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Sample records for 60-hz electric fields

  1. Endocrinological effects of strong 60-Hz electric fields on rats

    SciTech Connect

    Free, M.J.; Kaune, W.T.; Phillips, R.D.; Cheng, H.C.

    1981-01-01

    Adult male rats were exposed or sham-exposed to 60-Hz electric fields without spark discharges, ozone, or significant levels or other secondary variables. No effects were discharges, ozone, or significant levels of other secondary variables. No effects were observed on body weights or plasma hormone levels after 30 days of exposure at an effective field strength of 68 kV/m. After 120 days of exposure (effective field strength = 64 kV/m), effects were inconsistent, with signficant reductions in body weight and plasma levels of follicle-stimulating hormone and corticosterone occurring in one replicate experiment but not in the other. Plasma testosterone levels were significantly reduced after 120 days of exposure in one experiment, with a similar but not statistically significant reduction in a replicate experiment. Weanling rats, exposed or sham-exposed in electric fields with an effective field strength of 80 kV/m from 20 to 56 days of age, exhibited identical or closely similar growth trends in body and organ weights. Hormone levels in exposed and sham-exposed groups were also similar. However, there was an apparent phase shift between the two groups in the cyclic variations of concentrations of hormones at different stages of development, particularly with respect to follicle-stimulating hormone and corticosterone. We concluded that 60-Hz electric fields may bring about subtle changes in the endocrine system of rats, and that these changes may be related to alterations in episodic rhythms.

  2. Cardiovascular response of rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hilton, D.I.; Phillips, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    Recently, it has been reported that exposure to high-strength electric fields can influence electrocardiogram (ECG) patterns, heart rates, and blood pressures in various species of animals. Our studies were designed to evaluate these reported effects and to help clarify some of the disagreement present in the literature. Various cardiovascular variables were measured in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed or sham-exposed to 60-Hz electric fields at 80 to 100 kV/m for periods up to four months. No significant differences in heart rates, ECG patterns, blood pressures, or vascular reactivity were observed between exposed and sham-exposed rats after 8 hours, 40 hours, 1 month, or 4 months of exposure. Our studies cannot be directly compared to the work of other investigators because of differences in animal species and electric-field characteristics. However, our failure to detect any cardiovascular changes may have been the result of (1) eliminating secondary field effects such as shocks, audible noise, corona, and ozone; (2) minimizing steady-state microcurrents between the mouth of the animal and watering devices; and (3) minimizing electric-field-induced vibration of the electrodes and animal cages.

  3. Detection thresholds for 60 Hz electric fields by nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, J.L.; Rogers, W.R.; Smith, H.D.

    1995-12-31

    Because responses of animals to detection of the presence of an electric field (EF) are a possible mechanism for production of biological effects, it is important to know what EF intensities are detectable. Operant methods were used to train six baboons (Papio cynocephalus) to perform a psychophysical task involving detection of EF presence. During the response phase of a trial, a subject responded on one push button to report the presence of the EF and on a different push button to report the absence of the EF. Correct reports of EF presence or absence produced delivery of food rewards. The subjects became proficient at performing this psychophysical detection task; during 35 days of testing, false alarm rates averaged 9%. The average EF detection threshold was 12 kV/m; the range of means among subjects was 5--15 kV/m. Two special test procedures confirmed that the subjects were responding directly to EF presence or absence and not to artifacts that might be associated with EF generation. The EF detection threshold of nonhuman primates is similar to thresholds reported for rats and humans.

  4. Effects of 60 Hz electric fields on operant and social stress behaviors of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Lucas, J.H.; Moore, G.T.; Orr, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    An overall description of this research program is presented. The objectives are to investigate using nonhuman primates, possible behavioral effects associated with exposure to high-intensity, 60 Hz, electric fields. 6 tabs.

  5. Effects of 60-Hz electric fields on embryo and chick development, growth, and behavior. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    The objective of this study was to utilize an avian model to determine the effects of 60-Hz electric fields on embryo and chick development. A specially designed incubator allowed simultaneous incubation of control eggs and eggs exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Two series of experimental voltages were utilized for this study. In Series 1, the subject eggs were exposed to 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 kV/m fields and, in Series 2, eggs were exposed to 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 kV/m. Data were collected on mortality, malformation, and growth (weight) of 7- and 14-day-old embryos after continuous exposure to electric fields. Eggs were also incubated, exposed to electric fields, and hatched in order to collect data on chick weights at one day and at 2, 4, and 6 weeks after hatching. Behavior tests on newly hatched chicks that had been exposed to electric fields during development were also performed. The results indicated no consistent effect of 60-Hz electric fields, varying from 0.1 to 100 kV/m, on mortality, malformations, weights, bone growth (metatarsal length), or behavior of embryos or chicks. This study strongly suggests that within the scope of this project, there is no consistent direct effect of 60 Hz electric fields on the health and well-being of avian embryos. A dose-response analysis was also utilized in which all the data in each series, for each age of the embryos, were simultaneously evaluated in a statistical model. This analysis demonstrated that there is no significant dose-response of electric fields on 7- and 14-day-old embryo and 1-day-old chick weights. 24 refs., 21 figs., 56 tabs.

  6. Effects of 60-Hz electric fields on living plants exposed for extended periods. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    The effects of intense 60-Hz electric fields were studied by exposing plants of five kinds (crops) for extended periods in a special greenhouse where cultural and environmental factors could be controlled. Plant populations and densities simulated field conditions. While exposed, plants of all crops germinated satisfactorily, and plants of sweet corn and wheat completed their life cycles and produced viable seed. Plants of alfalfa and tall fescue were at the early bloom stage when harvested. Exposure of plants of five kinds to electric fields had no statistically significant effects on seed germination, seedling growth, plant growth, phenology, flowering, seed set, biomass production, plant height, leaf area, plant survival, and nodulation. Exposure to 60-Hz electric fields resulted in very limited damage to terminal leaf tips, awns, and corn tassels, particularly at fields of 30 kV/m or greater. 47 refs., 36 figs., 44 tabs.

  7. Effects of 60 Hz electric fields on operant and social stress behaviors of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Coelho, A.M. Jr.; Easley, S.P.; Lucas, J.H.; Moore, G.T.; Orr, J.L.; Smith, H.D.; Taylor, L.L.; Tuttle, M.L.

    1987-10-24

    The objective of this program is to investigate, using the baboon as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human, possible behavioral effects associated with exposure to high intensity 60 Hz electric fields. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, will be used by the Department of Energy (DOE) to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences resulting from exposure of humans to the electric fields associated with power transmission over high voltage lines. This research program consists of four major research projects, all of which have been successfully completed. The first project evaluated the potentially aversive character of exposure to 60 Hz electric fields by determining the threshold intensity that produces escape or avoidance responses. The second project estimated the threshold intensity for detection threshold was 12 kV/m; the range of means was 6 to 16 kV/m. The third project assessed, in separate experiments conducted at 30 and 60 kV/m, effects of chronic exposure to electric fields on the performance of two operant conditioning tasks, fixed ratio (FR), and differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL). In the same two experiments, the fourth project investigated, using the systematic quantitative observational sampling methods of primatology, the possible stress-inducing effects of chronic exposure to 60 Hz electric fields on the behavior of baboons living in small social groups. 131 refs., 87 figs., 123 tabs.

  8. Comparison of cardiac and 60 Hz magnetically induced electric fields measured in anesthetized rats

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.L.; Creim, J.A.

    1997-06-01

    Extremely low frequency magnetic fields interact with an animal by inducing internal electric fields, which are in addition to the normal endogenous fields present in living animals. Male rats weighing about 560 g each were anesthetized with ketamine and xylazine. Small incisions were made in the ventral body wall at the chest and upper abdomen to position a miniature probe for measuring internal electric fields. The calibration constant for the probe size was 5.7 mm, with a flat response from at least 12 Hz to 20 kHz. A cardiac signal, similar to the normal electrocardiogram with a heart rate of about 250 bpm, was readily obtained at the chest. Upon analysis of its spectrum, the cardiac field detected by the probe had a broad maximum at 32--95 Hz. When the rates were exposed to a 1 mT, 60 Hz magnetic field, a spike appeared in the spectrum at 60 Hz. The peak-to-peak magnitudes of electric fields associated with normal heart function were comparable to fields induced by a 1 mT magnetic field at 60 Hz for those positions measured on the body surface. Within the body, or in different directions relative to the applied field, the induced fields were reduced. The cardiac field increased near the heart, becoming much larger than the induced field. Thus, the cardiac electric field, together with the other endogenous fields, combine with induced electric fields and help to provide reference levels for the induced-field dosimetry of ELF magnetic field exposures of living animals.

  9. 60-Hz electric-field effects on pineal melatonin rhythms: time course for onset and recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.W.; Chess, E.K.; Anderson, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    Rats exposed for 3 weeks to uniform 60-Hz electric fields of 39 kV/m (effective field strength) failed to show normal pineal gland circadian rhythms in serotonin N-acetyl transferase activity and melatonin concentrations. The time required for recovery of the melatonin rhythm after cessation of field exposure was determined to be less than 3 days. The rapid recovery suggests that the overall metabolic competence of the pineal is not permanently compromised by electric-field exposure, and that the circadian rhythm effect may be neuronally mediated.

  10. Effect of chronic 60-Hz electric field exposure on mammary tumorigenesis in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.; Leung, F.C.; Rommereim, D.N.; Buschbom, R.L.; Wilson, B.W.; Stevens, R.G.

    1989-07-01

    Female rats were administered a single dosage of 7 or 10 mg of DMBA intragastrically between 50 and 55 days of age and palpated weekly for mammary tumors in two experiments. Rats were either exposed to a 40 kV/m 60-Hz electric field or sham-exposed in utero through 18 or 23 weeks of age. There was no difference between electric field exposed and sham-exposed in incidence of first tumor. When the results of the two experiments were combined, the electric field exposed groups had significantly more tumors per tumor-bearing animal than the sham-groups. These results may have implications for the role of electric power use in the etiology and promotion of breast cancer. 21 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Diurnal patterns in brain biogenic amines of rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Vasquez, B.J.; Anderson, L.E.; Lowery, C.I.; Adey, W.R.

    1988-01-01

    Levels of brain neurotransmitters and their metabolites, as well as concentrations of enzymes associated with their synthesis and metabolism, fluctuate during the day in patterns defined as circadian. The present study examined these rhythms in albino rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Thirty-six animals were exposed to a 39 kV/m field for 4 weeks, 20 h/day, in a parallel-plate electrode system. A group of 36 sham animals was similarly handled and housed in a nonenergized exposure system. On the sampling day, animals were sacrificed at 4-h intervals throughout the 24-h day. Brains were removed, dissected, and kept frozen until chemically analyzed. The levels of biogenic amines and their acidic metabolites in the striatum, hypothalamus, and hippocampus were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD) methods. Repeated exposure to 60-Hz electric fields produced significant alterations in the diurnal rhythms of several biogenic amines: dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC, the primary metabolite of dopamine in the rat) in the striatum, and norepinephrine, dopamine, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA; serotonin metabolite) in the hypothalamus. Levels of serotonin in the striatum and hypothalamus showed clear circadian patterns that was not affected by the field. No diurnal or field-related changes were observed in the hippocampal amines.

  12. Chronic exposure to a 60-Hz electric field: effects on neuromuscular function in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, R.A.; Laszewski, B.L.; Carr, D.B.

    1981-01-01

    Neuromuscular function in adult male rats was studied following 30 days of exposure to a 60-Hz electric field at 100 kV/m (unperturbed field strength). Isometric force transducters were attached to the tendons of the plantaris (predominantly fast twitch), and soleus (predominantly slow twitch) muscles in the urethan-anesthetized rat. Square-wave stimuli were delivered to the distal stump of the transected sciatic nerve. Several measurements were used to characterize neuromuscular function, including twitch characteristics, chronaxie, tetanic and posttetanic potentiation, and fatigue and recovery. The results from three independent series of experiments are reported. Only recovery from fatigue in slow-twitch muscles was consistently and significantly affected (enhanced) by electric-field exposure. This effect does not appear to be mediated by field-induced changes in either neuromuscular transmission, or in the contractile mechanism itself. It is suggested that the effect may be mediated secondary to an effect on mechanisms regulating muscle blood flow or metabolism.

  13. Effects of 60 Hz electrical fields on operant and social stress behaviors of nonhuman primates: Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Coelho, A.M. Jr.; Easley, S.P.; Orr, J.L.

    1988-04-06

    The objective of this program is to investigate, using the baboon as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human, behavioral effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric fields. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, could be used to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences resulting from exposure of humans to the electric fields associated with power transmission over high voltage lines. This program is being conducted at Southwest Research Institute as part of an international collaborative information exchange and scientific research effort involving the United State Department of Energy, Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry, and Japan's Central Research Institute of the Electric Power Industry. Since August of 1984, four major research projects were successfully completed. 48 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Biological effects of 60-Hz electric fields on small and large laboratory animals

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    Rats and mice were exposed to 60-Hz electric fields up to 330 kV/m for durations as long as four months. No significant effects were found in the following major areas: metabolic status and growth; organ and tissue morphology; brain morphology; cardiovascular function; serum chemistry; reproduction; prenatal growth and development; teratology; bone growth; peripheral nerve function; humoral and cell-mediated immunity; susceptibility to viral infection; cell and membrane function; illness/malaise; and cytogenetics. Statistically significant effects of electric field exposures were observed in the following areas: bone fracture repair; neonatal development; neuromuscular function; endocrinology; hematology; neurochemistry; urine volume and chemistry; sympathetic nervous system; behavior. It is likely that many of the effects observed are secondary to chronic stimulation of the animal by the field. Our research efforts have shifted to an in-depth investigation of nervous system functions, with emphasis in behavior, neurochemistry, neurophysiology, and dosimetry. Current and future research in these areas will focus on: relationship of effects to field strength and duration of exposure; recovery from observed effects; fundamental understanding of observed effects; fundamental understanding of interaction of field with animal (dosimetry); and biological significance of observed effects. (ERB)

  15. Effects of 60-Hz electric fields on serotonin metabolism in the rat pineal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.; Hilton, D.I.; Phillips, R.D.; Wilson, B.W.; Chess, E.K.

    1982-06-01

    Serotonin and two of its metabolites, melatonin and 5-methoxytryptophol, exhibit circadian rhythmicity in the pineal gland. We recently reported a marked reduction in the normal night-time increase in melatonin concentration in the pineal glands of rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Concomitant with the apparent abolition of melatonin rhythmicity, serotonin-N-acetyl transferase (SNAT) activity was suppressed. We have now conducted studies to determine if abolition of the rhythm in melatonin production in electric-field-exposed rats arises solely from interference in SNAT activity, or if the availability of pineal serotonin is a factor that is affected by exposure. Pineal serotonin concentrations were compared in rats that were either exposed or sham exposed to 65 kV/m for 30 days. Sham-exposed animals exhibited normal diurnal rhythmicity for pineal concentrations of both melatonin and serotonin; melatonin levels increased markedly during the dark phase with a concurrent decrease in serotonin levels. In the exposed animals, however, normal serotonin rhythmicity was abolished; serotonin levels in these animals did not increase during the light period. The conclusion that electric field exposure results in a biochemical alteration in SNAT enzyme activity can be inferred from the loss of both serotonin and melatonin rhythmicity, as well as by direct measurement of SNAT activity itself. 35 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  16. Comparison of the coupling of grounded and ungrounded humans to vertical 60-Hz electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kaune, W.T.; Kistler, L.M.; Miller, M.C.

    1985-12-01

    Total induced currents and average induced axial current densities have been published in the literature for human models exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. The results of these studies have been quite useful, but they deal with a somewhat idealized exposure situation that ignores the insulating effects of most types of footwear. This paper describes a new laboratory technique for studying the relationship between grounded and ungrounded exposure of humans. A conducting model of the body 40-cm-tall man was electrically divided into seven segments. Wires connected to the conducting surfaces of these segments were routed horizontally through shielded cable to remote, battery-powered electronics. The ''common'' potential of the electronics was biased to the electric-field-induced potential of the model, allowing us to accurately measure the current induced in each body segment of the model. The method was tested by measuring the current induced in the upper hemisphere of a ungrounded sphere: agreement between theory and measurement was excellent. Measurements were made with the human model located at 15 positions, ranging from touching ground to remote from ground (i.e., in free space). The ratios of free-space to grounded currents crossing horizontal sections through the body were: neck, 0.58; chest, 0.40; abdomen, 0.39; thigh, 0.36; ankle, 0.17.

  17. Nonhuman primates will not respond to turn off strong 60 Hz electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Orr, J.L.; Smith, H.D.

    1995-12-31

    Using a set of six baboons (Papio cynocephalus), the authors conducted a series of seven experiments designed to evaluate the potentially aversive character of a 60 Hz electric field (EF). Initially, the subjects were trained, using food rewards as the reinforcer, to respond only when a cue light was illuminated. Next, an EF was presented along with the cue light; responses produced delivery of a food pellet and turned off both the cue light and the EF. Then, stimulus and reward conditions were varied. The authors determined that (1) presence of a strong EF does not affect operant responding for food rewards, (2) subjects will not respond at normal rates when the only reinforcer is termination of a strong EF, (3) presence of a strong EF can serve as a discriminative stimulus, (4) presence of a strong EF does not affect extinction of an appetite-motivated task, and (5) presentation of an EF can become a secondary reinforcer. The pattern of results was consistent across all experiments, suggesting that an EF of as much as 65 kV/m is not aversive to nonhuman primates. Separately, the authors demonstrated that the average EF detection threshold for baboons is 12 kV/m. Thus, EF exposure at intensities well above the detection threshold and at species-scaled EF strengths greater than those found environmentally does not appear to be aversive.

  18. Leukemia following occupational exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields among Ontario electric utility workers.

    PubMed

    Miller, A B; To, T; Agnew, D A; Wall, C; Green, L M

    1996-07-15

    In a nested case-control study of 1,484 cancer cases and 2,179 matched controls from a cohort of 31,543 Ontario Hydro male employees, the authors evaluated associations of cancer risk with electric field exposure and reevaluated the previously reported findings for magnetic fields. Pensioners were followed from January 1, 1970, and active workers (including those who left the corporation) from January 1, 1973, with both groups followed through December 31, 1988. Exposures to electric and magnetic fields and to potential occupational confounders were estimated through job exposure matrices. Odds ratios were elevated for hematopoietic malignancies with cumulative electric field exposure. After adjustment, the odds ratio for leukemia in the upper tertile was 4.45 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-19.7). Odds ratios were also elevated for acute nonlymphoid leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, and chronic lymphoid leukemia. For cumulative magnetic field exposure, there were similar elevations that fell with adjustment. Evaluation of the combined effect of electric and magnetic fields for leukemia showed significant elevations of risk for high exposure to both, with a dose-response relation for increasing exposure to electric fields and an inconsistent effect for magnetic fields. There was some evidence of a nonsignificant association for brain cancer and benign brain tumors with magnetic fields. For lung cancer, the odds ratio for high exposure to electric and magnetic fields was 1.84 (95% CI 0.69-4.94). PMID:8678046

  19. Reproduction, growth, and development of rats during chronic exposure to multiple field strengths of 60-Hz electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rommereim, D.N.; Rommereim, R.L.; Sikov, M.R.; Buschbom, R.L.; Anderson, L.E. )

    1990-04-01

    A study with multiple exposure groups and large group sizes was performed to establish whether exposure to 60-Hz electric fields would result in reproductive and developmental toxicity. A response model was developed from previous results and tested in groups of rats exposed to electric fields at various field strengths. Female rats were mated, and sperm-positive animals randomly distributed among four groups: sham-exposed or exposed to 10, 65, or 130 kV/m, 60-Hz vertical electric fields. Animals were exposed for 19 hr/day throughout the experiment. During gestation, exposure to the higher field strengths resulted in slightly depressed weight gains of dams. Offspring were born in the field and remained with their dams through the suckling period. Numbers of pups per litter and pup mortality did not differ among the exposure groups. Dams exposed at 65 kV/m lost slightly more weight through the lactation period than the control group. Male pups exposed to higher field strengths gained slightly less weight from 4 to 21 days of age than did sham-exposed animals. At weaning, two F1 females per litter (randomly selected) continued on the same exposure regimen were mated at 11 weeks of age to unexposed males, and euthanized at 20 days of gestation. Uterine contents were evaluated, and all live fetuses were weighed and examined for external, visceral, and skeletal malformations. Fertility and gestational weight gain of F1 females were not affected by exposure, nor was prenatal viability or fetal body weight. No significant increase in the incidence of litters with malformations was observed. Although no developmental toxicity was detected, exposures produced physical changes in the dams, evidenced as a rust-colored deposit on the muzzle and ears (chromodacryorrhea) that increased in incidence and severity at 65 and 130 kV/m.

  20. Effects of 60 Hz electric fields on operant and social stress behavior of nonhuman primates. Quarterly technical progress report No. 20, September 28-December 20, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.

    1986-01-03

    This research program will evaluate the aversive character of exposure to 60 Hz electric fields by determining the threshold intensity which produces avoidance or escape responses, will estimate the threshold intensity for detection of 60 Hz electric fields, will assess effects of chronic exposure to 60 Hz electric fields on the performance of two operant conditioning tasks, fixed ratio and differential reinforcement of low rate responding, will investigate, using the systematic quantitative observational sampling methods of primatology, the possible stress-inducing effects of chronic exposure to 60 Hz electric fields on the behavior of baboons living in small social groups. In all experiments, the electric fields will be described, characterized, and controlled to account for recognized artifacts associated with high intensity 60 Hz electric fields and the health of all subjects will be described using the methods of primate veterinary medicine.

  1. Effects of 60 Hz electric fields on operant and social stress behaviors of nonhuman primates. Project technical status report, November 23, 1985-January 17, 1986. [Papio cynocephalus

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-24

    The objective was to investigate, using baboons (superspecies Papio cynocephalus) as surrogates, possible behavioral effects associated with exposure to high intensity 60 Hz electric fields. This program consists of four major projects. The first will evaluate the potential aversive character of exposure to 60 Hz electric fields by determining the threshold intensity which produces avoidance or escape responses. The second project will estimate the threshold intensity for detection of 60 Hz electric fields. The third will assess effects of chronic exposure to 60 Hz electric fields on the performance of two operant conditioning tasks, fixed ratio (FR) and differential reinforcement of low rate responding (DRL). The fourth will investigate the possible stress-inducing effects of chronic exposure to 60 Hz electric fields on the behavior of baboons living in small social groups.

  2. Electric fields induced in chicken eggs by 60-Hz magnetic fields and the dosimetric importance of biological membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Chicken eggs are convenient models for observing the effects of inhomogeneities and variations, such as those found in biological membranes and in cellular conductivities, on the distribution of internal electric fields as induced by exposure to magnetic fields. The vitelline membrane separates the yolk, which has a conductivity of 0.26 S/m, from the white, which has a conductivity of 0.85 S/m. A miniaturized probe with 2.4-mm resolution was used to measure induced fields in eggs placed in a uniform, 1-mT magnetic field at 60 Hz. The E fields induced in eggs with homogenized contents agreed with expectations based on simple theory. Results were similar to intact eggs unless the probe moved the yolk off-center, which greatly perturbed the induced fields. A more reproducible arrangement, which consisted of saline-agar filled dishes with a hole cut for test samples, was developed to enhance definition of electrical parameters. With this test system, the vitelline membrane was found to be responsible for most of the perturbation of the induced field, because it electrically isolates the yolk from the surrounding white. From a theoretical viewpoint, this dosimetry for the macroscopic egg yolk is analogous to the interaction of fields with microscopic cells. These findings may have important implications for research on biological effects of ELF electromagnetic fields, especially for studies of avian embryonic development.

  3. Effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Coelho, A.M.; Easley, S.P.; Orr, J.L.; Reiter, R.J.; Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-09-24

    A series of pioneering electric and magnetic field experiments were completed using nonhuman primates and a unique, well-engineered, and reliable exposure facility. Effects of operant behavior, social behavior, and serum melatonin concentration were examined using 60 Hz field combinations of other 6 W/m and 0.6 G or 30 W/m and 1.0 G. Observations noted in the course of this study include: Combines electric and magnetic field exposure does not have any important effect on short-term memory; the transitory increases in social behavior observed in previous electric fields did not occur; combined electric and magnetic field exposure might lead to reduced behavioral frequency in baboon social groups; three experiments clearly establish that one set of exposure conditions does not produce molatonin suppression in nonhuman primates; and a small pilot experiment suggests that a different exposure protocol might result in melatonin suppression.

  4. Effects of 60 Hz electric fields on operant and social stress behaviors of nonhuman primates: Projects 3 and 4

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Coelho, A.M. Jr.; Easley, S.P.; Orr, J.L.; Smith, H.D.; Taylor, L.L.; Tuttle, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this program is to investigate, using the baboon as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human, possible hehavioral effects associated with exposure to high intensity 60 Hz electric fields. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, will be used by the Department of Energy (DOE) to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences resulting from exposure of humans to the electric fields associated with power transmission over high voltage lines. This research program consists of four major research projects, all of which have been successfully completed. The third project assessed, in separate experiments conducted at 30 and 60 kV/m, effects of chronic exposure to electric fields on the performance of two operant conditioning tasks, fixed ratio (FR), and differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL). In the same two experiments, the fourth project investigated, using the systematic quantitative observational sampling methods of primatology, the possible stress-inducing effects of chronic exposure to 60 Hz electric fields on the behavior of baboons living in small social groups. This volume contains only appendices for projects 3 and 4. 81 figs., 67 tabs.

  5. Effects of intermittent 60-Hz high voltage electric fields on metabolism, activity, and temperature in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbergy, R.S; Duffy, P.H.; Sacher, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    Transient effects of 100-kV/m extremely low frequency electric fields were studied in the white footed deermouse, Peromyscus leucopus. Gross motor activity, carbon dioxide production, oxygen consumption, and core body temperature were monitored before, during, and after intermittent field exposures (four hour-long exposures, at one-hour intervals). Thirty-four mice were exposed in cages with plastic floors floating above ground potential, and 21 mice were exposed in cages with grounded metal floor plates. The first field exposure produced an immediate, transient increase of activity and gas measures during the inactive phase of the circadian cycle. All measures returned to baseline levels before the second exposure and were not significantly changed throughout the remainder of the exposures. The rapid habituation of field-induced arousal suggests that significant metabolic changes will not be measured in experiments in which the interval between exposure and measurement is greater than two hours.

  6. Effects of exposure to a 60-kV/m, 60-Hz electric field on the social behavior of baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Easley, S.P.; Coelho, A.M. Jr.; Rogers, W.R. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors found in a previously reported study that exposure to a 30-kV/m, 60-Hz electric field had significant effects on the social behavior of baboons. However, it was not established whether or not the effects were related specifically to the 30-kV/m intensity of the field. A new experiment was conducted to determine whether or not exposure to a 60-Hz electric field at 60 kV/m would produce like changes in the baboons' social behavior. They exposed one group of eight male baboons to an electric field 12 hours a day, 7 days a week, for 6 weeks. A second group of eight animals was maintained under sham-exposure (control) conditions. Rates of performing on each of six categories of social behavior and on four categories of nonsocial behavior were used as criteria for comparing exposed with unexposed subjects and for within-group comparisons during three six-week experimental periods: Pre-Exposure, Exposure, and Post-Exposure. The results indicate that (1) during the exposure period, exposed animals exhibited statistically significant differences from controls in means of performance rates based on several behavioral categories; (2) across all three periods, within-group comparisons revealed that behaviors of exposed baboons were significantly affected by exposure to the electric field; (3) changes in performance levels probably reflect a stress response to the electric field; and (4) the means of response rates of animals exposed at 60 kV/m were higher, but not double, those of animals exposed at 30 kV/m. As in the 30-kV/m experiment, animals exposed at 60 kV/m exhibited significant differences in performances of Passive Affinity, Tension, and Stereotypy. Mean rates of performing these categories were 122% (Passive Affinity), 48% (Tension), and 40% (Stereotypy) higher in the exposed group than in the control group during exposure to the 60-kV/m field.

  7. Chronic exposure of primates to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields: II. Neurochemical effects

    SciTech Connect

    Seegal, R.F.; Wolpaw, J.R.; Dowman, R.

    1989-01-01

    We exposed Macaca nemestrina (pig-tailed macaques) to electric (E) and magnetic (B) fields ranging in intensity from 3 kV/m and 0.1 G to 30 kV/m and 0.9 G for three 21-day (d) periods. Experimental animals were exposed to sham E and B fields for two 21-d periods, one prior to and one following actual exposure to E and B fields, resulting in a total of five 21-d periods. Control animals were exposed to sham E and B fields for the entire 105-d interval. At the end of each 21-d period cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was obtained by lumbar puncture and analyzed for concentrations of homovanillic acid (HVA) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), metabolites of dopamine and serotonin neurotransmitters, respectively, by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD). Results are based on an examination of six experimental and four control animals. Exposure to E and B fields at all strengths was associated with a significant decline in CSF concentrations of both HVA and 5-HIAA when statistical comparisons were made against values obtained at the end of the preexposure interval. However, HVA returned to preexposure levels during the postexposure period, while 5-HIAA did not. No significant change in the concentrations of HVA or 5-HIAA was noted in the control animals. These results strongly suggest that exposure of the nonhuman primate to E and B fields can significantly affect specific biochemical estimates of nervous system function. These effects may involve alterations either in neuronal activity or in the activity of enzymes that catabolize the neurotransmitters.

  8. Study of the behavioral and biological effects of high strength 60 HZ electric fields. Quarterly technical progress report No. 15, 12 May 1984-3 August 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-08-15

    Progress is reported in the construction of a test facility for studying the effects of high intensity, 60 Hz electric fields on baboons. Effects to be studied include operant out social behaviors. (ACR)

  9. Effects of exposure to 30 kV/m, 60-Hz electric fields on the social behavior of baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, A.M. Jr.; Easley, S.P.; Rogers, W.R. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that exposure to a 30-kV/m, 60-Hz electric field produces significant change (stress) in the social behavior of adult male baboons (Papio cynocephalus anubis). One group of eight baboons was exposed to an electric field (12 hours per day, 7 days per week for 6 weeks) while a second group of eight baboons was maintained in a sham-exposure (control) condition. Exposed subjects and control subjects were compared over three, six-week experimental periods (pre-exposure, exposure, and post-exposure). Performance rates of six categories of social behaviors (passive affinity, active affinity, approach, tension, threat, and attack) and four categories of nonsocial behaviors (forage, manipulate, posture, and stereotypy) were used to compare the two groups. The results of our study indicate that (1) there were no significant differences between the two groups during the pre-exposure or post-exposure periods; (2) during the exposure period, experimental and control groups exhibited statistically significant differences in the mean performance rates of three behavior categories; (3) within-group comparisons across periods indicate that the experimentally exposed group exhibited statistically significant changes in passive affinity, tension, and stereotypy; and (4) changes in behavior performance among the exposed subjects reflect a stress response to the electric field.

  10. Biological studies of swine exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Volume 1. Overview and summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-12-01

    Over a three-year period, three generations of female miniature swine and their offspring were exposed to a 30-kV/m, 60-Hz electric field. Such a field approximates the 12-kV/m field that a human would experience under a 765-kV line. After swine exposures varying from 6 to 36 months, project personnel analyzed a wide range of biological parameters including growth, blood cell and serum biochemistry, blood immunoglobulin levels, behavior, peripheral nerve function, cell-mediated immunity, cytogenetics, and reproduction and development. There were no significant differences in health effects between the exposed and sham-exposed swine, except in the area of fetal development. The first breeding produced no significant difference between exposed and control offspring. When those offspring were bred after 18 months of exposure, the fetuses of exposed sows had an increased incidence of morphological malformations and lower body weight than fetuses from control sows. The live-born had lower body weights and increased birth defects. Several factors suggest that electric fields per se may not have caused these reproductive changes. For example, similar types of malformations occurred in control pigs. Also, in second-generation sows, the incidence of fetal malformations was similar for both exposed and control groups. It is possible that other factors such as housing, inbreeding, disease, or treatment of disease may have produced the observed effects. 64 refs., 13 figs., 25 tabs.

  11. A 60 Hz electric and magnetic field exposure facility for nonhuman primates: Design and operational data during experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Lucas, J.H.; Cory, W.E.; Orr, J.L.; Smith, H.D.

    1995-12-31

    A unique exposure facility was designed and constructed to generate large-scale vertical electric fields (EF) of up to 65 kV/m and horizontal magnetic fields (MF) of up to 100 {micro}T (1G), so that the behavioral and neuroendocrine effects of 60 Hz EF or combined electric and magnetic field (E/MF) exposure could be examined using nonhuman primates as subjects. Facility design and operational problems and their solutions are presented, and representative operational data from four sets of experiments are provided. A specially designed, optically isolated, 4 cm spherical-dipole EF probe and a commercially available MF probe were used to map the EF and MF within the fiberglass animal cages. In addition, amplifiers, signal conditioners, and A/D converters provided EF, MF, and transformer signals to a microcomputer at 15 min intervals. The apparatus produced homogeneous, stable E/MF at the desired intensities, and the fiberglass cages did not produce appreciable distortion or attenuation. Levels of recognized EF artifacts such as corona and ozone were negligible. The facility worked as intended, providing a well-characterized and artifact-controlled environment for experiments with baboons (Papio cynocephalus).

  12. Study of the behavioral and biological effects of high-strength 60-Hz electric fields. Quarterly technical progress report number 10, 18 December 1982-18 March 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-20

    The objective of this contract is to use the baboon as a surrogate for the human in studies of the possible deleterious effects of exposure to high strength, 60 Hz electric fields. The specific aims of this contract are to (1) design and construct an exposure facility in which baboons can be exposed to an electric field up to 60 kV/m in intensity for experiments and (2) to develop computer models relating the fields and currents produced in both baboons and humans by exposure to high strength, 60 Hz electric fields.

  13. Study of the behavioral and biological effects of high-strength 60-Hz electric fields. Quarterly progress report, 11 October 1981-10 January 1982. [Research plan

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    The primary objective of this research is to study the effects of high intensity, 60 Hz electric fields on baboon behavior to obtain information which will assist in the determination of the degree of risk of deleterious consequences for humans exposed to such fields. The generalization of results obtained with the baboon to predictions concerning humans will be aided by the development of computer models relating the surface electric field intensities and internal current densities produced in baboons and humans by exposure to high intensity, 60 Hz electric fields. Research plans are described.

  14. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-09-24

    The objective of this program is to investigate behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields (E/MF), using the baboon (Papio cynocephalus) as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, could be used to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences of human exposure to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission. This report covers a series of three experiments (Experiments III, IV, and IVA) on the effect of combined 60-Hz E/MF on operant behavior. These experiments were a continuation of previous investigations of 60-Hz electric field exposure on baboons.

  15. Biological studies of swine exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Volume 4: growth, reproduction, and development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-12-01

    Swine were exposed to uniform, vertical, 60-Hz, 30-kV/m electric fields for 20 hours/day, 7 days/week. The parental generation (F/sub 0/ gilts) was bred after 4 months on study; some were killed for teratologic study at 100 days of gestation (dg), and the others produced a first-generation (F/sub 1/) of offspring. The pooled incidence of terata in these litters was similar in the exposed and sham-exposed groups. The F/sub 0/ females, which produced the F/sub 1/ generation, were rebred after 18 months of exposure and were killed at 100 dg: malformation incidence in exposed litters (75%) was significantly greater than in sham-exposed litters (29%). Types of malformations were not dissimilar between the two groups. The F/sub 1/ gilts were bred at 18 months of age; there were indications of impaired copulatory behavior and decreased fertility in the exposed animals. Defective offspring were found in significantly more of the exposed litters (71%) than in sham-exposed litters (33%). The F/sub 1/ sows were bred again 10 months later, and teratologic evaluations were performed on their second litters at 100 dg. The percentage of litters with malformed fetuses was essentially identical in the exposed and sham-exposed groups (70 and 73%, respectively). The change in malformation incidences between generations and between the first and second breedings makes it difficult to unequivocally conclude that chronic exposure to a strong electric field caused developmental effects in swine, although it appears there may be an association. It is also possible that other factors, such as housing, inbreeding, disease or its treatment may have contributed to the results. 22 refs., 9 figs., 28 tabs.

  16. Effects of a 30 kV/m, 60 Hz electric field on the social behavior of baboons: A crossover experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Easley, S.P.; Coelho, A.M. Jr.; Rogers, W.R. )

    1992-01-01

    Using a crossover experimental design, we evaluated our earlier findings that exposure to a 30 kV/m, 60 Hz electric field for 12 hours per day, 7 days per week for 6 weeks produced significant changes in the performance rates of social behaviors among young adult male baboons. In the crossover experiment, the former control group was exposed to a 30 kV/m, 60 Hz electric field for 3 weeks. Only an extremely small, incidental magnetic field was generated by the exposure apparatus. We found that electric-field exposure again produced increases in the performance rates that index Passive Affinity, Tension, and Stereotypy. These findings, combined with results from our other electric-field experiments, indicate that exposure to strong electric fields, in the absence of associated magnetic fields, consistently produces effects that are expressed as increases in rates of performance of social behaviors in young adult male baboons.

  17. Behavioral and prenatal effects of 60-Hz fields

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-08-01

    Purpose was to determine possible neural, behavioral, and reproductive effects of low-intensity 60-Hz electric fields on mammals (rats) exposed in-utero. The tests used shortly after birth included negative geotaxis, the acoustic startle response, surface righting, in-air righting, cliff avoidance, emotionality, and swimming endurance. Variations between the exposed and control groups are discussed. 9 tables. (DLC)

  18. EFFECTS OF 60-HZ FIELDS ON HUMAN HEALTH PARAMETERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Specific results of research on the effects of exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields have often been contradictory and difficult to replicate. The study reported here used quantitative exercise testing techniques to evaluate whether increases in metabolism, caused by mod...

  19. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.D.

    1993-01-22

    The objective of this program is to investigate behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields (E/MF), using the baboon (Papio cynocephalus) as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, could be used to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences of human exposure to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission.

  20. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates. Annual report, FY1992

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.D

    1993-01-22

    The objective of this program is to investigate behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields (E/MF), using the baboon (Papio cynocephalus) as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, could be used to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences of human exposure to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission.

  1. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, J.L.

    1990-04-01

    The objective of this program is to investigate, using the baboon as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human, behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, could be used to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences resulting from exposure of humans to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission. Activities this quarter extended those of the first project year: the modification of the facility to include 60-Hz magnetic fields, and development of the capability for studies of neuroendocrine parameters by obtaining blood samples from baboons during electric and magnetic field exposure. 18 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine systems of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this program is to investigate, using the baboon as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human, behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, could be used to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences resulting from exposure of humans to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission. Activities this quarter extended those of the first project year which focused on two technical areas: the modification of the facility to include 60-Hz magnetic fields, and development of the capability for studies of neuroendocrine parameters by obtaining blood samples from baboons during electric and magnetic field exposure. 25 figs., 11 tabs.

  3. (Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates)

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, J.L.

    1989-03-24

    The objective of this program is to investigate, using the baboon as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human, behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, could be used to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences resulting from exposure of humans to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission. The test facility is being modified to include combined electric and magnetic field capability. This will be accomplished by the installation of a magnetic field exposure system and modification of the electric field exposure equipment. The purpose of this document is to provide information on the design. 14 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-07-14

    This volume contains detailed experimental data to accompany quarterly report, dated July 14, 1992, by this group entitled Investigation of Effects of 60-Hz Electric Fields on Operant and Social Behavior and on the Neuroendocrine System of Nonhuman Primates.'' This volume is a collection of Appendices which are entitled: Appendix A- Field Mapping Data Forms, Appendix B- Exposure Area (East Side) Electric Field Data, Appendix C- Exposure Area (East Side) Magnetic Field Data, Appendix D- Sham Area (West Side) Magnetic Field Data, Appendix E- Memoranda Concerning Field Onset During Experiment IV and the Crossover Experiment, Appendix F- Exposure Area (East Side) Electric Field Data, Appendix G- Exposure Area (East Side) Magnetic Field Data, Appendix H- Sham Area (west Side) Magnetic Field Data, Appendix I- Compiled Data and Anovas for Experiment III Social Data, Appendix J -Written Comments Provided by Statistician Dr. Robert Mason, and Appendix K- Reference Text Provided by Dr. Coelho.

  5. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, J.L.

    1989-10-01

    The objective of this program is to investigate, using the baboon as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human, behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields. Results from this program could be used to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences resulting from exposure of humans to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission. This program is being conducted at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) as part of an international collaborative information exchange and scientific research effort. This annual report marks the completion of the first year of the four year research program. This project year has focused on two technical areas: the modification of the facility to include 60-Hz magnetic fields, and development of the capability for studies of neuroendocrine parameters by obtaining blood samples from baboons during electric and magnetic field exposure. Activities in the social behavior, operant behavior, and laboratory animal sciences during this project year have been in preparation for the start of Experiment 3. 7 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Regularly scheduled, day-time, slow-onset 60 Hz electric and magnetic field exposure does not depress serum melatonin concentration in nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Smith, H.D.; Orr, J.L.; Reiter, R.J.; Barlow-Walden, L.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments conducted with laboratory rodents indicate that exposure to 60 Hz electric fields or magnetic fields can suppress nocturnal melatonin concentrations in pineal gland and blood. In three experiments employing three field-exposed and three sham-exposed nonhuman primates, each implanted with an indwelling venous cannula to allow repeated blood sampling, the authors studied the effects of either 6 kV/m and 50 {micro}T (0.5 G) or 30 kV/m and 100 {micro}T (1.0 G) on serum melatonin patterns. The fields were ramped on and off slowly, so that no transients occurred. Extensive quality control for the melatonin assay, computerized control and monitoring of field intensities, and consistent exposure protocols were used. No changes in nocturnal serum melatonin concentration resulted from 6 weeks of day-time exposure with slow field onset/offset and a highly regular exposure protocol. These results indicate that, under the conditions tested, day-time exposure to 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields in combination does not result in melatonin suppression in primates.

  7. Effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on nueroendocrine system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.

    1993-01-22

    This series of experiments, using a well-characterized exposure facility and employing a variety of control procedures to study behavior and the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates, does not provide any evidence that exposure to power-frequency electric fields, or electric and magnetic fields in combination, for 12 hours per day for six weeks produces any deleterious effects in young-adult males. The primate experiments summarized here confirm the general conclusion indicated by experiments with rodents; although biological and behavioral changes can occur, there are no clear results establishing the occurrence of adverse effects in experiments involving relatively short-term exposure to environmentally-relevant electric or magnetic fields. Given the general agreement of the primate and rodent results, conclusions from the laboratory animal studies therefore presumably generalize well to humans.

  8. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-09-01

    A cohort of sixteen male baboons were assigned to electric and magnetic field (E/MF) exposure and sham-exposure. The social behavior subjects were simultaneously exposed to 60 Hz E/MF. Ten behavioral categories were measured. Each behavioral category was comprised of multiple molecular behaviors that could be objectively identified and counted. Six of the behavior categories were social'', in that interactions between subjected were involved. The remaining four were non-social'' and pertained to individual behaviors such as movements or postural stances.

  9. Exposure of baboons to combined 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields does not produce work stoppage or affect operant performance on a match-to-sample task

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, J.L.; Rogers, W.R.; Smith, H.D.

    1995-12-31

    The authors examined the effects of combined 60 Hz electric and magnetic field (EMF) exposure on performance of delayed match-to-sample (MTS) procedure involving the flash rate of a light as the stimulus. Six baboons (Papio cynocephalus) fully acquired the task; four others functioned accurately only when cued. All ten subjects were assigned to EMF-exposed or sham-exposed groups of five and were used to test for a work-stoppage effect that was previously observed with initial exposure to electric fields (EF) of 30 or 60 kV/m. Here, the authors report the results of two experiments, each consisting of 6 week preexposure, exposure, and postexposure periods. They found no evidence of work stoppage with fields of 6 kV/m and 50 {micro}T (0.5 G) or with 30 kV/m and 100 {micro}T (1.0 G). In neither experiment was there evidence of an adverse effect of 60 Hz EMF exposure on MTS performance.

  10. Rapid-onset/offset, variably scheduled 60 Hz electric and magnetic field exposure reduces nocturnal serum melatonin concentration in nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Smith, H.D.; Reiter, R.J.; Barlow-Walden, L.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments with rodents indicate that power-frequency electric field (EF) or magnetic field (MF) exposure can suppress the normal nocturnal increase in melatonin concentration in pineal gland and blood. In a separate set of three experiments conducted with nonhuman primates, the authors did not observe melatonin suppression as a result of 6 weeks of day-time exposure to combined 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields (E/MF) with regularly schedule ``slow`` E/MF onsets/offsets. The study described here used a different exposure paradigm in which two baboons were exposed to E/MF with ``rapid`` E/MF onsets/offsets accompanied by EF transients not found with slowly ramped E/MF onset/offset; profound reductions in nocturnal serum melatonin concentration were observed in this experiment. If replicated in a more extensive experiment, the observation of melatonin suppression only in the presence of E/MF transients would suggest that very specific exposure parameters determine the effects of 60 Hz E/MF on melatonin.

  11. (Study of the behavioral and biological effects of high intensity 60 Hz electric fields): Quarterly technical progress report No. 29

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, J.L.

    1989-07-14

    Activities this quarter involved all phases of the project plus a meeting of the Joint Committee in Tokyo. Detailed mapping of the exposure facility is scheduled to be completed during the week of August 14, 1989. Both electric and magnetic fields should be available for tests of the components of the tether and blood sampling system for the neuroendocrine pilot study in September 1989. The groups for the social behavior study are stabilizing appropriately. Details on the formation of the groups and their status has been provided. Dr. Coelho has included information related to aspects of the social experiment ranging from age estimation in baboons through the cardiovascular consequences of psychosocial stress. In addition, a draft manuscript is included on the data from the previous experiments which describes the effects of 30 and 60 kV/m electric fields on the social behavior of baboons. Tests of the blood handling procedures and analysis methods have been completed. With the exception of the catecholamine analyses, the handling procedures and variability in replicate measurements are satisfactory. Logistic and practical considerations now weigh strongly against including the analysis of the blood samples for catecholamines. Preliminary tests indicate that a sampling procedure which will work for the other compounds is probably not satisfactory for the catecholamines.

  12. Effects of concurrent exposure to 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields on the social behavior of baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, A.M. Jr.; Easley, S.P.; Rogers, W.R. |

    1995-12-31

    Previous research has demonstrated that 30 or 60 kV/m electric fields (EF) reliably produce temporary increases in the performance of three categories of baboon social behavior: Passive Affinity, Tension, and Stereotypy. The experimental design included 6 week preexposure, exposure, and postexposure periods with experimental and control groups, each with eight subjects. Here, the authors report two experiments that evaluated the effects of combined EF and magnetic fields (MF) on baboon social behavior. One experiment demonstrated that exposure to 6 kV/m EF and 50 {micro}T (0.5 G) MF produced Period {times} Group interactions for Stereotypy and Attack, but the previously observed increases in Passive Affinity, Tension, and Stereotypy did not occur. A second experiment demonstrated that exposure to 30 kV/m EF and 100 {micro}T 1.0 G MF did not produce the same magnitude of increases in Passive Affinity, Tension, and Stereotypy observed previously with 30 kV/m EF alone. The exposed group exhibited decreased performance rates for several behavior categories during exposure with further declines during postexposure. The control group showed fewer downward trends across periods.

  13. Are the stray 60-Hz electromagnetic fields associated with the distribution and use of electric power a significant cause of cancer?

    PubMed

    Jackson, J D

    1992-04-15

    The putative causal relation between ambient low-frequency (50 or 60 Hz) electromagnetic fields (necessarily present in living and working environments because of our ever increasing use of electrical devices) and cancer, especially leukemia, can be tested on the large scale by examining historical data on the growth of the generation and consumption of electric power since 1900 and corresponding data on cancer death and incidence rates. The United States per capita generation and residential consumption of electric power have grown roughly exponentially since 1900; total per capita generation has increased by a factor of 10 since 1940, and per capita residential consumption has increased by a factor of 20 in the same period. The ubiquitous stray fields from power distribution lines and internal and external wiring in buildings have grown in the same proportions. In contrast to the explosive increase in the generation and use of electricity, the age-adjusted cancer death rate for the population as a whole shows only a slight rise since 1900. When respiratory cancers (largely caused by tobacco use) are subtracted, the remaining death rate has actually fallen since 1940. That the death rate may have fallen because of better diagnosis and treatment, despite a rising incidence rate, is not substantiated, especially for leukemia, including childhood leukemia, where the incidence rate has been constant or declining slightly for the past 25 yr. The absence of any appreciable change in the national cancer incidence rates during a period in which residential use of electric power has increased dramatically shows that the associated stray 50- or 60-Hz electromagnetic fields pose no significant hazard to the average individual. PMID:1565645

  14. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-07-14

    The objective of this program is to investigate behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields, using the baboon (Papio cynocephalus). Results from this program are used to estimate consequences of human exposure to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission. Electric and magnetic field measurements for Experiment IIIA (Confirmatory), Experiment IV and Social Behavior portion of Experiment III are presented. The systems for the production and monitoring of the fields performed satisfactorily during Experiment IIIA and during all but the last part of Experiment IV. In Experiment III, two-way repeated analyses of variance revealed statistically significant Group (Exposed and Sham Exposed) and Period (Baseline. Exposure, and Post-Exposure) main effects. Two significant Period by Group interactions were also found. Seven of the ten behavioral categories showed a main effect of Period. Two-sample t-test comparisons of the two groups for each period indicated that performance rates in two behavioral categories (Stereotypy and Posture) were significantly lower in the Exposure Group. In general, the Exposed subjects exhibited a trend of progressively lower performance rates across the three periods. Specific accomplishments reported in this document were: measurement of electric and magnetic fields for Experiments IIIA and IV, completed analysis of the Social Behavioral data from Experiment III, and a detailed discussion of statistical methods employed on the Social Behavioral portion of Experiment III, and hematology data were collected and recorded for Operant and Social Behavioral subjects for Experiment IV.

  15. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.D.

    1992-11-02

    The objective of this program is to investigate behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields (E/MF), using the baboon surrogate for the human. Baboon social groups were scanned and electronically monitored during Experiments IV and IVA. The social scan, form that the technicians used to identify baboon locations and proximity to other baboons: was used to gain a simple snapshot of the position of the baboons in their cage. The scans were taken hourly every morning and evening for a total of eight scans per side per day. This report covers in detail the scan and activity data-gathering process. A set of appendices is attached which include printouts of the data sets and adjunct material pertinent to interpreting the data. The supporting material is comprised of calendars and listings of major events that occurred during the scan and activity data collection.

  16. Electric field of the power terrestrial sources observed by microsatellite Chibis-M in the Earth's ionosphere in frequency range 1-60 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkin, Fedir; Korepanov, Valery; Dudkin, Denis; Pilipenko, Vyacheslav; Pronenko, Vira; Klimov, Stanislav

    2015-07-01

    The power line emission (PLE) 50/60 Hz and the Schumann resonance (SR) harmonics were detected by the use of a compact electrical field sensor of length 0.42 m during microsatellite Chibis-M mission in years 2012-2014. The initial orbit of Chibis-M has altitude 500 km and inclination 52°. We present the space distribution of PLE and its connections with the possible overhead power lines. PLE has been recorded both in the shade and sunlit parts of the orbits as opposed to SR which have been recorded only in the nightside of the Earth. The cases of an extra long distance of PLE propagation in the Earth's ionosphere and increased value of SR Q factor have been also observed. These results should stimulate the ionosphere model refinement for ultralow frequency and extremely low frequency electromagnetic wave propagation as well as a study on new possibility of the ionosphere diagnostics.

  17. Chronically indwelling venous cannula and automatic blood sampling system for use with nonhuman primates exposed to 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Lucas, J.H.; Smith, H.D.; Orr, J.L.; Mikiten, B.C.

    1995-12-31

    An automated blood sampling system was developed for use with tethered baboons (Papio cynocephalus) during concurrent exposure to 60 Hz 30 kV/m electric fields and 0.1 mT (1.0 G) magnetic fields. The system was controlled by a FORTH-based microcomputer, which operated a pump, a fraction collector, and two pinch valves. A swivel mechanism at the end of the tether allowed the baboons to move freely in their cages. The hardware and software were designed for fail-safe operation. Heparinized saline was infused at a rate of 0.5 ml/min until a sample cycle was initiated. Then, blood was drawn from the animal into a storage tube at a rate of 12.5 ml/min, a sample of undiluted blood was taken from the end of the storage tube near the baboon, and the blood remaining in the storage tube was then flushed back into the animal. Use of the storage tube prevented the peristaltic pump rollers from pressing on tubing containing blood, and return of the blood diluted with saline limited the blood wasted per sample to less than 0.5 ml. The system functioned reliably in three experiments, collecting samples as scheduled 97% of the time. Although it was initially designed for and used successfully with primates in an electric and magnetic field environment, this type of system could be employed in many areas of biomedical research or medical treatment.

  18. Initial studies on the effects of combined 60 Hz electric and magnetic field exposure on the immune system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, K.K.; Rogers, W.R.; Smith, H.D.

    1995-12-31

    In a pilot immunology experiment, peripheral blood samples from six baboons (Papio cynocephalus) housed as a social group were collected during week 5 of preexposure, exposure, and postexposure periods that were each 6 weeks in duration. The subjects were exposed to vertical 6 kV/m and horizontal 50 {micro}T (0.5 G) fields for 12 h per day. Lymphocytes collected during the exposure period displayed statistically significant (P < .05) reductions in CD3{sup +} and CD4{sup +} counts, interleukin 2 receptor expression, and proliferative response to pokeweed mitogen. A second experiment was conducted using samples from seven subjects exposed to 30 kV/m and 100 {micro}T (1.0 G) and eight sham-exposed subjects. Statistically significant Period {times} Group interactions occurred for total white blood cell count and CD4{sup +} to CD8{sup +} ratio, but the pattern of results was not suggestive of an exposure-related effect. Although components of the nonhuman primate immune system appear to be affected by 60 Hz electric and magnetic field exposure in one of two experiments, additional experiments are required to evaluate this possibility.

  19. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates. Quarterly report 40, Operant behavior: Experiments 3, 4, and 4A

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-09-24

    The objective of this program is to investigate behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields (E/MF), using the baboon (Papio cynocephalus) as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, could be used to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences of human exposure to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission. This report covers a series of three experiments (Experiments III, IV, and IVA) on the effect of combined 60-Hz E/MF on operant behavior. These experiments were a continuation of previous investigations of 60-Hz electric field exposure on baboons.

  20. Initial exposure to 30 kV/m or 60 kV/m 60 Hz electric fields produces temporary cessation of operant behavior of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Orr, J.L.; Smith, H.D.

    1995-12-31

    In two separate experiments, the authors examined the effects of a 60 Hz electric field (EF) on performance of an operant schedule consisting of two signaled components: fixed-ratio (FR30) and differential reinforcement of low-rate (DRL20). In each experiment, 12 naive baboons (Papio cynocephalus) were assigned randomly to either an EF-exposed experimental group or a sham-exposed control group. A homogeneous vertical EF of 30 kV/m was used in one experiment; 60 kV/m was used in the other. The experimental design for both experiments included 6 week preexposure, exposure, and postexposure periods. The planned analyses indicated no evidence of statistically significant (P < .05) effects of EF exposure. However, exploratory analyses comparing performance during the last week of preexposure and the first week of exposure revealed statistically significant acute effects (work stoppage): The mean response rates of the EF-exposed groups were greatly reduced on day 1 of exposure but were normal by the end of day 2 of EF exposure. The authors hypothesize that introduction of a highly unusual stimulus, the EF, temporarily interfered with normal operant behavior to produce a primary work stoppage. Supplementary cross-over experiments added at the end of each main experiment indicated that work stoppage occurred again when formerly EF-exposed subjects served as sham-exposed controls, while other subjects received their first EF exposure. Presumably, reoccurrence of other stimuli correlated with initial exposure to the EF became sufficient to subsequently cause secondary work stoppage in the absence of direct EF exposure. The primary and secondary work-stoppage effects were reproducible.

  1. Residential 60-Hz magnetic fields and temporal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Robert Stephen

    1998-06-01

    The basic question addressed by this research is: How well can data from a single measurement visit estimate longer-term ambient residential 60-Hz magnetic field levels? We undertook repeat 60-Hz magnetic field measurements every two months for one year, plus one additional visit for 14 days of measurement. The study sample consisted of 51 single-family homes, 24 in Minneapolis-St. Paul and 27 in Detroit. Homes were selected by random-digit dialing; each was home to a child eligible to serve a control subject in the National Cancer Institute-Children's Cancer Group Electromagnetic Fields and Radon Study. Trained survey interviewers obtained all measurement data, using an expanded measurement protocol from the main study: (1) spot 60-Hz magnetic field measurements at the centers of three rooms and at the front door; (2) 24- hour (or 14 day) 60-Hz magnetic field measurement in the subject child's bedroom; and (3) geomagnetic field at the centers of two rooms and on the child's bed. The data set available for analysis consists of 349 out of 357 (97.8%) possible sets of spot measurements and 1060 out of 1071 (99.0%) possible days of 24-hour and two-week measurements. A Long-Term Estimate, Child's Bedroom, or LTECB, the geometric mean of the 24-hour measurement geometric means, was used as the reference for analysis. The LTECB was analyzed for house-level main effects and for repeated-measures (temporal) main effects. House-level main effects account for only 41% of the variability in the LTECB. The statistically significant main effects are study area, wire code and population density. A clear trend of increasing LTECB with population density is evident. The seasonal effect is small, but statistically significant. There is no evidence for a day-of-week effect, but a statistically significant diurnal effect is present. Correlation coefficients relating the LTECB to any of three primary single-visit measurement and exposure metric surrogates are >.9. However, when

  2. Influence of 60-Hz magnetic fields on sea urchin development

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, S.; Zimmerman, A.M.; Winters, W.D.; Cameron, I.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Continuous exposure of sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) embryos at 18 degrees C to a cyclic 60-Hz magnetic field at 0.1 mT rms beginning 4 min after insemination caused a significant developmental delay during the subsequent 23 hours. No delay in development was recorded for periods up to 18 hours after fertilization. At 18 h, most embryos were in the mesenchyme blastula stage. At 23 h, most control embryos were in mid-gastrula whereas most magnetic-field-exposed embryos were in the early gastrula stage. Thus an estimated 1-h delay occurred between these developmental stages. The results are discussed in terms of possible magnetic-field modification of transcription as well as interference with cell migration during gastrulation. The present study extends and supports the growing body of information about potential effects of exposures to extremely-low-frequency (ELF) magnetic fields on developing organisms.

  3. Effects of 60 Hz electric fields on operant and social stress behaviors of nonhuman primates. Annual report, August 5, 1984-October 25, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Lucas, J.H.; Moore, G.T.; Orr, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    Operant behavioral methods have been used to assess the aversiveness of intense electric fields. One aspect of the aversiveness of a stimulus is the ability to act as a negative reinforcer. A negative reinforcer is a stimulus whose response contingent termination maintains behavior. Baboons were trained to perform an operant task to obtain food rewards, determined that the addition of an intense electric field did not disrupt performance, measured the background level of responding in the absence of any primary reinforcers, assessed the ability of electric field termination to maintain operant responding, and verified that the electric field could serve as a discriminative stimulus.

  4. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates. Quarterly report 37 - Part 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-07-14

    This volume contains detailed experimental data to accompany quarterly report, dated July 14, 1992, by this group entitled ``Investigation of Effects of 60-Hz Electric Fields on Operant and Social Behavior and on the Neuroendocrine System of Nonhuman Primates.`` This volume is a collection of Appendices which are entitled: Appendix A- Field Mapping Data Forms, Appendix B- Exposure Area (East Side) Electric Field Data, Appendix C- Exposure Area (East Side) Magnetic Field Data, Appendix D- Sham Area (West Side) Magnetic Field Data, Appendix E- Memoranda Concerning Field Onset During Experiment IV and the Crossover Experiment, Appendix F- Exposure Area (East Side) Electric Field Data, Appendix G- Exposure Area (East Side) Magnetic Field Data, Appendix H- Sham Area (west Side) Magnetic Field Data, Appendix I- Compiled Data and Anovas for Experiment III Social Data, Appendix J -Written Comments Provided by Statistician Dr. Robert Mason, and Appendix K- Reference Text Provided by Dr. Coelho.

  5. Effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates. Draft final report, October 1, 1988--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Coelho, A.M.; Easley, S.P.; Orr, J.L.; Reiter, R.J.; Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-09-24

    A series of pioneering electric and magnetic field experiments were completed using nonhuman primates and a unique, well-engineered, and reliable exposure facility. Effects of operant behavior, social behavior, and serum melatonin concentration were examined using 60 Hz field combinations of other 6 W/m and 0.6 G or 30 W/m and 1.0 G. Observations noted in the course of this study include: Combines electric and magnetic field exposure does not have any important effect on short-term memory; the transitory increases in social behavior observed in previous electric fields did not occur; combined electric and magnetic field exposure might lead to reduced behavioral frequency in baboon social groups; three experiments clearly establish that one set of exposure conditions does not produce molatonin suppression in nonhuman primates; and a small pilot experiment suggests that a different exposure protocol might result in melatonin suppression.

  6. Long-term effects of 60-Hz electric vs. magnetic fields on IL-1 and other immune parameters in sheep: Phase 4 study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hefeneider, S.H.; McCoy, S.L.; Hausman, F.A.

    1998-10-01

    This study was designed to assess the effect of exposure to long-term low-frequency electric and magnetic fields (EMF) from an environmental 500-kV transmission line on immune function in sheep. The primary hypothesis tested was that the reduction in IL-1 activity observed in two previous short-term studies (9 months) was due to exposure to EMF from this transmission line. The secondary hypothesis was that long-term exposure (27 months) would impact immune function and animal health. To characterize the components of the EMF environment responsible for the previously observed reduction in IL-1 activity, the experiment was designed not only to examine the effect of exposure to electric and magnetic fields, but also to examine the magnetic field component alone. This was done by constructing a third pen (MF) which was shielded with wire to effectively eliminate the electric field while not significantly affecting the magnitude of the magnetic field.

  7. Effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on nueroendocrine system of nonhuman primates. Final report, October 1, 1988--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.

    1993-01-22

    This series of experiments, using a well-characterized exposure facility and employing a variety of control procedures to study behavior and the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates, does not provide any evidence that exposure to power-frequency electric fields, or electric and magnetic fields in combination, for 12 hours per day for six weeks produces any deleterious effects in young-adult males. The primate experiments summarized here confirm the general conclusion indicated by experiments with rodents; although biological and behavioral changes can occur, there are no clear results establishing the occurrence of adverse effects in experiments involving relatively short-term exposure to environmentally-relevant electric or magnetic fields. Given the general agreement of the primate and rodent results, conclusions from the laboratory animal studies therefore presumably generalize well to humans.

  8. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates. Social behavior portions of Experiments III and IV: Quarterly report No. 39

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-09-01

    A cohort of sixteen male baboons were assigned to electric and magnetic field (E/MF) exposure and sham-exposure. The social behavior subjects were simultaneously exposed to 60 Hz E/MF. Ten behavioral categories were measured. Each behavioral category was comprised of multiple molecular behaviors that could be objectively identified and counted. Six of the behavior categories were ``social``, in that interactions between subjected were involved. The remaining four were ``non-social`` and pertained to individual behaviors such as movements or postural stances.

  9. Long-term effects of 60-Hz electric vs. magnetic fields on IL-1 and other immune parameters in sheep: Phase 5 study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hefeneider, S.H.; McCoy, S.L.; Hausman, F.A.

    1998-10-01

    This study was designed to assess the effect of exposure to long-term low-frequency electric and magnetic fields (EMF) from a 500-kV transmission line on immune function in sheep. The primary hypothesis was that the reduction in IL-1 activity observed in two previous short-term studies (9 months) was due to EMF exposure from this transmission line. The secondary hypothesis was that long-term exposure (27 months) would impact immune function and animal health. To characterize the components of EMF responsible for the previously observed reduction in IL-1 activity, the experiment was designed not only to examine the effect of exposure to electric and magnetic fields, but also to examine the magnetic field component alone.

  10. Effects of 60 Hz electric fields on operant and social stress behaviors of nonhuman primates. Technical status report, June 8-August 2, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-08-02

    Progress made at calibrating the electric field distribution within and around cages used for behavorial testing of baboons is described. It is concluded that all of the parts of the ''system'' are rather constant in their readings. The only component which seems to show appreciable variability is the 4 cm probe. Although the optically coupled 4 cm spherical dipole probe usually performs well, it is becoming apparent that sometimes it can produce misleading results. Although we do not yet understand the situation completely, it appears as though there are at least two variables affecting the probe, battery voltage and humidity. 2 figs., 9 tabs.

  11. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates: Neuroendocrine portion of Experiment IV

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-08-31

    This quarterly report covers the neuroendocrine Portion of Experiment IV. Serum melatonin concentration was measured in individual baboons, each implanted with a chronically indwelling venous cannula. As in Experiment III the system of six automatic blood samplers was used to achieve undisturbed, 24 hr per day, simultaneous blood sampling from six individual subjects. The objective of the neuroendocrine portion of Experiment IV was to determine if 30 kV/m electric and 1.0 G magnetic field (E/MF) exposure produced a 50% decline in nocturnal serum melatonin concentration. Other groups of subjects were tested concurrently during Experiment IV to assess E/MF effects on group social and individual operant behavior. The results of these experiments will be covered respectively in the next two quarterly reports. The results of Experiment IV, as was the case with the result of Experiments III and IIIA, provide little or no evidence that E/MF exposure, under the conditions of these experiments, affects nocturnal serum melatonin concentrations of nonhuman primates. Together the negative results of Experiments III, IIA and IV indicate that day-time exposure of primates to slow-onset/offset, regularly-scheduled E/MF does not produce melatonin suppression, strongly suggesting that such exposure would not affect human melatonin either. However, before concluding that E/MF exposure in general has no effect on primate melatonin, nightime exposure needs to be examined, and the possibility, suggested by the Pilot Experiment, that fast onset/offset, irregularly-scheduled E/MF can completely suppress melatonin needs to be investigated.

  12. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates. Quarterly report 37 - Part 1, Text

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-07-14

    The objective of this program is to investigate behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields, using the baboon (Papio cynocephalus). Results from this program are used to estimate consequences of human exposure to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission. Electric and magnetic field measurements for Experiment IIIA (Confirmatory), Experiment IV and Social Behavior portion of Experiment III are presented. The systems for the production and monitoring of the fields performed satisfactorily during Experiment IIIA and during all but the last part of Experiment IV. In Experiment III, two-way repeated analyses of variance revealed statistically significant Group (Exposed and Sham Exposed) and Period (Baseline. Exposure, and Post-Exposure) main effects. Two significant Period by Group interactions were also found. Seven of the ten behavioral categories showed a main effect of Period. Two-sample t-test comparisons of the two groups for each period indicated that performance rates in two behavioral categories (Stereotypy and Posture) were significantly lower in the Exposure Group. In general, the Exposed subjects exhibited a trend of progressively lower performance rates across the three periods. Specific accomplishments reported in this document were: measurement of electric and magnetic fields for Experiments IIIA and IV, completed analysis of the Social Behavioral data from Experiment III, and a detailed discussion of statistical methods employed on the Social Behavioral portion of Experiment III, and hematology data were collected and recorded for Operant and Social Behavioral subjects for Experiment IV.

  13. Large Granular Lymphocytic (LGL) Leukemia in Rats Exposed to Intermittent 60 Hz Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Larry E.); Morris, James E.); Miller, Douglas L.); Ebi, K L.; Sasser, Lyle B.)

    2001-04-01

    An animal model for large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia in male Fischer 344 rats utilized to determine whether magnetic field exposure can be shown to influence the progression of leukemia. We previously reported that exposure to continuous 60 Hz 1 mT magnetic fields did not significantly alter the clinical progression of LGL leukemia in young male rats following inspection of spleen cells from donor leukemic rats. Results presented here extend those studies with the objectives to (1) replicate the previous study of continuous 60-Hz magnetic field exposures but using fewer LGL cells in the inoculum, and (2) determine if intermittent 60-Hz magnetic fields can alter the clinical progression of leukemia.

  14. Constraints of thermal noise on the effects of weak 60-Hz magnetic fields acting on biological magnetite.

    PubMed Central

    Adair, R K

    1994-01-01

    Previous calculations of limits imposed by thermal noise on the effects of weak 60-Hz magnetic fields on biological magnetite are generalized and extended to consider multiple signals, the possibility of anomalously large magnetosome structures, and the possibility of anomalously small cytoplasm viscosities. The results indicate that the energies transmitted to the magnetite elements by fields less than 5 microT, characteristic of the electric power distribution system, will be much less than thermal noise energies. Hence, the effects of such weak fields will be masked by that noise and cannot be expected to affect biology or, therefore, the health of populations. PMID:8159681

  15. Effects of a 60 Hz magnetic field on central cholinergic systems of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W. )

    1993-03-15

    The authors studied the effects of an acute exposure to a 60 Hz magnetic field on sodium-dependent, high-affinity choline uptake in the brain of the rat. Decreases in uptake were observed in the frontal cortex and hippocampus after the animals were exposed to a magnetic field at flux densities [>=] 0.75 mT. These effects of the magnetic field were blocked by pretreating the animals with the narcotic antagonist naltrexone, but not by the peripheral opioid antagonist, naloxone methiodide. These data indicate that the magnetic-field-induced decreases in high-affinity choline uptake in the rat brain were mediated by endogenous opioids in the central nervous systems.

  16. Rodent cell transformation and immediate early gene expression following 60-Hz magnetic field exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Balcer-Kubiczek, E K; Zhang, X F; Harrison, G H; McCready, W A; Shi, Z M; Han, L H; Abraham, J M; Ampey, L L; Meltzer, S J; Jacobs, M C; Davis, C C

    1996-01-01

    Some epidemiological studies suggest that exposure to power frequency magnetic fields (MFs) may be associated with an elevated risk of human cancer, but the experimental database remains limited and controversial. We investigated the hypothesis that 60-Hz MF action at the cellular level produces changes in gene expression that can result in neoplastic transformation. Twenty-four hour 200 microT continuous MF exposure produced negative results in two standard transformation systems (Syrian hamster embryo cells and C3H/10T1/2 murine fibroblasts) with or without postexposure to a chemical promoter. This prompted a reexamination of previously reported MF-induced changes in gene expression in human HL60 cells. Extensive testing using both coded and uncoded analyses was negative for an MF effect. Using the same exposure conditions as in the transformation studies, no MF-induced changes in ornithine decarboxylase expression were observed in C3H/10T1/2 cells, casting doubt on a promotional role of MF for the tested cells and experimental conditions. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. A Figure 2. B Figure 2. C Figure 2. D Figure 3. A Figure 3. B Figure 4. Figure 5. A Figure 5. B Figure 5. C Figure 5. D Figure 5. E Figure 6. A Figure 6. B Figure 6. C Figure 6. D Figure 6. E Figure 7. Figure 8. A Figure 8. B Figure 8. C Figure 9. Figure 10. A Figure 10. B PMID:8959408

  17. Evaluation of the developmental toxicity of 60 Hz magnetic fields and harmonic frequencies in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Ryan, B M; Polen, M; Gauger, J R; Mallett, E; Kearns, M B; Bryan, T L; McCormick, D L

    2000-05-01

    Experimental data suggest that exposure to the 50 and 60 Hz sinusoidal components of power-frequency magnetic fields (MFs) does not have an adverse impact on fetal development. However, the possible developmental toxicity of MF harmonics has not been investigated. This study was designed to determine whether exposure to 180 Hz MFs (third harmonic), alone or in combination with 60 Hz MFs, induces birth defects in Sprague-Dawley rats. Groups of sperm-positive dams (> or =20/group) were exposed for 18.5 h per day from gestation days 6 through 19 to (1) ambient MFs only (<0.0001 mT; sham controls); (2) 60 Hz MFs at 0.2 mT; (3) 180 Hz MFs at 0.2 mT; or (4) 60 Hz + 180 Hz MFs (10% third harmonic; total field strength = 0.2 mT). Litter size, litter weight, percentage live births, sex ratio, and number of resorption sites were determined for each dam, and gross external, visceral, cephalic and skeletal examinations were performed on all fetuses. MF exposure had no significant effects on litter size, litter weight, or fetal development. With the exception of common rib variants, the incidence of fetal anomalies was comparable in all groups. A small increase in the incidence of rib variants was seen in the group exposed to 60 Hz + 180 Hz MFs; however, the incidence of rib variants in this group was similar to that in historical controls from our laboratory. These data extend the existing database on developmental toxicity of MFs by demonstrating that exposure to 180 Hz MFs, either alone or superimposed on an underlying 60 Hz signal, does not induce biologically significant developmental toxicity. These data do not support the hypothesis that exposure to power-frequency MFs is an important risk factor for fetal development. PMID:10790286

  18. Biomedical effects associated with energy-transmission systems: effects of 60-Hz electric fields on circadian and ultradian physiological and behavioral functions in small rodents. Period covered: January 1, 1980-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Ehret, C.F.; Rosenberg, R.S.; Sacher, G.A.; Duffy, P.H.; Groh, K.R.; Russell, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of extremely low frequency (ELF) electric fields on transient patterns of circadian rhythms of physiological and behavioral end points are being investigated. This project is developing a data base to determine the exposure conditions that disturb the highly characteristic waveforms of ultradian, circadian, and infradian rhythms. The project has taken the following approach: (1) small rodents are exposed to well-defined ELF horizontal or vertical electric fields at nominal field strengths as high as 100 kV/m in individual residential facilities; (2) exposures follow a variety of schedules ranging from brief (one minute) to continuous, and including variations of circadian periodicities; (3) end points such as metabolism, activity, core body temperature, operant performance, and weight gain are continuously recorded for long intervals by microprocessor-controlled data acquisition systems; (4) the characteristic waveforms are analyzed by several statistical procedures for deviations from their unperturbed ultradian and circadian patterns; and (5) when and if exposures induce distrubances of the patterns, a search for concomitant neurochemical changes will begin. The following conclusions were reached: under a variety of exposure conditions the circadian regulatory system of the rat remained intact; brief ELF exposures at field strengths above 35 kV/m, presented during the inactive phase of the circadian cycle, produced a transient arousal in mice, characterized by increases in motor activity, carbon dioxide production, and oxygen consumption; the transient arousal habituated rapidly; no significant effects were seen in the second, third, or fourth exposure of mice using a one hour on, one hour off protocol; and there were no circadian aftereffects of the intermittent ELF stimulus in mice, based on measuresof rhythms of activity and gas metabolism.

  19. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates: Neuroendocrine portion of Experiment IV. Quarterly report No. 38

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-08-31

    This quarterly report covers the neuroendocrine Portion of Experiment IV. Serum melatonin concentration was measured in individual baboons, each implanted with a chronically indwelling venous cannula. As in Experiment III the system of six automatic blood samplers was used to achieve undisturbed, 24 hr per day, simultaneous blood sampling from six individual subjects. The objective of the neuroendocrine portion of Experiment IV was to determine if 30 kV/m electric and 1.0 G magnetic field (E/MF) exposure produced a 50% decline in nocturnal serum melatonin concentration. Other groups of subjects were tested concurrently during Experiment IV to assess E/MF effects on group social and individual operant behavior. The results of these experiments will be covered respectively in the next two quarterly reports. The results of Experiment IV, as was the case with the result of Experiments III and IIIA, provide little or no evidence that E/MF exposure, under the conditions of these experiments, affects nocturnal serum melatonin concentrations of nonhuman primates. Together the negative results of Experiments III, IIA and IV indicate that day-time exposure of primates to slow-onset/offset, regularly-scheduled E/MF does not produce melatonin suppression, strongly suggesting that such exposure would not affect human melatonin either. However, before concluding that E/MF exposure in general has no effect on primate melatonin, nightime exposure needs to be examined, and the possibility, suggested by the Pilot Experiment, that fast onset/offset, irregularly-scheduled E/MF can completely suppress melatonin needs to be investigated.

  20. [Infantile leukemia and exposure to 50/60 Hz magnetic fields: review of epidemiologic evidence in 2000].

    PubMed

    Lagorio, S; Salvan, A

    2001-01-01

    We review the epidemiological evidence on childhood leukemia and residential exposure to 50/60 Hz magnetic fields. The possibility of carcinogenic effects of power frequency magnetic fields (ELF-EMF), at levels below units of micro tesla (microT), was first raised in 1979 by a case-control study on childhood cancer carried out in Denver, USA. In that study, excess risks of total cancer and leukemia were observed among children living in homes with "high or very high current configuration", as categorised on the basis of proximity to electric lines and transformers. Many other epidemiological studies have been published since then, characterised by improved--although still not optimal--methods of exposure assessment. At the end of 2000, the epidemiological evidence to support the association between exposure to extremely-low-frequency magnetic fields and the risk of childhood leukemia is less consistent than what was observed in the mid 90s. At the same time, a growing body of experimental evidence has accumulated against both a direct and a promoting carcinogenic effect of ELF-EMF. Such "negative" experimental evidence hampers a causal interpretation of the "positive" epidemiological studies. PMID:11758279

  1. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates. Quarterly report, Scan and activity data for experiments 4 and 4A, [July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.D.

    1992-11-02

    The objective of this program is to investigate behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields (E/MF), using the baboon surrogate for the human. Baboon social groups were scanned and electronically monitored during Experiments IV and IVA. The social scan, form that the technicians used to identify baboon locations and proximity to other baboons: was used to gain a simple snapshot of the position of the baboons in their cage. The scans were taken hourly every morning and evening for a total of eight scans per side per day. This report covers in detail the scan and activity data-gathering process. A set of appendices is attached which include printouts of the data sets and adjunct material pertinent to interpreting the data. The supporting material is comprised of calendars and listings of major events that occurred during the scan and activity data collection.

  2. Case-control study of childhood cancer and exposure to 60-Hz magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Savitz, D.A.; Wachtel, H.; Barnes, F.A.; John, E.M.; Tvrdik, J.G.

    1988-07-01

    Concern with health effects of extremely low frequency magnetic fields has been raised by epidemiologic studies of childhood cancer in relation to proximity to electric power distribution lines. This case-control study was designed to assess the relation between residential exposure to magnetic fields and the development of childhood cancer. Eligible cases consisted of all 356 residents of the five-county 1970 Denver, Colorado Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area aged 0-14 years who were diagnosed with any form of cancer between 1976 and 1983. Controls were selected by random digit dialing to approximate the case distribution by age, sex, and telephone exchange area. Exposure was characterized through in-home electric and magnetic field measurements under low and high power use conditions and wire configuration codes, a surrogate measure of long-term magnetic field levels. Measured magnetic fields under low power use conditions had a modest association with cancer incidence; a cutoff score of 2.0 milligauss resulted in an odds ratio of 1.4 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.6-2.9) for total cancers and somewhat larger odds ratios (ORs) for leukemias (OR = 1.9), lymphomas (OR = 2.2), and soft tissue sarcomas (OR = 3.3). Neither magnetic fields (OR = 1.0) nor electric fields (OR = 0.9) under high power use conditions were related to total cancers. Wire codes associated with higher magnetic fields were more common among case than control homes. The odds ratio to contrast very high and high to very low, low, and buried wire codes was 1.5 (95% CI = 1.0-2.3) for total cases, with consistency across cancer subgroups except for brain cancer (OR = 2.0) and lymphomas (OR = 0.8). Contrasts of very high to buried wire code homes produced larger, less precise odds ratios of 2.3 for total cases, 2.9 for leukemias, and 3.3 for lymphomas.

  3. Clinical progression of transplanted large granular lymphocytic leukemia in Fischer 334 rats exposed to 60 Hz magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, James E. ); Sasser, Lyle B. ); Miller, Douglas L. ); Dagle, Gerald E.; Rafferty, C N.; Ebi, K L.; Anderson, Larry E. )

    1999-01-19

    The purpose of this study was to determine if 60 Hz magnetic fields could alter the clinical progression of leukemia in an animal model. Large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia cells from spleens of leukemic rats were transplanted into young male Fischer rats, producing signs of leukemia in about 2-3 months. The animals were injected with 2.2 x 107 LGL leukemia cells at the initiation of the study and assigned to 4 treatment groups 108/group) as follows: (1) 10 G linearly polarized 60 Hz magnetic fields, (2) sham exposed null energized unit with residual 20 mG fields, (3) ambient controls < 1 mG, and (4) positive controls (a single 5 Gy whole body exposure to 60Co 4 days prior to initiation of exposure). The magnetic fields were activated 20h/day, 7 days/week. Eighteen Rats (18 from each treatment group) were bled, killed, and evaluated at a5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 11 weeks of exposure. Hematological endpoints, changes in spleen growth, and LGL cell infiltration into the spleen and liver were measured to evaluate the leukemia progression. Significant differences were not detected between the magnetic field exposed groups and the ambient control group, although the clinical progress of leukemia was enhanced in the positive control animals. These data indicate that exposure to sinusoidal, linearly polarized 60 Hz, 10 G magnetic fields did not significantly alter the clinical progression of LGL leukemia. Furthermore, the data are in general agreement with previous results of a companion repeated-bleeding study.

  4. BIGEL analysis of gene expression in HL60 cells exposed to X rays or 60 Hz magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balcer-Kubiczek, E. K.; Zhang, X. F.; Han, L. H.; Harrison, G. H.; Davis, C. C.; Zhou, X. J.; Ioffe, V.; McCready, W. A.; Abraham, J. M.; Meltzer, S. J.

    1998-01-01

    We screened a panel of 1,920 randomly selected cDNAs to discover genes that are differentially expressed in HL60 cells exposed to 60 Hz magnetic fields (2 mT) or X rays (5 Gy) compared to unexposed cells. Identification of these clones was accomplished using our two-gel cDNA library screening method (BIGEL). Eighteen cDNAs differentially expressed in X-irradiated compared to control HL60 cells were recovered from a panel of 1,920 clones. Differential expression in experimental compared to control cells was confirmed independently by Northern blotting of paired total RNA samples hybridized to each of the 18 clone-specific cDNA probes. DNA sequencing revealed that 15 of the 18 cDNA clones produced matches with the database for genes related to cell growth, protein synthesis, energy metabolism, oxidative stress or apoptosis (including MYC, neuroleukin, copper zinc-dependent superoxide dismutase, TC4 RAS-like protein, peptide elongation factor 1alpha, BNIP3, GATA3, NF45, cytochrome c oxidase II and triosephosphate isomerase mRNAs). In contrast, BIGEL analysis of the same 1,920 cDNAs revealed no differences greater than 1.5-fold in expression levels in magnetic-field compared to sham-exposed cells. Magnetic-field-exposed and control samples were analyzed further for the presence of mRNA encoding X-ray-responsive genes by hybridization of the 18 specific cDNA probes to RNA from exposed and control HL60 cells. Our results suggest that differential gene expression is induced in approximately 1% of a random pool of cDNAs by ionizing radiation but not by 60 Hz magnetic fields under the present experimental conditions.

  5. Effect of 60 Hz electromagnetic fields on the activity of hsp70 promoter: an in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-De la Fuente, Abraham O.; Alcocer-González, Juan M.; Heredia-Rojas, J. Antonio; Rodríguez-Padilla, Cristina; Rodríguez-Flores, Laura E.; Santoyo-Stephano, Martha A.; Castañeda-Garza, Esperanza; Taméz-Guerra, Reyes S.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to EMFs (electromagnetic fields) results in a number of important biological changes, including modification of genetic expression. We have investigated the effect of 60 Hz sinusoidal EMFs at a magnetic flux density of 80 μT on the expression of the luciferase gene contained in a plasmid labelled as pEMF (EMF plasmid). This gene construct contains the specific sequences for the induction of hsp70 (heat-shock protein 70) expression by EMFs, as well as the reporter for the luciferase gene. The pEMF vector was electrotransferred into quadriceps muscles of BALB/c mice that were later exposed to EMFs. Increased luciferase expression was observed in mice exposed to EMFs 2 h daily for 7 days compared with controls (P<0.05). These data along with other reports in the literature suggest that EMFs can have far-reaching effects on the genome. PMID:23124775

  6. Effects of a 60 Hz magnetic field on photosynthetic CO2 uptake and early growth of radish seedlings.

    PubMed

    Yano, Akira; Ohashi, Yoshiaki; Hirasaki, Tomoyuki; Fujiwara, Kazuhiro

    2004-12-01

    Photosynthetic CO2 uptake rate and early growth parameters of radish Raphanus sativus L. seedlings exposed to an extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELF MF) were investigated. Radish seedlings were exposed to a 60 Hz, 50 microT(rms) (root mean square) sinusoidal magnetic field (MF) and a parallel 48 microT static MF for 6 or 15 d immediately after germination. Control seedlings were exposed to the ambient MF but not the ELF MF. The CO2 uptake rate of ELF MF exposed seedlings on day 5 and later was lower than that of the control seedlings. The dry weight and the cotyledon area of ELF MF exposed seedlings on day 6 and the fresh weight, the dry weight and the leaf area of ELF MF exposed seedlings on day 15 were significantly lower than those of the control seedlings, respectively. In another experiment, radish seedlings were grown without ELF MF exposure for 14 d immediately after germination, and then exposed to the ELF MF for about 2 h, and the photosynthetic CO2 uptake rate was measured during the short-term ELF MF exposure. The CO2 uptake rate of the same seedlings was subsequently measured in the ambient MF (control) without the ELF MF. There was no difference in the CO2 uptake rate of seedlings exposed to the ELF MF or the ambient MF. These results indicate that continuous exposure to 60 Hz, 50 microT(rms) sinusoidal MF with a parallel 48 microT static MF affects the early growth of radish seedlings, but the effect is not so severe that modification of photosynthetic CO2 uptake can observed during short-term MF exposure. PMID:15515039

  7. Lack of effect of a 60 Hz magnetic field on biomarkers of tumor promotion in the skin of SENCAR mice

    SciTech Connect

    Digiovanni, John; Johnston, D A.; Rupp, Tim; Sasser, Lyle B. ); Anderson, Larry E. ); Morris, James E. ); Miller, Douglas L. ); Kavet, R; Walborg, Earl R.

    1999-04-20

    It has been proposed that extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields may enhance tumorigenesis through a co-promotional mechanism. This hypothesis has been further tested using the two-stage model of mouse skin carcinogenesis, i.e. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced promotion of skin carcinogenesis in mice initiated by a single subcarcinogenic dose of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene. Experimentation utilized three different doses of TPA within its dose-response range (0.85, 1.70 or 3.40 nmol) and examined the following early biomarkers of tumor promotion after 1, 2 and 5 weeks of promotion: increases in epidermal thickness and the labeling index of epidermal cells, induction of epidermal ornithine decarboxylase activity and down regulation of epidermal protein kinase C activity. Mice exposed to a 60 Hz magnetic field having a flux density of 2 mT for 6 hr per day for 5 days per week were compared to mice exposed to an ambient magnetic field. Within the sensitivity limits of the biomarker methodology and the exposure parameters employed, no consistent, statistically significant effects, indicative of co-promotion by the magnetic field, were demonstrated.

  8. Effect of 60 Hz electromagnetic fields on the activity of hsp70 promoter: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez de la Fuente, Abraham O; Alcocer-González, Juan M; Antonio Heredia-Rojas, J; Balderas-Candanosa, Isaías; Rodríguez-Flores, Laura E; Rodríguez-Padilla, Cristina; Taméz-Guerra, Reyes S

    2009-03-01

    We have evaluated the effect of 60 Hz sinusoidal magnetic fields (MF) at 8 and 8 microT on expression of the luciferase gene contained in a gene construct labelled as Electromagnetic Field-plasmid (pEMF). The vector included the hsp70 promotor containing the 3 nCTCTn sequences previously described for the induction of hsp70 expression by magnetic fields, as well as the reporter of the luciferase gene. We also replicated the study of Lin et al. [Lin H, Blank M, Rossol-Haseroth K, Goodman R. Regulating genes with electromagnetic response elements. J Cell Biochem 2001;81(1):143-48]. The pEMF plasmid was transfected into HeLa and BMK16 cell lines that were later exposed to either MF or thermal shock (TS). An increased luciferase expression was found in both the cells exposed to MF and TS compared with their control groups (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the combined effect of MF and TS was also analyzed. A synergistic effect between two factors was observed for this co-exposure condition in terms of luciferase gene expression. PMID:18957326

  9. Effects of a 60 Hz Magnetic Field Exposure Up to 3000 μT on Human Brain Activation as Measured by Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Legros, Alexandre; Modolo, Julien; Brown, Samantha; Roberston, John; Thomas, Alex W.

    2015-01-01

    Several aspects of the human nervous system and associated motor and cognitive processes have been reported to be modulated by extremely low-frequency (ELF, < 300 Hz) time-varying Magnetic Fields (MF). Due do their worldwide prevalence; power-line frequencies (60 Hz in North America) are of particular interest. Despite intense research efforts over the last few decades, the potential effects of 60 Hz MF still need to be elucidated, and the underlying mechanisms to be understood. In this study, we have used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to characterize potential changes in functional brain activation following human exposure to a 60 Hz MF through motor and cognitive tasks. First, pilot results acquired in a first set of subjects (N=9) were used to demonstrate the technical feasibility of using fMRI to detect subtle changes in functional brain activation with 60 Hz MF exposure at 1800 μT. Second, a full study involving a larger cohort of subjects tested brain activation during 1) a finger tapping task (N=20), and 2) a mental rotation task (N=21); before and after a one-hour, 60 Hz, 3000 μT MF exposure. The results indicate significant changes in task-induced functional brain activation as a consequence of MF exposure. However, no impact on task performance was found. These results illustrate the potential of using fMRI to identify MF-induced changes in functional brain activation, suggesting that a one-hour 60 Hz, 3000 μT MF exposure can modulate activity in specific brain regions after the end of the exposure period (i.e., residual effects). We discuss the possibility that MF exposure at 60 Hz, 3000 μT may be capable of modulating cortical excitability via a modulation of synaptic plasticity processes. PMID:26214312

  10. Effects of 60 Hz electromagnetic fields on early growth in three plant species and a replication of previous results.

    PubMed

    Davies, M S

    1996-01-01

    In an attempt to replicate the findings of Smith et al., seeds of Raphanus sativus L. (radish), Sinapsis alba L. (mustard), and Hordeum vulgare L. (barley) were grown for between 9 and 21 days in continuous electromagnetic fields (EMFs) at "ion-cyclotron resonance" conditions for stimulation of Ca(2+) (B(H) = 78.3 mu T, B(HAC) = 40 mu T peak-peak at 60 Hz, B(V) = 0). On harvesting, radish showed results similar to those of Smith et al. Dry stem weight and plant height were both significantly greater (Mann-Whitney tests, Ps < 0.05) in EMF-exposed plants than in control plants in each EMF experiment. Wet root weight was significantly greater in EMF-exposed plants in two out of three experiments, as were dry leaf weight, dry whole weight, and stem diameter. Dry root weight, wet leaf weight, and wet whole weight were significantly greater in EMF-exposed plants in one of three experiments. All significant differences indicated an increase in weight or size in the EMF-exposed plants. In each of the sham experiments, no differences between exposed and control plants were evident. Mustard plants failed to respond to the EMFs in any of the plant parameters measured. In one experiment, barley similarly failed to respond; but in another showed significantly greater wet root weight and significantly smaller stem diameter and dry seed weight at the end of the experiment in exposed plants compared to control plants. Although these results give no clue about the underlying bioelectromagnetic mechanism, they demonstrate that, at least for one EMF-sensitive biosystem, results can be independently replicated in another laboratory. Such replication is crucial in establishing the validity of bioelectromagnetic science. PMID:8860733

  11. Effects of 60 Hz electromagnetic fields on early growth in three plant species and a replication of previous results

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.S.

    1996-05-01

    In an attempt to replicate the findings of Smith et al., seeds of Raphanus sativus L. (radish), Sinapsis alba L. (mustard), and Hordeum vulgare L. (barley) were grown for between 9 and 21 days in continuous electromagnetic fields (EMFs) at ion-cyclotron resonance conditions for stimulation of Ca{sup 2+} (B{sub H} = 78.3 {micro}T, B{sub HAC} = 40 {micro}T peak-peak at 60 Hz, B{sub v} = 0). On harvesting, radish showed results similar to those of Smith et al. Dry stem weight and plant height were both significantly greater (Mann-Whitney tests, Ps < 0.05) in EMF-exposed plants than in control plants in each EMF experiment. Wet root weight was significantly greater in EMF-exposed plants in two out of three experiments, as were dry leaf weight, dry whole weight, and stem diameter. Dry root weight, wet leaf weight, and wet whole weight were significantly greater in EMF-exposed plants in one of three experiments. All significant differences indicated an increase in weight or size in the EMF-exposed plants. In each of the sham experiments, no differences between exposed and control plants were evident. Mustard plants failed to respond to the EMFs in any of the plant parameters measured. In one experiment, barley similarly failed to respond; but in another showed significantly greater wet root weight and significantly smaller stem diameter and dry seed weight at the end of the experiment in exposed plants compared to control plants. Although these results give no clue about the underlying bioelectromagnetic mechanism, they demonstrate that, at least for one EMF-sensitive biosystem, results can be independently replicated in another laboratory. Such replication is crucial in establishing the validity of bioelectromagnetic science.

  12. Effects of 60 Hz Magnetic Field Exposure on the Pineal and Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis in the Siberian Hamster (Phodopus Sungorus)

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Bary W.); Matt, Kathleen S.; Morris, James E.); Sasser, Lyle B.); Miller, Douglas L.); Anderson, Larry E.)

    1999-11-15

    Experiments using the dwarf Siberian hamster Phodopus sungorus were carried out to determine possible neuroendocrine consequences of one-time and repeated exposures to 60 Hz magnetic fields (MF). Animals were maintained in either a short-light (SL, 8 h light:16 h dar) or long-light (LL, 16 h light:8h dark) photoperiod.

  13. Effect of 60 Hz magnetic fields on the activation of hsp70 promoter in cultured INER-37 and RMA E7 cells.

    PubMed

    Heredia-Rojas, J Antonio; Rodríguez de la Fuente, Abraham Octavio; Alcocer González, Juan Manuel; Rodríguez-Flores, Laura E; Rodríguez-Padilla, Cristina; Santoyo-Stephano, Martha A; Castañeda-Garza, Esperanza; Taméz-Guerra, Reyes S

    2010-10-01

    It has been reported that 50-60 Hz magnetic fields (MF) with flux densities ranging from microtesla to millitesla are able to induce heat shock factor or heat shock proteins in various cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of 60 Hz sinusoidal MF at 8 and 80 μT on the expression of the luciferase gene contained in a plasmid labeled as electromagnetic field-plasmid (pEMF). This gene construct contains the specific sequences previously described for the induction of hsp70 expression by MF, as well as the reporter for the luciferase gene. The pEMF vector was transfected into INER-37 and RMA E7 cell lines that were later exposed to either MF or thermal shock (TS). Cells that received the MF or TS treatments and their controls were processed according to the luciferase assay system for evaluate luciferase activity. An increased luciferase gene expression was observed in INER-37 cells exposed to MF and TS compared with controls (p < 0.05), but MF exposure had no effect on the RMA E7 cell line. PMID:20835776

  14. The effect of 60-Hz magnetic fields on co-promotion of chemically induced skin tumors on SENCAR mice: a discussion of three studies.

    PubMed Central

    McLean, J R; Thansandote, A; Lecuyer, D; Goddard, M

    1997-01-01

    Three independent experiments involving a total of 288 SENCAR mice were used to study the effects of 60-Hz magnetic fields on the growth and development of skin tumors. Given the constraints imposed by the experimental design, the results did not support a role for magnetic fields as a tumor co-promoter. This negative finding could also be interpreted to mean that the SENCAR mouse skin tumor model was not sensitive enough to detect the action of a weak co-promoter. The two-stage (initiation/promotion) model was used to assess the genotoxic potential of magnetic fields because it had been widely used to evaluate chemical carcinogens. This model, however, lacks the sensitivity to detect all but the most potent direct-acting carcinogens, and the tumor response to the action of low doses of promoter results in large random fluctuations in tumor incidence, yield, and multiplicity. The need to limit tumor incidence in the sham is a necessary condition to ensure that a magnetic field-induced effect on tumorigenesis would have a reasonable chance of being detected. This requirement, and the variability in tumor development between and within experiments, increases the level of uncertainty in the system and makes a weak response to the magnetic field difficult to detect and interpret. PMID:9074887

  15. Evaluation of the possible copromoting effect of a 60 Hz magnetic field during chemically induced carcinogenesis in skin of SENCAR mice. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    DiGiovanni, J.; Walborg, E.F.; Anderson, L.E.; Sasser, L.B.; Morris, J.E.; Miller, D.L. |

    1997-11-01

    It has been hypothesized that exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields can enhance tumorigenesis through a copromotional mechanism. Equivocal support for this hypothesis was provided by experiments performed by Stuchly et al. using a mouse skin model; i.e. the induction of skin tumors in SENCAR mice exposed to a single subcarcinogenic dose of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and promotion by repetitive doses of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). The mice were exposed to a 2 mT (60 Hz) magnetic field during the entire promotion phase of the experiment. The Stuchly study, which utilized single weekly doses of TPA, demonstrated a statistically significant increase in skin tumors after 16--18 weeks of promotion; however, by 23 weeks of promotion, the difference was not statistically significant. The study was designed to provide definitive evidence to confirm or refute a copromotional role of ELF magnetic field exposure on DMBA/TPA-induced skin carcinogenesis in SENCAR mice. This study was modeled after the study of Stuchly et al., (1992), including the animal model and exposure conditions. However, three different promoting doses of TPA, within the linear dose response range for induction of skin tumors, were utilized.

  16. Involvement of protein kinase C in the modulation of morphine-induced analgesia and the inhibitory effects of exposure to 60-hz magnetic fields in the land snail, Cepaea nemoralis

    SciTech Connect

    Kavaliers, M.; Ossenkopp, K.P. )

    1990-02-26

    One of the more consistent and dramatic effects of exposure to magnetic fields is the attenuation of morphine-induced analgesia. Results of previous studies have implicated alterations in calcium channel functioning and Ca{sup ++} flux in the mediation of these effects. It is generally accepted that Ca{sup ++}-activated-phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (Protein kinase C; PKC) plays an important role in relaying trans-membrane signaling in diverse Ca{sup ++} dependent cellular processes. In experiment 1 we observed that morphine-induced analgesia in the land snail, Cepaea nemoralis, as measured by the latency of an avoidance behavior to a warmed surface, was reduced by the PKC activator, SC-9, and was enhanced by the PKC inhibitors, H-7 and H-9. In contrast, HA-10004, a potent inhibitor of other protein kinases, but only a very weak inhibitor of PKC, had no effect on morphine-induced analgesia. In experiment 2 exposure of snails for 30 minutes to a 1.0 gauss (rms) 60-Hz magnetic field reduced morphine-induced analgesia. This inhibitory effect of the magnetic field was reduced by the PKC inhibitors, H-7 and H-9, and was augmented by the PKC activator SC-9. These results suggest that: (i) PKC is involved in the modulation of morphine-induced analgesia and, (ii) the inhibitory effects of magnetic fields involve PKC.

  17. Numerical calculation and measurement of 60-Hz current densities induced in an upright grounded cylinder.

    PubMed

    Kaune, W T; McCreary, F A

    1985-01-01

    Power-frequency electric fields are strongly perturbed in the vicinity of human beings and experimental animals. As a consequence, the extrapolation of biological data from laboratory animals to human-exposure situations cannot use the unperturbed exposure field strength as a common exposure parameter. Rather, comparisons between species must be based on the actual electric fields at the outer surfaces of and inside the bodies of the subjects. Experimental data have been published on surface and internal fields for a few exposure situations, but it is not feasible to characterize experimentally more than a small fraction of the diverse types of exposures which occur in the laboratory and in the field. A predictive numerical model is needed, one whose predictions have been verified in situations where experimental data are available, and one whose results can be used with confidence in new exposure situations. This paper describes a numerical technique which can be used to develop such a model, and it carries out this development for a test case, that of a homogeneous right-circular cylinder resting upright on-end on a ground plane and exposed to a vertical, uniform, 60-Hz electric field. The accuracy of the model is tested by comparing short-circuit currents and induced current densities predicted by it to measured values: Agreement is good. PMID:3836665

  18. Harmonics of 60 Hz in power systems caused by geomagnetic disturbances. [Manitoba

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashi, K.; Oguti, T.; Watanabe, T.; Tsuruda, K.; Kokubun, S.; Horita, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Simultaneous VLF/ULF observations carried out near Winnipeg, Manitoba show that geomagnetic disturbances control the behavior of harmonics of 60 Hz man-made electric power. The harmonics of 60 Hz detected by the VLF receiver are at multiples of 180 Hz, indicating that they originated from a 3 phase ac power system. Under geomagnetically quiet conditions, only odd harmonics of 70 Hz were detected. In disturbed conditions, both odd and even harmonics were excited. The strength of each harmonic changed concurrently with geomagnetic pulsation (ULF) activity. These findings seem to indicate that a portion of telluric currents shunted into the power line system through the neutrals of the Y-connected transformers give rise to a dc bias to the transformer core materials and that it distorts their hysteresis loops, activating harmonics of 60 Hz power. A mathematical proof is given that a hysteresis loop having a point of symmetry generates odd harmonics only, whereas loops lacking in point-symmetry generally give rise to both odd and even harmonics. A general formula was obtained to calculate the strength of each harmonic based on the shape of the hysteresis loop.

  19. Effect of ambient levels of power-line-frequency electric fields on a developing vertebrate

    SciTech Connect

    Blackman, C.F.; House, D.E.; Benane, S.G.; Joines, W.T.; Spiegel, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Fertilized eggs of Gallus domesticus were exposed continuously during their 21-day incubation period to either 50- or 60-Hz sinusoidal electric fields at an average intensity of 10 Vrms/m. The exposure apparatus was housed in an environmental room maintained at 37 degrees C and 55-60% relative humidity (RH). Within 1.5 days after hatching, the chickens were removed from the apparatus and tested. The test consisted of examining the effect of 50- or 60-Hz electromagnetic fields at 15.9 Vrms/m and 73 nTrms (in a local geomagnetic field of 38 microT, 85 degrees N) on efflux of calcium ions from the chicken brain. For eggs exposed to 60-Hz electric fields during incubation, the chicken brains demonstrated a significant response to 50-Hz fields but not to 60-Hz fields, in agreement with the results from commercially incubated eggs. In contrast, the brains from chicks exposed during incubation to 50-Hz fields were not affected by either 50- or 60-Hz fields. These results demonstrate that exposure of a developing organism to ambient power-line-frequency electric fields at levels typically found inside buildings can alter the response of brain tissue to field-induced calcium-ion efflux. The physiological significance of this finding has yet to be established.

  20. Power line emission 50/60 Hz and Schumann resonances observed by microsatellite Chibis-M in the Earth's ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkin, Denys; Pilipenko, Vyacheslav; Dudkin, Fedir; Pronenko, Vira; Klimov, Stanislav

    2015-04-01

    The overhead power lines are the sources of intense wideband electromagnetic (EM) emission, especially in ELF-VLF range, because of significant length (up to a few thousand kilometers) and strong 50/60 Hz currents with noticeable distortion. The radiation efficiency of the power line emission (PLE) increases with the harmonic order, so they are well observed by ground-based EM sensors. However their observations by low orbiting satellites (LEO) are very rare, particularly at basic harmonic 50/60 Hz, because of the ionospheric plasma opacity in ELF band. The Schumann resonance (SR) is the narrow-band EM noise that occurs due to the global thunderstorm activity in the Earth-ionosphere cavity. The first five eigenmodes of the SR are 7.8, 14.3, 20.8, 27.3 and 33.8 Hz and, thus, SR harmonics are also strongly absorbed by the Earth ionosphere. The published numerical simulations show that the penetration depth of such an ELF emission into the Earth's ionosphere is limited to 50-70 km for electric field and 120-240 km for magnetic field. From this follows, that PLE and SR can hardly ever be detected by LEO satellites, i.e. above the F-layer of ionosphere. In spite of this fact, these emissions were recently observed with use of the electric field antennas placed on the satellites C/NOFS (USA) and Chibis-M (Russia). Microsatellite Chibis-M was launched on January 24, 2012, at 23:18:30 UTC from the cargo ship "Progress M-13M" to circular orbit with altitude ~500 km and inclination ~52° . Chibis-M mass is about 40 kg where one third is a scientific instrumentation. The dimensions of the microsatellite case are 0.26x0.26x0.54 m with the outside mounted solar panels, service and scientific instrumentation. The main scientific objective of Chibis-M is the theoretical model verification for the atmospheric gamma-ray bursts. It requires the study of the accompanying EM processes such as the plasma waves produced by the lightning discharges in the VLF band. Chibis-M decayed on 15

  1. Effect of ambient levels of power-line-frequency electric fields on a developing vertebrate (journal version)

    SciTech Connect

    Blackman, C.F.; House, D.E.; Benane, S.G.; Joines, W.T.; Spiegel, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Fertilized eggs of Gallus domesticus were exposed continuously during their 21-day incubation period to either 50 or 60-Hz sinusoidal electric fields at an average intensity of 10 Vrms/m. Within 1.5 days after hatching, the chickens were removed from the apparatus and tested. The test consisted of examining the effect of 50- or 60-Hz electromagnetic fields at 15.9 Vrms/m and 73 nTrms (in a local geomagnetic field of 38 uT, 85 deg N) on efflux of calcium ions from the chicken brain. For eggs exposed to 60-Hz electric fields during incubation, the chicken brains demonstrated a significant response to 50-Hz fields but not to 60-Hz fields, in agreement with the results from commercially incubated eggs. In contrast, the brains from chicks exposed during incubation to 50-Hz fields were not affected by either 50- or 60-Hz fields. These results demonstrate that exposure of a developing organism to ambient power-line-frequency electric fields at levels typically found inside buildings can alter the response of brain tissue to radiation-induced calcium-ion efflux.

  2. Mitigation of 50-60 Hz power line interference in geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, M. B.; Said, R. K.; Inan, U. S.

    2010-12-01

    The analysis of ELF/VLF radio data has broad applications for ionospheric and magnetospheric phenomena, lightning activity, long-range communications, and geophysical prospecting. However, recordings of ELF/VLF data on the ground are adversely affected by the presence of electromagnetic fields from 50-60 Hz power lines, whose harmonics can extend to many kilohertz and interfere with the detection of natural and man-made signals. Removal of this interference is complicated by the time-varying fundamental frequency of power lines and strongly varying characteristics across different power grids. We discuss two methods for isolation and then subtraction of this interference, by an adaptive filtering technique and with least squares matrix analysis. Methods for estimating the time-varying frequency are also discussed. A few variants of these techniques are applied both to simulated data and then to real data. It is found that least squares isolation gives superior results, although the adaptive filter is potentially more effective for poorly behaved power line interference with rapidly changing fundamental frequencies as well as being computationally more efficient.

  3. Lung cancer in relation to employment in the electrical utility industry and exposure to magnetic fields.

    PubMed Central

    Savitz, D A; Dufort, V; Armstrong, B; Thériault, G

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A recent study found that lung cancer may be associated with exposures encountered in the electrical utility industry. To further evaluate this possibility, data were collected and analysed from five large electrical utility companies in the United States. METHODS: A cohort of 138905 male workers employed between 1950 and 1986 was followed up for mortality to the end of 1988, with 20733 deaths identified of which 1692 were due to lung cancer. Mortality from lung cancer was examined in relation to the duration of employment in specific jobs thought to have high exposure to 60 Hz magnetic fields and to an index of cumulative exposure to magnetic fields based on personal measurements. Exposure to pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) as estimated from another study was also considered. Poisson regression generated rate ratios for categories of exposure based on comparisons within the cohort adjusted for age, calendar year, race, socioeconomic status, work status, and estimated exposure to asbestos. RESULTS: Mortality rose modestly with duration of work as an electrician or power plant operator reaching rate ratios of 1.4 with > or = 20 years in those jobs but not with duration of work as a lineman or a combination of jobs thought to have high exposures to 60 Hz magnetic fields or PEMFs. Cumulative indices of exposure to 60 Hz magnetic fields and PEMFs were both associated with rate ratios of 1.2-1.3 in the highest intervals. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that lung cancer is not strongly associated with duration of employment in specific jobs associated with high potential exposure to 60 Hz magnetic fields or to PEMFs. Small associations of lung cancer with indices of both 60 Hz magnetic fields and PEMFs leave open the possibility that larger associations have been diluted through exposure misclassification. Refined exposure assessment, especially to PEMFs, would be required to evaluate that possibility. PMID:9245945

  4. EFFECT OF AMBIENT LEVELS OF POWER-LINE-FREQUENCY ELECTRIC FIELDS ON A DEVELOPING VERTEBRATE (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fertilized eggs of Gallus domesticus were exposed continuously during their 21-day incubation period to either 50-Hz or 60-Hz sinusoidal electric fields at an average intensity of 10 Vrms/m. Within 1.5 days after hatching, the chickens were removed from the apparatus and tested. ...

  5. Lay understanding of low-frequency electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Morgan, M G; Florig, H K; Nair, I; Cortés, C; Marsh, K; Pavlosky, K

    1990-01-01

    People do not start with a blank slate when they hear risk-communication messages. All such messages are processed through existing knowledge structures and understanding. Hence, to design effective and reliable risk-communication materials one must understand the state of people's knowledge--correct and incorrect--about an issue. We developed a simple "mental model" of what people minimally need to know to make informed decisions about field-related issues. Then we performed studies to explore how and to what extent respondents of various groups understood physical properties of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields. Actual knowledge of respondents was then compared with the predicates of the model. Electrical engineering juniors and semi-technical employees of utilities displayed a good command of most of the concepts in the simple model, but little awareness of the limits to their knowledge. Lay respondents correctly knew only a few of the simplest elements of the model, but they displayed a much greater awareness of the limits to their knowledge. Both lay and semi-technical respondents were found to share several misconceptions. On average, they correctly rank-ordered some common field-exposure conditions by field strength, but they could not differentiate between electric and magnetic fields and could not differentiate among field strengths associated with different appliances. Most respondents dramatically underestimated the range of actual field strengths. Many respondents understood that field strength decreases with distance from a source, but they underestimated the rate of decrease. In contrast to X-rays and microwaves, which respondents appeared to think about in rather similar terms, 60-Hz fields were not thought of as being highly similar to any other agent, although the closest parallels were found with ultrasound. Changes in mood, thought, and behavior, and the existence of an "electrical aura," were all seen as plausible results of exposure to a 60-Hz

  6. Electric Field Imaging Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcutt, Terrence; Hughitt, Brian; Burke, Eric; Generazio, Edward

    2016-01-01

    NDE historically has focused technology development in propagating wave phenomena with little attention to the field of electrostatics and emanating electric fields. This work is intended to bring electrostatic imaging to the forefront of new inspection technologies, and new technologies in general. The specific goals are to specify the electric potential and electric field including the electric field spatial components emanating from, to, and throughout volumes containing objects or in free space.

  7. Emerging issues in extremely-low-frequency electric and magnetic field health research

    SciTech Connect

    Kavet, R.I.; Banks, R.S.

    1986-04-01

    Concern has increased over potential consequences of exposure to electric and magnetic fields of extremely low frequency (0-100 Hz), particularly from power transmission and distribution. Also at issue are electrical environments in homes and workplaces. Until recently, research focused on the electric, rather than the magnetic, field; now, both are under extensive investigation. A review of research to date indicates the following: Electric and magnetic fields can produce effects in vitro, with the locus of field interaction believed to be at the cell membrane. Chronic in vivo electric field exposure fails to produce effects except in behavior, neurophysiology, endocrinology, and, possibly, fetal development. The extrapolation of these animal data to humans requires further research. The epidemiological literature has, in some cases, reported an association between increased cancer rates and putative field exposure. Exposure assessments indicate that, in all likelihood, human exposures to 60-Hz electric fields of the magnitudes found under transmission lines are very infrequent; assessments are continuing to characterize exposure to 60-Hz magnetic fields and to measure the field frequency spectra found in residential and workplace settings. The public health issues emerging from this research focus on fetal development and on the initiation or promotion of cancer. It is critical to reduce existing uncertainties in order to enable valid risk assessment.

  8. Exposure scheme separates effects of electric shock and electric field for honey bees, Apis mellifera L

    SciTech Connect

    Bindokas, V.P.; Gauger, J.R.; Greenberg, B.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanisms to explain disturbance of honey bee colonies under a 765-kV, 60-Hz transmission line (electric (E) field = 7 kV/m) fall into two categories: direct bee perception of enhanced in-hive E fields, and perception of shock from induced currents. The same adverse biological effects previously observed in honey bee colonies exposed under a 765-kV transmission line can be reproduced by exposing worker bees to shock or E field within elongated hive entranceways (= tunnels). Exposure to intense E field caused disturbance only if bees were in contact with a conductive substrate. E-field and shock exposure can be separated and precisely defined within tunnels, eliminating dosimetric vagaries that occur when entire hives are exposed to E field.

  9. Deficits in high- (>60 Hz) gamma-band oscillations during visual processing in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Grützner, Christine; Wibral, Michael; Sun, Limin; Rivolta, Davide; Singer, Wolf; Maurer, Konrad; Uhlhaas, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Current theories of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia have focused on abnormal temporal coordination of neural activity. Oscillations in the gamma-band range (>25 Hz) are of particular interest as they establish synchronization with great precision in local cortical networks. However, the contribution of high gamma (>60 Hz) oscillations toward the pathophysiology is less established. To address this issue, we recorded magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data from 16 medicated patients with chronic schizophrenia and 16 controls during the perception of Mooney faces. MEG data were analysed in the 25–150 Hz frequency range. Patients showed elevated reaction times and reduced detection rates during the perception of upright Mooney faces while responses to inverted stimuli were intact. Impaired processing of Mooney faces in schizophrenia patients was accompanied by a pronounced reduction in spectral power between 60–120 Hz (effect size: d = 1.26) which was correlated with disorganized symptoms (r = −0.72). Our findings demonstrate that deficits in high gamma-band oscillations as measured by MEG are a sensitive marker for aberrant cortical functioning in schizophrenia, suggesting an important aspect of the pathophysiology of the disorder. PMID:23532620

  10. Electric Field Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arribas, E.; Gallardo, C.; Molina, M.; Sanjosé, V.

    We present the computer program called LINES which is able to calculate and visualize the electric field lines due to seven different discrete configurations of electric point charges. Also we show two examples of the graphic screens generated by LINES.

  11. Power line harmonic radiation observed by the DEMETER spacecraft at 50/60 Hz and low harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němec, F.; Parrot, M.; Santolík, O.

    2015-10-01

    We present a low-altitude satellite survey of Power Line Harmonic Radiation (PLHR), i.e., electromagnetic waves radiated by electric power systems on the ground. We focus on frequencies corresponding to the first few harmonics of the base power system frequencies (50 Hz or 60 Hz, depending on the region). It is shown that the intensities of electromagnetic waves detected at these frequencies at an altitude of about 700 km are significantly enhanced above industrialized areas. The frequencies at which the wave intensities are increased are in excellent agreement with base power system frequencies just below the satellite location. We also investigate a possible presence of the weekend effect, i.e., if the situation is different during the weekends when the power consumption is lower than during the weekdays. Such an effect might be possibly present in the European region, but it is very weak. PLHR effects are less often detected in the summer, as the ionospheric absorption increases, and also, the radiation is obscured by lightning generated emissions. This difference is smaller in the U.S. region, in agreement with the monthly variations of the power consumption. The analysis of the measured frequency spectra reveals that although intensity increases at low odd harmonics of base power system frequencies are routinely detected, low even harmonics are generally absent. Finally, we verify the relation of PLHR intensities to the geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) proxy. It is shown that the PLHR intensity is increased at the times of higher GIC proxy values during the night.

  12. Impact of electric fields on honey bees

    SciTech Connect

    Bindokas, V.P.

    1985-01-01

    Biological effects in honey bee colonies under a 765-kV, 60-Hz transmission line (electric (E) field = 7 kV/m) were confirmed using controlled dosimetry and treatment reversal to replicate findings within the same season. Hives in the same environment but shielded from E field are normal, suggesting effects are caused by interaction of E field with the hive. Bees flying through the ambient E field are not demonstrably affected. Different thresholds and severity of effects were found in colonies exposed to 7, 5.5, 4.1, 1.8, and 0.65 to 0.85 kV/m at incremental distances from the line. Most colonies exposed at 7 kV/m failed in 8 weeks and failed to overwinter at greater than or equal to4.1 kV/m. Data suggest the limit of a biological effects corridor lies between 15 and 27 m (4.1 and 1.8 kV/m) beyond the outer phase of the transmission line. Mechanisms to explain colony disturbance fall into two categories, direct perception of enhanced in-hive E fields, and perception of shock from induced currents. The same effects induced in colonies with total-hive E-field exposure can be reproduced with shock or E-field exposure of worker bees in extended hive entranceways (= porches). Full-scale experiments demonstrate bee exposure to E fields including 100 kV/m under moisture-free conditions within a non-conductive porch causes no detectable effect on colony behavior. Exposure of bees on a conductive (e.g. wet) substrate produces been disturbance, increased mortality, abnormal propolization, and possible impairment of colony growth. Thresholds for effects caused by step-potential-induced currents are: 275-350 nA - disturbance of single bees; 600 nA - onset of abnormal propolization; and 900 nA - sting.

  13. Pulsed electric fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concept of pulsed electric fields (PEF) was first proposed in 1967 to change the behavior or microorganisms. The electric field phenomenon was identified as membrane rupture theory in the 1980s. Increasing the membrane permeability led to the application of PEF assisted extraction of cellular co...

  14. ELF electric and magnetic fields: Pacific Northwest Laboratory studies

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.

    1992-06-01

    Studies have been conducted at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to examine extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields for possible biological effects in animals. Three areas of investigation are reported here: (1) studies on the nervous system, including behavior and neuroendocrine function, (2) experiments on cancer development in animals, and (3) measurements of currents and electric fields induced in animal models by exposure to external magnetic fields. In behavioral experiments, rats have been shown to be responsive to ELF electric field exposure. Furthermore, experimental data indicate that short-term memory may be affected in albino rats exposed to combined ELF and static magnetic fields. Neuroendocrine studies have been conducted to demonstrate an apparent stress-related response in rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Nighttime pineal melatonin levels have been shown to be significantly depressed in animals exposed to either electric or magnetic fields. A number of animal tumor models are currently under investigation to examine possible relationships between ELF exposure and carcinogenesis. Finally, theoretical and experimental measurements have been performed which form the basis for animals and human exposure comparisons.

  15. Distillation under electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, V.M.; Blankenship, K.D.; Tsouris, C.

    1997-11-01

    Distillation Is the most common separation process used in the chemical and petroleum industry. Major limitations in the applicability and efficiency of distillation come from thermodynamic equilibria, that is, vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE), and heat and mass transfer rates. In this work, electric fields are used to manipulate the VLE of mixtures. VLE experiments are performed for various binary mixtures in the presence of electric fields on the order of a few kilovolts per centimeter. The results show that the VLE is changed by electric fields, with changes in the separation factor as high as 10% being observed. Batch distillation experiments are also carried out for binary mixtures of 2-propanol and water with and without an applied electric field. Results show enhanced distillation rates and separation efficiency in the presence of an electric field but decreased separation enhancement when the electric current is increased. The latter phenomenon is caused by the formation at the surface of the liquid mixture of microdroplets that are entrained by the vapor. These observations suggest that there should be an electric field strength for each system for which the separation enhancement is maximum.

  16. Electromagnetic Fields Associated with Commercial Solar Photovoltaic Electric Power Generating Facilities.

    PubMed

    Tell, R A; Hooper, H C; Sias, G G; Mezei, G; Hung, P; Kavet, R

    2015-01-01

    The southwest region of the United States is expected to experience an expansion of commercial solar photovoltaic generation facilities over the next 25 years. A solar facility converts direct current generated by the solar panels to three-phase 60-Hz power that is fed to the grid. This conversion involves sequential processing of the direct current through an inverter that produces low-voltage three-phase power, which is stepped up to distribution voltage (∼12 kV) through a transformer. This study characterized magnetic and electric fields between the frequencies of 0 Hz and 3 GHz at two facilities operated by the Southern California Edison Company in Porterville, CA and San Bernardino, CA. Static magnetic fields were very small compared to exposure limits established by IEEE and ICNIRP. The highest 60-Hz magnetic fields were measured adjacent to transformers and inverters, and radiofrequency fields from 5-100 kHz were associated with the inverters. The fields measured complied in every case with IEEE controlled and ICNIRP occupational exposure limits. In all cases, electric fields were negligible compared to IEEE and ICNIRP limits across the spectrum measured and when compared to the FCC limits (≥0.3 MHz). PMID:26023811

  17. Detection of refrigerator-associated 60 Hz alternating current as ventricular fibrillation by an implantable defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Al Khadra, Ayman S; Al Jutaily, Abdulaziz; Al Shuhri, Salem

    2006-03-01

    This report describes a patient with an implantable defibrillator who suffered an inappropriate defibrillation shock upon retrieving some food items from his inadequately earthed refrigerator. Noise typical of electrical interference can be observed in the stored electrogram of the episode. The patient was instructed to earth his home appliances, but he decided to avoid his refrigerator altogether, and has had no subsequent shocks. PMID:16627434

  18. Analysis of the 60-Hz power system at KSC: The Orsino substation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalu, Alex O.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis of the Orsino Substation, a component (50 percent) of the 60-Hertz electric power system at the Kennedy Space Center, is presented. Presented here are separate single-line diagrams of the sixteen feeder circuits to permit easy access to information on the individual feeders for future planning. The load condition of each feeder and load break switch are presented and a heuristic reliability analysis of the system is performed. Information is given about the system fashion useful for decision making purposes. The beauty of it is in the simplified manner by which information about the system can be obtained.

  19. Electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.; Etters, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    A number of energy momentum anomalies are described that result from the use of Abraham-Lorentz electromagnetic theory. These anomalies have in common the motion of charged bodies or current carrying conductors relative to the observer. The anomalies can be avoided by using the nonflow approach, based on internal energy of the electromagnetic field. The anomalies can also be avoided by using the flow approach, if all contributions to flow work are included. The general objective of this research is a fundamental physical understanding of electric and magnetic fields which, in turn, might promote the development of new concepts in electric space propulsion. The approach taken is to investigate quantum representations of these fields.

  20. [Biological and health effects on electric and magnetic fields at extremely low frequencies].

    PubMed

    Torregrossa, M V

    2005-01-01

    While the enormous benefits of using electricity in everyday life and health care are unquestioned, during the past 20 years the general public has become increasingly concerned about potential adverse health effects of exposure to electric and magnetic fields at extremely low frequencies (ELF). Such exposures arise mainly from the transmission and use of electrical energy at the power frequencies of 50/60 Hz. The international scientific community is addressing the associated health issues through in vitro, in vivo and epidemiological studies, although present research results are often contradictory. The purpose of this paper is to provide information about the possible impacts of exposure to electric and magnetic field at ELF frequencies on health within the community and the workplace. Information comes from recent research studies on this subject and from epidemiological pooled studies recently reviewed by eminent authorities. PMID:16353681

  1. Missile launch detection electric field perturbation experiment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, R.J.; Rynne, T.M.

    1993-04-28

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and SARA Inc. participated in the ATMD missile launch activities that occurred at WSMR during January 1993. LLNL and SARA deployed sensors for monitoring of basic phenomena. An attempt was made to measure perturbations of the earth geo-potential during the launch of a Lance missile. The occurrence of the perturbation is expected from the conducting body of the missile and the exhaust plume. A set of voltage-probe antennas were used to monitor the local electric field perturbation from the launch at ranges of approximately 1 km. Examination of the data acquired during the launch period failed to show identifiable correlation of the field variations with the launch event. Three reasons are ascribed to this lack of event data: (1) The electric field potential variations have a limited spatial correlation length - the fields measured in one region have little correlation to measurements made at distances of a kilometer away. The potential variations are related to localized atmospheric disturbances and are generally unpredictable. A value for the spatial correlation length is also not known. (2) The conductivity of the plume and missile body are not adequate to produce a field perturbation of adequate magnitude. Phenomena related to the exhaust plume and missile may exist and be outside of the collection range of the equipment employed for these measurements. (3) The presence of 60 Hz power line noise was of sufficient magnitude to irreversibly contaminate measurements.

  2. Simple estimation of induced electric fields in nervous system tissues for human exposure to non-uniform electric fields at power frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarao, Hiroo; Miyamoto, Hironobu; Korpinen, Leena; Hayashi, Noriyuki; Isaka, Katsuo

    2016-06-01

    Most results regarding induced current in the human body related to electric field dosimetry have been calculated under uniform field conditions. We have found in previous work that a contact current is a more suitable way to evaluate induced electric fields, even in the case of exposure to non-uniform fields. If the relationship between induced currents and external non-uniform fields can be understood, induced electric fields in nervous system tissues may be able to be estimated from measurements of ambient non-uniform fields. In the present paper, we numerically calculated the induced electric fields and currents in a human model by considering non-uniform fields based on distortion by a cubic conductor under an unperturbed electric field of 1 kV m‑1 at 60 Hz. We investigated the relationship between a non-uniform external electric field with no human present and the induced current through the neck, and the relationship between the current through the neck and the induced electric fields in nervous system tissues such as the brain, heart, and spinal cord. The results showed that the current through the neck can be formulated by means of an external electric field at the central position of the human head, and the distance between the conductor and the human model. As expected, there is a strong correlation between the current through the neck and the induced electric fields in the nervous system tissues. The combination of these relationships indicates that induced electric fields in these tissues can be estimated solely by measurements of the external field at a point and the distance from the conductor.

  3. Simple estimation of induced electric fields in nervous system tissues for human exposure to non-uniform electric fields at power frequency.

    PubMed

    Tarao, Hiroo; Miyamoto, Hironobu; Korpinen, Leena; Hayashi, Noriyuki; Isaka, Katsuo

    2016-06-21

    Most results regarding induced current in the human body related to electric field dosimetry have been calculated under uniform field conditions. We have found in previous work that a contact current is a more suitable way to evaluate induced electric fields, even in the case of exposure to non-uniform fields. If the relationship between induced currents and external non-uniform fields can be understood, induced electric fields in nervous system tissues may be able to be estimated from measurements of ambient non-uniform fields. In the present paper, we numerically calculated the induced electric fields and currents in a human model by considering non-uniform fields based on distortion by a cubic conductor under an unperturbed electric field of 1 kV m(-1) at 60 Hz. We investigated the relationship between a non-uniform external electric field with no human present and the induced current through the neck, and the relationship between the current through the neck and the induced electric fields in nervous system tissues such as the brain, heart, and spinal cord. The results showed that the current through the neck can be formulated by means of an external electric field at the central position of the human head, and the distance between the conductor and the human model. As expected, there is a strong correlation between the current through the neck and the induced electric fields in the nervous system tissues. The combination of these relationships indicates that induced electric fields in these tissues can be estimated solely by measurements of the external field at a point and the distance from the conductor. PMID:27222929

  4. Histologic study of the internal organs of rats chronically exposed to a high-intensity electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Seto, Y.J.; Majeau-Chargois, D.; Lymangrover, J.R.; Dunlap, W.P.; Hsieh, S.T.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of 120-day exposure to a high-intensity (80 kV/m), 60-Hz electric field on histology of selected internal organs of Sprague-Dawley rats was investigated. The organs examined were the pituitary, thymus, heart, lungs, liver, spleen, right and left adrenals, right and left kidneys, and right and left testes. Histological examination of 10-micron tissue sections from randomly selected animals revealed no specific evidence of histopathologic differences between field-exposed and sham-exposed animals at the light microscopic level.

  5. Recent studies in the behavioral toxicology of ELF electric and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lovely, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    Behavioral responses to ELF electric and magnetic fields are reviewed starting with the simple sensory awareness or detection by an animal and moving on through more-complicated behavioral responses such as behavior that averts exposure. The literature selected in this review is taken primarily from the area of behavioral toxicology. As such, it does not review work on specialized response systems to ELF fields. The most notable of these omitted specialized response systems are electroreception, which occurs in a number of fish species, and homing/navigation and communication of the location of food that occurs in several species of birds and in honeybees, respectively. The toxicologic orientation of most researches that evaluate the effects of exposure to ELF electric and magnetic fields has been influenced primarily by the missions of DOE and the power industry programs to determine the health effects of power frequency (50- and 60-Hz) electric and magnetic fields. Because of these large programmatic efforts, most of the recent research has in fact been done at 50 or 60 Hz. In the context of the above limitations, remarkably few robust behavioral effects have been reported. Those that have been reported probably relate to an animal's perception of the electric field, although there are some exceptions to this generalization. The apparent lack of deleterious effects in animals is consistent with recent studies on humans that have been conducted in the UK. With this in mind, it is tempting to conclude that exposure to an ELF field is a rather innocuous event and, other than possible mini-shocks, is without hazard. 43 references.

  6. Overview - Electric fields. [in magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cauffman, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    The electric fields session is designed to review progress in observation, theory, and modeling of magnetospheric electric fields, and to expose important new results. The present report comments on the state and prospects of electric field research, with particular emphasis on relevance to quantitative modeling of the magnetospheric processes. Attention is given to underlying theories and models. Modeling philosophy is discussed relative to explanatory models and representative models. Modeling of magnetospheric electric fields, while in its infancy, is developing rapidly on many fronts employing a variety of approaches. The general topic of magnetospheric electric fields is becoming of prime importance in understanding space plasmas.

  7. Effects of controlled-frequency moderate electric fields on pectin methylesterase and polygalacturonase activities in tomato homogenate.

    PubMed

    Samaranayake, Chaminda P; Sastry, Sudhir K

    2016-05-15

    The effect of controlled-frequency moderate electric field treatments on pectin methylesterase and polygalcturonase activities in tomato homogenate was investigated by subjecting identically treated control and electrically-treated samples to the same temperature history. Additionally, a model was developed for the motion of the enzyme molecules subjected to an electric field. Results show that the application of electric fields at a low field strength (0.4V/cm) constant temperature (65°C) has a statistically significant effect on pectin methylesterase activity, typically at or lower than 60 Hz. At higher frequencies, the effects are negligible. Molecular motion simulations suggest that the efficacy at low frequencies may be due to the amplitude of motion being of the order of the intermolecular distance for water. Higher frequencies result in small overall displacements due to rapid reversals in the direction of motion. PMID:26775970

  8. Magnetospheric electric fields and currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauk, B. H.; Zanetti, L. J.

    1987-01-01

    The progress made in the years 1983-1986 in understanding the character and operation of magnetospheric electric fields and electric currents is discussed, with emphasis placed on the connection with the interior regions. Special attention is given to determinations of global electric-field configurations, measurements of the response of magnetospheric particle populations to the electric-field configurations, and observations of the magnetospheric currents at high altitude and during northward IMF. Global simulations of current distributions are discussed, and the sources of global electric fields and currents are examined. The topics discussed in the area of impulsive and small-scale phenomena include substorm current systems, impulsive electric fields and associated currents, and field-aligned electrodynamics. A key finding of these studies is that the electric fields and currents are interrelated and cannot be viewed as separate entities.

  9. Further studies of 60-Hz exposure effects on human function. Final report summary, July 3, 1989--September 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, C.; Cohen, H.D.

    1994-03-29

    The objective of the exploratory study was to determine whether the electric or magnetic field, presented separately in an intermittent fashion, would produce the same pattern of heart rate increases and decreases seen in the original intermittent exposure study. In addition, time of day and baseline heart rate were explored in an attempt to clarify design issues that arose from previous studies. Twenty-four healthy young men 21 to 35 years of age participated in the study. Half were exposed to a 9-kV/m electric field, and half to a 200-mG magnetic field. Within each of these groups, half were exposed in the morning and half in the afternoon.

  10. Discussion of an EMF (electric and magnetic field) protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Afifi, A.A.; Banks, R.S.; Kheifets, L.I.; Newman, B. Associates, Inc., Minneapolis, MN )

    1990-07-01

    In 1989, three collaborating cancer research agencies initiated large-scale case-control studies of the postulated association between residential exposure to 50/60-Hz electric and magnetic fields and the induction of childhood leukemia. To facilitate design of the exposure assessment component of these studies, the Electric Power Research Institute sponsored a two-day workshop on February 6--8, 1989. The workshop's objective was to develop a detailed state-of-the science'' protocol for direct and/or surrogate measurements of a subject's EMF exposure history. Emphasis was placed on the difficulties inherent in measuring the exposure of small children. Attendees were divided into three working groups, addressing the following questions, respectively: How can historical exposure best be assessed; what should be measured outdoors; and what should be measured indoors Consensus on a single protocol was not found to be possible, given the state of knowledge about EMF exposure and the pathophysiology of childhood leukemia. However, the discussion produced a comprehensive analysis of the issues involved in addressing the crucial questions of who and what should be measured, and when, where and how these measurements should take place. In particular, discussion focused on: personal monitoring versus area measurements; exposure metrics; relevant time periods over the subjects life for measurement; location and duration of measurements; and protocol development considerations. Attendees expressed strong interest in another, similar workshop sometime in the future. 1 tab.

  11. Behavioral evidence that magnetic field effects in the land snail, Cepaea nemoralis, might not depend on magnetite or induced electric currents

    SciTech Connect

    Prato, F.S.; Kavaliers, M.; Carson, J.J.L.

    1996-05-01

    Although extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields (< 300 Hz) appear to exert a variety of biological effects, the magnetic field sensing/transduction mechanism(s) remains to be established. Here, using the inhibitory effects of magnetic fields on endogenous opioid peptide-mediated analgesic response of the land snail, Cepaea nemoralis, the authors addressed the mechanism(s) of action of ELF magnetic fields. Indirect mechanisms involving both induced electric fields and direct magnetic field detection mechanisms (e.g., magnetite, parametric resonance) were evaluated. Snails were exposed to a static magnetic field (B{sub DC} = 78 {+-} 1 {micro}T) and a 60 Hz magnetic field (B{sub AC} = 299 {+-} 1 {micro}T peak) with the angle between the static and 60 Hz magnetic fields varied in eight steps between 0{degree} and 90{degree}. At 0{degree} and 90{degree}, the magnetic field reduced opioid-induced analgesia by approximately 20%, and this inhibition was increased to a maximum of 50% when the angle was between 50{degree} and 70{degree}. Because B{sub AC} was fixed in amplitude, direction, and frequency, any induced electric currents would be constant independent of the B{sub AC}/B{sub DC} angle. Also, an energy transduction mechanism involving magnetite should show greatest sensitivity at 90{degree}. Therefore, the energy transduction mechanism probably does not involve induced electric currents or magnetite. Rather, their results suggest a direct magnetic field detection mechanism consistent with the parametric resonance model proposed by Lednev.

  12. Reproduction, growth, and development of rats during exposure to electric fields at multiple strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E. )

    1991-11-01

    A study with multiple exposure groups and large group sizes was performed to establish whether exposure to 60-Hz electric fields would result in reproductive and development toxicity. Female rats were mated, and sperm-positive animals randomly distributed among four groups: sham-exposed, or exposed to 10, 65, or 130 kV/m, 60-Hz vertical electric fields. During gestation, exposure to the higher field strengths resulted in slightly depressed weight gains of dams. Numbers ofpups per litter and pup mortality did not differ among the exposure groups. Dams exposed at 65 kV/m lost slightly more weight through the lactation period than the control group. Male pups exposed to high field strengths gained slightly less weight from 4 to 21 days of age than did sham exposed animals. At weaning, two F{sub 1} females per litter continued on the same exposure regimen, were mated at 11 weeks of age to unexposed males, and sacrificed at 20 days of gestation. Fertility and gestational weight gain of F{sub 1} females were not affected by exposure, nor was prenatal viability or fetal body weight. No significant increase in the incidence of litters with malformations was observed. Although no developmental toxicity was detected, exposures produced physical changes in the dams, evidenced as a rust-colored deposit on the muzzle and ears (chromodacryorrhea) that increased in incidence and severity at 65 and 130 kV/m. Incidence of chromodacryorrhea was not significantly different between sham-exposed rats and those exposed at 10 kV/m. 29 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. ELF electric and magnetic fields: Pacific Northwest Laboratory studies. [Extremely Low Frequency (ELF)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.

    1992-06-01

    Studies have been conducted at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to examine extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields for possible biological effects in animals. Three areas of investigation are reported here: (1) studies on the nervous system, including behavior and neuroendocrine function, (2) experiments on cancer development in animals, and (3) measurements of currents and electric fields induced in animal models by exposure to external magnetic fields. In behavioral experiments, rats have been shown to be responsive to ELF electric field exposure. Furthermore, experimental data indicate that short-term memory may be affected in albino rats exposed to combined ELF and static magnetic fields. Neuroendocrine studies have been conducted to demonstrate an apparent stress-related response in rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Nighttime pineal melatonin levels have been shown to be significantly depressed in animals exposed to either electric or magnetic fields. A number of animal tumor models are currently under investigation to examine possible relationships between ELF exposure and carcinogenesis. Finally, theoretical and experimental measurements have been performed which form the basis for animals and human exposure comparisons.

  14. Discovery of a Variable-Frequency, 50--60 HZ Quasi-Periodic Oscillation on the Normal Branch of GX 17+2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijnands, R. A. D.; van der Klis, M.; Psaltis, D.; Lamb, F. K.; Kuulkers, E.; Dieters, S.; van Paradijs, J.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    1996-09-01

    We report the discovery, with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer, of a 50--60 Hz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) in GX 17+2. The QPO is seen when GX 17+2 is on the normal branch in the X-ray color-color diagram. Its frequency initially increases from 59 to 62 Hz as the source moves down the normal branch, but below the middle of the normal branch it decreases to ~50 Hz. Together with this frequency decrease, the QPO peak becomes much broader, from ~4 Hz in the upper part of the normal branch to ~15 Hz in the lower normal branch. The rms amplitude remains approximately constant between 1% and 2% along the entire normal branch. From a comparison of the properties of this QPO with those of QPOs previously observed along the normal branch in other Z sources, we conclude that it is most likely the horizontal-branch QPO (HBO). However, this QPO displays a number of unusual characteristics. The decrease in the QPO frequency along the lower normal branch is not in agreement with the predictions of the beat-frequency model for the HBO unless the mass flux through the inner disk decreases as the source moves down the lower normal branch. We tentatively suggest that the required decrease in the mass flux through the inner disk is caused by an unusually rapid increase in the mass flux in the radial inflow as GX 17+2 moves down the normal branch. Assuming that this explanation is correct, we can derive an upper bound on the dipole component of the star's magnetic field at the magnetic equator of 5 x 109 G for a 1.4 Msolar neutron star with a radius of 106 cm.

  15. Electric Field Containerless Processing Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.; Rhim, W. K.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this task is to develop the science and technology base required to design and construct a high temperature electric field positioning module that could be used by materials scientists to conduct containerless science experiments in a low gravity environment. Containerless science modules that employ electric fields to position and manipulate samples offer several advantages over acoustic or electromagnetic systems. The electric field system will operate not only at atmospheric pressures but also in a vacuum, in contrast to the acoustic modules which can only operate in atmosphere where the acoustic forces are sufficient. The electric field technique puts minimum energy into the sample, whereas the electromagnetic system can deposit energy into the sample through eddy current heat as well as physical mixing in the sample. Two types of electric field modules have been constructed and tested to date. One employs a charged sample and uses electrostatic forces to position and control the sample. The second type of module induces electrical polarization of the sample and electric field gradients to position and control the sample.

  16. Introducing electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, John

    2016-09-01

    The clear introduction of basic concepts and definitions is crucial for teaching any topic in physics. I have always found it difficult to teach fields. While searching for better explanations I hit on an approach of reading foundational texts and electromagnetic textbooks in ten year lots, ranging from 1840 to the present. By combining this with modern techniques of textual interpretation I attempt to clarify three introductory concepts: how the field is defined; the principle of superposition and the role of the electrostatic field in a circuit.

  17. Electric and magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, R. H.; Kotter, F. R.; Misakian, M.; Ortiz, P.

    1981-02-01

    The NBS program concerned with developing methods for evaluating and calibrating instrumentation for use in measuring the electric field and various ion-related electrical quantities in the vicinity of high-voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission lines is described. Apparatus designed to simulate the transmission line environment is also considered.

  18. Electric and magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, R. H.; Kotter, F. R.; Misakian, M.; Hagler, J. N.

    1982-07-01

    Methods for evaluating and calibrating instrumentation for use in measuring the electric field and various ion related electrical quantities in the vicinity of high voltage direct current transmission lines are developed. Apparatus designed to simulate the transmission line environment are also evaluated.

  19. Interaction of biological systems with static and ELF electric and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.; Kelman, B.J.; Weigel, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    Although background levels of atmospheric electric and geomagnetic field levels are extremely low, over the past several decades, human beings and other life forms on this planet have been subjected to a dramatically changing electromagnetic milieu. An exponential increase in exposure to electromagnetic fields has occurred, largely because of such technological advances as the growth of electrical power generation and transmission systems, the increased use of wireless communications, and the use of radar. In addition, electromagnetic field generating devices have proliferated in industrial plants, office buildings, homes, public transportation systems, and elsewhere. Although significant increases have occurred in electromagnetic field strenghths spanning all frequency ranges, this symposium addresses only the impact of these fields at static and extremely low frequencies (ELF), primarily 50 and 60 Hz. This volume contains the proceedings of the symposium entitled /open quotes/Interaction of biological systems with static and ELF electric and magnetic fields/close quotes/. The purpose of the symposium was to provide a forum for discussions of all aspects of research on the interaction of static and ELF electromagnetic fields with biological systems. These systems include simple biophysical models, cell and organ preparations, whole animals, and man. Dosimetry, exposure system design, and artifacts in ELF bioeffects research were also addressed, along with current investigations that examine fundamental mechanisms of interactions between the fields and biological processes. Papers are indexed separately.

  20. Formation of osteoclast-like cells is suppressed by low frequency, low intensity electric fields.

    PubMed

    Rubin, J; McLeod, K J; Titus, L; Nanes, M S; Catherwood, B D; Rubin, C T

    1996-01-01

    With use of a solenoid to generate uniform time-varying electric fields, the effect of extremely low frequency electric fields on osteoclast-like cell formation stimulated by 1,25(OH)2D3 was studied in primary murine marrow culture. Recruitment of osteoclast-like cells was assessed by counting multinuclear, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase positive cells on day 8 of culture. A solenoid was used to impose uniform time-varying electric fields on cells; sham exposures were performed with an identical solenoid with a null net electric field. During the experiments, both solenoids heated interiorly to approximately 1.5 degrees C above ambient incubator temperature. As a result of the heating, cultures in the sham solenoid formed more osteoclast-like cells than those on the incubator shelf (132 +/- 12%). For this reason, cells exposed to the sham solenoid were used for comparison with cultures exposed to the active coil. Marrow cells were plated at 1.4 x 10(6)/cm2 in square chamber dishes and exposed to 60 Hz electric fields at 9.6 muV/cm from days 1 to 8. Field exposure inhibited osteoclast-like cell recruitment by 17 +/- 3% as compared with sham exposure (p < 0.0001). Several variables, including initial cell plating density, addition of prostaglandin E2 to enhance osteoclast-like cell recruitment, and field parameters, were also assessed. In this secondary series, extremely low frequency fields inhibited osteoclast-like cell formation by 24 +/- 4% (p < 0.0001), with their inhibitory effect consistent throughout all variations in protocol. These experiments demonstrate that extremely low intensity, low frequency sinusoidal electric fields suppress the formation of osteoclast-like cells in marrow culture. The in vitro results support in vivo findings that demonstrate that electric fields inhibit the onset of osteopenia and the progression of osteonecrosis; this suggests that extremely low frequency fields may inhibit osteoclast recruitment in vivo. PMID:8618169

  1. Dielectrophoretic forces and potentials induced on pairs of cells in an electric field.

    PubMed Central

    Foster, K R; Sowers, A E

    1995-01-01

    A combined numerical/experimental study is reported of the membrane potentials and dielectrophoretically induced forces between cells, membrane pressures, and velocity of attraction of cells under the influence of an electric field. This study was designed to explore electrical and mechanical effects produced by a field on cells in close proximity or undergoing electrically induced fusion. Laplace's equation for pairs of membrane-covered spheres in close proximity was solved numerically by the boundary element method, and the electrically induced forces on the cells and between cells were obtained by evaluating the Maxwell stress tensor. The velocity of approach of erythrocyte ghosts or fused ghosts in a 60-Hz field of 6 V/mm was measured experimentally, and the data were interpreted by using Batchelor's theory for hydrodynamic interaction of hard spheres. The numerical results show clearly the origin of the dielectrophoretic pressures and forces in fused and unfused cells and the effects of a nearby cell on the induced membrane potentials. The experimental results agree well with predictions based on the simple electrical model of the cell. The analysis shows the strong effect of hydrodynamic interactions between the cells in determining their velocity of approach. PMID:8519978

  2. THOR Electric Field Instrument - EFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Bale, Stuart D.; Bonnell, John W.; Lindqvist, Per-Arne; Phal, Yamuna; Rothkaehl, Hanna; Soucek, Jan; Vaivads, Andris; Åhlen, Lennart

    2016-04-01

    Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) is the first mission ever flown in space dedicated to plasma turbulence. The Electric Field Instrument (EFI) will measure the vector electric field from 0 to 200 kHz. EFI consists of two sets of sensors: Spin-plane Double Probes (EFI-SDP) providing high sensitivity DC electric field in the spacecraft spin plane (2D), and the High-Frequency Antenna (EFI-HFA) providing 3D electric field at frequencies above ~1 kHz. EFI-SDP consists of 4 biased spherical probes extended on 50 m long wire booms, 90 degrees apart in the spin plane, giving a 100 m baseline for each of the two spin-plane electric field components. EFI-HFA consists of 6 x 1.25 m long monopoles, forming 3 dipolar antennas crossed at 90 degrees to each other. In addition to the sensors, EFI contains HFA and SDP pre-amplifiers, as well as bias electronics boards (BEBs) hosted in the man electronics box of the Field and Wave processor (FWP). As THOR spacecraft has a sun-pointing spin axis, EFI-SDP measures the electric field in the plane approximately orthogonal to the sun using long wire booms. The sun-pointing attitude greatly reduces errors due to wake effects and asymmetric photoelectron clouds, enabling the highly accurate in comparison to earlier missions ±0.1 mV/m near-DC electric field measurements. Interferometry using the electric field probes can be used to infer wavelengths and scale sizes at the smallest scales in the plasma. EFI also measures the floating potential of the satellite, which can be used to estimate the plasma density at very high time resolution (up to a few hundred Hz). The sun-pointing attitude greatly reduces changes in the illuminated area, and hence the associated spin-dependent errors. In combination with densities derived from the observed plasma frequency emission line, EFI monitors the plasma density from DC to a few hundred Hz. EFI measurements characterize electric field and density variations associated with kinetic scale plasma

  3. Electric fields and quantum wormholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Dalit; Freivogel, Ben; Iqbal, Nabil

    2015-09-01

    Electric fields can thread a classical Einstein-Rosen bridge. Maldacena and Susskind have recently suggested that in a theory of dynamical gravity the entanglement of ordinary perturbative quanta should be viewed as creating a quantum version of an Einstein-Rosen bridge between the particles, or a "quantum wormhole." We demonstrate within low-energy effective field theory that there is a precise sense in which electric fields can also thread such quantum wormholes. We define a nonperturbative "wormhole susceptibility" that measures the ease of passing an electric field through any sort of wormhole. The susceptibility of a quantum wormhole is suppressed by powers of the U (1 ) gauge coupling relative to that for a classical wormhole but can be made numerically equal with a sufficiently large amount of entangled matter.

  4. Electric fields in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    Two techniques, tracking the motions of Ba(+) clouds and measuring the differences in floating potential between symmetric double probes, were successful in: (1) demonstrating the basic convective nature of magnetospheric electric fields, (2) mapping global patterns of convection at upper ionosphere levels, and (3) revealing the physics of electric currents in the ionosphere and the importance of magnetosphere-ionosphere feedback in altering the imposed convection.

  5. Electrophoresis in strong electric fields.

    PubMed

    Barany, Sandor

    2009-01-01

    Two kinds of non-linear electrophoresis (ef) that can be detected in strong electric fields (several hundred V/cm) are considered. The first ("classical" non-linear ef) is due to the interaction of the outer field with field-induced ionic charges in the electric double layer (EDL) under conditions, when field-induced variations of electrolyte concentration remain to be small comparatively to its equilibrium value. According to the Shilov theory, the non-linear component of the electrophoretic velocity for dielectric particles is proportional to the cubic power of the applied field strength (cubic electrophoresis) and to the second power of the particles radius; it is independent of the zeta-potential but is determined by the surface conductivity of particles. The second one, the so-called "superfast electrophoresis" is connected with the interaction of a strong outer field with a secondary diffuse layer of counterions (space charge) that is induced outside the primary (classical) diffuse EDL by the external field itself because of concentration polarization. The Dukhin-Mishchuk theory of "superfast electrophoresis" predicts quadratic dependence of the electrophoretic velocity of unipolar (ionically or electronically) conducting particles on the external field gradient and linear dependence on the particle's size in strong electric fields. These are in sharp contrast to the laws of classical electrophoresis (no dependence of V(ef) on the particle's size and linear dependence on the electric field gradient). A new method to measure the ef velocity of particles in strong electric fields is developed that is based on separation of the effects of sedimentation and electrophoresis using videoimaging and a new flowcell and use of short electric pulses. To test the "classical" non-linear electrophoresis, we have measured the ef velocity of non-conducting polystyrene, aluminium-oxide and (semiconductor) graphite particles as well as Saccharomice cerevisiae yeast cells as a

  6. Microstickies agglomeration by electric field.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaotang Tony; Hsieh, Jeffery S

    2016-01-01

    Microstickies deposits on both paper machine and paper products when it agglomerates under step change in ionic strength, pH, temperature and chemical additives. These stickies increase the down time of the paper mill and decrease the quality of paper. The key property of microstickies is its smaller size, which leads to low removal efficiency and difficulties in measurement. Thus the increase of microstickies size help improve both removal efficiency and reduce measurement difficulty. In this paper, a new agglomeration technology based on electric field was investigated. The electric treatment could also increase the size of stickies particles by around 100 times. The synergetic effect between electric field treatment and detacky chemicals/dispersants, including polyvinyl alcohol, poly(diallylmethylammonium chloride) and lignosulfonate, was also studied. PMID:27332828

  7. Electric field divertor plasma pump

    DOEpatents

    Schaffer, M.J.

    1994-10-04

    An electric field plasma pump includes a toroidal ring bias electrode positioned near the divertor strike point of a poloidal divertor of a tokamak, or similar plasma-confining apparatus. For optimum plasma pumping, the separatrix of the poloidal divertor contacts the ring electrode, which then also acts as a divertor plate. A plenum or other duct near the electrode includes an entrance aperture open to receive electrically-driven plasma. The electrode is insulated laterally with insulators, one of which is positioned opposite the electrode at the entrance aperture. An electric field E is established between the ring electrode and a vacuum vessel wall, with the polarity of the bias applied to the electrode being relative to the vessel wall selected such that the resultant electric field E interacts with the magnetic field B already existing in the tokamak to create an E [times] B/B[sup 2] drift velocity that drives plasma into the entrance aperture. The pumped plasma flow into the entrance aperture is insensitive to variations, intentional or otherwise, of the pump and divertor geometry. Pressure buildups in the plenum or duct connected to the entrance aperture in excess of 10 mtorr are achievable. 11 figs.

  8. Electric field divertor plasma pump

    DOEpatents

    Schaffer, Michael J.

    1994-01-01

    An electric field plasma pump includes a toroidal ring bias electrode (56) positioned near the divertor strike point of a poloidal divertor of a tokamak (20), or similar plasma-confining apparatus. For optimum plasma pumping, the separatrix (40) of the poloidal divertor contacts the ring electrode (56), which then also acts as a divertor plate. A plenum (54) or other duct near the electrode (56) includes an entrance aperture open to receive electrically-driven plasma. The electrode (56) is insulated laterally with insulators (63,64), one of which (64) is positioned opposite the electrode at the entrance aperture. An electric field E is established between the ring electrode (56) and a vacuum vessel wall (22), with the polarity of the bias applied to the electrode being relative to the vessel wall selected such that the resultant electric field E interacts with the magnetic field B already existing in the tokamak to create an E.times.B/B.sup.2 drift velocity that drives plasma into the entrance aperture. The pumped plasma flow into the entrance aperture is insensitive to variations, intentional or otherwise, of the pump and divertor geometry. Pressure buildups in the plenum or duct connected to the entrance aperture in excess of 10 mtorr are achievable.

  9. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

    1992-12-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry are described. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field. 8 figs.

  10. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McComas, David J.; Nordholt, Jane E.

    1992-01-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field.

  11. Exposure assessment of extremely low frequency electric fields in Tehran, Iran, 2010.

    PubMed

    Nassiri, Parvin; Esmaeilpour, Mohammad Reza Monazzam; Gharachahi, Ehsan; Haghighat, Gholamali; Yunesian, Masoud; Zaredar, Narges

    2013-01-01

    Extremely Low-Frequency (ELF) electric and magnetic fields belonging to the nonionizing electromagnetic radiation spectrum have a frequency of 50 - 60 Hz. All people are exposed to a complex set of electric and magnetic fields that spread throughout the environment. The current study was carried out to assess people's exposure to an ELF electric field in the Tehran metropolitan area in 2010. The measurement of the electronic fields was performed using an HI-3604 power frequency field strength measurement device. A total number of 2,753 measurements were performed. Afterward, the data obtained were transferred to the base map using Arc View Version 3.2 and Arc Map Version 9.3. Finally, an interpolation method was applied to expand the intensity of the electric field to the entire city. Based on the results obtained, the electric field was divided into three parts with various intensities including 0-5 V m, 5-15 V m, and >15 V m. It should be noted that the status of high voltage transmission lines, electric substations, and specific points including schools and hospitals were also marked on the map. Minimum and maximum electric field intensities were measured tantamount to 0.31 V m and 19.80 V m, respectively. In all measurements, the electric field was much less than the amount provided in the ICNIRP Guide. The results revealed that 141 hospitals and 6,905 schools are situated in an area with electric field intensity equal to 0-5 V m, while 15 hospitals and 95 schools are located in zones of 5-15 V m and more than 15 V m. Examining high voltage transmission lines and electric substations in Tehran and its suburbs suggested that the impact of the lines on the background electric field of the city was low. Accordingly, 0.97 km of Tehran located on the city border adjacent to the high voltage transmission lines have an electric field in the range of 5 to 15 V m. The noted range is much lower than the available standards. In summary, it can be concluded that the public

  12. Apparatuses and methods for generating electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Jill R; McJunkin, Timothy R; Tremblay, Paul L

    2013-08-06

    Apparatuses and methods relating to generating an electric field are disclosed. An electric field generator may include a semiconductive material configured in a physical shape substantially different from a shape of an electric field to be generated thereby. The electric field is generated when a voltage drop exists across the semiconductive material. A method for generating an electric field may include applying a voltage to a shaped semiconductive material to generate a complex, substantially nonlinear electric field. The shape of the complex, substantially nonlinear electric field may be configured for directing charged particles to a desired location. Other apparatuses and methods are disclosed.

  13. Nanoconfined water under electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzar, Alenka; Bratko, D.; Daub, C. D.

    2010-03-01

    We study the effect of electric field on interfacial tension of nanoconfined water [1,2] using molecular simulations. Our analysis and simulations confirm that classical electrostriction characterizes usual electrowetting behavior in nanoscale hydrophobic channels and nanoporous materials [3]. We suggest a new mechanism to orient nanoparticles by an applied electric field even when the particles carry no charges or dipoles of their own. Coupling to the field can be accomplished trough solvent-mediated interaction between the electric field and a nanoparticle [4]. For nanoscale particles in water, we find the response to the applied field to be sufficiently fast to make this mechanism relevant for biological processes, design of novel nanostructures and sensors, and development of nanoengineering methods [5]. [1]C. D. Daub, D. Bratko, K. Leung and A. Luzar, J. Phys. Chem. C 111, 505 (2007). [2] D. Bratko, C. D. Daub, K. Leung and A. Luzar, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129, 2504 (2007) [3] D. Bratko, C. D. Daub and A. Luzar, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 10, 6807 (2008). [4] D. Bratko, C. D. Daub and A. Luzar, Faraday Discussions 141, 55 (2009). [5] C. D. Daub, D. Bratko, T. Ali and A. Luzar, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 207801 (2009).

  14. Electric and magnetic field exposures for people living near a 735-Kilovolt power line

    SciTech Connect

    Levallois, P.; Gauvin, D.; St. Laurent, J.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a 735-kV transmission line on the electric and magnetic field exposures of people living at the edge of the line`s right of way. Exposure of 18 adults, mostly white-collar workers, living in different bungalows located 190-240 feet from the line (exposed subjects) was compared to that of 17 adults living in similar residences far away from any transmission line. Each subject carried a Positron meter for 24 hr during 1 workday, which measured 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields every minute. All measurements were carried out in parallel for exposed and unexposed subjects during the same weeks between September and December. During measurements the average loading on the line varied between 600 and 1100 A. The average magnetic field intensity while at home was 4.4 times higher among exposed subjects than unexposed (7.1 versus 1.6 Mg, p=0.0001) and 6.2 times higher when considering only the sleeping period (6.8 versus 1.1 mG, p=0.0001). Based on the 24-hr measurement, average magnetic field exposure was three times higher among the exposed was positively correlated with the loading on the line (r=0.8, p+0.001). Percentage of time above a magnetic field threshold F(2 mG or 7.8 mG) was a good indicator to distinguish the two types of exposure. Percentage of time above 20 V/m was significantly different, but percentage of time above 78 V/m was rare and comparable for the two groups. Variability of exposure was very low. This study demonstrates that a 735-kV line contributes significantly to residential 60-Hz magnetic field exposure and, to a lesser extent, electric fields for people living at the edge of the right way. Because of the limited size of our sample, caution is recommended before generalizing these results. Nevertheless, due to the uncertainty on the risks associated with such an unusual high residential exposure, research is needed on its possible effects. 30 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  15. Electric Field Mediated Droplet Centering

    SciTech Connect

    Bei, Z.-M.; Jones, T.B.; Tucker-Schwartz, A.; Harding, D.R.

    2010-03-12

    Double emulsion droplets subjected to a uniform ac electric field self-assemble into highly concentric structures via the dipole/dipole force if the outer droplet has a higher dielectric constant than the suspending liquid. The dielectric constant of the inner droplet has no influence. To minimize field-induced droplet distortion, the liquids must be density matched to ~0.1%. Centering of ~3 to 6 mm diameter droplets is achieved within ~60 s for field strengths of ~10^4 V_rms /m in liquids of viscosity ~10 cP. Effective centering depends strongly on frequency if the outer shell is conductive.

  16. From sunlight in space to 60 Hz on earth - The losses along the way. [satellite solar power transmission efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denman, O. S.

    1978-01-01

    The space-to-ground links for the Solar Power Satellite System are discussed in terms of worst, best, and nominal efficiency used in the development of the preliminary design. An uncertainty analysis of this design illustrates the effect of link efficiency on SPS size and mass. It is shown that a solar power satellite can deliver power to a ground-based utility for 4 to 5 cents per kWh, depending on the efficiency of the solar cells available in 1987. The overall efficiency of converting sunlight in space to electric power delivered to utilities ranged from 3.83% for the worst combination of efficiencies to 9.5% for the best, with a nominal efficiency of 7.12%.

  17. GROUNDWATER AND SOIL REMEDIATION USING ELECTRICAL FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enhancements of contaminants removal and degradation in low permeability soils by electrical fields are achieved by the processes of electrical heating, electrokinetics, and electrochemical reactions. Electrical heating increases soil temperature resulting in the increase of cont...

  18. Pulsed electric field increases reproduction.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, Dimitris J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study the effect of pulsed electric field - applied in corona discharge photography - on Drosophila melanogaster reproduction, possible induction of DNA fragmentation, and morphological alterations in the gonads. Materials and methods Animals were exposed to different field intensities (100, 200, 300, and 400 kV/m) during the first 2-5 days of their adult lives, and the effect on reproductive capacity was assessed. DNA fragmentation during early- and mid-oogenesis was investigated by application of the TUNEL (Terminal deoxynucleotide transferase dUTP Nick End Labeling) assay. Sections of follicles after fixation and embedding in resins were observed for possible morphological/developmental abnormalities. Results The field increased reproduction by up to 30% by increasing reproductive capacity in both sexes. The effect increased with increasing field intensities. The rate of increase diminished at the strongest intensities. Slight induction of DNA fragmentation was observed exclusively in the nurse (predominantly) and follicle cells, and exclusively at the two most sensitive developmental stages, i.e., germarium and predominantly stage 7-8. Sections of follicles from exposed females at stages of early and mid-oogennesis other than germarium and stages 7-8 did not reveal abnormalities. Conclusions (1) The specific type of electric field may represent a mild stress factor, inducing DNA fragmentation and cell death in a small percentage of gametes, triggering the reaction of the animal's reproductive system to increase the rate of gametogenesis in order to compensate the loss of a small number of gametes. (2) The nurse cells are the most sensitive from all three types of egg chamber cells. (3) The mid-oogenesis checkpoint (stage 7-8) is more sensitive to this field than the early oogenesis one (germarium) in contrast to microwave exposure. (4) Possible therapeutic applications, or applications in increasing fertility, should be investigated. PMID:26651869

  19. Analysis of magnetic field levels at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulou, Christos G.

    1994-01-01

    The scope of this work is to evaluate the magnetic field levels of distribution systems and other equipment at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Magnetic fields levels in several operational areas and various facilities are investigated. Three dimensional mappings and contour are provided along with the measured data. Furthermore, the portion of magnetic fields generated by the 60 Hz fundamental frequency and the portion generated by harmonics are examined. Finally, possible mitigation techniques for attenuating fields from electric panels are discussed.

  20. Safety of high speed guided ground transportation systems: Potential health effects of low frequency electromagnetic fields due to maglev and other electric rail systems. Final report, October 1991-July 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Creasey, W.A.; Goldberg, R.B.

    1993-08-01

    Table of Contents: Executive Summary; Clinical and Epidemiologic Studies of Railroad Workers and Others Exposed to EMF Associated with Railroad Operation; Dosimetry: Characterization of EMF Exposure of Railroad Workers, Utility Workers, and the General Public; Epidemiologic Studies of Workers and the General Public Exposed to Power Frequency (50 and 60 HZ) Electric and Magnetic Fields; Clinical and Epidemiologic Studies of Human Exposure to Static Magnetic Fields (MRI and Research Facilities); Animal Health Effects and Behavioral Studies; Animal and Cellular Studies on Window' EMF Effects; EMF Guidelines; and Conclusions.

  1. Electrical field of electrical appliances versus distance: A preliminary analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, Nur Badariah Ahmad; Hani Nordin, Farah; Ismail, Fakaruddin Ali Ahmad; Alkahtani, Ammar Ahmed; Balasubramaniam, Nagaletchumi; Hock, Goh Chin; Shariff, Z. A. M.

    2013-06-01

    Every household electrical appliance that is plugged in emits electric field even if it is not operating. The source where the appliance is plugged into and the components of household electrical appliance contribute to electric field emission. The electric field may cause unknown disturbance to the environment or also affect the human health and the effect might depends on the strength of the electric field emitted by the appliance. This paper will investigate the strength of the electric field emitted by four different electrical appliances using spectrum analyser. The strength will be captured at three different distances; (i) 1m (ii) 2m and (iii) 3m and analysis of the strength of the electrical field is done based on the three different distances. The measurement results show that the strength of the electric field is strongest when it is captured at 1m and the weakest at 3m from the electrical appliance. The results proved that the farther an object is located from the electrical appliance; the less effect the magnetic field has.

  2. Electric Field Effect in Intrinsic Josephson Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, T.

    The electric field effect in intrinsic Josephson junction stacks (IJJ's) is investigated on the basis of the capacitively-coupled IJJ model. We clarify the current-voltage characteristics of the IJJ's in the presence of an external electric field. It is predicted that the IJJ's show a dynamical transition to the voltage state as the external electric field is increased.

  3. Electric Field Induced Interfacial Instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusner, Robert E.; Min, Kyung Yang; Wu, Xiao-lun; Onuki, Akira

    1999-01-01

    The study of the interface in a charge-free, critical and near-critical binary fluid in the presence of an externally applied electric field is presented. At sufficiently large fields, the interface between the two phases of the binary fluid should become unstable and exhibit an undulation with a predefined wavelength on the order of the capillary length. As the critical point is approached, this wavelength is reduced, potentially approaching length-scales such as the correlation length or critical nucleation radius. At this point the critical properties of the system may be affected. In this paper, the flat interface of a marginally polar binary fluid mixture is stressed by a perpendicular alternating electric field and the resulting instability is characterized by the critical electric field E(sub c) and the pattern observed. The character of the surface dynamics at the onset of instability is found to be strongly dependent on the frequency f of the field applied. The plot of E(sub c) vs. f for a fixed temperature shows a sigmoidal shape, whose low and high frequency limits are well described by a power-law relationship, E(sub c) = epsilon(exp zeta) with zeta = 0.35 and zeta = 0.08, respectively. The low-limit exponent compares well with the value zeta = 4 for a system of conducting and non-conducting fluids. On the other hand, the high-limit exponent coincides with what was first predicted by Onuki. The instability manifests itself as the conducting phase penetrates the non-conducting phase. As the frequency increases, the shape of the pattern changes from an array of bifurcating strings to an array of column-like (or rod-like) protrusions, each of which spans the space between the plane interface and one of the electrodes. For an extremely high frequency, the disturbance quickly grows into a parabolic cone pointing toward the upper plate. As a result, the interface itself changes its shape from that of a plane to that of a high sloping pyramid.

  4. Cell separation using electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangano, Joseph (Inventor); Eppich, Henry (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention involves methods and devices which enable discrete objects having a conducting inner core, surrounded by a dielectric membrane to be selectively inactivated by electric fields via irreversible breakdown of their dielectric membrane. One important application of the invention is in the selection, purification, and/or purging of desired or undesired biological cells from cell suspensions. According to the invention, electric fields can be utilized to selectively inactivate and render non-viable particular subpopulations of cells in a suspension, while not adversely affecting other desired subpopulations. According to the inventive methods, the cells can be selected on the basis of intrinsic or induced differences in a characteristic electroporation threshold, which can depend, for example, on a difference in cell size and/or critical dielectric membrane breakdown voltage. The invention enables effective cell separation without the need to employ undesirable exogenous agents, such as toxins or antibodies. The inventive method also enables relatively rapid cell separation involving a relatively low degree of trauma or modification to the selected, desired cells. The inventive method has a variety of potential applications in clinical medicine, research, etc., with two of the more important foreseeable applications being stem cell enrichment/isolation, and cancer cell purging.

  5. Cell separation using electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangano, Joseph A. (Inventor); Eppich, Henry M. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention involves methods and devices which enable discrete objects having a conducting inner core, surrounded by a dielectric membrane to be selectively inactivated by electric fields via irreversible breakdown of their dielectric membrane. One important application of the invention is in the selection, purification, and/or purging of desired or undesired biological cells from cell suspensions. According to the invention, electric fields can be utilized to selectively inactivate and render non-viable particular subpopulations of cells in a suspension, while not adversely affecting other desired subpopulations. According to the inventive methods, the cells can be selected on the basis of intrinsic or induced differences in a characteristic electroporation threshold, which can depend, for example, on a difference in cell size and/or critical dielectric membrane breakdown voltage. The invention enables effective cell separation without the need to employ undesirable exogenous agents, such as toxins or antibodies. The inventive method also enables relatively rapid cell separation involving a relatively low degree of trauma or modification to the selected, desired cells. The inventive method has a variety of potential applications in clinical medicine, research, etc., with two of the more important foreseeable applications being stem cell enrichment/isolation, and cancer cell purging.

  6. ELECTRIC-FIELD-ENHANCED FABRIC FILTRATION OF ELECTRICALLY CHARGED FLYASH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper summarizes measurements in which both external electric field (applied by electrodes at the fabric surface) and flyash electrical charge (controlled by an upstream corona precharger) are independent variables in a factorial performance experiment carried out in a labora...

  7. Very Broadband Rayleigh-Wave Dispersion (0.06 - 60 Hz) and Shear-Wave Velocity Structure Under Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, K. A.; Bilek, S. L.; Patton, H. J.; Abbott, R. E.; Stead, R.; Pancha, A.; White, R.

    2009-12-01

    Earth structure plays an important role in the generation of seismic waves for all sources. Nowhere is this more evident than at near-surface depths where man-made sources, such as explosions, are conducted. For example, short-period Rayleigh waves (Rg) are excited and propagate in the upper 2 km of Earth's crust. The importance of Rg in the generation of S waves from explosion sources through near-source scattering depends greatly on the shear-wave velocity structure at very shallow depths. Using three distinct datasets, we present a very broadband Rayleigh-wave phase velocity dispersion curve for the Yucca Flat (YF) region of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The first dataset consists of waveforms of historic NTS explosions recorded on regional seismic networks and will provide information for the lowest frequencies (0.06-0.3 Hz). The second dataset is comprised of waveforms from a non-nuclear explosion on YF recorded at near-local distances and will be used for mid-range frequencies (0.2-1.5 Hz). The third dataset contains high-frequency waveforms recorded from refraction microtremor surveys on YF. This dataset provides information between 1.5 and 60 Hz. Initial results from the high frequency dataset indicate velocities range from 0.45-0.9 km/s at 1.5 Hz and 0.25-0.45 km/s at 60 Hz. The broadband nature of the dispersion curve will allow us to invert for the shear-wave velocity structure to 10 km depth, with focus on shallow depths where nuclear tests were conducted in the YF region. The velocity model will be used by researchers as a tool to aid the development of new explosion source models that incorporate shear wave generation. The new model can also be used to help improve regional distance yield estimation and source discrimination for small events.

  8. Electric and magnetic field exposures for people living near a 735-kilovolt power line.

    PubMed Central

    Levallois, P; Gauvin, D; St-Laurent, J; Gingras, S; Deadman, J E

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a 735-kV transmission line on the electric and magnetic field exposures of people living at the edge of the line's right of way. Exposure of 18 adults, mostly white-collar workers, living in different bungalows located 190-240 feet from the line (exposed subjects) was compared to that of 17 adults living in similar residences far away from any transmission line. Each subject carried a Positron meter for 24 hr during 1 workday, which measured 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields every minute. All measurements were carried out in parallel for exposed and unexposed subjects during the same weeks between September and December. During measurements the average loading on the line varied between 600 and 1100 A. The average magnetic field intensity while at home was 4.4 times higher among exposed subjects than unexposed (7.1 versus 1.6 mG, p = 0.0001) and 6.2 times higher when considering only the sleeping period (6.8 versus 1.1 mG, p = 0.0001). Based on the 24-hr measurement, average magnetic field exposure was three times higher among the exposed. Electric field intensity was also higher among the exposed while at home (26.3 versus 14.0 V/m, p = 0.03). Magnetic field intensity among the exposed was positively correlated with the loading on the line (r = 0.8, p = 0.001). Percentage of time above a magnetic field threshold (2 mG or 7.8 mG) was a good indicator to distinguish the two types of exposure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1. PMID:7498095

  9. MMS Observations of Parallel Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergun, R.; Goodrich, K.; Wilder, F. D.; Sturner, A. P.; Holmes, J.; Stawarz, J. E.; Malaspina, D.; Usanova, M.; Torbert, R. B.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Burch, J. L.; Strangeway, R. J.; Russell, C. T.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.; Hesse, M.; Goldman, M. V.; Drake, J. F.; Phan, T.; Nakamura, R.

    2015-12-01

    Parallel electric fields are a necessary condition for magnetic reconnection with non-zero guide field and are ultimately accountable for topological reconfiguration of a magnetic field. Parallel electric fields also play a strong role in charged particle acceleration and turbulence. The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission targets these three universal plasma processes. The MMS satellites have an accurate three-dimensional electric field measurement, which can identify parallel electric fields as low as 1 mV/m at four adjacent locations. We present preliminary observations of parallel electric fields from MMS and provide an early interpretation of their impact on magnetic reconnection, in particular, where the topological change occurs. We also examine the role of parallel electric fields in particle acceleration. Direct particle acceleration by parallel electric fields is well established in the auroral region. Observations of double layers in by the Van Allan Probes suggest that acceleration by parallel electric fields may be significant in energizing some populations of the radiation belts. THEMIS observations also indicate that some of the largest parallel electric fields are found in regions of strong field-aligned currents associated with turbulence, suggesting a highly non-linear dissipation mechanism. We discuss how the MMS observations extend our understanding of the role of parallel electric fields in some of the most critical processes in the magnetosphere.

  10. Electric Field Induced Interfacial Instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusner, Robert E.; Min, Kyung Yang; Wu, Xiao-Lun; Onuki, Akira

    1996-01-01

    The study of the interface in a charge-free, nonpolar, critical and near-critical binary fluid in the presence of an externally applied electric field is presented. At sufficiently large fields, the interface between the two phases of the binary fluid should become unstable and exhibit an undulation with a predefined wavelength on the order of the capillary length. As the critical point is approached, this wavelength is reduced, potentially approaching length-scales such as the correlation length or critical nucleation radius. At this point the critical properties of the system may be affected. In zero gravity, the interface is unstable at all long wavelengths in the presence of a field applied across it. It is conjectured that this will cause the binary fluid to break up into domains small enough to be outside the instability condition. The resulting pattern formation, and the effects on the critical properties as the domains approach the correlation length are of acute interest. With direct observation, laser light scattering, and interferometry, the phenomena can be probed to gain further understanding of interfacial instabilities and the pattern formation which results, and dimensional crossover in critical systems as the critical fluctuations in a particular direction are suppressed by external forces.

  11. Pair-production in inhomogeneous electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Xue Shesheng

    2008-01-03

    This is a preliminary study on the rate of electron-positron pair production in spatially inhomogeneous electric fields. We study the rate in the Sauter field and compare it to the rate in the homogeneous field.

  12. Electric Dipole Moment Experiment Systematic from Electric Field Discharge Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, B.; Gould, Harvey

    2014-09-01

    A magnetic field, in the direction of the electric field and synchronous with the electric field reversal, will mimic an EDM signal. One might expect a discharge across the electric field plates to produce magnetic fields with only small or vanishing components parallel to the electric field, minimizing its systematic effect. Our experimental model, using simulated discharge currents, found otherwise: the discharge current may be at an angle to the normal, and thus generate a normal magnetic field. Comparison of data from the experimental model with the results from calculations will be presented, along with estimates of the time-averaged normal magnetic field seen by atoms in an electron EDM experiment using a fountain of laser-cooled francium, as a function of discharge current.

  13. Charged Hadron Properties in Background Electric Fields

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold, Brian C. Tiburzi, Andre Walker-Loud

    2010-02-01

    We report on a lattice calculation demonstrating a novel new method to extract the electric polarizability of charged pseudo-scalar mesons by analyzing two point correlation functions computed in classical background electric fields.

  14. Tuning Photoluminescence Response by Electric Field in Electrically Soft Ferroelectrics.

    PubMed

    Khatua, Dipak Kumar; Kalaskar, Abhijeet; Ranjan, Rajeev

    2016-03-18

    We show that an electrically soft ferroelectric host can be used to tune the photoluminescence (PL) response of rare-earth emitter ions by external electric field. The proof of this concept is demonstrated by changing the PL response of the Eu^{3+} ion by electric field on a model system Eu-doped 0.94(Na_{1/2}Bi_{1/2}TiO_{3})-0.06(BaTiO_{3}). We also show that new channels of radiative transitions, forbidden otherwise, open up due to positional disorder in the system, which can as well be tuned by electric field. PMID:27035321

  15. Electric double layer of anisotropic dielectric colloids under electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, M.; Wu, H.; Luijten, E.

    2016-07-01

    Anisotropic colloidal particles constitute an important class of building blocks for self-assembly directed by electrical fields. The aggregation of these building blocks is driven by induced dipole moments, which arise from an interplay between dielectric effects and the electric double layer. For particles that are anisotropic in shape, charge distribution, and dielectric properties, calculation of the electric double layer requires coupling of the ionic dynamics to a Poisson solver. We apply recently proposed methods to solve this problem for experimentally employed colloids in static and time-dependent electric fields. This allows us to predict the effects of field strength and frequency on the colloidal properties.

  16. Compact Electric- And Magnetic-Field Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winterhalter, Daniel; Smith, Edward

    1994-01-01

    Compact sensor measures both electric and magnetic fields. Includes both short electric-field dipole and search-coil magnetometer. Three mounted orthogonally providing triaxial measurements of electromagnetic field at frequencies ranging from near 0 to about 10 kHz.

  17. Electric Field Analysis of Breast Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sree, V. Gowri; Udayakumar, K.; Sundararajan, R.

    2011-01-01

    An attractive alternative treatment for malignant tumors that are refractive to conventional therapies, such as surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, is electrical-pulse-mediated drug delivery. Electric field distribution of tissue/tumor is important for effective treatment of tissues. This paper deals with the electric field distribution study of a tissue model using MAXWELL 3D Simulator. Our results indicate that tumor tissue had lower electric field strength compared to normal cells, which makes them susceptible to electrical-pulse-mediated drug delivery. This difference could be due to the altered properties of tumor cells compared to normal cells, and our results corroborate this. PMID:22295214

  18. Hydrocarbon disperse systems in electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Deinega, Y.F.

    1983-07-01

    On the basis of method for regulating the smooth adjustment of the charge of the disperse phase of hydrocarbon systems in electric fields from positive to negative values by means of surfactants, a schematic electrokinetic picture of the behavior of the systems is derived. Changes in the structure of the disperse systems in electric fields have a substantial effect on the rheological properties of the system. The effect of electric fields on the formation of crystallization-condensation structures, the mechanism of electrical conduction with a high rate of deformation, and the many practical applications of electrical effects on hydrocarbon disperse systems are also studied.

  19. Entanglement generation by electric field background

    SciTech Connect

    Ebadi, Zahra Mirza, Behrouz

    2014-12-15

    The quantum vacuum is unstable under the influence of an external electric field and decays into pairs of charged particles, a process which is known as the Schwinger pair production. We propose and demonstrate that this electric field can generate entanglement. Using the Schwinger pair production for constant and pulsed electric fields, we study entanglement for scalar particles with zero spins and Dirac fermions. One can observe the variation of the entanglement produced for bosonic and fermionic modes with respect to different parameters.

  20. Electric field soundings through thunderstorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Thomas C.; Rust, W. D.

    1991-01-01

    Twelve balloon soundings of the electric field in thunderstorms are reported. The maximum magnitude of E in the storms averaged 96 +/-28 kV/m, with the largest being 146 kV/m. The maximum was usually observed between vertically adjacent regions of opposite charge. Using a 1D approximation to Gauss' law, four to ten charge regions in the storms are inferred. The magnitude of the density in the charge regions varied between 0.2 and 13 nC/cu m. The vertical extent of the charge regions ranged from 130 to 2100 m. None of the present 12 storms had charge distributions that fit the long-accepted model of Simpson et al. (1937, 1941) of a lower positive charge, a main negative charge, and an upper positive charge. In addition to regions similar to the Simpson model, the present storms had screening layers at the upper and lower cloud boundaries and extra charge regions, usually in the lower part of the cloud.

  1. Electric fields in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirchhoff, V. W. J. H.

    1975-01-01

    F-region drift velocities, measured by incoherent-scatter radar were analyzed in terms of diurnal, seasonal, magnetic activity, and solar cycle effects. A comprehensive electric field model was developed that includes the effects of the E and F-region dynamos, magnetospheric sources, and ionospheric conductivities, for both the local and conjugate regions. The E-region dynamo dominates during the day but at night the F-region and convection are more important. This model provides much better agreement with observations of the F-region drifts than previous models. Results indicate that larger magnitudes occur at night, and that daily variation is dominated by the diurnal mode. Seasonal variations in conductivities and thermospheric winds indicate a reversal in direction in the early morning during winter from south to northward. On magnetic perturbed days and the drifts deviate rather strongly from the quiet days average, especially around 13 L.T. for the northward and 18 L.T. for the westward component.

  2. Manipulating Flames with AC Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Kyle

    2013-11-01

    Time-oscillating electric fields applied to plasmas present in flames create steady flows of gas capable of shaping, directing, enhancing, or even extinguishing flames. Interestingly, electric winds induced by AC electric fields can be stronger that those due to static fields of comparable magnitude. Furthermore, unlike static fields, the electric force due to AC fields is localized near the surface of the flame. Consequently, the AC response depends only on the local field at the surface of the flame - not on the position of the electrodes used to generate the field. These results suggest that oscillating electric fields can be used to manipulate and control combustion processes at a distance. To characterize and explain these effects, we investigate a simple experimental system comprising a laminar methane-air flame positioned between two parallel-plate electrodes. We quantify both the electric and hydrodynamic response of the flame as a function of frequency and magnitude of the applied field. A theoretical model shows how steady gas flows emerge from the time-averaged electrical force due to the field-induced motion of ions generated within the flame and by their disappearance by recombination. These results provide useful insights into the application of AC fields to direct combustion processes.

  3. Modeling the electric field of weakly electric fish.

    PubMed

    Babineau, David; Longtin, André; Lewis, John E

    2006-09-01

    Weakly electric fish characterize the environment in which they live by sensing distortions in their self-generated electric field. These distortions result in electric images forming across their skin. In order to better understand electric field generation and image formation in one particular species of electric fish, Apteronotus leptorhynchus, we have developed three different numerical models of a two-dimensional cross-section of the fish's body and its surroundings. One of these models mimics the real contour of the fish; two other geometrically simple models allow for an independent study of the effects of the fish's body geometry and conductivity on electric field and image formation. Using these models, we show that the fish's tapered body shape is mainly responsible for the smooth, uniform field in the rostral region, where most electroreceptors are located. The fish's narrowing body geometry is also responsible for the relatively large electric potential in the caudal region. Numerical tests also confirm the previous hypothesis that the electric fish body acts approximately like an ideal voltage divider; this is true especially for the tail region. Next, we calculate electric images produced by simple objects and find they vary according to the current density profile assigned to the fish's electric organ. This explains some of the qualitative differences previously reported for different modeling approaches. The variation of the electric image's shape as a function of different object locations is explained in terms of the fish's geometrical and electrical parameters. Lastly, we discuss novel cues for determining an object's rostro-caudal location and lateral distance using these electric images. PMID:16943504

  4. Substorm electric fields at nightside low latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, K. K.; Kikuchi, T.; Tomizawa, I.; Nagatsuma, T.

    2014-12-01

    The convection electric field penetrates from the polar ionosphere to low latitude and drives the DP2 currents in the global ionosphere with an intensified equatorial electrojet (EEJ). The electric field often reverses its direction, that is, the overshielding occurs and causes the equatorial counterelectrojet (CEJ) during storm and substorms. In this paper we report that the overshielding electric field is detected by the HF Doppler sounders at low latitude on the nightside. We analyzed the Doppler frequency of the HF radio signals propagated over 120 km in Japan at frequencies of 5 and 8 MHz and compared with the equatorial EEJ/CEJ during the substorm expansion phase. We found that the overshielding electric field reaches around 2 mV/m during major substorms (AL <-1800 nT). Taking the geometrical attenuation into account, we estimate the equatorial electric field to be about 1.5 mV/m. We also found that the correlation coefficient was 0.94 between the overshielding electric field and eastward equatorial electrojet at YAP on the night side. The electric field drives the eastward electrojets in the equatorial ionosphere on the night side. It is to be noted that the overshielding electric field is observed on the nightside at low latitude during the major substorms, while the convection electric field is dominant during smaller size substorms, as the CEJ flows on the dayside. These results suggest that the overshielding electric field associated with the Region-2 field-aligned currents becomes dominant during substorms at low latitude on the nightside as well as on the dayside.

  5. Large electric fields in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozer, F. S.; Boehm, M. H.; Cattell, C. A.; Temerin, M.; Wygant, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The Langmuir solitonlike structures which contain plasma frequency oscillations of 500 mV/m and parallel electric fields of about 100 mV/m, observed in the auroral zone below 1000 km, are studied. The characteristics of electrostatic shocks that contain perpendicular fields of 1000 mV/m and parallel fields of 100 mV/m, and of double layers that have parallel fields of 10 mV/m are described. Observations of the geomagnetic tail reveal the presence of 100 mV/m turbulent electric fields and 5-10 mV/m quasi-static fields in the high latitude boundary of the plasma sheet, and inside the plasma sheet fields of 5-10 mV/m are detected. The large amplitude quasi-static electric field fluctuations of 100 mV/m and the dc fields of approximately 5 mV/m observed in the bow shock are examined.

  6. Regulation of endothelial MAPK/ERK signalling and capillary morphogenesis by low-amplitude electric field

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Abdul Q.; Taghian, Toloo; Hemingway, Bryan; Cho, Hongkwan; Kogan, Andrei B.; Narmoneva, Daria A.

    2013-01-01

    Low-amplitude electric field (EF) is an important component of wound-healing response and can promote vascular tissue repair; however, the mechanisms of action on endothelium remain unclear. We hypothesized that physiological amplitude EF regulates angiogenic response of microvascular endothelial cells via activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) pathway. A custom set-up allowed non-thermal application of EF of high (7.5 GHz) and low (60 Hz) frequency. Cell responses following up to 24 h of EF exposure, including proliferation and apoptosis, capillary morphogenesis, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and MAPK pathways activation were quantified. A db/db mouse model of diabetic wound healing was used for in vivo validation. High-frequency EF enhanced capillary morphogenesis, VEGF release, MEK-cRaf complex formation, MEK and ERK phosphorylation, whereas no MAPK/JNK and MAPK/p38 pathways activation was observed. The endothelial response to EF did not require VEGF binding to VEGFR2 receptor. EF-induced MEK phosphorylation was reversed in the presence of MEK and Ca2+ inhibitors, reduced by endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibition, and did not depend on PI3K pathway activation. The results provide evidence for a novel intracellular mechanism for EF regulation of endothelial angiogenic response via frequency-sensitive MAPK/ERK pathway activation, with important implications for EF-based therapies for vascular tissue regeneration. PMID:22993248

  7. Electric field generation in martian dust devils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Erika L.; Farrell, William M.; Rafkin, Scot C. R.

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial dust devils are known to generate electric fields from the vertical separation of charged dust particles. The particles present within the dust devils on Mars may also be subject to similar charging processes and so likely contribute to electric field generation there as well. However, to date, no Mars in situ instrumentation has been deployed to measure electric field strength. In order to explore the electric environment of dust devils on Mars, the triboelectric dust charging physics from the Macroscopic Triboelectric Simulation (MTS) code has been coupled to the Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS). Using this model, we examine how macroscopic electric fields are generated within martian dust disturbances and attempt to quantify the time evolution of the electrodynamical system. Electric fields peak for several minutes within the dust devil simulations. The magnitude of the electric field is a strong function of the size of the particles present, the average charge on the particles and the number of particles lifted. Varying these parameters results in peak electric fields between tens of millivolts per meter and tens of kilovolts per meter.

  8. Electric Field Dependence of the Electrical Conductivity of VOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, N.

    1985-01-01

    We have observed non-ohmic behavior in the resistivity of VOx for very small electric fields. In an attempt to explain these results several models are considered. We suggest that the sharpening of the transition to the insulating state with applied electric field is due to a reduction of the length of time during which regions of the sample fluctuate into the insulating state.

  9. Horizontal electric fields from lightning return strokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, E. M.; Medelius, P. J.; Rubinstein, M.; Uman, M. A.; Johnson, J.

    1988-01-01

    An experiment to measure simultaneously the wideband horizontal and vertical electric fields from lightning return strokes is described. Typical wave shapes of the measured horizontal and vertical fields are presented, and the horizontal fields are characterized. The measured horizontal fields are compared with calculated horizontal fields obtained by applying the wavetilt formula to the vertical fields. The limitations and sources of error in the measurement technique are discussed.

  10. Nanomechanical electric and electromagnetic field sensor

    DOEpatents

    Datskos, Panagiotis George; Lavrik, Nickolay

    2015-03-24

    The present invention provides a system for detecting and analyzing at least one of an electric field and an electromagnetic field. The system includes a micro/nanomechanical oscillator which oscillates in the presence of at least one of the electric field and the electromagnetic field. The micro/nanomechanical oscillator includes a dense array of cantilevers mounted to a substrate. A charge localized on a tip of each cantilever interacts with and oscillates in the presence of the electric and/or electromagnetic field. The system further includes a subsystem for recording the movement of the cantilever to extract information from the electric and/or electromagnetic field. The system further includes a means of adjusting a stiffness of the cantilever to heterodyne tune an operating frequency of the system over a frequency range.

  11. Interaction Between Flames and Electric Fields Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Zeng-Guang; Hegde, Uday

    2003-01-01

    The interaction between flames and electric fields has long been an interesting research subject that has theoretical importance as well as practical significance. Many of the reactions in a flame follow an ionic pathway: that is, positive and negative ions are formed during the intermediate steps of the reaction. When an external electric field is applied, the ions move according to the electric force (the Coulomb force) exerted on them. The motion of the ions modifies the chemistry because the reacting species are altered, it changes the velocity field of the flame, and it alters the electric field distribution. As a result, the flame will change its shape and location to meet all thermal, chemical, and electrical constraints. In normal gravity, the strong buoyant effect often makes the flame multidimensional and, thus, hinders the detailed study of the problem.

  12. Electric fields in the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzworth, Robert H.

    1987-01-01

    Middle atmospheric electrodynamics is characterized by discussing the present understanding of the background electrical conductivity and the sources for electric fields and currents within the medium. Results of recent research that contradicts the historical view of the region are presented. Of principal interest to the present direction of the field is the attempt to quantize the low and high altitude electric generators such as thunderstorms or ionospheric convection. It is noted that the many-fold increase in available electric parameter data from within the middle atmosphere has been a great stimulus to recent research; however, these measurements have tended to raise more questions than they give answers.

  13. Molecular dynamics in high electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, M.; Cune, L. C.

    2016-06-01

    Molecular rotation spectra, generated by the coupling of the molecular electric-dipole moments to an external time-dependent electric field, are discussed in a few particular conditions which can be of some experimental interest. First, the spherical-pendulum molecular model is reviewed, with the aim of introducing an approximate method which consists in the separation of the azimuthal and zenithal motions. Second, rotation spectra are considered in the presence of a static electric field. Two particular cases are analyzed, corresponding to strong and weak fields. In both cases the classical motion of the dipoles consists of rotations and vibrations about equilibrium positions; this motion may exhibit parametric resonances. For strong fields a large macroscopic electric polarization may appear. This situation may be relevant for polar matter (like pyroelectrics, ferroelectrics), or for heavy impurities embedded in a polar solid. The dipolar interaction is analyzed in polar condensed matter, where it is shown that new polarization modes appear for a spontaneous macroscopic electric polarization (these modes are tentatively called "dipolons"); one of the polarization modes is related to parametric resonances. The extension of these considerations to magnetic dipoles is briefly discussed. The treatment is extended to strong electric fields which oscillate with a high frequency, as those provided by high-power lasers. It is shown that the effect of such fields on molecular dynamics is governed by a much weaker, effective, renormalized, static electric field.

  14. Axial current generation from electric field: chiral electric separation effect.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xu-Guang; Liao, Jinfeng

    2013-06-01

    We study a relativistic plasma containing charged chiral fermions in an external electric field. We show that with the presence of both vector and axial charge densities, the electric field can induce an axial current along its direction and thus cause chirality separation. We call it the chiral electric separation effect (CESE). On a very general basis, we argue that the strength of CESE is proportional to μ(V)μ(A) with μ(V) and μ(A) the chemical potentials for vector charge and axial charge. We then explicitly calculate this CESE conductivity coefficient in thermal QED at leading-log order. The CESE can manifest a new gapless wave mode propagating along the electric field. Potential observable effects of CESE in heavy-ion collisions are also discussed. PMID:25167486

  15. Electric field replaces gravity in laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorgolewski, S.

    For several years experiments in physical laboratories and in the fitotron have shown that one can replace gravitational field with electrical fields for plants. First obvious experiments in strong electrical fields in the MV/m regi on show that any materials and living plants respond immediately to Coulomb forces. Such fields are found in nature during thunderstorms. One has to be very careful in handling such strong fields for safety reasons. The fair weather global electrical field is about 20,000 times weaker. The coulomb forces are proportional to the square of the field strength and are thus 400 milion times weaker for a field of the order of 100 V/m.Yet it was found that some plants respond to such "weak" fields. We must remember that the electrical field is a factor of 10 38 times stronger than gravitational interaction. In plants we have dissociated in water mineral salts and the ions are subject to such ernormous forces. It was shown and published that the positive charges in the air in fields of the order of 3kV/m enhance lettuce growth by a factor of four relative to fields about 30 times weaker (100V/m). Reversal of the field polarity reverses the direction of plant growth and retards the plant's growth. Such fields overpower the gravitropism in the laboratory. More so horizontal electrical field is othogonal to gravity, now the fields do not see each other. Lettuce now growth horizontally ignoring the gravitational field. We can thus select the plants whose electrotropism even in the laboratory overwhelms gravity. This is important for the long space flights that we must grow vegetarian food for the crew. The successful harvesting of wheat in orbit does not contradict our experimental findings because wheat is not electrotropic like all plants from the grass family. The results of fitotron experiments with kV/m electrical fields are richly illustrated with colour digital photographs. We also subjected the candle flame to very strong horizontal

  16. Dipole relaxation in an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Richard M.

    1980-07-01

    From Boltzmann's equation, S=k lnΩ, an expression for the orientational entropy, S of a rigid rod (electric dipole) is derived. The free energy of the dipole in an electric field is then calculated as a function of both the dipole's average orientation and the field strength. Application of the equilibrium criterion to the free energy yields the field dependence of the entropy of the dipole. Irreversible thermodynamics is used to derive the general form of the equation of motion of the dipole's average orientation. Subsequent application of Newton's second law of motion produces Debye's classical expression for the relaxation of an electric dipole in a viscous medium.

  17. Control of magnetism by electric fields.

    PubMed

    Matsukura, Fumihiro; Tokura, Yoshinori; Ohno, Hideo

    2015-03-01

    The electrical manipulation of magnetism and magnetic properties has been achieved across a number of different material systems. For example, applying an electric field to a ferromagnetic material through an insulator alters its charge-carrier population. In the case of thin films of ferromagnetic semiconductors, this change in carrier density in turn affects the magnetic exchange interaction and magnetic anisotropy; in ferromagnetic metals, it instead changes the Fermi level position at the interface that governs the magnetic anisotropy of the metal. In multiferroics, an applied electric field couples with the magnetization through electrical polarization. This Review summarizes the experimental progress made in the electrical manipulation of magnetization in such materials, discusses our current understanding of the mechanisms, and finally presents the future prospects of the field. PMID:25740132

  18. Nonlinear cell response to strong electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardos, D. C.; Thompson, C. J.; Yang, Y. S.; Joyner, K. H.

    2000-07-01

    The response of living cells to externally applied electric fields is of widespread interest. In particular, the intensification of electric fields across cell membranes is believed to be responsible, through membrane rupture and reversible membrane breakdown processes, for certain types of tissue damage in electrical trauma cases which cannot be attributed to Joule heating. Large elongated cells such as skeletal muscle fibres are particularly vulnerable to such damage. Previous theoretical studies of field intensification across cell membranes in such cells have assumed the membrane current to be linear in the applied field (Ohmic membrane conductivity) and were limited to sinusoidal applied fields. In this paper, we investigate a simple model of a long cylindrical cell, corresponding to nerve or skeletal muscle cells. Employing the electroquasistatic approximation, a system of coupled first-order differential equations for the membrane electric field is derived which incorporates arbitrary time dependence in the external field and nonlinear membrane response (non-Ohmic conductivity). The behaviour of this model is investigated for a variety of applied fields in both the linear and highly nonlinear regimes. We find that peak membrane fields predicted by the nonlinear model are approximately twice as intense, for low-frequency electrical trauma conditions, as those of the linear theory.

  19. Collapse of DNA under Alternating Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chunda; Riehn, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that double-stranded DNA can collapse in presence of a strong electric field. Here we provide an in-depth study of the collapse of DNA under weak confinement in microchannels as a function of buffer strength, driving frequency, applied electric field strength, and molecule size. We find that the critical electric field at which DNA molecules collapse (10s of kV/cm) is strongly dependent on driving frequency dependent (100 … 800 Hz) and molecular size (20 … 160 kbp), and weakly dependent on the ionic strength (8 … 60 mM). We argue that an apparent stretching at very high electric fields is an artifact of the finite frame time of video microscopy. PACS numbers: 87.14.gk, 36.20.Ey, 82.35.Lr, 82.35.Rs PMID:26274209

  20. Electric/magnetic field sensor

    DOEpatents

    Schill, Jr., Robert A.; Popek, Marc [Las Vegas, NV

    2009-01-27

    A UNLV novel electric/magnetic dot sensor includes a loop of conductor having two ends to the loop, a first end and a second end; the first end of the conductor seamlessly secured to a first conductor within a first sheath; the second end of the conductor seamlessly secured to a second conductor within a second sheath; and the first sheath and the second sheath positioned adjacent each other. The UNLV novel sensor can be made by removing outer layers in a segment of coaxial cable, leaving a continuous link of essentially uncovered conductor between two coaxial cable legs.

  1. Rotating Capacitor Measures Steady Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. R.; Kirkham, H.; Eng, B.

    1986-01-01

    Portable sensor measures electric fields created by dc powerlines or other dc-high-voltage sources. Measures fields from 70 to 50,000 V/m with linearity of 2 percent. Sensor used at any height above ground. Measures both magnitude and direction of field and provides signals representing these measurements to remote readout device. Sensor functions with minimal disturbance of field it is measuring.

  2. Crystal growth under external electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Uda, Satoshi; Koizumi, Haruhiko; Nozawa, Jun; Fujiwara, Kozo

    2014-10-06

    This is a review article concerning the crystal growth under external electric fields that has been studied in our lab for the past 10 years. An external field is applied electrostatically either through an electrically insulating phase or a direct injection of an electric current to the solid-interface-liquid. The former changes the chemical potential of both solid and liquid and controls the phase relationship while the latter modifies the transport and partitioning of ionic solutes in the oxide melt during crystallization and changes the solute distribution in the crystal.

  3. Electric field measurements with stratospheric balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iversen, I. B.

    1989-01-01

    Electric fields and currents in the middle atmosphere are important elements of the modern picture of this region. Balloon instruments, reaching the level of the stratosphere, were used extensively for the experimental work. The research has shown good progress, both in the MAP period and in the years before and after. The knowledge was increased about, e.g., the upper atmosphere potential, the electric properties of the medium itself and about the coupling with magnetospheric (ionospheric) fields and currents. Also various measurements have brought about a discussion of the possible existence of hitherto unknown sources. Throughout the MAP period the work on a possible definition of an electric index has continued.

  4. Biological effects of electric fields: EPRI's role

    SciTech Connect

    Kavet, R.

    1982-07-01

    Since 1973 the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has supported research to evaluate the biological effects which may result from exposure to electric fields produced by AC overhead transmission lines; more recently, EPRI has also begun DC research. Through 1981 EPRI will have expended $8.7M on these efforts. Ongoing AC projects are studying a variety of lifeforms exposed to electric fields; these include humans, miniature swine, rats, honeybees, chick embryos, and crops. The status of these projects is discussed. The DC program has not as yet produced data. These studies will add to the current data base so as to enable a more complete assessment of health risks which may be associated with exposure to electric fields at power frequencies.

  5. Electric field induced spin-polarized current

    DOEpatents

    Murakami, Shuichi; Nagaosa, Naoto; Zhang, Shoucheng

    2006-05-02

    A device and a method for generating an electric-field-induced spin current are disclosed. A highly spin-polarized electric current is generated using a semiconductor structure and an applied electric field across the semiconductor structure. The semiconductor structure can be a hole-doped semiconductor having finite or zero bandgap or an undoped semiconductor of zero bandgap. In one embodiment, a device for injecting spin-polarized current into a current output terminal includes a semiconductor structure including first and second electrodes, along a first axis, receiving an applied electric field and a third electrode, along a direction perpendicular to the first axis, providing the spin-polarized current. The semiconductor structure includes a semiconductor material whose spin orbit coupling energy is greater than room temperature (300 Kelvin) times the Boltzmann constant. In one embodiment, the semiconductor structure is a hole-doped semiconductor structure, such as a p-type GaAs semiconductor layer.

  6. Stability of Spherical Vesicles in Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The stability of spherical vesicles in alternating (ac) electric fields is studied theoretically for asymmetric conductivity conditions across their membranes. The vesicle deformation is obtained from a balance between the curvature elastic energies and the work done by the Maxwell stresses. The present theory describes and clarifies the mechanisms for the four types of morphological transitions observed experimentally on vesicles exposed to ac fields in the frequency range from 500 to 2 × 107 Hz. The displacement currents across the membranes redirect the electric fields toward the membrane normal to accumulate electric charges by the Maxwell−Wagner mechanism. These accumulated electric charges provide the underlying molecular mechanism for the morphological transitions of vesicles as observed on the micrometer scale. PMID:20575588

  7. Nanoparticle Near-Surface Electric Field.

    PubMed

    Chkhartishvili, Levan

    2016-12-01

    Theoretical studies show that surface reconstruction in some crystals involves splitting the surface atomic layer into two-upper and lower-sublayers consisting of atoms with only positive or only negative effective electric charges, respectively. In a macroscopic crystal with an almost infinite surface, the electric field induced by such a surface-dipole is practically totally concentrated between the sublayers. However, when the material is powdered and its particles are of sufficiently small sizes, an electric field of a significant magnitude can be induced outside the sublayers as well. We have calculated the distribution of the electric field and its potential induced at the surface of a disc-shaped particle. The suggested novel nanoscale effect explains the increase in physical reactivity of nanopowders with decreasing particle sizes. PMID:26831686

  8. Rotationally Vibrating Electric-Field Mill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkham, Harold

    2008-01-01

    A proposed instrument for measuring a static electric field would be based partly on a conventional rotating-split-cylinder or rotating-split-sphere electric-field mill. However, the design of the proposed instrument would overcome the difficulty, encountered in conventional rotational field mills, of transferring measurement signals and power via either electrical or fiber-optic rotary couplings that must be aligned and installed in conjunction with rotary bearings. Instead of being made to rotate in one direction at a steady speed as in a conventional rotational field mill, a split-cylinder or split-sphere electrode assembly in the proposed instrument would be set into rotational vibration like that of a metronome. The rotational vibration, synchronized with appropriate rapid electronic switching of electrical connections between electric-current-measuring circuitry and the split-cylinder or split-sphere electrodes, would result in an electrical measurement effect equivalent to that of a conventional rotational field mill. A version of the proposed instrument is described.

  9. Computer Simulation of Electric Field Lines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkup, L.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a computer program which plots electric field line plots. Includes program listing, sample diagrams produced on a BBC model B microcomputer (which could be produced on other microcomputers by modifying the program), and a discussion of the properties of field lines. (JN)

  10. Electric field measurements from Halley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoll, Keri; Harrison, R. Giles

    2016-04-01

    Antarctica is a unique location for the study of atmospheric electricity. Not only is it one of the most pollutant free places on Earth, but its proximity to the south magnetic pole means that it is an ideal location to study the effects of solar variability on the atmospheric electric field. This is due to the reduced shielding effect of the geomagnetic field at the poles which leads to a greater flux of incoming Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) as well as an increased probability of energetic particle precipitation from SEPs and relativistic electrons. To investigate such effects, two electric field mills of different design were installed at the British Antarctic Survey Halley base in February 2015 (75. 58 degrees south, 26.66 degrees west). Halley is situated on the Brunt Ice Shelf in the south east of the Weddell Sea and has snow cover all year round. Preliminary analysis has focused on selection of fair weather criteria using wind speed and visibility measurements which are vital to assess the effects of falling snow, blowing snow and freezing fog on the electric field measurements. When the effects of such adverse weather conditions are removed clear evidence of the characteristic Carnegie Curve diurnal cycle exists in the Halley electric field measurements (with a mean value of 50V/m and showing a 40% peak to peak variation in comparison to the 34% variation in the Carnegie data). Since the Carnegie Curve represents the variation in thunderstorm activity across the Earth, its presence in the Halley data confirms the presence of the global atmospheric electric circuit signal at Halley. The work presented here will discuss the details of the Halley electric field dataset, including the variability in the fair weather measurements, with a particular focus on magnetic field fluctuations.

  11. A nonuniform electrical field electroporation chamber design.

    PubMed

    Hollon, T; Yoshimura, F K

    1989-11-01

    We show an inexpensive design for an electroporation chamber which subjects electroporated cells to a nonuniform electrical field. Our design, which we call an electroporation cylinder, improved transfection efficiency over that of a uniform field design (electroporation cuvettes) by about sixfold when tested in five mouse cell lines with a transient gene expression assay. Electroporation cylinders subjected cells to electrical field strengths at least as powerful as those of electroporation cuvettes, as judged by comparing the percentages of cells killed by electroporation. Cylinder and cuvette designs were similar in their effect on the variability of transfection efficiency. Electroporation cylinders may be particularly useful when the optimal electrical field strength for a cell line is not known or is unattainable with a given power supply. PMID:2610341

  12. Electric field profiles in obstructed helium discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendel, Peter; Ganguly, Biswa; Bletzinger, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Axial and radial variations of electric field have been measured in dielectric shielded 25 mm diameter parallel plate electrode for 2 mA, 2250 V helium dc discharge at 1.75 Torr with 6.5 mm gap. The axial and radial electric field profiles have been measured from the polarization dependent Stark splitting of 21S --> 11 1P transition through collision induced fluorescence from 43D --> 23P. The electric field values showed a strong radial variation peaking up to 5 kV/cm near the cathode radial boundary, and decreasing to about 1 kV/cm near the anode, suggesting the formation of an obstructed discharge for this low Pd condition. Also, the on-axis electric field was nearly constant across the gap indicating a radially non-uniform current density. In order to obtain information about the space charge distribution in this obstructed discharge, it was modeled using the 2-d axisymmetric Poisson solver with COMSOL finite element modeling program. The model discharge dimensions were selected to match the experimental dimensions. The best fit to the measured electric field distribution was obtained with a space charge variation of ρ(r) =ρ0 (r/r0)3 , where ρ(r) is the local space charge density, ρ0 is the maximum space-charge density, r the local radial value and r0 the radius of the electrode.

  13. Microwave electric field sensing with Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stack, Daniel T.; Kunz, Paul D.; Meyer, David H.; Solmeyer, Neal

    2016-05-01

    Atoms form the basis of precise measurement for many quantities (time, acceleration, rotation, magnetic field, etc.). Measurements of microwave frequency electric fields by traditional methods (i.e. engineered antennas) have limited sensitivity and can be difficult to calibrate properly. Highly-excited (Rydberg) neutral atoms have very large electric-dipole moments and many dipole allowed transitions in the range of 1 - 500 GHz. It is possible to sensitively probe the electric field in this range using the combination of two quantum interference phenomena: electromagnetically induced transparency and the Autler-Townes effect. This technique allows for very sensitive field amplitude, polarization, and sub-wavelength imaging measurements. These quantities can be extracted by measuring properties of a probe laser beam as it passes through a warm rubidium vapor cell. Thus far, Rydberg microwave electrometry has relied upon the absorption of the probe laser. We report on our use of polarization rotation, which corresponds to the real part of the susceptibility, for measuring the properties of microwave frequency electric fields. Our simulations show that when a magnetic field is present and directed along the optical propagation direction a polarization rotation signal exists and can be used for microwave electrometry. One central advantage in using the polarization rotation signal rather than the absorption signal is that common mode laser noise is naturally eliminated leading to a potentially dramatic increase in signal-to-noise ratio.

  14. Electric field controlled emulsion phase contactor

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Timothy C.

    1995-01-01

    A system for contacting liquid phases comprising a column for transporting a liquid phase contacting system, the column having upper and lower regions. The upper region has a nozzle for introducing a dispersed phase and means for applying thereto a vertically oriented high intensity pulsed electric field. This electric field allows improved flow rates while shattering the dispersed phase into many micro-droplets upon exiting the nozzle to form a dispersion within a continuous phase. The lower region employs means for applying to the dispersed phase a horizontally oriented high intensity pulsed electric field so that the dispersed phase undergoes continuous coalescence and redispersion while being urged from side to side as it progresses through the system, increasing greatly the mass transfer opportunity.

  15. Electric field controlled emulsion phase contactor

    DOEpatents

    Scott, T.C.

    1995-01-31

    A system is described for contacting liquid phases comprising a column for transporting a liquid phase contacting system, the column having upper and lower regions. The upper region has a nozzle for introducing a dispersed phase and means for applying thereto a vertically oriented high intensity pulsed electric field. This electric field allows improved flow rates while shattering the dispersed phase into many micro-droplets upon exiting the nozzle to form a dispersion within a continuous phase. The lower region employs means for applying to the dispersed phase a horizontally oriented high intensity pulsed electric field so that the dispersed phase undergoes continuous coalescence and redispersion while being urged from side to side as it progresses through the system, increasing greatly the mass transfer opportunity. 5 figs.

  16. Electric fields in the dayside auroral oval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, T. S.; Mikkelsen, I. S.; Lassen, K.; Haerendel, G.; Reiger, E.; Valenzuela, A.; Mozer, F. S.; Temerin, M.; Holback, B.; Bjoern, L.

    1980-01-01

    The results from four independent electric field experiments flown on three Black Brant 4 rockets in the forenoon dayside auroral oval in December 1974 and January 1975 are correlated with ground-based observations and rocket particle data. The electric field varied from zero to 150 mV/m. The predominant plasma convection was toward noon along the auroral oval with a smaller component directed toward the polar cap. In one case, however, a reversal occurred within the oval with plasma convection away from noon. Comparisons with magnetometer data indicate that in the dayside auroral oval, Hall currents sometimes are responsible for magnetic fluctuations observed on the ground. Comparisons with particle data show that the magnitude of the electric fields is inversely correlated with the electron energy flux.

  17. Microfluidic Screening of Electric Fields for Electroporation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Paulo A; Ge, Zhifei; Moran, Jeffrey L; Buie, Cullen R

    2016-01-01

    Electroporation is commonly used to deliver molecules such as drugs, proteins, and/or DNA into cells, but the mechanism remains poorly understood. In this work a rapid microfluidic assay was developed to determine the critical electric field threshold required for inducing bacterial electroporation. The microfluidic device was designed to have a bilaterally converging channel to amplify the electric field to magnitudes sufficient to induce electroporation. The bacterial cells are introduced into the channel in the presence of SYTOX(®), which fluorescently labels cells with compromised membranes. Upon delivery of an electric pulse, the cells fluoresce due to transmembrane influx of SYTOX(®) after disruption of the cell membranes. We calculate the critical electric field by capturing the location within the channel of the increase in fluorescence intensity after electroporation. Bacterial strains with industrial and therapeutic relevance such as Escherichia coli BL21 (3.65 ± 0.09 kV/cm), Corynebacterium glutamicum (5.20 ± 0.20 kV/cm), and Mycobacterium smegmatis (5.56 ± 0.08 kV/cm) have been successfully characterized. Determining the critical electric field for electroporation facilitates the development of electroporation protocols that minimize Joule heating and maximize cell viability. This assay will ultimately enable the genetic transformation of bacteria and archaea considered intractable and difficult-to-transfect, while facilitating fundamental genetic studies on numerous diverse microbes. PMID:26893024

  18. Microfluidic Screening of Electric Fields for Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Paulo A.; Ge, Zhifei; Moran, Jeffrey L.; Buie, Cullen R.

    2016-01-01

    Electroporation is commonly used to deliver molecules such as drugs, proteins, and/or DNA into cells, but the mechanism remains poorly understood. In this work a rapid microfluidic assay was developed to determine the critical electric field threshold required for inducing bacterial electroporation. The microfluidic device was designed to have a bilaterally converging channel to amplify the electric field to magnitudes sufficient to induce electroporation. The bacterial cells are introduced into the channel in the presence of SYTOX®, which fluorescently labels cells with compromised membranes. Upon delivery of an electric pulse, the cells fluoresce due to transmembrane influx of SYTOX® after disruption of the cell membranes. We calculate the critical electric field by capturing the location within the channel of the increase in fluorescence intensity after electroporation. Bacterial strains with industrial and therapeutic relevance such as Escherichia coli BL21 (3.65 ± 0.09 kV/cm), Corynebacterium glutamicum (5.20 ± 0.20 kV/cm), and Mycobacterium smegmatis (5.56 ± 0.08 kV/cm) have been successfully characterized. Determining the critical electric field for electroporation facilitates the development of electroporation protocols that minimize Joule heating and maximize cell viability. This assay will ultimately enable the genetic transformation of bacteria and archaea considered intractable and difficult-to-transfect, while facilitating fundamental genetic studies on numerous diverse microbes. PMID:26893024

  19. Electric field control of the cell orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westman, Christopher; Sabirianov, Renat

    2008-03-01

    Many physiological processes depend on the response of biological cells to external forces. The natural electric field at a wound controls the orientation of the cell and its division.[1] We model the cell as an elongated elliptical particle with given Young's modulus with surface charge distribution in the external electric field. Using this simple theoretical model that includes the forces due to electrostatics and the elasticity of cells, we calculated analytically the response of the cell orientation and its dynamics in the presence of time varying electric field. The calculations reflect many experimentally observed features. Our model predicts the response of the cellular orientation to a sinusoidally varying applied electric field as a function of frequency similar to recent stress-induced effects.[2] *Bing Song, Min Zhao, John V. Forrester, and Colin D. McCaig, ``Electrical cues regulate the orientation and frequency of cell division and the rate of wound healing in vivo'', PNAS 2002, vol. 99 , 13577-13582. *R. De, A. Zemel, and S.A. Safran, ``Dynamics of cell orientation'', Nature Physics 2007, vol.3, 655.

  20. Microfluidic Screening of Electric Fields for Electroporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Paulo A.; Ge, Zhifei; Moran, Jeffrey L.; Buie, Cullen R.

    2016-02-01

    Electroporation is commonly used to deliver molecules such as drugs, proteins, and/or DNA into cells, but the mechanism remains poorly understood. In this work a rapid microfluidic assay was developed to determine the critical electric field threshold required for inducing bacterial electroporation. The microfluidic device was designed to have a bilaterally converging channel to amplify the electric field to magnitudes sufficient to induce electroporation. The bacterial cells are introduced into the channel in the presence of SYTOX®, which fluorescently labels cells with compromised membranes. Upon delivery of an electric pulse, the cells fluoresce due to transmembrane influx of SYTOX® after disruption of the cell membranes. We calculate the critical electric field by capturing the location within the channel of the increase in fluorescence intensity after electroporation. Bacterial strains with industrial and therapeutic relevance such as Escherichia coli BL21 (3.65 ± 0.09 kV/cm), Corynebacterium glutamicum (5.20 ± 0.20 kV/cm), and Mycobacterium smegmatis (5.56 ± 0.08 kV/cm) have been successfully characterized. Determining the critical electric field for electroporation facilitates the development of electroporation protocols that minimize Joule heating and maximize cell viability. This assay will ultimately enable the genetic transformation of bacteria and archaea considered intractable and difficult-to-transfect, while facilitating fundamental genetic studies on numerous diverse microbes.

  1. Field-aligned currents and large scale magnetospheric electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dangelo, N.

    1980-01-01

    D'Angelo's model of polar cap electric fields (1977) was used to visualize how high-latitude field-aligned currents are driven by the solar wind generator. The region 1 and region 2 currents of Iijima and Potemra (1976) and the cusp field-aligned currents of Wilhjelm et al. (1978) and McDiarmid et al. (1978) are apparently driven by different generators, although in both cases the solar wind is their ultimate source.

  2. Modeling of Nanoparticle-Mediated Electric Field Enhancement Inside Biological Cells Exposed to AC Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Pawan K.; Kang, Sung Kil; Kim, Gon Jun; Choi, Jun; Mohamed, A.-A. H.; Lee, Jae Koo

    2009-08-01

    We present in this article the effect of alternating electric field at kilohertz (kHz) and megahertz (MHz) frequencies on the biological cells in presence and absence of nanoparticles. The induced electric field strength distribution in the region around cell membrane and nucleus envelope display different behavior at kHz and MHz frequencies. The attachment of gold nanoparticles (GNPs), especially gold nanowires around the surface of nucleus induce enhanced electric field strengths. The induced field strengths are dependent on the length of nanowire and create varying field regions when the length of nanowire is increased from 2 to 4 µm. The varying nanowire length increased the induced field strengths inside nucleoplasm and region adjacent to the nucleus in the cytoplasm. We investigated a process of electrostatic disruption of nucleus membrane when the induced electric field strength across the nucleus exceeds its tensile strength.

  3. Electric Field Quantitative Measurement System and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method and system are provided for making a quantitative measurement of an electric field. A plurality of antennas separated from one another by known distances are arrayed in a region that extends in at least one dimension. A voltage difference between at least one selected pair of antennas is measured. Each voltage difference is divided by the known distance associated with the selected pair of antennas corresponding thereto to generate a resulting quantity. The plurality of resulting quantities defined over the region quantitatively describe an electric field therein.

  4. Electric Field Effects in RUS Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Darling, Timothy W; Ten Cate, James A; Allured, Bradley; Carpenter, Michael A

    2009-09-21

    Much of the power of the Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) technique is the ability to make mechanical resonance measurements while the environment of the sample is changed. Temperature and magnetic field are important examples. Due to the common use of piezoelectric transducers near the sample, applied electric fields introduce complications, but many materials have technologically interesting responses to applied static and RF electric fields. Non-contact optical, buffered, or shielded transducers permit the application of charge and externally applied electric fields while making RUS measurements. For conducting samples, in vacuum, charging produces a small negative pressure in the volume of the material - a state rarely explored. At very high charges we influence the electron density near the surface so the propagation of surface waves and their resonances may give us a handle on the relationship of electron density to bond strength and elasticity. Our preliminary results indicate a charge sign dependent effect, but we are studying a number of possible other effects induced by charging. In dielectric materials, external electric fields influence the strain response, particularly in ferroelectrics. Experiments to study this connection at phase transformations are planned. The fact that many geological samples contain single crystal quartz suggests a possible use of the piezoelectric response to drive vibrations using applied RF fields. In polycrystals, averaging of strains in randomly oriented crystals implies using the 'statistical residual' strain as the drive. The ability to excite vibrations in quartzite polycrystals and arenites is explored. We present results of experimental and theoretical approaches to electric field effects using RUS methods.

  5. Electric field effects in RUS measurements.

    PubMed

    Darling, Timothy W; Allured, Bradley; Tencate, James A; Carpenter, Michael A

    2010-02-01

    Much of the power of the Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) technique is the ability to make mechanical resonance measurements while the environment of the sample is changed. Temperature and magnetic field are important examples. Due to the common use of piezoelectric transducers near the sample, applied electric fields introduce complications, but many materials have technologically interesting responses to applied static and RF electric fields. Non-contact optical, buffered, or shielded transducers permit the application of charge and externally applied electric fields while making RUS measurements. For conducting samples, in vacuum, charging produces a small negative pressure in the volume of the material--a state rarely explored. At very high charges we influence the electron density near the surface so the propagation of surface waves and their resonances may give us a handle on the relationship of electron density to bond strength and elasticity. Our preliminary results indicate a charge sign dependent effect, but we are studying a number of possible other effects induced by charging. In dielectric materials, external electric fields influence the strain response, particularly in ferroelectrics. Experiments to study this connection at phase transformations are planned. The fact that many geological samples contain single crystal quartz suggests a possible use of the piezoelectric response to drive vibrations using applied RF fields. In polycrystals, averaging of strains in randomly oriented crystals implies using the "statistical residual" strain as the drive. The ability to excite vibrations in quartzite polycrystals and arenites is explored. We present results of experimental and theoretical approaches to electric field effects using RUS methods. PMID:19850314

  6. Electric field stimulated growth of Zn whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niraula, D.; McCulloch, J.; Warrell, G. R.; Irving, R.; Karpov, V. G.; Shvydka, Diana

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the impact of strong (˜104 V/cm) electric fields on the development of Zn whiskers. The original samples, with considerable whisker infestation were cut from Zn-coated steel floors and then exposed to electric fields stresses for 10-20 hours at room temperature. We used various electric field sources, from charges accumulated in samples irradiated by: (1) the electron beam of a scanning electron microscope (SEM), (2) the electron beam of a medical linear accelerator, and (3) the ion beam of a linear accelerator; we also used (4) the electric field produced by a Van der Graaf generator. In all cases, the exposed samples exhibited a considerable (tens of percent) increase in whiskers concentration compared to the control sample. The acceleration factor defined as the ratio of the measured whisker growth rate over that in zero field, was estimated to approach several hundred. The statistics of lengths of e-beam induced whiskers was found to follow the log-normal distribution known previously for metal whiskers. The observed accelerated whisker growth is attributed to electrostatic effects. These results offer promise for establishing whisker-related accelerated life testing protocols.

  7. Electric fields and double layers in plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Thiemann, H.; Schunk, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    Various mechanisms for driving double layers in plasmas are briefly described, including applied potential drops, currents, contact potentials, and plasma expansions. Some dynamical features of the double layers are discussed. These features, as seen in simulations, laboratory experiments, and theory, indicate that double layers and the currents through them undergo slow oscillations which are determined by the ion transit time across an effective length of the system in which double layers form. It is shown that a localized potential dip forms at the low potential end of a double layer, which interrupts the electron current through it according to the Langmuir criterion, whenever the ion flux into the double is disrupted. The generation of electric fields perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field by contact potentials is also discussed. Two different situations were considered; in one, a low-density hot plasma is sandwiched between high-density cold plasmas, while in the other a high-density current sheet permeates a low-density background plasma. Perpendicular electric fields develop near the contact surfaces. In the case of the current sheet, the creation of parallel electric fields and the formation of double layers are also discussed when the current sheet thickness is varied. Finally, the generation of electric fields and double layers in an expanding plasma is discussed.

  8. Performance optimization in electric field gradient focusing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuefei; Farnsworth, Paul B; Tolley, H Dennis; Warnick, Karl F; Woolley, Adam T; Lee, Milton L

    2009-01-01

    Electric field gradient focusing (EFGF) is a technique used to simultaneously separate and concentrate biomacromolecules, such as proteins, based on the opposing forces of an electric field gradient and a hydrodynamic flow. Recently, we reported EFGF devices fabricated completely from copolymers functionalized with poly(ethylene glycol), which display excellent resistance to protein adsorption. However, the previous devices did not provide the predicted linear electric field gradient and stable current. To improve performance, Tris-HCl buffer that was previously doped in the hydrogel was replaced with a phosphate buffer containing a salt (i.e., potassium chloride, KCl) with high mobility ions. The new devices exhibited stable current, good reproducibility, and a linear electric field distribution in agreement with the shaped gradient region design due to improved ion transport in the hydrogel. The field gradient was calculated based on theory to be approximately 5.76 V/cm(2) for R-phycoerythrin when the applied voltage was 500 V. The effect of EFGF separation channel dimensions was also investigated; a narrower focused band was achieved in a smaller diameter channel. The relationship between the bandwidth and channel diameter is consistent with theory. Three model proteins were resolved in an EFGF channel of this design. The improved device demonstrated 14,000-fold concentration of a protein sample (from 2 ng/mL to 27 microg/mL). PMID:19081099

  9. DC Electric Fields at the Magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, H. E.; Escoubet, C. P.; Masson, A.

    2014-12-01

    In order to understand the transfer of energy, momentum and mass through the magnetopause one needs to know several plasma and field parameters including the DC electric field which is known to be challenging to measure in tenuous plasma regions, e.g. in the inner side of the magnetopause where the density drops below 1/cc. However, each of the Cluster spacecraft carries five different experiments that can provide information about DC electric fields, i.e. double probe antenna (EFW) and electron drift meter (EDI) as well as electron and ion spectrometers (PEACE, CIS-HIA, CIS-CODIF). Each technique is very different and has its own strengths and limitations. Therefore it is important to compare all available measurements before making a judgement on DC electric field variation at the magnetopause; note that only very rarely all five measurements are available at the same time. Although the full-resolution observations in the Cluster archive are calibrated, they can still contain various errors. However, when two experiments show the same field, it is quite likely that this is the right field because the different measurements are based on so complimentary techniques and the field varies so much when the spacecraft moves from the magnetosheath through the magnetopause into the magnetosphere, or vice versa. In this presentation we present several cases of the magnetopause crossings and how the different measurements agree and disagree around the magnetopause region.

  10. Tuning Bimolecular Chemical Reactions by Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tscherbul, Timur V.; Krems, Roman V.

    2015-07-01

    We develop a theoretical method for solving the quantum mechanical reactive scattering problem in the presence of external fields based on a hyperspherical coordinate description of the reaction complex combined with the total angular momentum representation for collisions in external fields. The method allows us to obtain converged results for the chemical reaction LiF +H →Li +HF in an electric field. Our calculations demonstrate that, by inducing couplings between states of different total angular momenta, electric fields with magnitudes <150 kV /cm give rise to resonant scattering and a significant modification of the total reaction probabilities, product state distributions, and the branching ratios for reactive versus inelastic scattering.

  11. Tuning Bimolecular Chemical Reactions by Electric Fields.

    PubMed

    Tscherbul, Timur V; Krems, Roman V

    2015-07-10

    We develop a theoretical method for solving the quantum mechanical reactive scattering problem in the presence of external fields based on a hyperspherical coordinate description of the reaction complex combined with the total angular momentum representation for collisions in external fields. The method allows us to obtain converged results for the chemical reaction LiF+H→Li+HF in an electric field. Our calculations demonstrate that, by inducing couplings between states of different total angular momenta, electric fields with magnitudes <150  kV/cm give rise to resonant scattering and a significant modification of the total reaction probabilities, product state distributions, and the branching ratios for reactive versus inelastic scattering. PMID:26207466

  12. Models of the earth's electric field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, D.

    1974-01-01

    Detailed models of the electric field of the magnetosphere are derived in several stages. For all, the conductivity along field lines is assumed to be high enough to ensure the vanishing of E B everywhere except in the ionosphere. At first the rotation of the earth is ignored completely and a simple model is constructed which fits certain observed properties. Next, the rotation of the earth is taken into account, but the field is assumed to be that of a magnetic dipole rotating around its symmetry axis. This allows the concept of the electric potential to be retained, which permits the derivation of interesting properties including the use of a conjugate potential which paces the drift of charged particles in the field. Finally, the general case involving asymmetrical rotation is briefly discussed.

  13. Large-scale electric fields in post-flare loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinata, Satoshi

    1987-01-01

    As the electrical conductivity along the magnetic field in the solar atmosphere is large, parallel electric fields have been neglected in most investigations. The importance of such fields is demonstrated for post-flare loops, and a model for them is introduced which takes into account the effect of parallel electric fields. The electric field calculated from the model is consistent with the electric field observed by Foukal et al. (1983).

  14. Electric field mediated colloidal assembly and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, Jaime Javier

    2011-12-01

    This dissertation presents video microscopy measurements and computer simulations of colloidal particle interactions in inhomogeneous, high-frequency AC electric fields. The interactions of particles with each other and inhomogeneous electric fields are quantified as a function of concentration, field amplitude, and frequency. Visual state diagrams show that these interactions in concentrated systems produce quasi-two dimensional microstructures including confined hard disk fluids, oriented dipolar chains, and oriented hexagonal close packed crystals. The interaction of a particle interacting with an electric field is directly measured with analyses of a single diffusing colloid within electric fields in the absence of many body effects. Concentrated systems are characterized in terms of density profiles across the electrode gap and angular pair distribution functions. An inverse Monte Carlo analysis extracted the induced dipole-induced dipole interaction from concentrated measurements. A single adjustable parameter consistently modified the induced dipole-field potential and the induced dipole-induced dipole potential to account for modification of the local electric field as the result of the local particle concentration, frequency and configuration. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) perform sensitive measurements of internal three dimensional structure of crystals assembled in an interfacial quadrupole electrode device. Radial distributions as functions of elevation are used to characterize the equilibrium structure. A single adjustable parameter modified known potentials to match Monte Carlo simulations with experiment. The local density from experiment and simulation matched the expected density calculated from a balance of osmotic pressure and dielectrophoretic compression. Simulations qualitatively matched experimental observations of microstructure as a function of field amplitude. Programmable assembly for colloidal crystals is implemented in the

  15. Health of workers exposed to electric fields.

    PubMed Central

    Broadbent, D E; Broadbent, M H; Male, J C; Jones, M R

    1985-01-01

    The results of health questionnaire interviews with 390 electrical power transmission and distribution workers, together with long term estimates of their exposure to 50 Hz electric fields, and short term measurements of the actual exposure for 287 of them are reported. Twenty eight workers received measurable exposures, averaging about 30 kVm-1h over the two week measurement period. Estimated exposure rates were considerably greater, but showed fair correlation with the measurements. Although the general level of health was higher than we have found in manual workers in other industries, there were significant differences in the health measures between different categories of job, different parts of the country, and in association with factors such as overtime, working alone, or frequently changing shift. After allowing for the effects of job and location, however, we found no significant correlations of health with either measured or estimated exposure to electric fields. PMID:3970875

  16. PHASE EQUILIBRIA MODIFICATION BY ELECTRIC FIELDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary focus of this program is to obtain a fundamental understanding of the effects of electric fields on polar and nonpolar mixtures in gas and liquid phases, with the ultimate goal of using this understanding in devising novel means to dramatically improve existing enviro...

  17. Nonthermal processing by radio frequency electric fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Radio frequency electric fields (RFEF) processing is relatively new and has been shown to inactivate bacteria in apple juice, orange juice and apple cider at moderately low temperatures. Key equipment components of the process include a radio frequency power supply and a treatment chamber that is ca...

  18. AC photovoltaic module magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, C.; Chang, G.J.; Reyes, A.B.; Whitaker, C.M.

    1997-12-31

    Implementation of alternating current (AC) photovoltaic (PV) modules, particularly for distributed applications such as PV rooftops and facades, may be slowed by public concern about electric and magnetic fields (EMF). This paper documents magnetic field measurements on an AC PV module, complementing EMF research on direct-current PV modules conducted by PG and E in 1993. Although not comprehensive, the PV EMF data indicate that 60 Hz magnetic fields (the EMF type of greatest public concern) from PV modules are comparable to, or significantly less than, those from household appliances. Given the present EMF research knowledge, AC PV module EMF may not merit considerable concern.

  19. Field-aligned currents and ionospheric electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasuhara, F.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that the observed distribution of the ionospheric electric field can be deduced from an equation combining Ohm's law with the current continuity equation by using the 'observed' distribution of field-aligned currents as the boundary condition for two models of the ionosphere. The first model has one conductive annular ring representing the quiet-time auroral precipitation belt; the second has two conductive annular rings that simulate the discrete and diffuse auroral regions. An analysis is performed to determine how well the electric-field distribution can be reproduced. The results indicate that the first model reproduces the Sq(p)-type distribution, the second model reproduces reasonably well a substorm-type potential and ionospheric current patterns together with the Harang discontinuity, and that the distribution of field-aligned currents is the same for both models.

  20. Swarm Equatorial Electric Field Inversion Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alken, Patrick; Maus, Stefan; Vigneron, Pierre; Sirol, Olivier; Hulot, Gauthier

    2014-05-01

    The day-time eastward equatorial electric field (EEF) in the ionospheric E-region plays a crucial role in equatorial ionospheric dynamics. It is responsible for driving the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) current system, equatorial vertical ion drifts, and the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA). Due to its importance, there is much interest in accurately measuring and modeling the EEF for both climatological and near real-time studies. The Swarm satellite mission offers a unique opportunity to estimate the equatorial electric field from measurements of the geomagnetic field. Due to the near-polar orbits of each satellite, the on-board magnetometers record a full profile in latitude of the ionospheric current signatures at satellite altitude. These latitudinal magnetic profiles are then modeled using a first principles approach with empirical climatological inputs specifying the state of the ionosphere, in order to recover the EEF. We will present preliminary estimates of the EEF using the first Swarm geomagnetic field measurements, and compare them with independently measured electric fields from the JULIA ground-based radar in Peru.

  1. Observations of large transient magnetospheric electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggson, T. L.; Heppner, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    Transient electric field events were observed with the long, double probe instrumentation carried by the IMP-6 satellite. Nine, clearly defined, exceptionally large amplitude events are presented here. The events are observed in the midnight sector at geocentric distances 3.5 to .5.5 R sub e at middle latitudes within a magnetic L-shell range of 4.8 to 7.5. They usually have a total duration of one to several minutes, with peak power spectra amplitudes occurring at a frequency of about 0.3 Hz. The events occur under magnetically disturbed conditions, and in most cases they can be associated with negative dH/dt excursions at magnetic observatories located near the foot of the magnetic field line intersecting IMP-6. The magnetospheric motions calculated for these electric fields indicated a quasi-stochastical diffusive process rather than the general inward magnetospheric collapsing motion expected during the expansive phases of auroral substorm activity.

  2. Electric fields in Scanning Electron Microscopy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arat, K. T.; Bolten, J.; Klimpel, T.; Unal, N.

    2016-03-01

    The electric field distribution and charging effects in Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) were studied by extending a Monte-Carlo based SEM simulator by a fast and accurate multigrid (MG) based 3D electric field solver. The main focus is on enabling short simulation times with maintaining sufficient accuracy, so that SEM simulation can be used in practical applications. The implementation demonstrates a gain in computation speed, when compared to a Gauss-Seidel based reference solver is roughly factor of 40, with negligible differences in the result (~10-6 𝑉). In addition, the simulations were compared with experimental SEM measurements using also complex 3D sample, showing that i) the modelling of e-fields improves the simulation accuracy, and ii) multigrid method provide a significant benefit in terms of simulation time.

  3. Swarm equatorial electric field chain: First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alken, P.; Maus, S.; Chulliat, A.; Vigneron, P.; Sirol, O.; Hulot, G.

    2015-02-01

    The eastward equatorial electric field (EEF) in the E region ionosphere drives many important phenomena at low latitudes. We developed a method of estimating the EEF from magnetometer measurements of near-polar orbiting satellites as they cross the magnetic equator, by recovering a clean signal of the equatorial electrojet current and modeling the observed current to determine the electric field present during the satellite pass. This algorithm is now implemented as an official Level-2 Swarm product. Here we present first results of EEF estimates from nearly a year of Swarm data. We find excellent agreement with independent measurements from the ground-based coherent scatter radar at Jicamarca, Peru, as well as horizontal field measurements from the West African Magnetometer Network magnetic observatory chain. We also calculate longitudinal gradients of EEF measurements made by the A and C lower satellite pair and find gradients up to about 0.05 mV/m/deg with significant longitudinal variability.

  4. Influence of electric field on cellular migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guido, Isabella; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    Cells have the ability to detect continuous current electric fields (EFs) and respond to them with a directed migratory movement. Dictyostelium discoideum (D.d.) cells, a key model organism for the study of eukaryotic chemotaxis, orient and migrate toward the cathode under the influence of an EF. The underlying sensing mechanism and whether it is shared by the chemotactic response pathway remains unknown. Whereas genes and proteins that mediate the electric sensing as well as that define the migration direction have been previously investigated in D.d. cells, a deeper knowledge about the cellular kinematic effects caused by the EF is still lacking. Here we show that besides triggering a directional bias the electric field influences the cellular kinematics by accelerating the movement of cells along their path. We found that the migratory velocity of the cells in an EF increases linearly with the exposure time. Through the analysis of the PI3K and Phg2 distribution in the cytosol and of the cellular adherence to the substrate we aim at elucidating whereas this speed up effect in the electric field is due to either a molecular signalling or the interaction with the substrate. This work is part of the MaxSynBio Consortium which is jointly funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research of Germany and the Max Planck Society.

  5. A dynamic model of thundercloud electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nisbet, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    A description is given of the first results obtained with a new type of dynamic electrical model of a thundercloud that allows the charge rearrangement produced in arc breakdown, as well as the conduction and displacement currents, to be calculated with realistic generator configurations. The model demonstrates the great complexity of behavior of thunderclouds owing to the interaction of the nonlinear breakdown mechanisms, the energy stored in the electric field, and a conductivity that varies with altitude. It is also seen that dynamic charge distributions and electric fields are quite different from static distributions. It is noted that these differences affect the initial conditions before and after lightning strokes. The conduction current density to the ionosphere is very much larger in the dynamic cases than in static simulations. Such basic properties of thunderclouds as the production of cloud-to-ground strokes are seen as compatible only with a very limited range of thundercloud models. Another finding is that coronal and convection currents cause the electric fields at the surface to be much smaller than they would be in their absence.

  6. Mechanism of biological effects observed in honey bees (Apis mellifera, L. ) hived under extra-high-voltage transmission lines: implications derived from bee exposure to simulated intense electric fields and shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Bindokas, V.P.; Gauger, J.R.; Greenberg, B.

    1988-01-01

    This work explores mechanisms for disturbance of honey bee colonies under a 765 kV, 60-Hz transmission line (electric (E) field = 7 kV/m) observed in previous studies. Proposed mechanisms fell into two categories: direct bee perception of enhanced in-hive E fields and perception of shock from induced currents. The adverse biological effects could be reproduced in simulations where only the worker bees were exposed to shock or to E field in elongated hive entranceways (= tunnels). We now report the results of full-scale experiments using the tunnel exposure scheme, which assesses the contribution of shock and intense E field to colony disturbance. Exposure of worker bees (1400 h) to 60-Hz E fields including 100 kV/m under moisture-free conditions within a nonconductive tunnel causes no deleterious affect on colony behavior. Exposure of bees in conductive (e.g., wet) tunnels produces bee disturbance, increased mortality, abnormal propolization, and possible impairment of colony growth. We propose that this substrate dependence of bee disturbance is the result of perception of shock from coupled body currents and enhanced current densities postulated to exist in the legs and thorax of bees on conductors. Similarly, disturbance occurs when bees are exposed to step-potential-induced currents. At 275-350 nA single bees are disturbed; at 600 nA bees begin abnormal propolization behavior; and stinging occurs at 900 nA. We conclude that biological effects seen in bee colonies under a transmission line are primarily the result of electric shock from induced hive currents. This evaluation is based on the limited effects of E-field exposure in tunnels, the observed disturbance thresholds caused by shocks in tunnels, and the ability of hives exposed under a transmission line to source currents 100-1,000 times the shock thresholds.

  7. Electric field distribution characteristics of photoconductive antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Sheng-Wu; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2012-10-01

    Photoexcitation of biased semiconductor photoconductive antennas by femtosecond pulses is the most common and convenient technique for generating strong terahertz (THz) pulses. In this paper, we use the three-dimensional (3D) finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) to analyze electric field distribution of THz pulses in the near-field from a photoconductive antenna. The simulation is based on solving Maxwell's equations and the carrier rate equations simultaneously on realistic dipole antenna structures. The 3D FDTD simulation gives detailed features of THz electric field distribution in and out of the antenna. It is found that the difference of near-field distribution between the substrate and free space is considerably large. The fields of the alternating-current dipole exhibit an unsymmetrical distribution and a large deviation from those calculated using the simple Hertzian dipole theory. The magnitude of THz field in and out of the substrate attenuates rapidly while it holds the line in the gap center. The high-frequency components of THz radiation emission come only from the dipole antenna, while the low-frequency components are from both the center electrodes and coplanar stripline waveguide. This work can be used to optimize the design of antenna geometry and raise the radiation field power.

  8. Interaction of Electric Fields with Vascular Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghian, Toloo; Sheikh, Abdul; Narmoneva, Daria; Kogan, Andrei

    2012-04-01

    Electrical stimulation has been shown to be effective in improving healing rate of the non-healing or slow-healing wounds, a significant high-cost clinical issue. In order to optimize this process, identifying the mechanisms underlying the interaction of vascular cells with electric field (EF) is of interest. We have developed a 3D model of the cultured cells to simulate EF distribution in the cell membrane. The electrical stimulation of cells has been performed using our novel device that generates EF without any contact between electrodes and cells. The results indicate that cells respond to EF by releasing a specific growth factor (PlGF) which is important for blood vessel growth during wound healing.

  9. Numerical simulation of electric field assisted sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, Brandon A.

    A fully coupled thermal-electric-sintering finite element model was developed and implemented to explore electric field assisted sintering techniques (FAST). FAST is a single step processing operation for producing bulk materials from powders, in which the powder is heated by the application of electric current under pressure. This process differs from other powder processing techniques such as hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and traditional press and sinter operations where the powder or compact is heated externally, in that the powder is heated directly as a result of internal Joule heating (for conductive powders) and/or by direct conduction from the die and punches. The overall result is much more efficient heating which allows heating rates of >1000°C/min to be achieved which is desirable for sintering bulk nanocrystalline and other novel high performance materials. Previous modeling efforts on FAST have only considered the thermal-electric aspect of the problem and have neglected densification. In addition to the introduction of a sintering model, a detailed thermal-electric study of process parameters was carried out in order to identify key system variables and quantify their effect on the overall system response and subsequent thermal history of a consolidated sample. This analysis was compared to empirical data from a parallel experimental study and shown to satisfactorily predict the observed trends. This model was then integrated with a phenomenologically based sintering model to capture the densification of the sample. This fully coupled model was used to predict densification kinetics under FAST like conditions and examine the evolution of material properties as the sample transitions from a loose powder to a fully dense compact and the resulting effect on the electrical and thermal fields within the compact. This model was also used to explore the effect of non-uniform thermal, electrical, stress and density fields on the final geometry and local

  10. Method of electric field flow fractionation wherein the polarity of the electric field is periodically reversed

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Fred J.

    1992-01-01

    A novel method of electric field flow fractionation for separating solute molecules from a carrier solution is disclosed. The method of the invention utilizes an electric field that is periodically reversed in polarity, in a time-dependent, wave-like manner. The parameters of the waveform, including amplitude, frequency and wave shape may be varied to optimize separation of solute species. The waveform may further include discontinuities to enhance separation.