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Sample records for 64-slice multidetector ct

  1. 64 Slice multi-detector row cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    Pannu, Harpreet K; Johnson, Pamela T; Fishman, Elliot K

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac imaging is feasible with multi-detector row (MDCT) scanners. Coronary arterial anatomy and both non-calcified and calcified plaques are depicted at CT coronary angiography. Vessel wall pathology and luminal diameter are depicted, and secondary myocardial changes may also be seen. Diagnostic capacity has increased with technological advancement, and preliminary investigations confirm the utility of 64-MDCT in low- and intermediate-risk patients who present to the emergency department with acute chest pain. The clinical indications, 64-MDCT technique, and MDCT findings in coronary artery disease are reviewed. PMID:18941811

  2. Imaging of Herniated Discs of the Cervical Spine: Inter-Modality Differences between 64-Slice Multidetector CT and 1.5-T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ji Sook; Han, Jong Kyu; Kim, Hyun-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess inter-modality variability when evaluating cervical intervertebral disc herniation using 64-slice multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods Three musculoskeletal radiologists independently reviewed cervical spine 1.5-T MRI and 64-slice MDCT data on C2-3 though C6-7 of 51 patients in the context of intervertebral disc herniation. Interobserver and inter-modality agreements were expressed as unweighted kappa values. Weighted kappa statistics were used to assess the extents of agreement in terms of the number of involved segments (NIS) in disc herniation and epicenter measurements collected using MDCT and MRI. Results The interobserver agreement rates upon evaluation of disc morphology by the three radiologists were in fair to moderate agreement (k = 0.39-0.53 for MDCT images; k = 0.45-0.56 for MRIs). When the disc morphology was categorized into two and four grades, the inter-modality agreement rates were moderate (k-value, 0.59) and substantial (k-value, 0.66), respectively. The inter-modality agreements for evaluations of the NIS (k-value, 0.78) and the epicenter (k-value, 0.79) were substantial. Also, the interobserver agreements for the NIS (CT; k-value, 0.85 and MRI; k-value, 0.88) and epicenter (CT; k-value, 0.74 and MRI; k-value, 0.70) evaluations by two readers were substantial. MDCT tended to underestimate the extent of herniated disc lesions compared with MRI. Conclusion Multidetector-row computed tomography and MRI showed a moderate-to-substantial degree of inter-modality agreement for the assessment of herniated cervical discs. MDCT images have a tendency to underestimate the anterior/posterior extent of the herniated disc compared with MRI. PMID:26175589

  3. Role of 64 slice multidetector computed tomography and angiography to establish relationship between tumor size, aneurysm formation and spontaneous rupture of renal angiomyolipomas: Single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Shruti P.; Pal, Bipin Chandra; Patel, Kajal N.; Sutariya, Harsh; Trivedi, Hargovind L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the role of computed tomography (CT) angiography using 64 slice multidetector CT scan to establish relationships among tumor size, aneurysm formation, and spontaneous rupture of renal angiomyolipomas (AML). Materials and Methods: Total 27 patients were diagnosed as having renal angiomyolipoma (AML) at institute of kidney disease and research center from June 2008 to June 2015. All patients with renal AML underwent contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) with CT angiography with 64 slice multidetector CT scan. Results: Total 34 kidneys were found to be affected by AML. Out of which 6 AML were ruptured and remaining 28 were unruptured. If tumor size of 4 cm or larger is used as predictor of rupture; sensitivity 20%, specificity 89%, positive predictive value 83.3%, and negative predictive value 28.5%; and If aneurysm size >5 mm is used as predictor of rupture; sensitivity 75%, specificity 90%, positive predictive value 50%, and negative predictive value 96.4% was found. Conclusion: Tumor size, aneurysm size and tumor multiplicity cannot use as a predictor of spontaneous rupture of the tumor. PMID:27141187

  4. Radiation dose evaluation in 64-slice CT examinations with adult and paediatric anthropomorphic phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, K; Aoyama, T; Yamauchi-Kawaura, C; Koyama, S; Yamauchi, M; Ko, S; Akahane, K; Nishizawa, K

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the organ dose and effective dose to patients undergoing routine adult and paediatric CT examinations with 64-slice CT scanners and to compare the doses with those from 4-, 8- and 16-multislice CT scanners. Patient doses were measured with small (<7 mm wide) silicon photodiode dosemeters (34 in total), which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within adult and 6-year-old child anthropomorphic phantoms. Output signals from photodiode dosemeters were read on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed. For the adult phantom, organ doses (for organs within the scan range) and effective doses were 8–35 mGy and 7–18 mSv, respectively, for chest CT, and 12–33 mGy and 10–21 mSv, respectively, for abdominopelvic CT. For the paediatric phantom, organ and effective doses were 4–17 mGy and 3–7 mSv, respectively, for chest CT, and 5–14 mGy and 3–9 mSv, respectively, for abdominopelvic CT. Doses to organs at the boundaries of the scan length were higher for 64-slice CT scanners using large beam widths and/or a large pitch because of the larger extent of over-ranging. The CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose–length product (DLP) and the effective dose values using 64-slice CT for the adult and paediatric phantoms were the same as those obtained using 4-, 8- and 16-slice CT. Conversion factors of DLP to the effective dose by International Commission on Radiological Protection 103 were 0.024 mSv⋅mGy−1⋅cm−1 and 0.019 mSv⋅mGy−1⋅cm−1 for adult chest and abdominopelvic CT scans, respectively. PMID:19934069

  5. Radiation dose evaluation in 64-slice CT examinations with adult and paediatric anthropomorphic phantoms.

    PubMed

    Fujii, K; Aoyama, T; Yamauchi-Kawaura, C; Koyama, S; Yamauchi, M; Ko, S; Akahane, K; Nishizawa, K

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the organ dose and effective dose to patients undergoing routine adult and paediatric CT examinations with 64-slice CT scanners and to compare the doses with those from 4-, 8- and 16-multislice CT scanners. Patient doses were measured with small (<7 mm wide) silicon photodiode dosemeters (34 in total), which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within adult and 6-year-old child anthropomorphic phantoms. Output signals from photodiode dosemeters were read on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed. For the adult phantom, organ doses (for organs within the scan range) and effective doses were 8-35 mGy and 7-18 mSv, respectively, for chest CT, and 12-33 mGy and 10-21 mSv, respectively, for abdominopelvic CT. For the paediatric phantom, organ and effective doses were 4-17 mGy and 3-7 mSv, respectively, for chest CT, and 5-14 mGy and 3-9 mSv, respectively, for abdominopelvic CT. Doses to organs at the boundaries of the scan length were higher for 64-slice CT scanners using large beam widths and/or a large pitch because of the larger extent of over-ranging. The CT dose index (CTDI(vol)), dose-length product (DLP) and the effective dose values using 64-slice CT for the adult and paediatric phantoms were the same as those obtained using 4-, 8- and 16-slice CT. Conversion factors of DLP to the effective dose by International Commission on Radiological Protection 103 were 0.024 mSvmGy(-1)cm(-1) and 0.019 mSvmGy(-1)cm(-1) for adult chest and abdominopelvic CT scans, respectively. PMID:19934069

  6. Performance evaluation of a 64-slice CT system with z-flying focal spot.

    PubMed

    Flohr, T; Stierstorfer, K; Raupach, R; Ulzheimer, S; Bruder, H

    2004-12-01

    The meanwhile established generation of 16-slice CT systems enables routine sub-millimeter imaging at short breath-hold times. Clinical progress in the development of multidetector row CT (MDCT) technology beyond 16 slices can more likely be expected from further improvement in spatial and temporal resolution rather than from a mere increase in the speed of volume coverage. We present an evaluation of a recently introduced 64-slice CT system (SOMATOM Sensation 64, Siemens AG, Forchheim, Germany), which uses a periodic motion of the focal spot in longitudinal direction (z-flying focal spot) to double the number of simultaneously acquired slices. This technique acquires 64 overlapping 0.6 mm slices per rotation. The sampling scheme corresponds to that of a 64 x 0.3 mm detector, with the goal of improved longitudinal resolution and reduced spiral artifacts. After an introduction to the detector design, we discuss the basics of z-flying focal spot technology (z-Sharp). We present phantom and specimen scans for performance evaluation. The measured full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the thinnest spiral slice is 0.65 mm. All spiral slice widths are almost independent of the pitch, with deviations of less than 0.1 mm from the nominal value. Using a high-resolution bar pattern phantom (CATPHAN, Phantom Laboratories, Salem, NY), the longitudinal resolution can be demonstrated to be up to 15 lp/cm at the isocenter independent of the pitch, corresponding to a bar diameter of 0.33 mm. Longitudinal resolution is only slightly degraded for off-center locations. At a distance of 100 mm from the isocenter, 14 lp/cm can be resolved in the z-direction, corresponding to a bar diameter of 0.36 mm. Spiral "windmill" artifacts presenting as hyper- and hypodense structures around osseous edges are effectively reduced by the z-flying focal spot technique. Cardiac scanning benefits from the short gantry rotation time of 0.33 s, providing up to 83 ms temporal resolution with 2-segment ECG

  7. Detection of plaque rupture using 64-slice multidetector row computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Reimann, Anja J; Beck, Torsten; Heuschmid, Martin; Brodoefel, Harald; Burgstahler, Christof; Schröder, Stephen; Kopp, Andreas F

    2008-01-01

    The present case report describes a 37-year-old man who presented to the emergency room with symptoms of a myocardial infarction but no high-grade stenosis on conventional catheter angiography. Consecutive multi-detector row computed tomography of the coronary arteries showed an intimal flap along a fibrous plaque formation in the left anterior descending artery. This finding was found to represent a plaque rupture, and the lesion was treated with an 18 mm stent. Multidetector row computed tomography helped to correctly position the stent by identifying the exact location of the rupture along the long plaque formation. PMID:18340394

  8. Evaluation of cardiac function and myocardial viability with 16- and 64-slice multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Andreas F; Heuschmid, Martin; Reimann, Anja; Kuettner, Axel; Beck, Thorsten; Ohmer, Martin; Burgstahler, Christoph; Brodoefel, Harald; Claussen, Claus D; Schroeder, Stephen

    2005-11-01

    Retrospectively ECG-gated MDCT shows a high correlation and acceptable agreement of left-ventricular functional parameters compared to MR imaging. Thus, in addition to the non-invasive evaluation of coronary arteries, further important additional information of left-ventricular functional parameters with clinical and prognostic relevance can be achieved by one single MDCT examination. For assessment of myocardial viability, low-dose CT late enhancement scanning is feasible, and preliminary results look promising. CT late enhancement adds valuable diagnostic information on the haemodynamical significance of coronary stenoses or prior to interventional procedures. PMID:16479639

  9. The role of 64-slice multi-detector computed tomography in the detection of subclinical atherosclerosis of the coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hae Chang; Ahn, Youngkeun; Ko, Jum Suk; Lee, Min Goo; Sim, Doo Sun; Park, Keun Ho; Yoon, Nam Sik; Youn, Hyun Ju; Hong, Young Joon; Kim, Kye Hun; Park, Hyung Wook; Kim, Ju Han; Kim, Yun-Hyeon; Jeong, Myung Ho; Cho, Jeong Gwan; Park, Jong Chun; Kang, Jung Chaee

    2010-12-01

    in only 2 patients who had been treated with PCI during a mean follow-up period of 387 ± 253 days. The incidence of significant subclinical coronary stenosis as detected by MDCT in a general medical check-up was 3.4%, and the false-positive rate of MDCT for detecting significant coronary artery stenosis was 55.8% (29/52). 64-Slice MDCT can be a useful tool for noninvasive evaluation of coronary arteries in asymptomatic patients. Further study is needed to clarify the clinical implications of MDCT in general medical check-ups. PMID:20922490

  10. Assessments of Coronary Artery Visibility and Radiation Dose in Infants with Congenital Heart Disease on Cardiac 128-slice CT and on Cardiac 64-slice CT.

    PubMed

    Cui, Y; Huang, M; Zheng, J; Li, J; Liu, H; Liang, C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the coronary artery visibility and radiation dose in infants with CHD on cardiac 128-slice CT and on cardiac 64-slice CT. The images of 200 patients were analyzed in this study, 100 patients were selected randomly from a group of 789 infants (<1 years old) with CHD undergoing 128-slice CT prospective ECG-triggered axial scan, and 100 were selected randomly from 911 infants with CHD undergoing 64-slice CT retrospective ECG-gated spiral scan. The visibility of coronary artery segments was graded on a four-point scale. The coronary arteries were considered to be detected or visible when grade was 2 or higher. The visibility of the coronary artery segments and the radiation dose was compared between the two groups. Except for the rate of LM (96 vs. 99%), the detection rates of the total, LAD, LCX, RCA, and the proximal segment of the RCA in the 256-slice CT group were significantly higher than those in the 64-slice CT group (51.7, 53.33, 33.67, 53.33, and 99 vs. 34.8, 34.33, 18, 30.67, and 75%, respectively). The counts of visibility score (4/3/2/1) for the LM and the proximal segment of the RCA were 62/22/12/4 and 56/20/17/7, respectively, in the 128-slice CT group and 17/42/30/1 and 9/30/38/25, respectively, in the 64-slice CT group. There were significant differences, especially for score 4 and 3, between the two groups. The radiation dose in the 128-slice CT group was significantly decreased than those in the 64-slice CT group (CTDIvol 1.88 ± 0.51 vs. 5.61 ± 0.63 mGy; SSDE 4.48 ± 1.15 vs. 13.97 ± 1.52 mGy; effective radiation dose 1.36 ± 0.44 vs. 4.06 ± 0.7 mSv). With reduced radiation dose, the visibility of the coronary artery in infants with CHD via prospective ECG-triggered mode on a 128-slice CT is superior to that of the 64-slice CT using retrospective ECG-gated spiral mode. PMID:26271472

  11. Radiation Exposure of Ovarian Cancer Patients: Contribution of CT Examinations Performed on Different MDCT (16 and 64 Slices) Scanners and Image Quality Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Stefania; Origgi, Daniela; Brambilla, Sarah; De Maria, Federica; Foà, Riccardo; Raimondi, Sara; Colombo, Nicoletta; Bellomi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study is to compare radiation doses given to ovarian cancer patients by different computed tomographies (CTs) and to evaluate association between doses and subjective and objective image quality. CT examinations included were performed either on a 16-slice CT, equipped with automatic z-axis tube current modulation, or on a 64-slice CT, equipped with z-axis, xy-axis modulation, and adaptive statistical iterative algorithm (ASIR). Evaluation of dose included the following dose descriptors: volumetric CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose length product (DLP), and effective dose (E). Objective image noise was evaluated in abdominal aorta and liver. Subjective image quality was evaluated by assessment of image noise, spatial resolution and diagnostic acceptability. Mean and median CTDIvol, DLP, and E; correlation between CTDIvol and DLP and patients’ weight; comparison of objective noise for the 2 scanners; association between dose descriptors and subjective image quality. The 64-slice CT delivered to patients 24.5% lower dose (P < 0.0001) than 16-slice CT. There was a significant correlation between all dose descriptors (CTDIvol, DLP, E) and weight (P < 0.0001). Objective noise was comparable for the 2 CT scanners. There was a significant correlation between dose descriptors and image noise for the 64-slice CT, and between dose descriptors and spatial resolution for the 16-slice CT. Current dose reduction systems may reduce radiation dose without significantly affecting image quality and diagnostic acceptability of CT exams. PMID:25929914

  12. Radiation exposure of ovarian cancer patients: contribution of CT examinations performed on different MDCT (16 and 64 slices) scanners and image quality evaluation: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Stefania; Origgi, Daniela; Brambilla, Sarah; De Maria, Federica; Foà, Riccardo; Raimondi, Sara; Colombo, Nicoletta; Bellomi, Massimo

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study is to compare radiation doses given to ovarian cancer patients by different computed tomographies (CTs) and to evaluate association between doses and subjective and objective image quality.CT examinations included were performed either on a 16-slice CT, equipped with automatic z-axis tube current modulation, or on a 64-slice CT, equipped with z-axis, xy-axis modulation, and adaptive statistical iterative algorithm (ASIR). Evaluation of dose included the following dose descriptors: volumetric CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose length product (DLP), and effective dose (E). Objective image noise was evaluated in abdominal aorta and liver. Subjective image quality was evaluated by assessment of image noise, spatial resolution and diagnostic acceptability.Mean and median CTDIvol, DLP, and E; correlation between CTDIvol and DLP and patients' weight; comparison of objective noise for the 2 scanners; association between dose descriptors and subjective image quality.The 64-slice CT delivered to patients 24.5% lower dose (P < 0.0001) than 16-slice CT. There was a significant correlation between all dose descriptors (CTDIvol, DLP, E) and weight (P < 0.0001). Objective noise was comparable for the 2 CT scanners. There was a significant correlation between dose descriptors and image noise for the 64-slice CT, and between dose descriptors and spatial resolution for the 16-slice CT.Current dose reduction systems may reduce radiation dose without significantly affecting image quality and diagnostic acceptability of CT exams. PMID:25929914

  13. Impact of the z-flying focal spot on resolution and artifact behavior for a 64-slice spiral CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Kyriakou, Yiannis; Kachelriess, Marc; Knaup, Michael; Krause, Jens U; Kalender, Willi A

    2006-06-01

    The effect of the z-flying focal spot (zFFS) technology was evaluated by simulations and measurements with respect to resolution and artifact behavior for a 64-slice spiral cone-beam computed tomography (CT) scanner. The zFFS alternates between two z-positions of the X-ray focal spot, acquiring two slices per detector row, which results in double sampling in the z-direction. We implemented a modified reconstruction that is able to obtain images as they would be without zFFS. A delta phantom equipped with a thin gold disc was used to measure slice sensitivity profiles (SSP), and a high-contrast bar phantom was used to quantify the resolution in the x/z-plane with and without zFFS. The zFFS decreases the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the SSPs by a factor of about 1.4. The double z-sampling allows the separation of 0.4 mm bars in the z-direction compared with 0.6 mm in the case without zFFS. The zFFS effectively reduces windmill artifacts in the reconstructed images while maintaining the transverse resolution, even at the largest available pitch value of 1.5. PMID:16541229

  14. Non-invasive Detection of Aortic and Coronary Atherosclerosis in Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia by 64 Slice Multi-detector Row Computed Tomography Angiography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) is a rare disorder characterized by the early onset of atherosclerosis, often at the ostia of coronary arteries. In this study we document for the first time that aortic and coronary atherosclerosis can be detected using 64 slice multiple detector-row ...

  15. Non-invasive detection of aortic and coronary atherosclerosis in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia by 64 slice multi-detector row computed tomography angiography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) is a rare disorder characterized by the early onset of atherosclerosis, often at the ostia of coronary arteries. In this study we document for the first time that aortic and coronary atherosclerosis can be detected using 64 slice multiple detector row ...

  16. Image reconstruction and image quality evaluation for a 64-slice CT scanner with z-flying focal spot.

    PubMed

    Flohr, T G; Stierstorfer, K; Ulzheimer, S; Bruder, H; Primak, A N; McCollough, C H

    2005-08-01

    We present a theoretical overview and a performance evaluation of a novel z-sampling technique for multidetector row CT (MDCT), relying on a periodic motion of the focal spot in the longitudinal direction (z-flying focal spot) to double the number of simultaneously acquired slices. The z-flying focal spot technique has been implemented in a recently introduced MDCT scanner. Using 32 x 0.6 mm collimation, this scanner acquires 64 overlapping 0.6 mm slices per rotation in its spiral (helical) mode of operation, with the goal of improved longitudinal resolution and reduction of spiral artifacts. The longitudinal sampling distance at isocenter is 0.3 mm. We discuss in detail the impact of the z-flying focal spot technique on image reconstruction. We present measurements of spiral slice sensitivity profiles (SSPs) and of longitudinal resolution, both in the isocenter and off-center. We evaluate the pitch dependence of the image noise measured in a centered 20 cm water phantom. To investigate spiral image quality we present images of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom and patient scans. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the spiral SSPs shows only minor variations as a function of the pitch, measured values differ by less than 0.15 mm from the nominal values 0.6, 0.75, 1, 1.5, and 2 mm. The measured FWHM of the smallest slice ranges between 0.66 and 0.68 mm at isocenter, except for pitch 0.55 (0.72 mm). In a centered z-resolution phantom, bar patterns up to 15 lp/cm can be visualized independent of the pitch, corresponding to 0.33 mm longitudinal resolution. 100 mm off-center, bar patterns up to 14 lp/cm are visible, corresponding to an object size of 0.36 mm that can be resolved in the z direction. Image noise for constant effective mAs is almost independent of the pitch. Measured values show a variation of less than 7% as a function of the pitch, which demonstrates correct utilization of the applied radiation dose at any pitch. The product of image noise and

  17. Image reconstruction and image quality evaluation for a 64-slice CT scanner with z-flying focal spot

    SciTech Connect

    Flohr, T.G.; Stierstorfer, K.; Ulzheimer, S.; Bruder, H.; Primak, A.N.; McCollough, C.H.

    2005-08-15

    We present a theoretical overview and a performance evaluation of a novel z-sampling technique for multidetector row CT (MDCT), relying on a periodic motion of the focal spot in the longitudinal direction (z-flying focal spot) to double the number of simultaneously acquired slices. The z-flying focal spot technique has been implemented in a recently introduced MDCT scanner. Using 32x0.6 mm collimation, this scanner acquires 64 overlapping 0.6 mm slices per rotation in its spiral (helical) mode of operation, with the goal of improved longitudinal resolution and reduction of spiral artifacts. The longitudinal sampling distance at isocenter is 0.3 mm. We discuss in detail the impact of the z-flying focal spot technique on image reconstruction. We present measurements of spiral slice sensitivity profiles (SSPs) and of longitudinal resolution, both in the isocenter and off-center. We evaluate the pitch dependence of the image noise measured in a centered 20 cm water phantom. To investigate spiral image quality we present images of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom and patient scans. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the spiral SSPs shows only minor variations as a function of the pitch, measured values differ by less than 0.15 mm from the nominal values 0.6, 0.75, 1, 1.5, and 2 mm. The measured FWHM of the smallest slice ranges between 0.66 and 0.68 mm at isocenter, except for pitch 0.55 (0.72 mm). In a centered z-resolution phantom, bar patterns up to 15 lp/cm can be visualized independent of the pitch, corresponding to 0.33 mm longitudinal resolution. 100 mm off-center, bar patterns up to 14 lp/cm are visible, corresponding to an object size of 0.36 mm that can be resolved in the z direction. Image noise for constant effective mAs is almost independent of the pitch. Measured values show a variation of less than 7% as a function of the pitch, which demonstrates correct utilization of the applied radiation dose at any pitch. The product of image noise and square

  18. Infant Cardiac CT Angiography with 64-Slice and 256-Slice CT: Comparison of Radiation Dose and Image Quality Using a Pediatric Phantom

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Greta S. P.; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2012-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to investigate the image quality and radiation exposure of pediatric protocols for cardiac CT angiography (CTA) in infants under one year of age. Methodology/Principal Findings Cardiac CTA examinations were performed using an anthropomorphic phantom representing a 1-year-old child scanned with non-electrocardiogram-gated (NG), retrospectively electrocardiogram-gated helical (RGH) and prospectively electrocardiogram-gated axial (PGA) techniques in 64-slice and 256-slice CT scanners. The thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) were used for direct organ dose measurement, while dose-length product and effective mAs were also used to estimate the patient dose. For image quality, noise and signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) were assessed based on regions-of-interest drawn on the reconstructed CT images, and were compared with the proposed cardiac image quantum index (CIQI). Estimated dose results were in accordant to the measured doses. The NG scan showed the best image quality in terms of noise and SNR. The PGA scan had better image quality than the RGH scan with 83.70% dose reduction. Noise and SNR were also corresponded to the proposed CIQI. Conclusions/Significance The PGA scan protocol was a good choice in balancing radiation exposure and image quality for infant cardiac CTA. We also suggested that the effective mAs and the CIQI were suitable in assessing the tradeoffs between radiation dose and image quality for cardiac CTA in infants. These results are useful for future implementation of dose reduction strategies in pediatric cardiac CTA protocols. PMID:23185380

  19. Quantitative analysis of myocardial perfusion SPECT anatomically guided by co-registered 64-slice coronary CT angiography

    PubMed Central

    Slomka, Piotr J.; Cheng, Victor Y.; Dey, Damini; Woo, Jonghye; Ramesh, Amit; Kriekinge, Serge Van; Suzuki, Yasuzuki; Elad, Yaron; Karlsberg, Ronald; Berman, Daniel S.; Germano, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Aim Sequential testing by coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) and myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) obtained on standalone scanners may be needed to diagnose coronary artery disease (CAD) in equivocal cases. We have developed an automated technique for MPS-CTA registration and demonstrate its utility for improved MPS quantification by guiding the co-registered physiological (MPS) with anatomical CTA information. Methods Automated registration of MPS left ventricular (LV) surfaces with CTA coronary trees was accomplished by iterative minimization of voxel differences between pre-segmented CTA volumes and “motion-frozen” MPS data. Studies of 35 sequential patients (26 males), mean age 67±12 years with 64-slice coronary CTA, MPS and with available results of the invasive coronary angiography performed within 3 months were retrospectively analyzed. 3D coronary vessels and CTA slices were extracted and fused with quantitative MPS results mapped on LV surfaces and MPS coronary regions. Automatically co-registered CTA images and extracted trees were used to correct the MPS contours and to adjust the standard vascular region definitions for MPS quantification. Results Automated co-registration of MPS and coronary CTA had the success rate of 96% as assessed visually; the average errors were 4.3±3.3 mm in translation and 1.5±2.6 deg in rotation on stress and 4.2±3.1 mm in translation and 1.7±3.2 deg in rotation on rest. MPS vascular region definition was adjusted in 17 studies and LV contours were adjusted in 11 studies using co-registered CTA images as a guide. CTA-guided MP analysis resulted in improved area under the receiver operator characteristics (ROC) curves for the detection of RCA and LCX lesions as compared to standard MPS analysis 0.84±0.08 vs. 0.70±0.11 for LCX (p = 0.03) and 0.92±0.05 vs. 0.75±0.09 (p=0.02) for RCA. Conclusions Software image co-registration of standalone coronary CTA and MPS obtained on separate scanners can be performed

  20. Myocardial bridging of the right coronary artery inside the right atrial myocardium identified by ECG-gated 64-slice multidetector computed tomography angiography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Cheng; Chen, Huan-Wu; Fu, Chen-Ju; Lin, Fen-Chiung; Wen, Ming-Shien; Liu, Yuan-Chang

    2010-01-01

    A myocardial bridge (MB) is defined as an intramyocardial course of a major epicardial coronary artery, and it is mainly confined to the left ventricle and the left anterior descending coronary artery. There are rare reports of right coronary MB seen during angiographic examination. Herein, we present a 49 year-old man with right coronary artery MB without luminal narrowing in the diastolic and systolic phases of electrocardiography-gated computed tomography images. The value of multi-detector computed tomography for the detection of anatomical variants in the cardiovascular system is further discussed. PMID:20438676

  1. Evaluation of organ doses and specific k effective dose of 64-slice CT thorax examination using an adult anthropomorphic phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, S.; Karim, M. K. A.; Bakar, K. A.; Sabarudin, A.; Chin, A. W.; Saripan, M. I.; Bradley, D. A.

    2016-09-01

    The magnitude of radiation dose in computed tomography (CT) depends on the scan acquisition parameters, investigated herein using an anthropomorphic phantom (RANDO®) and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD). Specific interest was in the organ doses resulting from CT thorax examination, the specific k coefficient for effective dose estimation for particular protocols also being determined. For measurement of doses representing five main organs (thyroid, lung, liver, esophagus and skin), TLD-100 (LiF:Mg, Ti) were inserted into selected holes in a phantom slab. Five CT thorax protocols were investigated, one routine (R1) and four that were modified protocols (R2 to R5). Organ doses were ranked from greatest to least, found to lie in the order: thyroid>skin>lung>liver>breast. The greatest dose, for thyroid at 25 mGy, was that in use of R1 while the lowest, at 8.8 mGy, was in breast tissue using R3. Effective dose (E) was estimated using three standard methods: the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP)-103 recommendation (E103), the computational phantom CT-EXPO (E(CTEXPO)) method, and the dose-length product (DLP) based approach. E103 k factors were constant for all protocols, ~8% less than that of the universal k factor. Due to inconsistency in tube potential and pitch factor the k factors from CTEXPO were found to vary between 0.015 and 0.010 for protocols R3 and R5. With considerable variation between scan acquisition parameters and organ doses, optimization of practice is necessary in order to reduce patient organ dose.

  2. The feasibility of a 64-slice MDCT for detection of the Adamkiewicz artery: comparison of the detection rate of intravenous injection CT angiography using a 64-slice MDCT versus intra-arterial and intravenous injection CT angiography using a 16-slice MDCT.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Tatsuya; Kono, Atsushi K; Negi, Noriyuki; Hashimura, Hiromi; Uotani, Kensuke; Okita, Yutaka; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2013-12-01

    Identification of the Adamkiewicz artery (AKA) using CT angiography (CTA) is crucial in patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) or aortic dissection (AD). The purpose of this study was to compare the AKA detection rate of intravenous injection with a 64-slice MDCT (IV64) versus a 16-slice MDCT (IV16) as well as by CTA using intra-arterial injection with a 16-slice MDCT (IA16). A retrospective review of 160 consecutive patients who underwent CTA was performed. There were 108 TAA and 52 AD cases, 105 of whom were examined with IV64, 15 with IV16, and 40 with IA16. The AKA detectability for each imaging method was assessed, and the factors influencing the detectability were analyzed by multivariate analysis. The detection rates for IV64, IV16, and IA16 were 85.7, 60.0, and 80.0 %, respectively, with IV64 being more sensitive than IV16 (P = 0.025). The detection rate for AD patients was 66.7 % with IV64, which was similar to IV16 (57.1 %) and IA16 (66.8 %). On the other hand, the detection rate for TAA patients was 93.3 % with IV64, which was higher than IV16 (62.5 %, P = 0.021) and similar to IA16 (88.0 %). Multivariate analysis demonstrated the independent factors for AKA detectability were TAA versus AD (P = 0.005, Odds ratio = 3.98) and IV64 versus IV16 (P = 0.037, Odds ratio = 4.03). The detection rate was higher for IV64 than for IV16, especially for TAA patients, while the rate was similar between IV64 and invasive IA16. A 64-slice MDCT thus provides a less invasive visualization of the AKA. PMID:24081485

  3. Trapping volumetric measurement by multidetector CT in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Effect of CT threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaohua; Yuan, Huishu; Duan, Jianghui; Du, Yipeng; Shen, Ning; He, Bei

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of various computed tomography (CT) thresholds on trapping volumetric measurements by multidetector CT in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).Methods: Twenty-three COPD patients were scanned with a 64-slice CT scanner in both the inspiratory and expiratory phase. CT thresholds of −950 Hu in inspiration and −950 to −890 Hu in expiration were used, after which trapping volumetric measurements were made using computer software. Trapping volume percentage (Vtrap%) under the different CT thresholds in the expiratory phase and below −950 Hu in the inspiratory phase was compared and correlated with lung function.Results: Mean Vtrap% was similar under −930 Hu in the expiratory phase and below −950 Hu in the inspiratory phase, being 13.18 ± 9.66 and 13.95 ± 6.72 (both lungs), respectively; this difference was not significant (P= 0.240). Vtrap% under −950 Hu in the inspiratory phase and below the −950 to −890 Hu threshold in the expiratory phase was moderately negatively correlated with the ratio of forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity and the measured value of forced expiratory volume in one second as a percentage of the predicted value.Conclusions: Trapping volumetric measurement with multidetector CT is a promising method for the quantification of COPD. It is important to know the effect of various CT thresholds on trapping volumetric measurements.

  4. Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT) Updated:Sep 3,2015 ... facts MDCT is a very fast type of computed tomography (CT) scan. MDCT creates pictures of the healthy ...

  5. Multidetector CT of blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Soto, Jorge A; Anderson, Stephan W

    2012-12-01

    The morbidity, mortality, and economic costs resulting from trauma in general, and blunt abdominal trauma in particular, are substantial. The "panscan" (computed tomographic [CT] examination of the head, neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis) has become an essential element in the early evaluation and decision-making algorithm for hemodynamically stable patients who sustained abdominal trauma. CT has virtually replaced diagnostic peritoneal lavage for the detection of important injuries. Over the past decade, substantial hardware and software developments in CT technology, especially the introduction and refinement of multidetector scanners, have expanded the versatility of CT for examination of the polytrauma patient in multiple facets: higher spatial resolution, faster image acquisition and reconstruction, and improved patient safety (optimization of radiation delivery methods). In this article, the authors review the elements of multidetector CT technique that are currently relevant for evaluating blunt abdominal trauma and describe the most important CT signs of trauma in the various organs. Because conservative nonsurgical therapy is preferred for all but the most severe injuries affecting the solid viscera, the authors emphasize the CT findings that are indications for direct therapeutic intervention. PMID:23175542

  6. Quantification of coronary artery plaque using 64-slice dual-source CT: comparison of semi-automatic and automatic computer-aided analysis based on intravascular ultrasonography as the gold standard.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Jun; Jin, Gong Yong; Kim, Eun Young; Han, Young Min; Chae, Jei Keon; Lee, Sang Rok; Kwon, Keun Sang

    2013-12-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of automatic computer-aided analysis (CAA) compared with semi-automatic CAA for differentiating lipid-rich from fibrous plaques based on coronary CT angiography (CCTA) imaging. Seventy-four coronary plaques in 57 patients were evaluated by CCTA using 64-slice dual-source CT. Quantitative analysis of coronary artery plaques was performed by measuring the relative volumes (low, medium, and calcified) of plaque components using automatic CAA and by measuring mean CT density using semi-automatic CAA. We compared the two plaque measurement methods for lipid-rich and fibrous plaques using Pearson's correlation. Intravascular ultrasonography was used as the goal standard for assessment of plaques. Mean CT density of plaques tended to increase in the order of lipid [36 ± 19 Hounsfield unit (HU)], fibrous (106 ± 34 HU), and then calcified plaques (882 ± 296 HU). The mean relative volumes of 'low' components measured by automatic CAA were 13.8 ± 4.6, 7.9 ± 6.7, and 3.5 ± 3.0 % for lipid, fibrous, and calcified plaques, respectively (r = -0.348, P = 0.022). The mean relative volumes of 'medium' components on automatic CAA were 12.9 ± 4.1, 15.7 ± 9.6, and 5.6 ± 4.8 % for lipid, fibrous, and calcified plaques, respectively (r = -0.385, P = 0.011). The mean relative volumes of low and medium components within plaques significantly correlated with the types of plaques. Plaque analysis using automatic CAA has the potential to differentiate lipid from fibrous plaques based on measurement of the relative volume percentages of the low and medium components. PMID:24293043

  7. Multidetector CT of the female pelvis.

    PubMed

    Siddall, Kristina A; Rubens, Deborah J

    2005-11-01

    In the emergency room setting, multidetector detector CT (MDCT) offers rapid, noninvasive, multiplanar evaluation of female patients who have acute pelvic pain. MDCT has been integrated into several of the major trauma centers, and its use may surpass the use of ultrasound in the trauma evaluation of the pregnant patient. In the nonemergent setting, MDCT can be used to stage gynecologic malignancy and to evaluate tumor recurrence. Multiplanar MDCT has received some acceptance for evaluation of small primary tumor volume and small metastatic implants. MDCT also has a role in the evaluation of pelvic varices and suspected pelvic congestion syndrome. PMID:16253664

  8. Multidetector CT for Penetrating Torso Trauma: State of the Art.

    PubMed

    Dreizin, David; Munera, Felipe

    2015-11-01

    The use of computed tomography (CT) for hemodynamically stable victims of penetrating torso trauma continues to increase but remains less singular to the work-up than in blunt trauma. Research in this area has focused on the incremental benefits of CT within the context of evolving diagnostic algorithms and in conjunction with techniques such as laparoscopy, endoscopy, and angiographic intervention. This review centers on the current state of multidetector CT as a triage tool for penetrating torso trauma and the primacy of trajectory evaluation in diagnosis, while emphasizing diagnostic challenges that have lingered despite tremendous technological advances since CT was first used in this setting 3 decades ago. As treatment strategies have also changed considerably over the years in parallel with advances in CT, current management implications of organ-specific injuries depicted at multidetector CT are also discussed. PMID:26492022

  9. New absorbed dose measurement with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Onizuka, Ryota; Hioki, Kazunari; Tomiyama, Yuuki; Yamashita, Yusuke

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop new dosimetry with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). The ionization measurement was performed with a Farmer ionization chamber at the center and four peripheral points in the body-type and head-type cylindrical water phantoms. The ionization was converted to the absorbed dose using a (60)Co absorbed-dose-to-water calibration factor and Monte Carlo (MC) -calculated correction factors. The correction factors were calculated from MDCT (Brilliance iCT, 64-slice, Philips Electronics) modeled with GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) software based on the EGSnrc MC code. The spectrum of incident x-ray beams and the configuration of a bowtie filter for MDCT were determined so that calculated photon intensity attenuation curves for aluminum (Al) and calculated off-center ratio (OCR) profiles in air coincided with those measured. The MC-calculated doses were calibrated by the absorbed dose measured at the center in both cylindrical water phantoms. Calculated doses were compared with measured doses at four peripheral points and the center in the phantom for various beam pitches and beam collimations. The calibration factors and the uncertainty of the absorbed dose determined using this method were also compared with those obtained by CTDIair (CT dose index in air). Calculated Al half-value layers and OCRs in air were within 0.3% and 3% agreement with the measured values, respectively. Calculated doses at four peripheral points and the centers for various beam pitches and beam collimations were within 5% and 2% agreement with measured values, respectively. The MC-calibration factors by our method were 44-50% lower than values by CTDIair due to the overbeaming effect. However, the calibration factors for CTDIair agreed within 5% with those of our method after correction for the overbeaming effect. Our method makes it possible to directly measure the absorbed dose for MDCT and is more robust and accurate than the

  10. New absorbed dose measurement with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Onizuka, Ryota; Hioki, Kazunari; Tomiyama, Yuuki; Yamashita, Yusuke

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop new dosimetry with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). The ionization measurement was performed with a Farmer ionization chamber at the center and four peripheral points in the body-type and head-type cylindrical water phantoms. The ionization was converted to the absorbed dose using a 60Co absorbed-dose-to-water calibration factor and Monte Carlo (MC) -calculated correction factors. The correction factors were calculated from MDCT (Brilliance iCT, 64-slice, Philips Electronics) modeled with GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) software based on the EGSnrc MC code. The spectrum of incident x-ray beams and the configuration of a bowtie filter for MDCT were determined so that calculated photon intensity attenuation curves for aluminum (Al) and calculated off-center ratio (OCR) profiles in air coincided with those measured. The MC-calculated doses were calibrated by the absorbed dose measured at the center in both cylindrical water phantoms. Calculated doses were compared with measured doses at four peripheral points and the center in the phantom for various beam pitches and beam collimations. The calibration factors and the uncertainty of the absorbed dose determined using this method were also compared with those obtained by CTDIair (CT dose index in air). Calculated Al half-value layers and OCRs in air were within 0.3% and 3% agreement with the measured values, respectively. Calculated doses at four peripheral points and the centers for various beam pitches and beam collimations were within 5% and 2% agreement with measured values, respectively. The MC-calibration factors by our method were 44-50% lower than values by CTDIair due to the overbeaming effect. However, the calibration factors for CTDIair agreed within 5% with those of our method after correction for the overbeaming effect. Our method makes it possible to directly measure the absorbed dose for MDCT and is more robust and accurate than the

  11. Coronary artery dissection with rupture of aortic valve commissure following type A aortic dissection: the role of 64-slice MDCT.

    PubMed

    Das, K M; Abdou, Sayed M; El-Menyar, Ayman; Ayman, El Menyar; Khulaifi, A A; Nabti, A L

    2008-01-01

    A rare case of bilateral coronary artery dissection with rupture of aortic valve commissure following type A aortic dissection is described. 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) was able to demonstrate both this findings along with involvement of other neck vessels. TEE demonstrated the severity and mechanisms of aortic valve damage and assisted the surgeon in valve repair. MDCT has played an invaluable role in the diagnosis of the abnormal details of such life-threatening vascular complications. PMID:18384568

  12. Multi-detector row CT of pancreatic islet cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Horton, Karen M; Hruban, Ralph H; Yeo, Charles; Fishman, Elliot K

    2006-01-01

    Pancreatic islet cell tumors (ICTs) are neuroendocrine neoplasms that produce and secrete hormones to a variable degree. These neoplasms can present a diagnostic challenge, both clinically and radiologically. ICTs can be classified as either syndromic or nonsyndromic on the basis of their clinical manifestations. Multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of both syndromic and nonsyndromic ICTs. In general, syndromic ICTs are less than 3 cm in size. They are typically hyperenhancing and are usually best seen on CT scans obtained during the arterial phase. Nonsyndromic ICTs tend to be larger than syndromic ICTs at presentation and are more likely to be cystic or necrotic. It is important for the radiologist to be familiar with appropriate CT protocol for the evaluation of patients with suspected pancreatic ICT and to understand the variable CT appearances of these neoplasms. PMID:16549609

  13. Multidetector CT of pulmonary cavitation: filling in the holes.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, K H; Babar, J L; Balan, A

    2015-04-01

    Pulmonary cavitation causes significant morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis of the presence and aetiology of a cavity is therefore crucial in order to avoid further demise in both the localized pulmonary and systemic disorders that may manifest with pulmonary cavity formation. Multidetector CT has become the principal diagnostic technique for detecting pulmonary cavitation and its complications. This review provides an overview of the aetiologies and their imaging findings using this technique. Combining a literature review with case illustration, a synopsis of the different imaging features and constellations is provided, which may suggest a particular cause and aid the differentiation from diseases with similar findings. PMID:25623513

  14. Scenes from the past: initial investigation of early jurassic vertebrate fossils with multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Bolliger, Stephan A; Ross, Steffen; Thali, Michael J; Hostettler, Bernhard; Menkveld-Gfeller, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    The study of fossils permits the reconstruction of past life on our planet and enhances our understanding of evolutionary processes. However, many fossils are difficult to recognize, being encased in a lithified matrix whose tedious removal is required before examination is possible. The authors describe the use of multidetector computed tomography (CT) in locating, identifying, and examining fossil remains of crocodilians (Mesosuchia) embedded in hard shale, all without removing the matrix. In addition, they describe how three-dimensional (3D) reformatted CT images provided details that were helpful for extraction and preparation. Multidetector CT can help experienced paleontologists localize and characterize fossils in the matrix of a promising rock specimen in a nondestructive manner. Moreover, with its capacity to generate highly accurate 3D images, multidetector CT can help determine whether the fossils warrant extraction and can assist in planning the extraction process. Thus, multidetector CT may well become an invaluable tool in the field of paleoradiology. PMID:22977034

  15. Cam-type deformities: Concepts, criteria, and multidetector CT features.

    PubMed

    Mellado, J M; Radi, N

    2015-01-01

    Interpreting imaging studies of a painful hip requires detailed knowledge of the regional anatomy. Some variants of the proximal femur, such as cam-type deformities, can course asymptomatically or cause femoroacetabular impingement. The principal numerical criterion for defining cam-type deformities, the alpha angle, has some limitations. In this article, we review the anatomic variants of the anterior aspect of the proximal femur, focusing on cam-type deformities. Using diagrams and multidetector CT images, we describe the parameters that are useful for characterizing these deformities in different imaging techniques. We also discuss the potential correspondence of imaging findings of cam-type deformities with the terms coined by anatomists and anthropologists to describe these phenomena. PMID:25660594

  16. Cardiac Conduction System: Delineation of Anatomic Landmarks With Multidetector CT

    PubMed Central

    Saremi, Farhood; Torrone, Maria; Yashar, Nooshin

    2009-01-01

    Major components of the cardiac conduction system including the sinoatrial node (SAN), atrioventricular node (AVN), the His Bundle, and the right and left bundle branches are too small to be directly visualized by multidetector CT (MDCT) given the limited spatial resolution of current scanners. However, the related anatomic landmarks and variants of this system a well as the areas with special interest to electrophysiologists can be reliably demonstrated by MDCT. Some of these structures and landmarks include the right SAN artery, right atrial cavotricuspid isthmus, Koch triangle, AVN artery, interatrial muscle bundles, and pulmonary veins. In addition, MDCT has an imperative role in demarcating potential arrhythmogenic structures. The aim of this review will be to assess the extent at which MDCT can outline the described anatomic landmarks and therefore provide crucial information used in clinical practice. PMID:19898655

  17. Multiplanar and three-dimensional multi-detector row CT of thoracic vessels and airways in the pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Marilyn J

    2003-12-01

    Multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) has changed the approach to imaging of thoracic anatomy and disease in the pediatric population. At the author's institution, multi-detector row CT with multiplanar and three-dimensional reconstruction has become an important examination in the evaluation of systemic and pulmonary vasculature and the tracheobronchial tree. In some clinical situations, multi-detector row CT with reformatted images is obviating conventional angiography, which is associated with higher radiation doses and longer sedation times. Although multi-detector row CT with multiplanar and three-dimensional reconstruction is expanding the applications of CT of the thorax, its role as a diagnostic tool still needs to be better defined. The purposes of this article are to describe how to perform multi-detector row CT with multiplanar and three-dimensional reconstruction in young patients, to discuss various reconstruction techniques available, and to discuss applications in the evaluation of vascular and airways diseases. PMID:14563904

  18. Uncommon Complex Anomaly of Inferior Vena Cava and Left Iliac Vein Demonstrated by Multidetector-Row CT Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Ogul, Hayri; Yuce, Ihsan; Yalcin, Ahmet; Karaca, Leyla; Okur, Aylin; Kantarci, Mecit

    2014-01-01

    Retroperitoneal venous anomalies have clinical importance in retroperitoneal and pelvic surgery. Multidetector-row computed tomography (CT) angiography is an important imaging method to be preferred in evaluating vascular structures in this locality. We describe a complex retroperitoneal venous anomaly with a multidetector-row CT angiography. PMID:25437601

  19. Coronary calcium mass scores measured by identical 64-slice MDCT scanners are comparable: a cardiac phantom study.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, Hildebrand; Greuter, Marcel J W; Groen, Jaap M; Vliegenthart-Proença, Rozemarijn; Renema, Klaasjan W K; de Lange, Frank; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2010-01-01

    scores obtained in the same scan mode are comparable between identical 64-slice CT scanners and identical 64-slice CT scanners on different sites can be used in follow-up studies. Furthermore, for all systems significant differences were found between mass scores and the physical calcium mass; however, the differences were relatively small and consistent. PMID:19768572

  20. Pancreatic pseudoaneurysm in a child with hereditary pancreatitis: diagnosis with multidetector CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Hossam K; Hagspiel, Klaus D; McGahren, Eugene D; Angle, John F; Leung, Daniel A; Spinosa, David J; Matsumoto, Alan H; Rodgers, Bradley M

    2004-08-01

    Pseudoaneurysm formation is a serious vascular complication of pancreatitis. It most commonly affects splenic and gastroduodenal arteries. We report a rare case of superior mesenteric artery pseudoaneurysm in a child with hereditary pancreatitis. Multidetector CT angiography allowed the comprehensive assessment of the aneurysm and allowed accurate surgical planning obviating the need for catheter angiography. PMID:15107963

  1. Dual-energy CT revisited with multidetector CT: review of principles and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Karçaaltıncaba, Muşturay; Aktaş, Aykut

    2011-09-01

    Although dual-energy CT (DECT) was first conceived in the 1970s, it was not widely used for CT indications. Recently, the simultaneous acquisition of volumetric dual-energy data has been introduced using multidetector CT (MDCT) with two X-ray tubes and rapid kVp switching (gemstone spectral imaging). Two major advantages of DECT are material decomposition by acquiring two image series with different kVp and the elimination of misregistration artifacts. Hounsfield unit measurements by DECT are not absolute and can change depending on the kVp used for an acquisition. Typically, a combination of 80/140 kVp is used for DECT, but for some applications, 100/140 kVp is preferred. In this study, we summarized the clinical applications of DECT and included images that were acquired using the dual-source CT and rapid kVp switching. In general, unenhanced images can be avoided by using DECT for body and neurological applications; iodine can be removed from the image, and a virtual, non-contrast (water) image can be obtained. Neuroradiological applications allow for the removal of bone and calcium from the carotid and brain CT angiography. Thorax applications include perfusion imaging in patients with pulmonary thromboemboli and other chest diseases, xenon ventilation-perfusion imaging and solitary nodule characterization. Cardiac applications include dual-energy cardiac perfusion, viability and cardiac iron detection. The removal of calcific plaques from arteries, bone removal and aortic stent graft evaluation may be achieved in the vascular system. Abdominal applications include the detection and characterization of liver and pancreas masses, the diagnosis of steatosis and iron overload, DECT colonoscopy and CT cholangiography. Urinary system applications are urinary calculi characterization (uric acid vs. non-uric acid), renal cyst characterization and mass characterization. Musculoskeletal applications permit the differentiation of gout from pseudogout and a reduction of

  2. Advances in Multidetector CT Diagnosis of Pediatric Pulmonary Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Thacker, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    Although pediatric pulmonary thromboembolism is historically believed to be rare with relatively little information available in the medical literature regarding its imaging evaluation, it is more common than previously thought. Thus, it is imperative for radiologists to be aware of the most recent advances in its imaging information, particularly multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), the imaging modality of choice in the pediatric population. The overarching goal of this article is to review the most recent updates on MDCT diagnosis of pediatric pulmonary thromboembolism. PMID:26957904

  3. Misty mesentery: a pictorial review of multidetector-row CT findings.

    PubMed

    Filippone, A; Cianci, R; Di Fabio, F; Storto, M L

    2011-04-01

    The term "misty mesentery" indicates a pathological increase in mesenteric fat attenuation at computed tomography (CT). It is frequently observed on multidetector CT (MDCT) scans performed during daily clinical practice and may be caused by various pathological conditions, including oedema, inflammation, haemorrhage, neoplastic infiltration or sclerosing mesenteritis. In patients suffering from acute abdominal disease, misty mesentery may be considered a feature of the underlying disease. Otherwise, it may represent an incidental finding on MDCT performed for other reasons. This article describes the MDCT features of misty mesentery in different diseases in order to provide a rational approach to the differential diagnosis. PMID:21311992

  4. Multidetector CT of Mandibular Fractures, Reductions, and Complications: A Clinically Relevant Primer for the Radiologist.

    PubMed

    Dreizin, David; Nam, Arthur J; Tirada, Nikki; Levin, Martin D; Stein, Deborah M; Bodanapally, Uttam K; Mirvis, Stuart E; Munera, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    After the nasal bones, the mandible is the second most common site of facial fractures, and mandibular fractures frequently require open reduction. In the trauma injury setting, multidetector computed tomography (CT) has become the cornerstone imaging modality for determining the most appropriate treatment management, fixation method, and surgical approach. Multidetector CT is also used to assess the adequacy of the reduction and evaluate potential complications in the postoperative period. For successful restoration of the mandible's form and function, as well as management of posttraumatic and postoperative complications, reconstructive surgeons are required to have a detailed understanding of mandibular biomechanics, occlusion, and anatomy. To provide added value in the diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-up of mandibular fractures, radiologists should be aware of these concepts. Knowledge of the techniques commonly used to achieve occlusal and anatomic reduction and of the rationale behind the range of available treatment options for different injury patterns-from isolated and nondisplaced fractures to multisite and comminuted fractures-also is essential. This article focuses on the use of multidetector CT for pre- and postoperative evaluation of mandibular fractures and outlines fundamental concepts of diagnosis and management-beginning with an explanation of common fracture patterns and their biomechanical underpinnings, and followed by a review of the common postoperative appearances of these fractures after semirigid and rigid fixation procedures. Specific considerations regarding fractures in different regions of the tooth-bearing and non-tooth-bearing mandible and the unique issues pertaining to the edentulous atrophic mandible are reviewed, and key features that distinguish major from minor complications are described. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27618328

  5. Virtual anthropology and forensic identification using multidetector CT

    PubMed Central

    Savall, F; Mokrane, F-Z; Rousseau, H; Crubézy, E; Rougé, D; Telmon, N

    2014-01-01

    Virtual anthropology is made possible by modern cross-sectional imaging. Multislice CT (MSCT) can be used for comparative bone and dental identification, reconstructive identification and lesion identification. Comparative identification, the comparison of ante- and post-mortem imaging data, can be performed on both teeth and bones. Reconstructive identification, a considerable challenge for the radiologist, identifies the deceased by determining sex, geographical origin, stature and age at death. Lesion identification combines virtual autopsy and virtual anthropology. MSCT can be useful in palaeopathology, seeking arthropathy, infection, oral pathology, trauma, tumours, haematological disorders, stress indicators or occupational stress in bones and teeth. We examine some of the possibilities offered by this new radiological subspeciality that adds a new dimension to the work of the forensic radiologist. A multidisciplinary approach is crucial and involves communication and data exchange between radiologists, forensic pathologists, anthropologists and radiographers. PMID:24234584

  6. Heterogeneous Microinfarcts Caused by Coronary Microemboli: Evaluation with Multidetector CT and MR Imaging in a Swine Model1

    PubMed Central

    Saloner, David; Martin, Alastair J.; Ursell, Philip C.; Saeed, Maythem

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To directly compare the sensitivity of 64-section multidetector computed tomography (CT) with that of 1.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the depiction and measurement of heterogeneous 7–8-week-old microinfarcts and the quantification of regional left ventricular (LV) function and perfusion in the territory of coronary intervention in a swine model. Materials and Methods: Approval was obtained from the institutional animal committee. An x-ray/MR system was used to catheterize the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery with x-ray guidance and to delineate the perfusion territory. The vessel was selectively microembolized in six pigs with small-diameter embolic material (40–120 µm, 250000 count). At 7–8 weeks after microembolization, multidetector CT and MR imaging were used to assess LV function, first-pass perfusion, and delayed contrast enhancement in remote myocardium and microinfarct scars. Histochemical staining with triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) was used to confirm and quantify heterogeneous microinfarct scars. The two-tailed Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to detect differences between modalities and myocardial regions. Results: The LAD territory was 32.4% ± 3.8(stadard error of the mean) of the LV mass. Multidetector CT and MR imaging have similar sensitivity in the detection of regional and global LV dysfunction and extent of microinfarct. The mean LV end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, and ejection fraction were 93 mL ± 8, 46 mL ± 4, and 50% ± 3, respectively, on multidetector CT images and 92 mL ± 8, 48 mL ± 5, and 48% ± 3, respectively, on MR images (P ≥ .05). The extent of heterogeneous microinfarct was not significantly different between multidetector CT (6.3% ± 0.8 of the LV mass), MR imaging (6.6% ± 0.5 of the LV mass), and TTC staining (7.0% ± 0.6 of the LV mass). First-pass multidetector CT and MR imaging demonstrated significant regional differences (P < .05) in time to peak between the

  7. Scenes from the past: multidetector CT of Egyptian mummies of the Redpath Museum.

    PubMed

    Wade, Andrew D; Garvin, Gregory J; Hurnanen, Jaana H; Williams, Licd Lana; Lawson, Barbara; Nelson, Andrew J; Tampieri, Donatella

    2012-01-01

    As a nondestructive method of historical and anthropologic inquiry, imaging has played an important role in mummy studies over the past several decades. Recent technologic advances have made multidetector computed tomography (CT) an especially useful means for deepening the present understanding of ancient cultures by examining preserved human remains. In April 2011, three ancient Egyptian human mummies from the Redpath Museum of McGill University were examined with 320-section multidetector CT as part of the IMPACT Radiological Mummy Database project headquartered at the University of Western Ontario. Whole-body scanning was performed with a section thickness of 0.5 mm and a peak voltage of 120 kVp, and the raw CT datasets were postprocessed by using smooth body and high-resolution bone convolution filters. Two of the mummies were scanned at different energy levels (80 and 135 keV). The high-resolution CT scans revealed the details of mummification and allowed observations about the socioeconomic and health status of the human subjects based on both the mummification technique used and the appearance of the remains, particularly the bones and teeth. The paleopathologic information obtained from the scans confirmed some findings in studies performed in the same mummies in the late 19th and 20th centuries. The CT scans also demonstrated a high degree of variability in Egyptian mortuary practice, variability that is not generally recognized in the literature. Unusual features that were observed included a relatively uncommon retained heart in mummy RM2718, retained lungs in a mummy from which the heart had been extracted (RM2720), and a cartonnage plaque placed over the left abdomen of a mummy that had been eviscerated transperineally (RM2717). PMID:22787004

  8. Multidetector CT in emergency radiology: acute and generalized non-traumatic abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Paolantonio, Pasquale; Rengo, Marco; Ferrari, Riccardo; Laghi, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Multidetector CT (MDCT) is an imaging technique that provides otherwise unobtainable information in the diagnostic work-up of patients presenting with acute abdominal pain. A correct working diagnosis depends essentially on understanding the individual patient's clinical data and laboratory findings. In haemodynamically stable patients with acute severe and generalized abdominal pain, MDCT is now the preferred imaging test and gives invaluable diagnostic information, also in unstable patients after stabilization. In this descriptive review, we focus our attention on acute, severe and generalized or undifferentiated non-traumatic abdominal pain. The main differential diagnoses are acute pancreatitis, gastrointestinal perforation, ruptured abdominal aneurysm and acute mesenteric ischaemia. We will provide radiologist readers with a technical guide to optimize MDCT imaging protocols and list the major CT signs essential to reach a correct diagnosis and guide the best treatment. PMID:26689097

  9. High resolution multidetector CT aided tissue analysis and quantification of lung fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavaletta, Vanessa A.; Karwoski, Ronald A.; Bartholmai, Brian; Robb, Richard A.

    2006-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, also known as Idiopathic Usual Interstitial Pneumontis, pathologically) is a progressive diffuse lung disease which has a median survival rate of less than four years with a prevalence of 15-20/100,000 in the United States. Global function changes are measured by pulmonary function tests and the diagnosis and extent of pulmonary structural changes are typically assessed by acquiring two-dimensional high resolution CT (HRCT) images. The acquisition and analysis of volumetric high resolution Multi-Detector CT (MDCT) images with nearly isotropic pixels offers the potential to measure both lung function and structure. This paper presents a new approach to three dimensional lung image analysis and classification of normal and abnormal structures in lungs with IPF.

  10. [Multidetector row CT in assessment of coronary artery calcification on hemodialisis].

    PubMed

    Caro, P; Delgado, R; Dapena, F; Núñez, A

    2007-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a strong predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Coronary artery calcification is more frequent, more extensive and progresses more rapidly in CKD than in general population. They are also considered a marker of coronary heart disease, with high prevalence and functional significance. It suggests that detection and surveillance may be worthwhile in general clinical practice. New non-invasive image techniques, like Multi-detector row CT, a type of spiral scanner, assess density and volume of calcification at multiple sites and allow quantitative scoring of vascular calcification using calcium scores analogous to those from electron-beam CT. We have assessed and quantified coronary artery calcification with 16 multidetector row CT in 44 patients on hemodialysis and their relationship with several cardiovascular risk factors. Coronary artery calcification prevalence was of 84 % with mean calcium score of 1580 +/- 2010 ( r 0-9844) with calcium score > 400 in 66% of patients. It was usually multiple, affecting more than two vessels in more than 50%. In all but one patient, left anterior descending artery was involved with higher calcium score level at right coronary artery. Advanced age, male, diabetes, smoking, more morbidity, cerebrovascular disease previous, and calcium-binders phosphate and analogous vitamin D treatment would seem to be associated with coronary artery calcification. Coronary artery calcification is very frequent and extensive, usually multiple and associated to modifiable risk factors in hemodialysis patients. Multi-detector-row CT seems an effective, suitable, readily applicable method to assess and quantify coronary artery calcification. PMID:18336102

  11. 64-Slice spiral computed tomography and three-dimensional reconstruction in the diagnosis of cystic pancreatic tumors

    PubMed Central

    WEN, ZHAOXIA; YAO, FENGQING; WANG, YUXING

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to describe the characteristics of cystic pancreatic tumors using computed tomography (CT) and to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy (DA) of post-imaging three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction. Clinical and imaging data, including multi-slice spiral CT scans, enhanced scans and multi-faceted reconstruction, from 30 patients with pathologically confirmed cystic pancreatic tumors diagnosed at the Linyi People's Hospital between August 2008 and June 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Following the injection of Ultravist® 300 contrast agent, arterial, portal venous and parenchymal phase scans were obtained at 28, 60 and 150 sec, respectively, and 3D reconstructions of the CT images were generated. The average age of the patients was 38.4 years (range, 16–77 years), and the cohort included 5 males and 25 females (ratio, 1:5). The patients included 8 cases of mucinous cystadenoma (DA), 80%]; 9 cases of cystadenocarcinoma (DA, 84%); 6 cases of serous cystadenoma (DA, 100%); 3 cases of solid pseudopapillary tumor (DA, 100%); and 4 cases of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (DA, 100%). 3D reconstructions of CT images were generated and, in the 4 cases of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, the tumor was connected to the main pancreatic duct and multiple mural nodules were detected in one of these cases. The DA of the 3D-reconstructed images of cystic pancreatic tumors was 89.3%. The 64-slice spiral CT and 3D-reconstructed CT images facilitated the visualization of cystic pancreatic tumor characteristics, in particular the connections between the tumor and the main pancreatic duct. In conclusion, the 3D reconstruction of multi-slice CT data may provide an important source of information for the surgical team, in combination with the available clinical data. PMID:27073473

  12. Influence of z overscanning on normalized effective doses calculated for pediatric patients undergoing multidetector CT examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Tzedakis, Antonis; Damilakis, John; Perisinakis, Kostas; Karantanas, Apostolos; Karabekios, Spiros; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2007-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of z overscanning on normalized effective dose for pediatric patients undergoing multidetector-computed tomography (CT) examinations. Five commercially available mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms representing newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year-old patients and the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP, version 4C2) radiation transport code were employed in the current study to simulate pediatric CT exposures. For all phantoms, axial and helical examinations at 120 kV tube voltage were simulated. Scans performed at 80 kV were also simulated. Sex-specific normalized effective doses were estimated for four standard CT examinations i.e., head-neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and trunk, for all pediatric phantoms. Data for both axial and helical mode acquisition were obtained. In the helical mode, z overscanning was taken into account. The validity of the Monte Carlo results was verified by comparison with dose data obtained using thermoluminescence dosimetry and a physical pediatric anthropomorphic phantom simulating a 10-year-old child. In all cases normalized effective dose values were found to increase with increasing z overscanning. The percentage differences in normalized data between axial and helical scans may reach 43%, 70%, 36%, and 26% for head-neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and trunk studies, respectively. Normalized data for female pediatric patients was in general higher compared to male patients for all ages, examined regions, and z overscanning values. For both male and female children, the normalized effective dose values were reduced as the age was increased. For the same typical exposure conditions, dose values decreased when lower tube voltage was used; for a 1-year-old child, for example, the effective dose was 3.8 times lower when 80 kV instead of 120 kV was used. Normalized data for the estimation of effective dose to pediatric patients undergoing standard axial and helical CT examinations on an

  13. Influence of z overscanning on normalized effective doses calculated for pediatric patients undergoing multidetector CT examinations.

    PubMed

    Tzedakis, Antonis; Damilakis, John; Perisinakis, Kostas; Karantanas, Apostolos; Karabekios, Spiros; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of z overscanning on normalized effective dose for pediatric patients undergoing multidetector-computed tomography (CT) examinations. Five commercially available mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms representing newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year-old patients and the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP, version 4C2) radiation transport code were employed in the current study to simulate pediatric CT exposures. For all phantoms, axial and helical examinations at 120 kV tube voltage were simulated. Scans performed at 80 kV were also simulated. Sex-specific normalized effective doses were estimated for four standard CT examinations i.e., head-neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and trunk, for all pediatric phantoms. Data for both axial and helical mode acquisition were obtained. In the helical mode, z overscanning was taken into account. The validity of the Monte Carlo results was verified by comparison with dose data obtained using thermoluminescence dosimetry and a physical pediatric anthropomorphic phantom simulating a 10-year-old child. In all cases normalized effective dose values were found to increase with increasing z overscanning. The percentage differences in normalized data between axial and helical scans may reach 43%, 70%, 36%, and 26% for head-neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and trunk studies, respectively. Normalized data for female pediatric patients was in general higher compared to male patients for all ages, examined regions, and z overscanning values. For both male and female children, the normalized effective dose values were reduced as the age was increased. For the same typical exposure conditions, dose values decreased when lower tube voltage was used; for a 1-year-old child, for example, the effective dose was 3.8 times lower when 80 kV instead of 120 kV was used. Normalized data for the estimation of effective dose to pediatric patients undergoing standard axial and helical CT examinations on an

  14. Usefulness of multidetector CT angiography for anomalous origin of coronary artery

    PubMed Central

    Ishisone, Takenori; Satoh, Mamoru; Okabayashi, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Motoyuki

    2014-01-01

    A 17-year-old man underwent clinical evaluation of exercise-induced syncope. Routine exercise stress test did not show any myocardial ischaemic changes or arrhythmias on the ECG recording. However, multidetector CT (MDCT) angiography of the coronary arteries revealed an abnormal origin of the left coronary artery from the right coronary sinus. The participants’ symptoms were diagnosed as cardiogenic syncope possibly due to transient stenosis of the left main coronary artery caught between the functionally distended aortic root and the pulmonary trunk during exercise. After successful patch coronary angioplasty, his symptoms disappeared completely even during a similar degree of strenuous exercise. It is important for clinicians not to overlook possible coronary artery anomalies during management of patients with exercise-induced syncope. MDCT coronary angiography may be a useful and non-invasive tool to establish diagnosis and a surgical approach to rectify congenital coronary artery anomalies. PMID:25150237

  15. Pulmonary arterial hypertension: an imaging review comparing MR pulmonary angiography and perfusion with multidetector CT angiography

    PubMed Central

    Junqueira, F P; Lima, C M A O; Coutinho, A C; Parente, D B; Bittencourt, L K; Bessa, L G P; Domingues, R C; Marchiori, E

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a progressive disease that leads to substantial morbidity and eventual death. Pulmonary multidetector CT angiography (MDCTA), pulmonary MR angiography (MRA) and MR-derived pulmonary perfusion (MRPP) imaging are non-invasive imaging techniques for the differential diagnosis of PH. MDCTA is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, one of the most common causes of PH. MRA and MRPP are promising techniques that do not require the use of ionising radiation or iodinated contrast material, and can be useful for patients for whom such material cannot be used. This review compares the imaging aspects of pulmonary MRA and 64-row MDCTA in patients with chronic thromboembolic or idiopathic PH. PMID:22932061

  16. Multidetector CT angiography influences the choice of treatment for blunt carotid artery injury

    PubMed Central

    Beliaev, Andrei M; Civil, Ian

    2014-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman presented with a 2 h history of left neck pain after striking her neck against a marble bench while playing with her son. The patient was screened for blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) and a left carotid bruit was identified. Subsequently, she underwent multidetector CT angiography (MCTA) of the aortic arch and neck vessels, which demonstrated a flow-limiting dissection of the left common carotid artery (CCA). The patient was started on heparin infusion and underwent an emergency operation. At surgery, a circumferential intimal dissection was excised and the arteriotomy defect closed with an autologous venous patch. This case emphasises the importance of adequately examining patients with direct injury to the neck, screening relevant patients for BCVI and investigating them with MCTA that influences the choice of a treatment option. PMID:25103313

  17. First in vivo head-to-head comparison of high-definition versus standard-definition stent imaging with 64-slice computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Tobias A; Stehli, Julia; Fiechter, Michael; Dougoud, Svetlana; Sah, Bert-Ram; Gebhard, Cathérine; Bull, Sacha; Gaemperli, Oliver; Kaufmann, Philipp A

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare image quality characteristics from 64-slice high definition (HDCT) versus 64-slice standard definition CT (SDCT) for coronary stent imaging. In twenty-five stents of 14 patients, undergoing contrast-enhanced CCTA both on 64-slice SDCT (LightSpeedVCT, GE Healthcare) and HDCT (Discovery HD750, GE Healthcare), radiation dose, contrast, noise and stent characteristics were assessed. Two blinded observers graded stent image quality (score 1 = no, 2 = mild, 3 = moderate, and 4 = severe artefacts). All scans were reconstructed with increasing contributions of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) blending (0, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 %). Image quality was significantly superior in HDCT versus SDCT (score 1.7 ± 0.5 vs. 2.7 ± 0.7; p < 0.05). Image noise was significantly higher in HDCT compared to SDCT irrespective of ASIR contributions (p < 0.05). Addition of 40 % ASIR or more reduced image noise significantly in both HDCT and SDCT. In HDCT in-stent luminal attenuation was significantly lower and mean measured in-stent luminal diameter was significantly larger (1.2 ± 0.4 mm vs. 0.8 ± 0.4 mm; p < 0.05) compared to SDCT. Radiation dose from HDCT was comparable to SDCT (1.8 ± 0.7 mSv vs. 1.7 ± 0.7 mSv; p = ns). Use of HDCT for coronary stent imaging reduces partial volume artefacts from stents yielding improved image quality versus SDCT at a comparable radiation dose. PMID:23636300

  18. Contrast enhanced multi-detector CT and MR findings of a well-differentiated pancreatic vipoma

    PubMed Central

    Camera, Luigi; Severino, Rosa; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Masone, Stefania; Mansueto, Gelsomina; Maurea, Simone; Fonti, Rosa; Salvatore, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic vipoma is an extremely rare tumor accounting for less than 2% of endocrine pancreatic neoplasms with a reported incidence of 0.1-0.6 per million. While cross-sectional imaging findings are usually not specific, exact localization of the tumor by means of either computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) is pivotal for surgical planning. However, cross-sectional imaging findings are usually not specific and further characterization of the tumor may only be achieved by somatostatin-receptor scintigraphy (SRS). We report the case of a 70 years old female with a two years history of watery diarrhoea who was found to have a solid, inhomogeneously enhancing lesion at the level of the pancreatic tail at Gadolinium-enhanced MR (Somatom Trio 3T, Siemens, Germany). The tumor had been prospectively overlooked at a contrast-enhanced multi-detector CT (Aquilion 64, Toshiba, Japan) performed after i.v. bolus injection of only 100 cc of iodinated non ionic contrast media because of a chronic renal failure (3.4 mg/mL) but it was subsequently confirmed by SRS. The patient first underwent a successful symptomatic treatment with somatostatin analogues and was then submitted to a distal pancreasectomy with splenectomy to remove a capsulated whitish tumor which turned out to be a well-differentiated vipoma at histological and immuno-histochemical analysis. PMID:25349667

  19. Multi-detector row CT scanning in Paleoanthropology at various tube current settings and scanning mode.

    PubMed

    Badawi-Fayad, J; Yazbeck, C; Balzeau, A; Nguyen, T H; Istoc, A; Grimaud-Hervé, D; Cabanis, E- A

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal tube current setting and scanning mode for hominid fossil skull scanning, using multi-detector row computed tomography (CT). Four fossil skulls (La Ferrassie 1, Abri Pataud 1, CroMagnon 2 and Cro-Magnon 3) were examined by using the CT scanner LightSpeed 16 (General Electric Medical Systems) with varying dose per section (160, 250, and 300 mAs) and scanning mode (helical and conventional). Image quality of two-dimensional (2D) multiplanar reconstructions, three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions and native images was assessed by four reviewers using a four-point grading scale. An ANOVA (analysis of variance) model was used to compare the mean score for each sequence and the overall mean score according to the levels of the scanning parameters. Compared with helical CT (mean score=12.03), the conventional technique showed sustained poor image quality (mean score=4.17). With the helical mode, we observed a better image quality at 300 mAs than at 160 in the 3D sequences (P=0.03). Whereas in native images, a reduction in the effective tube current induced no degradation in image quality (P=0.05). Our study suggests a standardized protocol for fossil scanning with a 16 x 0.625 detector configuration, a 10 mm beam collimation, a 0.562:1 acquisition mode, a 0.625/0.4 mm slice thickness/reconstruction interval, a pitch of 5.62, 120 kV and 300 mAs especially when a 3D study is required. PMID:16211320

  20. Cirsoid Aneurysm of Coronary Arteries Associated with Arterioventricular Fistula Evaluated by 64-Multidetector CT Coronary Angiography: Depiction of a Case

    SciTech Connect

    Marrone, Gianluca Mamone, Giuseppe; Milazzo, Mariapina; Caruso, Settimo; Baravoglia, Cesar Hernandez; Vitulo, Patrizio; Gridelli, Bruno; Luca, Angelo

    2009-05-15

    A female patient with severe pulmonary hypertension was admitted for lung transplant evaluation. As an incidental finding, the chest CT showed diffuse and dilated coronaries, not detected at previous echocardiography. A coronary CT angiography was then performed using a 64-multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanner to better evaluate the coronary tree. The images obtained after postprocessing demonstrated tremendously aneurysmatic and tortuous coronary arteries and the presence of a septal branch deepening into the myocardium and penetrating the right ventricle cavity, forming an abnormal arterioventricular fistula. A causal relation between the aneurysms and the fistula is suspected.

  1. Quantitative parameters to compare image quality of non-invasive coronary angiography with 16-slice, 64-slice and dual-source computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Burgstahler, Christof; Reimann, Anja; Brodoefel, Harald; Daferner, Ulrike; Herberts, Tina; Tsiflikas, Ilias; Thomas, Christoph; Drosch, Tanja; Schroeder, Stephen; Heuschmid, Martin

    2009-03-01

    Multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) is a non-invasive modality to visualize coronary arteries with an overall good image quality. Improved spatial and temporal resolution of 64-slice and dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) scanners are supposed to have a positive impact on diagnostic accuracy and image quality. However, quantitative parameters to compare image quality of 16-slice, 64-slice MSCT and DSCT are missing. A total of 256 CT examinations were evaluated (Siemens, Sensation 16: n = 90; Siemens Sensation 64: n = 91; Siemens Definition: n = 75). Mean Hounsfield units (HU) were measured in the cavum of the left ventricle (LV), the ascending aorta (Ao), the left ventricular myocardium (My) and the proximal part of the left main (LM), the left anterior descending artery (LAD), the right coronary artery (RCA) and the circumflex artery (CX). Moreover, the ratio of intraluminal attenuation (HU) to myocardial attenuation was assessed for all coronary arteries. Clinical data [body mass index (BMI), gender, heart rate] were accessible for all patients. Mean attenuation (CA) of the coronary arteries was significantly higher for DSCT in comparison to 64- and 16-slice MSCT within the RCA [347 +/- 13 vs. 254 +/- 14 (64-MSCT) vs. 233 +/- 11 (16-MSCT) HU], LM (362 +/- 11/275 +/- 12/262 +/- 9), LAD (332 +/- 17/248 +/- 19/219 +/- 14) and LCX (310 +/- 12/210 +/- 13/221 +/- 10, all p < 0.05), whereas there was no significant difference between DSCT and 64-MSCT for the LV, the Ao and My. Heart rate had a significant impact on CA ratio in 16-slice and 64-slice CT only (p < 0.05). BMI had no impact on the CA ratio in DSCT only (p < 0.001). Improved spatial and temporal resolution of dual-source CT is associated with better opacification of the coronary arteries and a better contrast with the myocardium, which is independent of heart rate. In comparison to MSCT, opacification of the coronary arteries at DSCT is not affected by BMI. The main advantage of DSCT lies with the

  2. Novel ultrahigh resolution data acquisition and image reconstruction for multi-detector row CT

    SciTech Connect

    Flohr, T. G.; Stierstorfer, K.; Suess, C.; Schmidt, B.; Primak, A. N.; McCollough, C. H.

    2007-05-15

    We present and evaluate a special ultrahigh resolution mode providing considerably enhanced spatial resolution both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction for a routine medical multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) system. Data acquisition is performed by using a flying focal spot both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction in combination with tantalum grids that are inserted in front of the multi-row detector to reduce the aperture of the detector elements both in-plane and in the z-axis direction. The dose utilization of the system for standard applications is not affected, since the grids are moved into place only when needed and are removed for standard scanning. By means of this technique, image slices with a nominal section width of 0.4 mm (measured full width at half maximum=0.45 mm) can be reconstructed in spiral mode on a CT system with a detector configuration of 32x0.6 mm. The measured 2% value of the in-plane modulation transfer function (MTF) is 20.4 lp/cm, the measured 2% value of the longitudinal (z axis) MTF is 21.5 lp/cm. In a resolution phantom with metal line pair test patterns, spatial resolution of 20 lp/cm can be demonstrated both in the scan plane and along the z axis. This corresponds to an object size of 0.25 mm that can be resolved. The new mode is intended for ultrahigh resolution bone imaging, in particular for wrists, joints, and inner ear studies, where a higher level of image noise due to the reduced aperture is an acceptable trade-off for the clinical benefit brought about by the improved spatial resolution.

  3. Multidetector CT Findings and Differential Diagnoses of Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma and Metastatic Pleural Diseases in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoon Kyung; Lee, Kyung Won; Yi, Chin A; Koo, Jin Mo; Jung, Soon-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the multidetector CT (MDCT) features of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) and metastatic pleural disease (MPD). Materials and Methods The authors reviewed the MDCT images of 167 patients, 103 patients with MPM and 64 patients with MPD. All 167 cases were pathologically confirmed by sonography-guided needle biopsy of pleura, thoracoscopic pleural biopsy, or open thoracotomy. CT features were evaluated with respect to pleural effusion, pleural thickening, invasion of other organs, lung abnormality, lymphadenopathy, mediastinal shifting, thoracic volume decrease, asbestosis, and the presence of pleural plaque. Results Pleural thickening was the most common CT finding in MPM (96.1%) and MPD (93.8%). Circumferential pleural thickening (31.1% vs. 10.9%, odds ratio [OR] 3.670), thickening of fissural pleura (83.5% vs. 67.2%, OR 2.471), thickening of diaphragmatic pleura (90.3% vs. 73.4%, OR 3.364), pleural mass (38.8% vs. 23.4%, OR 2.074), pericardial involvement (56.3% vs. 20.3%, OR 5.056), and pleural plaque (66.0% vs. 21.9%, OR 6.939) were more frequently seen in MPM than in MPD. On the other hand, nodular pleural thickening (59.2% vs. 76.6%, OR 0.445), hilar lymph node metastasis (5.8% vs. 20.3%, OR 0.243), mediastinal lymph node metastasis (10.7% vs. 37.5%, OR 0.199), and hematogenous lung metastasis (9.7% vs. 29.2%, OR 0.261) were less frequent in MPM than in MPD. When we analyzed MPD from extrathoracic malignancy (EMPD) separately and compared them to MPM, circumferential pleural thickening, thickening of interlobar fissure, pericardial involvement and presence of pleural plaque were significant findings indicating MPM than EMPD. MPM had significantly lower occurrence of hematogenous lung metastasis, as compared with EMPD. Conclusion Awareness of frequent and infrequent CT findings could aid in distinguishing MPM from MPD. PMID:27390546

  4. Statistical iterative reconstruction for streak artefact reduction when using multidetector CT to image the dento-alveolar structures

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Y; Kober, C

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: When metallic prosthetic appliances and dental fillings exist in the oral cavity, the appearance of metal-induced streak artefacts is not avoidable in CT images. The aim of this study was to develop a method for artefact reduction using the statistical reconstruction on multidetector row CT images. Methods: Adjacent CT images often depict similar anatomical structures. Therefore, reconstructed images with weak artefacts were attempted using projection data of an artefact-free image in a neighbouring thin slice. Images with moderate and strong artefacts were continuously processed in sequence by successive iterative restoration where the projection data was generated from the adjacent reconstructed slice. First, the basic maximum likelihood–expectation maximization algorithm was applied. Next, the ordered subset–expectation maximization algorithm was examined. Alternatively, a small region of interest setting was designated. Finally, the general purpose graphic processing unit machine was applied in both situations. Results: The algorithms reduced the metal-induced streak artefacts on multidetector row CT images when the sequential processing method was applied. The ordered subset–expectation maximization and small region of interest reduced the processing duration without apparent detriments. A general-purpose graphic processing unit realized the high performance. Conclusions: A statistical reconstruction method was applied for the streak artefact reduction. The alternative algorithms applied were effective. Both software and hardware tools, such as ordered subset–expectation maximization, small region of interest and general-purpose graphic processing unit achieved fast artefact correction. PMID:24754471

  5. A method of estimating conceptus doses resulting from multidetector CT examinations during all stages of gestation

    SciTech Connect

    Damilakis, John; Tzedakis, Antonis; Perisinakis, Kostas; Papadakis, Antonios E.

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: Current methods for the estimation of conceptus dose from multidetector CT (MDCT) examinations performed on the mother provide dose data for typical protocols with a fixed scan length. However, modified low-dose imaging protocols are frequently used during pregnancy. The purpose of the current study was to develop a method for the estimation of conceptus dose from any MDCT examination of the trunk performed during all stages of gestation. Methods: The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code was employed in this study to model the Siemens Sensation 16 and Sensation 64 MDCT scanners. Four mathematical phantoms were used, simulating women at 0, 3, 6, and 9 months of gestation. The contribution to the conceptus dose from single simulated scans was obtained at various positions across the phantoms. To investigate the effect of maternal body size and conceptus depth on conceptus dose, phantoms of different sizes were produced by adding layers of adipose tissue around the trunk of the mathematical phantoms. To verify MCNP results, conceptus dose measurements were carried out by means of three physical anthropomorphic phantoms, simulating pregnancy at 0, 3, and 6 months of gestation and thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) crystals. Results: The results consist of Monte Carlo-generated normalized conceptus dose coefficients for single scans across the four mathematical phantoms. These coefficients were defined as the conceptus dose contribution from a single scan divided by the CTDI free-in-air measured with identical scanning parameters. Data have been produced to take into account the effect of maternal body size and conceptus position variations on conceptus dose. Conceptus doses measured with TLD crystals showed a difference of up to 19% compared to those estimated by mathematical simulations. Conclusions: Estimation of conceptus doses from MDCT examinations of the trunk performed on pregnant patients during all stages of gestation can be made

  6. A cardiac phantom study on quantitative correction of coronary calcium score on multi-detector, dual source, and electron beam tomography for velocity, calcification density, and acquisition time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greuter, Marcel J. W.; Groen, Jaap M.; Nicolai, Lieuwe J.; Dijkstra, Hildebrand; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2009-02-01

    Objective: To quantify the influence of velocity, calcification density and acquisition time on coronary calcium determination using multi-detector CT, dual-source CT and EBT. Materials and Methods: Artificial arteries with four calcifications of increasing density were attached to a robotic arm to which a linear movement was applied between 0 and 120 mm/s (step 10 mm/s). The phantom was scanned five times on 64-slice MDCT, DSCT and EBT using a standard acquisition protocol and the average Agatston score was determined. Results: Increasing motion artifacts were observed at increasing velocities on all scanners, with increasing severity from EBT to DSCT to 64-slice MDCT. The Agatston score showed a linear dependency on velocity from which a correction factor was derived. This correction factor showed a linear dependency on calcification density (0.92<=R2<=0.95). The slope and offset of this correction factor also showed a linear dependency on acquisition time (0.84<=R2<=0.86). Conclusion: The Agatston score is highly dependent on the average density of individual calcifications. The dependency of the Agatston score on velocity shows a linear behaviour on calcification density. A quantitative method could be derived which corrects the measured calcium score for the influence of velocity, calcification density and acquisition time.

  7. Multi-Detector Coronary CT Imaging for the Identification of Coronary Artery Stenoses in a “Real-World” Population

    PubMed Central

    Makaryus, Amgad N; Henry, Sonia; Loewinger, Lee; Makaryus, John N; Boxt, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Multi-detector computed tomography (CT) has emerged as a modality for the non-invasive assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD). Prior studies have selected patients for evaluation and have excluded many of the “real-world” patients commonly encountered in daily practice. We compared 64-detector-CT (64-CT) to conventional coronary angiography (CA) to investigate the accuracy of 64-CT in determining significant coronary stenoses in a “real-world” clinical population. METHODS A total of 1,818 consecutive patients referred for 64-CT were evaluated. CT angiography was performed using the GE LightSpeed VCT (GE® Healthcare). Forty-one patients in whom 64-CT results prompted CA investigation were further evaluated, and results of the two diagnostic modalities were compared. RESULTS A total of 164 coronary arteries and 410 coronary segments were evaluated in 41 patients (30 men, 11 women, age 39–85 years) who were identified by 64-CT to have significant coronary stenoses and who thereafter underwent CA. The overall per-vessel sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy at the 50% stenosis level were 86%, 84%, 65%, 95%, and 85%, respectively, and 77%, 93%, 61%, 97%, and 91%, respectively, in the per-segment analysis at the 50% stenosis level. CONCLUSION 64-CT is an accurate imaging tool that allows a non-invasive assessment of significant CAD with a high diagnostic accuracy in a “real-world” population of patients. The sensitivity and specificity that we noted are not as high as those in prior reports, but we evaluated a population of patients that is typically encountered in clinical practice and therefore see more “real-world” results. PMID:25628513

  8. Multi-Detector Computed Tomography Angiography for Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Purpose Computed tomography (CT) scanning continues to be an important modality for the diagnosis of injury and disease, most notably for indications of the head and abdomen. (1) According to a recent report published by the Canadian Institutes of Health Information, (1) there were about 10.3 scanners per million people in Canada as of January 2004. Ontario had the fewest number of CT scanners per million compared to the other provinces (8 CT scanners per million). The wait time for CT in Ontario of 5 weeks approaches the Canadian median of 6 weeks. This health technology and policy appraisal systematically reviews the published literature on multidetector CT (MDCT) angiography as a diagnostic tool for the newest indication for CT, coronary artery disease (CAD), and will apply the results of the review to current health care practices in Ontario. This review does not evaluate MDCT to detect coronary calcification without contrast medium for CAD screening purposes. The Technology Compared with conventional CT scanning, MDCT can provide smaller pieces of information and can cover a larger area faster. (2) Advancing MDCT technology (8, 16, 32, 64 slice systems) is capable of producing more images in less time. For general CT scanning, this faster capability can reduce the time that patients must stay still during the procedure, thereby reducing potential movement artefact. However, the additional clinical utility of images obtained from faster scanners compared to the images obtained from conventional CT scanners for current CT indications (i.e., non-moving body parts) is not known. There are suggestions that the new fast scanners can reduce wait times for general CT. MDCT angiography that utilizes a contrast medium, has been proposed as a minimally invasive replacement to coronary angiography to detect coronary artery disease. MDCT may take between 15 to 45 minutes; coronary angiography may take up to 1 hour. Although 16-slice and 32-slice CT

  9. Multidetector CT diagnosis of massive hemobilia due to gallbladder polyposis in a child with metachromatic leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Matthew R; Karmazyn, Boaz; Fan, Rong

    2015-12-01

    Hemobilia secondary to gallbladder polyposis is rare in children but has been reported in a few children with metachromatic leukodystrophy. We present a case with preoperative multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) diagnosis of massive hemobilia caused by gallbladder polyposis in a patient with metachromatic leukodystrophy. Our report highlights the importance of both awareness of the association of gallbladder polyposis with other syndromes such as metachromatic leukodystrophy as well as the possibility of this entity presenting with life-threatening bleeding. PMID:26160127

  10. National Survey of Radiation Dose and Image Quality in Adult CT Head Scans in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chung-Jung; Mok, Greta S. P.; Tsai, Mang-Fen; Tsai, Wei-Ta; Yang, Bang-Hung; Tu, Chun-Yuan; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the influence of different variables on radiation dose and image quality based on a national database. Materials and Methods Taiwan’s Ministry of Health and Welfare requested all radiology departments to complete a questionnaire for each of their CT scanners. Information gathered included all scanning parameters for CT head scans. For the present analysis, CT machines were divided into three subgroups: single slice CT (Group A); multi-detector CT (MDCT) with 2-64 slices (Group B); and MDCT with more than 64 slices (Group C). Correlations between computed tomography dose index (CTDI) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) with cumulated tube rotation number (CTW(n)) and cumulated tube rotation time (CTW(s)), and sub group analyses of CTDI and SNR across the three groups were performed. Results CTDI values demonstrated a weak correlation (r = 0.33) with CTW(n) in Group A. SNR values demonstrated a weak negative correlation (r = -0.46) with CTW(n) in Group C. MDCT with higher slice numbers used more tube potential resulting in higher effective doses. There were both significantly lower CTDI and SNR values in helical mode than in axial mode in Group B, but not Group C. Conclusion CTW(n) and CTW(s) did not influence radiation output. Helical mode is more often used in MDCT and results in both lower CTDI and SNR compared to axial mode in MDCT with less than 64 slices. PMID:26125549

  11. Estimating radiation dose to organs of patients undergoing conventional and novel multidetector CT exams using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, Erin

    Advances in Computed Tomography (CT) technology have led to an increase in the modality's diagnostic capabilities and therefore its utilization, which has in turn led to an increase in radiation exposure to the patient population. As a result, CT imaging currently constitutes approximately half of the collective exposure to ionizing radiation from medical procedures. In order to understand the radiation risk, it is necessary to estimate the radiation doses absorbed by patients undergoing CT imaging. The most widely accepted risk models are based on radiosensitive organ dose as opposed to whole body dose. In this research, radiosensitive organ dose was estimated using Monte Carlo based simulations incorporating detailed multidetector CT (MDCT) scanner models, specific scan protocols, and using patient models based on accurate patient anatomy and representing a range of patient sizes. Organ dose estimates were estimated for clinical MDCT exam protocols which pose a specific concern for radiosensitive organs or regions. These dose estimates include estimation of fetal dose for pregnant patients undergoing abdomen pelvis CT exams or undergoing exams to diagnose pulmonary embolism and venous thromboembolism. Breast and lung dose were estimated for patients undergoing coronary CTA imaging, conventional fixed tube current chest CT, and conventional tube current modulated (TCM) chest CT exams. The correlation of organ dose with patient size was quantified for pregnant patients undergoing abdomen/pelvis exams and for all breast and lung dose estimates presented. Novel dose reduction techniques were developed that incorporate organ location and are specifically designed to reduce close to radiosensitive organs during CT acquisition. A generalizable model was created for simulating conventional and novel attenuation-based TCM algorithms which can be used in simulations estimating organ dose for any patient model. The generalizable model is a significant contribution of this

  12. Monte Carlo simulations in multi-detector CT (MDCT) for two PET/CT scanner models using MASH and FASH adult phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belinato, W.; Santos, W. S.; Paschoal, C. M. M.; Souza, D. N.

    2015-06-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) has been extensively used in oncology for diagnosis and staging of tumors, radiotherapy planning and follow-up of patients with cancer, as well as in cardiology and neurology. This study determines by the Monte Carlo method the internal organ dose deposition for computational phantoms created by multidetector CT (MDCT) beams of two PET/CT devices operating with different parameters. The different MDCT beam parameters were largely related to the total filtration that provides a beam energetic change inside the gantry. This parameter was determined experimentally with the Accu-Gold Radcal measurement system. The experimental values of the total filtration were included in the simulations of two MCNPX code scenarios. The absorbed organ doses obtained in MASH and FASH phantoms indicate that bowtie filter geometry and the energy of the X-ray beam have significant influence on the results, although this influence can be compensated by adjusting other variables such as the tube current-time product (mAs) and pitch during PET/CT procedures.

  13. A model for quantitative correction of coronary calcium scores on multidetector, dual source, and electron beam computed tomography for influences of linear motion, calcification density, and temporal resolution: A cardiac phantom study

    SciTech Connect

    Greuter, M. J. W.; Groen, J. M.; Nicolai, L. J.; Dijkstra, H.; Oudkerk, M.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to quantify the influence of linear motion, calcification density, and temporal resolution on coronary calcium determination using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), dual source CT (DSCT), and electron beam tomography (EBT) and to find a quantitative method which corrects for the influences of these parameters using a linear moving cardiac phantom. Methods: On a robotic arm with artificial arteries with four calcifications of increasing density, a linear movement was applied between 0 and 120 mm/s (step of 10 mm/s). The phantom was scanned five times on 64-slice MDCT, DSCT, and EBT using a standard acquisition protocol. The average Agatston, volume, and mass scores were determined for each velocity, calcification, and scanner. Susceptibility to motion was quantified using a cardiac motion susceptibility (CMS) index. Resemblance to EBT and physical volume and mass was quantified using a {Delta} index. Results: Increasing motion artifacts were observed at increasing velocities on all scanners, with increasing severity from EBT to DSCT to 64-slice MDCT. The calcium score showed a linear dependency on motion from which a correction factor could be derived. This correction factor showed a linear dependency on the mean calcification density with a good fit for all three scoring methods and all three scanners (0.73{<=}R{sup 2}{<=}0.95). The slope and offset of this correction factor showed a linear dependency on temporal resolution with a good fit for all three scoring methods and all three scanners (0.83{<=}R{sup 2}{<=}0.98). CMS was minimal for EBT and increasing values were observed for DSCT and highest values for 64-slice MDCT. CMS was minimal for mass score and increasing values were observed for volume score and highest values for Agatston score. For all densities and scoring methods DSCT showed on average the closest resemblance to EBT calcium scores. When using the correction factor, CMS index decreased on average by

  14. Monte Carlo simulations to assess the effects of tube current modulation on breast dose for multidetector CT

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Erin; Yaghmai, Nazanin; Jude, Cecilia Matilda; DeMarco, John J; Cagnon, Christopher H; Goldin, Jonathan G; Primak, Andrew N; Stevens, Donna M; Cody, Dianna D; McCollough, Cynthia H; McNitt-Gray, Michael F

    2010-01-01

    Tube current modulation was designed to reduce radiation dose in CT imaging while maintaining overall image quality. This study aims to develop a method for evaluating the effects of tube current modulation (TCM) on organ dose in CT exams of actual patient anatomy. This method was validated by simulating a TCM and a fixed tube current chest CT exam on 30 voxelized patient models and estimating the radiation dose to each patient’s glandular breast tissue. This new method for estimating organ dose was compared with other conventional estimates of dose reduction. Thirty detailed voxelized models of patient anatomy were created based on image data from female patients who had previously undergone clinically indicated CT scans including the chest area. As an indicator of patient size, the perimeter of the patient was measured on the image containing at least one nipple using a semi-automated technique. The breasts were contoured on each image set by a radiologist and glandular tissue was semi-automatically segmented from this region. Previously validated Monte Carlo models of two multidetector CT scanners were used, taking into account details about the source spectra, filtration, collimation and geometry of the scanner. TCM data were obtained from each patient’s clinical scan and factored into the model to simulate the effects of TCM. For each patient model, two exams were simulated: a fixed tube current chest CT and a tube current modulated chest CT. X-ray photons were transported through the anatomy of the voxelized patient models, and radiation dose was tallied in the glandular breast tissue. The resulting doses from the tube current modulated simulations were compared to the results obtained from simulations performed using a fixed mA value. The average radiation dose to the glandular breast tissue from a fixed tube current scan across all patient models was 19 mGy. The average reduction in breast dose using the tube current modulated scan was 17%. Results were

  15. Characterization of Pulmonary Vein Dimensions Using High-Definition 64-Slice Computed Tomography prior to Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Stähli, Barbara E.; Klaeser, Bernd; Fuchs, Tobias A.; Ghadri, Jelena R.; Lüscher, Thomas F.; Kaufmann, Philipp A.; Duru, Firat

    2014-01-01

    Background. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography is commonly acquired before radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) for atrial fibrillation (AFib) to guide the procedure. We analyzed pulmonary vein (PV) ostial diameter and volumes on a high-definition 64-slice CT (HDCT) scanner in patients with AFib prior to RFCA. Methods and Results. This retrospective study included 50 patients (mean age 60.2 ± 11.4 years, 30 males) undergoing cardiac HDCT scanning before RFCA for drug refractory AFib and 50 age-, BMI-, and sex-matched controls with normal sinus rhythm undergoing HDCT. PV ostial diameter and volume were measured and calculated using a semiautomatic calliper tool. Total ostial PV volume was significantly increased in patients with AFib as compared to controls (P < 0.005). Similarly, total ostial PV diameter was significantly increased in AFib compared to controls (P < 0.001). In AFib, the largest PV volume and diameters were measured in right superior PV (P < 0.05 versus controls). The difference in PV volume between patients and controls was most pronounced in right superior PVs (P = 0.015). Right middle PVs were found more often in patients with AFib (16/50; 32%) than in normal subjects (7/50; 14%). Conclusion. Enlargement of PV ostial area and enlargement of volume are frequent findings in patients with drug refractory AFib. These parameters may add to the risk stratification for AFib recurrence following RFCA. PMID:25089213

  16. Missed rib fractures on evaluation of initial chest CT for trauma patients: pattern analysis and diagnostic value of coronal multiplanar reconstruction images with multidetector row CT

    PubMed Central

    Cho, S H; Sung, Y M; Kim, M S

    2012-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to review the prevalence and radiological features of rib fractures missed on initial chest CT evaluation, and to examine the diagnostic value of additional coronal images in a large series of trauma patients. Methods 130 patients who presented to an emergency room for blunt chest trauma underwent multidetector row CT of the thorax within the first hour during their stay, and had follow-up CT or bone scans as diagnostic gold standards. Images were evaluated on two separate occasions: once with axial images and once with both axial and coronal images. The detection rates of missed rib fractures were compared between readings using a non-parametric method of clustered data. In the cases of missed rib fractures, the shapes, locations and associated fractures were evaluated. Results 58 rib fractures were missed with axial images only and 52 were missed with both axial and coronal images (p=0.088). The most common shape of missed rib fractures was buckled (56.9%), and the anterior arc (55.2%) was most commonly involved. 21 (36.2%) missed rib fractures had combined fractures on the same ribs, and 38 (65.5%) were accompanied by fracture on neighbouring ribs. Conclusion Missed rib fractures are not uncommon, and radiologists should be familiar with buckle fractures, which are frequently missed. Additional coronal imagescan be helpful in the diagnosis of rib fractures that are not seen on axial images. PMID:22514102

  17. Comparison of Multidetector CT and Gadobutrol-Enhanced MR Imaging for Evaluation of Small, Solid Pancreatic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Tae Won; Kim, Jung Hoon; Yu, Mi Hye; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and MRI for lesion conspicuity, as well as the detection and characterization of small solid pancreatic lesions (SPLs). Materials and Methods 193 patients with small SPLs (< 3 cm) and 52 patients with normal pancreas who underwent both multiphasic MDCT and gadobutrol-enhanced MRI were included in our study. Two radiologists blinded to the pathologic diagnoses independently reviewed those images, and determined the detection of "SPL per se" and "SPL in consideration of secondary features", the lesion conspicuity, the probability of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), and the most likely specific diagnosis. Results The sensitivity of MRI for "detection of SPL per se" was significantly higher than that of CT in both reviewers: 92.7% (179/193) and 97.9% (189/193), respectively, for reviewer 1 (p = 0.031) and 90.7% (175/193) and 99.5% (192/193), respectively, for reviewer 2 (p < 0.001). In addition, MRI provided better lesion conspicuity than MDCT for both reviewers (p < 0.001). However, CT and MRI did not show significant difference in sensitivity for "detection of SPL in consideration of secondary features", specificity for SPL detection, and differentiation of PDAC vs. non-PDAC (p > 0.05). The accuracies of CT and MRI for making a specific diagnosis were as follows: 85.7% (210/245) vs. 86.9% (213/245), respectively, for reviewer 1 (p = 0.736), and 91.8% (225/245) vs. 93.5% (229/245), respectively, for reviewer 2 (p = 0.454). Conclusion MRI showed better lesion conspicuity than MDCT, but did not show significantly different diagnostic performance compared with MDCT for detecting and characterizing small SPLs. PMID:27390542

  18. Detection, visualization and evaluation of anomalous coronary anatomy on 16-slice multidetector-row CT.

    PubMed

    van Ooijen, Peter M A; Dorgelo, Joost; Zijlstra, Felix; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2004-12-01

    Early identification and evaluation of relatively frequent anomalous coronary anatomy is quite relevant because of the occurrence of sudden cardiac death or related symptoms of myocardial ischemia. Selective coronary angiography (CAG) is invasive, expensive and cannot always provide the required information adequately. Recently, non-invasive imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) have been shown to provide a good anatomical view of the coronary artery tree. This study aims to demonstrate the value of 16-MDCT for evaluation of anomalous coronary anatomy. In 13 patients scanned using 16-MDCT, six different coronary anomalies were diagnosed [two absent left main, one single vessel left coronary artery (LCA), three LCA originating from the right (two with interarterial course), six right coronary artery originating from the left, one double left anterior descending (LAD)]. Mean diagnostic quality, recorded by two observers using a 5-point scale (1= non-diagnostic to 5= excellent diagnostic quality), resulted in a mean score of 3.73 (SD 1.19) without any non-diagnostic result. MDCT offers an accurate diagnostic modality to visualize the origin and course of anomalous coronary arteries by a three-dimensional display of anatomy. Shortcomings in CAG can be overcome by the use of contrast-enhanced MDCT. PMID:15452665

  19. Multi-detector CT features of acute intestinal ischemia and their prognostic correlations

    PubMed Central

    Moschetta, Marco; Telegrafo, Michele; Rella, Leonarda; Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio; Angelelli, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Acute intestinal ischemia is an abdominal emergency occurring in nearly 1% of patients presenting with acute abdomen. The causes can be occlusive or non occlusive. Early diagnosis is important to improve survival rates. In most cases of late or missed diagnosis, the mortality rate from intestinal infarction is very high, with a reported value ranging from 60% to 90%. Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) is a fundamental imaging technique that must be promptly performed in all patients with suspected bowel ischemia. Thanks to the new dedicated reconstruction program, its diagnostic potential is much improved compared to the past and currently it is superior to that of any other noninvasive technique. The increased spatial and temporal resolution, high-quality multi-planar reconstructions, maximum intensity projections, vessel probe, surface-shaded volume rending and tissue transition projections make MDCT the gold standard for the diagnosis of intestinal ischemia, with reported sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of 64%-93%, 92%-100%, 90%-100% and 94%-98%, respectively. MDCT contributes to appropriate treatment planning and provides important prognostic information thanks to its ability to define the nature and extent of the disease. The purpose of this review is to examine the diagnostic and prognostic role of MDCT in bowel ischemia with special regard to the state of art new reconstruction software. PMID:24876917

  20. Volume Changes of Experimental Carotid Sidewall Aneurysms Due to Embolization with Liquid Embolic Agents: A Multidetector CT Angiography Study

    SciTech Connect

    Dudeck, O. Okuducu, A. F.; Jordan, O.; Tesmer, K.; Pech, M.; Weigang, E.; Ruefenacht, D. A.; Doelker, E.; Felix, R.

    2006-12-15

    Iodine-containing polyvinyl alcohol polymer (I-PVAL) is a novel precipitating liquid embolic that allows for artifact-free evaluation of CT angiography (CTA). As accurate aneurysm volumetry can be performed with multidetector CTA, we determined volumes of experimental aneurysms before, immediately after, and 4 weeks after embolization of 14 porcine experimental carotid sidewall aneurysms with this liquid embolic. An automated three-dimensional software measurement tool was used for volumetric analysis of volume-rendering CTA data. Furthermore, intra-aneurysmal pressure changes during liquid embolization were measured in four silicone aneurysms and potential polymer volume changes within 4 weeks were assessed in vitro. Liquid embolic injection was performed during temporary balloon occlusion of the aneurysm neck, resulting in a mean occlusion rate of 98.3%. Aneurysms enlarged significantly during embolization by 61.1 {+-} 28.9%, whereas a significant shrinkage of 5.6 {+-} 2.7% was observed within the follow-up period. Histologic analysis revealed an inflammatory foreign body reaction with partial polymer degradation. In silicone aneurysm models, intra-aneurysmal pressure remained unchanged during liquid embolic injection, whereas balloon inflation resulted in a mean pressure increase of 31.2 {+-} 0.7%. No polymer shrinkage was observed in vitro. The aneurysm enlargement noted was presumably due to pressure elevation after balloon inflation, which resulted in dilatation of the weak venous wall of the newly constructed aneurysm-another shortcoming of this experimental aneurysm model. The volume decrease after 4 weeks expressed partial polymer degradation.

  1. Multidetector CT Enterography versus Double-Balloon Enteroscopy: Comparison of the Diagnostic Value for Patients with Suspected Small Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qiaozhen; Zhao, Jianping; Liu, Mei; Liao, Guangquan; Chen, Nianjun; Tian, Dean; Wu, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To compare the diagnostic value of multidetector CT enterography (MDCTE) and double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) for patients with suspected small bowel diseases. Methods. From January 2009 to January 2014, 190 patients with suspected small bowel diseases were examined with MDCTE and DBE. The characteristics of the patients, detection rates, diagnostic yields, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were described and analyzed. Results. The overall detection rates of DBE and MDCTE were 92.6% and 55.8%, respectively (P<0.05), while the overall diagnostic yields were 83.2% and 33.7%, respectively (P<0.05). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of DBE were all higher than those of MDCTE. DBE had a higher diagnostic yield for OGIB (87.3% versus 20.9%, P<0.05). The diagnostic yields of DBE were higher than those of MDCTE for inflammatory diseases, angioma/angiodysplasia, and diverticulums, while being not for gastrointestinal tumors/polyps. Conclusions. The diagnostic value of DBE for small bowel diseases is better than that of MDCTE as a whole, but if gastrointestinal tumors are suspected, MDCTE is also needed to gain a comprehensive and accurate diagnosis. PMID:26962305

  2. Multidetector CT Enterography versus Double-Balloon Enteroscopy: Comparison of the Diagnostic Value for Patients with Suspected Small Bowel Diseases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Guo, Qiaozhen; Zhao, Jianping; Liu, Mei; Liao, Guangquan; Chen, Nianjun; Tian, Dean; Wu, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To compare the diagnostic value of multidetector CT enterography (MDCTE) and double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) for patients with suspected small bowel diseases. Methods. From January 2009 to January 2014, 190 patients with suspected small bowel diseases were examined with MDCTE and DBE. The characteristics of the patients, detection rates, diagnostic yields, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were described and analyzed. Results. The overall detection rates of DBE and MDCTE were 92.6% and 55.8%, respectively (P<0.05), while the overall diagnostic yields were 83.2% and 33.7%, respectively (P<0.05). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of DBE were all higher than those of MDCTE. DBE had a higher diagnostic yield for OGIB (87.3% versus 20.9%, P<0.05). The diagnostic yields of DBE were higher than those of MDCTE for inflammatory diseases, angioma/angiodysplasia, and diverticulums, while being not for gastrointestinal tumors/polyps. Conclusions. The diagnostic value of DBE for small bowel diseases is better than that of MDCTE as a whole, but if gastrointestinal tumors are suspected, MDCTE is also needed to gain a comprehensive and accurate diagnosis. PMID:26962305

  3. Noise-reducing algorithms do not necessarily provide superior dose optimisation for hepatic lesion detection with multidetector CT

    PubMed Central

    Dobeli, K L; Lewis, S J; Meikle, S R; Thiele, D L; Brennan, P C

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the dose-optimisation potential of a smoothing filtered backprojection (FBP) and a hybrid FBP/iterative algorithm to that of a standard FBP algorithm at three slice thicknesses for hepatic lesion detection with multidetector CT. Methods: A liver phantom containing a 9.5-mm opacity with a density of 10 HU below background was scanned at 125, 100, 75, 50 and 25 mAs. Data were reconstructed with standard FBP (B), smoothing FBP (A) and hybrid FBP/iterative (iDose4) algorithms at 5-, 3- and 1-mm collimation. 10 observers marked opacities using a four-point confidence scale. Jackknife alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic figure of merit (FOM), sensitivity and noise were calculated. Results: Compared with the 125-mAs/5-mm setting for each algorithm, significant reductions in FOM (p<0.05) and sensitivity (p<0.05) were found for all three algorithms for all exposures at 1-mm thickness and for all slice thicknesses at 25 mAs, with the exception of the 25-mAs/5-mm setting for the B algorithm. Sensitivity was also significantly reduced for all exposures at 3-mm thickness for the A algorithm (p<0.05). Noise for the A and iDose4 algorithms was approximately 13% and 21% lower, respectively, than for the B algorithm. Conclusion: Superior performance for hepatic lesion detection was not shown with either a smoothing FBP algorithm or a hybrid FBP/iterative algorithm compared with a standard FBP technique, even though noise reduction with thinner slices was demonstrated with the alternative approaches. Advances in knowledge: Reductions in image noise with non-standard CT algorithms do not necessarily translate to an improvement in low-contrast object detection. PMID:23392194

  4. Nonalcoholic Hepatic Steatosis Is a Strong Predictor of High-Risk Coronary-Artery Plaques as Determined by Multidetector CT

    PubMed Central

    Osawa, Kazuhiro; Miyoshi, Toru; Yamauchi, Kentarou; Koyama, Yasushi; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Sato, Shuhei; Kanazawa, Susumu; Ito, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Background Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with a risk of coronary artery disease (e.g., diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome). We evaluated whether nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis is associated with high-risk plaques as assessed by multidetector computed tomography (CT). Methods This retrospective study involved 414 participants suspected of having coronary artery disease. Nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis was defined as a liver-to-spleen fat ratio of <1.0 and the presence and appropriate characteristics of coronary-artery plaques as assessed by coronary CT angiography. High-risk plaques were identified, as were low-density plaques, positive remodeling, and spotty calcification. Results Compared with patients who did not have nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis, patients with nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis had more low-density plaques (21% vs. 44%, p<0.01), positive remodeling (41% vs. 58%, p = 0.01), and spotty calcification (12% vs. 36%, p<0.01). The number of high-risk plaques in patients with nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis was greater than in those without nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis (p<0.01). Patients with nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis were more likely to have high-risk plaques than were those with only an elevated level of visceral adipose tissue (≥86 cm2; 35% vs. 16%, p<0.01). Multivariate analyses that included nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis, amount of visceral adipose tissue, and the presence/absence of traditional risk factors demonstrated that nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis was an independent predictor of high-risk plaques (odds ratio: 4.60; 95% confidence interval: 1.94–9.07, p<0.01). Conclusions Diagnosis of nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis may be of value when assessing the risk of coronary artery disease. PMID:26125952

  5. 64 slice-coronary computed tomography sensitivity and specificity in the evaluation of coronary artery bypass graft stenosis: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Barbero, Umberto; Iannaccone, Mario; d'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Barbero, Cristina; Mohamed, Abdirashid; Annone, Umberto; Benedetto, Sara; Celentani, Dario; Gagliardi, Marco; Moretti, Claudio; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2016-08-01

    A non-invasive approach to define grafts patency and stenosis in the follow-up of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) patients may be an interesting alternative to coronary angiography. 64-slice-coronary computed tomography is nowadays a diffused non-invasive method that permits an accurate evaluation of coronary stenosis, due to a high temporal and spatial resolution. However, its sensitivity and specificity in CABG evaluation has to be clearly defined, since published studies used different protocols and scanners. We collected all studies investigating patients with stable symptoms and previous CABG and reporting the comparison between diagnostic performances of invasive coronary angiography and 64-slice-coronary computed tomography. As a result, sensitivity and specificity of 64-slice-coronary computed tomography for CABG occlusion were 0.99 (95% CI 0.97-1.00) and 0.99 (95% CI: 0.99-1.00) with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.99. 64-slice-coronary computed tomography sensitivity and specificity for the presence of any CABG stenosis >50% were 0.98 (95% CI: 0.97-0.99) and 0.98 (95% CI: 0.96-0.98), while AUC was 0.99. At meta-regression, neither the age nor the time from graft implantation had effect on sensitivity and specificity of 64-slice-coronary computed tomography detection of significant CABG stenosis or occlusion. In conclusion 64-slice-coronary computed tomography confirmed its high sensitivity and specificity in CABG stenosis or occlusion evaluation. PMID:27140337

  6. A retrospective comparison of smart prep and test bolus multi-detector CT pulmonary angiography protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Suckling, Tara; Smith, Tony; Reed, Warren

    2013-06-15

    Optimal arterial opacification is crucial in imaging the pulmonary arteries using computed tomography (CT). This poses the challenge of precisely timing data acquisition to coincide with the transit of the contrast bolus through the pulmonary vasculature. The aim of this quality assurance exercise was to investigate if a change in CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) scanning protocol resulted in improved opacification of the pulmonary arteries. Comparison was made between the smart prep protocol (SPP) and the test bolus protocol (TBP) for opacification in the pulmonary trunk. A total of 160 CTPA examinations (80 using each protocol) performed between January 2010 and February 2011 were assessed retrospectively. CT attenuation coefficients were measured in Hounsfield Units (HU) using regions of interest at the level of the pulmonary trunk. The average pixel value, standard deviation (SD), maximum, and minimum were recorded. For each of these variables a mean value was then calculated and compared for these two CTPA protocols. Minimum opacification of 200 HU was achieved in 98% of the TBP sample but only 90% of the SPP sample. The average CT attenuation over the pulmonary trunk for the SPP was 329 (SD = ±21) HU, whereas for the TBP it was 396 (SD = ±22) HU (P = 0.0017). The TBP also recorded higher maximum (P = 0.0024) and minimum (P = 0.0039) levels of opacification. This study has found that a TBP resulted in significantly better opacification of the pulmonary trunk than the SPP.

  7. Automated characterization of normal and pathologic lung tissue by topological texture analysis of multidetector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, H. F.; Fink, C.; Becker, C.; Reiser, M.

    2007-03-01

    Reliable and accurate methods for objective quantitative assessment of parenchymal alterations in the lung are necessary for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of pulmonary diseases. Two major types of alterations are pulmonary emphysema and fibrosis, emphysema being characterized by abnormal enlargement of the air spaces distal to the terminal, nonrespiratory bronchiole, accompanied by destructive changes of the alveolar walls. The main characteristic of fibrosis is coursening of the interstitial fibers and compaction of the pulmonary tissue. With the ability to display anatomy free from superimposing structures and greater visual clarity, Multi-Detector-CT has shown to be more sensitive than the chest radiograph in identifying alterations of lung parenchyma. In automated evaluation of pulmonary CT-scans, quantitative image processing techniques are applied for objective evaluation of the data. A number of methods have been proposed in the past, most of which utilize simple densitometric tissue features based on the mean X-ray attenuation coefficients expressed in terms of Hounsfield Units [HU]. Due to partial volume effects, most of the density-based methodologies tend to fail, namely in cases, where emphysema and fibrosis occur within narrow spatial limits. In this study, we propose a methodology based upon the topological assessment of graylevel distribution in the 3D image data of lung tissue which provides a way of improving quantitative CT evaluation. Results are compared to the more established density-based methods.

  8. Reliability of vertebral fracture assessment using multidetector CT lateral scout views: the Framingham Osteoporosis Study

    PubMed Central

    Samelson, E. J.; Christiansen, B. A.; Demissie, S.; Broe, K. E.; Zhou, Y.; Meng, C. A.; Yu, W.; Cheng, X.; O’Donnell, C. J.; Hoffmann, U.; Genant, H. K.; Kiel, D. P.; Bouxsein, M. L.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Two radiologists evaluated images of the spine from computed tomography (CT) scans on two occasions to diagnose vertebral fracture in 100 individuals. Agreement was fair to good for mild fractures, and agreement was good to excellent for more severe fractures. CT scout views are useful to assess vertebral fracture. Introduction We investigated inter-reader agreement between two radiologists and intra-reader agreement between duplicate readings for each radiologist, in assessment of vertebral fracture using a semi-quantitative method from lateral scout views obtained by CT. Methods Participants included 50 women and 50 men (age 50-87 years, mean 70 years) in the Framingham Study. T4-L4 vertebrae were assessed independently by two radiologists on two occasions using a semi-quantitative scale as normal, mild, moderate, or severe fracture. Results Vertebra-specific prevalence of grade ≥1 (mild) fracture ranged from 3% to 5%. We found fair (κ=56-59%) inter-reader agreement for grade ≥1 vertebral fractures and good (κ=68-72%) inter-reader agreement for grade ≥2 fractures. Intra-reader agreement for grade ≥1 vertebral fracture was fair (κ=55%) for one reader and excellent for another reader (κ=77%), whereas intra-reader agreement for grade ≥2 vertebral fracture was excellent for both readers (κ=76% and 98%). Thoracic vertebrae were more difficult to evaluate than the lumbar region, and agreement was lowest (inter-reader κ=43%) for fracture at the upper (T4-T9) thoracic levels and highest (inter-reader κ=76-78%) for the lumbar spine (L1-L4). Conclusions Based on a semi-quantitative method to classify vertebral fractures using CT scout views, agreement within and between readers was fair to good, with the greatest source of variation occurring for fractures of mild severity and for the upper thoracic region. Agreement was good to excellent for fractures of at least moderate severity. Lateral CT scout views can be useful in clinical research settings

  9. Clinical value of multidetector CT coronary angiography as a preoperative screening test before non‐coronary cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Vincenzo; Gostoli, Valentina; Lovato, Luigi; Montalti, Maurizio; Marzocchi, Antonio; Gavelli, Giampaolo; Branzi, Angelo; Bartolomeo, Roberto Di; Fattori, Rossella

    2007-01-01

    Objective Myocardial scintigraphy and/or conventional angiography (CA) are often performed before cardiac surgery in an attempt to identify unsuspected coronary artery disease which might result in significant cardiac morbidity and mortality. Multidetector CT coronary angiography (MDCTCA) has a recognised high negative predictive value and may provide a non‐invasive alternative in this subset of patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical value of MDCTCA as a preoperative screening test in candidates for non‐coronary cardiac surgery. Methods 132 patients underwent MDCTCA (Somatom Sensation 16 Cardiac, Siemens) in the assessment of the cardiac risk profile before surgery. Coronary arteries were screened for ⩾50% stenosis. Patients without significant stenosis (Group 1) underwent surgery without any adjunctive screening tests while all patients with coronary lesions ⩾50% at MDCTCA (Group 2) underwent CA. Results 16 patients (12.1%) were excluded due to poor image quality. 72 patients without significant coronary stenosis at MDCTCA were submitted to surgery. 30 out of 36 patients with significant (⩾50%) coronary stenosis at MDCTCA and CA underwent adjunctive bypass surgery or coronary angioplasty. In 8 patients, MDCTCA overestimated the severity of the coronary lesions (>50% MDCTCA, <50% CA). No severe cardiovascular perioperative events such as myocardial ischaemia, myocardial infarction or cardiac failure occurred in any patient in Group 1. Conclusions MDCTCA seems to be effective as a preoperative screening test prior to non‐coronary cardiac surgery. In this era of cost containment and optimal care of patients, MDCTCA is able to provide coronary vessel and ventricular function evaluation and may become the method of choice for the assessment of a cardiovascular risk profile prior to major surgery. PMID:17164488

  10. Quantitative Features of Liver Lesions, Lung Nodules, and Renal Stones at Multi-Detector Row CT Examinations: Dependency on Radiation Dose and Reconstruction Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Justin; Mileto, Achille; Nelson, Rendon C; Roy Choudhury, Kingshuk; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-04-01

    Purpose To determine if radiation dose and reconstruction algorithm affect the computer-based extraction and analysis of quantitative imaging features in lung nodules, liver lesions, and renal stones at multi-detector row computed tomography (CT). Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of data from a prospective, multicenter, HIPAA-compliant, institutional review board-approved clinical trial was performed by extracting 23 quantitative imaging features (size, shape, attenuation, edge sharpness, pixel value distribution, and texture) of lesions on multi-detector row CT images of 20 adult patients (14 men, six women; mean age, 63 years; range, 38-72 years) referred for known or suspected focal liver lesions, lung nodules, or kidney stones. Data were acquired between September 2011 and April 2012. All multi-detector row CT scans were performed at two different radiation dose levels; images were reconstructed with filtered back projection, adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction, and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) algorithms. A linear mixed-effects model was used to assess the effect of radiation dose and reconstruction algorithm on extracted features. Results Among the 23 imaging features assessed, radiation dose had a significant effect on five, three, and four of the features for liver lesions, lung nodules, and renal stones, respectively (P < .002 for all comparisons). Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction had a significant effect on three, one, and one of the features for liver lesions, lung nodules, and renal stones, respectively (P < .002 for all comparisons). MBIR reconstruction had a significant effect on nine, 11, and 15 of the features for liver lesions, lung nodules, and renal stones, respectively (P < .002 for all comparisons). Of note, the measured size of lung nodules and renal stones with MBIR was significantly different than those for the other two algorithms (P < .002 for all comparisons). Although lesion texture was

  11. Crossed Fused Renal Ectopia: Presentations on 99mTc-MAG3 Scan, 99mTc-DMSA SPECT, and Multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Moon, Eun Ha; Kim, Min-Woo; Kim, Young Jun; Sun, In O

    2015-10-01

    Crossed renal ectopia is an uncommon developmental anomaly in which both kidneys are located on the same side of the body. The present case describes a 20-year-old man who underwent the military entrance physical examination. The ultrasound showed the right kidney in normal site with slightly increased size, but the left kidney was not identified. Tc-MAG3 scan showed a single kidney with 2 ureters, and the orifices of the ureters were connected at both sides of bladder. Tc-DMSA SPECT and contrast-enhanced multidetector CT were performed and revealed crossed fused renal ectopia. PMID:26252333

  12. Optimised z-axis coverage at multidetector-row CT in adults suspected of acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Brassart, N; Winant, C; Tack, D; Gevenois, P A; De Maertelaer, V

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare diagnostic performances of two reduced z-axis coverages to full coverage of the abdomen and pelvis for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and alternative diseases at unenhanced CT. Methods: This study included 152 adults suspected of appendicitis who were enrolled in two ethical committee-approved previous prospective trials. Based on scans covering the entire abdomen and pelvis (set L), two additional sets of images were generated, each with reduced z-axis coverages: (1) from the top of the iliac crests to the pubis (set S) and (2) from the diaphragmatic crus to the pubis (set M). Two readers independently coded the visualisation of the appendix, measured its diameter and proposed a diagnosis (appendicitis or alternative). Final diagnosis was based on surgical findings or clinical follow-up. Fisher exact and McNemar tests and logistic regression were used. Results: 46 patients had a definite diagnosis of appendicitis and 53 of alternative diseases. The frequency of appendix visualisation was lower for set S than set L for both readers (89% and 84% vs 95% and 91% by Readers A and B, respectively; p=0.021 and 0.022). The probability of giving a correct diagnosis was lower for set S (68%) than set L (78%; odds ratio, 0.611; p=0.008) for both readers, without significant difference between sets L and M (77%, p=0.771); z-axis coverage being reduced by 25% for set M. Conclusion: Coverage from diaphragmatic crus to pubis, but not focused on pelvis only, can be recommended in adults suspected of appendicitis. Advances in knowledge: In suspected appendicitis, CT-coverage can be reduced from diaphragmatic crus to pubis. PMID:23690436

  13. Computerized assessment of motion-contaminated calcified plaques in cardiac multidetector CT

    SciTech Connect

    King, Martin; Giger, Maryellen L.; Suzuki, Kenji; Bardo, Dianna M. E.; Greenberg, Brent; Lan Li; Pan Xiaochuan

    2007-12-15

    An automated method for evaluating the image quality of calcified plaques with respect to motion artifacts in noncontrast-enhanced cardiac computed tomography (CT) images is introduced. This method involves using linear regression (LR) and artificial neural network (ANN) regression models for predicting two patient-specific, region-of-interest-specific, reconstruction-specific and temporal phase-specific image quality indices. The first is a plaque motion index, which is derived from the actual trajectory of the calcified plaque and is represented on a continuous scale. The second is an assessability index, which reflects the degree to which a calcified plaque is affected by motion artifacts, and is represented on an ordinal five-point scale. Two sets of assessability indices were provided independently by two radiologists experienced in evaluating cardiac CT images. Inputs for the regression models were selected from 12 features characterizing the dynamic, morphological, and intensity-based properties of the calcified plaques. Whereas LR-velocity (LR-V) used only a single feature (three-dimensional velocity), the LR-multiple (LR-M) and ANN regression models used the same subset of these 12 features selected through stepwise regression. The regression models were parameterized and evaluated using a database of simulated calcified plaque images from the dynamic NCAT phantom involving nine heart rate/multi-sector gating combinations and 40 cardiac phases covering two cardiac cycles. Six calcified plaques were used for the plaque motion indices and three calcified plaques were used for both sets of assessability indices. In one configuration, images from the second cardiac cycle were used for feature selection and regression model parameterization, whereas images from the first cardiac cycle were used for testing. With this configuration, repeated measures concordance correlation coefficients (CCCs) and associated 95% confidence intervals for the LR-V, LR-M, and ANN

  14. Improving Image Quality of On-Board Cone-Beam CT in Radiation Therapy Using Image Information Provided by Planning Multi-Detector CT: A Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ching-Ching; Chen, Fong-Lin; Lo, Yeh-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to improve the image quality of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) mounted on the gantry of a linear accelerator used in radiation therapy based on the image information provided by planning multi-detector CT (MDCT). Methods MDCT-based shading correction for CBCT and virtual monochromatic CT (VMCT) synthesized using the dual-energy method were performed. In VMCT, the high-energy data were obtained from CBCT, while the low-energy data were obtained from MDCT. An electron density phantom was used to investigate the efficacy of shading correction and VMCT on improving the target detectability, Hounsfield unit (HU) accuracy and variation, which were quantified by calculating the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the percent difference (%Diff) and the standard deviation of the CT numbers for tissue equivalent background material, respectively. Treatment plan studies for a chest phantom were conducted to investigate the effects of image quality improvement on dose planning. Results For the electron density phantom, the mean value of CNR was 17.84, 26.78 and 34.31 in CBCT, shading-corrected CBCT and VMCT, respectively. The mean value of %Diff was 152.67%, 11.93% and 7.66% in CBCT, shading-corrected CBCT and VMCT, respectively. The standard deviation within a uniform background of CBCT, shading-corrected CBCT and VMCT was 85, 23 and 15 HU, respectively. With regards to the chest phantom, the monitor unit (MU) difference between the treatment plan calculated using MDCT and those based on CBCT, shading corrected CBCT and VMCT was 6.32%, 1.05% and 0.94%, respectively. Conclusions Enhancement of image quality in on-board CBCT can contribute to daily patient setup and adaptive dose delivery, thus enabling higher confidence in patient treatment accuracy in radiation therapy. Based on our results, VMCT has the highest image quality, followed by the shading corrected CBCT and the original CBCT. The research results presented in this study should be

  15. Cardiac sarcoidosis evaluated with gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance and contrast-enhanced 64-slice computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Smedema, Jan-Peter; Truter, Rene; de Klerk, Petra A; Zaaiman, Leonie; White, Leonie; Doubell, Anton F

    2006-09-20

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-system granulomatous disorder of unknown etiology with symptomatic cardiac involvement in up to 7% of patients. The clinical features of sarcoid heart disease include congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, conduction disturbances, and sudden death. We evaluated the value of contrast-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography in delineating myocardial scar and granulomatous inflammation by comparing our findings with gadolinium magnetic resonance in a patient diagnosed with cardiac sarcoidosis. PMID:16257460

  16. Dosimetric characterization and image quality evaluation of the AIRO mobile CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Weir, Victor J; Zhang, Jie; Bruner, Angela P

    2015-01-01

    Radiation dose and image quality from a recently introduced mobile CT imaging system are presented. Radiation dose was measured using a conventional 100 mm pencil ionization chamber and CT polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA) body and head phantoms. Image quality was evaluated with a CATPHAN 500 phantom. Spatial resolution, low contrast resolution, Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), and Normalized Noise Power Spectrum (NNPS) were analyzed. Radiation dose and image quality were compared to those from a multi-detector CT scanner (Siemens Sensation 64). Under identical technique factors radiation dose (mGy/mAs) from the AIRO mobile CT system (AIRO) is higher than that from a 64 slice CT scanner. Based on MTF analysis, both Soft and Standard filters of the AIRO system lost resolution quickly compared to the Sensation 64 slice CT. The Siemens scanner had up to 7 lp/cm for the head FOV and H40 kernel and up to 5 lp/cm at body FOV for the B40f kernel. The Standard kernel in the AIRO system was evaluated to have 3 lp/cm and 4 lp/cm for the body and head FOVs respectively. NNPS of the AIRO shows low frequency noise due to ring-like artifacts which may be caused by detector calibration or lack of artifact reducing image post-processing. Due to a higher dose in terms of mGy/mAs at both head and body FOV, the contrast to noise ratio is higher in the AIRO system than in the Siemens scanner. However detectability of the low contrast objects is poorer in the AIRO due to the presence of ring artifacts in the location of the targets. PMID:26410470

  17. Regional Mapping of Aortic Wall Stress by Using Deformable, Motion-coherent Modeling based on Electrocardiography-gated Multidetector CT Angiography: Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Mileto, Achille; Heye, Tobias J; Makar, Ryan A; Hurwitz, Lynne M; Marin, Daniele; Boll, Daniel T

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To investigate the feasibility of deformable, motion-coherent modeling based on electrocardiography-gated multidetector computed tomographic (CT) angiography of the thoracic aorta and to evaluate whether quantifiable information on aortic wall stress as a function of patient-specific cardiovascular parameters can be gained. Materials and Methods For this institutional review board-approved, HIPAA-compliant study, thoracic electrocardiography-gated dual-source multidetector CT angiographic images were used from 250 prospectively enrolled patients (150 men, 100 women; mean age, 79 years). On reconstructed 50-phase CT angiographic images, aortic strain and deformation were determined at seven cardiac and aortic locations. One-way analysis of variance was used by assessing the magnitude for longitudinal and axial strain and axial deformation, as well as time-resolved peak and maxima count for longitudinal strain and axial deformation. Interdependencies between aortic strain and deformation with extracted hemodynamic parameters were evaluated. Results With increasing heart rates, there was a significant decrease in longitudinal strain (P = .009, R(2) = 0.95) and a decrease in the number of longitudinal strain peaks (P < .001, R(2) = 0.79); however, a significant increase in axial deformation (P < .001, R(2) = 0.31) and axial strain (P = .009, R(2) = 0.61) was observed. Increasing aortic blood velocity led to increased longitudinal strain (P = .018, R(2) = 0.42) and longitudinal strain peak counts (P = .011, R(2) = 0.48). Pronounced motion in the longitudinal direction limited motion in the axial plane (P < .019, R(2) = 0.29-0.31). Conclusion The results of this study render a clinical basis and provide proof of principle for the use of deformable, motion-coherent modeling to provide quantitative information on physiological motion of the aorta under various hemodynamic circumstances. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article

  18. Validity of blood flow measurement using 320 multi-detectors CT and first-pass distribution theory: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Yu, Xuefang; Xu, Shaopeng; Zhou, Kenneth J.

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of measuring the myocardial blood flow using 320 row detector CT by first-pass technique. Heart was simulated with a container that was filled with pipeline of 3mm diameter; coronary artery was simulated with a pipeline of 2 cm diameter and connected with the simulated heart. The simulated coronary artery was connected with a big container with 1500 ml saline and 150ml contrast agent. One pump linking with simulated heart will withdraw with a speed of 10 ml/min, 15 ml/min, 20 ml/min, 25 ml/min and 30 ml/min. First CT scan starts after 30 s of pumpback with certain speed. The second CT scan starts 5 s after first CT scans. CT images processed as follows: The second CT scan images subtract first CT scan images, calculate the increase of CT value of simulated heart and the CT value of the unit volume of simulated coronary artery and then to calculate the total inflow of myocardial blood flow. CT myocardial blood flows were calculated as: 0.94 ml/s, 2.09 ml/s, 2.74 ml/s, 4.18 ml/s, 4.86 ml/s. The correlation coefficient is 0.994 and r2 = 0.97. The method of measuring the myocardial blood flow using 320 row detector CT by 2 scans is feasible. It is possible to develop a new method for quantitatively and functional assessment of myocardial perfusion blood flow with less radiation does.

  19. Virtual Monochromatic Images from Dual-Energy Multidetector CT: Variance in CT Numbers from the Same Lesion between Single-Source Projection-based and Dual-Source Image-based Implementations.

    PubMed

    Mileto, Achille; Barina, Andrew; Marin, Daniele; Stinnett, Sandra S; Roy Choudhury, Kingshuk; Wilson, Joshua M; Nelson, Rendon C

    2016-04-01

    Purpose To determine the variance in virtual monochromatic computed tomography (CT) numbers from the same lesion, comparing the two clinically available dual-energy multidetector CT hardware implementations (single-source projection-based and dual-source image-based), in a phantom-based simulated abdominal environment. Materials and Methods This phantom-based study was exempt from institutional review board oversight. Polyethylene terephthalate spheres (15 and 18 mm) with two iodine-to-saline dilutions (0.8 and 1.2 mg of iodine per millilliter) were serially suspended in a cylindrical polypropylene bottle filled with diluted iodinated contrast material. The bottle was placed into a 36-cm-wide torso-shaped water phantom simulating the abdomen of a medium-sized patient. Dual-energy (80/140 kVp) and single-energy (100 and 120 kVp) scans were obtained with single-source and dual-source multidetector CT implementations. Virtual monochromatic images were reconstructed at energy levels of 40-140 keV (in 10-keV increments) in either the projection-space or image-space domain. A multivariate regression analysis approach was used to investigate the effect of energy level, lesion size, lesion iodine content, and implementation type on measured CT numbers. Results There were significant differences in the attenuation values measured in the simulated lesions with the single-source projection-based platform and the dual-source image-based implementation (P < .001 for all comparisons). The magnitude of these differences was greatest at lower monochromatic energy levels and at lower iodine concentrations (average difference at 40 keV: 25.7 HU; average difference at 140 keV: 7 HU). The monochromatic energy level and the lesion iodine concentration had a significant effect on the difference in the measured attenuation values between the two implementations, which indicates that the two imaging platforms respond differently to changes in investigated variables (P < .001 for all

  20. Preoperative Gross Classification of Gastric Adenocarcinoma: Comparison of Double Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound and Multi-Detector Row CT.

    PubMed

    Yan, Caoxin; Bao, Xiaofeng; Shentu, Weihui; Chen, Jian; Liu, Chunmei; Ye, Qin; Wang, Liuhong; Tan, Yangbin; Huang, Pintong

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) with double contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCEUS), in which intravenous microbubbles are used alongside oral contrast-enhanced ultrasound, in determining the gross classification of patients with gastric carcinoma (GC). Altogether, 239 patients with GC proved by histology after endoscopic biopsy were included in this study. DCEUS and MDCT were performed pre-operatively. The diagnostic accuracies of DCEUS and MDCT in determining the gross classification were calculated and compared. The overall accuracy of DCEUS in determining the gross appearance of GC was higher than that of MDCT (84.9% vs. 79.9%, p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in accuracy between DCEUS and MDCT for Borrmann I and IV classifications of advanced gastric cancer (χ(2), p = 0.323 for Borrmann type I, p = 0.141 for Borrmann type IV). The accuracy of DCEUS for early GC and Borrmann II and III classifications of GC was higher than that of MDCT (χ(2), p = 0.000 for all). DCEUS may be regarded as a valuable complementary tool to MDCT in determining the gross appearance of gastric adenocarcinoma pre-operatively. PMID:27072076

  1. Cardiac Multi-detector CT Segmentation Based on Multiscale Directional Edge Detector and 3D Level Set.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Sofia; Esposito, Antonio; Palmisano, Anna; Colantoni, Caterina; Cerutti, Sergio; Rizzo, Giovanna

    2016-05-01

    Extraction of the cardiac surfaces of interest from multi-detector computed tomographic (MDCT) data is a pre-requisite step for cardiac analysis, as well as for image guidance procedures. Most of the existing methods need manual corrections, which is time-consuming. We present a fully automatic segmentation technique for the extraction of the right ventricle, left ventricular endocardium and epicardium from MDCT images. The method consists in a 3D level set surface evolution approach coupled to a new stopping function based on a multiscale directional second derivative Gaussian filter, which is able to stop propagation precisely on the real boundary of the structures of interest. We validated the segmentation method on 18 MDCT volumes from healthy and pathologic subjects using manual segmentation performed by a team of expert radiologists as gold standard. Segmentation errors were assessed for each structure resulting in a surface-to-surface mean error below 0.5 mm and a percentage of surface distance with errors less than 1 mm above 80%. Moreover, in comparison to other segmentation approaches, already proposed in previous work, our method presented an improved accuracy (with surface distance errors less than 1 mm increased of 8-20% for all structures). The obtained results suggest that our approach is accurate and effective for the segmentation of ventricular cavities and myocardium from MDCT images. PMID:26319010

  2. The role of multidetector CT in local staging and evaluation of retroperitoneal surgical margin involvement in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Elibol, Funda Dinç; Obuz, Funda; Sökmen, Selman; Terzi, Cem; Canda, Aras Emre; Sağol, Özgül; Sarıoğlu, Sülen

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate preoperative T and N staging and retroperitoneal surgical margin (RSM) involvement in colon cancer using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). METHODS In this retrospective study, preoperative MDCTs of 141 patients with colon adenocarcinoma were evaluated in terms of T and N staging and retroperitoneal surgical margin involvement by two observers. Results were compared with histopathology. RESULTS In determining extramural invasion, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy of MDCT were 81%, 50%, 95%, 26%, and 81% for observer 1 and 87%, 75%, 97%, 27%, and 84% for observer 2, respectively. Moderate interobserver agreement was observed (κ=0.425). In determining T stage of the tumor, accuracy of MDCT was 55% for observer 1 and 51% for observer 2. In the detection of lymph node metastasis, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of MDCT were 84%, 46%, 60%, 74% and 64% for observer 1 and 84%, 56%, 65%, 78%, and 70% for observer 2, respectively. Interobserver agreement was substantial (κ=0.650). RSM was involved in six cases (4.7%). When only retroperitoneal colon segments were considered, 1.6% of subjects demonstrated RSM involvement. Four of the six RSM-positive tumors were located on sigmoid colon and one tumor was on transverse colon and caecum. Considering all colon tumors, in the detection of RSM involvement, sensitivity and specificity of MDCT were 33% and 81% for observer 1 and 50% and 80% for observer 2. Interobserver agreement was moderate (κ=0.518). CONCLUSION MDCT is a promising technique with moderate interobserver agreement in detection of extramural invasion, lymph node metastases, and RSM involvement in colon carcinomas. PMID:26611110

  3. Diagnosis of Small-Bowel Diseases: Prospective Comparison of Multi-Detector Row CT Enterography with MR Enterography.

    PubMed

    Masselli, Gabriele; Di Tola, Marco; Casciani, Emanuele; Polettini, Elisabetta; Laghi, Francesca; Monti, Riccardo; Bernieri, Maria Giulia; Gualdi, Gianfranco

    2016-05-01

    Purpose To prospectively compare the accuracies of computed tomographic (CT) enterography and magnetic resonance (MR) enterography for the detection and characterization of small-bowel diseases. Materials and Methods The institutional review board approved the study protocol, and informed consent was obtained from all participants. From June 2009 to July 2013, 150 consecutive patients (81 men and 69 women; mean age, 38.8 years; range, 18-74 years), who were suspected of having a small-bowel disease on the basis of clinical findings and whose previous upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy findings were normal, underwent CT and MR enterography. Two independent readers reviewed CT and MR enterographic images for the presence of small-bowel diseases, for differentiating between inflammatory and noninflammatory diseases, and for extraenteric complications. The histopathologic findings of surgical (n = 23) and endoscopic (n = 32) biopsy specimens were used as the reference standard; the results of video-capsule endoscopy (n = 36) and clinical follow-up (n = 59) were used only to confirm the absence of small-bowel disease. Results MR and CT enterography were successfully performed in all 150 patients. Overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy, respectively, in identifying patients with small-bowel lesions were 75.9% (41 of 54), 94.8% (91 of 96), and 88.0% (132 of 150) for CT enterography and 92.6% (50 of 54), 99.0% (95 of 96), and 96.7% (145 of 150) for MR enterography. The sensitivity of MR enterography was significantly higher than that of CT enterography for the detection of both overall small-bowel diseases (P = .0159) and neoplastic diseases (P = .0412) but not for the detection of inflammatory diseases (P > .99) or noninflammatory and nonneoplastic diseases (P = .6171). Conclusion MR enterography is more accurate than CT enterography in the detection of small-bowel diseases; MR enterography was more accurate in detecting neoplastic diseases in particular

  4. Quantitative Analysis of Intraventricular Dyssynchrony Using Wall Thickness by Multidetector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Quynh A.; Singh, Jagmeet P.; Cannon, Christopher P.; Sarwar, Ammar; Nasir, Khurram; Auricchio, Angelo; Faletra, Francesco F.; Sorgente, Antonio; Conca, Cristina; Moccetti, Tiziano; Handschumacher, Mark; Brady, Thomas J.; Hoffmann, Udo

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We sought to determine the feasibility of cardiac computed tomography (CT) to detect significant differences in the extent of left ventricular dyssynchrony in heart failure (HF) patients with wide QRS, HF patients with narrow QRS, and age-matched controls. BACKGROUND The degree of mechanical dyssynchrony has been suggested as a predictor of response to cardiac resynchronization therapy. There have been no published reports of dyssynchrony assessment with the use of CT. METHODS Thirty-eight subjects underwent electrocardiogram-gated contrast-enhanced 64-slice multidetector CT. The left ventricular endocardial and epicardial boundaries were delineated from short-axis images reconstructed at 10% phase increments of the cardiac cycle. Global and segmental CT dyssynchrony metrics that used changes in wall thickness, wall motion, and volume over time were assessed for reproducibility. We defined a global metric using changes in wall thickness as the dyssynchrony index (DI). RESULTS The DI was the most reproducible metric (interobserver and intraobserver intraclass correlation coefficients ≥0.94, p < 0.0001) and was used to determine differences between the 3 groups: HF-wide QRS group (ejection fraction [EF] 22 ± 8%, QRS 163 ± 28 ms), HF-narrow QRS (EF 26 ± 7%, QRS 96 ± 11 ms), and age-matched control subjects (EF 64 ± 5%, QRS 87 ± 9 ms). Mean DI was significantly different between the 3 groups (HF-wide QRS: 152 ± 44 ms, HF-narrow QRS: 121 ± 58 ms, and control subjects: 65 ± 12 ms; p < 0.0001) and greater in the HF-wide QRS (p < 0.0001) and HF-narrow QRS (p = 0.005) groups compared with control subjects. We found that DI had a good correlation with 2-dimensional (r = 0.65, p = 0.012) and 3-dimensional (r = 0.68, p = 0.008) echocardiographic dyssynchrony. CONCLUSIONS Quantitative assessment of global CT-derived DI, based on changes in wall thickness over time, is highly reproducible and renders significant differences between subjects most likely to

  5. Comparative assessment of three image reconstruction techniques for image quality and radiation dose in patients undergoing abdominopelvic multidetector CT examinations

    PubMed Central

    Desai, G S; Thabet, A; Elias, A Y A; Sahani, D V

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare image quality and radiation dose of abdominal CT examinations reconstructed with three image reconstruction techniques. Methods In this Institutional Review Board-approved study, contrast-enhanced (CE) abdominopelvic CT scans from 23 patients were reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) and iterative reconstruction in image space (IRIS) and were reviewed by two blinded readers. Subjective (acceptability, sharpness, noise and artefacts) and objective (noise) measures of image quality were recorded for each image data set. Radiation doses in CT dose index (CTDI) dose–length product were also calculated for each examination type and compared. Imaging parameters were compared using the Wilcoxon signed rank test and a paired t-test. Results All 69 CECT examinations were of diagnostic quality and similar for overall acceptability (mean grade for ASiR, 3.9±0.3; p=0.2 for Readers 1 and 2; IRIS, 3.9±0.4, p=0.2; FBP, 3.8±0.9). Objective noise was considerably lower with both iterative techniques (p<0.0001 and 0.0016 for ASiR and IRIS). Recorded mean radiation dose, i.e. CTDIvol, was 24% and 10% less with ASiR (11.4±3.4 mGy; p<0.001) and IRIS (13.5±3.7 mGy; p=0.06), respectively, than with FBP: 15.0±3.5 mGy. Conclusion At the system parameters used in this study, abdominal CT scans reconstructed with ASiR and IRIS provide diagnostic images with reduced image noise and 10–24% lower radiation dose than FBP. Advances in knowledge CT images reconstructed with FBP are frequently noisy on lowering the radiation dose. Newer iterative reconstruction techniques have different approaches to produce images with less noise; ASiR and IRIS provide diagnostic abdominal CT images with reduced image noise and radiation dose compared with FBP. This has been documented in this study. PMID:23255538

  6. Development of adaptive noise reduction filter algorithm for pediatric body images in a multi-detector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimaru, Eiji; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Okita, Izumi; Ninomiya, Yuuji; Tomoshige, Yukihiro; Kurokawa, Takehiro; Ono, Yutaka; Nakamura, Yuko; Suzuki, Masayuki

    2008-03-01

    Recently, several kinds of post-processing image filters which reduce the noise of computed tomography (CT) images have been proposed. However, these image filters are mostly for adults. Because these are not very effective in small (< 20 cm) display fields of view (FOV), we cannot use them for pediatric body images (e.g., premature babies and infant children). We have developed a new noise reduction filter algorithm for pediatric body CT images. This algorithm is based on a 3D post-processing in which the output pixel values are calculated by nonlinear interpolation in z-directions on original volumetric-data-sets. This algorithm does not need the in-plane (axial plane) processing, so the spatial resolution does not change. From the phantom studies, our algorithm could reduce SD up to 40% without affecting the spatial resolution of x-y plane and z-axis, and improved the CNR up to 30%. This newly developed filter algorithm will be useful for the diagnosis and radiation dose reduction of the pediatric body CT images.

  7. Colonoscopy after CT-diagnosed acute diverticulitis: Is it really necessary?

    PubMed Central

    Ou, George; Rosenfeld, Greg; Brown, Jacqueline; Chan, Nathan; Hong, Thomas; Lim, Howard; Bressler, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Background Computed tomography (CT) scans are commonly used to diagnose acute diverticulitis, but there are overlapping features between diverticulitis and colorectal cancer (CRC) on imaging studies. Hence, colonoscopy is typically recommended after an episode of acute diverticulitis to rule out underlying malignancy. Currently, 64-slice multidetector CT scanners are capable of providing higher-resolution images and may be able to distinguish malignancy from diverticular inflammation. We aimed to determine the prevalence of CRC among patients with CT-diagnosed acute diverticulitis. Methods We performed a retrospective study of patients with acute diverticulitis diagnosed on CT scan between December 2005 and December 2010 at St. Paul’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC. Nonresidents were excluded. We reviewed CT scan reports that included the term “diverticulitis,” reports of follow-up colonic evaluation within 1 year of diagnosis and pathology results. We queried the provincial cancer registry to ensure no cases of CRC were missed. Results A total of 293 patients had acute diverticulitis diagnosed on CT scan, but 8 were nonresidents and were excluded. Of the 285 included in the analysis, the mean age was 59.4 ± 15.1 years, and 167 (58.6%) were men. Among the 114 patients who underwent follow-up evaluation, malignancy was diagnosed in 4 (3.5%). The overall prevalence of malignancy among patients with CT-diagnosed diverticulitis was 1.4%. Conclusion Routine endoscopic evaluation after an episode of diverticulitis diagnosed with high-resolution CT scan does not appear to be necessary. Selective approach in patients with protracted clinical course or those with mass lesion/obstruction on CT scan may be of benefit. PMID:26022155

  8. Multidetector CT with 3-dimensional volume rendering in the evaluation of the spine in patients with Neurofibromatosis type 1: a retrospective review in 73 patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1) may involve the spine as various abnormalities including bony dysplasia, scoliosis, and nerve sheath tumors. Surgery may be performed for stabilization of the spine. We have seen an increase in requests for multidetector CT (MDCT) imaging with the (three-dimensional) 3D-volume rendered (VR) images in patients evaluated at our institution. We, therefore, investigated how MDCT could be best utilized in this patient population. Methods Seventy-three patients with NF-1 were identified in whom MDCT imaging was performed for diagnostic, pre-operative, or post-operative evaluation of spinal abnormalities. True axial source images and two dimensional (2D) orthogonal reconstructed MDCT images, as well as the VR images, were compared with plain radiographs and MRI. In addition, the MDCT study was compared to the VR images. These studies were reviewed to compare assessment of A) bony abnormalities such as remodeling from dural ectasia, dysplasia, and fusion, B) abnormal spinal curvature, C) nerve sheath tumors, and D) surgical instrumentation. Results When compared to plain radiographs, the MDCT and VR images were rated as helpful for evaluating the abnormalities of the spine in 19 of 24 patients for a total of 30 findings. This included the following categories A) (n = 6), B) (n = 5), C) (n = 7), and D) (n = 12). Compared to MR, the MDCT and VR study was helpful in evaluating the findings of NF-1 in 24 of 36 patients for a total of 40 findings. This included the following categories A) (n = 12), B) (n = 10), C) (n = 3), and D) (n = 15). When the VR images were compared to the orthogonal MDCT, the VR images was rated as helpful in 41 of 73 patients for a total of 60 findings, including the following categories: A) (n = 11), B) (n = 24), C) (n = 0), and D) (n = 25). Conclusion MDCT has distinct advantages over plain radiographs and MR imaging, and the VR images over MDCT in the

  9. Angular on-line tube current modulation in multidetector CT examinations of children and adults: The influence of different scanning parameters on dose reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Papadakis, Antonios E.; Perisinakis, Kostas; Damilakis, John

    2007-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the potential of angular on-line tube current modulation on dose reduction in pediatric and adult patients undergoing multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) examinations. Five physical anthropomorphic phantoms that simulate the average individual as neonate, 1-year-old, 5-year-old, 10-year-old, and adult were employed in the current study. Phantoms were scanned with the use of on-line tube current modulation (TCM). Percent dose reduction (%DR) factors achieved by applying TCM, were determined for standard protocols used for head and neck, shoulder, thorax, thorax and abdomen, abdomen, abdomen and pelvis, pelvis, and whole body examinations. A preliminary study on the application of TCM in MDCT examinations of adult patients was performed to validate the results obtained in anthropomorphic phantoms. Dose reduction was estimated as the percentage difference of the modulated milliamperes for each scan and the preset milliamperes prescribed by the scan protocol. The dose reduction in children was found to be much lower than the corresponding reduction achieved for adults. For helical scans the %DR factors, ranged between 1.6% and 7.4% for the neonate, 2.9% and 8.7% for the 1-year old, 2% and 6% for the 5-year-old, 5% and 10.9% for the 10-year-old, and 10.4% and 20.7% for the adult individual. For sequential scans the corresponding %DR factors ranged between 1.3% and 6.7%, 4.5% and 11%, 4.2% and 6.6%, 6.4% and 12.3%, and 8.9% and 23.3%, respectively. Broader beam collimations are associated with decreased %DR factors, when other scanning parameters are held constant. TCM did not impair image noise. In adult patients, the %DR values were found to be in good agreement with the corresponding results obtained in the anthropomorphic adult phantom. In conclusion, on-line TCM may be considered as a valuable tool for reducing dose in routine CT examinations of pediatric and adult patients. However, the dose reduction achieved with TCM

  10. Morphometric Evaluation of Bony Nasolacrimal Canal in a Caucasian Population with Primary Acquired Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction: A Multidetector Computed Tomography Study

    PubMed Central

    Yazici, Alper; Yanik, Bahar; Yazici, Hasmet; Demirpolat, Gulen

    2016-01-01

    Objective The bony nasolacrimal duct (BNLD) morphology as a contributory factor in primary acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction (PANDO) is still controversial. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the morphometric differences of BNLDs in unilateral PANDO patients between PANDO and non-PANDO sides, as compared with the control group using multidetector computed tomography (CT). Materials and Methods Bilateral BNLDs in 39 unilateral PANDO patients and 36 control subjects were retrospectively reviewed. CT images with 0.5-mm thickness were obtained with a 64-slice scanner. The length, volume, coronal orientation type, sagittal orientation angle of BNLD, and relative lacrimal sac-BNLD angle were assessed. The entrance, minimum and distal end transverse diameters (TD) of BNLD was investigated. Results The mean minimum and distal end BNLD TDs measurements were significantly narrower in PANDO patients, both in PANDO and non-PANDO sides, as compared with the control group (p < 0.001 and p = 0.040, respectively); however, there were no significant differences between PANDO and non-PANDO sides within PANDO patients. The length, entrance TD, volume, coronal orientation type, sagittal orientation angle of BNLD, and relative lacrimal sac-BNLD angle were not significantly different between PANDO patients and control subjects, as well as between PANDO and non-PANDO sides within PANDO patients. Conclusion The narrow mean minimum and distal end BNLD TD in PANDO patients, in both PANDO and non-PANDO sides, may be associated with PANDO development. The lack of difference between PANDO and non-PANDO sides within PANDO patients and some overlap between PANDO patients and control subjects suggest that narrow BNLD is not the sole factor. PMID:26957913

  11. [Valvular heart disease: multidetector computed tomography evaluation].

    PubMed

    Franco, A; Fernández-Pérez, G C; Tomás-Mallebrera, M; Badillo-Portugal, S; Orejas, M

    2014-01-01

    Heart valve disease is a clinical problem that has been studied with classical imaging techniques like echocardiography and MRI. Technological advances in CT make it possible to obtain static and dynamic images that enable not only a morphological but also a functional analysis in many cases. Although it is currently indicated only in patients with inconclusive findings at echocardiography and MRI or those in whom these techniques are contraindicated, multidetector CT makes it possible to diagnose stenosis or regurgitation through planimetry, to evaluate and quantify valvular calcium, and to show the functional repercussions of these phenomena on the rest of the structures of the heart. Given that multidetector CT is being increasingly used in the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease, we think it is interesting for radiologists to know its potential for the study of valvular disease. PMID:23246401

  12. The development, validation and application of a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner model for assessing organ doses to the pregnant patient and the fetus using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, J.; Bednarz, B.; Caracappa, P. F.; Xu, X. G.

    2009-05-01

    The latest multiple-detector technologies have further increased the popularity of x-ray CT as a diagnostic imaging modality. There is a continuing need to assess the potential radiation risk associated with such rapidly evolving multi-detector CT (MDCT) modalities and scanning protocols. This need can be met by the use of CT source models that are integrated with patient computational phantoms for organ dose calculations. Based on this purpose, this work developed and validated an MDCT scanner using the Monte Carlo method, and meanwhile the pregnant patient phantoms were integrated into the MDCT scanner model for assessment of the dose to the fetus as well as doses to the organs or tissues of the pregnant patient phantom. A Monte Carlo code, MCNPX, was used to simulate the x-ray source including the energy spectrum, filter and scan trajectory. Detailed CT scanner components were specified using an iterative trial-and-error procedure for a GE LightSpeed CT scanner. The scanner model was validated by comparing simulated results against measured CTDI values and dose profiles reported in the literature. The source movement along the helical trajectory was simulated using the pitch of 0.9375 and 1.375, respectively. The validated scanner model was then integrated with phantoms of a pregnant patient in three different gestational periods to calculate organ doses. It was found that the dose to the fetus of the 3 month pregnant patient phantom was 0.13 mGy/100 mAs and 0.57 mGy/100 mAs from the chest and kidney scan, respectively. For the chest scan of the 6 month patient phantom and the 9 month patient phantom, the fetal doses were 0.21 mGy/100 mAs and 0.26 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. The paper also discusses how these fetal dose values can be used to evaluate imaging procedures and to assess risk using recommendations of the report from AAPM Task Group 36. This work demonstrates the ability of modeling and validating an MDCT scanner by the Monte Carlo method, as well as

  13. Threshold adjusted calcium scoring using CT is less susceptible to cardiac motion and more accurate.

    PubMed

    Groen, J M; Dijkstra, H; Greuter, M J W; Oudkerk, M

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate calcium scoring on computed tomography (CT) using an adjusted threshold depending on the maximum Hounsfield value within the calcification (HU(peak)). The volume of 19 calcifications was retrospectively determined on 64-slice multidetector CT and dual source CT (DSCT) at different thresholds and the threshold associated with the physical volume was determined. In addition, approximately 10 000 computer simulations were done simulating the same process for calcifications with mixed density. Using these data a relation between the HU(peak) and the threshold could be established. Hereafter, this relation was assessed by scanning six calcifications in a phantom at 40-110 beats per minute using DSCT. The influence of motion was determined and the measured calcium scores were compared to the physical volumes and mass. A positive linear correlation was found between the scoring threshold and the HU(peak) of the calcifications both for the phantom measurements as for the computer simulations. Using this relation the individual threshold for each calcification could be calculated. Calcium scores of the moving calcifications determined with an adjusted threshold were approximately 30% less susceptible to cardiac motion compared to standard calcium scoring. Furthermore, these scores approximated the physical volume and mass at least 10% better than the standard calcium scores. The threshold in calcium scoring should be adjusted for each individual calcification based on the HU(peak) of the calcification. Calcium scoring using an adjusted threshold is less susceptible to cardiac motion and more accurate compared to the physical values. PMID:19291982

  14. Heart CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - heart; Computed axial tomography scan - heart; Computed tomography scan - heart; Calcium scoring; Multi-detector CT scan - heart; Electron beam computed tomography - heart; Agaston score; Coronary calcium scan

  15. Sinus CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - sinus; Computed axial tomography scan - sinus; Computed tomography scan - sinus; CT scan - sinus ... 2014:chap 67. Shaw AS, Dixon AK. Multidetector computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, eds. Grainger & Allison's ...

  16. Pelvic CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - pelvis; Computed axial tomography scan - pelvis; Computed tomography scan - pelvis; CT scan - pelvis ... gov/pubmed/18381118 . Shaw AS, Dixon AK. Multidetector computed tomography. In: Grainger RC, Allison D, Adam, Dixon AK, ...

  17. Multidetector computed tomographic angiography of the cardiovascular system

    PubMed Central

    Burrill, Joshua; Dabbagh, Zaid; Gollub, Frank; Hamady, Mohamed

    2007-01-01

    The introduction of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is considered a dramatic development in CT imaging that has direct implication in the imaging of various systems, in particular the cardiovascular system. The advantages of MDCT are an enormous increase in imaging acquisition speed, more coverage of the patient, and high spatial resolution. This article reviews the recent developments in CT angiography and discusses the clinical application relevant to diagnosis and endovascular treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:17989269

  18. Significant reduction of left atrial volume concomitant with clinical improvement after percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation for drug-refractory hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, and its precise detection with multidetector CT

    PubMed Central

    Maekawa, Yuichiro; Akita, Keitaro; Tsuruta, Hikaru; Yamada, Yoshitake; Hayashida, Kentaro; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Murata, Mitsushige; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Objective In patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM), left atrial (LA) volume measurement is very important to provide prognostic information. Recent studies demonstrated that multidetector CT (MDCT) is useful to assess the changes in LA volume. Our aim was to examine the utility of a follow-up cardiac MDCT for long-term evaluation of the effect of percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation (PTSMA) on LA volume. Methods We studied a consecutive cohort of 20 patients with drug-refractory symptomatic HOCM after PTSMA. We evaluated LA volume analyses with cardiac MDCT on patients who underwent PTSMA as compared to echocardiography. Results Before PTSMA, 75% of all patients had heart failure-associated symptoms in the New York Heart Association functional class III/IV. All patients experienced relief from heart failure-associated symptoms after PTSMA. Cardiac MDCT showed significant reduction in the index of maximum LA volume during follow-up compared to before PTSMA in the same way as in echocardiography (93.6±34.1 mL/m2 vs 82.6±35.3 mL/m2, p=0.035). A Bland-Altman plot showed small mean differences and limits of agreement in the measurements of the index of maximum LA volume before and after PTSMA between echocardiography and MDCT. Conclusions The follow-up cardiac MDCT was a useful tool to evaluate the effectiveness of PTSMA on reduction of LA volume. Cardiac MDCT might provide comparable measurements of the LA volume in patients with drug-refractory symptomatic HOCM before and after PTSMA compared to echocardiography. PMID:27307994

  19. Patient-specific dose estimation for pediatric chest CT

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Frush, Donald P.

    2008-12-15

    Current methods for organ and effective dose estimations in pediatric CT are largely patient generic. Physical phantoms and computer models have only been developed for standard/limited patient sizes at discrete ages (e.g., 0, 1, 5, 10, 15 years old) and do not reflect the variability of patient anatomy and body habitus within the same size/age group. In this investigation, full-body computer models of seven pediatric patients in the same size/protocol group (weight: 11.9-18.2 kg) were created based on the patients' actual multi-detector array CT (MDCT) data. Organs and structures in the scan coverage were individually segmented. Other organs and structures were created by morphing existing adult models (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. Organ and effective dose of these patients from a chest MDCT scan protocol (64 slice LightSpeed VCT scanner, 120 kVp, 70 or 75 mA, 0.4 s gantry rotation period, pitch of 1.375, 20 mm beam collimation, and small body scan field-of-view) was calculated using a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated to simulate radiation transport in the same CT system. The seven patients had normalized effective dose of 3.7-5.3 mSv/100 mAs (coefficient of variation: 10.8%). Normalized lung dose and heart dose were 10.4-12.6 mGy/100 mAs and 11.2-13.3 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. Organ dose variations across the patients were generally small for large organs in the scan coverage (<7%), but large for small organs in the scan coverage (9%-18%) and for partially or indirectly exposed organs (11%-77%). Normalized effective dose correlated weakly with body weight (correlation coefficient: r=-0.80). Normalized lung dose and heart dose correlated strongly with mid-chest equivalent diameter (lung: r=-0.99, heart: r=-0.93); these strong correlation relationships can be used to estimate patient-specific organ dose for

  20. The relevance of image quality indices for dose optimization in abdominal multi-detector row CT in children: experimental assessment with pediatric phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisse, H. J.; Brenot, J.; Pierrat, N.; Gaboriaud, G.; Savignoni, A.; DeRycke, Y.; Neuenschwander, S.; Aubert, B.; Rosenwald, J.-C.

    2009-04-01

    This study assessed and compared various image quality indices in order to manage the dose of pediatric abdominal MDCT protocols and to provide guidance on dose reduction. PMMA phantoms representing average body diameters at birth, 1 year, 5 years, 10 years and 15 years of age were scanned in a four-channel MDCT with a standard pediatric abdominal CT protocol. Image noise (SD, standard deviation of CT number), noise derivative (ND, derivative of the function of noise with respect to dose) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured. The 'relative' low-contrast detectability (rLCD) was introduced as a new quantity to adjust LCD to the various phantom diameters on the basis of the LCD1% assessed in a Catphan® phantom and a constant central absorbed dose. The required variations of CTDIvol16 with respect to phantom size were analyzed in order to maintain each image quality index constant. The use of a fixed SD or CNR level leads to major dose ratios between extreme patient sizes (factor 22.7 to 44 for SD, 31.7 to 51.5 for CNR2.8%), whereas fixed ND and rLCD result in acceptable dose ratios ranging between factors of 2.9 and 3.9 between extreme phantom diameters. For a 5-9 mm rLCD1%, adjusted ND values range between -0.84 and -0.11 HU mGy-1. Our data provide guidance on dose reduction on the basis of patient dimensions and the required rLCD (e.g., to get a constant 7 mm rLCD1% for abdominal diameters of 10, 13, 16, 20 and 25 cm, tube current-time product should be adjusted in order to obtain CTDIvol16 values of 6.2, 7.2, 8.8, 11.6 and 17.7 mGy, respectively).

  1. Radiation dose reduction with application of non-linear adaptive filters for abdominal CT

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarabjeet; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Sung, Mi Kim; Back, Anni; Blake, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of non-linear adaptive filters (NLAF) on abdominal computed tomography (CT) images acquired at different radiation dose levels. METHODS: Nineteen patients (mean age 61.6 ± 7.9 years, M:F = 8:11) gave informed consent for an Institutional Review Board approved prospective study involving acquisition of 4 additional image series (200, 150, 100, 50 mAs and 120 kVp) on a 64 slice multidetector row CT scanner over an identical 10 cm length in the abdomen. The CT images acquired at 150, 100 and 50 mAs were processed with the NLAF. Two radiologists reviewed unprocessed and processed images for image quality in a blinded randomized manner. CT dose index volume, dose length product, patient weight, transverse diameters, objective noise and CT numbers were recorded. Data were analyzed using Analysis of Variance and Wilcoxon signed rank test. RESULTS: Of the 31 lesions detected in abdominal CT images, 28 lesions were less than 1 cm in size. Subjective image noise was graded as unacceptable in unprocessed images at 50 and 100 mAs, and in NLAF processed images at 50 mAs only. In NLAF processed images, objective image noise was decreased by 21% (14.4 ± 4/18.2 ± 4.9) at 150 mAs, 28.3% (15.7 ± 5.6/21.9 ± 4) at 100 mAs and by 39.4% (18.8 ± 9/30.4 ± 9.2) at 50 mAs compared to unprocessed images acquired at respective radiation dose levels. At 100 mAs the visibility of smaller structures improved from suboptimal in unprocessed images to excellent in NLAF processed images, whereas diagnostic confidence was respectively improved from probably confident to fully confident. CONCLUSION: NLAF lowers image noise, improves the visibility of small structures and maintains lesion conspicuity at down to 100 mAs for abdominal CT. PMID:22328968

  2. The effect of z overscanning on radiation burden of pediatric patients undergoing head CT with multidetector scanners: a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Tzedakis, Antonis; Perisinakis, Kostas; Raissaki, Maria; Damilakis, John

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of z overscanning on eye lens dose and effective dose received by pediatric patients undergoing head CT examinations. A pediatric patient study was carried out to obtain the exposure parameters and data regarding the eye lens position with respect to imaged volume boundaries. This information was used to simulate CT exposures by Monte Carlo code. The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP, version 4C2) radiation transport code and five mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms representing newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year-old patient, were employed in the current study. To estimate effective dose, the weighted computed tomography dose index was calculated by cylindrical polymethyl-methacrylate phantoms of 9.7, 13.1, 15.4, 16.1, and 16.9 cm in diameter representing the pediatric head of newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year-old individuals, respectively. The validity of the Monte Carlo calculated approach was verified by comparison with dose data obtained using physical pediatric anthropomorphic phantoms and thermoluminescence dosimetry. For all patients studied, the eye lenses were located in the region -1 to 3 cm from the first slice of the imaged volume. Doses from axial scans were always lower than those from corresponding helical examinations. The percentage differences in normalized eye lens absorbed dose between contiguous axial and helical examinations with pitch=1 were found to be up to 10.9%, when the eye lenses were located inside the region to be imaged. When the eye lenses were positioned 0-3 cm far from the first slice of region to be imaged, the normalized dose to the lens from contiguous axial examinations was up to 11 times lower than the corresponding values from helical mode with pitch=1. The effective dose from axial examinations was up to 24% lower than corresponding values from helical examinations with pitch=1. In conclusion, it is more dose efficient to use axial mode acquisition rather than helical scan

  3. The effect of z overscanning on radiation burden of pediatric patients undergoing head CT with multidetector scanners: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Tzedakis, Antonis; Perisinakis, Kostas; Raissaki, Maria; Damilakis, John

    2006-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of z overscanning on eye lens dose and effective dose received by pediatric patients undergoing head CT examinations. A pediatric patient study was carried out to obtain the exposure parameters and data regarding the eye lens position with respect to imaged volume boundaries. This information was used to simulate CT exposures by Monte Carlo code. The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP, version 4C2) radiation transport code and five mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms representing newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year-old patient, were employed in the current study. To estimate effective dose, the weighted computed tomography dose index was calculated by cylindrical polymethyl-methacrylate phantoms of 9.7, 13.1, 15.4, 16.1, and 16.9 cm in diameter representing the pediatric head of newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year-old individuals, respectively. The validity of the Monte Carlo calculated approach was verified by comparison with dose data obtained using physical pediatric anthropomorphic phantoms and thermoluminescence dosimetry. For all patients studied, the eye lenses were located in the region -1 to 3 cm from the first slice of the imaged volume. Doses from axial scans were always lower than those from corresponding helical examinations. The percentage differences in normalized eye lens absorbed dose between contiguous axial and helical examinations with pitch=1 were found to be up to 10.9%, when the eye lenses were located inside the region to be imaged. When the eye lenses were positioned 0-3 cm far from the first slice of region to be imaged, the normalized dose to the lens from contiguous axial examinations was up to 11 times lower than the corresponding values from helical mode with pitch=1. The effective dose from axial examinations was up to 24% lower than corresponding values from helical examinations with pitch=1. In conclusion, it is more dose efficient to use axial mode acquisition rather than helical scan

  4. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization Therapy for a Hypoplastic Pelvic Kidney with a Single Vaginal Ectopic Ureter to Control Incontinence: The Usefulness of Three-Dimensional CT Angiography Using Multidetector-Row Helical CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kudoh, Kouichi Kadota, Masataka; Nakayama, Yoshiharu; Imuta, Masanori; Yasuda, Tsuyoshi; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Inadome, Akito; Yoshida, Masaki; Ueda, Shouichi

    2003-09-15

    A girl with continuous urinary incontinence was successfully treated by angiographic embolization of a hypoplastic pelvic kidney with a single unilateral vaginal ectopic opening of the ureter. For this intervention, CT angiography was useful for detecting the corresponding renal artery of the hypoplastic kidney.

  5. Image quality and attenuation values of multi detector CT coronary angiography using high iodine-concentration contrast material: A comparison of the use of iopromide 370 and iomeprol 400

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Yeh, Dae Wook; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Lee, Won Jae; Lim, Hyo Keun

    2010-01-01

    Background: Effects of high iodine-concentration contrast material on the image quality of coronary CT angiography (CCTA) have not been well evaluated. Purpose: To compare the image quality and attenuation values of CCTA between patients administered iopromide 370 and iomeprol 400 with the use of 64-slice multidetector CT. Material and Methods: Patients were prospectively enrolled and were randomized into two groups (group A, 151 patients received iopromide 370, iodine flux = 1.48 g I/s; group B, 146 patients received iomeprol 400, iodine flux = 1.60 g I/s). CT attenuation was measured in the coronary arteries and great arteries and measurements were standardized based on an iodine flux of 1.5 0 g I/s. The image quality of 15 coronary artery segments was graded by two radiologists in consensus with the use of a four-point scale (1 = excellent to 4 = poor enhancement). Non-parametric statistical approaches were used to compare the two groups. Results: The median attenuation values in the coronary arteries were 454 HU and 464 HU for iopromide 370 and iomeprol 400, respectively, and they did not differ (P = 0.26). When standardizing for an iodine flux, significantly higher attenuation values were found for iopromide 370 (median = 460 HU, range = 216-791 HU) compared with iomeprol 400 (median = 435 HU, range = 195—758 HU) (P = 0.006). The median image quality score of coronary arterial segments was 1 (range 1—2) for both groups (P = 0.84). Conclusion: The attenuation values in the coronary arteries after injection of the same amount of two high iodine-concentration contrast materials at the same flow rate with different iodine fluxes are similar with no difference in image quality. With standardization for an iodine flux, the attenuation is significantly higher when using iopromide 370. PMID:20849317

  6. Comparison of the Diagnostic Image Quality of the Canine Maxillary Dentoalveolar Structures Obtained by Cone Beam Computed Tomography and 64-Multidetector Row Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Soukup, Jason W; Drees, Randi; Koenig, Lisa J; Snyder, Christopher J; Hetzel, Scott; Miles, Chanda R; Schwarz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this blinded study was to validate the use of cone beam computed tomography (C) for imaging of the canine maxillary dentoalveolar structures by comparing its diagnostic image quality with that of 64-multidetector row CT Sagittal slices of a tooth-bearing segment of the maxilla of a commercially purchased dog skull embedded in methylmethacrylate were obtained along a line parallel with the dental arch using a commercial histology diamond saw. The slice of tooth-bearing bone that best depicted the dentoalveolar structures was chosen and photographed. The maxillary segment was imaged with cone beam CT and 64-multidetector row CT. Four blinded evaluators compared the cone beam CT and 64-multidetector row CT images and image quality was scored as it related to the anatomy of dentoalveolar structures. Trabecular bone, enamel, dentin, pulp cavity, periodontal ligament space, and lamina dura were scored In addition, a score depicting the evaluators overall impression of the image was recorded. Images acquired with cone beam CT were found to be significantly superior in image quality to images acquired with 64-multidetector row CT overall, and in all scored categories. In our study setting cone beam CT was found to be a valid and clinically superior imaging modality for the canine maxillary dentoalveolar structures when compared to 64-multidetector row CT. PMID:26415384

  7. Multi-detector row computed tomography angiography of peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Dijkshoorn, Marcel L.; Pattynama, Peter M. T.; Myriam Hunink, M. G.

    2007-01-01

    With the introduction of multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT), scan speed and image quality has improved considerably. Since the longitudinal coverage is no longer a limitation, multi-detector row computed tomography angiography (MDCTA) is increasingly used to depict the peripheral arterial runoff. Hence, it is important to know the advantages and limitations of this new non-invasive alternative for the reference test, digital subtraction angiography. Optimization of the acquisition parameters and the contrast delivery is important to achieve a reliable enhancement of the entire arterial runoff in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) using fast CT scanners. The purpose of this review is to discuss the different scanning and injection protocols using 4-, 16-, and 64-detector row CT scanners, to propose effective methods to evaluate and to present large data sets, to discuss its clinical value and major limitations, and to review the literature on the validity, reliability, and cost-effectiveness of multi-detector row CT in the evaluation of PAD. PMID:17882427

  8. Dose management in CT facility

    PubMed Central

    Tsapaki, V; Rehani, M

    2007-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) examinations have rapidly increased in number over the last few years due to recent advances such as the spiral, multidetector-row, CT fluoroscopy and Positron Emission Tomography (PET)-CT technology. This has resulted in a large increase in collective radiation dose as reported by many international organisations. It is also stated that frequently, image quality in CT exceeds the level required for confident diagnosis. This inevitably results in patient radiation doses that are higher than actually required, as also stressed by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regarding the CT exposure of paediatric and small adult patients. However, the wide range in exposure parameters reported, as well as the different CT applications reveal the difficulty in standardising CT procedures. The purpose of this paper is to review the basic CT principles, outline the recent technological advances and their impact in patient radiation dose and finally suggest methods of radiation dose optimisation. PMID:21614279

  9. CHIMERA Multidetector at Laboratori Nazionali del Sud

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, S.; Anzalone, A.; Baldo, M.; Barna, R.; Campisi, M.g.; Cardella, G.; Cavallaro, Sl., Amico, V.D.; De Filippo, E.; DePasquale, D.; Femino, S.; Geraci, E.; Giustolisi, F.; Guazzoni, P.; Iacono-Manno, C.M.; Italiano, A.; Lanzalone, G.; Lanzano, G.; LoNigro, S.; Lombardo, U.; Manfredi, G.; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Porto, F.; Sambataro, S.; Sperduto, M.L.; Sutera, C.M.; Zetta, L.

    2000-12-31

    The installation of CHIMERA multidetector, designed in order to study central collisions in heavy ion reactions at intermediate energy, is going on at LNS and the first experiment with the forward part (688 telescopes) is running since May 1999. The aim of this contribution is to present the status of the project.

  10. Validation of a paediatric thyroid phantom using different multidetector computed tomography models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsabbagh, M.; Ng, L. Y.; Tajuddin, A. A.; Manap, M. A.; Zainon, R.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the attenuation values of a fabricated paediatric thyroid phantom material using different MDCT models. A paediatric thyroid phantom was designed to mimic the shape and size of a paediatric patient with an age of 9 years using high- density Polyethylene as the phantom material. The fabricated phantom was scanned using two different multidetector CT scanners (16- and 128-row detectors). The CT numbers were evaluated and the mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) of the phantom material were obtained at each applied energy from each scanner. The results were compared with the tables of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The CTs of 16- and 128-row detectors showed that the obtained attenuation values are very similar to the NIST's values. However, the CT of the 128-row detectors showed a slightly much closer match to the NIST's values. This refers to the type and quality of the electronic connections between the detectors. Furthermore, the type and number of detectors (16- and 128-detectors) could affect the details and quality of the output images. The results show that different multidetector CTs can be used to validate the phantom and determine the mass attenuation coefficients of its material.

  11. State-of-the-art in CT hardware and scan modes for cardiovascular CT

    PubMed Central

    Halliburton, Sandra; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Dey, Damini; Einstein, Andrew J.; Gentry, Ralph; George, Richard T.; Gerber, Thomas; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Weigold, Wm. Guy

    2013-01-01

    Multidetector row computed tomography (CT) allows noninvasive anatomic and functional imaging of the heart, great vessels, and the coronary arteries. In recent years, there have been several advances in CT hardware, which have expanded the clinical utility of CT for cardiovascular imaging; such advances are ongoing. This review article from the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) Basic and Emerging Sciences and Technology (BEST) Working Group summarizes the technical aspects of current state-of-the-art CT hardware and describes the scan modes this hardware supports for cardiovascular CT imaging. PMID:22551595

  12. SU-E-I-21: Dosimetric Characterization and Image Quality Evaluation of the AIRO Mobile CT Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, V; Zhang, J; Bruner, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The AIRO Mobile CT system was recently introduced which overcomes the limitations from existing CT, CT fluoroscopy, and intraoperative O-arm. With an integrated table and a large diameter bore, the system is suitable for cranial, spine and trauma procedures, making it a highly versatile intraoperative imaging system. This study is to investigate radiation dose and image quality of the AIRO and compared with those from a routine CT scanner. Methods: Radiation dose was measured using a conventional 100mm pencil ionization chamber and CT polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA) body and head phantoms. Image quality was evaluated with a CATPHAN 500 phantom. Spatial resolution, low contrast resolution (CNR), Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), and Normalized Noise Power Spectrum (NNPS) were analyzed. Results: Under identical technique conditions, radiation dose (mGy/mAs) from the AIRO mobile CT system (AIRO) is higher than that from a 64 slice CT scanner. MTFs show that both Soft and Standard filters of the AIRO system lost resolution quickly compared to the Sensation 64 slice CT. With the Standard kernel, the spatial resolutions of the AIRO system are 3lp/cm and 4lp/cm for the body and head FOVs, respectively. NNPSs show low frequency noise due to ring-like artifacts. Due to a higher dose in terms of mGy/mAs at both head and body FOV, CNR of the AIRO system is higher than that of the Siemens scanner. However detectability of the low contrast objects is poorer in the AIRO due to the presence of ring artifacts in the location of the targets. Conclusion: For image guided surgery applications, the AIRO has some advantages over a routine CT scanner due to its versatility, large bore size, and acceptable image quality. Our evaluation of the physical performance helps its future improvements.

  13. A case of fatal sigmoid volvulus visualized on postmortem radiography: The importance of image optimization with multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Usui, Akihito; Kawasumi, Yusuke; Hosokai, Yoshiyuki; Ishizuka, Yuya; Ikeda, Tomoya; Saito, Haruo; Funayama, Masato

    2016-03-01

    This report describes the case of a man who developed fatal sigmoid volvulus that was identified on postmortem radiography before forensic autopsy. Postmortem radiography is useful for visualizing the body prior to autopsy. We discuss postmortem multidetector computed tomography that was tailored for optimum image quality to allow reconstruction of the fatal findings in multiple axes and in three dimensions, helping to pinpoint the anatomical sites of interest. This involves techniques such as manipulation of the scanning beam pitch and overlapping CT section acquisition. These techniques are best performed by personnel with CT technology training. PMID:26980251

  14. Research on radiation exposure from CT part of hybrid camera and diagnostic CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solný, Pavel; Zimák, Jaroslav

    2014-11-01

    Research on radiation exposure from CT part of hybrid camera in seven different Departments of Nuclear Medicine (DNM) was conducted. Processed data and effective dose (E) estimations led to the idea of phantom verification and comparison of absorbed doses and software estimation. Anonymous data from about 100 examinations from each DNM was gathered. Acquired data was processed and utilized by dose estimation programs (ExPACT, ImPACT, ImpactDose) with respect to the type of examination and examination procedures. Individual effective doses were calculated using enlisted programs. Preserving the same procedure in dose estimation process allows us to compare the resulting E. Some differences and disproportions during dose estimation led to the idea of estimated E verification. Consequently, two different sets of about 100 of TLD 100H detectors were calibrated for measurement inside the Aldersnon RANDO Anthropomorphic Phantom. Standard examination protocols were examined using a 2 Slice CT- part of hybrid SPECT/CT. Moreover, phantom exposure from body examining protocol for 32 Slice and 64 Slice diagnostic CT scanner was also verified. Absorbed dose (DT,R) measured using TLD detectors was compared with software estimation of equivalent dose HT values, computed by E estimation software. Though, only limited number of cavities for detectors enabled measurement within the regions of lung, liver, thyroid and spleen-pancreas region, some basic comparison is possible.

  15. Visualisation of the Bonebridge by means of CT and CBCT

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With the Bonebridge, a new bone-anchored hearing aid has been available since March 2012. The objective of the study was to analyse the visualisation of the implant itself as well as its impact on the representation of the bony structures of the petrosal bone in CT, MRI and cone beam CT (CBCT). Methods The Bonebridge was implanted unilaterally in two completely prepared human heads. The radiological imaging by means of CBCT, 64-slice CT, 1.5-T and 3.0-T MRI was conducted both preoperatively and postoperatively. The images were subsequently evaluated from both the ENT medical and nd radiological perspectives. Results As anticipated, no visualisation of the implant or of the petrosal bones could be realised on MRI because of the interactive technology and the magnet artefact. In contrast, an excellent evaluability of the implant itself as well as of the surrounding neurovascular structures (sinus sigmoideus, skull base, middle ear, inner ear, inner auditory canal) was exhibited in both the CT and in the CBCT. Conclusion The Bonebridge can be excellently imaged with the radiological imaging technologies of CT and CBCT. In the process, CBCT shows discrete advantages in comparison with CT. No relevant restrictions in image quality in the evaluation of the bony structures of the petrosal bones could be seen. PMID:24004903

  16. Multi-detector computed tomography demonstrates smoke inhalation injury at early stage.

    PubMed

    Koljonen, Virve; Maisniemi, Kreu; Virtanen, Kaisa; Koivikko, Mika

    2007-06-01

    A multitrauma victim was transported to our trauma centre. Smoke inhalation injury was suspected based on trauma history and clinical examination. The first trauma computer tomography (CT) obtained 2.8 h after the injury revealed subtle ground-glass opacifications with mainly peribronchial distribution and patchy peribronchial consolidations centrally in the left lung. A repeated scan showed a more distinctive demarcation of the peribronchial opacities, further substantiating the clinically verified smoke inhalation injury. The golden standard for diagnosing smoke inhalation injury still is fibroptic bronchoscopy examination. This paper shows that lesions typical to smoke inhalation injury appear much earlier than previously reported. Whether assessment of smoke inhalation injury severity using CT could clinically benefit patients is controversial and still requires further research. Multi-detector computed tomography is readily available in trauma centres and to simply neglect its potential as a diagnostic tool in some inhalation injury would be unwise. PMID:17285330

  17. [Review of pre- and post-treatment multidetector computed tomography findings in abdominal aortic aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Casula, E; Lonjedo, E; Cerverón, M J; Ruiz, A; Gómez, J

    2014-01-01

    The increase in the frequency of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) and the widely accepted use of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) as a first-line treatment or as an alternative to conventional surgery make it necessary for radiologists to have thorough knowledge of the pre- and post-treatment findings. The high image quality provided by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) enables CT angiography to play a fundamental role in the study of AAA and in planning treatment. The objective of this article is to review the cases of AAA in which CT angiography was the main imaging technique, so that radiologists will be able to detect the signs related to this disease, to diagnose it, to plan treatment, and to detect complications in the postoperative period. PMID:23489768

  18. Coronary CT angiography: current status and continuing challenges.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z; Choo, G H; Ng, K H

    2012-05-01

    Coronary CT angiography has been increasingly used in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease owing to rapid technological developments, which are reflected in the improved spatial and temporal resolution of the images. High diagnostic accuracy has been achieved with multislice CT scanners (64 slice and higher), and in selected patients coronary CT angiography is regarded as a reliable alternative to invasive coronary angiography. With high-quality coronary CT imaging increasingly being performed, patients can benefit from an imaging modality that provides a rapid and accurate diagnosis while avoiding an invasive procedure. Despite the tremendous contributions of coronary CT angiography to cardiac imaging, study results reported in the literature should be interpreted with caution as there are some limitations existing within the study design or related to patient risk factors. In addition, some attention must be given to the potential health risks associated with the ionising radiation received during cardiac CT examinations. Radiation dose associated with coronary CT angiography has raised serious concerns in the literature, as the risk of developing malignancy is not negligible. Various dose-saving strategies have been implemented, with some of the strategies resulting in significant dose reduction. The aim of this review is to present an overview of the role of coronary CT angiography on cardiac imaging, with focus on coronary artery disease in terms of the diagnostic and prognostic value of coronary CT angiography. Various approaches for dose reduction commonly recommended in the literature are discussed. Limitations of coronary CT angiography are identified. Finally, future directions and challenges with the use of coronary CT angiography are highlighted. PMID:22253353

  19. Coronary CT angiography: current status and continuing challenges

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Z; Choo, G H; Ng, K H

    2012-01-01

    Coronary CT angiography has been increasingly used in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease owing to rapid technological developments, which are reflected in the improved spatial and temporal resolution of the images. High diagnostic accuracy has been achieved with multislice CT scanners (64 slice and higher), and in selected patients coronary CT angiography is regarded as a reliable alternative to invasive coronary angiography. With high-quality coronary CT imaging increasingly being performed, patients can benefit from an imaging modality that provides a rapid and accurate diagnosis while avoiding an invasive procedure. Despite the tremendous contributions of coronary CT angiography to cardiac imaging, study results reported in the literature should be interpreted with caution as there are some limitations existing within the study design or related to patient risk factors. In addition, some attention must be given to the potential health risks associated with the ionising radiation received during cardiac CT examinations. Radiation dose associated with coronary CT angiography has raised serious concerns in the literature, as the risk of developing malignancy is not negligible. Various dose-saving strategies have been implemented, with some of the strategies resulting in significant dose reduction. The aim of this review is to present an overview of the role of coronary CT angiography on cardiac imaging, with focus on coronary artery disease in terms of the diagnostic and prognostic value of coronary CT angiography. Various approaches for dose reduction commonly recommended in the literature are discussed. Limitations of coronary CT angiography are identified. Finally, future directions and challenges with the use of coronary CT angiography are highlighted. PMID:22253353

  20. Fractured Ribs and the CT Funky Fat Sign of Diaphragmatic Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Strollo, Diane C.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic diaphragmatic rupture remains a diagnostic challenge for both radiologists and surgeons. In recent years, multidetector CT has markedly improved the diagnosis of diaphragmatic injury in polytrauma patients. Herein, we describe two cases of subacute presentation of traumatic diaphragmatic rupture from a penetrating rib fracture and subsequent intrathoracic herniation of omental fat, representing the CT “funky fat” sign. PMID:27429823

  1. Fractured Ribs and the CT Funky Fat Sign of Diaphragmatic Rupture.

    PubMed

    Ocak, Iclal; Strollo, Diane C

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic diaphragmatic rupture remains a diagnostic challenge for both radiologists and surgeons. In recent years, multidetector CT has markedly improved the diagnosis of diaphragmatic injury in polytrauma patients. Herein, we describe two cases of subacute presentation of traumatic diaphragmatic rupture from a penetrating rib fracture and subsequent intrathoracic herniation of omental fat, representing the CT "funky fat" sign. PMID:27429823

  2. Dose reduction by automatic exposure control in multidetector computed tomography: comparison between measurement and calculation.

    PubMed

    Lechel, U; Becker, C; Langenfeld-Jäger, G; Brix, G

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of dose reduction in multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) by current-modulated automatic exposure control (AEC) and to test the reliability of the dose estimation by the conventional CT dosimetry program CT-EXPO, when an average tube current is used. Phantom measurements were performed at a CT system with 64 detector rows for four representative examination protocols, each without and with current-modulated AEC. Organ and effective doses were measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) at an anthropomorphic Alderson phantom and compared with those given by the calculation with CT-EXPO. The application of AEC yielded dose reductions between 27 and 40% (TLD measurements). While good linearity was observed between measured and computed effective dose values both without and with AEC, the organ doses showed large deviations between measurement and calculation. The dose to patients undergoing a MDCT examination can be reduced considerably by applying a current-modulated AEC. Dosimetric algorithms using a constant current-time product provide reliable estimates of the effective dose. PMID:18987864

  3. Radiation doses in chest, abdomen and pelvis CT procedures.

    PubMed

    Manssor, E; Abuderman, A; Osman, S; Alenezi, S B; Almehemeid, S; Babikir, E; Alkhorayef, M; Sulieman, A

    2015-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scanning is recognised as a high-radiation dose modality and estimated to be 17 % of the radiological procedure and responsible for 70 % of medical radiation exposure. Although diagnostic X rays provide great benefits, their use involves some risk for developing cancer. The objectives of this study are to estimate radiation doses during chest, abdomen and pelvis CT. A total of 51 patients were examined for the evaluation of metastasis of a diagnosed primary tumour during 4 months. A calibrated CT machine from Siemens 64 slice was used. The mean age was 48.0 ± 18.6 y. The mean patient weight was 73.8 ± 16.1 kg. The mean dose-length product was 1493.8 ± 392.1 mGy cm, Volume CT dose index (CTDI vol) was 22.94 ± 5.64 mGy and the mean effective dose was 22.4 ± 5.9 mSv per procedure. The radiation dose per procedure was higher as compared with previous studies. Therefore, the optimisation of patient's radiation doses is required in order to reduce the radiation risk. PMID:25852181

  4. Multi-Detector Row Computed Tomography Findings of Pelvic Congestion Syndrome Caused by Dilated Ovarian Veins

    PubMed Central

    Eren, Suat

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of multi-detector row CT (MDCT) on pelvic congestion syndrome (PCS), which is often overlooked or poorly visualized with routine imaging examination. Materials and Methods: We evaluated the MDCT features of 40 patients with PCS (mean age, 45 years; range, 29–60 years) using axial, coronal, sagittal, 3D volume-rendered, and Maximum Intensity Projection MIP images. Results: MDCT revealed pelvic varices and ovarian vein dilatations in all patients. Bilateral ovarian vein dilatation was present in 25 patients, and 15 patients had unilateral dilatation. While 12 cases of secondary pelvic varices occurred simultaneously with a retroaortic left renal vein, 10 cases were due solely to a mass obstruction or stenosis of venous structures. Conclusion: MDCT is an effective tool in the evaluation of PCS, and it has more advantages than other imaging modalities. PMID:25610142

  5. CT of nontraumatic thoracic aortic emergencies.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Sanjeev; West, O Clark

    2005-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT), especially multidetector row CT (MDCT), is often the preferred imaging test used for evaluation of nontraumatic thoracic aortic abnormalities. Unenhanced images, usually followed by contrast-enhanced arterial imaging, allow for rapid detailed aortic assessment. Understanding the spectrum of acute thoracic aortic conditions which may present similarly (aortic dissection, aneurysm rupture, penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer, intramural hematoma) will ensure that patients are diagnosed and treated appropriately. Familiarity with imaging protocols and potential mimics will prevent confusion of normal anatomy and variants with aortic disease. PMID:16274000

  6. Multi-detector computed tomography in the diagnosis and management of acute aortic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Hallinan, James Thomas Patrick Decourcy; Anil, Gopinathan

    2014-01-01

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a spectrum of conditions, which may ultimately progress to potentially life-threatening aortic rupture. This syndrome encompasses aortic dissection (AD), intramural haematoma, penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer and unstable thoracic aortic aneurysms. Multi-detector CT (MDCT) is crucial for the diagnosis of AAS, especially in the emergency setting due to its speed, accuracy and ready availability. This review attends to the value of appropriate imaging protocols in obtaining good quality images that can permit a confident diagnosis of AAS. AD is the most commonly encountered AAS and also the one with maximum potential to cause catastrophic outcome if not diagnosed and managed promptly. Hence, this review briefly addresses certain relevant clinical perspectives on this condition. Differentiating the false from the true lumen in AD is often essential; a spectrum of CT findings, e.g., “beak sign”, aortic “cobwebs” that allows such differentiation have been described with explicit illustrations. The value of non enhanced CT scans, especially useful in the diagnosis of an intramural hematoma has also been illustrated. Overlap in the clinical and imaging features of the various conditions presenting as AAS is not unusual. However, on most instances MDCT enables the right diagnosis. On select occasions MRI or trans-esophageal echocardiography may be required as a problem solving tool. PMID:24976936

  7. [PROGNOSTIC VALUE OF SOME HEMOSTASIS-RELATED, HOMOCYSTEINE, HIGH SENSITIVE C R P AND MULTIDETECTOR COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY PARAMETERS IN PULMONARY EMBOLISM].

    PubMed

    Todua, F; Akhvlediani, M; Vorobiova, E; Baramidze, A; Tsivtsivadze, G; Gachechiladze, D

    2016-05-01

    Nowadays, an arsenal of diagnostic methods is used in diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, which includes x-ray, angiography, perfusion-ventilation scintigraphy, CT and magnetic resonance imaging, Doppler and laboratory studies. Purpose of our study was to evaluate the diagnostic significance of determination of some parameters of hemostasis (D-dimer, Soluble fibrinmonomer complexes, fibrinogen), homocysteine, hs-CRP and multidetector computed tomography in suspected pulmonary embolism. We have examined 54 patients -31 men and 23 women, aged 18 to 76 years, with characteristics of pulmonary embolism. According to our data, Multidetector computed tomography angiopulmonography , measuring D-dimer, fibrinogen and related hyperhomocysteinemia with increased level of hs-CRP may serve as binding, diagnostically significant laboratory markers in the diagnosis and treatment efficacy of pulmonary thromboembolism. PMID:27348165

  8. SU-E-I-19: Optimization of Low Contrast Detectability Across Two CT Manufacturers

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, U; Dauer, L; Erdi, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Our goal was to evaluate low contrast detectability (LCD) for abdominal CT protocols across two CT scanner manufacturers, while producing a similar noise texture and CTDIvol for acquired images. Methods: A CIRS tissue equivalent LCD phantom containing three columns of 7 spherical targets, ranging from 10 mm to 2.4 mm, that are 5, 10, and 20 HU below the background matrix (HUBB) was scanned using two a GE HD750 64 slice scanner and a Siemens Somatom Definition AS 64 slice scanner. Protocols were designed to deliver a CTDIvol of 12.26 mGy and images were reconstructed with FBP, ASIR and Sapphire. Comparisons were made with those algorithms that had matching noise power spectrum peaks (NPS). NPS information was extracted from a previously published article that matched NPS peak frequencies across manufacturers by calculating the NPS from uniform phantom images reconstructed with several IR algorithms. Results: The minimum detectable lesion size in the 20 HUBB and 10 HUBB column was 6.3 mm, and 10 mm in the 5 HUBB column for the GE HD 750 scanner. The minimum detectable lesion size in the 20 HUBB column was 4.8 mm, in the 10 HUBB column, 9.5 mm, and the 5 HUBB column, 10 mm for the Siemens Somatom Definition AS. Conclusion: Reducing radiation dose while improving or maintaining LCD is possible with application of IR. However, there are several different IR algorithms, with each generating a different resolution and noise texture. In multi-manufacturer settings, matching only the CTDIvol between manufacturers may Result in a loss of clinically relevant information.

  9. The effect of z overscanning on patient effective dose from multidetector helical computed tomography examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Tzedakis, A.; Damilakis, J.; Perisinakis, K.; Stratakis, J.; Gourtsoyiannis, N.

    2005-06-15

    z overscanning in multidetector (MD) helical CT scanning is prerequisite for the interpolation of acquired data required during image reconstruction and refers to the exposure of tissues beyond the boundaries of the volume to be imaged. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of z overscanning on the patient effective dose from helical MD CT examinations. The Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport code was employed in the current study to simulate CT exposure. The validity of the Monte Carlo simulation was verified by (a) a comparison of calculated and measured standard computed tomography dose index (CTDI) dosimetric data, and (b) a comparison of calculated and measured dose profiles along the z axis. CTDI was measured using a pencil ionization chamber and head and body CT phantoms. Dose profiles along the z axis were obtained using thermoluminescence dosimeters. A commercially available mathematical anthropomorphic phantom was used for the estimation of effective doses from four standard CT examinations, i.e., head and neck, chest, abdomen and pelvis, and trunk studies. Data for both axial and helical modes of operation were obtained. In the helical mode, z overscanning was taken into account. The calculated effective dose from a CT exposure was normalized to CTDI{sub freeinair}. The percentage differences in the normalized effective dose between contiguous axial and helical scans with pitch=1, may reach 13.1%, 35.8%, 29.0%, and 21.5%, for head and neck, chest, abdomen and pelvis, and trunk studies, respectively. Given that the same kilovoltage and tube load per rotation were used in both axial and helical scans, the above differences may be attributed to z overscanning. For helical scans with pitch=1, broader beam collimation is associated with increased z overscanning and consequently higher normalized effective dose value, when other scanning parameters are held constant. For a given beam collimation, the selection of a higher value of

  10. Principle and applications of dual source CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flohr, Thomas

    2008-08-01

    Dual source CT (DSCT) has the potential to solve remaining limitations of conventional multi-detector row CT (MDCT)-scanners, such as insufficient temporal resolution for ECG-controlled cardiac imaging. A DSCT is equipped with two X-ray tubes and two corresponding detectors that are mounted onto the rotating gantry with an angular offset of 90°. The key benefit of DSCT for cardiac scanning is improved temporal resolution equivalent to a quarter of the gantry rotation time (83 ms at 0.33 s rotation time). Additionally, both X-ray tubes can be operated at different kV- and mA-settings, enabling the acquisition of dual energy data. The acquisition of dual energy CT data can add functional information to the morphological information based on different X-ray attenuation coefficients that is usually obtained in a CT examination.

  11. SU-E-P-11: Comparison of Image Quality and Radiation Dose Between Different Scanner System in Routine Abdomen CT

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, S; Wang, Y; Weng, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of routine abdomen computed tomography exam with the automatic current modulation technique (ATCM) performed in two different brand 64-slice CT scanners in our site. Materials and Methods A retrospective review of routine abdomen CT exam performed with two scanners; scanner A and scanner B in our site. To calculate standard deviation of the portal hepatic level with a region of interest of 12.5 mm x 12.5mm represented to the image noise. The radiation dose was obtained from CT DICOM image information. Using Computed tomography dose index volume (CTDIv) to represented CT radiation dose. The patient data in this study were with normal weight (about 65–75 Kg). Results The standard deviation of Scanner A was smaller than scanner B, the scanner A might with better image quality than scanner B. On the other hand, the radiation dose of scanner A was higher than scanner B(about higher 50–60%) with ATCM. Both of them, the radiation dose was under diagnostic reference level. Conclusion The ATCM systems in modern CT scanners can contribute a significant reduction in radiation dose to the patient. But the reduction by ATCM systems from different CT scanner manufacturers has slightly variation. Whatever CT scanner we use, it is necessary to find the acceptable threshold of image quality with the minimum possible radiation exposure to the patient in agreement with the ALARA principle.

  12. Organ doses to adult patients for chest CT

    SciTech Connect

    Huda, Walter; Sterzik, Alexander; Tipnis, Sameer; Schoepf, U. Joseph

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to estimate organ doses for chest CT examinations using volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) data as well as accounting for patient weight. Methods: A CT dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT CT patient dosimetry calculator) was used to compute organ doses for a 70 kg patient undergoing chest CT examinations, as well as volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) in a body CT dosimetry phantom at the same CT technique factors. Ratios of organ dose to CTDI{sub vol} (f{sub organ}) were generated as a function of anatomical location in the chest for the breasts, lungs, stomach, red bone marrow, liver, thyroid, liver, and thymus. Values of f{sub organ} were obtained for x-ray tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kV for 1, 4, 16, and 64 slice CT scanners from two vendors. For constant CT techniques, we computed ratios of dose in water phantoms of differing diameter. By modeling patients of different weights as equivalent water cylinders of different diameters, we generated factors that permit the estimation of the organ doses in patients weighing between 50 and 100 kg who undergo chest CT examinations relative to the corresponding organ doses received by a 70 kg adult. Results: For a 32 cm long CT scan encompassing the complete lungs, values of f{sub organ} ranged from 1.7 (thymus) to 0.3 (stomach). Organs that are directly in the x-ray beam, and are completely irradiated, generally had f{sub organ} values well above 1 (i.e., breast, lung, heart, and thymus). Organs that are not completely irradiated in a total chest CT scan generally had f{sub organ} values that are less than 1 (e.g., red bone marrow, liver, and stomach). Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV resulted in modest increases in f{sub organ} for the heart (9%) and thymus (8%), but resulted in larger increases for the breast (19%) and red bone marrow (21%). Adult patient chests have been modeled by water cylinders with diameters between

  13. Evaluation of hepatic arterial anatomy by multidetector computed tomographic angiography in living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Keles, Papatya; Yuce, Ihsan; Keles, Sait; Kantarci, Mecit

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to define the different courses and percentages of hepatic artery that were detected during preoperative evaluation of living liver donors by multidetector computed tomographic angiography (MDCTA). We evaluated 150 donors before hepatic transplantation. All of the donors were evaluated by multislice CT scan with 256 detectors. For each patient, arterial, portal and venous phase images were obtained. The hepatic arterial variations were evaluated by the same radiologist according to Michels' classification. Common hepatic arterial anatomy (type I) was observed in 95 donors (63.3%). Other arterial variations were determined in the remaining 55 donors (36.6%). The second common variation was type XI which did not match with the description of Michels' classification variation in 15 donors (10%). The remaining variations described in Michels' classification were seen at lower rates. Type VII or X variation was not seen. MDCTA is a useful method to identify the blood supply of the liver before the liver transplantations, and surgeons can make their plan on the basis of CT data. PMID:26910605

  14. Advances of multidetector computed tomography in the characterization and staging of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tsili, Athina C; Argyropoulou, Maria I

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for approximately 90%-95% of kidney tumors. With the widespread use of cross-sectional imaging modalities, more than half of RCCs are detected incidentally, often diagnosed at an early stage. This may allow the planning of more conservative treatment strategies. Computed tomography (CT) is considered the examination of choice for the detection and staging of RCC. Multidetector CT (MDCT) with the improvement of spatial resolution and the ability to obtain multiphase imaging, multiplanar and three-dimensional reconstructions in any desired plane brought about further improvement in the evaluation of RCC. Differentiation of RCC from benign renal tumors based on MDCT features is improved. Tumor enhancement characteristics on MDCT have been found closely to correlate with the histologic subtype of RCC, the nuclear grade and the cytogenetic characteristics of clear cell RCC. Important information, including tumor size, localization, and organ involvement, presence and extent of venous thrombus, possible invasion of adjacent organs or lymph nodes, and presence of distant metastases are provided by MDCT examination. The preoperative evaluation of patients with RCC was improved by depicting the presence or absence of renal pseudocapsule and by assessing the possible neoplastic infiltration of the perirenal fat tissue and/or renal sinus fat compartment. PMID:26120380

  15. SPECT/CT and pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Jann; Gutte, Henrik

    2014-05-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is diagnosed either by ventilation/perfusion (V/P) scintigraphy or pulmonary CT angiography (CTPA). In recent years both techniques have improved. Many nuclear medicine centres have adopted the single photon emission CT (SPECT) technique as opposed to the planar technique for diagnosing PE. SPECT has been shown to have fewer indeterminate results and a higher diagnostic value. The latest improvement is the combination of a low-dose CT scan with a V/P SPECT scan in a hybrid tomograph. In a study comparing CTPA, planar scintigraphy and SPECT alone, SPECT/CT had the best diagnostic accuracy for PE. In addition, recent developments in the CTPA technique have made it possible to image the pulmonary arteries of the lungs in one breath-hold. This development is based on the change from a single-detector to multidetector CT technology with an increase in volume coverage per rotation and faster rotation. Furthermore, the dual energy CT technique is a promising modality that can provide functional imaging in combination with anatomical information. Newer high-end CT scanners and SPECT systems are able to visualize smaller subsegmental emboli. However, consensus is lacking regarding the clinical impact and treatment. In the present review, SPECT and SPECT in combination with low-dose CT, CTPA and dual energy CT are discussed in the context of diagnosing PE. PMID:24213621

  16. Coronary artery anomalies in adults: imaging at dual source CT coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Laspas, Fotios; Roussakis, Arkadios; Mourmouris, Christos; Kritikos, Nikolaos; Efthimiadou, Roxani; Andreou, John

    2013-04-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the coronary arteries have an incidence of 1%, and most of these are benign. However, a small number are associated with myocardial ischaemia and sudden death. Various imaging modalities are available for coronary artery assessment. Recently, multi-detector CT has emerged as an accurate diagnostic tool for defining coronary artery anomalies. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to review the dual source CT appearance of congenital anomalies of the coronary arteries in adults. PMID:23551776

  17. Precision of dosimetry-related measurements obtained on current multidetector computed tomography scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Kelsey B.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Zhang, Di; Kim, Hyun J.; Cody, Dianna D.

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) intrascanner and interscanner variability has not been well characterized. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the within-run, between-run, and between-scanner precision of physical dosimetry-related measurements collected over the course of 1 yr on three different makes and models of multidetector row CT (MDCT) scanners. Methods: Physical measurements were collected using nine CT scanners (three scanners each of GE VCT, GE LightSpeed 16, and Siemens Sensation 64 CT). Measurements were made using various combinations of technical factors, including kVp, type of bowtie filter, and x-ray beam collimation, for several dosimetry-related quantities, including (a) free-in-air CT dose index (CTDI{sub 100,air}); (b) calculated half-value layers and quarter-value layers; and (c) weighted CT dose index (CTDI{sub w}) calculated from exposure measurements collected in both a 16 and 32 cm diameter CTDI phantom. Data collection was repeated at several different time intervals, ranging from seconds (for CTDI{sub 100,air} values) to weekly for 3 weeks and then quarterly or triannually for 1 yr. Precision of the data was quantified by the percent coefficient of variation (%CV). Results: The maximum relative precision error (maximum %CV value) across all dosimetry metrics, time periods, and scanners included in this study was 4.33%. The median observed %CV values for CTDI{sub 100,air} ranged from 0.05% to 0.19% over several seconds, 0.12%-0.52% over 1 week, and 0.58%-2.31% over 3-4 months. For CTDI{sub w} for a 16 and 32 cm CTDI phantom, respectively, the range of median %CVs was 0.38%-1.14% and 0.62%-1.23% in data gathered weekly for 3 weeks and 1.32%-2.79% and 0.84%-2.47% in data gathered quarterly or triannually for 1 yr. Conclusions: From a dosimetry perspective, the MDCT scanners tested in this study demonstrated a high degree of within-run, between-run, and between-scanner precision (with relative precision errors typically well

  18. SU-E-I-23: A General KV Constrained Optimization of CNR for CT Abdominal Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, V; Zhang, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: While Tube current modulation has been well accepted for CT dose reduction, kV adjusting in clinical settings is still at its early stage. This is mainly due to the limited kV options of most current CT scanners. kV adjusting can potentially reduce radiation dose and optimize image quality. This study is to optimize CT abdomen imaging acquisition based on the assumption of a continuous kV, with the goal to provide the best contrast to noise ratio (CNR). Methods: For a given dose (CTDIvol) level, the CNRs at different kV and pitches were measured with an ACR GAMMEX phantom. The phantom was scanned in a Siemens Sensation 64 scanner and a GE VCT 64 scanner. A constrained mathematical optimization was used to find the kV which led to the highest CNR for the anatomy and pitch setting. Parametric equations were obtained from polynomial fitting of plots of kVs vs CNRs. A suitable constraint region for optimization was chosen. Subsequent optimization yielded a peak CNR at a particular kV for different collimations and pitch setting. Results: The constrained mathematical optimization approach yields kV of 114.83 and 113.46, with CNRs of 1.27 and 1.11 at the pitch of 1.2 and 1.4, respectively, for the Siemens Sensation 64 scanner with the collimation of 32 x 0.625mm. An optimized kV of 134.25 and 1.51 CNR is obtained for a GE VCT 64 slice scanner with a collimation of 32 x 0.625mm and a pitch of 0.969. At 0.516 pitch and 32 x 0.625 mm an optimized kV of 133.75 and a CNR of 1.14 was found for the GE VCT 64 slice scanner. Conclusion: CNR in CT image acquisition can be further optimized with a continuous kV option instead of current discrete or fixed kV settings. A continuous kV option is a key for individualized CT protocols.

  19. Anthropometric Assessment of Neck Adipose Tissue and Airway Volume Using Multidetector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Maresky, Hillel S.; Sharfman, Zachary; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Gomori, J.M.; Copel, Laurian; Tal, Sigal

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Neck adiposity tissue volume (NATV) accumulation is an indicator for metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Neck circumference is a poor measure of NATV, and a quantifier for this entity has not yet been established. To evaluate volumetric quantification by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) as a reproducible anthropometric tool to measure NATV and airway volume (AWV). A total of 519 patients, including a subset of 70 random patients who underwent head and neck CT scanning in our hospital within 1 year (2013), were studied. Included patients were all those undergoing nonenhanced CT (NECT) or CT angiography (CTA). Neck cross-sectional areas (NCSA) were measured at 2 separate levels of the neck, and 3D postprocessing tissue reconstruction was performed, and NATV and AWVs were quantified volumetrically for all patients within the year. The average NCSA at the level of the soft palate and thyroid cartilage was 22,579 and 14,500 mm2, respectively. NATV when compared to the upper and lower levels of NCSA showed correlations of 0.64 and 0.79, respectively (P < 0.001). Interobserver analysis showed mean deviations of 0.46% and 0.32% for NATV and AWV, respectively. A strong correlation between NATV and body mass index (BMI) was found (r = 0.658, P < 0.001), and the top quartile of NATV:AWV patients (out of 519 patients) displayed a statistically significant mortality rate during 670 days of follow-up (d = 7.5%, P = 0.032). After adjustment for age and gender, the association between NATV:AWV and mortality was close to significant (P = 0.072). Volumetric quantification of NATV and AWV is a reproducible and prognostic anthropometric tool, as a high NATV:AWV demonstrated a significant risk factor for mortality; future research may further advance our understanding of this phenomenon. PMID:26559286

  20. Rectal cancer staging: Multidetector-row computed tomography diagnostic accuracy in assessment of mesorectal fascia invasion

    PubMed Central

    Ippolito, Davide; Drago, Silvia Girolama; Franzesi, Cammillo Talei; Fior, Davide; Sironi, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) as compared with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in identifying mesorectal fascia (MRF) invasion in rectal cancer patients. METHODS: Ninety-one patients with biopsy proven rectal adenocarcinoma referred for thoracic and abdominal CT staging were enrolled in this study. The contrast-enhanced MDCT scans were performed on a 256 row scanner (ICT, Philips) with the following acquisition parameters: tube voltage 120 KV, tube current 150-300 mAs. Imaging data were reviewed as axial and as multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) images along the rectal tumor axis. MRI study, performed on 1.5 T with dedicated phased array multicoil, included multiplanar T2 and axial T1 sequences and diffusion weighted images (DWI). Axial and MPR CT images independently were compared to MRI and MRF involvement was determined. Diagnostic accuracy of both modalities was compared and statistically analyzed. RESULTS: According to MRI, the MRF was involved in 51 patients and not involved in 40 patients. DWI allowed to recognize the tumor as a focal mass with high signal intensity on high b-value images, compared with the signal of the normal adjacent rectal wall or with the lower tissue signal intensity background. The number of patients correctly staged by the native axial CT images was 71 out of 91 (41 with involved MRF; 30 with not involved MRF), while by using the MPR 80 patients were correctly staged (45 with involved MRF; 35 with not involved MRF). Local tumor staging suggested by MDCT agreed with those of MRI, obtaining for CT axial images sensitivity and specificity of 80.4% and 75%, positive predictive value (PPV) 80.4%, negative predictive value (NPV) 75% and accuracy 78%; while performing MPR the sensitivity and specificity increased to 88% and 87.5%, PPV was 90%, NPV 85.36% and accuracy 88%. MPR images showed higher diagnostic accuracy, in terms of MRF involvement, than native axial images

  1. Advances in CT imaging for urolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Andrabi, Yasir; Patino, Manuel; Das, Chandan J.; Eisner, Brian; Sahani, Dushyant V.; Kambadakone, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Urolithiasis is a common disease with increasing prevalence worldwide and a lifetime-estimated recurrence risk of over 50%. Imaging plays a critical role in the initial diagnosis, follow-up and urological management of urinary tract stone disease. Unenhanced helical computed tomography (CT) is highly sensitive (>95%) and specific (>96%) in the diagnosis of urolithiasis and is the imaging investigation of choice for the initial assessment of patients with suspected urolithiasis. The emergence of multi-detector CT (MDCT) and technological innovations in CT such as dual-energy CT (DECT) has widened the scope of MDCT in the stone disease management from initial diagnosis to encompass treatment planning and monitoring of treatment success. DECT has been shown to enhance pre-treatment characterization of stone composition in comparison with conventional MDCT and is being increasingly used. Although CT-related radiation dose exposure remains a valid concern, the use of low-dose MDCT protocols and integration of newer iterative reconstruction algorithms into routine CT practice has resulted in a substantial decrease in ionizing radiation exposure. In this review article, our intent is to discuss the role of MDCT in the diagnosis and post-treatment evaluation of urolithiasis and review the impact of emerging CT technologies such as dual energy in clinical practice. PMID:26166961

  2. Advances in CT imaging for urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Andrabi, Yasir; Patino, Manuel; Das, Chandan J; Eisner, Brian; Sahani, Dushyant V; Kambadakone, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Urolithiasis is a common disease with increasing prevalence worldwide and a lifetime-estimated recurrence risk of over 50%. Imaging plays a critical role in the initial diagnosis, follow-up and urological management of urinary tract stone disease. Unenhanced helical computed tomography (CT) is highly sensitive (>95%) and specific (>96%) in the diagnosis of urolithiasis and is the imaging investigation of choice for the initial assessment of patients with suspected urolithiasis. The emergence of multi-detector CT (MDCT) and technological innovations in CT such as dual-energy CT (DECT) has widened the scope of MDCT in the stone disease management from initial diagnosis to encompass treatment planning and monitoring of treatment success. DECT has been shown to enhance pre-treatment characterization of stone composition in comparison with conventional MDCT and is being increasingly used. Although CT-related radiation dose exposure remains a valid concern, the use of low-dose MDCT protocols and integration of newer iterative reconstruction algorithms into routine CT practice has resulted in a substantial decrease in ionizing radiation exposure. In this review article, our intent is to discuss the role of MDCT in the diagnosis and post-treatment evaluation of urolithiasis and review the impact of emerging CT technologies such as dual energy in clinical practice. PMID:26166961

  3. Multidetector computed tomography analysis of benign and malignant nodules in patients with chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, CAISONG; LIU, WEI; YANG, JUN; YANG, JING; SHAO, KANGWEI; YUAN, LIXIN; CHEN, HAIRONG; LU, WEI; ZHU, YING

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) features of benign and malignant nodules in patients with chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (CLT). MDCT findings, including the size, solid percentage, calcification, margin, capsule, anteroposterior-transverse diameter ratio as well as the mode and the degree of enhancement of 137 thyroid nodules in 127 CLT cases were retrospectively analyzed. Furthermore, the correlation between MDCT findings and pathological results combined with the CT perfusion imaging was analyzed for the differences between benign and malignant nodules. A total of 77.5% (31/40) of malignant nodules were completely solid, and 33% (32/97) of benign nodules were predominantly cystic. Compared with the benign nodules, micro-calcification and internal calcification were more frequently observed in the malignant nodules (P<0.05). MDCT features such as ill-defined margin, absence of capsule or incomplete capsule or homogeneous enhancement were more likely to be present in the malignant nodules (P<0.05). Nevertheless, no significant difference was observed in the enhancement degree at arterial or venous phase between benign and malignant nodules (P>0.05). MDCT features are useful in differentiating the benign and malignant nodules in CLT patients, and it may be essential for a radiologist to review the MDCT characteristics of nodules in the clinical practice. PMID:27347131

  4. Multidetector Computed Tomography Features in Differentiating Exophytic Renal Angiomyolipoma from Retroperitoneal Liposarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiushi; Juan, Yu-Hsiang; Li, Yong; Xie, Jia-Jun; Liu, Hui; Huang, Hongfei; Liu, Zaiyi; Zheng, Junhui; Saboo, Ujwala S.; Saboo, Sachin S.; Liang, Changhong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study aims to evaluate the multidetector computed tomography (CT) imaging features in differentiating exophytic renal angiomyolipoma (AML) from retroperitoneal liposarcoma. We retrospectively enrolled 42 patients with confirmed exophytic renal AML (31 patients) or retroperitoneal liposarcoma (11 patients) during 8 years period to assess: renal parenchymal defect at site of tumor contact, supply from branches of renal artery, tumoral vessel extending through the renal parenchyma, dilated intratumoral vessels, hemorrhage, non–fat-containing intratumoral nodules with postcontrast enhancement, calcification, renal sinus enlargement, anterior displacement of kidneys, and other associated AML. Renal parenchymal defect, renal arterial blood supply, tumoral vessel through the renal parenchyma, dilated intratumoral vessels, intratumoral/perirenal hemorrhage, renal sinus enlargement, and associated AML were seen only or mainly in exophytic renal AML (all P value < 0.05); however, non–fat-attenuating enhancing intratumoral nodules, intratumoral calcification, and anterior displacement of the kidney were more common in liposarcoma (all P value < 0.05). AMLs reveal renal parenchymal defect at the site of tumor contact, supply from renal artery, tumoral vessel extending through the renal parenchyma, dilated intratumoral vessels, intratumoral and/or perirenal hemorrhage, renal sinus enlargement, and associated AML. Non–fat-attenuating enhancing intratumoral nodules, intratumoral calcifications, and anterior displacement of kidney were more commonly seen in liposarcoma. PMID:26376398

  5. To assess vascular calcification in the patients of hypoparathyroidism using multidetector computed tomography scan

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Pooja; Prakash, Mahesh; Singhal, Manphool; Bhadada, Sanjay Kumar; Gupta, Yashdeep; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Our pilot data showed an increased intima media thickness in the patients with sporadic idiopathic hypoparathyroidism (SIH). Alteration in homeostasis of calcium, phosphate, and parathyroid hormone (PTH) may predispose to increase the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The data on objective assessment of this increased risk is however lacking. Objective: To assess the effect of altered calcium, phosphate, and PTH homeostasis in the patients with SIH on coronary calcium score (a marker of increase vascular risk) by multidetector computed tomography scan (MDCT). Methods: In this case-control study, we measured coronary CT calcium score in 30 patients of SIH and compared with 40 age and sex matched healthy subjects. Correlation of coronary calcium score with biochemical parameters was evaluated. Results: Three of the 30 cases (10%) with SIH were found to have coronary artery calcification (CAC) of varying degree, whereas none of the control showed CAC (P = 0.07). The patients with CAC had significantly lower serum calcium levels (albumin corrected), as compared to the patients without CAC. Inverse correlation of CAC was found with serum calcium levels. No correlation was found with other biochemical parameters. Conclusion: The vascular risk is increased in the patients with SIH as assessed by coronary calcium score measured by MDCT. Low serum calcium levels might be a predisposing factor for this increased risk. PMID:26693429

  6. Normalized CT Dose Index of the CT Scanners Used in the National Lung Screening Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cody, Dianna D.; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Cagnon, Christopher H.; Larke, Frederick J.; McNitt-Gray, Michael M.; Kruger, Randell L.; Flynn, Michael J.; Seibert, J. Anthony; Judy, Philip F.; Wu, Xizeng

    2010-01-01

    The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) includes 33 participating institutions, which performed 75, 133 lung cancer screening CT exams from 26,724 subjects during 2002–2007. For trial quality assurance reasons, CT radiation dose measurement data were collected from all multidetector-row CT scanners used in the NLST. A total of 247 measurements on 96 multi-row detector scanners were collected using a standard CT dose index (CTDI) measurement protocol. The scan parameters employed in the measurements (tube voltage, mAs and detector-channel configuration) were set according to trial-protocol for average size subjects. The normalized CTDIw (computed as CTDIw /mAs) obtained from each trial-participating scanner was tabulated. This study demonstrated a statistically significant difference in normalized CT dose index among CT scanner manufacturers, likely due to design differences such as filtration, bow-tie design and geometry. Our findings also indicated a statistically significant difference in normalized CT dose index among CT scanner models within GE, Siemens, and Philips. We also demonstrated a statistically significant difference in normalized CT dose index among all models and all manufacturers. And, we demonstrated a statistically significant difference in normalized CT dose index from CT scanners among manufacturers when grouped by 4 or 8 data channels vs 16, 32, or 64 channels, suggesting improved dose efficiency in more complex scanners. Average normalized CT dose index values varied by almost a factor of two across all scanners from all manufacturers. This study was focused on machine specific normalized CT dose index; patient dose and image quality were not addressed. PMID:20489094

  7. Mechanical thrombectomy using a combined CT/C-arm X-ray system

    PubMed Central

    Herweh, Christian; Pham, Mirko; Schönenberger, Silvia; Bösel, Julian; Ringleb, Peter A; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Möhlenbruch, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Background Mechanical thrombectomy (MT) using stent-retrievers has been proven to be a safe and effective treatment in acute ischemic stroke (AIS), particularly in large vessel occlusion. Other than patient characteristics, time to recanalization is the most important factor linked to outcome. MT is usually performed in a dedicated angiography suite using a floor- and/or ceiling-mounted biplane angiographic system. Here we report our first experience of MT with a new combined CT and mobile C-arm X-ray device setup. Methods Patients with AIS underwent stroke imaging (non-contrast enhanced CT, CT perfusion, and CT angiography) using a commercially available 64-slice CT scanner which was modified for combined use with a C-arm system. In patients with large vessel occlusion, MT was conducted without further patient transfer within the CT imaging suite using a mobile C-arm X-ray device equipped with a 30×30 cm (12×12 inch), 1.5×1.5 k full-view flat detector which was positioned between the gantry and patient table. The safety and feasibility of this new system was assessed in preliminary patients. Results Angiographic imaging quality of the mobile C-arm was feasible and satisfactory for diagnostic angiography and MT. Using this setup, time between stroke imaging and groin puncture (picture-to-puncture time) was reduced by up to 35 min (including time for preparation of the patient such as intubation). Conclusions MT using a combined CT/C-arm system is safe and feasible. The potential advantages, particularly time saving and ensuing improvement in patient outcome, need to be assessed in a larger study. PMID:25935925

  8. MULTIDETECTOR-ROW COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS OF PRESUMED PREURETERAL VENA CAVA IN CATS.

    PubMed

    Pey, Pascaline; Marcon, Oriana; Drigo, Michele; Specchi, Swan; Bertolini, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Preureteral vena cava (circumcaval ureter, retrocaval ureter) occurs in a third of the feline population and has been associated with ureteral strictures in humans. The aim of this retrospective cross-sectional study was to describe the contrast-enhanced multidetector row computed tomographic (MDCT) characteristics of presumed preureteral vena cava in a group of cats. Medical records from two institutions located in different continents were searched from 2010-2013 for cases with complete contrast-enhanced MDCT examinations of the abdomen (i.e. included the entire course of the ureters and prerenal and renal segments of the caudal vena cava) and a diagnosis of preureteral caudal vena cava. For cases meeting inclusion criteria, CT scan data were retrieved and characteristics of the preureteral caudal vena cava were recorded. Presence of concomitant renal or ureteral diseases was also recorded. A total of 272 cats had contrast-enhanced abdominal CT scans during the study period and of these, 68 cats (22.43 ± 4.96%) had a diagnosis of presumed preureteral vena cava. In all affected cats, a "reverse-J ureter" was observed, i.e. a ureter running medially at the level of L4-5, passing dorsally to the caudal vena cava and then exiting ventrally between the caudal vena cava and aorta returning to its normal position. Having a preureteral vena cava resulted in an increased risk for concurrent urinary signs (OR = 3.00; CI: 95%; 1.28-6.99; P = 0.01). Findings supported the use of contrast-enhanced MDCT for characterizing morphology of preureteral vena cava and its relation with ureters in cats. PMID:25786990

  9. Importance of extracolonic findings at IV contrast medium-enhanced CT colonography versus those at non-enhanced CT colonography.

    PubMed

    Spreng, Adrian; Netzer, Peter; Mattich, Joerg; Dinkel, Hans-Peter; Vock, Peter; Hoppe, Hanno

    2005-10-01

    To compare the clinical importance of extracolonic findings at intravenous (IV) contrast-enhanced CT colonography versus those at non-enhanced CT colonography. IV contrast medium-enhanced (n=72) and non-enhanced (n=30) multidetector CT colonography was performed in 102 symptomatic patients followed by conventional colonoscopy on the same day. The impact of extracolonic findings on further work up and treatment was assessed by a review of patient records. Extracolonic findings were divided into two groups: either leading to further work up respectively having an impact on therapy or not. A total of 303 extracolonic findings were detected. Of those, 71% (215/303) were found on IV contrast-enhanced CT, and 29% (88/303) were found on non-enhanced CT colonography. The extracolonic findings in 25% (26/102) of all patients led to further work up or had an impact on therapy. Twenty-two of these patients underwent CT colonography with IV contrast enhancement, and four without. The percentage of extracolonic findings leading to further work up or having an impact on therapy was higher for IV contrast-enhanced (31%; 22/72) than for non-enhanced (13%; 4/30) CT scans (P=0.12). IV contrast-enhanced CT colonography produced more extracolonic findings than non-enhanced CT colonography. A substantially greater proportion of findings on IV contrast-enhanced CT colonography led to further work up and treatment than did non-enhanced CT colonography. PMID:15965661

  10. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Matos, António P.; Mascarenhas, Vasco; Herédia, Vasco

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall. PMID:25295188

  11. Multidetector computer tomography: evaluation of blunt chest trauma in adults.

    PubMed

    Palas, João; Matos, António P; Mascarenhas, Vasco; Herédia, Vasco; Ramalho, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall. PMID:25295188

  12. Image quality in low-dose coronary computed tomography angiography with a new high-definition CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Kazakauskaite, Egle; Husmann, Lars; Stehli, Julia; Fuchs, Tobias; Fiechter, Michael; Klaeser, Bernd; Ghadri, Jelena R; Gebhard, Catherine; Gaemperli, Oliver; Kaufmann, Philipp A

    2013-02-01

    A new generation of high definition computed tomography (HDCT) 64-slice devices complemented by a new iterative image reconstruction algorithm-adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction, offer substantially higher resolution compared to standard definition CT (SDCT) scanners. As high resolution confers higher noise we have compared image quality and radiation dose of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) from HDCT versus SDCT. Consecutive patients (n = 93) underwent HDCT, and were compared to 93 patients who had previously undergone CCTA with SDCT matched for heart rate (HR), HR variability and body mass index (BMI). Tube voltage and current were adapted to the patient's BMI, using identical protocols in both groups. The image quality of all CCTA scans was evaluated by two independent readers in all coronary segments using a 4-point scale (1, excellent image quality; 2, blurring of the vessel wall; 3, image with artefacts but evaluative; 4, non-evaluative). Effective radiation dose was calculated from DLP multiplied by a conversion factor (0.014 mSv/mGy × cm). The mean image quality score from HDCT versus SDCT was comparable (2.02 ± 0.68 vs. 2.00 ± 0.76). Mean effective radiation dose did not significantly differ between HDCT (1.7 ± 0.6 mSv, range 1.0-3.7 mSv) and SDCT (1.9 ± 0.8 mSv, range 0.8-5.5 mSv; P = n.s.). HDCT scanners allow low-dose 64-slice CCTA scanning with higher resolution than SDCT but maintained image quality and equally low radiation dose. Whether this will translate into higher accuracy of HDCT for CAD detection remains to be evaluated. PMID:22825255

  13. CT -- Body

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Body Computed tomography (CT) of the body uses special x-ray ... Body? What is CT Scanning of the Body? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  14. Patient acceptance for CT colonography: what is the real issue?

    PubMed

    Thomeer, M; Bielen, D; Vanbeckevoort, D; Dymarkowski, S; Gevers, A; Rutgeerts, P; Hiele, M; Van Cutsem, E; Marchal, G

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the discomfort associated with CT colonography compared with colonoscopy and bowel purgation cleansing, and to evaluate patient preference between CT colonography and colonoscopy. In a total of 124 patients, scheduled for multidetector virtual CT colonography and diagnostic colonoscopy, patient acceptance and future preference were assessed during the different steps of the procedure (colon preparation, CT examination, and conventional colonoscopy). Patients who described contradictory findings between the degree of discomfort and their preference regarding follow-up examinations were retrospectively reinterviewed regarding the reason for this discrepancy. Colonoscopy was graded slightly more uncomfortable than virtual CT colonography, but the preparation was clearly the most uncomfortable part of the procedure. Concerning their preference regarding follow-up examinations, 71% of the patients preferred virtual CT colonography, 24% preferred colonoscopy, and 5% had no preference. Twenty-eight percent of the patients preferred virtual CT colonography despite that they thought it was equally or even more uncomfortable than colonoscopy. This was mainly due to the faster procedure (17 patients), the lower physical challenge (14 patients), and the lack of sedation (12 patients) of virtual CT colonography. Factors other than the discomfort related to the examinations play an important role in the patient's preference for virtual CT colonography, namely the faster procedure, the lower physical challenge, and the lack of sedation. Since the preparation plays a major decisive factor in the patient acceptance of virtual CT colonography, more attention should be given to fecal tagging. PMID:12042947

  15. Aborted sudden cardiac death associated with an anomalous right coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Rienzi A; Valdés, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery anomalies arising from the opposite sinus of Valsalva and having an interarterial course between the aorta (AO) and pulmonary artery (PA) are the second most common cause of sudden cardiac death among young athletes, after hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The right coronary artery (RCA) originating from the AO above the left sinus of Valsalva (LSV) is an extremely rare anomaly. We report the first case of a RCA arising from the AO above the LSV that subsequently runs between the AO and the PA, discovered by a 64-slice multidetector coronary CT, in a patient who was successfully resuscitated from ventricular fibrillation (VF) cardiac arrest while running in a marathon race. PMID:26153291

  16. SU-E-T-541: Measurement of CT Density Model Variations and the Impact On the Accuracy of Monte Carlo (MC) Dose Calculation in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, H; Li, B; Behrman, R; Russo, G; Kachnic, L; Lu, H; Fernando, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To measure the CT density model variations between different CT scanners used for treatment planning and impact on the accuracy of MC dose calculation in lung SBRT. Methods: A Gammex electron density phantom (RMI 465) was scanned on two 64-slice CT scanners (GE LightSpeed VCT64) and a 16-slice CT (Philips Brilliance Big Bore CT). All three scanners had been used to acquire CT for CyberKnife lung SBRT treatment planning. To minimize the influences of beam hardening and scatter for improving reproducibility, three scans were acquired with the phantom rotated 120° between scans. The mean CT HU of each density insert, averaged over the three scans, was used to build the CT density models. For 14 patient plans, repeat MC dose calculations were performed by using the scanner-specific CT density models and compared to a baseline CT density model in the base plans. All dose re-calculations were done using the same plan beam configurations and MUs. Comparisons of dosimetric parameters included PTV volume covered by prescription dose, mean PTV dose, V5 and V20 for lungs, and the maximum dose to the closest critical organ. Results: Up to 50.7 HU variations in CT density models were observed over the baseline CT density model. For 14 patient plans examined, maximum differences in MC dose re-calculations were less than 2% in 71.4% of the cases, less than 5% in 85.7% of the cases, and 5–10% for 14.3% of the cases. As all the base plans well exceeded the clinical objectives of target coverage and OAR sparing, none of the observed differences led to clinically significant concerns. Conclusion: Marked variations of CT density models were observed for three different CT scanners. Though the differences can cause up to 5–10% differences in MC dose calculations, it was found that they caused no clinically significant concerns.

  17. Differential associations between blood biomarkers of inflammation, oxidation, and lipid metabolism with varying forms of coronary atherosclerotic plaque as quantified by coronary CT angiography

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Quynh A.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Schlett, Christopher L.; Nasir, Khurram; Butler, Javed; Kurtz, Emily; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Hoffmann, Udo; Januzzi, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Although epidemiologic data link biomarkers of cardiovascular risk with incident and prevalent coronary artery disease, exact anatomic relationships between biomarkers and coronary atherosclerosis as measured by coronary CT angiography remain unclear. Patients with acute chest pain who ultimately had no evidence of acute coronary syndrome underwent contrast-enhanced 64-slice coronary CT angiography to determine presence, extent and composition of coronary atherosclerotic plaque. We determined the differences in levels of blood biomarkers measured at the time of the CT scan between different CT-based atherosclerotic plaque groups. Among 313 patients (mean age: 51.6 ± 11 years, 62% male) high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and matrix metalloproteinase-2 were associated with the extent of calcified plaque (P = 0.03 and P<0.001), while hs-CRP and apolipoprotein A1 were associated with the extent of non-calcified plaque (P = 0.03 and P = 0.004; respectively). Despite a generally lower risk profile, subjects with exclusively non-calcified plaque had significantly higher levels of hs-CRP and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (P = 0.01 and P = 0.03; respectively) and lower levels of adiponectin (P = 0.03) when compared to subjects with calcified plaque (n = 130, 42%). Biomarkers reflecting inflammation, vascular remodeling, oxidation, and lipoprotein metabolism maybe associated with different patterns of coronary atherosclerosis as quantified by coronary CT angiography. PMID:21222039

  18. Pulmonary Findings on Computed Tomography in Asymptomatic Total Joint Arthroplasty Patients.

    PubMed

    Vigdorchik, Jonathan M; Riesgo, Aldo M; Lincoln, Denis; Markel, David C

    2016-08-01

    An increase in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolus (PE) in the early postoperative period has been attributed to the use of multidetector 64-slice computed tomographic (CT) scans. It was suspected that this finding was the result of marrow or fat emboli that are commonly associated with arthroplasty rather than a true venous thromboembolic phenomenon. The purpose of this study was to determine the baseline pulmonary findings in asymptomatic patients after total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Over a 1-year period, an institutional review board-approved prospective study of 20 asymptomatic patients using a multidetector 64-slice CT scanner was performed. Overall, 15 TKAs and 5 total hip arthroplasties were included for analysis. All of the CT scans were negative for PE. There were no signs of microemboli or fat emboli on any scan. No patient went on to develop a PE at 2 years postoperatively. Despite the fact that emboli are created during TJA, if emboli are seen on a CT scan postoperatively, they should be assumed to be real events with clinical sequelae. If pulmonary symptoms develop postoperatively, they should not simply be assumed to be the result of fat or marrow embolism. PMID:26551068

  19. 3D Printing of CT Dataset: Validation of an Open Source and Consumer-Available Workflow.

    PubMed

    Bortolotto, Chandra; Eshja, Esmeralda; Peroni, Caterina; Orlandi, Matteo A; Bizzotto, Nicola; Poggi, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    The broad availability of cheap three-dimensional (3D) printing equipment has raised the need for a thorough analysis on its effects on clinical accuracy. Our aim is to determine whether the accuracy of 3D printing process is affected by the use of a low-budget workflow based on open source software and consumer's commercially available 3D printers. A group of test objects was scanned with a 64-slice computed tomography (CT) in order to build their 3D copies. CT datasets were elaborated using a software chain based on three free and open source software. Objects were printed out with a commercially available 3D printer. Both the 3D copies and the test objects were measured using a digital professional caliper. Overall, the objects' mean absolute difference between test objects and 3D copies is 0.23 mm and the mean relative difference amounts to 0.55 %. Our results demonstrate that the accuracy of 3D printing process remains high despite the use of a low-budget workflow. PMID:26175139

  20. CT Scans

    MedlinePlus

    ... cross-sectional pictures of your body. Doctors use CT scans to look for Broken bones Cancers Blood clots Signs of heart disease Internal bleeding During a CT scan, you lie still on a table. The table ...

  1. Multidetector computed tomography of temporomandibular joint: A road less travelled

    PubMed Central

    Pahwa, Shivani; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Roychaudhary, Ajoy; Bhutia, Ongkila

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the imaging anatomy of temporomandibular joint (TMJ), describes the technique of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) of the TMJ, and describes in detail various osseous pathologic afflictions affecting the joint. Traumatic injuries affecting the mandibular condyle are most common, followed by joint ankylosis as a sequel to arthritis. The congenital anomalies are less frequent, hemifacial microsomia being the most commonly encountered anomaly involving the TMJ. Neoplastic afflictions of TMJ are distinctly uncommon, osteochondroma being one of the most common lesions. MDCT enables comprehensive evaluation of osseous afflictions of TMJ, and is a valuable tool for surgical planning. Sagittal, coronal and 3D reformatted images well depict osseous TMJ lesions, and their relationship to adjacent structures. PMID:25984518

  2. Toroid cavity/coil NMR multi-detector

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Meadows, Alexander D.; Gregar, Joseph S.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2007-09-18

    An analytical device for rapid, non-invasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of multiple samples using a single spectrometer is provided. A modified toroid cavity/coil detector (TCD), and methods for conducting the simultaneous acquisition of NMR data for multiple samples including a protocol for testing NMR multi-detectors are provided. One embodiment includes a plurality of LC resonant circuits including spatially separated toroid coil inductors, each toroid coil inductor enveloping its corresponding sample volume, and tuned to resonate at a predefined frequency using a variable capacitor. The toroid coil is formed into a loop, where both ends of the toroid coil are brought into coincidence. Another embodiment includes multiple micro Helmholtz coils arranged on a circular perimeter concentric with a central conductor of the toroid cavity.

  3. Multidetector computed tomography findings in deaths with severe burns.

    PubMed

    Levy, Angela D; Harcke, Howard T; Getz, John M; Mallak, Craig T

    2009-06-01

    This study compared autopsy with postmortem multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) findings in charred remains. Seventeen consecutive male subjects (mean age, 29.4 years) who perished in a fire-related event resulting in charred remains underwent total body MDCT immediately prior to routine autopsy that included serum carboxyhemoglobin measurement. MDCT showed all thermal tissue changes (skin and subcutaneous fat loss, skeletal muscle retraction, pugilistic attitude, cortical fractures, bone and organ destruction, thermal epidural hematoma, and thermal amputation) and established all fracture patterns that were lethal, but autopsy added the fire as a contributory cause of death when there was carboxyhemoglobin elevation. MDCT had limited value in determination of lethal vascular and visceral injuries. MDCT is an effective complement to autopsy in the setting of charred remains and may serve to augment a limited autopsy. This may be particularly useful in mass casualty scenarios. PMID:19465802

  4. Cardiac Injuries: A Review of Multidetector Computed Tomography Findings

    PubMed Central

    Baxi, Ameya Jagdish; Restrepo, Carlos; Mumbower, Amy; McCarthy, Michael; Rashmi, Katre

    2015-01-01

    Trauma is the leading cause of death in United States in the younger population. Cardiac trauma is common following blunt chest injuries and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. This study discusses various multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) findings of cardiac trauma. Cardiac injuries are broadly categorized into the most commonly occurring blunt cardiac injury and the less commonly occurring penetrating injury. Signs and symptoms of cardiac injury can be masked by the associated injuries. Each imaging modality including chest radiographs, echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging and MDCT has role in evaluating these patients. However, MDCT is noninvasive; universally available and has a high spatial, contrast, and temporal resolution. It is a one stop shop to diagnose and evaluate complications of cardiac injury. MDCT is an imaging modality of choice to evaluate patients with cardiac injuries especially the injuries capable of causing hemodynamic instability. PMID:26839855

  5. Development and performance evaluation of an experimental fine pitch detector multislice CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Yasuhiro; Nukui, Masatake; Ishihara, Yotaro; Fujishige, Takashi; Ogata, Kentaro; Moritake, Masahiro; Kurochi, Haruo; Ogata, Tsuyoshi; Yahata, Mitsuru; Tang Xiangyang

    2009-04-15

    The authors have developed an experimental fine pitch detector multislice CT scanner with an ultrasmall focal spot x-ray tube and a high-density matrix detector through current CT technology. The latitudinal size of the x-ray tube focal spot was 0.4 mm. The detector dimension was 1824 channels (azimuthal direction)x32 rows (longitudinal direction) at row width of 0.3125 mm, in which a thinner reflected separator surrounds each detector cell coupled with a large active area photodiode. They were mounted on a commercial 64-slice CT scanner gantry while the scan field of view (50 cm) and gantry rotation speed (0.35 s) can be maintained. The experimental CT scanner demonstrated the spatial resolution of 0.21-0.22 mm (23.8-22.7 lp/cm) with the acrylic slit phantom and in-plane 50%-MTF 9.0 lp/cm and 10%-MTF 22.0 lp/cm. In the longitudinal direction, it demonstrated the spatial resolution of 0.24 mm with the high-resolution insert of the CATPHAN phantom and 0.34 mm as the full width at half maximum of the slice sensitivity profile. In low-contrast detectability, 3 mm at 0.3% was visualized at the CTDI{sub vol} of 47.2 mGy. Two types of 2.75 mm diameter vessel phantoms with in-stent stenosis at 25%, 50%, and 75% stair steps were scanned, and the reconstructed images can clearly resolve the stenosis at each case. The experimental CT scanner provides high-resolution imaging while maintaining low-contrast detectability, demonstrating the potentiality for clinical applications demanding high spatial resolution, such as imaging of inner ear, lung, and bone, or low-contrast detectability, such as imaging of coronary artery.

  6. Tendon entrapments and dislocations in ankle and hindfoot fractures: evaluation with multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ballard, David H; Campbell, Kevin J; Blanton, Lee E; Williams, Jason T; Sangster, Guillermo; Hollister, Anne M; Simoncini, Alberto A

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of tendon entrapments and tendon dislocations associated with ankle and hindfoot fractures in patients studied by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Additionally, we describe particular tendon injuries associated with specific fractures. This was a retrospective review of all individuals with a trauma-protocol CT for suspected ankle and/or hindfoot fractures during a consecutive 41-month time period at a single Level I Trauma Center. Each patient's images were evaluated by two radiologists and an orthopedic surgeon for tendon entrapment, tendon dislocation, and bone(s) fractured or dislocated. There were 398 patients with ankle and/or hindfoot fractures that showed tendon entrapment or dislocation in 64 (16.1 %) patients. There were 30 (46.9 %) patients with 40 tendon entrapments, 31 (48.4 %) patients with 59 tendon dislocations, and three (4.7 %) patients with both tendon entrapment and dislocation. All patients with tendon entrapments were seen with either pilon fractures and/or a combination of posterior, medial, or lateral malleolar fractures. The most frequently entrapped tendon was the posterior tibialis tendon (PTT) in 27 patients (27/30, 90.0 %). The peroneal tendons were the most frequently dislocated, representing 27 (87.1 %) of patients with tendon dislocation; all resulted from a talar or calcaneal fracture or subluxation. This study demonstrates that tendon entrapments and tendon dislocations are commonly seen in complex fractures of the ankle and hindfoot. Pilon fractures were associated with the majority of tendon entrapments, whereas calcaneus fractures were associated with the majority of tendon dislocations. PMID:27234977

  7. Advances in imaging protocols for cardiac MDCT: from 16- to 64-row multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Andreas F; Heuschmid, Martin; Reimann, Anja; Kuettner, Axel; Beck, Thorsten; Burgstahler, Christoph; Brodoefel, Harald; Claussen, Claus D; Schroeder, Stephen

    2005-12-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the Western world. Since the majority of all invasive diagnostic coronary angiography procedures are not followed by therapeutic interventions, interest is growing in noninvasive technologies to diagnose and visualize CAD. The most promising of these is multislice spiral computed tomography (MSCT), which can visualize human coronary arteries in vivo noninvasively. Since 1999, this technique has improved rapidly, offering faster gantry rotation times and smaller voxel sizes. The image quality has become significantly more stable and MSCT has become a robust imaging modality. Beginning with 4-slice scanners in 1999, the latest scanner generation employs 64 slices. The present article summarizes the technical principles, image protocols and possible clinical applications of the current 64-row scanners. PMID:18637233

  8. [The features of adults' coronary artery anomalies shown by 64-multi-detector rows CT].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhentuan; Yu, Jianqun; Zhang, Youyi; Yuan, Hongmei

    2009-06-01

    To analyze the adults' coronary artery anomalies revealed by 64-MDCT, we retrospectively analyzed 34 cases of coronary artery anomalies (26 males and 8 females, averagely aged 53. 4 years with a range from 30 to 72 years). Multi-plannar reconstruction (MPR), maximum intensity projection (MIP), surface shadow display (SSD) and volume rendering (VR) were used to demonstrate the anomalous coronary artery. We found 4 cases of RCA from the left coronary sinus, 8 cases with secondary RCA, 1 case with high locations of left main (LM) segments from left sinus of valves, 1 case with LAD originated from main pulmonary artery, 3 cases with separate origin of LAD and LCX. Ten cases with myocardial bridge were shown (9 cases in LAD, 1 case in LCX); coronary fistula was seen in 2 cases (one was RCA-RA fistula, another was LAD-RV fistula), coronary aneurysm was found in 2 cases. Three cases in RCA were short and small. In conclusion, 64-MDCT is a good choice for diagnosing the anomalous coronary artery. PMID:19634659

  9. Multi-detector CT assessment in pulmonary hypertension: techniques, systematic approach to interpretation and key findings

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Gareth; Reynolds, John H.; Ganeshan, Arul; Ment, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) may be suspected based on the clinical history, physical examination and electrocardiogram findings but imaging is usually central to confirming the diagnosis, establishing a cause and guiding therapy. The diagnostic pathway of PAH involves a variety of complimentary investigations of which computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) has established a central role both in helping identify an underlying cause for PAH and assessing resulting functional compromise. In particular CTPA is considered as the gold standard technique for the diagnosis of thromboembolic disease. This article reviews the CTPA evaluation in PAH, describing CTPA techniques, a systematic approach to interpretation and spectrum of key imaging findings. PMID:26029645

  10. Feature-based characterization of motion-contaminated calcified plaques in cardiac multidetector CT

    SciTech Connect

    King, Martin; Giger, Maryellen L.; Suzuki, Kenji; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2007-12-15

    In coronary calcium scoring, motion artifacts affecting calcified plaques are commonly characterized using descriptive terms, which incorporate an element of subjectivity in their interpretations. Quantitative indices may improve the objective characterization of these motion artifacts. In this paper, an automated method for generating 12 quantitative indices, i.e., features that characterize the motion artifacts affecting calcified plaques, is presented. This method consists of using the rapid phase-correlated region-of-interest (ROI) tracking algorithm for reconstructing ROI images of calcified plaques automatically from the projection data obtained during a cardiac scan, and applying methods for extracting features from these images. The 12 features include two dynamic, six morphological, and four intensity-based features. The two dynamic features are three-dimensional (3D) velocity and 3D acceleration. The six morphological features include edge-based volume, threshold-based volume, sphericity, irregularity, average margin gradient, and variance of margin gradient. The four intensity-based features are maximum intensity, mean intensity, minimum intensity, and standard deviation of intensity. The 12 features were extracted from 54 reconstructed sets of simulated four-dimensional images from the dynamic NCAT phantom involving six calcified plaques under nine heart rate/multi-sector gating combinations. In order to determine how well the 12 features correlated with a plaque motion index, which was derived from the trajectory of the plaque, partial correlation coefficients adjusted for heart rate, number of gated sectors, and mean feature values of the six plaques were calculated for all 12 features. Features exhibiting stronger correlations (|r| set-membership sign [0.60,1.00]) with the motion index were 3D velocity, maximum intensity, and standard deviation of intensity. Features demonstrating stronger correlations (|r| set-membership sign [0.60,1.00]) with other features mostly involved intensity-based features. Edge-based volume/irregularity and average margin gradient/variance of margin gradient were the only two feature pairs out of 12 with stronger correlations that did not involve intensity-based features. Automatically extracted features of the motion artifacts affecting calcified plaques in cardiac computed tomography images potentially can be used to develop models for predicting image assessability with respect to motion artifacts.

  11. Syphilitic aortitis complicated by multiple aortic aneurysms: findings of multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianhua; Yuan, Qinghai; Golamaully, Reza; Gong, Tingting

    2011-06-01

    We report a case of syphilitic aortitis complicated by multiple aortic aneurysms in a 50-year-old man with elevated rapid plasma reagin titer of 1:128 and positive Treponema pallidum particle agglutination test. 256-slice MDCT depicted two saccular aneurysms in the descending thoracic aorta with a markedly thick mural thrombus causing the trachea and esophagus to shift to the right. Thickening of the aortic wall was also noted. Stenting of the proximal descending thoracic aortic aneurysm and aorto-right common carotid artery bypass were performed. Operative findings revealed thickening of the descending thoracic aortic wall with a coarse luminal surface. PMID:21505957

  12. Thoracic Injuries in earthquake-related versus non-earthquake-related trauma patients: differentiation via Multi-detector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhi-hui; Yang, Zhi-gang; Chen, Tian-wu; Chu, Zhi-gang; Deng, Wen; Shao, Heng

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Massive earthquakes are harmful to humankind. This study of a historical cohort aimed to investigate the difference between earthquake-related crush thoracic traumas and thoracic traumas unrelated to earthquakes using a multi-detector Computed Tomography (CT). METHODS: We retrospectively compared an earthquake-exposed cohort of 215 thoracic trauma crush victims of the Sichuan earthquake to a cohort of 215 non-earthquake-related thoracic trauma patients, focusing on the lesions and coexisting injuries to the thoracic cage and the pulmonary parenchyma and pleura using a multi-detector CT. RESULTS: The incidence of rib fracture was elevated in the earthquake-exposed cohort (143 vs. 66 patients in the non-earthquake-exposed cohort, Risk Ratio (RR) = 2.2; p<0.001). Among these patients, those with more than 3 fractured ribs (106/143 vs. 41/66 patients, RR = 1.2; p<0.05) or flail chest (45/143 vs. 11/66 patients, RR = 1.9; p<0.05) were more frequently seen in the earthquake cohort. Earthquake-related crush injuries more frequently resulted in bilateral rib fractures (66/143 vs. 18/66 patients, RR = 1.7; p<0.01). Additionally, the incidence of non-rib fracture was higher in the earthquake cohort (85 vs. 60 patients, RR = 1.4; p<0.01). Pulmonary parenchymal and pleural injuries were more frequently seen in earthquake-related crush injuries (117 vs. 80 patients, RR = 1.5 for parenchymal and 146 vs. 74 patients, RR = 2.0 for pleural injuries; p<0.001). Non-rib fractures, pulmonary parenchymal and pleural injuries had significant positive correlation with rib fractures in these two cohorts. CONCLUSIONS: Thoracic crush traumas resulting from the earthquake were life threatening with a high incidence of bony thoracic fractures. The ribs were frequently involved in bilateral and severe types of fractures, which were accompanied by non-rib fractures, pulmonary parenchymal and pleural injuries. PMID:21789386

  13. Quantitative assessment of lipiodol deposition after Chemoembolization: Comparison between cone-beam CT and multi-detector CT

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rongxin; Geschwind, Jean-François; Wang, Zhijun; Tacher, Vania; Lin, MingDe

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the ability of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) acquired directly after TACE to assess lipiodol deposition in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and compare it to unenhanced MDCT. Materials and methods Fifteen HCC patients were treated with conventional TACE, and CBCT was used to assess the lipiodol deposition directly after TACE. Unenhanced MDCT was performed 24 hours after TACE. Four patients were excluded because the margin of tumor or area of lipiodol deposition was not clear. The image enhancement density of the entire tumor (T) and liver parenchyma (L) was measured by ImageJ software, and tumor-to-liver contrast (TLC) was calculated. In addition, volumetric measurement of tumor and lipiodol was performed by semiautomatic 3D volume segmentation and compared using linear regression to evaluate consistency between two imaging modalities. Results The mean value of TLC on CBCT was not significantly different from that on MDCT (337.7±233.5 HU versus 283.0±152.1 HU, P=0.103). The average volume of the whole tumor and of only the lipiodol deposited regions, and the calculated average percentage of lipiodol retention on CBCT were not significantly different when compared to MDCT (tumor volume: 9.6±11.8 cm3 versus 10.8±14.2 cm3, P=0.142; lipiodol volume: 6.3±7.7 cm3 versus 7.0±8.1 cm3, P=0.214; percentage of lipiodol retention: 68.9%±24.0% versus 72.2%±23.1%, P=0.578). Additionally, there was a high correlation in the volume of tumor and lipiodol between CBCT and MDCT (R2=0.919 and 0.903, respectively). Conclusions The quantitative image enhancement and volume analyses demonstrate that CBCT is similar to MDCT in assessing the lipiodol deposition in HCC after TACE. PMID:24094672

  14. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial ... or other growth (mass) Cerebral atrophy (loss of brain tissue) ... with the hearing nerve Stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA)

  15. SU-E-I-25: Determining Tube Current, Tube Voltage and Pitch Suitable for Low- Dose Lung Screening CT

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K; Matthews, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The quality of a computed tomography (CT) image and the dose delivered during its acquisition depend upon the acquisition parameters used. Tube current, tube voltage, and pitch are acquisition parameters that potentially affect image quality and dose. This study investigated physicians' abilities to characterize small, solid nodules in low-dose CT images for combinations of current, voltage and pitch, for three CT scanner models. Methods: Lung CT images was acquired of a Data Spectrum anthropomorphic torso phantom with various combinations of pitch, tube current, and tube voltage; this phantom was used because acrylic beads of various sizes could be placed within the lung compartments to simulate nodules. The phantom was imaged on two 16-slice scanners and a 64-slice scanner. The acquisition parameters spanned a range of estimated CTDI levels; the CTDI estimates from the acquisition software were verified by measurement. Several experienced radiologists viewed the phantom lung CT images and noted nodule location, size and shape, as well as the acceptability of overall image quality. Results: Image quality for assessment of nodules was deemed unsatisfactory for all scanners at 80 kV (any tube current) and at 35 mA (any tube voltage). Tube current of 50 mA or more at 120 kV resulted in similar assessments from all three scanners. Physician-measured sphere diameters were closer to actual diameters for larger spheres, higher tube current, and higher kV. Pitch influenced size measurements less for larger spheres than for smaller spheres. CTDI was typically overestimated by the scanner software compared to measurement. Conclusion: Based on this survey of acquisition parameters, a low-dose CT protocol of 120 kV, 50 mA, and pitch of 1.4 is recommended to balance patient dose and acceptable image quality. For three models of scanners, this protocol resulted in estimated CTDIs from 2.9–3.6 mGy.

  16. SU-E-I-62: Assessing Radiation Dose Reduction and CT Image Optimization Through the Measurement and Analysis of the Detector Quantum Efficiency (DQE) of CT Images Using Different Beam Hardening Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, J; Aldoohan, S; Gill, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Reducing patient dose while maintaining (or even improving) image quality is one of the foremost goals in CT imaging. To this end, we consider the feasibility of optimizing CT scan protocols in conjunction with the application of different beam-hardening filtrations and assess this augmentation through noise-power spectrum (NPS) and detector quantum efficiency (DQE) analysis. Methods: American College of Radiology (ACR) and Catphan phantoms (The Phantom Laboratory) were scanned with a 64 slice CT scanner when additional filtration of thickness and composition (e.g., copper, nickel, tantalum, titanium, and tungsten) had been applied. A MATLAB-based code was employed to calculate the image of noise NPS. The Catphan Image Owl software suite was then used to compute the modulated transfer function (MTF) responses of the scanner. The DQE for each additional filter, including the inherent filtration, was then computed from these values. Finally, CT dose index (CTDIvol) values were obtained for each applied filtration through the use of a 100 mm pencil ionization chamber and CT dose phantom. Results: NPS, MTF, and DQE values were computed for each applied filtration and compared to the reference case of inherent beam-hardening filtration only. Results showed that the NPS values were reduced between 5 and 12% compared to inherent filtration case. Additionally, CTDIvol values were reduced between 15 and 27% depending on the composition of filtration applied. However, no noticeable changes in image contrast-to-noise ratios were noted. Conclusion: The reduction in the quanta noise section of the NPS profile found in this phantom-based study is encouraging. The reduction in both noise and dose through the application of beam-hardening filters is reflected in our phantom image quality. However, further investigation is needed to ascertain the applicability of this approach to reducing patient dose while maintaining diagnostically acceptable image qualities in a

  17. MULTIDETECTOR-ROW COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY PATTERNS OF BRONCHOESPHAGEAL ARTERY HYPERTROPHY AND SYSTEMIC-TO-PULMONARY FISTULA IN DOGS.

    PubMed

    Ledda, Gianluca; Caldin, Marco; Mezzalira, Giorgia; Bertolini, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Anomalies involving arterial branches in the lungs are one of the causes of hemoptysis in humans and dogs. Congenital and acquired patterns of bronchoesophageal artery hypertrophy have been reported in humans based on CT characteristics. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe clinical, echocardiographic, and multidetector computed tomography features of bronchoesophageal artery hypertrophy and systemic-to-pulmonary arterial communications in a sample of 14 dogs. Two main vascular patterns were identified in dogs that resembled congenital and acquired conditions reported in humans. Pattern 1 appeared as an aberrant origin of the right bronchoesophageal artery, normal origin of the left one, and enlargement of both the bronchial and esophageal branches that formed a dense network terminating in a pulmonary artery through an orifice. Pattern 2 appeared as a normal origin of both right and left bronchoesophageal arteries, with an enlarged and tortuous course along the bronchi to the periphery of the lung, where they communicated with subsegmental pulmonary arteries. Dogs having Pattern 1 also had paraesophageal and esophageal varices, with the latter being confirmed by videoendoscopy examination. Authors conclude that dogs with Pattern 1 should be differentiated from dogs with other congenital vascular systemic-to-pulmonary connections. Dogs having Pattern 2 should be evaluated for underlying pleural or pulmonary diseases. Bronchoesophageal artery hypertrophy can be accompanied by esophageal venous engorgement and should be included in the differential diagnosis for esophageal and paraesophageal varices in dogs. PMID:25961802

  18. Current and Novel Imaging Techniques in Coronary CT.

    PubMed

    Machida, Haruhiko; Tanaka, Isao; Fukui, Rika; Shen, Yun; Ishikawa, Takuya; Tate, Etsuko; Ueno, Eiko

    2015-01-01

    Multidetector coronary computed tomography (CT), which is widely performed to assess coronary artery disease noninvasively and accurately, provides excellent image quality. Use of electrocardiography (ECG)-controlled tube current modulation and low tube voltage can reduce patient exposure to nephrotoxic contrast media and carcinogenic radiation when using standard coronary CT with a retrospective ECG-gated helical scan. Various imaging techniques are expected to overcome the limitations of standard coronary CT, which also include insufficient spatial and temporal resolution, beam-hardening artifacts, limited coronary plaque characterization, and an inability to allow functional assessment of coronary stenosis. Use of a step-and-shoot scan, iterative reconstruction, and a high-pitch dual-source helical scan can further reduce radiation dose. Dual-energy CT can improve contrast medium enhancement and reasonably reduce the contrast dose when combined with noise reduction with the use of iterative reconstruction. High-definition CT can improve spatial resolution and diagnostic evaluation of small or peripheral coronary vessels and coronary stents. Dual-source CT and a motion correction algorithm can improve temporal resolution and reduce coronary motion artifacts. Whole-heart coverage with 320-detector CT and an intelligent boundary registration algorithm can eliminate stair-step artifacts. By decreasing beam hardening and enabling material decomposition, dual-energy CT is expected to remove or reduce the depiction of coronary calcification to improve intraluminal evaluation of calcified vessels and to provide detailed analysis of coronary plaque components and accurate qualitative and quantitative assessment of myocardial perfusion. Fractional flow reserve derived from coronary CT is a state-of-the-art noninvasive technique for accurately identifying myocardial ischemia beyond coronary CT. Understanding these techniques is important to enhance the value of coronary CT

  19. SU-E-CAMPUS-J-06: The Impact of CT-Scan Energy On Range Uncertainty in Proton Therapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Grantham, K; Li, H; Zhao, T; Klein, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of tube potential (kVp) on the CTnumber (HU) to proton stopping power ratio (PSPR) conversion table; the range uncertainty and the dosimetric change introduced by a mismatch in kVp between the CT and the HU to PSPR table used to calculate dose are analyzed. Methods: A CIRS CT-ED phantom was scanned with a Philips Brilliance 64-slice scanner under 90kVp and 120kVp tube potentials. Two HU to PSPR curves were then created. Using Eclipse (Varian) a treatment plan was created for a single beam in a water phantom (HU=0) passing through a wedge-shaped heterogeneity (HU=1488). The dose was recalculated by changing only the HU to PSPR table used in the dose calculation. The change in range (the distal 90% isodose line) relative to a distal structure was recorded as a function of heterogeneity thickness in the beam. To show the dosimetric impact of a mismatch in kVp between the CT and the HU to PSPR table, we repeated this procedure using a clinical plan comparing DVH data. Results: The HU to PSPR tables diverge for low-density bone and higher density structures. In the phantom plan, the divergence of the tables results in a change in range of ~1mm per cm of bone in the beam path for the HU used. For the clinical plan, a mismatch in kVp showed a 28% increase in mean dose to the brainstem along with a 10% increase in maximum dose to the brainstem center. Conclusion: A mismatch in kVp between the CT and the HU to PSPR table can introduce significant uncertainty in the proton beam range. For dense bone, the measured range uncertainty is about 1mm per cm of bone in the beam. CT-scan energy verification should be employed, particularly when high-density media is in the proton beam path.

  20. Prediction of Small Bowel Obstruction Caused by Bezoars Using Risk Factor Categories on Multidetector Computed Tomographic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Lian-qin; Cheng, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to detect factors associated with small bowel obstruction (SBO) caused by bezoars on multidetector computed tomographic findings. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed 61 patients who had bezoars in the small bowels on MDCT. The patients were divided into SBO patients group and non-SBO patients group. The mean values of the diameter, volume, and CT attenuation as well as location and characteristics of the bezoars were compared between the two groups. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine factors associated with SBO. Results. There were 32 patients (52.5%) in the SBO group and 29 patients (47.5%) in the non-SBO group. The bezoars in the SBO group had greater values of each mean diameter and mean volume than those in the non-SBO group (3.2 ± 0.5 cm versus 1.6 ± 0.7 cm, P < 0.0001, 14.9 ± 6.4 cm3 versus 2.5 ± 2.7 cm3, P < 0.0001, resp.) and had a lower CT attenuation than the non-SBO group (55.5 ± 23.4 versus 173.0 ± 68.0, P < 0.0001). The SBO group had higher prevalence of phytobezoar appearance (75.0% versus 10.3%, P < 0.0001). Major diameters of bezoar and phytobezoar were significant independent risk factors associated with SBO (odds ratio = 36.09, 8.26, resp., and P = 0.0004, 0.044, resp.). Conclusions. Major diameter of bezoar or phytobezoar is a potential risk factor associated with SBO. PMID:27403434

  1. Radiation Dose to the Thyroid and Gonads in Patients Undergoing Cardiac CT Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Behroozi, Hamid; Davoodi, Mohammad; Aghasi, Shahriar

    2015-01-01

    Background: The present data show a global increase in the rate of cardiovascular disease. Cardiac CT angiography has developed as a fast and non-invasive cardiac imaging modality following the introduction of multi-slice computed tomogaraphy. Objectives: The aim of this study was to measure the radiation dose to the thyroid and pelvis regions in patients undergoing cardiac CT angiography using the Care Dose 4D method of 64-slice scanner. Patients and Methods: Eighty-one patients (41 males and 40 females) who were diagnosed with suspected coronary artery disease and were referred to Golestan Hospital, Imaging Department were recruited. Inclusion criteria were based on the protocol of multi-slice CT coronary angiography. The radiation dose to the thyroid and pelvis regions was measured using thermo luminescent dosimeters (TLDs). Results: The mean radiation dose to the thyroid in male and female subjects was 0.32 mSv and 0.41 mSv, respectively (P = 0.032) (total mean, 0.36 mSv). The mean radiation dose to the pelvis in male and female subjects was 81 μSv and 112 μSv, respectively (P = 0.026) (total mean, 96.5 μSv), Conclusions: The total mean radiation dose to the thyroid and gonads was 0.36 mSv, and 96.5 μSv, respectively for the subjects. These values were high for one organ in a single study. Gender can affect the radiation dose to the thyroid and gonads. This can be attributed to the anatomical characteristic differences of the male and female subjects. PMID:26060556

  2. CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... that slides into the center of the CT scanner. Once you are inside the scanner, the machine's x-ray beam rotates around you. Modern spiral scanners can perform the exam without stopping. A computer ...

  3. SU-E-I-57: Evaluation and Optimization of Effective-Dose Using Different Beam-Hardening Filters in Clinical Pediatric Shunt CT Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, K; Aldoohan, S; Collier, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Study image optimization and radiation dose reduction in pediatric shunt CT scanning protocol through the use of different beam-hardening filters Methods: A 64-slice CT scanner at OU Childrens Hospital has been used to evaluate CT image contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and measure effective-doses based on the concept of CT dose index (CTDIvol) using the pediatric head shunt scanning protocol. The routine axial pediatric head shunt scanning protocol that has been optimized for the intrinsic x-ray tube filter has been used to evaluate CNR by acquiring images using the ACR approved CT-phantom and radiation dose CTphantom, which was used to measure CTDIvol. These results were set as reference points to study and evaluate the effects of adding different filtering materials (i.e. Tungsten, Tantalum, Titanium, Nickel and Copper filters) to the existing filter on image quality and radiation dose. To ensure optimal image quality, the scanner routine air calibration was run for each added filter. The image CNR was evaluated for different kVps and wide range of mAs values using above mentioned beam-hardening filters. These scanning protocols were run under axial as well as under helical techniques. The CTDIvol and the effective-dose were measured and calculated for all scanning protocols and added filtration, including the intrinsic x-ray tube filter. Results: Beam-hardening filter shapes energy spectrum, which reduces the dose by 27%. No noticeable changes in image low contrast detectability Conclusion: Effective-dose is very much dependent on the CTDIVol, which is further very much dependent on beam-hardening filters. Substantial reduction in effective-dose is realized using beam-hardening filters as compare to the intrinsic filter. This phantom study showed that significant radiation dose reduction could be achieved in CT pediatric shunt scanning protocols without compromising in diagnostic value of image quality.

  4. Intraarterial CT Angiography Using Ultra Low Volume of Iodine Contrast – Own Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Garcarek, Jerzy; Kurcz, Jacek; Guziński, Maciej; Banasik, Mirosław; Miś, Marcin; Gołębiowski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background High volume of intravenous contrast in CT-angiography may result in contrast-induced nephropathy. Intraarterial ultra-low volume of contrast medium results in its satisfactory blood concentration with potentially good image quality. The first main purpose was to assess the influence of the method on function of transplanted kidney in patients with impaired graft function. The second main purpose of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of this method for detection of gastrointestinal and head-and-neck haemorrhages. Material/Methods Between 2010 and 2013 intraarterial CT-angiography was performed in 56 patients, including 28 with chronic kidney disease (CKD). There were three main subgroups: 18 patients after kidney transplantation, 10 patients with gastrointestinal hemorrhage, 8 patients with head-and-neck hemorrhage. Contralateral or ipsilateral inguinal arterial approach was performed. The 4-French vascular sheaths and 4F-catheters were introduced under fluoroscopy. Intraarterial CT was performed using 64-slice scanner. The scanning protocol was as follows: slice thickness 0.625 mm, pitch 1.3, gantry rotation 0.6 sec., scanning delay 1–2 sec. The extent of the study was established on the basis of scout image. In patients with CKD 6–8 mL of Iodixanol (320 mg/mL) diluted with saline to 18–24 mL was administered at a speed of 4–5 mL/s. Results Vasculature was properly visualized in all patients. In patients with impaired renal function creatinine/eGFR levels remained stable in all but one case. Traditional arteriography failed and CT-angiography demonstrated the site of bleeding in 3 of 10 patients with symptoms of gastrointestinal bleeding (30%). In 8 patients with head-and-neck bleeding CT-angiography did not prove beneficial when compared to traditional arteriography. Conclusions 1. Ultra-low contrast intraarterial CT-angiography does not deteriorate the function of transplanted kidneys in patients with impaired graft function. 2. 3

  5. Study of statistical properties of hybrid statistic in coherent multidetector compact binary coalescences search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haris, K.; Pai, Archana

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we revisit the coherent gravitational wave search problem of compact binary coalescences with multidetector network consisting of advanced interferometers like LIGO-Virgo. Based on the loss of the optimal multidetector signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), we construct a hybrid statistic as a best of maximum-likelihood-ratio (MLR) statistic tuned for face-on and face-off binaries. The statistical properties of the hybrid statistic is studied. The performance of this hybrid statistic is compared with that of the coherent MLR statistic for generic inclination angles. Owing to the single synthetic data stream, the hybrid statistic gives few false alarms compared to the multidetector MLR statistic and small fractional loss in the optimum SNR for a large range of binary inclinations. We demonstrate that, for a LIGO-Virgo network and binary inclination ɛ <7 0 ° and ɛ >11 0 ° , the hybrid statistic captures more than 98% of the network optimum matched filter SNR with a low false alarm rate. The Monte Carlo exercise with two distributions of incoming inclination angles—namely, U [cos ɛ ] and a more realistic distribution proposed by B. F. Schutz [Classical Quantum Gravity 28, 125023 (2011)]—are performed with the hybrid statistic and give approximately 5% and 7% higher detection probabilities, respectively, compared to the two stream multidetector MLR statistic for a fixed false alarm probability of 1 0-5.

  6. An improved analytical model for CT dose simulation with a new look at the theory of CT dose

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Robert L.; Munley, Michael T.; Bayram, Ersin

    2005-12-15

    Gagne [Med. Phys. 16, 29-37 (1989)] has previously described a model for predicting the sensitivity and dose profiles in the slice-width (z) direction for CT scanners. The model, developed prior to the advent of multidetector CT scanners, is still widely used; however, it does not account for the effect of anode tilt on the penumbra or include the heel effect, both of which are increasingly important for the wider beams (up to 40 mm) of contemporary, multidetector scanners. Additionally, it applied only on (or near) the axis of rotation, and did not incorporate the photon energy spectrum. The improved model described herein transcends all of the aforementioned limitations of the Gagne model, including extension to the peripheral phantom axes. Comparison of simulated and measured dose data provides experimental validation of the model, including verification of the superior match to the penumbra provided by the tilted-anode model, as well as the observable effects on the cumulative dose distribution. The initial motivation for the model was to simulate the quasiperiodic dose distribution on the peripheral, phantom axes resulting from a helical scan series in order to facilitate the implementation of an improved method of CT dose measurement utilizing a short ion chamber, as proposed by Dixon [Med. Phys. 30, 1272-1280 (2003)]. A more detailed set of guidelines for implementing such measurements is also presented in this paper. In addition, some fundamental principles governing CT dose which have not previously been clearly enunciated follow from the model, and a fundamental (energy-based) quantity dubbed 'CTDI-aperture' is introduced.

  7. An improved analytical model for CT dose simulation with a new look at the theory of CT dose.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Robert L; Munley, Michael T; Bayram, Ersin

    2005-12-01

    Gagne [Med. Phys. 16, 29-37 (1989)] has previously described a model for predicting the sensitivity and dose profiles in the slice-width (z) direction for CT scanners. The model, developed prior to the advent of multidetector CT scanners, is still widely used; however, it does not account for the effect of anode tilt on the penumbra or include the heel effect, both of which are increasingly important for the wider beams (up to 40 mm) of contemporary, multidetector scanners. Additionally, it applied only on (or near) the axis of rotation, and did not incorporate the photon energy spectrum. The improved model described herein transcends all of the aforementioned limitations of the Gagne model, including extension to the peripheral phantom axes. Comparison of simulated and measured dose data provides experimental validation of the model, including verification of the superior match to the penumbra provided by the tilted-anode model, as well as the observable effects on the cumulative dose distribution. The initial motivation for the model was to simulate the quasiperiodic dose distribution on the peripheral, phantom axes resulting from a helical scan series in order to facilitate the implementation of an improved method of CT dose measurement utilizing a short ion chamber, as proposed by Dixon [Med. Phys. 30, 1272-1280 (2003)]. A more detailed set of guidelines for implementing such measurements is also presented in this paper. In addition, some fundamental principles governing CT dose which have not previously been clearly enunciated follow from the model, and a fundamental (energy-based) quantity dubbed "CTDI-aperture" is introduced. PMID:16475771

  8. Serial CT Findings of Paragonimus Infested Dogs and the Micro-CT Findings of the Worm Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang Hyun; Goo, Jin Mo; Lee, Hyun Ju; Hong, Sung-Tae; Shen, Cheng Hua; Chung, Doo Hyun; Son, Kyu Ri; Chang, Jung Min; Eo, Hong

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate the serial CT findings of Paragonimus westermani infected dogs and the microscopic structures of the worm cysts using Micro-CT. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the committee on animal research at our institution. Fifteen dogs infected with P. westermani underwent serial contrast-enhanced CT scans at pre-infection, after 10 days of infection, and monthly thereafter until six months for determining the radiologic-pathologic correlation. Three dogs (one dog each time) were sacrificed at 1, 3 and 6 months, respectively. After fixation of the lungs, both multi-detector CT and Micro-CT were performed for examining the worm cysts. Results The initial findings were pleural effusion and/or subpleural ground-glass opacities or linear opacities at day 10. At day 30, subpleural and peribronchial nodules appeared with hydropneumothorax and abdominal or chest wall air bubbles. Cavitary change and bronchial dilatation began to be seen on CT scan at day 30 and this was mostly seen together with mediastinal lymphadenopathy at day 60. Thereafter, subpleural ground-glass opacities and nodules with or without cavitary changes were persistently observed until day 180. After cavitary change of the nodules, the migratory features of the subpleural or peribronchial nodules were seen on all the serial CT scans. Micro-CT showed that the cyst wall contained dilated interconnected tubular structures, which had communications with the cavity and the adjacent distal bronchus. Conclusion The CT findings of paragonimiasis depend on the migratory stage of the worms. The worm cyst can have numerous interconnected tubular channels within its own wall and these channels have connections with the cavity and the adjacent distal bronchus. PMID:17923779

  9. Evaluation of organ doses in CT examinations with an infant anthropomorphic phantom.

    PubMed

    Fujii, K; Akahane, K; Miyazaki, O; Horiuchi, T; Shimada, A; Nagmatsu, H; Yamauchi, M; Yamauchi-Kawaura, C; Kawasaki, T

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate organ doses in infant CT examinations with multi-detector row CT scanners. Radiation doses were measured with radiophotoluminescence glass dosemeters set in various organ positions within a 1-y-old child anthropomorphic phantom and organ doses were evaluated from the measurement values. Doses for tissues or organs within the scan range were 28-36 mGy in an infant head CT, 3-11 mGy in a chest CT, 5-11 mGy in an abdominal-pelvic CT and 2-14 mGy in a cardiac CT. The doses varied by the differences in the types of CT scanners and scan parameters used at each medical facility. Compared with those for children of various ages, the doses in an infant CT protocol were found to be similar to or slightly smaller than those in a paediatric CT for 5- or 6-y-old children. PMID:21743079

  10. Principles of CT and CT technology.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Lee W

    2007-09-01

    This article provides a review of the basic principles of CT within the context of the evolution of CT. Modern CT technology can be understood as a natural progression of improvements and innovations in response to both engineering problems and clinical requirements. Detailed discussions of multislice CT, CT image quality evaluation, and radiation doses in CT will be presented in upcoming articles in this series. PMID:17823453

  11. Lumbosacral spine CT

    MedlinePlus

    Spinal CT; CT - lumbosacral spine ... In other cases, a CT of the lumbosacral spine may be done after injecting contrast dye into ... of the body. A CT of the lumbosacral spine can evaluate fractures and changes of the spine, ...

  12. Thoracic CT

    MedlinePlus

    ... table that slides into the center of the scanner. Once you are inside the scanner, the machine's x-ray beam rotates around you. ... than 300 pounds, have your doctor contact the scanner operator before the exam. CT scanners have a ...

  13. Paleoradiology: advanced CT in the evaluation of nine Egyptian mummies.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Heidi; Torres, William E; Ernst, Randy D

    2002-01-01

    Axial thin-collimation state-of-the-art spiral computed tomography (CT) was combined with sagittal and coronal reformatting, three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction, and virtual "fly-through" techniques to nondestructively study nine Egyptian mummies. These techniques provided important paleopathologic and historical information about mummification techniques, depicted anatomy in the most informative imaging plane, illustrated the soft-tissue preservation and physical appearance of mummies in superb detail, and generated an intriguing virtual tour through hollow mummified remains without harming the specimens themselves. Images generated with these methods can help archaeologists and Egyptologists understand these fascinating members of mankind and can serve as adjunct visual aids for laypersons who are interested in mummies. CT has emerged as the imaging modality of choice for the examination of Egyptian mummies due to its noninvasive cross-sectional nature and inherently superior contrast and spatial resolution. As multi-detector row CT and postprocessing tools evolve, the capabilities and applications of CT will continue to proliferate, attesting to the expanded versatility and utility of CT as a noninvasive research tool in the multidisciplinary study of Egyptian mummies. PMID:11896227

  14. Mycotic aneurysm of the left subclavian artery: CT findings.

    PubMed

    Visrutaratna, P; Charoenkwan, P; Saeteng, S

    2006-01-01

    Mycotic aneurysms caused by aspergillosis are rare. We report a nine-year-old girl with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who had invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and subsequently developed a left subclavian artery aneurysm. Prior to the aneurysm, computed tomography (CT) of the chest showed a nodule with an air crescent in the left upper lobe, adhering to the mediastinum and the left subclavian artery. The left subclavian artery was ill-defined and had a small lumen, and it was embedded in the wall of the nodule. 37 days after the chest CT, the patient underwent a left thoracotomy because of massive haemoptysis, at which time a false aneurysm in the left subclavian artery was found. Plication of the aneurysm was performed. On a follow-up CT with multiplanar reconstruction six days after surgery, there were the plicated aneurysm and a small amount of pleural effusion in the upper portion of the left hemithorax, adjacent to the plication. In invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, it is important to be aware of the possibility of mycotic aneurysms, particularly in patients with pulmonary lesions adjacent to mediastinal vessels with ill-defined borders and small lumens, since the aneurysms may increase in size and rupture. CT, particularly multidetector CT, helps in visualisation of mycotic aneurysms. PMID:16397728

  15. SU-E-I-17: Evaluation of Commercially Available Extension Plates for the ACR CT Accreditation Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Greene-Donnelly, K; Ogden, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of commercially available extension plates on Hounsfield Unit (HU) values in the ACR CT accreditation phantom (Model 464, Gammex Inc., Middleton, Wi). The extension plates are intended to improve water HU values in scanners where the traditional solution involves scanning the phantom with an adjacent water or CTDI phantom. Methods: The Model 464 phantom was scanned on 9 different CT scanners at 8 separate sites representing 16 and 64 slice MDCT technology from four CT manufacturers. The phantom was scanned with and without the extension plates (Gammex 464 EXTPLT-KIT) in helical and axial modes. A water phantom was also scanned to verify water HU calibration. Technique was 120 kV tube potential, 350 mAs, and 210 mm display field of view. Slice thickness and reconstruction algorithm were based on site clinical protocols. The widest available beam collimation was used. Regions of interest were drawn on the HU test objects in Module 1 of the phantom and mean values recorded. Results: For all axial mode scans, water HU values were within limits with or without the extension plates. For two scanners (both Lightspeed VCT, GE Medical Systems, Waukesha WI), axial mode bone HU values were above the specified range both with and without the extension plates though they were closer to the specified range with the plates installed. In helical scan mode, two scanners (both GE Lightspeed VCT) had water HU values above the specified range without the plates installed. With the plates installed, the water HU values were within range for all scanners in all scan modes. Conclusion: Using the plates, the Lightspeed VCT scanners passed the water HU test when scanning in helical mode. The benefit of the extension plates was evident in helical mode scanning with GE scanners using a nominal 4 cm beam. Disclosure: The extension plates evaluated in this work were provided free of charge to the authors. The authors have no other financial interest in Gammex

  16. Patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk estimation in CT: Part II. Application to patients

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Toncheva, Greta; Yoshizumi, Terry T.; Frush, Donald P.

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Current methods for estimating and reporting radiation dose from CT examinations are largely patient-generic; the body size and hence dose variation from patient to patient is not reflected. Furthermore, the current protocol designs rely on dose as a surrogate for the risk of cancer incidence, neglecting the strong dependence of risk on age and gender. The purpose of this study was to develop a method for estimating patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk from CT examinations. Methods: The study included two patients (a 5-week-old female patient and a 12-year-old male patient), who underwent 64-slice CT examinations (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare) of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis at our institution in 2006. For each patient, a nonuniform rational B-spine (NURBS) based full-body computer model was created based on the patient's clinical CT data. Large organs and structures inside the image volume were individually segmented and modeled. Other organs were created by transforming an existing adult male or female full-body computer model (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. A Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated for dose simulation on the LightSpeed VCT scanner was used to estimate patient-specific organ dose, from which effective dose and risks of cancer incidence were derived. Patient-specific organ dose and effective dose were compared with patient-generic CT dose quantities in current clinical use: the volume-weighted CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) and the effective dose derived from the dose-length product (DLP). Results: The effective dose for the CT examination of the newborn patient (5.7 mSv) was higher but comparable to that for the CT examination of the teenager patient (4.9 mSv) due to the size-based clinical CT protocols at our institution, which employ lower scan techniques for smaller

  17. [CT fluoroscopy].

    PubMed

    Rogalla, P; Juran, R

    2004-07-01

    Percutaneous biopsy of pulmonary nodules requires precise needle placement, with the goal of attaining a secure position of the needle for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes as quickly as possible and with minimal tissue damage along the access route. The requirements from the image guidance system during the intervention are, in addition to universal applicability, a quick reaction time and a user-friendly interface. CT fluoroscopy fulfils these requirements, although radiation protection for the patient and radiologist becomes an important issue. PMID:15232690

  18. Value and Accuracy of Multidetector Computed Tomography in Obstructive Jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Rishi Philip; Moorkath, Abdunnisar; Basti, Ram Shenoy; Suresh, Hadihally B.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Objective; To find out the role of MDCT in the evaluation of obstructive jaundice with respect to the cause and level of the obstruction, and its accuracy. To identify the advantages of MDCT with respect to other imaging modalities. To correlate MDCT findings with histopathology/surgical findings/Endoscopic Retrograde CholangioPancreatography (ERCP) findings as applicable. Material/Methods This was a prospective study conducted over a period of one year from August 2014 to August 2015. Data were collected from 50 patients with clinically suspected obstructive jaundice. CT findings were correlated with histopathology/surgical findings/ERCP findings as applicable. Results Among the 50 people studied, males and females were equal in number, and the majority belonged to the 41–60 year age group. The major cause for obstructive jaundice was choledocholithiasis. MDCT with reformatting techniques was very accurate in picking a mass as the cause for biliary obstruction and was able to differentiate a benign mass from a malignant one with high accuracy. There was 100% correlation between the CT diagnosis and the final diagnosis regarding the level and type of obstruction. MDCT was able to determine the cause of obstruction with an accuracy of 96%. Conclusions MDCT with good reformatting techniques has excellent accuracy in the evaluation of obstructive jaundice with regards to the level and cause of obstruction. PMID:27429673

  19. PET/MRI and PET/CT in Lung Lesions and Thoracic Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Flechsig, Paul; Mehndiratta, Amit; Haberkorn, Uwe; Kratochwil, Clemens; Giesel, Frederik L

    2015-07-01

    More than one decade ago, introduction of integrated PET/CT scanners changed oncologic imaging and oncologic patient management profoundly. With these systems, the metabolic information acquired by PET can be anatomically localized even to small structures such as small primary tumors, lymph nodes, and soft tissue masses owing to the high-resolution multidetector CT scanners. This has made PET/CT a most reliable method for tumor detection, characterization, staging, and response monitoring. The importance of an integrated functional and morphologic approach to better understand the biology of oncologic disease and to improve therapy planning is underlined by the increasing number of PET/CT systems worldwide, leading to an increasing number of scientific publications in the field. The paradigmatic indication of integrated PET/CT is staging of patients with lung cancer, as PET/CT allows for precise pretherapeutic staging and also posttreatment restaging according to the TNM criteria. The growing numbers of targeted therapy strategies in the fields of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy, which are adapted to dedicated tumor stages, require the exact classifications of each patient's tumor stage. In this context, whole-body examinations using integrated (18)F-FDG-PET/CT have been shown to reduce the side effects of futile invasive procedures and reduce additional costly staging procedures. In this review article, the diagnostic and therapeutic effects of PET/CT examinations are highlighted and compared with some competitive techniques such as scintigraphy, MRI, and, where possible, integrated PET/MRI. PMID:26050655

  20. SU-E-I-27: Estimating KERMA Area Product for CT Localizer Images

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, K; Greene-Donnelly, K; Bennett, R; Thorpe, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To estimate the free-in-air KERMA-Area Product (KAP) incident on patients due to CT localizer scans for common CT exams. Methods: In-plane beam intensity profiles were measured in localizer acquisition mode using OSLs for a 64 slice MDCT scanner (Lightspeed VCT, GE Medical Systems, Waukesha WI). The z-axis beam width was measured as a function of distance from isocenter. The beam profile and width were used to calculate a weighted average air KERMA per unit mAs as a function of intercepted x-axis beam width for objects symmetric about the localizer centerline.Patient areas were measured using manually drawn regions and divided by localizer length to determine average width. Data were collected for 50 head exams (lateral localizer only), 15 head/neck exams, 50 chest exams, and 50 abdomen/pelvis exams. Mean patient widths and acquisition techniques were used to calculate the weighted average free-in-air KERMA, which was multiplied by the patient area to estimate KAP. Results: Scan technique was 120 kV tube voltage, 10 mA current, and table speed of 10 cm/s. The mean ± standard deviation values of KAP were 120 ± 11.6, 469 ± 62.6, 518 ± 45, and 763 ± 93 mGycm{sup 2} for head, head/neck, chest, and abdomen/pelvis exams, respectively. For studies with AP and lateral localizers, the AP/lateral area ratio was 1.20, 1.33, and 1.24 for the head/neck, chest, and abdomen/pelvis exams, respectively. However, the AP/lateral KAP ratios were 1.12, 1.08, and 1.07, respectively. Conclusion: Calculation of KAP in CT localizers is complicated by the non-uniform intensity profile and z-axis beam width. KAP values are similar to those for simple radiographic exams such as a chest radiograph and represent a small fraction of the x-ray exposure at CT. However, as CT doses are reduced the localizer contribution will be a more significant fraction of the total exposure.

  1. Imaging Quality Evaluation of Low Tube Voltage Coronary CT Angiography Using Low Concentration Contrast Medium

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zaixian; Wang, Qingguo; Zheng, Linfeng; Feng, Yan; Zhou, Zhiguo; Zhang, Guixiang; Li, Kangan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the image quality of prospectively ECG-gated low voltage coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) with an administration of low concentration contrast medium. Method and Materials A total of 101 patients, each with a heart rate below 65 beats per minute (BPM), underwent a prospectively ECG-gated axial scan in CT coronary angiography on a 64-slice CT scanner. All patients were allocated in three groups (group A: n=31, 80kVp, 300 mgI/ml; group B: n=34, 100kVp, 300 mgI/ml; group C: n=36, 120kVp, 370 mgI/ml). The CT attenuation values of aortic root (AR), left main coronary artery (LMA), right main coronary artery (RMA) and chest subcutaneous fat tissue were measured. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of AR, LMA and RMA were calculated according to the formulas below. The values of computed tomography dose index (CTDI) and dose-length product (DLP) were recorded. Image quality was assessed on a 5-point scale. The results were compared using the one-way ANOVA and rank sum tests. Results The values of CNR and SNR for vessels in group A and group B were not significantly different from group C (each p > 0.05). The effective radiation dose in group A (1.51±0.70 mSv) and group B (2.59±1.24 mSv) were both lower than group C (4.92±2.82 mSv) (each p < 0.05). There was no significant difference among the image quality scores of group A (4.10±0.41), group B (3.90±0.48) and group C (4.04±0.36) (each P > 0.05). Conclusion Low tube voltage coronary CT angiography using low concentration contrast medium does not affect the imaging quality for assessing the coronary arteries compared with high voltage coronary CT angiography using high concentration contrast medium. Meanwhile low concentration contrast medium allowed 47-69% of radiation dose reduction. PMID:25811785

  2. Multidetector computed tomography evaluation of cavernous haemangioma of the azygous vein

    PubMed Central

    Das, Karuna Moy; Ahmed, Ali M.; Aljubab, Abdulwahab; Alzoum, Mohammed A.

    2013-01-01

    Giant cavernous haemangioma of azygous arch is extremely rare. We present the multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) features of a mediastinal cavernous haemangioma in an asymptomatic child detected in a follow-up examination. MDCT features with multiple venous lakes filling from the periphery, focal specks of calcification, low-density soft tissue mass along with tortuous varicose veins and large feeding veins from the abdomen are suggestive of cavernous haemangioma. PMID:23660735

  3. Anthropometric Assessment of Neck Adipose Tissue and Airway Volume Using Multidetector Computed Tomography: An Imaging Approach and Association With Overall Mortality.

    PubMed

    Maresky, Hillel S; Sharfman, Zachary; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Gomori, J M; Copel, Laurian; Tal, Sigal

    2015-11-01

    Neck adiposity tissue volume (NATV) accumulation is an indicator for metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Neck circumference is a poor measure of NATV, and a quantifier for this entity has not yet been established. To evaluate volumetric quantification by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) as a reproducible anthropometric tool to measure NATV and airway volume (AWV). A total of 519 patients, including a subset of 70 random patients who underwent head and neck CT scanning in our hospital within 1 year (2013), were studied. Included patients were all those undergoing nonenhanced CT (NECT) or CT angiography (CTA). Neck cross-sectional areas (NCSA) were measured at 2 separate levels of the neck, and 3D postprocessing tissue reconstruction was performed, and NATV and AWVs were quantified volumetrically for all patients within the year. The average NCSA at the level of the soft palate and thyroid cartilage was 22,579 and 14,500 mm, respectively. NATV when compared to the upper and lower levels of NCSA showed correlations of 0.64 and 0.79, respectively (P < 0.001). Interobserver analysis showed mean deviations of 0.46% and 0.32% for NATV and AWV, respectively. A strong correlation between NATV and body mass index (BMI) was found (r = 0.658, P < 0.001), and the top quartile of NATV:AWV patients (out of 519 patients) displayed a statistically significant mortality rate during 670 days of follow-up (d = 7.5%, P = 0.032). After adjustment for age and gender, the association between NATV:AWV and mortality was close to significant (P = 0.072). Volumetric quantification of NATV and AWV is a reproducible and prognostic anthropometric tool, as a high NATV:AWV demonstrated a significant risk factor for mortality; future research may further advance our understanding of this phenomenon. PMID:26559286

  4. Acute aortic syndrome-pitfalls on gated and non-gated CT scan.

    PubMed

    Husainy, Mohammad Ali; Sayyed, Farhina; Puppala, Sapna

    2016-08-01

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a life-threatening condition which includes aortic dissection (AD), penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU) and intramural hematoma (IMH). Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) plays a crucial role in the diagnosis of this condition and for further clinical follow-up. It is important for radiologists to be aware of common pitfalls in cardiac-gated and non-gated CT in diagnosing AAS. They should also be wary of common mimics of AAS which may make a significant difference towards management of these patients. In this review, we present from our practice some of the common pitfalls and mimics of AAS on MDCT. PMID:27220654

  5. Optimal cutoff threshold for calcium quantification in isotropic CT calcium scans by validating against registered intravascular ultrasound with radiofrequency backscatter.

    PubMed

    Dhungel, Abinashi; Qian, Zhen; Vazquez, Gustavo; Rinehart, Sarah; Weeks, Michael; Voros, Szilard

    2012-01-01

    3D Computed Tomography (CT) provides noninvasive, low-radiation method of coronary artery calcium (CAC) measurement. Conventional CAC images are acquired on multidetector-row CT scanners without contrast, and reconstructed with 3 mm slice thickness. The calcium volume is quantified by registering voxels with attenuation values greater than or equal to 130 Hounsfield Unit (HU). In isotropic CAC images with 0.5 mm slice thickness obtained from 320-detector row CT, the optimal value of attenuation cutoff threshold is unknown. In this paper we find the optimal cutoff threshold for calcium quantification in isotropic CT calcium scans by validating against registered intravascular ultrasound with radiofrequency backscatter (IVUS/VH). From the statistical analysis of calcium data obtained from the images of 9 patients we found a range of optimal thresholds and the conventional threshold of 130 HU was in the range. Further, the optimal values were different for individual patients. PMID:23367046

  6. Investigation of temporal resolution required for CT coronary angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Kazuya; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Kawai, Tatsuya; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2012-03-01

    Sub-second multi-detector computed tomography systems (MDCTs) offer great potentials for improving cardiac imaging. However, since the temporal resolution of such CT systems is not sufficient, blurring and artifacts produced by fast cardiac motion are still problematic. The purposes of this study were to investigate the accurate method for measurement of temporal resolution (TR) of the cardiac CT and required TR for obtaining better CT coronary angiography (CTCA). We employed a dual source CT system (Somatom Definition, Siemens), which has various temporal resolution modes (83, 125, and 165 msec) for electro-cardiogram (ECG)-gated scanning. The temporal sensitivity profiles (TSPs) were measured by a new method using temporal impulse generated by metal ball (impulse method). The CTCA images of 200 patients with heart rates (HRs) ranging from 36 to 117 beat per minute (bpm) were visually evaluated using a 4-point scale. The 165-msec TR mode, which is mostly available on recent MDCTs, showed a sufficient image quality only at low HR (<= 60 bpm) for all 3 arteries. The image quality of 125-msec TR mode was acceptable at low to intermediate HRs (< 80 bpm) for LADs and LCXs, and insufficient for the RCAs in cases with HR more than 71 bpm. The 83-msec TR mode demonstrated excellent image quality except for cases with very quick motion of the RCAs at a high HR (>80 bpm).

  7. Imaging study on the optic canal using sixty four-slice spiral computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Peng-Fei; Dai, Xiu-Yu; Lv, Yongbin; Liu, Shaoyi; Mu, Xiao-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rapid advances in multislice computed tomography (MSCT) technology facilitate accurate clinical imaging. The newly developed 64-slice CT increases temporal and spatial resolution efficiently. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the application of 64 slice spiral computed tomography (CT) on the imaging of the normal optics canal. Methods and materials: 100 healthy adults were investigated using 64 slice spiral CT. The optics canal was scanned, reconstructed and examined. Results: Among the four walls of the optic canal, the medial wall is the longest one. The upper wall and outer wall are inferior to the medial wall while the inferior wall is the shortest one. All the data accomplished by the 64 slice CT was consistent with the results of previous reports using other methods. Conclusion: The results suggested that the 64 slice spiral CT could be a valuable and accurate method for measuring the length of optics canal walls. PMID:26885062

  8. TH-C-18A-11: Investigating the Minimum Scan Parameters Required to Generate Free-Breathing Fast-Helical CT Scans Without Motion-Artifacts

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D; Neylon, J; Dou, T; Jani, S; Lamb, J; Low, D; Tan, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A recently proposed 4D-CT protocol uses deformable registration of free-breathing fast-helical CT scans to generate a breathing motion model. In order to allow accurate registration, free-breathing images are required to be free of doubling-artifacts, which arise when tissue motion is greater than scan speed. This work identifies the minimum scanner parameters required to successfully generate free-breathing fast-helical scans without doubling-artifacts. Methods: 10 patients were imaged under free breathing conditions 25 times in alternating directions with a 64-slice CT scanner using a low dose fast helical protocol. A high temporal resolution (0.1s) 4D-CT was generated using a patient specific motion model and patient breathing waveforms, and used as the input for a scanner simulation. Forward projections were calculated using helical cone-beam geometry (800 projections per rotation) and a GPU accelerated reconstruction algorithm was implemented. Various CT scanner detector widths and rotation times were simulated, and verified using a motion phantom. Doubling-artifacts were quantified in patient images using structural similarity maps to determine the similarity between axial slices. Results: Increasing amounts of doubling-artifacts were observed with increasing rotation times > 0.2s for 16×1mm slice scan geometry. No significant increase in doubling artifacts was observed for 64×1mm slice scan geometry up to 1.0s rotation time although blurring artifacts were observed >0.6s. Using a 16×1mm slice scan geometry, a rotation time of less than 0.3s (53mm/s scan speed) would be required to produce images of similar quality to a 64×1mm slice scan geometry. Conclusion: The current generation of 16 slice CT scanners, which are present in most Radiation Oncology departments, are not capable of generating free-breathing sorting-artifact-free images in the majority of patients. The next generation of CT scanners should be capable of at least 53mm/s scan speed

  9. Clinical application of in vivo treatment delivery verification based on PET/CT imaging of positron activity induced at high energy photon therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janek Strååt, Sara; Andreassen, Björn; Jonsson, Cathrine; Noz, Marilyn E.; Maguire, Gerald Q., Jr.; Näfstadius, Peder; Näslund, Ingemar; Schoenahl, Frederic; Brahme, Anders

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate in vivo verification of radiation treatment with high energy photon beams using PET/CT to image the induced positron activity. The measurements of the positron activation induced in a preoperative rectal cancer patient and a prostate cancer patient following 50 MV photon treatments are presented. A total dose of 5 and 8 Gy, respectively, were delivered to the tumors. Imaging was performed with a 64-slice PET/CT scanner for 30 min, starting 7 min after the end of the treatment. The CT volume from the PET/CT and the treatment planning CT were coregistered by matching anatomical reference points in the patient. The treatment delivery was imaged in vivo based on the distribution of the induced positron emitters produced by photonuclear reactions in tissue mapped on to the associated dose distribution of the treatment plan. The results showed that spatial distribution of induced activity in both patients agreed well with the delivered beam portals of the treatment plans in the entrance subcutaneous fat regions but less so in blood and oxygen rich soft tissues. For the preoperative rectal cancer patient however, a 2 ± (0.5) cm misalignment was observed in the cranial-caudal direction of the patient between the induced activity distribution and treatment plan, indicating a beam patient setup error. No misalignment of this kind was seen in the prostate cancer patient. However, due to a fast patient setup error in the PET/CT scanner a slight mis-position of the patient in the PET/CT was observed in all three planes, resulting in a deformed activity distribution compared to the treatment plan. The present study indicates that the induced positron emitters by high energy photon beams can be measured quite accurately using PET imaging of subcutaneous fat to allow portal verification of the delivered treatment beams. Measurement of the induced activity in the patient 7 min after receiving 5 Gy involved count rates which were about

  10. Clinical application of in vivo treatment delivery verification based on PET/CT imaging of positron activity induced at high energy photon therapy.

    PubMed

    Janek Strååt, Sara; Andreassen, Björn; Jonsson, Cathrine; Noz, Marilyn E; Maguire, Gerald Q; Näfstadius, Peder; Näslund, Ingemar; Schoenahl, Frederic; Brahme, Anders

    2013-08-21

    The purpose of this study was to investigate in vivo verification of radiation treatment with high energy photon beams using PET/CT to image the induced positron activity. The measurements of the positron activation induced in a preoperative rectal cancer patient and a prostate cancer patient following 50 MV photon treatments are presented. A total dose of 5 and 8 Gy, respectively, were delivered to the tumors. Imaging was performed with a 64-slice PET/CT scanner for 30 min, starting 7 min after the end of the treatment. The CT volume from the PET/CT and the treatment planning CT were coregistered by matching anatomical reference points in the patient. The treatment delivery was imaged in vivo based on the distribution of the induced positron emitters produced by photonuclear reactions in tissue mapped on to the associated dose distribution of the treatment plan. The results showed that spatial distribution of induced activity in both patients agreed well with the delivered beam portals of the treatment plans in the entrance subcutaneous fat regions but less so in blood and oxygen rich soft tissues. For the preoperative rectal cancer patient however, a 2 ± (0.5) cm misalignment was observed in the cranial-caudal direction of the patient between the induced activity distribution and treatment plan, indicating a beam patient setup error. No misalignment of this kind was seen in the prostate cancer patient. However, due to a fast patient setup error in the PET/CT scanner a slight mis-position of the patient in the PET/CT was observed in all three planes, resulting in a deformed activity distribution compared to the treatment plan. The present study indicates that the induced positron emitters by high energy photon beams can be measured quite accurately using PET imaging of subcutaneous fat to allow portal verification of the delivered treatment beams. Measurement of the induced activity in the patient 7 min after receiving 5 Gy involved count rates which were about

  11. On the relationship of minimum detectable contrast to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yifang; Scott, Alexander; Allahverdian, Janet; Lee, Christina; Kightlinger, Blake; Azizyan, Avetis; Miller, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    CT dose optimization is typically guided by pixel noise or contrast-to-noise ratio that does not delineate low contrast details adequately. We utilized the statistically defined low contrast detectability to study its relationship to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT. A realistically shaped medium sized abdomen phantom was customized to contain a cylindrical void of 4 cm diameter. The void was filled with a low contrast (1% and 2%) insert containing six groups of cylindrical targets ranging from 1.2 mm to 7 mm in size. Helical CT scans were performed using a Siemens 64-slice mCT and a GE Discovery 750 HD at various doses. After the subtractions between adjacent slices, the uniform sections of the filtered backprojection reconstructed images were partitioned to matrices of square elements matching the sizes of the targets. It was verified that the mean values from all the elements in each matrix follow a Gaussian distribution. The minimum detectable contrast (MDC), quantified by the mean signal to background difference equal to the distribution's standard deviation multiplied by 3.29, corresponding to 95% confidence level, was found to be related to the phantom specific dose and the element size by a power law (R^2  >  0.990). Independent readings on the 5 mm and 7 mm targets were compared to the measured contrast to the MDC ratios. The results showed that 93% of the cases were detectable when the measured contrast exceeds the MDC. The correlation of the MDC to the pixel noise and target size was also identified and the relationship was found to be the same for the scanners in the study. To quantify the impact of iterative reconstructions to the low contrast detectability, the noise structure was studied in a similar manner at different doses and with different ASIR blending fractions. The relationship of the dose to the blending fraction and low contrast detectability is presented. PMID:26389637

  12. On the relationship of minimum detectable contrast to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yifang; Scott, Alexander, II; Allahverdian, Janet; Lee, Christina; Kightlinger, Blake; Azizyan, Avetis; Miller, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    CT dose optimization is typically guided by pixel noise or contrast-to-noise ratio that does not delineate low contrast details adequately. We utilized the statistically defined low contrast detectability to study its relationship to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT. A realistically shaped medium sized abdomen phantom was customized to contain a cylindrical void of 4 cm diameter. The void was filled with a low contrast (1% and 2%) insert containing six groups of cylindrical targets ranging from 1.2 mm to 7 mm in size. Helical CT scans were performed using a Siemens 64-slice mCT and a GE Discovery 750 HD at various doses. After the subtractions between adjacent slices, the uniform sections of the filtered backprojection reconstructed images were partitioned to matrices of square elements matching the sizes of the targets. It was verified that the mean values from all the elements in each matrix follow a Gaussian distribution. The minimum detectable contrast (MDC), quantified by the mean signal to background difference equal to the distribution’s standard deviation multiplied by 3.29, corresponding to 95% confidence level, was found to be related to the phantom specific dose and the element size by a power law (R^2  >  0.990). Independent readings on the 5 mm and 7 mm targets were compared to the measured contrast to the MDC ratios. The results showed that 93% of the cases were detectable when the measured contrast exceeds the MDC. The correlation of the MDC to the pixel noise and target size was also identified and the relationship was found to be the same for the scanners in the study. To quantify the impact of iterative reconstructions to the low contrast detectability, the noise structure was studied in a similar manner at different doses and with different ASIR blending fractions. The relationship of the dose to the blending fraction and low contrast detectability is presented.

  13. Dual Energy CT Angiography of Peripheral Arterial Disease: Feasibility of Using Lower Contrast Medium Volume

    PubMed Central

    Almutairi, Abdulrahman; Sun, Zhonghua; Poovathumkadavi, Abduljaleel; Assar, Tarek

    2015-01-01

    Objective One of the main drawbacks associated with Dual Energy Computed Tomography Angiography (DECTA) is the risk of developing contrast medium-induced nephropathy (CIN). The aim of the present study was firstly, to design an optimal CT imaging protocol by determining the feasibility of using a reduced contrast medium volume in peripheral arterial DECTA, and secondly, to compare the results with those obtained from using routine contrast medium volume. Methods Thirty four patients underwent DECTA for the diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease. They were randomly divided into two groups: Group 1 (routine contrast volume group) with n = 17, injection rate 4–5 ml/s, and 1.5 ml/kg of contrast medium, and Group 2 ((low contrast volume group), with n = 17, injection rate 4–5ml/s, and contrast medium volume 0.75 ml/kg. A fast kilovoltage—switching 64-slice CT scanner in the dual-energy mode was employed for the study. A total of 6 datasets of monochromatic images at 50, 55, 60, 65, 70 and 75 keV levels were reconstructed with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) at 50%. A 4-point scale was the tool for qualitative analysis of results. The two groups were compared and assessed quantitatively for image quality on the basis of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR). Radiation and contrast medium doses were also compared. Results The overall mean CT attenuation and mean noise for all lower extremity body parts was significantly lower for the low volume contrast group (p<0.001), and varied significantly between groups (p = 0.001), body parts (p<0.001) and keVs (p<0.001). The interaction between group body parts was significant with CT attenuation and CNR (p = 0.002 and 0.003 respectively), and marginally significant with SNR (p = 0.047), with minimal changes noticed between the two groups. Group 2 (low contrast volume group) displayed the lowest image noise between 65 and 70 keV, recorded the highest SNR and CNR at 65 keV, and

  14. Enhanced reading time efficiency by use of automatically unfolded CT rib reformations in acute trauma.

    PubMed

    Bier, Georg; Schabel, Christoph; Othman, Ahmed; Bongers, Malte N; Schmehl, Jörg; Ditt, Hendrik; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Bamberg, Fabian; Notohamiprodjo, Mike

    2015-11-01

    Rationale of this study was to evaluate whether unfolded rib images enhance time efficiency in detection of rib fractures and time efficiency in patients with acute thoracic trauma. 51 subsequent patients with thoracic trauma underwent 64-slice computed tomography. 1mm thick axial slices were reformatted using a commercially available post-processing software application generating rotatable unfolded rib images. Diagnostic accuracy was evaluated by 3 readers and compared to multiplanar reformations of the original CT images. Reformation and evaluation times were recorded. 116 rib fractures were detected. The multiplanar reformation analysis yielded a sensitivity of 87.9%/93.9%/79.7% with a specificity of 97%/97%/82.2%, whilst the unfolded rib image analysis yielded a sensitivity of 94.8%/94.8%/92.2% and a specificity of 85.2/87.8%/82.4 (p=0.06/0.8/0.04) with high inter-observer agreement (k=0.79-0.85). The mean reading time for the multiplanar reformations was significantly longer (reader 1: 103.7 ± 27.1s/reader 2: 81.8 ± 40.6s/reader 3: 154.3 ± 39.2s) than the evaluation of the unfolded rib images (19.4 ± 4.9s/26.9 ± 15.0s/49.9 ± 18.7s; p<0.01). Concluding, the unfolded rib display reduces reading time for detection of rib fractures in acute thoracic trauma patients significantly and does not compromise the diagnostic accuracy significantly in experienced radiologists. However, unexperienced readers may profit from use of this display. PMID:26226916

  15. Applying an animal model to quantify the uncertainties of an image-based 4D-CT algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Greg; Wang, Kevin; Battista, Jerry; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to use an animal model to quantify the spatial displacement uncertainties and test the fundamental assumptions of an image-based 4D-CT algorithm in vivo. Six female Landrace cross pigs were ventilated and imaged using a 64-slice CT scanner (GE Healthcare) operating in axial cine mode. The breathing amplitude pattern of the pigs was varied by periodically crimping the ventilator gas return tube during the image acquisition. The image data were used to determine the displacement uncertainties that result from matching CT images at the same respiratory phase using normalized cross correlation (NCC) as the matching criteria. Additionally, the ability to match the respiratory phase of a 4.0 cm subvolume of the thorax to a reference subvolume using only a single overlapping 2D slice from the two subvolumes was tested by varying the location of the overlapping matching image within the subvolume and examining the effect this had on the displacement relative to the reference volume. The displacement uncertainty resulting from matching two respiratory images using NCC ranged from 0.54 ± 0.10 mm per match to 0.32 ± 0.16 mm per match in the lung of the animal. The uncertainty was found to propagate in quadrature, increasing with number of NCC matches performed. In comparison, the minimum displacement achievable if two respiratory images were matched perfectly in phase ranged from 0.77 ± 0.06 to 0.93 ± 0.06 mm in the lung. The assumption that subvolumes from separate cine scan could be matched by matching a single overlapping 2D image between to subvolumes was validated. An in vivo animal model was developed to test an image-based 4D-CT algorithm. The uncertainties associated with using NCC to match the respiratory phase of two images were quantified and the assumption that a 4.0 cm 3D subvolume can by matched in respiratory phase by matching a single 2D image from the 3D subvolume was validated. The work in this paper shows the image-based 4D-CT

  16. The Role of Multidetector Computed Tomography in the Early Diagnosis of Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis in Patients with Febrile Neutropenia Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Çiledağ, Nazan; Arda, Kemal; Arıbaş, Bilgin Kadri; Tekgündüz, Ali Irfan Emre; Altuntaş, Fevzi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate vessel involvement and the role of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in the earlydiagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in patients with febrile neutropenia and antibiotic-resistant feverundergoing autologous bone morrow transplantation. Material and Methods: In all, 74 pulmonary MDCT examinations in 37 consecutive hematopoietic stem celltransplantation patients with febrile neutropenia and clinically suspected IPA were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Diagnosis of IPA was based on Fungal Infections Cooperative Group, and National Institute of Allergy andInfectious Diseases Mycoses Study Consensus Group criteria. In all, 0, 14, and 11 patients were diagnosed as proven,probable, and possible IPA, respectively. Among the 25 patients accepted as probable and possible IPA, all had pulmonaryMDCT findings consistent with IPA. The remaining 12 patients were accepted as having fever of unknown origin (FUO)and had patent vessels based on MDCT findings.In the patients with probable and possible IPA, 72 focal pulmonary lesions were observed; in 41 of the 72 (57%) lesionsvascular occlusion was noted and the CT halo sign was observed in 25 of these 41 (61%) lesions. Resolution of feveroccurred following antifungal therapy in 19 (76%) of the 25 patients with probable and possible IPA. In all, 6 (25%)of the patients diagnosed as IPA died during follow-up. Transplant-related mortality 100 d post transplant in patientswith IPA and FUO was 24% and 0%, respectively. Conclusion: In conclusion, MDCT has a potential role in the early diagnosis of IPA via detection of vessel occlusion. PMID:24744620

  17. A Novel Fast Helical 4D-CT Acquisition Technique to Generate Low-Noise Sorting Artifact–Free Images at User-Selected Breathing Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, David; Lamb, James; White, Benjamin; Jani, Shyam; Gaudio, Sergio; Lee, Percy; Ruan, Dan; McNitt-Gray, Michael; Low, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To develop a novel 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) technique that exploits standard fast helical acquisition, a simultaneous breathing surrogate measurement, deformable image registration, and a breathing motion model to remove sorting artifacts. Methods and Materials: Ten patients were imaged under free-breathing conditions 25 successive times in alternating directions with a 64-slice CT scanner using a low-dose fast helical protocol. An abdominal bellows was used as a breathing surrogate. Deformable registration was used to register the first image (defined as the reference image) to the subsequent 24 segmented images. Voxel-specific motion model parameters were determined using a breathing motion model. The tissue locations predicted by the motion model in the 25 images were compared against the deformably registered tissue locations, allowing a model prediction error to be evaluated. A low-noise image was created by averaging the 25 images deformed to the first image geometry, reducing statistical image noise by a factor of 5. The motion model was used to deform the low-noise reference image to any user-selected breathing phase. A voxel-specific correction was applied to correct the Hounsfield units for lung parenchyma density as a function of lung air filling. Results: Images produced using the model at user-selected breathing phases did not suffer from sorting artifacts common to conventional 4D-CT protocols. The mean prediction error across all patients between the breathing motion model predictions and the measured lung tissue positions was determined to be 1.19 ± 0.37 mm. Conclusions: The proposed technique can be used as a clinical 4D-CT technique. It is robust in the presence of irregular breathing and allows the entire imaging dose to contribute to the resulting image quality, providing sorting artifact–free images at a patient dose similar to or less than current 4D-CT techniques.

  18. Evaluation of pulmonary sequestration with multidetector computed tomography angiography in a select cohort of patients: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Long, Qihua; Zha, Yunfei; Yang, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to evaluate the role of multidetector computed tomography angiography in diagnosing patients with pulmonary sequestration. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the computed tomography studies and clinical materials of 43 patients who had undergone preoperative multidetector computed tomography angiography in our hospital and had pathologically proven pulmonary sequestration. Each examination of pulmonary sequestration was reviewed for type, location, parenchymal changes, arterial supply and venous drainage on two-dimensional and three-dimensional computed tomography images. RESULTS: Multidetector computed tomography successfully detected all pulmonary sequestrations in the 43 patients (100%). This included 40 patients (93.0%) with intralobar sequestration and 3 patients (7.0%) with extralobar sequestration. The locations of pulmonary sequestration were left lower lobe (28 cases, 70% of intralobar sequestrations), right lower lobe (12 cases, 30% of intralobar sequestrations) and costodiaphragmatic sulcus (3 cases). Cases of sequestered lung presented as mass lesions (37.2%), cystic lesions (32.6%), pneumonic lesions (16.3%), cavitary lesions (9.3%) and bronchiectasis (4.6%). The angioarchitecture of pulmonary sequestration, including feeding arteries from the thoracic aorta (86.1%), celiac truck (9.3%), abdominal aorta (2.3%) and left gastric artery (2.3%) and venous drainage into inferior pulmonary veins (86.0%) and the azygos vein system (14.0%), was visualized on multidetector computed tomography. Finally, the multidetector computed tomography angiography results of the sequestered lungs and angioarchitectures were surgically confirmed in all the patients. CONCLUSIONS: As a noninvasive modality, multidetector computed tomography angiography is helpful for making diagnostic decisions regarding pulmonary sequestration with high confidence and for visualizing the related parenchymal characteristics, arterial supply, and venous drainage

  19. Statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in clinical CT systems: Experimental assessment of noise performance

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ke; Tang, Jie; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To reduce radiation dose in CT imaging, the statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) method has been introduced for clinical use. Based on the principle of MBIR and its nonlinear nature, the noise performance of MBIR is expected to be different from that of the well-understood filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction method. The purpose of this work is to experimentally assess the unique noise characteristics of MBIR using a state-of-the-art clinical CT system. Methods: Three physical phantoms, including a water cylinder and two pediatric head phantoms, were scanned in axial scanning mode using a 64-slice CT scanner (Discovery CT750 HD, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) at seven different mAs levels (5, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, 200, 300). At each mAs level, each phantom was repeatedly scanned 50 times to generate an image ensemble for noise analysis. Both the FBP method with a standard kernel and the MBIR method (Veo{sup ®}, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) were used for CT image reconstruction. Three-dimensional (3D) noise power spectrum (NPS), two-dimensional (2D) NPS, and zero-dimensional NPS (noise variance) were assessed both globally and locally. Noise magnitude, noise spatial correlation, noise spatial uniformity and their dose dependence were examined for the two reconstruction methods. Results: (1) At each dose level and at each frequency, the magnitude of the NPS of MBIR was smaller than that of FBP. (2) While the shape of the NPS of FBP was dose-independent, the shape of the NPS of MBIR was strongly dose-dependent; lower dose lead to a “redder” NPS with a lower mean frequency value. (3) The noise standard deviation (σ) of MBIR and dose were found to be related through a power law of σ ∝ (dose){sup −β} with the component β ≈ 0.25, which violated the classical σ ∝ (dose){sup −0.5} power law in FBP. (4) With MBIR, noise reduction was most prominent for thin image slices. (5) MBIR lead to better noise spatial

  20. Statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in clinical CT systems: Experimental assessment of noise performance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Tang, Jie; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce radiation dose in CT imaging, the statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) method has been introduced for clinical use. Based on the principle of MBIR and its nonlinear nature, the noise performance of MBIR is expected to be different from that of the well-understood filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction method. The purpose of this work is to experimentally assess the unique noise characteristics of MBIR using a state-of-the-art clinical CT system. Methods: Three physical phantoms, including a water cylinder and two pediatric head phantoms, were scanned in axial scanning mode using a 64-slice CT scanner (Discovery CT750 HD, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) at seven different mAs levels (5, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, 200, 300). At each mAs level, each phantom was repeatedly scanned 50 times to generate an image ensemble for noise analysis. Both the FBP method with a standard kernel and the MBIR method (Veo®, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) were used for CT image reconstruction. Three-dimensional (3D) noise power spectrum (NPS), two-dimensional (2D) NPS, and zero-dimensional NPS (noise variance) were assessed both globally and locally. Noise magnitude, noise spatial correlation, noise spatial uniformity and their dose dependence were examined for the two reconstruction methods. Results: (1) At each dose level and at each frequency, the magnitude of the NPS of MBIR was smaller than that of FBP. (2) While the shape of the NPS of FBP was dose-independent, the shape of the NPS of MBIR was strongly dose-dependent; lower dose lead to a “redder” NPS with a lower mean frequency value. (3) The noise standard deviation (σ) of MBIR and dose were found to be related through a power law of σ ∝ (dose)−β with the component β ≈ 0.25, which violated the classical σ ∝ (dose)−0.5 power law in FBP. (4) With MBIR, noise reduction was most prominent for thin image slices. (5) MBIR lead to better noise spatial uniformity when compared

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine Computed tomography (CT) of the spine is a diagnostic imaging ... Spine? What is CT Scanning of the Spine? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  2. Role of Multidetector Computed Tomography in the Diagnosis of Colorectal Perforations.

    PubMed

    Saturnino, Pietro Paolo; Pinto, Antonio; Liguori, Carlo; Ponticiello, Gianluca; Romano, Luigia

    2016-02-01

    Colonic perforations can be classified into perforations that occur at the site of a localized pathologic process and cecal perforations that occur secondary to distal colonic obstructions. Rectal perforations may result from foreign bodies inserted into the rectum; moreover, deep rectal biopsies, polypectomy, improper cleansing enema, or thermometer placement may also lead to rectal perforation. Correct identification of the cause and site of the perforation is crucial for appropriate management and surgical planning. Multidetector row computed tomography has a pivot role in planning the type of operative treatment, the prognosis, and in assessing those patients who have clinical symptoms of peritonitis but no radiographic signs of perforation. PMID:26827738

  3. Tumor volume of resectable gastric adenocarcinoma on multidetector computed tomography: association with N categories

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hang; Chen, Xiao-li; Li, Jun-ru; Li, Zhen-lin; Chen, Tian-wu; Pu, Hong; Yin, Long-lin; Xu, Guo-hui; Li, Zhen-wen; Reng, Jing; Zhou, Peng; Cheng, Zhu-zhong; Cao, Ying

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the gross tumor volume of resectable gastric adenocarcinoma on multidetector computed tomography could predict the presence of regional lymph node metastasis and could determine N categories. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 202 consecutive patients with gastric adenocarcinoma who had undergone gastrectomy 1 week after contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography were retrospectively identified. The gross tumor volume was evaluated on multidetector computed tomography images. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine whether the gross tumor volume could predict regional lymph node metastasis, and the Mann-Whitney U test was performed to compare the gross tumor volume among N categories. Additionally, a receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to identify the accuracy of the gross tumor volume in differentiating N categories. RESULTS: The gross tumor volume could predict regional lymph node metastasis (p<0.0001) in the univariate analysis, and the multivariate analyses indicated that the gross tumor volume was an independent risk factor for regional lymph node metastasis (p=0.005, odds ratio=1.364). The Mann-Whitney U test showed that the gross tumor volume could distinguish N0 from the N1-N3 categories, N0-N1 from N2-N3, and N0-N2 from N3 (all p<0.0001). In the T1-T4a categories, the gross tumor volume could differentiate N0 from the N1-N3 categories (cutoff, 12.3 cm3), N0-N1 from N2-N3 (cutoff, 16.6 cm3), and N0-N2 from N3 (cutoff, 24.6 cm3). In the T4a category, the gross tumor volume could differentiate N0 from the N1-N3 categories (cutoff, 15.8 cm3), N0-N1 from N2-N3 (cutoff, 17.8 cm3), and N0-N2 from N3 (cutoff, 24 cm3). CONCLUSION: The gross tumor volume of resectable gastric adenocarcinoma on multidetector computed tomography could predict regional lymph node metastasis and N categories. PMID:27166769

  4. Congenital pulmonary venolobar syndrome: Value of multidetector computed tomography in preoperative assessment

    PubMed Central

    Hamad, Abdel-Mohsen Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    A 6-month old baby referred to our department because of recurrent attacks of respiratory distress with chest infection. Chest radiology revealed reduction of the right hemithorax with mediastinal shift to the right. Multidetector computed tomography showed hypoplasia of the right lung and right pulmonary artery, systemic arterial supply to the lung from the abdominal aorta, and and absence of right venous drainage to the left atrium. This picture is consistent with congenital pulmonary venolobar syndrome. The patient underwent right pneumonectomy; the postoperative course was uneventful. PMID:22924077

  5. Multidetector computed tomography imaging of congenital anomalies of major airways: A pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Sundarakumar, Dinesh Kumar; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Sharma, Raju; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Kabra, Susheel Kumar; Jagia, Priya

    2011-12-28

    Congenital airway anomalies can be asymptomatic or may cause severe respiratory distress requiring immediate treatment. These anomalies can present early in life, or may be just incidental findings. It is important to recognize these entities to realize their clinical significance and to avoid false diagnosis. In this article, the various congenital airway anomalies and their imaging features by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) are reviewed in order of occurrence during the embryological timeline. This pictorial essay reviews the various distinct congenital airway lesions and their MDCT manifestations. It also provides insight into the embryological basis of the congenital airway lesions encountered. PMID:22224177

  6. Bosniak classification of renal cystic lesions according to multidetector computed tomography findings*

    PubMed Central

    de Miranda, Christiana Maia Nobre Rocha; Maranhão, Carol Pontes de Miranda; dos Santos, Carla Jotta Justo; Padilha, Igor Gomes; de Farias, Lucas de Pádua Gomes; da Rocha, Milzi Sarmento

    2014-01-01

    Renal cystic lesions are usually diagnosed in the radiologists’ practice and therefore their characterization is crucial to determine the clinical approach to be adopted and prognosis. The Bosniak classification based on computed tomography findings has allowed for standardization and categorization of lesions in increasing order of malignancy (I, II, IIF, III and IV) in a simple and accurate way. The present iconographic essay developed with multidetector computed tomography images of selected cases from the archives of the authors’ institution, is aimed at describing imaging findings that can help in the diagnosis of renal cysts. PMID:25741060

  7. [The role of multidetector computer tomography in diagnosis of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Lohanikhina, K Iu; Hordiienko, K P; Kozarenko, T M

    2014-10-01

    With the objective to improve the diagnostic semiotics of an acute pancreatitis (AP) 35 patients were examined, using 64-cut computeric tomograph Lightspeed VCT (GE, USA) with intravenous augmentation in arterial and portal phases. Basing on analysis of the investigations conducted, using multidetector computeric tomography (MDCT), the AP semiotics was systematized, which is characteristic for oedematous and destructive forms, diagnosed in 19 (44.2%) and 16 (45.8%) patients, accordingly. The procedure for estimation of preservation of the organ functional capacity in pancreonecrosis pres- ence was elaborated, promoting rising of the method diagnostic efficacy by 5.3 - 9.4%. PMID:25675779

  8. Multi-detector computed tomography imaging of large airway pathology: A pictorial review

    PubMed Central

    Jugpal, Tejeshwar Singh; Garg, Anju; Sethi, Gulshan Rai; Daga, Mradul Kumar; Kumar, Jyoti

    2015-01-01

    The tracheobronchial tree is a musculo-cartilagenous framework which acts as a conduit to aerate the lungs and consequently the entire body. A large spectrum of pathological conditions can involve the trachea and bronchial airways. These may be congenital anomalies, infections, post-intubation airway injuries, foreign body aspiration or neoplasms involving the airway. Appropriate management of airway disease requires an early and accurate diagnosis. In this pictorial essay review, we will comprehensively describe the various airway pathologies and their imaging findings by multi-detector computed tomography. PMID:26753061

  9. Advances in post-mortem CT-angiography

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, J; Dominguez, A; Vanhaebost, J; Mangin, P

    2014-01-01

    Performing a post-mortem multidetector CT (MDCT) scan has already become routine in some institutes of forensic medicine. To better visualize the vascular system, different techniques of post-mortem CT-angiography have been explored, which can essentially be divided into partial- and whole-body angiography techniques. Probably the most frequently applied technique today is the so-called multiphase post-mortem CT-angiography (MPMCTA) a standardized method for investigating the vessels of the head, thorax and abdomen. Different studies exist, describing its use for medicolegal investigations, and its advantages as well as its artefacts and pitfalls. With the aim to investigate the performance of PMCTA and to develop and validate techniques, an international working group was created in 2012 called the “Technical Working Group Post-mortem Angiography Methods” (TWGPAM). Beyond its primary perspective, the goals of this group include creating recommendations for the indication of the investigation and for the interpretation of the images and to distribute knowledge about PMCTA. This article provides an overview about the different approaches that have been developed and tested in recent years and an update about ongoing research in this field. It will explain the technique of MPMCTA in detail and give an outline of its indications, application, advantages and limitations. PMID:24234582

  10. CT Coronary Angiography: 256-Slice and 320-Detector Row Scanners

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Edward M.; Rybicki, Frank J.; Steigner, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has rapidly evolved from 4-detector row systems in 1998 to 256-slice and 320-detector row CT systems. With smaller detector element size and faster gantry rotation speed, spatial and temporal resolution of the 64-detector MDCT scanners have made coronary artery imaging a reliable clinical test. Wide-area coverage MDCT, such as the 256-slice and 320-detector row MDCT scanners, has enabled volumetric imaging of the entire heart free of stair-step artifacts at a single time point within one cardiac cycle. It is hoped that these improvements will be realized with greater diagnostic accuracy of CT coronary angiography. Such scanners hold promise in performing a rapid high quality “triple rule-out” test without high contrast load, improved myocardial perfusion imaging, and even four-dimensional CT subtraction angiography. These emerging technical advances and novel applications will continue to change the way we study coronary artery disease beyond detecting luminal stenosis. PMID:20425186

  11. Practical considerations for noise power spectra estimation for clinical CT scanners.

    PubMed

    Dolly, Steven; Chen, Hsin-Chen; Anastasio, Mark; Mutic, Sasa; Li, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Local noise power spectra (NPS) have been commonly calculated to represent the noise properties of CT imaging systems, but their properties are significantly affected by the utilized calculation schemes. In this study, the effects of varied calculation parameters on the local NPS were analyzed, and practical suggestions were provided regarding the estimation of local NPS for clinical CT scanners. The uniformity module of a Catphan phantom was scanned with a Philips Brilliance 64 slice CT simulator with varied scanning protocols. Images were reconstructed using FBP and iDose4 iterative reconstruction with noise reduction levels 1, 3, and 6. Local NPS were calculated and compared for varied region of interest (ROI) locations and sizes, image background removal methods, and window functions. Additionally, with a predetermined NPS as a ground truth, local NPS calculation accuracy was compared for computer simulated ROIs, varying the aforementioned parameters in addition to ROI number. An analysis of the effects of these varied calculation parameters on the magnitude and shape of the NPS was conducted. The local NPS varied depending on calculation parameters, particularly at low spatial frequencies below ~ 0.15 mm-1. For the simulation study, NPS calculation error decreased exponentially as ROI number increased. For the Catphan study the NPS magnitude varied as a function of ROI location, which was better observed when using smaller ROI sizes. The image subtraction method for background removal was the most effective at reducing low-frequency background noise, and produced similar results no matter which ROI size or window function was used. The PCA background removal method with a Hann window function produced the closest match to image subtraction, with an average percent difference of 17.5%. Image noise should be analyzed locally by calculating the NPS for small ROI sizes. A minimum ROI size is recommended based on the chosen radial bin size and image pixel

  12. Estimation of absorbed doses from paediatric cone-beam CT scans: MOSFET measurements and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangroh; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Toncheva, Greta; Frush, Donald P; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a dose estimation tool with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. A 5-y-old paediatric anthropomorphic phantom was computed tomography (CT) scanned to create a voxelised phantom and used as an input for the abdominal cone-beam CT in a BEAMnrc/EGSnrc MC system. An X-ray tube model of the Varian On-Board Imager((R)) was built in the MC system. To validate the model, the absorbed doses at each organ location for standard-dose and low-dose modes were measured in the physical phantom with MOSFET detectors; effective doses were also calculated. In the results, the MC simulations were comparable to the MOSFET measurements. This voxelised phantom approach could produce a more accurate dose estimation than the stylised phantom method. This model can be easily applied to multi-detector CT dosimetry. PMID:19889800

  13. Noise power spectrum studies of CT systems with off-centered image object and bowtie filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Cardona, Daniel; Cruz-Bastida, Juan P.; Li, Ke; Budde, Adam; Hsieh, Jiang; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2016-03-01

    In previous studies of the noise power spectrum (NPS) of multi-detector CT (MDCT) systems, the image object was usually placed at the iso-center of the CT system; therefore, the bowtie filter had negligible impact on the shape of the two-dimensional (2D) NPS of MDCT. This work characterized the NPS of off-centered objects when a bowtie filter is present. It was found that the interplay between the bowtie filter and object position has significant impact on the rotational symmetry of the 2D NPS. Depending on the size of the bowtie filter, the degree of object off-centering, and the location of the region of interest (ROI) used for the NPS measurements, the symmetry of the 2D NPS can be classified as circular, dumbbell, and a peculiar cloverleaf symmetry. An anisotropic NPS corresponds to structured noise texture, which may directly influence the detection performance of certain low contrast detection tasks.

  14. Search for continuous gravitational waves: Metric of the multidetector F-statistic

    SciTech Connect

    Prix, Reinhard

    2007-01-15

    We develop a general formalism for the parameter-space metric of the multidetector F-statistic, which is a matched-filtering detection statistic for continuous gravitational waves. We find that there exists a whole family of F-statistic metrics, parametrized by the (unknown) amplitude parameters of the gravitational wave. The multidetector metric is shown to be expressible in terms of noise-weighted averages of single-detector contributions, which implies that the number of templates required to cover the parameter space does not scale with the number of detectors. Contrary to using a longer observation time, combining detectors of similar sensitivity is therefore the computationally cheapest way to improve the sensitivity of coherent wide-parameter searches for continuous gravitational waves. We explicitly compute the F-statistic metric family for signals from isolated spinning neutron stars, and we numerically evaluate the quality of different metric approximations in a Monte Carlo study. The metric predictions are tested against the measured mismatches and we identify regimes in which the local metric is no longer a good description of the parameter-space structure.

  15. Multidetector computed tomography angiography of the renal arteries: normal anatomy and its variations*

    PubMed Central

    de Mello Júnior, Carlos Fernando; Araujo Neto, Severino Aires; de Carvalho Junior, Arlindo Monteiro; Rebouças, Rafael Batista; Negromonte, Gustavo Ramalho Pessoa; de Oliveira, Carollyne Dantas

    2016-01-01

    Conventional angiography is still considered the gold standard for the study of the anatomy and of vascular diseases of the abdomen. However, the advent of multidetector computed tomography and techniques of digital image reconstruction has provided an alternative means of performing angiography, without the risks inherent to invasive angiographic examinations. Therefore, within the field of radiology, there is an ever-increasing demand for deeper knowledge of the anatomy of the regional vasculature and its variations. Variations in the renal vascular system are relatively prevalent in the venous and arterial vessels. For various conditions in which surgical planning is crucial to the success of the procedure, knowledge of this topic is important. The aim of this study was to familiarize the general radiologist with variations in the renal vascular system. To that end, we prepared a pictorial essay comprising multidetector computed tomography images obtained in a series of cases. We show patterns representative of the most common anatomical variations in the arterial blood supply to the kidneys, calling attention to the nomenclature, as well as to the clinical and surgical implications of such variations.

  16. Novel Wearable and Wireless Ring-Type Pulse Oximeter with Multi-Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cheng-Yang; Chan, Ming-Che; Chen, Chien-Yue; Lin, Bor-Shyh

    2014-01-01

    The pulse oximeter is a popular instrument to monitor the arterial oxygen saturation (SPO2). Although a fingertip-type pulse oximeter is the mainstream one on the market at present, it is still inconvenient for long-term monitoring, in particular, with respect to motion. Therefore, the development of a wearable pulse oximeter, such as a finger base-type pulse oximeter, can effectively solve the above issue. However, the tissue structure of the finger base is complex, and there is lack of detailed information on the effect of the light source and detector placement on measuring SPO2. In this study, the practicability of a ring-type pulse oximeter with a multi-detector was investigated by optical human tissue simulation. The optimal design of a ring-type pulse oximeter that can provide the best efficiency of measuring SPO2 was discussed. The efficiency of ring-type pulse oximeters with a single detector and a multi-detector was also discussed. Finally, a wearable and wireless ring-type pulse oximeter was also implemented to validate the simulation results and was compared with the commercial fingertip-type pulse oximeter. PMID:25244586

  17. Comparison between clinical indicators of transmembrane oxygenator thrombosis and multidetector computed tomographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Panigada, Mauro; L'Acqua, Camilla; Passamonti, Serena Maria; Mietto, Cristina; Protti, Alessandro; Riva, Roberto; Gattinoni, Luciano

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to assess whether multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) could accurately confirm the clinical suspicion of transmembrane oxygenator thrombosis (MOT) during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Twenty-seven oxygenators were examined using MDCT at the end of patient treatment. Transmembrane oxygenator thrombosis was suspected in 15 of them according to the presence of at least 2 of the following clinical indicators: (1) increase in d-dimer, (2) decrease in platelet count, (3) decrease in oxygenator performance, and (4) presence of clots on the surface of the oxygenator. Transmembrane oxygenator thrombosis was confirmed by MDCT in 5 (33%) of them. Transmembrane oxygenator thrombosis was unexpectedly found in 5 (41%) of the remaining 12 oxygenators not suspected for MOT. Eight (80%) of these oxygenators had clots accounting for less than 1% of total volume. Clots were mainly detectable at the apical corner of the oxygenator, most likely due to greater blood stasis. We found a significant increase in d-dimer and in membrane oxygenator shunt and a decrease in platelet count from the start to the discontinuation of ECMO. Hemostatic abnormalities significantly reverted 48 hours after oxygenator removal, suggesting the role of ECMO in activation of the coagulation cascade. Multidetector computed tomographic scan could not accurately confirm the clinical suspicion of MOT. PMID:25547046

  18. Multidetector computed tomography angiography of the renal arteries: normal anatomy and its variations.

    PubMed

    de Mello Júnior, Carlos Fernando; Araujo Neto, Severino Aires; de Carvalho Junior, Arlindo Monteiro; Rebouças, Rafael Batista; Negromonte, Gustavo Ramalho Pessoa; de Oliveira, Carollyne Dantas

    2016-01-01

    Conventional angiography is still considered the gold standard for the study of the anatomy and of vascular diseases of the abdomen. However, the advent of multidetector computed tomography and techniques of digital image reconstruction has provided an alternative means of performing angiography, without the risks inherent to invasive angiographic examinations. Therefore, within the field of radiology, there is an ever-increasing demand for deeper knowledge of the anatomy of the regional vasculature and its variations. Variations in the renal vascular system are relatively prevalent in the venous and arterial vessels. For various conditions in which surgical planning is crucial to the success of the procedure, knowledge of this topic is important. The aim of this study was to familiarize the general radiologist with variations in the renal vascular system. To that end, we prepared a pictorial essay comprising multidetector computed tomography images obtained in a series of cases. We show patterns representative of the most common anatomical variations in the arterial blood supply to the kidneys, calling attention to the nomenclature, as well as to the clinical and surgical implications of such variations. PMID:27403020

  19. 3D detection of colonic polyps by CT colonography: accuracy, pitfalls, and solutions by adjunct 2D workup.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, S A; Ernst, A S; Beer, M; Juchems, M S

    2015-10-01

    Computed tomography colonography (CTC) enables evaluation of the colon with minimal invasiveness. In spite of advances in multidetector CT (MDCT) technology and advanced software features, including electronic bowel cleansing (digital removal and tagging of fluid and debris), a number of potential pitfalls in the evaluation of the 3D volumetric dataset persist. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the strengths and potential pitfalls in the detection of colorectal polyps using CTC via a primary three-dimensional (3D) approach for evaluation. PMID:26220124

  20. Head CT (image)

    MedlinePlus

    CT stands for computerized tomography. In this procedure, a thin X-ray beam is rotated around the ... D image of a section through the body. CT scans are very detailed and provide excellent information ...

  1. CT scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    CT stands for computerized tomography. In this procedure, a thin X-ray beam is rotated around the ... D image of a section through the body. CT scans are very detailed and provide excellent information ...

  2. CT appearance of splenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelson, D.S.; Cohen, B.A.; Armas, R.R.

    1982-12-01

    Splenosis is an unusual complication of splenic trauma. The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of splenosis is described. One should consider this diagnosis when faced with a history of splenic trauma and multiple round or oval masses at CT.

  3. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-05-21

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  4. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-04

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  5. Orbit CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... results may mean: Bleeding Broken eye socket bone Graves disease Infection Tumor Risks CT scans and other x- ... Livingstone; 2014:chap 66. Read More CT scan Graves disease Tumor Update Date 1/18/2015 Updated by: ...

  6. Evaluation of exposure dose reduction in multislice CT coronary angiography (MS-CTA) with prospective ECG-gated helical scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Takamasa; Tsuyuki, Masaharu; Okumura, Miwa; Sano, Tomonari; Kondo, Takeshi; Takase, Shinichi

    2008-03-01

    A novel low-dose ECG-gated helical scan method to investigate coronary artery diseases was developed. This method uses a high pitch for scanning (based on the patient's heart rate) and X-rays are generated only during the optimal cardiac phases. The dose reduction was obtained using a two-level approach: 1) To use a 64-slice CT scanner (Aquilion, Toshiba, Otawara, Tochigi, Japan) with a scan speed of 0.35 s/rot. to helically scan the heart at a high pitch based on the patient's heart rate. By changing the pitch from the conventional 0.175 to 0.271 for a heart rate of 60 bpm, the exposure dose was reduced to 65%. 2) To employ tube current gating that predicts the timing of optimal cardiac phases from the previous cardiac cycle and generates X-rays only during the required cardiac phases. The combination of high speed scanning with a high pitch and appropriate X-ray generation only in the cardiac phases from 60% to 90% allows the exposure dose to be reduced to 5.6 mSv for patients with a heart rate lower than 65 bpm. This is a dose reduction of approximately 70% compared to the conventional scanning method recommended by the manufacturer when segmental reconstruction is considered. This low-dose protocol seamlessly allows for wide scan ranges (e.g., aortic dissection) with the benefits of ECG-gated helical scanning: smooth continuity for longitudinal direction and utilization of data from all cardiac cycles.

  7. 3D CT-guided pulsed radiofrequency treatment for trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Fang, Luo; Ying, Shen; Tao, Wang; Lan, Meng; Xiaotong, Yu; Nan, Ji

    2014-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a pain syndrome characterized by pain in the trigeminal area often accompanied by a brief facial spasm or tic. The purpose of our study was to investigate the efficacy and clinical utility of CT-guided pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) for treatment of TN. Patients who were diagnosed with severe TN between September 2010 and October 2010 at Beijing Tiantan Hospital were included. Pulsed radiofrequency treatment (PRFT) was employed to treat TN. To verify the accurate needle position, a thin-section cranial CT scan was performed by using a multidetector CT scanner. Three-dimensional reconstruction was performed to visualize the location of the needle and the foramen ovale. A total of 20 patients were included in the study. Seven patients (35%) had favorable outcome 1 year after the PRFT. The numeric rating scale in the 7 patients with good outcome was significantly lower than the 13 patients with bad outcome at 1 day, 1 week, and 2 weeks after the treatment. The remaining 13 patients had residual pain 2 weeks after the PRFT and had to receive radiofrequency thermocoagulation (RFTC). In conclusion, the results of our study demonstrate that CT-guided PRFT is not an effective method of pain treatment for idiopathic TN as compared with conventional RFTC. However, CT-guided PRFT is associated with less complication than RFTC. PMID:23433058

  8. Three-dimensional reconstruction of New Zealand rabbit antebrachium by multidetector computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Özkadif, S; Eken, E; Beşoluk, K; Dayan, M. O.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal biometric peculiarities of New Zealand white rabbit antebrachium (radius and ulna) by means of three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) images. Under general anesthesia, the antebrachiums of a total of sixteen rabbits of both sexes were scanned with a general diagnostic MDCT. Biometric measurements of the reconstructed models from high resolution MDCT images were analyzed statistically. Consequently, when biometric measurement values of corresponding bones of antebrachium were compared, it was revealed that there was no statistical significance within both sexes but there were statistically important differences between both sexes in some biometric measurements. It has been suggested that the results from the study can shed light on future studies on the skeletal system and can form a modern point of view to anatomical education. PMID:27175177

  9. An Unusual Left Ventricular Outflow Pseudoaneurysm: Usefulness of Echocardiography and Multidetector Computed Tomography for Surgical Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Da Col, Uberto; Ramoni, Enrico Di Bella, Isidoro; Ragni, Temistocle

    2009-01-15

    Left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) pseudoaneurysm is a rare but potentially lethal complication, mainly after aortic root endocarditis or surgery. Usually it originates from a dehiscence in the mitral-aortic intervalvular fibrosa and it arises posteriorly to the aortic root. Due to these anatomical features, its imaging assessment is challenging and surgical repair requires complex procedures. An unusual case of LVOT pseudoaneurysm is described. It was detected by transthoracic ecocardiography 7 months after aortic root replacement for acute endocarditis. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) confirmed the presence of a pouch located between the aortic root and the right atrium. Computed tomography also detected the origin of the pseudoaneurysm from the muscular interventricular septum of the LVOT, rather below the aortic valve plane. It was repaired with an extracardiac surgical approach, sparing the aortic root bioprosthesis previously implanted. The high-resolution three-dimensional details provided by the preoperative MDCT allowed us to plan a simple and effective surgical strategy.

  10. [Multidetector computed tomography of coronary arteries: state of the art. Second part: clinical applications].

    PubMed

    González, Aloha Meave; Rosas, Erick Alexánderson; Valero, Mónica Rodríguez; Ramírez, Gabriela Meléndez; García, Alfonso Martínez; Fernández, Carlos Sierra; Torres, Rodrigo Calleja; Castillo, Leonardo García-Rojas; Molina, Pedro Alberto Lamothe; Zarza, Mary Carmen Herrera; de Avila, Martha Armas; López, Juan Manuel Ochoa; Vázquez-Lamadrid, Jorge; Hayama, Eric Kimura

    2008-01-01

    At the beginning of the evaluation of Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Coronary Multidetector Computed Tomography (MDCT) was exclusively used to detect calcified plaques in coronary arteries through the Calcium Score, whose value by itself is limited. Nowadays, thanks to the technological advancements, potential clinical applications, with this method, include detection of coronary arterial stenosis, assessment of coronary bridges, and evaluation of anomalous coronaries. The intraluminal coronary stent evaluation is not possible yet, but this might become possible with the new-generation scanners. At the moment, the published results seem to be promising, nonetheless, the enthusiasm generated by this method should be accompanied by adequate training, as well as by its validation and certification. PMID:18754411

  11. Congenital coronary arteries anomalies: review of the literature and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT)-appearance.

    PubMed

    Montaudon, M; Latrabe, V; Iriart, X; Caix, P; Laurent, F

    2007-07-01

    The prevalence of coronary arteries congenital anomalies is 1 to 2% in the general population. Although the spectrum of their clinical manifestations is very broad from total inocuity to lethal, anomalies of coronary arteries need to be recognized by clinicians in certain circumstances: they are the first cause of death in young adults under physical exercise and an abnormal course of a coronary artery can complicate a cardiac surgery. Therefore, a non-invasive test is highly suitable for detecting anomalies of coronary arteries and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is likely to be the best one. To understand how anomalies of coronary arteries may occur, we have reviewed the recent literature about their development. Then, the main types of anomalies are presented with their clinical context, and representative MDCT images from our personal database are used for illustration. PMID:17563833

  12. Demonstration of normal and dilated testicular veins by multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Karcaaltincaba, Musturay

    2011-04-01

    Recent advances in multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) technology enabled better visualization of testicular (gonadal) vein using submillimeter slice thickness and three-dimensional images. Normally, the testicular vein measures 1-3 mm and drains into the inferior vena cava and left renal vein on the right and left sides, respectively. They can be seen in most patients during MDCT studies. Curved planar and volume-rendered images can be used to display testicular veins. We aim to demonstrate MDCT findings of normal testicular vein and its pathologies including varicocele, varices, the testicular vascular pedicle sign, and phlebolith. The testicular vein can be dilated owing to varicocele or portal hypertension and in patients with intraabdominal seminomas arising from undescended testis. The testicular vein can also cause ureteral compression at the crossing point. Understanding MDCT findings of the normal testicular vein and its various pathologies can allow a correct diagnosis, thereby avoiding further diagnostic tests. PMID:21519988

  13. Marketing cardiac CT programs.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jason

    2010-01-01

    There are two components of cardiac CT discussed in this article: coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA).The distinctive advantages of each CT examination are outlined. In order to ensure a successful cardiac CT program, it is imperative that imaging facilities market their cardiac CT practices effectively in order to gain a competitive advantage in this valuable market share. If patients receive quality care by competent individuals, they are more likely to recommend the facility's cardiac CT program. Satisfied patients will also be more willing to come back for any further testing. PMID:22276376

  14. Presentation of floating mass transducer and Vibroplasty couplers on CT and cone beam CT.

    PubMed

    Mlynski, Robert; Nguyen, Thi Dao; Plontke, Stefan K; Kösling, Sabrina

    2014-04-01

    Various titanium coupling elements, Vibroplasty Couplers, maintaining the attachment of the Floating Mass Transducer (FMT) of the active middle ear implant Vibrant Soundbridge (VSB) to the round window, the stapes suprastructure or the stapes footplate are in use to optimally transfer energy from the FMT to the inner ear fluids. In certain cases it is of interest to radiologically verify the correct position of the FMT coupler assembly. The imaging appearance of FMT connected to these couplers, however, is not well known. The aim of this study was to present the radiological appearance of correctly positioned Vibroplasty Couplers together with the FMT using two different imaging techniques. Vibroplasty Couplers were attached to the FMT of a Vibrant Soundbridge and implanted in formalin fixed human temporal bones. Five FMT coupler assemblies were implanted in different positions: conventionally to the incus, a Bell-Coupler, a CliP-Coupler, a Round Window-Coupler and an Oval Window-Coupler. High spatial resolution imaging with Multi-Detector CT (MDCT) and Cone Beam CT (CBCT) was performed in each specimen. Images were blind evaluated by two radiologists on a visual basis. Middle ear details, identification of FMT and coupler, position of FMT coupler assembly and artefacts were assessed. CBCT showed a better spatial resolution and a higher visual image quality than MDCT, but there was no significant advantage over MDCT in delineating the structures or the temporal bone of the FMT Coupler assemblies. The FMT with its coupler element could be clearly identified in the two imaging techniques. The correct positioning of the FMT and all types of couplers could be demonstrated. Both methods, MDCT and CBCT, are appropriate methods for postoperative localization of FMT in combination with Vibroplasty Couplers and for verifying their correct position. If CBCT is available, this method is recommended due to the better spatial resolution and less metal artifacts. PMID:23529745

  15. Staging of colorectal cancer using contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomographic colonography

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Srikala; Kalra, Naveen; Bhatia, Anmol; Wig, Jaidev; Rana, Surinder; Bhasin, Deepak; Vaiphei, Kim; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Preoperative staging is essential for the optimal treatment and surgical planning of colorectal cancers. This study was aimed to evaluate the accuracy of colorectal cancer staging done using contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomographic colonography (CEMDCTC). METHODS We recruited 25 patients with 28 proven colorectal cancers. A 16-slice multidetector computed tomography scanner was used to generate two-dimensional multiplanar reformatted sagittal, coronal and oblique coronal images, and three-dimensional virtual colonography (endoluminal) images. Axial and reformatted views were analysed, and TNM staging was done. Patients underwent surgery and conventional colonoscopy, and surgical histopathological correlation was obtained. RESULTS The diagnostic accuracies for TNM colorectal cancer staging were 92.3% for T staging, 42.3% for N staging and 96.1% for M staging using CEMDCTC. There was excellent positive correlation for T staging between CEMDCTC and both surgery (κ-value = 0.686) and histopathology (κ-value = 0.838) (p < 0.0001), and moderate positive correlation for N staging between CEMDCTC and surgery (κ-value = 0.424; p < 0.0001). The correlation between CEMDCTC and histopathology for N staging was poor (κ-value = 0.186; p < 0.05); the negative predictive value was 100% for lymph node detection. Moderate positive correlation was seen for M staging between CEMDCTC and both surgery (κ-value = 0.462) and histopathology (κ-value = 0.649). No false negatives were identified in any of the M0 cases. CONCLUSION CEMDCTC correlated well with pathologic T and M stages, but poorly with pathologic N stage. It is an extremely accurate tool for T staging, but cannot reliably distinguish between malignant lymph nodes and enlarged reactive lymph nodes. PMID:25630322

  16. MO-E-17A-08: Attenuation-Based Size Adjusted, Scanner-Independent Organ Dose Estimates for Head CT Exams: TG 204 for Head CT

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, K; Bostani, M; Cagnon, C; McNitt-Gray, M; Zankl, M; DeMarco, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: AAPM Task Group 204 described size specific dose estimates (SSDE) for body scans. The purpose of this work is to use a similar approach to develop patient-specific, scanner-independent organ dose estimates for head CT exams using an attenuation-based size metric. Methods: For eight patient models from the GSF family of voxelized phantoms, dose to brain and lens of the eye was estimated using Monte Carlo simulations of contiguous axial scans for 64-slice MDCT scanners from four major manufacturers. Organ doses were normalized by scannerspecific 16 cm CTDIvol values and averaged across all scanners to obtain scanner-independent CTDIvol-to-organ-dose conversion coefficients for each patient model. Head size was measured at the first slice superior to the eyes; patient perimeter and effective diameter (ED) were measured directly from the GSF data. Because the GSF models use organ identification codes instead of Hounsfield units, water equivalent diameter (WED) was estimated indirectly. Using the image data from 42 patients ranging from 2 weeks old to adult, the perimeter, ED and WED size metrics were obtained and correlations between each metric were established. Applying these correlations to the GSF perimeter and ED measurements, WED was calculated for each model. The relationship between the various patient size metrics and CTDIvol-to-organ-dose conversion coefficients was then described. Results: The analysis of patient images demonstrated the correlation between WED and ED across a wide range of patient sizes. When applied to the GSF patient models, an exponential relationship between CTDIvol-to-organ-dose conversion coefficients and the WED size metric was observed with correlation coefficients of 0.93 and 0.77 for the brain and lens of the eye, respectively. Conclusion: Strong correlation exists between CTDIvol normalized brain dose and WED. For the lens of the eye, a lower correlation is observed, primarily due to surface dose variations. Funding

  17. Performance tests for ray-scan 64 PET/CT based on NEMA NU-2 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Suying; Zhou, Kun; Zhang, Qiushi; Zhang, Jinming; Yang, Kun; Xu, Baixuan; Ren, Qiushi

    2015-03-01

    This paper focuses on evaluating the performance of the Ray-Scan 64 PET/CT system, a newly developed PET/CT in China. It combines a 64 slice helical CT scanner with a high resolution PET scanner based on BGO crystals assembled in 36 rings. The energy window is 350~ 650 keV, and the coincidence window is set at 12 ns in both 2D and 3D mode. The transaxial field of view (FOV) is 600 mm in diameter, and the axial FOV is 163 mm. Method: Performance measurements were conducted focusing on PET scanners based on NEMA NU-2 2007 standard. We reported the full characterization (spatial resolution, sensitivity, count rate performance, scatter fraction, accuracy of correction, and image quality) in both 2D and 3D mode. In addition, the clinical images from two patients of different types of tumor were presented to further demonstrate this PET/CT system performance in clinical application. Results: using the NEMA NU-2 2007 standard, the main results: (1) the transaxial resolution at 1cm from the gantry center for 2D and 3D was both 4.5mm (FWHM), and at 10cm from the gantry center, the radial (tangential) resolution were 5.6mm (5.3mm) and 5.4mm (5.2mm) in 2D and 3D mode respectively. The axial resolution at 1cm and 10cm off axis was 3.4mm (4.8mm) and 5.5mm (5.8mm) in 2D (3D) mode respectively; (2) the sensitivity for the radial position R0(r=0mm) and R100(r=100mm) were 1.741 kcps/MBq and 1.767 kcps/MBq respectively in 2D mode and 7.157 kcps/MBq and 7.513 kcps/MBq in 3D mode; (3) the scatter fraction was calculated as 18.36% and 42.92% in 2D and 3D mode, respectively; (4) contrast of hot spheres in the image quality phantom in 2D mode was 50.33% (52.87%), 33.34% (40.86%), 20.64% (26.36%), and 10.99% (15.82%), respectively, in N=4 (N=8). Besides, in clinical study, the diameter of lymph tumor was about 2.4 cm, and the diameter of lung cancer was 4.2 cm. This PET/CT system can distinguish the position of cancer easily. Conclusion: The results show that the performance of the newly

  18. Lung Motion Model Validation Experiments, Free-Breathing Tissue Densitometry, and Ventilation Mapping using Fast Helical CT Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Hsiang-Tai

    The uncertainties due to respiratory motion present significant challenges to accurate characterization of cancerous tissues both in terms of imaging and treatment. Currently available clinical lung imaging techniques are subject to inferior image quality and incorrect motion estimation, with consequences that can systematically impact the downstream treatment delivery and outcome. The main objective of this thesis is the development of the techniques of fast helical computed tomography (CT) imaging and deformable image registration for the radiotherapy applications in accurate breathing motion modeling, lung tissue density modeling and ventilation imaging. Fast helical CT scanning was performed on 64-slice CT scanner using the shortest available gantry rotation time and largest pitch value such that scanning of the thorax region amounts to just two seconds, which is less than typical breathing cycle in humans. The scanning was conducted under free breathing condition. Any portion of the lung anatomy undergoing such scanning protocol would be irradiated for only a quarter second, effectively removing any motion induced image artifacts. The resulting CT data were pristine volumetric images that record the lung tissue position and density in a fraction of the breathing cycle. Following our developed protocol, multiple fast helical CT scans were acquired to sample the tissue positions in different breathing states. To measure the tissue displacement, deformable image registration was performed that registers the non-reference images to the reference one. In modeling breathing motion, external breathing surrogate signal was recorded synchronously with the CT image slices. This allowed for the tissue-specific displacement to be modeled as parametrization of the recorded breathing signal using the 5D lung motion model. To assess the accuracy of the motion model in describing tissue position change, the model was used to simulate the original high-pitch helical CT scan

  19. Lung Motion Model Validation Experiments, Free-Breathing Tissue Densitometry, and Ventilation Mapping using Fast Helical CT Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Hsiang-Tai

    The uncertainties due to respiratory motion present significant challenges to accurate characterization of cancerous tissues both in terms of imaging and treatment. Currently available clinical lung imaging techniques are subject to inferior image quality and incorrect motion estimation, with consequences that can systematically impact the downstream treatment delivery and outcome. The main objective of this thesis is the development of the techniques of fast helical computed tomography (CT) imaging and deformable image registration for the radiotherapy applications in accurate breathing motion modeling, lung tissue density modeling and ventilation imaging. Fast helical CT scanning was performed on 64-slice CT scanner using the shortest available gantry rotation time and largest pitch value such that scanning of the thorax region amounts to just two seconds, which is less than typical breathing cycle in humans. The scanning was conducted under free breathing condition. Any portion of the lung anatomy undergoing such scanning protocol would be irradiated for only a quarter second, effectively removing any motion induced image artifacts. The resulting CT data were pristine volumetric images that record the lung tissue position and density in a fraction of the breathing cycle. Following our developed protocol, multiple fast helical CT scans were acquired to sample the tissue positions in different breathing states. To measure the tissue displacement, deformable image registration was performed that registers the non-reference images to the reference one. In modeling breathing motion, external breathing surrogate signal was recorded synchronously with the CT image slices. This allowed for the tissue-specific displacement to be modeled as parametrization of the recorded breathing signal using the 5D lung motion model. To assess the accuracy of the motion model in describing tissue position change, the model was used to simulate the original high-pitch helical CT scan

  20. Utility of C-arm CT in overcoming challenges in patients undergoing Transarterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Chinmay; Sreekumar, K. P.; Prabhu, Nirmal Kumar; kannan, Rajesh R; Moorthy, Srikanth

    2014-01-01

    Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is the well-known treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma. Multiple digital subtraction angiography (DSA) acquisitions in different projections are required to identify difficult arterial feeders. Moreover, the tell-tale tumor blush can be obscured by proximity to lung base, small size of lesion, and breathing artifacts. C-arm CT is a revolutionary advancement in the intervention radiology suite that allows acquisition of data which can be reformatted in multiple planes and volume rendered incorporating both soft tissue and vascular information like multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). These images acquired during the TACE procedure can provide critical inputs for achieving a safe and effective therapy. This case series aims to illustrate the utility of C-arm CT in solving specific problems encountered while performing TACE. PMID:24851011

  1. Dual-phase CT for the assessment of acute vascular injuries in high-energy blunt trauma: the imaging findings and management implications.

    PubMed

    Iacobellis, Francesca; Ierardi, Anna M; Mazzei, Maria A; Magenta Biasina, Alberto; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Nicola, Refky; Scaglione, Mariano

    2016-05-01

    Acute vascular injuries are the second most common cause of fatalities in patients with multiple traumatic injuries; thus, prompt identification and management is essential for patient survival. Over the past few years, multidetector CT (MDCT) using dual-phase scanning protocol has become the imaging modality of choice in high-energy deceleration traumas. The objective of this article was to review the role of dual-phase MDCT in the identification and management of acute vascular injuries, particularly in the chest and abdomen following multiple traumatic injuries. In addition, this article will provide examples of MDCT features of acute vascular injuries with correlative surgical and interventional findings. PMID:26882960

  2. Practical CT dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshizumi, T.T.; Suneja, S.K.; Teal, J.S. )

    1989-07-01

    The dose from computed tomography (CT) examinations is not negligible from a radiation safety standpoint. Occasionally, one encounters a case in which an unsuspected pregnant woman undergoes a CT pelvic scan, and the radiologist is required to estimate the dose to the fetus. This article addresses practical methods of CT dosimetry with a specific discussion on fetal dose estimate. Three methods are described: (1) the use of a dose chart, (2) the pencil ionization chamber method, and (3) the thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) method.

  3. CT findings in leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Heiberg, E.; Wolverson, M.K.; Sundaram, M.; Shields, J.B.

    1984-12-01

    Review of 84 computed tomographic (CT) scans in leukemic patients demonstrate a wide spectrum of abnormalities. Findings caused by leukemia were lymphadenopathy, visceral enlargement, focal defects, and tissue infiltration. Hemorrhage was by far the most common complication and could usually be characterized on the noncontrast CT scan. The distinction between old hematomas, foci of infection, and leukemia infiltration could not be made with certainty without CT-guided aspiration. Unusual instances of sepsis, such as microabscesses of the liver and typhlitis, were seen.

  4. PET/CT Artifacts

    PubMed Central

    Blodgett, Todd M.; Mehta, Ajeet S.; Mehta, Amar S.; Laymon, Charles M.; Carney, Jonathan; Townsend, David W.

    2014-01-01

    There are several artifacts encountered in PET/CT imaging, including attenuation correction (AC) artifacts associated with using CT for attenuation correction. Several artifacts can mimic a 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) avid malignant lesions and therefore recognition of these artifacts is clinically relevant. Our goal was to identify and characterize these artifacts and also discuss some protocol variables that may affect image quality in PET/CT. PMID:21237418

  5. Characterizing string-of-pearls colloidal silica by multidetector hydrodynamic chromatography and comparison to multidetector size-exclusion chromatography, off-line multiangle static light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Amandaa K; Striegel, André M

    2011-04-15

    The string-of-pearls-type morphology is ubiquitous, manifesting itself variously in proteins, vesicles, bacteria, synthetic polymers, and biopolymers. Characterizing the size and shape of analytes with such morphology, however, presents a challenge, due chiefly to the ease with which the "strings" can be broken during chromatographic analysis or to the paucity of information obtained from the benchmark microscopy and off-line light scattering methods. Here, we address this challenge with multidetector hydrodynamic chromatography (HDC), which has the ability to determine, simultaneously, the size, shape, and compactness and their distributions of string-of-pearls samples. We present the quadruple-detector HDC analysis of colloidal string-of-pearls silica, employing static multiangle and quasielastic light scattering, differential viscometry, and differential refractometry as detection methods. The multidetector approach shows a sample that is broadly polydisperse in both molar mass and size, with strings ranging from two to five particles, but which also contains a high concentration of single, unattached "pearls". Synergistic combination of the various size parameters obtained from the multiplicity of detectors employed shows that the strings with higher degrees of polymerization have a shape similar to the theory-predicted shape of a Gaussian random coil chain of nonoverlapping beads, while the strings with lower degrees of polymerization have a prolate ellipsoidal shape. The HDC technique is contrasted experimentally with multidetector size-exclusion chromatography, where, even under extremely gentle conditions, the strings still degraded during analysis. Such degradation is shown to be absent in HDC, as evidenced by the fact that the molar mass and radius of gyration obtained by HDC with multiangle static light scattering detection (HDC/MALS) compare quite favorably to those determined by off-line MALS analysis under otherwise identical conditions. The

  6. Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging: detection of ischemia in a porcine model with FFR verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Vembar, Mani; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2014-03-01

    Dynamic cardiac CT perfusion (CTP) is a high resolution, non-invasive technique for assessing myocardial blood ow (MBF), which in concert with coronary CT angiography enable CT to provide a unique, comprehensive, fast analysis of both coronary anatomy and functional ow. We assessed perfusion in a porcine model with and without coronary occlusion. To induce occlusion, each animal underwent left anterior descending (LAD) stent implantation and angioplasty balloon insertion. Normal ow condition was obtained with balloon completely de ated. Partial occlusion was induced by balloon in ation against the stent with FFR used to assess the extent of occlusion. Prospective ECG-triggered partial scan images were acquired at end systole (45% R-R) using a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner. Images were reconstructed using FBP and a hybrid iterative reconstruction (iDose4, Philips Healthcare). Processing included: beam hardening (BH) correction, registration of image volumes using 3D cubic B-spline normalized mutual-information, and spatio-temporal bilateral ltering to reduce partial scan artifacts and noise variation. Absolute blood ow was calculated with a deconvolutionbased approach using singular value decomposition (SVD). Arterial input function was estimated from the left ventricle (LV) cavity. Regions of interest (ROIs) were identi ed in healthy and ischemic myocardium and compared in normal and occluded conditions. Under-perfusion was detected in the correct LAD territory and ow reduction agreed well with FFR measurements. Flow was reduced, on average, in LAD territories by 54%.

  7. C-arm CT for histomorphometric evaluation of lumbar spine trabecular microarchitecture: a study on anorexia nervosa patients.

    PubMed

    Phan, C M; Khalilzadeh, O; Dinkel, J; Wang, I S; Bredella, M A; Misra, M; Miller, K K; Klibanski, A; Gupta, R

    2013-07-01

    Bone histomorphometry measurements require high spatial resolution that may not be feasible using multidetector CT (MDCT). This study evaluated the trabecular microarchitecture of lumbar spine using MDCT and C-arm CT in a series of young adult patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). 11 young females with AN underwent MDCT (anisotropic resolution with a slice thickness of ~626 μm) and C-arm CT (isotropic resolution of ~200 µm). Standard histomorphometric parameters the of L1 vertebral body, namely the apparent trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV), trabecular thickness (TbTh), trabecular number (TbN) and trabecular separation (TbSp), were analysed using MicroView software (GE Healthcare, Piscataway, NJ). Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Trabecular parameters derived from MDCT and C-arm CT were compared, and their association with BMD parameters was evaluated. Histomorphometric parameters derived from C-arm CT, namely TbTh, TbN and TbSp, were significantly different from the corresponding MDCT parameters. There were no significant correlations between C-arm CT-derived parameters and the corresponding MDCT-derived parameters. C-arm CT-derived parameters were significantly (p<0.001) correlated with anteroposterior L1 spine BMD and Z-scores: TbTh (r=0.723, r=0.744, respectively), TbN (r=-0.720, r=-0.712, respectively) and TbSp (r=0.656, r=0.648, respectively). BV/TV, derived from C-arm CT, was significantly associated with body mass index (r=0.636) and ideal body weight (r=0.730) (p<0.05). These associations were not present in MDCT-derived parameters. This study suggests that the spatial resolution offered by C-arm CT more accurately captures the histomorphometric parameters of trabecular morphology than MDCT in patients with AN. PMID:23640801

  8. CT of Gastric Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Guniganti, Preethi; Bradenham, Courtney H; Raptis, Constantine; Menias, Christine O; Mellnick, Vincent M

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting are common presenting symptoms among adult patients seeking care in the emergency department, and, with the increased use of computed tomography (CT) to image patients with these complaints, radiologists will more frequently encounter a variety of emergent gastric pathologic conditions on CT studies. Familiarity with the CT appearance of emergent gastric conditions is important, as the clinical presentation is often nonspecific and the radiologist may be the first to recognize gastric disease as the cause of a patient's symptoms. Although endoscopy and barium fluoroscopy remain important tools for evaluating patients with suspected gastric disease in the outpatient setting, compared with CT these modalities enable less comprehensive evaluation of patients with nonspecific complaints and are less readily available in the acute setting. Endoscopy is also more invasive than CT and has greater potential risks. Although the mucosal detail of CT is relatively poor compared with barium fluoroscopy or endoscopy, CT can be used with the appropriate imaging protocols to identify inflammatory conditions of the stomach ranging from gastritis to peptic ulcer disease. In addition, CT can readily demonstrate the various complications of gastric disease, including perforation, obstruction, and hemorrhage, which may direct further clinical, endoscopic, or surgical management. We will review the normal anatomy of the stomach and discuss emergent gastric disease with a focus on the usual clinical presentation, typical imaging appearance, and differentiating features, as well as potential imaging pitfalls. PMID:26562229

  9. Trabecular bone class mapping across resolutions: translating methods from HR-pQCT to clinical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentinitsch, Alexander; Fischer, Lukas; Patsch, Janina M.; Bauer, Jan; Kainberger, Franz; Langs, Georg; DiFranco, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Quantitative assessment of 3D bone microarchitecture in high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) has shown promise in fracture risk assessment and biomechanics, but is limited to the distal radius and tibia. Trabecular microarchitecture classes (TMACs), based on voxel-wise clustering texture and structure tensor features in HRpQCT, is extended in this paper to quantify trabecular bone classes in clinical multi-detector CT (MDCT) images. Our comparison of TMACs in 12 cadaver radii imaged using both HRpQCT and MDCT yields a mean Dice score of up to 0.717+/-0.40 and visually concordant bone quality maps. Further work to develop clinically viable bone quantitative imaging using HR-pQCT validation could have a significant impact on overall bone health assessment.

  10. Complete Preoperative Evaluation of Pulmonary Atresia with Ventricular Septal Defect with Multi-Detector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingzhe; Li, Hongyin; Liu, Zhibo; Wu, Qingyu; Xu, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) with cardiac catheterization and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) in comprehensive evaluation of the global cardiovascular anatomy in patients with pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect (PA-VSD). Methods The clinical and imaging data of 116 patients with PA-VSD confirmed by surgery were reviewed. Using findings at surgery as the reference standard, data from MDCT, TTE and catheterization were reviewed for assessment of native pulmonary vasculature and intracardiac defects. Results MDCT was more accurate than catheterization and TTE in identification of native pulmonary arteries. MDCT is also the most accurate test for delineation of the major aortopulmonary collateral arteries. The inter-modality agreement for evaluation of overriding aorta and VSD were both excellent. In the subgroup with surgical correlation, excellent agreement was found between TTE and surgery, and substantial agreement was also found at MDCT. Conclusion MDCT can correctly delineate the native pulmonary vasculatures and intracardiac defects and may be a reliable method for noninvasive assessment of global cardiovascular abnormalities in patients with PA-VSD. PMID:26741649

  11. Synthetic streams in a gravitational wave inspiral search with a multidetector network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haris, K.; Pai, Archana

    2014-07-01

    A gravitational wave inspiral search with a global network of interferometers when carried in a phase coherent fashion mimics a search with two effective synthetic data streams. The streams are constructed by the linear combination of the overwhitened data from individual detectors. We demonstrate here that the two synthetic data streams pertaining to the two polarizations of the gravitational wave can be derived prior to the maximum-likelihood analysis in a most natural way using the technique of singular-value decomposition applied to the network signal-to-noise ratio vector. The singular-value technique combined with the matched filtering in network plus spectral space enables the construction of the synthetic streams. We further show that the network log likelihood ratio is then the sum of the log-likelihood ratios of these synthetic streams. In this formalism, the four extrinsic parameters of the nonspinning inspiral signal, namely, amplitude, initial phase, binary inclination, and the polarization {A0,ϕa,ɛ ,Ψ}, are mapped to the two amplitudes and two phases, namely, {ρL,ρR,ΦL,ΦR}. We show that the maximization over the new extrinsic parameters is a straightforward exercise closely linked to the single detector approach in the literature. Toward the end, we connect all the previous works related to the multidetector gravitational wave inspiral search and present in the same notation.

  12. Multidetector computed tomography findings and correlations with proteinuria in nutcracker syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cho, Byoung Soo; Suh, Jin Soon; Hahn, Won Ho; Kim, Sung Do; Lim, Joo Won

    2010-03-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) as a diagnostic tool for nutcracker syndrome (NS) and its association with proteinuria. The angle and distance between the aorta and the superior mesenteric artery (SMA), the degree of difference in corticomedullary enhancement (DCE) between kidneys in the nephrographic phase of computed tomography, peak velocity ratio (PVR), and anteroposterior diameter ratio (APDR) in the sonogram were measured. The MDCT results, sonogram results, and the ratio of protein:creatinine were significantly different between NS patients and the controls. The area under the curve for angle, distance, and DCE were 0.895 +/- 0.058, 0.876 +/- 0.063, and 0.942 +/- 0.036, respectively. The cutoff values for angle and distance had sensitivity and specificity values of 96.2 and 80% for <22.4 degrees and 84.6 and 80% for <4.9 mm, respectively. The DCE had a sensitivity of 88.5% and a specificity of 100% for the positive scores. There were significant correlations between the degree of DCE and the ratio of protein:creatinine (r = 0.337, p = 0.031), and between distance and the ratio of protein:creatinine (r = -0.419, p = 0.006). We conclude that MDCT has diagnostic value for NS in children and that MDCT findings are correlated with proteinuria. PMID:20020159

  13. A Structural and Functional Assessment of the Lung via Multidetector-Row Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Eric A.; Simon, Brett A.; McLennan, Geoffrey

    2006-01-01

    With advances in multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT), it is now possible to image the lung in 10 s or less and accurately extract the lungs, lobes, and airway tree to the fifth- through seventh-generation bronchi and to regionally characterize lung density, texture, ventilation, and perfusion. These methods are now being used to phenotype the lung in health and disease and to gain insights into the etiology of pathologic processes. This article outlines the application of these methodologies with specific emphasis on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We demonstrate the use of our methods for assessing regional ventilation and perfusion and demonstrate early data that show, in a sheep model, a regionally intact hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstrictor (HPV) response with an apparent inhibition of HPV regionally in the presence of inflammation. We present the hypothesis that, in subjects with pulmonary emphysema, one major contributing factor leading to parenchymal destruction is the lack of a regional blunting of HPV when the regional hypoxia is related to regional inflammatory events (bronchiolitis or alveolar flooding). If maintaining adequate blood flow to inflamed lung regions is critical to the nondestructive resolution of inflammatory events, the pathologic condition whereby HPV is sustained in regions of inflammation would likely have its greatest effect in the lung apices where blood flow is already reduced in the upright body posture. PMID:16921136

  14. Determination of Single-Kidney Glomerular Filtration Rate in Human Subjects by Using CT

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Soon Hyo; Saad, Ahmed; Herrmann, Sandra M.; Textor, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To test the hypothesis that computed tomography (CT)–derived measurements of single-kidney glomerular filtration rate (GFR) obtained in human subjects with 64-section CT agree with those obtained with iothalamate clearance, a rigorous reference standard. Materials and Methods The institutional review board approved this HIPAA-compliant study, and written informed consent was obtained. Ninety-six patients (age range, 51–73 years; 46 men, 50 women) with essential (n = 56) or renovascular (n = 40) hypertension were prospectively studied in controlled conditions (involving sodium intake and renin-angiotensin blockade). Single-kidney perfusion, volume, and GFR were measured by using multidetector CT time-attenuation curves and were compared with GFR measured by using iothalamate clearance, as assigned to the right and left kidney according to relative volumes. The reproducibility of CT GFR over a 3-month period (n = 21) was assessed in patients with renal artery stenosis who were undergoing stable medical treatment. Statistical analysis included the t test, Wilcoxon signed rank test, linear regression, and Bland-Altman analysis. Results CT GFR values were similar to those of iothalamate clearance (mean ± standard deviation, 38.2 mL/min ± 18 vs 41.6 mL/min ± 17; P = .062). Stenotic kidney CT GFR in patients with renal artery stenosis was lower than contralateral kidney GFR or essential hypertension single-kidney GFR (mean, 23.1 mL/min ± 13 vs 36.9 mL/min ± 17 [P = .0008] and 45.2 mL/min ± 16 [P = .019], respectively), as was iothalamate clearance (mean, 26.9 mL/min ± 14 vs 38.5 mL/min ± 15 [P = .0004] and 49.0 mL/min ± 14 [P = .001], respectively). CT GFR correlated well with iothalamate GFR (linear regression, CT GFR = 0.88*iothalamate GFR, r2 = 0.89, P < .0001), and Bland-Altman analysis was used to confirm the agreement. CT GFR was also moderately reproducible in medically treated patients with renal artery stenosis (concordance coefficient

  15. Use of Computed Tomography – Digital Subtraction Angiography in differentiating pulmonary thrombosis and pulmonary artery dissection in a large pulmonary artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Hashrul N.Z.; Lim, Andy K.; Lau, Kenneth K.

    2016-01-01

    70 year-old female with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) presented with typical symptoms of an exacerbation of COPD. Management of COPD resolved her wheezing, but ongoing hypoxia and retrospective history of atypical chest pain prompted exclusion of a pulmonary embolus. A CT Pulmonary Angiogram (CTPA) with standard 64-slice CT revealed an extensive non-occlusive defect in a grossly dilated right pulmonary artery. Presence of circumferential cuff of soft tissue within sub-segmental pulmonary artery branch raised the possibility of pulmonary artery dissection (PAD). Exclusion of PAD was important as it precluded full anticoagulation. A dynamic CT-digital subtraction angiography (CT-DSA) with the 320-slice multidetector CT (Aquilion-one Vision, Toshiba) did not reveal any intimal flap or contrast extension into the pulmonary arterial wall, suggesting it is unlikely to be PAD. The patient was started on full anticoagulation and reported improvement of symptoms with reduction in pulmonary thrombus burden on repeat CTPA at 4 weeks. To our knowledge, this is the first reported use of dynamic CT-DSA in ruling out PAD. PMID:27144113

  16. Use of Computed Tomography - Digital Subtraction Angiography in differentiating pulmonary thrombosis and pulmonary artery dissection in a large pulmonary artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Hashrul N Z; Lim, Andy K; Lau, Kenneth K

    2016-01-01

    70 year-old female with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) presented with typical symptoms of an exacerbation of COPD. Management of COPD resolved her wheezing, but ongoing hypoxia and retrospective history of atypical chest pain prompted exclusion of a pulmonary embolus. A CT Pulmonary Angiogram (CTPA) with standard 64-slice CT revealed an extensive non-occlusive defect in a grossly dilated right pulmonary artery. Presence of circumferential cuff of soft tissue within sub-segmental pulmonary artery branch raised the possibility of pulmonary artery dissection (PAD). Exclusion of PAD was important as it precluded full anticoagulation. A dynamic CT-digital subtraction angiography (CT-DSA) with the 320-slice multidetector CT (Aquilion-one Vision, Toshiba) did not reveal any intimal flap or contrast extension into the pulmonary arterial wall, suggesting it is unlikely to be PAD. The patient was started on full anticoagulation and reported improvement of symptoms with reduction in pulmonary thrombus burden on repeat CTPA at 4 weeks. To our knowledge, this is the first reported use of dynamic CT-DSA in ruling out PAD. PMID:27144113

  17. CT liver volumetry using geodesic active contour segmentation with a level-set algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kenji; Epstein, Mark L.; Kohlbrenner, Ryan; Obajuluwa, Ademola; Xu, Jianwu; Hori, Masatoshi; Baron, Richard

    2010-03-01

    Automatic liver segmentation on CT images is challenging because the liver often abuts other organs of a similar density. Our purpose was to develop an accurate automated liver segmentation scheme for measuring liver volumes. We developed an automated volumetry scheme for the liver in CT based on a 5 step schema. First, an anisotropic smoothing filter was applied to portal-venous phase CT images to remove noise while preserving the liver structure, followed by an edge enhancer to enhance the liver boundary. By using the boundary-enhanced image as a speed function, a fastmarching algorithm generated an initial surface that roughly estimated the liver shape. A geodesic-active-contour segmentation algorithm coupled with level-set contour-evolution refined the initial surface so as to more precisely fit the liver boundary. The liver volume was calculated based on the refined liver surface. Hepatic CT scans of eighteen prospective liver donors were obtained under a liver transplant protocol with a multi-detector CT system. Automated liver volumes obtained were compared with those manually traced by a radiologist, used as "gold standard." The mean liver volume obtained with our scheme was 1,520 cc, whereas the mean manual volume was 1,486 cc, with the mean absolute difference of 104 cc (7.0%). CT liver volumetrics based on an automated scheme agreed excellently with "goldstandard" manual volumetrics (intra-class correlation coefficient was 0.95) with no statistically significant difference (p(F<=f)=0.32), and required substantially less completion time. Our automated scheme provides an efficient and accurate way of measuring liver volumes.

  18. Spiral CT: vascular applications.

    PubMed

    Rankin, S C

    1998-08-01

    Recent technical advances in CT have renewed interest in the development of CT angiography (CTA). CT angiography is a minimally invasive method of visualising the vascular system and is becoming an alternative to conventional arteriography in some situations. Spiral technology allows a volume of data to be obtained on a single breath-hold with no respiratory misregistration. Fast machines with second or subsecond acquisition times mean the images are obtained while there are high circulating levels of contrast medium giving peak vascular opacification from a peripheral intravenous injection. Accurate timing will ensure either the arterial or venous phase is imaged. Multiple overlapping axial images can be obtained from the data set with no increase in radiation dose to the patient and from these scans computer generated multiplanar and 3D images are obtained which can be viewed from numerous angles. CT angiography can be performed more quickly, less invasively and at reduced cost compared to conventional angiography. PMID:9717621

  19. Pediatric CT Scans

    Cancer.gov

    The Radiation Epidemiology Branch and collaborators have initiated a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the relationship between radiation exposure from CT scans conducted during childhood and adolescence and the subsequent development of cancer.

  20. Thoracic spine CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... that slides into the center of the CT scanner. Once you are inside the scanner, the machine's x-ray beam rotates around you. (Modern "spiral" scanners can perform the exam without stopping.) A computer ...

  1. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... that slides into the center of the CT scanner. While inside the scanner, the machine's x-ray beam rotates around you. ... breathing during the test, you should notify the scanner operator immediately. Scanners come with an intercom and ...

  2. Arm CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - arm; Computed axial tomography scan - arm; Computed tomography scan - arm; CT scan - arm ... Mosby; 2013:chap 57. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  3. Leg CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - leg; Computed axial tomography scan - leg; Computed tomography scan - leg; CT scan - leg ... Saunders; 2012:chap 11. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  4. Shoulder CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - shoulder; Computed axial tomography scan - shoulder; Computed tomography scan - shoulder; CT scan - shoulder ... Mosby; 2012:chap 57. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  5. Lumbar spine CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - lumbar spine; Computed axial tomography scan - lumbar spine; Computed tomography scan - lumbar spine; CT - lower back ... stopping.) A computer creates separate images of the spine area, called slices. These images can be stored, ...

  6. Chest CT Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... pictures to create a very detailed, three-dimensional (3D) model of organs. Sometimes, a substance called contrast dye is injected into a vein in your arm for the CT scan. This substance highlights areas in your chest, which ...

  7. CT Colonography (Virtual Colonoscopy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... into the colon using a hand-held squeeze bulb. Sometimes an electronic pump is used to deliver ... When you enter the CT scanner room, special light lines may be seen projected onto your body, ...

  8. CT Angiography (CTA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CT Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Angiography uses one of three imaging technologies and, in most cases, a contrast material injection ...

  9. Multidetector computed tomography angiography of the celiac trunk and hepatic arterial system: normal anatomy and main variants *

    PubMed Central

    Araujo Neto, Severino Aires; de Mello Júnior, Carlos Fernando; Franca, Henrique Almeida; Duarte, Cláudia Martina Araújo; Borges, Rafael Farias; de Magalhães, Ana Guardiana Ximenes

    2016-01-01

    Although digital angiography remains as the gold standard for imaging the celiac arterial trunk and hepatic arteries, multidetector computed tomography in association with digital images processing by software resources represents a useful tool particularly attractive for its non invasiveness. Knowledge of normal anatomy as well as of its variations is helpful in images interpretation and to address surgical planning on a case-by-case basis. The present essay illustrates several types of anatomical variations of celiac trunk, hepatic artery and its main branches, by means of digitally reconstructed computed tomography images, correlating their prevalence in the population with surgical implications. PMID:26929461

  10. Incidental finding of a papillary fibroelastoma on the aortic valve in 16 slice multi-detector row computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Bootsveld, A; Puetz, J; Grube, E

    2004-06-01

    Papillary fibroelastoma (PFE) is a benign, rare, gelatinous tumour derived from the endocardium, primarily the cardiac valves, which is usually diagnosed by high resolution echocardiography. Although rarely clinically symptomatic, PFEs have a potential for coronary ischaemia, systemic embolisation with neurologic symptoms, and sometimes valvar dysfunction. There are reports of coronary occlusion and even sudden cardiac death due to a ball valve phenomenon on the coronary ostia. This report describes the characteristics of a PFE with multidetector 16 slice computed tomography and 1.5 Tesla cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:15145899

  11. Multidetector computed tomography in the evaluation of pediatric acute abdominal pain in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Ching; Lin, Chien-Heng

    2016-06-01

    The accurate diagnosis of pediatric acute abdominal pain is one of the most challenging tasks in the emergency department (ED) due to its unclear clinical presentation and non-specific findings in physical examinations, laboratory data, and plain radiographs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of abdominal multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) performed in the ED on pediatric patients presenting with acute abdominal pain. A retrospective chart review of children aged <18 years with acute abdominal pain who visited the emergency department and underwent MDCT between September 2004 and June 2007 was conducted. Patients with a history of trauma were excluded. A total of 156 patients with acute abdominal pain (85 males and 71 females, age 1-17 years; mean age 10.9 ± 4.6 years) who underwent abdominal MDCT in the pediatric ED during this 3-year period were enrolled in the study. One hundred and eighteen patients with suspected appendicitis underwent abdominal MDCT. Sixty four (54.2%) of them had appendicitis, which was proven by histopathology. The sensitivity of abdominal MDCT for appendicitis was found to be 98.5% and the specificity was 84.9%. In this study, the other two common causes of nontraumatic abdominal emergencies were gastrointestinal tract (GI) infections and ovarian cysts. The most common etiology of abdominal pain in children that requires imaging with abdominal MDCT is appendicitis. MDCT has become a preferred and invaluable imaging modality in evaluating uncertain cases of pediatric acute abdominal pain in ED, in particular for suspected appendicitis, neoplasms, and gastrointestinal abnormalities. PMID:27154197

  12. Multidetector Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation of Craniovertebral junction Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Dhadve, Rajshree U.; Garge, Shaileshkumar S.; Vyas, Pooja D.; Thakker, Nirav R.; Shah, Sonali H.; Jaggi, Sunila T.; Talwar, Inder A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Craniovertebral junction (CVJ) abnormalities constitute an important group of treatable neurological disorders with diagnostic dilemma. Their precise diagnosis, identification of probable etiology, and pretreatment evaluation significantly affects prognosis and quality of life of patients. Aims: The study was to classify various craniovertebral junction disorders according to their etiology and to define the importance of precise diagnosis for pretreatment evaluation with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods: This is a prospective observational study of 62 patients referred to our department between October 2012 and September 2014. All patients suspected to have a craniovertebral junction disorder were included in the study, from all age groups and both genders. Detailed clinical history was taken. Radiographs of cervical spine were collected if available. All patients were subjected to MDCT and/or MRI. Results: In our study of 62 patients; 39 were males and 23 were females, with male to female ratio of 1.6:1. Most common age group was 2nd -3rd decade (19 patients, 30.64%). Developmental anomalies (33 patients, 53.22%) were the most common etiology group followed by traumatic (10 patients, 16.12%), degenerative (eight patients, 12.90%), infective (four patients, 6.45%), inflammatory and neoplastic (three patients each, 4.8%), and no cause found in one patient. Conclusions: CVJ abnormalities constitute an important group of treatable neurological disorders, especially in certain ethnic groups and are approached with much caution by clinicians. Thus, it is essential that radiologists should be able to make a precise diagnosis of craniovertebral junction abnormalities, classify them into etiological group, and rule out important mimickers on MDCT and/or MRI, as this information ultimately helps determine the management of such abnormalities, prognosis, and quality of life of patients. PMID

  13. Multidetector computed tomography features of pancreatic metastases from leiomyosarcoma: Experience at a tertiary cancer center

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Chong Hyun; Keraliya, Abhishek; Shinagare, Atul B; Kim, Kyung Won; Ramaiya, Nikhil H; Tirumani, Sree Harsha

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To describe the multidetector computed tomography features of pancreatic metastasis from leiomyosarcoma (LMS). METHODS: Between January 1995 and December 2012, 13 consecutive patients (11 women, 2 men; mean age of 57 years; range, 38-78 years) with pancreatic metastases from LMS were included in our study. Imaging features including location, number, largest dimension, tumor attenuation and enhancement characteristics, presence of necrosis, pancreatic ductal dilatation, common bile duct (CBD) dilatation, presence of pancreatitis, and atrophy were documented. RESULTS: The most common site of origin of the pancreatic metastases from LMS was uterus (38.5%), followed by retroperitoneum (30.8%) and extremity (23.1%). None of the patients in our study had pancreas as the first site of metastasis. All patients developed pancreatic metastases at a median interval of 24 mo. Pancreatic metastases from LMS were solitary in 8/13 patients and multiple in 5/13 patients, had no predilection for any part of the pancreas, were hypovascular on arterial phase in 10/13 patients and associated with pancreatic duct dilatation in 3/13 patients. None had CBD dilatation. None of the pancreatic metastases in LMS cohort caused pancreatitis, and atrophy. Median duration of follow-up was 19 mo for LMS cohort during which two patients underwent resection of metastasis (median survival 45 mo) while the remaining underwent systemic therapy (median survival 13 mo). CONCLUSION: Pancreatic metastases from LMS are often solitary and hypovascular masses and less commonly associated with pancreatic ductal dilatation, CBD dilatation, pancreatitis or pancreatic atrophy. Surgical resection of solitary LMS pancreatic metastasis can be considered due to the long survival of these patients. PMID:27027985

  14. Statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in clinical CT systems. Part II. Experimental assessment of spatial resolution performance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Garrett, John; Ge, Yongshuai; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) methods have been introduced to clinical CT systems and are being used in some clinical diagnostic applications. The purpose of this paper is to experimentally assess the unique spatial resolution characteristics of this nonlinear reconstruction method and identify its potential impact on the detectabilities and the associated radiation dose levels for specific imaging tasks. Methods: The thoracic section of a pediatric phantom was repeatedly scanned 50 or 100 times using a 64-slice clinical CT scanner at four different dose levels [CTDIvol =4, 8, 12, 16 (mGy)]. Both filtered backprojection (FBP) and MBIR (Veo®, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) were used for image reconstruction and results were compared with one another. Eight test objects in the phantom with contrast levels ranging from 13 to 1710 HU were used to assess spatial resolution. The axial spatial resolution was quantified with the point spread function (PSF), while the z resolution was quantified with the slice sensitivity profile. Both were measured locally on the test objects and in the image domain. The dependence of spatial resolution on contrast and dose levels was studied. The study also features a systematic investigation of the potential trade-off between spatial resolution and locally defined noise and their joint impact on the overall image quality, which was quantified by the image domain-based channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) detectability index d′. Results: (1) The axial spatial resolution of MBIR depends on both radiation dose level and image contrast level, whereas it is supposedly independent of these two factors in FBP. The axial spatial resolution of MBIR always improved with an increasing radiation dose level and/or contrast level. (2) The axial spatial resolution of MBIR became equivalent to that of FBP at some transitional contrast level, above which MBIR demonstrated superior spatial resolution than FBP (and vice

  15. Statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in clinical CT systems. Part II. Experimental assessment of spatial resolution performance

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong; Garrett, John; Ge, Yongshuai

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) methods have been introduced to clinical CT systems and are being used in some clinical diagnostic applications. The purpose of this paper is to experimentally assess the unique spatial resolution characteristics of this nonlinear reconstruction method and identify its potential impact on the detectabilities and the associated radiation dose levels for specific imaging tasks. Methods: The thoracic section of a pediatric phantom was repeatedly scanned 50 or 100 times using a 64-slice clinical CT scanner at four different dose levels [CTDI{sub vol} =4, 8, 12, 16 (mGy)]. Both filtered backprojection (FBP) and MBIR (Veo{sup ®}, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) were used for image reconstruction and results were compared with one another. Eight test objects in the phantom with contrast levels ranging from 13 to 1710 HU were used to assess spatial resolution. The axial spatial resolution was quantified with the point spread function (PSF), while the z resolution was quantified with the slice sensitivity profile. Both were measured locally on the test objects and in the image domain. The dependence of spatial resolution on contrast and dose levels was studied. The study also features a systematic investigation of the potential trade-off between spatial resolution and locally defined noise and their joint impact on the overall image quality, which was quantified by the image domain-based channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) detectability index d′. Results: (1) The axial spatial resolution of MBIR depends on both radiation dose level and image contrast level, whereas it is supposedly independent of these two factors in FBP. The axial spatial resolution of MBIR always improved with an increasing radiation dose level and/or contrast level. (2) The axial spatial resolution of MBIR became equivalent to that of FBP at some transitional contrast level, above which MBIR demonstrated superior spatial resolution than

  16. Relevant incidental findings at abdominal multi-detector contrast-enhanced computed tomography: A collateral screening?

    PubMed Central

    Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Mauri, Giovanni; Muzzupappa, Claudia; Poloni, Alessandro; Bandirali, Michele; Esseridou, Anastassia; Tritella, Stefania; Secchi, Francesco; Di Leo, Giovanni; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence of relevant incidental findings (RIFs) detected during routine abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CeCT). METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated the reports of a consecutive series of abdominal CeCT studies performed between January and May 2013. For each report, patients’ age and sex, admission as inpatient or outpatient, clinical suspicion as indicated by the requesting physician, availability of a previous abdominal examination, and name of the reporting radiologist were recorded. Based on the clinical suspicion, the presence and features of any RIFs (if needing additional workup) was noted. RESULTS: One thousand forty abdominal CeCT were performed in 949 patients (528 males, mean age 66 ± 14 years). No significant difference was found between inpatients and outpatients age and sex distribution (P > 0.472). RIFs were found in 195/1040 (18.8%) CeCT [inpatients = 108/470 (23.0%); outpatients = 87/570 (15.2%); P = 0.002]. RIFs were found in 30/440 (6.8%) CeCT with a previous exam and in 165/600 (27.5%) without a previous exam (P < 0.001). Radiologists’ distribution between inpatients or outpatients was significantly different (P < 0.001). RIFs prevalence increased with aging, except for a peak in 40-49 year group. Most involved organs were kidneys, gallbladder, and lungs. CONCLUSION: A RIF is detected in 1/5 patients undergoing abdominal CeCT. Risk of overdiagnosis should be taken into account. PMID:26516432

  17. Construction of a multimodal CT-video chest model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrnes, Patrick D.; Higgins, William E.

    2014-03-01

    Bronchoscopy enables a number of minimally invasive chest procedures for diseases such as lung cancer and asthma. For example, using the bronchoscope's continuous video stream as a guide, a physician can navigate through the lung airways to examine general airway health, collect tissue samples, or administer a disease treatment. In addition, physicians can now use new image-guided intervention (IGI) systems, which draw upon both three-dimensional (3D) multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) chest scans and bronchoscopic video, to assist with bronchoscope navigation. Unfortunately, little use is made of the acquired video stream, a potentially invaluable source of information. In addition, little effort has been made to link the bronchoscopic video stream to the detailed anatomical information given by a patient's 3D MDCT chest scan. We propose a method for constructing a multimodal CT-video model of the chest. After automatically computing a patient's 3D MDCT-based airway-tree model, the method next parses the available video data to generate a positional linkage between a sparse set of key video frames and airway path locations. Next, a fusion/mapping of the video's color mucosal information and MDCT-based endoluminal surfaces is performed. This results in the final multimodal CT-video chest model. The data structure constituting the model provides a history of those airway locations visited during bronchoscopy. It also provides for quick visual access to relevant sections of the airway wall by condensing large portions of endoscopic video into representative frames containing important structural and textural information. When examined with a set of interactive visualization tools, the resulting fused data structure provides a rich multimodal data source. We demonstrate the potential of the multimodal model with both phantom and human data.

  18. Automated coronary CT angiography plaque-lumen segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, Harvey E.; Krishnan, Karthik; Napel, Sandy; Rubin, Geoffrey D.; Turner, Wesley D.; Avila, Ricardo S.

    2009-02-01

    We are investigating the feasibility of a computer-aided detection (CAD) system to assist radiologists in diagnosing coronary artery disease in ECG gated cardiac multi-detector CT scans having calcified plaque. Coronary artery stenosis analysis is challenging if calcified plaque or the iodinated blood pool hides viable lumen. The research described herein provides an improved presentation to the radiologist by removing obscuring calcified plaque and blood pool. The algorithm derives a Gaussian estimate of the point spread function (PSF) of the scanner responsible for plaque blooming by fitting measured CTA image profiles. An initial estimate of the extent of calcified plaque is obtained from the image evidence using a simple threshold. The Gaussian PSF estimate is then convolved with the initial plaque estimate to obtain an estimate of the extent of the blooming artifact and this plaque blooming image is subtracted from the CT image to obtain an image largely free of obscuring plaque. In a separate step, the obscuring blood pool is suppressed using morphological operations and adaptive region growing. After processing by our algorithm, we are able to project the segmented plaque-free lumen to form synthetic angiograms free from obstruction. We can also analyze the coronary arteries with vessel tracking and centerline extraction to produce cross sectional images for measuring lumen stenosis. As an additional aid to radiologists, we also produce plots of calcified plaque and lumen cross-sectional area along selected blood vessels. The method was validated using digital phantoms and actual patient data, including in one case, a validation against the results of a catheter angiogram.

  19. Accessible or Inaccessible? Diagnostic Efficacy of CT-Guided Core Biopsies of Head and Neck Masses

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, Jane D. McCusker, Mark W.; Power, Sarah; PearlyTi, Joanna; Thornton, John; Brennan, Paul; Lee, Michael J.; O’Hare, Alan; Looby, Seamus

    2015-04-15

    PurposeTissue sampling of lesions in the head and neck is challenging due to complex regional anatomy and sometimes necessitates open surgical biopsy. However, many patients are poor surgical candidates due to comorbidity. Thus, we evaluated the use of CT guidance for establishing histopathological diagnosis of head and neck masses.MethodsAll consecutive patients (n = 22) who underwent CT-guided core biopsy of head or neck masses between April 2009 and August 2012 were retrospectively reviewed using the departmental CT interventional procedures database. The indication for each biopsy performed was to establish or exclude a diagnosis of neoplasia in patients with suspicious head or neck lesions found on clinical examination or imaging studies. Patients received conscious sedation and 18 G, semiautomated core needle biopsies were performed by experienced neuroradiologists using 16-slice multidetector row CT imaging guidance (Somatom Definition Siemens Medical Solutions, Germany). Histopathology results of each biopsy were analysed.ResultsSixteen of 22 biopsies that were performed (73 %) yielded a pathological diagnosis. Anatomic locations biopsied included: masticator (n = 7), parapharyngeal (n = 3), parotid (n = 3), carotid (n = 3), perivertebral (n = 3), pharyngeal (n = 2), and retropharyngeal (n = 1) spaces. Six biopsies (27 %) were nondiagnostic due to inadequate tissue sampling, particularly small biopsy sample size and failure to biopsy the true sampling site due to extensive necrosis. No major complications were encountered.ConclusionsThe use of CT guidance to perform core biopsies of head and neck masses is an effective means of establishing histopathological diagnosis and reduces the need for diagnostic open surgical biopsy and general anaesthesia.

  20. Role of (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1).

    PubMed

    Lastoria, Secondo; Marciello, Francesca; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Aloj, Luigi; Caracò, Corradina; Aurilio, Michela; D'Ambrosio, Laura; Di Gennaro, Francesca; Ramundo, Valeria; Camera, Luigi; De Luca, Leonardo; Fonti, Rosa; Napolitano, Vincenzo; Colao, Annamaria

    2016-06-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is a hereditary syndrome predisposing to many endocrine and neuroendocrine tumors (NET). Conventional imaging (CI) cannot provide satisfactory results for all the different types of MEN1-related tumors. Objective of this prospective observational study was to evaluate the role of (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT in MEN1 compared to CI. Diagnostic performance of (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT for the detection of NET was evaluated as well as the prognostic role of SUVmax. Eighteen patients with genetically confirmed MEN1 were evaluated by (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT, endoscopic ultrasounds, multidetector-row computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and hormone/markers serum measurements. Four MEN1-related tumor sites (pancreas, pituitary, parathyroids, adrenals) were considered. Sensitivity and specificity of (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT for the detection of NET were calculated. There was (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT uptake in 11/11 patients with pancreatic lesions, in 9/12 with pituitary adenoma, in 5/15 with parathyroid enlargements, and in 5/7 with adrenal lesions. (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT showed sensitivity and specificity of 100 and 100 % in pancreas, 75 and 83 % in pituitary, 28 and 100 % in parathyroids, and 62.5 and 100 % in adrenals, respectively. Compared with CI, no significant difference in sensitivity for pancreas, pituitary, and adrenals was found, while CI had a better sensitivity for parathyroids (p = 0.002). On the ROC analysis, progression of pancreatic lesions was significantly associated to SUVmax <12.3 (p < 0.05). (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT is greatly helpful in the work-up of MEN1 providing a panoramic view of MEN1-related lesions. There is also a prognostic role of (68)Ga-PET in patients with MEN1-pancreatic lesions. PMID:26242621

  1. Patient- and cohort-specific dose and risk estimation for abdominopelvic CT: a study based on 100 patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Frush, Donald P.; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this work was twofold: (a) to estimate patient- and cohort-specific radiation dose and cancer risk index for abdominopelvic computer tomography (CT) scans; (b) to evaluate the effects of patient anatomical characteristics (size, age, and gender) and CT scanner model on dose and risk conversion coefficients. The study included 100 patient models (42 pediatric models, 58 adult models) and multi-detector array CT scanners from two commercial manufacturers (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare; SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare). A previously-validated Monte Carlo program was used to simulate organ dose for each patient model and each scanner, from which DLP-normalized-effective dose (k factor) and DLP-normalized-risk index values (q factor) were derived. The k factor showed exponential decrease with increasing patient size. For a given gender, q factor showed exponential decrease with both increasing patient size and patient age. The discrepancies in k and q factors across scanners were on average 8% and 15%, respectively. This study demonstrates the feasibility of estimating patient-specific organ dose and cohort-specific effective dose and risk index in abdominopelvic CT requiring only the knowledge of patient size, gender, and age.

  2. Clinical Structural Anatomy of the Inferior Pyramidal Space Reconstructed Within the Cardiac Contour Using Multidetector-Row Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Mori, Shumpei; Fukuzawa, Koji; Takaya, Tomofumi; Takamine, Sachiko; Ito, Tatsuro; Fujiwara, Sei; Nishii, Tatsuya; Kono, Atsushi K; Yoshida, Akihiro; Hirata, Ken-Ichi

    2015-07-01

    Although many studies have described the detailed anatomy of the inferior pyramidal space, it may not be easy for cardiologists who have few chances to study cadaveric hearts to understand the correct morphology of the structure. The inferior pyramidal space is the part of extracardiac fibro-adipose tissue wedging between the 4 cardiac chambers from the diaphragmatic surface of the heart. Many cardiologists have interests in pericardial adipose tissue, but the inferior pyramidal space seems to have been neglected. A number of important structures, including the coronary sinus, atrioventricular node, atrioventricular nodal artery, membranous septum, muscular atrioventricular sandwich (previously called the "muscular atrioventricular septum"), atrial septum, ventricular septum, aortic valvar complex, mitral valvar attachment, and tricuspid valvar attachment are associated with the inferior pyramidal space. We previously revealed its 3-dimensional live anatomy using multidetector-row computed tomography. Moreover, the 3-dimensional understanding of the anatomy in association with the cardiac contour is important from the viewpoints of clinical cardiac electrophysiology. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate extended findings regarding the clinical structural anatomy of the inferior pyramidal space, which was reconstructed in combination with the cardiac contour using multidetector-row computed tomography, and discuss the clinical implications of the findings. PMID:25884276

  3. Criteria for establishing shielding of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) rooms.

    PubMed

    Verdun, F R; Aroua, A; Baechler, S; Schmidt, S; Trueb, P R; Bochud, F O

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to compare two methods used for determining the proper shielding of computed tomography (CT) rooms while considering recent technological advances in CT scanners. The approaches of the German Institute for Standardisation and the US National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements were compared and a series of radiation measurements were performed in several CT rooms at the Lausanne University Hospital. The following three-step procedure is proposed for assuring sufficient shielding of rooms hosting new CT units with spiral mode acquisition and various X-ray beam collimation widths: (1) calculate the ambient equivalent dose for a representative average weekly dose length product at the position where shielding is required; (2) from the maximum permissible weekly dose at the location of interest, calculate the transmission factor F that must be taken to ensure proper shielding and (3) convert the transmission factor into a thickness of lead shielding. A similar approach could be adopted to use when designing shielding for fluoroscopy rooms, where the basic quantity would be the dose area product instead of the load of current (milliampere-minute). PMID:20215444

  4. Sex estimation based on scapula analysis in a Japanese population using multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Torimitsu, Suguru; Makino, Yohsuke; Saitoh, Hisako; Sakuma, Ayaka; Ishii, Namiko; Yajima, Daisuke; Inokuchi, Go; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Yamaguchi, Rutsuko; Hashimoto, Mari; Hoshioka, Yumi; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2016-05-01

    Accurate sex estimation based on measurements of dimorphic dimensions in human unknown remains is important as the first step toward making individual identification. The purpose of this study was to assess the sexual dimorphism of the scapula and to quantify the accuracy of sex estimation in a contemporary Japanese forensic sample using scapular measurements based on three-dimensional (3D) computed tomographic (CT) images. A total of 218 cadavers (109 males, 109 females) that underwent postmortem CT and subsequent forensic autopsy were used. Ten scapular measurements were performed on 3D CT reconstructed images that extracted only bone data, and were analyzed using descriptive statistics and discriminant function analyses (DFA). All measurements were dimorphic in terms of sex differences. Univariate DFA provided sex classification accuracy rates of 75.7-91.3%. Stepwise DFA yielded sex prediction accuracy rates of 93.1-94.5%. In conclusion, the scapular measurements using 3D CT images of a contemporary Japanese population may be useful for the estimation of skeletal sex in the field of forensic anthropology. PMID:26965402

  5. Comparison between MDCT and Grayscale IVUS in a Quantitative Analysis of Coronary Lumen in Segments with or without Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Falcão, João L. A. A.; Falcão, Breno A. A.; Gurudevan, Swaminatha V.; Campos, Carlos M.; Silva, Expedito R.; Kalil-Filho, Roberto; Rochitte, Carlos E.; Shiozaki, Afonso A.; Coelho-Filho, Otavio R.; Lemos, Pedro A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The diagnostic accuracy of 64-slice MDCT in comparison with IVUS has been poorly described and is mainly restricted to reports analyzing segments with documented atherosclerotic plaques. Objectives We compared 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) with gray scale intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) for the evaluation of coronary lumen dimensions in the context of a comprehensive analysis, including segments with absent or mild disease. Methods The 64-slice MDCT was performed within 72 h before the IVUS imaging, which was obtained for at least one coronary, regardless of the presence of luminal stenosis at angiography. A total of 21 patients were included, with 70 imaged vessels (total length 114.6 ± 38.3 mm per patient). A coronary plaque was diagnosed in segments with plaque burden > 40%. Results At patient, vessel, and segment levels, average lumen area, minimal lumen area, and minimal lumen diameter were highly correlated between IVUS and 64-slice MDCT (p < 0.01). However, 64-slice MDCT tended to underestimate the lumen size with a relatively wide dispersion of the differences. The comparison between 64-slice MDCT and IVUS lumen measurements was not substantially affected by the presence or absence of an underlying plaque. In addition, 64-slice MDCT showed good global accuracy for the detection of IVUS parameters associated with flow-limiting lesions. Conclusions In a comprehensive, multi-territory, and whole-artery analysis, the assessment of coronary lumen by 64-slice MDCT compared with coronary IVUS showed a good overall diagnostic ability, regardless of the presence or absence of underlying atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:25993595

  6. Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography (Virtual ... to allow for inflation with air while CT images are being taken. If you’re scheduled for ...

  7. Pelvic CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... that slides into the center of the CT scanner. Once you are inside the scanner, the machine's x-ray beam rotates around you. ... weight limit. Too much weight can damage the scanner's working parts. You will be asked to remove ...

  8. Diagnosis of Variants of Single Right Coronary Trunk Using 64 Multidetector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Ashley E.; Saremi, Farhood

    2008-01-01

    Single coronary anomalies are one of the rarest variants of coronary anatomy. Widespread use of coronary CT angiography has made it possible to diagnose these variants with increasing incidence. We report two cases of single right coronary trunk with different anatomic course of the left coronary artery; one anterior to the main pulmonary artery and the second between the main pulmonary artery and ascending aorta and then coursing within the interventricular septum. PMID:22470606

  9. Distribution of Mitral Annular and Aortic Valve Calcium as Assessed by Unenhanced Multidetector Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Koshkelashvili, Nikoloz; Codolosa, Jose N; Goykhman, Igor; Romero-Corral, Abel; Pressman, Gregg S

    2015-12-15

    Aging is associated with calcium deposits in various cardiovascular structures, but patterns of calcium deposition, if any, are unknown. In search of such patterns, we performed quantitative assessment of mitral annular calcium (MAC) and aortic valve calcium (AVC) in a broad clinical sample. Templates were created from gated computed tomography (CT) scans depicting the aortic valve cusps and mitral annular segments in relation to surrounding structures. These were then applied to CT reconstructions from ungated, clinically indicated CT scans of 318 subjects, aged ≥65 years. Calcium location was assigned using the templates and quantified by the Agatston method. Mean age was 76 ± 7.3 years; 48% were men and 58% were white. Whites had higher prevalence (p = 0.03) and density of AVC than blacks (p = 0.02), and a trend toward increased MAC (p = 0.06). Prevalence of AVC was similar between men and women, but AVC scores were higher in men (p = 0.008); this difference was entirely accounted for by whites. Within the aortic valve, the left cusp was more frequently calcified than the others. MAC was most common in the posterior mitral annulus, especially its middle (P2) segment. For the anterior mitral annulus, the medial (A3) segment calcified most often. In conclusion, AVC is more common in whites than blacks, and more intense in men, but only in whites. Furthermore, calcium deposits in the mitral annulus and aortic valve favor certain locations. PMID:26517948

  10. PET/CT imaging artifacts.

    PubMed

    Sureshbabu, Waheeda; Mawlawi, Osama

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the principles of PET/CT imaging and describe the artifacts associated with it. PET/CT is a new imaging modality that integrates functional (PET) and structural (CT) information into a single scanning session, allowing excellent fusion of the PET and CT images and thus improving lesion localization and interpretation accuracy. Moreover, the CT data can also be used for attenuation correction, ultimately leading to high patient throughput. These combined advantages have rendered PET/CT a preferred imaging modality over dedicated PET. Although PET/CT imaging offers many advantages, this dual-modality imaging also poses some challenges. CT-based attenuation correction can induce artifacts and quantitative errors that can affect the PET emission images. For instance, the use of contrast medium and the presence of metallic implants can be associated with focal radiotracer uptake. Furthermore, the patient's breathing can introduce mismatches between the CT attenuation map and the PET emission data, and the discrepancy between the CT and PET fields of view can lead to truncation artifacts. After reading this article, the technologist should be able to describe the principles of PET/CT imaging, identify at least 3 types of image artifacts, and describe the differences between PET/CT artifacts of different causes: metallic implants, respiratory motion, contrast medium, and truncation. PMID:16145223

  11. Seventh-generation CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besson, G. M.

    2016-03-01

    A new dual-drum CT system architecture has been recently introduced with the potential to achieve significantly higher temporal resolution than is currently possible in medical imaging CT. The concept relies only on known technologies; in particular rotation speeds several times higher than what is possible today could be achieved leveraging typical x-ray tube designs and capabilities. However, the architecture lends itself to the development of a new arrangement of x-ray sources in a toroidal vacuum envelope containing a rotating cathode ring and a (optionally rotating) shared anode ring to potentially obtain increased individual beam power as well as increase total exposure per rotation. The new x-ray source sub-system design builds on previously described concepts and could make the provision of multiple conventional high-power cathodes in a CT system practical by distributing the anode target between the cathodes. In particular, relying on known magnetic-levitation technologies, it is in principle possible to more than double the relative speed of the electron-beam with respect to the target, thus potentially leading to significant individual beam power increases as compared to today's state-of-the-art. In one embodiment, the proposed design can be naturally leveraged by the dual-drum CT concept previously described to alleviate the problem of arranging a number of conventional rotating anode-stem x-ray tubes and power conditioners on the limited space of a CT gantry. In another embodiment, a system with three cathodes is suggested leveraging the architecture previously proposed by Franke.

  12. Evaluation of patient dose using a virtual CT scanner: Applications to 4DCT simulation and Kilovoltage cone-beam imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMarco, J. J.; McNitt-Gray, M. F.; Cagnon, C. H.; Angel, E.; Agazaryan, N.; Zankl, M.

    2008-02-01

    This work evaluates the effects of patient size on radiation dose from simulation imaging studies such as four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT). 4DCT studies are scans that include temporal information, frequently incorporating highly over-sampled imaging series necessary for retrospective sorting as a function of respiratory phase. This type of imaging study can result in a significant dose increase to the patient due to the slower table speed as compared with a conventional axial or helical scan protocol. Kilovoltage cone-beam imaging is a relatively new imaging technique that requires an on-board kilovoltage x-ray tube and a flat-panel detector. Instead of porting individual reference fields, the kV tube and flat-panel detector are rotated about the patient producing a cone-beam CT data set (kV-CBCT). To perform these investigations, we used Monte Carlo simulation methods with detailed models of adult patients and virtual source models of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanners. The GSF family of three-dimensional, voxelized patient models, were implemented as input files using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. The adult patient models represent a range of patient sizes and have all radiosensitive organs previously identified and segmented. Simulated 4DCT scans of each voxelized patient model were performed using a multi-detector CT source model that includes scanner specific spectra, bow-tie filtration, and helical source path. Standard MCNPX tally functions were applied to each model to estimate absolute organ dose based upon an air-kerma normalization measurement for nominal scanner operating parameters.

  13. Pediatric Chest and Abdominopelvic CT: Organ Dose Estimation Based on 42 Patient Models

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Paulson, Erik K.; Frush, Donald P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To estimate organ dose from pediatric chest and abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) examinations and evaluate the dependency of organ dose coefficients on patient size and CT scanner models. Materials and Methods The institutional review board approved this HIPAA–compliant study and did not require informed patient consent. A validated Monte Carlo program was used to perform simulations in 42 pediatric patient models (age range, 0–16 years; weight range, 2–80 kg; 24 boys, 18 girls). Multidetector CT scanners were modeled on those from two commercial manufacturers (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wis; SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany). Organ doses were estimated for each patient model for routine chest and abdominopelvic examinations and were normalized by volume CT dose index (CTDIvol). The relationships between CTDIvol-normalized organ dose coefficients and average patient diameters were evaluated across scanner models. Results For organs within the image coverage, CTDIvol-normalized organ dose coefficients largely showed a strong exponential relationship with the average patient diameter (R2 > 0.9). The average percentage differences between the two scanner models were generally within 10%. For distributed organs and organs on the periphery of or outside the image coverage, the differences were generally larger (average, 3%–32%) mainly because of the effect of overranging. Conclusion It is feasible to estimate patient-specific organ dose for a given examination with the knowledge of patient size and the CTDIvol. These CTDIvol-normalized organ dose coefficients enable one to readily estimate patient-specific organ dose for pediatric patients in clinical settings. This dose information, and, as appropriate, attendant risk estimations, can provide more substantive information for the individual patient for both clinical and research applications and can yield more expansive information on dose profiles

  14. Computer-aided detection of small bowel strictures in CT enterography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainani, Nisha I.; Näppi, Janne J.; Sahani, Dushyant V.; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2011-03-01

    The workflow of CT enterography in an emergency setting could be improved significantly by computer-aided detection (CAD) of small bowel strictures to enable even non-expert radiologists to detect sites of obstruction rapidly. We developed a CAD scheme to detect strictures automatically from abdominal multi-detector CT enterography image data by use of multi-scale template matching and a blob detector method. A pilot study was performed on 15 patients with 22 surgically confirmed strictures to study the effect of the CAD scheme on observer performance. The 77% sensitivity of an inexperienced radiologist assisted by CAD was comparable with the 81% sensitivity of an unaided expert radiologist (p=0.07). The use of CAD reduced the reading time to identify strictures significantly (p<0.0001). Most of the false-positive CAD detections were caused by collapsed bowel loops, approximated bowel wall, muscles, or vessels, and they were easy to dismiss. The results indicate that CAD could provide radiologists with a rapid and accurate interpretation of strictures to improve workflow in an emergency setting.

  15. The role of coronary CT angiography in chronic total occlusion intervention

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Stephen C W; Lim, Michael C L; Chan, Carmen W S

    2010-01-01

    Revascularisation by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in chronic total occlusion (CTO) is often a technically challenging procedure. The manipulation of wires and devices through a CTO during PCI without any means to visually identify vessel-wall boundaries involves an inherent risk of complications such as arterial dissection, perforation and cardiac tamponade. With the tremendous advances in multidetector CT technology and the popularity of utilising coronary CT angiogram (CCTA) for a workup of chest pain patients, an increasing number of CTO cases are being encountered. Therefore, the primary goal of CCTA for imaging in CTOs involves identifying the presence and locations of CTO as well as predicting the potential clinical benefits derived from revascularisation of the occluded segment. The secondary goal includes preprocedural planning to shorten procedure times, visualisation of the procedure in predicting the ease with which a CTO can be crossed and the frequency of procedure-related complications such as contrast nephropathy and radiation skin injury. Apart from these, CCTA also plays a role in postprocedural assessment of the revascularised arterial segments and long-term follow-up on the patency of coronary stents.

  16. Epidemiology and association of vascular and valvular calcium quantified by multidetector computed tomography in elderly asymptomatic subjects.

    PubMed

    Cury, Ricardo C; Ferencik, Maros; Hoffmann, Udo; Ferullo, Ashley; Moselewski, Fabian; Abbara, Suhny; Booth, Sarah L; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Brady, Thomas J; Achenbach, Stephan

    2004-08-01

    The epidemiology of and association between vascular and valvular calcium as quantified by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) were studied in 416 elderly subjects with no history of coronary artery disease. Coronary calcium (CC), descending thoracic aortic calcium (DTAC), aortic valve calcium (AVC), and mitral valve calcium (MVC) were present in 282 (68%), 214 (51%), 152 (37%), and 68 (16%) subjects, respectively. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that after adjusting for age and gender, subjects with AVC (odds ratio [OR] 2.3), MVC (OR 2.81), and DTAC (OR 2.79) were independently and significantly more likely to have CC. Further evidence is provided for the notion that calcifications in those regions are associated and that MDCT can be used as a tool for the global assessment of vascular and valvular calcium. PMID:15276102

  17. Autopsy radiography: digital radiographs (DR) vs multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in high-velocity gunshot-wound victims.

    PubMed

    Harcke, H Theodore; Levy, Angela D; Abbott, Robert M; Mallak, Craig T; Getz, John M; Champion, Howard R; Pearse, Lisa

    2007-03-01

    This study compared full-body digital radiography (DR) with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in the postmortem evaluation of gunshot wound (GSW) victims. Thirteen consecutive male GSW victims (mean age, 27 years) had full-body DR and MDCT prior to routine autopsy. DR successfully identified all metallic fragments, but MDCT was superior in its ability to precisely determine location because it provided 3-dimensional anatomic localization. In all cases, MDCT more accurately assessed organ injuries and wound tracks. Both DR and MDCT are limited in classifying multiple wounds and major vessel injury, but MDCT is generally superior to DR. MDCT shows significant advantages over DR in the forensic evaluation of GSW victims. This is particularly advantageous for the pathologist retrieving metallic fragments and for describing fracture detail accurately. Use of MDCT instead of radiographs will require medical examiners to become familiar with reading cross-sectional images. PMID:17325457

  18. Observational case series: an algorithm incorporating multidetector computed tomography in the medicolegal investigation of human remains after a natural disaster.

    PubMed

    Berran, Philip J; Mazuchowski, Edward L; Marzouk, Abubakr; Harcke, H Theodore

    2014-07-01

    An algorithm incorporating multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), digital radiographs, and external examination was used to triage cases for noninvasive or complete autopsy after a natural disaster. The algorithm was applied to 27 individuals who died during or soon after the earthquake that struck the Republic of Haiti on January 12, 2010. Of the 27 cases reviewed, 7 (26%) required a complete autopsy to determine cause and manner of death. In the remaining 20 (74%), cause and manner of death were determined with a reasonable degree of medical certainty after review of circumstances, an external examination, and postmortem imaging by MDCT and digital radiography (noninvasive autopsy). MDCT was particularly useful in detecting skeletal fractures caused by blunt force injury which were not evident on digital radiographs. The algorithm incorporating postmortem MDCT can be useful in the triage of human remains for autopsy after a natural disaster. PMID:24684535

  19. A Study of Internal Thoracic Arteriovenous Principal Perforators by Using Multi-detector Row Computed Tomography Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Hashikawa, Kazunobu; Sakakibara, Shunsuke; Onishi, Hiroyuki; Terashi, Hiroto

    2016-01-01

    Objective: There are numerous reports of perforating branches from the intercostal spaces of the internal thoracic vessels. These branches have varying diameters, and a main perforating branch, the principal perforator, most often found in the second or third intercostal space. We report different results based on multi-detector row computed tomography. Methods: We evaluated 121 sides from 70 women scheduled for breast reconstruction with free lower abdominal skin flaps who underwent preoperative multi-detector row computed tomographic scan between June 2008 and June 2015. For primary reconstruction, we analyzed both sides, and for 1-sided secondary reconstruction, we analyzed only the unaffected side. We evaluated both early arterial phase and late venous phase 5-mm horizontal, cross-sectional, and volume-rendering images for perforation sites and internal thoracic arteriovenous perforating branches’ intercostal space thickness. We analyzed differences in thickness between the internal thoracic arteries and veins and symmetry in cases involving both sides. Results: Venous principal perforators nearly always perforated the same intercostal spaces as accompanying veins of arterial principal perforators (99.2%), forming arteriovenous principal perforators. We found 49 principal perforators in the first intercostal space (37.4%), 52 in the second intercostal space (39.7%), 23 in the third intercostal space (17.6%), 6 in the fourth intercostal space (4.6%), and 1 in the fifth intercostal space (0.7%). Of the 51 cases in which we studied both sides, 25 cases (49%) had principal perforators with bilateral symmetry. Conclusions: In contrast to findings from past reports, we found that internal thoracic arteriovenous principal perforators were often present in almost the same numbers in the first and second intercostal spaces. PMID:26958104

  20. Concha bullosa: CT evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zinreich, S J; Mattox, D E; Kennedy, D W; Chisholm, H L; Diffley, D M; Rosenbaum, A E

    1988-01-01

    Aeration of the middle turbinate, termed "concha bullosa," is a common anatomical variant of intranasal anatomy. Of 320 patients evaluated for sinus disease with coronal CT, 34% had concha bullosa on at least one side. The overall incidence of inflammatory disease in the ostiomeatal complex in these symptomatic patients was not different between those with and without concha bullosa. However, there were many cases in which an abnormally large middle turbinate appeared to obstruct the ostiomeatal complex causing secondary infection of the ethmoid, frontal, and maxillary sinuses. Obstruction of drainage of the concha bullosa itself can lead to mucocele formation. Furthermore, the presence of a concha bullosa has important implications for the technique of endoscopic surgery used in the management of the sinus disease. The anatomy, pathophysiology, and CT findings in patients with concha bullosa are reviewed. PMID:3170840

  1. Quantitative micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevrhal, Sven

    2005-09-01

    Micro-CT for bone structural analysis has progressed from an in-vitro laboratory technique to devices for in-vivo assessment of small animals and the peripheral human skeleton. Currently, topological parameters of bone architecture are the primary goals of analysis. Additional measurement of the density or degree of mineralization (DMB) of trabecular and cortical bone at the microscopic level is desirable to study effects of disease and treatment progress. This information is not commonly extracted because of the challenges of accurate measurement and calibration at the tissue level. To assess the accuracy of micro-CT DMB measurements in a realistic but controlled situation, we prepared bone-mimicking watery solutions at concentrations of 100 to 600 mg/cm3 K2PO4H and scanned them with micro-CT, both in glass vials and microcapillary tubes with inner diameters of 50, 100 and 150 μm to simulate trabecular thickness. Values of the linear attenuation coefficients μ in the reconstructed image are commonly affected by beam hardening effects for larger samples and by partial volume effects for small volumes. We implemented an iterative reconstruction technique to reduce beam hardening. Partial voluming was sought to be reduced by excluding voxels near the tube wall. With these two measures, improvement on the constancy of the reconstructed voxel values and linearity with solution concentration could be observed to over 90% accuracy. However, since the expected change in real bone is small more measurements are needed to confirm that micro-CT can indeed be adapted to assess bone mineralization at the tissue level.

  2. Cardiac Multidetector Computed Tomography: Basic Physics of Image Acquisition and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Bardo, Dianna M.E; Brown, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac MDCT is here to stay. And, it is more than just imaging coronary arteries. Understanding the differences in and the benefits of one CT scanner from another will help you to optimize the capabilities of the scanner, but requires a basic understanding of the MDCT imaging physics. This review provides key information needed to understand the differences in the types of MDCT scanners, from 64 – 320 detectors, flat panels, single and dual source configurations, step and shoot prospective and retrospective gating, and how each factor influences radiation dose, spatial and temporal resolution, and image noise. PMID:19936200

  3. Calcified coronary artery plaque measurement with cardiac CT in population-based studies: standardized protocol of Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) and Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study.

    PubMed

    Carr, J Jeffrey; Nelson, Jennifer Clark; Wong, Nathan D; McNitt-Gray, Michael; Arad, Yadon; Jacobs, David R; Sidney, Stephan; Bild, Diane E; Williams, O Dale; Detrano, Robert C

    2005-01-01

    Calcified coronary artery plaque, measured at cardiac computed tomography (CT), is a predictor of cardiovascular disease and may play an increasing role in cardiovascular disease risk assessment. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) and the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute are population-based studies in which calcified coronary artery plaque was measured with electron-beam and multi-detector row CT and a standardized protocol in 6814 (MESA) and 3044 (CARDIA study) participants. The studies were approved by the appropriate institutional review board from the study site or agency, and written informed consent was obtained from each participant. Participation in the CT examination was high, image quality was good, and agreement for the presence of calcified plaque was high (kappa = 0.92, MESA; kappa = 0.77, CARDIA study). Extremely high agreement was observed between and within CT image analysts for the presence (kappa > 0.90, all) and amount (intraclass correlation coefficients, >0.99) of calcified plaque. Measurement of calcified coronary artery plaque with cardiac CT is well accepted by participants and can be implemented with consistently high-quality results with a standardized protocol and trained personnel. If predictive value of calcified coronary artery plaque for cardiovascular events proves sufficient to justify screening a segment of the population, then a standardized cardiac CT protocol is feasible and will provide reproducible results for health care providers and the public. PMID:15618373

  4. CT number variations in micro CT imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Shu-Ju; Hsieh, Hui-Ling; Chao, Tsi-Chian

    2008-03-01

    CT numbers can be directly computed from the linear attenuation coefficients in the reconstructed CT images and are correlated to the electron densities of the chemical elements with specific atomic numbers. However, the computed CT numbers can be varied when different imaging parameters are used. Phantoms composed of clinically relevant and tissue-equivalent materials (lung, bone, muscle, and adipose) were scanned with a commercial circular-scanning micro CT imager. This imaging system is composed with a micro-focused x-ray tube and charged-coupled device (CCD) camera as the detector. The mean CT numbers and the corresponding standard deviations in terms of Hounsfield units were then computed from a pre-defined region of interest located within the reconstructed volumetric images. The variations of CT number were then identified from a series of imaging parameters. Those parameters include imaging acquisition modes (e.g., the metal filter used in the x-ray tube), reconstruction methods (e.g., Feldkamp and iterative algorithm), and post-image processing techniques (e.g., ring artifact, beam-hardening artifact, and smoothing processing). These variations of CT numbers are useful and important in tissue characterization, quantitative bone structure analysis, bone marrow density evaluation, and Monte Carlo dose calculations for the pilot small animal study when micro CT imaging systems are employed. Also these variations can be used as the quantification for the performance of the micro CT imaging systems.

  5. Geographic Distribution of CT, MRI and PET Devices in Japan: A Longitudinal Analysis Based on National Census Data

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Masatoshi; Koike, Soichi; Kashima, Saori; Awai, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Background Japan has the most CT and MRI scanners per unit population in the world; however, the geographic distribution of these technologies is currently unknown. Moreover, nothing is known of the cause-effect relationship between the number of diagnostic imaging devices and their geographic distribution. Methods Data on the number of CT, MRI and PET devices and that of their utilizations in all 1829 municipalities of Japan was generated, based on the Static Survey of Medical Institutions conducted by the government. The inter-municipality equity of the number of devices or utilizations was evaluated with Gini coefficient. Results Between 2005 and 2011, the number of CT, MRI and PET devices in Japan increased by 47% (8789 to 12945), 19% (5034 to 5990) and 70% (274 to 466), respectively. Gini coefficient of the number of devices was largest for PET and smallest for CT (p for PET-MRI difference <0.001; MRI-CT difference <0.001). For all three modalities, Gini coefficient steadily decreased (p for 2011-2005 difference: <0.001 for CT; 0.003 for MRI; and <0.001 for PET). The number of devices in old models (single-detector CT, MRI<1.5 tesla, and conventional PET) decreased, while that in new models (multi-detector CT, MRI≥1.5 tesla, and PET-CT) increased. Gini coefficient of the old models increased or remained unchanged (increase rate of 9%, 3%, and -1%; p for 2011-2008 difference <0.001, 0.072, and 0.562, respectively), while Gini coefficient of the new models decreased (-10%, -9%, and -10%; p for 2011-2008 difference <0.001, <0.001, and <0.001 respectively). Similar results were observed in terms of utilizations. Conclusions The more abundant a modality, the more equal the modality’s distribution. Any increase in the modality made its distribution more equal. The geographic distribution of the diagnostic imaging technology in Japan appears to be affected by spatial competition derived from a market force. PMID:25946125

  6. Chronic osteomyelitis examined by CT

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, V.W.; Jeffrey, R.B. Jr.; Federle, M.P.; Helms, C.A.; Trafton, P.

    1985-01-01

    CT examination of 25 patients who had acute exacerbations of chronic osteomyelitis allowed for the correct identification of single or multiple sequestra in 14 surgical patients. Plain radiographs were equivocal for sequestra in seven of these patients, because the sequestra were too small or because diffuse bony sclerosis was present. CT also demonstrated a foreign body and five soft tissue abscesses not suspected on the basis of plain radiographs. CT studies, which helped guide the operative approach, were also useful in treating those patients whose plain radiographs were positive for sequestra. The authors review the potential role of CT in evaluating patients with chronic osteomyelitis.

  7. CT findings of atrial myxoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, F.; Kohno, A.; Saitoh, R.; Shigeta, A.

    1984-04-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of six atrial myxomas was analyzed. Five of the myxomas were located in the left atrium and one was in the right atrium. The margin of the myxoma was at least slightly lobulated in five cases and the content was inhomogeneous in all. Calcification was demonstrated in three cases. The site of attachment of the myxoma was demonstrated by CT to be the arial septum in all cases. The CT finding correlated well with the operative findings. It is concluded that it is possible with CT to diagnose atrial myxoma by the location and nature of the intracardiac mass and to differentiate it from thrombus.

  8. Nano-CT Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masschaele, B.

    Tomography is a non-destructive research technique which allows investigating the internal structure of objects in 3D . The "centre for X-ray tomography (UGCT)" of the Ghent University has developed a modular X-ray micro/nanoCT scanner which is used for multi-disciplinary research. In this paper we give an overview of the different components of the UGCT scanner with special attention to the X-ray imaging detectors. Also the software tools for data reconstruction and analysis and some obtained results are discussed.

  9. Comparison of 64-Detector CT Colonography and Conventional Colonoscopy in the Detection of Colorectal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Devir, Cigdem; Kebapci, Mahmut; Temel, Tuncer; Ozakyol, Aysegul

    2016-01-01

    Background: Colon cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. The early detection of colorectal cancer using screening programs is important for managing early-stage colorectal cancers and polyps. Modalities that allow examination of the entire colon are conventional colonoscopy, double contrast barium enema examination and multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) colonography. Objectives: To compare CT colonography and conventional colonoscopy results and to evaluate the accuracy of CT colonography for detecting colorectal lesions. Patients and Methods: In a prospective study performed at Gastroenterology and Radiology Departments of Medical Faculty of Eskisehir Osmangazi University, CT colonography and colonoscopy results of 31 patients with family history of colorectal carcinoma, personal or family history of colorectal polyps, lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding, change in bowel habits, iron deficiency anemia and abdominal pain were compared. Regardless of the size, CT colonography and conventional colonoscopy findings for all the lesions were cross - tabulated and the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated. To assess the agreement between CT colonography and conventional colonoscopy examinations, the Kappa coefficient of agreementt was used. Statistical analysis was performed by SPSS ver 15.0. Results: Regardless of the size, MDCT colonography showed 83% sensitivity and 95% specificity, with a positive predictive value of 95% and a negative predictive value of 83% for the detection of colorectal polyps and masses. MDCT colonography displayed 92% sensitivity and 95% specificity, with a positive predictive value of 92% and a negative predictive value of 95% for polyps ≥ 10 mm. For polyps between 6mm and 9 mm, MDCT colonography displayed 75% sensitivity and 100% specificity, with a positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value of 90%. For polyps ≤ 5 mm MDCT

  10. Four- and Eight-Channel Aortoiliac CT Angiography: A Comparative Study

    SciTech Connect

    Karcaaltincaba, Musturay Foley, Dennis

    2005-04-15

    Purpose. To compare performance parameters, contrast material load and radiation dose in a patient cohort having aortoiliac CT angiography using 4- and 8-channel multidetector CT (MDCT) systems. Methods. Eighteen patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms underwent initial 4-channel and follow-up 8-channel MDCT angiography. Both the 4- and 8-channel MDCT systems utilized a matrix detector of 16 x 1.25 mm rows. Scan coverage included the abdominal aorta and iliac arteries to the level of the proximal femoral arteries. For 4-channel MDCT, nominal slice thickness and beam pitch were 1.25 mm and 1.5, respectively, and for 8-channel MDCT they were 1.25 mm and 1.35 or 1.65 respectively. Scan duration, iodinated contrast material load and mean aortoiliac attenuation were compared retrospectively. Comparative radiation dose measurements for 4- and 8-channel MDCT were obtained using a multiple scan average dose technique on an abdominal phantom. Results. Compared with 4-channel MDCT, 8-channel MDCT aortoiliac angiography was performed with equivalent collimation, decreased contrast load (mean 45% decrease: 144 ml versus 83 ml of 300 mg iodine/ml contrast material) and decreased acquisition time (mean 51% shorter: 34.4 sec versus 16.9 sec) without a significant change in mean aortic enhancement (299 HU versus 300 HU, p > 0.05). Radiation dose was 2 rad for the 4-channel system and 2/1.5 rad for the 8-channel system at 1.35/1.65 pitch respectively. Conclusion. Compared with 4-channel MDCT, aortoiliac CT angiography with 8-channel MDCT produces equivalent z-axis resolution with decreased contrast load and acquisition time without increased radiation exposure.

  11. Differences of Upper Airway Morphology According to Obesity: Study with Cephalometry and Dynamic MD-CT

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Chun, Bum Soo; Lee, Ho Won

    2010-01-01

    Objectives We investigated difference of parameters of polysomnography, cephalometry and dynamic multi-detector computerized tomography (MD-CT) in wake and sleep states according to obesity. Methods We evaluated 93 patients who underwent polysomnography and cephalometry. MD-CT was performed in 68 of these 93 patients. Fifty-nine and 34 patients were classified as obese and non-obese, with obesity defined as BMI ≥25. Cephalometry results were analyzed for 12 variables. Using the MD-CT, we evaluated dynamic upper airway morphology in wake and sleep states and divided the upper airway into four parts named as high retropalatal (HRP), low retropalatal (LRP), high retroglossal (HRG), and low retroglossal (LRG). A minimal cross sectional area (mCSA) and collapsibility index (CI) were calculated for each airway level. Results Diastolic blood pressure (P=0.0005), neck circumference (P<0.0001), and apnea-hypopnea index (P<0.0001) were statistically significantly different between the obese and non-obese group. Among 12 cephalometric variables, there was a significant difference in only the distance from mandibular plane to hyoid bone (P=0.003). There was statistical difference in CI of HRG and LRG in sleep state (P=0.0449, 0.0281) but no difference in mCSA in wake and sleep states. Conclusion The obese group had more severe sleep apnea than the non-obese group. We believe that the increased severity of apnea in the obese group may be have been due to increased collapsibility of the upper airway rather than decreased size of the upper airway. PMID:20978543

  12. Dose reduction and image quality optimizations in CT of pediatric and adult patients: phantom studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, P.-H.; Lee, C.-L.; Kim, D.-H.; Lee, Y.-J.; Jeon, S.-S.; Kim, H.-J.

    2014-03-01

    Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) can be used to easily and rapidly perform numerous acquisitions, possibly leading to a marked increase in the radiation dose to individual patients. Technical options dedicated to automatically adjusting the acquisition parameters according to the patient's size are of specific interest in pediatric radiology. A constant tube potential reduction can be achieved for adults and children, while maintaining a constant detector energy fluence. To evaluate radiation dose, the weighted CT dose index (CTDIw) was calculated based on the CT dose index (CTDI) measured using an ion chamber, and image noise and image contrast were measured from a scanned image to evaluate image quality. The dose-weighted contrast-to-noise ratio (CNRD) was calculated from the radiation dose, image noise, and image contrast measured from a scanned image. The noise derivative (ND) is a quality index for dose efficiency. X-ray spectra with tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kVp were used to compute the average photon energy. Image contrast and the corresponding contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were determined for lesions of soft tissue, muscle, bone, and iodine relative to a uniform water background, as the iodine contrast increases at lower energy (i.e., k-edge of iodine is 33 keV closer to the beam energy) using mixed water-iodine contrast normalization (water 0, iodine 25, 100, 200, and 1000 HU, respectively). The proposed values correspond to high quality images and can be reduced if only high-contrast organs are assessed. The potential benefit of lowering the tube voltage is an improved CNRD, resulting in a lower radiation dose and optimization of image quality. Adjusting the tube potential in abdominal CT would be useful in current pediatric radiography, where the choice of X-ray techniques generally takes into account the size of the patient as well as the need to balance the conflicting requirements of diagnostic image quality and radiation dose

  13. PET/CT: fundamental principles.

    PubMed

    Seemann, Marcus D

    2004-05-28

    Positron emission tomography (PET) facilitates the evaluation of metabolic and molecular characteristics of a wide variety of cancers, but is limited in its ability to visualize anatomical structures. Computed tomography (CT) facilitates the evaluation of anatomical structures of cancers, but can not visualize their metabolic and molecular aspects. Therefore, the combination of PET and CT provides the ability to accurately register metabolic and molecular aspects of disease with anatomical findings, adding further information to the diagnosis and staging of tumors. The recent generation of high performance PET/CT scanners combines a state of the art full-ring 3D PET scanner and a high-end 16-slice CT scanner. In PET/CT scanners, a CT examination is used for attenuation correction of PET images rather than standard transmission scanning using superset 68 Ge sources. This reduces the examination time, but metallic objects and contrast agents that alter the CT image quality and quantitative measurements of standardized uptake values (SUV) may lead to artifacts in the PET images. Hybrid PET/CT imaging will be very important in oncological applications in the decades to come, and possibly for use in cancer screening and cardiac imaging. PMID:15257877

  14. Quantifying tumour heterogeneity with CT

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Heterogeneity is a key feature of malignancy associated with adverse tumour biology. Quantifying heterogeneity could provide a useful non-invasive imaging biomarker. Heterogeneity on computed tomography (CT) can be quantified using texture analysis which extracts spatial information from CT images (unenhanced, contrast-enhanced and derived images such as CT perfusion) that may not be perceptible to the naked eye. The main components of texture analysis can be categorized into image transformation and quantification. Image transformation filters the conventional image into its basic components (spatial, frequency, etc.) to produce derived subimages. Texture quantification techniques include structural-, model- (fractal dimensions), statistical- and frequency-based methods. The underlying tumour biology that CT texture analysis may reflect includes (but is not limited to) tumour hypoxia and angiogenesis. Emerging studies show that CT texture analysis has the potential to be a useful adjunct in clinical oncologic imaging, providing important information about tumour characterization, prognosis and treatment prediction and response. PMID:23545171

  15. Coronary vasospasm during CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Takehiro; Toyama, Takuji; Tsushima, Yoshito; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    A 71-year-old man, a heavy smoker, was admitted for evaluation of "chest oppression" after every dinner. Cardiac CT with a beta-blocker showed coronary stenosis in the left circumflex. Although adenosine triphosphate-stress perfusion single-photon emission CT revealed no ischemia, Holter electrocardiography belatedly indicated an ST elevation associated with his symptoms while smoking. He was diagnosed to have vasospastic angina. Cardiac CT without a beta-blocker showed thin diffuse plaque and negative remolding without any significant stenosis at the same site. Asian patients have a tendency to develop vasospastic angina. Although beta-blockers are recommended for cardiac CT, the routine administration of beta-blockers in cardiac CT may have some risk for such cases. PMID:25065860

  16. Development of a Radiation Dose Reporting Software for X-ray Computed Tomography (CT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Aiping

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has experienced tremendous technological advances in recent years and has established itself as one of the most popular diagnostic imaging tools. While CT imaging clearly plays an invaluable role in modern medicine, its rapid adoption has resulted in a dramatic increase in the average medical radiation exposure to the worldwide and United States populations. Existing software tools for CT dose estimation and reporting are mostly based on patient phantoms that contain overly simplified anatomies insufficient in meeting the current and future needs. This dissertation describes the development of an easy-to-use software platform, “VirtualDose”, as a service to estimate and report the organ dose and effective dose values for patients undergoing the CT examinations. “VirtualDose” incorporates advanced models for the adult male and female, pregnant women, and children. To cover a large portion of the ignored obese patients that frequents the radiology clinics, a new set of obese male and female phantoms are also developed and applied to study the effects of the fat tissues on the CT radiation dose. Multi-detector CT scanners (MDCT) and clinical protocols, as well as the most recent effective dose algorithms from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103 are adopted in “VirtualDose” to keep pace with the MDCT development and regulatory requirements. A new MDCT scanner model with both body and head bowtie filter is developed to cover both the head and body scanning modes. This model was validated through the clinical measurements. A comprehensive slice-by-slice database is established by deriving the data from a larger number of single axial scans simulated on the patient phantoms using different CT bowtie filters, beam thicknesses, and different tube voltages in the Monte Carlo N-Particle Extended (MCNPX) code. When compared to the existing CT dose software packages, organ dose data in this

  17. 3D left ventricular extracellular volume fraction by low-radiation dose cardiac CT: Assessment of interstitial myocardial fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nacif, Marcelo Souto; Liu, Yixun; Yao, Jianhua; Liu, Songtao; Sibley, Christopher T.; Summers, Ronald M.; Bluemke, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Myocardial fibrosis leads to impaired cardiac function and events. Extracellular volume fraction (ECV) assessed with an iodinated contrast agent and measured by cardiac CT may be a useful noninvasive marker of fibrosis. Objective The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a 3-dimensional (3D) ECV calculation toolkit (ECVTK) for ECV determination by cardiac CT. Methods Twenty-four subjects (10 systolic heart failure, age, 60 ± 17 years; 5 diastolic failure, age 56 ± 20 years; 9 matched healthy subjects, age 59 ± 7 years) were evaluated. Cardiac CT examinations were done on a 320-multidetector CT scanner before and after 130 mL of iopamidol (Isovue-370; Bracco Diagnostics, Plainsboro, NJ, USA) was administered. A calcium score type sequence was performed before and 7 minutes after contrast with single gantry rotation during 1 breath hold and single cardiac phase acquisition. ECV was calculated as (ΔHUmyocardium/ΔHUblood) × (1 − Hct) where Hct is the hematocrit, and ΔHU is the change in Hounsfield unit attenuation = HUafter iodine − HUbefore iodine. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was performed to assess myocardial structure and function. Results Mean 3D ECV values were significantly higher in the subjects with systolic heart failure than in healthy subjects and subjects with diastolic heart failure (mean, 41% ± 6%, 33% ± 2%, and 35% ± 5%, respectively; P = 0.02). Interobserver and intraobserver agreements were excellent for myocardial, blood pool, and ECV (intraclass correlation coefficient, >0.90 for all). Higher 3D ECV by cardiac CT was associated with reduced systolic circumferential strain, greater end-diastolic and -systolic volumes, and lower ejection fraction (r = 0.70, r = 0.60, r = 0.73, and r = −0.68, respectively; all P < 0.001). Conclusion 3D ECV by cardiac CT can be performed with ECVTK. We demonstrated increased ECV in subjects with systolic heart failure compared with healthy subjects. Cardiac CT results also

  18. Thoracic textilomas: CT findings*

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Dianne Melo; Zanetti, Gláucia; Araujo, Cesar Augusto; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Pereira e Silva, Jorge Luiz; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza, Arthur Soares; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze chest CT scans of patients with thoracic textiloma. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of 16 patients (11 men and 5 women) with surgically confirmed thoracic textiloma. The chest CT scans of those patients were evaluated by two independent observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. RESULTS: The majority (62.5%) of the textilomas were caused by previous heart surgery. The most common symptoms were chest pain (in 68.75%) and cough (in 56.25%). In all cases, the main tomographic finding was a mass with regular contours and borders that were well-defined or partially defined. Half of the textilomas occurred in the right hemithorax and half occurred in the left. The majority (56.25%) were located in the lower third of the lung. The diameter of the mass was ≤ 10 cm in 10 cases (62.5%) and > 10 cm in the remaining 6 cases (37.5%). Most (81.25%) of the textilomas were heterogeneous in density, with signs of calcification, gas, radiopaque marker, or sponge-like material. Peripheral expansion of the mass was observed in 12 (92.3%) of the 13 patients in whom a contrast agent was used. Intraoperatively, pleural involvement was observed in 14 cases (87.5%) and pericardial involvement was observed in 2 (12.5%). CONCLUSIONS: It is important to recognize the main tomographic aspects of thoracic textilomas in order to include this possibility in the differential diagnosis of chest pain and cough in patients with a history of heart or thoracic surgery, thus promoting the early identification and treatment of this postoperative complication. PMID:25410842

  19. Validation of CT doses of SPECT/CT and PET/CT hybrid devices: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Sera, Terez; Porubszky, Tamas; Papos, Miklos; Elek, Richard; Besenyi, Zsuzsanna; Gion, Katalin; Bartha, Andras; Pellet, Sandor; Pavics, Laszlo

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was to check the validity of computed tomographic (CT) doses exhibited by SPECT/CT and PET/CT hybrid devices. Dose measurements were taken from four SPECT/CT and four PET/CT cameras commercially available from different manufacturers. A calibrated ionization chamber was placed in whole-body or head phantoms for the acquisition of CT images with clinically used parameters. Computed tomography dose index (CTDIvol) values were calculated according to the IEC 60601-2-44:1999 formula. The measured CTDIvol doses were compared with those preprogrammed by the manufacturer. In the case of the whole-body phantom, the differences between the measured and displayed values varied between -31 and +24% [European document RP162 (2012) sets up the limit for acceptance criterion as ±20%]. The head phantom data showed either an agreement between -10 and +24%, or an underestimation by two-fold. The latter seemed to be because, while preprogramming the doses, the manufacturer had used the whole-body phantom instead of a proper head phantom. The results of the work demonstrate the need for individual dosimetric calibration of every single X-ray tube. Dosimetric checks should be included in the regular quality control programmes of the SPECT/CT and PET/CT devices. Special attention should be paid to head-and-neck and paediatric protocols, in which the use of a head phantom is recommended for dose calibration. PMID:24499726

  20. Stature estimation based on measurements of the sternal medullary cavity using multidetector computed tomography images of Japanese cadavers.

    PubMed

    Torimitsu, Suguru; Makino, Yohsuke; Saitoh, Hisako; Sakuma, Ayaka; Ishii, Namiko; Hayakawa, Mutsumi; Yajima, Daisuke; Inokuchi, Go; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2014-09-01

    Stature estimation using a skeleton is important for the medicolegal investigation of unidentified human remains. The aims of this study were to identify a correlation between stature and measurements of the sternal medullary cavity using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and derive regression equations for stature estimation in the Japanese population. Measurements were conducted on 215 Japanese subjects (107 males, 108 females) who underwent postmortem computed tomography with subsequent forensic autopsy between May 2012 and January 2014. For assessment, MDCT cross-sections through the mid-point of the first costal facets were chosen. The length of a rising diagonal stroke from the bottom left to the top right of the sternal medullary cavity (RS) and the length of a falling diagonal stroke from top left to bottom right of the sternal medullary cavity (FS) were measured. Statistical analyses indicated that both RS and FS were positively correlated with stature regardless of sex. The correlations were stronger for males than for females. The correlation coefficients for RS were higher than those for FS, and standard errors of estimation calculated by regression analysis using RS were lower than those using FS regardless of sex. Measurement of the sternal medullary cavity using MDCT images may be a potentially useful tool for stature estimation, particularly in cases where better predictors such as long bones are not available. PMID:25082372

  1. Feasibility of 320-row multi-detector computed tomography angiography to assess bioabsorbable everolimus-eluting vascular scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Asami, Masahiko; Aoki, Jiro; Serruys, Patrick W; Abizaid, Alexandre; Saito, Shigeru; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Kimura, Takeshi; Simonton, Charles A; Tanabe, Kengo

    2016-04-01

    Coronary computer tomographic angiography (CCTA) for screening intra-arterial vessel disease is gaining rapid clinical acceptance in recent years, but its use for such assessments in metal-stented vessel segments is very limited due to blooming artifacts introduced by the metal. However, vessel segments treated by the polymeric everolimus-eluting bioresorbable vascular scaffolds (Absorb) are readily monitored for intravascular disease over time with CCTA. The data on the accuracy of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) in patients treated with Absorb is still sparse. Results on 5 Japanese case studies from ABSORB EXTEND are presented here. Five patients were treated with Absorb, and follow-up angiography was conducted at 8 to 14 months as per routine site standard of practice. 320-row MDCT scan was performed within 1 month before the angiography. By MDCT, all Absorb-treated lesions were clearly evaluated and restenosis were not observed. Minimal diameter and % diameter stenosis were similar between MDCT and quantitative angiography (2.07 ± 0.13 vs. 2.03 ± 0.06 mm, P = 0.86, and 22.5 ± 5.0 vs. 21.5 ± 4.5 %, P = 0.88, respectively). MDCT appears to be feasible and useful for evaluating lumen patency and vessel disease in segments implanted with Absorb at follow-up. PMID:26445951

  2. SU-E-I-34: Evaluating Use of AEC to Lower Dose for Lung Cancer Screening CT Protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Arbique, G; Anderson, J; Guild, J; Duan, X; Malguria, N; Omar, H; Brewington, C; Zhang, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The National Lung Screening Trial mandated manual low dose CT technique factors, where up to a doubling of radiation output could be used over a regular to large patient size range. Recent guidance from the AAPM and ACR for lung cancer CT screening recommends radiation output adjustment for patient size either through AEC or a manual technique chart. This study evaluated the use of AEC for output control and dose reduction. Methods: The study was performed on a multidetector helical CT scanner (Aquillion ONE, Toshiba Medical) equipped with iterative reconstruction (ADIR-3D), AEC was adjusted with a standard deviation (SD) image quality noise index. The protocol SD parameter was incrementally increased to reduce patient population dose while image quality was evaluated by radiologist readers scoring the clinical utility of images on a Likert scale. Results: Plots of effective dose vs. body size (water cylinder diameter reported by the scanner) demonstrate monotonic increase in patient dose with increasing patient size. At the initial SD setting of 19 the average CTDIvol for a standard size patient was ∼ 2.0 mGy (1.2 mSv effective dose). This was reduced to ∼1.0 mGy (0.5 mSv) at an SD of 25 with no noticeable reduction in clinical utility of images as demonstrated by Likert scoring. Plots of effective patient diameter and BMI vs body size indicate that these metrics could also be used for manual technique charts. Conclusion: AEC offered consistent and reliable control of radiation output in this study. Dose for a standard size patient was reduced to one-third of the 3 mGy CTDIvol limit required for ACR accreditation of lung cancer CT screening. Gary Arbique: Research Grant, Toshiba America Medical Systems; Cecelia Brewington: Research Grant, Toshiba America Medical Systems; Di Zhang: Employee, Toshiba America Medical Systems.

  3. CT Angiography after 20 Years

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Geoffrey D.; Leipsic, Jonathon; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Fleischmann, Dominik; Napel, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Through a marriage of spiral computed tomography (CT) and graphical volumetric image processing, CT angiography was born 20 years ago. Fueled by a series of technical innovations in CT and image processing, over the next 5–15 years, CT angiography toppled conventional angiography, the undisputed diagnostic reference standard for vascular disease for the prior 70 years, as the preferred modality for the diagnosis and characterization of most cardiovascular abnormalities. This review recounts the evolution of CT angiography from its development and early challenges to a maturing modality that has provided unique insights into cardiovascular disease characterization and management. Selected clinical challenges, which include acute aortic syndromes, peripheral vascular disease, aortic stent-graft and transcatheter aortic valve assessment, and coronary artery disease, are presented as contrasting examples of how CT angiography is changing our approach to cardiovascular disease diagnosis and management. Finally, the recently introduced capabilities for multispectral imaging, tissue perfusion imaging, and radiation dose reduction through iterative reconstruction are explored with consideration toward the continued refinement and advancement of CT angiography. PMID:24848958

  4. [CT colonography in daily practice].

    PubMed

    Stoker, Jaap; Dekker, Evelien

    2013-01-01

    The sensitivity of computed tomography (CT) colonography for colorectal carcinoma and large polyps (≥ 10 mm) is comparable with that of colonoscopy. Acceptance in symptomatic patients is higher than for colonoscopy. The accuracy of CT colonography for polyps of 6-9 mm, for flat polyps and in particular for polyps < 6 mm is lower than for colonoscopy. Indication for CT colonography depends on the a prior chance of finding something relevant, as colonoscopy is necessary in the case of relevant findings. CT colonography can be an alternative to colonoscopy in patients with symptoms consistent with colorectal cancer when colonoscopy is not possible or appears incomplete. It can be used as primary technique in older patients with comorbidity and low a prior chance of relevant findings. CT colonography is less appropriate for surveillance as the accuracy for flat polyps is lower. CT colonography is not suitable in hereditary syndromes due to the lower accuracy for polyps < 10 mm. CT colonography can be a good alternative in patients with irritable bowel syndrome in the case of a low suspicion of colorectal cancer. PMID:24168847

  5. Use of 3D imaging in CT of the acute trauma patient: impact of a PACS-based software package.

    PubMed

    Soto, Jorge A; Lucey, Brain C; Stuhlfaut, Joshua W; Varghese, Jose C

    2005-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of a picture archiving and communication systems (PACS)-based software package on the requests for 3D reconstructions of multidetector CT (MDCT) data sets in the emergency radiology of a level 1 trauma center, we reviewed the number and type of physician requests for 3D reconstructions of MDCT data sets for patients admitted after sustaining multiple trauma, during a 12-month period (January 2003-December 2003). During the first 5 months of the study, 3D reconstructions were performed in dedicated workstations located separately from the emergency radiology CT interpretation area. During the last 7 months of the study, reconstructions were performed online by the attending radiologist or resident on duty, using a software package directly incorporated into the PACS workstations. The mean monthly number of 3D reconstructions requested during the two time periods was compared using Student's t test. The monthly mean +/- SD of 3D reconstructions performed before and after 3D software incorporation into the PACS was 34+/-7 (95% CI, 10-58) and 132+/-31 (95% CI, 111-153), respectively. This difference was statistically significant (p<0.0001). In the multiple trauma patient, implementation of PACS-integrated software increases utilization of 3D reconstructions of MDCT data sets. PMID:16028324

  6. Diagnostic accuracy of sub-mSv prospective ECG-triggering cardiac CT in young infant with complex congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Zhong, Yu Min; Sun, Ai Min; Wang, Qian; Ouyang, Rong Zhen; Hu, Li Wei; Qiu, Han Sheng; Wang, Shi Yu; Li, Jian Ying

    2016-06-01

    To explore the clinical value and evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of sub-mSv low-dose prospective ECG-triggering cardiac CT (CCT) in young infants with complex congenital heart disease (CHD). A total of 102 consecutive infant patients (53 boys and 49 girls with mean age of 2.9 ± 2.4 m and weight less than 5 kg) with complex CHD were prospectively enrolled. Scans were performed on a 64-slice high definition CT scanner with low dose prospective ECG-triggering mode and reconstructed with 80 % adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm. All studies were performed during free breathing with sedation. The subjective image quality was evaluated by 5-point grading scale and interobserver variability was calculated. The objective image noise (standard deviation, SD) and contrast to noise ratio (CNR) was calculated. The effective radiation dose from the prospective ECG-triggering mode was recorded and compared with the virtual conventional retrospective ECG-gating mode. The detection rate for the origin of coronary artery was calculated. All patients also underwent echocardiography before CCT examination. 81 patients had surgery and their preoperative CCT and echocardiography findings were compared with the surgical results and sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and accuracy were calculated for separate cardiovascular anomalies. Heart rates were 70-161 beats per minute (bpm) with mean value of 129.19 ± 14.52 bpm. The effective dose of 0.53 ± 0.15 mSv in the prospective ECG-triggering cardiac CT was lower than the calculated value in a conventional retrospective ECG-gating mode (2.00 ± 0.35 mSv) (p < 0.001). The mean CNR and SD were 28.19 ± 13.00 and 15.75 ± 3.61HU, respectively. The image quality scores were 4.31 ± 0.36 and 4.29 ± 0.41 from reviewer 1 and 2 respectively with an excellent agreement between them (Kappa = 0.85). The detection rate for the origins of the left and right coronary

  7. Reducing CT dose in myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Emma; Dixon, Kat L

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to reduce the radiation dose arising from computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction to single photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging studies without adversely affecting its accuracy. Using the Perspex CTDI phantom with the Xi detector to measure dose, CT scans were acquired using the Siemens Symbia T over the full range of CT settings available. Using the default setting 'AECmean', the measured dose at the centre of the phantom was 1.68 mGy and the breast dose from the scout view was 0.30 mGy. The lowest dose was achieved using the dose modulation setting in which the doses were reduced to 1.21 mGy and undetectable (<0.01 mGy), respectively. To observe the effect of changing these settings, 30 patients received a stress scan with default CT settings and a rest scan utilizing single photon emission computed tomography-guided CT and the dose modulation CT settings. Results showed a mean effective dose reduction of 23.6%. The dose reduction was greatest for larger patients, with the largest dose reduction for one patient being 72%. There was no apparent difference in attenuation correction between the two sets of resultant images. These new lower-dose settings are now applied to all clinical myocardial perfusion imaging studies. PMID:26302461

  8. Kilovoltage CT using a linac-CT scanner combination.

    PubMed

    Thieke, C; Malsch, U; Schlegel, W; Debus, J; Huber, P; Bendl, R; Thilmann, C

    2006-09-01

    Modern radiotherapy techniques such as intensity modulation are capable of generating complex dose distributions whose high dose areas tightly conform to the tumour target volume, sparing critical organs even when they are located in close proximity. This potential can only be exploited to its full extent when the accumulated dose actually delivered over the complete treatment course is sufficiently close to the dose computed on the initial CT scan used for treatment planning. Exact patient repositioning is mandatory, but also other sources of error, e.g. changes of the patient's anatomy under therapy, should be taken into account. At the German Cancer Research Center, we use a combination of a linear accelerator and a CT scanner installed in one room and sharing the same couch. It allows the quantification and correction of interfractional variations between planning and treatment delivery. In this paper, we describe treatments of prostate, paraspinal and head and neck tumours. All patients were immobilized by customized fixation devices and treated in a stereotactic setup. For each patient, frequent CT scans were taken during the treatment course. Each scan was compared with the original planning CT using manual checks and automatic rigid matching algorithms. Depending on the individual case, the adaptation to variations was carried out offline after several fractions or in real-time between the CT scan and linac irradiation. We discuss the techniques for detecting and correcting interfractional errors and outline the procedural steps of a linac-CT scanner-supported radiation treatment course. PMID:16980687

  9. Semi-automatic procedure to extract Couinaud liver segments from multislice CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, Jay; Durgan, Jacob; Subramanyan, Krishna

    2003-05-01

    Liver resection and transplantation surgeries require careful planning and accurate knowledge of the vascular and gross anatomy of the liver. This study aims to create a semi-automatic method for segmenting the liver, along with its entire venous vessel tree from multi-detector computed tomograms. Using fast marching and region-growth techniques along with morphological operations, we have developed a software package which can isolate the liver and the hepatic venous network from a user-selected seed point. The user is then presented with volumetric analysis of the liver and a 3-Dimensional surface rendering. Software tools allow the user to then analyze the lobes of the liver based upon venous anatomy, as defined by Couinaud. The software package also has utilities for data management, key image specification, commenting, and reporting. Seven patients were scanned with contrast on the Mx8000 CT scanner (Philips Medical Systems), the data was analyzed using our method and compared with results found using a manual method. The results show that the semi-automated method utilizes less time than manual methods, with results that are consistent and similar. Also, display of the venous network along with the entire liver in three dimensions is a unique feature of this software.

  10. Children, CT Scan and Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Bajoghli, Morteza; Bajoghli, Farshad; Tayari, Nazila; Rouzbahani, Reza

    2010-01-01

    Children are more sensitive to radiation than adults. Computerized tomography (CT) consists of 25 % of all medical imaging. It was estimated that more than 2% of all carcinomas in the USA are due to CT scans. There is an ongoing focus on the reduction of CT scan radiation dose. Awareness about risk-benefits of CT has increased. Reduction of radiological exam is an important issue because the accumulation effects of radiation can be hazardous. In addition, proper protocol should be followed for diagnostic procedures of ionization radiation and computerized tomography. Effective radiation dose should range from 0.8 to 10.5 millisievert. The same protocol should be followed in different hospitals as well. Basic principles of radiation protection should be monitored. As much as possible, both technician and radiologist must be present during computerized tomography for children, and MRI and ultrasound should be replaced if possible. PMID:21566776

  11. Adrenal cortex dysfunction: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Huebener, K.H.; Treugut, H.

    1984-01-01

    The computed tomographic appearance of the adrenal gland was studied in 302 patients with possible endocrinologic disease and 107 patients undergoing CT for nonendocrinologic reasons. Measurements of adrenal size were also made in 100 adults with no known adrenal pathology. CT proved to be a sensitive diagnostic tool in combination with clinical studies. When blood hormone levels are increased, CT can differentiate among homogeneous organic hyperplasia, nodular hyperplasia, benign adenoma, and malignant cortical adenoma. When blood hormone levels are decreased, CT can demonstrate hypoplasia or metastatic tumorous destruction. Calcifications can be demonstrated earlier than on plain radiographs. When hormone elimination is increased, the morphologic substrate can be identified; tumorous changes can be localized and infiltration of surrounding organs recognized.

  12. CT Demonstration of Caput Medusae

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Edward C.; Vilensky, Joel A.

    2009-01-01

    Maximum intensity and volume rendered CT displays of caput medusae are provided to demonstrate both the anatomy and physiology of this portosystemic shunt associated with portal hypertension. (Contains 2 figures.)

  13. CT Perfusion of the Head

    MedlinePlus

    ... scanning combines special x-ray equipment with sophisticated computers to produce multiple images or pictures of the ... being studied can then be examined on a computer monitor, printed or transferred to a CD. CT ...

  14. CT of the pulmonary ligament

    SciTech Connect

    Godwin, J.D.; Vock, P.; Osborne, D.R.

    1983-08-01

    Most computed tomographic (CT) scans of the chest show the inferior pulmonary ligament and an associated septum in the lower lobe, although CT descriptions of these structures have not been reported. Conventional radiography of the ligament has relied on indirect signs: the position of the lower lobe in the presence of pneumothorax or pleural effusion, soft-tissue peaks along the upper surface of the diaphragm, and the rare traumatic paramediastinal pneumatocele (attributed to air in the ligament). CT clarifies the anatomic relations of the ligament and alterations caused by pleural effusion and pneumothorax. The ligament is probably responsible for some long linear shadows at the lung bases, and CT helps to distinguish these from scars, walls of bullae, and normal structures such as the phrenic nerve and the interlobar fissures.

  15. Multiplanar CT of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, S.L.G.; Glenn, W.V.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 16 chapters. Some of the topics are: CT of the Sacrum, The Postoperative Spine, Film Organizations and Case Reporting, Degeneration and Disc Disease of the Intervertebral Joint, Lumbar Spinal Stenosis, and Cervical and Thoracic Spine.

  16. Multiple myeloma: evaluation by CT

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiman, J.S.; McLeod, R.A.; Kyle, R.A.; Beabout, J.W.

    1985-02-01

    Although patients who have multiple myeloma usually have straightforward clinical symptoms and corroborative radiographs, in some instances, these patients will present atypically, with symptoms suggesting active disease but radiographs that are normal or nonspecific. The authors reviewed the records of 32 patients who had documented multiple myeloma and had undergone CT examinations, assessing the value of those examinations. Although CT is not indicated in all patients who have multiple myeloma, it is especially useful in patients who have bone pain and normal or nonspecific radiographs. CT provided confirmatory information in all cases in which lesions were seen on radiographs. CT also frequently demonstrated a greater extent of disease than could be appreciated on the radiographs.

  17. A Case of Coronary Cameral Fistula with Associated Aneurysm: Role of ECG Gated 256- Slice Dual Source Multidetector Computed Tomography in Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Lalit; Rissam, Harmeet Kaur; Puri, Sunil Kumar

    2016-01-01

    We report an interesting case of coronary cameral fistula with associated aneurysmal dilatation of coronary artery. The complete evaluation including anatomical relationships with surrounding vascular and non-vascular structures can be achieved with ECG gated multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT). MDCT has many advantages over echocardiography and digital subtraction catheter angiography, because of its ability to demonstrate the fistula separate from surrounding cardiovascular structures along with any aneurysm or obstruction in its course. Thus, MDCT is emerging as the initial non-invasive imaging technique for comprehensive preoperative evaluation of these rare congenital anomalies for cardiovascular surgeons to achieve better operative assessibity and outcome. PMID:27437325

  18. Development of a parallel detection and processing system using a multidetector array for wave field restoration in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Taya, Masaki; Matsutani, Takaomi; Ikuta, Takashi; Saito, Hidekazu; Ogai, Keiko; Harada, Yoshihito; Tanaka, Takeo; Takai, Yoshizo

    2007-08-15

    A parallel image detection and image processing system for scanning transmission electron microscopy was developed using a multidetector array consisting of a multianode photomultiplier tube arranged in an 8x8 square array. The system enables the taking of 64 images simultaneously from different scattered directions with a scanning time of 2.6 s. Using the 64 images, phase and amplitude contrast images of gold particles on an amorphous carbon thin film could be separately reconstructed by applying respective 8 shaped bandpass Fourier filters for each image and multiplying the phase and amplitude reconstructing factors.

  19. Development of a parallel detection and processing system using a multidetector array for wave field restoration in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Taya, Masaki; Matsutani, Takaomi; Ikuta, Takashi; Saito, Hidekazu; Ogai, Keiko; Harada, Yoshihito; Tanaka, Takeo; Takai, Yoshizo

    2007-08-01

    A parallel image detection and image processing system for scanning transmission electron microscopy was developed using a multidetector array consisting of a multianode photomultiplier tube arranged in an 8 x 8 square array. The system enables the taking of 64 images simultaneously from different scattered directions with a scanning time of 2.6 s. Using the 64 images, phase and amplitude contrast images of gold particles on an amorphous carbon thin film could be separately reconstructed by applying respective 8 shaped bandpass Fourier filters for each image and multiplying the phase and amplitude reconstructing factors. PMID:17764327

  20. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced 3.0-Tesla MRI findings for the preoperative detection of focal liver lesions: Comparison with iodine-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyong-Hu; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Im, In-Chul; Lee, Jae-Seung; Kim, Moon-Jib; Kwak, Byung-Joon; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Dong, Kyung-Rae

    2012-12-01

    The safety of gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic-acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA) has been confirmed, but more study is needed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) for whom surgical treatment is considered or with a metastatic hepatoma. Research is also needed to examine the rate of detection of hepatic lesions compared to multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), which is used most frequently to localize and characterize a HCC. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI and iodine-enhanced MDCT imaging were compared for the preoperative detection of focal liver lesions. The clinical usefulness of each method was examined. The current study enrolled 79 patients with focal liver lesions who preoperatively underwent MRI and MDCT. In these patients, there was less than one month between the two diagnostic modalities. Imaging data were taken before and after contrast enhancement in both methods. To evaluate the images, we analyzed the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the lesions and the liver parenchyma. To compare the sensitivity of the two methods, we performed a quantitative analysis of the percentage signal intensity of the liver (PSIL) on a high resolution picture archiving and communication system (PACS) monitor (paired-samples t-test, p < 0.05). The enhancement was evaluated based on a consensus of four observers. The enhancement pattern and the morphological features during the arterial and the delayed phases were correlated between the Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI findings and the iodine-enhanced MDCT by using an adjusted x2 test. The SNRs, CNRs, and PSIL all had a greater detection rate in Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced MRI than in iodine-enhanced MDCT. Hepatocyte-selective uptake was observed 20 minutes after the injection in the focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH, 9/9), adenoma (9/10), and highly-differentiated HCC (grade G1, 27/30). Rim

  1. Multidetector computed tomography angiography for assessment of in-stent restenosis: meta-analysis of diagnostic performance

    PubMed Central

    Vanhoenacker, Piet K; Decramer, Isabel; Bladt, Olivier; Sarno, Giovanna; Van Hul, Erik; Wijns, William; Dwamena, Ben A

    2008-01-01

    Background Multi-detector computed tomography angiography (MDCTA)of the coronary arteries after stenting has been evaluated in multiple studies. The purpose of this study was to perform a structured review and meta-analysis of the diagnostic performance of MDCTA for the detection of in-stent restenosis in the coronary arteries. Methods A Pubmed and manual search of the literature on in-stent restenosis (ISR) detected on MDCTA compared with conventional coronary angiography (CA) was performed. Bivariate summary receiver operating curve (SROC) analysis, with calculation of summary estimates was done on a stent and patient basis. In addition, the influence of study characteristics on diagnostic performance and number of non-assessable segments (NAP) was investigated with logistic meta-regression. Results Fourteen studies were included. On a stent basis, Pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.82(0.72–0.89) and 0.91 (0.83–0.96). Pooled negative likelihood ratio and positive likelihood ratio were 0.20 (0.13–0.32) and 9.34 (4.68–18.62) respectively. The exclusion of non-assessable stents and the strut thickness of the stents had an influence on the diagnostic performance. The proportion of non-assessable stents was influenced by the number of detectors, stent diameter, strut thickness and the use of an edge-enhancing kernel. Conclusion The sensitivity of MDTCA for the detection of in-stent stenosis is insufficient to use this test to select patients for further invasive testing as with this strategy around 20% of the patients with in-stent stenosis would be missed. Further improvement of scanner technology is needed before it can be recommended as a triage instrument in practice. In addition, the number of non-assessable stents is also high. PMID:18671850

  2. Relationship between Coronary Artery Calcium Score by Multidetector Computed Tomography and Plaque Components by Virtual Histology Intravascular Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun Ha; Park, In Hyae; Jeong, Myung Ho; Ahmed, Khurshid; Hwang, Seung Hwan; Lee, Min Goo; Park, Keun-Ho; Sim, Doo Sun; Kim, Ju Han; Ahn, Youngkeun; Cho, Jeong Gwan; Park, Jong Chun; Kang, Jung Chaee

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between coronary artery calcium score (CACS) assessed by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and plaque components assessed by virtual histology-intravascular ultrasound (VH-IVUS) in 172 coronary artery disease (CAD) patients with 250 coronary lesions. CACS was assessed according to Agatston scoring method by MDCT and patients were divided into four groups: Group I (CACS = 0 [n = 52]); Group II (CACS = 1-100 [n = 99]); Group III (CACS = 101-400 [n = 84]); and Group IV (CACS > 400 [n = 15]). Total atheroma volume was greatest in Group IV (152 ± 132 µL vs 171 ± 114 µL vs 195 ± 149 µL vs 321±182 µL, P < 0.001). The absolute dense calcium (DC) and necrotic core (NC) volumes were greatest, and relative DC volume was greatest in Group IV (5.5 ± 6.6 µL vs 11.0 ± 10.3 µL vs 15.6 ± 13.6 µL vs 36.6 ± 18.2 µL, P < 0.001, and 14.8 ± 18.2 µL vs 19.5 ± 18.9 µL vs 22.5 ± 19.1 µL vs 41.7 ± 27.9 µL, P < 0.001, and 6.4 ± 5.3% vs 11.0 ± 6.2% vs 14.0 ± 6.5% vs 20.0 ± 7.8%, P < 0.001, respectively). The absolute plaque and DC and NC volumes and the relative DC volume correlated positively with calcium score. CAD patients with high calcium score have more vulnerable plaque components (greater DC and NC-containing plaques) than those with low calcium score. PMID:21860556

  3. Multidetector computed tomography versus platelet/spleen diameter ratio as methods for the detection of gastroesophageal varices

    PubMed Central

    Karatzas, Andreas; Triantos, Christos; Kalafateli, Maria; Marzigie, Misiel; Labropoulou-Karatza, Chryssoula; Thomopoulos, Konstantinos; Petsas, Theodoros; Kalogeropoulou, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Background All patients with liver cirrhosis should undergo screening endoscopy, but there are limitations and this approach places a heavy burden upon endoscopy units. The aim of this study was to compare multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and the platelet/spleen diameter ratio as non-invasive methods for the detection of gastroesophageal varices. Methods The study included 38 cirrhotics who underwent upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy and MDCT within one month. Two radiologists reviewed the scans, in order to determine the presence and the size of varices. Blood tests and measurement of the spleen maximum diameter were also carried out and the platelet/spleen diameter ratio was calculated. Endoscopy was considered the gold standard and the results of the two methods were compared to it. Results Varices were detected by upper GI endoscopy in 24 of 38 patients. The mean sensitivity and specificity of MDCT for the two observers was 86.1% and 57.1% respectively. In patients with large varices (>5 mm), the sensitivity was 100% (4/4). Using 909 as a cut-off value of the platelet/spleen diameter ratio this method yielded a sensitivity of 56.5% and a specificity of 35.7%. The difference in sensitivity and specificity between the two methods was statistically significant P<0.05. Conclusion MDCT was accurate for the detection of gastroesophageal varices, especially those with clinically significant size (>5 mm), and superior to platelet/spleen diameter ratio. MDCT could replace, in selected patients, upper GI endoscopy as a method for detecting gastroesophageal varices in cirrhotic patients. PMID:26751694

  4. Detection of root perforations using conventional and digital intraoral radiography, multidetector computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Eskandarloo, Amir; Noruzi-Gangachin, Maruf; Khajeh, Samira

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to compare the accuracy of conventional intraoral (CI) radiography, photostimulable phosphor (PSP) radiography, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for detection of strip and root perforations in endodontically treated teeth. Materials and Methods Mesial and distal roots of 72 recently extracted molar were endodontically prepared. Perforations were created in 0.2, 0.3, or 0.4 mm diameter around the furcation of 48 roots (strip perforation) and at the external surface of 48 roots (root perforation); 48 roots were not perforated (control group). After root obturation, intraoral radiography, CBCT and MDCT were taken. Discontinuity in the root structure was interpreted as perforation. Two observers examined the images. Data were analyzed using Stata software and Chi-square test. Results The sensitivity and specificity of CI, PSP, CBCT and MDCT in detection of strip perforations were 81.25% and 93.75%, 85.42% and 91.67%, 97.92% and 85.42%, and 72.92% and 87.50%, respectively. For diagnosis of root perforation, the sensitivity and specificity were 87.50% and 93.75%, 89.58% and 91.67%, 97.92% and 85.42%, and 81.25% and 87.50%, respectively. For detection of strip perforation, the difference between CBCT and all other methods including CI, PSP and MDCT was significant (p < 0.05). For detection of root perforation, only the difference between CBCT and MDCT was significant, and for all the other methods no statistically significant difference was observed. Conclusions If it is not possible to diagnose the root perforations by periapical radiographs, CBCT is the best radiographic technique while MDCT is not recommended. PMID:25671214

  5. Ct2 Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Soloway, Mark S

    2016-09-01

    The patient is an 80-year-old man who presented with gross hematuria. His past medical history indicates he was a cigarette smoker with 50 pack/years. He was successfully treated for carcinoma of the lung 7 years ago. He received chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery. He has mild COPD but has a good performance status. His laboratory studies do not indicate any abnormalities in terms of renal function. He does not have any significant cardiac disease. He has a medium build. He had prostate cancer and underwent a successful radical prostatectomy 10 years ago. His PSA is undetectable. He has some urinary incontinence and wears two pads/day. He underwent the appropriate investigations for gross hematuria. A CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis was normal with the exception of a 4-cm posterior mass in the bladder. There was no hydronephrosis and no enlarged lymph nodes. He underwent a transurethral resection of a solitary bladder tumor performed by another urologist. The tumor was described as large and sessile. It was located on the posterior wall and was approximately 4 cm. The bimanual examination did not reveal a mass. The pathology report stated that the tumor was a high-grade urothelial carcinoma with invasion into the muscularis propria. There was no lymphovascular invasion. I performed a reTURBT, and at that procedure, I did not identify any obvious tumor but the prior resection site was evident. I resected the prior tumor site quite extensively both in depth and width. The pathology revealed only focal carcinoma in situ. There was ample muscle in the specimen and there was some fat as well. As stated, they were free of any cancer. The patient is receptive to any treatment approach. PMID:27457483

  6. Regularization design for high-quality cone-beam CT of intracranial hemorrhage using statistical reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Xu, J.; Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Wang, X.; Foos, D. H.; Aygun, N.; Koliatsos, V. E.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is associated with pathologies such as hemorrhagic stroke and traumatic brain injury. Multi-detector CT is the current front-line imaging modality for detecting ICH (fresh blood contrast 40-80 HU, down to 1 mm). Flat-panel detector (FPD) cone-beam CT (CBCT) offers a potential alternative with a smaller scanner footprint, greater portability, and lower cost potentially well suited to deployment at the point of care outside standard diagnostic radiology and emergency room settings. Previous studies have suggested reliable detection of ICH down to 3 mm in CBCT using high-fidelity artifact correction and penalized weighted least-squared (PWLS) image reconstruction with a post-artifact-correction noise model. However, ICH reconstructed by traditional image regularization exhibits nonuniform spatial resolution and noise due to interaction between the statistical weights and regularization, which potentially degrades the detectability of ICH. In this work, we propose three regularization methods designed to overcome these challenges. The first two compute spatially varying certainty for uniform spatial resolution and noise, respectively. The third computes spatially varying regularization strength to achieve uniform "detectability," combining both spatial resolution and noise in a manner analogous to a delta-function detection task. Experiments were conducted on a CBCT test-bench, and image quality was evaluated for simulated ICH in different regions of an anthropomorphic head. The first two methods improved the uniformity in spatial resolution and noise compared to traditional regularization. The third exhibited the highest uniformity in detectability among all methods and best overall image quality. The proposed regularization provides a valuable means to achieve uniform image quality in CBCT of ICH and is being incorporated in a CBCT prototype for ICH imaging.

  7. Gender Differences of Airway Dimensions in Anatomically Matched Sites on CT in Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu-Il; Schroeder, Joyce; Lynch, David; Newell, John; Make, Barry; Friedlander, Adam; Estépar, Raúl San José; Hanania, Nicola A.; Washko, George; Murphy, James R.; Wilson, Carla; Hokanson, John E.; Zach, Jordan; Butterfield, Kiel; Bowler, Russell P.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives There are limited data on, and controversies regarding gender differences in the airway dimensions of smokers. Multi-detector CT (MDCT) images were analyzed to examine whether gender could explain differences in airway dimensions of anatomically matched airways in smokers. Materials and Methods We used VIDA imaging software to analyze MDCT scans from 2047 smokers (M:F, 1021:1026) from the COPDGene® cohort. The airway dimensions were analyzed from segmental to subsubsegmental bronchi. We compared the differences of luminal area, inner diameter, wall thickness, wall area percentage (WA%) for each airway between men and women, and multiple linear regression including covariates (age, gender, body sizes, and other relevant confounding factors) was used to determine the predictors of each airway dimensions. Results Lumen area, internal diameter and wall thickness were smaller for women than men in all measured airway (18.4 vs 22.5 mm2 for segmental bronchial lumen area, 10.4 vs 12.5 mm2 for subsegmental bronchi, 6.5 vs 7.7 mm2 for subsubsegmental bronchi, respectively p < 0.001). However, women had greater WA% in subsegmental and subsubsegmental bronchi. In multivariate regression, gender remained one of the most significant predictors of WA%, lumen area, inner diameter and wall thickness. Conclusion Women smokers have higher WA%, but lower luminal area, internal diameter and airway thickness in anatomically matched airways as measured by CT scan than do male smokers. This difference may explain, in part, gender differences in the prevalence of COPD and airflow limitation. PMID:21756032

  8. SU-E-I-24: Method for CT Automatic Exposure Control Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Gracia, M; Olasolo, J; Martin, M; Bragado, L; Gallardo, N; Miquelez, S; Maneru, F; Lozares, S; Pellejero, S; Rubio, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Design of a phantom and a simple method for the automatic exposure control (AEC) verification in CT. This verification is included in the computed tomography (CT) Spanish Quality Assurance Protocol. Methods: The phantom design is made from the head and the body phantom used for the CTDI measurement and PMMA plates (35×35 cm2) of 10 cm thickness. Thereby, three different thicknesses along the longitudinal axis are obtained which permit to evaluate the longitudinal AEC performance. Otherwise, the existent asymmetry in the PMMA layers helps to assess angular and 3D AEC operation.Recent acquisition in our hospital (August 2014) of Nomex electrometer (PTW), together with the 10 cm pencil ionization chamber, led to register dose rate as a function of time. Measurements with this chamber fixed at 0° and 90° on the gantry where made on five multidetector-CTs from principal manufacturers. Results: Individual analysis of measurements shows dose rate variation as a function of phantom thickness. The comparative analysis shows that dose rate is kept constant in the head and neck phantom while the PMMA phantom exhibits an abrupt variation between both results, being greater results at 90° as the thickness of the phantom is 3.5 times larger than in the perpendicular direction. Conclusion: Proposed method is simple, quick and reproducible. Results obtained let a qualitative evaluation of the AEC and they are consistent with the expected behavior. A line of future development is to quantitatively study the intensity modulation and parameters of image quality, and a possible comparative study between different manufacturers.

  9. Cardiac cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Manzke, Robert . E-mail: robert.manzke@philips.com

    2005-10-15

    This doctoral thesis addresses imaging of the heart with retrospectively gated helical cone-beam computed tomography (CT). A thorough review of the CT reconstruction literature is presented in combination with a historic overview of cardiac CT imaging and a brief introduction to other cardiac imaging modalities. The thesis includes a comprehensive chapter about the theory of CT reconstruction, familiarizing the reader with the problem of cone-beam reconstruction. The anatomic and dynamic properties of the heart are outlined and techniques to derive the gating information are reviewed. With the extended cardiac reconstruction (ECR) framework, a new approach is presented for the heart-rate-adaptive gated helical cardiac cone-beam CT reconstruction. Reconstruction assessment criteria such as the temporal resolution, the homogeneity in terms of the cardiac phase, and the smoothness at cycle-to-cycle transitions are developed. Several reconstruction optimization approaches are described: An approach for the heart-rate-adaptive optimization of the temporal resolution is presented. Streak artifacts at cycle-to-cycle transitions can be minimized by using an improved cardiac weighting scheme. The optimal quiescent cardiac phase for the reconstruction can be determined automatically with the motion map technique. Results for all optimization procedures applied to ECR are presented and discussed based on patient and phantom data. The ECR algorithm is analyzed for larger detector arrays of future cone-beam systems throughout an extensive simulation study based on a four-dimensional cardiac CT phantom. The results of the scientific work are summarized and an outlook proposing future directions is given. The presented thesis is available for public download at www.cardiac-ct.net.

  10. CT Imaging: Basics and New Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyrin, Françoise; Engelke, Klaus

    This chapter presents the principle of X-ray CT and its evolution during the last 40 years. The first section describes the physical basis of X-ray CT, tomographic image reconstruction algorithms, and the source of artifacts in X-ray CT images. The second section is devoted to the evolution of CT technology from the first translation-rotation systems to multi-slice spiral CTs currently used today. The next section addresses specific developments of CT technology and applications, like perfusion CT, quantitative CT, and spectral CT. The fourth section introduces the problem of radiation exposure delivered to the patient and its evaluation. Finally the last section addresses the development in micro- and even nano-CT which is a rapidly evolving area in preclinical imaging and biology.

  11. New horizons in cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    den Harder, A M; Willemink, M J; de Jong, P A; Schilham, A M R; Rajiah, P; Takx, R A P; Leiner, T

    2016-08-01

    Until recently, cardiovascular computed tomography angiography (CCTA) was associated with considerable radiation doses. The introduction of tube current modulation and automatic tube potential selection as well as high-pitch prospective ECG-triggering and iterative reconstruction offer the ability to decrease dose with approximately one order of magnitude, often to sub-millisievert dose levels. In parallel, advancements in computational technology have enabled the measurement of fractional flow reserve (FFR) from CCTA data (FFRCT). This technique shows potential to replace invasively measured FFR to select patients in need of coronary intervention. Furthermore, developments in scanner hardware have led to the introduction of dual-energy and photon-counting CT, which offer the possibility of material decomposition imaging. Dual-energy CT reduces beam hardening, which enables CCTA in patients with a high calcium burden and more robust myocardial CT perfusion imaging. Future-generation CT systems will be capable of counting individual X-ray photons. Photon-counting CT is promising and may result in a substantial further radiation dose reduction, vastly increased spatial resolution, and the introduction of a whole new class of contrast agents. PMID:26932775

  12. Dose reduction assessment in dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging in a porcine balloon-induced-ischemia model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Vembar, Mani; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the use of an advanced hybrid iterative reconstruction (IR) technique (iDose4, Philips Health- care) for low dose dynamic myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) imaging. A porcine model was created to mimic coronary stenosis through partial occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery with a balloon catheter. The severity of LAD occlusion was adjusted with FFR measurements. Dynamic CT images were acquired at end-systole (45% R-R) using a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner. Various corrections were applied to the acquired scans to reduce motion and imaging artifacts. Absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF) was computed with a deconvolution-based approach using singular value decomposition (SVD). We compared a high and a low dose radiation protocol corresponding to two different tube-voltage/tube-current combinations (80kV p/100mAs and 120kV p/150mAs). The corresponding radiation doses for these protocols are 7.8mSv and 34.3mSV , respectively. The images were reconstructed using conventional FBP and three noise-reduction strengths of the IR method, iDose. Flow contrast-to-noise ratio, CNRf, as obtained from MBF maps, was used to quantitatively evaluate the effect of reconstruction on contrast between normal and ischemic myocardial tissue. Preliminary results showed that the use of iDose to reconstruct low dose images provide better or comparable CNRf to that of high dose images reconstructed with FBP, suggesting significant dose savings. CNRf was improved with the three used levels of iDose compared to FBP for both protocols. When using the entire 4D dynamic sequence for MBF computation, a 77% dose reduction was achieved, while considering only half the scans (i.e., every other heart cycle) allowed even further dose reduction while maintaining relatively higher CNRf.

  13. Assessment of regional ventilation and deformation using 4D-CT imaging for healthy human lungs during tidal breathing.

    PubMed

    Jahani, Nariman; Choi, Sanghun; Choi, Jiwoong; Iyer, Krishna; Hoffman, Eric A; Lin, Ching-Long

    2015-11-15

    This study aims to assess regional ventilation, nonlinearity, and hysteresis of human lungs during dynamic breathing via image registration of four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) scans. Six healthy adult humans were studied by spiral multidetector-row CT during controlled tidal breathing as well as during total lung capacity and functional residual capacity breath holds. Static images were utilized to contrast static vs. dynamic (deep vs. tidal) breathing. A rolling-seal piston system was employed to maintain consistent tidal breathing during 4D-CT spiral image acquisition, providing required between-breath consistency for physiologically meaningful reconstructed respiratory motion. Registration-derived variables including local air volume and anisotropic deformation index (ADI, an indicator of preferential deformation in response to local force) were employed to assess regional ventilation and lung deformation. Lobar distributions of air volume change during tidal breathing were correlated with those of deep breathing (R(2) ≈ 0.84). Small discrepancies between tidal and deep breathing were shown to be likely due to different distributions of air volume change in the left and the right lungs. We also demonstrated an asymmetric characteristic of flow rate between inhalation and exhalation. With ADI, we were able to quantify nonlinearity and hysteresis of lung deformation that can only be captured in dynamic images. Nonlinearity quantified by ADI is greater during inhalation, and it is stronger in the lower lobes (P < 0.05). Lung hysteresis estimated by the difference of ADI between inhalation and exhalation is more significant in the right lungs than that in the left lungs. PMID:26316512

  14. Assessment of a CT image of the oral cavity with use of an aid focusing on a neck examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyo-Jong; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Kim, Sung-Soo; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Chung, Woon-Kwan

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to provide clinical information on an oral cavity disease assessment that was conducted using a self-manufactured aid in a computed tomography (CT) oral examination. The study subjects included 30 patients, who were examined using a multi-detector CT (MDCT) 128-slice CT Scanner. Rapidia software was used for quantitative analysis, while a questionnaire and qualitative analysis were used to assess the convenience. The significance was evaluated using a Student's t-test and a Wilcoxon signed rank test. A p value < 0.05 was considered significant. The convenience was evaluated by using a multiple response frequency analysis. The means and the standard deviations, which depended on use of the aid, were 2440.41 ± 4226.26 and 57443.86 ± 12445.91 respectively, the higher values being seen in the image assessment when the aid was used (p = 0.000). In a qualitative evaluation, the means and standard deviations were 2.52 ± 0.44 and 1.62 ± 0.22, respectively, the higher values being shown in the image assessment when the aid was used (p = 0.012). According to the convenience assessment that was conducted using a questionnaire, 80% of the respondents answered that they did not have any inconvenience when using the aid because the scores were 4 points or higher on the scale. In conclusion, the contrast increased when the aid, which enabled a clear identification of the anatomical structure, was inserted to examine the oral cavity. In particular, the patients considered the use of the aid to be convenient. Overall, the aid is recommended for use in a head/neck examination.

  15. Renal applications of dual-energy CT.

    PubMed

    Kaza, Ravi K; Platt, Joel F

    2016-06-01

    Dual-energy CT is being increasingly used for abdominal imaging due to its incremental benefit of material characterization without significant increase in radiation dose. Knowledge of the different dual-energy CT acquisition techniques and image processing algorithms is essential to optimize imaging protocols and understand potential limitations while using dual-energy CT renal imaging such as urinary calculi characterization, assessment of renal masses and in CT urography. This review article provides an overview of the current dual-energy CT techniques and use of dual-energy CT in renal imaging. PMID:27010938

  16. Malignant external otitis: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, H.D.; Wolfe, P.; May, M.

    1982-11-01

    Malignant external otitis is an aggressive infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa that most often occurs in elderly diabetics. Malignant external otitis often spreads inferiorly from the external canal to involve the subtemporal area and progresses medially towards the petrous apex leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies. The computed tomographic (CT) findings in malignant external otitis include obliteration of the normal fat planes in the subtemporal area as well as patchy destruction of the bony cortex of the mastoid. The point of exit of the various cranial nerves can be identified on CT scans, and the extent of the inflammatory mass correlates well with the clinical findings. Four cases of malignant external otitis are presented. In each case CT provided a good demonstration of involvement of the soft tissues at the base of the skull.

  17. CT of the gluteal region

    SciTech Connect

    Wechsler, R.J.; Schilling, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    Although the buttock can be involved in many pathologic processes, most physicians pay little attention to this area of the body. Because pelvic computed tomography (CT) delineates gluteal anatomy exquisitely, pathologic processes in the buttock are now frequently seen. Inflammation, neoplasm, or trauma involving the buttock may be difficult to differentiate without clinical history. However, spread of these processes to or from the pelvis or retroperitoneum is easily documented by CT. A number of these pathologic processes and the pathways of spread of disease involving the pelvis or retroperitoneum are described in this review.

  18. In Defense of Body CT

    PubMed Central

    McCollough, Cynthia H.; Guimarães, Luís; Fletcher, Joel G.

    2009-01-01

    Rapid technical developments, and an expanding list of applications that have supplanted less accurate or more invasive diagnostic tests, have led to a dramatic increase in the use of body CT imaging in medical practice since its introduction in 1975. Our purpose here is to discuss medical justification of the small risk associated with the ionizing radiation used in CT and to provide perspectives on practice-specific decisions that can maximize overall patient benefit. In addition, we review available dose management and optimization technique. PMID:19542392

  19. Changes in entrance surface dose in relation to the location of shielding material in chest computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Y. M.; Cho, J. H.; Kim, S. C.

    2015-07-01

    This study examined the effects of entrance surface dose (ESD) on the abdomen and pelvis of the patient when undergoing chest computed tomography (CT) procedure, and evaluated the effects of ESD reduction depending on the location of radiation shield. For CT scanner, the 64-slice multi-detector computed tomography was used. The alderson radiation therapy phantom and optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD), which enabled measurement from low to high dose, were also used. For measurement of radiation dose, the slice number from 9 to 21 of the phantom was set as the test range, which included apex up to both costophrenic angles. A total of 10 OSLD nanoDots were attached for measurement of the front and rear ESD. Cyclic tests were performed using the low-dose chest CT and high-resolution CT (HRCT) protocol on the following set-ups: without shielding; shielding only on the front side; shielding only on the rear side; and shielding for both front and rear sides. According to the test results, ESD for both front and rear sides was higher in HRCT than low-dose CT when radiation shielding was not used. It was also determined that, compared to the set-up that did not use the radiation shield, locating the radiation shield on the front side was effective in reducing front ESD, while locating the radiation shield on the rear side reduced rear ESD level. Shielding both the front and rear sides resulted in ESD reduction. In conclusion, it was confirmed that shielding the front and rear sides was the most effective method to reduce the ESD effect caused by scatter ray during radiography.

  20. PET/CT in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Tinsu; Mawlawi, Osama

    2008-11-15

    PET/CT is an effective tool for the diagnosis, staging and restaging of cancer patients. It combines the complementary information of functional PET images and anatomical CT images in one imaging session. Conventional stand-alone PET has been replaced by PET/CT for improved patient comfort, patient throughput, and most importantly the proven clinical outcome of PET/CT over that of PET and that of separate PET and CT. There are over two thousand PET/CT scanners installed worldwide since 2001. Oncology is the main application for PET/CT. Fluorine-18 deoxyglucose is the choice of radiopharmaceutical in PET for imaging the glucose uptake in tissues, correlated with an increased rate of glycolysis in many tumor cells. New molecular targeted agents are being developed to improve the accuracy of targeting different disease states and assessing therapeutic response. Over 50% of cancer patients receive radiation therapy (RT) in the course of their disease treatment. Clinical data have demonstrated that the information provided by PET/CT often changes patient management of the patient and/or modifies the RT plan from conventional CT simulation. The application of PET/CT in RT is growing and will become increasingly important. Continuing improvement of PET/CT instrumentation will also make it easier for radiation oncologists to integrate PET/CT in RT. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the current PET/CT technology, to project the future development of PET and CT for PET/CT, and to discuss some issues in adopting PET/CT in RT and potential improvements in PET/CT simulation of the thorax in radiation therapy.

  1. Low-dose interpolated average CT for attenuation correction in cardiac PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tung-Hsin; Zhang, Geoffrey; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Chen, Chih-Hao; Yang, Bang-Hung; Wu, Nien-Yun; Huang, Tzung-Chi

    2010-07-01

    Because of the advantages in the use of high photon flux and thus the short scan times of CT imaging, the traditional 68Ge scans for positron emission tomography (PET) image attenuation correction have been replaced by CT scans in the modern PET/CT technology. The combination of fast CT scan and slow PET scan often causes image misalignment between the PET and CT images due to respiration motion. Use of the average CT derived from cine CT images is reported to reduce such misalignment. However, the radiation dose to patients is higher with cine CT scans. This study introduces a method that uses breath-hold CT images and their interpolations to generate the average CT for PET image attenuation correction. Breath-hold CT sets are taken at end-inspiration and end-expiration. Deformable image registration is applied to generate a voxel-to-voxel motion matrix between the two CT sets. The motion is equally divided into 5 steps from inspiration to expiration and 5 steps from expiration to inspiration, generating a total of 8 phases of interpolated CT sets. An average CT image is generated from all the 10 phase CT images, including original inhale/exhale CT and 8 interpolated CT sets. Quantitative comparison shows that the reduction of image misalignment artifacts using the average CT from the interpolation technique for PET attenuation correction is at a similar level as that using cine average CT, while the dose to the patient from the CT scans is reduced significantly. The interpolated average CT method hence provides a low dose alternative to cine CT scans for PET attenuation correction.

  2. Visual vs Fully Automatic Histogram-Based Assessment of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) Progression Using Sequential Multidetector Computed Tomography (MDCT)

    PubMed Central

    Colombi, Davide; Dinkel, Julien; Weinheimer, Oliver; Obermayer, Berenike; Buzan, Teodora; Nabers, Diana; Bauer, Claudia; Oltmanns, Ute; Palmowski, Karin; Herth, Felix; Kauczor, Hans Ulrich; Sverzellati, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe changes over time in extent of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) at multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) assessed by semi-quantitative visual scores (VSs) and fully automatic histogram-based quantitative evaluation and to test the relationship between these two methods of quantification. Methods Forty IPF patients (median age: 70 y, interquartile: 62-75 years; M:F, 33:7) that underwent 2 MDCT at different time points with a median interval of 13 months (interquartile: 10-17 months) were retrospectively evaluated. In-house software YACTA quantified automatically lung density histogram (10th-90th percentile in 5th percentile steps). Longitudinal changes in VSs and in the percentiles of attenuation histogram were obtained in 20 untreated patients and 20 patients treated with pirfenidone. Pearson correlation analysis was used to test the relationship between VSs and selected percentiles. Results In follow-up MDCT, visual overall extent of parenchymal abnormalities (OE) increased in median by 5 %/year (interquartile: 0 %/y; +11 %/y). Substantial difference was found between treated and untreated patients in HU changes of the 40th and of the 80th percentiles of density histogram. Correlation analysis between VSs and selected percentiles showed higher correlation between the changes (Δ) in OE and Δ 40th percentile (r=0.69; p<0.001) as compared to Δ 80th percentile (r=0.58; p<0.001); closer correlation was found between Δ ground-glass extent and Δ 40th percentile (r=0.66, p<0.001) as compared to Δ 80th percentile (r=0.47, p=0.002), while the Δ reticulations correlated better with the Δ 80th percentile (r=0.56, p<0.001) in comparison to Δ 40th percentile (r=0.43, p=0.003). Conclusions There is a relevant and fully automatically measurable difference at MDCT in VSs and in histogram analysis at one year follow-up of IPF patients, whether treated or untreated: Δ 40th percentile might reflect the change in overall extent of lung

  3. Spinopelvic dissociation: multidetector computed tomographic evaluation of fracture patterns and associated injuries at a single level 1 trauma center.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pushpender; Barnwell, Jonathan C; Lenchik, Leon; Wuertzer, Scott D; Miller, Anna N

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the present study is to evaluate multidetector computed tomographic (MDCT) fracture patterns and associated injuries in patients with spinopelvic dissociation (SPD). Our institutional trauma registry database was reviewed from Jan. 1, 2006, to Sept. 30, 2012, specifically evaluating patients with sacral fractures. MDCT scans of patients with sacral fractures were reviewed to determine the presence of SPD. SPD cases were characterized into the following fracture patterns: U-shaped, Y-shaped, T-shaped, H-shaped, and burst. The following MDCT features were recorded: level of the horizontal fracture, location of vertical fracture, kyphosis between major fracture fragments, displacement of fracture fragment, narrowing of central spinal canal, narrowing of neural foramina, and extension into sacroiliac joints. Quantitative evaluation of the sacral fractures was performed in accordance with the consensus statement by the Spine Trauma Study Group. Medical records were reviewed to determine associated pelvic and non-pelvic fractures, bladder and bowel injuries, nerve injuries, and type of surgical intervention. Twenty-one patients had SPD, of whom 13 were men and eight were women. Mean age was 41.8 years (range 18.8 to 87.7). Five fractures (24 %) were U-shaped, six (29 %) H-shaped, four (19 %) Y-shaped, and six (29 %) burst. Nine patients (43 %) had central canal narrowing, and 19 (90 %) had neural foramina narrowing. Eleven patients (52 %) had kyphotic angulation between major fracture fragments, and seven patients (33 %) had either anterior (24 %) or posterior (10 %) displacement of the proximal fracture fragment. Fourteen patients (67 %) had associated pelvic fractures, and 20 (95 %) had associated non-pelvic fractures. Two patients (10 %) had associated urethral injuries, and one (5 %) had an associated colon injury. Seven patients (33 %) had associated nerve injuries. Six patients (29 %) had surgical fixation while 15 (71 %) were

  4. Role of 16-multidetector computed tomography in the assessment of coronary artery stenoses: A prospective study of consecutive patients

    PubMed Central

    Postel, Thomas; Frick, Matthias; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Alber, Hannes; Zwick, Ralf; Suessenbacher, Alois; Mallouhi, Ammar; Friedrich, Guy; Pachinger, Otmar; Nedden, Dieter Zur; Weidinger, Franz

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recent studies have demonstrated a high sensitivity (S) of 16-multidetector computed tomography (16-MDCT) for the detection of significant coronary artery stenoses. Whether these results are applicable to clinical practice is unclear. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to compare 16-MDCT angiography with conventional coronary angiography (CCA) for the detection of significant coronary artery stenoses in a consecutive series of patients. METHOD A total of 93 consecutive patients (mean [± SD] age 59±9 years), in whom CCA was performed for stable angina pectoris, underwent 16-MDCT angiography (16×0.75 mm, table feed 6.5 mm/s, rotation time 0.42 s; Sensation 16, Siemens Medical Solutions, Germany) the day before performing CCA. Patients with diabetes mellitus, serum creatinine level higher than 132.6 μmol/L and/or acute coronary syndromes were excluded. Two observers blinded to CCA results evaluated MDCT angiograms according to standard criteria. Segment-based (13 segments per patient) and patient-based (at least one stenosis greater than 50% lumen diameter reduction) analyses were performed. RESULTS A total of 1209 segments were analyzed. Of these segments, 173 (14%) were excluded due to poor image quality or massive calcification. In 86 segments, CCA revealed significant coronary artery stenosis (greater than 50% diameter reduction). However, 16-MDCT detected only 47 of these, resulting in a S of 55% and a specificity (SP) of 97% (positive predictive value 64%; negative predictive value 96%). On a patient-based analysis, the S increased to 89%, whereas the SP still remained high (87%). CONCLUSION In this relatively large consecutive cohort, S for the detection of significant coronary artery stenoses was moderate on a segment-based analysis but increased on a patient-based analysis using 16-MDCT. In contrast, SP was high in both analyses, supporting the use of 16-MDCT for the exclusion of significant coronary artery stenoses. Further

  5. Pulmonary 64-MDCT angiography with 50 mL of iodinated contrast material in an unselected patient population: a feasible protocol*

    PubMed Central

    Trad, Henrique Simão; Boasquevisque, Gustavo Santos; Giacometti, Tiago Rangon; Trad, Catherine Yang; Zoghbi Neto, Orlando Salomão; Trad, Clovis Simão

    2016-01-01

    Objective To propose a protocol for pulmonary angiography using 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (64-MDCT) with 50 mL of iodinated contrast material, in an unselected patient population, as well as to evaluate vascular enhancement and image quality. Materials and Methods We evaluated 29 patients (22-86 years of age). The body mass index ranged from 19.0 kg/m2 to 41.8 kg/m2. Patients underwent pulmonary CT angiography in a 64-MDCT scanner, receiving 50 mL of iodinated contrast material via venous access at a rate of 4.5 mL/s. Bolus tracking was applied in the superior vena cava. Two experienced radiologists assessed image quality and vascular enhancement. Results The mean density was 382 Hounsfield units (HU) for the pulmonary trunk; 379 and 377 HU for the right and left main pulmonary arteries, respectively; and 346 and 364 HU for the right and left inferior pulmonary arteries, respectively. In all patients, subsegmental arteries were analyzed. There were streak artifacts from contrast material in the superior vena cava in all patients. However, those artifacts did not impair the image analysis. Conclusion Our findings suggest that pulmonary angiography using 64-MDCT with 50 mL of iodinated contrast can produce high quality images in unselected patient populations. PMID:27141128

  6. Pocket atlas of normal CT anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, J.B.; Lee, J.K.T.; Sagel, S.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a quick reference for interpreting CT scans of the extracranial organs. This collection of 41 CT scans covers all the major organs of the body: neck and larynx; chest; abdomen; male pelvis; and female pelvis.

  7. [CT diagnosis of coal workers' pneumoconiosis].

    PubMed

    Pan, J S

    1989-02-01

    In order to evaluate the usefulness of CT in CWP, 100 coal workers were examined with both chest radiograph and CT scan. Comparison was done, the result indicated that both modalities yielded similar sensitivity to simple CWP. The CT score of simple CWP correlated well with ILO classification and 1986 Chinese criteria for staging of pneumoconiosis, whereas in complicated CWP, the CT scan was significantly superior to chest radiograph. CT scan identified readily large opacities. It could detect large opacities in 40% of simple CWP diagnosed on the basis of chest radiograph. CT scan also identified more cavities and calcifications within large opacities. The CT attenuation values were less reliable. The authors were of the opinion that at present CT attenuation values is not recommended for routine evaluation of CWP. PMID:2758921

  8. Acute pancreatitis: clinical vs. CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.C.; Barkin, J.; Isikoff, M.B.; Silver stein, W.; Kalser, M.

    1982-08-01

    In a prospective study of 91 patients with acute pancreatitis, computed tomographic (CT) findings were correlated with the clinical type of acute pancreatitis. In acute edematous pancreatitis (63 patients; 16 with repeat CT), CT was normal (28%) or showed inflammation limited to the pancreas (61%). Phlegmonous changes were present in 11%, including one patient with focal pancreatic hemorrhage, indicating that clinically unsuspected hemorrhagic pancreatitis can occur. In acute necrotizing (hemorrhagic, suppurative) pancreatitis (nine patients; eight with repeat CT), no patient had a normal CT scan and 89% had phlegmonous changes. One patient had hemorrhagic pancreatitis and three had abscesses. In acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis (10 patients; three with repeat CT), there were pancreatic calcifications (70%), a focal mass (40%), and pancreatic ductal dilation (30%). On follow-up CT, the findings of acute pancreatitis did not always disappear with resolution of the clinical symptons. This was especialy true of phlegmonous pancreatitis, where the CT findings could persist for months.

  9. The evolution of PET-CT.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Bettye G

    2005-01-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) was the first fused or combined medical imaging technique. Although PET-CT has received widespread acclaim as a major imaging advancement, many questions have surfaced regarding its use. This article answers some of these questions and examines what PET-CT means to medicine and the medical imaging community. PMID:15835615

  10. Calibrator Blocks For Computerized Tomography (CT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, H. Peter

    1990-01-01

    Sets of calibrator blocks developed for use with industrial computerized tomography (CT) systems. Set of blocks (or number of stacked sets of blocks) placed on object table of CT system and scanned in usual way. Blocks include holes of known size, shape, and location. Appearance of holes in output image of CT system used to verify operation of system.

  11. Low kV settings CT angiography (CTA) with low dose contrast medium volume protocol in the assessment of thoracic and abdominal aorta disease: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Talei Franzesi, C; Fior, D; Bonaffini, P A; Minutolo, O; Sironi, S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the diagnostic quality of low dose (100 kV) CT angiography (CTA), by using ultra-low contrast medium volume (30 ml), for thoracic and abdominal aorta evaluation. Methods: 67 patients with thoracic or abdominal vascular disease underwent multidetector CT study using a 256 slice scanner, with low dose radiation protocol (automated tube current modulation, 100 kV) and low contrast medium volume (30 ml; 4 ml s−1). Density measurements were performed on ascending, arch, descending thoracic aorta, anonymous branch, abdominal aorta, and renal and common iliac arteries. Radiation dose exposure [dose–length product (DLP)] was calculated. A control group of 35 patients with thoracic or abdominal vascular disease were evaluated with standard CTA protocol (automated tube current modulation, 120 kV; contrast medium, 80 ml). Results: In all patients, we correctly visualized and evaluated main branches of the thoracic and abdominal aorta. No difference in density measurements was achieved between low tube voltage protocol (mean attenuation value of thoracic aorta, 304 HU; abdominal, 343 HU; renal arteries, 331 HU) and control group (mean attenuation value of thoracic aorta, 320 HU; abdominal, 339; renal arteries, 303 HU). Radiation dose exposure in low tube voltage protocol was significantly different between thoracic and abdominal low tube voltage studies (490 and 324 DLP, respectively) and the control group (thoracic DLP, 1032; abdomen, DLP 1078). Conclusion: Low-tube-voltage protocol may provide a diagnostic performance comparable with that of the standard protocol, decreasing radiation dose exposure and contrast material volume amount. Advances in knowledge: Low-tube-voltage-setting protocol combined with ultra-low contrast agent volume (30 ml), by using new multidetector-row CT scanners, represents a feasible diagnostic tool to significantly reduce the radiation dose delivered to patients and to preserve renal function

  12. Reproducibility and validity of lung density measures from cardiac CT scans – the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Lung Study

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Eric A; Jiang, Rui; Baumhauer, Heather; Brooks, Michael A; Carr, J Jeffrey; Detrano, Robert; Reinhardt, Joseph; Rodriguez, Josanna; Stukovsky, Karen; Wong, Nathan; Barr, R Graham

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Cardiac CT scans for the assessment of coronary calcium scores include approximately 70% of the lung volume and may be useful for the quantitative assessment of emphysema. The reproducibility of lung density measures from cardiac CTs and their validity compared to lung density measures from full-lung scans is unknown. Methods and Methods The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) performed paired cardiac CT scans for 6,814 participants at baseline and at follow-up. The MESA-Lung Study assessed lung density measures in the lung fields of these cardiac scans, counting voxels below -910 HU as moderate-to-severe emphysema-like lung regions. We evaluated: 1) the reproducibility of lung density measures among 120 randomly selected participants, 2) the comparability of measures acquired on electron-beam CT (EBT) and multidetector CT (MDCT) scanners among 10 participants; and 3) the validity of these measures compared to full-lung scans among 42 participants. Limits of agreement were determined using Bland-Altman approaches. Results Percent emphysema measures from paired cardiac scans were highly correlated (r=0.92-0.95) with mean difference of -0.05% (95% limits of agreement: -8.3, 8.4%). Measures from EBT and MDCT scanners were comparable (mean difference -0.9%; 95% limits of agreement: -5.1, 3.3%). Percent emphysema measures from MDCT cardiac and MDCT full-lung scans were highly correlated (r=0.93) and demonstrated reasonable agreement (mean difference 2.2%; 95% limits of agreement: -9.2, 13.8%). Conclusion While full-lung imaging is preferred for the quantification of emphysema, the lung imaging from paired cardiac CTs provided a reproducible and valid quantitative assessment of emphysema in a population-based sample. PMID:19427979

  13. In-Plane Shielding for CT: Effect of Off-Centering, Automatic Exposure Control and Shield-to-Surface Distance

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Pragya; Singh, Sarabjeet; Saini, Sanjay; Shepard, Jo-Anne O.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess effects of off-centering, automatic exposure control, and padding on attenuation values, noise, and radiation dose when using in-plane bismuth-based shields for CT scanning. Materials and Methods A 30 cm anthropomorphic chest phantom was scanned on a 64-multidetector CT, with the center of the phantom aligned to the gantry isocenter. Scanning was repeated after placing a bismuth breast shield on the anterior surface with no gap and with 1, 2, and 6 cm of padding between the shield and the phantom surface. The "shielded" phantom was also scanned with combined modulation and off-centering of the phantom at 2 cm, 4 cm and 6 cm below the gantry isocenter. CT numbers, noise, and surface radiation dose were measured. The data were analyzed using an analysis of variance. Results The in-plane shield was not associated with any significant increment for the surface dose or CT dose index volume, which was achieved by comparing the radiation dose measured by combined modulation technique to the fixed mAs (p > 0.05). Irrespective of the gap or the surface CT numbers, surface noise increased to a larger extent compared to Hounsfield unit (HU) (0-6 cm, 26-55%) and noise (0-6 cm, 30-40%) in the center. With off-centering, in-plane shielding devices are associated with less dose savings, although dose reduction was still higher than in the absence of shielding (0 cm off-center, 90% dose reduction; 2 cm, 61%) (p < 0.0001). Streak artifacts were noted at 0 cm and 1 cm gaps but not at 2 cm and 6 cm gaps of shielding to the surface distances. Conclusion In-plane shields are associated with greater image noise, artifactually increased attenuation values, and streak artifacts. However, shields reduce radiation dose regardless of the extent of off-centering. Automatic exposure control did not increase radiation dose when using a shield. PMID:19270862

  14. Dose coefficients in pediatric and adult abdominopelvic CT based on 100 patient models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Frush, Donald P.; Paulson, Erik K.; Samei, Ehsan

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies have shown the feasibility of estimating patient dose from a CT exam using CTDIvol-normalized-organ dose (denoted as h), DLP-normalized-effective dose (denoted as k), and DLP-normalized-risk index (denoted as q). However, previous studies were limited to a small number of phantom models. The purpose of this work was to provide dose coefficients (h, k, and q) across a large number of computational models covering a broad range of patient anatomy, age, size percentile, and gender. The study consisted of 100 patient computer models (age range, 0 to 78 y.o.; weight range, 2-180 kg) including 42 pediatric models (age range, 0 to 16 y.o.; weight range, 2-80 kg) and 58 adult models (age range, 18 to 78 y.o.; weight range, 57-180 kg). Multi-detector array CT scanners from two commercial manufacturers (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare; SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare) were included. A previously-validated Monte Carlo program was used to simulate organ dose for each patient model and each scanner, from which h, k, and q were derived. The relationships between h, k, and q and patient characteristics (size, age, and gender) were ascertained. The differences in conversion coefficients across the scanners were further characterized. CTDIvol-normalized-organ dose (h) showed an exponential decrease with increasing patient size. For organs within the image coverage, the average differences of h across scanners were less than 15%. That value increased to 29% for organs on the periphery or outside the image coverage, and to 8% for distributed organs, respectively. The DLP-normalized-effective dose (k) decreased exponentially with increasing patient size. For a given gender, the DLP-normalized-risk index (q) showed an exponential decrease with both increasing patient size and patient age. The average differences in k and q across scanners were 8% and 10%, respectively. This study demonstrated that the knowledge of patient information and CTDIvol/DLP values may

  15. Regional Ventilation Changes in Severe Asthma after Bronchial Thermoplasty with 3He MR Imaging and CT

    PubMed Central

    Thomen, Robert P.; Sheshadri, Ajay; Quirk, James D.; Kozlowski, Jim; Ellison, Henry D.; Szczesniak, Rhonda D.; Castro, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To quantify regional lung ventilation in healthy volunteers and patients with severe asthma (both before and after thermoplasty) by using a combination of helium 3 (3He) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computed tomography (CT), with the intention of developing more effective image-guided treatments for obstructive lung diseases. Materials and Methods With approval of the local institutional review board, informed consent, and an Investigational New Drug Exemption, six healthy volunteers and 10 patients with severe asthma were imaged in compliance with HIPAA regulations by using both multidetector CT and 3He MR imaging. Individual bronchopulmonary segments were labeled voxel by voxel from the CT images and then registered to the 3He MR images by using custom software. The 3He signal intensity was then analyzed by evaluating the volume-weighted fraction of total-lung signal intensity present in each segment (segmental ventilation percentage [SVPsegmental ventilation percentage]) and by identifying the whole-lung defect percentage and the segmental defect percentage. Of the 10 patients with asthma, seven received treatment with bronchial thermoplasty and were imaged with 3He MR a second time. Changes in segmental defect percentages and whole-lung defect percentages are presented. Results Ventilation measures for healthy volunteers yielded smaller segment-to-segment variation (mean SVPsegmental ventilation percentage, 100% ± 18 [standard deviation]) than did the measures for patients with severe asthma (mean SVPsegmental ventilation percentage, 97% ± 23). Patients with asthma also demonstrated larger segmental defect percentages (median, 13.5%; interquartile range, 8.9%–17.8%) than healthy volunteers (median, 6%; interquartile range, 5.6%–6.3%). These quantitative results confirm what is visually observed on the 3He images. A Spearman correlation of r = −0.82 was found between the change in whole-lung defect percentage and the number of days between

  16. Value of two-phase dynamic multidetector computed tomography in differential diagnosis of post-inflammatory strictures from esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Karmazanovsky, Grigory G; Buryakina, Svetlana A; Kondratiev, Evgeny V; Yang, Qin; Ruchkin, Dmitry V; Kalinin, Dmitry V

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the computed tomography (CT) findings in patients with post-inflammatory esophageal strictures (corrosive and peptic) and reveal the optimal scanning phase protocols for distinguishing post-inflammatory esophageal stricture and esophageal cancer. METHODS: Sixty-five patients with esophageal strictures of different etiology were included in this study: 24 patients with 27 histopathologically confirmed corrosive strictures, 10 patients with 12 peptic strictures and 31 patients with esophageal cancer were evaluated with a two-phase dynamic contrast-enhanced MDCT. Arterial and venous phases at 10 and 35 s after the attenuation of 200 HU were obtained at the descending aorta, with a delayed phase at 6-8 min after the start of injection of contrast media. For qualitative analysis, CT scans of benign strictures were reviewed for the presence/absence of the following features: “target sign”, luminal mass, homogeneity of contrast medium uptake, concentric wall thickening, conically shaped suprastenotic dilatation, smooth boundaries of stenosis and smooth mucous membrane at the transition to stenosis, which were compared with a control group of 31 patients who had esophageal cancer. The quantitative analysis included densitometric parameter acquisition using regions-of-interest measurement of the zone of stenosis and normal esophageal wall and the difference between those measurements (ΔCT) at all phases of bolus contrast enhancement. Esophageal wall thickening, length of esophageal wall thickening and size of the regional lymph nodes were also evaluated. RESULTS: The presence of a concentric esophageal wall, conically shaped suprastenotic dilatation, smooth upper and lower boundaries, “target sign” and smooth mucous membrane at the transition to stenosis were suggestive of a benign cause, with sensitivities of 92.31%, 87.17%, 94.87%, 76.92% and 82.05%, respectively, and specificities of 70.96%, 89.66%, 80.65%, 96.77% and 93.55%, respectively

  17. Combined anatomical and functional imaging using coronary CT angiography and myocardial perfusion SPECT in symptomatic adults with abnormal origin of a coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Uebleis, C; Groebner, M; von Ziegler, F; Becker, A; Rischpler, C; Tegtmeyer, R; Becker, C; Lehner, S; Haug, A R; Cumming, P; Bartenstein, P; Franz, W M; Hacker, M

    2012-10-01

    There has been a lack of standardized workup guidelines for patients with congenital abnormal origin of a coronary artery from the opposite sinus (ACAOS). We aimed to evaluate the use of cardiac hybrid imaging using multi-detector row CT (MDCT) for coronary CT angiography (Coronary CTA) and stress-rest myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) for comprehensive diagnosis of symptomatic adult patients with ACAOS. Seventeen symptomatic patients (12 men; 54 ± 13 years) presenting with ACAOS underwent coronary CTA and MPS. Imaging data were analyzed by conventional means, and with additional use of 3D image fusion to allocate stress induced perfusion defects (PD) to their supplying coronary arteries. An anomalous RCA arose from the left anterior sinus in eight patients, an abnormal origin from the right sinus was detected in nine patients (5 left coronary arteries, LCA and 4 LCx). Five of the 17 patients (29%) demonstrated a reversible PD in MPS. There was no correlation between the anatomical variants of ACAOS and the presence of myocardial ischemia. Image fusion enabled the allocation of reversible PD to the anomalous vessel in three patients (two cases in the RCA and the other in the LCA territory); PD in two patients were allocated to the territory of artery giving rise to the anomalies, rather than the anomalies themselves. In a small cohort of adult symptomatic patients with ACAOS anomaly there was no relation found between the specific anatomical variant and the appearance of stress induced myocardial ischemia using cardiac hybrid imaging. PMID:22147107

  18. Time-resolved cardiac interventional cone-beam CT reconstruction from fully truncated projections using the prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thériault Lauzier, Pascal; Tang, Jie; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2012-05-01

    C-arm cone-beam CT could replace preoperative multi-detector CT scans in the cardiac interventional setting. However, cardiac gating results in view angle undersampling and the small size of the detector results in projection data truncation. These problems are incompatible with conventional tomographic reconstruction algorithms. In this paper, the prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) reconstruction method was adapted to solve these issues. The performance of the proposed method was compared to that of FDK, FDK with extrapolated projection data (E-FDK), and total variation-based compressed sensing. A canine projection dataset acquired using a clinical C-arm imaging system supplied realistic cardiac motion and anatomy for this evaluation. Three different levels of truncation were simulated. The relative root mean squared error and the universal image quality index were used to quantify the reconstruction accuracy. Three main conclusions were reached. (1) The adapted version of the PICCS algorithm offered the highest image quality and reconstruction accuracy. (2) No meaningful variation in performance was observed when the amount of truncation was changed. (3) This study showed evidence that accurate interior tomography with an undersampled acquisition is possible for realistic objects if a prior image with minimal artifacts is available.

  19. Micro-CT as a guide for clinical CT development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritman, Erik L.; Eaker, Diane R.; Jorgensen, Steven M.

    2006-08-01

    Micro-CT, with voxel size ~10 -5 mm 3, has a great advantage over traditional microscopic methods in its ability to generate detailed 3D images in relatively large, opaque, volumes such as an intact mouse femur, heart or kidney. In addition to providing new insights into tissue structure-to-function interrelationships, micro-CT can contribute to suggesting new applications of clinical CT imaging such as: A. The spatio-density-temporal resolution that is needed to: 1) Quantitate an organ's Basic Functional Unit (smallest collection of diverse cells that behaves like the organ), which requires voxels less than 10 -4 mm 3 in volume; 2) Quantitate new vessel growth which manifests as increased x-ray contrast enhancement in tissues during passage of a bolus of intravascular contrast agent; 3) Quantitate endothelial integrity by the movement of x-ray contrast agents across the endothelial inner lining of vessel walls. B. The use of x-ray scatter for providing the contrast amongst soft tissue components and/or their interfaces for enhanced discrimination of nerve and muscular/tendon fiber directions.

  20. Dataset of calcified plaque condition in the stenotic coronary artery lesion obtained using multidetector computed tomography to indicate the addition of rotational atherectomy during percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Yasushi; Hamazaki, Yuji; Sekimoto, Teruo; Kaneko, Kyouichi; Kodama, Yusuke; Li, Hui-Ling; Suyama, Jumpei; Gokan, Takehiko; Sakai, Koshiro; Kosaki, Ryota; Yokota, Hiroyuki; Tsujita, Hiroaki; Tsukamoto, Shigeto; Sakurai, Masayuki; Sambe, Takehiko; Oguchi, Katsuji; Uchida, Naoki; Kobayashi, Shinichi; Aoki, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Youichi

    2016-06-01

    Our data shows the regional coronary artery calcium scores (lesion CAC) on multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and the cross-section imaging on MDCT angiography (CTA) in the target lesion of the patients with stable angina pectoris who were scheduled for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). CAC and CTA data were measured using a 128-slice scanner (Somatom Definition AS+; Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim, Germany) before PCI. CAC was measured in a non-contrast-enhanced scan and was quantified using the Calcium Score module of SYNAPSE VINCENT software (Fujifilm Co. Tokyo, Japan) and expressed in Agatston units. CTA were then continued with a contrast-enhanced ECG gating to measure the severity of the calcified plaque condition. We present that both CAC and CTA data are used as a benchmark to consider the addition of rotational atherectomy during PCI to severely calcified plaque lesions. PMID:26977441

  1. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; De Man, Bruno; Manjeshwar, Ravindra; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    A challenge for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) quantitation is patient respiratory motion, which can cause an underestimation of lesion activity uptake and an overestimation of lesion volume. Several respiratory motion correction methods benefit from longer duration CT scans that are phase matched with PET scans. However, even with the currently available, lowest dose CT techniques, extended duration cine CT scans impart a substantially high radiation dose. This study evaluates methods designed to reduce CT radiation dose in PET/CT scanning. We investigated selected combinations of dose reduced acquisition and noise suppression methods that take advantage of the reduced requirement of CT for PET attenuation correction (AC). These include reducing CT tube current, optimizing CT tube voltage, adding filtration, CT sinogram smoothing and clipping. We explored the impact of these methods on PET quantitation via simulations on different digital phantoms. CT tube current can be reduced much lower for AC than that in low dose CT protocols. Spectra that are higher energy and narrower are generally more dose efficient with respect to PET image quality. Sinogram smoothing could be used to compensate for the increased noise and artifacts at radiation dose reduced CT images, which allows for a further reduction of CT dose with no penalty for PET image quantitation. When CT is not used for diagnostic and anatomical localization purposes, we showed that ultra-low dose CT for PET/CT is feasible. The significant dose reduction strategies proposed here could enable respiratory motion compensation methods that require extended duration CT scans and reduce radiation exposure in general for all PET/CT imaging.

  2. CT colonography: techniques, indications, findings.

    PubMed

    Mang, Thomas; Graser, Anno; Schima, Wolfgang; Maier, Andrea

    2007-03-01

    Computed tomographic colonography (CTC) is a minimally invasive technique for imaging the entire colon. Based on a helical thin-section CT of the cleansed and air-distended colon, two-dimensional and three-dimensional projections are used for image interpretation. Several clinical improvements in patient preparation, technical advances in CT, and new developments in evaluation software have allowed CTC to develop into a powerful diagnostic tool. It is already well established as a reliable diagnostic tool in symptomatic patients. Many experts currently consider CTC a comparable alternative to conventional colonoscopy, although there is still debate about its sensitivity for the detection of colonic polyps in a screening population. This article summarizes the main indications, the current techniques in patient preparation, data acquisition and data analysis as well as imaging features for common benign and malignant colorectal lesions. PMID:17224254

  3. Dual energy CT for attenuation correction with PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The authors evaluate the energy dependent noise and bias properties of monoenergetic images synthesized from dual-energy CT (DECT) acquisitions. These monoenergetic images can be used to estimate attenuation coefficients at energies suitable for positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. This is becoming more relevant with the increased use of quantitative imaging by PET/CT and SPECT/CT scanners. There are, however, potential variations in the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images as a function of energy. Methods: The authors used analytic approximations and simulations to estimate the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images of water-filled cylinders with different shapes and the NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom from 40 to 520 keV, the range of SPECT and PET energies. The dual-kVp spectra were based on the GE Lightspeed VCT scanner at 80 and 140 kVp with added filtration of 0.5 mm Cu. The authors evaluated strategies of noise suppression with sinogram smoothing and dose minimization with reduction of tube currents at the two kVp settings. The authors compared the impact of DECT-based attenuation correction with single-kVp CT-based attenuation correction on PET quantitation for the NCAT phantom for soft tissue and high-Z materials of bone and iodine contrast enhancement. Results: Both analytic calculations and simulations displayed the expected minimum noise value for a synthesized monoenergetic image at an energy between the mean energies of the two spectra. In addition the authors found that the normalized coefficient of variation in the synthesized attenuation map increased with energy but reached a plateau near 160 keV, and then remained constant with increasing energy up to 511 keV and beyond. The bias was minimal, as the linear attenuation coefficients of the synthesized monoenergetic images were within 2.4% of the known true values across the entire energy range

  4. Computer-aided measurement of liver volumes in CT by means of geodesic active contour segmentation coupled with level-set algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kenji; Kohlbrenner, Ryan; Epstein, Mark L.; Obajuluwa, Ademola M.; Xu Jianwu; Hori, Masatoshi

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: Computerized liver extraction from hepatic CT images is challenging because the liver often abuts other organs of a similar density. The purpose of this study was to develop a computer-aided measurement of liver volumes in hepatic CT. Methods: The authors developed a computerized liver extraction scheme based on geodesic active contour segmentation coupled with level-set contour evolution. First, an anisotropic diffusion filter was applied to portal-venous-phase CT images for noise reduction while preserving the liver structure, followed by a scale-specific gradient magnitude filter to enhance the liver boundaries. Then, a nonlinear grayscale converter enhanced the contrast of the liver parenchyma. By using the liver-parenchyma-enhanced image as a speed function, a fast-marching level-set algorithm generated an initial contour that roughly estimated the liver shape. A geodesic active contour segmentation algorithm coupled with level-set contour evolution refined the initial contour to define the liver boundaries more precisely. The liver volume was then calculated using these refined boundaries. Hepatic CT scans of 15 prospective liver donors were obtained under a liver transplant protocol with a multidetector CT system. The liver volumes extracted by the computerized scheme were compared to those traced manually by a radiologist, used as ''gold standard.''Results: The mean liver volume obtained with our scheme was 1504 cc, whereas the mean gold standard manual volume was 1457 cc, resulting in a mean absolute difference of 105 cc (7.2%). The computer-estimated liver volumetrics agreed excellently with the gold-standard manual volumetrics (intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.95) with no statistically significant difference (F=0.77; p(F{<=}f)=0.32). The average accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and percent volume error were 98.4%, 91.1%, 99.1%, and 7.2%, respectively. Computerized CT liver volumetry would require substantially less completion time

  5. CT-assisted agile manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, James H.; Yancey, Robert N.

    1996-11-01

    The next century will witness at least two great revolutions in the way goods are produced. First, workers will use the medium of virtual reality in all aspects of marketing, research, development, prototyping, manufacturing, sales and service. Second, market forces will drive manufacturing towards small-lot production and just-in-time delivery. Already, we can discern the merging of these megatrends into what some are calling agile manufacturing. Under this new paradigm, parts and processes will be designed and engineered within the mind of a computer, tooled and manufactured by the offspring of today's rapid prototyping equipment, and evaluated for performance and reliability by advanced nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques and sophisticated computational models. Computed tomography (CT) is the premier example of an NDE method suitable for future agile manufacturing activities. It is the only modality that provides convenient access to the full suite of engineering data that users will need to avail themselves of computer- aided design, computer-aided manufacturing, and computer- aided engineering capabilities, as well as newly emerging reverse engineering, rapid prototyping and solid freeform fabrication technologies. As such, CT is assured a central, utilitarian role in future industrial operations. An overview of this exciting future for industrial CT is presented.

  6. Stereological estimation of left-ventricular volumetric and functional parameters from multidetector-row computed tomography data.

    PubMed

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Pagonidis, Konstantin; Schlosser, Thomas; Hunold, Peter; Damilakis, John; Barkhausen, Jörg; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2008-07-01

    This study aims to optimize the stereological method for estimating left-ventricular (LV) parameters from retrospectively electrocardiography-gated 16-row MDCT and to compare stereological estimations with those by MRI. MDCT was performed in 17 consecutive patients with known or suspected coronary disease. Stereological measurements based on point counting were optimized by determining the appropriate distance between grid points. LV parameters were evaluated by standard CT analysis using a semi-automatic segmentation method. Two independent observers evaluated the reproducibility of the stereological method. End-diastolic volume (EDV) and end-systolic volume (ESV) estimations with a coefficient of error below 5% were obtained in a mean time of 2.3 +/- 0.5 min with a point spacing of 25 and 15 pixels, respectively. The intra- and interobserver variability for estimating LV parameters was 2.6-4.4 and 4.9-8.2%, respectively. MRI estimations were highly correlated with those by standard CT analysis (R > 0.82) and stereology (R > 0.84). Stereological method significantly overestimated EDV and ESV compared to MRI (EDV: P = 0.0011; ESV: P = 0.0013), whereas for stroke volume (SV) and ejection fraction (EF), no difference was observed (P > 0.05). For standard CT analysis and MRI, significant differences were found except for SV and EF (EDV: P = 0.0008; ESV: P = 0.0004; EF: P = 0.051; SV: P = 0.064). The time-efficient optimized stereological method enables the reproducible evaluation of LV function from MDCT. PMID:18351349

  7. Modern CT applications in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Garland, Melissa R; Lawler, Leo P; Whitaker, Brent R; Walker, Ian D F; Corl, Frank M; Fishman, Elliot K

    2002-01-01

    Although computed tomography (CT) is used primarily for diagnosis in humans, it can also be used to diagnose disease in veterinary patients. CT and associated three-dimensional reconstruction have a role in diagnosis of a range of illnesses in a variety of animals. In a sea turtle with failure to thrive, CT showed a nodal mass in the chest, granulomas in the lungs, and a ball in the stomach. CT of a sea dragon with balance and movement problems showed absence of the swim bladder. In a sloth with failure to thrive, CT allowed diagnosis of a coin in the intestine. CT of a puffin with failure to thrive showed a mass in the chest, which was found to be a hematoma. In a smooth-sided toad whose head was tilted to one side and who was circling in that direction, CT showed partial destruction of the temporal bone. CT of a domestic cat with listlessness showed a mass with focal calcification, which proved to be a leiomyosarcoma. CT of a sea otter showed pectus excavatum, which is caused by the animal smashing oysters against its chest. In a Japanese koi with abdominal swelling, CT allowed diagnosis of a hepatoma. PMID:11796898

  8. MRI, enhanced CT, and FDG PET/CT in primary retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aisheng; Zhai, Zhijun; Wang, Yang; Zuo, Changjing

    2015-01-01

    Primary retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenocarcinoma (PRMC) is an extremely rare neoplasm. We present a case of PRMC with MRI, enhanced CT, and FDG PET/CT findings. Abdominal MRI showed a cystic lesion in the retroperitoneum with a mural nodule. The mural nodule showed progressive enhancement on enhanced CT and intense FDG uptake on early PET/CT with increased SUVmax on delayed PET/CT. Laparoscopy was performed. Retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenocarcinoma was confirmed histopathologically. Metastasis from gastrointestinal tract or ovary was excluded. This case indicates, although rare, PRMC should be considered when a hypermetabolic retroperitoneal cystic lesion with bilateral normal ovaries is found on FDG PET/CT. PMID:24445275

  9. Calculations of two new dose metrics proposed by AAPM Task Group 111 using the measurements with standard CT dosimetry phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob

    2013-08-15

    papers. R{sub 100} is presented for a majority of multidetector CT scanners currently on the market, and can be easily assessed for other CT scanners or operating conditions not covered in this study. The central to peripheral D{sub eq} ratio is about 1.50 and 1.12 times of R{sub 100} for the 32- and 16-cm diameter PMMA phantom, respectively.

  10. Evaluation of postoperative lymphocele according to amounts and symptoms by using 3-dimensional CT volumetry in kidney transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Heungman; Hwang, Sung Ho; Lim, Sungyoon; Kim, Myung Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the risk factors for postoperative lymphocele, for predicting and preventing complications. Methods We evaluated 92 kidney transplant recipients with multidetector CT (MDCT) at 1-month posttransplantation. From admission and 1-month postoperative records, data including diabetes, dialysis type, immunosuppressant use, steroid pulse therapy, and transplantation side were collected. Lymphocele volume was measured with 3-dimensional reconstructed, nonenhanced MDCT at one month postoperatively. The correlations between risk factors and lymphocele volume and between risk factors and symptomatic lymphocele (SyL) were analyzed. The cutoff was calculated by using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for SyL volume. Results Among 92 recipients, the mean volume was 44.53 ± 176.43 cm3 and 12 had SyL. Univariable analysis between risk factors and lymphocele volume indicated that donor age, retransplantation, and inferiorly located lymphocele were statistically significant. The ROC curve for SyL showed that 33.20 cm3 was the cutoff, with 83.3% sensitivity and 93.7% specificity. On univariable analysis between risk factors and SyL, steroid pulse, inferiorly located lymphocele, and >33.20 cm3 were statistically significant. Multivariable analysis indicated that steroid pulse, >33.20 cm3, and serum creatinine level at one month were significant factors. Conclusion Risk factors including donor age, retransplantation, steroid pulse therapy, and inferiorly located lymphocele are important predictors of large lymphoceles or SyL. In high-risk recipients, careful monitoring of renal function and early image surveillance such as CT or ultrasound are recommended. If the asymptomatic lymphocele is >33.20 cm3 or located inferiorly, early interventions can be considered while carefully observing the changes in symptoms. PMID:27617254

  11. Multidetector Computed Tomography-Based Microstructural Analysis Reveals Reduced Bone Mineral Content and Trabecular Bone Changes in the Lumbar Spine after Transarterial Chemoembolization Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Takasu, Miyuki; Yamagami, Takuji; Nakamura, Yuko; Komoto, Daisuke; Kaichi, Yoko; Tani, Chihiro; Date, Shuji; Kiguchi, Masao; Awai, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose It is well recognized that therapeutic irradiation can result in bone damage. However, long-term bone toxicity associated with computed tomography (CT) performed during interventional angiography has received little attention. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of osteoporosis and trabecular microstructural changes in patients after transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hepatocellular carcinoma therapy using an interventional-CT system. Materials and Methods Spinal microarchitecture was examined by 64-detector CT in 81 patients who underwent TACE, 35 patients with chronic hepatitis, and 79 controls. For each patient, the volumetric CT dose index (CTDIv) during TACE (CTDIv (TACE)), the dose-length product (DLP) during TACE (DLP (TACE)), and CTDIv and DLP of routine dynamic CT scans (CTDIv (CT) and DLP (CT), respectively), were calculated as the sum since 2008. Using a three dimensional (3D) image analysis system, the tissue bone mineral density (tBMD) and trabecular parameters of the 12th thoracic vertebra were calculated. Using tBMD at a reported cutoff value of 68 mg/cm3, the prevalence of osteoporosis was assessed. Results The prevalence of osteoporosis was significantly greater in the TACE vs. the control group (39.6% vs. 18.2% for males, P<0.05 and 60.6% vs. 34.8% for females, P<0.01). Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated that sex, age, and CTDIv (CT) significantly affected the risk of osteoporosis. Of these indices, CTDIv (CT) had the highest area under the curve (AUC) (0.735). Correlation analyses of tBMD with cumulative radiation dose revealed weak correlations between tBMD and CTDIv (CT) (r2 = 0.194, P<0.001). Conclusion The prevalence of osteoporosis was significantly higher in post TACE patients than in control subjects. The cumulative radiation dose related to routine dynamic CT studies was a significant contributor to the prevalence of osteoporosis. PMID:25329933

  12. Optical-CT scanning of polymer gels

    PubMed Central

    Oldham, M

    2006-01-01

    The application of optical-CT scanning to achieve accurate high-resolution 3D dosimetry is a subject of current interest. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief overview of past research and achievements in optical-CT polymer gel dosimetry, and to review current issues and challenges. The origins of optical-CT imaging of light-scattering polymer gels are reviewed. Techniques to characterize and optimize optical-CT performance are presented. Particular attention is given to studies of artifacts in optical-CT imaging, an important area that has not been well studied to date. The technique of optical-CT simulation by Monte-Carlo modeling is introduced as a tool to explore such artifacts. New simulation studies are presented and compared with experimental data. PMID:17082823

  13. Gastric interposition following transhiatal esophagectomy: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, B.H.; Agha, F.P.; Glazer, G.M.; Orringer, M.B.

    1985-04-01

    Transhiatal esophagectomy without thoracotomy (THE) but with gastric interposition results in less morbidity and mortality than standard transpleural esophagectomy with thoracotomy. Barium examination has been the primary radiographic study following THE for detecting postoperative complications. The authors reviewed computed tomography (CT) scans of 21 patients who had undergone THE and correlated CT appearance with clinical status and with findings of the barium studies. Local mediastinal recurrent neoplasm was detected by CT in seven patients; barium study within 2 weeks of the CT scan failed to detect tumor recurrence in three of these patients. CT is the modality of choice for detecting locally recurrent neoplasm and distant metastases following THE and may also be helpful in patients with postoperative mediastinal abscess. Normal mediastinal CT anatomy after esophagectomy is reviewed in order to warn against pitfalls in scan interpretation.

  14. Intracranial vascular malformations: MR and CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kucharczyk, W.; Lemme-Pleghos, L.; Uske, A.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Dooms, G.; Norman, D.

    1985-08-01

    Twenty-four patients with 29 cerebrovascular malformations were evaluated with a combination of computed tomography (CT), angiography, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Characteristics of the malformations on MR images were reviewed retrospectively, and a comparative evaluation of MR and CT images was made. Of 14 angiographically evident malformations, 13 intra-axial lesions were detected on both CT and MR images, and one dural malformation gave false-negative results on both modalities. The appearance of parenchymal lesions on MR images closely mirrored characteristic CT findings. Angiographically evident malformations have a highly characteristic appearance on MR images. MR may be more sensitive than CT in the detection of small hemorrhagic foci associated with cryptic arteriovenous malformations and may add specificity in the diagnosis of occult malformations in some cases, but MR is less sensitive than CT for the detection of small calcified malformations.

  15. Imaging of extralobar pulmonary sequestration in a patient with tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia, ventricular septal defect and multiple aorto-pulmonary collateral arteries with multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Greil, Gerald F; Schoebinger, Max; Kuettner, Axel; Schaefer, Jürgen F; Hofbeck, Michael; Claussen, Claus D; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Sieverding, Ludger

    2008-01-01

    Complex pulmonary vascular blood supply is common in patients with tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia, major systemic to pulmonary collateral arteries and hypoplastic or deficient central pulmonary arteries. An extralobar lung sequestration, which has not been described previously in these patients, was imaged in a 6-week-old infant with multidetector computed tomography with sub-millimeter resolution. Arterial and venous vessels were analyzed using three-dimensional vascular exploration tools and results were confirmed with cardiac catheterization. PMID:18715464

  16. Cortical Tremor (CT) with coincident orthostatic movements.

    PubMed

    Termsarasab, Pichet; Frucht, Steven J

    2015-01-01

    Cortical tremor (CT) is a form of cortical reflex myoclonus that can mimic essential tremor (ET). Clinical features that are helpful in distinguishing CT from ET are the irregular and jerky appearance of the movements. We report two patients with CT with coexisting orthostatic movements, either orthostatic tremor (OT) or myoclonus, who experienced functional improvement in both cortical myoclonus and orthostatic movements when treated with levetiracetam. PMID:26788343

  17. Radiation dose measurements in coronary CT angiography

    PubMed Central

    Sabarudin, Akmal; Sun, Zhonghua

    2013-01-01

    Coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography is associated with high radiation dose and this has raised serious concerns in the literature. Awareness of various parameters for dose estimates and measurements of coronary CT angiography plays an important role in increasing our understanding of the radiation exposure to patients, thus, contributing to the implementation of dose-saving strategies. This article provides an overview of the radiation dose quantity and its measurement during coronary CT angiography procedures. PMID:24392190

  18. Accuracy in contouring of small and low contrast lesions: Comparison between diagnostic quality computed tomography scanner and computed tomography simulation scanner-A phantom study

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Yick Wing; Wong, Wing Kei Rebecca; Yu, Siu Ki; Lam, Wai Wang; Geng Hui

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy in detection of small and low-contrast regions using a high-definition diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scanner compared with a radiotherapy CT simulation scanner. A custom-made phantom with cylindrical holes of diameters ranging from 2-9 mm was filled with 9 different concentrations of contrast solution. The phantom was scanned using a 16-slice multidetector CT simulation scanner (LightSpeed RT16, General Electric Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI) and a 64-slice high-definition diagnostic CT scanner (Discovery CT750 HD, General Electric Healthcare). The low-contrast regions of interest (ROIs) were delineated automatically upon their full width at half maximum of the CT number profile in Hounsfield units on a treatment planning workstation. Two conformal indexes, CI{sub in}, and CI{sub out}, were calculated to represent the percentage errors of underestimation and overestimation in the automated contours compared with their actual sizes. Summarizing the conformal indexes of different sizes and contrast concentration, the means of CI{sub in} and CI{sub out} for the CT simulation scanner were 33.7% and 60.9%, respectively, and 10.5% and 41.5% were found for the diagnostic CT scanner. The mean differences between the 2 scanners' CI{sub in} and CI{sub out} were shown to be significant with p < 0.001. A descending trend of the index values was observed as the ROI size increases for both scanners, which indicates an improved accuracy when the ROI size increases, whereas no observable trend was found in the contouring accuracy with respect to the contrast levels in this study. Images acquired by the diagnostic CT scanner allow higher accuracy on size estimation compared with the CT simulation scanner in this study. We recommend using a diagnostic CT scanner to scan patients with small lesions (<1 cm in diameter) for radiotherapy treatment planning, especially for those pending for stereotactic radiosurgery in which accurate delineation of small

  19. Porcine Ex Vivo Liver Phantom for Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography: Development and Initial Results

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Scott M.; Giraldo, Juan C. Ramirez; Knudsen, Bruce; Grande, Joseph P.; Christner, Jodie A.; Xu, Man; Woodrum, David A.; McCollough, Cynthia H.; Callstrom, Matthew R.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To demonstrate the feasibility of developing a fixed, dual-input, biological liver phantom for dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) imaging and to report initial results of use of the phantom for quantitative CT perfusion imaging. Materials and Methods Porcine livers were obtained from completed surgical studies and perfused with saline and fixative. The phantom was placed in a body-shaped, CT-compatible acrylic container and connected to a perfusion circuit fitted with a contrast injection port. Flow-controlled contrast-enhanced imaging experiments were performed using a 128-slice and 64 slice, dual-source multidetector CT scanners. CT angiography protocols were employed to obtain portal venous and hepatic arterial vascular enhancement, reproduced over a period of four to six months. CT perfusion protocols were employed at different input flow rates to correlate input flow with calculated tissue perfusion, to test reproducibility and demonstrate the feasibility of simultaneous dual input liver perfusion. Histologic analysis of the liver phantom was also performed. Results CT angiogram 3D reconstructions demonstrated homogenous tertiary and quaternary branching of the portal venous system out to the periphery of all lobes of the liver as well as enhancement of the hepatic arterial system to all lobes of the liver and gallbladder throughout the study period. For perfusion CT, the correlation between the calculated mean tissue perfusion in a volume of interest and input pump flow rate was excellent (R2 = 0.996) and color blood flow maps demonstrated variations in regional perfusion in a narrow range. Repeat perfusion CT experiments demonstrated reproducible time-attenuation curves and dual-input perfusion CT experiments demonstrated that simultaneous dual input liver perfusion is feasible. Histologic analysis demonstrated that the hepatic microvasculature and architecture appeared intact and well preserved at the completion of four to six

  20. Helical 4D CT and Comparison with Cine 4D CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Tinsu

    4D CT was one of the most important developments in radiation oncology in the last decade. Its early development in single slice CT and commercialization in multi-slice CT has radically changed our practice in radiation treatment of lung cancer, and has enabled the stereotactic radiosurgery of early stage lung cancer. In this chapter, we will document the history of 4D CT development, detail the data sufficiency condition governing the 4D CT data collection; present the design of the commercial helical 4D CTs from Philips and Siemens; compare the differences between the helical 4D CT and the GE cine 4D CT in data acquisition, slice thickness, acquisition time and work flow; review the respiratory monitoring devices; and understand the causes of image artifacts in 4D CT.

  1. Fluorocapsules for Improved Function, Immunoprotection, and Visualization of Cellular Therapeutics with MR, US, and CT Imaging1

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Brad P.; Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús; Hota, Partha; Liddell, Robert; Walczak, Piotr; Howland, Valerie; Chacko, Vadappuram P.; Kraitchman, Dara L.; Arepally, Aravind

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop novel immunoprotective alginate microcapsule formulations containing perfluorocarbons (PFCs) that may increase cell function, provide immunoprotection for xenografted cells, and simultaneously enable multimodality imaging. Materials and Methods: All animal experiments were approved by an Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Cadaveric human islet cells were encapsulated with alginate, poly-l-lysine, and perfluorooctyl bromide (PFOB) or perfluoropolyether (PFPE). In vitro viability and the glucose-stimulation index for insulin were determined over the course of 2 weeks and analyzed by using a cross-sectional time series regression model. The sensitivity of multimodality (computed tomography [CT], ultrasonography [US], and fluorine 19 [19F] magnetic resonance [MR] imaging) detection was determined for fluorocapsules embedded in gel phantoms. C57BL/6 mice intraperitoneally receiving 6000 PFOB-labeled (n = 6) or 6000 PFPE-labeled (n = 6) islet-containing fluorocapsules and control mice intraperitoneally receiving 6000 PFOB-labeled (n = 6) or 6000 PFPE-labeled (n = 6) fluorocapsules without islets were monitored for human C-peptide (insulin) secretion during a period of 55 days. Mice underwent 19F MR imaging at 9.4 T and micro-CT. Swine (n = 2) receiving 9000 PFOB capsules through renal artery catheterization were imaged with a clinical multidetector CT scanner. Signal intensity was evaluated by using a paired t test. Results: Compared with nonfluorinated alginate microcapsules, PFOB fluorocapsules increased insulin secretion of encapsulated human islets, with values up to 18.5% (3.78 vs 3.19) at 8-mmol/L glucose concentration after 7 days in culture (P < .001). After placement of the immunoprotected encapsulated cells into mice, a sustained insulin release was achieved with human C-peptide levels of 19.1 pmol/L ± 0.9 (standard deviation) and 33.0 pmol/L ± 1.0 for PFPE and PFOB capsules, respectively. Fluorocapsules were readily visualized

  2. Laxative-free CT colonography

    PubMed Central

    Slater, A; Betts, M; D'Costa, H

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine if the introduction of faecal tagging to CT colonography (CTC) made the examination easier to tolerate or reduced the number of false-positives. Methods Our department changed bowel preparation for CT colonography from Picolax (Ferring Pharmaceuticals Ltd, London, UK) to Gastrografin® (Bracco Diagnostics Inc, Princeton, NJ) only with a modified diet. Questionnaires were given to a subgroup of patients within these cohorts. The numbers of false-positives were compared between two cohorts before and after this change. false-positives were defined as lesions reported on CT that were not confirmed by subsequent endoscopic examination. Polyps were matched if they were in the same or adjacent segments, and were within 5 mm of the reported size. Results 412 patients were identified from the Picolax cohort, and 116 from the Gastrografin cohort. 62 patients in each group completed questionnaires. Gastrografin produced less diarrhoea; 34% had five or more bowel motions in the previous day and night, compared with 77% for Picolax (p<0.001), although more patients found drinking it unpleasant compared with Picolax (85% reported drinking Picolax as “easy” vs 61% for Gastrografin; p=0.002). Picolax produced more non-diagnostic examinations, although this difference was not statistically significant. There was not a significant reduction in the numbers of false-positives (2 out of 112 for Gastrografin group, 14 out of 389 for the Picolax group; p=0.54). Conclusion Switching from Picolax to Gastrografin as a CTC preparation technique produced less diarrhoea, but did not reduce the number of false-positives. PMID:22167512

  3. An outlook on x-ray CT research and development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ge; Yu, Hengyong; De Man, Bruno

    2008-03-01

    Over the past decade, computed tomography (CT) theory, techniques and applications have undergone a rapid development. Since CT is so practical and useful, undoubtedly CT technology will continue advancing biomedical and non-biomedical applications. In this outlook article, we share our opinions on the research and development in this field, emphasizing 12 topics we expect to be critical in the next decade: analytic reconstruction, iterative reconstruction, local/interior reconstruction, flat-panel based CT, dual-source CT, multi-source CT, novel scanning modes, energy-sensitive CT, nano-CT, artifact reduction, modality fusion, and phase-contrast CT. We also sketch several representative biomedical applications. PMID:18404940

  4. [Development of real-time CT fluoroscopy].

    PubMed

    Katada, K; Anno, H; Takeshita, G; Ogura, Y; Koga, S; Ida, Y; Nonomura, K; Kanno, T; Ohashi, A; Sata, S

    1994-10-25

    A new CT system that permits real-time monitoring of CT images was developed. Phantom and volunteer studies revealed that the images were displayed at a rate of six per second with a delay time of 0.83 second with clinically sufficient resolution (256 x 256) using the newly developed fast image processor and partial-reconstruction algorithm. The clinical trial of stereotactic aspiration of intracerebral hematoma was successful. The initial trial with CT fluoroscopy revealed potential usefulness of the system in biopsy and other CT-guided interventions. PMID:9261196

  5. Transsphenoidal hypophysectomy: postsurgical CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Dolinskas, C.A.; Simeone, F.A.

    1985-03-01

    Transsphenoidal surgery produces changes in the paranasal sinuses and sella that should be familiar to radiologists in view of frequency of this type of surgery. Some of these changes, such as soft-tissue-density debris in the sinuses, are transient. Fat and other packing material identifiable in the sinuses and sella after surgery is permanent. The procedure is associated with a variety of complications that are readily detectable by computed tomography (CT). These include bleeding, compression of parasellar structures by packing material, cerebrospinal fluid leaks, and pneumocephalus. After a transsphenoidal procedure, with or without follow-up radiation therapy, residual enhancing intrasellar and parasellar lesions may still be identified.

  6. Optimal Dose Levels in Screening Chest CT for Unimpaired Detection and Volumetry of Lung Nodules, with and without Computer Assisted Detection at Minimal Patient Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Christe, Andreas; Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt; Huber, Adrian; Steiger, Philipp; Leidolt, Lars; Roos, Justus E.; Heverhagen, Johannes; Ebner, Lukas

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this phantom study was to minimize the radiation dose by finding the best combination of low tube current and low voltage that would result in accurate volume measurements when compared to standard CT imaging without significantly decreasing the sensitivity of detecting lung nodules both with and without the assistance of CAD. Methods An anthropomorphic chest phantom containing artificial solid and ground glass nodules (GGNs, 5–12 mm) was examined with a 64-row multi-detector CT scanner with three tube currents of 100, 50 and 25 mAs in combination with three tube voltages of 120, 100 and 80 kVp. This resulted in eight different protocols that were then compared to standard CT sensitivity (100 mAs/120 kVp). For each protocol, at least 127 different nodules were scanned in 21–25 phantoms. The nodules were analyzed in two separate sessions by three independent, blinded radiologists and computer-aided detection (CAD) software. Results The mean sensitivity of the radiologists for identifying solid lung nodules on a standard CT was 89.7%±4.9%. The sensitivity was not significantly impaired when the tube and current voltage were lowered at the same time, except at the lowest exposure level of 25 mAs/80 kVp [80.6%±4.3% (p = 0.031)]. Compared to the standard CT, the sensitivity for detecting GGNs was significantly lower at all dose levels when the voltage was 80 kVp; this result was independent of the tube current. The CAD significantly increased the radiologists’ sensitivity for detecting solid nodules at all dose levels (5–11%). No significant volume measurement errors (VMEs) were documented for the radiologists or the CAD software at any dose level. Conclusions Our results suggest a CT protocol with 25 mAs and 100 kVp is optimal for detecting solid and ground glass nodules in lung cancer screening. The use of CAD software is highly recommended at all dose levels. PMID:24386126

  7. Is hepatotropic contrast enhanced MR a more effective method in differential diagnosis of hemangioma than multi-phase CT and unenhanced MR?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cavernous hemangiomas are the most frequent neoplasms of the liver and in routine clinical practice they often need to be differentiated from malignant tumors and other benign focal lesions. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of hepatic hemangiomas, showing atypical pattern on US, improves with the use of Gd-BOPTA in comparison with contrast-enhanced multi-phase computed tomography (CT). Methods 178 consecutive patients with ambiguous hepatic masses showing atypical hyperechoic pattern on grey-scale US, underwent unenhanced and contrast-enhanced multi-phase multi-detector CT and MR (1.5T) with the use of liver-specific contrast medium gadobenate dimeglumine (Gd-BOPTA). After intravenous contrast administration arterial (HAP), venous-portal (PVP), equilibrium phases (EP) both in CT and MR and additionally hepatobiliary phase (HBP) in MR were obtained. 398 lesions have been detected including 99 hemangiomas and 299 other lesions. Results In non-enhanced MDCT examination detection of hemangiomas was characterized by sensitivity of 76%, specificity of 90%, PPV of 71%, NPV of 92% and accuracy of 86%. Non-enhanced MR examination showed sensitivity of 98%, specificity of 99%, PPV of 99%, NPV of 99% and accuracy of 99%. After intravenous administration of contrast medium in MR the mentioned above parameters did not increase significantly. Conclusion Gd-BOPTA-enhanced MR in comparison with unenhanced MRI does not improve diagnostic accuracy in discriminating hemangiomas that show non-specific appearance in ultrasound examination. Unenhanced MR as a method of choice should directly follow US in course of diagnostic algorithm in differentiation of hemangiomas from other liver tumors. PMID:21504593

  8. Inhibition of fibrosis and inflammation by triple therapy with pirfenidone, edaravone and erythropoietin in rabbits with drug-induced lung injury: comparison of CT imaging and pathological findings.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shobu; Nitta, Norihisa; Sonoda, Akinaga; Nitta-Seko, Ayumi; Ohta, Shinichi; Tsuchiya, Keiko; Otani, Hideji; Tomozawa, Yuki; Nagatani, Yukihiro; Mukaisho, Kenichi; Takahashi, Masashi; Murata, Kiyoshi

    2013-11-01

    In a rabbit model of bleomycin-induced lung injury, computed tomography (CT) and pathological studies were conducted to investigate whether the progression of this injury is inhibited by pirfenidone and by triple therapy with pirfenidone, edaravone and erythropoietin. We divided nine rabbits with bleomycin-induced lung injury into three equally sized groups. Group 1 served as the control, group 2 received pirfenidone alone and group 3 was treated with pirfenidone, edaravone and erythropoietin. Multidetector CT (MDCT) scans were acquired immediately after the administration of bleomycin, and further scans were performed on days 14 and 28. The area of abnormal opacity was calculated. The rabbit lungs were removed and the size of abnormal areas in macroscopic specimens was calculated and the degree of fibrosis and inflammation in microscopic specimens was scored. In order, the average size of the area of abnormal opacity on CT scans was largest in group 1, followed by groups 2 and 3. On day 28, the area of opacity was significantly smaller in group 3 than in group 1 (P=0.071). The average size of the area of abnormal opacity on macroscopic findings was largest in group 1, followed in order by groups 2 and 3; the difference between group 1 and 3 was significant (P<0.05). The average fibrosis score was highest in group 3 followed by groups 2 and 1. By contrast, the average inflammation score was highest in group 2 followed by groups 1 and 3. Although the administration of pirfenidone alone slowed the progression of bleomycin-induced lung injury, the triple-drug combination was more effective. PMID:24223628

  9. Accuracy of multislice CT angiography for the assessment of in-stent restenoses in the iliac arteries at reduced dose: a phantom study

    PubMed Central

    Perisinakis, K; Manousaki, E; Zourari, K; Tsetis, D; Tzedakis, A; Papadakis, A; Karantanas, A; Damilakis, J

    2011-01-01

    Objective We investigated the potential of low-dose CT angiography for accurate assessment of in-stent restenoses (ISRs) of the iliac artery. Method A Rando anthropomorphic phantom (Alderson Research Labs, Stanford, CA), custom-made wax simulating hyperplastic tissue and a nitinol stent were used to simulate a patient with clinically relevant iliac artery ISRs. The cylindrical lumen was filled with a solution of iodine contrast medium diluted in saline, representing a patient's blood during CT angiography. The phantom was subjected to standard- and low-dose angiographic exposures using a modern multidetector (MD) CT scanner. The percentage of ISR was determined using the profile along a line normal to the lumen axis on reconstructed images of 2 and 5 mm slice thickness. Percentage ISRs derived using the standard- and low-dose protocols were compared. In a preliminary study, seven patients with stents were subjected to standard- and low-dose MDCT angiography during follow-up. The resulting images were assessed and compared by two experienced radiologists. Results The accuracy in measuring the percentage ISR was found to be better than 12% for all simulated stenoses. The differences between percentage ISRs measured on images obtained at 120 kVp/160 mAs and 80 kVp/80 mAs were below 6%. Patient image sets acquired using low-exposure factors were judged to be of satisfactory diagnostic quality. The assessment of ISR did not differ significantly between image sets acquired using the standard factors and those acquired using the low-exposure factors, although the mean reduction in patient effective dose was 48%. Conclusion A reduction in exposure factors during MDCT angiography of the iliac artery is possible without affecting the accuracy in the determination of ISRs. PMID:21325364

  10. Synchronous navigation for CT colonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Adam; Summers, Ronald M.; Roy, Dave

    2006-03-01

    We present a synchronous navigation module for CT colonography (CTC) reading. The need for such a system arises because most CTC protocols require a patient to be scanned in both supine and prone positions to increase sensitivity in detecting colonic polyps. However, existing clinical practices are limited to reading one scan at a time. Such limitation is due to the fact that building a reference system between scans for the highly flexible colon is a nontrivial task. The conventional centerline approach, generating only the longitudinal distance along the colon, falls short in providing the necessary orientation information to synchronize the virtual navigation cameras in both scanned positions. In this paper we describe a synchronous navigation system by using the teniae coli as anatomical references. Teniae coli are three parallel bands of longitudinal smooth muscle on the surface of the colon. They are morphologically distinguishable and form a piecewise triple helix structure from the appendix to the sigmoid colon. Because of these characteristics, they are ideal references to synchronize virtual cameras in both scanned positions. Our new navigation system consists of two side-by-side virtual colonoscopic view panels (for the supine and prone data sets respectively) and one single camera control unit (which controls both the supine and prone virtual cameras). The capability to examine the same colonic region simultaneously in both scanned images can raise an observer's confidence in polyp identification and potentially improve the performance of CT colonography.

  11. Intracranial CT angiography obtained from a cerebral CT perfusion examination

    SciTech Connect

    Gratama van Andel, H. A. F.; Venema, H. W.; Majoie, C. B.; Den Heeten, G. J.; Grimbergen, C. A.; Streekstra, G. J.

    2009-04-15

    CT perfusion (CTP) examinations of the brain are performed increasingly for the evaluation of cerebral blood flow in patients with stroke and vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Of the same patient often also a CT angiography (CTA) examination is performed. This study investigates the possibility to obtain CTA images from the CTP examination, thereby possibly obviating the CTA examination. This would save the patient exposure to radiation, contrast, and time. Each CTP frame is a CTA image with a varying amount of contrast enhancement and with high noise. To improve the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) we combined all 3D images into one 3D image after registration to correct for patient motion between time frames. Image combination consists of weighted averaging in which the weighting factor of each frame is proportional to the arterial contrast. It can be shown that the arterial CNR is maximized in this procedure. An additional advantage of the use of the time series of CTP images is that automatic differentiation between arteries and veins is possible. This feature was used to mask veins in the resulting 3D images to enhance visibility of arteries in maximum intensity projection (MIP) images. With a Philips Brilliance 64 CT scanner (64x0.625 mm) CTP examinations of eight patients were performed on 80 mm of brain using the toggling table technique. The CTP examination consisted of a time series of 15 3D images (2x64x0.625 mm; 80 kV; 150 mAs each) with an interval of 4 s. The authors measured the CNR in images obtained with weighted averaging, images obtained with plain averaging, and images with maximal arterial enhancement. The authors also compared CNR and quality of the images with that of regular CTA examinations and examined the effectiveness of automatic vein masking in MIP images. The CNR of the weighted averaged images is, on the average, 1.73 times the CNR of an image at maximal arterial enhancement in the CTP series, where the use of plain averaging

  12. Volumetric quantification of lung nodules in CT with iterative reconstruction (ASiR and MBIR)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baiyu; Barnhart, Huiman; Richard, Samuel; Robins, Marthony; Colsher, James; Samei, Ehsan

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Volume quantifications of lung nodules with multidetector computed tomography (CT) images provide useful information for monitoring nodule developments. The accuracy and precision of the volume quantification, however, can be impacted by imaging and reconstruction parameters. This study aimed to investigate the impact of iterative reconstruction algorithms on the accuracy and precision of volume quantification with dose and slice thickness as additional variables.Methods: Repeated CT images were acquired from an anthropomorphic chest phantom with synthetic nodules (9.5 and 4.8 mm) at six dose levels, and reconstructed with three reconstruction algorithms [filtered backprojection (FBP), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR), and model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR)] into three slice thicknesses. The nodule volumes were measured with two clinical software (A: Lung VCAR, B: iNtuition), and analyzed for accuracy and precision.Results: Precision was found to be generally comparable between FBP and iterative reconstruction with no statistically significant difference noted for different dose levels, slice thickness, and segmentation software. Accuracy was found to be more variable. For large nodules, the accuracy was significantly different between ASiR and FBP for all slice thicknesses with both software, and significantly different between MBIR and FBP for 0.625 mm slice thickness with Software A and for all slice thicknesses with Software B. For small nodules, the accuracy was more similar between FBP and iterative reconstruction, with the exception of ASIR vs FBP at 1.25 mm with Software A and MBIR vs FBP at 0.625 mm with Software A.Conclusions: The systematic difference between the accuracy of FBP and iterative reconstructions highlights the importance of extending current segmentation software to accommodate the image characteristics of iterative reconstructions. In addition, a calibration process may help reduce the dependency of

  13. Attenuation correction of emission PET images with average CT: Interpolation from breath-hold CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tzung-Chi; Zhang, Geoffrey; Chen, Chih-Hao; Yang, Bang-Hung; Wu, Nien-Yun; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2011-05-01

    Misregistration resulting from the difference of temporal resolution in PET and CT scans occur frequently in PET/CT imaging, which causes distortion in tumor quantification in PET. Respiration cine average CT (CACT) for PET attenuation correction has been reported to improve the misalignment effectively by several papers. However, the radiation dose to the patient from a four-dimensional CT scan is relatively high. In this study, we propose a method to interpolate respiratory CT images over a respiratory cycle from inhalation and exhalation breath-hold CT images, and use the average CT from the generated CT set for PET attenuation correction. The radiation dose to the patient is reduced using this method. Six cancer patients of various lesion sites underwent routine free-breath helical CT (HCT), respiration CACT, interpolated average CT (IACT), and 18F-FDG PET. Deformable image registration was used to interpolate the middle phases of a respiratory cycle based on the end-inspiration and end-expiration breath-hold CT scans. The average CT image was calculated from the eight interpolated CT image sets of middle respiratory phases and the two original inspiration and expiration CT images. Then the PET images were reconstructed by these three methods for attenuation correction using HCT, CACT, and IACT. Misalignment of PET image using either CACT or IACT for attenuation correction in PET/CT was improved. The difference in standard uptake value (SUV) from tumor in PET images was most significant between the use of HCT and CACT, while the least significant between the use of CACT and IACT. Besides the similar improvement in tumor quantification compared to the use of CACT, using IACT for PET attenuation correction reduces the radiation dose to the patient.

  14. CT demonstration of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, D.; Korobkin, M.; Silverman, P.M.; Dunnick, N.R.

    1983-08-01

    Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage with subsequent adrenal insufficiency is a recognized complication of anticoagulant therapy. Because the clinical manifestations are often nonspecific, the antemortem diagnosis of adrenal hemorrhage has been a difficult clinical problem. Computed tomography (CT) provides detailed images of the adrenal glands that are not possible with conventional imaging methods. The CT findings of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage in an anticoagulated patient are reported.

  15. CT of schistosomal calcification of the intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Fataar, S.; Bassiony, H.; Satyanath, S.; Rudwan, M.; Hebbar, G.; Khalifa, A.; Cherian, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    The spectrum of schistosomal colonic calcification on abdominal radiographs has been described. The appearance on computed tomography (CT) is equally distinctive and occurs with varying degrees of genitourinary calcification. The authors have experience in three cases with the appearance on CT of intestinal calcification due to schistosomiasis.

  16. Multiparametric PET/CT in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The standardized uptake value (SUV) and other measurements of tumour uptake of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) on positron emission tomography (PET) can potentially be supplemented by additional imaging parameters derived either from the PET images or from the computed tomography (CT) component of integrated PET/CT examinations including tumour size, CT attenuation, texture (reflecting tumour heterogeneity) and blood flow. This article illustrates the emerging benefits of such a multiparametric approach. Example benefits include greater diagnostic accuracy in characterization of adrenal masses achieved by using both the SUV and measured CT attenuation. Tumour size combined with the SUV can potentially improve the prognostic information available from PET/CT in oesophageal and lung cancer. However, greater improvements may be realized through using CT measurements of texture instead of size. Studies in breast and lung cancer suggest that combined PET/CT measurements of glucose metabolism and blood flow provide correlates for tumour proliferation and angiogenesis, respectively. These combined measurements can be utilized to determine vascular-metabolic phenotypes, which vary with tumour type. Uncoupling of blood flow and metabolism suggests a poor prognosis for larger more advanced tumours, high-grade lesions and tumours responding poorly to treatment. Vascular-metabolic imaging also has the potential to subclassify tumour response to treatment. The additional biomarkers described can be readily incorporated in existing FDG-PET examinations thereby improving the ability of PET/CT to depict tumour biology, characterize potentially malignant lesions, and assess prognosis and therapeutic response. PMID:23023069

  17. CT demonstration of an aortoesophageal fistula.

    PubMed

    Longo, J M; Lopez-Rasines, G; Ortega, E; Pagola, M A

    1987-01-01

    A case of aortoesophageal fistula (AEF) is reported in a patient with esophageal bleeding resulting from ingestion of a foreign body. CT showed a saccular aneurysm in close proximity to the esophageal lumen at the level of the bleeding site. AEF has not previously been described on CT. PMID:3107831

  18. A Wiki Based CT Protocol Management System.

    PubMed

    Szczykutowicz, Timothy P; Rubert, Nicholas; Belden, Daryn; Ciano, Amanda; Duplissis, Andrew; Hermanns, Ashley; Monette, Stephen; Saldivar, Elliott Janssen

    2015-01-01

    At the University of Wisconsin Madison Department of Radiology, CT protocol management requires maintenance of thousands of parameters for each scanner. Managing CT protocols is further complicated by the unique configurability of each scanner. Due to recent Joint Commission requirements, now all CT protocol changes must be documented and reviewed by a site's CT protocol optimization team. The difficulty of managing the CT protocols was not in assembling the protocols, but in managing and implementing changes. This is why a wiki based solution for protocol management was implemented. A wiki inherently keeps track of all changes, logging who made the changes and when, allowing for editing and viewing permissions to be controlled, as well as allowing protocol changes to be instantly relayed to all scanner locations. PMID:26710573

  19. Artifacts in CT: recognition and avoidance.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Julia F; Keat, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    Artifacts can seriously degrade the quality of computed tomographic (CT) images, sometimes to the point of making them diagnostically unusable. To optimize image quality, it is necessary to understand why artifacts occur and how they can be prevented or suppressed. CT artifacts originate from a range of sources. Physics-based artifacts result from the physical processes involved in the acquisition of CT data. Patient-based artifacts are caused by such factors as patient movement or the presence of metallic materials in or on the patient. Scanner-based artifacts result from imperfections in scanner function. Helical and multisection technique artifacts are produced by the image reconstruction process. Design features incorporated into modern CT scanners minimize some types of artifacts, and some can be partially corrected by the scanner software. However, in many instances, careful patient positioning and optimum selection of scanning parameters are the most important factors in avoiding CT artifacts. PMID:15537976

  20. CT angiography in the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease: a transformation in cardiovascular CT practice

    PubMed Central

    Al Moudi, Mansour; Cao, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) angiography represents the most important technical development in CT imaging and it has challenged invasive angiography in the diagnostic evaluation of cardiovascular abnormalities. Over the last decades, technological evolution in CT imaging has enabled CT angiography to become a first-line imaging modality in the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. This review provides an overview of the diagnostic applications of CT angiography (CTA) in cardiovascular disease, with a focus on selected clinical challenges in some common cardiovascular abnormalities, which include abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism (PE) and coronary artery disease. An evidence-based review is conducted to demonstrate how CT angiography has changed our approach in the diagnosis and management of cardiovascular disease. Radiation dose reduction strategies are also discussed to show how CT angiography can be performed in a low-dose protocol in the current clinical practice. PMID:25392823

  1. CT angiography in the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease: a transformation in cardiovascular CT practice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhonghua; Al Moudi, Mansour; Cao, Yan

    2014-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT) angiography represents the most important technical development in CT imaging and it has challenged invasive angiography in the diagnostic evaluation of cardiovascular abnormalities. Over the last decades, technological evolution in CT imaging has enabled CT angiography to become a first-line imaging modality in the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. This review provides an overview of the diagnostic applications of CT angiography (CTA) in cardiovascular disease, with a focus on selected clinical challenges in some common cardiovascular abnormalities, which include abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism (PE) and coronary artery disease. An evidence-based review is conducted to demonstrate how CT angiography has changed our approach in the diagnosis and management of cardiovascular disease. Radiation dose reduction strategies are also discussed to show how CT angiography can be performed in a low-dose protocol in the current clinical practice. PMID:25392823

  2. Cardiac CT Imaging of Plaque Vulnerability: Hype or Hope?

    PubMed

    Willemink, Martin J; Leiner, Tim; Maurovich-Horvat, Pál

    2016-03-01

    Advances in cardiovascular computed tomography (CT) have resulted in an excellent ability to exclude coronary heart disease (CHD). Anatomical information, functional information, and spectral information can already be obtained with current CT technologies. Moreover, novel developments such as targeted nanoparticle contrast agents, photon-counting CT, and phase contrast CT will further enhance the diagnostic value of cardiovascular CT. This review provides an overview of current state of the art and future cardiovascular CT imaging. PMID:26922591

  3. SLATE: Virtualizing multiscale CT training

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sourav; Sharma, Kriti Sen; Lee, Spencer J.; Fox, Edward A.; Wang, Ge

    2014-01-01

    Training on micro- and nano- computed tomography (CT) scanners has been traditionally conducted via extensive practice on the instrument. This entails presence of an instructor to guide through the training procedure, until reasonable experience is attained. Modern tomographic instruments being expensive to maintain, the operational costs escalates with increasing number of training conducted. In a pioneering approach, the technical know-how to operate such equipment has been partly imparted via virtual reality environment running on the Second Life grid. The experimentation has indicated a reduction of the total training time. The authors hope that in the long run, such techniques will aid in significant reduction of instruction time and costs associated with training. PMID:22635178

  4. Physiologic evaluation of ischemia using cardiac CT: current status of CT myocardial perfusion and CT fractional flow reserve.

    PubMed

    Choi, Andrew D; Joly, Joanna M; Chen, Marcus Y; Weigold, Wm Guy

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac CT, specifically coronary CT angiography (CTA), is an established technology which detects anatomically significant coronary artery disease with a high sensitivity and negative predictive value compared with invasive coronary angiography. However, the limited ability of CTA to determine the physiologic significance of intermediate coronary stenoses remains a shortcoming compared with other noninvasive methods such as single-photon emission CT, stress echocardiography, and stress cardiac magnetic resonance. Two methods have been investigated recently: (1) myocardial CT perfusion and (2) fractional flow reserve (FFR) computed from CT (FFRCT). Improving diagnostic accuracy by combining the anatomic aspects of coronary CTA with a physiologic assessment via CT perfusion or FFRCT may reduce the need for additional testing to evaluate for ischemia, reduce downstream costs and risks associated with an invasive procedure, and lead to improved patient outcomes. Given a rapidly expanding body of research in this field, this comparative review summarizes the present literature while contrasting the benefits, limitations, and future directions in myocardial CT perfusion and FFRCT imaging. PMID:25151919

  5. Comparison of Multidetector Computed Tomography and Flat-Panel Computed Tomography Regarding Visualization of Cortical Fractures, Cortical Defects, and Orthopedic Screws: A Phantom Study.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Jakob; Benndorf, Matthias; Lang, Hannah; Lampert, Florian; Kemna, Lars; Konstantinidis, Lukas; Neubauer, Claudia; Reising, Kilian; Zajonc, Horst; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Goerke, Sebastian M

    2015-08-01

    To compare the visualization of cortical fractures, cortical defects, and orthopedic screws in a dedicated extremity flat-panel computed tomography (FPCT) scanner and a multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanner.We used feet of European roe deer as phantoms for cortical fractures, cortical defects, and implanted orthopedic screws. FPCT and MDCT scans were performed with equivalent dose settings. Six observers rated the scans according to number of fragments, size of defects, size of defects opposite orthopedic screws, and the length of different screws. The image quality regarding depiction of the cortical bone was assessed. The gold standard (real number of fragments) was evaluated by autopsy.The correlation of reader assessment of fragments, cortical defects, and screws with the gold standard was similar for FPCT and MDCT. Three readers rated the subjective image quality of the MDCT to be higher, whereas the others showed no preferences.Although the image quality was rated higher in the MDCT than in the FPCT by 3 out of 6 observers, both modalities proved to be comparable regarding the visualization of cortical fractures, cortical defects, and orthopedic screws and of use to musculoskeletal radiology regarding fracture detection and postsurgical evaluation in our experimental setting. PMID:26252281

  6. Comparison of Multidetector Computed Tomography and Flat-Panel Computed Tomography Regarding Visualization of Cortical Fractures, Cortical Defects, and Orthopedic Screws

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Jakob; Benndorf, Matthias; Lang, Hannah; Lampert, Florian; Kemna, Lars; Konstantinidis, Lukas; Neubauer, Claudia; Reising, Kilian; Zajonc, Horst; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Goerke, Sebastian M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To compare the visualization of cortical fractures, cortical defects, and orthopedic screws in a dedicated extremity flat-panel computed tomography (FPCT) scanner and a multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanner. We used feet of European roe deer as phantoms for cortical fractures, cortical defects, and implanted orthopedic screws. FPCT and MDCT scans were performed with equivalent dose settings. Six observers rated the scans according to number of fragments, size of defects, size of defects opposite orthopedic screws, and the length of different screws. The image quality regarding depiction of the cortical bone was assessed. The gold standard (real number of fragments) was evaluated by autopsy. The correlation of reader assessment of fragments, cortical defects, and screws with the gold standard was similar for FPCT and MDCT. Three readers rated the subjective image quality of the MDCT to be higher, whereas the others showed no preferences. Although the image quality was rated higher in the MDCT than in the FPCT by 3 out of 6 observers, both modalities proved to be comparable regarding the visualization of cortical fractures, cortical defects, and orthopedic screws and of use to musculoskeletal radiology regarding fracture detection and postsurgical evaluation in our experimental setting. PMID:26252281

  7. State of the Art. A structural and functional assessment of the lung via multidetector-row computed tomography: phenotyping chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Eric A; Simon, Brett A; McLennan, Geoffrey

    2006-08-01

    With advances in multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT), it is now possible to image the lung in 10 s or less and accurately extract the lungs, lobes, and airway tree to the fifth- through seventh-generation bronchi and to regionally characterize lung density, texture, ventilation, and perfusion. These methods are now being used to phenotype the lung in health and disease and to gain insights into the etiology of pathologic processes. This article outlines the application of these methodologies with specific emphasis on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We demonstrate the use of our methods for assessing regional ventilation and perfusion and demonstrate early data that show, in a sheep model, a regionally intact hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstrictor (HPV) response with an apparent inhibition of HPV regionally in the presence of inflammation. We present the hypothesis that, in subjects with pulmonary emphysema, one major contributing factor leading to parenchymal destruction is the lack of a regional blunting of HPV when the regional hypoxia is related to regional inflammatory events (bronchiolitis or alveolar flooding). If maintaining adequate blood flow to inflamed lung regions is critical to the nondestructive resolution of inflammatory events, the pathologic condition whereby HPV is sustained in regions of inflammation would likely have its greatest effect in the lung apices where blood flow is already reduced in the upright body posture. PMID:16921136

  8. The Diminishing Role of Pelvic Stability Evaluation in the Era of Computed Tomographic Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chih-Yuan; Teng, Lan-Hsuan; Liao, Chien-Hung; Hsu, Yu-Pao; Wang, Shang-Yu; Kuo, Ling-Wei; Yuan, Kuo-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pelvic fractures can result in life-threatening hemorrhages or other associated injuries. Therefore, computed tomography (CT) scanning plays a key role in the management of pelvic fracture patients. However, CT scanning is utilized as an adjunct in secondary survey according to traditional Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) guidelines, whereas pelvic x-ray is used as a primary tool to evaluate pelvic stability and the necessity of further CT scanning. In the current study, we attempted to evaluate the role of CT scanning in the era of advanced technology. The significance of pelvic stability was also analyzed. From January 2012 to December 2014, the trauma registry and medical records of pelvic fracture patients were retrospectively reviewed. A 64-slice multidetector CT scanner was used in our emergency department as a standard diagnostic tool for evaluating trauma patients. Pelvic x-ray was used as a primary tool for screening pelvic fractures, and pelvic stability was evaluated accordingly. CT scans were performed in patients with unstable pelvic fractures, suspected associated intra-abdominal injuries (IAIs), or other conditions based on the physicians’ clinical judgment. The clinical features of patients with stable and unstable pelvic fractures were compared. The patients with stable pelvic fractures were analyzed to determine the characteristics associated with retroperitoneal hemorrhage (RH) or IAIs. Patients with stable pelvic fractures were also compared based on whether they underwent a CT scan. A total of 716 patients were enrolled in this study. There were 533 (74.4%) patients with stable pelvic fractures. Of these patients, there were 66 (12.4%) and 50 (9.4%) patients with associated RH and IAI, respectively. There were no significant differences between the patients with associated RH based on their primary evaluation (vital signs, volume of blood transfusion, and hemoglobin level). Similarly, the demographics and the primary evaluation

  9. Noncontrast helical CT for ureteral stones.

    PubMed

    Boridy, I C; Nikolaidis, P; Kawashima, A; Sandler, C M; Goldman, S M

    1998-01-01

    Noncontrast helical computed tomography (CT) has recently been found to be superior to excretory urography (IVU) in the evaluation of patients with suspected ureterolithiasis. Noncontrast helical CT does not require the use of intravenous contrast material with its associated cost and risk of adverse reactions and can be completed within 5 min, in most cases. Noncontrast CT often detects extraurinary pathology responsible for the patient's symptoms. CT is also more sensitive than IVU in detecting the calculus, regardless of its size, location, and chemical composition. However, confidently differentiating ureteral calculi from phleboliths along the course of the ureter may, at times, be difficult. The "tissue-rim" sign, a rim of soft tissue attenuation around the suspicious calcification, is helpful in making this distinction. Noncontrast CT does not provide physiological information about renal function and the degree of obstruction. A pilot study has suggested a proportional relationship between the extent of perinephric edema and the degree of obstruction. The cost of the examination and the radiation dose delivered to the patient may be higher with CT. Despite these limitations, noncontrast helical CT has quickly become the imaging study of choice in evaluating patients with acute flank pain. PMID:9542010

  10. Cytomegalovirus pneumonia in transplant patients: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Eun-Young Kang; Patz, E.F. Jr.; Mueller, N.L.

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the CT findings of cytomegalovirus (CMV) pneumonia in transplant patients. The study included 10 transplant patients who had chest CT scan and pathologically proven isolated pulmonary CMV infection. Five patients had bone marrow transplant and five had solid organ transplant. The CT scans were retrospectively reviewed for pattern and distribution of disease and the CT findings compared with the findings on open lung biopsy (n = 9) and autopsy (n = 1). Nine of 10 patients had parenchymal abnormalities apparent at CT and I had normal CT scans. The findings in the nine patients included small nodules (n = 6), consolidation (n = 4), ground-glass attenuation (n = 4), and irregular lines (n = 1). The nodules had a bilateral and symmetric distribution and involved all lung zones. The consolidation was most marked in the lower lung zones. The CT findings of CMV pneumonia in transplant patients are heterogeneous. The most common patterns include small nodules and areas of consolidation. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Ion Stopping Powers and CT Numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Moyers, Michael F.; Sardesai, Milind; Sun, Sean; Miller, Daniel W.

    2010-10-01

    One of the advantages of ion beam therapy is the steep dose gradient produced near the ion's range. Use of this advantage makes knowledge of the stopping powers for all materials through which the beam passes critical. Most treatment planning systems calculate dose distributions using depth dose data measured in water and an algorithm that converts the kilovoltage X-ray computed tomography (CT) number of a given material to its linear stopping power relative to water. Some materials present in kilovoltage scans of patients and simulation phantoms do not lie on the standard tissue conversion curve. The relative linear stopping powers (RLSPs) of 21 different tissue substitutes and positioning, registration, immobilization, and beamline materials were measured in beams of protons accelerated to energies of 155, 200, and 250 MeV; carbon ions accelerated to 290 MeV/n; and iron ions accelerated to 970 MeV/n. These same materials were scanned with both kilovoltage and megavoltage CT scanners to obtain their CT numbers. Measured RLSPs and CT numbers were compared with calculated and/or literature values. Relationships of RLSPs to physical densities, electronic densities, kilovoltage CT numbers, megavoltage CT numbers, and water equivalence values converted by a treatment planning system are given. Usage of CT numbers and substitution of measured values into treatment plans to provide accurate patient and phantom simulations are discussed.

  12. Comparison of Two Accelerators for Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Calculations, NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPU and Intel Xeon Phi 5110p Coprocessor: A Case Study for X-ray CT Imaging Dose Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tianyu; Xu, X. George; Carothers, Christopher D.

    2014-06-01

    Hardware accelerators are currently becoming increasingly important in boosting high performance computing sys- tems. In this study, we tested the performance of two accelerator models, NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPU and Intel Xeon Phi 5110p coprocessor, using a new Monte Carlo photon transport package called ARCHER-CT we have developed for fast CT imaging dose calculation. The package contains three code variants, ARCHER - CTCPU, ARCHER - CTGPU and ARCHER - CTCOP to run in parallel on the multi-core CPU, GPU and coprocessor architectures respectively. A detailed GE LightSpeed Multi-Detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) scanner model and a family of voxel patient phantoms were included in the code to calculate absorbed dose to radiosensitive organs under specified scan protocols. The results from ARCHER agreed well with those from the production code Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX). It was found that all the code variants were significantly faster than the parallel MCNPX running on 12 MPI processes, and that the GPU and coprocessor performed equally well, being 2.89~4.49 and 3.01~3.23 times faster than the parallel ARCHER - CTCPU running with 12 hyperthreads.

  13. Falx Cerebri Ossification: CT and MRI Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tsitouridis, I; Natsis, K; Goutsaridou, F; Tsitouridis, K; Tarazi, L; Chondromatidou, S; Papapostolou, P; Papastergiou, C; Emmanouilidou, M

    2006-11-30

    During the last three years, CT and MRI brain scans of 40 patients revealed falx cerebri partial ossification as an incidental finding. The patients had been admitted for brain CT and MRI for several reasons. In most cases, there was no problem in the differential diagnosis of falx cerebri ossification during interpretation of the cases. In a few cases, the lesion should be distinguished from calcified meningioma, small hematoma in the interhemispheric fissure and in one case there was also meningeal infiltration of breast cancer. In these cases both CT and MRI scans of the brain were evaluated and a definite diagnosis was made. PMID:24351265

  14. CT & CBCT imaging: assessment of the orbits.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, David C

    2012-11-01

    The orbits can be visualized easily on routine or customized protocols for computed tomography (CT) or cone beam CT (CBCT) scans. Detailed orbital investigations are best performed with 3-dimensional imaging methods. CT scans are preferred for visualizing the osseous orbital anatomy and fissures while magnetic resonance imaging is preferred for evaluating tumors and inflammation. CBCT provides high-resolution anatomic data of the sinonasal spaces, airway, soft tissue surfaces, and bones but does not provide much detail within the soft tissues. This article discusses CBCT imaging of the orbits, osseous anatomy of the orbits, and CBCT investigation of selected orbital pathosis. PMID:22981080

  15. Pediatric CT: Strategies to Lower Radiation Dose

    PubMed Central

    Zacharias, Claudia; Alessio, Adam M.; Otto, Randolph K.; Iyer, Ramesh S.; Philips, Grace S.; Swanson, Jonathan O.; Thapa, Mahesh M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The introduction of MDCT has increased the utilization of CT in pediatric radiology along with concerns for radiation sequelae. This article reviews general principles of lowering radiation dose, the basic physics that impact radiation dose, and specific CT integrated dose-reduction tools focused on the pediatric population. CONCLUSION The goal of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the recent literature regarding CT dose reduction methods, their limitations, and an outlook on future developments with a focus on the pediatric population. The discussion will initially focus on general considerations that lead to radiation dose reduction, followed by specific technical features that influence the radiation dose. PMID:23617474

  16. Acute orbital pseudotumors: classification and CT features

    SciTech Connect

    Nugent, R.A.; Rootman, J.; Robertson, W.D.; Lapointe, J.S.; Harrison, P.B.

    1981-11-01

    Acute orbital pseudotumors are inflammatory lesions of unknown etiology that may affect part or, less often, all of the tissue within the orbit. A retrospective computed tomographic (CT) study of 16 patients demonstrated that these lesions occur in one of five specific anatomic patterns: anterior, posterior, diffuse, lacrimal, or myositic. The most common location was lacrimal followed by anterior psuedotumors. Posterior, diffuse, and myositic pseudotumors were equally frequent. Localization on the basis of clinical features correlated with the CT localization. Illustrative cases of each of the five types are included. The role of CT in evaluating the therapeutic response is discussed.

  17. The challenges of CT colonography reimbursement.

    PubMed

    Dachman, Abraham H; Yee, Judy

    2013-12-01

    CT colonography has been shown to be an effective method to screen for colorectal cancer. However, at present, full endorsement and reimbursement for screening CT colonography, particularly by the US Preventive Services Task Force and CMS, respectively, are absent, so this screening option is infrequently used, and optical colonoscopy remains the de facto standard screening option. The authors summarize the past accomplishments that led to the current state of reimbursement and outline the remaining challenges and road to full acceptance and reimbursement of screening CT colonography nationally. PMID:24295944

  18. CT in pyogenic osteomyelitis of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Kattapuram, S.V.; Phillips, W.C.; Boyd, R.

    1983-06-01

    Six patients with bacteriologically proven pyogenic osteomyelitis of the spine were followed serially with computed tomography (CT). Initial evaluation of the involved vertebral bodies and adjacent soft tissues showed a drop in CT numbers when compared to normal cancellous bone and soft tissues. A soft-tissue mass was seen in all cases. After appropriate antibiotic therapy, all six patients showed an increase in bone density and a diminution of the soft-tissue mass (p < 0.05). Five of the six patients showed a further decrease in soft-tissue CT numbers.

  19. CT of osteomyelitis of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Golimbu, C.; Firooznia, H.; Rafii, M.

    1984-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scans were performed in 17 adults with osteomyelitis of the spine. The dominant features were paravertebral soft-tissue swelling, abscess formation, and bone erosion. In two patients there were no findings indicative of osteomyelitis on conventional radiographs, but CT revealed paravertebral abscesses and bone lysis, helping to establish the diagnosis of osteomyelitis, chiefly because of its ability to detect early erosion of spongy vertabral bone, disk involvement, paravertebral soft-tissue swelling or abscess, and extension of the pathology into the spinal canal. Furthermore, CT facilitated closed-needle biopsy, helping to establish the pathologic diagnosis.

  20. Cine CT technique for dynamic airway studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ell, S.R.; Jolles, H.; Keyes, W.D.; Galvin, J.R.

    1985-07-01

    The advent of cine CT scanning with its 50-msec data acquisition time promises a much wider range of dynamic CT studies. The authors describe a method for dynamic evaluation of the extrathoracic airway, which they believe has considerable potential application in nonfixed upper-airway disease, such as sleep apnea and stridor of unknown cause. Conventional CT is limited in such studies by long data acquisition time and can be used to study only prolonged maneuvers such as phonation. Fluoroscopy and digital subtraction studies are limited by relatively high radiation dose and inability to image all wall motions simultaneously.

  1. Photon counting spectral CT versus conventional CT: comparative evaluation for breast imaging application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.; Fritz, Shannon G.

    2011-04-01

    Spectral CT systems with photon counting detectors have more advantages compared to conventional CT systems. However, clinical applications have been hampered for a long time due to the high demands of clinical systems and limitations of spectroscopic x-ray detectors. Photon counting detector technology has gained considerable improvements in the past decade, and spectral CT has become a hot topic. Several experimental spectral CT systems are under investigation. The purpose of this work was to perform the first direct, side-by-side comparison of existing spectral CT technology with a mature clinical CT system based on a conventional energy integrating detector. We have built an experimental spectral CT system whose main parameters are similar to the parameters of a clinical CT system. The system uses a spectroscopic cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector. The detector includes two rows of CZT pixels with 256 pixels in each row. The pixel size is 1 × 1 mm2, and the maximum count rate is 2 Mcounts/pixel/s. The spectral CT system has a magnification factor of 1.62 and the source to detector and source to image distances of 85 and 53 cm, respectively. The above parameters are similar to those of the clinical CT system, Siemens Sensation 16, used for comparison. The two systems were compared by imaging spatial resolution and contrast resolution phantoms made from acrylic cylinders with 14 cm diameters. The resolution phantom included Al wires with 0.3, 0.6, and 1 mm diameters, and 0.25 g cc-1 CaCO3 contrast. The contrast phantom included contrast elements with 1.7, 5, and 15 mg cc-1 iodine, and 1.1, 3.3, and 10 mg cc-1 gadolinium. The phantoms were imaged with the two systems using 120 kVp tube voltage and 470 mR total skin exposure. The spectral CT showed CT numbers, image noise, and spatial and contrast resolutions to be similar within 10% compared to the Siemens 16 system, and provided an average of 10% higher CNR. However, the spectral CT system had a major

  2. Impact of Body Mass Index on Vascular Calcification and Pericardial Fat Volume Among Patients with Suspected Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nafakhi, Hussein; Al-Mosawi, Abdulameer; Elwali, Hayder; Al-Nafakh, Hasan; Tawfeq, Raad; Nafakhi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess the effect of body mass index (BMI) on the relationship between pericardial fat volume (PFV), aortic root calcification (ARC) and coronary artery calcification (CAC) among patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods: This cross-sectional study took place between January and December 2014 at the Kufa University Teaching Hospital, Najaf, Iraq. A total of 130 consecutive patients with an intermediate pretest probability of ischaemic heart disease who underwent 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (CT) angiography during the study period were recruited. Of these, 111 were included in the study and divided into groups according to BMI. Imaging markers were measured on CT angiography. Results: A total of 28 patients were obese, while 42 and 41 were overweight and normal weight, respectively. The median PFV, CAC and ARC was 109 cm3 (interquartile range [IQR]: 52–176 cm3), 0 Agatston score (IQR: 0–52 Agatston score) and 0 Agatston score (IQR: 0–15 Agatston score), respectively, in the normal weight group in comparison to 79 cm3 (IQR: 43–138 cm3), 0 Agatston score (IQR: 0–54 Agatston score) and 0 Agatston score (IQR: 0–0 Agatston score), respectively, in the obese group. Significant correlations were observed between PFV and CAC (r2 = 0.22; P = 0.002) and ARC and CAC (r2 = 0.37; P <0.001) in the normal weight group. However, no significant correlations were observed for obese and overweight patients. Conclusion: These findings indicate that BMI may not be an accurate tool for measuring adiposity or assessing subclinical coronary atherosclerosis in patients with suspected CAD. PMID:27606110

  3. Use of CT in stapedial otosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mafee, M.F.; Henrikson, G.C.; Deitch, R.L.; Norouzi, P.; Kumar, A.; Kriz, R.; Valvassori, G.E.

    1985-09-01

    Otosclerosis (otospongiosis) is a primary focal disease of the labyrinthine capsule. The stapes footplate is fixed when the spongiotic focus expands and invades the oval window. Persons with stapedial otosclerosis experience a progressive conductive hearing loss. In many cases, cochlear degeneration is observed, in which a mixed hearing loss occurs. Using computed tomography (CT), the authors studied the ears of 45 selected patients with conductive or mixed hearing loss. CT proved valuable in determining otosclerotic changes of the oval window and otic capsule. Spongiotic changes of the otic capsule are better appreciated by CT than complex motion tomography. The usefulness of CT in diagnosing other causes of conductive or mixed hearing loss is also described.

  4. CT of thrombosed arteriovenous malformations in children

    SciTech Connect

    Mitnick, J.S.; Pinto, R.S.; Lin, J.P.; Rose, H.; Lieberman, A.

    1984-02-01

    Thrombosed arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in children are rare lesions that may present with headaches or a seizure disorder. Thirteen patients (4 months to 21 years of age) with this lesion were examined with computed tomography (CT). In 11 patients surgical confirmation was obtained, and the other two patients were examined with follow-up CT scans. Angiography either showed an avascular mass (7/13) or was negative (6/13). CT showed a lobulated lesion (8/13), peripheral location (11/13), and minimal surrounding edema (8/13). All of the lesions were hyperdense prior to the administration of contrast material and all enhanced either slightly or not at all following contrast material administration. It is concluded that these characteristic CT features aid in making the diagnosis of thrombosed AVM. The major differential diagnosis is small intracerebral neoplasm.

  5. CT in the diagnosis of enterovesical fistulae

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, S.M.; Fishman, E.K.; Gatewood, O.M.B.; Jones, B.; Siegelman, S.S.

    1985-06-01

    Enterovesical fistulae are difficult to demonstrate by conventional radiographic methods. Computed tomography (CT), a sensitive, noninvasive method of documenting the presence of such fistulae, is unique in its ability to outline the extravesical component of the primary disease process. Twenty enterovesical fistulae identified by CT were caused by diverticulitis (nine), carcinoma of the rectosigmoid (two), Crohn disease (three), gynecologic tumors (two), bladder cancer (one), cecal carcinoma (one), prostatic neoplasia (one), and appendiceal abscess (one). The CT findings included intravesical air (90%), passage of orally or rectally administered contrast medium into the bladder (20%), focal bladder-wall thickening (90%), thickening of adjacent bowel wall (85%), and an extraluminal mass that often contained air (75%). CT proved to be an important new method in the diagnosis of enterovesical fistulae.

  6. Acute pancreatitis: prognostic value of CT

    SciTech Connect

    Balthazar, E.J.; Ranson, J.H.C.; Naidich, D.P.; Megibow, A.J.; Caccavale, R.; Cooper, M.M.

    1985-09-01

    In 83 patients with acute pancreatitis, the initial computed tomographic (CT) examinations were classified by degree of disease severity (grades A-E) and were correlated with the clinical follow-up, objective prognostic signs, and complications and death. The length of hospitalization correlated well with the severity of the initial CT findings. Abscesses occurred in 21.6% of the entire group, compared with 60.0% of grade E patients. Pleural effusions were also more common in grade E patients. Abscesses were seen in 80.0% of patients with six to eight prognostic signs, compared with 12.5% of those with zero to two. The use of prognostic signs with initial CT findings results in improved prognostic accuracy. Early CT examination of patients with acute pancreatitis is a useful prognostic indicator of morbidity and mortality.

  7. CT of soft-tissue neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Weekes, R.G.; McLeod, R.A.; Reiman, H.M.; Pritchard, D.J.

    1985-02-01

    The computed tomographic scans (CT) of 84 patients with untreated soft-tissue neoplasms were studied, 75 with primary and nine with secondary lesions. Each scan was evaluated using several criteria: homogeneity and density, presence and type of calcification, presence of bony destruction, involvement of multiple muscle groups, definition of adjacent fat, border definition, and vessel or nerve involvement. CT demonstrated the lesion in all 84 patients and showed excellent anatomic detail in 64 of the 75 patients with primary neoplasms. The CT findings were characteristic enough to suggest the histology of the neoplasm in only 13 lesions (nine lipomas, three hemangiomas, one neurofibroma). No malignant neoplasm had CT characteristics specific enough to differentiate it from any other malignant tumor. However, malignant neoplasms could be differentiated from benign neoplasms in 88% of the cases.

  8. SPECT/CT in pediatric patient management.

    PubMed

    Nadel, Helen R

    2014-05-01

    Hybrid SPECT/CT imaging is becoming the standard of care in pediatric imaging. Indications are mainly for oncologic imaging including mIBG scintigraphy for neuroblastoma and I-123 post surgical imaging of children with thyroid carcinoma, bone scintigraphy for back pain, children referred from sports medicine and neurodevelopmentally delayed children presenting with pain symptoms. The studies provide improved diagnostic accuracy, and oncologic imaging that includes optimized CT as part of the SPECT/CT study may decrease the number of studies and sedation procedures an individual child may need. The studies, however, must be tailored on an individual basis as the addition of the CT study can increase exposure to the child and should only be performed after appropriate justification and with adherence to optimized low dose pediatric protocols. PMID:24554052

  9. CT Image Presentations For Oral Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Michael L.; Rothman, Stephen L. G.; Schwarz, Melvyn S.; Tivattanasuk, Eva S.

    1988-06-01

    Reformatted CT images of the mandible and maxilla are described as a planning aid to the surgical implantation of dental fixtures. Precisely scaled and cross referenced axial, oblique, CT generated panorex, and 3-D images are generated to help indicate where and how critical anatomic structures are positioned. This information guides the oral surgeon to those sites where dental implants have optimal osteotic support and least risk to sensitive neural tissue. Oblique images are generated at 1-2 mm increments along the arch of the mandible (or maxilla). Each oblique is oriented perpendicular to the local arch curvature. The adjoining five CT generated panorex views match the patient's mandibular (or maxilla) arch, with each of the views separated by twice the distance between axial CT slices. All views are mutually cross-referenced to show fine detail of the underlying mandibular (or maxilla) structure. Several exams are illustrated and benefit to subsequent surgery is assessed.

  10. CT and PET-CT of a Dog with Multiple Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    KIM, Jisun; KWON, Seong Young; CENA, Rohani; PARK, Seungjo; OH, Juyeon; OUI, Heejin; CHO, Kyoung-Oh; MIN, Jung-Joon; CHOI, Jihye

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 10-year-old, intact female Yorkshire terrier had multiple pulmonary nodules on thoracic radiography and ultrasonography with no lesions elsewhere. Computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) were performed to identify metastasis and undetected primary tumors. On CT examination, pulmonary nodules had a hypoattenuating center with thin peripheral enhancement, suggesting ischemic or necrotizing lesion. In PET-CT at 47 min after intravenous injection of 11.1 MBq/kg of FDG, the maximum standardized uptake value of each pulmonary nodule was about from 3.8 to 6.4. There were no abnormal lesions except for four pulmonary nodules on the CT and PET-CT. Primary lung tumor was tentatively diagnosed, and palliative therapy using 2 mg/kg tramadol and 2.2 mg/kg carprofen twice per day was applied. After the dog’s euthanasia due to deteriorated clinical signs and poor prognosis, undifferentiated pulmonary adenocarcinoma was diagnosed through histopathologic and immunochemistry examination. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study of CT and PET-CT features of canine pulmonary adenocarcinoma. In this case, multiple pulmonary adenocarcinoma could be determined on the basis of FDG PET-CT through screening the obvious distant metastasis and/or lymph node invasions and excluding unknown primary tumors. PMID:24389742

  11. Progress in Fully Automated Abdominal CT Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Automated analysis of abdominal CT has advanced markedly over just the last few years. Fully automated assessment of organs, lymph nodes, adipose tissue, muscle, bowel, spine, and tumors are some examples where tremendous progress has been made. Computer-aided detection of lesions has also improved dramatically. CONCLUSION This article reviews the progress and provides insights into what is in store in the near future for automated analysis for abdominal CT, ultimately leading to fully automated interpretation. PMID:27101207

  12. CT of trauma to the abnormal kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Rhyner, P.; Federle, M.P.; Jeffrey, R.B.

    1984-04-01

    Traumatic injuries to already abnormal kidneys are difficult to assess by excretory urography and clinical evaluation. Bleeding and urinary extravasation may accompany minor trauma; conversely, underlying tumors, perirenal hemorrhage, and extravasation may be missed on urography. Computed tomography (CT) was performed in eight cases including three neoplasms, one adult polycystic disease, one simple renal cyst, two hydronephrotic kidneys, and one horseshoe kidney. CT provided specific and clinically useful information in each case that was not apparent on excretory urography.