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Sample records for 60-hz fields estradiol

  1. Behavioral and prenatal effects of 60-Hz fields

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-08-01

    Purpose was to determine possible neural, behavioral, and reproductive effects of low-intensity 60-Hz electric fields on mammals (rats) exposed in-utero. The tests used shortly after birth included negative geotaxis, the acoustic startle response, surface righting, in-air righting, cliff avoidance, emotionality, and swimming endurance. Variations between the exposed and control groups are discussed. 9 tables. (DLC)

  2. EFFECTS OF 60-HZ FIELDS ON HUMAN HEALTH PARAMETERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Specific results of research on the effects of exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields have often been contradictory and difficult to replicate. The study reported here used quantitative exercise testing techniques to evaluate whether increases in metabolism, caused by mod...

  3. Residential 60-Hz magnetic fields and temporal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Robert Stephen

    1998-06-01

    The basic question addressed by this research is: How well can data from a single measurement visit estimate longer-term ambient residential 60-Hz magnetic field levels? We undertook repeat 60-Hz magnetic field measurements every two months for one year, plus one additional visit for 14 days of measurement. The study sample consisted of 51 single-family homes, 24 in Minneapolis-St. Paul and 27 in Detroit. Homes were selected by random-digit dialing; each was home to a child eligible to serve a control subject in the National Cancer Institute-Children's Cancer Group Electromagnetic Fields and Radon Study. Trained survey interviewers obtained all measurement data, using an expanded measurement protocol from the main study: (1) spot 60-Hz magnetic field measurements at the centers of three rooms and at the front door; (2) 24- hour (or 14 day) 60-Hz magnetic field measurement in the subject child's bedroom; and (3) geomagnetic field at the centers of two rooms and on the child's bed. The data set available for analysis consists of 349 out of 357 (97.8%) possible sets of spot measurements and 1060 out of 1071 (99.0%) possible days of 24-hour and two-week measurements. A Long-Term Estimate, Child's Bedroom, or LTECB, the geometric mean of the 24-hour measurement geometric means, was used as the reference for analysis. The LTECB was analyzed for house-level main effects and for repeated-measures (temporal) main effects. House-level main effects account for only 41% of the variability in the LTECB. The statistically significant main effects are study area, wire code and population density. A clear trend of increasing LTECB with population density is evident. The seasonal effect is small, but statistically significant. There is no evidence for a day-of-week effect, but a statistically significant diurnal effect is present. Correlation coefficients relating the LTECB to any of three primary single-visit measurement and exposure metric surrogates are >.9. However, when

  4. Endocrinological effects of strong 60-Hz electric fields on rats

    SciTech Connect

    Free, M.J.; Kaune, W.T.; Phillips, R.D.; Cheng, H.C.

    1981-01-01

    Adult male rats were exposed or sham-exposed to 60-Hz electric fields without spark discharges, ozone, or significant levels or other secondary variables. No effects were discharges, ozone, or significant levels of other secondary variables. No effects were observed on body weights or plasma hormone levels after 30 days of exposure at an effective field strength of 68 kV/m. After 120 days of exposure (effective field strength = 64 kV/m), effects were inconsistent, with signficant reductions in body weight and plasma levels of follicle-stimulating hormone and corticosterone occurring in one replicate experiment but not in the other. Plasma testosterone levels were significantly reduced after 120 days of exposure in one experiment, with a similar but not statistically significant reduction in a replicate experiment. Weanling rats, exposed or sham-exposed in electric fields with an effective field strength of 80 kV/m from 20 to 56 days of age, exhibited identical or closely similar growth trends in body and organ weights. Hormone levels in exposed and sham-exposed groups were also similar. However, there was an apparent phase shift between the two groups in the cyclic variations of concentrations of hormones at different stages of development, particularly with respect to follicle-stimulating hormone and corticosterone. We concluded that 60-Hz electric fields may bring about subtle changes in the endocrine system of rats, and that these changes may be related to alterations in episodic rhythms.

  5. Influence of 60-Hz magnetic fields on sea urchin development

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, S.; Zimmerman, A.M.; Winters, W.D.; Cameron, I.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Continuous exposure of sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) embryos at 18 degrees C to a cyclic 60-Hz magnetic field at 0.1 mT rms beginning 4 min after insemination caused a significant developmental delay during the subsequent 23 hours. No delay in development was recorded for periods up to 18 hours after fertilization. At 18 h, most embryos were in the mesenchyme blastula stage. At 23 h, most control embryos were in mid-gastrula whereas most magnetic-field-exposed embryos were in the early gastrula stage. Thus an estimated 1-h delay occurred between these developmental stages. The results are discussed in terms of possible magnetic-field modification of transcription as well as interference with cell migration during gastrulation. The present study extends and supports the growing body of information about potential effects of exposures to extremely-low-frequency (ELF) magnetic fields on developing organisms.

  6. Cardiovascular response of rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hilton, D.I.; Phillips, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    Recently, it has been reported that exposure to high-strength electric fields can influence electrocardiogram (ECG) patterns, heart rates, and blood pressures in various species of animals. Our studies were designed to evaluate these reported effects and to help clarify some of the disagreement present in the literature. Various cardiovascular variables were measured in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed or sham-exposed to 60-Hz electric fields at 80 to 100 kV/m for periods up to four months. No significant differences in heart rates, ECG patterns, blood pressures, or vascular reactivity were observed between exposed and sham-exposed rats after 8 hours, 40 hours, 1 month, or 4 months of exposure. Our studies cannot be directly compared to the work of other investigators because of differences in animal species and electric-field characteristics. However, our failure to detect any cardiovascular changes may have been the result of (1) eliminating secondary field effects such as shocks, audible noise, corona, and ozone; (2) minimizing steady-state microcurrents between the mouth of the animal and watering devices; and (3) minimizing electric-field-induced vibration of the electrodes and animal cages.

  7. Detection thresholds for 60 Hz electric fields by nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, J.L.; Rogers, W.R.; Smith, H.D.

    1995-12-31

    Because responses of animals to detection of the presence of an electric field (EF) are a possible mechanism for production of biological effects, it is important to know what EF intensities are detectable. Operant methods were used to train six baboons (Papio cynocephalus) to perform a psychophysical task involving detection of EF presence. During the response phase of a trial, a subject responded on one push button to report the presence of the EF and on a different push button to report the absence of the EF. Correct reports of EF presence or absence produced delivery of food rewards. The subjects became proficient at performing this psychophysical detection task; during 35 days of testing, false alarm rates averaged 9%. The average EF detection threshold was 12 kV/m; the range of means among subjects was 5--15 kV/m. Two special test procedures confirmed that the subjects were responding directly to EF presence or absence and not to artifacts that might be associated with EF generation. The EF detection threshold of nonhuman primates is similar to thresholds reported for rats and humans.

  8. Effects of 60 Hz electric fields on operant and social stress behaviors of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Lucas, J.H.; Moore, G.T.; Orr, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    An overall description of this research program is presented. The objectives are to investigate using nonhuman primates, possible behavioral effects associated with exposure to high-intensity, 60 Hz, electric fields. 6 tabs.

  9. Large Granular Lymphocytic (LGL) Leukemia in Rats Exposed to Intermittent 60 Hz Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Larry E.); Morris, James E.); Miller, Douglas L.); Ebi, K L.; Sasser, Lyle B.)

    2001-04-01

    An animal model for large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia in male Fischer 344 rats utilized to determine whether magnetic field exposure can be shown to influence the progression of leukemia. We previously reported that exposure to continuous 60 Hz 1 mT magnetic fields did not significantly alter the clinical progression of LGL leukemia in young male rats following inspection of spleen cells from donor leukemic rats. Results presented here extend those studies with the objectives to (1) replicate the previous study of continuous 60-Hz magnetic field exposures but using fewer LGL cells in the inoculum, and (2) determine if intermittent 60-Hz magnetic fields can alter the clinical progression of leukemia.

  10. Effects of 60-Hz electric fields on living plants exposed for extended periods. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    The effects of intense 60-Hz electric fields were studied by exposing plants of five kinds (crops) for extended periods in a special greenhouse where cultural and environmental factors could be controlled. Plant populations and densities simulated field conditions. While exposed, plants of all crops germinated satisfactorily, and plants of sweet corn and wheat completed their life cycles and produced viable seed. Plants of alfalfa and tall fescue were at the early bloom stage when harvested. Exposure of plants of five kinds to electric fields had no statistically significant effects on seed germination, seedling growth, plant growth, phenology, flowering, seed set, biomass production, plant height, leaf area, plant survival, and nodulation. Exposure to 60-Hz electric fields resulted in very limited damage to terminal leaf tips, awns, and corn tassels, particularly at fields of 30 kV/m or greater. 47 refs., 36 figs., 44 tabs.

  11. Effects of 60-Hz electric fields on embryo and chick development, growth, and behavior. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    The objective of this study was to utilize an avian model to determine the effects of 60-Hz electric fields on embryo and chick development. A specially designed incubator allowed simultaneous incubation of control eggs and eggs exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Two series of experimental voltages were utilized for this study. In Series 1, the subject eggs were exposed to 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 kV/m fields and, in Series 2, eggs were exposed to 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 kV/m. Data were collected on mortality, malformation, and growth (weight) of 7- and 14-day-old embryos after continuous exposure to electric fields. Eggs were also incubated, exposed to electric fields, and hatched in order to collect data on chick weights at one day and at 2, 4, and 6 weeks after hatching. Behavior tests on newly hatched chicks that had been exposed to electric fields during development were also performed. The results indicated no consistent effect of 60-Hz electric fields, varying from 0.1 to 100 kV/m, on mortality, malformations, weights, bone growth (metatarsal length), or behavior of embryos or chicks. This study strongly suggests that within the scope of this project, there is no consistent direct effect of 60 Hz electric fields on the health and well-being of avian embryos. A dose-response analysis was also utilized in which all the data in each series, for each age of the embryos, were simultaneously evaluated in a statistical model. This analysis demonstrated that there is no significant dose-response of electric fields on 7- and 14-day-old embryo and 1-day-old chick weights. 24 refs., 21 figs., 56 tabs.

  12. Effects of 60 Hz electric fields on operant and social stress behaviors of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Coelho, A.M. Jr.; Easley, S.P.; Lucas, J.H.; Moore, G.T.; Orr, J.L.; Smith, H.D.; Taylor, L.L.; Tuttle, M.L.

    1987-10-24

    The objective of this program is to investigate, using the baboon as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human, possible behavioral effects associated with exposure to high intensity 60 Hz electric fields. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, will be used by the Department of Energy (DOE) to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences resulting from exposure of humans to the electric fields associated with power transmission over high voltage lines. This research program consists of four major research projects, all of which have been successfully completed. The first project evaluated the potentially aversive character of exposure to 60 Hz electric fields by determining the threshold intensity that produces escape or avoidance responses. The second project estimated the threshold intensity for detection threshold was 12 kV/m; the range of means was 6 to 16 kV/m. The third project assessed, in separate experiments conducted at 30 and 60 kV/m, effects of chronic exposure to electric fields on the performance of two operant conditioning tasks, fixed ratio (FR), and differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL). In the same two experiments, the fourth project investigated, using the systematic quantitative observational sampling methods of primatology, the possible stress-inducing effects of chronic exposure to 60 Hz electric fields on the behavior of baboons living in small social groups. 131 refs., 87 figs., 123 tabs.

  13. Comparison of cardiac and 60 Hz magnetically induced electric fields measured in anesthetized rats

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.L.; Creim, J.A.

    1997-06-01

    Extremely low frequency magnetic fields interact with an animal by inducing internal electric fields, which are in addition to the normal endogenous fields present in living animals. Male rats weighing about 560 g each were anesthetized with ketamine and xylazine. Small incisions were made in the ventral body wall at the chest and upper abdomen to position a miniature probe for measuring internal electric fields. The calibration constant for the probe size was 5.7 mm, with a flat response from at least 12 Hz to 20 kHz. A cardiac signal, similar to the normal electrocardiogram with a heart rate of about 250 bpm, was readily obtained at the chest. Upon analysis of its spectrum, the cardiac field detected by the probe had a broad maximum at 32--95 Hz. When the rates were exposed to a 1 mT, 60 Hz magnetic field, a spike appeared in the spectrum at 60 Hz. The peak-to-peak magnitudes of electric fields associated with normal heart function were comparable to fields induced by a 1 mT magnetic field at 60 Hz for those positions measured on the body surface. Within the body, or in different directions relative to the applied field, the induced fields were reduced. The cardiac field increased near the heart, becoming much larger than the induced field. Thus, the cardiac electric field, together with the other endogenous fields, combine with induced electric fields and help to provide reference levels for the induced-field dosimetry of ELF magnetic field exposures of living animals.

  14. 60-Hz electric-field effects on pineal melatonin rhythms: time course for onset and recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.W.; Chess, E.K.; Anderson, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    Rats exposed for 3 weeks to uniform 60-Hz electric fields of 39 kV/m (effective field strength) failed to show normal pineal gland circadian rhythms in serotonin N-acetyl transferase activity and melatonin concentrations. The time required for recovery of the melatonin rhythm after cessation of field exposure was determined to be less than 3 days. The rapid recovery suggests that the overall metabolic competence of the pineal is not permanently compromised by electric-field exposure, and that the circadian rhythm effect may be neuronally mediated.

  15. Diurnal patterns in brain biogenic amines of rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Vasquez, B.J.; Anderson, L.E.; Lowery, C.I.; Adey, W.R.

    1988-01-01

    Levels of brain neurotransmitters and their metabolites, as well as concentrations of enzymes associated with their synthesis and metabolism, fluctuate during the day in patterns defined as circadian. The present study examined these rhythms in albino rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Thirty-six animals were exposed to a 39 kV/m field for 4 weeks, 20 h/day, in a parallel-plate electrode system. A group of 36 sham animals was similarly handled and housed in a nonenergized exposure system. On the sampling day, animals were sacrificed at 4-h intervals throughout the 24-h day. Brains were removed, dissected, and kept frozen until chemically analyzed. The levels of biogenic amines and their acidic metabolites in the striatum, hypothalamus, and hippocampus were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD) methods. Repeated exposure to 60-Hz electric fields produced significant alterations in the diurnal rhythms of several biogenic amines: dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC, the primary metabolite of dopamine in the rat) in the striatum, and norepinephrine, dopamine, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA; serotonin metabolite) in the hypothalamus. Levels of serotonin in the striatum and hypothalamus showed clear circadian patterns that was not affected by the field. No diurnal or field-related changes were observed in the hippocampal amines.

  16. Effects of a 60 Hz magnetic field on central cholinergic systems of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W. )

    1993-03-15

    The authors studied the effects of an acute exposure to a 60 Hz magnetic field on sodium-dependent, high-affinity choline uptake in the brain of the rat. Decreases in uptake were observed in the frontal cortex and hippocampus after the animals were exposed to a magnetic field at flux densities [>=] 0.75 mT. These effects of the magnetic field were blocked by pretreating the animals with the narcotic antagonist naltrexone, but not by the peripheral opioid antagonist, naloxone methiodide. These data indicate that the magnetic-field-induced decreases in high-affinity choline uptake in the rat brain were mediated by endogenous opioids in the central nervous systems.

  17. Chronic exposure to a 60-Hz electric field: effects on neuromuscular function in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, R.A.; Laszewski, B.L.; Carr, D.B.

    1981-01-01

    Neuromuscular function in adult male rats was studied following 30 days of exposure to a 60-Hz electric field at 100 kV/m (unperturbed field strength). Isometric force transducters were attached to the tendons of the plantaris (predominantly fast twitch), and soleus (predominantly slow twitch) muscles in the urethan-anesthetized rat. Square-wave stimuli were delivered to the distal stump of the transected sciatic nerve. Several measurements were used to characterize neuromuscular function, including twitch characteristics, chronaxie, tetanic and posttetanic potentiation, and fatigue and recovery. The results from three independent series of experiments are reported. Only recovery from fatigue in slow-twitch muscles was consistently and significantly affected (enhanced) by electric-field exposure. This effect does not appear to be mediated by field-induced changes in either neuromuscular transmission, or in the contractile mechanism itself. It is suggested that the effect may be mediated secondary to an effect on mechanisms regulating muscle blood flow or metabolism.

  18. Effect of chronic 60-Hz electric field exposure on mammary tumorigenesis in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.; Leung, F.C.; Rommereim, D.N.; Buschbom, R.L.; Wilson, B.W.; Stevens, R.G.

    1989-07-01

    Female rats were administered a single dosage of 7 or 10 mg of DMBA intragastrically between 50 and 55 days of age and palpated weekly for mammary tumors in two experiments. Rats were either exposed to a 40 kV/m 60-Hz electric field or sham-exposed in utero through 18 or 23 weeks of age. There was no difference between electric field exposed and sham-exposed in incidence of first tumor. When the results of the two experiments were combined, the electric field exposed groups had significantly more tumors per tumor-bearing animal than the sham-groups. These results may have implications for the role of electric power use in the etiology and promotion of breast cancer. 21 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  19. Effects of 60 Hz electrical fields on operant and social stress behaviors of nonhuman primates: Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Coelho, A.M. Jr.; Easley, S.P.; Orr, J.L.

    1988-04-06

    The objective of this program is to investigate, using the baboon as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human, behavioral effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric fields. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, could be used to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences resulting from exposure of humans to the electric fields associated with power transmission over high voltage lines. This program is being conducted at Southwest Research Institute as part of an international collaborative information exchange and scientific research effort involving the United State Department of Energy, Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry, and Japan's Central Research Institute of the Electric Power Industry. Since August of 1984, four major research projects were successfully completed. 48 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Biological effects of 60-Hz electric fields on small and large laboratory animals

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    Rats and mice were exposed to 60-Hz electric fields up to 330 kV/m for durations as long as four months. No significant effects were found in the following major areas: metabolic status and growth; organ and tissue morphology; brain morphology; cardiovascular function; serum chemistry; reproduction; prenatal growth and development; teratology; bone growth; peripheral nerve function; humoral and cell-mediated immunity; susceptibility to viral infection; cell and membrane function; illness/malaise; and cytogenetics. Statistically significant effects of electric field exposures were observed in the following areas: bone fracture repair; neonatal development; neuromuscular function; endocrinology; hematology; neurochemistry; urine volume and chemistry; sympathetic nervous system; behavior. It is likely that many of the effects observed are secondary to chronic stimulation of the animal by the field. Our research efforts have shifted to an in-depth investigation of nervous system functions, with emphasis in behavior, neurochemistry, neurophysiology, and dosimetry. Current and future research in these areas will focus on: relationship of effects to field strength and duration of exposure; recovery from observed effects; fundamental understanding of observed effects; fundamental understanding of interaction of field with animal (dosimetry); and biological significance of observed effects. (ERB)

  1. Effects of 60-Hz electric fields on serotonin metabolism in the rat pineal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.; Hilton, D.I.; Phillips, R.D.; Wilson, B.W.; Chess, E.K.

    1982-06-01

    Serotonin and two of its metabolites, melatonin and 5-methoxytryptophol, exhibit circadian rhythmicity in the pineal gland. We recently reported a marked reduction in the normal night-time increase in melatonin concentration in the pineal glands of rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Concomitant with the apparent abolition of melatonin rhythmicity, serotonin-N-acetyl transferase (SNAT) activity was suppressed. We have now conducted studies to determine if abolition of the rhythm in melatonin production in electric-field-exposed rats arises solely from interference in SNAT activity, or if the availability of pineal serotonin is a factor that is affected by exposure. Pineal serotonin concentrations were compared in rats that were either exposed or sham exposed to 65 kV/m for 30 days. Sham-exposed animals exhibited normal diurnal rhythmicity for pineal concentrations of both melatonin and serotonin; melatonin levels increased markedly during the dark phase with a concurrent decrease in serotonin levels. In the exposed animals, however, normal serotonin rhythmicity was abolished; serotonin levels in these animals did not increase during the light period. The conclusion that electric field exposure results in a biochemical alteration in SNAT enzyme activity can be inferred from the loss of both serotonin and melatonin rhythmicity, as well as by direct measurement of SNAT activity itself. 35 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  2. Comparison of the coupling of grounded and ungrounded humans to vertical 60-Hz electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kaune, W.T.; Kistler, L.M.; Miller, M.C.

    1985-12-01

    Total induced currents and average induced axial current densities have been published in the literature for human models exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. The results of these studies have been quite useful, but they deal with a somewhat idealized exposure situation that ignores the insulating effects of most types of footwear. This paper describes a new laboratory technique for studying the relationship between grounded and ungrounded exposure of humans. A conducting model of the body 40-cm-tall man was electrically divided into seven segments. Wires connected to the conducting surfaces of these segments were routed horizontally through shielded cable to remote, battery-powered electronics. The ''common'' potential of the electronics was biased to the electric-field-induced potential of the model, allowing us to accurately measure the current induced in each body segment of the model. The method was tested by measuring the current induced in the upper hemisphere of a ungrounded sphere: agreement between theory and measurement was excellent. Measurements were made with the human model located at 15 positions, ranging from touching ground to remote from ground (i.e., in free space). The ratios of free-space to grounded currents crossing horizontal sections through the body were: neck, 0.58; chest, 0.40; abdomen, 0.39; thigh, 0.36; ankle, 0.17.

  3. Nonhuman primates will not respond to turn off strong 60 Hz electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Orr, J.L.; Smith, H.D.

    1995-12-31

    Using a set of six baboons (Papio cynocephalus), the authors conducted a series of seven experiments designed to evaluate the potentially aversive character of a 60 Hz electric field (EF). Initially, the subjects were trained, using food rewards as the reinforcer, to respond only when a cue light was illuminated. Next, an EF was presented along with the cue light; responses produced delivery of a food pellet and turned off both the cue light and the EF. Then, stimulus and reward conditions were varied. The authors determined that (1) presence of a strong EF does not affect operant responding for food rewards, (2) subjects will not respond at normal rates when the only reinforcer is termination of a strong EF, (3) presence of a strong EF can serve as a discriminative stimulus, (4) presence of a strong EF does not affect extinction of an appetite-motivated task, and (5) presentation of an EF can become a secondary reinforcer. The pattern of results was consistent across all experiments, suggesting that an EF of as much as 65 kV/m is not aversive to nonhuman primates. Separately, the authors demonstrated that the average EF detection threshold for baboons is 12 kV/m. Thus, EF exposure at intensities well above the detection threshold and at species-scaled EF strengths greater than those found environmentally does not appear to be aversive.

  4. Rodent cell transformation and immediate early gene expression following 60-Hz magnetic field exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Balcer-Kubiczek, E K; Zhang, X F; Harrison, G H; McCready, W A; Shi, Z M; Han, L H; Abraham, J M; Ampey, L L; Meltzer, S J; Jacobs, M C; Davis, C C

    1996-01-01

    Some epidemiological studies suggest that exposure to power frequency magnetic fields (MFs) may be associated with an elevated risk of human cancer, but the experimental database remains limited and controversial. We investigated the hypothesis that 60-Hz MF action at the cellular level produces changes in gene expression that can result in neoplastic transformation. Twenty-four hour 200 microT continuous MF exposure produced negative results in two standard transformation systems (Syrian hamster embryo cells and C3H/10T1/2 murine fibroblasts) with or without postexposure to a chemical promoter. This prompted a reexamination of previously reported MF-induced changes in gene expression in human HL60 cells. Extensive testing using both coded and uncoded analyses was negative for an MF effect. Using the same exposure conditions as in the transformation studies, no MF-induced changes in ornithine decarboxylase expression were observed in C3H/10T1/2 cells, casting doubt on a promotional role of MF for the tested cells and experimental conditions. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. A Figure 2. B Figure 2. C Figure 2. D Figure 3. A Figure 3. B Figure 4. Figure 5. A Figure 5. B Figure 5. C Figure 5. D Figure 5. E Figure 6. A Figure 6. B Figure 6. C Figure 6. D Figure 6. E Figure 7. Figure 8. A Figure 8. B Figure 8. C Figure 9. Figure 10. A Figure 10. B PMID:8959408

  5. Evaluation of the developmental toxicity of 60 Hz magnetic fields and harmonic frequencies in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Ryan, B M; Polen, M; Gauger, J R; Mallett, E; Kearns, M B; Bryan, T L; McCormick, D L

    2000-05-01

    Experimental data suggest that exposure to the 50 and 60 Hz sinusoidal components of power-frequency magnetic fields (MFs) does not have an adverse impact on fetal development. However, the possible developmental toxicity of MF harmonics has not been investigated. This study was designed to determine whether exposure to 180 Hz MFs (third harmonic), alone or in combination with 60 Hz MFs, induces birth defects in Sprague-Dawley rats. Groups of sperm-positive dams (> or =20/group) were exposed for 18.5 h per day from gestation days 6 through 19 to (1) ambient MFs only (<0.0001 mT; sham controls); (2) 60 Hz MFs at 0.2 mT; (3) 180 Hz MFs at 0.2 mT; or (4) 60 Hz + 180 Hz MFs (10% third harmonic; total field strength = 0.2 mT). Litter size, litter weight, percentage live births, sex ratio, and number of resorption sites were determined for each dam, and gross external, visceral, cephalic and skeletal examinations were performed on all fetuses. MF exposure had no significant effects on litter size, litter weight, or fetal development. With the exception of common rib variants, the incidence of fetal anomalies was comparable in all groups. A small increase in the incidence of rib variants was seen in the group exposed to 60 Hz + 180 Hz MFs; however, the incidence of rib variants in this group was similar to that in historical controls from our laboratory. These data extend the existing database on developmental toxicity of MFs by demonstrating that exposure to 180 Hz MFs, either alone or superimposed on an underlying 60 Hz signal, does not induce biologically significant developmental toxicity. These data do not support the hypothesis that exposure to power-frequency MFs is an important risk factor for fetal development. PMID:10790286

  6. Reproduction, growth, and development of rats during chronic exposure to multiple field strengths of 60-Hz electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rommereim, D.N.; Rommereim, R.L.; Sikov, M.R.; Buschbom, R.L.; Anderson, L.E. )

    1990-04-01

    A study with multiple exposure groups and large group sizes was performed to establish whether exposure to 60-Hz electric fields would result in reproductive and developmental toxicity. A response model was developed from previous results and tested in groups of rats exposed to electric fields at various field strengths. Female rats were mated, and sperm-positive animals randomly distributed among four groups: sham-exposed or exposed to 10, 65, or 130 kV/m, 60-Hz vertical electric fields. Animals were exposed for 19 hr/day throughout the experiment. During gestation, exposure to the higher field strengths resulted in slightly depressed weight gains of dams. Offspring were born in the field and remained with their dams through the suckling period. Numbers of pups per litter and pup mortality did not differ among the exposure groups. Dams exposed at 65 kV/m lost slightly more weight through the lactation period than the control group. Male pups exposed to higher field strengths gained slightly less weight from 4 to 21 days of age than did sham-exposed animals. At weaning, two F1 females per litter (randomly selected) continued on the same exposure regimen were mated at 11 weeks of age to unexposed males, and euthanized at 20 days of gestation. Uterine contents were evaluated, and all live fetuses were weighed and examined for external, visceral, and skeletal malformations. Fertility and gestational weight gain of F1 females were not affected by exposure, nor was prenatal viability or fetal body weight. No significant increase in the incidence of litters with malformations was observed. Although no developmental toxicity was detected, exposures produced physical changes in the dams, evidenced as a rust-colored deposit on the muzzle and ears (chromodacryorrhea) that increased in incidence and severity at 65 and 130 kV/m.

  7. Constraints of thermal noise on the effects of weak 60-Hz magnetic fields acting on biological magnetite.

    PubMed Central

    Adair, R K

    1994-01-01

    Previous calculations of limits imposed by thermal noise on the effects of weak 60-Hz magnetic fields on biological magnetite are generalized and extended to consider multiple signals, the possibility of anomalously large magnetosome structures, and the possibility of anomalously small cytoplasm viscosities. The results indicate that the energies transmitted to the magnetite elements by fields less than 5 microT, characteristic of the electric power distribution system, will be much less than thermal noise energies. Hence, the effects of such weak fields will be masked by that noise and cannot be expected to affect biology or, therefore, the health of populations. PMID:8159681

  8. Effects of 60 Hz electric fields on operant and social stress behavior of nonhuman primates. Quarterly technical progress report No. 20, September 28-December 20, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.

    1986-01-03

    This research program will evaluate the aversive character of exposure to 60 Hz electric fields by determining the threshold intensity which produces avoidance or escape responses, will estimate the threshold intensity for detection of 60 Hz electric fields, will assess effects of chronic exposure to 60 Hz electric fields on the performance of two operant conditioning tasks, fixed ratio and differential reinforcement of low rate responding, will investigate, using the systematic quantitative observational sampling methods of primatology, the possible stress-inducing effects of chronic exposure to 60 Hz electric fields on the behavior of baboons living in small social groups. In all experiments, the electric fields will be described, characterized, and controlled to account for recognized artifacts associated with high intensity 60 Hz electric fields and the health of all subjects will be described using the methods of primate veterinary medicine.

  9. Clinical progression of transplanted large granular lymphocytic leukemia in Fischer 334 rats exposed to 60 Hz magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, James E. ); Sasser, Lyle B. ); Miller, Douglas L. ); Dagle, Gerald E.; Rafferty, C N.; Ebi, K L.; Anderson, Larry E. )

    1999-01-19

    The purpose of this study was to determine if 60 Hz magnetic fields could alter the clinical progression of leukemia in an animal model. Large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia cells from spleens of leukemic rats were transplanted into young male Fischer rats, producing signs of leukemia in about 2-3 months. The animals were injected with 2.2 x 107 LGL leukemia cells at the initiation of the study and assigned to 4 treatment groups 108/group) as follows: (1) 10 G linearly polarized 60 Hz magnetic fields, (2) sham exposed null energized unit with residual 20 mG fields, (3) ambient controls < 1 mG, and (4) positive controls (a single 5 Gy whole body exposure to 60Co 4 days prior to initiation of exposure). The magnetic fields were activated 20h/day, 7 days/week. Eighteen Rats (18 from each treatment group) were bled, killed, and evaluated at a5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 11 weeks of exposure. Hematological endpoints, changes in spleen growth, and LGL cell infiltration into the spleen and liver were measured to evaluate the leukemia progression. Significant differences were not detected between the magnetic field exposed groups and the ambient control group, although the clinical progress of leukemia was enhanced in the positive control animals. These data indicate that exposure to sinusoidal, linearly polarized 60 Hz, 10 G magnetic fields did not significantly alter the clinical progression of LGL leukemia. Furthermore, the data are in general agreement with previous results of a companion repeated-bleeding study.

  10. Effects of 60 Hz electric fields on operant and social stress behaviors of nonhuman primates. Project technical status report, November 23, 1985-January 17, 1986. [Papio cynocephalus

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-24

    The objective was to investigate, using baboons (superspecies Papio cynocephalus) as surrogates, possible behavioral effects associated with exposure to high intensity 60 Hz electric fields. This program consists of four major projects. The first will evaluate the potential aversive character of exposure to 60 Hz electric fields by determining the threshold intensity which produces avoidance or escape responses. The second project will estimate the threshold intensity for detection of 60 Hz electric fields. The third will assess effects of chronic exposure to 60 Hz electric fields on the performance of two operant conditioning tasks, fixed ratio (FR) and differential reinforcement of low rate responding (DRL). The fourth will investigate the possible stress-inducing effects of chronic exposure to 60 Hz electric fields on the behavior of baboons living in small social groups.

  11. Electric fields induced in chicken eggs by 60-Hz magnetic fields and the dosimetric importance of biological membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Chicken eggs are convenient models for observing the effects of inhomogeneities and variations, such as those found in biological membranes and in cellular conductivities, on the distribution of internal electric fields as induced by exposure to magnetic fields. The vitelline membrane separates the yolk, which has a conductivity of 0.26 S/m, from the white, which has a conductivity of 0.85 S/m. A miniaturized probe with 2.4-mm resolution was used to measure induced fields in eggs placed in a uniform, 1-mT magnetic field at 60 Hz. The E fields induced in eggs with homogenized contents agreed with expectations based on simple theory. Results were similar to intact eggs unless the probe moved the yolk off-center, which greatly perturbed the induced fields. A more reproducible arrangement, which consisted of saline-agar filled dishes with a hole cut for test samples, was developed to enhance definition of electrical parameters. With this test system, the vitelline membrane was found to be responsible for most of the perturbation of the induced field, because it electrically isolates the yolk from the surrounding white. From a theoretical viewpoint, this dosimetry for the macroscopic egg yolk is analogous to the interaction of fields with microscopic cells. These findings may have important implications for research on biological effects of ELF electromagnetic fields, especially for studies of avian embryonic development.

  12. Effects of 60 Hz electric fields on operant and social stress behaviors of nonhuman primates: Projects 3 and 4

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Coelho, A.M. Jr.; Easley, S.P.; Orr, J.L.; Smith, H.D.; Taylor, L.L.; Tuttle, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this program is to investigate, using the baboon as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human, possible hehavioral effects associated with exposure to high intensity 60 Hz electric fields. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, will be used by the Department of Energy (DOE) to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences resulting from exposure of humans to the electric fields associated with power transmission over high voltage lines. This research program consists of four major research projects, all of which have been successfully completed. The third project assessed, in separate experiments conducted at 30 and 60 kV/m, effects of chronic exposure to electric fields on the performance of two operant conditioning tasks, fixed ratio (FR), and differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL). In the same two experiments, the fourth project investigated, using the systematic quantitative observational sampling methods of primatology, the possible stress-inducing effects of chronic exposure to 60 Hz electric fields on the behavior of baboons living in small social groups. This volume contains only appendices for projects 3 and 4. 81 figs., 67 tabs.

  13. Effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Coelho, A.M.; Easley, S.P.; Orr, J.L.; Reiter, R.J.; Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-09-24

    A series of pioneering electric and magnetic field experiments were completed using nonhuman primates and a unique, well-engineered, and reliable exposure facility. Effects of operant behavior, social behavior, and serum melatonin concentration were examined using 60 Hz field combinations of other 6 W/m and 0.6 G or 30 W/m and 1.0 G. Observations noted in the course of this study include: Combines electric and magnetic field exposure does not have any important effect on short-term memory; the transitory increases in social behavior observed in previous electric fields did not occur; combined electric and magnetic field exposure might lead to reduced behavioral frequency in baboon social groups; three experiments clearly establish that one set of exposure conditions does not produce molatonin suppression in nonhuman primates; and a small pilot experiment suggests that a different exposure protocol might result in melatonin suppression.

  14. Leukemia following occupational exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields among Ontario electric utility workers.

    PubMed

    Miller, A B; To, T; Agnew, D A; Wall, C; Green, L M

    1996-07-15

    In a nested case-control study of 1,484 cancer cases and 2,179 matched controls from a cohort of 31,543 Ontario Hydro male employees, the authors evaluated associations of cancer risk with electric field exposure and reevaluated the previously reported findings for magnetic fields. Pensioners were followed from January 1, 1970, and active workers (including those who left the corporation) from January 1, 1973, with both groups followed through December 31, 1988. Exposures to electric and magnetic fields and to potential occupational confounders were estimated through job exposure matrices. Odds ratios were elevated for hematopoietic malignancies with cumulative electric field exposure. After adjustment, the odds ratio for leukemia in the upper tertile was 4.45 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-19.7). Odds ratios were also elevated for acute nonlymphoid leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, and chronic lymphoid leukemia. For cumulative magnetic field exposure, there were similar elevations that fell with adjustment. Evaluation of the combined effect of electric and magnetic fields for leukemia showed significant elevations of risk for high exposure to both, with a dose-response relation for increasing exposure to electric fields and an inconsistent effect for magnetic fields. There was some evidence of a nonsignificant association for brain cancer and benign brain tumors with magnetic fields. For lung cancer, the odds ratio for high exposure to electric and magnetic fields was 1.84 (95% CI 0.69-4.94). PMID:8678046

  15. Effects of intermittent 60-Hz high voltage electric fields on metabolism, activity, and temperature in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbergy, R.S; Duffy, P.H.; Sacher, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    Transient effects of 100-kV/m extremely low frequency electric fields were studied in the white footed deermouse, Peromyscus leucopus. Gross motor activity, carbon dioxide production, oxygen consumption, and core body temperature were monitored before, during, and after intermittent field exposures (four hour-long exposures, at one-hour intervals). Thirty-four mice were exposed in cages with plastic floors floating above ground potential, and 21 mice were exposed in cages with grounded metal floor plates. The first field exposure produced an immediate, transient increase of activity and gas measures during the inactive phase of the circadian cycle. All measures returned to baseline levels before the second exposure and were not significantly changed throughout the remainder of the exposures. The rapid habituation of field-induced arousal suggests that significant metabolic changes will not be measured in experiments in which the interval between exposure and measurement is greater than two hours.

  16. Case-control study of childhood cancer and exposure to 60-Hz magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Savitz, D.A.; Wachtel, H.; Barnes, F.A.; John, E.M.; Tvrdik, J.G.

    1988-07-01

    Concern with health effects of extremely low frequency magnetic fields has been raised by epidemiologic studies of childhood cancer in relation to proximity to electric power distribution lines. This case-control study was designed to assess the relation between residential exposure to magnetic fields and the development of childhood cancer. Eligible cases consisted of all 356 residents of the five-county 1970 Denver, Colorado Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area aged 0-14 years who were diagnosed with any form of cancer between 1976 and 1983. Controls were selected by random digit dialing to approximate the case distribution by age, sex, and telephone exchange area. Exposure was characterized through in-home electric and magnetic field measurements under low and high power use conditions and wire configuration codes, a surrogate measure of long-term magnetic field levels. Measured magnetic fields under low power use conditions had a modest association with cancer incidence; a cutoff score of 2.0 milligauss resulted in an odds ratio of 1.4 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.6-2.9) for total cancers and somewhat larger odds ratios (ORs) for leukemias (OR = 1.9), lymphomas (OR = 2.2), and soft tissue sarcomas (OR = 3.3). Neither magnetic fields (OR = 1.0) nor electric fields (OR = 0.9) under high power use conditions were related to total cancers. Wire codes associated with higher magnetic fields were more common among case than control homes. The odds ratio to contrast very high and high to very low, low, and buried wire codes was 1.5 (95% CI = 1.0-2.3) for total cases, with consistency across cancer subgroups except for brain cancer (OR = 2.0) and lymphomas (OR = 0.8). Contrasts of very high to buried wire code homes produced larger, less precise odds ratios of 2.3 for total cases, 2.9 for leukemias, and 3.3 for lymphomas.

  17. Chronic exposure of primates to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields: II. Neurochemical effects

    SciTech Connect

    Seegal, R.F.; Wolpaw, J.R.; Dowman, R.

    1989-01-01

    We exposed Macaca nemestrina (pig-tailed macaques) to electric (E) and magnetic (B) fields ranging in intensity from 3 kV/m and 0.1 G to 30 kV/m and 0.9 G for three 21-day (d) periods. Experimental animals were exposed to sham E and B fields for two 21-d periods, one prior to and one following actual exposure to E and B fields, resulting in a total of five 21-d periods. Control animals were exposed to sham E and B fields for the entire 105-d interval. At the end of each 21-d period cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was obtained by lumbar puncture and analyzed for concentrations of homovanillic acid (HVA) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), metabolites of dopamine and serotonin neurotransmitters, respectively, by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD). Results are based on an examination of six experimental and four control animals. Exposure to E and B fields at all strengths was associated with a significant decline in CSF concentrations of both HVA and 5-HIAA when statistical comparisons were made against values obtained at the end of the preexposure interval. However, HVA returned to preexposure levels during the postexposure period, while 5-HIAA did not. No significant change in the concentrations of HVA or 5-HIAA was noted in the control animals. These results strongly suggest that exposure of the nonhuman primate to E and B fields can significantly affect specific biochemical estimates of nervous system function. These effects may involve alterations either in neuronal activity or in the activity of enzymes that catabolize the neurotransmitters.

  18. Effects of exposure to a 60-kV/m, 60-Hz electric field on the social behavior of baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Easley, S.P.; Coelho, A.M. Jr.; Rogers, W.R. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors found in a previously reported study that exposure to a 30-kV/m, 60-Hz electric field had significant effects on the social behavior of baboons. However, it was not established whether or not the effects were related specifically to the 30-kV/m intensity of the field. A new experiment was conducted to determine whether or not exposure to a 60-Hz electric field at 60 kV/m would produce like changes in the baboons' social behavior. They exposed one group of eight male baboons to an electric field 12 hours a day, 7 days a week, for 6 weeks. A second group of eight animals was maintained under sham-exposure (control) conditions. Rates of performing on each of six categories of social behavior and on four categories of nonsocial behavior were used as criteria for comparing exposed with unexposed subjects and for within-group comparisons during three six-week experimental periods: Pre-Exposure, Exposure, and Post-Exposure. The results indicate that (1) during the exposure period, exposed animals exhibited statistically significant differences from controls in means of performance rates based on several behavioral categories; (2) across all three periods, within-group comparisons revealed that behaviors of exposed baboons were significantly affected by exposure to the electric field; (3) changes in performance levels probably reflect a stress response to the electric field; and (4) the means of response rates of animals exposed at 60 kV/m were higher, but not double, those of animals exposed at 30 kV/m. As in the 30-kV/m experiment, animals exposed at 60 kV/m exhibited significant differences in performances of Passive Affinity, Tension, and Stereotypy. Mean rates of performing these categories were 122% (Passive Affinity), 48% (Tension), and 40% (Stereotypy) higher in the exposed group than in the control group during exposure to the 60-kV/m field.

  19. BIGEL analysis of gene expression in HL60 cells exposed to X rays or 60 Hz magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balcer-Kubiczek, E. K.; Zhang, X. F.; Han, L. H.; Harrison, G. H.; Davis, C. C.; Zhou, X. J.; Ioffe, V.; McCready, W. A.; Abraham, J. M.; Meltzer, S. J.

    1998-01-01

    We screened a panel of 1,920 randomly selected cDNAs to discover genes that are differentially expressed in HL60 cells exposed to 60 Hz magnetic fields (2 mT) or X rays (5 Gy) compared to unexposed cells. Identification of these clones was accomplished using our two-gel cDNA library screening method (BIGEL). Eighteen cDNAs differentially expressed in X-irradiated compared to control HL60 cells were recovered from a panel of 1,920 clones. Differential expression in experimental compared to control cells was confirmed independently by Northern blotting of paired total RNA samples hybridized to each of the 18 clone-specific cDNA probes. DNA sequencing revealed that 15 of the 18 cDNA clones produced matches with the database for genes related to cell growth, protein synthesis, energy metabolism, oxidative stress or apoptosis (including MYC, neuroleukin, copper zinc-dependent superoxide dismutase, TC4 RAS-like protein, peptide elongation factor 1alpha, BNIP3, GATA3, NF45, cytochrome c oxidase II and triosephosphate isomerase mRNAs). In contrast, BIGEL analysis of the same 1,920 cDNAs revealed no differences greater than 1.5-fold in expression levels in magnetic-field compared to sham-exposed cells. Magnetic-field-exposed and control samples were analyzed further for the presence of mRNA encoding X-ray-responsive genes by hybridization of the 18 specific cDNA probes to RNA from exposed and control HL60 cells. Our results suggest that differential gene expression is induced in approximately 1% of a random pool of cDNAs by ionizing radiation but not by 60 Hz magnetic fields under the present experimental conditions.

  20. Study of the behavioral and biological effects of high strength 60 HZ electric fields. Quarterly technical progress report No. 15, 12 May 1984-3 August 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-08-15

    Progress is reported in the construction of a test facility for studying the effects of high intensity, 60 Hz electric fields on baboons. Effects to be studied include operant out social behaviors. (ACR)

  1. Effect of 60 Hz electromagnetic fields on the activity of hsp70 promoter: an in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-De la Fuente, Abraham O.; Alcocer-González, Juan M.; Heredia-Rojas, J. Antonio; Rodríguez-Padilla, Cristina; Rodríguez-Flores, Laura E.; Santoyo-Stephano, Martha A.; Castañeda-Garza, Esperanza; Taméz-Guerra, Reyes S.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to EMFs (electromagnetic fields) results in a number of important biological changes, including modification of genetic expression. We have investigated the effect of 60 Hz sinusoidal EMFs at a magnetic flux density of 80 μT on the expression of the luciferase gene contained in a plasmid labelled as pEMF (EMF plasmid). This gene construct contains the specific sequences for the induction of hsp70 (heat-shock protein 70) expression by EMFs, as well as the reporter for the luciferase gene. The pEMF vector was electrotransferred into quadriceps muscles of BALB/c mice that were later exposed to EMFs. Increased luciferase expression was observed in mice exposed to EMFs 2 h daily for 7 days compared with controls (P<0.05). These data along with other reports in the literature suggest that EMFs can have far-reaching effects on the genome. PMID:23124775

  2. Effects of a 60 Hz magnetic field on photosynthetic CO2 uptake and early growth of radish seedlings.

    PubMed

    Yano, Akira; Ohashi, Yoshiaki; Hirasaki, Tomoyuki; Fujiwara, Kazuhiro

    2004-12-01

    Photosynthetic CO2 uptake rate and early growth parameters of radish Raphanus sativus L. seedlings exposed to an extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELF MF) were investigated. Radish seedlings were exposed to a 60 Hz, 50 microT(rms) (root mean square) sinusoidal magnetic field (MF) and a parallel 48 microT static MF for 6 or 15 d immediately after germination. Control seedlings were exposed to the ambient MF but not the ELF MF. The CO2 uptake rate of ELF MF exposed seedlings on day 5 and later was lower than that of the control seedlings. The dry weight and the cotyledon area of ELF MF exposed seedlings on day 6 and the fresh weight, the dry weight and the leaf area of ELF MF exposed seedlings on day 15 were significantly lower than those of the control seedlings, respectively. In another experiment, radish seedlings were grown without ELF MF exposure for 14 d immediately after germination, and then exposed to the ELF MF for about 2 h, and the photosynthetic CO2 uptake rate was measured during the short-term ELF MF exposure. The CO2 uptake rate of the same seedlings was subsequently measured in the ambient MF (control) without the ELF MF. There was no difference in the CO2 uptake rate of seedlings exposed to the ELF MF or the ambient MF. These results indicate that continuous exposure to 60 Hz, 50 microT(rms) sinusoidal MF with a parallel 48 microT static MF affects the early growth of radish seedlings, but the effect is not so severe that modification of photosynthetic CO2 uptake can observed during short-term MF exposure. PMID:15515039

  3. Biological studies of swine exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Volume 1. Overview and summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-12-01

    Over a three-year period, three generations of female miniature swine and their offspring were exposed to a 30-kV/m, 60-Hz electric field. Such a field approximates the 12-kV/m field that a human would experience under a 765-kV line. After swine exposures varying from 6 to 36 months, project personnel analyzed a wide range of biological parameters including growth, blood cell and serum biochemistry, blood immunoglobulin levels, behavior, peripheral nerve function, cell-mediated immunity, cytogenetics, and reproduction and development. There were no significant differences in health effects between the exposed and sham-exposed swine, except in the area of fetal development. The first breeding produced no significant difference between exposed and control offspring. When those offspring were bred after 18 months of exposure, the fetuses of exposed sows had an increased incidence of morphological malformations and lower body weight than fetuses from control sows. The live-born had lower body weights and increased birth defects. Several factors suggest that electric fields per se may not have caused these reproductive changes. For example, similar types of malformations occurred in control pigs. Also, in second-generation sows, the incidence of fetal malformations was similar for both exposed and control groups. It is possible that other factors such as housing, inbreeding, disease, or treatment of disease may have produced the observed effects. 64 refs., 13 figs., 25 tabs.

  4. Lack of effect of a 60 Hz magnetic field on biomarkers of tumor promotion in the skin of SENCAR mice

    SciTech Connect

    Digiovanni, John; Johnston, D A.; Rupp, Tim; Sasser, Lyle B. ); Anderson, Larry E. ); Morris, James E. ); Miller, Douglas L. ); Kavet, R; Walborg, Earl R.

    1999-04-20

    It has been proposed that extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields may enhance tumorigenesis through a co-promotional mechanism. This hypothesis has been further tested using the two-stage model of mouse skin carcinogenesis, i.e. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced promotion of skin carcinogenesis in mice initiated by a single subcarcinogenic dose of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene. Experimentation utilized three different doses of TPA within its dose-response range (0.85, 1.70 or 3.40 nmol) and examined the following early biomarkers of tumor promotion after 1, 2 and 5 weeks of promotion: increases in epidermal thickness and the labeling index of epidermal cells, induction of epidermal ornithine decarboxylase activity and down regulation of epidermal protein kinase C activity. Mice exposed to a 60 Hz magnetic field having a flux density of 2 mT for 6 hr per day for 5 days per week were compared to mice exposed to an ambient magnetic field. Within the sensitivity limits of the biomarker methodology and the exposure parameters employed, no consistent, statistically significant effects, indicative of co-promotion by the magnetic field, were demonstrated.

  5. [Infantile leukemia and exposure to 50/60 Hz magnetic fields: review of epidemiologic evidence in 2000].

    PubMed

    Lagorio, S; Salvan, A

    2001-01-01

    We review the epidemiological evidence on childhood leukemia and residential exposure to 50/60 Hz magnetic fields. The possibility of carcinogenic effects of power frequency magnetic fields (ELF-EMF), at levels below units of micro tesla (microT), was first raised in 1979 by a case-control study on childhood cancer carried out in Denver, USA. In that study, excess risks of total cancer and leukemia were observed among children living in homes with "high or very high current configuration", as categorised on the basis of proximity to electric lines and transformers. Many other epidemiological studies have been published since then, characterised by improved--although still not optimal--methods of exposure assessment. At the end of 2000, the epidemiological evidence to support the association between exposure to extremely-low-frequency magnetic fields and the risk of childhood leukemia is less consistent than what was observed in the mid 90s. At the same time, a growing body of experimental evidence has accumulated against both a direct and a promoting carcinogenic effect of ELF-EMF. Such "negative" experimental evidence hampers a causal interpretation of the "positive" epidemiological studies. PMID:11758279

  6. Effect of 60 Hz electromagnetic fields on the activity of hsp70 promoter: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez de la Fuente, Abraham O; Alcocer-González, Juan M; Antonio Heredia-Rojas, J; Balderas-Candanosa, Isaías; Rodríguez-Flores, Laura E; Rodríguez-Padilla, Cristina; Taméz-Guerra, Reyes S

    2009-03-01

    We have evaluated the effect of 60 Hz sinusoidal magnetic fields (MF) at 8 and 8 microT on expression of the luciferase gene contained in a gene construct labelled as Electromagnetic Field-plasmid (pEMF). The vector included the hsp70 promotor containing the 3 nCTCTn sequences previously described for the induction of hsp70 expression by magnetic fields, as well as the reporter of the luciferase gene. We also replicated the study of Lin et al. [Lin H, Blank M, Rossol-Haseroth K, Goodman R. Regulating genes with electromagnetic response elements. J Cell Biochem 2001;81(1):143-48]. The pEMF plasmid was transfected into HeLa and BMK16 cell lines that were later exposed to either MF or thermal shock (TS). An increased luciferase expression was found in both the cells exposed to MF and TS compared with their control groups (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the combined effect of MF and TS was also analyzed. A synergistic effect between two factors was observed for this co-exposure condition in terms of luciferase gene expression. PMID:18957326

  7. A 60 Hz electric and magnetic field exposure facility for nonhuman primates: Design and operational data during experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Lucas, J.H.; Cory, W.E.; Orr, J.L.; Smith, H.D.

    1995-12-31

    A unique exposure facility was designed and constructed to generate large-scale vertical electric fields (EF) of up to 65 kV/m and horizontal magnetic fields (MF) of up to 100 {micro}T (1G), so that the behavioral and neuroendocrine effects of 60 Hz EF or combined electric and magnetic field (E/MF) exposure could be examined using nonhuman primates as subjects. Facility design and operational problems and their solutions are presented, and representative operational data from four sets of experiments are provided. A specially designed, optically isolated, 4 cm spherical-dipole EF probe and a commercially available MF probe were used to map the EF and MF within the fiberglass animal cages. In addition, amplifiers, signal conditioners, and A/D converters provided EF, MF, and transformer signals to a microcomputer at 15 min intervals. The apparatus produced homogeneous, stable E/MF at the desired intensities, and the fiberglass cages did not produce appreciable distortion or attenuation. Levels of recognized EF artifacts such as corona and ozone were negligible. The facility worked as intended, providing a well-characterized and artifact-controlled environment for experiments with baboons (Papio cynocephalus).

  8. Effects of exposure to 30 kV/m, 60-Hz electric fields on the social behavior of baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, A.M. Jr.; Easley, S.P.; Rogers, W.R. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that exposure to a 30-kV/m, 60-Hz electric field produces significant change (stress) in the social behavior of adult male baboons (Papio cynocephalus anubis). One group of eight baboons was exposed to an electric field (12 hours per day, 7 days per week for 6 weeks) while a second group of eight baboons was maintained in a sham-exposure (control) condition. Exposed subjects and control subjects were compared over three, six-week experimental periods (pre-exposure, exposure, and post-exposure). Performance rates of six categories of social behaviors (passive affinity, active affinity, approach, tension, threat, and attack) and four categories of nonsocial behaviors (forage, manipulate, posture, and stereotypy) were used to compare the two groups. The results of our study indicate that (1) there were no significant differences between the two groups during the pre-exposure or post-exposure periods; (2) during the exposure period, experimental and control groups exhibited statistically significant differences in the mean performance rates of three behavior categories; (3) within-group comparisons across periods indicate that the experimentally exposed group exhibited statistically significant changes in passive affinity, tension, and stereotypy; and (4) changes in behavior performance among the exposed subjects reflect a stress response to the electric field.

  9. Study of the behavioral and biological effects of high-strength 60-Hz electric fields. Quarterly technical progress report number 10, 18 December 1982-18 March 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-20

    The objective of this contract is to use the baboon as a surrogate for the human in studies of the possible deleterious effects of exposure to high strength, 60 Hz electric fields. The specific aims of this contract are to (1) design and construct an exposure facility in which baboons can be exposed to an electric field up to 60 kV/m in intensity for experiments and (2) to develop computer models relating the fields and currents produced in both baboons and humans by exposure to high strength, 60 Hz electric fields.

  10. Study of the behavioral and biological effects of high-strength 60-Hz electric fields. Quarterly progress report, 11 October 1981-10 January 1982. [Research plan

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    The primary objective of this research is to study the effects of high intensity, 60 Hz electric fields on baboon behavior to obtain information which will assist in the determination of the degree of risk of deleterious consequences for humans exposed to such fields. The generalization of results obtained with the baboon to predictions concerning humans will be aided by the development of computer models relating the surface electric field intensities and internal current densities produced in baboons and humans by exposure to high intensity, 60 Hz electric fields. Research plans are described.

  11. Effects of a 60 Hz Magnetic Field Exposure Up to 3000 μT on Human Brain Activation as Measured by Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Legros, Alexandre; Modolo, Julien; Brown, Samantha; Roberston, John; Thomas, Alex W.

    2015-01-01

    Several aspects of the human nervous system and associated motor and cognitive processes have been reported to be modulated by extremely low-frequency (ELF, < 300 Hz) time-varying Magnetic Fields (MF). Due do their worldwide prevalence; power-line frequencies (60 Hz in North America) are of particular interest. Despite intense research efforts over the last few decades, the potential effects of 60 Hz MF still need to be elucidated, and the underlying mechanisms to be understood. In this study, we have used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to characterize potential changes in functional brain activation following human exposure to a 60 Hz MF through motor and cognitive tasks. First, pilot results acquired in a first set of subjects (N=9) were used to demonstrate the technical feasibility of using fMRI to detect subtle changes in functional brain activation with 60 Hz MF exposure at 1800 μT. Second, a full study involving a larger cohort of subjects tested brain activation during 1) a finger tapping task (N=20), and 2) a mental rotation task (N=21); before and after a one-hour, 60 Hz, 3000 μT MF exposure. The results indicate significant changes in task-induced functional brain activation as a consequence of MF exposure. However, no impact on task performance was found. These results illustrate the potential of using fMRI to identify MF-induced changes in functional brain activation, suggesting that a one-hour 60 Hz, 3000 μT MF exposure can modulate activity in specific brain regions after the end of the exposure period (i.e., residual effects). We discuss the possibility that MF exposure at 60 Hz, 3000 μT may be capable of modulating cortical excitability via a modulation of synaptic plasticity processes. PMID:26214312

  12. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-09-24

    The objective of this program is to investigate behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields (E/MF), using the baboon (Papio cynocephalus) as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, could be used to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences of human exposure to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission. This report covers a series of three experiments (Experiments III, IV, and IVA) on the effect of combined 60-Hz E/MF on operant behavior. These experiments were a continuation of previous investigations of 60-Hz electric field exposure on baboons.

  13. Biological studies of swine exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Volume 4: growth, reproduction, and development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-12-01

    Swine were exposed to uniform, vertical, 60-Hz, 30-kV/m electric fields for 20 hours/day, 7 days/week. The parental generation (F/sub 0/ gilts) was bred after 4 months on study; some were killed for teratologic study at 100 days of gestation (dg), and the others produced a first-generation (F/sub 1/) of offspring. The pooled incidence of terata in these litters was similar in the exposed and sham-exposed groups. The F/sub 0/ females, which produced the F/sub 1/ generation, were rebred after 18 months of exposure and were killed at 100 dg: malformation incidence in exposed litters (75%) was significantly greater than in sham-exposed litters (29%). Types of malformations were not dissimilar between the two groups. The F/sub 1/ gilts were bred at 18 months of age; there were indications of impaired copulatory behavior and decreased fertility in the exposed animals. Defective offspring were found in significantly more of the exposed litters (71%) than in sham-exposed litters (33%). The F/sub 1/ sows were bred again 10 months later, and teratologic evaluations were performed on their second litters at 100 dg. The percentage of litters with malformed fetuses was essentially identical in the exposed and sham-exposed groups (70 and 73%, respectively). The change in malformation incidences between generations and between the first and second breedings makes it difficult to unequivocally conclude that chronic exposure to a strong electric field caused developmental effects in swine, although it appears there may be an association. It is also possible that other factors, such as housing, inbreeding, disease or its treatment may have contributed to the results. 22 refs., 9 figs., 28 tabs.

  14. Effects of 60 Hz electromagnetic fields on early growth in three plant species and a replication of previous results.

    PubMed

    Davies, M S

    1996-01-01

    In an attempt to replicate the findings of Smith et al., seeds of Raphanus sativus L. (radish), Sinapsis alba L. (mustard), and Hordeum vulgare L. (barley) were grown for between 9 and 21 days in continuous electromagnetic fields (EMFs) at "ion-cyclotron resonance" conditions for stimulation of Ca(2+) (B(H) = 78.3 mu T, B(HAC) = 40 mu T peak-peak at 60 Hz, B(V) = 0). On harvesting, radish showed results similar to those of Smith et al. Dry stem weight and plant height were both significantly greater (Mann-Whitney tests, Ps < 0.05) in EMF-exposed plants than in control plants in each EMF experiment. Wet root weight was significantly greater in EMF-exposed plants in two out of three experiments, as were dry leaf weight, dry whole weight, and stem diameter. Dry root weight, wet leaf weight, and wet whole weight were significantly greater in EMF-exposed plants in one of three experiments. All significant differences indicated an increase in weight or size in the EMF-exposed plants. In each of the sham experiments, no differences between exposed and control plants were evident. Mustard plants failed to respond to the EMFs in any of the plant parameters measured. In one experiment, barley similarly failed to respond; but in another showed significantly greater wet root weight and significantly smaller stem diameter and dry seed weight at the end of the experiment in exposed plants compared to control plants. Although these results give no clue about the underlying bioelectromagnetic mechanism, they demonstrate that, at least for one EMF-sensitive biosystem, results can be independently replicated in another laboratory. Such replication is crucial in establishing the validity of bioelectromagnetic science. PMID:8860733

  15. Effects of 60 Hz electromagnetic fields on early growth in three plant species and a replication of previous results

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.S.

    1996-05-01

    In an attempt to replicate the findings of Smith et al., seeds of Raphanus sativus L. (radish), Sinapsis alba L. (mustard), and Hordeum vulgare L. (barley) were grown for between 9 and 21 days in continuous electromagnetic fields (EMFs) at ion-cyclotron resonance conditions for stimulation of Ca{sup 2+} (B{sub H} = 78.3 {micro}T, B{sub HAC} = 40 {micro}T peak-peak at 60 Hz, B{sub v} = 0). On harvesting, radish showed results similar to those of Smith et al. Dry stem weight and plant height were both significantly greater (Mann-Whitney tests, Ps < 0.05) in EMF-exposed plants than in control plants in each EMF experiment. Wet root weight was significantly greater in EMF-exposed plants in two out of three experiments, as were dry leaf weight, dry whole weight, and stem diameter. Dry root weight, wet leaf weight, and wet whole weight were significantly greater in EMF-exposed plants in one of three experiments. All significant differences indicated an increase in weight or size in the EMF-exposed plants. In each of the sham experiments, no differences between exposed and control plants were evident. Mustard plants failed to respond to the EMFs in any of the plant parameters measured. In one experiment, barley similarly failed to respond; but in another showed significantly greater wet root weight and significantly smaller stem diameter and dry seed weight at the end of the experiment in exposed plants compared to control plants. Although these results give no clue about the underlying bioelectromagnetic mechanism, they demonstrate that, at least for one EMF-sensitive biosystem, results can be independently replicated in another laboratory. Such replication is crucial in establishing the validity of bioelectromagnetic science.

  16. Effects of 60 Hz Magnetic Field Exposure on the Pineal and Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis in the Siberian Hamster (Phodopus Sungorus)

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Bary W.); Matt, Kathleen S.; Morris, James E.); Sasser, Lyle B.); Miller, Douglas L.); Anderson, Larry E.)

    1999-11-15

    Experiments using the dwarf Siberian hamster Phodopus sungorus were carried out to determine possible neuroendocrine consequences of one-time and repeated exposures to 60 Hz magnetic fields (MF). Animals were maintained in either a short-light (SL, 8 h light:16 h dar) or long-light (LL, 16 h light:8h dark) photoperiod.

  17. Effects of a 30 kV/m, 60 Hz electric field on the social behavior of baboons: A crossover experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Easley, S.P.; Coelho, A.M. Jr.; Rogers, W.R. )

    1992-01-01

    Using a crossover experimental design, we evaluated our earlier findings that exposure to a 30 kV/m, 60 Hz electric field for 12 hours per day, 7 days per week for 6 weeks produced significant changes in the performance rates of social behaviors among young adult male baboons. In the crossover experiment, the former control group was exposed to a 30 kV/m, 60 Hz electric field for 3 weeks. Only an extremely small, incidental magnetic field was generated by the exposure apparatus. We found that electric-field exposure again produced increases in the performance rates that index Passive Affinity, Tension, and Stereotypy. These findings, combined with results from our other electric-field experiments, indicate that exposure to strong electric fields, in the absence of associated magnetic fields, consistently produces effects that are expressed as increases in rates of performance of social behaviors in young adult male baboons.

  18. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, J.L.

    1990-04-01

    The objective of this program is to investigate, using the baboon as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human, behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, could be used to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences resulting from exposure of humans to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission. Activities this quarter extended those of the first project year: the modification of the facility to include 60-Hz magnetic fields, and development of the capability for studies of neuroendocrine parameters by obtaining blood samples from baboons during electric and magnetic field exposure. 18 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine systems of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this program is to investigate, using the baboon as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human, behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, could be used to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences resulting from exposure of humans to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission. Activities this quarter extended those of the first project year which focused on two technical areas: the modification of the facility to include 60-Hz magnetic fields, and development of the capability for studies of neuroendocrine parameters by obtaining blood samples from baboons during electric and magnetic field exposure. 25 figs., 11 tabs.

  20. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.D.

    1993-01-22

    The objective of this program is to investigate behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields (E/MF), using the baboon (Papio cynocephalus) as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, could be used to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences of human exposure to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission.

  1. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates. Annual report, FY1992

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.D

    1993-01-22

    The objective of this program is to investigate behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields (E/MF), using the baboon (Papio cynocephalus) as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, could be used to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences of human exposure to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission.

  2. Regularly scheduled, day-time, slow-onset 60 Hz electric and magnetic field exposure does not depress serum melatonin concentration in nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Smith, H.D.; Orr, J.L.; Reiter, R.J.; Barlow-Walden, L.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments conducted with laboratory rodents indicate that exposure to 60 Hz electric fields or magnetic fields can suppress nocturnal melatonin concentrations in pineal gland and blood. In three experiments employing three field-exposed and three sham-exposed nonhuman primates, each implanted with an indwelling venous cannula to allow repeated blood sampling, the authors studied the effects of either 6 kV/m and 50 {micro}T (0.5 G) or 30 kV/m and 100 {micro}T (1.0 G) on serum melatonin patterns. The fields were ramped on and off slowly, so that no transients occurred. Extensive quality control for the melatonin assay, computerized control and monitoring of field intensities, and consistent exposure protocols were used. No changes in nocturnal serum melatonin concentration resulted from 6 weeks of day-time exposure with slow field onset/offset and a highly regular exposure protocol. These results indicate that, under the conditions tested, day-time exposure to 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields in combination does not result in melatonin suppression in primates.

  3. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-09-01

    A cohort of sixteen male baboons were assigned to electric and magnetic field (E/MF) exposure and sham-exposure. The social behavior subjects were simultaneously exposed to 60 Hz E/MF. Ten behavioral categories were measured. Each behavioral category was comprised of multiple molecular behaviors that could be objectively identified and counted. Six of the behavior categories were social'', in that interactions between subjected were involved. The remaining four were non-social'' and pertained to individual behaviors such as movements or postural stances.

  4. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-07-14

    This volume contains detailed experimental data to accompany quarterly report, dated July 14, 1992, by this group entitled Investigation of Effects of 60-Hz Electric Fields on Operant and Social Behavior and on the Neuroendocrine System of Nonhuman Primates.'' This volume is a collection of Appendices which are entitled: Appendix A- Field Mapping Data Forms, Appendix B- Exposure Area (East Side) Electric Field Data, Appendix C- Exposure Area (East Side) Magnetic Field Data, Appendix D- Sham Area (West Side) Magnetic Field Data, Appendix E- Memoranda Concerning Field Onset During Experiment IV and the Crossover Experiment, Appendix F- Exposure Area (East Side) Electric Field Data, Appendix G- Exposure Area (East Side) Magnetic Field Data, Appendix H- Sham Area (west Side) Magnetic Field Data, Appendix I- Compiled Data and Anovas for Experiment III Social Data, Appendix J -Written Comments Provided by Statistician Dr. Robert Mason, and Appendix K- Reference Text Provided by Dr. Coelho.

  5. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, J.L.

    1989-10-01

    The objective of this program is to investigate, using the baboon as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human, behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields. Results from this program could be used to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences resulting from exposure of humans to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission. This program is being conducted at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) as part of an international collaborative information exchange and scientific research effort. This annual report marks the completion of the first year of the four year research program. This project year has focused on two technical areas: the modification of the facility to include 60-Hz magnetic fields, and development of the capability for studies of neuroendocrine parameters by obtaining blood samples from baboons during electric and magnetic field exposure. Activities in the social behavior, operant behavior, and laboratory animal sciences during this project year have been in preparation for the start of Experiment 3. 7 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Exposure of baboons to combined 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields does not produce work stoppage or affect operant performance on a match-to-sample task

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, J.L.; Rogers, W.R.; Smith, H.D.

    1995-12-31

    The authors examined the effects of combined 60 Hz electric and magnetic field (EMF) exposure on performance of delayed match-to-sample (MTS) procedure involving the flash rate of a light as the stimulus. Six baboons (Papio cynocephalus) fully acquired the task; four others functioned accurately only when cued. All ten subjects were assigned to EMF-exposed or sham-exposed groups of five and were used to test for a work-stoppage effect that was previously observed with initial exposure to electric fields (EF) of 30 or 60 kV/m. Here, the authors report the results of two experiments, each consisting of 6 week preexposure, exposure, and postexposure periods. They found no evidence of work stoppage with fields of 6 kV/m and 50 {micro}T (0.5 G) or with 30 kV/m and 100 {micro}T (1.0 G). In neither experiment was there evidence of an adverse effect of 60 Hz EMF exposure on MTS performance.

  7. Rapid-onset/offset, variably scheduled 60 Hz electric and magnetic field exposure reduces nocturnal serum melatonin concentration in nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Smith, H.D.; Reiter, R.J.; Barlow-Walden, L.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments with rodents indicate that power-frequency electric field (EF) or magnetic field (MF) exposure can suppress the normal nocturnal increase in melatonin concentration in pineal gland and blood. In a separate set of three experiments conducted with nonhuman primates, the authors did not observe melatonin suppression as a result of 6 weeks of day-time exposure to combined 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields (E/MF) with regularly schedule ``slow`` E/MF onsets/offsets. The study described here used a different exposure paradigm in which two baboons were exposed to E/MF with ``rapid`` E/MF onsets/offsets accompanied by EF transients not found with slowly ramped E/MF onset/offset; profound reductions in nocturnal serum melatonin concentration were observed in this experiment. If replicated in a more extensive experiment, the observation of melatonin suppression only in the presence of E/MF transients would suggest that very specific exposure parameters determine the effects of 60 Hz E/MF on melatonin.

  8. Effect of 60 Hz magnetic fields on the activation of hsp70 promoter in cultured INER-37 and RMA E7 cells.

    PubMed

    Heredia-Rojas, J Antonio; Rodríguez de la Fuente, Abraham Octavio; Alcocer González, Juan Manuel; Rodríguez-Flores, Laura E; Rodríguez-Padilla, Cristina; Santoyo-Stephano, Martha A; Castañeda-Garza, Esperanza; Taméz-Guerra, Reyes S

    2010-10-01

    It has been reported that 50-60 Hz magnetic fields (MF) with flux densities ranging from microtesla to millitesla are able to induce heat shock factor or heat shock proteins in various cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of 60 Hz sinusoidal MF at 8 and 80 μT on the expression of the luciferase gene contained in a plasmid labeled as electromagnetic field-plasmid (pEMF). This gene construct contains the specific sequences previously described for the induction of hsp70 expression by MF, as well as the reporter for the luciferase gene. The pEMF vector was transfected into INER-37 and RMA E7 cell lines that were later exposed to either MF or thermal shock (TS). Cells that received the MF or TS treatments and their controls were processed according to the luciferase assay system for evaluate luciferase activity. An increased luciferase gene expression was observed in INER-37 cells exposed to MF and TS compared with controls (p < 0.05), but MF exposure had no effect on the RMA E7 cell line. PMID:20835776

  9. (Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates)

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, J.L.

    1989-03-24

    The objective of this program is to investigate, using the baboon as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human, behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, could be used to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences resulting from exposure of humans to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission. The test facility is being modified to include combined electric and magnetic field capability. This will be accomplished by the installation of a magnetic field exposure system and modification of the electric field exposure equipment. The purpose of this document is to provide information on the design. 14 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on nueroendocrine system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.

    1993-01-22

    This series of experiments, using a well-characterized exposure facility and employing a variety of control procedures to study behavior and the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates, does not provide any evidence that exposure to power-frequency electric fields, or electric and magnetic fields in combination, for 12 hours per day for six weeks produces any deleterious effects in young-adult males. The primate experiments summarized here confirm the general conclusion indicated by experiments with rodents; although biological and behavioral changes can occur, there are no clear results establishing the occurrence of adverse effects in experiments involving relatively short-term exposure to environmentally-relevant electric or magnetic fields. Given the general agreement of the primate and rodent results, conclusions from the laboratory animal studies therefore presumably generalize well to humans.

  11. Effects of concurrent exposure to 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields on the social behavior of baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, A.M. Jr.; Easley, S.P.; Rogers, W.R. |

    1995-12-31

    Previous research has demonstrated that 30 or 60 kV/m electric fields (EF) reliably produce temporary increases in the performance of three categories of baboon social behavior: Passive Affinity, Tension, and Stereotypy. The experimental design included 6 week preexposure, exposure, and postexposure periods with experimental and control groups, each with eight subjects. Here, the authors report two experiments that evaluated the effects of combined EF and magnetic fields (MF) on baboon social behavior. One experiment demonstrated that exposure to 6 kV/m EF and 50 {micro}T (0.5 G) MF produced Period {times} Group interactions for Stereotypy and Attack, but the previously observed increases in Passive Affinity, Tension, and Stereotypy did not occur. A second experiment demonstrated that exposure to 30 kV/m EF and 100 {micro}T 1.0 G MF did not produce the same magnitude of increases in Passive Affinity, Tension, and Stereotypy observed previously with 30 kV/m EF alone. The exposed group exhibited decreased performance rates for several behavior categories during exposure with further declines during postexposure. The control group showed fewer downward trends across periods.

  12. (Study of the behavioral and biological effects of high intensity 60 Hz electric fields): Quarterly technical progress report No. 29

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, J.L.

    1989-07-14

    Activities this quarter involved all phases of the project plus a meeting of the Joint Committee in Tokyo. Detailed mapping of the exposure facility is scheduled to be completed during the week of August 14, 1989. Both electric and magnetic fields should be available for tests of the components of the tether and blood sampling system for the neuroendocrine pilot study in September 1989. The groups for the social behavior study are stabilizing appropriately. Details on the formation of the groups and their status has been provided. Dr. Coelho has included information related to aspects of the social experiment ranging from age estimation in baboons through the cardiovascular consequences of psychosocial stress. In addition, a draft manuscript is included on the data from the previous experiments which describes the effects of 30 and 60 kV/m electric fields on the social behavior of baboons. Tests of the blood handling procedures and analysis methods have been completed. With the exception of the catecholamine analyses, the handling procedures and variability in replicate measurements are satisfactory. Logistic and practical considerations now weigh strongly against including the analysis of the blood samples for catecholamines. Preliminary tests indicate that a sampling procedure which will work for the other compounds is probably not satisfactory for the catecholamines.

  13. Are the stray 60-Hz electromagnetic fields associated with the distribution and use of electric power a significant cause of cancer?

    PubMed

    Jackson, J D

    1992-04-15

    The putative causal relation between ambient low-frequency (50 or 60 Hz) electromagnetic fields (necessarily present in living and working environments because of our ever increasing use of electrical devices) and cancer, especially leukemia, can be tested on the large scale by examining historical data on the growth of the generation and consumption of electric power since 1900 and corresponding data on cancer death and incidence rates. The United States per capita generation and residential consumption of electric power have grown roughly exponentially since 1900; total per capita generation has increased by a factor of 10 since 1940, and per capita residential consumption has increased by a factor of 20 in the same period. The ubiquitous stray fields from power distribution lines and internal and external wiring in buildings have grown in the same proportions. In contrast to the explosive increase in the generation and use of electricity, the age-adjusted cancer death rate for the population as a whole shows only a slight rise since 1900. When respiratory cancers (largely caused by tobacco use) are subtracted, the remaining death rate has actually fallen since 1940. That the death rate may have fallen because of better diagnosis and treatment, despite a rising incidence rate, is not substantiated, especially for leukemia, including childhood leukemia, where the incidence rate has been constant or declining slightly for the past 25 yr. The absence of any appreciable change in the national cancer incidence rates during a period in which residential use of electric power has increased dramatically shows that the associated stray 50- or 60-Hz electromagnetic fields pose no significant hazard to the average individual. PMID:1565645

  14. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.D.

    1992-11-02

    The objective of this program is to investigate behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields (E/MF), using the baboon surrogate for the human. Baboon social groups were scanned and electronically monitored during Experiments IV and IVA. The social scan, form that the technicians used to identify baboon locations and proximity to other baboons: was used to gain a simple snapshot of the position of the baboons in their cage. The scans were taken hourly every morning and evening for a total of eight scans per side per day. This report covers in detail the scan and activity data-gathering process. A set of appendices is attached which include printouts of the data sets and adjunct material pertinent to interpreting the data. The supporting material is comprised of calendars and listings of major events that occurred during the scan and activity data collection.

  15. Electric field of the power terrestrial sources observed by microsatellite Chibis-M in the Earth's ionosphere in frequency range 1-60 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkin, Fedir; Korepanov, Valery; Dudkin, Denis; Pilipenko, Vyacheslav; Pronenko, Vira; Klimov, Stanislav

    2015-07-01

    The power line emission (PLE) 50/60 Hz and the Schumann resonance (SR) harmonics were detected by the use of a compact electrical field sensor of length 0.42 m during microsatellite Chibis-M mission in years 2012-2014. The initial orbit of Chibis-M has altitude 500 km and inclination 52°. We present the space distribution of PLE and its connections with the possible overhead power lines. PLE has been recorded both in the shade and sunlit parts of the orbits as opposed to SR which have been recorded only in the nightside of the Earth. The cases of an extra long distance of PLE propagation in the Earth's ionosphere and increased value of SR Q factor have been also observed. These results should stimulate the ionosphere model refinement for ultralow frequency and extremely low frequency electromagnetic wave propagation as well as a study on new possibility of the ionosphere diagnostics.

  16. The effect of 60-Hz magnetic fields on co-promotion of chemically induced skin tumors on SENCAR mice: a discussion of three studies.

    PubMed Central

    McLean, J R; Thansandote, A; Lecuyer, D; Goddard, M

    1997-01-01

    Three independent experiments involving a total of 288 SENCAR mice were used to study the effects of 60-Hz magnetic fields on the growth and development of skin tumors. Given the constraints imposed by the experimental design, the results did not support a role for magnetic fields as a tumor co-promoter. This negative finding could also be interpreted to mean that the SENCAR mouse skin tumor model was not sensitive enough to detect the action of a weak co-promoter. The two-stage (initiation/promotion) model was used to assess the genotoxic potential of magnetic fields because it had been widely used to evaluate chemical carcinogens. This model, however, lacks the sensitivity to detect all but the most potent direct-acting carcinogens, and the tumor response to the action of low doses of promoter results in large random fluctuations in tumor incidence, yield, and multiplicity. The need to limit tumor incidence in the sham is a necessary condition to ensure that a magnetic field-induced effect on tumorigenesis would have a reasonable chance of being detected. This requirement, and the variability in tumor development between and within experiments, increases the level of uncertainty in the system and makes a weak response to the magnetic field difficult to detect and interpret. PMID:9074887

  17. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-07-14

    The objective of this program is to investigate behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields, using the baboon (Papio cynocephalus). Results from this program are used to estimate consequences of human exposure to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission. Electric and magnetic field measurements for Experiment IIIA (Confirmatory), Experiment IV and Social Behavior portion of Experiment III are presented. The systems for the production and monitoring of the fields performed satisfactorily during Experiment IIIA and during all but the last part of Experiment IV. In Experiment III, two-way repeated analyses of variance revealed statistically significant Group (Exposed and Sham Exposed) and Period (Baseline. Exposure, and Post-Exposure) main effects. Two significant Period by Group interactions were also found. Seven of the ten behavioral categories showed a main effect of Period. Two-sample t-test comparisons of the two groups for each period indicated that performance rates in two behavioral categories (Stereotypy and Posture) were significantly lower in the Exposure Group. In general, the Exposed subjects exhibited a trend of progressively lower performance rates across the three periods. Specific accomplishments reported in this document were: measurement of electric and magnetic fields for Experiments IIIA and IV, completed analysis of the Social Behavioral data from Experiment III, and a detailed discussion of statistical methods employed on the Social Behavioral portion of Experiment III, and hematology data were collected and recorded for Operant and Social Behavioral subjects for Experiment IV.

  18. Chronically indwelling venous cannula and automatic blood sampling system for use with nonhuman primates exposed to 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Lucas, J.H.; Smith, H.D.; Orr, J.L.; Mikiten, B.C.

    1995-12-31

    An automated blood sampling system was developed for use with tethered baboons (Papio cynocephalus) during concurrent exposure to 60 Hz 30 kV/m electric fields and 0.1 mT (1.0 G) magnetic fields. The system was controlled by a FORTH-based microcomputer, which operated a pump, a fraction collector, and two pinch valves. A swivel mechanism at the end of the tether allowed the baboons to move freely in their cages. The hardware and software were designed for fail-safe operation. Heparinized saline was infused at a rate of 0.5 ml/min until a sample cycle was initiated. Then, blood was drawn from the animal into a storage tube at a rate of 12.5 ml/min, a sample of undiluted blood was taken from the end of the storage tube near the baboon, and the blood remaining in the storage tube was then flushed back into the animal. Use of the storage tube prevented the peristaltic pump rollers from pressing on tubing containing blood, and return of the blood diluted with saline limited the blood wasted per sample to less than 0.5 ml. The system functioned reliably in three experiments, collecting samples as scheduled 97% of the time. Although it was initially designed for and used successfully with primates in an electric and magnetic field environment, this type of system could be employed in many areas of biomedical research or medical treatment.

  19. Evaluation of the possible copromoting effect of a 60 Hz magnetic field during chemically induced carcinogenesis in skin of SENCAR mice. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    DiGiovanni, J.; Walborg, E.F.; Anderson, L.E.; Sasser, L.B.; Morris, J.E.; Miller, D.L. |

    1997-11-01

    It has been hypothesized that exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields can enhance tumorigenesis through a copromotional mechanism. Equivocal support for this hypothesis was provided by experiments performed by Stuchly et al. using a mouse skin model; i.e. the induction of skin tumors in SENCAR mice exposed to a single subcarcinogenic dose of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and promotion by repetitive doses of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). The mice were exposed to a 2 mT (60 Hz) magnetic field during the entire promotion phase of the experiment. The Stuchly study, which utilized single weekly doses of TPA, demonstrated a statistically significant increase in skin tumors after 16--18 weeks of promotion; however, by 23 weeks of promotion, the difference was not statistically significant. The study was designed to provide definitive evidence to confirm or refute a copromotional role of ELF magnetic field exposure on DMBA/TPA-induced skin carcinogenesis in SENCAR mice. This study was modeled after the study of Stuchly et al., (1992), including the animal model and exposure conditions. However, three different promoting doses of TPA, within the linear dose response range for induction of skin tumors, were utilized.

  20. Initial studies on the effects of combined 60 Hz electric and magnetic field exposure on the immune system of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, K.K.; Rogers, W.R.; Smith, H.D.

    1995-12-31

    In a pilot immunology experiment, peripheral blood samples from six baboons (Papio cynocephalus) housed as a social group were collected during week 5 of preexposure, exposure, and postexposure periods that were each 6 weeks in duration. The subjects were exposed to vertical 6 kV/m and horizontal 50 {micro}T (0.5 G) fields for 12 h per day. Lymphocytes collected during the exposure period displayed statistically significant (P < .05) reductions in CD3{sup +} and CD4{sup +} counts, interleukin 2 receptor expression, and proliferative response to pokeweed mitogen. A second experiment was conducted using samples from seven subjects exposed to 30 kV/m and 100 {micro}T (1.0 G) and eight sham-exposed subjects. Statistically significant Period {times} Group interactions occurred for total white blood cell count and CD4{sup +} to CD8{sup +} ratio, but the pattern of results was not suggestive of an exposure-related effect. Although components of the nonhuman primate immune system appear to be affected by 60 Hz electric and magnetic field exposure in one of two experiments, additional experiments are required to evaluate this possibility.

  1. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates. Quarterly report 40, Operant behavior: Experiments 3, 4, and 4A

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-09-24

    The objective of this program is to investigate behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields (E/MF), using the baboon (Papio cynocephalus) as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, could be used to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences of human exposure to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission. This report covers a series of three experiments (Experiments III, IV, and IVA) on the effect of combined 60-Hz E/MF on operant behavior. These experiments were a continuation of previous investigations of 60-Hz electric field exposure on baboons.

  2. Initial exposure to 30 kV/m or 60 kV/m 60 Hz electric fields produces temporary cessation of operant behavior of nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Orr, J.L.; Smith, H.D.

    1995-12-31

    In two separate experiments, the authors examined the effects of a 60 Hz electric field (EF) on performance of an operant schedule consisting of two signaled components: fixed-ratio (FR30) and differential reinforcement of low-rate (DRL20). In each experiment, 12 naive baboons (Papio cynocephalus) were assigned randomly to either an EF-exposed experimental group or a sham-exposed control group. A homogeneous vertical EF of 30 kV/m was used in one experiment; 60 kV/m was used in the other. The experimental design for both experiments included 6 week preexposure, exposure, and postexposure periods. The planned analyses indicated no evidence of statistically significant (P < .05) effects of EF exposure. However, exploratory analyses comparing performance during the last week of preexposure and the first week of exposure revealed statistically significant acute effects (work stoppage): The mean response rates of the EF-exposed groups were greatly reduced on day 1 of exposure but were normal by the end of day 2 of EF exposure. The authors hypothesize that introduction of a highly unusual stimulus, the EF, temporarily interfered with normal operant behavior to produce a primary work stoppage. Supplementary cross-over experiments added at the end of each main experiment indicated that work stoppage occurred again when formerly EF-exposed subjects served as sham-exposed controls, while other subjects received their first EF exposure. Presumably, reoccurrence of other stimuli correlated with initial exposure to the EF became sufficient to subsequently cause secondary work stoppage in the absence of direct EF exposure. The primary and secondary work-stoppage effects were reproducible.

  3. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates. Social behavior portions of Experiments III and IV: Quarterly report No. 39

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-09-01

    A cohort of sixteen male baboons were assigned to electric and magnetic field (E/MF) exposure and sham-exposure. The social behavior subjects were simultaneously exposed to 60 Hz E/MF. Ten behavioral categories were measured. Each behavioral category was comprised of multiple molecular behaviors that could be objectively identified and counted. Six of the behavior categories were ``social``, in that interactions between subjected were involved. The remaining four were ``non-social`` and pertained to individual behaviors such as movements or postural stances.

  4. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates. Quarterly report 37 - Part 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-07-14

    This volume contains detailed experimental data to accompany quarterly report, dated July 14, 1992, by this group entitled ``Investigation of Effects of 60-Hz Electric Fields on Operant and Social Behavior and on the Neuroendocrine System of Nonhuman Primates.`` This volume is a collection of Appendices which are entitled: Appendix A- Field Mapping Data Forms, Appendix B- Exposure Area (East Side) Electric Field Data, Appendix C- Exposure Area (East Side) Magnetic Field Data, Appendix D- Sham Area (West Side) Magnetic Field Data, Appendix E- Memoranda Concerning Field Onset During Experiment IV and the Crossover Experiment, Appendix F- Exposure Area (East Side) Electric Field Data, Appendix G- Exposure Area (East Side) Magnetic Field Data, Appendix H- Sham Area (west Side) Magnetic Field Data, Appendix I- Compiled Data and Anovas for Experiment III Social Data, Appendix J -Written Comments Provided by Statistician Dr. Robert Mason, and Appendix K- Reference Text Provided by Dr. Coelho.

  5. Effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates. Draft final report, October 1, 1988--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Coelho, A.M.; Easley, S.P.; Orr, J.L.; Reiter, R.J.; Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-09-24

    A series of pioneering electric and magnetic field experiments were completed using nonhuman primates and a unique, well-engineered, and reliable exposure facility. Effects of operant behavior, social behavior, and serum melatonin concentration were examined using 60 Hz field combinations of other 6 W/m and 0.6 G or 30 W/m and 1.0 G. Observations noted in the course of this study include: Combines electric and magnetic field exposure does not have any important effect on short-term memory; the transitory increases in social behavior observed in previous electric fields did not occur; combined electric and magnetic field exposure might lead to reduced behavioral frequency in baboon social groups; three experiments clearly establish that one set of exposure conditions does not produce molatonin suppression in nonhuman primates; and a small pilot experiment suggests that a different exposure protocol might result in melatonin suppression.

  6. Effects of 60 Hz electric fields on operant and social stress behaviors of nonhuman primates. Annual report, August 5, 1984-October 25, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Lucas, J.H.; Moore, G.T.; Orr, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    Operant behavioral methods have been used to assess the aversiveness of intense electric fields. One aspect of the aversiveness of a stimulus is the ability to act as a negative reinforcer. A negative reinforcer is a stimulus whose response contingent termination maintains behavior. Baboons were trained to perform an operant task to obtain food rewards, determined that the addition of an intense electric field did not disrupt performance, measured the background level of responding in the absence of any primary reinforcers, assessed the ability of electric field termination to maintain operant responding, and verified that the electric field could serve as a discriminative stimulus.

  7. Long-term effects of 60-Hz electric vs. magnetic fields on IL-1 and other immune parameters in sheep: Phase 4 study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hefeneider, S.H.; McCoy, S.L.; Hausman, F.A.

    1998-10-01

    This study was designed to assess the effect of exposure to long-term low-frequency electric and magnetic fields (EMF) from an environmental 500-kV transmission line on immune function in sheep. The primary hypothesis tested was that the reduction in IL-1 activity observed in two previous short-term studies (9 months) was due to exposure to EMF from this transmission line. The secondary hypothesis was that long-term exposure (27 months) would impact immune function and animal health. To characterize the components of the EMF environment responsible for the previously observed reduction in IL-1 activity, the experiment was designed not only to examine the effect of exposure to electric and magnetic fields, but also to examine the magnetic field component alone. This was done by constructing a third pen (MF) which was shielded with wire to effectively eliminate the electric field while not significantly affecting the magnitude of the magnetic field.

  8. Effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on nueroendocrine system of nonhuman primates. Final report, October 1, 1988--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.

    1993-01-22

    This series of experiments, using a well-characterized exposure facility and employing a variety of control procedures to study behavior and the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates, does not provide any evidence that exposure to power-frequency electric fields, or electric and magnetic fields in combination, for 12 hours per day for six weeks produces any deleterious effects in young-adult males. The primate experiments summarized here confirm the general conclusion indicated by experiments with rodents; although biological and behavioral changes can occur, there are no clear results establishing the occurrence of adverse effects in experiments involving relatively short-term exposure to environmentally-relevant electric or magnetic fields. Given the general agreement of the primate and rodent results, conclusions from the laboratory animal studies therefore presumably generalize well to humans.

  9. Long-term effects of 60-Hz electric vs. magnetic fields on IL-1 and other immune parameters in sheep: Phase 5 study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hefeneider, S.H.; McCoy, S.L.; Hausman, F.A.

    1998-10-01

    This study was designed to assess the effect of exposure to long-term low-frequency electric and magnetic fields (EMF) from a 500-kV transmission line on immune function in sheep. The primary hypothesis was that the reduction in IL-1 activity observed in two previous short-term studies (9 months) was due to EMF exposure from this transmission line. The secondary hypothesis was that long-term exposure (27 months) would impact immune function and animal health. To characterize the components of EMF responsible for the previously observed reduction in IL-1 activity, the experiment was designed not only to examine the effect of exposure to electric and magnetic fields, but also to examine the magnetic field component alone.

  10. Effects of 60 Hz electric fields on operant and social stress behaviors of nonhuman primates. Technical status report, June 8-August 2, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-08-02

    Progress made at calibrating the electric field distribution within and around cages used for behavorial testing of baboons is described. It is concluded that all of the parts of the ''system'' are rather constant in their readings. The only component which seems to show appreciable variability is the 4 cm probe. Although the optically coupled 4 cm spherical dipole probe usually performs well, it is becoming apparent that sometimes it can produce misleading results. Although we do not yet understand the situation completely, it appears as though there are at least two variables affecting the probe, battery voltage and humidity. 2 figs., 9 tabs.

  11. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates: Neuroendocrine portion of Experiment IV

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-08-31

    This quarterly report covers the neuroendocrine Portion of Experiment IV. Serum melatonin concentration was measured in individual baboons, each implanted with a chronically indwelling venous cannula. As in Experiment III the system of six automatic blood samplers was used to achieve undisturbed, 24 hr per day, simultaneous blood sampling from six individual subjects. The objective of the neuroendocrine portion of Experiment IV was to determine if 30 kV/m electric and 1.0 G magnetic field (E/MF) exposure produced a 50% decline in nocturnal serum melatonin concentration. Other groups of subjects were tested concurrently during Experiment IV to assess E/MF effects on group social and individual operant behavior. The results of these experiments will be covered respectively in the next two quarterly reports. The results of Experiment IV, as was the case with the result of Experiments III and IIIA, provide little or no evidence that E/MF exposure, under the conditions of these experiments, affects nocturnal serum melatonin concentrations of nonhuman primates. Together the negative results of Experiments III, IIA and IV indicate that day-time exposure of primates to slow-onset/offset, regularly-scheduled E/MF does not produce melatonin suppression, strongly suggesting that such exposure would not affect human melatonin either. However, before concluding that E/MF exposure in general has no effect on primate melatonin, nightime exposure needs to be examined, and the possibility, suggested by the Pilot Experiment, that fast onset/offset, irregularly-scheduled E/MF can completely suppress melatonin needs to be investigated.

  12. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates. Quarterly report 37 - Part 1, Text

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-07-14

    The objective of this program is to investigate behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields, using the baboon (Papio cynocephalus). Results from this program are used to estimate consequences of human exposure to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power transmission. Electric and magnetic field measurements for Experiment IIIA (Confirmatory), Experiment IV and Social Behavior portion of Experiment III are presented. The systems for the production and monitoring of the fields performed satisfactorily during Experiment IIIA and during all but the last part of Experiment IV. In Experiment III, two-way repeated analyses of variance revealed statistically significant Group (Exposed and Sham Exposed) and Period (Baseline. Exposure, and Post-Exposure) main effects. Two significant Period by Group interactions were also found. Seven of the ten behavioral categories showed a main effect of Period. Two-sample t-test comparisons of the two groups for each period indicated that performance rates in two behavioral categories (Stereotypy and Posture) were significantly lower in the Exposure Group. In general, the Exposed subjects exhibited a trend of progressively lower performance rates across the three periods. Specific accomplishments reported in this document were: measurement of electric and magnetic fields for Experiments IIIA and IV, completed analysis of the Social Behavioral data from Experiment III, and a detailed discussion of statistical methods employed on the Social Behavioral portion of Experiment III, and hematology data were collected and recorded for Operant and Social Behavioral subjects for Experiment IV.

  13. Involvement of protein kinase C in the modulation of morphine-induced analgesia and the inhibitory effects of exposure to 60-hz magnetic fields in the land snail, Cepaea nemoralis

    SciTech Connect

    Kavaliers, M.; Ossenkopp, K.P. )

    1990-02-26

    One of the more consistent and dramatic effects of exposure to magnetic fields is the attenuation of morphine-induced analgesia. Results of previous studies have implicated alterations in calcium channel functioning and Ca{sup ++} flux in the mediation of these effects. It is generally accepted that Ca{sup ++}-activated-phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (Protein kinase C; PKC) plays an important role in relaying trans-membrane signaling in diverse Ca{sup ++} dependent cellular processes. In experiment 1 we observed that morphine-induced analgesia in the land snail, Cepaea nemoralis, as measured by the latency of an avoidance behavior to a warmed surface, was reduced by the PKC activator, SC-9, and was enhanced by the PKC inhibitors, H-7 and H-9. In contrast, HA-10004, a potent inhibitor of other protein kinases, but only a very weak inhibitor of PKC, had no effect on morphine-induced analgesia. In experiment 2 exposure of snails for 30 minutes to a 1.0 gauss (rms) 60-Hz magnetic field reduced morphine-induced analgesia. This inhibitory effect of the magnetic field was reduced by the PKC inhibitors, H-7 and H-9, and was augmented by the PKC activator SC-9. These results suggest that: (i) PKC is involved in the modulation of morphine-induced analgesia and, (ii) the inhibitory effects of magnetic fields involve PKC.

  14. Biomedical effects associated with energy-transmission systems: effects of 60-Hz electric fields on circadian and ultradian physiological and behavioral functions in small rodents. Period covered: January 1, 1980-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Ehret, C.F.; Rosenberg, R.S.; Sacher, G.A.; Duffy, P.H.; Groh, K.R.; Russell, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of extremely low frequency (ELF) electric fields on transient patterns of circadian rhythms of physiological and behavioral end points are being investigated. This project is developing a data base to determine the exposure conditions that disturb the highly characteristic waveforms of ultradian, circadian, and infradian rhythms. The project has taken the following approach: (1) small rodents are exposed to well-defined ELF horizontal or vertical electric fields at nominal field strengths as high as 100 kV/m in individual residential facilities; (2) exposures follow a variety of schedules ranging from brief (one minute) to continuous, and including variations of circadian periodicities; (3) end points such as metabolism, activity, core body temperature, operant performance, and weight gain are continuously recorded for long intervals by microprocessor-controlled data acquisition systems; (4) the characteristic waveforms are analyzed by several statistical procedures for deviations from their unperturbed ultradian and circadian patterns; and (5) when and if exposures induce distrubances of the patterns, a search for concomitant neurochemical changes will begin. The following conclusions were reached: under a variety of exposure conditions the circadian regulatory system of the rat remained intact; brief ELF exposures at field strengths above 35 kV/m, presented during the inactive phase of the circadian cycle, produced a transient arousal in mice, characterized by increases in motor activity, carbon dioxide production, and oxygen consumption; the transient arousal habituated rapidly; no significant effects were seen in the second, third, or fourth exposure of mice using a one hour on, one hour off protocol; and there were no circadian aftereffects of the intermittent ELF stimulus in mice, based on measuresof rhythms of activity and gas metabolism.

  15. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates: Neuroendocrine portion of Experiment IV. Quarterly report No. 38

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-08-31

    This quarterly report covers the neuroendocrine Portion of Experiment IV. Serum melatonin concentration was measured in individual baboons, each implanted with a chronically indwelling venous cannula. As in Experiment III the system of six automatic blood samplers was used to achieve undisturbed, 24 hr per day, simultaneous blood sampling from six individual subjects. The objective of the neuroendocrine portion of Experiment IV was to determine if 30 kV/m electric and 1.0 G magnetic field (E/MF) exposure produced a 50% decline in nocturnal serum melatonin concentration. Other groups of subjects were tested concurrently during Experiment IV to assess E/MF effects on group social and individual operant behavior. The results of these experiments will be covered respectively in the next two quarterly reports. The results of Experiment IV, as was the case with the result of Experiments III and IIIA, provide little or no evidence that E/MF exposure, under the conditions of these experiments, affects nocturnal serum melatonin concentrations of nonhuman primates. Together the negative results of Experiments III, IIA and IV indicate that day-time exposure of primates to slow-onset/offset, regularly-scheduled E/MF does not produce melatonin suppression, strongly suggesting that such exposure would not affect human melatonin either. However, before concluding that E/MF exposure in general has no effect on primate melatonin, nightime exposure needs to be examined, and the possibility, suggested by the Pilot Experiment, that fast onset/offset, irregularly-scheduled E/MF can completely suppress melatonin needs to be investigated.

  16. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates. Quarterly report, Scan and activity data for experiments 4 and 4A, [July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.D.

    1992-11-02

    The objective of this program is to investigate behavioral and neuroendocrine effects associated with exposure to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields (E/MF), using the baboon surrogate for the human. Baboon social groups were scanned and electronically monitored during Experiments IV and IVA. The social scan, form that the technicians used to identify baboon locations and proximity to other baboons: was used to gain a simple snapshot of the position of the baboons in their cage. The scans were taken hourly every morning and evening for a total of eight scans per side per day. This report covers in detail the scan and activity data-gathering process. A set of appendices is attached which include printouts of the data sets and adjunct material pertinent to interpreting the data. The supporting material is comprised of calendars and listings of major events that occurred during the scan and activity data collection.

  17. Numerical calculation and measurement of 60-Hz current densities induced in an upright grounded cylinder.

    PubMed

    Kaune, W T; McCreary, F A

    1985-01-01

    Power-frequency electric fields are strongly perturbed in the vicinity of human beings and experimental animals. As a consequence, the extrapolation of biological data from laboratory animals to human-exposure situations cannot use the unperturbed exposure field strength as a common exposure parameter. Rather, comparisons between species must be based on the actual electric fields at the outer surfaces of and inside the bodies of the subjects. Experimental data have been published on surface and internal fields for a few exposure situations, but it is not feasible to characterize experimentally more than a small fraction of the diverse types of exposures which occur in the laboratory and in the field. A predictive numerical model is needed, one whose predictions have been verified in situations where experimental data are available, and one whose results can be used with confidence in new exposure situations. This paper describes a numerical technique which can be used to develop such a model, and it carries out this development for a test case, that of a homogeneous right-circular cylinder resting upright on-end on a ground plane and exposed to a vertical, uniform, 60-Hz electric field. The accuracy of the model is tested by comparing short-circuit currents and induced current densities predicted by it to measured values: Agreement is good. PMID:3836665

  18. Mitigation of 50-60 Hz power line interference in geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, M. B.; Said, R. K.; Inan, U. S.

    2010-12-01

    The analysis of ELF/VLF radio data has broad applications for ionospheric and magnetospheric phenomena, lightning activity, long-range communications, and geophysical prospecting. However, recordings of ELF/VLF data on the ground are adversely affected by the presence of electromagnetic fields from 50-60 Hz power lines, whose harmonics can extend to many kilohertz and interfere with the detection of natural and man-made signals. Removal of this interference is complicated by the time-varying fundamental frequency of power lines and strongly varying characteristics across different power grids. We discuss two methods for isolation and then subtraction of this interference, by an adaptive filtering technique and with least squares matrix analysis. Methods for estimating the time-varying frequency are also discussed. A few variants of these techniques are applied both to simulated data and then to real data. It is found that least squares isolation gives superior results, although the adaptive filter is potentially more effective for poorly behaved power line interference with rapidly changing fundamental frequencies as well as being computationally more efficient.

  19. Harmonics of 60 Hz in power systems caused by geomagnetic disturbances. [Manitoba

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashi, K.; Oguti, T.; Watanabe, T.; Tsuruda, K.; Kokubun, S.; Horita, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Simultaneous VLF/ULF observations carried out near Winnipeg, Manitoba show that geomagnetic disturbances control the behavior of harmonics of 60 Hz man-made electric power. The harmonics of 60 Hz detected by the VLF receiver are at multiples of 180 Hz, indicating that they originated from a 3 phase ac power system. Under geomagnetically quiet conditions, only odd harmonics of 70 Hz were detected. In disturbed conditions, both odd and even harmonics were excited. The strength of each harmonic changed concurrently with geomagnetic pulsation (ULF) activity. These findings seem to indicate that a portion of telluric currents shunted into the power line system through the neutrals of the Y-connected transformers give rise to a dc bias to the transformer core materials and that it distorts their hysteresis loops, activating harmonics of 60 Hz power. A mathematical proof is given that a hysteresis loop having a point of symmetry generates odd harmonics only, whereas loops lacking in point-symmetry generally give rise to both odd and even harmonics. A general formula was obtained to calculate the strength of each harmonic based on the shape of the hysteresis loop.

  20. Effects of field-manure applications on stratified 17B-estradiol concentrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The estrogenic hormone, 17'-estradiol (E2), is a potent endocrine disrupting compound found in animal manures. The objective of this study was to assess the occurrence of manure-borne E2 stratified through soil in fields that receive swine (Sus scrofa domestica) manure slurry as fertilizer. Soil cor...

  1. Deficits in high- (>60 Hz) gamma-band oscillations during visual processing in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Grützner, Christine; Wibral, Michael; Sun, Limin; Rivolta, Davide; Singer, Wolf; Maurer, Konrad; Uhlhaas, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Current theories of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia have focused on abnormal temporal coordination of neural activity. Oscillations in the gamma-band range (>25 Hz) are of particular interest as they establish synchronization with great precision in local cortical networks. However, the contribution of high gamma (>60 Hz) oscillations toward the pathophysiology is less established. To address this issue, we recorded magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data from 16 medicated patients with chronic schizophrenia and 16 controls during the perception of Mooney faces. MEG data were analysed in the 25–150 Hz frequency range. Patients showed elevated reaction times and reduced detection rates during the perception of upright Mooney faces while responses to inverted stimuli were intact. Impaired processing of Mooney faces in schizophrenia patients was accompanied by a pronounced reduction in spectral power between 60–120 Hz (effect size: d = 1.26) which was correlated with disorganized symptoms (r = −0.72). Our findings demonstrate that deficits in high gamma-band oscillations as measured by MEG are a sensitive marker for aberrant cortical functioning in schizophrenia, suggesting an important aspect of the pathophysiology of the disorder. PMID:23532620

  2. Power line emission 50/60 Hz and Schumann resonances observed by microsatellite Chibis-M in the Earth's ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkin, Denys; Pilipenko, Vyacheslav; Dudkin, Fedir; Pronenko, Vira; Klimov, Stanislav

    2015-04-01

    The overhead power lines are the sources of intense wideband electromagnetic (EM) emission, especially in ELF-VLF range, because of significant length (up to a few thousand kilometers) and strong 50/60 Hz currents with noticeable distortion. The radiation efficiency of the power line emission (PLE) increases with the harmonic order, so they are well observed by ground-based EM sensors. However their observations by low orbiting satellites (LEO) are very rare, particularly at basic harmonic 50/60 Hz, because of the ionospheric plasma opacity in ELF band. The Schumann resonance (SR) is the narrow-band EM noise that occurs due to the global thunderstorm activity in the Earth-ionosphere cavity. The first five eigenmodes of the SR are 7.8, 14.3, 20.8, 27.3 and 33.8 Hz and, thus, SR harmonics are also strongly absorbed by the Earth ionosphere. The published numerical simulations show that the penetration depth of such an ELF emission into the Earth's ionosphere is limited to 50-70 km for electric field and 120-240 km for magnetic field. From this follows, that PLE and SR can hardly ever be detected by LEO satellites, i.e. above the F-layer of ionosphere. In spite of this fact, these emissions were recently observed with use of the electric field antennas placed on the satellites C/NOFS (USA) and Chibis-M (Russia). Microsatellite Chibis-M was launched on January 24, 2012, at 23:18:30 UTC from the cargo ship "Progress M-13M" to circular orbit with altitude ~500 km and inclination ~52° . Chibis-M mass is about 40 kg where one third is a scientific instrumentation. The dimensions of the microsatellite case are 0.26x0.26x0.54 m with the outside mounted solar panels, service and scientific instrumentation. The main scientific objective of Chibis-M is the theoretical model verification for the atmospheric gamma-ray bursts. It requires the study of the accompanying EM processes such as the plasma waves produced by the lightning discharges in the VLF band. Chibis-M decayed on 15

  3. Power line harmonic radiation observed by the DEMETER spacecraft at 50/60 Hz and low harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němec, F.; Parrot, M.; Santolík, O.

    2015-10-01

    We present a low-altitude satellite survey of Power Line Harmonic Radiation (PLHR), i.e., electromagnetic waves radiated by electric power systems on the ground. We focus on frequencies corresponding to the first few harmonics of the base power system frequencies (50 Hz or 60 Hz, depending on the region). It is shown that the intensities of electromagnetic waves detected at these frequencies at an altitude of about 700 km are significantly enhanced above industrialized areas. The frequencies at which the wave intensities are increased are in excellent agreement with base power system frequencies just below the satellite location. We also investigate a possible presence of the weekend effect, i.e., if the situation is different during the weekends when the power consumption is lower than during the weekdays. Such an effect might be possibly present in the European region, but it is very weak. PLHR effects are less often detected in the summer, as the ionospheric absorption increases, and also, the radiation is obscured by lightning generated emissions. This difference is smaller in the U.S. region, in agreement with the monthly variations of the power consumption. The analysis of the measured frequency spectra reveals that although intensity increases at low odd harmonics of base power system frequencies are routinely detected, low even harmonics are generally absent. Finally, we verify the relation of PLHR intensities to the geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) proxy. It is shown that the PLHR intensity is increased at the times of higher GIC proxy values during the night.

  4. Transport of 17beta-estradiol and testosterone in a field lysimeter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    17ß-estradiol (E2) and testosterone (T) are present in sources such as waste treatment effluent and manures, and can potentially disrupt aquatic organisms at low concentrations. Laboratory studies consistently indicate limited mobility and rapid attenuation of E2 and T in soils; however, these hormo...

  5. Transport of 17ß-Estradiol and Testosterone in a Field Lysimeter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    17ß-estradiol (E2) and testosterone (T) are naturally present in manures and have the potential to disrupt aquatic organisms at low concentrations. Laboratory studies have indicated that E2 and T would have limited mobility and would attenuate rapidly in soils; however, these hormones are consistent...

  6. Discovery of a Variable-Frequency, 50--60 HZ Quasi-Periodic Oscillation on the Normal Branch of GX 17+2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijnands, R. A. D.; van der Klis, M.; Psaltis, D.; Lamb, F. K.; Kuulkers, E.; Dieters, S.; van Paradijs, J.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    1996-09-01

    We report the discovery, with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer, of a 50--60 Hz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) in GX 17+2. The QPO is seen when GX 17+2 is on the normal branch in the X-ray color-color diagram. Its frequency initially increases from 59 to 62 Hz as the source moves down the normal branch, but below the middle of the normal branch it decreases to ~50 Hz. Together with this frequency decrease, the QPO peak becomes much broader, from ~4 Hz in the upper part of the normal branch to ~15 Hz in the lower normal branch. The rms amplitude remains approximately constant between 1% and 2% along the entire normal branch. From a comparison of the properties of this QPO with those of QPOs previously observed along the normal branch in other Z sources, we conclude that it is most likely the horizontal-branch QPO (HBO). However, this QPO displays a number of unusual characteristics. The decrease in the QPO frequency along the lower normal branch is not in agreement with the predictions of the beat-frequency model for the HBO unless the mass flux through the inner disk decreases as the source moves down the lower normal branch. We tentatively suggest that the required decrease in the mass flux through the inner disk is caused by an unusually rapid increase in the mass flux in the radial inflow as GX 17+2 moves down the normal branch. Assuming that this explanation is correct, we can derive an upper bound on the dipole component of the star's magnetic field at the magnetic equator of 5 x 109 G for a 1.4 Msolar neutron star with a radius of 106 cm.

  7. Estradiol Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... a medication that is applied topically to the vagina. Estradiol is in a class of medications called ... swelling, redness, burning, irritation, or itching of the vagina vaginal discharge Some side effects can be serious. ...

  8. Further studies of 60-Hz exposure effects on human function. Final report summary, July 3, 1989--September 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, C.; Cohen, H.D.

    1994-03-29

    The objective of the exploratory study was to determine whether the electric or magnetic field, presented separately in an intermittent fashion, would produce the same pattern of heart rate increases and decreases seen in the original intermittent exposure study. In addition, time of day and baseline heart rate were explored in an attempt to clarify design issues that arose from previous studies. Twenty-four healthy young men 21 to 35 years of age participated in the study. Half were exposed to a 9-kV/m electric field, and half to a 200-mG magnetic field. Within each of these groups, half were exposed in the morning and half in the afternoon.

  9. Very Broadband Rayleigh-Wave Dispersion (0.06 - 60 Hz) and Shear-Wave Velocity Structure Under Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, K. A.; Bilek, S. L.; Patton, H. J.; Abbott, R. E.; Stead, R.; Pancha, A.; White, R.

    2009-12-01

    Earth structure plays an important role in the generation of seismic waves for all sources. Nowhere is this more evident than at near-surface depths where man-made sources, such as explosions, are conducted. For example, short-period Rayleigh waves (Rg) are excited and propagate in the upper 2 km of Earth's crust. The importance of Rg in the generation of S waves from explosion sources through near-source scattering depends greatly on the shear-wave velocity structure at very shallow depths. Using three distinct datasets, we present a very broadband Rayleigh-wave phase velocity dispersion curve for the Yucca Flat (YF) region of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The first dataset consists of waveforms of historic NTS explosions recorded on regional seismic networks and will provide information for the lowest frequencies (0.06-0.3 Hz). The second dataset is comprised of waveforms from a non-nuclear explosion on YF recorded at near-local distances and will be used for mid-range frequencies (0.2-1.5 Hz). The third dataset contains high-frequency waveforms recorded from refraction microtremor surveys on YF. This dataset provides information between 1.5 and 60 Hz. Initial results from the high frequency dataset indicate velocities range from 0.45-0.9 km/s at 1.5 Hz and 0.25-0.45 km/s at 60 Hz. The broadband nature of the dispersion curve will allow us to invert for the shear-wave velocity structure to 10 km depth, with focus on shallow depths where nuclear tests were conducted in the YF region. The velocity model will be used by researchers as a tool to aid the development of new explosion source models that incorporate shear wave generation. The new model can also be used to help improve regional distance yield estimation and source discrimination for small events.

  10. Estradiol: micrograms or milligrams

    PubMed Central

    Wickramasuriya, Nalin; Shaw, Nicholas J

    2016-01-01

    Summary Estrogen is used to induce puberty in peripubertal girls with hypogonadism. Although both synthetic and natural forms are available, along with different routes of administration, in the UK oral ethinyl estradiol and the low-dose oral contraceptive pill are commonly used as hormone replacement therapy for practical reasons. We present five peripubertal girls (aged 12.5–14.9 years) with hypogonadism (two with primary hypogonadism due to Turner syndrome and three with central (secondary) hypogonadism as part of multiple pituitary hormone deficiency) who for a variety of reasons have received milligram doses of estradiol (E2) in error for between 6 weeks and 6 months, instead of the expected microgram doses of ethinyl estradiol. Although there are no direct comparisons in peripubertal girls between synthetic and natural estrogens, all girls had vaginal bleeding whilst receiving the milligram doses and have ended up with reduced final heights, below the 9th centile in 1 and below the 2nd centile in 4. Whilst reduction in final height may be part of the underlying condition (especially in Turner syndrome) the two girls with height predictions performed prior to receiving the estrogen overdose have not achieved their predicted height. Estrogen is one of the few drugs which is available in both milligram and microgram formulations. Clinicians need to be alert to the possibility of patients receiving the wrong formulation and dosage in error. Learning points Girls with primary and secondary gonadal failure require assistance with pubertal induction. Although several different formulations and route of administration are available, for practical reasons, the majority of girls in the UK receive oral ethinyl estradiol. Estrogen preparations are available in both milligram and microgram formulations, with potential for receiving the wrong dose. Girls receiving milligram rather than microgram preparations all had vaginal bleeding and a short final height. PMID

  11. Drospirenone/ethinyl estradiol.

    PubMed

    Rapkin, Andrea J; Sorger, Shelley N; Winer, Sharon A

    2008-02-01

    Drospirenone 3 mg/ethinyl estradiol 20 microg (24/4) is a new unique oral contraceptive formulation that combines in a novel dosing regimen the lowest dosage of ethinyl estradiol commonly used today with drospirenone, an innovative progestin. Drospirenone is a compound closely resembling progesterone, but with the antimineralocorticoid and antiandrogenic properties of a related therapeutic agent, the diuretic, antihypertensive and androgen receptor antagonist, 17alpha-spironolactone. The prolongation of hormonally active pills in the monthly drospirenone/ethinyl estradiol cycle from 21 days to 24 days, followed by 4 days of inactive pills, is an interesting variant of the recently developed extended pill regimens (1). Recent contraceptive research has focused on improving side effect profiles and providing noncontraceptive health and lifestyle advantages. Many of these benefits are now supported with evidence-based medicine (2). Most available oral contraceptives improve cycle regularity, menstrual pain, excessive menstrual flow and acne. However, weight gain, bloating, food cravings, breast tenderness and mood alterations (especially irritability and depression and the complex of affective, behavioral and somatic symptoms of premenstrual syndrome [PMS] and the severe form of PMS, premenstrual dysphoric disorder [PMDD]) are not generally improved with the traditional oral contraceptive formulations (3). Drospirenone/ethinyl estradiol 24/4 is currently the only hormonally based contraceptive regimen with large, randomized, controlled trials demonstrating efficacy for PMDD. It has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) indications not only for the prevention of pregnancy but also for PMDD and for moderate acne vulgaris in women who choose oral contraception for birth control (4, 5). PMID:18389090

  12. 21 CFR 201.313 - Estradiol labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Pharmacopeia under the designation “Alpha Estradiol.” The substance should no longer be referred to in drug labeling as “Alpha Estradiol.” The Food and Drug Administration would not object to label references to the... referred to the presence of “Estradiol (formerly known as Alpha Estradiol).”...

  13. 21 CFR 201.313 - Estradiol labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Pharmacopeia under the designation “Alpha Estradiol.” The substance should no longer be referred to in drug labeling as “Alpha Estradiol.” The Food and Drug Administration would not object to label references to the... referred to the presence of “Estradiol (formerly known as Alpha Estradiol).”...

  14. 21 CFR 201.313 - Estradiol labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Pharmacopeia under the designation “Alpha Estradiol.” The substance should no longer be referred to in drug labeling as “Alpha Estradiol.” The Food and Drug Administration would not object to label references to the... referred to the presence of “Estradiol (formerly known as Alpha Estradiol).”...

  15. 21 CFR 201.313 - Estradiol labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Pharmacopeia under the designation “Alpha Estradiol.” The substance should no longer be referred to in drug labeling as “Alpha Estradiol.” The Food and Drug Administration would not object to label references to the... referred to the presence of “Estradiol (formerly known as Alpha Estradiol).”...

  16. 21 CFR 201.313 - Estradiol labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Pharmacopeia under the designation “Alpha Estradiol.” The substance should no longer be referred to in drug labeling as “Alpha Estradiol.” The Food and Drug Administration would not object to label references to the... referred to the presence of “Estradiol (formerly known as Alpha Estradiol).”...

  17. Facial coloration tracks changes in women's estradiol.

    PubMed

    Jones, Benedict C; Hahn, Amanda C; Fisher, Claire I; Wincenciak, Joanna; Kandrik, Michal; Roberts, S Craig; Little, Anthony C; DeBruine, Lisa M

    2015-06-01

    Red facial coloration is an important social cue in many primate species, including humans. In such species, the vasodilatory effects of estradiol may cause red facial coloration to change systematically during females' ovarian cycle. Although increased red facial coloration during estrus has been observed in female mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), evidence linking primate facial color changes directly to changes in measured estradiol is lacking. Addressing this issue, we used a longitudinal design to demonstrate that red facial coloration tracks within-subject changes in women's estradiol, but not within-subject changes in women's progesterone or estradiol-to-progesterone ratio. Moreover, the relationship between estradiol and facial redness was observed in two independent samples of women (N = 50 and N = 65). Our results suggest that changes in facial coloration may provide cues of women's fertility and present the first evidence for a direct link between estradiol and female facial redness in a primate species. PMID:25796069

  18. Membrane estradiol signaling in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Micevych, Paul; Dominguez, Reymundo

    2009-01-01

    While the physiology of membrane-initiated estradiol signaling in the nervous system has remained elusive, a great deal of progress has been made toward understanding the activation of cell signaling. Membrane-initiated estradiol signaling activates G proteins and their downstream cascades, but the identity of membrane receptors and the proximal signaling mechanism(s) have been more difficult to elucidate. Mounting evidence suggests that classical intracellular estrogen receptor-α (ERα) and ERβ are trafficked to the membrane to mediate estradiol cell signaling. Moreover, an interaction of membrane ERα and ERβ with metabotropic glutamate receptors has been identified that explains the pleomorphic actions of membrane-initiated estradiol signaling. This review focuses on the mechanism of actions initiated by membrane estradiol receptors and discusses the role of scaffold proteins and signaling cascades involved in the regulation of nociception, sexual receptivity and the synthesis of neuroprogesterone, an important component in the central nervous system signaling. PMID:19416735

  19. Effect of ambient levels of power-line-frequency electric fields on a developing vertebrate

    SciTech Connect

    Blackman, C.F.; House, D.E.; Benane, S.G.; Joines, W.T.; Spiegel, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Fertilized eggs of Gallus domesticus were exposed continuously during their 21-day incubation period to either 50- or 60-Hz sinusoidal electric fields at an average intensity of 10 Vrms/m. The exposure apparatus was housed in an environmental room maintained at 37 degrees C and 55-60% relative humidity (RH). Within 1.5 days after hatching, the chickens were removed from the apparatus and tested. The test consisted of examining the effect of 50- or 60-Hz electromagnetic fields at 15.9 Vrms/m and 73 nTrms (in a local geomagnetic field of 38 microT, 85 degrees N) on efflux of calcium ions from the chicken brain. For eggs exposed to 60-Hz electric fields during incubation, the chicken brains demonstrated a significant response to 50-Hz fields but not to 60-Hz fields, in agreement with the results from commercially incubated eggs. In contrast, the brains from chicks exposed during incubation to 50-Hz fields were not affected by either 50- or 60-Hz fields. These results demonstrate that exposure of a developing organism to ambient power-line-frequency electric fields at levels typically found inside buildings can alter the response of brain tissue to field-induced calcium-ion efflux. The physiological significance of this finding has yet to be established.

  20. Nomegestrol acetate/estradiol: in oral contraception.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lily P H; Plosker, Greg L

    2012-10-01

    Nomegestrol acetate/estradiol is a combined oral contraceptive with approval in many countries. This fixed-dose combination tablet contains nomegestrol acetate, a highly selective progestogen, and estradiol, a natural estrogen. It is the first monophasic combined oral contraceptive to contain estradiol, and is taken in 28-day cycles, consisting of 24 active therapy days with 4 placebo days (i.e. 24/4-day cycles). In two large, 1-year, randomized, open-label, multicentre, phase III trials in healthy adult women (aged 18-50 years), nomegestrol acetate/estradiol was at least as effective as drospirenone/ethinylestradiol as contraceptive therapy, as the pregnancy rates in women aged 18-35 years (primary efficacy population) in terms of the Pearl Index (primary endpoint) were numerically lower with nomegestrol acetate/estradiol, although the between-group difference was not statistically significant. In both trials, nomegestrol acetate/estradiol was given in a 24/4-day cycle, and drospirenone/ethinylestradiol was given in a 21/7-day cycle. The criteria for using condoms in case of forgotten doses were less stringent in the nomegestrol acetate/estradiol group than in the drospirenone/ethinylestradiol group. Nomegestrol acetate/estradiol therapy for up to 1 year was generally well tolerated in healthy adult women, with an acceptable tolerability profile in line with that expected for a combined oral contraceptive. The most commonly reported adverse events were acne and abnormal withdrawal bleeding (most often shorter, lighter or absent periods). Overall, compared with drospirenone/ethinylestradiol, nomegestrol acetate/estradiol appeared to be associated with less favourable acne-related outcomes, and shorter, lighter or absent periods. PMID:22950535

  1. 21 CFR 556.240 - Estradiol and related esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Estradiol and related esters. 556.240 Section 556... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.240 Estradiol and related esters. No residues of estradiol, resulting from the use of estradiol or any of the related esters, are permitted in excess of the...

  2. Environmental magnetic fields: Influences on early embryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, I.L.; Hardman, W.E.; Winters, W.D.; Zimmerman, S.; Zimmerman, A.M. )

    1993-04-01

    A 10-mG, 50 to 60-Hz magnetic field is in the intensity and frequency range that people worldwide are often exposed to in homes and in the workplace. Studies about the effects of 50- to 100-Hz electromagnetic fields on various species of animal embryos (fish, chick, fly, sea urchin, rat, and mouse) indicate that early stages of embryonic development are responsive to fluctuating magnetic fields. Chick, sea urchin, and mouse embryos are responsive to magnetic field intensities of 10-100 mG. Results from studies on sea urchin embryos indicate that exposure to conditions of rotating 60-Hz magnetic fields, e.g., similar to those in our environment, interferes with cell proliferation at the morula stage in a manner dependent on field intensity. The cleavage stages, prior to the 64-cell stage, were not delayed by this rotating 60-Hz magnetic field suggesting that the ionic surges, DNA replication, and translational events essential for early cleavage stages were not significantly altered. Studies of histone synthesis in early sea urchin embryos indicated that the rotating 60-Hz magnetic field decreased zygotic expression of early histone genes at the morula stage and suggests that this decrease in early histone production was limiting to cell proliferation. Whether these comparative observations from animal development studies will be paralleled by results from studies of human embryogenesis, as suggested by some epidemiology studies, has yet to be established. 38 refs.

  3. Ethinyl Estradiol and Etonogestrel Vaginal Ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... a class of medications called combination hormonal contraceptives (birth control medications). Etonogestrel is a progestin and ethinyl estradiol ... contraceptive ring is a very effective method of birth control but does not prevent the spread of human ...

  4. Serum estradiol and coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, R J; Gore, J M; Zive, M; Brady, P; Klaiber, E; Broverman, D; Ockene, I S; Dalen, J E

    1987-01-01

    Serum estradiol levels were measured in 300 men undergoing coronary angiography. Among these men, there were no significant differences in the serum estradiol levels between patients with (mean, 26.4 pg/ml) and those without (mean, 30.9 pg/ml) angiographically confirmed coronary artery disease. There were no significant differences in any of the established coronary risk factors when patients were subdivided according to the presence or absence of coronary artery disease or according to the extent of disease. In addition, no significant correlation was noted between mean serum estradiol levels and the extent of coronary artery disease as classified by the number of obstructed coronary vessels. A matched-pairs analysis was carried out in which patients who had normal coronary arteries were matched with those who had coronary artery disease on the basis of age, cigarette smoking, prior history of myocardial infarction, and body mass index. The mean serum estradiol level in the patients with coronary artery disease was 28.7 pg/ml, and the mean estradiol level was 31.4 pg/ml for the matched patients with normal coronary arteries. In addition, when serial (three) estradiol determinations were carried out in 100 patients, no association was observed between degree of estradiol variability and the occurrence and/or extent of coronary artery disease. The results of this observational study fail to support an association between serum estradiol levels and the presence or degree of coronary artery disease in men as documented by coronary angiography. PMID:3799667

  5. Effect of ambient levels of power-line-frequency electric fields on a developing vertebrate (journal version)

    SciTech Connect

    Blackman, C.F.; House, D.E.; Benane, S.G.; Joines, W.T.; Spiegel, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Fertilized eggs of Gallus domesticus were exposed continuously during their 21-day incubation period to either 50 or 60-Hz sinusoidal electric fields at an average intensity of 10 Vrms/m. Within 1.5 days after hatching, the chickens were removed from the apparatus and tested. The test consisted of examining the effect of 50- or 60-Hz electromagnetic fields at 15.9 Vrms/m and 73 nTrms (in a local geomagnetic field of 38 uT, 85 deg N) on efflux of calcium ions from the chicken brain. For eggs exposed to 60-Hz electric fields during incubation, the chicken brains demonstrated a significant response to 50-Hz fields but not to 60-Hz fields, in agreement with the results from commercially incubated eggs. In contrast, the brains from chicks exposed during incubation to 50-Hz fields were not affected by either 50- or 60-Hz fields. These results demonstrate that exposure of a developing organism to ambient power-line-frequency electric fields at levels typically found inside buildings can alter the response of brain tissue to radiation-induced calcium-ion efflux.

  6. Biomechanical properties of osteoporotic rat femurs after different hormonal treatments: genistein, estradiol, and estradiol/progesterone

    PubMed Central

    Azboy, İbrahim; Özkaya, Mustafa; Demir, Teyfik; Demirtaş, Abdullah; Kağan Arslan, Arslan; Özkul, Emin; Akcan, Adnan; Tolunay, Tolga

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of the study is to compare the effects of genistein, estradiol, estradiol/progesterone combination on the bone mineral density and biomechanical properties of ovariectomized rats’ bone. Methods: 50 female adult Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups. Bilaterally ovaeriectomy were performed in all groups except the sham-operated group. Groups were a sham-operated group and a control group (water was given), estradiol treated group (17-β estradiol 0.015 mg/kg per day), genistein treated group (genistein 10 mg/kg per day), and an estradiol/progesterone combination group (17-β estradiol 0.015 mg/kg plus drosperinone 0.028 mg/kg per day). The water or hormones were implemented in relevant groups for eight weeks by orogasthric catheter. The bone mineral density and biomechanical properties of the femur were analyzed. Results: Genistein, estradiol, and estradiol/progesterone groups increased bone mineral density significantly compared to the control group. In diaphysis and metaphysis bending test, all groups had higher peak load values than the control group. There were statistically significant differences between the estrogen/progesterone group and control group in diaphysis bending with regard to peak load. There were statistically significant differences between the estradiol and control groups in metaphysis bending with regard to peak load. In axial rotation test, all groups had higher peak torque values than the control groups. Conclusions: Genistein, estradiol and estrogen/progesterone combination improved the biomechanical properties of the ovariectomized rat bone. Genistein which has less side effects may be considered as an alternative in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. PMID:27194109

  7. Serum estradiol levels in male cigarette smokers.

    PubMed

    Klaiber, E L; Broverman, D M; Dalen, J E

    1984-11-01

    Serum estradiol levels were compared in smoking and nonsmoking men in two separate samples. Sample I consisted of 41 young adult male volunteers ranging in age from 18 to 24 years. Twenty-three men smoked an average of 24.5 +/- 6.9 cigarettes daily. The duration of smoking averaged 5.2 +/- 2.2 years. Sample II consisted of 35 husbands who had been evaluated for infertility; they ranged in age from 19 to 49 years. Eighteen men smoked an average of 21.6 +/- 7.9 cigarettes daily. The duration of smoking averaged 11.5 +/- 4.5 years. Age, height, and weight did not differ significantly between smokers and nonsmokers within either group. Serum estradiol levels were significantly elevated in smokers compared with nonsmokers in both groups (p less than 0.001 and p less than 0.0001 in Samples I and II, respectively). No significant correlations were found between serum estradiol levels and the number of cigarettes smoked daily, or with the duration of smoking in either sample. The differences in serum estradiol levels between smokers and nonsmokers could not be attributed to the differences in marijuana and alcohol use that existed between the smokers and nonsmokers in each sample. The recent reports of elevated serum estradiol levels as a possible risk factor in coronary heart disease are discussed in view of the known relationship of cigarette smoking to coronary heart disease. PMID:6496540

  8. EFFECTS OF 17B ESTRADIOL AND ETHINYL ESTRADIOL ON REPRODUCTIVE INDICATORS IN LABORATORY-EXPOSED CUNNER, TAUTOGOLABRUS ADPERSUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cunner (Tautogolabrus adspersus) are being studied in our laboratory to evaluate how 17 - estradiol and ethinyl estradiol affect their reproductive success. Cunner was selected because this species spawns daily, is common in estuarine areas, is easily obtainable, and is amenable ...

  9. 21 CFR 522.842 - Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.842 Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate. (a) Sponsors. See sponsors in... testosterone propionate (one implant consisting of 8 pellets, each pellet containing 2.5 mg estradiol...

  10. 21 CFR 522.842 - Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.842 Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate. (a) Sponsors. See sponsors in... testosterone propionate (one implant consisting of 8 pellets, each pellet containing 2.5 mg estradiol...

  11. 21 CFR 522.842 - Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.842 Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate. (a) Sponsors. See sponsors in... testosterone propionate (one implant consisting of 8 pellets, each pellet containing 2.5 mg estradiol...

  12. 21 CFR 522.842 - Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.842 Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate. (a) Sponsors. See sponsors in... testosterone propionate (one implant consisting of 8 pellets, each pellet containing 2.5 mg estradiol...

  13. 21 CFR 522.842 - Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.842 Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate. (a) Sponsors. See sponsors in... testosterone propionate (one implant consisting of 8 pellets, each pellet containing 2.5 mg estradiol...

  14. Inhibition of Estradiol Synthesis Impairs Fear Extinction in Male Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Bronwyn M.; Milad, Mohammed R.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging research has demonstrated that the sex hormone estradiol regulates fear extinction in female rodents and women. Estradiol may also regulate fear extinction in males, given its role in synaptic plasticity in both sexes. Here we report that inhibition of estradiol synthesis during extinction training, via the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole,…

  15. ELEVATION OF SERUM 17-B-ESTRADIOL IN CHANNEL CATFISH FOLLOWING INJECTION OF 17-B-ESTRADIOL, ETHYNYL ESTRADIOL, ESTRONE, ESTRIOL, AND ESTRADIOL-17B- GLUCURONIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    17-b-Estradiol is naturally converted in numerous organisms to various derivatives/metabolites, which may be excreted from the organism into its immediate external environment. There is a paucity of data regarding the biological effects of the derivatives/metabolites on aquatic o...

  16. Fate of glucuronide conjugated estradiol in soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The reproductive hormone, 17ß-estradiol (E2), is made more water soluble (polar) in the body by attachment of glucuronide acid to E2, facilitating urinary elimination. The fate of this potentially more mobile polar form of E2 is not well understood. Soil sorption studies were conducted using [14C] 1...

  17. Sorption and degradation of 17ß-estradiol-17sulfate in agricultural soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    17ß-estradiol (E2) can induce endocrine disruptions at low concentrations. Laboratory studies have indicated low potential for persistence and mobility of E2 in the environment, and yet field studies measure estrogens at concentrations of concern. Humans and animals eliminate E2 primarily as a conju...

  18. Analysis of magnetic field levels at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulou, Christos G.

    1994-01-01

    The scope of this work is to evaluate the magnetic field levels of distribution systems and other equipment at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Magnetic fields levels in several operational areas and various facilities are investigated. Three dimensional mappings and contour are provided along with the measured data. Furthermore, the portion of magnetic fields generated by the 60 Hz fundamental frequency and the portion generated by harmonics are examined. Finally, possible mitigation techniques for attenuating fields from electric panels are discussed.

  19. Inhibition of estradiol synthesis impairs fear extinction in male rats.

    PubMed

    Graham, Bronwyn M; Milad, Mohammed R

    2014-07-01

    Emerging research has demonstrated that the sex hormone estradiol regulates fear extinction in female rodents and women. Estradiol may also regulate fear extinction in males, given its role in synaptic plasticity in both sexes. Here we report that inhibition of estradiol synthesis during extinction training, via the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole, significantly impairs extinction recall in male rats. This deficit in extinction recall is not due to state-dependent memory formation and is completely abolished by coadministration of estradiol. Our data suggest that estradiol may be just as important in the regulation of fear extinction in males as it is in females. PMID:24939838

  20. Inhibition of estradiol synthesis impairs fear extinction in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Bronwyn M.; Milad, Mohammed R.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging research has demonstrated that the sex hormone estradiol regulates fear extinction in female rodents and women. Estradiol may also regulate fear extinction in males, given its role in synaptic plasticity in both sexes. Here we report that inhibition of estradiol synthesis during extinction training, via the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole, significantly impairs extinction recall in male rats. This deficit in extinction recall is not due to state-dependent memory formation and is completely abolished by coadministration of estradiol. Our data suggest that estradiol may be just as important in the regulation of fear extinction in males as it is in females. PMID:24939838

  1. THE INFLUENCE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON INHIBITION OF MCF-7 CELL GROWTH BY TAMOXIFEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE INFLUENCE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON INHIBITION OF MCF-7 CELL GROWTH BY TAMOXIFEN.
    Harland and Liburdy (1) reported that 1.2-uT, 60-Hz magnetic fields could significantly block the inhibitory action of pharmacological levels of tamoxifen (10-7 M) on the growth of MCF-7 human br...

  2. The Binding Constant of Estradiol to Bovine Serum Albumin: An Upper-Level Experiment Utilizing Tritium-Labeled Estradiol and Liquid Scintillation Counting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peihong Liang; Adhyaru, Bhavin; Pearson, Wright L.; Williams, Kathryn R.

    2006-01-01

    The experiment used [to the third power]H-labeled estradiol to determine the binding constant of estradiol to bovine serum albumin. Estradiol must complex with serum proteins for the transport in the blood stream because of its low solubility in aqueous systems and estradiol-protein binding constant, where K[subscript B] is important to understand…

  3. Final report on key comparison CCQM-K55.a (estradiol): An international comparison of mass fraction purity assignment of estradiol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westwood, Steven; Josephs, Ralf; Daireaux, Adeline; Wielgosz, Robert; Davies, Stephen; Wang, Hongjie; Rodrigues, Jainana; Wollinger, Wagner; Windust, Anthony; Kang, Ma; Fuhai, Su; Philipp, Rosemarie; Kuhlich, Paul; Wong, Siu-kay; Shimizu, Yoshitaka; Pérez, Melina; Avila, Marco; Fernandes-Whaley, Maria; Prevoo, D.; de Vos, J.; Visser, R.; Archer, M.; LeGoff, Thierry; Wood, Steve; Bearden, Dan; Bedner, Mary; Boroujerdi, Arezue; Duewer, David; Hancock, Diane; Lang, Brian; Porter, Barbara; Schantz, Michele; Sieber, John; White, Edward; Wise, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    purity. The relative expanded uncertainties reported by laboratories having results consistent with the KCRV ranged from 0.2% to 0.8%. The review of results that were biased from the KCRV showed that two major analytical challenges are posed by the material: the measurement of its water content and controlling for related substance artefact formation during the analysis process. The results displaying a positive bias relative to the KCRV (overestimation of estradiol content) were due to underestimation of the water content of the material, while those with a negative bias (underestimation of estradiol) overestimated the total related substance impurities through a failure to detect and control for artefact formation arising from in situ oxidative dimerization of estradiol in neutral solution prior to analysis. There was however good agreement between all participants in the identification and the quantification of the individual related structure impurities actually present in the sample. The comparison also demonstrated the utility of high-field 1H NMR for both quantitative and qualitative analysis of high purity compounds. It is noted that all the participants who used qNMR as a major or contributing technique and included it as part of, combined it or confirmed it with a conventional 'mass balance' data estimate, obtained results consistent with the KCRV. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  4. Estradiol-induced promotion of hepatocarcinogenesis in medaka: Relationship of foci of cellular alteration to neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, J.B.; Hinton, D.E.

    1995-12-31

    In some laboratory and field studies, female fish have higher prevalences of liver tumors than do males. The authors hypothesize gender and site-specific differences in prevalence are due to variable exposures of previously initiated fish to tumor modulating compounds. Estradiol, a growth promoter, increases incidences of hepatic tumors in carcinogen-treated rainbow trout and medaka (Oryzias latipes). Estradiol also increases incidences of hepatic foci of cellular alteration (FCA) in medaka. FCA are found in subadults of tumor-bearing feral populations. Lack of knowledge about the relationship of various phenotypes of FCA to eventual tumors, however, has prevented use of FCA as a biomarker. The authors examined fate and growth of liver FCA using a 2-step, initiation-promotion protocol. Three week old medaka were exposed to 200 ppm diethylnitrosamine (DEN) for 24 hr. and then fed 0.1 ppm 17-{beta}-estradiol (E2) continuously through sampling at weeks 4--26. Percent volume of FCA and morphometric characteristics of normal and focal hepatocytes, including numerical density and average hepatocyte volume were quantified using computer-assisted stereology. E2 increased percentage of liver occupied by DEN-initiated amphophilic, basophilic and eosinophilic FCA in both sexes. Focal parameters of young, DEN-initiated and estradiol-treated medaka were not reached until much later in fish given only DEN. Non-focal hepatocytes in estradiol-treated medaka were smaller and more numerous than in DEN-only counterparts. Morphometric analysis is quantitatively tracking the fate of specific phenotypes of FCA to determine their role in progression to cancer.

  5. Dissipation of 17B-estradiol in composted poultry litter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of heated composting and ambient temperature poultry waste decomposition on the fate of 17ß-estradiol and testosterone were determined in separate experiments. A mixture of poultry litter, wood chips and straw was amended with [14C]17ß-estradiol or [14C]testosterone and allowed to under...

  6. Estradiol release kinetics determine tissue response in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Otto, Christiane; Kantner, Ingrid; Nubbemeyer, Reinhard; Schkoldow, Jenny; Fuchs, Iris; Krahl, Elisabeth; Vonk, Richardus; Schüler, Christiane; Fritzemeier, Karl-Heinrich; Erben, Reinhold G

    2012-04-01

    Estrogen replacement is an effective therapy of postmenopausal symptoms such as hot flushes, bone loss, and vaginal dryness. Undesired estrogen effects are the stimulation of uterine and mammary gland epithelial cell proliferation as well as hepatic estrogenicity. In this study, we examined the influence of different estradiol release kinetics on tissue responsivity in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Pulsed release kinetics was achieved by ip or sc administration of estradiol dissolved in physiological saline containing 10% ethanol (EtOH/NaCl) whereas continuous release kinetics was achieved by sc injection of estradiol dissolved in benzylbenzoate/ricinus oil (1+4, vol/vol). Initial 3-d experiments in OVX rats showed that pulsed ip estradiol administration had profoundly reduced stimulatory effects on the uterus and the liver compared with continuous release kinetics. On the other hand, both administration forms prevented severe vaginal atrophy. Based on these results, we compared the effects of pulsed (sc in EtOH/NaCl) vs. continuous (sc in benzylbenzoate/ricinus oil) estradiol release kinetics on bone, uterus, mammary gland, and liver in a 4-month study in OVX rats. Ovariectomy-induced bone loss was prevented by both administration regimes. However, pulsed estradiol resulted in lower uterine weight, reduced induction of hepatic gene expression, and reduced mammary epithelial hyperplasia relative to continuous estradiol exposure. We conclude that organ responsivity is influenced by different hormone release kinetics, a fact that might be exploited to reduce undesired estradiol effects in postmenopausal women. PMID:22334713

  7. Sulfation of estradiol in human epidermal keratinocyte.

    PubMed

    Kushida, Akira; Hattori, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Nozomi; Kobayashi, Tetsuyuki; Date, Akira; Tamura, Hiroomi

    2011-01-01

    Epidermis is one of the well-known estrogen target tissues. Information regarding estrogen metabolism in epidermis is still very limited compared to that of estrogen action. In the breast cancer tissue, 17β-estradiol (E(2)) is inactivated by sulfation and the expression level of estrogen sulfotransferase (SULT1E1) is inversely correlated with its malignancy. However, there is little datum about inactivation of estradiol in skin. In order to detect and measure E(2) and its metabolites simultaneously, we established an assay method with radio HPLC. A majority of [(3)H] labeled E(2) was converted to E(2) sulfate in normal human epidermal keratinocyte (NHEK) cells. The estimated activity of sulfotransferase toward E(2) at 20 nM was 0.11±0.01 (pmol/min/mg protein). Significant induction of estrogen sulfotransferase activity was observed in calcium-differentiated NHEK cells (0.58±0.07 (pmol/min/mg protein)). The gene expression of SULT1E1 was fifteen-fold higher in differentiated keratinocyte than in proliferating keratinocyte, whereas that of steroid sulfatase was reduced. These results suggest that E(2) inactivation is primarily mediated by SULT1E1 in keratinocyte and E(2) action is likely suppressed in epidermal differentiation. PMID:21720030

  8. Role of pregnane xenobiotic receptor in the midbrain ventral tegmental area for estradiol- and 3α,5α-THP-facilitated lordosis of female rats

    PubMed Central

    Frye, C.A.; Koonce, C.J.; Walf, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Progesterone and its metabolite, 5α-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one (3α,5α-THP), have actions in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) that are required for lordosis, a characteristic mating posture of female rodents. 17β-estradiol (estradiol) co-varies with progestogens over natural cycles, enhances production of 3α,5α-THP, is required for successful reproductive behavior. Objectives A question of interest is the role of pregnane xenobiotic receptor (PXR), a nuclear receptor that regulates enzymes needed for the production of 3α,5α-THP, for estradiol-mediated lordosis. The hypothesis tested was that if PXR is involved in estradiol-mediated biosynthesis of 3α,5α-THP and reproductive behavior, knocking down expression of PXR in the VTA of estradiol-primed, but not vehicle-primed, rats should decrease lordosis and midbrain 3α,5α-THP; effects may be attenuated by 3α,5α-THP administered to the VTA. Methods Ovariectomized rats were administered subcutaneous injections of oil vehicle or estradiol. Rats were then administered PXR antisense oligonucleotides (PXR AS-ODNs; which are expected to locally knock down expression of PXR), or control (saline), infusions to the VTA. Rats were administered 3α,5α-THP or vehicle via infusions to the VTA. Reproductive behavior (paced mating task) of rats was determined in addition to exploratory (open field), affective (elevated plus maze), pro-social (social interaction task) behavior. Results Reproductive behavior (i.e. increased lordosis) was enhanced with estradiol-priming and infusions of 3α,5α-THP to the VTA. Infusions of PXR AS-ODNs to the VTA attenuated responses in estradiol-, but not vehicle-, primed rats, compared to control infusions. Conclusions PXR may be involved in a neuroregulatory response involving biosynthesis of 3α,5α-THP in the midbrain VTA of estradiol-primed rats. PMID:24435323

  9. Effects of exposure to estradiol and estradiol plus testosterone on the Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) female prostate.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Diego Augusto Lopes; Zanatelli, Marianna; Shinohara, Filipe Zardini; Góes, Rejane Maira; Dos Santos, Fernanda Cristina Alcântara; Vilamaior, Patricia Simone Leite; Taboga, Sebastião Roberto

    2013-05-01

    The female prostate is a differentiated organ found in several mammal species, including humans and rodents. This gland has been related to important functions on female reproductive biology. Although the factors, which regulate prostate's development and activity are not well known, its functionality has been related to steroid hormones. It is well established that cyclic changes of estradiol and progesterone levels promote histophysiological adaptations of the whole female body. In contrast, only a few is found about those adaptations in female prostate. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of estradiol and estradiol + testosterone association on gerbil female prostate in order to verify, which hormonal associations are necessary to its homeostasis. For this, adult females had the ovaries surgically removed. After recovering, they received estradiol and estradiol + testosterone doses through 30 days, each 48 h. The prostatic tissue underwent morphological and morphometric-estereological analysis. Hormonal restriction caused great gland involution and decreased secretory activity, aspects that were reverted by exposure to estradiol and estradiol + testosterone. However, these hormones were not able to re-establish the normal prostate histoarchitecture. The immunoreaction of steroid receptors (ER-α, ER-β, and AR) responded differently among the experimental and control groups, and PCNA assay showed a decrease in epithelial cell proliferation within groups that had hormone privation. Therefore, we conclude that estradiol and testosterone are able to influence prostate morphophysiology and the maintenance of gland homeostasis depends on a balance among these and other hormones. PMID:23529937

  10. DIBROMOACETIC ACID-INDUCED ELEVATIONS OF ESTRADIOL IN THE CYCLING AND OVARIECTOMOZED/ESTRADIOL-IMPLANTED FEMALE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Goldman, JM and Murr, AS. Dibromoacetic Acid-induced Elevations of Estradiol in Both Cycling and Ovariectomized / Estradiol-implanted Female Rats

    ABSTRACT
    Haloacetic acids are one of the principal classes of disinfection by-products generated by the chlorination of mun...

  11. Lung cancer in relation to employment in the electrical utility industry and exposure to magnetic fields.

    PubMed Central

    Savitz, D A; Dufort, V; Armstrong, B; Thériault, G

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A recent study found that lung cancer may be associated with exposures encountered in the electrical utility industry. To further evaluate this possibility, data were collected and analysed from five large electrical utility companies in the United States. METHODS: A cohort of 138905 male workers employed between 1950 and 1986 was followed up for mortality to the end of 1988, with 20733 deaths identified of which 1692 were due to lung cancer. Mortality from lung cancer was examined in relation to the duration of employment in specific jobs thought to have high exposure to 60 Hz magnetic fields and to an index of cumulative exposure to magnetic fields based on personal measurements. Exposure to pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) as estimated from another study was also considered. Poisson regression generated rate ratios for categories of exposure based on comparisons within the cohort adjusted for age, calendar year, race, socioeconomic status, work status, and estimated exposure to asbestos. RESULTS: Mortality rose modestly with duration of work as an electrician or power plant operator reaching rate ratios of 1.4 with > or = 20 years in those jobs but not with duration of work as a lineman or a combination of jobs thought to have high exposures to 60 Hz magnetic fields or PEMFs. Cumulative indices of exposure to 60 Hz magnetic fields and PEMFs were both associated with rate ratios of 1.2-1.3 in the highest intervals. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that lung cancer is not strongly associated with duration of employment in specific jobs associated with high potential exposure to 60 Hz magnetic fields or to PEMFs. Small associations of lung cancer with indices of both 60 Hz magnetic fields and PEMFs leave open the possibility that larger associations have been diluted through exposure misclassification. Refined exposure assessment, especially to PEMFs, would be required to evaluate that possibility. PMID:9245945

  12. Estradiol and tamoxifen interaction at receptor sites at 37 C.

    PubMed

    Fishman, J H

    1983-09-01

    Mature rat uterine cytosol was pretreated with dextran-coated charcoal at 0 C for 2 h. This renders the subsequently formed estradiol-receptor complex thermostable at 37 C and also uncovers antiestrogen binding sites, possibly by removing an endogenous ligand. A sharp distinction is found between tamoxifen and estradiol as receptor ligands in pretreated cytosols in that tamoxifen will inhibit estradiol binding, on incubation at 37 C, only if dithiothreitol (DTT) had been included in the pretreatment solution. The presence of tamoxifen as the sole ligand in cytosol pretreated in the presence of DTT does not protect the estradiol receptor from thermal inactivation and following 37 C incubation tamoxifen is found bound exclusively to antiestrogen binding sites. Incubating the cytosol at 37 C with an equimolar mixture of estradiol and tamoxifen results in a very large increase in receptor-bound estradiol. This effect is attributed to the presence of tamoxifen complexed with antiestrogen sites. Tamoxifen in such equimolar ligand mixture binds to antiestrogen sites and is excluded from receptor sites by the estradiol, whose affinity for these sites is much greater than that of tamoxifen. PMID:6191968

  13. AC photovoltaic module magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, C.; Chang, G.J.; Reyes, A.B.; Whitaker, C.M.

    1997-12-31

    Implementation of alternating current (AC) photovoltaic (PV) modules, particularly for distributed applications such as PV rooftops and facades, may be slowed by public concern about electric and magnetic fields (EMF). This paper documents magnetic field measurements on an AC PV module, complementing EMF research on direct-current PV modules conducted by PG and E in 1993. Although not comprehensive, the PV EMF data indicate that 60 Hz magnetic fields (the EMF type of greatest public concern) from PV modules are comparable to, or significantly less than, those from household appliances. Given the present EMF research knowledge, AC PV module EMF may not merit considerable concern.

  14. EFFECT OF AMBIENT LEVELS OF POWER-LINE-FREQUENCY ELECTRIC FIELDS ON A DEVELOPING VERTEBRATE (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fertilized eggs of Gallus domesticus were exposed continuously during their 21-day incubation period to either 50-Hz or 60-Hz sinusoidal electric fields at an average intensity of 10 Vrms/m. Within 1.5 days after hatching, the chickens were removed from the apparatus and tested. ...

  15. 3D model of amphioxus steroid receptor complexed with estradiol

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Michael E.; Chang, David J.

    2009-08-28

    The origins of signaling by vertebrate steroids are not fully understood. An important advance was the report that an estrogen-binding steroid receptor [SR] is present in amphioxus, a basal chordate with a similar body plan as vertebrates. To investigate the evolution of estrogen-binding to steroid receptors, we constructed a 3D model of amphioxus SR complexed with estradiol. This 3D model indicates that although the SR is activated by estradiol, some interactions between estradiol and human ER{alpha} are not conserved in the SR, which can explain the low affinity of estradiol for the SR. These differences between the SR and ER{alpha} in the steroid-binding domain are sufficient to suggest that another steroid is the physiological regulator of the SR. The 3D model predicts that mutation of Glu-346 to Gln will increase the affinity of testosterone for amphioxus SR and elucidate the evolution of steroid-binding to nuclear receptors.

  16. 21 CFR 522.1940 - Progesterone and estradiol benzoate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... in calves to be processed for veal. (2) Steers—(i) Amount—(A) 200 mg progesterone and 20 mg estradiol... calves. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. (3) Steers fed in confinement for...

  17. 21 CFR 522.1940 - Progesterone and estradiol benzoate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... in calves to be processed for veal. (2) Steers—(i) Amount—(A) 200 mg progesterone and 20 mg estradiol... calves. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. (3) Steers fed in confinement for...

  18. 21 CFR 522.1940 - Progesterone and estradiol benzoate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... in calves to be processed for veal. (2) Steers—(i) Amount—(A) 200 mg progesterone and 20 mg estradiol... calves. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. (3) Steers fed in confinement for...

  19. 21 CFR 522.1940 - Progesterone and estradiol benzoate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... in calves to be processed for veal. (2) Steers—(i) Amount—(A) 200 mg progesterone and 20 mg estradiol... calves. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. (3) Steers fed in confinement for...

  20. 21 CFR 522.1940 - Progesterone and estradiol benzoate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... in calves to be processed for veal. (2) Steers—(i) Amount—(A) 200 mg progesterone and 20 mg estradiol... calves. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. (3) Steers fed in confinement for...

  1. Association Between Preovulatory Concentrations of Estradiol and Expression of Uterine Milk Protein Precursor, Inhibin Beta A, Period 1, Proenkephalin, and Receptors for Oxytocin, Progesterone, and Estradiol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eliminating the preovulatory surge of estradiol decreased uterine weight, uterine protein, RNA to DNA ratio, rate of protein synthesis, and embryo survival following embryo transfer in sheep. Furthermore, cows that did not exhibit standing estrus (decreased preovulatory concentrations of estradiol) ...

  2. Estradiol rapidly modulates odor responses in mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Cherian, S; Wai Lam, Y; McDaniels, I; Struziak, M; Delay, R J

    2014-06-01

    In rodents, many social behaviors are driven by the sense of smell. The vomeronasal organ (VNO), part of the accessory olfactory system mediates many of these chemically driven behaviors. The VNO is heavily vascularized, and is readily accessible to circulating peptide or steroid hormones. Potentially, this allows circulating hormones to alter behavior through modulating the output of the primary sensory neurons in the VNO, the vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs). Based on this, we hypothesized that steroid hormones, in particular 17β-estradiol, would modulate activity of VSNs. In this paper, we show that the estrogen receptors, GPR30 and ERα, were present in VSNs and that estradiol may be synthesized locally in the VNO. Our results also showed that 17β-estradiol decreased responses of isolated VSNs to dilute urine, a potent natural stimulus, with respect to current amplitudes and depolarization. Further, 17β-estradiol increased the latency of the first action potential (AP) and the AP amplitude. Additionally, calcium responses to sulfated steroids (present in the low molecular weight fraction of urine) that act as ligands for apical vomeronasal receptors were decreased by 17β-estradiol. In conclusion, we show that estradiol modulates odorant responses mediated by VSNs and hence paves the way for future studies to better understand the mechanisms by which odorant mediated behavior is altered by endocrine status of the animal. PMID:24680884

  3. Estradiol signaling via sequestrable surface receptors.

    PubMed

    Benten, W P; Stephan, C; Lieberherr, M; Wunderlich, F

    2001-04-01

    Estradiol (E(2))-signaling is widely considered to be exclusively mediated through the transcription-regulating intracellular estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and ERbeta. The aim of this study was to investigate transcription-independent E(2)-signaling in mouse IC-21 macrophages. E(2) and E(2)-BSA induce a rapid rise in the intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) of Fura-2 loaded IC-21 cells as examined by spectrofluorometry. These changes in [Ca(2+)](i) can be inhibited by pertussis toxin, but not by the ER-blockers tamoxifen and raloxifene. The E(2)-signaling initiated at the plasma membrane is mediated through neither ERalpha nor ERbeta, but rather through a novel G protein-coupled membrane E(2)-receptor as revealed by RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. A special feature of this E(2)-receptor is its sequestration upon agonist stimulation. Sequestration depends on energy and temperature, and it proceeds through a clathrin- and caveolin-independent pathway. PMID:11250949

  4. Response of dairy cattle to transient voltages and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Reinemann, D.J.; Laughlin, N.K.; Stetson, L.E.

    1995-07-01

    Stray voltages in dairy facilities have been studied since the 1970`s. Previous research using steady-state ac and dc voltages has defined cow-contact voltage levels which may cause behavior and associated production problems. This research was designed to address concerns over possible effects of transient voltages and magnetic fields on dairy cows. Dairy cows response to transient voltages and magnetic fields was measured. The waveforms of the transient voltages applied were: 5 cycles of 60-Hz ac with a total pulse time of 83 ms, 1 cycle of 60-Hz ac with a total pulse time of 16 ms, and 1 cycle of an ac square wave (spiking positive and negative) of 2-ms duration. Alternating magnetic fields were produced by passing 60-Hz ac fundamental frequency with 2nd and 3rd harmonic and random noise components in metal structures around the cows. The maximum magnetic field associated with this current flow was in excess of 4 G. A wide range of sensitivity to transient voltages was observed among cows. Response levels from 24 cows to each transient exposure were normally distributed. No responses to magnetic fields were observed.

  5. Degradation of estradiol and ethinyl estradiol by activated sludge and by a defined mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Weber, Stefanie; Leuschner, Prisca; Kämpfer, Peter; Dott, Wolfgang; Hollender, Juliane

    2005-04-01

    The aerobic degradation of the natural hormone 17-beta-estradiol (E2) and the synthetic hormone 17-alpha-ethinyl estradiol (EE2) was investigated in batch experiments with activated sludge from a conventional and a membrane sewage treatment plant. E2 was converted to estrone (E1), the well known metabolite, and further completely transformed within 3 days. The turnover rates of E2 did not differ greatly between conventional and membrane activated sludge. EE2 was persistent in both sludges. By several transfers into fresh E2-medium an enrichment culture could be selected that used E2 as growth substrate. Further enrichment and isolation led to a defined mixed culture consisting of two strains, which were identified by a polyphasic approach as Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Ralstonia sp., respectively. The culture used E2 and E1 as growth substrates and transformed estriol (E3) and 16-alpha-hydroxyestrone but not the xenoestrogens bisphenol A, alpha-zearalenol, mestranol or EE2. The turnover rates of E2 were 0.025-0.1 microg h(-1) cfu(-1) and did not depend on the steroid concentration. PMID:15290133

  6. Enhanced osteoblast proliferation and collagen gene expression by estradiol

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest, M.; Schmid, Ch.; Froesch, E.R. )

    1988-04-01

    Estrogens play a crucial role in the development of postmenopausal osteoporosis. However, the mechanism by which estrogens exert their effects on bone is unknown. To examine possible direct effects of 17{beta}-estradiol on bone-forming cells, the authors used pure rat osteoblast-like cells in vitro as a model. Osteoblast-like cells prepared from calvaria of newborn rats were cultured serum-free in methylcellulose-containing medium for 21 days. Osteoblast-like cells proliferate selectively into clonally derived cell clusters of spherical morphorlogy. 17{beta}-Estradiol at concentrations of 0.1 nM and 1 nM enhanced osteoblast-like cell proliferation by 41% and 68% above vehicle-treated controls. The biologically inactive stereoisomer 17{alpha}-estradiol (same concentrations) had no effect. Moreover, the antiestrogen tamoxifen abolished the stimulation of osteoblast-like cell proliferation by 17{beta}-estradiol. After 21 days of culture, RNA was prepared and analyzed in a dot-hybridization assay for the abundance of pro{alpha}1(I) collagen mRNA. Steady-state mRNA levels were increased in cultures treated with 17{beta}-estradiol in a dose-dependent manner with maximal stimulation at 1 nM and 10 nM. At the same concentrations, the percentage of synthesized protein (labeled by ({sup 3}H)proline pulse) that was digestible by collagenase was increased, indicating that 17{beta}-estradiol acts as pretranslational levels to enhance synthesis of bone collagen. These data show that the osteoblast is a direct target for 17{beta}-estradiol.

  7. Transdermal estradiol for postpartum depression: A promising treatment option

    PubMed Central

    Moses-Kolko, Eydie L.; Berga, Sarah L.; Kalro, Brinda; Sit, Dorothy K.Y.; Wisner, Katherine L.

    2009-01-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is the most common complication of childbirth and affects one out of seven childbearing women. While conventional pharmacological and psychotherapeutic antidepressant treatments are effective for PPD, a natural alternative may be preferred by postpartum women, especially those who breastfeed their infants. The treatment of PPD with synthetic forms of naturally occurring estrogen is mechanistically appealing because PPD occurs in the context of estrogen withdrawal at parturition. Preliminary evidence suggests that PPD is a disorder of hormone-related mood dysregulation (similar to perimenopausal depression) that can be effectively treated with estrogen. This review provides the basic science and clinical background as well as safety considerations to support the application of transdermal estradiol as a treatment for PPD. We conclude that estradiol treatment for PPD requires confirmation of efficacy in a randomized clinical trial prior to routine clinical use as monotherapy. Additional data regarding maternal tolerability of cyclic progestins, long-term safety of estradiol treatment, estradiol passage into breastmilk and infants, and interdisciplinary collaboration among psychiatrists and gynecologists is also needed before estradiol is used in women who decline or fail to respond to first-line antidepressant treatments, or as an augmentation of conventional antidepressant treatment. PMID:19661765

  8. The role of estradiol in male reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Schulster, Michael; Bernie, Aaron M; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, testosterone and estrogen have been considered to be male and female sex hormones, respectively. However, estradiol, the predominant form of estrogen, also plays a critical role in male sexual function. Estradiol in men is essential for modulating libido, erectile function, and spermatogenesis. Estrogen receptors, as well as aromatase, the enzyme that converts testosterone to estrogen, are abundant in brain, penis, and testis, organs important for sexual function. In the brain, estradiol synthesis is increased in areas related to sexual arousal. In addition, in the penis, estrogen receptors are found throughout the corpus cavernosum with high concentration around neurovascular bundles. Low testosterone and elevated estrogen increase the incidence of erectile dysfunction independently of one another. In the testes, spermatogenesis is modulated at every level by estrogen, starting with the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis, followed by the Leydig, Sertoli, and germ cells, and finishing with the ductal epithelium, epididymis, and mature sperm. Regulation of testicular cells by estradiol shows both an inhibitory and a stimulatory influence, indicating an intricate symphony of dose-dependent and temporally sensitive modulation. Our goal in this review is to elucidate the overall contribution of estradiol to male sexual function by looking at the hormone's effects on erectile function, spermatogenesis, and libido. PMID:26908066

  9. The role of estradiol in male reproductive function

    PubMed Central

    Schulster, Michael; Bernie, Aaron M; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, testosterone and estrogen have been considered to be male and female sex hormones, respectively. However, estradiol, the predominant form of estrogen, also plays a critical role in male sexual function. Estradiol in men is essential for modulating libido, erectile function, and spermatogenesis. Estrogen receptors, as well as aromatase, the enzyme that converts testosterone to estrogen, are abundant in brain, penis, and testis, organs important for sexual function. In the brain, estradiol synthesis is increased in areas related to sexual arousal. In addition, in the penis, estrogen receptors are found throughout the corpus cavernosum with high concentration around neurovascular bundles. Low testosterone and elevated estrogen increase the incidence of erectile dysfunction independently of one another. In the testes, spermatogenesis is modulated at every level by estrogen, starting with the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis, followed by the Leydig, Sertoli, and germ cells, and finishing with the ductal epithelium, epididymis, and mature sperm. Regulation of testicular cells by estradiol shows both an inhibitory and a stimulatory influence, indicating an intricate symphony of dose-dependent and temporally sensitive modulation. Our goal in this review is to elucidate the overall contribution of estradiol to male sexual function by looking at the hormone's effects on erectile function, spermatogenesis, and libido. PMID:26908066

  10. Direction of estradiol metabolism as a control of its hormonal action--uterotrophic activity of estradiol metabolites.

    PubMed

    Martucci, C; Fishman, J

    1977-12-01

    The uterotrophic activities of the catechol metabolites of estradiol 2-hydroxyestrone, 2-methoxyestrone and 2-hydroxyestradiol were measured under conditions of continuous administration of sc implanted paraffin pellets. The activity of these estrogens was compared to that of estradiol-17beta and its other principal metabolites estrone, estriol and 15alpha-hydroxyestriol (estetrol). The major catechol estrogens, 2-hydroxyestrone and 2-methoxyestrone, and the pregnancy metabolite, 15alpha-hydroxyestriol, exhibited no uterotrophic activity. The minor catecholestrogen, 2-hydroxyestradiol, showed some activity whose character was different from that exhibited by implants of estradiol, estrone and estriol all of which were equipotent uterotrophic agents. Implants of 2-hydroxyestrone in the presence of estradiol or estriol pellets did not diminish the response to the latter indicating that the 2-hydroxyestrone is not antiestrogenic under these conditions. It is concluded that the direction of estradiol metabolism can have a profound influence on the expression of peripheral hormonal activity with hydroxylation at C-2 terminating and hydroxylation at C-16 extending it. PMID:590186

  11. β-Estradiol and ethinyl-estradiol contamination in the rivers of the Carpathian Basin.

    PubMed

    Avar, Péter; Zrínyi, Zita; Maász, Gábor; Takátsy, Anikó; Lovas, Sándor; G-Tóth, László; Pirger, Zsolt

    2016-06-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2) and 17α-ethinyl estradiol (EE2), which are environmental estrogens, have been determined with LC-MS in freshwater. Their sensitive analysis needs derivatization and therefore is very hard to achieve in multiresidue screening. We analyzed samples from all the large and some small rivers (River Danube, Drava, Mur, Sava, Tisza, and Zala) of the Carpathian Basin and from Lake Balaton. Freshwater was extracted on solid phase and derivatized using dansyl chloride. Separation was performed on a Kinetex XB-C18 column. Detection was achieved with a benchtop orbitrap mass spectrometer using targeted MS analysis for quantification. Limits of quantification were 0.05 ng/L (MS1) and 0.1 ng/L (MS/MS) for E2, and 0.001 ng/L (MS1) and 0.2 ng/L (MS/MS) for EE2. River samples contained n.d.-5.2 ng/L E2 and n.d.-0.68 ng/L EE2. Average levels of E2 and EE2 were 0.61 and 0.084 ng/L, respectively, in rivers, water courses, and Lake Balaton together, but not counting city canal water. EE2 was less abundant, but it was still present in almost all of the samples. In beach water samples from Lake Balaton, we measured 0.076-0.233 E2 and n.d.-0.133 EE2. A relative high amount of EE2 was found in river Zala (0.68 ng/L) and in Hévíz-Páhoki canal (0.52 ng/L), which are both in the catchment area of Lake Balaton (Hungary). PMID:26936475

  12. Membrane-initiated estradiol actions mediate structural plasticity and reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Micevych, Paul; Christensen, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Over the years, our ideas about estrogen signaling have greatly expanded. In addition to estradiol having direct nuclear actions that mediate transcription and translation, more recent experiments have demonstrated membrane-initiated signaling. Both direct nuclear and estradiol membrane signaling can be mediated by the classical estrogen receptors, ERα and ERβ, which are two of the numerous putative membrane estrogen receptors. Thus far, however, only ERα has been shown to play a prominent role in regulating female reproduction and sexual behavior. Because ERα is a ligand-gated transcription factor and not a typical membrane receptor, trafficking to the cell membrane requires post-translational modifications. Two necessary modifications are palmitoylation and association with caveolins, a family of scaffolding proteins. In addition to their role in trafficking, caveolin proteins also serve to determine ERα interactions with metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). It is through these complexes that ERα, which cannot by itself activate G proteins, is able to initiate intracellular signaling. Various combinations of ERα-mGluR interactions have been demonstrated throughout the nervous system from hippocampus to striatum to hypothalamus to dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in both neurons and astrocytes. These combinations of ER and mGluR allow estradiol to have both facilitative and inhibitory actions in neurons. In hypothalamic astrocytes, the estradiol-mediated release of intracellular calcium stores regulating neurosteroid synthesis requires ERα-mGluR1a interaction. In terms of estradiol regulation of female sexual receptivity, activation of ERα-mGluR1a signaling complex leads to the release of neurotransmitters and alteration of neuronal morphology. This review will examine estradiol membrane signaling (EMS) activating a limbic-hypothalamic lordosis regulating circuit, which involves ERα trafficking, internalization, and modifications of neuronal morphology

  13. Estradiol Membrane-Initiated Signaling and Female Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Micevych, Paul E; Wong, Angela May; Mittelman-Smith, Melinda Anne

    2016-01-01

    The discoveries of rapid, membrane-initiated steroid actions and central nervous system steroidogenesis have changed our understanding of the neuroendocrinology of reproduction. Classical nuclear actions of estradiol and progesterone steroids affecting transcription are essential. However, with the discoveries of membrane-associated steroid receptors, it is becoming clear that estradiol and progesterone have neurotransmitter-like actions activating intracellular events. Ultimately, membrane-initiated actions can influence transcription. Estradiol membrane-initiated signaling (EMS) modulates female sexual receptivity and estrogen feedback regulating the luteinizing hormone (LH) surge. In the arcuate nucleus, EMS activates a lordosis-regulating circuit that extends to the medial preoptic nucleus and subsequently to the ventromedial nucleus (VMH)—the output from the limbic and hypothalamic regions. Here, we discuss how EMS leads to an active inhibition of lordosis behavior. To stimulate ovulation, EMS facilitates astrocyte synthesis of progesterone (neuroP) in the hypothalamus. Regulation of GnRH release driving the LH surge is dependent on estradiol-sensitive kisspeptin (Kiss1) expression in the rostral periventricular nucleus of the third ventricle (RP3V). NeuroP activation of the LH surge depends on Kiss1, but the specifics of signaling have not been well elucidated. RP3V Kiss1 neurons appear to integrate estradiol and progesterone information which feeds back onto GnRH neurons to stimulate the LH surge. In a second population of Kiss1 neurons, estradiol suppresses the surge but maintains tonic LH release, another critical component of the estrous cycle. Together, evidence suggests that regulation of reproduction involves membrane action of steroids, some of which are synthesized in the brain. PMID:26140715

  14. Comparative Biological Effects and Potency of 17a- and 17ß-Estradiol In Fathead Minnows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    17ß-estradiol is the most potent natural estrogen commonly found in anthropogenically altered environments and has been the focus of many toxicological laboratory studies. However, fewer aquatic toxicological data on the effects of 17a-estradiol, a diastereoisomer of 17ß-estradiol, exists in the li...

  15. 21 CFR 556.240 - Estradiol and related esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Estradiol and related esters. 556.240 Section 556.240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS TOLERANCES FOR RESIDUES OF NEW ANIMAL DRUGS IN FOOD...

  16. 21 CFR 556.240 - Estradiol and related esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Estradiol and related esters. 556.240 Section 556.240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS TOLERANCES FOR RESIDUES OF NEW ANIMAL DRUGS IN FOOD...

  17. 21 CFR 556.240 - Estradiol and related esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Estradiol and related esters. 556.240 Section 556.240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS TOLERANCES FOR RESIDUES OF NEW ANIMAL DRUGS IN FOOD...

  18. Fate of 17B-estradiol in anaerobic lagoon digesters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fate of [14C]17B-estradiol ([14C]E2) was monitored for 42 d in triplicate 10 L anaerobic digesters. Total radioactive residues (TRR) decreased rapidly in the liquid layer of the digesters and reached a steady-state value of 19-24% of the initial dose after 4 days. LC/MS/MS analyses of the liqu...

  19. Fate of estradiol and testosterone in anaerobic lagoon digestors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laboratory-scale lagoon digestors were constructed, and the fate of 14C-labelled 17ß-estradiol (E2) and testosterone (Test) were monitored for 42 d anaerobically under biological and sterile conditions. Hormone levels decreased in the liquid layer and increased in the sludge with time. At 42 d, 16-2...

  20. Fate of glucuronide conjugated estradiol in the environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fate and transport of conjugated reproductive hormones, which are polar compared to parent hormones, are little understood. Laboratory bench-scale soil (Hamar; Sandy, mixed, frigid typic Endoaquolls) sorption studies were conducted using [14C] 17ß-estradiol-3-glucuronide for a range of concentra...

  1. 21 CFR 522.2478 - Trenbolone acetate and estradiol benzoate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.2478 Trenbolone acetate and estradiol benzoate. (a) Specifications. Each implant dose...) For an implant as described in paragraph (a)(1) of this section: (A) Amount. 200 mg trenbolone acetate... feed efficiency. (C) Limitations. Implant subcutaneously in ear only. Safety and effectiveness have...

  2. 21 CFR 522.2478 - Trenbolone acetate and estradiol benzoate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.2478 Trenbolone acetate and estradiol benzoate. (a) Specifications. Each implant dose...) For an implant as described in paragraph (a)(1) of this section: (A) Amount. 200 mg trenbolone acetate... feed efficiency. (C) Limitations. Implant subcutaneously in ear only. Safety and effectiveness have...

  3. 21 CFR 522.2478 - Trenbolone acetate and estradiol benzoate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.2478 Trenbolone acetate and estradiol benzoate. (a) Specifications. Each implant dose...) For an implant as described in paragraph (a)(1) of this section: (A) Amount. 200 mg trenbolone acetate... feed efficiency. (C) Limitations. Implant subcutaneously in ear only. Safety and effectiveness have...

  4. 21 CFR 522.2478 - Trenbolone acetate and estradiol benzoate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.2478 Trenbolone acetate and estradiol benzoate. (a) Specifications. Each implant dose...) For an implant as described in paragraph (a)(1) of this section: (A) Amount. 200 mg trenbolone acetate... feed efficiency. (C) Limitations. Implant subcutaneously in ear only. Safety and effectiveness have...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1260 - Estradiol test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Estradiol test system. 862.1260 Section 862.1260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1260 - Estradiol test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Estradiol test system. 862.1260 Section 862.1260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1260 - Estradiol test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Estradiol test system. 862.1260 Section 862.1260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1260 - Estradiol test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Estradiol test system. 862.1260 Section 862.1260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1260 - Estradiol test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Estradiol test system. 862.1260 Section 862.1260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  10. Neurotensin enhances estradiol induced DNA synthesis in immature rat uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Mistry, A.; Vijayan, E.

    1985-05-27

    Systemic administration of Neurotensin, a tridecapeptide, in immature rats treated with estradiol benzoate significantly enhances uterine DNA synthesis as reflected by the incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine. The peptide may have a direct action on the uterus. Substance P, a related peptide, had no effect on uterine DNA synthesis. 18 references, 4 tables.

  11. Estradiol valerate and alcohol intake: dose-response assessments

    PubMed Central

    Quirarte, Gina L; Reid, Larry D; de la Teja, I Sofía Ledesma; Reid, Meta L; Sánchez, Marco A; Díaz-Trujillo, Arnulfo; Aguilar-Vazquez, Azucena; Prado-Alcalá, Roberto A

    2007-01-01

    Background An injection of estradiol valerate (EV) provides estradiol for a prolonged period. Recent research indicates that a single 2.0 mg injection of EV modifies a female rat's appetite for alcoholic beverages. This research extends the initial research by assessing 8 doses of EV (from .001 to 2.0 mg/female rat), as well assessing the effects of 2.0 mg EV in females with ovariectomies. Results With the administration of EV, there was a dose-related loss of bodyweight reaching the maximum loss, when it occurred, at about 4 days after injections. Subsequently, rats returned to gaining weight regularly. Of the doses tested, only the 2.0 mg dose produced a consistent increase in intake of ethanol during the time previous research indicated that the rats would show enhanced intakes. There was, however, a dose-related trend for smaller doses to enhance intakes. Rats with ovariectomies showed a similar pattern of effects, to intact rats, with the 2 mg dose. After extensive histories of intake of alcohol, both placebo and EV-treated females had estradiol levels below the average measured in females without a history of alcohol-intake. Conclusion The data support the conclusion that pharmacological doses of estradiol can produce enduring changes that are manifest as an enhanced appetite for alcoholic beverages. The effect can occur among females without ovaries. PMID:17335585

  12. Pregnancy-Induced Gingivitis and OMICS in Dentistry: In Silico Modeling and in Vivo Prospective Validation of Estradiol-Modulated Inflammatory Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Zeidán-Chuliá, Fares; Könönen, Eija; Moreira, José C. F.; Liukkonen, Joonas; Sorsa, Timo; Gürsoy, Ulvi K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Pregnancy-associated gingivitis is a bacterial-induced inflammatory disease with a remarkably high prevalence ranging from 35% to 100% across studies. Yet little is known about the attendant mechanisms or diagnostic biomarkers that can help predict individual susceptibility for rational personalized medicine. We aimed to define inflammatory proteins in saliva, induced or inhibited by estradiol, as early diagnostic biomarkers or target proteins in relation to pregnancy-associated gingivitis. An in silico gene/protein interaction network model was developed by using the STITCH 3.1 with “experiments” and “databases” as input options and a confidence score of 0.700 (high confidence). Salivary estradiol, interleukin (IL)-1β and -8, myeloperoxidase (MPO), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, -8, and -9, and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 levels from 30 women were measured prospectively three times during pregnancy and twice during postpartum. In silico analysis revealed that estradiol interacts with IL-1β and -8 by an activation link when the “actions view” was consulted. In saliva, estradiol concentrations associated positively with TIMP-1 and negatively with MPO and MMP-8 concentrations. When the gingival bleeding on probing percentage (BOP%) was included in the model as an effect modifier, the only association, a negative one, was found between estradiol and MMP-8. Throughout gestation, estradiol modulates the inflammatory response by inhibiting neutrophilic enzymes, such as MMP-8. The interactions between salivary degradative enzymes and proinflammatory cytokines during pregnancy suggest promising ways to identify candidate biomarkers for pregnancy-associated gingivitis, and for personalized medicine in the field of dentistry. Finally, we call for greater investments in, and action for biomarker research in periodontology and dentistry that have surprisingly lagged behind in personalized medicine compared to other fields

  13. ESTRADIOL AND THE ESTRADIOL METABOLITE, 2-HYDROXYESTRADIOL, ACTIVATE AMP-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE IN C2C12 MYOTUBES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Systemic loss of estradiol (E2) during menopause is associated with increased adiposity which can be prevented with E2 replacement. Rodent studies suggest that E2, or lack of, is a key mediator in menopause-related metabolic changes. We have previously demonstrated that E2 treatment produces a rap...

  14. The Orientation and Dynamics of Estradiol and Estradiol Oleate in Lipid Membranes and HDL Disc Models

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Alexander; Scheidt, Holger A.; Feller, Scott E.; Metso, Jari; Badeau, Robert M.; Tikkanen, Matti J.; Wähälä, Kristiina; Jauhiainen, Matti; Huster, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Estradiol (E2) and E2 oleate associate with high-density lipoproteins (HDLs). Their orientation in HDLs is unknown. We studied the orientation of E2 and E2 oleate in membranes and reconstituted HDLs, finding that E2 and E2 oleate are membrane-associated and highly mobile. Our combination of NMR measurements, molecular dynamics simulation, and analytic theory identifies three major conformations where the long axis of E2 assumes a parallel, perpendicular, or antiparallel orientation relative to the membrane’s z-direction. The perpendicular orientation is preferred, and furthermore, in this orientation, E2 strongly favors a particular roll angle, facing the membrane with carbons 6, 7, 15, and 16, whereas carbons 1, 2, 11, and 12 point toward the aqueous phase. In contrast, the long axis of E2 oleate is almost exclusively oriented at an angle of ∼60° to the z-direction. In such an orientation, the oleoyl chain is firmly inserted into the membrane. Thus, both E2 and E2 oleate have a preference for interface localization in the membrane. These orientations were also found in HDL discs, suggesting that only lipid-E2 interactions determine the localization of the molecule. The structural mapping of E2 and E2 oleate may provide a design platform for specific E2-HDL-targeted pharmacological therapies. PMID:24988346

  15. Analysis of the 60-Hz power system at KSC: The Orsino substation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalu, Alex O.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis of the Orsino Substation, a component (50 percent) of the 60-Hertz electric power system at the Kennedy Space Center, is presented. Presented here are separate single-line diagrams of the sixteen feeder circuits to permit easy access to information on the individual feeders for future planning. The load condition of each feeder and load break switch are presented and a heuristic reliability analysis of the system is performed. Information is given about the system fashion useful for decision making purposes. The beauty of it is in the simplified manner by which information about the system can be obtained.

  16. Coils performances of superconducting cables for 50/60 Hz applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lacaze, A.; Laumond, Y. ); Tavergnier, J.P.; Fevrier, A.; Verhaege, T. ); Dalle, B.; Ansart, A. )

    1991-03-01

    Multifilamentary superconducting wires with a greatly reduced level of losses have been produced with unit lengths of several tens of kilometers by AISA (GEC ALSTHOM - IGC). With the reduction of the filament diameter, proximity effects are avoided and the authors take a maximum advantage of the reversible motion of flux lines, so that the hysteretic and matrix losses are lower. In this paper the authors report on 50 Hz and DC quench currents, 50 Hz AC losses, 50 Hz electromagnetic stability results.

  17. Detection of refrigerator-associated 60 Hz alternating current as ventricular fibrillation by an implantable defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Al Khadra, Ayman S; Al Jutaily, Abdulaziz; Al Shuhri, Salem

    2006-03-01

    This report describes a patient with an implantable defibrillator who suffered an inappropriate defibrillation shock upon retrieving some food items from his inadequately earthed refrigerator. Noise typical of electrical interference can be observed in the stored electrogram of the episode. The patient was instructed to earth his home appliances, but he decided to avoid his refrigerator altogether, and has had no subsequent shocks. PMID:16627434

  18. Relationship between ovarian reserve and preovulatory estradiol during a fixed-time AI protocol in beef heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estradiol production is essential for reproductive efficiency. This study compared numbers of follicles in beef cows that did or did not have elevated preovulatory estradiol during a fixed-time AI (FTAI) protocol. In experiment 1, 5 low estradiol (LowE2) and 5 high estradiol (HighE2) cows were slaug...

  19. Endocrine disrupter--estradiol--in Chesapeake Bay tributaries.

    PubMed

    Dorabawila, Nelum; Gupta, Gian

    2005-04-11

    Exogenous chemicals that interfere with natural hormonal functions are considered endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Estradiol (17beta-estradiol or E2) is the most potent of all xenoestrogens. Induction of vitellogenin (VTG) production in male fish occurs at E2 concentrations as low as 1 ng l-1. E2 reaches aquatic systems mainly through sewage and animal waste disposal. Surface water samples from ponds, rivers (Wicomico, Manokin and Pocomoke), sewage treatment plants (STPs), and coastal bays (Assawoman, Monie, Chincoteague, and Tangier Sound-Chesapeake Bay) on the Eastern Shore of Maryland were analyzed for E2 using enzyme linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA). E2 concentrations in river waters varied between 1.9 and 6.0 ng l-1. Highest E2 concentrations in river waters were observed immediately downstream of STPs. E2 concentrations in all the coastal bays tested were 2.3-3.2 ng l-1. PMID:15811666

  20. Estradiol Upregulates c-FLIPlong Expression in Anterior Pituitary Cells.

    PubMed

    Jaita, G; Zárate, S; Ferraris, J; Gottardo, M F; Eijo, G; Magri, M L; Pisera, D; Seilicovich, A

    2016-04-01

    Anterior pituitary cell turnover depends on a tight balance between proliferation and apoptosis. We have previously shown that estrogens sensitize anterior pituitary cells to pro-apoptotic stimuli. c-FLIP (cellular-FLICE-inhibitory-protein) isoforms are regulatory proteins of apoptosis triggered by death receptors. c-FLIPshort isoform competes with procaspase-8 inhibiting its activation. However, c-FLIPlong isoform may have a pro- or anti-apoptotic function depending on its expression level. In the present study, we explored whether estrogens modulate c-FLIP expression in anterior pituitary cells from ovariectomized (OVX) rats and in GH3 cells, a somatolactotrope cell line. Acute administration of 17β-estradiol to OVX rats increased c-FLIPlong expression in the anterior pituitary gland without changing c-FLIPshort expression as assessed by Western blot. Estradiol in vitro also increased c-FLIPlong expression in anterior pituitary cells but not in GH3 cells. As determined by flow cytometry, the percentage of anterior pituitary cells expressing c-FLIP was higher than in GH3 cells. However, c-FLIP fluorescence intensity in GH3 cells was higher than in anterior pituitary cells. FasL increased the percentage of TUNEL-positive GH3 cells incubated either with or without estradiol suggesting that the pro-apoptotic action of Fas activation is estrogen-independent. Our results show that unlike what happens in nontumoral pituitary cells, estrogens do not modulate either c-FLIPlong expression or FasL-induced apoptosis in GH3 cells. The stimulatory effect of estradiol on c-FLIPlong expression could be involved in the sensitizing effect of this steroid to apoptosis in anterior pituitary cells. The absence of this estrogenic action in tumor pituitary cells could be involved in their tumor-like behavior. PMID:26566102

  1. Determination of estriol, estradiol, estrone, and progesterone in cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Hubinger, Jean C

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the development and validation of a reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with UV detection for the determination of the hormones estriol, estradiol, estrone, and progesterone in topically applied products. The developed method was then used to conduct a postmarket survey of consumer products for these hormones. Each product was first mixed with Celite and then extracted with methanol. Extracts were cleaned on a Waters Oasis HLB solid phase extraction cartridge, and then analyzed using reversed phase HPLC. The analytes were separated using an Agilent Zorbax Eclipse XDB C8 (5 μm, 250 mm by 4.6 mm) analytical column and detected by their absorbance at 230 nm. Chromatographic separation was achieved by a 1.0-ml/min linear gradient from 30% acetonitrile and 70% water to 80% acetonitrile and 20% water over 30 min. A final 5 min hold time and a re-equilibration time of 10 min were used to prepare the column for subsequent analysis. Recovery from two different brand lotions spiked with three different levels of estriol, estradiol, estrone, and progesterone ranged from 81.8% to 101%. In this study, a total of 70 cosmetic products were surveyed. Twenty two (63%) of the 35 products were labeled as containing an estrogen and/ or progesterone and also provided quantitative label information about the hormone ingredient. The most frequently labeled hormones were progesterone (66%), estriol (46%), estradiol (11%), and estrone (6%). Six products labeled as containing estriol were found to contain estradiol. An estrogen and/or progesterone were found in 34 products at concentrations ranging from 86.0 to 26,800 μg/g. Progesterone was not found in one product labeled as containing this hormone. An additional 35 products, which did not list hormones on their labels, were analyzed and estrogen or progesterone was not detected in these products. PMID:26454975

  2. Transdermal estradiol treatment during breastfeeding: maternal and infant serum concentrations.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Emily; Bogen, Debra L; Hoxha, Denada; Wisner, Katherine L

    2016-04-01

    We examined estradiol (E2) and estrone (E1) concentrations in breastfeeding mother-infant dyads. The mothers had postpartum depression and were participants in a randomized clinical trial with three treatments (transdermal E2, sertraline, and placebo). Neither infant E1 and E2 concentrations nor infant growth differed across the treatments. Transdermal E2 administration of 50 to 200 mcg/day for breastfeeding women did not affect infant E1 or E2 concentrations or infant growth. PMID:25956588

  3. Estradiol induces functional inactivation of p53 by intracellular redistribution.

    PubMed

    Molinari, A M; Bontempo, P; Schiavone, E M; Tortora, V; Verdicchio, M A; Napolitano, M; Nola, E; Moncharmont, B; Medici, N; Nigro, V; Armetta, I; Abbondanza, C; Puca, G A

    2000-05-15

    Estrogen treatment of MCF-7 cells grown in serum-free medium induced a modification of the intracellular distribution of p53 protein. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining showed that p53 was localized in the nucleus of untreated cell and that after 48 h of hormone treatment, it was mostly localized in the cytoplasm. This effect was blocked by the antiestrogen ICI182,780. Intracellular redistribution of p53 was correlated to a reduced expression of the WAF1/CIP1 gene product and to the presence of degradation fragments of p53 in the cytosol. Estradiol treatment prevented the growth inhibition induced by oligonucleotide transfection, simulating DNA damage. This observation indicated that the wild-type p53 gene product present in the MCF-7 cell could be inactivated by estradiol through nuclear exclusion to permit the cyclin-dependent phosphorylation events leading to the G1-S transition. In addition, the estradiol-induced inactivation of p53 could be involved in the tumorigenesis of estrogen-dependent neoplasm. PMID:10825127

  4. Estradiol and its membrane-impermeable conjugate estradiol-BSA inhibit tamoxifen-stimulated prolactin secretion in incubated rat pituitaries.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, R; Bellido, C; Garrido-Gracia, J C; Alonso, R; Sánchez-Criado, J E

    2006-04-01

    In the absence of estrogen (E), the selective E receptor modulator tamoxifen (TX) has two agonist effects in the rat pituitary: induction of progesterone receptor (PR)-dependent GnRH self-priming in the gonadotrope, and stimulation of prolactin (PRL) secretion in the lactotrope. TX-induced gonadotropin (GnRH) self-priming is absent when 10(-8) M estradiol-17beta (E2) is added to the incubation medium of pituitaries from TX-treated rats. The present experiments investigated whether PR-independent PRL release into the incubation medium of pituitaries from TX-treated ovariectomized (OVX) rats was affected by E2, and the effect of different ER ligands (ICI182780, TX, estradiol-17alpha, E2 -BSA) on TX-stimulated PRL secretion. Moreover, the effect of E2 on TRH-stimulated PRL secretion in pituitaries collected from estradiol benzoate- and TX-treated OVX rats was studied. It was found that: i) incubation with E2 supressed the PRL releasing effect of injected TX; ii) whereas coincubation with the pure anti-E type II ICI182780 antagonized the inhibitory effect of E2, coincubation with the anti-E type I TX did not; iii) estradiol-17alpha lacked inhibitory action, whereas a dose-dependent inhibitory effect of both E2 and E2 -BSA was noticed; and iv) TRH stimulatory effect on PRL release in pituitaries from TX-treated rats was blocked by addition of E2 to the medium. Taken together, these data argue in favor of the presence of specific membrane recognition sites for E in the lactotrope involved in steroid-specific E2 inhibition of TX-stimulated PRL secretion. PMID:16595727

  5. Role of astroglia in the neuroplastic and neuroprotective actions of estradiol.

    PubMed

    Azcoitia, Iñigo; Santos-Galindo, María; Arevalo, María A; Garcia-Segura, Luis M

    2010-12-01

    Astrocyte-neuron cross-talk is an essential component of the mechanisms involved in the neuroendocrine and neuroprotective actions of estradiol. Astrocytes express estrogen receptors, show morphological and functional modifications in response to estradiol and participate in the hormonal regulation of synaptic plasticity and neuroendocrine events. In addition, estradiol interferes with the activation of astrocytes under pathological conditions, modulating the release of neurotrophic factors and inflammatory molecules by these cells. Furthermore, under neurodegenerative conditions, astrocytes synthesize estradiol, which acts as a local neuroprotectant. The actions of estradiol on astrocytes can be imitated by selective estrogen receptor modulators. Some of these molecules, which are free of the peripheral risks associated with estrogen therapy, exert estradiol-like anti-inflammatory actions on astrocytes and are potential therapeutic candidates for the control of reactive astrogliosis. PMID:21143654

  6. Rapid Direct Action of Estradiol in GnRH Neurons: Findings and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Kenealy, Brian P.; Terasawa, E.

    2011-01-01

    Estradiol plays a pivotal role in the control of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuronal function and female reproduction. While positive and negative feedback actions of estradiol that enhance and suppress release of GnRH and LH are primarily mediated through estrogen receptor alpha located in interneurons, a series of recent studies in our laboratory indicate that rapid excitatory actions of estradiol also directly modify GnRH neuronal activity. We observed this phenomenon in cultured primate GnRH neurons, but similar rapid direct actions of estradiol are also described in cultured GnRH neurons and green fluorescent protein-labeled GnRH neurons of mice. Importantly, rapid direct action of estradiol in GnRH neurons is mediated through membrane or membrane associated receptors, such as GPR30, STX-sensitive receptors, and ERβ. In this review, possible implications of this rapid estradiol action in GnRH neurons are discussed. PMID:22654841

  7. Dose-dependent regulation of cell proliferation and collagen degradation by estradiol on ligamentum flavum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Estradiol plays an important role in the regulation of collagen metabolism. Deficiency of estradiol has been reported to be associated with the degeneration of many connective tissues. However, the association of estradiol and hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum was seldom explored. Therefore, we studied the effects of estradiol on cultured cells from the ligamentum flavum. Methods Primary cultures of human ligamentum flavum cells obtained from surgical specimens of 14 patients undergoing spinal surgery were used to investigate the effect of estradiol on cell proliferation and the expression of collagen, elastin, and matrix metalloproteinases. Downstream pathways of estrogen receptor underlying the regulation of metalloproteinases were also investigated. Results In our study, we revealed the existence of estrogen receptors on both female and male ligamentum flavum cells with a gender difference. 17β-estradiol increased early (24 hours) proliferation of ligamentum flavum cells in a dose dependent manner and the effect could not be seen when the cell density increased. Estradiol with a concentration of 10-9 M decreased collagen levels and increased the expression of MMP-13. Adding an antagonist of PI3K downstream pathway could reverse the expression of MMP-13 caused by estradiol. Conclusions The results implied estradiol regulated the expression of MMP-13 via PI3K pathway and contributed to the homeostasis of extracellular matrix in the ligamentum flavum. PMID:25022571

  8. TEMPORAL AND CONCENTRATION DEPENDENT ESTRADIOL EFFECTS ON NEURAL PATHWAYS MEDIATING SEXUAL RECEPTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Micevych, Paul; Sinchak, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The acceptance of estradiol signaling through receptors found in the cell membrane, as well as, the nucleus has provided for a re-examination of timing and location of estradiol actions on neural circuits mediating sexual receptivity (lordosis). Estradiol membrane signaling involves the transactivation of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) that transduce steroid information through PKC signaling cascades producing rapid activation of lordosis regulating circuits. It has been known for some time that estradiol initially produces an inhibition of the medial preoptic nucleus (MPN). We have demonstrated that underlying this inhibition is estradiol acting in the arcuate nucleus to induce β-endorphin release which inhibits the MPN through a μ-opioid receptor mechanism. This transient inhibition is relieved by either subsequent progesterone treatment or longer exposure to higher doses of estradiol to facilitate lordosis behavior. We review recent findings about estradiol membrane signaling inducing dendritic spine formation in the arcuate nucleus that is critical for estradiol induction of sexual receptivity. Moreover, we discuss the evidence that in addition to ERα, several other putative membrane estrogen receptors facilitate lordosis behavior through regulation of the arcuate nucleus. These include the GRP30 and the STX activated Gq-mER. Finally, we report on the importance of GABA acting at GABAB receptors for estradiol membrane signaling that regulates lordosis circuit activation and sexual receptivity. PMID:24028299

  9. The formation at 37 C of a nondissociable receptor-estradiol complex.

    PubMed

    Fishman, J H; Fishman, J

    1985-08-30

    The receptor-estradiol complex formed in rat uterine cytosol when heated at 37 C converts from a dissociable to a nondissociable form. The conversion is best observed in cytosols pretreated with charcoal at 0 C which renders the subsequently formed receptor-estradiol complexes thermostable at 37 C. In the presence of dithiothreitol the heated complex remains dissociable. Tamoxifen does not form nondissociable complexes with the estradiol receptor. It is proposed that the nondissociable form of the receptor complex is a required phase in the mechanism of estradiol action. PMID:2412556

  10. A Comparison of the Effects of Transdermal Estradiol and Estradiol Valerate on Endometrial Receptivity in Frozen-thawed Embryo Transfer Cycles: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Davar, Robab; Janati, Sima; Mohseni, Fereshteh; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi; Asgari, Soheila

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal endometrial preparation protocol by comparing the clinical outcome of two methods of endometrial preparation in frozen-thawed embryo transfer (FET) cycles, including that is, oral estradiol and 17ß-estradiol transdermal patch. Methods: In this randomized controlled trial, women underwent either conventional IVF or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) who had at least two top-quality embryos appropriate for cryopreservation and frozen embryos from previous cycles. In the study group (n=45), 17-B estradiol transdermal patches 100 μg were applied from the second day of the cycle and continued every other day. Then, each patch was removed after four days. In the control group (n=45), oral estradiol valerate 6 mg was started at the same time and continued daily. Results: There was a significant difference in estradiol level on the day of progesterone administration and the day of embryo transfer between the two groups (p= 0.001 in both), but no significant difference was observed between them in biochemical and clinical pregnancy rates (32.6% vs. 33.3%, p=1.000 and 30.2% vs. 33.3%, p=0.810, respectively). Conclusion: It is suggested that estradiol transdermal patches be used instead of oral estradiol in FET cycles. Due to the reduced costs, drug dose, and emotional stress as well as the simplicity of the protocol for patients. PMID:27141464

  11. Energy metabolism and hindbrain AMPK: regulation by estradiol.

    PubMed

    Briski, Karen P; Ibrahim, Baher A; Tamrakar, Pratistha

    2014-03-01

    Nerve cell energy status is screened within multiple classically defined hypothalamic and hindbrain components of the energy balance control network, including the hindbrain dorsal vagal complex (DVC). Signals of caudal DVC origin have a physiological role in glucostasis, e.g., maintenance of optimal supply of the critical substrate fuel, glucose, through control of motor functions such as fuel consumption and gluco-counterregulatory hormone secretion. A2 noradrenergic neurons are a likely source of these signals as combinatory laser microdissection/high-sensitivity Western blotting reveals expression of multiple biomarkers for metabolic sensing, including adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Hypoglycemia elicits estradiol-dependent sex differences in A2 AMPK activation as phospho-AMPK (pAMPK) expression is augmented in male and ovariectomized (OVX) female, but not estrogen-replaced, OVX rats. This dichotomy may reflect, in part, estradiol-mediated up-regulation of glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme expression during hypoglycemia. Our new model for short-term feeding abstinence has physiological relevance to planned (dieting) or unplanned (meal delay) interruption of consumption in modern life, which is negatively correlated with appetite control and obesity, and is useful for investigating how estrogen may mitigate the effects of disrupted fuel acquisition on energy balance via actions within the DVC. Estradiol reduces DVC AMPK activity after local delivery of the AMP mimic, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-riboside, or cessation of feeding for 12 h but elevates pAMPK expression when these treatments are combined. These data suggest that estrogen maintains cellular energy stability over periods of suspended fuel acquisition and yet optimizes, by DVC AMPK-dependent mechanisms, counter-regulatory responses to metabolic challenges that occur during short-span feeding abstinence. PMID:25372736

  12. Nomegestrol acetate-17b-estradiol for oral contraception

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Oral contraceptives remain a popular method of contraception over 50 years after their introduction. While safe and effective for many women, the failure rate of oral contraception is about 8%. Concerns about the risk of venous thromboembolism continue to drive the search for the safest oral contraceptive formulations. The oral contraceptive NOMAC-E2 contains nomegestrol acetate (NOMAC) 2.5 mg + 17b-estradiol (E2) 1.5 mg. The approved dosing regimen is 24 days of active hormone, followed by a 4-day hormone-free interval. NOMAC is a progestin derived from testosterone, which has high bioavailability, rapid absorption, and a long half-life. Estradiol, though it has a lower bioavailability, has been successfully combined with NOMAC in a monophasic oral contraceptive. Two recently published randomized controlled trials demonstrate that NOMAC-E2 is an effective contraceptive, with a Pearl Index less than one pregnancy per 100 woman-years. The bleeding pattern on NOMAC-E2 is characterized by fewer bleeding/spotting days, shorter withdrawal bleeds, and a higher incidence of amenorrhea than the comparator oral contraceptive containing drospirenone and ethinyl estradiol. The adverse event profile appears to be acceptable. Few severe adverse events were reported in the randomized controlled trials. The most common adverse events were irregular bleeding, acne, and weight gain. Preliminary studies suggest that NOMAC-E2 does not seem to have negative effects on hemostatic and metabolic parameters. While no one oral contraceptive formulation is likely to be the optimum choice for all women, NOMAC-E2 is a formulation with effectiveness comparable with that of other oral contraceptives, and a reassuring safety profile. PMID:23836965

  13. Nomegestrol acetate-17b-estradiol for oral contraception.

    PubMed

    Burke, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Oral contraceptives remain a popular method of contraception over 50 years after their introduction. While safe and effective for many women, the failure rate of oral contraception is about 8%. Concerns about the risk of venous thromboembolism continue to drive the search for the safest oral contraceptive formulations. The oral contraceptive NOMAC-E2 contains nomegestrol acetate (NOMAC) 2.5 mg + 17b-estradiol (E2) 1.5 mg. The approved dosing regimen is 24 days of active hormone, followed by a 4-day hormone-free interval. NOMAC is a progestin derived from testosterone, which has high bioavailability, rapid absorption, and a long half-life. Estradiol, though it has a lower bioavailability, has been successfully combined with NOMAC in a monophasic oral contraceptive. Two recently published randomized controlled trials demonstrate that NOMAC-E2 is an effective contraceptive, with a Pearl Index less than one pregnancy per 100 woman-years. The bleeding pattern on NOMAC-E2 is characterized by fewer bleeding/spotting days, shorter withdrawal bleeds, and a higher incidence of amenorrhea than the comparator oral contraceptive containing drospirenone and ethinyl estradiol. The adverse event profile appears to be acceptable. Few severe adverse events were reported in the randomized controlled trials. The most common adverse events were irregular bleeding, acne, and weight gain. Preliminary studies suggest that NOMAC-E2 does not seem to have negative effects on hemostatic and metabolic parameters. While no one oral contraceptive formulation is likely to be the optimum choice for all women, NOMAC-E2 is a formulation with effectiveness comparable with that of other oral contraceptives, and a reassuring safety profile. PMID:23836965

  14. HT update: spotlight on estradiol/norethindrone acetate combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Colleen L; Murray, Christine A

    2008-01-01

    The goal of postmenopausal hormone therapy is to alleviate the symptoms that are associated with the loss of estrogen. Many formulations of estrogen and progestin are available, depending on the needs and circumstances of each individual woman. For postmenopausal women, the choice of whether or not to begin therapy requires knowledge of the risks and benefits of estrogen and/or progestin replacement. The purpose of this review is to describe the risks and benefits of hormonal therapy, focusing on estradiol/norethindrone acetate combination therapy. PMID:18488874

  15. Patterns of Salivary Estradiol and Progesterone across the Menstrual Cycle

    PubMed Central

    GANDARA, BEATRICE K.; LERESCHE, LINDA; MANCL, LLOYD

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the normality of menstrual cycles on the basis of progesterone and estradiol levels in self-collected saliva samples. Twenty-two women, ages 19–40 years, self-collected whole unstimulated saliva specimens each morning for two consecutive menstrual cycles. On the basis of presence/timing of hormone peaks, two investigators classified 24 cycles as normal, 10 as likely normal, and 10 as clearly not normal with respect to expected profiles. Our results show that whole saliva samples collected at home on a daily basis provide a noninvasive, feasible method of determining menstrual cycle profiles. PMID:17435149

  16. All-around holographic three-dimensional light field display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Dongdong; Liu, Lilin; Wang, Zixin; Sun, Bixiong; Wang, Biao

    2012-10-01

    Technology for all-around holographic three-dimensional (3D) light field display is proposed in this paper. A plane mirror keeps rotating around the optical axis. At each angular position, the mirror-image's Fourier CGH of the target object is projected onto the mirror. The reflected CGH contributes a specific viewing angle range to the target object. Linking up all viewing angle ranges in the horizontal plane, all-around display can be realized via the "afterimage" effect. An all-around holographic 3D light field display is implemented experimentally here with a 60 Hz SLM by introducing an observer tracking unit in the proposed display system.

  17. Effects of estradiol on neural responses to social signals in female túngara frogs.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Mukta; Burmeister, Sabrina S

    2015-11-01

    Estradiol plays an important role in mediating changes in female sexual behavior across reproductive cycles. In the túngara frog [Physalaemus (=Engystomops) pustulosus], the relationship between gonadal activity and female sexual behavior, as expressed by phonotaxis, is mediated primarily by estradiol. Estradiol receptors are expressed in auditory and motivational brain areas and the hormone could serve as an important modulator of neural responses to conspecific calls. To better understand how estradiol modifies neural responses to conspecific social signals, we manipulated estradiol levels and measured expression of the immediate early gene egr-1 in the auditory midbrain, thalamus and limbic forebrain in response to conspecific or heterospecific calls. We found that estradiol and conspecific calls increased egr-1 expression in the auditory midbrain and limbic forebrain, but in the thalamus, only conspecific calls were effective. In the preoptic area, estradiol enhanced the effect of the conspecific call on egr-1 expression, suggesting that the preoptic area could act as a hormonal gatekeeper to phonotaxis. Overall, the results suggest that estradiol has broad influences on the neural circuit involved in female reproduction, particularly those implicated in phonotaxis. PMID:26449971

  18. Dissipation and transformation of 17B-estradiol-17-sulfate in soil-water systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogen conjugates are known to be precursors of endocrine-disrupting free estrogens, e.g. 17B-estradiol (E2) and estrone (E1), in the environment. This study investigated the fate of a sulfate conjugated estrogen, 17B-estradiol-17-sulfate (E2-17S), in agricultural soils using laboratory batch stu...

  19. THE PATHOBIOLOGY OF 17B-ESTRADIOL IN SUMMER FLOUNDER, PARALICHTYS DENTATUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estradiol has been shown to cause increased vitellogenin (VtG) concentrations in male fish. The intent of this study was to evaluate the pathobiology associated with exposure to 17 -estradiol (E2) on liver, gonad, and kidney tissues of summer flounder, Paralichthys dentatus. Juve...

  20. Effects of preovulatory estradiol concentration on embryo survival and pregnancy establishment in beef cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The role of estradiol during the preovulatory period on embryo survival and pregnancy establishment has not been characterized in beef cows. We hypothesized that preovulatory estradiol is important for embryo survival and pregnancy establishment in beef cows. In order to establish the importance o...

  1. Exogenous estradiol alters gonadal growth and timing of temperature sex determination in gonads of sea turtle.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Hernández, Verónica; Marmolejo-Valencia, Alejandro; Merchant-Larios, Horacio

    2015-12-01

    Temperature sex determining species offer a model for investigating how environmental cues become integrated to the regulation of patterning genes and growth, among bipotential gonads. Manipulation of steroid hormones has revealed the important role of aromatase in the regulation of the estrogen levels involved in temperature-dependent sex determination. Estradiol treatment counteracts the effect of male-promoting temperature, but the resulting ovarian developmental pattern differs from that manifested with the female-promoting temperature. Hypoplastic gonads have been reported among estradiol-treated turtles; however the estradiol effect on gonadal size has not been examined. Here we focused on the sea turtle Lepidochelys olivacea, which develops hypoplastic gonads with estradiol treatment. We studied the effect of estradiol on cell proliferation and on candidate genes involved in ovarian pattern. We found this effect is organ specific, causing a dramatic reduction in gonadal cell proliferation during the temperature-sensitive period. Although the incipient gonads resembled tiny ovaries, remodeling of the medullary cords and down-regulation of testicular factor Sox9 were considerably delayed. Contrastingly, with ovarian promoting temperature as a cue, exogenous estradiol induced the up-regulation of the ovary factor FoxL2, prior to the expression of aromatase. The strong expression of estrogen receptor alpha at the time of treatment suggests that it mediates estradiol effects. Overall results indicate that estradiol levels required for gonadal growth and to establish the female genetic network are delicately regulated by temperature. PMID:26465360

  2. Application of fly ash as an adsorbent for Estradiol in animal waste.

    PubMed

    Norris, Pauline; Hagan, Stephanie; Cohron, Martin; Zhao, Houying; Pan, Wei-Ping; Li, Kawang

    2015-09-15

    The contamination of agricultural ground with estrogen compounds through application of animal wastes is a present concern. At the same time, current uses for waste fly ash having high carbon content are limited. To help mitigate these problems, we examine using waste fly ash as a useful adsorbent for Estradiol in pig waste digests. In this study, Estradiol was added to vials containing water and fly ash from several different power plants. After an extraction process, the amount of Estradiol in the water was measured. Commercial activated carbon was also used for comparison purposes. Vials containing varying concentrations of Estradiol and no trapping material were used as a control. The results from this study indicate that fly ash can be used as a trapping material for Estradiol in water, but that commercially available activated carbon can trap about an order of magnitude more Estradiol than the fly ash and that the effects of the fly ash matrix can both inhibit and promote the solvation of Estradiol into water depending possibly upon pH and cation concentration effects. In addition, preliminary extraction studies using pig waste digest indicate that fly ash can be used as adsorbent for Estradiol present in pig waste. PMID:26150373

  3. Modeling of Coupled Degradation, Sorption, and Transport of 17beta-Estradiol in Undisturbed Soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence of 17 beta-estradiol in the environment, even at part-per trillion concentrations, may raise significant concern regarding the health of aquatic organisms. Once 17 beta-estradiol is released into the environment from human and animal sources, its fate and transport is controlled by fact...

  4. Luteinizing hormone secretion as influenced by age and estradiol in the prepubertal gilt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to determine if there is an age related reduction in the sensitivity of the negative feedback action of estradiol on luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion in the prepubertal gilt. Ovariectomized gilts at 90 (n = 12), 150 (n = 11) or 210 (n = 12) days of age received estradiol ...

  5. Ultrasound and estradiol plasma levels in threatened abortion.

    PubMed

    Melis, G B; Strigini, F; Fruzzetti, F; Paoletti, A M; Battistelli, P; Boldrini, A

    1984-01-01

    Ultrasound examination and unconjugated estriol assay were performed in 111 women with threatened abortion between the 6th and the 20th week of pregnancy. In viable pregnancies, fetal echoes and fetal heart movements were always observed by sonar from the 10th week onward and estradiol levels always increased above 30 pg/ml from the 13th week. Both ultrasound and estriol assay showed high percentages of uncertain prognostic indication on pregnancy outcome when examinations were performed during the first weeks of pregnancy. However, in the same period estriol levels higher than 30 pg/ml were always correlated with the favourable outcome of pregnancy, since no abortion occurred in subjects with detectable estriol values. During the second trimester ultrasound and estradiol results were normal in all viable pregnancies, while they were abnormal in 71.4% of pregnancies which failed to continue. Estriol values were always undetectable when fetuses could not be identified by sonar or they were dead. These data seem to demonstrate that both methods have similar prognostic value in patients with threatened abortion. However both sonar examination and estriol levels sometimes failed in predicting subsequent pregnancy interruptions, suggesting that abortions were not related to either fetal or placental alterations. PMID:6395604

  6. Antigenotoxic effect of allicin against estradiol-17beta-induced genotoxic damage in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Yasir Hasan; Beg, Tanveer; Ara, Gulshan; Gupta, Jyoti; Afzal, Mohammad

    2010-07-01

    Antigenotoxic activity of allicin, one of the sulphur compounds of garlic (Allium sativum) which possesses antioxidant and thiol disulphide exchange activity, was studied against estradiol-17beta-induced genotoxic damage using chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) as parameters. Approximately 10, 20 and 40 microM of estradiol-17beta was tested for its genotoxic effect in the presence of metabolic activation and was found to be genotoxic at 20 and 40 microM. Approximately 20 microM of estradiol-17beta was treated along with 5, 10 and 15 microM of allicin, separately, in the presence of metabolic activation. Similar treatments were given with 40 microM of estradiol-17beta. Treatments along with allicin result in the reduction of CAs and SCEs, suggesting its anti-genotoxic activity in human lymphocytes in vitro against estradiol-17beta-induced genotoxic damage. PMID:20582805

  7. Cancer link to magnetic field exposure: a hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Easterly, C.E.

    1981-08-01

    The hypothesis is presented for a relationship between exposure to magnetic fields and the induction of cancer: alterations in the mitotic processes caused by exposure to magnetic fields can provide a proliferative stimulus to latent tumor cells, thereby leading to the expression of malignant neoplasia. In a review of the literature, it was found that most of the magnetic field data cited were taken in connection with static field conditions. Neither 0 or 60 Hz fields interact with biological tissue in a manner analogous to the resonant energy absorption found with microwave exposure. Some evidence, however, indicates similar biologic effects for both frequencies with those at 60 Hz being somewhat more pronounced. While there is no data relating magnetic field exposure to any parameter directly related to cellular toxicity or cellular death, there is a growing data base indicating increases or decreases in cellular reproductive rate and function consequent to magnetic field exposure. Therefore, it appears that mathematical development of the hypothesis discussed is possible utilizing available information. (JMT)

  8. Comparing biological effects of estrone (E1) and 17ß-estradiol (E2) in mature fathead minnows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence of endocrine active compounds such as estrogens in treated wastewater effluent and their effects on aquatic life are causing concern among aquatic resource managers. Among the natural estrogens are 17ß-estradiol, 17a-estradiol, and estrone. Although 17ß-estradiol has received significa...

  9. An overview of the development of combined oral contraceptives containing estradiol: focus on estradiol valerate/dienogest

    PubMed Central

    Fruzzetti, Franca; Trémollieres, Florence; Bitzer, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Natural estrogens such as estradiol (E2) or its valerate ester (E2V) offer an alternative to ethinyl estradiol (EE). E2-containing combined oral contraceptives (COCs) have demonstrated sufficient ovulation inhibition and acceptable contraceptive efficacy. However, earlier formulations were generally associated with unacceptable bleeding profiles. Two E2V-containing preparations have been approved to date for contraceptive use: E2V/cypro-terone acetate (CPA) (Femilar®; only approved in Finland and only in women >40 years or women aged 35–40 years in whom a COC containing EE is not appropriate) and E2V/dienogest (DNG; Qlaira®/Natazia®). The objective of the current review is to provide an overview of the development of COCs containing natural estrogen, highlighting past issues and challenges faced by earlier formulations, as well as the current status and future directions. The majority of information to date pertains to the development of E2V/DNG. PMID:22468839

  10. Sorption, uptake, and biotransformation of 17β-estradiol, 17α-ethinylestradiol, zeranol, and trenbolone acetate by hybrid poplar.

    PubMed

    Bircher, Sam; Card, Marcella L; Zhai, Guangshu; Chin, Yu-Ping; Schnoor, Jerald L

    2015-12-01

    Hormonally active compounds may move with agricultural runoff from fields with applied manure and biosolids into surface waters where they pose a threat to human and environmental health. Riparian zone plants could remove hormonally active compounds from agricultural runoff. Therefore, sorption to roots, uptake, translocation, and transformation of 3 estrogens (17β-estradiol, 17α-ethinylestradiol, and zeranol) and 1 androgen (trenbolone acetate) commonly found in animal manure or biosolids were assessed by hydroponically grown hybrid poplar, Populus deltoides x nigra, DN-34, widely used in riparian buffer strips. Results clearly showed that these hormones were rapidly removed from 2 mg L(-1) hydroponic solutions by more than 97% after 10 d of exposure to full poplar plants or live excised poplars (cut-stem, no leaves). Removals by sorption to dead poplar roots that had been autoclaved were significantly less, 71% to 84%. Major transformation products (estrone and estriol for estradiol; zearalanone for zeranol; and 17β-trenbolone from trenbolone acetate) were detected in the root tissues of all 3 poplar treatments. Root concentrations of metabolites peaked after 1 d to 5 d and then decreased in full and live excised poplars by further transformation. Metabolite concentrations were less in dead poplar treatments and only slowly increased without further transformation. Taken together, these findings show that poplars may be effective in controlling the movement of hormonally active compounds from agricultural fields and avoiding runoff to streams. PMID:26184466

  11. Magnetic-field-induced DNA strand breaks in brain cells of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Henry; Singh, Narendra P

    2004-01-01

    In previous research, we found that rats acutely (2 hr) exposed to a 60-Hz sinusoidal magnetic field at intensities of 0.1-0.5 millitesla (mT) showed increases in DNA single- and double-strand breaks in their brain cells. Further research showed that these effects could be blocked by pretreating the rats with the free radical scavengers melatonin and N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone, suggesting the involvement of free radicals. In the present study, effects of magnetic field exposure on brain cell DNA in the rat were further investigated. Exposure to a 60-Hz magnetic field at 0.01 mT for 24 hr caused a significant increase in DNA single- and double-strand breaks. Prolonging the exposure to 48 hr caused a larger increase. This indicates that the effect is cumulative. In addition, treatment with Trolox (a vitamin E analog) or 7-nitroindazole (a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor) blocked magnetic-field-induced DNA strand breaks. These data further support a role of free radicals on the effects of magnetic fields. Treatment with the iron chelator deferiprone also blocked the effects of magnetic fields on brain cell DNA, suggesting the involvement of iron. Acute magnetic field exposure increased apoptosis and necrosis of brain cells in the rat. We hypothesize that exposure to a 60-Hz magnetic field initiates an iron-mediated process (e.g., the Fenton reaction) that increases free radical formation in brain cells, leading to DNA strand breaks and cell death. This hypothesis could have an important implication for the possible health effects associated with exposure to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields in the public and occupational environments. PMID:15121512

  12. Relationship between Carotenoids, Retinol, and Estradiol Levels in Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Maggio, Marcello; de Vita, Francesca; Lauretani, Fulvio; Bandinelli, Stefania; Semba, Richard D.; Bartali, Benedetta; Cherubini, Antonio; Cappola, Anne R.; Ceda, Gian Paolo; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Background. In vitro evidence suggests anti-estrogenic properties for retinol and carotenoids, supporting a chemo-preventive role of these phytochemicals in estrogen-dependent cancers. During aging there are significant reductions in retinol and carotenoid concentrations, whereas estradiol levels decline during menopause and progressively increase from the age of 65. We aimed to investigate the hypothesis of a potential relationship between circulating levels of retinol, carotenoids, and estradiol (E2) in a cohort of late post-menopausal women. Methods. We examined 512 women ≥ 65 years from the InCHIANTI study. Retinol, α-caroten, β-caroten, β-criptoxantin, lutein, zeaxanthin, and lycopene levels were assayed at enrollment (1998–2000) by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography. Estradiol and testosterone (T) levels were assessed by Radioimmunometry (RIA) and testosterone-to-estradiol ratio (T/E2), as a proxy of aromatase activity, was also calculated. General linear models adjusted for age (Model 1) and further adjusted for other confounders including Body Mass Index (BMI) BMI, smoking, intake of energy, lipids, and vitamin A; C-Reactive Protein, insulin, total cholesterol, liver function, and testosterone (Model 2) were used to investigate the relationship between retinol, carotenoids, and E2 levels. To address the independent relationship between carotenoids and E2 levels, factors significantly associated with E2 in Model 2 were also included in a fully adjusted Model 3. Results. After adjustment for age, α-carotene (β ± SE = −0.01 ± 0.004, p = 0.02) and β-carotene (β ± SE = −0.07 ± 0.02, p = 0.0007) were significantly and inversely associated with E2 levels. α-Carotene was also significantly and positively associated with T/E2 ratio (β ± SE = 0.07 ± 0.03, p = 0.01). After adjustment for other confounders (Model 2), the inverse relationship between α-carotene (β ± SE = −1.59 ± 0.61, p = 0.01), β-carotene (β ± SE = −0.29 ± 0.08, p

  13. Seizure facilitating activity of the oral contraceptive ethinyl estradiol.

    PubMed

    Younus, Iyan; Reddy, Doodipala Samba

    2016-03-01

    Contraceptive management is critical in women with epilepsy. Although oral contraceptives (OCs) are widely used by many women with epilepsy, little is known about their impact on epileptic seizures and epileptogenesis. Ethinyl estradiol (EE) is the primary component of OC pills. In this study, we investigated the pharmacological effect of EE on epileptogenesis and kindled seizures in female mice using the hippocampus kindling model. Animals were stimulated daily with or without EE until generalized stage 5 seizures were elicited. EE treatment significantly accelerated the rate of epileptogenesis. In acute studies, EE caused a significant decrease in the afterdischarge threshold and increased the incidence and severity of seizures in fully-kindled mice. In chronic studies, EE treatment caused a greater susceptibility to kindled seizures. Collectively, these results are consistent with moderate proconvulsant-like activity of EE. Such excitatory effects may affect seizure risk in women with epilepsy taking OC pills. PMID:26874323

  14. Laccase mediated transformation of 17β-estradiol in soil.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rashmi; Cabrera, Miguel L; Radcliffe, David E; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Qingguo

    2015-02-01

    It is known that 17β-estradiol (E2) can be transformed by reactions mediated by some oxidoreductases such as laccase in water. Whether or how such reactions can happen in soil is however unknown although they may significantly impact the environmental fate of E2 that is introduced to soil by land application of animal wastes. We herein studied the reaction of E2 in a model soil mediated by laccase, and found that the reaction behaviors differ significantly from those in water partly because of the dramatic difference in laccase stability. We also examined E2 transformation in soil using (14)C-labeling in combination with soil organic matter extraction and size exclusion chromatography, which indicated that applied (14)C radioactivity was preferably bound to humic acids. The study provides useful information for understanding the environmental fate of E2 and for developing a novel soil remediation strategy via enzyme-enhanced humification reactions. PMID:25489747

  15. Detection of estradiol-17β during a mass coral spawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, S.; Atkinson, M. J.

    1992-04-01

    The steroid estradiol-17β (E2) is associated with female gametogenesis in all vertebrates and many invertebrates. This is the first report of estrogens in scleractinian corals. Seawater and egg slicks were collected during a mass coral spawn at Ningaloo reef, Western Australia for the measurement of total phosphate (TP) and E2. Total P in the water column increased 600 times, from 0.5μM to 300μM. Concentrations of E2 increased nearly 8 fold during the spawn, from 55 to 420 pg/100 ml seawater. Coral eggs collected from egg slicks contained 368±40 pg E2/g dry wt of eggs. Estrogen may be a key hormone in a simple endocrine system of scleractinian corals that synchronizes growth and development of coral oocytes. Its potential role in triggering spawning via chemical messengers in the water column warrants further research.

  16. Effects of estradiol and progesterone on the reproduction of the freshwater crayfish Cherax albidus.

    PubMed

    Coccia, E; De Lisa, E; Di Cristo, C; Di Cosmo, A; Paolucci, M

    2010-02-01

    In this study we have investigated the role of 17beta-estradiol and progesterone in the reproduction of the crayfish Cherax albidus by using vitellogenin (VTG) as a biomarker. Early-vitellogenic (EV), full-vitellogenic (FV), and non-vitellogenic (NV) females of Cherax albidus were treated with 17beta-estradiol, progesterone, or both for 4 weeks. Levels of VTG mRNA in the hepatopancreas were detected by RT-PCR. The PCR product was sequenced and showed 97% homology with Cherax quadricarinatus VTG. 17beta-estradiol was more effective than progesterone and 17beta-estradiol plus progesterone in increasing the vitellogenin transcript in the hepatopancreas of EV and FV females. On the contrary, progesterone was more effective than 17beta-estradiol and 17beta-estradiol plus progesterone in increasing the vitellogenin concentration in the hemolymph of EV and FV females. Hepatopancreas histology and fatty acid composition of females injected with hormones showed major modifications. No effects were registered in NV females. In conclusion, 17beta-estradiol and progesterone influence VTG synthesis, although our data indicate that they act through different pathways and are not effective until the proper hormonal environment is established, as demonstrated by their inefficacy in NV females. PMID:20203252

  17. Day length and estradiol affect same-sex affiliative behavior in the female meadow vole

    PubMed Central

    Beery, Annaliese K.; Loo, Theresa J.; Zucker, Irving

    2008-01-01

    Non-sexual social bonding between adult mammals remains poorly understood, despite its importance in many species. Female meadow voles are territorial and nest alone in long summer day lengths when circulating estradiol concentrations are high, but cohabit in groups in short winter photoperiods when estradiol secretion is low. The influence of day length and estradiol on same-sex huddling behavior was assessed in adult female pairs housed together in long day lengths (LDs) or short day lengths (SDs) from weaning. The behavior of intact, ovariectomized, and estradiol-treated ovariectomized females from each photoperiod was assessed during 3 hour partner preference tests. Intact SD voles, unlike intact LD voles, spent the majority of the test in proximity to their cage mates. Estradiol treatment of SD voles significantly reduced time spent huddling with the partner. Neither ovariectomy nor estradiol treatment significantly affected the amount of time LD females spent in contact with their partners. Low estradiol availability is therefore a necessary but not sufficient condition for maintenance of high levels of huddling. These results establish that ovarian hormones interact with photoperiod to affect same-sex social behavior. PMID:18387611

  18. High estradiol levels improve false memory rates and meta-memory in highly schizotypal women.

    PubMed

    Hodgetts, Sophie; Hausmann, Markus; Weis, Susanne

    2015-10-30

    Overconfidence in false memories is often found in patients with schizophrenia and healthy participants with high levels of schizotypy, indicating an impairment of meta-cognition within the memory domain. In general, cognitive control is suggested to be modulated by natural fluctuations in oestrogen. However, whether oestrogen exerts beneficial effects on meta-memory has not yet been investigated. The present study sought to provide evidence that high levels of schizotypy are associated with increased false memory rates and overconfidence in false memories, and that these processes may be modulated by natural differences in estradiol levels. Using the Deese-Roediger-McDermott paradigm, it was found that highly schizotypal participants with high estradiol produced significantly fewer false memories than those with low estradiol. No such difference was found within the low schizotypy participants. Highly schizotypal participants with high estradiol were also less confident in their false memories than those with low estradiol; low schizotypy participants with high estradiol were more confident. However, these differences only approached significance. These findings suggest that the beneficial effect of estradiol on memory and meta-memory observed in healthy participants is specific to highly schizotypal individuals and might be related to individual differences in baseline dopaminergic activity. PMID:26292620

  19. Pharmacokinetic studies of solubilized estradiol given vaginally in a novel softgel capsule

    PubMed Central

    Pickar, J. H.; Amadio, J. M.; Bernick, B. A.; Mirkin, S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the bioavailability and safety of a novel vaginal capsule containing solubilized bioidentical 17β-estradiol for vulvar and vaginal atrophy and compare its pharmacokinetics with that of an approved vaginal estradiol tablet in healthy postmenopausal women. Methods Two randomized, single-dose, two-way cross-over, relative bioavailability trials compared the pharmacokinetics of a solubilized vaginal estradiol softgel capsule (TX-004HR, test) with that of a vaginal estradiol tablet (Vagifem®, reference) in postmenopausal women (aged 40–65 years) at 10-μg and 25-μg doses. In each study, women were randomly assigned to receive a single dose of the test capsule or reference tablet, followed by a single dose of the alternate drug after a 14-day washout. Results Thirty-five women completed the 10-μg study and 36 completed the 25-μg study. Significantly lower systemic levels of estradiol, estrone, and estrone sulfate at both doses of the test product were observed compared with equivalent doses of the reference product, with lower AUC0-24 and C max and earlier t max. No adverse events were reported in either trial. Conclusion TX-004HR, a novel estradiol vaginal softgel capsule, exhibited significantly lower systemic exposure than equivalent doses of an approved vaginal estradiol tablet at both 10-μg and 25-μg doses. Both doses of each product were safe and well-tolerated. PMID:26857443

  20. Regulation of the mouse medial prefrontal cortical synapses by endogenous estradiol.

    PubMed

    Galvin, Christopher; Ninan, Ipe

    2014-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that low endogenous estradiol might be a susceptibility factor for anxiety and trauma-related disorders in women. Consistently, fear extinction, a form of inhibitory learning critical for the management of anxiety symptoms, is positively correlated with endogenous estradiol levels. To understand the synaptic basis of the effect of endogenous estradiol on fear extinction, we studied glutamatergic transmission and plasticity in the infralimbic medial prefrontal cortex (IL-mPFC), a brain region crucial for the regulation of fear extinction. Diestrus mice (low estradiol) exhibited a higher basal glutamatergic transmission compared with proestrus mice (high estradiol). Synaptic plasticity was also regulated by endogenous estradiol, which favored synaptic potentiation in a GluN2B-dependent manner. Activation of estrogen receptor β (ERβ) but not ERα rescued synaptic potentiation in diestrus mice by enhancing GluN2B-mediated NMDA receptor transmission. Our results suggest that both endogenous estradiol and ERβ activation facilitate the ability of the IL-mPFC synapses to undergo potentiation, a mechanism necessary for the regulation of fear extinction. PMID:24608267

  1. Context-Specific Effects of Estradiol on Spatial Learning and Memory in the Zebra Finch

    PubMed Central

    Rensel, M.A.; Salwiczek, L.; Roth, J.; Schlinger, B.A.

    2012-01-01

    Estradiol is known to impact cognitive function including spatial learning and memory, with studies focused largely on rodent models. Estrogens can be produced peripherally or centrally as neuroestrogens, and the specific role for neuroestrogens in memory processes remains unresolved. Many songbirds possess remarkable spatial memory capabilities and also express the estrogen synthetic enzyme aromatase abundantly in the hippocampus, suggesting that locally-produced estrogens may promote the acquisition or retrieval of spatial memories in these birds. We examined the effect of estradiol on spatial memory in three contexts in the zebra finch: retrieval after discrimination training, retrieval after familiarization but without discrimination training, and memory acquisition, using a combination of estradiol implants and oral dosing with the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole (FAD). Retrieval of spatial memory in both contexts was impaired when estradiol production was blocked. However, spatial memory acquisition was enhanced when estradiol production was inhibited whereas estradiol replacement impaired acquisition. These results provide evidence for a context-specific role of estradiol in songbird spatial memory, results that finds accord with some mammalian studies but have not yet been observed in birds. PMID:23257279

  2. Pharmacokinetic studies of solubilized estradiol given vaginally in a novel softgel capsule.

    PubMed

    Pickar, J H; Amadio, J M; Bernick, B A; Mirkin, S

    2016-04-01

    Objective To evaluate the bioavailability and safety of a novel vaginal capsule containing solubilized bioidentical 17β-estradiol for vulvar and vaginal atrophy and compare its pharmacokinetics with that of an approved vaginal estradiol tablet in healthy postmenopausal women. Methods Two randomized, single-dose, two-way cross-over, relative bioavailability trials compared the pharmacokinetics of a solubilized vaginal estradiol softgel capsule (TX-004HR, test) with that of a vaginal estradiol tablet (Vagifem®, reference) in postmenopausal women (aged 40-65 years) at 10-μg and 25-μg doses. In each study, women were randomly assigned to receive a single dose of the test capsule or reference tablet, followed by a single dose of the alternate drug after a 14-day washout. Results Thirty-five women completed the 10-μg study and 36 completed the 25-μg study. Significantly lower systemic levels of estradiol, estrone, and estrone sulfate at both doses of the test product were observed compared with equivalent doses of the reference product, with lower AUC0-24 and Cmax and earlier tmax. No adverse events were reported in either trial. Conclusion TX-004HR, a novel estradiol vaginal softgel capsule, exhibited significantly lower systemic exposure than equivalent doses of an approved vaginal estradiol tablet at both 10-μg and 25-μg doses. Both doses of each product were safe and well-tolerated. PMID:26857443

  3. Day length and estradiol affect same-sex affiliative behavior in the female meadow vole.

    PubMed

    Beery, Annaliese K; Loo, Theresa J; Zucker, Irving

    2008-06-01

    Non-sexual social bonding between adult mammals is poorly understood, despite its importance in many species. Female meadow voles are territorial and nest alone in long summer day lengths when circulating estradiol concentrations are high, but cohabit in groups in short winter photoperiods when estradiol secretion is low. The influence of day length and estradiol on same-sex huddling behavior was assessed in adult female pairs housed together in long day lengths (LDs) or short day lengths (SDs) from weaning. The behavior of intact, ovariectomized, and estradiol-treated ovariectomized females from each photoperiod was assessed during 3 h partner-preference tests. Intact SD voles, unlike intact LD voles, spent the majority of the test in proximity to their cage-mates. Estradiol treatment of SD voles significantly reduced time spent huddling with the partner. Neither ovariectomy nor estradiol treatment significantly affected the amount of time LD females spent in contact with their partners. Low estradiol availability is therefore a necessary but not sufficient condition for maintenance of high levels of huddling. These results establish that ovarian hormones interact with photoperiod to affect same-sex social behavior. PMID:18387611

  4. Estradiol enhances the acquisition of lithium chloride-induced conditioned taste aversion in castrated male rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shih-Fan; Tsai, Yuan-Feen; Tai, Mei-Yun; Yeh, Kuei-Ying

    2015-10-01

    The present study examined the effects of short-term treatment with ovarian hormones on the acquisition of conditioned taste aversion (CTA). Adult male rats were castrated and randomly divided into LiCl- and saline-treated groups. Nineteen days after castration, all of the animals were subjected to 23.5-h daily water deprivation for seven successive days (day 1 to day 7). On the conditioning day (day 8), the rats received either a 4 ml/kg of 0.15 M LiCl or the same dose of saline injection immediately after administration of a 2 % sucrose solution during the 30-min water session. Starting from day 6, rats in both groups received one of the following treatments: daily subcutaneous injection of (1) estradiol alone (30 μg/kg; estradiol benzoate (E) group), (2) estradiol plus progesterone (500 μg; E + progesterone (P) group), or (3) olive oil. From day 9 to day 11, all of the rats were given daily two-bottle preference tests during the 30-min fluid session. The estradiol and estradiol plus progesterone treatments in the LiCl groups resulted in significantly lower preference scores for the sucrose solution compared with the olive oil treatment groups, but no difference in preference score was seen between these two groups. These results indicate that both the estradiol and estradiol plus progesterone treatments in the LiCl groups enhanced the acquisition of CTA learning and suggest that estradiol affects the acquisition of CTA mediated by an activational effect in male rats, whereas progesterone treatment does not influence the effects of estradiol on the acquisition of CTA.

  5. Increased Estradiol and Improved Sleep, But Not Hot Flashes, Predict Enhanced Mood during the Menopausal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Petrillo, Laura Fagioli; Koukopoulos, Alexia; Viguera, Adele C.; Hirschberg, April; Nonacs, Ruta; Somley, Brittny; Pasciullo, Erica; White, David P.; Hall, Janet E.; Cohen, Lee S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The antidepressant effect of estrogen in women undergoing the menopause transition is hypothesized to be mediated by central nervous system effects of increasing estradiol on mood or through a pathway involving suppression of hot flashes and associated sleep disturbance. Estrogen therapy (ET) and the hypnotic agent zolpidem were selected as interventions in a three-arm, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to distinguish the effects of estradiol, sleep, and hot flashes on depression. Methods: Women with depressive disorders, hot flashes, and sleep disturbance were randomly assigned to transdermal 17β-estradiol 0.05 mg/d, zolpidem 10 mg/d, or placebo for 8 wk. Changes in serum estradiol, perceived sleep quality, objectively measured sleep, and hot flashes were examined as predictors of depression improvement [Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS)] using multivariate linear regression. Results: Seventy-two peri/postmenopausal women with depression disorders were randomized to 17β-estradiol (n = 27), zolpidem (n = 31), or placebo (n = 14). There was no significant difference between groups in depression improvement (overall MADRS decrease 11.8 ± 8.6). Increasing estradiol (P = 0.009) and improved sleep quality (P < 0.001) predicted improved mood in adjusted models but reduced hot flashes (P = 0.99) did not. Post hoc subgroup analyses revealed that the therapeutic effect of increasing estradiol levels on mood was seen in perimenopausal (P = 0.009), but not postmenopausal, women. Conclusions: For women with menopause-associated depression, improvement in depression is predicted by improved sleep, and among perimenopausal women, by increasing estradiol levels. These results suggest that changes in estradiol and sleep quality, rather than hot flashes, mediate depression during the menopause transition. Therapies targeting insomnia may be valuable in treating menopause-associated depression. PMID:21525161

  6. Low doses of estradiol partly inhibit release of GH in sheep without affecting basal levels.

    PubMed

    Hudmon, A; Davenport, G; Coleman, E S; Sartin, J L

    2009-10-01

    Estradiol increases basal growth hormone (GH) concentrations in sheep and cattle. This study sought to determine the effects of estradiol on GH-releasing hormone (GRH)-stimulated GH release in sheep. Growth hormone secretory characteristics, the GH response to GRH, and steady-state GH mRNA concentrations were determined in castrated male lambs treated with 2 different doses of estradiol 17-beta for a 28-d experimental period. Although no differences between treatments in mean GH, basal GH, or GH pulse number were observed after 28 d of estradiol treatment, GH pulse amplitude was greater (P < 0.05) in the 2.00-cm implant-treated animals than in the control and 0.75-cm implant group. The effect of estradiol treatment on GRH-stimulated GH release revealed differences between the control and estradiol-treated animals (P < 0.05). The 15-min GH responses to 0.075 microg/kg hGRH in the control, 0.75-cm, and 2.00-cm implant groups, respectively, were 76 +/- 10, 22.6 +/- 2.1, and 43.6 +/- 15.0 ng/mL. Growth hormone mRNA content was determined for pituitary glands from the different treatment groups, and no differences in steady-state GH mRNA levels were observed. There were no differences in the mean plasma concentrations of IGF-I, cortisol, T(3), or T(4) from weekly samples. Growth hormone release from cultured ovine pituitary cells from control sheep was not affected by estradiol after 72 h or in a subsequent 3-h incubation with estradiol combined with GRH. These data suggest that estradiol has differing actions on basal and GRH-stimulated GH concentrations in plasma, but the increase in pulse amplitude does not represent an increased pituitary sensitivity to GRH. PMID:19616401

  7. Nuclear estradiol binding in rat adipocytes. Regional variations and regulatory influences of hormones.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, S B; Børglum, J D; Eriksen, E F; Richelsen, B

    1991-06-01

    The nuclear estrogen receptor was characterised in isolated rat adipocytes. The binding reaction with [3H]estradiol was performed with intact isolated rat adipocytes and the radioactivity associated with the nucleus was subsequently determined after cell lysis. The nuclear uptake of [3H]estrogen in rat adipocytes was temperature dependent and steroid specific. The steady-state binding was achieved after 30 min at 37 degrees C and was constant for several hours. Estradiol was found to bind to a homogeneous class of nuclear receptors in epididymal adipocytes with an apparent Kd of 3.1 +/- 0.76 nM and a Bmax of 7.98 +/- 1.11 fmol/10(6) cells corresponding to about 4800 receptors per nucleus. The estradiol binding exhibited regional variations in isolated adipocytes. In lean rats the highest receptor number was found in epididymal adipocytes, whereas there was a significantly lower number of nuclear binding sites in perirenal and subcutaneous adipocytes (P less than 0.05), unlike in older and more obese rats where the nuclear estradiol binding was greatest in adipocytes from the perirenal fat depot. Incubations with isoproterenol (10 microM) and dibutyryl-cAMP (2.5 mM) both reduced estradiol binding by 56% (P less than 0.005), while insulin (1 nM) enhanced the estradiol binding by 37% (P less than 0.01). In conclusion, a specific and high affinity nuclear estradiol receptor was demonstrated in rat adipocytes and regional differences in nuclear estradiol binding were detected. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that nuclear estradiol binding could be modulated by other agents known to affect adipocyte metabolism. PMID:1646650

  8. Low-dosage micronized 17 beta-estradiol prevents bone loss in postmenopausal women

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ettinger, B.; Genant, H. K.; Steiger, P.; Madvig, P.

    1992-01-01

    With the use of a double-blind, randomized, dose-ranging design, we tested during an 18-month period the degree of protection against postmenopausal bone loss afforded by micronized 17 beta-estradiol in dosages of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg. All subjects received supplementation to ensure a minimum of 1500 mg calcium daily. Fifty-one subjects completed at least 1 year of follow-up bone density measurements by quantitative computed tomography and by single- and dual-photon absorptiometry. In the placebo group spinal trabecular bone density decreased 4.9% annually (p less than 0.001), whereas in those taking micronized 17 beta-estradiol bone density tended to increase (annual increases of 0.3% in the 0.5 mg micronized 17 beta-estradiol group, 1.8% in the 1.0 mg micronized 17 beta-estradiol group, and 2.5% in the 2.0 mg micronized 17 beta-estradiol group). After completing the double-blind phase, 41 subjects completed an additional 18 months of follow-up while taking 1.0 mg micronized 17 beta-estradiol. During this time one third of the subjects were randomly assigned to discontinue calcium supplements. Among those who previously received placebo, trabecular bone density increased 4.3% annually, whereas among those who had used micronized 17 beta-estradiol, trabecular bone density response was inversely related to the dosage previously used. Additionally and independently, the level of calcium intake showed a statistically significant correlation with the change in spinal trabecular bone density (r = 0.37, p = 0.02). We conclude that micronized 17 beta-estradiol has a continuous skeletal dose-response effect in the range of 0.5 to 2.0 mg and that calcium intake positively modifies the skeletal response to 1.0 mg micronized 17 beta-estradiol.

  9. Steady-state pharmacokinetics following application of a novel transdermal estradiol spray in healthy postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Morton, Terri L; Gattermeir, David J; Petersen, Craig A; Day, Wesley W; Schumacher, Robert J

    2009-09-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the steady-state pharmacokinetics (PK) of estradiol and its metabolites, estrone and estrone sulfate, following application of a novel estradiol transdermal spray to healthy postmenopausal women. Participants were randomly assigned in parallel to receive 1-, 2-, or 3-spray doses (24 participants/dose level) of a 1.7% estradiol metered-dose transdermal spray (1.53 mg/spray) once daily for 14 days. Blood was collected predose on days 1 to 14 and over 7 days after the last dose. Serum concentrations for all 3 analytes reached steady state by day 7 or 8 and were still slightly above baseline on day 21. Estradiol, estrone, and estrone sulfate serum concentrations generally increased with increasing dose. Mean estradiol and estrone maximum serum concentration (C(max)) following 1, 2, or 3 sprays for 14 days were 36 and 50, 57 and 60, and 54 and 71 pg/mL, respectively. Estradiol time when maximum concentration occurred (t(max)) was 18 to 20 hours. The area under the serum concentration-time curve over 24 hours following the last dose of study drug (AUC(0-24 h)) on day 14 for the 1-, 2-, and 3-spray groups, respectively, was 471, 736, and 742 pg.h/mL for estradiol; 886, 1208, and 1367 pg x h/mL for estrone; and 16,501, 26,515, and 27,971 pg x h/mL for estrone sulfate. The metered-dose estradiol transdermal spray delivers estradiol at therapeutic levels and produces low serum estrone concentrations. PMID:19628730

  10. A metabolomics study of the inhibitory effect of 17-beta-estradiol on osteoclast proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yanqiu; Cheng, Mengchun; Zhang, Xiaozhe; Xiao, Hongbin

    2015-02-01

    Estradiol is a major drug used clinically to alleviate osteoporosis, partly through inhibition of the activity of osteoclasts, which play a crucial role in bone resorption. So far, little is known about the effects of estradiol on osteoclast metabolism. In this study, ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS)-based metabolomics strategy was used to investigate the metabolite response to 17β-estradiol in mouse osteoclast RAW264.7, a commonly used cell model for studying osteoporosis. Our results showed that the application of estradiol altered the levels of 27 intracellular metabolites, including lysophosphatidylcholines (LysoPCs), other lipids and amino acid derivants. The changes of all the 27 metabolites were observed in the study of estradiol induced osteoclast proliferation inhibition (1 μM estradiol applied), while the changes of only 18 metabolites were observed in the study of differentiation inhibition (0.1 μM estradiol applied). Further pathway impact analysis determined glycerophospholipid metabolism as the main potential target pathway of estradiol, which was further confirmed by LCAT (phosphatidylcholine-sterol acyltransferase) activity changes and lipid peroxidative product (MDA, methane dicarboxylic aldehyde) changes caused by estradiol. Additionally, we found that estradiol significantly decreased intracellular oxidative stress during cell proliferation but not during cell differentiation. Our study suggested that estradiol generated a highly condition-dependent influence on osteoclast metabolism. PMID:25474166

  11. Mechanism of the Rapid Effect of 17β -Estradiol on Medial Amygdala Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabekura, Junichi; Oomura, Yutaka; Minami, Taketsugu; Mizuno, Yuji; Fukuda, Atsuo

    1986-07-01

    The mechanism by which sex steroids rapidly modulate the excitability of neurons was investigated by intracellular recording of neurons in rat medial amygdala brain slices. Brief hyperpolarization and increased potassium conductance were produced by 17β - estradiol. This effect persisted after elimination of synaptic input and after suppression of protein synthesis. Thus, 17β -estradiol directly changes the ionic conductance of the postsynaptic membrane of medial amygdala neurons. In addition, a greater proportion of the neurons from females than from males responded to 17β -estradiol.

  12. Comparison of cytochrome P-450 species which catalyze the hydroxylations of the aromatic ring of estradiol and estradiol 17-sulfate.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Takanashi, K; Imaoka, S; Funae, Y; Kawano, S; Inoue, K; Kamataki, T; Takagi, H; Yoshizawa, I

    1991-06-01

    For identification of microsomal cytochrome P-450 (P-450) enzymes which catalyze 2- or 4-hydroxylations of estrogens in the rat liver, estradiol (E2) and estradiol 17-sulfate (E2-17-S) were selected as the substrates and incubated with various kinds of purified P-450 enzymes: PB-1, PB-2, PB-4 and PB-5 obtained from phenobarbital-treated male rats (Sprague-Dawley); MC-1 and MC-5 from 3-methylcholanthrene-treated male rats; and UT-1, UT-2, UT-4 and UT-5 from untreated animals. The reactions were carried out under the P-450-reconstructed system, and the resulting products were determined by HPLC using electrochemical detection. All the enzymes tested were shown to have varying degrees of catalytic activities for 2-hydroxylation of the two substrates; UT-1 and UT-2 had the highest activity. Of the induced P-450 enzymes, PB-2 and MC-1 showed fairly high catalytic activity for 4-hydroxylation of E2. The P-450 enzymes obtained from the untreated male rats, especially UT-4, showed the highest catalytic activity for 4-hydroxylation of the two substrates. From these results and also from kinetic experiments, the P-450 enzymes which catalyze 2- and 4-hydroxylations of estrogen were considered to be different species. A part of E2 was converted to such metabolites as estrone and those having a hydroxyl group at positions 6 beta, 15 alpha or 16 alpha, each production of which was estimated to be catalyzed by single or multiple P-450s. PMID:2064989

  13. Numerical Analysis of Induced Current in Human Head Exposed to Nonuniform Magnetic Field Including Harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarao, Hiroo; Hayashi, Noriyuki; Isaka, Katsuo

    In this paper, induced currents in an anatomical head model exposed to a non-uniform ELF magnetic field (B-field) including harmonics are numerically calculated, and are discussed based on the basic restriction established by International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). A casual hair dryer of 100V and 1.2kW is chosen as a typical source of the non-uniform B-field including both the fundamental and second harmonic components. The B-field distribution around the hair dryer is estimated by using the 3-orthogonal magnetic dipole moments, which are derived from a couple of measured values around it. The high-resolution human head model used is constructed based on the MRI images of a real human, and consists of six kinds of tissues (bone, brain, eyeballs, muscle, skin and blood). So-called impedance method is used for the numerical calculation of the induced current. The numerical results show that the maximum values of the induced current of 17µA/m2, for the 60Hz component, which is about 1/120 of the ICNIRP basic restriction appear in the muscle near the eyeball when the hair dryer is used from the side of the head model, and the averaged current in the eyeballs that have the highest conductivity is the highest among the six tissues. It is also demonstrated that the induced current due to the 120Hz B-field becomes comparable to the 60Hz current although the magnitude of the 120Hz B-field is much smaller than that of the 60Hz B-field.

  14. OOCYTE ENVELOPE PROTEINS AND VITELLOGENIN IN MALE SHEEPHEAD MINNOW EXPOSED TO ESTRADIOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oocyte Envelope Proteins and Vitellogenin Expression in Male Sheepshead Minnows Exposed to Estradiol (Abstract). To be presented at the 22nd Annual Meeting of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry: Changing Environmental Awareness: Societal Concerns and Scientifi...

  15. Estradiol: Mediator of memories, spine density and cognitive resilience to stress in female rodents.

    PubMed

    Luine, Victoria

    2016-06-01

    Estradiol rapidly activates, within minutes, various physiological functions and behaviors including cognition in rodents. This review describes rapid effects of estradiol on hippocampal dependent learning and memory tasks in rodents. Mechanisms underlying the memory enhancements including the activation of signaling molecules and the enhancement of dendritic spinogenesis are briefly reviewed. In addition, the role of estradiol in the cognitive resilience to chronic stress exhibited only in females is discussed including contributions of ovarian as well as intra-hippocampally derived estrogens to this sex difference. Finally, speculations on possible physiologic functions for rapid mnemonic changes mediated by estrogens are made. Overall, the emergence of a novel and powerful mechanism for regulation of cognition by estradiol is described. PMID:26241030

  16. COULD ETHINYL ESTRADIOL AFFECT THE POPULATION BIOLOGY OF CUNNER, TAUTOGOLABRUS ADSPERSUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals in the environment may disturb the population dynamics of wildlife by affecting reproductive output and embryonic development of organisms. This study used a population model to evaluate whether ethinyl estradiol (EE2 could affect cunner Tautogolabr...

  17. Proplatelet formation of megakaryocytes is triggered by autocrine-synthesized estradiol

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Yuka; Yoshikawa, Jun; Hashimoto, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Payne, Anita H.; Todokoro, Kazuo

    2003-01-01

    A matured megakaryocyte releases thousands of platelets through a drastic morphological change, proplatelet formation (PPF). The megakaryocyte/erythrocyte-specific transcription factor, p45 NF-E2, is essential for initiating PPF, but the factor regulating PPF has not been identified. Here we report that estradiol synthesized in megakaryocytes triggers PPF. We demonstrate that a key enzyme for steroid hormone biosynthesis, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD), is a target of p45 NF-E2, and rescues PPF of p45 NF-E2-deficient megakaryocytes. We also show that estradiol is synthesized within megakaryocytes, and that extracellular estradiol stimulates PPF, inhibition of 3β-HSD activity blocks PPF, and estrogen receptor antagonists inhibit platelet production in vivo. We conclude that autocrine estradiol action regulates platelet production by triggering PPF. PMID:14665668

  18. Testosterone and estradiol produce different effects on cognitive performance in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Robert B.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of castration and hormone treatment on cognitive performance were evaluated in male rats. Castrated animals received either testosterone or estradiol and were compared with gonadally intact animals and with castrated controls. Results revealed a dissociation between the effects of testosterone and estradiol on cognitive performance in male rats. Specifically, estradiol enhanced acquisition of a delayed matching-to-position spatial task, similar to previously published observations in females. In contrast, neither castration nor testosterone treatment had any significant effect on acquisition of the delayed matching-to-position task, but did appear to affect delay-dependent working memory. None of the treatments had any significant effect on acquisition of a configural association negative patterning task, suggesting that effects on the delayed matching-to-position task were not due to effects on motivational factors. These data demonstrate that, as in females, gonadal hormones influence cognitive performance in males and suggest that estradiol and testosterone affect distinct cognitive domains. PMID:15890350

  19. Tyrosinase-like activity and estradiol binding in rat uterine nuclear extracts.

    PubMed

    Garai, J; Clark, J H

    1992-05-01

    Nuclear extracts from the uteri of estradiol-implanted rats contain a tyrosinase-like enzyme that has three activities: monophenolase or cresolase, diphenolase or catecholase, and estrogen binding. When [3H]estradiol was used as a substrate, 3H2O was released from the A ring in the presence of copper and ascorbic acid. The optimal concentrations of these cofactors for the cresolase activity were established. The cresolase activity was lost on attempts at further purification. Estradiol binding was observed in conjunction with the enzymatic activity and was dependent on the presence of ascorbic acid and copper. The most potent inhibitors of 3H2O release from [3H]estradiol were those with a dihydroxyphenol moiety. The reaction was also sensitive to sulfhydryl reagents. These features of the enzyme are distinctive from other oxidases capable of attacking the aromatic ring of estrogens. PMID:1488787

  20. [Effectiveness of transdermal administration of 17-beta-estradiol in the management of menopause].

    PubMed

    Grio, R; Piacentino, R; Abbondanza, M; Cirnigliaro, C; Fusi, D; Corsello, F P; Arrichiello, G; Canestrelli, M; Marchino, G L

    1992-01-01

    Seventeen-beta-estradiol administered via a transdermic route was used to treat menopausal symptoms. The results obtained demonstrate the drug's good level of tolerability and considerable efficacy. PMID:1508379

  1. Combination of automatic HPLC-RIA method for determination of estrone and estradiol in serum.

    PubMed

    Yasui, T; Yamada, M; Kinoshita, H; Uemura, H; Yoneda, N; Irahara, M; Aono, T; Sunahara, S; Mito, Y; Kurimoto, F; Hata, K

    1999-01-01

    We developed a highly sensitive assay for estrone and 17 beta-estradiol in serum. Estrone and 17 beta-estradiol, obtained by solid-phase extraction using a Sep pak tC18 cartridge, were purified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Quantitation of estrone and 17 beta-estradiol were carried out by radioimmunoassay. Not insignificantly, this automatic system of extraction and HPLC succeeded in analyzing 80 samples a week. Intra-assay coefficients of variation (CV) for estrone and 17 beta-estradiol ranged from 19.5 to 28.7%, and from 8.5 to 13.7%, respectively. The minimum detectable dose for estrone and 17 beta-estradiol were 1.04 pg/ml and 0.64 pg/ml, respectively. The serum levels of 17 beta-estradiol using our method strongly correlated with those by Gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The serum levels of estrone and 17 beta-estradiol in 154 peri- and postmenopausal women were estimated to be between 15 and 27 pg/ml and between 3.5 and 24.0 pg/ml, respectively, while the serum level of 17 beta-estradiol in postmenopausal women, in particular, was estimated to be from 3.5 to 6.3 pg/ml. For postmenopausal women who suffered from vasomotor symptoms, the mean levels of estrone and 17 beta-estradiol at 12 to 18 hours after treatment with daily 0.625 mg conjugated equine estrogen (CEE) and 2.5 mg medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) were 135.0 and 21.3 pg/ml at 12 months, respectively. On the other hand, levels of estrone and 17 beta-estradiol at 12 to 18 hours after treatment with CEE and MPA every other day, were 73.4 and 15.3 pg/ml, respectively. These highly sensitive assays for estrone and 17 beta-estradiol are useful in measuring low levels of estrogen in postmenopausal women, and monitoring estrogen levels in women receiving CEE as hormone replacement therapy. PMID:10633293

  2. Estradiol influences the mechanical properties of human fetal osteoblasts through cytoskeletal changes

    SciTech Connect

    Muthukumaran, Padmalosini; Lim, Chwee Teck; Lee, Taeyong

    2012-07-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estradiol induced stiffness changes of osteoblasts were quantified using AFM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estradiol causes significant decrease in the stiffness of osteoblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decreased stiffness was caused by decreased density of f-actin network. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stiffness changes were not associated with mineralized matrix of osteoblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estradiol increases inherent alkaline phosphatase activity of osteoblasts. -- Abstract: Estrogen is known to have a direct effect on bone forming osteoblasts and bone resorbing osteoclasts. The cellular and molecular effects of estrogen on osteoblasts and osteoblasts-like cells have been extensively studied. However, the effect of estrogen on the mechanical property of osteoblasts has not been studied yet. It is important since mechanical property of the mechanosensory osteoblasts could be pivotal to its functionality in bone remodeling. This is the first study aimed to assess the direct effect of estradiol on the apparent elastic modulus (E{sup Asterisk-Operator }) and corresponding cytoskeletal changes of human fetal osteoblasts (hFOB 1.19). The cells were cultured in either medium alone or medium supplemented with {beta}-estradiol and then subjected to Atomic Force Microscopy indentation (AFM) to determine E{sup Asterisk-Operator }. The underlying changes in cytoskeleton were studied by staining the cells with TRITC-Phalloidin. Following estradiol treatment, the cells were also tested for proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization. With estradiol treatment, E{sup Asterisk-Operator} of osteoblasts significantly decreased by 43-46%. The confocal images showed that the changes in f-actin network observed in estradiol treated cells can give rise to the changes in the stiffness of the cells. Estradiol also increases the inherent alkaline phosphatase activity of the cells. Estradiol induced stiffness

  3. Estradiol and mental rotation: relation to dimensionality, difficulty, or angular disparity?

    PubMed

    Hampson, Elizabeth; Levy-Cooperman, Na'ama; Korman, Jennifer M

    2014-03-01

    Several studies have reported that performance on spatial rotation tests is better at menses than at high estradiol phases of the menstrual cycle in women. These effects are debated because nearly all reports of menstrual cycle variability have relied on a single test, the Mental Rotations Test (MRT, Vandenberg and Kuse, 1978). In the present study, we investigated key features of the MRT that might be responsible for its association with estradiol levels. We hypothesized that associations could be demonstrated for other tasks that share the same characteristics. Forty-four women ages 20-38 years, matched on education and general ability, were assessed at low (n=24) or high (n=20) estradiol stages of the menstrual cycle on a set of spatial tests that varied in dimensionality, plane of rotation, angular disparity, and effortfulness. Saliva was used to quantify estradiol and progesterone. Low estradiol was found to be associated with significantly better accuracy on the MRT and also on a mental rotation task that required large angles of rotation but employed only two-dimensional object representations and rotations limited to the picture plane. In contrast, a task using identical stimuli that required only small angles of rotation did not show an estradiol effect. A group difference also was seen on a test of perceptual closure. The results confirm that the estradiol effect is not limited to the MRT, and identify the rotational element, but also aspects of figural perception, as possible processes that may be responsive to estrogens. These findings advance our understanding by showing an association between estradiol and discrete spatial processes. Implications for understanding the origins of the robust sex difference commonly observed on the MRT are discussed. PMID:24394702

  4. Estradiol Stimulates Vasodilatory and Metabolic Pathways in Cultured Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sobrino, Agua; Mata, Manuel; Laguna-Fernandez, Andrés; Novella, Susana; Oviedo, Pilar J.; García-Pérez, Miguel Angel; Tarín, Juan J.; Cano, Antonio; Hermenegildo, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Vascular effects of estradiol are being investigated because there are controversies among clinical and experimental studies. DNA microarrays were used to investigate global gene expression patterns in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) exposed to 1 nmol/L estradiol for 24 hours. When compared to control, 187 genes were identified as differentially expressed with 1.9-fold change threshold. Supervised principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis revealed the differences between control and estradiol-treated samples. Physiological concentrations of estradiol are sufficient to elicit significant changes in HUVEC gene expression. Notch signaling, actin cytoskeleton signaling, pentose phosphate pathway, axonal guidance signaling and integrin signaling were the top-five canonical pathways significantly regulated by estrogen. A total of 26 regulatory networks were identified as estrogen responsive. Microarray data were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR in cardiovascular meaning genes; cyclooxigenase (COX)1, dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH)2, phospholipase A2 group IV (PLA2G4) B, and 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase were up-regulated by estradiol in a dose-dependent and estrogen receptor-dependent way, whereas COX2, DDAH1 and PLA2G4A remained unaltered. Moreover, estradiol-induced COX1 gene expression resulted in increased COX1 protein content and enhanced prostacyclin production. DDAH2 protein content was also increased, which in turn decreased asymmetric dimethylarginine concentration and increased NO release. All stimulated effects of estradiol on gene and protein expression were estrogen receptor-dependent, since were abolished in the presence of the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182780. This study identifies new vascular mechanisms of action by which estradiol may contribute to a wide range of biological processes. PMID:20011585

  5. 17β-Estradiol Attenuates Conduit Pulmonary Artery Mechanical Property Changes With Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Liu, Aiping; Tian, Lian; Golob, Mark; Eickhoff, Jens C; Boston, Madison; Chesler, Naomi C

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a rapidly fatal vascular disease, strikes women more often than men. Paradoxically, female PAH patients have better prognosis and survival rates than males. The female sex hormone 17β-estradiol has been linked to the better outcome of PAH in females; however, the mechanisms by which 17β-estradiol alters PAH progression and outcomes remain unclear. Because proximal pulmonary arterial (PA) stiffness, one hallmark of PAH, is a powerful predictor of mortality and morbidity, we hypothesized that 17β-estradiol attenuates PAH-induced changes in mechanical properties in conduit proximal PAs, which imparts hemodynamic and energetic benefits to right ventricular function. To test this hypothesis, female mice were ovariectomized and treated with 17β-estradiol or placebo. PAH was induced in mice using SU5416 and chronic hypoxia. Extra-lobar left PAs were isolated and mechanically tested ex vivo to study both static and frequency-dependent mechanical behaviors in the presence or absence of smooth muscle cell activation. Our static mechanical test showed significant stiffening of large PAs with PAH (P<0.05). 17β-Estradiol restored PA compliance to control levels. The dynamic mechanical test demonstrated that 17β-estradiol protected the arterial wall from the PAH-induced frequency-dependent decline in dynamic stiffness and loss of viscosity with PAH (P<0.05). As demonstrated by the in vivo measurement of PA hemodynamics via right ventricular catheterization, modulation by 17β-estradiol of mechanical proximal PAs reduced pulsatile loading, which contributed to improved ventricular-vascular coupling. This study provides a mechanical mechanism for delayed disease progression and better outcome in female PAH patients and underscores the therapeutic potential of 17β-estradiol in PAH. PMID:26418020

  6. Stereological study of the effects of letrozole and estradiol valerate treatment on the ovary of rats

    PubMed Central

    Noorafshan, Ali; Ahmadi, Maryam; Mesbah, Seyed-Fakhroddin

    2013-01-01

    Objective Letrozole and estradiol valerate are used to treat some hormonally-responsive symptoms and also in modeling of the polycystic ovary syndrome. However, the stereological analysis of the ovary has received less attention. Estimation of the whole ovary volume using the Cavalieri method can be applied in any orientation desired, but estimation of the mean volume of the oocytes requires isotropic uniform random sectioning. Here, a combined method was developed for estimating the parameters. To our knowledge, no comparison has been made of the effects of letrozole and estradiol on the ovary. Methods Sixty rats were divided into 4 groups receiving estradiol (4 mg/kg), olive oil, letrozole (1 mg/kg), or normal saline. After 21 days, their ovaries were studied. Results Relative to the control group, the total volume of the ovary and the cortex increased in the letrozole-treated and estradiol-treated rats. In addition, the number of the preantral, antral, and granulosa cells decreased by 43% to 56% in the letrozole- and estradiol-treated rats. On average, a 19% increase was observed in the atretic oocytes of the letrozole-treated and estradiol-treated rats, but the mean oocyte volume decreased by 29% to 44% in letrozole- and estradiol-treated rats. Furthermore, the letrozole-treated rats showed a 5-fold and 7-fold increase in the volume of the cysts and corpus luteum, respectively. A 3-fold increase was found in the volume of both the cysts and corpus luteum in the estradiol group. Conclusion The structural changes of the ovary were most pronounced in the letrozole-treated animals. PMID:24179868

  7. Methods for long-term 17β-estradiol administration to mice.

    PubMed

    Ingberg, E; Theodorsson, A; Theodorsson, E; Strom, J O

    2012-01-01

    Rodent models constitute a cornerstone in the elucidation of the effects and biological mechanisms of 17β-estradiol. However, a thorough assessment of the methods for long-term administration of 17β-estradiol to mice is lacking. The fact that 17β-estradiol has been demonstrated to exert different effects depending on dose emphasizes the need for validated administration regimens. Therefore, 169 female C57BL/6 mice were ovariectomized and administered 17β-estradiol using one of the two commonly used subcutaneous methods; slow-release pellets (0.18 mg, 60-day release pellets; 0.72 mg, 90-day release pellets) and silastic capsules (with/without convalescence period, silastic laboratory tubing, inner/outer diameter: 1.575/3.175 mm, filled with a 14 mm column of 36 μg 17β-estradiol/mL sesame oil), or a novel peroral method (56 μg 17β-estradiol/day/kg body weight in the hazelnut cream Nutella). Forty animals were used as ovariectomized and intact controls. Serum samples were obtained weekly for five weeks and 17β-estradiol concentrations were measured using radioimmunoassay. The peroral method resulted in steady concentrations within--except on one occasion--the physiological range and the silastic capsules produced predominantly physiological concentrations, although exceeding the range by maximum a factor three during the first three weeks. The 0.18 mg pellet yielded initial concentrations an order of magnitude higher than the physiological range, which then decreased drastically, and the 0.72 mg pellet produced between 18 and 40 times higher concentrations than the physiological range during the entire experiment. The peroral method and silastic capsules described in this article constitute reliable modes of administration of 17β-estradiol, superior to the widely used commercial pellets. PMID:22137913

  8. Galanthamine Plus Estradiol Treatment Enhances Cognitive Performance in Aged Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, R.B.; Chipman, A.M.; Hammond, R.; Nelson, D.

    2011-01-01

    We hypothesize that beneficial effects of estradiol on cognitive performance diminish with age and time following menopause due to a progressive decline in basal forebrain cholinergic function. This study tested whether galanthamine, a cholinesterase inhibitor used to treat memory impairment associated with Alzheimer’s disease, could enhance or restore estradiol effects on cognitive performance in aged rats that had been ovariectomized in middle-age. Rats were ovariectomized at 16–17 months of age. At 21–22 months of age rats began receiving daily injections of galanthamine (5 mg/day) or vehicle. After one week, half of each group also received 17ß-estradiol administered subcutaneously. Rats were then trained on a delayed matching to position (DMP) T-maze task, followed by an operant stimulus discrimination/reversal learning task. Treatment with galanthamine + estradiol significantly enhanced the rate of DMP acquisition and improved short-term delay-dependent spatial memory performance. Treatment with galanthamine or estradiol alone were without significant effect. Effects were task-specific in that galanthamine + estradiol treatment did not significantly improve performance on the stimulus discrimination/reversal learning task. In fact, estradiol was associated with a significant increase in incorrect responses on this task after reversal of the stimulus contingency. In addition, treatments did not significantly affect hippocampal choline acetyltransferase activity or acetylcholine release. This may be an effect of age, or possibly is related to compensatory changes associated with long-term cholinesterase inhibitor treatment. The data suggest that treating with a cholinesterase inhibitor can enhance the effects of estradiol on acquisition of a DMP task by old rats following a long period of hormone deprivation. This could be of particular benefit to older women who have not used hormone therapy for many years and are beginning to show signs of mild

  9. Effects of estradiol on uterine perfusion in anesthetized cyclic mares affected with uterine vascular elastosis.

    PubMed

    Esteller-Vico, A; Liu, I K M; Vaughan, B; Steffey, E P; Brosnan, R J

    2016-01-01

    Uterine vascular elastosis in mares is characterized by degeneration of uterine vasculature through thickening of the elastin layers. Factors commonly associated with this degeneration include age, parity, and chronic uterine endometritis. Affected mares have also been shown to exhibit decreases in uterine blood flow and perfusion of the uterus. Due to the increased thickness of the elastin layers, we hypothesize that vasodilatation of the uterine vasculature is also impaired. To test the functionality of these vessels, we evaluated the vasodilatory effects of estradiol on the uterine vascular bed in mares with normal vasculature and mares with severe elastosis. Both groups were tested in estrus and diestrus. Fluorescent microspheres were used to determine basal blood perfusion, followed by the intravenous administration of 1.0 μg/kg of 17β-estradiol. After 90 min, perfusion was measured once again to determine the vascular response to estradiol. Control mares in estrus displayed a significant increase in total uterine blood flow after the administration of estradiol when compared to baseline levels. No other group had a significant increase in total blood flow and perfusion after estradiol administration. The administration of estradiol in control mares induced regional increases in perfusion in the uterine horns and uterine body during estrus and only in the uterine horns during diestrus. Mares affected by elastosis exhibited no regional differences in perfusion levels post-estradiol administration. The difference in the vasodilatory response induced by estradiol between reproductively healthy mares and mares affected with elastosis indicates that the functionality of the affected vessels is compromised. PMID:26642749

  10. Signaling mechanisms involved in the acute effects of estradiol on 5-HT clearance.

    PubMed

    Benmansour, Saloua; Privratsky, Anthony A; Adeniji, Opeyemi S; Frazer, Alan

    2014-05-01

    Estradiol was found previously to have an antidepressant-like effect and to block the ability of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) to have an antidepressant-like effect. The antidepressant-like effect of estradiol was due to estrogen receptor β (ERβ) and/or GPR30 activation, whereas estradiol's blockade of the effect of an SSRI was mediated by ERα. This study focuses on investigating signaling pathways as well as interacting receptors associated with these two effects of estradiol. In vivo chronoamperometry was used to measure serotonin transporter (SERT) function. The effect of local application of estradiol or selective agonists for ERα (PPT) or ERβ (DPN) into the CA3 region of the hippocampus of ovariectomized (OVX) rats on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) clearance as well as on the ability of fluvoxamine to slow 5-HT clearance was examined after selective blockade of signaling pathways or that of interacting receptors. Estradiol- or DPN-induced slowing of 5-HT clearance mediated by ERβ was blocked after inhibition of MAPK/ERK1/2 but not of PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. This effect also involved interactions with TrkB, and IGF-1 receptors. Estradiol's or PPT's inhibition of the fluvoxamine-induced slowing of 5-HT clearance mediated by ERα, was blocked after inhibition of either MAPK/ERK1/2 or PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. This effect involved interactions with the IGF-1 receptor and with the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1, but not with TrkB. This study illustrates some of the signaling pathways required for the effects of estradiol on SERT function, and particularly shows that ER subtypes elicit different as well as common signaling pathways for their actions. PMID:24423185

  11. Sorption and transport of 17beta-estradiol and testosterone in undisturbed soil columns.

    PubMed

    Sangsupan, H A; Radcliffe, D E; Hartel, P G; Jenkins, M B; Vencill, W K; Cabrera, M L

    2006-01-01

    Land-applied domestic animal wastes contain appreciable amounts of 17beta-estradiol (henceforth, estradiol) and testosterone. These sex hormones may be transported through soil to groundwater and streams, where they may adversely affect the environment. Previous column transport studies with these hormones used repacked soil and did not consider preferential flow. We, therefore, determined the sorption and transport characteristics of estradiol and testosterone in undisturbed soil columns (15-cm i.d. by 32-cm height). In the sorption experiment, isotherms for estradiol and testosterone were nonlinear with Freundlich exponents (n) less than one. Sorption of both hormones decreased with soil depth, and estradiol sorbed more strongly than testosterone. Average estradiol Freundlich sorption coefficients (K(f)) values were 36.9 microg(1 - n) mL(n) g(-1) for the 0- to 10-cm soil depth and 25.7 microg(1 - n) mL(n) g(-1) for the 20- to 30-cm soil depth. Average testosterone K(f) values were 26.7 microg(1 - n) mL(n) g(-1) for the 0- to 10-cm soil depth and 14.0 microg(1 - n) mL(n) g(-1) for the 20- to 30-cm soil depth. In the transport experiment, 27% of the estradiol and 42% of the testosterone leached through the soil columns. Approximately 50% of the remaining soil-bound hormones were sorbed in the top 10 cm of soil. In almost all instances, breakthrough concentrations of estradiol, testosterone, and a chloride tracer peaked simultaneously. Simultaneous breakthrough and HYDRUS-1D transport parameters indicated both chemical and physical nonequilibrium processes affected hormone transport. This suggests hormones placed on soil surfaces may contaminate groundwater under conditions of preferential flow. PMID:17071897

  12. Comparison of cardiac-induced endogenous fields and power frequency induced exogenous fields in an anatomical model of the human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Rodney A.; Gandhi, Om P.

    1998-10-01

    Time-domain potentials measured at 64 points on the surface of a large canine heart, considered comparable with those of a human heart, were used to calculate the electric fields and current densities within various organs of the human body. A heterogeneous volume conductor model of an adult male with a resolution of approximately and 30 segmented tissue types was used along with the admittance method and successive over-relaxation to calculate the voltage distribution throughout the torso and head as a function of time. From this time-domain voltage description, values of and were obtained, allowing for maximum values to be found within the given tissues of interest. Frequency analysis was then used to solve for and in the various organs, so that average, minimum and maximum values within specific bandwidths (0-40, 40-70 and 70-100 Hz) could be analysed. A comparison was made between the computed results and measured data from both EKG waveforms and isopotential surface maps for validation, with good agreement in both amplitude and shape between the computed and measured results. These computed endogenous fields were then compared with exogenous fields induced in the body from a 60 Hz high-voltage power line and a 60 Hz uniform magnetic field of 1 mT directed from the front to the back of the body. The high-voltage power line EMFs and 1 mT magnetic field were used as `bench' marks for comparison with several safety guidelines for power frequency (50/60 Hz) EMF exposures. The endogenous electric fields and current densities in most of the tissues (except for

  13. Consequences of nongenomic actions of estradiol on pathogenic genital tract response

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Estradiol is a steroid hormone that regulates the structure and function of the female reproductive system. In addition to its genomic effects, which are mediated by activated nuclear receptors, estradiol elicits a variety of rapid signaling events independently of transcriptional or genomic regulation. These nongenomic actions influence the milieu of the genital tract, which changes the ability of pathogens to infect the genital tract. This review discusses our current knowledge regarding the mechanisms and relevance of nongenomic estradiol signaling in the genital tract that could change the ability of pathogens to invade epithelial cells. PubMed was searched through January 1980 for papers related to estradiol actions in the ovary, fallopian tube, uterus and cervix. The mechanisms conveying these rapid effects consist of a multitude of signaling molecules and include cross-talk with slower transcriptional actions. The nongenomic actions of estradiol that influence the infectious abilities of pathogens occur either directly on the genital tract cells or indirectly by modulating the local and systemic immune systems. Additional in-depth characterization of the response is required before the normal and pathological reproductive functions of the nongenomic estradiol pathway can be targeted for pharmacological intervention. PMID:23351368

  14. Estradiol attenuates directed migration of vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Kolodgie, F. D.; Jacob, A.; Wilson, P. S.; Carlson, G. C.; Farb, A.; Verma, A.; Virmani, R.

    1996-01-01

    Although the cardiovascular benefits of the hormone estrogen are at least, in part, mediated by its antiproliferative effect on vascular smooth muscle, its action on the migration of these cells is unknown. To explore this relationship, female rat aortic smooth muscle cells were grown in hormone-free medium, and the effect of various concentrations of beta-estradiol on directed cellular migration was measured in vitro using a microwell Boyden chamber apparatus. Migration of smooth muscle cells to the known chemoattractants platelet-derived growth factor, insulin-like growth factor-1, and fibronectin (all at peak doses for migratory activity) was attenuated by beta-estradiol (0.5 to 10 ng/ml) in a concentration-dependent manner relative to control cells treated with vehicle (0.01% ethanol). This response was insensitive to pretreatment with indomethacin and was stereospecific (17 alpha-estradiol lacked response). Like beta-estradiol, the synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol attenuated directed smooth muscle cell migration whereas the male hormone testosterone was ineffective. Additional studies showed that beta-estradiol-mediated suppression of migration was inhibited by the anti-estrogen ICI 164,384 and the gene transcription inhibitor actinomycin D. These are the first results demonstrating a reduction in directed smooth muscle cell migration by beta-estradiol. The mechanism of this estrogen-mediated response appears to involve conventional estrogen receptors. PMID:8774151

  15. Modulatory Effects of Sex Steroids Progesterone and Estradiol on Odorant Evoked Responses in Olfactory Receptor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Paul; Mohrhardt, Julia; Gisselmann, Günter; Hatt, Hanns

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the sex steroid hormones progesterone and estradiol on physiology and behavior during menstrual cycles and pregnancy is well known. Several studies indicate that olfactory performance changes with cyclically fluctuating steroid hormone levels in females. Knowledge of the exact mechanisms behind how female sex steroids modulate olfactory signaling is limited. A number of different known genomic and non-genomic actions that are mediated by progesterone and estradiol via interactions with different receptors may be responsible for this modulation. Next generation sequencing-based RNA-Seq transcriptome data from the murine olfactory epithelium (OE) and olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) revealed the expression of several membrane progestin receptors and the estradiol receptor Gpr30. These receptors are known to mediate rapid non-genomic effects through interactions with G proteins. RT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining results provide evidence for progestin and estradiol receptors in the ORNs. These data support the hypothesis that steroid hormones are capable of modulating the odorant-evoked activity of ORNs. Here, we validated this hypothesis through the investigation of steroid hormone effects by submerged electro-olfactogram and whole cell patch-clamp recordings of ORNs. For the first time, we demonstrate that the sex steroid hormones progesterone and estradiol decrease odorant-evoked signals in the OE and ORNs of mice at low nanomolar concentrations. Thus, both of these sex steroids can rapidly modulate the odor responsiveness of ORNs through membrane progestin receptors and the estradiol receptor Gpr30. PMID:27494699

  16. Sex, estradiol, and spatial memory in a food-caching corvid.

    PubMed

    Rensel, Michelle A; Ellis, Jesse M S; Harvey, Brigit; Schlinger, Barney A

    2015-09-01

    Estrogens significantly impact spatial memory function in mammalian species. Songbirds express the estrogen synthetic enzyme aromatase at relatively high levels in the hippocampus and there is evidence from zebra finches that estrogens facilitate performance on spatial learning and/or memory tasks. It is unknown, however, whether estrogens influence hippocampal function in songbirds that naturally exhibit memory-intensive behaviors, such as cache recovery observed in many corvid species. To address this question, we examined the impact of estradiol on spatial memory in non-breeding Western scrub-jays, a species that routinely participates in food caching and retrieval in nature and in captivity. We also asked if there were sex differences in performance or responses to estradiol. Utilizing a combination of an aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, with estradiol implants, we found that while overall cache recovery rates were unaffected by estradiol, several other indices of spatial memory, including searching efficiency and efficiency to retrieve the first item, were impaired in the presence of estradiol. In addition, males and females differed in some performance measures, although these differences appeared to be a consequence of the nature of the task as neither sex consistently out-performed the other. Overall, our data suggest that a sustained estradiol elevation in a food-caching bird impairs some, but not all, aspects of spatial memory on an innate behavioral task, at times in a sex-specific manner. PMID:26232613

  17. Promotion of human adipocyte precursor replication by 17beta-estradiol in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Roncari, D A; Van, R L

    1978-01-01

    The influence of 17beta-estradiol and 17alpha-estradiol on adult human omental adipocyte precursors grown in a propagating culture system was studied. Cells were grown in subculture in the presence or absence of hormone. 17beta-estradiol resulted in significant promotion of adipocyte precursor replication, as determined by cell counting and incorporation of radioactive thymidine into DNA. The hormone stimulated cell multiplication in the concentration range 0.5--500 ng/ml growth medium. The highest level tested was 500 ng/ml. The maximal effects were obtained at 50 ng/ml (P less than 0.001 by paired t test, 48 h after hormone addition). All 10 cell strains (five were derived from men and five from women) that were tested responded similarly to the hormone. 17beta-estradiol did not affect cell size. 17alpha-estradiol did not promote the replication of adipocyte precursors, nor did it influence cell size. Thus, 17beta-estradiol, which is the active isomer in known target tissues, stimulates the multiplication of human adipocyte precursors in culture. Images PMID:690182

  18. Estradiol receptor: phosphorylation on tyrosine in uterus and interaction with anti-phosphotyrosine antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Migliaccio, A; Rotondi, A; Auricchio, F

    1986-01-01

    Estradiol receptor from rat uteri incubated with [32P] orthophosphate has been purified by diethylstilbestrol--Sepharose followed by heparin--Sepharose chromatography. The purified receptor, analyzed by centrifugation through sucrose gradients after incubation with monoclonal antibodies against purified estradiol receptor, appears to be labeled with 32P. The receptor preparation has been further purified by immunoaffinity chromatography and submitted to SDS--poly-acrylamide gel electrophoresis. A heavily 32P-labeled 68 kd protein and a very lightly 32P-labeled 48 kd protein, probably a proteolytic product of the 68 kd protein, were detected. Phosphoamino acid analysis of the receptor eluted from the immunoaffinity column shows that its 32P-labeling occurs exclusively on tyrosine. This is the first report on phosphorylation on tyrosine of a steroid receptor in tissue. It is consistent with our previous finding that a uterus estradiol receptor-kinase, which confers hormone binding ability to the estradiol receptor, in vitro phosphorylates this receptor exclusively on tyrosine. Calf uterus receptor binds with high specificity and affinity to monoclonal anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies covalently bound to Sepharose (Kd = 0.28 nM). Dephosphorylation of the receptor by nuclei containing the calf uterus nuclear phosphatase abolishes the interaction with antibodies. These results suggest that also in calf uterus, estradiol receptor is phosphorylated on tyrosine. Anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies bound to Sepharose have been used to partially purify the estradiol receptor from calf uterus. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:2431901

  19. Emerging issues in extremely-low-frequency electric and magnetic field health research

    SciTech Connect

    Kavet, R.I.; Banks, R.S.

    1986-04-01

    Concern has increased over potential consequences of exposure to electric and magnetic fields of extremely low frequency (0-100 Hz), particularly from power transmission and distribution. Also at issue are electrical environments in homes and workplaces. Until recently, research focused on the electric, rather than the magnetic, field; now, both are under extensive investigation. A review of research to date indicates the following: Electric and magnetic fields can produce effects in vitro, with the locus of field interaction believed to be at the cell membrane. Chronic in vivo electric field exposure fails to produce effects except in behavior, neurophysiology, endocrinology, and, possibly, fetal development. The extrapolation of these animal data to humans requires further research. The epidemiological literature has, in some cases, reported an association between increased cancer rates and putative field exposure. Exposure assessments indicate that, in all likelihood, human exposures to 60-Hz electric fields of the magnitudes found under transmission lines are very infrequent; assessments are continuing to characterize exposure to 60-Hz magnetic fields and to measure the field frequency spectra found in residential and workplace settings. The public health issues emerging from this research focus on fetal development and on the initiation or promotion of cancer. It is critical to reduce existing uncertainties in order to enable valid risk assessment.

  20. Modeling Sorption and Degradation of 17β-Estradiol-17-Sulfate in Agricultural Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, X.; Casey, F. X.; Hakk, H.; Shrestha, S. L.; DeSutter, T.; Khan, E.; Oduor, P. G.

    2011-12-01

    The natural steroid hormone, 17β-estradiol (E2), can be an endocrine disruptor at part-per trillion levels. Laboratory studies indicate a low potential for E2 persistence and mobility in the environment; however, field studies consistently indicate the presence of E2 and its primary metabolite, estrone, at levels sufficiently high to impact water quality. To facilitate urine excretion, animals may release E2 as a sulfated conjugate, which would have a higher aqueous solubility than the parent compound. We hypothesize that E2 conjugates contribute to the detection of free estrogens in the environment. The objective of this study was to determine the sorption, degradation, and mobility of a model conjugate, 17β-estradiol-17-sulfate (E2-17S), in agricultural soils. Radiolabeled E2-17S ([14C]E2-17S) was chemically synthesized in a three-step process, and then batch experiments were conducted in natural and sterile soils. Additionally, soil organic carbon (OC) was varied (1.29 and 0.26%) to investigate its effect on the fate of [14C]E2-17S. Liquid scintillation counting (LSC) was used in concert with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to detect and quantitate parent compound and metabolites of E2-17S in the aqueous and bound phases. Residual soil was combusted to determine non-extractable levels of 14C. The E2-17S was relatively stable in the aqueous phase for natural and sterile soils. Mono- and di- hydroxyl E2-17S were detected as metabolites of E2-17S in the aqueous phase above both sterile and natural soil. Deconjugation to form E2 was not observed in aqueous phase; however, E2 and estrone were extracted from both natural and sterile soils. A conceptual model was developed to simulate and identify the fate and transport processes of E2-17S. Organic carbon was found to be an important factor affecting the sorption and degradation of E2-17S in soils.

  1. [Membrane receptors for estradiol--new way of biological action].

    PubMed

    Lachowicz-Ochedalska, Agnieszka

    2005-01-01

    Classical action of steroid hormones, called genomic, includes binding to their intracellular receptor, require hours or days to occur and require transcriptional effects with subsequent modulation of protein expression. Some of the biological effects induced by steroids, and mainly by sex steroids, take place within seconds or few minutes, time far too fast to be due to the genomic changes. The rapid, nongenomic action of estradiol are attributed to membrane action, probably through variety of proteins present in cell membrane. The rapid effects of steroid hormones are manifold, ranging from activation of protein and tyrosine kinases, G proteins, and modulation of ion channels. The nongenomic way of action includes also non-direct control of processes of transcription and gene expression. There are at least three different way to interact with cell membrane. Steroids may change membrane fluidity, without binding to any known protein or receptor. Another way is allosteric modulation of non-specific for steroid hormones receptors, or structural and enzymatic protein present in cell membrane. Evidence suggests that the classical steroid receptors can be localized at the plasma membrane, triggering signals typical for G-proteins coupled receptors. Physiological significance of nongenomic action of steroids needs to be elucidated. PMID:16350726

  2. Differences in oocyte development and estradiol sensitivity among mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Pepling, Melissa E; Sundman, Emily A; Patterson, Nicole L; Gephardt, Grant W; Medico, Leonard; Wilson, Krystal I

    2010-02-01

    Mouse oocytes develop in clusters of interconnected cells called germline cysts. Shortly after birth, the majority of cysts break apart and primordial follicles form, consisting of one oocyte surrounded by granulosa cells. Concurrently, oocyte number is reduced by two-thirds. Exposure of neonatal females to estrogenic compounds causes multiple oocyte follicles that are likely germline cysts that did not break down. Supporting this idea, estrogen disrupts cyst breakdown and may regulate normal oocyte development. Previously, the CD-1 strain was used to study cyst breakdown and oocyte survival, but it is unknown if there are differences in these processes in other mouse strains. It is also unknown if there are variations in estrogen sensitivity during oocyte development. Here, we examined neonatal oocyte development in FVB, C57BL/6, and F2 hybrid (Oct4-GFP) strains, and compared them with the CD-1 strain. We found variability in oocyte development among the four strains. We also investigated estrogen sensitivity differences, and found that C57BL/6 ovaries are more sensitive to estradiol than CD-1, FVB, or Oct4-GFP ovaries. Insight into differences in oocyte development will facilitate comparison of mice generated on different genetic backgrounds. Understanding variations in estrogen sensitivity will lead to better understanding of the risks of environmental estrogen exposure in humans. PMID:19846484

  3. Estradiol protective role in atherogenesis through LDL structure modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papi, Massimiliano; Brunelli, Roberto; Ciasca, Gabriele; Maiorana, Alessandro; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Palmieri, Valentina; Parasassi, Tiziana; De Spirito, Marco

    2016-07-01

    Relevant physiological functions are exerted by circulating low density lipoprotein (LDL) as well as eventual pathological processes triggering atherogenesis. Modulation of these functions can well be founded on modifications of LDL structure. Given its large dimension, multicomponent organization and strong interactions between the protein apoB-100 and lipids, determining LDL 3D structure remains a challenge. We propose a novel quantitative physical approach to this complex biological problem. We introduce a three-component model, fitted to small angle x-ray scattering data on LDL maintained in physiological conditions, able to achieve a consistent 3D structure. Unexpected features include three distinct protein domains protruding out of a sphere, quite rough in its surface, where several core lipid areas are exposed. All LDL components are affected by 17-β-estradiol (E2) binding to apoB-100. Mostly one of the three protruding protein domains, dramatically reducing its presence on the surface and with a consequent increase of core lipids’ exposure. This result suggests a structural basis for some E2 protecting roles and LDL physiological modifications.

  4. Estradiol promotes the rewarding effects of nicotine in female rats.

    PubMed

    Flores, Rodolfo J; Pipkin, Joseph A; Uribe, Kevin P; Perez, Adriana; O'Dell, Laura E

    2016-07-01

    It is presently unclear whether ovarian hormones, such as estradiol (E2), promote the rewarding effects of nicotine in females. Thus, we compared extended access to nicotine intravenous self-administration (IVSA) in intact male, intact female, and OVX female rats (Study 1) as well as OVX females that received vehicle or E2 supplementation (Study 2). The E2 supplementation procedure involved a 4-day injection regimen involving 2 days of vehicle and 2 days of E2 administration. Two doses of E2 (25 or 250μg) were assessed in separate groups of OVX females in order to examine the dose-dependent effects of this hormone on the rewarding effects of nicotine. The rats were given 23-hour access to nicotine IVSA using an escalating dose regimen (0.015, 0.03, and 0.06mg/kg/0.1mL). Each dose was self-administered for 4 days with 3 intervening days of nicotine abstinence. The results revealed that intact females displayed higher levels of nicotine intake as compared to males. Also, intact females displayed higher levels of nicotine intake versus OVX females. Lastly, our results revealed that OVX rats that received E2 supplementation displayed a dose-dependent increase in nicotine intake as compared to OVX rats that received vehicle. Together, our results suggest that the rewarding effects of nicotine are enhanced in female rats via the presence of the ovarian hormone, E2. PMID:27059334

  5. Estradiol regulates MICA expression in human endometrial cells

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Satarupa; Pioli, Patricia A.; Conejo-Garcia, Jose; Wira, Charles R.; Sentman, Charles L.

    2008-01-01

    The human endometrium undergoes cyclical changes regulated by sex hormones. Evidence suggests sex hormones regulate NK cell recruitment into the uterus in large numbers. NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed on human NK cells, γδ and CD8 T cells. NKG2D ligands are known to be sensors of cellular “stress”. In this study, we investigated whether sex hormones directly regulate expression of NKG2D ligands in the human uterus. Estradiol increased MICA expression on uterine epithelial cells; regulation was estrogen receptor-dependent. Real-time PCR analysis showed that NKG2D ligands MICA and MICB were expressed in the human endometrium. MICA protein was detected primarily on epithelial cells, and greater expression was observed in immunohistochemical analysis of tissues from patients in the secretory phase of the menstrual cycle. Thus, estrogens regulate expression of MICA. These data suggest hormonal regulation of innate immunity and NKG2D-mediated recognition in other tissues and diseases where estrogen may be involved. PMID:18728002

  6. Estradiol replacement extends the window of opportunity for hippocampal function

    PubMed Central

    Vedder, LC; Bredemann, TM; McMahon, LL

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that treating aged female rats, ovariectomized (OVX) as young adults, with acute proestrous levels of 17β estradiol (E2) increases CA1 spine density, NMDAR/AMPAR ratio, GluN2B-mediated NMDAR current, and LTP at CA3-CA1 synapses if administered by 15, but not at 19, months post-OVX, defining the critical window of opportunity. Importantly, when rats are aged with ovaries intact until OVX at 20 months, hippocampal E2 responsiveness is maintained, indicating the deficit at 19 months post-OVX is a consequence of the duration of hormone deprivation and not chronological age. Here, we find the beneficial effect of E2 on novel object recognition in OVX rats was constrained by the same critical window. Furthermore, chronic low level E2 replacement, commenced by 11 months post-OVX using subcutaneous capsules removed 2 weeks prior to acute proestrous E2 treatment, prevents the loss of hippocampal responsiveness at 19 months post-OVX. These data define the dynamic nature of the critical window showing that chronic replacement with physiological E2 levels within a certain period post-OVX can lengthen the window. PMID:24813636

  7. Estradiol replacement extends the window of opportunity for hippocampal function.

    PubMed

    Vedder, Lindsey C; Bredemann, Teruko M; McMahon, Lori L

    2014-10-01

    We previously reported that treating aged female rats, ovariectomized (OVX) as young adults, with acute proestrous levels of 17β estradiol (E2) increases CA1 spine density, NMDAR to AMPAR ratio, GluN2B-mediated NMDAR current, and long-term potentiation at CA3-CA1 synapses if administered by 15, but not at 19-month post-OVX, defining the critical window of opportunity. Importantly, when rats are aged with ovaries intact until OVX at 20 months, hippocampal E2 responsiveness is maintained, indicating the deficit at 19-month post-OVX is a consequence of the duration of hormone deprivation and not chronological age. Here, we find the beneficial effect of E2 on novel object recognition in OVX rats was constrained by the same critical window. Furthermore, chronic low-level E2 replacement, commenced by 11-month post-OVX using subcutaneous capsules removed 2 weeks before acute proestrous E2 treatment, prevents the loss of hippocampal responsiveness at 19-month post-OVX. These data define the dynamic nature of the critical window showing that chronic replacement with physiological E2 levels within a certain period post-OVX can lengthen the window. PMID:24813636

  8. Estradiol-induced vaginal mucus inhibits antigen penetration and CD8+ T cell priming in response to intravaginal immunization

    PubMed Central

    Seavey, Matthew M.; Mosmann, Tim R.

    2010-01-01

    Although vaginal immunization has been explored as a strategy to induce mucosal immunity in the female reproductive tract, this site displays unique immunological features that probably evolved to inhibit anti-paternal T cell responses after insemination to allow successful pregnancy. We previously demonstrated that estradiol, which induces an estrus-like state, prevented CD8+ T cell priming during intravaginal immunization of mice. We now show that estradiol prevented antigen loading of vaginal antigen presenting cells (APC) after intravaginal immunization. Histological examination confirmed that estradiol prevented penetration of peptide antigen into the vaginal wall. Removal of the estradiol-induced mucus barrier by mucinase partially restored antigen loading of vaginal APC and CD8+ T cell proliferation in vivo. The estradiol-induced mucus barrier may thus prevent exposure to antigens delivered intravaginally, supplementing additional estradiol-dependent mechanism(s) that inhibit CD8+ T cell priming after insemination or vaginal vaccination. PMID:19428849

  9. COMPARISON OF THE EFFECTS OF ESTRADIOL AND PROGESTERONE ON SEROTONERGIC FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Benmansour, Saloua; Weaver, Rami S.; Barton, Amanda K.; Adeniji, Opeyemi S.; Frazer, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Background Ovarian hormones may contribute to the vulnerability to depression as well as to the response to antidepressants (ADs). Previously we reported that acute systemic treatment with estradiol or progesterone blocked the ability of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), fluvoxamine, to inhibit serotonin transporter (SERT) function in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. In this study, behavioral consequences as well as receptor mechanisms underlying these hormonal effects were investigated. Methods Using the forced swimming test (FST), the acute effect of estradiol and/or progesterone on fluvoxamine’s AD-like effects was investigated. Using in vivo chronoamperometry, the effect of local application of estradiol or progesterone into the CA3 region of the hippocampus of OVX rats on 5-HT clearance as well as on the ability of fluvoxamine to slow 5-HT clearance was investigated. Results The decreased immobility and increased swimming caused by fluvoxamine in the FST was blocked in rats treated with estradiol and/or progesterone. Local application of estradiol, but not progesterone, slowed 5-HT clearance and both hormones blocked the ability of fluvoxamine to slow 5-HT clearance. Use of hormone receptor agonists, antagonists and hormone-BSA complexes revealed that the effects of estradiol are mediated by activation of membrane as well as nuclear estrogen receptors (ER). The AD-like effect of estradiol involved ERβ and GPR30 whereas its blockade of fluvoxamine’s effects was ERα-mediated. The effects of progesterone occurred solely by activation of intracellular progesterone receptors. Conclusion Targeting of ERβ or GPR30 might reveal a strategy to permit beneficial effects of estrogen without its deleterious effect on SSRI-efficacy. PMID:22225849

  10. Effects of endocrine disruptors on genes associated with 17beta-estradiol metabolism and excretion.

    PubMed

    Hanet, Nathalie; Lancon, Allan; Delmas, Dominique; Jannin, Brigitte; Chagnon, Marie-Christine; Cherkaoui-Malki, Moustapha; Latruffe, Norbert; Artur, Yves; Heydel, Jean-Marie

    2008-11-01

    In order to provide a global analysis of the effects of endocrine disruptors on the hormone cellular bioavailability, we combined 17beta-estradiol (E2) cellular flow studies with real-time PCR and Western blot expression measurements of genes involved in the hormone metabolism and excretion. Three endocrine disruptors commonly found in food were chosen for this study, which was conducted in the estrogen receptor (ER) negative hepatoblastoma HepG2 cell line: bisphenol A (BPA), genistein (GEN) and resveratrol (RES). We showed that 24 h after a single dose treatment with genistein, resveratrol or bisphenol A, the expression of ATP-binding cassette transporters (the multidrug resistance or MDR, and the multidrug resistance associated proteins or MRP) uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) and/or sulfotransferases (ST) involved in 17beta-estradiol elimination process were significantly modulated and that 17beta-estradiol cellular flow was modified. Resveratrol induced MDR1 and MRP3 expressions, bisphenol A induced MRP2 and MRP3 expressions, and both enhanced 17beta-estradiol efflux. Genistein, on the other hand, inhibited ST1E1 and UGT1A1 expressions, and led to 17beta-estradiol cellular retention. Thus, we demonstrate that bisphenol A, genistein and resveratrol modulate 17beta-estradiol cellular bioavailability in HepG2 and that these modulations most probably involve regulations of 17beta-estradiol phase II and III metabolism proteins. Up to now, the estrogenicity of environmental estrogenic pollutants has been based on the property of these compounds to bind to ERs. Our results obtained with ER negative cells provide strong evidence for the existence of ER-independent pathways leading to endocrine disruption. PMID:18634814

  11. VITAMIN D–BINDING PROTEIN IN HEALTHY PRE- AND POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN: RELATIONSHIP WITH ESTRADIOL CONCENTRATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Pop, L. Claudia; Shapses, Sue A.; Chang, Brian; Sun, Wei; Wang, Xiangbing

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between endogenous serum estradiol and vitamin D–binding protein (DBP) and total, free, and bioavailable 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) concentrations in pre- and postmenopausal women. Methods In 165 healthy women (ages, 26 to 75 years) not taking any form of exogenous estrogen, the serum concentrations of estradiol, 25OHD, DBP, parathyroid hormone, and albumin were measured. Free and bioavailable 25OHD (free + albumin-bound) levels were calculated from total 25OHD, DBP, and serum albumin levels. Results Premenopausal women had higher serum 25OHD (31.5 ± 7.9 ng/mL), DBP (45.3 ± 6.2 mg/dL), and estradiol (52.8 ± 35.0 pg/mL) levels than postmenopausal women (26.5 ± 4.9 ng/mL, 41.7 ± 5.7 mg/dL, and 12.9 ± 4.9 pg/mL), respectively. In addition, the calculated free and bioavailable 25OHD levels were higher in pre- than postmenopausal women (P<.05). Serum estradiol correlated with DBP (r = 0.22; P<.01) and total 25OHD (r = 0.27; P<.01). In multivariate regression models (with or without serum 25OHD), estradiol was independently associated with DBP (P<.05). Conclusion Lower estradiol level is one of the factors that contribute to lower DBP levels in older women. Our data indicate that besides well-known factors such as age, gender, and race, serum estradiol concentrations are also a physiologic predictor of DBP concentration. PMID:26121448

  12. Estradiol protects female rats against sepsis induced by Enterococcus faecalis improving leukocyte bactericidal activity.

    PubMed

    Saia, Rafael Simone; Garcia, Fabíola Morales; Cárnio, Evelin Capellari

    2015-10-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a Gram-positive bacteria described as an important causative agent of sepsis. The contact between host leukocytes and bacteria activates the innate immunity, participating as the first defense mechanism against infection. Pro-inflammatory cytokines [including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin-1β] and nitric oxide (NO) are essential to recruitment of leukocytes into the infectious focus as well as their activation for phagocytosis. Beyond the bacteria species, gender has been considered another factor to predict outcome in septic patients. Studies suggest that females exhibit a protective advantage during sepsis models, being gonadal hormones possible modulators of functions of immune cells. Nevertheless, the role of estradiol during Gram-positive infection remains a literature gap. Our aims were to investigate whether estradiol protects rats against bacterial dissemination during E. faecalis-induced sepsis. We determined whether estradiol modulates the local and systemic inflammatory response, as well as the cell migration into the infectious focus and the bactericidal capacity of leukocytes. Our findings demonstrated that estradiol pre-treated rats showed a dose-dependent reduction in bacterial counts in peritoneal lavage fluid (PLF) and in liver. Moreover, TNF-α and nitrate levels were increased in plasma, while only TNF-α was increased in the PLF in estradiol-treated rats. The prevention of bacterial dissemination may be related to the enhanced neutrophil and macrophage migration into the peritoneal cavity. Furthermore, estradiol improved the phagocytic and bactericidal ability of these both inflammatory cells. Taken together, the present study clearly demonstrates an important protective role of estradiol against sepsis induced by E. faecalis in female rats. PMID:26143494

  13. Detection of estradiol at an electrochemical immunosensor with a Cu UPD|DTBP-Protein G scaffold.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Xinhai; Zhang, Jiamei; Feng, Heqing; Liu, Xiuhua; Wong, Danny K Y

    2012-05-15

    A copper monolayer was formed on a gold electrode surface via underpotential deposition (UPD) method to construct a Cu UPD|DTBP-Protein G immunosensor for the sensitive detection of 17β-estradiol. Copper UPD monolayer can minimize the non-specific adsorption of biological molecules on the immunosensor surface and enhance the binding efficiency between immunosensor surface and thiolated Protein G. The crosslinker DTBP (Dimethyl 3,3'-dithiobispropionimidate · 2HCl) has strong ability to immobilize Protein G molecules on the electrode surface and the immobilized Protein G provides an orientation-controlled binding of antibodies. A monolayer of propanethiol was firstly self-assembled on the gold electrode surface, and a copper monolayer was deposited via UPD on the propanethiol modified electrode. Propanethiol monolayer helps to stabilize the copper monolayer by pushing the formation and stripping potentials of the copper UPD monolayer outside the potential range in which copper monolayer can be damaged easily by oxygen in air. A droplet DTBP-Protein G was then applied on the modified electrode surface followed by the immobilization of estradiol antibody. Finally, a competitive immunoassay was conducted between estradiol-BSA (bovine serum albumin) conjugate and free estradiol for the limited binding sites of estradiol antibody. Square wave voltammetry (SWV) was employed to monitor the electrochemical reduction current of ferrocenemethanol and the SWV current decreased with the increase of estradiol-BSA conjugate concentration at the immunosensor surface. Calibration of immunosensors in waste water samples spiked with 17β-estradiol yielded a linear response up to ≈ 2200 pg mL(-1), a sensitivity of 3.20 μA/pg mL(-1) and a detection limit of 12 pg mL(-1). The favorable characteristics of the immunosensors such as high selectivity, sensitivity and low detection limit can be attributed to the Cu UPD|DTBP-Protein G scaffold. PMID:22405841

  14. Peripheral microvascular vasodilatory response to estradiol and genistein in women with insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wenner, Megan M.; Taylor, Hugh S.; Stachenfeld, Nina S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Estradiol enhances vasodilation in healthy women, but vascular effects of the phytoestrogen genistein are still under investigation. Insulin resistance (IR) compromises microvascular function. We therefore examined the interaction of estradiol, genistein, and IR on microvascular vasodilatory responsiveness. Methods We hypothesized that estradiol and genistein increase microvascular vasodilation in healthy women (control, n=8, 23±2 yr, BMI 25.9±2.9 kg/m2) but not in women with IR (n=7, 20±1 yr, BMI 27.3±3.0 kg/m2). We used the cutaneous circulation as a model of microvascular vasodilatory function. We determined cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) with laser Doppler flowmetry and beat-to-beat blood pressure during local cutaneous heating (42°C) with estradiol or genistein microdialysis perfusions. Because heat induced vasodilation is primarily an NO mediated response, we examined microvascular vasodilation with and without L-NMMA. Results In control women, estradiol enhanced CVC (94.4±2.6 % vs. saline 81.6±4.2 % CVCmax, P<0.05), which was reversed with L-NMMA (80.9±7.8 % CVCmax, P<0.05), but genistein did not affect vasodilation. Neither estradiol nor genistein altered CVC in IR, although L-NMMA attenuated CVC during genistein. Conclusions Our study does not support improved microvascular responsiveness during genistein exposure in healthy young women, and demonstrates that neither estradiol nor genistein improve microvascular vasodilatory responsiveness in women with IR. PMID:25996650

  15. Comparison of Two Methods of Estradiol Replacement: their Physiological and Behavioral Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mosquera, Laurivette; Shepherd, Luz; Torrado, Aranza I; Torres-Diaz, Yvonne M; Miranda, Jorge D; Segarra, Annabell C

    2016-01-01

    Fluctuating sex steroids during the estrous or menstrual cycle of mammalian females make it difficult to determine their role on behaviors and physiology. To avoid this, many investigators ovariectomize their animals and administer progesterone, estradiol or a combination of both. Several different strategies are used to administer estradiol, which confounds interpretation of results. This study compared two methods of estradiol replacement implants: Silastic tubes filled with crystalline estradiol benzoate (E2) and commercially available estradiol benzoate pellets. Implants were placed subcutaneously in adult ovariectomized (OVX) rats and blood samples obtained weekly. Control OVX rats received empty Silastic tubes or placebo pellets. Our data shows that E2 plasma levels from rats with Silastic implants peaked after one week and decreased slowly thereafter. In contrast, plasma E2 from commercial pellets peaked after two weeks, increasing and decreasing over time. To validate hormone release, body weight was monitored. All E2 treated animals maintained a similar body weight over the four weeks period whereas an increase in body weight over time was observed in the OVX group that received empty implants, confirming E2 release and supporting the role of E2 in the regulation of body weight. Furthermore, the effects of E2 on basal locomotor activity were assessed using animal activity cages. Results showed no difference between E2 and control group in several locomotor activities. These results indicate that Silastic implants achieve more stable plasma estradiol levels than pellets and thus are a better alternative for studies of estradiol on brain function and behavior. PMID:26962471

  16. Estradiol levels modulate brain activity and negative responses to psychosocial stress across the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Albert, Kimberly; Pruessner, Jens; Newhouse, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Although ovarian hormones are thought to have a potential role in the well-known sex difference in mood and anxiety disorders, the mechanisms through which ovarian hormone changes contribute to stress regulation are not well understood. One mechanism by which ovarian hormones might impact mood regulation is by mediating the effect of psychosocial stress, which often precedes depressive episodes and may have mood consequences that are particularly relevant in women. In the current study, brain activity and mood response to psychosocial stress was examined in healthy, normally cycling women at either the high or low estradiol phase of the menstrual cycle. Twenty eight women were exposed to the Montreal Imaging Stress Task (MIST), with brain activity determined through functional magnetic resonance imaging, and behavioral response assessed with subjective mood and stress measures. Brain activity responses to psychosocial stress differed between women in the low versus high estrogen phase of the menstrual cycle: women with high estradiol levels showed significantly less deactivation in limbic regions during psychosocial stress compared to women with low estradiol levels. Additionally, women with higher estradiol levels also had less subjective distress in response to the MIST than women with lower estradiol levels. The results of this study suggest that, in normally cycling premenopausal women, high estradiol levels attenuate the brain activation changes and negative mood response to psychosocial stress. Normal ovarian hormone fluctuations may alter the impact of psychosocially stressful events by presenting periods of increased vulnerability to psychosocial stress during low estradiol phases of the menstrual cycle. This menstrual cycle-related fluctuation in stress vulnerability may be relevant to the greater risk for affective disorder or post-traumatic stress disorder in women. PMID:26123902

  17. Estradiol regulation of nucleotidases in female reproductive tract epithelial cells and fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zheng; Fahey, John V; Bodwell, Jack E; Rodriguez-Garcia, Marta; Rossoll, Richard M; Crist, Sarah G; Patel, Mickey V; Wira, Charles R

    2013-01-01

    The use of topical and oral adenosine derivatives in HIV prevention that need to be maintained in tissues and cells at effective levels to prevent transmission prompted us to ask whether estradiol could influence the regulation of catabolic nucleotidase enzymes in epithelial cells and fibroblasts from the upper and lower female reproductive tract (FRT) as these might affect cellular TFV-DP levels. Epithelial cells and fibroblasts were isolated from endometrium (EM), endocervix (CX) and ectocervix (ECX) tissues from hysterectomy patients, grown to confluence and treated with or without estradiol prior to RNA isolation. The expression of nucleotidase (NT) genes was measurable by RT-PCR in epithelial cells and fibroblasts from all FRT tissues. To determine if sex hormones have the potential to regulate NT, we evaluated NT gene expression and NT biological activity in FRT cells following hormone treatment. Estradiol increased expression of Cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase after 2 or 4 h in endometrial epithelial cells but not epithelial cells or fibroblasts from other sites. In studies using a modified 5'-Nucleotidase biological assay for nucleotidases, estradiol increased NT activity in epithelial cells and fibroblasts from the EM, CX and ECX at 24 and 48 h. In related studies, HUVEC primary cells and a HUVEC cell line were unresponsive to estradiol in terms of nucleotidase expression or biological activity. Our findings of an increase in nucleotidase expression and biological activity induced by estradiol do not directly assess changes in microbicide metabolism. However, they do suggest that when estradiol levels are elevated during the menstrual cycle, FRT epithelial cells and fibroblasts from the EM, CX and ECX have the potential to influence microbicide levels that could enhance protection of HIV-target cells (CD4+T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells) throughout the FRT. PMID:23936114

  18. The potential for estradiol and ethinylestradiol degradation in English rivers.

    PubMed

    Jürgens, Monika D; Holthaus, Karlijn I E; Johnson, Andrew C; Smith, JenniferJ L; Hetheridge, Malcom; Williams, Richard J

    2002-03-01

    Water samples were collected in spring, summer, and winter from English rivers in urban/industrial (River Aire and River Calder, Yorkshire, UK) and rural environments (River Thames, Oxfordshire, UK) to study the biodegradation potential of the key steroid estrogen 17beta-estradiol (E2) and its synthetic derivate ethinylestradiol (EE2). Microorganisms in the river water samples were capable of transforming E2 to estrone (E1) with half-lives of 0.2 to 9 d when incubated at 20 degrees C. The E1 was then further degraded at similar rates. The most rapid biodegradation rates were associated with the downstream summer samples of the River Aire and River Calder. E2 degradation rates were similar for spiking concentrations throughout the range of 20 ng/L to 500 microg/L. Microbial cleavage of the steroid ring system was demonstrated by release of radiolabeled CO2 from the aromatic ring of E2 (position 4). When E2 was degraded, the loss of estrogenicity, measured by the yeast estrogen screen (YES) assay, closely followed the loss of the parent molecule. Thus, apart from the transient formation of E1, the degradation of E2 does not form other significantly estrogenic intermediates. The E2 could also be degraded when incubated with anaerobic bed sediments. Compared to E2, EE2 was much more resistant to biodegradation, but both E2 and EE2 were susceptible to photodegradation, with half-lives in the order of 10 d under ideal conditions. PMID:11883412

  19. Estradiol rapidly inhibits soluble guanylyl cyclase expression in rat uterus

    PubMed Central

    Krumenacker, Joshua S.; Hyder, Salman M.; Murad, Ferid

    2001-01-01

    Previous reports that investigated the regulation of the NO/soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cGMP pathway by estrogenic compounds have focused primarily on the levels of NO, NO-producing enzymes, and cGMP in various tissues. In this study, we demonstrate that 17β-estradiol (E2) regulates the α1 and β1 subunits of the NO receptor, sGC, at the mRNA and protein levels in rat uterus. Using real-time quantitative PCR, we found that within 1 h of in vivo E2 administration to rats, sGC mRNA levels begin to diminish. After 3 h, there is a maximal diminution of sGC mRNA expression (sGC α1 10% and sGC β1 33% of untreated). This effect was blocked by the estrogen receptor antagonist, ICI 182,780, indicating that estrogen receptor is required. The effect of E2 also was observed in vitro with incubations of uterine tissue, indicating that the response does not depend on the secondary release of other hormones or factors from other tissues. Puromycin did not block the effect, suggesting the effects occur because of preexisting factors in uterine tissues and do not require new protein synthesis. Using immunoblot analysis, we found that sGC protein levels also were reduced by E2 over a similar time course as the sGC mRNA. We conclude that sGC plays a vital role in the NO/sGC/cGMP regulatory pathway during conditions of elevated estrogen levels in the rat uterus as a result of the reduction of sGC expression. PMID:11209068

  20. Transdermal Estradiol Treatment for Postpartum Depression: A Pilot, Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Wisner, Katherine L; Sit, Dorothy K Y; Moses-Kolko, Eydie L; Driscoll, Kara E; Prairie, Beth A; Stika, Catherine S; Eng, Heather F; Dills, John L; Luther, James F; Wisniewski, Stephen R

    2015-08-01

    Postpartum depression occurs in 14.5% of women in the first 3 months after birth. This study was an 8-week acute phase randomized trial with 3 cells (transdermal estradiol [E2], sertraline [SERT], and placebo [PL]) for the treatment of postpartum major depressive disorder. However, the study was stopped after batch analysis revealed that the E2 serum concentrations were lower than prestudy projections. This paper explores our experiences that will inform future investigations of therapeutic E2 use. Explanations for the low E2 concentrations were as follows: (1) study patch nonadhesion, which did not explain the low concentrations across the entire sample. (2) Ineffective transdermal patch preparations, although 2 different patch preparations were used and no significant main effect of patch type on E2 concentrations was found. (3) Obesity, at study entry, E2-treated women had body mass index of 32.9 (7.4) (mean [SD]). No pharmacokinetic data comparing E2 concentrations from transdermal patches in obese women versus normal weight controls are available. (4) Induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP450) 3A4 and other E2 elimination pathways in pregnancy. CYP4503A4 is induced in pregnancy and is a pathway for the metabolism of E2. Conversion to estrone and phase II metabolism via glucuronidation and sulfation, which also increase in pregnancy, are routes of E2 elimination. The time required for these pathways to normalize after delivery has not been elucidated. The observation that transdermal E2 doses greater than 100 μg/d did not increase serum concentrations was unexpected. Another hypothesis consistent with this observation is suppression of endogenous E2 secretion with increasing exogenous E2 dosing. PMID:26061609

  1. Transdermal Estradiol Treatment for Postpartum Depression: A Pilot Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wisner, Katherine L.; Sit, Dorothy K.Y.; Moses-Kolko, Eydie L.; Driscoll, Kara E.; Prairie, Beth; Stika, Catherine S.; Eng, Heather F.; Dills, John L; Luther, James F.; Wisniewski, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Postpartum depression occurs in 14.5% of women in the first three months after birth. This study was an 8 week acute phase randomized trial with three cells (transdermal estradiol (E2), sertraline, and placebo) for the treatment of postpartum major depressive disorder. However, the study was stopped after batch analysis revealed that the E2 serum concentrations were lower than pre-study projections. This paper explores our experiences that will inform future investigations of therapeutic E2 use. Explanations for the low E2 concentrations were: 1) Study patch non-adhesion, which did not explain the low concentrations across the entire sample. 2) Ineffective transdermal patch preparations, although two different patch preparations were used and no significant main effect of patch type on E2 concentrations was found. 3) Obesity, at study entry, E2-treated women had mean ± SD BMI=32.9 ±7.4. No pharmacokinetic data comparing E2 concentrations from transdermal patches in obese women vs. normal weight controls are available. 4) Induction of Cytochrome P450 (CYP450) 3A4 and other E2 elimination pathways in pregnancy. CYP4503A4 is induced in pregnancy and is a pathway for the metabolism of E2. Conversion to estrone and Phase II metabolism via glucuronidation and sulfation, which also increase in pregnancy, are routes of E2 elimination. The time required for these pathways to normalize after delivery has not been elucidated. The observation that transdermal E2 doses greater than 100 mcg/day did not increase serum concentrations was unexpected. Another hypothesis consistent with this observation is suppression of endogenous E2 secretion with increasing exogenous E2 dosing. PMID:26061609

  2. Estradiol rapidly inhibits soluble guanylyl cyclase expression in rat uterus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krumenacker, J. S.; Hyder, S. M.; Murad, F.

    2001-01-01

    Previous reports that investigated the regulation of the NO/soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cGMP pathway by estrogenic compounds have focused primarily on the levels of NO, NO-producing enzymes, and cGMP in various tissues. In this study, we demonstrate that 17beta-estradiol (E2) regulates the alpha(1) and beta(1) subunits of the NO receptor, sGC, at the mRNA and protein levels in rat uterus. Using real-time quantitative PCR, we found that within 1 h of in vivo E2 administration to rats, sGC mRNA levels begin to diminish. After 3 h, there is a maximal diminution of sGC mRNA expression (sGC alpha(1) 10% and sGC beta(1) 33% of untreated). This effect was blocked by the estrogen receptor antagonist, ICI 182,780, indicating that estrogen receptor is required. The effect of E2 also was observed in vitro with incubations of uterine tissue, indicating that the response does not depend on the secondary release of other hormones or factors from other tissues. Puromycin did not block the effect, suggesting the effects occur because of preexisting factors in uterine tissues and do not require new protein synthesis. Using immunoblot analysis, we found that sGC protein levels also were reduced by E2 over a similar time course as the sGC mRNA. We conclude that sGC plays a vital role in the NO/sGC/cGMP regulatory pathway during conditions of elevated estrogen levels in the rat uterus as a result of the reduction of sGC expression.

  3. Estradiol-induced gene expression in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowman, C.J.; Kroll, K.J.; Gross, T.G.; Denslow, N.D.

    2002-01-01

    Vitellogenin (Vtg) and estrogen receptor (ER) gene expression levels were measured in largemouth bass to evaluate the activation of the ER-mediated pathway by estradiol (E2). Single injections of E2 ranging from 0.0005 to 5 mg/kg up-regulated plasma Vtg in a dose-dependent manner. Vtg and ER mRNAs were measured using partial cDNA sequences corresponding to the C-terminal domain for Vtg and the ligand-binding domain of ER?? sequences. After acute E2-exposures (2 mg/kg), Vtg and ER mRNAs and plasma Vtg levels peaked after 2 days. The rate of ER mRNA accumulation peaked 36-42 h earlier than Vtg mRNA. The expression window for ER defines the primary response to E2 in largemouth bass and that for Vtg a delayed primary response. The specific effect of E2 on other estrogen-regulated genes was tested during these same time windows using differential display RT-PCR. Specific up-regulated genes that are expressed in the same time window as Vtg were ERp72 (a membrane-bound disulfide isomerase) and a gene with homology to an expressed gene identified in zebrafish. Genes that were expressed in a pattern that mimics the ER include the gene for zona radiata protein ZP2, and a gene with homology to an expressed gene found in winter flounder. One gene for fibrinogen ?? was down-regulated and an unidentified gene was transiently up-regulated after 12 h of exposure and returned to basal levels by 48 h. Taken together these studies indicate that the acute molecular response to E2 involves a complex network of responses over time. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Modeling the photocatalytic mineralization in water of commercial formulation of estrogens 17-β estradiol (E2) and nomegestrol acetate in contraceptive pills in a solar powered compound parabolic collector.

    PubMed

    Colina-Márquez, José; Machuca-Martínez, Fiderman; Li Puma, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors in water are contaminants of emerging concern due to the potential risks they pose to the environment and to the aquatic ecosystems. In this study, a solar photocatalytic treatment process in a pilot-scale compound parabolic collector (CPC) was used to remove commercial estradiol formulations (17-β estradiol and nomegestrol acetate) from water. Photolysis alone degraded up to 50% of estradiol and removed 11% of the total organic carbon (TOC). In contrast, solar photocatalysis degraded up to 57% of estrogens and the TOC removal was 31%, with 0.6 g/L of catalyst load (TiO2 Aeroxide P-25) and 213.6 ppm of TOC as initial concentration of the commercial estradiols formulation. The adsorption of estrogens over the catalyst was insignificant and was modeled by the Langmuir isotherm. The TOC removal via photocatalysis in the photoreactor was modeled considering the reactor fluid-dynamics, the radiation field, the estrogens mass balance, and a modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate law, that was expressed in terms of the rate of photon adsorption. The optimum removal of the estrogens and TOC was achieved at a catalyst concentration of 0.4 g/L in 29 mm diameter tubular CPC reactors which approached the optimum catalyst concentration and optical thickness determined from the modeling of the absorption of solar radiation in the CPC, by the six-flux absorption-scattering model (SFM). PMID:26205059

  5. Lay understanding of low-frequency electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Morgan, M G; Florig, H K; Nair, I; Cortés, C; Marsh, K; Pavlosky, K

    1990-01-01

    People do not start with a blank slate when they hear risk-communication messages. All such messages are processed through existing knowledge structures and understanding. Hence, to design effective and reliable risk-communication materials one must understand the state of people's knowledge--correct and incorrect--about an issue. We developed a simple "mental model" of what people minimally need to know to make informed decisions about field-related issues. Then we performed studies to explore how and to what extent respondents of various groups understood physical properties of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields. Actual knowledge of respondents was then compared with the predicates of the model. Electrical engineering juniors and semi-technical employees of utilities displayed a good command of most of the concepts in the simple model, but little awareness of the limits to their knowledge. Lay respondents correctly knew only a few of the simplest elements of the model, but they displayed a much greater awareness of the limits to their knowledge. Both lay and semi-technical respondents were found to share several misconceptions. On average, they correctly rank-ordered some common field-exposure conditions by field strength, but they could not differentiate between electric and magnetic fields and could not differentiate among field strengths associated with different appliances. Most respondents dramatically underestimated the range of actual field strengths. Many respondents understood that field strength decreases with distance from a source, but they underestimated the rate of decrease. In contrast to X-rays and microwaves, which respondents appeared to think about in rather similar terms, 60-Hz fields were not thought of as being highly similar to any other agent, although the closest parallels were found with ultrasound. Changes in mood, thought, and behavior, and the existence of an "electrical aura," were all seen as plausible results of exposure to a 60-Hz

  6. Comparison of three enzyme immunoassays for measuring 17beta-estradiol in flushed dairy manure wastewater.

    PubMed

    Hanselman, Travis A; Graetz, Donald A; Wilkie, Ann C

    2004-01-01

    Natural steroidal estrogens are an environmental concern because low nanogram per liter concentrations in water can adversely affect aquatic vertebrate species by disrupting the normal function of their endocrine systems. There is a critical need to accurately measure estrogens in dairy wastes, a potential source of estrogens such as 17beta-estradiol, to assess the risk of estrogen contamination of agricultural drainage waters resulting from land application. Commercially available enzyme immunoassay (EIA) kits have been used for measuring 17beta-estradiol in livestock manure, but it is not known if different EIAs provide similar results. We compared three EIAs by measuring 17beta-estradiol in two samples of flushed dairy manure wastewater (FDMW). The measured concentrations of 17beta-estradiol in FDMW differed according to the immunoassay used. The differences were attributed to a matrix interference associated with coextracted humic substances. Future research should develop methods that enable routine measurement of 17beta-estradiol in livestock wastes by more conclusive analytical techniques such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. PMID:15356254

  7. Estradiol receptor of calf uterus: interactions with heparin-agarose and purification.

    PubMed Central

    Molinari, A M; Medici, N; Moncharmont, B; Puca, G A

    1977-01-01

    Heparin attached covalently to agarose beads binds the "native" form of the estradiol receptor with very high affinity. Chondroitin sulfate does not bind to the receptor. When the receptor is complexed with hormone, the affinity is at least 10 times higher. Only the "native" and not the "nuclear" or the "derived" (i.e., after activation by a calcium-dependent enzyme) forms of the estradiol receptor interact with heparin. The "native" estradiol-receptor complex is purified to homogeneity after chromatography on columns of heparin-agarose, Sephadex G-200, and DEAE-cellulose, followed by two more Sephadex G-200 columns. The purified molecule is a single polypeptide of molecular weight 69,000 by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulphate. The sedimentation coefficient on sucrose gradients is 4.3 S, the Stokes radius from gel filtration is 36.5 A, and the isoelectric point is 6.4. The purified [3H]estradiol-receptor complex exchanges the radioactive hormone with estradiol or other estrogenic steroids, but not with testosterone, 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone, or progesterone. Images PMID:270721

  8. Differing transcriptional responses to pulsed or continuous estradiol exposure in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Wang, Hongliang; Johnson, Suzanne M; Horner-Glister, Emma; Thompson, John; White, Ian N H; Al-Azzawi, Farook

    2008-07-01

    This study used human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) that were treated with 17beta-estradiol for 5 days as 1h pulse or 24h continuous treatment at concentrations such that the 24h exposure (concentration x time) was identical in both conditions. Cell proliferation was studied and gene expression profiling was carried out using the Affymetrix GeneChip microarray analysis. Changes in morphology and apoptosis in HUVECs were examined with electron microscopy. Time-course studies of expression of genes vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were performed by quantitative PCR. We observed that cell proliferation was significantly decreased over days 3-5 with pulsed estradiol treatment relative to constant exposure. Microarray results showed that after 5 days, 801 genes differed (P<0.05) between continuous versus pulsed estradiol treatment. Functional analysis showed a significant number of genes to be associated with apoptosis and cell cycle pathways. We did not find any evidence of apoptosis from flow cytometry or electron microscopy examination. Our study highlights a large number of significantly different molecular responses to estradiol depending upon the mode of administration of estradiol. Significant changes were observed in genes involved in apoptosis and proliferation including VEGF, IGF receptors, and tumor protein p53. PMID:18562193

  9. Ovariectomy and 17β-estradiol replacement in rats and mice: a visual demonstration.

    PubMed

    Ström, Jakob O; Theodorsson, Annette; Ingberg, Edvin; Isaksson, Ida-Maria; Theodorsson, Elvar

    2012-01-01

    Estrogens are a family of female sexual hormones with an exceptionally wide spectrum of effects. When rats and mice are used in estrogen research they are commonly ovariectomized in order to ablate the rapidly cycling hormone production, replacing the 17β-estradiol exogenously. There is, however, lack of consensus regarding how the hormone should be administered to obtain physiological serum concentrations. This is crucial since the 17β-estradiol level/administration method profoundly influences the experimental results. We have in a series of studies characterized the different modes of 17β-estradiol administration, finding that subcutaneous silastic capsules and per-oral nut-cream Nutella are superior to commercially available slow-release pellets (produced by the company Innovative Research of America) and daily injections in terms of producing physiological serum concentrations of 17β-estradiol. Amongst the advantages of the nut-cream method, that previously has been used for buprenorphine administration, is that when used for estrogen administration it resembles peroral hormone replacement therapy and is non-invasive. The subcutaneous silastic capsules are convenient and produce the most stable serum concentrations. This video article contains step-by-step demonstrations of ovariectomy and 17β-estradiol hormone replacement by silastic capsules and peroral Nutella in rats and mice, followed by a discussion of important aspects of the administration procedures. PMID:22710371

  10. Ovariectomy and 17β-estradiol Replacement in Rats and Mice: A Visual Demonstration

    PubMed Central

    Ström, Jakob O.; Theodorsson, Annette; Ingberg, Edvin; Isaksson, Ida-Maria; Theodorsson, Elvar

    2012-01-01

    Estrogens are a family of female sexual hormones with an exceptionally wide spectrum of effects. When rats and mice are used in estrogen research they are commonly ovariectomized in order to ablate the rapidly cycling hormone production, replacing the 17β-estradiol exogenously. There is, however, lack of consensus regarding how the hormone should be administered to obtain physiological serum concentrations. This is crucial since the 17β-estradiol level/administration method profoundly influences the experimental results1-3. We have in a series of studies characterized the different modes of 17β-estradiol administration, finding that subcutaneous silastic capsules and per-oral nut-cream Nutella are superior to commercially available slow-release pellets (produced by the company Innovative Research of America) and daily injections in terms of producing physiological serum concentrations of 17β-estradiol4-6. Amongst the advantages of the nut-cream method, that previously has been used for buprenorphine administration7, is that when used for estrogen administration it resembles peroral hormone replacement therapy and is non-invasive. The subcutaneous silastic capsules are convenient and produce the most stable serum concentrations. This video article contains step-by-step demonstrations of ovariectomy and 17β-estradiol hormone replacement by silastic capsules and peroral Nutella in rats and mice, followed by a discussion of important aspects of the administration procedures. PMID:22710371

  11. Aging alters the expression of genes for neuroprotection and synaptic function following acute estradiol treatment

    PubMed Central

    Aenlle, Kristina K.; Foster, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    This study used microarray analysis to examine age-related changes in gene expression 6 and 12 hr following a single estradiol injection in ovariectomized mice. Estradiol-responsive gene expression at the 6 hr time point was reduced in aged (18 mo) animals compared to young (4 mo) and middle-aged (MA, 12 mo) mice. Examination of gene clustering within biological and functional pathways indicated that young and MA mice exhibited increased expression of genes for cellular components of the synapse and decreased expression of genes related to oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial dysfunction. At the 12 hr time point, estradiol-responsive gene expression increased in aged animals and decreased in young and MA mice compared to the 6 hr time point. Gene clustering analysis indicated that aged mice exhibited increased expression of genes for signaling pathways that are rapidly influenced by estradiol. The age differences in gene expression for rapid signaling pathways may relate to disparity in basal pathway activity and estradiol mediated activation of rapid signaling cascades. PMID:19790252

  12. Testosterone metabolism in human skin cells in vitro and its interaction with estradiol and dutasteride.

    PubMed

    Münster, U; Hammer, S; Blume-Peytavi, U; Schäfer-Korting, M

    2003-01-01

    Since the limited knowledge of cutaneous drug metabolism can impair the development of specifically acting topical dermatics and transdermal application systems, the cell-type-specific androgen metabolism in human skin and its inhibition by drugs were investigated. Cultured human foreskin and scalp skin keratinocytes and fibroblasts as well as occipital scalp dermal papilla cells (DPC) were incubated with testosterone 10(-6) and 10(-8)M alone and in the presence of 17alpha-estradiol, 17beta-estradiol or dutasteride for 24 h. Androgens extracted from culture supernatants were subjected to thin-layer chromatography and quantified by beta-counting. In keratinocytes and DPC, dihydrotestosterone (DHT) was only formed to a low extent while androstenedione was the main metabolite. In fibroblasts, DHT formation was pronounced following 10(-8)M testosterone. Dutasteride 10(-8)M completely suppressed 5alpha-dihydro metabolite formation. 17alpha-Estradiol and 17beta-estradiol at nontoxic concentrations decreased 17-ketometabolites. Human skin regulates testosterone action by cell-type-specific activation or deactivation. Effects of 17alpha-estradiol in androgenetic alopecia are not due to 5alpha-reductase inhibition. Dutasteride may be useful in acne and androgenetic alopecia. PMID:14528059

  13. Testosterone reduces cumulative burying in female Wistar rats with minimal participation of estradiol.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-García, Ana G; Contreras, Carlos M; Vásquez-Hernández, Diana I; Molina-Jiménez, Tania; Jacome-Jacome, Emma

    2009-10-01

    Testosterone exerts anxiolytic effects, but the participation of its aromatase metabolic product estradiol is controversial. Therefore, we used the defensive burying paradigm in female Wistar rats to explore testosterone's (1.0 mg/rat, s.c.) interactions with picrotoxin (a noncompetitive gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptor [GABA(A)] antagonist; 1.0 mg/kg, i.p.), formestane (an aromatase inhibitor; 3.0 mg/rat, s.c.), and tamoxifen (an estrogen receptor-beta antagonist; 1.0 mg/kg, s.c.). Serum levels of testosterone, estradiol, and progesterone were determined in the same rats. Burying latency and locomotion did not significantly change. Systemic testosterone administration enhanced serum testosterone and estradiol levels and reduced defensive burying. This reduction in total burying was blocked by pretreatment with picrotoxin and tamoxifen, but not formestane. We conclude that testosterone produced anxiolytic-like effects in female rats that were mediated by actions at the GABA(A) receptor, with participation of the estradiol receptor-beta, rather than estradiol aromatization. PMID:19520107

  14. Estradiol in the Preoptic Area Regulates the Dopaminergic Response to Cocaine in the Nucleus Accumbens.

    PubMed

    Tobiansky, Daniel J; Will, Ryan G; Lominac, Kevin D; Turner, Jonathan M; Hattori, Tomoko; Krishnan, Krittika; Martz, Julia R; Nutsch, Victoria L; Dominguez, Juan M

    2016-06-01

    The sex-steroid hormone estradiol (E2) enhances the psychoactive effects of cocaine, as evidenced by clinical and preclinical studies. The medial preoptic area (mPOA), a region in the hypothalamus, is a primary neural locus for neuroendocrine integration, containing one of the richest concentrations of estrogen receptors in the CNS and also has a key role in the regulation of naturally rewarding behaviors. However, whether estradiol enhances the neurochemical response to cocaine by acting in the mPOA is still unclear. Using neurotoxic lesions and microdialysis, we examined whether the mPOA modulates cocaine-induced neurochemical activity in the nucleus accumbens. Tract tracing and immunohistochemical staining were used to determine whether projections from the mPOA to the ventral tegmental area (VTA) are sensitive to estrogen signaling. Finally, estradiol microinjections followed by microdialysis were used to determine whether estrogenic signaling in the mPOA modulates cocaine-induced changes of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens. Results showed that lesions of the mPOA or microinjections of estradiol directly into the mPOA increased cocaine-induced release of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the mPOA modulates cocaine responsiveness via projections to both dopaminergic and GABAergic neurons in the VTA, and that these projections are sensitive to estrogenic stimulation. Taken together, these findings point to a novel estradiol-dependent pathway that modulates cocaine-induced neurochemical activity in the mesolimbic system. PMID:26647972

  15. Estradiol receptor has proteolytic activity that is responsible for its own transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Puca, G A; Abbondanza, C; Nigro, V; Armetta, I; Medici, N; Molinari, A M

    1986-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of various protease inhibitors and substrates on the hormone- and temperature-dependent binding of partially purified estradiol-receptor complex to isolated nuclei. Only serine protease substrates and inhibitors significantly depressed estradiol receptor transformation. At 20 degrees C, we observed 50% inhibition with about 3 microM aprotinin or with 1.4 mM diisopropyl fluorophosphate. Aprotinin also blocked those size and charge modifications of receptor that are characteristic of the transformation process. The estradiol receptor was able to bind to aprotinin-agarose only under transforming conditions; i.e., the interaction was hormone- and temperature-dependent and inhibited by molybdate. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate, a covalent reagent for serine esterases, competitively inhibited the binding and specifically eluted the estradiol-receptor complex that had been bound to aprotinin-agarose. These results indicate that estradiol receptor transformation is due to the effect of a serine protease and that the receptor itself is endowed with this catalytic activity, which is triggered by the steroid. PMID:2426695

  16. Estradiol receptor has proteolytic activity that is responsible for its own transformation.

    PubMed

    Puca, G A; Abbondanza, C; Nigro, V; Armetta, I; Medici, N; Molinari, A M

    1986-08-01

    We have investigated the effect of various protease inhibitors and substrates on the hormone- and temperature-dependent binding of partially purified estradiol-receptor complex to isolated nuclei. Only serine protease substrates and inhibitors significantly depressed estradiol receptor transformation. At 20 degrees C, we observed 50% inhibition with about 3 microM aprotinin or with 1.4 mM diisopropyl fluorophosphate. Aprotinin also blocked those size and charge modifications of receptor that are characteristic of the transformation process. The estradiol receptor was able to bind to aprotinin-agarose only under transforming conditions; i.e., the interaction was hormone- and temperature-dependent and inhibited by molybdate. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate, a covalent reagent for serine esterases, competitively inhibited the binding and specifically eluted the estradiol-receptor complex that had been bound to aprotinin-agarose. These results indicate that estradiol receptor transformation is due to the effect of a serine protease and that the receptor itself is endowed with this catalytic activity, which is triggered by the steroid. PMID:2426695

  17. Electromagnetic Fields Associated with Commercial Solar Photovoltaic Electric Power Generating Facilities.

    PubMed

    Tell, R A; Hooper, H C; Sias, G G; Mezei, G; Hung, P; Kavet, R

    2015-01-01

    The southwest region of the United States is expected to experience an expansion of commercial solar photovoltaic generation facilities over the next 25 years. A solar facility converts direct current generated by the solar panels to three-phase 60-Hz power that is fed to the grid. This conversion involves sequential processing of the direct current through an inverter that produces low-voltage three-phase power, which is stepped up to distribution voltage (∼12 kV) through a transformer. This study characterized magnetic and electric fields between the frequencies of 0 Hz and 3 GHz at two facilities operated by the Southern California Edison Company in Porterville, CA and San Bernardino, CA. Static magnetic fields were very small compared to exposure limits established by IEEE and ICNIRP. The highest 60-Hz magnetic fields were measured adjacent to transformers and inverters, and radiofrequency fields from 5-100 kHz were associated with the inverters. The fields measured complied in every case with IEEE controlled and ICNIRP occupational exposure limits. In all cases, electric fields were negligible compared to IEEE and ICNIRP limits across the spectrum measured and when compared to the FCC limits (≥0.3 MHz). PMID:26023811

  18. A quick and easy method for checking compliance of multi-frequency magnetic fields with ICNIRP's guidelines.

    PubMed

    Filippopoulos, George; Karabetsos, Efthymios

    2008-08-01

    In many practical cases human exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields with many spectral components (multi-frequency fields) has to be examined in order to check compliance with ICNIRP's guidelines. Showing compliance, according to existing methods, requires sophisticated instruments and measurement procedures to assess some complex exposure metrics. Furthermore, even where the field levels are very low, there is no method to show compliance using broadband instruments, which are the most common and simple ones. In this paper, a new method is described where the frequencies emitted by the source are known and only simple broadband instruments are required. First, the spectral distribution of the field that maximizes exposure metrics is found. Then, an effective reference level for the broadband value of the field is estimated for this distribution. If the measured broadband value of the magnetic field is lower than this reference level, then compliance with ICNIRP's guidelines is readily shown. A case study for a magnetic field consisting of 50 Hz and 60 Hz components is presented. The worst-case spectral distribution contained 64% 50 Hz and 76.8% 60 Hz components, and the corresponding effective broadband reference level is 64 muT for general public exposure. The method is generally conservative in cases of incoherent fields and very conservative in cases of coherent fields. To that end, it is practically a quick and easy test to check if further measurements are needed or not. Application of this method is expected to save time, money, and resources. PMID:18617807

  19. Tyrosine kinase/p21ras/MAP-kinase pathway activation by estradiol-receptor complex in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Migliaccio, A; Di Domenico, M; Castoria, G; de Falco, A; Bontempo, P; Nola, E; Auricchio, F

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism by which estradiol acts on cell multiplication is still unclear. Under conditions of estradiol-dependent growth, estradiol treatment of human mammary cancer MCF-7 cells triggers rapid and transient activation of the mitogen-activated (MAP) kinases, erk-1 and erk-2, increases the active form of p21ras, tyrosine phosphorylation of Shc and p190 protein and induces association of p190 to p21ras-GAP. Both Shc and p190 are substrates of activated src and once phosphorylated, they interact with other proteins and upregulate p21ras. Estradiol activates the tyrosine kinase/p21ras/MAP-kinase pathway in MCF-7 cells with kinetics which are similar to those of peptide mitogens. It is only after introduction of the human wild-type 67 kDa estradiol receptor cDNA that Cos cells become estradiol-responsive in terms of erk-2 activity. This finding, together with the inhibition by the pure anti-estrogen ICI 182 780 of the stimulatory effect of estradiol on each step of the pathway in MCF-7 cells proves that the classic estradiol receptor is responsible for the transduction pathway activation. Transfection experiments of Cos cells with the estradiol receptor cDNA and in vitro experiments with c-src show that the estradiol receptor activates c-src and this activation requires occupancy of the receptor by hormone. Our experiments suggest that c-src is an initial and integral part of the signaling events mediated by the estradiol receptor. Images PMID:8635462

  20. An expansion plan for the 60 Hz power distribution system at KSC: LC-39 substations load allocation plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalu, Alex

    1990-01-01

    The increasing load density in the LC-39 area of Kennedy Space Center (KSC) can be met by either modifying the existing substation and increasing its capacity or by planning an additional new substation. Evidence that the later approach is more economical, enhances the system reliability, and would produce more satisfactory performance indices is provided. Network theory is the basis for the optimal location determination of the proposed substation. A load reallocation plan which minimizes investment cost and power losses and meets other desirable system features is drafted. The report should be useful to the system designer and can be a useful guideline for future facility planners.

  1. From sunlight in space to 60 Hz on earth - The losses along the way. [satellite solar power transmission efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denman, O. S.

    1978-01-01

    The space-to-ground links for the Solar Power Satellite System are discussed in terms of worst, best, and nominal efficiency used in the development of the preliminary design. An uncertainty analysis of this design illustrates the effect of link efficiency on SPS size and mass. It is shown that a solar power satellite can deliver power to a ground-based utility for 4 to 5 cents per kWh, depending on the efficiency of the solar cells available in 1987. The overall efficiency of converting sunlight in space to electric power delivered to utilities ranged from 3.83% for the worst combination of efficiencies to 9.5% for the best, with a nominal efficiency of 7.12%.

  2. Histologic study of the internal organs of rats chronically exposed to a high-intensity electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Seto, Y.J.; Majeau-Chargois, D.; Lymangrover, J.R.; Dunlap, W.P.; Hsieh, S.T.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of 120-day exposure to a high-intensity (80 kV/m), 60-Hz electric field on histology of selected internal organs of Sprague-Dawley rats was investigated. The organs examined were the pituitary, thymus, heart, lungs, liver, spleen, right and left adrenals, right and left kidneys, and right and left testes. Histological examination of 10-micron tissue sections from randomly selected animals revealed no specific evidence of histopathologic differences between field-exposed and sham-exposed animals at the light microscopic level.

  3. Relationship between modulation by estradiol, progesterone and calcium upon the pharmacological reactivity of uteri of dogs.

    PubMed

    Calixto, J B; Aucélio, J G; Jurkiewicz, A

    1979-09-01

    The influence of treatment with estradiol and progesterone, was studied on the contractions induced in immature dog uteri by histamine, acetylcholine, oxytocin and barium chloride, in vitro. Two parameters were measured from dose-response curves: rho and pD2. It was observed that although pD2 values were slightly affected by hormonal treatment, the values of rho for oxytocin and acetylcholine receptors were greatly reduced by estradiol treatment and further decreased by association of estradiol plus progesterone; the effects for histamine and barium chloride were less affected. Increasing Ca2+ concentration in the nutrient solution completely reverted the variations for rho values. The results indicate tat the effect of drugs on the dog uterus depends on the balance between the modulating actions of ovarian hormones and calcium. PMID:504784

  4. What if the Women's Health Initiative had used transdermal estradiol and oral progesterone instead?

    PubMed

    Simon, James A

    2014-07-01

    The author considers hypothetical comparisons between oral conjugated equine estrogens and transdermal estradiol and between oral medroxyprogesterone acetate and oral micronized progesterone for their effects on four primary outcomes of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI): cardiovascular disease risk, cerebrovascular disease risk, venous thromboembolism risk, and breast cancer risk. Although the discussion in this article focuses on transdermal estradiol delivered through patches, gels, or lotions, it could be broadened to include all forms of nonoral estrogen administration. After a brief review of the WHI and a survey of the relevant literature in which the safety of these various hormone therapies is assessed or compared, the author uses statistical methods to ascertain the attributable risk of venous thromboembolism for transdermal estradiol versus oral hormone therapy and imputes those risks into the WHI primary outcomes. PMID:24398406

  5. SIGNALING MECHANISMS INVOLVED IN THE ACUTE EFFECTS OF ESTRADIOL ON 5-HT CLEARANCE

    PubMed Central

    Benmansour, Saloua; Privratsky, Anthony A.; Adeniji, Opeyemi S.; Frazer, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Estradiol was found previously to have an antidepressant-like effect and to block the ability of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) to have an antidepressant-like effect. The antidepressant-like effect of estradiol was due to estrogen receptor β (ERβ) and/or GPR30 activation whereas estradiol’s blockade of the effect of an SSRI was mediated by ERα. This study focuses on investigating signaling pathways as well as interacting receptors associated with these two effects of estradiol. In vivo chronoamperometry was used to measure serotonin transporter (SERT) function. The effect of local application of estradiol or selective agonists for ERα (PPT) or ERβ (DPN) into the CA3 region of the hippocampus of ovariectomized (OVX) rats on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) clearance as well as on the ability of fluvoxamine to slow 5-HT clearance was examined after selective blockade of signaling pathways or that of interacting receptors. Estradiol- or DPN-induced slowing of 5-HT clearance mediated by ERβ was blocked after inhibition of MAPK/ERK1/2 but not of PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. This effect also involved interactions with TrkB, and IGF-1 receptors. Estradiol’s or PPT’s inhibition of the fluvoxamine-induced slowing of 5-HT clearance mediated by ERα, was blocked after inhibition of either MAPK/ERK1/2 or PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. This effect involved interactions with the IGF-1 receptor and with the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 but not with TrkB. This study illustrates some of the signaling pathways required for the effects of estradiol on SERT function and particularly shows that ER subtypes elicit different as well as common signaling pathways for their actions. PMID:24423185

  6. Polymorphism of 17-beta estradiol in a transdermal drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Variankaval, N E; Jacob, K I; Dinh, S M

    2002-03-01

    The inclusions in a typical transdermal drug delivery system (TDS) containing estradiol drug were characterized using microscopic, spectroscopic and thermal analytical techniques. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to determine the locations and morphologies of the crystals in the matrix. Two different types of crystals randomly distributed laterally inside the patch were observed. Solid aggregates were found surrounding needle-like inclusions. Optical imaging through the thickness of the patch and SEM sections of the patch revealed that these inclusions were found to occupy a single layer inside the adhesive matrix. No inclusions were observed either in the backing-matrix interface or the matrix-liner interface. The inclusions exhibited a wide range of sizes. The thickness of the crystals as determined by SEM ranged from 10-14 microm. Out of the four crystal forms of estradiol, two of which are solvates (EA and EM) and the other two are anhydrous (EC and ED). Forms EC and ED did not exhibit significant differences in the spectra. Thermal analysis revealed that this was due to the highly unstable nature of ED and its tendency to either convert spontaneously to EC or occur in mixtures with it. The Raman spectrum of the aggregates in the patch showed peaks that seemed characteristic of at least two different forms of estradiol. Only one of these forms is a completely hydrogen bonded system and therefore, was concluded to be estradiol hemihydrate. A splitting of the C17-O peak at 1284 cm(-1) and 1294 cm(-1) was attributed to the existence of at least two types of crystal forms - one that exhibits hydrogen bonding and one that does not. DSC on different concentrations of estradiol in acrylic adhesive showed a clear endotherm for 14 wt % estradiol and apparent endotherms for lower concentrations. The absence of crystallization exotherms is due to the extremely slow kinetics of crystals growth in the polymeric patch. PMID:15348624

  7. Relationships of serum estradiol levels, menopausal duration, and mood during hormonal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Klaiber, E L; Broverman, D M; Vogel, W; Peterson, L G; Snyder, M B

    1997-10-01

    A study was undertaken in 38 menopausal women on-cyclic HRT (estropipate) and estropipate + nor-ethindrone). Serum estradiol levels during treatment were related to mood changes and platelet MAO activity. The relationship between serum estradiol levels and mood changes was found to be a function of the duration of menopause. Women with a short duration of menopause (12.9 months +/- 6.1) were compared to women with a long duration of menopause (76.6 months +/- 52.3). Women with a short duration of menopause had significantly lower mean serum estradiol levels during HRT compared to women with a long duration of menopause (216.9 +/- 62.3 vs. 291.13 +/- 118.12, respectively, p < .02). It had previously been reported that estrogen treatment in menopausal women had a positive effect on mood, whereas the combination of estrogen plus a progestin had a negative effect on mood. We found that the women with a long duration of menopause and higher treatment serum estradiol levels had significantly more dysphoria when receiving a combination of estrogen plus progestin than did the women with a short duration of menopause and lower serum estradiol levels. However, both short and long duration menopausal groups showed improvement in mood when estrogen was administered alone. Platelet MAO levels, a marker of adrenergic and serotonergic function thought to relate to mood, were negatively correlated with serum estradiol levels during HRT. We suggest that these paradoxical findings may be secondary to a prolonged estrogen deficiency state in women with a long duration of menopause. PMID:9373888

  8. Effect of estradiol and bisphenol A on human hepatoblastoma cell viability and telomerase activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, B L; Zhao, Q Z; Gao, X Y; Hou, G J

    2015-11-01

    Sex hormones from environmental and physiological sources might play a major role in the pathogenesis of hepatoblastoma in children. This study investigated the effects of estradiol and bisphenol A on the proliferation and telomerase activity of human hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells. The cells were divided into 6 treatment groups: control, bisphenol A, estradiol, anti-estrogen ICI 182,780 (hereinafter ICI), bisphenol A+ICI, and estradiol+ICI. Cell proliferation was measured based on average absorbance using the Cell Counting-8 assay. The cell cycle distribution and apoptotic index were determined by flow cytometry. Telomerase activity was detected by polymerase chain reaction and a telomeric repeat amplification protocol assay. A higher cell density was observed in bisphenol A (P<0.01) and estradiol (P<0.05) groups compared with the control group. Cell numbers in S and G2/M phases after treatment for 48 h were higher (P<0.05), while the apoptotic index was lower (P<0.05) and telomerase activities at 48 and 72 h (P<0.05) were higher in these groups than in the control group. The cell density was also higher in bisphenol A+ICI (P<0.01) and estradiol+ICI (P<0.05) groups compared with the ICI group. Furthermore, cell numbers were increased in S and G2/M phases (P<0.05), while the apoptotic index was lower (P<0.05) and telomerase activities at 48 and 72 h were higher (P<0.05) in these groups than in the ICI group. Therefore, bisphenol A and estradiol promote HepG2 cell proliferation in vitro by inhibition of apoptosis and stimulation of telomerase activity via an estrogen receptor-dependent pathway. PMID:26397976

  9. 17β-estradiol protects the lung against acute injury: possible mediation by vasoactive intestinal polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, Sayyed A; Dickman, Kathleen G; Berisha, Hasan; Said, Sami I

    2011-12-01

    Beyond their classical role as a class of female sex hormones, estrogens (e.g. 17β-estradiol) exert important biological actions, both protective and undesirable. We have investigated the ability of estradiol to protect the lung in three models of acute injury induced by 1) oxidant stress due to the herbicide paraquat; 2) excitotoxicity, caused by glutamate agonist N-methyl-d-aspartate; and 3) acute alveolar anoxia. We also assessed the role of estrogen receptors (ER) ERα and ERβ and the neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in mediating this protection. Isolated guinea pig or rat lungs were perfused in situ at constant flow and mechanically ventilated. The onset and severity of lung injury were monitored by increases in pulmonary arterial and airway pressures, wet/dry lung weight ratio, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid protein content. Estradiol was infused into the pulmonary circulation, beginning 10 min before induction of injury and continued for 60-90 min. Lung injury was marked by significant increases in the above measurements, with paraquat producing the most severe, and excitotoxicity the least severe, injury. Estradiol significantly attenuated the injury in each model. Both ER were constitutively expressed and immunohistochemically demonstrable in normal lung, and their selective agonists reduced anoxic injury, the only model in which they were tested. As it protected against injury, estradiol rapidly and significantly stimulated VIP mRNA expression in rat lung. Estradiol attenuated acute lung injury in three experimental models while stimulating VIP gene expression, a known mechanism of lung protection. The up-regulated VIP expression could have partially mediated the protection by estrogen. PMID:22009726

  10. 17β-Estradiol Protects the Lung against Acute Injury: Possible Mediation by Vasoactive Intestinal Polypeptide

    PubMed Central

    Hamidi, Sayyed A.; Dickman, Kathleen G.; Berisha, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Beyond their classical role as a class of female sex hormones, estrogens (e.g. 17β-estradiol) exert important biological actions, both protective and undesirable. We have investigated the ability of estradiol to protect the lung in three models of acute injury induced by 1) oxidant stress due to the herbicide paraquat; 2) excitotoxicity, caused by glutamate agonist N-methyl-d-aspartate; and 3) acute alveolar anoxia. We also assessed the role of estrogen receptors (ER) ERα and ERβ and the neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in mediating this protection. Isolated guinea pig or rat lungs were perfused in situ at constant flow and mechanically ventilated. The onset and severity of lung injury were monitored by increases in pulmonary arterial and airway pressures, wet/dry lung weight ratio, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid protein content. Estradiol was infused into the pulmonary circulation, beginning 10 min before induction of injury and continued for 60–90 min. Lung injury was marked by significant increases in the above measurements, with paraquat producing the most severe, and excitotoxicity the least severe, injury. Estradiol significantly attenuated the injury in each model. Both ER were constitutively expressed and immunohistochemically demonstrable in normal lung, and their selective agonists reduced anoxic injury, the only model in which they were tested. As it protected against injury, estradiol rapidly and significantly stimulated VIP mRNA expression in rat lung. Estradiol attenuated acute lung injury in three experimental models while stimulating VIP gene expression, a known mechanism of lung protection. The up-regulated VIP expression could have partially mediated the protection by estrogen. PMID:22009726

  11. Effect of estradiol on planktonic growth, coaggregation, and biofilm formation of the Prevotella intermedia group bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fteita, Dareen; Könönen, Eija; Söderling, Eva; Gürsoy, Ulvi Kahraman

    2014-06-01

    Alterations in the quantity and quality of biofilms at gingival margin are considered to play a role in the initiation and development of pregnancy-related gingivitis. Prevotella intermedia sensu lato is able to consume estradiol, the major sex hormone secreted during pregnancy, in the absence of vitamin K. The aim of the study was to examine the effect of estradiol on the planktonic growth, coaggregation, polysaccharide production, and biofilm formation of the P. intermedia group bacteria, namely P. intermedia, Prevotella nigrescens, and Prevotella pallens. In all experiments, the type strain (ATCC) and a clinical strain (AHN) of P. intermedia, P. nigrescens, and P. pallens were incubated with the concentrations of 0, 30, 90, and 120 nmol/L of estradiol. Planktonic growth was assessed by means of the colony forming unit method, while coaggregation and biofilm formation were assessed by spectrophotometric methods. In the determination of protein and polysaccharide levels, the Bradford and phenol-sulfuric acid methods were used, respectively. P. pallens AHN 9283 and P. nigrescens ATCC 33563 increased their numbers at planktonic stage with increasing estradiol concentrations. In 48-h biofilm tests, elevated protein levels were found for both strains of P. intermedia, and the strains P. nigrescens ATCC 33563 and P. pallens AHN 9283 in the presence of estradiol. The P. intermedia strains also increased the levels of polysaccharide formation in the biofilm. Coaggregation of the P. intermedia group organisms with Fusobacterium nucleatum was enhanced only in P. intermedia AHN 8290. In conclusion, our in vitro experiments indicate that estradiol regulates planktonic growth, coaggregation, polysaccharide production, and biofilm formation characteristics of P. intermedia, P. nigrescens, and P. pallens differently. These results may, at least partly, explain the differences seen in their contribution to the pathogenesis of pregnancy-related gingivitis. PMID

  12. A Pilot Study on BMI, Serum Testosterone and Estradiol Levels in Allergic Male Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lokaj-Berisha, Violeta; Gacaferri-Lumezi, Besa; Berisha, Naser; Gashi-Hoxha, Sanije

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The dramatic increase in the prevalence of high body mass index (BMI) increases the prevalence of allergic diseases, both in adults and children and obesity is associated with hypogonadism in adult males. AIM: We aimed to evaluate the effect of high body mass index on plasma concentrations of testosterone and estradiol in young pubertal and adult males with allergic diseases. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Morning fasting blood samples were obtained form 51 allergic patients and 6 healthy volunteer males between the ages 11-57 years (Mean 26.9, DS ± 11.9 years). Total testosterone, estradiol, FSH and LH concentrations were measured by radioimmunoassay. All participants were subjected to skin prick tests with test kit G aeroallergens, and BMI was calculated according to the body weight divided by the square of height (kg/m2). RESULTS: Low levels of testosterone and high levels of estradiol were associated with high BMI only in patients with asthma/rhinitis, but not in asthma patients. Allergic dermatitis/urticaria group along with healthy controls were overweight but within normal ranges for total testosterone and estradiol concentrations. Patients with allergic rhinitis were within normal ranges for BMI, total testosterone and estradiol concentrations. CONCLUSION: High BMI is not always associated with low levels of testosterone and high levels of estradiol in our patients with allergic diseases, but low levels of testosterone are present in patients with asthma and asthma/rhinitis although not among patients with rhinitis only. Our results should be confirmed in a larger group of participants.

  13. Estradiol modulates medial prefrontal cortex and amygdala activity during fear extinction in women and female rats

    PubMed Central

    Zeidan, Mohamed A.; Igoe, Sarah A.; Linnman, Clas; Vitalo, Antonia; Levine, John B.; Klibanski, Anne; Goldstein, Jill M.; Milad, Mohammed R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Men and women differ in their ability to extinguish fear. Fear extinction requires the activation of brain regions including the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and amygdala. Could estradiol modulate the activity of these brain regions during fear extinction? Methods All rat experiments were conducted in naturally cycling females. Rats underwent fear conditioning on day 1. On day 2, they underwent extinction training during the metestrus phase of the cycle (low estrogen and progesterone). Extinction recall was assessed on day 3. Systemic injections of estrogen-receptor beta and alpha agonists, and estradiol were administered at different time points to assess their influence on extinction consolidation and c-fos expression in the vmPFC and amygdala. In parallel, healthy naturally cycling women underwent an analogous fear conditioning extinction training while in a 3T fMRI scanner. Measurement of their estradiol levels and skin conductance responses were obtained throughout the experiment. Results In female rats, administration of the estrogen-receptor beta (but not alpha) agonist facilitated extinction recall. Immediate (but not delayed) post-extinction training administration of estradiol facilitated extinction memory consolidation and increased c-fos expression in the vmPFC while reducing it in the amygdala. In parallel, natural variance in estradiol in pre-menopausal cycling women modulated vmPFC and amygdala reactivity and facilitated extinction recall. Conclusion We provide translational evidence that demonstrates the influence of endogenous and exogenous estradiol on the fear extinction network. Our data suggest that women’s endogenous hormonal status should be considered in future neurobiological research related to anxiety and mood disorders. PMID:21762880

  14. Changes in ovarian function associated with circulating concentrations of estradiol before a GnRH-induced ovulation in beef cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    These studies were conducted to evaluate causes for differences in circulating concentrations of estradiol prior to a GnRH-induced ovulation and to determine if exogenous GnRH administration could alter LH secretion and subsequent follicular estradiol production. Beef cows (Experiment 1; n = 32, Ex...

  15. Mammary gland morphology and gene expression signature of prepubertal male and female rats following exposure to exogenous estradiol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to characterize the actions of xenoestrogens, it is essential to possess a solid portrait of the physiological effects of exogenous estradiol. We assessed effects of three doses of exogenous estradiol (E2) (0.1, 1.0 and 10 micrograms/kg/day) on the mammary gland morphology and gene expressi...

  16. Reproductive performance in sows treated with estradiol benzoate/human chorionic gonadotrophin combination at weaning.

    PubMed Central

    Friendship, R M; Bosu, W T; King, G J

    1982-01-01

    The effects of estradiol benzoate plus human chorionic gonadotrophin administered on the day of weaning on the reproductive performance in sows was studied. The treatment advanced the onset of estrus but the duration of estrus was slightly prolonged. Breeding on the post-weaning estrus was associated with poor pregnancy rate and smaller litters. The treatment did not cause permanent damage to the reproductive tract as the reproductive performance of the treated sows after subsequent breedings were unaffected. The possible causes of the poor fertility in the estradiol benzoate plus human chorionic gonadotrophin treated sows are discussed. PMID:6890868

  17. [Zoely, a combined oral contraceptive, monophasic pill containing estradiol and nomegestrol acetate].

    PubMed

    Pintiaux, A; Gaspard, U; Nisolle, M

    2012-03-01

    A new combined oral contraceptive called Zoely has just been marketed in Belgium. It contains nomegestrol acetate, a progestin known for its high contraceptive reliability based on its antigonadotropic power and long half-life. This progestin is associated with estradiol and Zoely is devoid of ethinyl estradiol, which is the usual component of the majority of combined oral contraceptives and is primarily responsible for thrombotic side effects of the pill. The compositon and type of regimen of this new oral contraceptive contribute to its efficacy and excellent clinical tolerance. PMID:22611833

  18. Effects of Estradiol and Venlafaxine on Insomnia Symptoms and Sleep Quality in Women with Hot Flashes

    PubMed Central

    Ensrud, Kristine E.; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Hohensee, Chancellor; Caan, Bette; Carpenter, Janet S.; Freeman, Ellen W.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Landis, Carol A.; Manson, JoAnn; Newton, Katherine M.; Otte, Julie; Reed, Susan D.; Shifren, Jan L.; Sternfeld, Barbara; Woods, Nancy F.; Joffe, Hadine

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Determine effects of low-dose estradiol and low-dose venlafaxine on self-reported sleep measures in menopausal women with hot flashes. Design: 3-arm double-blind randomized trial. Participants assigned in a 2:2:3 ratio to 17β estradiol 0.5 mg/day (n = 97), venlafaxine XR 75 mg/day (n = 96), or placebo (n = 146) for 8 weeks. Setting: Academic research centers. Participants: 339 community-dwelling perimenopausal and postmenopausal women with ≥ 2 bothersome hot flashes per day. Measurements and Results: Insomnia symptoms (Insomnia Severity Index [ISI]) and sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index [PSQI]) at baseline, week 4 and 8; 325 women (96%) provided ISI data and 312 women (92%) provided PSQI data at baseline and follow-up. At baseline, mean (SD) hot flash frequency was 8.1/day (5.3), mean ISI was 11.1 (6.0), and mean PSQI was 7.5 (3.4). Mean (95% CI) change from baseline in ISI at week 8 was −4.1 points (−5.3 to −3.0) with estradiol, −5.0 points (−6.1 to −3.9) with venlafaxine, and −3.0 points (−3.8 to −2.3) with placebo (P overall treatment effect vs. placebo 0.09 for estradiol and 0.007 for venlafaxine). Mean (95% CI) change from baseline in PSQI at week 8 was −2.2 points (−2.8 to −1.6) with estradiol, −2.3 points (−2.9 to −1.6) with venlafaxine, and −1.2 points (−1.7 to −0.8) with placebo (P overall treatment effect vs. placebo 0.04 for estradiol and 0.06 for venlafaxine). Conclusions: Among perimenopausal and postmenopausal women with hot flashes, both low dose oral estradiol and low-dose venlafaxine compared with placebo modestly reduced insomnia symptoms and improved subjective sleep quality. Clinical Trial Registration: NCT01418209 at www.clinicaltrials.gov Citation: Ensrud KE, Guthrie KA, Hohensee C, Caan B, Carpenter JS, Freeman EW, LaCroix AZ, Landis CA, Manson J, Newton KM, Otte J, Reed SD, Shifren JL, Sternfeld B, Woods NF, Joffe H. Effects of estradiol and venlafaxine on insomnia symptoms

  19. Behavioral evidence that magnetic field effects in the land snail, Cepaea nemoralis, might not depend on magnetite or induced electric currents

    SciTech Connect

    Prato, F.S.; Kavaliers, M.; Carson, J.J.L.

    1996-05-01

    Although extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields (< 300 Hz) appear to exert a variety of biological effects, the magnetic field sensing/transduction mechanism(s) remains to be established. Here, using the inhibitory effects of magnetic fields on endogenous opioid peptide-mediated analgesic response of the land snail, Cepaea nemoralis, the authors addressed the mechanism(s) of action of ELF magnetic fields. Indirect mechanisms involving both induced electric fields and direct magnetic field detection mechanisms (e.g., magnetite, parametric resonance) were evaluated. Snails were exposed to a static magnetic field (B{sub DC} = 78 {+-} 1 {micro}T) and a 60 Hz magnetic field (B{sub AC} = 299 {+-} 1 {micro}T peak) with the angle between the static and 60 Hz magnetic fields varied in eight steps between 0{degree} and 90{degree}. At 0{degree} and 90{degree}, the magnetic field reduced opioid-induced analgesia by approximately 20%, and this inhibition was increased to a maximum of 50% when the angle was between 50{degree} and 70{degree}. Because B{sub AC} was fixed in amplitude, direction, and frequency, any induced electric currents would be constant independent of the B{sub AC}/B{sub DC} angle. Also, an energy transduction mechanism involving magnetite should show greatest sensitivity at 90{degree}. Therefore, the energy transduction mechanism probably does not involve induced electric currents or magnetite. Rather, their results suggest a direct magnetic field detection mechanism consistent with the parametric resonance model proposed by Lednev.

  20. 17beta-estradiol-induced activation of ERK1/2 through endogenous androgen receptor-estradiol receptor alpha-Src complex in human prostate cells.

    PubMed

    Chieffi, Paolo; Kisslinger, Annamaria; Sinisi, Antonio A; Abbondanza, Ciro; Tramontano, Donatella

    2003-09-01

    We examined the effect of estrogens on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in EPN cells, a line of epithelial cells derived from human normal prostate. 17beta-estradiol (E2) caused a rapid and transient activation of MAPK (ERK1/2) within 5 min. This effect was counteracted by the anti-estrogen ICI 182-780 and by MEK inhibitor PD098059. The activation of ERK1/2 through 17beta-estradiol triggered simultaneous association of endogenous androgen receptor, estrogen receptor alpha and Src. In addition, E2 stimulated the proliferation of EPN cells, suggesting that the formation of the ternary complex and the consequent activation of ERKs are implicated in the mechanism regulating proliferation of epithelial prostate cells. PMID:12888920

  1. Applied AC and DC magnetic fields cause alterations in the mitotic cycle of early sea urchin embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, M.; Ernst, S.G.

    1995-09-01

    This study demonstrates that exposure to 60 Hz magnetic fields (3.4--8.8 mt) and magnetic fields over the range DC-600 kHz (2.5--6.5 mT) can alter the early embryonic development of sea urchin embryos by inducing alterations in the timing of the cell cycle. Batches of fertilized eggs were exposed to the fields produced by a coil system. Samples of the continuous cultures were taken and scored for cell division. The times of both the first and second cell divisions were advanced by ELF AC fields and by static fields. The magnitude of the 60 Hz effect appears proportional to the field strength over the range tested. the relationship to field frequency was nonlinear and complex. For certain frequencies above the ELF range, the exposure resulted in a delay of the onset of mitosis. The advance of mitosis was also dependent on the duration of exposure and on the timing of exposure relative to fertilization.

  2. Pregnancy rates after ewes were treated with estradiol-17beta and oxytocin.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cervical dilation may improve transcervical sheep embryo-transfer procedures, if the cervical dilation method does not reduce pregnancy rates. This experiment was conducted to determine whether estradiol-17beta-oxytocin treatment, which dilates the cervix in luteal-phase ewes, affects pregnancy rat...

  3. Effects of liquid swine manure on dissipation of 17ß-estradiol in soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    17ß-estradiol (E2), an estrogenic hormone, degrades within hours and bind strongly to soils and sediments; however, estrogens are frequently detected in the environment at concentrations that impact water quality. Colloidal (COC) and dissolved (DOC) organic carbon may enhance the persistence and mob...

  4. An On-Farm Survey of Spatial and Temporal Stratifications of 17ß-Estradiol Concentrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    17ß-estradiol (E2), a natural estrogenic hormone, may cause endocrine disruption in sensitive organisms. It has been reported to dissipate rapidly in soil laboratory studies, but is frequently detected in the environment leading to question about possible sources and processes that explain the mobil...

  5. Changes in salivary estradiol predict changes in women's preferences for vocal masculinity.

    PubMed

    Pisanski, Katarzyna; Hahn, Amanda C; Fisher, Claire I; DeBruine, Lisa M; Feinberg, David R; Jones, Benedict C

    2014-08-01

    Although many studies have reported that women's preferences for masculine physical characteristics in men change systematically during the menstrual cycle, the hormonal mechanisms underpinning these changes are currently poorly understood. Previous studies investigating the relationships between measured hormone levels and women's masculinity preferences tested only judgments of men's facial attractiveness. Results of these studies suggested that preferences for masculine characteristics in men's faces were related to either women's estradiol or testosterone levels. To investigate the hormonal correlates of within-woman variation in masculinity preferences further, here we measured 62 women's salivary estradiol, progesterone, and testosterone levels and their preferences for masculine characteristics in men's voices in five weekly test sessions. Multilevel modeling of these data showed that changes in salivary estradiol were the best predictor of changes in women's preferences for vocal masculinity. These results complement other recent research implicating estradiol in women's mate preferences, attention to courtship signals, sexual motivation, and sexual strategies, and are the first to link women's voice preferences directly to measured hormone levels. PMID:25051294

  6. EFFECTS OF ETHYNYL ESTRADIOL EXPOSURE ON REPRODUCTIVE PARAMETERS IN AN ESTUARINE FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study investigated the impact of ethynyl estradiol (EE2) on reproductive success of cunner, Tautogolabrus adspersus. EE2 is the estrogen used in human contraceptives and is released into the aquatic environment in sewage treatment effluent. Reproductively active male and fem...

  7. Objective Habitual Physical Activity and Estradiol Levels in Obese Latina Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Gyllenhammer, Lauren E.; Vanni, Amanda K.; Byrd-Williams, Courtney E.; Kalan, Marc; Bernstein, Leslie; Davis, Jaimie N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Lifetime physical activity (PA) is associated with decreased breast cancer (BC) risk; reports suggest that PA during adolescence contributes strongly to this relationship. PA lowers production of sex hormones, specifically estradiol, or decreases insulin resistance (IR), thereby lowering risk. Overweight Latina adolescents are insulin resistant and exhibit low levels of PA, potentially increasing their future BC risk. Methods 37 obese Latina adolescents (15.7 ±1.1 yrs) provided measures of PA using accelerometry; plasma follicular phase estradiol, sex-hormone binding globulin, total and free testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEAS); IR using HOMA-IR; body composition via DEXA. Partial correlations and stepwise linear regressions assessed cross-sectional relationships between sex hormones, IR and PA. Body composition, and age were included a priori as covariates. Results Estradiol was negatively associated with accelerometer counts per minute (CPM) (r= −0.4; p=0.02), percent time spent in moderate PA (%MPA) (r= −0.5; p=0.006), and percent time in moderate or vigorous PA (%MVPA) (r= −0.5; p=0.007). DHEAS was positively associated with CPM (r=0.4, p=0.009), %MPA (r=0.3, p=0.04), and %MVPA (r=0.3, p=0.04). Other sex hormones and IR were not associated with PA measures. Conclusion This study is the first to show that higher habitual PA was inversely associated with estradiol in obese adolescents. PMID:23038707

  8. Dynamics of estradiol and testosterone and seminal fluid indexes in smokers and nonsmokers.

    PubMed

    Klaiber, E L; Broverman, D M

    1988-10-01

    The serum levels of estradiol (E2) and testosterone (T), the metabolic clearance rates of estradiol (MCRE2) and testosterone (MCRT), and the production rates of estradiol and testosterone (PRE2) and (PRT) were examined in 22 male smokers and 21 male nonsmokers. Seminal fluid indexes (sperm count, % motility, grade of motility, and % of sperm with abnormal morphology) were also assessed. The mean E2 level and the mean PRE2 were significantly greater in smokers than in nonsmokers (P less than 0.001 and P less than 0.01, respectively); however, the means of MCRE2, MCRT, PRT, and T did not differ significantly in smokers compared to nonsmokers. No significant product-moment correlations were found between the various hormonal measures and the seminal fluid indexes in the overall sample. However, the smokers with sperm counts below the median sperm count of the sample had significantly higher mean levels of E2 and PRE2 than did the smokers with sperm counts above that median. Mechanisms that might mediate the greater PRE2 of smokers and a negative relationship between estradiol and sperm count are discussed. PMID:3169284

  9. [Medication of the month. A new combined oral contraceptive containing estradiol valerate and dienogest (Qlaira)].

    PubMed

    Gaspard, U; Pintiaux, A; Kridelka, F

    2010-12-01

    In combined oral contraception (OC), a drastic reduction of both ethinylestradiol and androgenic progestins mostly derived from 19 NOR testosterone, allowed to moderately reduce the adverse impact of classical combined pills on metabolism and circulation (both arterial and venous). However, the marked hepatic action of ethinylestradiol, even in small dosages, lessens the expected risk reduction. For the first time, an OC has been developed, which contains estradiol valerate (with reduced hepatic action because of lack of a 17alpha ethinyl group) with dienogest, a 19 NOR testosterone-derived nonandrogenic progestin, which powerfully inhibits endometrial proliferation. Thanks to a dynamic modulation of estrogen and progestin doses (26 active days + 2 placebo days), an adequate contraceptive effectiveness, a good cycle control and drug tolerance are achieved, similar to those obtained with a classical low-dose OC. Recent data indicate that this new combination reduces the usually observed metabolic impact. An adequate cycle control (with 20% amenorrhea) is achieved for the first time with estradiol valerate + progestin,, in opposition with prior catastrophic results with other formulations containing 17beta-estradiol. A second combination containing estradiol + nomegestrol acetate (monophasic, 24 active days + 4 placebo days) is under study and seems also to yield promising results. Of course, in-depth study of metabolic and vascular effects of these new combinations is mandatory - and ongoing. PMID:21287768

  10. 17ß-Estradiol Is Necessary for Extinction of Cocaine Seeking in Female Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twining, Robert C.; Tuscher, Jennifer J.; Doncheck, Elizabeth M.; Frick, Karyn M.; Mueller, Devin

    2013-01-01

    Human and preclinical models of addiction demonstrate that gonadal hormones modulate acquisition of drug seeking. Little is known, however, about the effects of these hormones on extinction of drug-seeking behavior. Here, we investigated how 17ß-estradiol (E[subscript 2]) affects expression and extinction of cocaine seeking in female rats. Using a…

  11. EFFECTS OF ETHINYL ESTRADIOL ON GONDAL DEVELOPMENT AND PATHOLOGY IN CUNNER, TAUTOGOLABRUS ADSPERSUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The intent of this study was to determine histopathologically the effect of ethinyl estradiol (EE2) on gonadal development, liver and kidney condition in reproductively active cunner, Tautogolabrus adspersus. Reproductively active cunner were treated by implanting EE2 in a slow r...

  12. Effects of bromocriptine on (/sup 3/H)estradiol binding in cytosol of anterior pituitary

    SciTech Connect

    De Nicola, A.F.; Weisenberg, L.S.; Arakelian, M.C.; Libertun, C.

    1981-07-01

    The hypothalamus may control hormone receptors in the anterior pituitary either by a direct trophic effect or indirectly by regulation of serum pituitary hormone levels. Rats whose medial basal hypothalamus had been destroyed in order to suppress neural control of the gland showed a reduction in (/sup 3/H)estradiol binding in the anterior pituitary and high serum PRL levels; both changes were reversed by treatment of the lesioned rats with daily injections of bromocriptine, a dopamine agonist. In nonlesioned animals, the same treatment did not modify significantly those parameters. In another hyperprolactinemic model (rats with anterior pituitaries transplanted under the kidney capsule), (/sup 3/H)estradiol binding by the in situ pituitaries of the host rats was similar to that in the nongrafted controls. These results suggest that changes due to median eminence lesion are reversible and that bromocriptine is able to act as a substitutive therapy which restores binding of estradiol in glands whose receptors have been decreased by the effect of the lesion. High PRL levels due to pituitary transplant do not account for the observed changes in the pituitary estradiol binding.

  13. Sorption and degradation of 17ß-estradiol-17-sulfate in sterilized soil-water systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To identify abiotic processes that govern the fate of a sulfate conjugated estrogen, 17ß-estradiol-17-sulfate (E2-17S), soil batch experiments were conducted to investigate the dissipation, sorption, and degradation of radiolabeled E2-17S under sterilized conditions. The aqueous dissipation half-liv...

  14. Persistence and Fate of 17beta-estradiol and testosterone in agricultural soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Steroidal hormones are constantly released into the environment by man-made and natural sources. The goal of this study was to examine the persistence and fate of 17beta-estradiol and testosterone, the two primary natural hormones. Incubation experiments were conducted under aerobic and anaerobic co...

  15. Effects of liquid swine manure on sorption of 17ß-estradiol to soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogens are potent endocrine disrupting chemicals and can be found in the environment. Animal manure can contain estrogenic hormones, specifically 17'-estradiol (E2). A common manure management practice is to contain liquid manure in a manure storage ponds or lagoons, which is then applied on or i...

  16. Isolation and Bioaugmentation of an Estradiol-Degrading Bacterium and Its Integration into a Mature Biofilm▿

    PubMed Central

    Iasur-Kruh, Lilach; Hadar, Yitzhak; Minz, Dror

    2011-01-01

    Bioaugmentation can alter the potential activity as well as the composition of the naturally occurring microbial biota during bioremediation of a contaminated site. The focus of the current study is the pollutant 17β-estradiol (E2), which can cause endocrine effects and is potentially harmful to aquatic biota and to public health. The community composition and function of biofilms, originating from a wetland system, as affected by augmentation of an estradiol-degrading bacterium (EDB-LI1) under different conditions, were investigated. EDB-LI1 inoculation into biofilm from two wetland ponds representing early and advanced water treatment stages, respectively, yielded three significant observations, as follows: (i) EDB-LI1, enriched from a biofilm of a constructed wetland wastewater treatment system, was detected (by quantitative PCR [qPCR] analysis) in this environment in the augmented biofilm only; (ii) the augmented biofilm acquired the ability to remove estradiol; and (iii) the bacterial community composition (analyzed by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis [DGGE]) of the augmented biofilm differed from that of the control biofilm. Furthermore, EDB-LI1 bioaugmentation showed a higher level of removal of estradiol with biofilms that originated from the advanced-treatment-stage wetland pond than those from the early-treatment-stage pond. Hence, the bioaugmentation efficiency of EDB-LI1 depends on both the quality of the feed water and the microbial community composition in the pond. PMID:21478310

  17. Estradiol and song affect female zebra finch behavior independent of dopamine in the striatum

    PubMed Central

    Svec, Lace A.; Lookingland, Keith J.; Wade, Juli

    2009-01-01

    Female songbirds display preferences for certain song characteristics, but the neural and hormonal mechanisms mediating these preferences are not fully clear. The present study sought to further explore the role of estradiol, as well as assess potential roles of dopaminergic systems, on behavioral responses to song. Adult female zebra finches were treated with estradiol and exposed to tutored or untutored song or silence. Behavior was quantified and neurochemistry of the nucleus accumbens and striatum was examined with high performance liquid chromatography. As a control, the responses of these two systems to treatment with raclopride, a specific D2 receptor antagonist, were also evaluated. This manipulation did not affect dopamine (DA), but did increase DOPAC and the DOPAC/DA ratio. Estradiol reduced the display of two behaviors, distance calls and visual scanning, but had no effect on dopaminergic responses. Auditory stimulus exposure affected other vocalizations, but song presentation did not modulate the levels of DA or its metabolite, DOPAC in the nucleus accumbens or striatum. Collectively, the results suggest that both estradiol and auditory stimuli can modify the behavioral responses of adult zebra finches, but they may not change DA concentration or turnover in striatal dopamine neurons. PMID:19615392

  18. The anorectic effect of fenfluramine is increased by estradiol treatment in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Heidi M; Eckel, Lisa A

    2005-10-15

    The emergence of sex- and estrous cycle-related differences in the anorectic effect of fenfluramine, a serotonin (5-HT) agonist, prompted us to investigate whether these behavioral changes are mediated by estradiol. Rats were ovariectomized and housed in cages that permitted the analysis of feeding and locomotor activity via an automated, computerized system. Using a within-subjects design, we investigated the effects of 1 mg/kg d-fenfluramine and saline vehicle on food intake and wheel running in ovariectomized rats following estradiol benzoate (EB) and oil vehicle treatment. A cyclic regimen of EB treatment was used to mimic the changes in endogenous estradiol secretion over the rat's 4-day estrous cycle. The decrease in food intake following fenfluramine treatment was greater in EB-treated rats, relative to oil-treated rats. Fenfluramine also produced a small but significant decrease in wheel running in ovariectomized rats that was not modulated by EB treatment. Thus, EB's ability to increase the anorectic effect of this dose of fenfluramine appears behaviorally specific. Although the inhibition of food intake by fenfluramine is largely attributed to its ability to increase synaptic levels of 5-HT, additional research involving selective 5-HT receptor agonists and antagonists is necessary to determine whether estradiol interacts with the endogenous 5-HT system to control food intake in the female rat. PMID:16139852

  19. Sensitive determination of 17β-estradiol in river water using a graphene based electrochemical sensor.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Fernando C; Rossi, Bruno; Donatoni, Maria C; de Oliveira, Kleber T; Pereira, Ernesto C

    2015-06-30

    In this study, a novel material for the electrochemical determination of 17β-estradiol using an electrode based on reduced graphene oxide and a metal complex porphyrin has been applied to environmental monitoring. The electrochemical profile of the proposed electrode was analyzed by differential pulse voltammetry, which showed a shift of the oxidation peak potential of 17β-estradiol to 150mV in a less positive direction compared to the bare reduced graphene oxide electrode. DPV experiments were performed in PBS at pH 7.0 to determine 17β-estradiol without any previous step of extraction, cleanup, or derivatization, in the range of 0.1-1.0μmolL(-1) with a detection limit archived at 5.3nmolL(-1) (1.4μgL(-1)). The proposed sensor was successfully applied in the determination of 17β-estradiol in a river water sample without any purification step and was successfully analyzed under the standard addition method. All the obtained results were in agreement with those from the HPLC procedure. PMID:26041518

  20. Sorption and Degradation of 17ß-Estradiol-17Sulfate in Agricultural Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the environment, the natural estrogenic hormone, 17ß-estradiol (E2) can potentially induce endocrine disruptions at low concentrations, i.e. 1-10 ng/L. Laboratory based studies have found low potentials for the persistence and mobility of E2 in the environment due to its high degradation and/or s...

  1. Occurrence and Pathways of Manure-borne 17beta-Estradiol in Vadose Zone Water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reproductive hormones, such as 17beta-estradiol (E2), can cause physiological and reproductive disorders in numerous species at low part per trillion concentrations. The persistence and transport pathways of manure-borne E2 in agricultural soils were determined by comparing the occurrence of E2 in t...

  2. Diatom response to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Parkinson, W.C.; Sulik, G.L. )

    1992-06-01

    Reports that extremely low-frequency magnetic fields can interfere with normal biological cell function continue to stimulate experimental activity as well as investigations into the possible mechanism of the interaction. The cyclotron resonance' model of Liboff has been tested by Smith et al. using as the biological test system the diatom Amphora coffeiformis. They report enhanced motility of the diatom in response to a low-frequency electromagnetic field tuned to the cyclotron resonance condition for calcium ions. We report here an attempt to reproduce their results. Following their protocol diatoms were seeded onto agar plates containing varying amounts of calcium and exposed to colinear DC and AC magnetic fields tuned to the cyclotron resonant condition for frequencies of 16, 30, and 60 Hz. The fractional motility was compared with that of control plates seeded at the same time from the same culture. We find no evidence of a cyclotron resonance effect.

  3. Triclosan is a potent inhibitor of estradiol and estrone sulfonation in sheep placenta

    PubMed Central

    James, Margaret O.; Li, Wenjun; Summerlot, David P.; Rowland-Faux, Laura; Wood, Charles E.

    2016-01-01

    The personal care product Triclosan, 5-chloro-2(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)-phenol, is widely used in consumer products as an antibacterial agent and is increasingly found in the environment as a contaminant of sewage sludge and wastewater. This compound has been identified in plasma and urine of people in the United States, Sweden and Australia. Triclosan is known to inhibit sulfonation of phenolic xenobiotics and is structurally related to inhibitors of estrogen sulfotransferase, such as polychlorobiphenylols. In pregnancy, the placenta is an important source of estrogen, which is needed for normal fetal development and successful parturition, and estrogen sulfotransferase is thought to play an important role in regulation of estrogen availability. In this study, we examined the effect of Triclosan on sheep placental cytosolic sulfotransferase activity with 17-beta-estradiol and estrone as substrates. For comparison, we studied the effects of 4-hydroxy-3,3′,4′,5-tetrachlorobiphenyl and 2′-hydroxytriclocarban on estradiol sulfonation. The apparent Km for placental cytosolic sulfotransferase activity with estradiol as substrate was 0.27±0.06 nM (mean±S.D., n=3 individuals) and with estrone as substrate was 1.86±0.22 nM. Partial substrate inhibition was observed with estradiol at concentrations higher than 10–20 nM, as is typical of estrogen sulfotransferases (SULT1E1) in other species. Studies of the effect of Triclosan on estrogen sulfotransferase activity were conducted with several concentrations (0.1–6 nM) of estradiol and with 2 nM estrone. Triclosan was a very potent inhibitor of both estradiol and estrone sulfonation. For estradiol the inhibition was shown to be mixed competitive/uncompetitive, with Kic of 0.09±0.01 nM and Kiu of 5.2±2.9 nM. The IC50 for inhibition of estrone sulfonation was 0.60±0.06 nM. At an environmentally relevant concentration of 1 μM, Triclosan was not a substrate for glucuronidation in sheep placental microsomes. Triclosan

  4. Sexual Function in Women on Estradiol or Venlafaxine for Hot Flushes: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Susan D.; Mitchell, Caroline M.; Joffe, Hadine; Cohen, Lee; Shifren, Jan L.; Newton, Katherine M.; Freeman, Ellen W.; Larson, Joseph C.; Manson, JoAnn E.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Guthrie, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate sexual function in midlife women taking low-dose oral estradiol or venlafaxine for hot flushes. Methods In an 8-week randomized controlled trial among women aged 40-62 years, sexual function was compared between oral estradiol 0.5 mg/day or venlafaxine 75 mg/day (both compared with placebo). Measures included composite and 6 domain scores from the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) and sexually related personal distress. Results Participants were aged 54.6 (standard deviation [SD] 3.8) years, 59% Caucasian, with 8.1 (SD 5.3) daily hot flushes. Median composite baseline FSFI score was 16.3 (SD 11.9, n=256) for all women and 21.7 (SD 9.3, n=198) among sexually active women. Composite mean FSFI change from baseline to week-8 was 1.4 (95% Confidence Interval [CI] -0.4, 3.2) for estradiol, 1.1 (95% CI -0.5, 2.7) for venlafaxine and -0.3 (95% CI -1.6, 1.0) for placebo. Composite FSFI and sexually-related distress change from baseline did not differ between estradiol and placebo (p= 0.38, p=0.30) or venlafaxine and placebo (p=0.79, p=0.48). Among sexually active women, FSFI domain score change from baseline differences (active compared with placebo) in desire was 0.3 (95% CI 0.0, 0.6) for estradiol; -0.6 (95% CI -1.2, 0.0) in orgasm for venlafaxine, and 0.9 (95% CI 0.2, 1.6) in penetration pain for venlafaxine. No women reported adverse events related to sexual dysfunction. Conclusions Overall sexual function among nondepressed midlife women experiencing hot flushes did not change over 8-weeks with low-dose oral estradiol or venlafaxine (compared with placebo), although subtle increase in desire (estradiol), and decreases in orgasm and pain (venlafaxine) may exist. PMID:25004335

  5. Naturally-occurring estradiol-17{beta}-fatty acid esters, but not estradiol-17{beta}, preferentially induce mammary tumorigenesis in female rats: Implications for an important role in human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Laura H.; Yu Jina; Xu Xiaomeng; Lee, Anthony J.; Zhu Baoting

    2008-06-15

    Because mammary glands are surrounded by adipose tissues, we hypothesize that the ultra-lipophilic endogenous estrogen-17{beta}-fatty acid esters may have preferential hormonal and carcinogenic effects in mammary tissues compared to other target organs (such as the uterus and pituitary). This hypothesis is tested in the present study. We found that all 46 rats implanted with an estradiol-17{beta} pellet developed large pituitary tumors (average weight = 251 {+-}103 mg) and had to be terminated early, but only 48% of them developed mammary tumors. In addition, approximately one-fourth of them developed a huge uterus. In the 26 animals implanted with a mixture containing estradiol-17{beta}-stearate and estradiol-17{beta}-palmitate (two representative estradiol-17{beta}-fatty acid esters) or in the 29 animals implanted with estradiol-17{beta}-stearate alone (in the same molar dose as estradiol-17{beta}), 73% and 79%, respectively, of them developed mammary tumors, whereas only 3 or 2 animals, respectively, had to be terminated early due to the presence of a large pituitary tumor. Both tumorous and normal mammary tissues contained much higher levels of estrogen esterase than other tissues, which catalyzes the releases of bioactive estrogens from their fatty acid esters. In conclusion, while estradiol-17{beta} is much stronger in inducing pituitary tumor (100% incidence) than mammary tumor, estradiol-17{beta}-fatty acid esters have a higher efficacy than estradiol-17{beta} in inducing mammary tumor and yet it only has little ability to induce uterine out-growth and pituitary tumorigenesis. This study establishes the endogenous estrogen-17{beta}-fatty acid esters as preferential inducers of mammary tumorigenesis.

  6. Diethylstilbestrol can effectively accelerate estradiol-17-O-glucuronidation, while potently inhibiting estradiol-3-O-glucuronidation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Liangliang; Xiao, Ling; Xia, Yangliu; Zhou, Kun; Wang, Huili; Huang, Minyi; Ge, Guangbo; Wu, Yan; Wu, Ganlin; Yang, Ling

    2015-03-01

    This in vitro study investigates the effects of diethylstilbestrol (DES), a widely used toxic synthetic estrogen, on estradiol-3- and 17-O- (E2-3/17-O) glucuronidation, via culturing human liver microsomes (HLMs) or recombinant UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) with DES and E2. DES can potently inhibit E2-3-O-glucuronidation in HLM, a probe reaction for UGT1A1. Kinetic assays indicate that the inhibition follows a competitive inhibition mechanism, with the Ki value of 2.1 ± 0.3 μM, which is less than the possible in vivo level. In contrast to the inhibition on E2-3-O-glucuronidation, the acceleration is observed on E2-17-O-glucuronidation in HLM, in which cholestatic E2-17-O-glucuronide is generated. In the presence of DES (0–6.25 μM), K{sub m} values for E2-17-O-glucuronidation are located in the range of 7.2–7.4 μM, while V{sub max} values range from 0.38 to 1.54 nmol/min/mg. The mechanism behind the activation in HLM is further demonstrated by the fact that DES can efficiently elevate the activity of UGT1A4 in catalyzing E2-17-O-glucuronidation. The presence of DES (2 μM) can elevate V{sub max} from 0.016 to 0.81 nmol/min/mg, while lifting K{sub m} in a much lesser extent from 4.4 to 11 μM. Activation of E2-17-O-glucuronidation is well described by a two binding site model, with K{sub A}, α, and β values of 0.077 ± 0.18 μM, 3.3 ± 1.1 and 104 ± 56, respectively. However, diverse effects of DES towards E2-3/17-O-glucuronidation are not observed in liver microsomes from several common experimental animals. In summary, this study issues new potential toxic mechanisms for DES: potently inhibiting the activity of UGT1A1 and powerfully accelerating the formation of cholestatic E2-17-O-glucuronide by UGT1A4. - Highlights: • E2-3-O-glucuronidation in HLM is inhibited when co-incubated with DES. • E2-17-O-glucuronidation in HLM is stimulated when co-incubated with DES. • Acceleration of E2-17-O-glucuronidationin in HLM by DES is via activating the

  7. DREAM/calsenilin/KChIP3 modulates strategy selection and estradiol-dependent learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Tunur, Tumay; Stelly, Claire E; Schrader, Laura Ann

    2013-12-01

    Downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM)/calsenilin(C)/K⁺ channel interacting protein 3 (KChIP3) is a multifunctional Ca²⁺-binding protein highly expressed in the hippocampus that inhibits hippocampus-sensitive memory and synaptic plasticity in male mice. Initial studies in our lab suggested opposing effects of DR/C/K3 expression in female mice. Fluctuating hormones that occur during the estrous cycle may affect these results. In this study, we hypothesized that DR/C/K3 interacts with 17β-estradiol, the primary estrogen produced by the ovaries, to play a role in hippocampus function. We investigated the role of estradiol and DR/C/K3 in learning strategy in ovariectomized (OVX) female mice. OVX WT and DR/C/K3 knockout (KO) mice were given three injections of vehicle (sesame oil) or 17β-estradiol benzoate (0.25 mg in 100 mL sesame oil) 48, 24, and 2 h before training and testing. DR/C/K3 and estradiol had a time-dependent effect on strategy use in the female mice. Male KO mice exhibited enhanced place strategy relative to WT 24 h after pre-exposure. Fear memory formation was significantly reduced in intact female KO mice relative to intact WT mice, and OVX reduced fear memory formation in the WT, but had no effect in the KO mice. Long-term potentiation in hippocampus slices from female mice was enhanced by circulating ovarian hormones in both WT and DR/C/K3 KO mice. Paired-pulse depression was not affected by ovarian hormones but was reduced in DR/C/K3 KO mice. These results provide the first evidence that DR/C/K3 plays a timing-dependent role in estradiol regulation of learning, memory, and plasticity. PMID:24248121

  8. Influence of dynorphin on estradiol- and cervical stimulation-induced prolactin surges in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, Andrea M; Helena, Cleyde V; Cristancho-Gordo, Ruth; Gonzalez-Iglesias, Arturo E; Bertram, Richard

    2016-08-01

    Prolactin is an anterior pituitary hormone necessary for fertility, pregnancy maintenance, lactation, and aspects of maternal behavior. In rodents, there is a surge of prolactin on the afternoon of proestrus, and a semi-circadian pattern of prolactin surges during early pregnancy, with a diurnal and nocturnal surge every day. Both of these patterns can be replicated in ovariectomized rats. A prior study demonstrated that central antagonism of κ-opioid receptors, the target of dynorphin, largely abolished the nocturnal prolactin surge in pregnant rats. We build on this to determine whether dynorphin, perhaps from the arcuate population that co-express kisspeptin, neurokinin B, and dynorphin (KNDy neurons), also contributes to the estradiol- or cervical stimulation-induced surges in ovariectomized rats. Ovariectomized rats were treated with either estradiol or cervical stimulation to induce prolactin surge(s). Blood samples were taken around the expected surge time to determine the effect of either acute κ-opioid receptor antagonism or previous chemical ablation of the KNDy population on prolactin levels. Dynorphin antagonism does significantly disrupt the nocturnal prolactin surge, but it does not contribute to the estradiol-induced surge. Chemical ablation of KNDy neurons had opposite effects; ablation of 40 % of the KNDy neurons had no impact on the nocturnal prolactin surge, while a somewhat larger ablation significantly reduced the size of the estradiol-induced surge. We conclude that dynorphin is likely a controlling factor for the nocturnal surge induced by cervical stimulation, and that other KNDy neuron products must play a role in the estradiol-induced surge. PMID:27038317

  9. Estradiol Binds to Insulin and Insulin Receptor Decreasing Insulin Binding in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Root-Bernstein, Robert; Podufaly, Abigail; Dillon, Patrick F.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Insulin (INS) resistance associated with hyperestrogenemias occurs in gestational diabetes mellitus, polycystic ovary syndrome, ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, estrogen therapies, metabolic syndrome, and obesity. The mechanism by which INS and estrogen interact is unknown. We hypothesize that estrogen binds directly to INS and the insulin receptor (IR) producing INS resistance. Objectives: To determine the binding constants of steroid hormones to INS, the IR, and INS-like peptides derived from the IR; and to investigate the effect of estrogens on the binding of INS to its receptor. Methods: Ultraviolet spectroscopy, capillary electrophoresis, and NMR demonstrated estrogen binding to INS and its receptor. Horse-radish peroxidase-linked INS was used in an ELISA-like procedure to measure the effect of estradiol on binding of INS to its receptor. Measurements: Binding constants for estrogens to INS and the IR were determined by concentration-dependent spectral shifts. The effect of estradiol on INS binding to its receptor was determined by shifts in the INS binding curve. Main Results: Estradiol bound to INS with a Kd of 12 × 10−9 M and to the IR with a Kd of 24 × 10−9 M, while other hormones had significantly less affinity. Twenty-two nanomolars of estradiol shifted the binding curve of INS to its receptor 0.8 log units to the right. Conclusion: Estradiol concentrations in hyperestrogenemic syndromes may interfere with INS binding to its receptor producing significant INS resistance. PMID:25101056

  10. Localization of neuropeptide-Y immunoreactivity in estradiol-concentrating cells in the hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Sar, M.; Sahu, A.; Crowley, W.R.; Kalra, S.P. )

    1990-12-01

    Considerable evidence shows that gonadal steroids exert a facilitatory influence on levels and release of neuropeptide-Y (NPY) from the hypothalamus. However, it is not known whether gonadal steroids act directly on NPY-producing cells in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of the hypothalamus to produce these facilitatory effects on NPY or whether they act on other cells that have a modulatory influence via synapses on ARC NPY cells. We applied the combined method of steroid autoradiography and immunocytochemistry to assess the localization of (3H)estradiol in relation to NPY-producing cells in the hypothalamus. Rats (n = 6) were bilaterally ovariectomized and injected intracerebroventricularly with colchicine. Twenty-four hours later each rat received an iv injection of 17 beta-(2,4,6,7,16,17(-3)H)estradiol (SA, 166 Ci/mmol) at a dose of 5.0 micrograms/kg BW. One hour after the injection of (3H)estradiol, the rats were perfused with 4% paraformaldehyde; brains were removed, frozen in isopentane precooled in liquid nitrogen (-190 C), sectioned, and processed for autoradiography. The autoradiograms were then incubated with specific antibodies for NPY immunostaining by the avidin-biotin-peroxidase method. The results revealed NPY-immunopositive cells in the ARC, striatum, hippocampus, amygdala, and cerebral cortex and a few cells in the median eminence. NPY-immunoreactive fibers were also detected in the internal layer of the median eminence. The largest number of neurons showing NPY immunoreactivity in the cytoplasm was detected in the ARC, and only in this nucleus did we observed colocalization of (3H)estradiol and NPY immunoreactivity in neurons. A population of NPY-immunopositive cells in the ARC (10-20%) exhibited nuclear (3H)estradiol; the majority of these cells were located in the lateral and ventral portions of the ARC.

  11. 17Beta-Estradiol Inhibits Calcium-Activated Potassium Channel Expressions in Rat Whole Bladder

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of estrogen on the expression of calcium-activated potassium (KCa) channels in an overactive bladder rat model. To this end, mRNA and protein levels of KCa channel subtypes in the bladder of ovariectomized rats were measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, respectively. Methods: Ten-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided randomly into 3 groups: sham-operated control group (n=11), ovariectomy group (n=11), and the group treated with estrogen after ovariectomy (n=12). Rats in the last group were subcutaneously injected with 17β-estradiol (50 μg/kg) every other day for 2 weeks, whereas rats in the other 2 groups received vehicle (soybean oil) alone. Two weeks after treatment, the whole bladder was excised for mRNA and protein measurements. Results: Protein levels of the large-conductance KCa (BK) channels in the ovariectomy group were 1.5 folds higher than those in the sham-operated control group. However, the protein levels of the other KCa channel subtypes did not change significantly upon bilateral ovariectomy. Treatment with 17β-estradiol after ovariectomy restored BK channel protein levels to the control value. In contrast, BK channel mRNA levels were not significantly affected by either ovariectomy alone or 17β-estradiol treatment. The small-conductance KCa type 3 channel (SK3) mRNA and protein levels decreased to 75% of control levels upon 17β-estradiol treatment. Conclusions: These results suggest that 17β-estradiol may influence urinary bladder function by modulating BK and SK3 channel expression. PMID:27032553

  12. Preparation of 17β-estradiol-imprinted material by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization and its application.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yanru; Niu, Yuling; Gong, Xiaohan; Ma, Meihua; Ren, Xiaowei; Zhu, Weihua; Luo, Ruiming; Gong, Bolin

    2015-04-01

    A novel 17β-estradiol molecularly imprinted polymer was grafted onto the surface of initiator-immobilized silica by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. The resulting molecularly imprinted polymer was characterized by elemental analysis and thermogravimetric analysis. The binding property of molecularly imprinted polymer for 17β-estradiol was also studied with both static and dynamic methods. The results showed that the molecularly imprinted polymer possessed excellent recognition capacity for 17β-estradiol (180.65 mg/g at 298 K), and also exhibited outstanding selectivity for 17β-estradiol over the other competitive compounds (such as testosterone and progesterone). Then, the determination of trace 17β-estradiol in beef samples was successfully developed by using molecularly imprinted polymer solid-phase extraction coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography. The limit of detection was 0.25 ng/mL, and the amount of 17β-estradiol in beef samples was detected at 2.83 ng/g. This work proposed a sensitive, rapid, reliable, and convenient approach for the determination of trace 17β-estradiol in complicated beef samples. PMID:25619938

  13. Application of stable carbon isotope analysis to the detection of 17beta-estradiol administration to cattle.

    PubMed

    Buisson, C; Hebestreit, M; Weigert, A Preiss; Heinrich, K; Fry, H; Flenker, U; Banneke, S; Prevost, S; Andre, F; Schaenzer, W; Houghton, E; Le Bizec, B

    2005-11-01

    The use of anabolic agents in food producing animals is prohibited within the EU since 1988 (96/22/EC directive). The control of the illegal use of natural steroid hormones in cattle is still an exciting analytical challenge as far as no definitive method and non-ambiguous analytical criteria are available. The ability of gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) to demonstrate the administration of 17beta-estradiol to bovine has been investigated in this paper. By comparison of 13C/12C isotopic ratio of main urinary estradiol metabolite, i.e. 17alpha-estradiol, with two endogenous reference compounds (ERCs), i.e. dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and 5-androstene-3beta,17alpha-diol, the differentiation of estradiol metabolite origin, either endogenous or exogenous, has been proved to be achievable. After treatment, the delta(13)C(VPDB)-values of 17alpha-estradiol reached -27 per thousand to -29 per thousand, whereas delta13CVPDB-values of DHEA remained between -13 per thousand and -20 per thousand depending on the diet, maize and grass, respectively. A significant difference of delta13CVPDB between ERCs and 17alpha-estradiol was measurable over a period of 2 weeks after estradiol ester administration to the animal. PMID:16233872

  14. Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate and mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate inhibit growth and reduce estradiol levels of antral follicles in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Rupesh K.; Singh, Jeffery M.; Leslie, Tracie C.; Meachum, Sharon; Flaws, Jodi A.; Yao, Humphrey H-C

    2010-01-15

    Any insult that affects survival of ovarian antral follicles can cause abnormal estradiol production and fertility problems. Phthalate esters (PEs) are plasticizers used in a wide range of consumer and industrial products. Exposure to these chemicals has been linked to reduced fertility in humans and animal models. Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) decrease serum estradiol levels and aromatase (Arom) expression, prolong estrous cycles, and cause anovulation in animal and culture models. These observations suggest PEs directly target antral follicles. We therefore tested the hypothesis that DEHP (1-100 mug/ml) and MEHP (0.1-10 mug/ml) directly inhibit antral follicular growth and estradiol production. Antral follicles from adult mice were cultured with DEHP or MEHP, and/or estradiol for 96 h. During culture, follicle size was measured every 24 h as a measurement of follicle growth. After culture, media were collected for measurement of estradiol levels and follicles were subjected to measurement of cylin-D-2 (Ccnd2), cyclin-dependant-kinase-4 (Cdk4), and Arom. We found that DEHP and MEHP inhibited growth of follicles and decreased estradiol production compared to controls at the highest doses. DEHP and MEHP also decreased mRNA expression of Ccnd2, Cdk4, and Arom at the highest dose. Addition of estradiol to the culture medium prevented the follicles from DEHP- and MEHP-induced inhibition of growth, reduction in estradiol levels, and decreased Ccnd2 and Cdk4 expression. Collectively, our results indicate that DEHP and MEHP may directly inhibit antral follicle growth via a mechanism that partially includes reduction in levels of estradiol production and decreased expression of cell cycle regulators.

  15. Hepatic expression of heme oxygenase-1 and antioxidant response element-mediated genes following administration of ethinyl estradiol to rats

    SciTech Connect

    Morio, Lisa A.; Leone, Angelique; Sawant, Sharmilee P.; Nie, Alex Y.; Brandon Parker, J.; Taggart, Peter; Barron, Alfred M.; McMillian, Michael K. . E-mail: mmcmilli@prdus.jnj.com; Lord, Peter

    2006-11-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is one of several enzymes induced by hepatotoxicants, and is thought to have an important protective role against cellular stress during liver inflammation and injury. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the role of HO-1 in estradiol-induced liver injury. A single dose of ethinyl estradiol (500 mg/kg, po) resulted in mild liver injury. Repeated administration of ethinyl estradiol (500 mg/kg/day for 4 days, po) resulted in no detectable liver injury or dysfunction. Using RT-PCR analysis, we demonstrate that HO-1 gene expression in whole liver tissue is elevated (> 20-fold) after the single dose of ethinyl estradiol. The number and intensity of HO-1 immunoreactive macrophages were increased after the single dose of ethinyl estradiol. HO-1 expression was undetectable in hepatic parenchymal cells from rats receiving Methocel control or a single dose of ethinyl estradiol, however cytosolic HO-1 immunoreactivity in these cells after repeated dosing of ethinyl estradiol was pronounced. The increases in HO-1 mRNA and HO-1 immunoreactivity following administration of a single dose of ethinyl estradiol suggested that this enzyme might be responsible for the observed protection of the liver during repeated dosing. To investigate the effect of HO-1 expression on ethinyl estradiol-induced hepatotoxicity, rats were pretreated with hemin (50 {mu}mol/kg, ip, a substrate and inducer of HO-1), with tin protoporphyrin IX (60 {mu}mol/kg, ip, an HO-1 inhibitor), or with gadolinium chloride (10 mg/kg, iv, an inhibitor/toxin of Kupffer cells) 24 h before ethinyl estradiol treatment. Pretreatment with modulators of HO-1 expression and activity had generally minimal effects on ethinyl estradiol-induced liver injury. These data suggest that HO-1 plays a limited role in antioxidant defense against ethinyl estradiol-induced oxidative stress and hepatotoxicity, and suggests that other coordinately induced enzymes are responsible for protection observed

  16. Exposure scheme separates effects of electric shock and electric field for honey bees, Apis mellifera L

    SciTech Connect

    Bindokas, V.P.; Gauger, J.R.; Greenberg, B.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanisms to explain disturbance of honey bee colonies under a 765-kV, 60-Hz transmission line (electric (E) field = 7 kV/m) fall into two categories: direct bee perception of enhanced in-hive E fields, and perception of shock from induced currents. The same adverse biological effects previously observed in honey bee colonies exposed under a 765-kV transmission line can be reproduced by exposing worker bees to shock or E field within elongated hive entranceways (= tunnels). Exposure to intense E field caused disturbance only if bees were in contact with a conductive substrate. E-field and shock exposure can be separated and precisely defined within tunnels, eliminating dosimetric vagaries that occur when entire hives are exposed to E field.

  17. Neuroendocrine mediated effects of electromagnetic-field exposure: Possible role of the pineal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.B.; Stevens, R.G.; Anderson, L.E. )

    1989-01-01

    Reports from recent epidemiological studies have suggested a possible association between extremely low frequently (ELF; including 50- or 60-Hz) electric- and magnetic-field exposure, and increased risk of certain cancers, depression, and miscarriage. ELF field-induced pineal gland dysfunction is a possible etiological factor in these effects. Work in our laboratory and elsewhere has shown that ELF electromagnetic-field exposure can alter the normal circadian rhythm of melatonin synthesis and release in the pineal gland. Consequences of reduced or inappropriately timed melatonin release on the endocrine, neuronal, and immune systems are discussed. Laboratory data linking ELF field exposure to changes in pineal circadian rhythms in both animal and humans are reviewed. The authors suggest that the pineal gland, in addition to being a convenient locus for measuring dyschronogenic effects of ELF field exposure, may play a central role in biological response to these fields via alterations in the melatonin signal.

  18. Effects of CB1 receptor agonism and antagonism on behavioral fear and physiological stress responses in adult intact, ovariectomized, and estradiol-replaced female rats.

    PubMed

    Simone, J J; Malivoire, B L; McCormick, C M

    2015-10-15

    There is growing interest in the development of cannabis-based therapies for the treatment of fear and anxiety disorders. There are a few studies, but none in females, of the effects of the highly selective cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) agonist, arachidonyl 2'-chlorethylamide (ACEA), on behavioral fear. In experiment 1 involving gonadally-intact females, ACEA (either 0.1 or 0.01 mg/kg) was without effect in the elevated plus maze (EPM), and the lower dose decreased anxiety in the open field test (OFT). AM251 increased anxiety in the EPM and decreased locomotor activity in the OFT. Twenty-four hours after fear conditioning, neither ACEA nor AM251 affected generalized fear or conditioned fear recall. AM251 and 0.1 mg/kg ACEA impaired, and 0.01 mg/kg ACEA enhanced, within-session fear extinction. AM251 increased plasma corticosterone concentrations after the fear extinction session, whereas ACEA was without effect. Based on evidence that estradiol may moderate the effects of CB1 receptor signaling in females, experiment 2 involved ovariectomized (OVX) rats provided with 10-μg 17β-Estradiol and compared with OVX rats without hormone replacement (oil vehicle). Irrespective of hormone treatment, AM251 increased anxiety in the EPM, whereas ACEA (0.01 mg/kg) was without effect. Neither hormone nor drug altered anxiety in the OFT, but estradiol increased and AM251 decreased distance traveled. After fear conditioning, AM251 decreased generalized fear. Neither hormone nor drug had any effect on recall or extinction of conditioned fear, however, ACEA and AM251 increased fear-induced plasma corticosterone concentrations. Further, when results with intact rats were compared with those from OVX rats, gonadal status did not moderate the effects of either AM251 or ACEA, although OVX displayed greater anxiety and fear than did intact rats. Thus, the effects of CB1 receptor antagonism and agonism in adult female rats do not depend on ovarian estradiol. PMID:26311003

  19. Design, construction, and validation of a large capacity rodent magnetic field exposure laboratory.

    PubMed

    Gauger, J R; Johnson, T R; Stangel, J E; Patterson, R C; Williams, D A; Harder, J B; McCormick, D L

    1999-01-01

    A magnetic field exposure laboratory has been constructed to support National Toxicology Program studies for the evaluation of the toxicity and carcinogenicity of pure, linearly polarized, 60 Hz magnetic fields in rodents. This dual corridor, controlled access facility can support the simultaneous exposure of 1200 rats and 1200 mice. The facility contains fully redundant electrical and environmental control systems and was constructed using non-metallic materials to maintain low levels of background (ambient), stray, and cross-talk magnetic fields. The exposure module design provides for large uniform exposure volumes with good control of stray and cross-talk fields, while allowing the use of roll-around cage racks for simplified animal husbandry. Stray fields and cross-talk have been further reduced by the inclusion of "steering coils" in each exposure module. Ambient 60 Hz fields (less cross-talk) in all exposure rooms are <0.1 microT (1 mG), and static magnetic fields have been mapped extensively. Magnetic field strength, waveform, temperature, relative humidity, light intensity, noise level, vibration, and air flow in all animal holding areas are tightly regulated, and are monitored continuously during all studies. Field uniformity in the animal exposure volumes is better than -/+l0%; a systematic program of cage, rack, and room rotation controls for possible positional effects within the exposure system. Magnetic fields are turned on and off over multiple cycles to prevent the induction of transients associated with abrupt field level changes. Total harmonic distortion is <3% at all field strengths. The facility has been used to study magnetic field bioeffects in rodent model systems in experiments ranging in duration from 8 weeks to 2 years. PMID:9915589

  20. AC magnetic field losses in BSCCO-2223 superconducting tapes

    SciTech Connect

    Lelovic, M.; Mench, S.; Deis, T.

    1997-09-01

    The AC magnetic losses at power frequencies (60 Hz) were investigated for mono- and multifilament Ag-sheathed (Bi, Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} (BSCCO-2223) tapes with similar transport critical current (I{sub c}) values at 77 K. The multifilament sample exhibited higher losses than the monofilament under the same conditions. Loss peaks are discussed in terms of intergranular, intragranular and eddy current losses. Because of BSCCO`s anisotropy, field orientation has a large effect on the magnitude of these peaks, even at relatively small angles. Losses for fields applied parallel to the c-axis of the textured BSCCO grains are larger by more than one order of magnitude than those applied perpendicular.

  1. Estradiol receptors agonists induced effects in rat intestinal microcirculation during sepsis.

    PubMed

    Sharawy, Nivin; Ribback, Silvia; Al-Banna, Nadia; Lehmann, Christian; Kern, Hartmut; Wendt, Michael; Cerny, Vladimir; Dombrowski, Frank; Pavlovic, Dragan

    2013-01-01

    The steroid hormone estradiol is suggested to play a protective role in intestinal injury during systemic inflammation (sepsis). Our aim was to determine the effects of specific estradiol receptor (ER-α and ER-ß) agonists on the intestinal microcirculation during experimental sepsis. Male and sham ovariectomized female rats were subjected to sham colon ascendens stent peritonitis (CASP), and they were compared to male and ovariectomized female rats underwent CASP and either estradiol receptor α (ER-α) agonist propyl pyrazole triol (PPT), estradiol receptor ß (ER-ß) agonist diarylpropiolnitrile (DPN), or vehicle treatment. Intravital microscopy was performed, which is sufficiently sensitive to measure changes in the functional capillary density (FCD) as well as the major steps in leukocyte recruitment (rolling and adhesion). The leukocyte extravasations were also quantified by using histological paraffin sections of formalin fixed intestine. We found that either DPN (ER-β) or PPT (ER-α) significantly reduced (P<0.05) sepsis-induced leukocyte-endothelial interaction (rolling, adherent leukocytes and neutrophil extravasations) and improved the intestinal muscular FCD. [PPT: Female; Leukocyte rolling (n/min): V(3) 3.7±0.7 vs 0.8±0.2, Leukocyte adhesion(n/mm(2)): V(3) 131.3±22.6 vs 57.2±13.5, Neutrophil extravasations (n/10000 μm(2)): 3.1±0.7 vs 6 ±1. Male; Leukocyte adhesion (n/mm(2)): V(1) 154.8±19.2 vs 81.3±11.2, V(3) 115.5±23.1 vs 37.8±12]. [DPN: Female; neutrophil extravasations (n/10000 μm(2)) 3.8±0.6 vs 6 ±1. Male; Leukocyte adhesion (n/mm(2)) V(1) 154.8±19.2 vs 70±10.5, V(3) 115.5±23.1 vs 52.8±9.6].Those results suggest that the observed effects of estradiol receptors on different phases of leukocytes recruitment with the improvement of the functional capillary density could partially explain the previous demonstrated salutary effects of estradiol on the intestinal microcirculation during sepsis. The observed activity of this class of

  2. Exposure of human cells to electromagnetic fields. Final report, 1 January 1988-31 December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, A.S.

    1990-02-27

    This study addressed the following basic question: How does extremely low-level non-ionizing radiation affect human cells, and if there are cellular responses that can be directly related to signal parameters such as frequency, amplitude and time of exposure. The focus of these studies was to identify transcriptional changes in human cultured cells, HL60, which result from exposure of these cells to defined extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (elf EMFS). Our experiments show a pronounced measurable response observed as transcript increase, with associated changes in protein synthesis. The major findings relative to transcriptional changes are fourfold: (1) transcript changes in human cells correlate with previous findings of transcriptional and translational changes in Drosophila salivary gland cells; (2) the frequency of the signal in the amplitude (with resulting changes in E- and B-fields) in log increments from 0.5 to 500 uV at 60 Hz gives both amplitude and time-dependent windows, and (4) genes not usually expressed in HL-60 are unaffected by exposure to elf EMFs. Changes in the overall protein synthetic pattern have also been observed following exposure of HL60 cells to 60 Hz signals.

  3. COMPARISON OF THE ESTROGENIC POTENCIES OF ESTRADIOL, ETHYNYLESTRADIOL, DIETHYLSTILBESTROL, NONYLPHENOL AND METHOXYCHLOR IN VIVO AND IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five natural, pharmaceutical, or xenobiotic chemicals (17b-estradiol, ethynylestradiol, diethystilbestrol, nonylphenol, methoxychlor) were tested in two in vitro (MCF-7 breast tumor cell proliferation [E-screen], yeast estrogen system [YES]), and one in vivo (male sheepshead min...

  4. Enhancement of nitric oxide generation by low frequency electromagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa; Tanigawa; Tanigawa; Imai; Hongo; Kondo

    2000-07-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in the intracellular signal transduction pathways for nitric oxide synthase (NOS) induction. The electromagnetic field (EMF) is believed to increase the free radical lifespan [S. Roy, Y. Noda, V. Eckert, M.G. Traber, A. Mori, R. Liburdy, L. Packer, The phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced oxidative burst in rat peritoneal neutrophils is increased by a 0.1 mT (60 Hz) magnetic field, FEBS Lett. 376 (1995) 164-6; F.S. Prato, M. Kavaliers, J.J. Carson, Behavioural evidence that magnetic field effects in the land snail, Cepaea nemoralis, might not depend on magnetite or induced electric currents, Bioelectromagnetics 17 (1996) 123-30; A.L. Hulbert, J. Metcalfe, R. Hesketh, Biological response to electromagnetic fields, FASEB 12 (1998) 395-420]. We tested the effects of EMF on endotoxin induced nitric oxide (NO) generation in vivo. Male BALB/C mice were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) intraperitoneously (i.p.), followed by the exposure to EMF (0.1 mT, 60 Hz). Five hours and 30 min after the LPS administration, mice were administered with a NO spin trap, ferrous N-methyl-D-glucaminedithiocarbamate (MGD-Fe). Thirty minutes later, mice were sacrificed, and their livers were removed. The results were compared to three control groups: group A (LPS (-) EMF(-)); group B (LPS(-) EMF(+)); group C (LPS(+) EMF(-)). The ESR spectra of obtained livers were examined at room temperature. Three-line spectra of NO adducts were observed in the livers of all groups. In groups A and B very weak signals were observed, but in groups C and D strong spectra were observed. The signal intensity of the NO adducts in Group D was also significantly stronger than that in Group C. EMF itself did not induce NO generation, however, it enhanced LPS induced NO generation in vivo. PMID:10927193

  5. Weak extremely-low-frequency magnetic field-induced regeneration anomalies in the planarian, Dugesia tigrina

    SciTech Connect

    Jenrow, K.A.; Smith, C.H.; Liboff, A.R.

    1996-12-31

    The authors recently reported that cephalic regeneration in the planarian Dugesia tigrina was significantly delayed in populations exposed continuously to combined parallel DC and AC magnetic fields. This effect was consistent with hypotheses suggesting an underlying resonance phenomenon. The authors report here, in a parallel series of investigations on the same model system, that the incidence of regeneration anomalies presenting as tumor-like protuberances also increases significantly (P < .001) in association with exposure to weak 60 Hz magnetic fields, with peak intensities ranging between 1.0 and 80.0 {micro}T. These anomalies often culminate in the complete disaggregation of the organism. Similar to regeneration rate effects, the incidence of regeneration anomalies is specifically dependent upon the planaria possessing a fixed orientation with respect to the applied magnetic field vectors. However, unlike the regeneration rate effects, the AC magnetic field alone, in the absence of any measurable DC field, is capable of producing these anomalies. Moreover, the incidence of regeneration anomalies follows a clear dose-response relationship as a function of AC magnetic field intensity, with the threshold for induced electric field intensity estimated at 5 {micro} V/m. The addition of either 51.1 or 78.4 {micro}T DC magnetic fields, applied in parallel combination with the AC field, enhances the appearance of anomalies relative to the 60 Hz AC field alone, but only at certain AC field intensities. Thus, whereas the previous study of regeneration rate effects appeared to involve exclusively resonance interactions, the regeneration anomalies reported here appear to result primarily from Faraday induction coupling.

  6. GABAergic Transmission to Kisspeptin Neurons Is Differentially Regulated by Time of Day and Estradiol in Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Carol F.; Moenter, Suzanne M.

    2014-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion is regulated by estradiol feedback. This feedback switches from negative to positive in females; this switch depends on time of day in many species. Estradiol feedback is likely conveyed via afferents. Kisspeptin neurons of the arcuate nucleus and anteroventral–periventricular region (AVPV) may differentially regulate GnRH neurons during negative and positive feedback, respectively. We tested estradiol and time of day regulation of GABAergic transmission and postsynaptic response to GABA in these two populations using transgenic mice with GFP-identified kisspeptin neurons. Ovariectomized (OVX) mice treated or not with estradiol (E) were studied in the AM (negative feedback) or PM (positive feedback). GABAA receptor reversal potential was unaffected by time of day or estradiol. GABA depolarized the membrane potential of arcuate neurons from OVX+E mice; this response was blunted in cells from OVX mice. GABA hyperpolarized AVPV kisspeptin neurons, except in the OVX PM group in which GABA did not alter membrane potential attributable to a PM hyperpolarization of baseline membrane potential. In both kisspeptin neuron populations from OVX mice, the frequency of GABAergic spontaneous postsynaptic currents was increased in the PM; this increase was blunted by estradiol. In arcuate, but not AVPV, kisspeptin neurons, estradiol reduced miniature postsynaptic current amplitude independent of time of day. Using nonstationary fluctuation analysis and diazepam to manipulate GABAA receptor apparent affinity, the decrease in arcuate miniature postsynaptic current amplitude was attributed to decreased number of receptors bound by GABA. Time of day and estradiol feedback thus both target presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms to differentially regulate kisspeptin neurons via GABAergic transmission. PMID:25471569

  7. Follicle-Stimulating Hormone and Estradiol Interact to Stimulate Glutathione Synthesis in Rat Ovarian Follicles and Granulosa Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Yvonne D.; Nakamura, Brooke N.; Luderer, Ulrike

    2009-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH), the most abundant intracellular nonprotein thiol, is critical for many cellular functions. The rate-limiting step in GSH synthesis is catalyzed by glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL), a heterodimer composed of a catalytic (GCLC) and a modifier (GCLM) subunit. The tissue-specific regulation of GSH synthesis is poorly understood. We showed previously that gonadotropin hormones regulate ovarian GSH synthesis. In the present study, we sought to clarify the ovarian cell type-specific effects of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and estradiol on GSH synthesis. Immature female rats were treated with estradiol to stimulate development of small antral follicles. Granulosa cells (GCs) from these follicles or whole follicles were cultured in serum-free media, with or without FSH and 17beta-estradiol. The GSH and GCLC protein and mRNA levels increased in GCs treated with FSH alone. The effects of FSH on GCLC and GCLM protein and mRNA levels, GCL enzymatic activity, and GSH concentrations in GCs were significantly enhanced by the addition of estradiol. Estradiol alone had no effects on GSH. Dibromo-cAMP mimicked and protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors prevented FSH stimulation of GCL subunit protein levels. In cultured small antral follicles, FSH stimulated estradiol synthesis and robustly increased GCL subunit mRNA and protein levels and GSH concentrations. The GCL subunit mRNA expression increased in both the granulosa cells and theca cells of follicles with FSH stimulation. These data demonstrate that maximal stimulation of GSH synthesis by FSH in granulosa cells and follicles requires estradiol. Without estradiol, FSH causes lesser increases in GCL subunit expression via a PKA-dependent pathway. PMID:19516019

  8. Development and validation of in vitro-in vivo correlation (IVIVC) for estradiol transdermal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Manda, Prashanth; Pavurala, Naresh; Khan, Mansoor A; Krishnaiah, Yellela S R

    2015-07-28

    The objective of this study was to develop a level A in vitro-in vivo correlation (IVIVC) for drug-in-adhesive (DIA) type estradiol transdermal drug delivery systems (TDDS). In vitro drug permeation studies across human skin were carried out to obtain the percent of estradiol permeation from marketed products. The in vivo time versus plasma concentration data of three estradiol TDDS at drug loadings of 2.0, 3.8 and 7.6mg (delivery rates of 25, 50 and 100μg/day, respectively) was deconvoluted using Wagner-Nelson method to obtain percent of in vivo drug absorption in postmenopausal women. The IVIVC between the in vitro percent of drug permeation (X) and in vivo percent of drug absorption (Y) for these three estradiol TDDS was constructed using GastroPlus® software. There was a high correlation (R(2)=1.0) with a polynomial regression of Y=-0.227X(2)+0.331X-0.001. These three estradiol TDDS were used for internal validation whereas another two products of the same formulation design (with delivery rates of 60 and 100μg/day) were used for external validation. The predicted estradiol serum concentrations (convoluted from in vitro skin permeation data) were compared with the observed serum concentrations for the respective products. The developed IVIVC model passed both the internal and external validations as the prediction errors (%PE) for Cmax and AUC were less than 15%. When another marketed estradiol TDDS with a delivery rate of 100μg/day but with a slight variation in formulation design was chosen, it did not pass external validation indicating the product-specific nature of IVIVC model. Results suggest that the IVIVC model developed in this study can be used to successfully predict the in vivo performance of the same estradiol TDDS with in vivo delivery rates ranging from 25 to 100μg/day. PMID:25979329

  9. Increased egg estradiol concentration feminizes digit ratios of male pheasants (Phasianus colchicus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saino, N.; Rubolini, D.; Romano, M.; Boncoraglio, G.

    2007-03-01

    The length ratio between individual digits differs between males and females in humans, other mammals, lizards, and one bird species. Sexual dimorphism in digit ratios and variation among individuals of the same sex may depend on differential exposure to androgens and estrogens during embryonic life. Organizational effects of sex hormones could cause the observed correlations between digit ratios and diverse phenotypic traits in humans. However, no study has investigated experimentally the effect of prenatal estrogens on digit ratios. We analyzed the effect of estradiol injection in ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) eggs on digit ratios. Males from control eggs had higher ratios between the second or third and the fourth digit of the right foot compared to females. Estradiol-treated eggs produced males with lower (feminized) right foot second to fourth digit ratio. Thus, we provided the first experimental evidence that prenatal exposure to physiologically high estrogen levels affects bird digit ratios.

  10. Matching plasmon resonances to the C=C and C-H bonds in estradiol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbomson, Ifeoma G.; McMeekin, Scott; De La Rue, Richard; Johnson, Nigel P.

    2015-03-01

    We tune nanoantennas to resonate within mid-infrared wavelengths to match the vibrational resonances of C=C and C-H of the hormone estradiol. Modelling and fabrication of the nanoantennas produce plasmon resonances between 2 μm to 7 μm. The hormone estradiol was dissolved in ethanol and evaporated, leaving thickness of a few hundreds of nanometres on top of gold asymmetric split H-like shaped on a fused silica substrate. The reflectance was measured and a red-shift is recorded from the resonators plasmonic peaks. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is use to observe enhanced spectra of the stretching modes for the analyte which belongs to alkenyl biochemical group.

  11. Serum levels of testosterone precursors, testosterone and estradiol in 10 animal species.

    PubMed

    Wichmann, U; Wichmann, G; Krause, W

    1984-05-01

    Blood levels of testosterone precursors, i.e. pregnenolone, progesterone, 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone, androstendione, DHEA, and delta 5-androstendiol as well as testosterone and estradiol are measured in 10 animals each of 10 different species. The determination is done by radioimmunoassay with steroidspecific antibodies. Precursors of the delta 5-pathway (DHEA, androstendiol) are low in the red deer, dog, cat, rat and guinea pig. Precursors of the delta 4-pathway (progesterone, 17-hydroxprogesterone, androstendione) are lower in the bull, boar, ram, stallion and rabbit thus indicating a predominance of different pathways in the animal species studied herein. Pregnenolone concentrations are of equal height in all animals, testosterone is lowest in the cat and stallion. In the latter species the estradiol/testosterone ratio is spectacular high. PMID:6540697

  12. Progesterone After Estradiol Modulates Shuttle-Cage Escape by Facilitating Volition

    PubMed Central

    Mayeaux, Darryl J.; Tandle, Sarah M.; Cilano, Sean M.; Fitzharris, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    In animal models of depression, depression is defined as performance on a learning task. That task is typically escaping a mild electric shock in a shuttle cage by moving from one side of the cage to the other. Ovarian hormones influence learning in other kinds of tasks, and these hormones are associated with depressive symptoms in humans. The role of these hormones in shuttle-cage escape learning, however, is less clear. This study manipulated estradiol and progesterone in ovariectomized female rats to examine their performance in shuttle-cage escape learning without intentionally inducing a depressive-like state. Progesterone, not estradiol, within four hours of testing affected latencies to escape. The improvement produced by progesterone was in the decision to act, not in the speed of learning or speed of escaping. This parallels depression in humans in that depressed people are slower in volition, in their decisions to take action. PMID:26823653

  13. Increased egg estradiol concentration feminizes digit ratios of male pheasants (Phasianus colchicus).

    PubMed

    Saino, N; Rubolini, D; Romano, M; Boncoraglio, G

    2007-03-01

    The length ratio between individual digits differs between males and females in humans, other mammals, lizards, and one bird species. Sexual dimorphism in digit ratios and variation among individuals of the same sex may depend on differential exposure to androgens and estrogens during embryonic life. Organizational effects of sex hormones could cause the observed correlations between digit ratios and diverse phenotypic traits in humans. However, no study has investigated experimentally the effect of prenatal estrogens on digit ratios. We analyzed the effect of estradiol injection in ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) eggs on digit ratios. Males from control eggs had higher ratios between the second or third and the fourth digit of the right foot compared to females. Estradiol-treated eggs produced males with lower (feminized) right foot second to fourth digit ratio. Thus, we provided the first experimental evidence that prenatal exposure to physiologically high estrogen levels affects bird digit ratios. PMID:17136513

  14. Randomized Controlled Trial of Low-Dose Estradiol and the SNRI Venlafaxine for Vasomotor Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Joffe, Hadine; Guthrie, Katherine A.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Reed, Susan D.; Ensrud, Kristine E.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Newton, Katherine M.; Freeman, Ellen W.; Anderson, Garnet L.; Larson, Joseph C.; Hunt, Julie; Shifren, Jan; Rexrode, Kathryn M.; Caan, Bette; Sternfeld, Barbara; Carpenter, Janet S.; Cohen, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Importance Estrogen therapy is the gold standard treatment for hot flashes and night sweats, but some women are unable or unwilling to use it because of associated risks. The serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor venlafaxine is used widely as a non-hormonal treatment. While clinical impression is that serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are less effective than estrogen, these medications have not been simultaneously evaluated in one clinical trial. Objective To determine the efficacy and tolerability of low-dose oral 17-beta-estradiol and low-dose venlafaxine XR in alleviating vasomotor symptoms. Design and Participants 339 peri- and postmenopausal women with ≥2 bothersome vasomotor symptoms per day (mean 8.1, SD 5.3/day) were recruited from the community to MsFLASH (Menopause Strategies: Finding Lasting Answers for Symptoms and Health) clinical network sites November 2011—October 2012. Interventions Participants were randomized to double-blinded treatment with low-dose oral 17-beta-estradiol 0.5-mg/day (n=97), low-dose venlafaxine XR 75-mg/day (n=96), or placebo (n=146) for 8 weeks. Main Outcomes Primary outcome was the mean daily frequency of vasomotor symptoms after 8 weeks of treatment. Secondary outcomes were vasomotor symptom severity, bother and interference. Intent-to-treat analyses compared change in vasomotor symptom frequency between each active intervention and placebo and between the two active treatments. Results Compared to baseline, mean vasomotor symptom frequency at week 8 decreased by 53% with estradiol, 48% with venlafaxine, and 29% with placebo. Estradiol reduced the frequency of symptoms by 2.3 (95% CI 1.3–3.4) more per day than placebo (p<0.001), and venlafaxine by 1.8 (95% CI 0.8–2.7) more per day than placebo (p=0.005). Results were consistent for VMS severity, bother and interference. Low-dose estradiol reduced symptom frequency by 0.6 more per day than venlafaxine (95% CI, 1.8 more per day to 0.6 fewer per day than

  15. Simultaneous Degradation of Estrone, 17β-Estradiol and 17α-Ethinyl Estradiol in an Aqueous UV/H₂O₂ System.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Chao; Deng, Jing; Song, Yali; Li, Qingsong; Guo, Yaping; Li, Cong

    2015-10-01

    UV/H₂O₂, which is an advanced treatment technology used to reduce multiple contaminants, is effective in potable water treatment. Simultaneous degradation effects and kinetics of three types of coexisting micropollutant estrogens (steroid estrogens, SEs), including estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2) and 17α-ethinyl estradiol (EE2), in deionized water were studied. Experiments were carried out with ultraviolet-C (UVC) radiation, together with hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂), in a cylinder photoreactor. The results demonstrated that the degradation processes of all of the estrogens strongly fit first-order kinetics. Single solutions of E1, E2 and EE2 showed higher degradation rates and removal efficiencies under the same reaction conditions compared with those under mixed conditions. Coexisting combinations of estrogens were put into the UV/H₂O₂ system to estimate their possible competitive influences on each other by examining their removal efficiencies and reaction rate constant, k, values. E1 is predominantly reduced rapidly during the competition, while the presence of other estrogens has negligible impacts on E1; however, the degradation of E2 and EE2 is affected by the competitive background, not in relation to the types but to the existing amounts. In the UV/H₂O₂ system, photocatalysis of the estrogens can stably produce an intermediate X, with the highest quantity coming from E1, while considerably lower quantities are obtained from E2 and EE2. PMID:26404330

  16. Simultaneous Degradation of Estrone, 17β-Estradiol and 17α-Ethinyl Estradiol in an Aqueous UV/H2O2 System

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Chao; Deng, Jing; Song, Yali; Li, Qingsong; Guo, Yaping; Li, Cong

    2015-01-01

    UV/H2O2, which is an advanced treatment technology used to reduce multiple contaminants, is effective in potable water treatment. Simultaneous degradation effects and kinetics of three types of coexisting micropollutant estrogens (steroid estrogens, SEs), including estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2) and 17α-ethinyl estradiol (EE2), in deionized water were studied. Experiments were carried out with ultraviolet-C (UVC) radiation, together with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), in a cylinder photoreactor. The results demonstrated that the degradation processes of all of the estrogens strongly fit first-order kinetics. Single solutions of E1, E2 and EE2 showed higher degradation rates and removal efficiencies under the same reaction conditions compared with those under mixed conditions. Coexisting combinations of estrogens were put into the UV/H2O2 system to estimate their possible competitive influences on each other by examining their removal efficiencies and reaction rate constant, k, values. E1 is predominantly reduced rapidly during the competition, while the presence of other estrogens has negligible impacts on E1; however, the degradation of E2 and EE2 is affected by the competitive background, not in relation to the types but to the existing amounts. In the UV/H2O2 system, photocatalysis of the estrogens can stably produce an intermediate X, with the highest quantity coming from E1, while considerably lower quantities are obtained from E2 and EE2. PMID:26404330

  17. Estradiol enhances retention but not organization of hippocampus-dependent memory in intact male mice.

    PubMed

    Al Abed, Alice Shaam; Sellami, Azza; Brayda-Bruno, Laurent; Lamothe, Valérie; Noguès, Xavier; Potier, Mylène; Bennetau-Pelissero, Catherine; Marighetto, Aline

    2016-07-01

    Because estrogens have mostly been studied in gonadectomized females, effects of chronic exposure to environmental estrogens in the general population are underestimated. Estrogens can enhance hippocampus-dependent memory through the modulation of information storage. However, declarative memory, the hippocampus-dependent memory of facts and events, demands more than abilities to retain information. Specifically, memory of repetitive events of everyday life such as "where I parked" requires abilities to organize/update memories to prevent proactive interference from similar memories of previous "parking events". Whether such organizational processes are estrogen-sensitive is unknown. We here studied, in intact young and aged adult mice, drinking-water (1μM) estradiol effects on both retention and organizational components of hippocampus-dependent memory, using a radial-maze task of everyday-like memory. Demand on retention vs organization was manipulated by varying the time-interval separating repetitions of similar events. Estradiol increased performance in young and aged mice under minimized organizational demand, but failed to improve the age-associated memory impairment and diminished performance in young mice under high organizational demand. In fact, estradiol prolonged mnemonic retention of successive events without improving organization abilities, hence resulted in more proactive interference from irrelevant memories. c-Fos imaging of testing-induced brain activations showed that the deterioration of young memory was associated with dentate gyrus dysconnectivity, reminiscent of that seen in aged mice. Our findings support the view that estradiol is promnesic but also reveal that such property can paradoxically impair memory. These findings have important outcomes regarding health issues relative to the impact of environmental estrogens in the general population. PMID:27038677

  18. 17β-estradiol differentially regulates stress circuitry activity in healthy and depressed women.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Emily G; Holsen, Laura M; Lancaster, Katie; Makris, Nikos; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Sue; Remington, Anne; Weiss, Blair; Buka, Stephen; Klibanski, Anne; Goldstein, Jill M

    2015-02-01

    Many regions within stress neurocircuitry, including the anterior hypothalamus, amygdala, hippocampus, and medial prefrontal cortex, are densely populated with sex steroid receptors. Substantial evidence from animal studies indicates that the gonadal hormone 17β-estradiol (E₂) impacts the structure and function of these regions, but human studies are limited. Characterizing estradiol's role in stress circuitry in vivo in humans may have important clinical implications given the comorbidity between major depressive disorder (MDD), stress circuitry dysfunction and endocrine dysregulation. In this study, we determined estradiol's role in modulating activity within cortical and subcortical stress circuitry regions in healthy and MDD women. Subjects were part of a population-based birth cohort, the New England Family Study. Capitalizing on the endogenous fluctuation in E₂ during the menstrual cycle, we conducted a within-person repeated-measures functional neuroimaging study in which 15 women with recurrent MDD, in remission, and 15 healthy control women underwent hormonal evaluations, behavioral testing, and fMRI scanning on two occasions, under low and high E₂ conditions. Subjects completed an fMRI scan while undergoing a mild visual stress challenge that reliably activated stress neural circuitry. Results demonstrate that E₂ modulates activity across key stress circuitry regions, including bilateral amygdala, hippocampus, and hypothalamus. In healthy women, robust task-evoked BOLD signal changes observed under low E₂ conditions were attenuated under high E₂ conditions. This hormonal capacity to regulate activity in stress circuitry was not observed in MDD women, despite their remitted status, suggesting that dysregulation of gonadal hormone function may be a characteristic trait of the disease. These findings serve to deepen our understanding of estradiol's actions in the healthy brain and the neurobiological mechanisms that may underlie the pronounced

  19. Association Between Serum Levels of Testosterone and Estradiol With Meibomian Gland Assessments in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Ablamowicz, Anna F.; Nichols, Jason J.; Nichols, Kelly K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aims of this analysis were to determine if there is an association between serum levels of testosterone and estradiol with meibomian gland (MG) morphology and lipid layer thickness. Methods The data used for this analysis were collected from postmenopausal women with and without dry eye disease. Meibography was used to assess MG dropout on the central two-thirds of the eyelid and biomicroscopy was used for assessing MG expressibility and meibum quality. Venous blood samples were drawn for serum hormone level analysis. The Kruskal-Wallis test and Spearman correlations were used for statistical analysis. Results One hundred ninety-eight postmenopausal women with an average age of 61.2 (±9.1) years were included in this analysis. Testosterone levels showed significant differences between MG dropout grades 1 and 4 (P = 0.002) and grades 2 and 4 (P = 0.01), whereas estradiol levels were different based on MG dropout (P = 0.53). No significant correlations were found between testosterone (r = 0.10, P = 0.17) or estradiol (r = 0.05, P = 0.45) and lipid layer thickness. Conclusions Testosterone levels were increased with MG dropout, which was significant between the mild and severe dropout groups, whereas no significant differences were found with estradiol and any MG assessment. Although the literature suggests an association of serum hormone levels and pathogenesis of dry eye disease in postmenopausal women, analysis of active sex steroid precursors and local tissue hormone levels may prove more useful. PMID:26830366

  20. Estradiol-tethered micropatterned surfaces for the study of estrogenic non-genomic pathways.

    PubMed

    Qi, B; Shimizu, Y; Nakanishi, J; Winnik, F M

    2016-08-21

    Besides its well-known hormonal effects initiated in the nucleus, estradiol (E2) also activates non-nuclear pathways through interactions with receptors located on the cell plasma membrane. Micropatterned substrates consisting of gold dots bearing tethered E2 distributed on a cell-adhesive substrate were prepared and shown to trigger specifically E2 non-genomic effects in cells grown on the substrates. PMID:27451960

  1. Effects of estradiol on cocaine self-administration and cocaine discrimination by female rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Mello, Nancy K; Negus, S Stevens; Knudson, Inge M; Kelly, Maureen; Mendelson, Jack H

    2008-03-01

    The ovarian steroid hormone, estradiol, enhances the reinforcing and locomotor activating effects of cocaine in rodents under some conditions. The present study evaluated the acute effects of estradiol benzoate (E(2)beta) on cocaine self-administration and cocaine discrimination in female rhesus monkeys. Cocaine self-administration (0.10 mg/kg/inj., i.v.) was maintained on a fixed-ratio (FR) 30 schedule of reinforcement, and monkeys had access to cocaine during one 2-h session each day. E(2)beta in a cyclodextrin vehicle (0.00001-0.01 mg/kg, i.m.) was administered 30 min before test sessions conducted twice each week. Cocaine doses were administered in an irregular order during each dose-effect curve determination (0.001-0.3 mg/kg/inj.). Blood samples were collected after test sessions to determine 17beta-estradiol levels. Banana-flavored food pellets were available on an FR 30 schedule in three 1-h sessions each day. Five monkeys were trained to discriminate cocaine (0.18 mg/kg, i.m.) from saline in a two-key food-reinforced procedure, and the effects of pretreatment with E(2)beta in cyclodextrin and in sesame oil were studied. Acute administration of E(2)beta did not consistently alter the cocaine self-administration or drug discrimination dose-effect curves in comparison to saline control treatment. Females also did not self-administer E(2)beta (0.00001-0.10 mg/kg, i.v.) above saline levels. Finally, E(2)beta (0.0001-0.01 mg/kg, i.m.) did not substitute for cocaine in monkeys trained to discriminate cocaine from saline. Taken together, these data suggest that over the dose range studied, estradiol administration does not consistently alter the abuse-related effects of cocaine in female rhesus monkeys. PMID:17507915

  2. Estradiol modulates myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation and contractility in skeletal muscle of female mice.

    PubMed

    Lai, Shaojuan; Collins, Brittany C; Colson, Brett A; Kararigas, Georgios; Lowe, Dawn A

    2016-05-01

    Impairment of skeletal muscle function has been associated with changes in ovarian hormones, especially estradiol. To elucidate mechanisms of estradiol on skeletal muscle strength, the hormone's effects on phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (pRLC) and muscle contractility were investigated, hypothesizing an estradiol-specific beneficial impact. In a skeletal muscle cell line, C2C12, pRLC was increased by 17β-estradiol (E2) in a concentration-dependent manner. In skeletal muscles of C57BL/6 mice that were E2 deficient via ovariectomy (OVX), pRLC was lower than that from ovary-intact, sham-operated mice (Sham). The reduced pRLC in OVX muscle was reversed by in vivo E2 treatment. Posttetanic potentiation (PTP) of muscle from OVX mice was low compared with that from Sham mice, and this decrement was reversed by acute E2 treatment, demonstrating physiological consequence. Western blot of those muscles revealed that low PTP corresponded with low pRLC and higher PTP with greater pRLC. We aimed to elucidate signaling pathways affecting E2-mediated pRLC using a kinase inhibitor library and C2C12 cells as well as a specific myosin light chain kinase inhibitor in muscles. PI3K/Akt, MAPK, and CamKII were identified as candidate kinases sensitive to E2 in terms of phosphorylating RLC. Applying siRNA strategy in C2C12 cells, pRLC triggered by E2 was found to be mediated by estrogen receptor-β and the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor. Together, these results provide evidence that E2 modulates myosin pRLC in skeletal muscle and is one mechanism by which this hormone can affect muscle contractility in females. PMID:26956186

  3. Estradiol and brain serotonin reuptake transporter in long-term ovariectomized parkinsonian monkeys.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Maria Gabriela; Morissette, Marc; Di Paolo, Thérèse

    2013-08-01

    This study evaluated the effect of a one month 17β-estradiol treatment on brain serotonin (5-HT) reuptake transporter (SERT) in long-term ovariectomized (OVX) female monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) bearing a unilateral lesion with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) injected directly into the left substantia nigra modeling Parkinson disease (PD). Ovariectomy and MPTP lesion were performed four years before the estrogen treatment to model postmenopausal PD patients. SERT was measured by autoradiography using the radioligand [(3)H]Citalopram. Specific binding to SERT decreased in anterior cerebral cortex, nucleus accumbens, caudate nucleus and putamen on the lesioned side of 17β-estradiol and vehicle-treated monkeys compared to the intact side. In caudate nucleus and putamen the lesioned-induced decrease of [(3)H]Citalopram specific binding was more extensive in anterior and middle than posterior parts. [(3)H]Citalopram specific binding was increased in the cortex anterior cingulate gyrus of monkeys treated with 17β-estradiol in both brain hemispheres and was unchanged in the other brain regions investigated including the raphe nucleus. Positive correlations between [(3)H]Citalopram specific binding and 5-HT as well as 5-HIAA concentrations (reported previously) were obtained in the caudate nucleus and putamen and a negative correlation between SERT binding and 5-HIAA/5-HT concentration ratio suggesting MPTP lesion-induced 5-HT neuronal loss and lower 5-HT neurotransmission controlling and decreasing SERT for homeostasis. 17β-estradiol treatment initiated four years after ovariectomy of monkeys modeling hormonal conditions of post-menopause shows that SERT still displays some responsiveness to estrogens as observed in the anterior cingulate cortex. These results support a role of estrogens in 5-HT activity in PD. PMID:23719069

  4. 17β-Estradiol Differentially Regulates Stress Circuitry Activity in Healthy and Depressed Women

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Emily G; Holsen, Laura M; Lancaster, Katie; Makris, Nikos; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Sue; Remington, Anne; Weiss, Blair; Buka, Stephen; Klibanski, Anne; Goldstein, Jill M

    2015-01-01

    Many regions within stress neurocircuitry, including the anterior hypothalamus, amygdala, hippocampus, and medial prefrontal cortex, are densely populated with sex steroid receptors. Substantial evidence from animal studies indicates that the gonadal hormone 17β-estradiol (E2) impacts the structure and function of these regions, but human studies are limited. Characterizing estradiol's role in stress circuitry in vivo in humans may have important clinical implications given the comorbidity between major depressive disorder (MDD), stress circuitry dysfunction and endocrine dysregulation. In this study, we determined estradiol's role in modulating activity within cortical and subcortical stress circuitry regions in healthy and MDD women. Subjects were part of a population-based birth cohort, the New England Family Study. Capitalizing on the endogenous fluctuation in E2 during the menstrual cycle, we conducted a within-person repeated-measures functional neuroimaging study in which 15 women with recurrent MDD, in remission, and 15 healthy control women underwent hormonal evaluations, behavioral testing, and fMRI scanning on two occasions, under low and high E2 conditions. Subjects completed an fMRI scan while undergoing a mild visual stress challenge that reliably activated stress neural circuitry. Results demonstrate that E2 modulates activity across key stress circuitry regions, including bilateral amygdala, hippocampus, and hypothalamus. In healthy women, robust task-evoked BOLD signal changes observed under low E2 conditions were attenuated under high E2 conditions. This hormonal capacity to regulate activity in stress circuitry was not observed in MDD women, despite their remitted status, suggesting that dysregulation of gonadal hormone function may be a characteristic trait of the disease. These findings serve to deepen our understanding of estradiol's actions in the healthy brain and the neurobiological mechanisms that may underlie the pronounced sex

  5. Analyzing the influence of BDNF heterozygosity on spatial memory response to 17β-estradiol

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Y W C; Du, X; van den Buuse, M; Hill, R A

    2015-01-01

    The recent use of estrogen-based therapies as adjunctive treatments for the cognitive impairments of schizophrenia has produced promising results; however the mechanism behind estrogen-based cognitive enhancement is relatively unknown. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates learning and memory and its expression is highly responsive to estradiol. We recently found that estradiol modulates the expression of hippocampal parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons, known to regulate neuronal synchrony and cognitive function. What is unknown is whether disruptions to the aforementioned estradiol–parvalbumin pathway alter learning and memory, and whether BDNF may mediate these events. Wild-type (WT) and BDNF heterozygous (+/−) mice were ovariectomized (OVX) at 5 weeks of age and simultaneously received empty, estradiol- or progesterone-filled implants for 7 weeks. At young adulthood, mice were tested for spatial and recognition memory in the Y-maze and novel-object recognition test, respectively. Hippocampal protein expression of BDNF and GABAergic interneuron markers, including parvalbumin, were assessed. WT OVX mice show impaired performance on Y-maze and novel-object recognition test. Estradiol replacement in OVX mice prevented the Y-maze impairment, a Behavioral abnormality of dorsal hippocampal origin. BDNF and parvalbumin protein expression in the dorsal hippocampus and parvalbumin-positive cell number in the dorsal CA1 were significantly reduced by OVX in WT mice, while E2 replacement prevented these deficits. In contrast, BDNF+/− mice showed either no response or an opposite response to hormone manipulation in both behavioral and molecular indices. Our data suggest that BDNF status is an important biomarker for predicting responsiveness to estrogenic compounds which have emerged as promising adjunctive therapeutics for schizophrenia patients. PMID:25603414

  6. Estradiol lowers intracranial self-stimulation thresholds and enhances cocaine facilitation of intracranial self-stimulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Galankin, Timofey; Shekunova, Elena; Zvartau, Edwin

    2010-11-01

    Women initiate cocaine use at a younger age and have more complications (e.g., higher rates of major or minor depression) related to cocaine use than men. It has been proposed that estrogens play an important role in these sex differences. The addictive potential of psychoactive drugs can be measured in rats via a rewarding intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) procedure. The rate-independent method of ICSS allows researchers to assess the "pure" rewarding effect of cocaine without influence of nonspecific motor reactions. The present study aimed to estimate effects of estradiol and a combination of estradiol and cocaine on ICSS in ovariectomized female rats. 17-β-estradiol (5μg/animal/day, 2 days) produced a long-lasting gradual lowering of the thresholds for ICSS. The ability of estradiol to decrease thresholds for ICSS has never been shown previously. Combination of 17-β-estradiol and cocaine (5.0mg/kg, 5 days) produced a greater effect on ICSS thresholds than the effect of either compound alone. No tolerance or sensitization to cocaine developed during the study. Present findings suggest estradiol increases sensitivity of the brain reward system in rats, which may have an important implication in understanding sex differences in cocaine effects. PMID:20736014

  7. The induction of pro-angiogenic processes within a collagen scaffold via exogenous estradiol and endometrial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pence, Jacquelyn C; Clancy, Kathryn B H; Harley, Brendan A C

    2015-10-01

    Nutrient transport remains a major limitation in the design of biomaterials. One approach to overcome this constraint is to incorporate features to induce angiogenesis-mediated microvasculature formation. Angiogenesis requires a temporal presentation of both pro- and anti-angiogenic factors to achieve stable vasculature, leading to increasingly complex biomaterial design scheme. The endometrium, the lining of the uterus and site of embryo implantation, exemplifies a non-pathological model of rapid growth, shedding, and re-growth of dense vascular networks regulated by the dynamic actions of estradiol and progesterone. In this study, we examined the individual and combined response of endometrial epithelial cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells to exogenous estradiol within a three-dimensional collagen scaffold. While endothelial cells did not respond to exogenous estradiol, estradiol directly stimulated endometrial epithelial cell transduction pathways and resulted in dose-dependent increases in endogenous VEGF production. Co-culture experiments using conditioned media demonstrated estradiol stimulation of endometrial epithelial cells can induce functional changes in endothelial cells within the collagen biomaterial. We also report the effect of direct endometrial epithelial and endothelial co-culture as well as covalent immobilization of estradiol within the collagen biomaterial. These efforts establish the suitability of an endometrial-inspired model for promoting pro-angiogenic events within regenerative medicine applications. These results also suggest the potential for developing biomaterial-based models of the endometrium. PMID:25944769

  8. Estradiol coupling to human monocyte nitric oxide release is dependent on intracellular calcium transients: evidence for an estrogen surface receptor.

    PubMed

    Stefano, G B; Prevot, V; Beauvillain, J C; Fimiani, C; Welters, I; Cadet, P; Breton, C; Pestel, J; Salzet, M; Bilfinger, T V

    1999-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that estrogen acutely stimulates constitutive NO synthase (cNOS) activity in human peripheral monocytes by acting on an estrogen surface receptor. NO release was measured in real time with an amperometric probe. 17beta-estradiol exposure to monocytes stimulated NO release within seconds in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas 17alpha-estradiol had no effect. 17beta-estradiol conjugated to BSA (E2-BSA) also stimulated NO release, suggesting mediation by a membrane surface receptor. Tamoxifen, an estrogen receptor inhibitor, antagonized the action of both 17beta-estradiol and E2-BSA, whereas ICI 182,780, a selective inhibitor of the nuclear estrogen receptor, had no effect. We further showed, using a dual emission microfluorometry in a calcium-free medium, that the 17beta-estradiol-stimulated release of monocyte NO was dependent on the initial stimulation of intracellular calcium transients in a tamoxifen-sensitive process. Leeching out the intracellular calcium stores abolished the effect of 17beta-estradiol on NO release. RT-PCR analysis of RNA obtained from the cells revealed a strong estrogen receptor-alpha amplification signal and a weak beta signal. Taken together, a physiological dose of estrogen acutely stimulates NO release from human monocytes via the activation of an estrogen surface receptor that is coupled to increases in intracellular calcium. PMID:10490972

  9. Does estradiol have an impact on the dipeptidyl peptidase IV enzyme activity of the Prevotella intermedia group bacteria?

    PubMed

    Fteita, Dareen; Könönen, Eija; Gürsoy, Mervi; Söderling, Eva; Gürsoy, Ulvi Kahraman

    2015-12-01

    Initiation and development of pregnancy-associated gingivitis is seemingly related to the microbial shift towards specific gram-negative anaerobes in subgingival biofilms. It is known that Prevotella intermedia sensu lato is able to use estradiol as an alternative source of growth instead of vitamin K. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of estradiol on the bacterial dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) enzyme activity in vitro as a virulent factor of the Prevotella intermedia group bacteria, namely P. intermedia, Prevotella nigrescens, Prevotella pallens, and Prevotella aurantiaca. In all experiments, 2 strains of each Prevotella species were used. Bacteria were incubated with the concentrations of 0, 30, 90, and 120 nmol/L of estradiol and were allowed to build biofilms at an air-solid interface. DPPIV activities of biofilms were measured kinetically during 20 min using a fluorometric assay. The enzyme activity was later related to the amount of protein produced by the same biofilm, reflecting the biofilm mass. Estradiol significantly increased DPPIV activities of the 8 Prevotella strains in a strain- and dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our in vitro experiments indicate that estradiol regulates the DPPIV enzyme activity of P. intermedia, P. nigrescens, P. pallens, and P. aurantiaca strains differently. Our results may, at least partly, explain the role of estradiol to elicit a virulent state which contributes to the pathogenesis of pregnancy-related gingivitis. PMID:26386229

  10. Effect of agricultural antibiotics on the persistence and transformation of 17beta-estradiol in a Sequatchie loam.

    PubMed

    Chun, Soul; Lee, Jaehoon; Geyer, Roland; White, David C; Raman, D Raj

    2005-01-01

    A laboratory incubation study was conducted to investigate the effect of agricultural antibiotics (sulfamethazine, tylosin, and chlortetracycline) on the persistence and transformation of 17beta-estradiol in Sequatchie loam. We measured concentrations of 17beta-estradiol and its primary metabolite (estrone) in soils spiked with antibiotics and 17beta-estradiol. Dehydrogenase activity (DHA) was also measured as an indicator of the total microbial activity of the soils. The presence of antibiotics significantly decreased transformation of 17beta-estradiol to estrone. There was a positive correlation between the DHA and the concentrations of estrone in soil spiked with 17beta-estradiol only, implying that the reaction is mainly catalyzed by dehydrogenases. However, the positive correlation was weakened in soil spiked with 17beta-estradiol and antibiotics together. We recommend that any study evaluating the fate and transport of estrogenic hormones in soil should include the effect of agricultural antibiotics because antibiotics and estrogenic hormones are commonly excreted together in environmental samples. PMID:16190018

  11. Crystallization of beta-estradiol in an acrylic transdermal drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Variankaval, N E; Jacob, K I; Dinh, S M

    1999-03-15

    Transdermal drug delivery systems are pharmaceutical products that can deliver controlled doses of drugs from polymeric patches applied on the human skin. The long-term stability of these patches is a critical issue relative to their performance in delivering drugs at a constant rate. Where a drug has been dissolved in the polymeric adhesive patch, crystallization has been reported in several systems. This study uses a variety of characterization tools to determine the physical and chemical nature of the precipitates formed in situ in estradiol patches. Optical microscopy revealed that crystals were formed in a single layer inside the adhesive matrix and that there were two distinctly different morphologies: needle-like crystals and aggregates around the needles. From IR measurements it was evident that estradiol probably was present in more than one crystal form in these patches. Raman microscopy showed that the needle-like crystals contain the adhesive component and the aggregates some modified crystal form of estradiol, indicating that in addition to the drug, the polymeric adhesive also crystallizes during storage. PMID:10397943

  12. Localization of /sup 3/H-estradiol in the reproductive organs of male and female baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Weaker, F.J.; Sheridan, P.J.

    1982-05-01

    The uptake and retention of radiolabeled estradiol by both the male and female reproductive organs were examined in the baboon. Two male and two female baboons were injected intracardially with 1 microgram/kg body weight of /sup 3/H-estradiol and two animals, one male and one female, were injected with both labeled and 100 micrograms/kg body weight of unlabeled estradiol. One and a half hours after the injections, the animals were sacrificed and the uterus, cervix, vagina, oviduct, seminal vesicles, and prostate gland were removed and processed for autoradiography. The stratified squamous epithelia of the cervix and vagina demonstrated a light uptake of the label in the germinative, but not in the superficial cell layers. The columnar cells lining the oviduct and uterine glands were labeled, whereas the luminal epithelium of the uterus and the glandular epithelia of the seminal vesicles and prostate gland did not sequester the tritiated steroid. The interstitial cells of all the organs studied demonstrated a moderate to heavy uptake of the radioactivity, whereas the smooth muscle cells were lightly labeled except in the vagina, in which these cells displayed a moderate number of silver grains.

  13. Role of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript in estradiol-mediated neuroprotection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yun; Zhang, Wenri; Klaus, Judith; Young, Jennifer; Koerner, Ines; Sheldahl, Laird C.; Hurn, Patricia D.; Martínez-Murillo, Francisco; Alkayed, Nabil J.

    2006-09-01

    Estrogen reduces brain injury after experimental cerebral ischemia in part through a genomic mechanism of action. Using DNA microarrays, we analyzed the genomic response of the brain to estradiol, and we identified a transcript, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), that is highly induced in the cerebral cortex by estradiol under ischemic conditions. Using in vitro and in vivo models of neural injury, we confirmed and characterized CART mRNA and protein up-regulation by estradiol in surviving neurons, and we demonstrated that i.v. administration of a rat CART peptide is protective against ischemic brain injury in vivo. We further demonstrated binding of cAMP response element (CRE)-binding protein to a CART promoter CRE site in ischemic brain and rapid activation by CART of ERK in primary cultured cortical neurons. The findings suggest that CART is an important player in estrogen-mediated neuroprotection and a potential therapeutic agent for stroke and other neurodegenerative diseases. ischemia | stroke | estrogen

  14. 17β-estradiol attenuates injury-induced microglia activation in the oculomotor nucleus.

    PubMed

    Gyenes, A; Hoyk, Z; Csakvari, E; Siklos, L; Parducz, A

    2010-12-15

    Recent studies provide increasing data indicating the prominent role of estrogens in protecting the nervous system against the noxious consequences of nerve injury. It is also clear that in the process of nerve injury and recovery not only the neurons, but the glial cells are also involved and they are important components of the protective mechanisms. In the present article the effect of 17β-estradiol on injury-induced microglia activation was studied in an animal model. Peripheral axotomy of the oculomotor neurons was achieved by the removal of the right eyeball including the extraocular muscles of ovariectomized adult mice. The time course and the extent of microglia activation was followed by the unbiased morphometric analysis of CD11b immunoreactive structures within the oculomotor nucleus. The first sign of microglia activation appeared after 24 h following injury, the maximal effect was found on the fourth day. In ovariectomized females hormone treatment (daily injection of 17β-estradiol, 5 μg/100 g b.w.) decreased significantly the microglia reaction at postoperative day 4. Our results show that microglia response to nerve injury is affected by estradiol, that is these cells may mediate some of the hormonal effects and may contribute to protective mechanisms resulting in the structural and functional recovery of the nervous system. PMID:20870014

  15. Photoelectrochemical removal of 17β-estradiol using a RuO2-graphene electrode.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Fernando C; Gorup, Luiz F; Rocha, Robson S; Lanza, Marcos R V; Pereira, Ernesto C

    2016-11-01

    A new electrode for the photoelectrochemical removal of 17β-estradiol from water using ruthenium oxide nanoparticles supported on reduced graphene oxide is proposed in this study. The morphology, microstructure and the electrochemical performance of the material were characterized using HRTEM, XRD and Raman spectroscopy. The characterization showed the formation of reduced graphene oxide from a micro-wave assisted hydrothermal method with a particle size of 5.0 nm + 2.4 nm. The electrochemical measurements point to a high performance of the electrode in the presence of a white light source. The hormone removal efficiency in water containing 50 μmol L(-1) of 17β-estradiol was evaluated using chronoamperometry at +1.0 V and the process was monitored using liquid chromatography. The reaction is pseudo first order with the removal of 92.2% of 17β-estradiol after 60 min of photoelectrocatalytic treatment. PMID:27487094

  16. 17β-Estradiol induces supernumerary primordial germ cells in embryos of the polychaete Platynereis dumerilii.

    PubMed

    Lidke, Anika K; Bannister, Stephanie; Löwer, Andreas M; Apel, David M; Podleschny, Martina; Kollmann, Martin; Ackermann, Christian F; García-Alonso, Javier; Raible, Florian; Rebscher, Nicole

    2014-01-15

    In the polychaete Platynereis dumerilii exactly four primordial germ cells (PGCs) arise in early development and are subject to a transient mitotic arrest until the animals enter gametogenesis. In order to unravel the mechanisms controlling the number of PGCs in Platynereis, we tested whether the steroid 17β-estradiol (E2) is able to induce PGC proliferation, as it had been described in other species. Our data provide strong support for such a mechanism, showing that E2 significantly increases the occurrence of larvae with supernumerary PGCs in Platynereis in a dose dependent manner. E2 responsiveness is restricted to early developmental stages, when the PGCs are specified. During these stages, embryos exhibit high expression levels of the estradiol receptor (ER). The ER transcript localizes to the yolk-free cytoplasm of unfertilized eggs and segregates into the micromeres during cleavage stages. Nuclear ER protein is found asymmetrically distributed between daughter cells. Neither transcript nor protein is detectable in PGCs at larval stages. Addition of the specific estradiol receptor inhibitor ICI-182,780 (ICI) abolishes the proliferative effect of E2, suggesting that it is mediated by ER signaling. Our study reports for the first time an ER mediated proliferative effect of E2 on PGCs in an invertebrate organism. PMID:24287341

  17. Doxorubicin loaded 17β-estradiol based SWNT dispersions for target specific killing of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Moumita; Das, Prasanta Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The present work reports the synthesis of a 17β-estradiol based amphiphiles comprising of polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety linked through succinic acid that non-covalently dispersed (76%) the single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in water. The superior exfoliation of carbon nanotubes was characterized by microscopic and spectroscopic studies. Significant stability of these SWNT dispersions was observed in the presence of protein in cell culture media and the nanohybrids were highly biocompatible toward mammalian cells. Anticancer drug doxorubicin loaded on these nanohybrids was selectively delivered within estrogen receptor rich cancer cells, MCF7 (breast cancer cell) and A549 (lung cancer cell). Microscopic studies showed the localization of doxorubicin within the cancer cell nucleus whereas no such localization was observed in ER negative cells. Both these ER positive cancer cells were killed by ∼3 fold higher efficiency than that of ER negative MDA-MB-231 (advanced breast cancer cell) and HeLa cells that are deprived of estrogen receptors. Thus, judiciously designed estradiol based nanohybrids proved to be excellent tool for SWNT dispersion and also for selectively killing of ER positive cancer cells. To the best of our knowledge, for the first time non-covalently modified SWNTs by estradiol based amphiphilic dispersing agent have been used for selective killing of ER positive cancer cells by doxorubicin loaded on dispersed SWNTs. It holds immense promise to be exploited as a cancer therapeutic agent. PMID:26970825

  18. A new contraceptive pill containing 17β-estradiol and nomegestrol acetate.

    PubMed

    Christin-Maitre, Sophie; Laroche, Emmanuelle; Bricaire, Léopoldine

    2013-01-01

    Most combined oral contraceptive pills contain ethinyl estradiol (EE) with progestins. In order to minimize the pill's cardiovascular risks, the concept of using 17β-estradiol (E2), the endogenous estradiol, arose in the 1970s. Many attempts to develop a pill containing 17β-E2 have failed as cycle control was low. The first pill containing 17β-E2 was launched in 2011. This monophasic pill contains 24 pills with 1.5 mg 17β-E2 and 2.5 mg nomegestrol acetate, and four placebo pills. Studies conducted in Europe and the USA demonstrate that its Pearl index is 0.38 and 1.13, respectively. It has less influence on hemostasis, fibrinolysis markers, lipids and carbohydrate metabolism than the combined oral contraceptive levonorgestrel/EE (150 g/30 g and 100 µg/20 µg). Withdrawal bleedings are shorter and lighter as compared with women using drospirenone/EE (3 mg/ 30 µg). The number of women without withdrawal bleeding is approximately 30% after 12 months. Even though its contraindications are identical to other combined oral contraceptives, this nomegestrol acetate/E2 pill should be considered to be of interest for many women. PMID:23241152

  19. Calmodulin-stimulated phosphorylation of 17 beta-estradiol receptor on tyrosine.

    PubMed Central

    Migliaccio, A; Rotondi, A; Auricchio, F

    1984-01-01

    The calf uterine 17 beta-estradiol receptor is a phosphoprotein. Phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of the receptor is controlled by a cytosol receptor kinase that activates the hormone binding and by a nuclear phosphatase that inactivates this binding. This report concerns the nature of the 17 beta-estradiol receptor kinase. Highly purified calf uterus 17 beta-estradiol receptor preinactivated by the nuclear phosphatase was used as substrate of the purified receptor kinase. Ca2+ and calmodulin stimulate both the kinase-dependent activation of the hormone binding and 32P incorporation from [gamma-32P]-ATP into the receptor. Maximal stimulation of hormone binding activation requires 1 microM Ca2+ and 0.6 microM calmodulin. Fifteen micromolar trifluoperazine is the lowest concentration that will prevent completely Ca2+-calmodulin stimulation of the kinase. The receptor is phosphorylated by the receptor kinase exclusively on tyrosine. Phosphorylation of proteins on tyrosine is a rare event implicated in hormone-induced cell growth and cell transformation. Images PMID:6207535

  20. Safety of high speed guided ground transportation systems: Potential health effects of low frequency electromagnetic fields due to maglev and other electric rail systems. Final report, October 1991-July 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Creasey, W.A.; Goldberg, R.B.

    1993-08-01

    Table of Contents: Executive Summary; Clinical and Epidemiologic Studies of Railroad Workers and Others Exposed to EMF Associated with Railroad Operation; Dosimetry: Characterization of EMF Exposure of Railroad Workers, Utility Workers, and the General Public; Epidemiologic Studies of Workers and the General Public Exposed to Power Frequency (50 and 60 HZ) Electric and Magnetic Fields; Clinical and Epidemiologic Studies of Human Exposure to Static Magnetic Fields (MRI and Research Facilities); Animal Health Effects and Behavioral Studies; Animal and Cellular Studies on Window' EMF Effects; EMF Guidelines; and Conclusions.

  1. Cocaine-induced sensitization correlates with testosterone in male Japanese quail but not with estradiol in female Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Gill, Karin E; Madison, Farrah N; Akins, Chana K

    2015-01-01

    Research has indicated that gonadal hormones may mediate behavioral and biological responses to cocaine. Estrogen, in particular, has been shown to increase behavioral responding to cocaine in female rats relative to male rats. The current study investigated the effect of cocaine on locomotor activity and hormonal correlates in male and female Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica). In Japanese quail, circulating hormone levels can be manipulated without surgical alterations via modifying the photoperiod. Male and female quail were housed on either 8L:16D (light:dark) or 16L:8D (light:dark) cycle for 21days. Blood samples were taken prior to the beginning of the experiment and assays were performed to determine the levels of testosterone (T) and estradiol (E2). Quail were given injections of saline or cocaine (10 or 20mg/kg) once a day for 10days. Immediately after each injection, birds were placed in open field arenas and distance traveled was measured for 30min. Results showed that male quail housed under long-light conditions exhibited cocaine-induced sensitization to 10mg/kg cocaine which was correlated with the high levels of plasma T. Female quail housed under short-light conditions demonstrated sensitization to 10mg/kg cocaine, but this was not correlated with the levels of plasma E2. The current findings suggest that cocaine-induced locomotor activity was associated with T in males but not with E2 in females. PMID:25456105

  2. Effects of electromagnetic field exposure on the heart: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Elmas, Onur

    2016-01-01

    The use of electrical devices has gradually increased throughout the last century, and scientists have suggested that electromagnetic fields (EMF) generated by such devices may have harmful effects on living creatures. This work represents a systematic review of collective scholarly literature examining the effects of EMFs on the heart. Although most works describing effects of EMF exposure have been carried out using city electric frequencies (50-60 Hz), a consensus has not been reached about whether long- or short-term exposure to 50-60 Hz EMF negatively affects the heart. Studies have indicated that EMFs produced at cell-phone frequencies cause no-effect on the heart. Differences between results of studies may be due to a compensatory response developed by the body over time. At greater EMF strengths or shorter exposures, the ability of the body to develop compensation mechanisms is reduced and the potential for heart-related effects increases. It is noteworthy that diseases of heart tissues such as myocardial ischemia can also be successfully treated using EMF. Despite the substantial volume of data that has been collected on heart-related effects of EMFs, additional studies are needed at the cellular and molecular level to fully clarify the subject. Until the effects of EMF on heart tissue are more fully explored, electronic devices generating EMFs should be approached with caution. PMID:24021427

  3. Going off the grid: ERα breast cancer beyond estradiol.

    PubMed

    Perone, Ylenia; Magnani, Luca

    2016-07-01

    Novel studies have linked cholesterol biosynthesis to drug resistance in luminal breast cancer. Structural data suggest that cholesterol metabolites, including 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC), can act as ERα ligands in these cells. Additionally, hypercholesterolemia has now been linked to breast cancer progression. The focus of this review is to briefly summarize these recent findings and discuss how epigenetic reprogramming is definitively connected to endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis. We elaborate on how these data support a working model in which cholesterol biosynthesis promotes autocrine, pro-invasive signaling via activation of a series of closely related transcription factors. Importantly, we discuss how this mechanism of resistance is specifically associated with aromatase inhibitors. Finally, we examine how the field is now considering the development of anticholesterol therapeutics and companion biomarkers to stratify and treat ERα breast cancer patients. In particular, we review recent progress in pharmaceutical strategies targeting the cholesterol molecular machinery in primary and secondary breast cancers. PMID:27151575

  4. Effects of Long-Term Treatment with Estradiol and Estrogen Receptor Subtype Agonists on Serotonergic Function in Ovariectomized Rats.

    PubMed

    Benmansour, Saloua; Adeniji, Opeyemi S; Privratsky, Anthony A; Frazer, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Acute estradiol treatment was reported to slow the clearance of serotonin via activation of estrogen receptors (ER)β and/or GPR30 and to block the ability of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) to slow serotonin clearance via activation of ERα. In this study, the behavioral consequences of longer-term treatments with estradiol or ER subtype-selective agonists and/or an SSRI were examined in the forced swim test (FST). Ovariectomized rats were administered the following for 2 weeks: estradiol, ERβ agonist (diarylpropionitrile, DPN), GPR30 agonist (G1), ERα agonist (PPT), and/or the SSRI sertraline. Similar to sertraline, longer-term treatment with estradiol, DPN or G1 induced an antidepressant-like effect. By contrast, PPT did not, even though it blocked the antidepressant-like effect of sertraline. Uterus weights, used as a peripheral measure of estrogenic activity, were increased by estradiol and PPT but not DPN or G1 treatment. A second part of this study investigated, using Western blot analyses in homogenates from hippocampus, whether these behavioral effects are accompanied by changes in the activation of specific signaling pathways and/or TrkB. Estradiol and G1 increased phosphorylation of Akt, ERK and TrkB. These effects were similar to those obtained after treatment with sertraline. Treatment with DPN increased phosphorylation of ERK and TrkB, but it did not alter that of Akt. Treatment with PPT increased phosphorylation of Akt and ERK without altering that of TrkB. In conclusion, activation of at least TrkB and possibly ERK may be involved in the antidepressant-like effect of estradiol, ERβ and GPR30 agonists whereas Akt activation may not be necessary. PMID:26159182

  5. Pharmacokinetics of the first combination 17β-estradiol/progesterone capsule in clinical development for menopausal hormone therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pickar, James H.; Bon, Charles; Amadio, Julia M.; Mirkin, Sebastian; Bernick, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study aims to compare the pharmacokinetics and oral bioavailability of a capsule combining 17β-estradiol and progesterone in a non–peanut oil–containing formulation with those of widely used and approved separate formulations of estradiol and progesterone coadministered to healthy postmenopausal women. Methods: This was an open-label, balanced, randomized, single-dose, two-treatment, three-period, three-sequence, cross-over, partial-replicate, reference-scaled study. Postmenopausal women (aged 40-65 y) were randomly assigned to one of three dosing sequences of test and reference products (TRR, RTR, or RRT, where T is the test drug and R is the coadministered reference product), with each of the three periods separated by a 14-day washout. The primary pharmacokinetic endpoints were Cmax, AUC(0-t), and AUC(0-inf) for the test and reference products, assessed for bioequivalence using the scaled average bioequivalence or unscaled average bioequivalence method. Safety was assessed by clinical observation, participant-reported adverse events, and laboratory data, including blood levels of hormones. Results: Sixty-six women were randomly assigned, and 62 women (94.0%) completed all three study periods. All AUC and Cmax parameters met bioequivalence criteria for all analytes (estradiol, progesterone, and estrone), except Cmax for total estrone. The extent of estradiol and progesterone absorption was similar between the test product and the reference products. Four adverse events—all considered mild and unrelated to the study drugs—were reported. Conclusions: The combination 17β-estradiol/progesterone product demonstrates bioavailability similar to those of the respective reference products of estradiol and progesterone. If regulatory approval is obtained, this new hormone therapy would be the first treatment of menopause symptoms to combine progesterone with 17β-estradiol in an oral formulation. PMID:25944519

  6. Estradiol and GPER Activation Differentially Affect Cell Proliferation but Not GPER Expression in the Hippocampus of Adult Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Duarte-Guterman, Paula; Lieblich, Stephanie E.; Chow, Carmen; Galea, Liisa A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Estradiol increases cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus of the female rodent but it is not known whether the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER), a membrane receptor, is involved in this process, nor whether there are regional differences in estradiol’s effects on cell proliferation. Thus, we investigated whether estradiol exerts its effects on cell proliferation in the dorsal and ventral dentate gyrus through GPER, using the GPER agonist, G1, and antagonist, G15. Ovariectomized adult female rats received a single injection of either: 17β-estradiol (10 μg), G1 (0.1, 5, 10 μg), G15 (40 μg), G15 and estradiol, or vehicle (oil, DMSO, or oil+DMSO). After 30 min, animals received an injection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and were perfused 24 h later. Acute treatment with estradiol increased, while the GPER agonist G1 (5 μg) decreased, the number of BrdU+ cells in the dentate gyrus relative to controls. The GPER antagonist, G15 increased the number of BrdU+ cells relative to control in the dorsal region and decreased the number of BrdU+ cells in the ventral region. However, G15 treatment in conjunction with estradiol partially eliminated the estradiol-induced increase in cell proliferation in the dorsal dentate gyrus. Furthermore, G1 decreased the expression of GPER in the dentate gyrus but not the CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus. In summary, we found that activation of GPER decreased cell proliferation and GPER expression in the dentate gyrus of young female rats, presenting a potential and novel estrogen-independent role for this receptor in the adult hippocampus. PMID:26075609

  7. Changes in brain volume in response to estradiol levels, amphetamine sensitization and haloperidol treatment in awake female rats.

    PubMed

    Madularu, Dan; Kulkarni, Praveen; Ferris, Craig F; Brake, Wayne G

    2015-08-27

    Estrogen has been shown to further ameliorate symptoms when administered in conjunction with antipsychotics in patients with schizophrenia. We have previously shown that chronic haloperidol (HAL) treatment reduces amphetamine (AMPH)-induced locomotor activity in AMPH-sensitized rats, but only when paired with high levels of the estrogen, 17-β estradiol. In addition, we reported estradiol-dependent responses to AMPH in AMPH-sensitized rats as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging. It is thus clear that estradiol and antipsychotics both affect the rat brain, however the mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. The aim of the current study was to assess this interaction by investigating the effects of estradiol, AMPH and HAL on brain volume changes in awake female rats. Repeated exposure to AMPH resulted in an overall reduction in brain volume, regardless of hormonal status (i.e. no, low or high estradiol). Similarly, chronic HAL treatment further reduced brain volume compared to acute treatment. Hormonal status affected hippocampal volume with rats receiving low estradiol replacement showing larger volume; this difference was no longer significant after repeated exposure to AMPH. Finally, we found changes in volume in response to AMPH throughout hippocampal components (i.e. CA1-CA3 and dentate) as well as components of the mesocortical system. In conclusion, brain volume seems to be influenced by hormonal status, as well as exposure to AMPH and haloperidol treatment. These findings implicate areas where estradiol, amphetamine and antipsychotics may be producing volumetric changes in the brain, pointing the way to where future studies should focus. PMID:26032742

  8. A 67 kDa non-hormone binding estradiol receptor is present in human mammary cancers.

    PubMed

    Castoria, G; Migliaccio, A; Bilancio, A; Pagano, M; Abbondanza, C; Auricchio, F

    1996-03-01

    The presence of large amounts of a 67 kDa estradiol receptor that does not bind hormone was observed in 8 to 37 human mammary tumors (34 malignant and 3 benign). This form of receptor was detected by its conversion to hormone binding receptor by an endogenous tyrosine kinase in vitro. All 8 tumors were malignant. In these, the incubation of cytosol with ATP was seen to cause a 1- to 5-fold increase in estradiol-specific binding sites. These sites bound estradiol with physiological affinity, and their appearance was associated with tyrosine phosphorylation of estradiol receptor. The enzyme converting the non-hormone binding receptor into the hormone binding receptor is largely present in cytosol and scarce in membranes. It has been extensively purified. It is a 67 kDa protein under denaturating conditions, binds calmodulin-Sepharose in a Ca2+-dependent manner, is stimulated by Ca2+ and calmodulin, phosphorylates exogenous actin, is activated by the estradiol-receptor complex. The enzyme interacts with antibodies directed against the carboxy-terminal and catalytic domains of c-src. Therefore, it is a putative new member of the large c-src-related kinase family. Human mammary cancers with significant amounts of 67 kDa non-hormone binding receptor show relatively low levels of hormone binding estradiol receptor. The presence of non-hormone binding receptor that can be activated by in vitro tyrosine phosphorylation suggests that functional interaction of estradiol receptor with tyrosine kinases is altered in malignant tumors and has bearing on loss of hormone dependence and progression of the mammary cancer malignancy. PMID:8598306

  9. Sexual maturation and administration of 17β-estradiol and testosterone induce complex gene expression changes in skin and increase resistance of Atlantic salmon to ectoparasite salmon louse.

    PubMed

    Krasnov, Aleksei; Wesmajervi Breiland, Mette S; Hatlen, Bjarne; Afanasyev, Sergey; Skugor, Stanko

    2015-02-01

    The crustacean ectoparasitic salmon louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) is a major problem of Atlantic salmon aquaculture in the Northern hemisphere. Host-pathogen interactions in this system are highly complex. Resistance to the parasite involves variations in genetic background, nutrition, properties of skin, and status of the endocrine and immune systems. This study addressed the relationship between sex hormones and lice infection. Field observation revealed a sharp reduction of lice prevalence during sexual maturation with no difference between male and female fish. To determine if higher resistance against lice was related to sex hormones, post-smolt salmon were administered control feed and feeds containing 17β-estradiol (20 mg/kg) and testosterone (25 mg/kg) during a 3-week pre-challenge period. After challenge with lice, counts were reduced 2-fold and 1.5-fold in fish that received 17β-estradiol and testosterone, respectively. Gene expression analyses were performed from skin of salmon collected in the field trial and from the controlled lab experiment at three time points (end of feeding-before challenge, 3 days post challenge (dpc) and 16 dpc) using oligonucleotide microarray and qPCR. Differential expression was observed in genes associated with diverse biological processes. Both studies revealed similar changes of several antibacterial acute phase proteins; of note was induction of cathelicidin and down-regulation of a defensin gene. Treatment with hormones revealed their ability to modulate T helper cell (Th)-mediated immunity in skin. Enhanced protection achieved by 17β-estradiol administration might in part be due to the skewing of Th responses away from the prototypic anti-parasitic Th2 immunity and towards the more effective Th1 responses. Multiple genes involved in wound healing, differentiation and remodelling of skin tissue were stimulated during maturation but suppressed with sex hormones. Such opposite regulation suggested that these processes

  10. Fate and Transport of 17β-estradiol Beneath Animal Waste Holding Ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, L. A.; Tyner, J. S.; Hawkins, S. A.; Lee, J.; Buchanan, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    Steroidal hormones, such as 17β-estradiol (E2), are prevalent in animal waste and are a common subject of study due to potential stream and groundwater contamination. These particular hormones are labeled as Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) because of their developmental effects in reptiles and amphibians. Dairy waste at concentrated animal feeding operations is typically stored in a pond that is regulated by law to include an underlying soil liner with a minimal hydraulic conductivity to limit leaching beneath the pond, yet some studies have traced stream and groundwater contamination to these ponds. Previous studies have shown that the soil underlying earthen ponds are always unsaturated. This increases the pore water velocity relative to a given flux, which itself is dictated almost entirely by an organic seal that forms at the bottom of a waste pond. This increased velocity results in more rapid transport and less retention time within the vadose zone where E2 could biodegrade into its daughter product, estrone (E1). And since the soil is unsaturated and therefore has a negative pressure, preferential flow should not serve as a method of transport. On the contrary, E2 and E1 may sorb to mobile colloids increasing their mobility. This study will evaluate the use of biochar, an increasingly common activated carbon source, as a soil liner amendment. Biochar has a specific surface area that can exceed 1,500 m2/g and is high in organic matter, which E2 sorbs to strongly. The biochar amendment should be most effective and enduring as a layer located at the bottom of the soil liner so that the leachate has been treated by the soil prior to contact. Another proposed amendment technique is to uniformly mix the biochar within the soil liner to increase the leachate contact time with the biochar, but realistically could prove to be too costly and energy-intensive. Field and laboratory studies were conducted to analyze hormone persistence and transport processes and

  11. AC Electrostatic Field Study : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lebby, Gary L.

    1990-08-28

    The phenomenon of fast transients propagating to the outer sheath of a gas insulated substation (GIS) during switching and disconnect operations as well as the distortion of the electric field gradient around an electric transmission line in the presence of field measuring equipment are examples of electrostatic and electromagnetic field problems that are very much on the minds of both power engineers and maintenance personnel alike. Maintenance personnel working on high voltage equipment want to know the areas that have the highest electric field strength gradients and they want to reduce the risk of being shocked when touching a conventionally 60 Hz grounded GIS enclosure due to fast transients initiated by faults and switching operations. In studying these phenomena during the performance period of this grant, tower configurations for the electric field strength gradient measurements were tested with the ESURF3D program acquired from BPA and gas insulated substation test pole (GISTP) models were tested using the Alternative Transients Program (ATP) version Electromagnets Transients Program (EMTP). The results of these two modeling paradigms are presented in this report not as the last word on these subjects, but as a couple of the many ways one can approach two classical electromagnetic waves problems. 19 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Effects of estradiol on VEGF and bFGF by Akt in endometrial cancer cells are mediated through the NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jieqing; Song, Honglin; Lu, Yanqiong; Chen, Haiyan; Jiang, Si; Li, Li

    2016-08-01

    Endometrial carcinogenesis may be related to the long-term effects of estradiol with no antagonism. However, how estradiol regulates cell proliferation is unknown. In the present study, through investigating the molecular events involved in estradiol induced angiogenics factors VEGF and bFGF, we found that estradiol induced endometrial cancer cell division, proliferation, migratory and invasive capacity in vitro and upregulated mRNA expression and protein synthesis of VEGF and bFGF. The estradiol-dependent induction of the expression of VEGF and bFGF was blocked by ER inhibitor, AKT inhibitor and NF-κB inhibitor (PDTC) in estrogen receptor positive Ishikawa cells and blocked by AKT inhibitor, NF-κB inhibitor (PDTC) in estrogen receptor negative HEC-1A cells. Moreover, estradiol activation of AKT was also blocked by AKT antagonist. NF-κB activation was restricted by estradiol concentration and time. Estradiol leading to VEGF and bFGF induction was also confirmed by the development of xenograft tumors in vivo. Taken together, our data suggest that estradiol induces the production of angiogenic factors via a mechanism involving AKT-mediated NF-κB activation partly in non-genomic manner without the estrogen receptor. PMID:27349969

  13. Treatment of noncyclic lactating dairy cows with progesterone and estradiol or with progesterone, GnRH, prostaglandin F2 alpha, and estradiol.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z Z; Burton, L J; McDougall, S; Jolly, P D

    2000-03-01

    The efficacy of two programs for treating noncyclic cows was compared. In trial 1, 478 cows in five herds were randomly divided into two groups. Cows in one group (C group) were treated with an intravaginal progesterone device for 8 d followed in 48 h by 1 mg of estradiol benzoate to cows that had not been detected in estrus since device removal. Those in the other group (CGP group) were treated with progesterone and estradiol as for the C group plus 10 micrograms of a GnRH agonist (buserelin) at device insertion and 25 mg of PGF2 alpha 7 d after device insertion. In trial 2 with 729 cows in nine herds, the treatments were similar to those in trial 1 except that the duration of progesterone treatment was 7 d. No significant difference was found between trials and results from both trials were combined. Compared with C group cows, CGP group cows had a greater estrous response rate (93.2 vs. 89.1%), a greater conception rate to first artificial insemination (AI, 47.1 vs. 29.4%), marginally lower conception rate to second AI (52.9 vs. 59.7%), lower nonpregnancy rate (8.3 vs. 11.1%), and shorter intervals from the start of breeding to conception by AI (9.8 vs. 15.3 d) or by AI or natural mating (21.6 vs. 26.3 d). The treatment protocol used for the CGP group achieved better reproductive performance than that used for the C group. PMID:10750103

  14. Mixtures of xenoestrogens disrupt estradiol-induced non-genomic signaling and downstream functions in pituitary cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Our study examines the effects of xenoestrogen mixtures on estradiol-induced non-genomic signaling and associated functional responses. Bisphenol-A, used to manufacture plastic consumer products, and nonylphenol, a surfactant, are estrogenic by a variety of assays, including altering many intracellular signaling pathways; bisphenol-S is now used as a bisphenol-A substitute. All three compounds contaminate the environment globally. We previously showed that bisphenol-S, bisphenol-A, and nonylphenol alone rapidly activated several kinases at very low concentrations in the GH3/B6/F10 rat pituitary cell line. Methods For each assay we compared the response of individual xenoestrogens at environmentally relevant concentrations (10-15 -10-7 M), to their mixture effects on 10-9 M estradiol-induced responses. We used a medium-throughput plate immunoassay to quantify phosphorylations of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) and c-Jun-N-terminal kinases (JNKs). Cell numbers were assessed by crystal violet assay to compare the proliferative effects. Apoptosis was assessed by measuring caspase 8 and 9 activities via the release of the fluorescent product 7-amino-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin. Prolactin release was measured by radio-immunoassay after a 1 min exposure to all individual and combinations of estrogens. Results Individual xenoestrogens elicited phospho-activation of ERK in a non-monotonic dose- (fM-nM) and mostly oscillating time-dependent (2.5-60 min) manner. When multiple xenoestrogens were combined with nM estradiol, the physiologic estrogen’s response was attenuated. Individual bisphenol compounds did not activate JNK, while nonylphenol did; however, the combination of two or three xenoestrogens with estradiol generated an enhanced non-monotonic JNK dose–response. Estradiol and all xenoestrogen compounds induced cell proliferation individually, while the mixtures of these compounds with estradiol suppressed proliferation below that of the

  15. Energy harvesting from stray power-frequency magnetic field employing a piezoelectric unimorph based heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wei; Lu, Yueran; Zhang, Jitao; Qu, Chiwen; Che, Gaofeng; Peng, Jiancai

    2016-03-01

    An energy harvester using a piezoelectric unimorph based heterostructure is presented to convert stray power-frequency (50 Hz or 60 Hz) magnetic field energy into electrical energy. The harvester consists a piezoelectric unimorph and a U-shaped mass structure. The U-shaped mass structure with two parallel bar magnets leads to a large rotary inertia for the given proof mass. An enhanced exciting torque is induced on the unimorph and the response of the harvester to the external magnetic field is strengthened. Under the resonant frequency of 50 Hz, the harvester produces a power of 154.6 µW with a matching load resistance of 199 kΩ at a magnetic field of 0.5 Oe. Through an up-conversion management circuit, the energy harvester can successfully drive a wireless sensor node with high power consumption (90 mW at transmitting and 18 mW at receiving) at a duration of 205 ms.

  16. In vivo estradiol production in postovulatory ovaries is enhanced by administration of testosterone but not by 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, K; Tamaoki, B

    1984-02-01

    Pre- and postovulatory states of ovaries were induced by the injection of PMSG and PMSG + hCG treatments, respectively, to immature rats. The concentration of ovarian estradiol measured by radioimmunoassay decreased significantly following hCG treatment to PMSG-pretreated rats. Subcutaneous administration of testosterone in soybean oil-glycerol mixture (9:1, v/v) restored the decreased concentration of the ovarian estradiol markedly in the PMSG + hCG treated rats, but not in the group treated with PMSG alone or in the control group treated with no gonadotropin. On the other hand, 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone showed no increase in the ovarian estradiol of any group. When an ethanol solution of testosterone was administered s.c. to the PMSG + hCG treated rats, the ovarian estradiol level was maximally enhanced from 0.5 to 1.0 h after the injection. On the other hand, 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone and 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone in ethanol showed no effect 1 h after the injection. These results indicate that the drastic decrease in ovarian estradiol production due to the hCG administration is caused by an acute decrease in the supply of aromatizable androgens to ovarian aromatase. PMID:6714511

  17. Brain-Generated Estradiol Drives Long-Term Optimization of Auditory Coding to Enhance the Discrimination of Communication Signals

    PubMed Central

    Tremere, Liisa A.; Pinaud, Raphael

    2011-01-01

    Auditory processing and hearing-related pathologies are heavily influenced by steroid hormones in a variety of vertebrate species including humans. The hormone estradiol has been recently shown to directly modulate the gain of central auditory neurons, in real-time, by controlling the strength of inhibitory transmission via a non-genomic mechanism. The functional relevance of this modulation, however, remains unknown. Here we show that estradiol generated in the songbird homologue of the mammalian auditory association cortex, rapidly enhances the effectiveness of the neural coding of complex, learned acoustic signals in awake zebra finches. Specifically, estradiol increases mutual information rates, coding efficiency and the neural discrimination of songs. These effects are mediated by estradiol’s modulation of both rate and temporal coding of auditory signals. Interference with the local action or production of estradiol in the auditory forebrain of freely-behaving animals disrupts behavioral responses to songs, but not to other behaviorally-relevant communication signals. Our findings directly show that estradiol is a key regulator of auditory function in the adult vertebrate brain. PMID:21368039

  18. Levels of estradiol and testosterone are altered in Chinese men with sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wu, F; Chen, T; Mao, S; Jiang, H; Ding, Q; Xu, G

    2016-09-01

    An estimated 20-30% of adult men have at least one manifestation of sexual dysfunction, the most common of which are premature ejaculation (PE) and erectile dysfunction (ED). Emerging evidence has suggested an association between the regulation of hormones with the processes of erection and ejaculation. In this study, we aim to investigate the relationship between sexual dysfunction, namely, PE and ED, and the levels and ratios of estradiol to testosterone in Chinese men. A retrospective case-control study was performed involving 878 male patients aged from 18 to 74 years (mean: 36 years). The ratio of estradiol to testosterone was significantly higher for subjects with ED (7.45 ± 3.09 × 10(-3) ; p < 0.001), and combined PE and ED (6.66 ± 3.05 × 10(-3) ; p = 0.032) compared with that of the control group (6.01 ± 2.61 × 10(-3) ). The ratio was also significantly higher for ED patients when compared with PE patients (5.26 ± 2.18 × 10(-3) ; p < 0.001). Furthermore, compared with the control group, subjects with PE had similar levels of estradiol (95.47 ± 37.86 pmol/L vs. 94.12 ± 32.32 pmol/L; p = 0.678) but significantly higher levels of testosterone (18.66 ± 6.03 nmol/L vs. 16.82 ± 4.93 nmol/L; p < 0.001). This contrasted with the ED group, which showed similar levels of testosterone (16.96 ± 5.86 nmol/L vs. 16.82 ± 4.93 nmol/L; p = 0.773) and significantly higher levels of estradiol (116.88 ± 40.81 pmol/L vs. 94.12 ± 32.32 pmol/L; p < 0.001) compared with control. Subjects with combined ED and PE also had a significantly higher level of estradiol (104.98 ± 43.99 pmol/L vs. 94.12 ± 32.32 pmol/L; p = 0.014) and similar levels of testosterone (17.30 ± 7.23 nmol/L vs. 16.82 ± 4.93 nmol/L; p = 0.503) compared with control. In conclusion, this study involving Chinese males with sexual dysfunction reports, for the first time, that there is an association between sexual dysfunction

  19. Evaluation of the effects of gender and estradiol treatment on the intestinal microcirculation during experimental sepsis.

    PubMed

    Sharawy, Nivin; Pavlovic, Dragan; Wendt, Michael; Cerny, Vladimir; Lehmann, Christian

    2011-11-01

    Intestinal barrier dysfunction plays an important role in sepsis. Females may tolerate sepsis better than males, which could be due to the relative resistance of the female intestine to gut injury and inflammation when subjected to sepsis. In this study the intestinal microcirculation was investigated in 50 female and 40 male rats divided in to 9 groups of 10 animals. Male and female rats were subjected to sham CASP (colon ascendens stent peritonitis). We induced experimental sepsis (CASP) in another two groups of male and female rats. The role of the estradiol treatment was evaluated both in male and ovariectomized female rats. Female rats were subjected to sham ovariectomy 3 weeks before sham CASP. Male and ovariectomized female rats were treated with estradiol (10mg/kg estradiol in rizinus oil immediately and 12h following CASP). Another two groups of male and ovariectomized female rats received placebo oil treatment. To evaluate the effects of gender and estradiol treatment on the microvascular perfusion during sepsis, intravital microscopy was performed twenty-four hours after sham CASP or CASP surgery, which permits the in vivo determination of leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction (rolling leukocytes and adherent leukocytes) and the measurement of functional capillary density (FCD), which served as the measure of quality of microvascular perfusion. We found that there was gender difference mainly in the leukocyte endothelial interaction rather than the functional capillary density (FCD), in which male showed significant increases (P<0.05) both in the leukocyte adhesion and rolling leukocytes in submucosal venules (V1 and V3) in comparison to female rats. (Leukocyte adhesion: V1 107.1 ± 49.2n/mm(2); V3 112.3 ± 68.1n/mm(2)) (Rolling leukocytes:V1 16.2 ± 10.3n/min; V3 8.4 ± 8.2n/min). In addition estradiol replacement in ovariectomized female and male rats induced significant decreases (P<0.05) in the leukocyte adhesion and rolling (V1 and V3) with a

  20. Mimicking of Estradiol Binding by Flame Retardants and Their Metabolites: A Crystallographic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gosavi, Rajendrakumar A.; Knudsen, Gabriel A.; Birnbaum, Linda S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Brominated flame retardants (BFRs), used in many types of consumer goods, are being studied because of concerns about possible health effects related to endocrine disruption, immunotoxicity, reproductive toxicity, and neurotoxicity. Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), the most widely used BFR, and human metabolites of certain congeners of polybrominated diphenyl ether (e.g., 3-OH-BDE-47) have been suggested to inhibit estrogen sulfotransferase, potentially affecting estrogen metabolism. Objectives: Our primary goal was to understand the structural mechanism for inhibition of the hormone-metabolizing enzyme estrogen sulfotransferase by certain BFRs. We also sought to understand various factors that facilitate the binding of flame retardants in the enzyme binding pocket. Methods: We used X-ray crystallography to obtain atomic detail of the binding modes of TBBPA and 3-OH-BDE-47 to estrogen sulfotransferase for comparison with binding of the endogenous substrate estradiol. Results: The crystal structures reveal how BFRs mimic estradiol binding as well as the various interactions between the compounds and protein residues that facilitate its binding. In addition, the structures provide insights into the ability of the sulfotransferase substrate binding pocket to accommodate a range of halogenated compounds that satisfy minimal structural criteria. Conclusions: Our results show how BFRs or their metabolites can bind to and inhibit a key hormone-metabolizing enzyme, potentially causing endocrine disruption. Citation: Gosavi RA, Knudsen GA, Birnbaum LS, Pedersen LC. 2013. Mimicking of estradiol binding by flame retardants and their metabolites: a crystallographic analysis. Environ Health Perspect 121:1194–1199; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1306902 PMID:23959441

  1. Fate of 4-nonylphenol and 17β-estradiol in the Redwood River of Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Writer, Jeffrey H; Ryan, Joseph N; Keefe, Steffanie H; Barber, Larry B

    2012-01-17

    The majority of previous research investigating the fate of endocrine-disrupting compounds has focused on single processes generally in controlled laboratory experiments, and limited studies have directly evaluated their fate and transport in rivers. This study evaluated the fate and transport of 4-nonylphenol, 17β-estradiol, and estrone in a 10-km reach of the Redwood River in southwestern Minnesota. The same parcel of water was sampled as it moved downstream, integrating chemical transformation and hydrologic processes. The conservative tracer bromide was used to track the parcel of water being sampled, and the change in mass of the target compounds relative to bromide was determined at two locations downstream from a wastewater treatment plant effluent outfall. In-stream attenuation coefficients (k(stream)) were calculated by assuming first-order kinetics (negative values correspond to attenuation, whereas positive values indicate production). Attenuation of 17β-estradiol (k(stream) = -3.2 ± 1.0 day(-1)) was attributed primarily due to sorption and biodegradation by the stream biofilm and bed sediments. Estrone (k(stream) = 0.6 ± 0.8 day(-1)) and 4-nonylphenol (k(stream) = 1.4 ± 1.9 day(-1)) were produced in the evaluated 10-km reach, likely due to biochemical transformation from parent compounds (17β-estradiol, 4-nonylphenolpolyethoxylates, and 4-nonyphenolpolyethoxycarboxylates). Despite attenuation, these compounds were transported kilometers downstream, and thus additive concentrations from multiple sources and transformation of parent compounds into degradates having estrogenic activity can explain their environmental persistence and widespread observations of biological disruption in surface waters. PMID:22208914

  2. Effects of estradiol on reduction of osteoarthritis in rabbits through effect on matrix metalloproteinase proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiguo; Wang, Lin; Xu, Zhanwang; Yin, Yanxia; Su, Jun; Niu, Xiufeng; Cao, Xuecheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Osteoarthritis (OA), as a known degenerative joint disease, is the most common form of arthritis. In this study, we aimed to elucidate unclear pathogenesis of OA. Materials and Methods: Rabbit models of OA were established by the transection of the anterior cruciate ligament. Rabbits were randomly divided into three equal groups: the experimental group (OA modeling, treated with estradiol), the control group (OA modeling, treated with normal saline) and the normal group (without OA modeling). The glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and hyaluronan (HA) content of knee joint were collected and assayed. In addition, gene expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-13 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 were evaluated by real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. Results: Animal models were developed successfully. GAG and HA concentrations were significantly increased in the experimental and the normal group compared with the control group (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively). Significant increase of GAG level in 6, 9 and 12 week-samples were found in the experimental group compared with the control group (P<0.01). The expression level of MMP-1 and MMP-13 in the experimental group were lower than the control group (P<0.01), but still higher than those of the normal group (P<0.01). TIMP-1 expression level was found to be higher in the experimental group than that of the control and normal group (P<0.01). Conclusion: The results suggested the possible role of estradiol in the pathological process of OA via its effect on the MMPs. The results also implied the effect of estradiol intervention on OA. PMID:27114801

  3. Fate of 4-nonylphenol and 17β-estradiol in the Redwood River of Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Writer, Jeffrey; Ryan, Joseph N.; Keefe, Steffanie H.; Barber, Larry B.

    2012-01-01

    The majority of previous research investigating the fate of endocrine-disrupting compounds has focused on single processes generally in controlled laboratory experiments, and limited studies have directly evaluated their fate and transport in rivers. This study evaluated the fate and transport of 4-nonylphenol, 17β-estradiol, and estrone in a 10-km reach of the Redwood River in southwestern Minnesota. The same parcel of water was sampled as it moved downstream, integrating chemical transformation and hydrologic processes. The conservative tracer bromide was used to track the parcel of water being sampled, and the change in mass of the target compounds relative to bromide was determined at two locations downstream from a wastewater treatment plant effluent outfall. In-stream attenuation coefficients (kstream) were calculated by assuming first-order kinetics (negative values correspond to attenuation, whereas positive values indicate production). Attenuation of 17β-estradiol (kstream = −3.2 ± 1.0 day–1) was attributed primarily due to sorption and biodegradation by the stream biofilm and bed sediments. Estrone (kstream = 0.6 ± 0.8 day–1) and 4-nonylphenol (kstream = 1.4 ± 1.9 day–1) were produced in the evaluated 10-km reach, likely due to biochemical transformation from parent compounds (17β-estradiol, 4-nonylphenolpolyethoxylates, and 4-nonyphenolpolyethoxycarboxylates). Despite attenuation, these compounds were transported kilometers downstream, and thus additive concentrations from multiple sources and transformation of parent compounds into degradates having estrogenic activity can explain their environmental persistence and widespread observations of biological disruption in surface waters.

  4. Prostaglandin H synthase catalyzes regiospecific release of tritium from labeled estradiol

    SciTech Connect

    Degen, G.H.; Jellinck, P.H.; Hershcopf, R.J.

    1987-06-01

    Prostaglandin H synthase (PHS) from ram seminal vesicle microsomes was found to catalyze the release of tritium (3H) from estradiol (E2) regiospecifically labeled in position C-2 or C-4 of ring A but not from positions C-17 alpha, C-16 alpha, or C-6,7. Formation of 3H2O from ring A of E2 is dependent upon native enzyme supplemented with either arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, or hydrogen peroxide and proceeds very rapidly as do other cooxidation reactions catalyzed by PHS-peroxidase. The 3H-loss from ring A of E2 reflecting oxidative displacement of this isotope by PHS increases linearly up to 100 microM under our conditions (8-45 nmol/mg x 5 min). Loss of tritium in various blanks is negligible by comparison. Indomethacin (0.07 and 0.2 mM) inhibited the PHS-dependent release of 3H2O from estradiol but less efficiently than it inhibited DES-cooxidation measured in parallel incubations under similar conditions. Addition of EDTA (0.5 mM) had no effect on the regiospecific transfer of 3H from E2 or on DES-oxidation; ascorbic acid (0.5 mM) or NADH (0.33 mM) clearly inhibited both reactions and to a similar extent. These data suggest that estradiol-2/4-hydroxylation can be catalyzed by PHS in vitro probably via its peroxidase activity and point to PHS as an enzyme that could contribute to catechol estrogen formation in vitro by tissue preparations in the presence of unsaturated fatty acids or peroxides.

  5. Biodistribution and metabolism of 16. cap alpha. -((/sup 18/F)-fluoro)-17. beta. -estradiol

    SciTech Connect

    Mathias, C.J.; Brodack, J.W.; Kilbourn, M.R.; Carlson, K.A.; Katzenellenbogen, J.A.; Welch, M.J.

    1985-05-01

    The uptake of receptor-mediated radiopharmaceuticals as measured by target to non-target uptake ratios depends upon many parameters. These include blood flow to the tissue, blood volume, receptor concentration as well as metabolism of the tracer. In a rat tumor model (DMBA) induced mammary tumors with high concentration of estrogen receptors) uptake of /sup 18/F-estradiol was studied while blood flow was measured with the use of /sup 125/I-iodoantipyrine, blood volume was measured with the use of /sup 99m/Tc-labeled red blood cells, and the receptor concentration by in vitro assay. The results demonstrate no correlation between blood flow and uptake of ligand, or between receptor concentration and uptake of ligand. No correlation existed between blood volume and uptake or /sup 18/F-estradiol, even though the blood volume varied by a factor of --20 in the tumors studied. The distribution of the fluorine-18 may depend upon metabolites of the ligand rather than the ligand itself. The authors have developed a technique to separate metabolites from the administered compound in blood and tissues. The distribution of the compound in the blood at times >30 mins after injection was primarily within the red blood cells in a chemical form that was not extractable even in lysed blood samples. By injecting blood from one rate into another the authors have shown that the activity in blood 2 hours after injection of /sup 18/F-estradiol is not available for uptake in receptor rich tissue but remains in the blood and non-target tissues.

  6. Female Japanese quail with high levels of estradiol demonstrate cocaine-induced conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Gill, Karin E; Reynolds, Anna R; Prendergast, Mark A; Akins, Chana K

    2016-06-01

    Preclinical research has indicated that females may be more sensitive to the rewarding properties of cocaine. However, the majority of this research has been done in rodent species. Environmental cues associated with human drug-taking behavior tend to be visual. Because rodents do not rely on the visual system as their primary sense modality, the use of a visually oriented species may add to our understanding of cue-elicited drug cravings and relapse. The present study examined the potential role of the steroid hormone, estradiol, in the rewarding properties of cocaine in female Japanese quail using a conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure. In the current experiment, female quail were housed on either an 8L:16D (light:dark) or 16L:8D (light:dark) cycle for 21 days to induce photoregression or photostimulation, respectively. They then received 10, 20, or 30 mg/kg cocaine, or saline during conditioning. Conditioning trials were carried out for 8 days, once per day for 30 min, for a total of 4 cocaine and 4 saline alternating conditioning trials. Results indicated that female quail housed in long-light conditions (16L:8D) had significantly higher levels of estradiol than short-cycle females. Additionally, photostimulated female quail developed a CPP to 10 and 20 mg/kg cocaine. Short-cycle females did not show cocaine-induced CPP to any dose tested. Results indicate that cocaine is dose-dependently rewarding to photostimulated female Japanese quail. Furthermore, the current findings suggest that estradiol may enhance the rewarding properties of cocaine in female quail. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26963687

  7. Sexual dimorphism of brain aromatase activity in medaka: induction of a female phenotype by estradiol.

    PubMed Central

    Melo, A C; Ramsdell, J S

    2001-01-01

    In this study we identified sex-dependent dimorphism of brain aromatase in the teleost medaka and examined its regulation by sex steriods. We first investigated differential distribution of brain aromatase activity in sexually mature male and female medaka in serial coronal sections of the brain and identified the hypothalamic nuclei contained in each section using the brain atlas of medaka. In the brain of male medaka, high levels of activity are localized in sections containing the preoptic (POA) and suprachiasmatic nuclei (SC) (63-75 fmol/hr) and low levels in the nuclei periventricular dorsalis (HD), ventralis (HV), and caudalis (Hc), nuclei diffusus of lobulus inferiores (NDIL), and nuclei tuberi anteriores (TA) and posteriores (TP) (< 25 fmol/hr). In the brain of female medaka high aromatase activity is localized in sections containing the HD, HV, Hc, NDIL, TA, and TP (85-80 fmol/hr) and highly variable levels in the POA and SC (23-70 fmol/hr). The concentration and time dependency of the exposure of male medaka to estradiol on the total brain aromatase activity and morphologic sex characteristics were determined next. Estradiol increased the activity of brain aromatase in a concentration-dependent manner at 2.5 and 25 microg/L, but the increase was lower at higher concentrations of the hormone. The effect was time dependent, gradually increasing up to the fifth day of exposure, after which it reached a plateau. Estradiol induction of brain aromatase analyzed using Lineweaver-Burke plots of saturation assays revealed a non-first-order reaction. The results indicate that a positive feedback mechanism regulates brain aromatase and imply that the sexual dimorphic distribution of aromatase may be highly sensitive to physiologic cues and environmental perturbations in fish. PMID:11333187

  8. Estrogens and development of pulmonary hypertension - Interaction of estradiol metabolism and pulmonary vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Tofovic, Stevan P.

    2010-01-01

    Severe pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by clustered proliferation of endothelial cells in the lumina of small size pulmonary arteries resulting in concentric obliteration of the lumina and formation of complex vascular structures known as plexiform lesions. This debilitating disease occurs more frequently in women, yet both animal studies in classical models of PAH and limited clinical data suggest protective effects of estrogens: the estrogen paradox in pulmonary hypertension. Little is known about the role of estrogens in PAH, but one line of evidence strongly suggests that the vascular protective effects of 17β-estradiol (estradiol; E2) are mediated largely by its downstream metabolites. Estradiol is metabolized to 2-hydroxyestradiol (2HE) by CYP1A1/CYP1B1, and 2HE is converted to 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME) by catechol-O-methyl transferase. 2ME is extensively metabolized to 2-methoxyestrone, a metabolite that lacks biologic activity but which may be converted back to 2ME. 2ME has no estrogenic activity and its effects are mediated by estrogen receptors-independent mechanism(s). Notably, in systemic and pulmonary vascular endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts 2ME exerts stronger anti-mitotic effects than E2 itself. E2 and 2ME, despite having similar effects on other cardiovascular cells, have opposing effects on endothelial cells; that is, in endothelial cells, E2 is pro-mitogenic, pro-angiogenic and anti- apoptotic, whereas 2ME is antimitogenic, anti-angiogenic and pro-apoptotic. This may have significant ramifications in severe PAH that involves uncontrolled proliferation of monoclonal, apoptosis resistant endothelial cells. Based on its cellular effects, 2ME should be expected to attenuate the progression of disease and provide protection in severe PAH. In contrast, E2, due to its mitogenic, angiogenic, and anti-apoptotic effects (otherwise desirable in normal, quiescent endothelial cells), may even adversely affect

  9. Mutation inhibition by beta-estradiol after low doses of gamma-irradiation of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Puck, T T; Johnson, R; Webb, P

    1999-03-01

    The methodology previously described for measuring mutagenesis has been applied to the study of mutation prevention in immortalized G2 phase human lymphocytes exposed to 25 and 50 cGy of gamma-radiation. Caffeine prevents repair of mutations. Two times 10(-4) M beta-estradiol applied for 2.5 h markedly decreases induced mutations and affects male and female cells similarly. Quantitative measurement of mutagenesis in cells of different individuals and the effect of various agents on mutation yield should be important in prevention of cancer and other mutational disease. PMID:11225056

  10. Early Postmenopausal Transdermal 17β-Estradiol Therapy and Amyloid-β Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Kantarci, Kejal; Lowe, Val J.; Lesnick, Timothy G.; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Bailey, Kent R.; Fields, Julie A.; Shuster, Lynne T.; Zuk, Samantha M.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Mielke, Michelle M.; Gleason, Carey; Jack, Clifford R.; Rocca, Walter A.; Miller, Virginia M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: It remains controversial whether hormone therapy in recently postmenopausal women modifies the risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Objective: To investigate the effects of hormone therapy on amyloid-β deposition in recently postmenopausal women. Methods: Participants within 5–36 months past menopause in the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study, a randomized, double blinded placebo-controlled clinical trial, were randomized to: 1) 0.45 mg/day oral conjugated equine estrogens (CEE); 2) 50μg/day transdermal 17β-estradiol; or 3) placebo pills and patch for four years. Oral progesterone (200 mg/day) was given to active treatment groups for 12 days each month. 11C Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET imaging was performed in 68 of the 118 participants at Mayo Clinic approximately seven years post randomization and three years after stopping randomized treatment. PiB Standard unit value ratio (SUVR) was calculated. Results: Women (age = 52–65) randomized to transdermal 17β-estradiol (n = 21) had lower PiB SUVR compared to placebo (n = 30) after adjusting for age [odds ratio (95% CI) = 0.31(0.11–0.83)]. In the APOE ɛ4 carriers, transdermal 17β-estradiol treated women (n = 10) had lower PiB SUVR compared to either placebo (n = 5) [odds ratio (95% CI) = 0.04(0.004–0.44)], or the oral CEE treated group (n = 3) [odds ratio (95% CI) = 0.01(0.0006–0.23)] after adjusting for age. Hormone therapy was not associated with PiB SUVR in the APOE ɛ4 non-carriers. Conclusion: In this pilot study, transdermal 17β-estradiol therapy in recently postmenopausal women was associated with a reduced amyloid-β deposition, particularly in APOE ɛ4 carriers. This finding may have important implications for the prevention of AD in postmenopausal women, and needs to be confirmed in a larger sample. PMID:27163830

  11. The evolving role of dendritic spines and memory: Interaction(s) with estradiol.

    PubMed

    Frankfurt, Maya; Luine, Victoria

    2015-08-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Estradiol and Cognition". Memory processing is presumed to depend on synaptic plasticity, which appears to have a role in mediating the acquisition, consolidation, and retention of memory. We have studied the relationship between estrogen, recognition memory, and dendritic spine density in the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex, areas critical for memory, across the lifespan in female rodents. The present paper reviews the literature on dendritic spine plasticity in mediating both short and long term memory, as well as the decreased memory that occurs with aging and Alzheimer's disease. It also addresses the role of acute and chronic estrogen treatments in these processes. PMID:25993604

  12. Magnetic field survey at PG&E photovoltaic sites

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, G.J.; Jennings, C.

    1994-08-01

    Public awareness has aroused concerns over the possible effects of magnetic fields on human health. While research continues to determine if magnetic fields do, in fact, affect human health, concerned individuals are requesting data on magnetic field sources in their environments to base personal decisions about limiting their exposure to these sources. Timely acceptance and implementation of photovoltaics (PV), particularly for distributed applications such as PV rooftops, windows, and vehicles, may be hampered by the lack of PV magnetic field data. To address this situation, magnetic flux density was measured around equipment at two PVUSA (Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications) project sites in Kerman and Davis, California. This report documents the data and compares the PV magnetic fields with published data on more prevalent magnetic field sources. Although not comprehensive, electric and magnetic field (EMF) data taken at PVUSA indicate that 60-Hz magnetic fields (the EMF type of greatest public concern) are significantly less for PV arrays than for household applications. Therefore, given the present EMF research knowledge, PV array EMF may not merit considerable concern. The PV system components exhibiting significant AC magnetic fields are the transformers and power conditioning units (PCUs). However, the AC magnetic fields associated with these components are localized and are not detected at PV system perimeters. Concern about transformer and PCU EMF would apply to several generation and storage technologies.

  13. Recent studies in the behavioral toxicology of ELF electric and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lovely, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    Behavioral responses to ELF electric and magnetic fields are reviewed starting with the simple sensory awareness or detection by an animal and moving on through more-complicated behavioral responses such as behavior that averts exposure. The literature selected in this review is taken primarily from the area of behavioral toxicology. As such, it does not review work on specialized response systems to ELF fields. The most notable of these omitted specialized response systems are electroreception, which occurs in a number of fish species, and homing/navigation and communication of the location of food that occurs in several species of birds and in honeybees, respectively. The toxicologic orientation of most researches that evaluate the effects of exposure to ELF electric and magnetic fields has been influenced primarily by the missions of DOE and the power industry programs to determine the health effects of power frequency (50- and 60-Hz) electric and magnetic fields. Because of these large programmatic efforts, most of the recent research has in fact been done at 50 or 60 Hz. In the context of the above limitations, remarkably few robust behavioral effects have been reported. Those that have been reported probably relate to an animal's perception of the electric field, although there are some exceptions to this generalization. The apparent lack of deleterious effects in animals is consistent with recent studies on humans that have been conducted in the UK. With this in mind, it is tempting to conclude that exposure to an ELF field is a rather innocuous event and, other than possible mini-shocks, is without hazard. 43 references.

  14. Dynamic Resistance of YBCO-Coated Conductors in Applied AC Fields with DC Transport Currents and DC Background Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth, Robert C; Zhang, Yifei; Ha, Tam T; Gouge, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    In order to predict heat loads in future saturable core fault-current-limiting devices due to ac fringing fields, dynamic resistance in YBCO-coated conductors was measured at 77 K in peak ac fields up to 25 mT at 60 Hz and in dc fields up to 1 T. With the sample orientation set such that the conductor face was either parallel or perpendicular to the ac and dc applied fields, the dynamic resistance was measured at different fractions of the critical current to determine the relationship between the dc transport current and the applied fields. With respect to field orientation, the dynamic resistance for ac fields that were perpendicular to the conductor face was significantly higher than when the ac fields were parallel to the conductor face. It was also observed that the dynamic resistance: (1) increased with increasing fraction of the dc transport current to the critical current, (2) was proportional to the inverse of the critical current, and (3) demonstrated a linear dependence with the applied ac field once a threshold field was exceeded. This functional behavior was consistent with a critical state model for the dynamic resistance, but discrepancies in absolute value of the dynamic resistance suggested that further theoretical development is needed.

  15. [Combined effects of testosterone and estradiol on the ventral lobe of the rat postate in organ culture].

    PubMed

    Feyel-Cabanes, T; Robel, P; Baulieu, E E

    1977-10-31

    After organ culture without hormone, the epithelial gland cells of Rat veantral prostate undergo atrophic changes, whereas the interstitial stroma components tend to increase. Estradiol (1-1,000 nM),added to the culture medium, is ineffective. On the contrary, testosterone (1-100 nM) maintains epithelial cells and prevents the increase of interstitial stroma. When estradiol (1-1,000 nM) is combined with a physiological concentration of testosterone (1-4 nM), the epithelial cells are well maintained, but the inhibitory action of testosterone on the stroma is counteracted so that the glandular epithelium and the interstitial stroma are both stimulated. However, when testosterone is used at supraphysiological (10-100 nM) concentrations, estradiol is completely ineffective and the structure of the prostate is identical to the one given by the androgen alone. PMID:413648

  16. Evidence that the (/sup 3/H)estradiol-binding protein in pancreas is localized in exocrine cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, A.; Richardson, S.B.; Altszuler, N.; Lane, B.

    1985-06-01

    Extracts of rat pancreas contain significant amounts of an (/sup 3/H)estradiol-binding protein. The amount of steroid-binding activity that could be measured varied considerably depending on the tonicity of the homogenizing medium. High speed supernatants of homogenates initially prepared in isotonic buffer contained about 10% of the binding activity as homogenates prepared in hypotonic buffer. Extraction with hypotonic buffer of pellets obtained by the isotonic procedure yielded most of the remaining (/sup 3/H)estradiol-binding activity. In an attempt to avoid errors resulting from incomplete homogenization and to detect possible changes in intracellular distribution of (/sup 3/H)estradiol-binding activity, pancreata were initially homogenized in isotonic buffer and centrifuged at high speed (100,000 X g; 1 hr). The pellet was then extracted with hypotonic buffer and centrifuged again at high speed, and both supernatants were analyzed for (/sup 3/H)estradiol-binding and amylase activities. Two or 14 days after treatment of male rats with streptozotocin, no apparent decline or redistribution of (/sup 3/H)estradiol-binding activity to the cytosol was noted despite extensive alteration of beta-islet cells, as determined by electron microscopic examination of sections of these pancreata and significant loss of insulin, as measured by RIA. Amylase activity was unaffected 2 days after streptozotocin treatment, but was depressed to about 1% of control levels at 14 days. Administration of insulin to the latter group of animals resulted in return of amylase to normal levels and a modest increase (approximately 50%) in (/sup 3/H)estradiol-binding activity.

  17. Effects of 17β-estradiol on cardiac Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in high fat diet fed rats.

    PubMed

    Obradovic, Milan; Zafirovic, Sonja; Jovanovic, Aleksandra; Milovanovic, Emina Sudar; Mousa, Shaker A; Labudovic-Borovic, Milica; Isenovic, Esma R

    2015-11-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate in vivo effects of estradiol on Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity/expression in high fat (HF) diet fed rats. Adult male Wistar rats were fed normally (Control, n = 7) or with a HF diet (Obese, n = 14) for 10 weeks. After 10 weeks, half of the obese rats were treated with estradiol (Obese + Estradiol, n = 7, 40 μg/kg, i.p.) as a bolus injection and 24 h after treatment all the rats were sacrificed. Estradiol in vivo in obese rats in comparison with obese non-treated rats led to a statistically significant increase in concentration of serum Na(+) (p < 0.05), Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity (p < 0.01), expression of α1 (p < 0.01) and α2 (p < 0.05) subunit of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, both PI3K subunits p85 (p < 0.01), p110 (p < 0.05), and association of IRS-1 with p85 (p < 0.05), while significantly decrease expression of AT1 (p < 0.05) and Rho A (p < 0.01) proteins. Our results suggest that estradiol in vivo in pathophysiological conditions, such as obesity accompanied with insulin resistance stimulates activity and expression of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase by a mechanism that involves the participation of IRS-1/PI3K/Akt signaling. In addition, the decreasing level of AT1 and Rho A proteins estradiol probably attenuates the detrimental effect of obesity to decreased IRS-1/PI3K association and consequently reduce Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity/expression. PMID:26284496

  18. Estradiol differentially induces progesterone receptor isoforms expression through alternative promoter regulation in a mouse embryonic hypothalamic cell line.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Martínez, Edgar Ricardo; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio; Zarain-Herzberg, Angel; Rodríguez, María Carmen; Mendoza-Garcés, Luciano; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia; Cerbón, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) presents two main isoforms (PR-A and PR-B) that are regulated by two specific promoters and transcribed from alternative transcriptional start sites. The molecular regulation of PR isoforms expression in embryonic hypothalamus is poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to assess estradiol regulation of PR isoforms in a mouse embryonic hypothalamic cell line (mHypoE-N42), as well as the transcriptional status of their promoters. MHypoE-N42 cells were treated with estradiol for 6 and 12 h. Then, Western blot, real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and chromatin and DNA immunoprecipitation experiments were performed. PR-B expression was transiently induced by estradiol after 6 h of treatment in an estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)-dependent manner. This induction was associated with an increase in ERα phosphorylation (serine 118) and its recruitment to PR-B promoter. After 12 h of estradiol exposure, a downregulation of this PR isoform was associated with a decrease of specific protein 1, histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation, and RNA polymerase II occupancy on PR-B promoter, without changes in DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation. In contrast, there were no estradiol-dependent changes in PR-A expression that could be related with the epigenetic marks or the transcription factors evaluated. We demonstrate that PR isoforms are differentially regulated by estradiol and that the induction of PR-B expression is associated to specific transcription factors interactions and epigenetic changes in its promoter in embryonic hypothalamic cells. PMID:26676302

  19. Development and evaluation of polymer nanoparticles for oral delivery of estradiol to rat brain in a model of Alzheimer's pathology.

    PubMed

    Mittal, G; Carswell, H; Brett, R; Currie, S; Kumar, M N V Ravi

    2011-03-10

    The purpose of this study was to develop tween 80 (T-80) coated polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) nanoparticles that can deliver estradiol to the brain upon oral administration. Estradiol containing nanoparticles were made by a single emulsion technique and T-80 coating was achieved by incubating the re-constituted nanoparticles at different concentrations of T-80. The process of T-80 coating on the nanoparticles was optimized and the pharmacokinetics of estradiol nanoparticles was studied as a function of T-80 coating. The nanoparticles were then evaluated in an ovariectomized (OVX) rat model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) that mimics the postmenopausal conditions. The nanoparticles bound T-80 were found to proportionally increase from 9.72 ± 1.07 mg to 63.84 ± 3.59 mg with an increase in the initial concentration T-80 from 1% to 5% and were stable in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) and simulated intestinal fluid (SIF). Orally administered T-80 coated nanoparticles resulted in significantly higher brain estradiol levels after 24h (1.969 ± 0.197 ng/g tissue) as compared to uncoated ones (1.105 ± 0.136 ng/g tissue) at a dose of 0.2mg/rat, suggesting a significant role of surface coating. Moreover, these brain estradiol levels were almost similar to those obtained after administration of the same dose of drug suspension via 100% bioavailable intramuscular route (2.123 ± 0.370 ng/g tissue), indicating the increased fraction of bioavailable drug reaching the brain when administered orally. Also, the nanoparticle treated group was successful in preventing the expression of amyloid beta-42 (Aβ42) immunoreactivity in the hippocampus region of brain. Together, the results indicate the potential of nanoparticles for oral delivery of estradiol to brain. PMID:21111014

  20. Effect of prenatal and neonatal exposure to lead on the affinity and number of estradiol receptors in the uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Wiebe, J.P.; Barr, K.J.

    1988-01-01

    Female Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with lead chloride (20 ppm or 200 ppm Pb) or sodium chloride (controls) in their drinking water. Three treatment regimens were employed: (I) rats were treated prior to mating and uteri were removed from 21-d-old offspring, (II) treatments were begun when females were in d 7 of pregnancy and continued on the dams until the pups were 21 d old, and half of these offspring were continued on the Pb treatments and half on saline, with uteri removed during diestrus when female offspring were approximately 150 d old; (III) female rats were treated from d 21 to d 35 and then uteri were removed. Estradiol-receptor binding and affinity were determined on the uterine tissues. Treatment with lead prior to mating (group I) resulted in a significant increase in estradiol-receptor affinity (K/sub a/) in 21-d-old offspring without a change in estradiol receptor number (N). Treatment from d 7 of pregnancy until weaning of the pups resulted in approximately 35% decrease in estradiol receptors per milligram uterine protein when these offspring reached 150 d of age (group II). Similarly, treatment with Pb from d 21 until d 35 or until d 150 resulted in a significant decrease in uterine estradiol receptor number at 35 and 150 d, respectively, while the K/sub a/ was significantly increased by the exposure to Pb. The results demonstrate that prenatal and/or postnatal exposure to PB alters the number and affinity of estradiol receptors in the prepubertal and adult rat uterus.

  1. 17β-Estradiol and genistein acute treatments improve some cerebral cortex homeostasis aspects deteriorated by aging in female rats.

    PubMed

    Morán, Javier; Garrido, Pablo; Alonso, Ana; Cabello, Estefanía; González, Celestino

    2013-04-01

    Aging is associated with decreased insulin sensitivity and impaired cerebral glucose homeostasis. These changes increase neural sensitivity to metabolic damage contributing to cognitive decline, being the decrease in plasma estrogen following menopause one of the main factors involved in aged females. Phytoestrogens as genistein are structurally similar to 17β-estradiol, bind to estrogen receptors, and can evoke both estrogenic and anti-estrogenic effects. Estrogens and phytoestrogens have neuroprotective potential, but the physiological mechanisms are not fully understood. Young and aged female Wistar rats were ovariectomized and treated acutely with 17β-estradiol (1.4μg/kg body weight), genistein (10 or 40 mg/kg body weight), or vehicle. Cortical expression of glucose transporter-3 (GLUT-3) and -4 (GLUT-4), cytochrome c oxidase (CO), estrogen receptor-α (ERα) and -β (ERβ) was measured by Western blotting. There was an age-related decline in GLUT-4, CO and ERβ levels. Both drugs, estradiol and genistein, were able to reverse GLUT-3 downregulation in the cortex following late ovariectomy. However, genistein was the only treatment able to restore completely GLUT-4 levels in aged rats. In contrast, estradiol was more potent than genistein at increasing CO, a marker of cerebral oxidative metabolism. As regards ER levels, estradiol increased the ERα67 quantity diminished by late ovariectomy, while genistein did the same with the other ERα isoform, ERα46, highlighting drug-specific differences in expression changes for both isoforms. On the other hand, no treatment-related differences were found regarding ERβ levels. Therefore, genistein like estradiol could be suitable treatments against cortical metabolic dysfunction caused by aging. These treatments may hold promise as neuroprotective strategies against diabetes and age-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23419687

  2. Validity of estimating non-SHBG bound testosterone and estradiol from total hormone measurements in boys and girls

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, D. Walt; Dorgan, Joanne F.

    2010-01-01

    Background Circulating levels of bioavailable estradiol and testosterone are often desirable for clinical practice or investigational studies of children. However, assays to measure circulating hormone levels might not always be accessible. We sought to validate the empirical calculation of circulating bioavailable testosterone and estradiol in children. Methods 663 eight to ten year olds were recruited to the Dietary Intervention Study in Children (DISC). DISC was a randomized clinical trial designed to test efficacy of a dietary intervention to reduce serum cholesterol (LDL-C) in children with elevated cholesterol. Assay measures of estradiol, testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin concentration (SHBG), and albumin concentration in girls as well as dihydrotestosterone in boys were measured for up to 10 years. We calculated measures of circulating non-SHBG bound estradiol and testosterone from total hormone levels using the law of mass action. We compared proportional differences in assay measured minus calculated non-SHBG bound hormone levels versus their averages using GEE-estimated linear regressions. Results On average, calculated values overestimated assay measured values (−11.7% for non-SHBG bound estradiol in girls and −2.6% for non-SHBG bound testosterone in boys). The intercept and slope of the regression for non-SHBG bound estradiol in girls were −0.13 (95% CI −0.14 to −0.12) and 0.005 (95% CI 0.003 to 0.007), respectively. The intercept and slope for non-SHBG bound testosterone in boys were −0.16 (95% CI −0.17 to −0.14) and 0.0006 (95% CI 0.0005–0.0006). Conclusion While calculated values might be useful for research purposes, they are generally not close enough for clinical purposes. PMID:20406780

  3. Estradiol-induced neurogenesis in the female accessory olfactory bulb is required for the learning of the male odor.

    PubMed

    Brus, Maïna; Trouillet, Anne-Charlotte; Hellier, Vincent; Bakker, Julie

    2016-08-01

    Odors processed by the main and accessory olfactory bulbs (MOB, AOB) are important for sexual behavior. Interestingly, both structures continue to receive new neurons during adulthood. A role for olfactory neurogenesis in sexual behavior in female mice has recently been shown and gonadal hormones such as estradiol can modulate adult neurogenesis. Therefore, we wanted to determine the role of estradiol in learning the odors of sexual partners and in the adult neurogenesis of female aromatase knockout mice (ArKO), unable to produce estradiol. Female wild-type (WT) and ArKO mice were exposed to male odors during 7 days, and olfactory preferences, cell proliferation, cell survival and functional involvement of newborn neurons were analyzed, using BrdU injections, in combination with a marker of cell activation (Zif268) and neuronal fate (doublecortin, NeuN). Behavioral tasks indicated that both WT and ArKO females were able to discriminate between the odors of two different males, but ArKO mice failed to learn the familiar male odor. Proliferation of newborn cells was reduced in ArKO mice only in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Olfactory exposure decreased cell survival in the AOB in WT females, suggesting a role for estradiol in a structure involved in sexual behavior. Finally, newborn neurons do not seem to be functionally involved in the AOB of ArKO mice compared with WT, when females were exposed to the odor of a familiar male, suggesting that estradiol-induced neurogenesis in the AOB is required for the learning of the male odor in female mice. Aromatase knockout mice (ArKO) presented deficits in olfactory preferences without affecting their olfactory discrimination abilities, and showed no functional involvement of newborn neurons in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) in response to the odor of a familiar male. These results suggest that estradiol-induced neurogenesis in the female AOB is required for the learning of the male odor. PMID:27216894

  4. Estradiol and isotype-selective estrogen receptor agonists modulate the mesocortical dopaminergic system in gonadectomized female rats.

    PubMed

    Sárvári, Miklós; Deli, Levente; Kocsis, Pál; Márk, László; Maász, Gábor; Hrabovszky, Erik; Kalló, Imre; Gajári, Dávid; Vastagh, Csaba; Sümegi, Balázs; Tihanyi, Károly; Liposits, Zsolt

    2014-10-01

    The mesocortical dopaminergic pathway projecting from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) to the prefrontal cortex (PFC) contributes to the processing of reward signals. This pathway is regulated by gonadal steroids including estradiol. To address the putative role of estradiol and isotype-selective estrogen receptor (ER) agonists in the regulation of the rodent mesocortical system, we combined fMRI, HPLC-MS and qRT-PCR techniques. In fMRI experiments adult, chronically ovariectomized rats, treated with either vehicle, estradiol, ERα agonist 16α-lactone-estradiol (LE2) or ERβ agonist diarylpropionitrile (DPN), received a single dose of d-amphetamine-sulphate (10mg/kg, i.p.) and BOLD responses were monitored in the VTA and the PFC. Ovariectomized rats showed no significant response to amphetamine. In contrast, the VTA of ER agonist-substituted ovariectomized rats showed robust amphetamine-evoked BOLD increases. The PFC of estradiol-replaced animals was also responsive to amphetamine. Mass spectroscopic analysis of dopamine and its metabolites revealed a two-fold increase in both dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid content of the PFC in estradiol-replaced animals compared to ovariectomized controls. qRT-PCR studies revealed upregulation of dopamine transporter and dopamine receptor in the VTA and PFC, respectively, of ER agonist-treated ovariectomized animals. Collectively, the results indicate that E2 and isotype-selective ER agonists can powerfully modulate the responsiveness of the mesocortical dopaminergic system, increase the expression of key genes related to dopaminergic neurotransmission and augment the dopamine content of the PFC. In a broader sense, the findings support the concept that the manifestation of reward signals in the PFC is dependent on the actual estrogen milieu of the brain. PMID:24976584

  5. Estradiol regulates AQP2 expression in the collecting duct: a novel inhibitory role for estrogen receptor α.

    PubMed

    Cheema, Muhammad Umar; Irsik, Debra L; Wang, Yan; Miller-Little, William; Hyndman, Kelly A; Marks, Eileen S; Frøkiær, Jørgen; Boesen, Erika I; Norregaard, Rikke

    2015-08-15

    While there is evidence that sex hormones influence multiple systems involved in salt and water homeostasis, the question of whether sex hormones regulate aquaporin-2 (AQP2) and thus water handling by the collecting duct has been largely ignored. Accordingly, the present study investigated AQP2 expression, localization and renal water handling in intact and ovariectomized (OVX) female rats, with and without estradiol or progesterone replacement. OVX resulted in a significant increase in urine osmolality and increase in p256-AQP2 in the renal cortex at 7 days post-OVX, as well as induced body weight changes. Relative to OVX alone, estradiol repletion produced a significant increase in urine output, normalized urinary osmolality and reduced both total AQP2 (protein and mRNA) and p256-AQP2 expression, whereas progesterone repletion had little effect. Direct effects of estradiol on AQP2 mRNA and protein levels were further tested in vitro using the mpkCCD principal cell line. Estradiol treatment of mpkCCD cells reduced AQP2 at both the mRNA and protein level in the absence of deamino-8-d-AVP (dDAVP) and significantly blunted the dDAVP-induced increase in AQP2 at the protein level only. We determined that mpkCCD and native mouse collecting ducts express both estrogen receptor (ER)α and ERβ and that female mice lacking ERα displayed significant increases in AQP2 protein compared with wild-type littermates, implicating ERα in mediating the inhibitory effect of estradiol on AQP2 expression. These findings suggest that changes in estradiol levels, such as during menopause or following reproductive surgeries, may contribute to dysregulation of water homeostasis in women. PMID:26062878

  6. Effects of controlled-frequency moderate electric fields on pectin methylesterase and polygalacturonase activities in tomato homogenate.

    PubMed

    Samaranayake, Chaminda P; Sastry, Sudhir K

    2016-05-15

    The effect of controlled-frequency moderate electric field treatments on pectin methylesterase and polygalcturonase activities in tomato homogenate was investigated by subjecting identically treated control and electrically-treated samples to the same temperature history. Additionally, a model was developed for the motion of the enzyme molecules subjected to an electric field. Results show that the application of electric fields at a low field strength (0.4V/cm) constant temperature (65°C) has a statistically significant effect on pectin methylesterase activity, typically at or lower than 60 Hz. At higher frequencies, the effects are negligible. Molecular motion simulations suggest that the efficacy at low frequencies may be due to the amplitude of motion being of the order of the intermolecular distance for water. Higher frequencies result in small overall displacements due to rapid reversals in the direction of motion. PMID:26775970

  7. REPRODUCTIVE CHANGES IN THE ESTUARINE FISH CUNNER (TAUTOGOLABRUS ADSPERSUS) EXPOSED TO 17B-ESTRDIOL AND ETHYLINYL ESTRADIOL IN THE LABORATORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Both 17 -estradiol and ethinyl estradiol are environmental estrogens that have been shown to cause estrogenic effects in fish collected from rivers receiving sewage treatment efHuent. Cunner (Tautogolabrus adspersus) are being studied in our laboratory to evaluate how 17 -estradi...

  8. Changes in ovarian function associated with circulating concentrations of estradiol prior to a GnRH-induced ovulation in beef cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous reports suggest increased circulating concentrations of estradiol prior to GnRH induced ovulation improved conception rates and pregnancy maintenance in beef cattle, and cultured granulosa cells from animals with high antral follicle numbers produced more estradiol and had increased express...

  9. Identification of changes in bovine oviductal mRNA expression by RNAseq from animals with high and low circulating estradiol concentrations during timed artificial insemination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Timed artificial insemination of beef cows with high concentrations of estradiol at time of insemination are known to impact pregnancy success by 27%±5% compared to animals with low estradiol. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms responsible for this biological variation is key to improving repro...

  10. Changes in ovarian function associated with circulating concentrations of estradiol prior to a GnRH-induced ovulation in beef cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    These studies were conducted to evaluate causes for differences in circulating concentrations of estradiol prior to a GnRH-induced ovulation and to determine if exogenous GnRH administration could alter LH secretion and subsequent follicular estradiol production. Beef cows (Experiment 1; n = 32, Ex...

  11. The influence of body condition on 17-beta estradiol levels in relation to vitellogenesis in female Vipera aspis (Reptilia, Viperidae).

    PubMed

    Bonnet, X; Naulleau, G; Mauget, R

    1994-03-01

    Seventy-six wild Vipera aspis females were caught over 3 years and placed in outdoor enclosures; 39 reproduced and 37 did not. Almost all the reproductive females had a body condition index (BCI) greater than 0.70 when vitellogenesis began. Monthly blood samples were taken by cardiac puncture. The main plasma parameters of vitellogenesis were measured by spectrophotometry: total plasma calcium, phosphorus, phospholipids, cholesterol, triglycerides, proteins, and albumin. Plasma 17-beta estradiol levels were determined by RIA. Vitellogenesis started soon after hibernation in reproductive females with very high 17-beta estradiol concentrations (average of 4.00 ng/ml) and there was a marked mobilization of maternal reserves (fat bodies, liver, and vertebral bone) associated with very high values of plasma calcium, phosphorus, phospholipids, cholesterol, triglycerides, and proteins. The kinetics of the main plasma components were described throughout the vitellogenesis period (from March to early June), when all plasma parameters differed markedly between reproductive and nonreproductive females. After ovulation, the differences between the two groups of females disappeared except in the case of albumin, which remained at a very low level in reproductive females for 6 months. All nonreproductive females had low 17-beta estradiol plasma levels during vitellogenesis (average of 0.08 ng/ml) and there was no suggestion of mobilization of maternal reserves. After vitellogenesis plasma concentrations of estradiol were low in reproductive (an average of 0.08 ng/ml) and in nonreproductive animals (0.06 ng/ml). Five nonreproductive females kept in the laboratory were estrogenized by 17-beta estradiol silastic implants. The 17-beta estradiol concentrations were close to those measured in reproductive females during vitellogenesis. Maternal reserves were mobilized, with almost all metabolic parameters exhibiting the vitellogenic pattern. When the silastic implants were removed

  12. Annual changes in fecal estradiol-17beta concentrations of the sun bear (Helarctos malayanus) in Sarawak, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Onuma, Manabu; Suzuki, Masatsugu; Uchida, Eiji; Niiyama, Masami; Ohtaishi, Noriyuki

    2002-04-01

    Fecal estradiol concentrations were measured in three captive unmated female sun bears (Helarctos malayanus) from August 1998 to July 1999 in Sarawak, Malaysia and vaginal smears from one of the females was observed in August 1998 and March 1999. A single peak in fecal estradiol concentration was obvious for each bear in August or September 1998, and there was a much higher percentage of superficial vaginal anuclear cells in August 1998 than in March 1999. These results suggest that sun bears in Sarawak are likely to be a seasonal breeder associated with a peak of estrogen production in August or September. PMID:12014574

  13. Resting state alpha frequency is associated with menstrual cycle phase, estradiol and use of oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Brötzner, Christina P; Klimesch, Wolfgang; Doppelmayr, Michael; Zauner, Andrea; Kerschbaum, Hubert H

    2014-08-19

    Ongoing intrinsic brain activity in resting, but awake humans is dominated by alpha oscillations. In human, individual alpha frequency (IAF) is associated with cognitive performance. Noticeable, performance in cognitive and emotional tasks in women is associated with menstrual cycle phase and sex hormone levels, respectively. In the present study, we correlated frequency of alpha oscillation in resting women with menstrual cycle phase, sex hormone level, or use of oral contraceptives. Electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded from 57 women (aged 24.07 ± 3.67 years) having a natural menstrual cycle as well as from 57 women (aged 22.37 ± 2.20 years) using oral contraceptives while they sat in an armchair with eyes closed. Alpha frequency was related to the menstrual cycle phase. Luteal women showed highest and late follicular women showed lowest IAF or center frequency. Furthermore, IAF as well as center frequency correlated negatively with endogenous estradiol level, but did not reveal an association with endogenous progesterone. Women using oral contraceptives showed an alpha frequency similar to women in the early follicular phase. We suggest that endogenous estradiol modulate resting alpha frequency. PMID:25010817

  14. Unilateral Erythema Nodosum following Norethindrone Acetate, Ethinyl Estradiol, and Ferrous Fumarate Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Min, Michelle S.; Fischer, Rob; Fournier, John B.

    2016-01-01

    Erythema nodosum is a septal panniculitis that typically presents as symmetric, tender nodules on the anterior aspects of bilateral lower extremities. Nearly half of cases are due to secondary causes, with oral contraceptive pills being the leading pharmaceutical cause. However, to our knowledge, there has yet to be a published association with norethindrone acetate, ethinyl estradiol, and ferrous fumarate. We report our experience with a 30-year-old woman who developed unilateral tender nodules within a month of starting 1 mg norethindrone acetate and 20 mcg ethinyl estradiol daily. Of note, she had previously taken oral contraceptives with the same estrogen agent but different progesterone, without problems. We conclude that systemically triggered erythema nodosum can present with lesions localized to one extremity. When a patient presents with tender, firm nodules, clinicians should consider the possibility of erythema nodosum and its triggers, such as oral contraceptives. Additionally, should a patient on hormonal therapy develop erythema nodosum, changing the progesterone agent may allow the patient to continue similar therapy without developing symptoms. PMID:27110414

  15. Pharmacodynamic assessment of dihydroxyprogesterone acetophenide plus estradiol enanthate as a monthly injectable contraceptive.

    PubMed

    Recio, R; Garza-Flores, J; Schiavon, R; Reyes, A; Diaz-Sanchez, V; Valles, V; Luz de la Cruz, D; Oropeza, G; Perez-Palacios, G

    1986-06-01

    The pharmacodynamics of the combination of dihydroxyprogesterone acetophenide (DHPA) and estradiol enanthate (E2-EN) following its intramuscular administration at two doses were studied in 16 healthy women of reproductive age. Subjects were randomly allocated in two groups: group I (n = 9) received the combination DHPA 150 mg + E2-EN 10 mg on three consecutive monthly injections, while group II (n = 7) received half-dose of the same formulation. Ovarian function and endometrial bleeding patterns were investigated in all participants for one pre-treatment cycle, three treatment intervals and two post-treatment cycles. The results disclosed that ovulation was inhibited for at least 30 days following DHPA/E2-EN administration in all participants from both groups. The circulating estradiol levels 30 days after last injection were slightly elevated as compared with those observed in normal early follicular phase. Return to ovulatory cycles was documented within 90 days after treatment. The length of the bleeding-free intervals during treatment was shortened in both groups, particularly in group II. No significant changes in HDL-cholesterol levels were observed throughout the study. It is envisaged however, that large modification of the formulation and additional long-term safety studies will be required prior to its recommendation. PMID:3769482

  16. Endurance training associated with slightly lowered serum estradiol levels decreases mineral density of canine skeleton.

    PubMed

    Puustjärvi, K; Karjalainen, P; Nieminen, J; Arokoski, J; Parviainen, M; Helminen, H J; Soimakallio, S

    1992-06-01

    The effects of long-term running exercise were studied in 20 beagle dogs. A total of 10 dogs ran from the age of 15 weeks to the age of 70 weeks in a progressive program for up to 40 km/day. A total of 10 sister dogs spent the study period in individual cages. When the dogs were 70 weeks old, bone mineral density of the vertebrae, hip, and radius was analyzed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA; Lunar) and the vertebrae were also assessed by quantitative computed tomography (QCT; Siemens DR 1). Mineral density was lower in the running dogs than in the controls. The difference was greatest in the spine in the QCT analysis. Blood chemistry analyses revealed that the metabolism of the bone was significantly accelerated. The estradiol levels showed the trend to be reduced in the running group. The beneficial effect of exercise on mineral density has been shown in many earlier studies. However, in this study we demonstrate the possibility of adverse effects of long-term exercise on bone tissue. The change was associated with a decrease of serum estradiol level. PMID:1414479

  17. Clozapine and risperidone influence on cortisol and estradiol levels in male patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Piriu, G; Torac, E; Gaman, L E; Iosif, L; Tivig, I C; Delia, C; Gilca, M; Stoian, I; Atanasiu, V

    2015-01-01

    Estrogens role in schizophrenia patients is a subject, which has gained an increased attention from the medical community. Estrogens have been shown to inhibit dopamine actions, improve neuronal regeneration, and overall, have a protective role in the pathology of schizophrenia. The adjunctive estrogen therapy for men is currently under debate. Antipsychotic medication is known to influence the hypothalamo-hypophyseal - gonadal axis by inducing variable degrees of hyperprolactinemia. Several studies have found that some of the atypical antipsychotics lower cortisol levels in patients and also in healthy controls. We have investigated the effects of clozapine and risperidone on estradiol levels in men with schizophrenia. We have also evaluated the levels of prolactin and cortisol, taking into account the possible influence of antipsychotic drugs on both these hormones. Both prolactin and cortisol also have the potential to regulate sexual hormones biosynthesis. Our study found decreased estradiol levels in men with schizophrenia treated with clozapine and risperidone, while prolactin levels were increased only in the risperidone treated group. Cortisol levels are not statistically significant different between groups. PMID:26664488

  18. Estradiol rapidly modulates spinogenesis in hippocampal dentate gyrus: Involvement of kinase networks.

    PubMed

    Hojo, Yasushi; Munetomo, Arisa; Mukai, Hideo; Ikeda, Muneki; Sato, Rei; Hatanaka, Yusuke; Murakami, Gen; Komatsuzaki, Yoshimasa; Kimoto, Tetsuya; Kawato, Suguru

    2015-08-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Estradiol and cognition". Estradiol (E2) is locally synthesized within the hippocampus and the gonads. Rapid modulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity by E2 is essential for synaptic regulation. The molecular mechanisms of modulation through the synaptic estrogen receptor (ER) and its downstream signaling, however, are largely unknown in the dentate gyrus (DG). We investigated the E2-induced modulation of dendritic spines in male adult rat hippocampal slices by imaging Lucifer Yellow-injected DG granule cells. Treatments with 1 nM E2 increased the density of spines by approximately 1.4-fold within 2h. Spine head diameter analysis showed that the density of middle-head spines (0.4-0.5 μm) was significantly increased. The E2-induced spine density increase was suppressed by blocking Erk MAPK, PKA, PKC and LIMK. These suppressive effects by kinase inhibitors are not non-specific ones because the GSK-3β antagonist did not inhibit E2-induced spine increase. The ER antagonist ICI 182,780 also blocked the E2-induced spine increase. Taken together, these results suggest that E2 rapidly increases the density of spines through kinase networks that are driven by synaptic ER. PMID:26122288

  19. Effect of vinca alkaloids on ERalpha levels and estradiol-induced responses in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Campa, Carlos; Casado, Pedro; Rodríguez, René; Zuazua, Pedro; García-Pedrero, Juana M; Lazo, Pedro S; Ramos, Sofía

    2006-07-01

    Vinca alkaloids (VAs) such as Vincristine, Vinblastine and Vinorelbine are antineoplastic drugs that inhibit tubulin polymerisation into microtubules, induce mitotic G2/M arrest, activate c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and induce apoptosis. Although there are many studies evaluating the effect of VAs on breast cancer patients, until now little was known about how these compounds and estradiol signaling pathways might interfere. In this report, we show for the first time that VAs decreased ERalpha protein levels in the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7; VAs induced a parallel decrease in estrogen receptor mRNA. All the VAs tested inhibited estradiol (E2) mediated transactivation at ERE-driven promoters. E2 inhibited VAs-induced AP1 stimulation in MCF-7, but this inhibition was not observed when E2 is added 24 h in advance of VAs treatment. In contrast to the reported preventing effect over taxol-mediated apoptosis, E2 did not prevent VAs-induced cell death and interestingly, addition of E2 24 hours in advance of VAs treatment resulted in an increase of the number of cells undergoing apoptosis. Similar results were observed when E2 is replaced by other proliferation signals such as EGF. These results demonstrate that in the breast cancer cell-line MCF-7, E2-induced proliferation before VAs treatment enhances the apoptotical response to VAs which might have important implications in clinica. PMID:16555127

  20. Noncontraceptive benefits of the estradiol valerate/dienogest combined oral contraceptive: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Nappi, Rossella E; Serrani, Marco; Jensen, Jeffrey T

    2014-01-01

    Combined oral contraceptives formulated to include estradiol (E2) have recently become available for the indication of pregnancy prevention. A combined estradiol valerate and dienogest pill (E2V/DNG), designed to be administered using an estrogen step-down and a progestin step-up regimen over 26 days of active treatment followed by 2 days of placebo (26/2-day regimen), has also undergone research to assess the potential for additional noncontraceptive benefits. Randomized, placebo-controlled studies have demonstrated that E2V/DNG is an effective treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding – a reduction in median menstrual blood loss approaching 90% occurs after 6 months of treatment. To date, E2V/DNG is the only oral contraceptive approved for this indication. Comparator studies have also demonstrated a reduction in hormone withdrawal-associated symptoms in users of E2V/DNG compared with a conventional 21/7-day regimen of ethinylestradiol/levonorgestrel. Other potential noncontraceptive benefits associated with E2V/DNG, like improvement in dysmenorrhea, sexual function, and quality of life, are comparable with those associated with other combined oral contraceptives and are discussed further in this review. PMID:25120376

  1. Bisphenol A exposure reduces the estradiol response to gonadotropin stimulation during in vitro fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Michael S.; Kim, Dongsul; vom Saal, Frederick S.; Taylor, Julia A.; Cheng, Gloria; Lamb, Julie D.; Fujimoto, Victor Y.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Investigate associations between serum BPA concentrations and follicular response to exogenous ovary stimulation. Design Fasting serum was prospectively collected on the day of oocyte retrieval and assessed for unconjugated BPA using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with Coularray detection. Multivariable linear regression and negative binomial regression were used to assess associations between concentrations of BPA and outcome measures. Models were adjusted for race/ethnicity, antral follicle count at baseline, and cigarette smoking. Setting A reproductive health center. Patients Forty-four women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF). Main outcome measures Peak-estradiol level (E2) and the number of oocytes retrieved during IVF. Results The median unconjugated serum BPA concentration is 2.53 ng/ml (range 0.3–67.36 ng/ml). Bisphenol A is inversely associated with E2 (β=−0.16; 95% confidence interval (CI) −0.32, 0.01), as well as with E2 normalized to the number of mature-sized follicles at the hCG trigger (β=−0.14; 95%CI −0.24, −0.03). No association is observed for BPA and the number of oocytes retrieved (adjusted risk ratio=0.95; 95%CI 0.82, 1.10). Conclusions Bisphenol A is associated with a reduced estradiol response during IVF. Although limited by the preliminary nature of this study, these results merit confirmation in a future comprehensive investigation. PMID:21813122

  2. Tamoxifen counteracts estradiol induced effects on striatal and hypophyseal dopamine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Ferretti, C.; Blengio, M.; Ghi, P.; Racca, S.; Genazzani, E.; Portaleone, P.

    1988-01-01

    We investigated the ability of Tamoxifen (TAM), an antiestrogen drug, to counteract the modification induced by estrogens on dopamine (DA) receptors on striatum and on adenohypophysis of ovex female rats. Subacute treatment with 17..beta..-estradiol (E/sub 2/) at both low (0.1 ..mu..g/kg) and high (20 ..mu..g/kg) doses confirmed its ability to increase the number of striatal /sup 3/H-Spiperone (/sup 3/H-SPI) binding sites in a dose dependent manner. By contrast in the pituitary, only high doses of estrogen were effective in reducing the number of DA receptors. We treated ovex female rats for 15 days with TAM alone or associated with E/sub 2/, to see if these estrogenic effects could be suppressed by an antiestrogenic drug. TAM did not affect the number of striatal DA receptors, but significantly increased the adenohypophy-seal DA binding sites, without varying their affinity. No changes were observed in pituitary and striatal DA receptor density, even when TAM was injected in association with estradiol. In conclusions: TAM is able to counteract the effects estrogens have on DA receptors. However there is some evidence that it could influence the pituitary DA systems independently of it antiestrogenic activity.

  3. The effect of a progesterone/estradiol ear implant on the performance of young beef steers.

    PubMed

    Boyazoglu, P A; Palmer, C; Campbell, M C; Mankgeli, M R

    1992-03-01

    A progesterone/estradiol ear implant was tested over a 84 d feedlot period on 96 young Bonsmara steers which were randomly allocated to implant and control groups. Animals were adapted over 5 d to a complete feed formulated to South African feedlot standards. Health aberrations were observed and feed intake, mass gain and slaughter data were recorded. The implant group elicited a 23.2 kg gain per animal (P less than 0.01). Mean treatment feed intakes varied marginally but the implant group showed a 14.91% feed to gain improvement over controls. Warm carcass dressing percentage showed an overall improvement of 4.96% for both groups. Bloat incidence was calculated at 0.98% over 8,064 cattle feedlot days. Mortality was 2.08% and 12 animals were considered to be chronic bloaters. This may have been due to the high proportion of fine particles in the diet. A composite feed sample revealed that 62.48% consisted of particle lengths of 0.5-4mm. The effect of this on ruminal health is briefly discussed. It is concluded that the progesterone/estradiol implant provided greater mass gain and improved feed to gain ratios for treated steers over a control group. PMID:1569536

  4. Unilateral Erythema Nodosum following Norethindrone Acetate, Ethinyl Estradiol, and Ferrous Fumarate Combination Therapy.

    PubMed

    Min, Michelle S; Fischer, Rob; Fournier, John B

    2016-01-01

    Erythema nodosum is a septal panniculitis that typically presents as symmetric, tender nodules on the anterior aspects of bilateral lower extremities. Nearly half of cases are due to secondary causes, with oral contraceptive pills being the leading pharmaceutical cause. However, to our knowledge, there has yet to be a published association with norethindrone acetate, ethinyl estradiol, and ferrous fumarate. We report our experience with a 30-year-old woman who developed unilateral tender nodules within a month of starting 1 mg norethindrone acetate and 20 mcg ethinyl estradiol daily. Of note, she had previously taken oral contraceptives with the same estrogen agent but different progesterone, without problems. We conclude that systemically triggered erythema nodosum can present with lesions localized to one extremity. When a patient presents with tender, firm nodules, clinicians should consider the possibility of erythema nodosum and its triggers, such as oral contraceptives. Additionally, should a patient on hormonal therapy develop erythema nodosum, changing the progesterone agent may allow the patient to continue similar therapy without developing symptoms. PMID:27110414

  5. Estradiol Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to treat and prevent hot flushes (hot flashes; sudden strong feelings of heat and sweating) in ... and cause problems with the skin or nervous system) or gallbladder, thyroid, liver, pancreas, or kidney disease. ...

  6. Rainfall and tillage effects on transport of fecal bacteria and sex hormones 17beta-estradiol and testosterone from broiler litter applications to a Georgia Piedmont Ultisol.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Michael B; Truman, Clint C; Siragusa, Gregory; Line, Eric; Bailey, J Stan; Frye, Jonathan; Endale, Dinku M; Franklin, Dorcas H; Schomberg, Harry H; Fisher, Dwight S; Sharpe, Ronald R

    2008-09-15

    Poultry litter provides nutrients for crop and pasture production; however, it also contains fecal bacteria, sex hormones (17beta-estradiol and testosterone) and antibiotic residues that may contaminate surface waters. Our objective was to quantify transport of fecal bacteria, estradiol, testosterone and antibiotic residues from a Cecil sandy loam managed since 1991 under no-till (NT) and conventional tillage (CT) to which either poultry litter (PL) or conventional fertilizer (CF) was applied based on the nitrogen needs of corn (Zea mays L) in the Southern Piedmont of NE Georgia. Simulated rainfall was applied for 60 min to 2 by 3-m field plots at a constant rate in 2004 and variable rate in 2005. Runoff was continuously measured and subsamples taken for determining flow-weighted concentrations of fecal bacteria, hormones, and antibiotic residues. Neither Salmonella, nor Campylobacter, nor antimicrobial residues were detected in litter, soil, or runoff. Differences in soil concentrations of fecal bacteria before and after rainfall simulations were observed only for Escherichia coli in the constant rainfall intensity experiment. Differences in flow-weighted concentrations were observed only for testosterone in both constant and variable intensity rainfall experiments, and were greatest for treatments that received poultry litter. Total loads of E. coli and fecal enterococci, were largest for both tillage treatments receiving poultry litter for the variable rainfall intensity. Load of testosterone was greatest for no-till plots receiving poultry litter under variable rainfall intensity. Poultry litter application rates commensurate for corn appeared to enhance only soil concentrations of E. coli, and runoff concentrations of testosterone above background levels. PMID:18571694

  7. Haemostatic effects of a new combined oral contraceptive, nomegestrol acetate/17β-estradiol, compared with those of levonorgestrel/ethinyl estradiol. A double-blind, randomised study.

    PubMed

    Gaussem, Pascale; Alhenc-Gelas, Martine; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Bachelot-Loza, Christilla; Remones, Veronique; Ali, Fouad Dali; Aiach, Martine; Scarabin, Pierre-Yves

    2011-03-01

    Use of oral contraceptives (OC) that combine a progestogen with synthetic ethinyl estradiol (EE) is associated with increased risk of venous thromboembolism. NOMAC/E2 is a new monophasic OC that combines nomegestrol acetate (NOMAC), a highly selective progestogen, with 17β-estradiol (E2). The study objective was to compare the effects on markers of haemostasis of NOMAC/E2 (2.5 mg/1.5 mg) versus the second-generation OC, levonorgestrel (LNG)/EE (100 μg/20 μg). Healthy women (age 18-38 years) received once-daily treatment for three consecutive 28-day cycles in a double-blind, randomised study: either NOMAC/E2 for 24 days with a four-day placebo interval (n=45) or LNG/EE for 21 days with a seven-day placebo interval (n=45) per cycle. Mean changes from baseline to end-of-treatment in coagulation markers, including prothrombin fragment 1+2 (primary endpoint), fibrinolysis markers and platelet functions were assessed. Mean prothrombin fragment 1+2 levels (primary endpoint) did not increase with NOMAC/E2 compared with LNG/EE ( -0.02 vs. +0.08 nM, p<0.01). Other significant differences between NOMAC/E2 and LNG/EE were mean changes in antithrombin (+0.3% vs. -4.4%, p<0.001), activated protein C resistance - normalised ratio (+0.20 vs. +0.46, p<0.01), D-dimer ( -53 vs. +43 ng/ml, p<0.001), plasminogen (+6% vs. +30%, p<0.0001) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 ( -3.1 vs. -8.0 ng/ml, p<0.001). There was no effect of either treatment on platelet aggregation. The NOMAC/E2 pill regimen has fewer adverse effects on blood biological coagulation and fibrinolysis markers than LNG/EE. This suggests that NOMAC/E2 could have a more favourable venous thromboembolism risk profile than LNG/EE; further epidemiological data are required to confirm this. PMID:21225090

  8. [Biological and health effects on electric and magnetic fields at extremely low frequencies].

    PubMed

    Torregrossa, M V

    2005-01-01

    While the enormous benefits of using electricity in everyday life and health care are unquestioned, during the past 20 years the general public has become increasingly concerned about potential adverse health effects of exposure to electric and magnetic fields at extremely low frequencies (ELF). Such exposures arise mainly from the transmission and use of electrical energy at the power frequencies of 50/60 Hz. The international scientific community is addressing the associated health issues through in vitro, in vivo and epidemiological studies, although present research results are often contradictory. The purpose of this paper is to provide information about the possible impacts of exposure to electric and magnetic field at ELF frequencies on health within the community and the workplace. Information comes from recent research studies on this subject and from epidemiological pooled studies recently reviewed by eminent authorities. PMID:16353681

  9. Gravitational Effects on Near Field Flow Structure of Low Density Gas Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, D. W.; Yep, T. W.; Agrawal, A. K.

    2005-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in Earth gravity and microgravity to acquire quantitative data on near field flow structure of helium jets injected into air. Microgravity conditions were simulated in the 2.2- second drop tower at NASA Glenn Research Center. The jet flow was observed by quantitative rainbow schlieren deflectometry, a non-intrusive line of site measurement technique for the whole field. The flow structure was characterized by distributions of angular deflection and helium mole percentage obtained from color schlieren images taken at 60 Hz. Results show that the jet in microgravity was up to 70 percent wider than that in Earth gravity. The global jet flow oscillations observed in Earth gravity were absent in microgravity, providing direct experimental evidence that the flow instability in the low density jet was buoyancy induced. The paper provides quantitative details of temporal flow evolution as the experiment undergoes change in gravity in the drop tower.

  10. Gravitational Effects on Near Field Flow Structure of Low Density Gas Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yep, Tze-Wing; Agrawal, Ajay K.; Griffin, DeVon; Salzman, Jack (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in Earth gravity and microgravity to acquire quantitative data on near field flow structure of helium jets injected into air. Microgravity conditions were simulated in the 2.2-second drop tower at NASA Glenn Research Center. The jet flow was observed by quantitative rainbow schlieren deflectometry, a non-intrusive line of site measurement technique for the whole field. The flow structure was characterized by distributions of angular deflection and helium mole percentage obtained from color schlieren images taken at 60 Hz. Results show that the jet flow was significantly influenced by the gravity. The jet in microgravity was up to 70 percent wider than that in Earth gravity. The jet flow oscillations observed in Earth gravity were absent in microgravity, providing direct experimental evidence that the flow instability in the low density jet was buoyancy induced. The paper provides quantitative details of temporal flow evolution as the experiment undergoes a change in gravity in the drop tower.

  11. Reproduction, growth, and development of rats during exposure to electric fields at multiple strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E. )

    1991-11-01

    A study with multiple exposure groups and large group sizes was performed to establish whether exposure to 60-Hz electric fields would result in reproductive and development toxicity. Female rats were mated, and sperm-positive animals randomly distributed among four groups: sham-exposed, or exposed to 10, 65, or 130 kV/m, 60-Hz vertical electric fields. During gestation, exposure to the higher field strengths resulted in slightly depressed weight gains of dams. Numbers ofpups per litter and pup mortality did not differ among the exposure groups. Dams exposed at 65 kV/m lost slightly more weight through the lactation period than the control group. Male pups exposed to high field strengths gained slightly less weight from 4 to 21 days of age than did sham exposed animals. At weaning, two F{sub 1} females per litter continued on the same exposure regimen, were mated at 11 weeks of age to unexposed males, and sacrificed at 20 days of gestation. Fertility and gestational weight gain of F{sub 1} females were not affected by exposure, nor was prenatal viability or fetal body weight. No significant increase in the incidence of litters with malformations was observed. Although no developmental toxicity was detected, exposures produced physical changes in the dams, evidenced as a rust-colored deposit on the muzzle and ears (chromodacryorrhea) that increased in incidence and severity at 65 and 130 kV/m. Incidence of chromodacryorrhea was not significantly different between sham-exposed rats and those exposed at 10 kV/m. 29 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Prospective case-control study of premenopausal serum estradiol and testosterone levels and breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer is frequently a hormonally dependent cancer, and associations of circulating estrogens and androgens with subsequent breast cancer risk are well established in postmenopausal women. Associations of serum estrogens and androgens with breast cancer risk in premenopausal women are less well studied. The objective of this study was to determine whether estradiol and testosterone levels in serum collected before menopause are associated with subsequent breast cancer risk. Methods We conducted a prospective case-control study of 266 participants who were registered in the Columbia, Missouri, Serum Bank and not using exogenous hormones at the time of blood collection. Each of 98 in situ or invasive breast cancer cases with prediagnostic serum collected before menopause was matched to two controls by age, date, menstrual cycle day, and time of day of blood collection. Estradiol and testosterone concentrations were quantified by using specific radioimmunoassays, and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) was quantified with a chemiluminescent immunoassay to allow calculation of the non-SHBG bound hormone fractions. Data were analyzed by using conditional logistic regression. All tests of statistical significance were two-sided. Results Serum testosterone was strongly and significantly associated with breast cancer risk. The relative odds (OR) for increasing quartiles of total testosterone were 1.0, 2.1 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.9 to 4.8), 1.5 (95% CI, 0.6 to 3.4), and 3.3 (95% CI, 1.5 to 7.5, Ptrend = 0.006). Comparable ORs for the non-SHBG bound fraction of testosterone that is bioavailable were 1.0, 1.7 (95% CI, 0.7 to 4.2), 1.7 (95% CI, 0.7 to 4.0), and 4.2 (95% CI, 1.6 to 10.9, Ptrend = 0.002). Total and non-SHBG-bound estradiol were not associated with breast cancer, but extreme variation in levels across the menstrual cycle coupled with relatively small numbers, particularly for analyses stratified by cycle phase, limited the power to

  13. Comparing biological effects and potencies of estrone and 17 B-estradiol in mature fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence of endocrine active compounds such as estrogens in treated wastewater effluent and their effects on aquatic life are causing concern among aquatic resource managers. In contrast to 17B-estradiol (E2), the steroid hormone produced by all vertebrates, the biological effects of estrone (E1...

  14. Increased circulating estradiol in mice fed a high-fat diet does not attenuate ovariectomy-induced bone structural deterioration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ovariectomy-induced estrogen deficiency increases adiposity and induces substantial bone loss by increasing osteoclast activity. This study investigated whether obesity induced by a high-fat diet alter circulating estradiol levels, mitigates or exacerbates bone structure deterioration, and changes m...

  15. Seasonal changes in 17-ß estradiol of the Rio Grande Chub (Gila pandora) in south-central New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caldwell, Colleen A.; Fuller, S. Adam; Gould, William R.; Turner, Paul R.; Hallford, Dennis M.

    2004-01-01

    Timing of gametogensis and thus spawning can be inferred through changes in plasma concentrations of gonadal hormones. In preparation for ovulation and spawning, mean concentrations of 17ß-estradiol in a population of Rio Grande chub (Gila pandora) occupying the Rio Bonito, New Mexico, peaked at 37.6 ng/mL on 16 June and declined to 1.50 ng/mL by 11 August. Similarly, the gonadal somatic index (GSI) increased from 9.02 on 21 May (n = 9) to 11.85 on 16 June (n = 2) and declined to 6.10 on 11 August (n = 2). Peak concentrations of 17ß-estradiol and elevated GSI in June coincided with peak daylength for the year (14 h and 12 min) and average water temperature of 15.1°C. Concentrations of 17ß-estradiol remained low through 3 October indicating no additional spawning events in the Rio Grande chub population. We demonstrated 17ß-estradiol is a nondestructive and thus useful tool in estimating timing of spawning in a wild fish population.

  16. Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), nitric oxide metabolite, and estradiol levels in serum and peritoneal fluid in women with endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Kianpour, Maryam; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi; Ahmadi, Sayad Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Increase in nitric oxide (NO) concentration accompanied by alteration in peritoneal immune defense reactions is involved in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. Asymmetric dimethylarginine is an endogenous competitive inhibitor of NO synthase. This study was designed to compare NO metabolite (nitrite), asymmetric dimethylarginine, and estradiol concentrations in serum and peritoneal fluid (PF) of patients with and without endometriosis. Materials and Methods: Subjects were assigned to two groups based on their laparoscopic results. The groups consisted of women with and without endometriosis (90 and 89 participants, respectively). The serum and peritoneal levels of nitrite (stable NO metabolite), asymmetric dimethylarginine, and estradiol were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. These parameters were analyzed and compared between the groups statistically using SPSS software version 16. Results: Both nitrite and asymmetric dimethylarginine levels were significantly higher in the serum of the participants from both groups than those in the PF group (P < 0.05). However, no significant difference in the asymmetric dimethylarginine level was detected between the two groups. In addition, the PF level of nitrite increased significantly in patients with endometriosis when compared with non-endometriosis subjects (P < 0.05). The PF levels of estradiol in both groups were significantly higher than the serum levels of estradiol (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The NO metabolite level of PF implies the possible role of NO in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. PMID:26257805

  17. Rainfall timing effect on concentrations of testosterone and estradiol in surface runoff from broiler litter applied to grassed plots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Broiler litter contains the sex hormones testosterone and estradiol, which may contaminate surface runoff following litter application to grasslands. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of runoff occurring at different times after litter application and under different environmental con...

  18. Sorption of bisphenol A, 17a-ethinyl estradiol and phenanthrene on thermally and hydrothermally produced biochars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, organic contaminant removal potential of biochars made from various agricultural residuals was investigated through sorption experiments. The model pollutants include endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) such as common estrogenic compounds, bisphenol A (BPA) and 17a-ethinyl estradiol...

  19. Effects of ultrasound on estradiol level, bone mineral density, bone biomechanics and matrix metalloproteinase-13 expression in ovariectomized rabbits

    PubMed Central

    XIA, LU; HE, HONGCHEN; GUO, HUA; QING, YUXI; HE, CHENG-QI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to observe the effect of ultrasound (US) on estradiol level, bone mineral density (BMD), bone biomechanics and matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) expression in ovariectomized (OVX) rabbits. A total of 28 virgin New Zealand white rabbits were randomly assigned into the following groups: Control (control group), ovariectomy (OVX group), ovariectomy with ultrasound therapy (US group) and ovariectomy with estrogen replacement therapy group (ERT group). At 8 weeks after ovariectomy, the US group received ultrasound treatment while the ERT group were orally treated with conjugated estrogens, and the control and OVX groups remained untreated. The estradiol level, BMD and bone biomechanics, cartilage histology and the MMP-13 expression were analyzed after the intervention. The results indicate that the US treatment increased estradiol level, BMD and bone biomechanical function. Furthermore, the US treatment appeared to improve the recovery of cartilage morphology and decreased the expression of MMP-13 in OVX models. Furthermore, the results suggest that 10 days of US therapy was sufficient to prevent the reduction of estradiol, BMD and bone biomechanical function, to protect osteoarthritis cartilage structure, and to reduce MMP-13 transcription and expression in OVX rabbits. Therefore, US treatment may be a potential treatment for postmenopausal osteoarthritis and osteoporosis. PMID:26622502

  20. INDUCTION OF ZONA RADIATA PROTEINS AND VITELLOGENINS IN ESTRADIOL AND NONYLPHENOL EXPOSED MALE SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS (CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Knoebl, Iris, Michael J. Hemmer and Nancy D. Denslow. 2004. Induction of Zona Radiata Proteins and Vitellogenins in Estradiol and Nonylphenol Exposed Male Sheepshead Minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus). Mar. Environ. Res. 58(2-5):547-551. (ERL,GB X1059).

    Several genes normall...