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Sample records for 6-mv laser triggered

  1. Fundamental science investigations to develop a 6-MV laser triggered gas switch for ZR: first annual report.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Van Den Avyle, James A.; Lehr, Jane Marie; Rose, David; Krompholz, Hermann G.; Vela, Russell; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Timoshkin, Igor (University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland); Woodworth, Joseph Ray; Prestwich, Kenneth Randel (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Krile, John; Given, Martin (University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland); McKee, G. Randall; Rosenthal, Stephen Edgar; Struve, Kenneth William; Welch, Dale Robert (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Benwell, Andrew L. (University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri); Kovaleski, Scott; LeChien, Keith, R.; Johnson, David (Titan Pulse Sciences Division); Fouracre, R.A. (University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland); Yeckel, Chris (University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri); Wakeland, Peter Eric; Miller, A. R. (Titan Pulse Sciences Division); Hodge, Keith Conquest (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Pasik, Michael Francis; Savage, Mark Edward; Maenchen, John Eric; Curry, Randy D.; Feltz, Greg; Bliss, David Emery; MacGregor, Scott (University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland); Corley, J. P. (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Anaya, Victor (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Wallace, Zachariah (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Thoma, Carsten (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Neuber, Andreas. (Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX)

    2007-03-01

    In October 2005, an intensive three-year Laser Triggered Gas Switch (LTGS) development program was initiated to investigate and solve observed performance and reliability issues with the LTGS for ZR. The approach taken has been one of mission-focused research: to revisit and reassess the design, to establish a fundamental understanding of LTGS operation and failure modes, and to test evolving operational hypotheses. This effort is aimed toward deploying an initial switch for ZR in 2007, on supporting rolling upgrades to ZR as the technology can be developed, and to prepare with scientific understanding for the even higher voltage switches anticipated needed for future high-yield accelerators. The ZR LTGS was identified as a potential area of concern quite early, but since initial assessments performed on a simplified Switch Test Bed (STB) at 5 MV showed 300-shot lifetimes on multiple switch builds, this component was judged acceptable. When the Z{sub 20} engineering module was brought online in October 2003 frequent flashovers of the plastic switch envelope were observed at the increased stresses required to compensate for the programmatically increased ZR load inductance. As of October 2006, there have been 1423 Z{sub 20} shots assessing a variety of LTGS designs. Numerous incremental and fundamental switch design modifications have been investigated. As we continue to investigate the LTGS, the basic science of plastic surface tracking, laser triggering, cascade breakdown, and optics degradation remain high-priority mission-focused research topics. Significant progress has been made and, while the switch does not yet achieve design requirements, we are on the path to develop successively better switches for rolling upgrade improvements to ZR. This report summarizes the work performed in FY 2006 by the large team. A high-level summary is followed by detailed individual topical reports.

  2. Laser-triggered vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Brannon, Paul J.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    1990-01-01

    A laser-triggered vacuum switch has a material such as a alkali metal halide on the cathode electrode for thermally activated field emission of electrons and ions upon interaction with a laser beam, the material being in contact with the cathode with a surface facing the discharge gap. The material is preferably a mixture of KCl and Ti powders. The laser may either shine directly on the material, preferably through a hole in the anode, or be directed to the material over a fiber optic cable.

  3. XI UV Laser Trigger System

    SciTech Connect

    Brickeen, B.K.; Morelli, G.L.; Paiva, R.A.; Powell, C.A.; Sundvold, P.D.

    1999-01-26

    The X1 accelerator project at Sandia National Laboratory/New Mexico utilizes SF6 insulated, multi-stage, UV laser triggered gas switches. A 265 nm UV laser system was designed and built to generate eight simultaneous output pulses of 10 mJ each with a 13 nsec pulse width. A 1061 nm solid-state Nd:Cr:GSGG laser was frequency quadrupled using a two-stage doubling process. The 1061 nm fundamental laser energy was frequency doubled with a KTP crystal to 530 nm, achieving 65% conversion efficiency. The 530 nm output was frequency doubled with KD*P crystal to 265 nm, achieving conversion efficiency of 31%. The 265 nm beam pulse was split into eight parallel channels with a system of partially reflecting mirrors. Low timing jitter and stable energy output were achieved. The entire optical system was packaged into a rugged, o-ring sealed, aluminum structure 10''x19''x2.75''. The size of the electronics was 12''x8''x8''. Subsequent accelerator system requirements dictated a redesign of the triggering system for an output beam with less angular divergence. An unstable, crossed porro prism resonator was designed and incorporated into the system. The beam divergence of the redesigned system was successfully decreased to 0.97 mrad in the UV. The resulting frequency doubling efficiencies were 55% to 530 nm and 25% to 265 nm. The optical output remained at 10 mJ in each channel with an 11 nsec pulse width.

  4. Photon spectral characteristics of dissimilar 6 MV linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Hinson, William H; Kearns, William T; deGuzman, Allan F; Bourland, J Daniel

    2008-05-01

    This work measures and compares the energy spectra of four dosimetrically matched 6 MV beams, generated from four physically different linear accelerators. The goal of this work is twofold. First, this study determines whether the spectra of dosimetrically matched beams are measurably different. This study also demonstrates that the spectra of clinical photon beams can be measured as a part of the beam data collection process for input to a three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning system. The spectra of 6 MV beams that are dosimetrically matched for clinical use were studied to determine if the beam spectra are similarly matched. Each of the four accelerators examined had a standing waveguide, but with different physical designs. The four accelerators were two Varian 2100C/Ds (one 6 MV/18 MV waveguide and one 6 MV/10 MV waveguide), one Varian 600 C with a vertically mounted waveguide and no bending magnet, and one Siemens MD 6740 with a 6 MV/10 MV waveguide. All four accelerators had percent depth dose curves for the 6 MV beam that were matched within 1.3%. Beam spectra were determined from narrow beam transmission measurements through successive thicknesses of pure aluminum along the central axis of the accelerator, made with a graphite Farmer ion chamber with a Lucite buildup cap. An iterative nonlinear fit using a Marquardt algorithm was used to find each spectrum. Reconstructed spectra show that all four beams have similar energy distributions with only subtle differences, despite the differences in accelerator design. The measured spectra of different 6 MV beams are similar regardless of accelerator design. The measured spectra show excellent agreement with those found by the auto-modeling algorithm in a commercial 3D treatment planning system that uses a convolution dose calculation algorithm. Thus, beam spectra can be acquired in a clinical setting at the time of commissioning as a part of the routine beam data collection. PMID:18561644

  5. Laser triggering of water switches in terrawatt-class pulse power accelerators.

    SciTech Connect

    Woodworth, Joseph Ray; Johnson, David Lee (Titan Pulse Sciences, San Leandro, CA); Wilkins, Frank (Bechtel Nevada, Las Vegas, NV); Van De Valde, David (EG&G Technical Services, Albuquerque, NM); Sarkisov, Gennady Sergeevich; Zameroski, Nathan D.; Starbird, Robert L.

    2005-12-01

    Focused Beams from high-power lasers have been used to command trigger gas switches in pulse power accelerators for more than two decades. This Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project was aimed at determining whether high power lasers could also command trigger water switches on high-power accelerators. In initial work, we determined that focused light from three harmonics of a small pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm, 532 nm, and 355 nm could be used to form breakdown arcs in water, with the lowest breakdown thresholds of 110 J/cm{sup 2} or 14 GW/cm{sup 2} at 532 nm in the green. In laboratory-scale laser triggering experiments with a 170-kV pulse-charged water switch with a 3-mm anode-cathode gap, we demonstrated that {approx}90 mJ of green laser energy could trigger the gap with a 1-{sigma} jitter of less than 2ns, a factor of 10 improvement over the jitter of the switch in its self breaking mode. In the laboratory-scale experiments we developed optical techniques utilizing polarization rotation of a probe laser beam to measure current in switch channels and electric field enhancements near streamer heads. In the final year of the project, we constructed a pulse-power facility to allow us to test laser triggering of water switches from 0.6- MV to 2.0 MV. Triggering experiments on this facility using an axicon lens for focusing the laser and a switch with a 740 kV self-break voltage produced consistent laser triggering with a {+-} 16-ns 1-{sigma} jitter, a significant improvement over the {+-} 24-ns jitter in the self-breaking mode.

  6. LASER TRIGGERED GAS SWITCHES UTILIZING BEAM TRANSPORT THROUGH 1 MO-cm DEIONIZED WATER.

    SciTech Connect

    Woodworth, Joseph Ray; Lehr, Jane; Blickem, James R.; Wallace, Zachariah R.; Anaya, Victor Jr; Corley, John P; Lott, John; Hodge, Keith; Zameroski, Nathan D.

    2005-11-01

    We report on the successful attempts to trigger high voltage pressurized gas switches by utilizing beam transport through 1 MO-cm deionized water. The wavelength of the laser radiation was 532 nm. We have investigated Nd: YAG laser triggering of a 6 MV, SF6 insulated gas switch for a range of laser and switch parameters. Laser wavelength of 532 nm with nominal pulse lengths of 10 ns full width half maximum (FWHM) were used to trigger the switch. The laser beam was transported through 67 cm-long cell of 1 MO-cm deionized water constructed with anti reflection UV grade fused silica windows. The laser beam was then focused to form a breakdown arc in the gas between switch electrodes. Less than 10 ns jitter in the operation of the switch was obtained for laser pulse energies of between 80-110 mJ. Breakdown arcs more than 35 mm-long were produced by using a 70 cm focusing optic.

  7. Photoconductive semiconductor switches: Laser Q-switch trigger and switch-trigger laser integration

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, G.M.; Mar, A.; Hamil, R.A.; Zutavern, F.J.; Helgeson, W.D.

    1997-12-01

    This report provides a summary of the Pulser In a Chip 9000-Discretionary LDRD. The program began in January of 1997 and concluded in September of 1997. The over-arching goal of this LDRD is to study whether laser diode triggered photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS) can be used to activate electro-optic devices such as Q-switches and Pockels cells and to study possible laser diode/switch integration. The PCSS switches we used were high gain GaAs switches because they can be triggered with small amounts of laser light. The specific goals of the LDRD were to demonstrate: (1) that small laser diode arrays that are potential candidates for laser-switch integration will indeed trigger the PCSS switch, and (2) that high gain GaAs switches can be used to trigger optical Q-switches in lasers such as the lasers to be used in the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source and the laser used for direct optical initiation (DOI) of explosives. The technology developed with this LDRD is now the prime candidate for triggering the Q switch in the multiple lasers in the laser trigger system of the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source and may be utilized in other accelerators. As part of the LDRD we developed a commercial supplier. To study laser/switch integration we tested triggering the high gain GaAs switches with: edge emitting laser diodes, vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs), and transverse junction stripe (TJS) lasers. The first two types of lasers (edge emitting and VCSELs) did activate the PCSS but are harder to integrate with the PCSS for a compact package. The US lasers, while easier to integrate with the switch, did not trigger the PCSS at the US laser power levels we used. The PCSS was used to activate the Q-switch of the compact laser to be used in the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source.

  8. Laser trigger system for the Jupiter module

    SciTech Connect

    Paiva, R.; Sundvoid, S.; Morelli, G.; Powell, C.; Hamil, R.; Corley, J.; Pankuch, P.; Law, K.; Alexander, J.

    1995-10-01

    A UV laser trigger system has been designed to trigger the eight SF6 filled high voltage switches in the Jupiter module. The system is compact and modular, allowing for approximately thirty lasers to be triggered simultaneously in the full Jupiter design. The laser will be kinematically mounted near the high voltage section to minimize the path length to the high voltage switches and decrease the sensitivity to misalignment. The laser system is specifically built for the purpose of triggering the Jupiter module. It is a 265 nm UV laser system designed to generate eight simultaneous laser pulses of 10 mJ each with a 13 nsec pulsewidth. A 1061 nm solid-state Nd:Cr:GSGG laser is frequency quadrupled with a two stage doubling process. The 1061 nm fundamental laser energy is frequency doubled with a type II KTP crystal to generate 530 nm energy. The 530 nm output is frequency doubled with a type I KD*P crystal to generate 265 nm energy. The 265 nm pulse is split into eight parallel channels with a system of partially reflecting mirrors. Low timing jitter and a stable energy output level for the system were achieved. The entire optical system was packaged in a rugged, sealed aluminum structure 10 in. {times} 19 in. {times} 2.75 in. The size of the laser electronics unit is 7 in. {times} 8 in. {times} 8 in.

  9. The new 6 MV AMS-facility DREAMS at Dresden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Heller, René; Hanf, Daniel; Rugel, Georg; Merchel, Silke

    2013-01-01

    A new 6 MV electrostatic tandem accelerator has been put into operation at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR). The system is equipped for accelerator mass spectrometry and opens a new research field at HZDR and the Helmholtz Association. It will be also used for ion beam analysis as well as for material modification via high-energy ion implantation. The research activity at the DREsden Accelerator Mass Spectrometry facility (DREAMS) based on a 6 MV Tandetron is primarily dedicated to the long-lived radioisotopes of 10Be, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, and 129I. DREAMS background levels have been found to be at 4.5 × 10-16 for 10Be/9Be, 8 × 10-16 for 26Al/27Al, 3 × 10-15 for 36Cl/35Cl and 8 × 10-15 for 41Ca/40Ca, respectively. The observed background of 2 × 10-13 for 129I/127I originates from intrinsic 129I from AgI produced from commercial KI. The introduction of quality assurance approaches for AMS, such as the use of traceable calibration materials and taking part in interlaboratory comparisons, guarantees high accuracy data for future DREAMS users. During first experiments an energy calibration of the accelerator has been carried out using the nuclear reaction 1H(15N,γα)12C yielding an energy correction factor of 1.019.

  10. Analytical scatter kernels for portal imaging at 6 MV.

    PubMed

    Spies, L; Bortfeld, T

    2001-04-01

    X-ray photon scatter kernels for 6 MV electronic portal imaging are investigated using an analytical and a semi-analytical model. The models are tested on homogeneous phantoms for a range of uniform circular fields and scatterer-to-detector air gaps relevant for clinical use. It is found that a fully analytical model based on an exact treatment of photons undergoing a single Compton scatter event and an approximate treatment of second and higher order scatter events, assuming a multiple-scatter source at the center of the scatter volume, is accurate within 1% (i.e., the residual scatter signal is less than 1% of the primary signal) for field sizes up to 100 cm2 and air gaps over 30 cm, but shows significant discrepancies for larger field sizes. Monte Carlo results are presented showing that the effective multiple-scatter source is located toward the exit surface of the scatterer, rather than at its center. A second model is therefore investigated where second and higher-order scattering is instead modeled by fitting an analytical function describing a nonstationary isotropic point-scatter source to Monte Carlo generated data. This second model is shown to be accurate to within 1% for air gaps down to 20 cm, for field sizes up to 900 cm2 and phantom thicknesses up to 50 cm. PMID:11339752

  11. SU-E-T-221: Investigation of Lower Energy (< 6 MV) Photon Beams for Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Ming, X; Feng, Y; Zhou, L; Ahmad, M; Deng, J; Nguyen, K; Griffin, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the potential applications of the lower energy (< 6MV) photon beams in the radiotherapeutic management of pediatric cancer and lung cancer patients. Methods: Photon beams of 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6MV were first simulated with EGS4/BEAM and then used for Monte-Carlo dose calculations. For four pediatric patients with abdominal and brain lesions, six 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) plans were generated using single photon energy (2 to 6MV) or mixed energies (3 and 6MV). Furthermore, a virtual machine of 3 and 6MV was commissioned in a treatment planning system (TPS) based on Monte-Carlo simulated data. Three IMRT plans of a lung cancer patient were generated on this virtual machine. All plans were normalized to D95% of target dose for 6MV plan and then compared in terms of integral dose and OAR sparing. Results: For the four pediatric patients, the integral dose for the 2, 3, 4 and 5MV plans increased by 9%, 5%, 3.5%, 1.7%, respectively as compared to 6MV. Almost all OARs in the 2MV plan received more than 10% more doses than 6MV. Mixed energy 3DCRT plans were of the same quality as 6MV plans. For the lung IMRT plans, both the 3MV plan and the mixed beam plan showed better OAR sparing in comparison to 6MV plan. Specifically, the maximum and mean doses to the spinal cord in the mixed energy plan were lower by 21% and 16%, respectively. Conclusion: Single lower energy photon beam was found to be inferior to 6MV in the radiotherapy of pediatric patients and lung cancer patients when the integral doses and the doses to the OARs were considered. However, mixed energy plans combining low with high energy beams showed significant OAR sparing while maintaining the same PTV coverage. Investigation with more patient data is ongoing for further confirmation.

  12. SIRIUS - A new 6 MV accelerator system for IBA and AMS at ANSTO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastuovic, Zeljko; Button, David; Cohen, David; Fink, David; Garton, David; Hotchkis, Michael; Ionescu, Mihail; Long, Shane; Levchenko, Vladimir; Mann, Michael; Siegele, Rainer; Smith, Andrew; Wilcken, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    The Centre for Accelerator Science (CAS) facility at ANSTO has been expanded with a new 6 MV tandem accelerator system supplied by the National Electrostatic Corporation (NEC). The beamlines, end-stations and data acquisition software for the accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) were custom built by NEC for rare isotope mass spectrometry, while the beamlines with end-stations for the ion beam analysis (IBA) are largely custom designed at ANSTO. An overview of the 6 MV system and its performance during testing and commissioning phase is given with emphasis on the IBA end-stations and their applications for materials modification and characterisation.

  13. Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects in A549 Cells Exposed to 6 MV X-rays.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuning; Xu, Jing; Shao, Weixian; Geng, Chong; Li, Jia; Guo, Feng; Miao, Hui; Shen, Wenbin; Ye, Tao; Liu, Yazhou; Xu, Haiting; Zhang, Xuguang

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study is to explore the bystander effects in A549 cells that have been exposed to 6MV X-ray. Control group, irradiated group, irradiated conditioned medium (ICM)-received group, and fresh medium group were designed in this study. A549 cells in the logarithmic growth phase were irradiated with 6MV X-ray at 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2. In ICM-received group, post-irradiation A549 cells were cultured for 3 h and were transferred into non-irradiated A549 cells for further cultivation. Clone forming test was applied to detect the survival fraction of cells. Annexin V-FITC/PI double-staining assay was used to detect the apoptosis of A549 cells 24, 48, 72, and 96 h after 2-Gy 6MV X-ray irradiation, and the curves of apoptosis were drawn. The changes in the cell cycles 4, 48, 72, and 96 h after 2-Gy 6MV X-ray irradiation were detected using PI staining flow cytometry. With the increase of irradiation dose, the survival fraction of A549 cells after the application of 0.5 Gy irradiation was decreasing continuously. In comparison to the control group, the apoptosis rate of the ICM-received group was increased in a time-dependent pattern, with the highest apoptosis rate observed at 72 h (p < 0.05). Cell count in G2/M stages was obviously increased compared with that of the control group (p < 0.05), with the highest count observed at 72 h, after which G2/M stage arrest was diminished. ICM can cause apparent A549 cell damage, indicating that 6MV X-ray irradiation can induce bystander effect on A549 cells, which reaches a peak at 72 h. PMID:25686868

  14. Microwave Triggered Laser Ionization of Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadiee, Ehsan; Prasad, Sarita; Jerald Buchenauer, C.; Schamiloglu, Edl

    2012-10-01

    The goal of this work is to study the evolution and dynamics of plasma expansion when a high power microwave (HPM) pulse is overlapped in time and space on a very small, localized region of plasma formed by a high energy laser pulse. The pulsed Nd:YAG laser (8 ns, 600mJ, repetition rate 10 Hz) is focused to generate plasma filaments in air with electron density of 10^17/cm^3. When irradiated with a high power microwave pulse these electrons would gain enough kinetic energy and further escalate avalanche ionization of air due to elastic electron-neutral collisions thereby causing an increased volumetric discharge region. An X-band relativistic backward wave oscillator(RBWO) at the Pulsed Power,Beams and Microwaves laboratory at UNM is constructed as the microwave source. The RBWO produces a microwave pulse of maximum power 400 MW, frequency of 10.1 GHz, and energy of 6.8 Joules. Special care is being given to synchronize the RBWO and the pulsed laser system in order to achieve a high degree of spatial and temporal overlap. A photodiode and a microwave waveguide detector will be used to ensure the overlap. Also, a new shadowgraph technique with a nanosecond time resolution will be used to detect changes in the shock wave fronts when the HPM signal overlaps the laser pulse in time and space.

  15. Evaluation of a photon and an electron beam of a 6-MV linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S C; Modur, P; Basavatia, R

    1988-01-01

    The first Mitsubishi medical linear accelerator in the United States was commissioned in April 1985. This unit EXL-8 (marketed by Mitsubishi International Corporation) produces 8-MeV electron beams in addition to 6-MV x rays. It is a 100-cm source-axis distance isocentric machine. Acceptance testing and performance evaluation of this accelerator were completed. Our measurements included beam characteristics and dosimetry parameters for both modalities. Central axis % depth dose (% DD), tissue-maximum ratio, field size output factors, wedge factors, etc., for this Linac 6-MV beam, are reported. Characteristics of the 8-MeV electron beam, namely % DD data, isodose curves, and cone ratios for various electron applicators are presented. PMID:3211045

  16. Spectral differences in 6 MV beams with matched PDDs and the effect on chamber response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lye, J. E.; Butler, D. J.; Ramanathan, G.; Franich, R. D.

    2012-11-01

    The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) has installed an Elekta Synergy platform linac to establish a direct megavoltage primary standard calibration service, instead of relying on calibrations derived from 60Co. One of the 6 MV beams of the ARPANSA linac has been approximately matched to the Varian high energy platform 6 MV photon beam. The electron beam energy was adjusted to match the percentage depth dose (PDD) curve and TPR20,10. This work calculates the error introduced when using a calibration factor from this Elekta Synergy Platform linac on a Varian high-energy platform beam at 6 MV. Monte Carlo models of the Varian and matched Elekta accelerator accurately predict the measured PDDs and profiles, but show significantly different energy spectra, resulting mainly from differences in target thickness between the two accelerators. Monte Carlo modelling of the energy correction factor kQ of a secondary standard NE2561 chamber shows a difference of 0.4% between the Varian and the Varian-matched Elekta beams. Although small, this is a significant discrepancy for primary standard calibrations. Similar variations are expected for chambers of similar construction, and additional variations may occur with other linac manufacturers. The work has also investigated the design of a custom flattening filter to precisely match the energy spectrum of the Varian beam on the Elekta platform.

  17. Spectral differences in 6 MV beams with matched PDDs and the effect on chamber response.

    PubMed

    Lye, J E; Butler, D J; Ramanathan, G; Franich, R D

    2012-11-21

    The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) has installed an Elekta Synergy platform linac to establish a direct megavoltage primary standard calibration service, instead of relying on calibrations derived from (60)Co. One of the 6 MV beams of the ARPANSA linac has been approximately matched to the Varian high energy platform 6 MV photon beam. The electron beam energy was adjusted to match the percentage depth dose (PDD) curve and TPR(20,10). This work calculates the error introduced when using a calibration factor from this Elekta Synergy Platform linac on a Varian high-energy platform beam at 6 MV. Monte Carlo models of the Varian and matched Elekta accelerator accurately predict the measured PDDs and profiles, but show significantly different energy spectra, resulting mainly from differences in target thickness between the two accelerators. Monte Carlo modelling of the energy correction factor k(Q) of a secondary standard NE2561 chamber shows a difference of 0.4% between the Varian and the Varian-matched Elekta beams. Although small, this is a significant discrepancy for primary standard calibrations. Similar variations are expected for chambers of similar construction, and additional variations may occur with other linac manufacturers. The work has also investigated the design of a custom flattening filter to precisely match the energy spectrum of the Varian beam on the Elekta platform. PMID:23103442

  18. Investigation of UV Laser Triggered, Nanosecond, Surface Flashover Switches

    SciTech Connect

    Nunnally, W C; Neurath, R; Holmes, C; Sampayan, S; Caporaso, G

    2003-06-03

    Triggered, multi-channel, surface discharges or surface flashover switching have been investigated as a low inductance, low pulse rate switch for conducting large currents. This paper discusses the investigation of UV (355 nm) laser triggered, single channel, low inductance, ns closure and sub-ns jitter switches for applications in switching high dielectric constant, compact pulse forming lines into accelerator loads. The experimental arrangement for evaluating the switch performance and for measuring the high field dielectric constant of the pulse forming lines is presented. Experimental results of delay and jitter measurements versus optical energy on the flashover surface and dc electric field charge.

  19. Triggering Excimer Lasers by Photoionization from Corona Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Zhongmin; Duffey, Thomas; Brown, Daniel; Kushner, Mark

    2009-10-01

    High repetition rate ArF (192 nm) excimer lasers are used for photolithography sources in microelectronics fabrication. In highly attaching gas mixtures, preionization is critical to obtaining stable, reproducible glow discharges. Photoionization from a separate corona discharge is one technique for preionization which triggers the subsequent electron avalanche between the main electrodes. Photoionization triggering of an ArF excimer laser sustained in multi-atmosphere Ne/Ar/F2/Xe gas mixtures has been investigated using a 2-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics model including radiation transport. Continuity equations for charged and neutral species, and Poisson's equation are solved coincident with the electron temperature with transport coefficients obtained from solutions of Boltzmann's equation. Photoionizing radiation is produced by a surface discharge which propagates along a corona-bar located adjacent to the discharge electrodes. The consequences of pulse power waveform, corona bar location, capacitance and gas mixture on uniformity, symmetry and gain of the avalanche discharge will be discussed.

  20. High voltage switch triggered by a laser-photocathode subsystem

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Ping; Lundquist, Martin L.; Yu, David U. L.

    2013-01-08

    A spark gap switch for controlling the output of a high voltage pulse from a high voltage source, for example, a capacitor bank or a pulse forming network, to an external load such as a high gradient electron gun, laser, pulsed power accelerator or wide band radar. The combination of a UV laser and a high vacuum quartz cell, in which a photocathode and an anode are installed, is utilized as triggering devices to switch the spark gap from a non-conducting state to a conducting state with low delay and low jitter.

  1. An optically-triggered semiconductor switch for high power laser beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Weng W.; Warren, M.E.

    1995-04-01

    The work involves research leading to an optically triggered switch for a high power laser pulse. The switch uses a semiconductor heterostructure whose optical properties are modified by a low power laser trigger such as a laser diode. Potential applications include optical control of pulsed power systems, control of medical lasers and implementation of security features in optical warhead architectures.

  2. Effect of helium-neon laser on musculoskeletal trigger points

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder-Mackler, L.; Bork, C.; Bourbon, B.; Trumbore, D.

    1986-07-01

    Cold lasers have been proposed recently as a therapeutic tool for treating a wide variety of pathological conditions, including wounds, arthritis, orthopedic problems, and pain. These proposed therapeutic effects largely have been unsubstantiated by research. A randomized, double blind study was undertaken to ascertain the effect of a helium-neon (He-Ne) laser on the resistance of areas of skin overlying musculoskeletal trigger points. These areas usually demonstrate decreased skin resistance when compared with the surrounding tissue. Thirty patients with musculoskeletal trigger points were assigned randomly to either an experimental or a placebo group. In addition to standard physical therapy, each patient received three 15-second applications of a He-Ne laser or placebo stimulation from an identical unit that did not emit a laser. The results of a two-way analysis of covariance with one repeated measure showed a statistically significant increase (p less than .007) in skin resistance. This increase in an abnormal skin resistance pattern may accompany the resolution of pathological conditions.

  3. Laser Triggered Electron Injection into a Channel Guided Wakefield Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; Filip, C.

    2005-10-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators have demonstrated the generation of narrow energy spread (˜ few %) electron beams with considerable amount of charge (>100 pC). Stability of laser-plasma accelerators, as in the conventional accelerators, requires highly synchronized injection of electrons into the structured accelerating field. The Colliding Pulse Method[1] with pre-formed plasma channel guiding [2] can result in jitter-free injection in a dark-current-free accelerating structure. We report on experimental progress of laser triggered injection of electrons into a laser wakefield, where an intense laser pulse is guided by a pre-formed plasma channel. The experiments use the multi-beam, multi-terawatt Ti:Al2O3 laser at LOASIS facility of LBNL. The ignitor-heater method is used to first produce a pre-formed plasma channel in a hydrogen gas jet. Two counter propagating beams (wakefield driver:100-500mJ-50fs, injector:50-300mJ-50fs) then are focused onto the entrance of the channel. Preliminary results indicate that electron beam properties are affected by the second beam. Details of the experiment will be presented. [1]G.Fubiani, et al, Phys. Rev. E 70, 016402 (2004). [2]C.G.R. Geddes et al, Nature 431, 538 (2004). This work is supported by DoE under contract DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  4. Therapeutic dose simulation of a 6 MV Varian Linac photon beam using GEANT4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, E.; Ali, A. S.; Khaled, N. E.; Radi, A.

    2015-10-01

    A developed program in C++ language using GEANT4 libraries was used to simulate the gantry of a 6 MV high energy photon linear accelerator (Linac). The head of a clinical linear accelerator based on the manufacturer's detailed information is simulated. More than 2× 109 primary electrons are used to create the phase space file. Evaluation of the percentage depth dose (PDD) and flatness symmetry (lateral dose profiles) in water phantom were performed. Comparisons between experimental and simulated data were carried out for three field sizes; 5 × 5, 10 × 10 and 15 × 15 cm2. A relatively good agreement appeared between computed and measured PDD. Electron contamination and spatial distribution for both photons and electrons in the simulated beam are evaluated. Moreover, the obtained lateral dose profiles at 15, 50, and 100 mm depth are compatible with the measured values. The obtained results concluded that, GEANT4 code is a promising applicable Monte Carlo program in radiotherapy applications.

  5. Dosimetric Characteristics of 6 MV Modified Beams by Physical Wedges of a Siemens Linear Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Zabihzadeh, Mansour; Birgani, Mohammad Javad Tahmasebi; Hoseini-Ghahfarokhi, Mojtaba; Arvandi, Sholeh; Hoseini, Seyed Mohammad; Fadaei, Mahbube

    2016-01-01

    Physical wedges still can be used as missing tissue compensators or filters to alter the shape of isodose curves in a target volume to reach an optimal radiotherapy plan without creating a hotspot. The aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric properties of physical wedges filters such as off-axis photon fluence, photon spectrum, output factor and half value layer. The photon beam quality of a 6 MV Primus Siemens modified by 150 and 450 physical wedges was studied with BEAMnrc Monte Carlo (MC) code. The calculated present depth dose and dose profile curves for open and wedged photon beam were in good agreement with the measurements. Increase of wedge angle increased the beam hardening and this effect was more pronounced at the heal region. Using such an accurate MC model to determine of wedge factors and implementation of it as a calculation algorithm in the future treatment planning systems is recommended. PMID:27221838

  6. A new HVE 6 MV AMS system at the University of Cologne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, M. G.; Dewald, A.; Gottdang, A.; Heinze, S.; Mous, D. J. W.

    2011-12-01

    CologneAMS is the new Centre for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at the University of Cologne. It will operate a dedicated AMS system designed to measure all standard cosmogenic nuclides ( 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, 129I) and which uses a 6 MV Tandetron™ accelerator equipped with an all solid-state power supply, foil and gas stripper. The system also enables a sensitive detection of heavy ions up to 239U and 244Pu. The high-energy mass-spectrometer consists of a 90 degree magnet with a radius of 2 m and a mass-energy product of 351 AMU MeV to allow the detection of 244Pu 5+ up to the maximum terminal voltage of 6 MV. This magnet is followed by an electrostatic energy analyzer and a switching magnet that can transport the rare isotope beam into various beamlines. The switching magnet forms a third analyzing element which is needed especially for the sensitive detection of heavy elements. So far two beamlines are equipped with their own detection system. One of these lines is used for suppression of isobaric background in the case of the analysis of e.g. 36Cl. This is accomplished by an absorber foil which generates a Z-dependent energy loss in combination with a momentum/charge-state selection via a 120 degree magnet that features up to 30 mrad acceptance for efficient beam transport. In this contribution we will introduce the new Centre, the layout and specific characteristics of the AMS system as well as the main topics of the future scientific work to be performed at CologneAMS.

  7. Laser-assisted vacuum arc extreme ultraviolet source: a comparison of picosecond and nanosecond laser triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyene, Girum A.; Tobin, Isaac; Juschkin, Larissa; Hayden, Patrick; O’Sullivan, Gerry; Sokell, Emma; Zakharov, Vassily S.; Zakharov, Sergey V.; O’Reilly, Fergal

    2016-06-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light generation by hybrid laser-assisted vacuum arc discharge plasmas, utilizing Sn-coated rotating-disc-electrodes, was investigated. The discharge was initiated by localized ablation of the liquid tin coating of the cathode disc by a laser pulse. The laser pulse, at 1064 nm, was generated by Nd:YAG lasers with variable energy from 1 to 100 mJ per pulse. The impact of shortening the laser pulse from 7 ns to 170 ps on the EUV generation has been investigated in detail. The use of ps pulses resulted in an increase in emission of EUV radiation. With a fixed discharge energy of ~4 J, the EUV conversion efficiency tends to plateau at ~2.4  ±  0.25% for the ps laser pulses, while for the ns pulses, it saturates at ~1.7  ±  0.3%. Under similar discharge and laser energy conditions, operating the EUV source with the ps-triggering resulted also in narrower spectral profiles of the emission in comparison to ns-triggering. The results indicate an advantage in using ps-triggering in laser-assisted discharges to produce brighter plasmas required for applications such as metrology.

  8. Measurement of skin and target dose in post-mastectomy radiotherapy using 4 and 6 MV photon beams

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background For patients with high risk breast cancer and mastectomy, radiotherapy is the treatment of choice to improve survival and local control. Target dose is mainly limited due to skin reactions. The feasibility of using 4 MV beams for chest wall treatment was studied and compared to standard 6 MV bolus radiotherapy. Methods Post-mastectomy IMRT was planned on an Alderson-phantom using 4 and 6 MV photon beams without/with a 0.5 cm thick bolus. Dose was measured using TLDs placed at 8 locations in 1 and 3 mm depth to represent skin and superficial target dose, respectively. Results 4 MV and 6 MV beams with bolus perform equally regarding target coverage. The minimum and mean superficial target dose for the 6 MV and 4 MV were 93.0% and 94.7%, and 93.1% and 94.4%, respectively. Regarding skin dose the 4 MV photon beam was advantageous. The minimum and mean skin dose for the 6 MV and 4 MV was 76.7% and 81.6%, and 69.4% and 72.9%, respectively. The TPS was able to predict dose in the build-up region with a precision of around 5%. Conclusions The use of 4 MV photon beams are a good alternative for treating the thoracic wall without the need to place a bolus on the patient. The main limitation of 4 MV beams is the limited dose rate. PMID:24238366

  9. Liquid ionization chamber measurements of dose distributions in small 6 MV photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasu, Alexandru; Löfroth, Per-Olov; Wickman, Göran

    1998-01-01

    A new liquid ionization chamber (LIC) design optimized for high spatial resolution was used for measurements of dose distributions in radiation fields intended for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). This work was mainly focused on the properties of this detector in radiation fields from linear accelerators for clinical radiotherapy (pulsed radiation with dose rates from approximately 0.5 to and beam diameters down to 8 mm). The narrow beams used in stereotactic radiosurgery require detectors with small sizes in order to provide a good spatial resolution. The LIC is investigated to see whether it can be used as a detector for dose measurements in beams currently used for stereotactic radiosurgery. Its properties are compared with those of silicon diodes. The comparisons include output factor (OF), depth dose and profile measurements in 6 MV photon fields of different sizes. For OF measurements, an NACP air ionization chamber was also used in the comparison. The dependence of the response on the detector orientation in the photon beam is also investigated for the diodes and the LIC. The results suggest that LICs can provide better properties than diodes for measuring dose distributions in narrow photon beams.

  10. A dose-response curve for biodosimetry from a 6 MV electron linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Lemos-Pinto, M M P; Cadena, M; Santos, N; Fernandes, T S; Borges, E; Amaral, A

    2015-10-01

    Biological dosimetry (biodosimetry) is based on the investigation of radiation-induced biological effects (biomarkers), mainly dicentric chromosomes, in order to correlate them with radiation dose. To interpret the dicentric score in terms of absorbed dose, a calibration curve is needed. Each curve should be constructed with respect to basic physical parameters, such as the type of ionizing radiation characterized by low or high linear energy transfer (LET) and dose rate. This study was designed to obtain dose calibration curves by scoring of dicentric chromosomes in peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated in vitro with a 6 MV electron linear accelerator (Mevatron M, Siemens, USA). Two software programs, CABAS (Chromosomal Aberration Calculation Software) and Dose Estimate, were used to generate the curve. The two software programs are discussed; the results obtained were compared with each other and with other published low LET radiation curves. Both software programs resulted in identical linear and quadratic terms for the curve presented here, which was in good agreement with published curves for similar radiation quality and dose rates. PMID:26445334

  11. Effect of transverse magnetic fields on a simulated in-line 6 MV linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Aubin, J.; Steciw, S.; Fallone, B. G.

    2010-08-01

    The effects of a transverse magnetic field on an in-line side-coupled 6 MV linear accelerator are given. The results are directly applicable to a linac-MR system used for real-time image guided adaptive radiotherapy. Our previously designed end-to-end linac simulation incorporated the results from the axisymmetric 2D electron gun program EGN2w. However, since the magnetic fields being investigated are non-axisymmetric in nature for the work presented here, the electron gun simulation was performed using OPERA-3d/SCALA. The simulation results from OPERA-3d/SCALA showed excellent agreement with previous results. Upon the addition of external magnetic fields to our fully 3D linac simulation, it was found that a transverse magnetic field of 6 G resulted in a 45 ± 1% beam loss, and by 14 G, no electrons were incident on the target. Transverse magnetic fields on the linac simulation produced a highly asymmetric focal spot at the target, which translated into a 13% profile asymmetry at 6 G. Upon translating the focal spot with respect to the target coordinates, profile symmetry was regained at the expense of a lateral shift in the dose profiles. It was found that all points in the penumbra failed a 1%/1 mm acceptance criterion for fields between 4 and 6 G. However, it was also found that the lateral profile shifts were corrected by adjusting the jaw positions asymmetrically.

  12. Dosimetric properties of dysprosium doped lithium borate glass irradiated by 6 MV photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ab Rasid, A.; Wagiran, H.; Hashim, S.; Ibrahim, Z.; Ali, H.

    2015-07-01

    Undoped and dysprosium doped lithium borate glass system with empirical formula (70-x) B2O3-30 Li2O-(x) Dy2O3 (x=0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 1.0 mol%) were prepared using the melt-quenching technique. The dosimetric measurements were performed by irradiating the samples to 6 MV photon beam using linear accelerator (LINAC) over a dose range of 0.5-5.0 Gy. The glass series of dysprosium doped lithium borate glass produced the best thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve with the highest intensity peak from sample with 1.0 mol% Dy2O3 concentration. Minimum detectable dose was detected at 2.24 mGy, good linearity of regression coefficient, high reproducibility and high sensitivity compared to the undoped glass are from 1.0 mol% dysprosium doped lithium borate glass. The results indicated that the series of dysprosium doped lithium glasses have a great potential to be considered as a thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD).

  13. Dosimetry of a Small-Animal Irradiation Model using a 6 MV Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, F. Moran; Martinez-Davalos, A.; Garcia-Garduno, O. A.

    2010-12-07

    A custom made rat-like phantom was used to measure dose distributions using a 6 MV linear accelerator. The phantom has air cavities that simulate the lungs and cylindrical inserts that simulate the backbone. The calculated dose distributions were obtained with the BrainScan v.5.31 TPS software. For the irradiation two cases were considered: (a) near the region where the phantom has two air cavities that simulate the lungs, and (b) with an entirely uniform phantom. The treatment plan consisted of two circular cone arcs that imparted a 500 cGy dose to a simulated lesion in the backbone. We measured dose distributions using EBT2 GafChromic film and an Epson Perfection V750 scanner working in transmission mode. Vertical and horizontal profiles, isodose curves from 50 to 450 cGy, dose and distance to agreement (DTA) histograms and Gamma index were obtained to compare the dose distributions using DoseLab v4.11. As a result, these calculations show very good agreement between calculated and measured dose distribution in both cases. With a 2% 2 mm criteria 100% of the points pass the Gamma test for the uniform case, while 98.9% of the points do it for the lungs case.

  14. Dosimetry of a Small-Animal Irradiation Model using a 6 MV Linear Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitch, F. Morán; García-Garduño, O. A.; Martínez-Dávalos, A.

    2010-12-01

    A custom made rat-like phantom was used to measure dose distributions using a 6 MV linear accelerator. The phantom has air cavities that simulate the lungs and cylindrical inserts that simulate the backbone. The calculated dose distributions were obtained with the BrainScan v.5.31 TPS software. For the irradiation two cases were considered: (a) near the region where the phantom has two air cavities that simulate the lungs, and (b) with an entirely uniform phantom. The treatment plan consisted of two circular cone arcs that imparted a 500 cGy dose to a simulated lesion in the backbone. We measured dose distributions using EBT2 GafChromic film and an Epson Perfection V750 scanner working in transmission mode. Vertical and horizontal profiles, isodose curves from 50 to 450 cGy, dose and distance to agreement (DTA) histograms and Gamma index were obtained to compare the dose distributions using DoseLab v4.11. As a result, these calculations show very good agreement between calculated and measured dose distribution in both cases. With a 2% 2 mm criteria 100% of the points pass the Gamma test for the uniform case, while 98.9% of the points do it for the lungs case.

  15. Reduction of the "horns" observed on the beam profiles of a 6-MV linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Constantinou, C; Sternick, E S

    1984-01-01

    The presence of large "horns" was found while plotting beam profiles during acceptance testing of a 6-MV linear accelerator. The in-phantom off-axis ratio (OAR), measured at 22 cm off the central axis along the diagonal of a 40 X 40 cm field at dmax was found to be 1.19, while beam uniformity was within specifications at 10-cm depth. A change in the gun injection voltage and the replacement of the magnet surrounding the magnetron with one of greater strength resulted in a reduction of the OAR to 1.085. The beam uniformity at depth was maintained within specifications. An alternative solution of adding a modifying filter in the primary beam was considered undesirable because of the 20%-25% reduction in dose rate caused by such filters. The relationship between the energy, the intensity distribution of the beam, and the magnitude of the horns is discussed, and the beam profiles, isodoses, and central axis depth doses before and after the changes are compared. PMID:6439993

  16. Analyzing the characteristics of 6 MV photon beam at low monitor unit settings

    PubMed Central

    Nithya, L.; Raj, N. Arunai Nambi; Rathinamuthu, Sasikumar

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing the characteristics of a low monitor unit (MU) setting is essential, particularly for intensity-modulated techniques. Intensity modulation can be achieved through intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). There is possibility for low MUs in the segments of IMRT and VMAT plans. The minimum MU/segment must be set by the physicist in the treatment planning system at the time of commissioning. In this study, the characteristics such as dose linearity, stability, flatness, and symmetry of 6 MV photon beam of a Synergy linear accelerator at low MU settings were investigated for different dose rates. The measurements were performed for Synergy linear accelerator using a slab phantom with a FC65-G chamber and Profiler 2. The MU linearity was studied for 1–100 MU using a field size of 10 cm ×10 cm. The linearity error for 1 MU was 4.2%. Flatness of the beam was deteriorated in 1 MU condition. The beam stability and symmetry was well within the specification. Using this study, we conclude that the treatment delivered with <3 MU may result in uncertainty in dose delivery. To ensure the correct dose delivery with less uncertainty, it is recommended to use ≥3 MU as the minimum MU per segment in IMRT and VMAT plans. PMID:27051168

  17. Nonlinearity in MCF7 Cell Survival Following Exposure to Modulated 6 MV Radiation Fields

    PubMed Central

    Castiella, Marion; Franceries, Xavier; Cassol, Emmanuelle; Vieillevigne, Laure; Pereda, Veronica; Bardies, Manuel; Courtade-Saïdi, Monique

    2015-01-01

    The study of cell survival following exposure to nonuniform radiation fields is taking on particular interest because of the increasing evidence of a nonlinear relationship at low doses. We conducted in vitro experiments using the MCF7 breast cancer cell line. A 2.4 × 2.4 cm2 square area of a T25 flask was irradiated by a Varian Novalis accelerator delivering 6 MV photons. Cell survival inside the irradiation field, in the dose gradient zone and in the peripheral zone, was determined using a clonogenic assay for different radiation doses at the isocenter. Increased cell survival was observed inside the irradiation area for doses of 2, 10, and 20 Gy when nonirradiated cells were present at the periphery, while the cells at the periphery showed decreased survival compared to controls. Increased survival was also observed at the edge of the dose gradient zone for cells receiving 0.02 to 0.01 Gy when compared with cells at the periphery of the same flask, whatever the isocenter dose. These data are the first to report cell survival in the dose gradient zone. Radiotherapists must be aware of this nonlinearity in dose response. PMID:26740805

  18. Effect of transverse magnetic fields on a simulated in-line 6 MV linac.

    PubMed

    St Aubin, J; Steciw, S; Fallone, B G

    2010-08-21

    The effects of a transverse magnetic field on an in-line side-coupled 6 MV linear accelerator are given. The results are directly applicable to a linac-MR system used for real-time image guided adaptive radiotherapy. Our previously designed end-to-end linac simulation incorporated the results from the axisymmetric 2D electron gun program EGN2w. However, since the magnetic fields being investigated are non-axisymmetric in nature for the work presented here, the electron gun simulation was performed using OPERA-3d/SCALA. The simulation results from OPERA-3d/SCALA showed excellent agreement with previous results. Upon the addition of external magnetic fields to our fully 3D linac simulation, it was found that a transverse magnetic field of 6 G resulted in a 45 +/- 1% beam loss, and by 14 G, no electrons were incident on the target. Transverse magnetic fields on the linac simulation produced a highly asymmetric focal spot at the target, which translated into a 13% profile asymmetry at 6 G. Upon translating the focal spot with respect to the target coordinates, profile symmetry was regained at the expense of a lateral shift in the dose profiles. It was found that all points in the penumbra failed a 1%/1 mm acceptance criterion for fields between 4 and 6 G. However, it was also found that the lateral profile shifts were corrected by adjusting the jaw positions asymmetrically. PMID:20679699

  19. The design of a simulated in-line side-coupled 6 MV linear accelerator waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    St Aubin, Joel; Steciw, Stephen; Fallone, B. G.

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The design of a 3D in-line side-coupled 6 MV linac waveguide for medical use is given, and the effect of the side-coupling and port irises on the radio frequency (RF), beam dynamics, and dosimetric solutions is examined. This work was motivated by our research on a linac-MR hybrid system, where accurate electron trajectory information for a clinical medical waveguide in the presence of an external magnetic field was needed. Methods: For this work, the design of the linac waveguide was generated using the finite element method. The design outlined here incorporates the necessary geometric changes needed to incorporate a full-end accelerating cavity with a single-coupling iris, a waveguide-cavity coupling port iris that allows power transfer into the waveguide from the magnetron, as well as a method to control the RF field magnitude within the first half accelerating cavity into which the electrons from the gun are injected. Results: With the full waveguide designed to resonate at 2998.5{+-}0.1 MHz, a full 3D RF field solution was obtained. The accuracy of the 3D RF field solution was estimated through a comparison of important linac parameters (Q factor, shunt impedance, transit time factor, and resonant frequency) calculated for one accelerating cavity with the benchmarked program SUPERFISH. It was found that the maximum difference between the 3D solution and SUPERFISH was less than 0.03%. The eigenvalue solver, which determines the resonant frequencies of the 3D side-coupled waveguide simulation, was shown to be highly accurate through a comparison with lumped circuit theory. Two different waveguide geometries were examined, one incorporating a 0.5 mm first side cavity shift and another with a 1.5 mm first side cavity shift. The asymmetrically placed side-coupling irises and the port iris for both models were shown to introduce asymmetries in the RF field large enough to cause a peak shift and skewing (center of gravity minus peak shift) of an initially

  20. Near surface photon energy spectra outside a 6 MV field edge.

    PubMed

    Edwards, C R; Mountford, P J

    2004-09-21

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference between a 6 MV linear accelerator x-ray energy spectrum outside the field edge near a phantom surface, and the corresponding spectrum on the central axis. The Monte Carlo code MCNP-4A was used to calculate the spectra on the central axis and at 1, 2, 5 and 10 cm from the edge of a 4 x 4 cm2, 10 x 10 cm2 and 15 x 15 cm2 field. Compared to the spectrum on the central axis, the spectra outside the field edge showed two distinct regions: a broad peak below about 0.5 MeV, and a lower amplitude, less rapidly changing region at higher energies from 0.5 to 6 MeV. The lower energy peak was due to scattered photons, and the higher energy component was due mainly to primary photons transmitted through the jaws of the secondary collimator. The potential impact of these spectral differences on critical organ photon dosimetry was determined by calculating the ratio of the sensitivity of a Scanditronix EDD-5 diode and of a LiF:Mg:Ti thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) outside the field edge to their respective sensitivity at the calibration position on the central axis. The lower energy peak combined with the non-uniform energy sensitivity of each detector produced up to a two-thirds overestimate of x-ray dose outside the field by the diode, whereas the response ratio of the TLD was about unity. These results indicated that a similar evaluation was required for profile measurements of a dynamic wedged field and measurements in an intensity modulated beam with either type of detector. PMID:15509076

  1. NOTE: Near surface photon energy spectra outside a 6 MV field edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, C. R.; Mountford, P. J.

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference between a 6 MV linear accelerator x-ray energy spectrum outside the field edge near a phantom surface, and the corresponding spectrum on the central axis. The Monte Carlo code MCNP-4A was used to calculate the spectra on the central axis and at 1, 2, 5 and 10 cm from the edge of a 4 × 4 cm2, 10 × 10 cm2 and 15 × 15 cm2 field. Compared to the spectrum on the central axis, the spectra outside the field edge showed two distinct regions: a broad peak below about 0.5 MeV, and a lower amplitude, less rapidly changing region at higher energies from 0.5 to 6 MeV. The lower energy peak was due to scattered photons, and the higher energy component was due mainly to primary photons transmitted through the jaws of the secondary collimator. The potential impact of these spectral differences on critical organ photon dosimetry was determined by calculating the ratio of the sensitivity of a Scanditronix EDD-5 diode and of a LiF:Mg:Ti thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) outside the field edge to their respective sensitivity at the calibration position on the central axis. The lower energy peak combined with the non-uniform energy sensitivity of each detector produced up to a two-thirds overestimate of x-ray dose outside the field by the diode, whereas the response ratio of the TLD was about unity. These results indicated that a similar evaluation was required for profile measurements of a dynamic wedged field and measurements in an intensity modulated beam with either type of detector.

  2. Dual channel formation in a laser-triggered spark gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushner, M. J.; Kimura, W. D.; Ford, D. H.; Byron, S. R.

    1985-12-01

    During self-break in spark-gap switches, multiple streamers can form in close proximity to one another. The rate of expansion of these streamers is sufficiently fast that they can interact during the current pulse. To help understand how these closely spaced, expanding spark columns interact, a laser-triggered spark gap has been studied in which two parallel columns (separation 1.3 mm) are simultaneously preionized, resulting in a pair of nearly identical, axisymmetric spark columns. The spark gap (electrode separation 1.2 cm) switches a 100 ns, 40-60 kV, 12-20 kA, 1.5 Ω waterline. Interferograms of the expanding arc channels are obtained with a laser interferometer having a time and spatial resolution of 5 ns and 10 μm, respectively. Voltage and current were measured with an internal capacitive-voltage divider and a current viewing resistor. The interferograms show that for initially identical axisymmetric columns, the individual channels do not merge into a single larger axisymmetric spark column. Instead, regions of high gas density remain inside the combined column long into the recovery period. The columns also do not remain axisymmetric as they grow, indicating a long-range interaction between the channels. The voltage drop and resistance of the dual channel spark gaps changes by less than 15% from that of a single spark channel. A scaling model is presented to explain the resistance measurements and to predict the change in resistance for multichannel spark gaps.

  3. Commissioning of a Varian Clinac iX 6 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Dirgayussa, I Gde Eka Yani, Sitti; Haryanto, Freddy; Rhani, M. Fahdillah

    2015-09-30

    Monte Carlo modelling of a linear accelerator is the first and most important step in Monte Carlo dose calculations in radiotherapy. Monte Carlo is considered today to be the most accurate and detailed calculation method in different fields of medical physics. In this research, we developed a photon beam model for Varian Clinac iX 6 MV equipped with MilleniumMLC120 for dose calculation purposes using BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo system based on the underlying EGSnrc particle transport code. Monte Carlo simulation for this commissioning head LINAC divided in two stages are design head Linac model using BEAMnrc, characterize this model using BEAMDP and analyze the difference between simulation and measurement data using DOSXYZnrc. In the first step, to reduce simulation time, a virtual treatment head LINAC was built in two parts (patient-dependent component and patient-independent component). The incident electron energy varied 6.1 MeV, 6.2 MeV and 6.3 MeV, 6.4 MeV, and 6.6 MeV and the FWHM (full width at half maximum) of source is 1 mm. Phase-space file from the virtual model characterized using BEAMDP. The results of MC calculations using DOSXYZnrc in water phantom are percent depth doses (PDDs) and beam profiles at depths 10 cm were compared with measurements. This process has been completed if the dose difference of measured and calculated relative depth-dose data along the central-axis and dose profile at depths 10 cm is ≤ 5%. The effect of beam width on percentage depth doses and beam profiles was studied. Results of the virtual model were in close agreement with measurements in incident energy electron 6.4 MeV. Our results showed that photon beam width could be tuned using large field beam profile at the depth of maximum dose. The Monte Carlo model developed in this study accurately represents the Varian Clinac iX with millennium MLC 120 leaf and can be used for reliable patient dose calculations. In this commissioning process, the good

  4. Commissioning of a Varian Clinac iX 6 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirgayussa, I. Gde Eka; Yani, Sitti; Rhani, M. Fahdillah; Haryanto, Freddy

    2015-09-01

    Monte Carlo modelling of a linear accelerator is the first and most important step in Monte Carlo dose calculations in radiotherapy. Monte Carlo is considered today to be the most accurate and detailed calculation method in different fields of medical physics. In this research, we developed a photon beam model for Varian Clinac iX 6 MV equipped with MilleniumMLC120 for dose calculation purposes using BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo system based on the underlying EGSnrc particle transport code. Monte Carlo simulation for this commissioning head LINAC divided in two stages are design head Linac model using BEAMnrc, characterize this model using BEAMDP and analyze the difference between simulation and measurement data using DOSXYZnrc. In the first step, to reduce simulation time, a virtual treatment head LINAC was built in two parts (patient-dependent component and patient-independent component). The incident electron energy varied 6.1 MeV, 6.2 MeV and 6.3 MeV, 6.4 MeV, and 6.6 MeV and the FWHM (full width at half maximum) of source is 1 mm. Phase-space file from the virtual model characterized using BEAMDP. The results of MC calculations using DOSXYZnrc in water phantom are percent depth doses (PDDs) and beam profiles at depths 10 cm were compared with measurements. This process has been completed if the dose difference of measured and calculated relative depth-dose data along the central-axis and dose profile at depths 10 cm is ≤ 5%. The effect of beam width on percentage depth doses and beam profiles was studied. Results of the virtual model were in close agreement with measurements in incident energy electron 6.4 MeV. Our results showed that photon beam width could be tuned using large field beam profile at the depth of maximum dose. The Monte Carlo model developed in this study accurately represents the Varian Clinac iX with millennium MLC 120 leaf and can be used for reliable patient dose calculations. In this commissioning process, the good criteria of dose

  5. Bidirectional laser triggering in highly-resistive vanadium-dioxide thin films by using a 966-nm pump laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihoon; Kim, Bong-Jun; Yu, Bong-Ahn; Kang, Hyun Wook; Nam, Seung Yun; Oh, Junghwan; Lee, Yong Wook

    2016-01-01

    By incorporating a 966-nm pump laser diode, we realized bidirectional laser triggering in a twoterminal planar device based on a highly-resistive vanadium-dioxide (VO2) thin film grown by using the pulsed laser deposition method. Bidirectional laser triggering of up to 10 mA was achieved by directly illuminating the VO2 film with a focused infrared laser beam, and the transient responses of the laser-triggered currents were analyzed. A switching contrast between the off-state and the on-state currents was measured as ˜3571, and the rising and the falling times were measured as ˜40 and ˜20 ms, respectively, when laser pulses with a pulse width of 100 ms excited the VO2-based device.

  6. 6.1-MV, 0.79-MA laser-triggered gas switch for multimodule, multiterawatt pulsed-power accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechien, K. R.; Stygar, W. A.; Savage, M. E.; Wakeland, P. E.; Anaya, V.; Artery, D. S.; Baremore, M. J.; Bliss, D. E.; Chavez, R.; Coombs, G. D.; Corley, J. P.; Jones, P. A.; Kipp, A. K.; Lewis, B. A.; Lott, J. A.; Lynch, J. J.; McKee, G. R.; Ploor, S. D.; Prestwich, K. R.; Roznowski, S. A.; Spencer, D. C.; White, S. D.; Woodworth, J. R.

    2010-03-01

    A 6.1-MV, 0.79-MA laser-triggered gas switch (LTGS) is used to synchronize the 36 modules of the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories. Each module includes one switch, which serves as the last command-fired switch of the module, and hence is used to determine the time at which each module electrically closes relative to the other modules. The switch is ˜81-cm in length, ˜45-cm in diameter, and is immersed in mineral oil. The outer switch envelope consists of six corrugated monomer-cast acrylic insulators and five contoured stainless-steel rings. The trigger electrodes are fabricated from copper-infused tungsten. The switch is pressurized with several atmospheres of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which is turbulently purged within 2 seconds after every shot. Each switch is powered from a 6-MV, 0.78-MJ Marx generator which pulse charges a 24-nF intermediate-store water capacitor in 1.4-μs. Closure of the switch allows power to flow into pulse-forming transmission lines. The power pulse is subsequently compressed by water switches, which results in a total accelerator output power in excess of 70-TW. A previous version of the LTGS performed exceptionally at a 5.4-MV, 0.7-MA level on an engineering test module used for switch development. It exhibited a 1-σ jitter of ˜5ns, a prefire and flashover rate less than 0.1%, and a lifetime in excess of 150 shots. When installed on the Z accelerator, however, the switch exhibited a prefire probability of ˜3%, a flashover probability of ˜7%, and a 15-ns jitter. The difference in performance is attributed to several factors such as higher total charge transfer, exposure to more debris, and more stressful dynamic mechanical loading upon machine discharge. Under these conditions, the replacement lifetime was less than ten shots. Since refurbishment of Z in October 2007, there have been three LTGS design iterations to improve the performance at 6.1-MV. The most recent design exhibits a prefire rate of less than 0.1%, a

  7. Kinetic simulation studies of laser-triggering in the Z gas switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, D. R.; Rose, D. V.; Thoma, C.; Clark, R. E.; Miller, C.; Madrid, E. A.; Zimmerman, W. R.; Rambo, P. K.; Schwarz, J.; Savage, M.; Atherton, B. W.

    2013-08-01

    Advanced z-pinch accelerators require precise timing of multiple mega-ampere drivers to deliver terawatt power. The triggering of these drivers is now largely initiated by laser ionization of gas switches. In this paper, we discuss detailed fully kinetic simulation of the Z laser-triggered gas switch involving detailed finite-difference time-domain particle-in-cell Monte Carlo modeling of the trigger section of the switch. Other components of the accelerator from the Marx bank through the pulse-forming line are described as circuit elements. The simulations presented here build on a recently developed model of electro-negative gas breakdown and streamer propagation that included photons produced from de-excited neutrals. New effects include multi-photon ionization of the gas in a prescribed laser field. The simulations show the sensitivity of triggering to laser parameters including focal plane within the anode-cathode gap of the trigger section of the switch, intensity at focus, and laser pulse length. Detailed electromagnetic simulations of the trigger section with circuit modeling of the upstream and downstream components are largely in agreement with Z data and demonstrate a new capability.

  8. Kinetic simulation studies of laser-triggering in the Z gas switch

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, D. R.; Rose, D. V.; Thoma, C.; Clark, R. E.; Miller, C.; Madrid, E. A.; Zimmerman, W. R.; Rambo, P. K.; Schwarz, J.; Savage, M.; Atherton, B. W.

    2013-08-15

    Advanced z-pinch accelerators require precise timing of multiple mega-ampere drivers to deliver terawatt power. The triggering of these drivers is now largely initiated by laser ionization of gas switches. In this paper, we discuss detailed fully kinetic simulation of the Z laser-triggered gas switch involving detailed finite-difference time-domain particle-in-cell Monte Carlo modeling of the trigger section of the switch. Other components of the accelerator from the Marx bank through the pulse-forming line are described as circuit elements. The simulations presented here build on a recently developed model of electro-negative gas breakdown and streamer propagation that included photons produced from de-excited neutrals. New effects include multi-photon ionization of the gas in a prescribed laser field. The simulations show the sensitivity of triggering to laser parameters including focal plane within the anode-cathode gap of the trigger section of the switch, intensity at focus, and laser pulse length. Detailed electromagnetic simulations of the trigger section with circuit modeling of the upstream and downstream components are largely in agreement with Z data and demonstrate a new capability.

  9. Compact 180-kV Marx generator triggered in atmospheric air by femtosecond laser filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arantchouk, L.; Point, G.; Brelet, Y.; Larour, J.; Carbonnel, J.; André, Y.-B.; Mysyrowicz, A.; Houard, A.

    2014-03-01

    We developed a compact Marx generator triggered in atmospheric air by a single femtosecond laser beam undergoing filamentation. Voltage pulses of 180 kV could be generated with a subnanosecond jitter. The same laser beam was also used to initiate simultaneously guided discharges up to 21 cm long at the output of the generator.

  10. Compact 180-kV Marx generator triggered in atmospheric air by femtosecond laser filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Arantchouk, L. Larour, J.; Point, G.; Brelet, Y.; Carbonnel, J.; André, Y.-B.; Mysyrowicz, A.; Houard, A.

    2014-03-10

    We developed a compact Marx generator triggered in atmospheric air by a single femtosecond laser beam undergoing filamentation. Voltage pulses of 180 kV could be generated with a subnanosecond jitter. The same laser beam was also used to initiate simultaneously guided discharges up to 21 cm long at the output of the generator.

  11. Optical breakdown of air triggered by femtosecond laser filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polynkin, Pavel; Moloney, Jerome V.

    2011-10-01

    We report experiments on the generation of dense plasma channels in ambient air using a dual laser pulse excitation scheme. The dilute plasma produced through the filamentation of an ultraintense femtosecond laser pulse is densified via avalanche ionization driven by a co-propagating multi-Joule nanosecond pulse.

  12. Air cavity effects on the radition dose to the larynx using Co-60, 6 MV, and 10 MV photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Niroomand-Rad, A.; Harter, K.W.; Thobejane, S.; Bertrand, K.

    1994-07-30

    The purpose was to determine the perturbation effect in the surface layers of lesions located in the air-tumor tissues interface of larynx using {sup 60}Co, 6 MV, and 10 MV photon beams. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were embedded at 16 measurement locations in slab no. 8 of a humanoid phantom and exposed to two lateral-opposed beams using standard 7 {times} 7 cm fields. Similarly, radiographic and radiochromic films were placed between slabs no. 7 and no. 8 of the humanoid phantom and exposed to two lateral-opposed radiation beams. The dosimeters were irradiated with {sup 60}Co, 6 MV, and 10 MV photon beams. Computer tomography (CT) treatment planning without inhomogeneity correction was performed. At the tissue-air interface, the average measured percentage dose (% dose{sub m}) is about (108.7 {+-} 4.8%) with TLD data, (96.8 {+-} 2.5%) with radiographic film data, and (100.8 {+-} 4.9%) with radiochromic film data. Similarly, in the central part of the cavity, the % dose{sub m} is (98.4 {+-} 3.1)% with TLD data, (94.3 {+-} 3.3)% with radiographic film data, and (91.7 {+-} 5.0)% with radiochromic film data. Using the CT-based generated dose distribution (without inhomogeneity correction), the average calculated percentage dose (% dose{sub c}) is (98.7 {+-} 1.0%) at the tissue-air interface and 98% in the central part of the air cavity. For the beam energies studied, the variation from the % dose {sub m} at the tissue-air interface for a given dosimetry technique is relatively small and therefore should not be significant in clinical settings. The variation from the % dose{sub m} at the tissue-air interface is more significant for lower energies. This variation is about 4.3% for 10 MV photon beam, therefore, while institutional practice favors lower energy ({sup 60}Co to 6 MV) for node-negative glottic cancers, physical/dosimetric evidence offers no disadvantage to the use of higher energy photons. 10 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Evaluation of the usefulness of a MOSFET detector in an anthropomorphic phantom for 6-MV photon beam.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Ryosuke; Hirano, Eriko; Kitou, Satoshi; Goka, Tomonori; Matsubara, Kana; Kameoka, Satoru; Matsuura, Taeko; Ariji, Takaki; Nishio, Teiji; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ogino, Takashi

    2010-07-01

    In order to evaluate the usefulness of a metal oxide-silicon field-effect transistor (MOSFET) detector as a in vivo dosimeter, we performed in vivo dosimetry using the MOSFET detector with an anthropomorphic phantom. We used the RANDO phantom as an anthropomorphic phantom, and dose measurements were carried out in the abdominal, thoracic, and head and neck regions for simple square field sizes of 10 x 10, 5 x 5, and 3 x 3 cm(2) with a 6-MV photon beam. The dose measured by the MOSFET detector was verified by the dose calculations of the superposition (SP) algorithm in the XiO radiotherapy treatment-planning system. In most cases, the measured doses agreed with the results of the SP algorithm within +/-3%. Our results demonstrated the utility of the MOSFET detector for in vivo dosimetry even in the presence of clinical tissue inhomogeneities. PMID:20821083

  14. Low-jitter, high-voltage, infrared, laser-triggered, vacuum switch

    SciTech Connect

    Earley, L.M.; Barnes, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    A laser-triggered, high-voltage vacuum switch using a triggering pellet embedded in the cathode has been developed. The switch was constructed with tungsten electrodes and used either KC1 or Poco graphite pellets. An aperture in the anode allowed the laser beam to strike the pellet on the cathode surface. Reliable triggering was achieved with only 200 {mu}J of laser energy at a wavelength of 1064 nm. The switch was operated with an A-K gap voltage ranging from 5- to 30-kV with switching currents up to 15 kA peak. The delay time of the switch vaired from 70 {plus minus} 3 ns at 25 kv to 500 {plus minus} 100 ns at 5 kV. 6 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Direct detection of 6 MV x-rays from a medical linear accelerator using a semiconducting polymer diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Christopher A.; Chan, Yit-Fong; Intaniwet, Akarin; Shkunov, Maxim; Nisbet, Andrew; Keddie, Joseph L.; Sellin, Paul J.

    2013-07-01

    Recently, a new family of low-cost x-radiation detectors have been developed, based on semiconducting polymer diodes, which are easy to process, mechanically flexible, relatively inexpensive, and able to cover large areas. To test their potential for radiotherapy applications such as beam monitors or dosimeters, as an alternative to the use of solid-state inorganic detectors, we present the direct detection of 6 MV x-rays from a medical linear accelerator using a thick film, semiconducting polymer detector. The diode was subjected to 4 ms pulses of 6 MV x-rays at a rate of 60 Hz, and produces a linear increase in photocurrent with increasing dose rate (from 16.7 to 66.7 mGy s-1). The sensitivity of the diode was found to range from 13 to 20 nC mGy-1 cm-3, for operating voltages from -50 to -150 V, respectively. The diode response was found to be stable after exposure to doses up to 15 Gy. Testing beyond this dose range was not carried out. Theoretical calculations show that the addition of heavy metallic nanoparticles to polymer films, even at low volume fractions, increases the x-ray sensitivity of the polymer film/nanoparticle composite so that it exceeds that for silicon over a wide range of x-ray energies. The possibility of detecting x-rays with energies relevant to medical oncology applications opens up the potential for these polymer detectors to be used in detection and imaging applications using medical x-ray beams.

  16. Design of a timing circuit for random laser triggering on aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mysak, Erin R.; Dessiaterik, Yury N.; McKinney, C. J.; Miller, Roger E.; Baer, Tomas

    2006-01-01

    A versatile timing device has been developed that permits a variety of lasers, including Nd :YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet), excimer, and CO2 lasers, to be triggered at random times. The present application is to single-particle mass spectrometry, where the corresponding arrival times are random and signaled by a laser light-scattering apparatus. The timing circuit triggers the Nd :YAG laser flashlamps approximately 200μs prior to the desired laser output pulse, followed by the Q-switch triggering pulses, which can also be used to control other lasers and/or the ion extraction optics. The flashlamps are discharged ten times per second to maintain the proper heat load on the Nd :YAG laser flashlamps. If fewer than 10particles/s are detected by light-scattering apparatus, the unit sends substitute pulses to maintain the average of 10discharges/s. When the particle flux is higher than ten per second, the circuit is designed to ignore the extra particle events. A simpler version of the circuit is also described, which accepts two timing inputs and outputs a pulse for ion extraction at a preselected time.

  17. Experimental study on artificially triggered lightning using high power lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, S.; Shimada, Y.; Yasuda, H.; Yamanaka, C.; Fujita, H.; Izawa, Y.; Yamanaka, T.; Wang, D.; Kawasaki, Z.; Matsu-ura, K.; Ishikubo, Y.; Adachi, M.

    1996-05-01

    A series of laboratory experiments has been conducted to investigate the initiating effects of laser plasma channel on electrical discharge. It was confirmed that the plasma channels reduce the required electrical field strength for electrical discharges to occur by a factor of 6. A field experimental site targeting natural lightning is being prepared. The thunderstorm monitoring system and the laser and optical systems have been developed and tested against various weather conditions. The results from the laboratory experiments and field experiments will be discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Laser light triggered-activated carbon nanosystem for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Chu, Maoquan; Peng, Jinliang; Zhao, Jiajia; Liang, Shanlu; Shao, Yuxiang; Wu, Qiang

    2013-02-01

    Among carbon-based nanomaterials, activated carbon (AC) may be an ideal candidate as a carrier for tumor therapeutic agents. Here we found a new property of nanoscale activated carbon (NAC) with narrow size distribution, namely the rapid conversion of light to thermal energy both in vitro and in vivo. An aqueous suspension of 200 μL of NAC (1 mg/mL) exhibited a rapid temperature increase of more than 35 °C after irradiation for 20 min with a 655-nm laser; this was within the temperature range for effective tumor treatment. We demonstrated that lung cancer cells (H-1299) incubated with bamboo nano-AC (BNAC) were killed with high efficiency after laser irradiation. In addition, mouse tumors with sizes smaller than the laser spot that had been injected with BNAC disappeared after irradiation. For tumors larger than the laser spot area, the incorporation of the photosensitizer ZnPc obviously increased the tumor growth inhibition efficiency of BNAC. BNAC-ZnPc was found to exhibit a synergistic effect when photothermal and photodynamic therapies were administered in combination. These results indicated that NAC can be used for high efficiency cancer phototherapy. PMID:23228422

  19. Measurement of laser power for photo-triggered drug delivery in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R.; Zhang, X. L.; Liu, F.; Zhang, Z. L.; Chen, Y. J.; Zhao, E. M.; Liu, L.

    2016-07-01

    Thus far, despite many investigations have been carried out for photo-triggered drug delivery systems, most of them suffer from an intrinsic drawback of without real-time monitoring mechanism. Incident intensity of light is a feasible parameter to monitor the drug release profiles. However, it is difficult to measure the incident laser power irradiated onto the photo-triggered carriers in drug delivery systems during in vivo therapy. We design an online measurement method based on the fluorescence intensity ratio (FIR) technique through upconversion nanoparticles. FIR value varies with temperature of sample due to the thermal effect induced by the incident laser, which validates the laser power measurement. Effects of rare earth doping concentration, as well as experimental conditions including laser spots and wavelengths on the measurement behavior were also investigated.

  20. Design and investigation of a multichannel laser-triggered vacuum switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Wenfang; He, Zhenghao; Mao, Xiaopo

    2016-03-01

    A laser-triggered vacuum switch (LTVS) is an advanced closing switch with nanosecond delay and jitter. In order to enhance hold-off voltage and extend the service lifetime of an LTVS, we designed a multichannel laser-triggered vacuum switch (MLTVS) utilizing a cone-shaped target electrode placed on the cathode platform. The fabrication and testing of the MLTVS is described in this paper. Experimental results show that the working voltage of the MLTVS with a gap distance of 12 mm is from 30 V to 20 kV. The threshold energy for triggering the switch is 0.4 mJ corresponding to a peak power density of 27.9 MW/cm2. The triggering lifetime of a spot can reach up to 18 000 shots. In addition, the relationship between triggering lifetime and target materials is analyzed using a field emission scanning electron microscope. A hypothesis of the vacuum gap's triggering mechanism is discussed based on the measured results.

  1. Experimental Characterization of a Laser-Triggered, Gas-Insulated, Spark-Gap Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, J. F.; Brown, D. J.; Domonkos, M. T.; Ruden, E. L.; Schmitt-Sody, A.; Lucero, A. P.; Canright, J. P.; Miner, R. L.

    2015-11-01

    We have developed an experimental test bed to characterize the performance of a laser-triggered spark-gap switch as it transitions from photoionization to current conduction. The discharge of current through the switch is triggered by a focused 532-nm wavelength beam from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with a pulse duration of about 10 ns. The trigger pulse is delivered along the longitudinal axis of the switch, and the focal spot can be placed anywhere along the axis of the 5-mm, gas-insulated gap between the switch electrodes. The test bed is designed to support a variety of working gases (e.g., Ar, N2, He, H2) over a range of pressures. Electrical and optical diagnostics are used to measure switch performance as a function of parameters such as charge voltage, trigger pulse energy, insulating gas pressure, and gas species. Data from our experiments will be used to determine the minimum conditions necessary to induce the breakdown and conduction of a gas-insulated electrode gap in the presence of laser-induced photoionization. The electromagnetic particle-in-cell code ICEPIC will be used to produce numerical simulations of the laser-initiated arc discharge, and the experimental data will be used to validate the calculations.

  2. A nanoscale vacuum-tube diode triggered by few-cycle laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Takuya; Maisenbacher, Lothar; Liehl, Andreas; Dombi, Péter; Hommelhoff, Peter

    2015-02-01

    We propose and demonstrate a nanoscale vacuum-tube diode triggered by few-cycle near-infrared laser pulses. It represents an ultrafast electronic device based on light fields, exploiting near-field optical enhancement at surfaces of two metal nanotips. The sharper of the two tips displays a stronger field-enhancement, resulting in larger photoemission yields at its surface. One laser pulse with a peak intensity of 4.7 × 1011 W/cm2 triggers photoemission of ˜16 electrons from the sharper cathode tip, while emission from the blunter anode tip is suppressed by 19 dB to ˜0.2 electrons per pulse. Thus, the laser-triggered current between two tips exhibit a rectifying behavior, in analogy to classical vacuum-tube diodes. According to the kinetic energy of the emitted electrons and the distance between the tips, the total operation time of this laser-triggered nanoscale diode is estimated to be below 1 ps.

  3. A nanoscale vacuum-tube diode triggered by few-cycle laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, Takuya Hommelhoff, Peter; Maisenbacher, Lothar; Liehl, Andreas; Dombi, Péter

    2015-02-02

    We propose and demonstrate a nanoscale vacuum-tube diode triggered by few-cycle near-infrared laser pulses. It represents an ultrafast electronic device based on light fields, exploiting near-field optical enhancement at surfaces of two metal nanotips. The sharper of the two tips displays a stronger field-enhancement, resulting in larger photoemission yields at its surface. One laser pulse with a peak intensity of 4.7 × 10{sup 11 }W/cm{sup 2} triggers photoemission of ∼16 electrons from the sharper cathode tip, while emission from the blunter anode tip is suppressed by 19 dB to ∼0.2 electrons per pulse. Thus, the laser-triggered current between two tips exhibit a rectifying behavior, in analogy to classical vacuum-tube diodes. According to the kinetic energy of the emitted electrons and the distance between the tips, the total operation time of this laser-triggered nanoscale diode is estimated to be below 1 ps.

  4. Intracerebral delivery of Carboplatin in combination with either 6 MV Photons or monoenergetic synchrotron X-rays are equally efficacious for treatment of the F98 rat glioma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to compare side-by-side the therapeutic efficacy of a 6-day infusion of carboplatin, followed by X-irradiation with either 6 MV photons or synchrotron X-rays, tuned above the K-edge of Pt, for treatment of F98 glioma bearing rats. Methods Carboplatin was administered intracerebrally (i.c.) to F98 glioma bearing rats over 6 days using AlzetTM osmotic pumps starting 7 days after tumor implantation. Radiotherapy was delivered in a single 15 Gy fraction on day 14 using a conventional 6 MV linear accelerator (LINAC) or 78.8 keV synchrotron X-rays. Results Untreated control animals had a median survival time (MeST) of 33 days. Animals that received either carboplatin alone or irradiation alone with either 78.8 keV or 6 MV had a MeSTs 38 and 33 days, respectively. Animals that received carboplatin in combination with X-irradiation had a MeST of > 180 days with a 55% cure rate, irrespective of whether they were irradiated with either 78.8 KeV synchrotron X-rays or 6MV photons. Conclusions These studies have conclusively demonstrated the equivalency of i.c. delivery of carboplatin in combination with X-irradiation with either 6 MV photons or synchrotron X-rays. PMID:22992374

  5. EXPERIMENTS WITH UV LASER TRIGGERED SPARK GAPS IN A STACKED BLUMLEIN SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Nunnally, W; Lewis, R; Allen, F; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Sampayan, S; Caporaso, G

    2005-05-26

    This paper discusses switch requirements from basic circuit analysis and the experimental setup, parameters, and results of an experiment to investigate the feasibility of UV laser triggering of up to 40 Blumlein lines in a very compact Stacked Blumlein Line System. In addition, the method of fabricating a very compact SBL transmission lines is presented. Then the behavior of the switch parameters in the stack when closure is initiated with a UV laser pulse is presented. Specifically, the time varying inductance and resistance of the laser initiated gas discharge channel is presented and compared with a circuit model to elucidate the switch performance.

  6. Improved laser triggering and guiding of meqavolt discharges with dual fs-ns pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Mejean, Guillaume; Ackermann, Roland; Kasparian, Jerome; Salmon, Estelle; Yu Jin; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Rethmeier, Kay; Kalkner, Wilfried; Rohwetter, Philipp; Stelmaszczyk, Kamil; Woeste, Ludger

    2006-01-09

    We demonstrate that the capacity of ultrashort high-power laser pulses to trigger and guide high-voltage discharges can be significantly enhanced by a subsequent visible nanosecond laser pulse. The femtosecond pulse induces a bundle of filaments, which creates a conducting channel of low density and cold plasma connecting the electrodes. The subsequent laser pulse photodetaches electrons from O{sub 2}{sup -} ions in the electrode leader. The resulting electrons allow efficient heating by Joule effect in a retroaction loop, resulting in a 5% reduction of the breakdown voltage.

  7. An electrically triggered 200 kV rail-gap switch for wide aperture excimer lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endoh, A.; Watanabe, S.; Watanabe, M.

    1984-03-01

    A wide aperture (7 x 7 sq cm), high output energy (5 J in KrF and 13.8 J in XeCl), UV preionized excimer laser is described. A self-breakdown rail gap was employed as an output switch with the maximum voltage and current up to 230 kV and 300 kA, respectively. To solve the switching jitter problem associated with the self-breakdown, an electrical triggering was investigated. The measured minimum switching time delay and gap closing time were 40 and 10 ns, respectively. The number of channels up to 50 was observed with a uniform distribution over the 80-cm electrode length. The triggering jitter was measured to be less than a nanosecond. The maximum operation voltage of the triggered rail gap was 200 kV. The successful trigger operation was obtained in the range 30-98 percent of the self-breakdown voltage.

  8. Observation of temporal evolution following laser triggered rf breakdown in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Jiahang; Chen, Huaibi; Du, Yingchao; Gai, Wei; Huang, Wenhui; Jing, Chunguang; Shi, Jiaru; Tang, Chuanxiang; Wang, Faya; Yan, Lixin

    2014-07-01

    Radio frequency breakdown is one of the fundamental phenomena that limits the operational performance of most of high power and high gradient vacuum rf devices. We report on experimental results of rf breakdown in an S-band photocathode gun triggered by an intensity controlled laser. Through measurement and analysis of the time dependence of the collected current at the gun exit and the stored rf energy in the cavity, one can gain insight into the time evolution of the rf breakdown process. Multiple breakdowns were observed within one rf pulse due to power flow between cells after the initial emission. Similarities of the laser-triggered breakdowns to those occurring in the course of cavity conditioning and normal operation are found by comparing the postbreakdown signals in both cases. It is shown that an intense laser can offer a more controllable and flexible method for rf breakdown studies.

  9. Monte Carlo Simulation of a 6 MV X-Ray Beam for Open and Wedge Radiation Fields, Using GATE Code

    PubMed Central

    Bahreyni-Toosi, Mohammad-Taghi; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Momennezhad, Mahdi; Hasanabadi, Fatemeh; Gholamhosseinian, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a control software system, based on Monte Carlo simulation, and calculations of dosimetric parameters of standard and wedge radiation fields, using a Monte Carlo method. GATE version 6.1 (OpenGATE Collaboration), was used to simulate a compact 6 MV linear accelerator system. In order to accelerate the calculations, the phase-space technique and cluster computing (Condor version 7.2.4, Condor Team, University of Wisconsin–Madison) were used. Dosimetric parameters used in treatment planning systems for the standard and wedge radiation fields (10 cm × 10 cm to 30 cm × 30 cm and a 60° wedge), including the percentage depth dose and dose profiles, were measured by both computational and experimental methods. Gamma index was applied to compare calculated and measured results with 3%/3 mm criteria. Gamma index was applied to compare calculated and measured results. Almost all calculated data points have satisfied gamma index criteria of 3% to 3 mm. Based on the good agreement between calculated and measured results obtained for various radiation fields in this study, GATE may be used as a useful tool for quality control or pretreatment verification procedures in radiotherapy. PMID:25426430

  10. Simulation of the 6 MV Elekta Synergy Platform linac photon beam using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission

    PubMed Central

    Didi, Samir; Moussa, Abdelilah; Yahya, Tayalati; Mustafa, Zerfaoui

    2015-01-01

    The present work validates the Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission Monte Carlo software for the simulation of a 6 MV photon beam given by Elekta Synergy Platform medical linear accelerator treatment head. The simulation includes the major components of the linear accelerator (LINAC) with multi-leaf collimator and a homogeneous water phantom. Calculations were performed for the photon beam with several treatment field sizes ranging from 5 cm × 5 cm to 30 cm × 30 cm at 100 cm distance from the source. The simulation was successfully validated by comparison with experimental distributions. Good agreement between simulations and measurements was observed, with dose differences of about 0.02% and 2.5% for depth doses and lateral dose profiles, respectively. This agreement was also emphasized by the Kolmogorov–Smirnov goodness-of-fit test and by the gamma-index comparisons where more than 99% of the points for all simulations fulfill the quality assurance criteria of 2 mm/2%. PMID:26500399

  11. Effect of electron contamination of a 6 MV x-ray beam on near surface diode dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, C. R.; Mountford, P. J.; Moloney, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    In critical organ in vivo x-ray dosimetry, the relative contaminating electron contribution to the total dose and total detector response outside the field will be different to the corresponding contributions at the central axis detector calibration position, mainly due to the effects of shielding in the linear accelerator head on the electron and x-ray energy spectrum. To investigate these contributions, the electron energy response of a Scanditronix PFD diode was measured using electrons with mean energies from 0.45 to 14.6 MeV, and the Monte Carlo code MCNP-4C was used to calculate the electron energy spectra on the central axis, and at 1 and 10 cm outside the edge of a 4 × 4, 10 × 10 and a 15 × 15 cm2 6 MV x-ray field. The electron contribution to the total dose varied from about 8% on the central axis of the smallest field to about 76% at 10 cm outside the edge of the largest field. The electron contribution to the total diode response varied from about 7-8% on the central axis of all three fields to about 58% at 10 cm outside the edge of the smallest field. The results indicated that a near surface x-ray dose measurement with a diode outside the treatment field has to be interpreted with caution and requires knowledge of the relative electron contribution specific to the measurement position and field size.

  12. Simulation of the 6 MV Elekta Synergy Platform linac photon beam using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission.

    PubMed

    Didi, Samir; Moussa, Abdelilah; Yahya, Tayalati; Mustafa, Zerfaoui

    2015-01-01

    The present work validates the Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission Monte Carlo software for the simulation of a 6 MV photon beam given by Elekta Synergy Platform medical linear accelerator treatment head. The simulation includes the major components of the linear accelerator (LINAC) with multi-leaf collimator and a homogeneous water phantom. Calculations were performed for the photon beam with several treatment field sizes ranging from 5 cm × 5 cm to 30 cm × 30 cm at 100 cm distance from the source. The simulation was successfully validated by comparison with experimental distributions. Good agreement between simulations and measurements was observed, with dose differences of about 0.02% and 2.5% for depth doses and lateral dose profiles, respectively. This agreement was also emphasized by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness-of-fit test and by the gamma-index comparisons where more than 99% of the points for all simulations fulfill the quality assurance criteria of 2 mm/2%. PMID:26500399

  13. Triggering GaAs lock-on switches with laser diode arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, G.M.; Buttram, M.T.; Helgeson, W.D.; McLaughlin, D.L.; O'Malley, M.W.; Zutavern, F.J. ); Rosen, A.; Stabile, P.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Laser diode arrays have been used to trigger GaAs Photoconducting Semiconductor Switches (PCSS) charged to voltages of up to 60 kV and conducting currents of 580 A. The driving forces behind the use of laser diode arrays are compactness, elimination of complicated optics, and the ability to run at high repetition rates. Laser diode arrays are compactness, elimination of complicated optics, and the ability to run at high repetition rates. Laser diode arrays can trigger GaAs at high fields as the result of a new switching mode (lock-on) with very high carrier number gain. We have achieved switching of up to 10 MW in a 60 {Omega} system, with a pulse rise time of 500 ps. At 1.2 MW we have achieved repetition rates of 1 kHz with switch rise time of 500 ps for 10{sup 5} shots. The laser diode array used for these experiments delivers a 166 W pulse. In a single shot mode we have switched 4 kA with a flash lamp pumped laser and 600 A with the 166 W array. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Affirmation of triggered Jovian radio emissions and their attribution to corotating radio lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, W.

    1985-01-01

    It is argued that the original statistical evidence for the existence of triggered radio emissions and corotating radio lasers on Jupiter remains valid notwithstanding the critique of Desch and Kaiser (1985). The Voyager radio spectrograms used to identify the triggered emissions are analyzed and the results are discussed. It is shown that the critique by Desch and Kaiser is unjustified because it is not based on the original event criteria, i.e., the correlation between the occurrence of Jovian auroral kilometric radiation and fast-drift type III solar bursts in the same frequency.

  15. SU-E-J-38: Comparison of 6MV Photon Dose in a Perpendicular and Parallel Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Ghila, A; Fallone, B; Rathee, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Integrating a linac with an MRI system would allow for real time tumour tracking however the patient will be irradiated in the presence of a magnetic field. The present study experimentally investigates the magnetic field effects on entrance, exit, and interface dose for both transverse and parallel magnetic fields. Methods: Polystyrene was used to construct a set of phantoms for Gafchromic film measurements. One phantom had an adjustable air gap and four other phantoms had one surface at various angles. The linac-MR prototype consisting of a biplanar permanent magnet coupled to a linac was used for the transverse magnetic field measurements. A couple of solenoid electromagnets, stacked on top of each other and irradiated along their bore, were used for the parallel field measurements. Results: All doses are relative to no magnetic field. The transverse magnetic field reduced the entrance dose for all surface angles by strongly deflecting the contaminant electrons. The exit dose in a transverse magnetic field was found to be significantly higher. The entrance dose with a parallel magnetic field present is higher due to the contaminant electrons being concentrated within the beam area. The air gap phantom measurements, done in a transverse magnetic field, show a significant increase of the dose at the proximal side of the air gap and a decrease at the distal side. The measurements, done in the parallel magnetic field, show the concentration of secondary electrons in the air gap. Conclusion: The radiation dose measurements of a 6MV beam in a parallel and transverse magnetic field presented here are currently being replicated using Monte Carlo simulations. This verified Monte Carlo system could provide the dose calculation basis for future linac-MR systems.

  16. Verification measurements and clinical evaluation of the iPlan RT Monte Carlo dose algorithm for 6 MV photon energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petoukhova, A. L.; van Wingerden, K.; Wiggenraad, R. G. J.; van de Vaart, P. J. M.; van Egmond, J.; Franken, E. M.; van Santvoort, J. P. C.

    2010-08-01

    This study presents data for verification of the iPlan RT Monte Carlo (MC) dose algorithm (BrainLAB, Feldkirchen, Germany). MC calculations were compared with pencil beam (PB) calculations and verification measurements in phantoms with lung-equivalent material, air cavities or bone-equivalent material to mimic head and neck and thorax and in an Alderson anthropomorphic phantom. Dosimetric accuracy of MC for the micro-multileaf collimator (MLC) simulation was tested in a homogeneous phantom. All measurements were performed using an ionization chamber and Kodak EDR2 films with Novalis 6 MV photon beams. Dose distributions measured with film and calculated with MC in the homogeneous phantom are in excellent agreement for oval, C and squiggle-shaped fields and for a clinical IMRT plan. For a field with completely closed MLC, MC is much closer to the experimental result than the PB calculations. For fields larger than the dimensions of the inhomogeneities the MC calculations show excellent agreement (within 3%/1 mm) with the experimental data. MC calculations in the anthropomorphic phantom show good agreement with measurements for conformal beam plans and reasonable agreement for dynamic conformal arc and IMRT plans. For 6 head and neck and 15 lung patients a comparison of the MC plan with the PB plan was performed. Our results demonstrate that MC is able to accurately predict the dose in the presence of inhomogeneities typical for head and neck and thorax regions with reasonable calculation times (5-20 min). Lateral electron transport was well reproduced in MC calculations. We are planning to implement MC calculations for head and neck and lung cancer patients.

  17. Accurate dosimetry with GafChromic EBT film of a 6 MV photon beam in water: What level is achievable?

    SciTech Connect

    Battum, L. J. van; Hoffmans, D.; Piersma, H.; Heukelom, S.

    2008-02-15

    This paper focuses on the accuracy, in absolute dose measurements, with GafChromic EBT film achievable in water for a 6 MV photon beam up to a dose of 2.3 Gy. Motivation is to get an absolute dose detection system to measure up dose distributions in a (water) phantom, to check dose calculations. An Epson 1680 color (red green blue) transmission flatbed scanner has been used as film scanning system, where the response in the red color channel has been extracted and used for the analyses. The influence of the flatbed film scanner on the film based dose detection process was investigated. The scan procedure has been optimized; i.e. for instance a lateral correction curve was derived to correct the scan value, up to 10%, as a function of optical density and lateral position. Sensitometric curves of different film batches were evaluated in portrait and landscape scan mode. Between various batches important variations in sensitometric curve were observed. Energy dependence of the film is negligible, while a slight variation in dose response is observed for very large angles between film surface and incident photon beam. Improved accuracy in absolute dose detection can be obtained by repetition of a film measurement to tackle at least the inherent presence of film inhomogeneous construction. We state that the overall uncertainty is random in absolute EBT film dose detection and of the order of 1.3% (1 SD) under the condition that the film is scanned in a limited centered area on the scanner and at least two films have been applied. At last we advise to check a new film batch on its characteristics compared to available information, before using that batch for absolute dose measurements.

  18. Improvement of the atmospheric discharge laser-triggered ability using multiple pulses from a kilohertz KrF laser

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaura, Michiteru

    2005-08-15

    The potential ability of lasers to control lightning can be improved by using a train of pulses with submillisecond separations. Laser-triggered experiments in a small-scale (10-mm gap) atmospheric discharge facility show that the triggering is dramatically enhanced when a five-pulse train of sub-Joule energy is used instead of a single pulse. This effect increases rapidly as the pulse interval is reduced. It appears that at a submillisecond pulse interval, sufficient positive and negative ions survive in subsequent pulses, thus enabling easy deionization. Hence, significant plasma buildup occurs from one pulse to the next. However, this persistence of ions would appear to imply that the rate of recombination (effectively a charge transfer between ions) is considerably lower than previously believed.

  19. Pulsed laser triggered high speed microfluidic fluorescence activated cell sorter†‡

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ting-Hsiang; Chen, Yue; Park, Sung-Yong; Hong, Jason; Teslaa, Tara; Zhong, Jiang F.; Di Carlo, Dino; Teitell, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    We report a high speed and high purity pulsed laser triggered fluorescence activated cell sorter (PLACS) with a sorting throughput up to 20 000 mammalian cells s−1 with 37% sorting purity, 90% cell viability in enrichment mode, and >90% purity in high purity mode at 1500 cells s−1 or 3000 beads s−1. Fast switching (30 μs) and a small perturbation volume (~90 pL) is achieved by a unique sorting mechanism in which explosive vapor bubbles are generated using focused laser pulses in a single layer microfluidic PDMS channel. PMID:22361780

  20. High on/off ratio nanosecond laser pulses for a triggered single-photon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Gang; Liu, Bei; He, Jun; Wang, Junmin

    2016-07-01

    An 852 nm nanosecond laser pulse chain with a high on/off ratio is generated by chopping a continuous-wave laser beam using a Mach–Zehnder-type electro-optic intensity modulator (MZ-EOIM). The detailed dependence of the MZ-EOIM’s on/off ratio on various parameters is characterized. By optimizing the incident beam polarization and stabilizing the MZ-EOIM temperature, a static on/off ratio of 12600:1 is achieved. The dynamic on/off ratios versus the pulse repetition rate and the pulse duty cycle are measured and discussed. The high-on/off-ratio nanosecond pulsed laser system was used in a triggered single-photon source based on a trapped single cesium atom, which reveals clear antibunching.

  1. Laser triggered injection of electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator with the colliding pulse method

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, K.; Fubiani, G.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Michel, P.; van Tilborg, J.; Toth, C.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Leemans, W.P.

    2004-10-22

    An injection scheme for a laser wakefield accelerator that employs a counter propagating laser (colliding with the drive laser pulse, used to generate a plasma wake) is discussed. The threshold laser intensity for electron injection into the wakefield was analyzed using a heuristic model based on phase-space island overlap. Analysis shows that the injection can be performed using modest counter propagating laser intensity a{sub 1} < 0.5 for a drive laser intensity of a{sub 0} = 1.0. Preliminary experiments were preformed using a drive beam and colliding beam. Charge enhancement by the colliding pulse was observed. Increasing the signal-to-noise ratio by means of a preformed plasma channel is discussed.

  2. Output factor comparison of Monte Carlo and measurement for Varian TrueBeam 6 MV and 10 MV flattening filter-free stereotactic radiosurgery system.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jason Y; Ning, Holly; Arora, Barbara C; Zhuge, Ying; Miller, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    The dose measurements of the small field sizes, such as conical collimators used in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), are a significant challenge due to many factors including source occlusion, detector size limitation, and lack of lateral electronic equilibrium. One useful tool in dealing with the small field effect is Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. In this study, we report a comparison of Monte Carlo simulations and measurements of output factors for the Varian SRS system with conical collimators for energies of 6 MV flattening filter-free (6 MV) and 10 MV flattening filter-free (10 MV) on the TrueBeam accelerator. Monte Carlo simulations of Varian's SRS system for 6 MV and 10 MV photon energies with cones sizes of 17.5 mm, 15.0 mm, 12.5 mm, 10.0 mm, 7.5 mm, 5.0 mm, and 4.0 mm were performed using EGSnrc (release V4 2.4.0) codes. Varian's version-2 phase-space files for 6 MV and 10 MV of TrueBeam accelerator were utilized in the Monte Carlo simulations. Two small diode detectors Edge (Sun Nuclear) and Small Field Detector (SFD) (IBA Dosimetry) were applied to measure the output factors. Significant errors may result if detector correction factors are not applied to small field dosimetric measurements. Although it lacked the machine-specific kfclin,fmsrQclin,Qmsr correction factors for diode detectors in this study, correction factors were applied utilizing published studies conducted under similar conditions. For cone diameters greater than or equal to 12.5 mm, the differences between output factors for the Edge detector, SFD detector, and MC simulations are within 3.0% for both energies. For cone diameters below 12.5 mm, output factors differences exhibit greater variations. PMID:27167266

  3. Comparison of Head Scatter Factor for 6MV and 10MV flattened (FB) and Unflattened (FFF) Photon Beam using indigenously Designed Columnar Mini Phantom

    PubMed Central

    Ashokkumar, Sigamani; Nambi Raj, N Arunai; Sinha, Sujit Nath; Yadav, Girigesh; Thiyagarajan, Rajesh; Raman, Kothanda; Mishra, Manindra Bhushan

    2014-01-01

    To measure and compare the head scatter factor for flattened (FB) and unflattened (FFF) of 6MV and 10MV photon beam using indigenously designed mini phantom. A columnar mini phantom was designed as recommended by AAPM Task Group 74 with low and high atomic number materials at 10 cm (mini phantom) and at approximately twice the depth of maximum dose water equivalent thickness (brass build-up cap). Scatter in the accelerator (Sc) values of 6MV-FFF photon beams are lesser than that of the 6MV-FB photon beams (0.66-2.8%; Clinac iX, 2300CD) and (0.47-1.74%; True beam) for field sizes ranging from 10 × 10 cm2 to 40 × 40 cm2. Sc values of 10MV-FFF photon beams are lesser (0.61-2.19%; True beam) than that of the 10MV-FB photons beams for field sizes ranging from 10 × 10 cm2 to 40 × 40 cm2. The SSD had no influence on head scatter for both flattened and unflattened beams and irrespective of head design of the different linear accelerators. The presence of field shaping device influences the Sc values. The collimator exchange effect reveals that the opening of the upper jaw increases Sc irrespective of FB or FFF photon beams and different linear accelerators, and it is less significant in FFF beams. Sc values of 6MV-FB square field were in good agreement with that of AAPM, TG-74 published data for Varian (Clinac iX, 2300CD) accelerator. Our results confirm that the removal of flattening filter decreases in the head scatter factor compared to flattened beam. This could reduce the out-of-field dose in advanced treatment delivery techniques. PMID:25190997

  4. Effect of triggered discharge using an excimer laser with high-repetition-rate of the order of kilohertz

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaura, Michiteru; Watanabe, Takashi; Hayashi, Nobuya; Ihara, Satoshi

    2005-03-28

    The triggering ability of the laser-triggered lightning method is improved by using a KrF excimer laser with a high-repetition-rate of the order of kHz order. It is clarified that the effect of a triggered discharge is considerably enhanced when the plasma density is greater than 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}. Thus far, the laser-triggered lightning method has not been expected to display a triggering ability since one pulse of an excimer laser possesses energy of less than 1 J, and the produced plasma has a low density of 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}, its plasma density is one order lower than that required for its application in the triggering and guiding of lightning discharge. The enhancement of plasma density achieved by utilizing the accumulation effect of charged particles generated by the high-repetition-rate laser was 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}. This led to an effective a 50% reduction in the self-breakdown voltage.

  5. Infrared laser pulse triggers increased singlet oxygen production in tumour cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolovski, S. G.; Zolotovskaya, S. A.; Goltsov, A.; Pourreyron, C.; South, A. P.; Rafailov, E. U.

    2013-12-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a technique developed to treat the ever-increasing global incidence of cancer. This technique utilises singlet oxygen (1O2) generation via a laser excited photosensitiser (PS) to kill cancer cells. However, prolonged sensitivity to intensive light (6-8 weeks for lung cancer), relatively low tissue penetration by activating light (630 nm up to 4 mm), and the cost of PS administration can limit progressive PDT applications. The development of quantum-dot laser diodes emitting in the highest absorption region (1268 nm) of triplet oxygen (3O2) presents the possibility of inducing apoptosis in tumour cells through direct 3O2 --> 1O2 transition. Here we demonstrate that a single laser pulse triggers dose-dependent 1O2 generation in both normal keratinocytes and tumour cells and show that tumour cells yield the highest 1O2 far beyond the initial laser pulse exposure. Our modelling and experimental results support the development of direct infrared (IR) laser-induced tumour treatment as a promising approach in tumour PDT.

  6. Calculation of effective dose from measurements of secondary neutron spectra and scattered photon dose from dynamic MLC IMRT for 6 MV, 15 MV, and 18 MV beam energies.

    PubMed

    Howell, Rebecca M; Hertel, Nolan E; Wang, Zhonglu; Hutchinson, Jesson; Fullerton, Gary D

    2006-02-01

    Effective doses were calculated from the delivery of 6 MV, 15 MV, and 18 MV conventional and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) prostate treatment plans. ICRP-60 tissue weighting factors were used for the calculations. Photon doses were measured in phantom for all beam energies. Neutron spectra were measured for 15 MV and 18 MV and ICRP-74 quality conversion factors used to calculate ambient dose equivalents. The ambient dose equivalents were corrected for each tissue using neutron depth dose data from the literature. The depth corrected neutron doses were then used as a measure of the neutron component of the ICRP protection quantity, organ equivalent dose. IMRT resulted in an increased photon dose to many organs. However, the IMRT treatments resulted in an overall decrease in effective dose compared to conventional radiotherapy. This decrease correlates to the ability of an intensity-modulated field to minimize dose to critical normal structures in close proximity to the treatment volume. In a comparison of the three beam energies used for the IMRT treatments, 6 MV resulted in the lowest effective dose, while 18 MV resulted in the highest effective dose. This is attributed to the large neutron contribution for 18 MV compared to no neutron contribution for 6 MV. PMID:16532941

  7. Dosimetric comparison of a 6-MV flattening-filter and a flattening-filter-free beam for lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yon-Lae; Chung, Jin-Beom; Kim, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Jin-Young; Kang, Sang-Won; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of clinical usage of a flattening-filter-free (FFF) beam for treatment with lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). Ten patients were treated with SABR and a 6-MV FFF beam for this study. All plans using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were optimized in the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) by using the Acuros XB (AXB) dose calculation algorithm and were delivered by using a Varian TrueBeam ™ linear accelerator equipped with a high-definition (HD) multi-leaf collimator. The prescription dose used was 48 Gy in 4 fractions. In order to compare the plan using a conventional 6-MV flattening-filter (FF) beam, the SABR plan was recalculated under the condition of the same beam settings used in the plan employing the 6-MV FFF beam. All dose distributions were calculated by using Acuros XB (AXB, version 11) and a 2.5-mm isotropic dose grid. The cumulative dosevolume histograms (DVH) for the planning target volume (PTV) and all organs at risk (OARs) were analyzed. Technical parameters, such as total monitor units (MUs) and the delivery time, were also recorded and assessed. All plans for target volumes met the planning objectives for the PTV ( i.e., V95% > 95%) and the maximum dose ( i.e., Dmax < 110%) revealing adequate target coverage for the 6-MV FF and FFF beams. Differences in DVH for target volumes (PTV and clinical target volume (CTV)) and OARs on the lung SABR plans from the interchange of the treatment beams were small, but showed a marked reduction (52.97%) in the treatment delivery time. The SABR plan with a FFF beam required a larger number of MUs than the plan with the FF beam, and the mean difference in MUs was 4.65%. This study demonstrated that the use of the FFF beam for lung SABR plan provided better treatment efficiency relative to 6-MV FF beam. This strategy should be particularly beneficial for high dose conformity to the lung and decreased intra-fraction movements because of

  8. 3D pulsed laser-triggered high-speed microfluidic fluorescence-activated cell sorter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Wu, Ting-Hsiang; Kung, Yu-Chun; Teitell, Michael A; Chiou, Pei-Yu

    2013-11-12

    We report a 3D microfluidic pulsed laser-triggered fluorescence-activated cell sorter capable of sorting at a throughput of 23 000 cells per s with 90% purity in high-purity mode and at a throughput of 45 000 cells per s with 45% purity in enrichment mode in one stage and in a single channel. This performance is realized by exciting laser-induced cavitation bubbles in a 3D PDMS microfluidic channel to generate high-speed liquid jets that deflect detected fluorescent cells and particles focused by 3D sheath flows. The ultrafast switching mechanism (20 μs complete on-off cycle), small liquid jet perturbation volume, and three-dimensional sheath flow focusing for accurate timing control of fast (1.5 m s(-1)) passing cells and particles are three critical factors enabling high-purity sorting at high-throughput in this sorter. PMID:23844418

  9. Laser-triggered intraocular implant to induce photodynamic therapy for posterior capsule opacification prevention.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaoguo; Huang, Wenyong; Lei, Ming; He, Yuanfeng; Yan, Mina; Zhang, Xuefei; Zhao, Chunshun

    2016-02-10

    Posterior capsule opacification (PCO) is one of the main reasons for loss of vision again after cataract surgery. In this study, intraocular lenses were modified with indocyanine green (ICG) and sealed up with PLGA to form long-term intraocular implants (ICG-IOL). When triggered by laser, ICG-IOL would induce photodynamic therapy (PDT). In-vitro cell viability assay and scratch wound healing assay demonstrated that ICG-IOL could effectively inhibit HLEpiC proliferation and migration without causing damage to the cells far away from it. Laser attenuation test indicated that ICG-IOL could be applied in vivo. In-vivo pharmacodynamics and safety study showed that ICG-IOL could significantly prevent the occurrence of PCO and was safe for intraocular normal tissue. All these results suggested that ICG-IOL would be a very promising candidate for PCO prevention. PMID:26456263

  10. Photo-triggering and secondary electron produced ionization in electric discharge ArF* excimer lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Zhongmin; Kushner, Mark J.

    2011-10-01

    Electric discharge excimer lasers are sustained in multi-atmosphere attaching gas mixtures that are typically preionized to enable a reproducible, uniform glow, which maximizes optical quality and gain. This preionization is often accomplished using UV light produced by a corona discharge within the plasma cavity. To quantify the relationship between corona discharge properties and those of the laser discharge, the triggering of electron avalanche by preionizing UV light in an electric discharge-pumped ArF* excimer laser was numerically investigated using a two-dimensional model. The preionizing UV fluxes were generated by a corona-bar discharge driven by the same voltage pulse as the main discharge sustained in a multi-atmospheric Ne/Ar/Xe/F2 gas mixture. The resulting peak photo-electron density in the inter-electrode spacing is around 108 cm-3, and its distribution is biased toward the UV source. The preionization density increases with increasing dielectric constant and capacitance of the corona bar. The symmetry and uniformity of the discharge are, however, improved significantly once the main avalanche develops. In addition to bulk electron impact ionization, the ionization generated by sheath accelerated secondary electrons was found to be important in sustaining the discharge current at experimentally observed values. At peak current, the magnitude of the ionization by sheath accelerated electrons is comparable to that from bulk electron impact in the vicinity of the cathode.

  11. Trigger effect of infrared femtosecond laser irradiation on neoplasm in experimental cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gening, Tatyana; Voronova, Olga; Zolotovskii, Igor; Sysoliatin, Alexey; Dolgova, Dinara; Abakumova, Tatyana

    2013-02-01

    The present work discusses effect of infrared (IR) femtosecond laser irradiation on neoplasm of white mice with experimental cervical cancer- 5 (CC-5 on the 20th and 30th days after tumor transplantation). Tumor tissue was irradiated by femtosecond erbium doped fiber laser: the wavelength is 1.55 μm, average and peak powers are1,25 mW and 6kW, respectively, irradiation trials n=10. The average energy density (energy dose) on a tissue for two groups of animals was 0,24 J/cm2 and 0,36 J/cm2 for a single trial. Irradiation was followed by biochemical determination of LPO AOS parameters ("Lipid peroxidation-antioxidants" system): malondialdehyde (MDA), activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and glutathione-reductase (GR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST). A subsequent morphological study of tumor tissue was performed. Mathematical analysis of data demonstrates a weak dependence of the studied parameters on energy dose. The latter implies the trigger effect of IR femtosecond laser irradiation on redox-dependent processes in neoplasm at experimental cervical cancer.

  12. SU-E-J-14: A Comparison of a 2.5MV Imaging Beam to KV and 6MV Imaging Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Nitsch, P; Robertson, D; Balter, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare image quality metrics and dose of TrueBeam V2.0’s 2.5MV imaging beam and kV and 6MV images. Methods: To evaluate the MV image quality, the Standard Imaging QC-3 and Varian Las Vegas (LV) phantoms were imaged using the ‘quality’ and ‘low dose’ modes and then processed using RIT113 V6.3. The LEEDS phantom was used to evaluate the kV image quality. The signal to noise ratio (SNR) was also evaluated in patient images using Matlab. In addition, dose per image was evaluated at a depth of 5cm using solid water for a 28.6 cm × 28.6 cm field size, which is representative of the largest jaw settings at an SID of 150cm. Results: The 2.5MV images had lower dose than the 6 MV images and a contrast to noise ratio (CNR) about 1.4 times higher, when evaluated using the QC-3. When energy was held constant but dose varied, the different modes, ‘low dose’ and ‘quality’, showed less than an 8% difference in CNR. The ‘quality’ modes demonstrated better spatial resolution than the ‘low dose’; however, even with the ‘low dose’ all line pairs were distinct except for the 0.75lp/mm on the 2.5MV. The LV phantom was used to measure low contrast detectability and showed similar results to the QC-3. Several patient images all confirmed that SNR were highest in kV images followed by 2.5MV and then 6MV. Qualitatively, for anatomical areas with large variability in thickness, like lateral head and necks, 2.5MV images show more anatomy, such as shoulder position, than kV images. Conclusions: The kV images clearly provide the best image metrics per unit dose. The 2.5MV beam showed excellent contrast at a lower dose than 6MV and may be superior to kV for difficult to image areas that include large changes in anatomical thickness. P Balter: Varian, Sun Nuclear, Philips, CPRIT.

  13. Investigating MALDI MSI parameters (Part 2) - On the use of a mechanically shuttered trigger system for improved laser energy stability.

    PubMed

    Steven, Rory T; Dexter, Alex; Bunch, Josephine

    2016-07-15

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is now widely used to desorb, ionize and detect molecules from complex samples and tissue sections. The detected ion intensity within MALDI MS and MSI is intimately linked to the laser energy per pulse incident upon the sample during analysis. Laser energy/power stability can be significantly affected by the manner in which the laser is operated. High-repetition rate diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) lasers are being increasingly adopted to enable high-throughput MALDI MSI analysis. Within this work two different laser-triggering setups are used to demonstrate the effect of laser energy instabilities due to spiking and thermal control phenomena and a setup with a shutter to remove these effects. The effect of non-equilibrium laser operation on MALDI MSI data versus the more stable laser pulse energy of the shutter-triggered system is demonstrated in thin films of α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) and for imaging of murine brain tissue sections. Significant unwanted variations in absolute and relative detected ion intensity are shown where energy variation is introduced by these phenomena, which return to equilibrium within the setup employed here over timescales relevant to MALDI MS analysis. PMID:27090002

  14. Laser triggered Z-pinch broadband extreme ultraviolet source for metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, I.; Lunney, J. G.; Juschkin, L.; Sidelnikov, Y.; O'Reilly, F.; Sokell, E.; Sheridan, P.

    2013-05-20

    We compare the extreme ultraviolet emission characteristics of tin and galinstan (atomic %: Ga: 78.35, In: 14.93, Sn: 6.72) between 10 nm and 18 nm in a laser-triggered discharge between liquid metal-coated electrodes. Over this wavelength range, the energy conversion efficiency for galinstan is approximately half that of tin, but the spectrum is less strongly peaked in the 13-15 nm region. The extreme ultraviolet source dimensions were 110 {+-} 25 {mu}m diameter and 500 {+-} 125 {mu}m length. The flatter spectrum, and -19 Degree-Sign C melting point, makes this galinstan discharge a relatively simple high radiance extreme ultraviolet light source for metrology and scientific applications.

  15. Two-color interferometer for the study of laser filamentation triggered electric discharges in air

    SciTech Connect

    Point, Guillaume Brelet, Yohann; Arantchouk, Leonid; Carbonnel, Jérôme; Prade, Bernard; Mysyrowicz, André; Houard, Aurélien

    2014-12-15

    We present a space and time resolved interferometric plasma diagnostic for use on plasmas where neutral-bound electron contribution to the refractive index cannot be neglected. By recording simultaneously the plasma optical index at 532 and 1064 nm, we are able to extract independently the neutral and free electron density profiles. We report a phase resolution of 30 mrad, corresponding to a maximum resolution on the order of 4×10{sup 22} m{sup −3} for the electron density, and of 10{sup 24} m{sup −3} for the neutral density. The interferometer is demonstrated on centimeter-scale sparks triggered by laser filamentation in air with typical currents of a few tens of A.

  16. SU-E-T-322: The Evaluation of the Gafchromic EBT3 Film in Low Dose 6 MV X-Ray Beams with Different Scanning Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H; Sung, J; Yoon, M; Kim, D; Chung, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We have evaluated the response of the Gafchromic EBT3 film in low dose for 6 MV x-ray beams with two scanning modes, the reflection scanning mode and the transmission scanning mode. Methods: We irradiated the Gafcromic EBT3 film using a 60 degree enhanced dynamic wedge (EDW) with 6 MV x-ray beams from Clinac iX Linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The irradiated Gafchromic EBT3 film was scanned with different scanning modes, the reflection scanning mode and the transmission scanning mode. The scanned Gafchromic EBT3 film was analyzed with MATLAB. Results: When 7.2 cGy was irradiated to the Gafchromic EBT3 film, the uncertainty was 0.54 cGy with reflection scanning mode and was 0.88 cGy with transmission scanning mode. When 24 cGy was irradiated to the Gafchromic EBT3 film, the uncertainty was similar to the case of 7.2 cGy irradiation showing 0.51 cGy of uncertainty with reflection scanning mode and 0.87 cGy of uncertainty with transmission scanning mode. The result suggests that the reflection mode should be used in Gafchromic EBT3 film for low irradiation. Conclusion: The result suggests that the reflection mode should be used in Gafchromic EBT3 film for low irradiation.

  17. Interferometric and schlieren characterization of the plasmas and shock wave dynamics during laser-triggered discharge in atmospheric air

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Wenfu; Li, Xingwen Wu, Jian; Yang, Zefeng; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2014-08-15

    This paper describes our efforts to reveal the underlying physics of laser-triggered discharges in atmospheric air using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and schlieren photography. Unlike the hemispherical shock waves that are produced by laser ablation, bell-like morphologies are observed during laser-triggered discharges. Phase shifts are recovered from the interferograms at a time of 1000 ns by the 2D fast Fourier transform method, and then the values of the refractive index are deduced using the Abel inversion. An abundance of free electrons is expected near the cathode surface. The schlieren photographs visualize the formation of stagnation layers at ∼600 ns in the interaction zones of the laser- and discharge-produced plasmas. Multiple reflected waves are observed at later times with the development of shock wave propagations. Estimations using the Taylor-Sedov self-similar solution indicated that approximately 45.8% and 51.9% of the laser and electrical energies are transferred into the gas flow motions, respectively. Finally, numerical simulations were performed, which successfully reproduced the main features of the experimental observations, and provided valuable insights into the plasma and shock wave dynamics during the laser-triggered discharge.

  18. Genotoxic Damage to Glioblastoma Cells Treated with 6 MV X-Radiation in The Presence or Absence of Methoxy Estradiol, IUDR or Topotecan

    PubMed Central

    Eyvazzadeh, Nazila; Neshasteh-Riz, Ali; Mahdavi, Seyed Rabee; Mohsenifar, Afshin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the cumulative genotoxic damage to glioblastoma (GBM) cells, grown as multicellular spheroids, following exposure to 6 MV X-rays (2 Gy, 22 Gy) with or without, 2- methoxy estradiol (2ME2), iododeoxyuridine (IUDR) or topotecan (TPT), using the Picogreen assay. Materials and Methods The U87MG cells cultured as spheroids were treated with 6 MV X-ray using linear accelerator. Specimens were divided into five groups and irradiated using X-ray giving the dose of 2 Gy after sequentially incubated with one of the following three drug combinations: TPT, 2-ME2/TPT, IUDR/TPT or 2ME2/IUDR/ TPT. One specimen was used as the irradiated only sample (R). The last group was also irradiated with total dose of 22 Gy (each time 2 Gy) of 6 MV X-ray in 11 fractions and treated for three times. DNA damage was evaluated using the Picogreen method in the experimental study. Results R/TPT treated group had more DNA damage [double strand break (DSB)/single strand break (SSB)] compared with the untreated group (P<0.05). Moreover the R/ TPT group treated with 2ME2 followed by IUDR had maximum DNA damage in spheroid GBM indicating an augmented genotoxicity in the cells. The DNA damage was induced after seven fractionated irradiation and two sequential treatments with 2ME2/IUDR/TPT. To ensure accuracy of the slope of dose response curve the fractionated radiation was calculated as 7.36 Gy with respect to α/β ratio based on biologically effective dose (BED) formulae. Conclusion Cells treated with 2ME2/IUDR showed more sensitivity to radiation and accumulative DNA damage. DNA damage was significantly increased when GBM cells treated with TPT ceased at S phase due to the inhibition of topoisomerase enzyme and phosphorylation of Chk1 enzyme. These results suggest that R/TPT- treated cells increase sensitivity to 2ME2 and IUDR especially when they are used together. Therefore, due to an increase in the level of DNA damage (SSB vs. DSB) and impairment of DNA repair machinery

  19. Quantification of the In Vitro Radiosensitivity of Mung Bean Sprout Elongation to 6MV X-Ray: A Revised Target Model Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tzu Hwei; Kittipayak, Samrit; Lin, Yu Ting; Lin, Cheng Hsun; Pan, Lung Kwang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a revised target model for quantifying the in vitro radiosensitivity of mung bean sprout elongation to 6-MV X-rays was developed. The revised target model, which incorporated the Poisson prediction for a low probability of success, provided theoretical estimates that were highly consistent with the actual data measured in this study. The revised target model correlated different in vitro radiosensitivities to various effective target volumes and was successfully confirmed by exposing mung beans in various elongation states to various doses of 6-MV X-rays. For the experiment, 5,000 fresh mung beans were randomly distributed into 100 petri dishes, which were randomly divided into ten groups. Each group received an initial watering at a different time point prior to X-ray exposure, resulting in different effective target volumes. The bean sprouts were measured 70 hr after X-ray exposure, and the average length of the bean sprouts in each group was recorded as an index of the mung bean in vitro radiosensitivity. Mung beans that received an initial watering either six or sixteen hours before X-ray exposure had the shortest sprout length, indicating that the maximum effective target volume was formed within that specific time period. The revised target model could be also expanded to interpret the “two-hit” model of target theory, although the experimental data supported the “one-hit” model. If the “two-hit” model was sustained, theoretically, the target size would be 2.14 times larger than its original size to produce the same results. PMID:26053016

  20. Tumoricidal activity of low-energy 160-KV versus 6-MV X-rays against platinum-sensitized F98 glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sara N.; Pradhan, Anil K.; Barth, Rolf F.; Nahar, Sultana N.; Nakkula, Robin J.; Yang, Weilian; Palmer, Alycia M.; Turro, Claudia; Weldon, Michael; Bell, Erica Hlavin; Mo, Xiaokui

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study were (i) to investigate the differences in effects between 160-kV low-energy and 6-MV high-energy X-rays, both by computational analysis and in vitro studies; (ii) to determine the effects of each on platinum-sensitized F98 rat glioma and murine B16 melanoma cells; and (iii) to describe the in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo toxicity of a Pt(II) terpyridine platinum (Typ-Pt) complex. Simulations were performed using the Monte Carlo code Geant4 to determine enhancement in absorption of low- versus high-energy X-rays by Pt and to determine dose enhancement factors (DEFs) for a Pt-sensitized tumor phantom. In vitro studies were carried out using Typ-Pt and again with carboplatin due to the unexpected in vivo toxicity of Typ-Pt. Cell survival was determined using clonogenic assays. In agreement with computations and simulations, in vitro data showed up to one log unit reduction in surviving fractions (SFs) of cells treated with 1–4 µg/ml of Typ-Pt and irradiated with 160-kV versus 6-MV X-rays. DEFs showed radiosensitization in the 50–200 keV range, which fell to approximate unity at higher energies, suggesting marginal interactions at MeV energies. Cells sensitized with 1–5 or 7 µg/ml of carboplatin and then irradiated also showed a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in SFs. However, it was unlikely this was due to increased interactions. Theoretical and in vitro studies presented here demonstrated that the tumoricidal activity of low-energy X-rays was greater than that of high-energy X-rays against Pt-sensitized tumor cells. Determining whether radiosensitization is a function of increased interactions will require additional studies. PMID:25266332

  1. Tumoricidal activity of low-energy 160-KV versus 6-MV X-rays against platinum-sensitized F98 glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sara N; Pradhan, Anil K; Barth, Rolf F; Nahar, Sultana N; Nakkula, Robin J; Yang, Weilian; Palmer, Alycia M; Turro, Claudia; Weldon, Michael; Bell, Erica Hlavin; Mo, Xiaokui

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study were (i) to investigate the differences in effects between 160-kV low-energy and 6-MV high-energy X-rays, both by computational analysis and in vitro studies; (ii) to determine the effects of each on platinum-sensitized F98 rat glioma and murine B16 melanoma cells; and (iii) to describe the in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo toxicity of a Pt(II) terpyridine platinum (Typ-Pt) complex. Simulations were performed using the Monte Carlo code Geant4 to determine enhancement in absorption of low- versus high-energy X-rays by Pt and to determine dose enhancement factors (DEFs) for a Pt-sensitized tumor phantom. In vitro studies were carried out using Typ-Pt and again with carboplatin due to the unexpected in vivo toxicity of Typ-Pt. Cell survival was determined using clonogenic assays. In agreement with computations and simulations, in vitro data showed up to one log unit reduction in surviving fractions (SFs) of cells treated with 1-4 µg/ml of Typ-Pt and irradiated with 160-kV versus 6-MV X-rays. DEFs showed radiosensitization in the 50-200 keV range, which fell to approximate unity at higher energies, suggesting marginal interactions at MeV energies. Cells sensitized with 1-5 or 7 µg/ml of carboplatin and then irradiated also showed a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in SFs. However, it was unlikely this was due to increased interactions. Theoretical and in vitro studies presented here demonstrated that the tumoricidal activity of low-energy X-rays was greater than that of high-energy X-rays against Pt-sensitized tumor cells. Determining whether radiosensitization is a function of increased interactions will require additional studies. PMID:25266332

  2. Radioprotective effects of selenium and vitamin-E against 6MV X-rays in human blood lymphocytes by micronucleus assay

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Aram; Moosavi, Seyed Akbar; Changizi, Vahid; Abbasian Ardakani, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Critical macromolecules of cells such as DNA are in exposure to damage of free radicals that induced from the interaction of ionizing radiation with biological systems. Selenium and vitamin-E are natural compounds that have been shown to be a direct free radical scavenger. The aim of this study was to investigate the radioprotective effect of selenium and vitamin-E separately and synergistically against genotoxicity induced by 6MV x-rays irradiation in blood lymphocytes. Methods: Fifteen volunteers were divided into three groups include A, B and C. These groups were given selenium (800IU), vitamin-E (100mg) and selenium (400IU) + vitamin-E (50mg), respectively. Peripheral blood samples were collected from each group before (0hr) and 1, 2 and 3hr after selenium and vitamin-E administration (separately and synergistically). Then the blood samples were irradiated to 200cGy of 6MV x-rays. After that lymphocyte samples were cultured with mitogenic stimulation to determine the chromosomal aberrations with micronucleus assay in cytokinesis-blocked binucleated cells. Results: The lymphocytes in the blood samples collected at one hr after ingestion selenium and vitamin-E, exposed in vitro to x-rays exhibited a significant decrease in the incidence of micronuclei, compared with control group at 0hr. The maximum protection and decrease in frequency of micronuclei (50%) were observed at one hr after administration of selenium and vitamin-E synergistically. Conclusion: The data suggest that ingestion of selenium and vitamin-E as a radioprotector substance before exposures may reduce genetic damage caused by x-rays irradiation. PMID:27493911

  3. Dosimetry of interface region near closed air cavities for Co-60, 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams using Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Chandra P; Darko, Johnson; Vidyasagar, P B; Schreiner, L John

    2010-04-01

    Underdosing of treatment targets can occur in radiation therapy due to electronic disequilibrium around air-tissue interfaces when tumors are situated near natural air cavities. These effects have been shown to increase with the beam energy and decrease with the field size. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and tomotherapy techniques employ combinations of multiple small radiation beamlets of varying intensities to deliver highly conformal radiation therapy. The use of small beamlets in these techniques may therefore result in underdosing of treatment target in the air-tissue interfaces region surrounding an air cavity. This work was undertaken to investigate dose reductions near the air-water interfaces of 1x1x1 and 3x3x3 cm(3) air cavities, typically encountered in the treatment of head and neck cancer utilizing radiation therapy techniques such as IMRT and tomotherapy using small fields of Co-60, 6 MV and 15 MV photons. Additional investigations were performed for larger photon field sizes encompassing the entire air-cavity, such as encountered in conventional three dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) techniques. The EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the dose reductions (in water) in air-water interface region for single, parallel opposed and four field irradiations with 2x2 cm(2) (beamlet), 10x2 cm(2) (fan beam), 5x5 and 7x7 cm(2) field sizes. The magnitude of dose reduction in water near air-water interface increases with photon energy; decreases with distance from the interface as well as decreases as the number of beams are increased. No dose reductions were observed for large field sizes encompassing the air cavities. The results demonstrate that Co-60 beams may provide significantly smaller interface dose reductions than 6 MV and 15 MV irradiations for small field irradiations such as used in IMRT and tomotherapy. PMID:20589116

  4. Dependence of current rise time on laser-triggered discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Soowon; Kamohara, Takashi; Hosseini, S. Hamid R.; Katsuki, Sunao

    2016-07-01

    A powerful, stable extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source is the most important component for EUV lithography and EUV mask inspection. Here, we investigate the characteristics of laser-triggered discharge plasma at three different current rise times, fast, middle and slow. A height-adjustable coaxial birdcage was used to change circuit inductance. The rise time was varied between 30 ns–55 ns with peak current of 10 kA. The time-integrated EUV (at 13.5 nm in 2% bandwidth) intensity for the fast rise time was found to be 55% stronger than that of the slow rise time despite its lower energy. A high-speed Mach–Zehnder interferogram and visible imaging of the pinch plasma were employed to discuss plasma compression processes qualitatively and quantitatively. Also discharge produced debris was investigated using a silicon-crystal witness plate. The fast rise current was found to have advantages such as lower debris, higher EUV intensity, and possibility of suppressing instability in comparison with the slow rise time. As expected, total debris amounts lessened proportionally to the primary charged energy, as found from a comparison of fast and slow rise currents.

  5. Laser-triggered hollow-cathode plasma process for film growth

    SciTech Connect

    Witanachchi, S.; Mahawela, P.; Mukherjee, P.

    2004-09-01

    A method of generating a pulsed plasma plume of metallic species using a hollow-cathode arc discharge arrangement is presented. Electrical energy from a pulse-forming network (PFN) generates the transient plasma that evaporates material from the anode that is placed inside a hollow cathode. The discharge is triggered by thermionic electrons produced by a CO{sub 2} laser pulse that impinges on one of the electrodes. This plasma process has been used to deposit carbon films in a low-pressure argon or nitrogen ambient. Current pulses of 4-10 ms in duration with peak currents of 350 A have been produced by the PFN. Characteristics of the produced plasma have been studied by optical emission spectroscopy. The amount of energy imparted to the argon plasma is more than that for a nitrogen plasma. Comparison of on-axis intensity for the 426.9 nm line of C{sup +} for the two plasmas shows that the density of carbon ions generated in the nitrogen plasma is higher than that in the argon plasma. Films deposited by this method have fairly uniform thickness profiles that are of the form cos{sup 0.4} {theta} for the argon plasma and cos{sup 2.2} {theta} for the nitrogen plasma. This indicates that the nitrogen plasma is more forward directed than the argon plasma. Deposition rates of about 10-16 A /pulse have been obtained for carbon films.

  6. Electron contamination modeling and skin dose in 6 MV longitudinal field MRIgRT: Impact of the MRI and MRI fringe field

    SciTech Connect

    Oborn, B. M.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Butson, M. J.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Keall, P. J.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: In recent times, longitudinal field MRI-linac systems have been proposed for 6 MV MRI-guided radiotherapy (MRIgRT). The magnetic field is parallel with the beam axis and so will alter the transport properties of any electron contamination particles. The purpose of this work is to provide a first investigation into the potential effects of the MR and fringe magnetic fields on the electron contamination as it is transported toward a phantom, in turn, providing an estimate of the expected patient skin dose changes in such a modality. Methods: Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations of a water phantom exposed to a 6 MV x-ray beam were performed. Longitudinal magnetic fields of strengths between 0 and 3 T were applied to a 30 x 30 x 20 cm{sup 3} phantom. Surrounding the phantom there is a region where the magnetic field is at full MRI strength, consistent with clinical MRI systems. Beyond this the fringe magnetic field entering the collimation system is also modeled. The MRI-coil thickness, fringe field properties, and isocentric distance are varied and investigated. Beam field sizes of 5 x 5, 10 x 10, 15 x 15 and 20 x 20 cm{sup 2} were simulated. Central axis dose, 2D virtual entry skin dose films, and 70 {mu}m skin depth doses were calculated using high resolution scoring voxels. Results: In the presence of a longitudinal magnetic field, electron contamination from the linear accelerator is encouraged to travel almost directly toward the patient surface with minimal lateral spread. This results in a concentration of electron contamination within the x-ray beam outline. This concentration is particularly encouraged if the fringe field encompasses the collimation system. Skin dose increases of up to 1000% were observed for certain configurations and increases above Dmax were common. In nonmagnetically shielded cases, electron contamination generated from the jaw faces and air column is trapped and propagated almost directly to the phantom entry region, giving rise to

  7. An evaluation of NCRP report 151--radiation shielding design for radiotherapy facilities, and a feasibility study for 6 MV open-door treatments in an existing high-energy radiation therapy bunker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kildea, John

    This thesis describes a study of shielding design techniques used for radiation therapy facilities that employ megavoltage linear accelerators. Specifically, an evaluation of the shielding design formalism described in NCRP report 151 was undertaken and a feasibility study for open-door 6 MV radiation therapy treatments in existing 6 MV, 18 MV treatment rooms at the Montreal General Hospital (MGH) was conducted. To evaluate the shielding design formalism of NCRP 151, barrier-attenuated equivalent doses were measured for several of the treatment rooms at the MGH and compared with expectations from NCRP 151 calculations. It was found that, while the insight and recommendations of NCRP 151 are very valuable, its dose predictions are not always correct. As such, the NCRP 151 methodology is best used in conjunction with physical measurements. The feasibility study for 6 MV open-door treatments made use of the NCRP 151 formalism, together with physical measurements for realistic 6 MV workloads. The results suggest that, dosimetrically, 6 MV open door treatments are feasible. A conservative estimate for the increased dose at the door arising from such treatments is 0.1 mSv, with a 1/8 occupancy factor, as recommended in NCRP 151, included.

  8. Angular ion emission characteristics of a laser triggered tin vacuum arc as light source for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbraak, Harald; Küpper, Felix; Jonkers, Jeroen; Bergmann, Klaus

    2010-11-01

    The angular resolved emission of tin ions from a laser triggered vacuum arc to be used as light source for extreme ultraviolet lithography is presented. Ion energies of more than 200 keV for emission angles up to 50° with respect to the optical axis are observed. The angular emission characteristic is strongly anisotropic with a pronounced peak for fast ions into a cone with an opening angle of roughly 10° at an angle of 35° with respect to the optical axis. These ions also exhibit a distinct energy distribution function compared to the more isotropic emitted bulk of ions, which can be referred to different mechanisms of production. Looking at the discharge current parameters, the production of the directed fast ions can be connected with a peaked increase in the impedance, which gives hint to a plasma instability as origin of those ions. The emission of isotropic emitted ions is in agreement with a model of plasma expansion into vacuum. The emission characteristic is also strongly dependent on the parameter of the trigger laser. It is shown that using a double trigger laser pulse the fast ion production can be suppressed by more than one order of magnitude.

  9. SU-E-T-175: Evaluation of the Relative Output Ratio for Collimator Jaw and MLC Defined Small Static 6MV Photon Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, G; Thwaites, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate relative output ratio of collimator jaw and MLC defined small photon fields. Methods: Relative output ratios were measured using Gafchromic EBT3 film for a 6 MV photon beam on a Novalis Tx with HD120 MLC. Beam collimation was achieved by the jaws for 1.0 cm and 3.0 cm and MLC defined square field sizes between 0.5 cm and 1.0 cm with varying jaw settings between 2.0 and 4.0 cm. Film pieces were exposed to 4 Gy. Experiments were repeated with each session consisting of five consecutive exposures for the given MLC and/or jaw collimation and with the MLC and the jaws reset for each exposure. Films were scanned using EPSON 10000XL flatbed scanner approximately 24 hours after exposure in 48 bit RGB format at 150 dpi. Film calibration data were corrected for daily linac output variations. Doses were evaluated using the green channel with square ROI sizes of 0.1 – 0.6 cm. Converted doses were normalised for output ratio calculation using the 3.0 cm field as a machine specific reference field size. Mean output ratio and coefficient of variation (CV) were calculated for each experimental session. Results: For the Novalis 6 MV photon beam the output ratios between 0.719 and 0.872 have been measured for the jaw/MLC combinations tested. For a jaw setting of 4.0 cm field, the mean CV of the output ratios increased from 0.77% to 1.48% with decreasing MLC field size from 1.0 cm to 0.5 cm. For a nominal MLC 1.0 cm field, the CV increased to 1.00% from 0.77% with reducing jaw field size from 4.0 cm to 2.0 cm. Conclusion: The relative output ratio and the associated CV were dependent on the collimator jaw and MLC settings. The field size dependent CV showed similar trends to those reported in the literature.

  10. Superiority of Low Energy 160 KV X-Rays Compared to High Energy 6 MV X-Rays in Heavy Element Radiosensitization for Cancer Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sara N.; Pradhan, Anil K.; Nahar, Sultana N.; Barth, Rolf F.; Yang, Weilian; Nakkula, Robin J.; Palmer, Alycia; Turro, Claudia

    2013-06-01

    High energy X-rays in the MeV range are generally employed in conventional radiation therapy from linear accelerators (LINAC) to ensure sufficient penetration depths. However, lower energy X-rays in the keV range may be more effective when coupled with heavy element (high-Z or HZ) radiosensitizers. Numerical simulations of X-ray energy deposition for tumor phantoms sensitized with HZ radiosensitizers were performed using the Monte Carlo code Geant4. The results showed enhancement in energy deposition to radiosensitized phantoms relative to unsensitized phantoms for low energy X-rays in the keV range. In contrast, minimal enhancement was seen using high energy X-rays in the MeV range. Dose enhancement factors (DEFs) were computed and showed radiosensitization only in the low energy range < 200 keV, far lower than the energy of the majority of photons in the LINAC energy range. In vitro studies were carried to demonstrate the tumoricidal effects of HZ sensitized F98 rat glioma cells following irradiation with both low energy 160 kV and high energy 6 MV X-ray sources. The platinum compound, pyridine terpyridine Pt(II) nitrate, was initially used because it was 7x less toxic that an equivalent amount of carboplatin in vitro studies. This would allow us to separate the radiotoxic and the chemotoxic effects of HZ sensitizers. Results from this study showed a 10-fold dose dependent reduction in surviving fractions (SF) of radiosensitized cells treated with low energy 160 kV X-rays compared to those treated with 6 MV X-rays. This is in agreement with our simulations that show an increase in dose deposition in radiosensitized tumors for low energy X-rays. Due to unforeen in vivo toxicity, however, another in vitro study was performed using the commonly used, Pt-based chemotherapeutic drug carboplatin which confirmed earlier results. This lays the ground work for a planned in vivo study using F98 glioma bearing rats. This study demonstrates that while high energy X-rays are

  11. SU-E-T-53: Benchmarking a Monte Carlo Model for Patient Plane Leakage Calculations of Low Energy 6MV Unique Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Constantin, M; Sawkey, D; Johnsen, S; Hsu, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To validate the physics parameters of a Monte Carlo model for patient plane leakage calculations on the 6MV Unique linac by comparing the simulations against IEC patient plane leakage measurements. The benchmarked model can further be used for shielding design optimization, to predict leakage in the proximity of intended treatment fields, reduce the system weight and cost, and improve components reliability. Methods: The treatment head geometry of the Unique linac was simulated in Geant4 (v9.4.p02 with “Opt3” standard electromagnetic physics list) based on CAD drawings of all collimation and shielding components projected from the target to the area within 2m from isocenter. A 4×4m2 scorer was inserted 1m from the target in the patient plane and multiple phase space files were recorded by performing a 40-node computing cluster simulation on the EC2 cloud. The photon energy fluence was calculated relative to the value at isocenter for a 10×10cm2 field using 10×10mm2 bins. Tungsten blocks were parked accordingly to represent MLC120. The secondary particle contamination to patient plane was eliminated by “killing” those particles prior to the primary collimator entrance using a “kill-plane”, which represented the upper head shielding components not being modeled. Both IEC patient-plane leakage and X/Y-jaws transmission were simulated. Results: The contribution of photons to energy fluence was 0.064% on average, in excellent agreement with the experimental data available at 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5m from isocenter, characterized by an average leakage of 0.045% and a maximum leakage of 0.085%. X- and Y-jaws transmissions of 0.43% and 0.44% were found in good agreement with measurements of 0.48% and 0.43%, respectively. Conclusion: A Geant4 model based on energy fluence calculations for the 6MV Unique linac was created and validated using IEC patient plane leakage measurements. The “kill-plane” has effectively eliminated electron contamination to

  12. Dosimetric Comparison of 6 MV and 15 MV Single Arc Rapidarc to Helical TomoTherapy for the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Jing; Yue Jinbo; McLawhorn, Robert; Yang Wensha; Wijesooriya, Krishni; Dunlap, Neal E.; Sheng Ke; Yin Fangfang; Benedict, Stanley H.

    2011-10-01

    We conducted a planning study to compare Varian's RapidArc (RA) and helical TomoTherapy (HT) for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Three intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans were generated for 8 patients with pancreatic cancer: one using HT with 6-MV beam (Plan{sub HT6}), one using single-arc RA with 6-MV beam (Plan{sub RA6}), and one using single-arc RA with 15-MV beam (Plan{sub RA15}). Dosimetric indices including high/low conformality index (CI{sub 100%}/CI{sub 50%}), heterogeneity index (HI), monitor units (MUs), and doses to organs at risk (OARs) were compared. The mean CI{sub 100%} was statistically equivalent with respect to the 2 treatment techniques, as well as beam energy (0.99, 1.01, and 1.02 for Plan{sub HT6}, Plan{sub RA6}, and Plan{sub RA156,} respectively). The CI{sub 50%} and HI were improved in both RA plans over the HT plan. The RA plans significantly reduced MU (MU{sub RA6} = 697, MU{sub RA15} = 548) compared with HT (MU{sub HT6} = 6177, p = 0.008 in both cases). The mean maximum cord dose was decreased from 29.6 Gy in Plan{sub HT6} to 21.6 Gy (p = 0.05) in Plan{sub RA6} and 21.7 Gy (p = 0.04) in Plan{sub RA15}. The mean bowel dose decreased from 17.2 Gy in Plan{sub HT6} to 15.2 Gy (p = 0.03) in Plan{sub RA6} and 15.0 Gy (p = 0.03) Plan{sub RA15}. The mean liver dose decreased from 8.4 Gy in Plan{sub HT6} to 6.3 Gy (p = 0.04) in Plan{sub RA6} and 6.2 Gy in Plan{sub RA15}. Variations of the mean dose to the duodenum, kidneys, and stomach were statistically insignificant. RA and HT can both deliver conformal dose distributions to target volumes while limiting the dose to surrounding OARs in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Dosimetric advantages might be gained by using RA over HT by reducing the dose to OARs and total MUs used for treatment.

  13. Bidirectional current triggering in planar devices based on serially connected VO2 thin films using 965 nm laser diode.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihoon; Park, Kyongsoo; Kim, Bong-Jun; Lee, Yong Wook

    2016-08-01

    By incorporating a 965 nm laser diode, the bidirectional current triggering of up to 30 mA was demonstrated in a two-terminal planar device based on serially connected vanadium dioxide (VO2) thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition. The bidirectional current triggering was realized by using the focused beams of laser pulses through the photo-thermally induced phase transition of VO2. The transient responses of laser-triggered currents were also investigated when laser pulses excited the device at a variety of pulse widths and repetition rates of up to 4.0 Hz. A switching contrast between off- and on-state currents was obtained as ~8333, and rising and falling times were measured as ~39 and ~29 ms, respectively, for 50 ms laser pulses. PMID:27505740

  14. Improved operation of a microwave pulse compressor with a laser-triggered high-pressure gas plasma switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlapakovski, A.; Gorev, S.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of laser beam parameters on the output pulses of a resonant microwave compressor with a laser-triggered plasma switch was investigated. The S-band compressor, consisting of a rectangular waveguide-based cavity and H-plane waveguide tee with a shorted side arm, was filled with pressurized dry air and pumped by 1.8-μs-long microwave pulses of up to 450 kW power. A Nd:YAG laser was used to ignite the gas discharge in the tee side arm for output pulse extraction. The laser beam (at 213 nm or 532 nm) was directed along the RF electric field lines. It was found that the compressor operated most effectively when the laser beam was focused at the center of the switch waveguide cross-section. In this case, the power extraction efficiency reached ˜47% at an output power of ˜14 MW, while when the laser beam was not focused the maximal extraction efficiency was only ˜20% at ˜6 MW output power. Focusing the laser beam resulted also in a dramatic decrease (down to <1 ns) in the delay of the output pulses' appearance with respect to the time of the beam's entrance into the switch, and the jitter of the output pulses' appearance was minimized. In addition, the quality of the output pulses' waveform was significantly improved.

  15. Comparison of build-up region doses in oblique tangential 6 MV photon beams calculated by AAA and CCC algorithms in breast Rando phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masunun, P.; Tangboonduangjit, P.; Dumrongkijudom, N.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the build-up region doses on breast Rando phantom surface with the bolus covered, the doses in breast Rando phantom and also the doses in a lung that is the heterogeneous region by two algorithms. The AAA in Eclipse TPS and the collapsed cone convolution algorithm in Pinnacle treatment planning system were used to plan in tangential field technique with 6 MV photon beam at 200 cGy total doses in Breast Rando phantom with bolus covered (5 mm and 10 mm). TLDs were calibrated with Cobalt-60 and used to measure the doses in irradiation process. The results in treatment planning show that the doses in build-up region and the doses in breast phantom were closely matched in both algorithms which are less than 2% differences. However, overestimate of doses in a lung (L2) were found in AAA with 13.78% and 6.06% differences at 5 mm and 10 mm bolus thickness, respectively when compared with CCC algorithm. The TLD measurements show the underestimate in buildup region and in breast phantom but the doses in a lung (L2) were overestimated when compared with the doses in the two plannings at both thicknesses of the bolus.

  16. Monte Carlo correction factors for a Farmer 0.6 cm3 ion chamber dose measurement in the build-up region of the 6 MV clinical beam.

    PubMed

    Pena, J; Sánchez-Doblado, F; Capote, R; Terrón, J A; Gómez, F

    2006-03-21

    Reference dosimetry of photon fields is a well-established subject and currently available protocols (such as the IAEA TRS-398 and AAPM TG-51) provide methods for converting the ionization chamber (IC) reading into dose to water, provided reference conditions of charged particle equilibrium (CPE) are fulfilled. But these protocols cannot deal with the build-up region, where the lack of CPE limits the applicability of the cavity theorems and so the chamber correction factors become depth dependent. By explicitly including the IC geometry in the Monte Carlo simulations, depth-dependent dose correction factors are calculated for a PTW 30001 0.6 cm(3) ion chamber in the build-up region of the 6 MV photon beam. The corrected percentage depth dose (PDD) agrees within 2% with that measured using the NACP 02 plane-parallel ion chamber in the build-up region at depths greater than 0.4 cm, where the Farmer chamber wall reaches the phantom surface. PMID:16510960

  17. Fiber-coupled organic plastic scintillator for on-line dose rate monitoring in 6 MV X-ray beam for external radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindvold, Lars R.; Beierholm, A. R.; Andersen, C. E.

    2010-02-01

    Fiber-coupled organic plastic scintillators enable on-line dose rate monitoring in conjunction with pulsed radiation sources like linear medical accelerators (linacs). The accelerator, however, generates a significant amount of stray ionizing radiation. This radiation excites the long optical fiber (15-20 m), connecting the scintillator, typically with a diameter of 1 mm and 5 mm in length, with the optical detector circuit, causing parasitic luminescence in the optical fiber. In this paper we propose a method for circumventing this problem. The method is based on the use of an organic scintillator, 2-Naphthoic acid, doped in an optical polymer. The organic scintillator possesses a long luminescent lifetime (room temperature phosphorescence). The scintillator is molded onto the distal end of a polymer optical fiber. The luminescent signal from the scintillator is detected by a PMT in photon-counting mode. The long lifetime of the scintillator signal facilitates a temporal gating of the dose rate signal with respect to the parasitic luminescence from the optical fiber. We will present data obtained using a solid water phantom irradiated with 6 MV Xrays from a medical linac at the Copenhagen University Hospital. Also issues pertaining to the selection of proper matrix as well as phosphorescent dye will be presented in this paper.

  18. Improving interaction in navigated surgery by combining a pan-tilt mounted laser and a pointer with triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojdanic, D.; Chen, L.; Peitgen, H.-O.

    2012-02-01

    User interaction during navigated surgery is often a critical issue in the overall procedure, as several complex aspects must be considered, such as sterility, workflow, field of view, and cognitive load. This work introduces a new approach for intraoperative interaction that seamlessly fits the high surgical requirements. A navigation system, typically consisting of a tracking system and a monitor for 3D virtual models, is augmented with a tracked pointer with triggering functionality and a pan-tilt mounted laser. The pointer, which is sterile and can be applied for landmark-based organ registration, is used for wireless interaction with the monitor scene. The laser system enables the calibration of the monitor, which is out of the tracking system's range. Moreover, the laser beam can focus on any organ point defined on the virtual model, which improves targeting or visual feedback during intervention. The calibration of the laser system, monitor, and triggered pointer is achieved by an effective procedure, which can be easily repeated in operating room. The mathematical background of the calibration is based on the Levenberg-Marquardt and Umeyama's algorithms.

  19. Comparison of pencil-beam, collapsed-cone and Monte-Carlo algorithms in radiotherapy treatment planning for 6-MV photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Jin; Kim, Sung Kyu; Kim, Dong Ho

    2015-07-01

    Treatment planning system calculations in inhomogeneous regions may present significant inaccuracies due to loss of electronic equilibrium. In this study, three different dose calculation algorithms, pencil beam (PB), collapsed cone (CC), and Monte-Carlo (MC), provided by our planning system were compared to assess their impact on the three-dimensional planning of lung and breast cases. A total of five breast and five lung cases were calculated by using the PB, CC, and MC algorithms. Planning treatment volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) delineations were performed according to our institution's protocols on the Oncentra MasterPlan image registration module, on 0.3-0.5 cm computed tomography (CT) slices taken under normal respiration conditions. Intensitymodulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans were calculated for the three algorithm for each patient. The plans were conducted on the Oncentra MasterPlan (PB and CC) and CMS Monaco (MC) treatment planning systems for 6 MV. The plans were compared in terms of the dose distribution in target, the OAR volumes, and the monitor units (MUs). Furthermore, absolute dosimetry was measured using a three-dimensional diode array detector (ArcCHECK) to evaluate the dose differences in a homogeneous phantom. Comparing the dose distributions planned by using the PB, CC, and MC algorithms, the PB algorithm provided adequate coverage of the PTV. The MUs calculated using the PB algorithm were less than those calculated by using. The MC algorithm showed the highest accuracy in terms of the absolute dosimetry. Differences were found when comparing the calculation algorithms. The PB algorithm estimated higher doses for the target than the CC and the MC algorithms. The PB algorithm actually overestimated the dose compared with those calculated by using the CC and the MC algorithms. The MC algorithm showed better accuracy than the other algorithms.

  20. A feasibility study to calculate unshielded fetal doses to pregnant patients in 6-MV photon treatments using Monte Carlo methods and anatomically realistic phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Bednarz, Bryan; Xu, X. George

    2008-07-15

    A Monte Carlo-based procedure to assess fetal doses from 6-MV external photon beam radiation treatments has been developed to improve upon existing techniques that are based on AAPM Task Group Report 36 published in 1995 [M. Stovall et al., Med. Phys. 22, 63-82 (1995)]. Anatomically realistic models of the pregnant patient representing 3-, 6-, and 9-month gestational stages were implemented into the MCNPX code together with a detailed accelerator model that is capable of simulating scattered and leakage radiation from the accelerator head. Absorbed doses to the fetus were calculated for six different treatment plans for sites above the fetus and one treatment plan for fibrosarcoma in the knee. For treatment plans above the fetus, the fetal doses tended to increase with increasing stage of gestation. This was due to the decrease in distance between the fetal body and field edge with increasing stage of gestation. For the treatment field below the fetus, the absorbed doses tended to decrease with increasing gestational stage of the pregnant patient, due to the increasing size of the fetus and relative constant distance between the field edge and fetal body for each stage. The absorbed doses to the fetus for all treatment plans ranged from a maximum of 30.9 cGy to the 9-month fetus to 1.53 cGy to the 3-month fetus. The study demonstrates the feasibility to accurately determine the absorbed organ doses in the mother and fetus as part of the treatment planning and eventually in risk management.

  1. Ultrasharp-front laser pulses generated by energetic-electron flux triggering of laser propagation in overdense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Ya; Yu, Yong; Shen, Bai-Fei; Wang, Jia-Xiang; Zhu, Wen-Jun; Chen, Zi-Yu; Ye, Yan

    2013-08-01

    This paper reports that an initially opaque plasma foil, irradiated by a laser pulse with intensity below the self-induced transparency (SIT) threshold, will become transparent, if a flux of energetic electrons is present. Based on this phenomenon, named flux-induced transparency (FIT), an approach to obtaining ultrasharp-front laser pulses is proposed. With the presence of an energetic-electron flux generated by a p-polarized laser irradiating an overdense plasma foil from the rear side, the propagation of an s-polarized laser irradiating the front surface of the foil can be manipulated. The transmitted s-polarized laser pulse has an ultrasharp front which rises by three orders of magnitude within a few laser cycles. The profile of the transmitted pulse is tunable by controlling the time at which the energetic-electron flux arrives at the front surface.

  2. Comparison of out-of-field photon doses in 6 MV IMRT and neutron doses in proton therapy for adult and pediatric patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athar, Basit S.; Bednarz, Bryan; Seco, Joao; Hancox, Cindy; Paganetti, Harald

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess lateral out-of-field doses in 6 MV IMRT (intensity modulated radiation therapy) and compare them with secondary neutron equivalent dose contributions in proton therapy. We simulated out-of-field photon doses to various organs as a function of distance, patient's age, gender and treatment volumes based on 3, 6, 9 cm field diameters in the head and neck and spine region. The out-of-field photon doses to organs near the field edge were found to be in the range of 2, 5 and 10 mSv Gy-1 for 3 cm, 6 cm and 9 cm diameter IMRT fields, respectively, within 5 cm of the field edge. Statistical uncertainties calculated in organ doses vary from 0.2% to 40% depending on the organ location and the organ volume. Next, a comparison was made with previously calculated neutron equivalent doses from proton therapy using identical field arrangements. For example, out-of-field doses for IMRT to lung and uterus (organs close to the 3 cm diameter spinal field) were computed to be 0.63 and 0.62 mSv Gy-1, respectively. These numbers are found to be a factor of 2 smaller than the corresponding out-of-field doses for proton therapy, which were estimated to be 1.6 and 1.7 mSv Gy-1 (RBE), respectively. However, as the distance to the field edge increases beyond approximately 25 cm the neutron equivalent dose from proton therapy was found to be a factor of 2-3 smaller than the out-of-field photon dose from IMRT. We have also analyzed the neutron equivalent doses from an ideal scanned proton therapy (assuming not significant amount of absorbers in the treatment head). Out-of-field doses were found to be an order of magnitude smaller compared to out-of-field doses in IMRT or passive scattered proton therapy. In conclusion, there seem to be three geometrical areas when comparing the out-of-target dose from IMRT and (passive scattered) proton treatments. Close to the target (in-field, not analyzed here) protons offer a distinct advantage due to the lower

  3. The effect of voxel size on dose distribution in Varian Clinac iX 6 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yani, Sitti; Dirgayussa, I. Gde E.; Rhani, Moh. Fadhillah; Haryanto, Freddy; Arif, Idam

    2015-09-01

    Recently, Monte Carlo (MC) calculation method has reported as the most accurate method of predicting dose distributions in radiotherapy. The MC code system (especially DOSXYZnrc) has been used to investigate the different voxel (volume elements) sizes effect on the accuracy of dose distributions. To investigate this effect on dosimetry parameters, calculations were made with three different voxel sizes. The effects were investigated with dose distribution calculations for seven voxel sizes: 1 × 1 × 0.1 cm3, 1 × 1 × 0.5 cm3, and 1 × 1 × 0.8 cm3. The 1 × 109 histories were simulated in order to get statistical uncertainties of 2%. This simulation takes about 9-10 hours to complete. Measurements are made with field sizes 10 × 10 cm2 for the 6 MV photon beams with Gaussian intensity distribution FWHM 0.1 cm and SSD 100.1 cm. MC simulated and measured dose distributions in a water phantom. The output of this simulation i.e. the percent depth dose and dose profile in dmax from the three sets of calculations are presented and comparisons are made with the experiment data from TTSH (Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore) in 0-5 cm depth. Dose that scored in voxels is a volume averaged estimate of the dose at the center of a voxel. The results in this study show that the difference between Monte Carlo simulation and experiment data depend on the voxel size both for percent depth dose (PDD) and profile dose. PDD scan on Z axis (depth) of water phantom, the big difference obtain in the voxel size 1 × 1 × 0.8 cm3 about 17%. In this study, the profile dose focused on high gradient dose area. Profile dose scan on Y axis and the big difference get in the voxel size 1 × 1 × 0.1 cm3 about 12%. This study demonstrated that the arrange voxel in Monte Carlo simulation becomes important.

  4. The effect of voxel size on dose distribution in Varian Clinac iX 6 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yani, Sitti; Dirgayussa, I Gde E.; Haryanto, Freddy; Arif, Idam; Rhani, Moh. Fadhillah

    2015-09-30

    Recently, Monte Carlo (MC) calculation method has reported as the most accurate method of predicting dose distributions in radiotherapy. The MC code system (especially DOSXYZnrc) has been used to investigate the different voxel (volume elements) sizes effect on the accuracy of dose distributions. To investigate this effect on dosimetry parameters, calculations were made with three different voxel sizes. The effects were investigated with dose distribution calculations for seven voxel sizes: 1 × 1 × 0.1 cm{sup 3}, 1 × 1 × 0.5 cm{sup 3}, and 1 × 1 × 0.8 cm{sup 3}. The 1 × 10{sup 9} histories were simulated in order to get statistical uncertainties of 2%. This simulation takes about 9-10 hours to complete. Measurements are made with field sizes 10 × 10 cm2 for the 6 MV photon beams with Gaussian intensity distribution FWHM 0.1 cm and SSD 100.1 cm. MC simulated and measured dose distributions in a water phantom. The output of this simulation i.e. the percent depth dose and dose profile in d{sub max} from the three sets of calculations are presented and comparisons are made with the experiment data from TTSH (Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore) in 0-5 cm depth. Dose that scored in voxels is a volume averaged estimate of the dose at the center of a voxel. The results in this study show that the difference between Monte Carlo simulation and experiment data depend on the voxel size both for percent depth dose (PDD) and profile dose. PDD scan on Z axis (depth) of water phantom, the big difference obtain in the voxel size 1 × 1 × 0.8 cm{sup 3} about 17%. In this study, the profile dose focused on high gradient dose area. Profile dose scan on Y axis and the big difference get in the voxel size 1 × 1 × 0.1 cm{sup 3} about 12%. This study demonstrated that the arrange voxel in Monte Carlo simulation becomes important.

  5. Monte Carlo characterization of skin doses in 6 MV transverse field MRI-linac systems: Effect of field size, surface orientation, magnetic field strength, and exit bolus

    SciTech Connect

    Oborn, B. M.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Butson, M. J.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The main focus of this work is to continue investigations into the Monte Carlo predicted skin doses seen in MRI-guided radiotherapy. In particular, the authors aim to characterize the 70 {mu}m skin doses over a larger range of magnetic field strength and x-ray field size than in the current literature. The effect of surface orientation on both the entry and exit sides is also studied. Finally, the use of exit bolus is also investigated for minimizing the negative effects of the electron return effect (ERE) on the exit skin dose. Methods: High resolution GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations of a water phantom exposed to a 6 MV x-ray beam (Varian 2100C) have been performed. Transverse magnetic fields of strengths between 0 and 3 T have been applied to a 30x30x20 cm{sup 3} phantom. This phantom is also altered to have variable entry and exit surfaces with respect to the beam central axis and they range from -75 deg. to +75 deg. The exit bolus simulated is a 1 cm thick (water equivalent) slab located on the beam exit side. Results: On the entry side, significant skin doses at the beam central axis are reported for large positive surface angles and strong magnetic fields. However, over the entry surface angle range of -30 deg. to -60 deg., the entry skin dose is comparable to or less than the zero magnetic field skin dose, regardless of magnetic field strength and field size. On the exit side, moderate to high central axis skin dose increases are expected except at large positive surface angles. For exit bolus of 1 cm thickness, the central axis exit skin dose becomes an almost consistent value regardless of magnetic field strength or exit surface angle. This is due to the almost complete absorption of the ERE electrons by the bolus. Conclusions: There is an ideal entry angle range of -30 deg. to -60 deg. where entry skin dose is comparable to or less than the zero magnetic field skin dose. Other than this, the entry skin dose increases are significant, especially at

  6. Accuracy of dose measurements and calculations within and beyond heterogeneous tissues for 6 MV photon fields smaller than 4 cm produced by Cyberknife

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, Ellen E.; Daskalov, George M.

    2008-06-15

    For the small radiation field sizes used in stereotactic radiosurgery, lateral electronic disequilibrium and steep dose gradients exist in a large portion of these fields, requiring the use of high-resolution measurement techniques. These relatively large areas of electronic disequilibrium make accurate dosimetry as well as dose calculation more difficult, and this is exacerbated in regions of tissue heterogeneity. Tissue heterogeneity was considered insignificant in the brain where stereotactic radiosurgery was first used. However, as this technique is expanded to the head and neck and other body sites, dose calculations need to account for dose perturbations in and beyond air cavities, lung, and bone. In a previous study we have evaluated EBT Gafchromic film (International Specialty Products, Wayne, NJ) for dosimetry and characterization of the Cyberknife radiation beams and found that it was comparable to other common detectors used for small photon beams in solid water equivalent phantoms. In the present work EBT film is used to measure dose in heterogeneous slab phantoms containing lung and bone equivalent materials for the 6 MV radiation beams of diameter 7.5 to 40 mm produced by the Cyberknife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA). These measurements are compared to calculations done with both the clinically utilized Raytrace algorithm as well as the newly developed Monte Carlo based algorithm available on the Cyberknife treatment planning system. Within the low density material both the measurements and Monte Carlo calculations correctly model the decrease in dose produced by a loss of electronic equilibrium, whereas the Raytrace algorithm incorrectly predicts an enhancement of dose in this region. Beyond the low density material an enhancement of dose is correctly calculated by both algorithms. Within the high density bone heterogeneity the EBT film measurements represent dose to unit density tissue in bone and agree with the Monte Carlo results when corrected to dose

  7. Development of Extreme Ultraviolet Radiation Source using Laser Triggered Vacuum Spark Discharge Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Masato; Yamada, Junzaburo; Zhu Qiushi; Hotta, Eiki

    2009-01-21

    A laser triggerd discharge produced Sn plasma light source has been developed. Experimental parameters such as electrode separation and laser irradiation power are varied to optimize EUV emission power. It is clear that the maximum EUV radiation was occurred in the position where the pinch was observed.

  8. Power Oscillator Circuit Modeling And Redesign For The Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA-II) Switch Trigger Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David L.; Hamil, Roy A.; Prestwich, Kenneth R.; Rohwein, Gerald J.; Donovan, Guy L.; Schaub, Charles M.

    1987-05-01

    The energy output and reliability of the multi-joule, injection-locked KrF laser used to trigger the PBFA II accelerator gas switches were improved through modifications identified in modeling the Blumlein driver circuit for the power oscillator. A combination of the SCEPTRE1 network solver code and JASON2 electrostatic field code were used to model the laser pulse-forming circuit in its single-channel rail gap configuration and modified versions with three or five discrete switches across the 1.45-m-wide, water-insulated transmission line. Three regularly spaced trigatron spark gaps resulted in a more uniformly driven laser volume with lower variations in voltages (10%) and rise times (9%) along its length. With the new configuration, over 3000 shots have been recorded without a single misfire compared to an average of ---25 shots before a prefire with the original design. The gas mix and pressure had to be optimized to match a given driver pulse voltage and rise time to achieve maximum performance from the laser. We summarize the model results which led to our decision to change the Blumlein switch configuration.

  9. Research on synchronization of 15 parallel high gain photoconductive semiconductor switches triggered by high power pulse laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Xia, Liansheng; Chen, Yi; Liu, Yi; Yang, Chao; Ye, Mao; Deng, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    The synchronization of 15 parallel high gain gallium arsenide photoconductive semiconductor switches (GaAs PCSS) has been researched aiming to get higher output voltage. Each PCSS is triggered independently by a high power pulse laser diode. The pulse width, energy, peak power, and central wavelength of the laser pulse are approximately 18 ns, 360 μJ, 20 kW, and 905 nm, respectively. In the stacked Blumlein transmission lines structure, the synchronous conduction of 15 parallel GaAs PCSSs has been achieved by offering optimized bias voltage and laser parameters. The method of synchronization calculation is given, and the synchronization of the 15 parallel GaAs PCSSs is measured as 775 ps. Furthermore, influences of the bias voltage, laser parameters on the synchronization are analyzed. In the output terminal, superimposed by the output voltages of 15 Blumlein transmission lines, the total output voltage reaches up to 328 kV, which is the highest output voltage of GaAs PCSSs that has been reported so far.

  10. Photothermic regulation of gene expression triggered by laser-induced carbon nanohorns

    PubMed Central

    Miyako, Eijiro; Deguchi, Tomonori; Nakajima, Yoshihiro; Yudasaka, Masako; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Horie, Masanori; Shichiri, Mototada; Higuchi, Yuriko; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru; Shigeri, Yasushi; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Iijima, Sumio

    2012-01-01

    The development of optical methods to control cellular functions is important for various biological applications. In particular, heat shock promoter-mediated gene expression systems by laser light are attractive targets for controlling cellular functions. However, previous approaches have considerable technical limitations related to their use of UV, short-wavelength visible (vis), and infrared (IR) laser light, which have poor penetration into biological tissue. Biological tissue is relatively transparent to light inside the diagnostic window at wavelengths of 650–1,100 nm. Here we present a unique optical biotechnological method using carbon nanohorn (CNH) that transforms energy from diagnostic window laser light to heat to control the expression of various genes. We report that with this method, laser irradiation within the diagnostic window resulted in effective heat generation and thus caused heat shock promoter-mediated gene expression. This study provides an important step forward in the development of light-manipulated gene expression technologies. PMID:22529368

  11. Gene Silencing by Gold Nanoshell-Mediated Delivery and Laser-Triggered Release of Antisense Oligonucleotide and siRNA

    PubMed Central

    Huschka, Ryan; Barhoumi, Aoune; Liu, Qing; Roth, Jack A.; Ji, Lin; Halas, Naomi J.

    2013-01-01

    The approach of RNA interference (RNAi)- using antisense DNA or RNA oligonucleotides to silence activity of a specific pathogenic gene transcript and reduce expression of the encoded protein- is very useful in dissecting genetic function and holds significant promise as a molecular therapeutic. A major obstacle in achieving gene silencing with RNAi technology is the systemic delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides. Here we demonstrate an engineered gold nanoshell (NS)-based therapeutic oligonucleotide delivery vehicle, designed to release its cargo on demand upon illumination with a near-infrared (NIR) laser. A poly(L)lysine peptide (PLL) epilayer covalently attached to the NS surface (NS-PLL) is used to capture intact, single-stranded antisense DNA oligonucleotides, or alternatively, double-stranded short-interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules. Controlled release of the captured therapeutic oligonucleotides in each case is accomplished by continuous wave NIR laser irradiation at 800 nm, near the resonance wavelength of the nanoshell. Fluorescently tagged oligonucleotides were used to monitor the time-dependent release process and light-triggered endosomal release. A green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing human lung cancer H1299 cell line was used to determine cellular uptake and gene silencing mediated by the NS-PLL carrying GFP gene-specific single-stranded DNA antisense oligonucleotide (AON-GFP), or a double-stranded siRNA (siRNA-GFP), in vitro. Light-triggered delivery resulted in ∼ 47% and ∼49% downregulation of the targeted GFP expression by AON-GFP and siRNA-GFP, respectively. Cytotoxicity induced by both the NS-PLL delivery vector and by laser irradiation is minimal, as demonstrated by a XTT cell proliferation assay. PMID:22862291

  12. Gene silencing by gold nanoshell-mediated delivery and laser-triggered release of antisense oligonucleotide and siRNA.

    PubMed

    Huschka, Ryan; Barhoumi, Aoune; Liu, Qing; Roth, Jack A; Ji, Lin; Halas, Naomi J

    2012-09-25

    RNA interference (RNAi)--using antisense DNA or RNA oligonucleotides to silence activity of a specific pathogenic gene transcript and reduce expression of the encoded protein--is very useful in dissecting genetic function and holds significant promise as a molecular therapeutic. A major obstacle in achieving gene silencing with RNAi technology is the systemic delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides. Here we demonstrate an engineered gold nanoshell (NS)-based therapeutic oligonucleotide delivery vehicle, designed to release its cargo on demand upon illumination with a near-infrared (NIR) laser. A poly-L-lysine peptide (PLL) epilayer covalently attached to the NS surface (NS-PLL) is used to capture intact, single-stranded antisense DNA oligonucleotides, or alternatively, double-stranded short-interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules. Controlled release of the captured therapeutic oligonucleotides in each case is accomplished by continuous wave NIR laser irradiation at 800 nm, near the resonance wavelength of the nanoshell. Fluorescently tagged oligonucleotides were used to monitor the time-dependent release process and light-triggered endosomal release. A green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing human lung cancer H1299 cell line was used to determine cellular uptake and gene silencing mediated by the NS-PLL carrying GFP gene-specific single-stranded DNA antisense oligonucleotide (AON-GFP), or a double-stranded siRNA (siRNA-GFP), in vitro. Light-triggered delivery resulted in ~47% and ~49% downregulation of the targeted GFP expression by AON-GFP and siRNA-GFP, respectively. Cytotoxicity induced by both the NS-PLL delivery vector and by laser irradiation is minimal, as demonstrated by a XTT cell proliferation assay. PMID:22862291

  13. Characterization of the cellular response triggered by gold nanoparticle-mediated laser manipulation.

    PubMed

    Kalies, Stefan; Keil, Sebastian; Sender, Sina; Hammer, Susanne C; Antonopoulos, Georgios C; Schomaker, Markus; Ripken, Tammo; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Meyer, Heiko; Heinemann, Dag

    2015-11-01

    Laser-based transfection techniques have proven high applicability in several cell biologic applications. The delivery of different molecules using these techniques has been extensively investigated. In particular, new high-throughput approaches such as gold nanoparticle–mediated laser transfection allow efficient delivery of antisense molecules or proteins into cells preserving high cell viabilities. However, the cellular response to the perforation procedure is not well understood. We herein analyzed the perforation kinetics of single cells during resonant gold nanoparticle–mediated laser manipulation with an 850-ps laser system at a wavelength of 532 nm. Inflow velocity of propidium iodide into manipulated cells reached a maximum within a few seconds. Experiments based on the inflow of FM4-64 indicated that the membrane remains permeable for a few minutes for small molecules. To further characterize the cellular response postmanipulation, we analyzed levels of oxidative heat or general stress. Although we observed an increased formation of reactive oxygen species by an increase of dichlorofluorescein fluorescence, heat shock protein 70 was not upregulated in laser-treated cells. Additionally, no evidence of stress granule formation was visible by immunofluorescence staining. The data provided in this study help to identify the cellular reactions to gold nanoparticle–mediated laser manipulation. PMID:26562032

  14. Characterization of the cellular response triggered by gold nanoparticle-mediated laser manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalies, Stefan; Keil, Sebastian; Sender, Sina; Hammer, Susanne C.; Antonopoulos, Georgios C.; Schomaker, Markus; Ripken, Tammo; Escobar, Hugo Murua; Meyer, Heiko; Heinemann, Dag

    2015-11-01

    Laser-based transfection techniques have proven high applicability in several cell biologic applications. The delivery of different molecules using these techniques has been extensively investigated. In particular, new high-throughput approaches such as gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection allow efficient delivery of antisense molecules or proteins into cells preserving high cell viabilities. However, the cellular response to the perforation procedure is not well understood. We herein analyzed the perforation kinetics of single cells during resonant gold nanoparticle-mediated laser manipulation with an 850-ps laser system at a wavelength of 532 nm. Inflow velocity of propidium iodide into manipulated cells reached a maximum within a few seconds. Experiments based on the inflow of FM4-64 indicated that the membrane remains permeable for a few minutes for small molecules. To further characterize the cellular response postmanipulation, we analyzed levels of oxidative heat or general stress. Although we observed an increased formation of reactive oxygen species by an increase of dichlorofluorescein fluorescence, heat shock protein 70 was not upregulated in laser-treated cells. Additionally, no evidence of stress granule formation was visible by immunofluorescence staining. The data provided in this study help to identify the cellular reactions to gold nanoparticle-mediated laser manipulation.

  15. High-frequency trigger generators for CuBr-laser high voltage pumping source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torgaev, S.; Kozhemyak, O.; Yaroslavtsev, E.; Trigub, M.; Musorov, I.; Chertikhina, D.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper the circuits of high frequency trigger generators of pulses of the nanosecond duration are presented. A detailed study of a generator based on the avalanche transistor with the use of a coaxial cable instead of a capacitor is described. This circuit showed advanced characteristics of the output pulses. A circuit of a generator built on high-speed digital components is also considered. The basic advantages and disadvantages of both generators are presented in this paper.

  16. 6 MV x-ray spectra obtained by small field size attenuation measurements in water and their use in small field size dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cenney W.

    Direct measurement of x-ray spectra produced by medical linear accelerators is not possible because of high intensity and energy of the radiation involved. Knowledge of energy spectra are very useful in determination of parameters that convert from ionization chamber measurements to absorbed dose. Many indirect methods for determination of x-ray spectra in therapy beams have been developed. In the present work photon beams generated by a 6-MV Varian 6000 linear accelerator were used to obtain small field (0.5 x 0.5 to 4.0 x 4.0 cm 2 at 0.5 cm increments per side) attenuation values in water for the depths from 5 to 30 cm, at 5 cm increments. Attenuation values lying between those depths were interpolated using the Newton-Coates method and attenuation data of zero-field was obtained by extrapolation. Based on the measured attenuation curves, the relative air kerma and photon energy x-ray spectra were derived for all investigating fields using a user input parameter program and an iterative procedure. The attenuation curves of the radiation fields were calculated using the reconstructed spectrum. They were compared with the measured attenuation data at each iteration step until a satisfactory fit between the measured and calculated attenuation curves was obtained. In order for derived spectra to be of practical use in radiotherapy treatment planning, they must accurate reproduce measured dose distribution data. From the knowledge of the incident beam attenuation and the incident x-ray energy spectrum for the zero-field, the percentage depth dose of the zero-field was calculated at different points along the Central Axis. The percentage depth doses of larger fields were calculated by applying of the Relative Scatter Factor to the percentage depth dose of the zero-field. The agreement was within 1.11% for all fields, ranging from 0.5 x 0.5 to 4.0 x 4.0 cm2 at 0.5 cm increments per side. Further, the reconstructed spectrum for 4 x 4 cm2 field size was used in Monte

  17. Optical diagnostics of vascular reactions triggered by weak allergens using laser speckle-contrast imaging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, Yu L; Kalchenko, V V; Astaf'eva, N G; Meglinski, I V

    2014-08-31

    The capability of using the laser speckle contrast imaging technique with a long exposure time for visualisation of primary acute skin vascular reactions caused by a topical application of a weak contact allergen is considered. The method is shown to provide efficient and accurate detection of irritant-induced primary acute vascular reactions of skin. The presented technique possesses a high potential in everyday diagnostic practice, preclinical studies, as well as in the prognosis of skin reactions to the interaction with potentially allergenic materials. (laser biophotonics)

  18. Triggered Jovian radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, W.

    1985-01-01

    Certain Jovian radio emissions seem to be triggered from outside, by much weaker radio waves from the sun. Recently found in the Voyager observations near Jupiter, such triggering occurs at hectometric wavelengths during the arrival of solar radio bursts, with the triggered emissions lasting sometimes more than an hour as they slowly drifted toward higher frequencies. Like the previous discovery of similar triggered emissions at the earth, this suggests that Jupiter's emissions might also originate from natural radio lasers.

  19. ECG-triggering of the laser Doppler signal: an approach for perfusion imaging on the beating calf heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardell, Karin; Karlsson, Daniel M.; Loenn, Urban; Traff, Stefan; Casimir-Ahn, Henrik

    2001-06-01

    Laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) has successfully been used to map the myocardial perfusion on patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery on the arrested heart. The need for intra-operative evaluation of graft function is obvious in routine surgery but even more imperative when adapting new surgical techniques where the procedure is performed on the beating heart. When using LDPI on the beating heart, artifacts originating from the movement of the heart are superimposed on the Doppler signal. We have investigated a method to reduce these artifacts by controlling the sampling sequence with ECG-triggering. The method has been assessed in an animal model on the beating calf heart. After sternotomy, an area covering 1 cm2 was imaged at the anterior wall of the left ventricle. In this area, six perfusion images were captured each of them recorded at fixed, but different time intervals in the cardiac cycle. In addition continuous measurements at one spot was done during 1 - 2 minutes. The signal recorded during pumping action was high compared to measurements performed in the same muscle area during infusion of blood with a syringe pump. Repeated measurements captured at a fixed delay time from the R-peak in the same areas at the same heart frequency showed reproducibility. ECG-triggering of the laser Doppler signal is the first step in our attempts to adapt LDPI to enabling assessment of myocardial perfusion on the beating heart. Further technical achievements and in-vivo investigations are, however, needed and will be performed by our research team in future studies.

  20. Prolongation of the lifetime of guided discharges triggered in atmospheric air by femtosecond laser filaments up to 130 μs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arantchouk, L.; Honnorat, B.; Thouin, E.; Point, G.; Mysyrowicz, A.; Houard, A.

    2016-04-01

    The triggering and guiding of electric discharges produced in atmospheric air by a compact 100 kV Marx generator is realized in laboratory using an intense femtosecond laser pulse undergoing filamentation. We describe here an approach allowing extending the lifetime of the discharges by injecting a current with an additional circuit. Laser guiding discharges with a length of 8.5 cm and duration of 130 μs were obtained.

  1. Constituent Components of Out-of-Field Scatter Dose for 18-MV Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy: A Comparison With 6-MV and Implications for Carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ruben, Jeremy D.; Smith, Ryan; Lancaster, Craig M.; Haynes, Matthew; Jones, Phillip; Panettieri, Vanessa

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To characterize and compare the components of out-of-field dose for 18-MV intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and their 6-MV counterparts and consider implications for second cancer induction. Methods and Materials: Comparable plans for each technique/energy were delivered to a water phantom with a sloping wall; under full scatter conditions; with field edge abutting but outside the bath to prevent internal/phantom scatter; and with shielding below the linear accelerator head to attenuate head leakage. Neutron measurements were obtained from published studies. Results: Eighteen-megavolt IMRT produces 1.7 times more out-of-field scatter than 18-MV 3D-CRT. In absolute terms, however, differences are just approximately 0.1% of central axis dose. Eighteen-megavolt IMRT reduces internal/patient scatter by 13%, but collimator scatter (C) is 2.6 times greater than 18-MV 3D-CRT. Head leakage (L) is minimal. Increased out-of-field photon scatter from 18-MV IMRT carries out-of-field second cancer risks of approximately 0.2% over and above the 0.4% from 18-MV 3D-CRT. Greater photoneutron dose from 18-MV IMRT may result in further maximal, absolute increased risk to peripheral tissue of approximately 1.2% over 18-MV 3D-CRT. Out-of-field photon scatter remains comparable for the same modality irrespective of beam energy. Machine scatter (C+L) from 18 versus 6 MV is 1.2 times higher for IMRT and 1.8 times for 3D-CRT. It is 4 times higher for 6-MV IMRT versus 3D-CRT. Reduction in internal scatter with 18 MV versus 6 MV is 27% for 3D-CRT and 29% for IMRT. Compared with 6-MV 3D-CRT, 18-MV IMRT increases out-of-field second cancer risk by 0.2% from photons and adds 0.28-2.2% from neutrons. Conclusions: Out-of-field photon dose seems to be independent of beam energy for both techniques. Eighteen-megavolt IMRT increases out-of-field scatter 1.7-fold over 3D-CRT because of greater collimator scatter despite

  2. Laser light triggers increased Raman amplification in the regime of nonlinear Landau damping.

    PubMed

    Depierreux, S; Yahia, V; Goyon, C; Loisel, G; Masson-Laborde, P-E; Borisenko, N; Orekhov, A; Rosmej, O; Rienecker, T; Labaune, C

    2014-01-01

    Stimulated Raman backscattering (SRS) has many unwanted effects in megajoule-scale inertially confined fusion (ICF) plasmas. Moreover, attempts to harness SRS to amplify short laser pulses through backward Raman amplification have achieved limited success. In high-temperature fusion plasmas, SRS usually occurs in a kinetic regime where the nonlinear response of the Langmuir wave to the laser drive and its host of complicating factors make it difficult to predict the degree of amplification that can be achieved under given experimental conditions. Here we present experimental evidence of reduced Landau damping with increasing Langmuir wave amplitude and determine its effects on Raman amplification. The threshold for trapping effects to influence the amplification is shown to be very low. Above threshold, the complex SRS dynamics results in increased amplification factors, which partly explains previous ICF experiments. These insights could aid the development of more efficient backward Raman amplification schemes in this regime. PMID:24938756

  3. Laser light triggers increased Raman amplification in the regime of nonlinear Landau damping

    PubMed Central

    Depierreux, S.; Yahia, V.; Goyon, C.; Loisel, G.; Masson-Laborde, P. -E.; Borisenko, N.; Orekhov, A.; Rosmej, O.; Rienecker, T.; Labaune, C.

    2014-01-01

    Stimulated Raman backscattering (SRS) has many unwanted effects in megajoule-scale inertially confined fusion (ICF) plasmas. Moreover, attempts to harness SRS to amplify short laser pulses through backward Raman amplification have achieved limited success. In high-temperature fusion plasmas, SRS usually occurs in a kinetic regime where the nonlinear response of the Langmuir wave to the laser drive and its host of complicating factors make it difficult to predict the degree of amplification that can be achieved under given experimental conditions. Here we present experimental evidence of reduced Landau damping with increasing Langmuir wave amplitude and determine its effects on Raman amplification. The threshold for trapping effects to influence the amplification is shown to be very low. Above threshold, the complex SRS dynamics results in increased amplification factors, which partly explains previous ICF experiments. These insights could aid the development of more efficient backward Raman amplification schemes in this regime. PMID:24938756

  4. Laser phototherapy triggers the production of reactive oxygen species in oral epithelial cells without inducing DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Dillenburg, Caroline Siviero; Almeida, Luciana Oliveira; Martins, Manoela Domingues; Squarize, Cristiane Helena; Castilho, Rogerio Moraes

    2014-04-01

    Laser phototherapy (LPT) is widely used in clinical practice to accelerate healing. Although the use of LPT has advantages, the molecular mechanisms involved in the process of accelerated healing and the safety concerns associated with LPT are still poorly understood. We investigated the physiological effects of LPT irradiation on the production and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), genomic instability, and deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) damage in human epithelial cells. In contrast to a high energy density (20  J/cm²), laser administered at a low energy density (4  J/cm²) resulted in the accumulation of ROS. Interestingly, 4  J/cm² of LPT did not induce DNA damage, genomic instability, or nuclear influx of the BRCA1 DNA damage repair protein, a known genome protective molecule that actively participates in DNA repair. Our results suggest that administration of low energy densities of LPT induces the accumulation of safe levels of ROS, which may explain the accelerated healing results observed in patients. These findings indicate that epithelial cells have an endowed molecular circuitry that responds to LPT by physiologically inducing accumulation of ROS, which triggers accelerated healing. Importantly, our results suggest that low energy densities of LPT can serve as a safe therapy to accelerate epithelial healing. PMID:24781593

  5. Thermally triggered fiber lasers based on secondary-type-In Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Feng, Fu-Rong; Ran, Yang; Liang, Yi-Zhi; Gao, Shuai; Feng, Yuan-Hua; Jin, Long; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2016-06-01

    The secondary-type-In grating formed in a small-core photosensitivity active fiber is discovered and investigated. Due to the different grating types, the transmission dip of a secondary grating structure chases and integrates with the type-In grating structure as the temperature increases, which strengthens the reflectivity of the grating. By use of these secondary-type-In gratings as Bragg reflectors, a thermally activated distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) fiber laser is proposed, which can be potentially used in high-temperature alarms and sensors. PMID:27244391

  6. Nanoscale Electron Bunching in Laser-Triggered Ionization Injection in Plasma Accelerators.

    PubMed

    Xu, X L; Pai, C-H; Zhang, C J; Li, F; Wan, Y; Wu, Y P; Hua, J F; Lu, W; An, W; Yu, P; Joshi, C; Mori, W B

    2016-07-15

    Ionization injection is attractive as a controllable injection scheme for generating high quality electron beams using plasma-based wakefield acceleration. Because of the phase-dependent tunneling ionization rate and the trapping dynamics within a nonlinear wake, the discrete injection of electrons within the wake is nonlinearly mapped to a discrete final phase space structure of the beam at the location where the electrons are trapped. This phenomenon is theoretically analyzed and examined by three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations which show that three-dimensional effects limit the wave number of the modulation to between >2k_{0} and about 5k_{0}, where k_{0} is the wave number of the injection laser. Such a nanoscale bunched beam can be diagnosed by and used to generate coherent transition radiation and may find use in generating high-power ultraviolet radiation upon passage through a resonant undulator. PMID:27472116

  7. Nanoscale Electron Bunching in Laser-Triggered Ionization Injection in Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. L.; Pai, C.-H.; Zhang, C. J.; Li, F.; Wan, Y.; Wu, Y. P.; Hua, J. F.; Lu, W.; An, W.; Yu, P.; Joshi, C.; Mori, W. B.

    2016-07-01

    Ionization injection is attractive as a controllable injection scheme for generating high quality electron beams using plasma-based wakefield acceleration. Because of the phase-dependent tunneling ionization rate and the trapping dynamics within a nonlinear wake, the discrete injection of electrons within the wake is nonlinearly mapped to a discrete final phase space structure of the beam at the location where the electrons are trapped. This phenomenon is theoretically analyzed and examined by three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations which show that three-dimensional effects limit the wave number of the modulation to between >2 k0 and about 5 k0, where k0 is the wave number of the injection laser. Such a nanoscale bunched beam can be diagnosed by and used to generate coherent transition radiation and may find use in generating high-power ultraviolet radiation upon passage through a resonant undulator.

  8. Polyelectrolyte/carbon nanotube composite microcapsules and drug release triggered by laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Haruyuki; Kato, Noritaka

    2016-03-01

    The fabrication of stimuli-responsive capsules is one of the hot topics in the research field of drug delivery systems. Near-infrared (NIR) light is one of the promising stimuli, because of its high transparency to biological tissues, and NIR-responsive capsules have been fabricated using various NIR-adsorbing materials. Here, we employed single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as the NIR-adsorbing material, and microcapsules containing SWCNTs were fabricated by a combination of the layer-by-layer and template-assisted methods. The anti-cancer drug was loaded into the capsules, and the release rates in the dark and under NIR laser irradiation were compared. Distinct release was confirmed in the latter case, whereas almost no release was detected in the former case, indicating that the SWCNT molecule is a suitable light absorber for use with optically addressable drug carriers.

  9. Laser-triggered degelation control of gold nanoparticle embedded peptide organogels.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Hakan; Sakalak, Huseyin; Yavuz, Mustafa S; Demirel, Gokhan

    2013-06-11

    Further understanding of the interactions between nanoparticles (NPs) and biological molecules offers new possibilities in the applications of nanomedicine and nanodiagnostics. The properties of NPs, including size, shape, and surface functionality, play a decisive role in these interactions. Herein, we evaluated the influences of gold NPs (AuNPs) with different sizes (5-60 nm) and shapes (i.e., spherical, rod, and cage) on the self-assembly of diphenylalanine (Phe-Phe) dipeptides. We found that the size of AuNPs smaller than 10 nm did not affect the self-assembly process of Phe-Phe, while bigger AuNPs (>10 nm) caused the formation of starlike peptide morphologies connected to one center. In the case of shape differences, nanorod and nanocage morphologies acted differently than spherical ones and caused the formation of densely packed, networklike dipeptide morphologies. In addition to these experiments, by combining photothermal properties of AuNPs with a Phe-Phe-based organogel having a thermo-responsive property, we demonstrated that the degelation process of AuNPs embedded organogels may be controlled by laser illumination. Complete degelation was achieved in about 10 min. We believe that such control may open the door to new opportunities for a number of applications, such as controlled release of drugs and tissue engineering. PMID:23706149

  10. Optical triggering of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser via transverse bleaching of a Cr:YAG saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Cole, Brian; Lei, Jonathan; DiLazaro, Tom; Schilling, Bradley; Goldberg, Lew

    2009-11-01

    Optical triggering via direct bleaching of a Cr:YAG saturable absorber was applied to a monolithic Nd:YAG/Cr:YAG laser crystal. The method uses a single laser diode bar to bleach a thin sheet within the saturable absorber from a direction orthogonal to the lasing axis. By placing the Q-switch at the time corresponding to the steepest slope (dT/dt) for change in transmission during bleaching, the pulse-to-pulse timing jitter showed a 13.2x reduction in standard deviation, from 132 ns for free-running operation to 10 ns with optical triggering. We measured that a fluence of 60 kW/cm(2) was sufficient to enable optical triggering, where a diode appropriately sized for the length of the Cr:YAG (approximately 3 mm) would then require only approximately 150 W of optical power over a 1-2 micros duration to enable effective jitter reduction. Additionally, we measured an increase in optical-to-optical efficiency with optical triggering, where the efficiency improved from 12% to 13.5%. PMID:19881668

  11. Developing a pulse trigger generator for a three-electrode spark-gap switch in a transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyuan; Guo, Lihong; Zhang, Xingliang

    2016-04-01

    To improve the probability and stability of breakdown discharge in a three-electrode spark-gap switch for a high-power transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser and to improve the efficiency of its trigger system, we developed a high-voltage pulse trigger generator based on a two-transistor forward converter topology and a multiple-narrow-pulse trigger method. Our design uses a narrow high-voltage pulse (10 μs) to break down the hyperbaric gas between electrodes of the spark-gap switch; a dry high-voltage transformer is used as a booster; and a sampling and feedback control circuit (mainly consisting of a SG3525 and a CD4098) is designed to monitor the spark-gap switch and control the frequency and the number of output pulses. Our experimental results show that this pulse trigger generator could output high-voltage pulses (number is adjusted) with an amplitude of >38 kV and a width of 10 μs. Compared to a conventional trigger system, our design had a breakdown probability increased by 2.7%, an input power reduced by 1.5 kW, an efficiency increased by 0.12, and a loss reduced by 1.512 kW. PMID:27131693

  12. Developing a pulse trigger generator for a three-electrode spark-gap switch in a transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingyuan; Guo, Lihong; Zhang, Xingliang

    2016-04-01

    To improve the probability and stability of breakdown discharge in a three-electrode spark-gap switch for a high-power transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser and to improve the efficiency of its trigger system, we developed a high-voltage pulse trigger generator based on a two-transistor forward converter topology and a multiple-narrow-pulse trigger method. Our design uses a narrow high-voltage pulse (10 μs) to break down the hyperbaric gas between electrodes of the spark-gap switch; a dry high-voltage transformer is used as a booster; and a sampling and feedback control circuit (mainly consisting of a SG3525 and a CD4098) is designed to monitor the spark-gap switch and control the frequency and the number of output pulses. Our experimental results show that this pulse trigger generator could output high-voltage pulses (number is adjusted) with an amplitude of >38 kV and a width of 10 μs. Compared to a conventional trigger system, our design had a breakdown probability increased by 2.7%, an input power reduced by 1.5 kW, an efficiency increased by 0.12, and a loss reduced by 1.512 kW.

  13. SU-E-T-499: Comparison of Measured Tissue Phantom Ratios (TPR) Against Calculated From Percent Depth Doses (PDD) with and Without Peak Scatter Factor (PSF) in 6MV Open Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanasamy, G; Cruz, W; Gutierrez, Alonso; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Papanikolaou, N; Stathakis, S; Breton, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To examine the accuracy of measured tissue phantom ratios (TPR) values with TPR calculated from percentage depth dose (PDD) with and without peak scatter fraction (PSF) correction. Methods: For 6MV open beam, TPR and PDD values were measured using PTW Semiflex (31010) ionization field and reference chambers (0.125cc volume) in a PTW MP3-M water tank. PDD curves were measured at SSD of 100cm for 7 square fields from 3cm to 30cm. The TPR values were measured up to 22cm depth for the same fields by continuous water draining method with ionization chamber static at 100cm from source. A comparison study was performed between the (a) measured TPR, (b) TPR calculated from PDD without PSF, (c) TPR calculated from PDD with PSF and (d) clinical TPR from RadCalc (ver 6.2, Sun Nuclear Corp). Results: There is a field size, depth dependence on TPR values. For 10cmx10cm, the differences in surface dose (DDs), dose at 10cm depth (DD10) <0.5%; differences in dmax (Ddmax) <2mm for the 4 methods. The corresponding values for 30cmx30cm are DDs, DD10 <0.2% and Ddmax<3mm. Even though for 3cmx3cm field, DDs and DD10 <1% and Ddmax<1mm, the calculated TPR values with and without PSF correction differed by 2% at >20cm depth. In all field sizes at depths>28cm, (d) clinical TPR values are larger than that from (b) and (c) by >3%. Conclusion: Measured TPR in method (a) differ from calculated TPR in methods (b) and (c) to within 1% for depths < 28cm in all 7 fields in open 6MV beam. The dmax values are within 3mm of each other. The largest deviation of >3% was observed in clinical TPR values in method (d) for all fields at depths < 28cm.

  14. Validation of GEANT4 simulations for percentage depth dose calculations in heterogeneous media by using small photon beams from the 6-MV Cyberknife: Comparison with photon beam dosimetry with EBT2 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chung Il; Yoon, Sei-Chul; Shin, Jae Won; Hong, Seung-Woo; Suh, Tae Suk; Min, Kyung Joo; Lee, Sang Deok; Chung, Su Mi; Jung, Jae-Yong

    2015-04-01

    Percentage depth dose (PDD) distributions in heterogeneous phantoms with lung and soft bone equivalent media are studied by using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code. For lung equivalent media, Balsa wood is used, and for soft bone equivalent media, a compound material with epoxy resin, hardener and calcium carbonate is used. Polystyrene slabs put together with these materials are used as a heterogeneous phantom. Dose measurements are performed with Gafchromic EBT2 film by using photon beams from the 6-MV CyberKnife at the Seoul Uridul Hospital. The cone sizes of the photon beams are varied from 5 to 10 to 30 mm. When the Balsa wood is inserted in the phantom, the dose measured with EBT2 film is found to be significantly different from the dose without the EBT2 film in and the dose beyond the Balsa wood region, particularly for small field sizes. On the other hand, when the soft bone equivalent material is inserted in the phantom, the discrepancy between the dose measured with EBT2 film and the dose without EBT2 film can be seen only in the region of the soft bone equivalent material. GEANT4 simulations are done with and without the EBT2 film to compare the simulation results with measurements. The GEANT4 simulations including EBT2 film are found to agree well with the measurements for all the cases within an error of 2.2%. The results of the present study show that GEANT4 gives reasonable results for the PDD calculations in heterogeneous media when using photon beams produced by the 6-MV CyberKnife

  15. Amplification of ps-pulses from freely triggerable gain-switched laser diodes at 1062 nm and second harmonic generation in periodically poled lithium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönau, Thomas; Riecke, Sina M.; Lauritsen, Kristian; Erdmann, Rainer

    2011-03-01

    We present a compact frequency-doubled laser source with fundamental wavelength operation at 1062 nm. A freely triggerable seed diode laser delivers sub-100 ps pulses in the picojoule range at variable repetition rates up to 80 MHz. After amplification in a Ytterbium-doped fiber amplifier, the average power exceeds 380mW at 40 MHz, which corresponds to 9.5 nJ pulses and about 75W of peak power. The output beam is then focussed into periodically poled lithium niobate for second harmonic generation (SHG). In this way, green picosecond pulses with an energy of up to 2 nJ at 40MHz are generated. The pulse energy and pulse shape of the second harmonic pulses are systematically studied for various repetition rates, allowing conclusions on the amplifier performance under different operating conditions.

  16. Characteristics of a laser triggered spark gap using air, Ar, CH4, H2, He, N2, SF6, and Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, W. D.; Kushner, M. J.; Seamans, J. F.

    1988-03-01

    A KrF discharge laser (248 nm) has been used to laser trigger, by volume preionization, a spark gap switch (38-65 kV, >10 kA, 100 ns pulse duration) filled with 20 different gas mixtures using various combinations of air, Ar, CH4, H2, He, N2 SF6, and Xe. A pulsed laser interferometer is used to probe the spark column. Characteristics studied include the internal structure of the column, the arc expansion rate, and evidence of any photoionization precursor effect. Our results show that the rate of arc expansion varies depending on the average molecular weight of the mixtures. In this experiment, pure H2 has the highest rate (≊9.5×105 cm/s) and air has one of the lowest (≊7×105 cm/s) for the same hold-off voltage. A computer model of the spark column formation is able to predict most of the structure observed in the arcs, including the effect of mixing gases with widely different molecular weights. The work suggests that, under proper circumstances, the spark gap switch performance may be improved by using gases lighter than conventional switch gases such as SF6.

  17. A study of the shielding used to reduce leakage and scattered radiation to the fetus in a pregnant patient treated with a 6-MV external X-ray beam.

    PubMed

    Han, Bin; Bednarz, Bryan; Xu, X George

    2009-12-01

    A Monte Carlo-based procedure has been developed to assess the shielded fetal doses from 6 MV external photon beam radiation treatments and improve upon existing techniques that are based on AAPM Task Group Report 36 (TG-36). Anatomically realistic models of the pregnant patient representing 3- and 6-mo gestational stages were implemented into the MCNPX code together with a detailed accelerator model that is capable of simulating scattered and leakage radiation from the accelerator head. The phantom was shielded using suggested lead and Cerrobend in different locations and with different thicknesses. Absorbed doses to the fetus both with and without shielding were calculated considering typical mantle, head and neck, and brain treatment plans. The unshielded fetal doses tended to increase with decreasing distance from the field edge to the nearest fetal point and increasing of the field size. The unshielded absorbed doses to the fetus for all treatment plans ranged from a maximum of 4.08 microGy/MU (monitor unit) to a minimum 0.09 microGy/MU. The use of lead or Cerrobend shielding reduced the fetal doses by factors of up to 4. For an optimal shield half-value layer, the dose reduction between lead and Cerrobend was statistically insignificant. The maximum permitted MUs for the mantle treatments with shielding were calculated based on 5 cGy dose limits suggested by TG-36. The study demonstrates an accurate assessing tool that can be used to determine the absorbed dose to the fetus and to design the shielding as part of the treatment planning and risk management. PMID:19901592

  18. A STUDY OF THE SHIELDING USED TO REDUCE LEAKAGE AND SCATTERED RADIATION TO THE FETUS IN A PREGNANT PATIENT TREATED WITH A 6-MV EXTERNAL X-RAY BEAM

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bin; Bednarz, Bryan; Xu, X. George

    2012-01-01

    A Monte Carlo-based procedure has been developed to assess the shielded fetal doses from 6 MV external photon beam radiation treatments and improve upon existing techniques that are based on AAPM Task Group Report 36 (TG-36). Anatomically realistic models of the pregnant patient representing 3- and 6-mo gestational stages were implemented into the MCNPX code together with a detailed accelerator model that is capable of simulating scattered and leakage radiation from the accelerator head. The phantom was shielded using suggested lead and Cerrobend in different locations and with different thicknesses. Absorbed doses to the fetus both with and without shielding were calculated considering typical mantle, head and neck, and brain treatment plans. The unshielded fetal doses tended to increase with decreasing distance from the field edge to the nearest fetal point and increasing of the field size. The unshielded absorbed doses to the fetus for all treatment plans ranged from a maximum of 4.08 μGy/MU (monitor unit) to a minimum 0.09 μGy/MU. The use of lead or Cerrobend shielding reduced the fetal doses by factors of up to 4. For an optimal shield half-value layer, the dose reduction between lead and Cerrobend was statistically insignificant. The maximum permitted MUs for the mantle treatments with shielding were calculated based on 5 cGy dose limits suggested by TG-36. The study demonstrates an accurate assessing tool that can be used to determine the absorbed dose to the fetus and to design the shielding as part of the treatment planning and risk management. PMID:19901592

  19. Effect of a short weak prepulse on laser-triggered front-surface heavy-ion acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Bochkarev, S. G.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Golovin, G. V.; Uryupina, D. S.; Shulyapov, S. A.; Savel'ev, A. B.; Andriyash, A. V.

    2012-10-15

    A suppression of light-ion acceleration (from surface water contaminants) was observed when a moderate-intensity subpicosecond laser pulse was focused on a thick metal target. Simultaneously, an effective generation of high-energy multicharge ions of the target material (Fe) was experimentally observed. A numerical simulation based on the Boltzmann-Vlasov-Poisson model revealed that this is due to the very specific regime of cleaning contaminants from the target surface by the short weak prepulse preceding the main pulse by more than 10 ns and having an intensity below the surface breakdown threshold. Because this prepulse causes the contaminant layer to boil explosively, a low-density gap forms above the target surface. These conditions are consequently favorable for boosting the energy of heavy ions.

  20. Triggering Klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan, Kelton D.; /Purdue U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    To determine if klystrons will perform to the specifications of the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) project, a new digital trigger controller is needed for the Klystron/Microwave Department Test Laboratory. The controller needed to be programmed and Windows based user interface software needed to be written to interface with the device over a USB (Universal Serial Bus). Programming the device consisted of writing logic in VHDL (VHSIC (Very High Speed Integrated Circuits) hardware description language), and the Windows interface software was written in C++. Xilinx ISE (Integrated Software Environment) was used to compile the VHDL code and program the device, and Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 was used to compile the C++ based Windows software. The device was programmed in such a way as to easily allow read/write operations to it using a simple addressing model, and Windows software was developed to interface with the device over a USB connection. A method of setting configuration registers in the trigger device is absolutely necessary to the development of a new triggering system, and the method developed will fulfill this need adequately. More work is needed before the new trigger system is ready for use. The configuration registers in the device need to be fully integrated with the logic that will generate the RF signals, and this system will need to be tested extensively to determine if it meets the requirements for low noise trigger outputs.

  1. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  2. Low-visibility light-intensity laser-triggered release of entrapped calcein from 1,2-bis (tricosa-10,12-diynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes is mediated through a type I photoactivation pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yavlovich, Amichai; Viard, Mathias; Gupta, Kshitij; Sine, Jessica; Vu, Mylinh; Blumenthal, Robert; Tata, Darrell B; Puri, Anu

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported on the physical characteristics of photo-triggerable liposomes containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), and 1,2-bis (tricosa-10,12-diynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DC8,9PC) carrying a photo agent as their payload. When exposed to a low-intensity 514 nm wavelength (continuous-wave) laser light, these liposomes were observed to release entrapped calcein green (Cal-G; Ex/Em 490/517 nm) but not calcein blue (Cal-B; Ex/Em 360/460 nm). In this study, we have investigated the mechanism for the 514 nm laser-triggered release of the Cal-G payload using several scavengers that are known specifically to inhibit either type I or type II photoreaction pathways. Liposomes containing DPPC:DC8,9PC: distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DSPE)-polyethylene glycol (PEG)-2000 (86:10:04 mole ratio) were loaded either with fluorescent (calcein) or nonfluorescent (3H-inulin) aqueous markers. In addition, a non-photo-triggerable formulation (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine [POPC]:DC8,9PC:DSPE-PEG2000) was also studied with the same payloads. The 514 nm wavelength laser exposure on photo-triggerable liposomes resulted in the release of Cal-G but not that of Cal-B or 3H-inulin, suggesting an involvement of a photoactivated state of Cal-G due to the 514 nm laser exposure. Upon 514 nm laser exposures, substantial hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, ≈100 μM) levels were detected from only the Cal-G loaded photo-triggerable liposomes but not from Cal-B-loaded liposomes (≤10 μM H2O2). The Cal-G release from photo-triggerable liposomes was found to be significantly inhibited by ascorbic acid (AA), resulting in a 70%–80% reduction in Cal-G release. The extent of AA-mediated inhibition of Cal-G release from the liposomes also correlated with the consumption of AA. No AA consumption was detected in the 514 nm laserexposed Cal B-loaded liposomes, thus confirming a role of photoactivation of Cal-G in liposome destabilization. Inclusion of 100 mM K3Fe(CN)6 (a

  3. Microwave-triggered laser switch

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, M.S.

    1982-05-19

    A high-repetition rate switch is described for delivering short duration, high-powered electrical pulses from a pulsed-charged dc power supply. The present invention utilizes a microwave-generating device such as a magnetron that is capable of producing high-power pulses at high-pulse repetition rates and fast-pulse risetimes for long periods with high reliability. The rail-gap electrodes provide a large surface area that reduces induction effects and minimizes electrode erosion. Additionally, breakdown is initiated in a continuous geometric fashion that also increases operating lifetime of the device.

  4. Microwave-triggered laser switch

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, Martin S.

    1984-01-01

    A high-repetition rate switch for delivering short duration, high-power electrical pulses from a pulsed-charged dc power supply. The present invention utilizes a microwave-generating device such as a magnetron that is capable of producing high-power pulses at high-pulse repetition rates and fast-pulse risetimes for long periods with high reliability. The rail-gap electrodes provide a large surface area that reduces induction effects and minimizes electrode erosion. Additionally, breakdown is initiated in a continuous geometric fashion that also increases operating lifetime of the device.

  5. Firearm trigger assembly

    DOEpatents

    Crandall, David L.; Watson, Richard W.

    2010-02-16

    A firearm trigger assembly for use with a firearm includes a trigger mounted to a forestock of the firearm so that the trigger is movable between a rest position and a triggering position by a forwardly placed support hand of a user. An elongated trigger member operatively associated with the trigger operates a sear assembly of the firearm when the trigger is moved to the triggering position. An action release assembly operatively associated with the firearm trigger assembly and a movable assembly of the firearm prevents the trigger from being moved to the triggering position when the movable assembly is not in the locked position.

  6. Absorbed Dose to Water Determination Using IAEA, HPA, NACP, AAPM, NCRP and ICRU Protocols for 1.25 MeV Gamma Ray 6 MV and 10 MV X-Rays: An Intercomparison of Results when IAEA was taken as a Standard Protocol.

    PubMed

    Dolah, M T; Samat, S B; Kadni, T

    2000-01-01

    Absorbed dose to water was measured with ionisation chambers NE 2561 (#267), NE 2581 (#334), NE 2571 (#1028), using the IAEA standard water phantom. The ionisation chamber was inserted in the water phantom at a reference depth dependent on the type of the radiation quality used. Three radiation qualities were used namely 1.25 MeV gamma ray, 6 MV x-rays and 10 MV x-rays. The values of the absorbed dose to water were determined by the N(K)- and N(X)- based methods, i.e with the use of IAEA, HPA, NACP, AAPM, NCRP and ICRU protocols. The aim of this study was to make an intercomparison of the results, by taking the IAEA protocol as a standard. The largest deviation contributed by any of these protocols was recorded for each quality. It was found that AAPM, NCRP and ICRU protocols contributed 0.94% for 1.25 MeV gamma ray, NACP contributed 2.12% for the 6 MV x-rays, and NACP contributed 2.35% for 10 MV x-rays. Since the acceptable limit of deviation set by the IAEA for this absorbed dose work is ± 3%, it is clear that the overall deviations obtained were all satisfactory. PMID:22844215

  7. Rational design of a comprehensive cancer therapy platform using temperature-sensitive polymer grafted hollow gold nanospheres: simultaneous chemo/photothermal/photodynamic therapy triggered by a 650 nm laser with enhanced anti-tumor efficacy.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiaoran; Chen, Yinyin; Cheng, Ziyong; Deng, Kerong; Ma, Ping'an; Hou, Zhiyao; Liu, Bei; Huang, Shanshan; Jin, Dayong; Lin, Jun

    2016-03-28

    Combining multi-model treatments within one single system has attracted great interest for the purpose of synergistic therapy. In this paper, hollow gold nanospheres (HAuNs) coated with a temperature-sensitive polymer, poly(oligo(ethylene oxide) methacrylate-co-2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl methacrylate) (p(OEGMA-co-MEMA)), co-loaded with DOX and a photosensitizer Chlorin e6 (Ce6) were successfully synthesized. As high as 58% DOX and 6% Ce6 by weight could be loaded onto the HAuNs-p(OEGMA-co-MEMA) nanocomposites. The grafting polymer brushes outside the HAuNs play the role of "gate molecules" for controlled drug release by 650 nm laser radiation owing to the temperature-sensitive property of the polymer and the photothermal effect of HAuNs. The HAuNs-p(OEGMA-co-MEMA)-Ce6-DOX nanocomposites with 650 nm laser radiation show effective inhibition of cancer cells in vitro and enhanced anti-tumor efficacy in vivo. In contrast, control groups without laser radiation show little cytotoxicity. The nanocomposite demonstrates a way of "killing three birds with one stone", that is, chemotherapy, photothermal and photodynamic therapy are triggered simultaneously by the 650 nm laser stimulation. Therefore, the nanocomposites show the great advantages of multi-modal synergistic effects for cancer therapy by a remote-controlled laser stimulus. PMID:26956400

  8. Rational design of a comprehensive cancer therapy platform using temperature-sensitive polymer grafted hollow gold nanospheres: simultaneous chemo/photothermal/photodynamic therapy triggered by a 650 nm laser with enhanced anti-tumor efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiaoran; Chen, Yinyin; Cheng, Ziyong; Deng, Kerong; Ma, Ping'an; Hou, Zhiyao; Liu, Bei; Huang, Shanshan; Jin, Dayong; Lin, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Combining multi-model treatments within one single system has attracted great interest for the purpose of synergistic therapy. In this paper, hollow gold nanospheres (HAuNs) coated with a temperature-sensitive polymer, poly(oligo(ethylene oxide) methacrylate-co-2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl methacrylate) (p(OEGMA-co-MEMA)), co-loaded with DOX and a photosensitizer Chlorin e6 (Ce6) were successfully synthesized. As high as 58% DOX and 6% Ce6 by weight could be loaded onto the HAuNs-p(OEGMA-co-MEMA) nanocomposites. The grafting polymer brushes outside the HAuNs play the role of ``gate molecules'' for controlled drug release by 650 nm laser radiation owing to the temperature-sensitive property of the polymer and the photothermal effect of HAuNs. The HAuNs-p(OEGMA-co-MEMA)-Ce6-DOX nanocomposites with 650 nm laser radiation show effective inhibition of cancer cells in vitro and enhanced anti-tumor efficacy in vivo. In contrast, control groups without laser radiation show little cytotoxicity. The nanocomposite demonstrates a way of ``killing three birds with one stone'', that is, chemotherapy, photothermal and photodynamic therapy are triggered simultaneously by the 650 nm laser stimulation. Therefore, the nanocomposites show the great advantages of multi-modal synergistic effects for cancer therapy by a remote-controlled laser stimulus.Combining multi-model treatments within one single system has attracted great interest for the purpose of synergistic therapy. In this paper, hollow gold nanospheres (HAuNs) coated with a temperature-sensitive polymer, poly(oligo(ethylene oxide) methacrylate-co-2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl methacrylate) (p(OEGMA-co-MEMA)), co-loaded with DOX and a photosensitizer Chlorin e6 (Ce6) were successfully synthesized. As high as 58% DOX and 6% Ce6 by weight could be loaded onto the HAuNs-p(OEGMA-co-MEMA) nanocomposites. The grafting polymer brushes outside the HAuNs play the role of ``gate molecules'' for controlled drug release by 650 nm laser radiation

  9. Myofascial trigger point pain.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Bernadette

    2013-01-01

    Myofascial trigger point pain is an extremely prevalent cause of persistent pain disorders in all parts of the body, not just the head, neck, and face. Features include deep aching pain in any structure, referred from focally tender points in taut bands of skeletal muscle (the trigger points). Diagnosis depends on accurate palpation with 2-4 kg/cm2 of pressure for 10 to 20 seconds over the suspected trigger point to allow the referred pain pattern to develop. In the head and neck region, cervical muscle trigger points (key trigger points) often incite and perpetuate trigger points (satellite trigger points) and referred pain from masticatory muscles. Management requires identification and control of as many perpetuating factors as possible (posture, body mechanics, psychological stress or depression, poor sleep or nutrition). Trigger point therapies such as spray and stretch or trigger point injections are best used as adjunctive therapy. PMID:24864393

  10. Single-photon emission at a rate of 143 MHz from a deterministic quantum-dot microlens triggered by a mode-locked vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser

    SciTech Connect

    Schlehahn, A.; Gschrey, M.; Schnauber, P.; Schulze, J.-H.; Rodt, S.; Strittmatter, A.; Heindel, T. Reitzenstein, S.; Gaafar, M.; Vaupel, M.; Stolz, W.; Rahimi-Iman, A.; Koch, M.

    2015-07-27

    We report on the realization of a quantum dot (QD) based single-photon source with a record-high single-photon emission rate. The quantum light source consists of an InGaAs QD which is deterministically integrated within a monolithic microlens with a distributed Bragg reflector as back-side mirror, which is triggered using the frequency-doubled emission of a mode-locked vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser (ML-VECSEL). The utilized compact and stable laser system allows us to excite the single-QD microlens at a wavelength of 508 nm with a pulse repetition rate close to 500 MHz at a pulse width of 4.2 ps. Probing the photon statistics of the emission from a single QD state at saturation, we demonstrate single-photon emission of the QD-microlens chip with g{sup (2)}(0) < 0.03 at a record-high single-photon flux of (143 ± 16) MHz collected by the first lens of the detection system. Our approach is fully compatible with resonant excitation schemes using wavelength tunable ML-VECSELs, which will optimize the quantum optical properties of the single-photon emission in terms of photon indistinguishability.

  11. Single-photon emission at a rate of 143 MHz from a deterministic quantum-dot microlens triggered by a mode-locked vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlehahn, A.; Gaafar, M.; Vaupel, M.; Gschrey, M.; Schnauber, P.; Schulze, J.-H.; Rodt, S.; Strittmatter, A.; Stolz, W.; Rahimi-Iman, A.; Heindel, T.; Koch, M.; Reitzenstein, S.

    2015-07-01

    We report on the realization of a quantum dot (QD) based single-photon source with a record-high single-photon emission rate. The quantum light source consists of an InGaAs QD which is deterministically integrated within a monolithic microlens with a distributed Bragg reflector as back-side mirror, which is triggered using the frequency-doubled emission of a mode-locked vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser (ML-VECSEL). The utilized compact and stable laser system allows us to excite the single-QD microlens at a wavelength of 508 nm with a pulse repetition rate close to 500 MHz at a pulse width of 4.2 ps. Probing the photon statistics of the emission from a single QD state at saturation, we demonstrate single-photon emission of the QD-microlens chip with g(2)(0) < 0.03 at a record-high single-photon flux of (143 ± 16) MHz collected by the first lens of the detection system. Our approach is fully compatible with resonant excitation schemes using wavelength tunable ML-VECSELs, which will optimize the quantum optical properties of the single-photon emission in terms of photon indistinguishability.

  12. Asthma triggers (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors from chemicals, and smoke from cigarettes. ... asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors from chemicals, and smoke from cigarettes.

  13. Asthma triggers (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... common asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors from chemicals, and smoke from cigarettes. ... common asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors from chemicals, and smoke from cigarettes.

  14. Fabrication of Plasmonic Nanorod-Embedded Dipeptide Microspheres via the Freeze-Quenching Method for Near-Infrared Laser-Triggered Drug-Delivery Applications.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Hakan; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Babur, Esra; Duman, Memed; Aydin, Halil M; Demirel, Gokhan

    2016-05-01

    Control of drug release by an external stimulus may provide remote controllability, low toxicity, and reduced side effects. In this context, varying physical external stimuli, including magnetic and electric fields, ultrasound, light, and pharmacological stimuli, have been employed to control the release rate of drug molecules in a diseased region. However, the design and development of alternative on-demand drug-delivery systems that permit control of the dosage of drug released via an external stimulus are still required. Here, we developed near-infrared laser-activatable microspheres based on Fmoc-diphenylalanine (Phe-Phe) dipeptides and plasmonic gold nanorods (AuNRs) via a simple freeze-quenching approach. These plasmonic nanoparticle-embedded microspheres were then employed as a smart drug-delivery platform for native, continuous, and pulsatile doxorubicin (DOX) release. Remarkable sustained, burst, and on-demand DOX release from the fabricated microspheres were achieved by manipulating the laser exposure time. Our results demonstrate that AuNR-embedded dipeptide microspheres have great potential for controlled drug-delivery systems. PMID:27064415

  15. THE STAR LEVEL-3 TRIGGER SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    LANGE, J.S.; ADLER, C.; BERGER, J.; DEMELLO, M.; FLIERL, D.; ET AL

    1999-11-15

    The STAR level-3 trigger is a MYRINET interconnected ALPHA processor farm, performing online tracking of N{sub track} {ge} 8000 particles (N{sub point} {le} 45 per track) with a design input rate of R=100 Hz. A large scale prototype system was tested in 12/99 with laser and cosmic particle events.

  16. Stay away from asthma triggers

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma triggers - stay away from; Asthma triggers - avoiding; Reactive airway disease - triggers; Bronchial asthma - triggers ... to them. Have someone who does not have asthma cut the grass, or wear a facemask if ...

  17. Causality and headache triggers

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Dana P.; Smitherman, Todd A.; Martin, Vincent T.; Penzien, Donald B.; Houle, Timothy T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to explore the conditions necessary to assign causal status to headache triggers. Background The term “headache trigger” is commonly used to label any stimulus that is assumed to cause headaches. However, the assumptions required for determining if a given stimulus in fact has a causal-type relationship in eliciting headaches have not been explicated. Methods A synthesis and application of Rubin’s Causal Model is applied to the context of headache causes. From this application the conditions necessary to infer that one event (trigger) causes another (headache) are outlined using basic assumptions and examples from relevant literature. Results Although many conditions must be satisfied for a causal attribution, three basic assumptions are identified for determining causality in headache triggers: 1) constancy of the sufferer; 2) constancy of the trigger effect; and 3) constancy of the trigger presentation. A valid evaluation of a potential trigger’s effect can only be undertaken once these three basic assumptions are satisfied during formal or informal studies of headache triggers. Conclusions Evaluating these assumptions is extremely difficult or infeasible in clinical practice, and satisfying them during natural experimentation is unlikely. Researchers, practitioners, and headache sufferers are encouraged to avoid natural experimentation to determine the causal effects of headache triggers. Instead, formal experimental designs or retrospective diary studies using advanced statistical modeling techniques provide the best approaches to satisfy the required assumptions and inform causal statements about headache triggers. PMID:23534872

  18. AMY trigger system

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Yoshihide

    1989-04-01

    A trigger system of the AMY detector at TRISTAN e{sup +}e{sup -} collider is described briefly. The system uses simple track segment and shower cluster counting scheme to classify events to be triggered. It has been operating successfully since 1987.

  19. LHCb Topological Trigger Reoptimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Ilten, Philip; Khairullin, Egor; Rogozhnikov, Alex; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Williams, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The main b-physics trigger algorithm used by the LHCb experiment is the so- called topological trigger. The topological trigger selects vertices which are a) detached from the primary proton-proton collision and b) compatible with coming from the decay of a b-hadron. In the LHC Run 1, this trigger, which utilized a custom boosted decision tree algorithm, selected a nearly 100% pure sample of b-hadrons with a typical efficiency of 60-70%; its output was used in about 60% of LHCb papers. This talk presents studies carried out to optimize the topological trigger for LHC Run 2. In particular, we have carried out a detailed comparison of various machine learning classifier algorithms, e.g., AdaBoost, MatrixNet and neural networks. The topological trigger algorithm is designed to select all ’interesting” decays of b-hadrons, but cannot be trained on every such decay. Studies have therefore been performed to determine how to optimize the performance of the classification algorithm on decays not used in the training. Methods studied include cascading, ensembling and blending techniques. Furthermore, novel boosting techniques have been implemented that will help reduce systematic uncertainties in Run 2 measurements. We demonstrate that the reoptimized topological trigger is expected to significantly improve on the Run 1 performance for a wide range of b-hadron decays.

  20. Common Asthma Triggers

    MedlinePlus

    ... your bedding on the hottest water setting. Outdoor Air Pollution Outdoor air pollution can trigger an asthma attack. This pollution can ... your newspaper to plan your activities for when air pollution levels will be low. Cockroach Allergen Cockroaches and ...

  1. Dealing with Asthma Triggers

    MedlinePlus

    ... smell given off by paint or gas, and air pollution. If you notice that an irritant triggers your ... or other tobacco products around you. If outdoor air pollution is a problem, running the air conditioner or ...

  2. ELECTRONIC TRIGGER CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Russell, J.A.G.

    1958-01-01

    An electronic trigger circuit is described of the type where an output pulse is obtained only after an input voltage has cqualed or exceeded a selected reference voltage. In general, the invention comprises a source of direct current reference voltage in series with an impedance and a diode rectifying element. An input pulse of preselected amplitude causes the diode to conduct and develop a signal across the impedance. The signal is delivered to an amplifier where an output pulse is produced and part of the output is fed back in a positive manner to the diode so that the amplifier produces a steep wave front trigger pulsc at the output. The trigger point of the described circuit is not subject to variation due to the aging, etc., of multi-electrode tabes, since the diode circuit essentially determines the trigger point.

  3. Calorimetry Triggering in ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Igonkina, O.; Achenbach, R.; Adragna, P.; Aharrouche, M.; Alexandre, G.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X.; Aracena, I.; Backlund, S.; Baines, J.; Barnett, B.M.; Bauss, B.; Bee, C.; Behera, P.; Bell, P.; Bendel, M.; Benslama, K.; Berry, T.; Bogaerts, A.; Bohm, C.; Bold, T.; /UC, Irvine /AGH-UST, Cracow /Birmingham U. /Barcelona, IFAE /CERN /Birmingham U. /Rutherford /Montreal U. /Santa Maria U., Valparaiso /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Geneva U. /City Coll., N.Y. /Barcelona, IFAE /CERN /Birmingham U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Lisbon, LIFEP /Rio de Janeiro Federal U. /City Coll., N.Y. /Birmingham U. /Copenhagen U. /Copenhagen U. /Brookhaven /Rutherford /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Pennsylvania U. /Montreal U. /SLAC /CERN /Michigan State U. /Chile U., Catolica /City Coll., N.Y. /Oxford U. /La Plata U. /McGill U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Hamburg U. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Geneva U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /CERN /Rutherford /Rio de Janeiro Federal U. /Birmingham U. /Montreal U. /CERN /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Liverpool U. /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Pennsylvania U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Geneva U. /Birmingham U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Rutherford /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Rutherford /Royal Holloway, U. of London /AGH-UST, Cracow /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Hamburg U. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Geneva U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Michigan State U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U. /Birmingham U. /CERN /Montreal U. /Stockholm U. /Arizona U. /Regina U. /Regina U. /Rutherford /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /City Coll., N.Y. /University Coll. London /Humboldt U., Berlin /Queen Mary, U. of London /Argonne /LPSC, Grenoble /Arizona U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Antonio Narino U. /Hamburg U. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Chile U., Catolica /Indiana U. /Manchester U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Rutherford /City Coll., N.Y. /Stockholm U. /La Plata U. /Antonio Narino U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Antonio Narino U. /Pavia U. /City Coll., N.Y. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Pennsylvania U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /Chile U., Catolica /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Rutherford /Barcelona, IFAE /Nevis Labs, Columbia U. /CERN /Antonio Narino U. /McGill U. /Rutherford /Santa Maria U., Valparaiso /Rutherford /Chile U., Catolica /Brookhaven /Oregon U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Barcelona, IFAE /McGill U. /Antonio Narino U. /Antonio Narino U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Sydney U. /Rutherford /McGill U. /McGill U. /Pavia U. /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Barcelona, IFAE /SLAC /Stockholm U. /Moscow State U. /Stockholm U. /Birmingham U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Birmingham U. /Geneva U. /Oregon U. /Barcelona, IFAE /University Coll. London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Birmingham U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Birmingham U. /Oregon U. /La Plata U. /Geneva U. /Chile U., Catolica /McGill U. /Pavia U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Regina U. /Birmingham U. /Birmingham U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Oxford U. /CERN /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /UC, Irvine /UC, Irvine /Wisconsin U., Madison /Rutherford /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /CERN /Geneva U. /Copenhagen U. /City Coll., N.Y. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Rio de Janeiro Federal U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Stockholm U. /University Coll. London

    2011-12-08

    The ATLAS experiment is preparing for data taking at 14 TeV collision energy. A rich discovery physics program is being prepared in addition to the detailed study of Standard Model processes which will be produced in abundance. The ATLAS multi-level trigger system is designed to accept one event in 2/10{sup 5} to enable the selection of rare and unusual physics events. The ATLAS calorimeter system is a precise instrument, which includes liquid Argon electro-magnetic and hadronic components as well as a scintillator-tile hadronic calorimeter. All these components are used in the various levels of the trigger system. A wide physics coverage is ensured by inclusively selecting events with candidate electrons, photons, taus, jets or those with large missing transverse energy. The commissioning of the trigger system is being performed with cosmic ray events and by replaying simulated Monte Carlo events through the trigger and data acquisition system.

  4. Dynamic Triggering Stress Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Huizar, H.; Velasco, A. A.

    2008-12-01

    It has been well established that static (permanent) stress changes can trigger nearby earthquakes, within a few fault lengths from the causative event, whereas triggering by dynamic (transient) stresses carried by seismic waves both nearby and at remote distances has not been as well documented nor understood. An analysis of the change in the local stress caused by the passing of surfaces waves is important for the understanding of this phenomenon. In this study, we modeled the change in the stress that the passing of Rayleigh and Loves waves causes on a fault plane of arbitrary orientation, and applied a Coulomb failure criteria to calculate the potential of these stress changes to trigger reverse, normal or strike-slip failure. We preliminarily test these model results with data from dynamically triggering earthquakes in the Australian Bowen Basin. In the Bowen region, the modeling predicts a maximum triggering potential for Rayleigh waves arriving perpendicularly to the strike of the reverse faults present in the region. The modeled potentials agree with our observations, and give us an understanding of the dynamic stress orientation needed to trigger different type of earthquakes.

  5. Cygnus Trigger System

    SciTech Connect

    G. Corrow, M. Hansen, D. Henderson, C. Mitton

    2008-02-01

    The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two radiographic sources (Cygnus 1, Cygnus 2) each with a dose rating of 4 rads at 1 m, and a 1-mm diameter spot size. The electrical specifications are: 2.25 MV, 60 kA, 60 ns. This facility is located in an underground environment at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These sources were developed as a primary diagnostic for subcritical tests, which are single-shot, high-value events. In such an application there is an emphasis on reliability and reproducibility. A robust, low-jitter trigger system is a key element for meeting these goals. The trigger system was developed with both commercial and project-specific equipment. In addition to the traditional functions of a trigger system there are novel features added to protect the investment of a high-value shot. Details of the trigger system, including elements designed specifically for a subcritical test application, will be presented. The individual electronic components have their nominal throughput, and when assembled have a system throughput with a measured range of jitter. The shot-to-shot jitter will be assessed both individually and in combination. Trigger reliability and reproducibility results will be presented for a substantial number of shots executed at the NTS.

  6. Trigger mechanism for engines

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, L.R.

    1989-02-28

    A trigger mechanism is described for a blower-vacuum apparatus having a trigger mounted within a handle and a small engine comprising: a throttle; a ''L'' shaped lever having first and second legs mounted for rotation about an intermediate pivot within the handle when the trigger is depressed, interconnecting the trigger and the throttle, the second leg having first teeth defined therein, the lever further having idle, full throttle and stop positions; a normally raised latch means adapted to be rotated and axially depressed, the latch means having second teeth situated on a cam to engage the first teeth for holding the lever in an intermediate position between the idle and full throttle positions when the latch means is rotated. The latch means further are cam teeth into potential engagement with the lever teeth when the trigger is depressed, lever is biased to the stop position; and idle adjusting means means for intercepting the second leg for preventing the second leg from reaching the stop position when the latch means is raised.

  7. Microfabricated triggered vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Schare, Joshua M.; Bunch, Kyle

    2010-05-11

    A microfabricated vacuum switch is disclosed which includes a substrate upon which an anode, cathode and trigger electrode are located. A cover is sealed over the substrate under vacuum to complete the vacuum switch. In some embodiments of the present invention, a metal cover can be used in place of the trigger electrode on the substrate. Materials used for the vacuum switch are compatible with high vacuum, relatively high temperature processing. These materials include molybdenum, niobium, copper, tungsten, aluminum and alloys thereof for the anode and cathode. Carbon in the form of graphitic carbon, a diamond-like material, or carbon nanotubes can be used in the trigger electrode. Channels can be optionally formed in the substrate to mitigate against surface breakdown.

  8. Video Event Trigger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L.; Lichter, Michael J.

    1994-01-01

    Video event trigger (VET) processes video image data to generate trigger signal when image shows significant change like motion or appearance, disappearance, change in color, change in brightness, or dilation of object. System aids in efficient utilization of image-data-storage and image-data-processing equipment in applications in which many video frames show no changes and are wasteful to record and analyze all frames when only relatively few frames show changes of interest. Applications include video recording of automobile crash tests, automated video monitoring of entrances, exits, parking lots, and secure areas.

  9. TOTEM Trigger System Firmware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopal, Josef

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the TOTEM Trigger System Firmware that is operational at LHC since 2009. The TOTEM experiment is devoted to the forward hadronic physics at collision energy from 2.7 to 14TeV. It is composed of three different subdetectors that are placed at 9, 13.5, and 220m from the Interaction Point 5. A time-critical-logic firmware is implemented inside FPGA circuits to review collisions and to select the relevant ones to be stored by the Data Acquisition (DAQ). The Trigger system has been modified in the 2012-2013 LHC runs allowing the experiment to take data in cooperation with CMS.

  10. Disambiguating Syntactic Triggers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakas, William Gregory; Fodor, Janet Dean

    2012-01-01

    We present data from an artificial language domain that suggest new contributions to the theory of syntactic triggers. Whether a learning algorithm is capable of matching the achievements of child learners depends in part on how much parametric ambiguity there is in the input. For practical reasons this cannot be established for the domain of all…

  11. Triggered plasma opening switch

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, C W

    1988-02-23

    A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

  12. Triggered plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mendel, Clifford W.

    1988-01-01

    A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

  13. Laser fusion pulse shape controller

    DOEpatents

    Siebert, Larry D.

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus for controlling the pulse shape, i.e., the pulse duration and intensity pattern, of a pulsed laser system, and which is particularly well adapted for controlling the pellet ignition pulse in a laser-driven fusion reaction system. The apparatus comprises a laser generator for providing an optical control pulse of the shape desired, a pulsed laser triggered by the control pulse, and a plurality of optical Kerr-effect gates serially disposed at the output of the pulsed laser and selectively triggered by the control pulse to pass only a portion of the pulsed laser output generally corresponding in shape to the control pulse.

  14. Optically triggered infrared photodetector.

    PubMed

    Ramiro, Íñigo; Martí, Antonio; Antolín, Elisa; López, Esther; Datas, Alejandro; Luque, Antonio; Ripalda, José M; González, Yolanda

    2015-01-14

    We demonstrate a new class of semiconductor device: the optically triggered infrared photodetector (OTIP). This photodetector is based on a new physical principle that allows the detection of infrared light to be switched ON and OFF by means of an external light. Our experimental device, fabricated using InAs/AlGaAs quantum-dot technology, demonstrates normal incidence infrared detection in the 2-6 μm range. The detection is optically triggered by a 590 nm light-emitting diode. Furthermore, the detection gain is achieved in our device without an increase of the noise level. The novel characteristics of OTIPs open up new possibilities for third generation infrared imaging systems ( Rogalski, A.; Antoszewski, J.; Faraone, L. J. Appl. Phys. 2009, 105 (9), 091101). PMID:25490236

  15. Neural networks for triggering

    SciTech Connect

    Denby, B. ); Campbell, M. ); Bedeschi, F. ); Chriss, N.; Bowers, C. ); Nesti, F. )

    1990-01-01

    Two types of neural network beauty trigger architectures, based on identification of electrons in jets and recognition of secondary vertices, have been simulated in the environment of the Fermilab CDF experiment. The efficiencies for B's and rejection of background obtained are encouraging. If hardware tests are successful, the electron identification architecture will be tested in the 1991 run of CDF. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, D.; Briggs, M.; Connaughton, V.; Kippen, M.; Preece, R.

    2003-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  17. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Band, D.; Kippen, M.

    2004-09-28

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  18. Isolating Triggered Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Elizabeth J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Bullock, James S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2007-09-12

    Galaxy pairs provide a potentially powerful means of studying triggered star formation from galaxy interactions. We use a large cosmological N-body simulation coupled with a well-tested semi-analytic substructure model to demonstrate that the majority of galaxies in close pairs reside within cluster or group-size halos and therefore represent a biased population, poorly suited for direct comparison to 'field' galaxies. Thus, the frequent observation that some types of galaxies in pairs have redder colors than 'field' galaxies is primarily a selection effect. We use our simulations to devise a means to select galaxy pairs that are isolated in their dark matter halos with respect to other massive subhalos (N= 2 halos) and to select a control sample of isolated galaxies (N= 1 halos) for comparison. We then apply these selection criteria to a volume-limited subset of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey with M{sub B,j} {le} -19 and obtain the first clean measure of the typical fraction of galaxies affected by triggered star formation and the average elevation in the star formation rate. We find that 24% (30.5 %) of these L* and sub-L* galaxies in isolated 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc pairs exhibit star formation that is boosted by a factor of {approx}> 5 above their average past value, while only 10% of isolated galaxies in the control sample show this level of enhancement. Thus, 14% (20 %) of the galaxies in these close pairs show clear triggered star formation. Our orbit models suggest that 12% (16%) of 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc close pairs that are isolated according to our definition have had a close ({le} 30 h{sup -1} kpc) pass within the last Gyr. Thus, the data are broadly consistent with a scenario in which most or all close passes of isolated pairs result in triggered star formation. The isolation criteria we develop provide a means to constrain star formation and feedback prescriptions in hydrodynamic simulations and a very general method of understanding the importance of

  19. Triggered Codeswitching between Cognate Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broersma, Mirjam

    2009-01-01

    This study shows further evidence for triggered codeswitching. In natural speech from a Dutch-English bilingual, codeswitches occurred more often directly next to a cognate (or "trigger word") than elsewhere. This evidence from typologically related, cognate languages extends previous evidence for triggering between typologically unrelated…

  20. Subnanosecond trigger system for ETA

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, E.G.; Lauer, E.J.; Reginato, L.L.; Rogers D.; Schmidt, J.A.

    1980-05-30

    A high-voltage trigger system capable of triggering 30, 250 kV spark gaps; each with less than +- 1 ns jitter has been constructed. In addition to low jitter rates, the trigger system must be capable of delivering the high voltage pulses to the spark gaps either simultaneously or sequentially as determined by other system requirements. The trigger system consists of several stages of pulse amplification culminating in 160 kV pulses having 30 ns risetime. The trigger system is described and test data provided.

  1. Protons Trigger Mitochondrial Flashes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianhua; Zhang, Xing; Huang, Zhanglong; Wu, Di; Liu, Beibei; Zhang, Rufeng; Yin, Rongkang; Hou, Tingting; Jian, Chongshu; Xu, Jiejia; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Yanru; Gao, Feng; Cheng, Heping

    2016-07-26

    Emerging evidence indicates that mitochondrial flashes (mitoflashes) are highly conserved elemental mitochondrial signaling events. However, which signal controls their ignition and how they are integrated with other mitochondrial signals and functions remain elusive. In this study, we aimed to further delineate the signal components of the mitoflash and determine the mitoflash trigger mechanism. Using multiple biosensors and chemical probes as well as label-free autofluorescence, we found that the mitoflash reflects chemical and electrical excitation at the single-organelle level, comprising bursting superoxide production, oxidative redox shift, and matrix alkalinization as well as transient membrane depolarization. Both electroneutral H(+)/K(+) or H(+)/Na(+) antiport and matrix proton uncaging elicited immediate and robust mitoflash responses over a broad dynamic range in cardiomyocytes and HeLa cells. However, charge-uncompensated proton transport, which depolarizes mitochondria, caused the opposite effect, and steady matrix acidification mildly inhibited mitoflashes. Based on a numerical simulation, we estimated a mean proton lifetime of 1.42 ns and diffusion distance of 2.06 nm in the matrix. We conclude that nanodomain protons act as a novel, to our knowledge, trigger of mitoflashes in energized mitochondria. This finding suggests that mitoflash genesis is functionally and mechanistically integrated with mitochondrial energy metabolism. PMID:27463140

  2. Laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, W.A.; Boskma, P.

    1980-12-01

    Unrestricted laser fusion offers nations an opportunity to circumvent arms control agreements and develop thermonuclear weapons. Early laser weapons research sought a clean radiation-free bomb to replace the fission bomb, but this was deceptive because a fission bomb was needed to trigger the fusion reaction and additional radioactivity was induced by generating fast neutrons. As laser-implosion experiments focused on weapons physics, simulating weapons effects, and applications for new weapons, the military interest shifted from developing a laser-ignited hydrogen bomb to more sophisticated weapons and civilian applications for power generation. Civilian and military research now overlap, making it possible for several countries to continue weapons activities and permitting proliferation of nuclear weapons. These countries are reluctant to include inertial confinement fusion research in the Non-Proliferation Treaty. 16 references. (DCK)

  3. Effector triggered immunity

    PubMed Central

    Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria produce virulence factors called effectors, which are important components of the infection process. Effectors aid in pathogenesis by facilitating bacterial attachment, pathogen entry into or exit from the host cell, immunoevasion, and immunosuppression. Effectors also have the ability to subvert host cellular processes, such as hijacking cytoskeletal machinery or blocking protein translation. However, host cells possess an evolutionarily conserved innate immune response that can sense the pathogen through the activity of its effectors and mount a robust immune response. This “effector triggered immunity” (ETI) was first discovered in plants but recent evidence suggest that the process is also well conserved in metazoans. We will discuss salient points of the mechanism of ETI in metazoans from recent studies done in mammalian cells and invertebrate model hosts. PMID:25513770

  4. LIF bio-aerosol threat triggers: then and now

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeFreez, Richard

    2009-09-01

    Bio-aerosol terrorist attacks have been carried out against civilians in the United States and elsewhere. Unfortunately, recurrence appears inevitable. A fast, reliable, and inexpensive bioaerosol threat detection trigger can be an important tool for detect-to-protect and detect-to-treat countermeasure scenarios. Bio-aerosol threat detection triggers employing light, historically laser light but recently LED light, for induced native- or auto-fluorescence (LIF) have been developed for well over a decade without a generally accepted solution being found. This paper presents a brief history of LIF triggers and reviews many vendor efforts, past and current. Various technical approaches and design considerations are discussed. Triggers from ICx technology, currently available or in development, are also discussed.

  5. The CMS high level trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gori, Valentina

    2014-05-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a 2-level trigger system: the Level 1 Trigger, implemented on custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. A software trigger system requires a tradeoff between the complexity of the algorithms running on the available computing power, the sustainable output rate, and the selection efficiency. Here we will present the performance of the main triggers used during the 2012 data taking, ranging from simpler single-object selections to more complex algorithms combining different objects, and applying analysis-level reconstruction and selection. We will discuss the optimisation of the triggers and the specific techniques to cope with the increasing LHC pile-up, reducing its impact on the physics performance.

  6. The CMS High Level Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trocino, Daniele

    2014-06-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system: the Level-1 Trigger, implemented in custom-designed electronics, and the High-Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. A software trigger system requires a tradeoff between the complexity of the algorithms running with the available computing power, the sustainable output rate, and the selection efficiency. We present the performance of the main triggers used during the 2012 data taking, ranging from simple single-object selections to more complex algorithms combining different objects, and applying analysis-level reconstruction and selection. We discuss the optimisation of the trigger and the specific techniques to cope with the increasing LHC pile-up, reducing its impact on the physics performance.

  7. Final report on LDRD project : advanced optical trigger systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Roose, Lars D.; Hadley, G. Ronald; Mar, Alan; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Geib, Kent Martin; Sullivan, Charles Thomas; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Bauer, Thomas M.; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Montano, Victoria A.

    2008-09-01

    Advanced optically-activated solid-state electrical switch development at Sandia has demonstrated multi-kA/kV switching and the path for scalability to even higher current/power. Realization of this potential requires development of new optical sources/switches based on key Sandia photonic device technologies: vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) devices. The key to increasing the switching capacity of PCSS devices to 5kV/5kA and higher is to distribute the current in multiple parallel line filaments triggered by an array of high-brightness line-shaped illuminators. Commercial mechanically-stacked edge-emitting lasers have been used to trigger multiple filaments, but they are difficult to scale and manufacture with the required uniformity. In VCSEL arrays, adjacent lasers utilize identical semiconductor material and are lithographically patterned to the required dimensions. We have demonstrated multiple-line filament triggering using VCSEL arrays to approximate line generation. These arrays of uncoupled circular-aperture VCSELs have fill factors ranging from 2% to 30%. Using these arrays, we have developed a better understanding of the illumination requirements for stable triggering of multiple-filament PCSS devices. Photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) devices offer advantages of high voltage operation (multi-kV), optical isolation, triggering with laser pulses that cannot occur accidentally in nature, low cost, high speed, small size, and radiation hardness. PCSS devices are candidates for an assortment of potential applications that require multi-kA switching of current. The key to increasing the switching capacity of PCSS devices to 5kV/5kA and higher is to distribute the current in multiple parallel line filaments triggered by an array of high-brightness line-shaped illuminators. Commercial mechanically-stacked edge-emitting lasers have been demonstrated to trigger multiple filaments, but they

  8. Triggering with the LHCb calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefevre, Regis; LHCb Collaboration

    2009-04-01

    The LHCb experiment at the LHC has been conceived to pursue high precision studies of CP violation and rare phenomena in b hadron decays. The online selection is crucial in LHCb and relies on the calorimeters to trigger on high transverse energy electrons, photons, π0 and hadrons. In this purpose a dedicated electronic has been realized. The calorimeter trigger system has been commissioned and is used to trigger on cosmic muons before beams start circulating in the LHC. When the LHC will start, it will also provide a very useful interaction trigger.

  9. The NA62 trigger system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivda, M.; NA62 Collaboration

    2013-08-01

    The main aim of the NA62 experiment (NA62 Technical Design Report, [1]) is to study ultra-rare Kaon decays. In order to select rare events over the overwhelming background, central systems with high-performance, high bandwidth, flexibility and configurability are necessary, that minimize dead time while maximizing data collection reliability. The NA62 experiment consists of 12 sub-detector systems and several trigger and control systems, for a total channel count of less than 100,000. The GigaTracKer (GTK) has the largest number of channels (54,000), and the Liquid Krypton (LKr) calorimeter shares with it the largest raw data rate (19 GB/s). The NA62 trigger system works with 3 trigger levels. The first trigger level is based on a hardware central trigger unit, so-called L0 Trigger Processor (L0TP), and Local Trigger Units (LTU), which are all located in the experimental cavern. Other two trigger levels are based on software, and done with a computer farm located on surface. The L0TP receives information from triggering sub-detectors asynchronously via Ethernet; it processes the information, and then transmits a final trigger decision synchronously to each sub-detector through the Trigger and Timing Control (TTC) system. The interface between L0TP and the TTC system, which is used for trigger and clock distribution, is provided by the Local Trigger Unit board (LTU). The LTU can work in two modes: global and stand-alone. In the global mode, the LTU provides an interface between L0TP and TTC system. In the stand-alone mode, the LTU can fully emulate L0TP and so provides an independent way for each sub-detector for testing or calibration purposes. In addition to the emulation functionality, a further functionality is implemented that allows to synchronize the clock of the LTU with the L0TP and the TTC system. For testing and debugging purposes, a Snap Shot Memory (SSM) interface is implemented, that can work

  10. Triggering of repeated earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, G. A.; Zakrzhevskaya, N. A.; Sobolev, D. G.

    2016-03-01

    Based on the analysis of the world's earthquakes with magnitudes M ≥ 6.5 for 1960-2013, it is shown that they cause global-scale coherent seismic oscillations which most distinctly manifest themselves in the period interval of 4-6 min during 1-3 days after the event. After these earthquakes, a repeated shock has an increased probability to occur in different seismically active regions located as far away as a few thousand km from the previous event, i.e., a remote interaction of seismic events takes place. The number of the repeated shocks N( t) decreases with time, which characterizes the memory of the lithosphere about the impact that has occurred. The time decay N( t) can be approximated by the linear, exponential, and powerlaw dependences. No distinct correlation between the spatial locations of the initial and repeated earthquakes is revealed. The probable triggering mechanisms of the remote interaction between the earthquakes are discussed. Surface seismic waves traveling several times around the Earth's, coherent oscillations, and global source are the most preferable candidates. This may lead to the accumulation and coalescence of ruptures in the highly stressed or weakened domains of a seismically active region, which increases the probability of a repeated earthquake.

  11. Fermi GBM Early Trigger Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael; Paciesas, Bill; Meegan, Charles

    2009-05-25

    Since the launch of the Fermi observatory on June 11 2008, the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has seen approximately 250 triggers of which about 150 were cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). GBM operates dozens of trigger algorithms covering various energy bands and timescales and is therefore sensitive to a wide variety of phenomena, both astrophysical and not.

  12. Triggering requirements for SSC physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gilchriese, M.G.D.

    1989-04-01

    Some aspects of triggering requirements for high P{sub T} physics processes at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) are described. A very wide range of trigger types will be required to enable detection of the large number of potential physics signatures possible at the SSC. Although in many cases trigger rates are not now well understood, it is possible to conclude that the ability to trigger on transverse energy, number and energy of jets, number and energy of leptons (electrons and muons), missing energy and combinations of these will be required. An SSC trigger system must be both highly flexible and redundant to ensure reliable detection of many new physics processes at the SSC.

  13. An enhanced multiwavelength ultraviolet biological trigger lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achey, Alexander; Bufton, Jack; Dawson, Jeffrey; Huang, Wen; Lee, Sangmin; Mehta, Nikhil; Prasad, Coorg R.

    2004-12-01

    A compact Ultraviolet Biological Trigger Lidar (UBTL) instrument for detection and discrimination of bio-warfare-agent (BWA) simulant aerosol clouds was developed by us [Prasad, et al, 2004] using a 5mW, 375nm semiconductor UV optical source (SUVOS) laser diode. It underwent successful field tests at Dugway Proving Ground and demonstrated measurement ranges of over 300m for elastic scattering and >100m for fluorescence. The UBTL was modified during mid-2004 to enhance its detection and discrimination performance with increased range of operation and sensitivity. The major optical modifications were: 1. increase in telescope collection aperture to 200 mm diameter: 2. addition of 266nm and 977nm laser transmitters: 3. addition of three detection channels for 266nm and 977nm elastic backscatter and fluorescence centered at 330nm. Also the commercial electronics of the original UBTL were replaced with a multi-channel field programmable gate array (FPGA) chip for laser diode modulation and data acquisition that allowed simultaneous and continuous operation of the UBTL sensor on all of its transmitter and receiver wavelengths. A notebook computer was added for data display and storage. Field tests were performed during July 2004 at the Edgewood Chemical and Biological Center in Maryland to establish the enhanced performance of UBTL subsystems. Results of these tests are presented and discussed.

  14. Circuit Stops Prelasing In A Q-Switched Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, George E.

    1995-01-01

    Protective shutdown circuit stops prelasing in Q-switched laser operating at pulse-repetition rate of about 10 Hz. During normal operation, Q-switch prevents emission of light from laser cavity during application of Q-switch-trigger pulse. When circuit detects prelasing, it triggers relay turning off laser power supply. Circuit integrated into almost any Q-switched-laser system, provided one gains access to laser light, Q-switch-trigger pulse, and safety-interlock line of laser power supply.

  15. Seismology: dynamic triggering of earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Gomberg, Joan; Johnson, Paul

    2005-10-01

    After an earthquake, numerous smaller shocks are triggered over distances comparable to the dimensions of the mainshock fault rupture, although they are rare at larger distances. Here we analyse the scaling of dynamic deformations (the stresses and strains associated with seismic waves) with distance from, and magnitude of, their triggering earthquake, and show that they can cause further earthquakes at any distance if their amplitude exceeds several microstrain, regardless of their frequency content. These triggering requirements are remarkably similar to those measured in the laboratory for inducing dynamic elastic nonlinear behaviour, which suggests that the underlying physics is similar. PMID:16208360

  16. Pulsed thyristor trigger control circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A trigger control circuit is provided for producing firing pulses for the thyristor of a thyristor control system such as a power factor controller. The control circuit overcomes thyristor triggering problems involved with the current lag associated with controlling inductive loads and utilizes a phase difference signal, already present in the power factor controller, in deriving a signal for inhibiting generation of a firing pulse until no load current is flowing from the preceding half cycle and thereby ensuring that the thyristor is triggered on during each half cycle.

  17. Triggered Release from Polymer Capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Esser-Kahn, Aaron P.; Odom, Susan A.; Sottos, Nancy R.; White, Scott R.; Moore, Jeffrey S.

    2011-07-06

    Stimuli-responsive capsules are of interest in drug delivery, fragrance release, food preservation, and self-healing materials. Many methods are used to trigger the release of encapsulated contents. Here we highlight mechanisms for the controlled release of encapsulated cargo that utilize chemical reactions occurring in solid polymeric shell walls. Triggering mechanisms responsible for covalent bond cleavage that result in the release of capsule contents include chemical, biological, light, thermal, magnetic, and electrical stimuli. We present methods for encapsulation and release, triggering methods, and mechanisms and conclude with our opinions on interesting obstacles for chemically induced activation with relevance for controlled release.

  18. The D0 upgrade trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Eno, S.

    1994-09-01

    The current trigger system for the D0 detector at Fermilab`s Tevatron will need to be upgraded when the Min Injector is installed and the Tevatron can operate at luminosities exceeding 10{sup 32} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} and with a crossing time of 132 ns. We report on preliminary designs for upgrades to the trigger system for the Main Injector era.

  19. A tumor-targeting near-infrared laser-triggered drug delivery system based on GO@Ag nanoparticles for chemo-photothermal therapy and X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jinjin; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Jing; Ma, Rou; Gao, Jun; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Chaofeng; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2014-07-01

    In this study, a GO@Ag nanocomposite was synthesized by chemical deposition of Ag nanoparticles onto graphene oxide (GO) through a hydro thermal reaction, and doxorubicin (DOX), one of the most effective drugs against a wide range of cancers, was employed as the model drug and linked to GO@Ag via ester bonds with a very high drug loading efficiency (∼82.0%, weight ratio of DOX/GO@Ag), then GO@Ag-DOX was functionalized by DSPE-PEG2000-NGR, giving GO@Ag-DOX with active tumor-targeting capacity and excellent stability in physiological solutions. The release profiles of DOX from GO@Ag-DOX-NGR showed strong dependences on near-infrared (NIR) laser and the SPR effect of Ag nanoparticles. Compared with free DOX in an in vivo murine tumor model, GO@Ag-DOX-NGR afforded much higher antitumor efficacy without obvious toxic effects to normal organs owing to 8.4-fold higher DOX uptake of tumor and 1.7-fold higher DOX released in tumor with NIR laser than the other tissues. Besides, in this work, GO@Ag-DOX-NGR not only served as a powerful tumor diagnostic X-ray contrast agent, but also as a strong agent for photothermal ablation of tumor, the ability of GO@Ag-DOX-NGR nanoparticles to combine the local specific chemotherapy with external photothermal therapy (PTT) significantly improved the therapeutic efficacy. GO@Ag-DOX-NGR showed excellent chem-photothermal therapeutic efficacy, tumor-targeting property, NIR laser-controlled drug releasing function and X-ray imaging ability, demonstrating that there is a great potential of GO@Ag-DOX-NGR for cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:24746963

  20. Slow earthquakes triggered by typhoons.

    PubMed

    Liu, ChiChing; Linde, Alan T; Sacks, I Selwyn

    2009-06-11

    The first reports on a slow earthquake were for an event in the Izu peninsula, Japan, on an intraplate, seismically active fault. Since then, many slow earthquakes have been detected. It has been suggested that the slow events may trigger ordinary earthquakes (in a context supported by numerical modelling), but their broader significance in terms of earthquake occurrence remains unclear. Triggering of earthquakes has received much attention: strain diffusion from large regional earthquakes has been shown to influence large earthquake activity, and earthquakes may be triggered during the passage of teleseismic waves, a phenomenon now recognized as being common. Here we show that, in eastern Taiwan, slow earthquakes can be triggered by typhoons. We model the largest of these earthquakes as repeated episodes of slow slip on a reverse fault just under land and dipping to the west; the characteristics of all events are sufficiently similar that they can be modelled with minor variations of the model parameters. Lower pressure results in a very small unclamping of the fault that must be close to the failure condition for the typhoon to act as a trigger. This area experiences very high compressional deformation but has a paucity of large earthquakes; repeating slow events may be segmenting the stressed area and thus inhibiting large earthquakes, which require a long, continuous seismic rupture. PMID:19516339

  1. Anthropogenic Triggering of Large Earthquakes

    PubMed Central

    Mulargia, Francesco; Bizzarri, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The physical mechanism of the anthropogenic triggering of large earthquakes on active faults is studied on the basis of experimental phenomenology, i.e., that earthquakes occur on active tectonic faults, that crustal stress values are those measured in situ and, on active faults, comply to the values of the stress drop measured for real earthquakes, that the static friction coefficients are those inferred on faults, and that the effective triggering stresses are those inferred for real earthquakes. Deriving the conditions for earthquake nucleation as a time-dependent solution of the Tresca-Von Mises criterion applied in the framework of poroelasticity yields that active faults can be triggered by fluid overpressures < 0.1 MPa. Comparing this with the deviatoric stresses at the depth of crustal hypocenters, which are of the order of 1–10 MPa, we find that injecting in the subsoil fluids at the pressures typical of oil and gas production and storage may trigger destructive earthquakes on active faults at a few tens of kilometers. Fluid pressure propagates as slow stress waves along geometric paths operating in a drained condition and can advance the natural occurrence of earthquakes by a substantial amount of time. Furthermore, it is illusory to control earthquake triggering by close monitoring of minor “foreshocks”, since the induction may occur with a delay up to several years. PMID:25156190

  2. Anthropogenic Triggering of Large Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulargia, Francesco; Bizzarri, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    The physical mechanism of the anthropogenic triggering of large earthquakes on active faults is studied on the basis of experimental phenomenology, i.e., that earthquakes occur on active tectonic faults, that crustal stress values are those measured in situ and, on active faults, comply to the values of the stress drop measured for real earthquakes, that the static friction coefficients are those inferred on faults, and that the effective triggering stresses are those inferred for real earthquakes. Deriving the conditions for earthquake nucleation as a time-dependent solution of the Tresca-Von Mises criterion applied in the framework of poroelasticity yields that active faults can be triggered by fluid overpressures < 0.1 MPa. Comparing this with the deviatoric stresses at the depth of crustal hypocenters, which are of the order of 1-10 MPa, we find that injecting in the subsoil fluids at the pressures typical of oil and gas production and storage may trigger destructive earthquakes on active faults at a few tens of kilometers. Fluid pressure propagates as slow stress waves along geometric paths operating in a drained condition and can advance the natural occurrence of earthquakes by a substantial amount of time. Furthermore, it is illusory to control earthquake triggering by close monitoring of minor ``foreshocks'', since the induction may occur with a delay up to several years.

  3. Anthropogenic triggering of large earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Mulargia, Francesco; Bizzarri, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The physical mechanism of the anthropogenic triggering of large earthquakes on active faults is studied on the basis of experimental phenomenology, i.e., that earthquakes occur on active tectonic faults, that crustal stress values are those measured in situ and, on active faults, comply to the values of the stress drop measured for real earthquakes, that the static friction coefficients are those inferred on faults, and that the effective triggering stresses are those inferred for real earthquakes. Deriving the conditions for earthquake nucleation as a time-dependent solution of the Tresca-Von Mises criterion applied in the framework of poroelasticity yields that active faults can be triggered by fluid overpressures < 0.1 MPa. Comparing this with the deviatoric stresses at the depth of crustal hypocenters, which are of the order of 1-10 MPa, we find that injecting in the subsoil fluids at the pressures typical of oil and gas production and storage may trigger destructive earthquakes on active faults at a few tens of kilometers. Fluid pressure propagates as slow stress waves along geometric paths operating in a drained condition and can advance the natural occurrence of earthquakes by a substantial amount of time. Furthermore, it is illusory to control earthquake triggering by close monitoring of minor "foreshocks", since the induction may occur with a delay up to several years. PMID:25156190

  4. Industrial accidents triggered by lightning.

    PubMed

    Renni, Elisabetta; Krausmann, Elisabeth; Cozzani, Valerio

    2010-12-15

    Natural disasters can cause major accidents in chemical facilities where they can lead to the release of hazardous materials which in turn can result in fires, explosions or toxic dispersion. Lightning strikes are the most frequent cause of major accidents triggered by natural events. In order to contribute towards the development of a quantitative approach for assessing lightning risk at industrial facilities, lightning-triggered accident case histories were retrieved from the major industrial accident databases and analysed to extract information on types of vulnerable equipment, failure dynamics and damage states, as well as on the final consequences of the event. The most vulnerable category of equipment is storage tanks. Lightning damage is incurred by immediate ignition, electrical and electronic systems failure or structural damage with subsequent release. Toxic releases and tank fires tend to be the most common scenarios associated with lightning strikes. Oil, diesel and gasoline are the substances most frequently released during lightning-triggered Natech accidents. PMID:20817399

  5. Know Your Smoking Triggers | Smokefree.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Triggers are the things that make you want to smoke. Different people have different triggers, like a stressful situation, sipping coffee, going to a party, or smelling cigarette smoke. Most triggers fall into one of these four categories: Emotional Pattern Social Withdrawal Knowing your triggers and understanding the best way to deal with them is your first line of defense.

  6. Integral magnetic ignition pickup trigger

    SciTech Connect

    King, R.

    1992-10-27

    This patent describes a trigger system for the ignition system of an internal combustion engine having a crankcase with a rotatable crankshaft therein, and a flywheel on one end of the crankcase connected to an end of the crankshaft. It comprises: a nonferromagnetic disk-shaped hub for connection to the crankshaft and rotatable therewith on the end opposite the flywheel; and a stationary sensor mounted adjacent the hub for detecting impulses from the magnetically responsive elements as the hub rotates and utilizing the impulses to trigger the ignition system.

  7. Detector array control and triggering

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, S.; Anzalone, A.; Bartolucci, M. |

    1998-08-01

    A commercial DSP-based board installed in a host-PC was employed for the fast, on-line and real-time computation of special algorithms, in order to perform event selection and operate as a 2nd level trigger. Moreover an ad hoc build interface, realized using PLDs with a view to connecting the DSP-board to the ADCs and to the data acquisition system, has been tested in order to evaluate the performances of these programmable devices used as a look-up-table and as a decisional part of a 1st level trigger.

  8. Waveguide detuning caused by transverse magnetic fields on a simulated in-line 6 MV linac

    SciTech Connect

    St Aubin, J.; Steciw, S.; Fallone, B. G.

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: Due to the close proximity of the linear accelerator (linac) to the magnetic resonance (MR) imager in linac-MR systems, it will be subjected to magnet fringe fields larger than the Earth's magnetic field of 5x10{sup -5} T. Even with passive or active shielding designed to reduce these fields, some magnitude of the magnetic field is still expected to intersect the linac, causing electron deflection and beam loss. This beam loss, resulting from magnetic fields that cannot be eliminated with shielding, can cause a detuning of the waveguide due to excessive heating. The detuning, if significant, could lead to an even further decrease in output above what would be expected strictly from electron deflections caused by an external magnetic field. Thus an investigation of detuning was performed through various simulations. Methods: According to the Lorentz force, the electrons will be deflected away from their straight course to the target, depositing energy as they impact the linac copper waveguide. The deposited energy would lead to a heating and deformation of the copper structure resulting in resonant frequency changes. PARMELA was used to determine the mean energy and fraction of total beam lost in each linac cavity. The energy deposited into the copper waveguide from the beam losses caused by transverse magnetic fields was calculated using the Monte Carlo program DOSRZnrc. From the total energy deposited, the rise in temperature and ultimately the deformation of the structure was estimated. The deformed structure was modeled using the finite element method program COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS to determine the change in cavity resonant frequency. Results: The largest changes in resonant frequency were found in the first two accelerating cavities for each field strength investigated. This was caused by a high electron fluence impacting the waveguide inner structures coupled with their low kinetic energies. At each field strength investigated, the total change in accelerator frequency was less than a manufacturing tolerance of 10 kHz and is thus not expected to have a noticeable effect on accelerator performance. Conclusions: The amount of beam loss caused by magnetic fringe fields for a linac in a linac-MR system depends on the effectiveness of its magnetic shielding. Despite the best efforts to shield the linac from the magnetic fringe fields, some persistent magnetic field is expected which would result in electron beam loss. This investigation showed that the detuning of the waveguide caused by additional electron beam loss in persistent magnetic fields is not a concern.

  9. Relative biological damage and electron fluence in and out of a 6 MV photon field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syme, A.; Kirkby, C.; Mirzayans, R.; Mac Kenzie, M.; Field, C.; Fallone, B. G.

    2009-11-01

    Scattered radiation in the penumbra of a megavoltage radiation therapy beam can deposit a non-negligible dose in the healthy tissue around a target volume. The lower energy of the radiation in this region suggests that its biological effectiveness might not be the same as that of the open beam. In this work, we determined the relative biological damage in normal human fibroblasts after megavoltage irradiation in two geometries. The first was an open-beam irradiation and the second was a blocked configuration in which only scattered radiation could reach the target cells. The biological damage was evaluated by the γ-H2AX immunofluorescence assay, which is capable of detecting DNA double-strand breaks in individual cells. We report that the scattered radiation is more effective at producing biological damage than the open beam radiation. We found a 27% enhancement in the net mean nuclear γ-H2AX fluorescence intensity at 2 Gy and a 48% enhancement at 4 Gy. These findings are of interest due to the increased doses of penumbral radiation close to target volumes both in dose escalation studies and in IMRT treatment deliveries where high dose gradients exist for the purpose of conformal avoidance of healthy tissues.

  10. A New Look at Trigger Point Injections

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Clara S. M.; Wong, Steven H. S.

    2012-01-01

    Trigger point injections are commonly practised pain interventional techniques. However, there is still lack of objective diagnostic criteria for trigger points. The mechanisms of action of trigger point injection remain obscure and its efficacy remains heterogeneous. The advent of ultrasound technology in the noninvasive real-time imaging of soft tissues sheds new light on visualization of trigger points, explaining the effect of trigger point injection by blockade of peripheral nerves, and minimizing the complications of blind injection. PMID:21969825

  11. Environmental Triggers of Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Burek, C. Lynne; Talor, Monica V.

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroiditis is among the most prevalent of all the autoimmunities. Autoimmune thyroiditis is multifactorial with contributions from genetic and environmental factors. Much information has been published about the genetic predisposition to autoimmune thyroiditis both in experimental animals and humans. There is, in contrast, very little data on environmental agents that can serve as the trigger or autoimmunity in a genetically predisposed host. The best-established environmental factor is excess dietary iodine. Increased iodine consumption is strongly implicated as a trigger for thyroiditis, but only in genetically susceptible individuals. However, excess iodine is not the only environmental agent implicated as a trigger leading to autoimmune thyroiditis. There are a wide variety of other synthetic chemicals that affect the thyroid gland or have the ability to promote immune dysfunction in the host. These chemicals are released into the environment by design, such as in pesticides, or as a by-product of industry. Candidate pollutants include polyaromatic hydrocarbons, polybrominated biphenols, and polychlorinated biphenols, among others. Infections are also reputed to trigger autoimmunity and may act alone or in concert with environmental chemicals. We have utilized a unique animal model, the NOD.H2h4 mouse to explore the influence of iodine and other environmental factors on autoimmune thyroiditis. PMID:19818584

  12. Environmental triggers of autoimmune thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Burek, C Lynne; Talor, Monica V

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroiditis is among the most prevalent of all the autoimmunities. Autoimmune thyroiditis is multifactorial with contributions from genetic and environmental factors. Much information has been published about the genetic predisposition to autoimmune thyroiditis both in experimental animals and humans. There is, in contrast, very little data on environmental agents that can serve as the trigger for autoimmunity in a genetically predisposed host. The best-established environmental factor is excess dietary iodine. Increased iodine consumption is strongly implicated as a trigger for thyroiditis, but only in genetically susceptible individuals. However, excess iodine is not the only environmental agent implicated as a trigger leading to autoimmune thyroiditis. There are a wide variety of other synthetic chemicals that affect the thyroid gland or have the ability to promote immune dysfunction in the host. These chemicals are released into the environment by design, such as in pesticides, or as a by-product of industry. Candidate pollutants include polyaromatic hydrocarbons, polybrominated biphenols, and polychlorinated biphenols, among others. Infections are also reputed to trigger autoimmunity and may act alone or in concert with environmental chemicals. We have utilized a unique animal model, the NOD.H2(h4) mouse to explore the influence of iodine and other environmental factors on autoimmune thyroiditis. PMID:19818584

  13. Suicide Triggers Described by Herodotus

    PubMed Central

    Auchincloss, Stephane; Ahmadi, Jamshid

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to better understand the triggers of suicide, particularly among the ancient Greek and Persian soldiers and commanders. Method: ‘Herodotus:TheHistories’ is a history of the rulers and soldiery who participated in the Greco-Persian wars (492-449 BCE). A new translation (2013) of this manuscript was studied. Accounts of suicide were collected and collated, with descriptions of circumstances, methods, and probable triggers. Results: Nine accounts of suicide were identified. Eight of these were named individuals (4 Greeks and 4 Persians); of whom, seven were male. Only one (not the female) appeared to act in response to a mental disorder. Other triggers of suicide included guilt, avoidance of dishonour/punishment and altruism. Cutting/ stabbing was the most common method; others included hanging, jumping, poison, and burning (the single female). Conclusion: While soldiers at a time of war do not reflect the general community, they are nevertheless members of their society. Thus, this evidence demonstrates that suicide triggered by burdensome circumstances (in addition to mental disorder) was known to the Greek and Persian people more than two millennia ago. PMID:27437010

  14. Host defenses trigger salmonella's arsenal.

    PubMed

    Keestra, A Marijke; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2011-03-17

    Salmonella survives in macrophages by using a molecular syringe to deliver proteins into the host-cell cytosol where they manipulate phagocyte physiology. Arpaia and colleagues (Arpaia et al., 2011) show that deployment of this virulence factor is triggered by the very responses that are intended to confer host resistance. PMID:21402352

  15. Optical laser scanning of a leucodye micelle gel: preliminary results of a 3D dose verification of an IMRT treatment for a brain tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecasteele, J.; De Deene, Y.

    2013-06-01

    In the present study an in-house developed leucodye micelle gel was used in combination with an in-house developed optical laser scanner for the 3D dose verification of an IMRT treatment of a pituitary adenoma. In an initial prospective study, a gel measured depth dose distribution of a square 6 MV photon beam was compared with an ion chamber measurement. In a second experiment, the gel and scanner were used to verify a clinical dose distribution on a recently installed linear accelerator. The calibration procedure is identified as the major source of dose deviations.

  16. Triggered vaporization of gold nanodroplets for enhanced photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shu-Wei; Liu, Wei-Wen; Li, Pai-Chi

    2015-03-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization has been proposed for sonoporation. In this study, we hypothesize that, by using gold nanodroplets (AuNDs), vaporization can be triggered with external application of laser irradiation. In addition, the vaporization assisted sonoporation can enhance delivery of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) into the cells, thus potentially enhancing effects of plasmonic photothermal therapy. To test our hypothesis, in vitro studies were conducted. The delivery efficiency of AuNDs was also compared to that of AuNPs encapsulated in ultrasound microbubbles (AuMBs). The inertial cavitation dose (ICD), and optical density (OD) value of AuNPs were all measured under the applications of ultrasound only, laser only, and both ultrasound and laser. Results show that the cavitational effects and microbubble destruction were the highest with both ultrasound and laser being applied. In addition, destruction ratio of AuNDs was around 43%, compared to 35% microbubble destruction of AuMBs. Likewise, the OD value of AuNDs is 1.3 times higher than that of AuMBs under the same conditions, indicating that cavitation resulting from microbubble destruction did have the capability to assist the delivery of AuNPs into the cells. After the delivery, laser heating resulted in cell death. The cell viability with AuNDs was 45% left in the in vitro studies. Synergistic effects were also evident when combing laser with ultrasound.

  17. Improved quality of intrafraction kilovoltage images by triggered readout of unexposed frames

    SciTech Connect

    Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Jonassen, Johnny; Jensen, Carsten; Schmidt, Mai Lykkegaard

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The gantry-mounted kilovoltage (kV) imager of modern linear accelerators can be used for real-time tumor localization during radiation treatment delivery. However, the kV image quality often suffers from cross-scatter from the megavoltage (MV) treatment beam. This study investigates readout of unexposed kV frames as a means to improve the kV image quality in a series of experiments and a theoretical model of the observed image quality improvements. Methods: A series of fluoroscopic images were acquired of a solid water phantom with an embedded gold marker and an air cavity with and without simultaneous radiation of the phantom with a 6 MV beam delivered perpendicular to the kV beam with 300 and 600 monitor units per minute (MU/min). An in-house built device triggered readout of zero, one, or multiple unexposed frames between the kV exposures. The unexposed frames contained part of the MV scatter, consequently reducing the amount of MV scatter accumulated in the exposed frames. The image quality with and without unexposed frame readout was quantified as the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the gold marker and air cavity for a range of imaging frequencies from 1 to 15 Hz. To gain more insight into the observed CNR changes, the image lag of the kV imager was measured and used as input in a simple model that describes the CNR with unexposed frame readout in terms of the contrast, kV noise, and MV noise measured without readout of unexposed frames. Results: Without readout of unexposed kV frames, the quality of intratreatment kV images decreased dramatically with reduced kV frequencies due to MV scatter. The gold marker was only visible for imaging frequencies ≥3 Hz at 300 MU/min and ≥5 Hz for 600 MU/min. Visibility of the air cavity required even higher imaging frequencies. Readout of multiple unexposed frames ensured visibility of both structures at all imaging frequencies and a CNR that was independent of the kV frame rate. The image lag was 12.2%, 2

  18. Electric events synchronized with laser filaments in thunderclouds.

    PubMed

    Kasparian, Jérôme; Ackermann, Roland; André, Yves-Bernard; Méchain, Grégoire; Méjean, Guillaume; Prade, Bernard; Rohwetter, Philipp; Salmon, Estelle; Stelmaszczyk, Kamil; Yu, Jin; Mysyrowicz, André; Sauerbrey, Roland; Wöste, Ludger; Wolf, Jean-Pierre

    2008-04-14

    We investigated the possibility to trigger real-scale lightning using ionized filaments generated by ultrashort laser pulses in the atmosphere. Under conditions of high electric field during two thunderstorms, we observed a statistically significant number of electric events synchronized with the laser pulses, at the location of the filaments. This observation suggests that corona discharges may have been triggered by filaments. PMID:18542684

  19. The L3 energy trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzarri, R.; Cesaroni, F.; Gentile, S.; Lunadei, G.; Fukushima, M.; Herten, G.; Hebbeker, T.

    1989-11-01

    The L3 first-level energy trigger is based on energy measurements in electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters and in luminosity monitors. The information from these detectors is evaluated and a decision is taken in about 20 μs (the time between two bunch crossings in LEP is 22 μs). This trigger makes use of 300 CAMAC modules: an arithmetic logic unit (ALU), a BUS multiplexer (BS), a memory lookup table (MLU), a data stack (DS) and a fast encoding and readout ADC (FERA), each of them performing dedicated functions. The data are transmitted via front-panel ECL buses. The CAMAC data-way is used only for initialization and checking purposes. The system operates synchronously with a period of 60 ns.

  20. Method for triggering an action

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Bartholomew, David B.; Johnson, Monte L.; Moon, Justin; Koehler, Roger O.

    2006-10-17

    A method for triggering an action of at least one downhole device on a downhole network integrated into a downhole tool string synchronized to an event comprises determining latency, sending a latency adjusted signal, and performing the action. The latency is determined between a control device and the at least one downhole device. The latency adjusted signal for triggering an action is sent to the downhole device. The action is performed downhole synchronized to the event. A preferred method for determining latency comprises the steps: a control device sends a first signal to the downhole device; after receiving the signal, the downhole device sends a response signal to the control device; and the control device analyzes the time from sending the signal to receiving the response signal.

  1. The CDF silicon vertex trigger

    SciTech Connect

    B. Ashmanskas; A. Barchiesi; A. Bardi

    2003-06-23

    The CDF experiment's Silicon Vertex Trigger is a system of 150 custom 9U VME boards that reconstructs axial tracks in the CDF silicon strip detector in a 15 {mu}sec pipeline. SVT's 35 {mu}m impact parameter resolution enables CDF's Level 2 trigger to distinguish primary and secondary particles, and hence to collect large samples of hadronic bottom and charm decays. We review some of SVT's key design features. Speed is achieved with custom VLSI pattern recognition, linearized track fitting, pipelining, and parallel processing. Testing and reliability are aided by built-in logic state analysis and test-data sourcing at each board's input and output, a common inter-board data link, and a universal ''Merger'' board for data fan-in/fan-out. Speed and adaptability are enhanced by use of modern FPGAs.

  2. Optical Spectra of Triggered Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, T. D.; Biagi, C. J.; Hill, J. D.; Jordan, D. M.; Uman, M. A.; Christian, H. J., Jr.

    2009-12-01

    In August 2009, the first optical spectra of triggered lightning flashes were acquired. Data from two triggered lightning flashes were obtained at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing in north-central Florida. The spectrometer that was used has an average dispersion of 260 Å/mm resulting in an average resolution of 5 Å when mated to a Photron (SA1.1) high-speed camera. The spectra captured with this system had a free spectral range of 3800-8000 Å. The spectra were captured at 300,000 frames per second. The spectrometer's vertical field of view was 3 m at an altitude 50 m above the launch tower, intended to view the middle of the triggering wire. Preliminary results show that the copper spectrum dominated the earliest part of the flash and copper lines persisted during the total lifetime of the detectable spectrum. Animations over the lifetime of the stroke from the initial wire illumination to multiple return strokes show the evolution of the spectrum. In addition, coordinated high speed channel base current, electric field and imagery measurements of the exploding wire, downward leaders, and return strokes were recorded. Quantitative analysis of the spectral evolution will be discussed in the context of the overall flash development.

  3. SLAC collider injector, RF-drive synchronization and trigger electronics, and 15-AMP thermionic-gun development

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, R.; Miller, R.; McKinney, T.; Wilmunder, A.

    1981-02-01

    The rf drive system for the Collider Injector Development (EL CID) including laser timing, subharmonic buncher drive and phasing, and accelerator rf drive is described. The rf synchronized master trigger generation scheme for the collider is outlined. Also, a 15 amp peak, 200 kV short pulse gun being developed at SLAC as a backup to the Sinclair laser gun is described.

  4. Triggered optical coherence tomography for capturing rapid periodic motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ernest W.; Kobler, James B.; Yun, Seok H.

    2011-07-01

    Quantitative cross-sectional imaging of vocal folds during phonation is potentially useful for diagnosis and treatments of laryngeal disorders. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful technique, but its relatively low frame rates makes it challenging to visualize rapidly vibrating tissues. Here, we demonstrate a novel method based on triggered laser scanning to capture 4-dimensional (4D) images of samples in motu at audio frequencies over 100 Hz. As proof-of-concept experiments, we applied this technique to imaging the oscillations of biopolymer gels on acoustic vibrators and aerodynamically driven vibrations of the vocal fold in an ex vivo calf larynx model. Our results suggest that triggered 4D OCT may be useful in understanding and assessing the function of vocal folds and developing novel treatments in research and clinical settings.

  5. Star formation and its triggers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combes, F.

    2016-06-01

    The relation between star formation and gas density appears linear for galaxies on the main sequence, and when the molecular gas is considered. However, the star formation efficiency (SFE) defined as the ratio of SFR to gas surface densities, can be much higher when SF is triggered by a dynamical process such as galaxy interaction or mergers, or even secular evolution and cold gas accretion. I review recent work showing how the SFE can vary as a function of morphological type, environment, or redshift. Physical processes able to explain positive and negative feedback from supernovae or AGN are discussed.

  6. The Database Driven ATLAS Trigger Configuration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, Carlos; Gianelli, Michele; Martyniuk, Alex; Stelzer, Joerg; Stockton, Mark; Vazquez, Will

    2015-12-01

    The ATLAS trigger configuration system uses a centrally provided relational database to store the configurations for all levels of the ATLAS trigger system. The configuration used at any point during data taking is maintained in this database. A interface to this database is provided by the TriggerTool, a Java-based graphical user interface. The TriggerTool has been designed to work as both a convenient browser and editor of configurations in the database for both general users and experts. The updates to the trigger system necessitated by the upgrades and changes in both hardware and software during the first long shut down of the LHC will be explored.

  7. Triggering for charm, beauty, and truth

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, J.A.

    1982-02-01

    As the search for more and more rare processes accelerates, the need for more and more effective event triggers also accelerates. In the earliest experiments, a simple coincidence often sufficed not only as the event trigger, but as the complete record of an event of interest. In today's experiments, not only has the fast trigger become more sophisticated, but one or more additional level of trigger processing precedes writing event data to magnetic tape for later analysis. Further search experiments will certainly require further expansion in the number of trigger levels required to filter those rare events of particular interest.

  8. Externally triggered imaging technique for microbolometer-type terahertz imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Naoki; Sudou, Takayuki; Ishi, Tsutomu; Okubo, Syuichi; Isoyama, Goro; Irizawa, Akinori; Kawase, Keigo; Kato, Ryukou

    2016-04-01

    The authors developed terahertz (THz) imager which incorporates 320x240 focal plane array (FPA) with enhanced sensitivity in sub-THz region (ca. 0.5 THz). The imager includes functions such as external-trigger imaging, lock-in imaging, beam profiling and so on. The function of the external-trigger imaging is mainly described in this paper, which was verified in combination of the THz imager with the pulsed THz free electron laser (THz-FEL) developed by Osaka University. The THz-FEL emits THz radiation in a wavelength range of 25 - 150 μm at repetition rates of 2.5, 3.3, 5.0 and 10 pulses per second. The external trigger pulse for the THz imager was generated with a pulse generator, using brightening pulse for THz-FEL. A series of pulses emitted by the THz-FEL at 86 μm were introduced to the THz imager and Joule meter via beam splitter, so that the output signal of THz imager was normalized with the output of the Joule meter and the stability of the THz radiation from FEL was also monitored. The normalized output signals of THz imager (digits/μJ) obtained at the repetition rates mentioned above were found consistent with one another. The timing-relation of the external trigger pulse to the brightening pulse was varied and the influence of the timing-relation on beam pattern is presented. These experimental results verify that the external trigger imaging function operates correctly.

  9. Landslides triggered by the earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, E.L.; Keefer, D.K.

    1990-01-01

    The May 2 earthquake triggered landslides numbering in the thousands. Most numerous were rockfalls and rockslides that occurred mainly on slopes steeper than 60{degree} within sandstone, siltstone, and shale units of Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary strata. Soil falls from cutbank slopes along streams were also numerous. Seven slumps in natural slopes were triggered, and minor liquefaction-induced lateral-spread failures occurred along Los Gatos Creek. Rockfalls and rockslides occurred as far as 34 km northwest, 15 km south, and 26 km southwest of the epicenter. There were few slope failures to the east of the epicenter, owing to the absence of steep slopes in that direction. Throughout the area affected, rockfalls and rockslides were concentrated on southwest-facing slopes; the failures on slopes facing in the southwest quadrant accounted for as much as 93% of all failures in some areas. Rockfalls and rockslides from ridge crests were predominantly from sandstone units. Along steeply incised canyons, however, failures in shale and siltstone units were also common. Small rockslides and soil slides occurred from cut slopes above oil-well pump pads in the oil fields; slumps were common in the outer parts of steep fill slopes of the pump pads. The distribution of seismically induced landslides throughout the entire earthquake-affected area was mapped from true-color airphotos taken on May 3, 1985.

  10. Membrane-triggered plant immunity

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Su-Jin; Lee, Hong Gil; Seo, Pil Joon

    2014-01-01

    Plants have evolved sophisticated defense mechanisms to resist pathogen invasion. Upon the pathogen recognition, the host plants activate a variety of signal transduction pathways, and one of representative defense responses is systemic acquired resistance (SAR) that provides strong immunity against secondary infections in systemic tissues. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that modulation of membrane composition contributes to establishing SAR and disease resistance in Arabidopsis, but underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that a membrane-bound transcription factor (MTF) is associated with plant responses to pathogen attack. The MTF is responsive to microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP)-triggered membrane rigidification at the levels of transcription and proteolytic processing. The processed nuclear transcription factor possibly regulates pathogen resistance by directly regulating PATHOGENESIS-RELATED (PR) genes. Taken together, our results suggest that pathogenic microorganisms trigger changes in physico-chemical properties of cellular membrane in plants, and the MTF conveys the membrane information to the nucleus to ensure prompt establishment of plant immunity. PMID:25763708