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Sample records for 6-cys protein family

  1. Three Members of the 6-cys Protein Family of Plasmodium Play a Role in Gamete Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shahid M.; van Dooren, Maaike W.; Ramesar, Jai; Kaczanowski, Szymon; van Gemert, Geert-Jan; Kroeze, Hans; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; Eling, Wijnand M.; Sauerwein, Robert W.; Waters, Andrew P.; Janse, Chris J.

    2010-01-01

    The process of fertilization is critically dependent on the mutual recognition of gametes and in Plasmodium, the male gamete surface protein P48/45 is vital to this process. This protein belongs to a family of 10 structurally related proteins, the so called 6-cys family. To identify the role of additional members of this family in Plasmodium fertilisation, we performed genetic and functional analysis on the five members of the 6-cys family that are transcribed during the gametocyte stage of P. berghei. This analysis revealed that in addition to P48/45, two members (P230 and P47) also play an essential role in the process of parasite fertilization. Mating studies between parasites lacking P230, P48/45 or P47 demonstrate that P230, like P48/45, is a male fertility factor, consistent with the previous demonstration of a protein complex containing both P48/45 and P230. In contrast, disruption of P47 results in a strong reduction of female fertility, while males remain unaffected. Further analysis revealed that gametes of mutants lacking expression of p48/45 or p230 or p47 are unable to either recognise or attach to each other. Disruption of the paralog of p230, p230p, also specifically expressed in gametocytes, had no observable effect on fertilization. These results indicate that the P. berghei 6-cys family contains a number of proteins that are either male or female specific ligands that play an important role in gamete recognition and/or attachment. The implications of low levels of fertilisation that exist even in the absence of these proteins, indicating alternative pathways of fertilisation, as well as positive selection acting on these proteins, are discussed in the context of targeting these proteins as transmission blocking vaccine candidates. PMID:20386715

  2. Babesia bovis expresses Bbo-6cys-E, a member of a novel gene family that is homologous to the 6-cys family of Plasmodium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel Babesia bovis gene family encoding proteins with similarities to the Plasmodium 6cys protein family was identified by TBLASTN searches of the Babesia bovis genome using the sequence of the P. falciparum PFS230 protein as query, and was termed Bbo-6cys gene family. The Bbo-cys6 gene family co...

  3. The Structure of Plasmodium falciparum Blood-Stage 6-Cys Protein Pf41 Reveals an Unexpected Intra-Domain Insertion Required for Pf12 Coordination.

    PubMed

    Parker, Michelle L; Peng, Fangni; Boulanger, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is an apicomplexan parasite and the etiological agent of severe human malaria. The complex P. falciparum life cycle is supported by a diverse repertoire of surface proteins including the family of 6-Cys s48/45 antigens. Of these, Pf41 is localized to the surface of the blood-stage merozoite through its interaction with the glycophosphatidylinositol-anchored Pf12. Our recent structural characterization of Pf12 revealed two juxtaposed 6-Cys domains (D1 and D2). Pf41, however, contains an additional segment of 120 residues predicted to form a large spacer separating its two 6-Cys domains. To gain insight into the assembly mechanism and overall architecture of the Pf12-Pf41 complex, we first determined the 2.45 Å resolution crystal structure of Pf41 using zinc single-wavelength anomalous dispersion. Structural analysis revealed an unexpected domain organization where the Pf41 6-Cys domains are, in fact, intimately associated and the additional residues instead map predominately to an inserted domain-like region (ID) located between two β-strands in D1. Notably, the ID is largely proteolyzed in the final structure suggesting inherent flexibility. To assess the contribution of the ID to complex formation, we engineered a form of Pf41 where the ID was replaced by a short glycine-serine linker and showed by isothermal titration calorimetry that binding to Pf12 was abrogated. Finally, protease protection assays showed that the proteolytic susceptibility of the ID was significantly reduced in the complex, consistent with the Pf41 ID directly engaging Pf12. Collectively, these data establish the architectural organization of Pf41 and define an essential role for the Pf41 ID in promoting assembly of the Pf12-Pf41 heterodimeric complex. PMID:26414347

  4. A Fungal Family of Transcriptional Regulators: the Zinc Cluster Proteins

    PubMed Central

    MacPherson, Sarah; Larochelle, Marc; Turcotte, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    The trace element zinc is required for proper functioning of a large number of proteins, including various enzymes. However, most zinc-containing proteins are transcription factors capable of binding DNA and are named zinc finger proteins. They form one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators and are categorized into various classes according to zinc-binding motifs. This review focuses on one class of zinc finger proteins called zinc cluster (or binuclear) proteins. Members of this family are exclusively fungal and possess the well-conserved motif CysX2CysX6CysX5-12CysX2CysX6-8Cys. The cysteine residues bind to two zinc atoms, which coordinate folding of the domain involved in DNA recognition. The first- and best-studied zinc cluster protein is Gal4p, a transcriptional activator of genes involved in the catabolism of galactose in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Since the discovery of Gal4p, many other zinc cluster proteins have been characterized; they function in a wide range of processes, including primary and secondary metabolism and meiosis. Other roles include regulation of genes involved in the stress response as well as pleiotropic drug resistance, as demonstrated in budding yeast and in human fungal pathogens. With the number of characterized zinc cluster proteins growing rapidly, it is becoming more and more apparent that they are important regulators of fungal physiology. PMID:16959962

  5. The AVIT protein family

    PubMed Central

    Kaser, Alexandra; Winklmayr, Martina; Lepperdinger, Günther; Kreil, Günther

    2003-01-01

    Homologues of a protein originally isolated from snake venom and frog skin secretions are present in many vertebrate species. They contain 80–90 amino acids, 10 of which are cysteines with identical spacing. Various names have been given to these proteins, such as mamba intestinal protein 1 (MIT1), Bv8 (Bombina variegata molecular mass ∼8 kDa), prokineticins and endocrine-gland vascular endothelial growth factor (EG-VEGF). Their amino-terminal sequences are identical, and so we propose that the sequence of their first four residues, AVIT, is used as a name for this family. From a comparison of the sequences, two types of AVIT proteins can be discerned. These proteins seem to be distributed widely in mammalian tissues and are known to bind to G-protein-coupled receptors. Members of this family have been shown to stimulate contraction of the guinea pig ileum, to cause hyperalgesia after injection into rats and to be active as specific growth factors. Moreover, the messenger RNA level of one of these AVIT proteins changes rhythmically in the region of the brain known as the suprachiasmatic nucleus. This shows that members of this new family of small proteins are involved in diverse biological processes. PMID:12728244

  6. The stanniocalcin family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Graham F; Dimattia, Gabriel E

    2006-09-01

    Stannniocalcin (STC) is a polypeptide hormone that was originally identified in bony fishes as a systemic regulator of mineral metabolism, and is best known for its regulatory effects on calcium/phosphate transport by the gills, gut and kidneys. The mammalian homolog to fish STC was discovered in 1995 and has resulted in progressively growing interest ever since as to its possible role in humans. Moreover, new discoveries in the mammalian STC field are resulting in significant reappraisals as to its role in fishes. Perhaps the most significant of these has been the discovery of a second gene encoding stanniocalcin-related protein, or STC-2, first in mammals and subsequently in fish. This review covers the comparative endocrinology of the STCs in fishes and mammals from the perspectives of structure, function and regulation. It then delves into some of the newer aspects of STC-1/STC-2 biology that have been uncovered using both classical and transgenic approaches. Of these, one of the most intriguing discoveries relates to the receptor-mediated sequestration of STC by target cell organelles. The functions of other newly discovered mammalian and fish STC variants are also discussed, as is the recent discovery of STC-related homologs in invertebrates. Based on our current state of knowledge, it is apparent that STC has an ancient lineage and that the STC family of proteins is proving to have significant roles in metabolism, reproduction and development. PMID:16902962

  7. The Alba protein family: Structure and function.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Manish; Banerjee, Chinmoy; Nag, Shiladitya; Bandyopadhyay, Uday

    2016-05-01

    Alba family proteins are small, basic, dimeric nucleic acid-binding proteins, which are widely distributed in archaea and a number of eukaryotes. This family of proteins bears the distinct features of regulation through acetylation/deacetylation, hence named as acetylation lowers binding affinity (Alba). Alba family proteins bind DNA cooperatively with no apparent sequence specificity. Besides DNA, Alba proteins also interact with diverse RNA species and associate with ribonucleo-protein complexes. Initially, Alba proteins were recognized as chromosomal proteins and supposed to be involved in the maintenance of chromatin architecture and transcription repression. However, recent studies have shown increasing evidence of functional plasticity among Alba family of proteins that widely range from genome packaging and organization, transcriptional and translational regulation, RNA metabolism, and development and differentiation processes. In recent years, Alba family proteins have attracted growing interest due to their widespread occurrence in large number of organisms. Presence in multiple copies, functional crosstalk, differential binding affinity, and posttranslational modifications are some of the key factors that might regulate the biological functions of Alba family proteins. In this review article, we present an overview of the Alba family proteins, their salient features and emphasize their functional role in different organisms reported so far. PMID:26900088

  8. Protein function annotation using protein domain family resources.

    PubMed

    Das, Sayoni; Orengo, Christine A

    2016-01-15

    As a result of the genome sequencing and structural genomics initiatives, we have a wealth of protein sequence and structural data. However, only about 1% of these proteins have experimental functional annotations. As a result, computational approaches that can predict protein functions are essential in bridging this widening annotation gap. This article reviews the current approaches of protein function prediction using structure and sequence based classification of protein domain family resources with a special focus on functional families in the CATH-Gene3D resource. PMID:26434392

  9. Computational Study on Hemoglobin Protein Family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craciun, Dana; Isvoran, Adriana; Avram, Nicolae M.

    2009-05-01

    We have analyzed 19 proteins belonging to hemoglobin protein family: 3 for plants, 4 for invertebrates and the others for vertebrates. For every protein we have determined the following parameters: the fractal dimension of its backbone, the fractal dimension of its surface, the radius of gyration, the area of its molecular surface and the area of the surface of its cavities. At global level, we did not notice significant differences for the fractal parameters for proteins belonging to different organisms and it underlines that all these proteins perform the same biological function. We have obtained different values of the local and global surface fractal dimensions reflecting distinct roughness of protein pockets in comparison to the entire surface, also in good correlation with the biological function. The geometric characteristics are distinct for the three investigated families of proteins.

  10. S100 protein family in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongyan; Xu, Chengshan; Jin, Qing’e; Liu, Zhihua

    2014-01-01

    S100 protein family has been implicated in multiple stages of tumorigenesis and progression. Among the S100 genes, 22 are clustered at chromosome locus 1q21, a region frequently rearranged in cancers. S100 protein possesses a wide range of intracellular and extracellular functions such as regulation of calcium homeostasis, cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell invasion and motility, cytoskeleton interactions, protein phosphorylation, regulation of transcriptional factors, autoimmunity, chemotaxis, inflammation and pluripotency. Many lines of evidence suggest that altered expression of S100 proteins was associated with tumor progression and prognosis. Therefore, S100 proteins might also represent potential tumor biomarkers and therapeutic targets. In this review, we summarize the evidence connecting S100 protein family and cancer and discuss the mechanisms by which S100 exerts its diverse functions. PMID:24660101

  11. Comparative analysis of rigidity across protein families.

    PubMed

    Wells, S A; Jimenez-Roldan, J E; Römer, R A

    2009-01-01

    We present a comparative study in which 'pebble game' rigidity analysis is applied to multiple protein crystal structures, for each of six different protein families. We find that the main-chain rigidity of a protein structure at a given hydrogen bond energy cutoff is quite sensitive to small structural variations, and conclude that the hydrogen bond constraints in rigidity analysis should be chosen so as to form and test specific hypotheses about the rigidity of a particular protein. Our comparative approach highlights two different characteristic patterns ('sudden' or 'gradual') for protein rigidity loss as constraints are removed, in line with recent results on the rigidity transitions of glassy networks. PMID:19773604

  12. FIGfams : yet another set of protein families.

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, F.; Overbeek, R.; Rodriguez, A.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Chicago; Fellowship for the Interpretation of Genomes

    2009-11-01

    We present FIGfams, a new collection of over 100,000 protein families that are the product of manual curation and close strain comparison. Using the Subsystem approach the manual curation is carried out, ensuring a previously unattained degree of throughput and consistency. FIGfams are based on over 950,000 manually annotated proteins and across many hundred Bacteria and Archaea. Associated with each FIGfam is a two-tiered, rapid, accurate decision procedure to determine family membership for new proteins. FIGfams are freely available under an open source license. These can be downloaded at ftp://ftp.theseed.org/FIGfams/. The web site for FIGfams is http://www.theseed.org/wiki/FIGfams/.

  13. On the Entropy of Protein Families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, John P.; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Cocco, Simona; Jacquin, Hugo; Monasson, Rémi

    2016-03-01

    Proteins are essential components of living systems, capable of performing a huge variety of tasks at the molecular level, such as recognition, signalling, copy, transport, ... The protein sequences realizing a given function may largely vary across organisms, giving rise to a protein family. Here, we estimate the entropy of those families based on different approaches, including Hidden Markov Models used for protein databases and inferred statistical models reproducing the low-order (1- and 2-point) statistics of multi-sequence alignments. We also compute the entropic cost, that is, the loss in entropy resulting from a constraint acting on the protein, such as the mutation of one particular amino-acid on a specific site, and relate this notion to the escape probability of the HIV virus. The case of lattice proteins, for which the entropy can be computed exactly, allows us to provide another illustration of the concept of cost, due to the competition of different folds. The relevance of the entropy in relation to directed evolution experiments is stressed.

  14. The Extended Family of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Andrés; Nunes-Xavier, Caroline E; Bayón, Yolanda; Pulido, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the Tyr phosphorylation status of cellular proteins results from the coordinated action of Protein Tyrosine Kinases (PTKs) and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases (PTPs). PTPs have emerged as highly regulated enzymes with diverse substrate specificity, and proteins with Tyr-dephosphorylation or Tyr-dephosphorylation-like properties can be clustered as the PTPome. This includes proteins from the PTP superfamily, which display a Cys-based catalytic mechanism, as well as enzymes from other gene families (Asp-based phosphatases, His-based phosphatases) that have converged in protein Tyr-dephosphorylation-related functions by using non-Cys-based catalytic mechanisms. Within the Cys-based members of the PTPome, classical PTPs dephosphorylate specific phosphoTyr (pTyr) residues from protein substrates, whereas VH1-like dual-specificity PTPs dephosphorylate pTyr, pSer, and pThr residues, as well as nonproteinaceous substrates, including phosphoinositides and phosphorylated carbohydrates. In addition, several PTPs have impaired catalytic activity as a result of amino acid substitutions at their active sites, but retain regulatory functions related with pTyr signaling. As a result of their relevant biological activity, many PTPs are linked to human disease, including cancer, neurodevelopmental, and metabolic diseases, making these proteins important drug targets and molecular markers in the clinic. Here, a brief overview on the biochemistry and physiology of the different groups of proteins that belong to the mammalian PTPome is presented. PMID:27514797

  15. TIGRFAMS: The TIGRFAMs database of protein families

    DOE Data Explorer

    TIGRFAMs are protein families based on Hidden Markov Models or HMMs. Use this page to see the curated seed alignmet for each TIGRFam, the full alignment of all family members and the cutoff scores for inclusion in each of the TIGRFAMs. Also use this page to search through the TIGRFAMs and HMMs for text in the TIGRFAMs Text Search or search for specific sequences in the TIGRFAMs Sequence Search.[Copied from the Overview at http://www.jcvi.org/cms/research/projects/tigrfams/overview/] See also TIGRFAMs ordered by the roles they play at http://cmr.jcvi.org/tigr-scripts/CMR/shared/EvidenceList.cgi?ev_type=TIGRFAM&order_type=role.

  16. Nramp defines a family of membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Cellier, M; Privé, G; Belouchi, A; Kwan, T; Rodrigues, V; Chia, W; Gros, P

    1995-01-01

    Nramp (natural resistance-associated macrophage protein) is a newly identified family of integral membrane proteins whose biochemical function is unknown. We report on the identification of Nramp homologs from the fly Drosophila melanogaster, the plant Oryza sativa, and the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Optimal alignment of protein sequences required insertion of very few gaps and revealed remarkable sequence identity of 28% (yeast), 40% (plant), and 55% (fly) with the mammalian proteins (46%, 58%, and 73% similarity), as well as a common predicted transmembrane topology. This family is defined by a highly conserved hydrophobic core encoding 10 transmembrane segments. Other features of this hydrophobic core include several invariant charged residues, helical periodicity of sequence conservation suggesting conserved and nonconserved faces for several transmembrane helices, a consensus transport signature on the intracytoplasmic face of the membrane, and structural determinants previously described in ion channels. These characteristics suggest that the Nramp polypeptides form part of a group of transporters or channels that act on as yet unidentified substrates. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7479731

  17. Correlated rigid modes in protein families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Striegel, D. A.; Wojtowicz, D.; Przytycka, T. M.; Periwal, V.

    2016-04-01

    A great deal of evolutionarily conserved information is contained in genomes and proteins. Enormous effort has been put into understanding protein structure and developing computational tools for protein folding, and many sophisticated approaches take structure and sequence homology into account. Several groups have applied statistical physics approaches to extracting information about proteins from sequences alone. Here, we develop a new method for sequence analysis based on first principles, in information theory, in statistical physics and in Bayesian analysis. We provide a complete derivation of our approach and we apply it to a variety of systems, to demonstrate its utility and its limitations. We show in some examples that phylogenetic alignments of amino-acid sequences of families of proteins imply the existence of a small number of modes that appear to be associated with correlated global variation. These modes are uncovered efficiently in our approach by computing a non-perturbative effective potential directly from the alignment. We show that this effective potential approaches a limiting form inversely with the logarithm of the number of sequences. Mapping symbol entropy flows along modes to underlying physical structures shows that these modes arise due to correlated compensatory adjustments. In the protein examples, these occur around functional binding pockets.

  18. Correlated rigid modes in protein families.

    PubMed

    Striegel, D A; Wojtowicz, D; Przytycka, T M; Periwal, V

    2016-01-01

    A great deal of evolutionarily conserved information is contained in genomes and proteins. Enormous effort has been put into understanding protein structure and developing computational tools for protein folding, and many sophisticated approaches take structure and sequence homology into account. Several groups have applied statistical physics approaches to extracting information about proteins from sequences alone. Here, we develop a new method for sequence analysis based on first principles, in information theory, in statistical physics and in Bayesian analysis. We provide a complete derivation of our approach and we apply it to a variety of systems, to demonstrate its utility and its limitations. We show in some examples that phylogenetic alignments of amino-acid sequences of families of proteins imply the existence of a small number of modes that appear to be associated with correlated global variation. These modes are uncovered efficiently in our approach by computing a non-perturbative effective potential directly from the alignment. We show that this effective potential approaches a limiting form inversely with the logarithm of the number of sequences. Mapping symbol entropy flows along modes to underlying physical structures shows that these modes arise due to correlated compensatory adjustments. In the protein examples, these occur around functional binding pockets. PMID:27063781

  19. Physiological Functions of APP Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Ulrike C.; Zheng, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Biochemical and genetic evidence establishes a central role of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in Alzheimer disease (AD) pathogenesis. Biochemically, deposition of the β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides produced from proteolytic processing of APP forms the defining pathological hallmark of AD; genetically, both point mutations and duplications of wild-type APP are linked to a subset of early onset of familial AD (FAD) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy. As such, the biological functions of APP and its processing products have been the subject of intense investigation, and the past 20+ years of research have met with both excitement and challenges. This article will review the current understanding of the physiological functions of APP in the context of APP family members. PMID:22355794

  20. Thiol Dioxygenases: Unique Families of Cupin Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, C. R.; Karplus, P. A.; Dominy, J. E.

    2011-01-01

    Proteins in the cupin superfamily have a wide range of biological functions in archaea, bacteria and eukaryotes. Although proteins in the cupin superfamily show very low overall sequence similarity, they all contain two short but partially conserved cupin sequence motifs separated by a less conserved intermotif region that varies both in length and amino acid sequence. Furthermore, these proteins all share a common architecture described as a 6-stranded β-barrel core, and this canonical cupin or “jelly roll” β-barrel is formed with cupin motif 1, the intermotif region, and cupin motif 2 each forming two of the core six β-strands in the folded protein structure. The recently obtained crystal structures of cysteine dioxygenase (CDO), with contains conserved cupin motifs, show that it has the predicted canonical cupin β-barrel fold. Although there had been no reports of CDO activity in prokaryotes, we identified a number of bacterial cupin proteins of unknown function that share low similarity with mammalian CDO and that conserve many residues in the active site pocket of CDO. Putative bacterial CDOs predicted to have CDO activity were shown to have similar substrate specificity and kinetic parameters as eukaryotic CDOs. Information gleaned from crystal structures of mammalian CDO along with sequence information for homologs shown to have CDO activity facilitated the identification of a CDO family fingerprint motif. One key feature of the CDO fingerprint motif is that the canonical metal-binding glutamate residue in cupin motif 1 is replaced by a cysteine (in mammalian CDOs) or by a glycine (bacterial CDOs). The recent report that some putative bacterial CDO homologs are actually 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenases suggests that the CDO family may include proteins with specificities for other thiol substrates. A paralog of CDO in mammals was also identified and shown to be the other mammalian thiol dioxygenase, cysteamine dioxygenase (ADO). A tentative

  1. Sequence analysis of the AAA protein family.

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, A.

    1997-01-01

    The AAA protein family, a recently recognized group of Walker-type ATPases, has been subjected to an extensive sequence analysis. Multiple sequence alignments revealed the existence of a region of sequence similarity, the so-called AAA cassette. The borders of this cassette were localized and within it, three boxes of a high degree of conservation were identified. Two of these boxes could be assigned to substantial parts of the ATP binding site (namely, to Walker motifs A and B); the third may be a portion of the catalytic center. Phylogenetic trees were calculated to obtain insights into the evolutionary history of the family. Subfamilies with varying degrees of intra-relatedness could be discriminated; these relationships are also supported by analysis of sequences outside the canonical AAA boxes: within the cassette are regions that are strongly conserved within each subfamily, whereas little or even no similarity between different subfamilies can be observed. These regions are well suited to define fingerprints for subfamilies. A secondary structure prediction utilizing all available sequence information was performed and the result was fitted to the general 3D structure of a Walker A/GTPase. The agreement was unexpectedly high and strongly supports the conclusion that the AAA family belongs to the Walker superfamily of A/GTPases. PMID:9336829

  2. Annotation extension through protein family annotation coherence metrics

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Hugo P.; Clarke, Luka A.; Couto, Francisco M.

    2013-01-01

    Protein functional annotation consists in associating proteins with textual descriptors elucidating their biological roles. The bulk of annotation is done via automated procedures that ultimately rely on annotation transfer. Despite a large number of existing protein annotation procedures the ever growing protein space is never completely annotated. One of the facets of annotation incompleteness derives from annotation uncertainty. Often when protein function cannot be predicted with enough specificity it is instead conservatively annotated with more generic terms. In a scenario of protein families or functionally related (or even dissimilar) sets this leads to a more difficult task of using annotations to compare the extent of functional relatedness among all family or set members. However, we postulate that identifying sub-sets of functionally coherent proteins annotated at a very specific level, can help the annotation extension of other incompletely annotated proteins within the same family or functionally related set. As an example we analyse the status of annotation of a set of CAZy families belonging to the Polysaccharide Lyase class. We show that through the use of visualization methods and semantic similarity based metrics it is possible to identify families and respective annotation terms within them that are suitable for possible annotation extension. Based on our analysis we then propose a semi-automatic methodology leading to the extension of single annotation terms within these partially annotated protein sets or families. PMID:24130572

  3. Genomic analysis of membrane protein families: abundance and conserved motifs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Engelman, Donald M; Gerstein, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Background Polytopic membrane proteins can be related to each other on the basis of the number of transmembrane helices and sequence similarities. Building on the Pfam classification of protein domain families, and using transmembrane-helix prediction and sequence-similarity searching, we identified a total of 526 well-characterized membrane protein families in 26 recently sequenced genomes. To this we added a clustering of a number of predicted but unclassified membrane proteins, resulting in a total of 637 membrane protein families. Results Analysis of the occurrence and composition of these families revealed several interesting trends. The number of assigned membrane protein domains has an approximately linear relationship to the total number of open reading frames (ORFs) in 26 genomes studied. Caenorhabditis elegans is an apparent outlier, because of its high representation of seven-span transmembrane (7-TM) chemoreceptor families. In all genomes, including that of C. elegans, the number of distinct membrane protein families has a logarithmic relation to the number of ORFs. Glycine, proline, and tyrosine locations tend to be conserved in transmembrane regions within families, whereas isoleucine, valine, and methionine locations are relatively mutable. Analysis of motifs in putative transmembrane helices reveals that GxxxG and GxxxxxxG (which can be written GG4 and GG7, respectively; see Materials and methods) are among the most prevalent. This was noted in earlier studies; we now find these motifs are particularly well conserved in families, however, especially those corresponding to transporters, symporters, and channels. Conclusions We carried out a genome-wide analysis on patterns of the classified polytopic membrane protein families and analyzed the distribution of conserved amino acids and motifs in the transmembrane helix regions in these families. PMID:12372142

  4. Germins: A Diverse Protein Family Important For Crop Improvement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The germin protein family is comprised of two main subgroups in plants, oxalate oxidases (OXOs) and germin-like proteins (GLPs). These proteins are implicated in a variety of plant processes including germination, development, pollen formation, and response to abiotic and biotic stress. Here, we exa...

  5. Deciphering the Molecular and Functional Basis of Dbl Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Mamta; Dvorsky, Radovan; Ahmadian, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    The diffuse B-cell lymphoma (Dbl) family of the guanine nucleotide exchange factors is a direct activator of the Rho family proteins. The Rho family proteins are involved in almost every cellular process that ranges from fundamental (e.g. the establishment of cell polarity) to highly specialized processes (e.g. the contraction of vascular smooth muscle cells). Abnormal activation of the Rho proteins is known to play a crucial role in cancer, infectious and cognitive disorders, and cardiovascular diseases. However, the existence of 74 Dbl proteins and 25 Rho-related proteins in humans, which are largely uncharacterized, has led to increasing complexity in identifying specific upstream pathways. Thus, we comprehensively investigated sequence-structure-function-property relationships of 21 representatives of the Dbl protein family regarding their specificities and activities toward 12 Rho family proteins. The meta-analysis approach provides an unprecedented opportunity to broadly profile functional properties of Dbl family proteins, including catalytic efficiency, substrate selectivity, and signaling specificity. Our analysis has provided novel insights into the following: (i) understanding of the relative differences of various Rho protein members in nucleotide exchange; (ii) comparing and defining individual and overall guanine nucleotide exchange factor activities of a large representative set of the Dbl proteins toward 12 Rho proteins; (iii) grouping the Dbl family into functionally distinct categories based on both their catalytic efficiencies and their sequence-structural relationships; (iv) identifying conserved amino acids as fingerprints of the Dbl and Rho protein interaction; and (v) defining amino acid sequences conserved within, but not between, Dbl subfamilies. Therefore, the characteristics of such specificity-determining residues identified the regions or clusters conserved within the Dbl subfamilies. PMID:23255595

  6. Bcl-2 family proteins: master regulators of cell survival.

    PubMed

    Hatok, Jozef; Racay, Peter

    2016-08-01

    The most prominent function of proteins of the Bcl-2 family is regulation of the initiation of intrinsic (mitochondrial) pathways of apoptosis. However, recent research has revealed that in addition to regulation of mitochondrial apoptosis, proteins of the Bcl-2 family play important roles in regulating other cellular pathways with a strong impact on cell survival like autophagy, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response, intracellular calcium dynamics, cell cycle progression, mitochondrial dynamics and energy metabolism. This review summarizes the recent knowledge about functions of Bcl-2 family proteins that are related to cell survival. PMID:27505095

  7. Mu-8: visualizing differences between proteins and their families

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A complete understanding of the relationship between the amino acid sequence and resulting protein function remains an open problem in the biophysical sciences. Current approaches often rely on diagnosing functionally relevant mutations by determining whether an amino acid frequently occurs at a specific position within the protein family. However, these methods do not account for the biophysical properties and the 3D structure of the protein. We have developed an interactive visualization technique, Mu-8, that provides researchers with a holistic view of the differences of a selected protein with respect to a family of homologous proteins. Mu-8 helps to identify areas of the protein that exhibit: (1) significantly different bio-chemical characteristics, (2) relative conservation in the family, and (3) proximity to other regions that have suspect behavior in the folded protein. Methods Our approach quantifies and communicates the difference between a reference protein and its family based on amino acid indices or principal components of amino acid index classes, while accounting for conservation, proximity amongst residues, and overall 3D structure. Results We demonstrate Mu-8 in a case study with data provided by the 2013 BioVis contest. When comparing the sequence of a dysfunctional protein to its functional family, Mu-8 reveals several candidate regions that may cause function to break down. PMID:25237392

  8. Genome Pool Strategy for Structural Coverage of Protein Families

    SciTech Connect

    Jaroszewski, L.; Slabinski, L.; Wooley, J.; Deacon, A.M.; Lesley, S.A.; Wilson, I.A.; Godzik, A.

    2009-05-18

    Even closely homologous proteins often have different crystallization properties and propensities. This observation can be used to introduce an additional dimension into crystallization trials by simultaneous targeting multiple homologs in what we call a 'genome pool' strategy. We show that this strategy works because protein physicochemical properties correlated with crystallization success have a surprisingly broad distribution within most protein families. There are also easy and difficult families where this distribution is tilted in one direction. This leads to uneven structural coverage of protein families, with more easy ones solved. Increasing the size of the genome pool can improve chances of solving the difficult ones. In contrast, our analysis does not indicate that any specific genomes are easy or difficult. Finally, we show that the group of proteins with known 3D structures is systematically different from the general pool of known proteins and we assess the structural consequences of these differences.

  9. Comparison of the Folding Mechanism of Highly Homologous Proteins in the Lipid-binding Protein Family

    EPA Science Inventory

    The folding mechanism of two closely related proteins in the intracellular lipid binding protein family, human bile acid binding protein (hBABP) and rat bile acid binding protein (rBABP) were examined. These proteins are 77% identical (93% similar) in sequence Both of these singl...

  10. Metagenome and Metatranscriptome Analyses Using Protein Family Profiles.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Cuncong; Edlund, Anna; Yang, Youngik; McLean, Jeffrey S; Yooseph, Shibu

    2016-07-01

    Analyses of metagenome data (MG) and metatranscriptome data (MT) are often challenged by a paucity of complete reference genome sequences and the uneven/low sequencing depth of the constituent organisms in the microbial community, which respectively limit the power of reference-based alignment and de novo sequence assembly. These limitations make accurate protein family classification and abundance estimation challenging, which in turn hamper downstream analyses such as abundance profiling of metabolic pathways, identification of differentially encoded/expressed genes, and de novo reconstruction of complete gene and protein sequences from the protein family of interest. The profile hidden Markov model (HMM) framework enables the construction of very useful probabilistic models for protein families that allow for accurate modeling of position specific matches, insertions, and deletions. We present a novel homology detection algorithm that integrates banded Viterbi algorithm for profile HMM parsing with an iterative simultaneous alignment and assembly computational framework. The algorithm searches a given profile HMM of a protein family against a database of fragmentary MG/MT sequencing data and simultaneously assembles complete or near-complete gene and protein sequences of the protein family. The resulting program, HMM-GRASPx, demonstrates superior performance in aligning and assembling homologs when benchmarked on both simulated marine MG and real human saliva MG datasets. On real supragingival plaque and stool MG datasets that were generated from healthy individuals, HMM-GRASPx accurately estimates the abundances of the antimicrobial resistance (AMR) gene families and enables accurate characterization of the resistome profiles of these microbial communities. For real human oral microbiome MT datasets, using the HMM-GRASPx estimated transcript abundances significantly improves detection of differentially expressed (DE) genes. Finally, HMM-GRASPx was used to

  11. Metagenome and Metatranscriptome Analyses Using Protein Family Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Cuncong; Yooseph, Shibu

    2016-01-01

    Analyses of metagenome data (MG) and metatranscriptome data (MT) are often challenged by a paucity of complete reference genome sequences and the uneven/low sequencing depth of the constituent organisms in the microbial community, which respectively limit the power of reference-based alignment and de novo sequence assembly. These limitations make accurate protein family classification and abundance estimation challenging, which in turn hamper downstream analyses such as abundance profiling of metabolic pathways, identification of differentially encoded/expressed genes, and de novo reconstruction of complete gene and protein sequences from the protein family of interest. The profile hidden Markov model (HMM) framework enables the construction of very useful probabilistic models for protein families that allow for accurate modeling of position specific matches, insertions, and deletions. We present a novel homology detection algorithm that integrates banded Viterbi algorithm for profile HMM parsing with an iterative simultaneous alignment and assembly computational framework. The algorithm searches a given profile HMM of a protein family against a database of fragmentary MG/MT sequencing data and simultaneously assembles complete or near-complete gene and protein sequences of the protein family. The resulting program, HMM-GRASPx, demonstrates superior performance in aligning and assembling homologs when benchmarked on both simulated marine MG and real human saliva MG datasets. On real supragingival plaque and stool MG datasets that were generated from healthy individuals, HMM-GRASPx accurately estimates the abundances of the antimicrobial resistance (AMR) gene families and enables accurate characterization of the resistome profiles of these microbial communities. For real human oral microbiome MT datasets, using the HMM-GRASPx estimated transcript abundances significantly improves detection of differentially expressed (DE) genes. Finally, HMM-GRASPx was used to

  12. The KP4 killer protein gene family

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Killer protein 4 (KP4) is a well studied toxin secreted by the maize smut fungus Ustilago maydis that kills sensitive Ustilago strains as well as inhibits Fusarium and plant root growth. This small, cysteine rich protein is encoded by a virus that depends on host survival for replication. KP4 functi...

  13. Structural and Energetic Characterization of the Ankyrin Repeat Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Parra, R. Gonzalo; Espada, Rocío; Verstraete, Nina; Ferreiro, Diego U.

    2015-01-01

    Ankyrin repeat containing proteins are one of the most abundant solenoid folds. Usually implicated in specific protein-protein interactions, these proteins are readily amenable for design, with promising biotechnological and biomedical applications. Studying repeat protein families presents technical challenges due to the high sequence divergence among the repeating units. We developed and applied a systematic method to consistently identify and annotate the structural repetitions over the members of the complete Ankyrin Repeat Protein Family, with increased sensitivity over previous studies. We statistically characterized the number of repeats, the folding of the repeat-arrays, their structural variations, insertions and deletions. An energetic analysis of the local frustration patterns reveal the basic features underlying fold stability and its relation to the functional binding regions. We found a strong linear correlation between the conservation of the energetic features in the repeat arrays and their sequence variations, and discuss new insights into the organization and function of these ubiquitous proteins. PMID:26691182

  14. Sampling the membrane: function of rhomboid-family proteins.

    PubMed

    Lemberg, Marius K

    2013-05-01

    Rhomboids constitute a conserved protein superfamily that specifically binds membrane proteins and directs them into various different cellular pathways ranging from regulated secretion to endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD). Rhomboid proteases are known to release protein domains from membranes by a cut in their membrane anchor, whereas an emerging new class of rhomboid-family proteins lacks key catalytic residues and is not proteolytically active. Recent work has shown that these rhomboid pseudoproteases, including iRhoms and derlins, bind membrane proteins to regulate their fate, but the underlying molecular mechanism is not known. This review summarizes recent advances in the molecular understanding of rhomboid-family proteins and discusses common principles in how they recognize and bind proteins in the plane of the membrane. PMID:23369641

  15. The small heat shock proteins family: the long forgotten chaperones.

    PubMed

    Garrido, C; Paul, C; Seigneuric, R; Kampinga, H H

    2012-10-01

    Small heat shock proteins are a rather heterogeneous family of ATP-independent chaperones, some of which have been proven to block protein aggregation and help the cells to survive stressful conditions. Although much less studied than high molecular weight HSPs like HSP70/HSPA or HSP90/HSPC, their implication in physio-pathological processes and human diseases is now well evidenced, as it will be discussed in the different reviews of this special issue. In this mini-review we will just present a general introduction about the small heat shock proteins family. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Small HSPs in physiology and pathology. PMID:22449631

  16. The ProDom database of protein domain families.

    PubMed Central

    Corpet, F; Gouzy, J; Kahn, D

    1998-01-01

    The ProDom database contains protein domain families generated from the SWISS-PROT database by automated sequence comparisons. It can be searched on the World Wide Web (http://protein.toulouse.inra. fr/prodom.html ) or by E-mail (prodom@toulouse.inra.fr) to study domain arrangements within known families or new proteins. Strong emphasis has been put on the graphical user interface which allows for interactive analysis of protein homology relationships. Recent improvements to the server include: ProDom search by keyword; links to PROSITE and PDB entries; more sensitive ProDom similarity search with BLAST or WU-BLAST; alignments of query sequences with homologous ProDom domain families; and links to the SWISS-MODEL server (http: //www.expasy.ch/swissmod/SWISS-MODEL.html ) for homology based 3-D domain modelling where possible. PMID:9399865

  17. MICAL-Family Proteins: Complex Regulators of the Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Giridharan, Sai Srinivas Panapakkam

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The molecules interacting with CasL (MICAL) family members participate in a multitude of activities, including axonal growth cone repulsion, membrane trafficking, apoptosis, and bristle development in flies. An interesting feature of MICAL proteins is the presence of an N-terminal flavo-mono-oxygenase domain. This mono-oxygenase domain generates redox potential with which MICALs can either oxidize proteins or produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). Actin is one such protein that is affected by MICAL function, leading to dramatic cytoskeletal rearrangements. This review describes the MICAL-family members, and discusses their mechanisms of actin-binding and regulation of actin cytoskeleton organization. Recent Advances: Recent studies show that MICALs directly induce oxidation of actin molecules, leading to actin depolymerization. ROS production by MICALs also causes oxidation of collapsin response mediator protein-2, a microtubule assembly promoter, which subsequently undergoes phosphorylation. Critical Issues: MICAL proteins oxidize proteins through two mechanisms: either directly by oxidizing methionine residues or indirectly via the production of ROS. It remains unclear whether MICAL proteins employ both mechanisms or whether the activity of MICAL-family proteins might vary with different substrates. Future Directions: The identification of additional substrates oxidized by MICAL will shed new light on MICAL protein function. Additional directions include expanding studies toward the MICAL-like homologs that lack flavin adenine dinucleotide domains and oxidation activity. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2059–2073. PMID:23834433

  18. Clustering proteins into families using artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Ferrán, E A; Ferrara, P

    1992-02-01

    An artificial neural network was used to cluster proteins into families. The network, composed of 7 x 7 neurons, was trained with the Kohonen unsupervised learning algorithm using, as inputs, matrix patterns derived from the bipeptide composition of 447 proteins, belonging to 13 different families. As a result of the training, and without any a priori indication of the number or composition of the expected families, the network self-organized the activation of its neurons into topologically ordered maps in which almost all the proteins (96.7%) were correctly clustered into the corresponding families. In a second computational experiment, a similar network was trained with one family of the previous learning set (76 cytochrome c sequences). The new neural map clustered these proteins into 25 different neurons (five in the first experiment), wherein phylogenetically related sequences were positioned close to each other. This result shows that the network can adapt the clustering resolution to the complexity of the learning set, a useful feature when working with an unknown number of clusters. Although the learning stage is time consuming, once the topological map is obtained, the classification of new proteins is very fast. Altogether, our results suggest that this novel approach may be a useful tool to organize the search for homologies in large macromolecular databases. PMID:1314686

  19. The Protein 4.1 family: hub proteins in animals for organizing membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Baines, Anthony J; Lu, Hui-Chun; Bennett, Pauline M

    2014-02-01

    Proteins of the 4.1 family are characteristic of eumetazoan organisms. Invertebrates contain single 4.1 genes and the Drosophila model suggests that 4.1 is essential for animal life. Vertebrates have four paralogues, known as 4.1R, 4.1N, 4.1G and 4.1B, which are additionally duplicated in the ray-finned fish. Protein 4.1R was the first to be discovered: it is a major mammalian erythrocyte cytoskeletal protein, essential to the mechanochemical properties of red cell membranes because it promotes the interaction between spectrin and actin in the membrane cytoskeleton. 4.1R also binds certain phospholipids and is required for the stable cell surface accumulation of a number of erythrocyte transmembrane proteins that span multiple functional classes; these include cell adhesion molecules, transporters and a chemokine receptor. The vertebrate 4.1 proteins are expressed in most tissues, and they are required for the correct cell surface accumulation of a very wide variety of membrane proteins including G-Protein coupled receptors, voltage-gated and ligand-gated channels, as well as the classes identified in erythrocytes. Indeed, such large numbers of protein interactions have been mapped for mammalian 4.1 proteins, most especially 4.1R, that it appears that they can act as hubs for membrane protein organization. The range of critical interactions of 4.1 proteins is reflected in disease relationships that include hereditary anaemias, tumour suppression, control of heartbeat and nervous system function. The 4.1 proteins are defined by their domain structure: apart from the spectrin/actin-binding domain they have FERM and FERM-adjacent domains and a unique C-terminal domain. Both the FERM and C-terminal domains can bind transmembrane proteins, thus they have the potential to be cross-linkers for membrane proteins. The activity of the FERM domain is subject to multiple modes of regulation via binding of regulatory ligands, phosphorylation of the FERM associated domain and

  20. The KCTD family of proteins: structure, function, disease relevance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The family of potassium channel tetramerizationdomain (KCTD) proteins consists of 26 members with mostly unknown functions. The name of the protein family is due to the sequence similarity between the conserved N-terminal region of KCTD proteins and the tetramerization domain in some voltage-gated potassium channels. Dozens of publications suggest that KCTD proteins have roles in various biological processes and diseases. In this review, we summarize the character of Bric-a-brack,Tram-track, Broad complex(BTB) of KCTD proteins, their roles in the ubiquitination pathway, and the roles of KCTD mutants in diseases. Furthermore, we review potential downstream signaling pathways and discuss future studies that should be performed. PMID:24268103

  1. The neuronal calcium sensor family of Ca2+-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Burgoyne, R D; Weiss, J L

    2001-01-01

    Ca(2+) plays a central role in the function of neurons as the trigger for neurotransmitter release, and many aspects of neuronal activity, from rapid modulation to changes in gene expression, are controlled by Ca(2+). These actions of Ca(2+) must be mediated by Ca(2+)-binding proteins, including calmodulin, which is involved in Ca(2+) regulation, not only in neurons, but in most other cell types. A large number of other EF-hand-containing Ca(2+)-binding proteins are known. One family of these, the neuronal calcium sensor (NCS) proteins, has a restricted expression in retinal photoreceptors or neurons and neuroendocrine cells, suggesting that they have specialized roles in these cell types. Two members of the family (recoverin and guanylate cyclase-activating protein) have established roles in the regulation of phototransduction. Despite close sequence similarities, the NCS proteins have distinct neuronal distributions, suggesting that they have different functions. Recent work has begun to demonstrate the physiological roles of members of this protein family. These include roles in the modulation of neurotransmitter release, control of cyclic nucleotide metabolism, biosynthesis of polyphosphoinositides, regulation of gene expression and in the direct regulation of ion channels. In the present review we describe the known sequences and structures of the NCS proteins, information on their interactions with target proteins and current knowledge about their cellular and physiological functions. PMID:11115393

  2. Systems Proteomics View of the Endogenous Human Claudin Protein Family.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Koval, Michael; Ranganathan, Shoba; Fanayan, Susan; Hancock, William S; Lundberg, Emma K; Beavis, Ronald C; Lane, Lydie; Duek, Paula; McQuade, Leon; Kelleher, Neil L; Baker, Mark S

    2016-02-01

    Claudins are the major transmembrane protein components of tight junctions in human endothelia and epithelia. Tissue-specific expression of claudin members suggests that this protein family is not only essential for sustaining the role of tight junctions in cell permeability control but also vital in organizing cell contact signaling by protein-protein interactions. How this protein family is collectively processed and regulated is key to understanding the role of junctional proteins in preserving cell identity and tissue integrity. The focus of this review is to first provide a brief overview of the functional context, on the basis of the extensive body of claudin biology research that has been thoroughly reviewed, for endogenous human claudin members and then ascertain existing and future proteomics techniques that may be applicable to systematically characterizing the chemical forms and interacting protein partners of this protein family in human. The ability to elucidate claudin-based signaling networks may provide new insight into cell development and differentiation programs that are crucial to tissue stability and manipulation. PMID:26680015

  3. Deleted in liver cancer protein family in human malignancies (Review)

    PubMed Central

    Lukasik, D.; Wilczek, E.; Wasiutynski, A.; Gornicka, B.

    2011-01-01

    The Deleted in Liver Cancer (DLC) protein family comprises proteins that exert their function mainly by the Rho GTPase-activating protein (GAP) domain and by regulation of the small GTPases. Since Rho GTPases are key factors in cell proliferation, polarity, cytoskeletal remodeling and migration, the aberrant function of their regulators may lead to cell transformation. One subgroup of these proteins is the DLC family. It was found that the first identified gene from this family, DLC1, is often lost in hepatocellular carcinoma and may be involved as a tumor suppressor in the liver. Subsequent studies evaluated the hypothesis that the DLC1 gene acts as a tumor suppressor, not only in liver cancer, but also in other types of cancer. Following DLC1, two other members of the DLC protein family, DLC2 and DLC3, were identified. However, limited published data are available concerning the role of these proteins in malignant transformation. This review focuses on the structure and the role of DLC1 and its relatives in physiological conditions and summarizes data published thus far regarding DLC function in the neoplastic process. PMID:22866123

  4. BCL-2 family proteins as regulators of mitochondria metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gross, Atan

    2016-08-01

    The BCL-2 family proteins are major regulators of apoptosis, and one of their major sites of action are the mitochondria. Mitochondria are the cellular hubs for metabolism and indeed selected BCL-2 family proteins also possess roles related to mitochondria metabolism and dynamics. Here we discuss the link between mitochondrial metabolism/dynamics and the fate of stem cells, with an emphasis on the role of the BID-MTCH2 pair in regulating this link. We also discuss the possibility that BCL-2 family proteins act as metabolic sensors/messengers coming on and off of mitochondria to "sample" the cytosol and provide the mitochondria with up-to-date metabolic information. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26827940

  5. PSI-2: Structural Genomics to Cover Protein Domain Family Space

    PubMed Central

    Dessailly, Benoît H.; Nair, Rajesh; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Fajardo, J. Eduardo; Kouranov, Andrei; Lee, David; Fiser, Andras; Godzik, Adam; Rost, Burkhard; Orengo, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Summary One major objective of structural genomics efforts, including the NIH-funded Protein Structure Initiative (PSI), has been to increase the structural coverage of protein sequence space. Here, we present the target selection strategy used during the second phase of PSI (PSI-2). This strategy, jointly devised by the bioinformatics groups associated with the PSI-2 large-scale production centres, targets representatives from large, structurally uncharacterised protein domain families, and from structurally uncharacterised subfamilies in very large and diverse families with incomplete structural coverage. These very large families are extremely diverse both structurally and functionally, and are highly over-represented in known proteomes. On the basis of several metrics, we then discuss to what extent PSI-2, during its first three years, has increased the structural coverage of genomes, and contributed structural and functional novelty. Together, the results presented here suggest that PSI-2 is successfully meeting its objectives and provides useful insights into structural and functional space. PMID:19523904

  6. Expression and localization of X11 family proteins in neurons.

    PubMed

    Motodate, Rika; Saito, Yuhki; Hata, Saori; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2016-09-01

    The X11/Mint family of proteins comprises X11/X11α/Mint1, X11L/X11β/Mint2, and X11L2/X11γ/Mint3. Each of these molecules is an adaptor protein that contains a phosphotyrosine interaction/binding (PI/PTB) and two PDZ domains in its carboxy-terminal region. X11/Mint family members associate with a broad spectrum of membrane proteins, including Alzheimer's β-amyloid precursor protein (APP), alcadeins, and low density lipoprotein receptor proteins, as well as various cytoplasmic proteins including Arf, kalirin-7, and Munc18. In particular, X11 and X11L are thought to play various roles in the regulation of neural functions in brain. Nevertheless, the protein levels and respective localization of individual family members remain controversial. We analyzed the protein levels of X11 and X11L in the corresponding single- and double-knockout mice. X11 and X11L did not exhibit obvious changes of their protein levels when the other was absent, especially in cerebrum in which they were widely co-expressed. In cerebellum, X11 and X11L localized in characteristic patterns in various types of neurons, and X11 protein level increased without an obvious ectopic localization in X11L-knockout mice. Interestingly, only X11L protein existed specifically in brain, whereas, contrary to the accepted view, X11 protein was detected at the highest levels in brain but was also strongly detected in pancreas, testis, and paranephros. Together, our results indicate that both X11 and X11L exert largely in brain neurons, but X11 may also function in peripheral tissues. PMID:27268412

  7. Disorder and function: a review of the dehydrin protein family.

    PubMed

    Graether, Steffen P; Boddington, Kelly F

    2014-01-01

    Dehydration proteins (dehydrins) are group 2 members of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein family. The protein architecture of dehydrins can be described by the presence of three types of conserved sequence motifs that have been named the K-, Y-, and S-segments. By definition, a dehydrin must contain at least one copy of the lysine-rich K-segment. Abiotic stresses such as drought, cold, and salinity cause the upregulation of dehydrin mRNA and protein levels. Despite the large body of genetic and protein evidence of the importance of these proteins in stress response, the in vivo protective mechanism is not fully known. In vitro experimental evidence from biochemical assays and localization experiments suggests multiple roles for dehydrins, including membrane protection, cryoprotection of enzymes, and protection from reactive oxygen species. Membrane binding by dehydrins is likely to be as a peripheral membrane protein, since the protein sequences are highly hydrophilic and contain many charged amino acids. Because of this, dehydrins in solution are intrinsically disordered proteins, that is, they have no well-defined secondary or tertiary structure. Despite their disorder, dehydrins have been shown to gain structure when bound to ligands such as membranes, and to possibly change their oligomeric state when bound to ions. We review what is currently known about dehydrin sequences and their structures, and examine the various ligands that have been shown to bind to this family of proteins. PMID:25400646

  8. Disorder and function: a review of the dehydrin protein family

    PubMed Central

    Graether, Steffen P.; Boddington, Kelly F.

    2014-01-01

    Dehydration proteins (dehydrins) are group 2 members of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein family. The protein architecture of dehydrins can be described by the presence of three types of conserved sequence motifs that have been named the K-, Y-, and S-segments. By definition, a dehydrin must contain at least one copy of the lysine-rich K-segment. Abiotic stresses such as drought, cold, and salinity cause the upregulation of dehydrin mRNA and protein levels. Despite the large body of genetic and protein evidence of the importance of these proteins in stress response, the in vivo protective mechanism is not fully known. In vitro experimental evidence from biochemical assays and localization experiments suggests multiple roles for dehydrins, including membrane protection, cryoprotection of enzymes, and protection from reactive oxygen species. Membrane binding by dehydrins is likely to be as a peripheral membrane protein, since the protein sequences are highly hydrophilic and contain many charged amino acids. Because of this, dehydrins in solution are intrinsically disordered proteins, that is, they have no well-defined secondary or tertiary structure. Despite their disorder, dehydrins have been shown to gain structure when bound to ligands such as membranes, and to possibly change their oligomeric state when bound to ions. We review what is currently known about dehydrin sequences and their structures, and examine the various ligands that have been shown to bind to this family of proteins. PMID:25400646

  9. Current Overview of Allergens of Plant Pathogenesis Related Protein Families

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Mau; Singh, Rashmi Prabha; Kushwaha, Gajraj Singh; Iqbal, Naseer; Singh, Avinash; Kaushik, Sanket; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenesis related (PR) proteins are one of the major sources of plant derived allergens. These proteins are induced by the plants as a defense response system in stress conditions like microbial and insect infections, wounding, exposure to harsh chemicals, and atmospheric conditions. However, some plant tissues that are more exposed to environmental conditions like UV irradiation and insect or fungal attacks express these proteins constitutively. These proteins are mostly resistant to proteases and most of them show considerable stability at low pH. Many of these plant pathogenesis related proteins are found to act as food allergens, latex allergens, and pollen allergens. Proteins having similar amino acid sequences among the members of PR proteins may be responsible for cross-reactivity among allergens from diverse plants. This review analyzes the different pathogenesis related protein families that have been reported as allergens. Proteins of these families have been characterized in regard to their biological functions, amino acid sequence, and cross-reactivity. The three-dimensional structures of some of these allergens have also been evaluated to elucidate the antigenic determinants of these molecules and to explain the cross-reactivity among the various allergens. PMID:24696647

  10. Reactivity of human salivary proteins families toward food polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Soares, Susana; Vitorino, Rui; Osório, Hugo; Fernandes, Ana; Venâncio, Armando; Mateus, Nuno; Amado, Francisco; de Freitas, Victor

    2011-05-25

    Tannins are well-known food polyphenols that interact with proteins, namely, salivary proteins. This interaction is an important factor in relation to their bioavailability and is considered the basis of several important properties of tannins, namely, the development of astringency. It has been generally accepted that astringency is due to the tannin-induced complexation and/or precipitation of salivary proline-rich proteins (PRPs) in the oral cavity. However, this complexation is thought to provide protection against dietary tannins. Neverthless, there is no concrete evidence and agreement about which PRP families (acidic, basic, and glycosylated) are responsible for the interaction with condensed tannins. In the present work, human saliva was isolated, and the proteins existing in saliva were characterized by chromatographic and proteomic approaches (HPLC-DAD, ESI-MS, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and MALDI-TOF). These approaches were also adapted to study the affinity of the different families of salivary proteins to condensed tannins by the interaction of saliva with grape seed procyanidins. The results obtained when all the main families of salivary proteins are present in a competitive assay, like in the oral cavity, demonstrate that condensed tannins interact first with acidic PRPs and statherin and thereafter with histatins, glycosylated PRPs, and bPRPs. PMID:21417408

  11. Cullin Family Proteins and Tumorigenesis: Genetic Association and Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi; Sui, Jie; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Caiguo

    2015-01-01

    Cullin family proteins function as scaffolds to form numerous E3 ubiquitin ligases with RING proteins, adaptor proteins and substrate recognition receptors. These E3 ligases further recognize numerous substrates to participate in a variety of cellular processes, such as DNA damage and repair, cell death and cell cycle progression. Clinically, cullin-associated E3 ligases have been identified to involve numerous human diseases, especially with regard to multiple cancer types. Over the past few years, our understanding of cullin proteins and their functions in genome stability and tumorigenesis has expanded enormously. Herein, this review briefly provides current perspectives on cullin protein functions, and mainly summarizes and discusses molecular mechanisms of cullin proteins in tumorigenesis. PMID:25663940

  12. Proteins of the ETS family with transcriptional repressor activity.

    PubMed

    Mavrothalassitis, G; Ghysdael, J

    2000-12-18

    ETS proteins form one of the largest families of signal-dependent transcriptional regulators, mediating cellular proliferation, differentiation and tumorigenesis. Most of the known ETS proteins have been shown to activate transcription. However, four ETS proteins (YAN, ERF, NET and TEL) can act as transcriptional repressors. In three cases (ERF, NET and TEL) distinct repression domains have been identified and there are indications that NET and TEL may mediate transcription via Histone Deacetylase recruitment. All four proteins appear to be regulated by MAPKs, though for YAN and ERF this regulation seems to be restricted to ERKs. YAN, ERF and TEL have been implicated in cellular proliferation although there are indications suggesting a possible involvement of YAN and TEL in differentiation as well. Other ETS-domain proteins have been shown to repress transcription in a context specific manner, and there are suggestions that the ETS DNA-binding domain may act as a transcriptional repressor. Transcriptional repression by ETS domain proteins adds an other level in the orchestrated regulation by this diverse family of transcription factors that often recognize similar if not identical binding sites on DNA and are believed to regulate critical genes in a variety of biological processes. Definitive assessment of the importance of this novel regulatory level will require the identification of ETS proteins target genes and the further analysis of transcriptional control and biological function of these proteins in defined pathways. PMID:11175368

  13. Computing a new family of shape descriptors for protein structures.

    PubMed

    Røgen, Peter; Sinclair, Robert

    2003-01-01

    The large-scale 3D structure of a protein can be represented by the polygonal curve through the carbon alpha atoms of the protein backbone. We introduce an algorithm for computing the average number of times that a given configuration of crossings on such polygonal curves is seen, the average being taken over all directions in space. Hereby, we introduce a new family of global geometric measures of protein structures, which we compare with the so-called generalized Gauss integrals. PMID:14632419

  14. The inverse autotransporter family: intimin, invasin and related proteins.

    PubMed

    Leo, Jack C; Oberhettinger, Philipp; Schütz, Monika; Linke, Dirk

    2015-02-01

    Intimin and invasin are adhesins and central virulence factors of attaching and effacing bacteria, such as enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli, and enteropathogenic Yersiniae, respectively. These proteins are prototypes of a large family of adhesins distributed widely in Gram-negative bacteria. It is now evident that this protein family represents a previously unrecognized autotransporter secretion system, termed type Ve secretion. In contrast to classical autotransport, where the transmembrane β-barrel domain or translocation unit is C-terminal to the extracellular region or passenger domain, type Ve-secreted proteins have an inverted topology with the passenger domain C-terminal to the translocation unit; hence the term inverse autotransporter. This minireview covers the recent advances in elucidating the structure and biogenesis of inverse autotransporters. PMID:25596886

  15. The NSD family of protein methyltransferases in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Vougiouklakis, Theodore; Hamamoto, Ryuji; Nakamura, Yusuke; Saloura, Vassiliki

    2015-08-01

    The NSD family of protein lysine methyltransferases consists of NSD1, NSD2/WHSC1/MMSET and NSD3/WHSC1L1. NSD2 haploinsufficiency causes Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, while NSD1 mutations lead to the Sotos syndrome. Recently, a number of studies showed that the NSD methyltransferases were overexpressed, amplified or somatically mutated in multiple types of cancer, suggesting their critical role in cancer. These enzymes methylate specific lysine residues on histone tails and their dysfunction results in epigenomic aberrations which play a fundamental role in oncogenesis. Furthermore, NSD1 was also reported to methylate a nonhistone protein substrate, RELA/p65 subunit of NF-κB, implying its regulatory function through nonhistone methylation pathways. In this review, we summarize the current research regarding the role of the NSD family proteins in cancer and underline their potential as targets for novel cancer therapeutics. PMID:25942451

  16. Ferritin family proteins and their use in bionanotechnology.

    PubMed

    He, Didi; Marles-Wright, Jon

    2015-12-25

    Ferritin family proteins are found in all kingdoms of life and act to store iron within a protein cage and to protect the cell from oxidative damage caused by the Fenton reaction. The structural and biochemical features of the ferritins have been widely exploited in bionanotechnology applications: from the production of metal nanoparticles; as templates for semi-conductor production; and as scaffolds for vaccine design and drug delivery. In this review we first discuss the structural properties of the main ferritin family proteins, and describe how their organisation specifies their functions. Second, we describe materials science applications of ferritins that rely on their ability to sequester metal within their cavities. Finally, we explore the use of ferritin as a container for drug delivery and as a scaffold for the production of vaccines. PMID:25573765

  17. Ferritin family proteins and their use in bionanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    He, Didi; Marles-Wright, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin family proteins are found in all kingdoms of life and act to store iron within a protein cage and to protect the cell from oxidative damage caused by the Fenton reaction. The structural and biochemical features of the ferritins have been widely exploited in bionanotechnology applications: from the production of metal nanoparticles; as templates for semi-conductor production; and as scaffolds for vaccine design and drug delivery. In this review we first discuss the structural properties of the main ferritin family proteins, and describe how their organisation specifies their functions. Second, we describe materials science applications of ferritins that rely on their ability to sequester metal within their cavities. Finally, we explore the use of ferritin as a container for drug delivery and as a scaffold for the production of vaccines. PMID:25573765

  18. Sensory properties of the PII signalling protein family.

    PubMed

    Forchhammer, Karl; Lüddecke, Jan

    2016-02-01

    PII signalling proteins constitute one of the largest families of signalling proteins in nature. An even larger superfamily of trimeric sensory proteins with the same architectural principle as PII proteins appears in protein structure databases. Large surface-exposed flexible loops protrude from the intersubunit faces, where effector molecules are bound that tune the conformation of the loops. Via this mechanism, PII proteins control target proteins in response to cellular ATP/ADP levels and the 2-oxoglutarate status, thereby coordinating the cellular carbon/nitrogen balance. The antagonistic (ATP versus ADP) and synergistic (2-oxoglutarate and ATP) mode of effector molecule binding is further affected by PII -receptor interaction, leading to a highly sophisticated signalling network organized by PII . Altogether, it appears that PII is a multitasking information processor that, depending on its interaction environment, differentially transmits information on the energy status and the cellular 2-oxoglutarate level. In addition to the basic mode of PII function, several bacterial PII proteins may transmit a signal of the cellular glutamine status via covalent modification. Remarkably, during the evolution of plant chloroplasts, glutamine signalling by PII proteins was re-established by acquisition of a short sequence extension at the C-terminus. This plant-specific C-terminus makes the interaction of plant PII proteins with one of its targets, the arginine biosynthetic enzyme N-acetyl-glutamate kinase, glutamine-dependent. PMID:26527104

  19. TRIM family proteins: retroviral restriction and antiviral defence.

    PubMed

    Nisole, Sébastien; Stoye, Jonathan P; Saïb, Ali

    2005-10-01

    Members of the tripartite motif (TRIM) protein family are involved in various cellular processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, development, oncogenesis and apoptosis. Some TRIM proteins display antiviral properties, targeting retroviruses in particular. The potential activity of TRIM19, better known as promyelocytic leukaemia protein, against several viruses has been well documented and, recently, TRIM5alpha has been identified as the factor responsible for the previously described Lv1 and Ref1 antiretroviral activities. There is also evidence indicating that other TRIM proteins can influence viral replication. These findings are reviewed here, and the possibility that TRIMs represent a new and widespread class of antiviral proteins involved in innate immunity is also considered. PMID:16175175

  20. A novel family of small proteins that affect plant development

    SciTech Connect

    John Charles Walker

    2011-04-29

    The DVL genes represent a new group of plant proteins that influence plant growth and development. Overexpression of DVL1, and other members of the DVL family, causes striking phenotypic changes. The DVL proteins share sequence homology in their C-terminal half. Point mutations in the C-terminal domain show it is necessary and deletion studies demonstrate the C-terminal domain is sufficient to confer the overexpression phenotypes. The phenotypes observed, and the conservation of the protein sequence in the plant kingdom, does suggest the DVL proteins have a role in modulating plant growth and development. Our working hypothesis is the DVL proteins function as regulators of cellular signaling pathways that control growth and development.

  1. The APOBEC Protein Family: United by Structure, Divergent in Function.

    PubMed

    Salter, Jason D; Bennett, Ryan P; Smith, Harold C

    2016-07-01

    The APOBEC (apolipoprotein B mRNA editing catalytic polypeptide-like) family of proteins have diverse and important functions in human health and disease. These proteins have an intrinsic ability to bind to both RNA and single-stranded (ss) DNA. Both function and tissue-specific expression varies widely for each APOBEC protein. We are beginning to understand that the activity of APOBEC proteins is regulated through genetic alterations, changes in their transcription and mRNA processing, and through their interactions with other macromolecules in the cell. Loss of cellular control of APOBEC activities leads to DNA hypermutation and promiscuous RNA editing associated with the development of cancer or viral drug resistance, underscoring the importance of understanding how APOBEC proteins are regulated. PMID:27283515

  2. Evolutionary hierarchy of vertebrate-like heterotrimeric G protein families.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Arunkumar; Mustafa, Arshi; Almén, Markus Sällman; Fredriksson, Robert; Williams, Michael J; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2015-10-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins perform a crucial role as molecular switches controlling various cellular responses mediated by G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling pathway. Recent data have shown that the vertebrate-like G protein families are found across metazoans and their closest unicellular relatives. However, an overall evolutionary hierarchy of vertebrate-like G proteins, including gene family annotations and in particular mapping individual gene gain/loss events across diverse holozoan lineages is still incomplete. Here, with more expanded invertebrate taxon sampling, we have reconstructed phylogenetic trees for each of the G protein classes/families and provide a robust classification and hierarchy of vertebrate-like heterotrimeric G proteins. Our results further extend the evidence that the common ancestor (CA) of holozoans had at least five ancestral Gα genes corresponding to all major vertebrate Gα classes and contain a total of eight genes including two Gβ and one Gγ. Our results also indicate that the GNAI/O-like gene likely duplicated in the last CA of metazoans to give rise to GNAI- and GNAO-like genes, which are conserved across invertebrates. Moreover, homologs of GNB1-4 paralogon- and GNB5 family-like genes are found in most metazoans and that the unicellular holozoans encode two ancestral Gβ genes. Similarly, most bilaterian invertebrates encode two Gγ genes which include a representative of the GNG gene cluster and a putative homolog of GNG13. Interestingly, our results also revealed key evolutionary events such as the Drosophila melanogaster eye specific Gβ subunit that is found conserved in most arthropods and several previously unidentified species specific expansions within Gαi/o, Gαs, Gαq, Gα12/13 classes and the GNB1-4 paralogon. Also, we provide an overall proposed evolutionary scenario on the expansions of all G protein families in vertebrate tetraploidizations. Our robust classification/hierarchy is essential to further

  3. Specificity of botulinum protease for human VAMP family proteins.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hideyuki; Ida, Tomoaki; Tsutsuki, Hiroyasu; Mori, Masatoshi; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Kohda, Tomoko; Mukamoto, Masafumi; Goshima, Naoki; Kozaki, Shunji; Ihara, Hideshi

    2012-04-01

    The botulinum neurotoxin light chain (BoNT-LC) is a zinc-dependent metalloprotease that cleaves neuronal SNARE proteins such as SNAP-25, VAMP2, and Syntaxin1. This cleavage interferes with the neurotransmitter release of peripheral neurons and results in flaccid paralysis. SNAP, VAMP, and Syntaxin are representative of large families of proteins that mediate most membrane fusion reactions, as well as both neuronal and non-neuronal exocytotic events in eukaryotic cells. Neuron-specific SNARE proteins, which are target substrates of BoNT, have been well studied; however, it is unclear whether other SNARE proteins are also proteolyzed by BoNT. Herein, we define the substrate specificity of BoNT-LC/B, /D, and /F towards recombinant human VAMP family proteins. We demonstrate that LC/B, /D, and /F are able to cleave VAMP1, 2, and 3, but no other VAMP family proteins. Kinetic analysis revealed that all LC have higher affinity and catalytic activity for the non-neuronal SNARE isoform VAMP3 than for the neuronal VAMP1 and 2 isoforms. LC/D in particular exhibited extremely low catalytic activity towards VAMP1 relative to other interactions, which we determined through point mutation analysis to be a result of the Ile present at residue 48 of VAMP1. We also identified the VAMP3 cleavage sites to be at the Gln 59-Phe 60 (LC/B), Lys 42-Leu 43 (LC/D), and Gln 41-Lys 42 (LC/F) peptide bonds, which correspond to those of VAMP1 or 2. Understanding the substrate specificity and kinetic characteristics of BoNT towards human SNARE proteins may aid in the development of novel therapeutic uses for BoNT. PMID:22289120

  4. Target Molecular Simulations of RecA Family Protein Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhi-Yuan; Lee, Wen-Jay; Su, Wan-Sheng; Wang, Yeng-Tseng

    2012-01-01

    Modeling of the RadA family mechanism is crucial to understanding the DNA SOS repair process. In a 2007 report, the archaeal RadA proteins function as rotary motors (linker region: I71-K88) such as shown in Figure 1. Molecular simulations approaches help to shed further light onto this phenomenon. We find 11 rotary residues (R72, T75-K81, M84, V86 and K87) and five zero rotary residues (I71, K74, E82, R83 and K88) in the simulations. Inclusion of our simulations may help to understand the RadA family mechanism. PMID:22837683

  5. TIM-family proteins inhibit HIV-1 release

    PubMed Central

    Li, Minghua; Ablan, Sherimay D.; Miao, Chunhui; Zheng, Yi-Min; Fuller, Matthew S.; Rennert, Paul D.; Maury, Wendy; Johnson, Marc C.; Freed, Eric O.; Liu, Shan-Lu

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that T-cell immunoglobulin (Ig) and mucin domain (TIM) proteins play critical roles in viral infections. Herein, we report that the TIM-family proteins strongly inhibit HIV-1 release, resulting in diminished viral production and replication. Expression of TIM-1 causes HIV-1 Gag and mature viral particles to accumulate on the plasma membrane. Mutation of the phosphatidylserine (PS) binding sites of TIM-1 abolishes its ability to block HIV-1 release. TIM-1, but to a much lesser extent PS-binding deficient mutants, induces PS flipping onto the cell surface; TIM-1 is also found to be incorporated into HIV-1 virions. Importantly, TIM-1 inhibits HIV-1 replication in CD4-positive Jurkat cells, despite its capability of up-regulating CD4 and promoting HIV-1 entry. In addition to TIM-1, TIM-3 and TIM-4 also block the release of HIV-1, as well as that of murine leukemia virus (MLV) and Ebola virus (EBOV); knockdown of TIM-3 in differentiated monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) enhances HIV-1 production. The inhibitory effects of TIM-family proteins on virus release are extended to other PS receptors, such as Axl and RAGE. Overall, our study uncovers a novel ability of TIM-family proteins to block the release of HIV-1 and other viruses by interaction with virion- and cell-associated PS. Our work provides new insights into a virus-cell interaction that is mediated by TIMs and PS receptors. PMID:25136083

  6. Phosphorylation of spore coat proteins by a family of atypical protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Kim B; Sreelatha, Anju; Durrant, Eric S; Lopez-Garrido, Javier; Muszewska, Anna; Dudkiewicz, Małgorzata; Grynberg, Marcin; Yee, Samantha; Pogliano, Kit; Tomchick, Diana R; Pawłowski, Krzysztof; Dixon, Jack E; Tagliabracci, Vincent S

    2016-06-21

    The modification of proteins by phosphorylation occurs in all life forms and is catalyzed by a large superfamily of enzymes known as protein kinases. We recently discovered a family of secretory pathway kinases that phosphorylate extracellular proteins. One member, family with sequence similarity 20C (Fam20C), is the physiological Golgi casein kinase. While examining distantly related protein sequences, we observed low levels of identity between the spore coat protein H (CotH), and the Fam20C-related secretory pathway kinases. CotH is a component of the spore in many bacterial and eukaryotic species, and is required for efficient germination of spores in Bacillus subtilis; however, the mechanism by which CotH affects germination is unclear. Here, we show that CotH is a protein kinase. The crystal structure of CotH reveals an atypical protein kinase-like fold with a unique mode of ATP binding. Examination of the genes neighboring cotH in B. subtilis led us to identify two spore coat proteins, CotB and CotG, as CotH substrates. Furthermore, we show that CotH-dependent phosphorylation of CotB and CotG is required for the efficient germination of B. subtilis spores. Collectively, our results define a family of atypical protein kinases and reveal an unexpected role for protein phosphorylation in spore biology. PMID:27185916

  7. Vaccinia Virus N1l Protein Resembles a B Cell Lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) Family Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyagi, M.; Zhai, D.; Jin, C.; Aleshin, A.E.; Stec, B.; Reed, J.C.; Liddington, R.C.; /Burnham Inst.

    2007-07-03

    Poxviruses encode immuno-modulatory proteins capable of subverting host defenses. The poxvirus vaccinia expresses a small 14-kDa protein, N1L, that is critical for virulence. We report the crystal structure of N1L, which reveals an unexpected but striking resemblance to host apoptotic regulators of the B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) family. Although N1L lacks detectable Bcl-2 homology (BH) motifs at the sequence level, we show that N1L binds with high affinity to the BH3 peptides of pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins in vitro, consistent with a role for N1L in modulating host antiviral defenses.

  8. [Immunodiffusion analysis of plasma proteins in the canine family].

    PubMed

    Baranov, O K; Iurishina, N A; Savina, M A

    1976-01-01

    Immunodiffusion studies have been made on the plasma of 9 species (Vulpes vulpes, V. corsak, Alopex lagopus, Canis aureus, C. lupus, C. familiaris, C. dingo, Nyctereutes procynoides, Fennecus zerde) from the family of Canidae using milk antisera. Unlike rabbit antisera used earlier, milk antisera make it possible to detect more significant antigenic divergency with respect to 5 alpha- and beta-globulins. These globulins seem to have a higher evolution rate of antigenic mosaics as compared to other plasma proteins in the family investigated. The family Canidae serologically may be divided into two main groups: 1) the genus Canis which includes the wolf, domestic dog, dingo, jackal and 2) species which significantly differ from the former (the fox, polar fox, dog fox, fennec). In relation to these two groups, the raccoon dog occupies special position. PMID:62473

  9. Size dependent complexity of sequences in protein families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, W.

    2005-10-01

    The size dependent complexity of protein sequences in various families in the FSSP database is characterized by sequence entropy, sequence similarity and sequence identity. As the average length Lf of sequences in the family increases, an increasing trend of the sequence entropy and a decreasing trend of the sequence similarity and sequence identity are found. As Lf increases beyond 250, a saturation of the sequence entropy, the sequence similarity and the sequence identity is observed. Such a saturated behavior of complexity is attributed to the saturation of the probability Pg of global (long-range) interactions in protein structures when Lf >250. It is also found that the alphabet size of residue types describing the sequence diversity depends on the value of Lf, and becomes saturated at 12.

  10. Diversity in the Sir2 family of protein deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Buck, Stephen W; Gallo, Christopher M; Smith, Jeffrey S

    2004-06-01

    The silent information regulator (Sir2) family of protein deacetylases (Sirtuins) are nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)(+)-dependent enzymes that hydrolyze one molecule of NAD(+) for every lysine residue that is deacetylated. The Sirtuins are phylogenetically conserved in eukaryotes, prokaryotes, and Archeal species. Prokaryotic and Archeal species usually have one or two Sirtuin homologs, whereas eukaryotes typically have multiple versions. The founding member of this protein family is the Sir2 histone deacetylase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is absolutely required for transcriptional silencing in this organism. Sirtuins in other organisms often have nonhistone substrates and in eukaryotes, are not always localized in the nucleus. The diversity of substrates is reflected in the various biological activities that Sirtuins function, including development, metabolism, apoptosis, and heterochromatin formation. This review emphasizes the great diversity in Sirtuin function and highlights its unusual catalytic properties. PMID:14742637

  11. Argonaute Family Protein Expression in Normal Tissue and Cancer Entities

    PubMed Central

    Bruckmann, Astrid; Hauptmann, Judith; Deutzmann, Rainer; Meister, Gunter; Bosserhoff, Anja Katrin

    2016-01-01

    The members of the Argonaute (AGO) protein family are key players in miRNA-guided gene silencing. They enable the interaction between small RNAs and their respective target mRNA(s) and support the catalytic destruction of the gene transcript or recruit additional proteins for downstream gene silencing. The human AGO family consists of four AGO proteins (AGO1-AGO4), but only AGO2 harbors nuclease activity. In this study, we characterized the expression of the four AGO proteins in cancer cell lines and normal tissues with a new mass spectrometry approach called AGO-APP (AGO Affinity Purification by Peptides). In all analyzed normal tissues, AGO1 and AGO2 were most prominent, but marked tissue-specific differences were identified. Furthermore, considerable changes during development were observed by comparing fetal and adult tissues. We also identified decreased overall AGO expression in melanoma derived cell lines compared to other tumor cell lines and normal tissues, with the largest differences in AGO2 expression. The experiments described in this study suggest that reduced amounts of AGO proteins, as key players in miRNA processing, have impact on several cellular processes. Deregulated miRNA expression has been attributed to chromosomal aberrations, promoter regulation and it is known to have a major impact on tumor development and progression. Our findings will further increase our basic understanding of the molecular basis of miRNA processing and its relevance for disease. PMID:27518285

  12. Characterization of the Roco protein family in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    van Egmond, Wouter N; van Haastert, Peter J M

    2010-05-01

    The Roco family consists of multidomain Ras-GTPases that include LRRK2, a protein mutated in familial Parkinson's disease. The genome of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum encodes 11 Roco proteins. To study the functions of these proteins, we systematically knocked out the roco genes. Previously described functions for GbpC, Pats1, and QkgA (Roco1 to Roco3) were confirmed, while novel developmental defects were identified in roco4- and roco11-null cells. Cells lacking Roco11 form larger fruiting bodies than wild-type cells, while roco4-null cells show strong developmental defects during the transition from mound to fruiting body; prestalk cells produce reduced levels of cellulose, leading to unstable stalks that are unable to properly lift the spore head. Detailed phylogenetic analysis of four slime mold species reveals that QkgA and Roco11 evolved relatively late by duplication of an ancestor roco4 gene (later than approximately 300 million years ago), contrary to the situation with other roco genes, which were already present before the split of the common ancestor of D. discoideum and Polysphondylium pallidum (before approximately 600 million years ago). Together, our data show that the Dictyostelium Roco proteins serve a surprisingly diverse set of functions and highlight Roco4 as a key protein for proper stalk cell formation. PMID:20348387

  13. Argonaute Family Protein Expression in Normal Tissue and Cancer Entities.

    PubMed

    Völler, Daniel; Linck, Lisa; Bruckmann, Astrid; Hauptmann, Judith; Deutzmann, Rainer; Meister, Gunter; Bosserhoff, Anja Katrin

    2016-01-01

    The members of the Argonaute (AGO) protein family are key players in miRNA-guided gene silencing. They enable the interaction between small RNAs and their respective target mRNA(s) and support the catalytic destruction of the gene transcript or recruit additional proteins for downstream gene silencing. The human AGO family consists of four AGO proteins (AGO1-AGO4), but only AGO2 harbors nuclease activity. In this study, we characterized the expression of the four AGO proteins in cancer cell lines and normal tissues with a new mass spectrometry approach called AGO-APP (AGO Affinity Purification by Peptides). In all analyzed normal tissues, AGO1 and AGO2 were most prominent, but marked tissue-specific differences were identified. Furthermore, considerable changes during development were observed by comparing fetal and adult tissues. We also identified decreased overall AGO expression in melanoma derived cell lines compared to other tumor cell lines and normal tissues, with the largest differences in AGO2 expression. The experiments described in this study suggest that reduced amounts of AGO proteins, as key players in miRNA processing, have impact on several cellular processes. Deregulated miRNA expression has been attributed to chromosomal aberrations, promoter regulation and it is known to have a major impact on tumor development and progression. Our findings will further increase our basic understanding of the molecular basis of miRNA processing and its relevance for disease. PMID:27518285

  14. Characterization of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Interacting Protein (AIP) Mutations in Familial Isolated Pituitary Adenoma Families

    PubMed Central

    Igreja, Susana; Chahal, Harvinder S; King, Peter; Bolger, Graeme B; Srirangalingam, Umasuthan; Guasti, Leonardo; Chapple, J Paul; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Gueorguiev, Maria; Guegan, Katie; Stals, Karen; Khoo, Bernard; Kumar, Ajith V; Ellard, Sian; Grossman, Ashley B; Korbonits, Márta

    2010-01-01

    Familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA) is an autosomal dominant condition with variable genetic background and incomplete penetrance. Germline mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene have been reported in 15–40% of FIPA patients. Limited data are available on the functional consequences of the mutations or regarding the regulation of the AIP gene. We describe a large cohort of FIPA families and characterize missense and silent mutations using minigene constructs, luciferase and β-galactosidase assays, as well as in silico predictions. Patients with AIP mutations had a lower mean age at diagnosis (23.6±11.2 years) than AIP mutation-negative patients (40.4±14.5 years). A promoter mutation showed reduced in vitro activity corresponding to lower mRNA expression in patient samples. Stimulation of the protein kinase A-pathway positively regulates the AIP promoter. Silent mutations led to abnormal splicing resulting in truncated protein or reduced AIP expression. A two-hybrid assay of protein–protein interaction of all missense variants showed variable disruption of AIP-phosphodiesterase-4A5 binding. In summary, exonic, promoter, splice-site, and large deletion mutations in AIP are implicated in 31% of families in our FIPA cohort. Functional characterization of AIP changes is important to identify the functional impact of gene sequence variants. Hum Mutat 31:1–11, 2010. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20506337

  15. The ADF/cofilin family: actin-remodeling proteins

    PubMed Central

    Maciver, Sutherland K; Hussey, Patrick J

    2002-01-01

    The ADF/cofilins are a family of actin-binding proteins expressed in all eukaryotic cells so far examined. Members of this family remodel the actin cytoskeleton, for example during cytokinesis, when the actin-rich contractile ring shrinks as it contracts through the interaction of ADF/cofilins with both monomeric and filamentous actin. The depolymerizing activity is twofold: ADF/cofilins sever actin filaments and also increase the rate at which monomers leave the filament's pointed end. The three-dimensional structure of ADF/cofilins is similar to a fold in members of the gelsolin family of actin-binding proteins in which this fold is typically repeated three or six times; although both families bind polyphosphoinositide lipids and actin in a pH-dependent manner, they share no obvious sequence similarity. Plants and animals have multiple ADF/cofilin genes, belonging in vertebrates to two types, ADF and cofilins. Other eukaryotes (such as yeast, Acanthamoeba and slime moulds) have a single ADF/cofilin gene. Phylogenetic analysis of the ADF/cofilins reveals that, with few exceptions, their relationships reflect conventional views of the relationships between the major groups of organisms. PMID:12049672

  16. The latent transforming growth factor beta binding protein (LTBP) family.

    PubMed Central

    Oklü, R; Hesketh, R

    2000-01-01

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) cytokines are a multi-functional family that exert a wide variety of effects on both normal and transformed mammalian cells. The secretion and activation of TGFbetas is regulated by their association with latency-associated proteins and latent TGFbeta binding proteins (LTBPs). Over the past few years, three members of the LTBP family have been identified, in addition to the protoype LTBP1 first sequenced in 1990. Three of the LTBP family are expressed in a variety of isoforms as a consequence of alternative splicing. This review summarizes the differences between the isoforms in terms of the effects on domain structure and hence possible function. The close identity between LTBPs and members of the fibrillin family, mutations in which have been linked directly to Marfan's syndrome, suggests that anomalous expression of LTBPs may be associated with disease. Recent data indicating that differential expression of LTBP1 isoforms occurs during the development of coronary heart disease is considered, together with evidence that modulation of LTBP function, and hence of TGFbeta activity, is associated with a variety of cancers. PMID:11104663

  17. Role of the prion protein family in the gonads

    PubMed Central

    Allais-Bonnet, Aurélie; Pailhoux, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The prion-gene family comprises four members named PRNP (PRPc), PRND (Doppel), PRNT (PRT), and SPRN (Shadoo). According to species, PRND is located 16–52 kb downstream from the PRNP locus, whereas SPRN is located on another chromosome. The fourth prion-family gene, PRNT, belongs to the same genomic cluster as PRNP and PRND in humans and bovidae. PRNT and PRND possibly resulted from a duplication event of PRND and PRNP, respectively, that occurred early during eutherian species divergence. Although most of the studies concerning the prion-family has been done on PRPc and its involvement in transmissible neurodegenerative disorders, different works report some potential roles of these proteins in the reproductive function of both sexes. Among them, a clear role of PRND, that encodes for the Doppel protein, in male fertility has been demonstrated through gene targeting studies in mice. In other species, Doppel seems to play a role in testis and ovary development but its cellular localization is variable according to the gonadal developmental stage and to the mammalian species considered. For the other three genes, their roles in reproductive function appear ill-defined and/or controversial. The present review aimed to synthesize all the available data on these prion-family members and their relations with reproductive processes, mainly in the gonad of both sexes. PMID:25364761

  18. The PIN-FORMED (PIN) protein family of auxin transporters

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Summary The PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins are secondary transporters acting in the efflux of the plant signal molecule auxin from cells. They are asymmetrically localized within cells and their polarity determines the directionality of intercellular auxin flow. PIN genes are found exclusively in the genomes of multicellular plants and play an important role in regulating asymmetric auxin distribution in multiple developmental processes, including embryogenesis, organogenesis, tissue differentiation and tropic responses. All PIN proteins have a similar structure with amino- and carboxy-terminal hydrophobic, membrane-spanning domains separated by a central hydrophilic domain. The structure of the hydrophobic domains is well conserved. The hydrophilic domain is more divergent and it determines eight groups within the protein family. The activity of PIN proteins is regulated at multiple levels, including transcription, protein stability, subcellular localization and transport activity. Different endogenous and environmental signals can modulate PIN activity and thus modulate auxin-distribution-dependent development. A large group of PIN proteins, including the most ancient members known from mosses, localize to the endoplasmic reticulum and they regulate the subcellular compartmentalization of auxin and thus auxin metabolism. Further work is needed to establish the physiological importance of this unexpected mode of auxin homeostasis regulation. Furthermore, the evolution of PIN-based transport, PIN protein structure and more detailed biochemical characterization of the transport function are important topics for further studies. PMID:20053306

  19. Two Pfam protein families characterized by a crystal structure of protein lpg2210 from Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Every genome contains a large number of uncharacterized proteins that may encode entirely novel biological systems. Many of these uncharacterized proteins fall into related sequence families. By applying sequence and structural analysis we hope to provide insight into novel biology. Results We analyze a previously uncharacterized Pfam protein family called DUF4424 [Pfam:PF14415]. The recently solved three-dimensional structure of the protein lpg2210 from Legionella pneumophila provides the first structural information pertaining to this family. This protein additionally includes the first representative structure of another Pfam family called the YARHG domain [Pfam:PF13308]. The Pfam family DUF4424 adopts a 19-stranded beta-sandwich fold that shows similarity to the N-terminal domain of leukotriene A-4 hydrolase. The YARHG domain forms an all-helical domain at the C-terminus. Structure analysis allows us to recognize distant similarities between the DUF4424 domain and individual domains of M1 aminopeptidases and tricorn proteases, which form massive proteasome-like capsids in both archaea and bacteria. Conclusions Based on our analyses we hypothesize that the DUF4424 domain may have a role in forming large, multi-component enzyme complexes. We suggest that the YARGH domain may play a role in binding a moiety in proximity with peptidoglycan, such as a hydrophobic outer membrane lipid or lipopolysaccharide. PMID:24004689

  20. Graphical models of residue coupling in protein families.

    PubMed

    Thomas, John; Ramakrishnan, Naren; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Many statistical measures and algorithmic techniques have been proposed for studying residue coupling in protein families. Generally speaking, two residue positions are considered coupled if, in the sequence record, some of their amino acid type combinations are significantly more common than others. While the proposed approaches have proven useful in finding and describing coupling, a significant missing component is a formal probabilistic model that explicates and compactly represents the coupling, integrates information about sequence,structure, and function, and supports inferential procedures for analysis, diagnosis, and prediction.We present an approach to learning and using probabilistic graphical models of residue coupling. These models capture significant conservation and coupling constraints observable ina multiply-aligned set of sequences. Our approach can place a structural prior on considered couplings, so that all identified relationships have direct mechanistic explanations. It can also incorporate information about functional classes, and thereby learn a differential graphical model that distinguishes constraints common to all classes from those unique to individual classes. Such differential models separately account for class-specific conservation and family-wide coupling, two different sources of sequence covariation. They are then able to perform interpretable functional classification of new sequences, explaining classification decisions in terms of the underlying conservation and coupling constraints. We apply our approach in studies of both G protein-coupled receptors and PDZ domains, identifying and analyzing family-wide and class-specific constraints, and performing functional classification. The results demonstrate that graphical models of residue coupling provide a powerful tool for uncovering, representing, and utilizing significant sequence structure-function relationships in protein families. PMID:18451428

  1. The ubiquitin family meets the Fanconi anemia proteins.

    PubMed

    Renaudin, Xavier; Koch Lerner, Leticia; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins; Rosselli, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is a hereditary disorder characterized by bone marrow failure, developmental defects, predisposition to cancer and chromosomal abnormalities. FA is caused by biallelic mutations that inactivate genes encoding proteins involved in replication stress-associated DNA damage responses. The 20 FANC proteins identified to date constitute the FANC pathway. A key event in this pathway involves the monoubiquitination of the FANCD2-FANCI heterodimer by the collective action of at least 10 different proteins assembled in the FANC core complex. The FANC core complex-mediated monoubiquitination of FANCD2-FANCI is essential to assemble the heterodimer in subnuclear, chromatin-associated, foci and to regulate the process of DNA repair as well as the rescue of stalled replication forks. Several recent works have demonstrated that the activity of the FANC pathway is linked to several other protein post-translational modifications from the ubiquitin-like family, including SUMO and NEDD8. These modifications are related to DNA damage responses but may also affect other cellular functions potentially related to the clinical phenotypes of the syndrome. This review summarizes the interplay between the ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like proteins and the FANC proteins that constitute a major pathway for the surveillance of the genomic integrity and addresses the implications of their interactions in maintaining genome stability. PMID:27543315

  2. Protein-protein interactions of PDE4 family members - Functions, interactions and therapeutic value.

    PubMed

    Klussmann, Enno

    2016-07-01

    The second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is ubiquitous and directs a plethora of functions in all cells. Although theoretically freely diffusible through the cell from the site of its synthesis it is not evenly distributed. It rather is shaped into gradients and these gradients are established by phospodiesterases (PDEs), the only enzymes that hydrolyse cAMP and thereby terminate cAMP signalling upstream of cAMP's effector systems. Miles D. Houslay has devoted most of his scientific life highly successfully to a particular family of PDEs, the PDE4 family. The family is encoded by four genes and gives rise to around 20 enzymes, all with different functions. M. Houslay has discovered many of these functions and realised early on that PDE4 family enzymes are attractive drug targets in a variety of human diseases, but not their catalytic activity as that is encoded in conserved domains in all family members. He postulated that targeting the intracellular location would provide the specificity that modern innovative drugs require to improve disease conditions with fewer side effects than conventional drugs. Due to the wealth of M. Houslay's work, this article can only summarize some of his discoveries and, therefore, focuses on protein-protein interactions of PDE4. The aim is to discuss functions of selected protein-protein interactions and peptide spot technology, which M. Houslay introduced into the PDE4 field for identifying interacting domains. The therapeutic potential of PDE4 interactions will also be discussed. PMID:26498857

  3. Distinct adaptor proteins assist exit of Kre2-family proteins from the yeast ER

    PubMed Central

    Noda, Yoichi; Hara, Takehiro; Ishii, Minako; Yoda, Koji

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Svp26 protein of S. cerevisiae is an ER- and Golgi-localized integral membrane protein with 4 potential membrane-spanning domains. It functions as an adaptor protein that facilitates the ER exit of Ktr3, a mannosyltransferase required for biosynthesis of O-linked oligosaccharides, and the ER exit of Mnn2 and Mnn5, mannosyltransferases, which participate in the biosynthesis of N-linked oligosaccharides. Ktr3 belongs to the Kre2 family, which consists of 9 members of type-II membrane proteins sharing sequence similarities. In this report, we examined all Kre2 family members and found that the Golgi localizations of two others, Kre2 and Ktr1, were dependent on Svp26 by immunofluorescence microscopy and cell fractionations in sucrose density gradients. We show that Svp26 functions in facilitating the ER exit of Kre2 and Ktr1 by an in vitro COPII budding assay. Golgi localization of Ktr4 was not dependent on Svp26. Screening null mutants of the genes encoding abundant COPII membrane proteins for those showing mislocalization of Ktr4 in the ER revealed that Erv41 and Erv46 are required for the correct Golgi localization of Ktr4. We provide biochemical evidence that the Erv41-Erv46 complex functions as an adaptor protein for ER exit of Ktr4. This is the first demonstration of the molecular function of this evolutionally conserved protein complex. The domain switching experiments show that the lumenal domain of Ktr4 is responsible for recognition by the Erv41-Erv46 complex. Thus, ER exit of Kre2-family proteins is dependent on distinct adaptor proteins and our results provide new insights into the traffic of Kre2-family mannosyltransferases. PMID:24585773

  4. NMR studies of a new family of DNA binding proteins: the THAP proteins.

    PubMed

    Gervais, Virginie; Campagne, Sébastien; Durand, Jade; Muller, Isabelle; Milon, Alain

    2013-05-01

    The THAP (THanatos-Associated Protein) domain is an evolutionary conserved C2CH zinc-coordinating domain shared with a large family of cellular factors (THAP proteins). Many members of the THAP family act as transcription factors that control cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, angiogenesis, apoptosis and epigenetic gene silencing. They recognize specific DNA sequences in the promoters of target genes and subsequently recruit effector proteins. Recent structural and functional studies have allowed getting better insight into the nuclear and cellular functions of some THAP members and the molecular mechanisms by which they recognize DNA. The present article reviews recent advances in the knowledge of the THAP domains structures and their interaction with DNA, with a particular focus on NMR. It provides the solution structure of the THAP domain of THAP11, a recently characterized human THAP protein with important functions in transcription and cell growth in colon cancer. PMID:23306615

  5. Quantification of protein copy number in single mitochondria: The Bcl-2 family proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chaoxiang; Zhang, Xiang; Zhang, Shuyue; Zhu, Shaobin; Xu, Jingyi; Zheng, Yan; Han, Jinyan; Zeng, Jin-Zhang; Yan, Xiaomei

    2015-12-15

    Bcl-2 family proteins, represented by antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and proapoptotic protein Bax, are key regulators of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis pathway. To build a quantitative model of how Bcl-2 family protein interactions control mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization and subsequent cytochrome c release, it is essential to know the number of proteins in individual mitochondria. Here, we report an effective method to quantify the copy number and distribution of proteins in single mitochondria via immunofluorescent labeling and sensitive detection by a laboratory-built high sensitivity flow cytometer (HSFCM). Mitochondria isolated from HeLa cells were stained with Alexa Fluor 488 (AF488)-labeled monoclonal antibodies specifically targeting Bcl-2 or Bax and with nucleic acid dye. A series of fluorescent nanospheres with fluorescence intensity calibrated in the unit of molecules of equivalent soluble fluorochrome (MESF)-AF488 were used to construct a calibration curve for converting the immunofluorescence of a single mitochondrion to the number of antibodies bound to it and then to the number of proteins per mitochondrion. Under the normal condition, the measured mean copy numbers were 1300 and 220 per mitochondrion for Bcl-2 and Bax, respectively. A significant variation in protein copy number was identified, which ranged from 130 to 6000 (2.5-97.5%) for Bcl-2 and from 65 to 700 (2.5-97.5%) for Bax, respectively. We observed an approximately 4.4 fold increase of Bax copy number per mitochondrion upon 9h of apoptosis stimulation while the abundance of Bcl-2 remained almost unchanged. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of Bcl-2 family protein copy number and variance in single mitochondria. Collectively, we demonstrate that the HSFCM-based immunoassay provides a rapid and sensitive method for determining protein copy number distribution in single mitochondria. PMID:26176207

  6. Classification epitopes in groups based on their protein family

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The humoral immune system response is based on the interaction between antibodies and antigens for the clearance of pathogens and foreign molecules. The interaction between these proteins occurs at specific positions known as antigenic determinants or B-cell epitopes. The experimental identification of epitopes is costly and time consuming. Therefore the use of in silico methods, to help discover new epitopes, is an appealing alternative due the importance of biomedical applications such as vaccine design, disease diagnostic, anti-venoms and immune-therapeutics. However, the performance of predictions is not optimal been around 70% of accuracy. Further research could increase our understanding of the biochemical and structural properties that characterize a B-cell epitope. Results We investigated the possibility of linear epitopes from the same protein family to share common properties. This hypothesis led us to analyze physico-chemical (PCP) and predicted secondary structure (PSS) features of a curated dataset of epitope sequences available in the literature belonging to two different groups of antigens (metalloproteinases and neurotoxins). We discovered statistically significant parameters with data mining techniques which allow us to distinguish neurotoxin from metalloproteinase and these two from random sequences. After a five cross fold validation we found that PCP based models obtained area under the curve values (AUC) and accuracy above 0.9 for regression, decision tree and support vector machine. Conclusions We demonstrated that antigen's family can be inferred from properties within a single group of linear epitopes (metalloproteinases or neurotoxins). Also we discovered the characteristics that represent these two epitope groups including their similarities and differences with random peptides and their respective amino acid sequence. These findings open new perspectives to improve epitope prediction by considering the specific antigen

  7. PAT proteins, an ancient family of lipid droplet proteins that regulate cellular lipid stores.

    PubMed

    Bickel, Perry E; Tansey, John T; Welte, Michael A

    2009-06-01

    The PAT family of lipid droplet proteins includes 5 members in mammals: perilipin, adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP), tail-interacting protein of 47 kDa (TIP47), S3-12, and OXPAT. Members of this family are also present in evolutionarily distant organisms, including insects, slime molds and fungi. All PAT proteins share sequence similarity and the ability to bind intracellular lipid droplets, either constitutively or in response to metabolic stimuli, such as increased lipid flux into or out of lipid droplets. Positioned at the lipid droplet surface, PAT proteins manage access of other proteins (lipases) to the lipid esters within the lipid droplet core and can interact with cellular machinery important for lipid droplet biogenesis. Genetic variations in the gene for the best-characterized of the mammalian PAT proteins, perilipin, have been associated with metabolic phenotypes, including type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. In this review, we discuss how the PAT proteins regulate cellular lipid metabolism both in mammals and in model organisms. PMID:19375517

  8. Palmitoylation of POTE family proteins for plasma membrane targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sudipto; Ise, Tomoko; Nagata, Satoshi; Maeda, Hiroshi; Bera, Tapan K.; Pastan, Ira

    2007-11-23

    The POTE gene family is composed of 13 paralogs and likely evolved by duplications and remodeling of the human genome. One common property of POTE proteins is their localization on the inner aspect of the plasma membrane. To determine the structural elements required for membrane localization, we expressed mutants of different POTEs in 293T cells as EGFP fusion proteins. We also tested their palmitoylation by a biotin-switch assay. Our data indicate that the membrane localizations of different POTEs are mediated by similar 3-4 short cysteine rich repeats (CRRs) near the amino-terminuses and that palmitoylation on paired cysteine residues in each CRR motif is responsible for the localization. Multiple palmitoylation in the small CRRs can result in the strong association of whole POTEs with plasma membrane.

  9. Characterization of the PEST family protein tyrosine phosphatase BDP1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y W; Wang, H; Sures, I; Lammers, R; Martell, K J; Ullrich, A

    1996-11-21

    Using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification strategy, we identified a novel protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase) designated Brain Derived Phosphatase (BDP1). The full length sequence encoded an open reading frame of 459 amino acids with no transmembrane domain and had a calculated molecular weight of 50 kDa. The predicted amino acid sequence contained a PEST motif and accordingly, BDP1 shared the greatest homology with members of the PTP-PEST family. When transiently expressed in 293 cells BDP1 hydrolyzed p-Nitrophenylphosphate, confirming it as a functional protein tyrosine phosphatase. Northern blot analysis indicated that BDP1 was expressed not only in brain, but also in colon and several different tumor-derived cell lines. Furthermore, BDP1 was found to differentially dephosphorylate autophosphorylated tyrosine kinases which are known to be overexpressed in tumor tissues. PMID:8950995

  10. Chemosensitization of Prostate Cancer by Modulating Bcl-2 Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Karnak, David; Xu, Liang

    2010-01-01

    A major challenge in oncology is the development of chemoresistance. This often occurs as cancer progresses and malignant cells acquire mechanisms to resist insults that would normally induce apoptosis. The onset of androgen independence in advanced prostate cancer is a prime example of this phenomenon. Overexpression of the pro-survival/anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Mcl-1 are hallmarks of this transition. Here we outline the evolution of therapeutics designed to either limit the source or disrupt the interactions of these pro-survival proteins. By either lessening the stoichiometric abundance of Bcl-2/xL/Mcl-1 in reference to their pro-apoptotic foils or freeing these pro-apoptotic proteins from their grip, these treatments aim to sensitize cells to chemotherapy by priming cells for death. DNA anti-sense and RNA interference have been effectively employed to decrease Bcl-2 family mRNA and protein levels in cell culture models of advanced prostate cancer. However, clinical studies are lagging due to in vivo delivery challenges. The burgeoning field of nanoparticle delivery holds great promise in helping to overcome the challenge of administering highly labile nucleic acid based therapeutics. On another front, small molecule inhibitors that block the hetero-dimerization of pro-survival with pro-apoptotic proteins have significant clinical advantages and have advanced farther in clinical trials with promising early results. Most recently, a peptide has been discovered that can convert Bcl-2 from a pro-survival to a pro-apoptotic protein. The future may lie in targeting multiple steps of the apoptotic pathway, including Bcl-2/xL/Mcl-1, to debilitate the survival capacity of cancer cells and make chemotherapy induced death their only option. PMID:20298153

  11. The Golgin Family of Coiled-Coil Tethering Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Witkos, Tomasz M.; Lowe, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The golgins are a family of predominantly coiled-coil proteins that are localized to the Golgi apparatus. Golgins are present in all eukaryotes, suggesting an evolutionary conserved function. Golgins are anchored to the Golgi membrane by their carboxy terminus and are predicted to adopt an extended conformation that projects into the surrounding cytoplasm. This arrangement is ideal for the capture or tethering of nearby membranes or cytoskeletal elements. Golgin-mediated tethering is thought to be important for vesicular traffic at the Golgi apparatus, the maintenance of Golgi architecture, as well as the positioning of the Golgi apparatus within cells. In addition to acting as tethers, some golgins can also sequester various factors at the Golgi membrane, allowing for the spatiotemporal regulation of downstream cellular functions. Although it is now established that golgins are membrane and cytoskeleton tethers, the mechanisms underlying tethering remain poorly defined. Moreover, the importance of golgin-mediated tethering in a physiological context remains to be fully explored. This review will describe our current understanding of golgin function, highlighting recent progress that has been made, and goes on to discuss outstanding questions and potential avenues for future research with regard to this family of conserved Golgi-associated proteins. PMID:26793708

  12. Bcl-2 family proteins as targets for anticancer drug design.

    PubMed

    Huang, Z

    2000-12-27

    Bcl-2 family proteins are key regulators of programmed cell death or apoptosis that is implicated in many human diseases, particularly cancer. In recent years, they have attracted intensive interest in both basic research to understand the fundamental principles of cell survival and cell death and drug discovery to develop a new class of anticancer agents. The Bcl-2 family includes both anti- and pro-apoptotic proteins with opposing biological functions in either inhibiting or promoting cell death. High expression of anti-apoptotic members such as Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL commonly found in human cancers contributes to neoplastic cell expansion and interferes with the therapeutic action of many chemotherapeutic drugs. The functional blockade of Bcl-2 or Bcl-XL could either restore the apoptotic process in tumor cells or sensitize these tumors for chemo- and radiotherapies. This article reviews the recent progress in the design and discovery of small molecules that block the anti-apoptotic function of Bcl-2 or Bcl-XL. These chemical inhibitors are effective modulators of apoptosis and promising leads for the further development of new anticancer agents. PMID:11426648

  13. Claudin Family of Proteins and Cancer: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amar B.; Sharma, Ashok; Dhawan, Punita

    2010-01-01

    Tight junctions are the apical cell-cell adhesion that regulate paracellular permeability and are critical for epithelial cell polarity. Molecular architecture of tight junction has been studied extensively, which has confirmed that claudin family of proteins is integral component of tight junction. Loss of cell-cell adhesion is central to the cellular transformation and acquisition of metastatic potential; however, the role of claudin family of proteins play in a series of pathophysiological events, including human carcinoma development, is only now beginning to be understood. Several claudin mouse knockout models have been generated and the diversity of phenotypes observed clearly demonstrates their important roles in the maintenance of tissue integrity in various organs and suggest that claudins also participate in cellular contexts other than tight junctions. The mechanisms of claudin regulation and their exact roles in normal physiology and disease are being elucidated, but much work remains to be done. In this review, we have discussed the conceptual framework concerning claudins and their potential implication in cancer. We predict that next several years will likely witness a boom in our understanding of the potential role of claudins in the regulation of tumorigenesis, which may, in turn, provide new approaches for the targeted therapy. PMID:20671913

  14. Correlation of gene and protein structures in the FXYD family proteins.

    PubMed

    Franzin, Carla M; Yu, Jinghua; Thai, Khang; Choi, Jungyuen; Marassi, Francesca M

    2005-12-01

    The FXYD family proteins are auxiliary subunits of the Na,K-ATPase, expressed primarily in tissues that specialize in fluid or solute transport, or that are electrically excitable. These proteins range in size from about 60 to 160 amino acid residues, and share a core homology of 35 amino acid residues in and around a single transmembrane segment. Despite their relatively small sizes, they are all encoded by genes with six to nine small exons. We show that the helical secondary structures of three FXYD family members, FXYD1, FXYD3, and FXYD4, determined in micelles by NMR spectroscopy, reflect the structures of their corresponding genes. The coincidence of helical regions, and connecting segments, with the positions of intron-exon junctions in the genes, support the hypothesis that the FXYD proteins may have been assembled from discrete structural modules through exon shuffling. PMID:16288923

  15. Unifying mechanical and thermodynamic descriptions across the thioredoxin protein family

    PubMed Central

    Mottonen, James M.; Xu, Minli; Jacobs, Donald J.; Livesay, Dennis R.

    2010-01-01

    We compare various predicted mechanical and thermodynamic properties of nine oxidized thioredoxins (TRX) using a Distance Constraint Model (DCM). The DCM is based on a nonadditive free energy decomposition scheme, where entropic contributions are determined from rigidity and flexibility of structure based on distance constraints. We perform averages over an ensemble of constraint topologies to calculate several thermodynamic and mechanical response functions that together yield quantitative stability/flexibility relationships (QSFR). Applied to the TRX protein family, QSFR metrics display a rich variety of similarities and differences. In particular, backbone flexibility is well conserved across the family, whereas cooperativity correlation describing mechanical and thermodynamic couplings between residue pairs exhibit distinctive features that readily standout. The diversity in predicted QSFR metrics that describe cooperativity correlation between pairs of residues is largely explained by a global flexibility order parameter describing the amount of intrinsic flexibility within the protein. A free energy landscape is calculated as a function of the flexibility order parameter, and key values are determined where the native-state, transition-state and unfolded-state are located. Another key value identifies a mechanical transition where the global nature of the protein changes from flexible to rigid. The key values of the flexibility order parameter help characterize how mechanical and thermodynamic response is linked. Variation in QSFR metrics, and key characteristics of global flexibility are related to the native state x-ray crystal structure primarily through the hydrogen bond network. Furthermore, comparison of three TRX redox pairs reveals differences in thermodynamic response (i.e., relative melting point) and mechanical properties (i.e., backbone flexibility and cooperativity correlation) that are consistent with experimental data on thermal stabilities and

  16. Identification and analysis of YELLOW protein family genes in the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ai-Hua; Zhou, Qing-Xiang; Yu, Lin-Lin; Li, Wei-Guo; Yi, Yong-Zhu; Zhang, Yao-Zhou; Zhang, Zhi-Fang

    2006-01-01

    Background The major royal jelly proteins/yellow (MRJP/YELLOW) family possesses several physiological and chemical functions in the development of Apis mellifera and Drosophila melanogaster. Each protein of the family has a conserved domain named MRJP. However, there is no report of MRJP/YELLOW family proteins in the Lepidoptera. Results Using the YELLOW protein sequence in Drosophila melanogaster to BLAST silkworm EST database, we found a gene family composed of seven members with a conserved MRJP domain each and named it YELLOW protein family of Bombyx mori. We completed the cDNA sequences with RACE method. The protein of each member possesses a MRJP domain and a putative cleavable signal peptide consisting of a hydrophobic sequence. In view of genetic evolution, the whole Bm YELLOW protein family composes a monophyletic group, which is distinctly separate from Drosophila melanogaster and Apis mellifera. We then showed the tissue expression profiles of Bm YELLOW protein family genes by RT-PCR. Conclusion A Bombyx mori YELLOW protein family is found to be composed of at least seven members. The low homogeneity and unique pattern of gene expression by each member among the family ensure us to prophesy that the members of Bm YELLOW protein family would play some important physiological functions in silkworm development. PMID:16884544

  17. Folding dynamics of a family of beta-sheet proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Denis

    2008-03-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABP) consist of ten anti-parallel beta strands and two small alpha helices. The beta strands are arranged into two nearly orthogonal five-strand beta sheets that surround the interior cavity, which binds unsaturated long-chain fatty acids. In the brain isoform (BFABP), these are very important for the development of the central nervous system and neuron differentiation. Furthermore, BFABP is implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of human diseases including cancer and neuronal degenerative disorders. In this work, site-directed spin labeling combined with EPR techniques have been used to study the folding mechanism of BFABP. In the first series of studies, we labeled the two Cys residues at position 5 and 80 in the wild type protein with an EPR spin marker; in addition, two singly labeled mutants at positions 5 and 80 in the C80A and C5A mutants, respectively, were also produced and used as controls. The changes in the distances between the two residues were examined by a pulsed EPR method, DEER (Double Electron Electron Resonance), as a function of guanidinium hydrochloride concentration. The results were compared with those from CW EPR, circular dichroism and fluorescence measurements, which provide the information regarding sidechain mobility, secondary structure and tertiary structure, respectively. The results will be discussed in the context of the folding mechanism of the family of fatty acid binding proteins.

  18. Molecular evolution of the 14-3-3 protein family.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Shakes, D C

    1996-10-01

    Members of the highly conserved and ubiquitous 14-3-3 protein family modulate a wide variety of cellular processes. To determine the evolutionary relationships among specific 14-3-3 proteins in different plant, animal, and fungal species and to initiate a predictive analysis of isoform-specific differences in light of the latest functional and structural studies of 14-3-3, multiple alignments were constructed from forty-six 14-3-3 sequences retrieved from the GenBank and SwissProt databases and a newly identified second 14-3-3 gene from Caenorhabditis elegans. The alignment revealed five highly conserved sequence blocks. Blocks 2-5 correlate well with the alpha helices 3, 5, 7, and 9 which form the proposed internal binding domain in the three-dimensional structure model of the functioning dimer. Amino acid differences within the functional and structural domains of plant and animal 14-3-3 proteins were identified which may account for functional diversity amongst isoforms. Protein phylogenic trees were constructed using both the maximum parsimony and neighbor joining methods of the PHYLIP(3.5c) package; 14-3-3 proteins from Entamoeba histolytica, an amitochondrial protozoa, were employed as an outgroup in our analysis. Epsilon isoforms from the animal lineage form a distinct grouping in both trees, which suggests an early divergence from the other animal isoforms. Epsilons were found to be more similar to yeast and plant isoforms than other animal isoforms at numerous amino acid positions, and thus epsilon may have retained functional characteristics of the ancestral protein. The known invertebrate proteins group with the nonepsilon mammalian isoforms. Most of the current 14-3-3 isoform diversity probably arose through independent duplication events after the divergence of the major eukaryotic kingdoms. Divergence of the seven mammalian isoforms beta, zeta, gamma, eta, epsilon, tau, and sigma (stratifin/HME1) occurred before the divergence of mammalian and perhaps

  19. New Functions for the Ancient DedA Membrane Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Sikdar, Rakesh; Kumar, Sujeet; Boughner, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    The DedA protein family is a highly conserved and ancient family of membrane proteins with representatives in most sequenced genomes, including those of bacteria, archaea, and eukarya. The functions of the DedA family proteins remain obscure. However, recent genetic approaches have revealed important roles for certain bacterial DedA family members in membrane homeostasis. Bacterial DedA family mutants display such intriguing phenotypes as cell division defects, temperature sensitivity, altered membrane lipid composition, elevated envelope-related stress responses, and loss of proton motive force. The DedA family is also essential in at least two species of bacteria: Borrelia burgdorferi and Escherichia coli. Here, we describe the phylogenetic distribution of the family and summarize recent progress toward understanding the functions of the DedA membrane protein family. PMID:23086209

  20. PATtyFams: Protein Families for the Microbial Genomes in the PATRIC Database

    PubMed Central

    Davis, James J.; Gerdes, Svetlana; Olsen, Gary J.; Olson, Robert; Pusch, Gordon D.; Shukla, Maulik; Vonstein, Veronika; Wattam, Alice R.; Yoo, Hyunseung

    2016-01-01

    The ability to build accurate protein families is a fundamental operation in bioinformatics that influences comparative analyses, genome annotation, and metabolic modeling. For several years we have been maintaining protein families for all microbial genomes in the PATRIC database (Pathosystems Resource Integration Center, patricbrc.org) in order to drive many of the comparative analysis tools that are available through the PATRIC website. However, due to the burgeoning number of genomes, traditional approaches for generating protein families are becoming prohibitive. In this report, we describe a new approach for generating protein families, which we call PATtyFams. This method uses the k-mer-based function assignments available through RAST (Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology) to rapidly guide family formation, and then differentiates the function-based groups into families using a Markov Cluster algorithm (MCL). This new approach for generating protein families is rapid, scalable and has properties that are consistent with alignment-based methods. PMID:26903996

  1. A Network Synthesis Model for Generating Protein Interaction Network Families

    PubMed Central

    Sahraeian, Sayed Mohammad Ebrahim; Yoon, Byung-Jun

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we introduce a novel network synthesis model that can generate families of evolutionarily related synthetic protein–protein interaction (PPI) networks. Given an ancestral network, the proposed model generates the network family according to a hypothetical phylogenetic tree, where the descendant networks are obtained through duplication and divergence of their ancestors, followed by network growth using network evolution models. We demonstrate that this network synthesis model can effectively create synthetic networks whose internal and cross-network properties closely resemble those of real PPI networks. The proposed model can serve as an effective framework for generating comprehensive benchmark datasets that can be used for reliable performance assessment of comparative network analysis algorithms. Using this model, we constructed a large-scale network alignment benchmark, called NAPAbench, and evaluated the performance of several representative network alignment algorithms. Our analysis clearly shows the relative performance of the leading network algorithms, with their respective advantages and disadvantages. The algorithm and source code of the network synthesis model and the network alignment benchmark NAPAbench are publicly available at http://www.ece.tamu.edu/bjyoon/NAPAbench/. PMID:22912671

  2. Stathmin family proteins display specific molecular and tubulin binding properties.

    PubMed

    Charbaut, E; Curmi, P A; Ozon, S; Lachkar, S; Redeker, V; Sobel, A

    2001-05-11

    Stathmin family phosphoproteins (stathmin, SCG10, SCLIP, and RB3/RB3'/RB3") are involved in signal transduction and regulation of microtubule dynamics. With the exception of stathmin, they are expressed exclusively in the nervous system, where they display different spatio-temporal and functional regulations and hence play at least partially distinct and possibly complementary roles in relation to the control of development, plasticity, and neuronal activities. At the molecular level, each possesses a specific "stathmin-like domain" and, with the exception of stathmin, various combinations of N-terminal extensions involved in their association with intracellular membrane compartments. We show here that each stathmin-like domain also displays specific biochemical and tubulin interaction properties. They are all able to sequester two alpha/beta tubulin heterodimers as revealed by their inhibitory action on tubulin polymerization and by gel filtration. However, they differ in the stabilities of the complexes formed as well as in their interaction kinetics with tubulin followed by surface plasmon resonance as follows: strong stability and slow kinetics for RB3; medium for SCG10, SCLIP, and stathmin; and weak stability and rapid kinetics for RB3'. These results suggest that the fine-tuning of their stathmin-like domains contributes to the specific functional roles of stathmin family proteins in the regulation of microtubule dynamics within the various cell types and subcellular compartments of the developing or mature nervous system. PMID:11278715

  3. Cell cycle regulation by the NEK family of protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Fry, Andrew M; O'Regan, Laura; Sabir, Sarah R; Bayliss, Richard

    2012-10-01

    Genetic screens for cell division cycle mutants in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans led to the discovery of never-in-mitosis A (NIMA), a serine/threonine kinase that is required for mitotic entry. Since that discovery, NIMA-related kinases, or NEKs, have been identified in most eukaryotes, including humans where eleven genetically distinct proteins named NEK1 to NEK11 are expressed. Although there is no evidence that human NEKs are essential for mitotic entry, it is clear that several NEK family members have important roles in cell cycle control. In particular, NEK2, NEK6, NEK7 and NEK9 contribute to the establishment of the microtubule-based mitotic spindle, whereas NEK1, NEK10 and NEK11 have been implicated in the DNA damage response. Roles for NEKs in other aspects of mitotic progression, such as chromatin condensation, nuclear envelope breakdown, spindle assembly checkpoint signalling and cytokinesis have also been proposed. Interestingly, NEK1 and NEK8 also function within cilia, the microtubule-based structures that are nucleated from basal bodies. This has led to the current hypothesis that NEKs have evolved to coordinate microtubule-dependent processes in both dividing and non-dividing cells. Here, we review the functions of the human NEKs, with particular emphasis on those family members that are involved in cell cycle control, and consider their potential as therapeutic targets in cancer. PMID:23132929

  4. ProPhylo: partial phylogenetic profiling to guide protein family construction and assignment of biological process

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Phylogenetic profiling is a technique of scoring co-occurrence between a protein family and some other trait, usually another protein family, across a set of taxonomic groups. In spite of several refinements in recent years, the technique still invites significant improvement. To be its most effective, a phylogenetic profiling algorithm must be able to examine co-occurrences among protein families whose boundaries are uncertain within large homologous protein superfamilies. Results Partial Phylogenetic Profiling (PPP) is an iterative algorithm that scores a given taxonomic profile against the taxonomic distribution of families for all proteins in a genome. The method works through optimizing the boundary of each protein family, rather than by relying on prebuilt protein families or fixed sequence similarity thresholds. Double Partial Phylogenetic Profiling (DPPP) is a related procedure that begins with a single sequence and searches for optimal granularities for its surrounding protein family in order to generate the best query profiles for PPP. We present ProPhylo, a high-performance software package for phylogenetic profiling studies through creating individually optimized protein family boundaries. ProPhylo provides precomputed databases for immediate use and tools for manipulating the taxonomic profiles used as queries. Conclusion ProPhylo results show universal markers of methanogenesis, a new DNA phosphorothioation-dependent restriction enzyme, and efficacy in guiding protein family construction. The software and the associated databases are freely available under the open source Perl Artistic License from ftp://ftp.jcvi.org/pub/data/ppp/. PMID:22070167

  5. Zebrafish Fukutin family proteins link the unfolded protein response with dystroglycanopathies

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yung-Yao; White, Richard J.; Torelli, Silvia; Cirak, Sebahattin; Muntoni, Francesco; Stemple, Derek L.

    2011-01-01

    Allelic mutations in putative glycosyltransferase genes, fukutin and fukutin-related protein (fkrp), lead to a wide range of muscular dystrophies associated with hypoglycosylation of α-dystroglycan, commonly referred to as dystroglycanopathies. Defective glycosylation affecting dystroglycan–ligand interactions is considered to underlie the disease pathogenesis. We have modelled dystroglycanopathies in zebrafish using a novel loss-of-function dystroglycan allele and by inhibition of Fukutin family protein activities. We show that muscle pathology in embryos lacking Fukutin or FKRP is different from loss of dystroglycan. In addition to hypoglycosylated α-dystroglycan, knockdown of Fukutin or FKRP leads to a notochord defect and a perturbation of laminin expression before muscle degeneration. These are a consequence of endoplasmic reticulum stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), preceding loss of dystroglycan–ligand interactions. Together, our results suggest that Fukutin family proteins may play important roles in protein secretion and that the UPR may contribute to the phenotypic spectrum of some dystroglycanopathies in humans. PMID:21317159

  6. Nme family of proteins--clues from simple animals.

    PubMed

    Ćetković, Helena; Perina, Dragutin; Harcet, Matija; Mikoč, Andreja; Herak Bosnar, Maja

    2015-02-01

    Nucleoside-diphosphate kinases (Nme/Nm23/NDPK) are evolutionarily conserved enzymes involved in many biological processes in vertebrates. The biochemical mechanisms of these processes are still largely unknown. The Nme family consists of ten members in humans of which Nme1/2 have been extensively studied in the context of carcinogenesis, especially metastasis formation. Lately, it has been proven that the majority of genes linked to human diseases were already present in species distantly related to humans. Most of cancer-related protein domains appeared during the two main evolutionary transitions-the emergence of unicellular eukaryotes and the transition to multicellular metazoans. In spite of these recent insights, current knowledge about cancer and status of cancer-related genes in simple animals is limited. One possible way of studying human diseases relies on analyzing genes/proteins that cause a certain disease by using model organism that represent the evolutionary level at which these genes have emerged. Therefore, basal metazoans are ideal model organisms for gaining a clearer picture how characteristics and functions of Nme genes changed in the transition to multicellularity and increasing complexity in animals, giving us exciting new evidence of their possible functions in potential pathological conditions in humans. PMID:25042404

  7. Structural and functional insight into the universal stress protein family

    PubMed Central

    Tkaczuk, Karolina L; A Shumilin, Igor; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Evdokimova, Elena; Savchenko, Alexei; Minor, Wladek

    2013-01-01

    We present the crystal structures of two universal stress proteins (USP) from Archaeoglobus fulgidus and Nitrosomonas europaea in both apo- and ligand-bound forms. This work is the first complete synthesis of the structural properties of 26 USP available in the Protein Data Bank, over 75% of which were determined by structure genomics centers with no additional information provided. The results of bioinformatic analyses of all available USP structures and their sequence homologs revealed that these two new USP structures share overall structural similarity with structures of USPs previously determined. Clustering and cladogram analyses, however, show how they diverge from other members of the USP superfamily and show greater similarity to USPs from organisms inhabiting extreme environments. We compared them with other archaeal and bacterial USPs and discuss their similarities and differences in context of structure, sequential motifs, and potential function. We also attempted to group all analyzed USPs into families, so that assignment of the potential function to those with no experimental data available would be possible by extrapolation. PMID:23745136

  8. Different localization of Hsp105 family proteins in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Youhei; Yamagishi, Nobuyuki; Hatayama, Takumi

    2007-10-15

    Hsp105{alpha} and Hsp105{beta} of the HSP105 family are alternatively spliced products derived from an hsp 105 gene transcript. Hsp105{alpha} is constitutively expressed and also induced by various stress, whereas Hsp105{beta}, lacking 44 amino acids from Hsp105{alpha}, is specifically expressed during mild heat shock. Although Hsp105{alpha} is shown to localize in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells, cellular localization of Hsp105{beta} is not known. In this study, we showed that Hsp105{beta} localized in the nucleus of cells in contrast to cytoplasmic Hsp105{alpha}, suggesting that these proteins function in different cellular compartments of cells. Using deletion and substitution mutants of Hsp105{alpha} and Hsp105{beta}, we revealed that these proteins had a functional nuclear localization signal (NLS) and a nuclear export signal (NES). Furthermore, Hsp105{alpha} accumulated in the nucleus of cells when treated with leptomycin B, a specific inhibitor of NES-dependent nuclear export. siRNA for importin {beta}, an essential component for NLS-dependent nuclear transport, inhibited the nuclear localization of Hsp105{beta}. Furthermore, the 44 amino acids sequence found in Hsp105{alpha} but not in Hsp105{beta} suppressed the NLS activity. Thus, the different localization of Hsp105{alpha} and Hsp105{beta} is suggested to be due to the suppressed NLS activity in Hsp105{alpha}.

  9. A fusicoccin binding protein belongs to the family of 14-3-3 brain protein homologs.

    PubMed Central

    Korthout, H A; de Boer, A H

    1994-01-01

    The fusicoccin binding protein (FCBP) is a highly conserved plasma membrane protein present in all higher plants tested thus far. It exhibits high- and low-affinity binding for the fungal toxin fusicoccin (FC). We purified the active FCBP from a fraction highly enriched in plasma membrane by selective precipitation and anion exchange chromatography. After SDS-PAGE, the two FCBP subunits of 30 and 31 kD were detected as major bands. Amino acid sequence analysis of the 31-kD polypeptide displayed a high degree of identity with so-called 14-3-3 proteins, a class of mammalian brain proteins initially described as regulators of neurotransmitter synthesis and protein kinase C inhibitors. Thereafter, we affinity purified the 30- and 31-kD FCBP subunits, using biotinylated FC in combination with a monomeric avidin column. Immunodecoration of these 30- and 31-kD FCBP subunits with polyclonal antibodies raised against a 14-3-3 homolog from yeast confirmed the identity of the FCBP as a 14-3-3 homolog. Similar to all 14-3-3 protein homologs, the FCBP seems to exist as a dimer in native form. Thus far, the FCBP is the only 14-3-3 homolog with a receptor-like function. The conserved structure of the 14-3-3 protein family is a further indication that the FCBP plays an important role in the physiology of higher plants. PMID:7827499

  10. A large family of anti-activators accompanying XylS/AraC family regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Araceli E; Yan, Michael B; Tran, Minh; Wright, Nathan; Luzader, Deborah H; Kendall, Melissa M; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Nataro, James P

    2016-07-01

    AraC Negative Regulators (ANR) suppress virulence genes by directly down-regulating AraC/XylS members in Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we sought to investigate the distribution and molecular mechanisms of regulatory function for ANRs among different bacterial pathogens. We identified more than 200 ANRs distributed in diverse clinically important gram negative pathogens, including Vibrio spp., Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Yersinia spp., Citrobacter spp., enterotoxigenic (ETEC) and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), and members of the Pasteurellaceae. By employing a bacterial two hybrid system, pull down assays and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis, we demonstrate that Aar (AggR-activated regulator), a prototype member of the ANR family in EAEC, binds with high affinity to the central linker domain of AraC-like member AggR. ANR-AggR binding disrupted AggR dimerization and prevented AggR-DNA binding. ANR homologs of Vibrio cholerae, Citrobacter rodentium, Salmonella enterica and ETEC were capable of complementing Aar activity by repressing aggR expression in EAEC strain 042. ANR homologs of ETEC and Vibrio cholerae bound to AggR as well as to other members of the AraC family, including Rns and ToxT. The predicted proteins of all ANR members exhibit three highly conserved predicted α-helices. Site-directed mutagenesis studies suggest that at least predicted α-helices 2 and 3 are required for Aar activity. In sum, our data strongly suggest that members of the novel ANR family act by directly binding to their cognate AraC partners. PMID:27038276

  11. ORMDL proteins are a conserved new family of endoplasmic reticulum membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hjelmqvist, Lars; Tuson, Miquel; Marfany, Gemma; Herrero, Enric; Balcells, Susana; Gonzàlez-Duarte, Roser

    2002-01-01

    Background Annotations of completely sequenced genomes reveal that nearly half of the genes identified are of unknown function, and that some belong to uncharacterized gene families. To help resolve such issues, information can be obtained from the comparative analysis of homologous genes in model organisms. Results While characterizing genes from the retinitis pigmentosa locus RP26 at 2q31-q33, we have identified a new gene, ORMDL1, that belongs to a novel gene family comprising three genes in humans (ORMDL1, ORMDL2 and ORMDL3), and homologs in yeast, microsporidia, plants, Drosophila, urochordates and vertebrates. The human genes are expressed ubiquitously in adult and fetal tissues. The Drosophila ORMDL homolog is also expressed throughout embryonic and larval stages, particularly in ectodermally derived tissues. The ORMDL genes encode transmembrane proteins anchored in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Double knockout of the two Saccharomyces cerevisiae homologs leads to decreased growth rate and greater sensitivity to tunicamycin and dithiothreitol. Yeast mutants can be rescued by human ORMDL homologs. Conclusions From protein sequence comparisons we have defined a novel gene family, not previously recognized because of the absence of a characterized functional signature. The sequence conservation of this family from yeast to vertebrates, the maintenance of duplicate copies in different lineages, the ubiquitous pattern of expression in human and Drosophila, the partial functional redundancy of the yeast homologs and phenotypic rescue by the human homologs, strongly support functional conservation. Subcellular localization and the response of yeast mutants to specific agents point to the involvement of ORMDL in protein folding in the ER. PMID:12093374

  12. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase (Hipk) phosphorylates the small SPOC family protein Spenito.

    PubMed

    Dewald, D N; Steinmetz, E L; Walldorf, U

    2014-12-01

    The Drosophila homeodomain-interacting protein kinase (Hipk) is a versatile regulator involved in a variety of pathways, such as Notch and Wingless signalling, thereby acting in processes including the promotion of eye development or control of cell numbers in the nervous system. In vertebrates, extensive studies have related its homologue HIPK2 to important roles in the control of p53-mediated apoptosis and tumour suppression. Spenito (Nito) belongs to the group of small SPOC family proteins and has a role, amongst others, as a regulator of Wingless signalling downstream of Armadillo. In the present study, we show that both proteins have an enzyme-substrate relationship, adding a new interesting component to the broad range of Hipk interactions, and we map several phosphorylation sites of Nito. Furthermore, we were able to define a preliminary consensus motif for Hipk target sites, which will simplify the identification of new substrates of this kinase. PMID:25040100

  13. ErpC, a member of the complement regulator-acquiring family of surface proteins from Borrelia burgdorferi, possesses an architecture previously unseen in this protein family

    PubMed Central

    Caesar, Joseph J. E.; Johnson, Steven; Kraiczy, Peter; Lea, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is a spirochete responsible for Lyme disease, the most commonly occurring vector-borne disease in Europe and North America. The bacterium utilizes a set of proteins, termed complement regulator-acquiring surface proteins (CRASPs), to aid evasion of the human complement system by recruiting and presenting complement regulator factor H on its surface in a manner that mimics host cells. Presented here is the atomic resolution structure of a member of this protein family, ErpC. The structure provides new insights into the mechanism of recruitment of factor H and other factor H-related proteins by acting as a molecular mimic of host glycosaminoglycans. It also describes the architecture of other CRASP proteins belonging to the OspE/F-related paralogous protein family and suggests that they have evolved to bind specific complement proteins, aiding survival of the bacterium in different hosts. PMID:23722838

  14. New protein kinase and protein phosphatase families mediate signal transduction in bacterial catabolite repression.

    PubMed

    Galinier, A; Kravanja, M; Engelmann, R; Hengstenberg, W; Kilhoffer, M C; Deutscher, J; Haiech, J

    1998-02-17

    Carbon catabolite repression (CCR) is the prototype of a signal transduction mechanism. In enteric bacteria, cAMP was considered to be the second messenger in CCR by playing a role reminiscent of its actions in eukaryotic cells. However, recent results suggest that CCR in Escherichia coli is mediated mainly by an inducer exclusion mechanism. In many Gram-positive bacteria, CCR is triggered by fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, which activates HPr kinase, presumed to be one of the most ancient serine protein kinases. We here report cloning of the Bacillus subtilis hprK and hprP genes and characterization of the encoded HPr kinase and P-Ser-HPr phosphatase. P-Ser-HPr phosphatase forms a new family of phosphatases together with bacterial phosphoglycolate phosphatase, yeast glycerol-3-phosphatase, and 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate phosphatase whereas HPr kinase represents a new family of protein kinases on its own. It does not contain the domain structure typical for eukaryotic protein kinases. Although up to now the HPr modifying/demodifying enzymes were thought to exist only in Gram-positive bacteria, a sequence comparison revealed that they also are present in several Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria. PMID:9465101

  15. Human cytoplasmic actin proteins are encoded by a multigene family

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.; Gunning, P.; Kedes, L.

    1982-06-01

    The authors characterized nine human actin genes that they isolated from a library of cloned human DNA. Measurements of the thermal stability of hybrids formed between each cloned actin gene and ..cap alpha..-, ..beta..-, and ..gamma..-actin mRNA demonstrated that only one of the clones is most homologous to sarcomeric actin mRNA, whereas the remaining eight clones are most homologous to cytoplasmic actin mRNA. By the following criteria they show that these nine clones represent nine different actin gene loci rather than different alleles or different parts of a single gene: (i) the restriction enzyme maps of the coding regions are dissimilar; (ii) each clone contains sufficient coding region to encode all or most of an entire actin gene; and (iii) each clone contains sequences homologous to both the 5' and 3' ends of the coding region of a cloned chicken ..beta..-actin cDNA. They conclude, therefore, that the human cytoplasmic actin proteins are encoded by a multigene family.

  16. The prion protein family: a view from the placenta

    PubMed Central

    Makzhami, Samira; Passet, Bruno; Halliez, Sophie; Castille, Johan; Moazami-Goudarzi, Katayoun; Duchesne, Amandine; Vilotte, Marthe; Laude, Hubert; Mouillet-Richard, Sophie; Béringue, Vincent; Vaiman, Daniel; Vilotte, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    Based on its developmental pattern of expression, early studies suggested the implication of the mammalian Prion protein PrP, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored ubiquitously expressed and evolutionary conserved glycoprotein encoded by the Prnp gene, in early embryogenesis. However, gene invalidation in several species did not result in obvious developmental abnormalities and it was only recently that it was associated in mice with intra-uterine growth retardation and placental dysfunction. A proposed explanation for this lack of easily detectable developmental-related phenotype is the existence in the genome of one or more gene (s) able to compensate for the absence of PrP. Indeed, two other members of the Prnp gene family have been recently described, Doppel and Shadoo, and the consequences of their invalidation alongside that of PrP tested in mice. No embryonic defect was observed in mice depleted for Doppel and PrP. Interestingly, the co-invalidation of PrP and Shadoo in two independent studies led to apparently conflicting observations, with no apparent consequences in one report and the observation of a developmental defect of the ectoplacental cone that leads to early embryonic lethality in the other. This short review aims at summarizing these recent, apparently conflicting data highlighting the related biological questions and associated implications in terms of animal and human health. PMID:25364742

  17. Senescence Regulation by the p53 Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yingjuan; Chen, Xinbin

    2013-01-01

    p53, a guardian of the genome, exerts its tumor suppression activity by regulating a large number of downstream targets involved in cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, apoptosis, and cellular senescence. Although p53-mediated apoptosis is able to kill cancer cells, a role for cellular senescence in p53-dependent tumor suppression is becoming clear. Mouse studies showed that activation of p53-induced premature senescence promotes tumor regression in vivo. However, p53-mediated cellular senescence also leads to aging-related phenotypes, such as tissue atrophy, stem cell depletion, and impaired wound healing. In addition, several p53 isoforms and two p53 homologs, p63 and p73, have been shown to play a role in cellular senescence and/or aging. Importantly, p53, p63, and p73 are necessary for the maintenance of adult stem cells. Therefore, understanding the dual role the p53 protein family in cancer and aging is critical to solve cancer and longevity in the future. In this chapter, we provide an overview on how p53, p63, p73, and their isoforms regulate cellular senescence and aging. PMID:23296650

  18. Familial prion protein mutants inhibit Hrd1-mediated retrotranslocation of misfolded proteins by depleting misfolded protein sensor BiP.

    PubMed

    Peters, Sarah L; Déry, Marc-André; LeBlanc, Andrea C

    2016-03-01

    Similar to many proteins trafficking through the secretory pathway, cellular prion protein (PrP) partly retrotranslocates from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol through the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway in an attempt to alleviate accumulation of cellular misfolded PrP. Surprisingly, familial PrP mutants fail to retrotranslocate and simultaneously block normal cellular PrP retrotranslocation. That impairments in retrotranslocation of misfolded proteins could lead to global disruptions in cellular homeostasis prompted further investigations into PrP mutant retrotranslocation defects. A gain- and loss-of-function approach identified human E3 ubiquitin ligase, Hrd1, as a critical regulator of PrP retrotranslocation in mammalian cells. Expression of familial human PrP mutants, V210I(129V) and M232R(129V), not only abolished PrP retrotranslocation, but also that of Hrd1-dependent ERAD substrates, transthyretin TTR(D18G) and α1-anti-trypsin A1AT(NHK). Mutant PrP expression decreased binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) levels by 50% and attenuated ER stress-induced BiP by increasing BiP turnover 6-fold. Overexpression of BiP with PrP mutants rescued retrotranslocation of PrP, TTR(D18G) and A1AT(NHK). PrP mutants-induced cell death was also rescued by co-expression of BiP. These results show that PrP mutants highjack the Hrd1-dependent ERAD pathway, an action that would result in misfolded protein accumulation especially in terminally differentiated neurons. This could explain the age-dependent neuronal degeneration in familial prion diseases. PMID:26740554

  19. Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions with Trimeric Ligands: High Affinity Inhibitors of the MAGUK Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Klaus B.; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M.; Wilbek, Theis S.; Nielsen, Line S.; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S.; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins. PMID:25658767

  20. An updated version of NPIDB includes new classifications of DNA-protein complexes and their families.

    PubMed

    Zanegina, Olga; Kirsanov, Dmitriy; Baulin, Eugene; Karyagina, Anna; Alexeevski, Andrei; Spirin, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    The recent upgrade of nucleic acid-protein interaction database (NPIDB, http://npidb.belozersky.msu.ru/) includes a newly elaborated classification of complexes of protein domains with double-stranded DNA and a classification of families of related complexes. Our classifications are based on contacting structural elements of both DNA: the major groove, the minor groove and the backbone; and protein: helices, beta-strands and unstructured segments. We took into account both hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interaction. The analyzed material contains 1942 structures of protein domains from 748 PDB entries. We have identified 97 interaction modes of individual protein domain-DNA complexes and 17 DNA-protein interaction classes of protein domain families. We analyzed the sources of diversity of DNA-protein interaction modes in different complexes of one protein domain family. The observed interaction mode is sometimes influenced by artifacts of crystallization or diversity in secondary structure assignment. The interaction classes of domain families are more stable and thus possess more biological sense than a classification of single complexes. Integration of the classification into NPIDB allows the user to browse the database according to the interacting structural elements of DNA and protein molecules. For each family, we present average DNA shape parameters in contact zones with domains of the family. PMID:26656949

  1. Sub-grouping and sub-functionalization of the RIFIN multi-copy protein family

    PubMed Central

    Joannin, Nicolas; Abhiman, Saraswathi; Sonnhammer, Erik L; Wahlgren, Mats

    2008-01-01

    Background Parasitic protozoans possess many multicopy gene families which have central roles in parasite survival and virulence. The number and variability of members of these gene families often make it difficult to predict possible functions of the encoded proteins. The families of extra-cellular proteins that are exposed to a host immune response have been driven via immune selection to become antigenically variant, and thereby avoid immune recognition while maintaining protein function to establish a chronic infection. Results We have combined phylogenetic and function shift analyses to study the evolution of the RIFIN proteins, which are antigenically variant and are encoded by the largest multicopy gene family in Plasmodium falciparum. We show that this family can be subdivided into two major groups that we named A- and B-RIFIN proteins. This suggested sub-grouping is supported by a recently published study that showed that, despite the presence of the Plasmodium export (PEXEL) motif in all RIFIN variants, proteins from each group have different cellular localizations during the intraerythrocytic life cycle of the parasite. In the present study we show that function shift analysis, a novel technique to predict functional divergence between sub-groups of a protein family, indicates that RIFINs have undergone neo- or sub-functionalization. Conclusion These results question the general trend of clustering large antigenically variant protein groups into homogenous families. Assigning functions to protein families requires their subdivision into meaningful groups such as we have shown for the RIFIN protein family. Using phylogenetic and function shift analysis methods, we identify new directions for the investigation of this broad and complex group of proteins. PMID:18197962

  2. The CCN Family Proteins: Modulators of Bone Development and Novel Targets in Bone-Associated Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Po-Chun; Cheng, Hsu-Chen; Yang, Shun-Fa; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    The CCN family of proteins is composed of six extracellular matrix-associated proteins that play crucial roles in skeletal development, wound healing, fibrosis, and cancer. Members of the CCN family share four conserved cysteine-rich modular domains that trigger signal transduction in cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival through direct binding to specific integrin receptors and heparan sulfate proteoglycans. In the present review, we discuss the roles of the CCN family proteins in regulating resident cells of the bone microenvironment. In vertebrate development, the CCN family plays a critical role in osteo/chondrogenesis and vasculo/angiogenesis. These effects are regulated through signaling via integrins, bone morphogenetic protein, vascular endothelial growth factor, Wnt, and Notch via direct binding to CCN family proteins. Due to the important roles of CCN family proteins in skeletal development, abnormal expression of CCN proteins is related to the tumorigenesis of primary bone tumors such as osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, and chondrosarcoma. Additionally, emerging studies have suggested that CCN proteins may affect progression of secondary metastatic bone tumors by moderating the bone microenvironment. CCN proteins could therefore serve as potential therapeutic targets for drug development against primary and metastatic bone tumors. PMID:24551846

  3. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling Expedition: Expanding theUniverse of Protein Families

    SciTech Connect

    Yooseph, Shibu; Sutton, Granger; Rusch, Douglas B.; Halpern,Aaron L.; Williamson, Shannon J.; Remington, Karin; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Heidelberg, Karla B.; Manning, Gerard; Li, Weizhong; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Cieplak, Piotr; Miller, Christopher S.; Li, Huiying; Mashiyama, Susan T.; Joachimiak, Marcin P.; van Belle, Christopher; Chandonia, John-Marc; Soergel, David A.; Zhai, Yufeng; Natarajan, Kannan; Lee, Shaun; Raphael,Benjamin J.; Bafna, Vineet; Friedman, Robert; Brenner, Steven E.; Godzik,Adam; Eisenberg, David; Dixon, Jack E.; Taylor, Susan S.; Strausberg,Robert L.; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J.Craig

    2006-03-23

    Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families. A total of 3,995 medium- and large-sized clusters consisting of only GOS sequences are identified, out of which 1,700 have no detectable homology to known families. The GOS-only clusters contain a higher than expected proportion of sequences of viral origin, thus reflecting a poor sampling of viral diversity until now. Protein domain distributions in the GOS dataset and current protein databases show distinct biases. Several protein domains that were previously categorized as kingdom specific are shown to have GOS examples in other kingdoms. About 6,000 sequences (ORFans) from the literature that heretofore lacked similarity to known proteins have matches in the GOS data. The GOS dataset is also used to improve remote homology detection. Overall, besides nearly doubling the number of current proteins, the predicted GOS proteins also add a great deal of diversity to known protein families and shed light on their evolution. These observations are illustrated using several protein families, including phosphatases, proteases, ultraviolet-irradiation DNA damage repair enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and RuBisCO. The diversity added by GOS data has implications for choosing targets for experimental structure characterization as part of structural genomics efforts. Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature.

  4. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling Expedition: Expanding the Universe of Protein Families

    PubMed Central

    Yooseph, Shibu; Sutton, Granger; Rusch, Douglas B; Halpern, Aaron L; Williamson, Shannon J; Remington, Karin; Eisen, Jonathan A; Heidelberg, Karla B; Manning, Gerard; Li, Weizhong; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Cieplak, Piotr; Miller, Christopher S; Li, Huiying; Mashiyama, Susan T; Joachimiak, Marcin P; van Belle, Christopher; Chandonia, John-Marc; Soergel, David A; Zhai, Yufeng; Natarajan, Kannan; Lee, Shaun; Raphael, Benjamin J; Bafna, Vineet; Friedman, Robert; Brenner, Steven E; Godzik, Adam; Eisenberg, David; Dixon, Jack E; Taylor, Susan S; Strausberg, Robert L; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J. Craig

    2007-01-01

    Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families. A total of 3,995 medium- and large-sized clusters consisting of only GOS sequences are identified, out of which 1,700 have no detectable homology to known families. The GOS-only clusters contain a higher than expected proportion of sequences of viral origin, thus reflecting a poor sampling of viral diversity until now. Protein domain distributions in the GOS dataset and current protein databases show distinct biases. Several protein domains that were previously categorized as kingdom specific are shown to have GOS examples in other kingdoms. About 6,000 sequences (ORFans) from the literature that heretofore lacked similarity to known proteins have matches in the GOS data. The GOS dataset is also used to improve remote homology detection. Overall, besides nearly doubling the number of current proteins, the predicted GOS proteins also add a great deal of diversity to known protein families and shed light on their evolution. These observations are illustrated using several protein families, including phosphatases, proteases, ultraviolet-irradiation DNA damage repair enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and RuBisCO. The diversity added by GOS data has implications for choosing targets for experimental structure characterization as part of structural genomics efforts. Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature. PMID:17355171

  5. Two Novel Heat-Soluble Protein Families Abundantly Expressed in an Anhydrobiotic Tardigrade

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Ayami; Tanaka, Sae; Yamaguchi, Shiho; Kuwahara, Hirokazu; Takamura, Chizuko; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Horikawa, Daiki D.; Toyoda, Atsushi; Katayama, Toshiaki; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Fujiyama, Asao; Kubo, Takeo; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2012-01-01

    Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration by reversibly switching to an ametabolic state. This ability is called anhydrobiosis. In the anhydrobiotic state, tardigrades can withstand various extreme environments including space, but their molecular basis remains largely unknown. Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are heat-soluble proteins and can prevent protein-aggregation in dehydrated conditions in other anhydrobiotic organisms, but their relevance to tardigrade anhydrobiosis is not clarified. In this study, we focused on the heat-soluble property characteristic of LEA proteins and conducted heat-soluble proteomics using an anhydrobiotic tardigrade. Our heat-soluble proteomics identified five abundant heat-soluble proteins. All of them showed no sequence similarity with LEA proteins and formed two novel protein families with distinct subcellular localizations. We named them Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble (CAHS) and Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble (SAHS) protein families, according to their localization. Both protein families were conserved among tardigrades, but not found in other phyla. Although CAHS protein was intrinsically unstructured and SAHS protein was rich in β-structure in the hydrated condition, proteins in both families changed their conformation to an α-helical structure in water-deficient conditions as LEA proteins do. Two conserved repeats of 19-mer motifs in CAHS proteins were capable to form amphiphilic stripes in α-helices, suggesting their roles as molecular shield in water-deficient condition, though charge distribution pattern in α-helices were different between CAHS and LEA proteins. Tardigrades might have evolved novel protein families with a heat-soluble property and this study revealed a novel repertoire of major heat-soluble proteins in these anhydrobiotic animals. PMID:22937162

  6. The transthyretin-related protein: structural investigation of a novel protein family.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Erik; Bäckström, Stefan; Sauer, Uwe H; Sauer-Eriksson, A Elisabeth

    2006-09-01

    The transthyretin-related protein (TRP) family comprises proteins predicted to be structurally related to the homotetrameric transport protein transthyretin (TTR). The function of TRPs is not yet fully established, but recent data suggest that they are involved in purine catabolism. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of the Escherichia coli TRP in two crystal forms; one at 1.65 A resolution in the presence of zinc, and the other at 2.1 A resolution in the presence of zinc and bromide. The structures revealed five zinc-ion-binding sites per monomer. Of these, the zinc ions bound at sites I and II are coordinated in tetrahedral geometries to the side chains of residues His9, His96, His98, Ser114, and three water molecules at the putative ligand-binding site. Of these four residues, His9, His98, and Ser114 are conserved. His9 and His98 bind the central zinc (site I) together with two water molecules. The side chain of His98 also binds to the zinc ion at site II. Bromide ions bind at site I only, replacing one of the water molecules coordinated to the zinc ion. The C-terminal four amino acid sequence motif Y-[RK]-G-[ST] constitutes the signature sequence of the TRP family. Two Tyr111 residues form direct hydrogen bonds to each other over the tetramer interface at the area, which in TTR constitutes the rear part of its thyroxine-binding channel. The putative substrate/ligand-binding channel of TRP is consequently shallower and broader than its counterpart in TTR. PMID:16723258

  7. Nucleo-cytoplasmic functions of the PDZ-LIM protein family: new insights in organ development

    PubMed Central

    Krcmery, Jennifer; Camarata, Troy; Kulisz, Andre; Simon, Hans-Georg

    2010-01-01

    Summary Recent work on the PDZ-LIM protein family has revealed important activities at the cellular level, mediating signals between the nucleus and the cytoskeleton, with significant impact on organ development. We review and integrate current knowledge about the PDZ-LIM protein family and propose a new functional role, sequestering nuclear factors in the cytoplasm. Characterized by their PDZ and LIM domains, the PDZ-LIM family is comprised of evolutionarily conserved proteins found throughout the animal kingdom, from worms to humans. Combining two functional domains in one protein, PDZ-LIM proteins have wide-ranging and multi-compartmental cell functions during development and homeostasis while, in contrast, misregulation can lead to cancer formation and progression. New emerging roles include interactions with integrins, T-box transcription factors, and receptor tyrosine kinases. Facilitating the assembly of protein complexes, PDZ-LIM proteins can act as signal modulators, influence actin dynamics, regulate cell architecture and control gene transcription. PMID:20091751

  8. Stimulation of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysis by proteins of glycoside hydrolase family 61: structure and function of a large, enigmatic family.

    PubMed

    Harris, Paul V; Welner, Ditte; McFarland, K C; Re, Edward; Navarro Poulsen, Jens-Christian; Brown, Kimberly; Salbo, Rune; Ding, Hanshu; Vlasenko, Elena; Merino, Sandy; Xu, Feng; Cherry, Joel; Larsen, Sine; Lo Leggio, Leila

    2010-04-20

    Currently, the relatively high cost of enzymes such as glycoside hydrolases that catalyze cellulose hydrolysis represents a barrier to commercialization of a biorefinery capable of producing renewable transportable fuels such as ethanol from abundant lignocellulosic biomass. Among the many families of glycoside hydrolases that catalyze cellulose and hemicellulose hydrolysis, few are more enigmatic than family 61 (GH61), originally classified based on measurement of very weak endo-1,4-beta-d-glucanase activity in one family member. Here we show that certain GH61 proteins lack measurable hydrolytic activity by themselves but in the presence of various divalent metal ions can significantly reduce the total protein loading required to hydrolyze lignocellulosic biomass. We also solved the structure of one highly active GH61 protein and find that it is devoid of conserved, closely juxtaposed acidic side chains that could serve as general proton donor and nucleophile/base in a canonical hydrolytic reaction, and we conclude that the GH61 proteins are unlikely to be glycoside hydrolases. Structure-based mutagenesis shows the importance of several conserved residues for GH61 function. By incorporating the gene for one GH61 protein into a commercial Trichoderma reesei strain producing high levels of cellulolytic enzymes, we are able to reduce by 2-fold the total protein loading (and hence the cost) required to hydrolyze lignocellulosic biomass. PMID:20230050

  9. ELMO Domains, Evolutionary and Functional Characterization of a Novel GTPase-activating Protein (GAP) Domain for Arf Protein Family GTPases*

    PubMed Central

    East, Michael P.; Bowzard, J. Bradford; Dacks, Joel B.; Kahn, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    The human family of ELMO domain-containing proteins (ELMODs) consists of six members and is defined by the presence of the ELMO domain. Within this family are two subclassifications of proteins, based on primary sequence conservation, protein size, and domain architecture, deemed ELMOD and ELMO. In this study, we used homology searching and phylogenetics to identify ELMOD family homologs in genomes from across eukaryotic diversity. This demonstrated not only that the protein family is ancient but also that ELMOs are potentially restricted to the supergroup Opisthokonta (Metazoa and Fungi), whereas proteins with the ELMOD organization are found in diverse eukaryotes and thus were likely the form present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor. The segregation of the ELMO clade from the larger ELMOD group is consistent with their contrasting functions as unconventional Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factors and the Arf family GTPase-activating proteins, respectively. We used unbiased, phylogenetic sorting and sequence alignments to identify the most highly conserved residues within the ELMO domain to identify a putative GAP domain within the ELMODs. Three independent but complementary assays were used to provide an initial characterization of this domain. We identified a highly conserved arginine residue critical for both the biochemical and cellular GAP activity of ELMODs. We also provide initial evidence of the function of human ELMOD1 as an Arf family GAP at the Golgi. These findings provide the basis for the future study of the ELMOD family of proteins and a new avenue for the study of Arf family GTPases. PMID:23014990

  10. A tomato xylem sap protein represents a new family of small cysteine-rich proteins with structural similarity to lipid transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Rep, Martijn; Dekker, Henk L; Vossen, Jack H; de Boer, Albert D; Houterman, Petra M; de Koster, Chris G; Cornelissen, Ben J C

    2003-01-16

    The coding sequence of a major xylem sap protein of tomato was identified with the aid of mass spectrometry. The protein, XSP10, represents a novel family of extracellular plant proteins with structural similarity to plant lipid transfer proteins. The XSP10 gene is constitutively expressed in roots and lower stems. The decline of XSP10 protein levels in tomato infected with a fungal vascular pathogen may reflect breakdown or modification by the pathogen. PMID:12527365

  11. Structure and evolutionary history of a large family of NLR proteins in the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Howe, Kerstin; Schiffer, Philipp H; Zielinski, Julia; Wiehe, Thomas; Laird, Gavin K; Marioni, John C; Soylemez, Onuralp; Kondrashov, Fyodor; Leptin, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Multicellular eukaryotes have evolved a range of mechanisms for immune recognition. A widespread family involved in innate immunity are the NACHT-domain and leucine-rich-repeat-containing (NLR) proteins. Mammals have small numbers of NLR proteins, whereas in some species, mostly those without adaptive immune systems, NLRs have expanded into very large families. We describe a family of nearly 400 NLR proteins encoded in the zebrafish genome. The proteins share a defining overall structure, which arose in fishes after a fusion of the core NLR domains with a B30.2 domain, but can be subdivided into four groups based on their NACHT domains. Gene conversion acting differentially on the NACHT and B30.2 domains has shaped the family and created the groups. Evidence of positive selection in the B30.2 domain indicates that this domain rather than the leucine-rich repeats acts as the pathogen recognition module. In an unusual chromosomal organization, the majority of the genes are located on one chromosome arm, interspersed with other large multigene families, including a new family encoding zinc-finger proteins. The NLR-B30.2 proteins represent a new family with diversity in the specific recognition module that is present in fishes in spite of the parallel existence of an adaptive immune system. PMID:27248802

  12. Structure and evolutionary history of a large family of NLR proteins in the zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Zielinski, Julia; Kondrashov, Fyodor

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular eukaryotes have evolved a range of mechanisms for immune recognition. A widespread family involved in innate immunity are the NACHT-domain and leucine-rich-repeat-containing (NLR) proteins. Mammals have small numbers of NLR proteins, whereas in some species, mostly those without adaptive immune systems, NLRs have expanded into very large families. We describe a family of nearly 400 NLR proteins encoded in the zebrafish genome. The proteins share a defining overall structure, which arose in fishes after a fusion of the core NLR domains with a B30.2 domain, but can be subdivided into four groups based on their NACHT domains. Gene conversion acting differentially on the NACHT and B30.2 domains has shaped the family and created the groups. Evidence of positive selection in the B30.2 domain indicates that this domain rather than the leucine-rich repeats acts as the pathogen recognition module. In an unusual chromosomal organization, the majority of the genes are located on one chromosome arm, interspersed with other large multigene families, including a new family encoding zinc-finger proteins. The NLR-B30.2 proteins represent a new family with diversity in the specific recognition module that is present in fishes in spite of the parallel existence of an adaptive immune system. PMID:27248802

  13. The CCN family of proteins: structure–function relationships

    PubMed Central

    Holbourn, Kenneth P.; Acharya, K. Ravi; Perbal, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    The CCN proteins are key signalling and regulatory molecules involved in many vital biological functions, including cell proliferation, angiogenesis, tumourigenesis and wound healing. How these proteins influence such a range of functions remains incompletely understood but is probably related to their discrete modular nature and a complex array of intra- and inter-molecular interactions with a variety of regulatory proteins and ligands. Although certain aspects of their biology can be attributed to the four individual modules that constitute the CCN proteins, recent results suggest that some of their biological functions require cooperation between modules. Indeed, the modular structure of CCN proteins provides important insight into their structure–function relationships. PMID:18789696

  14. Avidin related protein 2 shows unique structural and functional features among the avidin protein family

    PubMed Central

    Hytönen, Vesa P; Määttä, Juha AE; Kidron, Heidi; Halling, Katrin K; Hörhä, Jarno; Kulomaa, Tuomas; Nyholm, Thomas KM; Johnson, Mark S; Salminen, Tiina A; Kulomaa, Markku S; Airenne, Tomi T

    2005-01-01

    Background The chicken avidin gene family consists of avidin and several avidin related genes (AVRs). Of these gene products, avidin is the best characterized and is known for its extremely high affinity for D-biotin, a property that is utilized in numerous modern life science applications. Recently, the AVR genes have been expressed as recombinant proteins, which have shown different biotin-binding properties as compared to avidin. Results In the present study, we have employed multiple biochemical methods to better understand the structure-function relationship of AVR proteins focusing on AVR2. Firstly, we have solved the high-resolution crystal structure of AVR2 in complex with a bound ligand, D-biotin. The AVR2 structure reveals an overall fold similar to the previously determined structures of avidin and AVR4. Major differences are seen, especially at the 1–3 subunit interface, which is stabilized mainly by polar interactions in the case of AVR2 but by hydrophobic interactions in the case of AVR4 and avidin, and in the vicinity of the biotin binding pocket. Secondly, mutagenesis, competitive dissociation analysis and differential scanning calorimetry were used to compare and study the biotin-binding properties as well as the thermal stability of AVRs and avidin. These analyses pinpointed the importance of residue 109 for biotin binding and stability of AVRs. The I109K mutation increased the biotin-binding affinity of AVR2, whereas the K109I mutation decreased the biotin-binding affinity of AVR4. Furthermore, the thermal stability of AVR2(I109K) increased in comparison to the wild-type protein and the K109I mutation led to a decrease in the thermal stability of AVR4. Conclusion Altogether, this study broadens our understanding of the structural features determining the ligand-binding affinities and stability as well as the molecular evolution within the protein family. This novel information can be applied to further develop and improve the tools already

  15. Genome-scale phylogenetic function annotation of large and diverse protein families

    PubMed Central

    Engelhardt, Barbara E.; Jordan, Michael I.; Srouji, John R.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2011-01-01

    The Statistical Inference of Function Through Evolutionary Relationships (SIFTER) framework uses a statistical graphical model that applies phylogenetic principles to automate precise protein function prediction. Here we present a revised approach (SIFTER version 2.0) that enables annotations on a genomic scale. SIFTER 2.0 produces equivalently precise predictions compared to the earlier version on a carefully studied family and on a collection of 100 protein families. We have added an approximation method to SIFTER 2.0 and show a 500-fold improvement in speed with minimal impact on prediction results in the functionally diverse sulfotransferase protein family. On the Nudix protein family, previously inaccessible to the SIFTER framework because of the 66 possible molecular functions, SIFTER achieved 47.4% accuracy on experimental data (where BLAST achieved 34.0%). Finally, we used SIFTER to annotate all of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe proteins with experimental functional characterizations, based on annotations from proteins in 46 fungal genomes. SIFTER precisely predicted molecular function for 45.5% of the characterized proteins in this genome, as compared with four current function prediction methods that precisely predicted function for 62.6%, 30.6%, 6.0%, and 5.7% of these proteins. We use both precision-recall curves and ROC analyses to compare these genome-scale predictions across the different methods and to assess performance on different types of applications. SIFTER 2.0 is capable of predicting protein molecular function for large and functionally diverse protein families using an approximate statistical model, enabling phylogenetics-based protein function prediction for genome-wide analyses. The code for SIFTER and protein family data are available at http://sifter.berkeley.edu. PMID:21784873

  16. Bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) family proteins: New therapeutic targets in major diseases.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Balasundaram; Mathur, Shruti; Manjula, Ramu; Tripathi, Shailesh

    2016-06-01

    The bromodomains and extra-terminal domain (BET) family proteins recognize acetylated chromatin through their bromodomains (BDs) and help in regulating gene expression. BDs are chromatin 'readers': by interacting with acetylated lysines on the histone tails, they recruit chromatin-regulating proteins on the promoter region to regulate gene expression and repression. Extensive efforts have been employed by scientific communities worldwide to identify and develop potential inhibitors of BET family BDs to regulate protein expression by inhibiting acetylated histone (H3/H4) interactions. Several small molecule inhibitors have been reported, which not only have high affinity but also have high specificity to BET BDs. These developments make BET family proteins an important therapeutic targets for major diseases such as cancer, neurological disorders, obesity and inflammation. Here, we review and discuss the structural biology of BET family BDs and their applications in major diseases. PMID:27240990

  17. Functional divergence outlines the evolution of novel protein function in NifH/BchL protein family.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Subarna; Bothra, Asim K; Sen, Arnab

    2013-11-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation is accomplished by prokaryotes through the catalytic action of complex metalloenzyme, nitrogenase. Nitrogenase is a two-protein component system comprising MoFe protein (NifD and K) and Fe protein (NifH). NifH shares structural and mechanistic similarities as well as evolutionary relationships with light-independent protochlorophyllide reductase (BchL), a photosynthesis-related metalloenzyme belonging to the same protein family. We performed a comprehensive bioinformatics analysis of the NifH/BchL family in order to elucidate the intrinsic functional diversity and the underlying evolutionary mechanism among the members. To analyse functional divergence in the NifH/ BchL family, we have conducted pair-wise estimation in altered evolutionary rates between the member proteins. We identified a number of vital amino acid sites which contribute to predicted functional diversity. We have also made use of the maximum likelihood tests for detection of positive selection at the amino acid level followed by the structure-based phylogenetic approach to draw conclusion on the ancient lineage and novel characterization of the NifH/BchL protein family. Our investigation provides ample support to the fact that NifH protein and BchL share robust structural similarities and have probably deviated from a common ancestor followed by divergence in functional properties possibly due to gene duplication. PMID:24287653

  18. POK/ZBTB proteins: an emerging family of proteins that regulate lymphoid development and function

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Uk; Maeda, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    Summary The germinal center (GC) is a unique histological structure found in peripheral lymphoid organs. GCs provide an important source of humoral immunity by generating high affinity antibodies against a pathogen. The GC response is tightly regulated during clonal expansion, immunoglobulin modification, and affinity maturation, while its deregulation has a detrimental effect on immune function, leading to development of diseases such as lymphoma and autoimmunity. LRF (lymphoma/leukemia-related factor), encoded by the ZBTB7A gene, is a transcriptional repressor belonging to the POK (POZ and Krüppel)/ZBTB (zing finger and BTB) protein family. LRF was originally identified as a PLZF (promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger) homologue that physically interacts with BCL6 (B-cell lymphoma 6), whose expression is required for GC formation and associated with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Recently, our group demonstrated that LRF plays critical roles in regulating lymphoid lineage commitment, mature B-cell development, and the GC response via distinct mechanisms. Here, we review POK/ZBTB protein function in lymphoid development, with particular emphasis on the role of LRF in GC B cells. PMID:22500835

  19. Four Members of Heat Shock Protein 70 Family in Korean Rose Bitterling (Rhodeus uyekii)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Hyun; Dong, Chun Mae; Kim, Julan; An, Cheul Min; Baek, Hae Ja; Kong, Hee Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein (HSP) 70, the highly conserved stress protein families, plays important roles in protecting cells against heat and other stresses in most animal species. In the present study, we identified and characterized four Hsp70 (RuHSP4, RuHSC70, RuHSP12A, RuGRP78) family proteins based on the expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis of the Korean rose bitterling R. uyekii cDNA library. The deduced RuHSP70 family has high amino acid identities of 72-99% with those of other species. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that RuHsp70 family clustered with fish groups (HSP4, HSC70, HSP12A, GRP78) proteins. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed the specific expression patterns of RuHsp70 family members in the early developmental stages and several tissues in Korean rose bitterling. The expression of 4 groups of Hsp70 family was detected in all tested tissue. Particularly, Hsp70 family of Korean rose bitterling is highly expressed in hepatopancreas and sexual gonad (testis and ovary). The expression of Hsp70 family was differentially regulated in accordance with early development stage of Rhodeus uyekii. PMID:27004270

  20. PANTHER: A Library of Protein Families and Subfamilies Indexed by Function

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Paul D.; Campbell, Michael J.; Kejariwal, Anish; Mi, Huaiyu; Karlak, Brian; Daverman, Robin; Diemer, Karen; Muruganujan, Anushya; Narechania, Apurva

    2003-01-01

    In the genomic era, one of the fundamental goals is to characterize the function of proteins on a large scale. We describe a method, PANTHER, for relating protein sequence relationships to function relationships in a robust and accurate way. PANTHER is composed of two main components: the PANTHER library (PANTHER/LIB) and the PANTHER index (PANTHER/X). PANTHER/LIB is a collection of “books,” each representing a protein family as a multiple sequence alignment, a Hidden Markov Model (HMM), and a family tree. Functional divergence within the family is represented by dividing the tree into subtrees based on shared function, and by subtree HMMs. PANTHER/X is an abbreviated ontology for summarizing and navigating molecular functions and biological processes associated with the families and subfamilies. We apply PANTHER to three areas of active research. First, we report the size and sequence diversity of the families and subfamilies, characterizing the relationship between sequence divergence and functional divergence across a wide range of protein families. Second, we use the PANTHER/X ontology to give a high-level representation of gene function across the human and mouse genomes. Third, we use the family HMMs to rank missense single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), on a database-wide scale, according to their likelihood of affecting protein function. PMID:12952881

  1. PATtyFams: Protein families for the microbial genomes in the PATRIC database

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Davis, James J.; Gerdes, Svetlana; Olsen, Gary J.; Olson, Robert; Pusch, Gordon D.; Shukla, Maulik; Vonstein, Veronika; Wattam, Alice R.; Yoo, Hyunseung

    2016-02-08

    The ability to build accurate protein families is a fundamental operation in bioinformatics that influences comparative analyses, genome annotation, and metabolic modeling. For several years we have been maintaining protein families for all microbial genomes in the PATRIC database (Pathosystems Resource Integration Center, patricbrc.org) in order to drive many of the comparative analysis tools that are available through the PATRIC website. However, due to the burgeoning number of genomes, traditional approaches for generating protein families are becoming prohibitive. In this report, we describe a new approach for generating protein families, which we call PATtyFams. This method uses the k-mer-based functionmore » assignments available through RAST (Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology) to rapidly guide family formation, and then differentiates the function-based groups into families using a Markov Cluster algorithm (MCL). In conclusion, this new approach for generating protein families is rapid, scalable and has properties that are consistent with alignment-based methods.« less

  2. Myelin tetraspan family proteins but no non-tetraspan family proteins are present in the ascidian (Ciona intestinalis) genome.

    PubMed

    Gould, Robert M; Morrison, Hilary G; Gilland, Edwin; Campbell, Robert K

    2005-08-01

    Several of the proteins used to form and maintain myelin sheaths in the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system (PNS) are shared among different vertebrate classes. These proteins include one-to-several alternatively spliced myelin basic protein (MBP) isoforms in all sheaths, proteolipid protein (PLP) and DM20 (except in amphibians) in tetrapod CNS sheaths, and one or two protein zero (P0) isoforms in fish CNS and in all vertebrate PNS sheaths. Several other proteins, including 2', 3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP), myelin and lymphocyte protein (MAL), plasmolipin, and peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22; prominent in PNS myelin), are localized to myelin and myelin-associated membranes, though class distributions are less well studied. Databases with known and identified sequences of these proteins from cartilaginous and teleost fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals were prepared and used to search for potential homologs in the basal vertebrate, Ciona intestinalis. Homologs of lipophilin proteins, MAL/plasmolipin, and PMP22 were identified in the Ciona genome. In contrast, no MBP, P0, or CNP homologs were found. These studies provide a framework for understanding how myelin proteins were recruited during evolution and how structural adaptations enabled them to play key roles in myelination. PMID:16110093

  3. An estimated 5% of new protein structures solved today represent a new Pfam family

    SciTech Connect

    Mistry, Jaina; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Punta, Marco

    2013-11-01

    This study uses the Pfam database to show that the sequence redundancy of protein structures deposited in the PDB is increasing. The possible reasons behind this trend are discussed. High-resolution structural knowledge is key to understanding how proteins function at the molecular level. The number of entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), the repository of all publicly available protein structures, continues to increase, with more than 8000 structures released in 2012 alone. The authors of this article have studied how structural coverage of the protein-sequence space has changed over time by monitoring the number of Pfam families that acquired their first representative structure each year from 1976 to 2012. Twenty years ago, for every 100 new PDB entries released, an estimated 20 Pfam families acquired their first structure. By 2012, this decreased to only about five families per 100 structures. The reasons behind the slower pace at which previously uncharacterized families are being structurally covered were investigated. It was found that although more than 50% of current Pfam families are still without a structural representative, this set is enriched in families that are small, functionally uncharacterized or rich in problem features such as intrinsically disordered and transmembrane regions. While these are important constraints, the reasons why it may not yet be time to give up the pursuit of a targeted but more comprehensive structural coverage of the protein-sequence space are discussed.

  4. Molecular Evolution of the Plant SLT Protein Family

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The products of the sodium/lithium tolerance (Slt) genes are proteins that have molecular chaperone activity in vitro. The results from extensive database analyses indicate that SLT-orthologous proteins are present only in seed plants (Spermatopsida). Herein we describe the sequence analysis of th...

  5. A family of cellular proteins related to snake venom disintegrins.

    PubMed Central

    Weskamp, G; Blobel, C P

    1994-01-01

    Disintegrins are short soluble integrin ligands that were initially identified in snake venom. A previously recognized cellular protein with a disintegrin domain was the guinea pig sperm protein PH-30, a protein implicated in sperm-egg membrane binding and fusion. Here we present peptide sequences that are characteristic for several cellular disintegrin-domain proteins. These peptide sequences were deduced from cDNA sequence tags that were generated by polymerase chain reaction from various mouse tissue and a mouse muscle cell line. Northern blot analysis with four sequence tags revealed distinct mRNA expression patterns. Evidently, cellular proteins containing a disintegrin domain define a superfamily of potential integrin ligands that are likely to function in important cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Images PMID:8146185

  6. Structural propensities of kinase family proteins from a Potts model of residue co-variation.

    PubMed

    Haldane, Allan; Flynn, William F; He, Peng; Vijayan, R S K; Levy, Ronald M

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the conformational propensities of proteins is key to solving many problems in structural biology and biophysics. The co-variation of pairs of mutations contained in multiple sequence alignments of protein families can be used to build a Potts Hamiltonian model of the sequence patterns which accurately predicts structural contacts. This observation paves the way to develop deeper connections between evolutionary fitness landscapes of entire protein families and the corresponding free energy landscapes which determine the conformational propensities of individual proteins. Using statistical energies determined from the Potts model and an alignment of 2896 PDB structures, we predict the propensity for particular kinase family proteins to assume a "DFG-out" conformation implicated in the susceptibility of some kinases to type-II inhibitors, and validate the predictions by comparison with the observed structural propensities of the corresponding proteins and experimental binding affinity data. We decompose the statistical energies to investigate which interactions contribute the most to the conformational preference for particular sequences and the corresponding proteins. We find that interactions involving the activation loop and the C-helix and HRD motif are primarily responsible for stabilizing the DFG-in state. This work illustrates how structural free energy landscapes and fitness landscapes of proteins can be used in an integrated way, and in the context of kinase family proteins, can potentially impact therapeutic design strategies. PMID:27241634

  7. Clustering of protein families into functional subtypes using Relative Complexity Measure with reduced amino acid alphabets

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Phylogenetic analysis can be used to divide a protein family into subfamilies in the absence of experimental information. Most phylogenetic analysis methods utilize multiple alignment of sequences and are based on an evolutionary model. However, multiple alignment is not an automated procedure and requires human intervention to maintain alignment integrity and to produce phylogenies consistent with the functional splits in underlying sequences. To address this problem, we propose to use the alignment-free Relative Complexity Measure (RCM) combined with reduced amino acid alphabets to cluster protein families into functional subtypes purely on sequence criteria. Comparison with an alignment-based approach was also carried out to test the quality of the clustering. Results We demonstrate the robustness of RCM with reduced alphabets in clustering of protein sequences into families in a simulated dataset and seven well-characterized protein datasets. On protein datasets, crotonases, mandelate racemases, nucleotidyl cyclases and glycoside hydrolase family 2 were clustered into subfamilies with 100% accuracy whereas acyl transferase domains, haloacid dehalogenases, and vicinal oxygen chelates could be assigned to subfamilies with 97.2%, 96.9% and 92.2% accuracies, respectively. Conclusions The overall combination of methods in this paper is useful for clustering protein families into subtypes based on solely protein sequence information. The method is also flexible and computationally fast because it does not require multiple alignment of sequences. PMID:20718947

  8. Matricellular proteins of the Cyr61/CTGF/NOV (CCN) family and the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Anna R.; Liszewska, Ewa; Jaworski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Matricellular proteins are secreted proteins that exist at the border of cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). However, instead of playing a role in structural integrity of the ECM, these proteins, that act as modulators of various surface receptors, have a regulatory function and instruct a multitude of cellular responses. Among matricellular proteins are members of the Cyr61/CTGF/NOV (CCN) protein family. These proteins exert their activity by binding directly to integrins and heparan sulfate proteoglycans and activating multiple intracellular signaling pathways. CCN proteins also influence the activity of growth factors and cytokines and integrate their activity with integrin signaling. At the cellular level, CCN proteins regulate gene expression and cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, senescence, adhesion, and migration. To date, CCN proteins have been extensively studied in the context of osteo- and chondrogenesis, angiogenesis, and carcinogenesis, but the expression of these proteins is also observed in a variety of tissues. The role of CCN proteins in the nervous system has not been systematically studied or described. Thus, the major aim of this review is to introduce the CCN protein family to the neuroscience community. We first discuss the structure, interactions, and cellular functions of CCN proteins and then provide a detailed review of the available data on the neuronal expression and contribution of CCN proteins to nervous system development, function, and pathology. PMID:26157362

  9. Evolutionary bases of carbohydrate recognition and substrate discrimination in the ROK protein family.

    PubMed

    Conejo, Maria S; Thompson, Steven M; Miller, Brian G

    2010-06-01

    The ROK (repressor, open reading frame, kinase) protein family (Pfam 00480) is a large collection of bacterial polypeptides that includes sugar kinases, carbohydrate responsive transcriptional repressors, and many functionally uncharacterized gene products. ROK family sugar kinases phosphorylate a range of structurally distinct hexoses including the key carbon source D: -glucose, various glucose epimers, and several acetylated hexosamines. The primary sequence elements responsible for carbohydrate recognition within different functional categories of ROK polypeptides are largely unknown due to a limited structural characterization of this protein family. In order to identify the structural bases for substrate discrimination in individual ROK proteins, and to better understand the evolutionary processes that led to the divergent evolution of function in this family, we constructed an inclusive alignment of 227 representative ROK polypeptides. Phylogenetic analyses and ancestral sequence reconstructions of the resulting tree reveal a discrete collection of active site residues that dictate substrate specificity. The results also suggest a series of mutational events within the carbohydrate-binding sites of ROK proteins that facilitated the expansion of substrate specificity within this family. This study provides new insight into the evolutionary relationship of ROK glucokinases and non-ROK glucokinases (Pfam 02685), revealing the primary sequence elements shared between these two protein families, which diverged from a common ancestor in ancient times. PMID:20512568

  10. Control of apoptosis by the BCL-2 protein family: implications for physiology and therapy.

    PubMed

    Czabotar, Peter E; Lessene, Guillaume; Strasser, Andreas; Adams, Jerry M

    2014-01-01

    The BCL-2 protein family determines the commitment of cells to apoptosis, an ancient cell suicide programme that is essential for development, tissue homeostasis and immunity. Too little apoptosis can promote cancer and autoimmune diseases; too much apoptosis can augment ischaemic conditions and drive neurodegeneration. We discuss the biochemical, structural and genetic studies that have clarified how the interplay between members of the BCL-2 family on mitochondria sets the apoptotic threshold. These mechanistic insights into the functions of the BCL-2 family are illuminating the physiological control of apoptosis, the pathological consequences of its dysregulation and the promising search for novel cancer therapies that target the BCL-2 family. PMID:24355989

  11. Rapid expansion of the protein disulfide isomerase gene family facilitates the folding of venom peptides.

    PubMed

    Safavi-Hemami, Helena; Li, Qing; Jackson, Ronneshia L; Song, Albert S; Boomsma, Wouter; Bandyopadhyay, Pradip K; Gruber, Christian W; Purcell, Anthony W; Yandell, Mark; Olivera, Baldomero M; Ellgaard, Lars

    2016-03-22

    Formation of correct disulfide bonds in the endoplasmic reticulum is a crucial step for folding proteins destined for secretion. Protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs) play a central role in this process. We report a previously unidentified, hypervariable family of PDIs that represents the most diverse gene family of oxidoreductases described in a single genus to date. These enzymes are highly expressed specifically in the venom glands of predatory cone snails, animals that synthesize a remarkably diverse set of cysteine-rich peptide toxins (conotoxins). Enzymes in this PDI family, termed conotoxin-specific PDIs, significantly and differentially accelerate the kinetics of disulfide-bond formation of several conotoxins. Our results are consistent with a unique biological scenario associated with protein folding: The diversification of a family of foldases can be correlated with the rapid evolution of an unprecedented diversity of disulfide-rich structural domains expressed by venomous marine snails in the superfamily Conoidea. PMID:26957604

  12. The Shroom family proteins play broad roles in the morphogenesis of thickened epithelial sheets

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chanjae; Le, Minh-Phuong; Wallingford, John B.

    2009-01-01

    Thickened epithelial sheets are found in most organ systems, but the mechanisms governing their morphogenesis remain poorly defined. We show here that Shroom family proteins are broadly involved in generating thickened epithelial sheets. Through in situ hybridization, we report temporal and spatial expression patterns of the four Shroom family members during early Xenopus development from oocytes to tadpole stages. Shroom1 and 2 mRNAs are maternally expressed, while Shroom3 and Shroom4 are zygotic transcripts. During later development, all four Shroom family proteins are broadly expressed in developing epithelial organs, and the epithelial cells that express Shrooms are elongated. Moreover, we show that ectopic expression of Shroom2, like Shroom3, is able to increase cell height and that loss of Shroom2 function results in a failure of cell elongation in the neural epithelium. These data suggest that Shroom family proteins play an important role in the morphogenesis of several different embryonic epithelial tissues. PMID:19384856

  13. Exploring metazoan evolution through dynamic and holistic changes in protein families and domains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding proteome evolution is important for deciphering processes that drive species diversity and adaptation. Herein, the dynamics of change in protein families and protein domains over the course of metazoan evolution was explored. Change, as defined by birth/death and duplication/deletion ...

  14. Characterization of a New Family of Metal Transport Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Guerinot, Mary Lou; Eide, David

    1999-06-01

    Soils at many DOE sites are contaminated with metals and radionuclides. Such soils obviously pose a risk to human and animal health. Unlike organic wastes, which can be metabolized, metals are immutable and cannot be degraded into harmless constituents. Phytoremediation, the use of plants to remove toxic materials from soil and water, may prove to be an environmentally friendly and cost effective solution for cleaning up metal contaminated sites. The success of phytoremediation will rely on the availability of plants that absorb, translocate, and tolerate the contaminating metals. However, before we can engineer such plants, we need more basic information on how plants acquire metals. An important long term goal of our research program is to understand how metals such as zinc, cadmium and iron are transported across membranes. Our research is focused on a new family of metal transporters, which we have identified through combined studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We have identified a family of 24 presumptive metal transport genes in a variety of organisms including yeast, trypanosomes, plants, nematodes, and humans. This family, which we have designated the ''ZIP'' genes, provides a rich source of material with which to undertake studies on metal transport in eukar

  15. Evolution of vertebrate E protein transcription factors: comparative analysis of the E protein gene family in Takifugu rubripes and humans.

    PubMed

    Hikima, Jun-ichi; Lennard, Mara L; Wilson, Melanie R; Miller, Norman W; Clem, L William; Warr, Gregory W

    2005-04-14

    E proteins are essential for B lymphocyte development and function, including immunoglobulin (Ig) gene rearrangement and expression. Previous studies of B cells in the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) identified E protein homologs that are capable of binding the muE5 motif and driving a strong transcriptional response. There are three E protein genes in mammals, HEB (TCF12), E2A (TCF3), and E2-2 (TCF4). The major expressed E proteins found in catfish B cells are homologs of HEB and of E2A. Here we sought to define the complete family of E protein genes in a teleost fish, Takifugu rubripes, taking advantage of the completed genome sequence. The catfish CFEB (HEB homolog) sequence identified homologous E-protein-encoding sequences in five scaffolds in the Takifugu genome database. Detailed comparative analysis with the human genome revealed the presence of five E protein homologs in Takifugu. Single genes orthologous to HEB and to E2-2 were identified. In contrast, two members of the E2A gene family were identified in Takifugu; one of these shows the alternative processing of transcripts that identifies it as the ortholog of the E12/E47-encoding mammalian E2A gene, whereas the second Takifugu E2A gene has no predicted alternative splice products. A novel fifth E protein gene (EX) was identified in Takifugu. Phylogenetic analysis revealed four E protein branches among vertebrates: EX, E2A, HEB, and E2-2. PMID:15713784

  16. Structural Features and Chaperone Activity of the NudC Protein Family

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Meiying; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Burdette, Alexander J.; Utepbergenov, Darkhan; Janczyk, Pawe; #322; #321; .; Derewenda, Urszula; Stukenberg, P. Todd; Caldwell, Kim A.; Derewenda, Zygmunt S.

    2012-05-25

    The NudC family consists of four conserved proteins with representatives in all eukaryotes. The archetypal nudC gene from Aspergillus nidulans is a member of the nud gene family that is involved in the maintenance of nuclear migration. This family also includes nudF, whose human orthologue, Lis1, codes for a protein essential for brain cortex development. Three paralogues of NudC are known in vertebrates: NudC, NudC-like (NudCL), and NudC-like 2 (NudCL2). The fourth distantly related member of the family, CML66, contains a NudC-like domain. The three principal NudC proteins have no catalytic activity but appear to play as yet poorly defined roles in proliferating and dividing cells. We present crystallographic and NMR studies of the human NudC protein and discuss the results in the context of structures recently deposited by structural genomics centers (i.e., NudCL and mouse NudCL2). All proteins share the same core CS domain characteristic of proteins acting either as cochaperones of Hsp90 or as independent small heat shock proteins. However, while NudC and NudCL dimerize via an N-terminally located coiled coil, the smaller NudCL2 lacks this motif and instead dimerizes as a result of unique domain swapping. We show that NudC and NudCL, but not NudCL2, inhibit the aggregation of several target proteins, consistent with an Hsp90-independent heat shock protein function. Importantly, and in contrast to several previous reports, none of the three proteins is able to form binary complexes with Lis1. The availability of structural information will be of help in further studies on the cellular functions of the NudC family.

  17. Conserved Features in the Structure, Mechanism, and Biogenesis of the Inverse Autotransporter Protein Family.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Eva; Stubenrauch, Christopher J; Grinter, Rhys; Croft, Nathan P; Purcell, Anthony W; Strugnell, Richard A; Dougan, Gordon; Lithgow, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial cell surface proteins intimin and invasin are virulence factors that share a common domain structure and bind selectively to host cell receptors in the course of bacterial pathogenesis. The β-barrel domains of intimin and invasin show significant sequence and structural similarities. Conversely, a variety of proteins with sometimes limited sequence similarity have also been annotated as "intimin-like" and "invasin" in genome datasets, while other recent work on apparently unrelated virulence-associated proteins ultimately revealed similarities to intimin and invasin. Here we characterize the sequence and structural relationships across this complex protein family. Surprisingly, intimins and invasins represent a very small minority of the sequence diversity in what has been previously the "intimin/invasin protein family". Analysis of the assembly pathway for expression of the classic intimin, EaeA, and a characteristic example of the most prevalent members of the group, FdeC, revealed a dependence on the translocation and assembly module as a common feature for both these proteins. While the majority of the sequences in the grouping are most similar to FdeC, a further and widespread group is two-partner secretion systems that use the β-barrel domain as the delivery device for secretion of a variety of virulence factors. This comprehensive analysis supports the adoption of the "inverse autotransporter protein family" as the most accurate nomenclature for the family and, in turn, has important consequences for our overall understanding of the Type V secretion systems of bacterial pathogens. PMID:27190006

  18. Molecular evolution of miraculin-like proteins in soybean Kunitz super-family.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, Purushotham; Gahloth, Deepankar; Tomar, Prabhat Pratap Singh; Sharma, Nidhi; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar

    2011-12-01

    Miraculin-like proteins (MLPs) belong to soybean Kunitz super-family and have been characterized from many plant families like Rutaceae, Solanaceae, Rubiaceae, etc. Many of them possess trypsin inhibitory activity and are involved in plant defense. MLPs exhibit significant sequence identity (~30-95%) to native miraculin protein, also belonging to Kunitz super-family compared with a typical Kunitz family member (~30%). The sequence and structure-function comparison of MLPs with that of a classical Kunitz inhibitor have demonstrated that MLPs have evolved to form a distinct group within Kunitz super-family. Sequence analysis of new genes along with available MLP sequences in the literature revealed three major groups for these proteins. A significant feature of Rutaceae MLP type 2 sequences is the presence of phosphorylation motif. Subtle changes are seen in putative reactive loop residues among different MLPs suggesting altered specificities to specific proteases. In phylogenetic analysis, Rutaceae MLP type 1 and type 2 proteins clustered together on separate branches, whereas native miraculin along with other MLPs formed distinct clusters. Site-specific positive Darwinian selection was observed at many sites in both the groups of Rutaceae MLP sequences with most of the residues undergoing positive selection located in loop regions. The results demonstrate the sequence and thereby the structure-function divergence of MLPs as a distinct group within soybean Kunitz super-family due to biotic and abiotic stresses of local environment. PMID:22274614

  19. The Pfam protein families database: towards a more sustainable future

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Robert D.; Coggill, Penelope; Eberhardt, Ruth Y.; Eddy, Sean R.; Mistry, Jaina; Mitchell, Alex L.; Potter, Simon C.; Punta, Marco; Qureshi, Matloob; Sangrador-Vegas, Amaia; Salazar, Gustavo A.; Tate, John; Bateman, Alex

    2016-01-01

    In the last two years the Pfam database (http://pfam.xfam.org) has undergone a substantial reorganisation to reduce the effort involved in making a release, thereby permitting more frequent releases. Arguably the most significant of these changes is that Pfam is now primarily based on the UniProtKB reference proteomes, with the counts of matched sequences and species reported on the website restricted to this smaller set. Building families on reference proteomes sequences brings greater stability, which decreases the amount of manual curation required to maintain them. It also reduces the number of sequences displayed on the website, whilst still providing access to many important model organisms. Matches to the full UniProtKB database are, however, still available and Pfam annotations for individual UniProtKB sequences can still be retrieved. Some Pfam entries (1.6%) which have no matches to reference proteomes remain; we are working with UniProt to see if sequences from them can be incorporated into reference proteomes. Pfam-B, the automatically-generated supplement to Pfam, has been removed. The current release (Pfam 29.0) includes 16 295 entries and 559 clans. The facility to view the relationship between families within a clan has been improved by the introduction of a new tool. PMID:26673716

  20. The Pfam protein families database: towards a more sustainable future.

    PubMed

    Finn, Robert D; Coggill, Penelope; Eberhardt, Ruth Y; Eddy, Sean R; Mistry, Jaina; Mitchell, Alex L; Potter, Simon C; Punta, Marco; Qureshi, Matloob; Sangrador-Vegas, Amaia; Salazar, Gustavo A; Tate, John; Bateman, Alex

    2016-01-01

    In the last two years the Pfam database (http://pfam.xfam.org) has undergone a substantial reorganisation to reduce the effort involved in making a release, thereby permitting more frequent releases. Arguably the most significant of these changes is that Pfam is now primarily based on the UniProtKB reference proteomes, with the counts of matched sequences and species reported on the website restricted to this smaller set. Building families on reference proteomes sequences brings greater stability, which decreases the amount of manual curation required to maintain them. It also reduces the number of sequences displayed on the website, whilst still providing access to many important model organisms. Matches to the full UniProtKB database are, however, still available and Pfam annotations for individual UniProtKB sequences can still be retrieved. Some Pfam entries (1.6%) which have no matches to reference proteomes remain; we are working with UniProt to see if sequences from them can be incorporated into reference proteomes. Pfam-B, the automatically-generated supplement to Pfam, has been removed. The current release (Pfam 29.0) includes 16 295 entries and 559 clans. The facility to view the relationship between families within a clan has been improved by the introduction of a new tool. PMID:26673716

  1. Selecting protein families for environmental features based on manifold regularization.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xingpeng; Xu, Weiwei; Park, E K; Li, Guangrong

    2014-06-01

    Recently, statistics and machine learning have been developed to identify functional or taxonomic features of environmental features or physiological status. Important proteins (or other functional and taxonomic entities) to environmental features can be potentially used as biosensors. A major challenge is how the distribution of protein and gene functions embodies the adaption of microbial communities across environments and host habitats. In this paper, we propose a novel regularization method for linear regression to adapt the challenge. The approach is inspired by local linear embedding (LLE) and we call it a manifold-constrained regularization for linear regression (McRe). The novel regularization procedure also has potential to be used in solving other linear systems. We demonstrate the efficiency and the performance of the approach in both simulation and real data. PMID:24802701

  2. p24 family proteins: key players in the regulation of trafficking along the secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Pastor-Cantizano, Noelia; Montesinos, Juan Carlos; Bernat-Silvestre, César; Marcote, María Jesús; Aniento, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    p24 family proteins have been known for a long time, but their functions have remained elusive. However, they are emerging as essential regulators of protein trafficking along the secretory pathway, influencing the composition, structure, and function of different organelles in the pathway, especially the ER and the Golgi apparatus. In addition, they appear to modulate the transport of specific cargos, including GPI-anchored proteins, G-protein-coupled receptors, or K/HDEL ligands. As a consequence, they have been shown to play specific roles in signaling, development, insulin secretion, and the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. The search of new putative ligands may open the way to discover new functions for this fascinating family of proteins. PMID:26224213

  3. p204, a p200 family protein, as a multifunctional regulator of cell proliferation and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Yi; Lengyel, Peter; Liu, Chuan-Ju

    2015-01-01

    The interferon-inducible p200 family comprises a group of homologous mouse and human proteins. Most of these have an N-terminal DAPIN domain and one or two partially conserved, 200 amino acid long C-terminal domains (designated as 200X domain). These proteins play important roles in the regulation of cell proliferation, tissue differentiation, apoptosis and senescence. p200 family proteins are involved also in autoimmunity and the control of tumor growth. These proteins function by binding to various target proteins (e.g. transcription factors, signaling proteins, oncoproteins and tumor suppressor proteins) and modulating target activity. This review concentrates on p204, a murine member of the family and its roles in regulating cell proliferation, cell and tissue differentiation (e.g. of skeletal muscle myotubes, beating cardiac myocytes, osteoblasts, chondrocytes and macrophages) and signaling by Ras proteins. The expression of p204 in various tissues as promoted by tissue-specific transcription factors, its distribution among subcellular compartments, and the controls of these features are also discussed. PMID:19027346

  4. The multi-protein family of sulfotransferases in plants: composition, occurrence, substrate specificity, and functions

    PubMed Central

    Hirschmann, Felix; Krause, Florian; Papenbrock, Jutta

    2014-01-01

    All members of the sulfotransferase (SOT, EC 2.8.2.-) protein family transfer a sulfuryl group from the donor 3′-phosphoadenosine 5′-phosphosulfate (PAPS) to an appropriate hydroxyl group of several classes of substrates. The primary structure of these enzymes is characterized by a histidine residue in the active site, defined PAPS binding sites and a longer SOT domain. Proteins with this SOT domain occur in all organisms from all three domains, usually as a multi-protein family. Arabidopsis thaliana SOTs, the best characterized SOT multi-protein family, contains 21 members. The substrates for several plant enzymes have already been identified, such as glucosinolates, brassinosteroids, jasmonates, flavonoids, and salicylic acid. Much information has been gathered on desulfo-glucosinolate (dsGl) SOTs in A. thaliana. The three cytosolic dsGl SOTs show slightly different expression patterns. The recombinant proteins reveal differences in their affinity to indolic and aliphatic dsGls. Also the respective recombinant dsGl SOTs from different A. thaliana ecotypes differ in their kinetic properties. However, determinants of substrate specificity and the exact reaction mechanism still need to be clarified. Probably, the three-dimensional structures of more plant proteins need to be solved to analyze the mode of action and the responsible amino acids for substrate binding. In addition to A. thaliana, more plant species from several families need to be investigated to fully elucidate the diversity of sulfated molecules and the way of biosynthesis catalyzed by SOT enzymes. PMID:25360143

  5. Arabidopsis Ovate Family Proteins, a Novel Transcriptional Repressor Family, Control Multiple Aspects of Plant Growth and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shucai; Chang, Ying; Guo, Jianjun; Zeng, Qingning; Ellis, Brian; Chen, Jay

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Arabidopsis genome contains 18 genes that are predicted to encode Ovate Family Proteins (AtOFPs), a protein family characterized by a conserved OVATE domain, an approximately 70-amino acid domain that was originally found in tomato OVATE protein. Among AtOFP family members, AtOFP1 has been shown to suppress cell elongation, in part, by suppressing the expression of AtGA20ox1, AtOFP4 has been shown to regulate secondary cell wall formation by interact with KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEODOMAIN PROTEIN 7 (KNAT7), and AtOFP5 has been shown to regulate the activity of a BEL1-LIKEHOMEODOMAIN 1(BLH1)-KNAT3 complex during early embryo sac development, but little is known about the function of other AtOFPs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrated here that AtOFP proteins could function as effective transcriptional repressors in the Arabidopsis protoplast transient expression system. The analysis of loss-of-function alleles of AtOFPs suggested AtOFP genes may have overlapping function in regulating plant growth and development, because none of the single mutants identified, including T-DNA insertion mutants in AtOFP1, AtOFP4, AtOFP8, AtOFP10, AtOFP15 and AtOFP16, displayed any apparent morphological defects. Further, Atofp1 Atofp4 and Atofp15 Atofp16 double mutants still did not differ significantly from wild-type. On the other hand, plants overexpressing AtOFP genes displayed a number of abnormal phenotypes, which could be categorized into three distinct classes, suggesting that AtOFP genes may also have diverse functions in regulating plant growth and development. Further analysis suggested that AtOFP1 regulates cotyledon development in a postembryonic manner, and global transcript profiling revealed that it suppress the expression of many other genes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results showed that AtOFPs function as transcriptional repressors and they regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development. These results provided the first overview of a

  6. Calcium-dependent and -independent interactions of the S100 protein family

    PubMed Central

    Santamaria-Kisiel, Liliana; Rintala-Dempsey, Anne C.; Shaw, Gary S.

    2006-01-01

    The S100 proteins comprise at least 25 members, forming the largest group of EF-hand signalling proteins in humans. Although the proteins are expressed in many tissues, each S100 protein has generally been shown to have a preference for expression in one particular tissue or cell type. Three-dimensional structures of several S100 family members have shown that the proteins assume a dimeric structure consisting of two EF-hand motifs per monomer. Calcium binding to these S100 proteins, with the exception of S100A10, results in an approx. 40° alteration in the position of helix III, exposing a broad hydrophobic surface that enables the S100 proteins to interact with a variety of target proteins. More than 90 potential target proteins have been documented for the S100 proteins, including the cytoskeletal proteins tubulin, glial fibrillary acidic protein and F-actin, which have been identified mostly from in vitro experiments. In the last 5 years, efforts have concentrated on quantifying the protein interactions of the S100 proteins, identifying in vivo protein partners and understanding the molecular specificity for target protein interactions. Furthermore, the S100 proteins are the only EF-hand proteins that are known to form both homo- and hetero-dimers, and efforts are underway to determine the stabilities of these complexes and structural rationales for their formation and potential differences in their biological roles. This review highlights both the calcium-dependent and -independent interactions of the S100 proteins, with a focus on the structures of the complexes, differences and similarities in the strengths of the interactions, and preferences for homo- compared with hetero-dimeric S100 protein assembly. PMID:16683912

  7. ADAM and ADAMTS family proteins and their role in the colorectal cancer etiopathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Przemyslaw, Leszczynski; Boguslaw, Hendrich Andrzej; Elzbieta, Szmida; Malgorzata, Sasiadek Maria

    2013-01-01

    The ADAM and ADAMTS families, also called adamalysins belong to an important group of extracellular matrix proteins. The ADAMs family belong to both the transmembrane and secreted proteins, while ADAMTS family only contains secreted forms. Adamalysins play an important role in the cell phenotype regulation via their activities in signaling pathways, cell adhesion and migration. The human proteome contains 21 ADAM, and 19 ADAMTS proteins, which are involved in extracellular matrix remodeling, shedding of various substrates such as: adhesion ligands, growth factors, their receptors and diverse cytokines. Recent studies provide evidence that adamalysins play a crucial role in colorectal cancer (CRC) etiopathogenesis. It seems possible that adamalysins might be used as CRC prediction markers or potential pharmaceutical targets. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(3): 139-150] PMID:23527857

  8. The Dishevelled Protein Family: Still Rather a Mystery After Over 20 Years of Molecular Studies

    PubMed Central

    Mlodzik, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Dishevelled (Dsh) is a key component of Wnt-signaling pathways and possibly also has other functional requirements. Dsh appears to be a key factor to interpret Wnt signals coming via the Wnt-receptor family, the Frizzled proteins, from the plasma membrane and route them into the correct intracellular pathways. However, how Dsh is regulated to relay signal flow to specific and distinct cellular responses upon interaction with the same Wnt-receptor family remains very poorly understood. PMID:26969973

  9. Unwinding RNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: DEAD-box proteins and related families.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz, J; Kressler, D; Linder, P

    1999-05-01

    Members of the RNA-helicase family are defined by several evolutionary conserved motifs. They are found in all organisms - from bacteria to humans - and many viruses. The minimum number of RNA helicases present within a eukaryotic cell can be predicted from the complete sequence of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. Recent progress in the functional analysis of various family members has given new insights into, and confirmed the significance of these proteins for, most cellular RNA metabolic processes. PMID:10322435

  10. Identification and in silico analysis of helical lipid binding regions in proteins belonging to the amphitropic protein family.

    PubMed

    Keller, Rob C A

    2014-12-01

    The role of protein-lipid interactions is increasingly recognized to be of importance in numerous biological processes. Bioinformatics is being increasingly used as a helpful tool in studying protein-lipid interactions. Especially recently developed approaches recognizing lipid binding regions in proteins can be implemented. In this study one of those bioinformatics approaches specialized in identifying lipid binding helical regions in proteins is expanded. The approach is explored further by features which can be easily obtained manually. Some interesting examples of members of the amphitropic protein family have been investigated in order to demonstrate the additional features of this bioinformatics approach. The results in this study seem to indicate interesting characteristics of amphitropic proteins and provide insight into the mechanistic functioning and overall understanding of this intriguing class of proteins. Additionally, the results demonstrate that the presented bioinformatics approach might be either an interesting starting point in protein-lipid interactions studies or a good tool for selecting new focus points for more detailed experimental research of proteins with known overall protein-lipid binding abilities. PMID:25431407

  11. Gambogic acid is an antagonist of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2-family proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Dayong; Jin, Chaofang; Shiau, Chung-wai; Kitada, Shinichi; Satterthwait, Arnold C; Reed, John C.

    2008-01-01

    The natural product Gambogic acid (GA) has been reported to have cytotoxic activity against tumor cells in culture, and was identified as an active compound in a cell-based high-throughput screening (HTS) assay for activators of caspases, proteases involved in apoptosis. Using the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2-family protein, Bfl-1, as a target for screening of a library of natural products, we identified GA as a competitive inhibitor that displaced BH3 peptides from Bfl-1 in a fluorescent polarization assay (FPA). Analysis of competition for BH3 peptide binding revealed that GA inhibits all 6 human Bcl-2-family proteins to various extents, with Mcl-1 and Bcl-B the most potently inhibited (concentrations required for 50% inhibition [IC50] <1 μM). Competition for BH3 peptide binding was also confirmed using a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) assay. GA functionally inhibited the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2-family proteins, as demonstrated by experiments using isolated mitochondria in which recombinant purified Bcl-2-family proteins suppress SMAC release in vitro, showing that GA neutralizes their suppressive effects on mitochondria in a concentration-dependent manner. GA killed tumor cell lines via an apoptotic mechanism, whereas analogs of GA with greatly reduced potency at BH3 peptide displacement showed little or no cytotoxic activity. However, GA retained cytotoxic activity against bax−/− bak−/− cells in which anti-apoptotic Bcl-2-family proteins lack a cytoprotective phenotype, implying that GA also has additional targets that contribute to its cytotoxic mechanism. Altogether, the findings suggest that suppression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2-family proteins may be among the cytotoxic mechanisms by which GA kills tumor cells. PMID:18566235

  12. A new heterogeneous family of telomerically encoded Cryptosporidium proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bouzid, Maha; Hunter, Paul R; McDonald, Vincent; Elwin, Kristin; Chalmers, Rachel M; Tyler, Kevin M

    2013-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is predominantly caused by two closely related species of protozoan parasites the zoonotic Cryptosporidium parvum and anthroponotic Cryptosporidium hominis which diverge phenotypically in respect to host range and virulence. Using comparative genomics we identified two genes displaying overt heterogeneity between species. Although initial work suggested both were species specific, Cops-1 for C. parvum and Chos-1 for C. hominis, subsequent study identified an abridged ortholog of Cops-1 in C. hominis. Cops-1 and Chos-1 showed limited, but significant, similarity to each other and share common features: (i) telomeric location: Cops-1 is the last gene on chromosome 2, whilst Chos-1 is the first gene on chromosome 5, (ii) encode circa 50-kDa secreted proteins with isoelectric points above 10, (iii) are serine rich, and (iv) contain internal nucleotide repeats. Importantly, Cops-1 sequence contains specific SNPs with good discriminatory power useful epidemiologically. C. parvum-infected patient sera recognized a 50-kDa protein in antigen preparations of C. parvum but not C. hominis, consistent with Cops-1 being antigenic for patients. Interestingly, anti-Cops-1 monoclonal antibody (9E1) stained oocyst content and sporozoite surface of C. parvum only. This study provides a new example of protozoan telomeres as rapidly evolving contingency loci encoding putative virulence factors. PMID:23467513

  13. Using the SUBcellular database for Arabidopsis proteins to localize the Deg protease family.

    PubMed

    Tanz, Sandra K; Castleden, Ian; Hooper, Cornelia M; Small, Ian; Millar, A Harvey

    2014-01-01

    Sub-functionalization during the expansion of gene families in eukaryotes has occurred in part through specific subcellular localization of different family members. To better understand this process in plants, compiled records of large-scale proteomic and fluorescent protein localization datasets can be explored and bioinformatic predictions for protein localization can be used to predict the gaps in experimental data. This process can be followed by targeted experiments to test predictions. The SUBA3 database is a free web-service at http://suba.plantenergy.uwa.edu.au that helps users to explore reported experimental data and predictions concerning proteins encoded by gene families and to define the experiments required to locate these homologous sets of proteins. Here we show how SUBA3 can be used to explore the subcellular location of the Deg protease family of ATP-independent serine endopeptidases (Deg1-Deg16). Combined data integration and new experiments refined location information for Deg1 and Deg9, confirmed Deg2, Deg5, and Deg8 in plastids and Deg 15 in peroxisomes and provide substantial experimental evidence for mitochondrial localized Deg proteases. Two of these, Deg3 and Deg10, additionally localized to the plastid, revealing novel dual-targeted Deg proteases in the plastid and the mitochondrion. SUBA3 is continually updated to ensure that researchers can use the latest published data when planning the experimental steps remaining to localize gene family functions. PMID:25161662

  14. Using the SUBcellular database for Arabidopsis proteins to localize the Deg protease family

    PubMed Central

    Tanz, Sandra K.; Castleden, Ian; Hooper, Cornelia M.; Small, Ian; Millar, A. Harvey

    2014-01-01

    Sub-functionalization during the expansion of gene families in eukaryotes has occurred in part through specific subcellular localization of different family members. To better understand this process in plants, compiled records of large-scale proteomic and fluorescent protein localization datasets can be explored and bioinformatic predictions for protein localization can be used to predict the gaps in experimental data. This process can be followed by targeted experiments to test predictions. The SUBA3 database is a free web-service at http://suba.plantenergy.uwa.edu.au that helps users to explore reported experimental data and predictions concerning proteins encoded by gene families and to define the experiments required to locate these homologous sets of proteins. Here we show how SUBA3 can be used to explore the subcellular location of the Deg protease family of ATP-independent serine endopeptidases (Deg1–Deg16). Combined data integration and new experiments refined location information for Deg1 and Deg9, confirmed Deg2, Deg5, and Deg8 in plastids and Deg 15 in peroxisomes and provide substantial experimental evidence for mitochondrial localized Deg proteases. Two of these, Deg3 and Deg10, additionally localized to the plastid, revealing novel dual-targeted Deg proteases in the plastid and the mitochondrion. SUBA3 is continually updated to ensure that researchers can use the latest published data when planning the experimental steps remaining to localize gene family functions. PMID:25161662

  15. Identification of a divergent M protein gene and an M protein-related gene family in Streptococcus pyogenes serotype 49.

    PubMed Central

    Haanes, E J; Cleary, P P

    1989-01-01

    The antigenically variant M protein of Streptococcus pyogenes enhances virulence by promoting resistance to phagocytosis. The serum opacity factor (OF), produced by a subset of M serotypes, is also antigenically variant, and its antigenic variability exactly parallels that of M protein. OF-positive and OF-negative streptococci are also phenotypically distinguishable by a number of other criteria. In order to study the differences between OF-positive and OF-negative streptococci, we cloned and sequenced the type 49 M protein gene (emm49), the first to be cloned from an OF-positive strain. This gene showed evolutionary divergence from the OF-negative M protein genes studied previously. Furthermore, emm49 was part of a gene family, in contrast to the single-copy nature of previously characterized M protein genes. Images PMID:2687231

  16. Identification of an iron-binding protein of the Dps family expressed by Streptococcus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Nicodème, Muriel; Perrin, Clarisse; Hols, Pascal; Bracquart, Patrice; Gaillard, Jean-Luc

    2004-01-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus PB18 can grow between 20 degrees and 52 degrees C and is resistant to various stresses such as heat, acidic or cold shock. During cold shock, a protein of 21.5 kDa was previously shown to be induced in S. thermophilus. In addition to its cold-shock induction, 2D-PAGE revealed that the 21.5-kDa protein was also expressed during the stationary phase of growth. The recent access to the genome sequence of S. thermophilus LMG18311 allowed the identification of a 173-amino acid protein displaying a strong homology between the 21.5-kDa protein and members of the Dps family of proteins. Specific staining of non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (ND-PAGE) followed by two-dimensional PAGE (2D-PAGE) showed that the 21.5-kDa protein was an iron-binding protein. PMID:15018103

  17. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression of Xenopus F-Box Family of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Saritas-Yildirim, Banu; Pliner, Hannah A.; Ochoa, Angelica; Silva, Elena M.

    2015-01-01

    Protein degradation via the multistep ubiquitin/26S proteasome pathway is a rapid way to alter the protein profile and drive cell processes and developmental changes. Many key regulators of embryonic development are targeted for degradation by E3 ubiquitin ligases. The most studied family of E3 ubiquitin ligases is the SCF ubiquitin ligases, which use F-box adaptor proteins to recognize and recruit target proteins. Here, we used a bioinformatics screen and phylogenetic analysis to identify and annotate the family of F-box proteins in the Xenopus tropicalis genome. To shed light on the function of the F-box proteins, we analyzed expression of F-box genes during early stages of Xenopus development. Many F-box genes are broadly expressed with expression domains localized to diverse tissues including brain, spinal cord, eye, neural crest derivatives, somites, kidneys, and heart. All together, our genome-wide identification and expression profiling of the Xenopus F-box family of proteins provide a foundation for future research aimed to identify the precise role of F-box dependent E3 ubiquitin ligases and their targets in the regulatory circuits of development. PMID:26327321

  18. The rheostat in the membrane: BCL-2 family proteins and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Volkmann, N; Marassi, F M; Newmeyer, D D; Hanein, D

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis, a mechanism for programmed cell death, has key roles in human health and disease. Many signals for cellular life and death are regulated by the BCL-2 family proteins and converge at mitochondria, where cell fate is ultimately decided. The BCL-2 family includes both pro-life (e.g. BCL-XL) and pro-death (e.g. BAX, BAK) proteins. Previously, it was thought that a balance between these opposing proteins, like a simple ‘rheostat', could control the sensitivity of cells to apoptotic stresses. Later, this rheostat concept had to be extended, when it became clear that BCL-2 family proteins regulate each other through a complex network of bimolecular interactions, some transient and some relatively stable. Now, studies have shown that the apoptotic circuitry is even more sophisticated, in that BCL-2 family interactions are spatially dynamic, even in nonapoptotic cells. For example, BAX and BCL-XL can shuttle between the cytoplasm and the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). Upstream signaling pathways can regulate the cytoplasmic–MOM equilibrium of BAX and thereby adjust the sensitivity of cells to apoptotic stimuli. Thus, we can view the MOM as the central locale of a dynamic life–death rheostat. BAX invariably forms extensive homo-oligomers after activation in membranes. However, recent studies, showing that activated BAX monomers determine the kinetics of MOM permeabilization (MOMP), perturb the lipid bilayer and form nanometer size pores, pose questions about the role of the oligomerization. Other lingering questions concern the molecular mechanisms of BAX redistribution between MOM and cytoplasm and the details of BAX/BAK–membrane assemblies. Future studies need to delineate how BCL-2 family proteins regulate MOMP, in concert with auxiliary MOM proteins, in a dynamic membrane environment. Technologies aimed at elucidating the structure and function of the full-length proteins in membranes are needed to illuminate some of these critical issues. PMID

  19. Reversible and Irreversible Aggregation of Proteins from the FET Family: Influence of Repeats in Protein Chain on Its Aggregation Capacity.

    PubMed

    Galzitskaya, Oxana V

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of protein chain regions responsible for protein aggregation is an important result of studying of the molecular mechanisms of prion diseases and different proteinopathies associated with the formation of pathological aggregations through the prion mechanism. The ability to control aggregation of proteins could be an important tool in the arsenal of the drug development. Here we demonstrate, on an example of RNA-binding proteins of the FET family from six animal species (human, gorilla, pig, mouse, chicken, zebra fish), the possible role of repeats within the disordered regions. For these proteins, different repeats are revealed in the prion-like (N-terminal disordered) domains, and in the C-terminal disordered regions, predicted using bioinformatics methods. Moreover, we have found that in more complex organisms the number of repeats is increased. It can be hypothesized that the presence of a large number of repeats in the disordered regions in the proteins of the FET-family could both modulate and accelerate the formation of a dynamic cross-beta structure, and pathological aggregates. PMID:26100283

  20. The CPCFC cuticular protein family: Anatomical and cuticular locations in Anopheles gambiae and distribution throughout Pancrustacea.

    PubMed

    Vannini, Laura; Bowen, John Hunter; Reed, Tyler W; Willis, Judith H

    2015-10-01

    Arthropod cuticles have, in addition to chitin, many structural proteins belonging to diverse families. Information is sparse about how these different cuticular proteins contribute to the cuticle. Most cuticular proteins lack cysteine with the exception of two families (CPAP1 and CPAP3), recently described, and the one other that we now report on that has a motif of 16 amino acids first identified in a protein, Bc-NCP1, from the cuticle of nymphs of the cockroach, Blaberus craniifer (Jensen et al., 1997). This motif turns out to be present as two or three copies in one or two proteins in species from many orders of Hexapoda. We have named the family of cuticular proteins with this motif CPCFC, based on its unique feature of having two cysteines interrupted by five amino acids (C-X(5)-C). Analysis of the single member of the family in Anopheles gambiae (AgamCPCFC1) revealed that its mRNA is most abundant immediately following ecdysis in larvae, pupae and adults. The mRNA is localized primarily in epidermis that secretes hard cuticle, sclerites, setae, head capsules, appendages and spermatheca. EM immunolocalization revealed the presence of the protein, generally in endocuticle of legs and antennae. A phylogenetic analysis found proteins bearing this motif in 14 orders of Hexapoda, but not in some species for which there are complete genomic data. Proteins were much longer in Coleoptera and Diptera than in other orders. In contrast to the 1 and occasionally 2 copies in other species, a dragonfly, Ladona fulva, has at least 14 genes coding for family members. CPCFC proteins were present in four classes of Crustacea with 5 repeats in one species, and motifs that ended C-X(7)-C in Malacostraca. They were not detected, except as obvious contaminants, in any other arthropod subphyla or in any other phylum. The conservation of CPCFC proteins throughout the Pancrustacea and the small number of copies in individual species indicate that, when present, these proteins are

  1. A Protein Domain and Family Based Approach to Rare Variant Association Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Tom G.; Shihab, Hashem A.; Rivas, Manuel A.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Campbell, Colin; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Gaunt, Tom R.

    2016-01-01

    Background It has become common practice to analyse large scale sequencing data with statistical approaches based around the aggregation of rare variants within the same gene. We applied a novel approach to rare variant analysis by collapsing variants together using protein domain and family coordinates, regarded to be a more discrete definition of a biologically functional unit. Methods Using Pfam definitions, we collapsed rare variants (Minor Allele Frequency ≤ 1%) together in three different ways 1) variants within single genomic regions which map to individual protein domains 2) variants within two individual protein domain regions which are predicted to be responsible for a protein-protein interaction 3) all variants within combined regions from multiple genes responsible for coding the same protein domain (i.e. protein families). A conventional collapsing analysis using gene coordinates was also undertaken for comparison. We used UK10K sequence data and investigated associations between regions of variants and lipid traits using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT). Results We observed no strong evidence of association between regions of variants based on Pfam domain definitions and lipid traits. Quantile-Quantile plots illustrated that the overall distributions of p-values from the protein domain analyses were comparable to that of a conventional gene-based approach. Deviations from this distribution suggested that collapsing by either protein domain or gene definitions may be favourable depending on the trait analysed. Conclusion We have collapsed rare variants together using protein domain and family coordinates to present an alternative approach over collapsing across conventionally used gene-based regions. Although no strong evidence of association was detected in these analyses, future studies may still find value in adopting these approaches to detect previously unidentified association signals. PMID:27128313

  2. The protein disulphide-isomerase family: unravelling a string of folds.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, D M; Söling, H D

    1999-01-01

    The mammalian protein disulphide-isomerase (PDI) family encompasses several highly divergent proteins that are involved in the processing and maturation of secretory proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. These proteins are characterized by the presence of one or more domains of roughly 95-110 amino acids related to the cytoplasmic protein thioredoxin. All but the PDI-D subfamily are composed entirely of repeats of such domains, with at least one domain containing and one domain lacking a redox-active -Cys-Xaa-Xaa-Cys- tetrapeptide. In addition to their known roles as redox catalysts and isomerases, the last few years have revealed additional functions of the PDI proteins, including peptide binding, cell adhesion and perhaps chaperone activities. Attention is now turning to the non-redox-active domains of the PDIs, which may play an important role in all of the known activities of these proteins. Thus the presence of both redox-active and -inactive domains within these proteins portends a complexity of functions differentially accommodated by the various family members. PMID:10085220

  3. The Golgi-Associated Hook3 Protein Is a Member of a Novel Family of Microtubule-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Walenta, Jason H.; Didier, Aaron J.; Liu, Xinran; Krämer, Helmut

    2001-01-01

    Microtubules are central to the spatial organization of diverse membrane-trafficking systems. Here, we report that Hook proteins constitute a novel family of cytosolic coiled coil proteins that bind to organelles and to microtubules. The conserved NH2-terminal domains of Hook proteins mediate attachment to microtubules, whereas the more divergent COOH-terminal domains mediate the binding to organelles. Human Hook3 bound to Golgi membranes in vitro and was enriched in the cis-Golgi in vivo. Unlike other cis-Golgi–associated proteins, however, a large fraction of Hook3 maintained its juxtanuclear localization after Brefeldin A treatment, indicating a Golgi-independent mechanism for Hook3 localization. Because overexpression of Hook3 caused fragmentation of the Golgi complex, we propose that Hook3 participates in defining the architecture and localization of the mammalian Golgi complex. PMID:11238449

  4. Cerebral venous thrombosis in young adult with familial protein S deficiency.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Franciele M; Silva, Caroline Ribeiro da; Borém, Michelle G; Miranda-Vilela, Ana L

    2015-04-01

    Hereditary thrombophilia is the inherited predisposition to venous or, occasionally, arterial thrombosis. In most cases, it is because of changes related to physiological coagulation inhibitors or mutations in genes of coagulation factors. Protein S, a vitamin K-dependent plasma glycoprotein, is a natural anticoagulant and its deficiency is associated with familial venous thrombosis. We present a case study that brings together two rare diseases, cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) and familial protein S deficiency, in a 21-year-old male patient with a positive family history of thrombosis. He developed a headache of moderate intensity lasting 30 days, followed by bizarre movements, which culminated in the patient's death. This report discusses the importance of family history for the diagnosis of hereditary thrombophilia, as well as the request for brain imaging for diagnosis of CVT for an early appropriate intervention, and the importance of specialized medical guidance for family members, who must receive medical advice to prevent another fatal episode in a family member. PMID:25304012

  5. Bioinformatic Characterization of the 4-Toluene Sulfonate Uptake Permease (TSUP) Family of Transmembrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shlykov, Maksim A.; Zheng, Wei Hao; Chen, Jonathan S.; Saier, Milton H.

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitous sequence diverse 4-Toluene Sulfonate Uptake Permease (TSUP) family contains few characterized members and is believed to catalyze the transport of several sulfur-based compounds. Prokaryotic members of the TSUP family outnumber the eukaryotic members substantially, and in prokaryotes, but not eukaryotes, extensive lateral gene transfer occurred during family evolution. Despite unequal representation, homologues from the three taxonomic domains of life share well-conserved motifs. We show that the prototypical eight TMS topology arose from an intragenic duplication of a four TMS unit. Possibly, a two TMS α-helical hairpin structure was the precursor of the 4 TMS repeat unit. Genome context analyses confirmed the proposal of a sulfur-based compound transport role for many TSUP homologues, but functional outliers appear to be prevalent as well. Preliminary results suggest that the TSUP family is a member of a large novel superfamily that includes rhodopsins, integral membrane chaperone proteins, transmembrane electron flow carriers and several transporter families. All of these proteins probably arose via the same pathway: 2 → 4 → 8 TMSs followed by loss of a TMS either at the N- or C-terminus, depending on the family, to give the more frequent 7 TMS topology. PMID:22192777

  6. PROTEINS FROM EIGHT EUKARYOTIC CYTOCHROME P-450 FAMILIES SHARE A SEGMENTED REGION OF SEQUENCE SIMILARITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Proteins from eight eukaryotic families in the cytochrome P-450 superfamily share one region of sequence similarity. his region begins 275-310 amino acids from the amino terminus of each P-450, continues for 170 residues, and ends 35-50 amino acids before the carboxyl terminus. h...

  7. Domain organization and phylogenetic analysis of the chitinase family of proteins in three species of insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A bioinformatics investigation of three insect species with completed genome sequences has revealed that insect chitinase-like proteins (glycosylhydrolase family 18) are encoded by a rather large and diverse group of genes. We identified 15, 16, and 13 putative chitinase-like genes in the genomic d...

  8. Functional and pathological relevance of HERC family proteins: a decade later.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Tena, Susana; Cubillos-Rojas, Monica; Schneider, Taiane; Rosa, Jose Luis

    2016-05-01

    The HERC gene family encodes proteins with two characteristic domains in their sequence: the HECT domain and the RCC1-like domain (RLD). In humans, the HERC family comprises six members that can be divided into two groups based on their molecular mass and domain structure. Whereas large HERCs (HERC1 and HERC2) contain one HECT and more than one RLD, small HERCs (HERC3-6) possess single HECT and RLD domains. Accumulating evidence shows the HERC family proteins to be key components of a wide range of cellular functions, including neurodevelopment, DNA damage repair, cell growth and immune response. Considering the significant recent advances made regarding HERC functionality, an updated review summarizing the progress is greatly needed at 10 years since the last HERC review. We provide an integrated view of HERC function and go into detail about its implications for several human diseases such as cancer and neurological disorders. PMID:26801221

  9. Isolation and characterization of an abortifacient protein, momorcochin, from root tubers of Momordica cochinchinensis (family cucurbitaceae).

    PubMed

    Yeung, H W; Ng, T B; Wong, N S; Li, W W

    1987-07-01

    A glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 32,000 as estimated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and characterized by an abundance of Asp and Glu residues and an absence of Cys residues in its amino acid analysis, was isolated from fresh root tubers of Momordica cochinchinensis using a procedure that involved acetone precipitation, ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion exchange chromatography on DEAE Sepharose CL-6B and gel filtration on Sephadex G-75. The protein was capable of inducing mid-term abortion in mice. The characteristics of this protein were compared and contrasted with those of the abortifacient proteins isolated from other plants of the Cucurbitaceae family. PMID:3667075

  10. Methuselah/Methuselah-like G protein-coupled receptors constitute an ancient metazoan gene family

    PubMed Central

    de Mendoza, Alexandre; Jones, Jeffery W.; Friedrich, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Inconsistent conclusions have been drawn regarding the phylogenetic age of the Methuselah/Methuselah-like (Mth/Mthl) gene family of G protein-coupled receptors, the founding member of which regulates development and lifespan in Drosophila. Here we report the results from a targeted homolog search of 39 holozoan genomes and phylogenetic analysis of the conserved seven transmembrane domain. Our findings reveal that the Mth/Mthl gene family is ancient, has experienced numerous extinction and expansion events during metazoan evolution, and acquired the current definition of the Methuselah ectodomain during its exceptional expansion in arthropods. In addition, our findings identify Mthl1, Mthl5, Mthl14, and Mthl15 as the oldest Mth/Mthl gene family paralogs in Drosophila. Future studies of these genes have the potential to define ancestral functions of the Mth/Mthl gene family. PMID:26915348

  11. Getting away with murder: how does the BCL-2 family of proteins kill with immunity?

    PubMed

    Renault, Thibaud T; Chipuk, Jerry E

    2013-05-01

    The adult human body produces approximately one million white blood cells every second. However, only a small fraction of the cells will survive because the majority is eliminated through a genetically controlled form of cell death known as apoptosis. This review places into perspective recent studies pertaining to the BCL-2 family of proteins as critical regulators of the development and function of the immune system, with particular attention on B cell and T cell biology. Here we discuss how elegant murine model systems have revealed the major contributions of the BCL-2 family in establishing an effective immune system. Moreover, we highlight some key regulatory pathways that influence the expression, function, and stability of individual BCL-2 family members, and discuss their role in immunity. From lethal mechanisms to more gentle ones, the final portion of the review discusses the nonapoptotic functions of the BCL-2 family and how they pertain to the control of immunity. PMID:23527542

  12. Defense Against Cannibalism: The SdpI Family of Bacterial Immunity/Signal Transduction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Povolotsky, Tatyana Leonidovna; Orlova, Ekaterina; Tamang, Dorjee G.

    2010-01-01

    The SdpI family consists of putative bacterial toxin immunity and signal transduction proteins. One member of the family in Bacillus subtilis, SdpI, provides immunity to cells from cannibalism in times of nutrient limitation. SdpI family members are transmembrane proteins with 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, or 12 putative transmembrane α-helical segments (TMSs). These varied topologies appear to be genuine rather than artifacts due to sequencing or annotation errors. The basic and most frequently occurring element of the SdpI family has 6 TMSs. Homologues of all topological types were aligned to determine the homologous TMSs and loop regions, and the positive-inside rule was used to determine sidedness. The two most conserved motifs were identified between TMSs 1 and 2 and TMSs 4 and 5 of the 6 TMS proteins. These showed significant sequence similarity, leading us to suggest that the primordial precursor of these proteins was a 3 TMS–encoding genetic element that underwent intragenic duplication. Various deletional and fusional events, as well as intragenic duplications and inversions, may have yielded SdpI homologues with topologies of varying numbers and positions of TMSs. We propose a specific evolutionary pathway that could have given rise to these distantly related bacterial immunity proteins. We further show that genes encoding SdpI homologues often appear in operons with genes for homologues of SdpR, SdpI’s autorepressor. Our analyses allow us to propose structure–function relationships that may be applicable to most family members. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00232-010-9260-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20563570

  13. Inactivating all three rb family pocket proteins is insufficient to initiate cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Shin, Myeong-Kyun; Sage, Julien; Lambert, Paul F

    2012-10-15

    Human papillomavirus-16 (HPV-16) is associated etiologically with many human cervical cancers. It encodes 3 oncogenes E5, E6, and E7. Of these oncogenes, E7 has been found to be the dominant driver of cervical cancer in mice. More than 100 cellular proteins have been reported to associate with HPV-16 E7, which is thought to dysregulate the cell cycle in part by binding and inducing the degradation of pRb and its related pocket protein family members, p107 and p130. The ability of E7 to inactivate the pRb family correlates with its ability to induce head and neck cancers in mice. We previously showed that the inactivation of pRb is itself not sufficient to recapitulate the oncogenic properties of E7 in cervical carcinogenesis. In this study, we evaluated mice that were deficient in multiple pocket proteins, including mice that lacked pRb, p107, and p130. Strikingly, combined loss of two or all 3 pocket proteins resulted in development of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, but not frank cervical carcinoma. These findings strongly argue that the oncogenic properties of HPV-16 E7 in human cervical carcinogenesis may involve disruption of E7 binding proteins beyond simply the pRb family members. PMID:22942253

  14. Variability and Action Mechanism of a Family of Anticomplement Proteins in Ixodes ricinus

    PubMed Central

    Lahaye, Kathia; Gensale, François; Denis, Valérie; Charloteaux, Benoît; Decrem, Yves; Prévôt, Pierre-Paul; Brossard, Michel; Vanhamme, Luc; Godfroid, Edmond

    2008-01-01

    Background Ticks are blood feeding arachnids that characteristically take a long blood meal. They must therefore counteract host defence mechanisms such as hemostasis, inflammation and the immune response. This is achieved by expressing batteries of salivary proteins coded by multigene families. Methodology/Principal Findings We report the in-depth analysis of a tick multigene family and describe five new anticomplement proteins in Ixodes ricinus. Compared to previously described Ixodes anticomplement proteins, these segregated into a new phylogenetic group or subfamily. These proteins have a novel action mechanism as they specifically bind to properdin, leading to the inhibition of C3 convertase and the alternative complement pathway. An excess of non-synonymous over synonymous changes indicated that coding sequences had undergone diversifying selection. Diversification was not associated with structural, biochemical or functional diversity, adaptation to host species or stage specificity but rather to differences in antigenicity. Conclusions/Significance Anticomplement proteins from I. ricinus are the first inhibitors that specifically target a positive regulator of complement, properdin. They may provide new tools for the investigation of role of properdin in physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms. They may also be useful in disorders affecting the alternative complement pathway. Looking for and detecting the different selection pressures involved will help in understanding the evolution of multigene families and hematophagy in arthropods. PMID:18167559

  15. A new family of β-helix proteins with similarities to the polysaccharide lyases

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Close, Devin W.; D'Angelo, Sara; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.

    2014-09-27

    Microorganisms that degrade biomass produce diverse assortments of carbohydrate-active enzymes and binding modules. Despite tremendous advances in the genomic sequencing of these organisms, many genes do not have an ascribed function owing to low sequence identity to genes that have been annotated. Consequently, biochemical and structural characterization of genes with unknown function is required to complement the rapidly growing pool of genomic sequencing data. A protein with previously unknown function (Cthe_2159) was recently isolated in a genome-wide screen using phage display to identify cellulose-binding protein domains from the biomass-degrading bacterium Clostridium thermocellum. Here, the crystal structure of Cthe_2159 is presentedmore » and it is shown that it is a unique right-handed parallel β-helix protein. Despite very low sequence identity to known β-helix or carbohydrate-active proteins, Cthe_2159 displays structural features that are very similar to those of polysaccharide lyase (PL) families 1, 3, 6 and 9. Cthe_2159 is conserved across bacteria and some archaea and is a member of the domain of unknown function family DUF4353. This suggests that Cthe_2159 is the first representative of a previously unknown family of cellulose and/or acid-sugar binding β-helix proteins that share structural similarities with PLs. More importantly, these results demonstrate how functional annotation by biochemical and structural analysis remains a critical tool in the characterization of new gene products.« less

  16. A new family of β-helix proteins with similarities to the polysaccharide lyases

    SciTech Connect

    Close, Devin W.; D'Angelo, Sara; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.

    2014-09-27

    Microorganisms that degrade biomass produce diverse assortments of carbohydrate-active enzymes and binding modules. Despite tremendous advances in the genomic sequencing of these organisms, many genes do not have an ascribed function owing to low sequence identity to genes that have been annotated. Consequently, biochemical and structural characterization of genes with unknown function is required to complement the rapidly growing pool of genomic sequencing data. A protein with previously unknown function (Cthe_2159) was recently isolated in a genome-wide screen using phage display to identify cellulose-binding protein domains from the biomass-degrading bacterium Clostridium thermocellum. Here, the crystal structure of Cthe_2159 is presented and it is shown that it is a unique right-handed parallel β-helix protein. Despite very low sequence identity to known β-helix or carbohydrate-active proteins, Cthe_2159 displays structural features that are very similar to those of polysaccharide lyase (PL) families 1, 3, 6 and 9. Cthe_2159 is conserved across bacteria and some archaea and is a member of the domain of unknown function family DUF4353. This suggests that Cthe_2159 is the first representative of a previously unknown family of cellulose and/or acid-sugar binding β-helix proteins that share structural similarities with PLs. More importantly, these results demonstrate how functional annotation by biochemical and structural analysis remains a critical tool in the characterization of new gene products.

  17. A Primary Sequence Analysis of the ARGONAUTE Protein Family in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Leal, Daniel; Castillo-Cobián, Amanda; Rodríguez-Arévalo, Isaac; Vielle-Calzada, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Small RNA (sRNA)-mediated gene silencing represents a conserved regulatory mechanism controlling a wide diversity of developmental processes through interactions of sRNAs with proteins of the ARGONAUTE (AGO) family. On the basis of a large phylogenetic analysis that includes 206 AGO genes belonging to 23 plant species, AGO genes group into four clades corresponding to the phylogenetic distribution proposed for the ten family members of Arabidopsis thaliana. A primary analysis of the corresponding protein sequences resulted in 50 sequences of amino acids (blocks) conserved across their linear length. Protein members of the AGO4/6/8/9 and AGO1/10 clades are more conserved than members of the AGO5 and AGO2/3/7 clades. In addition to blocks containing components of the PIWI, PAZ, and DUF1785 domains, members of the AGO2/3/7 and AGO4/6/8/9 clades possess other consensus block sequences that are exclusive of members within these clades, suggesting unforeseen functional specialization revealed by their primary sequence. We also show that AGO proteins of animal and plant kingdoms share linear sequences of blocks that include motifs involved in posttranslational modifications such as those regulating AGO2 in humans and the PIWI protein AUBERGINE in Drosophila. Our results open possibilities for exploring new structural and functional aspects related to the evolution of AGO proteins within the plant kingdom, and their convergence with analogous proteins in mammals and invertebrates.

  18. Abr and Bcr are multifunctional regulators of the Rho GTP-binding protein family.

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, T H; Xu, X; Kaartinen, V; Heisterkamp, N; Groffen, J; Bokoch, G M

    1995-01-01

    Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemias result from the fusion of the BCR and ABL genes, which generates a functional chimeric molecule. The Abr protein is very similar to Bcr but lacks a structural domain which may influence its biological regulatory capabilities. Both Abr and Bcr have a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) domain similar to those found in other proteins that stimulate GTP hydrolysis by members of the Rho family of GTP-binding proteins, as well as a region of homology with the guanine nucleotide dissociation-stimulating domain of the DBL oncogene product. We purified as recombinant fusion proteins the GAP- and Dbl-homology domains of both Abr and Bcr. The Dbl-homology domains of Bcr and Abr were active in stimulating GTP binding to CDC42Hs, RhoA, Rac1, and Rac2 (rank order, CDC42Hs > RhoA > Rac1 = Rac2) but were inactive toward Rap1A and Ha-Ras. Both Bcr and Abr acted as GAPs for Rac1, Rac2, and CDC42Hs but were inactive toward RhoA, Rap1A, and Ha-Ras. Each individual domain bound in a noncompetitive manner to GTP-binding protein substrates. These data suggest the multifunctional Bcr and Abr proteins might interact simultaneously and/or sequentially with members of the Rho family to regulate and coordinate cellular signaling. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7479768

  19. BCL2DB: database of BCL-2 family members and BH3-only proteins.

    PubMed

    Rech de Laval, Valentine; Deléage, Gilbert; Aouacheria, Abdel; Combet, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    BCL2DB (http://bcl2db.ibcp.fr) is a database designed to integrate data on BCL-2 family members and BH3-only proteins. These proteins control the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and probably many other cellular processes as well. This large protein group is formed by a family of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic homologs that have phylogenetic relationships with BCL-2, and by a collection of evolutionarily and structurally unrelated proteins characterized by the presence of a region of local sequence similarity with BCL-2, termed the BH3 motif. BCL2DB is monthly built, thanks to an automated procedure relying on a set of homemade profile HMMs computed from seed reference sequences representative of the various BCL-2 homologs and BH3-only proteins. The BCL2DB entries integrate data from the Ensembl, Ensembl Genomes, European Nucleotide Archive and Protein Data Bank databases and are enriched with specific information like protein classification into orthology groups and distribution of BH motifs along the sequences. The Web interface allows for easy browsing of the site and fast access to data, as well as sequence analysis with generic and specific tools. BCL2DB provides a helpful and powerful tool to both 'BCL-2-ologists' and researchers working in the various fields of physiopathology. Database URL: http://bcl2db.ibcp.fr. PMID:24608034

  20. Phenotypic variability in three families with valosin-containing protein mutation

    PubMed Central

    Spina, S.; Van Laar, A. D.; Murrell, J. R.; Hamilton, R. L.; Kofler, J. K.; Epperson, F.; Farlow, M. R.; Lopez, O. L.; Quinlan, J.; DeKosky, S. T.; Ghetti, B.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose The phenotype of IBMPFD [inclusion body myopathy with Paget’s disease of the bone and frontotemporal dementia (FTD)] associated with valosin-containing protein(VCP) mutation is described in three families. Methods Probands were identified based on a pathological diagnosis of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43-positive inclusions type IV. VCP sequencing was carried out. Clinical data on affected family members were reviewed. Results Ohio family: four subjects presented muscle weakness and wasting. (One subject had both neuropathic and myopathic findings and another subject showed only evidence of myopathy. The etiology of weakness could not be ascertained in the remaining two subjects.) Two individuals also showed Parkinsonism (with associated FTD in one of the two). The proband’s brain displayed FTLD-TDP type IV and Braak stage five Parkinson’s disease (PD). A VCP R191Q mutation was found. Pennsylvania family: 11 subjects developed IBMPFD. Parkinsonism was noted in two mutation carriers, whilst another subject presented with primary progressive aphasia (PPA). A novel VCP T262A mutation was found. Indiana family: three subjects developed IBMPFD. FTD was diagnosed in two individuals and suspected in the third one who also displayed muscle weakness. A VCP R159C mutation was found. Conclusions We identified three families with IBMPFD associated with VCP mutations. Clinical and pathological PD was documented for the first time in members of two families. A novel T262A mutation was found. One individual had PPA: an uncommon presentation of IBMPFD. PMID:22900631

  1. The 'tubulin-like' S1 protein of Spirochaeta is a member of the hsp65 stress protein family

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munson, D.; Obar, R.; Tzertzinis, G.; Margulis, L.

    1993-01-01

    A 65-kDa protein (called S1) from Spirochaeta bajacaliforniensis was identified as 'tubulin-like' because it cross-reacted with at least four different antisera raised against tubulin and was isolated, with a co-polymerizing 45-kDa protein, by warm-cold cycling procedures used to purify tubulin from mammalian brain. Furthermore, at least three genera of non-cultivable symbiotic spirochetes (Pillotina, Diplocalyx, and Hollandina) that contain conspicuous 24-nm cytoplasmic tubules displayed a strong fluorescence in situ when treated with polyclonal antisera raised against tubulin. Here we summarize results that lead to the conclusion that this 65-kDa protein has no homology to tubulin. S1 is an hsp65 stress protein homologue. Hsp65 is a highly immunogenic family of hsp60 proteins which includes the 65-kDa antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (an active component of Freund's complete adjuvant), Borrelia, Treponema, Chlamydia, Legionella, and Salmonella. The hsp60s, also known as chaperonins, include E. coli GroEL, mitochondrial and chloroplast chaperonins, the pea aphid 'symbionin' and many other proteins involved in protein folding and the stress response.

  2. High mobility group nucleosome-binding family proteins promote astrocyte differentiation of neural precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Motoshi; Lanjakornsiripan, Darin; Itoh, Yasuhiro; Kishi, Yusuke; Ogata, Toru; Gotoh, Yukiko

    2014-11-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant cell type in the mammalian brain and are important for the functions of the central nervous system. Although previous studies have shown that the STAT signaling pathway or its regulators promote the generation of astrocytes from multipotent neural precursor cells (NPCs) in the developing mammalian brain, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the astrocytic fate decision have still remained largely unclear. Here, we show that the high mobility group nucleosome-binding (HMGN) family proteins, HMGN1, 2, and 3, promote astrocyte differentiation of NPCs during brain development. HMGN proteins were expressed in NPCs, Sox9(+) glial progenitors, and GFAP(+) astrocytes in perinatal and adult brains. Forced expression of either HMGN1, 2, or 3 in NPCs in cultures or in the late embryonic neocortex increased the generation of astrocytes at the expense of neurons. Conversely, knockdown of either HMGN1, 2, or 3 in NPCs suppressed astrocyte differentiation and promoted neuronal differentiation. Importantly, overexpression of HMGN proteins did not induce the phosphorylation of STAT3 or activate STAT reporter genes. In addition, HMGN family proteins did not enhance DNA demethylation and acetylation of histone H3 around the STAT-binding site of the gfap promoter. Moreover, knockdown of HMGN family proteins significantly reduced astrocyte differentiation induced by gliogenic signal ciliary neurotrophic factor, which activates the JAK-STAT pathway. Therefore, we propose that HMGN family proteins are novel chromatin regulatory factors that control astrocyte fate decision/differentiation in parallel with or downstream of the JAK-STAT pathway through modulation of the responsiveness to gliogenic signals. PMID:25069414

  3. A conserved family of proteins facilitates nascent lipid droplet budding from the ER

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Vineet; Ojha, Namrata; Golden, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are found in all cells and play critical roles in lipid metabolism. De novo LD biogenesis occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) but is not well understood. We imaged early stages of LD biogenesis using electron microscopy and found that nascent LDs form lens-like structures that are in the ER membrane, raising the question of how these nascent LDs bud from the ER as they grow. We found that a conserved family of proteins, fat storage-inducing transmembrane (FIT) proteins, is required for proper budding of LDs from the ER. Elimination or reduction of FIT proteins in yeast and higher eukaryotes causes LDs to remain in the ER membrane. Deletion of the single FIT protein in Caenorhabditis elegans is lethal, suggesting that LD budding is an essential process in this organism. Our findings indicated that FIT proteins are necessary to promote budding of nascent LDs from the ER. PMID:26504167

  4. Vesicular trafficking in characean green algae and the possible involvement of a VAMP72-family protein

    PubMed Central

    Hoepflinger, Marion C; Hametner, Christina; Ueda, Takashi; Foissner, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The RAB5 GTPase ARA6 of Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be involved in endosomal trafficking by targeting vesicles to the plasma membrane. During this process AtARA6 is working in close relationship with the SNARE protein VAMP727 (vesicle associated membrane protein 727). Recently, ARA6 of the characean green algae Chara australis (CaARA6) was shown to have properties similar to AtARA6, pointing to similar trafficking pathways. In order to gain further insight into the vesicle trafficking machinery of Characeae, C. australis was analyzed for homologous proteins of the VAMP72-family. A CaVAMP72 protein was detected and classified by protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses. PMID:24614164

  5. Vesicular trafficking in characean green algae and the possible involvement of a VAMP72-family protein.

    PubMed

    Hoepflinger, Marion C; Hametner, Christina; Ueda, Takashi; Foissner, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The RAB5 GTPase ARA6 of Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be involved in endosomal trafficking by targeting vesicles to the plasma membrane. During this process AtARA6 is working in close relationship with the SNARE protein VAMP727 (vesicle associated membrane protein 727). Recently, ARA6 of the characean green algae Chara australis (CaARA6) was shown to have properties similar to AtARA6, pointing to similar trafficking pathways. In order to gain further insight into the vesicle trafficking machinery of Characeae, C. australis was analyzed for homologous proteins of the VAMP72-family. A CaVAMP72 protein was detected and classified by protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses. PMID:25764429

  6. Vesicular trafficking in characean green algae and the possible involvement of a VAMP72-family protein.

    PubMed

    Hoepflinger, Marion; Hametner, Christina; Ueda, Takashi; Foissner, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The RAB5 GTPase ARA6 (AtARA6) of Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be involved in endosomal trafficking by targeting vesicles to the plasma membrane. During this process AtARA6 is working in close relationship with the SNARE protein VAMP727 (vesicle associated membrane protein 727). Recently, ARA6 of the characean green algae Chara australis (CaARA6) was shown to have properties similar to AtARA6, pointing to similar trafficking pathways. In order to gain further insight into the vesicle trafficking machinery of characeae, C. australis was analyzed for homologous proteins of the VAMP72-family. A CaVAMP72 protein was detected and classified by protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses. PMID:24614164

  7. The shroom family proteins play broad roles in the morphogenesis of thickened epithelial sheets.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chanjae; Le, Minh-Phuong; Wallingford, John B

    2009-06-01

    Thickened epithelial sheets are found in a wide variety of organ systems and the mechanisms governing their morphogenesis remain poorly defined. We show here, through expression patterns and functional studies, that Shroom family proteins are broadly involved in generating thickened epithelial sheets. Through in situ hybridization, we report the temporal and spatial expression patterns of the four Shroom family members during early Xenopus development, from oocytes to tadpole stage embryos. Further, we show that Shroom1 and 2 mRNAs are maternally expressed, while Shroom3 and Shroom4 are zygotic transcripts. In addition, maternal Shroom1 and 2 mRNAs localize in the animal hemisphere of the Xenopus egg and early blastula. During later development, all four Shroom family proteins are broadly expressed in developing epithelial organs, and the epithelial cells that express Shrooms are elongated. Moreover, we show that ectopic expression of Shroom2, like Shroom3, is able to increase cell height and that loss of Shroom2 function results in a failure of cell elongation in the neural epithelium. Together, these data suggest that Shroom family proteins play an important role in the morphogenesis of several different epithelial tissues during development. Developmental Dynamics 238:1480-1491, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:19384856

  8. Identification, structure, and differential expression of members of a BURP domain containing protein family in soybean.

    PubMed

    Granger, Cheryl; Coryell, Virginia; Khanna, Anupama; Keim, Paul; Vodkin, Lila; Shoemaker, Randy C

    2002-08-01

    Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) exhibiting homology to a BURP domain containing gene family were identified from the Glycine max (L.) Merr. EST database. These ESTs were assembled into 16 contigs of variable sizes and lengths. Consistent with the structure of known BURP domain containing proteins, the translation products exhibit a modular structure consisting of a C-terminal BURP domain, an N-terminal signal sequence, and a variable internal region. The soybean family members exhibit 35-98% similarity in a -100-amino-acid C-terminal region, and a phylogenetic tree constructed using this region shows that some soybean family members group together in closely related pairs, triplets, and quartets, whereas others remain as singletons. The structure of these groups suggests that multiple gene duplication events occurred during the evolutionary history of this family. The depth and diversity of G. max EST libraries allowed tissue-specific expression patterns of the putative soybean BURPs to be examined. Consistent with known BURP proteins, the newly identified soybean BURPs have diverse expression patterns. Furthermore, putative paralogs can have both spatially and quantitatively distinct expression patterns. We discuss the functional and evolutionary implications of these findings, as well as the utility of EST-based analyses for identifying and characterizing gene families. PMID:12175072

  9. Meis family proteins are required for hindbrain development in the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Choe, Seong-Kyu; Vlachakis, Nikolaos; Sagerström, Charles G

    2002-02-01

    Meis homeodomain proteins function as Hox-cofactors by binding Pbx and Hox proteins to form multimeric complexes that control transcription of genes involved in development and differentiation. It is not known what role Meis proteins play in these complexes, nor is it clear which Hox functions require Meis proteins in vivo. We now show that a divergent Meis family member, Prep1, acts as a Hox co-factor in zebrafish. This suggests that all Meis family members have at least one shared function and that this function must be carried out by a conserved domain. We proceed to show that the Meinox domain, an N-terminal conserved domain shown to mediate Pbx binding, is sufficient to provide Meis activity to a Pbx/Hox complex. We find that this activity is separable from Pbx binding and resides within the M1 subdomain. This finding also presents a rational strategy for interfering with Meis activity in vivo. We accomplish this by expressing the Pbx4/Lzr N-terminus, which sequesters Meis proteins in the cytoplasm away from the nuclear transcription complexes. Sequestering Meis proteins in the cytoplasm leads to extensive loss of rhombomere (r) 3- and r4-specific gene expression, as well as defective rhombomere boundary formation in this region. These changes in gene expression correlate with impaired neuronal differentiation in r3 and r4, e.g. the loss of r3-specific nV branchiomotor neurons and r4-specific Mauthner neurons. We conclude that Meis family proteins are essential for the specification of r3 and r4 of the hindbrain. PMID:11830560

  10. Upregulation of human heme oxygenase gene expression by Ets-family proteins.

    PubMed

    Deramaudt, B M; Remy, P; Abraham, N G

    1999-03-01

    Overexpression of human heme oxygenase-1 has been shown to have the potential to promote EC proliferation and angiogenesis. Since Ets-family proteins have been shown to play an important role in angiogenesis, we investigated the presence of ETS binding sites (EBS), GGAA/T, and ETS protein contributing to human HO-1 gene expression. Several chloramphenicol acetyltransferase constructs were examined in order to analyze the effect of ETS family proteins on the transduction of HO-1 in Xenopus oocytes and in microvessel endothelial cells. Heme oxygenase promoter activity was up-regulated by FLI-1ERGETS-1 protein(s). Chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) assays demonstrated that the promoter region (-1500 to +19) contains positive and negative control elements and that all three members of the ETS protein family were responsible for the up-regulation of HHO-1. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA), performed with nuclear extracts from endothelial cells overexpressing HHO-1 gene, and specific HHO-1 oligonucleotides probes containing putative EBS resulted in a specific and marked bandshift. Synergistic binding was observed in EMSA between AP-1 on the one hand, FLI-1, ERG, and ETS-1 protein on the other. Moreover, 5'-deletion analysis demonstrated the existence of a negative control element of HHO-1 expression located between positions -1500 and -120 on the HHO-1 promoter. The presence of regulatory sequences for transcription factors such as ETS-1, FLI-1, or ERG, whose activity is associated with cell proliferation, endothelial cell differentiation, and matrix metalloproteinase transduction, may be an indication of the important role that HO-1 may play in coronary collateral circulation, tumor growth, angiogenesis, and hemoglobin-induced endothelial cell injuries. PMID:10022513

  11. TM9 family proteins control surface targeting of glycine-rich transmembrane domains.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Jackie; Le Coadic, Marion; Vernay, Alexandre; Dias, Marco; Gopaldass, Navin; Ouertatani-Sakouhi, Hajer; Cosson, Pierre

    2015-07-01

    TM9 family proteins (also named Phg1 proteins) have been previously shown to control cell adhesion by determining the cell surface localization of adhesion proteins such as the Dictyostelium SibA protein. Here, we show that the glycine-rich transmembrane domain (TMD) of SibA is sufficient to confer Phg1A-dependent surface targeting to a reporter protein. Accordingly, in Dictyostelium phg1A-knockout (KO) cells, proteins with glycine-rich TMDs were less efficiently transported out of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and to the cell surface. Phg1A, as well as its human ortholog TM9SF4 specifically associated with glycine-rich TMDs. In human cells, genetic inactivation of TM9SF4 resulted in an increased retention of glycine-rich TMDs in the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas TM9SF4 overexpression enhanced their surface localization. The bulk of the TM9SF4 protein was localized in the Golgi complex and a proximity-ligation assay suggested that it might interact with glycine-rich TMDs. Taken together, these results suggest that one of the main roles of TM9 proteins is to serve as intramembrane cargo receptors controlling exocytosis and surface localization of a subset of membrane proteins. PMID:25999474

  12. TM9 family proteins control surface targeting of glycine-rich transmembrane domains

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, Jackie; Le Coadic, Marion; Vernay, Alexandre; Dias, Marco; Gopaldass, Navin; Ouertatani-Sakouhi, Hajer; Cosson, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT TM9 family proteins (also named Phg1 proteins) have been previously shown to control cell adhesion by determining the cell surface localization of adhesion proteins such as the Dictyostelium SibA protein. Here, we show that the glycine-rich transmembrane domain (TMD) of SibA is sufficient to confer Phg1A-dependent surface targeting to a reporter protein. Accordingly, in Dictyostelium phg1A-knockout (KO) cells, proteins with glycine-rich TMDs were less efficiently transported out of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and to the cell surface. Phg1A, as well as its human ortholog TM9SF4 specifically associated with glycine-rich TMDs. In human cells, genetic inactivation of TM9SF4 resulted in an increased retention of glycine-rich TMDs in the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas TM9SF4 overexpression enhanced their surface localization. The bulk of the TM9SF4 protein was localized in the Golgi complex and a proximity-ligation assay suggested that it might interact with glycine-rich TMDs. Taken together, these results suggest that one of the main roles of TM9 proteins is to serve as intramembrane cargo receptors controlling exocytosis and surface localization of a subset of membrane proteins. PMID:25999474

  13. New functions of the chloroplast Preprotein and Amino acid Transporter (PRAT) family members in protein import.

    PubMed

    Rossig, Claudia; Reinbothe, Christiane; Gray, John; Valdes, Oscar; von Wettstein, Diter; Reinbothe, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Plant cells contain distinct compartments such as the nucleus, the endomembrane system comprising the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus, peroxisomes, vacuoles, as well as mitochondria and chloroplasts. All of these compartments are surrounded by 1 or 2 limiting membranes and need to import proteins from the cytosol. Previous work led to the conclusion that mitochondria and chloroplasts use structurally different protein import machineries in their outer and inner membranes for the uptake of cytosolic precursor proteins. Our most recent data show that there is some unexpected overlap. Three members of the family of preprotein and amino acid transporters, PRAT, were identified in chloroplasts that mediate the uptake of transit sequence-less proteins into the inner plastid envelope membrane. By analogy, mitochondria contain with TIM22 a related PRAT protein that is involved in the import of transit sequence-less proteins into the inner mitochondrial membrane. Both mitochondria and chloroplasts thus make use of similar import mechanisms to deliver some of their proteins to their final place. Because single homologs of HP20- and HP30-like proteins are present in algae such as Chlamydomonas, Ostreococcus, and Volvox, which diverged from land plants approximately 1 billion years ago, it is likely that the discovered PRAT-mediated mechanism of protein translocation evolved concomitantly with the secondary endosymbiotic event that gave rise to green plants. PMID:24476934

  14. Regulation of innate immune signalling pathways by the tripartite motif (TRIM) family proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Taro; Akira, Shizuo

    2011-01-01

    The innate immune system recognizes microbial components through pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs), including membrane-bound Toll-like receptors and cytosolic receptors such as RIG-I-like receptors and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sensors. These PRRs trigger distinct signal transduction pathways that culminate in induction of an array of cytokines and other mediators required for host defense. The tripartite motif (TRIM) family is a diverse family of RING finger domain-containing proteins, which are involved in a variety of cellular functions. Importantly, recent studies have shown that they are also involved in the regulation of innate immune responses through the modulation of PRR signalling pathways. PMID:21826793

  15. Members of the Meloidogyne avirulence protein family contain multiple plant ligand-like motifs.

    PubMed

    Rutter, William B; Hewezi, Tarek; Maier, Tom R; Mitchum, Melissa G; Davis, Eric L; Hussey, Richard S; Baum, Thomas J

    2014-08-01

    Sedentary plant-parasitic nematodes engage in complex interactions with their host plants by secreting effector proteins. Some effectors of both root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) and cyst nematodes (Heterodera and Globodera spp.) mimic plant ligand proteins. Most prominently, cyst nematodes secrete effectors that mimic plant CLAVATA3/ESR-related (CLE) ligand proteins. However, only cyst nematodes have been shown to secrete such effectors and to utilize CLE ligand mimicry in their interactions with host plants. Here, we document the presence of ligand-like motifs in bona fide root-knot nematode effectors that are most similar to CLE peptides from plants and cyst nematodes. We have identified multiple tandem CLE-like motifs conserved within the previously identified Meloidogyne avirulence protein (MAP) family that are secreted from root-knot nematodes and have been shown to function in planta. By searching all 12 MAP family members from multiple Meloidogyne spp., we identified 43 repetitive CLE-like motifs composing 14 unique variants. At least one CLE-like motif was conserved in each MAP family member. Furthermore, we documented the presence of other conserved sequences that resemble the variable domains described in Heterodera and Globodera CLE effectors. These findings document that root-knot nematodes appear to use CLE ligand mimicry and point toward a common host node targeted by two evolutionarily diverse groups of nematodes. As a consequence, it is likely that CLE signaling pathways are important in other phytonematode pathosystems as well. PMID:25014776

  16. RTX proteins: a highly diverse family secreted by a common mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Linhartová, Irena; Bumba, Ladislav; Mašín, Jiří; Basler, Marek; Osička, Radim; Kamanová, Jana; Procházková, Kateřina; Adkins, Irena; Hejnová-Holubová, Jana; Sadílková, Lenka; Morová, Jana; Šebo, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Repeats-in-toxin (RTX) exoproteins of Gram-negative bacteria form a steadily growing family of proteins with diverse biological functions. Their common feature is the unique mode of export across the bacterial envelope via the type I secretion system and the characteristic, typically nonapeptide, glycine- and aspartate-rich repeats binding Ca2+ ions. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge on the organization of rtx loci and on the biological and biochemical activities of therein encoded proteins. Applying several types of bioinformatic screens on the steadily growing set of sequenced bacterial genomes, over 1000 RTX family members were detected, with the biological functions of most of them remaining to be characterized. Activities of the so far characterized RTX family members are then discussed and classified according to functional categories, ranging from the historically first characterized pore-forming RTX leukotoxins, through the large multifunctional enzymatic toxins, bacteriocins, nodulation proteins, surface layer proteins, up to secreted hydrolytic enzymes exhibiting metalloprotease or lipase activities of industrial interest. PMID:20528947

  17. A comprehensive survey of the grapevine VQ gene family and its transcriptional correlation with WRKY proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Vannozzi, Alessandro; Wang, Gang; Zhong, Yan; Corso, Massimiliano; Cavallini, Erika; Cheng, Zong-Ming (Max)

    2015-01-01

    WRKY proteins are a class of transcription factors (TFs) involved in the regulation of various physiological processes, including the plant response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Recent studies in Arabidopsis have revealed that some WRKY TFs interact with a class of proteins designed as VQ proteins because of their typical conserved motif (FxxxVQxLTG). So far, no information is available about the genomic organization and the function of VQ motif-containing protein in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L). In the current study, we analyzed the 12X V1 prediction of the nearly homozygous PN40024 genotype identifying up to 18 predicted VQ genes (VvVQ). VvVQs phylogenetic and bioinformatic analyses indicated that the intron-exon structures and motif distribution are highly divergent between different members of the grapevine VQ family. Moreover, the analysis of the V. vinifera cv. Corvina expression atlas revealed a tissue- and stage-specific expression of several members of the family which also showed a significant correlation with WRKY TFs. Grapevine VQ genes also exhibited altered expression in response to drought, powdery mildew infection, salicylic acid (SA) and ethylene (ETH) treatments. The present study represents the first characterization of VQ genes in a grapevine genotype and it is a pivotal foundation for further studies aimed at functionally characterizing this mostly unknown grapevine multigenic family. PMID:26124765

  18. Involvement of Bcl-2-associated athanogene (BAG)-family proteins in the neuroprotection by rasagiline

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ji-Feng; He, Shuang; Kang, Ji-Feng; Xu, Qian; Hu, Ya-Cen; Zhang, Hai-Nan; Wang, Chun-Yu; Yan, Xin-Xiang; Tang, Bei-Sha

    2015-01-01

    Rasagiline, a novel monoamine oxidase (MAO)-B inhibitor, has a mild to moderate effect in relieving Parkinson’s disease (PD) symptoms as well as unique neuroprotective effects. Previous studies demonstrated rasagiline protect neurons by regulating Bcl-2 family proteins. Our study aimed to study whether Bcl-2-associated athanogene (BAG)-family proteins, which were reported closely associated with neurodegenerative disease, were involved in the neuroprotective effect of rasagiline. We found that after the administration of 1-methy1-4-phenvl-1,2,3,6-tetrahvdropvridine (MPTP), BAG2 and BAG5 proteins were up-regulated in the substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons of PD mouse model. A further increase of BAG2 and BAG5 was detected after intragastric administration of rasagiline to post-MPTP lesioned mice. Thus, the current study proved the association of BAG family proteins with PD, and suggested the involvement and a positive role of BAG2, BAG5 in the neuroprotection of rasagiline. These preliminary results implicate a novel pathway for further study on neuroprotection of rasagiline. PMID:26770414

  19. Conserved cellular function and stress-mediated regulation among members of the proteolipid protein family.

    PubMed

    Fernández, María E; Alfonso, Julieta; Brocco, Marcela A; Frasch, Alberto C

    2010-05-01

    Chronic stress causes morphological alterations in the hippocampus of rodents and tree shrews, including atrophy of CA3 dendrites and loss of synapses. The molecular mechanisms underlying these structural changes remain largely unknown. We have previously identified M6a as a stress responsive gene and shown that M6a is involved in filopodium/spine outgrowth and, likely, synapse formation. M6a belongs to the proteolipid protein (PLP) family, all of their members having four transmembrane domains that allow their localization at the plasma membrane. In the present work, we analyzed other members of this family, the closely related M6b as well as PLP and its splice variant DM20. We found that chronic restraint stress in mice reduces M6b and DM20, but not PLP, mRNA levels in the hippocampus. In addition, M6b and DM20, but again not PLP, induce filopodium formation in primary cultures of hippocampal neurons. Several M6b protein isoforms were studied, all of them having similar effects except for the one lacking the transmembrane domains. Our results reveal a conserved cellular function and a stress-mediated regulation among members of the proteolipid protein family, suggesting an involvement of proteolipid proteins in the stress response. PMID:19937804

  20. Dynamics of ten-eleven translocation hydroxylase family proteins and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in oligodendrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xianghui; Dai, Jinxiang; Ma, Yue; Mi, Yajing; Cui, Daxiang; Ju, Gong; Macklin, Wendy B; Jin, Weilin

    2014-06-01

    The ten-eleven translocation (TET) family of methylcytosine dioxygenases catalyze oxidation of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) and promote DNA demethylation. Despite the abundance of 5hmC and TET proteins in the brain, little is known about their role in oligodendrocytes (OLs). Here, we analyzed TET expression during OL development in vivo and in vitro, and found that three TET family members possess unique subcellular and temporal expression patterns. Furthermore, the level of 5hmC exhibits dynamic changes during OL maturation, which implies that 5hmC modification may play a role in the expression of critical genes necessary for OL maturation. siRNA-mediated silencing of the TET family proteins in OLs demonstrated that each of the TET proteins is required for OL differentiation. However, based on their unique domain structures, we speculate that the three TET members may function by different mechanisms. In summary, we have established the temporal expression of TET proteins and the dynamic level of 5hmC during OL development and demonstrate that all three TET members are necessary for OL differentiation. PMID:24615693

  1. RNA binding proteins in spermatogenesis: an in depth focus on the Musashi family

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Jessie M; Siddall, Nicole A; Hime, Gary R; McLaughlin, Eileen A

    2015-01-01

    Controlled gene regulation during gamete development is vital for maintaining reproductive potential. During the complex process of mammalian spermatogenesis, male germ cells experience extended periods of the inactive transcription despite heavy translational requirements for continued growth and differentiation. Hence, spermatogenesis is highly reliant on mechanisms of posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, facilitated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs), which remain abundantly expressed throughout this process. One such group of proteins is the Musashi family, previously identified as critical regulators of testis germ cell development and meiosis in Drosophila, and also shown to be vital to sperm development and reproductive potential in the mouse. This review describes the role and function of RBPs within the scope of male germ cell development, focusing on our recent knowledge of the Musashi proteins in spermatogenesis. The functional mechanisms utilized by RBPs within the cell are outlined in depth, and the significance of sub-cellular localization and stage-specific expression in relation to the mode and impact of posttranscriptional regulation is also highlighted. We emphasize the historical role of the Musashi family of RBPs in stem cell function and cell fate determination, as originally characterized in Drosophila and Xenopus, and conclude with our current understanding of the differential roles and functions of the mammalian Musashi proteins, Musashi-1 and Musashi-2, with a primary focus on our findings in spermatogenesis. This review highlights both the essential contribution of RBPs to posttranscriptional regulation and the importance of the Musashi family as master regulators of male gamete development. PMID:25851660

  2. RNA binding proteins in spermatogenesis: an in depth focus on the Musashi family.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Jessie M; Siddall, Nicole A; Hime, Gary R; McLaughlin, Eileen A

    2015-01-01

    Controlled gene regulation during gamete development is vital for maintaining reproductive potential. During the complex process of mammalian spermatogenesis, male germ cells experience extended periods of the inactive transcription despite heavy translational requirements for continued growth and differentiation. Hence, spermatogenesis is highly reliant on mechanisms of posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, facilitated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs), which remain abundantly expressed throughout this process. One such group of proteins is the Musashi family, previously identified as critical regulators of testis germ cell development and meiosis in Drosophila, and also shown to be vital to sperm development and reproductive potential in the mouse. This review describes the role and function of RBPs within the scope of male germ cell development, focusing on our recent knowledge of the Musashi proteins in spermatogenesis. The functional mechanisms utilized by RBPs within the cell are outlined in depth, and the significance of sub-cellular localization and stage-specific expression in relation to the mode and impact of posttranscriptional regulation is also highlighted. We emphasize the historical role of the Musashi family of RBPs in stem cell function and cell fate determination, as originally characterized in Drosophila and Xenopus, and conclude with our current understanding of the differential roles and functions of the mammalian Musashi proteins, Musashi-1 and Musashi-2, with a primary focus on our findings in spermatogenesis. This review highlights both the essential contribution of RBPs to posttranscriptional regulation and the importance of the Musashi family as master regulators of male gamete development. PMID:25851660

  3. Interferon-Inducible p200-Family Proteins as Novel Sensors of Cytoplasmic DNA: Role in Inflammation and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xin; Dickerson, Eric; Ponomareva, Larissa; Panchanathan, Ravichandran; Shen, Hui; Srivastava, Ratika

    2010-01-01

    Deregulated innate immune responses that result in increased levels of type I interferons (IFNs) and stimulation of IFN-inducible genes are thought to contribute to chronic inflammation and autoimmunity. One family of IFN-inducible genes is the Ifi200 family, which includes the murine (eg, Ifi202a, Ifi202b, Ifi203, Ifi204, Mndal, and Aim2) and human (eg, IFI16, MNDA, IFIX, and AIM2) genes. Genes in the family encode structurally related proteins (the p200-family proteins), which share at least one partially conserved repeat of 200-amino acid (200-AA) residues. Consistent with the presence of 2 consecutive oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding folds in the repeat, the p200-family proteins can bind to DNA. Additionally, these proteins (except the p202 proteins) also contain a pyrin (PYD) domain in the N-terminus. Increased expression of p202 proteins in certain strains of female mice is associated with lupus-like disease. Interestingly, only the Aim2 protein is conserved between the mouse and humans. Several recent studies have provided evidence that the Aim2 and p202 proteins can recognize DNA in cytoplasm and the Aim2 protein upon sensing DNA can form a caspase-1-activating inflammasome. In this review, we discuss how the ability of p200-family proteins to sense cytoplasmic DNA may contribute to the development of chronic inflammation and associated diseases. PMID:20187776

  4. Protein topology determines cysteine oxidation fate: the case of sulfenyl amide formation among protein families.

    PubMed

    Defelipe, Lucas A; Lanzarotti, Esteban; Gauto, Diego; Marti, Marcelo A; Turjanski, Adrián G

    2015-03-01

    Cysteine residues have a rich chemistry and play a critical role in the catalytic activity of a plethora of enzymes. However, cysteines are susceptible to oxidation by Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species, leading to a loss of their catalytic function. Therefore, cysteine oxidation is emerging as a relevant physiological regulatory mechanism. Formation of a cyclic sulfenyl amide residue at the active site of redox-regulated proteins has been proposed as a protection mechanism against irreversible oxidation as the sulfenyl amide intermediate has been identified in several proteins. However, how and why only some specific cysteine residues in particular proteins react to form this intermediate is still unknown. In the present work using in-silico based tools, we have identified a constrained conformation that accelerates sulfenyl amide formation. By means of combined MD and QM/MM calculation we show that this conformation positions the NH backbone towards the sulfenic acid and promotes the reaction to yield the sulfenyl amide intermediate, in one step with the concomitant release of a water molecule. Moreover, in a large subset of the proteins we found a conserved beta sheet-loop-helix motif, which is present across different protein folds, that is key for sulfenyl amide production as it promotes the previous formation of sulfenic acid. For catalytic activity, in several cases, proteins need the Cysteine to be in the cysteinate form, i.e. a low pKa Cys. We found that the conserved motif stabilizes the cysteinate by hydrogen bonding to several NH backbone moieties. As cysteinate is also more reactive toward ROS we propose that the sheet-loop-helix motif and the constraint conformation have been selected by evolution for proteins that need a reactive Cys protected from irreversible oxidation. Our results also highlight how fold conservation can be correlated to redox chemistry regulation of protein function. PMID:25741692

  5. Protein Topology Determines Cysteine Oxidation Fate: The Case of Sulfenyl Amide Formation among Protein Families

    PubMed Central

    Defelipe, Lucas A.; Lanzarotti, Esteban; Gauto, Diego; Marti, Marcelo A.; Turjanski, Adrián G.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine residues have a rich chemistry and play a critical role in the catalytic activity of a plethora of enzymes. However, cysteines are susceptible to oxidation by Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species, leading to a loss of their catalytic function. Therefore, cysteine oxidation is emerging as a relevant physiological regulatory mechanism. Formation of a cyclic sulfenyl amide residue at the active site of redox-regulated proteins has been proposed as a protection mechanism against irreversible oxidation as the sulfenyl amide intermediate has been identified in several proteins. However, how and why only some specific cysteine residues in particular proteins react to form this intermediate is still unknown. In the present work using in-silico based tools, we have identified a constrained conformation that accelerates sulfenyl amide formation. By means of combined MD and QM/MM calculation we show that this conformation positions the NH backbone towards the sulfenic acid and promotes the reaction to yield the sulfenyl amide intermediate, in one step with the concomitant release of a water molecule. Moreover, in a large subset of the proteins we found a conserved beta sheet-loop-helix motif, which is present across different protein folds, that is key for sulfenyl amide production as it promotes the previous formation of sulfenic acid. For catalytic activity, in several cases, proteins need the Cysteine to be in the cysteinate form, i.e. a low pKa Cys. We found that the conserved motif stabilizes the cysteinate by hydrogen bonding to several NH backbone moieties. As cysteinate is also more reactive toward ROS we propose that the sheet-loop-helix motif and the constraint conformation have been selected by evolution for proteins that need a reactive Cys protected from irreversible oxidation. Our results also highlight how fold conservation can be correlated to redox chemistry regulation of protein function. PMID:25741692

  6. An Insight into the Triabin Protein Family of American Hematophagous Reduviids: Functional, Structural and Phylogenetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Vargas, María J.; Santibáñez-López, Carlos E.; Corzo, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    A transcriptomic analysis of the saliva of T. pallidipennis together with a short proteomic analysis were carried out to reveal novel primary structures of the lipocalin/triabin protein families in this reduviid. Although triabins share some structural characteristics to lipocalins and they are classified as in the calcyn/lipocalin superfamily, triabins differ from lipocalins in the direction of β-strands in the general conformation of the β-barrel. The triabin protein family encompasses a wide variety of proteins, which disrupt the hemostasis of warm-blooded animals. Likewise, the function of proteins classified as triabins includes proteins that are carriers of small molecules, protease inhibitors, binders of specific cell-surface receptors as well as proteins that form complexes with other macromolecules. For example, triabin and pallidipin from the saliva of T. pallidipennis are thrombin and platelet aggregation inhibitors, respectively; triplatin from T. infestans binds to thromboxane A2; and nitrophorin from Rhodnius prolixus carries nitric oxide. Therefore, based on 42 new transcriptome sequences of triabins from the salivary glands of T. pallidipennis reported at present, and on triabin sequences of other American hematophagous reduviids already reported in the literature, subfamilies of triabins were proposed following phylogenetic analyses and functional characterization of triabin members. Eight subfamilies of proteins were recognized with known functions, which were the nitrophorin and amine binding proteins, Rhodnius prolixus aggregation inhibitor, triafestin, triatin, dipetalodipin and pallidipin, triplatin and infestilin, dimiconin and triabin, and procalin subfamilies. Interestingly, 70% of the analyzed sequences came from these eight subfamilies because there was no biological function associated with them, implying the existence of a vast number of proteins with potential novel biological activities. PMID:26891325

  7. Transmembrane signal transduction by peptide hormones via family B G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Culhane, Kelly J.; Liu, Yuting; Cai, Yingying; Yan, Elsa C. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Although family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) contain only 15 members, they play key roles in transmembrane signal transduction of hormones. Family B GPCRs are drug targets for developing therapeutics for diseases ranging from metabolic to neurological disorders. Despite their importance, the molecular mechanism of activation of family B GPCRs remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in expression and purification of functional receptors to the quantity for biophysical characterization. Currently, there is no crystal structure available of a full-length family B GPCR. However, structures of key domains, including the extracellular ligand binding regions and seven-helical transmembrane regions, have been solved by X-ray crystallography and NMR, providing insights into the mechanisms of ligand recognition and selectivity, and helical arrangements within the cell membrane. Moreover, biophysical and biochemical methods have been used to explore functions, key residues for signaling, and the kinetics and dynamics of signaling processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signal transduction mechanism of family B GPCRs at the molecular level and comments on the challenges and outlook for mechanistic studies of family B GPCRs. PMID:26594176

  8. Phylogeny of the Vitamin K 2,3-Epoxide Reductase (VKOR) Family and Evolutionary Relationship to the Disulfide Bond Formation Protein B (DsbB) Family

    PubMed Central

    Bevans, Carville G.; Krettler, Christoph; Reinhart, Christoph; Watzka, Matthias; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    In humans and other vertebrate animals, vitamin K 2,3-epoxide reductase (VKOR) family enzymes are the gatekeepers between nutritionally acquired K vitamins and the vitamin K cycle responsible for posttranslational modifications that confer biological activity upon vitamin K-dependent proteins with crucial roles in hemostasis, bone development and homeostasis, hormonal carbohydrate regulation and fertility. We report a phylogenetic analysis of the VKOR family that identifies five major clades. Combined phylogenetic and site-specific conservation analyses point to clade-specific similarities and differences in structure and function. We discovered a single-site determinant uniquely identifying VKOR homologs belonging to human pathogenic, obligate intracellular prokaryotes and protists. Building on previous work by Sevier et al. (Protein Science 14:1630), we analyzed structural data from both VKOR and prokaryotic disulfide bond formation protein B (DsbB) families and hypothesize an ancient evolutionary relationship between the two families where one family arose from the other through a gene duplication/deletion event. This has resulted in circular permutation of primary sequence threading through the four-helical bundle protein folds of both families. This is the first report of circular permutation relating distant α-helical membrane protein sequences and folds. In conclusion, we suggest a chronology for the evolution of the five extant VKOR clades. PMID:26230708

  9. Moesin: a member of the protein 4.1-talin-ezrin family of proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Lankes, W T; Furthmayr, H

    1991-01-01

    Moesin (membrane-organizing extension spike protein, pronounced mó ez in) has previously been isolated from bovine uterus and characterized as a possible receptor protein for heparan sulfate. We now have cloned and sequenced its complete cDNA, which represents a single 4.2-kilobase mRNA encoding a protein of 577 amino acids. It contains no apparent signal peptide or transmembrane domain. In addition, the protein shows significant sequence identity (72%) to ezrin (cytovillin, p81), as well as similarity to protein 4.1 and talin. All of the latter proteins have been postulated to serve as structural links between the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton. A similar role for moesin is implied by structure and domain predictions derived from the cDNA-deduced peptide sequence. Furthermore, our data indicate that moesin is identical to the 77-kDa band that copurifies with ezrin in its isolation from human placenta [Bretscher, A. (1989) J. Cell Biol. 108, 921-930]. Images PMID:1924289

  10. Reticulomics: Protein-Protein Interaction Studies with Two Plasmodesmata-Localized Reticulon Family Proteins Identify Binding Partners Enriched at Plasmodesmata, Endoplasmic Reticulum, and the Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Botchway, Stanley W; Slade, Susan E; Knox, Kirsten; Frigerio, Lorenzo; Oparka, Karl; Hawes, Chris

    2015-11-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a ubiquitous organelle that plays roles in secretory protein production, folding, quality control, and lipid biosynthesis. The cortical ER in plants is pleomorphic and structured as a tubular network capable of morphing into flat cisternae, mainly at three-way junctions, and back to tubules. Plant reticulon family proteins (RTNLB) tubulate the ER by dimerization and oligomerization, creating localized ER membrane tensions that result in membrane curvature. Some RTNLB ER-shaping proteins are present in the plasmodesmata (PD) proteome and may contribute to the formation of the desmotubule, the axial ER-derived structure that traverses primary PD. Here, we investigate the binding partners of two PD-resident reticulon proteins, RTNLB3 and RTNLB6, that are located in primary PD at cytokinesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Coimmunoprecipitation of green fluorescent protein-tagged RTNLB3 and RTNLB6 followed by mass spectrometry detected a high percentage of known PD-localized proteins as well as plasma membrane proteins with putative membrane-anchoring roles. Förster resonance energy transfer by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy assays revealed a highly significant interaction of the detected PD proteins with the bait RTNLB proteins. Our data suggest that RTNLB proteins, in addition to a role in ER modeling, may play important roles in linking the cortical ER to the plasma membrane. PMID:26353761

  11. Molecular Characterization and Expression Profiling of the Protein Disulfide Isomerase Gene Family in Brachypodium distachyon L

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiantang; Yin, Guangjun; Li, Xiaohui; Hu, Yingkao; Li, Jiarui; Yan, Yueming

    2014-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerases (PDI) are involved in catalyzing protein disulfide bonding and isomerization in the endoplasmic reticulum and functions as a chaperone to inhibit the aggregation of misfolded proteins. Brachypodium distachyon is a widely used model plant for temperate grass species such as wheat and barley. In this work, we report the first molecular characterization, phylogenies, and expression profiles of PDI and PDI-like (PDIL) genes in B. distachyon in different tissues under various abiotic stresses. Eleven PDI and PDIL genes in the B. distachyon genome by in silico identification were evenly distributed across all five chromosomes. The plant PDI family has three conserved motifs that are involved in catalyzing protein disulfide bonding and isomerization, but a different exon/intron structural organization showed a high degree of structural differentiation. Two pairs of genes (BdPDIL4-1 and BdPDIL4-2; BdPDIL7-1 and BdPDIL7-2) contained segmental duplications, indicating each pair originated from one progenitor. Promoter analysis showed that Brachypodium PDI family members contained important cis-acting regulatory elements involved in seed storage protein synthesis and diverse stress response. All Brachypodium PDI genes investigated were ubiquitously expressed in different organs, but differentiation in expression levels among different genes and organs was clear. BdPDIL1-1 and BdPDIL5-1 were expressed abundantly in developing grains, suggesting that they have important roles in synthesis and accumulation of seed storage proteins. Diverse treatments (drought, salt, ABA, and H2O2) induced up- and down-regulated expression of Brachypodium PDI genes in seedling leaves. Interestingly, BdPDIL1-1 displayed significantly up-regulated expression following all abiotic stress treatments, indicating that it could be involved in multiple stress responses. Our results provide new insights into the structural and functional characteristics of the plant PDI gene

  12. How can we understand an entire (super)family of proteins?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, Wouter

    2015-03-01

    Understanding how the functional properties of a protein are encoded in its amino acid sequence remains a formidable challenge. We use photoactive yellow protein (PYP) to determine how structure-function relationships can be obtained for an entire (super)family of proteins. PYP is a model system to study fundamental processes in proteins and a prototype for the PAS domain superfamily. It consists of a 100-residue PAS domain with an additional 25-residue N-terminal extension. PYP exhibits a photocycle that is initiated by pCA photoisomerization, followed by proton transfer from Glu46 to the pCA and a subsequent protein quake during formation of the pB intermediate. These structural changes are driven by the electrostatic epicenter formed by the buried ionized Glu46 side chain and involve partial protein unfolding, including the release of the N-terminal region. Deletion of the N-terminal region slows down pB decay 1,000-fold. We report results on family-wide structure function relationships in PYP. (i) Transplanting mutations that alter the properties of a highly studied PYP to a different PYP homolog are only partially successful, implying sequence context dependence of functional properties. (ii) We find a direct correlation between the strength of the hydrogen bonding between the pCA and Glu46 and functional properties of PYPs. The role of Glu46 as the epicenter for driving large conformational changes during pB formation is conserved. (iii) Across the PYP family the N-terminal region is negatively charged while the PAS core is positively charged. The resulting charge-charge interactions are critical for the function the N-terminal region. (iv) We find that residues conserved in the PAS domain superfamily exert their effects through conserved patterns of side chain interactions.

  13. Evolutionary and molecular facts link the WWC protein family to Hippo signaling.

    PubMed

    Wennmann, Dirk Oliver; Schmitz, Jürgen; Wehr, Michael C; Krahn, Michael P; Koschmal, Nora; Gromnitza, Sascha; Schulze, Ulf; Weide, Thomas; Chekuri, Anil; Skryabin, Boris V; Gerke, Volker; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Duning, Kerstin; Kremerskothen, Joachim

    2014-07-01

    The scaffolding protein KIBRA (also called WWC1) is involved in the regulation of important intracellular transport processes and the establishment of cell polarity. Furthermore, KIBRA/WWC1 is an upstream regulator of the Hippo signaling pathway that controls cell proliferation and organ size in animals. KIBRA/WWC1 represents only one member of the WWC protein family that also includes the highly similar proteins WWC2 and WWC3. Although the function of KIBRA/WWC1 was studied intensively in cells and animal models, the importance of WWC2 and WWC3 was not yet elucidated. Here, we describe evolutionary, molecular, and functional aspects of the WWC family. We show that the WWC genes arose in the ancestor of bilateral animals (clades such as insects and vertebrates) from a single founder gene most similar to the present KIBRA/WWC1-like sequence of Drosophila. This situation was still maintained until the common ancestor of lancelet and vertebrates. In fish, a progenitor-like sequence of mammalian KIBRA/WWC1 and WWC2 is expressed together with WWC3. Finally, in all tetrapods, the three family members, KIBRA/WWC1, WWC2, and WWC3, are found, except for a large genomic deletion including WWC3 in Mus musculus. At the molecular level, the highly conserved WWC proteins share a similar primary structure, the ability to form homo- and heterodimers and the interaction with a common set of binding proteins. Furthermore, all WWC proteins negatively regulate cell proliferation and organ growth due to a suppression of the transcriptional activity of YAP, the major effector of the Hippo pathway. PMID:24682284

  14. Transcriptional cofactors of the FOG family interact with GATA proteins by means of multiple zinc fingers.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, A H; Liew, C; Holmes, M; Kowalski, K; Mackay, J; Crossley, M

    1999-01-01

    Friend of GATA-1 (FOG-1) is a zinc finger protein that has been shown to interact physically with the erythroid DNA-binding protein GATA-1 and modulate its transcriptional activity. Recently, two new members of the FOG family have been identified: a mammalian protein, FOG-2, that also associates with GATA-1 and other mammalian GATA factors; and U-shaped, a Drosophila protein that interacts with the Drosophila GATA protein Pannier. FOG proteins contain multiple zinc fingers and it has been shown previously that the sixth finger of FOG-1 interacts specifically with the N-finger but not the C-finger of GATA-1. Here we show that fingers 1, 5 and 9 of FOG-1 also interact with the N-finger of GATA-1 and that FOG-2 and U-shaped also contain multiple GATA-interacting fingers. We define the key contact residues and show that these residues are highly conserved in GATA-interacting fingers. We examine the effect of selectively mutating the four interacting fingers of FOG-1 and show that each contributes to FOG-1's ability to modulate GATA-1 activity. Finally, we show that FOG-1 can repress GATA-1-mediated activation and present evidence that this ability involves the recently described CtBP co-repressor proteins that recognize all known FOG proteins. PMID:10329627

  15. A structural-alphabet-based strategy for finding structural motifs across protein families.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chih Yuan; Chen, Yao Chi; Lim, Carmay

    2010-08-01

    Proteins with insignificant sequence and overall structure similarity may still share locally conserved contiguous structural segments; i.e. structural/3D motifs. Most methods for finding 3D motifs require a known motif to search for other similar structures or functionally/structurally crucial residues. Here, without requiring a query motif or essential residues, a fully automated method for discovering 3D motifs of various sizes across protein families with different folds based on a 16-letter structural alphabet is presented. It was applied to structurally non-redundant proteins bound to DNA, RNA, obligate/non-obligate proteins as well as free DNA-binding proteins (DBPs) and proteins with known structures but unknown function. Its usefulness was illustrated by analyzing the 3D motifs found in DBPs. A non-specific motif was found with a 'corner' architecture that confers a stable scaffold and enables diverse interactions, making it suitable for binding not only DNA but also RNA and proteins. Furthermore, DNA-specific motifs present 'only' in DBPs were discovered. The motifs found can provide useful guidelines in detecting binding sites and computational protein redesign. PMID:20525797

  16. A family of RS domain proteins with novel subcellular localization and trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Kavanagh, Steven J.; Schulz, Thomas C.; Davey, Philippa; Claudianos, Charles; Russell, Carrie; Rathjen, Peter D.

    2005-01-01

    We report the sequence, conservation and cell biology of a novel protein, Psc1, which is expressed and regulated within the embryonic pluripotent cell population of the mouse. The Psc1 sequence includes an RS domain and an RNA recognition motif (RRM), and a sequential arrangement of protein motifs that has not been demonstrated for other RS domain proteins. This arrangement was conserved in a second mouse protein (BAC34721). The identification of Psc1 and BAC34721 homologues in vertebrates and related proteins, more widely throughout evolution, defines a new family of RS domain proteins termed acidic rich RS (ARRS) domain proteins. Psc1 incorporated into the nuclear speckles, but demonstrated novel aspects of subcellular distribution including localization to speckles proximal to the nuclear periphery and localization to punctate structures in the cytoplasm termed cytospeckles. Integration of Psc1 into cytospeckles was dependent on the RRM. Cytospeckles were dynamic within the cytoplasm and appeared to traffic into the nucleus. These observations suggest a novel role in RNA metabolism for ARRS proteins. PMID:15741184

  17. The La-Related Proteins, a Family with Connections to Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stavraka, Chara; Blagden, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionarily-conserved La-related protein (LARP) family currently comprises Genuine La, LARP1, LARP1b, LARP4, LARP4b, LARP6 and LARP7. Emerging evidence suggests each LARP has a distinct role in transcription and/or mRNA translation that is attributable to subtle sequence variations within their La modules and specific C-terminal domains. As emerging research uncovers the function of each LARP, it is evident that La, LARP1, LARP6, LARP7 and possibly LARP4a and 4b are dysregulated in cancer. Of these, LARP1 is the first to be demonstrated to drive oncogenesis. Here, we review the role of each LARP and the evidence linking it to malignancy. We discuss a future strategy of targeting members of this protein family as cancer therapy. PMID:26501340

  18. Characterization of a new family of metal transport proteins. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Guerinot, M.L.

    1998-06-01

    'Soils at many DOE sites are contaminated with metals and radionuclides. Such soils obviously pose a risk to human and animal health. Unlike organic wastes which can be metabolized, metals are immutable and cannot be degraded into harmless constituents. Phytoremediation, the use of plants to remove toxic materials from soil and water, may prove to be an environmentally friendly and cost effective solution for cleaning up metal-contaminated sites. The success of phytoremediation will rely on the availability of plants that absorb, translocate, and tolerate the contaminating metals. However, before the authors can engineer such plants, they need more basic information on how plants acquire metals. An important long term goal of the research program is to understand how metals such as zinc, cadmium and copper are transported across membranes. The research is focused on a new family of metal transporters which they have identified through combined studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. They have identified a family of 19 presumptive metal transport genes in a variety of organisms including yeast, trypanosomes, plants, nematodes, and humans. This family, which the authors have designated the ZIP genes, provides a rich source of material with which to undertake studies on metal transport in eukaryotes. The project has three main objectives: Objective 1: Determine the sub-cellular location of the ZIP proteins in Arabidopsis. Objective 2: Carry out a structure/function analysis of the proteins encoded by the ZIP gene family to identify regions of the protein responsible for substrate specificity and affinity. Objective 3: Engineer plants to overexpress and underexpress members of the ZIP gene family and analyze these transgenic plants for alterations in metal accumulation. They now know that manipulation of transporter levels will also require an understanding of post-transcriptional control of ZIP gene expression. They

  19. Characterization of the Deleted in Autism 1 Protein Family: Implications for Studying Cognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Azhari; Harrop, Sean P.; Bishop, Naomi E.

    2011-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of commonly occurring, highly-heritable developmental disabilities. Human genes c3orf58 or Deleted In Autism-1 (DIA1) and cXorf36 or Deleted in Autism-1 Related (DIA1R) are implicated in ASD and mental retardation. Both gene products encode signal peptides for targeting to the secretory pathway. As evolutionary medicine has emerged as a key tool for understanding increasing numbers of human diseases, we have used an evolutionary approach to study DIA1 and DIA1R. We found DIA1 conserved from cnidarians to humans, indicating DIA1 evolution coincided with the development of the first primitive synapses. Nematodes lack a DIA1 homologue, indicating Caenorhabditis elegans is not suitable for studying all aspects of ASD etiology, while zebrafish encode two DIA1 paralogues. By contrast to DIA1, DIA1R was found exclusively in vertebrates, with an origin coinciding with the whole-genome duplication events occurring early in the vertebrate lineage, and the evolution of the more complex vertebrate nervous system. Strikingly, DIA1R was present in schooling fish but absent in fish that have adopted a more solitary lifestyle. An additional DIA1-related gene we named DIA1-Like (DIA1L), lacks a signal peptide and is restricted to the genomes of the echinoderm Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and cephalochordate Branchiostoma floridae. Evidence for remarkable DIA1L gene expansion was found in B. floridae. Amino acid alignments of DIA1 family gene products revealed a potential Golgi-retention motif and a number of conserved motifs with unknown function. Furthermore, a glycine and three cysteine residues were absolutely conserved in all DIA1-family proteins, indicating a critical role in protein structure and/or function. We have therefore identified a new metazoan protein family, the DIA1-family, and understanding the biological roles of DIA1-family members will have implications for our understanding of autism and mental retardation. PMID

  20. Conserved evolutionary units in the heme-copper oxidase superfamily revealed by novel homologous protein families

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jimin; Li, Wenlin; Kinch, Lisa N; Grishin, Nick V

    2014-01-01

    The heme-copper oxidase (HCO) superfamily includes HCOs in aerobic respiratory chains and nitric oxide reductases (NORs) in the denitrification pathway. The HCO/NOR catalytic subunit has a core structure consisting of 12 transmembrane helices (TMHs) arranged in three-fold rotational pseudosymmetry, with six conserved histidines for heme and metal binding. Using sensitive sequence similarity searches, we detected a number of novel HCO/NOR homologs and named them HCO Homology (HCOH) proteins. Several HCOH families possess only four TMHs that exhibit the most pronounced similarity to the last four TMHs (TMHs 9–12) of HCOs/NORs. Encoded by independent genes, four-TMH HCOH proteins represent a single evolutionary unit (EU) that relates to each of the three homologous EUs of HCOs/NORs comprising TMHs 1–4, TMHs 5–8, and TMHs 9–12. Single-EU HCOH proteins could form homotrimers or heterotrimers to maintain the general structure and ligand-binding sites defined by the HCO/NOR catalytic subunit fold. The remaining HCOH families, including NnrS, have 12-TMHs and three EUs. Most three-EU HCOH proteins possess two conserved histidines and could bind a single heme. Limited experimental studies and genomic context analysis suggest that many HCOH proteins could function in the denitrification pathway and in detoxification of reactive molecules such as nitric oxide. HCO/NOR catalytic subunits exhibit remarkable structural similarity to the homotrimers of MAPEG (membrane-associated proteins in eicosanoid and glutathione metabolism) proteins. Gene duplication, fusion, and fission likely play important roles in the evolution of HCOs/NORs and HCOH proteins. PMID:24931479

  1. Molecular basis of the interaction between the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins and the proapoptotic protein ASPP2

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Chen; Benyamini, Hadar; Rotem, Shahar; Lebendiker, Mario; Danieli, Tsafi; Iosub, Anat; Refaely, Hadar; Dines, Monica; Bronner, Vered; Bravman, Tsafrir; Shalev, Deborah E.; Rüdiger, Stefan; Friedler, Assaf

    2008-01-01

    We have characterized the molecular basis of the interaction between ASPP2 and Bcl-2, which are key proteins in the apoptotic pathway. The C-terminal ankyrin repeats and SH3 domain of ASPP2 (ASPP2Ank-SH3) mediate its interactions with the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2. We used biophysical and computational methods to identify the interaction sites of Bcl-2 and its homologues with ASPP2. Using peptide array screening, we found that ASPP2Ank-SH3 binds two homologous sites in all three Bcl proteins tested: (i) the conserved BH4 motif, and (ii) a binding site for proapoptotic regulators. Quantitative binding studies revealed that binding of ASPP2Ank-SH3 to the Bcl-2 family members is selective at two levels: (i) interaction with Bcl-2-derived peptides is the tightest compared to peptides from the other family members, and (ii) within Bcl-2, binding of ASPP2Ank-SH3 to the BH4 domain is tightest. Sequence alignment of the ASPP2-binding peptides combined with binding studies of mutated peptides revealed that two nonconserved positions where only Bcl-2 contains positively charged residues account for its tighter binding. The experimental binding results served as a basis for docking analysis, by which we modeled the complexes of ASPP2Ank-SH3 with the full-length Bcl proteins. Using peptide arrays and quantitative binding studies, we found that Bcl-2 binds three loops in ASPP2Ank-SH3 with similar affinity, in agreement with our predicted model. Based on our results, we propose a mechanism in which ASPP2 induces apoptosis by inhibiting functional sites of the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins. PMID:18719108

  2. A Drosophila protein family implicated in pheromone perception is related to Tay-Sachs GM2-activator protein.

    PubMed

    Starostina, Elena; Xu, Aiguo; Lin, Heping; Pikielny, Claudio W

    2009-01-01

    Low volatility, lipid-like cuticular hydrocarbon pheromones produced by Drosophila melanogaster females play an essential role in triggering and modulating mating behavior, but the chemosensory mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. Recently, we showed that the CheB42a protein, which is expressed in only 10 pheromone-sensing taste hairs on the front legs of males, modulates progression to late stages of male courtship behavior in response to female-specific cuticular hydrocarbons. Here we report that expression of all 12 genes in the CheB gene family is predominantly or exclusively gustatory-specific, and occurs in many different, often non-overlapping patterns. Only the Gr family of gustatory receptor genes displays a comparable variety of gustatory-specific expression patterns. Unlike Grs, however, expression of all but one CheB gene is sexually dimorphic. Like CheB42a, other CheBs may therefore function specifically in gustatory perception of pheromones. We also show that CheBs belong to the ML superfamily of lipid-binding proteins, and are most similar to human GM2-activator protein (GM2-AP). In particular, GM2-AP residues involved in ligand binding are conserved in CheBs but not in other ML proteins. Finally, CheB42a is specifically secreted into the inner lumen of pheromone-sensing taste hairs, where pheromones interact with membrane-bound receptors. We propose that CheB proteins interact directly with lipid-like Drosophila pheromones and modulate their detection by the gustatory signal transduction machinery. Furthermore, as loss of GM2-AP in Tay-Sachs disease prevents degradation of GM2 gangliosides and results in neurodegeneration, the function of CheBs in pheromone response may involve biochemical mechanisms critical for lipid metabolism in human neurons. PMID:18952610

  3. Duplication, Selection and Gene Conversion in a Drosophila mojavensis Female Reproductive Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Kelleher, Erin S.; Markow, Therese A.

    2009-01-01

    Protein components of the Drosophila male ejaculate, several of which evolve rapidly, are critical modulators of reproductive success. Recent studies of female reproductive tract proteins indicate they also are extremely divergent between species, suggesting that reproductive molecules may coevolve between the sexes. Our current understanding of intersexual coevolution, however, is severely limited by the paucity of genetic and evolutionary studies on the female molecules involved. Physiological evidence of ejaculate–female coadaptation, paired with a promiscuous mating system, makes Drosophila mojavensis an exciting model system in which to study the evolution of reproductive proteins. Here we explore the evolutionary dynamics of a five-paralog gene family of female reproductive proteases within populations of D. mojavensis and throughout the repleta species group. We show that the proteins have experienced ongoing gene duplication and adaptive evolution and further exhibit dynamic patterns of pseudogenation, copy number variation, gene conversion, and selection within geographically isolated populations of D. mojavensis. The integration of these patterns in a single gene family has never before been documented in a reproductive protein. PMID:19204376

  4. RGG boxes within the TET/FET family of RNA-binding proteins are functionally distinct.

    PubMed

    Chau, Bess Ling; Ng, King Pan; Li, Kim K C; Lee, Kevin A W

    2016-08-01

    The multi-functional TET (TAF15/EWS/TLS) or FET (FUS/EWS/TLS) protein family of higher organisms harbor a transcriptional-activation domain (EAD) and an RNA-binding domain (RBD). The transcriptional activation function is, however, only revealed in oncogenic TET-fusion proteins because in native TET proteins it is auto-repressed by RGG-boxes within the TET RBD. Auto-repression is suggested to involve direct cation-pi interactions between multiple Arg residues within RGG boxes and EAD aromatics. Via analysis of TET transcriptional activity in different organisms, we report herein that repression is not autonomous but instead requires additional trans-acting factors. This finding is not supportive of a proposed model whereby repression occurs via a simple intramolecular EAD/RGG-box interaction. We also show that RGG-boxes present within reiterated YGGDRGG repeats that are unique to TAF15, are defective for repression due to the conserved Asp residue. Thus, RGG boxes within TET proteins can be functionally distinguished. While our results show that YGGDRGG repeats are not involved in TAF15 auto-repression, their remarkable number and conservation strongly suggest that they may confer specialized properties to TAF15 and thus contribute to functional differentiation within the TET/FET protein family. PMID:27159574

  5. Expression Pattern and Subcellular Localization of the Ovate Protein Family in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hui; Jiang, Wenzhu; Liu, Qing; Zhang, Hui; Piao, Mingxin; Chen, Zhengdao; Bian, Mingdi

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis ovate family proteins (AtOFPs) have been shown to function as transcriptional repressors and regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development. There are 31 genes that encode the full-length OVATE-domain containing proteins in the rice genome. In this study, the gene structure analysis revealed that OsOFPs are intron poor. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that OVATE proteins from rice, Arabidopsis and tomato can be divided into 4 groups (I–IV). Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis identified OsOFPs with different tissue-specific expression patterns at all stages of development in the rice plant. Interestingly, nearly half of the total number of OsOFP family was more highly expressed during the seed developmental stage. In addition, seed developmental cis-elements were found in the promoter region of the OsOFPs. Subcellular localization analysis revealed that YFP-OsOFP fusion proteins predominantly localized in the nucleus. Our results suggest that OsOFPs may act as regulatory proteins and play pivotal roles in the growth and development of rice. PMID:25760462

  6. Transmembrane and coiled-coil domain family 1 is a novel protein of the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Kho, Yik-Shing; Wang, Zhe; Chiang, Yan Ting; Ng, Gary K H; Shaw, Pang-Chui; Wang, Yuzhuo; Qi, Robert Z

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a continuous membrane network in eukaryotic cells comprising the nuclear envelope, the rough ER, and the smooth ER. The ER has multiple critical functions and a characteristic structure. In this study, we identified a new protein of the ER, TMCC1 (transmembrane and coiled-coil domain family 1). The TMCC family consists of at least 3 putative proteins (TMCC1-3) that are conserved from nematode to human. We show that TMCC1 is an ER protein that is expressed in diverse human cell lines. TMCC1 contains 2 adjacent transmembrane domains near the C-terminus, in addition to coiled-coil domains. TMCC1 was targeted to the rough ER through the transmembrane domains, whereas the N-terminal region and C-terminal tail of TMCC1 were found to reside in the cytoplasm. Moreover, the cytosolic region of TMCC1 formed homo- or hetero-dimers or oligomers with other TMCC proteins and interacted with ribosomal proteins. Notably, overexpression of TMCC1 or its transmembrane domains caused defects in ER morphology. Our results suggest roles of TMCC1 in ER organization. PMID:24454821

  7. Structure and dynamics of [gamma]-SNAP: Insight into flexibility of proteins from the SNAP family

    SciTech Connect

    Bitto, Eduard; Bingman, Craig A.; Kondrashov, Dmitry A.; McCoy, Jason G.; Bannen, Ryan M.; Wesenberg, Gary E.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2010-02-19

    Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein gamma ({gamma}-SNAP) is a member of an eukaryotic protein family involved in intracellular membrane trafficking. The X-ray structure of Brachydanio rerio {gamma}-SNAP was determined to 2.6 {angstrom} and revealed an all-helical protein comprised of an extended twisted-sheet of helical hairpins with a helical-bundle domain on its carboxy-terminal end. Structural and conformational differences between multiple observed {gamma}-SNAP molecules and Sec17, a SNAP family protein from yeast, are analyzed. Conformational variation in {gamma}-SNAP molecules is matched with great precision by the two lowest frequency normal modes of the structure. Comparison of the lowest-frequency modes from {gamma}-SNAP and Sec17 indicated that the structures share preferred directions of flexibility, corresponding to bending and twisting of the twisted sheet motif. We discuss possible consequences related to the flexibility of the SNAP proteins for the mechanism of the 20S complex disassembly during the SNAP receptors recycling.

  8. The acidic domains of the Toc159 chloroplast preprotein receptor family are intrinsically disordered protein domains

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The Toc159 family of proteins serve as receptors for chloroplast-destined preproteins. They directly bind to transit peptides, and exhibit preprotein substrate selectivity conferred by an unknown mechanism. The Toc159 receptors each include three domains: C-terminal membrane, central GTPase, and N-terminal acidic (A-) domains. Although the function(s) of the A-domain remains largely unknown, the amino acid sequences are most variable within these domains, suggesting they may contribute to the functional specificity of the receptors. Results The physicochemical properties of the A-domains are characteristic of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Using CD spectroscopy we show that the A-domains of two Arabidopsis Toc159 family members (atToc132 and atToc159) are disordered at physiological pH and temperature and undergo conformational changes at temperature and pH extremes that are characteristic of IDPs. Conclusions Identification of the A-domains as IDPs will be important for determining their precise function(s), and suggests a role in protein-protein interactions, which may explain how these proteins serve as receptors for such a wide variety of preprotein substrates. PMID:20042108

  9. InterPro: an integrated documentation resource for protein families, domains and functional sites.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Nicola J; Apweiler, Rolf; Attwood, Terri K; Bairoch, Amos; Bateman, Alex; Binns, David; Biswas, Margaret; Bradley, Paul; Bork, Peer; Bucher, Phillip; Copley, Richard; Courcelle, Emmanuel; Durbin, Richard; Falquet, Laurent; Fleischmann, Wolfgang; Gouzy, Jerome; Griffith-Jones, Sam; Haft, Daniel; Hermjakob, Henning; Hulo, Nicolas; Kahn, Daniel; Kanapin, Alexander; Krestyaninova, Maria; Lopez, Rodrigo; Letunic, Ivica; Orchard, Sandra; Pagni, Marco; Peyruc, David; Ponting, Chris P; Servant, Florence; Sigrist, Christian J A

    2002-09-01

    The exponential increase in the submission of nucleotide sequences to the nucleotide sequence database by genome sequencing centres has resulted in a need for rapid, automatic methods for classification of the resulting protein sequences. There are several signature and sequence cluster-based methods for protein classification, each resource having distinct areas of optimum application owing to the differences in the underlying analysis methods. In recognition of this, InterPro was developed as an integrated documentation resource for protein families, domains and functional sites, to rationalise the complementary efforts of the individual protein signature database projects. The member databases - PRINTS, PROSITE, Pfam, ProDom, SMART and TIGRFAMs - form the InterPro core. Related signatures from each member database are unified into single InterPro entries. Each InterPro entry includes a unique accession number, functional descriptions and literature references, and links are made back to the relevant member database(s). Release 4.0 of InterPro (November 2001) contains 4,691 entries, representing 3,532 families, 1,068 domains, 74 repeats and 15 sites of post-translational modification (PTMs) encoded by different regular expressions, profiles, fingerprints and hidden Markov models (HMMs). Each InterPro entry lists all the matches against SWISS-PROT and TrEMBL (2,141,621 InterPro hits from 586,124 SWISS-PROT and TrEMBL protein sequences). The database is freely accessible for text- and sequence-based searches. PMID:12230031

  10. Properties and Phylogeny of 76 Families of Bacterial and Eukaryotic Organellar Outer Membrane Pore-Forming Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Bhaskara L.; Saier, Milton H.

    2016-01-01

    We here report statistical analyses of 76 families of integral outer membrane pore-forming proteins (OMPPs) found in bacteria and eukaryotic organelles. 47 of these families fall into one superfamily (SFI) which segregate into fifteen phylogenetic clusters. Families with members of the same protein size, topology and substrate specificities often cluster together. Virtually all OMPP families include only proteins that form transmembrane pores. Nine such families, all of which cluster together in the SFI phylogenetic tree, contain both α- and β-structures, are multi domain, multi subunit systems, and transport macromolecules. Most other SFI OMPPs transport small molecules. SFII and SFV homologues derive from Actinobacteria while SFIII and SFIV proteins derive from chloroplasts. Three families of actinobacterial OMPPs and two families of eukaryotic OMPPs apparently consist primarily of α-helices (α-TMSs). Of the 71 families of (putative) β-barrel OMPPs, only twenty could not be assigned to a superfamily, and these derived primarily from Actinobacteria (1), chloroplasts (1), spirochaetes (8), and proteobacteria (10). Proteins were identified in which two or three full length OMPPs are fused together. Family characteristic are described and evidence agrees with a previous proposal suggesting that many arose by adjacent β-hairpin structural unit duplications. PMID:27064789

  11. Orphan Nuclear Receptor NR4A1 Binds a Novel Protein Interaction Site on Anti-apoptotic B Cell Lymphoma Gene 2 Family Proteins.

    PubMed

    Godoi, Paulo H C; Wilkie-Grantham, Rachel P; Hishiki, Asami; Sano, Renata; Matsuzawa, Yasuko; Yanagi, Hiroko; Munte, Claudia E; Chen, Ya; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M; Kalbitzer, Hans R; Matsuzawa, Shu-Ichi; Reed, John C

    2016-07-01

    B cell lymphoma gene 2 (Bcl-2) family proteins are key regulators of programmed cell death and important targets for drug discovery. Pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins reciprocally modulate their activities in large part through protein interactions involving a motif known as BH3 (Bcl-2 homology 3). Nur77 is an orphan member of the nuclear receptor family that lacks a BH3 domain but nevertheless binds certain anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins (Bcl-2, Bfl-1, and Bcl-B), modulating their effects on apoptosis and autophagy. We used a combination of NMR spectroscopy-based methods, mutagenesis, and functional studies to define the interaction site of a Nur77 peptide on anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins and reveal a novel interaction surface. Nur77 binds adjacent to the BH3 peptide-binding crevice, suggesting the possibility of cross-talk between these discrete binding sites. Mutagenesis of residues lining the identified interaction site on Bcl-B negated the interaction with Nur77 protein in cells and prevented Nur77-mediated modulation of apoptosis and autophagy. The findings establish a new protein interaction site with the potential to modulate the apoptosis and autophagy mechanisms governed by Bcl-2 family proteins. PMID:27129202

  12. A mysterious family of calcium-binding proteins from parasitic worms.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Charlotte M; Timson, David J

    2016-08-15

    There is a family of proteins from parasitic worms which combine N-terminal EF-hand domains with C-terminal dynein light chain-like domains. Data are accumulating on the biochemistry and cell biology of these proteins. However, little is known about their functions in vivo Schistosoma mansoni expresses 13 family members (SmTAL1-SmTAL13). Three of these (SmTAL1, SmTAL2 and SmTAL3) have been subjected to biochemical analysis which demonstrated that they have different molecular properties. Although their overall folds are predicted to be similar, small changes in the EF-hand domains result in differences in their ion binding properties. Whereas SmTAL1 and SmTAL2 are able to bind calcium (and some other) ions, SmTAL3 appears to be unable to bind any divalent cations. Similar biochemical diversity has been seen in the CaBP proteins from Fasciola hepatica Four family members are known (FhCaBP1-4). All of these bind to calcium ions. However, FhCaBP4 dimerizes in the presence of calcium ions, FhCaBP3 dimerizes in the absence of calcium ions and FhCaBP2 dimerizes regardless of the prevailing calcium ion concentration. In both the SmTAL and FhCaBP families, the proteins also differ in their ability to bind calmodulin antagonists and related drugs. Interestingly, SmTAL1 interacts with praziquantel (the drug of choice for treating schistosomiasis). The pharmacological significance (if any) of this finding is unknown. PMID:27528745

  13. The CATH database: an extended protein family resource for structural and functional genomics

    PubMed Central

    Pearl, F. M. G.; Bennett, C. F.; Bray, J. E.; Harrison, A. P.; Martin, N.; Shepherd, A.; Sillitoe, I.; Thornton, J.; Orengo, C. A.

    2003-01-01

    The CATH database of protein domain structures (http://www.biochem.ucl.ac.uk/bsm/cath_new) currently contains 34 287 domain structures classified into 1383 superfamilies and 3285 sequence families. Each structural family is expanded with domain sequence relatives recruited from GenBank using a variety of efficient sequence search protocols and reliable thresholds. This extended resource, known as the CATH-protein family database (CATH-PFDB) contains a total of 310 000 domain sequences classified into 26 812 sequence families. New sequence search protocols have been designed, based on these intermediate sequence libraries, to allow more regular updating of the classification. Further developments include the adaptation of a recently developed method for rapid structure comparison, based on secondary structure matching, for domain boundary assignment. The philosophy behind CATHEDRAL is the recognition of recurrent folds already classified in CATH. Benchmarking of CATHEDRAL, using manually validated domain assignments, demonstrated that 43% of domains boundaries could be completely automatically assigned. This is an improvement on a previous consensus approach for which only 10–20% of domains could be reliably processed in a completely automated fashion. Since domain boundary assignment is a significant bottleneck in the classification of new structures, CATHEDRAL will also help to increase the frequency of CATH updates. PMID:12520050

  14. Bioinformatic Characterization of the Trimeric Intracellular Cation-Specific Channel Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Silverio, Abe L. F.

    2014-01-01

    Trimeric intracellular cation-specific (TRIC) channels are integral to muscle excitation–contraction coupling. TRIC channels provide counter-ionic flux when calcium is rapidly transported from intracellular stores to the cell cytoplasm. Until recently, knowledge of the presence of these proteins was limited to animals. We analyzed the TRIC family and identified a profusion of prokaryotic family members with topologies and motifs similar to those of their eukaryotic counterparts. Prokaryotic members far outnumber eukaryotic members, and although none has been functionally characterized, the evidence suggests that they function as secondary carriers. The presence of fused N- or C-terminal domains of known biochemical functions as well as genomic context analyses provide clues about the functions of these prokaryotic homologs. They are proposed to function in metabolite (e.g., amino acid/ nucleotide) efflux. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that TRIC channel homologs diverged relatively early during evolutionary history and that horizontal gene transfer was frequent in prokaryotes but not in eukaryotes. Topological analyses of TRIC channels revealed that these proteins possess seven putative transmembrane segments (TMSs), which arose by intragenic duplication of a three-TMS polypeptide-encoding genetic element followed by addition of a seventh TMS at the C terminus to give the precursor of all current TRIC family homologs. We propose that this family arose in prokaryotes. PMID:21519847

  15. In vivo association of E2F and DP family proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, C L; Zukerberg, L R; Ngwu, C; Harlow, E; Lees, J A

    1995-01-01

    The mammalian transcription factor E2F plays an important role in regulating the expression of genes that are required for passage through the cell cycle. This transcriptional activity is inhibited by association with the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (pRB) or its relatives p107 and p103. The first cDNA from the E2F family to be cloned was designated E2F-1, and multiple E2F family members have now been identified. They bind to DNA as heterodimers, interacting with proteins known as DP. Here we demonstrate that DP is also a family of polypeptides with at least two members (hDP-1 and hDP-2). Both hDP-1 and hDP-2 bind to all E2F family members in vivo, and each complex is capable of activating transcription. However, the various E2F/DP complexes display strong differences in the ability to bind to either pRB or p107 in vivo, and the specificity of pRB or p107 binding is mediated by the E2F subunit. PMID:7739537

  16. Virulence Plasmid of Rhodococcus equi Contains Inducible Gene Family Encoding Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Barbara A.; Prescott, John F.; Palmer, Guy H.; Takai, Shinji; Nicholson, Vivian M.; Alperin, Debra C.; Hines, Stephen A.

    2001-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi causes severe pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals. This facultative intracellular pathogen produces similar lesions in immunocompromised humans, particularly in AIDS patients. Virulent strains of R. equi bear a large plasmid that is required for intracellular survival within macrophages and for virulence in foals and mice. Only two plasmid-encoded proteins have been described previously; a 15- to 17-kDa surface protein designated virulence-associated protein A (VapA) and an antigenically related 20-kDa protein (herein designated VapB). These two proteins are not expressed by the same R. equi isolate. We describe here the substantial similarity between VapA and VapB. Moreover, we identify three additional genes carried on the virulence plasmid, vapC, -D, and -E, that are tandemly arranged downstream of vapA. These new genes are members of a gene family and encode proteins that are approximately 50% homologous to VapA, VapB, and each other. vapC, -D, and -E are found only in R. equi strains that express VapA and are highly conserved in VapA-positive isolates from both horses and humans. VapC, -D, and -E are secreted proteins coordinately regulated by temperature with VapA; the proteins are expressed when R. equi is cultured at 37°C but not at 30°C, a finding that is compatible with a role in virulence. As secreted proteins, VapC, -D, and -E may represent targets for the prevention of rhodococcal pneumonia. An immunologic study using VapA-specific antibodies and recombinant Vap proteins revealed no evidence of cross-reactivity despite extensive sequence similarity over the carboxy terminus of all four proteins. PMID:11159951

  17. Structural and Mechanistic Characterization of L-Histidinol Phosphate Phosphatase from the PHP Family of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ghodge, Swapnil V.; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Fedorov, Elena V.; Hillerich, Brandan; Seidel, Ronald; Almo, Steven C.; Raushel, Frank M.

    2013-01-01

    l-Histidinol phosphate phosphatase (HPP) catalyzes the hydrolysis of L-histidinol phosphate to L-histidinol and inorganic phosphate, the penultimate step in the biosynthesis of L-histidine. HPP from the polymerase and histidinol phosphatase (PHP) family of proteins possesses a trinuclear active site and a distorted (β/α)7-barrel protein fold. This group of enzymes is closely related to the amidohydrolase superfamily of enzymes. The mechanism of phosphomonoester bond hydrolysis by the PHP family of HPP enzymes was addressed. Recombinant HPP from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis that was expressed in Escherichia coli contained a mixture of iron and zinc in the active site and had a catalytic efficiency of ~103 M−1 s−1. Expression of the protein under iron-free conditions resulted in the production of enzyme with a two orders of magnitude improvement in catalytic efficiency and a mixture of zinc and manganese in the active site. Solvent isotope and viscosity effects demonstrated that proton transfer steps and product dissociation steps are not rate-limiting. X-ray structures of HPP were determined with sulfate, L-histidinol/phosphate, and a complex of L-histidinol and arsenate bound in the active site. These crystal structures and the catalytic properties of variants were used to identify the structural elements required for catalysis and substrate recognition by the HPP family of enzymes within the amidohydrolase superfamily. PMID:23327428

  18. The structure, function and regulation of the nodulin 26-like intrinsic protein family of plant aquaglyceroporins.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Ian S; Choi, Won-Gyu; Roberts, Daniel M

    2006-08-01

    The nodulin 26-like intrinsic protein family is a group of highly conserved multifunctional major intrinsic proteins that are unique to plants, and which transport a variety of uncharged solutes ranging from water to ammonia to glycerol. Based on structure-function studies, the NIP family can be subdivided into two subgroups (I and II) based on the identity of the amino acids in the selectivity-determining filter (ar/R region) of the transport pore. Both subgroups appear to contain multifunctional transporters with low to no water permeability and the ability to flux multiple uncharged solutes of varying sizes depending upon the composition of the residues of the ar/R filter. NIPs are subject to posttranslational phosphorylation by calcium-dependent protein kinases. In the case of the family archetype, soybean nodulin 26, phosphorylation has been shown to stimulate its transport activity and to be regulated in response to developmental as well as environmental cues, including osmotic stresses. NIPs tend to be expressed at low levels in the plant compared to other MIPs, and several exhibit cell or tissue specific expression that is subject to spatial and temporal regulation during development. PMID:16716251

  19. The role of the acidity of N-heteroaryl sulfonamides as inhibitors of bcl-2 family protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Touré, B Barry; Miller-Moslin, Karen; Yusuff, Naeem; Perez, Lawrence; Doré, Michael; Joud, Carol; Michael, Walter; DiPietro, Lucian; van der Plas, Simon; McEwan, Michael; Lenoir, Francois; Hoe, Madelene; Karki, Rajesh; Springer, Clayton; Sullivan, John; Levine, Kymberly; Fiorilla, Catherine; Xie, Xiaoling; Kulathila, Raviraj; Herlihy, Kara; Porter, Dale; Visser, Michael

    2013-02-14

    Overexpression of the antiapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family of proteins is commonly associated with cancer cell survival and resistance to chemotherapeutics. Here, we describe the structure-based optimization of a series of N-heteroaryl sulfonamides that demonstrate potent mechanism-based cell death. The role of the acidic nature of the sulfonamide moiety as it relates to potency, solubility, and clearance is examined. This has led to the discovery of novel heterocyclic replacements for the acylsulfonamide core of ABT-737 and ABT-263. PMID:24900652

  20. Functional characterization of fidgetin, an AAA-family protein mutated in fidget mice

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yan; Mahaffey, Connie L.; Berube, Nathalie; Nystuen, Arne; Frankel, Wayne N. . E-mail: wnf@jax.org

    2005-03-10

    The mouse fidget mutation is an autosomal recessive mutation that renders reduced or absent semicircular canals, microphthalmia, and various skeletal abnormalities to affected mice. We previously identified the defective gene which encodes fidgetin, a new member of the ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities (AAA proteins). Here, we report on the subcellular localization of fidgetin as well as that of two closely related proteins, fidgetin-like 1 and fidgetin-like 2. Epitope-tagging and immunostaining revealed that both fidgetin and fidgetin-like 2 were predominantly localized to the nucleus, whereas fidgetin-like 1 was both nuclear and cytoplasmic. Furthermore, deletion studies identified a putative bipartite nuclear localization signal in the middle portion of the fidgetin protein. Since AAA proteins are known to form functional hetero- or homo-hexamers, we used reciprocal immunoprecipitation to examine the potential interaction among these proteins. We found that fidgetin interacted with itself and this specific interaction was abolished when either the N- or C-terminus of the protein was truncated. Taken together, our results suggest that fidgetin is a nuclear AAA-family protein with the potential to form homo-oligomers, thus representing the first step towards the elucidation of fidgetin's cellular function and the disease mechanism in fidget mutant mice.

  1. Using hierarchical clustering of secreted protein families to classify and rank candidate effectors of rust fungi.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Diane G O; Win, Joe; Cano, Liliana M; Szabo, Les J; Kamoun, Sophien; Raffaele, Sylvain

    2012-01-01

    Rust fungi are obligate biotrophic pathogens that cause considerable damage on crop plants. Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, the causal agent of wheat stem rust, and Melampsora larici-populina, the poplar leaf rust pathogen, have strong deleterious impacts on wheat and poplar wood production, respectively. Filamentous pathogens such as rust fungi secrete molecules called disease effectors that act as modulators of host cell physiology and can suppress or trigger host immunity. Current knowledge on effectors from other filamentous plant pathogens can be exploited for the characterisation of effectors in the genome of recently sequenced rust fungi. We designed a comprehensive in silico analysis pipeline to identify the putative effector repertoire from the genome of two plant pathogenic rust fungi. The pipeline is based on the observation that known effector proteins from filamentous pathogens have at least one of the following properties: (i) contain a secretion signal, (ii) are encoded by in planta induced genes, (iii) have similarity to haustorial proteins, (iv) are small and cysteine rich, (v) contain a known effector motif or a nuclear localization signal, (vi) are encoded by genes with long intergenic regions, (vii) contain internal repeats, and (viii) do not contain PFAM domains, except those associated with pathogenicity. We used Markov clustering and hierarchical clustering to classify protein families of rust pathogens and rank them according to their likelihood of being effectors. Using this approach, we identified eight families of candidate effectors that we consider of high value for functional characterization. This study revealed a diverse set of candidate effectors, including families of haustorial expressed secreted proteins and small cysteine-rich proteins. This comprehensive classification of candidate effectors from these devastating rust pathogens is an initial step towards probing plant germplasm for novel resistance components. PMID:22238666

  2. Members of the Chloride Intracellular Ion Channel Protein Family Demonstrate Glutaredoxin-Like Enzymatic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Al Khamici, Heba; Brown, Louise J.; Hossain, Khondker R.; Hudson, Amanda L.; Sinclair-Burton, Alxcia A.; Ng, Jane Phui Mun; Daniel, Elizabeth L.; Hare, Joanna E.; Cornell, Bruce A.; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Davey, Mary W.; Valenzuela, Stella M.

    2015-01-01

    The Chloride Intracellular Ion Channel (CLIC) family consists of six evolutionarily conserved proteins in humans. Members of this family are unusual, existing as both monomeric soluble proteins and as integral membrane proteins where they function as chloride selective ion channels, however no function has previously been assigned to their soluble form. Structural studies have shown that in the soluble form, CLIC proteins adopt a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fold, however, they have an active site with a conserved glutaredoxin monothiol motif, similar to the omega class GSTs. We demonstrate that CLIC proteins have glutaredoxin-like glutathione-dependent oxidoreductase enzymatic activity. CLICs 1, 2 and 4 demonstrate typical glutaredoxin-like activity using 2-hydroxyethyl disulfide as a substrate. Mutagenesis experiments identify cysteine 24 as the catalytic cysteine residue in CLIC1, which is consistent with its structure. CLIC1 was shown to reduce sodium selenite and dehydroascorbate in a glutathione-dependent manner. Previous electrophysiological studies have shown that the drugs IAA-94 and A9C specifically block CLIC channel activity. These same compounds inhibit CLIC1 oxidoreductase activity. This work for the first time assigns a functional activity to the soluble form of the CLIC proteins. Our results demonstrate that the soluble form of the CLIC proteins has an enzymatic activity that is distinct from the channel activity of their integral membrane form. This CLIC enzymatic activity may be important for protecting the intracellular environment against oxidation. It is also likely that this enzymatic activity regulates the CLIC ion channel function. PMID:25581026

  3. Identification and characterization of a novel human neutrophil protein related to the S100 family.

    PubMed Central

    Guignard, F; Mauel, J; Markert, M

    1995-01-01

    A rabbit polyclonal antibody raised against myeloid-related protein 8 (MRP-8), a protein of the S100 family, recognized another S100 protein (MRP-14) as well as a protein of 6.5 kDa (p6) in the cytosol of resting neutrophils. p6 was found to be a novel member of the S100 family. It consisted of two isoforms with pI values of 6.2 (the minor form, p6a) and 6.3 (the major form, p6b) and constituted 5% of the total cytosolic proteins. Both isoforms were also demonstrated in the cytosol of monocytes, but not in lymphocytes, as previously shown for MRP-8 and MRP-14. Only the major isoform bound radioactive Ca2+, as also observed for MRP-8, whereas the different variants of MRP-14 were all labelled. On neutrophil activation with opsonized zymosan, a stimulant known to require extracellular Ca2+, 58% of p6a and 42% of p6b was translocated to the membrane. With phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, a Ca(2+)-independent stimulant, no translocation was detected. This translocation pattern was similar to that observed with MRP-8 and MRP-14. In addition, p6, MRP-8 and MRP-14 were specifically associated with the cytoskeletal fraction of the membrane. The Ca(2+)-dependent translocation of the novel S100 protein in parallel with MRP-8 and MRP-14 suggests a role for these proteins in regulating the Ca2+ signal to the membrane cytoskeleton and thus in regulating neutrophil activation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7626002

  4. The ts111 Mutation of Paramecium tetraurelia Affects a Member of the Protein Palmitoylation Family.

    PubMed

    Prajer, Małgorzata; Tarcz, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The thermosensitive ts111 mutant of Parameciun tetraurelia carries a recessive mutation which causes cell death after 2-8 divisions at the restrictive temperature of 35 degrees C. Expression at 35 degrees C induces disassembly of the infraciliary lattice (ICL). In this study, we found that the ts111 mutation also results in significant abnormalities in the number and structure of contractile vacuole complexes (CVCs) and in their functioning at the restrictive temperature. In order to characterize the ts111 gene, the complementation cloning was performed by microinjection into the macronucleus of an indexed genomic DNA library. The mutation was complemented by a sequence of 852 bp, which differed from the mutant sequence by a single nucleotide substitution. The deduced protein sequence is 284 amino acids long. It contains a domain referred to as the DHHC domain, associated with 2 trans-membrane helices. The DHHC proteins belong to the Palmitoyl-Acyl Transferases (PATs) protein family, which is implicated in the protein palmitoylation process playing the role in protein addressing. The ts111 mutation induces the amino acid change, localized before the first membrane helix. Transformation of ts111 mutant cells with the TS111-GFP gene fusion showed the expected reparation restoring thermoresistance and also demonstrated a localization of the protein in contractile vacuoles, but not in the ICL. The entire gene silencing in wild type cells at restrictive temperature caused the same effect as the expression of a point mutation in ts111 mutant. The authors propose the following hypotheses: (i) function of CVCs at the restrictive temperature depends in Paramecium on the TS111 protein--a member of the PAT family, and the primary effect of the termosensitive ts111 mutation are morphological abnormalities and dysfunction of CVCs, (ii) disassembly of the ICL is a secondary effect of the ts111 mutation, which results from disturbed regulation of the intracellular concentration

  5. Conserved Features in the Structure, Mechanism, and Biogenesis of the Inverse Autotransporter Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Eva; Stubenrauch, Christopher J.; Grinter, Rhys; Croft, Nathan P.; Purcell, Anthony W.; Strugnell, Richard A.; Dougan, Gordon; Lithgow, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial cell surface proteins intimin and invasin are virulence factors that share a common domain structure and bind selectively to host cell receptors in the course of bacterial pathogenesis. The β-barrel domains of intimin and invasin show significant sequence and structural similarities. Conversely, a variety of proteins with sometimes limited sequence similarity have also been annotated as “intimin-like” and “invasin” in genome datasets, while other recent work on apparently unrelated virulence-associated proteins ultimately revealed similarities to intimin and invasin. Here we characterize the sequence and structural relationships across this complex protein family. Surprisingly, intimins and invasins represent a very small minority of the sequence diversity in what has been previously the “intimin/invasin protein family”. Analysis of the assembly pathway for expression of the classic intimin, EaeA, and a characteristic example of the most prevalent members of the group, FdeC, revealed a dependence on the translocation and assembly module as a common feature for both these proteins. While the majority of the sequences in the grouping are most similar to FdeC, a further and widespread group is two-partner secretion systems that use the β-barrel domain as the delivery device for secretion of a variety of virulence factors. This comprehensive analysis supports the adoption of the “inverse autotransporter protein family” as the most accurate nomenclature for the family and, in turn, has important consequences for our overall understanding of the Type V secretion systems of bacterial pathogens. PMID:27190006

  6. Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Family Proteins and c-jun Signaling in Injury-induced Schwann Cell Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Jeong; Shin, Yoon Kyung; Park, Hwan Tae

    2014-06-01

    Schwann cells (SCs) in the peripheral nerves myelinate axons during postnatal development to allow saltatory conduction of nerve impulses. Well-organized structures of myelin sheathes are maintained throughout life unless nerves are insulted. After peripheral nerve injury, unidentified signals from injured nerves drive SC dedifferentiation into an immature state. Dedifferentiated SCs participate in axonal regeneration by producing neurotrophic factors and removing degenerating nerve debris. In this review, we focus on the role of mitogen activated protein kinase family proteins (MAP kinases) in SC dedifferentiation. In addition, we will highlight neuregulin 1 and the transcription factor c-jun as upstream and downstream signals for MAP kinases in SC responses to nerve injury. PMID:24963277

  7. The actin family protein ARP6 contributes to the structure and the function of the nucleolus

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamura, Hiroshi; Matsumori, Haruka; Kalendova, Alzbeta; Hozak, Pavel; Goldberg, Ilya G.; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Saitoh, Noriko; Harata, Masahiko

    2015-08-21

    The actin family members, consisting of actin and actin-related proteins (ARPs), are essential components of chromatin remodeling complexes. ARP6, one of the nuclear ARPs, is part of the Snf-2-related CREB-binding protein activator protein (SRCAP) chromatin remodeling complex, which promotes the deposition of the histone variant H2A.Z into the chromatin. In this study, we showed that ARP6 influences the structure and the function of the nucleolus. ARP6 is localized in the central region of the nucleolus, and its knockdown induced a morphological change in the nucleolus. We also found that in the presence of high concentrations of glucose ARP6 contributed to the maintenance of active ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription by placing H2A.Z into the chromatin. In contrast, under starvation, ARP6 was required for cell survival through the repression of rDNA transcription independently of H2A.Z. These findings reveal novel pleiotropic roles for the actin family in nuclear organization and metabolic homeostasis. - Highlights: • ARP6, an actin related protein, is important for nucleolar function and structure. • A population of ARP6 is localized in the center of nucleolus. • Depletion of ARP6 resulted in aberrant shape of the nucleolus. • ARP6 maintains the active rDNA transcription under high glucose. • ARP6 is required for the repression of rDNA transcription under starvation.

  8. Comparison of ligand migration and binding in heme proteins of the globin family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karin, Nienhaus; Ulrich Nienhaus, G.

    2015-12-01

    The binding of small diatomic ligands such as carbon monoxide or dioxygen to heme proteins is among the simplest biological processes known. Still, it has taken many decades to understand the mechanistic aspects of this process in full detail. Here, we compare ligand binding in three heme proteins of the globin family, myoglobin, a dimeric hemoglobin, and neuroglobin. The combination of structural, spectroscopic, and kinetic experiments over many years by many laboratories has revealed common properties of globins and a clear mechanistic picture of ligand binding at the molecular level. In addition to the ligand binding site at the heme iron, a primary ligand docking site exists that ensures efficient ligand binding to and release from the heme iron. Additional, secondary docking sites can greatly facilitate ligand escape after its dissociation from the heme. Although there is only indirect evidence at present, a preformed histidine gate appears to exist that allows ligand entry to and exit from the active site. The importance of these features can be assessed by studies involving modified proteins (via site-directed mutagenesis) and comparison with heme proteins not belonging to the globin family.

  9. PANTHER version 10: expanded protein families and functions, and analysis tools

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Huaiyu; Poudel, Sagar; Muruganujan, Anushya; Casagrande, John T.; Thomas, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    PANTHER (Protein Analysis THrough Evolutionary Relationships, http://pantherdb.org) is a widely used online resource for comprehensive protein evolutionary and functional classification, and includes tools for large-scale biological data analysis. Recent development has been focused in three main areas: genome coverage, functional information (‘annotation’) coverage and accuracy, and improved genomic data analysis tools. The latest version of PANTHER, 10.0, includes almost 5000 new protein families (for a total of over 12 000 families), each with a reference phylogenetic tree including protein-coding genes from 104 fully sequenced genomes spanning all kingdoms of life. Phylogenetic trees now include inference of horizontal transfer events in addition to speciation and gene duplication events. Functional annotations are regularly updated using the models generated by the Gene Ontology Phylogenetic Annotation Project. For the data analysis tools, PANTHER has expanded the number of different ‘functional annotation sets’ available for functional enrichment testing, allowing analyses to access all Gene Ontology annotations—updated monthly from the Gene Ontology database—in addition to the annotations that have been inferred through evolutionary relationships. The Prowler (data browser) has been updated to enable users to more efficiently browse the entire database, and to create custom gene lists using the multiple axes of classification in PANTHER. PMID:26578592

  10. Functional and Evolutionary Analysis of the CASPARIAN STRIP MEMBRANE DOMAIN PROTEIN Family1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Roppolo, Daniele; Boeckmann, Brigitte; Pfister, Alexandre; Boutet, Emmanuel; Rubio, Maria C.; Dénervaud-Tendon, Valérie; Vermeer, Joop E.M.; Gheyselinck, Jacqueline; Xenarios, Ioannis; Geldner, Niko

    2014-01-01

    CASPARIAN STRIP MEMBRANE DOMAIN PROTEINS (CASPs) are four-membrane-span proteins that mediate the deposition of Casparian strips in the endodermis by recruiting the lignin polymerization machinery. CASPs show high stability in their membrane domain, which presents all the hallmarks of a membrane scaffold. Here, we characterized the large family of CASP-like (CASPL) proteins. CASPLs were found in all major divisions of land plants as well as in green algae; homologs outside of the plant kingdom were identified as members of the MARVEL protein family. When ectopically expressed in the endodermis, most CASPLs were able to integrate the CASP membrane domain, which suggests that CASPLs share with CASPs the propensity to form transmembrane scaffolds. Extracellular loops are not necessary for generating the scaffold, since CASP1 was still able to localize correctly when either one of the extracellular loops was deleted. The CASP first extracellular loop was found conserved in euphyllophytes but absent in plants lacking Casparian strips, an observation that may contribute to the study of Casparian strip and root evolution. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), CASPL showed specific expression in a variety of cell types, such as trichomes, abscission zone cells, peripheral root cap cells, and xylem pole pericycle cells. PMID:24920445

  11. Controllability of protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based networks: Participation of the hub 14-3-3 protein family.

    PubMed

    Uhart, Marina; Flores, Gabriel; Bustos, Diego M

    2016-01-01

    Posttranslational regulation of protein function is an ubiquitous mechanism in eukaryotic cells. Here, we analyzed biological properties of nodes and edges of a human protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based network, especially of those nodes critical for the network controllability. We found that the minimal number of critical nodes needed to control the whole network is 29%, which is considerably lower compared to other real networks. These critical nodes are more regulated by posttranslational modifications and contain more binding domains to these modifications than other kinds of nodes in the network, suggesting an intra-group fast regulation. Also, when we analyzed the edges characteristics that connect critical and non-critical nodes, we found that the former are enriched in domain-to-eukaryotic linear motif interactions, whereas the later are enriched in domain-domain interactions. Our findings suggest a possible structure for protein-protein interaction networks with a densely interconnected and self-regulated central core, composed of critical nodes with a high participation in the controllability of the full network, and less regulated peripheral nodes. Our study offers a deeper understanding of complex network control and bridges the controllability theorems for complex networks and biological protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based networked systems. PMID:27195976

  12. Controllability of protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based networks: Participation of the hub 14-3-3 protein family

    PubMed Central

    Uhart, Marina; Flores, Gabriel; Bustos, Diego M.

    2016-01-01

    Posttranslational regulation of protein function is an ubiquitous mechanism in eukaryotic cells. Here, we analyzed biological properties of nodes and edges of a human protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based network, especially of those nodes critical for the network controllability. We found that the minimal number of critical nodes needed to control the whole network is 29%, which is considerably lower compared to other real networks. These critical nodes are more regulated by posttranslational modifications and contain more binding domains to these modifications than other kinds of nodes in the network, suggesting an intra-group fast regulation. Also, when we analyzed the edges characteristics that connect critical and non-critical nodes, we found that the former are enriched in domain-to-eukaryotic linear motif interactions, whereas the later are enriched in domain-domain interactions. Our findings suggest a possible structure for protein-protein interaction networks with a densely interconnected and self-regulated central core, composed of critical nodes with a high participation in the controllability of the full network, and less regulated peripheral nodes. Our study offers a deeper understanding of complex network control and bridges the controllability theorems for complex networks and biological protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based networked systems. PMID:27195976

  13. Competition between members of the tribbles pseudokinase protein family shapes their interactions with mitogen activated protein kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Guan, Hongtao; Shuaib, Aban; Leon, David Davila De; Angyal, Adrienn; Salazar, Maria; Velasco, Guillermo; Holcombe, Mike; Dower, Steven K; Kiss-Toth, Endre

    2016-01-01

    Spatio-temporal regulation of intracellular signalling networks is key to normal cellular physiology; dysregulation of which leads to disease. The family of three mammalian tribbles proteins has emerged as an important controller of signalling via regulating the activity of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), the PI3-kinase induced signalling network and E3 ubiquitin ligases. However, the importance of potential redundancy in the action of tribbles and how the differences in affinities for the various binding partners may influence signalling control is currently unclear. We report that tribbles proteins can bind to an overlapping set of MAPK-kinases (MAPKK) in live cells and dictate the localisation of the complexes. Binding studies in transfected cells reveal common regulatory mechanisms and suggest that tribbles and MAPKs may interact with MAPKKs in a competitive manner. Computational modelling of the impact of tribbles on MAPK activation suggests a high sensitivity of this system to changes in tribbles levels, highlighting that these proteins are ideally placed to control the dynamics and balance of activation of concurrent signalling pathways. PMID:27600771

  14. Competition between members of the tribbles pseudokinase protein family shapes their interactions with mitogen activated protein kinase pathways

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Hongtao; Shuaib, Aban; Leon, David Davila De; Angyal, Adrienn; Salazar, Maria; Velasco, Guillermo; Holcombe, Mike; Dower, Steven K.; Kiss-Toth, Endre

    2016-01-01

    Spatio-temporal regulation of intracellular signalling networks is key to normal cellular physiology; dysregulation of which leads to disease. The family of three mammalian tribbles proteins has emerged as an important controller of signalling via regulating the activity of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), the PI3-kinase induced signalling network and E3 ubiquitin ligases. However, the importance of potential redundancy in the action of tribbles and how the differences in affinities for the various binding partners may influence signalling control is currently unclear. We report that tribbles proteins can bind to an overlapping set of MAPK-kinases (MAPKK) in live cells and dictate the localisation of the complexes. Binding studies in transfected cells reveal common regulatory mechanisms and suggest that tribbles and MAPKs may interact with MAPKKs in a competitive manner. Computational modelling of the impact of tribbles on MAPK activation suggests a high sensitivity of this system to changes in tribbles levels, highlighting that these proteins are ideally placed to control the dynamics and balance of activation of concurrent signalling pathways. PMID:27600771

  15. Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin family proteins in the regulation of B cell immune response

    PubMed Central

    Pore, Debasis; Gupta, Neetu

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic reorganization of the cortical cytoskeleton is essential for numerous cellular processes including B and T cell activation and migration. The Ezrin, Radixin and Moesin (ERM) family proteins play structural and regulatory roles in the rearrangement of plasma membrane flexibility and protrusions through their reversible interaction with cortical actin filaments and plasma membrane. Recent studies demonstrate that ERM proteins are not only involved in cytoskeletal organization but also offer a platform for the transmission of signals in response to a variety of extracellular stimuli through their ability to crosslink transmembrane receptors with downstream signaling components. In this review, we summarize the present knowledge and recent progress made towards elucidating a novel role of ERM proteins in the regulation of B function in health and disease. PMID:25746045

  16. Structural characterization of a capping protein interaction motif defines a family of actin filament regulators

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Valladares, Maria; Kim, Taekyung; Kannan, Balakrishnan; Tung, Alvin; Aguda, Adeleke H; Larsson, Mårten; Cooper, John A; Robinson, Robert C

    2011-01-01

    Capping protein (CP) regulates actin dynamics by binding the barbed ends of actin filaments. Removal of CP may be one means to harness actin polymerization for processes such as cell movement and endocytosis. Here we structurally and biochemically investigated a CP interaction (CPI) motif present in the otherwise unrelated proteins CARMIL and CD2AP. The CPI motif wraps around the stalk of the mushroom-shaped CP at a site distant from the actin-binding interface, which lies on the top of the mushroom cap. We propose that the CPI motif may act as an allosteric modulator, restricting CP to a low-affinity, filament-binding conformation. Structure-based sequence alignments extend the CPI motif–containing family to include CIN85, CKIP-1, CapZIP and a relatively uncharacterized protein, WASHCAP (FAM21). Peptides comprising these CPI motifs are able to inhibit CP and to uncap CP-bound actin filaments. PMID:20357771

  17. SID1 transmembrane family, member 2 (Sidt2): a novel lysosomal membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Jialin, Gao; Xuefan, Gu; Huiwen, Zhang

    2010-11-26

    In a recent proteomic study of lysosomal proteins [10], we identified SID1 transmembrane family, member 2 (Sidt2) as a novel lysosomal membrane protein candidate. The Sidt2 gene encodes an 832-amino acid residues protein with a calculated molecular mass of 94.5kDa. Bioinformatic analysis showed that Sidt2 is a multipass transmembrane protein that contains 10 putative N-glycosylation sites (NxS/T) and two potential tyrosine-based sorting signals (YGSF and YDTL). Using specific anti-Sidt2 antibody and lysosomal markers, the lysosomal localization of Sidt2 was determined by immunofluorescence. Furthermore, using subcellular fractionation techniques, we demonstrated that Sidt2 is a lysosomal integral membrane protein. Endogenous Sidt2 was detected in multiple tissues of mouse and rat with approximately 120-130kDa molecular weights due to extensive glycosylation. After digestion with PNGase F, the apparent molecular mass of Sidt2 decreased to the predicted value of 95kDa. In rats, Sidt2 was highly expressed in the liver, brain, and kidney, whereas no or little expression was found in the skeletal muscles, heart, and other tissues. In summary, Sidt2 is a highly glycosylated lysosomal integral membrane protein that shows tissue-specific expression. PMID:20965152

  18. The cloning of Grb10 reveals a new family of SH2 domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Ooi, J; Yajnik, V; Immanuel, D; Gordon, M; Moskow, J J; Buchberg, A M; Margolis, B

    1995-04-20

    SH2 domains function to bind proteins containing phosphotyrosine and are components of proteins that are important signal transducers for tyrosine kinases. We have cloned SH2 domain proteins by screening bacterial expression libraries with the tyrosine phosphorylated carboxyterminus of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. Here we report the identification of a new SH2 domain protein, Grb10. Grb10 is highly related to Grb7, an SH2 domain protein that we have previously identified. In addition to an SH2 domain, Grb7 and Grb10 have a central domain with similarity to a putative C. elegans gene likely to be involved in neuronal migration. At least three forms of Grb10 exist in fibroblasts apparently due to alternate translational start sites. Grb10 undergoes serine but not tyrosine phosphorylation after EGF treatment resulting in a shift mobility in a large fraction of Grb10 molecules. However Grb10 appears to bind poorly to EGF-Receptor and the true binding partner for the Grb10 SH2 domain is unclear. Grb10 maps to mouse chromosome 11 very close to the EGF-Receptor which is remarkably similar to Grb7 that maps near the EGF-Receptor related HER2 receptor. The finding of multiple family members with evolutionarily conserved domains indicates that these SH2 domain proteins are likely to have an important, although as of yet, unidentified function. PMID:7731717

  19. Phylogenetic distribution and membrane topology of the LytR-CpsA-Psr protein family

    PubMed Central

    Hübscher, Judith; Lüthy, Lucas; Berger-Bächi, Brigitte; Stutzmann Meier, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Background The bacterial cell wall is the target of many antibiotics and cell envelope constituents are critical to host-pathogen interactions. To combat resistance development and virulence, a detailed knowledge of the individual factors involved is essential. Members of the LytR-CpsA-Psr family of cell envelope-associated attenuators are relevant for β-lactam resistance, biofilm formation, and stress tolerance, and they are suggested to play a role in cell wall maintenance. However, their precise function is still unknown. This study addresses the occurrence as well as sequence-based characteristics of the LytR-CpsA-Psr proteins. Results A comprehensive list of LytR-CpsA-Psr proteins was established, and their phylogenetic distribution and clustering into subgroups was determined. LytR-CpsA-Psr proteins were present in all Gram-positive organisms, except for the cell wall-deficient Mollicutes and one strain of the Clostridiales. In contrast, the majority of Gram-negatives did not contain LytR-CpsA-Psr family members. Despite high sequence divergence, the LytR-CpsA-Psr domains of different subclusters shared a highly similar, predicted mixed a/β-structure, and conserved charged residues. PhoA fusion experiments, using MsrR of Staphylococcus aureus, confirmed membrane topology predictions and extracellular location of its LytR-CpsA-Psr domain. Conclusion The LytR-CpsA-Psr domain is unique to bacteria. The presence of diverse subgroups within the LytR-CpsA-Psr family might indicate functional differences, and could explain variations in phenotypes of respective mutants reported. The identified conserved structural elements and amino acids are likely to be important for the function of the domain and will help to guide future studies of the LytR-CpsA-Psr proteins. PMID:19099556

  20. The major vault protein is related to the toxic anion resistance protein (TelA) family.

    PubMed

    Suprenant, Kathy A; Bloom, Nathan; Fang, Jianwen; Lushington, Gerald

    2007-03-01

    Vaults are barrel-shaped ribonucleoprotein particles that are abundant in certain tumors and multidrug resistant cancer cells. Prokaryotic relatives of the major vault protein, MVP, have not been identified. We used sequence analysis and molecular modeling to show that MVP and the toxic anion resistance protein, TelA of Rhodobacter sphaeroides strain 2.4.1, share a novel fold that consists of a three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet. Because of this strong structural correspondence, we examined whether mammalian cell vaults respond to tellurite treatment. In the presence of the oxyanion tellurite, large vault aggregates, or vaultosomes, appear at the cell periphery in 15 min or less. Vaultosome formation is temperature-dependent, reversible, and occurs in normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells as well as transformed HeLa cervical cancer cells. Vaultosome formation is not restricted to tellurite and occurs in the presence of other toxic oxyanions (selenate, selinite, arsenate, arsenite, vanadate). In addition, vaultosomes form independently from other stress-induced ribonucleoprotein complexes, stress granules and aggresomes. Vaultosome formation is therefore a unique cellular response to an environmental toxin. PMID:17337707

  1. [Role of proteins of the macroglobulin family in regulation of tumor growth].

    PubMed

    Zorin, N A; Zorina, V N; Zorina, R M

    2006-01-01

    Proteins of the macroglobulin family are an ancient and evolutionarily conservative link of the immune system, which is actively involved in both inhibition of tumor growth cells and proliferation of tumor cells. Two basically different binding sites and a great conformational plasticity of all representatives of the macroglobulin family, as well as the presence of two to four representatives of the family in the blood of most species allow them to transport diverse substances and exert various regulatory influences on both the tumor and the entire organism. For example, the capacity of macroglobulins for binding hydrolases makes it possible to inhibit enzyme mediated tumor invasion. At the same time, an excess of macroglobulin/hydrolase complexes can activate apoptosis. The tumor is able of using macroglobulins, especially pregnancy-associated proteins, for its own protection. Specifically, pregnancy-associated alpha2-glycoprotein, which is actively produced by human tumor cells, blocks the histocompatibility complex antigens. On the contrary, the capacity of binding zinc stimulates the thymulin-dependent activation of natural killer cells. Nevertheless, the actively growing tumor expresses many receptors to macroglobulins, which are the main carriers of some cytokines and growth factors essential for proliferation. PMID:16523653

  2. Structural and functional relationships of the XPF/MUS81 family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Ciccia, Alberto; McDonald, Neil; West, Stephen C

    2008-01-01

    Proteins belonging to the XPF/MUS81 family play important roles in the repair of DNA lesions caused by UV-light or DNA cross-linking agents. Most eukaryotes have four family members that assemble into two distinct heterodimeric complexes, XPF-ERCC1 and MUS81-EME1. Each complex contains one catalytic and one noncatalytic subunit and exhibits endonuclease activity with a variety of 3'-flap or fork DNA structures. The catalytic subunits share a characteristic core containing an excision repair cross complementation group 4 (ERCC4) nuclease domain and a tandem helix-hairpin-helix (HhH)(2) domain. Diverged domains are present in the noncatalytic subunits and may be required for substrate targeting. Vertebrates possess two additional family members, FANCM and Fanconi anemia-associated protein 24 kDa (FAAP24), which possess inactive nuclease domains. Instead, FANCM contains a functional Superfamily 2 (SF2) helicase domain that is required for DNA translocation. Determining how these enzymes recognize specific DNA substrates and promote key repair reactions is an important challenge for the future. PMID:18518821

  3. Structural, evolutionary and functional analysis of the NAC domain protein family in Eucalyptus.

    PubMed

    Hussey, Steven G; Saïdi, Mohammed N; Hefer, Charles A; Myburg, Alexander A; Grima-Pettenati, Jacqueline

    2015-06-01

    NAC domain transcription factors regulate many developmental processes and stress responses in plants and vary widely in number and family structure. We analysed the characteristics and evolution of the NAC gene family of Eucalyptus grandis, a fast-growing forest tree in the rosid order Myrtales. NAC domain genes identified in the E. grandis genome were subjected to amino acid sequence, phylogenetic and motif analyses. Transcript abundance in developing tissues and abiotic stress conditions in E. grandis and E. globulus was quantified using RNA-seq and reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). One hundred and eighty-nine E. grandis NAC (EgrNAC) proteins, arranged into 22 subfamilies, are extensively duplicated in subfamilies associated with stress response. Most EgrNAC genes form tandem duplicate arrays that frequently carry signatures of purifying selection. Sixteen amino acid motifs were identified in EgrNAC proteins, eight of which are enriched in, or unique to, Eucalyptus. New candidates for the regulation of normal and tension wood development and cold responses were identified. This first description of a Myrtales NAC domain family reveals an unique history of tandem duplication in stress-related subfamilies that has likely contributed to the adaptation of eucalypts to the challenging Australian environment. Several new candidates for the regulation of stress, wood formation and tree-specific development are reported. PMID:25385212

  4. Preferentially Expressed Antigen in Melanoma (PRAME) and the PRAME Family of Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Nora; Kewitz, Stefanie; Staege, Martin S

    2016-01-01

    Preferentially expressed antigen in melanoma (PRAME) is the best characterized member of the PRAME family of leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins. Mammalian genomes contain multiple members of the PRAME family whereas in other vertebrate genomes only one PRAME-like LRR protein was identified. PRAME is a cancer/testis antigen that is expressed at very low levels in normal adult tissues except testis but at high levels in a variety of cancer cells. In contrast to most other cancer/testis antigens, PRAME is expressed not only in solid tumors but also in leukemia cells. Expression of PRAME and other members of the PRAME family is regulated epigenetically. PRAME interacts with varying pathways that might be directly involved in the malignant phenotype of cancer cells. For instance, PRAME is able to dominantly repress retinoic acid signaling in these cells. On the other hand, PRAME-derived peptides can be recognized as epitopes by cytotoxic T cells and PRAME represents an attractive target for immunological treatment strategies. PMID:26694250

  5. Multisignal control of expression of the LHCX protein family in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    Taddei, Lucilla; Stella, Giulio Rocco; Rogato, Alessandra; Bailleul, Benjamin; Fortunato, Antonio Emidio; Annunziata, Rossella; Sanges, Remo; Thaler, Michael; Lepetit, Bernard; Lavaud, Johann; Jaubert, Marianne; Finazzi, Giovanni; Bouly, Jean-Pierre; Falciatore, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Diatoms are phytoplanktonic organisms that grow successfully in the ocean where light conditions are highly variable. Studies of the molecular mechanisms of light acclimation in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum show that carotenoid de-epoxidation enzymes and LHCX1, a member of the light-harvesting protein family, both contribute to dissipate excess light energy through non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). In this study, we investigate the role of the other members of the LHCX family in diatom stress responses. Our analysis of available genomic data shows that the presence of multiple LHCX genes is a conserved feature of diatom species living in different ecological niches. Moreover, an analysis of the levels of four P. tricornutum LHCX transcripts in relation to protein expression and photosynthetic activity indicates that LHCXs are differentially regulated under different light intensities and nutrient starvation, mostly modulating NPQ capacity. We conclude that multiple abiotic stress signals converge to regulate the LHCX content of cells, providing a way to fine-tune light harvesting and photoprotection. Moreover, our data indicate that the expansion of the LHCX gene family reflects functional diversification of its members which could benefit cells responding to highly variable ocean environments. PMID:27225826

  6. Molecular basis for amino acid sensing by family C G-protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wellendorph, P; Bräuner-Osborne, H

    2009-01-01

    Family C of human G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is constituted by eight metabotropic glutamate receptors, two γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB1–2) subunits forming the heterodimeric GABAB receptor, the calcium-sensing receptor, three taste1 receptors (T1R1–3), a promiscuous L-α-amino acid receptor G-protein-coupled receptor family C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6A) and seven orphan receptors. Aside from the orphan receptors, the family C GPCRs are dimeric receptors characterized by a large extracellular Venus flytrap domain which bind the endogenous agonists. Except from the GABAB1–2 and T1R2–3 receptor, all receptors are either activated or positively modulated by amino acids. In this review, we outline mutational, biophysical and structural studies which have elucidated the interaction of the amino acids with the Venus flytrap domains, molecular mechanisms of receptor selectivity and the initial steps in receptor activation. PMID:19298394

  7. Multisignal control of expression of the LHCX protein family in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Lucilla; Stella, Giulio Rocco; Rogato, Alessandra; Bailleul, Benjamin; Fortunato, Antonio Emidio; Annunziata, Rossella; Sanges, Remo; Thaler, Michael; Lepetit, Bernard; Lavaud, Johann; Jaubert, Marianne; Finazzi, Giovanni; Bouly, Jean-Pierre; Falciatore, Angela

    2016-06-01

    Diatoms are phytoplanktonic organisms that grow successfully in the ocean where light conditions are highly variable. Studies of the molecular mechanisms of light acclimation in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum show that carotenoid de-epoxidation enzymes and LHCX1, a member of the light-harvesting protein family, both contribute to dissipate excess light energy through non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). In this study, we investigate the role of the other members of the LHCX family in diatom stress responses. Our analysis of available genomic data shows that the presence of multiple LHCX genes is a conserved feature of diatom species living in different ecological niches. Moreover, an analysis of the levels of four P. tricornutum LHCX transcripts in relation to protein expression and photosynthetic activity indicates that LHCXs are differentially regulated under different light intensities and nutrient starvation, mostly modulating NPQ capacity. We conclude that multiple abiotic stress signals converge to regulate the LHCX content of cells, providing a way to fine-tune light harvesting and photoprotection. Moreover, our data indicate that the expansion of the LHCX gene family reflects functional diversification of its members which could benefit cells responding to highly variable ocean environments. PMID:27225826

  8. Expression of proteins involved in DNA damage response in familial and sporadic breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Partipilo, Giulia; Simone, Giovanni; Scattone, Anna; Scarpi, Emanuela; Azzariti, Amalia; Mangia, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the expression of proteins involved in DNA damage response could improve knowledge of the pathways that contribute to familial and sporadic breast cancer (BC). We aimed to assess the different roles of BRCA1, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1), BRCT-repeat inhibitor of hTERT expression (BRIT1) and novel SWItch 5 (SWI5) expression in 130 sporadic and 73 familial BC samples, by immunohistochemistry. In the sporadic group, negative nuclear BRCA1 (nBRCA1) expression was associated with positive PgR (p = 0.037). Negative association was found between nBRCA1 expression and HER2 (p = 0.001). In the familial group, nBRCA1 expression was associated with ER (p = 0.002). Reduced nBRCA1 expression was associated with higher histological grade and positive Ki67 both in sporadic (p = 0.0010, p = 0.047) and familial groups (p < 0.001, p = 0.001). Nuclear PARP1 (nPARP1) expression was associated with histological grade (p = 0.035) and positive PgR (p = 0.047) in sporadic cases. High cytoplasmic and low nuclear BRIT1 (cBRIT1 and nBRIT1) expression were associated with high histological grade in the familial group (p = 0.013, p = 0.025). Various statistical associations between the protein expressions were observed in the sporadic group, while in familial group only few associations were found. Univariate analyses showed that nPARP1 expression is able to discriminate between sporadic and familial tumors (OR 2.80, p = 0.002). Multivariate analyses proved that its overexpression is an independent factor associated with a high risk of sporadic tumor (OR 2.96, p = 0.017). Our findings indicate that nPARP1 expression is an independent factor for sporadic BCs and PARP1 inhibitors could be a promising therapy for different phenotypes. PMID:26205471

  9. Genome-wide analysis of the Zn(II)2Cys6 zinc cluster-encoding gene family in Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins with a Zn(II)2Cys6 domain, Cys-X2-Cys-X6-Cys-X5-12-Cys-X2-Cys-X6-9-Cys (hereafter, referred to as the C6 domain), form a subclass of zinc finger proteins found exclusively in fungi and yeast. Genome sequence databases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans have provided an overvie...

  10. Identification of an essential Caulobacter crescentus gene encoding a member of the Obg family of GTP-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Maddock, J; Bhatt, A; Koch, M; Skidmore, J

    1997-01-01

    We have identified an essential Caulobacter crescentus gene (cgtA) that encodes a member of a recently identified subfamily of GTPases (the Obg family) conserved from Bacteria to Archaea to humans. This evolutionary conservation between distantly related species suggests that this family of GTP-binding proteins possesses a fundamental, yet unknown, cellular role. In this report, we describe the isolation and sequence of the cgtA gene. The predicted CgtA protein displays striking similarity to the Obg family of small, monomeric GTP-binding proteins, both in the conserved guanine nucleotide-binding domains and throughout the N-terminal glycine-rich domain that is found in many members of the Obg family. Disruption of the cgtA gene was lethal, demonstrating that this gene is essential for cell growth. Immunoblot analysis revealed that CgtA protein levels remained constant throughout the C. crescentus cell cycle. PMID:9335292

  11. The BCL-2 protein family, BH3-mimetics and cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Delbridge, A R D; Strasser, A

    2015-01-01

    Escape from apoptosis is a key attribute of tumour cells and facilitates chemo-resistance. The ‘BCL-2-regulated' or ‘intrinsic' apoptotic pathway integrates stress and survival signalling to govern whether a cancer cell will live or die. Indeed, many pro-apoptotic members of the BCL-2 family have demonstrated tumour-suppression activity in mouse models of cancer and are lost or repressed in certain human cancers. Conversely, overexpression of pro-survival BCL-2 family members promotes tumorigenesis in humans and in mouse models. Many of the drugs currently used in the clinic mediate their therapeutic effects (at least in part) through the activation of the BCL-2-regulated apoptotic pathway. However, initiators of this apoptotic pathway, such as p53, are mutated, lost or silenced in many human cancers rendering them refractory to treatment. To counter such resistance mechanisms, a novel class of therapeutics, ‘BH3-mimetics', has been developed. These drugs directly activate apoptosis by binding and inhibiting select antiapoptotic BCL-2 family members and thereby bypass the requirement for upstream initiators, such as p53. In this review, we discuss the role of the BCL-2 protein family in the development and treatment of cancer, with an emphasis on mechanistic studies using well-established mouse models of cancer, before describing the development and already recognised potential of the BH3-mimetic compounds. PMID:25952548

  12. Cryo-EM structure of lysenin pore elucidates membrane insertion by an aerolysin family protein.

    PubMed

    Bokori-Brown, Monika; Martin, Thomas G; Naylor, Claire E; Basak, Ajit K; Titball, Richard W; Savva, Christos G

    2016-01-01

    Lysenin from the coelomic fluid of the earthworm Eisenia fetida belongs to the aerolysin family of small β-pore-forming toxins (β-PFTs), some members of which are pathogenic to humans and animals. Despite efforts, a high-resolution structure of a channel for this family of proteins has been elusive and therefore the mechanism of activation and membrane insertion remains unclear. Here we determine the pore structure of lysenin by single particle cryo-EM, to 3.1 Å resolution. The nonameric assembly reveals a long β-barrel channel spanning the length of the complex that, unexpectedly, includes the two pre-insertion strands flanking the hypothetical membrane-insertion loop. Examination of other members of the aerolysin family reveals high structural preservation in this region, indicating that the membrane-insertion pathway in this family is conserved. For some toxins, proteolytic activation and pro-peptide removal will facilitate unfolding of the pre-insertion strands, allowing them to form the β-barrel of the channel. PMID:27048994

  13. Getting away with murder: how do the BCL-2 family of proteins kill with immunity?

    PubMed Central

    Renault, Thibaud T.; Chipuk, Jerry E.

    2013-01-01

    About 1 million per second is the number of white blood cells the adult human body produces. However, only a small fraction of them will survive as the majority is eliminated through a genetically controlled form of cell death referred to as apoptosis. This review places into perspective recent studies pertaining to the BCL-2 family of proteins as critical regulators of the development and function of the immune system, with particular attention on B cell and T cell biology. Here we discuss how elegant murine model systems have revealed the major contributions of the BCL-2 family in establishing an effective immune system. Moreover, we highlight some key regulatory pathways that influence the expression, function, and stability of individual BCL-2 family members, and discuss their role in immunity. From deadly methods to more gentle manners, the final portion of the review discusses the non-apoptotic functions of the BCL-2 family and how they pertain to the control of immunity. PMID:23527542

  14. ANOs 3–7 in the anoctamin/Tmem16 Cl− channel family are intracellular proteins

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Charity; Qu, Zhiqiang; Osunkoya, Adeboye O.; Cui, Yuanyuan

    2012-01-01

    Ca2+-activated Cl− channels (CaCCs) participate in numerous physiological functions such as neuronal excitability, sensory transduction, and transepithelial fluid transport. Recently, it was shown that heterologously expressed anoctamins ANO1 and ANO2 generate currents that resemble native CaCCs. The anoctamin family (also called Tmem16) consists of 10 members, but it is not known whether all members of the family are CaCCs. Expression of ANOs 3–7 in HEK293 cells did not generate Cl− currents activated by intracellular Ca2+, as determined by whole cell patch clamp electrophysiology. With the use of confocal imaging, only ANO1 and ANO2 traffic to the plasma membrane when expressed heterologously. Furthermore, endogenously expressed ANO7 in the human prostate is predominantly intracellular. We took a chimeric approach to identify regions critical for channel trafficking and function. However, none of the chimeras of ANO1 and ANO5/7 that we made trafficked to the plasma membrane. Our results suggest that intracellular anoctamins may be endoplasmic reticulum proteins, although it remains unknown whether these family members are CaCCs. Determining the role of anoctamin family members in ion transport will be critical to understanding their functions in physiology and disease. PMID:22075693

  15. Cryo-EM structure of lysenin pore elucidates membrane insertion by an aerolysin family protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokori-Brown, Monika; Martin, Thomas G.; Naylor, Claire E.; Basak, Ajit K.; Titball, Richard W.; Savva, Christos G.

    2016-04-01

    Lysenin from the coelomic fluid of the earthworm Eisenia fetida belongs to the aerolysin family of small β-pore-forming toxins (β-PFTs), some members of which are pathogenic to humans and animals. Despite efforts, a high-resolution structure of a channel for this family of proteins has been elusive and therefore the mechanism of activation and membrane insertion remains unclear. Here we determine the pore structure of lysenin by single particle cryo-EM, to 3.1 Å resolution. The nonameric assembly reveals a long β-barrel channel spanning the length of the complex that, unexpectedly, includes the two pre-insertion strands flanking the hypothetical membrane-insertion loop. Examination of other members of the aerolysin family reveals high structural preservation in this region, indicating that the membrane-insertion pathway in this family is conserved. For some toxins, proteolytic activation and pro-peptide removal will facilitate unfolding of the pre-insertion strands, allowing them to form the β-barrel of the channel.

  16. Cryo-EM structure of lysenin pore elucidates membrane insertion by an aerolysin family protein

    PubMed Central

    Bokori-Brown, Monika; Martin, Thomas G.; Naylor, Claire E.; Basak, Ajit K.; Titball, Richard W.; Savva, Christos G.

    2016-01-01

    Lysenin from the coelomic fluid of the earthworm Eisenia fetida belongs to the aerolysin family of small β-pore-forming toxins (β-PFTs), some members of which are pathogenic to humans and animals. Despite efforts, a high-resolution structure of a channel for this family of proteins has been elusive and therefore the mechanism of activation and membrane insertion remains unclear. Here we determine the pore structure of lysenin by single particle cryo-EM, to 3.1 Å resolution. The nonameric assembly reveals a long β-barrel channel spanning the length of the complex that, unexpectedly, includes the two pre-insertion strands flanking the hypothetical membrane-insertion loop. Examination of other members of the aerolysin family reveals high structural preservation in this region, indicating that the membrane-insertion pathway in this family is conserved. For some toxins, proteolytic activation and pro-peptide removal will facilitate unfolding of the pre-insertion strands, allowing them to form the β-barrel of the channel. PMID:27048994

  17. Divergence of genes encoding non-specific lipid transfer proteins in the poaceae family.

    PubMed

    Jang, Cheol Seong; Jung, Jae Hyeong; Yim, Won Cheol; Lee, Byung-Moo; Seo, Yong Weon; Kim, Wook

    2007-10-31

    The genes encoding non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs), members of a small multigene family, show a complex pattern of expressional regulation, suggesting that some diversification may have resulted from changes in their expression after duplication. In this study, the evolution of nsLTP genes within the Poaceae family was characterized via a survey of the pseudogenes and unigenes encoding the nsLTP in rice pseudomolecules and the NCBI unigene database. nsLTP-rich regions were detected in the distal portions of rice chromosomes 11 and 12; these may have resulted from the most recent large segmental duplication in the rice genome. Two independent tandem duplications were shown to occur within the nsLTP-rich regions of rice. The genomic distribution of the nsLTP genes in the rice genome differs from that in wheat. This may be attributed to gene migration, chromosomal rearrangement, and/or differential gene loss. The genomic distribution pattern of nsLTP genes in the Poaceae family points to the existence of some differences among cereal nsLTP genes, all of which diverged from an ancient gene. The unigenes encoding nsLTPs in each cereal species are clustered into five groups. The somewhat different distribution of nsLTP-encoding EST clones between the groups across cereal species imply that independent duplication(s) followed by subfunctionalization (and/or neofunctionalization) of the nsLTP gene family in each species occurred during speciation. PMID:17978574

  18. An insight into the sialome of Anopheles funestus reveals an emerging pattern in anopheline salivary protein families.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Eric; Dao, Adama; Pham, Van M; Ribeiro, José M C

    2007-02-01

    Anopheles funestus, together with Anopheles gambiae, is responsible for most malaria transmission in sub-Saharan Africa, but little is known about molecular aspects of its biology. To investigate the salivary repertoire of this mosquito, we randomly sequenced 916 clones from a salivary-gland cDNA library from adult female F1 offspring of field-caught An. funestus. Thirty-three protein sequences, mostly full-length transcripts, are predicted to be secreted salivary proteins. We additionally describe 25 full-length housekeeping-associated transcripts. In accumulating mosquito sialotranscriptome information--which includes An. gambiae, Anopheles stephensi, Anopheles darlingi, Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus, Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus, and now An. funestus--a pattern is emerging. First, ubiquitous protein families are recruited for a salivary role, such as members of the antigen-5 family and enzymes of nucleotide and carbohydrate catabolism. Second, a group of protein families exclusive to blood-feeding Nematocera includes the abundantly expressed D7 proteins also found in sand flies and Culicoides. A third group of proteins, only found in Culicidae, includes the 30 kDa allergen family and several mucins. Finally, 10 protein and peptide families, five of them multigenic, are exclusive to anophelines. Among these proteins may reside good epidemiological markers to measure human exposure to anopheline species such as An. funestus and An. gambiae. PMID:17244545

  19. Expression, localisation and phylogeny of a novel family of plant-specific membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kasaras, A; Kunze, R

    2010-09-01

    In a screen for senescence-associated genes in Arabidopsis thaliana, a novel, highly up-regulated membrane protein was identified. It is a member of an uncharacterised, strictly plant-specific gene family and was named AtDMP1 (Arabidopsis thaliana DUF679 domain membrane protein 1). The AtDMP proteins are predicted to have four transmembrane spans, with cytosolic amino- and carboxy-termini. In this study, we investigated the phylogenetic distribution of DMP proteins, their tissue-specific expression and subcellular localisation in A. thaliana. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Physcomitrella patens genomes in dicots contain only a single DMP gene copy, whereas there are five to 13 DMP genes and 11-16 in monocots, many of which supposedly result from recent gene duplications. The ubiquitous occurrence of DMP proteins in green plants and their absence from other kingdoms suggest a role in plant-specific processes. In A. thaliana, expression of nine out of ten DMP genes was detected. The expression patterns were found to be markedly tissue- and development-specific; thus, functional redundancy of most proteins is unlikely. The occurrence of several AtDMPs in tissues undergoing senescence (AtDMP1, -3, -4), dehiscence (AtDMP7) or abscission (AtDMP2, -4, -7) suggests involvement of DMPs in different types of programmed cell death. AtDMP-eGFP fusion proteins were found to localise either to the endoplasmic reticulum, the tonoplast or, under certain conditions, to both membrane systems. Further investigations are in progress to elucidate functions of the AtDMP proteins. PMID:20712629

  20. Mechanisms Directing the Nuclear Localization of the CtBP Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Verger, Alexis; Quinlan, Kate G. R.; Crofts, Linda A.; Spanò, Stefania; Corda, Daniela; Kable, Eleanor P. W.; Braet, Filip; Crossley, Merlin

    2006-01-01

    The C-terminal binding protein (CtBP) family includes four proteins (CtBP1 [CtBP1-L], CtBP3/BARS [CtBP1-S], CtBP2, and RIBEYE) which are implicated both in transcriptional repression and in intracellular trafficking. However, the precise mechanisms by which different CtBP proteins are targeted to different subcellular regions remains unknown. Here, we report that the nuclear import of the various CtBP proteins and splice isoforms is differentially regulated. We show that CtBP2 contains a unique nuclear localization signal (NLS) located within its N-terminal region, which contributes to its nuclear accumulation. Using heterokaryon assays, we show that CtBP2 is capable of shuttling between the nucleus and cytoplasm of the cell. Moreover, CtBP2 can heterodimerize with CtBP1-L and CtBP1-S and direct them to the nucleus. This effect strongly depends on the CtBP2 NLS. PXDLS motif-containing transcription factors, such as BKLF, that bind CtBP proteins can also direct them to the nucleus. We also report the identification of a splice isoform of CtBP2, CtBP2-S, that lacks the N-terminal NLS and localizes to the cytoplasm. Finally, we show that mutation of the CtBP NADH binding site impairs the ability of the proteins to dimerize and to associate with BKLF. This reduces the nuclear accumulation of CtBP1. Our results suggest a model in which the nuclear localization of CtBP proteins is influenced by the CtBP2 NLS, by binding to PXDLS motif partner proteins, and through the effect of NADH on CtBP dimerization. PMID:16782877

  1. Evolutionary Diversification of the Sm Family of RNA-Associated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The Sm family of proteins is closely associated with RNA metabolism throughout all life. These proteins form homomorphic and heteromorphic rings consisting of six or seven subunits with a characteristic central pore, the presence of which is critical for binding U-rich regions of single-stranded RNA. Eubacteria and Archaea typically carry one or two forms of Sm proteins and assemble one homomorphic ring per Sm protein. Eukaryotes typically carry 16 or more Sm proteins that assemble to form heteromorphic rings which lie at the center of a number of critical RNA-associated small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs). High Sm protein diversity and heteromorphic Sm rings are features stretching back to the origin of eukaryotes; very deep phylogenetic divisions among existing Sm proteins indicate simultaneous evolution across essentially all existing eukaryotic life. Two basic forms of heteromorphic Sm rings are found in eukaryotes. Fixed Sm rings are highly stable and static and are assembled around an RNA cofactor. Flexible Sm rings also stabilize and chaperone RNA but assemble in the absence of an RNA substrate and, more significantly, associate with and dissociate from RNA substrates more freely than fixed rings. This suggests that the conformation of flexible Sm rings might be modified in some specific manner to facilitate association and dissociation with RNA. Diversification of eukaryotic Sm proteins may have been initiated by gene transfers and/or genome clashes that accompanied the origin of the eukaryotic cell itself, with further diversification driven by a greater need for steric specificity within increasingly complex snRNPs. PMID:18687770

  2. A New Family of Giardial Cysteine-Rich Non-VSP Protein Genes and a Novel Cyst Protein

    PubMed Central

    Birkeland, Shanda R.; Preheim, Sarah P.; Cipriano, Michael J.; McArthur, Andrew G.; Gillin, Frances D.

    2006-01-01

    Since the Giardia lamblia cyst wall is necessary for survival in the environment and host infection, we tested the hypothesis that it contains proteins other than the three known cyst wall proteins. Serial analysis of gene expression during growth and encystation revealed a gene, “HCNCp” (High Cysteine Non-variant Cyst protein), that was upregulated late in encystation, and that resembled the classic Giardia variable surface proteins (VSPs) that cover the trophozoite plasmalemma. HCNCp is 13.9% cysteine, with many “CxxC” tetrapeptide motifs and a transmembrane sequence near the C-terminus. However, HCNCp has multiple “CxC” motifs rarely found in VSPs, and does not localize to the trophozoite plasmalemma. Moreover, the HCNCp C-terminus differed from the canonical VSP signature. Full-length epitope-tagged HCNCp expressed under its own promoter was upregulated during encystation with highest expression in cysts, including 42 and 21 kDa C-terminal fragments. Tagged HCNCp targeted to the nuclear envelope in trophozoites, and co-localized with cyst proteins to encystation-specific secretory vesicles during encystation. HCNCp defined a novel trafficking pathway as it localized to the wall and body of cysts, while the cyst proteins were exclusively in the wall. Unlike VSPs, HCNCp is expressed in at least five giardial strains and four WB subclones expressing different VSPs. Bioinformatics identified 60 additional large high cysteine membrane proteins (HCMp) containing ≥20 CxxC/CxC's lacking the VSP-specific C-terminal CRGKA. HCMp were absent or rare in other model or parasite genomes, except for Tetrahymena thermophila with 30. MEME analysis classified the 61 gHCMp genes into nine groups with similar internal motifs. Our data suggest that HCNCp is a novel invariant cyst protein belonging to a new HCMp family that is abundant in the Giardia genome. HCNCp and the other HCMp provide a rich source for developing parasite-specific diagnostic reagents, vaccine

  3. Selection and sequence analysis of a cDNA clone encoding a known chorion protein of the A family.

    PubMed Central

    Tsitilou, S G; Regier, J C; Kafatos, F C

    1980-01-01

    Using as criteria the size, abundance and developmental specificity of hybridizing mRNA sequences, we have selected from our chorion cDNA library a clone corresponding to a specific chorion protein, A4--cl. Comparison between the clone sequence and the largely known sequence of A4--cl validates the use of the cDNA library for sequence analysis of the chorion multigene families. The two major chorion protein families, A and B, share certain structural similarities. Images PMID:7433133

  4. Xanthorrhizol induced DNA fragmentation in HepG2 cells involving Bcl-2 family proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Tee, Thiam-Tsui; Cheah, Yew-Hoong; Meenakshii, Nallappan; Mohd Sharom, Mohd Yusof; Azimahtol Hawariah, Lope Pihie

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We isolated xanthorrhizol, a sesquiterpenoid compound from Curcuma xanthorrhiza. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Xanthorrhizol induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells as observed using SEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Apoptosis in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells involved Bcl-2 family proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA fragmentation was observed in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA fragmentation maybe due to cleavage of PARP and DFF45/ICAD proteins. -- Abstract: Xanthorrhizol is a plant-derived pharmacologically active sesquiterpenoid compound isolated from Curcuma xanthorrhiza. Previously, we have reported that xanthorrhizol inhibited the proliferation of HepG2 human hepatoma cells by inducing apoptotic cell death via caspase activation. Here, we attempt to further elucidate the mode of action of xanthorrhizol. Apoptosis in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells as observed by scanning electron microscopy was accompanied by truncation of BID; reduction of both anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-X{sub L} expression; cleavage of PARP and DFF45/ICAD proteins and DNA fragmentation. Taken together, these results suggest xanthorrhizol as a potent antiproliferative agent on HepG2 cells by inducing apoptosis via Bcl-2 family members. Hence we proposed that xanthorrhizol could be used as an anti-liver cancer drug for future studies.

  5. The actinin family of actin cross-linking proteins - a genetic perspective.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Anita C H; Young, Paul W

    2015-01-01

    Actinins are one of the major actin cross-linking proteins found in virtually all cell types and are the ancestral proteins of a larger family that includes spectrin, dystrophin and utrophin. Invertebrates have a single actinin-encoding ACTN gene, while mammals have four. Mutations in all four human genes have now been linked to heritable diseases or traits. ACTN1 mutations cause macrothrombocytopenia, a platelet disorder characterized by excessive bleeding. ACTN2 mutations have been linked to a range of cardiomyopathies, and ACTN4 mutations cause a kidney condition called focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Intriguingly, approximately 16 % of people worldwide are homozygous for a nonsense mutation in ACTN3 that abolishes actinin-3 protein expression. This ACTN3 null allele has undergone recent positive selection in specific human populations, which may be linked to improved endurance and adaptation to colder climates. In this review we discuss the human genetics of the ACTN gene family, as well as ACTN gene knockout studies in several model organisms. Observations from both of these areas provide insights into the evolution and cellular functions of actinins. PMID:26312134

  6. Emerging role of rhomboid family proteins in mammalian biology and disease.

    PubMed

    Bergbold, Nina; Lemberg, Marius K

    2013-12-01

    From proteases that cleave peptide bonds in the plane of the membrane, rhomboids have evolved into a heterogeneous superfamily with a wide range of different mechanistic properties. In mammals 14 family members have been annotated based on a shared conserved membrane-integral rhomboid core domain, including intramembrane serine proteases and diverse proteolytically inactive homologues. While the function of rhomboid proteases is the proteolytic release of membrane-tethered factors, rhomboid pseudoproteases including iRhoms and derlins interact with their clients without cleaving them. It has become evident that specific recognition of membrane protein substrates and clients by the rhomboid fold reflects a spectrum of cellular functions ranging from growth factor activation, trafficking control to membrane protein degradation. This review summarizes recent progress on rhomboid family proteins in the mammalian secretory pathway and raises the question whether they can be seen as new drug targets for inflammatory diseases and cancer. This article is part of a special issue entitled: Intramembrane Proteases. PMID:23562403

  7. The InterPro database, an integrated documentation resource for protein families, domains and functional sites.

    PubMed

    Apweiler, R; Attwood, T K; Bairoch, A; Bateman, A; Birney, E; Biswas, M; Bucher, P; Cerutti, L; Corpet, F; Croning, M D; Durbin, R; Falquet, L; Fleischmann, W; Gouzy, J; Hermjakob, H; Hulo, N; Jonassen, I; Kahn, D; Kanapin, A; Karavidopoulou, Y; Lopez, R; Marx, B; Mulder, N J; Oinn, T M; Pagni, M; Servant, F; Sigrist, C J; Zdobnov, E M

    2001-01-01

    Signature databases are vital tools for identifying distant relationships in novel sequences and hence for inferring protein function. InterPro is an integrated documentation resource for protein families, domains and functional sites, which amalgamates the efforts of the PROSITE, PRINTS, Pfam and ProDom database projects. Each InterPro entry includes a functional description, annotation, literature references and links back to the relevant member database(s). Release 2.0 of InterPro (October 2000) contains over 3000 entries, representing families, domains, repeats and sites of post-translational modification encoded by a total of 6804 different regular expressions, profiles, fingerprints and Hidden Markov Models. Each InterPro entry lists all the matches against SWISS-PROT and TrEMBL (more than 1,000,000 hits from 462,500 proteins in SWISS-PROT and TrEMBL). The database is accessible for text- and sequence-based searches at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/interpro/. Questions can be emailed to interhelp@ebi.ac.uk. PMID:11125043

  8. The InterPro database, an integrated documentation resource for protein families, domains and functional sites

    PubMed Central

    Apweiler, R.; Attwood, T. K.; Bairoch, A.; Bateman, A.; Birney, E.; Biswas, M.; Bucher, P.; Cerutti, L.; Corpet, F.; Croning, M. D. R.; Durbin, R.; Falquet, L.; Fleischmann, W.; Gouzy, J.; Hermjakob, H.; Hulo, N.; Jonassen, I.; Kahn, D.; Kanapin, A.; Karavidopoulou, Y.; Lopez, R.; Marx, B.; Mulder, N. J.; Oinn, T. M.; Pagni, M.; Servant, F.; Sigrist, C. J. A.; Zdobnov, E. M.

    2001-01-01

    Signature databases are vital tools for identifying distant relationships in novel sequences and hence for inferring protein function. InterPro is an integrated documentation resource for protein families, domains and functional sites, which amalgamates the efforts of the PROSITE, PRINTS, Pfam and ProDom database projects. Each InterPro entry includes a functional description, annotation, literature references and links back to the relevant member database(s). Release 2.0 of InterPro (October 2000) contains over 3000 entries, representing families, domains, repeats and sites of post-translational modification encoded by a total of 6804 different regular expressions, profiles, fingerprints and Hidden Markov Models. Each InterPro entry lists all the matches against SWISS-PROT and TrEMBL (more than 1 000 000 hits from 462 500 proteins in SWISS-PROT and TrEMBL). The database is accessible for text- and sequence-based searches at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/interpro/. Questions can be emailed to interhelp@ebi.ac.uk. PMID:11125043

  9. Functions and regulation of the multitasking FANCM family of DNA motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xiaoyu; Sung, Patrick; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2015-01-01

    Members of the conserved FANCM family of DNA motor proteins play key roles in genome maintenance processes. FANCM supports genome duplication and repair under different circumstances and also functions in the ATR-mediated DNA damage checkpoint. Some of these roles are shared among lower eukaryotic family members. Human FANCM has been linked to Fanconi anemia, a syndrome characterized by cancer predisposition, developmental disorder, and bone marrow failure. Recent studies on human FANCM and its orthologs from other organisms have provided insights into their biological functions, regulation, and collaboration with other genome maintenance factors. This review summarizes the progress made, with the goal of providing an integrated view of the functions and regulation of these enzymes in humans and model organisms and how they advance our understanding of genome maintenance processes. PMID:26341555

  10. Ancient intron insertion sites and palindromic genomic duplication evolutionally shapes an elementally functioning membrane protein family

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka-Kunishima, Motoko; Ishida, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Kunitaro; Honda, Motoo; Oonuma, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    Background In spite of the recent accumulation of genomic data, the evolutionary pathway in the individual genes of present-day living taxa is still elusive for most genes. Among ion channels, inward K+ rectifier (IRK) channels are the fundamental and well-defined protein group. We analyzed the genomic structures of this group and compared them among a phylogenetically wide range with our sequenced Halocynthia roretzi, a tunicate, IRK genomic genes. Results A total of 131 IRK genomic genes were analyzed. The phylogenic trees of amino acid sequences revealed a clear diversification of deuterostomic IRKs from protostomic IRKs and suggested that the tunicate IRKs are possibly representatives of the descendants of ancestor forms of three major groups of IRKs in the vertebrate. However, the exon-intron structures of the tunicate IRK genomes showed considerable similarities to those of Caenorhabditis. In the vertebrate clade, the members in each major group increased at least four times those in the tunicate by various types of global gene duplication. The generation of some major groups was inferred to be due to anti-tandem (palindromic) duplication in early history. The intron insertion points greatly decreased during the evolution of the vertebrates, remaining as a unique conservation of an intron insertion site in the portion of protein-protein interaction within the coding regions of all vertebrate G-protein-activated IRK genes. Conclusion From the genomic survey of a family of IRK genes, it was suggested that the ancient intron insertion sites and the unique palindromic genomic duplication evolutionally shaped this membrane protein family. PMID:17708769

  11. Hormone signaling linked to silkmoth sex pheromone biosynthesis involves Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-mediated phosphorylation of the insect PAT family protein Bombyx mori lipid storage droplet protein-1(BmLsd)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The structurally-related members of the PAT family of proteins, which are so name based on similarity amongst perilipin, adipophilin/adipocyte differentiation-related protein (ADRP), and tail-interacting protein of 47 kilodaltons (TIP47), are cytoplasmic lipid droplet (LD)-associated proteins charac...

  12. Consequences of splice variation on Secretin family G protein-coupled receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Furness, Sebastian GB; Wootten, Denise; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M

    2012-01-01

    The Secretin family of GPCRs are endocrine peptide hormone receptors that share a common genomic organization and are the subject of a wide variety of alternative splicing. All GPCRs contain a central seven transmembrane domain responsible for transducing signals from the outside of the cell as well as extracellular amino and intracellular carboxyl termini. Members of the Secretin receptor family have a relatively large N-terminus and a variety of lines of evidence support a common mode of ligand binding and a common ligand binding fold. These receptors are best characterized as coupling to intracellular signalling pathways via Gαs and Gαq but are also reported to couple to a multitude of other signalling pathways. The intracellular loops are implicated in regulating the interaction between the receptor and heterotrimeric G protein complexes. Alternative splicing of exons encoding both the extracellular N-terminal domain as well as the extracellular loops of some family members has been reported and as expected these splice variants display altered ligand affinity as well as differential activation by endogenous ligands. Various forms of alternative splicing have also been reported to alter intracellular loops 1 and 3 as well as the C-terminus and as one might expect these display differences in signalling bias towards downstream effectors. These diverse pharmacologies require that the physiological role of these splice variants be addressed but should provide unique opportunities for drug design and development. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Secretin Family (Class B) G Protein-Coupled Receptors. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.166.issue-1 PMID:21718310

  13. Protein family and fold occurrence in genomes: power-law behaviour and evolutionary model.

    PubMed

    Qian, J; Luscombe, N M; Gerstein, M

    2001-11-01

    Global surveys of genomes measure the usage of essential molecular parts, defined here as protein families, superfamilies or folds, in different organisms. Based on surveys of the first 20 completely sequenced genomes, we observe that the occurrence of these parts follows a power-law distribution. That is, the number of distinct parts (F) with a given genomic occurrence (V) decays as F=aV(-b), with a few parts occurring many times and most occurring infrequently. For a given organism, the distributions of families, superfamilies and folds are nearly identical, and this is reflected in the size of the decay exponent b. Moreover, the exponent varies between different organisms, with those of smaller genomes displaying a steeper decay (i.e. larger b). Clearly, the power law indicates a preference to duplicate genes that encode for molecular parts which are already common. Here, we present a minimal, but biologically meaningful model that accurately describes the observed power law. Although the model performs equally well for all three protein classes, we focus on the occurrence of folds in preference to families and superfamilies. This is because folds are comparatively insensitive to the effects of point mutations that can cause a family member to diverge beyond detectable similarity. In the model, genomes evolve through two basic operations: (i) duplication of existing genes; (ii) net flow of new genes. The flow term is closely related to the exponent b and can accommodate considerable gene loss; however, we demonstrate that the observed data is reproduced best with a net inflow, i.e. with more gene gain than loss. Moreover, we show that prokaryotes have much higher rates of gene acquisition than eukaryotes, probably reflecting lateral transfer. A further natural outcome from our model is an estimation of the fold composition of the initial genome, which potentially relates to the common ancestor for modern organisms. Supplementary material pertaining to this work

  14. Functional Specialization Among Members Of Knickkopf Family Of Proteins In Insect Cuticle Organization

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Sujata S.; Moussian, Bernard; Specht, Charles A.; Arakane, Yasuyuki; Kramer, Karl J.; Beeman, Richard W.; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam

    2014-01-01

    Our recent study on the functional analysis of the Knickkopf protein from T. castaneum (TcKnk), indicated a novel role for this protein in protection of chitin from degradation by chitinases. Knk is also required for the laminar organization of chitin in the procuticle. During a bioinformatics search using this protein sequence as the query, we discovered the existence of a small family of three Knk-like genes (including the prototypical TcKnk) in the T. castaneum genome as well as in all insects with completed genome assemblies. The two additional Knk-like genes have been named TcKnk2 and TcKnk3. Further complexity arises as a result of alternative splicing and alternative polyadenylation of transcripts of TcKnk3, leading to the production of three transcripts (and by inference, three proteins) from this gene. These transcripts are named TcKnk3-Full Length (TcKnk3-FL), TcKnk3-5′ and TcKnk3-3′. All three Knk-family genes appear to have essential and non-redundant functions. RNAi for TcKnk led to developmental arrest at every molt, while down-regulation of either TcKnk2 or one of the three TcKnk3 transcripts (TcKnk3-3′) resulted in specific molting arrest only at the pharate adult stage. All three Knk genes appear to influence the total chitin content at the pharate adult stage, but to variable extents. While TcKnk contributes mostly to the stability and laminar organization of chitin in the elytral and body wall procuticles, proteins encoded by TcKnk2 and TcKnk3-3′ transcripts appear to be required for the integrity of the body wall denticles and tracheal taenidia, but not the elytral and body wall procuticles. Thus, the three members of the Knk-family of proteins perform different essential functions in cuticle formation at different developmental stages and in different parts of the insect anatomy. PMID:25144557

  15. Silkmoth chorion proteins: sequence analysis of the products of a multigene family.

    PubMed Central

    Regier, J C; Kafatos, F C; Goodfliesh, R; Hood, L

    1978-01-01

    Five polypeptide components have been isolated from the eggshell (chorions) of a silkmoth. Two are homogeneous on sodium dodecyl sulfate and isoelectric focusing gels, and three contain predominantly two proteins each. Amino acid analyses show that all five components are similar to each other. These proteins have been sequenced from the amino terminus. Homogeneous components yielded single sequences; heterogeneous components yielded two residues at some positions, consistent with their containing two major electrophoretic components. Striking similarities are apparent among all these sequences. These similarities can be increased dramatically by separating each of the three protein mixtures into two sequences and introducing a small number of gaps or insertions. This is due in part to bringing into register a portion that contains short repeating subunits found in all sequences. All proteins are also characterized by a region of high cysteine content near the amino terminus followed by a longer low-cysteine region. The data suggest that these proteins share a common evolutionary origin and are encoded by a multigene family. Images PMID:272655

  16. Evolutionary Implications and Physicochemical Analyses of Selected Proteins of Type III Polyketide Synthase Family

    PubMed Central

    Mallika, V.; Sivakumar, K.C.; Soniya, E.V.

    2011-01-01

    Type III polyketide synthases have a substantial role in the biosynthesis of various polyketides in plants and microorganisms. Comparative proteomic analysis of type III polyketide synthases showed evolutionarily and structurally related positions in a compilation of amino acid sequences from different families. Bacterial and fungal type III polyketide synthase proteins showed <50% similarity but in higher plants, it exhibited >80% among chalcone synthases and >70% in the case of non-chalcone synthases. In a consensus phylogenetic tree based on 1000 replicates; bacterial, fungal and plant proteins were clustered in separate groups. Proteins from bryophytes and pteridophytes grouped immediately near to the fungal cluster, demonstrated how evolutionary lineage has occurred among type III polyketide synthase proteins. Upon physicochemical analysis, it was observed that the proteins localized in the cytoplasm and were hydrophobic in nature. Molecular structural analysis revealed comparatively stable structure comprising of alpha helices and random coils as major structural components. It was found that there was a decline in the structural stability with active site mutation as prophesied by the in silico mutation studies. PMID:21697991

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv0899 defines a family of membrane proteins widespread in nitrogen-fixing bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Marassi, Francesca M.

    2011-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis membrane protein Rv0899 confers adaptation of the bacterium to acidic environments. Due to strong sequence homology of its C-terminus to bacterial OmpA-like domains, Rv0899 has been proposed to constitute an outer membrane porin of M. tuberculosis. However, OmpA-like domains are widespread in a wide variety of bacterial proteins with different functions. Furthermore, the three-dimensional structure of Rv0899 does not contain a transmembrane β-barrel, and recent evidence demonstrates that it does not have porin activity. Instead, the rv0899 gene is part of an operon (rv0899-rv0901) that is required for fast ammonia secretion, pH neutralization and growth of M. tuberculosis in acidic environments. The mechanism whereby these functions are accomplished is not known. To gain further functional insights, a targeted search of the genomic databases was performed for proteins with sequence similarity beyond the OmpA-like C-terminus. The results presented here, show that Rv0899-like proteins are widespread in bacteria with functions in nitrogen metabolism, adaptation to nutrient poor environments, and/or establishing symbiosis with the host organism, and appear to form a protein family. These findings suggest that M. tuberculosis Rv0899 may also assist similar processes and lend further support to its role in ammonia secretion and M. tuberculosis adaptation to the host environment. PMID:21905117

  18. Structural insights into nonvesicular lipid transport by the oxysterol binding protein homologue family.

    PubMed

    Tong, Junsen; Manik, Mohammad Kawsar; Yang, Huiseon; Im, Young Jun

    2016-08-01

    Sterols such as cholesterol in mammals and ergosterol in fungi are essential membrane components and play a key role in membrane function and in cell signaling. The intracellular distribution and processing of sterols and other phospholipids are in part carried out by oxysterol binding protein-related proteins (ORPs) in eukaryotes. Seven ORPs (Osh1-Osh7 proteins) in yeast have distinct functions in maintaining distribution, metabolism and signaling of intracellular lipids but they share at least one essential function. Significant progress has been made in understanding the ligand specificity and mechanism of non-vesicular lipid transport by ORPs. The unique structural features of Osh proteins explain the diversity and specificity of functions in PI(4)P-coupled lipid transport optimized in membrane contact sites. This review discusses the current advances in structural biology regarding this protein family and its potential functions, introducing them as the key players in the novel pathways of phosphoinositide-coupled directional transport of various lipids. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon. PMID:26784528

  19. A constitutive nucleolar protein identified as a member of the nucleoplasmin family.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Zachmann, M S; Hügle-Dörr, B; Franke, W W

    1987-01-01

    Using monoclonal antibodies we have localized a polypeptide, appearing on gel electrophoresis with a Mr of approximately 38,000 and a pI of approximately 5.6, to the granular component of the nucleoli of Xenopus laevis oocytes and a broad range of cells from various species. The protein (NO38) also occurs in certain distinct nucleoplasmic particles but is not detected in ribosomes and other cytoplasmic components. During mitosis NO38-containing material dissociates from the nucleolar organizer region and distributes over the chromosomal surfaces and the perichromosomal cytoplasm; in telophase it re-populates the forming nucleoli. With these antibodies we have isolated from a X. laevis ovary lambda gt11 expression library a cDNA clone encoding a polypeptide which, on one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, co-migrates with authentic NO38. The amino acid sequence deduced from this clone defines a polypeptide of 299 amino acids of mol. wt 33,531 which is characterized by the presence of two domains exceptionally rich in aspartic and glutamic acid, one of them flanked by two putative karyophilic signal heptapeptides. Comparison with other protein sequences shows that NO38 is closely related to the histone-binding, karyophilic protein nucleoplasmin: the first 124 amino acids have 58 amino acid positions in common. Protein NO38 also shows striking homologies to the phosphopeptide region of rat nucleolar protein B23 and the carboxyterminal region of human B23. We propose that protein NO38, which forms distinct homo-oligomers of approximately 7S and Mr of approximately 230,000, is a member of a family of karyophilic proteins, the 'nucleoplasmin family'. It is characterized by its specific association with the nucleolus and might be involved in nuclear accumulation, nucleolar storage and pre-rRNA assembly of ribosomal proteins in a manner similar to that discussed for the role of nucleoplasmin in histone storage and chromatin assembly. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3

  20. GapIII, a new brain-enriched member of the GTPase-activating protein family.

    PubMed

    Baba, H; Fuss, B; Urano, J; Poullet, P; Watson, J B; Tamanoi, F; Macklin, W B

    1995-08-15

    Ras GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) are negative regulators of ras, which controls proliferation and differentiation in many cells. Ras GAPs have been found in a variety of species from yeast to mammals. We describe here a newly identified mammalian GAP, GapIII, which was obtained by differential screening of a rat oligodendrocyte cDNA library. GapIII putatively encodes a 834 amino acid protein with a predicted molecular weight of 96 kDa, which contains a consensus GAP-related domain (GRD). The protein encoded by this cDNA has high homology with Gap1m, which was recently identified as a putative mammalian homolog of Drosophila Gap1. These proteins contain three structural domains, an N-terminal calcium-dependent phospholipid binding domain, GRD, and a C-terminal PH/Btk domain. Because of the sequence homology and the structural similarities of this protein with Gap1m, we hypothesize that GapIII and Gap1m may be members of a mammalian GAP gene family, separate from p120GAP, neurofibromin (NF1), and IQGAP. To confirm the GapIII protein activity, constructs containing different GapIII-GRD domains were transformed into iral mutant yeast to determine their relative ability to replace IRA1 functionally. Constructs that contained essentially the full-length protein (all three domains), the GRD alone, or the GRD plus PH/Btk domain suppressed heat shock sensitivity of ira1, whereas constructs that contained the GRD with part of the PH/Btk domain had only a weak ability to suppress heat shock sensitivity. These results suggest that the GapIII GRD itself is sufficient to down-regulate ras proteins in yeast. Expression of GapIII mRNA (4.2 kb) was examined by Northern analysis and in situ hybridization. This mRNA was expressed at highest levels in the brain, where its expression increased with development. Lower levels of the mRNA were expressed in the spleen and lung. Among neural cells, GapIII mRNA was expressed in neurons and oligodendrocytes, but not in astrocytes

  1. Paired box mutations in familial and sporadic aniridia predicts truncated aniridia proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Martha, A.; Ferrell, R. E.; Mintz-Hittner, H.; Lyons, L. A.; Saunders, G. F.

    1994-01-01

    Aniridia, an autosomal dominant ocular disorder characterized by iris hypoplasia, results from mutations in the PAX6 gene, which encodes paired box and homeobox motifs. In this report we describe five new mutations in the paired box region of the human PAX6 gene that are associated with aniridia. The paired box mutations that we detected were in both familial (three) and sporadic (two) cases. All five mutations predict truncated PAX6 proteins. Our study indicates that early premature translational termination mutations in the PAX6 gene result in haploinsufficiency and generate the aniridia phenotype. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7909985

  2. Photocontrolled Exposure of Pro-apoptotic Peptide Sequences in LOV Proteins Modulates Bcl-2 Family Interactions.

    PubMed

    Mart, Robert J; Meah, Dilruba; Allemann, Rudolf K

    2016-04-15

    LOV domains act as biomolecular sensors for light, oxygen or the environment's redox potential. Conformational changes upon the formation of a covalent cysteinyl flavin adduct are propagated through hydrogen-bonding networks in the core of designed hybrid phototropin LOV2 domains that incorporate the Bcl homology region 3 (BH3) of the key pro-apoptotic protein BH3-interacting-domain death agonist (BID). The resulting change in conformation of a flanking amphiphilic α-helix creates a light-dependent optogenetic tool for the modulation of interactions with the anti-apoptotic B-cell leukaemia-2 (Bcl-2) family member Bcl-xL . PMID:26493687

  3. DUF538 protein super family is predicted to be the potential homologue of bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein in plant system.

    PubMed

    Gholizadeh, Ashraf; Kohnehrouz, Samira Baghban

    2013-03-01

    DUF538 protein super family includes a number of plant proteins that their role is not yet clear. These proteins have been frequently reported to be expressed in plants under various stressful stimuli such as bacteria and elicitors. In order to further understand about this protein family we utilized bioinformatics tools to analyze its structure in details. As a result, plants DUF538 was predicted to be the partial structural homologue of BPI (bactericidal/permeability increasing) proteins in mammalian innate immune system that provides the first line of defense against different pathogens including bacteria, fungi, viruses and parasites. Moreover, on the base of the experimental data, it was identified that exogenously applied purified fused product of Celosia DUF538 affects the bacterial growth more possibly similar to BPI through the binding to the bacterial membranes. In conclusion, as the first ever time report, we nominated DUF538 protein family as the potential structural and functional homologue of BPI protein in plants, providing a basis to study the novel functions of this protein family in the biological systems in the future. PMID:23456176

  4. Activation of family C G-protein-coupled receptors by the tripeptide glutathione.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minghua; Yao, Yi; Kuang, Donghui; Hampson, David R

    2006-03-31

    The Family C G-protein-coupled receptors include the metabotropic glutamate receptors, the gamma-aminobutyric acid, type B (GABAB) receptor, the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), which participates in the regulation of calcium homeostasis in the body, and a diverse group of sensory receptors that encompass the amino acid-activated fish 5.24 chemosensory receptor, the mammalian T1R taste receptors, and the V2R pheromone receptors. A common feature of Family C receptors is the presence of an amino acid binding site. In this study, a preliminary in silico analysis of the size and shape of the amino acid binding pocket in selected Family C receptors suggested that some members of this family could accommodate larger ligands such as peptides. Subsequent screening and docking experiments identified GSH as a potential ligand or co-ligand at the fish 5.24 receptor and the rat CaSR. These in silico predictions were confirmed using an [3H]GSH radioligand binding assay and a fluorescence-based functional assay performed on wild-type and chimeric receptors. Glutathione was shown to act as an orthosteric agonist at the 5.24 receptor and as a potent enhancer of calcium-induced activation of the CaSR. Within the mammalian receptors, this effect was specific to the CaSR because GSH neither directly activated nor potentiated other Family C receptors including GPRC6A (the putative mammalian homolog of the fish 5.24 receptor), the metabotropic glutamate receptors, or the GABAB receptor. Our findings reveal a potential new role for GSH and suggest that this peptide may act as an endogenous modulator of the CaSR in the parathyroid gland where this receptor is known to control the release of parathyroid hormone, and in other tissues such as the brain and gastrointestinal tract where the role of the calcium receptor appears to subserve other, as yet unknown, physiological functions. PMID:16455645

  5. Spider Glue Proteins Have Distinct Architectures Compared with Traditional Spidroin Family Members*

    PubMed Central

    Vasanthavada, Keshav; Hu, Xiaoyi; Tuton-Blasingame, Tiffany; Hsia, Yang; Sampath, Sujatha; Pacheco, Ryan; Freeark, Jordan; Falick, Arnold M.; Tang, Simon; Fong, Justine; Kohler, Kristin; La Mattina-Hawkins, Coby; Vierra, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive spider glues are required to perform a variety of tasks, including web construction, prey capture, and locomotion. To date, little is known regarding the molecular and structural features of spider glue proteins, in particular bioadhesives that interconnect dragline or scaffolding silks during three-dimensional web construction. Here we use biochemical and structural approaches to identify and characterize two aggregate gland specific gene products, AgSF1 and AgSF2, and demonstrate that these proteins co-localize to the connection joints of both webs and wrapping silks spun from the black widow spider, Latrodectus hesperus. Protein architectures are markedly divergent between AgSF1 and AgSF2, as well as traditional spider silk fibroin family members, suggesting connection joints consist of a complex proteinaceous network. AgSF2 represents a nonglycosylated 40-kDa protein that has novel internal amino acid block repeats with the consensus sequence NVNVN embedded in a glycine-rich matrix. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of AgSF1 reveals pentameric QPGSG iterations that are similar to conserved modular elements within mammalian elastin, a rubber-like elastomeric protein that interfaces with collagen. Wet-spinning methodology using purified recombinant proteins show AgSF1 has the potential to self-assemble into fibers. X-ray fiber diffraction studies performed on these synthetic fibers reveal the presence of noncrystalline domains that resemble classical rubber networks. Collectively, these data support that the aggregate gland serves to extrude a protein mixture that contains substances that allow for the self-assembly of fiber-like structures that interface with dragline silks to mediate prey capture. PMID:22927444

  6. T cell inactivation by poxviral B22 family proteins increases viral virulence.

    PubMed

    Alzhanova, Dina; Hammarlund, Erika; Reed, Jason; Meermeier, Erin; Rawlings, Stephanie; Ray, Caroline A; Edwards, David M; Bimber, Ben; Legasse, Alfred; Planer, Shannon; Sprague, Jerald; Axthelm, Michael K; Pickup, David J; Lewinsohn, David M; Gold, Marielle C; Wong, Scott W; Sacha, Jonah B; Slifka, Mark K; Früh, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    Infections with monkeypox, cowpox and weaponized variola virus remain a threat to the increasingly unvaccinated human population, but little is known about their mechanisms of virulence and immune evasion. We now demonstrate that B22 proteins, encoded by the largest genes of these viruses, render human T cells unresponsive to stimulation of the T cell receptor by MHC-dependent antigen presentation or by MHC-independent stimulation. In contrast, stimuli that bypass TCR-signaling are not inhibited. In a non-human primate model of monkeypox, virus lacking the B22R homologue (MPXVΔ197) caused only mild disease with lower viremia and cutaneous pox lesions compared to wild type MPXV which caused high viremia, morbidity and mortality. Since MPXVΔ197-infected animals displayed accelerated T cell responses and less T cell dysregulation than MPXV US2003, we conclude that B22 family proteins cause viral virulence by suppressing T cell control of viral dissemination. PMID:24832205

  7. Predicting the reactivity of proteins from their sequence alone: Kazal family of protein inhibitors of serine proteinases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Stephen M.; Lu, Wuyuan; Qasim, M. A.; Anderson, Stephen; Apostol, Izydor; Ardelt, Wojciech; Bigler, Theresa; Chiang, Yi Wen; Cook, James; James, Michael N. G.; Kato, Ikunoshin; Kelly, Clyde; Kohr, William; Komiyama, Tomoko; Lin, Tiao-Yin; Ogawa, Michio; Otlewski, Jacek; Park, Soon-Jae; Qasim, Sabiha; Ranjbar, Michael; Tashiro, Misao; Warne, Nicholas; Whatley, Harry; Wieczorek, Anna; Wieczorek, Maciej; Wilusz, Tadeusz; Wynn, Richard; Zhang, Wenlei; Laskowski, Michael

    2001-01-01

    An additivity-based sequence to reactivity algorithm for the interaction of members of the Kazal family of protein inhibitors with six selected serine proteinases is described. Ten consensus variable contact positions in the inhibitor were identified, and the 19 possible variants at each of these positions were expressed. The free energies of interaction of these variants and the wild type were measured. For an additive system, this data set allows for the calculation of all possible sequences, subject to some restrictions. The algorithm was extensively tested. It is exceptionally fast so that all possible sequences can be predicted. The strongest, the most specific possible, and the least specific inhibitors were designed, and an evolutionary problem was solved. PMID:11171964

  8. Elucidating the Activation Mechanism of the Insulin-Family Proteins with Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Papaioannou, Anastasios; Kuyucak, Serdar; Kuncic, Zdenka

    2016-01-01

    The insulin-family proteins bind to their own receptors, but insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) can also bind to the A isoform of the insulin receptor (IR-A), activating unique and alternative signaling pathways from those of insulin. Although extensive studies of insulin have revealed that its activation is associated with the opening of the B chain-C terminal (BC-CT), the activation mechanism of the insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) still remains unknown. Here, we present the first comprehensive study of the insulin-family proteins comparing their activation process and mechanism using molecular dynamics simulations to reveal new insights into their specificity to the insulin receptor. We have found that all the proteins appear to exhibit similar stochastic dynamics in their conformational change to an active state. For the IGFs, our simulations show that activation involves two opening locations: the opening of the BC-CT section away from the core, similar to insulin; and the additional opening of the BC-CT section away from the C domain. Furthermore, we have found that these two openings occur simultaneously in IGF-I, but not in IGF-II, where they can occur independently. This suggests that the BC-CT section and the C domain behave as a unified domain in IGF-I, but as two independent domains in IGF-II during the activation process, implying that the IGFs undergo different activation mechanisms for receptor binding. The probabilities of the active and inactive states of the proteins suggest that IGF-II is hyperactive compared to IGF-I. The hinge residue and the hydrophobic interactions in the core are found to play a critical role in the stability and activity of IGFs. Overall, our simulations have elucidated the crucial differences and similarities in the activation mechanisms of the insulin-family proteins, providing new insights into the molecular mechanisms responsible for the observed differences between IGF-I and IGF-II in receptor binding. PMID

  9. The Aspergillus fumigatus Damage Resistance Protein Family Coordinately Regulates Ergosterol Biosynthesis and Azole Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jinxing; Zhai, Pengfei; Zhang, Yuanwei; Zhang, Caiyun; Sang, Hong; Han, Guanzhu; Keller, Nancy P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ergosterol is a major and specific component of the fungal plasma membrane, and thus, the cytochrome P450 enzymes (Erg proteins) that catalyze ergosterol synthesis have been selected as valuable targets of azole antifungals. However, the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus has developed worldwide resistance to azoles largely through mutations in the cytochrome P450 enzyme Cyp51 (Erg11). In this study, we demonstrate that a cytochrome b5-like heme-binding damage resistance protein (Dap) family, comprised of DapA, DapB, and DapC, coordinately regulates the functionality of cytochrome P450 enzymes Erg5 and Erg11 and oppositely affects susceptibility to azoles. The expression of all three genes is induced in an azole concentration-dependent way, and the decreased susceptibility to azoles requires DapA stabilization of cytochrome P450 protein activity. In contrast, overexpression of DapB and DapC causes dysfunction of Erg5 and Erg11, resulting in abnormal accumulation of sterol intermediates and further accentuating the sensitivity of ΔdapA strains to azoles. The results of exogenous-hemin rescue and heme-binding-site mutagenesis experiments demonstrate that the heme binding of DapA contributes the decreased azole susceptibility, while DapB and -C are capable of reducing the activities of Erg5 and Erg11 through depletion of heme. In vivo data demonstrate that inactivated DapA combined with activated DapB yields an A. fumigatus mutant that is easily treatable with azoles in an immunocompromised mouse model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Compared to the single Dap proteins found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we suggest that this complex Dap family regulatory system emerged during the evolution of fungi as an adaptive means to regulate ergosterol synthesis in response to environmental stimuli. PMID:26908577

  10. Channel Catfish, Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque 1818, Tetraspanin Membrane Protein Family: Characterization and Expression Analysis of CD81 cDNA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CD81, also known as the target of an antiproliferative antibody 1 (TAPA-1), is a member of tetraspanin integral membrane protein family. This protein plays many important roles in immune functions. In this report, we characterized and analyzed expression of the channel catfish CD81 transcript. T...

  11. Role of EBNA-3 Family Proteins in EBV Associated B-cell Lymphomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Shaoni; Ghosh Roy, Shatadru; Bose, Priyanka; Saha, Abhik

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is highly ubiquitous in human population and establishes a lifelong asymptomatic infection within the infected host unless the immune system is compromised. Following initial infection in the oropharyngeal epithelial cells, EBV primarily infects naive B-lymphocytes and develops a number of B-cell lymphomas particularly in immune-deficient individuals. In vitro, EBV can also infect and subsequently transform quiescent B-lymphocytes into continuously proliferating lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) resembling EBV-induced lymphoproliferative disorders in which a subset of latent transcripts are detected. Genetic studies revealed that EBNA-3 family comprising of three adjacent genes in the viral genome—EBNA-3A and -3C, but not -3B, are critical for B-cell transformation. Nevertheless, all three proteins appear to significantly contribute to maintain the overall proliferation and viability of transformed cells, suggesting a critical role in lymphoma development. Apart from functioning as important viral transcriptional regulators, EBNA-3 proteins associate with many cellular proteins in different signaling networks, providing a suitable platform for lifelong survival of the virus and concurrent lymphoma development in the infected host. The chapter describes the function of each these EBV nuclear antigen 3 proteins employed by the virus as a means to understand viral pathogenesis of several EBV-associated B-cell malignancies. PMID:27092119

  12. Mechanistic Insights into Reversible Photoactivation in Proteins of the GFP Family

    PubMed Central

    Gayda, Susan; Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Light-controlled modification of the fluorescence emission properties of proteins of the GFP family is of crucial importance for many imaging applications including superresolution microscopy. Here, we have studied the reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein mIrisGFP using optical spectroscopy. By analyzing the pH dependence of isomerization and protonation equilibria and the isomerization kinetics, we have obtained insight into the coupling of the chromophore to the surrounding protein moiety and a better understanding of the photoswitching mechanism. A different acid-base environment of the chromophore’s protonating group in its two isomeric forms, which can be inferred from the x-ray structures of IrisFP, is key to the photoswitching function and ensures that isomerization and protonation are correlated. Amino acids near the chromophore, especially Glu212, rearrange upon isomerization, and Glu212 protonation modulates the chromophore pKa. In mIrisGFP, the cis chromophore protonates in two steps, with pKcis of 5.3 and 6, which is much lower than pKtrans (>10). Based on these results, we have put forward a mechanistic scheme that explains how the combination of isomeric and acid-base properties of the chromophore in its protein environment can produce negative and positive photoswitching modes. PMID:23260054

  13. Overview of OVATE FAMILY PROTEINS, A Novel Class of Plant-Specific Growth Regulators.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shucai; Chang, Ying; Ellis, Brian

    2016-01-01

    OVATE FAMILY PROTEINS (OFPs) are a class of proteins with a conserved OVATE domain. OVATE protein was first identified in tomato as a key regulator of fruit shape. OFPs are plant-specific proteins that are widely distributed in the plant kingdom including mosses and lycophytes. Transcriptional activity analysis of Arabidopsis OFPs (AtOFPs) in protoplasts suggests that they act as transcription repressors. Functional characterization of OFPs from different plant species including Arabidopsis, rice, tomato, pepper, and banana suggests that OFPs regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development, which is likely achieved by interacting with different types of transcription factors including the KNOX and BELL classes, and/or directly regulating the expression of target genes such as Gibberellin 20 oxidase (GA20ox). Here, we examine how OVATE was originally identified, summarize recent progress in elucidation of the roles of OFPs in regulating plant growth and development, and describe possible mechanisms underpinning this regulation. Finally, we review potential new research directions that could shed additional light on the functional biology of OFPs in plants. PMID:27065353

  14. Overview of OVATE FAMILY PROTEINS, A Novel Class of Plant-Specific Growth Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shucai; Chang, Ying; Ellis, Brian

    2016-01-01

    OVATE FAMILY PROTEINS (OFPs) are a class of proteins with a conserved OVATE domain. OVATE protein was first identified in tomato as a key regulator of fruit shape. OFPs are plant-specific proteins that are widely distributed in the plant kingdom including mosses and lycophytes. Transcriptional activity analysis of Arabidopsis OFPs (AtOFPs) in protoplasts suggests that they act as transcription repressors. Functional characterization of OFPs from different plant species including Arabidopsis, rice, tomato, pepper, and banana suggests that OFPs regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development, which is likely achieved by interacting with different types of transcription factors including the KNOX and BELL classes, and/or directly regulating the expression of target genes such as Gibberellin 20 oxidase (GA20ox). Here, we examine how OVATE was originally identified, summarize recent progress in elucidation of the roles of OFPs in regulating plant growth and development, and describe possible mechanisms underpinning this regulation. Finally, we review potential new research directions that could shed additional light on the functional biology of OFPs in plants. PMID:27065353

  15. OSBP-Related Protein Family in Lipid Transport Over Membrane Contact Sites

    PubMed Central

    Olkkonen, Vesa M.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that oxysterol-binding protein-related proteins (ORPs) localize at membrane contact sites, which are high-capacity platforms for inter-organelle exchange of small molecules and information. ORPs can simultaneously associate with the two apposed membranes and transfer lipids across the interbilayer gap. Oxysterol-binding protein moves cholesterol from the endoplasmic reticulum to trans-Golgi, driven by the retrograde transport of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI4P). Analogously, yeast Osh6p mediates the transport of phosphatidylserine from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane in exchange for PI4P, and ORP5 and -8 are suggested to execute similar functions in mammalian cells. ORPs may share the capacity to bind PI4P within their ligand-binding domain, prompting the hypothesis that bidirectional transport of a phosphoinositide and another lipid may be a common theme among the protein family. This model, however, needs more experimental support and does not exclude a function of ORPs in lipid signaling. PMID:26715851

  16. Six Subgroups and Extensive Recent Duplications Characterize the Evolution of the Eukaryotic Tubulin Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Findeisen, Peggy; Mühlhausen, Stefanie; Dempewolf, Silke; Hertzog, Jonny; Zietlow, Alexander; Carlomagno, Teresa; Kollmar, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Tubulins belong to the most abundant proteins in eukaryotes providing the backbone for many cellular substructures like the mitotic and meiotic spindles, the intracellular cytoskeletal network, and the axonemes of cilia and flagella. Homologs have even been reported for archaea and bacteria. However, a taxonomically broad and whole-genome-based analysis of the tubulin protein family has never been performed, and thus, the number of subfamilies, their taxonomic distribution, and the exact grouping of the supposed archaeal and bacterial homologs are unknown. Here, we present the analysis of 3,524 tubulins from 504 species. The tubulins formed six major subfamilies, α to ζ. Species of all major kingdoms of the eukaryotes encode members of these subfamilies implying that they must have already been present in the last common eukaryotic ancestor. The proposed archaeal homologs grouped together with the bacterial TubZ proteins as sister clade to the FtsZ proteins indicating that tubulins are unique to eukaryotes. Most species contained α- and/or β-tubulin gene duplicates resulting from recent branch- and species-specific duplication events. This shows that tubulins cannot be used for constructing species phylogenies without resolving their ortholog–paralog relationships. The many gene duplicates and also the independent loss of the δ-, ε-, or ζ-tubulins, which have been shown to be part of the triplet microtubules in basal bodies, suggest that tubulins can functionally substitute each other. PMID:25169981

  17. The CRMP Family of Proteins and Their Role in Sema3A Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Eric F.; Strittmatter, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    The CRMP proteins were originally identified as mediators of Sema3A signaling and neuronal differentiation. Much has been learned about the mechanism by which CRMPs regulate cellular responses to Sema3A. In this review, the evidence for CRMP as a component of the Sema3A signaling cascade and the modulation of CRMP by plexin and phosphorylation are considered. In addition, current knowledge of the function of CRMP in a variety of cellular processes, including regulation of the cytoskeleton and endocytosis, is discussed in relationship to the mechanisms of axonal growth cone Sema3A response. The secreted protein Sema3A (collapsin-1) was the first identified vertebrate semaphorin. Sema3A acts primarily as a repulsive axon guidance cue, and can cause a dramatic collapse of the growth cone lamellipodium. This process results from the redistribution of the F-actin cytoskeleton1,2 and endocytosis of the growth cone cell membrane.2–4 Neuropilin-1 (NP1) and members of the class A plexins (PlexA) form a Sema3A receptor complex, with NP1 serving as a high-affinity ligand binding partner, and PlexA transducing the signal into the cell via its large intracellular domain. Although the effect of Sema3A on growth cones was first described nearly 15 years ago, the intracellular signaling pathways that lead to the cellular effects have only recently begun to be understood. Monomeric G-proteins, various kinases, the redox protein, MICAL, and protein turnover have all been implicated in PlexA transduction. In addition, the collapsin-response-mediator protein (CRMP) family of cytosolic phosphoproteins plays a crucial role in Sema3A/NP1/PlexA signal transduction. Current knowledge regarding CRMP functions are reviewed here. PMID:17607942

  18. Trichinella spiralis: genome database searches for the presence and immunolocalization of protein disulphide isomerase family members.

    PubMed

    Freitas, C P; Clemente, I; Mendes, T; Novo, C

    2016-01-01

    The formation of nurse cells in host muscle cells during Trichinella spiralis infection is a key step in the infective mechanism. Collagen trimerization is set up via disulphide bond formation, catalysed by protein disulphide isomerase (PDI). In T. spiralis, some PDI family members have been identified but no localization is described and no antibodies specific for T. spiralis PDIs are available. In this work, computational approaches were used to search for non-described PDIs in the T. spiralis genome database and to check the cross-reactivity of commercial anti-human antibodies with T. spiralis orthologues. In addition to a previously described PDI (PDIA2), endoplasmic reticulum protein (ERp57/PDIA3), ERp72/PDIA4, and the molecular chaperones calreticulin (CRT), calnexin (CNX) and immunoglobulin-binding protein/glucose-regulated protein (BIP/GRP78), we identified orthologues of the human thioredoxin-related-transmembrane proteins (TMX1, TMX2 and TMX3) in the genome protein database, as well as ERp44 (PDIA10) and endoplasmic reticulum disulphide reductase (ERdj5/PDIA19). Immunocytochemical staining of paraffin sections of muscle infected by T. spiralis enabled us to localize some orthologues of the human PDIs (PDIA3 and TMX1) and the chaperone GRP78. A theoretical three-dimensional model for T. spiralis PDIA3 was constructed. The localization and characteristics of the predicted linear B-cell epitopes and amino acid sequence of the immunogens used for commercial production of anti-human PDIA3 antibodies validated the use of these antibodies for the immunolocalization of T. spiralis PDIA3 orthologues. These results suggest that further study of the role of the PDIs and chaperones during nurse cell formation is desirable. PMID:25475092

  19. Rhizavidin from Rhizobium etli: the first natural dimer in the avidin protein family

    PubMed Central

    Helppolainen, Satu H.; Nurminen, Kirsi P.; Määttä, Juha A. E.; Halling, Katrin K.; Slotte, J. Peter; Huhtala, Tuulia; Liimatainen, Timo; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Airenne, Kari J.; Närvänen, Ale; Jänis, Janne; Vainiotalo, Pirjo; Valjakka, Jarkko; Kulomaa, Markku S.; Nordlund, Henri R.

    2007-01-01

    Rhizobium etli CFN42 is a symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacterium of the common bean Phaseolus vulgaris. The symbiotic plasmid p42d of R. etli comprises a gene encoding a putative (strept)avidin-like protein, named rhizavidin. The amino acid sequence identity of rhizavidin in relation to other known avidin-like proteins is 20–30%. The amino acid residues involved in the (strept)avidin–biotin interaction are well conserved in rhizavidin. The structural and functional properties of rhizavidin were carefully studied, and we found that rhizavidin shares characteristics with bradavidin, streptavidin and avidin. However, we found that it is the first naturally occurring dimeric protein in the avidin protein family, in contrast with tetrameric (strept)avidin and bradavidin. Moreover, it possesses a proline residue after a flexible loop (GGSG) in a position close to Trp-110 in avidin, which is an important biotin-binding residue. [3H]Biotin dissociation and ITC (isothermal titration calorimetry) experiments showed dimeric rhizavidin to be a high-affinity biotin-binding protein. Its thermal stability was lower than that of avidin; although similar to streptavidin, it was insensitive to proteinase K. The immunological cross-reactivity of rhizavidin was tested with human serum samples obtained from cancer patients exposed to (strept)avidin. No significant cross-reactivity was observed. The biodistribution of the protein was studied by SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography) imaging in rats. Similarly to avidin, rhizavidin was observed to accumulate rapidly, mainly in the liver. Evidently, rhizavidin could be used as a complement to (strept)avidin in (strept)avidin–biotin technology. PMID:17447892

  20. Crystal structure of the YajQ-family protein XC_3703 from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhixin; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Jun

    2016-09-01

    As an important bacterial second messenger, bis-(3',5')-cyclic diguanylate (cyclic di-GMP or c-di-GMP) has been implicated in numerous biological activities, including biofilm formation, motility, survival and virulence. These processes are manipulated by the binding of c-di-GMP to its receptors. XC_3703 from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, which belongs to the YajQ family of proteins, has recently been identified as a potential c-di-GMP receptor. XC_3703, together with XC_2801, functions as a transcription factor activating virulence-related genes, which can be reversed by the binding of c-di-GMP to XC_3703. However, the structural basis of how c-di-GMP regulates XC_3703 remains elusive. In this study, the structure of XC_3703 was determined to 2.1 Å resolution using the molecular-replacement method. The structure of XC_3703 consists of two domains adopting the same topology, which is similar to that of the RNA-recognition motif (RRM). Arg65, which is conserved among the c-di-GMP-binding subfamily of the YajQ family of proteins, together with Phe80 in domain II, forms a putative c-di-GMP binding site. PMID:27599864

  1. The Plasmodium PHIST and RESA-Like Protein Families of Human and Rodent Malaria Parasites.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Cristina K; Naissant, Bernina; Coppi, Alida; Bennett, Brandy L; Aime, Elena; Franke-Fayard, Blandine; Janse, Chris J; Coppens, Isabelle; Sinnis, Photini; Templeton, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    The phist gene family has members identified across the Plasmodium genus, defined by the presence of a domain of roughly 150 amino acids having conserved aromatic residues and an all alpha-helical structure. The family is highly amplified in P. falciparum, with 65 predicted genes in the genome of the 3D7 isolate. In contrast, in the rodent malaria parasite P. berghei 3 genes are identified, one of which is an apparent pseudogene. Transcripts of the P. berghei phist genes are predominant in schizonts, whereas in P. falciparum transcript profiles span different asexual blood stages and gametocytes. We pursued targeted disruption of P. berghei phist genes in order to characterize a simplistic model for the expanded phist gene repertoire in P. falciparum. Unsuccessful attempts to disrupt P. berghei PBANKA_114540 suggest that this phist gene is essential, while knockout of phist PBANKA_122900 shows an apparent normal progression and non-essential function throughout the life cycle. Epitope-tagging of P. falciparum and P. berghei phist genes confirmed protein export to the erythrocyte cytoplasm and localization with a punctate pattern. Three P. berghei PEXEL/HT-positive exported proteins exhibit at least partial co-localization, in support of a common vesicular compartment in the cytoplasm of erythrocytes infected with rodent malaria parasites. PMID:27022937

  2. Worniu, a Snail family zinc-finger protein, is required for brain development in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Shovon I; Ganguly, Atish; Roote, John; Ip, Y Tony

    2004-10-01

    The Snail family of zinc-finger transcriptional repressors is essential for morphogenetic cell movements, mesoderm formation, and neurogenesis during embryonic development. These proteins also control cell cycle, cell death, and cancer progression. In Drosophila, three members of this protein family, Snail, Escargot, and Worniu, have essential but redundant functions in asymmetric cell division of neuroblasts. In addition, Snail is critical for early mesoderm formation and Escargot is required for maintaining diploidy in wing imaginal disc cells. In this report, we demonstrate that Worniu plays a role in brain development. We show that alleles of the l(2)35Da complementation group are mutants of worniu. The developing larvae of these mutant alleles fail to shorten their brainstems. The brain phenotype, as well as the lethality, of these mutants can be rescued by worniu transgenes. Moreover, RNAi experiments targeting the worniu transcript show the same nonshortening phenotype in larval brains. worniu is expressed in the neuroblasts of brain hemispheres and ventral ganglions. The results suggest that the loss of Worniu function within the neuroblasts ultimately causes the larval brainstem to fail to go through shortening during development. PMID:15366015

  3. ADAM and ADAMTS Family Proteins and Snake Venom Metalloproteinases: A Structural Overview

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Soichi

    2016-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) family proteins constitute a major class of membrane-anchored multidomain proteinases that are responsible for the shedding of cell-surface protein ectodomains, including the latent forms of growth factors, cytokines, receptors and other molecules. Snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) are major components in most viper venoms. SVMPs are primarily responsible for hemorrhagic activity and may also interfere with the hemostatic system in envenomed animals. SVMPs are phylogenetically most closely related to ADAMs and, together with ADAMs and related ADAM with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) family proteinases, constitute adamalysins/reprolysins or the M12B clan (MEROPS database) of metalloproteinases. Although the catalytic domain structure is topologically similar to that of other metalloproteinases such as matrix metalloproteinases, the M12B proteinases have a modular structure with multiple non-catalytic ancillary domains that are not found in other proteinases. Notably, crystallographic studies revealed that, in addition to the conserved metalloproteinase domain, M12B members share a hallmark cysteine-rich domain designated as the “ADAM_CR” domain. Despite their name, ADAMTSs lack disintegrin-like structures and instead comprise two ADAM_CR domains. This review highlights the current state of our knowledge on the three-dimensional structures of M12B proteinases, focusing on their unique domains that may collaboratively participate in directing these proteinases to specific substrates. PMID:27196928

  4. Plant stress proteins of the thaumatin-like family discovered in animals.

    PubMed

    Brandazza, Anna; Angeli, Sergio; Tegoni, Mariella; Cambillau, Christian; Pelosi, Paolo

    2004-08-13

    Thaumatin-like proteins (TLPs) are polypeptides of about 200 residues synthesized by plants in response to fungal infection. In addition to the exceptionally strong sweet taste exhibited by some members, they are also reported to be endowed with endo-beta-1,3-glucanase activity and alpha-amylase inhibiting properties. However, the detailed mechanism of their antifungal action is not completely understood. So far, TLPs have only been described in plants, with several members of the family expressed in the same species. Here, for the first time in animals, we report the identification of two genes encoding members of the thaumatin-like proteins family in the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria and show their expression in different parts of the body. Southern blot and Western blot experiments revealed the presence of orthologous genes and their expression products in the related species Locusta migratoria. A search through the available genomes yielded similar sequences in the nematode Caenorhabditis but not in Drosophila and other insects. A three-dimensional model of S. gregaria TLP suggests a glucanase function. As in plants, TLPs could play a defense role in insects against pathogens. PMID:15304314

  5. ADAM and ADAMTS Family Proteins and Snake Venom Metalloproteinases: A Structural Overview.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Soichi

    2016-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) family proteins constitute a major class of membrane-anchored multidomain proteinases that are responsible for the shedding of cell-surface protein ectodomains, including the latent forms of growth factors, cytokines, receptors and other molecules. Snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) are major components in most viper venoms. SVMPs are primarily responsible for hemorrhagic activity and may also interfere with the hemostatic system in envenomed animals. SVMPs are phylogenetically most closely related to ADAMs and, together with ADAMs and related ADAM with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) family proteinases, constitute adamalysins/reprolysins or the M12B clan (MEROPS database) of metalloproteinases. Although the catalytic domain structure is topologically similar to that of other metalloproteinases such as matrix metalloproteinases, the M12B proteinases have a modular structure with multiple non-catalytic ancillary domains that are not found in other proteinases. Notably, crystallographic studies revealed that, in addition to the conserved metalloproteinase domain, M12B members share a hallmark cysteine-rich domain designated as the "ADAM_CR" domain. Despite their name, ADAMTSs lack disintegrin-like structures and instead comprise two ADAM_CR domains. This review highlights the current state of our knowledge on the three-dimensional structures of M12B proteinases, focusing on their unique domains that may collaboratively participate in directing these proteinases to specific substrates. PMID:27196928

  6. The Plasmodium PHIST and RESA-Like Protein Families of Human and Rodent Malaria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Cristina K.; Naissant, Bernina; Coppi, Alida; Bennett, Brandy L.; Aime, Elena; Franke-Fayard, Blandine; Janse, Chris J.; Coppens, Isabelle; Sinnis, Photini; Templeton, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    The phist gene family has members identified across the Plasmodium genus, defined by the presence of a domain of roughly 150 amino acids having conserved aromatic residues and an all alpha-helical structure. The family is highly amplified in P. falciparum, with 65 predicted genes in the genome of the 3D7 isolate. In contrast, in the rodent malaria parasite P. berghei 3 genes are identified, one of which is an apparent pseudogene. Transcripts of the P. berghei phist genes are predominant in schizonts, whereas in P. falciparum transcript profiles span different asexual blood stages and gametocytes. We pursued targeted disruption of P. berghei phist genes in order to characterize a simplistic model for the expanded phist gene repertoire in P. falciparum. Unsuccessful attempts to disrupt P. berghei PBANKA_114540 suggest that this phist gene is essential, while knockout of phist PBANKA_122900 shows an apparent normal progression and non-essential function throughout the life cycle. Epitope-tagging of P. falciparum and P. berghei phist genes confirmed protein export to the erythrocyte cytoplasm and localization with a punctate pattern. Three P. berghei PEXEL/HT-positive exported proteins exhibit at least partial co-localization, in support of a common vesicular compartment in the cytoplasm of erythrocytes infected with rodent malaria parasites. PMID:27022937

  7. Calcium-dependent Phospholipid Scramblase Activity of TMEM16 Protein Family Members*

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Jun; Fujii, Toshihiro; Imao, Takeshi; Ishihara, Kenji; Kuba, Hiroshi; Nagata, Shigekazu

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetrical distribution of phospholipids between the inner and outer plasma membrane leaflets is disrupted in various biological processes. We recently identified TMEM16F, an eight-transmembrane protein, as a Ca2+-dependent phospholipid scramblase that exposes phosphatidylserine (PS) to the cell surface. In this study, we established a mouse lymphocyte cell line with a floxed allele in the TMEM16F gene. When TMEM16F was deleted, these cells failed to expose PS in response to Ca2+ ionophore, but PS exposure was elicited by Fas ligand treatment. We expressed other TMEM16 proteins in the TMEM16F−/− cells and found that not only TMEM16F, but also 16C, 16D, 16G, and 16J work as lipid scramblases with different preference to lipid substrates. On the other hand, a patch clamp analysis in 293T cells indicated that TMEM16A and 16B, but not other family members, acted as Ca2+-dependent Cl− channels. These results indicated that among 10 TMEM16 family members, 7 members could be divided into two subfamilies, Ca2+-dependent Cl− channels (16A and 16B) and Ca2+-dependent lipid scramblases (16C, 16D, 16F, 16G, and 16J). PMID:23532839

  8. Elaboration, diversification and regulation of the Sir1 family of silencing proteins in Saccharomyces.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Jennifer E G; Babiarz, Joshua E; Teytelman, Leonid; Wolfe, Kenneth H; Rine, Jasper

    2009-04-01

    Heterochromatin renders domains of chromosomes transcriptionally silent and, due to clonal variation in its formation, can generate heritably distinct populations of genetically identical cells. Saccharomyces cerevisiae's Sir1 functions primarily in the establishment, but not the maintenance, of heterochromatic silencing at the HMR and HML loci. In several Saccharomyces species, we discovered multiple paralogs of Sir1, called Kos1-Kos4 (Kin of Sir1). The Kos and Sir1 proteins contributed partially overlapping functions to silencing of both cryptic mating loci in S. bayanus. Mutants of these paralogs reduced silencing at HML more than at HMR. Most genes of the SIR1 family were located near telomeres, and at least one paralog was regulated by telomere position effect. In S. cerevisiae, Sir1 is recruited to the silencers at HML and HMR via its ORC interacting region (OIR), which binds the bromo adjacent homology (BAH) domain of Orc1. Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, which diverged from Saccharomyces after the appearance of the silent mating cassettes, but before the whole-genome duplication, contained an ortholog of Kos3 that was apparently the archetypal member of the family, with only one OIR. In contrast, a duplication of this domain was present in all orthologs of Sir1, Kos1, Kos2, and Kos4. We propose that the functional specialization of Sir3, itself a paralog of Orc1, as a silencing protein was facilitated by the tandem duplication of the OIR domain in the Sir1 family, allowing distinct Sir1-Sir3 and Sir1-Orc1 interactions through OIR-BAH domain interactions. PMID:19171939

  9. Plant, Animal, and Fungal Micronutrient Queuosine Is Salvaged by Members of the DUF2419 Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Queuosine (Q) is a modification found at the wobble position of tRNAs with GUN anticodons. Although Q is present in most eukaryotes and bacteria, only bacteria can synthesize Q de novo. Eukaryotes acquire queuine (q), the free base of Q, from diet and/or microflora, making q an important but under-recognized micronutrient for plants, animals, and fungi. Eukaryotic type tRNA-guanine transglycosylases (eTGTs) are composed of a catalytic subunit (QTRT1) and a homologous accessory subunit (QTRTD1) forming a complex that catalyzes q insertion into target tRNAs. Phylogenetic analysis of eTGT subunits revealed a patchy distribution pattern in which gene losses occurred independently in different clades. Searches for genes co-distributing with eTGT family members identified DUF2419 as a potential Q salvage protein family. This prediction was experimentally validated in Schizosaccharomyces pombe by confirming that Q was present by analyzing tRNAAsp with anticodon GUC purified from wild-type cells and by showing that Q was absent from strains carrying deletions in the QTRT1 or DUF2419 encoding genes. DUF2419 proteins occur in most Eukarya with a few possible cases of horizontal gene transfer to bacteria. The universality of the DUF2419 function was confirmed by complementing the S. pombe mutant with the Zea mays (maize), human, and Sphaerobacter thermophilus homologues. The enzymatic function of this family is yet to be determined, but structural similarity with DNA glycosidases suggests a ribonucleoside hydrolase activity. PMID:24911101

  10. Identification and Expression of the Family of Classical Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatases in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    van Eekelen, Mark; Overvoorde, John; van Rooijen, Carina; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) have an important role in cell survival, differentiation, proliferation, migration and other cellular processes in conjunction with protein-tyrosine kinases. Still relatively little is known about the function of PTPs in vivo. We set out to systematically identify all classical PTPs in the zebrafish genome and characterize their expression patterns during zebrafish development. We identified 48 PTP genes in the zebrafish genome by BLASTing of human PTP sequences. We verified all in silico hits by sequencing and established the spatio-temporal expression patterns of all PTPs by in situ hybridization of zebrafish embryos at six distinct developmental stages. The zebrafish genome encodes 48 PTP genes. 14 human orthologs are duplicated in the zebrafish genome and 3 human orthologs were not identified. Based on sequence conservation, most zebrafish orthologues of human PTP genes were readily assigned. Interestingly, the duplicated form of ptpn23, a catalytically inactive PTP, has lost its PTP domain, indicating that PTP activity is not required for its function, or that ptpn23b has lost its PTP domain in the course of evolution. All 48 PTPs are expressed in zebrafish embryos. Most PTPs are maternally provided and are broadly expressed early on. PTP expression becomes progressively restricted during development. Interestingly, some duplicated genes retained their expression pattern, whereas expression of other duplicated genes was distinct or even mutually exclusive, suggesting that the function of the latter PTPs has diverged. In conclusion, we have identified all members of the family of classical PTPs in the zebrafish genome and established their expression patterns. This is the first time the expression patterns of all members of the large family of PTP genes have been established in a vertebrate. Our results provide the first step towards elucidation of the function of the family of classical PTPs. PMID:20838449

  11. Mutations in Centrosomal Protein CEP152 in Primary Microcephaly Families Linked to MCPH4

    PubMed Central

    Guernsey, Duane L.; Jiang, Haiyan; Hussin, Julie; Arnold, Marc; Bouyakdan, Khalil; Perry, Scott; Babineau-Sturk, Tina; Beis, Jill; Dumas, Nadine; Evans, Susan C.; Ferguson, Meghan; Matsuoka, Makoto; Macgillivray, Christine; Nightingale, Mathew; Patry, Lysanne; Rideout, Andrea L.; Thomas, Aidan; Orr, Andrew; Hoffmann, Ingrid; Michaud, Jacques L.; Awadalla, Philip; Meek, David C.; Ludman, Mark; Samuels, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    Primary microcephaly is a rare condition in which brain size is substantially diminished without other syndromic abnormalities. Seven autosomal loci have been genetically mapped, and the underlying causal genes have been identified for MCPH1, MCPH3, MCPH5, MCPH6, and MCPH7 but not for MCPH2 or MCPH4. The known genes play roles in mitosis and cell division. We ascertained three families from an Eastern Canadian subpopulation, each with one microcephalic child. Homozygosity analysis in two families using genome-wide dense SNP genotyping supported linkage to the published MCPH4 locus on chromosome 15q21.1. Sequencing of coding exons of candidate genes in the interval identified a nonconservative amino acid change in a highly conserved residue of the centrosomal protein CEP152. The affected children in these two families were both homozygous for this missense variant. The third affected child was compound heterozygous for the missense mutation plus a second, premature-termination mutation truncating a third of the protein and preventing its localization to centrosomes in transfected cells. CEP152 is the putative mammalian ortholog of Drosphila asterless, mutations in which affect mitosis in the fly. Published data from zebrafish are also consistent with a role of CEP152 in centrosome function. By RT-PCR, CEP152 is expressed in the embryonic mouse brain, similar to other MCPH genes. Like some other MCPH genes, CEP152 shows signatures of positive selection in the human lineage. CEP152 is a strong candidate for the causal gene underlying MCPH4 and may be an important gene in the evolution of human brain size. PMID:20598275

  12. Plant, animal, and fungal micronutrient queuosine is salvaged by members of the DUF2419 protein family.

    PubMed

    Zallot, Rémi; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Gaston, Kirk W; Forouhar, Farhad; Limbach, Patrick A; Hunt, John F; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie

    2014-08-15

    Queuosine (Q) is a modification found at the wobble position of tRNAs with GUN anticodons. Although Q is present in most eukaryotes and bacteria, only bacteria can synthesize Q de novo. Eukaryotes acquire queuine (q), the free base of Q, from diet and/or microflora, making q an important but under-recognized micronutrient for plants, animals, and fungi. Eukaryotic type tRNA-guanine transglycosylases (eTGTs) are composed of a catalytic subunit (QTRT1) and a homologous accessory subunit (QTRTD1) forming a complex that catalyzes q insertion into target tRNAs. Phylogenetic analysis of eTGT subunits revealed a patchy distribution pattern in which gene losses occurred independently in different clades. Searches for genes co-distributing with eTGT family members identified DUF2419 as a potential Q salvage protein family. This prediction was experimentally validated in Schizosaccharomyces pombe by confirming that Q was present by analyzing tRNA(Asp) with anticodon GUC purified from wild-type cells and by showing that Q was absent from strains carrying deletions in the QTRT1 or DUF2419 encoding genes. DUF2419 proteins occur in most Eukarya with a few possible cases of horizontal gene transfer to bacteria. The universality of the DUF2419 function was confirmed by complementing the S. pombe mutant with the Zea mays (maize), human, and Sphaerobacter thermophilus homologues. The enzymatic function of this family is yet to be determined, but structural similarity with DNA glycosidases suggests a ribonucleoside hydrolase activity. PMID:24911101

  13. The C1q Family of Proteins: Insights into the Emerging Non-Traditional Functions

    PubMed Central

    Ghebrehiwet, Berhane; Hosszu, Kinga K.; Valentino, Alisa; Peerschke, Ellinor I. B.

    2012-01-01

    Research conducted over the past 20 years have helped us unravel not only the hidden structural and functional subtleties of human C1q, but also has catapulted the molecule from a mere recognition unit of the classical pathway to a well-recognized molecular sensor of damage-modified self or non-self antigens. Thus, C1q is involved in a rapidly expanding list of pathological disorders – including autoimmunity, trophoblast migration, preeclampsia, and cancer. The results of two recent reports are provided to underscore the critical role C1q plays in health and disease. First is the observation by Singh et al. (2011) showing that pregnant C1q−/− mice recapitulate the key features of human preeclampsia that correlate with increased fetal death. Treatment of the C1q−/− mice with pravastatin restored trophoblast invasiveness, placental blood flow, and angiogenic balance and, thus, prevented the onset of preeclampsia. Second is the report by Hong et al. (2009) which showed that C1q can induce apoptosis of prostate cancer cells by activating the tumor suppressor molecule WW-domain containing oxydoreductase (WWOX or WOX1) and destabilizing cell adhesion. Downregulation of C1q on the other hand, enhanced prostate hyperplasia and cancer formation due to failure of WOX1 activation. C1q belongs to a family of structurally and functionally related TNF-α-like family of proteins that may have arisen from a common ancestral gene. Therefore C1q not only shares the diverse functions with the tumor necrosis factor family of proteins, but also explains why C1q has retained some of its ancestral “cytokine-like” activities. This review is intended to highlight some of the structural and functional aspects of C1q by underscoring the growing list of its non-traditional functions. PMID:22536204

  14. Luminescent quantum clusters of gold in transferrin family protein, lactoferrin exhibiting FRET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xavier, Paulrajpillai Lourdu; Chaudhari, Kamalesh; Verma, Pramod Kumar; Pal, Samir Kumar; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2010-12-01

    We report the synthesis of highly luminescent, water soluble quantum clusters (QCs) of gold, which are stabilized by an iron binding transferrin family protein, lactoferrin (Lf). The synthesized AuQC@Lfclusters were characterized using UV-Visiblespectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), photoluminescence (PL), matrix assisted laser desorption ionizationmass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), FTIR spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy along with picosecond-resolved lifetime measurements. Detailed investigations with FTIR and CD spectroscopy have revealed changes in the secondary structure of the protein in the cluster. We have also studied Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) occurring between the protein and the cluster. The ability of the clusters to sense cupric ions selectively at ppm concentrations was tested. The stability of clusters in widely varying pH conditions and their continued luminescence make it feasible for them to be used for intracellular imaging and molecular delivery, particularly in view of Lf protection.We report the synthesis of highly luminescent, water soluble quantum clusters (QCs) of gold, which are stabilized by an iron binding transferrin family protein, lactoferrin (Lf). The synthesized AuQC@Lfclusters were characterized using UV-Visiblespectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), photoluminescence (PL), matrix assisted laser desorption ionizationmass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), FTIR spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy along with picosecond-resolved lifetime measurements. Detailed investigations with FTIR and CD spectroscopy have revealed changes in the secondary structure of the protein in the cluster. We have also studied Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) occurring between the protein and the cluster. The ability of the clusters to sense cupric ions selectively at ppm concentrations was tested. The

  15. Investigating the Host Binding Signature on the Plasmodium falciparum PfEMP1 Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Janes, Joel H.; Wang, Christopher P.; Levin-Edens, Emily; Vigan-Womas, Inès; Guillotte, Micheline; Melcher, Martin; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Smith, Joseph D.

    2011-01-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family plays a central role in antigenic variation and cytoadhesion of P. falciparum infected erythrocytes. PfEMP1 proteins/var genes are classified into three main subfamilies (UpsA, UpsB, and UpsC) that are hypothesized to have different roles in binding and disease. To investigate whether these subfamilies have diverged in binding specificity and test if binding could be predicted by adhesion domain classification, we generated a panel of 19 parasite lines that primarily expressed a single dominant var transcript and assayed binding against 12 known host receptors. By limited dilution cloning, only UpsB and UpsC var genes were isolated, indicating that UpsA var gene expression is rare under in vitro culture conditions. Consequently, three UpsA variants were obtained by rosette purification and selection with specific monoclonal antibodies to create a more representative panel. Binding assays showed that CD36 was the most common adhesion partner of the parasite panel, followed by ICAM-1 and TSP-1, and that CD36 and ICAM-1 binding variants were highly predicted by adhesion domain sequence classification. Binding to other host receptors, including CSA, VCAM-1, HABP1, CD31/PECAM, E-selectin, Endoglin, CHO receptor “X”, and Fractalkine, was rare or absent. Our findings identify a category of larger PfEMP1 proteins that are under dual selection for ICAM-1 and CD36 binding. They also support that the UpsA group, in contrast to UpsB and UpsC var genes, has diverged from binding to the major microvasculature receptor CD36 and likely uses other mechanisms to sequester in the microvasculature. These results demonstrate that CD36 and ICAM-1 have left strong signatures of selection on the PfEMP1 family that can be detected by adhesion domain sequence classification and have implications for how this family of proteins is specializing to exploit hosts with varying levels of anti-malaria immunity. PMID

  16. Investigating the host binding signature on the Plasmodium falciparum PfEMP1 protein family.

    PubMed

    Janes, Joel H; Wang, Christopher P; Levin-Edens, Emily; Vigan-Womas, Inès; Guillotte, Micheline; Melcher, Martin; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Smith, Joseph D

    2011-05-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family plays a central role in antigenic variation and cytoadhesion of P. falciparum infected erythrocytes. PfEMP1 proteins/var genes are classified into three main subfamilies (UpsA, UpsB, and UpsC) that are hypothesized to have different roles in binding and disease. To investigate whether these subfamilies have diverged in binding specificity and test if binding could be predicted by adhesion domain classification, we generated a panel of 19 parasite lines that primarily expressed a single dominant var transcript and assayed binding against 12 known host receptors. By limited dilution cloning, only UpsB and UpsC var genes were isolated, indicating that UpsA var gene expression is rare under in vitro culture conditions. Consequently, three UpsA variants were obtained by rosette purification and selection with specific monoclonal antibodies to create a more representative panel. Binding assays showed that CD36 was the most common adhesion partner of the parasite panel, followed by ICAM-1 and TSP-1, and that CD36 and ICAM-1 binding variants were highly predicted by adhesion domain sequence classification. Binding to other host receptors, including CSA, VCAM-1, HABP1, CD31/PECAM, E-selectin, Endoglin, CHO receptor "X", and Fractalkine, was rare or absent. Our findings identify a category of larger PfEMP1 proteins that are under dual selection for ICAM-1 and CD36 binding. They also support that the UpsA group, in contrast to UpsB and UpsC var genes, has diverged from binding to the major microvasculature receptor CD36 and likely uses other mechanisms to sequester in the microvasculature. These results demonstrate that CD36 and ICAM-1 have left strong signatures of selection on the PfEMP1 family that can be detected by adhesion domain sequence classification and have implications for how this family of proteins is specializing to exploit hosts with varying levels of anti-malaria immunity. PMID:21573138

  17. Signalling to actin assembly via the WASP (Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein)-family proteins and the Arp2/3 complex.

    PubMed Central

    Millard, Thomas H; Sharp, Stewart J; Machesky, Laura M

    2004-01-01

    The assembly of a branched network of actin filaments provides the mechanical propulsion that drives a range of dynamic cellular processes, including cell motility. The Arp2/3 complex is a crucial component of such filament networks. Arp2/3 nucleates new actin filaments while bound to existing filaments, thus creating a branched network. In recent years, a number of proteins that activate the filament nucleation activity of Arp2/3 have been identified, most notably the WASP (Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein) family. WASP-family proteins activate the Arp2/3 complex, and consequently stimulate actin assembly, in response to extracellular signals. Structural studies have provided a significant refinement in our understanding of the molecular detail of how the Arp2/3 complex nucleates actin filaments. There has also been much progress towards an understanding of the complicated signalling processes that regulate WASP-family proteins. In addition, the use of gene disruption in a number of organisms has led to new insights into the specific functions of individual WASP-family members. The present review will discuss the Arp2/3 complex and its regulators, in particular the WASP-family proteins. Emphasis will be placed on recent developments in the field that have furthered our understanding of actin dynamics and cell motility. PMID:15040784

  18. A family of intermediate filament-like proteins is sequentially assembled into the cytoskeleton of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Anderson-White, Brooke R.; Ivey, F. Douglas; Cheng, Katherine; Szatanek, Tomasz; Lorestani, Alexander; Beckers, Con J.; Ferguson, David J.P.; Sahoo, Nivedita; Gubbels, Marc-Jan

    2010-01-01

    Summary The intracellular protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii divides by a unique process of internal budding that involves the assembly of two daughter cells within the mother. The cytoskeleton of Toxoplasma, which is composed of microtubules associated with an inner membrane complex (IMC), has an important role in this process. The IMC, which is directly under the plasma membrane, contains a set of flattened membranous sacs lined on the cytoplasmic side by a network of filamentous proteins. This network contains a family of intermediate filament-like proteins or IMC proteins. In order to elucidate the division process, we have characterized a 14-member sub-family of Toxoplasma IMC proteins that share a repeat motif found in proteins associated with the cortical alveoli in all alveolates. By creating fluorescent protein fusion reporters for the family members we determined the spatio-temporal patterns of all 14 IMC proteins through tachyzoite development. This revealed several distinct distribution patterns and some provide the basis for novel structural models such as the assembly of certain family members into the basal complex. Furthermore we identified IMC15 as an early marker of budding and, lastly, the dynamic patterns observed throughout cytokinesis provide a timeline for daughter parasite development and division. PMID:20698859

  19. Connexin 33: a rodent-specific member of the gap junction protein family?

    PubMed

    Fischer, Petra; Brehm, Ralph; Konrad, Lutz; Hartmann, Sonja; Kliesch, Sabine; Bohle, Rainer M; Bergmann, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Gap junctional intercellular communication between Sertoli cells and between Sertoli cells and spermatogonia is considered to play a key role in the regulation of both proliferation and differentiation of germ cells. A member of the gap junction protein family, Connexin 33 (cx33), probably has an inhibitory effect on the formation of gap junctions and so far it is the only cx that has been exclusively found in rat and mouse testes. Thus, this connexin seems to be a special member of the cx family. Using immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, polymerase chain reaction, and reverse transcription (RT)-PCR (tissue homogenate and microdissected cells), we studied the possible occurrence of cx33 at the protein, the DNA, and the RNA level in human testis. Whereas immunohistochemistry using the only commercially available anti-cx33 antibody showed similar labeling to the rat within the seminiferous epithelium, we could not find any further evidence for the existence of cx33 using Western blot analysis, PCR, and RT-PCR in human testis. Based on the demonstration of the staining pattern of mitochondria in human germ cells and on preabsorption studies, we could demonstrate anti-cx33 antibody cross-reacting with mitochondrial ferritin, a protein localized in the mitochondria of human testicular spermatids. Therefore, we were not able to abide by the suspicion that cx33 is present in human testis. Additionally, it was not possible to demonstrate cx33 via PCR and immunohistochemistry in the testis of different mammals (dog, cattle, pig, horse, and marmoset monkey) with normal spermatogenesis. These data indicate that cx33 seems to be the first rodent-specific testicular cx. PMID:15611570

  20. Comparative genomics of the family Vibrionaceae reveals the wide distribution of genes encoding virulence-associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Species of the family Vibrionaceae are ubiquitous in marine environments. Several of these species are important pathogens of humans and marine species. Evidence indicates that genetic exchange plays an important role in the emergence of new pathogenic strains within this family. Data from the sequenced genomes of strains in this family could show how the genes encoded by all these strains, known as the pangenome, are distributed. Information about the core, accessory and panproteome of this family can show how, for example, genes encoding virulence-associated proteins are distributed and help us understand how virulence emerges. Results We deduced the complete set of orthologs for eleven strains from this family. The core proteome consists of 1,882 orthologous groups, which is 28% of the 6,629 orthologous groups in this family. There were 4,411 accessory orthologous groups (i.e., proteins that occurred in from 2 to 10 proteomes) and 5,584 unique proteins (encoded once on only one of the eleven genomes). Proteins that have been associated with virulence in V. cholerae were widely distributed across the eleven genomes, but the majority was found only on the genomes of the two V. cholerae strains examined. Conclusions The proteomes are reflective of the differing evolutionary trajectories followed by different strains to similar phenotypes. The composition of the proteomes supports the notion that genetic exchange among species of the Vibrionaceae is widespread and that this exchange aids these species in adapting to their environments. PMID:20537180

  1. Biochemical Roles for Conserved Residues in the Bacterial Fatty Acid-binding Protein Family.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Tyler C; Miller, Darcie J; Jackson, Pamela; Nourse, Amanda; White, Stephen W; Rock, Charles O

    2016-03-18

    Fatty acid kinase (Fak) is a ubiquitous Gram-positive bacterial enzyme consisting of an ATP-binding protein (FakA) that phosphorylates the fatty acid bound to FakB. In Staphylococcus aureus, Fak is a global regulator of virulence factor transcription and is essential for the activation of exogenous fatty acids for incorporation into phospholipids. The 1.2-Å x-ray structure of S. aureus FakB2, activity assays, solution studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and in vivo complementation were used to define the functions of the five conserved residues that define the FakB protein family (Pfam02645). The fatty acid tail is buried within the protein, and the exposed carboxyl group is bound by a Ser-93-fatty acid carboxyl-Thr-61-His-266 hydrogen bond network. The guanidinium of the invariant Arg-170 is positioned to potentially interact with a bound acylphosphate. The reduced thermal denaturation temperatures of the T61A, S93A, and H266A FakB2 mutants illustrate the importance of the hydrogen bond network in protein stability. The FakB2 T61A, S93A, and H266A mutants are 1000-fold less active in the Fak assay, and the R170A mutant is completely inactive. All FakB2 mutants form FakA(FakB2)2 complexes except FakB2(R202A), which is deficient in FakA binding. Allelic replacement shows that strains expressing FakB2 mutants are defective in fatty acid incorporation into phospholipids and virulence gene transcription. These conserved residues are likely to perform the same critical functions in all bacterial fatty acid-binding proteins. PMID:26774272

  2. A new family of cyclophilins with an RNA recognition motif that interact with members of the trx/MLL protein family in Drosophila and human cells.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Melanie; Fair, Keri; Amero, Sally; Nelson, Stephanie; Harte, Peter J; Diaz, Manuel O

    2002-04-01

    A new family of cyclophilins with an RNA recognition motif (RRM) has members in vertebrates, roundworms and flatworms. We have identified a Drosophilacyclophilin, Dcyp33, with a high degree of amino acid sequence identity and similarity with other members of the family. Dcyp33 interacts through its RRM domain with the third PHD finger of trithorax. This interaction is conserved in the human homologues of these proteins, Cyp33 and MLL. Over expression of Dcyp33 in DrosophilaSL1 cells results in down-regulation of AbdominalB Hoxgene expression, mirroring the effect of human Cyp33 on the expression of human HOXgenes. PMID:11976948

  3. ST proteins, a new family of plant tandem repeat proteins with a DUF2775 domain mainly found in Fabaceae and Asteraceae

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many proteins with tandem repeats in their sequence have been described and classified according to the length of the repeats: I) Repeats of short oligopeptides (from 2 to 20 amino acids), including structural cell wall proteins and arabinogalactan proteins. II) Repeats that range in length from 20 to 40 residues, including proteins with a well-established three-dimensional structure often involved in mediating protein-protein interactions. (III) Longer repeats in the order of 100 amino acids that constitute structurally and functionally independent units. Here we analyse ShooT specific (ST) proteins, a family of proteins with tandem repeats of unknown function that were first found in Leguminosae, and their possible similarities to other proteins with tandem repeats. Results ST protein sequences were only found in dicotyledonous plants, limited to several plant families, mainly the Fabaceae and the Asteraceae. ST mRNAs accumulate mainly in the roots and under biotic interactions. Most ST proteins have one or several Domain(s) of Unknown Function 2775 (DUF2775). All deduced ST proteins have a signal peptide, indicating that these proteins enter the secretory pathway, and the mature proteins have tandem repeat oligopeptides that share a hexapeptide (E/D)FEPRP followed by 4 partially conserved amino acids, which could determine a putative N-glycosylation signal, and a fully conserved tyrosine. In a phylogenetic tree, the sequences clade according to taxonomic group. A possible involvement in symbiosis and abiotic stress as well as in plant cell elongation is suggested, although different STs could play different roles in plant development. Conclusions We describe a new family of proteins called ST whose presence is limited to the plant kingdom, specifically to a few families of dicotyledonous plants. They present 20 to 40 amino acid tandem repeat sequences with different characteristics (signal peptide, DUF2775 domain, conservative repeat regions) from the

  4. Necrosis-like death can engage multiple pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein family members

    PubMed Central

    Soratroi, Claudia; Villunger, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Necroptosis is a physiologically relevant mode of cell death with some well-described initiating events, but largely unknown executioners. Here we investigated necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) sensitive death elicited by different necroptosis stimuli in L929 mouse fibrosarcoma cells, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) and bone marrow-derived macrophages. We found that TNFα- or zVAD-induced necroptosis occurs independently of the recently implicated executioners Bmf or PARP-2, but can involve the Bcl-2 family proteins Bid and Bak. Furthermore, this type of necroptosis is associated with mitochondrial cytochrome c release and partly sensitive to cyclosporine A inhibition, suggesting a cross talk with the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. Necroptosis triggered by cadmium (Cd) exposure caused fully Nec-1-sensitive and caspase-independent death in L929 cells that was associated with autocrine TNFα-mediated feed-forward signalling. In MEF Cd-exposure elicited a mixed mode of cell death that was to some extent Nec-1-sensitive but also displayed features of apoptosis. It was partly dependent on Bmf and Bax/Bak, proteins typically considered to act pro-apoptotic, but ultimately insensitive to caspase inhibition. Overall, our study indicates that inducers of “extrinsic” and “intrinsic” necroptosis can both trigger TNF-receptor signalling. Further, necroptosis may depend on mitochondrial changes engaging proteins considered critical for MOMP during apoptosis that ultimately contribute to caspase-independent necrotic cell death. PMID:22971741

  5. IFITM-Family Proteins: The Cell’s First Line of Antiviral Defense

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Charles C.; Zhong, Guocai; Huang, I-Chueh; Farzan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Animal cells use a wide variety of mechanisms to slow or prevent replication of viruses. These mechanisms are usually mediated by antiviral proteins whose expression and activities can be constitutive but are frequently amplified by interferon induction. Among these interferon-stimulated proteins, members of the IFITM (interferon-induced transmembrane) family are unique because they prevent infection before a virus can traverse the lipid bilayer of the cell. At least three human IFITM proteins—IFITM1, IFITM2, and IFITM3—have antiviral activities. These activities limit infection in cultured cells by many viruses, including dengue virus, Ebola virus, influenza A virus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, and West Nile virus. Murine Ifitm3 controls influenza A virus infection in vivo, and polymorphisms in human IFITM3 correlate with the severity of both seasonal and highly pathogenic avian influenza virus. Here we review the discovery and characterization of the IFITM proteins, describe the spectrum of their antiviral activities, and discuss potential mechanisms underlying these effects. PMID:25599080

  6. Distinct roles of the RasGAP family proteins in C. elegans associative learning and memory

    PubMed Central

    Gyurkó, M. Dávid; Csermely, Péter; Sőti, Csaba; Steták, Attila

    2015-01-01

    The Ras GTPase activating proteins (RasGAPs) are regulators of the conserved Ras/MAPK pathway. Various roles of some of the RasGAPs in learning and memory have been reported in different model systems, yet, there is no comprehensive study to characterize all gap genes in any organism. Here, using reverse genetics and neurobehavioural tests, we studied the role of all known genes of the rasgap family in C. elegans in associative learning and memory. We demonstrated that their proteins are implicated in different parts of the learning and memory processes. We show that gap-1 contribute redundantly with gap-3 to the chemosensation of volatile compounds, gap-1 plays a major role in associative learning, while gap-2 and gap-3 are predominantly required for short- and long-term associative memory. Our results also suggest that the C. elegans Ras orthologue let-60 is involved in multiple processes during learning and memory. Thus, we show that the different classes of RasGAP proteins are all involved in cognitive function and their complex interplay ensures the proper formation and storage of novel information in C. elegans. PMID:26469632

  7. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Family of Pneumococcal Proteins That Are Protective against Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Adamou, John E.; Heinrichs, Jon H.; Erwin, Alice L.; Walsh, William; Gayle, Tony; Dormitzer, Melissa; Dagan, Ron; Brewah, Yambasu A.; Barren, Philip; Lathigra, Raju; Langermann, Solomon; Koenig, Scott; Johnson, Syd

    2001-01-01

    Four pneumococcal genes (phtA, phtB, phtD, and phtE) encoding a novel family of homologous proteins (32 to 87% identity) were identified from the Streptococcus pneumoniae genomic sequence. These open reading frames were selected as potential vaccine candidates based upon their possession of hydrophobic leader sequences which presumably target these proteins to the bacterial cell surface. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences of these gene products revealed the presence of a histidine triad motif (HxxHxH), termed Pht (pneumococcal histidine triad) that is conserved and repeated several times in each of the four proteins. The four pht genes (phtA, phtB, phtD, and a truncated version of phtE) were expressed in Escherichia coli. A flow cytometry-based assay confirmed that PhtA, PhtB, PhtD and, to a lesser extent, PhtE were detectable on the surface of intact bacteria. Recombinant PhtA, PhtB, and PhtD elicited protection against certain pneumococcal capsular types in a mouse model of systemic disease. These novel pneumococcal antigens may serve as effective vaccines against the most prevalent pneumococcal serotypes. PMID:11159990

  8. Insight into the evolution of the histidine triad protein (HTP) family in Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhu-Qing; Zhang, Yan-Mei; Pan, Xiu-Zhen; Wang, Bin; Chen, Jian-Qun

    2013-01-01

    The Histidine Triad Proteins (HTPs), also known as Pht proteins in Streptococcus pneumoniae, constitute a family of surface-exposed proteins that exist in many pathogenic streptococcal species. Although many studies have revealed the importance of HTPs in streptococcal physiology and pathogenicity, little is known about their origin and evolution. In this study, after identifying all htp homologs from 105 streptococcal genomes representing 38 different species/subspecies, we analyzed their domain structures, positions in genome, and most importantly, their evolutionary histories. By further projecting this information onto the streptococcal phylogeny, we made several major findings. First, htp genes originated earlier than the Streptococcus genus and gene-loss events have occurred among three streptococcal groups, resulting in the absence of the htp gene in the Bovis, Mutans and Salivarius groups. Second, the copy number of htp genes in other groups of Streptococcus is variable, ranging from one to four functional copies. Third, both phylogenetic evidence and domain structure analyses support the division of two htp subfamilies, designated as htp I and htp II. Although present mainly in the pyogenic group and in Streptococcus suis, htp II members are distinct from htp I due to the presence of an additional leucine-rich-repeat domain at the C-terminus. Finally, htp genes exhibit a faster nucleotide substitution rate than do housekeeping genes. Specifically, the regions outside the HTP domains are under strong positive selection. This distinct evolutionary pattern likely helped Streptococcus to easily escape from recognition by host immunity. PMID:23527301

  9. Ras family proteins: new players involved in the diplotene arrest of Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Jessus, C; Rime, H; Ozon, R

    1998-11-01

    Oogonia undergo numerous mitotic cell cycles before completing the last DNA replication and entering the meiotic prophase I. After chromosome pairing and chromatid exchanges between paired chromosomes, the oocyte I remains arrested at the diplotene stage of the first meiotic prophase. Oocyte growth then occurs independently of cell division; indeed, during this growth period, oocytes (4n DNA) are prevented from completing the meiotic divisions. How is the prophase arrest regulated? One of the players of the prophase block is the high level of intracellular cAMP, maintained by an active adenylate cyclase. By using lethal toxin from Clostridium sordellii (LT), a glucosyltransferase that glucosylates and inactivates small G proteins of the Ras subfamily, we have shown that inhibition of either Ras or Rap or both proteins is sufficient to release the prophase block of Xenopus oocytes in a cAMP-dependent manner. The implications of Ras family proteins as new players involved in the prophase arrest of Xenopus oocytes will be discussed here. PMID:10069002

  10. Characterization of two patched receptors for the vertebrate hedgehog protein family

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, David; Stone, Donna M.; Brush, Jennifer; Ryan, Anne; Armanini, Mark; Frantz, Gretchen; Rosenthal, Arnon; de Sauvage, Frederic J.

    1998-01-01

    The multitransmembrane protein Patched (PTCH) is the receptor for Sonic Hedgehog (Shh), a secreted molecule implicated in the formation of embryonic structures and in tumorigenesis. Current models suggest that binding of Shh to PTCH prevents the normal inhibition of the seven-transmembrane-protein Smoothened (SMO) by PTCH. According to this model, the inhibition of SMO signaling is relieved after mutational inactivation of PTCH in the basal cell nevus syndrome. Recently, PTCH2, a molecule with sequence homology to PTCH, has been identified. To characterize both PTCH molecules with respect to the various Hedgehog proteins, we have isolated the human PTCH2 gene. Biochemical analysis of PTCH and PTCH2 shows that they both bind to all hedgehog family members with similar affinity and that they can form a complex with SMO. However, the expression patterns of PTCH and PTCH2 do not fully overlap. While PTCH is expressed throughout the mouse embryo, PTCH2 is found at high levels in the skin and in spermatocytes. Because Desert Hedgehog (Dhh) is expressed specifically in the testis and is required for germ cell development, it is likely that PTCH2 mediates its activity in vivo. Chromosomal localization of PTCH2 places it on chromosome 1p33–34, a region deleted in some germ cell tumors, raising the possibility that PTCH2 may be a tumor suppressor in Dhh target cells. PMID:9811851

  11. Novel dimerization mode of the human Bcl-2 family protein Bak, a mitochondrial apoptosis regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongfei; Takemoto, Chie; Akasaka, Ryogo; Uchikubo-Kamo, Tomomi; Kishishita, Seiichiro; Murayama, Kazutaka; Terada, Takaho; Chen, Lirong; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Sugano, Sumio; Tanaka, Akiko; Inoue, Makoto; Kigawa, Takanori; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2009-05-29

    Interactions of Bcl-2 family proteins play a regulatory role in mitochondrial apoptosis. The pro-apoptotic protein Bak resides in the outer mitochondrial membrane, and the formation of Bak homo- or heterodimers is involved in the regulation of apoptosis. The previously reported structure of the human Bak protein (residues Glu16-Gly186) revealed that a zinc ion was coordinated with two pairs of Asp160 and His164 residues from the symmetry-related molecules. This zinc-dependent homodimer was regarded as an anti-apoptotic dimer. In the present study, we determined the crystal structure of the human Bak residues Ser23-Asn185 at 2.5 {angstrom}, and found a distinct type of homodimerization through Cys166 disulfide bridging between the symmetry-related molecules. In the two modes of homodimerization, the molecular interfaces are completely different. In the membrane-targeted model of the S-S bridged dimer, the BH3 motifs are too close to the membrane to interact directly with the anti-apoptotic relatives, such as Bcl-x{sub L}. Therefore, the Bak dimer structure reported here may represent a pro-apoptotic mode under oxidized conditions.

  12. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 phosphorylation of familial prion protein mutants exacerbates conversion into amyloid structure.

    PubMed

    Rouget, Raphaël; Sharma, Gyanesh; LeBlanc, Andréa C

    2015-02-27

    Familial prion protein (PrP) mutants undergo conversion from soluble and protease-sensitive to insoluble and partially protease-resistant proteins. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) phosphorylation of wild type PrP (pPrP) at serine 43 induces a conversion of PrP into aggregates and fibrils. Here, we investigated whether familial PrP mutants are predisposed to Cdk5 phosphorylation and whether phosphorylation of familial PrP mutants increases conversion. PrP mutants representing three major familial PrP diseases and different PrP structural domains were studied. We developed a novel in vitro kinase reaction coupled with Thioflavin T binding to amyloid structure assay to monitor phosphorylation-dependent amyloid conversion. Although non-phosphorylated full-length wild type or PrP mutants did not convert into amyloid, Cdk5 phosphorylation rapidly converted these into Thioflavin T-positive structures following first order kinetics. Dephosphorylation partially reversed conversion. Phosphorylation-dependent conversion of PrP from α-helical structures into β-sheet structures was confirmed by circular dichroism. Relative to wild type pPrP, most PrP mutants showed increased rate constants of conversion. In contrast, non-phosphorylated truncated PrP Y145X (where X represents a stop codon) and Q160X mutants converted spontaneously into Thioflavin T-positive fibrils after a lag phase of over 20 h, indicating nucleation-dependent polymerization. Phosphorylation reduced the lag phase by over 50% and thus accelerated the formation of the nucleating event. Consistently, phosphorylated Y145X and phosphorylated Q160X exacerbated conversion in a homologous seeding reaction, whereas WT pPrP could not seed WT PrP. These results demonstrate an influence of both the N terminus and the C terminus of PrP on conversion. We conclude that post-translational modifications of the flexible N terminus of PrP can cause or exacerbate PrP mutant conversion. PMID:25572400

  13. Novel Interactions of the TRTK12 Peptide with S100 Protein Family Members: Specificity and Thermodynamic Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Wafer, Lucas N.; Tzul, Franco O.; Pandharipande, Pranav P.; Makhatadze, George I.

    2013-01-01

    The S100 protein family consists of small, dimeric proteins that exert their biological functions in response to changing calcium concentrations. S100B is the best studied member and has been shown to interact with over 20 binding partners in a calcium-dependent manner. The TRTK12 peptide, derived from the consensus binding sequence for S100B, has previously been found to interact with S100A1 and has been proposed to be a general binding partner of the S100 family. To test this hypothesis and gain a better understanding of the specificity of binding for the S100 proteins sixteen members of the human S100 family were screened against this peptide and its alanine variants. Novel interactions were only found with two family members: S100P and S100A2, indicating that TRTK12 selectively interacts with a small subset of the S100 proteins. Substantial promiscuity was observed in the binding site of S100B to accommodate variations in the peptide sequence, while S100A1, S100A2, and S100P exhibited larger differences in the binding constants for the TRTK12 alanine variants. This suggests that single-point substitutions can be used to selectively modulate the affinity of TRTK12 peptides for individual S100 proteins. This study has important implications for the rational drug design of inhibitors for the S100 proteins, which are involved in a variety of cancers and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23899389

  14. Chitosanases from Family 46 of Glycoside Hydrolases: From Proteins to Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Viens, Pascal; Lacombe-Harvey, Marie-Ève; Brzezinski, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    Chitosanases, enzymes that catalyze the endo-hydrolysis of glycolytic links in chitosan, are the subject of numerous studies as biotechnological tools to generate low molecular weight chitosan (LMWC) or chitosan oligosaccharides (CHOS) from native, high molecular weight chitosan. Glycoside hydrolases belonging to family GH46 are among the best-studied chitosanases, with four crystallography-derived structures available and more than forty enzymes studied at the biochemical level. They were also subjected to numerous site-directed mutagenesis studies, unraveling the molecular mechanisms of hydrolysis. This review is focused on the taxonomic distribution of GH46 proteins, their multi-modular character, the structure-function relationships and their biological functions in the host organisms. PMID:26516868

  15. The alpha/beta fold family of proteins database and the cholinesterase gene server ESTHER.

    PubMed Central

    Cousin, X; Hotelier, T; Giles, K; Lievin, P; Toutant, J P; Chatonnet, A

    1997-01-01

    ESTHER (for esterases, alpha/betahydrolase enzyme and relatives) is a database of sequences phylogenetically related to cholinesterases. These sequences define a homogeneous group of enzymes (carboxylesterases, lipases and hormone-sensitive lipases) sharing a similar structure of a central beta-sheet surrounded by alpha-helices. Among these proteins a wide range of functions can be found (hydrolases, adhesion molecules, hormone precursors). The purpose of ESTHER is to help comparison of structures and functions of members of the family. Since the last release, new features have been added to the server. A BLAST comparison tool allows sequence homology searches within the database sequences. New sections are available: kinetics and inhibitors of cholinesterases, fasciculin-acetylcholinesterase interaction and a gene structure review. The mutation analysis compilation has been improved with three-dimensional images. A mailing list has been created. PMID:9016525

  16. Chitosanases from Family 46 of Glycoside Hydrolases: From Proteins to Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Viens, Pascal; Lacombe-Harvey, Marie-Ève; Brzezinski, Ryszard

    2015-11-01

    Chitosanases, enzymes that catalyze the endo-hydrolysis of glycolytic links in chitosan, are the subject of numerous studies as biotechnological tools to generate low molecular weight chitosan (LMWC) or chitosan oligosaccharides (CHOS) from native, high molecular weight chitosan. Glycoside hydrolases belonging to family GH46 are among the best-studied chitosanases, with four crystallography-derived structures available and more than forty enzymes studied at the biochemical level. They were also subjected to numerous site-directed mutagenesis studies, unraveling the molecular mechanisms of hydrolysis. This review is focused on the taxonomic distribution of GH46 proteins, their multi-modular character, the structure-function relationships and their biological functions in the host organisms. PMID:26516868

  17. OSBP-Related Protein Family: Mediators of Lipid Transport and Signaling at Membrane Contact Sites.

    PubMed

    Kentala, Henriikka; Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Olkkonen, Vesa M

    2016-01-01

    Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) and its related protein homologs, ORPs, constitute a conserved family of lipid-binding/transfer proteins (LTPs) expressed ubiquitously in eukaryotes. The ligand-binding domain of ORPs accommodates cholesterol and oxysterols, but also glycerophospholipids, particularly phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI4P). ORPs have been implicated as intracellular lipid sensors or transporters. Most ORPs carry targeting determinants for the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and non-ER organelle membrane. ORPs are located and function at membrane contact sites (MCSs), at which ER is closely apposed with other organelle limiting membranes. Such sites have roles in lipid transport and metabolism, control of Ca(2+) fluxes, and signaling events. ORPs are postulated either to transport lipids over MCSs to maintain the distinct lipid compositions of organelle membranes, or to control the activity of enzymes/protein complexes with functions in signaling and lipid metabolism. ORPs may transfer PI4P and another lipid class bidirectionally. Transport of PI4P followed by its hydrolysis would in this model provide the energy for transfer of the other lipid against its concentration gradient. Control of organelle lipid compositions by OSBP/ORPs is important for the life cycles of several pathogenic viruses. Targeting ORPs with small-molecular antagonists is proposed as a new strategy to combat viral infections. Several ORPs are reported to modulate vesicle transport along the secretory or endocytic pathways. Moreover, antagonists of certain ORPs inhibit cancer cell proliferation. Thus, ORPs are LTPs, which mediate interorganelle lipid transport and coordinate lipid signals with a variety of cellular regimes. PMID:26811291

  18. Disorder and structure in the Rab11 binding domain of Rab11 family interacting protein 2.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jie; Liu, Yuqi; Bose, Kakoli; Henry, Gillian D; Baleja, James D

    2009-01-27

    Rab11 plays a central role in plasma membrane recycling which returns cellular receptors for reuse at the cell surface. A recently identified family of Rab11 interacting proteins (FIP) includes FIP2. The C-terminal region of FIP2 is essential for colocalization with Rab11 on early endosomes and for enabling formation of higher-order oligomers. Rab11 binding and oligomerization of FIP2 are separable. Here we have determined the three-dimensional structure of the 40-residue coiled-coil oligomerization domain of FIP2 in the absence of Rab11 using NMR methods. The N-terminal half showed strong NOE cross-peaks and well-dispersed NMR resonances, whereas the C-terminal half had fewer NOE cross-peaks and less chemical shift dispersion. The 10 C-terminal residues were mostly disordered. The final structures of the dimer had favorable Ramachandran angles and a root-mean-square deviation of 0.59 +/- 0.13 A over superimposed backbone residues. The structure allows a comparison to a structure of FIP2 in complex with Rab11 that was determined crystallographically. In complex with Rab11, the C-terminal residues are not disordered but have a helical structure that predicts residual dipolar coupling constants that are incompatible with those measured on the unbound FIP2. In both structures, a histidine residue is found at the normally hydrophobic position of the heptad repeat of the coiled coil, and here we show its ionization destabilizes the coiled-coil structure. Together, these data allow us to build a model in which the binding of FIP family proteins to Rab11 can be described in terms of conformational changes and that suggests new modes of regulation. PMID:19119858

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2179c protein establishes a new exoribonuclease family with broad phylogenetic distribution.

    PubMed

    Abendroth, Jan; Ollodart, Anja; Andrews, Emma S V; Myler, Peter J; Staker, Bart L; Edwards, Thomas E; Arcus, Vickery L; Grundner, Christoph

    2014-01-24

    Ribonucleases (RNases) maintain the cellular RNA pool by RNA processing and degradation. In many bacteria, including the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the enzymes mediating several central RNA processing functions are still unknown. Here, we identify the hypothetical Mtb protein Rv2179c as a highly divergent exoribonuclease. Although the primary sequence of Rv2179c has no detectable similarity to any known RNase, the Rv2179c crystal structure reveals an RNase fold. Active site residues are equivalent to those in the DEDD family of RNases, and Rv2179c has close structural homology to Escherichia coli RNase T. Consistent with the DEDD fold, Rv2179c has exoribonuclease activity, cleaving the 3' single-strand overhangs of duplex RNA. Functional orthologs of Rv2179c are prevalent in actinobacteria and found in bacteria as phylogenetically distant as proteobacteria. Thus, Rv2179c is the founding member of a new, large RNase family with hundreds of members across the bacterial kingdom. PMID:24311791

  20. Transcriptional regulation of Sox2 by the retinoblastoma family of pocket proteins

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Carmen; Morey, Lluis; Silva-Álvarez, Sabela Da; Fernandes, Tânia; Abad, María; Croce, Luciano Di; García-Caballero, Tomás; Serrano, Manuel; Rivas, Carmen; Vidal, Anxo; Collado, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Cellular reprogramming to iPSCs has uncovered unsuspected links between tumor suppressors and pluripotency factors. Using this system, it was possible to identify tumor suppressor p27 as a repressor of Sox2 during differentiation. This led to the demonstration that defects in the repression of Sox2 can contribute to tumor development. The members of the retinoblastoma family of pocket proteins, pRb, p107 and p130, are negative regulators of the cell cycle with tumor suppressor activity and with roles in differentiation. In this work we studied the relative contribution of the retinoblastoma family members to the regulation of Sox2 expression. We found that deletion of Rb or p130 leads to impaired repression of Sox2, a deffect amplified by inactivation of p53. We also identified binding of pRb and p130 to an enhancer with crucial regulatory activity on Sox2 expression. Using cellular reprogramming we tested the impact of the defective repression of Sox2 and confirmed that Rb deficiency allows the generation of iPSCs in the absence of exogenous Sox2. Finally, partial depletion of Sox2 positive cells reduced the pituitary tumor development initiated by Rb loss in vivo. In summary, our results show that Sox2 repression by pRb is a relevant mechanism of tumor suppression. PMID:25576924

  1. Lst4, the yeast Fnip1/2 orthologue, is a DENN-family protein

    PubMed Central

    Pacitto, Angela; Ascher, David B.; Wong, Louise H.; Blaszczyk, Beata K.; Nookala, Ravi K.; Zhang, Nianshu; Dokudovskaya, Svetlana; Levine, Tim P.; Blundell, Tom L.

    2015-01-01

    The folliculin/Fnip complex has been demonstrated to play a crucial role in the mechanisms underlying Birt–Hogg–Dubé (BHD) syndrome, a rare inherited cancer syndrome. Lst4 has been previously proposed to be the Fnip1/2 orthologue in yeast and therefore a member of the DENN family. In order to confirm this, we solved the crystal structure of the N-terminal region of Lst4 from Kluyveromyces lactis and show it contains a longin domain, the first domain of the full DENN module. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Lst4 through its DENN domain interacts with Lst7, the yeast folliculin orthologue. Like its human counterpart, the Lst7/Lst4 complex relocates to the vacuolar membrane in response to nutrient starvation, most notably in carbon starvation. Finally, we express and purify the recombinant Lst7/Lst4 complex and show that it exists as a 1 : 1 heterodimer in solution. This work confirms the membership of Lst4 and the Fnip proteins in the DENN family, and provides a basis for using the Lst7/Lst4 complex to understand the molecular function of folliculin and its role in the pathogenesis of BHD syndrome. PMID:26631379

  2. Cloning of apg-2 encoding a novel member of heat shock protein 110 family.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Y; Kimura, T; Kishishita, M; Noda, Y; Fujita, J

    1997-04-11

    Chinese hamster heat shock protein 110-encoding gene (hsp110), mouse apg-1 and human hsp70RY are structurally related genes, with the first two encoding about 110-kDa HSPs [Yoon et al. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 15725-15733; Kaneko et al. (1997) J. Biol. Chem., in press; Fathallah et al. (1993) J. Immunol. 151, 810-813]. Using apg-1 cDNA as a probe, we isolated a novel cDNA, apg-2 from a mouse testis cDNA library, which was highly homologous to human hsp70RY. However, the predicted amino acid (aa) sequence of APG-2 was longer (841 aa) than that of HSP70RY (701 aa) and comparable to those of HSP110 and APG-1. Northern blot analysis revealed that the expression of apg-2 transcripts was ubiquitous in various mouse tissues, and most abundant in the testis and ovary. While induction of hsp70 transcripts was observed in mouse TAMA26 Sertoli cells and NIH/3T3 fibroblasts on temperature shift from 37 degrees C to 42 degrees C (traditional heat shock) or from 32 degrees C to 39 degrees C, apg-2 transcripts were not induced under either condition. These results suggest that apg-2 is an isoform of mouse homolog of hsp70RY, but that it belongs to the hsp110 family instead of hsp70 family, and that it plays a role under non-stress conditions. PMID:9161406

  3. Teneurins: a conserved family of transmembrane proteins involved in intercellular signaling during development.

    PubMed

    Tucker, R P; Chiquet-Ehrismann, R

    2006-02-15

    Teneurins, which were initially described as ten-a and the pair-rule gene ten-m/odz in Drosophila, are a family of highly conserved proteins that have recently been characterized in Caenorhabditis elegans and a number of vertebrates. We have proposed the nomenclature teneurin 1-4 for the four members of this gene family found in vertebrates. Recent evidence shows that teneurins belong to a novel class of signaling molecules that function both at the cell surface as type II transmembrane receptors and, after the release of the intracellular domain, as transcriptional regulators. Nuclear localization of the intracellular domain has been observed in vitro in mammalian cells and confirmed in vivo in C. elegans. RNAi studies and mutational analysis has revealed that Ten-1 in C. elegans is an important regulator of many aspects of morphogenesis, including germ cell development and neuronal pathfinding. In vertebrates, teneurins are concentrated in the developing and adult central nervous system and at sites of pattern formation, including the developing limb. Teneurins also possess a carboxy terminal sequence that may be processed to generate a neuromodulatory peptide. Teneurin function appears to be required for a fundamentally important signaling mechanism conserved between invertebrates and vertebrates having an impact on many processes relying on cell-cell contact throughout development. PMID:16406038

  4. HrpI of Erwinia amylovora functions in secretion of harpin and is a member of a new protein family.

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Z M; Beer, S V

    1993-01-01

    HrpI, a 78-kDa protein, functions in the secretion of harpin, a proteinaceous elicitor of the hypersensitive response from Erwinia amylovora. The predicted amino acid sequence of HrpI is remarkably similar to that of LcrD of Yersinia species, the first member of a recently described protein family. Other proteins of the family are MixA from Shigella flexneri, InvA from Salmonella typhimurium, FlhA from Caulobacter crescentus, HrpI from Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae, HrpO from Pseudomonas solanacearum, and HrpC2 from Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria. Cells of E. amylovora containing mutated hrpI genes or cells of Escherichia coli containing the cloned hrp gene cluster with mutated hrpI produce but do not export harpin. When similar cells with functional hrpI genes were grown at 25 degrees C, but not at 37 degrees C, harpin was exported to the culture supernatant. Direct evidence that HrpI is involved in the secretion of a virulence protein has been offered. Two other loci of the hrp gene cluster are involved in the regulation of harpin, and four other loci also are involved in the secretion of harpin. Since harpin and other proteins likely to be secreted by the LcrD family of proteins lack typical signal peptides, their secretion mechanism is distinct from the general protein export pathway. Images PMID:8253684

  5. SLAM family receptors and the SLAM-associated protein (SAP) modulate T cell functions

    PubMed Central

    Keszei, Marton; Romero, Xavier; Tsokos, George C.

    2010-01-01

    One or more of the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) family (SLAMF) of cell surface receptors, which consists of nine transmembrane proteins, i.e., SLAMF1-9, are expressed on most hematopoietic cells. While most SLAMF receptors serve as self-ligands, SLAMF2 and SLAMF4 use each other as counter structures. Six of the receptors carry one or more copies of a unique intracellular tyrosine-based switch motif, which has high affinity for the single SH2-domain signaling molecules SLAM-associated protein and EAT-2. Whereas SLAMF receptors are costimulatory molecules on the surface of CD4+, CD8+, and natural killer (NK) T cells, they also involved in early phases of lineage commitment during hematopoiesis. SLAMF receptors regulate T lymphocyte development and function and modulate lytic activity, cytokine production, and major histocompatibility complex-independent cell inhibition of NK cells. Furthermore, they modulate B cell activation and memory generation, neutrophil, dendritic cell, macrophage and eosinophil function, and platelet aggregation. In this review, we will discuss the role of SLAM receptors and their adapters in Tcell function, and we will examine the role of these receptors and their adapters in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease and their contribution to disease susceptibility in systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:20146065

  6. Protein-losing enteropathy in a patient with familial adenomatous polyposis and advanced colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yoshihiko; Muguruma, Naoki; Kimura, Tetsuo; Okamoto, Koichi; Sogabe, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Kohno, Seiya; Nakasono, Masahiko; Hayashi, Hiroshige; Bando, Yoshimi; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2016-06-01

    A 29-year-old female visited a hospital because of increasingly severe lower leg edema. She was diagnosed as having multiple polyps in the stomach and colon by gastroscopy and sigmoidoscopy as well as multiple liver tumors by abdominal CT. She was referred to our hospital for further examination. Total colonoscopy revealed a type 2 tumor in the transverse colon and more than 200 polyps distributed throughout the colorectum. Biopsies of the tumor and polyps showed histological characteristics of adenocarcinoma and tubulovillous adenoma, respectively. Thus, she was diagnosed as having metastatic colon cancer derived from familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Laboratory tests showed a marked hypoalbuminemia of 1.1 g/dl. The fecal alpha-1 anti-trypsin test showed abnormal clearance (62.1 ml/day), and scintigraphy using 99mTc-human serum albumin revealed protein loss in the whole colon. Multiple ligation probe amplification analysis of the APC gene identified a germline duplication of exons 11-13. Direct sequencing of the reverse transcription PCR products of APC mRNA revealed a deletion of 25 base pairs and a tandem duplication of exons 11-13. This case was considered to be protein-losing enteropathy resulting from numerous colonic tubulovillous adenomas and advanced colon cancer in a FAP patient with unusual mutational events in APC. PMID:27170298

  7. Actin cytoskeleton organization regulated by the PAK family of protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Eby, J J; Holly, S P; van Drogen, F; Grishin, A V; Peter, M; Drubin, D G; Blumer, K J

    1998-08-27

    Cdc42, Rac1 and other Rho-type GTPases regulate gene expression, cell proliferation and cytoskeletal architecture [1,2]. A challenge is to identify the effectors of Cdc42 and Rac1 that mediate these biological responses. Protein kinases of the p21-activated kinase (PAK) family bind activated Rac1 and Cdc42, and switch on mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathways; however, their roles in regulating actin cytoskeleton organization have not been clearly established [3-5]. Here, we show that mutants of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking the PAK homologs Ste20 and Cla4 exhibit actin cytoskeletal defects, in vivo and in vitro, that resemble those of cdc42-1 mutants. Moreover, STE20 overexpression suppresses cdc42-1 growth defects and cytoskeletal defects in vivo, and Ste20 kinase corrects the actin-assembly defects of permeabilized cdc42-1 cells in vitro. Thus, PAKs are effectors of Cdc42 in pathways that regulate the organization of the cortical actin cytoskeleton. PMID:9742399

  8. The Musashi family of RNA binding proteins: master regulators of multiple stem cell populations.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Jessie M; McLaughlin, Eileen A; Hime, Gary R; Siddall, Nicole A

    2013-01-01

    In order to maintain their unlimited capacity to divide, stem cells require controlled temporal and spatial protein expression. The Musashi family of RNA-binding proteins have been shown to exhibit this necessary translational control through both repression and activation in order to regulate multiple stem cell populations. This chapter looks in depth at the initial discovery and characterisation of Musashi in the model organism Drosophila, and its subsequent emergence as a master regulator in a number of stem cell populations. Furthermore the unique roles for mammalian Musashi-1 and Musashi-2 in different stem cell types are correlated with the perceived diagnostic power of Musashi expression in specific stem cell derived oncologies. In particular the potential role for Musashi in the identification and treatment of human cancer is considered, with a focus on the role of Musashi-2 in leukaemia. Finally, the manipulation of Musashi expression is proposed as a potential avenue towards the targeted treatment of specific aggressive stem cell cancers. PMID:23696360

  9. The Rab protein family: Genetic mapping of six Rab genes in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, M.D.F.S.; Gutierrez, M.J.; Kingsmore, S.F.

    1995-12-10

    Rab proteins constitute a family of GTP-binding proteins that are located in distinct intracellular compartments and play a role in the regulation of vesicular trafficking. Yeast mutations in Rab gene homologs cause defects in vesicular transport similar to those observed in beige (bg) mice. To investigate Rab genes as candidates for mouse mutations characterized by defects in vesicular trafficking, we utilized an intersubspecific backcross [C57BL/6J-bg{sup J} X (C57BL/6J-bg{sup J} X CAST/Ei)F{sub 1}] segregating for the bg locus. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) were obtained through Southern hybridization of F{sub 1} and C57BL/6J chromosomal DNA with the coding sequences of Rab genes. These RFLPs and 12 polymorphic microsatellites were used to determine the segregation of the Rab genes in 93 backcross mice. Rab4a, Rab4b, Rab7, Rab10, Rab22, and Rab24 were localized on mouse chromosomes 8, 7, 9, 12, 2, and 13, respectively. Although the results exclude these loci as candidates for bg, they demonstrate a wide dispersion of Rab genes throughout the mouse genome and reveal that Rab4b and Rab24 are possible candidates for the mouse mutations reduced pigmentation (rp) and purkinje cell degeneration (pcd), respectively. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. A new family of highly variable proteins in the Chlamydophila pneumoniae genome

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Eduardo P. C.; Pradillon, Olivier; Bui, Hung; Sayada, Chalom; Denamur, Erick

    2002-01-01

    Chlamydiaceae are obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens characterized by a wide range of vertebrate host, tissue tropism and spectrum of diseases. To get insights into the biological mechanisms involved in these differences, we have put forward a computational and experimental procedure to identify the genome recombination hotspots, as frequent sequence variation allows rapid adaptation to environmental changes. We find a larger potential for recombination in Chlamydophila pneumoniae genomes as compared with Chlamydia trachomatis or Chlamydia muridarum. Such potential is mostly concentrated in a family of seven previously uncharacterized species-specific elements that we named ppp for C.pneumoniae polymorphic protein genes, which have the potential to vary by homologous recombination and slipped-mispair. Experimen tally, we show that these sequences are indeed highly polymorphic among a collection of nine C.pneumoniae strains of very diverse geographical and pathological origins, mainly by slippage of a poly(C) tract. We also show that most elements are transcribed during infection. In silico analyses suggest that Ppps correspond to outer membrane proteins. Given their species specificity, their putative location in the outer membrane and their extreme polymorphism, Ppps are most likely to be important in the pathogenesis of C.pneumoniae and could represent targets for future vaccine development. PMID:12384581

  11. The contribution of pathways initiated via the Gq\\11 G-protein family to atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Tinker, Andrew; Finlay, Malcom; Nobles, Muriel; Opel, Aaisha

    2016-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the commonest cardiac arrhythmia and leads to significant clinical morbidity and mortality. It has a complex pathophysiology but is often initiated by atrial ectopic beats and because of atrial remodelling once it occurs it can become established. Thus therapeutic interventions designed to prevent the initial occurrence of the arrhythmia are particularly needed. At the cellular level, these ectopic beats arise because of abnormal calcium release events from the sarcoplasmic reticulum leading to an inward current mediated by the sodium-calcium exchanger. There has been considerable interest in this over the last few years largely focused on the ryanodine receptor and related signalling pathways. However, atrial myocytes also possess a well-developed inositol trisphosphate (IP3) dependent calcium release system and this has been less studied. In this review we focus on pathways and molecules that couple via the Gq\\11 family of G-proteins including regulators of G-protein signalling that may influence IP3 mediated calcium release and atrial fibrillation. PMID:26773203

  12. Neuroprotection via pro-survival protein kinase C isoforms associated with Bcl-2 family members.

    PubMed

    Weinreb, Orly; Bar-Am, Orit; Amit, Tamar; Chillag-Talmor, Orly; Youdim, Moussa B H

    2004-09-01

    This study provides new insights into neuroprotection involving interaction of protein kinase C (PKC) pathway with Bcl-2 family proteins. Using a model of serum deprivation, we investigated the mechanism by which the anti-Parkinson/monoamine oxidase (MAO)-B inhibitor drug, rasagiline, exerts its neuroprotective effect in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. Here, we report that rasagiline (0.1-10 microM) decreased apoptosis via multiple protection mechanisms, including the stimulation of PKC phosphorylation; up-regulation of PKCalpha and PKC mRNAs, induction of Bcl-xL, Bcl-w, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNAs; and down-regulation of Bad and Bax mRNAs. Moreover, rasagiline inhibited the cleavage and activation of procaspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), whereas the PKC inhibitor, GF109203X, reversed these actions. Similarly, rasagiline decreased serum-free-induced levels of the important regulator of cell death, Bad, which was also blocked by GF109203X, indicating the involvement of PKC in rasagiline-induced cell survival. Furthermore, these studies have established that PKC- and Bcl-2-dependent neuroprotective activity of rasagiline is dependent on its propargyl moiety, because propargylamine had similar effects with the same potency. PMID:15247150

  13. Homology probing: identification of cDNA clones encoding members of the protein-serine kinase family

    SciTech Connect

    Hanks, S.K.

    1987-01-01

    Mixed /sup 32/P-labeled oligonucleotide probes were used to screen a HeLa cDNA library for clones encoding amino acid contiguities whose conservation is characteristic of the protein-serine kinase family. Eighty thousand clones were screened, from which 19 were identified as showing strong hybridization to two distinct probes. Four clones were chosen for characterization by partial DNA sequence analysis and 3 of these were found to encode amino acid sequences typical of protein-serine kinases. One deduced amino acid sequence shares 72% identify with rabbit skeletal muscle phosphorylase kinase ..gamma..-subunit, while another is closely related to the yeast protein-serine kinases CDC2 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and CDC28 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This screening approach should have applications in the identification of clones encoding previously unknown or poorly characterized members of other protein families.

  14. Expanded microbial genome coverage and improved protein family annotation in the COG database

    PubMed Central

    Galperin, Michael Y.; Makarova, Kira S.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial genome sequencing projects produce numerous sequences of deduced proteins, only a small fraction of which have been or will ever be studied experimentally. This leaves sequence analysis as the only feasible way to annotate these proteins and assign to them tentative functions. The Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs) database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/COG/), first created in 1997, has been a popular tool for functional annotation. Its success was largely based on (i) its reliance on complete microbial genomes, which allowed reliable assignment of orthologs and paralogs for most genes; (ii) orthology-based approach, which used the function(s) of the characterized member(s) of the protein family (COG) to assign function(s) to the entire set of carefully identified orthologs and describe the range of potential functions when there were more than one; and (iii) careful manual curation of the annotation of the COGs, aimed at detailed prediction of the biological function(s) for each COG while avoiding annotation errors and overprediction. Here we present an update of the COGs, the first since 2003, and a comprehensive revision of the COG annotations and expansion of the genome coverage to include representative complete genomes from all bacterial and archaeal lineages down to the genus level. This re-analysis of the COGs shows that the original COG assignments had an error rate below 0.5% and allows an assessment of the progress in functional genomics in the past 12 years. During this time, functions of many previously uncharacterized COGs have been elucidated and tentative functional assignments of many COGs have been validated, either by targeted experiments or through the use of high-throughput methods. A particularly important development is the assignment of functions to several widespread, conserved proteins many of which turned out to participate in translation, in particular rRNA maturation and tRNA modification. The new version of the

  15. The SAM domains of Anks family proteins are critically involved in modulating the degradation of EphA receptors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jieun; Lee, Haeryung; Kim, Yujin; Yoo, Sooyeon; Park, Eunjeong; Park, Soochul

    2010-04-01

    We recently reported that the phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain of Anks family proteins binds to EphA8, thereby positively regulating EphA8-mediated signaling pathways. In the current study, we identified a potential role for the SAM domains of Anks family proteins in EphA signaling. We found that SAM domains of Anks family proteins directly bind to ubiquitin, suggesting that Anks proteins regulate the degradation of ubiquitinated EphA receptors. Consistent with the role of Cbl ubiquitin ligases in the degradation of Eph receptors, our results revealed that the ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl induced the ubiquitination and degradation of EphA8 upon ligand binding. Ubiquitinated EphA8 also bound to the SAM domains of Odin, a member of the Anks family proteins. More importantly, the overexpression of wild-type Odin protected EphA8 and EphA2 from undergoing degradation following ligand stimulation and promoted EphA-mediated inhibition of cell migration. In contrast, a SAM domain deletion mutant of Odin strongly impaired the function of endogenous Odin, suggesting that the mutant functions in a dominant-negative manner. An analysis of Odin-deficient primary embryonic fibroblasts indicated that Odin levels play a critical role in regulating the stability of EphA2 in response to ligand stimulation. Taken together, our studies suggest that the SAM domains of Anks family proteins play a pivotal role in enhancing the stability of EphA receptors by modulating the ubiquitination process. PMID:20100865

  16. The SAM Domains of Anks Family Proteins Are Critically Involved in Modulating the Degradation of EphA Receptors ▿

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jieun; Lee, Haeryung; Kim, Yujin; Yoo, Sooyeon; Park, Eunjeong; Park, Soochul

    2010-01-01

    We recently reported that the phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain of Anks family proteins binds to EphA8, thereby positively regulating EphA8-mediated signaling pathways. In the current study, we identified a potential role for the SAM domains of Anks family proteins in EphA signaling. We found that SAM domains of Anks family proteins directly bind to ubiquitin, suggesting that Anks proteins regulate the degradation of ubiquitinated EphA receptors. Consistent with the role of Cbl ubiquitin ligases in the degradation of Eph receptors, our results revealed that the ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl induced the ubiquitination and degradation of EphA8 upon ligand binding. Ubiquitinated EphA8 also bound to the SAM domains of Odin, a member of the Anks family proteins. More importantly, the overexpression of wild-type Odin protected EphA8 and EphA2 from undergoing degradation following ligand stimulation and promoted EphA-mediated inhibition of cell migration. In contrast, a SAM domain deletion mutant of Odin strongly impaired the function of endogenous Odin, suggesting that the mutant functions in a dominant-negative manner. An analysis of Odin-deficient primary embryonic fibroblasts indicated that Odin levels play a critical role in regulating the stability of EphA2 in response to ligand stimulation. Taken together, our studies suggest that the SAM domains of Anks family proteins play a pivotal role in enhancing the stability of EphA receptors by modulating the ubiquitination process. PMID:20100865

  17. Identification of a Testis-Enriched Heat Shock Protein and Fourteen Members of Hsp70 Family in the Swamp Eel

    PubMed Central

    He, Yan; Luo, Majing; Yi, Minhan; Sheng, Yue; Cheng, Yibin; Zhou, Rongjia; Cheng, Hanhua

    2013-01-01

    Background Gonad differentiation is one of the most important developmental events in vertebrates. Some heat shock proteins are associated with gonad development. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in the teleost fish and its roles in sex differentiation are poorly understood. Methods and Findings We have identified a testis-enriched heat shock protein Hspa8b2 in the swamp eel using Western blot analysis and Mass Spectrometry (MS). Fourteen Hsp70 family genes were further identified in this species based on transcriptome information. The phylogenetic tree of Hsp70 family was constructed using the Maximum Likelihood method and their expression patterns in the swamp eel gonads were analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Conclusion There are fourteen gene members in the Hsp70 family in the swamp eel genome. Hsp70 family, particularly Hspa8, has expanded in the species. One of the family members Hspa8b2 is predominantly expressed in testis of the swamp eel. PMID:23750249

  18. Biochemical characterization of the Drosophila dpp protein, a member of the transforming growth factor beta family of growth factors.

    PubMed Central

    Panganiban, G E; Rashka, K E; Neitzel, M D; Hoffmann, F M

    1990-01-01

    The decapentaplegic (dpp) gene of Drosophila melanogaster is required for pattern formation in the embryo and for viability of the epithelial cells in the imaginal disks. The dpp protein product predicted from the DNA sequence is similar to members of a family of growth factors that includes transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta). We have produced polyclonal antibodies to a recombinant dpp protein made in bacteria and used a metallothionein promoter to express a dpp cDNA in Drosophila S2 cells. Similar to other proteins in the TGF-beta family, the dpp protein produced by the Drosophila cells was proteolytically cleaved, and both portions of the protein were secreted from the cells. The amino-terminal 47-kilodalton (kDa) peptide was found in the medium and in the proteins adhering to the plastic petri dish. The carboxy-terminal peptide, the region with sequence similarity to the active ligand portion of TGF-beta, was found extracellularly as a 30-kDa homodimer. Most of the 30-kDa homodimer was in the S2 cell protein adsorbed onto the surface of the plastic dish. The dpp protein could be released into solution by increased salt concentration and nonionic detergent. Under these conditions, the amino-terminal and carboxy-terminal portions of dpp were not associated in a stable complex. Images PMID:1692958

  19. Domain-Swapped Dimer of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cytochrome c551: Structural Insights into Domain Swapping of Cytochrome c Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nagao, Satoshi; Ueda, Mariko; Osuka, Hisao; Komori, Hirofumi; Kamikubo, Hironari; Kataoka, Mikio; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Hirota, Shun

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome c (cyt c) family proteins, such as horse cyt c, Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytochrome c551 (PA cyt c551), and Hydrogenobacter thermophilus cytochrome c552 (HT cyt c552), have been used as model proteins to study the relationship between the protein structure and folding process. We have shown in the past that horse cyt c forms oligomers by domain swapping its C-terminal helix, perturbing the Met–heme coordination significantly compared to the monomer. HT cyt c552 forms dimers by domain swapping the region containing the N-terminal α-helix and heme, where the heme axial His and Met ligands belong to different protomers. Herein, we show that PA cyt c551 also forms domain-swapped dimers by swapping the region containing the N-terminal α-helix and heme. The secondary structures of the M61A mutant of PA cyt c551 were perturbed slightly and its oligomer formation ability decreased compared to that of the wild-type protein, showing that the stability of the protein secondary structures is important for domain swapping. The hinge loop of domain swapping for cyt c family proteins corresponded to the unstable region specified by hydrogen exchange NMR measurements for the monomer, although the swapping region differed among proteins. These results show that the unstable loop region has a tendency to become a hinge loop in domain-swapped proteins. PMID:25853415

  20. A family of antimicrobial peptides is produced by processing of a 7S globulin protein in Macadamia integrifolia kernels.

    PubMed

    Marcus, J P; Green, J L; Goulter, K C; Manners, J M

    1999-09-01

    A new family of antimicrobial peptides has been discovered in Macadamia integrifolia. The first member of this new family to be purified from nut kernels was a peptide of 45 aa residues, termed MiAMP2c. This peptide inhibited various plant pathogenic fungi in vitro. cDNA clones corresponding to MiAMP2c encoded a 666 aa precursor protein homologous to vicilin 7S globulin proteins. The deduced precursor protein sequence contained a putative hydrophobic N-terminal signal sequence (28 aa), an extremely hydrophilic N-proximal region (212 aa), and a C-terminal region of 426 aa which is represented in all vicilins. The hydrophilic portion of the deduced protein contained the sequence for MiAMP2c as well as three additional segments having the same cysteine spacing pattern as MiAMP2c. Each member of the MiAMP2 family (i.e. MiAMP2a, b, c and d) consisted of approximately 50 amino acids and contained a C-X-X-X-C-(10-12)X-C-X-X-X-C motif. Subsequent isolations from seed exudates led to the purification of the predicted family members MiAMP2b and 2d, both of which also exhibited antimicrobial activity in vitro. These results suggest that some vicilins play a role in defence during seed germination. PMID:10571855

  1. Comprehensive Phylogenetic Analysis Sheds Light on the Diversity and Origin of the MLO Family of Integral Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kusch, Stefan; Pesch, Lina; Panstruga, Ralph

    2016-03-01

    Mildew resistanceLocusO(MLO) proteins are polytopic integral membrane proteins that have long been considered as plant-specific and being primarily involved in plant-powdery mildew interactions. However, research in the past decade has revealed that MLO proteins diverged into a family with several clades whose members are associated with different physiological processes. We provide a largely increased dataset of MLO amino acid sequences, comprising nearly all major land plant lineages. Based on this comprehensive dataset, we defined seven phylogenetic clades and reconstructed the likely evolution of the MLO family in embryophytes. We further identified several MLO peptide motifs that are either conserved in all MLO proteins or confined to one or several clades, supporting the notion that clade-specific diversification of MLO functions is associated with particular sequence motifs. In baker's yeast, some of these motifs are functionally linked to transmembrane (TM) transport of organic molecules and ions. In addition, we attempted to define the evolutionary origin of the MLO family and found that MLO-like proteins with highly diverse membrane topologies are present in green algae, but also in the distinctly related red algae (Rhodophyta), Amoebozoa, and Chromalveolata. Finally, we discovered several instances of putative fusion events between MLO proteins and different kinds of proteins. Such Rosetta stone-type hybrid proteins might be instructive for future analysis of potential MLO functions. Our findings suggest that MLO is an ancient protein that possibly evolved in unicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes, and consolidated in land plants with a conserved topology, comprising seven TM domains and an intrinsically unstructured C-terminus. PMID:26893454

  2. Comprehensive Phylogenetic Analysis Sheds Light on the Diversity and Origin of the MLO Family of Integral Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kusch, Stefan; Pesch, Lina; Panstruga, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Mildew resistance Locus O (MLO) proteins are polytopic integral membrane proteins that have long been considered as plant-specific and being primarily involved in plant–powdery mildew interactions. However, research in the past decade has revealed that MLO proteins diverged into a family with several clades whose members are associated with different physiological processes. We provide a largely increased dataset of MLO amino acid sequences, comprising nearly all major land plant lineages. Based on this comprehensive dataset, we defined seven phylogenetic clades and reconstructed the likely evolution of the MLO family in embryophytes. We further identified several MLO peptide motifs that are either conserved in all MLO proteins or confined to one or several clades, supporting the notion that clade-specific diversification of MLO functions is associated with particular sequence motifs. In baker’s yeast, some of these motifs are functionally linked to transmembrane (TM) transport of organic molecules and ions. In addition, we attempted to define the evolutionary origin of the MLO family and found that MLO-like proteins with highly diverse membrane topologies are present in green algae, but also in the distinctly related red algae (Rhodophyta), Amoebozoa, and Chromalveolata. Finally, we discovered several instances of putative fusion events between MLO proteins and different kinds of proteins. Such Rosetta stone-type hybrid proteins might be instructive for future analysis of potential MLO functions. Our findings suggest that MLO is an ancient protein that possibly evolved in unicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes, and consolidated in land plants with a conserved topology, comprising seven TM domains and an intrinsically unstructured C-terminus. PMID:26893454

  3. Functional characterization of spectrin-actin-binding domains in 4.1 family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Gimm, J Aura; An, Xiuli; Nunomura, Wataru; Mohandas, Narla

    2002-06-11

    Protein 4.1R is the prototypical member of a protein family that includes 4.1G, 4.1B, and 4.1N. 4.1R plays a crucial role in maintaining membrane mechanical integrity by binding cooperatively to spectrin and actin through its spectrin-actin-binding (SAB) domain. While the binary interaction between 4.1R and spectrin has been well characterized, the actin binding site in 4.1R remains unidentified. Moreover, little is known about the interaction of 4.1R homologues with spectrin and actin. In the present study, we showed that the 8 aa motif (LKKNFMES) within the 10 kDa spectrin-actin-binding domain of 4.1R plays a critical role in binding of 4.1R to actin. Recombinant 4.1R SAB domain peptides with mutations in this motif showed a marked decrease in their ability to form ternary complexes with spectrin and actin. Binary protein-protein interaction studies revealed that this decrease resulted from the inability of mutant SAB peptides to bind to actin filaments while affinity for spectrin was unchanged. We also documented that the 14 C-terminal residues of the 21 amino acid cassette encoded by exon 16 in conjunction with residues 27-43 encoded by exon 17 constituted a fully functional minimal spectrin-binding motif. Finally, we showed that 4.1N SAB domain was unable to form a ternary complex with spectrin and actin, while 4.1G and 4.1B SAB domains were able to form such a complex but less efficiently than 4.1R SAB. This was due to a decrease in the ability of 4.1G and 4.1B SAB domain to interact with actin but not with spectrin. These data enabled us to propose a model for the 4.1R-spectrin-actin ternary complex which may serve as a general paradigm for regulation of spectrin-based cytoskeleton interaction in various cell types. PMID:12044158

  4. The Caenorhabditis elegans Protein FIC-1 Is an AMPylase That Covalently Modifies Heat-Shock 70 Family Proteins, Translation Elongation Factors and Histones.

    PubMed

    Truttmann, Matthias C; Cruz, Victor E; Guo, Xuanzong; Engert, Christoph; Schwartz, Thomas U; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2016-05-01

    Protein AMPylation by Fic domain-containing proteins (Fic proteins) is an ancient and conserved post-translational modification of mostly unexplored significance. Here we characterize the Caenorhabditis elegans Fic protein FIC-1 in vitro and in vivo. FIC-1 is an AMPylase that localizes to the nuclear surface and modifies core histones H2 and H3 as well as heat shock protein 70 family members and translation elongation factors. The three-dimensional structure of FIC-1 is similar to that of its human ortholog, HYPE, with 38% sequence identity. We identify a link between FIC-1-mediated AMPylation and susceptibility to the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, establishing a connection between AMPylation and innate immunity in C. elegans. PMID:27138431

  5. The Caenorhabditis elegans Protein FIC-1 Is an AMPylase That Covalently Modifies Heat-Shock 70 Family Proteins, Translation Elongation Factors and Histones

    PubMed Central

    Truttmann, Matthias C.; Guo, Xuanzong; Engert, Christoph; Schwartz, Thomas U.; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2016-01-01

    Protein AMPylation by Fic domain-containing proteins (Fic proteins) is an ancient and conserved post-translational modification of mostly unexplored significance. Here we characterize the Caenorhabditis elegans Fic protein FIC-1 in vitro and in vivo. FIC-1 is an AMPylase that localizes to the nuclear surface and modifies core histones H2 and H3 as well as heat shock protein 70 family members and translation elongation factors. The three-dimensional structure of FIC-1 is similar to that of its human ortholog, HYPE, with 38% sequence identity. We identify a link between FIC-1-mediated AMPylation and susceptibility to the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, establishing a connection between AMPylation and innate immunity in C. elegans. PMID:27138431

  6. Return to sender: use of Plasmodium ER retrieval sequences to study protein transport in the infected erythrocyte and predict putative ER protein families.

    PubMed

    Külzer, Simone; Gehde, Nina; Przyborski, Jude M

    2009-06-01

    We have investigated how knowledge of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retrieval signals can be used to study specific trafficking pathways in the malaria-infected erythrocyte. We show that addition of various lumenal ER retrieval signals to soluble green fluorescent protein (GFP) chimaera causes retrieval of the fusion protein in the parasite's ER. In contrast, adding these signals to the C-terminus of a membrane bound protein does not affect its eventual sub-cellular localization. This demonstrates proof of principle that ER retrieval signals can be used to study the solubility state of Plasmodium falciparum proteins during their transport to the host erythrocyte. Furthermore, using our knowledge of ER retrieval signals, we identify Plasmodium ER protein families and assign putative functions to them. PMID:19294420

  7. LRAD3, a Novel LDL Receptor Family Member that Modulates Amyloid Precursor Protein Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, Sripriya; Noyes, Nathaniel C.; Migliorini, Mary; Winkles, Jeffrey A.; Battey, Frances D.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Smith, Elizabeth; Yepes, Manuel; Mikhailenko, Irina; Strickland, Dudley K.

    2011-01-01

    We have identified a novel LDL receptor family member, termed LDL receptor class A domain containing 3 (LRAD3), which is expressed in neurons. The LRAD3 gene encodes an approximately 50 kDa type I transmembrane receptor with an ectodomain containing three LDLa repeats, a transmembrane domain and a cytoplasmic domain containing a conserved dileucine internalization motif and two polyproline motifs with potential to interact with WW domain containing proteins. Immunohistochemical analysis of mouse brain reveals LRAD3 expression in the cortex and hippocampus. In the mouse hippocampal derived cell line, HT22, LRAD3 partially co-localizes with amyloid precursor protein (APP), and interacts with APP as revealed by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. To identify the portion of APP that interacts with LRAD3, we employed solid phase binding assays which demonstrated that LRAD3 failed to bind to a soluble APP fragment (sAPPα) released following α-secretase cleavage. In contrast, C99, the β-secretase product that remains cell associated, co-precipitated with LRAD3, confirming that regions within this portion of APP are important for associating with LRAD3. The association of LRAD3 with APP increases the amyloidogenic pathway of APP processing, resulting in a decrease in sAPPα production and increased Aβ peptide production. Pulse-chase experiments confirm that LRAD3 expression significantly decreases the cellular half-live of mature APP. These results reveal that LRAD3 influences APP processing and raises the possibility that LRAD3 alters APP function in neurons including its downstream signaling. PMID:21795536

  8. Functional selective oxytocin-derived agonists discriminate between individual G protein family subtypes.

    PubMed

    Busnelli, Marta; Saulière, Aude; Manning, Maurice; Bouvier, Michel; Galés, Celine; Chini, Bice

    2012-02-01

    We used a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer biosensor to screen for functional selective ligands of the human oxytocin (OT) receptor. We demonstrated that OT promoted the direct engagement and activation of G(q) and all the G(i/o) subtypes at the OT receptor. Other peptidic analogues, chosen because of specific substitutions in key OT structural/functional residues, all showed biased activation of G protein subtypes. No ligand, except OT, activated G(oA) or G(oB), and, with only one exception, all of the peptides that activated G(q) also activated G(i2) and G(i3) but not G(i1), G(oA), or G(oB), indicating a strong bias toward these subunits. Two peptides (DNalOVT and atosiban) activated only G(i1) or G(i3), failed to recruit β-arrestins, and did not induce receptor internalization, providing the first clear examples of ligands differentiating individual G(i/o) family members. Both analogs inhibited cell proliferation, showing that a single G(i) subtype-mediated pathway is sufficient to prompt this physiological response. These analogs represent unique tools for examining the contribution of G(i/o) members in complex biological responses and open the way to the development of drugs with peculiar selectivity profiles. This is of particular relevance because OT has been shown to improve symptoms in neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders characterized by abnormal social behaviors, such as autism. Functional selective ligands, activating a specific G protein signaling pathway, may possess a higher efficacy and specificity on OT-based therapeutics. PMID:22069312

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis efpA encodes an efflux protein of the QacA transporter family.

    PubMed Central

    Doran, J L; Pang, Y; Mdluli, K E; Moran, A J; Victor, T C; Stokes, R W; Mahenthiralingam, E; Kreiswirth, B N; Butt, J L; Baron, G S; Treit, J D; Kerr, V J; Van Helden, P D; Roberts, M C; Nano, F E

    1997-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv efpA gene encodes a putative efflux protein, EfpA, of 55,670 Da. The deduced EfpA protein was similar in secondary structure to Pur8, MmrA, TcmA, LfrA, EmrB, and other members of the QacA transporter family (QacA TF) which mediate antibiotic and chemical resistance in bacteria and yeast. The predicted EfpA sequence possessed all transporter motifs characteristic of the QacA TF, including those associated with proton-antiport function and the motif considered to be specific to exporters. The 1,590-bp efpA open reading frame was G+C rich (65%), whereas the 40-bp region immediately upstream had an A+T bias (35% G+C). Reverse transcriptase-PCR assays indicated that efpA was expressed in vitro and in situ. Putative promoter sequences were partially overlapped by the A+T-rich region and by a region capable of forming alternative secondary structures indicative of transcriptional regulation in analogous systems. PCR single-stranded conformational polymorphism analysis demonstrated that these upstream flanking sequences and the 231-bp, 5' coding region are highly conserved among both drug-sensitive and multiply-drug-resistant isolates of M. tuberculosis. The efpA gene was present in the slow-growing human pathogens M. tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae, and Mycobacterium bovis and in the opportunistic human pathogens Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellular. However, efpA was not present in 17 other opportunistically pathogenic or nonpathogenic mycobacterial species. PMID:9008277

  10. Nitrobindin: An Ubiquitous Family of All β-Barrel Heme-proteins.

    PubMed

    De Simone, Giovanna; Ascenzi, Paolo; Polticelli, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    Rhodnius prolixus nitrophorins (Rp-NPs), Arabidopsis thaliana nitrobindin (At-Nb), and Homo sapiens THAP4 (Hs-THAP4) are the unique known proteins that use a β-barrel fold to bind ferric heme, which is devoted to NO transport and/or catalysis. The eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel Rp-NPs, which represent the only heme-binding lipocalins, are devoted to deliver NO into the blood vessel of the host and to scavenge histamine during blood sucking. Regarding Nbs, crystallographic data suggest the ability of At-Nb and Hs-THAP4 to bind ferric heme; however, no data are available with respect to these functions in the natural host. Here, a bioinformatics investigation based on the amino acid sequences and three-dimensional structures of At-Nb and Hs-THAP4 suggests a conservation of the 10-stranded antiparallel β-barrel Nb structural module in all life kingdoms of the evolutionary ladder. In particular, amino acid residues involved in the heme recognition and in the structure stabilization of the Nb structural module are highly conserved (identity > 29%; homology > 83%). Moreover, molecular models of putative Nbs from different organisms match very well with each other and known three-dimensional structures of Nbs. Furthermore, phylogenetic tree reconstruction indicates that NPs and Nbs group in distinct clades. These data indicate that 10-stranded β-barrel Nbs constitute a new ubiquitous heme protein family spanning from bacteria to Homo sapiens. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(6):423-428, 2016. PMID:27080126

  11. Mammalian molybdo-flavoenzymes, an expanding family of proteins: structure, genetics, regulation, function and pathophysiology.

    PubMed Central

    Garattini, Enrico; Mendel, Ralf; Romão, Maria João; Wright, Richard; Terao, Mineko

    2003-01-01

    The molybdo-flavoenzymes are structurally related proteins that require a molybdopterin cofactor and FAD for their catalytic activity. In mammals, four enzymes are known: xanthine oxidoreductase, aldehyde oxidase and two recently described mouse proteins known as aldehyde oxidase homologue 1 and aldehyde oxidase homologue 2. The present review article summarizes current knowledge on the structure, enzymology, genetics, regulation and pathophysiology of mammalian molybdo-flavoenzymes. Molybdo-flavoenzymes are structurally complex oxidoreductases with an equally complex mechanism of catalysis. Our knowledge has greatly increased due to the recent crystallization of two xanthine oxidoreductases and the determination of the amino acid sequences of many members of the family. The evolution of molybdo-flavoenzymes can now be traced, given the availability of the structures of the corresponding genes in many organisms. The genes coding for molybdo-flavoenzymes are expressed in a cell-specific fashion and are controlled by endogenous and exogenous stimuli. The recent cloning of the genes involved in the biosynthesis of the molybdenum cofactor has increased our knowledge on the assembly of the apo-forms of molybdo-flavoproteins into the corresponding holo-forms. Xanthine oxidoreductase is the key enzyme in the catabolism of purines, although recent data suggest that the physiological function of this enzyme is more complex than previously assumed. The enzyme has been implicated in such diverse pathological situations as organ ischaemia, inflammation and infection. At present, very little is known about the pathophysiological relevance of aldehyde oxidase, aldehyde oxidase homologue 1 and aldehyde oxidase homologue 2, which do not as yet have an accepted endogenous substrate. PMID:12578558

  12. Roles of Hcp family proteins in the pathogenesis of the porcine extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli type VI secretion system.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ying; Wang, Xiangru; Shou, Jin; Zong, Bingbing; Zhang, Yanyan; Tan, Jia; Chen, Jing; Hu, Linlin; Zhu, Yongwei; Chen, Huanchun; Tan, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Hcp (hemolysin-coregulated protein) is considered a vital component of the functional T6SS (Type VI Secretion System), which is a newly discovered secretion system. Our laboratory has previously sequenced the whole genome of porcine extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) strain PCN033, and identified an integrated T6SS encoding three different hcp family genes. In this study, we first identified a functional T6SS in porcine ExPEC strain PCN033, and demonstrated that the Hcp family proteins were involved in bacterial competition and the interactions with other cells. Interestingly, the three Hcp proteins had different functions. Hcp2 functioned predominantly in bacterial competition; all three proteins were involved in the colonization of mice; and Hcp1 and Hcp3 were predominantly contributed to bacterial-eukaryotic cell interactions. We showed an active T6SS in porcine ExPEC strain PCN033, and the Hcp family proteins had different functions in their interaction with other bacteria or host cells. PMID:27229766

  13. Roles of Hcp family proteins in the pathogenesis of the porcine extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli type VI secretion system

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ying; Wang, Xiangru; Shou, Jin; Zong, Bingbing; Zhang, Yanyan; Tan, Jia; Chen, Jing; Hu, Linlin; Zhu, Yongwei; Chen, Huanchun; Tan, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Hcp (hemolysin-coregulated protein) is considered a vital component of the functional T6SS (Type VI Secretion System), which is a newly discovered secretion system. Our laboratory has previously sequenced the whole genome of porcine extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) strain PCN033, and identified an integrated T6SS encoding three different hcp family genes. In this study, we first identified a functional T6SS in porcine ExPEC strain PCN033, and demonstrated that the Hcp family proteins were involved in bacterial competition and the interactions with other cells. Interestingly, the three Hcp proteins had different functions. Hcp2 functioned predominantly in bacterial competition; all three proteins were involved in the colonization of mice; and Hcp1 and Hcp3 were predominantly contributed to bacterial-eukaryotic cell interactions. We showed an active T6SS in porcine ExPEC strain PCN033, and the Hcp family proteins had different functions in their interaction with other bacteria or host cells. PMID:27229766

  14. A first-principles model of early evolution: emergence of gene families, species, and preferred protein folds.

    PubMed

    Zeldovich, Konstantin B; Chen, Peiqiu; Shakhnovich, Boris E; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2007-07-01

    In this work we develop a microscopic physical model of early evolution where phenotype--organism life expectancy--is directly related to genotype--the stability of its proteins in their native conformations-which can be determined exactly in the model. Simulating the model on a computer, we consistently observe the "Big Bang" scenario whereby exponential population growth ensues as soon as favorable sequence-structure combinations (precursors of stable proteins) are discovered. Upon that, random diversity of the structural space abruptly collapses into a small set of preferred proteins. We observe that protein folds remain stable and abundant in the population at timescales much greater than mutation or organism lifetime, and the distribution of the lifetimes of dominant folds in a population approximately follows a power law. The separation of evolutionary timescales between discovery of new folds and generation of new sequences gives rise to emergence of protein families and superfamilies whose sizes are power-law distributed, closely matching the same distributions for real proteins. On the population level we observe emergence of species--subpopulations that carry similar genomes. Further, we present a simple theory that relates stability of evolving proteins to the sizes of emerging genomes. Together, these results provide a microscopic first-principles picture of how first-gene families developed in the course of early evolution. PMID:17630830

  15. Protein interactions with HER-family receptors can have different characteristics depending on the hosting cell line.

    PubMed

    Barta, Pavel; Malmberg, Jennie; Melicharova, Ludmila; Strandgård, John; Orlova, Anna; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Laznicek, Milan; Andersson, Karl

    2012-05-01

    Cell lines are common model systems in the development of therapeutic proteins and in the research on cellular functions and dysfunctions. In this field, the protein interaction assay is a frequently used tool for assessing the adequacy of a protein for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. In this study, we investigated the extent to which the interaction characteristics depend on the choice of cell line for HER-family receptors. The interaction characteristics of two therapeutic antibodies (trastuzumab and cetuximab) and one Affibody molecule (ZHER2:342), interacting with the intended receptor were characterized with high precision using an automated real-time interaction method, in different cell lines (HaCaT, A431, HEP-G2, SKOV3, PC3, DU-145). Clear differences in binding affinity and kinetics, up to one order of magnitude, were found for the interaction of the same protein binding to the same receptor on different cells for all three proteins. For HER-family receptors, it is therefore important to refer to the measured affinity for a protein-receptor interaction together with the hosting cell line. The ability to accurately measure affinity and kinetics of a protein-receptor interaction on cell lines of different origins may increase the understanding of underlying receptor biology, and impact the selection of candidates in the development of therapeutic or diagnostic agents. PMID:22200885

  16. A First-Principles Model of Early Evolution: Emergence of Gene Families, Species, and Preferred Protein Folds

    PubMed Central

    Zeldovich, Konstantin B; Chen, Peiqiu; Shakhnovich, Boris E; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2007-01-01

    In this work we develop a microscopic physical model of early evolution where phenotype—organism life expectancy—is directly related to genotype—the stability of its proteins in their native conformations—which can be determined exactly in the model. Simulating the model on a computer, we consistently observe the “Big Bang” scenario whereby exponential population growth ensues as soon as favorable sequence–structure combinations (precursors of stable proteins) are discovered. Upon that, random diversity of the structural space abruptly collapses into a small set of preferred proteins. We observe that protein folds remain stable and abundant in the population at timescales much greater than mutation or organism lifetime, and the distribution of the lifetimes of dominant folds in a population approximately follows a power law. The separation of evolutionary timescales between discovery of new folds and generation of new sequences gives rise to emergence of protein families and superfamilies whose sizes are power-law distributed, closely matching the same distributions for real proteins. On the population level we observe emergence of species—subpopulations that carry similar genomes. Further, we present a simple theory that relates stability of evolving proteins to the sizes of emerging genomes. Together, these results provide a microscopic first-principles picture of how first-gene families developed in the course of early evolution. PMID:17630830

  17. The TopoVIB-Like protein family is required for meiotic DNA double-strand break formation.

    PubMed

    Robert, T; Nore, A; Brun, C; Maffre, C; Crimi, B; Bourbon, H-M; de Massy, B

    2016-02-26

    Meiotic recombination is induced by the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) catalyzed by SPO11, the ortholog of subunit A of TopoVI DNA topoisomerase (TopoVIA). TopoVI activity requires the interaction between A and B subunits. We identified a conserved family of plant and animal proteins [the TOPOVIB-Like (TOPOVIBL) family] that share strong structural similarity to the TopoVIB subunit of TopoVI DNA topoisomerase. We further characterize the meiotic recombination proteins Rec102 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), Rec6 (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), and MEI-P22 (Drosophila melanogaster) as homologs to the transducer domain of TopoVIB. We demonstrate that the mouse TOPOVIBL protein interacts and forms a complex with SPO11 and is required for meiotic DSB formation. We conclude that meiotic DSBs are catalyzed by a complex involving SPO11 and TOPOVIBL. PMID:26917764

  18. Structural basis for antagonizing a host restriction factor by C7 family of poxvirus host-range proteins

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiangzhi; Krumm, Brian; Li, Yongchao; Deng, Junpeng; Xiang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Human sterile alpha motif domain-containing 9 (SAMD9) protein is a host restriction factor for poxviruses, but it can be overcome by some poxvirus host-range proteins that share homology with vaccinia virus C7 protein. To understand the mechanism of action for this important family of host-range factors, we determined the crystal structures of C7 and myxoma virus M64, a C7 family member that is unable to antagonize SAMD9. Despite their different functions and only 23% sequence identity, the two proteins have very similar overall structures, displaying a previously unidentified fold comprised of a compact 12-stranded antiparallel β-sandwich wrapped in two short α helices. Extensive structure-guided mutagenesis of C7 identified three loops clustered on one edge of the β sandwich as critical for viral replication and binding with SAMD9. The loops are characterized with functionally important negatively charged, positively charged, and hydrophobic residues, respectively, together forming a unique “three-fingered molecular claw.” The key residues of the claw are not conserved in two C7 family members that do not antagonize SAMD9 but are conserved in distantly related C7 family members from four poxvirus genera that infect diverse mammalian species. Indeed, we found that all in the latter group of proteins bind SAMD9. Taken together, our data indicate that diverse mammalian poxviruses use a conserved molecular claw in a C7-like protein to target SAMD9 and overcome host restriction. PMID:26578811

  19. Protein sequence evidence for monophyly of the carnivore families Procyonidae and Mustelidae.

    PubMed

    de Jong, W W

    1986-05-01

    The amino acid sequence of the eye lens protein alpha-crystallin A of the ring-tailed cat, Bassariscus astutus, has been determined. The sequence of the Bassariscus alpha A chain, which is 173 residues long, was compared with the previously determined set of 41 mammalian alpha A sequences. Among the investigated carnivores (dog, cat, sloth bear, American mink, gray seal, and California sea lion) the Bassariscus alpha A sequence exclusively shares two amino acid replacements with the alpha A chain of the mink, Mustela vison: 7 His----Gln and 61 Ile----Val. The Mustela and Bassariscus alpha A sequences differ at only three positions and have no replacements in common with any of the other investigated carnivore alpha A chains. Furthermore, the replacement 7 His----Gln has only been found in three-toed sloth, whereas 61 Ile----Val occurs scattered in three other taxa: pig, rhinoceros, and prosimians. It thus is most parsimonious to join Bassariscus and Mustela--and consequently their respective families, Procyonidae and Mustelidae--as sister groups in the phylogenetic tree of mammalian alpha A sequences. PMID:3444403

  20. Loss of Prkar1a leads to Bcl-2 family protein induction and cachexia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gangoda, L; Doerflinger, M; Srivastava, R; Narayan, N; Edgington, L E; Orian, J; Hawkins, C; O'Reilly, L A; Gu, H; Bogyo, M; Ekert, P; Strasser, A; Puthalakath, H

    2014-01-01

    Loss of function mutations in the Prkar1a gene are the cause of most cases of Carney complex disorder. Defects in Prkar1a are thought to cause hyper-activation of PKA signalling, which drives neoplastic transformation, and Prkar1a is therefore considered to be a tumour suppressor. Here we show that loss of Prkar1a in genetically modified mice caused transcriptional activation of several proapoptotic Bcl-2 family members and thereby caused cell death. Interestingly, combined loss of Bim and Prkar1a increased colony formation of fibroblasts in culture and promoted their growth as tumours in immune-deficient mice. Apart from inducing apoptosis, systemic deletion of Prkar1a caused cachexia with muscle loss, macrophage activation and increased lipolysis as well as serum triglyceride levels. Loss of single allele of Prkar1a did not enhance tumour development in a skin cancer model, but surprisingly, when combined with the loss of Bim, caused a significant delay in tumorigenesis and this was associated with upregulation of other BH3-only proteins, PUMA and NOXA. These results show that loss of Prkar1a can only promote tumorigenesis when Prkar1a-mediated apoptosis is somehow countered. PMID:25012505

  1. Lincomycin Biosynthesis Involves a Tyrosine Hydroxylating Heme Protein of an Unusual Enzyme Family

    PubMed Central

    Novotna, Jitka; Olsovska, Jana; Novak, Petr; Mojzes, Peter; Chaloupkova, Radka; Kamenik, Zdenek; Spizek, Jaroslav; Kutejova, Eva; Mareckova, Marketa; Tichy, Pavel; Damborsky, Jiri; Janata, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    The gene lmbB2 of the lincomycin biosynthetic gene cluster of Streptomyces lincolnensis ATCC 25466 was shown to code for an unusual tyrosine hydroxylating enzyme involved in the biosynthetic pathway of this clinically important antibiotic. LmbB2 was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified near to homogeneity and shown to convert tyrosine to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA). In contrast to the well-known tyrosine hydroxylases (EC 1.14.16.2) and tyrosinases (EC 1.14.18.1), LmbB2 was identified as a heme protein. Mass spectrometry and Soret band-excited Raman spectroscopy of LmbB2 showed that LmbB2 contains heme b as prosthetic group. The CO-reduced differential absorption spectra of LmbB2 showed that the coordination of Fe was different from that of cytochrome P450 enzymes. LmbB2 exhibits sequence similarity to Orf13 of the anthramycin biosynthetic gene cluster, which has recently been classified as a heme peroxidase. Tyrosine hydroxylating activity of LmbB2 yielding DOPA in the presence of (6R)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-L-biopterin (BH4) was also observed. Reaction mechanism of this unique heme peroxidases family is discussed. Also, tyrosine hydroxylation was confirmed as the first step of the amino acid branch of the lincomycin biosynthesis. PMID:24324587

  2. YcgC represents a new protein deacetylase family in prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Shun; Guo, Shu-Juan; Chen, Chien-Sheng; Liu, Cheng-Xi; Jiang, He-Wei; Ge, Feng; Deng, Jiao-Yu; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Li, Yang; Qi, Bang-Ruo; Ahn, Young-Hoon; Cole, Philip A; Zhu, Heng; Tao, Sheng-Ce

    2015-01-01

    Reversible lysine acetylation is one of the most important protein posttranslational modifications that plays essential roles in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. However, only a few lysine deacetylases (KDACs) have been identified in prokaryotes, perhaps in part due to their limited sequence homology. Herein, we developed a ‘clip-chip’ strategy to enable unbiased, activity-based discovery of novel KDACs in the Escherichia coli proteome. In-depth biochemical characterization confirmed that YcgC is a serine hydrolase involving Ser200 as the catalytic nucleophile for lysine deacetylation and does not use NAD+ or Zn2+ like other established KDACs. Further, in vivo characterization demonstrated that YcgC regulates transcription by catalyzing deacetylation of Lys52 and Lys62 of a transcriptional repressor RutR. Importantly, YcgC targets a distinct set of substrates from the only known E. coli KDAC CobB. Analysis of YcgC’s bacterial homologs confirmed that they also exhibit KDAC activity. YcgC thus represents a novel family of prokaryotic KDACs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05322.001 PMID:26716769

  3. Loss of Prkar1a leads to Bcl-2 family protein induction and cachexia in mice.

    PubMed

    Gangoda, L; Doerflinger, M; Srivastava, R; Narayan, N; Edgington, L E; Orian, J; Hawkins, C; O'Reilly, L A; Gu, H; Bogyo, M; Ekert, P; Strasser, A; Puthalakath, H

    2014-11-01

    Loss of function mutations in the Prkar1a gene are the cause of most cases of Carney complex disorder. Defects in Prkar1a are thought to cause hyper-activation of PKA signalling, which drives neoplastic transformation, and Prkar1a is therefore considered to be a tumour suppressor. Here we show that loss of Prkar1a in genetically modified mice caused transcriptional activation of several proapoptotic Bcl-2 family members and thereby caused cell death. Interestingly, combined loss of Bim and Prkar1a increased colony formation of fibroblasts in culture and promoted their growth as tumours in immune-deficient mice. Apart from inducing apoptosis, systemic deletion of Prkar1a caused cachexia with muscle loss, macrophage activation and increased lipolysis as well as serum triglyceride levels. Loss of single allele of Prkar1a did not enhance tumour development in a skin cancer model, but surprisingly, when combined with the loss of Bim, caused a significant delay in tumorigenesis and this was associated with upregulation of other BH3-only proteins, PUMA and NOXA. These results show that loss of Prkar1a can only promote tumorigenesis when Prkar1a-mediated apoptosis is somehow countered. PMID:25012505

  4. Drosophila DOCK family protein sponge regulates the JNK pathway during thorax development.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Kazushige; Ozasa, Fumito; Eguchi, Koichi; Yoshioka, Yasuhide; Yoshida, Hideki; Hiai, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2014-01-01

    The dedicator of cytokinesis (DOCK) family proteins that are conserved in a wide variety of species are known as DOCK1-DOCK11 in mammals. The Sponge (Spg) is a Drosophila counterpart to the mammalian DOCK3. Specific knockdown of spg by pannir-GAL4 or apterous-GAL4 driver in wing discs induced split thorax phenotype in adults. Reduction of the Drosophila c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), basket (bsk) gene dose enhanced the spg knockdown-induced phenotype. Conversely, overexpression of bsk suppressed the split thorax phenotype. Monitoring JNK activity in the wing imaginal discs by immunostaining with anti-phosphorylated JNK (anti-pJNK) antibody together with examination of lacZ expression in a puckered-lacZ enhancer trap line revealed the strong reduction of the JNK activity in the spg knockdown clones. This was further confirmed by Western immunoblot analysis of extracts from wing discs of spg knockdown fly with anti-pJNK antibody. Furthermore, the Duolink in situ Proximity Ligation Assay method detected interaction signals between Spg and Rac1 in the wing discs. Taken together, these results indicate Spg positively regulates JNK pathway that is required for thorax development and the regulation is mediated by interaction with Rac1. PMID:25311449

  5. Direct Involvement of Retinoblastoma Family Proteins in DNA Repair by Non-homologous End-Joining

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Rebecca; Zoumpoulidou, Georgia; Luczynski, Maciej T.; Rieger, Simone; Moquet, Jayne; Spanswick, Victoria J.; Hartley, John A.; Rothkamm, Kai; Huang, Paul H.; Mittnacht, Sibylle

    2015-01-01

    Summary Deficiencies in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair lead to genetic instability, a recognized cause of cancer initiation and evolution. We report that the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB1) is required for DNA DSB repair by canonical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ). Support of cNHEJ involves a mechanism independent of RB1’s cell-cycle function and depends on its amino terminal domain with which it binds to NHEJ components XRCC5 and XRCC6. Cells with engineered loss of RB family function as well as cancer-derived cells with mutational RB1 loss show substantially reduced levels of cNHEJ. RB1 variants disabled for the interaction with XRCC5 and XRCC6, including a cancer-associated variant, are unable to support cNHEJ despite being able to confer cell-cycle control. Our data identify RB1 loss as a candidate driver of structural genomic instability and a causative factor for cancer somatic heterogeneity and evolution. PMID:25818292

  6. Differential distributions of the Ca2+ -dependent activator protein for secretion family proteins (CAPS2 and CAPS1) in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Sadakata, Tetsushi; Itakura, Makoto; Kozaki, Shunji; Sekine, Yukiko; Takahashi, Masami; Furuichi, Teiichi

    2006-04-20

    The Ca(2+)-dependent activator protein for secretion (CAPS/Cadps) family consists of two members, CAPS1 and CAPS2, and plays an important role in secretory granule exocytosis. It has been shown that CAPS1 regulates catecholamine release from neuroendocrine cells, whereas CAPS2 is involved in the release of two neurotrophins, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), from parallel fibers of cerebellar granule cells. Although both CAPS proteins are expressed predominantly in the brain, their cellular and regional distributions in the brain are largely unknown. In this study we analyzed the immunohistochemical distributions of the CAPS family proteins in the mouse brain. In most areas of the embryonic nervous system CAPS1 and CAPS2 proteins were complementarily expressed. In the postnatal brain, CAPS1 was widespread at different levels. On the other hand, CAPS2 was localized to distinct cell types and fibers of various brain regions, including the olfactory bulb, cerebrum, hippocampal formation, thalamus, mesencephalic tegmentum, cerebellum, medulla, and spinal cord, except for some regions that overlapped with CAPS1. These CAPS2 cellular distribution patterns had the marked feature of coinciding with those of BDNF in various brain regions. Immunolabels for CAPS2 were also colocalized with those for some proteins related to exocytosis (VAMP and SNAP-25) and endocytosis (Dynamin I) in the cell soma and processes of the mesencephalic tegmentum and cerebellum, suggesting that these proteins might be involved in the dynamics of CAPS2-associated vesicles, although their colocalization on vesicles remains elusive. These results demonstrate that the CAPS family proteins are involved in the secretion of different secretory substances in developing and postnatal brains, and that CAPS2 is probably involved in BDNF secretion in many brain areas. PMID:16506193

  7. Identification of a family of fatty acid-speciated Sonic Hedgehog proteins, whose members display differential biological properties

    PubMed Central

    Houel, Stephane; Rodgriguez-Blanco, Jezabel; Singh, Samer; Schilling, Neal; J.Capobianco, Anthony; Ahn, Natalie G.; Robbins, David J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Hedgehog (HH) proteins are proteolytically processed into a biologically active form, which is covalently modified by cholesterol and palmitate. However, most studies of HH biogenesis have characterized protein from cells in which HH is over-expressed. We purified Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) from cells expressing physiologically relevant levels, and showed that it was more potent than SHH isolated from over-expressing cells. Furthermore, the SHH in our preparations were modified with a diverse spectrum of fatty acids on their amino-termini, and this spectrum of fatty acids varied dramatically depending on the growth conditions of the cells. The fatty acid composition of SHH affected its trafficking to lipid rafts, as well as its potency. Our results suggest that HH proteins exist as a family of diverse lipid-speciated proteins, which might be altered in different physiological and pathological contexts to regulate distinct properties of HH proteins. PMID:25732819

  8. A direct role for the Sec1/Munc18-family protein Vps33 as a template for SNARE assembly.

    PubMed

    Baker, Richard W; Jeffrey, Philip D; Zick, Michael; Phillips, Ben P; Wickner, William T; Hughson, Frederick M

    2015-09-01

    Fusion of intracellular transport vesicles requires soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) and Sec1/Munc18-family (SM) proteins. Membrane-bridging SNARE complexes are critical for fusion, but their spontaneous assembly is inefficient and may require SM proteins in vivo. We report x-ray structures of Vps33, the SM subunit of the yeast homotypic fusion and vacuole protein-sorting (HOPS) complex, bound to two individual SNAREs. The two SNAREs, one from each membrane, are held in the correct orientation and register for subsequent complex assembly. Vps33 and potentially other SM proteins could thus act as templates for generating partially zipped SNARE assembly intermediates. HOPS was essential to mediate SNARE complex assembly at physiological SNARE concentrations. Thus, Vps33 appears to catalyze SNARE complex assembly through specific SNARE motif recognition. PMID:26339030

  9. Human Umbilical Tissue-Derived Cells Promote Synapse Formation and Neurite Outgrowth via Thrombospondin Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Sehwon; Kim, Namsoo; Yin, Henry H.; Harris, Ian R.; Dejneka, Nadine S.

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy demonstrates great potential for the treatment of neurological disorders. Human umbilical tissue-derived cells (hUTCs) were previously shown to have protective and regenerative effects in animal models of stroke and retinal degeneration, but the underlying therapeutic mechanisms are unknown. Because synaptic dysfunction, synapse loss, degeneration of neuronal processes, and neuronal death are hallmarks of neurological diseases and retinal degenerations, we tested whether hUTCs contribute to tissue repair and regeneration by stimulating synapse formation, neurite outgrowth, and neuronal survival. To do so, we used a purified rat retinal ganglion cell culture system and found that hUTCs secrete factors that strongly promote excitatory synaptic connectivity and enhance neuronal survival. Additionally, we demonstrated that hUTCs support neurite outgrowth under normal culture conditions and in the presence of the growth-inhibitory proteins chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, myelin basic protein, or Nogo-A (reticulon 4). Furthermore, through biochemical fractionation and pharmacology, we identified the major hUTC-secreted synaptogenic factors as the thrombospondin family proteins (TSPs), TSP1, TSP2, and TSP4. Silencing TSP expression in hUTCs, using small RNA interference, eliminated both the synaptogenic function of these cells and their ability to promote neurite outgrowth. However, the majority of the prosurvival functions of hUTC-conditioned media was spared after TSP knockdown, indicating that hUTCs secrete additional neurotrophic factors. Together, our findings demonstrate that hUTCs affect multiple aspects of neuronal health and connectivity through secreted factors, and each of these paracrine effects may individually contribute to the therapeutic function of these cells. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Human umbilical tissue-derived cells (hUTC) are currently under clinical investigation for the treatment of geographic atrophy secondary to age-related macular

  10. Multi-species protein similarity clustering reveals novel expanded immune gene families in the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Ian C; Modak, Tejashree H; Lane, Chris E; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta

    2016-06-01

    Comparative genomics research in non-model species has highlighted how invertebrate hosts possess complex diversified repertoires of immune molecules. The levels of diversification in particular immune gene families appear to differ between invertebrate lineages and even between species within lineages, reflecting differences not only in evolutionary histories, but also in life histories, environmental niches, and pathogen exposures. The goal of this research was to identify immune-related gene families experiencing high levels of diversification in eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica. Families containing 1) transcripts differentially expressed in eastern oysters in response to bacterial challenge and 2) a larger number of transcripts compared to other species included those coding for the C1q and C-type lectin domain containing proteins (C1qDC and CTLDC), GTPase of the immune-associated proteins (GIMAP), scavenger receptors (SR), fibrinogen-C domain containing proteins (also known as FREPs), dopamine beta-hydrolase (DBH), interferon-inducible 44 (IFI44), serine protease inhibitors, apextrin, and dermatopontin. Phylogenetic analysis of two of the families significantly expanded in bivalves, IFI44 and GIMAP, showed a patchy distribution within both protostomes and deuterostomes, suggesting multiple independent losses and lineage-specific expansions. Increased availability of genomic information for a broader range of non-model species broadly distributed through vertebrate and invertebrate phyla will likely lead to improved knowledge on mechanisms of immune-gene diversification. PMID:27033806

  11. Bacillus cereus efflux protein BC3310 – a multidrug transporter of the unknown major facilitator family, UMF-2

    PubMed Central

    Kroeger, Jasmin K.; Hassan, Karl; Vörös, Aniko; Simm, Roger; Saidijam, Massoud; Bettaney, Kim E.; Bechthold, Andreas; Paulsen, Ian T.; Henderson, Peter J. F.; Kolstø, Anne-Brit

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic classification divides the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) into 82 families, including 25 families that are comprised of transporters with no characterized functions. This study describes functional data for BC3310 from Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579, a member of the “unknown major facilitator family-2” (UMF-2). BC3310 was shown to be a multidrug efflux pump conferring resistance to ethidium bromide, SDS and silver nitrate when heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli DH5α ΔacrAB. A conserved aspartate residue (D105) in putative transmembrane helix 4 was identified, which was essential for the energy dependent ethidium bromide efflux by BC3310. Transport proteins of the MFS comprise specific sequence motifs. Sequence analysis of UMF-2 proteins revealed that they carry a variant of the MFS motif A, which may be used as a marker to distinguish easily between this family and other MFS proteins. Genes orthologous to bc3310 are highly conserved within the B. cereus group of organisms and thus belong to the core genome, suggesting an important conserved functional role in the normal physiology of these bacteria. PMID:26528249

  12. Crystal Structure of Cytomegalovirus IE1 Protein Reveals Targeting of TRIM Family Member PML via Coiled-Coil Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sevvana, Madhumati; Otto, Victoria; Schilling, Eva-Maria; Stump, Joachim D.; Müller, Regina; Reuter, Nina; Sticht, Heinrich; Muller, Yves A.; Stamminger, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    PML nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) are enigmatic structures of the cell nucleus that act as key mediators of intrinsic immunity against viral pathogens. PML itself is a member of the E3-ligase TRIM family of proteins that regulates a variety of innate immune signaling pathways. Consequently, viruses have evolved effector proteins to modify PML-NBs; however, little is known concerning structure-function relationships of viral antagonists. The herpesvirus human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) expresses the abundant immediate-early protein IE1 that colocalizes with PML-NBs and induces their dispersal, which correlates with the antagonization of NB-mediated intrinsic immunity. Here, we delineate the molecular basis for this antagonization by presenting the first crystal structure for the evolutionary conserved primate cytomegalovirus IE1 proteins. We show that IE1 consists of a globular core (IE1CORE) flanked by intrinsically disordered regions. The 2.3 Å crystal structure of IE1CORE displays an all α-helical, femur-shaped fold, which lacks overall fold similarity with known protein structures, but shares secondary structure features recently observed in the coiled-coil domain of TRIM proteins. Yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that IE1CORE binds efficiently to the TRIM family member PML, and is able to induce PML deSUMOylation. Intriguingly, this results in the release of NB-associated proteins into the nucleoplasm, but not of PML itself. Importantly, we show that PML deSUMOylation by IE1CORE is sufficient to antagonize PML-NB-instituted intrinsic immunity. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that IE1CORE binds via the coiled-coil domain to PML and also interacts with TRIM5α We propose that IE1CORE sequesters PML and possibly other TRIM family members via structural mimicry using an extended binding surface formed by the coiled-coil region. This mode of interaction might render the antagonizing activity less susceptible to

  13. Comprehensive characterization of expression patterns of protein 4.1 family members in mouse adrenal gland: implications for functions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Liu, Congrong; Debnath, Gargi; Baines, Anthony J; Conboy, John G; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli

    2010-10-01

    The members of the protein 4.1 family, 4.1R, 4.1G, 4.1N, and 4.1B, are encoded by four genes, all of which undergo complex alternative splicing. It is well established that 4.1R, the prototypical member of the family, serves as an adapter that links the spectrin-actin based cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane in red cells. It is required for mechanical resilience of the membrane, and it ensures the cell surface accumulation of selected membrane proteins. However, the function of 4.1 proteins outside erythrocytes remains under-explored, especially in endocrine tissues. Transcripts of all 4.1 homologs have previously been documented to be abundantly expressed in adrenal gland. In order to begin to decipher the function of 4.1 proteins in adrenal gland, we performed a detailed characterization of the expression pattern of various 4.1 proteins and their cellular localization. We show that 4.1R (~80 and ~135 kDa) splice forms are expressed on the membrane of all cells, while a ~160 kDa 4.1G splice form is distributed in the cytoplasm and the membrane of zona glomerulosa and of medullary cells. Two 4.1N splice forms, ~135 and ~95 kDa, are present in the peri-nuclear region of both zona glomerulosa and medullary cells, while a single ~130 kDa 4.1B splice form, is detected in all layers of adrenal gland in both the cytoplasm and the membrane. The characterization of distinct splice forms of various 4.1 proteins with diverse cellular and sub-cellular localization indicates multiple functions for this family of proteins in endocrine functions of adrenal gland. PMID:20890708

  14. Eubacterial SpoVG Homologs Constitute a New Family of Site-Specific DNA-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jutras, Brandon L.; Chenail, Alicia M.; Rowland, Christi L.; Carroll, Dustin; Miller, M. Clarke; Bykowski, Tomasz; Stevenson, Brian

    2013-01-01

    A site-specific DNA-binding protein was purified from Borrelia burgdorferi cytoplasmic extracts, and determined to be a member of the highly conserved SpoVG family. This is the first time a function has been attributed to any of these ubiquitous bacterial proteins. Further investigations into SpoVG orthologues indicated that the Staphylococcus aureus protein also binds DNA, but interacts preferentially with a distinct nucleic acid sequence. Site-directed mutagenesis and domain swapping between the S. aureus and B. burgdorferi proteins identified that a 6-residue stretch of the SpoVG α-helix contributes to DNA sequence specificity. Two additional, highly conserved amino acid residues on an adjacent β-sheet are essential for DNA-binding, apparently by contacts with the DNA phosphate backbone. Results of these studies thus identified a novel family of bacterial DNA-binding proteins, developed a model of SpoVG-DNA interactions, and provide direction for future functional studies on these wide-spread proteins. PMID:23818957

  15. Candida albicans Agglutinin-Like Sequence (Als) Family Vignettes: A Review of Als Protein Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, Lois L.; Cota, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    Approximately two decades have passed since the description of the first gene in the Candida albicans ALS (agglutinin-like sequence) family. Since that time, much has been learned about the composition of the family and the function of its encoded cell-surface glycoproteins. Solution of the structure of the Als adhesive domain provides the opportunity to evaluate the molecular basis for protein function. This review article is formatted as a series of fundamental questions and explores the diversity of the Als proteins, as well as their role in ligand binding, aggregative effects, and attachment to abiotic surfaces. Interaction of Als proteins with each other, their functional equivalence, and the effects of protein abundance on phenotypic conclusions are also examined. Structural features of Als proteins that may facilitate invasive function are considered. Conclusions that are firmly supported by the literature are presented while highlighting areas that require additional investigation to reveal basic features of the Als proteins, their relatedness to each other, and their roles in C. albicans biology. PMID:27014205

  16. Immunodetection of protein glycoforms encoded by two independent genes of the self-incompatibility multigene family of Brassica

    SciTech Connect

    Umbach, A.L.; Lalonde, B.A.; Kandasamy, M.K.; Nasrallah, J.B.; Nasrallah, M.E. )

    1990-06-01

    Glycoprotein products of two highly homologous Brassica S gene family members were studied: SLSG (S locus-specific glycoprotein), product of an SLG gene at the S locus, and SLR1 (S locus-related) protein, product of the SLR1 gene, a gene unlinked to the S locus. A polyclonal antibody directed against a trpE-SLR1 fusion protein facilitated study of the SLR1 protein. SLR1 protein was detected in a number of crucifer species. No variation in the level of this protein was found between self-compatible and self-incompatible plants. Both SLSG and SLR1 protein occurred as glycoforms on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels. Each glycoform had several charge forms, indicated by elution patterns from a high performance liquid chromatography cation exchange column and behavior on two-dimensional gels. Deglycosylation of both SLSG and SLR1 protein caused loss of the glycoforms, which apparently arose from differences in glycosylation. Consistent with their apparent similar post-translational processing, immunolocalization showed that SLR1 protein, like SLSG, accumulated in the stigma papillae cell walls. Thus, both SLSG and SLR1 protein are present at the site of pollen-stigma interaction.

  17. A novel firefly luciferase biosensor enhances the detection of apoptosis induced by ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Junwei; Zhang, Huan; Fang, Liurong; Xi, Yongqiang; Zhou, Yanrong; Luo, Rui; Wang, Dang Xiao, Shaobo; Chen, Huanchun

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • We developed a novel firefly luciferase based biosensor to detect apoptosis. • The novel biosensor 233-DnaE-DEVDG was reliable, sensitive and convenient. • 233-DnaE-DEVDG faithfully indicated ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induced apoptosis. • EsxA, esxT and esxL in ESAT-6 family proteins induced apoptosis. • Activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) participated in esxT-induced apoptosis. - Abstract: The activation of caspase-3 is a key surrogate marker for detecting apoptosis. To quantitate caspase-3 activity, we constructed a biosensor comprising a recombinant firefly luciferase containing a caspase-3 cleavage site. When apoptosis was induced, caspase-3 cleavage of the biosensor activated firefly luciferase by a factor greater than 25. The assay conveniently detected apoptosis in real time, indicating that it will facilitate drug discovery. We screened ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and found that esxA, esxT and esxL induced apoptosis. Further, activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and the NF-κB-regulated genes encoding tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) participated in esxT-induced apoptosis. We conclude that this assay is useful for high-throughput screening to identify and characterize proteins and drugs that regulate apoptosis.

  18. CaMKII-MEDIATED PHOSPHORYLATION OF THE BOMBYX MORI LIPID STORAGE DROPLET PROTEIN-1 (BmLsd1), AN INSECT PAT FAMILY PROTEIN, IS ESSENTIAL FOR SILKMOTH SEX PHEROMONE BIOSYNTHESIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The structurally-related members of the PAT family of proteins, which are so name based on similarity amongst perilipin, adipophilin/adipocyte differentiation-related protein (ADRP), and tail-interacting protein of 47 kilodaltons (TIP47), are cytoplasmic lipid droplet (LD)-associated proteins charac...

  19. Structural genomics analysis of uncharacterized protein families overrepresented in human gut bacteria identifies a novel glycoside hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacteroides spp. form a significant part of our gut microbiome and are well known for optimized metabolism of diverse polysaccharides. Initial analysis of the archetypal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron genome identified 172 glycosyl hydrolases and a large number of uncharacterized proteins associated with polysaccharide metabolism. Results BT_1012 from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron VPI-5482 is a protein of unknown function and a member of a large protein family consisting entirely of uncharacterized proteins. Initial sequence analysis predicted that this protein has two domains, one on the N- and one on the C-terminal. A PSI-BLAST search found over 150 full length and over 90 half size homologs consisting only of the N-terminal domain. The experimentally determined three-dimensional structure of the BT_1012 protein confirms its two-domain architecture and structural analysis of both domains suggests their specific functions. The N-terminal domain is a putative catalytic domain with significant similarity to known glycoside hydrolases, the C-terminal domain has a beta-sandwich fold typically found in C-terminal domains of other glycosyl hydrolases, however these domains are typically involved in substrate binding. We describe the structure of the BT_1012 protein and discuss its sequence-structure relationship and their possible functional implications. Conclusions Structural and sequence analyses of the BT_1012 protein identifies it as a glycosyl hydrolase, expanding an already impressive catalog of enzymes involved in polysaccharide metabolism in Bacteroides spp. Based on this we have renamed the Pfam families representing the two domains found in the BT_1012 protein, PF13204 and PF12904, as putative glycoside hydrolase and glycoside hydrolase-associated C-terminal domain respectively. PMID:24742328

  20. The porcine gene TBP10 encodes a protein homologous to the human tat-binding protein/26S protease subunit family.

    PubMed

    Leeb, T; Rettenberger, G; Breech, J; Hameister, H; Brenig, B

    1996-03-01

    We have cloned a porcine gene, designated TBP1O, that belongs to the Tat-binding protein/26S protease subunit family. The genomic structure of the porcine TBP1O gene was analyzed after isolation of three overlapping genomic phage lambda clones. The TBP10 gene harbors 12 exons spanning 4.5 kb of chromosomal DNA. The TBP1O gene was assigned to Chromosome (Chr) 12 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on metaphase chromosomes. The chromosomal location was confirmed by PCR analysis of a porcine-rodent hybrid cell panel. The TBP1O protein is encoded by a 1221 nucleotide cDNA and has a molecular mass of 45.6 kDa. The predicted amino acid sequence has highest similarity to the human and bovine p45 subunit of the 26S protease and the human transcription factor TRIP1. Further similarities were detected to the slime mold protein DdTBP1O and the Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein SUG1. Like DdTBP1O and other members of the protein family, the porcine TBP1O harbors a leucine zipper motif in the N-terminal region and a domain characteristics of ATP-dependent proteases in the C-terminal region. PMID:8833236

  1. Characterizing Bcl-2 Family Protein Conformation and Oligomerization Using Cross-Linking and Antibody Gel-Shift in Conjunction with Native PAGE.

    PubMed

    Dewson, Grant

    2016-01-01

    The Bcl-2 family of proteins tightly controls the intrinsic or mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. This family is subdivided based on function into pro-survival proteins (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Bcl-w, Mcl-1, Bfl-1/A1) and pro-apoptotic proteins. The pro-apoptotic subset is further divided into those proteins that initiate the pathway, the BH3-only proteins (including Bim, Puma, Noxa, and Bid), and those that execute the pathway, Bak and Bax. Whether a cell lives or dies in response to apoptotic stress is determined by the interactions of the Bcl-2 family, which is in turn influenced by their conformation. We describe here a protocol to interrogate the interactions and conformation of the Bcl-2 family of proteins under native conditions. PMID:27108440

  2. Lipid transfer particle from the silkworm, Bombyx mori, is a novel member of the apoB/large lipid transfer protein family[S

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Takeru; Yuasa, Masashi; Fujimoto, Hirofumi; Sakudoh, Takashi; Honda, Naoko; Fugo, Hajime; Tsuchida, Kozo

    2013-01-01

    Lipid transfer particle (LTP) is a high-molecular-weight, very high-density lipoprotein known to catalyze the transfer of lipids between a variety of lipoproteins, including both insects and vertebrates. Studying the biosynthesis and regulation pathways of LTP in detail has not been possible due to a lack of information regarding the apoproteins. Here, we sequenced the cDNA and deduced amino acid sequences for three apoproteins of LTP from the silkworm (Bombyx mori). The three subunit proteins of the LTP are coded by two genes, apoLTP-II/I and apoLTP-III. ApoLTP-I and apoLTP-II are predicted to be generated by posttranslational cleavage of the precursor protein, apoLTP-II/I. Clusters of amphipathic secondary structure within apoLTP-II/I are similar to Homo sapiens apolipoprotein B (apoB) and insect lipophorins. The apoLTP-II/I gene is a novel member of the apoB/large lipid transfer protein gene family. ApoLTP-III has a putative conserved juvenile hormone-binding protein superfamily domain. Expression of apoLTP-II/I and apoLTP-III genes was synchronized and both genes were primarily expressed in the fat body at the stage corresponding to increased lipid transport needs. We are now in a position to study in detail the physiological role of LTP and its biosynthesis and assembly. PMID:23812557

  3. Acute inhibition of myostatin-family proteins preserves skeletal muscle in mouse models of cancer cachexia

    SciTech Connect

    Benny Klimek, Margaret E.; Aydogdu, Tufan; Link, Majik J.; Pons, Marianne; Koniaris, Leonidas G.; Zimmers, Teresa A.

    2010-01-15

    Cachexia, progressive loss of fat and muscle mass despite adequate nutrition, is a devastating complication of cancer associated with poor quality of life and increased mortality. Myostatin is a potent tonic muscle growth inhibitor. We tested how myostatin inhibition might influence cancer cachexia using genetic and pharmacological approaches. First, hypermuscular myostatin null mice were injected with Lewis lung carcinoma or B16F10 melanoma cells. Myostatin null mice were more sensitive to tumor-induced cachexia, losing more absolute mass and proportionately more muscle mass than wild-type mice. Because myostatin null mice lack expression from development, however, we also sought to manipulate myostatin acutely. The histone deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin A has been shown to increase muscle mass in normal and dystrophic mice by inducing the myostatin inhibitor, follistatin. Although Trichostatin A administration induced muscle growth in normal mice, it failed to preserve muscle in colon-26 cancer cachexia. Finally we sought to inhibit myostatin and related ligands by administration of the Activin receptor extracellular domain/Fc fusion protein, ACVR2B-Fc. Systemic administration of ACVR2B-Fc potently inhibited muscle wasting and protected adipose stores in both colon-26 and Lewis lung carcinoma cachexia, without affecting tumor growth. Enhanced cachexia in myostatin knockouts indicates that host-derived myostatin is not the sole mediator of muscle wasting in cancer. More importantly, skeletal muscle preservation with ACVR2B-Fc establishes that targeting myostatin-family ligands using ACVR2B-Fc or related molecules is an important and potent therapeutic avenue in cancer cachexia.

  4. GNormPlus: An Integrative Approach for Tagging Genes, Gene Families, and Protein Domains

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chih-Hsuan; Kao, Hung-Yu; Lu, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    The automatic recognition of gene names and their associated database identifiers from biomedical text has been widely studied in recent years, as these tasks play an important role in many downstream text-mining applications. Despite significant previous research, only a small number of tools are publicly available and these tools are typically restricted to detecting only mention level gene names or only document level gene identifiers. In this work, we report GNormPlus: an end-to-end and open source system that handles both gene mention and identifier detection. We created a new corpus of 694 PubMed articles to support our development of GNormPlus, containing manual annotations for not only gene names and their identifiers, but also closely related concepts useful for gene name disambiguation, such as gene families and protein domains. GNormPlus integrates several advanced text-mining techniques, including SimConcept for resolving composite gene names. As a result, GNormPlus compares favorably to other state-of-the-art methods when evaluated on two widely used public benchmarking datasets, achieving 86.7% F1-score on the BioCreative II Gene Normalization task dataset and 50.1% F1-score on the BioCreative III Gene Normalization task dataset. The GNormPlus source code and its annotated corpus are freely available, and the results of applying GNormPlus to the entire PubMed are freely accessible through our web-based tool PubTator. PMID:26380306

  5. Numb family proteins are essential for cardiac morphogenesis and progenitor differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chen; Guo, Hua; Li, Jingjing; Myint, Thomas; Pittman, William; Yang, Le; Zhong, Weimin; Schwartz, Robert J.; Schwarz, John J.; Singer, Harold A.; Tallquist, Michelle D.; Wu, Mingfu

    2014-01-01

    Numb family proteins (NFPs), including Numb and numb-like (Numbl), are cell fate determinants for multiple progenitor cell types. Their functions in cardiac progenitor differentiation and cardiac morphogenesis are unknown. To avoid early embryonic lethality and study NFP function in later cardiac development, Numb and Numbl were deleted specifically in heart to generate myocardial double-knockout (MDKO) mice. MDKOs were embryonic lethal and displayed a variety of defects in cardiac progenitor differentiation, cardiomyocyte proliferation, outflow tract (OFT) and atrioventricular septation, and OFT alignment. By ablating NFPs in different cardiac populations followed by lineage tracing, we determined that NFPs in the second heart field (SHF) are required for OFT and atrioventricular septation and OFT alignment. MDKOs displayed an SHF progenitor cell differentiation defect, as revealed by a variety of methods including mRNA deep sequencing. Numb regulated cardiac progenitor cell differentiation in an endocytosis-dependent manner. Studies including the use of a transgenic Notch reporter line showed that Notch signaling was upregulated in the MDKO. Suppression of Notch1 signaling in MDKOs rescued defects in p57 expression, proliferation and trabecular thickness. Further studies showed that Numb inhibits Notch1 signaling by promoting the degradation of the Notch1 intracellular domain in cardiomyocytes. This study reveals that NFPs regulate trabecular thickness by inhibiting Notch1 signaling, control cardiac morphogenesis in a Notch1-independent manner, and regulate cardiac progenitor cell differentiation in an endocytosis-dependent manner. The function of NFPs in cardiac progenitor differentiation and cardiac morphogenesis suggests that NFPs might be potential therapeutic candidates for cardiac regeneration and congenital heart diseases. PMID:24335256

  6. GNormPlus: An Integrative Approach for Tagging Genes, Gene Families, and Protein Domains.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chih-Hsuan; Kao, Hung-Yu; Lu, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    The automatic recognition of gene names and their associated database identifiers from biomedical text has been widely studied in recent years, as these tasks play an important role in many downstream text-mining applications. Despite significant previous research, only a small number of tools are publicly available and these tools are typically restricted to detecting only mention level gene names or only document level gene identifiers. In this work, we report GNormPlus: an end-to-end and open source system that handles both gene mention and identifier detection. We created a new corpus of 694 PubMed articles to support our development of GNormPlus, containing manual annotations for not only gene names and their identifiers, but also closely related concepts useful for gene name disambiguation, such as gene families and protein domains. GNormPlus integrates several advanced text-mining techniques, including SimConcept for resolving composite gene names. As a result, GNormPlus compares favorably to other state-of-the-art methods when evaluated on two widely used public benchmarking datasets, achieving 86.7% F1-score on the BioCreative II Gene Normalization task dataset and 50.1% F1-score on the BioCreative III Gene Normalization task dataset. The GNormPlus source code and its annotated corpus are freely available, and the results of applying GNormPlus to the entire PubMed are freely accessible through our web-based tool PubTator. PMID:26380306

  7. Differential Binding Activity of TGF-β Family Proteins to Select TGF-β Receptors.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Ashraf M; Dotimas, Hyna; Kahn, Julius; Lamerdin, Jane E; Hayes, David B; Gupta, Priyanka; Franti, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Growth differentiation factor-11 (GDF11) and myostatin (MSTN) are highly related transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) ligands with 89% amino acid sequence homology. They have different biologic activities and diverse tissue distribution patterns. However, the activities of these ligands are indistinguishable in in vitro assays. SMAD2/3 signaling has been identified as the canonical pathway for GDF11 and MSTN, However, it remains unclear which receptor heterodimer and which antagonists preferentially mediate and regulate signaling. In this study, we investigated the initiation and regulation of GDF11 and MSTN signaling at the receptor level using a novel receptor dimerization detection technology. We used the dimerization platform to link early receptor binding events to intracellular downstream signaling. This approach was instrumental in revealing differential receptor binding activity within the TGF-β family. We verified the ActR2b/ALK5 heterodimer as the predominant receptor for GDF11- and MSTN-induced SMAD2/3 signaling. We also showed ALK7 specifically mediates activin-B signaling. We verified follistatin as a potent antagonist to neutralize both SMAD2/3 signaling and receptor dimerization. More remarkably, we showed that the two related antagonists, growth and differentiation factor-associated serum protein (GASP)-1 and GASP2, differentially regulate GDF11 (and MSTN) signaling. GASP1 blocks both receptor dimerization and downstream signaling. However, GASP2 blocks only downstream signaling without interference from receptor dimerization. Our data strongly suggest that physical binding of GDF11 (and MSTN) to both ActR2b and ALK5 receptors is required for initiation of signaling. PMID:27340210

  8. Acute inhibition of myostatin-family proteins preserves skeletal muscle in mouse models of cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Benny Klimek, Margaret E; Aydogdu, Tufan; Link, Majik J; Pons, Marianne; Koniaris, Leonidas G; Zimmers, Teresa A

    2010-01-15

    Cachexia, progressive loss of fat and muscle mass despite adequate nutrition, is a devastating complication of cancer associated with poor quality of life and increased mortality. Myostatin is a potent tonic muscle growth inhibitor. We tested how myostatin inhibition might influence cancer cachexia using genetic and pharmacological approaches. First, hypermuscular myostatin null mice were injected with Lewis lung carcinoma or B16F10 melanoma cells. Myostatin null mice were more sensitive to tumor-induced cachexia, losing more absolute mass and proportionately more muscle mass than wild-type mice. Because myostatin null mice lack expression from development, however, we also sought to manipulate myostatin acutely. The histone deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin A has been shown to increase muscle mass in normal and dystrophic mice by inducing the myostatin inhibitor, follistatin. Although Trichostatin A administration induced muscle growth in normal mice, it failed to preserve muscle in colon-26 cancer cachexia. Finally we sought to inhibit myostatin and related ligands by administration of the Activin receptor extracellular domain/Fc fusion protein, ACVR2B-Fc. Systemic administration of ACVR2B-Fc potently inhibited muscle wasting and protected adipose stores in both colon-26 and Lewis lung carcinoma cachexia, without affecting tumor growth. Enhanced cachexia in myostatin knockouts indicates that host-derived myostatin is not the sole mediator of muscle wasting in cancer. More importantly, skeletal muscle preservation with ACVR2B-Fc establishes that targeting myostatin-family ligands using ACVR2B-Fc or related molecules is an important and potent therapeutic avenue in cancer cachexia. PMID:20036643

  9. The Puf family of RNA-binding proteins in plants: phylogeny, structural modeling, activity and subcellular localization

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Puf proteins have important roles in controlling gene expression at the post-transcriptional level by promoting RNA decay and repressing translation. The Pumilio homology domain (PUM-HD) is a conserved region within Puf proteins that binds to RNA with sequence specificity. Although Puf proteins have been well characterized in animal and fungal systems, little is known about the structural and functional characteristics of Puf-like proteins in plants. Results The Arabidopsis and rice genomes code for 26 and 19 Puf-like proteins, respectively, each possessing eight or fewer Puf repeats in their PUM-HD. Key amino acids in the PUM-HD of several of these proteins are conserved with those of animal and fungal homologs, whereas other plant Puf proteins demonstrate extensive variability in these amino acids. Three-dimensional modeling revealed that the predicted structure of this domain in plant Puf proteins provides a suitable surface for binding RNA. Electrophoretic gel mobility shift experiments showed that the Arabidopsis AtPum2 PUM-HD binds with high affinity to BoxB of the Drosophila Nanos Response Element I (NRE1) RNA, whereas a point mutation in the core of the NRE1 resulted in a significant reduction in binding affinity. Transient expression of several of the Arabidopsis Puf proteins as fluorescent protein fusions revealed a dynamic, punctate cytoplasmic pattern of localization for most of these proteins. The presence of predicted nuclear export signals and accumulation of AtPuf proteins in the nucleus after treatment of cells with leptomycin B demonstrated that shuttling of these proteins between the cytosol and nucleus is common among these proteins. In addition to the cytoplasmically enriched AtPum proteins, two AtPum proteins showed nuclear targeting with enrichment in the nucleolus. Conclusions The Puf family of RNA-binding proteins in plants consists of a greater number of members than any other model species studied to date. This, along with the

  10. Mutation of TweedleD, a member of an unconventional cuticle protein family, alters body shape in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Xiao; Middlebrooks, Brooke W.; Alexander, Sherry; Wasserman, Steven A.

    2006-01-01

    Body shape determination represents a critical aspect of morphogenesis. In the course of investigating body shape regulation in Drosophila, we have identified a dominant mutation, TweedleD1 (TwdlD1), that alters overall dimensions at the larval and pupal stages. Characterization of the affected locus led to the discovery of a gene family that has 27 members in Drosophila and is found only among insects. Analysis of gene expression at the RNA and protein levels revealed gene-specific temporal and spatial patterns in ectodermally derived tissues. In addition, light microscopic studies of fluorescently tagged proteins demonstrated that Tweedle proteins are incorporated into larval cuticular structures. This demonstration that a mutation in a Drosophila cuticular protein gene alters overall morphology confirms a role for the fly exoskeleton in determining body shape. Furthermore, parallels between these findings and studies of cuticle collagen genes in Caenorhabditis elegans suggest that the exoskeleton influences body shape in diverse organisms. PMID:17075064

  11. Crystal structure of cce_0566 from Cyanothece 51142, a protein associated with nitrogen fixation in the DUF269 family

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko G. W.; Robinson H.

    2012-02-01

    The crystal structure for cce{_}0566 (171 aa, 19.4 kDa), a DUF269 annotated protein from the diazotrophic cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, was determined to 1.60 {angstrom} resolution. Cce{_}0566 is a homodimer with each molecule composed of eight {alpha}-helices folded on one side of a three strand anti-parallel {beta}-sheet. Hydrophobic interactions between the side chains of largely conserved residues on the surface of each {beta}-sheet hold the dimer together. The fold observed for cce{_}0566 may be unique to proteins in the DUF269 family, hence, the protein may also have a function unique to nitrogen fixation. A solvent accessible cleft containing conserved charged residues near the dimer interface could represent the active site or ligand-binding surface for the protein's biological function.

  12. The Snail protein family regulates neuroblast expression of inscuteable and string, genes involved in asymmetry and cell division in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, S I; Ip, Y T

    2001-12-01

    Delaminated neuroblasts in Drosophila function as stem cells during embryonic central nervous system development. They go through repeated asymmetric divisions to generate multiple ganglion mother cells, which divide only once more to produce postmitotic neurons. Snail, a zinc-finger transcriptional repressor, is a pan-neural protein, based on its extensive expression in neuroblasts. Previous results have demonstrated that Snail and related proteins, Worniu and Escargot, have redundant and essential functions in the nervous system. We show that the Snail family of proteins control central nervous system development by regulating genes involved in asymmetry and cell division of neuroblasts. In mutant embryos that have the three genes deleted, the expression of inscuteable is significantly lowered, while the expression of other genes that participate in asymmetric division, including miranda, staufen and prospero, appears normal. The deletion mutants also have much reduced expression of string, suggesting that a key component that drives neuroblast cell division is abnormal. Consistent with the gene expression defects, the mutant embryos lose the asymmetric localization of prospero RNA in neuroblasts and lose the staining of Prospero protein that is normally present in ganglion mother cells. Simultaneous expression of inscuteable and string in the snail family deletion mutant efficiently restores Prospero expression in ganglion mother cells, demonstrating that the two genes are key targets of Snail in neuroblasts. Mutation of the dCtBP co-repressor interaction motifs in the Snail protein leads to reduction of the Snail function in central nervous system. These results suggest that the Snail family of proteins control both asymmetry and cell division of neuroblasts by activating, probably indirectly, the expression of inscuteable and string. PMID:11731456

  13. Molecular characterization and evolution of the SPRR family of keratinocyte differentiation markers encoding small proline-rich proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, S.; Fijneman, R.; Wiegant, J.; Van De Putte, P.; Backendorf, C. ); Van Kessel, A.D. )

    1993-06-01

    SPRR genes (formerly SPR) encode a novel class of polypeptides (small proline rich proteins) that are strongly induced during differentiation of human epidermal keratinocytes in vitro and in vivo. Recently the authors found that the N- and C-terminal domains of these proteins show strong sequence homology to loricrin and involucrin, suggesting that SPRR proteins constitute a new class of cornified envelope precursor proteins. Here they show that SPRR proteins are encoded by closely related members of a gene family, consisting of two genes for SPRR1, approximately seven genes for SPRR2, and a single gene for SPRR3. All SPRR genes are closely linked within a 300-kb DNA segment on human chromosome 1 band q21-q22, a region where the related loricrin and involucrin genes have also been mapped. The most characteristic feature of the SPRR gene family resides in the structure of the central segments of the encoded polypeptides that are built up from tandemly repeated units of either eight (SPRR1 and SPRR3) or nine (SPRR2) amino acids with the general consensus *K*PEP**. Sequencing data of the different members, together with their clustered chromosomal organization, strongly suggest that this gene family has evolved from a single progenitor gene by multiple intra- and intergenic duplications. Analysis of the different SPRR subfamilies reveals a gene-specific bias to either intra- or intergenic duplication. The authors propose that a process of homogenization has acted on the different members of one subfamily, whereas the different subfamilies appear to have diverged from each other, at the levels of both protein structure and gene regulation. 25 refs., 7 figs., 2 tab.

  14. Identification of a small, very acidic constitutive nucleolar protein (NO29) as a member of the nucleoplasmin family

    PubMed Central

    Zirwes, Rudolf F.; Schmidt-Zachmann, Marion S.; Franke, Werner W.

    1997-01-01

    We report the discovery and molecular characterization of a small and very acidic nucleolar protein of an SDS/PAGE mobility corresponding to Mr 29,000 (NO29). The cDNA-deduced sequence of the Xenopus laevis protein defines a polypeptide of a calculated molecular mass of 20,121 and a pI of 3.75, with an extended acidic region near its C terminus, and is related to the major nucleolar protein, NO38, and the histone-binding protein, nucleoplasmin. This member of the nucleoplasmin family of proteins was immunolocalized to nucleoli in Xenopus oocytes and diverse somatic cells. Protein NO29 is associated with nuclear particles from Xenopus oocytes, partly complexed with protein NO38, and occurs in preribosomes but not in mature ribosomes. The location and the enormously high content of negatively charged amino acids lead to the hypothesis that NO29 might be involved in the nuclear and nucleolar accumulation of ribosomal proteins and the coordinated assembly of pre-ribosomal particles. PMID:9326619

  15. Immunization with individual proteins of the Lrp/AsnC family induces protection against Brucella melitensis 16M challenges in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinhui; An, Chang; Yang, Mingjuan; Li, Xinran; Ke, Yuehua; Lei, Shuangshuang; Xu, Xiaoyang; Yu, Jiuxuan; Ren, Hang; Du, Xinying; Wang, Zhoujia; Qiu, Yefeng; Liu, Bo; Chen, Zeliang

    2015-01-01

    Brucellosis is one of the most common zoonoses worldwide. Subunit vaccines are promising for the prevention of human brucellosis. In our previous protective antigen screening studies, we identified a new protective antigen, BMEI0357, which belongs to the Lrp/asnC protein family, a conserved transcriptional regulator in bacteria that is absent in eukaryotes. In the present study, the Brucella genome annotation was screened and a total of six proteins were identified as members of the Lrp/AsnC family. Lrp/AsnC proteins have two domains that are conserved among the family members. However, sequence similarities between these proteins ranged from 9 to 50%, indicating high sequence heterogeneity. To test whether proteins of this family have similar characteristics, all six proteins were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant proteins were purified and their protective efficacy was evaluated in BALB/c mice challenged with Brucella melitensis 16M. The results show that all six Lrp/AsnC proteins could induce a protective immune response against Brucella melitensis 16M. Antibodies against the Lrp/AsnC proteins were detected in the immunized mice. However, levels of antibodies against these proteins were relatively variable in human brucellosis sera. Taken together, our results show that these six proteins of the Lrp/AsnC family in Brucella could induce protective immune responses in mice. PMID:26579099

  16. [A patient with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with a new valosin-containing protein (VCP) gene mutation].

    PubMed

    Segawa, Mari; Hoshi, Akihiko; Naruse, Hiroya; Kuroda, Masayuki; Bujo, Hideaki; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    In this communication, we report a patient with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) associated with a familial dyslipidemia. Genetic analysis revealed a novel heterozygous valosin-containing protein (VCP) mutation (c.466G>T (p.G156C)). The other gene analysis also disclosed a known homozygous LCAT mutation (c.101C>T (p.P10L)). VCP gene mutation shown should be responsible for familial ALS because of following reasons. The patient's father also was also affected by ALS. The VCP gene mutation (p.G156C) in the patient was located in the vicinity of a site frequently associated with pathogenic VCP variants. The same amino acid transformation as that of this patient has been reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of inclusion body myopathy with Paget's disease of the bone and frontotemporal dementia. This is the first case report of rare association of ALS with VCP mutation and dyslipidemia with LCAT mutation. PMID:26511028

  17. HER-3 targeting alters the dimerization pattern of ErbB protein family members in breast carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Karamouzis, Michalis V; Dalagiorgou, Georgia; Georgopoulou, Urania; Nonni, Afroditi; Kontos, Michalis; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G

    2016-02-01

    Breast carcinogenesis is a multi-step process in which membrane receptor tyrosine kinases are crucial participants. Lots of research has been done on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and HER-2 with important clinical results. However, breast cancer patients present intrinsic or acquired resistance to available HER-2-directed therapies, mainly due to HER-3. Using new techniques, such as proximity ligation assay, herein we evaluate the dimerization pattern of HER-3 and the importance of context-dependent dimer formation between HER-3 and other HER protein family members. Additionally, we show that the efficacy of novel HER-3 targeting agents can be better predicted in certain breast cancer patient sub-groups based on the dimerization pattern of HER protein family members. Moreover, this model was also evaluated and reproduced in human paraffin-embedded breast cancer tissues. PMID:26716646

  18. Calcium powered phloem protein of SEO gene family "Forisome" functions in wound sealing and act as biomimetic smart materials.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Vineet Kumar; Tuteja, Narendra

    2014-06-01

    Forisomes protein belongs to SEO gene family and is unique to Fabaceae family. These proteins are located in sieve tubes of phloem and function to prevent loss of nutrient-rich photoassimilates, upon mechanical injury/wounding. Forisome protein is also known as ATP independent, mechanically active proteins. Despite the wealth of information role of forisome in plants are not yet fully understood. Recent reports suggest that forisomes protein can act as ideal model to study self assembly mechanism for development of nanotechnological devices like microfluidic system application in space exploration mission. Improvement in micro instrument is highly demanding and has been a key technology by NASA in future space exploration missions. Based on its physical parameters, forisome are found to be ideal biomimetic materials for micro fluidic system because the conformational shifts can be replicated in vitro and are fully reversible over large number of cycles. By the use of protein engineering forisome recombinant protein can be tailored. Due to its unique ability to convert chemical energy into mechanical energy forisome has received much attention. For nanotechnological application and handling biomolecules such as DNA, RNA, protein and cell as a whole microfluidic system will be the most powerful technology. The discovery of new biomimetic smart materials has been a key factor in development of space science and its requirements in such a challenging environment. The field of microfludic, particularly in terms of development of its components along with identification of new biomimetic smart materials, deserves more attention. More biophysical investigation is required to characterize it to make it more suitable under parameters of performance. PMID:24905822

  19. Calcium powered phloem protein of SEO gene family "Forisome" functions in wound sealing and act as biomimetic smart materials.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Vineet Kumar; Tuteja, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    Forisomes protein belongs to SEO gene family and is unique to Fabaceae family. These proteins are located in sieve tubes of phloem and function to prevent loss of nutrient-rich photoassimilates, upon mechanical injury/wounding. Forisome protein is also known as ATP independent, mechanically active proteins. Despite the wealth of information role of forisome in plants are not yet fully understood. Recent reports suggest that forisomes protein can act as ideal model to study self assembly mechanism for development of nanotechnological devices like microfluidic system application in space exploration mission. Improvement in micro instrument is highly demanding and has been a key technology by NASA in future space exploration missions. Based on its physical parameters, forisome are found to be ideal biomimetic materials for micro fluidic system because the conformational shifts can be replicated in vitro and are fully reversible over large number of cycles. By the use of protein engineering forisome recombinant protein can be tailored. Due to its unique ability to convert chemical energy into mechanical energy forisome has received much attention. For nanotechnological application and handling biomolecules such as DNA, RNA, protein and cell as a whole microfluidic system will be the most powerful technology. The discovery of new biomimetic smart materials has been a key factor in development of space science and its requirements in such a challenging environment. The field of microfludic, particularly in terms of development of its components along with identification of new biomimetic smart materials, deserves more attention. More biophysical investigation is required to characterize it to make it more suitable under parameters of performance. PMID:25763691

  20. Ultra High Throughput Screening of Natural Product Extracts to Identify Pro-apoptotic Inhibitors of Bcl-2 Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hassig, Christian A.; Zeng, Fu-Yue; Kung, Paul; Kiankarimi, Mehrak; Kim, Sylvia; Diaz, Paul W.; Zhai, Dayong; Welsh, Kate; Morshedian, Shana; Su, Ying; O'Keefe, Barry; Newman, David J.; Rusman, Yudi; Kaur, Harneet; Salomon, Christine E.; Brown, Susan G.; Baire, Beeraiah; Michel, Andrew R.; Hoye, Thomas R.; Francis, Subhashree; Georg, Gunda I.; Walters, Michael A.; Divlianska, Daniela B.; Roth, Gregory P.; Wright, Amy E.; Reed, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins are validated cancer targets comprised of six related proteins. From a drug discovery perspective, these are challenging targets that exert their cellular functions through protein-protein interactions (PPIs). While several isoform-selective inhibitors have been developed using structure-based design or high throughput screening (HTS) of synthetic chemical libraries, no large scale screen of natural product collections has been reported. A competitive displacement fluorescence polarization (FP) screen of nearly 150,000 natural product extracts was conducted against all six anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins using fluorochrome-conjugated peptide ligands that mimic functionally-relevant PPIs. The screens were conducted in 1,536-well format and displayed satisfactory overall HTS statistics, with Z’-factor values ranging from 0.72 to 0.83, and a hit confirmation rate between 16-64%. Confirmed active extracts were orthogonally tested in a luminescent assay for caspase-3/7 activation in tumor cells. Active extracts were resupplied and effort toward the isolation of pure active components was initiated through iterative bioassay-guided fractionation. Several previously described altertoxins were isolated from a microbial source and the pure compounds demonstrate activity in both Bcl-2 FP and caspase cellular assays. The studies demonstrate the feasibility of ultra high throughput screening using natural product sources and highlight some of the challenges associated with this approach. PMID:24870016