Science.gov

Sample records for 6-12 mum wavelength

  1. Raman fibre lasers emitting at a wavelength above 2 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Dianov, Evgenii M; Bufetov, Igor' A; Mashinsky, V M; Neustruev, V B; Medvedkov, O I; Shubin, Aleksei V; Mel'kumov, Mikhail A; Gur'yanov, A N; Khopin, V F; Yashkov, M V

    2004-08-31

    Single-mode Raman fibre lasers emitting a few hundreds of millwatts at wavelengths of 2.0 and 2.2 {mu}m are built for the first time. Laser emission was amplified in a fibre with a germanium dioxide core and a silica cladding pumped by an Er/Yb-doped fibre laser. (lasers)

  2. Wafer bonded 1.55 mum vertical cavity laser arrays for wavelength division multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Adil Mahmood

    Vertical cavity lasers in the 1.55 mum wavelength band are attractive sources for optical networks. Previous devices have been limited by low output power and poor thermal performance. In this work, novel wafer bonding techniques were developed to create high-performance 1.55 mum vertical cavity lasers and a new class of multiple wavelength vertical cavity laser arrays. Wafer bonding enables the integration of thermally conductive GaAs/AlGaAs mirrors and traditional InP/InGaAsP active regions. A superlattice barrier was used as a buffer layer during bonding to reduce the number of non-radiative recombination centers in the active region. The surface of these superlattice layers was patterned prior to bonding to define multiple wavelength cavities. Continuous-wave operation was achieved at temperatures up to 105°C. This is the highest reported lasing temperature for a 1.55 mum vertical cavity laser. Threshold currents of 0.8 mA were measured. The peak output power at 20°C was 0.7 mW. The peak output power at 80°C was 0.2 mW. Single-mode operation with a side-mode suppression ration in excess of 40 dB was observed for a 5 mum aperture device. Four-channel arrays were also fabricated. The wavelength span was 1509.1--1524.4 nm with channel spacing of approximately 5 nm. This is the first demonstration of an independently addressable, multiple-wavelength vertical cavity laser array at 1.55 mum. Threshold currents of 1.0 mA and peak output powers of 0.5 mW were measured for array elements. Thermal and optical crosstalk between array elements are negligible, due to the high thermal conductivity of the bottom mirror and large device pitch.

  3. Continuously tunable fibre attenuator operating in the wavelength range near 1.5 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, Ol'ga I; Mishakov, Gennadii V; Sokolov, Viktor I; Varlamova, Nina V; Zapadinskii, Boris I

    2004-09-30

    A fibre attenuator is fabricated for the telecommunication wavelength range near 1.5 {mu}m in which a single-mode silica fibre with side polishing is used. The fibre surface is covered by a layer of fluorine-containing polymer with a large thermooptic coefficient. The principle of attenuator operation is based on a change in the conditions of total internal reflection for a guided mode in the polished region due to thermally induced variation in the refractive index of the fluoropolymer layer. The attenuator is insensitive to light polarisation, it has a continuously variable attenuation coefficient in the range 0.2-27 dB, and can be easily incorporated into fibreoptic links. (fibre optics)

  4. Broadband carbon monoxide laser system operating in the wavelength range of 2.5 - 8.3 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Yu M; Ionin, Andrei A; Kinyaevsky, I O; Klimachev, Yu M; Kozlov, A Yu; Kotkov, A A; Lanskii, G V; Shaiduko, A V

    2013-02-28

    A two-cascade frequency conversion of CO-laser radiation is demonstrated in a single sample of a nonlinear ZnGeP{sub 2} crystal. The crystal is pumped by a repetitively pulsed cryogenic lowpressure CO laser operating on {approx}150 vibration - rotational transitions in the wavelength range 5.0 - 7.5 {mu}m, which corresponds to the frequency range of a half octave. In the first conversion cascade, generation of second harmonic and sum frequencies of various pairs of CO-laser radiation give {approx}350 emission lines in the wavelength range 2.5 - 3.7 {mu}m. In the second cascade, by mixing the radiation converted in the first cascade with the residual radiation of the CO laser we have obtained {approx}90 lines in the range 4.3 - 5.0 {mu}m and more than 80 lines in the range 7.5 - 8.3 {mu}m. Thus, using a single sample of the nonlinear ZnGeP{sub 2} crystal pumped by the radiation of a single CO laser we have produced a source of broadband (more than one and a half octaves) laser radiation, simultaneously operating at {approx}670 lines in the wavelength range 2.5 - 8.3 {mu}m. (lasers)

  5. Radiation resistance of nonlinear crystals at a wavelength of 9.55 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Yu M; Voevodin, V G; Badikov, Valerii V; Geiko, L G; Geiko, P P; Ivashchenko, M V; Karapuzikov, A I; Sherstov, I V

    2001-12-31

    The results of radiation resistance measurements for twelve nonlinear crystals are presented. The crystals include the well-known nonlinear CdGeAs{sub 2}, ZnGeP{sub 2}, AgGaSe{sub 2}, GaSe, AgGaS{sub 2}, and Ag{sub 3}AsS{sub 3} crystals operating in the middle IR range, new mixed AgGaGeS{sub 4} and Cd{sub 0.35}Hg{sub 0.65}Ga{sub 2}S{sub 4} crystals, two-phase (orange and yellow) HgGa{sub 2}S{sub 4} crystal, and the doped GaSe:In crystal. The mixed crystals and the two-phase HgGa{sub 2}S{sub 4} crystal are transparent in the range from 0.4 - 0.5 to 11.5 - 14.5 {mu}m. The measurements were performed using a pulsed single-mode highly stability TEA CO{sub 2} laser with an output pulse duration of {approx}30 ns. The damage thresholds of new nonlinear AgGaGeS{sub 4} and Cd {sub 0.35}Hg{sub 0.65}Ga{sub 2}S{sub 4} crystals and of the HgGa{sub 2}S{sub 4} crystal (the orange and yellow phases) were found to be 1.5 - 2.2 times higher than for the crystals operating in the middle IR range. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  6. Frequency-resolved optical gating system with a tellurium crystal for characterizing free-electron lasers in the wavelength range of 10-30 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Iijima, Hokuto; Nagai, Ryoji; Nishimori, Nobuyuki; Hajima, Ryoichi; Minehara, Eisuke J.

    2009-12-15

    A second-harmonic generation frequency-resolved optical gating (SHG-FROG) system has been developed for the complete characterization of laser pulses in the wavelength range of 10-30 {mu}m. A tellurium crystal is used so that spectrally resolved autocorrelation signals with a good signal-to-noise ratio are obtained. Pulses (wavelength {approx}22 {mu}m) generated from a free-electron laser are measured by the SHG-FROG system. The SHG intensity profile and the spectrum obtained by FROG measurements are well consistent with those of independent measurements of the pulse length and spectrum. The pulse duration and spectral width determined from the FROG trace are 0.6 ps and 5.2 THz at full width half maximum, respectively.

  7. InAs/InP quantum dots emitting in the 1.55 {mu}m wavelength region by inserting submonolayer GaP interlayers

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Q.; Noetzel, R.; Veldhoven, P.J. van; Eijkemans, T.J.; Wolter, J.H.

    2004-08-23

    We report on the growth of InAs quantum dots (QDs) in GaInAsP on InP (100) substrates by chemical-beam epitaxy, with emission wavelength in the 1.55 {mu}m region. Submonolayer coverage of GaP on the GaInAsP buffer before deposition of the InAs QDs results in most efficient suppression of As/P exchange during InAs growth and subsequent growth interruption under arsenic flux. Continuous wavelength tuning from above 1.6 to below 1.5 {mu}m is thus achieved by varying the coverage of the GaP interlayer within the submonolayer range. Temperature dependent photoluminescence reveals distinct zero-dimensional carrier confinement and indicates that the InAs QDs are free of defects and dislocations.

  8. GaAsSb/GaAs strained structures with quantum wells for lasers with emission wavelength near 1.3 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Sadofyev, Yu. G.; Samal, N.; Andreev, B. A. Gavrilenko, V. I.; Morozov, S. V.; Spivakov, A. G.; Yablonsky, A. N.

    2010-03-15

    Optimum conditions for the growth of the GaAs{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}/GaAs heterostructures by the method of molecular-bean epitaxy are determined; it is shown that effective long-wavelength photoluminescence at T = 300 K can be obtained at wavelengths as long as {lambda} = 1.3 {mu}m by increasing the antimony incorporation. As the excitation power is increased, the appearance of a short-wavelength line (in addition to a shift of a photoluminescence maximum to shorter wavelengths characteristic of the type II heterojunctions) related to direct optical transitions in the real space takes place; this relation is confirmed by the results of studying the photoluminescence spectra with subpicosecond and nanosecond time resolution in the case of pulsed excitation.

  9. Long wavelength (1.3 {mu}m) vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with a wafer-bonded mirror and an oxygen-implanted confinement region

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Y.; Zhu, Z.H.; Lo, Y.H.; Huffaker, D.L.; Deppe, D.G.; Hou, H.Q.; Hammons, B.E.; Lin, W.; Tu, Y.K.

    1997-07-01

    We proposed and demonstrated a novel design for long wavelength (1.3 {mu}m) vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). In this design, oxygen-implanted current-confinement regions were formed in a GaAs/AlGaAs Bragg reflector which is the bottom mirror wafer bonded to an AlGaInAs/InP cavity consisting of nine strain-compensated quantum wells. Room- temperature continuous-wave (cw) operation of 1.3 {mu}m-VCSELs with a record low cw threshold current density of 1.57kA/cm{sup 2} and a record low cw threshold current of 1 mA have been realized. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Terahertz generation and power limits in In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As photomixer coupled to transverse-electromagnetic-horn antenna driven at 1.55 {mu}m wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Mangeney, J.; Meng, F.; Gacemi, D.; Peytavit, E.; Lampin, J. F.; Akalin, T.

    2010-10-18

    We report continuous wave generation at frequencies up to 2 THz using ion-irradiated In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As photomixers coupled to transverse-electromagnetic-horn antennae driven at {approx}1.55 {mu}m wavelength. Output powers up to 0.1 {mu}W at 700 GHz have been achieved. The dependence of the output power on incident optical power and the bias voltage is analyzed in the both regimes of Ohmic transport and recombination-limited transport. The fundamental limitations of the performance of the photomixer devices based on photoconductive phenomenon in recombination-limited transport are analyzed.

  11. Measurement of optical absorption in polycrystalline CVD diamond plates by the phase photothermal method at a wavelength of 10.6 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Luk'yanov, A Yu; Serdtsev, E V; Volkov, P V; Ral'chenko, Viktor G; Savel'ev, A V; Konov, Vitalii I; Khomich, A V

    2008-12-31

    A highly-efficient phase photothermal method is developed for quantitative measurements of the small optical absorption coefficient in thin plates made of highly transparent materials in which bulk losses significantly exceed surface losses. The bulk absorption coefficient at 10.6 {mu}m is estimated in polycrystalline diamond plates grown from the vapour phase (a CVD diamond). The results are compared with those for natural and synthetic diamond single crystals and with the concentrations of nitrogen and hydrogen impurities. The absorption coefficient of the best samples of the CVD diamond did not exceed 0.06 cm{sup -1}, which, taking into account the high thermal conductivity of the CVD diamond (1800-2200 W mK{sup -1} at room temperature), makes this material attractive for fabricating output windows of high-power CO{sub 2} lasers, especially for manufacturing large-size optics. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  12. Long wavelength (>1.55 {mu}m) room temperature emission and anomalous structural properties of InAs/GaAs quantum dots obtained by conversion of In nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Urbanczyk, A.; Keizer, J. G.; Koenraad, P. M.; Noetzel, R.

    2013-02-18

    We demonstrate that molecular beam epitaxy-grown InAs quantum dots (QDs) on (100) GaAs obtained by conversion of In nanocrystals enable long wavelength emission in the InAs/GaAs material system. At room temperature they exhibit a broad photoluminescence band that extends well beyond 1.55 {mu}m. We correlate this finding with cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy measurements. They reveal that the QDs are composed of pure InAs which is in agreement with their long-wavelength emission. Additionally, the measurements reveal that the QDs have an anomalously undulated top surface which is very different to that observed for Stranski-Krastanow grown QDs.

  13. MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDY OF A COMPLETE IRAC 3.6 {mu}m SELECTED GALAXY SAMPLE: A FAIR CENSUS OF RED AND BLUE POPULATIONS AT REDSHIFTS 0.4-1.2

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.-S.; Faber, S. M.; Koo, D.; Rigopoulou, D.; Magdis, G.; Newman, J.; Shu, C.; Luo, Z.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Wang, T.; Willner, S. P.; Fazio, G. G.; Barmby, P.; Coil, A.; Zheng, X. Z.

    2013-03-20

    We present a multi-wavelength study of a 3.6 {mu}m selected galaxy sample in the Extended Groth Strip (EGS). The sample is complete for galaxies with stellar mass >10{sup 9.5} M{sub Sun} and redshift 0.4 < z < 1.2. In this redshift range, the Infrared Array Camera 3.6 {mu}m band measures the rest-frame near-infrared band, permitting nearly unbiased selection with respect to both quiescent and star-forming galaxies. The numerous spectroscopic redshifts available in the EGS are used to train an artificial neural network to estimate photometric redshifts. The distribution of photometric redshift errors is Gaussian with standard deviation {approx}0.025(1 + z), and the fraction of redshift failures (>3{sigma} errors) is about 3.5%. A new method of validation based on pair statistics confirms the estimate of standard deviation even for galaxies lacking spectroscopic redshifts. Basic galaxy properties measured include rest-frame U - B colors, B- and K-band absolute magnitudes, and stellar masses. We divide the sample into quiescent and star-forming galaxies according to their rest-frame U - B colors and 24-3.6 {mu}m flux density ratios and derive rest K-band luminosity functions and stellar mass functions for quiescent, star-forming, and all galaxies. The results show that massive, quiescent galaxies were in place by z Almost-Equal-To 1, but lower mass galaxies generally ceased their star formation at later epochs.

  14. FAINT SUBMILLIMETER GALAXY COUNTS AT 450 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chian-Chou; Cowie, Lennox L.; Barger, Amy J.; Casey, Caitlin M.; Lee, Nicholas; Sanders, David B.; Williams, Jonathan P.; Wang, Wei-Hao

    2013-01-10

    We present the results of SCUBA-2 observations at 450 {mu}m and 850 {mu}m of the field lensed by the massive cluster A370. With a total survey area >100 arcmin{sup 2} and 1{sigma} sensitivities of 3.92 and 0.82 mJy beam{sup -1} at 450 and 850 {mu}m, respectively, we find a secure sample of 20 sources at 450 {mu}m and 26 sources at 850 {mu}m with a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) > 4. Using the latest lensing model of A370 and Monte Carlo simulations, we derive the number counts at both wavelengths. The 450 {mu}m number counts probe a factor of four deeper than the counts recently obtained from the Herschel Space Telescope at similar wavelengths, and we estimate that {approx}47%-61% of the 450 {mu}m extragalactic background light resolved into individual sources with 450 {mu}m fluxes greater than 4.5 mJy. The faint 450 {mu}m sources in the 4{sigma} sample have positional accuracies of 3 arcsec, while brighter sources (S/N >6{sigma}) are good to 1.4 arcsec. Using a deep radio map (1{sigma} {approx} 6 {mu}Jy) we find that the percentage of submillimeter sources having secure radio counterparts is 85% for 450 {mu}m sources with intrinsic fluxes >6 mJy and 67% for 850 {mu}m sources with intrinsic fluxes >4 mJy. We also find that 67% of the >4{sigma} 450 {mu}m sources are detected at 850 {mu}m, while the recovery rate at 450 {mu}m of >4{sigma} 850 {mu}m sources is 54%. Combined with the source redshifts estimated using millimetric flux ratios, the recovered rate is consistent with the scenario where both 450 {mu}m and 20 cm emission preferentially select lower redshift dusty sources, while 850 {mu}m emission traces a higher fraction of dusty sources at higher redshifts. We identify potential counterparts in various wavelengths from X-ray to mid-infrared and measure the multiwavelength photometry, which we then use to analyze the characteristics of the sources. We find three X-ray counterparts to our robust submillimeter sample (S/N > 5), giving an active galactic nucleus

  15. POLARIMETRY OF DG TAU AT 350 mum

    SciTech Connect

    Krejny, M.; Matthews, T. G.; Novak, G.; Cho, J.; Li, H.; Shinnaga, H.; Vaillancourt, J. E.

    2009-11-01

    We present the first 350 mum polarization measurement for the disk of the T Tauri star (TTS) DG Tau. The data were obtained using the SHARP polarimeter at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. We measured normalized Stokes parameters q= -0.0086 +- 0.0060 and u = -0.0012 +- 0.0061, which gives a 2sigma upper limit for the percent polarization of 1.7%. We obtain information about the polarization spectrum by comparing our 350 mum measurement with an 850 mum polarization detection previously published for this source. Comparing the two measurements in Stokes space (not in percent polarization) shows that the two data points are not consistent, i.e., either the degree of polarization or the angle of polarization (or both) must change significantly as one moves from 850 mum to 350 mum. This conclusion concerning the polarization spectrum disagrees with the predictions of a recent model for TTS disk polarization. We show that this discrepancy can be explained by optical depth effects. Specifically, we demonstrate that if one were to add more mass to the model disk, one would expect to obtain a model polarization spectrum in which the polarization degree falls sharply with increasing frequency, consistent with the observations at the two wavelengths. We suggest that multiwavelength polarimetry of TTS disk emission may provide a promising method for probing the opacity of TTS disks.

  16. SURVEY OF NEARBY FGK STARS AT 160 mum WITH SPITZER

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, Angelle; Beichman, Charles; Bryden, Geoff; Lisse, Carey

    2009-10-10

    The Spitzer Space Telescope has advanced debris disk science tremendously with a wealth of information on debris disks around nearby A, F, G, K, and M stars at 24 and 70 mum with the MIPS photometer and at 8-34 mum with IRS. Here we present 160 mum observations of a small subset of these stars. At this wavelength, the stellar photospheric emission is negligible and any detected emission corresponds to cold dust in extended Kuiper Belt analogs. However, the Spitzer 160 mum observations are limited in sensitivity by the large beam size which results in significant 'noise' due to cirrus and extragalactic confusion. In addition, the 160 mum measurements suffer from the added complication of a light leak next to the star's position whose flux is proportional to the near-infrared flux of the star. We are able to remove the contamination from the leak and report 160 mum measurements or upper limits for 24 stars. Three stars (HD 10647, HD 207129, and HD 115617) have excesses at 160 mum that we use to constrain the properties of the debris disks around them. A more detailed model of the spectral energy distribution of HD 10647 reveals that the 70 and 160 mum emission could be due to small water ice particles at a distance of 100 AU, consistent with Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging of circumstellar material in the system.

  17. Magnificent Mum Education Program Featuring the Mum Kids (Grades 4-5).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelleher, Christine, Ed.

    Magnificent Mum Education Program is a theme-based program developed around the garden mum. With its bright colors, various flower forms, perennial life cycle, and easy propagation, the garden mum is ideal for classroom use and community planting programs. The mum-theme lessons can be integrated into all subject areas including science, math,…

  18. Magnificent Mum Education Program Featuring the Mum Kids (Grades 2-3).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelleher, Christine, Ed.

    The Magnificent Mum Education Program is a theme-based program developed around the garden mum. With its bright colors, various flower forms, perennial life cycle, and easy propagation, the garden mum is ideal for classroom use and community planting programs. The mum-theme lessons can be integrated into all subject areas including science, math,…

  19. Hybrid Er/Yb fibre laser system for generating few-cycle 1.6 to 2.0 {mu}m pulses optically synchronised with high-power pulses near 1 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Andrianov, A V; Anashkina, E A; Murav'ev, S V; Kim, A V

    2013-03-31

    This paper presents the concept of fibre laser system design for generating optically synchronised femtosecond pulses at two, greatly differing wavelengths and reports experimental and numerical simulation studies of nonlinear conversion of femtosecond pulses at 1.5 {mu}m wavelength in a dispersion-shifted fibre, with the generation of synchronised pulses in the ranges 1.6 - 2 and 1 - 1.1 {mu}m. We describe a three-stage high-power fibre amplifier of femtosecond pulses at 1 {mu}m and a hybrid Er/Yb fibre laser system that has enabled the generation of 12 fs pulses with a centre wavelength of 1.7 {mu}m, synchronised with high-power (microjoule level) 250 fs pulses at 1.03 {mu}m. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  20. 36 CFR 6.12 - Prohibited acts and penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prohibited acts and penalties. 6.12 Section 6.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL SITES IN UNITS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 6.12 Prohibited acts and penalties. (a) The following are prohibited:...

  1. 46 CFR 12.01-6-12.01-7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 12.01-6-12.01-7 Section 12.01-6-12.01-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN REQUIREMENTS FOR RATING ENDORSEMENTS General §§ 12.01-6-12.01-7...

  2. Parents: Stay Mum on Daughter's Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159269.html Parents: Stay Mum on Daughter's Weight Girls who hear comments on size more ... be cautious about what they say to their daughters about their weight, new research says. The study ...

  3. Continuously tunable, 6{endash}14 {mu}m silver-gallium selenide optical parametric oscillator pumped at 1.57 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, S.; Allik, T.H.; Catella, G.; Utano, R.; Hutchinson, J.A.

    1997-08-01

    An angle tuned silver gallium selenide (AgGaSe{sub 2}) optical parametric oscillator (OPO), pumped by the fixed wavelength 1.57 {mu}m output of a noncritically phase-matched KTiOPO{sub 4} OPO, yielded radiation continuously tunable from 6 to 14 {mu}m. Energies of up to 1.2 mJ/pulse with bandwidths of {approximately}5cm{sup {minus}1} (full width at half-maximum) were obtained using a 6.5{times}6.5{times}35.3mm long, type I AgGaSe{sub 2} crystal. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. MUM1/IRF4: A Review.

    PubMed

    Gualco, Gabriela; Weiss, Lawrence M; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2010-07-01

    MUM1/IRF4 protein is a member of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family of transcriptional factors initially described as downstream regulators of interferon signaling. The quantity of this factor varies within the hematopoietic system in a lineage and stage-specific way. It is considered to be a key regulator of several steps in lymphoid, myeloid, and dendritic cell differentiation and maturation. MUM1/IRF4 expression is observed in many lymphoid and myeloid malignancies, and may be a promising target for the treatment of some of these neoplasms. We reviewed the literature on MUM1/IRF4, with emphasis on the pathologic aspects of this marker in reactive and malignant hematologic and nonhematologic conditions. PMID:20182347

  5. THE 15-20 {mu}m EMISSION IN THE REFLECTION NEBULA NGC 2023

    SciTech Connect

    Peeters, Els; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Wolfire, Mark G. E-mail: tielens@strw.leidenuniv.nl E-mail: mwolfire@astro.umd.edu

    2012-03-01

    We present 15-20 {mu}m spectral maps toward the reflection nebula NGC 2023 obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph in short-wavelength, high-resolution mode on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. These spectra reveal emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), C{sub 60}, and H{sub 2} superposed on a dust continuum. These emission components exhibit distinct spatial distributions: with increasing distance from the illuminating star, we observe the PAH emission followed by the dust continuum emission and the H{sub 2} emission. The C{sub 60} emission is located closest to the illuminating star in the south, while in the north it seems to be associated with the H/H{sub 2} transition. Emission from PAHs and PAH-related species produces features at 15.8, 16.4, 17.4, and 17.8 {mu}m and the 15-18 {mu}m plateau. These different PAH features show distinct spatial distributions. The 15.8 {mu}m band and 15-18 {mu}m plateau correlate with the 11.2 {mu}m PAH band and with each other, and are attributed to large, neutral PAHs. Conversely, the 16.4 {mu}m feature correlates with the 12.7 {mu}m PAH band, suggesting that both arise from species that are favored by the same conditions that favor PAH cations. The PAH contribution to the 17.4 {mu}m band is displaced toward the illuminating star with respect to the 11.2 and 12.7 {mu}m emission and is assigned to doubly ionized PAHs and/or a subset of cationic PAHs. The spatial distribution of the 17.8 {mu}m band suggests that it arises from both neutral and cationic PAHs. In contrast to their intensities, the profiles of the PAH bands and the 15-18 {mu}m plateau do not vary spatially. Consequently, we conclude that the carrier of the 15-18 {mu}m plateau is distinct from that of the PAH bands.

  6. ON THE 10 mum SILICATE FEATURE IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Nikutta, Robert; Elitzur, Moshe; Lacy, Mark E-mail: moshe@pa.uky.ed

    2009-12-20

    The 10 mum silicate feature observed with Spitzer in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) reveals some puzzling behavior. It (1) has been detected in emission in type 2 sources, (2) shows broad, flat-topped emission peaks shifted toward long wavelengths in several type 1 sources, and (3) is not seen in deep absorption in any source observed so far. We solve all three puzzles with our clumpy dust radiative transfer formalism. Addressing (1), we present the spectral energy distribution (SED) of SST1721+6012, the first type 2 quasar observed to show a clear 10 mum silicate feature in emission. Such emission arises in models of the AGN torus easily when its clumpy nature is taken into account. We constructed a large database of clumpy torus models and performed extensive fitting of the observed SED. We find that the cloud radial distribution varies as r {sup -1.5} and the torus contains 2-4 clouds along radial equatorial rays, each with optical depth at visual approx60-80. The source bolometric luminosity is approx3 x 10{sup 12} L{sub sun}. Our modeling suggests that approx<35% of objects with tori sharing these characteristics and geometry would have their central engines obscured. This relatively low obscuration probability can explain the clear appearance of the 10 mum emission feature in SST1721+6012 together with its rarity among other QSO2. Investigating (2), we also fitted the SED of PG1211+143, one of the first type 1 QSOs with a 10 mum silicate feature detected in emission. Together with other similar sources, this QSO appears to display an unusually broadened feature whose peak is shifted toward longer wavelengths. Although this led to suggestions of non-standard dust chemistry in these sources, our analysis fits such SEDs with standard galactic dust; the apparent peak shifts arise from simple radiative transfer effects. Regarding (3), we find additionally that the distribution of silicate feature strengths among clumpy torus models closely resembles the observed

  7. A 205 {mu}m [N II] MAP OF THE CARINA NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Oberst, T. E.; Parshley, S. C.; Nikola, T.; Stacey, G. J.; Loehr, A.; Lane, A. P.; Stark, A. A.; Kamenetzky, J.

    2011-10-01

    We present the results of a {approx}250 arcmin{sup 2} mapping of the 205 {mu}m [N II] fine-structure emission over the northern Carina Nebula, including the Car I and Car II H II regions. Spectra were obtained using the South Pole Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (SPIFI) at the Antarctic Submillimeter Telescope and Remote Observatory (AST/RO) at the South Pole. We supplement the 205 {mu}m data with new reductions of far-IR fine-structure spectra from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) in 63 {mu}m [O I], 122 {mu}m [N II], 146 {mu}m [O I], and 158 {mu}m [C II]; the 146 {mu}m [O I] data include 90 raster positions which have not been previously published. Morphological comparisons are made with optical, radio continuum, and CO maps. The 122/205 line ratio is used to probe the density of the low-ionization gas, and the 158/205 line ratio is used to probe the fraction of C{sup +} arising from photodissociation regions (PDRs). The [O I] and [C II] lines are used to construct a PDR model of Carina. When the PDR properties are compared with other sources, Carina is found to be more akin to 30 Doradus than galactic star-forming regions such as Orion, M17, or W49; this is consistent with the view of Carina as a more evolved region, where much of the parent molecular cloud has been ionized or swept away. These data constitute the first ground-based detection of the 205 {mu}m [N II] line, and the third detection overall since those of COBE FIRAS and the Kuiper Airborne Observatory in the early 1990s.

  8. An intracavity 16-[mu]m Raman laser: A theoretical investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Botha, L.R.; Heerden, S.P. van . Laser Research Dept.)

    1994-12-01

    A theoretical model describing the dynamics of an intracavity 16-[mu]m laser was developed. This laser consists of a TEA-CO[sub 2] laser with an intracavity Raman cell. The Raman medium could be either hydrogen or deuterium, depending on the required wavelength. Stokes, anti-Stokes, and pump coupling were considered. Output energies as well as pulse shapes were calculated. Optimum output coupling was also determined. The model predicted that the intracavity Raman laser could be a viable alternative to a conventional multipass Raman cell for generating intense 16-[mu]m pulses.

  9. SPITZER MIPS 24 and 70 {mu}m IMAGING NEAR THE SOUTH ECLIPTIC POLE: MAPS AND SOURCE CATALOGS

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Kimberly S.; Stabenau, Hans F.; Devlin, Mark J.; Truch, Matthew D. P.; Braglia, Filiberto G.; Chapin, Edward L.; Marsden, Gaelen; Scott, Douglas; Valiante, Elisabetta; Borys, Colin; Viero, Marco P.

    2010-12-15

    We have imaged an 11.5 deg{sup 2} region of sky toward the South Ecliptic Pole (R.A. =04{sup h}43{sup m}, decl. =-53{sup 0}40', J2000) at 24 and 70 {mu}m with MIPS, the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer. This region is coincident with a field mapped at longer wavelengths by AKARI and BLAST. We discuss our data reduction and source extraction procedures. The median 1{sigma} depths of the maps are 47 {mu}Jy beam{sup -1} at 24 {mu}m and 4.3 mJy beam{sup -1} at 70 {mu}m. At 24 {mu}m, we identify 93,098 point sources with signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) {>=}5 and an additional 63 resolved galaxies; at 70 {mu}m we identify 891 point sources with S/N {>=}6. From simulations, we determine a false detection rate of 1.8% (1.1%) for the 24 {mu}m (70 {mu}m) catalog. The 24 and 70 {mu}m point-source catalogs are 80% complete at 230 {mu}Jy and 11 mJy, respectively. These mosaic images and source catalogs will be available to the public through the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive.

  10. ORIGIN OF 12 {mu}m EMISSION ACROSS GALAXY POPULATIONS FROM WISE AND SDSS SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Donoso, E.; Yan Lin; Tsai, C.; Eisenhardt, P.; Stern, D.; Assef, R. J.; Leisawitz, D.; Jarrett, T. H.; Stanford, S. A.

    2012-04-01

    We cross-matched Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer sources brighter than 1 mJy at 12 {mu}m with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxy spectroscopic catalog to produce a sample of {approx}10{sup 5} galaxies at (z) = 0.08, the largest of its kind. This sample is dominated (70%) by star-forming (SF) galaxies from the blue sequence, with total IR luminosities in the range {approx}10{sup 8}-10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }. We identify which stellar populations are responsible for most of the 12 {mu}m emission. We find that most ({approx}80%) of the 12 {mu}m emission in SF galaxies is produced by stellar populations younger than 0.6 Gyr. In contrast, the 12 {mu}m emission in weak active galactic nuclei (AGNs; L{sub [Oiii]} < 10{sup 7} L{sub .}) is produced by older stars, with ages of {approx}1-3 Gyr. We find that L{sub 12{mu}m} linearly correlates with stellar mass for SF galaxies. At fixed 12 {mu}m luminosity, weak AGNs deviate toward higher masses since they tend to be hosted by massive, early-type galaxies with older stellar populations. SF galaxies and weak AGNs follow different L{sub 12{mu}m}-SFR (star formation rate) relations, with weak AGNs showing excess 12 {mu}m emission at low SFR (0.02-1 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}). This is likely due to dust grains heated by older stars. While the specific star formation rate (SSFR) of SF galaxies is nearly constant, the SSFR of weak AGNs decreases by {approx}3 orders of magnitude, reflecting the very different star formation efficiencies between SF galaxies and massive, early-type galaxies. Stronger type II AGNs in our sample (L[{sub Oiii]} > 10{sup 7} L{sub .}), act as an extension of massive SF galaxies, connecting the SF and weak AGN sequences. This suggests a picture where galaxies form stars normally until an AGN (possibly after a starburst episode) starts to gradually quench the SF activity. We also find that 4.6-12 {mu}m color is a useful first-order indicator of SF activity in a galaxy when no other data are available.

  11. 36 CFR 6.12 - Prohibited acts and penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (4) Operating a solid waste disposal site in violation of 40 CFR Parts 257 or 258, or in violation of... INTERIOR SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL SITES IN UNITS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 6.12 Prohibited acts and penalties. (a) The following are prohibited: (1) Operating a solid waste disposal site without a...

  12. Using a Checking Account. Grades 6-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trey, Frances

    Instructions and exercises on the use of checking accounts are provided for students in grades 6-12. The following topics are included: (1) reasons for opening a checking account; (2) how to open a checking account; (3) how to fill out deposit slips; (4) the elements of a check and how to write a check correctly; (5) checking account rules; (6)…

  13. A Stress Control Workbook for Youth Grades 6-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Jennie C.

    Stress is an inevitable part of students' lives, but too much stress can have damaging consequences. Ways in which children can respond positively are covered in this stress booklet. Intended for students in grades 6-12, the booklet is divided into 20 lessons on stress. Each lesson features various activities, role plays, exercises, and checklists…

  14. Parallel Curriculum Units for Science, Grades 6-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leppien, Jann H.; Purcell, Jeanne H.

    2011-01-01

    Based on the best-selling book "The Parallel Curriculum", this professional development resource gives multifaceted examples of rigorous learning opportunities for science students in Grades 6-12. The four sample units revolve around genetics, the convergence of science and society, the integration of language arts and biology, and the periodic…

  15. Comparison of laser-induced breakdown spectra of organic compounds with irradiation at 1.5 and 1.064 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Diane M.; Dagdigian, Paul J

    2008-11-01

    A comprehensive investigation of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) at 1.500 {mu}m of residues of six organic compounds (anthracene, caffeine, glucose, 1,3-dinitrobenzene, 2,4-dinitrophenol, and 2,4-dinitrotoluene) on aluminum substrates is presented and compared with LIBS at the Nd:YAG fundamental wavelength of 1.064 {mu}m. The overall emission intensities were found to be smaller at 1.500 {mu}m than at 1.064 {mu}m, and the ratios of C2 and CN molecular emissions to the H atomic emissions were observed to be less. Possible reasons for the observed differences in LIBS at 1.064 {mu}m versus 1.500 {mu}m are discussed.

  16. THE CONTRIBUTION OF THERMALLY-PULSING ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH AND RED SUPERGIANT STARS TO THE LUMINOSITIES OF THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS AT 1-24 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Melbourne, J.; Boyer, Martha L. E-mail: martha.l.boyer@nasa.gov

    2013-02-10

    We present the near-through mid-infrared flux contribution of thermally-pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) and massive red supergiant (RSG) stars to the luminosities of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC, respectively). Combined, the peak contribution from these cool evolved stars occurs at {approx}3-4 {mu}m, where they produce 32% of the SMC light, and 25% of the LMC flux. The TP-AGB star contribution also peaks at {approx}3-4 {mu}m and amounts to 21% in both galaxies. The contribution from RSG stars peaks at shorter wavelengths, 2.2 {mu}m, where they provide 11% of the SMC flux, and 7% for the LMC. Both TP-AGB and RSG stars are short lived, and thus potentially impose a large stochastic scatter on the near-IR derived mass-to-light (M/L) ratios of galaxies at rest-frame 1-4 {mu}m. To minimize their impact on stellar mass estimates, one can use the M/L ratio at shorter wavelengths (e.g., at 0.8-1 {mu}m). At longer wavelengths ({>=}8 {mu}m), emission from dust in the interstellar medium dominates the flux. In the LMC, which shows strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission at 8 {mu}m, TP-AGB and RSG contribute less than 4% of the 8 {mu}m flux. However, 19% of the SMC 8 {mu}m flux is from evolved stars, nearly half of which is produced by the rarest, dustiest, carbon-rich TP-AGB stars. Thus, star formation rates of galaxies, based on an 8 {mu}m flux (e.g., observed-frame 24 {mu}m at z = 2), may be biased modestly high, especially for galaxies with little PAH emission.

  17. FIRST SCIENCE OBSERVATIONS WITH SOFIA/FORCAST: 6-37 {mu}m IMAGING OF ORION BN/KL

    SciTech Connect

    De Buizer, James M.; Becklin, E. E.; Zinnecker, Hans; Shuping, Ralph Y.; Vacca, William D.; Morris, Mark R.; Herter, Terry L.; Adams, Joseph D.

    2012-04-20

    The Becklin-Neugebauer/Kleinmann-Low (BN/KL) region of the Orion Nebula is the nearest region of high-mass star formation in our galaxy. As such, it has been the subject of intense investigation at a variety of wavelengths, which have revealed it to be brightest in the infrared to submillimeter wavelength regime. Using the newly commissioned SOFIA airborne telescope and its 5-40 {mu}m camera FORCAST, images of the entire BN/KL complex have been acquired. The 31.5 and 37.1 {mu}m images represent the highest resolution observations ({approx}<4'') ever obtained of this region at these wavelengths. These observations reveal that the BN object is not the dominant brightness source in the complex at wavelengths {>=} 31.5 {mu}m and that this distinction goes instead to the source IRc4. It was determined from these images and derived dust color temperature maps that IRc4 is also likely to be self-luminous. A new source of emission has also been identified at wavelengths {>=} 31.5 {mu}m that coincides with the northeastern outflow lobe from the protostellar disk associated with radio source I.

  18. A Redox Economical Synthesis of Bioactive 6,12-Guaianolides

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Bo; Hexum, Joseph K.; Widen, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Syntheses of two 6,12-guaianolide analogs are reported within. The scope of the tandem allylboration/lactonization chemistry is expanded to provide a functionalized alleneyne-containing α-methylene butyrolactone that undergoes a Rh(I)-catalyzed cyclocarbonylation reaction to afford a 5-7-5 ring system. The resulting cycloadducts bear a structural resemblance to other NF-κB inhibitors such as cumambrin A and indeed were shown to inhibit NF-κB signaling and cancer cell growth. PMID:23662902

  19. Diode-pumped Tm : Sc{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} laser ({lambda} = 1.98 {mu}m)

    SciTech Connect

    Zavartsev, Yu D; Zagumennyi, A I; Kalachev, Yu L; Kutovoi, S A; Mikhailov, Viktor A; Podreshetnikov, V V; Shcherbakov, Ivan A

    2011-05-31

    Lasing at a wavelength of 1.98 {mu}m is obtained for the first time in a diode-pumped ({lambda} = 792 {mu}m) active element made of a Tm{sup 3+}: Sc{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} crystal grown by the Czochralski method. The laser slope efficiency reached 18.7% at the output power up to 520 mW. (lasers)

  20. Electronic speckle pattern interferometry and digital holographic interferometry with microbolometer arrays at 10.6 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Vandenrijt, Jean-Francois; Georges, Marc P.

    2010-09-20

    Electronic speckle pattern interferometry and digital holographic interferometry are investigated at long infrared wavelengths. Using such wavelengths allows one to extend the measurement range and decrease the sensitivity of the techniques to external perturbations. We discuss the behavior of reflection by the object surfaces due to the long wavelength. We have developed different experimental configurations associating a CO2 laser emitting at 10.6{mu}m and microbolometer arrays. Phase-shifting in-plane and out-of-plane electronic speckle pattern interferometry and lensless digital holographic interferometry are demonstrated on rotation measurements of a solid object.

  1. Room temperature photoluminescence at 4.5 {mu}m from InAsN

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Q.; Godenir, A. M. R.; Krier, A.; Lai, K. T.; Haywood, S. K.

    2008-03-15

    Nitrogen incorporation in InAsN epilayers grown by radio-frequency plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy was investigated as a function of growth conditions. Reduced growth rate, growth temperature, and arsenic flux significantly enhance the nitrogen incorporation. Optimal growth conditions allowed us to obtain high quality InAsN with nitrogen composition of up to 2.5%. The epilayers exhibit intense 4 K photoluminescence (PL) with double-peak features, which were attributed to free carrier recombination and localized carrier recombination. Strong room temperature PL emission up to a wavelength of 4.5 {mu}m is obtained.

  2. FREQUENT EXPRESSION OF MUM1/IRF4 IN BURKITT LYMPHOMA

    PubMed Central

    Gualco, Gabriela; Queiroga, Eduardo M.; Weiss, Lawrence M.; Klumb, Claudete E. N.; Harrington, William J.; Bacchi, Carlos E.

    2009-01-01

    Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is a highly aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) with endemic, sporadic and immunodeficiency-associated clinical variants composed of monomorphic medium-size B-cells with a high proliferation rate and a translocation involving the C-MYC locus. Classically the immunophenotype of Burkitt lymphoma has been considered to be of germinal center type. In most reports, all cases of BL are reported to be MUM1 negative. MUM1 expression is seen in plasma cells and in a small fraction of B cells located in the light zone of germinal centers corresponding to the final step of intra-germinal center (GC) B-cell differentiation, and in activated T-cells. Therefore, MUM1 expression may denote the final step of intra-GC B-cell differentiation at centrocyte stage, as well as the subsequent steps of B-cell maturation towards plasma cells. Unlike most normal GC B-cells, in which the expression of MUM1 and bcl-6 are mutually exclusive, the tumor cells in approximately 50% of MUM1 positive DLBCL show co-expression of bcl-6, suggesting that the expression of these proteins may be deregulated. In one of the few studies in the literature, 25 BL-cases, including 19 associated with HIV; two of these cases showed occasional MUM1+ cells, less than the 20% cut-off for positivity. We studied 222 cases of well-characterized Burkitt lymphoma with the classic phenotype and C-MYC translocation, and found 90 cases (40.5%) with MUM1 nuclear expression suggesting a late germinal center stage of differentiation. PMID:19144381

  3. 40 CFR 721.524 - Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic anhydride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.524 Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product... chemical substance identified generically as alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated,...

  4. 40 CFR 721.524 - Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic anhydride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.524 Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product... chemical substance identified generically as alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated,...

  5. 40 CFR 721.524 - Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic anhydride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.524 Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product... chemical substance identified generically as alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated,...

  6. 40 CFR 721.524 - Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic anhydride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.524 Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product... chemical substance identified generically as alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated,...

  7. 40 CFR 721.524 - Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic anhydride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.524 Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product... chemical substance identified generically as alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated,...

  8. 41 CFR 51-6.12 - Specification changes and similar actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Specification changes and similar actions. 51-6.12 Section 51-6.12 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public Contracts COMMITTEE FOR PURCHASE FROM PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED 6-PROCUREMENT PROCEDURES § 51-6.12...

  9. Optical amplification at the 1. 31 wavelength

    DOEpatents

    Cockroft, N.J.

    1994-02-15

    An optical amplifier operating at the 1.31 [mu]m wavelength for use in such applications as telecommunications, cable television, and computer systems is described. An optical fiber or other waveguide device is doped with both Tm[sup 3+] and Pr[sup 3+] ions. When pumped by a diode laser operating at a wavelength of 785 nm, energy is transferred from the Tm[sup 3+] ions to the Pr[sup 3+] ions, causing the Pr[sup 3+] ions to amplify at a wavelength of 1.31. 1 figure.

  10. Reflective optical imaging system for extreme ultraviolet wavelengths

    DOEpatents

    Viswanathan, Vriddhachalam K.; Newnam, Brian E.

    1993-01-01

    A projection reflection optical system has two mirrors in a coaxial, four reflection configuration to reproduce the image of an object. The mirrors have spherical reflection surfaces to provide a very high resolution of object feature wavelengths less than 200 .mu.m, and preferably less than 100 .mu.m. An image resolution of features less than 0.05-0.1 .mu.m, is obtained over a large area field; i.e., 25.4 mm .times.25.4 mm, with a distortion less than 0.1 of the resolution over the image field.

  11. Reflective optical imaging system for extreme ultraviolet wavelengths

    DOEpatents

    Viswanathan, V.K.; Newnam, B.E.

    1993-05-18

    A projection reflection optical system has two mirrors in a coaxial, four reflection configuration to reproduce the image of an object. The mirrors have spherical reflection surfaces to provide a very high resolution of object feature wavelengths less than 200 [mu]m, and preferably less than 100 [mu]m. An image resolution of features less than 0.05-0.1 [mu]m, is obtained over a large area field; i.e., 25.4 mm [times] 25.4 mm, with a distortion less than 0.1 of the resolution over the image field.

  12. Experiments on ocular tissue ablation at 5.3 and 6.0 {mu}m with the Los Alamos advanced FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Ren, Q.; Hill, R.

    1995-12-31

    We investigated the ablation characteristics of a picosecond free-electron laser and compared its ablation effects on ocular tissues at 5.3 {mu}m and 6.0 {mu}m. The Advanced FEL at Los Alamos, operating in the wavelength range 4-6 {mu}m, was used for this study. The 10-{mu}s macropulse consisted of {approximately}1000 micropulses, each approximately 15 ps in length and separated from one another by 9.2 ns. The FEL beam was passed through a series of attenuator and focused to a 200-{mu}m spot in the sample with a 150-mm f.l. CaF{sub 2} lens. The energy in each macropulse ranged from 5 to 120 mJ. Five transplantable corneal-scleral buttons preserved in corneal storage media were used for this study. The tissue sample was positioned at the focused FEL beam for the ablation, and then fixed for histologic study. Corneal cuts made at 6.0 {mu}m revealed a well-defined ablation boundary. The measured lateral zone of the tissue damage was 11 {+-} 2 {mu}m. The integrity of the adjacent tissue was well maintained. By contrast, the ablation boundary of the corneal cuts made at 5.3 {mu}m appeared to be very disruptive. The collagen fiber near the ablation was thermally denatured and lost its organized structure. The lateral dimension of such effect extended out to 220 {mu}m beyond the intended cut into the surrounding tissues. We concluded that a short-pulsed laser operating at 6 {mu}m may be a potentially effective tool for cutting ocular tissues.

  13. Aerosol and cloud backscatter at 1.06, 1.54, and 0.53 mum by airborne hard-target-calibrated Nd:YAG /methane Raman lidar.

    PubMed

    Spinhirne, J D; Chudamani, S; Cavanaugh, J F; Bufton, J L

    1997-05-20

    A lidar instrument was developed to make simultaneous measurements at three distinct wavelengths in the visible and near infrared at 0.532, 1.064, and 1.54 mum with high cross-sectional calibration accuracy. Aerosol and cloud backscatter cross sections were acquired during November and December 1989 and May and June 1990 by the NASA DC-8 aircraft as part of the Global Backscatter Experiment. The instrument, methodology, and measurement results are described. A Nd:YAG laser produced 1.064- and 0.532-mum energy. The 1.54-mum transmitted pulse was generated by Raman-shifted downconversion of the 1.064-mum pulse through a Raman cell pressured with methane gas. The lidar could be pointed in the nadir or zenith direction from the aircraft. A hard-target-based calibration procedure was used to obtain the ratio of the system calibration between the three wavelengths, and the absolute calibration was referenced to the 0.532-mum lidar molecular backscatter cross section for the clearest scattering regions. From the relative wavelength calibration, the aerosol backscatter cross sections at the longer wavelengths are resolved for values as small as 1% of the molecular cross section. Backscatter measurement accuracies are better than 10(-9) (m sr)(-1) at 1.064 and 1.54 mum. Results from the Pacific Ocean region of the multiwavelength backscatter dependence are presented. Results show extensive structure and variation for the aerosol cross sections. The range of observed aerosol cross section is over 4 orders of magnitude, from less than 10(-9) (m sr)(-1) to greater than 10(-5) (m sr)(-1). PMID:18253366

  14. Reflective Praxis through Narrative and Poetry: Performing "Peace Mum"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prendergast, Monica

    2010-01-01

    In the autumn of 2007 and spring of 2008 the author performed an adapted version of Dario Fo and Franca Rame's one-woman play "Peace Mom" (retitled for Canadian audiences as "Peace Mum") about American mother and peace activist Cindy Sheehan. The play was performed for University of Victoria Applied Theatre students and also in a number of…

  15. 21 CFR 516.24 - Granting MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Granting MUMS-drug designation. 516.24 Section 516.24 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation...

  16. 21 CFR 516.24 - Granting MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Granting MUMS-drug designation. 516.24 Section 516.24 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation...

  17. 21 CFR 516.24 - Granting MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Granting MUMS-drug designation. 516.24 Section 516.24 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation...

  18. 21 CFR 516.24 - Granting MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Granting MUMS-drug designation. 516.24 Section 516.24 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation...

  19. THE 5.25 AND 5.7 {mu}m ASTRONOMICAL POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON EMISSION FEATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Boersma, C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Mattioda, A. L.; Allamandola, L. J.; Bauschlicher, C. W.; Peeters, E.

    2009-01-10

    Astronomical mid-IR spectra show two minor polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features at 5.25 and 5.7 {mu}m (1905 and 1754 cm{sup -1}) that hitherto have been little studied, but contain information about the astronomical PAH population that complements that of the major emission bands. Here, we report a study involving both laboratory and theoretical analysis of the fundamentals of PAH spectroscopy that produce features in this region and use these to analyze the astronomical spectra. The Infrared Space Observatory Short Wavelength Spectrograph spectra of 15 objects showing these PAH features were considered for this study, however only four (HD 44179; NGC 7027; Orion Bar, two positions) have sufficient signal-to-noise between 5 and 6 {mu}m to allow for an in-depth analysis. All four astronomical spectra show similar peak positions and profiles. The 5.25 {mu}m feature is peaked and asymmetric, with an FWHM of about 0.12 {+-} 0.01 {mu}m ({approx}40 {+-} 6.5 cm{sup -1}), while the 5.7 {mu}m feature is broader and flatter, with an FWHM of about 0.17 {+-} 0.02 {mu}m (50 {+-} 5.6 cm{sup -1}). Detailed analysis of the laboratory spectra and quantum-chemical calculations show that the astronomical 5.25 and 5.7 {mu}m bands are a blend of combination, difference and overtone bands primarily involving CH stretching and CH in-plane and CH out-of-plane bending fundamental vibrations. The experimental and computational spectra show that, of all the hydrogen adjacency classes that are possible on PAHs, solo and duo hydrogens consistently produce prominent bands at the observed positions, whereas quartet hydrogens do not. In all, this study supports the picture that astronomical PAHs are large with compact, regular structures. From the coupling with primarily strong CH out-of-plane bending modes, one might surmise that the 5.25 and 5.7 {mu}m bands track the neutral PAH population. However, theory suggests that the role of charge in these astronomical bands might also be

  20. DEEP SPITZER 24 {mu}m COSMOS IMAGING. I. THE EVOLUTION OF LUMINOUS DUSTY GALAXIES-CONFRONTING THE MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Le Floc'h, Emeric; Ilbert, Olivier; Riguccini, Laurie; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Sanders, David; Aussel, Herve; Feruglio, Chiara; Frayer, David T.; Salvato, Mara; Capak, Peter; Scoville, Nick; Arnouts, Stephane; Surace, Jason; Sheth, Kartik; Yan Lin; Rodighiero, Giulia; Heinis, Sebastien; McCracken, Henry Joy; Thompson, David; Koekemoer, Anton

    2009-09-20

    We present the first results obtained from the identification of {approx}30,000 sources in the Spitzer/24 {mu}m observations of the COSMOS field at S{sub 24{mu}m} {approx}> 80 {mu}Jy. Using accurate photometric redshifts ({sigma} {sub z} {approx} 0.12 at z {approx} 2 for 24 {mu}m sources with i {sup +} {approx}< 25 mag AB) and simple extrapolations of the number counts at faint fluxes, we resolve with unprecedented detail the buildup of the mid-infrared background across cosmic ages. We find that {approx}50% and {approx}80% of the 24 {mu}m background intensity originate from galaxies at z {approx}< 1 and z {approx}< 2, respectively, supporting the scenario where highly obscured sources at very high redshifts (z {approx}> 2) contribute only marginally to the cosmic infrared background. Assuming flux-limited selections at optical wavelengths, we also find that the fraction of i {sup +}-band sources with 24 {mu}m detection strongly increases up to z {approx} 2 as a consequence of the rapid evolution that star-forming galaxies have undergone with look-back time. Nonetheless, this rising trend shows a clear break at z {approx} 1.3, probably due to k-correction effects implied by the complexity of spectral energy distributions in the mid-infrared. Finally, we compare our results with the predictions from different models of galaxy formation. We note that semianalytical formalisms currently fail to reproduce the redshift distributions observed at 24 {mu}m. Furthermore, the simulated galaxies at S {sub 24{mu}m} > 80 {mu}Jy exhibit R-K colors much bluer than observed and the predicted K-band fluxes are systematically underestimated at z {approx}> 0.5. Unless these discrepancies mainly result from an incorrect treatment of extinction in the models they may reflect an underestimate of the predicted density of high-redshift massive sources with strong ongoing star formation, which would point to more fundamental processes and/or parameters (e.g., initial mass function

  1. 350 {mu}m POLARIMETRY FROM THE CALTECH SUBMILLIMETER OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Dotson, Jessie L.; Vaillancourt, John E.; Kirby, Larry; Hildebrand, Roger H.; Dowell, C. Darren; Davidson, Jacqueline A. E-mail: jvaillancourt@sofia.usra.edu

    2010-02-01

    We present a summary of data obtained with the 350 {mu}m polarimeter, Hertz, at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. We give tabulated results and maps showing polarization vectors and intensity contours. The summary includes over 4300 individual measurements in 56 Galactic sources and two galaxies. Of these measurements, 2153 have P {>=} 3{sigma} {sub p} statistical significance. The median polarization of the entire data set is 1.46%.

  2. 41 CFR 51-6.12 - Specification changes and similar actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Specification changes and similar actions. 51-6.12 Section 51-6.12 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions... Procurement List, including a change that involves the assignment of a new national stock number or...

  3. USING THE 1.6 {mu}m BUMP TO STUDY REST-FRAME NEAR-INFRARED-SELECTED GALAXIES AT REDSHIFT 2

    SciTech Connect

    Sorba, Robert; Sawicki, Marcin

    2010-10-01

    We explore the feasibility and limitations of using the 1.6 {mu}m bump as a photometric redshift indicator and selection technique, and use it to study the rest-frame H-band galaxy luminosity and stellar mass functions (SMFs) at redshift z {approx} 2. We use publicly available Spitzer/IRAC images in the GOODS fields and find that color selection in the IRAC bandpasses alone is comparable in completeness and contamination to BzK selection. We find that the shape of the 1.6 {mu}m bump is robust, and photometric redshifts are not greatly affected by choice of model parameters. Comparison with spectroscopic redshifts shows photometric redshifts to be reliable. We create a rest-frame NIR-selected catalog of galaxies at z {approx} 2 and construct a galaxy SMF. Comparisons with other SMFs at approximately the same redshift but determined using shorter wavelengths show good agreement. This agreement suggests that selection at bluer wavelengths does not miss a significant amount of stellar mass in passive galaxies. Comparison with SMFs at other redshifts shows evidence for the downsizing scenario of galaxy evolution. We conclude by pointing out the potential for using the 1.6 {mu}m bump technique to select high-redshift galaxies with the JWST, whose {lambda}>0.6 {mu}m coverage will not be well suited to selecting galaxies using techniques that require imaging at shorter wavelengths.

  4. OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF AMORPHOUS AND CRYSTALLINE H{sub 2}O-ICE: 2.5-22 {mu}m (4000-455 cm{sup -1}) OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF H{sub 2}O-ICE

    SciTech Connect

    Mastrapa, R. M.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Sandford, S. A.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Roush, T. L.

    2009-08-20

    Using new laboratory spectra, we have calculated the real and imaginary parts of the index of refraction of amorphous and crystalline H{sub 2}O-ice from 20-150 K in the wavelength range 2.5-22 {mu}m (4000-455 cm{sup -1}) and joined these results with previous measurement from 1.25 to 2.5 {mu}m. These optical constants improve on previous measurements by having better temperature and spectral resolution and can be used to create model spectra for comparison to spectra of solar system objects and interstellar materials. In this wavelength range, the infrared band shapes and positions of amorphous H{sub 2}O-ice are strongly dependent on deposition temperature. Amorphous and crystalline H{sub 2}O-ice have distinctive spectral bands at all wavelengths in this region with bands weakening and shifting to shorter wavelength in amorphous H{sub 2}O-ice compared to crystalline H{sub 2}O-ice. Some notable exceptions are the band near 6 {mu}m, which is stronger in amorphous H{sub 2}O-ice, and the bands near 4.5 {mu}m and 12.5 {mu}m, which shift to longer wavelength in amorphous H{sub 2}O-ice.

  5. FIRST SCIENCE OBSERVATIONS WITH SOFIA/FORCAST: 6-37 {mu}m IMAGING OF THE CENTRAL ORION NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Shuping, R. Y.; Morris, Mark R.; Herter, Terry L.; Adams, Joseph D.; Gull, G. E.; Schoenwald, J.; Henderson, C. P.; Becklin, E. E.; De Buizer, James M.; Vacca, William D.; Zinnecker, Hans; Thomas Megeath, S.

    2012-04-20

    We present new mid-infrared images of the central region of the Orion Nebula using the newly commissioned Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy airborne telescope and its 5-40 {mu}m camera FORCAST. The 37.1 {mu}m images represent the highest resolution observations ({approx}<4'') ever obtained of this region at these wavelengths. After BN/KL (which is described in a separate paper in this issue), the dominant source at all wavelengths except 37.1 {mu}m is the Ney-Allen Nebula, a crescent-shaped extended source associated with {theta}{sup 1} D Ori. The morphology of the Ney-Allen nebula in our images is consistent with the interpretation that it is ambient dust swept up by the stellar wind from {theta}{sup 1} D Ori, as suggested by Smith et al. in 2005. Our observations also reveal emission from two 'proplyds' (proto-planetary disks), and a few embedded young stellar objects (YSOs; IRc 9, and OMC1-S IRS1, 2, and 10). The spectral energy distribution for IRc 9 is presented and fitted with standard YSO models from Robitaille et al. in 2007 to constrain the total luminosity, disk size, and envelope size. The diffuse, nebular emission we observe at all FORCAST wavelengths is most likely from the background photodissociation region (PDR) and shows structure that coincides roughly with H{alpha} and [N II] emission. We conclude that the spatial variations in the diffuse emission are likely due to undulations in the surface of the background PDR.

  6. 2-.mu.m fiber amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Shibin (Inventor); Wu, Jianfeng (Inventor); Geng, Jihong (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A 2-.mu.m fiber Amplified Spontaneous Emission (ASE) source provides a wide emission bandwidth and improved spectral stability/purity for a given output power. The fiber ASE source is formed from a heavy metal oxide multicomponent glass selected from germanate, tellurite and bismuth oxides and doped with high concentrations, 0.5-15 wt. %, thulium oxides (Tm.sub.2O.sub.3) or 0.1-5 wt% holmium oxides (Ho.sub.2O.sub.3) or mixtures thereof. The high concentration of thulium dopants provide highly efficient pump absorption and high quantum efficiency. Co-doping of Tm and Ho can broaden the ASE spectrum.

  7. Effect of laser radiation absorption in water and blood on the optimal wavelength for endovenous obliteration of varicose veins

    SciTech Connect

    Zhilin, K M; Minaev, V P; Sokolov, Aleksandr L

    2009-08-31

    This work examines laser radiation absorption in water and blood at the wavelengths that are used in endovenous laser treatment (EVLT): 0.81-1.06, 1.32, 1.47, 1.5 and 1.56 {mu}m. It is shown that the best EVLT conditions are ensured by 1.56-{mu}m radiation. Analysis of published data suggests that even higher EVLT efficacy may be achieved at wavelengths of 1.68 and 1.7 {mu}m. (laser medicine)

  8. Optical amplification at the 1.31 wavelength

    DOEpatents

    Cockroft, Nigel J.

    1994-01-01

    An optical amplifier operating at the 1.31 .mu.m wavelength for use in such applications as telecommunications, cable television, and computer systems. An optical fiber or other waveguide device is doped with both Tm.sup.3+ and Pr.sup.3+ ions. When pumped by a diode laser operating at a wavelength of 785 nm, energy is transferred from the Tm.sup.3+ ions to the Pr.sup.3+ ions, causing the Pr.sup.3+ ions to amplify at a wavelength of 1.31

  9. FOUR DECADES OF IRC +10216: EVOLUTION OF A CARBON-RICH DUST SHELL RESOLVED AT 10 {mu}m WITH MMT ADAPTIVE OPTICS AND MIRAC4

    SciTech Connect

    Males, Jared R.; Close, Laird M.; Skemer, Andrew J.; Hinz, Philip M.; Hoffmann, William F.; Marengo, Massimo

    2012-01-10

    The evolved carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch star IRC +10216 (CW Leo) is the brightest mid-infrared source outside the solar system, as well as one of the closest examples of an evolved star losing mass. It has a complex and variable circumstellar structure on small scales in the near-infrared, and mid-infrared interferometry has revealed a dynamic dust formation zone. We have obtained diffraction-limited imaging and grism spectroscopy of IRC +10216 at the 6.5 m MMT in the N band ({approx}8-13 {mu}m). These new observations show that a change has occurred in the dust shell surrounding IRC +10216 over the last two decades, which is illustrated by a change in the apparent shape of the well-known SiC spectral feature at {approx}11 {mu}m and a reduction in the continuum at 13 {mu}m. As expected, our diffraction-limited spatial information shows an extended circumstellar envelope. We also demonstrate that the dusty envelope appears to be {approx}30% larger at the wavelengths of the SiC feature, likely due to the increased opacity of SiC. The deconvolved full width at half-maximum of the object increases from 0.''43 ({approx} 56 AU) for {lambda} < 10 {mu}m to 0.''58 ({approx}75 AU) at 11.8 {mu}m, then decreases to 0.''5 ({approx}65 AU) at 12.7 {mu}m. Our estimates of IRC +10216's size allow us to plausibly tie the change in the spectrum over the last 12.5 years to the evolution of the dusty circumstellar envelope at speeds of 12-17 km s{sup -1}.

  10. Health Problems in the Classroom 6-12: An A-Z Reference Guide for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huffman, Dolores M.; Fontaine, Karen Lee; Price, Bernadette K.

    This guide provides a resource for middle and high school teachers, teacher aides, administrators, and educators, covering health problems that affect students in grades 6-12. The handbook alphabetically lists the most current health concerns for this age group. Part 1, "Health Issues in the Classroom," includes (1) "Health, Illness, and…

  11. Improving the Precollegiate Curriculum on Latin America, Grades 6-12. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirth, John D.

    The Latin America Project, which developed print and nonprint materials for use in grades 6-12, is described. The two-year effort was conducted in five phases: survey of existing materials; the development of curriculum units; review of curriculum by teachers attending summer institutes; field testing and evaluation; and dissemination. Titles of…

  12. Teaching Global Awareness Using the Media. Grades 6-12, Global Awareness Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamy, Steven L.; And Others

    This teaching guide on global awareness contains 15 media-related activities for students in grades 6-12. The objective is to help students see how the media affect their opinions and the roles the media plays in world affairs. The activities are divided into five sections. The first section contains a general survey of the students' knowledge of…

  13. 40 CFR 721.10559 - Morpholine, 4-C6-12 acyl derivs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as morpholine, 4-C6-12 acyl derivs. (PMN P-06...) through (h) are applicable to manufacturers, importers, and processors of this substance. (2) Limitations... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific...

  14. University of Chicago School Mathematics Project 6-12 Curriculum. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "University of Chicago School Mathematics Project ("UCSMP") 6-12 Curriculum" is a series of yearlong courses--(1) Transition Mathematics; (2) Algebra; (3) Geometry; (4) Advanced Algebra; (5) Functions, Statistics, and Trigonometry; and (6) Precalculus and Discrete Mathematics--emphasizing problem solving, real-world applications, and the use…

  15. Teens on Target Violence Prevention Curriculum for Grades 6-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Marla G.; Calhoun, Deane

    This curriculum is designed to help schools implement programs to prevent violence among students in grades 6-12. It is a six-session, school based curriculum intended for adolescents who are living in communities experiencing high rates of violence. It is facilitated by trained Teens on Target (TNT) members/peer educators, young people who are…

  16. X-ray generation in cryogenic targets irradiated by 1 {mu}m pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoura, A.; Amano, S.; Miyamoto, S.; Mochizuki, T.

    1998-01-01

    Soft x-ray spectral radiations from Xe, H{sub 2}O, and CO{sub 2} cryogenic targets irradiated by a 1 {mu}m neodymium doped YAG-slab laser at pulse widths of 12{endash}20 ns and at laser intensities of 5{times}10{sup 10}{endash}10{sup 12}W/cm{sup 2} have been observed. These targets radiate soft x-rays in a wavelength range of 10{endash}13 nm which is useful for projection microlithography. We have found a strong x-ray spectral peak at {lambda}=10.8nm with a Xe cryogenic target. The measured x-ray conversion efficiency with the Xe target was 0.8{percent}/sr({lambda}=10.8{plus_minus}0.27nm) at a laser intensity of 1{times}10{sup 12}W/cm{sup 2}. This was ten times or more efficient than that with H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} targets. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Sum-frequency generation from molecular monolayers using 14 {mu}m radiation from the FELIX free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Ham, E.W.M.; Vrehen, Q.H.F.; Eliel, E.R.

    1995-12-31

    Sum-frequency generation (SFG) has developed into a widely applied tool for study of surfaces and interfaces where molecules are present. It combines the surface specificity of a second-order nonlinear optical technique with the power of a spectroscopic method, and it can be used under widely varying experimental conditions ranging from UHV to electrochemical cells. The important characteristic of SFG is that it allows one to study the average spatial orientation of a molecular bond in a monolayer of molecules at an interface. Until recently SFG measurements were confined to the frequency interval Y {mu} > 1700 cm{sup -1} because of a lack of suitable laser sources at wave-lengths {lambda} > 6 {mu}m. So for most molecules only a few vibrational modes and thus intramolecular bonds can be studied. We have developed a universal sum-frequency spectrometer around the FELIX free-electron law that covers the complete molecular fingerprint since we can generate any IR wavelength between 2.75 and 110 f{mu} at the FELIX facility. We have used this setup for a series of exploratory SFG experiments in a frequency range that was hitherto unexplored in the study of molecular monolayers. We have studied thiol monolayers chemisorbed on a variety of noble metals (Au, Ag, Pt) where we focussed on the C-S stretch vibration at {nu} = 702 cm{sup -1} ({lambda} = 14.3 {mu}m). We have found spectroscopic features revealing the presence of both the trane and gauche conformers of the adsorbed molecules. The present measurements open a whole new wavelength range for nonlinear optical studies of interfaces.

  18. Method of Controlling Lasing Wavelength(s)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P. (Inventor); Murray, Keith E. (Inventor); Hutcheson, Ralph L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A method is provided to control the lasing wavelength of a laser material without changing or adjusting the mechanical components of a laser device, The rate at which the laser material is pumped with the pumping energy is controlled so that lasing occurs at one or more lasing wavelengths based on the rate. The lasing wavelengths are determined by transition lifetimes and/or energy transfer rates.

  19. Successive composition of two laser channels upon excitation of He-Ar-Xe (2.03 {mu}m) and Ar-Xe (1.73 {mu}m) mixtures by uranium fission fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Pikulev, A A; Tsvetkov, V M; Sosnin, P V; Sinyanskii, A A

    2009-06-30

    The operation efficiency of the scheme with successive composition of two laser channels upon excitation of the active medium by uranium-235 fission fragments is studied experimentally and numerically. For the He:Ar:Xe = 380:380:1 mixture (at a pressure of 1 atm and the lasing wavelength {lambda} = 2.03 {mu}m) the maximum lasing power of a double channel (1 kW) is almost twice that of a single channel (540 W). Calculations show that in the case of ideal composition (without losses on mirrors) the lasing power of the double channel can be increased to 1.2 kW. For the Ar:Xe = 380:1 mixture (the pressure is 0.5 atm, {lambda} = 1.73 {mu}m) the maximum lasing power of the double channel (620 W) is slightly above that of the single channel (520 W), which is caused by the losses on aluminum mirrors employed for channel doubling and by a negative effect of optical inhomogeneities. In the case of ideal composition, the lasing power can be increased to 830 W. (lasers)

  20. INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF GAS-PHASE POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON CATIONS IN THE 10-50 {mu}m SPECTRAL RANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, Joost M.; Redlich, Britta; Van der Meer, Alexander F. G.; Oomens, Jos

    2011-11-10

    The gas-phase infrared spectra of four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) cations have been recorded in the 10-50 {mu}m (or 1000-200 cm{sup -1}) spectral range via IR multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy. Ionized PAHs are formed by UV laser ionization in an effusive beam and subsequently irradiated with a single pulse of narrowband tunable infrared light produced by the Free-Electron Laser for IntraCavity Experiments FELICE. The ion population is then analyzed in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Upon resonance, dissociation is induced so that IR spectra can be recorded by monitoring either the depleted parent ion intensity or the appearance of fragment ions as a function of the wavelength. The intracavity IR fluence enables the recording of IRMPD spectra of strongly bound PAH cations in the hitherto inaccessible far-IR spectral range. Experimental spectra are presented for the radical cations of anthracene, tetracene, pentacene, and coronene. Spectra calculated with density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-311g(2df,2pd) level reproduce IR frequencies reasonably accurately in this spectral range when a uniform scaling factor of 0.94 over the complete 10-50 {mu}m spectral range is employed. We show that even vibrational modes with a calculated IR intensity lower than 1 km mol{sup -1} can be observed. For the catacondensed PAH cations we find CH out-of-plane bending vibrations involving four adjacent CH groups within a few wavenumbers of 733 cm{sup -1}, closely matching the 13.6 {mu}m UIR band. For the larger systems, pentacene and coronene, we observe a continuous structureless background absorption above 400 cm{sup -1} which is attributed to the high density of IR dipole allowed combination modes for these systems.

  1. [CrIII8MII6]12+ Coordination Cubes (MII=Cu, Co)**

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, Sergio; O'Connor, Helen M; Pineda, Eufemio Moreno; Pedersen, Kasper S; Nichol, Gary S; Mønsted, Ole; Weihe, Høgni; Piligkos, Stergios; McInnes, Eric J L; Lusby, Paul J; Brechin, Euan K

    2015-01-01

    [CrIII8MII6]12+ (MII=Cu, Co) coordination cubes were constructed from a simple [CrIIIL3] metalloligand and a “naked” MII salt. The flexibility in the design proffers the potential to tune the physical properties, as all the constituent parts of the cage can be changed without structural alteration. Computational techniques (known in theoretical nuclear physics as statistical spectroscopy) in tandem with EPR spectroscopy are used to interpret the magnetic behavior. PMID:25891167

  2. Broadband Ho{sup 3+}-doped fibre radiation source emitting at 2 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkov, A S; Sholokhov, E M; Paramonov, V M; Kosolapov, A F

    2008-10-31

    A 2-{mu}m broadband radiation source based on a fibre doped with holmium ions, which is pumped by a 1.12-{mu}m ytterbium fibre laser, is developed. The maximum output power of 8 mW is achieved for the emission spectrum width of 45 nm. (active optical fibres)

  3. 21 CFR 516.28 - Publication of MUMS-drug designations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... FDA will periodically update a publicly available list of MUMS-designated drugs. This list will be... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Publication of MUMS-drug designations. 516.28 Section 516.28 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  4. 21 CFR 516.28 - Publication of MUMS-drug designations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... FDA will periodically update a publicly available list of MUMS-designated drugs. This list will be... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Publication of MUMS-drug designations. 516.28 Section 516.28 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  5. Specific Heat of Helium in 2 {mu}m3 Boxes, Coupled or Uncoupled?

    SciTech Connect

    Mooney, K. P.; Kimball, M. O.; Gasparini, F. M.

    2006-09-07

    We report on recent measurements of the specific heat of helium confined in pill-boxes 2 {mu}m across and 2 {mu}m deep made lithographically on a silicon wafer. The experimental cells distribute liquid from a bulk reservoir to {approx} 108 boxes by an array of very shallow fill-channels (0.019 {mu}m and 0.010 {mu}m) which represent a negligible volume compared to that of the boxes. Since the channels are so shallow, the helium in them becomes superfluid at a much lower temperature than the liquid in the boxes. Therefore, during the course of the heat capacity measurements, the liquid in the channels in always normal, and the cell would be expected to behave as a system of uncoupled boxes. We compare these measurements with one previously made of a cell where the confinement was to 1 {mu}m boxes with an equivalent fill arrangement. While the shift in the position of the specific heat maximum relative to the 1 {mu}m cell is what one would expect on the basis of finite-size scaling, there are discrepancies in the specific heat amplitude between the 2 {mu}m cell utilizing different depth fill-channels, and with the 1 {mu}m cell. It is possible that the channels, even though normal and of negligible volume, provide a weak coupling between the boxes leading to a collective rather than single-box behavior.

  6. 21 CFR 516.23 - Timing of requests for MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.23 Timing of requests for MUMS-drug designation. A sponsor may request MUMS-drug designation at any time in the drug...

  7. 21 CFR 516.23 - Timing of requests for MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.23 Timing of requests for MUMS-drug designation. A sponsor may request MUMS-drug designation at any time in the drug...

  8. 21 CFR 516.23 - Timing of requests for MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.23 Timing of requests for MUMS-drug designation. A sponsor may request MUMS-drug designation at any time in the drug...

  9. 1.55 {mu}m GaAs/GaNAsSb/GaAs optical waveguides grown by radio frequency nitrogen plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, K. H.; Yoon, S. F.; Loke, W. K.; Wicaksono, S.; Xu, Z.; Ng, T. K.; Lew, K. L.; Saadsaoud, N.; Zegaoui, M.; Decoster, D.; Chazelas, J.

    2008-03-17

    We demonstrate a 1.55 {mu}m GaAs/GaNAsSb/GaAs optical waveguide grown by molecular beam epitaxy as an alternative to the AlGaAs/GaAs system. The 0.4-{mu}m-thick GaNAsSb guiding layer contains {approx}3.5% of N and 9% of Sb, resulting in optical band gap of 0.88 eV. The refractive index of the GaNAsSb layer was measured from 800 to 1700 nm. The GaNAsSb layer has a refractive index value of 3.42 at 1.55 {mu}m wavelength. The propagation loss measured using the Fabry-Perot resonance method was found to be affected by nitrogen-related defect absorption.

  10. Energy transition characterization of 1.18 and 1.3 {mu}m bands of bismuth fiber by spectroscopy of the transient oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Gumenyuk, Regina; Okhotnikov, Oleg G.; Golant, Konstantin; Golant, Konstantin; Gumenyuk, Regina; Okhotnikov, Oleg G.

    2011-05-09

    The experimental evidence of laser transition type in bismuth-doped silica fibers operating at different spectral bands is presented. Spectrally resolved transient (relaxation) oscillations studied for a Bi-doped fiber laser at room and liquid-nitrogen temperatures allow to identify the three- and four-level energy bands. 1.18 {mu}m short-wavelength band is found to be a three-level system at room temperature with highly populated terminal energy level of laser transition. The depopulation of ground level by cooling the fiber down to liquid-nitrogen temperature changes the transition to four-level type. Four-level energy transition distinguished at 1.32 {mu}m exhibits the net gain at room temperature.

  11. Molecular beam epitaxy grown AlAsSb/GaAsSb distributed Bragg reflector on InP substrate operating near 1. 55 [mu]m

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, O.; Fritz, I.J.; Dawson, L.R.; Howard, A.J.; Headley, T.J.; Olsen, J.A.; Klem, J.F.; Drummond, T.J. )

    1994-03-01

    Surface normal optoelectronic devices operating in the 1.3--1.5 [mu]m wavelength range require distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) with a practical number ([le]50) of mirror layers. This requirement implies a large refractive index difference between the mirror layers, which is difficult to achieve in the traditionally used phosphide compounds. For the first time, an AlAsSb/GaAsSb DBR grown nominally lattice matched to an InP substrate by molecular beam epitaxy is demonstrated. Reflectivity measurements indicate a stop band centered at 1.53 [mu]m, which is well fitted by these theoretical predictions. Atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy indicate reasonable crystal quality with some defects due to an unintentional lattice mismatch to the substrate.

  12. Metamorphic approach to single quantum dot emission at 1.55 {mu}m on GaAs substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Semenova, E. S.; Hostein, R.; Patriarche, G.; Mauguin, O.; Largeau, L.; Robert-Philip, I.; Beveratos, A.; Lemaitre, A.

    2008-05-15

    We report on the fabrication and the characterization of InAs quantum dots (QDs) embedded in an indium rich In{sub 0.42}Ga{sub 0.58}As metamorphic matrix grown on a GaAs substrate. Growth conditions were chosen so as to minimize the number of threading dislocations and other defects produced during the plastic relaxation. Sharp and bright lines, originating from the emission of a few isolated single quantum dots, were observed in microphotoluminescence around 1.55 {mu}m at 5 K. They exhibit, in particular, a characteristic exciton/biexciton behavior. These QDs could offer an interesting alternative to other approaches as InAs/InP QDs for the realization of single photon emitters at telecom wavelengths.

  13. Dual Wavelength Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Dual wavelength lasers are discussed, covering fundamental aspects on the spectroscopy and laser dynamics of these systems. Results on Tm:Ho:Er:YAG dual wavelength laser action (Ho at 2.1 m and Er at 2.9 m) as well as Nd:YAG (1.06 and 1.3 m) are presented as examples of such dual wavelength systems. Dual wavelength lasers are not common, but there are criteria that govern their behavior. Based on experimental studies demonstrating simultaneous dual wavelength lasing, some general conclusions regarding the successful operation of multi-wavelength lasers can be made.

  14. SPITZER 24 {mu}m SURVEY FOR DUST DISKS AROUND HOT WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, You-Hua; Bilikova, Jana; Gruendl, Robert A.; Su, Kate Y. L.; De Marco, Orsola; Guerrero, Martin A.; Updike, Adria C.; Rauch, Thomas

    2011-09-15

    Two types of dust disks around white dwarfs (WDs) have been reported: small dust disks around cool metal-rich WDs consisting of tidally disrupted asteroids and a large dust disk around the hot central WD of the Helix planetary nebula (PN) possibly produced by collisions among Kuiper-Belt-like objects. To search for more dust disks of the latter type, we have conducted a Spitzer MIPS 24 {mu}m survey of 71 hot WDs or pre-WDs, among which 35 are central stars of PNe (CSPNs). Nine of these evolved stars are detected and their 24 {mu}m flux densities are at least two orders of magnitude higher than their expected photospheric emission. Considering the bias against the detection of distant objects, the 24 {mu}m detection rate for the sample is {approx}>15%. It is striking that seven, or {approx}20%, of the WD and pre-WDs in known PNe exhibit 24 {mu}m excesses, while two, or 5%-6%, of the WDs not in PNe show 24 {mu}m excesses and they have the lowest 24 {mu}m flux densities. We have obtained follow-up Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectra for five objects. Four show clear continuum emission at 24 {mu}m, and one is overwhelmed by a bright neighboring star but still shows a hint of continuum emission. In the cases of WD 0950+139 and CSPN K 1-22, a late-type companion is present, making it difficult to determine whether the excess 24 {mu}m emission is associated with the WD or its red companion. High-resolution images in the mid-infrared are needed to establish unambiguously the stars responsible for the 24 {mu}m excesses.

  15. FIRST SCIENCE RESULTS FROM SOFIA/FORCAST: SUPER-RESOLUTION IMAGING OF THE S140 CLUSTER AT 37 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Paul M.; Adams, Joseph D.; Herter, Terry L.; Gull, George; Schoenwald, Justin E-mail: jdadams@astro.cornell.edu E-mail: geg3@cornell.edu; and others

    2012-04-20

    We present 37 {mu}m imaging of the S140 complex of infrared sources centered on IRS1 made with the FORCAST camera on SOFIA. These observations are the longest wavelength imaging to resolve clearly the three main sources seen at shorter wavelengths, IRS 1, 2, and 3, and are nearly at the diffraction limit of the 2.5 m telescope. We also obtained a small number of images at 11 and 31 {mu}m that are useful for flux measurement. Our images cover the area of several strong submillimeter sources seen in the area-SMM 1, 2, and 3-that are not coincident with any mid-infrared sources and are not visible in our longer wavelength imaging either. Our new observations confirm previous estimates of the relative dust optical depth and source luminosity for the components in this likely cluster of early B stars. We also investigate the use of super-resolution to go beyond the basic diffraction limit in imaging on SOFIA and find that the van Cittert algorithm, together with the 'multi-resolution' technique, provides excellent results.

  16. DISCOVERY AND ANALYSIS OF 21 {mu}m FEATURE SOURCES IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Volk, Kevin; Meixner, Margaret; Gordon, Karl D.; Hrivnak, Bruce J.; Matsuura, Mikako; Bernard-Salas, Jeronimo; Sloan, G. C.; Kraemer, Kathleen E.; Kemper, F.; Woods, Paul M.; Zijlstra, Albert A.; Sahai, Raghvendra; Gruendl, Robert A.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Indebetouw, Remy; Marengo, Massimo

    2011-07-10

    Spitzer Space Telescope mid-infrared spectroscopy has been obtained for 15 carbon-rich protoplanetary nebulae (PPNe) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and for two other such stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). Of these 17 PPNe, the unidentified 21 {mu}m feature is strong in 7 spectra, weak in 2 spectra, and very weak or questionable in 4 spectra. Two of the four spectra without the 21 {mu}m feature have a very strong feature near 11 {mu}m, similar to a feature observed in some carbon-rich planetary nebulae (PNe) in the LMC. We attribute this feature to unusual SiC dust, although the feature-to-continuum ratio is much larger than for SiC features in Galactic or Magellanic Cloud carbon star spectra. The remaining two objects show typical carbon-rich PPNe spectra with no 21 {mu}m features. One of the LMC objects that lacks the 21 {mu}m feature and one SMC object with a questionable 21 {mu}m detection may have mixed dust chemistries based upon their spectral similarity to Galactic [WC] PNe. The 13 objects that either definitely or may show the 21 {mu}m feature have distinct dust shell properties compared to the Galactic 21 {mu}m objects-the 21 {mu}m features are weaker, the estimated dust temperatures are significantly higher, the unidentified infrared (UIR) bands are stronger, and the UIRs show more structure. Four of the 21 {mu}m objects appear to show normal SiC emission features in their spectra. Many of the PPNe show strong 30 {mu}m features, although this feature carries less of the total mid-infrared emission than is normally the case for the Galactic 21 {mu}m PPNe. The LMC objects are in the LMC halo rather than in the LMC bar. The estimated luminosities of these PPNe vary from 4700 to 12,500 L{sub sun}.

  17. Vibrational and thermodynamic properties of α-, β-, γ-, and 6, 6, 12-graphyne structures.

    PubMed

    Perkgöz, Nihan Kosku; Sevik, Cem

    2014-05-01

    Electronic, vibrational, and thermodynamic properties of different graphyne structures, namely α-, β-, γ-, and 6, 6, 12-graphyne, are investigated through first principles-based quasi-harmonic approximation by using phonon dispersions predicted from density-functional perturbation theory. Similar to graphene, graphyne was shown to exhibit a structure with extraordinary electronic features, mechanical hardness, thermal resistance, and very high conductivity from different calculation methods. Hence, characterizing its phonon dispersions and vibrational and thermodynamic properties in a systematic way is of great importance for both understanding its fundamental molecular properties and also figuring out its phase stability issues at different temperatures. Thus, in this research work, thermodynamic stability of different graphyne allotropes is assessed by investigating vibrational properties, lattice thermal expansion coefficients, and Gibbs free energy. According to our results, although the imaginary vibrational frequencies exist for β-graphyne, there is no such a negative behavior for α-, γ-, and 6, 6, 12-graphyne structures. In general, the Grüneisen parameters and linear thermal expansion coefficients of these structures are calculated to be rather more negative when compared to those of the graphene structure. In addition, the predicted difference between the binding energies per atom for the structures of graphene and graphyne points out that graphyne networks have relatively lower phase stability in comparison with the graphene structures. PMID:24737253

  18. Electronic properties and carrier mobilities of 6,6,12-graphyne nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Heyu; Huang, Yuanhe; Bai, Hongcun

    2015-07-15

    Structures, stabilities, electronic properties and carrier mobilities of 6,6,12-graphyne nanoribbons (GyNRs) with armchair and zigzag edges are investigated using the self-consistent field crystal orbital method based on density functional theory. It is found that the 1D GyNRs are more stable than the 2D 6,6,12-graphyne sheet in the view of the Gibbs free energy. The stabilities of these GyNRs decrease as their widths increase. The calculated band structures show that all these GyNRs are semiconductors and that dependence of band gaps on the ribbon width is different from different types of the GyNRs. The carrier mobility was calculated based on the deformation theory and effective mass approach. It is found that the carrier mobilities of these GyNRs can reach the order of 10{sup 5} cm{sup 2} V {sup –1}s{sup –1} at room temperature and are comparable to those of graphene NRs. Moreover, change of the mobilities with change of the ribbon width is quite different from different types of the GyNRs.

  19. Q-switched lasing at 2 {mu}m in a Tm{sup 3+}:YAlO{sub 3} laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ushakov, S N; Khromov, M N; Shestakov, A V

    2009-05-31

    The parameters of a Q-switched longitudinally-diode-pumped Tm{sup 3+}:YAlO{sub 3} laser are presented. The pulse repetition rate is f = 1-15 Hz. The maximum average output power is 5 W (at f = 5-15 kHz), the minimum pulse duration is 130 ns (f = 1 kHz), the efficiency is 26% (with the slope efficiency of 58%). The laser wavelength under pumping in the region of 803-805 nm is 1.99 {mu}m. (lasers and amplifiers)

  20. Narrowband 1.5-{mu}m Bragg filter based on a polymer waveguide with a laser-written refractive-index grating

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Viktor I; Panchenko, Vladislav Ya; Seminogov, V N

    2010-10-15

    We report the fabrication of narrowband frequency-selective filters for the 1.5-{mu}m telecom window, which include a single-mode polymer waveguide with a submicron Bragg grating inscribed by a helium-cadmium laser. The filters have a reflectance R > 98 % and a nearly rectangular reflection band with a bandwidth {Delta}{lambda}{approx}0.4nm. They can be used as components of optical multiplexers/demultiplexers for combining and separating signals in high-speed dense wavelength-division multiplexed optical fibre communication systems. (laser components)

  1. 2 {mu}m laterally coupled distributed-feedback GaSb-based metamorphic laser grown on a GaAs substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Apiratikul, P.; He, L.; Richardson, C. J. K.

    2013-06-10

    We report a type-I GaSb-based laterally coupled distributed-feedback (DFB) laser grown on a GaAs substrate operating continuous wave at room temperature. The laser structure was designed to operate near a wavelength of 2 {mu}m and was grown metamorphically with solid-source molecular beam epitaxy. The device was fabricated using a 6th-order deep etch grating structure as part of the sidewalls of the narrow ridge waveguide. The DFB laser emits total output power of up to 40 mW in a single longitudinal mode operation at a heat-sink temperature of 20 Degree-Sign C.

  2. 21 CFR 516.31 - Scope of MUMS-drug exclusive marketing rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.31 Scope of MUMS-drug...

  3. 21 CFR 516.31 - Scope of MUMS-drug exclusive marketing rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.31 Scope of MUMS-drug...

  4. 21 CFR 516.31 - Scope of MUMS-drug exclusive marketing rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.31 Scope of MUMS-drug...

  5. 21 CFR 516.31 - Scope of MUMS-drug exclusive marketing rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.31 Scope of MUMS-drug...

  6. 21 CFR 516.31 - Scope of MUMS-drug exclusive marketing rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.31 Scope of MUMS-drug...

  7. 21 CFR 516.26 - Amendment to MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.26 Amendment to MUMS-drug designation. (a) At...

  8. 21 CFR 516.26 - Amendment to MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.26 Amendment to MUMS-drug designation. (a) At...

  9. 21 CFR 516.26 - Amendment to MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.26 Amendment to MUMS-drug designation. (a) At...

  10. THE CARNEGIE HUBBLE PROGRAM: THE LEAVITT LAW AT 3.6 {mu}m AND 4.5 {mu}m IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Scowcroft, Victoria; Freedman, Wendy L.; Madore, Barry F.; Monson, Andrew J.; Persson, S. E.; Seibert, Mark; Rigby, Jane R.; Sturch, Laura E-mail: wendy@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: amonson@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: mseibert@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: lsturch@bu.edu

    2011-12-10

    The Carnegie Hubble Program is designed to improve the extragalactic distance scale using data from the post-cryogenic era of Spitzer. The ultimate goal is a determination of the Hubble constant to an accuracy of 2%. This paper is the first in a series on the Cepheid population of the Large Magellanic Cloud, and focusses on the period-luminosity (PL) relations (Leavitt laws) that will be used, in conjunction with observations of Milky Way Cepheids, to set the slope and zero point of the Cepheid distance scale in the mid-infrared. To this end, we have obtained uniformly sampled light curves for 85 LMC Cepheids, having periods between 6 and 140 days. PL and period-color relations are presented in the 3.6 {mu}m and 4.5 {mu}m bands. We demonstrate that the 3.6 {mu}m band is a superb distance indicator. The cyclical variation of the [3.6]-[4.5] color has been measured for the first time. We attribute the amplitude and phase of the color curves to the dissociation and recombination of CO molecules in the Cepheid's atmosphere. The CO affects only the 4.5 {mu}m flux making it a potential metallicity indicator.

  11. Identification of MUM1 as a prognostic immunohistochemical marker in follicular lymphoma using computerized image analysis.

    PubMed

    Xerri, Luc; Bachy, Emmanuel; Fabiani, Bettina; Canioni, Danielle; Chassagne-Clément, Catherine; Dartigues-Cuilléres, Peggy; Charlotte, Frédéric; Brousse, Nicole; Rousselet, Marie-Christine; Foussard, Charles; Brice, Pauline; Feugier, Pierre; Morschhauser, Frank; Sonet, Anne; Olive, Daniel; Salles, Gilles

    2014-10-01

    Detection of MUM1+ cells in follicular lymphoma (FL) tissues was previously found to be associated with poor prognosis in a single report, whereas the usefulness of Ki-67 immunostaining remains debated. Our goal was to establish whether these markers have predictive value for patients with FL. We analyzed MUM1 and Ki-67 expression using immunohistochemistry in biopsy samples from 434 patients from the PRIMA randomized trial. The MUM1 prognostic value was then validated in a cohort of 138 patients from the FL2000 randomized trial, using the optimal cutoff value obtained from the PRIMA cohort. The surface of positive staining was quantified using computerized image analysis. In the PRIMA cohort, both high levels of MUM1 positivity (cutoff value of 0.80%) and high levels of Ki-67 positivity (cutoff value of 10.25%) were significantly associated with a shorter progression-free survival (PFS) (P = .004 and P = .007 for MUM1 and Ki-67, respectively). In a multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model, only MUM1 retained a statistical significance (hazards ratio 1.56; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-2.37; P = .038) after adjustment for the maintenance arm of treatment and the follicular lymphoma international prognostic index score. In the FL2000 cohort, high levels of MUM1 positivity were significantly associated to a shorter PFS (P = .004) and to a trend toward a shorter overall survival (P = .043). This remained significant using a multivariate Cox regression model after adjustment for the follicular lymphoma international prognostic index and the treatment arm for PFS (P = .016). These results show that MUM1 is a strong and robust predictive immunohistochemical marker in patients with FL. PMID:25149549

  12. Investigation of Antioxidative and Anticancer Potentials of Streptomyces sp. MUM256 Isolated from Malaysia Mangrove Soil

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Loh Teng-Hern; Ser, Hooi-Leng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han; Goh, Bey-Hing

    2015-01-01

    A Streptomyces strain, MUM256 was isolated from Tanjung Lumpur mangrove soil in Malaysia. Characterization of the strain showed that it has properties consistent with those of the members of the genus Streptomyces. In order to explore the potential bioactivities, extract of the fermented broth culture of MUM256 was prepared with organic solvent extraction method. DPPH and SOD activity were utilized to examine the antioxidant capacity and the results have revealed the potency of MUM256 in superoxide anion scavenging activity in dose-dependent manner. The cytotoxicity of MUM256 extract was determined using cell viability assay against 8 different panels of human cancer cell lines. Among all the tested cancer cells, HCT116 was the most sensitive toward the extract treatment. At the highest concentration of tested extract, the result showed 2.3-, 2.0-, and 1.8-folds higher inhibitory effect against HCT116, HT29, and Caco-2 respectively when compared to normal cell line. This result has demonstrated that MUM256 extract was selectively cytotoxic toward colon cancer cell lines. In order to determine the constituents responsible for its bioactivities, the extract was then subjected to chemical analysis using GC-MS. The analysis resulted in the identification of chemical constituents including phenolic and pyrrolopyrazine compounds which may responsible for antioxidant and anticancer activities observed. Based on the findings of this study, the presence of bioactive constituents in MUM256 extract could be a potential source for the development of antioxidative and chemopreventive agents. PMID:26635777

  13. The Arabidopsis Transcription Factor LUH/MUM1 Is Required for Extrusion of Seed Coat Mucilage1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jun; DeBowles, Danisha; Esfandiari, Elahe; Dean, Gillian; Carpita, Nicholas C.; Haughn, George W.

    2011-01-01

    During differentiation, the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seed coat epidermal cells secrete mucilage composed primarily of rhamnogalacturonan I that is extruded from the seed coat upon imbibition. The mucilage of the mucilage modified1 (mum1) mutant contains rhamnogalacturonan I that is more highly branched and lacks the ability to be extruded when exposed to water. Our cloning of the MUM1 gene shows that it encodes a putative transcription factor, LEUNIG_HOMOLOG (LUH). Cellular localization and transcriptional assay results suggest that LUH/MUM1 is a nucleus-localized transcriptional activator. LUH/MUM1 is expressed in all the tissues examined, including the seed coat. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction data suggest that LUH/MUM1 is expressed throughout seed coat development, reaching peak expression late in differentiation. LUH1/MUM1 expression in plants homozygous for mutations in several genes encoding regulators of seed coat mucilage was unchanged. Thus, LUH/MUM1 expression appears to be independent of other transcription factors known to regulate aspects of seed coat mucilage biology. The expression in the luh/mum1 mutant of three genes encoding enzymes needed for mucilage extrusion, MUM2, SUBSILIN PROTEASE1.7, and β-XYLOSIDASE1, was reduced relative to that of the wild type. Overexpression of MUM2 could partially rescue the mum1 phenotype. These data suggest that LUH/MUM1 is a positive regulator of all three genes. PMID:21518777

  14. Wavelength independent interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochberg, Eric B. (Inventor); Page, Norman A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A polychromatic interferometer utilizing a plurality of parabolic reflective surfaces to properly preserve the fidelity of light wavefronts irrespective of their wavelengths as they pass through the instrument is disclosed. A preferred embodiment of the invention utilizes an optical train which comprises three off-axis parabolas arranged in conjunction with a beam-splitter and a reference mirror to form a Twyman-Green interferometer. An illumination subsystem is provided and comprises a pair of lasers at different preselected wavelengths in the visible spectrum. The output light of the two lasers is coaxially combined by means of a plurality of reflectors and a grating beam combiner to form a single light source at the focal point of the first parabolic reflection surface which acts as a beam collimator for the rest of the optical train. By using visible light having two distinct wavelengths, the present invention provides a long equivalent wavelength interferogram which operates at visible light wherein the effective wavelength is equal to the product of the wavelengths of the two laser sources divided by their difference in wavelength. As a result, the invention provides the advantages of what amounts to long wavelength interferometry but without incurring the disadvantage of the negligible reflection coefficient of the human eye to long wavelength frequencies which would otherwise defeat any attempt to form an interferogram at that low frequency using only one light source.

  15. SHELS: OPTICAL SPECTRAL PROPERTIES OF WISE 22 {mu}m SELECTED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Ho Seong; Geller, Margaret J.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Dell'Antonio, Ian P. E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: dfabricant@cfa.harvard.edu

    2012-10-10

    We use a dense, complete redshift survey, the Smithsonian Hectospec Lensing Survey (SHELS), covering a 4 deg{sup 2} region of a deep imaging survey, the Deep Lens Survey (DLS), to study the optical spectral properties of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) 22 {mu}m selected galaxies. Among 507 WISE 22 {mu}m selected sources with (S/N){sub 22{mu}m} {>=} 3 ( Almost-Equal-To S{sub 22{mu}m} {approx}> 2.5 mJy), we identify the optical counterparts of 481 sources ({approx}98%) at R < 25.2 in the very deep, DLS R-band source catalog. Among them, 337 galaxies at R < 21 have SHELS spectroscopic data. Most of these objects are at z < 0.8. The infrared (IR) luminosities are in the range 4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8}(L{sub Sun }) {approx}< L{sub IR} {approx}< 5.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12}(L{sub Sun }). Most 22 {mu}m selected galaxies are dusty star-forming galaxies with a small (<1.5) 4000 A break. The stacked spectra of the 22 {mu}m selected galaxies binned in IR luminosity show that the strength of the [O III] line relative to H{beta} grows with increasing IR luminosity. The optical spectra of the 22 {mu}m selected galaxies also show that there are some ({approx}2.8%) unusual galaxies with very strong [Ne III] {lambda}3869, 3968 emission lines that require hard ionizing radiation such as active galactic nuclei (AGNs) or extremely young massive stars. The specific star formation rates (sSFRs) derived from the 3.6 and 22 {mu}m flux densities are enhanced if the 22 {mu}m selected galaxies have close late-type neighbors. The sSFR distribution of the 22 {mu}m selected galaxies containing AGNs is similar to the distribution for star-forming galaxies without AGNs. We identify 48 dust-obscured galaxy candidates with large ({approx}> 1000) mid-IR to optical flux density ratio. The combination of deep photometric and spectroscopic data with WISE data suggests that WISE can probe the universe to z {approx} 2.

  16. PROBING THE '30 {mu}m' FEATURE: LESSONS FROM EXTREME CARBON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Messenger, Stephen J.; Speck, Angela; Volk, Kevin E-mail: speckan@missouri.edu

    2013-02-20

    Some carbon-rich evolved stars exhibit a very prominent spectral feature at {approx}{sup 3}0 {mu}m''. The C-rich nature of these objects suggests that the carrier is a sulfide, carbide, or other substance apt to form in a reducing environment. However, the carrier of this spectral feature remains disputed, with magnesium sulfide (MgS) as the most favored candidate. In order to investigate the carrier of the {sup 3}0 {mu}m'' feature further, we have taken a dual approach, studying both laboratory and observational data. In order to obtain a homogeneous sample, we studied the {sup 3}0 {mu}m'' feature observed in the spectra of galactic extreme carbon stars that exhibit the 11 {mu}m SiC absorption feature. Thus, we avoid potential differences in the target objects that could contribute to the observed differences in the shape, position, and strength of the {sup 3}0 {mu}m'' feature. In addition, we analyzed the shape and position of the {sup 3}0 {mu}m'' features for a range of sulfide minerals for which laboratory data exist. Our study of observed astronomical features shows a range of shapes and positions for the {sup 3}0 {mu}m'' feature despite similarities in the source objects. The nature of our sample argues against grain processing or temperature differences due to hardening of the stellar radiation field with evolution. While there are very few correlations between spectral parameters for our sample, the peak positions of the {approx}11 {mu}m absorption and 30 {mu}m emission features do correlate, and these peak positions correlate with the modeled optical depth. These correlations suggest that the carriers of the observable spectral features are closely related to one another and to the density/pressure in the dust formation zone. Furthermore, we suggest that the blue-broadening of the 11 {mu}m feature cannot be attributed to SiS{sub 2} based on existing laboratory spectra, but further lab work is needed to investigate the effect of increasing oxidation.

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Herbaspirillum lusitanum P6-12, an Endophyte Isolated from Root Nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Vinícius Almir; Faoro, Helisson; Tadra-Sfeir, Michelle Zibbetti; Raittz, Roberto Tadeu; de Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; Monteiro, Rose Adele; Cardoso, Rodrigo Luis Alves; Wassem, Roseli; Chubatsu, Leda Satie; Huergo, Luciano Fernandes; Müller-Santos, Marcelo; Steffens, Maria Berenice Reynaud; Rigo, Liu Un; Pedrosa, Fábio de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Herbaspirillum lusitanum strain P6-12 (DSM 17154) is, so far, the only species of Herbaspirillum isolated from plant root nodules. Here we report a draft genome sequence of this organism. PMID:22815451

  18. Preparation of AlAsSb and mid-infrared (3-5 {mu}m) lasers by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Allerman, A.A.; Biefeld, R.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1996-12-31

    Mid-infrared (3-5 {mu}m) infrared lasers and LEDs are being developed for use in chemical sensor systems. As-rich, InAsSb heterostructures display unique electronic properties that are beneficial to the performance of these midwave infrared emitters. The authors have grown AlAs{sub 1{minus}x}Sb{sub x} epitaxial layers by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition using trimethylamine (TMAA) or ethyldimethylamine alane (EDMAA), triethylantimony (TESb) and arsine. They examined the growth of AlAs{sub 1{minus}x}Sb{sub x} using temperatures of 500 to 600 {degrees}C, pressures of 70 to 630 torr, V/III ratios of 1-27, and growth rates of 0.3 to 2.7 {mu}m/hour in a horizontal quartz reactor. The semi-metal properties of a p-GaAsSb/n-InAs heterojunction are utilized as a source for injection of electrons into the active region of lasers. A regrowth technique has been used to fabricate gain-guided lasers using AlAs{sub 1{minus}x}Sb{sub x} for optical confinement with either a strained InAsSb/InAs multi-quantum well (MQW) or an InAsSb/InAsP strained layer superlattice (SLS) as the active region. Under pulsed injection, the InAsSb/InAs MQW laser operated up to 210K with an emission wavelength of 3.8-3.9 {mu}m. Under pulsed optical pumping, the InAsSb/InAsP SLS operated to 240K with an emission wavelength of 3.5-3.7 {mu}m. LED emission has been observed with both active regions in both p-n junction and semi-metal injection structures.

  19. Wavelength Swept Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Seok Hyun; Bouma, Brett E.

    In optical interferometric metrology, the wavelength of light serves as a reference for length. At a given optical wavelength, an interference signal varies as a sinusoidal function of distance with a period equal to the wavelength. Although this approach offers unrivaled precision, the periodic signal results in a 2π ambiguity for measurement of lengths greater than one wavelength. In optical coherence tomography (OCT), one wishes to determine light scattering distances and distribution within a sample, but without the ambiguity. To accomplish this, OCT is based on interferometry using many optical wavelengths, each serving as a "ruler" with different periodicities. OCT traditionally has used broadband light sources providing a wide range of wavelengths, all simultaneously. Alternatively, a tunable light source emitting one wavelength at a time, rapidly swept over a broad spectral range, can also be used to achieve the absolute ranging capability in OCT. In this chapter, we describe a technical overview of these new emerging sources. We begin with a discussion general specifications of these light sources, the review basic fundamentals of laser and wavelength tuning. Finally, we discuss the principles of various techniques developed to date for high-speed and wide tuning range.

  20. Meaningful, Authentic and Place-Based Informal Science Education for 6-12 Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, E.; Dalbotten, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    American Indians are underrepresented in STEM and especially in Earth sciences. They have the lowest high school graduation rate and highest unemployment. On the other hand, tribes are in search of qualified young people to work in geo- and hydro-technical fields to manage reservations' natural resources. Dalbotten and her collaborators at the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa and local 6-12 teachers ran a place-based but non-themed informal monthly science camps (gidakiimanaaniwigamig) for 7 years starting 2003. Camps were held on reservation and some activities focused on observing seasonal changes. The students enjoyed coming to the camps but the camp activities went largely unnoticed by the reservation itself. For the last 5 years, we and the same cast of characters from the gidakiimanaaniwigamig camps ran a very place-based, research-based camp program, manoomin. The research was focused on manoomin (wild rice) which is a culturally important plant and food that grows in local lakes and wetlands. Manmade changes in hydrology, toxic metals from mining, and changing weather patterns due to climate change threaten this precious resource. Our plan was for 6-12 students to investigate the past, the present and the future conditions of manoomin on and around the reservation. It became clear by 3rd year that the research project, as conceived, was overly ambitious and could not be completed at the level we hoped in a camp setting (6 weekend camps = 6 full days per year). However, students felt that they were involved in research that was beneficial to their reservation, reported gaining self-confidence to pursue a career in science, and stated a desired to obtain a college degree. They also became aware of STEM employment opportunities on reservation that they could aim for. The camps also fostered a trusting relationship between researchers at Fond du Lac resource managers and the U. of MN. Based on these experiences, we proposed a new format for these

  1. MUM-1 expression differentiates AITL with HRS-like cells from cHL

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wenyong; Xie, Jianlan; Xu, Xiao; Gao, Xue; Xie, Ping; Zhou, Xiaoge

    2015-01-01

    MUM1 is a member of the interferon regulatory factor family of transcription factors. It is normally expressed in plasma cells, late B cells, and activated T cells, and has been described in several B-cell malignancies and some T-cell neoplasms. The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of MUM-1/IRF4 protein in differentiating angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma (AITL) with Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg (HRS)-like cells from cHL. We identified 12 cases of AITL with HRS-like cells and 24 cases of cHL from March 2013 to November 2014. IHC for MUM-1/IRF4 protein was performed on the tissue of these cases and some relevant positive and negative controls. MUM-1 was expressed in HRS-like cells and some neoplastic T-cells in AITL with HRS-like cells (12/12, 100%) and formed the rosettes around the HRS-like cells (12/12, 100%), expressed in HRS cells in classic Hodgkin Lymphoma (cHL) (24/24, 100%) and just one case formed rosettes around the HRS cells (1/24, 4.2%). Based on the results, MUM-1 could be a useful marker for the differential diagnosis between AITL with HRS-like cells and cHL. PMID:26617862

  2. Short wavelength FELS

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The generation of coherent ultraviolet and shorter wavelength light is presently limited to synchrotron sources. The recent progress in the development of brighter electron beams enables the use of much lower energy electron rf linacs to reach short-wavelengths than previously considered possible. This paper will summarize the present results obtained with synchrotron sources, review proposed short- wavelength FEL designs and then present a new design which is capable of over an order of magnitude higher power to the extreme ultraviolet. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  3. Assessing Students' Understanding of Macroevolution: Concerns regarding the validity of the MUM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novick, Laura R.; Catley, Kefyn M.

    2012-11-01

    In a recent article, Nadelson and Southerland (2010. Development and preliminary evaluation of the Measure of Understanding of Macroevolution: Introducing the MUM. The Journal of Experimental Education, 78, 151-190) reported on their development of a multiple-choice concept inventory intended to assess college students' understanding of macroevolutionary concepts, the Measure of Understanding Macroevolution (MUM). Given that the only existing evolution inventories assess understanding of natural selection, a microevolutionary concept, a valid assessment of students' understanding of macroevolution would be a welcome and necessary addition to the field of science education. Although the conceptual framework underlying Nadelson and Southerland's test is promising, we believe the test has serious shortcomings with respect to validity evidence for the construct being tested. We argue and provide evidence that these problems are serious enough that the MUM should not be used in its current form to measure students' understanding of macroevolution.

  4. Narrow-stripe metal-clad ridge-waveguide laser for 1. 3. mu. m wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Amann, M.; Stegmueller, B.

    1986-04-21

    Metal-clad ridge-waveguide lasers with stripe widths between 1.5 and 3 ..mu..m have been developed in InGaAsP-InP for 1.3 ..mu..m wavelength. By an appropriate design for these lasers, threshold currents as low as 20 mA are achieved for 200-..mu..m-long cavities. The corresponding low heat dissipation enables cw operation of upside-down mounted devices up to 85 /sup 0/C heat sink temperature.

  5. Long wavelength, high gain InAsSb strained-layer superlattice photoconductive detectors

    DOEpatents

    Biefeld, Robert M.; Dawson, L. Ralph; Fritz, Ian J.; Kurtz, Steven R.; Zipperian, Thomas E.

    1991-01-01

    A high gain photoconductive device for 8 to 12 .mu.m wavelength radiation including an active semiconductor region extending from a substrate to an exposed face, the region comprising a strained-layer superlattice of alternating layers of two different InAs.sub.1-x Sb.sub.x compounds having x>0.75. A pair of spaced electrodes are provided on the exposed face, and changes in 8 to 12 .mu.m radiation on the exposed face cause a large photoconductive gain between the spaced electrodes.

  6. Whole-grain food consumption in Singaporean children aged 6-12 years.

    PubMed

    Neo, Jia En; Binte Mohamed Salleh, Saihah; Toh, Yun Xuan; How, Kesslyn Yan Ling; Tee, Mervin; Mann, Kay; Hopkins, Sinead; Thielecke, Frank; Seal, Chris J; Brownlee, Iain A

    2016-01-01

    Public health bodies in many countries are attempting to increase population-wide habitual consumption of whole grains. Limited data on dietary habits exist in Singaporean children. The present study therefore aimed to assess whole grain consumption patterns in Singaporean children and compare these with dietary intake, physical activity and health parameters. Dietary intake (assessed by duplicate, multipass, 24-h food recalls), physical activity (by questionnaire) and anthropometric measurements were collected from a cross-section of 561 Singaporean children aged 6-12 years. Intake of whole grains was evaluated using estimates of portion size and international food composition data. Only 38·3 % of participants reported consuming whole grains during the dietary data collection days. Median intake of whole grains in consumers was 15·3 (interquartile range 5·4-34·8) g/d. The most commonly consumed whole-grain food groups were rice (29·5 %), wholemeal bread (28·9 %) and ready-to-eat breakfast cereals (18·8 %). A significantly lower proportion of Malay children (seven out of fifty-eight; P < 0·0001) consumed whole grains than children of other ethnicities. Only 6 % of all children consumed the amount of whole grains most commonly associated with improved health outcomes (48 g/d). There was no relationship between whole grain consumption patterns and BMI, waist circumference or physical activity but higher whole grain intake was associated with increased fruit, vegetable and dairy product consumption (P < 0·001). These findings demonstrate that consumption of whole grain foods is low at a population level and infrequent in Singaporean children. Future drives to increase whole-grain food consumption in this population are likely to require input from multiple stakeholders. PMID:27547396

  7. INFRARED DIAGNOSTICS FOR THE EXTENDED 12 {mu}m SAMPLE OF SEYFERTS

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, Stefi A.; Noel-Storr, Jacob; Dorn, Meghan; Staudaher, Shawn; Gallimore, Jack F.; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Axon, David J.; Robinson, Andy; Buchanan, Catherine L.; Elitzur, Moshe

    2010-02-10

    We present an analysis of Spitzer IRS spectroscopy of 83 active galaxies from the extended 12 {mu}m sample. We find rank correlations between several tracers of star formation which suggest that (1) the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon feature is a reliable tracer of star formation, (2) there is a significant contribution to the heating of the cool dust by stars, and (3) the H{sub 2} emission is also primarily excited by star formation. The 55-90 versus 20-30 spectral index plot is also a diagnostic of the relative contribution of starburst to active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We see there is a large change in spectral index across the sample: {Delta}{alpha} {approx} 3 for both indices. Thus, the contribution to the IR spectrum from the AGN and starburst components can be comparable in magnitude but the relative contribution also varies widely across the sample. We find rank correlations between several AGN tracers. We find correlations of the ratios [O III]lambda5007/[O IV] 26 {mu}m and [O III]lambda5007/[Ne V] 14 {mu}m with the silicate strength which we adopt as an orientation indicator. This suggests that some of the [O III]lambda5007 emission in these Seyferts is subject to orientation dependent obscuration as found by Haas et al. for radio galaxies and quasars. There is no correlation of [Ne V] equivalent width with the silicate 10 {mu}m strength, indicating that the [Ne V] emission is not strongly orientation dependent. This suggests that the obscuring material (e.g., torus) is not very optically thick at 14 {mu}m consistent with the results of Buchanan et al. We search for correlations between AGN and starburst tracers and we conclude that the AGN and starburst tracers are not correlated. This is consistent with our conclusion that the relative strength of the AGN and starburst components varies widely across the sample. Thus, there is no simple link between AGN fueling and black hole growth and star formation in these galaxies. The density diagnostic [Ne V] 14

  8. IDENTIFICATION OF THREE NEW PROTOPLANETARY NEBULAE EXHIBITING THE UNIDENTIFIED FEATURE AT 21 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Cerrigone, Luciano; Hora, Joseph L.; Hart, Alexa; Fazio, Giovanni; Umana, Grazia; Trigilio, Corrado E-mail: jhora@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: gfazio@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: corrado.trigilio@oact.inaf.it

    2011-09-10

    Among its great findings, the Infrared Astronomical Satellite mission showed the existence of an unidentified mid-IR feature around 21 {mu}m. Since its discovery, this feature has been detected in all C-rich protoplanetary nebulae (PPNe) of intermediate spectral type (F-G) and-weakly-in a few PNe and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, but the nature of its carriers remains unknown. In this paper, we show the detection of this feature in the spectra of three new stars transiting from the AGB to the PN stage obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Following a recent suggestion, we try to model the spectral energy distributions of our targets with amorphous carbon and FeO, which might be responsible for the unidentified feature. The fit thus obtained is not completely satisfactory, since the shape of the feature is not well matched. In an attempt to relate the unidentified feature to other dust features, we retrieved mid-IR spectra of all 21 {mu}m sources currently known from Infrared Space Observatory and Spitzer online archives and noticed a correlation between the flux emitted in the 21 {mu}m feature and that emitted at 7 and 11 {mu}m (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon bands and hydrogenated amorphous carbon broad emission). Such a correlation may point to a common nature of the carriers.

  9. Characteristics of the 2.65 {mu}m atomic xenon laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hebner, G.A.

    1995-10-01

    The laser characteristics of the 2.65 {mu}m xenon laser transition are reviewed. Measured and extrapolated laser efficiency in nuclear pumped and electron beam pumped system is reported. Previous research has indicated that the reported power efficiency is between 0.1 and 2 percent.

  10. Giving Feedback: Development of Scales for the Mum Effect, Discomfort Giving Feedback, and Feedback Medium Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Susie S.; Marler, Laura E.; Simmering, Marcia J.; Totten, Jeff W.

    2011-01-01

    Research in organizational behavior and human resources promotes the view that it is critical for managers to provide accurate feedback to employees, yet little research addresses rater tendencies (i.e., the "mum effect") and attitudes that influence how performance feedback is given. Because technology has changed the nature of communication in…

  11. 21 CFR 516.29 - Termination of MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.29 Termination of MUMS-drug designation. (a... sponsor; or (5) FDA withdraws the conditional approval or approval of the application for the new...

  12. 21 CFR 516.29 - Termination of MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.29 Termination of MUMS-drug designation. (a... sponsor; or (5) FDA withdraws the conditional approval or approval of the application for the new...

  13. 21 CFR 516.29 - Termination of MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.29 Termination of MUMS-drug designation. (a... sponsor; or (5) FDA withdraws the conditional approval or approval of the application for the new...

  14. 21 CFR 516.29 - Termination of MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.29 Termination of MUMS-drug designation. (a... sponsor; or (5) FDA withdraws the conditional approval or approval of the application for the new...

  15. 21 CFR 516.29 - Termination of MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.29 Termination of MUMS-drug designation. (a... sponsor; or (5) FDA withdraws the conditional approval or approval of the application for the new...

  16. 21 CFR 516.25 - Refusal to grant MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.25 Refusal to grant MUMS-drug designation... rationale in support of the intended use, (ii) Sufficient information about the product development plan...

  17. 21 CFR 516.25 - Refusal to grant MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.25 Refusal to grant MUMS-drug designation... rationale in support of the intended use, (ii) Sufficient information about the product development plan...

  18. 21 CFR 516.20 - Content and format of a request for MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.20 Content and format of a request for MUMS-drug designation. (a) A sponsor that submits a request for designation of a new...

  19. 21 CFR 516.20 - Content and format of a request for MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.20 Content and format of a request for MUMS-drug designation. (a) A sponsor that submits a request for designation of a new...

  20. 21 CFR 516.20 - Content and format of a request for MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.20 Content and format of a request for MUMS-drug designation. (a) A sponsor that submits a request for designation of a new...

  1. 21 CFR 516.30 - Annual reports for a MUMS-designated drug.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.30 Annual reports for a MUMS-designated drug... investigational new animal drug file addressed to the Director of the Office of Minor Use and Minor Species...

  2. 21 CFR 516.30 - Annual reports for a MUMS-designated drug.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.30 Annual reports for a MUMS-designated drug... investigational new animal drug file addressed to the Director of the Office of Minor Use and Minor Species...

  3. 21 CFR 516.25 - Refusal to grant MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.25 Refusal to grant MUMS-drug designation... rationale in support of the intended use, (ii) Sufficient information about the product development plan...

  4. 21 CFR 516.30 - Annual reports for a MUMS-designated drug.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.30 Annual reports for a MUMS-designated drug... investigational new animal drug file addressed to the Director of the Office of Minor Use and Minor Species...

  5. SPITZER 70 AND 160 {mu}m OBSERVATIONS OF THE COSMOS FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Frayer, D. T.; Huynh, M. T.; Bhattacharya, B.; Fadda, D.; Helou, G.; Sanders, D. B.; Le Floc'h, E.; Ilbert, O.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Lee, N.; Surace, J. A.; Capak, P.; Murphy, E.; Aussel, H.; Salvato, M.; Scoville, N. Z.; Fu, H.; Afonso-Luis, A.; Sargent, M. T.

    2009-11-15

    We present Spitzer 70 and 160 {mu}m observations of the COSMOS Spitzer survey (S-COSMOS). The data processing techniques are discussed for the publicly released products consisting of images and source catalogs. We present accurate 70 and 160 {mu}m source counts of the COSMOS field and find reasonable agreement with measurements in other fields and with model predictions. The previously reported counts for GOODS-North and the extragalactic First Look Survey are updated with the latest calibration, and counts are measured based on the large area SWIRE survey to constrain the bright source counts. We measure an extragalactic confusion noise level of {sigma} {sub c} = 9.4 {+-} 3.3 mJy (q = 5) for the MIPS 160 {mu}m band based on the deep S-COSMOS data and report an updated confusion noise level of {sigma} {sub c} = 0.35 {+-} 0.15 mJy (q = 5) for the MIPS 70 {mu}m band.

  6. High power 2 {mu}m diode-pumped Tm:YAG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.J.; Sutton, S.B.; Honea, E.C.; Skidmore, J.A.; Emanuel, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    Using a scaleable diode end-pumping technology developed at LLNL, we have demonstrated a compact Tm:YAG laser capable of generating more than 50 W of cw 2 {mu}m laser output power. The design and operational characteristics of this laser, which was built originally for use in assessing laser surgical techniques, are discussed.

  7. BCL6, MUM1 AND CD10 EXPRESSION IN MANTLE CELL LYMPHOMA

    PubMed Central

    Gualco, Gabriela; Weiss, Lawrence M.; Harrington, William J.; Bacchi, Carlos E.

    2009-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) characteristically express CD20, CD5 and cyclin-D1, carries the translocation t(11;14) (q13;q32) and typically has no expression of germinal center (GC) cell markers. So-called aberrant phenotypes such as CD5 negative and cyclin-D1-negative-MCL have been described. Also few cases with CD10 and/or BCL-6 protein expression have been reported. We analyzed 127 MCL looking for the frequency of aberrant immunophenotype, CD10, BCL-6 and MUM1 expression. All cases were CD20 and cyclin-D1 positive, 96% expressed CD5 and 98% showed the t(11;14). BCL-6 expression was observed in 12 % of the cases and MUM1 in 35%. No one case showed CD10 positivity in 30% or more neoplastic cells. Only 3 cases showed 10 to 20% of tumoral cells positive for CD10. MUM1 expression was observed in 67% of the BCL-6 positive cases. 32% of the cases showed a MUM1+/BCL-6-/CD10- phenotype and 56% had a triple-negative-pattern. Aberrant phenotype is infrequent but not rare, and does not rule out a diagnosis of MCL in an otherwise typical case. PMID:19826251

  8. "I Asked My Mum, but" and Other Cases of Unsuccessful Information Seeking by Asking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huvila, Isto

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Failure to find information is common. An exploratory analysis of cases when family members or friends were asked for information can provide better understanding of when, how and why interpersonal information seeking within a close network of individuals fails. Method. A sample of utterances (in form of "I asked my mum, but") was…

  9. Assessing Students' Understanding of Macroevolution: Concerns regarding the Validity of the MUM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novick, Laura R.; Catley, Kefyn M.

    2012-01-01

    In a recent article, Nadelson and Southerland (2010. Development and preliminary evaluation of the Measure of Understanding of Macroevolution: Introducing the MUM. "The Journal of Experimental Education", 78, 151-190) reported on their development of a multiple-choice concept inventory intended to assess college students' understanding of…

  10. Kinetically Blocked Stable 5,6:12,13-Dibenzozethrene: A Laterally π-Extended Zethrene with Enhanced Diradical Character.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Priya; Das, Soumyajit; Phan, Hoa; Herng, Tun Seng; Ding, Jun; Wu, Jishan

    2016-06-17

    Although the ground-state and physical properties of zethrene and recently invented 1,2:8,9-dibenzozethrene have been well studied, the other dibenzozethrene isomer, i.e., 5,6:12,13-dibenzozethrene, remained unexplored. A short synthetic route to a kinetically blocked stable 5,6:12,13-dibenzozethrene derivative 5 is presented. The ground state is found to be open-shell singlet experimentally, and the theoretical y0 was enhanced to 0.414, which corroborates nicely with the experimental and theoretical singlet-triplet energy gap. PMID:27227758

  11. Long wavelength infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Long wavelength infrared detection is achieved by a detector made with layers of quantum well material bounded on each side by barrier material to form paired quantum wells, each quantum well having a single energy level. The width and depth of the paired quantum wells, and the spacing therebetween, are selected to split the single energy level with an upper energy level near the top of the energy wells. The spacing is selected for splitting the single energy level into two energy levels with a difference between levels sufficiently small for detection of infrared radiation of a desired wavelength.

  12. Immunogenicity and safety of a trivalent inactivated 2010-2011 influenza vaccine in Taiwan infants aged 6-12 months.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kao-Pin; Hsu, Yu-Lung; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsueh; Lin, Hsiao-Chuan; Yen, Ting-Yu; Wei, Hsiu-Mei; Lin, Hung-Chih; Chen, An-Chyi; Chow, Julie Chi; Huang, Li-Min

    2014-05-01

    This prospective study aimed to investigate the immune responses and safety of an influenza vaccine in vaccine-naïve infants aged 6-12 months, and was conducted from November 2010 to May 2011. Fifty-nine infants aged 6-12 months received two doses of trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine 4 weeks apart. Hemagglutination inhibition titers were measured 4 weeks after the two doses of study vaccine. Based on the assumption that a hemagglutination inhibition titer of 1:40 or greater against the antigen would be protective in adults, two doses of the study vaccine generated a protective immune response of 63.2% against influenza A(H1N1), 82.5% against influenza A(H3N2) and 38.6% against influenza B viruses in infants aged 6-12 months. The geometric mean fold rises against influenza type A and B viruses also met the European Medicines Agency criteria for flu vaccines. The solicited events within 7 days after vaccination were mild in intensity. No deaths or adverse events such as optic neuritis, cranial neuropathy, and brachial neuropathy or Guillain-Barre syndrome were reported. Two doses of inactivated influenza vaccine were well tolerated and induced a protective immune response against influenza in infants aged 6-12 months. PMID:24625341

  13. 40 CFR 721.6100 - Phosphoric acid, C6-12-alkyl esters, compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol. 721.6100 Section 721.6100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as phosphoric acid, C6-12-alkyl esters, compounds with...

  14. 40 CFR 721.6100 - Phosphoric acid, C6-12-alkyl esters, compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol. 721.6100 Section 721.6100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as phosphoric acid, C6-12-alkyl esters, compounds with...

  15. 40 CFR 721.6100 - Phosphoric acid, C6-12-alkyl esters, compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol. 721.6100 Section 721.6100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as phosphoric acid, C6-12-alkyl esters, compounds with...

  16. 40 CFR 721.6100 - Phosphoric acid, C6-12-alkyl esters, compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol. 721.6100 Section 721.6100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as phosphoric acid, C6-12-alkyl esters, compounds with...

  17. 40 CFR 721.6100 - Phosphoric acid, C6-12-alkyl esters, compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol. 721.6100 Section 721.6100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as phosphoric acid, C6-12-alkyl esters, compounds with...

  18. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1984-06-25

    A short wavelength laser is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses. A multiplicity of panels, mounted on substrates, are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path. When the panels are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses, single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses are produced.

  19. Wavelength dependent delay in the onset of FEL tissue ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Tribble, J.A.; Edwards, G.S.; Lamb, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    We are investigating the wavelength dependence of the onset of laser tissue ablation in the IR Visible and UV ranges. Toward this end, we have made simultaneous measurements of the ejected material (using a HeNe probe beam tangential to the front surface) and the residual stress transient in the tissue (using traditional piezoelectric detection behind the thin samples). For the IR studies we have used the Vanderbilt FEL and for the UV and Vis range we have used a Q-switched ND:Yag with frequency doubling and quadrupling. To satisfy the conditions of the near field limit for the detection of the stress transient, the duration of the IR FEL macropulse must be as short as possible. We have obtained macropulses as short as 100 ns using Pockels Cell technology. The recording of the signals from both the photodiode monitoring the HeNe probe beam and the acoustic detector are synchronized with the arrival of the 100 ns macropulse. With subablative intensities, the resulting stress transient is bipolar with its positive peak separated from its negative peak by 100 ns in agreement with theory. Of particular interest is the comparison of ablative results using 3 {mu}m and 6.45 {mu}m pulses. Both the stress transient and the ejection of material suffer a greater delay (with respect to the arrival of the 100 ns pulse) when the FEL is tuned to 3 {mu}m as compared to 6.45 {mu}m. A comparison of IR Vis and UV data will be discussed in terms of microscopic mechanisms governing the laser ablation process.

  20. Switching of the photonic band gap in three-dimensional film photonic crystals based on opal-VO{sub 2} composites in the 1.3-1.6 {mu}m spectral range

    SciTech Connect

    Pevtsov, A. B. Grudinkin, S. A.; Poddubny, A. N.; Kaplan, S. F.; Kurdyukov, D. A.; Golubev, V. G.

    2010-12-15

    The parameters of three-dimensional photonic crystals based on opal-VO{sub 2} composite films in the 1.3-1.6 {mu}m spectral range important for practical applications (Telecom standard) are numerically calculated. For opal pores, the range of filling factors is established (0.25-0.6) wherein the composite exhibits the properties of a three-dimensional insulator photonic crystal. On the basis of the opal-VO{sub 2} composites, three-dimensional photonic film crystals are synthesized with specified parameters that provide a maximum shift of the photonic band gap in the vicinity of the wavelength {approx}1.5 {mu}m ({approx}170 meV) at the semiconductor-metal transition in VO{sub 2}.

  1. Self-assembled InAs quantum wire lasers on (001)InP at 1.6 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Suarez, F.; Fuster, D.; Gonzalez, L.; Gonzalez, Y.; Garcia, J. M.; Dotor, M. L.

    2006-08-28

    In this work, the authors present results on the growth by atomic layer molecular beam epitaxy and characterization of lasers with one and three stacked layers of InAs quantum wires (QWRs) as active zone and aluminum-free waveguides on (001) InP substrates. The separated confinement heterostructure consists of n-p InP claddings and a waveguide formed by short period superlattices of (InP){sub 5}/(GaInAs){sub 4} lattice matched to the InP substrate. The optimum growth conditions (substrate temperature and As and P pressures) have been determined to obtain waveguides with a flat surface in order to get a uniform QWR distribution. Lasing emission is observed at a wavelength of {approx}1.66 {mu}m up to 270 K from 15x3000 {mu}m{sup 2} devices, with a threshold current density at that temperature of 2 kA/cm{sup 2}.

  2. Optical fibre with a germanate glass core for lasing near 2 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Dvoirin, Vladislav V; Mashinskii, Valerii M; Iskhakova, L D; Dianov, Evgenii M; Yashkov, M V; Khopin, V F; Gur'yanov, Aleksei N

    2011-01-24

    An optical fibre with a core based on thulium-doped germanate glass (45SiO{sub 2} - 55GeO{sub 2}) and a quartz glass cladding is developed for the first time. Lasing on Tm{sup 3+} ions ({lambda} =1.862 {mu}m) with an output power up to 70 mW at a differential efficiency of 37% is obtained in a laser based on this fibre. (letters)

  3. 21 CFR 516.20 - Content and format of a request for MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Content and format of a request for MUMS-drug designation. 516.20 Section 516.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use...

  4. 21 CFR 516.30 - Annual reports for a MUMS-designated drug.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Annual reports for a MUMS-designated drug. 516.30 Section 516.30 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species...

  5. 21 CFR 516.26 - Amendment to MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Amendment to MUMS-drug designation. 516.26 Section 516.26 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New...

  6. 21 CFR 516.20 - Content and format of a request for MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Content and format of a request for MUMS-drug designation. 516.20 Section 516.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use...

  7. 21 CFR 516.25 - Refusal to grant MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Refusal to grant MUMS-drug designation. 516.25 Section 516.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species...

  8. 21 CFR 516.23 - Timing of requests for MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Timing of requests for MUMS-drug designation. 516.23 Section 516.23 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor...

  9. Ferroelectric Nd{sup 3+}:Sr{sub x}Ba{sub 1-x}(NbO{sub 3}){sub 2}-a new nonlinear laser crystal: cw 1-{mu}m stimulated emission ({sup 4}F{sub 3/2}{yields}{sup 4}I{sub 11/2}) and diffuse self-frequency doubling

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminskii, Alexandr A; Garsia, Sole J; Jaque, D; Capmany, J; Bagayev, S N

    1998-12-31

    Stimulated emission as a result of the inter-Stark transition in the 1-{mu}m {sup 4}F{sub 3/2}{yields}{sup 4}I{sub 11/2} channel of Nd{sup 3+} ions was excited for the first time in an acentric disordered Sr{sub x}Ba{sub 1-x}(NbO{sub 3}){sub 2} (x{approx}0.6) crystal. The low-threshold lasing of this crystal at the 1.0626 {mu}m wavelength was accompanied by diffuse intracavity generation of the second harmonic. (letters to the editor)

  10. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, Peter L.

    1986-01-01

    A short wavelength laser (28) is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses (30, 31). A multiplicity of panels (32), mounted on substrates (34), are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path (42). When the panels (32) are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses (30, 31), single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses (44, 46) are produced.

  11. Wavelength dependent mask defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badger, Karen; Butt, Shahid; Burnham, Jay; Faure, Tom; Hibbs, Michael; Rankin, Jed; Thibault, David; Watts, Andrew

    2005-05-01

    For years there has been a mismatch between the photomask inspection wavelength and the usage conditions. While the non-actinic inspection has been a source for concern, there has been essentially no evidence that a defect "escaped" the mask production process due to the inspection mismatch. This paper will describe the discovery of one such defect, as well as the diagnostic and inspection techniques used to identify the location, analyze the composition, and determine the source of the printed wafer defect. Conventional mask inspection techniques revealed no defects, however an actinic Aerial Image Metrology System (AIMS) revealed a 1.5 mm region on the mask with up to 59% transmission reduction at 193 nm. Further diagnostics demonstrated a strong wavelength dependence which accounted for the near invisibility of the defect at I line (365 nm) or even DUV (248 nm) wavelengths, which had 0% and 5% respective transmission reductions. Using some creative imaging techniques via AIMS tool and modeling, the defect was deduced to have a three dimensional Gaussian absorption character, with total width approximately 1.5 mm. Several non-destructive diagnostic techniques were developed to determine the composition and location of the defect within the substrate. These results will be described in addition to identifying methods for ensuring product quality in the absence of actinic inspection.

  12. Densification of silica glass induced by 0.8 and 1.5 {mu}m intense femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Saliminia, A.; Nguyen, N.T.; Chin, S.L.; Vallee, R.

    2006-05-01

    We investigate the physical mechanisms responsible for waveguide formation in silica glass induced by 1 kHz intense femtosecond laser pulses from a Ti-sapphire laser at 0.8 {mu}m as well as from a femtosecond optical parametric amplifier at 1.5 {mu}m. It is demonstrated that the densification taking place at the irradiated region is the principal cause for refractive index change in the waveguides written with both 0.8 and 1.5 {mu}m pulses. The birefringence induced by the stress arising from such densification and its behavior against thermal annealing are also studied.

  13. Fabrication of 3-{mu}m diameter pin hole array (PHA) on thick W substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Levato, T.; Pathak, N. C.; Ciricosta, O.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Koester, P.; Labate, L.; Giulietti, A.; Gizzi, L. A.; Giulietti, D.; De Angelis, F.; Di Fabrizio, E.; Delogu, P.

    2010-02-02

    Pin-hole arrays are used for a variety of applications including, for example, X-ray imaging of laser-plasmas for fusion relevant studies. More recently, a novel X-ray imaging technique has been proposed (this conference L. A. Gizzi et al.) within the High Power Laser Energy Research Facility (HiPER) to obtain spectrally resolved X-ray imaging using single photon detection. This technique requires a large number of images or, alternatively, large arrays of pin-holes, possibly with very small diameter (<<10 {mu}m). In view of this, a technique was implemented for the fabrication of large arrays of pin-holes in thick metal substrates. Here we report on the optimizations of the laser-matter interaction process to obtain high aspect ratio cylinder-like pin-hole on heavy metal substrate by using a frequency-doubled Ti:Sa femtosecond laser pulses operating at 10 Hz. The influence of an air breakdown and a (ns)prepulse, on the drilled pin-hole, is showed by means of SEM images both for surface effects and internal quality of the channels, with evidence of micro and nano-sized structures. The holes drilled at an intensity just below the laser breakdown threshold for plasma creation in air, have an internal diameter of about 3 {mu}m on a W substrate of 70 {mu}m thickness, a micro-cylinder-like shape and no detectable deviations of the axis from a straight line. Arrays of up to 800 pin-holes were produced with the pin-hole properties being highly stable across the array. The final X-ray transmission is showed by using a mu-focus X-ray source.

  14. Wavelength meter having elliptical wedge

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.; Feldman, M.

    1992-12-01

    A wavelength meter is disclosed which can determine the wavelength of a laser beam from a laser source within an accuracy range of two parts in 10[sup 8]. The wavelength meter has wedge having an elliptically shaped face to the optical path of the laser source and includes interferometer plates which form a vacuum housing. 7 figs.

  15. Wavelength meter having elliptical wedge

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.; Feldman, Mark

    1992-01-01

    A wavelength meter is disclosed which can determine the wavelength of a laser beam from a laser source within an accuracy range of two parts in 10.sup.8. The wavelength meter has wedge having an elliptically shaped face to the optical path of the laser source and includes interferometer plates which form a vacuum housing.

  16. The effects of slipage and diffraction in long wavelength operation of a free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zhulin, V.I.; Haselhoff, E.H.; Amersfoort, P.W. van

    1995-01-01

    The Free-Electron Laser user facility FELIX produces picosecond optical pulses in the wavelength range of 5-110 {mu}m. The proposed installation of a new undulator with a larger magnetic period would allow extension towards considerably larger wavelengths. This would result in the production of extremely short, far-infrared pulses, with a duration of a single optical period or even less. In order to investigate the pulse propagation for free-electron lasers operating in the long wavelength limit, a three-dimensional simulation code was developed. Using the FELIX parameters, with the addition of a long-period undulator, the effects of slippage, diffraction losses, changes in the filling factor, as well as the effects of the optical cavity geometry were studied for wavelengths up to 300 {mu}m, with electron pulses in the ps regime. It is shown that slippage effects are less restrictive for long wavelength operation than the increasing losses due to optical beam diffraction.

  17. High temperatures in inertial confinement fusion radiation cavities heated with 0. 35 [mu]m light

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, R.L.; Suter, L.J.; Darrow, C.B.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Kornblum, H.N.; Montgomery, D.S.; Phillion, D.W.; Rosen, M.D.; Theissen, A.R.; Wallace, R.J.; Ze, F. )

    1994-10-24

    We have demonstrated efficient coupling of 0.35 [mu]m laser light for radiation production in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) cavity targets. Temperatures of 270 eV are measured in cavities used for implosions and 300 eV in smaller cavities, significantly extending the temperature range attained in the laboratory to those required for high-gain indirect drive ICF. High-contrast, shaped drive pulses required for implosion experiments have also been demonstrated for the first time. Low levels of scattered light and fast electrons are observed, indicating that plasma instability production is not significant.

  18. Efficient 0.9-{mu}m neodymium-doped single-mode fibre laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bufetov, Igor' A; Dudin, V V; Shubin, Aleksei V; Senatorov, A K; Dianov, Evgenii M; Grudinin, A B; Goncharov, S E; Zalevskii, I D; Gur'yanov, A N; Yashkov, M V; Umnikov, A A; Vechkanov, N N

    2003-12-31

    An efficient cw single-mode double-clad Nd{sup 3+}-doped fibre laser is developed which operates at room temperature in a quasi-three level scheme on the 925-nm {sup 4}F{sub 3/2} - {sup 4}I{sub 9/2} transition upon diode pump at 805 nm. The gain in the laser resonator at 1.06 {mu}m is strongly suppressed due to a proper choice of the refractive index profile in the fibre core. The laser output power above 0.5 W is obtained with the slope efficiency exceeding 35 %. (letters)

  19. CO STRUCTURE OF THE 21 {mu}m SOURCE IRAS 22272+5435: A SIGN OF A JET LAUNCH?

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, Jun-ichi; Kwok, Sun; Yung, Bosco H. K.; Zhang Yong; Koning, Nico; Volgenau, Nikolaus H.

    2012-11-01

    We report the results of radio interferometric observations of the 21 {mu}m source IRAS 22272+5435 in the CO J = 2-1 line. 21 {mu}m sources are carbon-rich objects in the post-asymptotic-giant-branch phase of evolution, which show an unidentified emission feature at 21 {mu}m. Since 21 {mu}m sources usually also have circumstellar molecular envelopes, the mapping of CO emission from the envelope will be useful in tracing the nebular structure. From observations made with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy, we find that a torus and spherical wind model can explain only part of the CO structure. An additional axisymmetric region created by the interaction between an invisible jet and ambient material is suggested.

  20. X-ray spectrum in the range (6-12) A emitted by laser-produced plasma of samarium

    SciTech Connect

    Louzon, Einat; Henis, Zohar; Levi, Izhak; Hurvitz, Gilad; Ehrlich, Yosi; Fraenkel, Moshe; Maman, Shlomo; Mandelbaum, Pinchas

    2009-05-15

    A detailed analysis of the x-ray spectrum emitted by laser-produced plasma of samarium (6-12 A) is presented, using ab initio calculations with the HULLAC relativistic code and isoelectronic considerations. Resonance 3d-nf (n=4 to 7), 3p-4d, 3d-4p, and 3p-4s transitions in Ni samarium ions and in neighboring ionization states (from Mn to Zn ions) were identified. The experiment results show changes in the fine details of the plasma spectrum for different laser intensities.

  1. Polarized thermal radiation by layer-by-layer metallic emitters with sub-wavelength grating.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Leung, Wai; Kim, Tae Guen; Constant, Kristen; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2008-06-01

    Metallic thermal emitters consisting of two layers of differently structured nickel gratings on a homogeneous nickel layer are fabricated by soft lithography and studied for polarized thermal radiation. A thermal emitter in combination with a sub-wavelength grating shows a high extinction ratio, with a maximum value close to 5, in a wide mid-infrared range from 3.2 to 7.8 mum, as well as high emissivity up to 0.65 at a wavelength of 3.7 microm. All measurements show good agreement with theoretical predictions. Numerical simulations reveal that a high electric field exists within the localized air space surrounded by the gratings and the intensified electric-field is only observed for the polarizations perpendicular to the top sub-wavelength grating. This result suggests how the emissivity of a metal can be selectively enhanced at a certain range of wavelengths for a given polarization. PMID:18545587

  2. ECM at millimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copper, H. W.; Littlepage, R. S.

    1982-09-01

    ECM techniques appropriate to the millimeter wave band are examined with particular reference to the physics of the atmosphere and component performance capability. Model calculations show that even for state-of-the-art threat radars, the required ECM receiver sensitivity is well within the state-of-the-art for broadband superheterodyne systems. For ECM jammers, the most fundamental limitation arises from deficiencies in broadband/high power amplifiers. The solution to this problem will require different ECM system architectures than used at the lower frequencies. At millimeter wavelengths, atmospheric effects permit new jamming techniques requiring lower jamming power. For example, scattering by hydrometeors significantly raises the apparent sidelobe level of even low sidelobe antennas of threat radars, which reduces the power required to infringe through the sidelobes.

  3. Quadrature wavelength scanning interferometry.

    PubMed

    Moschetti, Giuseppe; Forbes, Alistair; Leach, Richard K; Jiang, Xiang; O'Connor, Daniel

    2016-07-10

    A novel method to double the measurement range of wavelength scanning interferometery (WSI) is described. In WSI the measured optical path difference (OPD) is affected by a sign ambiguity, that is, from an interference signal it is not possible to distinguish whether the OPD is positive or negative. The sign ambiguity can be resolved by measuring an interference signal in quadrature. A method to obtain a quadrature interference signal for WSI is described, and a theoretical analysis of the advantages is reported. Simulations of the advantages of the technique and of signal errors due to nonideal quadrature are discussed. The analysis and simulation are supported by experimental measurements to show the improved performances. PMID:27409307

  4. Efficient GaInNAs Gain Mirrors for Semiconductor Disk Lasers at 1.18 {mu}m and 1.22 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Korpijaervi, Ville-Markus; Puustinen, Janne; Leinonen, Tomi; Rautiainen, Jussi; Haerkoenen, Antti; Hakkarainen, Teemu; Guina, Mircea

    2010-11-10

    We report two GaInNAs/GaAs semiconductor disk lasers emitting at the wavelengths of 1180 nm and 1220 nm. The lasers generated 5 W and 7 W output powers, respectively, at a mount temperature of 15 deg. C. Both the gain mirrors were grown by molecular beam epitaxy and consisted of a GaAs/AlAs distributed Bragg reflector and an active region with 10 GaInNAs/GaNAs/GaAs QWs.

  5. Airbreathing Laser Propulsion Experiments with 1 {mu}m Terawatt Pharos IIILaser: Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Myrabo, L. N.; Lyons, P. W.; Jones, R. A.; Liu, S.; Manka, C.

    2011-11-10

    This basic research study examines the physics of airbreathing laser propulsion at the extreme flux range of 1-2x10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}--within the air breakdown threshold for l {mu}m radiation--using the terawatt Pharos III neodymium-glass pulsed laser. Six different experimental setups were employed using a 34 mm line focus with 66 {mu}m focal waist, positioned near the flat impulse surface. The 2nd Campaign investigated impulse generation with the laser beam focused at grazing incidence across near horizontal target surfaces, with pulse energies ranging from 55 to 186 J, and pulse-widths of 2 to 30 ns FWHM. Laser generated impulse was measured with a horizontal Plexiglas registered ballistic pendulum equipped with either a steel target insert or 0.5 Tesla permanent magnet (NEIT-40), to quantify changes in the momentum coupling coefficient (C{sub M}). Part 2 of this 2-part paper covers Campaign no. 2 results including C{sub M} performance data, and long exposure color photos of LP plasma phenomena.

  6. Airbreathing Laser Propulsion Experiments with 1 {mu}m Terawatt Pharos III Laser: Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Myrabo, L. N.; Lyons, P. W.; Jones, R. A.; Liu, S.; Manka, C.

    2011-11-10

    This basic research study examines the physics of airbreathing laser propulsion at the extreme flux range of 1-2x10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}--within the air breakdown threshold for l {mu}m radiation--using the terawatt PHAROS III neodymium-glass pulsed laser. Six different experimental setups were tested using a 34 mm line focus with 66 {mu}m focal waist, positioned near the flat impulse surface. The first campaign investigated impulse generation with the beam oriented almost normal to the target surface, with energies ranging from 23 to 376 J, and pulses of 5 to 30 ns FWHM. Air breakdown/ plasma dynamics were diagnosed with GOI cameras and color photography. Laser generated impulse was quantified with both vertical pendulums and piezoelectric pressure transducers using the standard performance metric, C{sub M}--the momentum coupling coefficient. Part 1 of this 2-part paper covers Campaign no. 1 results including laser plasma diagnostics, pressure gage and vertical pendulum data.

  7. Musculoskeletal extremity injuries in a cohort of schoolchildren aged 6-12: a 2.5-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Jespersen, E; Rexen, C T; Franz, C; Møller, N C; Froberg, K; Wedderkopp, N

    2015-04-01

    The objectives of this prospective school cohort study were to describe the epidemiology of diagnosed musculoskeletal extremity injuries and to estimate the injury incidence rates in relation to different settings, different body regions and injury types. In all, 1259 schoolchildren, aged 6-12, were surveyed weekly during 2.5 years using a new method of automated mobile phone text messaging asking questions on the presence of any musculoskeletal problems. All injuries were clinically diagnosed. Physical activity was measured from text messaging and accelerometers. A total number of 1229 injuries were diagnosed; 180 injuries in the upper extremity and 1049 in the lower extremity, with an overall rate of 1.59 injuries per 1000 physical activity units [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.50-1.68]. Upper extremities accounted for a rate of 0.23 (95% CI 0.20-0.27) and lower extremities accounted for 1.36 (95% CI 1.27-1.44). This study has added a wide overall perspective to the area concerning incidence and incidence rates of musculoskeletal extremity injuries in schoolchildren aged 6-12 years, including severe and less severe, traumatic, and overuse injuries. The understanding of injury epidemiology in children is fundamental to the acknowledgement and insurance of the appropriate prevention and treatment. PMID:24472003

  8. Wavelength-conserving grating router for intermediate wavelength density

    DOEpatents

    Deri, Robert J.; Patel, Rajesh R.; Bond, Steven W.; Bennett, Cory V.

    2007-03-20

    A wavelength router to be used for fiber optical networking router is based on a diffraction grating which utilizes only N wavelengths to interconnect N inputs to N outputs. The basic approach is to augment the grating with additional couplers or wavelength selective elements so than N-1 of the 2N-1 outputs are combined with other N outputs (leaving only N outputs). One embodiment uses directional couplers as combiners. Another embodiment uses wavelength-selective couplers. Another embodiment uses a pair of diffraction gratings to maintain parallel propagation of all optical beams. Also, beam combining can be implemented either by using retroflection back through the grating pair or by using couplers.

  9. Three-dimensional blast-wave-driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability and the effects of long-wavelength modes

    SciTech Connect

    Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Budde, A.; Krauland, C.; Marion, D. C.; Visco, A. J.; Ditmar, J. R.; Robey, H. F.; Remington, B. A.; Miles, A. R.; Cooper, A. B. R.; Sorce, C.; Plewa, T.; Hearn, N. C.; Killebrew, K. L.; Knauer, J. P.; Arnett, D.; Donajkowski, T.

    2009-05-15

    This paper describes experiments exploring the three-dimensional (3D) Rayleigh-Taylor instability at a blast-wave-driven interface. This experiment is well scaled to the He/H interface during the explosion phase of SN1987A. In the experiments, {approx}5 kJ of energy from the Omega laser was used to create a planar blast wave in a plastic disk, which is accelerated into a lower-density foam. These circumstances induce the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and, after the shock passes the interface, the system quickly becomes dominated by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The plastic disk has an intentional pattern machined at the plastic/foam interface. This perturbation is 3D with a basic structure of two orthogonal sine waves with a wavelength of 71 {mu}m and an amplitude of 2.5 {mu}m. Additional long-wavelength modes with a wavelength of either 212 or 424 {mu}m are added onto the single-mode pattern. The addition of the long-wavelength modes was motivated by the results of previous experiments where material penetrated unexpectedly to the shock front, perhaps due to an unintended structure. The current experiments and simulations were performed to explore the effects of this unintended structure; however, we were unable to reproduce the previous results.

  10. GLAST Science Across Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blandford, R. D.

    2006-12-01

    The GLAST satellites is almost guaranteed to revolutionize GeV gamma ray astronomy because of the great discoveries that are being made at hard X-ray energy by the Suzaku and Swift satellites and in the TeV range using the H.E.S.S. and Magic telescopes. Unidentified EGRET sources are likely to be identified and new and fainter sources will be found. Known classes of sources blazars, pulsars, gamma ray bursts, supernova remnants, binary X-ray sources and so on will be monitored in much greater detail. Finally, there is the need to limit or even detect dark matter through its annihilation signature. The science that will emerge from GLAST will be determined in large measure by the effort that is put into multiwavelength observing. This will require significant commitments of observing time for monitoring pulsar arrival times, measuring faint galaxy spectra, detecting GeV gamma rays gamma ray bursts and so on. In this talk I will attempt to summarize current thinking on the GLAST multi-wavelength observing program and propose some new approaches.

  11. UK AMD EMR USERS GROUP REPORT V: benefits of initiating ranibizumab therapy for neovascular AMD in eyes with vision better than 6/12

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Aaron Y; Lee, Cecilia S; Butt, Thomas; Xing, Wen; Johnston, Robert L; Chakravarthy, Usha; Egan, Catherine; Akerele, Toks; McKibbin, Martin; Downey, Louise; Natha, Salim; Bailey, Clare; Khan, Rehna; Antcliff, Richard; Varma, Atul; Kumar, Vineeth; Tsaloumas, Marie; Mandal, Kaveri; Liew, Gerald; Keane, Pearse A; Sim, Dawn; Bunce, Catey; Tufail, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Background/aims To study the effectiveness and clinical relevance of eyes treated with good (better than 6/12 or >70 Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study letters) visual acuity (VA) when initiating treatment with ranibizumab for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) in the UK National Health Service. Currently eyes with VA better than (>) 6/12 are not routinely funded for therapy. Methods Multicentre national nAMD database study on patients treated 3–5 years prior to the analysis. Anonymised structured data were collected from 14 centres. The primary outcome was the mean VA at year 1, 2 and 3. Secondary measures included the number of clinic visits and injections. Results The study included 12 951 treatment-naive eyes of 11 135 patients receiving 92 976 ranibizumab treatment episodes. A total of 754 patients had baseline VA better than 6/12 and at least 1-year of follow up. Mean VA of first treated eyes with baseline VA>6/12 at year 1, 2, 3 were 6/10, 6/12, 6/15, respectively and those with baseline VA 6/12 to >6/24 were 6/15, 6/17, 6/20, respectively (p values <0.001 for comparing differences between 6/12 and 6/12–6/24 groups). For the second eyes with baseline VA>6/12, mean VA at year 1, 2, 3 were 6/9, 6/9, 6/10 and those with baseline VA 6/12 to >6/24 were 6/15, 6/15, 6/27, respectively (p values <0.001–0.005). There was no significant difference in the average number of clinic visits or injections between those with VA better and worse than 6/12. Conclusions All eyes with baseline VA>6/12 maintained better mean VA than the eyes with baseline VA 6/12 to >6/24 at all time points for at least 2 years. The significantly better visual outcome in patients who were treated with good baseline VA has implications on future policy regarding the treatment criteria for nAMD patients’ funding. PMID:25680619

  12. COS Internal FUV Wavelength Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyes, Charles

    2009-07-01

    This program will be executed after the uplink of the OSM1 position updates derived from the determination of the wavelength-scale zero points and desired spectral ranges for each grating in activity COS29 {program 11487 - COS FUV Internal/External Wavelength Scales}. This program will verify that the operational spectral ranges for each grating, central wavelength, and FP-POS are those desired. Subsequent to a successful verification, COS FUV ERO observations that require accurate wavelength scales {if any} and FUV science can be enabled. An internal wavelength calibration spectrum using the default PtNe lamp {lamp 1} with each FUV grating at each central wavelength setting and each FP-POS position will be obtained for the verification. Additional exposures and waits between certain exposures will be required to avoid - and to evaluate - mechanism drifts.

  13. Research with high-power short-wavelength lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Holzrichter, J.F.; Campbell, E.M.; Lindl, J.D.; Storm, E.

    1985-03-05

    Three important high-temperature, high-density experiments were conducted recently using the 10-TW, short-wavelength Novette laser system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These experiments demonstrated successful solutions to problems that arose during previous experiments with long wavelength lasers (lambda greater than or equal to 1..mu..m) in which inertial confinement fusion (ICF), x-ray laser, and other high-temperature physics concepts were being tested. The demonstrations were: (1) large-scale plasmas (typical dimensions of up to 1000 laser wavelengths) were produced in which potentially deleterious laser-plasma instabilities were collisionally damped. (2) Deuterium-tritium fuel was imploded to a density of 20 g/cm/sup 3/ and a pressure of 10/sup 10/ atm. (3) A 700-fold amplification of soft x rays by stimulated emission at 206 and 209 A (62 eV) from Se/sup +24/ ions was observed in a laser-generated plasma. Isoelectronic scaling to 155 A (87 eV) in Y/sup +29/ was also demonstrated.

  14. Hg196 and the ``magical quartet'' of the extended Uν(6/12)⊗Uπ(6/4) supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernards, C.; Heinze, S.; Jolie, J.; Albers, M.; Fransen, C.; Radeck, D.

    2010-02-01

    We present the results of a γγ angular correlation experiment investigating the nucleus Hg196 and compare these with a theoretical description of Hg196 within the Uν(6/12)⊗Uπ(6/4) extended supersymmetry. To populate excited Hg196 states, we used the Cologne FN Tandem accelerator inducing the reaction Pt194(α,2n)Hg196 and analyzed the γ decays of levels up to an excitation energy of 2.4 MeV with the HORUS cube spectrometer. The new results on this mercury isotope allow a comparison between the experimental data and the supersymmetrical predictions and show good agreement. This way we can add Hg196 as a fifth supermultiplet member to the so-called magical quartet consisting of Pt194,195 and Au195,196.

  15. High-order multiphoton photoelectric effect at midinfrared laser wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Georges, A.T.

    2002-12-01

    A theoretical model that predicts the unexpectedly high photocurrents that were reported by Farkas et al. [J. Phys. B 31, L461 (1998)] for the photoelectric effect in gold at midinfrared laser wavelengths (12 {mu}m) is presented. It is shown that the observed effect, a nominally 46-photon process at threshold, is a stepwise and multiple-order process, which is strongly saturated at the moderate laser intensity of about {approx}10 MW/cm{sup 2}. The {approx_equal}30-photon-wide energy spectrum of the observed photoelectron current is due to above threshold photoemission. This relatively efficient above threshold effect is due to laser absorption in the long range Coulombic image surface potential.

  16. THE 8 {mu}m PHASE VARIATION OF THE HOT SATURN HD 149026b

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, Heather A.; Charbonneau, David; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Agol, Eric; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Henry, Gregory W.

    2009-09-20

    We monitor the star HD 149026 and its Saturn-mass planet at 8.0 {mu}m over slightly more than half an orbit using the Infrared Array Camera on the Spitzer Space Telescope. We find an increase of 0.0227% +- 0.0066% (3.4sigma significance) in the combined planet-star flux during this interval. The minimum flux from the planet is 45% +- 19% of the maximum planet flux, corresponding to a difference in brightness temperature of 480 +- 140 K between the two hemispheres. We derive a new secondary eclipse depth of 0.0411% +- 0.0076% in this band, corresponding to a dayside brightness temperature of 1440 +- 150 K. Our new secondary eclipse depth is half that of a previous measurement (3.0sigma difference) in this same bandpass by Harrrington et al. We re-fit the Harrrington et al. data and obtain a comparably good fit with a smaller eclipse depth that is consistent with our new value. In contrast to earlier claims, our new eclipse depth suggests that this planet's dayside emission spectrum is relatively cool, with an 8 {mu}m brightness temperature that is less than the maximum planet-wide equilibrium temperature. We measure the interval between the transit and secondary eclipse and find that that the secondary eclipse occurs 20.9{sup +7.2}{sub -6.5} minutes earlier (2.9sigma) than predicted for a circular orbit, a marginally significant result. This corresponds to ecos(omega) = -0.0079{sup +0.0027}{sub -0.0025}, where e is the planet's orbital eccentricity and omega is the argument of pericenter.

  17. THE CONNECTION BETWEEN 3.3 {mu}m POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON EMISSION AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Jong-Hak; Park, Dawoo; Kim, Ji Hoon; Imanishi, Masatoshi

    2012-02-15

    We investigate the connection between starburst and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity by comparing 3.3 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission with AGN properties. Utilizing the slitless spectroscopic capability of the AKARI space telescope, we observe a moderate-luminosity Type I AGN at z {approx} 0.4 to measure global starburst activity. The 3.3 {mu}m PAH emissions are detected for 7 out of 26 target galaxies. We find no strong correlation between the 3.3 {mu}m PAH emission and AGN luminosity in the limited range of the observed AGN luminosity, suggesting that global star formation may not be closely related to AGN activity. Combining our measurements with previous 3.3 {mu}m measurements of low-redshift Type I AGNs in the literature, we investigate the connection between nuclear starburst and AGN activity. In contrast to global star formation, the 3.3 {mu}m PAH luminosity measured from the central part of galaxies correlates with AGN luminosity, implying that starburst activity and AGN activity are directly connected in the nuclear region.

  18. The Long Wavelength Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. B.

    2006-08-01

    The Long Wavelength Array (LWA) will be a new, open, user-oriented astronomical instrument operating in the poorly explored window from 20-80 MHz at arcsecond level resolution and mJy level sensitivity. Key science drivers include (1) acceleration, propagation, and turbulence in the ISM, including the space-distribution and spectrum of Galactic cosmic rays, supernova remnants, and pulsars; (2) the high redshift universe, including the most distant radio galaxies and clusters - tools for understanding the earliest black holes and the cosmological evolution of Dark Matter and Dark Energy; (3) planetary, solar, and space science, including space weather prediction and extra-solar planet searches; and (4) the radio transient universe: including the known (e.g., SNe, GRBs) and the unknown. Because the LWA will explore one of the last and least investigated regions of the spectrum, the potential for new discoveries, including new classes of physical phenomena, is high, and there is a strong synergy with exciting new X-ray and Gamma-ray measurements, e.g. for cosmic ray acceleration, transients, and galaxy clusters. Operated by the University of New Mexico on behalf of the South West Consortium (SWC) the LWA will also provide a unique training ground for the next generation of radio astronomers. Students may also put skills learned on the LWA to work in computer science, electrical engineering, and the communications industry, among others. The development of the LWA will follow a phased build, which benefits from lessons learned at each phase. Four university-based Scientific Testing and Evaluation (ST&E) teams with different areas of concentration (1. High resolution imaging and particle acceleration; 2. Wide field imaging and large scale structures; 3. Ionosphere, and 4. RFI suppression and transient detection) will provide the feedback needed to assure that science objectives are met as the build develops. Currently in its first year of construction funding, the LWA

  19. THE NON-UNIFORM, DYNAMIC ATMOSPHERE OF BETELGEUSE OBSERVED AT MID-INFRARED WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Ravi, V.; Wishnow, E. H.; Townes, C. H.; Lockwood, S.; Mistry, H.; Tatebe, K.

    2011-10-10

    We present an interferometric study of the continuum surface of the red supergiant star Betelgeuse at 11.15 {mu}m wavelength, using data obtained with the Berkeley Infrared Spatial Interferometer each year between 2006 and 2010. These data allow an investigation of an optically thick layer within 1.4 stellar radii of the photosphere. The layer has an optical depth of {approx}1 at 11.15 {mu}m, and varies in temperature between 1900 K and 2800 K and in outer radius between 1.16 and 1.36 stellar radii. Electron-hydrogen-atom collisions contribute significantly to the opacity of the layer. The layer has a non-uniform intensity distribution that changes between observing epochs. These results indicate that large-scale surface convective activity strongly influences the dynamics of the inner atmosphere of Betelgeuse and mass-loss processes.

  20. Interference comparator for laser diode wavelength and wavelength instability measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobosz, Marek; KoŻuchowski, Mariusz

    2016-04-01

    Method and construction of a setup, which allows measuring the wavelength and wavelength instability of the light emitted by a laser diode (or a laser light source with a limited time coherence in general), is presented. The system is based on Twyman-Green interferometer configuration. Proportions of phases of the tested and reference laser's interference fringe obtained for a set optical path difference are a measure of the unknown wavelength. Optical path difference in interferometer is stabilized. The interferometric comparison is performed in vacuum chamber. The techniques of accurate fringe phase measurements are proposed. The obtained relative standard uncertainty of wavelength evaluation in the tested setup is about 2.5 ṡ 10-8. Uncertainty of wavelength instability measurement is an order of magnitude better. Measurement range of the current setup is from 500 nm to 650 nm. The proposed technique allows high accuracy wavelength measurement of middle or low coherence sources of light. In case of the enlarged and complex frequency distribution of the laser, the evaluated wavelength can act as the length master in interferometer for displacement measurement.

  1. Interference comparator for laser diode wavelength and wavelength instability measurement.

    PubMed

    Dobosz, Marek; Kożuchowski, Mariusz

    2016-04-01

    Method and construction of a setup, which allows measuring the wavelength and wavelength instability of the light emitted by a laser diode (or a laser light source with a limited time coherence in general), is presented. The system is based on Twyman-Green interferometer configuration. Proportions of phases of the tested and reference laser's interference fringe obtained for a set optical path difference are a measure of the unknown wavelength. Optical path difference in interferometer is stabilized. The interferometric comparison is performed in vacuum chamber. The techniques of accurate fringe phase measurements are proposed. The obtained relative standard uncertainty of wavelength evaluation in the tested setup is about 2.5 ⋅ 10(-8). Uncertainty of wavelength instability measurement is an order of magnitude better. Measurement range of the current setup is from 500 nm to 650 nm. The proposed technique allows high accuracy wavelength measurement of middle or low coherence sources of light. In case of the enlarged and complex frequency distribution of the laser, the evaluated wavelength can act as the length master in interferometer for displacement measurement. PMID:27131662

  2. COS Internal NUV Wavelength Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyes, Charles

    2009-07-01

    This program will be executed after the uplink of the OSM2 position updates derived from the determination of the wavelength-scale zero points and desired spectral ranges for each grating in activity COS14 {program 11474 - COS NUV Internal/External Wavelength Scales}. This program will verify that the operational spectral ranges for each grating, central wavelength, and FP-POS are those desired. Subsequent to a successful verification, COS NUV ERO observations and NUV science can be enabled. An internal wavelength calibration spectrum using the default PtNe lamp {lamp 1} with each NUV grating at each central wavelength setting and each FP-POS position will be obtained for the verification. Additional exposures and waits between certain exposures will be required to avoid - and to evaluate - mechanism drifts.

  3. Apparatus and method for generating continuous wave 16 .mu.m laser radiation using gaseous CF.sub.4

    DOEpatents

    Telle, John M.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method for generating continuous wave 16 .mu.m laser radiation using gaseous CF.sub.4. Laser radiation at 16 .mu.m has been observed in a cooled static cell containing low pressure CF.sub.4 optically pumped by an approximately 3 W output power cw CO.sub.2 laser. The laser cavity employed was a multiple-pass off-axis-path two spherical mirror ring resonator. Unidirectional CF.sub.4 laser output power at 615 cm.sup.-1 exceeded 2 mW. Computer calculations indicate that for modest pump powers of about 40 W, approximately 1 W of emitted laser radiation at 16 .mu.m might be obtained.

  4. Scaled Strong Field Interactions at Long Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sistrunk, Emily Frances

    The strong field regime describes interactions between light and matter where the electric field of the laser is a significant fraction of the binding field of the atom. Short pulsed lasers are capable of producing local fields on the order of the atomic unit of electric field. Under the influence of such strong fields, the ionization regime and electron dynamics are highly dependent on the wavelength used to drive the interaction. Few studies have been performed in the mid-infrared (MIR) spectral range. Using MIR wavelengths, the ponderomotive energy, Up, imposed on the electrons can be a factor of 20 greater than in the visible and near-infrared. Experiments on above threshold ionization (ATI) of cesium, nonsequential ionization (NSI) of noble gases, and high harmonic generation (HHG) in condensed phase media highlight the benefits of performing strong field investigations in the MIR. The photoelectron energy spectrum from above threshold ionization (ATI) of atoms provides details about the strong field interaction. Cesium atoms driven by a 3.6 mum laser indicate that excited states can play a large role in ionization from the ground state. Previous experiments on argon in the near-infrared can be compared to cesium at 3.6 im due to their similar Keldysh-scaling. Unlike argon, the measured ionization yield in cesium saturates at a higher intensity than predicted due to the Stark shift of the ground state. Such shifts have not been detected in argon. The low-lying 6P excited states of cesium produce a strong effect on the photoelectron energy spectrum, resulting in a splitting of each ATI peak. Enhancements in the photoelectron energy spectrum similar to those found in argon are observed in cesium. These enhancements are relatively insensitive to ellipticity of the drive laser. To take advantage of the large ponderomotive energy associated with Mid-IR lasers, ionization of argon, krypton and xenon is studied at 3.6 im. The factor of 20 increase in Up between the

  5. High-power fibre Raman lasers emitting in the 1.22-1.34-{mu}m range

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkov, Andrei S; Dianov, Evgenii M; Paramonov, Vladimir M; Medvedkov, O I; Vasil'ev, Sergei A; Bubnov, M M; Egorova, O N; Semenov, S L; Pershina, E V; Gur'yanov, A N; Laptev, A Yu; Khopin, V F; Umnikov, A A; Vechkanov, N I

    2000-09-30

    A set of diode-pumped fibre lasers producing a cw output of 4-7.5 W in the range from 1.05 to 1.15-{mu}m is realised on the basis of an ytterbium double-cladded fibre. The output of the ytterbium fibre laser was used to pump a Raman phosphor-silicate fibre converter, resulting in fibre lasers producing a cw output power of more than 3 W at 1.26 and 1.3-{mu}m. (lasers)

  6. THE 0.8-14.5 {mu}m SPECTRA OF MID-L TO MID-T DWARFS: DIAGNOSTICS OF EFFECTIVE TEMPERATURE, GRAIN SEDIMENTATION, GAS TRANSPORT, AND SURFACE GRAVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, D. C.; Leggett, S. K.; Geballe, T. R.; Cushing, Michael C.; Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, D.; Golimowski, David A.; Noll, K. S.; Fan Xiaohui

    2009-09-01

    We present new 5.2-14.5 {mu}m low-resolution spectra of 14 mid-L to mid-T dwarfs. We also present new 3.0-4.1 {mu}m spectra for five of these dwarfs. These data are supplemented by existing red and near-infrared spectra ({approx}0.6-2.5 {mu}m), as well as red through mid-infrared spectroscopy of seven other L and T dwarfs presented by Cushing et al. We compare these spectra to those generated from the model atmospheres of Saumon and Marley. The models reproduce the observed spectra well, except in the case of one very red L3.5 dwarf, 2MASS J22244381-0158521. The broad wavelength coverage allows us to constrain almost independently the four parameters used to describe these photospheres in our models: effective temperature (T {sub eff}), surface gravity, grain sedimentation efficiency (f{sub sed}), and vertical gas transport efficiency (K{sub zz} ). The CH{sub 4} bands centered at 2.2, 3.3, and 7.65 {mu}m and the CO band at 2.3 {mu}m are sensitive to K{sub zz} , and indicates that chemical mixing is important in all L and T dwarf atmospheres. The sample of L3.5 to T5.5 dwarfs spans the range 1800 K{approx}> T{sub eff} {approx}>1000 K, with an L-T transition (spectral types L7 to T4) that lies between 1400 and 1100 K for dwarfs with typical near-infrared colors; bluer and redder dwarfs can be 100 K warmer or cooler, respectively, when using infrared spectral types. When using optical spectral types, the bluer dwarfs have more typical T {sub eff} values as they tend to have earlier optical spectral types. In this model analysis, f {sub sed} increases rapidly between types T0 and T4, indicating that increased sedimentation can explain the rapid disappearance of clouds at this stage of brown dwarf evolution. There is a suggestion that the transition to dust-free atmospheres happens at lower temperatures for lower gravity dwarfs.

  7. CONFIRMING THE PRIMARILY SMOOTH STRUCTURE OF THE VEGA DEBRIS DISK AT MILLIMETER WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, A. Meredith; Plambeck, Richard; Chiang, Eugene; Wilner, David J.; Andrews, Sean M.; Mason, Brian; Carpenter, John M.; Chiang, Hsin-Fang; Williams, Jonathan P.; Hales, Antonio; Su, Kate; Dicker, Simon; Korngut, Phil; Devlin, Mark

    2012-05-01

    Clumpy structure in the debris disk around Vega has been previously reported at millimeter wavelengths and attributed to concentrations of dust grains trapped in resonances with an unseen planet. However, recent imaging at similar wavelengths with higher sensitivity has disputed the observed structure. We present three new millimeter-wavelength observations that help to resolve the puzzling and contradictory observations. We have observed the Vega system with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at a wavelength of 880 {mu}m and an angular resolution of 5''; with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) at a wavelength of 1.3 mm and an angular resolution of 5''; and with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) at a wavelength of 3.3 mm and angular resolution of 10''. Despite high sensitivity and short baselines, we do not detect the Vega debris disk in either of the interferometric data sets (SMA and CARMA), which should be sensitive at high significance to clumpy structure based on previously reported observations. We obtain a marginal (3{sigma}) detection of disk emission in the GBT data; the spatial distribution of the emission is not well constrained. We analyze the observations in the context of several different models, demonstrating that the observations are consistent with a smooth, broad, axisymmetric disk with inner radius 20-100 AU and width {approx}> 50 AU. The interferometric data require that at least half of the 860 {mu}m emission detected by previous single-dish observations with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope be distributed axisymmetrically, ruling out strong contributions from flux concentrations on spatial scales of {approx}<100 AU. These observations support recent results from the Plateau de Bure Interferometer indicating that previous detections of clumpy structure in the Vega debris disk were spurious.

  8. Multiple-wavelength tunable laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P. (Inventor); Walsh, Brian M. (Inventor); Reichle, Donald J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A tunable laser includes dispersion optics for separating generated laser pulses into first and second wavelength pulses directed along first and second optical paths. First and second reflective mirrors are disposed in the first and second optical paths, respectively. The laser's output mirror is partially reflective and partially transmissive with respect to the first wavelength and the second wavelength in accordance with provided criteria. A first resonator length is defined between the output mirror and the first mirror, while a second resonator length is defined between the output mirror and the second mirror. The second resonator length is a function of the first resonator length.

  9. AWG Filter for Wavelength Interrogator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, Richard J. (Inventor); Costa, Joannes M. (Inventor); Faridian, Fereydoun (Inventor); Moslehi, Behzad (Inventor); Sotoudeh, Vahid (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A wavelength interrogator is coupled to a circulator which couples optical energy from a broadband source to an optical fiber having a plurality of sensors, each sensor reflecting optical energy at a unique wavelength and directing the reflected optical energy to an AWG. The AWG has a detector coupled to each output, and the reflected optical energy from each grating is coupled to the skirt edge response of the AWG such that the adjacent channel responses form a complementary pair response. The complementary pair response is used to convert an AWG skirt response to a wavelength.

  10. Back injuries in a cohort of schoolchildren aged 6-12: A 2.5-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Franz, C; Jespersen, E; Rexen, C T; Leboeuf-Yde, C; Wedderkopp, N

    2016-08-01

    The aims of this prospective school cohort study were to describe the epidemiology of diagnosed back pain in childhood, classified as either nontraumatic or traumatic back injury, and to estimate the association with physical activity in different settings. Over 2.5 years, 1240 children aged 6-12 years were surveyed weekly using mobile text messages to ask about the presence or absence of back pain. Pain was clinically diagnosed and injuries were classified using the International Classification of Diseases version 10. Physical activity data were obtained from text messages and accelerometers. Of the 315 back injuries diagnosed, 186 injuries were nontraumatic and 129 were traumatic. The incidence rate ratio was 1.5 for a nontraumatic back injury compared with a traumatic injury. The overall estimated back injury incidence rate was 0.20 per 1000 physical activity units (95% confidence interval 0.18-0.23). The back injury incidence rates were higher for sports when exposure per 1000 physical activity units was taken into consideration and especially children horse-riding had a 40 times higher risk of sustaining a traumatic back injury compared to the risk during non-organized leisure time physical activity. However, the reasonably low injury incidence rates support the recommendations of children continuously being physically active. PMID:26130046

  11. THE 0.5-2.22 {mu}m SCATTERED LIGHT SPECTRUM OF THE DISK AROUND TW Hya: DETECTION OF A PARTIALLY FILLED DISK GAP AT 80 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Debes, John H.; Jang-Condell, Hannah; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Roberge, Aki; Schneider, Glenn

    2013-07-01

    We present a 0.5-2.2 {mu}m scattered light spectrum of the circumstellar disk around TW Hya from a combination of spatially resolved Hubble Space Telescope STIS spectroscopy and NICMOS coronagraphic images of the disk. We investigate the morphology of the disk at distances >40 AU over this wide range of wavelengths, and identify the presence of a depression in surface brightness at {approx}80 AU that could be caused by a gap in the disk. Additionally, we quantify the surface brightness, azimuthal symmetry, and spectral character of the disk as a function of radius. Our analysis shows that the scattering efficiency of the dust is largely neutral to blue over the observed wavelengths. We model the disk as a steady {alpha}-disk with an ad hoc gap structure. The thermal properties of the disk are self-consistently calculated using a three-dimensional radiative transfer code that uses ray tracing to model the heating of the disk interior and scattered light images. We find a good fit to the data over a wide range of distances from the star if we use a model disk with a partially filled gap of 30% depth at 80 AU and with a self-similar truncation knee at 100 AU. The origin of the gap is unclear, but it could arise from a transition in the nature of the disk's dust composition or the presence of a planetary companion. Based on scalings to previous hydrodynamic simulations of gap-opening criteria for embedded proto-planets, we estimate that a planetary companion forming the gap could have a mass between 6 and 28 M{sub Circled-Plus }.

  12. GaAsSb/InGaAs type-II quantum wells for long-wavelength lasers on GaAs substrates

    SciTech Connect

    KLEM,JOHN F.; SPAHN,OLGA B.; KURTZ,STEVEN R.; FRITZ,IAN J.; CHOQUETTE,KENT D.

    2000-03-15

    The authors have investigated the properties of GaAsSb/InGaAs type-II bilayer quantum well structures grown by molecule beam epitaxy for use in long-wavelength lasers on GaAs substrates. Structures with layer, strains and thicknesses designed to be thermodynamically stable against dislocation formation exhibit room-temperature photoluminescence at wavelengths as long as 1.43 {mu}m. The photoluminescence emission wavelength is significantly affected by growth temperature and the sequence of layer growth (InGaAs/GaAsSb vs GaAsSb/InGaAs), suggesting that Sb and/or In segregation results in non-ideal interfaces under certain growth conditions. At low injection currents, double heterostructure lasers with GaAsSb/InGaAs bilayer quantum well active regions display electroluminescence at wavelengths comparable to those obtained in photoluminescence, but at higher currents the electroluminescence shifts to shorter wavelengths. Lasers have been obtained with threshold current densities as low as 120 A/cm{sup 2} at 1.17 {mu}m, and 2.1 kA/cm{sup 2} at 1.21 {mu}m.

  13. THE LEGACY OF SCUPOL: 850 {mu}m IMAGING POLARIMETRY FROM 1997 TO 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Brenda C.; McPhee, Christie A.; Fissel, Laura M.; Curran, Rachel L.

    2009-05-15

    SCUPOL, the polarimeter for SCUBA on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, was the most prolific thermal imaging polarimeter built to date. Between 1997 and 2005, observations of 104 regions were made at 850 {mu}m in the mapping mode. The instrument has produced {approx}50 refereed journal publications, and that number is still growing. We have systematically re-reduced all imaging polarimetry made in the standard 'jiggle-map' mode from the SCUBA archive (2800+ individual observations) to produce a catalog of SCUPOL images and tables. We present the results of our analysis with figures and data tables produced for all 83 regions where significant polarization was detected. In addition, the reduced data cubes and data tables can be accessed online. In many cases, the data included in this paper have been previously published elsewhere. However, this publication includes unpublished data sets, in whole or in part, toward 39 regions, including cores in {rho} Ophiuchus, Orion's OMC-2 region, several young stellar objects, and the galaxy M87.

  14. Efficient waveguide-integrated tunnel junction detectors at 1.6 mum.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Philip C D; Laibowitz, Robert B; Libsch, Frank R; Labianca, Nancy C; Chiniwalla, Punit P

    2007-12-10

    Near-infrared detectors based on metal-insulator-metal tunnel junctions integrated with planarized silicon nanowire waveguides are presented, which we believe to be the first of their kind. The junction is coupled to the waveguide via a thin-film metal antenna feeding a plasmonic travelling wave structure that includes the tunnel junction. These devices are inherently broadband; the design presented here operates throughout the 1500-1700 nm region. Careful design of the antenna and travelling wave region substantially eliminates losses due to poor mode matching and RC rolloff, allowing efficient operation. The antennas are made from multilayer stacks of gold and nickel, and the active devices are Ni-NiO-Ni edge junctions. The waveguides are made via shallow trench isolation technology, resulting in a planar oxide surface with the waveguides buried a few nanometres beneath.The antennas are fabricated using directional deposition through a suspended Ge shadow mask, using a single level of electron-beam lithography. The waveguides are patterned with conventional 248-nm optical lithography and reactive-ion etching, then planarized using shallow-trench isolation technology. We also present measurements showing overall quantum efficiencies of 6% (responsivity 0.08 A/W at 1.605 mum), thus demonstrating that the previously very low overall quantum efficiencies reported for antenna-coupled tunnel junction devices are due to poor electromagnetic coupling and poor choices of antenna metal, not to any inherent limitations of the technology. PMID:19550928

  15. A NEW 24 {mu}m PHASE CURVE FOR {upsilon} ANDROMEDAE b

    SciTech Connect

    Crossfield, Ian J. M.; Hansen, Brad M. S.; Harrington, Joseph; Cho, James Y.-K.; Deming, Drake; Seager, Sara E-mail: hansen@astro.ucla.ed E-mail: J.Cho@qmul.ac.u E-mail: kristen@astro.columbia.ed

    2010-11-10

    We report the detection of 24 {mu}m variations from the planet-hosting {upsilon} Andromedae system consistent with the orbital periodicity of the system's innermost planet, {upsilon} And b. We find a peak-to-valley phase curve amplitude of 0.00130 times the mean system flux. Using a simple model with two hemispheres of constant surface brightness and assuming a planetary radius of 1.3 R{sub J} give a planetary temperature contrast of {approx}>900 K and an orbital inclination of {approx}>28{sup 0}. We further report the largest phase offset yet observed for an extrasolar planet: the flux maximum occurs {approx}80{sup 0} before phase 0.5. Such a large phase offset is difficult to reconcile with most current atmospheric circulation models. We improve on earlier observations of this system in several important ways: (1) observations of a flux calibrator star demonstrate the MIPS detector is stable to 10{sup -4} on long timescales, (2) we note that the background light varies systematically due to spacecraft operations, precluding use of this background as a flux calibrator (stellar flux measured above the background is not similarly affected), and (3) we calibrate for flux variability correlated with motion of the star on the MIPS detector. A reanalysis of our earlier observations of this system is consistent with our new result.

  16. THE TW Hya DISK AT 870 {mu}m: COMPARISON OF CO AND DUST RADIAL STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Sean M.; Wilner, David J.; Qi, Chunhua; Rosenfeld, Katherine A.; Oeberg, Karin I.; Espaillat, Catherine; Ho, Paul T. P.; Hughes, A. M.; Birnstiel, T.; Cieza, Lucas A.; Williams, Jonathan P.; Lin, Shin-Yi

    2012-01-10

    We present high-resolution (0.''3 = 16 AU), high signal-to-noise ratio Submillimeter Array observations of the 870 {mu}m (345 GHz) continuum and CO J = 3 - 2 line emission from the protoplanetary disk around TW Hya. Using continuum and line radiative transfer calculations, these data and the multiwavelength spectral energy distribution are analyzed together in the context of simple two-dimensional parametric disk structure models. Under the assumptions of a radially invariant dust population and gas-to-dust mass ratio, we are unable to simultaneously reproduce the CO and dust observations with model structures that employ either a single, distinct outer boundary or a smooth (exponential) taper at large radii. Instead, we find that the distribution of millimeter-sized dust grains in the TW Hya disk has a relatively sharp edge near 60 AU, contrary to the CO emission (and optical/infrared scattered light) that extends to a much larger radius of at least 215 AU. We discuss some possible explanations for the observed radial distribution of millimeter-sized dust grains and the apparent CO-dust size discrepancy, and suggest that they may be hallmarks of substructure in the dust disk or natural signatures of the growth and radial drift of solids that might be expected for disks around older pre-main-sequence stars like TW Hya.

  17. Study of ablation by laser irradiation of plane targets at wavelengths 1. 05, 0. 53, and 0. 35. mu. m

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M.H.; Toner, W.T.; Goldsack, T.J.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Veats, S.A.; Cunningham, P.F.; Lewis, C.L.S.

    1983-07-01

    Ablation by laser irradiation at wavelengths lambda = 1.05, 0.53, and 0.35 ..mu..m has been studied from analysis of time-resolved x-ray spectra of layered targets and of ion emission. Irradiance was varied in the range 2 x 10/sup 13/ to 2 x 10/sup 15/ W cm/sup -2/ with constant laser power and variable focal spot size. Deductions include the effect of lateral energy transport from small focal spots and ablation rates and ablation pressures obtained both in the limit of negligible transport and when lateral transport is significant. Advantages of short wavelengths for ablatively driven implosions are quantified.

  18. A color sensor wavelength meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durfee, Dallin; Jackson, Jarom; Otterstrom, Nils; Jones, Tyler; Archibald, James

    2016-05-01

    We will discuss a laser wavelength meter based on a commercial color sensor chip consisting of an array of photodiodes with different absorptive color filters. By comparing the relative amplitudes of light on the photodiodes, the wavelength of light can be determined with picometer-level precision and with picometer-scale calibration drift over a period longer than a month. This work was supported by NSF Grant Number PHY-1205736.

  19. Solid colloidal optical wavelength filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, J. L.

    1990-05-01

    A method for constructing a solid colloidal optical wavelength filter is discussed. The device was developed to filter optical wavelengths for spectroscopy, protection from intense radiation, monochromatizing, and analyzing optical radiation. The filter is formed by suspending spherical particles in a coagulable medium (such as setting plastic); agitating the particles and coagulable medium to produce an emulsion of particles suspended in the coagulable medium; and allowing the coagulable medium and suspended emulsion of particles to cool.

  20. SWOC: Spectral Wavelength Optimization Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruchti, G. R.

    2016-06-01

    SWOC (Spectral Wavelength Optimization Code) determines the wavelength ranges that provide the optimal amount of information to achieve the required science goals for a spectroscopic study. It computes a figure-of-merit for different spectral configurations using a user-defined list of spectral features, and, utilizing a set of flux-calibrated spectra, determines the spectral regions showing the largest differences among the spectra.

  1. SPITZER 24 {mu}m EXCESSES FOR BRIGHT GALACTIC STARS IN BOOeTES AND FIRST LOOK SURVEY FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Hovhannisyan, L. R.; Mickaelian, A. M.; Weedman, D. W.; Houck, J. R.; Le Floc'h, E.; Soifer, B. T.; Brand, K.; Dey, A.; Jannuzi, B. T. E-mail: dweedman@isc.astro.cornell.edu

    2009-07-15

    Optically bright Galactic stars (V {approx}< 13 mag) having f {sub {nu}}(24 {mu}m) > 1 mJy are identified in Spitzer mid-infrared surveys within 8.2 deg{sup 2} for the Booetes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey and within 5.5 deg{sup 2} for the First Look Survey (FLS). One hundred and twenty-eight stars are identified in Booetes and 140 in the FLS, and their photometry is given. (K - [24]) colors are determined using K magnitudes from the Two Micron All Sky Survey for all stars in order to search for excess 24 {mu}m luminosity compared to that arising from the stellar photosphere. Of the combined sample of 268 stars, 141 are of spectral types F, G, or K, and 17 of these 141 stars have 24 {mu}m excesses with (K - [24]) > 0.2 mag. Using limits on absolute magnitude derived from proper motions, at least eight of the FGK stars with excesses are main-sequence stars, and estimates derived from the distribution of apparent magnitudes indicate that all 17 are main-sequence stars. These estimates lead to the conclusion that between 9% and 17% of the main-sequence FGK field stars in these samples have 24 {mu}m infrared excesses. This result is statistically similar to the fraction of stars with debris disks found among previous Spitzer targeted observations of much brighter, main-sequence field stars.

  2. Fast stabilization of a CO{sub 2} laser for a frequency standard at 10 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Pisani, M.Q.; Sassi, M.P.; Zucco, M.

    1994-12-31

    A CO{sub 2} laser has been frequency stabilized to an OsO{sub 4} transition with a control bandwidth of 10 kHz. The obtained spectral purity of the laser is 100 Hz. The realization of very accurate frequency standards and experiments of high resolution spectroscopy in the 10 {mu}m region are made possible by this source.

  3. Towards short wavelengths FELs workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Winick, H.

    1993-12-01

    This workshop was caged because of the growing perception in the FEL source community that recent advances have made it possible to extend FEL operation to wavelengths about two orders of magnitude shorter than the 240 nm that has been achieved to date. In addition short wavelength FELs offer the possibilities of extremely high peak power (several gigawatts) and very short pulses (of the order of 100 fs). Several groups in the USA are developing plans for such short wavelength FEL facilities. However, reviewers of these plans have pointed out that it would be highly desirable to first carry out proof-of-principle experiments at longer wavelengths to increase confidence that the shorter wavelength devices will indeed perform as calculated. The need for such experiments has now been broadly accepted by the FEL community. Such experiments were the main focus of this workshop as described in the following objectives distributed to attendees: (1) Define measurements needed to gain confidence that short wavelength FELs will perform as calculated. (2) List possible hardware that could be used to carry out these measurements in the near term. (3) Define a prioritized FEL physics experimental program and suggested timetable. (4) Form collaborative teams to carry out this program.

  4. AKARI IRC INFRARED 2.5-5 {mu}m SPECTROSCOPY OF A LARGE SAMPLE OF LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Imanishi, Masatoshi; Nakagawa, Takao; Shirahata, Mai; Ohyama, Yoichi; Onaka, Takashi

    2010-10-01

    We present the results of our systematic infrared 2.5-5 {mu}m spectroscopy of 60 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) with infrared luminosities L{sub IR} = 10{sup 11}-10{sup 12} L{sub sun} and 54 ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) with L{sub IR} {>=} 10{sup 12} L{sub sun}, using the AKARI Infrared Camera (IRC). AKARI IRC slit-less spectroscopy allows us to probe the full range of emission from these galaxies, including spatially extended components. The 3.3 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features, hydrogen recombination emission lines, and various absorption features are detected and used to investigate the properties of these galaxies. Because of the relatively small effect of dust extinction in the infrared range, quantitative discussion of these dusty galaxy populations is possible. For sources with clearly detectable Br{beta} (2.63 {mu}m) and Br{alpha} (4.05 {mu}m) emission lines, the flux ratios are found to be similar to those predicted by case B theory. Starburst luminosities are estimated from both 3.3 {mu}m PAH and Br{alpha} emission, which roughly agree with each other. In addition to the detected starburst activity, a significant fraction of the observed sources display signatures of obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs), such as low PAH equivalent widths, large optical depths of dust absorption features, and red continuum emission. The energetic importance of optically elusive buried AGNs in optically non-Seyfert galaxies tends to increase with increasing galaxy infrared luminosity, from LIRGs to ULIRGs.

  5. THE INCIDENCE OF DEBRIS DISKS AT 24 {mu}m AND 670 Myr

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Laurie E.; Trilling, David E.; Rieke, George; Su, Kate

    2012-05-10

    We use Spitzer Space Telescope 24 {mu}m data to search for debris disks among 122 AFGKM stars from the {approx}670 Myr clusters Hyades, Coma Ber, and Praesepe, utilizing a number of advances in data reduction and determining the intrinsic colors of main-sequence stars. For our sample, the 1{sigma} dispersion about the main-sequence V-K{sub S} , K{sub S} -[24] locus is approximately 3.1%. We identify seven debris disks at 10% or more ({>=}3{sigma} confidence level) above the expected K{sub S} -[24] for purely photospheric emission. The incidence of excesses of 10% or greater in our sample at this age is 5.7{sup +3.1} {sub -1.7}%. Combining with results from the literature, the rate is 7.8{sup +4.2}{sub -2.1}% for early-type (B9-F4) stars and 2.7{sup +3.3}{sub -1.7}% for solar-like (F5-K9) stars. Our primary sample has strict criteria for inclusion to allow comparison with other work; when we relax these criteria, three additional debris disks are detected. They are all around stars of solar-like type and hence reinforce our conclusion that disks around such stars are still relatively common at 670 Myr and are similar to the rate around early-type stars. The apparently small difference in decay rates between early-type and solar-like stars is inconsistent with the first-order theoretical predictions that the later type stellar disks would decay an order of magnitude more quickly than the earlier type ones.

  6. DISCOVERY OF A FAINT COMPANION TO ALCOR USING MMT/AO 5 {mu}m IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Mamajek, Eric E.; Kenworthy, Matthew A.; Hinz, Philip M.; Meyer, Michael R.

    2010-03-15

    We report the detection of a faint stellar companion to the famous nearby A5V star Alcor (80 UMa). The companion has M-band ({lambda} = 4.8 {mu}m) magnitude 8.8 and projected separation 1.''11 (28 AU) from Alcor. The companion is most likely a low-mass ({approx}0.3 M {sub sun}) active star which is responsible for Alcor's X-ray emission detected by ROSAT (L {sub X} {approx_equal} 10{sup 28.3} erg s{sup -1}). Alcor is a nuclear member of the Ursa Major star cluster (UMa; d {approx_equal} 25 pc, age {approx_equal} 0.5 Gyr), and has been occasionally mentioned as a possible distant (709'') companion of the stellar quadruple Mizar ({zeta} UMa). Comparing the revised Hipparcos proper motion for Alcor with the mean motion for other UMa nuclear members shows that Alcor has a peculiar velocity of 1.1 km s{sup -1}, which is comparable to the predicted velocity amplitude induced by the newly discovered companion ({approx}1 km s{sup -1}). Using a precise dynamical parallax for Mizar and the revised Hipparcos parallax for Alcor, we find that Mizar and Alcor are physically separated by 0.36 {+-} 0.19 pc (74 {+-} 39 kAU; minimum 18 kAU), and their velocity vectors are marginally consistent ({chi}{sup 2} probability 6%). Given their close proximity and concordant motions we suggest that the Mizar quadruple and the Alcor binary be together considered the second closest stellar sextuplet. The addition of Mizar-Alcor to the census of stellar multiples with six or more components effectively doubles the local density of such systems within the local volume (d < 40 pc)

  7. Carbon dioxide sequestration monitoring and verification via laser based detection system in the 2 mum band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, Seth David

    Carbon Dioxide (CO2) is a known contributor to the green house gas effect. Emissions of CO2 are rising as the global demand for inexpensive energy is placated through the consumption and combustion of fossil fuels. Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) may provide a method to prevent CO2 from being exhausted to the atmosphere. The carbon may be captured after fossil fuel combustion in a power plant and then stored in a long term facility such as a deep geologic feature. The ability to verify the integrity of carbon storage at a location is key to the success of all CCS projects. A laser-based instrument has been built and tested at Montana State University (MSU) to measure CO2 concentrations above a carbon storage location. The CO2 Detection by Differential Absorption (CODDA) Instrument uses a temperature-tunable distributed feedback (DFB) laser diode that is capable of accessing a spectral region, 2.0027 to 2.0042 mum, that contains three CO2 absorption lines and a water vapor absorption line. This instrument laser is aimed over an open-air, two-way path of about 100 m, allowing measurements of CO2 concentrations to be made directly above a carbon dioxide release test site. The performance of the instrument for carbon sequestration site monitoring is studied using a newly developed CO2 controlled release facility. The field and CO2 releases are managed by the Zero Emissions Research Technology (ZERT) group at MSU. Two test injections were carried out through vertical wells simulating seepage up well paths. Three test injections were done as CO2 escaped up through a slotted horizontal pipe simulating seepage up through geologic fault zones. The results from these 5 separate controlled release experiments over the course of three summers show that the CODDA Instrument is clearly capable of verifying the integrity of full-scale CO2 storage operations.

  8. Observational properties of simulated galaxies in overdense and average regions at redshifts z ≃ 6-12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yajima, Hidenobu; Shlosman, Isaac; Romano-Díaz, Emilio; Nagamine, Kentaro

    2015-07-01

    We use high-resolution zoom-in cosmological simulations of galaxies of Romano-Díaz et al., post-processing them with a panchromatic three-dimensional radiation transfer code to obtain the galaxy UV luminosity function (LF) at z ≃ 6-12. The galaxies are followed in a rare, heavily overdense region within a ˜5σ density peak, which can host high-z quasars, and in an average density region, down to the stellar mass of Mstar ˜ 4 × 107 M⊙. We find that the overdense regions evolve at a substantially accelerated pace - the most massive galaxy has grown to Mstar ˜ 8.4 × 1010 M⊙ by z = 6.3, contains dust of Mdust ˜ 4.1 × 108 M⊙, and is associated with a very high star formation rate, SFR ˜ 745 M⊙ yr- 1. The attained SFR-Mstar correlation results in the specific SFR slowly increasing with Mstar. Most of the UV radiation in massive galaxies is absorbed by the dust, its escape fraction fesc is low, increasing slowly with time. Galaxies in the average region have less dust, and agree with the observed UV LF. The LF of the overdense region is substantially higher, and contains much brighter galaxies. The massive galaxies are bright in the infrared (IR) due to the dust thermal emission, with LIR ˜ 3.7 × 1012 L⊙ at z = 6.3, while LIR < 1011 L⊙ for the low-mass galaxies. Therefore, ALMA can probe massive galaxies in the overdense region up to z ˜ 10 with a reasonable integration time. The UV spectral properties of discy galaxies depend significantly upon the viewing angle. The stellar and dust masses of the most massive galaxy in the overdense region are comparable to those of the sub-millimetre galaxy found by Riechers et al. at z = 6.3, while the modelled SFR and the sub-millimetre flux fall slightly below the observed one. Statistical significance of these similarities and differences will only become clear with the upcoming ALMA observations.

  9. Sub-wavelength plasmon laser

    DOEpatents

    Bora, Mihail; Bond, Tiziana C.

    2016-04-19

    A plasmonic laser device has resonant nanocavities filled with a gain medium containing an organic dye. The resonant plasmon frequencies of the nanocavities are tuned to align with both the absorption and emission spectra of the dye. Variables in the system include the nature of the dye and the wavelength of its absorption and emission, the wavelength of the pumping radiation, and the resonance frequencies of the nanocavities. In addition the pumping frequency of the dye is selected to be close to the absorption maximum.

  10. Wavelength shifting of intra-cavity photons: Adiabatic wavelength tuning in rapidly wavelength-swept lasers.

    PubMed

    Jirauschek, Christian; Huber, Robert

    2015-07-01

    We analyze the physics behind the newest generation of rapidly wavelength tunable sources for optical coherence tomography (OCT), retaining a single longitudinal cavity mode during operation without repeated build up of lasing. In this context, we theoretically investigate the currently existing concepts of rapidly wavelength-swept lasers based on tuning of the cavity length or refractive index, leading to an altered optical path length inside the resonator. Specifically, we consider vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with microelectromechanical system (MEMS) mirrors as well as Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) and Vernier-tuned distributed Bragg reflector (VT-DBR) lasers. Based on heuristic arguments and exact analytical solutions of Maxwell's equations for a fundamental laser resonator model, we show that adiabatic wavelength tuning is achieved, i.e., hopping between cavity modes associated with a repeated build up of lasing is avoided, and the photon number is conserved. As a consequence, no fundamental limit exists for the wavelength tuning speed, in principle enabling wide-range wavelength sweeps at arbitrary tuning speeds with narrow instantaneous linewidth. PMID:26203373

  11. Wavelength shifting of intra-cavity photons: Adiabatic wavelength tuning in rapidly wavelength-swept lasers

    PubMed Central

    Jirauschek, Christian; Huber, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the physics behind the newest generation of rapidly wavelength tunable sources for optical coherence tomography (OCT), retaining a single longitudinal cavity mode during operation without repeated build up of lasing. In this context, we theoretically investigate the currently existing concepts of rapidly wavelength-swept lasers based on tuning of the cavity length or refractive index, leading to an altered optical path length inside the resonator. Specifically, we consider vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with microelectromechanical system (MEMS) mirrors as well as Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) and Vernier-tuned distributed Bragg reflector (VT-DBR) lasers. Based on heuristic arguments and exact analytical solutions of Maxwell’s equations for a fundamental laser resonator model, we show that adiabatic wavelength tuning is achieved, i.e., hopping between cavity modes associated with a repeated build up of lasing is avoided, and the photon number is conserved. As a consequence, no fundamental limit exists for the wavelength tuning speed, in principle enabling wide-range wavelength sweeps at arbitrary tuning speeds with narrow instantaneous linewidth. PMID:26203373

  12. TESTING 24 {mu}m AND INFRARED LUMINOSITY AS STAR FORMATION TRACERS FOR GALACTIC STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Vutisalchavakul, Nalin; Evans, Neal J. II

    2013-03-10

    We have tested some relations for star formation rates used in extragalactic studies for regions within the Galaxy. In nearby molecular clouds, where the initial mass function is not fully sampled, the dust emission at 24 {mu}m greatly underestimates star formation rates (by a factor of 100 on average) when compared to star formation rates determined from counting young stellar objects. The total infrared emission does no better. In contrast, the total far-infrared method agrees within a factor of two on average with star formation rates based on radio continuum emission for massive, dense clumps that are forming enough massive stars to have L{sub TIR} exceed 10{sup 4.5} L{sub Sun }. The total infrared and 24 {mu}m also agree well with each other for both nearby, low-mass star-forming regions and the massive, dense clump regions.

  13. HIGH-RESOLUTION 1.6 {mu}m SPECTRA OF FeH IN M AND L DWARFS {sup ,}

    SciTech Connect

    Hargreaves, Robert J.; Bernath, Peter F.; Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Wende, Sebastian; Seifahrt, Andreas E-mail: pfb500@york.ac.u E-mail: Charles.W.Bauschlicher@nasa.go E-mail: seifahrt@physics.ucdavis.ed

    2010-10-15

    Near-infrared bands due to the iron monohydride (FeH) molecule are a characteristic feature of late-M and -L dwarfs. We have created a line list at 2200 K for the FeH E {sup 4{Pi}}-A {sup 4{Pi}} electronic transition near 1.58 {mu}m (6300 cm{sup -1}) based on laboratory spectra and an ab initio calculation of the band strength. A variety of M and L dwarfs were observed near 1.6 {mu}m with high spectral resolution (R {approx} 70,000) using the Phoenix spectrograph on the 8.1 m Gemini South telescope. The FeH E-A transition made a surprisingly strong contribution to the observed spectral energy distributions and needs to be included in modeling of late-M and L dwarfs.

  14. Solid colloidal optical wavelength filter

    DOEpatents

    Alvarez, Joseph L.

    1992-01-01

    A solid colloidal optical wavelength filter includes a suspension of spheal particles dispersed in a coagulable medium such as a setting plastic. The filter is formed by suspending spherical particles in a coagulable medium; agitating the particles and coagulable medium to produce an emulsion of particles suspended in the coagulable medium; and allowing the coagulable medium and suspended emulsion of particles to cool.

  15. Wavelength-shifted Cherenkov radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krider, E. P.; Jacobson, V. L.; Pifer, A. E.; Polakos, P. A.; Kurz, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The scintillation and Cherenkov responses of plastic Cherenkov radiators containing different wavelength-shifting fluors in varying concentrations have been studied in beams of low energy protons and pions. For cosmic ray applications, where large Cherenkov to scintillation ratios are desired, the optimum fluor concentrations are 0.000025 by weight or less.

  16. Positive-tone silylated, dry-developed, deep ultraviolet resist with 0. 2 [mu]m resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, R.S.; Stein, S.M.; Boyce, C.H.; Cirelli, R.A.; Taylor, G.N. ); Baiocchi, F.A.; Kovalchick, J. ); Wheeler, D.R. )

    1994-11-01

    This paper describes the development of a surface-imaging process for a positive-tone silylated, dry-developed bilayer resist which has 0.2 [mu]m resolution and an aspect ratio of 4.5 using deep-UV (248 nm) exposure. The many processing variables such as thermal treatment parameters, silylation conditions, and etching conditions were examined to determine their effects on lithographic performance in terms of resolution, feature size linearity, focus latitude, and sensitivity. Critical to the success of the process are: the bilayer structure which restricts diffusion of the Si, the use of a disilane reagent to increase the Si content of the masking layer, limiting migration of photogenerated acid by the appropriate choice of softbake and post-exposure bake temperatures, initial etching with an Ar/Cl[sub 2] mixture to remove the thin layer of silylated resist in the exposed areas, and employing CO[sub 2] instead of O[sub 2] as the etching gas to eliminate lateral etching of the features. With this process we have obtained good critical dimension linearity down to 0.25 [mu]m for bright-field and dark-field lines and spaces as well as isolated lines and isolated spaces. The dose required is [similar to]75 mJ/cm[sup 2] and the dose latitude is [plus minus]6%. Focus latitude is at least [plus minus]0.4 [mu]m. We also observe no environmental effects on sensitivity or resolution.

  17. Teacher's Guide to Resources of the Oklahoma Historical Society, Keyed to the Priority Academic Student Skills (PASS), Grades 6-12 Oklahoma History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Diffusion Network (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC.

    This guide is correlated to the PASS (Priority Academic Student Skills) objectives for Oklahoma history in grades 6-12. The guide was developed to aid in the teaching of the PASS objectives by identifying primary sources, audiovisual materials, field trips and scholarly materials that relate to each objective. The guide is divided into seven…

  18. Dual effects of [Tyr(6)]-gamma2-MSH(6-12) on pain perception and in vivo hyperalgesic activity of its analogues.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chunnan; Huang, Wenmin; Xing, Xiaoting; Dong, Shouliang

    2010-09-01

    [Tyr(6)]-gamma2-MSH(6-12) with a short effecting time of about 20 min is one of the most potent rMrgC receptor agonists. To possibly increase its potency and metabolic stability, a series of analogues were prepared by replacing the Tyr(6) residue with the non-canonical amino acids 3-(1-naphtyl)-L-alanine, 4-fluoro-L-phenylalanine, 4-methoxy-L-phenylalanine and 3-nitro-L-tyrosine. Dose-dependent nociceptive assays performed in conscious rats by intrathecal injection of the MSH peptides showed [Tyr(6)]-gamma2-MSH(6-12) hyperalgesic effects at low doses (5-20 nmol) and analgesia at high doses (100-200 nmol). This analgesic activity is fully reversed by the kyotorphin receptor-specific antagonist Leu-Arg. For the two analogues containing in position 6, 4-fluoro-L-phenylalanine and 3-nitro-L-tyrosine, a hyperalgesic activity was not observed, while the 3-(1-naphtyl)-L-alanine analogue at 10 nmol dose was found to induce hyperalgesia at a potency very similar to gamma2-MSH(6-12), but with longer duration of the effect. Finally, the 4-methoxy-L-phenylalanine analogue (0.5 nmol) showed greatly improved hyperalgesic activity and prolonged effects compared to the parent [Tyr(6)]-gamma2-MSH(6-12) compound. PMID:20629198

  19. Validity and Reliability Study of the Self-Efficacy Scale in Rendering Piano Education to Children of 6-12 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekinci, Hatice

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to develop a valid and reliable scale that can be used in measuring self-efficacy of candidate music teachers in rendering piano education to children of 6-12 years. To this end, a pool of 51 items was created by using the literature, and taking the opinions of piano professors and piano instructors working with…

  20. Absorptivity modulation on wavy molten steel surfaces: The influence of laser wavelength and angle of incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, A. F. H.

    2012-10-08

    The modulation of the angle-dependent Fresnel absorptivity across wavy molten steel surfaces during laser materials processing, like drilling, cutting, or welding, has been calculated. The absorptivity is strongly altered by the grazing angle of incidence of the laser beam on the processing front. Owing to its specific Brewster-peak characteristics, the 10.64 {mu}m wavelength CO{sub 2}-laser shows an opposite trend with respect to roughness and angle-of-incidence compared to lasers in the wavelength range of 532-1070 nm. Plateaus or rings of Brewster-peak absorptivity can lead to hot spots on a wavy surface, often in close proximity to cold spots caused by shadow domains.

  1. 1 {mu}m EXCESS SOURCES IN THE UKIDSS. I. THREE T DWARFS IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY SOUTHERN EQUATORIAL STRIPE

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, Y.; Murata, K. L.; Fujiwara, M.; Nagayama, T.; Peterson, B. A.; Suenaga, T.; Furusawa, K.; Miyake, N.; Omori, K.; Suzuki, D.; Wada, K.

    2011-08-15

    We report the discovery of two field brown dwarfs, ULAS J0128-0041 and ULAS J0321+0051, and the rediscovery of ULAS J0226+0051 (IfA 0230-Z1), in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) southern equatorial stripe. They are found in the course of our follow-up observation program of 1 {mu}m excess sources in the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope Infrared Deep Sky Survey. The Gemini Multi-Object Spectrographs spectra at red optical wavelengths (6500-10500 A) are presented, which reveal that they are early-T dwarfs. The classification is also supported by their optical to near-infrared colors. It is noted that ULAS J0321+0051 is one of the faintest currently known T dwarfs. The estimated distances to the three objects are 50-110 pc, thus they are among the most distant field T dwarfs known. The dense temporal coverage of the target fields achieved by the SDSS-II Supernova Survey allows us to perform a simple time-series analysis of the dwarfs. We create stacked images of each year from 2002-2007 and find significant proper motions of 150-290 mas yr{sup -1} or transverse velocities of 40-100 km s{sup -1} for ULAS J0128-0041 and ULAS J0226+0051. We also find that there are no detectable, long-term (a-few-year) brightness variations above a few times 0.1 mag for the two brown dwarfs.

  2. Multi-wavelength holographic profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, E. A.; Gesualdi, M. R.; Muramatsu, M.

    2006-01-01

    A novel method for surface profilometry by holography is presented. We used a diode laser emitting at many wavelengths simultaneously as the light source and a Bi 12TiO 20 (BTO) crystal as the holographic medium in single exposure processes. The employ of multi-wavelength, large free spectral range (FSR) lasers leads to holographic images covered of interference fringes corresponding to the contour lines of the studied surface. In order to obtain the relief of the studied surface, the fringe analysis was performed by the phase stepping technique (PST) and the phase unwrapping was carried out by the Cellular-automata method. We analysed the relief of a tilted flat metallic bar and a tooth prosthesis.

  3. Wavelength Selection in Gyrotactic Bioconvection.

    PubMed

    Ghorai, S; Singh, R; Hill, N A

    2015-06-01

    We investigate pattern formation by swimming micro-organisms (bioconvection), when their orientation is determined by balance between gravitational and viscous torques (gyrotaxis), due to being bottom heavy. The governing equations, which consist of the Navier-Stokes equations for an incompressible fluid coupled with a micro-organism conservation equation, are solved numerically in a large cross section chamber with periodic boundary conditions in the horizontal directions. The influence of key parameters on wavelength selection in bioconvection patterns is investigated numerically. For realistic ranges of parameter values, the computed wavelengths are in good agreement with the experimental observations provided that the diffusion due to randomness in cell swimming behaviour is small, refuting a recently published claim that the mathematical model becomes inaccurate at long times. We also provide the first computational evidence of "bottom-standing" plumes in a three-dimensional simulation. PMID:25963246

  4. Review of short wavelength lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1985-03-18

    There has recently been a substantial amount of research devoted to the development of short wavelength amplifiers and lasers. A number of experimental results have been published wherein the observation of significant gain has been claimed on transitions in the EUV and soft x-ray regimes. The present review is intended to discuss the main approaches to the creation of population inversions and laser media in the short wavelength regime, and hopefully aid workers in the field by helping to provide access to a growing literature. The approaches to pumping EUV and soft x-ray lasers are discussed according to inversion mechanism. The approaches may be divided into roughly seven categories, including collisional excitation pumping, recombination pumping, direct photoionization and photoexcitation pumping, metastable state storage plus optical pumping, charge exchange pumping, and finally, the extension of free electron laser techniques into the EUV and soft x-ray regimes. 250 references.

  5. The Arabidopsis MUM2 gene encodes a beta-galactosidase required for the production of seed coat mucilage with correct hydration properties.

    PubMed

    Dean, Gillian H; Zheng, Huanquan; Tewari, Jagdish; Huang, Jun; Young, Diana S; Hwang, Yeen Ting; Western, Tamara L; Carpita, Nicholas C; McCann, Maureen C; Mansfield, Shawn D; Haughn, George W

    2007-12-01

    Seed coat development in Arabidopsis thaliana involves a complex pathway where cells of the outer integument differentiate into a highly specialized cell type after fertilization. One aspect of this developmental process involves the secretion of a large amount of pectinaceous mucilage into the apoplast. When the mature seed coat is exposed to water, this mucilage expands to break the primary cell wall and encapsulate the seed. The mucilage-modified2 (mum2) mutant is characterized by a failure to extrude mucilage on hydration, although mucilage is produced as normal during development. The defect in mum2 appears to reside in the mucilage itself, as mucilage fails to expand even when the barrier of the primary cell wall is removed. We have cloned the MUM2 gene and expressed recombinant MUM2 protein, which has beta-galactosidase activity. Biochemical analysis of the mum2 mucilage reveals alterations in pectins that are consistent with a defect in beta-galactosidase activity, and we have demonstrated that MUM2 is localized to the cell wall. We propose that MUM2 is involved in modifying mucilage to allow it to expand upon hydration, establishing a link between the galactosyl side-chain structure of pectin and its physical properties. PMID:18165329

  6. The Arabidopsis MUM2 Gene Encodes a β-Galactosidase Required for the Production of Seed Coat Mucilage with Correct Hydration Properties[W

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Gillian H.; Zheng, Huanquan; Tewari, Jagdish; Huang, Jun; Young, Diana S.; Hwang, Yeen Ting; Western, Tamara L.; Carpita, Nicholas C.; McCann, Maureen C.; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Haughn, George W.

    2007-01-01

    Seed coat development in Arabidopsis thaliana involves a complex pathway where cells of the outer integument differentiate into a highly specialized cell type after fertilization. One aspect of this developmental process involves the secretion of a large amount of pectinaceous mucilage into the apoplast. When the mature seed coat is exposed to water, this mucilage expands to break the primary cell wall and encapsulate the seed. The mucilage-modified2 (mum2) mutant is characterized by a failure to extrude mucilage on hydration, although mucilage is produced as normal during development. The defect in mum2 appears to reside in the mucilage itself, as mucilage fails to expand even when the barrier of the primary cell wall is removed. We have cloned the MUM2 gene and expressed recombinant MUM2 protein, which has β-galactosidase activity. Biochemical analysis of the mum2 mucilage reveals alterations in pectins that are consistent with a defect in β-galactosidase activity, and we have demonstrated that MUM2 is localized to the cell wall. We propose that MUM2 is involved in modifying mucilage to allow it to expand upon hydration, establishing a link between the galactosyl side-chain structure of pectin and its physical properties. PMID:18165329

  7. Silicon photonic device for wavelength sensing and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas Lopez, German R.

    Over the last decade advances and innovations from Silicon Photonics technology were observed in the telecommunications and computing industries. This technology which employs Silicon as an optical medium, relies on current CMOS micro-electronics fabrication processes to enable medium scale integration of many nano-photonic devices to produce photonic integrated circuitry. However, other fields of research such as optical sensor processing can benefit from silicon photonics technology, specially in sensors where the physical measurement is wavelength encoded. In this research work, we present a design and application of a thermally tuned silicon photonic device as an optical sensor interrogator. The main device is a micro-ring resonator filter of 10 mum of diameter. A photonic design toolkit was developed based on open source software from the research community. With those tools it was possible to estimate the resonance and spectral characteristics of the filter. From the obtained design parameters, a 7.8 x 3.8 mm optical chip was fabricated using standard micro-photonics techniques. In order to tune a ring resonance, Nichrome micro-heaters were fabricated on top of the device. Some fabricated devices were systematically characterized and their tuning response were determined. From measurements, a ring resonator with a free-spectral-range of 18.4 nm and with a bandwidth of 0.14 nm was obtained. Using just 5 mA it was possible to tune the device resonance up to 3 nm. In order to apply our device as a sensor interrogator in this research, a model of wavelength estimation using time interval between peaks measurement technique was developed and simulations were carried out to assess its performance. To test the technique, an experiment using a Fiber Bragg grating optical sensor was set, and estimations of the wavelength shift of this sensor due to axial strains yield an error within 22 pm compared to measurements from spectrum analyzer. Results from this study

  8. Set the P.A.C.E.! A Curriculum to Promote Mother-Child Communication about Sexuality and Reduce Sexual Risk Behaviors in Children Ages 6-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiIorio, Colleen K.; Pluhar, Erika I.; Pines, Kathy; Jennings, Tanya

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we describe the Set the P.A.C.E.! (Parents And Children Empowered) curriculum designed for mothers of children 6-12 years of age. The development of the curriculum was part of a research study to test an intervention to enhance the mother's role in promoting resilience among 6- to 12-year-old children and to reduce the risk of…

  9. InAs/InP single quantum wire formation and emission at 1.5 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Alen, B.; Fuster, D.; Gonzalez, Y.; Gonzalez, L.; Martinez-Pastor, J.

    2006-12-04

    Isolated InAs/InP self-assembled quantum wires have been grown using in situ accumulated stress measurements to adjust the optimal InAs thickness. Atomic force microscopy imaging shows highly asymmetric nanostructures with average length exceeding more than ten times their width. High resolution optical investigation of as-grown samples reveals strong photoluminescence from individual quantum wires at 1.5 {mu}m. Additional sharp features are related to monolayer fluctuations of the two-dimensional InAs layer present during the early stages of the quantum wire self-assembling process.

  10. Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers emitting near 1.5 {mu}m with Sb-based reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, O.; Klem, J.F.; Vawter, G.A.

    1998-04-01

    We describe use of AlAsSb/AlGaAsSb lattice matched to InP for distributed Bragg reflectors. These structures are integral to several surface normal devices, in particular vertical cavity surface emitting lasers. The high refractive index ratio of these materials allows formation of a highly reflective mirror with relatively few mirror pairs. As a result, we have been able to show for the first time the 77K CW operation of an optically pumped, monolithic, all-epitaxial vertical cavity laser, emitting at 1.56 {mu}m.