simulating bistable perception with interrupted ambiguous stimulus using self-oscillator dynamics with percept choice bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Fürstenau, Norbert

    2014-11-01

    A behavioral stochastic self-oscillator model is used for simulating interrupted ambiguous stimulus-induced percept reversals. The results provide further support for a dynamical systems foundation of cognitive and psychological problems as discussed in detail within the context of Gestalt psychology by Wagemans et al. (Concept Theor Found Psychol Bull 138(6):1218-1252, 2012), and for coordination dynamics of the brain (Kelso in Philos Trans R Soc B 367:906-918, 2012). Statistical evaluation of simulated reversal time series predicts a maximum of the percept reversal rate that conforms with a number of results in the literature. The macroscopic model is based on two inhibitorily coupled sets of three coupled nonlinear equations, one triplet for each percept. The derivation of our specific dynamics equations is based on a drastically simplified field theoretical approach using well-known phase synchronization for explaining brain dynamics on the macroscopic EEG level. The degree of coherence (contrast μ, 0 ≤ μ ≤ 1) of the superimposed fields required for onset of bistable dynamics is related to a phase synchronization index of EEG fields, and it is used in the present context as ambiguity control parameter. For quantitative agreement with the experimental data, the addition of a stochastic Langevin force term in the attention equation proved essential. Formal analysis leads to a quantification of well-known "cognitive inertia" and supports the interplay between percept choice (bifurcation) dynamics during stimulus onset and adaptive gain (attention fatigue) driven quasiperiodic percept reversals. PMID:25181991

  18. Interruptions of the ancient Shu Civilization: triggered by climate change or natural disaster?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xingyue; Bai, Song; Zeng, Na; Page Chamberlain, C.; Wang, Chengshan; Huang, Chengmin; Zhang, Qing

    2013-04-01

    Environmental proxies of a stable carbon isotope, total organic carbon, free iron oxide, and particle size distribution in sediments as well as the stable carbon and oxygen isotopes in fossil human and animal teeth were used to reconstruct the history of climate change and natural disasters near the Jinsha Relic Site and to track their effect on the ancient Shu Civilization, which was established in the Chengdu Plain of southwest China during the late Holocene. In general, the late Holocene climate in the Chengdu Plain demonstrated a drying and cooling trend, with evident cooler events ~4100 and ~2700 a BP, which coincided with global climate changes. The ancient Shu Civilization was interrupted twice, and it included three stages—the Baodun (4700-3700 a BP), the Sanxingdui (3700-3150 a BP), and the Shi'erqiao (3150-2600 a BP)—that were slightly related to the abrupt climate changes that resulted from the collapse of the classic Sanxingdui Civilization, which was founded in a regional warm period. The abrupt increase in sand content in the sediment from the Jinsha Site coincided with the palaeoearthquake and palaeodam burst in the Longmen Mountains when the Baodun and Shi'erqiao desisted, indicating that a flood had occurred due to a dam burst and may likely have caused the ancient civilization's destruction. Although the warm and humid climate, flat terrain and rich water resources prompted the prosperity of the ancient towns of Sanxingdui and Jinsha, frequent natural disasters, such as powerful earthquakes, landslide dams, and outburst floods, consistently affected the ancient Shu inhabitants.

  19. The Psychosocial Impact of Interrupted Childbearing in Long-term Female Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Canada, Andrea L.; Schover, Leslie R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To understand the influence of cancer-related infertility on women’s long-term distress and quality of life. Women diagnosed at age 40 or less with breast cancer, Hodgkin disease (HD), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), were interviewed an average of 10 years later. We predicted that women whose desire for a child at diagnosis remained unfulfilled would be significantly more distressed. Methods Participants completed a semi-structured phone interview, including the SF-12®, Brief Symptom Inventory-18, Impact of Events Scale (IES), Reproductive Concerns Scale (RCS), brief measures of marital satisfaction or comfort with dating, sexual satisfaction, and menopause symptoms. Results Of 455 women contacted by phone, 240 (53%) participated. Seventy-seven women had wanted a child at diagnosis but did not conceive subsequently (38 remaining childless and 39 with secondary infertility). Even controlling for other psychosocial and health factors, this group had higher distress about infertility (RCS) (P < 0.001), had more intrusive thoughts about infertility, and used more avoidance strategies when reminded of infertility (IES) (P < 0.001). Childless women were the most distressed. Women with adopted or stepchildren were intermediate, and those with at least one biological child were least distressed. Infertility-related distress did not differ significantly by cancer site. Conclusions Even at long-term follow-up, distress about interrupted childbearing persists, particularly in childless women. Social parenthood buffers distress somewhat, but not completely. Not only is it important to offer fertility preservation before cancer treatment, but interventions should be developed for survivors to alleviate unresolved grief about cancer-related infertility. PMID:22271533

  20. Detecting the molecular scars of evolution in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by analyzing interrupted coding sequences

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Computer-assisted analyses have shown that all bacterial genomes contain a small percentage of open reading frames with a frameshift or in-frame stop codon We report here a comparative analysis of these interrupted coding sequences (ICDSs) in six isolates of M. tuberculosis, two of M. bovis and one of M. africanum and question their phenotypic impact and evolutionary significance. Results ICDSs were classified as "common to all strains" or "strain-specific". Common ICDSs are believed to result from mutations acquired before the divergence of the species, whereas strain-specific ICDSs were acquired after this divergence. Comparative analyses of these ICDSs therefore define the molecular signature of a particular strain, phylogenetic lineage or species, which may be useful for inferring phenotypic traits such as virulence and molecular relationships. For instance, in silico analysis of the W-Beijing lineage of M. tuberculosis, an emergent family involved in several outbreaks, is readily distinguishable from other phyla by its smaller number of common ICDSs, including at least one known to be associated with virulence. Our observation was confirmed through the sequencing analysis of ICDSs in a panel of 21 clinical M. tuberculosis strains. This analysis further illustrates the divergence of the W-Beijing lineage from other phyla in terms of the number of full-length ORFs not containing a frameshift. We further show that ICDS formation is not associated with the presence of a mutated promoter, and suggest that promoter extinction is not the main cause of pseudogene formation. Conclusion The correlation between ICDSs, function and phenotypes could have important evolutionary implications. This study provides population geneticists with a list of targets, which could undergo selective pressure and thus alters relationships between the various lineages of M. tuberculosis strains and their host. This approach could be applied to any closely related bacterial strains or species for which several genome sequences are available. PMID:18325090

  1. Finding intron/exon splice junctions using INFO, INterruption Finder and Organizer.

    PubMed

    Laub, M T; Smith, D W

    1998-01-01

    INFO, INterruption Finder and Organizer, has been used to find coding sequence intron-exon splice junctions in human and other DNA by comparing the six conceptual translations of the input DNA sequence with sequences in protein databanks using a similarity matrix and windowing algorithm. Similarities detected both delineate position of the gene and provide clues as to the function of the gene product. In addition to use of a standard similarity matrix and windowing algorithm, INFO uses two novel steps, the MiniLibrary and Reverse Sequence steps, to enhance identification of small exons and to improve precision of junction nucleotide delineation. Exons as small as about 30 bases can be reliably found, and > 90% of junctions are precisely identified when canonical splice junction information is used. With the MiniLibrary and Reverse Sequence steps, INFO parameters need not be optimized by the user. In comparative test runs using 19 human DNA sequences, INFO found 108 of 111 exons, with 0 reported false positives, compared with 111 exons and 51 false positives for BLASTX, 99 exons and 6 false positives for GRAIL II, 77 exons and 24 false positives for GeneMark, 61 exons and 9 false positives for GeneID, and 105 exons and 6 false positives for PROCRUSTES. The correlation coefficient for finding and positioning these 111 exons was greater than 98% for INFO. Comparable results were obtained in test runs of 13 nonhuman DNA sequences. INFO is applicable to DNA from any species, will become more robust as sequence databanks expand, and complements other heuristic approaches. PMID:9672834

  2. Interruption of Transmission of Onchocerca volvulus in the Southern Chiapas Focus, México

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario A.; Domínguez-Vázquez, Alfredo; Unnasch, Thomas R.; Hassan, Hassan K.; Arredondo-Jiménez, Juan I.; Orozco-Algarra, María Eugenia; Rodríguez-Morales, Kristel B.; Rodríguez-Luna, Isabel C.; Prado-Velasco, Francisco Gibert

    2013-01-01

    Background The Southern Chiapas focus of onchocerciasis in Southern Mexico represents one of the major onchocerciasis foci in Latin America. All 559 endemic communities of this focus have undergone semi-annual mass treatment with ivermectin since 1998. In 50 communities of this focus, ivermectin frequency shifted from twice to four times a year in 2003; an additional 113 communities were added to the quarterly treatment regimen in 2009 to achieve a rapid suppression of transmission. Methodology/Principal findings In-depth epidemiologic and entomologic assessments were performed in six sentinel communities (which had undergone 2 rounds of ivermectin treatment per year) and three extra-sentinel communities (which had undergone 4 rounds of ivermectin treatment per year). None of the 67,924 Simulium ochraceum s.l. collected from this focus during the dry season of 2011 were found to contain parasite DNA when tested by polymerase chain reaction-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PCR-ELISA), resulting in an upper bound of the 95% confidence interval (95%-ULCI) of the infective rate in the vectors of 0.06/2,000 flies examined. Serological assays testing for Onchocerca volvulus exposure conducted on 4,230 children 5 years of age and under (of a total population of 10,280 in this age group) revealed that 2/4,230 individuals were exposed to O. volvulus (0.05%; one sided 95% confidence interval = 0.08%). Conclusions/Significance The in-depth epidemiological and entomological findings from the Southern Chiapas focus meet the criteria for interruption of transmission developed by the international community. PMID:23556018

  3. Reduction of maternal mortality due to preeclampsia in Colombia-an interrupted time-series analysis

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Medina, Rodolfo; Herrera-Escobar, Juan Pablo; Nieto-Díaz, Aníbal

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Preeclampsia is the most important cause of maternal mortality in developing countries. A comprehensive prenatal care program including bio-psychosocial components was developed and introduced at a national level in Colombia. We report on the trends in maternal mortality rates and their related causes before and after implementation of this program. Methods: General and specific maternal mortality rates were monitored for nine years (1998-2006). An interrupted time-series analysis was performed with monthly data on cases of maternal mortality that compared trends and changes in national mortality rates and the impact of these changes attributable to the introduction of a bio-psychosocial model. Multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate correlations between the interventions. Results: Five years after (2002 - 2006) its introduction the general maternal mortality rate was significantly reduced to 23% (OR=0.77, CI 95% 0.71-0.82).The implementation of BPSM also reduced the incidence of preeclampsia in 22% (OR= 0.78, CI 95% 0.67-0.88), as also the labor complications by hemorrhage in 25% (OR=0.75, CI 95% 0.59-0.90) associated with the implementation of red code. The other causes of maternal mortality did not reveal significant changes. Biomedical, nutritional, psychosocial assessments, and other individual interventions in prenatal care were not correlated to maternal mortality (p= 0.112); however, together as a model we observed a significant association (p= 0.042). Conclusions: General maternal mortality was reduced after the implementation of a comprehensive national prenatal care program. Is important the evaluation of this program in others populations. PMID:24970956

  4. Non-methylene-interrupted fatty acids from marine invertebrates: Occurrence, characterization and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Barnathan, Gilles

    2009-06-01

    Marine organisms, in particular invertebrates, have proved to be a major source of unique fatty acid (FA) structures originating from unusual biosynthetic pathways. Among them, non-methylene-interrupted (NMI) FA occur in various molluscs in the wide ranges of concentrations (up to 20%), such as the most often encountered 20:2 Delta5,11, 20:2 Delta5,13, 22:2 Delta7,13 or 22:2 Delta7,15. Such NMI FA have also been reported from algae, echinoderms, sponges, tropical rays, and many other invertebrates. The most intriguing marine invertebrates seem to be sponges that commonly contain very long-chain Delta5,9 FA. A third double bond can occur in the NMI FA as reported in some marine organisms, such as 20:3 Delta7,13,16 or 30:3 Delta5,9,23. Lipids of invertebrates from deep-sea hydrothermal and cold-seep vents gave rise to an intense research activity including reports on unprecedented NMI polyunsaturated FA. The bivalve molluscs are able to synthesize de novo the NMI FA but their precise biological interest is presently not well-known, although structural and functional roles in biological membranes have been suggested, in particular a higher resistance to oxidative processes and microbial lipases. Biosynthetic pathways of Delta5,9 FA in sponges were demonstrated up to C(26) FA structures and include particular elongation and desaturation steps. Recently, intense research effort has been conducted to investigate the biomedical potential of these unusual FA. Thus, Delta5,9 FA displayed interesting antiplasmodial activity. The most promising FA topoisomerase I inhibitors to date seem to be the long-chain Delta5,9 FA. This inhibitory activity is probably partially responsible for the toxicity displayed by some of the Delta5,9 FA towards cancer cell lines. PMID:19376188

  5. Interruptions in supplies of second-line antituberculosis drugs--United States, 2005-2012.

    PubMed

    2013-01-18

    Second-line drugs (SLDs) are essential for treating multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB* and XDR TB†). Drug shortages, in which supplies of all clinically interchangeable versions of a given Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-regulated drug become inadequate to meet actual or projected user demand, have been well-documented in many areas of medicine; for several years, drug shortages in the United States have affected the availability of SLDs for treatment of TB. In November 2010, a nationwide survey of TB control programs conducted by the National Tuberculosis Controllers Association (NTCA) indicated that shortages and other problems that hinder access to SLDs interfere with patient care and could promote the development of drug resistance as well as the transmission of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This report focuses on the growing issue of TB drug shortages and summarizes the findings of that survey, which indicated that 26 (79%) of the 33 responding health departments, representing approximately 75% of the U.S. TB burden, reported MDR TB during 2005-2010. Of these 26, 21 (81%) faced difficulties with SLD procurement, citing nationwide shortages (100%), shipping delays (71%), lack of resources (62%), and a complicated procurement process related to investigational new drug (IND) protocols (48%) as the main reasons. Adverse outcomes or other problems related to difficulties with SLD procurement were reported by 19 (90%) of 21 jurisdictions, with treatment delay (58%), a treatment lapse or interruption (32%), or the use of an inadequate regimen (32%) most commonly reported. Potential solutions for alleviating SLD shortages include stockpiling drugs centrally, sharing SLDs among jurisdictions, obtaining drugs from foreign manufacturers, and taking advantage of new legal requirements for drug suppliers to report shortages and impending shortages to FDA within a specified timeframe. Reliable, consistent access to SLDs will require the collaboration of CDC, FDA, state and local health departments, national health professional societies, and the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:23325352

  6. Characterizing the modification of surface proteins with poly(ethylene glycol) to interrupt platelet adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haiyan; Kaar, Joel L.; Russell, Alan J.; Wagner, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Surface protein modification with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) can inhibit acute thrombosis on damaged vascular and biomaterial surfaces by blocking surface protein–platelet interactions. However, the feasibility of employing protein reactive PEGs to limit intravascular and biomaterial thrombosis in vivo is contingent upon rapid and extensive surface protein modification. To characterize the factors controlling this potential therapeutic approach, the model protein bovine serum albumin was adsorbed onto polyurethane surfaces and modified with PEG-carboxymethyl succinimidyl ester (PEG-NHS), PEG-isocyanate (PEG-ISO), or PEG-diisocyanate (PEG-DISO) in aqueous buffer at varying concentrations and contact times. It was found that up to 5 PEGs could be attached per albumin molecule within one min and that adsorbed albumin PEGylation approached maximal levels by 6 min. The lability of reactive PEGs in aqueous buffer reduced total protein modification by 50% when the PEG solution was incubated for 7 min prior to application. For fibrinogen PEGylation (performed in the solution phase), PEG-NHS was more reactive than PEG-ISO or PEG-DISO. The γ peptide of fibrinogen, which contains several key platelet-binding motifs, was highly modified. A marked reduction in platelet adhesion was observed on fibrinogen-adsorbed polyurethane treated with PEG-NHS or PEG-DISO. Relative differences in platelet adhesion on PEG-NHS and PEG-DISO modified surfaces could be attributed to differences in reactivity towards fibrinogen and the size of the polymer backbone. Taken together, these findings provide insight and guidance for applying protein reactive PEGs for the interruption of acute thrombotic deposition. PMID:16457880

  7. Effects of elevated temperatures during interruption of irradiation on Harwell Red 4034 PMMA and Kodak Biomax alanine film dosimetry systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidereas, P.; Patil, D. S.; Garcia, R.; Tracy, R. P.; Holzman, J. M.

    2007-11-01

    In the industrial setting it is not uncommon for a process interruption to occur during irradiation. In this event, dosimeters may be exposed to prolonged periods of elevated temperature without exposure to ionizing radiation. Once the process is restarted, the same dosimeters are exposed to ionizing radiation in order to achieve target dose. The goal of this experiment was to simulate a process interruption within limits and quantify the effects of a combination of factors (heat, time, and fractionation) on dosimeter response. We present an in-depth experimental study on the response of dosimeters that have been irradiated, stored for a fixed period of time at several temperatures, and then re-irradiated. This study was performed using Harwell Red 4034 polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and Kodak BioMax alanine film dosimeters.

  8. Development of a Discharge Channel upon Electric Explosion of a Wire in Interrupted- and Uninterrupted-Current Regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Romanova, Vera; Tkachenko, Svetlana; Mingaleev, Albert; Agafonov, Alexey; Ter-Oganesyan, Alexey; Shelkovenko, Tatiana; Pikuz, Sergey

    2009-01-21

    Experimental results on the electrical explosion of thin W, Cu and Ni wires with a current density of {approx}10{sup 12} A/m{sup 2}, a current rise rate (dI/dt){approx}40 A/ns and a current pulse with amplitude 9 kA are presented. The structures of the discharge channels developed in single wire explosions in air and vacuum using laser shadow and schlieren imaging have been studied under the condition that the current in the circuit was interrupted. A difference in the shock wave propagation in air and the expansion of the exploded wire dense core in interrupted- and uninterrupted-current regimes has been observed. Analysis of the optical images has been performed in a shunting breakdown scenario.

  9. Simulation of SLF Interrupting Performance for SF6 Gas Circuit Breaker based on Serially Connected 3 Arc Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshizuka, Tadashi; Shinkai, Takeshi; Udagawa, Keisuke; Kawano, Hiromichi

    This paper shows the simulation of SLF interrupting performances for SF6 gas circuit breakers. From the measurements using 300kV-SF6 gas model circuit breakers, it was shown that the extinction peak voltages were varying with arcing times. But, the current values at the extinction peak were the same. To simulate the SLF interrupting performances for the circuit breakers, serially connected 3 arc models were used. Cassie arc model and two Mayr arc models were serially connected. In this arc model, the Cassie model simulates the high current arc. One of the Mayr arc model (Mayr model 1) simulates the arc around the voltage extinction peak. And the other Mayr arc model simulates the arc around current zero. In this model, arc voltage of the Cassie model and arc power loss of the Mayr model 1 are only estimated from the experiments. It was good agreement with the measurements and simulations.

  10. Decreased Prevalence of Anemia in Highland Areas of Low Malaria Transmission After a 1-Year Interruption of Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Noland, Gregory S.; Ayodo, George; Abuya, Jackson; Hodges, James S.; Rolfes, Melissa A. R.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Malaria control campaigns have reduced malaria transmission to very low levels in many areas of Africa. Yet the extent to which malaria interruption or elimination might decrease the prevalence of anemia in areas of low malaria transmission is unknown. Methods. Kapsisiywa and Kipsamoite, highland areas of Kenya with low, unstable malaria transmission, experienced a 12-month interruption in malaria transmission from April 2007 to May 2008, following high-level coverage (>70% of households) with indoor residual insecticide spraying in 2007. Hemoglobin levels were tested in 1697 randomly selected asymptomatic residents of Kapsisiywa (n = 910) and Kipsamoite (n = 787) at the beginning of a 12-month period of interrupted transmission (in May 2007) and 14 months later (in July 2008). Results. From May 2007 to July 2008, only 1 of 1697 study cohort members developed clinical malaria. In this period, the prevalence of anemia decreased in Kapsisiywa in all age groups (from 57.5% to 37.9% in children aged <5 years [P < .001], from 21.7% to 10.5% in children aged 5–14 years [P < .001], and from 22.7% to 16.6% in individuals aged ≥15 years [P = .004]). The prevalence of anemia in Kipsamoite also decreased in children aged <5 years (from 47.2% to 31.3%; P = .001) but was unchanged in children aged 5–14 years and in individuals aged ≥15 years. Among children <5 years, anemia prevalence was reduced by 34% in both Kapsisiywa (95% confidence interval [CI], 21%–45%) and Kipsamoite (95% CI, 16%–48%). Conclusions. Successful malaria elimination or interruption may lead to substantial reductions in anemia prevalence even in areas of very low transmission. PMID:22052892

  11. Large number of rebounding/founder HIV variants emerge from multifocal infection in lymphatic tissues after treatment interruption

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberger, Meghan K.; Keele, Brandon F.; Wietgrefe, Stephen W.; Fletcher, Courtney V.; Beilman, Gregory J.; Chipman, Jeffrey G.; Khoruts, Alexander; Estes, Jacob D.; Anderson, Jodi; Callisto, Samuel P.; Schmidt, Thomas E.; Thorkelson, Ann; Reilly, Cavan; Perkey, Katherine; Reimann, Thomas G.; Utay, Netanya S.; Nganou Makamdop, Krystelle; Stevenson, Mario; Douek, Daniel C.; Haase, Ashley T.; Schacker, Timothy W.

    2015-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) suppresses HIV replication in most individuals but cannot eradicate latently infected cells established before ART was initiated. Thus, infection rebounds when treatment is interrupted by reactivation of virus production from this reservoir. Currently, one or a few latently infected resting memory CD4 T cells are thought be the principal source of recrudescent infection, but this estimate is based on peripheral blood rather than lymphoid tissues (LTs), the principal sites of virus production and persistence before initiating ART. We, therefore, examined lymph node (LN) and gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) biopsies from fully suppressed subjects, interrupted therapy, monitored plasma viral load (pVL), and repeated biopsies on 12 individuals as soon as pVL became detectable. Isolated HIV RNA-positive (vRNA+) cells were detected by in situ hybridization in LTs obtained before interruption in several patients. After interruption, multiple foci of vRNA+ cells were detected in 6 of 12 individuals as soon as pVL was measureable and in some subjects, in more than one anatomic site. Minimal estimates of the number of rebounding/founder (R/F) variants were determined by single-gene amplification and sequencing of viral RNA or DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and plasma obtained at or just before viral recrudescence. Sequence analysis revealed a large number of R/F viruses representing recrudescent viremia from multiple sources. Together, these findings are consistent with the origins of recrudescent infection by reactivation from many latently infected cells at multiple sites. The inferred large pool of cells and sites to rekindle recrudescent infection highlights the challenges in eradicating HIV. PMID:25713386

  12. Large number of rebounding/founder HIV variants emerge from multifocal infection in lymphatic tissues after treatment interruption.

    PubMed

    Rothenberger, Meghan K; Keele, Brandon F; Wietgrefe, Stephen W; Fletcher, Courtney V; Beilman, Gregory J; Chipman, Jeffrey G; Khoruts, Alexander; Estes, Jacob D; Anderson, Jodi; Callisto, Samuel P; Schmidt, Thomas E; Thorkelson, Ann; Reilly, Cavan; Perkey, Katherine; Reimann, Thomas G; Utay, Netanya S; Nganou Makamdop, Krystelle; Stevenson, Mario; Douek, Daniel C; Haase, Ashley T; Schacker, Timothy W

    2015-03-10

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) suppresses HIV replication in most individuals but cannot eradicate latently infected cells established before ART was initiated. Thus, infection rebounds when treatment is interrupted by reactivation of virus production from this reservoir. Currently, one or a few latently infected resting memory CD4 T cells are thought be the principal source of recrudescent infection, but this estimate is based on peripheral blood rather than lymphoid tissues (LTs), the principal sites of virus production and persistence before initiating ART. We, therefore, examined lymph node (LN) and gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) biopsies from fully suppressed subjects, interrupted therapy, monitored plasma viral load (pVL), and repeated biopsies on 12 individuals as soon as pVL became detectable. Isolated HIV RNA-positive (vRNA+) cells were detected by in situ hybridization in LTs obtained before interruption in several patients. After interruption, multiple foci of vRNA+ cells were detected in 6 of 12 individuals as soon as pVL was measureable and in some subjects, in more than one anatomic site. Minimal estimates of the number of rebounding/founder (R/F) variants were determined by single-gene amplification and sequencing of viral RNA or DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and plasma obtained at or just before viral recrudescence. Sequence analysis revealed a large number of R/F viruses representing recrudescent viremia from multiple sources. Together, these findings are consistent with the origins of recrudescent infection by reactivation from many latently infected cells at multiple sites. The inferred large pool of cells and sites to rekindle recrudescent infection highlights the challenges in eradicating HIV. PMID:25713386

  13. Temporal trends of time to antiretroviral treatment initiation, interruption and modification: examination of patients diagnosed with advanced HIV in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Stephen T; Law, Matthew G; Cooper, David A; Keen, Phillip; McDonald, Ann; Middleton, Melanie; Woolley, Ian; Kelly, Mark; Petoumenos, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction HIV prevention strategies are moving towards reducing plasma HIV RNA viral load in all HIV-positive persons, including those undiagnosed, treatment naïve, on or off antiretroviral therapy. A proxy population for those undiagnosed are patients that present late to care with advanced HIV. The objectives of this analysis are to examine factors associated with patients presenting with advanced HIV, and establish rates of treatment interruption and modification after initiating ART. Methods We deterministically linked records from the Australian HIV Observational Database to the Australian National HIV Registry to obtain information related to HIV diagnosis. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with advanced HIV diagnosis. We used survival methods to evaluate rates of ART initiation by diagnosis CD4 count strata and by calendar year of HIV diagnosis. Cox models were used to determine hazard of first ART treatment interruption (duration >30 days) and time to first major ART modification. Results Factors associated (p<0.05) with increased odds of advanced HIV diagnosis were sex, older age, heterosexual mode of HIV exposure, born overseas and rural–regional care setting. Earlier initiation of ART occurred at higher rates in later periods (2007–2012) in all diagnosis CD4 count groups. We found an 83% (69, 91%) reduction in the hazard of first treatment interruption comparing 2007–2012 versus 1996–2001 (p<0.001), and no difference in ART modification for patients diagnosed with advanced HIV. Conclusions Recent HIV diagnoses are initiating therapy earlier in all diagnosis CD4 cell count groups, potentially lowering community viral load compared to earlier time periods. We found a marked reduction in the hazard of first treatment interruption, and found no difference in rates of major modification to ART by HIV presentation status in recent periods. PMID:25865372

  14. Work–Family Conflict, Task Interruptions, and Influence at Work Predict Musculoskeletal Pain in Operating Room Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Nützi, Marina; Koch, Patricia; Baur, Heiner; Elfering, Achim

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to examine the prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints in Swiss operating room (OR) nurses, and to investigate how work–family conflict, work interruptions, and influence at work are related to lumbar and cervical back pain. Methods Participants in this correlational questionnaire study included 116 OR nurses from eight different hospitals in Switzerland. Results We found that 66% of the OR staff suffered from musculoskeletal problems. The most prevalent musculoskeletal complaints were lumbar (52.7%) and cervical pain (38.4%). Furthermore, 20.5% reported pain in the mid spine region, 20.5% in the knees and legs, and 9.8% in the hands and feet. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that work–family conflict (p < 0.05) and interruptions (p < 0.05) significantly predicted lumbar and cervical pain in OR nurses, while influence at work (p < 0.05) only predicted lumbar pain. Conclusion These results suggest that reducing the work–family conflict and interruptions at work, as well as offering opportunities to influence one's workplace, help to promote OR nurses' health. PMID:26929846

  15. Enhancing the quantum efficiency of InGaN yellow-green light-emitting diodes by growth interruption

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Chunhua; Ma, Ziguang; Zhou, Junming; Lu, Taiping; Jiang, Yang; Zuo, Peng; Jia, Haiqiang; Chen, Hong

    2014-08-18

    We studied the effect of multiple interruptions during the quantum well growth on emission-efficiency enhancement of InGaN-based yellow-green light emitting diodes on c-plane sapphire substrate. The output power and dominant wavelength at 20 mA are 0.24 mW and 556.3 nm. High resolution x-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, and electroluminescence measurements demonstrate that efficiency enhancement could be partially attributed to crystal quality improvement of the active region resulted from reduced In clusters and relevant defects on the surface of InGaN layer by introducing interruptions. The less tilted energy band in the quantum well is also caused by the decrease of In-content gradient along c-axis resulted from In segregation during the interruptions, which increases spatial overlap of electron-hole wavefunction and thus the internal quantum efficiency. The latter also leads to smaller blueshift of dominant wavelength with current increasing.

  16. Successful surgical treatment of descending aorta interruption in a 29-year-old woman with acute paraplegia and subarachnoid hemorrhage: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shutang; Wang, Zhiheng; Zhang, Liang; Fu, Hongdu; Zhuang, Huanwei; Cao, Xianjun; Liang, Liming; Yang, Yanqi

    2015-01-01

    Interruption of the descending aorta is an extremely rare great vessel malformation. In this report, we describe a very unusual case of a 29-year-old female with a 13-year history of hypertension who was found to have an interruption of the descending aorta when she was hospitalized with a subarachnoid hemorrhage and symptoms of acute paraplegia. We successfully surgically corrected the defect using a Gore-Tex graft to bypass the aortic interruption. The patient's blood pressure postoperatively returned to normal, and the patient recovered completely from her paraplegia by the time of her 5-month follow-up visit. PMID:26045082

  17. Outcomes of Temporary Interruption of Rivaroxaban Compared With Warfarin in Patients With Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Matthew W.; Douketis, James D.; Patel, Manesh R.; Piccini, Jonathan P.; Hellkamp, Anne S.; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Spyropoulos, Alex C.; Hankey, Graeme J.; Singer, Daniel E.; Nessel, Christopher C.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Fox, Keith A. A.; Califf, Robert M.; Becker, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Background During long-term anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation, temporary interruptions (TIs) of therapy are common, but the relationship between patient outcomes and TIs has not been well studied. We sought to determine reasons for TI, the characteristics of patients undergoing TI, and the relationship between anticoagulant and outcomes among patients with TI. Methods and Results In the Rivaroxaban Once Daily, Oral, Direct Factor Xa Inhibition Compared With Vitamin K Antagonism for Prevention of Stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation (ROCKET AF), a randomized, double-blind, double-dummy study of rivaroxaban and warfarin in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, baseline characteristics, management, and outcomes, including stroke, non–central nervous system systemic embolism, death, myocardial infarction, and bleeding, were reported in participants who experienced TI (3–30 days) for any reason. The at-risk period for outcomes associated with TI was from TI start to 30 days after resumption of study drug. In 14 236 participants who received at least 1 dose of study drug, 4692 (33%) experienced TI. Participants with TI were similar to the overall ROCKET AF population in regard to baseline clinical characteristics. Only 6% (n=483) of TI incidences involved bridging therapy. Stroke/systemic embolism rates during the at-risk period were similar in rivaroxaban-treated and warfarin-treated participants (0.30% versus 0.41% per 30 days; hazard ratio [confidence interval]=0.74 [0.36–1.50]; P=0.40). Risk of major bleeding during the at-risk period was also similar in rivaroxaban-treated and warfarin-treated participants (0.99% versus 0.79% per 30 days; hazard ratio [confidence interval]=1.26 [0.80–2.00]; P=0.32). Conclusions TI of oral anticoagulation is common and is associated with substantial stroke risks and bleeding risks that were similar among patients treated with rivaroxaban or warfarin. Further investigation is needed to determine the optimal management strategy in patients with atrial fibrillation requiring TI of anticoagulation. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00403767. PMID:24552831

  18. Cockpit Interruptions and Distractions: Effective Management Requires a Careful Balancing Act

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dismukes, R. K.; Young, Grant E.; Sumwalt, Robert L., III; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Managing several tasks concurrently is an everyday part of cockpit operations. For the most part, crews handle concurrent task demands efficiently, yet crew preoccupation with one task to the detriment of performing other tasks is one of the more common forms of error in the cockpit. Most pilots are familiar with the December 1972 L1011 crash that occurred when the crew became preoccupied with a landing gear light malfunction and failed to notice that someone had inadvertently bumped off the autopilot. More recently a DC-9 landed gear-up in Houston when the crew, preoccupied with an stabilized approach, failed to recognize that the gear was not down because they had not switched the hydraulic pumps to high. We have recently started a research project to study why crews are vulnerable to these sorts of errors. As part of that project we reviewed NTSB reports of accidents attributed to crew error; we concluded that nearly half of these accidents involved lapses of attention associated with interruptions, distractions, or preoccupation with one task to the exclusion of another task. We have also analyzed 107 ASRS reports involving competing tasks; we present here some of our conclusions from those ASRS reports. These 107 reports involved 21 different types of routine tasks crews neglected at a critical moment while attending to another task. Sixty-nine percent of the neglected tasks involved either failure to monitor the current status or position of the aircraft or failure to monitor the actions of the pilot flying or taxiing. Thirty-four different types of competing activities distracted or preoccupied the pilots. Ninety percent of these competing activities fell into one of four broad categories: communication (e.g., discussion among crew or radio communication), heads-down work (e.g., programming the FMS or reviewing approach plates), responding to abnormals, or searching for VMC traffic. We will discuss examples of each of these four categories and suggest things crews can do to reduce their vulnerability to these and similar situations.

  19. 41 CFR 301-70.506 - How do we define actual cost and constructive cost when an employee interrupts a travel...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... appropriate en route travel time. ... cost and constructive cost when an employee interrupts a travel assignment because of an incapacitating illness or injury? 301-70.506 Section 301-70.506 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...

  20. 41 CFR 301-70.506 - How do we define actual cost and constructive cost when an employee interrupts a travel...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... appropriate en route travel time. ... cost and constructive cost when an employee interrupts a travel assignment because of an incapacitating illness or injury? 301-70.506 Section 301-70.506 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...

  1. 41 CFR 301-70.506 - How do we define actual cost and constructive cost when an employee interrupts a travel...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... appropriate en route travel time. ... cost and constructive cost when an employee interrupts a travel assignment because of an incapacitating illness or injury? 301-70.506 Section 301-70.506 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...

  2. The role of interruptible natural gas customers in New England heating oil markets: A preliminary examination of events in January-February 2000

    SciTech Connect

    2000-11-01

    This report provides an analysis of data collected from gas service providers and end-use customers in the six New England States and offers a preliminary assessment of the impact of interruptible gas customers on the distillate fuel oil market this past winter. Based on information collected and analyzed as of October 2000, the main findings areas follows: (1) For interruptible gas customers with distillate fuel oil as a backup fuel, their volume of interruptions was equivalent to about 1 to 2 percent of the total sales of distillate fuel oil in New England during January-February 2000. For the two peak weeks of gas supply interruptions, however, the equivalent volume of distillate fuel oil amounted to an estimated 3 to 6 percent of total sales in New England. There were no interruptions of the natural gas service during the 2-month period. (2) Purchases of distillate fuel oil by interruptible gas customers may have contributed somewhat to the spike in the price of distillate fuel oil in January-February 2000, especially during the peak weeks of gas interruptions. Nevertheless, other factors--a sudden drop in temperatures, low regional stocks of distillate fuels, and weather-related supply problems during a period of high customer demand--appear to have played a significant role in this price spike, as they have in previous spikes. (3) While this preliminary analysis suggests that interruptible natural gas service does not threaten the stability of the home heating oil market, several steps might be taken-without undermining the benefits of interruptible service--to reduce the potential adverse impacts of gas supply interruptions in times of market stress. Regardless of the magnitude of the impact of distillate fuel oil purchases by interruptible gas customers on Northeast heating oil markets, the threat of future heating oil price spikes and supply problems still remains. To help counter the threat, President Clinton in July 2000 directed Secretary Richardson to establish a heating oil component of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve in the Northeast, and 2 million barrels of heating oil are now stored in the reserve. Other possible policy options are outlined.

  3. Perioperative bridging anticoagulation during dabigatran or warfarin interruption among patients who had an elective surgery or procedure. Substudy of the RE-LY trial.

    PubMed

    Douketis, James D; Healey, Jeff S; Brueckmann, Martina; Eikelboom, John W; Ezekowitz, Michael D; Fraessdorf, Mandy; Noack, Herbert; Oldgren, Jonas; Reilly, Paul; Spyropoulos, Alex C; Wallentin, Lars; Connolly, Stuart J

    2015-03-01

    In patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) who require interruption of dabigatran or warfarin for an elective surgery/procedure, the risks and benefits of perioperative bridging anticoagulation is uncertain.We accessed the database from RE-LY, a randomised trial comparing dabigatran with warfarin for stroke prevention in AF, to assess the potential benefits and risks of bridging. In patients who had a first interruption of dabigatran or warfarin for an elective surgery/procedure, we compared the risk for major bleeding (MB), stroke or systemic embolism (SSE) and any thromboembolism (TE) in patients who were bridged or not bridged during the period of seven days before until 30 days after surgery/procedure. We used multivariable Cox regression to adjust for potential confounders.Bridging was used more during warfarin interruption than dabigatran interruption (27.5 % vs 15.4 %; p< 0.001). With dabigatran interruption, bridged patients had more MB (6.5 % vs 1.8 %, p< 0.001) than those not bridged but bridged and not bridged groups did not differ for any TE (1.2 % vs 0.6 %, p=0.16) and SSE (0.5 % vs 0.3 %, p=0.46). With warfarin interruption, bridged patients had more MB (6.8 % vs 1.6 %, p< 0.001) and any TE (1.8 % vs 0.3 %, p=0.007) than those not bridged but bridged and not bridged groups did not differ for SSE (0.5 % vs 0.2 %, p=0.321). In conclusion, in patients who interrupted dabigatran or warfarin for a surgery/ procedure in the RE-LY trial, use of bridging anticoagulation appeared to increase the risk for major bleeding irrespective of dabigatran or warfarin interruption. PMID:25472710

  4. Perceptual weighting of the envelope and fine structure across frequency bands for sentence intelligibility: Effect of interruption at the syllabic-rate and periodic-rate of speech

    PubMed Central

    Fogerty, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Listeners often only have fragments of speech available to understand the intended message due to competing background noise. In order to maximize successful speech recognition, listeners must allocate their perceptual resources to the most informative acoustic properties. The speech signal contains temporally-varying acoustics in the envelope and fine structure that are present across the frequency spectrum. Understanding how listeners perceptually weigh these acoustic properties in different frequency regions during interrupted speech is essential for the design of assistive listening devices. This study measured the perceptual weighting of young normal-hearing listeners for the envelope and fine structure in each of three frequency bands for interrupted sentence materials. Perceptual weights were obtained during interruption at the syllabic rate (i.e., 4 Hz) and the periodic rate (i.e., 128 Hz) of speech. Potential interruption interactions with fundamental frequency information were investigated by shifting the natural pitch contour higher relative to the interruption rate. The availability of each acoustic property was varied independently by adding noise at different levels. Perceptual weights were determined by correlating a listener’s performance with the availability of each acoustic property on a trial-by-trial basis. Results demonstrated similar relative weights across the interruption conditions, with emphasis on the envelope in high-frequencies. PMID:21786914

  5. Results of Antiretroviral Treatment Interruption and Intensification in Advanced Multi-Drug Resistant HIV Infection from the OPTIMA Trial

    PubMed Central

    Holodniy, Mark; Brown, Sheldon T.; Cameron, D. William; Kyriakides, Tassos C.; Angus, Brian; Babiker, Abdel; Singer, Joel; Owens, Douglas K.; Anis, Aslam; Goodall, Ruth; Hudson, Fleur; Piaseczny, Mirek; Russo, John; Schechter, Martin; Deyton, Lawrence; Darbyshire, Janet

    2011-01-01

    Background Guidance is needed on best medical management for advanced HIV disease with multidrug resistance (MDR) and limited retreatment options. We assessed two novel antiretroviral (ARV) treatment approaches in this setting. Methods and Findings We conducted a 2×2 factorial randomized open label controlled trial in patients with a CD4 count ≤300 cells/µl who had ARV treatment (ART) failure requiring retreatment, to two options (a) re-treatment with either standard (≤4 ARVs) or intensive (≥5 ARVs) ART and b) either treatment starting immediately or after a 12-week monitored ART interruption. Primary outcome was time to developing a first AIDS-defining event (ADE) or death from any cause. Analysis was by intention to treat. From 2001 to 2006, 368 patients were randomized. At baseline, mean age was 48 years, 2% were women, median CD4 count was 106/µl, mean viral load was 4.74 log10 copies/ml, and 59% had a prior AIDS diagnosis. Median follow-up was 4.0 years in 1249 person-years of observation. There were no statistically significant differences in the primary composite outcome of ADE or death between re-treatment options of standard versus intensive ART (hazard ratio 1.17; CI 0.86–1.59), or between immediate retreatment initiation versus interruption before re-treatment (hazard ratio 0.93; CI 0.68–1.30), or in the rate of non-HIV associated serious adverse events between re-treatment options. Conclusions We did not observe clinical benefit or harm assessed by the primary outcome in this largest and longest trial exploring both ART interruption and intensification in advanced MDR HIV infection with poor retreatment options. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00050089 PMID:21483491

  6. Dual Arterial Access for Stenting of Aortic Coarctation in Patients with Near-Total Descending Aortic Interruption.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Tahir; Jamallulail, Syed Ibrahim; Clarke, Bernard; Mahadevan, Vaikom S

    2015-12-01

    Endovascular stenting is a recognized treatment strategy for the treatment of coarctation of aorta (COA) in adults. The aortic coarctation is usually crossed retrogradely from the descending aorta via the femoral approach. We report three patients who had near-total descending aortic interruption and underwent successful stenting of severe COA using a combined radial/brachial and femoral approach due to difficulty in crossing the lesion retrogradely via a femoral approach. There were no procedural complications and no adverse events during 6 months of follow-up. PMID:26387128

  7. Real-Time Predictions of Reservoir Size and Rebound Time during Antiretroviral Therapy Interruption Trials for HIV

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Alison L.; Rosenbloom, Daniel I. S.; Goldstein, Edward; Hanhauser, Emily; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring the efficacy of novel reservoir-reducing treatments for HIV is challenging. The limited ability to sample and quantify latent infection means that supervised antiretroviral therapy (ART) interruption studies are generally required. Here we introduce a set of mathematical and statistical modeling tools to aid in the design and interpretation of ART-interruption trials. We show how the likely size of the remaining reservoir can be updated in real-time as patients continue off treatment, by combining the output of laboratory assays with insights from models of reservoir dynamics and rebound. We design an optimal schedule for viral load sampling during interruption, whereby the frequency of follow-up can be decreased as patients continue off ART without rebound. While this scheme can minimize costs when the chance of rebound between visits is low, we find that the reservoir will be almost completely reseeded before rebound is detected unless sampling occurs at least every two weeks and the most sensitive viral load assays are used. We use simulated data to predict the clinical trial size needed to estimate treatment effects in the face of highly variable patient outcomes and imperfect reservoir assays. Our findings suggest that large numbers of patients—between 40 and 150—will be necessary to reliably estimate the reservoir-reducing potential of a new therapy and to compare this across interventions. As an example, we apply these methods to the two “Boston patients”, recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants who experienced large reductions in latent infection and underwent ART-interruption. We argue that the timing of viral rebound was not particularly surprising given the information available before treatment cessation. Additionally, we show how other clinical data can be used to estimate the relative contribution that remaining HIV+ cells in the recipient versus newly infected cells from the donor made to the residual reservoir that eventually caused rebound. Together, these tools will aid HIV researchers in the evaluating new potentially-curative strategies that target the latent reservoir. PMID:27119536

  8. Factors associated with antiretroviral treatment interruption in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1-infected children attending the Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ebonyi, Augustine O.; Ejeliogu, Emeka U.; Okpe, Sylvanus E.; Shwe, David D.; Yiltok, Esther S.; Ochoga, Martha O.; Oguche, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Interrupting anti-retroviral therapy (ART) for any number of reasons is an indication of a compromised adherence to ART. Several factors, including the pill burden from other drugs used in treating co-infections in children with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), may influence ART adherence. The aim of this study was to identify the factors associated with ART interruption in HIV-1-infected children. Materials and Methods: A retrospective cohort study analysing data on 580 children consecutively enrolled on ART between February 2006 and December 2010 at the paediatric HIV clinic of Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH), Jos. Subjects were children aged 2 months — 15 years diagnosed with HIV-1 infection and on first-line ART. Cotrimoxazole prophylaxis was usually commenced at diagnosis while awaiting ART commencement. Children diagnosed with tuberculosis (TB) were also placed on multiple individual anti-TB drugs. Statistical analysis used: A comparison of the data on children with and without ART interruption was made. Variables associated with ART interruption in a univariate analysis were fit in a multivariate logistic model to determine the factors that were associated with ART interruption. Results: Children on anti-TB drugs were twice more likely to interrupt ART compared to those who were not, (adjusted odds ratio, AOR = 1.84 (1.03-3.28); P = 0.04). But children on cotrimoxazole prophylaxis had a 57% reduction in the odds of interrupting ART compared to those who were not, (AOR = 0.43 (0.20-0.93); P = 0.03). Conclusion: Children on ART and also taking multiple individual anti-TB drugs should be monitored closely for ART adherence. Cotrimoxazole prophylaxis should be encouraged in children diagnosed with HIV while awaiting ART commencement as this may prime them for a better ART adherence. PMID:25657493

  9. HIV-1 protein gp120 rapidly impairs memory in chicks by interrupting the glutamate-glutamine cycle.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, S P; Edwards, T M; Ng, K T; Robinson, S R

    2007-01-01

    Learning and memory impairments are frequently observed in patients suffering from AIDS Dementia Complex (ADC). These effects have been linked to the presence of gp120, an HIV viral coat glycoprotein. The present study investigated the possibility that gp120 prevents the uptake of extracellular glutamate by astrocytes, leading to an interruption of the glutamate-glutamine cycle and a subsequent impairment of memory. Ten microliters of 10nM gp120 was bilaterally injected into the region of the intermediate medial mesopallium of day-old chicks at various times before, or after, training using a single-trial passive avoidance task. Gp120 was found to significantly impair memory retention when injected 10-40 min after training. Memory impairments were evident within 5 min of gp120 administration and remained evident 24h later. Further, the amnestic effect of gp120 could be overcome with glutamine or with precursors of glutamate synthesis, but only weakly by glutamate. These results support the conclusion that the amnestic effect of gp120 is due to an impaired uptake of glutamate by astrocytes and a subsequent interruption of glutamine supply to neurones. The data indicate that the glutamate-glutamine cycle may be a useful therapeutic target in the treatment of ADC. PMID:16714124

  10. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identifies Homozygous GPR161 Mutation in a Family with Pituitary Stalk Interruption Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Karaca, Ender; Buyukkaya, Ramazan; Pehlivan, Davut; Charng, Wu-Lin; Yaykasli, Kursat O.; Bayram, Yavuz; Gambin, Tomasz; Withers, Marjorie; Atik, Mehmed M.; Arslanoglu, Ilknur; Bolu, Semih; Erdin, Serkan; Buyukkaya, Ayla; Yaykasli, Emine; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Pituitary stalk interruption syndrome (PSIS) is a rare, congenital anomaly of the pituitary gland characterized by pituitary gland insufficiency, thin or discontinuous pituitary stalk, anterior pituitary hypoplasia, and ectopic positioning of the posterior pituitary gland (neurohypophysis). The clinical presentation of patients with PSIS varies from isolated growth hormone (GH) deficiency to combined pituitary insufficiency and accompanying extrapituitary findings. Mutations in HESX1, LHX4, OTX2, SOX3, and PROKR2 have been associated with PSIS in less than 5% of cases; thus, the underlying genetic etiology for the vast majority of cases remains to be determined. Objective: We applied whole-exome sequencing (WES) to a consanguineous family with two affected siblings who have pituitary gland insufficiency and radiographic findings of hypoplastic (thin) pituitary gland, empty sella, ectopic neurohypophysis, and interrupted pitiutary stalk—characteristic clinical diagnostic findings of PSIS. Design and Participants: WES was applied to two affected and one unaffected siblings. Results: WES of two affected and one unaffected sibling revealed a unique homozygous missense mutation in GPR161, which encodes the orphan G protein–coupled receptor 161, a protein responsible for transducing extracellular signals across the plasma membrane into the cell. Conclusion: Mutations of GPR161 may be implicated as a potential novel cause of PSIS. PMID:25322266

  11. Neglect in Human Communication: Quantifying the Cost of Cell-Phone Interruptions in Face to Face Dialogs

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Rosenfeld, Matías; Calero, Cecilia I.; Fernandez Slezak, Diego; Garbulsky, Gerry; Bergman, Mariano; Trevisan, Marcos; Sigman, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    There is a prevailing belief that interruptions using cellular phones during face to face interactions may affect severely how people relate and perceive each other. We set out to determine this cost quantitatively through an experiment performed in dyads, in a large audience in a TEDx event. One of the two participants (the speaker) narrates a story vividly. The listener is asked to deliberately ignore the speaker during part of the story (for instance, attending to their cell-phone). The speaker is not aware of this treatment. We show that total amount of attention is the major factor driving subjective beliefs about the story and the conversational partner. The effects are mostly independent on how attention is distributed in time. All social parameters of human communication are affected by attention time with a sole exception: the perceived emotion of the story. Interruptions during day-to-day communication between peers are extremely frequent. Our data should provide a note of caution, by indicating that they have a major effect on the perception people have about what they say (whether it is interesting or not . . .) and about the virtues of the people around them. PMID:26039326

  12. Monitoring Delamination of Thermal Barrier Coating During Interrupted High-Heat Flux Laser Testing Using Upconversion Luminescence Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Zhu, Dongming; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2011-01-01

    Upconversion luminescence imaging of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) has been shown to successfully monitor TBC delamination progression during interrupted furnace cycling. However, furnace cycling does not adequately model engine conditions where TBC-coated components are subjected to significant heat fluxes that produce through-thickness temperature gradients that may alter both the rate and path of delamination progression. Therefore, new measurements are presented based on luminescence imaging of TBC-coated specimens subjected to interrupted high-heat-flux laser cycling exposures that much better simulate the thermal gradients present in engine conditions. The TBCs tested were deposited by electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) and were composed of 7wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) with an integrated delamination sensing layer composed of 7YSZ co-doped with erbium and ytterbium (7YSZ:Er,Yb). The high-heat-flux exposures that produce the desired through-thickness thermal gradients were performed using a high power CO2 laser operating at a wavelength of 10.6 microns. Upconversion luminescence images revealed the debond progression produced by the cyclic high-heat-flux exposures and these results were compared to that observed for furnace cycling.

  13. Neglect in human communication: quantifying the cost of cell-phone interruptions in face to face dialogs.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Rosenfeld, Matías; Calero, Cecilia I; Fernandez Slezak, Diego; Garbulsky, Gerry; Bergman, Mariano; Trevisan, Marcos; Sigman, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    There is a prevailing belief that interruptions using cellular phones during face to face interactions may affect severely how people relate and perceive each other. We set out to determine this cost quantitatively through an experiment performed in dyads, in a large audience in a TEDx event. One of the two participants (the speaker) narrates a story vividly. The listener is asked to deliberately ignore the speaker during part of the story (for instance, attending to their cell-phone). The speaker is not aware of this treatment. We show that total amount of attention is the major factor driving subjective beliefs about the story and the conversational partner. The effects are mostly independent on how attention is distributed in time. All social parameters of human communication are affected by attention time with a sole exception: the perceived emotion of the story. Interruptions during day-to-day communication between peers are extremely frequent. Our data should provide a note of caution, by indicating that they have a major effect on the perception people have about what they say (whether it is interesting or not . . .) and about the virtues of the people around them. PMID:26039326

  14. Mechanism of Fast Current Interruption in p -? -n Diodes for Nanosecond Opening Switches in High-Voltage-Pulse Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharabani, Y.; Rosenwaks, Y.; Eger, D.

    2015-07-01

    Step-recovery diodes operating in the snappy recovery regime are used as opening switches for generating narrow pulses with high-voltage amplitude. Physical modeling of the switching process is complex due to the large number of parameters involved, including diode structure, the extreme physical conditions, and the effect of external driving conditions. In this work, we address the problem by using a physical device simulator for solving the coupled device and electrical driving circuit equations. This method allows deciphering of the physical processes to take place in the diode during the fast current interruption phase. Herein we analyze the complete hard (snappy) reverse recovery process in short-base devices and determine the fast-transition-phase mechanism. It was found that the fast current interruption phase is constructed of two processes; the main parameters governing the switching time duration and the prepulse magnitude are the diode's reverse current density and its base-doping concentration. We describe the dependence of the switching performance in these parameters.

  15. Situs inversus with levocardia, infrahepatic interruption of the inferior vena cava, and azygos continuation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Del Prete, Alessandra; Cavaliere, Carlo; Di Pietto, Francesco; De Ritis, Rosaria

    2016-04-01

    Situs inversus incompletus is a rare congenital condition in which the major abdominal organs are reversed or mirrored from their normal positions. It is often associated with multiple congenital anomalies. We present the case of a 38-year-old woman with dyspnea and a clinical history of chronic kidney disease and kidney transplantation. Echocardiography showed a right atrial mass, and analysis of multidetector computed tomography angiography revealed the interruption of the inferior vena cava with an increase of the azygos vein and azygos continuation. These congenital malformations are often associated with deep vein thrombosis and/or pulmonary thromboembolism and explained the occurrence of dyspnea. Cardiac magnetic resonance with contrast medium confirmed the presence of the right atrial mass, the characteristics of which were attributed to interatrial thrombus, which was further confirmed by the success of thrombolytic therapy and the remission of symptoms. In conclusion, we described a case of situs inversus with levocardia in association with infrahepatic interruption of the inferior vena cava, and azygos continuation with cardiac thrombus and chronic renal failure. PMID:25737490

  16. Low Non-structured Antiretroviral Therapy Interruptions in HIV-Infected Persons Who Inject Drugs Receiving Multidisciplinary Comprehensive HIV Care at an Outpatient Drug Abuse Treatment Center.

    PubMed

    Vallecillo, Gabriel; Mojal, Sergio; Roquer, Albert; Samos, Pilar; Luque, Sonia; Martinez, Diana; Martires, Paula Karen; Torrens, Marta

    2016-05-01

    Continuous HIV treatment is necessary to ensure successful combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of patient-initiated non-structured treatment interruptions in HIV-infected persons who inject drugs and who received a multidisciplinary comprehensive program, including medical HIV care, drug-dependence treatment and psychosocial support, at a drug outpatient addiction center. Non-structured treatment interruptions were defined as ≥30 consecutive days off cART without medical indication. During a median follow-up of 53.8 months, 37/132 (28 %) patients experienced the first non-structured treatment interruptions. The cumulative probability of cART interruption at 5 years was 31.2 % (95 % CI 22.4-40.0). Current drug use injection ≥1/day (HR 14.77; 95 % CI 5.90-36.96) and cART naive patients (HR 0.35, 95 % CI 0.14-0.93) were predictive factors for non-structured treatment interruptions. HIV care provided at a drug addiction center is a useful strategy to sustain continuous cART, however, drug abstinence is essential for the long-term maintenance of cART. PMID:26427376

  17. Functional expression of SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil) protects retinal dopaminergic cells from neurotoxin-induced degeneration.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingling; Li, Ping; Carr, Aprell; Wang, Xiaokai; DeLaPaz, April; Sun, Lei; Lee, Eric; Tomei, Erika; Li, Lei

    2013-01-11

    We previously isolated a dominant mutation, night blindness b (nbb), which causes a late onset of retinal dopaminergic cell degeneration in zebrafish. In this study, we cloned the zebrafish nbb locus. Sequencing results revealed that nbb is a homolog of the vertebrate SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil). The Stil gene has been shown to play important roles in the regulation of vertebrate embryonic neural development and human cancer cell proliferation. In this study, we demonstrate that functional expression of Stil is also required for neural survival. In zebrafish, decreased expression of Stil resulted in increased toxic susceptibility of retinal dopaminergic cells to 6-hydroxydopamine. Increases in Stil-mediated Shh signaling transduction (i.e. by knocking down the Shh repressor Sufu) prevented dopaminergic cell death induced by neurotoxic insult. The data suggest that the oncogene Stil also plays important roles in neural protection. PMID:23166330

  18. Transcription of the SCL/TAL1 interrupting Locus (Stil) is required for cell proliferation in adult Zebrafish Retinas.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lei; Li, Ping; Carr, Aprell L; Gorsuch, Ryne; Yarka, Clare; Li, Jingling; Bartlett, Michael; Pfister, Delaney; Hyde, David R; Li, Lei

    2014-03-01

    The human oncogene SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil) is highly conserved in vertebrate species. Previously, we identified a homolog of the Stil gene in zebrafish mutant (night blindness b, nbb), which showed neural defects in the retina (e.g. dopaminergic cell degeneration and/or lack of regeneration). In this research, we examined the roles of Stil in cell proliferation after degeneration in adult zebrafish retinas. We demonstrated that knockdown of Stil gene expression or inhibition of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling transduction decreases the rate of cell proliferation. In contrast, activation of Shh signal transduction promotes cell proliferation. In nbb(+/-) retinas, inhibition of SUFU (a repressor in the Shh pathway) rescues the defects in cell proliferation due to down-regulation of Stil gene expression. The latter data suggest that Stil play a role in cell proliferation through the Shh signal transduction pathway. PMID:24469449

  19. Locally Advanced Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Impact of Pre-Radiotherapy Hemoglobin Level and Interruptions During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk Stoehr, Monika; Kazic, Nadja; Hakim, Samer G.; Walz, Annette; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: Stage IV head and neck cancer patients carry a poor prognosis. Clear understanding of prognostic factors can help to optimize care for the individual patient. This study investigated 11 potential prognostic factors including pre-radiotherapy hemoglobin level and interruptions during radiotherapy for overall survival (OS), metastases-free survival (MFS), and locoregional control (LC) after radiochemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven factors were investigated in 153 patients receiving radiochemotherapy for Stage IV squamous cell head and neck cancer: age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), tumor site, grading, T stage, N stage, pre-radiotherapy hemoglobin level, surgery, chemotherapy type, and interruptions during radiotherapy >1 week. Results: On multivariate analysis, improved OS was associated with KPS 90-100 (relative risk [RR], 2.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20-4.93; p = .012), hemoglobin {>=}12 g/dL (RR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.01-3.53; p = .048), and no radiotherapy interruptions (RR, 2.59; 95% CI, 1.15-5.78; p = .021). Improved LC was significantly associated with lower T stage (RR, 2.17; 95% CI, 1.16-4.63; p = .013), hemoglobin {>=}12 g/dL (RR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.92-9.09; p < .001), surgery (RR, 2.67; 95% CI, 1.28-5.88; p = .008), and no radiotherapy interruptions (RR, 3.32; 95% CI, 1.26-8.79; p = .015). Improved MFS was associated with KPS 90-100 (RR, 3.41; 95% CI, 1.46-8.85; p = .012). Conclusions: Significant predictors for outcome in Stage IV head and neck cancer were performance status, stage, surgery, pre-radiotherapy hemoglobin level, and interruptions during radiotherapy >1 week. It appears important to avoid anemia and radiotherapy interruptions to achieve the best treatment results.

  20. The interruption of thyroid and interrenal and the inter-hormonal interference in fish: does it promote physiologic adaptation or maladaptation?

    PubMed

    Peter, Valsa S; Peter, M C Subhash

    2011-12-01

    Endocrines, the chief components of chemical centers which produce hormones in tune with intrinsic and extrinsic clues, create a chemical bridge between the organism and the environment. In fishes also hormones integrate and modulate many physiologic functions and its synthesis, release, biological actions and metabolic clearance are well regulated. Consequently, thyroid hormones (THs) and cortisol, the products of thyroid and interrenal axes, have been identified for their common integrative actions on metabolic and osmotic functions in fish. On the other hand, many anthropogenic chemical substances, popularly known as endocrine disrupting chemicals, have been shown to disrupt the hormone-receptor signaling pathways in a number fish species. These chemicals which are known for their ability to induce endocrine disruption particularly on thyroid and interrenals can cause malfunction or maladaptation of many vital processes which are involved in the development, growth and reproduction in fish. On the contrary, evidence is presented that the endocrine interrupting agents (EIAs) can cause interruption of thyroid and interrenals, resulting in physiologic compensatory mechanisms which can be adaptive, though such hormonal interactions are less recognized in fishes. The EIAs of physical, chemical and biological origins can specifically interrupt and modify the hormonal interactions between THs and cortisol, resulting in specific patterns of inter-hormonal interference. The physiologic analysis of these inter-hormonal interruptions during acclimation and post-acclimation to intrinsic or extrinsic EIAs reveals that combinations of anti-hormonal, pro-hormonal or stati-hormonal interference may help the fish to fine-tune their metabolic and osmotic performances as part of physiologic adaptation. This novel hypothesis on the phenomenon of inter-hormonal interference and its consequent physiologic interference during thyroid and interrenal interruption thus forms the basis of physiologic acclimation. This interfering action of TH and cortisol during hormonal interruption may subsequently promote ecological adaptation in fish as these physiologic processes ultimately favor them to survive in their hostile environment. PMID:22001502

  1. Internet-based remote counseling to support stress management: preventing interruptions to regular exercise in elderly people

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Sayuri; Munakata, Tsunestugu; Hashimoto, Nobuyuki; Okunaka, Jyunzo; Koga, Tatsuzo

    2006-01-01

    Our research showed that a high degree of life-stress has a negative mental health effect that may interrupt regular exercise. We used an internet based, remotely conducted, face to face, preventive counseling program using video monitors to reduce the source of life-stresses that interrupts regular exercise and evaluated the preventative effects of the program in elderly people. NTSC Video signals were converted to the IP protocol and facial images were transmitted to a PC display using the exclusive optical network lines of JGN2. Participants were 22 elderly people in Hokkaido, Japan, who regularly played table tennis. A survey was conducted before the intervention in August 2003. IT remote counseling was conducted on two occasions for one hour on each occasion. A post intervention survey was conducted in February 2004 and a follow-up survey was conducted in March 2005. Network quality was satisfactory with little data loss and high display quality. Results indicated that self-esteem increased significantly, trait anxiety decreased significantly, cognition of emotional support by people other than family members had a tendency to increase, and source of stress had a tendency to decrease after the intervention. Follow-up results indicated that cognition of emotional support by family increased significantly, and interpersonal dependency decreased significantly compared to before the intervention. These results suggest that face to face IT remote counseling using video monitors is useful to keep elderly people from feeling anxious and to make them confident to continue exercising regularly. Moreover, it has a stress management effect.

  2. Measurement of functional residual capacity during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) by argon washout method without interruption of HFOV.

    PubMed

    Imanaka, H; Takezawa, J; Nishimura, M; Nishijima, M; Taenaka, N; Yoshiya, I

    1990-05-01

    A modified indicator gas washout method was developed to measure functional residual capacity (FRC) during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) without interruption of HFOV. A hot-wire flowmeter and medical gas analyzer measured the flow rate and argon concentration, respectively, at the expiratory end of the respiratory circuit. Upstream of the hot-wire flowmeter, two heat-and-moisture exchangers for resistance and a rubber balloon for capacitance were placed to convert the oscillating expiratory flow to an almost continuous flow. This made it possible to measure FRC during HFOV without interrupting HFOV. To measure the volume of the entire respiratory circuit, a 10 percent argon in 90 percent oxygen gas mixture was initially used as a bias flow, and after equilibration, the test gas was switched to 100 percent oxygen. By electrical integration of the product of the expiratory flow rate and argon concentration, the total amount of argon equilibrated in the entire respiratory circuit was calculated. The volume of the circuit was calculated by dividing the total amount of argon by the initial argon concentration. Functional residual capacity plus the volume of the respiratory circuit was similarly calculated and the difference was estimated as FRC. The accuracy and reproducibility of our method were evaluated by using a one-compartment lung model. There was a high correlation between the volume setting of the model lung and the estimated FRC. This method can be used to estimate FRC in a one-compartment lung model during HFOV, and it is potentially useful in clinical situations. PMID:2331911

  3. [Micropump infusion of gonadorelin in the treatment of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in patients with pituitary stalk interruption syndrome: cases analysis and literature review].

    PubMed

    Shao, Wei-min; Bai, Wen-jun; Chen, Yi-min; Liu, Lei; Wang, Yu-jie

    2014-08-18

    Two cases of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism caused by pituitary stalk interruption syndrome treated by pulse infusion of gonadorelin via micropump were reported, and their clinical features and the treatment process of pulse infusion of gonadorelin via micropump summarized. Both of the 2 patients were presented primarily with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. After the treatment with pulse infusion of gonadorelin via micropump, their syndrome of androgen deficiency improved and the gonadotropin levels promoted at the end of 12 weeks' follow-up. Pulse infusion of gonadorelin via micropump is an alternative to treat hypogonadotropic hypogonadism caused by pituitary stalk interruption syndrome. PMID:25131486

  4. Interrupted Incubation and Short-Term Storage of the Alfalfa Pollinator, Megachile rotundata (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae): A Potential Tool for Synchronizing Bees With Bloom

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interrupting the spring incubation with short-term low temperature storage of the developing pupae and pharate adult stage of Megachile rotundata (F.) is a useful technique for synchronizing the emergence of this bee species with the peak alfalfa bloom. However, low temperature exposure can be stres...

  5. Interruption of the semiochemical-based attraction of ambrosia beetles to ethanol-baited traps and ethanol-injected trap trees by Verbenone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined the ability of verbenone, a bark beetle anti-aggregation pheromone, to interrupt the semiochemical-based attraction of ambrosia beetles. Field trapping studies conducted in Ohio showed that a verbenone dispenser with a release rate of 50 mg / d at 25 oC reduced the attraction of Anisandr...

  6. CD and NMR investigation of collagen peptides mimicking a pathological Gly-Ser mutation and a natural interruption in a similar highly charged sequence context.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiuxia; Liu, Songqing; Yu, Wenyuan; Wang, Shaoru; Xiao, Jianxi

    2016-02-01

    Even a single Gly substitution in the triple helix domain of collagen leads to pathological conditions while natural interruptions are suggested to play important functional roles. Two peptides-one mimicking a pathological Gly-Ser substitution (ERSEQ) and the other one modeling a similar natural interruption sequence (DRSER)-are designed to facilitate the comparison for elucidating the molecular basis of their different biological roles. CD and NMR investigation of peptide ERSEQ indicates a reduction of the thermal stability and disruption of hydrogen bonding at the Ser mutation site, providing a structural basis of the OI disease resulting from the Gly-Ser mutation in the highly charged RGE environment. Both CD and NMR real-time folding results indicate that peptide ERSEQ displays a comparatively slower folding rate than peptide DRSER, suggesting that the Gly-Ser mutation may lead to a larger interference in folding than the natural interruption in a similar RSE context. Our studies suggest that unlike the rigid GPO environment, the abundant R(K)GE(D) motif may provide a more flexible sequence environment that better accommodates mutations as well as interruptions, while the electrostatic interactions contribute to its stability. These results shed insight into the molecular features of the highly charged motif and may aid the design of collagen biomimetic peptides containing important biological sites. PMID:26457583

  7. Stop the Madness! A Quick and Effective Guide to Interrupting Irresponsible Behavior in Any Setting: Home, School, the Workplace, Corrections, Treatment and Counseling Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sousa, Joyce B.; Peacock, Turhan; Sousa, Ronald W.

    Techniques are presented for interrupting and dealing with patterned irresponsible behaviors. A preface reviews the authors' journeys in working out this approach. A method for creating responsibility and accountability where it was not previously expressed is presented in six short chapters, titled: (1) "'Madness' Defined"; (2) "Working with the…

  8. The effect of high temperature interruptions during inductive period on the extent of flowering and on metabolic responses in olives (Olea europaea L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of the duration of high temperature interruption and the timing of it’s occurrence during inductive period on the extent of inhibition of inflorescence production in ‘Arbequina’ olive trees was investigated. Trees kept under inductive conditions in different growth chambers were subjected...

  9. Honoring Counterstories: Utilizing Digital Storytelling in the Culturally Responsive Classroom to Investigate the Community Cultural Wealth and Resiliency of Students with Limited or Interrupted Formal Education (SLIFE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Christina M.

    2013-01-01

    This ethnography seeks to identify the strengths that students with limited or interrupted formal education (SLIFE), a unique subpopulation of English Language Learners (ELLs), possess and explore how those strengths may be utilized in the secondary classroom. This research aims to shift the focus from "eliminating deficits" to working…

  10. Peek-a-What? Infants' Response to the Still-Face Task after Normal and Interrupted Peek-a-Boo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigelow, Ann E.; Best, Caitlin

    2013-01-01

    Infants' sensitivity to the vitality or tension envelope within dyadic social exchanges was investigated by examining their responses following normal and interrupted games of peek-a-boo embedded in a Still-Face Task. Infants 5-6 months old engaged in two modified Still-Face Tasks with their mothers. In one task, the initial interaction ended…

  11. Noncontact mapping guided ablation of right ventricular outflow tract ectopy in a patient with interruption of the inferior vena cava and azygos continuation.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Irene; Arya, A; Ben-Simon, Ron; McCready, Jack M; Herrey, Anna; Lambiase, Pier D

    2013-05-01

    A 58-year-old woman with symptomatic multiple monomorphic premature ventricular beats of a right ventricular outflow tract origin was referred for ablation. An inferior vena cava interruption with azygos continuation was discovered during catheter placement. This case describes positioning of the noncontact mapping array and successful radiofrequency ablation in this challenging anatomy. PMID:21418244

  12. The Validity and Precision of the Comparative Interrupted Time Series Design and the Difference-in-Difference Design in Educational Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somers, Marie-Andrée; Zhu, Pei; Jacob, Robin; Bloom, Howard

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the validity and precision of two nonexperimental study designs (NXDs) that can be used in educational evaluation: the comparative interrupted time series (CITS) design and the difference-in-difference (DD) design. In a CITS design, program impacts are evaluated by looking at whether the treatment group deviates from its…

  13. Morphogenesis, Flowering, and Gene Expression of Dendranthema grandiflorum in Response to Shift in Light Quality of Night Interruption.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Gyeong; Muneer, Sowbiya; Jeong, Byoung Ryong

    2015-01-01

    The impact of shifts in the spectral quality of light on morphogenesis, flowering, and photoperiodic gene expression during exposure to light quality of night interruption (NI) was investigated in Dendranthema grandiflorum. The circadian rhythms of plants grown in a closed walk-in growth chamber were interrupted at night for a total of 4 h, using light-emitting diodes with an intensity of 10 μmol·m⁻²·s⁻¹ PPF. The light quality of the NI was shifted from one wavelength to another after the first 2 h. Light treatments consisting of all possible pairings of blue (B), red (R), far-red (Fr), and white (W) light were tested. Plants in the NI treatment groups exposed to Fr light grew larger than plants in other treatment groups. Of plants in NI treatment groups, those in the NI-WB treatment grew the least. In addition, the impact of shifts in the light quality of NI on leaf expansion was greater in treatment groups exposed to a combination of either B and R or R and W light, regardless of their order of supply. Flowering was observed in the NI-RB, NI-FrR, NI-BFr, NI-FrB, NI-WB, NI-FrW, NI-WFr, NI-WR, and SD (short-day) treatments, and was especially promoted in the NI-BFr and NI-FrB treatments. In a combined shift treatment of B and R or B and W light, the NI concluded with B light (NI-RB and NI-WB) treatment induced flowering. The transcriptional factors phyA, cry1 and FTL (FLOWERING LOCUS T) were positively affected, while phyB and AFT were negatively affected. In conclusion, morphogenesis, flowering, and transcriptional factors were all significantly affected either positively or negatively by shifts in the light quality of NI. The light quality of the first 2 h of NI affected neither morphogenesis nor flowering, while the light quality of the last 2 h of NI significantly affected both morphogenesis and flowering. PMID:26197314

  14. Morphogenesis, Flowering, and Gene Expression of Dendranthema grandiflorum in Response to Shift in Light Quality of Night Interruption

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoo Gyeong; Muneer, Sowbiya; Jeong, Byoung Ryong

    2015-01-01

    The impact of shifts in the spectral quality of light on morphogenesis, flowering, and photoperiodic gene expression during exposure to light quality of night interruption (NI) was investigated in Dendranthema grandiflorum. The circadian rhythms of plants grown in a closed walk-in growth chamber were interrupted at night for a total of 4 h, using light-emitting diodes with an intensity of 10 μmol·m−2·s−1 PPF. The light quality of the NI was shifted from one wavelength to another after the first 2 h. Light treatments consisting of all possible pairings of blue (B), red (R), far-red (Fr), and white (W) light were tested. Plants in the NI treatment groups exposed to Fr light grew larger than plants in other treatment groups. Of plants in NI treatment groups, those in the NI-WB treatment grew the least. In addition, the impact of shifts in the light quality of NI on leaf expansion was greater in treatment groups exposed to a combination of either B and R or R and W light, regardless of their order of supply. Flowering was observed in the NI-RB, NI-FrR, NI-BFr, NI-FrB, NI-WB, NI-FrW, NI-WFr, NI-WR, and SD (short-day) treatments, and was especially promoted in the NI-BFr and NI-FrB treatments. In a combined shift treatment of B and R or B and W light, the NI concluded with B light (NI-RB and NI-WB) treatment induced flowering. The transcriptional factors phyA, cry1 and FTL (FLOWERING LOCUS T) were positively affected, while phyB and AFT were negatively affected. In conclusion, morphogenesis, flowering, and transcriptional factors were all significantly affected either positively or negatively by shifts in the light quality of NI. The light quality of the first 2 h of NI affected neither morphogenesis nor flowering, while the light quality of the last 2 h of NI significantly affected both morphogenesis and flowering. PMID:26197314

  15. Structured Treatment Interruptions and Low Doses of IL-2 in Patients with Primary HIV Infection. Inflammatory, Virological and Immunological Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Nicolás, David; Manzardo, Christian; Agüero, Fernando; Claramonte, Xavier; Plana, Montserrat; Tuset, Montserrat; Pumarola, Tomás; Gallart, Teresa; Gatell, José María; Miró, José María

    2015-01-01

    Background Interventions during primary HIV infection (PHI) can modify the clinical course during the chronic phase. The long-term effect of structured treatment interruptions (STI) followed by low doses of interleukin-2 (IL-2) in treated PHI patients is unknown. Methods Twelve PHI patients with viral load (VL) <20 copies/mL, CD4 cells >500 cells/mm3, and CD4/CD8 ratio >1, on antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiated within the first 90 days of infection and continued for at least 12 months were included. They underwent four STI and were then allocated (week 0 of the study) to ART alone or ART plus low doses of IL-2. ART was stopped once VL <20 copies/mL ('final stop'). Primary endpoints were VL<3000 copies/mL and CD4 cells >500 cells/mm3 at 48 weeks; secondary endpoints were immune activation, inflammatory markers until 48 weeks and the time before resuming ART (CD4 <350 cells/mm3 or AIDS) after ‘final stop’, compared between groups. Results Ten out of 12 patients were males, median age was 35 years and the main risk was men-who-have-sex-with-men. Only one out of 12 patients (in the STI group) maintained VL<3000 copies/mL and CD4 cells >500 cells/mm3 without ART at 48 weeks. All other virological and immunological parameters were comparable between groups at week 0, 'final stop' and week 48. However, the proportion of CD8-CD38+ cells, tumor necrosis factor and srIL-2 were higher in the IL-2 group at 'final stop' and week 24. All these differences vanished during follow-up. At 5 years after the final stop 3 out of 6 patients in the IL-2 group and 6 out of 6 patients in the STI group have resumed ART (P = 0.19). Conclusions STI and IL-2 failed to achieve virological control after ART interruption. STI were not deleterious in long-term follow-up, an important issue for eradication and functional cure trials. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02300623 PMID:26186440

  16. Peri-procedural interrupted oral anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation ablation: comparison of aspirin, warfarin, dabigatran, and rivaroxaban

    PubMed Central

    Winkle, Roger A.; Mead, R. Hardwin; Engel, Gregory; Kong, Melissa H.; Patrawala, Rob A.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Atrial fibrillation ablation requires peri-procedural oral anticoagulation (OAC) to prevent thromboembolic events. There are several options for OAC. We evaluate peri-procedural AF ablation complications using a variety of peri-procedural OACs. Methods and results We examined peri-procedural OAC and groin, bleeding, and thromboembolic complications for 2334 consecutive AF ablations using open irrigated-tip radiofrequency (RF) catheters. Pre-ablation OAC was warfarin in 1113 (47.7%), dabigatran 426 (18.3%), rivaroxaban 187 (8.0%), aspirin 472 (20.2%), and none 136 (5.8%). Oral anticoagulation was always interrupted and intraprocedural anticoagulation was unfractionated heparin (activated clotting time, ACT = 237 26 s). Pre- and post-OAC drugs were the same for 1591 (68.2%) and were different for 743 (31.8%). Following ablation, 693 (29.7%) were treated with dabigatran and 291 (12.5%) were treated with rivaroxaban. There were no problems changing from one OAC pre-ablation to another post-ablation. Complications included 12 (0.51%) pericardial tamponades [no differences for dabigatran (P = 0.457) or rivaroxaban (P = 0.163) compared with warfarin], 12 (0.51%) groin complications [no differences for rivaroxaban (P = 0.709) and fewer for dabigatran (P = 0.041) compared with warfarin]. Only 5 of 2334 (0.21%) required blood transfusions. There were two strokes (0.086%) and no transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs) in the first 48 h post-ablation. Three additional strokes (0.13%), and two TIAs (0.086%) occurred from 48 h to 30 days. Only one stroke had a residual deficit. Compared with warfarin, the neurologic event rate was not different for dabigatran (P = 0.684) or rivaroxaban (P = 0.612). Conclusion Using interrupted OAC, low target intraprocedural ACT, and irrigated-tip RF, the rate of peri-procedural groin, haemorrhagic, and thromboembolic complications was extremely low. There were only minimal differences between OACs. Low-risk patients may remain on aspirin/no OAC pre-ablation. There are no problems changing from one OAC pre-ablation to another post-ablation. PMID:25115168

  17. Understanding reasons for treatment interruption amongst patients on antiretroviral therapy – A qualitative study at the Lighthouse Clinic, Lilongwe, Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabai, Julia; Namakhoma, Ireen; Tweya, Hannock; Phiri, Sam; Schnitzler, Paul; Neuhann, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Background In recent years, scaling up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-limited settings moved impressively towards universal access. Along with these achievements, public health HIV programs are facing a number of challenges including the support of patients on lifelong therapy and the prevention of temporary/permanent loss of patients in care. Understanding reasons for treatment interruption (TI) can inform strategies for improving drug adherence and retention in care. Objective To evaluate key characteristics of patients resuming ART after TI at the Lighthouse Clinic in Lilongwe, Malawi, and to identify their reasons for interrupting ART. Design This study uses a mixed methods design to evaluate patients resuming ART after TI. We analysed an assessment form for patients with TI using pre-defined categories and a comments field to identify frequently stated reasons for TI. Additionally, we conducted 26 in-depth interviews to deepen our understanding of common reasons for TI. In-depth interviews also included the patients’ knowledge about ART and presence of social support systems. Qualitative data analysis was based on a thematic framework approach. Results A total of 347 patients (58.2% female, average age 35.1±11.3 years) with TI were identified. Despite the presence of social support and sufficient knowledge of possible consequences of TI, all patients experienced situations that resulted in TI. Analysis of in-depth interviews led to new and distinct categories for TI. The most common reason for TI was travel (54.5%, n=80/147), which further differentiated into work- or family-related travel. Patients also stated transport costs and health-care-provider-related reasons, which included perceived/enacted discrimination by health care workers. Other drivers of TI were treatment fatigue/forgetfulness, the patients’ health status, adverse drug effects, pregnancy/delivery, religious belief or perceived/enacted stigma. Conclusions To adequately address patients’ needs on a lifelong therapy, adherence-counselling sessions require provision of problem-solving strategies for common barriers to continuous care. PMID:25280736

  18. A Randomized Trial of Continuous Versus Interrupted Chest Compressions in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: Rationale for and Design of the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium CCC Trial

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Siobhan P.; Wang, Henry; Aufderheide, Tom P.; Vaillancourt, Christian; Schmicker, Robert H.; Cheskes, Sheldon; Straight, Ron; Kudenchuk, Peter; Morrison, Laurie; Colella, Riccardo; Condle, Joseph; Gamez, George; Hostler, David; Kayea, Tami; Ragsdale, Sally; Stephens, Shannon; Nichol, Graham

    2015-01-01

    The Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium is conducting a randomized trial comparing survival to hospital discharge after continuous chest compressions (CCC) without interruption for ventilation versus currently recommended American Heart Association cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with interrupted chest compressions (ICC) in adult patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) without obvious trauma or respiratory cause. Emergency medical services perform study CPR for three intervals of manual chest compressions (each about 2 minutes), or until restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Patients randomized to the CCC intervention receive 200 chest compressions with positive pressure ventilations at a rate of 10/minute without interruption in compressions. those randomized to the ICC study arm receive chest compressions interrupted for positive pressure ventilations at a compression:ventilation ratio of 30:2. In either group, each interval of compressions is followed by rhythm analysis and defibrillation as required. Insertion of an advanced airway is deferred for at least the first 6 minutes to reduce interruptions in either study arm. The study uses a cluster randomized design with every-six-month crossovers. The primary outcome is survival to hospital discharge. Secondary outcomes are neurologically intact survival and adverse events. A maximum of 23,600 patients (11,800 per group) enrolled during the post-run-in phase of the study will provide at least 90% power to detect a relative change of 16% in the rate of survival to discharge; 8.1% to 9.4% with overall significance level of 0.05. If this trial demonstrates improved survival with either strategy, more than 3,000 premature deaths from cardiac arrest would be averted annually. PMID:25728722

  19. Influence of apheresis container size on the maintenance of platelet in vitro storage properties after a 30-h interruption of agitation.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Stephen J; Skripchenko, Andrey; Seetharaman, Shalini; Myrup, Andrew; Kurtz, James; Thomas-Montgomery, Dedeene; Awatefe, Helen; Moroff, Gary

    2010-08-01

    We have previously conducted studies investigating maintenance of apheresis platelet in vitro quality measures during storage under simulated shipping conditions in which agitation was interrupted. This study examines the effect of increasing bag surface area on the preservation of in vitro platelet properties during storage with continuous agitation and with a 30 h interruption of agitation. Apheresis platelets were collected in 100% plasma with the Amicus separator to provide two identical platelet products, each with approximately 4-5 x 10(11) platelets. After collection, the volume was divided equally between 1.0 and 1.3 L PL2410 containers. In an initial study, both products were continuously agitated. In a second study, both products were subjected to a single 30-h period of interrupted agitation between Days 2 and 3 of storage by placement in a standard shipping box at room temperature. In each study, units were assayed during storage for standard in vitro platelet quality measures. Platelets stored in the 1.3 L container maintained slightly greater mean pH during 7 day storage with either continuous agitation (n=6) or with a 30-h interruption of agitation (n=12) than those of similarly treated identical platelets stored in the 1.0 L container. Most noteworthy, in experiments with products stored in the 1.0 L container in which there was a large decrease in pH to levels <6.7 or <6.3 on days 5 or 7, respectively, the pH in the matched product stored in the 1.3 L container was substantially greater (0.17+/-06 and 0.37+/-0.09 pH units greater, n=4, respectively). Other measures showed either small differences or comparability of platelet in vitro parameters with storage in the two containers after an interruption of agitation. PMID:20554476

  20. Limiting ac frequency and dc current of electrochemical double layer capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, Andrzej; Jakobczyk, Pawel; Galinski, Maciej; Lota, Grzegorz

    2015-04-01

    The general aim of the present paper was to compare and correlate factors describing operation rate limits of electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLCs), under both ac and dc conditions. Six laboratory-made and six commercial EDLCs were investigated with the use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and galvanostatic charging/discharging. A typical EIS spectrum, taken under ac conditions, consisted of two straight lines. The intersection of both straight lines indicates the frequency (transition frequency ftr) at which the device loses its capacitive properties. Similarly, during dc charging/discharging the I(dU/dt)-1 value (often called EDLCs capacitance), expressed as a function of the current I, also shows two straight lines. The intersection of the lines indicates a transition current Itr and the corresponding (dU/dt)tr voltage changes rate. A linear correlation was found between transition parameters determined under ac and dc conditions ((Redrftr)-1 and Itr(dU/dt)tr-1), with a high correlation parameter r2 = 0.99. The correlation enables estimation of the limiting operation rate of EDLCs under dc conditions based on the analysis of ac impedance spectroscopy curves.

  1. Spontaneous dc Current Generation in a Resistively Shunted Semiconductor Superlattice Driven by a Terahertz Field

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, K.N.; Cannon, E.H.; McKinney, J.C.; Campbell, D.K.; Alekseev, K.N.; Kusmartsev, F.V.; Alekseev, K.N.; Kusmartsev, F.V.

    1998-03-01

    We study a resistively shunted semiconductor superlattice subject to a high-frequency electric field. Using a balance equation approach that incorporates the influence of the electric circuit, we determine numerically a range of amplitude and frequency of the ac field for which a dc bias and current are generated {ital spontaneously} and show that this region is likely accessible to current experiments. Our simulations reveal that the Bloch frequency corresponding to the spontaneous dc bias is approximately an integer multiple of the ac field frequency. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Transverse depinning in weakly pinned vortices driven by crossed ac and dc currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, J.; Hilke, M.; Altounian, Z.

    2008-10-01

    We present experiments on weakly pinned vortices, which exhibit a large critical transverse depinning force. These results are obtained in the superconducting metallic glasses FexNi1-xZr2 using crossed ac and dc driving currents. We study the vortex depinning force due to the transverse ac drive as a function of a longitudinal dc drive; the ac and dc combination permits the separation of the transverse drive from the longitudinal one. We show that the force required for depinning in the transverse direction is greatly enhanced by the longitudinal drive, which demonstrates the existence of a large transverse critical force. The measurements are performed as a function of magnetic field and temperature and show that the transverse critical force exists in a large portion of the phase diagram. Hysteresis observed at the transverse depinning threshold is consistent with a first-order transverse depinning transition.

  3. Numerical prediction of fluid flow and heat transfer in a circular tube with longitudinal fins interrupted in the streamwise direction

    SciTech Connect

    Kelkar, K.M.; Patankar, S.V. )

    1990-05-01

    Numerical calculations have been made for the performance prediction of laminar flow through circular tubes with longitudinal fins interrupted in the streamwise direction by arranging them either in a staggered or an in-line manner. Calculations are made for three-dimensional parabolic flow. Due to the repetitive nature of the geometry in the axial direction, the flow exhibits periodically repeating behavior after some initial development length. Calculations have been made for various values of the axial length parameter and two Prandtl numbers for two different fin geometries. Results indicate that in the periodic fully developed regime, for a Prandtl number of 0.7, a tube with staggered arrangement of fins produces less heat transfer enhancement than a tube with continuous fins. A tube with in-line arrangement of fins gives about as much heat transfer augmentation as the tubes with either continuous or staggered fins but with a much less pressure drop penalty. Local quantities such as the axial velocity profiles and the variation of centerline axial velocity give a good physical understanding of the governing phenomena.

  4. Independence of interrupted coarsening on initial system order: ion-beam nanopatterning of amorphous versus crystalline silicon targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-García, J.; Gago, R.; Cuerno, R.; Sánchez-García, J. A.; Redondo-Cubero, A.; Castro, M.; Vázquez, L.

    2012-09-01

    Interrupted coarsening (IC) has recently been identified as an important feature for the dynamics of the typical length-scale in pattern-forming systems on surfaces. In practice, it can be beneficial to improve pattern ordering since it combines a certain degree of defect suppression with a limited increase in the typical pattern wavelength. However, little is known about its robustness with respect to changes in the preparation of the initial system for cases with potential applications. Working in the context of nano-scale pattern formation by ion-beam sputtering (IBS), we prove that IC properties do not depend on sample preparation. Specifically, interface dynamics under IBS is quantitatively compared on virgin amorphous and crystalline silicon surfaces, using 1 keV Ar+ ions at normal incidence where nanodot pattern formation is triggered by concurrent co-deposition of Fe atoms during processing. Atomic force microscopy shows that dot patterns with similar spatial order and dynamics are obtained in both cases, underscoring the key dynamical role of the amorphous surface layer produced by irradiation. Both systems have been quantitatively described by an effective interface equation. We employ a new procedure based on the linear growth of the initial surface correlations to accurately estimate the equation coefficients. Such a method improves the predictive power of the interface equation with respect to previous studies and leads to a better description of the experimental pattern and its dynamical features.

  5. An Interrupted Time-Series Analysis of Durkheim's Social Deregulation Thesis: The Case of the Russian Federation.

    PubMed

    Pridemore, William Alex; Chamlin, Mitchell B; Cochran, John K

    2007-06-01

    The dissolution of the Soviet Union resulted in sudden, widespread, and fundamental changes to Russian society. The former social welfare system-with its broad guarantees of employment, healthcare, education, and other forms of social support-was dismantled in the shift toward democracy, rule of law, and a free-market economy. This unique natural experiment provides a rare opportunity to examine the potentially disintegrative effects of rapid social change on deviance, and thus to evaluate one of Durkheim's core tenets. We took advantage of this opportunity by performing interrupted time-series analyses of annual age-adjusted homicide, suicide, and alcohol-related mortality rates for the Russian Federation using data from 1956 to 2002, with 1992-2002 as the postintervention time-frame. The ARIMA models indicate that, controlling for the long-term processes that generated these three time series, the breakup of the Soviet Union was associated with an appreciable increase in each of the cause-of-death rates. We interpret these findings as being consistent with the Durkheimian hypothesis that rapid social change disrupts social order, thereby increasing the level of crime and deviance. PMID:20165565

  6. Reverse subclavian flap and aorto-pulmonary window technique for repair of interrupted aortic arch and truncus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    de Siena, Paolo; Rajakaruna, Chanaka; Parry, Andrew J; Caputo, Massimo

    2011-09-01

    We report a surgical strategy for repairing an interrupted aortic arch (IAA) with truncus arteriosus (TA) by using a reverse subclavian flap and an aorto-pulmonary (A-P) window technique for preserving the pulmonary artery architecture. A 10-day-old neonate with type B IAA and type I TA with echocardiographic evidence of a significant distance between the ascending and descending aorta underwent surgical repair at the Bristol Royal Hospital for Children. The superior part of the arch was reconstructed using a reverse subclavian flap and the undersurface with a pulmonary homograft patch. The ascending aorta was separated from the pulmonary arteries using a Gore-Tex patch (A-P window type of repair) without disconnecting the branch pulmonary arteries, in order to preserve their architecture. The continuity between the right ventricle and the pulmonary artery bifurcation was established using a 12 mm Contegra conduit. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the neonate was discharged after 12 days. At follow-up, the patient remains well, gaining weight, with no echocardiographic evidences of obstruction. Reverse subclavian flap with homograft patch combined with and 'A-P window' technique for preservation of the pulmonary artery architecture is a useful and effective surgical strategy for neonates presenting with IAA associated with TA. PMID:21700591

  7. Closed-loop optogenetic control of thalamus as a new tool to interrupt seizures after cortical injury

    PubMed Central

    Paz, Jeanne T.; Davidson, Thomas J.; Frechette, Eric S.; Delord, Bruno; Parada, Isabel; Peng, Kathy; Deisseroth, Karl; Huguenard, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebrocortical injuries, such as stroke, are a major source of disability. Maladaptive consequences can result from post-injury local reorganization of cortical circuits. For example, epilepsy is a common sequela of cortical stroke, yet mechanisms responsible for seizures following cortical injuries remain unknown. In addition to local reorganization, long-range, extra-cortical connections might be critical for seizure maintenance. Here we report in rats the first evidence that the thalamus – a structure remote from but connected to the injured cortex – is required to maintain cortical seizures. Thalamocortical neurons connected to the injured epileptic cortex undergo changes in HCN channel expression and become hyperexcitable. Targeting these neurons with a closed-loop optogenetic strategy demonstrates that reducing their activity in real-time is sufficient to immediately interrupt electrographic and behavioral seizures. This approach is of therapeutic interest for intractable epilepsy, since it spares cortical function between seizures, in contrast to existing treatments such as surgical lesioning or drugs. PMID:23143518

  8. Sentence intelligibility during segmental interruption and masking by speech-modulated noise: Effects of age and hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Fogerty, Daniel; Ahlstrom, Jayne B; Bologna, William J; Dubno, Judy R

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated how single-talker modulated noise impacts consonant and vowel cues to sentence intelligibility. Younger normal-hearing, older normal-hearing, and older hearing-impaired listeners completed speech recognition tests. All listeners received spectrally shaped speech matched to their individual audiometric thresholds to ensure sufficient audibility with the exception of a second younger listener group who received spectral shaping that matched the mean audiogram of the hearing-impaired listeners. Results demonstrated minimal declines in intelligibility for older listeners with normal hearing and more evident declines for older hearing-impaired listeners, possibly related to impaired temporal processing. A correlational analysis suggests a common underlying ability to process information during vowels that is predictive of speech-in-modulated noise abilities. Whereas, the ability to use consonant cues appears specific to the particular characteristics of the noise and interruption. Performance declines for older listeners were mostly confined to consonant conditions. Spectral shaping accounted for the primary contributions of audibility. However, comparison with the young spectral controls who received identical spectral shaping suggests that this procedure may reduce wideband temporal modulation cues due to frequency-specific amplification that affected high-frequency consonants more than low-frequency vowels. These spectral changes may impact speech intelligibility in certain modulation masking conditions. PMID:26093436

  9. On migration of primary/peritectic interface during interrupted directional solidification of Sn-Ni peritectic alloy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Peng; Li, Xinzhong; Li, Jiangong; Su, Yanqing; Guo, Jingjie; Fu, Hengzhi

    2016-01-01

    The migration of the primary/peritectic interface in local isothermal condition is observed in dendritic structure of Sn-Ni peritectic alloy after experiencing interrupted directional solidification. It was observed that this migration of primary Ni3Sn2/peritectic Ni3Sn4 interface towards the primary Ni3Sn2 phase was accompanied by migration of liquid film located at this interface. The migration velocity of this interface was confirmed to be much faster than that of peritectic transformation, so this migration was mostly caused by superheating of primary Ni3Sn2 phase below TP, leading to nucleation and migration of liquid film at this interface. This migration can be classified as a kind of liquid film migration (LFM), and the migration velocity at the horizontal direction has been confirmed to be much faster than that along the direction of temperature gradient. Analytical prediction has shown that the migration of liquid film could be divided into two stages depending on whether primary phase exists below TP. If the isothermal annealing time is not long enough, both the liquid film and the primary/peritectic interface migrate towards the primary phase until the superheated primary phase has all been dissolved. Then, this migration process towards higher temperature is controlled by temperature gradient zone melting (TGZM). PMID:27075006

  10. On migration of primary/peritectic interface during interrupted directional solidification of Sn-Ni peritectic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Peng; Li, Xinzhong; Li, Jiangong; Su, Yanqing; Guo, Jingjie; Fu, Hengzhi

    2016-04-01

    The migration of the primary/peritectic interface in local isothermal condition is observed in dendritic structure of Sn–Ni peritectic alloy after experiencing interrupted directional solidification. It was observed that this migration of primary Ni3Sn2/peritectic Ni3Sn4 interface towards the primary Ni3Sn2 phase was accompanied by migration of liquid film located at this interface. The migration velocity of this interface was confirmed to be much faster than that of peritectic transformation, so this migration was mostly caused by superheating of primary Ni3Sn2 phase below TP, leading to nucleation and migration of liquid film at this interface. This migration can be classified as a kind of liquid film migration (LFM), and the migration velocity at the horizontal direction has been confirmed to be much faster than that along the direction of temperature gradient. Analytical prediction has shown that the migration of liquid film could be divided into two stages depending on whether primary phase exists below TP. If the isothermal annealing time is not long enough, both the liquid film and the primary/peritectic interface migrate towards the primary phase until the superheated primary phase has all been dissolved. Then, this migration process towards higher temperature is controlled by temperature gradient zone melting (TGZM).

  11. Pituitary Stalk Interruption Syndrome from Infancy to Adulthood: Clinical, Hormonal, and Radiological Assessment According to the Initial Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Bar, Céline; Zadro, Charline; Diene, Gwenaelle; Oliver, Isabelle; Pienkowski, Catherine; Jouret, Béatrice; Cartault, Audrey; Ajaltouni, Zeina; Salles, Jean-Pierre; Sevely, Annick; Tauber, Maithé; Edouard, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with pituitary stalk interruption syndrome (PSIS) are initially referred for hypoglycemia during the neonatal period or growth retardation during childhood. PSIS is either isolated (nonsyndromic) or associated with extra-pituitary malformations (syndromic). Objective To compare baseline characteristics and long-term evolution in patients with PSIS according to the initial presentation. Study Design Sixty-seven patients with PSIS were included. Data from subgroups were compared: neonates (n = 10) versus growth retardation patients (n = 47), and syndromic (n = 32) versus nonsyndromic patients (n = 35). Results Neonates displayed a more severe hormonal and radiological phenotype than children referred for growth retardation, with a higher incidence of multiple hormonal deficiencies (100% versus 34%; P = 0.0005) and a nonvisible anterior pituitary lobe (33% versus 2%; P = 0.0017). Regular follow-up of growth might have allowed earlier diagnosis in the children with growth retardation, as decreased growth velocity and growth retardation were present respectively 3 and 2 years before referral. We documented a progressive worsening of endocrine impairment throughout childhood in these patients. Presence of extra-pituitary malformations (found in 48%) was not associated with more severe hormonal and radiological characteristics. Growth under GH treatment was similar in the patient groups and did not vary according to the pituitary MRI findings. Conclusions PSIS diagnosed in the neonatal period has a particularly severe hormonal and radiological phenotype. The progressive worsening of endocrine impairment throughout childhood justifies periodic follow-up to check for additional hormonal deficiencies. PMID:26562670

  12. Hosed vs. unhosed: global response to interruptions of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning, with and without freshwater forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, N.; Galbraith, E. D.

    2015-10-01

    It is well known that glacial periods were punctuated by abrupt climate changes, with large impacts on air temperature, precipitation, and ocean circulation across the globe. However, the long-held idea that freshwater forcing, caused by massive iceberg discharges, was the driving force behind these changes has been questioned in recent years. This throws into doubt the abundant literature on modelling abrupt climate change through "hosing" experiments, whereby the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is interrupted by an injection of freshwater to the North Atlantic: if some, or all, abrupt climate change was not driven by freshwater input, could its character have been very different than the typical hosed experiments? Here, we take advantage of a global coupled ocean-atmosphere model that exhibits spontaneous, unhosed oscillations in AMOC strength, in order to examine how the global imprint of AMOC variations depends on whether or not it is the result of external freshwater input. The results imply that, to first order, the ocean-ice-atmosphere dynamics associated with an AMOC weakening dominate the global response, regardless of whether or not freshwater input is the cause. The exception lies in the impact freshwater inputs can have on the strength of other polar haloclines, particularly the Southern Ocean, to which freshwater can be transported relatively quickly after injection in the North Atlantic.

  13. An Interrupted Time-Series Analysis of Durkheim's Social Deregulation Thesis: The Case of the Russian Federation

    PubMed Central

    Pridemore, William Alex; Chamlin, Mitchell B.; Cochran, John K.

    2009-01-01

    The dissolution of the Soviet Union resulted in sudden, widespread, and fundamental changes to Russian society. The former social welfare system-with its broad guarantees of employment, healthcare, education, and other forms of social support-was dismantled in the shift toward democracy, rule of law, and a free-market economy. This unique natural experiment provides a rare opportunity to examine the potentially disintegrative effects of rapid social change on deviance, and thus to evaluate one of Durkheim's core tenets. We took advantage of this opportunity by performing interrupted time-series analyses of annual age-adjusted homicide, suicide, and alcohol-related mortality rates for the Russian Federation using data from 1956 to 2002, with 1992-2002 as the postintervention time-frame. The ARIMA models indicate that, controlling for the long-term processes that generated these three time series, the breakup of the Soviet Union was associated with an appreciable increase in each of the cause-of-death rates. We interpret these findings as being consistent with the Durkheimian hypothesis that rapid social change disrupts social order, thereby increasing the level of crime and deviance. PMID:20165565

  14. On migration of primary/peritectic interface during interrupted directional solidification of Sn-Ni peritectic alloy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Peng; Li, Xinzhong; Li, Jiangong; Su, Yanqing; Guo, Jingjie; Fu, Hengzhi

    2016-01-01

    The migration of the primary/peritectic interface in local isothermal condition is observed in dendritic structure of Sn–Ni peritectic alloy after experiencing interrupted directional solidification. It was observed that this migration of primary Ni3Sn2/peritectic Ni3Sn4 interface towards the primary Ni3Sn2 phase was accompanied by migration of liquid film located at this interface. The migration velocity of this interface was confirmed to be much faster than that of peritectic transformation, so this migration was mostly caused by superheating of primary Ni3Sn2 phase below TP, leading to nucleation and migration of liquid film at this interface. This migration can be classified as a kind of liquid film migration (LFM), and the migration velocity at the horizontal direction has been confirmed to be much faster than that along the direction of temperature gradient. Analytical prediction has shown that the migration of liquid film could be divided into two stages depending on whether primary phase exists below TP. If the isothermal annealing time is not long enough, both the liquid film and the primary/peritectic interface migrate towards the primary phase until the superheated primary phase has all been dissolved. Then, this migration process towards higher temperature is controlled by temperature gradient zone melting (TGZM). PMID:27075006

  15. Current interruption and particle beam generation by a plasma focus. Interim report (annual), 30 Sep 81-30 Sep 82

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdin, G.; Venneri, F.

    1982-11-30

    Through collaboration with Dr. K. H. Schoenbach of Texas Tech University the plasma focus opening switch (PFOS) was revised to answer basic questions as to utility of the concept. To estimate the plasma temperature and classical resistivity a soft X-ray spectrometer and X-ray pinhole camera were developed. The temperature was estimated from a coronal model to range between 0.4 to 0.5 keV for either a nitrogen or neon impurity (1 to 2%) in deuterium at 3 torr. Strong pinches were observed in pure neon (0.6 torr) with an electron temperature in the same range. The corresponding classical resistance of the pinch is 9 m omega whereas 500 m omega is more consistent with output voltage pulse and current flow at interruption indicating anomalous resistivity is present. A one-dimensional two-fluid computer code has been developed to model anomalous resistivity in the pinch phase and preliminary results are consistent with the snowplow model. The final analysis of the plasma focus particle beam generation experiments was completed and a strong correlation was found for the beam-target model as the mechanism for neutron production in the Illinois plasma focus device.

  16. Effects of beam interruption time on tumor control probability in single-fractionated carbon-ion radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Inaniwa, T; Kanematsu, N; Suzuki, M; Hawkins, R B

    2015-05-21

    Carbon-ion radiotherapy treatment plans are designed on the assumption that the beams are delivered instantaneously, irrespective of actual dose-delivery time structure in a treatment session. As the beam lines are fixed in the vertical and horizontal directions at our facility, beam delivery is interrupted in multi-field treatment due to the necessity of patient repositioning within the fields. Single-fractionated treatment for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is such a case, in which four treatment fields in multiple directions are delivered in one session with patient repositioning during the session. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the period of dose delivery, including interruptions due to patient repositioning, on tumor control probability (TCP) of NSCLC. All clinical doses were weighted by relative biological effectiveness (RBE) evaluated for instantaneous irradiation. The rate equationsdefined in the microdosimetric kinetic model (MKM) for primary lesions induced in DNA were applied to the single-fractionated treatment of NSCLC. Treatment plans were made for an NSCLC case for various prescribed doses ranging from 25 to 50?Gy (RBE), on the assumption of instantaneous beam delivery. These plans were recalculated by varying the interruption time ? ranging from 0 to 120?min between the second and third fields for continuous irradiations of 3?min per field based on the MKM. The curative doses that would result in a TCP of 90% were deduced for the respective interruption times. The curative dose was 34.5?Gy (RBE) for instantaneous irradiation and 36.6?Gy(RBE), 39.2?Gy (RBE), 41.2?Gy (RBE), 43.3?Gy (RBE) and 44.4?Gy(RBE) for ? = 0?min, 15?min, 30?min, 60?min and 120?min, respectively. The realistic biological effectiveness of therapeutic carbon-ion beam decreased with increasing interruption time. These data suggest that the curative dose can increase by 20% or more compared to the planned dose if the interruption time extends to 30?min or longer. These effects should be considered in carbon-ion radiotherapy treatment planning if a longer dose-delivery procedure time is anticipated. PMID:25933161

  17. Effects of beam interruption time on tumor control probability in single-fractionated carbon-ion radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaniwa, T.; Kanematsu, N.; Suzuki, M.; Hawkins, R. B.

    2015-05-01

    Carbon-ion radiotherapy treatment plans are designed on the assumption that the beams are delivered instantaneously, irrespective of actual dose-delivery time structure in a treatment session. As the beam lines are fixed in the vertical and horizontal directions at our facility, beam delivery is interrupted in multi-field treatment due to the necessity of patient repositioning within the fields. Single-fractionated treatment for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is such a case, in which four treatment fields in multiple directions are delivered in one session with patient repositioning during the session. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the period of dose delivery, including interruptions due to patient repositioning, on tumor control probability (TCP) of NSCLC. All clinical doses were weighted by relative biological effectiveness (RBE) evaluated for instantaneous irradiation. The rate equations defined in the microdosimetric kinetic model (MKM) for primary lesions induced in DNA were applied to the single-fractionated treatment of NSCLC. Treatment plans were made for an NSCLC case for various prescribed doses ranging from 25 to 50 Gy (RBE), on the assumption of instantaneous beam delivery. These plans were recalculated by varying the interruption time τ ranging from 0 to 120 min between the second and third fields for continuous irradiations of 3 min per field based on the MKM. The curative doses that would result in a TCP of 90% were deduced for the respective interruption times. The curative dose was 34.5 Gy (RBE) for instantaneous irradiation and 36.6 Gy (RBE), 39.2 Gy (RBE), 41.2 Gy (RBE), 43.3 Gy (RBE) and 44.4 Gy (RBE) for τ = 0 min, 15 min, 30 min, 60 min and 120 min, respectively. The realistic biological effectiveness of therapeutic carbon-ion beam decreased with increasing interruption time. These data suggest that the curative dose can increase by 20% or more compared to the planned dose if the interruption time extends to 30 min or longer. These effects should be considered in carbon-ion radiotherapy treatment planning if a longer dose-delivery procedure time is anticipated.

  18. Environmental change within the Balkan region during the past ca. 50 ka recorded in the sediments from lakes Prespa and Ohrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, B.; Vogel, H.; Zanchetta, G.; Sulpizio, R.

    2010-10-01

    Lakes Prespa and Ohrid, in the Balkan region, are considered to be amongst the oldest lakes in Europe. Both lakes are hydraulically connected via karst aquifers. From Lake Ohrid, several sediment cores up to 15 m long have been studied over the last few years. Here, we document the first long sediment record from nearby Lake Prespa to clarify the influence of Lake Prespa on Lake Ohrid and the environmental history of the region. Radiocarbon dating and dated tephra layers provide robust age control and indicate that the 10.5 m long sediment record from Lake Prespa reaches back to 48 ka. Glacial sedimentation is characterized by low organic matter content and absence of carbonates in the sediments, which indicate oligotrophic conditions in both lakes. Holocene sedimentation is characterized by particularly high carbonate content in Lake Ohrid and by particularly high organic matter content in Lake Prespa, which indicates a shift towards more mesotrophic conditions in the latter. Long-term environmental change and short-term events, such as related to the Heinrich events during the Pleistocene or the 8.2 ka cooling event during the Holocene, are well recorded in both lakes, but are only evident in certain proxies. The comparison of the sediment cores from both lakes indicates that environmental change affects particularly the trophic state of Lake Prespa due to its lower volume and water depth.

  19. An Interrupted Pathway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michell, Dee

    2011-01-01

    It took the author 22 years to get her first undergraduate degree. Not that she studied for all that time, of course, but she first enrolled in 1976 and she didn't graduate with her BA until April 1998. Why did it take so long? Was there something wrong with her? Was there anything anyone else could have done to help her get through university…

  20. Water Supply Interruptions and Suspected Cholera Incidence: A Time-Series Regression in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    PubMed Central

    Jeandron, Aurélie; Saidi, Jaime Mufitini; Kapama, Alois; Burhole, Manu; Birembano, Freddy; Vandevelde, Thierry; Gasparrini, Antonio; Armstrong, Ben; Cairncross, Sandy; Ensink, Jeroen H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The eastern provinces of the Democratic Republic of the Congo have been identified as endemic areas for cholera transmission, and despite continuous control efforts, they continue to experience regular cholera outbreaks that occasionally spread to the rest of the country. In a region where access to improved water sources is particularly poor, the question of which improvements in water access should be prioritized to address cholera transmission remains unresolved. This study aimed at investigating the temporal association between water supply interruptions and Cholera Treatment Centre (CTC) admissions in a medium-sized town. Methods and Findings Time-series patterns of daily incidence of suspected cholera cases admitted to the Cholera Treatment Centre in Uvira in South Kivu Province between 2009 and 2014 were examined in relation to the daily variations in volume of water supplied by the town water treatment plant. Quasi-poisson regression and distributed lag nonlinear models up to 12 d were used, adjusting for daily precipitation rates, day of the week, and seasonal variations. A total of 5,745 patients over 5 y of age with acute watery diarrhoea symptoms were admitted to the CTC over the study period of 1,946 d. Following a day without tap water supply, the suspected cholera incidence rate increased on average by 155% over the next 12 d, corresponding to a rate ratio of 2.55 (95% CI: 1.54–4.24), compared to the incidence experienced after a day with optimal production (defined as the 95th percentile—4,794 m3). Suspected cholera cases attributable to a suboptimal tap water supply reached 23.2% of total admissions (95% CI 11.4%–33.2%). Although generally reporting less admissions to the CTC, neighbourhoods with a higher consumption of tap water were more affected by water supply interruptions, with a rate ratio of 3.71 (95% CI: 1.91–7.20) and an attributable fraction of cases of 31.4% (95% CI: 17.3%–42.5%). The analysis did not suggest any association between levels of residual chlorine in the water fed to the distribution network and suspected cholera incidence. Laboratory confirmation of cholera was not available for this analysis. Conclusions A clear association is observed between reduced availability of tap water and increased incidence of suspected cholera in the entire town of Uvira in Eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo. Even though access to piped water supplies is low in Uvira, improving the reliability of tap water supply may substantially reduce the incidence of suspected cholera, in particular in neighbourhoods having a higher access to tap water. These results argue in favour of water supply investments that focus on the delivery of a reliable and sustainable water supply, and not only on point-of-use water quality improvements, as is often seen during cholera outbreaks. PMID:26506001