Science.gov

Sample records for 6-12 mum wavelength

  1. Raman fibre lasers emitting at a wavelength above 2 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Dianov, Evgenii M; Bufetov, Igor' A; Mashinsky, V M; Neustruev, V B; Medvedkov, O I; Shubin, Aleksei V; Mel'kumov, Mikhail A; Gur'yanov, A N; Khopin, V F; Yashkov, M V

    2004-08-31

    Single-mode Raman fibre lasers emitting a few hundreds of millwatts at wavelengths of 2.0 and 2.2 {mu}m are built for the first time. Laser emission was amplified in a fibre with a germanium dioxide core and a silica cladding pumped by an Er/Yb-doped fibre laser. (lasers)

  2. Wafer bonded 1.55 mum vertical cavity laser arrays for wavelength division multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Adil Mahmood

    Vertical cavity lasers in the 1.55 mum wavelength band are attractive sources for optical networks. Previous devices have been limited by low output power and poor thermal performance. In this work, novel wafer bonding techniques were developed to create high-performance 1.55 mum vertical cavity lasers and a new class of multiple wavelength vertical cavity laser arrays. Wafer bonding enables the integration of thermally conductive GaAs/AlGaAs mirrors and traditional InP/InGaAsP active regions. A superlattice barrier was used as a buffer layer during bonding to reduce the number of non-radiative recombination centers in the active region. The surface of these superlattice layers was patterned prior to bonding to define multiple wavelength cavities. Continuous-wave operation was achieved at temperatures up to 105°C. This is the highest reported lasing temperature for a 1.55 mum vertical cavity laser. Threshold currents of 0.8 mA were measured. The peak output power at 20°C was 0.7 mW. The peak output power at 80°C was 0.2 mW. Single-mode operation with a side-mode suppression ration in excess of 40 dB was observed for a 5 mum aperture device. Four-channel arrays were also fabricated. The wavelength span was 1509.1--1524.4 nm with channel spacing of approximately 5 nm. This is the first demonstration of an independently addressable, multiple-wavelength vertical cavity laser array at 1.55 mum. Threshold currents of 1.0 mA and peak output powers of 0.5 mW were measured for array elements. Thermal and optical crosstalk between array elements are negligible, due to the high thermal conductivity of the bottom mirror and large device pitch.

  3. Continuously tunable fibre attenuator operating in the wavelength range near 1.5 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, Ol'ga I; Mishakov, Gennadii V; Sokolov, Viktor I; Varlamova, Nina V; Zapadinskii, Boris I

    2004-09-30

    A fibre attenuator is fabricated for the telecommunication wavelength range near 1.5 {mu}m in which a single-mode silica fibre with side polishing is used. The fibre surface is covered by a layer of fluorine-containing polymer with a large thermooptic coefficient. The principle of attenuator operation is based on a change in the conditions of total internal reflection for a guided mode in the polished region due to thermally induced variation in the refractive index of the fluoropolymer layer. The attenuator is insensitive to light polarisation, it has a continuously variable attenuation coefficient in the range 0.2-27 dB, and can be easily incorporated into fibreoptic links. (fibre optics)

  4. Broadband carbon monoxide laser system operating in the wavelength range of 2.5 - 8.3 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Yu M; Ionin, Andrei A; Kinyaevsky, I O; Klimachev, Yu M; Kozlov, A Yu; Kotkov, A A; Lanskii, G V; Shaiduko, A V

    2013-02-28

    A two-cascade frequency conversion of CO-laser radiation is demonstrated in a single sample of a nonlinear ZnGeP{sub 2} crystal. The crystal is pumped by a repetitively pulsed cryogenic lowpressure CO laser operating on {approx}150 vibration - rotational transitions in the wavelength range 5.0 - 7.5 {mu}m, which corresponds to the frequency range of a half octave. In the first conversion cascade, generation of second harmonic and sum frequencies of various pairs of CO-laser radiation give {approx}350 emission lines in the wavelength range 2.5 - 3.7 {mu}m. In the second cascade, by mixing the radiation converted in the first cascade with the residual radiation of the CO laser we have obtained {approx}90 lines in the range 4.3 - 5.0 {mu}m and more than 80 lines in the range 7.5 - 8.3 {mu}m. Thus, using a single sample of the nonlinear ZnGeP{sub 2} crystal pumped by the radiation of a single CO laser we have produced a source of broadband (more than one and a half octaves) laser radiation, simultaneously operating at {approx}670 lines in the wavelength range 2.5 - 8.3 {mu}m. (lasers)

  5. Radiation resistance of nonlinear crystals at a wavelength of 9.55 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Yu M; Voevodin, V G; Badikov, Valerii V; Geiko, L G; Geiko, P P; Ivashchenko, M V; Karapuzikov, A I; Sherstov, I V

    2001-12-31

    The results of radiation resistance measurements for twelve nonlinear crystals are presented. The crystals include the well-known nonlinear CdGeAs{sub 2}, ZnGeP{sub 2}, AgGaSe{sub 2}, GaSe, AgGaS{sub 2}, and Ag{sub 3}AsS{sub 3} crystals operating in the middle IR range, new mixed AgGaGeS{sub 4} and Cd{sub 0.35}Hg{sub 0.65}Ga{sub 2}S{sub 4} crystals, two-phase (orange and yellow) HgGa{sub 2}S{sub 4} crystal, and the doped GaSe:In crystal. The mixed crystals and the two-phase HgGa{sub 2}S{sub 4} crystal are transparent in the range from 0.4 - 0.5 to 11.5 - 14.5 {mu}m. The measurements were performed using a pulsed single-mode highly stability TEA CO{sub 2} laser with an output pulse duration of {approx}30 ns. The damage thresholds of new nonlinear AgGaGeS{sub 4} and Cd {sub 0.35}Hg{sub 0.65}Ga{sub 2}S{sub 4} crystals and of the HgGa{sub 2}S{sub 4} crystal (the orange and yellow phases) were found to be 1.5 - 2.2 times higher than for the crystals operating in the middle IR range. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  6. Frequency-resolved optical gating system with a tellurium crystal for characterizing free-electron lasers in the wavelength range of 10-30 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Iijima, Hokuto; Nagai, Ryoji; Nishimori, Nobuyuki; Hajima, Ryoichi; Minehara, Eisuke J.

    2009-12-15

    A second-harmonic generation frequency-resolved optical gating (SHG-FROG) system has been developed for the complete characterization of laser pulses in the wavelength range of 10-30 {mu}m. A tellurium crystal is used so that spectrally resolved autocorrelation signals with a good signal-to-noise ratio are obtained. Pulses (wavelength {approx}22 {mu}m) generated from a free-electron laser are measured by the SHG-FROG system. The SHG intensity profile and the spectrum obtained by FROG measurements are well consistent with those of independent measurements of the pulse length and spectrum. The pulse duration and spectral width determined from the FROG trace are 0.6 ps and 5.2 THz at full width half maximum, respectively.

  7. InAs/InP quantum dots emitting in the 1.55 {mu}m wavelength region by inserting submonolayer GaP interlayers

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Q.; Noetzel, R.; Veldhoven, P.J. van; Eijkemans, T.J.; Wolter, J.H.

    2004-08-23

    We report on the growth of InAs quantum dots (QDs) in GaInAsP on InP (100) substrates by chemical-beam epitaxy, with emission wavelength in the 1.55 {mu}m region. Submonolayer coverage of GaP on the GaInAsP buffer before deposition of the InAs QDs results in most efficient suppression of As/P exchange during InAs growth and subsequent growth interruption under arsenic flux. Continuous wavelength tuning from above 1.6 to below 1.5 {mu}m is thus achieved by varying the coverage of the GaP interlayer within the submonolayer range. Temperature dependent photoluminescence reveals distinct zero-dimensional carrier confinement and indicates that the InAs QDs are free of defects and dislocations.

  8. GaAsSb/GaAs strained structures with quantum wells for lasers with emission wavelength near 1.3 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Sadofyev, Yu. G.; Samal, N.; Andreev, B. A. Gavrilenko, V. I.; Morozov, S. V.; Spivakov, A. G.; Yablonsky, A. N.

    2010-03-15

    Optimum conditions for the growth of the GaAs{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}/GaAs heterostructures by the method of molecular-bean epitaxy are determined; it is shown that effective long-wavelength photoluminescence at T = 300 K can be obtained at wavelengths as long as {lambda} = 1.3 {mu}m by increasing the antimony incorporation. As the excitation power is increased, the appearance of a short-wavelength line (in addition to a shift of a photoluminescence maximum to shorter wavelengths characteristic of the type II heterojunctions) related to direct optical transitions in the real space takes place; this relation is confirmed by the results of studying the photoluminescence spectra with subpicosecond and nanosecond time resolution in the case of pulsed excitation.

  9. Long wavelength (1.3 {mu}m) vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with a wafer-bonded mirror and an oxygen-implanted confinement region

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Y.; Zhu, Z.H.; Lo, Y.H.; Huffaker, D.L.; Deppe, D.G.; Hou, H.Q.; Hammons, B.E.; Lin, W.; Tu, Y.K.

    1997-07-01

    We proposed and demonstrated a novel design for long wavelength (1.3 {mu}m) vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). In this design, oxygen-implanted current-confinement regions were formed in a GaAs/AlGaAs Bragg reflector which is the bottom mirror wafer bonded to an AlGaInAs/InP cavity consisting of nine strain-compensated quantum wells. Room- temperature continuous-wave (cw) operation of 1.3 {mu}m-VCSELs with a record low cw threshold current density of 1.57kA/cm{sup 2} and a record low cw threshold current of 1 mA have been realized. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Terahertz generation and power limits in In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As photomixer coupled to transverse-electromagnetic-horn antenna driven at 1.55 {mu}m wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Mangeney, J.; Meng, F.; Gacemi, D.; Peytavit, E.; Lampin, J. F.; Akalin, T.

    2010-10-18

    We report continuous wave generation at frequencies up to 2 THz using ion-irradiated In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As photomixers coupled to transverse-electromagnetic-horn antennae driven at {approx}1.55 {mu}m wavelength. Output powers up to 0.1 {mu}W at 700 GHz have been achieved. The dependence of the output power on incident optical power and the bias voltage is analyzed in the both regimes of Ohmic transport and recombination-limited transport. The fundamental limitations of the performance of the photomixer devices based on photoconductive phenomenon in recombination-limited transport are analyzed.

  11. Measurement of optical absorption in polycrystalline CVD diamond plates by the phase photothermal method at a wavelength of 10.6 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Luk'yanov, A Yu; Serdtsev, E V; Volkov, P V; Ral'chenko, Viktor G; Savel'ev, A V; Konov, Vitalii I; Khomich, A V

    2008-12-31

    A highly-efficient phase photothermal method is developed for quantitative measurements of the small optical absorption coefficient in thin plates made of highly transparent materials in which bulk losses significantly exceed surface losses. The bulk absorption coefficient at 10.6 {mu}m is estimated in polycrystalline diamond plates grown from the vapour phase (a CVD diamond). The results are compared with those for natural and synthetic diamond single crystals and with the concentrations of nitrogen and hydrogen impurities. The absorption coefficient of the best samples of the CVD diamond did not exceed 0.06 cm{sup -1}, which, taking into account the high thermal conductivity of the CVD diamond (1800-2200 W mK{sup -1} at room temperature), makes this material attractive for fabricating output windows of high-power CO{sub 2} lasers, especially for manufacturing large-size optics. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  12. Long wavelength (>1.55 {mu}m) room temperature emission and anomalous structural properties of InAs/GaAs quantum dots obtained by conversion of In nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Urbanczyk, A.; Keizer, J. G.; Koenraad, P. M.; Noetzel, R.

    2013-02-18

    We demonstrate that molecular beam epitaxy-grown InAs quantum dots (QDs) on (100) GaAs obtained by conversion of In nanocrystals enable long wavelength emission in the InAs/GaAs material system. At room temperature they exhibit a broad photoluminescence band that extends well beyond 1.55 {mu}m. We correlate this finding with cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy measurements. They reveal that the QDs are composed of pure InAs which is in agreement with their long-wavelength emission. Additionally, the measurements reveal that the QDs have an anomalously undulated top surface which is very different to that observed for Stranski-Krastanow grown QDs.

  13. MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDY OF A COMPLETE IRAC 3.6 {mu}m SELECTED GALAXY SAMPLE: A FAIR CENSUS OF RED AND BLUE POPULATIONS AT REDSHIFTS 0.4-1.2

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.-S.; Faber, S. M.; Koo, D.; Rigopoulou, D.; Magdis, G.; Newman, J.; Shu, C.; Luo, Z.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Wang, T.; Willner, S. P.; Fazio, G. G.; Barmby, P.; Coil, A.; Zheng, X. Z.

    2013-03-20

    We present a multi-wavelength study of a 3.6 {mu}m selected galaxy sample in the Extended Groth Strip (EGS). The sample is complete for galaxies with stellar mass >10{sup 9.5} M{sub Sun} and redshift 0.4 < z < 1.2. In this redshift range, the Infrared Array Camera 3.6 {mu}m band measures the rest-frame near-infrared band, permitting nearly unbiased selection with respect to both quiescent and star-forming galaxies. The numerous spectroscopic redshifts available in the EGS are used to train an artificial neural network to estimate photometric redshifts. The distribution of photometric redshift errors is Gaussian with standard deviation {approx}0.025(1 + z), and the fraction of redshift failures (>3{sigma} errors) is about 3.5%. A new method of validation based on pair statistics confirms the estimate of standard deviation even for galaxies lacking spectroscopic redshifts. Basic galaxy properties measured include rest-frame U - B colors, B- and K-band absolute magnitudes, and stellar masses. We divide the sample into quiescent and star-forming galaxies according to their rest-frame U - B colors and 24-3.6 {mu}m flux density ratios and derive rest K-band luminosity functions and stellar mass functions for quiescent, star-forming, and all galaxies. The results show that massive, quiescent galaxies were in place by z Almost-Equal-To 1, but lower mass galaxies generally ceased their star formation at later epochs.

  14. FAINT SUBMILLIMETER GALAXY COUNTS AT 450 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chian-Chou; Cowie, Lennox L.; Barger, Amy J.; Casey, Caitlin M.; Lee, Nicholas; Sanders, David B.; Williams, Jonathan P.; Wang, Wei-Hao

    2013-01-10

    We present the results of SCUBA-2 observations at 450 {mu}m and 850 {mu}m of the field lensed by the massive cluster A370. With a total survey area >100 arcmin{sup 2} and 1{sigma} sensitivities of 3.92 and 0.82 mJy beam{sup -1} at 450 and 850 {mu}m, respectively, we find a secure sample of 20 sources at 450 {mu}m and 26 sources at 850 {mu}m with a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) > 4. Using the latest lensing model of A370 and Monte Carlo simulations, we derive the number counts at both wavelengths. The 450 {mu}m number counts probe a factor of four deeper than the counts recently obtained from the Herschel Space Telescope at similar wavelengths, and we estimate that {approx}47%-61% of the 450 {mu}m extragalactic background light resolved into individual sources with 450 {mu}m fluxes greater than 4.5 mJy. The faint 450 {mu}m sources in the 4{sigma} sample have positional accuracies of 3 arcsec, while brighter sources (S/N >6{sigma}) are good to 1.4 arcsec. Using a deep radio map (1{sigma} {approx} 6 {mu}Jy) we find that the percentage of submillimeter sources having secure radio counterparts is 85% for 450 {mu}m sources with intrinsic fluxes >6 mJy and 67% for 850 {mu}m sources with intrinsic fluxes >4 mJy. We also find that 67% of the >4{sigma} 450 {mu}m sources are detected at 850 {mu}m, while the recovery rate at 450 {mu}m of >4{sigma} 850 {mu}m sources is 54%. Combined with the source redshifts estimated using millimetric flux ratios, the recovered rate is consistent with the scenario where both 450 {mu}m and 20 cm emission preferentially select lower redshift dusty sources, while 850 {mu}m emission traces a higher fraction of dusty sources at higher redshifts. We identify potential counterparts in various wavelengths from X-ray to mid-infrared and measure the multiwavelength photometry, which we then use to analyze the characteristics of the sources. We find three X-ray counterparts to our robust submillimeter sample (S/N > 5), giving an active galactic nucleus

  15. POLARIMETRY OF DG TAU AT 350 mum

    SciTech Connect

    Krejny, M.; Matthews, T. G.; Novak, G.; Cho, J.; Li, H.; Shinnaga, H.; Vaillancourt, J. E.

    2009-11-01

    We present the first 350 mum polarization measurement for the disk of the T Tauri star (TTS) DG Tau. The data were obtained using the SHARP polarimeter at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. We measured normalized Stokes parameters q= -0.0086 +- 0.0060 and u = -0.0012 +- 0.0061, which gives a 2sigma upper limit for the percent polarization of 1.7%. We obtain information about the polarization spectrum by comparing our 350 mum measurement with an 850 mum polarization detection previously published for this source. Comparing the two measurements in Stokes space (not in percent polarization) shows that the two data points are not consistent, i.e., either the degree of polarization or the angle of polarization (or both) must change significantly as one moves from 850 mum to 350 mum. This conclusion concerning the polarization spectrum disagrees with the predictions of a recent model for TTS disk polarization. We show that this discrepancy can be explained by optical depth effects. Specifically, we demonstrate that if one were to add more mass to the model disk, one would expect to obtain a model polarization spectrum in which the polarization degree falls sharply with increasing frequency, consistent with the observations at the two wavelengths. We suggest that multiwavelength polarimetry of TTS disk emission may provide a promising method for probing the opacity of TTS disks.

  16. SURVEY OF NEARBY FGK STARS AT 160 mum WITH SPITZER

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, Angelle; Beichman, Charles; Bryden, Geoff; Lisse, Carey

    2009-10-10

    The Spitzer Space Telescope has advanced debris disk science tremendously with a wealth of information on debris disks around nearby A, F, G, K, and M stars at 24 and 70 mum with the MIPS photometer and at 8-34 mum with IRS. Here we present 160 mum observations of a small subset of these stars. At this wavelength, the stellar photospheric emission is negligible and any detected emission corresponds to cold dust in extended Kuiper Belt analogs. However, the Spitzer 160 mum observations are limited in sensitivity by the large beam size which results in significant 'noise' due to cirrus and extragalactic confusion. In addition, the 160 mum measurements suffer from the added complication of a light leak next to the star's position whose flux is proportional to the near-infrared flux of the star. We are able to remove the contamination from the leak and report 160 mum measurements or upper limits for 24 stars. Three stars (HD 10647, HD 207129, and HD 115617) have excesses at 160 mum that we use to constrain the properties of the debris disks around them. A more detailed model of the spectral energy distribution of HD 10647 reveals that the 70 and 160 mum emission could be due to small water ice particles at a distance of 100 AU, consistent with Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging of circumstellar material in the system.

  17. Magnificent Mum Education Program Featuring the Mum Kids (Grades 4-5).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelleher, Christine, Ed.

    Magnificent Mum Education Program is a theme-based program developed around the garden mum. With its bright colors, various flower forms, perennial life cycle, and easy propagation, the garden mum is ideal for classroom use and community planting programs. The mum-theme lessons can be integrated into all subject areas including science, math,…

  18. Magnificent Mum Education Program Featuring the Mum Kids (Grades 2-3).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelleher, Christine, Ed.

    The Magnificent Mum Education Program is a theme-based program developed around the garden mum. With its bright colors, various flower forms, perennial life cycle, and easy propagation, the garden mum is ideal for classroom use and community planting programs. The mum-theme lessons can be integrated into all subject areas including science, math,…

  19. Hybrid Er/Yb fibre laser system for generating few-cycle 1.6 to 2.0 {mu}m pulses optically synchronised with high-power pulses near 1 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Andrianov, A V; Anashkina, E A; Murav'ev, S V; Kim, A V

    2013-03-31

    This paper presents the concept of fibre laser system design for generating optically synchronised femtosecond pulses at two, greatly differing wavelengths and reports experimental and numerical simulation studies of nonlinear conversion of femtosecond pulses at 1.5 {mu}m wavelength in a dispersion-shifted fibre, with the generation of synchronised pulses in the ranges 1.6 - 2 and 1 - 1.1 {mu}m. We describe a three-stage high-power fibre amplifier of femtosecond pulses at 1 {mu}m and a hybrid Er/Yb fibre laser system that has enabled the generation of 12 fs pulses with a centre wavelength of 1.7 {mu}m, synchronised with high-power (microjoule level) 250 fs pulses at 1.03 {mu}m. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  20. 46 CFR 12.01-6-12.01-7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

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  1. 36 CFR 6.12 - Prohibited acts and penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prohibited acts and penalties. 6.12 Section 6.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL SITES IN UNITS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 6.12 Prohibited acts and penalties. (a) The following are prohibited:...

  2. Parents: Stay Mum on Daughter's Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159269.html Parents: Stay Mum on Daughter's Weight Girls who hear comments on size more ... be cautious about what they say to their daughters about their weight, new research says. The study ...

  3. Continuously tunable, 6{endash}14 {mu}m silver-gallium selenide optical parametric oscillator pumped at 1.57 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, S.; Allik, T.H.; Catella, G.; Utano, R.; Hutchinson, J.A.

    1997-08-01

    An angle tuned silver gallium selenide (AgGaSe{sub 2}) optical parametric oscillator (OPO), pumped by the fixed wavelength 1.57 {mu}m output of a noncritically phase-matched KTiOPO{sub 4} OPO, yielded radiation continuously tunable from 6 to 14 {mu}m. Energies of up to 1.2 mJ/pulse with bandwidths of {approximately}5cm{sup {minus}1} (full width at half-maximum) were obtained using a 6.5{times}6.5{times}35.3mm long, type I AgGaSe{sub 2} crystal. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. MUM1/IRF4: A Review.

    PubMed

    Gualco, Gabriela; Weiss, Lawrence M; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2010-07-01

    MUM1/IRF4 protein is a member of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family of transcriptional factors initially described as downstream regulators of interferon signaling. The quantity of this factor varies within the hematopoietic system in a lineage and stage-specific way. It is considered to be a key regulator of several steps in lymphoid, myeloid, and dendritic cell differentiation and maturation. MUM1/IRF4 expression is observed in many lymphoid and myeloid malignancies, and may be a promising target for the treatment of some of these neoplasms. We reviewed the literature on MUM1/IRF4, with emphasis on the pathologic aspects of this marker in reactive and malignant hematologic and nonhematologic conditions. PMID:20182347

  5. THE 15-20 {mu}m EMISSION IN THE REFLECTION NEBULA NGC 2023

    SciTech Connect

    Peeters, Els; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Wolfire, Mark G. E-mail: tielens@strw.leidenuniv.nl E-mail: mwolfire@astro.umd.edu

    2012-03-01

    We present 15-20 {mu}m spectral maps toward the reflection nebula NGC 2023 obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph in short-wavelength, high-resolution mode on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. These spectra reveal emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), C{sub 60}, and H{sub 2} superposed on a dust continuum. These emission components exhibit distinct spatial distributions: with increasing distance from the illuminating star, we observe the PAH emission followed by the dust continuum emission and the H{sub 2} emission. The C{sub 60} emission is located closest to the illuminating star in the south, while in the north it seems to be associated with the H/H{sub 2} transition. Emission from PAHs and PAH-related species produces features at 15.8, 16.4, 17.4, and 17.8 {mu}m and the 15-18 {mu}m plateau. These different PAH features show distinct spatial distributions. The 15.8 {mu}m band and 15-18 {mu}m plateau correlate with the 11.2 {mu}m PAH band and with each other, and are attributed to large, neutral PAHs. Conversely, the 16.4 {mu}m feature correlates with the 12.7 {mu}m PAH band, suggesting that both arise from species that are favored by the same conditions that favor PAH cations. The PAH contribution to the 17.4 {mu}m band is displaced toward the illuminating star with respect to the 11.2 and 12.7 {mu}m emission and is assigned to doubly ionized PAHs and/or a subset of cationic PAHs. The spatial distribution of the 17.8 {mu}m band suggests that it arises from both neutral and cationic PAHs. In contrast to their intensities, the profiles of the PAH bands and the 15-18 {mu}m plateau do not vary spatially. Consequently, we conclude that the carrier of the 15-18 {mu}m plateau is distinct from that of the PAH bands.

  6. ON THE 10 mum SILICATE FEATURE IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Nikutta, Robert; Elitzur, Moshe; Lacy, Mark E-mail: moshe@pa.uky.ed

    2009-12-20

    The 10 mum silicate feature observed with Spitzer in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) reveals some puzzling behavior. It (1) has been detected in emission in type 2 sources, (2) shows broad, flat-topped emission peaks shifted toward long wavelengths in several type 1 sources, and (3) is not seen in deep absorption in any source observed so far. We solve all three puzzles with our clumpy dust radiative transfer formalism. Addressing (1), we present the spectral energy distribution (SED) of SST1721+6012, the first type 2 quasar observed to show a clear 10 mum silicate feature in emission. Such emission arises in models of the AGN torus easily when its clumpy nature is taken into account. We constructed a large database of clumpy torus models and performed extensive fitting of the observed SED. We find that the cloud radial distribution varies as r {sup -1.5} and the torus contains 2-4 clouds along radial equatorial rays, each with optical depth at visual approx60-80. The source bolometric luminosity is approx3 x 10{sup 12} L{sub sun}. Our modeling suggests that approx<35% of objects with tori sharing these characteristics and geometry would have their central engines obscured. This relatively low obscuration probability can explain the clear appearance of the 10 mum emission feature in SST1721+6012 together with its rarity among other QSO2. Investigating (2), we also fitted the SED of PG1211+143, one of the first type 1 QSOs with a 10 mum silicate feature detected in emission. Together with other similar sources, this QSO appears to display an unusually broadened feature whose peak is shifted toward longer wavelengths. Although this led to suggestions of non-standard dust chemistry in these sources, our analysis fits such SEDs with standard galactic dust; the apparent peak shifts arise from simple radiative transfer effects. Regarding (3), we find additionally that the distribution of silicate feature strengths among clumpy torus models closely resembles the observed

  7. A 205 {mu}m [N II] MAP OF THE CARINA NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Oberst, T. E.; Parshley, S. C.; Nikola, T.; Stacey, G. J.; Loehr, A.; Lane, A. P.; Stark, A. A.; Kamenetzky, J.

    2011-10-01

    We present the results of a {approx}250 arcmin{sup 2} mapping of the 205 {mu}m [N II] fine-structure emission over the northern Carina Nebula, including the Car I and Car II H II regions. Spectra were obtained using the South Pole Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (SPIFI) at the Antarctic Submillimeter Telescope and Remote Observatory (AST/RO) at the South Pole. We supplement the 205 {mu}m data with new reductions of far-IR fine-structure spectra from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) in 63 {mu}m [O I], 122 {mu}m [N II], 146 {mu}m [O I], and 158 {mu}m [C II]; the 146 {mu}m [O I] data include 90 raster positions which have not been previously published. Morphological comparisons are made with optical, radio continuum, and CO maps. The 122/205 line ratio is used to probe the density of the low-ionization gas, and the 158/205 line ratio is used to probe the fraction of C{sup +} arising from photodissociation regions (PDRs). The [O I] and [C II] lines are used to construct a PDR model of Carina. When the PDR properties are compared with other sources, Carina is found to be more akin to 30 Doradus than galactic star-forming regions such as Orion, M17, or W49; this is consistent with the view of Carina as a more evolved region, where much of the parent molecular cloud has been ionized or swept away. These data constitute the first ground-based detection of the 205 {mu}m [N II] line, and the third detection overall since those of COBE FIRAS and the Kuiper Airborne Observatory in the early 1990s.

  8. An intracavity 16-[mu]m Raman laser: A theoretical investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Botha, L.R.; Heerden, S.P. van . Laser Research Dept.)

    1994-12-01

    A theoretical model describing the dynamics of an intracavity 16-[mu]m laser was developed. This laser consists of a TEA-CO[sub 2] laser with an intracavity Raman cell. The Raman medium could be either hydrogen or deuterium, depending on the required wavelength. Stokes, anti-Stokes, and pump coupling were considered. Output energies as well as pulse shapes were calculated. Optimum output coupling was also determined. The model predicted that the intracavity Raman laser could be a viable alternative to a conventional multipass Raman cell for generating intense 16-[mu]m pulses.

  9. SPITZER MIPS 24 and 70 {mu}m IMAGING NEAR THE SOUTH ECLIPTIC POLE: MAPS AND SOURCE CATALOGS

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Kimberly S.; Stabenau, Hans F.; Devlin, Mark J.; Truch, Matthew D. P.; Braglia, Filiberto G.; Chapin, Edward L.; Marsden, Gaelen; Scott, Douglas; Valiante, Elisabetta; Borys, Colin; Viero, Marco P.

    2010-12-15

    We have imaged an 11.5 deg{sup 2} region of sky toward the South Ecliptic Pole (R.A. =04{sup h}43{sup m}, decl. =-53{sup 0}40', J2000) at 24 and 70 {mu}m with MIPS, the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer. This region is coincident with a field mapped at longer wavelengths by AKARI and BLAST. We discuss our data reduction and source extraction procedures. The median 1{sigma} depths of the maps are 47 {mu}Jy beam{sup -1} at 24 {mu}m and 4.3 mJy beam{sup -1} at 70 {mu}m. At 24 {mu}m, we identify 93,098 point sources with signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) {>=}5 and an additional 63 resolved galaxies; at 70 {mu}m we identify 891 point sources with S/N {>=}6. From simulations, we determine a false detection rate of 1.8% (1.1%) for the 24 {mu}m (70 {mu}m) catalog. The 24 and 70 {mu}m point-source catalogs are 80% complete at 230 {mu}Jy and 11 mJy, respectively. These mosaic images and source catalogs will be available to the public through the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive.

  10. ORIGIN OF 12 {mu}m EMISSION ACROSS GALAXY POPULATIONS FROM WISE AND SDSS SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Donoso, E.; Yan Lin; Tsai, C.; Eisenhardt, P.; Stern, D.; Assef, R. J.; Leisawitz, D.; Jarrett, T. H.; Stanford, S. A.

    2012-04-01

    We cross-matched Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer sources brighter than 1 mJy at 12 {mu}m with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxy spectroscopic catalog to produce a sample of {approx}10{sup 5} galaxies at (z) = 0.08, the largest of its kind. This sample is dominated (70%) by star-forming (SF) galaxies from the blue sequence, with total IR luminosities in the range {approx}10{sup 8}-10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }. We identify which stellar populations are responsible for most of the 12 {mu}m emission. We find that most ({approx}80%) of the 12 {mu}m emission in SF galaxies is produced by stellar populations younger than 0.6 Gyr. In contrast, the 12 {mu}m emission in weak active galactic nuclei (AGNs; L{sub [Oiii]} < 10{sup 7} L{sub .}) is produced by older stars, with ages of {approx}1-3 Gyr. We find that L{sub 12{mu}m} linearly correlates with stellar mass for SF galaxies. At fixed 12 {mu}m luminosity, weak AGNs deviate toward higher masses since they tend to be hosted by massive, early-type galaxies with older stellar populations. SF galaxies and weak AGNs follow different L{sub 12{mu}m}-SFR (star formation rate) relations, with weak AGNs showing excess 12 {mu}m emission at low SFR (0.02-1 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}). This is likely due to dust grains heated by older stars. While the specific star formation rate (SSFR) of SF galaxies is nearly constant, the SSFR of weak AGNs decreases by {approx}3 orders of magnitude, reflecting the very different star formation efficiencies between SF galaxies and massive, early-type galaxies. Stronger type II AGNs in our sample (L[{sub Oiii]} > 10{sup 7} L{sub .}), act as an extension of massive SF galaxies, connecting the SF and weak AGN sequences. This suggests a picture where galaxies form stars normally until an AGN (possibly after a starburst episode) starts to gradually quench the SF activity. We also find that 4.6-12 {mu}m color is a useful first-order indicator of SF activity in a galaxy when no other data are available.

  11. Using a Checking Account. Grades 6-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trey, Frances

    Instructions and exercises on the use of checking accounts are provided for students in grades 6-12. The following topics are included: (1) reasons for opening a checking account; (2) how to open a checking account; (3) how to fill out deposit slips; (4) the elements of a check and how to write a check correctly; (5) checking account rules; (6)…

  12. A Stress Control Workbook for Youth Grades 6-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Jennie C.

    Stress is an inevitable part of students' lives, but too much stress can have damaging consequences. Ways in which children can respond positively are covered in this stress booklet. Intended for students in grades 6-12, the booklet is divided into 20 lessons on stress. Each lesson features various activities, role plays, exercises, and checklists…

  13. Parallel Curriculum Units for Science, Grades 6-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leppien, Jann H.; Purcell, Jeanne H.

    2011-01-01

    Based on the best-selling book "The Parallel Curriculum", this professional development resource gives multifaceted examples of rigorous learning opportunities for science students in Grades 6-12. The four sample units revolve around genetics, the convergence of science and society, the integration of language arts and biology, and the periodic…

  14. 36 CFR 6.12 - Prohibited acts and penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (4) Operating a solid waste disposal site in violation of 40 CFR Parts 257 or 258, or in violation of... INTERIOR SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL SITES IN UNITS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 6.12 Prohibited acts and penalties. (a) The following are prohibited: (1) Operating a solid waste disposal site without a...

  15. Comparison of laser-induced breakdown spectra of organic compounds with irradiation at 1.5 and 1.064 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Diane M.; Dagdigian, Paul J

    2008-11-01

    A comprehensive investigation of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) at 1.500 {mu}m of residues of six organic compounds (anthracene, caffeine, glucose, 1,3-dinitrobenzene, 2,4-dinitrophenol, and 2,4-dinitrotoluene) on aluminum substrates is presented and compared with LIBS at the Nd:YAG fundamental wavelength of 1.064 {mu}m. The overall emission intensities were found to be smaller at 1.500 {mu}m than at 1.064 {mu}m, and the ratios of C2 and CN molecular emissions to the H atomic emissions were observed to be less. Possible reasons for the observed differences in LIBS at 1.064 {mu}m versus 1.500 {mu}m are discussed.

  16. THE CONTRIBUTION OF THERMALLY-PULSING ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH AND RED SUPERGIANT STARS TO THE LUMINOSITIES OF THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS AT 1-24 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Melbourne, J.; Boyer, Martha L. E-mail: martha.l.boyer@nasa.gov

    2013-02-10

    We present the near-through mid-infrared flux contribution of thermally-pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) and massive red supergiant (RSG) stars to the luminosities of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC, respectively). Combined, the peak contribution from these cool evolved stars occurs at {approx}3-4 {mu}m, where they produce 32% of the SMC light, and 25% of the LMC flux. The TP-AGB star contribution also peaks at {approx}3-4 {mu}m and amounts to 21% in both galaxies. The contribution from RSG stars peaks at shorter wavelengths, 2.2 {mu}m, where they provide 11% of the SMC flux, and 7% for the LMC. Both TP-AGB and RSG stars are short lived, and thus potentially impose a large stochastic scatter on the near-IR derived mass-to-light (M/L) ratios of galaxies at rest-frame 1-4 {mu}m. To minimize their impact on stellar mass estimates, one can use the M/L ratio at shorter wavelengths (e.g., at 0.8-1 {mu}m). At longer wavelengths ({>=}8 {mu}m), emission from dust in the interstellar medium dominates the flux. In the LMC, which shows strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission at 8 {mu}m, TP-AGB and RSG contribute less than 4% of the 8 {mu}m flux. However, 19% of the SMC 8 {mu}m flux is from evolved stars, nearly half of which is produced by the rarest, dustiest, carbon-rich TP-AGB stars. Thus, star formation rates of galaxies, based on an 8 {mu}m flux (e.g., observed-frame 24 {mu}m at z = 2), may be biased modestly high, especially for galaxies with little PAH emission.

  17. FIRST SCIENCE OBSERVATIONS WITH SOFIA/FORCAST: 6-37 {mu}m IMAGING OF ORION BN/KL

    SciTech Connect

    De Buizer, James M.; Becklin, E. E.; Zinnecker, Hans; Shuping, Ralph Y.; Vacca, William D.; Morris, Mark R.; Herter, Terry L.; Adams, Joseph D.

    2012-04-20

    The Becklin-Neugebauer/Kleinmann-Low (BN/KL) region of the Orion Nebula is the nearest region of high-mass star formation in our galaxy. As such, it has been the subject of intense investigation at a variety of wavelengths, which have revealed it to be brightest in the infrared to submillimeter wavelength regime. Using the newly commissioned SOFIA airborne telescope and its 5-40 {mu}m camera FORCAST, images of the entire BN/KL complex have been acquired. The 31.5 and 37.1 {mu}m images represent the highest resolution observations ({approx}<4'') ever obtained of this region at these wavelengths. These observations reveal that the BN object is not the dominant brightness source in the complex at wavelengths {>=} 31.5 {mu}m and that this distinction goes instead to the source IRc4. It was determined from these images and derived dust color temperature maps that IRc4 is also likely to be self-luminous. A new source of emission has also been identified at wavelengths {>=} 31.5 {mu}m that coincides with the northeastern outflow lobe from the protostellar disk associated with radio source I.

  18. A Redox Economical Synthesis of Bioactive 6,12-Guaianolides

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Bo; Hexum, Joseph K.; Widen, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Syntheses of two 6,12-guaianolide analogs are reported within. The scope of the tandem allylboration/lactonization chemistry is expanded to provide a functionalized alleneyne-containing α-methylene butyrolactone that undergoes a Rh(I)-catalyzed cyclocarbonylation reaction to afford a 5-7-5 ring system. The resulting cycloadducts bear a structural resemblance to other NF-κB inhibitors such as cumambrin A and indeed were shown to inhibit NF-κB signaling and cancer cell growth. PMID:23662902

  19. Diode-pumped Tm : Sc{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} laser ({lambda} = 1.98 {mu}m)

    SciTech Connect

    Zavartsev, Yu D; Zagumennyi, A I; Kalachev, Yu L; Kutovoi, S A; Mikhailov, Viktor A; Podreshetnikov, V V; Shcherbakov, Ivan A

    2011-05-31

    Lasing at a wavelength of 1.98 {mu}m is obtained for the first time in a diode-pumped ({lambda} = 792 {mu}m) active element made of a Tm{sup 3+}: Sc{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} crystal grown by the Czochralski method. The laser slope efficiency reached 18.7% at the output power up to 520 mW. (lasers)

  20. Electronic speckle pattern interferometry and digital holographic interferometry with microbolometer arrays at 10.6 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Vandenrijt, Jean-Francois; Georges, Marc P.

    2010-09-20

    Electronic speckle pattern interferometry and digital holographic interferometry are investigated at long infrared wavelengths. Using such wavelengths allows one to extend the measurement range and decrease the sensitivity of the techniques to external perturbations. We discuss the behavior of reflection by the object surfaces due to the long wavelength. We have developed different experimental configurations associating a CO2 laser emitting at 10.6{mu}m and microbolometer arrays. Phase-shifting in-plane and out-of-plane electronic speckle pattern interferometry and lensless digital holographic interferometry are demonstrated on rotation measurements of a solid object.

  1. Room temperature photoluminescence at 4.5 {mu}m from InAsN

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Q.; Godenir, A. M. R.; Krier, A.; Lai, K. T.; Haywood, S. K.

    2008-03-15

    Nitrogen incorporation in InAsN epilayers grown by radio-frequency plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy was investigated as a function of growth conditions. Reduced growth rate, growth temperature, and arsenic flux significantly enhance the nitrogen incorporation. Optimal growth conditions allowed us to obtain high quality InAsN with nitrogen composition of up to 2.5%. The epilayers exhibit intense 4 K photoluminescence (PL) with double-peak features, which were attributed to free carrier recombination and localized carrier recombination. Strong room temperature PL emission up to a wavelength of 4.5 {mu}m is obtained.

  2. 40 CFR 721.524 - Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic anhydride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.524 Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product... chemical substance identified generically as alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated,...

  3. 40 CFR 721.524 - Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic anhydride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.524 Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product... chemical substance identified generically as alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated,...

  4. 40 CFR 721.524 - Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic anhydride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.524 Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product... chemical substance identified generically as alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated,...

  5. 40 CFR 721.524 - Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic anhydride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.524 Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product... chemical substance identified generically as alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated,...

  6. 40 CFR 721.524 - Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic anhydride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.524 Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product... chemical substance identified generically as alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated, reaction product with maleic... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alcohols, C6-12, ethoxylated,...

  7. 41 CFR 51-6.12 - Specification changes and similar actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Specification changes and similar actions. 51-6.12 Section 51-6.12 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public Contracts COMMITTEE FOR PURCHASE FROM PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED 6-PROCUREMENT PROCEDURES § 51-6.12...

  8. FREQUENT EXPRESSION OF MUM1/IRF4 IN BURKITT LYMPHOMA

    PubMed Central

    Gualco, Gabriela; Queiroga, Eduardo M.; Weiss, Lawrence M.; Klumb, Claudete E. N.; Harrington, William J.; Bacchi, Carlos E.

    2009-01-01

    Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is a highly aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) with endemic, sporadic and immunodeficiency-associated clinical variants composed of monomorphic medium-size B-cells with a high proliferation rate and a translocation involving the C-MYC locus. Classically the immunophenotype of Burkitt lymphoma has been considered to be of germinal center type. In most reports, all cases of BL are reported to be MUM1 negative. MUM1 expression is seen in plasma cells and in a small fraction of B cells located in the light zone of germinal centers corresponding to the final step of intra-germinal center (GC) B-cell differentiation, and in activated T-cells. Therefore, MUM1 expression may denote the final step of intra-GC B-cell differentiation at centrocyte stage, as well as the subsequent steps of B-cell maturation towards plasma cells. Unlike most normal GC B-cells, in which the expression of MUM1 and bcl-6 are mutually exclusive, the tumor cells in approximately 50% of MUM1 positive DLBCL show co-expression of bcl-6, suggesting that the expression of these proteins may be deregulated. In one of the few studies in the literature, 25 BL-cases, including 19 associated with HIV; two of these cases showed occasional MUM1+ cells, less than the 20% cut-off for positivity. We studied 222 cases of well-characterized Burkitt lymphoma with the classic phenotype and C-MYC translocation, and found 90 cases (40.5%) with MUM1 nuclear expression suggesting a late germinal center stage of differentiation. PMID:19144381

  9. Optical amplification at the 1. 31 wavelength

    DOEpatents

    Cockroft, N.J.

    1994-02-15

    An optical amplifier operating at the 1.31 [mu]m wavelength for use in such applications as telecommunications, cable television, and computer systems is described. An optical fiber or other waveguide device is doped with both Tm[sup 3+] and Pr[sup 3+] ions. When pumped by a diode laser operating at a wavelength of 785 nm, energy is transferred from the Tm[sup 3+] ions to the Pr[sup 3+] ions, causing the Pr[sup 3+] ions to amplify at a wavelength of 1.31. 1 figure.

  10. Reflective optical imaging system for extreme ultraviolet wavelengths

    DOEpatents

    Viswanathan, Vriddhachalam K.; Newnam, Brian E.

    1993-01-01

    A projection reflection optical system has two mirrors in a coaxial, four reflection configuration to reproduce the image of an object. The mirrors have spherical reflection surfaces to provide a very high resolution of object feature wavelengths less than 200 .mu.m, and preferably less than 100 .mu.m. An image resolution of features less than 0.05-0.1 .mu.m, is obtained over a large area field; i.e., 25.4 mm .times.25.4 mm, with a distortion less than 0.1 of the resolution over the image field.

  11. Reflective optical imaging system for extreme ultraviolet wavelengths

    DOEpatents

    Viswanathan, V.K.; Newnam, B.E.

    1993-05-18

    A projection reflection optical system has two mirrors in a coaxial, four reflection configuration to reproduce the image of an object. The mirrors have spherical reflection surfaces to provide a very high resolution of object feature wavelengths less than 200 [mu]m, and preferably less than 100 [mu]m. An image resolution of features less than 0.05-0.1 [mu]m, is obtained over a large area field; i.e., 25.4 mm [times] 25.4 mm, with a distortion less than 0.1 of the resolution over the image field.

  12. Experiments on ocular tissue ablation at 5.3 and 6.0 {mu}m with the Los Alamos advanced FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Ren, Q.; Hill, R.

    1995-12-31

    We investigated the ablation characteristics of a picosecond free-electron laser and compared its ablation effects on ocular tissues at 5.3 {mu}m and 6.0 {mu}m. The Advanced FEL at Los Alamos, operating in the wavelength range 4-6 {mu}m, was used for this study. The 10-{mu}s macropulse consisted of {approximately}1000 micropulses, each approximately 15 ps in length and separated from one another by 9.2 ns. The FEL beam was passed through a series of attenuator and focused to a 200-{mu}m spot in the sample with a 150-mm f.l. CaF{sub 2} lens. The energy in each macropulse ranged from 5 to 120 mJ. Five transplantable corneal-scleral buttons preserved in corneal storage media were used for this study. The tissue sample was positioned at the focused FEL beam for the ablation, and then fixed for histologic study. Corneal cuts made at 6.0 {mu}m revealed a well-defined ablation boundary. The measured lateral zone of the tissue damage was 11 {+-} 2 {mu}m. The integrity of the adjacent tissue was well maintained. By contrast, the ablation boundary of the corneal cuts made at 5.3 {mu}m appeared to be very disruptive. The collagen fiber near the ablation was thermally denatured and lost its organized structure. The lateral dimension of such effect extended out to 220 {mu}m beyond the intended cut into the surrounding tissues. We concluded that a short-pulsed laser operating at 6 {mu}m may be a potentially effective tool for cutting ocular tissues.

  13. Aerosol and cloud backscatter at 1.06, 1.54, and 0.53 mum by airborne hard-target-calibrated Nd:YAG /methane Raman lidar.

    PubMed

    Spinhirne, J D; Chudamani, S; Cavanaugh, J F; Bufton, J L

    1997-05-20

    A lidar instrument was developed to make simultaneous measurements at three distinct wavelengths in the visible and near infrared at 0.532, 1.064, and 1.54 mum with high cross-sectional calibration accuracy. Aerosol and cloud backscatter cross sections were acquired during November and December 1989 and May and June 1990 by the NASA DC-8 aircraft as part of the Global Backscatter Experiment. The instrument, methodology, and measurement results are described. A Nd:YAG laser produced 1.064- and 0.532-mum energy. The 1.54-mum transmitted pulse was generated by Raman-shifted downconversion of the 1.064-mum pulse through a Raman cell pressured with methane gas. The lidar could be pointed in the nadir or zenith direction from the aircraft. A hard-target-based calibration procedure was used to obtain the ratio of the system calibration between the three wavelengths, and the absolute calibration was referenced to the 0.532-mum lidar molecular backscatter cross section for the clearest scattering regions. From the relative wavelength calibration, the aerosol backscatter cross sections at the longer wavelengths are resolved for values as small as 1% of the molecular cross section. Backscatter measurement accuracies are better than 10(-9) (m sr)(-1) at 1.064 and 1.54 mum. Results from the Pacific Ocean region of the multiwavelength backscatter dependence are presented. Results show extensive structure and variation for the aerosol cross sections. The range of observed aerosol cross section is over 4 orders of magnitude, from less than 10(-9) (m sr)(-1) to greater than 10(-5) (m sr)(-1). PMID:18253366

  14. Reflective Praxis through Narrative and Poetry: Performing "Peace Mum"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prendergast, Monica

    2010-01-01

    In the autumn of 2007 and spring of 2008 the author performed an adapted version of Dario Fo and Franca Rame's one-woman play "Peace Mom" (retitled for Canadian audiences as "Peace Mum") about American mother and peace activist Cindy Sheehan. The play was performed for University of Victoria Applied Theatre students and also in a number of…

  15. 21 CFR 516.24 - Granting MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Granting MUMS-drug designation. 516.24 Section 516.24 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation...

  16. 21 CFR 516.24 - Granting MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Granting MUMS-drug designation. 516.24 Section 516.24 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation...

  17. 21 CFR 516.24 - Granting MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Granting MUMS-drug designation. 516.24 Section 516.24 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation...

  18. 21 CFR 516.24 - Granting MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Granting MUMS-drug designation. 516.24 Section 516.24 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation...

  19. THE 5.25 AND 5.7 {mu}m ASTRONOMICAL POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON EMISSION FEATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Boersma, C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Mattioda, A. L.; Allamandola, L. J.; Bauschlicher, C. W.; Peeters, E.

    2009-01-10

    Astronomical mid-IR spectra show two minor polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features at 5.25 and 5.7 {mu}m (1905 and 1754 cm{sup -1}) that hitherto have been little studied, but contain information about the astronomical PAH population that complements that of the major emission bands. Here, we report a study involving both laboratory and theoretical analysis of the fundamentals of PAH spectroscopy that produce features in this region and use these to analyze the astronomical spectra. The Infrared Space Observatory Short Wavelength Spectrograph spectra of 15 objects showing these PAH features were considered for this study, however only four (HD 44179; NGC 7027; Orion Bar, two positions) have sufficient signal-to-noise between 5 and 6 {mu}m to allow for an in-depth analysis. All four astronomical spectra show similar peak positions and profiles. The 5.25 {mu}m feature is peaked and asymmetric, with an FWHM of about 0.12 {+-} 0.01 {mu}m ({approx}40 {+-} 6.5 cm{sup -1}), while the 5.7 {mu}m feature is broader and flatter, with an FWHM of about 0.17 {+-} 0.02 {mu}m (50 {+-} 5.6 cm{sup -1}). Detailed analysis of the laboratory spectra and quantum-chemical calculations show that the astronomical 5.25 and 5.7 {mu}m bands are a blend of combination, difference and overtone bands primarily involving CH stretching and CH in-plane and CH out-of-plane bending fundamental vibrations. The experimental and computational spectra show that, of all the hydrogen adjacency classes that are possible on PAHs, solo and duo hydrogens consistently produce prominent bands at the observed positions, whereas quartet hydrogens do not. In all, this study supports the picture that astronomical PAHs are large with compact, regular structures. From the coupling with primarily strong CH out-of-plane bending modes, one might surmise that the 5.25 and 5.7 {mu}m bands track the neutral PAH population. However, theory suggests that the role of charge in these astronomical bands might also be

  20. DEEP SPITZER 24 {mu}m COSMOS IMAGING. I. THE EVOLUTION OF LUMINOUS DUSTY GALAXIES-CONFRONTING THE MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Le Floc'h, Emeric; Ilbert, Olivier; Riguccini, Laurie; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Sanders, David; Aussel, Herve; Feruglio, Chiara; Frayer, David T.; Salvato, Mara; Capak, Peter; Scoville, Nick; Arnouts, Stephane; Surace, Jason; Sheth, Kartik; Yan Lin; Rodighiero, Giulia; Heinis, Sebastien; McCracken, Henry Joy; Thompson, David; Koekemoer, Anton

    2009-09-20

    We present the first results obtained from the identification of {approx}30,000 sources in the Spitzer/24 {mu}m observations of the COSMOS field at S{sub 24{mu}m} {approx}> 80 {mu}Jy. Using accurate photometric redshifts ({sigma} {sub z} {approx} 0.12 at z {approx} 2 for 24 {mu}m sources with i {sup +} {approx}< 25 mag AB) and simple extrapolations of the number counts at faint fluxes, we resolve with unprecedented detail the buildup of the mid-infrared background across cosmic ages. We find that {approx}50% and {approx}80% of the 24 {mu}m background intensity originate from galaxies at z {approx}< 1 and z {approx}< 2, respectively, supporting the scenario where highly obscured sources at very high redshifts (z {approx}> 2) contribute only marginally to the cosmic infrared background. Assuming flux-limited selections at optical wavelengths, we also find that the fraction of i {sup +}-band sources with 24 {mu}m detection strongly increases up to z {approx} 2 as a consequence of the rapid evolution that star-forming galaxies have undergone with look-back time. Nonetheless, this rising trend shows a clear break at z {approx} 1.3, probably due to k-correction effects implied by the complexity of spectral energy distributions in the mid-infrared. Finally, we compare our results with the predictions from different models of galaxy formation. We note that semianalytical formalisms currently fail to reproduce the redshift distributions observed at 24 {mu}m. Furthermore, the simulated galaxies at S {sub 24{mu}m} > 80 {mu}Jy exhibit R-K colors much bluer than observed and the predicted K-band fluxes are systematically underestimated at z {approx}> 0.5. Unless these discrepancies mainly result from an incorrect treatment of extinction in the models they may reflect an underestimate of the predicted density of high-redshift massive sources with strong ongoing star formation, which would point to more fundamental processes and/or parameters (e.g., initial mass function

  1. 41 CFR 51-6.12 - Specification changes and similar actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Specification changes and similar actions. 51-6.12 Section 51-6.12 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions... Procurement List, including a change that involves the assignment of a new national stock number or...

  2. 350 {mu}m POLARIMETRY FROM THE CALTECH SUBMILLIMETER OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Dotson, Jessie L.; Vaillancourt, John E.; Kirby, Larry; Hildebrand, Roger H.; Dowell, C. Darren; Davidson, Jacqueline A. E-mail: jvaillancourt@sofia.usra.edu

    2010-02-01

    We present a summary of data obtained with the 350 {mu}m polarimeter, Hertz, at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. We give tabulated results and maps showing polarization vectors and intensity contours. The summary includes over 4300 individual measurements in 56 Galactic sources and two galaxies. Of these measurements, 2153 have P {>=} 3{sigma} {sub p} statistical significance. The median polarization of the entire data set is 1.46%.

  3. USING THE 1.6 {mu}m BUMP TO STUDY REST-FRAME NEAR-INFRARED-SELECTED GALAXIES AT REDSHIFT 2

    SciTech Connect

    Sorba, Robert; Sawicki, Marcin

    2010-10-01

    We explore the feasibility and limitations of using the 1.6 {mu}m bump as a photometric redshift indicator and selection technique, and use it to study the rest-frame H-band galaxy luminosity and stellar mass functions (SMFs) at redshift z {approx} 2. We use publicly available Spitzer/IRAC images in the GOODS fields and find that color selection in the IRAC bandpasses alone is comparable in completeness and contamination to BzK selection. We find that the shape of the 1.6 {mu}m bump is robust, and photometric redshifts are not greatly affected by choice of model parameters. Comparison with spectroscopic redshifts shows photometric redshifts to be reliable. We create a rest-frame NIR-selected catalog of galaxies at z {approx} 2 and construct a galaxy SMF. Comparisons with other SMFs at approximately the same redshift but determined using shorter wavelengths show good agreement. This agreement suggests that selection at bluer wavelengths does not miss a significant amount of stellar mass in passive galaxies. Comparison with SMFs at other redshifts shows evidence for the downsizing scenario of galaxy evolution. We conclude by pointing out the potential for using the 1.6 {mu}m bump technique to select high-redshift galaxies with the JWST, whose {lambda}>0.6 {mu}m coverage will not be well suited to selecting galaxies using techniques that require imaging at shorter wavelengths.

  4. OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF AMORPHOUS AND CRYSTALLINE H{sub 2}O-ICE: 2.5-22 {mu}m (4000-455 cm{sup -1}) OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF H{sub 2}O-ICE

    SciTech Connect

    Mastrapa, R. M.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Sandford, S. A.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Roush, T. L.

    2009-08-20

    Using new laboratory spectra, we have calculated the real and imaginary parts of the index of refraction of amorphous and crystalline H{sub 2}O-ice from 20-150 K in the wavelength range 2.5-22 {mu}m (4000-455 cm{sup -1}) and joined these results with previous measurement from 1.25 to 2.5 {mu}m. These optical constants improve on previous measurements by having better temperature and spectral resolution and can be used to create model spectra for comparison to spectra of solar system objects and interstellar materials. In this wavelength range, the infrared band shapes and positions of amorphous H{sub 2}O-ice are strongly dependent on deposition temperature. Amorphous and crystalline H{sub 2}O-ice have distinctive spectral bands at all wavelengths in this region with bands weakening and shifting to shorter wavelength in amorphous H{sub 2}O-ice compared to crystalline H{sub 2}O-ice. Some notable exceptions are the band near 6 {mu}m, which is stronger in amorphous H{sub 2}O-ice, and the bands near 4.5 {mu}m and 12.5 {mu}m, which shift to longer wavelength in amorphous H{sub 2}O-ice.

  5. FIRST SCIENCE OBSERVATIONS WITH SOFIA/FORCAST: 6-37 {mu}m IMAGING OF THE CENTRAL ORION NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Shuping, R. Y.; Morris, Mark R.; Herter, Terry L.; Adams, Joseph D.; Gull, G. E.; Schoenwald, J.; Henderson, C. P.; Becklin, E. E.; De Buizer, James M.; Vacca, William D.; Zinnecker, Hans; Thomas Megeath, S.

    2012-04-20

    We present new mid-infrared images of the central region of the Orion Nebula using the newly commissioned Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy airborne telescope and its 5-40 {mu}m camera FORCAST. The 37.1 {mu}m images represent the highest resolution observations ({approx}<4'') ever obtained of this region at these wavelengths. After BN/KL (which is described in a separate paper in this issue), the dominant source at all wavelengths except 37.1 {mu}m is the Ney-Allen Nebula, a crescent-shaped extended source associated with {theta}{sup 1} D Ori. The morphology of the Ney-Allen nebula in our images is consistent with the interpretation that it is ambient dust swept up by the stellar wind from {theta}{sup 1} D Ori, as suggested by Smith et al. in 2005. Our observations also reveal emission from two 'proplyds' (proto-planetary disks), and a few embedded young stellar objects (YSOs; IRc 9, and OMC1-S IRS1, 2, and 10). The spectral energy distribution for IRc 9 is presented and fitted with standard YSO models from Robitaille et al. in 2007 to constrain the total luminosity, disk size, and envelope size. The diffuse, nebular emission we observe at all FORCAST wavelengths is most likely from the background photodissociation region (PDR) and shows structure that coincides roughly with H{alpha} and [N II] emission. We conclude that the spatial variations in the diffuse emission are likely due to undulations in the surface of the background PDR.

  6. 2-.mu.m fiber amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Shibin (Inventor); Wu, Jianfeng (Inventor); Geng, Jihong (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A 2-.mu.m fiber Amplified Spontaneous Emission (ASE) source provides a wide emission bandwidth and improved spectral stability/purity for a given output power. The fiber ASE source is formed from a heavy metal oxide multicomponent glass selected from germanate, tellurite and bismuth oxides and doped with high concentrations, 0.5-15 wt. %, thulium oxides (Tm.sub.2O.sub.3) or 0.1-5 wt% holmium oxides (Ho.sub.2O.sub.3) or mixtures thereof. The high concentration of thulium dopants provide highly efficient pump absorption and high quantum efficiency. Co-doping of Tm and Ho can broaden the ASE spectrum.

  7. Effect of laser radiation absorption in water and blood on the optimal wavelength for endovenous obliteration of varicose veins

    SciTech Connect

    Zhilin, K M; Minaev, V P; Sokolov, Aleksandr L

    2009-08-31

    This work examines laser radiation absorption in water and blood at the wavelengths that are used in endovenous laser treatment (EVLT): 0.81-1.06, 1.32, 1.47, 1.5 and 1.56 {mu}m. It is shown that the best EVLT conditions are ensured by 1.56-{mu}m radiation. Analysis of published data suggests that even higher EVLT efficacy may be achieved at wavelengths of 1.68 and 1.7 {mu}m. (laser medicine)

  8. Optical amplification at the 1.31 wavelength

    DOEpatents

    Cockroft, Nigel J.

    1994-01-01

    An optical amplifier operating at the 1.31 .mu.m wavelength for use in such applications as telecommunications, cable television, and computer systems. An optical fiber or other waveguide device is doped with both Tm.sup.3+ and Pr.sup.3+ ions. When pumped by a diode laser operating at a wavelength of 785 nm, energy is transferred from the Tm.sup.3+ ions to the Pr.sup.3+ ions, causing the Pr.sup.3+ ions to amplify at a wavelength of 1.31

  9. FOUR DECADES OF IRC +10216: EVOLUTION OF A CARBON-RICH DUST SHELL RESOLVED AT 10 {mu}m WITH MMT ADAPTIVE OPTICS AND MIRAC4

    SciTech Connect

    Males, Jared R.; Close, Laird M.; Skemer, Andrew J.; Hinz, Philip M.; Hoffmann, William F.; Marengo, Massimo

    2012-01-10

    The evolved carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch star IRC +10216 (CW Leo) is the brightest mid-infrared source outside the solar system, as well as one of the closest examples of an evolved star losing mass. It has a complex and variable circumstellar structure on small scales in the near-infrared, and mid-infrared interferometry has revealed a dynamic dust formation zone. We have obtained diffraction-limited imaging and grism spectroscopy of IRC +10216 at the 6.5 m MMT in the N band ({approx}8-13 {mu}m). These new observations show that a change has occurred in the dust shell surrounding IRC +10216 over the last two decades, which is illustrated by a change in the apparent shape of the well-known SiC spectral feature at {approx}11 {mu}m and a reduction in the continuum at 13 {mu}m. As expected, our diffraction-limited spatial information shows an extended circumstellar envelope. We also demonstrate that the dusty envelope appears to be {approx}30% larger at the wavelengths of the SiC feature, likely due to the increased opacity of SiC. The deconvolved full width at half-maximum of the object increases from 0.''43 ({approx} 56 AU) for {lambda} < 10 {mu}m to 0.''58 ({approx}75 AU) at 11.8 {mu}m, then decreases to 0.''5 ({approx}65 AU) at 12.7 {mu}m. Our estimates of IRC +10216's size allow us to plausibly tie the change in the spectrum over the last 12.5 years to the evolution of the dusty circumstellar envelope at speeds of 12-17 km s{sup -1}.

  10. Improving the Precollegiate Curriculum on Latin America, Grades 6-12. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirth, John D.

    The Latin America Project, which developed print and nonprint materials for use in grades 6-12, is described. The two-year effort was conducted in five phases: survey of existing materials; the development of curriculum units; review of curriculum by teachers attending summer institutes; field testing and evaluation; and dissemination. Titles of…

  11. Teaching Global Awareness Using the Media. Grades 6-12, Global Awareness Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamy, Steven L.; And Others

    This teaching guide on global awareness contains 15 media-related activities for students in grades 6-12. The objective is to help students see how the media affect their opinions and the roles the media plays in world affairs. The activities are divided into five sections. The first section contains a general survey of the students' knowledge of…

  12. 40 CFR 721.10559 - Morpholine, 4-C6-12 acyl derivs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as morpholine, 4-C6-12 acyl derivs. (PMN P-06...) through (h) are applicable to manufacturers, importers, and processors of this substance. (2) Limitations... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific...

  13. University of Chicago School Mathematics Project 6-12 Curriculum. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "University of Chicago School Mathematics Project ("UCSMP") 6-12 Curriculum" is a series of yearlong courses--(1) Transition Mathematics; (2) Algebra; (3) Geometry; (4) Advanced Algebra; (5) Functions, Statistics, and Trigonometry; and (6) Precalculus and Discrete Mathematics--emphasizing problem solving, real-world applications, and the use…

  14. Health Problems in the Classroom 6-12: An A-Z Reference Guide for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huffman, Dolores M.; Fontaine, Karen Lee; Price, Bernadette K.

    This guide provides a resource for middle and high school teachers, teacher aides, administrators, and educators, covering health problems that affect students in grades 6-12. The handbook alphabetically lists the most current health concerns for this age group. Part 1, "Health Issues in the Classroom," includes (1) "Health, Illness, and…

  15. Teens on Target Violence Prevention Curriculum for Grades 6-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Marla G.; Calhoun, Deane

    This curriculum is designed to help schools implement programs to prevent violence among students in grades 6-12. It is a six-session, school based curriculum intended for adolescents who are living in communities experiencing high rates of violence. It is facilitated by trained Teens on Target (TNT) members/peer educators, young people who are…

  16. X-ray generation in cryogenic targets irradiated by 1 {mu}m pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoura, A.; Amano, S.; Miyamoto, S.; Mochizuki, T.

    1998-01-01

    Soft x-ray spectral radiations from Xe, H{sub 2}O, and CO{sub 2} cryogenic targets irradiated by a 1 {mu}m neodymium doped YAG-slab laser at pulse widths of 12{endash}20 ns and at laser intensities of 5{times}10{sup 10}{endash}10{sup 12}W/cm{sup 2} have been observed. These targets radiate soft x-rays in a wavelength range of 10{endash}13 nm which is useful for projection microlithography. We have found a strong x-ray spectral peak at {lambda}=10.8nm with a Xe cryogenic target. The measured x-ray conversion efficiency with the Xe target was 0.8{percent}/sr({lambda}=10.8{plus_minus}0.27nm) at a laser intensity of 1{times}10{sup 12}W/cm{sup 2}. This was ten times or more efficient than that with H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} targets. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Sum-frequency generation from molecular monolayers using 14 {mu}m radiation from the FELIX free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Ham, E.W.M.; Vrehen, Q.H.F.; Eliel, E.R.

    1995-12-31

    Sum-frequency generation (SFG) has developed into a widely applied tool for study of surfaces and interfaces where molecules are present. It combines the surface specificity of a second-order nonlinear optical technique with the power of a spectroscopic method, and it can be used under widely varying experimental conditions ranging from UHV to electrochemical cells. The important characteristic of SFG is that it allows one to study the average spatial orientation of a molecular bond in a monolayer of molecules at an interface. Until recently SFG measurements were confined to the frequency interval Y {mu} > 1700 cm{sup -1} because of a lack of suitable laser sources at wave-lengths {lambda} > 6 {mu}m. So for most molecules only a few vibrational modes and thus intramolecular bonds can be studied. We have developed a universal sum-frequency spectrometer around the FELIX free-electron law that covers the complete molecular fingerprint since we can generate any IR wavelength between 2.75 and 110 f{mu} at the FELIX facility. We have used this setup for a series of exploratory SFG experiments in a frequency range that was hitherto unexplored in the study of molecular monolayers. We have studied thiol monolayers chemisorbed on a variety of noble metals (Au, Ag, Pt) where we focussed on the C-S stretch vibration at {nu} = 702 cm{sup -1} ({lambda} = 14.3 {mu}m). We have found spectroscopic features revealing the presence of both the trane and gauche conformers of the adsorbed molecules. The present measurements open a whole new wavelength range for nonlinear optical studies of interfaces.

  18. Method of Controlling Lasing Wavelength(s)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P. (Inventor); Murray, Keith E. (Inventor); Hutcheson, Ralph L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A method is provided to control the lasing wavelength of a laser material without changing or adjusting the mechanical components of a laser device, The rate at which the laser material is pumped with the pumping energy is controlled so that lasing occurs at one or more lasing wavelengths based on the rate. The lasing wavelengths are determined by transition lifetimes and/or energy transfer rates.

  19. Successive composition of two laser channels upon excitation of He-Ar-Xe (2.03 {mu}m) and Ar-Xe (1.73 {mu}m) mixtures by uranium fission fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Pikulev, A A; Tsvetkov, V M; Sosnin, P V; Sinyanskii, A A

    2009-06-30

    The operation efficiency of the scheme with successive composition of two laser channels upon excitation of the active medium by uranium-235 fission fragments is studied experimentally and numerically. For the He:Ar:Xe = 380:380:1 mixture (at a pressure of 1 atm and the lasing wavelength {lambda} = 2.03 {mu}m) the maximum lasing power of a double channel (1 kW) is almost twice that of a single channel (540 W). Calculations show that in the case of ideal composition (without losses on mirrors) the lasing power of the double channel can be increased to 1.2 kW. For the Ar:Xe = 380:1 mixture (the pressure is 0.5 atm, {lambda} = 1.73 {mu}m) the maximum lasing power of the double channel (620 W) is slightly above that of the single channel (520 W), which is caused by the losses on aluminum mirrors employed for channel doubling and by a negative effect of optical inhomogeneities. In the case of ideal composition, the lasing power can be increased to 830 W. (lasers)

  20. INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF GAS-PHASE POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON CATIONS IN THE 10-50 {mu}m SPECTRAL RANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, Joost M.; Redlich, Britta; Van der Meer, Alexander F. G.; Oomens, Jos

    2011-11-10

    The gas-phase infrared spectra of four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) cations have been recorded in the 10-50 {mu}m (or 1000-200 cm{sup -1}) spectral range via IR multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy. Ionized PAHs are formed by UV laser ionization in an effusive beam and subsequently irradiated with a single pulse of narrowband tunable infrared light produced by the Free-Electron Laser for IntraCavity Experiments FELICE. The ion population is then analyzed in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Upon resonance, dissociation is induced so that IR spectra can be recorded by monitoring either the depleted parent ion intensity or the appearance of fragment ions as a function of the wavelength. The intracavity IR fluence enables the recording of IRMPD spectra of strongly bound PAH cations in the hitherto inaccessible far-IR spectral range. Experimental spectra are presented for the radical cations of anthracene, tetracene, pentacene, and coronene. Spectra calculated with density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-311g(2df,2pd) level reproduce IR frequencies reasonably accurately in this spectral range when a uniform scaling factor of 0.94 over the complete 10-50 {mu}m spectral range is employed. We show that even vibrational modes with a calculated IR intensity lower than 1 km mol{sup -1} can be observed. For the catacondensed PAH cations we find CH out-of-plane bending vibrations involving four adjacent CH groups within a few wavenumbers of 733 cm{sup -1}, closely matching the 13.6 {mu}m UIR band. For the larger systems, pentacene and coronene, we observe a continuous structureless background absorption above 400 cm{sup -1} which is attributed to the high density of IR dipole allowed combination modes for these systems.

  1. [CrIII8MII6]12+ Coordination Cubes (MII=Cu, Co)**

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, Sergio; O'Connor, Helen M; Pineda, Eufemio Moreno; Pedersen, Kasper S; Nichol, Gary S; Mønsted, Ole; Weihe, Høgni; Piligkos, Stergios; McInnes, Eric J L; Lusby, Paul J; Brechin, Euan K

    2015-01-01

    [CrIII8MII6]12+ (MII=Cu, Co) coordination cubes were constructed from a simple [CrIIIL3] metalloligand and a “naked” MII salt. The flexibility in the design proffers the potential to tune the physical properties, as all the constituent parts of the cage can be changed without structural alteration. Computational techniques (known in theoretical nuclear physics as statistical spectroscopy) in tandem with EPR spectroscopy are used to interpret the magnetic behavior. PMID:25891167

  2. 21 CFR 516.23 - Timing of requests for MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.23 Timing of requests for MUMS-drug designation. A sponsor may request MUMS-drug designation at any time in the drug...

  3. 21 CFR 516.23 - Timing of requests for MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.23 Timing of requests for MUMS-drug designation. A sponsor may request MUMS-drug designation at any time in the drug...

  4. 21 CFR 516.23 - Timing of requests for MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.23 Timing of requests for MUMS-drug designation. A sponsor may request MUMS-drug designation at any time in the drug...

  5. Broadband Ho{sup 3+}-doped fibre radiation source emitting at 2 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkov, A S; Sholokhov, E M; Paramonov, V M; Kosolapov, A F

    2008-10-31

    A 2-{mu}m broadband radiation source based on a fibre doped with holmium ions, which is pumped by a 1.12-{mu}m ytterbium fibre laser, is developed. The maximum output power of 8 mW is achieved for the emission spectrum width of 45 nm. (active optical fibres)

  6. 21 CFR 516.28 - Publication of MUMS-drug designations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... FDA will periodically update a publicly available list of MUMS-designated drugs. This list will be... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Publication of MUMS-drug designations. 516.28 Section 516.28 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  7. 21 CFR 516.28 - Publication of MUMS-drug designations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... FDA will periodically update a publicly available list of MUMS-designated drugs. This list will be... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Publication of MUMS-drug designations. 516.28 Section 516.28 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  8. Specific Heat of Helium in 2 {mu}m3 Boxes, Coupled or Uncoupled?

    SciTech Connect

    Mooney, K. P.; Kimball, M. O.; Gasparini, F. M.

    2006-09-07

    We report on recent measurements of the specific heat of helium confined in pill-boxes 2 {mu}m across and 2 {mu}m deep made lithographically on a silicon wafer. The experimental cells distribute liquid from a bulk reservoir to {approx} 108 boxes by an array of very shallow fill-channels (0.019 {mu}m and 0.010 {mu}m) which represent a negligible volume compared to that of the boxes. Since the channels are so shallow, the helium in them becomes superfluid at a much lower temperature than the liquid in the boxes. Therefore, during the course of the heat capacity measurements, the liquid in the channels in always normal, and the cell would be expected to behave as a system of uncoupled boxes. We compare these measurements with one previously made of a cell where the confinement was to 1 {mu}m boxes with an equivalent fill arrangement. While the shift in the position of the specific heat maximum relative to the 1 {mu}m cell is what one would expect on the basis of finite-size scaling, there are discrepancies in the specific heat amplitude between the 2 {mu}m cell utilizing different depth fill-channels, and with the 1 {mu}m cell. It is possible that the channels, even though normal and of negligible volume, provide a weak coupling between the boxes leading to a collective rather than single-box behavior.

  9. 1.55 {mu}m GaAs/GaNAsSb/GaAs optical waveguides grown by radio frequency nitrogen plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, K. H.; Yoon, S. F.; Loke, W. K.; Wicaksono, S.; Xu, Z.; Ng, T. K.; Lew, K. L.; Saadsaoud, N.; Zegaoui, M.; Decoster, D.; Chazelas, J.

    2008-03-17

    We demonstrate a 1.55 {mu}m GaAs/GaNAsSb/GaAs optical waveguide grown by molecular beam epitaxy as an alternative to the AlGaAs/GaAs system. The 0.4-{mu}m-thick GaNAsSb guiding layer contains {approx}3.5% of N and 9% of Sb, resulting in optical band gap of 0.88 eV. The refractive index of the GaNAsSb layer was measured from 800 to 1700 nm. The GaNAsSb layer has a refractive index value of 3.42 at 1.55 {mu}m wavelength. The propagation loss measured using the Fabry-Perot resonance method was found to be affected by nitrogen-related defect absorption.

  10. Molecular beam epitaxy grown AlAsSb/GaAsSb distributed Bragg reflector on InP substrate operating near 1. 55 [mu]m

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, O.; Fritz, I.J.; Dawson, L.R.; Howard, A.J.; Headley, T.J.; Olsen, J.A.; Klem, J.F.; Drummond, T.J. )

    1994-03-01

    Surface normal optoelectronic devices operating in the 1.3--1.5 [mu]m wavelength range require distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) with a practical number ([le]50) of mirror layers. This requirement implies a large refractive index difference between the mirror layers, which is difficult to achieve in the traditionally used phosphide compounds. For the first time, an AlAsSb/GaAsSb DBR grown nominally lattice matched to an InP substrate by molecular beam epitaxy is demonstrated. Reflectivity measurements indicate a stop band centered at 1.53 [mu]m, which is well fitted by these theoretical predictions. Atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy indicate reasonable crystal quality with some defects due to an unintentional lattice mismatch to the substrate.

  11. Energy transition characterization of 1.18 and 1.3 {mu}m bands of bismuth fiber by spectroscopy of the transient oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Gumenyuk, Regina; Okhotnikov, Oleg G.; Golant, Konstantin; Golant, Konstantin; Gumenyuk, Regina; Okhotnikov, Oleg G.

    2011-05-09

    The experimental evidence of laser transition type in bismuth-doped silica fibers operating at different spectral bands is presented. Spectrally resolved transient (relaxation) oscillations studied for a Bi-doped fiber laser at room and liquid-nitrogen temperatures allow to identify the three- and four-level energy bands. 1.18 {mu}m short-wavelength band is found to be a three-level system at room temperature with highly populated terminal energy level of laser transition. The depopulation of ground level by cooling the fiber down to liquid-nitrogen temperature changes the transition to four-level type. Four-level energy transition distinguished at 1.32 {mu}m exhibits the net gain at room temperature.

  12. Metamorphic approach to single quantum dot emission at 1.55 {mu}m on GaAs substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Semenova, E. S.; Hostein, R.; Patriarche, G.; Mauguin, O.; Largeau, L.; Robert-Philip, I.; Beveratos, A.; Lemaitre, A.

    2008-05-15

    We report on the fabrication and the characterization of InAs quantum dots (QDs) embedded in an indium rich In{sub 0.42}Ga{sub 0.58}As metamorphic matrix grown on a GaAs substrate. Growth conditions were chosen so as to minimize the number of threading dislocations and other defects produced during the plastic relaxation. Sharp and bright lines, originating from the emission of a few isolated single quantum dots, were observed in microphotoluminescence around 1.55 {mu}m at 5 K. They exhibit, in particular, a characteristic exciton/biexciton behavior. These QDs could offer an interesting alternative to other approaches as InAs/InP QDs for the realization of single photon emitters at telecom wavelengths.

  13. Dual Wavelength Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Dual wavelength lasers are discussed, covering fundamental aspects on the spectroscopy and laser dynamics of these systems. Results on Tm:Ho:Er:YAG dual wavelength laser action (Ho at 2.1 m and Er at 2.9 m) as well as Nd:YAG (1.06 and 1.3 m) are presented as examples of such dual wavelength systems. Dual wavelength lasers are not common, but there are criteria that govern their behavior. Based on experimental studies demonstrating simultaneous dual wavelength lasing, some general conclusions regarding the successful operation of multi-wavelength lasers can be made.

  14. SPITZER 24 {mu}m SURVEY FOR DUST DISKS AROUND HOT WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, You-Hua; Bilikova, Jana; Gruendl, Robert A.; Su, Kate Y. L.; De Marco, Orsola; Guerrero, Martin A.; Updike, Adria C.; Rauch, Thomas

    2011-09-15

    Two types of dust disks around white dwarfs (WDs) have been reported: small dust disks around cool metal-rich WDs consisting of tidally disrupted asteroids and a large dust disk around the hot central WD of the Helix planetary nebula (PN) possibly produced by collisions among Kuiper-Belt-like objects. To search for more dust disks of the latter type, we have conducted a Spitzer MIPS 24 {mu}m survey of 71 hot WDs or pre-WDs, among which 35 are central stars of PNe (CSPNs). Nine of these evolved stars are detected and their 24 {mu}m flux densities are at least two orders of magnitude higher than their expected photospheric emission. Considering the bias against the detection of distant objects, the 24 {mu}m detection rate for the sample is {approx}>15%. It is striking that seven, or {approx}20%, of the WD and pre-WDs in known PNe exhibit 24 {mu}m excesses, while two, or 5%-6%, of the WDs not in PNe show 24 {mu}m excesses and they have the lowest 24 {mu}m flux densities. We have obtained follow-up Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectra for five objects. Four show clear continuum emission at 24 {mu}m, and one is overwhelmed by a bright neighboring star but still shows a hint of continuum emission. In the cases of WD 0950+139 and CSPN K 1-22, a late-type companion is present, making it difficult to determine whether the excess 24 {mu}m emission is associated with the WD or its red companion. High-resolution images in the mid-infrared are needed to establish unambiguously the stars responsible for the 24 {mu}m excesses.

  15. FIRST SCIENCE RESULTS FROM SOFIA/FORCAST: SUPER-RESOLUTION IMAGING OF THE S140 CLUSTER AT 37 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Paul M.; Adams, Joseph D.; Herter, Terry L.; Gull, George; Schoenwald, Justin E-mail: jdadams@astro.cornell.edu E-mail: geg3@cornell.edu; and others

    2012-04-20

    We present 37 {mu}m imaging of the S140 complex of infrared sources centered on IRS1 made with the FORCAST camera on SOFIA. These observations are the longest wavelength imaging to resolve clearly the three main sources seen at shorter wavelengths, IRS 1, 2, and 3, and are nearly at the diffraction limit of the 2.5 m telescope. We also obtained a small number of images at 11 and 31 {mu}m that are useful for flux measurement. Our images cover the area of several strong submillimeter sources seen in the area-SMM 1, 2, and 3-that are not coincident with any mid-infrared sources and are not visible in our longer wavelength imaging either. Our new observations confirm previous estimates of the relative dust optical depth and source luminosity for the components in this likely cluster of early B stars. We also investigate the use of super-resolution to go beyond the basic diffraction limit in imaging on SOFIA and find that the van Cittert algorithm, together with the 'multi-resolution' technique, provides excellent results.

  16. Electronic properties and carrier mobilities of 6,6,12-graphyne nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Heyu; Huang, Yuanhe; Bai, Hongcun

    2015-07-15

    Structures, stabilities, electronic properties and carrier mobilities of 6,6,12-graphyne nanoribbons (GyNRs) with armchair and zigzag edges are investigated using the self-consistent field crystal orbital method based on density functional theory. It is found that the 1D GyNRs are more stable than the 2D 6,6,12-graphyne sheet in the view of the Gibbs free energy. The stabilities of these GyNRs decrease as their widths increase. The calculated band structures show that all these GyNRs are semiconductors and that dependence of band gaps on the ribbon width is different from different types of the GyNRs. The carrier mobility was calculated based on the deformation theory and effective mass approach. It is found that the carrier mobilities of these GyNRs can reach the order of 10{sup 5} cm{sup 2} V {sup –1}s{sup –1} at room temperature and are comparable to those of graphene NRs. Moreover, change of the mobilities with change of the ribbon width is quite different from different types of the GyNRs.

  17. Vibrational and thermodynamic properties of α-, β-, γ-, and 6, 6, 12-graphyne structures.

    PubMed

    Perkgöz, Nihan Kosku; Sevik, Cem

    2014-05-01

    Electronic, vibrational, and thermodynamic properties of different graphyne structures, namely α-, β-, γ-, and 6, 6, 12-graphyne, are investigated through first principles-based quasi-harmonic approximation by using phonon dispersions predicted from density-functional perturbation theory. Similar to graphene, graphyne was shown to exhibit a structure with extraordinary electronic features, mechanical hardness, thermal resistance, and very high conductivity from different calculation methods. Hence, characterizing its phonon dispersions and vibrational and thermodynamic properties in a systematic way is of great importance for both understanding its fundamental molecular properties and also figuring out its phase stability issues at different temperatures. Thus, in this research work, thermodynamic stability of different graphyne allotropes is assessed by investigating vibrational properties, lattice thermal expansion coefficients, and Gibbs free energy. According to our results, although the imaginary vibrational frequencies exist for β-graphyne, there is no such a negative behavior for α-, γ-, and 6, 6, 12-graphyne structures. In general, the Grüneisen parameters and linear thermal expansion coefficients of these structures are calculated to be rather more negative when compared to those of the graphene structure. In addition, the predicted difference between the binding energies per atom for the structures of graphene and graphyne points out that graphyne networks have relatively lower phase stability in comparison with the graphene structures. PMID:24737253

  18. DISCOVERY AND ANALYSIS OF 21 {mu}m FEATURE SOURCES IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Volk, Kevin; Meixner, Margaret; Gordon, Karl D.; Hrivnak, Bruce J.; Matsuura, Mikako; Bernard-Salas, Jeronimo; Sloan, G. C.; Kraemer, Kathleen E.; Kemper, F.; Woods, Paul M.; Zijlstra, Albert A.; Sahai, Raghvendra; Gruendl, Robert A.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Indebetouw, Remy; Marengo, Massimo

    2011-07-10

    Spitzer Space Telescope mid-infrared spectroscopy has been obtained for 15 carbon-rich protoplanetary nebulae (PPNe) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and for two other such stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). Of these 17 PPNe, the unidentified 21 {mu}m feature is strong in 7 spectra, weak in 2 spectra, and very weak or questionable in 4 spectra. Two of the four spectra without the 21 {mu}m feature have a very strong feature near 11 {mu}m, similar to a feature observed in some carbon-rich planetary nebulae (PNe) in the LMC. We attribute this feature to unusual SiC dust, although the feature-to-continuum ratio is much larger than for SiC features in Galactic or Magellanic Cloud carbon star spectra. The remaining two objects show typical carbon-rich PPNe spectra with no 21 {mu}m features. One of the LMC objects that lacks the 21 {mu}m feature and one SMC object with a questionable 21 {mu}m detection may have mixed dust chemistries based upon their spectral similarity to Galactic [WC] PNe. The 13 objects that either definitely or may show the 21 {mu}m feature have distinct dust shell properties compared to the Galactic 21 {mu}m objects-the 21 {mu}m features are weaker, the estimated dust temperatures are significantly higher, the unidentified infrared (UIR) bands are stronger, and the UIRs show more structure. Four of the 21 {mu}m objects appear to show normal SiC emission features in their spectra. Many of the PPNe show strong 30 {mu}m features, although this feature carries less of the total mid-infrared emission than is normally the case for the Galactic 21 {mu}m PPNe. The LMC objects are in the LMC halo rather than in the LMC bar. The estimated luminosities of these PPNe vary from 4700 to 12,500 L{sub sun}.

  19. 2 {mu}m laterally coupled distributed-feedback GaSb-based metamorphic laser grown on a GaAs substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Apiratikul, P.; He, L.; Richardson, C. J. K.

    2013-06-10

    We report a type-I GaSb-based laterally coupled distributed-feedback (DFB) laser grown on a GaAs substrate operating continuous wave at room temperature. The laser structure was designed to operate near a wavelength of 2 {mu}m and was grown metamorphically with solid-source molecular beam epitaxy. The device was fabricated using a 6th-order deep etch grating structure as part of the sidewalls of the narrow ridge waveguide. The DFB laser emits total output power of up to 40 mW in a single longitudinal mode operation at a heat-sink temperature of 20 Degree-Sign C.

  20. Q-switched lasing at 2 {mu}m in a Tm{sup 3+}:YAlO{sub 3} laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ushakov, S N; Khromov, M N; Shestakov, A V

    2009-05-31

    The parameters of a Q-switched longitudinally-diode-pumped Tm{sup 3+}:YAlO{sub 3} laser are presented. The pulse repetition rate is f = 1-15 Hz. The maximum average output power is 5 W (at f = 5-15 kHz), the minimum pulse duration is 130 ns (f = 1 kHz), the efficiency is 26% (with the slope efficiency of 58%). The laser wavelength under pumping in the region of 803-805 nm is 1.99 {mu}m. (lasers and amplifiers)

  1. Narrowband 1.5-{mu}m Bragg filter based on a polymer waveguide with a laser-written refractive-index grating

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Viktor I; Panchenko, Vladislav Ya; Seminogov, V N

    2010-10-15

    We report the fabrication of narrowband frequency-selective filters for the 1.5-{mu}m telecom window, which include a single-mode polymer waveguide with a submicron Bragg grating inscribed by a helium-cadmium laser. The filters have a reflectance R > 98 % and a nearly rectangular reflection band with a bandwidth {Delta}{lambda}{approx}0.4nm. They can be used as components of optical multiplexers/demultiplexers for combining and separating signals in high-speed dense wavelength-division multiplexed optical fibre communication systems. (laser components)

  2. 21 CFR 516.31 - Scope of MUMS-drug exclusive marketing rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.31 Scope of MUMS-drug...

  3. 21 CFR 516.31 - Scope of MUMS-drug exclusive marketing rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.31 Scope of MUMS-drug...

  4. 21 CFR 516.31 - Scope of MUMS-drug exclusive marketing rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.31 Scope of MUMS-drug...

  5. 21 CFR 516.31 - Scope of MUMS-drug exclusive marketing rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.31 Scope of MUMS-drug...

  6. 21 CFR 516.31 - Scope of MUMS-drug exclusive marketing rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.31 Scope of MUMS-drug...

  7. 21 CFR 516.26 - Amendment to MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.26 Amendment to MUMS-drug designation. (a) At...

  8. 21 CFR 516.26 - Amendment to MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.26 Amendment to MUMS-drug designation. (a) At...

  9. 21 CFR 516.26 - Amendment to MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.26 Amendment to MUMS-drug designation. (a) At...

  10. THE CARNEGIE HUBBLE PROGRAM: THE LEAVITT LAW AT 3.6 {mu}m AND 4.5 {mu}m IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Scowcroft, Victoria; Freedman, Wendy L.; Madore, Barry F.; Monson, Andrew J.; Persson, S. E.; Seibert, Mark; Rigby, Jane R.; Sturch, Laura E-mail: wendy@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: amonson@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: mseibert@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: lsturch@bu.edu

    2011-12-10

    The Carnegie Hubble Program is designed to improve the extragalactic distance scale using data from the post-cryogenic era of Spitzer. The ultimate goal is a determination of the Hubble constant to an accuracy of 2%. This paper is the first in a series on the Cepheid population of the Large Magellanic Cloud, and focusses on the period-luminosity (PL) relations (Leavitt laws) that will be used, in conjunction with observations of Milky Way Cepheids, to set the slope and zero point of the Cepheid distance scale in the mid-infrared. To this end, we have obtained uniformly sampled light curves for 85 LMC Cepheids, having periods between 6 and 140 days. PL and period-color relations are presented in the 3.6 {mu}m and 4.5 {mu}m bands. We demonstrate that the 3.6 {mu}m band is a superb distance indicator. The cyclical variation of the [3.6]-[4.5] color has been measured for the first time. We attribute the amplitude and phase of the color curves to the dissociation and recombination of CO molecules in the Cepheid's atmosphere. The CO affects only the 4.5 {mu}m flux making it a potential metallicity indicator.

  11. Identification of MUM1 as a prognostic immunohistochemical marker in follicular lymphoma using computerized image analysis.

    PubMed

    Xerri, Luc; Bachy, Emmanuel; Fabiani, Bettina; Canioni, Danielle; Chassagne-Clément, Catherine; Dartigues-Cuilléres, Peggy; Charlotte, Frédéric; Brousse, Nicole; Rousselet, Marie-Christine; Foussard, Charles; Brice, Pauline; Feugier, Pierre; Morschhauser, Frank; Sonet, Anne; Olive, Daniel; Salles, Gilles

    2014-10-01

    Detection of MUM1+ cells in follicular lymphoma (FL) tissues was previously found to be associated with poor prognosis in a single report, whereas the usefulness of Ki-67 immunostaining remains debated. Our goal was to establish whether these markers have predictive value for patients with FL. We analyzed MUM1 and Ki-67 expression using immunohistochemistry in biopsy samples from 434 patients from the PRIMA randomized trial. The MUM1 prognostic value was then validated in a cohort of 138 patients from the FL2000 randomized trial, using the optimal cutoff value obtained from the PRIMA cohort. The surface of positive staining was quantified using computerized image analysis. In the PRIMA cohort, both high levels of MUM1 positivity (cutoff value of 0.80%) and high levels of Ki-67 positivity (cutoff value of 10.25%) were significantly associated with a shorter progression-free survival (PFS) (P = .004 and P = .007 for MUM1 and Ki-67, respectively). In a multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model, only MUM1 retained a statistical significance (hazards ratio 1.56; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-2.37; P = .038) after adjustment for the maintenance arm of treatment and the follicular lymphoma international prognostic index score. In the FL2000 cohort, high levels of MUM1 positivity were significantly associated to a shorter PFS (P = .004) and to a trend toward a shorter overall survival (P = .043). This remained significant using a multivariate Cox regression model after adjustment for the follicular lymphoma international prognostic index and the treatment arm for PFS (P = .016). These results show that MUM1 is a strong and robust predictive immunohistochemical marker in patients with FL. PMID:25149549

  12. Investigation of Antioxidative and Anticancer Potentials of Streptomyces sp. MUM256 Isolated from Malaysia Mangrove Soil

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Loh Teng-Hern; Ser, Hooi-Leng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han; Goh, Bey-Hing

    2015-01-01

    A Streptomyces strain, MUM256 was isolated from Tanjung Lumpur mangrove soil in Malaysia. Characterization of the strain showed that it has properties consistent with those of the members of the genus Streptomyces. In order to explore the potential bioactivities, extract of the fermented broth culture of MUM256 was prepared with organic solvent extraction method. DPPH and SOD activity were utilized to examine the antioxidant capacity and the results have revealed the potency of MUM256 in superoxide anion scavenging activity in dose-dependent manner. The cytotoxicity of MUM256 extract was determined using cell viability assay against 8 different panels of human cancer cell lines. Among all the tested cancer cells, HCT116 was the most sensitive toward the extract treatment. At the highest concentration of tested extract, the result showed 2.3-, 2.0-, and 1.8-folds higher inhibitory effect against HCT116, HT29, and Caco-2 respectively when compared to normal cell line. This result has demonstrated that MUM256 extract was selectively cytotoxic toward colon cancer cell lines. In order to determine the constituents responsible for its bioactivities, the extract was then subjected to chemical analysis using GC-MS. The analysis resulted in the identification of chemical constituents including phenolic and pyrrolopyrazine compounds which may responsible for antioxidant and anticancer activities observed. Based on the findings of this study, the presence of bioactive constituents in MUM256 extract could be a potential source for the development of antioxidative and chemopreventive agents. PMID:26635777

  13. The Arabidopsis Transcription Factor LUH/MUM1 Is Required for Extrusion of Seed Coat Mucilage1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jun; DeBowles, Danisha; Esfandiari, Elahe; Dean, Gillian; Carpita, Nicholas C.; Haughn, George W.

    2011-01-01

    During differentiation, the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seed coat epidermal cells secrete mucilage composed primarily of rhamnogalacturonan I that is extruded from the seed coat upon imbibition. The mucilage of the mucilage modified1 (mum1) mutant contains rhamnogalacturonan I that is more highly branched and lacks the ability to be extruded when exposed to water. Our cloning of the MUM1 gene shows that it encodes a putative transcription factor, LEUNIG_HOMOLOG (LUH). Cellular localization and transcriptional assay results suggest that LUH/MUM1 is a nucleus-localized transcriptional activator. LUH/MUM1 is expressed in all the tissues examined, including the seed coat. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction data suggest that LUH/MUM1 is expressed throughout seed coat development, reaching peak expression late in differentiation. LUH1/MUM1 expression in plants homozygous for mutations in several genes encoding regulators of seed coat mucilage was unchanged. Thus, LUH/MUM1 expression appears to be independent of other transcription factors known to regulate aspects of seed coat mucilage biology. The expression in the luh/mum1 mutant of three genes encoding enzymes needed for mucilage extrusion, MUM2, SUBSILIN PROTEASE1.7, and β-XYLOSIDASE1, was reduced relative to that of the wild type. Overexpression of MUM2 could partially rescue the mum1 phenotype. These data suggest that LUH/MUM1 is a positive regulator of all three genes. PMID:21518777

  14. Wavelength independent interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochberg, Eric B. (Inventor); Page, Norman A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A polychromatic interferometer utilizing a plurality of parabolic reflective surfaces to properly preserve the fidelity of light wavefronts irrespective of their wavelengths as they pass through the instrument is disclosed. A preferred embodiment of the invention utilizes an optical train which comprises three off-axis parabolas arranged in conjunction with a beam-splitter and a reference mirror to form a Twyman-Green interferometer. An illumination subsystem is provided and comprises a pair of lasers at different preselected wavelengths in the visible spectrum. The output light of the two lasers is coaxially combined by means of a plurality of reflectors and a grating beam combiner to form a single light source at the focal point of the first parabolic reflection surface which acts as a beam collimator for the rest of the optical train. By using visible light having two distinct wavelengths, the present invention provides a long equivalent wavelength interferogram which operates at visible light wherein the effective wavelength is equal to the product of the wavelengths of the two laser sources divided by their difference in wavelength. As a result, the invention provides the advantages of what amounts to long wavelength interferometry but without incurring the disadvantage of the negligible reflection coefficient of the human eye to long wavelength frequencies which would otherwise defeat any attempt to form an interferogram at that low frequency using only one light source.

  15. SHELS: OPTICAL SPECTRAL PROPERTIES OF WISE 22 {mu}m SELECTED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Ho Seong; Geller, Margaret J.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Dell'Antonio, Ian P. E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: dfabricant@cfa.harvard.edu

    2012-10-10

    We use a dense, complete redshift survey, the Smithsonian Hectospec Lensing Survey (SHELS), covering a 4 deg{sup 2} region of a deep imaging survey, the Deep Lens Survey (DLS), to study the optical spectral properties of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) 22 {mu}m selected galaxies. Among 507 WISE 22 {mu}m selected sources with (S/N){sub 22{mu}m} {>=} 3 ( Almost-Equal-To S{sub 22{mu}m} {approx}> 2.5 mJy), we identify the optical counterparts of 481 sources ({approx}98%) at R < 25.2 in the very deep, DLS R-band source catalog. Among them, 337 galaxies at R < 21 have SHELS spectroscopic data. Most of these objects are at z < 0.8. The infrared (IR) luminosities are in the range 4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8}(L{sub Sun }) {approx}< L{sub IR} {approx}< 5.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12}(L{sub Sun }). Most 22 {mu}m selected galaxies are dusty star-forming galaxies with a small (<1.5) 4000 A break. The stacked spectra of the 22 {mu}m selected galaxies binned in IR luminosity show that the strength of the [O III] line relative to H{beta} grows with increasing IR luminosity. The optical spectra of the 22 {mu}m selected galaxies also show that there are some ({approx}2.8%) unusual galaxies with very strong [Ne III] {lambda}3869, 3968 emission lines that require hard ionizing radiation such as active galactic nuclei (AGNs) or extremely young massive stars. The specific star formation rates (sSFRs) derived from the 3.6 and 22 {mu}m flux densities are enhanced if the 22 {mu}m selected galaxies have close late-type neighbors. The sSFR distribution of the 22 {mu}m selected galaxies containing AGNs is similar to the distribution for star-forming galaxies without AGNs. We identify 48 dust-obscured galaxy candidates with large ({approx}> 1000) mid-IR to optical flux density ratio. The combination of deep photometric and spectroscopic data with WISE data suggests that WISE can probe the universe to z {approx} 2.

  16. PROBING THE '30 {mu}m' FEATURE: LESSONS FROM EXTREME CARBON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Messenger, Stephen J.; Speck, Angela; Volk, Kevin E-mail: speckan@missouri.edu

    2013-02-20

    Some carbon-rich evolved stars exhibit a very prominent spectral feature at {approx}{sup 3}0 {mu}m''. The C-rich nature of these objects suggests that the carrier is a sulfide, carbide, or other substance apt to form in a reducing environment. However, the carrier of this spectral feature remains disputed, with magnesium sulfide (MgS) as the most favored candidate. In order to investigate the carrier of the {sup 3}0 {mu}m'' feature further, we have taken a dual approach, studying both laboratory and observational data. In order to obtain a homogeneous sample, we studied the {sup 3}0 {mu}m'' feature observed in the spectra of galactic extreme carbon stars that exhibit the 11 {mu}m SiC absorption feature. Thus, we avoid potential differences in the target objects that could contribute to the observed differences in the shape, position, and strength of the {sup 3}0 {mu}m'' feature. In addition, we analyzed the shape and position of the {sup 3}0 {mu}m'' features for a range of sulfide minerals for which laboratory data exist. Our study of observed astronomical features shows a range of shapes and positions for the {sup 3}0 {mu}m'' feature despite similarities in the source objects. The nature of our sample argues against grain processing or temperature differences due to hardening of the stellar radiation field with evolution. While there are very few correlations between spectral parameters for our sample, the peak positions of the {approx}11 {mu}m absorption and 30 {mu}m emission features do correlate, and these peak positions correlate with the modeled optical depth. These correlations suggest that the carriers of the observable spectral features are closely related to one another and to the density/pressure in the dust formation zone. Furthermore, we suggest that the blue-broadening of the 11 {mu}m feature cannot be attributed to SiS{sub 2} based on existing laboratory spectra, but further lab work is needed to investigate the effect of increasing oxidation.

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Herbaspirillum lusitanum P6-12, an Endophyte Isolated from Root Nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Vinícius Almir; Faoro, Helisson; Tadra-Sfeir, Michelle Zibbetti; Raittz, Roberto Tadeu; de Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; Monteiro, Rose Adele; Cardoso, Rodrigo Luis Alves; Wassem, Roseli; Chubatsu, Leda Satie; Huergo, Luciano Fernandes; Müller-Santos, Marcelo; Steffens, Maria Berenice Reynaud; Rigo, Liu Un; Pedrosa, Fábio de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Herbaspirillum lusitanum strain P6-12 (DSM 17154) is, so far, the only species of Herbaspirillum isolated from plant root nodules. Here we report a draft genome sequence of this organism. PMID:22815451

  18. Meaningful, Authentic and Place-Based Informal Science Education for 6-12 Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, E.; Dalbotten, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    American Indians are underrepresented in STEM and especially in Earth sciences. They have the lowest high school graduation rate and highest unemployment. On the other hand, tribes are in search of qualified young people to work in geo- and hydro-technical fields to manage reservations' natural resources. Dalbotten and her collaborators at the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa and local 6-12 teachers ran a place-based but non-themed informal monthly science camps (gidakiimanaaniwigamig) for 7 years starting 2003. Camps were held on reservation and some activities focused on observing seasonal changes. The students enjoyed coming to the camps but the camp activities went largely unnoticed by the reservation itself. For the last 5 years, we and the same cast of characters from the gidakiimanaaniwigamig camps ran a very place-based, research-based camp program, manoomin. The research was focused on manoomin (wild rice) which is a culturally important plant and food that grows in local lakes and wetlands. Manmade changes in hydrology, toxic metals from mining, and changing weather patterns due to climate change threaten this precious resource. Our plan was for 6-12 students to investigate the past, the present and the future conditions of manoomin on and around the reservation. It became clear by 3rd year that the research project, as conceived, was overly ambitious and could not be completed at the level we hoped in a camp setting (6 weekend camps = 6 full days per year). However, students felt that they were involved in research that was beneficial to their reservation, reported gaining self-confidence to pursue a career in science, and stated a desired to obtain a college degree. They also became aware of STEM employment opportunities on reservation that they could aim for. The camps also fostered a trusting relationship between researchers at Fond du Lac resource managers and the U. of MN. Based on these experiences, we proposed a new format for these

  19. Preparation of AlAsSb and mid-infrared (3-5 {mu}m) lasers by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Allerman, A.A.; Biefeld, R.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1996-12-31

    Mid-infrared (3-5 {mu}m) infrared lasers and LEDs are being developed for use in chemical sensor systems. As-rich, InAsSb heterostructures display unique electronic properties that are beneficial to the performance of these midwave infrared emitters. The authors have grown AlAs{sub 1{minus}x}Sb{sub x} epitaxial layers by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition using trimethylamine (TMAA) or ethyldimethylamine alane (EDMAA), triethylantimony (TESb) and arsine. They examined the growth of AlAs{sub 1{minus}x}Sb{sub x} using temperatures of 500 to 600 {degrees}C, pressures of 70 to 630 torr, V/III ratios of 1-27, and growth rates of 0.3 to 2.7 {mu}m/hour in a horizontal quartz reactor. The semi-metal properties of a p-GaAsSb/n-InAs heterojunction are utilized as a source for injection of electrons into the active region of lasers. A regrowth technique has been used to fabricate gain-guided lasers using AlAs{sub 1{minus}x}Sb{sub x} for optical confinement with either a strained InAsSb/InAs multi-quantum well (MQW) or an InAsSb/InAsP strained layer superlattice (SLS) as the active region. Under pulsed injection, the InAsSb/InAs MQW laser operated up to 210K with an emission wavelength of 3.8-3.9 {mu}m. Under pulsed optical pumping, the InAsSb/InAsP SLS operated to 240K with an emission wavelength of 3.5-3.7 {mu}m. LED emission has been observed with both active regions in both p-n junction and semi-metal injection structures.

  20. Wavelength Swept Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Seok Hyun; Bouma, Brett E.

    In optical interferometric metrology, the wavelength of light serves as a reference for length. At a given optical wavelength, an interference signal varies as a sinusoidal function of distance with a period equal to the wavelength. Although this approach offers unrivaled precision, the periodic signal results in a 2π ambiguity for measurement of lengths greater than one wavelength. In optical coherence tomography (OCT), one wishes to determine light scattering distances and distribution within a sample, but without the ambiguity. To accomplish this, OCT is based on interferometry using many optical wavelengths, each serving as a "ruler" with different periodicities. OCT traditionally has used broadband light sources providing a wide range of wavelengths, all simultaneously. Alternatively, a tunable light source emitting one wavelength at a time, rapidly swept over a broad spectral range, can also be used to achieve the absolute ranging capability in OCT. In this chapter, we describe a technical overview of these new emerging sources. We begin with a discussion general specifications of these light sources, the review basic fundamentals of laser and wavelength tuning. Finally, we discuss the principles of various techniques developed to date for high-speed and wide tuning range.

  1. MUM-1 expression differentiates AITL with HRS-like cells from cHL

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wenyong; Xie, Jianlan; Xu, Xiao; Gao, Xue; Xie, Ping; Zhou, Xiaoge

    2015-01-01

    MUM1 is a member of the interferon regulatory factor family of transcription factors. It is normally expressed in plasma cells, late B cells, and activated T cells, and has been described in several B-cell malignancies and some T-cell neoplasms. The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of MUM-1/IRF4 protein in differentiating angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma (AITL) with Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg (HRS)-like cells from cHL. We identified 12 cases of AITL with HRS-like cells and 24 cases of cHL from March 2013 to November 2014. IHC for MUM-1/IRF4 protein was performed on the tissue of these cases and some relevant positive and negative controls. MUM-1 was expressed in HRS-like cells and some neoplastic T-cells in AITL with HRS-like cells (12/12, 100%) and formed the rosettes around the HRS-like cells (12/12, 100%), expressed in HRS cells in classic Hodgkin Lymphoma (cHL) (24/24, 100%) and just one case formed rosettes around the HRS cells (1/24, 4.2%). Based on the results, MUM-1 could be a useful marker for the differential diagnosis between AITL with HRS-like cells and cHL. PMID:26617862

  2. Short wavelength FELS

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The generation of coherent ultraviolet and shorter wavelength light is presently limited to synchrotron sources. The recent progress in the development of brighter electron beams enables the use of much lower energy electron rf linacs to reach short-wavelengths than previously considered possible. This paper will summarize the present results obtained with synchrotron sources, review proposed short- wavelength FEL designs and then present a new design which is capable of over an order of magnitude higher power to the extreme ultraviolet. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  3. Assessing Students' Understanding of Macroevolution: Concerns regarding the validity of the MUM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novick, Laura R.; Catley, Kefyn M.

    2012-11-01

    In a recent article, Nadelson and Southerland (2010. Development and preliminary evaluation of the Measure of Understanding of Macroevolution: Introducing the MUM. The Journal of Experimental Education, 78, 151-190) reported on their development of a multiple-choice concept inventory intended to assess college students' understanding of macroevolutionary concepts, the Measure of Understanding Macroevolution (MUM). Given that the only existing evolution inventories assess understanding of natural selection, a microevolutionary concept, a valid assessment of students' understanding of macroevolution would be a welcome and necessary addition to the field of science education. Although the conceptual framework underlying Nadelson and Southerland's test is promising, we believe the test has serious shortcomings with respect to validity evidence for the construct being tested. We argue and provide evidence that these problems are serious enough that the MUM should not be used in its current form to measure students' understanding of macroevolution.

  4. Whole-grain food consumption in Singaporean children aged 6-12 years.

    PubMed

    Neo, Jia En; Binte Mohamed Salleh, Saihah; Toh, Yun Xuan; How, Kesslyn Yan Ling; Tee, Mervin; Mann, Kay; Hopkins, Sinead; Thielecke, Frank; Seal, Chris J; Brownlee, Iain A

    2016-01-01

    Public health bodies in many countries are attempting to increase population-wide habitual consumption of whole grains. Limited data on dietary habits exist in Singaporean children. The present study therefore aimed to assess whole grain consumption patterns in Singaporean children and compare these with dietary intake, physical activity and health parameters. Dietary intake (assessed by duplicate, multipass, 24-h food recalls), physical activity (by questionnaire) and anthropometric measurements were collected from a cross-section of 561 Singaporean children aged 6-12 years. Intake of whole grains was evaluated using estimates of portion size and international food composition data. Only 38·3 % of participants reported consuming whole grains during the dietary data collection days. Median intake of whole grains in consumers was 15·3 (interquartile range 5·4-34·8) g/d. The most commonly consumed whole-grain food groups were rice (29·5 %), wholemeal bread (28·9 %) and ready-to-eat breakfast cereals (18·8 %). A significantly lower proportion of Malay children (seven out of fifty-eight; P < 0·0001) consumed whole grains than children of other ethnicities. Only 6 % of all children consumed the amount of whole grains most commonly associated with improved health outcomes (48 g/d). There was no relationship between whole grain consumption patterns and BMI, waist circumference or physical activity but higher whole grain intake was associated with increased fruit, vegetable and dairy product consumption (P < 0·001). These findings demonstrate that consumption of whole grain foods is low at a population level and infrequent in Singaporean children. Future drives to increase whole-grain food consumption in this population are likely to require input from multiple stakeholders. PMID:27547396

  5. Long wavelength, high gain InAsSb strained-layer superlattice photoconductive detectors

    DOEpatents

    Biefeld, Robert M.; Dawson, L. Ralph; Fritz, Ian J.; Kurtz, Steven R.; Zipperian, Thomas E.

    1991-01-01

    A high gain photoconductive device for 8 to 12 .mu.m wavelength radiation including an active semiconductor region extending from a substrate to an exposed face, the region comprising a strained-layer superlattice of alternating layers of two different InAs.sub.1-x Sb.sub.x compounds having x>0.75. A pair of spaced electrodes are provided on the exposed face, and changes in 8 to 12 .mu.m radiation on the exposed face cause a large photoconductive gain between the spaced electrodes.

  6. Narrow-stripe metal-clad ridge-waveguide laser for 1. 3. mu. m wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Amann, M.; Stegmueller, B.

    1986-04-21

    Metal-clad ridge-waveguide lasers with stripe widths between 1.5 and 3 ..mu..m have been developed in InGaAsP-InP for 1.3 ..mu..m wavelength. By an appropriate design for these lasers, threshold currents as low as 20 mA are achieved for 200-..mu..m-long cavities. The corresponding low heat dissipation enables cw operation of upside-down mounted devices up to 85 /sup 0/C heat sink temperature.

  7. INFRARED DIAGNOSTICS FOR THE EXTENDED 12 {mu}m SAMPLE OF SEYFERTS

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, Stefi A.; Noel-Storr, Jacob; Dorn, Meghan; Staudaher, Shawn; Gallimore, Jack F.; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Axon, David J.; Robinson, Andy; Buchanan, Catherine L.; Elitzur, Moshe

    2010-02-10

    We present an analysis of Spitzer IRS spectroscopy of 83 active galaxies from the extended 12 {mu}m sample. We find rank correlations between several tracers of star formation which suggest that (1) the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon feature is a reliable tracer of star formation, (2) there is a significant contribution to the heating of the cool dust by stars, and (3) the H{sub 2} emission is also primarily excited by star formation. The 55-90 versus 20-30 spectral index plot is also a diagnostic of the relative contribution of starburst to active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We see there is a large change in spectral index across the sample: {Delta}{alpha} {approx} 3 for both indices. Thus, the contribution to the IR spectrum from the AGN and starburst components can be comparable in magnitude but the relative contribution also varies widely across the sample. We find rank correlations between several AGN tracers. We find correlations of the ratios [O III]lambda5007/[O IV] 26 {mu}m and [O III]lambda5007/[Ne V] 14 {mu}m with the silicate strength which we adopt as an orientation indicator. This suggests that some of the [O III]lambda5007 emission in these Seyferts is subject to orientation dependent obscuration as found by Haas et al. for radio galaxies and quasars. There is no correlation of [Ne V] equivalent width with the silicate 10 {mu}m strength, indicating that the [Ne V] emission is not strongly orientation dependent. This suggests that the obscuring material (e.g., torus) is not very optically thick at 14 {mu}m consistent with the results of Buchanan et al. We search for correlations between AGN and starburst tracers and we conclude that the AGN and starburst tracers are not correlated. This is consistent with our conclusion that the relative strength of the AGN and starburst components varies widely across the sample. Thus, there is no simple link between AGN fueling and black hole growth and star formation in these galaxies. The density diagnostic [Ne V] 14

  8. Kinetically Blocked Stable 5,6:12,13-Dibenzozethrene: A Laterally π-Extended Zethrene with Enhanced Diradical Character.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Priya; Das, Soumyajit; Phan, Hoa; Herng, Tun Seng; Ding, Jun; Wu, Jishan

    2016-06-17

    Although the ground-state and physical properties of zethrene and recently invented 1,2:8,9-dibenzozethrene have been well studied, the other dibenzozethrene isomer, i.e., 5,6:12,13-dibenzozethrene, remained unexplored. A short synthetic route to a kinetically blocked stable 5,6:12,13-dibenzozethrene derivative 5 is presented. The ground state is found to be open-shell singlet experimentally, and the theoretical y0 was enhanced to 0.414, which corroborates nicely with the experimental and theoretical singlet-triplet energy gap. PMID:27227758

  9. 21 CFR 516.29 - Termination of MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.29 Termination of MUMS-drug designation. (a... sponsor; or (5) FDA withdraws the conditional approval or approval of the application for the new...

  10. 21 CFR 516.29 - Termination of MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.29 Termination of MUMS-drug designation. (a... sponsor; or (5) FDA withdraws the conditional approval or approval of the application for the new...

  11. 21 CFR 516.29 - Termination of MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.29 Termination of MUMS-drug designation. (a... sponsor; or (5) FDA withdraws the conditional approval or approval of the application for the new...

  12. 21 CFR 516.29 - Termination of MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.29 Termination of MUMS-drug designation. (a... sponsor; or (5) FDA withdraws the conditional approval or approval of the application for the new...

  13. 21 CFR 516.29 - Termination of MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.29 Termination of MUMS-drug designation. (a... sponsor; or (5) FDA withdraws the conditional approval or approval of the application for the new...

  14. 21 CFR 516.25 - Refusal to grant MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.25 Refusal to grant MUMS-drug designation... rationale in support of the intended use, (ii) Sufficient information about the product development plan...

  15. 21 CFR 516.25 - Refusal to grant MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.25 Refusal to grant MUMS-drug designation... rationale in support of the intended use, (ii) Sufficient information about the product development plan...

  16. 21 CFR 516.20 - Content and format of a request for MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.20 Content and format of a request for MUMS-drug designation. (a) A sponsor that submits a request for designation of a new...

  17. 21 CFR 516.20 - Content and format of a request for MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.20 Content and format of a request for MUMS-drug designation. (a) A sponsor that submits a request for designation of a new...

  18. 21 CFR 516.20 - Content and format of a request for MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.20 Content and format of a request for MUMS-drug designation. (a) A sponsor that submits a request for designation of a new...

  19. 21 CFR 516.30 - Annual reports for a MUMS-designated drug.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.30 Annual reports for a MUMS-designated drug... investigational new animal drug file addressed to the Director of the Office of Minor Use and Minor Species...

  20. 21 CFR 516.30 - Annual reports for a MUMS-designated drug.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.30 Annual reports for a MUMS-designated drug... investigational new animal drug file addressed to the Director of the Office of Minor Use and Minor Species...

  1. 21 CFR 516.25 - Refusal to grant MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.25 Refusal to grant MUMS-drug designation... rationale in support of the intended use, (ii) Sufficient information about the product development plan...

  2. 21 CFR 516.30 - Annual reports for a MUMS-designated drug.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.30 Annual reports for a MUMS-designated drug... investigational new animal drug file addressed to the Director of the Office of Minor Use and Minor Species...

  3. SPITZER 70 AND 160 {mu}m OBSERVATIONS OF THE COSMOS FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Frayer, D. T.; Huynh, M. T.; Bhattacharya, B.; Fadda, D.; Helou, G.; Sanders, D. B.; Le Floc'h, E.; Ilbert, O.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Lee, N.; Surace, J. A.; Capak, P.; Murphy, E.; Aussel, H.; Salvato, M.; Scoville, N. Z.; Fu, H.; Afonso-Luis, A.; Sargent, M. T.

    2009-11-15

    We present Spitzer 70 and 160 {mu}m observations of the COSMOS Spitzer survey (S-COSMOS). The data processing techniques are discussed for the publicly released products consisting of images and source catalogs. We present accurate 70 and 160 {mu}m source counts of the COSMOS field and find reasonable agreement with measurements in other fields and with model predictions. The previously reported counts for GOODS-North and the extragalactic First Look Survey are updated with the latest calibration, and counts are measured based on the large area SWIRE survey to constrain the bright source counts. We measure an extragalactic confusion noise level of {sigma} {sub c} = 9.4 {+-} 3.3 mJy (q = 5) for the MIPS 160 {mu}m band based on the deep S-COSMOS data and report an updated confusion noise level of {sigma} {sub c} = 0.35 {+-} 0.15 mJy (q = 5) for the MIPS 70 {mu}m band.

  4. High power 2 {mu}m diode-pumped Tm:YAG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.J.; Sutton, S.B.; Honea, E.C.; Skidmore, J.A.; Emanuel, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    Using a scaleable diode end-pumping technology developed at LLNL, we have demonstrated a compact Tm:YAG laser capable of generating more than 50 W of cw 2 {mu}m laser output power. The design and operational characteristics of this laser, which was built originally for use in assessing laser surgical techniques, are discussed.

  5. IDENTIFICATION OF THREE NEW PROTOPLANETARY NEBULAE EXHIBITING THE UNIDENTIFIED FEATURE AT 21 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Cerrigone, Luciano; Hora, Joseph L.; Hart, Alexa; Fazio, Giovanni; Umana, Grazia; Trigilio, Corrado E-mail: jhora@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: gfazio@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: corrado.trigilio@oact.inaf.it

    2011-09-10

    Among its great findings, the Infrared Astronomical Satellite mission showed the existence of an unidentified mid-IR feature around 21 {mu}m. Since its discovery, this feature has been detected in all C-rich protoplanetary nebulae (PPNe) of intermediate spectral type (F-G) and-weakly-in a few PNe and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, but the nature of its carriers remains unknown. In this paper, we show the detection of this feature in the spectra of three new stars transiting from the AGB to the PN stage obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Following a recent suggestion, we try to model the spectral energy distributions of our targets with amorphous carbon and FeO, which might be responsible for the unidentified feature. The fit thus obtained is not completely satisfactory, since the shape of the feature is not well matched. In an attempt to relate the unidentified feature to other dust features, we retrieved mid-IR spectra of all 21 {mu}m sources currently known from Infrared Space Observatory and Spitzer online archives and noticed a correlation between the flux emitted in the 21 {mu}m feature and that emitted at 7 and 11 {mu}m (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon bands and hydrogenated amorphous carbon broad emission). Such a correlation may point to a common nature of the carriers.

  6. Characteristics of the 2.65 {mu}m atomic xenon laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hebner, G.A.

    1995-10-01

    The laser characteristics of the 2.65 {mu}m xenon laser transition are reviewed. Measured and extrapolated laser efficiency in nuclear pumped and electron beam pumped system is reported. Previous research has indicated that the reported power efficiency is between 0.1 and 2 percent.

  7. Giving Feedback: Development of Scales for the Mum Effect, Discomfort Giving Feedback, and Feedback Medium Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Susie S.; Marler, Laura E.; Simmering, Marcia J.; Totten, Jeff W.

    2011-01-01

    Research in organizational behavior and human resources promotes the view that it is critical for managers to provide accurate feedback to employees, yet little research addresses rater tendencies (i.e., the "mum effect") and attitudes that influence how performance feedback is given. Because technology has changed the nature of communication in…

  8. BCL6, MUM1 AND CD10 EXPRESSION IN MANTLE CELL LYMPHOMA

    PubMed Central

    Gualco, Gabriela; Weiss, Lawrence M.; Harrington, William J.; Bacchi, Carlos E.

    2009-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) characteristically express CD20, CD5 and cyclin-D1, carries the translocation t(11;14) (q13;q32) and typically has no expression of germinal center (GC) cell markers. So-called aberrant phenotypes such as CD5 negative and cyclin-D1-negative-MCL have been described. Also few cases with CD10 and/or BCL-6 protein expression have been reported. We analyzed 127 MCL looking for the frequency of aberrant immunophenotype, CD10, BCL-6 and MUM1 expression. All cases were CD20 and cyclin-D1 positive, 96% expressed CD5 and 98% showed the t(11;14). BCL-6 expression was observed in 12 % of the cases and MUM1 in 35%. No one case showed CD10 positivity in 30% or more neoplastic cells. Only 3 cases showed 10 to 20% of tumoral cells positive for CD10. MUM1 expression was observed in 67% of the BCL-6 positive cases. 32% of the cases showed a MUM1+/BCL-6-/CD10- phenotype and 56% had a triple-negative-pattern. Aberrant phenotype is infrequent but not rare, and does not rule out a diagnosis of MCL in an otherwise typical case. PMID:19826251

  9. "I Asked My Mum, but" and Other Cases of Unsuccessful Information Seeking by Asking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huvila, Isto

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Failure to find information is common. An exploratory analysis of cases when family members or friends were asked for information can provide better understanding of when, how and why interpersonal information seeking within a close network of individuals fails. Method. A sample of utterances (in form of "I asked my mum, but") was…

  10. Assessing Students' Understanding of Macroevolution: Concerns regarding the Validity of the MUM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novick, Laura R.; Catley, Kefyn M.

    2012-01-01

    In a recent article, Nadelson and Southerland (2010. Development and preliminary evaluation of the Measure of Understanding of Macroevolution: Introducing the MUM. "The Journal of Experimental Education", 78, 151-190) reported on their development of a multiple-choice concept inventory intended to assess college students' understanding of…

  11. 40 CFR 721.6100 - Phosphoric acid, C6-12-alkyl esters, compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol. 721.6100 Section 721.6100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as phosphoric acid, C6-12-alkyl esters, compounds with...

  12. 40 CFR 721.6100 - Phosphoric acid, C6-12-alkyl esters, compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol. 721.6100 Section 721.6100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as phosphoric acid, C6-12-alkyl esters, compounds with...

  13. 40 CFR 721.6100 - Phosphoric acid, C6-12-alkyl esters, compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol. 721.6100 Section 721.6100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as phosphoric acid, C6-12-alkyl esters, compounds with...

  14. 40 CFR 721.6100 - Phosphoric acid, C6-12-alkyl esters, compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol. 721.6100 Section 721.6100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as phosphoric acid, C6-12-alkyl esters, compounds with...

  15. 40 CFR 721.6100 - Phosphoric acid, C6-12-alkyl esters, compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol. 721.6100 Section 721.6100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., compounds with 2-(dibutylamino) ethanol. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as phosphoric acid, C6-12-alkyl esters, compounds with...

  16. Immunogenicity and safety of a trivalent inactivated 2010-2011 influenza vaccine in Taiwan infants aged 6-12 months.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kao-Pin; Hsu, Yu-Lung; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsueh; Lin, Hsiao-Chuan; Yen, Ting-Yu; Wei, Hsiu-Mei; Lin, Hung-Chih; Chen, An-Chyi; Chow, Julie Chi; Huang, Li-Min

    2014-05-01

    This prospective study aimed to investigate the immune responses and safety of an influenza vaccine in vaccine-naïve infants aged 6-12 months, and was conducted from November 2010 to May 2011. Fifty-nine infants aged 6-12 months received two doses of trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine 4 weeks apart. Hemagglutination inhibition titers were measured 4 weeks after the two doses of study vaccine. Based on the assumption that a hemagglutination inhibition titer of 1:40 or greater against the antigen would be protective in adults, two doses of the study vaccine generated a protective immune response of 63.2% against influenza A(H1N1), 82.5% against influenza A(H3N2) and 38.6% against influenza B viruses in infants aged 6-12 months. The geometric mean fold rises against influenza type A and B viruses also met the European Medicines Agency criteria for flu vaccines. The solicited events within 7 days after vaccination were mild in intensity. No deaths or adverse events such as optic neuritis, cranial neuropathy, and brachial neuropathy or Guillain-Barre syndrome were reported. Two doses of inactivated influenza vaccine were well tolerated and induced a protective immune response against influenza in infants aged 6-12 months. PMID:24625341

  17. Long wavelength infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Long wavelength infrared detection is achieved by a detector made with layers of quantum well material bounded on each side by barrier material to form paired quantum wells, each quantum well having a single energy level. The width and depth of the paired quantum wells, and the spacing therebetween, are selected to split the single energy level with an upper energy level near the top of the energy wells. The spacing is selected for splitting the single energy level into two energy levels with a difference between levels sufficiently small for detection of infrared radiation of a desired wavelength.

  18. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1984-06-25

    A short wavelength laser is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses. A multiplicity of panels, mounted on substrates, are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path. When the panels are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses, single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses are produced.

  19. Wavelength dependent delay in the onset of FEL tissue ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Tribble, J.A.; Edwards, G.S.; Lamb, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    We are investigating the wavelength dependence of the onset of laser tissue ablation in the IR Visible and UV ranges. Toward this end, we have made simultaneous measurements of the ejected material (using a HeNe probe beam tangential to the front surface) and the residual stress transient in the tissue (using traditional piezoelectric detection behind the thin samples). For the IR studies we have used the Vanderbilt FEL and for the UV and Vis range we have used a Q-switched ND:Yag with frequency doubling and quadrupling. To satisfy the conditions of the near field limit for the detection of the stress transient, the duration of the IR FEL macropulse must be as short as possible. We have obtained macropulses as short as 100 ns using Pockels Cell technology. The recording of the signals from both the photodiode monitoring the HeNe probe beam and the acoustic detector are synchronized with the arrival of the 100 ns macropulse. With subablative intensities, the resulting stress transient is bipolar with its positive peak separated from its negative peak by 100 ns in agreement with theory. Of particular interest is the comparison of ablative results using 3 {mu}m and 6.45 {mu}m pulses. Both the stress transient and the ejection of material suffer a greater delay (with respect to the arrival of the 100 ns pulse) when the FEL is tuned to 3 {mu}m as compared to 6.45 {mu}m. A comparison of IR Vis and UV data will be discussed in terms of microscopic mechanisms governing the laser ablation process.

  20. Switching of the photonic band gap in three-dimensional film photonic crystals based on opal-VO{sub 2} composites in the 1.3-1.6 {mu}m spectral range

    SciTech Connect

    Pevtsov, A. B. Grudinkin, S. A.; Poddubny, A. N.; Kaplan, S. F.; Kurdyukov, D. A.; Golubev, V. G.

    2010-12-15

    The parameters of three-dimensional photonic crystals based on opal-VO{sub 2} composite films in the 1.3-1.6 {mu}m spectral range important for practical applications (Telecom standard) are numerically calculated. For opal pores, the range of filling factors is established (0.25-0.6) wherein the composite exhibits the properties of a three-dimensional insulator photonic crystal. On the basis of the opal-VO{sub 2} composites, three-dimensional photonic film crystals are synthesized with specified parameters that provide a maximum shift of the photonic band gap in the vicinity of the wavelength {approx}1.5 {mu}m ({approx}170 meV) at the semiconductor-metal transition in VO{sub 2}.

  1. Self-assembled InAs quantum wire lasers on (001)InP at 1.6 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Suarez, F.; Fuster, D.; Gonzalez, L.; Gonzalez, Y.; Garcia, J. M.; Dotor, M. L.

    2006-08-28

    In this work, the authors present results on the growth by atomic layer molecular beam epitaxy and characterization of lasers with one and three stacked layers of InAs quantum wires (QWRs) as active zone and aluminum-free waveguides on (001) InP substrates. The separated confinement heterostructure consists of n-p InP claddings and a waveguide formed by short period superlattices of (InP){sub 5}/(GaInAs){sub 4} lattice matched to the InP substrate. The optimum growth conditions (substrate temperature and As and P pressures) have been determined to obtain waveguides with a flat surface in order to get a uniform QWR distribution. Lasing emission is observed at a wavelength of {approx}1.66 {mu}m up to 270 K from 15x3000 {mu}m{sup 2} devices, with a threshold current density at that temperature of 2 kA/cm{sup 2}.

  2. 21 CFR 516.20 - Content and format of a request for MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Content and format of a request for MUMS-drug designation. 516.20 Section 516.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use...

  3. 21 CFR 516.30 - Annual reports for a MUMS-designated drug.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Annual reports for a MUMS-designated drug. 516.30 Section 516.30 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species...

  4. 21 CFR 516.26 - Amendment to MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Amendment to MUMS-drug designation. 516.26 Section 516.26 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New...

  5. 21 CFR 516.20 - Content and format of a request for MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Content and format of a request for MUMS-drug designation. 516.20 Section 516.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use...

  6. 21 CFR 516.25 - Refusal to grant MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Refusal to grant MUMS-drug designation. 516.25 Section 516.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species...

  7. 21 CFR 516.23 - Timing of requests for MUMS-drug designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Timing of requests for MUMS-drug designation. 516.23 Section 516.23 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor...

  8. Optical fibre with a germanate glass core for lasing near 2 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Dvoirin, Vladislav V; Mashinskii, Valerii M; Iskhakova, L D; Dianov, Evgenii M; Yashkov, M V; Khopin, V F; Gur'yanov, Aleksei N

    2011-01-24

    An optical fibre with a core based on thulium-doped germanate glass (45SiO{sub 2} - 55GeO{sub 2}) and a quartz glass cladding is developed for the first time. Lasing on Tm{sup 3+} ions ({lambda} =1.862 {mu}m) with an output power up to 70 mW at a differential efficiency of 37% is obtained in a laser based on this fibre. (letters)

  9. Ferroelectric Nd{sup 3+}:Sr{sub x}Ba{sub 1-x}(NbO{sub 3}){sub 2}-a new nonlinear laser crystal: cw 1-{mu}m stimulated emission ({sup 4}F{sub 3/2}{yields}{sup 4}I{sub 11/2}) and diffuse self-frequency doubling

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminskii, Alexandr A; Garsia, Sole J; Jaque, D; Capmany, J; Bagayev, S N

    1998-12-31

    Stimulated emission as a result of the inter-Stark transition in the 1-{mu}m {sup 4}F{sub 3/2}{yields}{sup 4}I{sub 11/2} channel of Nd{sup 3+} ions was excited for the first time in an acentric disordered Sr{sub x}Ba{sub 1-x}(NbO{sub 3}){sub 2} (x{approx}0.6) crystal. The low-threshold lasing of this crystal at the 1.0626 {mu}m wavelength was accompanied by diffuse intracavity generation of the second harmonic. (letters to the editor)

  10. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, Peter L.

    1986-01-01

    A short wavelength laser (28) is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses (30, 31). A multiplicity of panels (32), mounted on substrates (34), are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path (42). When the panels (32) are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses (30, 31), single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses (44, 46) are produced.

  11. Wavelength dependent mask defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badger, Karen; Butt, Shahid; Burnham, Jay; Faure, Tom; Hibbs, Michael; Rankin, Jed; Thibault, David; Watts, Andrew

    2005-05-01

    For years there has been a mismatch between the photomask inspection wavelength and the usage conditions. While the non-actinic inspection has been a source for concern, there has been essentially no evidence that a defect "escaped" the mask production process due to the inspection mismatch. This paper will describe the discovery of one such defect, as well as the diagnostic and inspection techniques used to identify the location, analyze the composition, and determine the source of the printed wafer defect. Conventional mask inspection techniques revealed no defects, however an actinic Aerial Image Metrology System (AIMS) revealed a 1.5 mm region on the mask with up to 59% transmission reduction at 193 nm. Further diagnostics demonstrated a strong wavelength dependence which accounted for the near invisibility of the defect at I line (365 nm) or even DUV (248 nm) wavelengths, which had 0% and 5% respective transmission reductions. Using some creative imaging techniques via AIMS tool and modeling, the defect was deduced to have a three dimensional Gaussian absorption character, with total width approximately 1.5 mm. Several non-destructive diagnostic techniques were developed to determine the composition and location of the defect within the substrate. These results will be described in addition to identifying methods for ensuring product quality in the absence of actinic inspection.

  12. Densification of silica glass induced by 0.8 and 1.5 {mu}m intense femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Saliminia, A.; Nguyen, N.T.; Chin, S.L.; Vallee, R.

    2006-05-01

    We investigate the physical mechanisms responsible for waveguide formation in silica glass induced by 1 kHz intense femtosecond laser pulses from a Ti-sapphire laser at 0.8 {mu}m as well as from a femtosecond optical parametric amplifier at 1.5 {mu}m. It is demonstrated that the densification taking place at the irradiated region is the principal cause for refractive index change in the waveguides written with both 0.8 and 1.5 {mu}m pulses. The birefringence induced by the stress arising from such densification and its behavior against thermal annealing are also studied.

  13. Fabrication of 3-{mu}m diameter pin hole array (PHA) on thick W substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Levato, T.; Pathak, N. C.; Ciricosta, O.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Koester, P.; Labate, L.; Giulietti, A.; Gizzi, L. A.; Giulietti, D.; De Angelis, F.; Di Fabrizio, E.; Delogu, P.

    2010-02-02

    Pin-hole arrays are used for a variety of applications including, for example, X-ray imaging of laser-plasmas for fusion relevant studies. More recently, a novel X-ray imaging technique has been proposed (this conference L. A. Gizzi et al.) within the High Power Laser Energy Research Facility (HiPER) to obtain spectrally resolved X-ray imaging using single photon detection. This technique requires a large number of images or, alternatively, large arrays of pin-holes, possibly with very small diameter (<<10 {mu}m). In view of this, a technique was implemented for the fabrication of large arrays of pin-holes in thick metal substrates. Here we report on the optimizations of the laser-matter interaction process to obtain high aspect ratio cylinder-like pin-hole on heavy metal substrate by using a frequency-doubled Ti:Sa femtosecond laser pulses operating at 10 Hz. The influence of an air breakdown and a (ns)prepulse, on the drilled pin-hole, is showed by means of SEM images both for surface effects and internal quality of the channels, with evidence of micro and nano-sized structures. The holes drilled at an intensity just below the laser breakdown threshold for plasma creation in air, have an internal diameter of about 3 {mu}m on a W substrate of 70 {mu}m thickness, a micro-cylinder-like shape and no detectable deviations of the axis from a straight line. Arrays of up to 800 pin-holes were produced with the pin-hole properties being highly stable across the array. The final X-ray transmission is showed by using a mu-focus X-ray source.

  14. Wavelength meter having elliptical wedge

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.; Feldman, Mark

    1992-01-01

    A wavelength meter is disclosed which can determine the wavelength of a laser beam from a laser source within an accuracy range of two parts in 10.sup.8. The wavelength meter has wedge having an elliptically shaped face to the optical path of the laser source and includes interferometer plates which form a vacuum housing.

  15. Wavelength meter having elliptical wedge

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.; Feldman, M.

    1992-12-01

    A wavelength meter is disclosed which can determine the wavelength of a laser beam from a laser source within an accuracy range of two parts in 10[sup 8]. The wavelength meter has wedge having an elliptically shaped face to the optical path of the laser source and includes interferometer plates which form a vacuum housing. 7 figs.

  16. The effects of slipage and diffraction in long wavelength operation of a free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zhulin, V.I.; Haselhoff, E.H.; Amersfoort, P.W. van

    1995-01-01

    The Free-Electron Laser user facility FELIX produces picosecond optical pulses in the wavelength range of 5-110 {mu}m. The proposed installation of a new undulator with a larger magnetic period would allow extension towards considerably larger wavelengths. This would result in the production of extremely short, far-infrared pulses, with a duration of a single optical period or even less. In order to investigate the pulse propagation for free-electron lasers operating in the long wavelength limit, a three-dimensional simulation code was developed. Using the FELIX parameters, with the addition of a long-period undulator, the effects of slippage, diffraction losses, changes in the filling factor, as well as the effects of the optical cavity geometry were studied for wavelengths up to 300 {mu}m, with electron pulses in the ps regime. It is shown that slippage effects are less restrictive for long wavelength operation than the increasing losses due to optical beam diffraction.

  17. High temperatures in inertial confinement fusion radiation cavities heated with 0. 35 [mu]m light

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, R.L.; Suter, L.J.; Darrow, C.B.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Kornblum, H.N.; Montgomery, D.S.; Phillion, D.W.; Rosen, M.D.; Theissen, A.R.; Wallace, R.J.; Ze, F. )

    1994-10-24

    We have demonstrated efficient coupling of 0.35 [mu]m laser light for radiation production in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) cavity targets. Temperatures of 270 eV are measured in cavities used for implosions and 300 eV in smaller cavities, significantly extending the temperature range attained in the laboratory to those required for high-gain indirect drive ICF. High-contrast, shaped drive pulses required for implosion experiments have also been demonstrated for the first time. Low levels of scattered light and fast electrons are observed, indicating that plasma instability production is not significant.

  18. Efficient 0.9-{mu}m neodymium-doped single-mode fibre laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bufetov, Igor' A; Dudin, V V; Shubin, Aleksei V; Senatorov, A K; Dianov, Evgenii M; Grudinin, A B; Goncharov, S E; Zalevskii, I D; Gur'yanov, A N; Yashkov, M V; Umnikov, A A; Vechkanov, N N

    2003-12-31

    An efficient cw single-mode double-clad Nd{sup 3+}-doped fibre laser is developed which operates at room temperature in a quasi-three level scheme on the 925-nm {sup 4}F{sub 3/2} - {sup 4}I{sub 9/2} transition upon diode pump at 805 nm. The gain in the laser resonator at 1.06 {mu}m is strongly suppressed due to a proper choice of the refractive index profile in the fibre core. The laser output power above 0.5 W is obtained with the slope efficiency exceeding 35 %. (letters)

  19. X-ray spectrum in the range (6-12) A emitted by laser-produced plasma of samarium

    SciTech Connect

    Louzon, Einat; Henis, Zohar; Levi, Izhak; Hurvitz, Gilad; Ehrlich, Yosi; Fraenkel, Moshe; Maman, Shlomo; Mandelbaum, Pinchas

    2009-05-15

    A detailed analysis of the x-ray spectrum emitted by laser-produced plasma of samarium (6-12 A) is presented, using ab initio calculations with the HULLAC relativistic code and isoelectronic considerations. Resonance 3d-nf (n=4 to 7), 3p-4d, 3d-4p, and 3p-4s transitions in Ni samarium ions and in neighboring ionization states (from Mn to Zn ions) were identified. The experiment results show changes in the fine details of the plasma spectrum for different laser intensities.

  20. CO STRUCTURE OF THE 21 {mu}m SOURCE IRAS 22272+5435: A SIGN OF A JET LAUNCH?

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, Jun-ichi; Kwok, Sun; Yung, Bosco H. K.; Zhang Yong; Koning, Nico; Volgenau, Nikolaus H.

    2012-11-01

    We report the results of radio interferometric observations of the 21 {mu}m source IRAS 22272+5435 in the CO J = 2-1 line. 21 {mu}m sources are carbon-rich objects in the post-asymptotic-giant-branch phase of evolution, which show an unidentified emission feature at 21 {mu}m. Since 21 {mu}m sources usually also have circumstellar molecular envelopes, the mapping of CO emission from the envelope will be useful in tracing the nebular structure. From observations made with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy, we find that a torus and spherical wind model can explain only part of the CO structure. An additional axisymmetric region created by the interaction between an invisible jet and ambient material is suggested.

  1. Polarized thermal radiation by layer-by-layer metallic emitters with sub-wavelength grating.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Leung, Wai; Kim, Tae Guen; Constant, Kristen; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2008-06-01

    Metallic thermal emitters consisting of two layers of differently structured nickel gratings on a homogeneous nickel layer are fabricated by soft lithography and studied for polarized thermal radiation. A thermal emitter in combination with a sub-wavelength grating shows a high extinction ratio, with a maximum value close to 5, in a wide mid-infrared range from 3.2 to 7.8 mum, as well as high emissivity up to 0.65 at a wavelength of 3.7 microm. All measurements show good agreement with theoretical predictions. Numerical simulations reveal that a high electric field exists within the localized air space surrounded by the gratings and the intensified electric-field is only observed for the polarizations perpendicular to the top sub-wavelength grating. This result suggests how the emissivity of a metal can be selectively enhanced at a certain range of wavelengths for a given polarization. PMID:18545587

  2. ECM at millimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copper, H. W.; Littlepage, R. S.

    1982-09-01

    ECM techniques appropriate to the millimeter wave band are examined with particular reference to the physics of the atmosphere and component performance capability. Model calculations show that even for state-of-the-art threat radars, the required ECM receiver sensitivity is well within the state-of-the-art for broadband superheterodyne systems. For ECM jammers, the most fundamental limitation arises from deficiencies in broadband/high power amplifiers. The solution to this problem will require different ECM system architectures than used at the lower frequencies. At millimeter wavelengths, atmospheric effects permit new jamming techniques requiring lower jamming power. For example, scattering by hydrometeors significantly raises the apparent sidelobe level of even low sidelobe antennas of threat radars, which reduces the power required to infringe through the sidelobes.

  3. Quadrature wavelength scanning interferometry.

    PubMed

    Moschetti, Giuseppe; Forbes, Alistair; Leach, Richard K; Jiang, Xiang; O'Connor, Daniel

    2016-07-10

    A novel method to double the measurement range of wavelength scanning interferometery (WSI) is described. In WSI the measured optical path difference (OPD) is affected by a sign ambiguity, that is, from an interference signal it is not possible to distinguish whether the OPD is positive or negative. The sign ambiguity can be resolved by measuring an interference signal in quadrature. A method to obtain a quadrature interference signal for WSI is described, and a theoretical analysis of the advantages is reported. Simulations of the advantages of the technique and of signal errors due to nonideal quadrature are discussed. The analysis and simulation are supported by experimental measurements to show the improved performances. PMID:27409307

  4. Efficient GaInNAs Gain Mirrors for Semiconductor Disk Lasers at 1.18 {mu}m and 1.22 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Korpijaervi, Ville-Markus; Puustinen, Janne; Leinonen, Tomi; Rautiainen, Jussi; Haerkoenen, Antti; Hakkarainen, Teemu; Guina, Mircea

    2010-11-10

    We report two GaInNAs/GaAs semiconductor disk lasers emitting at the wavelengths of 1180 nm and 1220 nm. The lasers generated 5 W and 7 W output powers, respectively, at a mount temperature of 15 deg. C. Both the gain mirrors were grown by molecular beam epitaxy and consisted of a GaAs/AlAs distributed Bragg reflector and an active region with 10 GaInNAs/GaNAs/GaAs QWs.

  5. Airbreathing Laser Propulsion Experiments with 1 {mu}m Terawatt Pharos IIILaser: Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Myrabo, L. N.; Lyons, P. W.; Jones, R. A.; Liu, S.; Manka, C.

    2011-11-10

    This basic research study examines the physics of airbreathing laser propulsion at the extreme flux range of 1-2x10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}--within the air breakdown threshold for l {mu}m radiation--using the terawatt Pharos III neodymium-glass pulsed laser. Six different experimental setups were employed using a 34 mm line focus with 66 {mu}m focal waist, positioned near the flat impulse surface. The 2nd Campaign investigated impulse generation with the laser beam focused at grazing incidence across near horizontal target surfaces, with pulse energies ranging from 55 to 186 J, and pulse-widths of 2 to 30 ns FWHM. Laser generated impulse was measured with a horizontal Plexiglas registered ballistic pendulum equipped with either a steel target insert or 0.5 Tesla permanent magnet (NEIT-40), to quantify changes in the momentum coupling coefficient (C{sub M}). Part 2 of this 2-part paper covers Campaign no. 2 results including C{sub M} performance data, and long exposure color photos of LP plasma phenomena.

  6. Airbreathing Laser Propulsion Experiments with 1 {mu}m Terawatt Pharos III Laser: Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Myrabo, L. N.; Lyons, P. W.; Jones, R. A.; Liu, S.; Manka, C.

    2011-11-10

    This basic research study examines the physics of airbreathing laser propulsion at the extreme flux range of 1-2x10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}--within the air breakdown threshold for l {mu}m radiation--using the terawatt PHAROS III neodymium-glass pulsed laser. Six different experimental setups were tested using a 34 mm line focus with 66 {mu}m focal waist, positioned near the flat impulse surface. The first campaign investigated impulse generation with the beam oriented almost normal to the target surface, with energies ranging from 23 to 376 J, and pulses of 5 to 30 ns FWHM. Air breakdown/ plasma dynamics were diagnosed with GOI cameras and color photography. Laser generated impulse was quantified with both vertical pendulums and piezoelectric pressure transducers using the standard performance metric, C{sub M}--the momentum coupling coefficient. Part 1 of this 2-part paper covers Campaign no. 1 results including laser plasma diagnostics, pressure gage and vertical pendulum data.

  7. Musculoskeletal extremity injuries in a cohort of schoolchildren aged 6-12: a 2.5-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Jespersen, E; Rexen, C T; Franz, C; Møller, N C; Froberg, K; Wedderkopp, N

    2015-04-01

    The objectives of this prospective school cohort study were to describe the epidemiology of diagnosed musculoskeletal extremity injuries and to estimate the injury incidence rates in relation to different settings, different body regions and injury types. In all, 1259 schoolchildren, aged 6-12, were surveyed weekly during 2.5 years using a new method of automated mobile phone text messaging asking questions on the presence of any musculoskeletal problems. All injuries were clinically diagnosed. Physical activity was measured from text messaging and accelerometers. A total number of 1229 injuries were diagnosed; 180 injuries in the upper extremity and 1049 in the lower extremity, with an overall rate of 1.59 injuries per 1000 physical activity units [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.50-1.68]. Upper extremities accounted for a rate of 0.23 (95% CI 0.20-0.27) and lower extremities accounted for 1.36 (95% CI 1.27-1.44). This study has added a wide overall perspective to the area concerning incidence and incidence rates of musculoskeletal extremity injuries in schoolchildren aged 6-12 years, including severe and less severe, traumatic, and overuse injuries. The understanding of injury epidemiology in children is fundamental to the acknowledgement and insurance of the appropriate prevention and treatment. PMID:24472003

  8. Wavelength-conserving grating router for intermediate wavelength density

    DOEpatents

    Deri, Robert J.; Patel, Rajesh R.; Bond, Steven W.; Bennett, Cory V.

    2007-03-20

    A wavelength router to be used for fiber optical networking router is based on a diffraction grating which utilizes only N wavelengths to interconnect N inputs to N outputs. The basic approach is to augment the grating with additional couplers or wavelength selective elements so than N-1 of the 2N-1 outputs are combined with other N outputs (leaving only N outputs). One embodiment uses directional couplers as combiners. Another embodiment uses wavelength-selective couplers. Another embodiment uses a pair of diffraction gratings to maintain parallel propagation of all optical beams. Also, beam combining can be implemented either by using retroflection back through the grating pair or by using couplers.

  9. Three-dimensional blast-wave-driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability and the effects of long-wavelength modes

    SciTech Connect

    Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Budde, A.; Krauland, C.; Marion, D. C.; Visco, A. J.; Ditmar, J. R.; Robey, H. F.; Remington, B. A.; Miles, A. R.; Cooper, A. B. R.; Sorce, C.; Plewa, T.; Hearn, N. C.; Killebrew, K. L.; Knauer, J. P.; Arnett, D.; Donajkowski, T.

    2009-05-15

    This paper describes experiments exploring the three-dimensional (3D) Rayleigh-Taylor instability at a blast-wave-driven interface. This experiment is well scaled to the He/H interface during the explosion phase of SN1987A. In the experiments, {approx}5 kJ of energy from the Omega laser was used to create a planar blast wave in a plastic disk, which is accelerated into a lower-density foam. These circumstances induce the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and, after the shock passes the interface, the system quickly becomes dominated by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The plastic disk has an intentional pattern machined at the plastic/foam interface. This perturbation is 3D with a basic structure of two orthogonal sine waves with a wavelength of 71 {mu}m and an amplitude of 2.5 {mu}m. Additional long-wavelength modes with a wavelength of either 212 or 424 {mu}m are added onto the single-mode pattern. The addition of the long-wavelength modes was motivated by the results of previous experiments where material penetrated unexpectedly to the shock front, perhaps due to an unintended structure. The current experiments and simulations were performed to explore the effects of this unintended structure; however, we were unable to reproduce the previous results.

  10. UK AMD EMR USERS GROUP REPORT V: benefits of initiating ranibizumab therapy for neovascular AMD in eyes with vision better than 6/12

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Aaron Y; Lee, Cecilia S; Butt, Thomas; Xing, Wen; Johnston, Robert L; Chakravarthy, Usha; Egan, Catherine; Akerele, Toks; McKibbin, Martin; Downey, Louise; Natha, Salim; Bailey, Clare; Khan, Rehna; Antcliff, Richard; Varma, Atul; Kumar, Vineeth; Tsaloumas, Marie; Mandal, Kaveri; Liew, Gerald; Keane, Pearse A; Sim, Dawn; Bunce, Catey; Tufail, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Background/aims To study the effectiveness and clinical relevance of eyes treated with good (better than 6/12 or >70 Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study letters) visual acuity (VA) when initiating treatment with ranibizumab for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) in the UK National Health Service. Currently eyes with VA better than (>) 6/12 are not routinely funded for therapy. Methods Multicentre national nAMD database study on patients treated 3–5 years prior to the analysis. Anonymised structured data were collected from 14 centres. The primary outcome was the mean VA at year 1, 2 and 3. Secondary measures included the number of clinic visits and injections. Results The study included 12 951 treatment-naive eyes of 11 135 patients receiving 92 976 ranibizumab treatment episodes. A total of 754 patients had baseline VA better than 6/12 and at least 1-year of follow up. Mean VA of first treated eyes with baseline VA>6/12 at year 1, 2, 3 were 6/10, 6/12, 6/15, respectively and those with baseline VA 6/12 to >6/24 were 6/15, 6/17, 6/20, respectively (p values <0.001 for comparing differences between 6/12 and 6/12–6/24 groups). For the second eyes with baseline VA>6/12, mean VA at year 1, 2, 3 were 6/9, 6/9, 6/10 and those with baseline VA 6/12 to >6/24 were 6/15, 6/15, 6/27, respectively (p values <0.001–0.005). There was no significant difference in the average number of clinic visits or injections between those with VA better and worse than 6/12. Conclusions All eyes with baseline VA>6/12 maintained better mean VA than the eyes with baseline VA 6/12 to >6/24 at all time points for at least 2 years. The significantly better visual outcome in patients who were treated with good baseline VA has implications on future policy regarding the treatment criteria for nAMD patients’ funding. PMID:25680619

  11. GLAST Science Across Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blandford, R. D.

    2006-12-01

    The GLAST satellites is almost guaranteed to revolutionize GeV gamma ray astronomy because of the great discoveries that are being made at hard X-ray energy by the Suzaku and Swift satellites and in the TeV range using the H.E.S.S. and Magic telescopes. Unidentified EGRET sources are likely to be identified and new and fainter sources will be found. Known classes of sources blazars, pulsars, gamma ray bursts, supernova remnants, binary X-ray sources and so on will be monitored in much greater detail. Finally, there is the need to limit or even detect dark matter through its annihilation signature. The science that will emerge from GLAST will be determined in large measure by the effort that is put into multiwavelength observing. This will require significant commitments of observing time for monitoring pulsar arrival times, measuring faint galaxy spectra, detecting GeV gamma rays gamma ray bursts and so on. In this talk I will attempt to summarize current thinking on the GLAST multi-wavelength observing program and propose some new approaches.

  12. COS Internal FUV Wavelength Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyes, Charles

    2009-07-01

    This program will be executed after the uplink of the OSM1 position updates derived from the determination of the wavelength-scale zero points and desired spectral ranges for each grating in activity COS29 {program 11487 - COS FUV Internal/External Wavelength Scales}. This program will verify that the operational spectral ranges for each grating, central wavelength, and FP-POS are those desired. Subsequent to a successful verification, COS FUV ERO observations that require accurate wavelength scales {if any} and FUV science can be enabled. An internal wavelength calibration spectrum using the default PtNe lamp {lamp 1} with each FUV grating at each central wavelength setting and each FP-POS position will be obtained for the verification. Additional exposures and waits between certain exposures will be required to avoid - and to evaluate - mechanism drifts.

  13. Hg196 and the ``magical quartet'' of the extended Uν(6/12)⊗Uπ(6/4) supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernards, C.; Heinze, S.; Jolie, J.; Albers, M.; Fransen, C.; Radeck, D.

    2010-02-01

    We present the results of a γγ angular correlation experiment investigating the nucleus Hg196 and compare these with a theoretical description of Hg196 within the Uν(6/12)⊗Uπ(6/4) extended supersymmetry. To populate excited Hg196 states, we used the Cologne FN Tandem accelerator inducing the reaction Pt194(α,2n)Hg196 and analyzed the γ decays of levels up to an excitation energy of 2.4 MeV with the HORUS cube spectrometer. The new results on this mercury isotope allow a comparison between the experimental data and the supersymmetrical predictions and show good agreement. This way we can add Hg196 as a fifth supermultiplet member to the so-called magical quartet consisting of Pt194,195 and Au195,196.

  14. Research with high-power short-wavelength lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Holzrichter, J.F.; Campbell, E.M.; Lindl, J.D.; Storm, E.

    1985-03-05

    Three important high-temperature, high-density experiments were conducted recently using the 10-TW, short-wavelength Novette laser system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These experiments demonstrated successful solutions to problems that arose during previous experiments with long wavelength lasers (lambda greater than or equal to 1..mu..m) in which inertial confinement fusion (ICF), x-ray laser, and other high-temperature physics concepts were being tested. The demonstrations were: (1) large-scale plasmas (typical dimensions of up to 1000 laser wavelengths) were produced in which potentially deleterious laser-plasma instabilities were collisionally damped. (2) Deuterium-tritium fuel was imploded to a density of 20 g/cm/sup 3/ and a pressure of 10/sup 10/ atm. (3) A 700-fold amplification of soft x rays by stimulated emission at 206 and 209 A (62 eV) from Se/sup +24/ ions was observed in a laser-generated plasma. Isoelectronic scaling to 155 A (87 eV) in Y/sup +29/ was also demonstrated.

  15. High-order multiphoton photoelectric effect at midinfrared laser wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Georges, A.T.

    2002-12-01

    A theoretical model that predicts the unexpectedly high photocurrents that were reported by Farkas et al. [J. Phys. B 31, L461 (1998)] for the photoelectric effect in gold at midinfrared laser wavelengths (12 {mu}m) is presented. It is shown that the observed effect, a nominally 46-photon process at threshold, is a stepwise and multiple-order process, which is strongly saturated at the moderate laser intensity of about {approx}10 MW/cm{sup 2}. The {approx_equal}30-photon-wide energy spectrum of the observed photoelectron current is due to above threshold photoemission. This relatively efficient above threshold effect is due to laser absorption in the long range Coulombic image surface potential.

  16. THE 8 {mu}m PHASE VARIATION OF THE HOT SATURN HD 149026b

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, Heather A.; Charbonneau, David; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Agol, Eric; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Henry, Gregory W.

    2009-09-20

    We monitor the star HD 149026 and its Saturn-mass planet at 8.0 {mu}m over slightly more than half an orbit using the Infrared Array Camera on the Spitzer Space Telescope. We find an increase of 0.0227% +- 0.0066% (3.4sigma significance) in the combined planet-star flux during this interval. The minimum flux from the planet is 45% +- 19% of the maximum planet flux, corresponding to a difference in brightness temperature of 480 +- 140 K between the two hemispheres. We derive a new secondary eclipse depth of 0.0411% +- 0.0076% in this band, corresponding to a dayside brightness temperature of 1440 +- 150 K. Our new secondary eclipse depth is half that of a previous measurement (3.0sigma difference) in this same bandpass by Harrrington et al. We re-fit the Harrrington et al. data and obtain a comparably good fit with a smaller eclipse depth that is consistent with our new value. In contrast to earlier claims, our new eclipse depth suggests that this planet's dayside emission spectrum is relatively cool, with an 8 {mu}m brightness temperature that is less than the maximum planet-wide equilibrium temperature. We measure the interval between the transit and secondary eclipse and find that that the secondary eclipse occurs 20.9{sup +7.2}{sub -6.5} minutes earlier (2.9sigma) than predicted for a circular orbit, a marginally significant result. This corresponds to ecos(omega) = -0.0079{sup +0.0027}{sub -0.0025}, where e is the planet's orbital eccentricity and omega is the argument of pericenter.

  17. THE CONNECTION BETWEEN 3.3 {mu}m POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON EMISSION AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Jong-Hak; Park, Dawoo; Kim, Ji Hoon; Imanishi, Masatoshi

    2012-02-15

    We investigate the connection between starburst and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity by comparing 3.3 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission with AGN properties. Utilizing the slitless spectroscopic capability of the AKARI space telescope, we observe a moderate-luminosity Type I AGN at z {approx} 0.4 to measure global starburst activity. The 3.3 {mu}m PAH emissions are detected for 7 out of 26 target galaxies. We find no strong correlation between the 3.3 {mu}m PAH emission and AGN luminosity in the limited range of the observed AGN luminosity, suggesting that global star formation may not be closely related to AGN activity. Combining our measurements with previous 3.3 {mu}m measurements of low-redshift Type I AGNs in the literature, we investigate the connection between nuclear starburst and AGN activity. In contrast to global star formation, the 3.3 {mu}m PAH luminosity measured from the central part of galaxies correlates with AGN luminosity, implying that starburst activity and AGN activity are directly connected in the nuclear region.

  18. The Long Wavelength Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. B.

    2006-08-01

    The Long Wavelength Array (LWA) will be a new, open, user-oriented astronomical instrument operating in the poorly explored window from 20-80 MHz at arcsecond level resolution and mJy level sensitivity. Key science drivers include (1) acceleration, propagation, and turbulence in the ISM, including the space-distribution and spectrum of Galactic cosmic rays, supernova remnants, and pulsars; (2) the high redshift universe, including the most distant radio galaxies and clusters - tools for understanding the earliest black holes and the cosmological evolution of Dark Matter and Dark Energy; (3) planetary, solar, and space science, including space weather prediction and extra-solar planet searches; and (4) the radio transient universe: including the known (e.g., SNe, GRBs) and the unknown. Because the LWA will explore one of the last and least investigated regions of the spectrum, the potential for new discoveries, including new classes of physical phenomena, is high, and there is a strong synergy with exciting new X-ray and Gamma-ray measurements, e.g. for cosmic ray acceleration, transients, and galaxy clusters. Operated by the University of New Mexico on behalf of the South West Consortium (SWC) the LWA will also provide a unique training ground for the next generation of radio astronomers. Students may also put skills learned on the LWA to work in computer science, electrical engineering, and the communications industry, among others. The development of the LWA will follow a phased build, which benefits from lessons learned at each phase. Four university-based Scientific Testing and Evaluation (ST&E) teams with different areas of concentration (1. High resolution imaging and particle acceleration; 2. Wide field imaging and large scale structures; 3. Ionosphere, and 4. RFI suppression and transient detection) will provide the feedback needed to assure that science objectives are met as the build develops. Currently in its first year of construction funding, the LWA

  19. THE NON-UNIFORM, DYNAMIC ATMOSPHERE OF BETELGEUSE OBSERVED AT MID-INFRARED WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Ravi, V.; Wishnow, E. H.; Townes, C. H.; Lockwood, S.; Mistry, H.; Tatebe, K.

    2011-10-10

    We present an interferometric study of the continuum surface of the red supergiant star Betelgeuse at 11.15 {mu}m wavelength, using data obtained with the Berkeley Infrared Spatial Interferometer each year between 2006 and 2010. These data allow an investigation of an optically thick layer within 1.4 stellar radii of the photosphere. The layer has an optical depth of {approx}1 at 11.15 {mu}m, and varies in temperature between 1900 K and 2800 K and in outer radius between 1.16 and 1.36 stellar radii. Electron-hydrogen-atom collisions contribute significantly to the opacity of the layer. The layer has a non-uniform intensity distribution that changes between observing epochs. These results indicate that large-scale surface convective activity strongly influences the dynamics of the inner atmosphere of Betelgeuse and mass-loss processes.

  20. Interference comparator for laser diode wavelength and wavelength instability measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobosz, Marek; KoŻuchowski, Mariusz

    2016-04-01

    Method and construction of a setup, which allows measuring the wavelength and wavelength instability of the light emitted by a laser diode (or a laser light source with a limited time coherence in general), is presented. The system is based on Twyman-Green interferometer configuration. Proportions of phases of the tested and reference laser's interference fringe obtained for a set optical path difference are a measure of the unknown wavelength. Optical path difference in interferometer is stabilized. The interferometric comparison is performed in vacuum chamber. The techniques of accurate fringe phase measurements are proposed. The obtained relative standard uncertainty of wavelength evaluation in the tested setup is about 2.5 ṡ 10-8. Uncertainty of wavelength instability measurement is an order of magnitude better. Measurement range of the current setup is from 500 nm to 650 nm. The proposed technique allows high accuracy wavelength measurement of middle or low coherence sources of light. In case of the enlarged and complex frequency distribution of the laser, the evaluated wavelength can act as the length master in interferometer for displacement measurement.

  1. Interference comparator for laser diode wavelength and wavelength instability measurement.

    PubMed

    Dobosz, Marek; Kożuchowski, Mariusz

    2016-04-01

    Method and construction of a setup, which allows measuring the wavelength and wavelength instability of the light emitted by a laser diode (or a laser light source with a limited time coherence in general), is presented. The system is based on Twyman-Green interferometer configuration. Proportions of phases of the tested and reference laser's interference fringe obtained for a set optical path difference are a measure of the unknown wavelength. Optical path difference in interferometer is stabilized. The interferometric comparison is performed in vacuum chamber. The techniques of accurate fringe phase measurements are proposed. The obtained relative standard uncertainty of wavelength evaluation in the tested setup is about 2.5 ⋅ 10(-8). Uncertainty of wavelength instability measurement is an order of magnitude better. Measurement range of the current setup is from 500 nm to 650 nm. The proposed technique allows high accuracy wavelength measurement of middle or low coherence sources of light. In case of the enlarged and complex frequency distribution of the laser, the evaluated wavelength can act as the length master in interferometer for displacement measurement. PMID:27131662

  2. COS Internal NUV Wavelength Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyes, Charles

    2009-07-01

    This program will be executed after the uplink of the OSM2 position updates derived from the determination of the wavelength-scale zero points and desired spectral ranges for each grating in activity COS14 {program 11474 - COS NUV Internal/External Wavelength Scales}. This program will verify that the operational spectral ranges for each grating, central wavelength, and FP-POS are those desired. Subsequent to a successful verification, COS NUV ERO observations and NUV science can be enabled. An internal wavelength calibration spectrum using the default PtNe lamp {lamp 1} with each NUV grating at each central wavelength setting and each FP-POS position will be obtained for the verification. Additional exposures and waits between certain exposures will be required to avoid - and to evaluate - mechanism drifts.

  3. Apparatus and method for generating continuous wave 16 .mu.m laser radiation using gaseous CF.sub.4

    DOEpatents

    Telle, John M.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method for generating continuous wave 16 .mu.m laser radiation using gaseous CF.sub.4. Laser radiation at 16 .mu.m has been observed in a cooled static cell containing low pressure CF.sub.4 optically pumped by an approximately 3 W output power cw CO.sub.2 laser. The laser cavity employed was a multiple-pass off-axis-path two spherical mirror ring resonator. Unidirectional CF.sub.4 laser output power at 615 cm.sup.-1 exceeded 2 mW. Computer calculations indicate that for modest pump powers of about 40 W, approximately 1 W of emitted laser radiation at 16 .mu.m might be obtained.

  4. Scaled Strong Field Interactions at Long Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sistrunk, Emily Frances

    The strong field regime describes interactions between light and matter where the electric field of the laser is a significant fraction of the binding field of the atom. Short pulsed lasers are capable of producing local fields on the order of the atomic unit of electric field. Under the influence of such strong fields, the ionization regime and electron dynamics are highly dependent on the wavelength used to drive the interaction. Few studies have been performed in the mid-infrared (MIR) spectral range. Using MIR wavelengths, the ponderomotive energy, Up, imposed on the electrons can be a factor of 20 greater than in the visible and near-infrared. Experiments on above threshold ionization (ATI) of cesium, nonsequential ionization (NSI) of noble gases, and high harmonic generation (HHG) in condensed phase media highlight the benefits of performing strong field investigations in the MIR. The photoelectron energy spectrum from above threshold ionization (ATI) of atoms provides details about the strong field interaction. Cesium atoms driven by a 3.6 mum laser indicate that excited states can play a large role in ionization from the ground state. Previous experiments on argon in the near-infrared can be compared to cesium at 3.6 im due to their similar Keldysh-scaling. Unlike argon, the measured ionization yield in cesium saturates at a higher intensity than predicted due to the Stark shift of the ground state. Such shifts have not been detected in argon. The low-lying 6P excited states of cesium produce a strong effect on the photoelectron energy spectrum, resulting in a splitting of each ATI peak. Enhancements in the photoelectron energy spectrum similar to those found in argon are observed in cesium. These enhancements are relatively insensitive to ellipticity of the drive laser. To take advantage of the large ponderomotive energy associated with Mid-IR lasers, ionization of argon, krypton and xenon is studied at 3.6 im. The factor of 20 increase in Up between the

  5. High-power fibre Raman lasers emitting in the 1.22-1.34-{mu}m range

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkov, Andrei S; Dianov, Evgenii M; Paramonov, Vladimir M; Medvedkov, O I; Vasil'ev, Sergei A; Bubnov, M M; Egorova, O N; Semenov, S L; Pershina, E V; Gur'yanov, A N; Laptev, A Yu; Khopin, V F; Umnikov, A A; Vechkanov, N I

    2000-09-30

    A set of diode-pumped fibre lasers producing a cw output of 4-7.5 W in the range from 1.05 to 1.15-{mu}m is realised on the basis of an ytterbium double-cladded fibre. The output of the ytterbium fibre laser was used to pump a Raman phosphor-silicate fibre converter, resulting in fibre lasers producing a cw output power of more than 3 W at 1.26 and 1.3-{mu}m. (lasers)

  6. THE 0.8-14.5 {mu}m SPECTRA OF MID-L TO MID-T DWARFS: DIAGNOSTICS OF EFFECTIVE TEMPERATURE, GRAIN SEDIMENTATION, GAS TRANSPORT, AND SURFACE GRAVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, D. C.; Leggett, S. K.; Geballe, T. R.; Cushing, Michael C.; Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, D.; Golimowski, David A.; Noll, K. S.; Fan Xiaohui

    2009-09-01

    We present new 5.2-14.5 {mu}m low-resolution spectra of 14 mid-L to mid-T dwarfs. We also present new 3.0-4.1 {mu}m spectra for five of these dwarfs. These data are supplemented by existing red and near-infrared spectra ({approx}0.6-2.5 {mu}m), as well as red through mid-infrared spectroscopy of seven other L and T dwarfs presented by Cushing et al. We compare these spectra to those generated from the model atmospheres of Saumon and Marley. The models reproduce the observed spectra well, except in the case of one very red L3.5 dwarf, 2MASS J22244381-0158521. The broad wavelength coverage allows us to constrain almost independently the four parameters used to describe these photospheres in our models: effective temperature (T {sub eff}), surface gravity, grain sedimentation efficiency (f{sub sed}), and vertical gas transport efficiency (K{sub zz} ). The CH{sub 4} bands centered at 2.2, 3.3, and 7.65 {mu}m and the CO band at 2.3 {mu}m are sensitive to K{sub zz} , and indicates that chemical mixing is important in all L and T dwarf atmospheres. The sample of L3.5 to T5.5 dwarfs spans the range 1800 K{approx}> T{sub eff} {approx}>1000 K, with an L-T transition (spectral types L7 to T4) that lies between 1400 and 1100 K for dwarfs with typical near-infrared colors; bluer and redder dwarfs can be 100 K warmer or cooler, respectively, when using infrared spectral types. When using optical spectral types, the bluer dwarfs have more typical T {sub eff} values as they tend to have earlier optical spectral types. In this model analysis, f {sub sed} increases rapidly between types T0 and T4, indicating that increased sedimentation can explain the rapid disappearance of clouds at this stage of brown dwarf evolution. There is a suggestion that the transition to dust-free atmospheres happens at lower temperatures for lower gravity dwarfs.

  7. Back injuries in a cohort of schoolchildren aged 6-12: A 2.5-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Franz, C; Jespersen, E; Rexen, C T; Leboeuf-Yde, C; Wedderkopp, N

    2016-08-01

    The aims of this prospective school cohort study were to describe the epidemiology of diagnosed back pain in childhood, classified as either nontraumatic or traumatic back injury, and to estimate the association with physical activity in different settings. Over 2.5 years, 1240 children aged 6-12 years were surveyed weekly using mobile text messages to ask about the presence or absence of back pain. Pain was clinically diagnosed and injuries were classified using the International Classification of Diseases version 10. Physical activity data were obtained from text messages and accelerometers. Of the 315 back injuries diagnosed, 186 injuries were nontraumatic and 129 were traumatic. The incidence rate ratio was 1.5 for a nontraumatic back injury compared with a traumatic injury. The overall estimated back injury incidence rate was 0.20 per 1000 physical activity units (95% confidence interval 0.18-0.23). The back injury incidence rates were higher for sports when exposure per 1000 physical activity units was taken into consideration and especially children horse-riding had a 40 times higher risk of sustaining a traumatic back injury compared to the risk during non-organized leisure time physical activity. However, the reasonably low injury incidence rates support the recommendations of children continuously being physically active. PMID:26130046

  8. CONFIRMING THE PRIMARILY SMOOTH STRUCTURE OF THE VEGA DEBRIS DISK AT MILLIMETER WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, A. Meredith; Plambeck, Richard; Chiang, Eugene; Wilner, David J.; Andrews, Sean M.; Mason, Brian; Carpenter, John M.; Chiang, Hsin-Fang; Williams, Jonathan P.; Hales, Antonio; Su, Kate; Dicker, Simon; Korngut, Phil; Devlin, Mark

    2012-05-01

    Clumpy structure in the debris disk around Vega has been previously reported at millimeter wavelengths and attributed to concentrations of dust grains trapped in resonances with an unseen planet. However, recent imaging at similar wavelengths with higher sensitivity has disputed the observed structure. We present three new millimeter-wavelength observations that help to resolve the puzzling and contradictory observations. We have observed the Vega system with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at a wavelength of 880 {mu}m and an angular resolution of 5''; with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) at a wavelength of 1.3 mm and an angular resolution of 5''; and with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) at a wavelength of 3.3 mm and angular resolution of 10''. Despite high sensitivity and short baselines, we do not detect the Vega debris disk in either of the interferometric data sets (SMA and CARMA), which should be sensitive at high significance to clumpy structure based on previously reported observations. We obtain a marginal (3{sigma}) detection of disk emission in the GBT data; the spatial distribution of the emission is not well constrained. We analyze the observations in the context of several different models, demonstrating that the observations are consistent with a smooth, broad, axisymmetric disk with inner radius 20-100 AU and width {approx}> 50 AU. The interferometric data require that at least half of the 860 {mu}m emission detected by previous single-dish observations with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope be distributed axisymmetrically, ruling out strong contributions from flux concentrations on spatial scales of {approx}<100 AU. These observations support recent results from the Plateau de Bure Interferometer indicating that previous detections of clumpy structure in the Vega debris disk were spurious.

  9. Multiple-wavelength tunable laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P. (Inventor); Walsh, Brian M. (Inventor); Reichle, Donald J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A tunable laser includes dispersion optics for separating generated laser pulses into first and second wavelength pulses directed along first and second optical paths. First and second reflective mirrors are disposed in the first and second optical paths, respectively. The laser's output mirror is partially reflective and partially transmissive with respect to the first wavelength and the second wavelength in accordance with provided criteria. A first resonator length is defined between the output mirror and the first mirror, while a second resonator length is defined between the output mirror and the second mirror. The second resonator length is a function of the first resonator length.

  10. AWG Filter for Wavelength Interrogator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, Richard J. (Inventor); Costa, Joannes M. (Inventor); Faridian, Fereydoun (Inventor); Moslehi, Behzad (Inventor); Sotoudeh, Vahid (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A wavelength interrogator is coupled to a circulator which couples optical energy from a broadband source to an optical fiber having a plurality of sensors, each sensor reflecting optical energy at a unique wavelength and directing the reflected optical energy to an AWG. The AWG has a detector coupled to each output, and the reflected optical energy from each grating is coupled to the skirt edge response of the AWG such that the adjacent channel responses form a complementary pair response. The complementary pair response is used to convert an AWG skirt response to a wavelength.

  11. THE 0.5-2.22 {mu}m SCATTERED LIGHT SPECTRUM OF THE DISK AROUND TW Hya: DETECTION OF A PARTIALLY FILLED DISK GAP AT 80 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Debes, John H.; Jang-Condell, Hannah; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Roberge, Aki; Schneider, Glenn

    2013-07-01

    We present a 0.5-2.2 {mu}m scattered light spectrum of the circumstellar disk around TW Hya from a combination of spatially resolved Hubble Space Telescope STIS spectroscopy and NICMOS coronagraphic images of the disk. We investigate the morphology of the disk at distances >40 AU over this wide range of wavelengths, and identify the presence of a depression in surface brightness at {approx}80 AU that could be caused by a gap in the disk. Additionally, we quantify the surface brightness, azimuthal symmetry, and spectral character of the disk as a function of radius. Our analysis shows that the scattering efficiency of the dust is largely neutral to blue over the observed wavelengths. We model the disk as a steady {alpha}-disk with an ad hoc gap structure. The thermal properties of the disk are self-consistently calculated using a three-dimensional radiative transfer code that uses ray tracing to model the heating of the disk interior and scattered light images. We find a good fit to the data over a wide range of distances from the star if we use a model disk with a partially filled gap of 30% depth at 80 AU and with a self-similar truncation knee at 100 AU. The origin of the gap is unclear, but it could arise from a transition in the nature of the disk's dust composition or the presence of a planetary companion. Based on scalings to previous hydrodynamic simulations of gap-opening criteria for embedded proto-planets, we estimate that a planetary companion forming the gap could have a mass between 6 and 28 M{sub Circled-Plus }.

  12. GaAsSb/InGaAs type-II quantum wells for long-wavelength lasers on GaAs substrates

    SciTech Connect

    KLEM,JOHN F.; SPAHN,OLGA B.; KURTZ,STEVEN R.; FRITZ,IAN J.; CHOQUETTE,KENT D.

    2000-03-15

    The authors have investigated the properties of GaAsSb/InGaAs type-II bilayer quantum well structures grown by molecule beam epitaxy for use in long-wavelength lasers on GaAs substrates. Structures with layer, strains and thicknesses designed to be thermodynamically stable against dislocation formation exhibit room-temperature photoluminescence at wavelengths as long as 1.43 {mu}m. The photoluminescence emission wavelength is significantly affected by growth temperature and the sequence of layer growth (InGaAs/GaAsSb vs GaAsSb/InGaAs), suggesting that Sb and/or In segregation results in non-ideal interfaces under certain growth conditions. At low injection currents, double heterostructure lasers with GaAsSb/InGaAs bilayer quantum well active regions display electroluminescence at wavelengths comparable to those obtained in photoluminescence, but at higher currents the electroluminescence shifts to shorter wavelengths. Lasers have been obtained with threshold current densities as low as 120 A/cm{sup 2} at 1.17 {mu}m, and 2.1 kA/cm{sup 2} at 1.21 {mu}m.

  13. Efficient waveguide-integrated tunnel junction detectors at 1.6 mum.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Philip C D; Laibowitz, Robert B; Libsch, Frank R; Labianca, Nancy C; Chiniwalla, Punit P

    2007-12-10

    Near-infrared detectors based on metal-insulator-metal tunnel junctions integrated with planarized silicon nanowire waveguides are presented, which we believe to be the first of their kind. The junction is coupled to the waveguide via a thin-film metal antenna feeding a plasmonic travelling wave structure that includes the tunnel junction. These devices are inherently broadband; the design presented here operates throughout the 1500-1700 nm region. Careful design of the antenna and travelling wave region substantially eliminates losses due to poor mode matching and RC rolloff, allowing efficient operation. The antennas are made from multilayer stacks of gold and nickel, and the active devices are Ni-NiO-Ni edge junctions. The waveguides are made via shallow trench isolation technology, resulting in a planar oxide surface with the waveguides buried a few nanometres beneath.The antennas are fabricated using directional deposition through a suspended Ge shadow mask, using a single level of electron-beam lithography. The waveguides are patterned with conventional 248-nm optical lithography and reactive-ion etching, then planarized using shallow-trench isolation technology. We also present measurements showing overall quantum efficiencies of 6% (responsivity 0.08 A/W at 1.605 mum), thus demonstrating that the previously very low overall quantum efficiencies reported for antenna-coupled tunnel junction devices are due to poor electromagnetic coupling and poor choices of antenna metal, not to any inherent limitations of the technology. PMID:19550928

  14. THE LEGACY OF SCUPOL: 850 {mu}m IMAGING POLARIMETRY FROM 1997 TO 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Brenda C.; McPhee, Christie A.; Fissel, Laura M.; Curran, Rachel L.

    2009-05-15

    SCUPOL, the polarimeter for SCUBA on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, was the most prolific thermal imaging polarimeter built to date. Between 1997 and 2005, observations of 104 regions were made at 850 {mu}m in the mapping mode. The instrument has produced {approx}50 refereed journal publications, and that number is still growing. We have systematically re-reduced all imaging polarimetry made in the standard 'jiggle-map' mode from the SCUBA archive (2800+ individual observations) to produce a catalog of SCUPOL images and tables. We present the results of our analysis with figures and data tables produced for all 83 regions where significant polarization was detected. In addition, the reduced data cubes and data tables can be accessed online. In many cases, the data included in this paper have been previously published elsewhere. However, this publication includes unpublished data sets, in whole or in part, toward 39 regions, including cores in {rho} Ophiuchus, Orion's OMC-2 region, several young stellar objects, and the galaxy M87.

  15. THE TW Hya DISK AT 870 {mu}m: COMPARISON OF CO AND DUST RADIAL STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Sean M.; Wilner, David J.; Qi, Chunhua; Rosenfeld, Katherine A.; Oeberg, Karin I.; Espaillat, Catherine; Ho, Paul T. P.; Hughes, A. M.; Birnstiel, T.; Cieza, Lucas A.; Williams, Jonathan P.; Lin, Shin-Yi

    2012-01-10

    We present high-resolution (0.''3 = 16 AU), high signal-to-noise ratio Submillimeter Array observations of the 870 {mu}m (345 GHz) continuum and CO J = 3 - 2 line emission from the protoplanetary disk around TW Hya. Using continuum and line radiative transfer calculations, these data and the multiwavelength spectral energy distribution are analyzed together in the context of simple two-dimensional parametric disk structure models. Under the assumptions of a radially invariant dust population and gas-to-dust mass ratio, we are unable to simultaneously reproduce the CO and dust observations with model structures that employ either a single, distinct outer boundary or a smooth (exponential) taper at large radii. Instead, we find that the distribution of millimeter-sized dust grains in the TW Hya disk has a relatively sharp edge near 60 AU, contrary to the CO emission (and optical/infrared scattered light) that extends to a much larger radius of at least 215 AU. We discuss some possible explanations for the observed radial distribution of millimeter-sized dust grains and the apparent CO-dust size discrepancy, and suggest that they may be hallmarks of substructure in the dust disk or natural signatures of the growth and radial drift of solids that might be expected for disks around older pre-main-sequence stars like TW Hya.

  16. A NEW 24 {mu}m PHASE CURVE FOR {upsilon} ANDROMEDAE b

    SciTech Connect

    Crossfield, Ian J. M.; Hansen, Brad M. S.; Harrington, Joseph; Cho, James Y.-K.; Deming, Drake; Seager, Sara E-mail: hansen@astro.ucla.ed E-mail: J.Cho@qmul.ac.u E-mail: kristen@astro.columbia.ed

    2010-11-10

    We report the detection of 24 {mu}m variations from the planet-hosting {upsilon} Andromedae system consistent with the orbital periodicity of the system's innermost planet, {upsilon} And b. We find a peak-to-valley phase curve amplitude of 0.00130 times the mean system flux. Using a simple model with two hemispheres of constant surface brightness and assuming a planetary radius of 1.3 R{sub J} give a planetary temperature contrast of {approx}>900 K and an orbital inclination of {approx}>28{sup 0}. We further report the largest phase offset yet observed for an extrasolar planet: the flux maximum occurs {approx}80{sup 0} before phase 0.5. Such a large phase offset is difficult to reconcile with most current atmospheric circulation models. We improve on earlier observations of this system in several important ways: (1) observations of a flux calibrator star demonstrate the MIPS detector is stable to 10{sup -4} on long timescales, (2) we note that the background light varies systematically due to spacecraft operations, precluding use of this background as a flux calibrator (stellar flux measured above the background is not similarly affected), and (3) we calibrate for flux variability correlated with motion of the star on the MIPS detector. A reanalysis of our earlier observations of this system is consistent with our new result.

  17. Study of ablation by laser irradiation of plane targets at wavelengths 1. 05, 0. 53, and 0. 35. mu. m

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M.H.; Toner, W.T.; Goldsack, T.J.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Veats, S.A.; Cunningham, P.F.; Lewis, C.L.S.

    1983-07-01

    Ablation by laser irradiation at wavelengths lambda = 1.05, 0.53, and 0.35 ..mu..m has been studied from analysis of time-resolved x-ray spectra of layered targets and of ion emission. Irradiance was varied in the range 2 x 10/sup 13/ to 2 x 10/sup 15/ W cm/sup -2/ with constant laser power and variable focal spot size. Deductions include the effect of lateral energy transport from small focal spots and ablation rates and ablation pressures obtained both in the limit of negligible transport and when lateral transport is significant. Advantages of short wavelengths for ablatively driven implosions are quantified.

  18. A color sensor wavelength meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durfee, Dallin; Jackson, Jarom; Otterstrom, Nils; Jones, Tyler; Archibald, James

    2016-05-01

    We will discuss a laser wavelength meter based on a commercial color sensor chip consisting of an array of photodiodes with different absorptive color filters. By comparing the relative amplitudes of light on the photodiodes, the wavelength of light can be determined with picometer-level precision and with picometer-scale calibration drift over a period longer than a month. This work was supported by NSF Grant Number PHY-1205736.

  19. SWOC: Spectral Wavelength Optimization Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruchti, G. R.

    2016-06-01

    SWOC (Spectral Wavelength Optimization Code) determines the wavelength ranges that provide the optimal amount of information to achieve the required science goals for a spectroscopic study. It computes a figure-of-merit for different spectral configurations using a user-defined list of spectral features, and, utilizing a set of flux-calibrated spectra, determines the spectral regions showing the largest differences among the spectra.

  20. Solid colloidal optical wavelength filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, J. L.

    1990-05-01

    A method for constructing a solid colloidal optical wavelength filter is discussed. The device was developed to filter optical wavelengths for spectroscopy, protection from intense radiation, monochromatizing, and analyzing optical radiation. The filter is formed by suspending spherical particles in a coagulable medium (such as setting plastic); agitating the particles and coagulable medium to produce an emulsion of particles suspended in the coagulable medium; and allowing the coagulable medium and suspended emulsion of particles to cool.

  1. SPITZER 24 {mu}m EXCESSES FOR BRIGHT GALACTIC STARS IN BOOeTES AND FIRST LOOK SURVEY FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Hovhannisyan, L. R.; Mickaelian, A. M.; Weedman, D. W.; Houck, J. R.; Le Floc'h, E.; Soifer, B. T.; Brand, K.; Dey, A.; Jannuzi, B. T. E-mail: dweedman@isc.astro.cornell.edu

    2009-07-15

    Optically bright Galactic stars (V {approx}< 13 mag) having f {sub {nu}}(24 {mu}m) > 1 mJy are identified in Spitzer mid-infrared surveys within 8.2 deg{sup 2} for the Booetes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey and within 5.5 deg{sup 2} for the First Look Survey (FLS). One hundred and twenty-eight stars are identified in Booetes and 140 in the FLS, and their photometry is given. (K - [24]) colors are determined using K magnitudes from the Two Micron All Sky Survey for all stars in order to search for excess 24 {mu}m luminosity compared to that arising from the stellar photosphere. Of the combined sample of 268 stars, 141 are of spectral types F, G, or K, and 17 of these 141 stars have 24 {mu}m excesses with (K - [24]) > 0.2 mag. Using limits on absolute magnitude derived from proper motions, at least eight of the FGK stars with excesses are main-sequence stars, and estimates derived from the distribution of apparent magnitudes indicate that all 17 are main-sequence stars. These estimates lead to the conclusion that between 9% and 17% of the main-sequence FGK field stars in these samples have 24 {mu}m infrared excesses. This result is statistically similar to the fraction of stars with debris disks found among previous Spitzer targeted observations of much brighter, main-sequence field stars.

  2. Fast stabilization of a CO{sub 2} laser for a frequency standard at 10 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Pisani, M.Q.; Sassi, M.P.; Zucco, M.

    1994-12-31

    A CO{sub 2} laser has been frequency stabilized to an OsO{sub 4} transition with a control bandwidth of 10 kHz. The obtained spectral purity of the laser is 100 Hz. The realization of very accurate frequency standards and experiments of high resolution spectroscopy in the 10 {mu}m region are made possible by this source.

  3. Towards short wavelengths FELs workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Winick, H.

    1993-12-01

    This workshop was caged because of the growing perception in the FEL source community that recent advances have made it possible to extend FEL operation to wavelengths about two orders of magnitude shorter than the 240 nm that has been achieved to date. In addition short wavelength FELs offer the possibilities of extremely high peak power (several gigawatts) and very short pulses (of the order of 100 fs). Several groups in the USA are developing plans for such short wavelength FEL facilities. However, reviewers of these plans have pointed out that it would be highly desirable to first carry out proof-of-principle experiments at longer wavelengths to increase confidence that the shorter wavelength devices will indeed perform as calculated. The need for such experiments has now been broadly accepted by the FEL community. Such experiments were the main focus of this workshop as described in the following objectives distributed to attendees: (1) Define measurements needed to gain confidence that short wavelength FELs will perform as calculated. (2) List possible hardware that could be used to carry out these measurements in the near term. (3) Define a prioritized FEL physics experimental program and suggested timetable. (4) Form collaborative teams to carry out this program.

  4. AKARI IRC INFRARED 2.5-5 {mu}m SPECTROSCOPY OF A LARGE SAMPLE OF LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Imanishi, Masatoshi; Nakagawa, Takao; Shirahata, Mai; Ohyama, Yoichi; Onaka, Takashi

    2010-10-01

    We present the results of our systematic infrared 2.5-5 {mu}m spectroscopy of 60 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) with infrared luminosities L{sub IR} = 10{sup 11}-10{sup 12} L{sub sun} and 54 ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) with L{sub IR} {>=} 10{sup 12} L{sub sun}, using the AKARI Infrared Camera (IRC). AKARI IRC slit-less spectroscopy allows us to probe the full range of emission from these galaxies, including spatially extended components. The 3.3 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features, hydrogen recombination emission lines, and various absorption features are detected and used to investigate the properties of these galaxies. Because of the relatively small effect of dust extinction in the infrared range, quantitative discussion of these dusty galaxy populations is possible. For sources with clearly detectable Br{beta} (2.63 {mu}m) and Br{alpha} (4.05 {mu}m) emission lines, the flux ratios are found to be similar to those predicted by case B theory. Starburst luminosities are estimated from both 3.3 {mu}m PAH and Br{alpha} emission, which roughly agree with each other. In addition to the detected starburst activity, a significant fraction of the observed sources display signatures of obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs), such as low PAH equivalent widths, large optical depths of dust absorption features, and red continuum emission. The energetic importance of optically elusive buried AGNs in optically non-Seyfert galaxies tends to increase with increasing galaxy infrared luminosity, from LIRGs to ULIRGs.

  5. THE INCIDENCE OF DEBRIS DISKS AT 24 {mu}m AND 670 Myr

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Laurie E.; Trilling, David E.; Rieke, George; Su, Kate

    2012-05-10

    We use Spitzer Space Telescope 24 {mu}m data to search for debris disks among 122 AFGKM stars from the {approx}670 Myr clusters Hyades, Coma Ber, and Praesepe, utilizing a number of advances in data reduction and determining the intrinsic colors of main-sequence stars. For our sample, the 1{sigma} dispersion about the main-sequence V-K{sub S} , K{sub S} -[24] locus is approximately 3.1%. We identify seven debris disks at 10% or more ({>=}3{sigma} confidence level) above the expected K{sub S} -[24] for purely photospheric emission. The incidence of excesses of 10% or greater in our sample at this age is 5.7{sup +3.1} {sub -1.7}%. Combining with results from the literature, the rate is 7.8{sup +4.2}{sub -2.1}% for early-type (B9-F4) stars and 2.7{sup +3.3}{sub -1.7}% for solar-like (F5-K9) stars. Our primary sample has strict criteria for inclusion to allow comparison with other work; when we relax these criteria, three additional debris disks are detected. They are all around stars of solar-like type and hence reinforce our conclusion that disks around such stars are still relatively common at 670 Myr and are similar to the rate around early-type stars. The apparently small difference in decay rates between early-type and solar-like stars is inconsistent with the first-order theoretical predictions that the later type stellar disks would decay an order of magnitude more quickly than the earlier type ones.

  6. Carbon dioxide sequestration monitoring and verification via laser based detection system in the 2 mum band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, Seth David

    Carbon Dioxide (CO2) is a known contributor to the green house gas effect. Emissions of CO2 are rising as the global demand for inexpensive energy is placated through the consumption and combustion of fossil fuels. Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) may provide a method to prevent CO2 from being exhausted to the atmosphere. The carbon may be captured after fossil fuel combustion in a power plant and then stored in a long term facility such as a deep geologic feature. The ability to verify the integrity of carbon storage at a location is key to the success of all CCS projects. A laser-based instrument has been built and tested at Montana State University (MSU) to measure CO2 concentrations above a carbon storage location. The CO2 Detection by Differential Absorption (CODDA) Instrument uses a temperature-tunable distributed feedback (DFB) laser diode that is capable of accessing a spectral region, 2.0027 to 2.0042 mum, that contains three CO2 absorption lines and a water vapor absorption line. This instrument laser is aimed over an open-air, two-way path of about 100 m, allowing measurements of CO2 concentrations to be made directly above a carbon dioxide release test site. The performance of the instrument for carbon sequestration site monitoring is studied using a newly developed CO2 controlled release facility. The field and CO2 releases are managed by the Zero Emissions Research Technology (ZERT) group at MSU. Two test injections were carried out through vertical wells simulating seepage up well paths. Three test injections were done as CO2 escaped up through a slotted horizontal pipe simulating seepage up through geologic fault zones. The results from these 5 separate controlled release experiments over the course of three summers show that the CODDA Instrument is clearly capable of verifying the integrity of full-scale CO2 storage operations.

  7. DISCOVERY OF A FAINT COMPANION TO ALCOR USING MMT/AO 5 {mu}m IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Mamajek, Eric E.; Kenworthy, Matthew A.; Hinz, Philip M.; Meyer, Michael R.

    2010-03-15

    We report the detection of a faint stellar companion to the famous nearby A5V star Alcor (80 UMa). The companion has M-band ({lambda} = 4.8 {mu}m) magnitude 8.8 and projected separation 1.''11 (28 AU) from Alcor. The companion is most likely a low-mass ({approx}0.3 M {sub sun}) active star which is responsible for Alcor's X-ray emission detected by ROSAT (L {sub X} {approx_equal} 10{sup 28.3} erg s{sup -1}). Alcor is a nuclear member of the Ursa Major star cluster (UMa; d {approx_equal} 25 pc, age {approx_equal} 0.5 Gyr), and has been occasionally mentioned as a possible distant (709'') companion of the stellar quadruple Mizar ({zeta} UMa). Comparing the revised Hipparcos proper motion for Alcor with the mean motion for other UMa nuclear members shows that Alcor has a peculiar velocity of 1.1 km s{sup -1}, which is comparable to the predicted velocity amplitude induced by the newly discovered companion ({approx}1 km s{sup -1}). Using a precise dynamical parallax for Mizar and the revised Hipparcos parallax for Alcor, we find that Mizar and Alcor are physically separated by 0.36 {+-} 0.19 pc (74 {+-} 39 kAU; minimum 18 kAU), and their velocity vectors are marginally consistent ({chi}{sup 2} probability 6%). Given their close proximity and concordant motions we suggest that the Mizar quadruple and the Alcor binary be together considered the second closest stellar sextuplet. The addition of Mizar-Alcor to the census of stellar multiples with six or more components effectively doubles the local density of such systems within the local volume (d < 40 pc)

  8. Observational properties of simulated galaxies in overdense and average regions at redshifts z ≃ 6-12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yajima, Hidenobu; Shlosman, Isaac; Romano-Díaz, Emilio; Nagamine, Kentaro

    2015-07-01

    We use high-resolution zoom-in cosmological simulations of galaxies of Romano-Díaz et al., post-processing them with a panchromatic three-dimensional radiation transfer code to obtain the galaxy UV luminosity function (LF) at z ≃ 6-12. The galaxies are followed in a rare, heavily overdense region within a ˜5σ density peak, which can host high-z quasars, and in an average density region, down to the stellar mass of Mstar ˜ 4 × 107 M⊙. We find that the overdense regions evolve at a substantially accelerated pace - the most massive galaxy has grown to Mstar ˜ 8.4 × 1010 M⊙ by z = 6.3, contains dust of Mdust ˜ 4.1 × 108 M⊙, and is associated with a very high star formation rate, SFR ˜ 745 M⊙ yr- 1. The attained SFR-Mstar correlation results in the specific SFR slowly increasing with Mstar. Most of the UV radiation in massive galaxies is absorbed by the dust, its escape fraction fesc is low, increasing slowly with time. Galaxies in the average region have less dust, and agree with the observed UV LF. The LF of the overdense region is substantially higher, and contains much brighter galaxies. The massive galaxies are bright in the infrared (IR) due to the dust thermal emission, with LIR ˜ 3.7 × 1012 L⊙ at z = 6.3, while LIR < 1011 L⊙ for the low-mass galaxies. Therefore, ALMA can probe massive galaxies in the overdense region up to z ˜ 10 with a reasonable integration time. The UV spectral properties of discy galaxies depend significantly upon the viewing angle. The stellar and dust masses of the most massive galaxy in the overdense region are comparable to those of the sub-millimetre galaxy found by Riechers et al. at z = 6.3, while the modelled SFR and the sub-millimetre flux fall slightly below the observed one. Statistical significance of these similarities and differences will only become clear with the upcoming ALMA observations.

  9. Sub-wavelength plasmon laser

    DOEpatents

    Bora, Mihail; Bond, Tiziana C.

    2016-04-19

    A plasmonic laser device has resonant nanocavities filled with a gain medium containing an organic dye. The resonant plasmon frequencies of the nanocavities are tuned to align with both the absorption and emission spectra of the dye. Variables in the system include the nature of the dye and the wavelength of its absorption and emission, the wavelength of the pumping radiation, and the resonance frequencies of the nanocavities. In addition the pumping frequency of the dye is selected to be close to the absorption maximum.

  10. Wavelength shifting of intra-cavity photons: Adiabatic wavelength tuning in rapidly wavelength-swept lasers.

    PubMed

    Jirauschek, Christian; Huber, Robert

    2015-07-01

    We analyze the physics behind the newest generation of rapidly wavelength tunable sources for optical coherence tomography (OCT), retaining a single longitudinal cavity mode during operation without repeated build up of lasing. In this context, we theoretically investigate the currently existing concepts of rapidly wavelength-swept lasers based on tuning of the cavity length or refractive index, leading to an altered optical path length inside the resonator. Specifically, we consider vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with microelectromechanical system (MEMS) mirrors as well as Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) and Vernier-tuned distributed Bragg reflector (VT-DBR) lasers. Based on heuristic arguments and exact analytical solutions of Maxwell's equations for a fundamental laser resonator model, we show that adiabatic wavelength tuning is achieved, i.e., hopping between cavity modes associated with a repeated build up of lasing is avoided, and the photon number is conserved. As a consequence, no fundamental limit exists for the wavelength tuning speed, in principle enabling wide-range wavelength sweeps at arbitrary tuning speeds with narrow instantaneous linewidth. PMID:26203373

  11. Wavelength shifting of intra-cavity photons: Adiabatic wavelength tuning in rapidly wavelength-swept lasers

    PubMed Central

    Jirauschek, Christian; Huber, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the physics behind the newest generation of rapidly wavelength tunable sources for optical coherence tomography (OCT), retaining a single longitudinal cavity mode during operation without repeated build up of lasing. In this context, we theoretically investigate the currently existing concepts of rapidly wavelength-swept lasers based on tuning of the cavity length or refractive index, leading to an altered optical path length inside the resonator. Specifically, we consider vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with microelectromechanical system (MEMS) mirrors as well as Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) and Vernier-tuned distributed Bragg reflector (VT-DBR) lasers. Based on heuristic arguments and exact analytical solutions of Maxwell’s equations for a fundamental laser resonator model, we show that adiabatic wavelength tuning is achieved, i.e., hopping between cavity modes associated with a repeated build up of lasing is avoided, and the photon number is conserved. As a consequence, no fundamental limit exists for the wavelength tuning speed, in principle enabling wide-range wavelength sweeps at arbitrary tuning speeds with narrow instantaneous linewidth. PMID:26203373

  12. TESTING 24 {mu}m AND INFRARED LUMINOSITY AS STAR FORMATION TRACERS FOR GALACTIC STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Vutisalchavakul, Nalin; Evans, Neal J. II

    2013-03-10

    We have tested some relations for star formation rates used in extragalactic studies for regions within the Galaxy. In nearby molecular clouds, where the initial mass function is not fully sampled, the dust emission at 24 {mu}m greatly underestimates star formation rates (by a factor of 100 on average) when compared to star formation rates determined from counting young stellar objects. The total infrared emission does no better. In contrast, the total far-infrared method agrees within a factor of two on average with star formation rates based on radio continuum emission for massive, dense clumps that are forming enough massive stars to have L{sub TIR} exceed 10{sup 4.5} L{sub Sun }. The total infrared and 24 {mu}m also agree well with each other for both nearby, low-mass star-forming regions and the massive, dense clump regions.

  13. HIGH-RESOLUTION 1.6 {mu}m SPECTRA OF FeH IN M AND L DWARFS {sup ,}

    SciTech Connect

    Hargreaves, Robert J.; Bernath, Peter F.; Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Wende, Sebastian; Seifahrt, Andreas E-mail: pfb500@york.ac.u E-mail: Charles.W.Bauschlicher@nasa.go E-mail: seifahrt@physics.ucdavis.ed

    2010-10-15

    Near-infrared bands due to the iron monohydride (FeH) molecule are a characteristic feature of late-M and -L dwarfs. We have created a line list at 2200 K for the FeH E {sup 4{Pi}}-A {sup 4{Pi}} electronic transition near 1.58 {mu}m (6300 cm{sup -1}) based on laboratory spectra and an ab initio calculation of the band strength. A variety of M and L dwarfs were observed near 1.6 {mu}m with high spectral resolution (R {approx} 70,000) using the Phoenix spectrograph on the 8.1 m Gemini South telescope. The FeH E-A transition made a surprisingly strong contribution to the observed spectral energy distributions and needs to be included in modeling of late-M and L dwarfs.

  14. Solid colloidal optical wavelength filter

    DOEpatents

    Alvarez, Joseph L.

    1992-01-01

    A solid colloidal optical wavelength filter includes a suspension of spheal particles dispersed in a coagulable medium such as a setting plastic. The filter is formed by suspending spherical particles in a coagulable medium; agitating the particles and coagulable medium to produce an emulsion of particles suspended in the coagulable medium; and allowing the coagulable medium and suspended emulsion of particles to cool.

  15. Wavelength-shifted Cherenkov radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krider, E. P.; Jacobson, V. L.; Pifer, A. E.; Polakos, P. A.; Kurz, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The scintillation and Cherenkov responses of plastic Cherenkov radiators containing different wavelength-shifting fluors in varying concentrations have been studied in beams of low energy protons and pions. For cosmic ray applications, where large Cherenkov to scintillation ratios are desired, the optimum fluor concentrations are 0.000025 by weight or less.

  16. Teacher's Guide to Resources of the Oklahoma Historical Society, Keyed to the Priority Academic Student Skills (PASS), Grades 6-12 Oklahoma History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Diffusion Network (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC.

    This guide is correlated to the PASS (Priority Academic Student Skills) objectives for Oklahoma history in grades 6-12. The guide was developed to aid in the teaching of the PASS objectives by identifying primary sources, audiovisual materials, field trips and scholarly materials that relate to each objective. The guide is divided into seven…

  17. Dual effects of [Tyr(6)]-gamma2-MSH(6-12) on pain perception and in vivo hyperalgesic activity of its analogues.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chunnan; Huang, Wenmin; Xing, Xiaoting; Dong, Shouliang

    2010-09-01

    [Tyr(6)]-gamma2-MSH(6-12) with a short effecting time of about 20 min is one of the most potent rMrgC receptor agonists. To possibly increase its potency and metabolic stability, a series of analogues were prepared by replacing the Tyr(6) residue with the non-canonical amino acids 3-(1-naphtyl)-L-alanine, 4-fluoro-L-phenylalanine, 4-methoxy-L-phenylalanine and 3-nitro-L-tyrosine. Dose-dependent nociceptive assays performed in conscious rats by intrathecal injection of the MSH peptides showed [Tyr(6)]-gamma2-MSH(6-12) hyperalgesic effects at low doses (5-20 nmol) and analgesia at high doses (100-200 nmol). This analgesic activity is fully reversed by the kyotorphin receptor-specific antagonist Leu-Arg. For the two analogues containing in position 6, 4-fluoro-L-phenylalanine and 3-nitro-L-tyrosine, a hyperalgesic activity was not observed, while the 3-(1-naphtyl)-L-alanine analogue at 10 nmol dose was found to induce hyperalgesia at a potency very similar to gamma2-MSH(6-12), but with longer duration of the effect. Finally, the 4-methoxy-L-phenylalanine analogue (0.5 nmol) showed greatly improved hyperalgesic activity and prolonged effects compared to the parent [Tyr(6)]-gamma2-MSH(6-12) compound. PMID:20629198

  18. Validity and Reliability Study of the Self-Efficacy Scale in Rendering Piano Education to Children of 6-12 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekinci, Hatice

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to develop a valid and reliable scale that can be used in measuring self-efficacy of candidate music teachers in rendering piano education to children of 6-12 years. To this end, a pool of 51 items was created by using the literature, and taking the opinions of piano professors and piano instructors working with…

  19. Positive-tone silylated, dry-developed, deep ultraviolet resist with 0. 2 [mu]m resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, R.S.; Stein, S.M.; Boyce, C.H.; Cirelli, R.A.; Taylor, G.N. ); Baiocchi, F.A.; Kovalchick, J. ); Wheeler, D.R. )

    1994-11-01

    This paper describes the development of a surface-imaging process for a positive-tone silylated, dry-developed bilayer resist which has 0.2 [mu]m resolution and an aspect ratio of 4.5 using deep-UV (248 nm) exposure. The many processing variables such as thermal treatment parameters, silylation conditions, and etching conditions were examined to determine their effects on lithographic performance in terms of resolution, feature size linearity, focus latitude, and sensitivity. Critical to the success of the process are: the bilayer structure which restricts diffusion of the Si, the use of a disilane reagent to increase the Si content of the masking layer, limiting migration of photogenerated acid by the appropriate choice of softbake and post-exposure bake temperatures, initial etching with an Ar/Cl[sub 2] mixture to remove the thin layer of silylated resist in the exposed areas, and employing CO[sub 2] instead of O[sub 2] as the etching gas to eliminate lateral etching of the features. With this process we have obtained good critical dimension linearity down to 0.25 [mu]m for bright-field and dark-field lines and spaces as well as isolated lines and isolated spaces. The dose required is [similar to]75 mJ/cm[sup 2] and the dose latitude is [plus minus]6%. Focus latitude is at least [plus minus]0.4 [mu]m. We also observe no environmental effects on sensitivity or resolution.

  20. Absorptivity modulation on wavy molten steel surfaces: The influence of laser wavelength and angle of incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, A. F. H.

    2012-10-08

    The modulation of the angle-dependent Fresnel absorptivity across wavy molten steel surfaces during laser materials processing, like drilling, cutting, or welding, has been calculated. The absorptivity is strongly altered by the grazing angle of incidence of the laser beam on the processing front. Owing to its specific Brewster-peak characteristics, the 10.64 {mu}m wavelength CO{sub 2}-laser shows an opposite trend with respect to roughness and angle-of-incidence compared to lasers in the wavelength range of 532-1070 nm. Plateaus or rings of Brewster-peak absorptivity can lead to hot spots on a wavy surface, often in close proximity to cold spots caused by shadow domains.

  1. 1 {mu}m EXCESS SOURCES IN THE UKIDSS. I. THREE T DWARFS IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY SOUTHERN EQUATORIAL STRIPE

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, Y.; Murata, K. L.; Fujiwara, M.; Nagayama, T.; Peterson, B. A.; Suenaga, T.; Furusawa, K.; Miyake, N.; Omori, K.; Suzuki, D.; Wada, K.

    2011-08-15

    We report the discovery of two field brown dwarfs, ULAS J0128-0041 and ULAS J0321+0051, and the rediscovery of ULAS J0226+0051 (IfA 0230-Z1), in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) southern equatorial stripe. They are found in the course of our follow-up observation program of 1 {mu}m excess sources in the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope Infrared Deep Sky Survey. The Gemini Multi-Object Spectrographs spectra at red optical wavelengths (6500-10500 A) are presented, which reveal that they are early-T dwarfs. The classification is also supported by their optical to near-infrared colors. It is noted that ULAS J0321+0051 is one of the faintest currently known T dwarfs. The estimated distances to the three objects are 50-110 pc, thus they are among the most distant field T dwarfs known. The dense temporal coverage of the target fields achieved by the SDSS-II Supernova Survey allows us to perform a simple time-series analysis of the dwarfs. We create stacked images of each year from 2002-2007 and find significant proper motions of 150-290 mas yr{sup -1} or transverse velocities of 40-100 km s{sup -1} for ULAS J0128-0041 and ULAS J0226+0051. We also find that there are no detectable, long-term (a-few-year) brightness variations above a few times 0.1 mag for the two brown dwarfs.

  2. Wavelength Selection in Gyrotactic Bioconvection.

    PubMed

    Ghorai, S; Singh, R; Hill, N A

    2015-06-01

    We investigate pattern formation by swimming micro-organisms (bioconvection), when their orientation is determined by balance between gravitational and viscous torques (gyrotaxis), due to being bottom heavy. The governing equations, which consist of the Navier-Stokes equations for an incompressible fluid coupled with a micro-organism conservation equation, are solved numerically in a large cross section chamber with periodic boundary conditions in the horizontal directions. The influence of key parameters on wavelength selection in bioconvection patterns is investigated numerically. For realistic ranges of parameter values, the computed wavelengths are in good agreement with the experimental observations provided that the diffusion due to randomness in cell swimming behaviour is small, refuting a recently published claim that the mathematical model becomes inaccurate at long times. We also provide the first computational evidence of "bottom-standing" plumes in a three-dimensional simulation. PMID:25963246

  3. Multi-wavelength holographic profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, E. A.; Gesualdi, M. R.; Muramatsu, M.

    2006-01-01

    A novel method for surface profilometry by holography is presented. We used a diode laser emitting at many wavelengths simultaneously as the light source and a Bi 12TiO 20 (BTO) crystal as the holographic medium in single exposure processes. The employ of multi-wavelength, large free spectral range (FSR) lasers leads to holographic images covered of interference fringes corresponding to the contour lines of the studied surface. In order to obtain the relief of the studied surface, the fringe analysis was performed by the phase stepping technique (PST) and the phase unwrapping was carried out by the Cellular-automata method. We analysed the relief of a tilted flat metallic bar and a tooth prosthesis.

  4. Review of short wavelength lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1985-03-18

    There has recently been a substantial amount of research devoted to the development of short wavelength amplifiers and lasers. A number of experimental results have been published wherein the observation of significant gain has been claimed on transitions in the EUV and soft x-ray regimes. The present review is intended to discuss the main approaches to the creation of population inversions and laser media in the short wavelength regime, and hopefully aid workers in the field by helping to provide access to a growing literature. The approaches to pumping EUV and soft x-ray lasers are discussed according to inversion mechanism. The approaches may be divided into roughly seven categories, including collisional excitation pumping, recombination pumping, direct photoionization and photoexcitation pumping, metastable state storage plus optical pumping, charge exchange pumping, and finally, the extension of free electron laser techniques into the EUV and soft x-ray regimes. 250 references.

  5. The Arabidopsis MUM2 gene encodes a beta-galactosidase required for the production of seed coat mucilage with correct hydration properties.

    PubMed

    Dean, Gillian H; Zheng, Huanquan; Tewari, Jagdish; Huang, Jun; Young, Diana S; Hwang, Yeen Ting; Western, Tamara L; Carpita, Nicholas C; McCann, Maureen C; Mansfield, Shawn D; Haughn, George W

    2007-12-01

    Seed coat development in Arabidopsis thaliana involves a complex pathway where cells of the outer integument differentiate into a highly specialized cell type after fertilization. One aspect of this developmental process involves the secretion of a large amount of pectinaceous mucilage into the apoplast. When the mature seed coat is exposed to water, this mucilage expands to break the primary cell wall and encapsulate the seed. The mucilage-modified2 (mum2) mutant is characterized by a failure to extrude mucilage on hydration, although mucilage is produced as normal during development. The defect in mum2 appears to reside in the mucilage itself, as mucilage fails to expand even when the barrier of the primary cell wall is removed. We have cloned the MUM2 gene and expressed recombinant MUM2 protein, which has beta-galactosidase activity. Biochemical analysis of the mum2 mucilage reveals alterations in pectins that are consistent with a defect in beta-galactosidase activity, and we have demonstrated that MUM2 is localized to the cell wall. We propose that MUM2 is involved in modifying mucilage to allow it to expand upon hydration, establishing a link between the galactosyl side-chain structure of pectin and its physical properties. PMID:18165329

  6. The Arabidopsis MUM2 Gene Encodes a β-Galactosidase Required for the Production of Seed Coat Mucilage with Correct Hydration Properties[W

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Gillian H.; Zheng, Huanquan; Tewari, Jagdish; Huang, Jun; Young, Diana S.; Hwang, Yeen Ting; Western, Tamara L.; Carpita, Nicholas C.; McCann, Maureen C.; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Haughn, George W.

    2007-01-01

    Seed coat development in Arabidopsis thaliana involves a complex pathway where cells of the outer integument differentiate into a highly specialized cell type after fertilization. One aspect of this developmental process involves the secretion of a large amount of pectinaceous mucilage into the apoplast. When the mature seed coat is exposed to water, this mucilage expands to break the primary cell wall and encapsulate the seed. The mucilage-modified2 (mum2) mutant is characterized by a failure to extrude mucilage on hydration, although mucilage is produced as normal during development. The defect in mum2 appears to reside in the mucilage itself, as mucilage fails to expand even when the barrier of the primary cell wall is removed. We have cloned the MUM2 gene and expressed recombinant MUM2 protein, which has β-galactosidase activity. Biochemical analysis of the mum2 mucilage reveals alterations in pectins that are consistent with a defect in β-galactosidase activity, and we have demonstrated that MUM2 is localized to the cell wall. We propose that MUM2 is involved in modifying mucilage to allow it to expand upon hydration, establishing a link between the galactosyl side-chain structure of pectin and its physical properties. PMID:18165329

  7. Silicon photonic device for wavelength sensing and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas Lopez, German R.

    Over the last decade advances and innovations from Silicon Photonics technology were observed in the telecommunications and computing industries. This technology which employs Silicon as an optical medium, relies on current CMOS micro-electronics fabrication processes to enable medium scale integration of many nano-photonic devices to produce photonic integrated circuitry. However, other fields of research such as optical sensor processing can benefit from silicon photonics technology, specially in sensors where the physical measurement is wavelength encoded. In this research work, we present a design and application of a thermally tuned silicon photonic device as an optical sensor interrogator. The main device is a micro-ring resonator filter of 10 mum of diameter. A photonic design toolkit was developed based on open source software from the research community. With those tools it was possible to estimate the resonance and spectral characteristics of the filter. From the obtained design parameters, a 7.8 x 3.8 mm optical chip was fabricated using standard micro-photonics techniques. In order to tune a ring resonance, Nichrome micro-heaters were fabricated on top of the device. Some fabricated devices were systematically characterized and their tuning response were determined. From measurements, a ring resonator with a free-spectral-range of 18.4 nm and with a bandwidth of 0.14 nm was obtained. Using just 5 mA it was possible to tune the device resonance up to 3 nm. In order to apply our device as a sensor interrogator in this research, a model of wavelength estimation using time interval between peaks measurement technique was developed and simulations were carried out to assess its performance. To test the technique, an experiment using a Fiber Bragg grating optical sensor was set, and estimations of the wavelength shift of this sensor due to axial strains yield an error within 22 pm compared to measurements from spectrum analyzer. Results from this study

  8. Set the P.A.C.E.! A Curriculum to Promote Mother-Child Communication about Sexuality and Reduce Sexual Risk Behaviors in Children Ages 6-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiIorio, Colleen K.; Pluhar, Erika I.; Pines, Kathy; Jennings, Tanya

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we describe the Set the P.A.C.E.! (Parents And Children Empowered) curriculum designed for mothers of children 6-12 years of age. The development of the curriculum was part of a research study to test an intervention to enhance the mother's role in promoting resilience among 6- to 12-year-old children and to reduce the risk of…

  9. InAs/InP single quantum wire formation and emission at 1.5 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Alen, B.; Fuster, D.; Gonzalez, Y.; Gonzalez, L.; Martinez-Pastor, J.

    2006-12-04

    Isolated InAs/InP self-assembled quantum wires have been grown using in situ accumulated stress measurements to adjust the optimal InAs thickness. Atomic force microscopy imaging shows highly asymmetric nanostructures with average length exceeding more than ten times their width. High resolution optical investigation of as-grown samples reveals strong photoluminescence from individual quantum wires at 1.5 {mu}m. Additional sharp features are related to monolayer fluctuations of the two-dimensional InAs layer present during the early stages of the quantum wire self-assembling process.

  10. Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers emitting near 1.5 {mu}m with Sb-based reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, O.; Klem, J.F.; Vawter, G.A.

    1998-04-01

    We describe use of AlAsSb/AlGaAsSb lattice matched to InP for distributed Bragg reflectors. These structures are integral to several surface normal devices, in particular vertical cavity surface emitting lasers. The high refractive index ratio of these materials allows formation of a highly reflective mirror with relatively few mirror pairs. As a result, we have been able to show for the first time the 77K CW operation of an optically pumped, monolithic, all-epitaxial vertical cavity laser, emitting at 1.56 {mu}m.

  11. HST/NICMOS IMAGING OF BRIGHT HIGH-REDSHIFT 24 {mu}m SELECTED GALAXIES: MERGING PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zamojski, Michel; Yan Lin; Dasyra, Kalliopi; Surace, Jason; Helou, George; Sajina, Anna; Heckman, Tim

    2011-04-01

    We present new results on the physical nature of infrared-luminous sources at 0.5 < z < 2.8 as revealed by HST/NICMOS imaging and Infrared Spectrograph mid-infrared spectroscopy. Our sample consists of 134 galaxies selected at 24 {mu}m with a flux of S(24 {mu}m)>0.9 mJy. We find many ({approx}60%) of our sources to possess an important bulge and/or central point source component, most of which reveal additional underlying structures after subtraction of a best-fit Sersic (or Sersic+PSF) profile. Based on visual inspection of the NIC2 images and their residuals, we estimate that {approx}80% of all our sources are mergers. We calculate lower and upper limits on the merger fraction to be 62% and 91%, respectively. At z < 1.5, we observe objects in early (pre-coalescence) merging stages to be mostly disk and star formation dominated, while we find mergers to be mainly bulge dominated and active galactic nucleus (AGN)-starburst composites during coalescence and then AGN dominated in late stages. This is analogous to what is observed in local ULIRGs. At z {>=} 1.5, we find a dramatic rise in the number of objects in pre-coalescence phases of merging, despite an increase in the preponderance of AGN signatures in their mid-IR spectra and luminosities above 10{sup 12.5} L{sub sun}. We further find the majority of mergers at those redshifts to retain a disk-dominated profile during coalescence. We conclude that, albeit still driven by mergers, these high-z ULIRGs are substantially different in nature from their local counterparts and speculate that this is likely due to their higher gas content. Finally, we observe obscured ({tau}{sub 9.7{mu}m}>3.36) quasars to live in faint and compact hosts and show that these are likely high-redshift analogs of local dense-core mergers. We find late-stage mergers to possess predominantly unobscured AGN spectra, but do not observe other morphological classes to carry any specific combination of {tau}{sub 9.7{mu}m} and polycyclic aromatic

  12. Wavelength tunable alexandrite regenerative amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Harter, D.J.; Bado, P.

    1988-11-01

    We describe a wavelength tunable alexandrite regenerative amplifier which is used to amplify nanosecond slices from a single-frequency cw dye laser or 50-ps pulses emitted by a diode laser to energies in the 10-mJ range. The amplified 5-ns slices generated by the cw-pumped line narrowed dye laser are Fourier transform limited. The 50-ps pulses emitted by a gain-switched diode laser are amplified by more than 10 orders of magnitude in a single stage.

  13. Plasmonic lens for ultraviolet wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Minoru; Tanimoto, Takuya; Inoue, Tsutomu; Aizawa, Kento

    2016-09-01

    A plasmonic lens (PL) is one of the promising photonic devices utilizing the surface plasmon wave. In this study, we have newly developed a PL with a 3.5 µm diameter for a wavelength of 375 nm (ultraviolet region). It is composed of multiple circular slit apertures milled in aluminum (Al) thin film. We have simulated the electric field distribution of the PL, and confirmed that a tightly focused beam spot of subwavelength size in the far-field region was attained. We have also measured the focusing characteristics of the PL using a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and compared them with the calculated results.

  14. BIN Diode For Submillimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, J.

    1989-01-01

    Diode formed by selective doping during epitaxial growth, starting with semi-insulating substrate. Use of high-mobility semiconductors like GaAs extends cutoff frequency. Either molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) or organometallic chemical-vapor deposition used to form layers of diode. Planar growth process permits subsequent fabrication of arrays of diodes by standard photolithographic techniques, to achieve quasi-optical coupling of submillimeter radiation. Useful for generation of harmonics or heterodyne mixing in receivers for atmospheric and space spectroscopy operating at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. Used as frequency doublers or triplers, diodes of new type extend frequency range of present solid-state oscillators.

  15. Note: Laser wavelength precision measurement based on a laser synthetic wavelength interferometer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liping; Chen, Benyong; Zhang, Shihua; Liu, Pengpeng; Zhang, Enzheng

    2016-08-01

    A laser wavelength precision measurement method is presented based on the laser synthetic wavelength interferometer (LSWI). According to the linear relation between the displacements of measurement and reference arms in the interferometer, the synthetic wavelength produced by an unknown wavelength and a reference wavelength can be measured by detecting the phase coincidences of two interference signals. The advantage of the method is that a larger synthetic wavelength resulting from an unknown wavelength very close to the reference wavelength can be easily determined according to the linear relation in the interferometer. Then the unknown wavelength is derived according to the one-to-one corresponding relationship between single wavelength and synthetic wavelength. Wavelengths of an external cavity diode laser and two He-Ne lasers were determined experimentally. The experimental results show that the proposed method is able to realize a relative uncertainty on the order of 10(-8). PMID:27587172

  16. Note: Laser wavelength precision measurement based on a laser synthetic wavelength interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Liping; Chen, Benyong; Zhang, Shihua; Liu, Pengpeng; Zhang, Enzheng

    2016-08-01

    A laser wavelength precision measurement method is presented based on the laser synthetic wavelength interferometer (LSWI). According to the linear relation between the displacements of measurement and reference arms in the interferometer, the synthetic wavelength produced by an unknown wavelength and a reference wavelength can be measured by detecting the phase coincidences of two interference signals. The advantage of the method is that a larger synthetic wavelength resulting from an unknown wavelength very close to the reference wavelength can be easily determined according to the linear relation in the interferometer. Then the unknown wavelength is derived according to the one-to-one corresponding relationship between single wavelength and synthetic wavelength. Wavelengths of an external cavity diode laser and two He-Ne lasers were determined experimentally. The experimental results show that the proposed method is able to realize a relative uncertainty on the order of 10-8.

  17. The Effect of Recorded Mum's Lullaby and Brahm’s Lullaby on Oxygen Saturation in Preterm Infants: a Randomized Double-Blind Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jabraeili, Mahnaz; Sabet, Tahmineh; MustafaGharebaghi, Manijeh; Asghari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Arshadi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Music stimulation has been shown to provide significant benefits to preterm infants. Thus the aim of this study was determine the effect of recorded mum's lullaby and Brahm’s lullaby on oxygen saturation in preterm infants. Methods: This double-blind randomized controlled trial was carried out on 66 premature newborns with the postnatal age of ≥3 days and weight ≤ 2800 grams at Taleghani Hospital. Infants were randomly divided into three groups: control, Brahm’s lullaby and Mum's lullaby groups. Infants were continuously monitored for primary outcome of percutaneous oxygen saturation, for three consecutive sessions. Results: There were significant difference in neonate oxygen saturation between the Brahm’s lullaby and Mum's lullaby as compared with control groups in the 15 minutes after intervention. Conclusion: This study showed beneficial effects of Brahm’s lullaby and Mum's lullaby sound. Therefore; it may be used for improving short term outcomes in premature infants. PMID:26989669

  18. COS FUV Internal/External Wavelength Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyes, Charles

    2009-07-01

    Observe external radial velocity standard targets in TIME-TAG {FLASH=YES} mode with all grating and central wavelength combinations. The purpose is to obtain zero-point offsets for the wavelength scale {internal wavecal lamp scale to external standard wavelength scale} and PSA dispersion relations for all central wavelengths. Following this determination, adjustments of the nominal science target spectral range for each grating and central wavelength combination will be made via SMS patchable constant for nominal OSM1 positions corresponding to each central wavelength. Subsequent to this modification of the wavelength scale {and its verification via analysis of COS30 - program 11488}, FUV science-related operations and wavelength-dependent EROs can commence.

  19. COS NUV Internal/External Wavelength Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyes, Charles

    2009-07-01

    Observe external radial velocity standard targets {preferably, though not required, in CVZ} in TIME-TAG {FLASH=YES} mode with as many grating and central wavelength combinations as feasible. The purpose is to obtain zero-point offsets for the wavelength scale {internal wavecal lamp scale to external standard wavelength scale} for all central wavelengths. Following this determination, adjustments of the nominal science target spectral range for each grating and central wavelength combination will be made via SMS patchable constant for nominal OSM2 positions corresponding to each central wavelength. Subsequent to this modification of the wavelength scale {and its verification in COS 15 - program 11475}, NUV science-related operations and wavelength-scale dependent EROs can commence.

  20. Sub-wavelength diffractive optics

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, M.E.; Wendt, J.R.; Vawter, G.A.

    1998-03-01

    This report represents the completion of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to investigate sub-wavelength surface relief structures fabricated by direct-write e-beam technology as unique and very high-efficiency optical elements. A semiconductor layer with sub-wavelength sized etched openings or features can be considered as a layer with an effective index of refraction determined by the fraction of the surface filled with semiconductor relative to the fraction filled with air or other material. Such as a layer can be used to implement planar gradient-index lenses on a surface. Additionally, the nanometer-scale surface structures have diffractive properties that allow the direct manipulation of polarization and altering of the reflective properties of surfaces. With this technology a single direct-write mask and etch can be used to integrate a wide variety of optical functions into a device surface with high efficiencies; allowing for example, direct integration of polarizing optics into the surface with high efficiencies; allowing for example, direct integration of polarizing optics into the surfaces of devices, forming anti-reflection surfaces or fabricating high-efficiency, high-numerical aperture lenses, including integration inside vertical semiconductor laser cavities.

  1. Multi-wavelength fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, Tiffany C.; Lo, Pei-An; Cho, Jaedu; Nouizi, Farouk; Chiang, Huihua K.; Kim, Chang-Seok; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2016-03-01

    The strong scattering and absorption of light in biological tissue makes it challenging to model the propagation of light, especially in deep tissue. This is especially true in fluorescent tomography, which aims to recover the internal fluorescence source distribution from the measured light intensities on the surface of the tissue. The inherently ill-posed and underdetermined nature of the inverse problem along with strong tissue scattering makes Fluorescence Tomography (FT) extremely challenging. Previously, multispectral detection fluorescent tomography (FT) has been shown to improve the image quality of FT by incorporating the spectral filtering of biological tissue to provide depth information to overcome the inherent absorption and scattering limitations. We investigate whether multi-wavelength fluorescent tomography can be used to distinguish the signals from multiple fluorophores with overlapping fluorescence spectrums using a unique near-infrared (NIR) swept laser. In this work, a small feasibility study was performed to see whether multi-wavelength FT can be used to detect subtle shifts in the absorption spectrum due to differences in fluorophore microenvironment.

  2. Compact silicon photonic wavelength-tunable laser diode with ultra-wide wavelength tuning range

    SciTech Connect

    Kita, Tomohiro Tang, Rui; Yamada, Hirohito

    2015-03-16

    We present a wavelength-tunable laser diode with a 99-nm-wide wavelength tuning range. It has a compact wavelength-tunable filter with high wavelength selectivity fabricated using silicon photonics technology. The silicon photonic wavelength-tunable filter with wide wavelength tuning range was realized using two ring resonators and an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The wavelength-tunable laser diode fabricated by butt-joining a silicon photonic filter and semiconductor optical amplifier shows stable single-mode operation over a wide wavelength range.

  3. Focusing X-rays to a 1-{mu}m spot using elastically bent, graded multilayer coated mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, J.H.; Thompson, A.C.; Kortright, J.B.

    1997-04-01

    In the x-ray fluorescent microprobe at beamline 10.3.1, the ALS bending magnet source is demagnified by a factor of several hundred using a pair of mirrors arranged in the Kirkpatrick-Baez (K-B) configuration. These are coated with multilayers to increase reflectivity and limit the pass band of the x-rays striking the sample. The x-rays excite characteristic fluorescent x-rays of elements in the sample, which are analyzed by an energy dispersive Si-Li detector, for a sensitive assay of the elemental content. By scanning the focal spot the spatial distribution of the elements is determined; the spatial resolution depends on the size of this spot. When spherical mirrors are used, the spatial resolution is limited by aberrations to 5 or 10 {mu}m. This has been improved to 1 {mu}m through the use of an elliptical mirror formed by elastically bending a plane mirror of uniform width and thickness with the optimum combination of end couples.

  4. Development of a PM-10 inlet for continuous operation and with recovery of the {gt}10-{mu}m fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Langer, G.; Pauley, B.J.

    1992-09-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) manufactured nuclear weapons` components out of plutonium (Pu) metal until 1990. The plant is now in a decontamination and disposition phase. In both the manufacturing mode and the present mode, Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the State of Colorado have required continuous monitoring of the air to detect releases of radionuclides. The air surveillance network established around the plant in the early 1950`s was replaced in 1972 with a network of high-volume (40 cfm) samplers (hivols). This network extends into the community. The hivois were patterned after the EPA total suspended particle (TSP) samplers with an approximate cutoff at 30 micrometers ({mu}m); however, the RFP version of the TSP sampler was designed to operate continuously and had to be relatively inconspicuous. After nearly 20 years of operation, the RFP air surveillance samplers are in need of updating or replacement, in part because the EPA has now established a new criterion for sampling of suspended particles; i.e., the PM-10 criterion. Only particles of less than 10-{mu}m aerodynamic diameter are considered hazardous to health through inhalation pathways. This report discusses the development of a PM-10 inlet for continuous operation.

  5. An innovative method for the preparation of mum (Thai fermented sausages) with acceptable technological quality and extended shelf-life.

    PubMed

    Wanangkarn, Amornrat; Liu, Deng-Cheng; Swetwiwathana, Adisorn; Tan, Fa-Jui

    2012-11-15

    Freshly-manufactured mum sausages were assigned to two processing methods (process I: stored at ∼30 °C for 14 days; process II: stored at ∼30 °C for three days, vacuum-packaged, and stored at 4 °C until day 28). Physicochemical, microbial, textural, and sensory properties of samples were analysed. The results showed that dehydration was more intense in process I samples, and resulted in lower moisture content and water activity. Significant decreases in pH values, and increases in lactic acid were observed in both samples by day 3. The total microflora and lactic acid bacteria counts increased rapidly during the fermentation and then decreased while the Enterobacteriaceae counts decreased steadily. Too much dehydration resulted in tough textures and unacceptable sensory qualities for process I samples. In conclusion, after three days of fermentation, with vacuum-packaging, ripening and storage at 4 °C up to 28 days, it is possible to produce mum sausages with better qualities and an extended shelf life. PMID:22868122

  6. Multiple wavelength light collimator and monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gore, Warren J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An optical system for receiving and collimating light and for transporting and processing light received in each of N wavelength ranges, including near-ultraviolet, visible, near-infrared and mid-infrared wavelengths, to determine a fraction of light received, and associated dark current, in each wavelength range in each of a sequence of time intervals.

  7. Internet Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Women With Postnatal Depression: A Randomized Controlled Trial of MumMoodBooster

    PubMed Central

    Milgrom, Jeannette; Danaher, Brian G; Holt, Charlene; Holt, Christopher J; Seeley, John R; Tyler, Milagra S; Ross, Jessica; Ericksen, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Background There are few published controlled trials examining the efficacy of Internet-based treatment for postnatal depression (PND) and none that assess diagnostic status (clinical remission) as the primary outcome. This is despite the need to improve treatment uptake and accessibility because fewer than 50% of postnatally depressed women seek help, even when identified as depressed. Objective In a randomized controlled trial (RCT), we aimed to test the efficacy of a 6-session Internet intervention (the MumMoodBooster program, previously evaluated in a feasibility trial) in a sample of postnatal women with a clinical diagnosis of depression. The MumMoodBooster program is a cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention, is highly interactive, includes a partner website, and was supported by low-intensity telephone coaching. Methods This was a parallel 2-group RCT (N=43) comparing the Internet CBT treatment (n=21) to treatment as usual (n=22). At baseline and at 12 weeks after enrollment, women’s diagnostic status was assessed by telephone with the Standardized Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-IV) and symptom severity with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II). Depression symptoms were measured repeatedly throughout the study period with the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Results At the end of the study, 79% (15/19) of women who received the Internet CBT treatment no longer met diagnostic criteria for depression on the SCID-IV (these outcome data were missing for 2 intervention participants). This contrasted with only 18% (4/22) remission in the treatment as usual condition. Depression scores on the BDI-II showed a large effect favoring the intervention group (d=.83, 95% CI 0.20-1.45). Small to medium effects were found on the PHQ-9 and on measures of anxiety and stress. Adherence to the program was very good with 86% (18/21) of users completing all sessions; satisfaction with the program was rated 3.1 out of 4 on average. Conclusions Our results

  8. Sub-microsecond wavelength stabilization of tunable lasers with the internal wavelength locker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Ryoga; Tatsumoto, Yudai; Sakuma, Kazuki; Onji, Hirokazu; Shimokozono, Makoto; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Kato, Kazutoshi

    2016-08-01

    We proposed a method of accelerating the wavelength stabilization after wavelength switching of the tunable distributed amplification-distributed feedback (TDA-DFB) laser using the internal wavelength locker to reduce the size and the cost of the wavelength control system. The configuration of the wavelength stabilization system based on this locker was as follows. At the wavelength locker, the light intensity after an optical filter is detected as a current by the photodiodes (PDs). Then, for estimating the wavelength, the current is processed by the current/voltage-converting circuit (IVC), logarithm amplifier (Log Amp) and field programmable gate array (FPGA). Finally, the laser current is tuned to the desired wavelength with reference to the estimated wavelength. With this control system the wavelength is stabilized within 800 ns after wavelength switching, which is even faster than that with the conventional control system.

  9. Refraction effects and wavelength dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claverie, J.; Dion, D.

    2006-09-01

    The performances of Electro-Optical (EO) systems such as visible or infrared cameras, lasers, operating within the Marine Surface Boundary Layer (MSBL), i.e. at heights up to a few tens of meters above the sea surface, are disturbed by various propagation mechanisms: molecular attenuation, aerosol extinction, refraction and turbulence. Refraction is responsible for focusing and defocusing of rays, detection range limitations, mirage formation and angular deviation. The refractive index depends on atmospheric pressure, air temperature and air humidity. Within the optical transmission bands, it also depends on the wavelength. In this paper, the results provided by two different formulations of the refractive index associated with the same ray tracing program are compared and discussed.

  10. Bolometric Arrays for Millimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, E.; Serrano, A.; Torres-Jácome, A.

    2009-11-01

    During last years, semiconductor bolometers using thin films have been developed at INAOE, specifically boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon films. The characteristics shown by these devices made them attractive to be used in astronomical instrumentation, mainly in two-dimentional arrays. These detector arrays used at the Large Millimeter Telescope will make possible to obtain astronomical images in millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. With this in mind, we are developing a method to produce, with enough reliability, bolometer arrays at INAOE. Until now, silicon nitride diaphragm arrays, useful as radiation absorbers, have succesfully been obtained. Sizes going from one to four millimeter by element in a consistent way; however we have not tested thermometers and metallic contact deposition yet. At the same time, we are working on two possible configurations for the readout electronics; one of them using commercial components while the other will be an integrated circuit specifically designed for this application. Both versions will work below 77K.

  11. Retinal spot size with wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Hammer, Daniel X.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Amnotte, Rodney E.; Eilert, Brent; Druessel, Jeffrey J.; Payne, Dale J.; Phillips, Shana L.; Stolarski, David J.; Noojin, Gary D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Cain, Clarence P.

    1997-06-01

    We have made an indirect in-vivo determination of spot size focusing in the rhesus monkey model. Measurement of the laser induced breakdown threshold both in-vitro and in-vivo allow correlation and assignment of a spot size after focusing through the living eye. We discuss and analyze the results and show how trends in minimum visible lesion data should be assessed in light of chromatic aberration. National laser safety standards are based on minimal visual lesion (MVL) threshold studies in different animal models. The energy required for a retinal lesion depends upon may parameters including wavelength and retinal spot size. We attempt to explain trends in reported MVL threshold studies using a model of the eye which allows calculation of changes in retinal spot size due to chromatic aberration.

  12. At-wavelength characterization of refractive x-ray lenses using a two-dimensional grating interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Rutishauser, Simon; David, Christian; Zanette, Irene; Weitkamp, Timm; Donath, Tilman

    2011-11-28

    We report on the application of a two-dimensional hard x-ray grating interferometer to x-ray optics metrology. The interferometer is sensitive to refraction angles in two perpendicular directions with a precision of 10 nrad. It is used to observe the wavefront changes induced by a single parabolic beryllium focusing lens of large radius of curvature. The lens shape is reconstructed and its residual aberrations are analyzed. Its profile differs from an ideal parabolic shape by less than 2 {mu}m or {lambda}/50 at {lambda} = 0.54 A wavelength.

  13. THE MASS LOSS RETURN FROM EVOLVED STARS TO THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD: EMPIRICAL RELATIONS FOR EXCESS EMISSION AT 8 AND 24 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, Sundar; Meixner, Margaret; Leitherer, Claus; Vijh, Uma; Gordon, Karl D.; Sewilo, Marta; Volk, Kevin; Blum, Robert D.; Harris, Jason; Babler, Brian L.; Bracker, Steve; Meade, Marilyn; Block, Miwa; Engelbracht, Charles W.; For, Bi-Qing; Misselt, Karl A.; Cohen, Martin; Hora, Joseph L.; Indebetouw, Remy; Markwick-Kemper, Francisca

    2009-06-15

    We present empirical relations describing excess emission from evolved stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using data from the Spitzer Space Telescope Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE) survey which includes the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {mu}m and Multiband Imaging Photometer (MIPS) 24, 70, and 160 {mu}m bands. We combine the SAGE data with the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS; J, H, and K {sub s}) and the optical Magellanic Cloud Photometric Survey (MCPS; U, B, V, and I) point source catalogs in order to create complete spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star candidates in the LMC. AGB star outflows are among the main producers of dust in a galaxy, and this mass loss results in an excess in the fluxes observed in the 8 and 24 {mu}m bands. The aim of this work is to investigate the mass loss return by AGB stars to the interstellar medium of the LMC by studying the dependence of the infrared excess flux on the total luminosity. We identify oxygen-rich, carbon-rich, and extreme AGB star populations in our sample based on their 2MASS and IRAC colors. The SEDs of oxygen- and carbon-rich AGB stars are compared with appropriate stellar photosphere models to obtain the excess flux in all the IRAC bands and the MIPS 24 {mu}m band. Extreme AGB stars are dominated by circumstellar emission at 8 and 24 {mu}m; thus we approximate their excesses with the flux observed in these bands. We find about 16,000 O-rich, 6300 C-rich, and 1000 extreme sources with reliable 8 {mu}m excesses, and about 4500 O-rich, 5300 C-rich, and 960 extreme sources with reliable 24 {mu}m excesses. The excesses are in the range 0.1 mJy to 5 Jy. The 8 and 24 {mu}m excesses for all three types of AGB candidates show a general increasing trend with luminosity. The color temperature of the circumstellar dust derived from the ratio of the 8 and 24 {mu}m excesses decreases with an increase in excess, while the 24 {mu}m

  14. MID-INFRARED GALAXY MORPHOLOGY FROM THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S{sup 4}G): THE IMPRINT OF THE DE VAUCOULEURS REVISED HUBBLE-SANDAGE CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM AT 3.6 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Buta, Ronald J.; Sheth, Kartik; Aravena, Manuel; Hinz, Joannah L.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Munoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Elmegreen, Debra M.; Masters, Karen L.; Comeron, Sebastien

    2010-09-15

    Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Array Camera imaging provides an opportunity to study all known morphological types of galaxies in the mid-IR at a depth significantly better than ground-based near-infrared and optical images. The goal of this study is to examine the imprint of the de Vaucouleurs classification volume in the 3.6 {mu}m band, which is the best Spitzer waveband for galactic stellar mass morphology owing to its depth and its reddening-free sensitivity mainly to older stars. For this purpose, we have prepared classification images for 207 galaxies from the Spitzer archive, most of which are formally part of the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S{sup 4}G), a Spitzer post-cryogenic ('warm') mission Exploration Science Legacy Program survey of 2331 galaxies closer than 40 Mpc. For the purposes of morphology, the galaxies are interpreted as if the images are blue light, the historical waveband for classical galaxy classification studies. We find that 3.6 {mu}m classifications are well correlated with blue-light classifications, to the point where the essential features of many galaxies look very similar in the two very different wavelength regimes. Drastic differences are found only for the most dusty galaxies. Consistent with a previous study by Eskridge et al., the main difference between blue-light and mid-IR types is an {approx}1 stage interval difference for S0/a to Sbc or Sc galaxies, which tend to appear 'earlier' in type at 3.6 {mu}m due to the slightly increased prominence of the bulge, the reduced effects of extinction, and the reduced (but not completely eliminated) effect of the extreme population I stellar component. We present an atlas of all of the 207 galaxies analyzed here and bring attention to special features or galaxy types, such as nuclear rings, pseudobulges, flocculent spiral galaxies, I0 galaxies, double-stage and double-variety galaxies, and outer rings, that are particularly distinctive in the mid-IR.

  15. Phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometry at EUV wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, K.A.; Tejnil, E.; Sang Lee

    1997-04-01

    A novel phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometer (PS/PDI) operating at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is being used to perform wavefront-measuring metrology at 13.4-nm wavelength to characterize aberrations in a multilayer-coated 10x Schwarzschild objective designed for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) projection lithography experiments. To achieve 0.1-micron critical dimension pattern transfer with EUV projection lithography at 13.4-nm wavelength, nearly diffraction-limited all-reflective multilayer-coated optical systems with 0.1 numerical aperture are required. The EUV wavefront, determined by the mirror surfaces and the reflective multilayer coatings, is measurable only at the operational wavelength of the system. The authors goal is to measure the EUV wavefront to an accuracy of 0.01 waves rms (0.13 nm). The PS/PDI is a type of point-diffraction interferometer, modified for significantly improved throughput and phase-shifting capability. The interferometer design utilizes a grating beamsplitter and pinhole spatial filters in the object and image planes of the optical system under test. The 10x-reduction Schwarzschild objective, with image-side numerical aperture of 0.08, is illuminated by a sub-micron pinhole in the object plane. A coarse, 20-micron pitch grating placed between the illumination pinhole and the Schwarzschild system serves a dual role as a small-angle beam-splitter and a phase-shifting element. The first-order diffracted beam from the grating is spatially filtered in the image plane of the Schwarzschild with a sub-100-nm pinhole and becomes the `D reference` wave in the interferometer. The zero-order beam is the `test` wave, and it passes unobstructed through a 4.5-{mu}m window in the image plane. The test and reference beams are separated by several microns in the image plane to minimize beam overlap. The interference fringes are recorded with a CCD detector placed about 12 cm from the Schwarzschild image plane.

  16. 3.6 AND 4.5 {mu}m PHASE CURVES AND EVIDENCE FOR NON-EQUILIBRIUM CHEMISTRY IN THE ATMOSPHERE OF EXTRASOLAR PLANET HD 189733b

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, Heather A.; Lewis, Nikole; Showman, Adam P.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Laughlin, Gregory; Burrows, Adam; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Agol, Eric; Aigrain, Suzanne; Charbonneau, David; Desert, Jean-Michel; Deming, Drake; Henry, Gregory W.; Langton, Jonathan

    2012-07-20

    We present new, full-orbit observations of the infrared phase variations of the canonical hot Jupiter HD 189733b obtained in the 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m bands using the Spitzer Space Telescope. When combined with previous phase curve observations at 8.0 and 24 {mu}m, these data allow us to characterize the exoplanet's emission spectrum as a function of planetary longitude and to search for local variations in its vertical thermal profile and atmospheric composition. We utilize an improved method for removing the effects of intrapixel sensitivity variations and robustly extracting phase curve signals from these data, and we calculate our best-fit parameters and uncertainties using a wavelet-based Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis that accounts for the presence of time-correlated noise in our data. We measure a phase curve amplitude of 0.1242% {+-} 0.0061% in the 3.6 {mu}m band and 0.0982% {+-} 0.0089% in the 4.5 {mu}m band, corresponding to brightness temperature contrasts of 503 {+-} 21 K and 264 {+-} 24 K, respectively. We find that the times of minimum and maximum flux occur several hours earlier than predicted for an atmosphere in radiative equilibrium, consistent with the eastward advection of gas by an equatorial super-rotating jet. The locations of the flux minima in our new data differ from our previous observations at 8 {mu}m, and we present new evidence indicating that the flux minimum observed in the 8 {mu}m is likely caused by an overshooting effect in the 8 {mu}m array. We obtain improved estimates for HD 189733b's dayside planet-star flux ratio of 0.1466% {+-} 0.0040% in the 3.6 {mu}m band and 0.1787% {+-} 0.0038% in the 4.5 {mu}m band, corresponding to brightness temperatures of 1328 {+-} 11 K and 1192 {+-} 9 K, respectively; these are the most accurate secondary eclipse depths obtained to date for an extrasolar planet. We compare our new dayside and nightside spectra for HD 189733b to the predictions of one-dimensional radiative transfer models from

  17. Room temperature synthesis and solid-state structure of Ni{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}.12H{sub 2}O

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, J.M.; LeBret, G.C.; Cleary, D.A. . E-mail: cleary@gonzaga.edu; Twamley, B.

    2005-04-15

    The synthesis and crystal structure of Ni{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}.12H{sub 2}O are reported. The compound was synthesized from aqueous solutions of nickel chloride and sodium hypodiphosphate at room temperature. The space group is orthorhombic, Pnnm. Unit cell dimensions are a=11.2418(5)A, b=18.5245(8)A, and c=7.3188(3)A, Z=4. The product is unstable with respect to dehydration above room temperature.

  18. Structure and conformational analysis of 5,11-dibenzyldibenzo[b,f][1,5]diazocine-6,12-dione. A novel approach for new chemosensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonnenmacher, E.; Brouant, P.; Mrozek, A.; Karolak-Wojciechowska, J.; Barbe, J.

    2000-04-01

    On the basis of structural similarities between various calcium channel antagonists (Verapamil or Diltiazem) a novel series of derivatives belonging to the dibenzodiazocinedione family were designed and synthesised to obtain drugs able to revert multidrug resistance (MDR). X-ray structure studies and conformational analysis of 5,11-dibenzyldibenzo[b,f][1,5]diazocine-6,12-dione were performed. Molecular modelling results have shown that observed reversal activity of this new derivative could refer to a thermodynamically limited concentration in a peculiar (extended) conformation.

  19. A HERSCHEL SURVEY OF THE [N II] 205 {mu}m LINE IN LOCAL LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES: THE [N II] 205 {mu}m EMISSION AS A STAR FORMATION RATE INDICATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Yinghe; Gao Yu; Lu, Nanyao; Xu, C. Kevin; Lord, S.; Howell, J.; Appleton, P.; Mazzarella, J.; Schulz, B.; Isaak, K. G.; Charmandaris, V.; Diaz-Santos, T.; Surace, J.; Evans, A.; Iwasawa, K.; Leech, J.; Petric, A. O.; Sanders, D. B.; Van der Werf, P. P.

    2013-03-01

    We present, for the first time, a statistical study of [N II] 205 {mu}m line emission for a large sample of local luminous infrared galaxies using Herschel Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver Fourier Transform Spectrometer (SPIRE FTS) data. For our sample of galaxies, we investigate the correlation between the [N II] luminosity (L{sub [N{sub II]}}) and the total infrared luminosity (L{sub IR}), as well as the dependence of L{sub [N{sub II]}}/L{sub IR} ratio on L{sub IR}, far-infrared colors (IRAS f{sub 60}/f{sub 100}), and the [O III] 88 {mu}m to [N II] luminosity ratio. We find that L{sub [N{sub II]}} correlates almost linearly with L{sub IR} for non-active galactic nucleus galaxies (all having L{sub IR} < 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }) in our sample, which implies that L{sub [N{sub II]}} can serve as a star formation rate tracer which is particularly useful for high-redshift galaxies that will be observed with forthcoming submillimeter spectroscopic facilities such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. Our analysis shows that the deviation from the mean L{sub [N{sub II]}}-L{sub IR} relation correlates with tracers of the ionization parameter, which suggests that the scatter in this relation is mainly due to the variations in the hardness, and/or ionization parameter, of the ambient galactic UV field among the sources in our sample.

  20. Parabolic Capillary Optics with less than 50 {mu}m Focus and Large Focal Distance for Synchrotron Radiation Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, Norbert; Eichhorn, Frank; Bjeoumikhov, Aniouar; Ollinger, Christoph

    2007-01-19

    We report the design and performance of a unique parabolic focusing optics for a general purpose materials research station at the bending magnet BM20 (ROBL-CRG) at ESRF. The measured gain between 8-12 keV was >1000, the focal spot <40 {mu}m at a focal length of 235 mm (8 keV) and 244 mm (11.5 keV), respectively, which allows the use of special sample environments around the focus spot. The low divergence of <0.15 deg. especially permits the in situ characterization of stress states in copper dual inlaid interconnect micro-structures as well as the measurement of far-field diffraction patterns of planar waveguides. First test results will be shown and the advantages of the parabolic focusing optics discussed.

  1. High-frequency operation of 0.3 {mu}m GaAs JFETs for low-power electronic

    SciTech Connect

    Zolper, J.C.; Baca, A.G.; Hietala, V.M.; Shul, R.J.; Sherwin, M.E.

    1996-09-01

    GaAs Junction Field Effect Transistors (JFETs) have attracted renewed attention for low-power, low-voltage electronics. JFETs have a significant advantage over MESFETs for low-power operation due to their higher gate barrier to current flow resulting from p/n junction gate. This paper reports recent advances in an all ion implanted self-aligned GaAs JFET with a gate length down to 0.3 {mu}m. By employing shallopw SiF implants next to the gate, dielectric sidewall spacers, and 50 keV source and drain implants, JFETs with a f{sub t} up to 49 GHz with good pinchoff and subthreshold characteristics have been realized. In addition, the JFET benefits from the use of shallow Zn or Cd implantation to form abrupt p{sup +}/n gate profiles.

  2. Single-molecule analysis of ultradilute solutions with guided streams of 1-{mu}m water droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, C.; Barnes, M.D.; Lermer, N.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1999-03-01

    We describe instrumentation for real-time detection of single-molecule fluorescence in guided streams of 1-{mu}m (nominal) water droplets. In this technique, target molecules were confined to droplets whose volumes were comparable with illumination volumes in diffraction-limited fluorescence microscopy and guided to the waist of a cw probe laser with an electrostatic potential. Concentration detection limits for Rhodamine 6G in water were determined to be {approximately}1 fM, roughly 3 orders of magnitude lower than corresponding limits determined recently with diffraction-limited microscopy techniques for a chemical separation of similar dyes. In addition to its utility as a vehicle for probing single molecules, instrumentation for producing and focusing stable streams of 1{endash}2-{mu}m-diameter droplets may have other important analytical applications as well. {copyright} 1999 Optical Society of America

  3. Wavelength Anomalies in UV-Vis Spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellinghuisen, J.

    2012-06-01

    Commercial spectrophotometers are great tools for recording absorption spectra of low-to-moderate resolution and high photometic quality. However, in the case of at least one such instrument, the Shimadzu UV-2101PC (and by assumption, similar Shimadzu models), the wavelength accuracy may not match the photometric accuracy. In fact the wavelength varies with slit width, spectral sampling interval, and even the specified range, with a smoothing algorithm invoked any time the spectrum includes more than 65 sampled wavelengths. This behavior appears not to be documented anywhere, but it has been present for at least 20 years and persists even in the latest software available to run the instrument. The wavelength shifts can be as large as 1 nm, so for applications where wavelength accuracy better than this is important, wavelength calibration must be done with care to ensure that the results are valid for the parameters used to record the target spectra.

  4. Wavelength Scaling of High Harmonic Generation Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Shiner, A. D.; Trallero-Herrero, C.; Kajumba, N.; Corkum, P. B.; Villeneuve, D. M.; Bandulet, H.-C.; Comtois, D.; Legare, F.; Giguere, M.; Kieffer, J-C.

    2009-08-14

    Using longer wavelength laser drivers for high harmonic generation is desirable because the highest extreme ultraviolet frequency scales as the square of the wavelength. Recent numerical studies predict that high harmonic efficiency falls dramatically with increasing wavelength, with a very unfavorable lambda{sup -(5-6)} scaling. We performed an experimental study of the high harmonic yield over a wavelength range of 800-1850 nm. A thin gas jet was employed to minimize phase matching effects, and the laser intensity and focal spot size were kept constant as the wavelength was changed. Ion yield was simultaneously measured so that the total number of emitting atoms was known. We found that the scaling at constant laser intensity is lambda{sup -6.3+}-{sup 1.1} in Xe and lambda{sup -6.5+}-{sup 1.1} in Kr over the wavelength range of 800-1850 nm, somewhat worse than the theoretical predictions.

  5. DETECTION OF THE DETACHED DUST SHELL OF U ANTLIAE AT MID-INFRARED WAVELENGTHS WITH AKARI/IRC

    SciTech Connect

    Arimatsu, Ko; Onaka, Takashi; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Ueta, Toshiya; Yamamura, Issei

    2011-03-10

    We report mid-infrared (MIR) imaging observations of the carbon star U Ant made with the Infrared Camera (IRC) on board AKARI. Subtraction of the artifacts and extended point-spread function of the central star reveals the detached dust shell around the carbon star at MIR wavelengths (15 and 24 {mu}m) for the first time. The observed radial brightness profiles of the MIR emission are well explained by two shells at 43'' and 50'' from the central star detected in optical scattered light observations. Combining Herschel/PACS, AKARI/FIS, and AKARI/IRC data, we obtain the infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) of the thermal emission from the detached shell of U Ant in a wide infrared spectral range of 15-160 {mu}m. Thermal emission of amorphous carbon grains with a single temperature cannot account for the observed SED from 15 to 160 {mu}m: it underestimates the emission at 15 {mu}m. Alternatively, the observed SED is fitted by the model in which amorphous carbon grains in the two shells have different temperatures of 60 and 104 K, which allocates most dust mass in the shell at 50''. This supports the previous suggestion that the 43'' shell is gas-rich and the 50'' shell is dust-rich. We suggest a possibility that the segregation of the gas and dust resulting from the drift motion of submicron-sized dust grains relative to the gas and that the hot dust component associated with the gas-rich shell is composed of very small grains that are strongly coupled with the gas.

  6. Multi-wavelength differential absorption measurements of chemical species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David M.

    The probability of accurate detection and quantification of airborne species is enhanced when several optical wavelengths are used to measure the differential absorption of molecular spectral features. Characterization of minor atmospheric constituents, biological hazards, and chemical plumes containing multiple species is difficult when using current approaches because of weak signatures and the use of a limited number of wavelengths used for identification. Current broadband systems such as Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) have either limitations for long-range propagation, or require transmitter power levels that are unsafe for operation in urban environments. Passive hyperspectral imaging systems that utilize absorption of solar scatter at visible and infrared wavelengths, or use absorption of background thermal emission, have been employed routinely for detection of airborne chemical species. Passive approaches have operational limitations at various ranges, or under adverse atmospheric conditions because the source intensity and spectrum is often an unknown variable. The work presented here describes a measurement approach that uses a known source of a low transmitted power level for an active system, while retaining the benefits of broadband and extremely long-path absorption operations. An optimized passive imaging system also is described that operates in the 3 to 4 mum window of the mid-infrared. Such active and passive instruments can be configured to optimize the detection of several hydrocarbon gases, as well as many other species of interest. Measurements have provided the incentive to develop algorithms for the calculations of atmospheric species concentrations using multiple wavelengths. These algorithms are used to prepare simulations and make comparisons with experimental results from absorption data of a supercontinuum laser source. The MODTRAN model is used in preparing the simulations, and also in developing additional

  7. Wavelength-doubling optical parametric oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Armstrong, Darrell J.; Smith, Arlee V.

    2007-07-24

    A wavelength-doubling optical parametric oscillator (OPO) comprising a type II nonlinear optical medium for generating a pair of degenerate waves at twice a pump wavelength and a plurality of mirrors for rotating the polarization of one wave by 90 degrees to produce a wavelength-doubled beam with an increased output energy by coupling both of the degenerate waves out of the OPO cavity through the same output coupler following polarization rotation of one of the degenerate waves.

  8. Optimizing constant wavelength neutron powder diffractometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cussen, Leo D.

    2016-06-01

    This article describes an analytic method to optimize constant wavelength neutron powder diffractometers. It recasts the accepted mathematical description of resolution and intensity in terms of new variables and includes terms for vertical divergence, wavelength and some sample scattering effects. An undetermined multiplier method is applied to the revised equations to minimize the RMS value of resolution width at constant intensity and fixed wavelength. A new understanding of primary spectrometer transmission (presented elsewhere) can then be applied to choose beam elements to deliver an optimum instrument. Numerical methods can then be applied to choose the best wavelength.

  9. Effective wavelength calibration for moire fringe projection

    SciTech Connect

    Purcell, Daryl; Davies, Angela; Farahi, Faramarz

    2006-12-01

    The fringe patterns seen when using moire instruments are similar to the patterns seen in traditional interferometry but differ in the spacing between consecutive fringes. In traditional interferometry, the spacing is constant and related to the wavelength of the source. In moire fringe projection, the spacing (the effective wavelength) may not be constant over the field of view and the spacing depends on the system geometry. In these cases, using a constant effective wavelength over the field of view causes inaccurate surface height measurements. We examine the calibration process of the moirefringe projection measurement, which takes this varying wavelength into account to produce a pixel-by-pixel wavelength map. The wavelength calibration procedure is to move the object in the out-of-plane direction a known distance until every pixel intensity value goes through at least one cycle. A sinusoidal function is then fit to the data to extract the effective wavelength pixel by pixel, yielding an effective wavelength map. A calibrated step height was used to validate the effective wavelength map with results within 1% of the nominal value of the step height. The error sources that contributed to the uncertainty in determining the height of the artifact are also investigated.

  10. Radio frequency controlled synthetic wavelength sweep for absolute distance measurement by optical interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Le Floch, Sebastien; Salvade, Yves; Mitouassiwou, Rostand; Favre, Patrick

    2008-06-01

    We present a new technique applied to the variable optical synthetic wavelength generation in optical interferometry. It consists of a chain of optical injection locking among three lasers: first a distributed-feedback laser is used as a master to injection lock an intensity-modulated laser that is directly modulated around 15 GHz by a radio frequency generator on a sideband. A second distributed-feedback laser is injection locked on another sideband of the intensity-modulated laser. The variable synthetic wavelength for absolute distance measurement is simply generated by sweeping the radio frequency over a range of several hundred megahertz, which corresponds to the locking range of the two slave lasers. In this condition, the uncertainty of the variable synthetic wavelength is equivalent to the radio frequency uncertainty. This latter has a relative accuracy of 10{sup -7} or better, resulting in a resolution of {+-}25 {mu}m for distances exceeding tens of meters. The radio frequency generator produces a linear frequency sweep of 1 ms duration (i.e., exactly equal to one absolute distance measurement acquisition time), with frequency steps of about 1 MHz. Finally, results of absolute distance measurements for ranges up to 10 m are presented.

  11. Photopolymers designed for high resolution laser ablation at a specific irradiation wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.; Bennett, L.S.; Kunz, T.; Hahn, C.

    1997-04-01

    We have developed novel photopolymers based on the triazeno chromophore group. The absorption properties can be tailored for a specific irradiation wavelength (e.g. 308 nm XeCl laser). With the introduction of a photolabile group into the main chain of the polymer we expected a mechanism which is mainly photochemical. This should result in high resolution etching with no thermal damage or chemical / physical modification to the material. The gaseous products of the photochemical decomposition were thought to assist the material removal, and to prevent the re-deposition of solid products which would contaminate the surface. We confirmed (SEM/AFM) that the irradiation of the polymer at 308 mn resulted in high resolution etching. No debris has been found around the etched comers. Maximum ablation rates of about 3 {mu}m / pulse were achieved due to the dynamic absorption behavior (bleaching during the pulse). No physical or chemical modifications of the polymer surface could be detected after irradiation at the tailored absorption wavelength, whereas irradiation at different wavelengths resulted in modified (physical and chemical) surfaces. The etching mechanism can be described as a laser induced microexplosion, revealed by ns-imaging. The etching of the polymer starts and ends with the laser pulse, shown by ns-interferometry, confirming that the acting mechanism is mainly photochemical at high fluences for our polymers. Our results demonstrate that the mechanism of ablation can be controlled by designing special polymers, which can be used as high resolution laser dry etching resists.

  12. Starbursts at space ultraviolet wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, Rosa M.

    2006-06-01

    Starbursts are systems with very high star formation rate per unit area. They are the preferred place where massive stars form; the main source of thermal and mechanical heating in the interstellar medium, and the factory where the heavy elements form. Thus, starbursts play an important role in the origin and evolution of galaxies. The similarities between the physical properties of local starbursts and high-z star-forming galaxies, highlight the cosmological relevance of starbursts. On the other hand, nearby starbursts are laboratories where to study violent star formation processes and their interaction with the interstellar and intergalactic media, in detail and deeply. Starbursts are bright at ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths, as they are in the far-infrared, due to the ‘picket-fence’ interstellar dust distribution. After the pioneering IUE program, high spatial and spectral resolution UV observations of local starburst galaxies, mainly taken with HST and FUSE, have made relevant contributions to the following issues: The determination of the initial mass function (IMF) in violent star forming systems in low and high metallicity environments, and in dense (e.g. in stellar clusters) and diffuse environments: A Salpeter IMF with high-mass stars constrains well the UV properties. The modes of star formation: Starburst clusters are an important mode of star formation. Super-stellar clusters have properties similar to globular clusters. The role of starbursts in AGN: Nuclear starbursts can dominate the UV light in Seyfert 2 galaxies, having bolometric luminosities similar to the estimated bolometric luminosities of the obscured AGN. The interaction between massive stars and the interstellar and intergalactic media: Outflows in cold, warm and coronal phases leave their imprints on the UV

  13. On the potential of mid-IR lasers for generating high harmonics with subnanometer wavelengths in gases

    SciTech Connect

    Emelin, M Yu; Ryabikin, M Yu

    2013-03-31

    The influence of the magnetic field of a laser pulse and the depletion of bound levels of working-medium atoms on the generation of high harmonics of mid-IR laser radiation in gases is investigated using numerical quantum-mechanical calculations. The maximum attainable spectral widths of high harmonics are estimated for model atoms with different ionisation potentials taking into account the aforementioned limiting effects. It is shown (within a two-dimensional model) that high harmonics with wavelengths to several angstroms can be generated by irradiating helium atoms with high-power femtosecond pulses of a laser [5] with a centre wavelength of 3.9 {mu}m. The possibility of observing experimentally relativistic effects using modern desktop mid-IR laser sources is demonstrated. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  14. THE ORIGIN OF THE 3.4 {mu}m FEATURE IN WILD 2 COMETARY PARTICLES AND IN ULTRACARBONACEOUS INTERPLANETARY DUST PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Matrajt, G.; Flynn, G.; Brownlee, D.; Joswiak, D.; Bajt, S.

    2013-03-10

    We analyzed two ultracarbonaceous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and two cometary Wild 2 particles with infrared spectroscopy. We characterized the carrier of the 3.4 {mu}m band in these samples and compared its profile and the CH{sub 2}/CH{sub 3} ratios to the 3.4 {mu}m band in the diffuse interstellar medium (DISM), in the insoluble organic matter from three primitive meteorites, in asteroid 24 Themis, and in the coma of comet 103P/Hartley 2. We found that the 3.4 {mu}m band in both Wild 2 and IDPs is similar, but different from all of the other astrophysical environments that we compared it to. The 3.4 {mu}m band in the IDPs and Wild 2 particles is dominated by CH{sub 2} groups, the peaks are narrower and stronger than in the meteorites, asteroid Themis, and the DISM. Also, the presence of the carbonyl group C=O at {approx}1700 cm{sup -1} (5.8 {mu}m) in most of the spectra of our samples indicates that these aliphatic chains have O bonded to them, which is quite different from astronomical spectra of the DISM. Based on all of these observations, we conclude that the origin of the carrier of the 3.4 {mu}m band in the IDPs and Wild 2 samples is not interstellar; instead, we suggest that the origin lies in the outermost parts of the solar nebula.

  15. Optimum wavelengths for two color ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, John J.

    1993-01-01

    The range uncertainties associated with the refractive atmosphere can be mitigated by the technique of two color, or dual wavelength, ranging. The precision of the differential time of flight (DTOF) measurement depends on the atmospheric dispersion between the two wavelengths, the received pulsewidths and photoelectron counts, and on the amount of temporal averaging. In general, the transmitted wavelengths are not independently chosen but instead are generated via nonlinear optics techniques (harmonic crystals, Raman scattering, etc.) which also determine their relative pulsewidths. The mean received photoelectrons at each wavelength are calculated via the familiar radar link equation which contains several wavelength dependent parameters. By collecting the various wavelength dependent terms, one can define a wavelength figure of merit for a two color laser ranging system. In this paper, we apply the wavelength figure of merit to the case of an extremely clear atmosphere and draw several conclusions regarding the relative merits of fundamental-second harmonic, fundamental-third harmonic, second-third harmonic, and Raman two color systems. We find that, in spite of the larger dispersion between wavelengths, fundamental-third harmonic systems have the lowest figure of merit due to a combination of poor detector performance at the fundamental and poor atmospheric transmission at the third harmonic. The fundamental-second harmonic systems (approximately 700 nm and 350 nm) have the highest figure of merit, but second-third harmonic systems, using fundamental transmitters near 1000 nm, are a close second. Raman-shifted transmitters appear to offer no advantage over harmonic systems because of the relatively small wavelength separation that can be achieved in light gases such as hydrogen and the lack of good ultrashort pulse transmitters with an optimum fundamental wavelength near 400 nm.

  16. Study of the interaction between a diblock polyelectrolyte PDMA-b-PAA and a gemini surfactant 12-6-12 in basic media.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hongmei; Peng, Baoliang; Liang, Yanyan; Han, Xia; Liu, Honglai

    2009-05-01

    The interactions between negatively charged diblock polyelectrolyte PDMA(71)-b-PAA(59) and oppositely charged gemini surfactant hexylene-1,6-bis(dodecyldimethylammonium bromide) (12-6-12) in basic media were studied using dynamic light scattering, fluorescence spectroscopy, surface tension, and (1)H NMR. With increased addition of surfactant, the conformation of polyelectrolyte experienced changes from the initial unimer with open-extended PAA block, to the nano-scaled aggregates/complexes with a maximum hydrodynamic diameter (D(h)), and finally to the stable complexes with a smaller D(h). Accordingly, the value of D(h) during the whole process of increasing the surfactant concentration changed from 14-17 nm, to 184 nm, and to the final 70 nm, respectively. This transformation was driven by the electrostatic attractive/repulsive interactions, the hydrophobic interaction between hydrophobic surfactant tails, and the hydrophilicity of PDMA block. PMID:19217121

  17. Two-fermion-four-boson description of Hg198 within the Uν(6/12)⊗Uπ(6/4) extended nuclear structure supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernards, C.; Heinze, S.; Jolie, J.; Fransen, C.; Linnemann, A.; Radeck, D.

    2009-05-01

    Using the Uν(6/12)⊗Uπ(6/4) extended supersymmetry, we constructed the energy spectrum and electromagnetic transition properties of the supermultiplet member Hg198 with two proton fermions coupled to a neutron boson core. Consistency between the supersymmetric interacting boson fermion fermion approximation (IBFFA) description and the F-spin symmetric interacting boson approximation (IBA-2) description is shown for this two-fermion-N-boson multiplet member. The data of a γγ angular correlation experiment using the HORUS cube γ-ray spectrometer—determining new multipole mixing ratios, level spins, γ transitions, and energy states—shows quite a good agreement, also for the low-energy part of the spectrum, when comparing theoretical predictions and experimental data. This is contrary to the usual assumption that a two-fermion-N-boson constellation should describe just the excited two-quasiparticle states.

  18. {sup 196}Hg and the 'magical quartet' of the extended U{sub {nu}}(6/12) x U{sub {pi}}(6/4) supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bernards, C.; Heinze, S.; Jolie, J.; Albers, M.; Fransen, C.; Radeck, D.

    2010-02-15

    We present the results of a {gamma}{gamma} angular correlation experiment investigating the nucleus {sup 196}Hg and compare these with a theoretical description of {sup 196}Hg within the U{sub {nu}}(6/12) x U{sub {pi}}(6/4) extended supersymmetry. To populate excited {sup 196}Hg states, we used the Cologne FN Tandem accelerator inducing the reaction {sup 194}Pt({alpha},2n){sup 196}Hg and analyzed the {gamma} decays of levels up to an excitation energy of 2.4 MeV with the HORUS cube spectrometer. The new results on this mercury isotope allow a comparison between the experimental data and the supersymmetrical predictions and show good agreement. This way we can add {sup 196}Hg as a fifth supermultiplet member to the so-called magical quartet consisting of {sup 194,195}Pt and {sup 195,196}Au.

  19. Maternal Thyroid Function during the Second Half of Pregnancy and Child Neurodevelopment at 6, 12, 24, and 60 Months of Age

    PubMed Central

    Chevrier, Jonathan; Harley, Kim G.; Kogut, Katherine; Holland, Nina; Johnson, Caroline; Eskenazi, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    Although evidence suggests that maternal hypothyroidism and mild hypothyroxinemia during the first half of pregnancy alters fetal neurodevelopment among euthyroid offspring, little data are available from later in gestation. In this study, we measured free T4 using direct equilibrium dialysis, as well as total T4 and TSH in 287 pregnant women at 27 weeks' gestation. We also assessed cognition, memory, language, motor functioning, and behavior in their children at 6, 12, 24, and 60 months of age. Increasing maternal TSH was related to better performance on tests of cognition and language at 12 months but not at later ages. At 60 months, there was inconsistent evidence that higher TSH was related to improved attention. We found no convincing evidence that maternal TH during the second half of pregnancy was related to impaired child neurodevelopment. PMID:22132346

  20. Relaxation oscillations of the radiation from a 2-{mu}m holmium laser with a Cr,Tm,Ho : YSGG crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Alpat'ev, A N; Smirnov, Valerii A; Shcherbakov, Ivan A

    1998-02-28

    Analytic expressions for the parameters of relaxation oscillations in a cw 2-{mu}m, Cr,Tm,Ho : YSGG crystal laser are derived and analysed. They are compared quantitatively with the corresponding parameters of a 2-{mu}m Cr,Tm : YSGG crystal laser. Significant differences are found between the damping decrements. The experimental and theoretical results are compared and the different operational dynamics of the Ho{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+} ion lasers explained. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  1. DISCOVERY OF A RICH CLUSTER AT z = 1.63 USING THE REST-FRAME 1.6 {mu}m 'STELLAR BUMP SEQUENCE' METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    Muzzin, Adam; Hoekstra, Henk; Wilson, Gillian; Demarco, Ricardo; Nantais, Julie; Lidman, Chris; Yee, H. K. C.; Rettura, Alessandro

    2013-04-10

    We present a new two-color algorithm, the 'Stellar Bump Sequence' (SBS), that is optimized for robustly identifying candidate high-redshift galaxy clusters in combined wide-field optical and mid-infrared (MIR) data. The SBS algorithm is a fusion of the well-tested cluster red-sequence method of Gladders and Yee with the MIR 3.6 {mu}m-4.5 {mu}m cluster detection method developed by Papovich. As with the cluster red-sequence method, the SBS identifies candidate overdensities within 3.6 {mu}m-4.5 {mu}m color slices, which are the equivalent of a rest-frame 1.6 {mu}m stellar bump 'red-sequence'. In addition to employing the MIR colors of galaxies, the SBS algorithm incorporates an optical/MIR (z'-3.6 {mu}m) color cut. This cut effectively eliminates foreground 0.2 mu}m-4.5 {mu}m colors that are similarly red as z > 1.0 galaxies and add noise when searching for high-redshift galaxy overdensities. We demonstrate using the z {approx} 1 GCLASS cluster sample that similar to the red sequence, the stellar bump sequence appears to be a ubiquitous feature of high-redshift clusters, and that within that sample the color of the stellar bump sequence increases monotonically with redshift and provides photometric redshifts accurate to {Delta}z = 0.05. We apply the SBS method in the XMM-LSS SWIRE field and show that it robustly recovers the majority of confirmed optical, MIR, and X-ray-selected clusters at z > 1.0 in that field. Lastly, we present confirmation of SpARCS J022427-032354 at z = 1.63, a new cluster detected with the method and confirmed with 12 high-confidence spectroscopic redshifts obtained using FORS2 on the Very Large Telescope. We conclude with a discussion of future prospects for using the algorithm.

  2. Comparative Study of Probiotic Ice Cream and Probiotic Drink on Salivary Streptococcus mutans Levels in 6-12 Years Age Group Children

    PubMed Central

    Mahantesha, Taranatha; Reddy, K M Parveen; Kumar, N H Praveen; Nara, Asha; Ashwin, Devasya; Buddiga, Vinutna

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dental caries is one of the most common health problems in the world. Probiotics are one the various preventive methods to reduce dental caries. The aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of probiotic ice cream and drink on salivary Streptococcus mutans levels in children of 6-12 years age group. Materials and Methods: A three phase study was carried out in children (n = 50) of 6-12 years age with zero decayed missing filled teeth (dmft)/DMFT. They were randomly divided into two equal groups. Saliva samples were collected before the consumptions of probiotic ice cream and probiotic drink. Colony count obtained was recorded as baseline data. For both groups probiotic ice cream and drink was given randomly for 7 days and a washout period of 90 days were given and then the saliva samples were collected and colony counting was done. Results: Statistical analysis was performed using Student’s paired t-test and multiple comparisons by Tukey’s honest significant difference test which showed, there is a significant reduction in salivary S. mutans level in both groups after 7 days period. However, after washout period only probiotic ice cream showed reduction whereas drink did not. Also, there was no significant difference between probiotic ice cream and drink. Conclusion: Probiotic organisms definitely have a role in reducing the salivary S. mutans level and ice cream would be a better choice than drink. However, the prolonged use of the agents and their effects on caries is still to be determined. PMID:26435616

  3. Physiological, pharmacokinetic and liver metabolism comparisons between 3-, 6-, 12- and 18-month-old male Sprague Dawley rats under ketamine-xylazine anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Giroux, Marie-Chantal; Santamaria, Raphael; Hélie, Pierre; Burns, Patrick; Beaudry, Francis; Vachon, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to compare the physiological changes (withdrawal and corneal reflexes, respiratory and cardiac frequency, blood oxygen saturation, and rectal temperature) following intraperitoneal administration of ketamine (80 mg/kg) and xylazine (10 mg/kg) to 3-, 6-, 12- and 18-month-old male Sprague Dawley rats (n=6/age group). Plasma pharmacokinetics, liver metabolism, and blood biochemistry were examined for a limited number of animals to better explain anesthetic drug effects. Selected organs were collected for histopathology. The results for the withdrawal and corneal reflexes suggest a shorter duration and decreased depth of anesthesia with aging. Significant cardiac and respiratory depression, as well as decreased blood oxygen saturation, occurred in all age groups however, cardiac frequency was the most affected parameter with aging, since the 6-, 12-, and 18-month-old animals did not recuperate to normal values during recovery from anesthesia. Pharmacokinetic parameters (T1/2 and AUC) increased and drug clearance decreased with aging, which strongly suggests that drug exposure is associated with the physiological results. The findings for liver S9 fractions of 18-month-old rats compared with the other age groups suggest that following a normal ketamine anesthetic dose (80 mg/kg), drug metabolism is impaired, leading to a significant increase of drug exposure. In conclusion, age and related factors have a substantial effect on ketamine and xylazine availability, which is reflected by significant changes in pharmacokinetics and liver metabolism of these drugs, and this translates into shorter and less effective anesthesia with increasing age. PMID:26489361

  4. The distinct clinical features and prognosis of the CD10+MUM1+ and CD10−Bcl6−MUM1− diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ting-Xun; Miao, Yi; Wu, Jia-Zhu; Gong, Qi-Xing; Liang, Jin-Hua; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Li; Fan, Lei; Hua, Dong; Chen, Yao-Yu; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Zhi-Hong; Li, Jian-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Using an immunohistochemistry (IHC) based method, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) can be classified into germinal center B-cell (GCB) and non-GCB subtypes. However, the prognostic value of Hans algorithm was contradictory in the literature. Using IHC and fluorescence in situ hybridization, we analyzed the antibodies applied in Hans algorithm and other genetic factors in 601 DLBCL patients and prognostic value of Hans algorithm in 306 cases who were treated with chemoimmunotherapy. The results showed that patients with GCB subtype have better overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) than non-GCB cases. However, to some extent, double positive (CD10+MUM1+, DP) and triple negative (CD10−Bcl6−MUM−, TN) showed different clinical characteristics and prognosis to others that were assigned to the same cell-of-origin group. The DP group showed similar OS (median OS: both not reached, P = 0.3650) and PFS (median PFS: 47.0 vs. 32.7 months, P = 0.0878) with the non-GCB group while the TN group showed similar OS (median OS: both not reached, P = 0.9278) and PFS (median PFS: both not reached, P = 0.9420) with the GCB group. In conclusion, Recognition of specific entities in Hans algorithm could help us to accurately predict outcome of the patients and choose the best clinical management for them. PMID:26857366

  5. Optical wavelength modulation in free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mabe, R.M.; Wong, R.K.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    An attribute of the free electron laser (FEL) is the continuous tunability of the optical wavelength by modulation of the electron beam energy. The variation of the wavelength and power of the optical beam is studied as a function of FEL operating parameters. These results will be applied to the Stanford SCA FEL and Boeing FEL.

  6. Wavelength scaling of laser plasma coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Kruer, W.L.

    1983-11-03

    The use of shorter wavelength laser light both enhances collisional absorption and reduces deleterious collective plasma effects. Coupling processes which can be important in reactor-size targets are briefly reviewed. Simple estimates are presented for the intensity-wavelength regime in which collisional absorption is high and collective effects are minimized.

  7. Semiconductor laser with multiple lasing wavelengths

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Arthur J.; Choquette, Kent D.; Chow, Weng W.

    2003-07-29

    A new class of multi-terminal vertical-cavity semiconductor laser components has been developed. These multi-terminal laser components can be switched, either electrically or optically, between distinct lasing wavelengths, or can be made to lase simultaneously at multiple wavelengths.

  8. Bi-doped fibre lasers and amplifiers emitting in a spectral region of 1.3 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Dianov, E M; Firstov, S V; Bufetov, I A; Khopin, V F; Gur'yanov, A N

    2008-07-31

    A bismuth-doped fibre laser emitting at wavelengths within the second transparency window of silica fibres is fabricated. It is shown that Bi-doped aluminium-free phosphogermanosilicate fibres pumped in the regions of 800 and 1200 nm have the amplification band at 1275-1375 nm. (letters)

  9. Highly reflective, long wavelength AlAsSb/GaAsSb distributed Bragg reflector grown by molecular beam epitaxy on InP substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, O.; Fritz, I.J.; Dawson, L.R.; Howard, A.J.; Headley, T.J.; Klem, J.F.; Drummond, T.J. )

    1995-01-16

    Surface normal optoelectronic devices operating at long wavelengths ([gt]1.3 [mu]m), require distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) with a practical number ([le]50) of mirror layers. This requirement implies a large refractive index difference between the mirror layers, which is difficult to achieve in the traditionally used phosphide compounds. We demonstrate a highly reflective AlAsSb/GaAsSb DBR grown nominally lattice matched to an InP substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. Reflectivity measurements indicate a stop band centered at 1.74 [mu]m with maximum reflectivity exceeding 98%, which is well fitted by our theoretical predictions. Atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy indicate reasonable crystal quality with some defects due to an unintentional lattice mismatch to the substrate.

  10. 880 {mu}m IMAGING OF A TRANSITIONAL DISK IN UPPER SCORPIUS: HOLDOVER FROM THE ERA OF GIANT PLANET FORMATION?

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, Geoffrey S.; Williams, Jonathan P.; Menard, Francois

    2012-07-01

    We present 880 {mu}m images of the transition disk around the star [PZ99] J160421.7-213028, a solar mass star in the nearby Upper Scorpius association. With a resolution down to 0.''34, we resolve the inner hole in this disk, and via model fitting to the visibilities and spectral energy distribution we determine both the structure of the outer region and the presence of sparse dust within the cavity. The disk contains {approx}0.1 M{sub Jup} of millimeter-emitting grains, with an inner disk edge of about 70 AU. The inner cavity contains a small amount of dust with a depleted surface density in a region extending from about 20 to 70 AU. Taking into account prior observations indicating little to no stellar accretion, the lack of a binary companion, and the presence of dust near {approx}0.1 AU, we determine that the most likely mechanism for the formation of this inner hole is the presence of one or more giant planets.

  11. National survey of psychologists' training and practice in breaking bad news: a mixed methods study of the MUM effect.

    PubMed

    Merker, Brad M; Hanson, William E; Poston, John M

    2010-09-01

    Research on breaking bad news has involved undergraduates, medical students, and physicians. However, to date, no studies have examined how, or whether, psychologists are trained to break bad news, as well as their current practice of breaking bad news. This mixed methods study explored the training and practice of 329 licensed psychologists/APA members in breaking bad news, using the MUM effect as a theoretical backdrop. Results suggest (1) psychologists are, as hypothesized, significantly more reluctant to break bad news than good news, (2) anxiety accounts for 30.6% of the variance in their reluctance, and (3) three-out-of-four psychologists break bad news "to some extent" or more, most typically related to a patient's psychological health, major Axis I diagnosis, or learning disability. Results also suggest most psychologists are not trained to break bad news, with only 2.7% being familiar with existing recommendations and guidelines; and anxiety, concerns for self/other, context, and norms play an important role in the bad news breaking process. Implications for theory, research, and practice are discussed and a training model is proposed. PMID:20499268

  12. Noise performance of 0.35-(mu)m SOI CMOS devices and micropower preamplifier following 63-MeV, 1-Mrad (Si) proton irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binkley, D. M.; Hopper, C. E.; Cressler, J. D.; Mojarradi, M. M.; Blalock, B. J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents measured noise for 0.35(mu)m, silicon-on-insulator devices and a micropower preamplifier following 63-MeV, 1-Mrad (Si) proton irradiation. Flicker noise voltage, important for gyros having low frequency output, increases less than 32% after irradiation.

  13. Photovoltaic effect in water induced by a 2.92-{mu}m Cr{sup 3+}:Yb{sup 3+}:Ho{sup 3+}: YSGG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Il'ichev, Nikolai N; Kulevskii, L A; Pashinin, Pavel P

    2005-10-31

    The appearance of the potential difference is observed on electrodes placed in a cell with water irradiated by a Q-switched 2.92-{mu}m Cr{sup 3+}:Yb{sup 3+}:Ho{sup 3+}:YSGG laser. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  14. Short wavelength FELs using the SLAC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Winick, H.; Bane, K.; Boyce, R.

    1993-08-01

    Recent technological developments have opened the possibility to construct a device which we call a Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS); a fourth generation light source, with brightness, coherence, and peak power far exceeding other sources. Operating on the principle of the free electron laser (FEL), the LCLS would extend the range of FEL operation to much aborter wavelength than the 240 mn that has so far been reached. We report the results of studies of the use of the SLAC linac to drive an LCLS at wavelengths from about 3-100 nm initially and possibly even shorter wavelengths in the future. Lasing would be achieved in a single pass of a low emittance, high peak current, high energy electron beam through a long undulator. Most present FELs use an optical cavity to build up the intensity of the light to achieve lasing action in a low gain oscillator configuration. By eliminating the optical cavity, which is difficult to make at short wavelengths, laser action can be extended to shorter wavelengths by Self-Amplified-Spontaneous-Emission (SASE), or by harmonic generation from a longer wavelength seed laser. Short wavelength, single pass lasers have been extensively studied at several laboratories and at recent workshops.

  15. Experimental verification of acoustic trace wavelength enhancement.

    PubMed

    Cray, Benjamin A

    2015-12-01

    Directivity is essentially a measure of a sonar array's beamwidth that can be obtained in a spherically isotropic ambient noise field; narrow array mainbeam widths are more directive than broader mainbeam widths. For common sonar systems, the directivity factor (or directivity index) is directly proportional to the ratio of an incident acoustic trace wavelength to the sonar array's physical length (which is always constrained). Increasing this ratio, by creating additional trace wavelengths for a fixed array length, will increase array directivity. Embedding periodic structures within an array generates Bragg scattering of the incident acoustic plane wave along the array's surface. The Bragg scattered propagating waves are shifted in a precise manner and create shorter wavelength replicas of the original acoustic trace wavelength. These replicated trace wavelengths (which contain identical signal arrival information) increase an array's wavelength to length ratio and thus directivity. Therefore, a smaller array, in theory, can have the equivalent directivity of a much larger array. Measurements completed in January 2015 at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center's Acoustic Test Facility, in Newport, RI, verified, near perfectly, these replicated, shorter, trace wavelengths. PMID:26723331

  16. Wavelengths Effective in Induction of Malignant Melanoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setlow, Richard B.; Grist, Eleanor; Thompson, Keith; Woodhead, Avril D.

    1993-07-01

    It is generally agreed that sunlight exposure is one of the etiologic agents in malignant melanoma of fair-skinned individuals. However, the wavelengths responsible for tumorigenesis are not known, although DNA is assumed to be the target because individuals defective in the repair of UV damage to DNA are several thousandfold more prone to the disease than the average population. Heavily pigmented backcross hybrids of the genus Xiphophorus (platyfish and swordtails) are very sensitive to melanoma induction by single exposures to UV. We irradiated groups of five 6-day-old fish with narrow wavelength bands at 302, 313, 365, 405, and 436 nm and scored the irradiated animals for melanomas 4 months later. We used several exposures at each wavelength to obtain estimates of the sensitivity for melanoma induction as a function of exposure and wavelength. The action spectrum (sensitivity per incident photon as a function of wavelength) for melanoma induction shows appreciable sensitivity at 365, 405, and probably 436 nm, suggesting that wavelengths not absorbed directly in DNA are effective in induction. We interpret the results as indicating that light energy absorbed in melanin is effective in inducing melanomas in this animal model and that, in natural sunlight, 90-95% of melanoma induction may be attributed to wavelengths > 320 nm-the UV-A and visible spectral regions.

  17. Wavelengths effective in induction of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Setlow, R.B.; Grist, E.; Thompson, K.; Woodhead, A.D. )

    1993-07-15

    It is generally agreed that sunlight exposure is one of the etiologic agents in malignant melanoma of fair-skinned individuals. However, the wavelengths responsible for tumorigenesis are not known, although DNA is assumed to be the target because individuals defective in the repair of UV damage to DNA are several thousandfold more prone to the disease than the average population. Heavily pigmented back-cross hybrids of the genus Xiphophorus (platyfish and swordtails) are very sensitive to melanoma induction by single exposures to UV. The authors irradiated groups of five 6-day-old fish with narrow wavelength bands at 302, 313, 365, 405, and 436 nm and score the irradiated animals for melanomas 4 months later. They used several exposures at each wavelength to obtain estimates of the sensitivity for melanoma induction as a function of exposure and wavelength. The action spectrum (sensitivity per incident photon as a function of wavelength) for melanoma induction shows appreciable sensitivity at 365, 405, and probably 436 nm, suggesting that wavelengths not absorbed directly in DNA are effective in induction. They interpret the results as indicating that light energy absorbed in melanin is effective in inducing melanomas in this animal model and that, in natural sunlight, 90-95% of melanoma induction may be attributed to wavelengths >320 nm-the UV-A and visible spectral regions. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Wavelength initialization employing wavelength recognition scheme in WDM-PON based on tunable lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Sil-Gu; Lee, Eun-Gu; Lee, Jong Hyun; Lee, Sang Soo; Lee, Jyung Chan

    2015-01-01

    We proposed a simple method to initialize the wavelength of tunable lasers in WDM-PON employing wavelength recognition scheme with an optical filter as a function of wavelength and accomplished plug and play operation. We also implemented a transceiver based on our proposed wavelength initialization scheme and then experimentally demonstrated the feasibility in WDM-PON configuration guaranteeing 16 channels with 100 GHz channel spacing. Our proposal is a cost-effective and easy-to-install method to realize the wavelength initialization of ONU. In addition, this method will support compatibility with all kind of tunable laser regardless of their structures and operating principles.

  19. Magic wavelengths for terahertz clock transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Xiaoji; Xu Xia; Chen Xuzong; Chen Jingbiao

    2010-01-15

    Magic wavelengths for laser trapping of boson isotopes of alkaline-earth metal atoms Sr, Ca, and Mg are investigated while considering terahertz clock transitions between the {sup 3}P{sub 0}, {sup 3}P{sub 1}, and {sup 3}P{sub 2} metastable triplet states. Our calculation shows that magic wavelengths for laser trapping do exist. This result is important because those metastable states have already been used to make accurate clocks in the terahertz frequency domain. Detailed discussions for magic wavelengths for terahertz clock transitions are given in this article.

  20. Laser wavelength metrology with color sensor chips.

    PubMed

    Jones, Tyler B; Otterstrom, Nils; Jackson, Jarom; Archibald, James; Durfee, Dallin S

    2015-12-14

    We present a laser wavelength meter based on a commercial color sensor chip. The chip consists of an array of photodiodes with different absorptive color filters. By comparing the relative amplitudes of light on the photodiodes, the wavelength of light can be determined. In addition to absorption in the filters, etalon effects add additional spectral features which improve the precision of the device. Comparing the measurements from the device to a commercial wavelength meter and to an atomic reference, we found that the device has picometer-level precision and picometer-scale drift over a period longer than a month. PMID:26699036

  1. Multimode fiber optic wavelength division multiplexing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) systems, with signals transmitted on different wavelengths through a single optical fiber, can have increased bandwidth and fault isolation properties over single wavelength optical systems. Two WDM system designs that might be used with multimode fibers are considered and a general description of the components which could be used to implement the system are given. The components described are sources, multiplexers, demultiplexers, and detectors. Emphasis is given to the demultiplexer technique which is the major developmental component in the WDM system.

  2. Wavelength Shifting Efficiency of Tetraphenyl Butadiene (TPB) at Extreme Ultraviolet Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Christopher; Orebi Gann, Gabriel; Gehman, Victor

    2015-10-01

    Tetraphenyl Butadiene (TPB) is a commonly used wavelength shifter (WLS) in neutrino and dark matter liquid noble gas scintillator detectors. Thin films of wavelength shifters are used to shift ultraviolet scintillation light into the visible spectrum for event reconstruction. The wavelength shifting efficiency of TPB is a function of the incident ultraviolet photon wavelength and is an important parameter for detector design, simulation and reconstruction. The wavelength shifting efficiency and emission spectrum has been previously measured down to 120 nm [Gehman et al., 2011]. To build liquid noble gas scintillator detectors with lighter elements (Ne, He) that use TPB as a WLS medium, the wavelength shifting efficiency must be known closer to 80 nm. This talk will present the current status and preliminary results from a set of measurements that will improve the precision of the efficiency of 120 nm, and extend the data to wavelengths as low as 45 nm.

  3. INFRARED SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF SEYFERT GALAXIES: SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF THE 12 {mu}m SAMPLE OF ACTIVE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Gallimore, J. F.; Yzaguirre, A.; Jakoboski, J.; Stevenosky, M. J.; Axon, D. J.; O'Dea, C. P.; Robinson, A.; Baum, S. A.; Buchanan, C. L.; Elitzur, M.; Elvis, M.

    2010-03-01

    The mid-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 83 active galaxies, mostly Seyfert galaxies, selected from the extended 12 {mu}m sample are presented. The data were collected using all three instruments, Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), Infrared Spectrograph (IRS), and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS), aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. The IRS data were obtained in spectral mapping mode, and the photometric data from IRAC and IRS were extracted from matched, 20'' diameter circular apertures. The MIPS data were obtained in SED mode, providing very low-resolution spectroscopy (R {approx} 20) between {approx}55 and 90 {mu}m in a larger, 20'' x 30'' synthetic aperture. We further present the data from a spectral decomposition of the SEDs, including equivalent widths and fluxes of key emission lines; silicate 10 {mu}m and 18 {mu}m emission and absorption strengths; IRAC magnitudes; and mid-far-infrared spectral indices. Finally, we examine the SEDs averaged within optical classifications of activity. We find that the infrared SEDs of Seyfert 1s and Seyfert 2s with hidden broad line regions (HBLRs, as revealed by spectropolarimetry or other technique) are qualitatively similar, except that Seyfert 1s show silicate emission and HBLR Seyfert 2s show silicate absorption. The infrared SEDs of other classes within the 12 {mu}m sample, including Seyfert 1.8-1.9, non-HBLR Seyfert 2 (not yet shown to hide a type 1 nucleus), LINER, and H II galaxies, appear to be dominated by star formation, as evidenced by blue IRAC colors, strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission, and strong far-infrared continuum emission, measured relative to mid-infrared continuum emission.

  4. Wavelength mismatch effect in electromagnetically induced absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharti, Vineet; Wasan, Ajay; Natarajan, Vasant

    2016-07-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of the phenomenon of electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) in a 4-level system consisting of vee and ladder subsystems. The four levels are coupled using one weak probe field, and two strong control fields. We consider an experimental realization using energy levels of Rb. This necessitates dealing with different conditions of wavelength mismatch-near-perfect match where all three wavelengths are approximately equal; partial mismatch where the wavelength of one control field is less than the other fields; and complete mismatch where all three wavelengths are unequal. We present probe absorption profiles with Doppler averaging at room temperature to account for experiments in a room temperature Rb vapor cell. Our analysis shows that EIA resonances can be studied using Rydberg states excited with diode lasers.

  5. Multiple-Wavelength Pyrometry Independent Of Emissivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    Multiple-wavelength pyrometric method provides for determination of two sequential temperatures of same surface or temperatures of two surfaces made of same material. Temperatures measured, without knowing emissivity, by uncalibrated spectral radiometer.

  6. Apparatus for shifting the wavelength of light

    DOEpatents

    McCulla, William H.; Allen, Jr., John D.

    1983-01-01

    A light beam is reflected back and forth between a rotating body having a retroreflection corner at opposite ends thereof and a fixed mirror to change the wavelength of the light beam by the Doppler effect.

  7. Controllable Dual-Wavelength Fiber Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Zhou, Jun; He, Bing; Liu, Hou-Kang; Liu, Chi; Wei, Yun-Rong; Dong, Jing-Xing; Lou, Qi-Hong

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate a controllable dual-wavelength fiber laser which contains a master laser and a slave laser. The master laser is a kind of ring cavity laser which can be injected into by the slave laser. The output laser wavelength is controlled by injected power of the slave laser; both single- and dual-wavelength operation can be achieved. Under free running, the master laser generates 1064 nm laser output. Here the slave laser is a 1072 nm fiber laser. The 1064 nm and 1072 nm laser coexist in output spectrum for relatively low injected power. Dual-wavelength and power-ratio-tunable operation can be achieved. If the injected power of the slave laser is high enough, the 1064 nm laser is extinguished automatically and there is only 1072 nm laser output.

  8. Multiple wavelength photolithography for preparing multilayer microstructures

    DOEpatents

    Dentinger, Paul Michael; Krafcik, Karen Lee

    2003-06-24

    The invention relates to a multilayer microstructure and a method for preparing thereof. The method involves first applying a first photodefinable composition having a first exposure wavelength on a substrate to form a first polymeric layer. A portion of the first photodefinable composition is then exposed to electromagnetic radiation of the first exposure wavelength to form a first pattern in the first polymeric layer. After exposing the first polymeric layer, a second photodefinable composition having a second exposure wavelength is applied on the first polymeric layer to form a second polymeric layer. A portion of the second photodefinable composition is then exposed to electromagnetic radiation of the second exposure wavelength to form a second pattern in the second polymeric layer. In addition, a portion of each layer is removed according to the patterns to form a multilayer microstructure having a cavity having a shape that corresponds to the portions removed.

  9. The effect of mothers education program based on the precede model on the mean weight in children (6-12 months) at health centers in Shiraz, Fars Province

    PubMed Central

    Kashfi, Seyed Mansour; Khani Jeihooni, Ali; Rezaianzadeh, Abbas; Karimi, Shahnaz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Growth retardation in children is a result of nutritional ignorance, inappropriate care, and inadequate monitoring of growth monitoring. This study was performed to assess the effect of mothers education program based on the precede model on the mean weight of children (6-12 months) at health centers in Shiraz, Fars Province. Methods: This quasi experimental study was conducted on 120 mothers (60 in the experimental and 60 in the control group) with single child and exclusively on breast feeding who were cared by health centers in Shiraz, Fars province. The data were gathered through a questionnaire which included demographic characteristics, the components of the precede model (knowledge, attitude, enabling as well as reinforcing factors, and maternal function) and child weight. Educational intervention was performed during 6 sessions each of which lasted for 55 to 60 minutes. The questionnaire was completed by the experiment a land control group before and 4 months after the training program. Results: The results showed that the educational intervention program in the experimental group caused significant increase in the means of knowledge (p<0.001) and attitude scores (p<0.001). This study showed that enabling and reinforcing factors (and training sessions), performance score of mothers as well as weight of children among experimental group were significantly higher than control group (p=0.01). Conclusion: The results of this study can be used as a guideline prevents growth retardation in health centers and other related organizations. PMID:25664296

  10. Integrated optical, acoustically tunable wavelength filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frangen, J.; Herrmann, H.; Ricken, R.; Seibert, H.; Sohler, W.

    1989-11-01

    A TM/TE convertor is combined with a TE-pass polarizer on a common LiNbO3 chip to obtain an integrated optical, acoustically tunable wavelength filter. Its tuning range is 1.45-1.57 micron wavelength with a filter half-width of 2.8 nm. Due to the combined acoustical/optical strip guide structure used in the mode convertor, a very low acoustic drive power of only 9 mW is required.

  11. Long Wavelength Monitoring of Protein Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Oien, Nathan P.; Nguyen, Luong T.; Jernigan, Finith E.; Priestman, Melanie A.

    2014-01-01

    A family of long wavelength protein kinase fluorescent reporters is described in which the probing wavelength is pre-programmed using readily available fluorophores. These agents can assess protein kinase activity within the optical window of tissue, as exemplified by monitoring endogenous cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity (1) in erythrocyte lysates and (2) in intact erythrocytes using a light-activatable reporter. PMID:24604833

  12. Observations of Venus at 1-meter wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Bryan J.

    2014-11-01

    Radio wavelength observations of Venus (including from the Magellan spacecraft) have been a powerful method of probing its surface and atmosphere since the 1950's. The emission is generally understood to come from a combination of emission and absorption in the subsurface, surface, and atmosphere at cm and shorter wavelengths [1]. There is, however, a long-standing mystery regarding the long wavelength emission from Venus. First discovered at wavelengths of 50 cm and greater [2], the effect was later confirmed to extend to wavelengths as short as 13 cm [1,3]. The brightness temperatures are depressed significantly 50 K around 10-20 cm, increasing to as much as 200 K around 1 m) from what one would expect from a "normal" surface (e.g., similar to the Moon or Earth) [1-3].No simple surface and subsurface model of Venus can reproduce these large depressions in the long wavelength emission [1-3]. Simple atmospheric and ionospheric models fail similarly. In an attempt to constrain the brightness temperature spectrum more fully, new observations have been made at wavelengths that cover the range 60 cm to 1.3 m at the Very Large Array, using the newly available low-band receiving systems there [4]. The new observations were made over a very wide wavelength range and at several Venus phases, with that wide parameter space coverage potentially allowing us to pinpoint the cause of the phenomenon. The observations and potential interpretations will be presented and discussed.[1] Butler et al. 2001, Icarus, 154, 226. [2] Schloerb et al. 1976, Icarus, 29, 329; Muhleman et al. 1973, ApJ, 183, 1081; Condon et al. 1973, ApJ, 183, 1075; Kuzmin 1965, Radiophysics. [3] Butler & Sault 2003, IAUSS, 1E, 17B. [4] Intema et al. 2014, BASI, 1.

  13. Long-wavelength VCSELs for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortsiefer, M.; Rosskopf, J.; Neumeyr, C.; Gründl, T.; Grasse, C.; Chen, J.; Hangauer, A.; Strzoda, R.; Gierl, C.; Meissner, P.; Küppers, F.; Amann, M.-C.

    2012-03-01

    Long-wavelength VCSELs with emission wavelengths beyond 1.3 μm have seen a remarkable progress over the last decade. This success has been accomplished by using highly advanced device concepts which effectively overcome the fundamental technological drawbacks related with long-wavelength VCSELs such as inferior thermal properties and allow for the realization of lasers with striking device performance. In this presentation, we will give an overview on the state of the technology for long-wavelength VCSELs in conjunction with their opportunities in applications for optical sensing. While VCSELs based on InP are limited to maximum emission wavelengths around 2.3 μm, even longer wavelengths up to the mid-infrared range beyond 3 μm can be achieved with VCSELs based on GaSb. For near-infrared InP-based VCSELs, the output characteristics include sub-mA threshold currents, up to several milliwatts of singlemode output power and ultralow power consumption. New concepts for widely tunable VCSELs with tuning ranges up to 100 nm independent from the material system for the active region are also presented. Today, optical sensing by Tunable Diode Laser Spectroscopy is a fast emerging market. Gas sensing systems are used for a wide range of applications such as industrial process control, environmental monitoring and safety applications. With their inherent and compared to other laser types superior properties including enhanced current tuning rates, wavelength tuning ranges, modulation frequencies and power consumption, long-wavelength VCSELs are regarded as key components for TDLS applications.

  14. Grating cavity dual wavelength dye laser.

    PubMed

    Zapata-Nava, Oscar Javier; Rodríguez-Montero, Ponciano; Iturbe-Castillo, M David; Treviño-Palacios, Carlos Gerardo

    2011-02-14

    We report simultaneous dual wavelength dye laser emission using Littman-Metcalf and Littrow cavity configurations with minimum cavity elements. Dual wavelength operation is obtained by laser operation in two optical paths inside the cavity, one of which uses reflection in the circulating dye cell. Styryl 14 laser dye operating in the 910 nm to 960 nm was used in a 15%:85% PC/EG solvent green pumped with a Q-switched doubled Nd3+:YAG laser. PMID:21369171

  15. Absolute distance measurements by variable wavelength interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bien, F.; Camac, M.; Caulfield, H. J.; Ezekiel, S.

    1981-02-01

    This paper describes a laser interferometer which provides absolute distance measurements using tunable lasers. An active feedback loop system, in which the laser frequency is locked to the optical path length difference of the interferometer, is used to tune the laser wavelengths. If the two wavelengths are very close, electronic frequency counters can be used to measure the beat frequency between the two laser frequencies and thus to determine the optical path difference between the two legs of the interferometer.

  16. A REMODEL OF THE ENVELOPE AROUND THE 21 {mu}m PROTOPLANETARY NEBULA IRAS 07134+1005

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chun-Hui; Lee, Chin-Fei

    2012-01-10

    Recently, the CO J = 3-2 observational result of the envelope of the 21 {mu}m protoplanetary nebula (PPN) IRAS 07134+1005 has been reported. Assuming that the CO J = 3-2 line was optically thin, the mass-loss rate of the superwind in this PPN was found to be at least 2 orders of magnitude lower than the typical range. In order to obtain a more accurate mass-loss rate, we reexamine these data and construct a radiative transfer model to compare with the data. Also, in order to better resolve the superwind, we adopt a different weighting on the data to obtain maps at a higher resolution. Our result shows that the CO J = 3-2 emission is located slightly further away from the central source than the mid-infrared emission, probably because the material is cooler on the outer part and is thus better traced by the CO emission. At a lower resolution, however, the CO emission appeared to be spatially coincident with the mid-IR emission. Our model has two components, an inner ellipsoidal shell-like superwind with an equatorial density enhancement and an outer spheroidal asymptotic giant branch wind. The thick torus in the previous model could be considered as the dense equatorial part of our ellipsoidal superwind. With radiative transfer, our model reproduces more observed features than the previous model, and it obtains an averaged superwind mass-loss rate of {approx}1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, which is typical for a superwind. The mass-loss rate in the equatorial plane is 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, which is also the same as that derived before from modeling the CO J = 1-0 emission.

  17. Matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization in the O---H and C=O absorption bands of aliphatic and aromatic matrices: dependence on laser wavelength and temporal beam profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, Rainer; Haglund, Richard F.; Hillenkamp, Franz

    1997-12-01

    A tunable free-electron laser (FEL) was used to initiate infrared (IR) matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization (MALDI) of small proteins in aliphatic and aromatic matrices. The laser wavelength was scanned from 2.65 to 4.2 [mu]m and from 5.5 to 6.5 [mu]m, covering the absorption bands of the O---H and C=O stretching vibrations found in such commonly used IR matrices as succinic, fumaric and nicotinic acids. The temporal profile of the laser pulse was also varied using a broadband electro-optic switch (Pockels cell) to study the effects of fluence and irradiance. Although there are absorption peaks at 3.3 [mu]m for succinic acid and fumaric acid, and at 4.1 [mu]m for nicotinic acid, the lowest threshold-fluence for IR MALDI in this region was around 2.94 [mu]m for all matrices. Moreover, the threshold-fluence increased with increasing absorption up to a value five times that of the 2.94 [mu]m value. This result raises questions about the relative contributions of the different sample constitutents to the absorption and the role of resonant absorption in IR MALDI. The threshold-fluences are typically one order of magnitude higher than those for ultraviolet (UV) MALDI, while extinction coefficients of the IR matrices are 100-1000 times smaller than for UV matrices. Therefore, the absorbed energies per unit volume at the MALDI threshold are 10-100 times smaller than in UV MALDI. All these facts clearly indicate that a different desorption/ionization process must be operative in IR MALDI. Variations in temporal profile of the FEL pulse also revealed that ion desorption depends on laser irradiance rather than laser fluence, a result which cannot be explained simply by energy loss due to heat conduction. Two possible models for IR desorption are suggested based on these observations.

  18. Beam quality and wavelength limitation in visible and UV FEL oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Tomimasu, T.

    1995-12-31

    The FELI linac beam has succeeded in visible-FEL oscillation on the third harmonics at 0.64 {mu}m using a 3-m undulator and a 6.72-m optical cavity with two Au-coated mirrors in Feb. 28, 1995. The beam is a 68-MeV, 40-A electron beam with a normalized emittance of 26 {pi}mm{center_dot}mrad and a relative energy spread of 1%. In 1993, an ultraviolet (UV) FEL oscillation was already achieved on the third harmonics at 0.37{mu} m using a 46-MeV, 130-A electron beam with a normalized emittance of 3{pi}mm{center_dot}mrad and a relative energy spread of 0.24% from the APEX L-band linac with an rf photocathode electron gun. However, we are now trying to achieve an FEL oscillation in the UV range using the FELI linac with the thermionic gun because of long-life, easy-operation, and low-cost of the thermionic gun, as the FELI ring with 9.8-m long straight sections capable of storing a long lived 1-A beam is in the design stage. Recent experimental and theoretical results on relations between beam quality and short wavelength FEL oscillations have been also reviewed and wavelength limitations due to normalized emittance and relative energy spread are discussed.

  19. On the Relative Importance of Convection and Temperature on the Behavior of the Ionosphere in North American during January 6-12, 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, P. G.; Buonsanto, M. J.; Reinisch, B. W.; Holt, J.; Fennelly, J. A.; Scali, J. L.; Comfort, R. H.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J.; Brittnacher, M.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements from a network of digisondes and an incoherent scatter radar In Eastern North American For January 6-12, 1997 have been compared with the Field Line Interhemispheric Plasma (FLIP) model which now includes the effects of electric field convective. With the exception of Bermuda, the model reproduces the daytime electron density very well most of the time. As is typical behavior for winter solar minimum on magnetically undisturbed nights, the measurements at Millstone Hill show high electron temperatures before midnight followed by a rapid decay, which is accompanied by a pronounced density enhancement in the early morning hours. The FLIP model reproduces the nighttime density enhancement well, provided the model is constrained to follow the topside electron temperature and the flux tube is full. Similar density enhancements are seen at Goose Bay, Wallops Island and Bermuda. However, the peak height variation and auroral images indicate the density enhancements at Goose Bay are most likely due to particle precipitation. Contrary to previously published work we find that the nighttime density variation at Millstone Hill is driven by the temperature behavior and not the other way around. Thus, in both the data and model, the overall nighttime density is lowered and the enhancement does not occur if the temperature remains high all night. Our calculations show that convections of plasma from higher magnetic latitudes does not cause the observed density maximum but it may enhance the density maximum if over-full flux tubes are convected over the station. On the other had, convection of flux tubes with high temperatures and depleted densities may prevent the density maximum from occurring. Despite the success in modeling the nighttime density enhancements, there remain two unresolved problems. First, the measured density decays much faster than the modeled density near sunset at Millstone Hill and Goose Bay though not at lower latitude stations. Second, we

  20. Efficient multicast routing in wavelength-division-multiplexing networks with light splitting and wavelength conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Sheng; Tian, Jinwen; Liu, Jian

    2005-04-01

    We propose wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM) networks with light splitting and wavelength conversion that can efficiently support multicast routing between nodes. Our iterative algorithm analyzes the original multicast routing network by decomposing it into multicast subgroups. These subgroups have the same wavelength, and the individual subgroup is combined to build a multicast tree. From the multicast tree, we can compute efficiently to multicast for short paths. Numerical results obtained for the ARPANET show that our algorithm can greatly reduce the optical blocking probability and the number of required wavelength conversions.

  1. Two wavelength satellite laser ranging using SPAD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prochazka, Ivan; Hamal, Karel; Jelinkova, Helena; Kirchner, Georg; Koidl, F.

    1993-01-01

    When ranging to satellites with lasers, there are several principal contributions to the error budget: from the laser ranging system on the ground, from the satellite retroarray geometry, and from the atmosphere. Using a single wavelength, we have routinely achieved a ranging precision of 8 millimeters when ranging to the ERS-1 and Starlette satellites. The systematic error of the atmosphere, assuming the existing dispersion models, is expected to be of the order of 1 cm. Multiple wavelengths ranging might contribute to the refinement of the existing models. Taking into account the energy balance, the existing picosecond lasers and the existing receiver and detection technology, several pairs or multiple wavelengths may be considered. To be able to improve the atmospheric models to the subcentimeter accuracy level, the differential time interval (DTI) has to be determined within a few picoseconds depending on the selected wavelength pair. There exist several projects based on picosecond lasers as transmitters and on two types of detection techniques: one is based on photodetectors, like photomultipliers or photodiodes connected to the time interval meters. Another technique is based on the use of a streak camera as an echo signal detector, temporal analyzer, and time interval vernier. The temporal analysis at a single wavelength using the streak camera showed the complexity of the problem.

  2. THE EVOLUTION OF SOLAR FLUX FROM 0.1 nm TO 160 {mu}m: QUANTITATIVE ESTIMATES FOR PLANETARY STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Claire, Mark W.; Sheets, John; Meadows, Victoria S.; Cohen, Martin; Ribas, Ignasi; Catling, David C.

    2012-09-20

    Understanding changes in the solar flux over geologic time is vital for understanding the evolution of planetary atmospheres because it affects atmospheric escape and chemistry, as well as climate. We describe a numerical parameterization for wavelength-dependent changes to the non-attenuated solar flux appropriate for most times and places in the solar system. We combine data from the Sun and solar analogs to estimate enhanced UV and X-ray fluxes for the young Sun and use standard solar models to estimate changing visible and infrared fluxes. The parameterization, a series of multipliers relative to the modern top of the atmosphere flux at Earth, is valid from 0.1 nm through the infrared, and from 0.6 Gyr through 6.7 Gyr, and is extended from the solar zero-age main sequence to 8.0 Gyr subject to additional uncertainties. The parameterization is applied to a representative modern day flux, providing quantitative estimates of the wavelength dependence of solar flux for paleodates relevant to the evolution of atmospheres in the solar system (or around other G-type stars). We validate the code by Monte Carlo analysis of uncertainties in stellar age and flux, and with comparisons to the solar proxies {kappa}{sup 1} Cet and EK Dra. The model is applied to the computation of photolysis rates on the Archean Earth.

  3. Uncooled 2.5 Gb/s operation of 1.3 mum GaInNAs DQW lasers over a wide temperature range.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yongqiang; Gustavsson, Johan S; Sadeghi, Mahdad; Wang, Shumin; Larsson, Anders; Savolainen, Pekka; Melanen, Petri; Sipilä, Pekko

    2006-04-01

    Ridge waveguide 1.3 mum GaInNAs lasers were fabricated from high quality double quantum well material grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Short cavity (250 mum) lasers have low threshold currents and small temperature dependencies of threshold current and slope efficiency, with a characteristic temperature of the threshold current as high as 200 K. The temperature stability allows for uncooled 2.5 Gb/s operation up to temperatures as high as 110 degrees C with a constant modulation voltage and only the bias current adjusted for constant average output power. Under these conditions, an extinction ratio larger than 6 dB and a spectral rms-width smaller than 2 nm are obtained. PMID:19516408

  4. Nonlinear frequency up-conversion of femtosecond pulses from an erbium fibre laser to the range of 0.8 - 1 {mu}m in silica fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Anashkina, E A; Andrianov, A V; Kim, A V

    2013-03-31

    We consider different mechanisms of nonlinear frequency up-conversion of femtosecond pulses emitted by an erbium fibre system ({lambda} = 1.5 {mu}m) to the range of 0.8 - 1.2 {mu}m in nonlinear silica fibres. The generation efficiency and the centre frequencies of dispersive waves are found as functions of the parameters of the fibre and the input pulse. Simple analytical estimates are obtained for the spectral distribution of the intensity and the frequency shift of a wave packet in the region of normal dispersion during the emission of a high-order soliton under phase matching conditions. In the geometrical optics approximation the frequency shifts are estimated in the interaction of dispersive waves with solitons in various regimes. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  5. CAN GROUND-BASED TELESCOPES DETECT THE OXYGEN 1.27 {mu}m ABSORPTION FEATURE AS A BIOMARKER IN EXOPLANETS?

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Hajime; Matsuo, Taro; Takami, Michihiro; Fujii, Yuka; Kotani, Takayuki; Tamura, Motohide; Murakami, Naoshi; Guyon, Olivier

    2012-10-10

    The oxygen absorption line imprinted in the scattered light from Earth-like planets has been considered the most promising metabolic biomarker for exolife. We examine the feasibility of the detection of the 1.27 {mu}m oxygen band from habitable exoplanets, in particular, around late-type stars observed with a future instrument on a 30 m class ground-based telescope. We analyzed the night airglow around 1.27 {mu}m with the IRCS/echelle spectrometer on Subaru and found that the strong telluric emission from atmospheric oxygen molecules declines by an order of magnitude by midnight. By compiling nearby star catalogs combined with the sky background model, we estimate the detectability of the oxygen absorption band from an Earth twin, if it exists, around nearby stars. We find that the most dominant source of photon noise for the oxygen 1.27 {mu}m band detection comes from the night airglow if the contribution of the stellar point-spread function (PSF) halo is suppressed enough to detect the planet. We conclude that the future detectors, for which the detection contrast is limited by photon noise, can detect the oxygen 1.27 {mu}m absorption band of Earth twins for {approx}50 candidates of the late-type star. This paper demonstrates the importance of deploying a small inner working angle as an efficient coronagraph and extreme adaptive optics on extremely large telescopes, and clearly shows that doing so will enable the study of potentially habitable planets.

  6. 900-mW average power and tunability from a diode-pumped 2.94-{mu}m Er:YAG oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, C.E.; Beach, R.J.; Sutton, S.B.; Furu, L.; Krupke, W.F.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, the authors report on a diode-side-pumped Er:YAG laser that generates over 500 mW of average power at 2.94 {mu}m, and tunes over a 6 nm range centered about the 2.94-{mu}m transition. Prior to the development of the laser, diode-pumped Er:YAG lasers have been end-pumped monolithic devices that deliver {approximately}200 mW of output at 2.94 {mu}m. Much of the difficulty in obtaining higher average power from Er:YAG stems from the unfavorable lifetimes of the upper and lower laser levels, the complex state dynamics, and a low stimulated emission cross section ({sigma} {approx} 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}20} cm{sup 2}). One of the most important dynamical processes in Er:YAG is cross relaxation between neighboring Er{sup 3+} ions in the {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} level. By recycling much of the {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} population (lower laser level) into {sup 4}I{sub 11/2} (upper laser level), the cross relaxation overcomes the unfavorable lifetimes of the two levels, allowing the population inversion to be sustained. It is this cross relaxation along with thermalization of the two laser levels that allows cw oscillation on the 2.94 {mu}m line to take place. The laser that they describe here is a quasi-cw device as the approach to obtaining higher average power and limited tunability relies on side pumping with a quasi-cw InGaAs laser diode array. In this way, a higher gain-length product is generated, which is necessary for extending the tuning range of the laser, and for overcoming the higher losses associated with a discreet-element resonator.

  7. THE CARNEGIE HUBBLE PROGRAM: THE LEAVITT LAW AT 3.6 AND 4.5 {mu}m IN THE MILKY WAY

    SciTech Connect

    Monson, Andrew J.; Freedman, Wendy L.; Madore, Barry F.; Persson, S. E.; Scowcroft, Victoria; Seibert, Mark; Rigby, Jane R. E-mail: wendy@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: persson@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: mseibert@obs.carnegiescience.edu

    2012-11-10

    The Carnegie Hubble Program (CHP) is designed to calibrate the extragalactic distance scale using data from the post-cryogenic era of the Spitzer Space Telescope. The ultimate goal of the CHP is a systematic improvement in the distance scale leading to a determination of the Hubble constant to within an accuracy of 2%. This paper focuses on the measurement and calibration of the Galactic Cepheid period-luminosity (PL, Leavitt) relation using the warm Spitzer/IRAC 1 and 2 bands at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m. We present photometric measurements covering the period range 4-70 days for 37 Galactic Cepheids. Data at 24 phase points were collected for each star. Three PL relations of the form M = a(log (P) - 1) + b are derived. The method adopted here takes the slope a to be -3.31, as determined from the Spitzer Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) data of Scowcroft et al. Using the geometric Hubble Space Telescope guide-star distances to 10 Galactic Cepheids, we find a calibrated 3.6 {mu}m PL zero point of -5.80 {+-} 0.03. Together with our value for the LMC zero point, we determine a reddening-corrected distance modulus of 18.48 {+-} 0.04 mag to the LMC. The mid-IR period-color diagram and the [3.6]-[4.5] color variation with phase are interpreted in terms of CO absorption at 4.5 {mu}m. This situation compromises the use of the 4.5 {mu}m data for distance determinations.

  8. THE COMPTON-THICK SEYFERT 2 NUCLEUS OF NGC 3281: TORUS CONSTRAINTS FROM THE 9.7 {mu}m SILICATE ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Sales, Dinalva A.; Pastoriza, M. G.; Riffel, R.; Winge, C.

    2011-09-01

    We present mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectra of the Compton-thick Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 3281, obtained with the Thermal-Region Camera Spectrograph at the Gemini-South telescope. The spectra present a very deep silicate absorption at 9.7 {mu}m, and [S IV] 10.5 {mu}m and [Ne II] 12.7 {mu}m ionic lines, but no evidence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission. We find that the nuclear optical extinction is in the range 24 mag {<=} A{sub V} {<=} 83 mag. A temperature T = 300 K was found for the blackbody dust continuum component of the unresolved 65 pc nucleus and the region at 130 pc SE, while the region at 130 pc NW reveals a colder temperature (200 K). We describe the nuclear spectrum of NGC 3281 using a clumpy torus model that suggests that the nucleus of this galaxy hosts a dusty toroidal structure. According to this model, the ratio between the inner and outer radius of the torus in NGC 3281 is R{sub 0}/R{sub d} = 20, with 14 clouds in the equatorial radius with optical depth of {tau}{sub V} = 40 mag. We would be looking in the direction of the torus equatorial radius (i = 60{sup 0}), which has outer radius of R{sub 0} {approx} 11 pc. The column density is N{sub H} {approx} 1.2 x 10{sup 24} cm{sup -2} and the iron K{alpha} equivalent width ({approx}0.5-1.2 keV) is used to check the torus geometry. Our findings indicate that the X-ray absorbing column density, which classifies NGC 3281 as a Compton-thick source, may also be responsible for the absorption at 9.7 {mu}m providing strong evidence that the silicate dust responsible for this absorption can be located in the active galactic nucleus torus.

  9. THE 3-5 {mu}m SPECTRUM OF NGC 1068 AT HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION: DISTRIBUTION OF EMISSION AND ABSORPTION FEATURES ACROSS THE NUCLEAR CONTINUUM SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Geballe, T. R.; Mason, R. E.; Rodriguez-Ardila, A.; Axon, D. J.

    2009-08-20

    We report moderate resolution 3-5 {mu}m spectroscopy of the nucleus of NGC 1068 obtained at 0.''3 (20 pc) resolution with the spectrograph slit aligned approximately along the ionization cones of the active galactic nucleus. The deconvolved full width at half-maximum of the nuclear continuum source in this direction is 0.''3. Four coronal lines of widely different excitations were detected; the intensity of each peaks near radio knot C, approximately 0.''3 north of the infrared continuum peak, where the radio jet changes direction. Together with the broadened line profiles observed near that location, this suggests that shock ionization is the dominant excitation mechanism of the coronal lines. The depth of the 3.4 {mu}m hydrocarbon absorption is maximum at and just south of the continuum peak, similar to the 10 {mu}m silicate absorption. That and the similar and rapid variations of the optical depths of both features across the nucleus suggest that substantial portions of both arise in a dusty environment just in front of the continuum source(s). A new and tighter limit is set on the column density of CO. Although clumpy models of the dust screen might explain the shallowness of the silicate feature, the presence of the 3.4 {mu}m feature and the absence of CO are strongly reminiscent of Galactic diffuse cloud environments and a consistent explanation for them and the observed silicate feature is found if all three phenomena occur in such an environment, existing as close as 10 pc to the central engine.

  10. Integrated nonlinear interferometer with wavelength multicasting functionality.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weili; Yu, Yu; Zhang, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Nonlinear interference based on four wave mixing (FWM) is extremely attractive due to its phase sensitivity. On the other hand, wavelength multicasting, which supports data point-to-multipoint connections, is a key functionality to increase the network efficiency and simplify the transmitter and receiver in the wavelength-division multiplexing systems. We propose and experimentally demonstrate a nonlinear interferometer with wavelength multicasting functionality based on single-stage FWM in an integrated silicon waveguide. With a three-pump and dual-signal input, four phase sensitive idlers are obtained at the interferometer output. For a proof-of-concept application, we further theoretically demonstrate the multicasting logic exclusive-OR (XOR) gate for both intensity and phase modulated signals. The proposed scheme would be potentially applied in various on-chip applications for future optical communication system. PMID:27505786

  11. Cryogenic Amplifier Based Receivers at Submillimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Reck, Theodore and; Schlecht, Erich; Lin, Robert; Deal, William

    2012-01-01

    The operating frequency of InP high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) based amplifiers has moved well in the submillimeter-wave frequencies over the last couple of years. Working amplifiers with usable gain in waveguide packages has been reported beyond 700 GHz. When cooled cryogenically, they have shown substantial improvement in their noise temperature. This has opened up the real possibility of cryogenic amplifier based heterodyne receivers at submillimeter wavelengths for ground-based, air-borne, and space-based instruments for astrophysics, planetary, and Earth science applications. This paper provides an overview of the science applications at submillimeter wavelengths that will benefit from this technology. It also describes the current state of the InP HEMT based cryogenic amplifier receivers at submillimeter wavelengths.

  12. Dynamic polarizabilities and magic wavelengths for dysprosium

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2011-03-15

    We theoretically study dynamic scalar polarizabilities of the ground and select long-lived excited states of dysprosium, a highly magnetic atom recently laser cooled and trapped. We demonstrate that there is a set of magic wavelengths of the unpolarized lattice laser field for each pair of states, which includes the ground state and one of these excited states. At these wavelengths, the energy shift due to laser field is the same for both states, which can be useful for resolved sideband cooling on narrow transitions and precision spectroscopy. We present an analytical formula that, near resonances, allows for the determination of approximate values of the magic wavelengths without calculating the dynamic polarizabilities of the excited states.

  13. Mechanisms and Methods for Selective Wavelength Filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret (Inventor); Brown, Thomas G. (Inventor); Gruhlke, Russell (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    An optical filter includes a dielectric waveguide layer, supporting waveguide modes at specific wavelengths and receiving incident light, a corrugated film layer, composed of one of a metal and a semiconductor and positioned adjacent to a second surface of the waveguide layer and a sensor layer, wherein the sensor layer is capable of absorbing optical energy and generating a corresponding electrical signal. The metal film layer supports a plurality of plasmons, the plurality of plasmons producing a first field and is excited by a transverse mode of the waveguide modes at a wavelength interval. The first field penetrates the sensor layer and the sensor layer generates an electrical signal corresponding to an intensity of received incident light within the wavelength interval.

  14. Device for wavelength-selective imaging

    DOEpatents

    Frangioni, John V.

    2010-09-14

    An imaging device captures both a visible light image and a diagnostic image, the diagnostic image corresponding to emissions from an imaging medium within the object. The visible light image (which may be color or grayscale) and the diagnostic image may be superimposed to display regions of diagnostic significance within a visible light image. A number of imaging media may be used according to an intended application for the imaging device, and an imaging medium may have wavelengths above, below, or within the visible light spectrum. The devices described herein may be advantageously packaged within a single integrated device or other solid state device, and/or employed in an integrated, single-camera medical imaging system, as well as many non-medical imaging systems that would benefit from simultaneous capture of visible-light wavelength images along with images at other wavelengths.

  15. Wavelength Dependence on the Space Charge Collection

    SciTech Connect

    Washington, A.; Teague, L.; Duff, M.; Burger, A.; Groza, M.; Buliga, V.

    2012-05-31

    The distribution of the internal electric field in Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te (CZT) materials has significant effects on the charge collection ability. Light exposure at various wavelengths is a relatively unexplored process that alters charge collection at the anode contact. The use of multiple wavelengths can target charge carriers at various trap energies and positions throughout the crystal. The controlled illumination increases charge collection by releasing trapped electron and hole carriers in the crystal despite differences in light energy. Our study presents the results from our investigation of the effect of external illumination of CZT on the internal electric field via the Pockels effect. The space charge collection is further analyzed based on location and intensity relative to the specific wavelength of illumination.

  16. Galactic Astronomy at Long Wavelengths: Past Prologue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazio, T. J. W.

    2005-12-01

    In the course of his long career, Bill Erickson has conducted long wavelength observations on a number of Galactic objects. These include observations of or searches for supernova remnants, pulsars, extrasolar planets, and the interstellar medium. Throughout, he has been instrumental in attempting to obtain higher angular resolution and higher sensitivity at long wavelengths. Perhaps not surprisingly, many of the questions that Bill tried to address with his observations remain unsolved today. These include such fundamental issues as, How are particles accelerated? Where are particles accelerated? What are the environmental impact, both direct and indirect, of particle acceleration? I shall provide a brief and necessarily incomplete survey of Bill's work in the Galaxy and show how it sets the stage for many of the questions facing modern long-wavelength instruments.

  17. B-cell transcription factors Pax-5, Oct-2, BOB.1, Bcl-6, and MUM1 are useful markers for the diagnosis of nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Herbeck, Rosemarie; Teodorescu Brînzeu, D; Giubelan, Marioara; Lazăr, Elena; Dema, Alis; Ioniţă, Hortensia

    2011-01-01

    In some instances, the overlap in morphologic features and antigen expression between nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) and classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) can cause confusion in the diagnosis. In these cases, the transcription factors (TFs) B-cell specific activator protein (BSAP)/Pax-5, octamer binding protein-2 (Oct-2), B-lymphocyte-specific co-activator BOB.1/OBF.1, Bcl-6 protein and multiple myeloma-1/interferon regulatory factor-4 (MUM1/IRF-4) may aid in clarifying the diagnosis. Twenty-two cases of NLPHL were studied for the immunohistochemical expression of Pax-5, Oct-2, BOB.1, Bcl-6 protein and MUM1/IRF-4. Our results sustain the usefulness of the selected set of TFs to diagnose and distinguish NLPHL from cHL since Pax-5, Oct-2, BOB.1 and Bcl-6 are consistently expressed by lymphocyte predominant (LP) cells and reported by others to be often unexpressed in Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells. By contrast, MUM1/IRF-4 protein scored negative in the majority of LP cells, but is reported to be expressed in almost all cases of cHL. Thus, although the expression of transcription factors is very heterogeneous, their simultaneous implementation for positive and differential diagnosis may be useful. PMID:21424034

  18. Integrated Optical, Acoustically Tunable Wavelength Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frangen, J.; Herrmann, Harald; Ricken, Raimund; Seibert, Holger; Sohler, Wolfgang; Strake, E.

    1989-12-01

    An integrated optical, acoustically tunable wavelength filter, consisting of a combination of TM-TE converter and integrated polarizer in LiNbO3, is demonstrated. The filter bandwidth is 2.8 nm; the center wavelength can be tuned from λ = 1.45 pm to λ = 1.57 pm by adjusting the driving acoustic frequency. Due to the combined acoustical/optical strip guide structure, used in the mode converter, a very low acoustic drive power of only 9 mW is required.

  19. Undulators for short wavelength FEL amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, R.

    1994-08-01

    Issues critical to the design of undulators for use in short wavelength FEL amplifiers, such as attainable on-axis field strength, device compactness, field quality, required magnetic gap, and strong focusing schemes, are discussed. The relative strength of various undulator technologies, including pure permanent magnet, hybrid, warm electromagnetic, pulsed, and superconducting electromagnetic devices in both helical and planar configurations are reviewed. Favored design options for proposed short wavelength FELs, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC and the DUV Free-Electron Laser at BNL, are presented.

  20. Miniature integrated-optical wavelength analyzer chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, R. E.; Dübendorfer, J.

    1995-11-01

    A novel integrated-optical chip suitable for realizing compact miniature wavelength analyzers with high linear dispersion is presented. The chip performs the complete task of converting the spectrum of an input beam into a corresponding spatial irradiance distribution without the need for an imaging function. We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach experimentally by monitoring the changes in the mode spectrum of a laser diode on varying its case temperature. Comparing the results with simultaneous measurements by a commercial spectrometer yielded a rms wavelength deviation of 0.01 nm.

  1. Modulation compression for short wavelength harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.

    2010-01-11

    Laser modulator is used to seed free electron lasers. In this paper, we propose a scheme to compress the initial laser modulation in the longitudinal phase space by using two opposite sign bunch compressors and two opposite sign energy chirpers. This scheme could potentially reduce the initial modulation wavelength by a factor of C and increase the energy modulation amplitude by a factor of C, where C is the compression factor of the first bunch compressor. Such a compressed energy modulation can be directly used to generate short wavelength current modulation with a large bunching factor.

  2. Wavelength-tunable microbolometers with metamaterial absorbers.

    PubMed

    Maier, Thomas; Brückl, Hubert

    2009-10-01

    Microbolometers are modified by metallic resonant absorber elements, leading to an enhanced responsivity at selectable wavelengths. The dissipative energy absorption of tailored metamaterials allows for engineering the response of conventional bolometer microbridges. The absorption peak position and height are determined by the geometry of the metamaterial. Square-shaped metal/dielectric/metal stacks as absorber elements show spectral resonances at wavelengths between 4.8 and 7.0 microm in accordance with numerical simulations. Total peak absorptions of 0.8 are obtained. The metamaterial modified bolometers are suitable for multispectral thermal imaging systems in the mid-IR and terahertz regime. PMID:19794799

  3. Undulators for short wavelength FEL amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, R.D.

    1994-12-01

    Issues critical to the design of undulators for use in short wavelength FEL amplifiers, such as attainable on-axis field strength, device compactness, field quality, required magnetic gap, and strong focusing schemes, are discussed. The relative strength of various undulator technologies, including pure permanent magnet, hybrid, warm electromagnetic, pulsed, and superconducting electromagnetic devices in both helical and planar configurations are reviewed. Favored design options for proposed short wavelength FELs, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC and the DUV Free-Electron Laser at BNL, are presented.

  4. Effects of Laser Wavelength on Ablator Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Wavelength-dependent or spectral radiation effects are potentially significant for thermal protection materials. NASA atmospheric entry simulations include trajectories with significant levels of shock layer radiation which is concentrated in narrow spectral lines. Tests using two different high powered lasers, the 10.6 micron LHMEL I CO2 laser and the near-infrared 1.07 micron fiber laser, on low density ablative thermal protection materials offer a unique opportunity to evaluate spectral effects. Test results indicated that the laser wavelength can impact the thermal response of an ablative material, in terms of bond-line temperatures, penetration times, mass losses, and char layer thicknesses.

  5. Group delay dispersion measurements in InGaAsP 1. 3-/mu/m optical amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Zenteno, L.

    1989-01-01

    Group delay dispersion (GDD) of -- 15 ps/nm has been measured in a near traveling wave optical amplifier at a wavelength where measured gain ripple was -- 2 dB, using the envelope phase-shift technique. This is compared to a measured GDD of -- 180 ps/nm in a single facet AR coated amplifier biased below threshold with a gain ripple of -- 17 dB. It is shown that these results agree qualitatively with standard theory. An important result is that GDD increases with the square of amplifier length. One may expect to reduce GDD by an order of magnitude if gain ripple is reduced to 0.5 dB.

  6. Dual-wavelength erbium-doped fiber laser with tunable wavelength spacing using a twin core fiber-based filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Guolu; Lou, Shuqin; Wang, Xin; Han, Bolin

    2014-05-01

    A dual-wavelength erbium-doped fiber laser with tunable wavelength spacing was proposed and experimentally demonstrated by using a twin core fiber (TCF)-based filter. Benefiting from the polarization dependence of the TCF-based filter, the laser operated in dual-wavelength oscillation with two orthogonal polarization states. By adjusting the polarization controller, the wavelength spacing was tuned from 0.1 nm to 1.2 nm without shifting the centre position of the two wavelengths. By stretching the TCF, the two wavelengths were simultaneously tuned with fixed wavelength spacing. Such a dual-wavelength fiber laser could find applications in optical fiber sensors and microwave photonics generation.

  7. Resolving the Moth at Millimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricarte, Angelo; Moldvai, Noel; Hughes, A. Meredith; Duchêne, Gaspard; Williams, Jonathan P.; Andrews, Sean M.; Wilner, David J.

    2013-09-01

    HD 61005, also known as "The Moth," is one of only a handful of debris disks that exhibit swept-back "wings" thought to be caused by interaction with the ambient interstellar medium (ISM). We present 1.3 mm Submillimeter Array observations of the debris disk around HD 61005 at a spatial resolution of 1.''9 that resolve the emission from large grains for the first time. The disk exhibits a double-peaked morphology at millimeter wavelengths, consistent with an optically thin ring viewed close to edge-on. To investigate the disk structure and the properties of the dust grains we simultaneously model the spatially resolved 1.3 mm visibilities and the unresolved spectral energy distribution (SED). The temperatures indicated by the SED are consistent with expected temperatures for grains close to the blowout size located at radii commensurate with the millimeter and scattered light data. We also perform a visibility-domain analysis of the spatial distribution of millimeter-wavelength flux, incorporating constraints on the disk geometry from scattered light imaging, and find suggestive evidence of wavelength-dependent structure. The millimeter-wavelength emission apparently originates predominantly from the thin ring component rather than tracing the "wings" observed in scattered light. The implied segregation of large dust grains in the ring is consistent with an ISM-driven origin for the scattered light wings.

  8. RESOLVING THE MOTH AT MILLIMETER WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Ricarte, Angelo; Moldvai, Noel; Hughes, A. Meredith; Duchene, Gaspard; Williams, Jonathan P.; Andrews, Sean M.; Wilner, David J.

    2013-09-01

    HD 61005, also known as ''The Moth'', is one of only a handful of debris disks that exhibit swept-back ''wings'' thought to be caused by interaction with the ambient interstellar medium (ISM). We present 1.3 mm Submillimeter Array observations of the debris disk around HD 61005 at a spatial resolution of 1.''9 that resolve the emission from large grains for the first time. The disk exhibits a double-peaked morphology at millimeter wavelengths, consistent with an optically thin ring viewed close to edge-on. To investigate the disk structure and the properties of the dust grains we simultaneously model the spatially resolved 1.3 mm visibilities and the unresolved spectral energy distribution (SED). The temperatures indicated by the SED are consistent with expected temperatures for grains close to the blowout size located at radii commensurate with the millimeter and scattered light data. We also perform a visibility-domain analysis of the spatial distribution of millimeter-wavelength flux, incorporating constraints on the disk geometry from scattered light imaging, and find suggestive evidence of wavelength-dependent structure. The millimeter-wavelength emission apparently originates predominantly from the thin ring component rather than tracing the ''wings'' observed in scattered light. The implied segregation of large dust grains in the ring is consistent with an ISM-driven origin for the scattered light wings.

  9. The wavelength dependence of Triton's light curve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, J.; Veverka, J.; Helfenstein, P.; Mcewen, A.

    1991-01-01

    Using Voyager observations, it is demonstrated that Triton's orbital light curve is strongly wavelength-dependent, a characteristic which readily explains some of the apparent discrepancies among pre-Voyager telescopic measurements. Specifically, a light curve amplitude (peak to peak) is found that decreases systematically with increasing wavelength from about 0.08 magnitude (peak to peak) near 200 nm to less than 0.02 magnitude near 1000 nm. Peak brightness occurs near 90 deg orbital longitude (leading hemisphere). The brightness variation across this hemisphere is close to sinusoidal; the variation across the darker hemisphere is more complex. The decrease in light curve amplitude with increasing wavelength appears to be due to a decrease in contrast among surface markings, rather than to atmospheric obscuration. The model also explains the observed decrease in the amplitude of Triton's light curve at visible wavelengths over the past decade, a decrease related to the current migration of the subsolar latitude toward the south pole; it is predicted that this trend will continue into the 1990s.

  10. Electricity and short wavelength radiation generator

    DOEpatents

    George, E.V.

    1985-08-26

    Methods and associated apparati for use of collisions of high energy atoms and ions of He, Ne, or Ar with themselves or with high energy neutrons to produce short wavelength radiation (lambda approx. = 840-1300 A) that may be utilized to produce cathode-anode currents or photovoltaic currents.

  11. Making Precise Antenna Reflectors For Millimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, G. Richard; Wanhainen, Joyce S.; Ketelsen, Dean A.

    1994-01-01

    In improved method of fabrication of precise, lightweight antenna reflectors for millimeter wavelengths, required precise contours of reflecting surfaces obtained by computer numberically controlled machining of surface layers bonded to lightweight, rigid structures. Achievable precision greater than that of older, more-expensive fabrication method involving multiple steps of low- and high-temperature molding, in which some accuracy lost at each step.

  12. Photomultiplier sensitivity improvement by using wavelength shifters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozma, Peter; Bajgar, Robert; Kozma, Petr, Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Photomultiplier quantum sensitivity in the UV region of the photomultipliers FEU-85, FEU-130 and FEU-140 can be improved by a wave-shifter covering. The best results were obtained for PMMA-polymethylmetacrylate and P-P' diphenylstilbene wavelength shifters.

  13. Two-wavelength spatial-heterodyne holography

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Gregory R.; Bingham, Philip R.; Simpson, John T.; Karnowski, Thomas P.; Voelkl, Edgar

    2007-12-25

    Systems and methods are described for obtaining two-wavelength differential-phase holograms. A method includes determining a difference between a filtered analyzed recorded first spatially heterodyne hologram phase and a filtered analyzed recorded second spatially-heterodyned hologram phase.

  14. SDIO long wavelength infrared detector requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duston, Dwight

    1990-01-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) has a significant requirement for infrared sensors for surveillance, tracking and discrimination of objects in space. Projected SDIO needs cover the range from short wavelengths out to 30 microns. Large arrays are required, and producibility and cost are major factors. The SDIO is pursuing several approaches including innovative concepts based on semiconductors and superconductors.

  15. Fiber optics wavelength division multiplexing(components)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Herbert D.

    1985-01-01

    The long term objectives are to develop optical multiplexers/demultiplexers, different wavelength and modulation stable semiconductor lasers and high data rate transceivers, as well as to test and evaluate fiber optic networks applicable to the Space Station. Progress in each of the above areas is briefly discussed.

  16. Single quantum dot emission at telecom wavelengths from metamorphic InAs/InGaAs nanostructures grown on GaAs substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Seravalli, L.; Trevisi, G.; Frigeri, P.; Rivas, D.; Munoz-Matutano, G.; Suarez, I.; Alen, B.; Canet, J.; Martinez-Pastor, J. P.

    2011-04-25

    We report on the growth by molecular beam epitaxy and the study by atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence of low density metamorphic InAs/InGaAs quantum dots. subcritical InAs coverages allow to obtain 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} dot density and metamorphic In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As (x=0.15,0.30) confining layers result in emission wavelengths at 1.3 {mu}m. We discuss optimal growth parameters and demonstrate single quantum dot emission up to 1350 nm at low temperatures, by distinguishing the main exciton complexes in these nanostructures. Reported results indicate that metamorphic quantum dots could be valuable candidates as single photon sources for long wavelength telecom windows.

  17. Short wavelength FELs using the SLAC linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winick, H.; Bane, K.; Boyce, R.; Cobb, J.; Loew, G.; Morton, P.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Paterson, J.; Pianetta, P.; Raubenheimer, T.; Seeman, J.; Tatchyn, R.; Vylet, V.; Pellegrini, C.; Rosenzweig, J.; Travish, G.; Prosnitz, D.; Scharlemann, E. T.; Halbach, K.; Kim, K.-J.; Schlueter, R.; Xie, M.; Bonifacio, R.; De Salvo, L.; Pierini, P.

    1994-08-01

    Recent technological developments have opened the possibility to construct a device which we call a linac coherent light source (LCLS) (C. Pellegrini et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 331 (1993) 223; H. Winick et al., Proc. IEEE 1993 Particle Accelerator Conf., Washington, DC, May 1993; C. Pellegrini, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 341 (1994) 326; J. Seeman, SPIE Meet. on Electron Beam Sources of High Brightness Radiation, San Diego, CA, July 1993 [1-4]); it would be a fourth-generation light source, with brightness, coherence, and peak power far exceeding other sources. Operating on the principle of the free electron laser (FEL), the LCLS would extend the range of FEL operation to much shorter wavelength than the 240 nm that has so far been reached. We report the results of studies of the use of the SLAC linac to drive an LCLS at wavelengths from about 3 to 100 nm initially and possibly even shorter wavelengths in the future. Lasing would be achieved in a single pass of a low emittance, high peak current, high-energy electron beam through a long undulator. Most present FELs use an optical cavity to build up the intensity of the light to achieve lasing action in a low-gain oscillator configuration. By eliminating the optical cavity, which is difficult to make at short wavelengths, laser action can be extended to shorter wavelengths by self-amplified-spontaneous-emission (SASE), or by harmonic generation from a longer wavelength seed laser. Short wavelength, single pass lasers have been extensively studied at several laboratories and at recent workshops (M. Cornacchia and H. Winick (eds.), SLAC Report 92/02; I. Ben-Zvi and H. Winick (eds.), BNL report 49651 [5,6]). The required low-emittance electron beam can be achieved with recently-developed rf photocathode electron guns (B.E. Carlsten, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 285 (1989) 313; J. Rosenzweig and L. Serafini, Proc. IEEE 1993 Particle Accelerator Conf., Washington, DC, 1993 [7,8]). The peak current is increased by about an

  18. Wavelength-tunable laser based on electro-optic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Pengfei; Tang, Suning

    2015-03-01

    Currently available wavelength-tunable lasers have technical difficulty in combining high-speed, continuous and wide wavelength tunability with high output power. We demonstrated a high-speed wavelength-tunable laser based on a fast electro-optic effect. We observed that the wavelength-swept speed exceeds 107 nm/s at center wavelength of 1550 nm with continuous wavelength tunability. Moreover, the maximum output power is over 100 mW and the wavelength tuning range is near 100 nm with a full width at half maximum of less than 0.5 nm.

  19. Photoacoustic optical properties at UV, VIS, and near IR wavelengths for laboratory generated and winter time ambient urban aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Gyawali, Madhu S.; Arnott, W. Patrick; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Song, Chen; Moosmuller, H.; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, M.; Chen, L-W A.; Green, M.; Watson, J. G.; Chow, J. C.

    2012-03-08

    We present the laboratory and ambient photoacoustic (PA) measurement of aerosol light absorption coefficients at ultraviolet wavelength (i.e., 355 nm) and compare with measurements at 405, 532, 870, and 1047 nm. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol light scattering coefficients were achieved by the integrating reciprocal nephelometer within the PA's acoustic resonator. Absorption and scattering measurements were carried out for various laboratory generated aerosols, including salt, incense, and kerosene soot to evaluate the instrument calibration and gain insight on the spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption and scattering. Ambient measurements were obtained in Reno, Nevada, between 18 December 2009 and 18 January 2010. The measurement period included days with and without strong ground level temperature inversions, corresponding to highly polluted (freshly emitted aerosols) and relatively clean (aged aerosols) conditions. Particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured and analyzed with other tracers of traffic emissions. The temperature inversion episodes caused very high concentration of PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 {mu}m and 10 {mu}m, respectively) and gaseous pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}). The diurnal change of absorption and scattering coefficients during the polluted (inversion) days increased approximately by a factor of two for all wavelengths compared to the clean days. The spectral variation in aerosol absorption coefficients indicated a significant amount of absorbing aerosol from traffic emissions and residential wood burning. The analysis of single scattering albedo (SSA), Angstrom exponent of absorption (AEA), and Angstrom exponent of scattering (AES) for clean and polluted days provides evidences that the aerosol aging and coating process is suppressed by strong temperature inversion under cloudy conditions. In general

  20. Choice of the proper wavelength for photochemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moan, Johan; Iani, Vladimir; Ma, LiWei

    1996-01-01

    All photosensitizers applied in experimental- and clinical-photochemotherapy (PCT) have broad absorption spectra stretching from the ultraviolet up to 6 - 700 nm. Light of wavelengths in the red part of the spectrum is chosen for PCT even though the extinction coefficients of the sensitizers are usually smaller in this wavelength region than at shorter wavelengths. Thus, if one wants to treat superficial tumors or skin disorders, this may be a wrong choice. Two pieces of information are needed in order to make a proper choice of wavelength to treat a lesion of a given depth: the wavelength dependence of the optical penetration depth into tissue, and the action spectrum for tumor destruction. Additionally, the skin photosensitivity induced by the drug should be considered. We have non-invasively measured the optical penetration spectra of human tissues in vivo and the fluorescence excitation spectra for several sensitizers, including protoporphyrin (PpIX), in cells. Assuming that the action spectrum for cell inactivation can be approximated by the fluorescence excitation spectrum of the sensitizer -- which is indeed the case for a number of sensitizers in cells in vitro -- we have considered the situation for 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced PpIX in human tissue. All the way down to about 2 mm below the surface light in the Soret band (-410 nm) would give the largest cell inactivation, while at depth exceeding 2 mm, the conventional 635 nm light would be optimal. Light at the argon laser wavelength 514.5 nm is more efficient than light at 635 nm down to 1 mm. From the surface and down to 6 mm, the 635 nm peak of the excitation spectrum of PpIX, as evaluated per photon incident on the skin surface, is redshifted by less than 2 nm. In some cases photosensitizing photoproducts are formed during PCT, such as photoprotoporphyrin during PCT with PpIX. In such cases it may be advantageous to apply a broad-band light source with a spectrum that covers also part of the action

  1. A Model Secondary (6-12) Plan for Reading Intervention and Development: A Response to Requests from Minnesota Schools and Districts to Provide Guidance in Developing Reading Intervention Programs for Secondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferraro, Jan; Houck, Bonnie; Klund, Sue; Hexum-Platzer, Sharon; Vortman-Smith, Jan

    2006-01-01

    The "Model Secondary (6-12) Plan for Reading Intervention and Development" has been designed to meet the cognitive needs of middle school through high school students whose reading performance ranges from those significantly below expectation through those reading at or above grade level. The reading needs of the population of students in need of…

  2. Synthesis of (6R,12R)-6,12-Dimethylpentadecan-2-one, the Female-Produced Sex Pheromone from Banded Cucumber Beetle Diabrotica balteata, Based on a Chiron Approach.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wei; Hao, Xiang; Shi, Yong; Tian, Wei-Sheng

    2015-12-01

    Herein we describe a synthesis of (6R,12R)-6,12-dimethylpentadecan-2-one (5), the female produced sex pheromone of banded cucumber beetle Diabrotica balteata Le Conte, from (R)-4-methyl-5-valerolactone, a methyl-branched chiron. PMID:26882689

  3. Quantitative phase imaging by three-wavelength digital holography

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Christopher J; Bingham, Philip R; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William; Paquit, Vincent C

    2008-01-01

    Three-wavelength digital holography is applied to obtain surface height measurements over several microns of range, while simultaneously maintaining the low noise precision of the single wavelength phase measurement. The precision is preserved by the use of intermediate synthetic wavelength steps generated from the three wavelengths and the use of hierarchical optical phase unwrapping. As the complex wave-front of each wavelength can be captured simultaneously in one digital image, real-time performance is achievable.

  4. Radio wavelength transients: Current and emerging prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazio, J.

    2008-03-01

    Known classes of radio wavelength transients range from the nearby stellar flares and radio pulsars to the distant Universe γ-ray burst afterglows. Hypothesized classes of radio transients include analogs of known objects, e.g., extrasolar planets emitting Jovian-like radio bursts and giant-pulse emitting pulsars in other galaxies, to the exotic, prompt emission from γ-ray bursts, evaporating black holes, and transmitters from other civilizations. A number of instruments and facilities are either under construction or in early observational stages and are slated to become available in the next few years. With a combination of wide fields of view and wavelength agility, the detection and study of radio transients will improve immensely.

  5. Coordinated observations of PHEMU at radio wavelengths.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluchino, S.; Schillirò, F.; Salerno, E.; Pupillo, G.; Kraus, A.; Mack, K.-H.

    We present preliminary results for our study of mutual phenomena of the Galilean satellites performed at radio wavelengths with the Medicina and Noto antennas of the Istituto di Radioastronomia \\textendash{} INAF, and with the Effelsberg 100-m radio telescope of the Max-Planck-Institute for Radioastronomy. Measurements of the radio flux density variation occurred during the mutual occultations of Io by Europa and Ganymede were carried out during the PHEMU09 campaign at K- and Q-band. Flux density variations observed for the first time at radio wavelengths are consistent with the typical optical patterns measured when partial occultations occurred. The flux density drops indicate a non-linear dependence with the percentage of overlapped area.

  6. Discrete Wavelength-Locked External Cavity Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Silver, Joel A.

    2004-01-01

    A prototype improved external cavity laser (ECL) was demonstrated in the second phase of a continuing effort to develop wavelength-agile lasers for fiber-optic communications and trace-gas-sensing applications. This laser is designed to offer next-generation performance for incorporation into fiber-optic networks. By eliminating several optical components and simplifying others used in prior designs, the design of this laser reduces costs, making lasers of this type very competitive in a price-sensitive market. Diode lasers have become enabling devices for fiber optic networks because of their cost, compactness, and spectral properties. ECLs built around diode laser gain elements further enhance capabilities by virtue of their excellent spectral properties with significantly increased (relative to prior lasers) wavelength tuning ranges. It is essential to exploit the increased spectral coverage of ECLs while simultaneously insuring that they operate only at precisely defined communication channels (wavelengths). Heretofore, this requirement has typically been satisfied through incorporation of add-in optical components that lock the ECL output wavelengths to these specific channels. Such add-in components contribute substantially to the costs of ECL lasers to be used as sources for optical communication networks. Furthermore, the optical alignment of these components, needed to attain the required wavelength precision, is a non-trivial task and can contribute substantially to production costs. The design of the present improved ECL differs significantly from the designs of prior ECLs. The present design relies on inherent features of components already included within an ECL, with slight modifications so that these components perform their normal functions while simultaneously effecting locking to the required discrete wavelengths. Hence, add-in optical components and the associated cost of alignment can be eliminated. The figure shows the locking feedback signal

  7. Dual-wavelength laser with topological charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haohai; Xu, Miaomiao; Zhao, Yongguang; Wang, Yicheng; Han, Shuo; Zhang, Huaijin; Wang, Zhengping; Wang, Jiyang

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrate the simultaneous oscillation of different photons with equal orbital angular momentum in solid-state lasers for the first time to our knowledge. Single tunable Hermite-Gaussian (HG0,n) (0 ≤ n ≤ 7) laser modes with dual wavelength were generated using an isotropic cavity. With a mode-converter, the corresponding Laguerre-Gaussian (LG0,n) laser modes were obtained. The oscillating laser modes have two types of photons at the wavelengths of 1077 and 1081 nm and equal orbital angular momentum of nħ per photon. These results identify the possibility of simultaneous oscillation of different photons with equal and controllable orbital angular momentum. It can be proposed that this laser should have promising applications in many fields based on its compact structure, tunable orbital angular momentum, and simultaneous oscillation of different photons with equal orbital angular momentum.

  8. Effect of wavelength shifter on Indus-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhri, Ali Akbar; Ghodke, A. D.; Singh, Gurnam

    2010-01-01

    The Indus-1 is a 450 MeV synchrotron radiation source for the production of VUV radiation ( λc=61 Å). In order to produce the radiation of shorter wavelength ( λc=31 Å), a superconducting wavelength shifter (WLS) with a peak field of 3 T is being considered for Indus-1. In the Indus-1 beam lifetime is short; therefore, WLS will be kept on during beam injection. To predict WLS effect, Smith's Hamiltonian for Halbach's magnetic field model has been re-derived to estimate linear and nonlinear component under the compensated electron beam trajectory transformation. To minimize the linear effects of WLS, various linear compensation schemes and its effects on Indus-1 operation are presented.

  9. The Long Wavelength Array Software Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowell, Jayce; Wood, Daniel; Stovall, Kevin; Ray, Paul S.; Clarke, Tracy; Taylor, Gregory

    2012-12-01

    The Long Wavelength Array Software Library (LSL) is a Python module that provides a collection of utilities to analyze and export data collected at the first station of the Long Wavelength Array, LWA1. Due to the nature of the data format and large-N (≳100 inputs) challenges faced by the LWA, currently available software packages are not suited to process the data. Using tools provided by LSL, observers can read in the raw LWA1 data, synthesize a filter bank, and apply incoherent de-dispersion to the data. The extensible nature of LSL also makes it an ideal tool for building data analysis pipelines and applying the methods to other low frequency arrays.

  10. Sinusoidal nonlinearity in wavelength-sweeping interferometry.

    PubMed

    Perret, Luc; Pfeiffer, Pierre

    2007-11-20

    We report the influence of the nonlinearities in the wavelength-sweeping speed on the resulting interferometric signals in an absolute distance interferometer. The sweeping signal is launched in the reference and target interferometers from an external cavity laser source. The experimental results demonstrate a good resolution in spite of the presence of nonlinearities in the wavelength sweep. These nonlinearities can be modeled by a sum of sinusoids. A simulation is then implemented to analyze the influence of their parameters. It shows that a sinusoidal nonlinearity is robust enough to give a good final measurement uncertainty through a Fourier transform technique. It can be concluded that an optimal value of frequency and amplitude exists in the case of a sinusoidal nonlinearity. PMID:18026546

  11. Zero-Points of FOS Wavelength Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Michael R.; Kerber, Florian

    We have investigated the internal zero-points of the HST's Faint object spectrograph (FOS) on-orbit wavelength calibration between 1990 (launch) and 1997 (de-commissioning). The analysis is based on cross-correlating about 1200 WAVECAL exposures for the high-resolution dispersers, using as templates those exposures which define the dispersion solutions currently in use by the FOS pipeline. FOS has two channels BLUE/RED using two independent Digicon detectors. For BLUE systematic shifts of the zero-points are present, which amount to a maximum offset of 7 pixels (1.75 diodes) over the entire period. The zero-points for RED modes present an apparently random distribution with a peak-to-peak range of 7 pixels. We discu ss the effect of the geomagnetic environment as a possible cause for the observed behaviour and describe the ongoing work to reduce the uncertainty in the wavelength scale.

  12. Metallic photonic crystals at optical wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kady, I.; Sigalas, M. M.; Biswas, R.; Ho, K. M.; Soukoulis, C. M.

    2000-12-01

    We theoretically study three-dimensional metallic photonic-band-gap (PBG) materials at near-infrared and optical wavelengths. Our main objective is to find the importance of absorption in the metal and the suitability of observing photonic band gaps in this structure. For that reason, we study simple cubic structures and the metallic scatterers are either cubes or interconnected metallic rods. Several different metals have been studied (aluminum, gold, copper, and silver). Copper gives the smallest absorption and aluminum is more absorptive. The isolated metallic cubes are less lossy than the connected rod structures. The calculations suggest that isolated copper scatterers are very attractive candidates for the fabrication of photonic crystals at the optical wavelengths.

  13. Multi-Wavelength Observations of Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, B.

    2012-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) provide a laboratory for studying various astrophysical processes, including particle acceleration, thermal and non thermal emission processes across the spectrum, distribution of heavy elements, the physics of strong shock waves, and the progenitor systems and environments of supernovae. Long studied in radio and X-rays, the past decade has seen a dramatic increase in the detection and subsequent study of SNRs in the infrared and gamma-ray regimes. Understanding the evolution of SNRs and their interaction with the interstellar medium requires a multi-wavelength approach. I will review the various physical processes observed in SNRs and how these processes are intertwined. In particular, I will focus on X-ray and infrared observations, which probe two very different but intrinsically connected phases of the ISM: gas and dust. I will discuss results from multi-wavelength studies of several SNRs at various stages of evolution, including Kepler, RCW 86, and the Cygnus Loop.

  14. Quasi-optical components at submillimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ediss, G. A.; Keen, N. J.; Mischerikow, K.-D.; Schulz, A.; Korn, A.

    1987-02-01

    Individual components of the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastonomie 650 micron Schottky barrier diode waveguide mixer-receiver and their performance at 650 microns wavelength are reported on. Scalar, dual-mode, and pyramidal horns are considered, and attempts to measure insertion losses by comparing the gain of the horn with that of a fundamental moded waveguide lead to estimates of the upper limits for horn losses at 650 microns. Radiometric loss measurements of an 8-mm thick Teflon lens and a 5-mm thick Rexolite lens are both larger than would be expected from the material loss tangents, probably due to reflections. The performance of various diplexers is also considered. Performance of the present quasi-optical components at 650 and 172 microns is not found to be significantly worse than at 1300 microns wavelength, with the probable exception of horn insertion losses.

  15. Eye-safe visible wavelength lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooley, T. W.; Reagan, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Recent technological advances on several fronts offer the possibility for relatively low-cost, eye-safe visible-wavelength lidar systems for autonomous aerosol/environmental monitoring applications. Improved silicon photodiodes and avalanche photodiodes that have become available offer high-quantum-efficiency detection at very low dark counts (10 to 1000 count/s) and can be used in a photon counting mode for signal plus background and dark current photoelectron count rates of megahertz. The essential requirements and features of a possible lidar system that capitalizes on technical advances on several fronts are outlined. A baseline lidar system is suggested for monitoring tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols. Sensitivity to wavelength, background radiation, detector characteristics, and other system parameters is discussed for several simulated data sets.

  16. Sinusoidal nonlinearity in wavelength-sweeping interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Perret, Luc; Pfeiffer, Pierre

    2007-11-20

    We report the influence of the nonlinearities in the wavelength-sweeping speed on the resulting interferometric signals in an absolute distance interferometer. The sweeping signal is launched in the reference and target interferometers from an external cavity laser source. The experimental results demonstrate a good resolution in spite of the presence of nonlinearities in the wavelength sweep. These nonlinearities can be modeled by a sum of sinusoids. A simulation is then implemented to analyze the influence of their parameters. It shows that a sinusoidal nonlinearity is robust enough to give a good final measurement uncertainty through a Fourier transform technique. It can be concluded that an optimal value of frequency and amplitude exists in the case of a sinusoidal nonlinearity.

  17. WAVELENGTH CALIBRATION OF THE HAMILTON ECHELLE SPECTROGRAPH

    SciTech Connect

    Pakhomov, Yu. V.; Zhao, G.

    2013-10-01

    We present the wavelength calibration of the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory. The main problem with the calibration of this spectrograph arises from the fact that thorium lines are absent in the spectrum of the presumed ThAr hollow-cathode lamp now under operation; numerous unknown strong lines, which have been identified as titanium lines, are present in the spectrum. We estimate the temperature of the lamp's gas which permits us to calculate the intensities of the lines and to select a large number of relevant Ti I and Ti II lines. The resulting titanium line list for the Lick hollow-cathode lamp is presented. The wavelength calibration using this line list was made with an accuracy of about 0.006 Å.

  18. Aperture-synthesis interferometry at optical wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Bernard F.

    1987-01-01

    The prospects for applying aperture-synthesis interferometry to the optical domain are reviewed. The radio examples such as the VLA provide a model, since the concepts are equally valid for radio and optical wavelengths. If scientific problems at the milliarc-second resolution level (or better) are to be addressed, a space-based optical array seems to be the only practical alternative, for the same reasons that dictated array development at radio wavelengths. One concept is examined, and speculations are offered concerning the prospects for developing real systems. Phase-coherence is strongly desired for a practical array, although self-calibration and phase-closure techniques allow one to relax the restriction on absolute phase stability. The design of an array must be guided by the scientific problems to be addressed.

  19. Long Wavelength Fluorescence Ratiometric Zinc Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hui Hui; Matveeva, Evgenia; Stoddard, Andrea K.; Fierke, Carol A.; Thompson, Richard B.

    2013-01-01

    A protein-based emission ratiometric fluorescence biosensor is described that exhibits sensitivity to free zinc ion solutions down to picomolar concentrations. Ratiometric measurements are widely used to assure accurate quantitation, and emission ratios are preferred for laser scanning microscopes such as confocal fluorescence microscopes. The relatively long emission wavelengths used are well suited to studies in tissues and other matrices which exhibit significant fluorescence background, and the apo-carbonic anhydrase moiety recognizes zinc ion with high and controllable specificity. PMID:23345045

  20. Multi-Wavelength Study of Segue 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Joanne D.; Schiefelbein, Spencer; Le, Donna; Corrin, Olivia; Joudi, Hanah; Lacy, Brianna I.

    2016-06-01

    Segue 3 is a very faint and distant star cluster, first identfied as being [Fe/H]=-1.7 dex, but later reclassified as [Fe/H]=-0.8. We study the stellar population in Washington and SDSS filters, adding to VI-photometry in the literature. We show the importance of multi-wavelength coverage, careful filter-selection, and use of the sub-giant and lower red-giant branch populations, to break the age-metallicity degeneracy.

  1. Varactor diodes for millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Brian J.; Hesler, Jeffrey L.; Dossal, Hasan; Crowe, Thomas W.

    1992-01-01

    Whisker-contacted GaAs Schottky barrier varactor diodes are the most common high-frequency multiplier element in use today. They are inherently simple devices that have very high frequency response and have been used to supply local oscillator power for Schottky heterodyne receivers to frequencies approaching 700 GHz. This paper discusses the development of improved varactor diode technology for space based applications at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths.

  2. Source of coherent short wavelength radiation

    DOEpatents

    Villa, Francesco

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for producing coherent radiation ranging from X-rays to the far ultraviolet (i.e., 1 Kev to 10 eV) utilizing the Compton scattering effect. A photon beam from a laser is scattered on a high energy electron bunch from a pulse power linac. The short wavelength radiation produced by such scattering has sufficient intensity and spatial coherence for use in high resolution applications such as microscopy.

  3. Effective wavelength scaling of rectangular aperture antennas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Yu, Li; Zhang, Jiasen; Gordon, Reuven

    2015-04-20

    We investigate the resonances of aperture antennas from the visible to the terahertz regime, with comparison to comprehensive simulations. Simple piecewise analytic behavior is found for the wavelength scaling over the entire spectrum, with a linear regime through the visible and near-IR. This theory will serve as a useful and simple design tool for applications including biosensors, nonlinear plasmonics and surface enhanced spectroscopies. PMID:25969079

  4. Tuning the Activation Wavelength of Photochromic Oxazines.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Subramani; Garcia-Amorós, Jaume; Thapaliya, Ek Raj; Nonell, Santi; Captain, Burjor; Raymo, Françisco M

    2016-06-17

    The activation wavelength of a photochromic oxazine can be shifted bathochromically with the introduction of a methoxy substituent on the chromophore responsible for initiating the photochemical transformation. This structural modification permits switching under mild illumination conditions, enhances the photoisomerization quantum yield and ensures outstanding fatigue resistance. Thus, these results can guide the design of new members of this family of photoresponsive molecular switches with improved photochemical and photophysical properties. PMID:27003328

  5. Deformable mirror for short wavelength applications

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Henry N.; Sweeney, Donald W.

    1999-01-01

    A deformable mirror compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation that can be precisely controlled to nanometer and subnanometer accuracy is described. Actuators are coupled between a reaction plate and a face plate which has a reflective coating. A control system adjusts the voltage supplied to the actuators; by coordinating the voltages supplied to the actuators, the reflective surface of the mirror can be deformed to correct for dimensional errors in the mirror or to produce a desired contour.

  6. Short wavelength striations on expanding plasma clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, D.; Gary, S.P.

    1989-01-01

    The growth and evolution of short wavelength (

  7. Multiple wavelength X-ray monochromators

    DOEpatents

    Steinmeyer, Peter A.

    1992-11-17

    An improved apparatus and method is provided for separating input x-ray radiation containing first and second x-ray wavelengths into spatially separate first and second output radiation which contain the first and second x-ray wavelengths, respectively. The apparatus includes a crystalline diffractor which includes a first set of parallel crystal planes, where each of the planes is spaced a predetermined first distance from one another. The crystalline diffractor also includes a second set of parallel crystal planes inclined at an angle with respect to the first set of crystal planes where each of the planes of the second set of parallel crystal planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. In one embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a single crystal. In a second embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a stack of two crystals. In a third embodiment, the crystalline diffractor includes a single crystal that is bent for focussing the separate first and second output x-ray radiation wavelengths into separate focal points.

  8. Multiple wavelength X-ray monochromators

    DOEpatents

    Steinmeyer, P.A.

    1992-11-17

    An improved apparatus and method is provided for separating input x-ray radiation containing first and second x-ray wavelengths into spatially separate first and second output radiation which contain the first and second x-ray wavelengths, respectively. The apparatus includes a crystalline diffractor which includes a first set of parallel crystal planes, where each of the planes is spaced a predetermined first distance from one another. The crystalline diffractor also includes a second set of parallel crystal planes inclined at an angle with respect to the first set of crystal planes where each of the planes of the second set of parallel crystal planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. In one embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a single crystal. In a second embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a stack of two crystals. In a third embodiment, the crystalline diffractor includes a single crystal that is bent for focusing the separate first and second output x-ray radiation wavelengths into separate focal points. 3 figs.

  9. Optically coupled cavities for wavelength switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costazo-Caso, Pablo A.; Granieri, Sergio; Siahmakoun, Azad

    2011-01-01

    An optical bistable device which presents hysteresis behavior is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The system finds applications in wavelength switching, pulse reshaping and optical bistability. It is based on two optically coupled cavities named master and slave. Each cavity includes a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA), acting as the gain medium of the laser, and two pair of fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) which define the lasing wavelength (being different in each cavity). Finally, a variable optical coupler (VOC) is employed to couple both cavities. Experimental characterization of the system performance is made analyzing the effects of the coupling coefficient between the two cavities and the driving current in each SOA. The properties of the hysteretic bistable curve and switching can be controlled by adjusting these parameters and the loss in the cavities. By selecting the output wavelength (λ1 or λ2) with an external filter it is possible to choose either the invert or non-invert switched signal. Experiments were developed employing both optical discrete components and a photonic integrated circuit. They show that for 8 m-long cavities the maximum switching frequency is about 500 KHz, and for 4 m-long cavities a minimum rise-time about 21 ns was measured. The switching time can be reduced by shortening the cavity lengths and using photonic integrated circuits.

  10. Wavelength switching in an optical klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, K.W.; Smith, T.I.

    1995-12-31

    A symmetric optical klystron consists of two identical undulator sections separated a dispersive section. For a device of a given length, an optical klystron is capable of producing much more bunching, and therefore more gain, than a traditional undulator. Another consequence of introducing dispersion between two undulator sections is that the overall spontaneous radiation pattern results from the interference between the two undulator sections, and as such resembles a standard undulator radiation pattern modulated by a sinusoidal interference term. The presence of several wavelength peaks in the spontaneous lineshape implies an equal number of peaks in the gain spectrum. If the strength of the dispersion section is adjusted to provide nearly equal gain on the two largest of these peaks, then they will compete, and the FEL may switch wavelengths based on noise, cavity length, or other perturbations. We provide the first observations of this behavior, using the FIREFLY system at the Stanford Picosecond FEL Center. In FIREFLY, relative wavelength switching by more than 3%--more than twice the laser linewidth-has been observed by varying dispersion section strength, while at intermediate points stable switching has also been observed as a function of cavity length.

  11. Peripheral detection and resolution with mid-/long-wavelength and short-wavelength sensitive cone systems.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hai-Feng; Zele, Andrew J; Suheimat, Marwan; Lambert, Andrew J; Atchison, David A

    2016-08-01

    This study compared neural resolution and detection limits of the human mid-/long-wavelength and short-wavelength cone systems with anatomical estimates of photoreceptor and retinal ganglion cell spacings and sizes. Detection and resolution limits were measured from central fixation out to 35° eccentricity across the horizontal visual field using a modified Lotmar interferometer. The mid-/long-wavelength cone system was studied using a green (550 nm) test stimulus to which S-cones have low sensitivity. To bias resolution and detection to the short-wavelength cone system, a blue (450 nm) test stimulus was presented against a bright yellow background that desensitized the M- and L-cones. Participants were three trichromatic males with normal visual functions. With green stimuli, resolution showed a steep central-peripheral gradient that was similar between participants, whereas the detection gradient was shallower and patterns were different between participants. Detection and resolution with blue stimuli were poorer than for green stimuli. The detection of blue stimuli was superior to resolution across the horizontal visual field and the patterns were different between participants. The mid-/long-wavelength cone system's resolution is limited by midget ganglion cell spacing and its detection is limited by the size of the M- and L-cone photoreceptors, consistent with previous observations. We found that no such simple relationships occur for the short-wavelength cone system between resolution and the bistratified ganglion cell spacing, nor between detection and the S-cone photoreceptor sizes. PMID:27580041

  12. Wavelength-division-multiplexing optical Benes-type networks with simultaneous space-wavelength switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamza, Haitham S.; Deogun, Jitender S.

    2006-11-01

    We propose new wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM) optical interconnect architectures with simultaneous space-wavelength switching capability and reduced complexity. The proposed architectures improve over existing space-wavelength Benes networks, as these require the same number of stages and hardware components as a pure space Benes network. In addition, wavelength conversion in the proposed designs occurs only between two predefined wavelengths, eliminating the need for expensive wide-range wavelength converters used in most existing designs. We develop and characterize three families of WDM Benes networks with reduced complexity, and we present a typical architecture in each of the families. We also propose a routing strategy to establish connections over each of the proposed families. Finally, we present a comparative analysis of the properties of proposed architectures with respect to known WDM Benes networks. It is shown that the new designs require a smaller number of switching stages and space switches, and they have a smaller overall cost compared to most existing WDM Benes interconnects.

  13. EXPLAINING THE [C II]157.7 {mu}m DEFICIT IN LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES-FIRST RESULTS FROM A HERSCHEL/PACS STUDY OF THE GOALS SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Santos, T.; Armus, L.; Howell, J. H.; Surace, J. A.; Charmandaris, V.; Murphy, E. J.; Haan, S.; Inami, H.; Malhotra, S.; Meijerink, R.; Stacey, G.; Petric, A. O.; Lu, N.; Veilleux, S.; Van der Werf, P. P.; Lord, S.; Appleton, P.; and others

    2013-09-01

    We present the first results of a survey of the [C II]157.7 {mu}m emission line in 241 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) comprising the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) sample, obtained with the PACS instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory. The [C II] luminosities, L{sub [C{sub II]}}, of the LIRGs in GOALS range from {approx}10{sup 7} to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} L{sub Sun }. We find that LIRGs show a tight correlation of [C II]/FIR with far-IR (FIR) flux density ratios, with a strong negative trend spanning from {approx}10{sup -2} to 10{sup -4}, as the average temperature of dust increases. We find correlations between the [C II]/FIR ratio and the strength of the 9.7 {mu}m silicate absorption feature as well as with the luminosity surface density of the mid-IR emitting region ({Sigma}{sub MIR}), suggesting that warmer, more compact starbursts have substantially smaller [C II]/FIR ratios. Pure star-forming LIRGs have a mean [C II]/FIR {approx} 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}, while galaxies with low polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) equivalent widths (EWs), indicative of the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), span the full range in [C II]/FIR. However, we show that even when only pure star-forming galaxies are considered, the [C II]/FIR ratio still drops by an order of magnitude, from 10{sup -2} to 10{sup -3}, with {Sigma}{sub MIR} and {Sigma}{sub IR}, implying that the [C II]157.7 {mu}m luminosity is not a good indicator of the star formation rate (SFR) for most local LIRGs, for it does not scale linearly with the warm dust emission most likely associated to the youngest stars. Moreover, even in LIRGs in which we detect an AGN in the mid-IR, the majority (2/3) of galaxies show [C II]/FIR {>=} 10{sup -3} typical of high 6.2 {mu}m PAH EW sources, suggesting that most AGNs do not contribute significantly to the FIR emission. We provide an empirical relation between the [C II]/FIR and the specific SFR for star

  14. Diffuse optical tomography using wavelength-swept laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jaedu; Lim, Gukbin; Jeong, Myung Yung; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Kim, Chang-Seok; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2013-03-01

    The design and implementation of a diffuse optical tomography system using wavelength-swept laser is described. Rapid and continuous wavelength change is utilized for high speed spectral scanning from 775 nm to 875 nm optical wavelength. Maximum speed of wavelength repetition is 1 kHz and averaged output power of the wavelength-swept laser is 20 mW. A fiber-optic Sagnac interferometer is incorporated to conduct passive amplitude modulation of the wavelength-swept laser. It is shown that the wavelength-swept laser can be successfully incorporated to the DOT system, and then reduces wavelength-shifting time and hardware complexity in multi-wavelength DOT implementation.

  15. Wavelength meter having single mode fiber optics multiplexed inputs

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.; Paris, R.D.; Feldman, M.

    1993-02-23

    A wavelength meter having a single mode fiber optics input is disclosed. The single mode fiber enables a plurality of laser beams to be multiplexed to form a multiplexed input to the wavelength meter. The wavelength meter can provide a determination of the wavelength of any one or all of the plurality of laser beams by suitable processing. Another aspect of the present invention is that one of the laser beams could be a known reference laser having a predetermined wavelength. Hence, the improved wavelength meter can provide an on-line calibration capability with the reference laser input as one of the plurality of laser beams.

  16. Wavelength meter having single mode fiber optics multiplexed inputs

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.; Paris, Robert D.; Feldman, Mark

    1993-01-01

    A wavelength meter having a single mode fiber optics input is disclosed. The single mode fiber enables a plurality of laser beams to be multiplexed to form a multiplexed input to the wavelength meter. The wavelength meter can provide a determination of the wavelength of any one or all of the plurality of laser beams by suitable processing. Another aspect of the present invention is that one of the laser beams could be a known reference laser having a predetermined wavelength. Hence, the improved wavelength meter can provide an on-line calibration capability with the reference laser input as one of the plurality of laser beams.

  17. Cloning of the Mutator Transposable Element Mua2, a Putative Regulator of Somatic Mutability of the A1-Mum2 Allele in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Qin, M.; Robertson, D. S.; Ellingboe, A. H.

    1991-01-01

    The identification of the autonomous or transposase-encoding element of the Mutator (Mu) transposable element system of maize is necessary to the characterization of the system. We reported previously that a transcript homologous to the internal region of the MuA element is associated with activity of the Mutator system. We describe here the cloning of another Mu element, designated MuA2, that cosegregates with Mutator activity as assayed by somatic instability of the a1-Mum2 allele. The MuA2 element has features typical of the transposable elements of the Mutator family, including the 210-bp terminal inverted repeats. Several lines of evidence suggest that MuA2 is an autonomous or transposase-encoding element of the Mu family: (1) MuA2 cosegregates with a genetically defined element that regulates somatic mutability of the a1-Mum2 allele; (2) MuA2 is hypomethylated while most other MuA2-hybridizing sequences in the genome are extensively methylated; (3) the increase of the copy number of MuA2 is concomitant with the increase of regulator elements; (4) MuA2-like elements are found in Mutator lines but not in non-Mutator inbreds. We propose that autonomous or transposase-encoding elements of the Mu family may be structurally conserved and MuA2-like. PMID:1661256

  18. RED SUPERGIANTS AS POTENTIAL TYPE IIn SUPERNOVA PROGENITORS: SPATIALLY RESOLVED 4.6 {mu}m CO EMISSION AROUND VY CMa AND BETELGEUSE

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Nathan; Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Ryde, Nils E-mail: hinkle@noao.edu

    2009-03-15

    We present high-resolution 4.6 {mu}m CO spectra of the circumstellar environments of two red supergiants (RSGs) that are potential supernova (SN) progenitors: Betelgeuse and VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa). Around Betelgeuse, {sup 12}CO emission within {+-}3'' ({+-}12 km s{sup -1}) follows a mildly clumpy but otherwise spherical shell, smaller than its {approx}55'' shell in K I {lambda}7699. In stark contrast, 4.6 {mu}m CO emission around VY CMa is coincident with bright K I in its clumpy asymmetric reflection nebula, within {+-}5'' ({+-}40 km s{sup -1}) of the star. Our CO data reveal redshifted features not seen in K I spectra of VY CMa, indicating a more isotropic distribution of gas punctuated by randomly distributed asymmetric clumps. The relative CO and K I distribution in Betelgeuse arises from ionization effects within a steady wind, whereas in VY CMa, K I is emitted from skins of CO cloudlets resulting from episodic mass ejections 500-1000 yr ago. In both cases, CO and K I trace potential pre-SN circumstellar matter: we conclude that an extreme RSG like VY CMa might produce a Type IIn event like SN 1988Z if it were to explode in its current state, but Betelgeuse will not. VY CMa demonstrates that luminous blue variables are not necessarily the only progenitors of SNe IIn, but it underscores the requirement that SNe IIn suffer enhanced episodic mass loss shortly before exploding.

  19. InN/InGaN multiple quantum wells emitting at 1.5 {mu}m grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Grandal, J.; Pereiro, J.; Bengoechea-Encabo, A.; Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Sanchez-Garcia, M. A.; Munoz, E.; Calleja, E.

    2011-02-07

    This work reports on the growth by molecular beam epitaxy and characterization of InN/InGaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) emitting at 1.5 {mu}m. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra show satellite peaks up to the second order. Estimated values of well (3 nm) and barrier (9 nm) thicknesses were derived from transmission electron microscopy and the fit between experimental data and simulated XRD spectra. Transmission electron microscopy and XRD simulations also confirmed that the InGaN barriers are relaxed with respect to the GaN template, while the InN MQWs grew under biaxial compression on the InGaN barriers. Low temperature (14 K) photoluminescence measurements reveal an emission from the InN MQWs at 1.5 {mu}m. Measurements as a function of temperature indicate the existence of localized states, probably due to InN quantum wells' thickness fluctuations as observed by transmission electron microscopy.

  20. Fission-fragment excited xenon/rare gas mixtures. I. Laser parameters of the 1. 73 [mu]m xenon transition

    SciTech Connect

    Hebner, G.A.; Hays, G.N. )

    1993-04-15

    Laser parameters for the 1.73 [mu]m (5[ital d][3/2][sub 1][minus]6[ital p][5/2][sub 2]) xenon transition in fission-fragment excited Ar/Xe, He/Ar/Xe, Ne/Ar/Xe, and He/Ne/Ar/Xe gas mixtures are presented. Using a cw F center laser, time resolved small signal gain was probed as a function of total pressure, xenon concentration, pump power, He/Ne/Ar buffer ratio and impurity concentration. Small signal gains of up to 2%/cm were observed for pump rates of 30 W/cm[sup 3]. Addition of helium and/or neon to the argon buffer increased the width of the time resolved laser gain pulse and reduced the absorption observed under some experimental conditions. Experimentally determined gain scaling laws for several gas mixtures are presented. The measured small signal gain was coupled with the results of laser cavity measurements to calculate the saturation intensity for several gas mixtures. The addition of helium or neon increases the saturation intensity for several gas mixtures. Laser cavity measurements as well as the gain [times] saturation intensity product indicate that the 1.73 [mu]m power efficiency is approximately 2% for several gas mixtures.

  1. Technique for rapid at-wavelength inspection of extreme ultraviolet mask blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Spector, S. J.; White, D. L.; Tennant, D. M.; Ocola, L. E.; Novembre, A. E.; Peabody, M. L.; Wood, O. R. II

    1999-11-01

    We have developed two new methods for at-wavelength inspection of mask blanks for extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. In one method an EUV photoresist is applied directly to a mask blank which is then flood exposed with EUV light and partially developed. In the second method, the photoresist is applied to an EUV transparent membrane that is placed in close proximity to the mask and then exposed and developed. Both reflectivity defects and phase defects alter the exposure of the resist, resulting in mounds of resist at defect sites that can then be located by visual inspection. In the direct application method, a higher contrast resist was shown to increase the height of the mounds, thereby improving the sensitivity of the technique. In the membrane method, a holographic technique was used to reconstruct an image of the mask, revealing the presence of very small defects, approximately 0.2 {mu}m in size. The demonstrated clean transfer of phase and amplitude defects to resist features on a membrane will be important when flagging defects in an automatic inspection tool. (c) 1999 American Vacuum Society.

  2. Spectrophotometry of comets at optical wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahearn, M. F.

    1982-01-01

    Techniques for spectrophotometry of comets are discussed, and results are reviewed for line and continuum spectrophotometry of comets at optical wavelengths. The techniques considered include photographic spectroscopy and spectrophotometry, photoelectric spectrophotometry, and methods based on the use of image dissector scanners, Fourier-transform instruments, and Fabry-Perot spectrometers. Results are summarized for the study of cometary emission features due to C2, CN, CH, OH, NH, C3, NH2, O, H, CO(plus), and H2O(plus). Relative abundances of various species in comets are examined, along with continuum spectrophotometry of the nuclei, comas, and tails of comets.

  3. Rotman lens for mm-wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Leonard T.; Hansen, Hedley J.; Abbott, Derek

    2002-11-01

    The 77 GHz band has been reserved for intelligent cruise control in luxury cars and some public transport services in America and the United Kingdom. The Rotman lens offers a cheap and compact means to extend the single beam systems generally used, to fully functional beam staring arrangements. Rotman lenses have been built for microwave frequencies with limited success. The flexibility of microstrip transmission lines and the advent of fast accurate simulation packages allow practical Rotman lenses to be designed at mm-wavelengths. This paper discusses the limitations of the conventional design approach and predicts the performance of a new Rotman lens designed at 77 GHz.

  4. Imaging Antenna Structure For Submillimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebeiz, G.; Rutledge, D.

    1990-01-01

    Integrated-circuit antenna structure contains two-dimensional array of antennas and antenna reflectors. In receiving mode, each antenna acts as part of detector for one picture element in millimeter- or submillimeter-wavelength imaging radar system. Millimeter-wave imaging system used to view objects through fog, smoke, or smog with resolution intermediate between microwave and visible-light imaging systems. Antenna elements, supports, and reflectors made by integrated-circuit techniques. Structures fabricated on front and back substrates separately. Substrates then joined. Inexpensive way to provide large number of small antenna elements required for imaging, all mounted rigidly in way that does not degrade operation.

  5. Simple novel all-optical wavelength converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhixin

    2009-02-01

    Based on Sagnac interferometric structure, a simple novel ultrafast scheme for an all-optical wavelength converter is proposed. The operations of this scheme with a 80-Gbits/s return to zero (RZ) pseudorandom bit sequence (PRBS) are simulated correctly with an output extinction ratio of more than 17.2 dB. Through numerical analysis, by comparison of the performance at 40- and 80-Gbits/s operation, the operating characteristics of the scheme are illustrated. Furthermore, the carrier recovery time of the semiconductor amplifier (SOA) is no longer a crucial parameter to restrict the operation speed of this scheme.

  6. Two wavelength division multiplexing WAN trials

    SciTech Connect

    Lennon, W.J.; Thombley, R.L.

    1995-01-20

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, as a super-user, supercomputer, and super-application site, is anticipating the future bandwidth and protocol requirements necessary to connect to other such sites as well as to connect to remote-sited control centers and experiments. In this paper the authors discuss their vision of the future of Wide Area Networking, describe the plans for a wavelength division multiplexed link connecting Livermore with the University of California at Berkeley and describe plans for a transparent, {approx} 10 Gb/s ring around San Francisco Bay.

  7. 1550-nm wavelength-tunable HCG VCSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, Christopher; Rao, Yi; Huang, Michael; Chang-Hasnain, Connie

    2014-02-01

    We demonstrate wavelength-tunable VCSELs using high contrast gratings (HCGs) as the top output mirror on VCSELs, operating at 1550 nm. Tunable HCG VCSELs with a ~25 nm mechanical tuning range as well as VCSELs with 2 mW output power were realized. Error-free operation of an optical link using directly-modulated tunable HCG VCSELs transmitting at 1.25 Gbps over 18 channels spaced by 100 GHz and transmitted over 20 km of single mode fiber is demonstrated, showing the suitability of the HCG tunable VCSEL as a low cost source for WDM communications systems.

  8. Multi-wavelength compressive computational ghost imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Stephen S.; Edgar, Matthew P.; Jonathan, Phillip; Sun, Baoqing; Padgett, Miles J.

    2013-03-01

    The field of ghost imaging encompasses systems which can retrieve the spatial information of an object through correlated measurements of a projected light field, having spatial resolution, and the associated reflected or transmitted light intensity measured by a photodetector. By employing a digital light projector in a computational ghost imaging system with multiple spectrally filtered photodetectors we obtain high-quality multi-wavelength reconstructions of real macroscopic objects. We compare different reconstruction algorithms and reveal the use of compressive sensing techniques for achieving sub-Nyquist performance. Furthermore, we demonstrate the use of this technology in non-visible and fluorescence imaging applications.

  9. Quasi-optical diplexer for millimeter wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Payne, J M; Wordeman, M R

    1978-12-01

    A quasi-optical diplexer for injection of signal and local oscillator frequencies into a mixer at millimeter wave-lengths is described. The diplexer accepts both image and signal bands, presents low loss at both the signal and local oscillator frequencies and rejects local oscillator noise at the signal frequency. The configuration of the device makes it particularly useful for Cassegrain receivers using a cooled mixer and a lens corrected feed system. The diplexer has been tested at 150 GHz on the 11-m radio telescope operated by The National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Tucson, Arizona. PMID:18699048

  10. Influence of spectral properties of wavelength-locked and wavelength-unlocked diode laser on fiber laser performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhihua; Tang, Xuan; Zhao, Pengfei; Li, Zebiao; Li, Chengyu; Li, Qi; Guo, Chao; Lin, Honghuan; Wang, Jianjun; Jing, Feng

    2016-07-01

    The influence of the spectral properties of laser diode (LD) pump source, i.e. central wavelength and linewidth, on the fiber laser performances are studied. The absorption degradation ratio (ADR) is introduced and evaluated as a guide for pump selection and fiber laser design. The spectra of wavelength-locked and wavelength-unlocked LDs are measured and they are used for fiber laser amplification. The results show that the efficiency of the wavelength-locked LDs is higher than that of the wavelength-unlocked LDs at full current but the residual pump power of wavelength-locked LDs can be much higher at lower current because of the side band.

  11. Wavelength-swept Tm-doped fiber laser operating in the two-micron wavelength band.

    PubMed

    Tokurakawa, M; Daniel, J M O; Chenug, C S; Liang, H; Clarkson, W A

    2014-08-25

    A wavelength-swept thulium-doped silica fiber laser using an intracavity rotating slotted-disk wavelength scanning filter in combination with an intracavity solid etalon for passive control of temporal and spectral profiles is reported. The laser yielded a wavelength swept output in a step-wise fashion with each laser pulse separated from the previous pulse by a frequency interval equal to the free-spectral-range of the etalon and with an instantaneous linewidth of <0.05 nm. Scanning ranges from 1905 nm to 2049 nm for a cladding-pumping laser configuration, and from 1768 nm to 1956 nm for a core-pumping laser configuration were achieved at average output powers up to ~1 W. PMID:25321211

  12. Wavelength-dependent transmission through sharp 90 degrees bends in sub-wavelength metallic slot waveguides.

    PubMed

    Mason, Daniel R; Gramotnev, Dmitri K; Kim, Kwang S

    2010-07-19

    In this paper, we present a comprehensive numerical study of the wavelength-dependence of transmission through sharp 90 degrees bends in metallic slot waveguides with sub-wavelength localization and varying geometrical parameters. In particular, it is demonstrated that increasing the plasmon wavelength results in a significant increase (up to nearly 100%) of transmission through the bend, combined with a reduction in the mode asymmetry in the second arm of the bend. The mode asymmetry and its relaxation are explained by interference of the transmitted mode with non-propagating and leaky modes generated at the bend. Comparison with the two-dimensional case of a metal-dielectric-metal waveguide is also conducted, showing significant differences for the slot waveguides based on the presence of different non-propagating and leaky modes. PMID:20720999

  13. Laser-to-electricity energy converter for short wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stirn, R. J.; Yeh, Y. C. M.

    1975-01-01

    Short-wavelength energy converter can be made using Schottky barrier structure. It has wider band gap than p-n junction silicon semiconductors, and thus it has improved response at wavelengths down to and including ultraviolet region.

  14. Frequency-wavelength calculator with table of dielectric properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, L. L.

    1972-01-01

    Frequency-wavelength calculator has been developed which rapidly and accurately calculates wavelength of given frequency in specific dielectric material. Unit fits into shirt pocket and includes table of dielectric properties and one-step calculator.

  15. Laser scanner ophthalmoscope with free selectable wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, Dietrich; Kalve, B.; Leistritz, Lutz; Scibor, Mateusz; Hammer, Martin

    1996-12-01

    Multispectral images can provide useful information for objective diagnosis, control of the effect of therapy and for a patient-specific optimization of therapy regime in ophthalmology. Laser scanner systems have the advantage of a high radiation power also in case of small spectral bandwidth. Additionally, the flying spot principle reduces the irradiation of the patient. Commercial laser scanner ophthalmoscopes (LSO) are developed till now only for qualitative, visual interpretation. Maximal four fixed wavelengths are available with a stabilized radiation power. Using the spectral properties of fundus pigments like xanthophyll, rhodopsin or of pathological alterations, e.g. hard exudates, its optical density or local distribution can be determined in this way before and after therapy. As also three wavelengths can be chosen which are best suited for determination of oxygen saturation (OS) in the blood, the validity of the 3-(lambda) -method for 2D calculation of OS can be tested. These investigations are first steps in functional diagnosis of the metabolism in the human ocular fundus.

  16. Coherence techniques at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chang

    2002-10-01

    The renaissance of Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray (SXR) optics in recent years is mainly driven by the desire of printing and observing ever smaller features, as in lithography and microscopy. This attribute is complemented by the unique opportunity for element specific identification presented by the large number of atomic resonances, essentially for all materials in this range of photon energies. Together, these have driven the need for new short-wavelength radiation sources (e.g. third generation synchrotron radiation facilities), and novel optical components, that in turn permit new research in areas that have not yet been fully explored. This dissertation is directed towards advancing this new field by contributing to the characterization of spatial coherence properties of undulator radiation and, for the first time, introducing Fourier optical elements to this short-wavelength spectral region. The first experiment in this dissertation uses the Thompson-Wolf two-pinhole method to characterize the spatial coherence properties of the undulator radiation at Beamline 12 of the Advanced Light Source. High spatial coherence EUV radiation is demonstrated with appropriate spatial filtering. The effects of small vertical source size and beamline apertures are observed. The difference in the measured horizontal and vertical coherence profile evokes further theoretical studies on coherence propagation of an EUV undulator beamline. A numerical simulation based on the Huygens-Fresnel principle is performed.

  17. Raman Amplifier Performance under New Wavelength Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalaf, Ashraf A. M.; Mustafa, Fathy M.

    2016-03-01

    Due to the benefits of Raman amplifier (RA) for long-haul Ultra Wideband (UW)-WDM optical communications systems, we are studying and investigating how to widen the bandwidth and flatten the gain of RA by testing it in a new wider range of wavelengths (1.4 μm≤λsignal≤1.7 μm) instead of the benchmark range (1.45 μm≤λsignal≤1.65 μm). Four different ranges of signal wavelengths are used in this paper with the aim of testing the performance of RA model proposed in [13-15]: 1. 1.4 μm≤λsignal≤1.45 μm 2. 1.45 μm≤λsignal≤1.65 μm 3. 1.65 μm≤λsignal≤1.75 μm 4. 1.43 μm≤λsignal≤1.7 μm Different model sizes are used and analyzed to get wider bandwidth and more flat gain.

  18. Short-wavelength Magnetic Buoyancy Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizerski, K. A.; Davies, C. R.; Hughes, D. W.

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic buoyancy instability plays an important role in the evolution of astrophysical magnetic fields. Here we revisit the problem introduced by Gilman of the short-wavelength linear stability of a plane layer of compressible isothermal fluid permeated by a horizontal magnetic field of strength decreasing with height. Dissipation of momentum and magnetic field is neglected. By the use of a Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation analysis, we explain in detail the limit in which the transverse horizontal wavenumber of the perturbation, denoted by k, is large (i.e., short horizontal wavelength) and show that the fastest growing perturbations become localized in the vertical direction as k is increased. The growth rates are determined by a function of the vertical coordinate z since, in the large k limit, the eigenmodes are strongly localized in the vertical direction. We consider in detail the case of two-dimensional perturbations varying in the directions perpendicular to the magnetic field, which, for sufficiently strong field gradients, are the most unstable. The results of our analysis are backed up by comparison with a series of initial value problems. Finally, we extend the analysis to three-dimensional perturbations.

  19. High Resolution Millimeter Wavelength Polarimetry at BIMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, R.; Crutcher, R. M.; Plambeck, R. L.; Wright, M. C. H.

    1998-05-01

    Polarimetry at far-infrared, sub-millimeter and millimeter wavelengths is a useful probe of the magnetic field structure in regions of star formation. However, most previous polarization observations have been conducted with single dish telescopes (KAO, CSO, JCMT, NRAO 12-meter) with limited angular resolution (greater than 20arcsec ). Polarization observations with interferometer arrays can provide higher angular resolution (about 4arcsec ) images of star-forming regions. We present here the details of a polarimetry system constructed for the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association (BIMA) millimeter array at Hat Creek (California) operating at wavelengths of 3.3 mm (90 GHz) and 1.3 mm (230 GHz). The polarizing element is a quarter wave plate made of Rexolite (cross-linked polystyrene) which has a diectric constant of approximately 2.55. The instrumental response, which is frequency-dependent since the polarizer is chromatic, has been determined to an accuracy of 0.3%. The polarimeter has also been used to monitor a select sample of quasars to determine their time variability. These quasar polarization data complement lower frequency monitoring surveys (less than 15 GHz) and constrain the emission models and magnetic field topology deduced for these objects.

  20. Long-wavelength microinstabilities in toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, W.W.; Rewoldt, G.

    1993-01-01

    Realistic kinetic toroidal eigenmode calculations have been carried out to support a proper assessment of the influence of long-wavelength microturbulence on transport in tokamak plasmas. In order to efficiently evaluate large-scale kinetic behavior extending over many rational surfaces, significant improvements have been made to a toroidal finite element code used to analyze the fully two-dimensional (r,[theta]) mode structures of trapped-ion and toroidal ion temperature gradient (ITG) instabilities. It is found that even at very long wavelengths, these eigenmodes exhibit a strong ballooning character with the associated radial structure relatively insensitive to ion Landau damping at the rational surfaces. In contrast to the long-accepted picture that the radial extent of trapped-ion instabilities is characterized by the ion-gyroradius-scale associated with strong localization between adjacent rational surfaces, present results demonstrate that under realistic conditions, the actual scale is governed by the large-scale variations in the equilibrium gradients. Applications to recent measurements of fluctuation properties in TFTR L-mode plasmas indicate that the theoretical trends appear consistent with spectral characteristics as well as rough heuristic estimates of the transport level. Benchmarking calculations in support of the development of a three-dimensional toroidal gyrokinetic code indicate reasonable agreement with respect to both the properties of the eigenfunctions and the magnitude of the eigenvalues during the linear phase of the simulations of toroidal ITG instabilities.

  1. Long-wavelength microinstabilities in toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, W.W.; Rewoldt, G.

    1993-01-01

    Realistic kinetic toroidal eigenmode calculations have been carried out to support a proper assessment of the influence of long-wavelength microturbulence on transport in tokamak plasmas. In order to efficiently evaluate large-scale kinetic behavior extending over many rational surfaces, significant improvements have been made to a toroidal finite element code used to analyze the fully two-dimensional (r,{theta}) mode structures of trapped-ion and toroidal ion temperature gradient (ITG) instabilities. It is found that even at very long wavelengths, these eigenmodes exhibit a strong ballooning character with the associated radial structure relatively insensitive to ion Landau damping at the rational surfaces. In contrast to the long-accepted picture that the radial extent of trapped-ion instabilities is characterized by the ion-gyroradius-scale associated with strong localization between adjacent rational surfaces, present results demonstrate that under realistic conditions, the actual scale is governed by the large-scale variations in the equilibrium gradients. Applications to recent measurements of fluctuation properties in TFTR L-mode plasmas indicate that the theoretical trends appear consistent with spectral characteristics as well as rough heuristic estimates of the transport level. Benchmarking calculations in support of the development of a three-dimensional toroidal gyrokinetic code indicate reasonable agreement with respect to both the properties of the eigenfunctions and the magnitude of the eigenvalues during the linear phase of the simulations of toroidal ITG instabilities.

  2. Light scattering by irregular particles much larger than the wavelength with wavelength-scale surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Grynko, Yevgen; Shkuratov, Yuriy; Förstner, Jens

    2016-08-01

    We simulate light scattering by random irregular particles that have dimensions much larger than the wavelength of incident light at the size parameter of X=200 using the discontinuous Galerkin time domain method. A comparison of the DGTD solution for smoothly faceted particles with that obtained with a geometric optics model shows good agreement for the scattering angle curves of intensity and polarization. If a wavelength-scale surface roughness is introduced, diffuse scattering at rough interface results in smooth and featureless curves for all scattering matrix elements which is consistent with the laboratory measurements of real samples. PMID:27472601

  3. Wavelength-band-tuning photodiodes by using various metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hwang, J D; Chan, Y D; Chou, T C

    2015-11-20

    Wavelength-band tuning was easily achieved in this work by depositing various metallic nanoparticles (NPs) on silicon p-n junction photodiodes (PDs). The normalization spectrum of the PDs deposited with gold (Au) NPs reveals a high-wavelength pass characteristic; the PDs with silver (Ag) NPs coating behave as a low-wavelength pass, and the PDs with Au/Ag bimetallic NPs appear as a band-wavelength pass PD with a full width at half maximum of 450 ∼ 630 nm. The issue of wavelength-band tuning is due to the different plasmonic resonance wavelengths associated with various metallic NPs. The extinction plot shows the Au NPs have a longer resonant wavelength of about 545 nm, leading to the incident light with a wavelength near or longer than 545 nm scattered by the Au NPs, hence a high-wavelength pass PD. The PDs with Ag NPs, due to the Ag NPs, exhibit a short resonant wavelength of 430 nm, and the short-wavelength incident light is absorbed near the silicon (Si) surface, where the Ag NPs is atop it. The shorter-wavelength incident light is enhanced by the plasmonic resonance of Ag NPs, making a low-wavelength PD. The Au/Ag NPs presents a resonant wavelength of 500 nm between the Au and Ag NPs. For the incident light with a wavelength close to 500 nm, a constructive interference causes a substantial increase in the local electromagnetic field, hence leading to a band-wavelength pass PD. PMID:26508114

  4. Wavelength Calibration Accuracy for the STIS CCD and MAMA Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascucci, Ilaria; Hodge, Phil; Proffitt, Charles R.; Ayres, T.

    2011-03-01

    Two calibration programs were carried out to determine the accuracy of the wavelength solutions for the most used STIS CCD and MAMA modes after Servicing Mission 4. We report here on the analysis of this dataset and show that the STIS wavelength solution has not changed after SM4. We also show that a typical accuracy for the absolute wavelength zero-points is 0.1 pixels while the relative wavelength accuracy is 0.2 pixels.

  5. Wavelength-Division Multiplexing Of Bipolar Digital Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbons, Ronnie D.; Ubele, John L., II

    1994-01-01

    In system, bipolar digital data transmitted by use of wavelength-division multiplexing on single optical fiber. Two different wavelengths used to transmit pulses signifying "positive" or "negative" bipolar digital data. Simultaneous absence of pulses at both wavelengths signifies digital "zero."

  6. A SEARCH FOR C II 158 {mu}m LINE EMISSION IN HCM 6A, A Ly{alpha} EMITTER AT z = 6.56

    SciTech Connect

    Kanekar, Nissim; Wagg, Jeff; Chary, Ranga Ram; Carilli, Christopher L.

    2013-07-10

    We report a Plateau de Bure Interferometer search for C II 158 {mu}m emission from HCM 6A, a lensed Ly{alpha} emitter (LAE) at z = 6.56. Our non-detections of C II 158 {mu}m line emission and 1.2 mm radio continuum emission yield 3{sigma} limits of L{sub CII} < 6.4 x 10{sup 7} x ({Delta}V/100 km s{sup -1}){sup 1/2} L{sub Sun} for the C II 158 {mu}m line luminosity and S{sub 1.2mm} < 0.68 mJy for the 1.2 mm flux density. The local conversion factor between L{sub CII} and the star formation rate (SFR) yields an SFR < 4.7 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, Almost-Equal-To 2 times lower than that inferred from the ultraviolet (UV) continuum, suggesting that the local factor may not be applicable in high-z LAEs. The non-detection of 1.2 mm continuum emission yields a total SFR < 28 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}; any obscured star formation is thus within a factor of two of the visible star formation. Our best-fit model to the rest-frame UV/optical spectral energy distribution of HCM 6A yields a stellar mass of 1.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} and an SFR of Almost-Equal-To 10 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, with negligible dust obscuration. We fortuitously detect CO J = 3-2 emission from a z = 0.375 galaxy in the foreground cluster A370, and obtain a CO line luminosity of L'(CO) > (8.95 {+-} 0.79) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2} and a molecular gas mass of M(H{sub 2}) > (4.12 {+-} 0.36) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }, for a CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor of 4.6 M{sub Sun} (K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}){sup -1}.

  7. DETECTION OF PARENT H{sub 2}O AND CO{sub 2} MOLECULES IN THE 2.5-5 {mu}m SPECTRUM OF COMET C/2007 N3 (LULIN) OBSERVED WITH AKARI

    SciTech Connect

    Ootsubo, Takafumi; Usui, Fumihiko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ueno, Munetaka; Wada, Takehiko; Matsuhara, Hideo; Nakagawa, Takao; Murakami, Hiroshi; Kawakita, Hideyo; Ishiguro, Masateru; Furusho, Reiko; Watanabe, Jun-ichi; Sekiguchi, Tomohiko; Ohyama, Youichi; Oyabu, Shinki; Onaka, Takashi

    2010-07-01

    Comet C/2007 N3 (Lulin) was observed with the Japanese infrared satellite AKARI in the near-infrared at a post-perihelion heliocentric distance of 1.7 AU. Observations were performed with the spectroscopic (2.5-5.0 {mu}m) and imaging (2.4, 3.2, and 4.1 {mu}m) modes on 2009 March 30 and 31 UT, respectively. AKARI images of the comet exhibit a sunward crescent-like shape coma and a dust tail extended toward the anti-solar direction. The 4.1 {mu}m image (CO/CO{sub 2} and dust grains) shows a distribution different from the 2.4 and 3.2 {mu}m images (H{sub 2}O and dust grains). The observed spectrum shows distinct bands at 2.66 and 4.26 {mu}m, attributed to H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}, respectively. This is the fifth comet in which CO{sub 2} has been directly detected in the near-infrared spectrum. In addition, CO at 4.67 {mu}m and a broad 3.2-3.6 {mu}m emission band from C-H bearing molecules were detected in the AKARI spectrum. The relative abundance ratios CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O and CO/H{sub 2}O derived from the molecular production rates are {approx}4%-5% and <2%, respectively. Comet Lulin belongs to the group that has relatively low abundances of CO and CO{sub 2} among all observed comets.

  8. THE INFRARED SPECTRA OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS WITH EXCESS PERIPHERAL H ATOMS (H {sub n} -PAHs) AND THEIR RELATION TO THE 3.4 AND 6.9 {mu}m PAH EMISSION FEATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Sandford, Scott A.; Bernstein, Max P.; Materese, Christopher K.

    2013-03-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are likely responsible for the family of infrared emission features seen in a wide variety of astrophysical environments. A potentially important subclass of these materials are PAHs whose edges contain excess H atoms (H {sub n} -PAHs). This type of compound may be present in space, but it has been difficult to assess this possibility because of a lack of suitable laboratory spectra to assist with analysis of astronomical data. We present 4000-500 cm{sup -1} (2.5-20 {mu}m) infrared spectra of 23 H {sub n} -PAHs and related molecules isolated in argon matrices under conditions suitable for interpretation of astronomical data. Spectra of molecules with mixed aromatic and aliphatic domains show characteristics that distinguish them from fully aromatic PAH equivalents. Two major changes occur as PAHs become more hydrogenated: (1) aromatic C-H stretching bands near 3.3 {mu}m weaken and are replaced with stronger aliphatic bands near 3.4 {mu}m, and (2) aromatic C-H out-of-plane bending mode bands in the 11-15 {mu}m region shift and weaken concurrent with growth of a strong aliphatic -CH{sub 2}- deformation mode near 6.9 {mu}m. Implications for interpreting astronomical spectra are discussed with emphasis on the 3.4 and 6.9 {mu}m features. Laboratory data is compared with emission spectra from IRAS 21282+5050, an object with normal PAH emission features, and IRAS 22272+5435 and IRAS 0496+3429, two protoplanetary nebulae with abnormally large 3.4 {mu}m features. We show that 'normal' PAH emission objects contain relatively few H {sub n} -PAHs in their emitter populations, but less evolved protoplanetary nebulae may contain significant abundances of these molecules.

  9. Multi-Wavelength Views of Messier 81

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on individual images below for larger view

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The magnificent spiral arms of the nearby galaxy Messier 81 are highlighted in this image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Located in the northern constellation of Ursa Major (which also includes the Big Dipper), this galaxy is easily visible through binoculars or a small telescope. M81 is located at a distance of 12 million light-years.

    The main image is a composite mosaic obtained with the multiband imaging photometer for Spitzer and the infrared array camera. Thermal infrared emission at 24 microns detected by the photometer (red, bottom left inset) is combined with camera data at 8.0 microns (green, bottom center inset) and 3.6 microns (blue, bottom right inset).

    A visible-light image of Messier 81, obtained at Kitt Peak National Observatory, a ground-based telescope, is shown in the upper right inset. Both the visible-light picture and the 3.6-micron near-infrared image trace the distribution of stars, although the Spitzer image is virtually unaffected by obscuring dust. Both images reveal a very smooth stellar mass distribution, with the spiral arms relatively subdued.

    As one moves to longer wavelengths, the spiral arms become the dominant feature of the galaxy. The 8-micron emission is dominated by infrared light radiated by hot dust that has been heated by nearby luminous stars. Dust in the galaxy is bathed by ultraviolet and visible light from nearby stars. Upon absorbing an ultraviolet or visible-light photon, a dust grain is heated and re-emits the energy at longer infrared wavelengths. The dust particles are composed of silicates (chemically similar to beach sand), carbonaceous grains and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and

  10. Dynamic Sensor Interrogation Using Wavelength-Swept Laser with a Polygon-Scanner-Based Wavelength Filter

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong Seok; Ko, Myeong Ock; Jung, Mi Sun; Park, Ik Gon; Kim, Namje; Han, Sang-Pil; Ryu, Han-Cheol; Park, Kyung Hyun; Jeon, Min Yong

    2013-01-01

    We report a high-speed (∼2 kHz) dynamic multiplexed fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor interrogation using a wavelength-swept laser (WSL) with a polygon-scanner-based wavelength filter. The scanning frequency of the WSL is 18 kHz, and the 10 dB scanning bandwidth is more than 90 nm around a center wavelength of 1,540 nm. The output from the WSL is coupled into the multiplexed FBG array, which consists of five FBGs. The reflected Bragg wavelengths of the FBGs are 1,532.02 nm, 1,537.84 nm, 1,543.48 nm, 1,547.98 nm, and 1,553.06 nm, respectively. A dynamic periodic strain ranging from 500 Hz to 2 kHz is applied to one of the multiplexed FBGs, which is fixed on the stage of the piezoelectric transducer stack. Good dynamic performance of the FBGs and recording of their fast Fourier transform spectra have been successfully achieved with a measuring speed of 18 kHz. The signal-to-noise ratio and the bandwidth over the whole frequency span are determined to be more than 30 dB and around 10 Hz, respectively. We successfully obtained a real-time measurement of the abrupt change of the periodic strain. The dynamic FBG sensor interrogation system can be read out with a WSL for high-speed and high-sensitivity real-time measurement. PMID:23899934

  11. INTERSTELLAR EXTINCTION LAW TOWARD THE GALACTIC CENTER III: J, H, K{sub S} BANDS IN THE 2MASS AND THE MKO SYSTEMS, AND 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0 {mu}m IN THE SPITZER/IRAC SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Shogo; Nagata, Tetsuya; Tamura, Motohide; Hatano, Hirofumi; Kato, Daisuke; Tanabe, Toshihiko; Sugitani, Koji

    2009-05-10

    We have determined interstellar extinction law toward the Galactic center (GC) at the wavelength from 1.2 to 8.0 {mu}m, using point sources detected in the IRSF/SIRIUS near-infrared (NIR) survey and those in the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) and Spitzer/IRAC/GLIMPSE II catalogs. The central region |l | {approx}<3.{sup 0}0 and |b | {approx}<1.{sup 0}0 has been surveyed in the J, H, and K{sub S} bands with the IRSF telescope and the SIRIUS camera whose filters are similar to the Mauna Kea Observatories (MKO) NIR photometric system. Combined with the GLIMPSE II point source catalog, we made K{sub S} versus K{sub S} - {lambda} color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) where {lambda}=3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {mu}m. The K{sub S} magnitudes of bulge red clump stars and the K{sub S} - {lambda} colors of red giant branches are used as a tracer of the reddening vector in the CMDs. From these magnitudes and colors, we have obtained the ratios of total-to-selective extinction A{sub K{sub S}}/E{sub K{sub S}}{sub -{lambda}} for the four IRAC bands. Combined with A{sub {lambda}}/A{sub K{sub S}} for the J and H bands derived by Nishiyama et al., we obtain A{sub J} :A{sub H} :A{sub K{sub S}}:A {sub [3.6]}:A {sub [4.5]}:A {sub [5.8]}:A {sub [8.0]} = 3.02:1.73:1:0.50:0.39:0.36:0.43 for the line of sight toward the GC. This confirms the flattening of the extinction curve at {lambda} {approx}> 3 {mu}m from a simple extrapolation of the power-law extinction at shorter wavelengths, in accordance with recent studies. The extinction law in the 2MASS J, H, and K{sub S} bands has also been calculated, and good agreement with that in the MKO system is found. Thus, it is established that the extinction in the wavelength range of J, H, and K{sub S} is well fitted by a power law of steep decrease A {sub {lambda}} {proportional_to} {lambda}{sup -2.0} toward the GC. In nearby molecular clouds and diffuse interstellar medium, the lack of reliable measurements of the total-to-selective extinction ratios

  12. Spin and wavelength multiplexed nonlinear metasurface holography

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Weimin; Zeuner, Franziska; Li, Xin; Reineke, Bernhard; He, Shan; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Liu, Juan; Wang, Yongtian; Zhang, Shuang; Zentgraf, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Metasurfaces, as the ultrathin version of metamaterials, have caught growing attention due to their superior capability in controlling the phase, amplitude and polarization states of light. Among various types of metasurfaces, geometric metasurface that encodes a geometric or Pancharatnam–Berry phase into the orientation angle of the constituent meta-atoms has shown great potential in controlling light in both linear and nonlinear optical regimes. The robust and dispersionless nature of the geometric phase simplifies the wave manipulation tremendously. Benefitting from the continuous phase control, metasurface holography has exhibited advantages over conventional depth controlled holography with discretized phase levels. Here we report on spin and wavelength multiplexed nonlinear metasurface holography, which allows construction of multiple target holographic images carried independently by the fundamental and harmonic generation waves of different spins. The nonlinear holograms provide independent, nondispersive and crosstalk-free post-selective channels for holographic multiplexing and multidimensional optical data storages, anti-counterfeiting, and optical encryption. PMID:27306147

  13. Wavelength-shifter Readout of Scintillation Counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauletta, Giovanni

    1998-04-01

    A compact system for reading out the scintillation counters of the CDF muon upgrade has been developed and tested. The system relies on wavelength-shifter (wls) fiber ribbon, glued to the side of 1.5 to 2 cm - thick counters, to collect and transfer the light from the scintillator to a small(Hamamatsu R5600) phototube, embedded in one corner of the counter. Prototype counters were constructed from polystyrene-based scintillator(Manufactured by Monocristal Institute at Kharkov under Dubna supervision.) using y11 - doped wls fibers(Manufactured by Kuraray.) for readout. Their response to cosmic ray muons was measured and found to be adequate for up to more than 3 m when the light collection was enhanced by mirroring the wls fiber ends furthest from the photomultiplier.

  14. Frequency multipliers for millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raisanen, Antti V.

    1992-01-01

    All-solid-state local oscillators in the terahertz frequency range are especially needed for space-borne radio astronomy and remote sensing of the atmosphere. Because solid-state oscillators cannot yet produce the necessary local oscillator power at submillimeter wavelengths, frequency multipliers are needed. So far, submillimeter-wave frequency multipliers are mainly based on a whisker-contacted Schottky diode as the nonlinear element. This paper discusses the multiplier theory and tools for analysis and design of millimeter- and submillimeter-wave multipliers. Experimental work is reviewed. The Schottky diode model at submillimeter frequencies, use of Schottky multiplier chains versus direct higher-order multipliers, and the effect of cooling on Schottky diode multipliers are discussed. Alternative diodes such as the high electron mobility varactor, the barrier-intrinsic n(+) diode, the barrier-n-n(+) diode, the quantum well diode, and the single barrier varactor are discussed, with attention also given to their potential as submillimeter frequency multipliers.

  15. Innovative Long Wavelength Infrared Detector Workshop Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, Frank J.

    1990-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on innovative long wavelength (lambda less than 17 microns) infrared (LWIR) detectors with the potential of meeting future NASA and DoD long-duration space application needs. Requirements are for focal plane arrays which operate near 65K using active refrigeration with mission lifetimes of five to ten years. The workshop addressed innovative concepts, new material systems, novel device physics, and current progress in relation to benchmark technology. It also provided a forum for discussion of performance characterization, producibility, reliability, and fundamental limitations of device physics. It covered the status of the incumbent HgCdTe technology, which shows encouraging progress towards LWIR arrays, and provided a snapshot of research and development in several new contender technologies.

  16. Spin and wavelength multiplexed nonlinear metasurface holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Weimin; Zeuner, Franziska; Li, Xin; Reineke, Bernhard; He, Shan; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Liu, Juan; Wang, Yongtian; Zhang, Shuang; Zentgraf, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Metasurfaces, as the ultrathin version of metamaterials, have caught growing attention due to their superior capability in controlling the phase, amplitude and polarization states of light. Among various types of metasurfaces, geometric metasurface that encodes a geometric or Pancharatnam-Berry phase into the orientation angle of the constituent meta-atoms has shown great potential in controlling light in both linear and nonlinear optical regimes. The robust and dispersionless nature of the geometric phase simplifies the wave manipulation tremendously. Benefitting from the continuous phase control, metasurface holography has exhibited advantages over conventional depth controlled holography with discretized phase levels. Here we report on spin and wavelength multiplexed nonlinear metasurface holography, which allows construction of multiple target holographic images carried independently by the fundamental and harmonic generation waves of different spins. The nonlinear holograms provide independent, nondispersive and crosstalk-free post-selective channels for holographic multiplexing and multidimensional optical data storages, anti-counterfeiting, and optical encryption.

  17. Spin and wavelength multiplexed nonlinear metasurface holography.

    PubMed

    Ye, Weimin; Zeuner, Franziska; Li, Xin; Reineke, Bernhard; He, Shan; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Liu, Juan; Wang, Yongtian; Zhang, Shuang; Zentgraf, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Metasurfaces, as the ultrathin version of metamaterials, have caught growing attention due to their superior capability in controlling the phase, amplitude and polarization states of light. Among various types of metasurfaces, geometric metasurface that encodes a geometric or Pancharatnam-Berry phase into the orientation angle of the constituent meta-atoms has shown great potential in controlling light in both linear and nonlinear optical regimes. The robust and dispersionless nature of the geometric phase simplifies the wave manipulation tremendously. Benefitting from the continuous phase control, metasurface holography has exhibited advantages over conventional depth controlled holography with discretized phase levels. Here we report on spin and wavelength multiplexed nonlinear metasurface holography, which allows construction of multiple target holographic images carried independently by the fundamental and harmonic generation waves of different spins. The nonlinear holograms provide independent, nondispersive and crosstalk-free post-selective channels for holographic multiplexing and multidimensional optical data storages, anti-counterfeiting, and optical encryption. PMID:27306147

  18. Achromatic Metasurface Lens at Telecommunication Wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Khorasaninejad, Mohammadreza; Aieta, Francesco; Kanhaiya, Pritpal; Kats, Mikhail A; Genevet, Patrice; Rousso, David; Capasso, Federico

    2015-08-12

    Nanoscale optical resonators enable a new class of flat optical components called metasurfaces. This approach has been used to demonstrate functionalities such as focusing free of monochromatic aberrations (i.e., spherical and coma), anomalous reflection, and large circular dichroism. Recently, dielectric metasurfaces that compensate the phase dispersion responsible for chromatic aberrations have been demonstrated. Here, we utilize an aperiodic array of coupled dielectric nanoresonators to demonstrate a multiwavelength achromatic lens. The focal length remains unchanged for three wavelengths in the near-infrared region (1300, 1550, and 1800 nm). Experimental results are in agreement with full-wave simulations. Our findings are an essential step toward a realization of broadband flat optical elements. PMID:26168329

  19. Short wavelength infrared hybrid focal plane arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vural, K.; Blackwell, J. D.; Marin, E. C.; Edwall, D. D.; Rode, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    The employment of area focal plane arrays (FPA) has made it possible to obtain second generation infrared imaging systems with high resolution and sensitivity. The Short Wavelength Infrared (SWIR) region (1-2.5 microns) is of importance for imaging objects at high temperature and under conditions of reflected sunlight. The present investigation is concerned with electrooptical characterization results for 32 x 32 SWIR detector arrays and FPAs which are suitable for use in a prototype imaging spectrometer. The employed detector material is Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te grown by liquid phase epitaxy on a CdTe transparent substrate. Attention is given to details of processing, the design of the detector array, the multiplexer, the fabrication of the hybrid FPA, and aspects of performance.

  20. Use of layer strains in strained-layer superlattices to make devices for operation in new wavelength ranges, E. G. , InAsSb at 8 to 12. mu. m. [InAs/sub 1-x/Sb/sub x/

    DOEpatents

    Osbourn, G.C.

    1983-10-06

    An intrinsic semiconductor electro-optical device comprises a p-n junction intrinsically responsive, when cooled, to electromagnetic radiation in the wavelength range of 8 to 12 ..mu..m. This radiation responsive p-n junction comprises a strained-layer superlattice (SLS) of alternating layers of two different III-V semiconductors. The lattice constants of the two semiconductors are mismatched, whereby a total strain is imposed on each pair of alternating semiconductor layers in the SLS structure, the proportion of the total strain which acts on each layer of the pair being proportional to the ratio of the layer thicknesses of each layer in the pair.

  1. Photoluminescence Study of Long Wavelength Superlattice Infrared Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoglund, Linda; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Soibel, Alexander; Ting, David Z.; Hill, Cory J.; Keo, Sam; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the relation between the photoluminescence (PL) intensity and the PL peak wavelength was studied. A linear decrease of the PL intensity with increasing cut-off wavelength of long wavelength infrared CBIRDs was observed at 77 K and the trend remained unchanged in the temperature range 10 - 77 K. This relation between the PL intensity and the peak wavelength can be favorably used for comparison of the optical quality of samples with different PL peak wavelengths. A strong increase of the width of the PL spectrum in the studied temperature interval was observed, which was attributed to thermal broadening.

  2. Tunable optical tweezers for wavelength-dependent measurements

    PubMed Central

    Hester, Brooke; Campbell, Gretchen K.; López-Mariscal, Carlos; Filgueira, Carly Levin; Huschka, Ryan; Halas, Naomi J.; Helmerson, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    Optical trapping forces depend on the difference between the trap wavelength and the extinction resonances of trapped particles. This leads to a wavelength-dependent trapping force, which should allow for the optimization of optical tweezers systems, simply by choosing the best trapping wavelength for a given application. Here we present an optical tweezer system with wavelength tunability, for the study of resonance effects. With this system, the optical trap stiffness is measured for single trapped particles that exhibit either single or multiple extinction resonances. We include discussions of wavelength-dependent effects, such as changes in temperature, and how to measure them. PMID:22559522

  3. The effect of track structure on cell inactivation and chromosome damage at a constant let of 120 keV/mum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, E. H.; Bailey, S. M.; Chen, D. J.; Cornforth, M. N.

    The influence of track structure on chromosome damage and cell inactivation are being investigated. Plateau-phase normal human fibroblast cultures were irradiated with gamma rays, and He, Ne and Ar ions. Particle velocities were chosen so that all beams had an LET of 120 keV/mum. In this constant-LET experimental design, the radial distribution of excitations and ionizations about the particle track is the most significant variable. Using premature chromosome condensation, chromatin breaks were measured at two time points, promptly after irradiation and after a prolonged incubation to allow for repair. These measurements give an indication of both initial chromosomal damage and also residual damage that is either not repaired or is misrepaired. Survival was measured under the same conditions. Results indicate that the RBEs for both cell inactivation and, to a lesser extent, chromosome damage decrease as particle energy increases.

  4. The 1.54-{mu}m photoluminescence from an (Er, Ge) co-doped SiO{sub 2} film deposited on Si by rf magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Heng, C.L.; Finstad, T.G.; Storaas, P.; Li, Y.J.; Gunnaes, A.E.; Nilsen, O.

    2004-11-08

    In this work, we report on quite strong 1.54-{mu}m photoluminescence (PL) from an (Er, Ge) co-doped SiO{sub 2} film deposited by rf magnetron sputtering. The PL intensity reaches a maximum value after the film is annealed at 700 deg. C for 30 min in N{sub 2}. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy observation, together with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis, indicates that amorphous Ge-rich nanoclusters precipitate in the film after 700 deg. C annealing. X-ray diffraction shows the presence of Ge nanocrystals after 900 deg. C annealing, and increasing Ge nanocrystal size with increasing annealing temperature up to 1100 deg. C. The results suggest that the amorphous Ge-rich nanoclusters are more effective than Ge nanocrystals in exciting the Er{sup 3+} PL.

  5. Broadening and shifting of the methanol 119 {mu}m gain line of linear and circular polarization by collision with chiral molecules

    SciTech Connect

    J.S. Bakos; G. Djotyan; Zsuzsa Soerlei; J. Szigeti; D. K. Mansfield; J. Sarkozi

    2000-06-21

    Evidence of circular dichroism has been observed in the spectral properties of a gas of left-right symmetric molecules. This dichroism comes about as the result of collisions of the symmetric molecules with left-right asymmetric molecules introduced as a buffer gas. In this sense, the dichroism can be said to have been transferred from the chiral buffer molecules to the symmetric, non-chiral molecules of the background vapor. This transferred dichroism appears as broadening in the gain line of the symmetric molecule which is asymmetric with respect to the right or left handedness of a circularly polarized probe. The broadening of the 119 {mu}m line of the methanol molecule was observed using infrared-far infrared double resonance spectroscopy.

  6. Pulsed laser operating on the first overtone of the CO molecule in the 2.5-4.2-{mu}m range. II. Frequency-selective lasing

    SciTech Connect

    Basov, N G; Ionin, Andrei A; Kotkov, A A; Seleznev, L V; Kurnosov, A K; Napartovich, A P; Turkin, N G; McCord, J E; Hager, G D

    2000-10-31

    Lasing properties of a pulsed electroionisation CO laser operating on the first overtone of the CO molecule in the frequency-selective regime were studied experimentally and theoretically. Lasing was observed on a large number of separate vibrational-rotational transitions {nu}+2{yields}{nu} from 13{yields}11 to 38{yields}36 (more than 400 spectral lines) in the spectral range from 2.7 to 4.2 {mu}m. The specific output energy of the overtone CO laser reached {approx}3.0 J l{sup -1} amagat{sup -1}, and the electrooptical conversion was {approx}0.6 %. The formation of emission spectra from high vibrational levels in the overtone CO laser observed for the first time is discussed. The comparison of experimental and theoretical data showed the necessity of including the multiquantum exchange on high vibrational levels into the kinetic model of the active medium of the CO laser. (lasers)

  7. Compositional dependence of the 1.8 {mu}m emission properties of Tm{sup 3+} ions in silicate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xin; Fan Sijun; Li Kefeng; Zhang Lei; Wang Shikai; Hu Lili

    2012-11-15

    The compositional dependence of the 1.8 {mu}m emission properties of Tm{sup 3+} ion-doped lead silicate glasses is investigated. Judd-Ofelt parameters are calculated and their variation with different glass modifier ions is obtained. The Judd-Ofelt parameters increase with decreased modifier ionic radius. A large spontaneous emission probability and a large emission cross-section are found to be related with the strength of the modifier ion. Fluorescence spectra are analyzed using rate equations and compared with recorded data. The results are very close, indicating the reliability of this method. Non-radiative probability is deduced by fitting the fluorescence decay curve; it becomes smaller with increased ionic field strength. Energy transfer processes are studied using the extended overlap integral method.

  8. Structural, magnetic, and mechanical properties of 5 {mu}m thick SmCo films suitable for use in microelectromechanical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Walther, A.; Givord, D.; Dempsey, N. M.; Khlopkov, K.; Gutfleisch, O.

    2008-02-15

    5 {mu}m thick SmCo films were deposited onto Si substrates using triode sputtering. A study of the influence of deposition temperature (T{sub dep}{<=}600 deg. C) on the structural, magnetic, and mechanical properties has shown that optimum properties [highest degree of in-plane texture, maximum in-plane coercivity and remanence (1.3 and 0.8 T, respectively), and no film peel-off] are achieved for films deposited at the relatively low temperature of 350 deg. C. This temperature is compatible with film integration into microelectromechanical systems. The deposition rate was increased from 3.6 to 18 {mu}m/h by increasing the surface area of the target from 7 to 81 cm{sup 2} while keeping the target potential fixed. Mechanically intact films could be prepared by deposition onto prepatterned films or deposition through a mask.

  9. Application of Thomson Scattering System at 1.06 {mu}m for Study of Plasma Density Dynamics at Multimirror Trap GOL-3

    SciTech Connect

    Polosatkin, S.V.; Burdakov, A.V.; Ivantsivsky, M.V.; Koidan, V.S.; Semionov, A.F.; Rovenskikh, V.V

    2005-01-15

    Thomson scattering system for measurements of radial profile of plasma density (range 0.5-5x10{sup 21} m{sup -3}) with temperature up to 2 keV was developed at the GOL-3 facility. First harmonics ({lambda}=1.06 {mu}m) of Nd glass laser is used. Scattered light from different points of plasma cross-section is imaged to a set of quartz optical fibers and detected by avalanche photodiodes.During the first 10 {mu}s after start of the relativistic electron beam injection the intense light emission from plasma is observed. Single powerful laser pulse is used for providing of good signal-noise ratio in this period. Later the plasma radiation intensity decreases and the less powerful laser oscillator operated in multiple-pulsed regime is used.Description of the diagnostics, methodical aspects of operation, and results of the density dynamics measurements are presented in the paper.

  10. Fission-fragment excited xenon/rare gas mixtures. II. Small signal gain of the 2. 03 [mu]m xenon transition

    SciTech Connect

    Hebner, G.A.; Hays, G.N. )

    1993-04-15

    The results of small signal gain measurements of the 2.03 [mu]m (5[ital d][3/2][sub 1][minus]6[ital p][3/2][sub 1]) xenon transition in fission-fragment excited Ar/Xe, He/Ar/Xe, Ne/Ar/Xe, and He/Ne/Ar/Xe gas mixtures is presented. Time resolved small signal gain was probed using a cw He/Xe discharge laser as a function of total pressure, xenon concentration, pump power, He/Ne/Ar buffer ratio, and impurity concentration. Small signal gains of up to 6%/cm were observed for pump rates of 15 W/cm[sup 3]. Addition of helium and/or neon to the argon buffer increased the width of the laser gain and reduced the absorption observed under some experimental conditions. Experimentally determined gain scaling laws for several gas mixtures are presented.

  11. Progress in extended wavelength VCSEL technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Klein; Dummer, Matthew; Hibbs-Brenner, Mary; Hogan, William; Steidl, Charles

    2013-03-01

    Vixar has been developing VCSELs at both shorter (680nm) and longer (1850nm) wavelengths. This paper reports on advances in technology at both of these wavelengths. 680nm VCSELs based upon the AlGaAs/AlGaInP materials system were designed and fabricated for high speed operation for plastic optical fiber (POF) based links for industrial, automotive and consumer applications. High speed testing was performed in a "back-to-back" configuration over short lengths of glass fiber, over 42 meters of POF, with and without I.C. drivers and preamps, and over temperature. Performance to 90°C, 10 Gbps and over 40 meters of plastic optical fiber has been demonstrated. Reliability testing has been performed over a range of temperatures and currents. Preliminary results predict a TT1% failure of at least 240,000 hours at 40°C and an average current modulation of 4mA. In addition, the VCSELs survive 1000 hours at 85% humidity 85°C in a non-hermetic package. 1850nm InP based VCSELs are being developed for optical neurostimulation. The goals are to optimize the output power and power conversion efficiency. 7mW of DC output power has been demonstrated at room temperature, as well as a power conversion efficiency of 12%. Devices operate to 85°C. Over 70mW of pulsed power has been achieved from a 35 VCSEL array, with a pulse width of 10μsec.

  12. Wavelength Prograimable Spectrophotometer For Individual Plant Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brach, E. J.; Simmonds, J.; Poirier, P.

    1983-11-01

    Action spectra for a number of light-mediated physiological processes, (e.g. germination, flowering, elongation) indicated that the effective wavelength for induction was between 600-700 nm and for supression was between 700-760 nm, with maxima at 660 nm and 730 nm respectively (see Smith 1975 for review). These studies predicted the existence of the photoreversible pigment phytochrome (P) existing in two forms, interconvertible by red and far-red light. The photo-equilibrium of the red absorbing (Pr) and far-red absorbing (Pfr) forms is determined by the proportions of red and far-red light available. Most of the infornation cooes from studies on dark grown plants using narrow band or uonochromatic light and until recently very little work has been done on the role of phytochrome in the natural environment. Because changes in the distribution of this physiologically active light in nature will result in an altered photo-equilibrium of the two forms of phytochrome, a new quantity c (zeta) was defined, as the ratio of the quantum flux at 660 ni to the quantum flux at 730 nm (Holmes and McCartney 1976, Monteith 1976). This relationship of zeta to the photochrome photoequilibrium (% Pfr) was determined for a series of natural and artificial light sources (Smith and Holmes 1977). owever, radiation of shorter wavelengths also has an infuence on plant development through its action on phytochrome (Parker et al 1946, Bertsch 1963). The absorption spectra of the two forms of phytochrome show, in addition to the vajor absorption bands in the red and far-red regions, minor bands in the blue and near uv (Hendricks 1962, Siegelman and Fuer 1964). Also photochrome does undergo light-induced absorbance changes 'in vitro' in the blue region of the spectrum (Everett and Briggs 1970). A more accurate estimate of photochrome photoequilibria would

  13. Short-wavelength ablation of solids: pulse duration and wavelength effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juha, Libor; Bittner, Michal; Chvostova, Dagmar; Letal, Vit; Krasa, Josef; Otcenasek, Zdenek; Kozlova, Michaela; Polan, Jiri; Prag, Ansgar R.; Rus, Bedrich; Stupka, Michal; Krzywinski, Jacek; Andrejczuk, Andrzej; Pelka, Jerzy B.; Sobierajski, Ryszard H.; Ryc, Leszek; Feldhaus, Josef; Boody, Frederick P.; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Bartnik, Andrzej; Mikolajczyk, Janusz; Rakowski, Rafal; Kubat, P.; Pina, Ladislav; Grisham, Michael E.; Vaschenko, Georgiy O.; Menoni, Carmen S.; Rocca, Jorge J. G.

    2004-11-01

    For conventional wavelength (UV-Vis-IR) lasers delivering radiation energy to the surface of materials, ablation thresholds, ablation (etch) rates, and the quality of ablated structures often differ dramatically between short (typically nanosecond) and ultrashort (typically femtosecond) pulses. Various short-wavelength (l < 100 nm) lasers emitting pulses with durations ranging from ~ 10 fs to ~ 1 ns have recently been put into a routine operation. This makes it possible to investigate how the ablation characteristics depend on the pulse duration in the XUV spectral region. 1.2-ns pulses of 46.9-nm radiation delivered from a capillary-discharge Ne-like Ar laser (Colorado State University, Fort Collins), focused by a spherical Sc/Si multilayer-coated mirror were used for an ablation of organic polymers and silicon. Various materials were irradiated with ellipsoidal-mirror-focused XUV radiation (λ = 86 nm, τ = 30-100 fs) generated by the free-electron laser (FEL) operated at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF1 FEL) in Hamburg. The beam of the Ne-like Zn XUV laser (λ = 21.2 nm, τ < 100 ps) driven by the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS) was also successfully focused by a spherical Si/Mo multilayer-coated mirror to ablate various materials. Based on the results of the experiments, the etch rates for three different pulse durations are compared using the XUV-ABLATOR code to compensate for the wavelength difference. Comparing the values of etch rates calculated for short pulses with those measured for ultrashort pulses, we can study the influence of pulse duration on XUV ablation efficiency. Ablation efficiencies measured with short pulses at various wavelengths (i.e. 86/46.9/21.2 nm from the above-mentioned lasers and ~ 1 nm from the double stream gas-puff Xe plasma source driven by PALS) show that the wavelength influences the etch rate mainly through the different attenuation lengths.

  14. THE 1.6 {mu}m NEAR-INFRARED NUCLEI OF 3C RADIO GALAXIES: JETS, THERMAL EMISSION, OR SCATTERED LIGHT?

    SciTech Connect

    Baldi, Ranieri D.; Chiaberge, Marco; Sparks, William; Macchetto, F. Duccio; Capetti, Alessandro; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Axon, David J.; Baum, Stefi A.; Quillen, Alice C.

    2010-12-20

    Using HST NICMOS 2 observations we have measured 1.6 {mu}m near-infrared nuclear luminosities of 100 3CR radio galaxies with z < 0.3, by modeling and subtracting the extended emission from the host galaxy. We performed a multiwavelength statistical analysis (including optical and radio data) of the properties of the nuclei following classification of the objects into FR I and FR II, and low-ionization galaxies (LIGs), high-ionization galaxies (HIGs), and broad-line objects (BLOs) using the radio morphology and optical spectra, respectively. The correlations among near-infrared, optical, and radio nuclear luminosity support the idea that the near-infrared nuclear emission of FR Is has a non-thermal origin. Despite the difference in radio morphology, the multiwavelength properties of FR II LIG nuclei are statistically indistinguishable from those of FR Is, an indication of a common structure of the central engine. All BLOs show an unresolved near-infrared nucleus and a large near-infrared excess with respect to FR II LIGs and FR Is of equal radio core luminosity. This requires the presence of an additional (and dominant) component other than the non-thermal light. Considering the shape of their spectral energy distribution, we ascribe the origin of their near-infrared light to hot circumnuclear dust. A near-infrared excess is also found in HIGs, but their nuclei are substantially fainter than those of BLO. This result indicates that substantial obscuration along the line of sight to the nuclei is still present at 1.6 {mu}m. Nonetheless, HIG nuclei cannot simply be explained in terms of dust obscuration: a significant contribution from light reflected in a circumnuclear scattering region is needed to account for their multiwavelength properties.

  15. Geometrical measurement of cardiac wavelength in reaction-diffusion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupraz, Marie; Jacquemet, Vincent

    2014-09-01

    The dynamics of reentrant arrhythmias often consists in multiple wavelets propagating throughout an excitable medium. An arrhythmia can be sustained only if these reentrant waves have a sufficiently short wavelength defined as the distance traveled by the excitation wave during its refractory period. In a uniform medium, wavelength may be estimated as the product of propagation velocity and refractory period (electrophysiological wavelength). In order to accurately measure wavelength in more general substrates relevant to atrial arrhythmias (heterogeneous and anisotropic), we developed a mathematical framework to define geometrical wavelength at each time instant based on the length of streamlines following the propagation velocity field within refractory regions. Two computational methods were implemented: a Lagrangian approach in which a set of streamlines were integrated, and an Eulerian approach in which wavelength was the solution of a partial differential equation. These methods were compared in 1D/2D tissues and in a model of the left atrium. An advantage of geometrical definition of wavelength is that the wavelength of a wavelet can be tracked over time with high temporal resolution and smaller temporal variability in an anisotropic and heterogeneous medium. The results showed that the average electrophysiological wavelength was consistent with geometrical measurements of wavelength. Wavelets were however often shorter than the electrophysiological wavelength due to interactions with boundaries and other wavelets. These tools may help to assess more accurately the relation between substrate properties and wavelet dynamics in computer models.

  16. Geometrical measurement of cardiac wavelength in reaction-diffusion models.

    PubMed

    Dupraz, Marie; Jacquemet, Vincent

    2014-09-01

    The dynamics of reentrant arrhythmias often consists in multiple wavelets propagating throughout an excitable medium. An arrhythmia can be sustained only if these reentrant waves have a sufficiently short wavelength defined as the distance traveled by the excitation wave during its refractory period. In a uniform medium, wavelength may be estimated as the product of propagation velocity and refractory period (electrophysiological wavelength). In order to accurately measure wavelength in more general substrates relevant to atrial arrhythmias (heterogeneous and anisotropic), we developed a mathematical framework to define geometrical wavelength at each time instant based on the length of streamlines following the propagation velocity field within refractory regions. Two computational methods were implemented: a Lagrangian approach in which a set of streamlines were integrated, and an Eulerian approach in which wavelength was the solution of a partial differential equation. These methods were compared in 1D/2D tissues and in a model of the left atrium. An advantage of geometrical definition of wavelength is that the wavelength of a wavelet can be tracked over time with high temporal resolution and smaller temporal variability in an anisotropic and heterogeneous medium. The results showed that the average electrophysiological wavelength was consistent with geometrical measurements of wavelength. Wavelets were however often shorter than the electrophysiological wavelength due to interactions with boundaries and other wavelets. These tools may help to assess more accurately the relation between substrate properties and wavelet dynamics in computer models. PMID:25273213

  17. Transversal wavelength-independent microradiography, a method for monitoring caries lesions over time, validated with transversal microradiography.

    PubMed

    Thomas, R Z; Ruben, J L; de Vries, J; ten Bosch, J J; Huysmans, M C D N J M

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a microradiographic method for measuring mineral concentration in a transversal geometry with thick (< or =3.2 mm) sections: transversal wavelength-independent microradiography (T-WIM). It was tested on bovine enamel and dentin samples in vitro, and the results were validated with those of transversal microradiography (TMR). 48 enamel and 48 dentin samples (3.2 x 3.2 x 1.5 mm) were embedded in acrylic resin, randomly divided into six groups of 8 dentin or 8 enamel samples, and demineralized for 0 (sound control), 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 weeks. For T-WIM, samples were imaged on film with polychromatic 40-kV Cu X-rays with an Al (0.25 mm)/Ni (0.02 mm) filter together with an aluminium/zinc step wedge. TMR slices (about 80 mum for enamel and about 130 mum for dentine) were subsequently cut from the centre of the samples and subjected to TMR. Microradiographs from both methods were digitized and image analysis software was used to calculate lesion depth and mineral loss. The relations between T-WIM and TMR results for mineral loss (DeltaZ) and lesion depth were nearly linear (r > or = 0.96) for both enamel and dentin. The slopes of the regression lines were between 0.99 and 1.02 except for DeltaZ in dentine, which was 0.89. It was concluded that T-WIM is a suitable method for TMR on thick samples. PMID:16741358

  18. A rapid, dispersion-based wavelength-stepped and wavelength-swept laser for optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Tozburun, Serhat; Siddiqui, Meena; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Optical-domain subsampling enables Fourier-domain OCT imaging at high-speeds and extended depth ranges while limiting the required acquisition bandwidth. To perform optical-domain subsampling, a wavelength-stepped rather than a wavelength-swept source is required. This preliminary study introduces a novel design for a rapid wavelength-stepped laser source that uses dispersive fibers in combination with a fast lithium-niobate modulator to achieve wavelength selection. A laser with 200 GHz wavelength-stepping and a sweep rate of 9 MHz over a 94 nm range at a center wavelength of 1550 nm is demonstrated. A reconfiguration of this source design to a continuous wavelength-swept light for conventional Fourier-domain OCT is also demonstrated. PMID:24663631

  19. Four-wavelength retinal vessel oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewes, Jonathan Jensen

    1999-11-01

    This dissertation documents the design and construction of a four-wavelength retinal vessel oximeter, the Eye Oximeter (EOX). The EOX scans low-powered laser beams (at 629, 678, 821 and 899 nm) into the eye and across a targeted retinal vessel to measure the transmittance of the blood within the vessel. From the transmittance measurements, the oxygen saturation of the blood within the vessel is computed. Retinal vessel oxygen saturation has been suggested as a useful parameter for monitoring a wide range of conditions including occult blood loss and a variety of ophthalmic diseases. An artificial eye that simulates the geometry of a human retinal vessel was constructed and used to calibrate the EOX saturation measurement. A number of different oximetry equations were developed and tested. From measurements made on whole human blood in the artificial eye, an oximetry equation that places a linear wavelength dependance on the scattering losses (3% decrease from 629 to 899 nm) is found to best calibrate the EOX oxygen saturation measurement. This calibration also requires that an adjustment be made to the absorption coefficient of hemoglobin at 629 nm that has been reported in the literature. More than 4,000 measurements were made in the eyes of three human subjects during the development of the EOX. Applying the oximetry equation developed through the in vitro experiments to human data, the average human retinal venous oxygen saturation is estimated to be 0.63 +/- 0.07 and the average human retinal arterial oxygen saturation is 0.99 +/- 0.03. Furthermore, measurements made away from the optic disk resulted in a larger variance in the calculated saturation when compared to measurements made on the optic disk. A series of EOX experiments using anesthetized swine helped to verify the sensitivity of the EOX measurement of oxygen saturation. It is found that the calibration in swine differed from the calibration in the artificial eye. An empirical calibration from the

  20. Dual-wavelength diode laser with electrically adjustable wavelength distance at 785  nm.

    PubMed

    Sumpf, Bernd; Kabitzke, Julia; Fricke, Jörg; Ressel, Peter; Müller, André; Maiwald, Martin; Tränkle, Günther

    2016-08-15

    A spectrally adjustable monolithic dual-wavelength diode laser at 785 nm as an excitation light source for shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) is presented. The spectral distance between the two excitation wavelengths can be electrically adjusted between 0 and 2.0 nm using implemented heater elements above the distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) gratings. Output powers up to 180 mW at a temperature of 25°C were measured. The spectral width is smaller than 13 pm, limited by the spectrum analyzer. The device is well-suited for Raman spectroscopy, and the flexible spectral distance allows a target-specific adjustment of the excitation light source for shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS). PMID:27519065

  1. Composite multiple wavelength laser material and multiple wavelength laser for use therewith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jani, Mahendra G. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A composite multiple wavelength laser material is provided and is typically constructed with a common axis of construction in the form of a rod of uniform cross-section. The rod comprises a plurality of segments of laser material bonded, e.g., diffusion bonded, to one another along the common axis. Each segment lases at a unique wavelength when excited to produce a laser emission. The segments can be made from a birefringent material doped with laser active ions. If the same birefringent host material is used for all segments, ground-state absorption losses can be reduced by terminating either end of the rod with end segments made from undoped pieces of the birefringent material.

  2. A new algorithm for optimizing the wavelength coverage for spectroscopic studies: Spectral Wavelength Optimization Code (SWOC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruchti, G. R.; Feltzing, S.; Lind, K.; Caffau, E.; Korn, A. J.; Schnurr, O.; Hansen, C. J.; Koch, A.; Sbordone, L.; de Jong, R. S.

    2016-09-01

    The past decade and a half has seen the design and execution of several ground-based spectroscopic surveys, both Galactic and Extragalactic. Additionally, new surveys are being designed that extend the boundaries of current surveys. In this context, many important considerations must be done when designing a spectrograph for the future. Among these is the determination of the optimum wavelength coverage. In this work, we present a new code for determining the wavelength ranges that provide the optimal amount of information to achieve the required science goals for a given survey. In its first mode, it utilizes a user-defined list of spectral features to compute a figure-of-merit for different spectral configurations. The second mode utilizes a set of flux-calibrated spectra, determining the spectral regions that show the largest differences among the spectra. Our algorithm is easily adaptable for any set of science requirements and any spectrograph design. We apply the algorithm to several examples, including 4MOST, showing the method yields important design constraints to the wavelength regions.

  3. A new algorithm for optimizing the wavelength coverage for spectroscopic studies: Spectral Wavelength Optimization Code (SWOC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruchti, G. R.; Feltzing, S.; Lind, K.; Caffau, E.; Korn, A. J.; Schnurr, O.; Hansen, C. J.; Koch, A.; Sbordone, L.; de Jong, R. S.

    2016-06-01

    The past decade and a half has seen the design and execution of several ground-based spectroscopic surveys, both Galactic and Extra-galactic. Additionally, new surveys are being designed that extend the boundaries of current surveys. In this context, many important considerations must be done when designing a spectrograph for the future. Among these is the determination of the optimum wavelength coverage. In this work, we present a new code for determining the wavelength ranges that provide the optimal amount of information to achieve the required science goals for a given survey. In its first mode, it utilizes a user-defined list of spectral features to compute a figure-of-merit for different spectral configurations. The second mode utilizes a set of flux-calibrated spectra, determining the spectral regions that show the largest differences among the spectra. Our algorithm is easily adaptable for any set of science requirements and any spectrograph design. We apply the algorithm to several examples, including 4MOST, showing the method yields important design constraints to the wavelength regions.

  4. Random-phase metasurfaces at optical wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    Pors, Anders; Ding, Fei; Chen, Yiting; Radko, Ilya P.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2016-01-01

    Random-phase metasurfaces, in which the constituents scatter light with random phases, have the property that an incident plane wave will diffusely scatter, hereby leading to a complex far-field response that is most suitably described by statistical means. In this work, we present and exemplify the statistical description of the far-field response, particularly highlighting how the response for polarised and unpolarised light might be alike or different depending on the correlation of scattering phases for two orthogonal polarisations. By utilizing gap plasmon-based metasurfaces, consisting of an optically thick gold film overlaid by a subwavelength thin glass spacer and an array of gold nanobricks, we design and realize random-phase metasurfaces at a wavelength of 800 nm. Optical characterisation of the fabricated samples convincingly demonstrates the diffuse scattering of reflected light, with statistics obeying the theoretical predictions. We foresee the use of random-phase metasurfaces for camouflage applications and as high-quality reference structures in dark-field microscopy, while the control of the statistics for polarised and unpolarised light might find usage in security applications. Finally, by incorporating a certain correlation between scattering by neighbouring metasurface constituents new types of functionalities can be realised, such as a Lambertian reflector. PMID:27328635

  5. Patrolling the Sky at Long Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Gregory B.; Obenberger, K.; Hartman, J.; LWA Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The first station of the Long Wavelength Array, “LWA1”, is located near the center of the Very Large Array in central New Mexico and has recently begun scientific operations as a stand-alone instrument with collecting area roughly equivalent to a 100m dish. The LWA1 images the sky in near-real-time using the “transient buffer - narrowband” (TBN) system which is operational with 258 dipoles, and a bandwidth of 70 kHz. This bandwidth can be placed at any frequency between 5 and 88 MHz. Near-real-time reduction of the data is accomplished by a dedicated cluster in the electronics shelter of the array. The LWA1 can also form up to 4 beams on the sky simultaneously with 16 MHz bandwidth in each of two tunings and full polarization which can provide higher senstivity for follow-up observations. Here we report on detection limits for prompt emission from approximately 30 Gamma-Ray Bursts at frequencies between 30 and 80 MHz. We also report on a number of bright transients of short duration that were detected in the course of searching the error-boxes of GRBs. Support for operations and continuing development of the LWA1 is provided by the National Science Foundation under grant AST-1139974 of the University Radio Observatory program.

  6. Underdense radiation sources: Moving towards longer wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, C. A.; Seely, J. F.; Weaver, J. L.; Feldman, U.; Tommasini, R.; Glendinning, S. G.; Chung, H.-K.; Rosen, M.; Lee, R. W.; Scott, H. A.; Tillack, M.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2006-06-01

    Underdense radiation sources have been developed to provide efficient laboratory multi-keV radiation sources for radiography and radiation hardening studies. In these plasmas laser absorption by inverse bremsstrahlung leads to high x-ray conversion efficiency because of efficient ionization of the low density aerogel or gas targets. Now we performing experiments in the soft x-ray energy regime where the atomic physics models are much more complicated. In recent experiments at the NIKE laser, we have irradiated a Ti-doped SiO{2} aerogel with up to 1650 J of 248 nm wavelength light. The absolute Ti L-shell emission in the 200-800 eV range is measured with a diagnostic that uses a transmission grating coupled to Si photodiodes. We will give an overview of the temporally-resolved absolutely calibrated spectra obtained over a range of conditions. Eventually we hope to extend our studies to x-ray production in the EUV range.

  7. Visible-wavelength semiconductor lasers and arrays

    DOEpatents

    Schneider, Jr., Richard P.; Crawford, Mary H.

    1996-01-01

    A visible semiconductor laser. The visible semiconductor laser includes an InAlGaP active region surrounded by one or more AlGaAs layers on each side, with carbon as the sole p-type dopant. Embodiments of the invention are provided as vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and as edge-emitting lasers (EELs). One or more transition layers comprised of a substantially indium-free semiconductor alloy such as AlAsP, AlGaAsP, or the like may be provided between the InAlGaP active region and the AlGaAS DBR mirrors or confinement layers to improve carrier injection and device efficiency by reducing any band offsets. Visible VCSEL devices fabricated according to the invention with a one-wavelength-thick (1.lambda.) optical cavity operate continuous-wave (cw) with lasing output powers up to 8 mW, and a peak power conversion efficiency of up to 11%.

  8. Visible-wavelength semiconductor lasers and arrays

    DOEpatents

    Schneider, R.P. Jr.; Crawford, M.H.

    1996-09-17

    The visible semiconductor laser includes an InAlGaP active region surrounded by one or more AlGaAs layers on each side, with carbon as the sole p-type dopant. Embodiments of the invention are provided as vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and as edge-emitting lasers (EELs). One or more transition layers comprised of a substantially indium-free semiconductor alloy such as AlAsP, AlGaAsP, or the like may be provided between the InAlGaP active region and the AlGaAS DBR mirrors or confinement layers to improve carrier injection and device efficiency by reducing any band offsets. Visible VCSEL devices fabricated according to the invention with a one-wavelength-thick (1{lambda}) optical cavity operate continuous-wave (cw) with lasing output powers up to 8 mW, and a peak power conversion efficiency of up to 11%. 5 figs.

  9. Early Results from the Long Wavelength Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Gregory B.; LWA Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The Long Wavelength Array (LWA) will be a new multi-purpose radio telescope operating in the frequency range 10-88 MHz. Scientific programs include pulsars, supernova remnants, general transient searches, radio recombination lines, solar and Jupiter bursts, investigations into the "dark ages" using redshifted hydrogen, and ionospheric phenomena. Upon completion, LWA will consist of 53 phased array "stations” distributed accross a region over 400 km in diameter. Each station consists of 256 pairs of dipole-type antennas whose signals are formed into beams, with outputs transported to a central location for high-resolution aperture synthesis imaging. The resulting image sensitivity is estimated to be a few mJy (5sigma, 8 MHz, 2 polarizations, 1 h, zenith) from 20-80 MHz; with angular resolution of a few arcseconds. Additional information is online at http://lwa.unm.edu. Partners in the LWA project include LANL, JPL, NRAO, NRL, UNM, NMT, and Virginia Tech. The first station of the LWA, called "LWA1", is located near the center of the EVLA and has recently begun scientific operations. The LWA1 images the sky in realtime using the "transient buffer - narrowband” (TBN) system which is operational with 257 dipoles, and a bandwidth of 70 kHz. The LWA1 can also form up to 4 beams on the sky simultaneously with 16 MHz bandwidth in each of two tuning and full polarization. Early results include observations of pulsars, the Sun, and Jupiter.

  10. Advances in multiple wavelength anomalous diffraction crystallography.

    PubMed

    Ealick, S E

    2000-10-01

    In only a few years, multiple wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) phasing has advanced from an esoteric technique used in only a few favorable cases to the method of choice for solving new macromolecular structures. Before 1994, MAD phasing had been used for fewer than a dozen new structure determinations. In 1999 alone, well over 100 new structures were determined by MAD phasing. The meteoric rise in MAD applications resulted from the availability of new synchrotron beamlines, equipped with low bandpass optics, fast readout detectors, cryogenic cooling and user-friendly interfaces. The power of MAD phasing has been amplified by the availability of new computer programs for locating the positions of the anomalous scattering atoms and for calculating phases from the experimental data. Phasing by anomalous scattering techniques has been applied to structures as large as 640 kDa and 120 selenium atoms in the asymmetric unit. The practical size limitation for application of MAD phasing techniques has not yet been encountered. PMID:11006535

  11. Short Wavelength Infrared Hybrid Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vural, K.; Blackwell, J. D...; Marin, E. C.; Edwall, D. D...; Rode, J. P.

    1983-11-01

    Short wavelength (λc = 2.5 μm) 32 x 32 HgCdTe focal plane arrays have been fabricated for use in an Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) developed by the Jet Propulsion Labora-tory for NASA. An Imaging Spectrometer provides simultaneous imaging of several spectral bands for applications in the sensing and monitoring of earth resources. The detector material is HgCdTe grown on CdTe substrates using liquid phase epitaxy. Planar processing is used to make photovoltaic detectors on 68 um centers. The detector array is mated to a silicon charge coupled device multiplexer to make hybrid focal plane arrays. Results show high performance detectors with a mean RoA = 9.6 x 107 Ω --cm2 and IleakAge (-100 mV) = 0.037 pA at 120K and near zero background. The yield and uniformity are high. The ratio of the standard deviation of the dc responsivity to the mean is 3% for 98.5% of the pixels. The D1.0 = 1.3 x 1012 cm - âœ"fiz/W at a background of 1013 ph/cm2-s and 120K which is close to the background limited (BLIP) D* of 1.9 x 1012 cm- âœ"Hz/W.

  12. Array of Bolometers for Submillimeter- Wavelength Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, James; Turner, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    A feed-horn-coupled monolithic array of micromesh bolometers is undergoing development for use in a photometric camera. The array is designed for conducting astrophysical observations in a wavelength band centered at 350 m. The bolometers are improved versions of previously developed bolometers comprising metalized Si3N4 micromesh radiation absorbers coupled with neutron- transmutation-doped Ge thermistors. Incident radiation heats the absorbers above a base temperature, changing the electrical resistance of each thermistor. In the present array of improved bolometers (see figure), the thermistors are attached to the micromesh absorbers by indium bump bonds and are addressed by use of lithographed, vapor-deposited electrical leads. This architecture reduces the heat capacity and minimizes the thermal conductivity to 1/20 and 1/300, respectively, of earlier versions of these detectors, with consequent improvement in sensitivity and speed of response. The micromesh bolometers, intended to operate under an optical background set by thermal emission from an ambient-temperature space-borne telescope, are designed such that the random arrival of photons ("photon noise") dominates the noise sources arising from the detector and readout electronics. The micromesh is designed to be a highly thermally and optically efficient absorber with a limiting response time of about 100 s. The absorber and thermistor heat capacity are minimized in order to give rapid speed of response. Due to the minimization of the absorber volume, the dominant source of heat capacity arises from the thermistor.

  13. OPS laser EPI design for different wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moloney, J. V.; Hader, J.; Li, H.; Kaneda, Y.; Wang, T. S.; Yarborough, M.; Koch, S. W.; Stolz, W.; Kunert, B.; Bueckers, C.; Chaterjee, S.; Hardesty, G.

    2009-02-01

    Design of optimized semiconductor optically-pumped semiconductor lasers (OPSLs) depends on many ingredients starting from the quantum wells, barrier and cladding layers all the way through to the resonant-periodic gain (RPG) and high reflectivity Bragg mirror (DBR) making up the OPSL active mirror. Accurate growth of the individual layers making up the RPG region is critical if performance degradation due to cavity misalignment is to be avoided. Optimization of the RPG+DBR structure requires knowledge of the heat generation and heating sinking of the active mirror. Nonlinear Control Strategies SimuLaseTM software, based on rigorous many-body calculations of the semiconductor optical response, allows for quantum well and barrier optimization by correlating low intensity photoluminescence spectra computed for the design, with direct experimentally measured wafer-level edge and surface PL spectra. Consequently, an OPSL device optimization procedure ideally requires a direct iterative interaction between designer and grower. In this article, we discuss the application of the many-body microscopic approach to OPSL devices lasing at 850nm, 1040nm and 2μm. The latter device involves and application of the many-body approach to mid-IR OPSLs based on antimonide materials. Finally we will present results on based on structural modifications of the epitaxial structure and/or novel material combinations that offer the potential to extend OPSL technology to new wavelength ranges.

  14. Evaporation duct effects at millimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K. D.

    1992-03-01

    The evaporation duct strongly influences low-altitude over-the-horizon propagation at millimeter wavelengths. Results from more than 2000 hours of propagation and meteorological measurements made at 94 GHz on a 40.6 km over-horizon, over-water path along the southern California coast show that the average received power was 63 dB greater than d for propagation in a nonducting, or standard, atmosphere; 90 percent of the measurements were at least 55 dB greater than diffraction. A numerical model of transmission loss based on the observed surface meteorology is discussed and results are compared to measured transmission loss. On average, modeling results underestimate observations by only 10 dB. In addition, results from modeling based on an independent climatology of evaporation duct heights for the area are shown to be adequate for most propagation assessment purposes. The reliability and reasonable accuracy of the numerical model provides a strong justification for utilizing the technique to assess millimeter wave communication and radar systems operating in many, if not all, ocean regions.

  15. Evaporation duct effects at millimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K. D.

    1990-03-01

    The evaporation duct strongly influences low-altitude over-the horizon propagation at millimeter wavelengths. Results from more than 2000 hours of propagation and meteorological measurements were made at 94 GHz on a 40.6 km over-horizon, over-water path along the southern California coast show that the average received power was 63 dB greater than expected for propagation in a nonconducting, or normal, atmosphere; 90 percent of the measurements were at least 55 dB greater than the normal atmosphere. A numerical model of transmission loss based on observed surface meteorology is discussed and results are compared to measured transmission loss. On average, modeling results underestimate the transmission loss by 10 dB. In addition, results from modeling based on an independent climatology of evaporation duct heights for the area are shown to be adequate for most propagation assessment purposes. The reliability and reasonable accuracy of the model provide a strong justification for utilizing the technique to assess millimeter wave communication and radar systems operating in many, if not all, ocean regions.

  16. Random-phase metasurfaces at optical wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Pors, Anders; Ding, Fei; Chen, Yiting; Radko, Ilya P; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I

    2016-01-01

    Random-phase metasurfaces, in which the constituents scatter light with random phases, have the property that an incident plane wave will diffusely scatter, hereby leading to a complex far-field response that is most suitably described by statistical means. In this work, we present and exemplify the statistical description of the far-field response, particularly highlighting how the response for polarised and unpolarised light might be alike or different depending on the correlation of scattering phases for two orthogonal polarisations. By utilizing gap plasmon-based metasurfaces, consisting of an optically thick gold film overlaid by a subwavelength thin glass spacer and an array of gold nanobricks, we design and realize random-phase metasurfaces at a wavelength of 800 nm. Optical characterisation of the fabricated samples convincingly demonstrates the diffuse scattering of reflected light, with statistics obeying the theoretical predictions. We foresee the use of random-phase metasurfaces for camouflage applications and as high-quality reference structures in dark-field microscopy, while the control of the statistics for polarised and unpolarised light might find usage in security applications. Finally, by incorporating a certain correlation between scattering by neighbouring metasurface constituents new types of functionalities can be realised, such as a Lambertian reflector. PMID:27328635

  17. Random-phase metasurfaces at optical wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pors, Anders; Ding, Fei; Chen, Yiting; Radko, Ilya P.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2016-06-01

    Random-phase metasurfaces, in which the constituents scatter light with random phases, have the property that an incident plane wave will diffusely scatter, hereby leading to a complex far-field response that is most suitably described by statistical means. In this work, we present and exemplify the statistical description of the far-field response, particularly highlighting how the response for polarised and unpolarised light might be alike or different depending on the correlation of scattering phases for two orthogonal polarisations. By utilizing gap plasmon-based metasurfaces, consisting of an optically thick gold film overlaid by a subwavelength thin glass spacer and an array of gold nanobricks, we design and realize random-phase metasurfaces at a wavelength of 800 nm. Optical characterisation of the fabricated samples convincingly demonstrates the diffuse scattering of reflected light, with statistics obeying the theoretical predictions. We foresee the use of random-phase metasurfaces for camouflage applications and as high-quality reference structures in dark-field microscopy, while the control of the statistics for polarised and unpolarised light might find usage in security applications. Finally, by incorporating a certain correlation between scattering by neighbouring metasurface constituents new types of functionalities can be realised, such as a Lambertian reflector.

  18. Optical extension at the 193-nm wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandbergen, Peter; McCallum, Martin; Amblard, Gilles R.; Domke, Wolf-Dieter; Smith, Bruce W.; Zavyalova, Lena; Petersen, John S.

    1999-07-01

    Lithography at 193nm is the first optical lithography technique that will be introduced for manufacturing of technology levels. where the required dimensions are smaller than the actual wavelength. This paper explores several techniques to extend 193nm to low k1 lithography. Most attention is given to binary mask solution in at 130nm dimensions, where k1 is 0.4. Various strong and Gaussian quadrupole illuminators were designed, manufactured and tested for this application. Strong quadrupoles show that largest DOF improvements. The drawback however, is that these strong quadrupoles are very duty cycle and dimensions specific, resulting in large proximity biases between different duty cycles. Due to their design, Gaussian quadrupoles sample much wider frequency ranges, resulting in less duty cycles specific DOF improvements and less proximity basis. At sub-130nm dimensions, strong phase shift masks provide significant latitude improvements, when compared to binary masks with quadrupole illumination. However, differences in dose to size for different duty cycles were up to 25 percent. For definition of contact holes, linewidth biasing through silylation, a key feature of the CARL bi-layer resist approach, demonstrated significant DOF latitude improvements compared to SLR at 140nm and 160nm contact holes.

  19. FIRST LIGHT LBT AO IMAGES OF HR 8799 bcde AT 1.6 AND 3.3 {mu}m: NEW DISCREPANCIES BETWEEN YOUNG PLANETS AND OLD BROWN DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Skemer, Andrew J.; Hinz, Philip M.; Rodigas, Timothy J.; Close, Laird; McCarthy, Don; Kulesa, Craig; Apai, Daniel; Bailey, Vanessa; Esposito, Simone; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Mannucci, Filippo; Agapito, Guido; Argomedo, Javier; Briguglio, Runa; Burrows, Adam; Leisenring, Jarron; Skrutskie, Michael; Desidera, Silvano; Mesa, Dino; Boutsia, Konstantina; and others

    2012-07-01

    As the only directly imaged multiple planet system, HR 8799 provides a unique opportunity to study the physical properties of several planets in parallel. In this paper, we image all four of the HR 8799 planets at H band and 3.3 {mu}m with the new Large Binocular Telescope adaptive optics system, PISCES, and LBTI/LMIRCam. Our images offer an unprecedented view of the system, allowing us to obtain H and 3.3 {mu}m photometry of the innermost planet (for the first time) and put strong upper limits on the presence of a hypothetical fifth companion. We find that all four planets are unexpectedly bright at 3.3 {mu}m compared to the equilibrium chemistry models used for field brown dwarfs, which predict that planets should be faint at 3.3 {mu}m due to CH{sub 4} opacity. We attempt to model the planets with thick-cloudy, non-equilibrium chemistry atmospheres but find that removing CH{sub 4} to fit the 3.3 {mu}m photometry increases the predicted L' (3.8 {mu}m) flux enough that it is inconsistent with observations. In an effort to fit the spectral energy distribution of the HR 8799 planets, we construct mixtures of cloudy atmospheres, which are intended to represent planets covered by clouds of varying opacity. In this scenario, regions with low opacity look hot and bright, while regions with high opacity look faint, similar to the patchy cloud structures on Jupiter and L/T transition brown dwarfs. Our mixed-cloud models reproduce all of the available data, but self-consistent models are still necessary to demonstrate their viability.

  20. Annealing studies of heteroepitaxial InSbN on GaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy for long-wavelength infrared detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, Nimai C.; Bharatan, Sudhakar; Li Jia; Iyer, Shanthi

    2012-10-15

    We report the effect of annealing on the structural, vibrational, electrical, and optical properties of heteropepitaxially grown InSbN epilayers on GaAs substrate by molecular beam epitaxy for long-wavelength infrared detector applications. As-grown epilayers exhibited high N incorporation in the both substitutional and interstitial sites, with N induced defects as evidenced from high resolution x-ray diffraction, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and room temperature (RT) micro-Raman studies. The as-grown optical band gap was observed at 0.132 eV ({approx}9.4 {mu}m) and the epilayer exhibited high background carrier concentration at {approx}10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} range with corresponding mobility of {approx}10{sup 3} cm{sup 2}/Vs. Ex situ and in situ annealing at 430 Degree-Sign C though led to the loss of N but improved InSb quality due to effective annihilation of N related defects and other lattice defects attested to enhanced InSb LO phonon modes in the corresponding Raman spectra. Further, annealing resulted in the optical absorption edge red shifting to 0.12 eV ({approx}10.3 {mu}m) and the layers were characterized by reduced background carrier concentration in the {approx}10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} range with enhanced mobility in {approx}10{sup 4} cm{sup 2}/Vs range.