Science.gov

Sample records for 65 mph speed limit

  1. 14 CFR 142.65 - Limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limitations. 142.65 Section 142.65 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES TRAINING CENTERS Operating Rules § 142.65 Limitations. (a) A...

  2. 14 CFR 23.33 - Propeller speed and pitch limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Propeller speed and pitch limits. 23.33... Propeller speed and pitch limits. (a) General. The propeller speed and pitch must be limited to values that... the all engine(s) operating climb speed specified in § 23.65, the propeller must limit the engine...

  3. 14 CFR 23.33 - Propeller speed and pitch limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Propeller speed and pitch limits. 23.33... Propeller speed and pitch limits. (a) General. The propeller speed and pitch must be limited to values that... the all engine(s) operating climb speed specified in § 23.65, the propeller must limit the engine...

  4. 14 CFR 23.33 - Propeller speed and pitch limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Propeller speed and pitch limits. 23.33... Propeller speed and pitch limits. (a) General. The propeller speed and pitch must be limited to values that... the all engine(s) operating climb speed specified in § 23.65, the propeller must limit the engine...

  5. 14 CFR 23.33 - Propeller speed and pitch limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Propeller speed and pitch limits. 23.33... Propeller speed and pitch limits. (a) General. The propeller speed and pitch must be limited to values that... the all engine(s) operating climb speed specified in § 23.65, the propeller must limit the engine...

  6. Generalized Geometric Quantum Speed Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, Diego Paiva; Cianciaruso, Marco; Céleri, Lucas C.; Adesso, Gerardo; Soares-Pinto, Diogo O.

    2016-04-01

    The attempt to gain a theoretical understanding of the concept of time in quantum mechanics has triggered significant progress towards the search for faster and more efficient quantum technologies. One of such advances consists in the interpretation of the time-energy uncertainty relations as lower bounds for the minimal evolution time between two distinguishable states of a quantum system, also known as quantum speed limits. We investigate how the nonuniqueness of a bona fide measure of distinguishability defined on the quantum-state space affects the quantum speed limits and can be exploited in order to derive improved bounds. Specifically, we establish an infinite family of quantum speed limits valid for unitary and nonunitary evolutions, based on an elegant information geometric formalism. Our work unifies and generalizes existing results on quantum speed limits and provides instances of novel bounds that are tighter than any established one based on the conventional quantum Fisher information. We illustrate our findings with relevant examples, demonstrating the importance of choosing different information metrics for open system dynamics, as well as clarifying the roles of classical populations versus quantum coherences, in the determination and saturation of the speed limits. Our results can find applications in the optimization and control of quantum technologies such as quantum computation and metrology, and might provide new insights in fundamental investigations of quantum thermodynamics.

  7. 36 CFR 4.21 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Speed limits. 4.21 Section 4... TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.21 Speed limits. (a) Park area speed limits are as follows: (1) 15 miles per hour... superintendent may designate a different speed limit upon any park road when a speed limit set forth in...

  8. 36 CFR 4.21 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Speed limits. 4.21 Section 4... TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.21 Speed limits. (a) Park area speed limits are as follows: (1) 15 miles per hour... superintendent may designate a different speed limit upon any park road when a speed limit set forth in...

  9. 36 CFR 4.21 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Speed limits. 4.21 Section 4... TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.21 Speed limits. (a) Park area speed limits are as follows: (1) 15 miles per hour... superintendent may designate a different speed limit upon any park road when a speed limit set forth in...

  10. 36 CFR 4.21 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Speed limits. 4.21 Section 4... TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.21 Speed limits. (a) Park area speed limits are as follows: (1) 15 miles per hour... superintendent may designate a different speed limit upon any park road when a speed limit set forth in...

  11. 36 CFR 4.21 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Speed limits. 4.21 Section 4... TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.21 Speed limits. (a) Park area speed limits are as follows: (1) 15 miles per hour... superintendent may designate a different speed limit upon any park road when a speed limit set forth in...

  12. A speed limit for evolution.

    PubMed

    Worden, R P

    1995-09-01

    An upper bound on the speed of evolution is derived. The bound concerns the amount of genetic information which is expressed in observable ways in various aspects of the phenotype. The genetic information expressed in some part of the phenotype of a species cannot increase faster than a given rate, determined by the selection pressure on that part. This rate is typically a small fraction of a bit per generation. Total expressed genetic information cannot increase faster than a species-specific rate--typically a few bits per generation. These bounds apply to all aspects of the phenotype, but are particularly relevant to cognition. As brains are highly complex, we expect large amounts of expressed genetic information in the brain--of the order of 100 kilobytes--yet evolutionary changes in brain genetic information are only a fraction of a bit per generation. This has important consequences for cognitive evolution. The limit implies that the human brain differs from the chimpanzee brain by at most 5 kilobytes of genetic design information. This is not enough to define a Language Acquisition Device, unless it depends heavily on pre-existing primate symbolic cognition. Subject to the evolutionary speed limit, in changing environments a simple, modular brain architecture is fitter than more complex ones. This encourages us to look for simplicity in brain design, rather than expecting the brain to be a patchwork of ad hoc adaptations. The limit implies that pure species selection is not an important mechanism of evolutionary change. PMID:7475097

  13. 36 CFR 1004.21 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... traffic control devices. (c) Operating a vehicle at a speed in excess of the speed limit is prohibited. (d... of a vehicle on a Presidio Trust road. Signs indicating that vehicle speed is determined by the...

  14. 36 CFR 1004.21 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... traffic control devices. (c) Operating a vehicle at a speed in excess of the speed limit is prohibited. (d... of a vehicle on a Presidio Trust road. Signs indicating that vehicle speed is determined by the...

  15. 45 CFR 3.26 - Speed limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Speed limit. 3.26 Section 3.26 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CONDUCT OF PERSONS AND TRAFFIC ON THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH FEDERAL ENCLAVE Traffic Regulations § 3.26 Speed limit. The speed limit is 25 miles...

  16. 45 CFR 3.26 - Speed limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Speed limit. 3.26 Section 3.26 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CONDUCT OF PERSONS AND TRAFFIC ON THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH FEDERAL ENCLAVE Traffic Regulations § 3.26 Speed limit. The speed limit is 25 miles...

  17. 45 CFR 3.26 - Speed limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Speed limit. 3.26 Section 3.26 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CONDUCT OF PERSONS AND TRAFFIC ON THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH FEDERAL ENCLAVE Traffic Regulations § 3.26 Speed limit. The speed limit is 25 miles...

  18. 45 CFR 3.26 - Speed limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Speed limit. 3.26 Section 3.26 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CONDUCT OF PERSONS AND TRAFFIC ON THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH FEDERAL ENCLAVE Traffic Regulations § 3.26 Speed limit. The speed limit is 25 miles...

  19. 45 CFR 3.26 - Speed limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Speed limit. 3.26 Section 3.26 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CONDUCT OF PERSONS AND TRAFFIC ON THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH FEDERAL ENCLAVE Traffic Regulations § 3.26 Speed limit. The speed limit is 25 miles...

  20. 36 CFR 1004.21 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Speed limits. 1004.21 Section 1004.21 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 1004.21 Speed limits. (a) Speed limits in the area administered by the Presidio Trust are as follows: (1) 15 miles...

  1. 36 CFR 1004.21 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Speed limits. 1004.21 Section 1004.21 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 1004.21 Speed limits. (a) Speed limits in the area administered by the Presidio Trust are as follows: (1) 15 miles...

  2. 36 CFR 1004.21 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Speed limits. 1004.21 Section 1004.21 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 1004.21 Speed limits. (a) Speed limits in the area administered by the Presidio Trust are as follows: (1) 15 miles...

  3. 33 CFR 401.28 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Speed limits. 401.28 Section 401... TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Seaway Navigation § 401.28 Speed limits. (a) The maximum speed over the bottom for a vessel of more than 12 m in overall length shall be regulated so as not...

  4. 33 CFR 401.28 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Speed limits. 401.28 Section 401... TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Seaway Navigation § 401.28 Speed limits. (a) The maximum speed over the bottom for a vessel of more than 12 m in overall length shall be regulated so as not...

  5. 33 CFR 401.28 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Speed limits. 401.28 Section 401... TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Seaway Navigation § 401.28 Speed limits. (a) The maximum speed over the bottom for a vessel of more than 12 m in overall length shall be regulated so as not...

  6. 33 CFR 401.28 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Speed limits. 401.28 Section 401... TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Seaway Navigation § 401.28 Speed limits. (a) The maximum speed over the bottom for a vessel of more than 12 m in overall length shall be regulated so as not...

  7. 33 CFR 401.28 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Speed limits. 401.28 Section 401... TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Seaway Navigation § 401.28 Speed limits. (a) The maximum speed over the bottom for a vessel of more than 12 m in overall length shall be regulated so as not...

  8. Speed limits, enforcement, and health consequences.

    PubMed

    Elvik, Rune

    2012-04-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge regarding the effects of speed limit enforcement on public health. Speed limits are commonly used around the world to regulate the maximum speed at which motor vehicles can be operated on public roads. Speed limits are statutory, and violations of them are normally sanctioned by means of fixed penalties (traffic tickets) or, in the event of serious violations, suspension of the driver's license and imposition of prison sentences. Speed limit violations are widespread in all countries for which statistics can be found. Speeding contributes more to the risk of traffic injury than do other risk factors for which estimates of population-attributable risk are available. Traffic speed strongly influences impact speed in crashes and therefore has major implications for public health. PMID:22224882

  9. 28 CFR 345.65 - Inmate medical work limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inmate medical work limitation. 345.65... PRISON INDUSTRIES (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits § 345.65 Inmate medical work limitation. In addition to any prior illnesses or injuries, medical limitations also include any illness...

  10. 28 CFR 345.65 - Inmate medical work limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inmate medical work limitation. 345.65... PRISON INDUSTRIES (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits § 345.65 Inmate medical work limitation. In addition to any prior illnesses or injuries, medical limitations also include any illness...

  11. 28 CFR 345.65 - Inmate medical work limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inmate medical work limitation. 345.65... PRISON INDUSTRIES (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits § 345.65 Inmate medical work limitation. In addition to any prior illnesses or injuries, medical limitations also include any illness...

  12. 40 CFR 65.46 - Alternative means of emission limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alternative means of emission limitation. 65.46 Section 65.46 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Storage Vessels § 65.46 Alternative means of...

  13. 28 CFR 345.65 - Inmate medical work limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inmate medical work limitation. 345.65 Section 345.65 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits § 345.65 Inmate medical...

  14. 28 CFR 345.65 - Inmate medical work limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inmate medical work limitation. 345.65 Section 345.65 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits § 345.65 Inmate medical...

  15. 76 FR 31800 - Airworthiness Directives; Viking Air Limited Model DHC-3 (Otter) Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska... AFM supplement: ``Airspeed limitation: VMO = 144 MPH for the effective date of this land/ski plane and... of 144 MPH, VMO speed limit for land/ in-service (TIS) after the ski plane and 134 MPH, VMO...

  16. 32 CFR 935.132 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Speed limits. 935.132 Section 935.132 National... WAKE ISLAND CODE Motor Vehicle Code § 935.132 Speed limits. Each person operating a motor vehicle on Wake Island shall operate it at a speed— (a) That is reasonable, safe, and proper, considering time...

  17. 32 CFR 935.132 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Speed limits. 935.132 Section 935.132 National... WAKE ISLAND CODE Motor Vehicle Code § 935.132 Speed limits. Each person operating a motor vehicle on Wake Island shall operate it at a speed— (a) That is reasonable, safe, and proper, considering time...

  18. 32 CFR 935.132 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Speed limits. 935.132 Section 935.132 National... WAKE ISLAND CODE Motor Vehicle Code § 935.132 Speed limits. Each person operating a motor vehicle on Wake Island shall operate it at a speed— (a) That is reasonable, safe, and proper, considering time...

  19. 50 CFR 38.13 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM MIDWAY ATOLL NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE Prohibitions § 38.13 Speed limits. No person on Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge will exceed the speed limit for automobiles, trucks... Atoll National Wildlife Refuge is 15 miles per hour....

  20. 50 CFR 38.13 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM MIDWAY ATOLL NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE Prohibitions § 38.13 Speed limits. No person on Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge will exceed the speed limit for automobiles, trucks... Atoll National Wildlife Refuge is 15 miles per hour....

  1. 50 CFR 38.13 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM MIDWAY ATOLL NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE Prohibitions § 38.13 Speed limits. No person on Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge will exceed the speed limit for automobiles, trucks... Atoll National Wildlife Refuge is 15 miles per hour....

  2. 50 CFR 38.13 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM MIDWAY ATOLL NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE Prohibitions § 38.13 Speed limits. No person on Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge will exceed the speed limit for automobiles, trucks... Atoll National Wildlife Refuge is 15 miles per hour....

  3. 50 CFR 38.13 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM MIDWAY ATOLL NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE Prohibitions § 38.13 Speed limits. No person on Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge will exceed the speed limit for automobiles, trucks... Atoll National Wildlife Refuge is 15 miles per hour....

  4. 32 CFR 935.132 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Speed limits. 935.132 Section 935.132 National... WAKE ISLAND CODE Motor Vehicle Code § 935.132 Speed limits. Each person operating a motor vehicle on Wake Island shall operate it at a speed— (a) That is reasonable, safe, and proper, considering time...

  5. 32 CFR 935.132 - Speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Speed limits. 935.132 Section 935.132 National... WAKE ISLAND CODE Motor Vehicle Code § 935.132 Speed limits. Each person operating a motor vehicle on Wake Island shall operate it at a speed— (a) That is reasonable, safe, and proper, considering time...

  6. 14 CFR 65.103 - Repairman certificate: Privileges and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Repairman certificate: Privileges and limitations. 65.103 Section 65.103 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Repairmen §...

  7. 14 CFR 65.103 - Repairman certificate: Privileges and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Repairman certificate: Privileges and limitations. 65.103 Section 65.103 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Repairmen §...

  8. 14 CFR 65.103 - Repairman certificate: Privileges and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Repairman certificate: Privileges and limitations. 65.103 Section 65.103 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Repairmen §...

  9. 14 CFR 65.103 - Repairman certificate: Privileges and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Repairman certificate: Privileges and limitations. 65.103 Section 65.103 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Repairmen §...

  10. 14 CFR 65.103 - Repairman certificate: Privileges and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Repairman certificate: Privileges and limitations. 65.103 Section 65.103 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... instructions of the certificate holder by whom the repairman is employed and the manufacturer's...

  11. Geometric derivation of the quantum speed limit

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Philip J.; Kok, Pieter

    2010-08-15

    The Mandelstam-Tamm and Margolus-Levitin inequalities play an important role in the study of quantum-mechanical processes in nature since they provide general limits on the speed of dynamical evolution. However, to date there has been only one derivation of the Margolus-Levitin inequality. In this paper, alternative geometric derivations for both inequalities are obtained from the statistical distance between quantum states. The inequalities are shown to hold for unitary evolution of pure and mixed states, and a counterexample to the inequalities is given for evolution described by completely positive trace-preserving maps. The counterexample shows that there is no quantum speed limit for nonunitary evolution.

  12. 14 CFR 65.81 - General privileges and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Mechanics § 65.81 General privileges and limitations. (a) A certificated mechanic may perform or supervise the maintenance, preventive... supervision of a certificated and appropriately rated mechanic, or a certificated repairman, who has...

  13. 14 CFR 65.81 - General privileges and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Mechanics § 65.81 General privileges and limitations. (a) A certificated mechanic may perform or supervise the maintenance, preventive... supervision of a certificated and appropriately rated mechanic, or a certificated repairman, who has...

  14. 14 CFR 65.81 - General privileges and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Mechanics § 65.81 General privileges and limitations. (a) A certificated mechanic may perform or supervise the maintenance, preventive... supervision of a certificated and appropriately rated mechanic, or a certificated repairman, who has...

  15. 14 CFR 65.81 - General privileges and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Mechanics § 65.81 General privileges and limitations. (a) A certificated mechanic may perform or supervise the maintenance, preventive... supervision of a certificated and appropriately rated mechanic, or a certificated repairman, who has...

  16. 14 CFR 65.81 - General privileges and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Mechanics § 65.81 General privileges and limitations. (a) A certificated mechanic may perform or supervise the maintenance, preventive... supervision of a certificated and appropriately rated mechanic, or a certificated repairman, who has...

  17. Time-limited optimal dynamics beyond the quantum speed limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Das, Kunal K.; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob F.; Opatrný, Tomáš

    2015-12-01

    The quantum speed limit sets the minimum time required to transfer a quantum system completely into a given target state. At shorter times the higher operation speed results in a loss of fidelity. Here we quantify the trade-off between the fidelity and the duration in a system driven by a time-varying control. The problem is addressed in the framework of Hilbert space geometry offering an intuitive interpretation of optimal control algorithms. This approach leads to a necessary criterion for control optimality applicable as a measure of algorithm convergence. The time fidelity trade-off expressed in terms of the direct Hilbert velocity provides a robust prediction of the quantum speed limit and allows one to adapt the control optimization such that it yields a predefined fidelity. The results are verified numerically in a multilevel system with a constrained Hamiltonian and a classification scheme for the control sequences is proposed based on their optimizability.

  18. Tectonic speed limits from plate kinematic reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahirovic, Sabin; Müller, R. Dietmar; Seton, Maria; Flament, Nicolas

    2015-05-01

    The motion of plates and continents on the planet's surface are a manifestation of long-term mantle convection and plate tectonics. Present-day plate velocities provide a snapshot of this ongoing process, and have been used to infer controlling factors on the speeds of plates and continents. However, present-day velocities do not capture plate behaviour over geologically representative periods of time. To address this shortcoming, we use a plate tectonic reconstruction approach to extract time-dependent plate velocities and geometries from which root mean square (RMS) velocities are computed, resulting in a median RMS plate speed of ∼ 4 cm /yr over 200 Myr. Linking tectonothermal ages of continental lithosphere to the RMS plate velocity analysis, we find that the increasing portions of plate area composed of continental and/or cratonic lithosphere significantly reduces plate speeds. Plates with any cratonic portion have a median RMS velocity of ∼ 5.8 cm /yr, while plates with more than 25% of cratonic area have a median RMS speed of ∼ 2.8 cm /yr. The fastest plates (∼ 8.5 cm /yr RMS speed) have little continental fraction and tend to be bounded by subduction zones, while the slowest plates (∼ 2.6- 2.8 cm /yr RMS speed) have large continental fractions and usually have little to no subducting part of plate perimeter. More generally, oceanic plates tend to move 2-3 times faster than continental plates, consistent with predictions of numerical models of mantle convection. The slower motion of continental plates is compatible with deep keels impinging on asthenospheric flow and increasing shear traction, thus anchoring the plate in the more viscous mantle transition zone. We also find that short-lived (up to ∼ 10 Myr) rapid accelerations of Africa (∼100 and 65 Ma), North America (∼100 and 55 Ma) and India (∼ 130 , 80 and 65 Ma) appear to be correlated with plume head arrivals as recorded by large igneous province (LIPs) emplacement. By evaluating

  19. 14 CFR 25.1505 - Maximum operating limit speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maximum operating limit speed. 25.1505... Operating Limitations § 25.1505 Maximum operating limit speed. The maximum operating limit speed (V MO/M MO airspeed or Mach Number, whichever is critical at a particular altitude) is a speed that may not...

  20. 14 CFR 25.1505 - Maximum operating limit speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maximum operating limit speed. 25.1505... Operating Limitations § 25.1505 Maximum operating limit speed. The maximum operating limit speed (V MO/M MO airspeed or Mach Number, whichever is critical at a particular altitude) is a speed that may not...

  1. 14 CFR 25.1505 - Maximum operating limit speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maximum operating limit speed. 25.1505... Operating Limitations § 25.1505 Maximum operating limit speed. The maximum operating limit speed (V MO/M MO airspeed or Mach Number, whichever is critical at a particular altitude) is a speed that may not...

  2. 14 CFR 25.1505 - Maximum operating limit speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maximum operating limit speed. 25.1505... Operating Limitations § 25.1505 Maximum operating limit speed. The maximum operating limit speed (V MO/M MO airspeed or Mach Number, whichever is critical at a particular altitude) is a speed that may not...

  3. 14 CFR 25.1505 - Maximum operating limit speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum operating limit speed. 25.1505... Operating Limitations § 25.1505 Maximum operating limit speed. The maximum operating limit speed (V MO/M MO airspeed or Mach Number, whichever is critical at a particular altitude) is a speed that may not...

  4. Quantum speed limits, coherence, and asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvian, Iman; Spekkens, Robert W.; Zanardi, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    The resource theory of asymmetry is a framework for classifying and quantifying the symmetry-breaking properties of both states and operations relative to a given symmetry. In the special case where the symmetry is the set of translations generated by a fixed observable, asymmetry can be interpreted as coherence relative to the observable eigenbasis, and the resource theory of asymmetry provides a framework to study this notion of coherence. We here show that this notion of coherence naturally arises in the context of quantum speed limits. Indeed, the very concept of speed of evolution, i.e., the inverse of the minimum time it takes the system to evolve to another (partially) distinguishable state, is a measure of asymmetry relative to the time translations generated by the system Hamiltonian. Furthermore, the celebrated Mandelstam-Tamm and Margolus-Levitin speed limits can be interpreted as upper bounds on this measure of asymmetry by functions which are themselves measures of asymmetry in the special case of pure states. Using measures of asymmetry that are not restricted to pure states, such as the Wigner-Yanase skew information, we obtain extensions of the Mandelstam-Tamm bound which are significantly tighter in the case of mixed states. We also clarify some confusions in the literature about coherence and asymmetry, and show that measures of coherence are a proper subset of measures of asymmetry.

  5. Limiting Speed of the Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirody, Jasmine; Berry, Richard; Oster, George

    The bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) drives swimming in a wide variety of bacterial species, making it crucial for several fundamental biological processes including chemotaxis and community formation. Recent experiments have shown that the structure of this nanomachine is more dynamic than previously believed. Specifically, the number of active torque-generating units (stators) was shown to vary across applied loads. This finding invalidates the experimental evidence reporting that limiting (zero-torque) speed is independent of the number of active stators. Here, we put forward a model for the torque generation mechanism of this motor and propose that the maximum speed of the motor increases as additional torque-generators are recruited. This is contrary to the current widely-held belief that there is a universal upper limit to the speed of the BFM. Our result arises from the assumption that stators disengage from the motor for a significant portion of their mechanochemical cycles at low loads. We show that this assumption is consistent with current experimental evidence and consolidate our predictions with arguments that a processive motor must have a high duty ratio at high loads.

  6. Quantum Speed Limits for Leakage and Decoherence.

    PubMed

    Marvian, Iman; Lidar, Daniel A

    2015-11-20

    We introduce state-independent, nonperturbative Hamiltonian quantum speed limits for population leakage and fidelity loss, for a gapped open system interacting with a reservoir. These results hold in the presence of initial correlations between the system and the reservoir, under the sole assumption that their interaction and its commutator with the reservoir Hamiltonian are norm bounded. The reservoir need not be thermal and can be time dependent. We study the significance of energy mismatch between the system and the local degrees of freedom of the reservoir that directly interact with the system. We demonstrate that, in general, by increasing the system gap we may reduce this energy mismatch, and, consequently, drive the system and the reservoir into resonance; this can accelerate fidelity loss, irrespective of the thermal properties or state of the reservoir. This implies that quantum error suppression strategies based on increasing the gap are not uniformly beneficial. Our speed limits also yield an elementary lower bound on the relaxation time of spin systems. PMID:26636833

  7. Quantum Speed Limits for Leakage and Decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvian, Iman; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2015-11-01

    We introduce state-independent, nonperturbative Hamiltonian quantum speed limits for population leakage and fidelity loss, for a gapped open system interacting with a reservoir. These results hold in the presence of initial correlations between the system and the reservoir, under the sole assumption that their interaction and its commutator with the reservoir Hamiltonian are norm bounded. The reservoir need not be thermal and can be time dependent. We study the significance of energy mismatch between the system and the local degrees of freedom of the reservoir that directly interact with the system. We demonstrate that, in general, by increasing the system gap we may reduce this energy mismatch, and, consequently, drive the system and the reservoir into resonance; this can accelerate fidelity loss, irrespective of the thermal properties or state of the reservoir. This implies that quantum error suppression strategies based on increasing the gap are not uniformly beneficial. Our speed limits also yield an elementary lower bound on the relaxation time of spin systems.

  8. 14 CFR 25.1516 - Other speed limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Other speed limitations. 25.1516 Section 25.1516 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Limitations § 25.1516 Other speed limitations. Any other limitation associated with speed must be established....

  9. 14 CFR 25.1516 - Other speed limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Other speed limitations. 25.1516 Section 25.1516 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Limitations § 25.1516 Other speed limitations. Any other limitation associated with speed must be established....

  10. 14 CFR 25.1516 - Other speed limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Other speed limitations. 25.1516 Section 25.1516 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Limitations § 25.1516 Other speed limitations. Any other limitation associated with speed must be established....

  11. 14 CFR 25.1516 - Other speed limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Other speed limitations. 25.1516 Section 25.1516 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Limitations § 25.1516 Other speed limitations. Any other limitation associated with speed must be established....

  12. 14 CFR 25.1516 - Other speed limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Other speed limitations. 25.1516 Section 25.1516 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Limitations § 25.1516 Other speed limitations. Any other limitation associated with speed must be established....

  13. 32 CFR 263.6 - Speeding or reckless driving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... driving. (a) No person shall drive a motor vehicle on the site at a speed greater than or in a manner... a special hazard exists that requires lower speed, the speed limit on the site is 15 m.p.h., unless another speed limit has been duly posted, and no person shall drive a motor vehicle on the site in...

  14. 14 CFR 25.33 - Propeller speed and pitch limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Propeller speed and pitch limits. 25.33... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 25.33 Propeller speed and pitch limits. (a) The propeller speed and pitch must be limited to values that will ensure— (1) Safe...

  15. 40 CFR 1037.640 - Variable vehicle speed limiters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Variable vehicle speed limiters. 1037... § 1037.640 Variable vehicle speed limiters. This section specifies provisions that apply for vehicle speed limiters (VSLs) that you model under § 1037.520. This does not apply for VSLs that you do...

  16. 14 CFR 25.33 - Propeller speed and pitch limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Propeller speed and pitch limits. 25.33... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 25.33 Propeller speed and pitch limits. (a) The propeller speed and pitch must be limited to values that will ensure— (1) Safe...

  17. 14 CFR 25.33 - Propeller speed and pitch limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Propeller speed and pitch limits. 25.33... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 25.33 Propeller speed and pitch limits. (a) The propeller speed and pitch must be limited to values that will ensure— (1) Safe...

  18. 40 CFR 1037.640 - Variable vehicle speed limiters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Variable vehicle speed limiters. 1037... § 1037.640 Variable vehicle speed limiters. This section specifies provisions that apply for vehicle speed limiters (VSLs) that you model under § 1037.520. This does not apply for VSLs that you do...

  19. 14 CFR 29.1517 - Limiting height-speed envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Limiting height-speed envelope. 29.1517... Operating Limitations § 29.1517 Limiting height-speed envelope. For Category A rotorcraft, if a range of heights exists at any speed, including zero, within which it is not possible to make a safe...

  20. 14 CFR 29.1517 - Limiting height-speed envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Limiting height-speed envelope. 29.1517... Operating Limitations § 29.1517 Limiting height-speed envelope. For Category A rotorcraft, if a range of heights exists at any speed, including zero, within which it is not possible to make a safe...

  1. 14 CFR 29.1517 - Limiting height-speed envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Limiting height-speed envelope. 29.1517... Operating Limitations § 29.1517 Limiting height-speed envelope. For Category A rotorcraft, if a range of heights exists at any speed, including zero, within which it is not possible to make a safe...

  2. 14 CFR 25.33 - Propeller speed and pitch limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Propeller speed and pitch limits. 25.33... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 25.33 Propeller speed and pitch limits. (a) The propeller speed and pitch must be limited to values that will ensure- (1) Safe...

  3. 14 CFR 25.33 - Propeller speed and pitch limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Propeller speed and pitch limits. 25.33... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 25.33 Propeller speed and pitch limits. (a) The propeller speed and pitch must be limited to values that will ensure— (1) Safe...

  4. 14 CFR 29.1517 - Limiting height-speed envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limiting height-speed envelope. 29.1517... Operating Limitations § 29.1517 Limiting height-speed envelope. For Category A rotorcraft, if a range of heights exists at any speed, including zero, within which it is not possible to make a safe...

  5. 14 CFR 29.1517 - Limiting height-speed envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limiting height-speed envelope. 29.1517... Operating Limitations § 29.1517 Limiting height-speed envelope. For Category A rotorcraft, if a range of heights exists at any speed, including zero, within which it is not possible to make a safe...

  6. Cytomegalovirus pp65 limits dissemination but is dispensable for persistence

    PubMed Central

    Malouli, Daniel; Hansen, Scott G.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Marshall, Emily E.; Hughes, Colette M.; Ventura, Abigail B.; Gilbride, Roxanne M.; Lewis, Matthew S.; Xu, Guangwu; Kreklywich, Craig; Whizin, Nathan; Fischer, Miranda; Legasse, Alfred W.; Viswanathan, Kasinath; Siess, Don; Camp, David G.; Axthelm, Michael K.; Kahl, Christoph; DeFilippis, Victor R.; Smith, Richard D.; Streblow, Daniel N.; Picker, Louis J.; Früh, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The most abundantly produced virion protein in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the immunodominant phosphoprotein 65 (pp65), which is frequently included in CMV vaccines. Although it is nonessential for in vitro CMV growth, pp65 displays immunomodulatory functions that support a potential role in primary and/or persistent infection. To determine the contribution of pp65 to CMV infection and immunity, we generated a rhesus CMV lacking both pp65 orthologs (RhCMVΔpp65ab). While deletion of pp65ab slightly reduced growth in vitro and increased defective particle formation, the protein composition of secreted virions was largely unchanged. Interestingly, pp65 was not required for primary and persistent infection in animals. Immune responses induced by RhCMVΔpp65ab did not prevent reinfection with rhesus CMV; however, reinfection with RhCMVΔUS2-11, which lacks viral-encoded MHC-I antigen presentation inhibitors, was prevented. Unexpectedly, induction of pp65b-specific T cells alone did not protect against RhCMVΔUS2-11 challenge, suggesting that T cells targeting multiple CMV antigens are required for protection. However, pp65-specific immunity was crucial for controlling viral dissemination during primary infection, as indicated by the marked increase of RhCMVΔpp65ab genome copies in CMV-naive, but not CMV-immune, animals. Our data provide rationale for inclusion of pp65 into CMV vaccines but also demonstrate that pp65-induced T cell responses alone do not recapitulate the protective effect of natural infection. PMID:24691437

  7. 49 CFR 213.329 - Curves, elevation and speed limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Curves, elevation and speed limitations. 213.329... Higher § 213.329 Curves, elevation and speed limitations. (a) The maximum crosslevel on the outside rail... lower than the inside rail. (b) (1) The maximum allowable operating speed for each curve is...

  8. 49 CFR 213.329 - Curves, elevation and speed limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Curves, elevation and speed limitations. 213.329... Higher § 213.329 Curves, elevation and speed limitations. (a) The maximum crosslevel on the outside rail... lower than the inside rail. (b) (1) The maximum allowable operating speed for each curve is...

  9. 49 CFR 213.57 - Curves; elevation and speed limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Curves; elevation and speed limitations. 213.57... speed limitations. (a) The maximum crosslevel on the outside rail of a curve may not be more than 8... applicable September 21, 1999.) (b)(1) The maximum allowable operating speed for each curve is determined...

  10. 49 CFR 213.57 - Curves; elevation and speed limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Curves; elevation and speed limitations. 213.57... speed limitations. (a) The maximum crosslevel on the outside rail of a curve may not be more than 8... applicable September 21, 1999.) (b)(1) The maximum allowable operating speed for each curve is determined...

  11. 49 CFR 213.329 - Curves, elevation and speed limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Curves, elevation and speed limitations. 213.329... Higher § 213.329 Curves, elevation and speed limitations. (a) The maximum crosslevel on the outside rail... lower than the inside rail. (b) (1) The maximum allowable operating speed for each curve is...

  12. Cytomegalovirus pp65 limits dissemination but is dispensable for persistence

    SciTech Connect

    Malouli, Daniel; Hansen, Scott G.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Marshall, Emily E.; Hughes, Colette M.; Ventura, Abigail B.; Gilbride, Roxanne M.; Lewis, Matthew S.; Xu, Guangwu; Kreklywich, Craig; Whizin, Nathan; Fischer, Miranda; Legasse, Alfred W.; Viswanathan, Kasinath; Siess, Don; Camp, David G.; Axthelm, Michael K.; Kahl, Christoph; DeFilippis, Victor R.; Smith, Richard D.; Streblow, Daniel N.; Picker, Louis J.; Früh, Klaus

    2014-04-01

    The tegument phosphoprotein pp65 (UL83) is the most abundant virion protein in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). Since pp65 is immunodominant in persistently infected individuals, subunit vaccines against HCMV often include pp65 as T cell stimulatory component. Although HCMV pp65 is non-essential for viral growth in vitro it is thought to have an important role in primary and persistent infection since pp65 displays multiple immunomodulatory functions. To determine whether pp65 is required for infection and to evaluate its role in natural and vaccination-induced immunity we generated a rhesus CMV lacking both homologues, pp65a (Rh111) and pp65b (Rh112). Lack of pp65 resulted in a slight growth defect in vitro and an increase of defective particle formation. However, most pp65-deleted virions in the supernatant were phenotypically normal and proteomics analysis revealed that the ratios of the remaining viral proteins were largely unchanged. RhCMV Δpp65ab was able to persistently infect CMV-negative rhesus macaques (RM) and to super-infect RM previously infected with CMV. To determine whether T cells against pp65 are essential for protection against CMV, we challenged Δpp65ab-infected animals with RhCMV ΔUS2-11, a viral recombinant that lacks inhibitors of MHC-I antigen presentation and is thus unable to overcome CMV-specific T cell immunity. Despite a complete lack of pp65-specific T cells, Δpp65ab protected against ΔUS2-11 challenge suggesting that pp65-specific T cells are not essential for T cell immunity against CMV. Using the same approach we further demonstrate that pp65b-specific T cells, induced by heterologous prime/boost vaccination, are not sufficient to protect against ΔUS2-11 challenge. Our data provides a new approach to test the efficacy of subunit vaccine candidates and suggest that pp65 vaccines are insufficient to induce a T cell response that recapitulates the protective effect of natural infection.

  13. A Health Impact Assessment of a Proposed Bill to Decrease Speed Limits on Local Roads in Massachusetts (U.S.A.)

    PubMed Central

    James, Peter; Ito, Kate; Banay, Rachel F.; Buonocore, Jonathan J.; Wood, Benjamin; Arcaya, Mariana C.

    2014-01-01

    Decreasing traffic speeds increases the amount of time drivers have to react to road hazards, potentially averting collisions, and makes crashes that do happen less severe. Boston’s regional planning agency, the Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC), in partnership with the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH), conducted a Health Impact Assessment (HIA) that examined the potential health impacts of a proposed bill in the state legislature to lower the default speed limits on local roads from 30 miles per hour (mph) to 25 mph. The aim was to reduce vehicle speeds on local roads to a limit that is safer for pedestrians, cyclists, and children. The passage of this proposed legislation could have had far-reaching and potentially important public health impacts. Lower default speed limits may prevent around 18 fatalities and 1200 serious injuries to motorists, cyclists and pedestrians each year, as well as promote active transportation by making local roads feel more hospitable to cyclists and pedestrians. While a lower speed limit would increase congestion and slightly worsen air quality, the benefits outweigh the costs from both a health and economic perspective and would save the state approximately $62 million annually from prevented fatalities and injuries. PMID:25279544

  14. A health impact assessment of a proposed bill to decrease speed limits on local roads in Massachusetts (U.S.A.).

    PubMed

    James, Peter; Ito, Kate; Banay, Rachel F; Buonocore, Jonathan J; Wood, Benjamin; Arcaya, Mariana C

    2014-01-01

    Decreasing traffic speeds increases the amount of time drivers have to react to road hazards, potentially averting collisions, and makes crashes that do happen less severe. Boston's regional planning agency, the Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC), in partnership with the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH), conducted a Health Impact Assessment (HIA) that examined the potential health impacts of a proposed bill in the state legislature to lower the default speed limits on local roads from 30 miles per hour (mph) to 25 mph. The aim was to reduce vehicle speeds on local roads to a limit that is safer for pedestrians, cyclists, and children. The passage of this proposed legislation could have had far-reaching and potentially important public health impacts. Lower default speed limits may prevent around 18 fatalities and 1200 serious injuries to motorists, cyclists and pedestrians each year, as well as promote active transportation by making local roads feel more hospitable to cyclists and pedestrians. While a lower speed limit would increase congestion and slightly worsen air quality, the benefits outweigh the costs from both a health and economic perspective and would save the state approximately $62 million annually from prevented fatalities and injuries. PMID:25279544

  15. Should We Raise the Reading Speed Limit?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berliner, David; Casanova, Ursula

    1988-01-01

    A recent study of reading rates of first grade students in Israel and America indicates that increased reading speed may improve comprehension and oral reading. Based on this finding, activities to help students read faster (and better) are suggested. (JL)

  16. 14 CFR 65.95 - Inspection authorization: Privileges and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Mechanics § 65.95... the aircraft owner, the mechanic submitting the aircraft, repair, or alteration for approval (if...

  17. 14 CFR 65.95 - Inspection authorization: Privileges and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Mechanics § 65.95... the aircraft owner, the mechanic submitting the aircraft, repair, or alteration for approval (if...

  18. 14 CFR 65.95 - Inspection authorization: Privileges and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Mechanics § 65.95... the aircraft owner, the mechanic submitting the aircraft, repair, or alteration for approval (if...

  19. 14 CFR 65.95 - Inspection authorization: Privileges and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Mechanics § 65.95... the aircraft owner, the mechanic submitting the aircraft, repair, or alteration for approval (if...

  20. 14 CFR 65.95 - Inspection authorization: Privileges and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Mechanics § 65.95... the aircraft owner, the mechanic submitting the aircraft, repair, or alteration for approval (if...

  1. LIMITS TO ICE ON ASTEROIDS (24) THEMIS AND (65) CYBELE

    SciTech Connect

    Jewitt, David; Guilbert-Lepoutre, Aurelie

    2012-01-15

    We present optical spectra of (24) Themis and (65) Cybele, two large main-belt asteroids on which exposed water ice has recently been reported. No emission lines, expected from resonance fluorescence in gas sublimated from the ice, were detected. Derived limits to the production rates of water are {approx}<400 kg s{sup -1} (5{sigma}) for each object, assuming a cometary H{sub 2}O/CN ratio. We rule out models in which a large fraction of the surface is occupied by high-albedo ('fresh') water ice because the measured albedos of Themis and Cybele are low ({approx}0.05-0.07). We also rule out models in which a large fraction of the surface is occupied by low-albedo ('dirty') water ice because dirty ice would be warm and would sublimate strongly enough for gaseous products to have been detected. If ice exists on these bodies it must be relatively clean (albedo {approx}>0.3) and confined to a fraction of the Earth-facing surface {approx}<10%. By analogy with impacted asteroid (596) Scheila, we propose an impact excavation scenario, in which 10 m scale projectiles have exposed buried ice. If the ice is even more reflective (albedo {approx}>0.6), then the timescale for sublimation of an optically thick layer can rival the {approx}10{sup 3} yr interval between impacts with bodies this size. In this sense, exposure by impact may be a quasi steady-state feature of ice-containing asteroids at 3 AU.

  2. 40 CFR 1037.640 - Variable vehicle speed limiters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... soft-top speed limit. You may also design your VSL to expire after accumulation of a predetermined number of miles. However, designs with soft tops or expiration features are subject to proration...) of this section. (ii) For VSLs with soft tops, the default speed does not include speeds...

  3. 14 CFR 23.33 - Propeller speed and pitch limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Propeller speed and pitch limits. 23.33 Section 23.33 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 23.33 Propeller speed and pitch limits....

  4. 49 CFR 213.57 - Curves; elevation and speed limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Curves; elevation and speed limitations. 213.57 Section 213.57 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Geometry § 213.57 Curves; elevation and speed limitations. (a) The...

  5. 28 CFR 65.11 - Limitations on fund and other assistance use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Limitations on fund and other assistance use. 65.11 Section 65.11 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY FEDERAL LAW ENFORCEMENT ASSISTANCE Allocation of Funds and Other Assistance § 65.11 Limitations on fund and other assistance use. (a) Land acquisition....

  6. Quantum speed limits for Bell-diagonal states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei; Jiang, Ke-Xia; Zhang, Ying-Jie; Xia, Yun-Jie

    2015-12-01

    The lower bounds of the evolution time between two distinguishable states of a system, defined as quantum speed limit time, can characterize the maximal speed of quantum computers and communication channels. We study the quantum speed limit time between the composite quantum states and their target states in the presence of nondissipative decoherence. For the initial states with maximally mixed marginals, we obtain the exact expressions of the quantum speed limit time which mainly depend on the parameters of the initial states and the decoherence channels. Furthermore, by calculating the quantum speed limit time for the time-dependent states started from a class of initial states, we discover that the quantum speed limit time gradually decreases in time, and the decay rate of the quantum speed limit time would show a sudden change at a certain critical time. Interestingly, at the same critical time, the composite system dynamics would exhibit a sudden transition from classical decoherence to quantum decoherence. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61178012 and 11304179), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant Nos. 20123705120002 and 20133705110001), the Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province of China (Grant No. ZR2014AP009), and the Scientific Research Foundation of Qufu Normal University.

  7. 40 CFR 65.8 - Procedures for approval of alternative means of emission limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Procedures for approval of alternative means of emission limitation. 65.8 Section 65.8 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE General Provisions § 65.8 Procedures for approval of alternative means...

  8. 40 CFR 65.8 - Procedures for approval of alternative means of emission limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Procedures for approval of alternative means of emission limitation. 65.8 Section 65.8 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE General Provisions § 65.8 Procedures for approval of alternative means...

  9. 40 CFR 65.8 - Procedures for approval of alternative means of emission limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedures for approval of alternative means of emission limitation. 65.8 Section 65.8 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE General Provisions § 65.8 Procedures for approval of alternative means...

  10. Quantum speed limit for a circuit-QED computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motzoi, Felix; Goerz, Michael; Theis, Lukas; Kessler, Torsten; Whaley, Birgitta; Wilhelm, Frank

    We examine the controlability and design landscape for circuit QED. We show that the speed limit for universal gates is on the order of 10ns for typical experimental parameters, with one cavity and two transmons. The results include simultaneous gates on different qubits (where the speed limit is given by the energy separation) as well as two-qubit gates, and neither requires qubit-frequency tuning, which can degrade coherence and increase overhead. This result shows that the coupling strength does not impose a fundamental limitation on the speed, and significantly outperforms current experimental implementations. Moreover we obtain fast speeds both in the near-resonant and dispersive cavity regime, and for both direct qubit control and control through the cavity.

  11. Design and analysis of 20 Gb/s inductorless limiting amplifier in 65 nm CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, He; Jianfei, Xu; Na, Yan; Jie, Sun; Liqian, Bian; Hao, Min

    2014-10-01

    A high speed inductorless limiting amplifier (LA) in an optical communication receiver with the working speed up to 20 Gb/s is presented. The LA includes an input matching network, a four-stage 3rd order amplifier core, an output buffer for the test and a DC offset cancellation (DCOC). It uses the active interleaving feedback technique both to broaden the bandwidth and achieve the flatness response. Based on our careful analysis of the DCOC and stability, an error amplifier is added to the DCOC loop in order to keep the offset voltage reasonable. Fabricated in the 65 nm CMOS technology, the LA only occupies an area of 0.45 × 0.25 mm2 (without PAD). The measurement results show that the LA achieves a differential voltage gain of 37 dB, and a 3-dB bandwidth of 16.5 GHz. Up to 26.5 GHz, the Sdd11 and Sdd22 are less than -16 dB and -9 dB. The chip excluding buffer is supplied by 1.2 V VDD and draws a current of 50 mA.

  12. Speed limit and ramp meter control for traffic flow networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goatin, Paola; Göttlich, Simone; Kolb, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    The control of traffic flow can be related to different applications. In this work, a method to manage variable speed limits combined with coordinated ramp metering within the framework of the Lighthill-Whitham-Richards (LWR) network model is introduced. Following a 'first-discretize-then-optimize' approach, the first order optimality system is derived and the switch of speeds at certain fixed points in time is explained, together with the boundary control for the ramp metering. Sequential quadratic programming methods are used to solve the control problem numerically. For application purposes, experimental setups are presented wherein variable speed limits are used as a traffic guidance system to avoid traffic jams on highway interchanges and on-ramps.

  13. 47 CFR 65.104 - Page limitations for rate of return submissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Page limitations for rate of return submissions. 65.104 Section 65.104 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERSTATE RATE OF RETURN PRESCRIPTION PROCEDURES AND METHODOLOGIES Procedures §...

  14. 47 CFR 65.104 - Page limitations for rate of return submissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Page limitations for rate of return submissions. 65.104 Section 65.104 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERSTATE RATE OF RETURN PRESCRIPTION PROCEDURES AND METHODOLOGIES Procedures §...

  15. 40 CFR 65.117 - Alternative means of emission limitation: Batch processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... limitation: Batch processes. 65.117 Section 65.117 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... for delivery of the replacement equipment and the actual date of delivery of the replacement equipment... been detected is allowed if the replacement equipment is not available provided the...

  16. 41 CFR 102-73.65 - Are there any limitations on leasing certain types of space?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Are there any limitations on leasing certain types of space? 102-73.65 Section 102-73.65 Public Contracts and Property... that leasing such space is necessary to meet requirements that cannot be met in public buildings,...

  17. 41 CFR 102-73.65 - Are there any limitations on leasing certain types of space?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Are there any limitations on leasing certain types of space? 102-73.65 Section 102-73.65 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 73-REAL ESTATE ACQUISITION Acquisition...

  18. Intelligent advisory speed limit dedication in highway using VANET.

    PubMed

    Jalooli, Ali; Shaghaghi, Erfan; Jabbarpour, Mohammad Reza; Noor, Rafidah Md; Yeo, Hwasoo; Jung, Jason J

    2014-01-01

    Variable speed limits (VSLs) as a mean for enhancing road traffic safety are studied for decades to modify the speed limit based on the prevailing road circumstances. In this study the pros and cons of VSL systems and their effects on traffic controlling efficiency are summarized. Despite the potential effectiveness of utilizing VSLs, we have witnessed that the effectiveness of this system is impacted by factors such as VSL control strategy used and the level of driver compliance. Hence, the proposed approach called Intelligent Advisory Speed Limit Dedication (IASLD) as the novel VSL control strategy which considers the driver compliance aims to improve the traffic flow and occupancy of vehicles in addition to amelioration of vehicle's travel times. The IASLD provides the advisory speed limit for each vehicle exclusively based on the vehicle's characteristics including the vehicle type, size, and safety capabilities as well as traffic and weather conditions. The proposed approach takes advantage of vehicular ad hoc network (VANET) to accelerate its performance, in the way that simulation results demonstrate the reduction of incident detection time up to 31.2% in comparison with traditional VSL strategy. The simulation results similarly indicate the improvement of traffic flow efficiency, occupancy, and travel time in different conditions. PMID:24999493

  19. SIMULATION OF WIND SPEED AND DIRECTION FROM LIMITED DATA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS) requires hourly wind data but these are not always available. Therefore, a procedure was developed to stochastically generate wind speed and direction from temporally limited wind data. For three locations. two statistical datasets were created to be used ...

  20. Intelligent Advisory Speed Limit Dedication in Highway Using VANET

    PubMed Central

    Md Noor, Rafidah; Yeo, Hwasoo; Jung, Jason J.

    2014-01-01

    Variable speed limits (VSLs) as a mean for enhancing road traffic safety are studied for decades to modify the speed limit based on the prevailing road circumstances. In this study the pros and cons of VSL systems and their effects on traffic controlling efficiency are summarized. Despite the potential effectiveness of utilizing VSLs, we have witnessed that the effectiveness of this system is impacted by factors such as VSL control strategy used and the level of driver compliance. Hence, the proposed approach called Intelligent Advisory Speed Limit Dedication (IASLD) as the novel VSL control strategy which considers the driver compliance aims to improve the traffic flow and occupancy of vehicles in addition to amelioration of vehicle's travel times. The IASLD provides the advisory speed limit for each vehicle exclusively based on the vehicle's characteristics including the vehicle type, size, and safety capabilities as well as traffic and weather conditions. The proposed approach takes advantage of vehicular ad hoc network (VANET) to accelerate its performance, in the way that simulation results demonstrate the reduction of incident detection time up to 31.2% in comparison with traditional VSL strategy. The simulation results similarly indicate the improvement of traffic flow efficiency, occupancy, and travel time in different conditions. PMID:24999493

  1. Bridge diagnosis at 55 mph

    SciTech Connect

    Azevedo, S

    1998-10-01

    The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) has helped sponsor a research project at Lawrence Livermore that produced a beneficial new tool as well as an R&D 100 Award. The HERMES Bridge Inspector will provide an invaluable capability to diagnose the problems of deteriorating bridge decks and do it accurately, efficiently, nondestructively, and, perhaps most important to motorists, without closing bridges. Almost 30% of 600,000 large highway bridges in the U.S. are classified "deficient" by the FHWA, and HERMES can make a significant contribution toward solving the problem of infrastructure assessment and repair. With further development, HERMES holds promise for other concrete inspection problems, such as railroads, tunnels, and runways. HERMES, or High-performance Electromagnetic Roadway Mapping and Evaluation System, is a radar-based sensing system mounted in a trailer. It can be pulled by a vehicle at traffic speeds over a bridge deck to collect information about the roadway subsurface -- its sensors gathering data 30 centimeters or more into concrete. An onboard computer system processes the data into three-dimensional images that pinpoint problems in the roadway concrete and give engineers quantitative information about deterioration in the bridge deck. Engineers can then better assess what repairs or reconstruction is necessary and avoid the cost overruns and delays that result from inexact problem diagnoses.

  2. Blazar Jets Push Closer to Cosmic Speed Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-01-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) have discovered jets of plasma blasted from the cores of distant galaxies at speeds within one-tenth of one percent of the speed of light, placing these plasma jets among the fastest objects yet seen in the Universe. "This tells us that the physical processes at the cores of these galaxies, called blazars, are extremely energetic and are capable of propelling matter very close to the absolute cosmic speed limit," said Glenn Piner of Whittier College in Whittier, California. Piner, who worked on the project with student Dipesh Bhattari, also of Whittier College, Philip Edwards of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, and Dayton Jones of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, presented their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in San Diego, California. According to Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity, no object with mass can be accelerated to the speed of light. To get even close to the speed of light requires enormous amounts of energy. "For example, to accelerate a bowling ball to the speed newly measured in these blazars would require all the energy produced in the world for an entire week," Piner said, "and the blobs of plasma in these jets are at least as massive as a large planet". Blazars are active galactic nuclei -- energetic regions surrounding massive black holes at the centers of galaxies. Material being drawn into the black hole forms a spinning disk called an accretion disk. Powerful jets of charged particles are ejected at high speeds along the poles of accretion disks. When these jets happen to be aimed nearly toward the Earth, the objects are called blazars. Taking advantage of the extremely sharp radio "vision" of the continent-wide VLBA, the scientists tracked individual features in the jets of three blazars at distances from Earth ranging from 7.3 to 9 billion light-years. A Boston University team led by Svetlana Jorstad earlier had identified

  3. Blazar Jets Push Closer to Cosmic Speed Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-01-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) have discovered jets of plasma blasted from the cores of distant galaxies at speeds within one-tenth of one percent of the speed of light, placing these plasma jets among the fastest objects yet seen in the Universe. "This tells us that the physical processes at the cores of these galaxies, called blazars, are extremely energetic and are capable of propelling matter very close to the absolute cosmic speed limit," said Glenn Piner of Whittier College in Whittier, California. Piner, who worked on the project with student Dipesh Bhattari, also of Whittier College, Philip Edwards of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, and Dayton Jones of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, presented their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in San Diego, California. According to Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity, no object with mass can be accelerated to the speed of light. To get even close to the speed of light requires enormous amounts of energy. "For example, to accelerate a bowling ball to the speed newly measured in these blazars would require all the energy produced in the world for an entire week," Piner said, "and the blobs of plasma in these jets are at least as massive as a large planet". Blazars are active galactic nuclei -- energetic regions surrounding massive black holes at the centers of galaxies. Material being drawn into the black hole forms a spinning disk called an accretion disk. Powerful jets of charged particles are ejected at high speeds along the poles of accretion disks. When these jets happen to be aimed nearly toward the Earth, the objects are called blazars. Taking advantage of the extremely sharp radio "vision" of the continent-wide VLBA, the scientists tracked individual features in the jets of three blazars at distances from Earth ranging from 7.3 to 9 billion light-years. A Boston University team led by Svetlana Jorstad earlier had identified

  4. 77 FR 37470 - Technical Standard Order (TSO)-C65a, Airborne Doppler Radar Ground Speed and/or Drift Angle...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-21

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Technical Standard Order (TSO)-C65a, Airborne Doppler Radar Ground Speed... Doppler radar ground speed and/or drift angle measuring equipment (for air carrier aircraft). SUMMARY: This notice announces the FAA's intent to cancel TSO-C65a, Airborne Doppler radar ground speed...

  5. The Limiting Speed of the Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirody, Jasmine A.; Berry, Richard M.; Oster, George

    2016-08-01

    Recent experiments on the bacterial flagellar motor have shown that the structure of this nanomachine, which drives locomotion in a wide range of bacterial species, is more dynamic than previously believed. Specifically, the number of active torque-generating units (stators) was shown to vary across applied loads. This finding invalidates the experimental evidence reporting that limiting (zero-torque) speed is independent of the number of active stators. Here, we propose that, contrary to previous assumptions, the maximum speed of the motor is not universal, but rather increases as additional torque-generators are recruited. This result arises from our assumption that stators disengage from the motor for a significant portion of their mechanochemical cycles at low loads. We show that this assumption is consistent with current experimental evidence and consolidate our predictions with arguments that a processive motor must have a high duty ratio at high loads.

  6. The Limiting Speed of the Bacterial Flagellar Motor.

    PubMed

    Nirody, Jasmine A; Berry, Richard M; Oster, George

    2016-08-01

    Recent experiments on the bacterial flagellar motor have shown that the structure of this nanomachine, which drives locomotion in a wide range of bacterial species, is more dynamic than previously believed. Specifically, the number of active torque-generating complexes (stators) was shown to vary across applied loads. This finding brings under scrutiny the experimental evidence reporting that limiting (zero-torque) speed is independent of the number of active stators. In this study, we propose that, contrary to previous assumptions, the maximum speed of the motor increases as additional stators are recruited. This result arises from our assumption that stators disengage from the motor for a significant portion of their mechanochemical cycles at low loads. We show that this assumption is consistent with current experimental evidence in chimeric motors, as well as with the requirement that a processive motor driving a large load via an elastic linkage must have a high duty ratio. PMID:27508439

  7. Are Students Aware of the Speed Limits on a University Campus?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Johnell; Raines, Stephanie; Klein, Nathan; Crisler, Matt; Wills, Rebekkah; Mossey, Mary; Koon, Beatrice; McKibben, Eric; Ogle, Jennifer; Robinson, Geary

    2010-01-01

    Driving speed is an important traffic safety issue. The lack of adherence to posted speed limits is a safety concern, especially on university campuses where the populations of drivers are at increased risk for crashes involving speeding due to their young age. Thus, driver speed and knowledge of speed limits on university campuses is an important…

  8. Quantum speed limit for perfect state transfer in one dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Yung, M.-H.

    2006-09-15

    The basic idea of spin-chain engineering for perfect quantum state transfer (QST) is to find a set of coupling constants in the Hamiltonian such that a particular state initially encoded on one site will evolve freely to the opposite site without any dynamical controls. The minimal possible evolution time represents a speed limit for QST. We prove that the optimal solution is the one simulating the precession of a spin in a static magnetic field. We also argue that, at least for solid-state systems where interactions are local, it is more realistic to characterize the computation power by the couplings than the initial energy.

  9. 14 CFR 27.33 - Main rotor speed and pitch limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Main rotor speed and pitch limits. 27.33... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 27.33 Main rotor speed and pitch limits. (a) Main rotor speed limits. A range of main rotor speeds must be established that— (1) With power...

  10. 14 CFR 29.33 - Main rotor speed and pitch limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Main rotor speed and pitch limits. 29.33... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 29.33 Main rotor speed and pitch limits. (a) Main rotor speed limits. A range of main rotor speeds must be established that— (1) With power...

  11. 14 CFR 27.33 - Main rotor speed and pitch limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Main rotor speed and pitch limits. 27.33... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 27.33 Main rotor speed and pitch limits. (a) Main rotor speed limits. A range of main rotor speeds must be established that— (1) With power...

  12. 14 CFR 29.33 - Main rotor speed and pitch limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Main rotor speed and pitch limits. 29.33... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 29.33 Main rotor speed and pitch limits. (a) Main rotor speed limits. A range of main rotor speeds must be established that— (1) With power...

  13. 14 CFR 27.33 - Main rotor speed and pitch limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Main rotor speed and pitch limits. 27.33... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 27.33 Main rotor speed and pitch limits. (a) Main rotor speed limits. A range of main rotor speeds must be established that— (1) With power...

  14. 14 CFR 29.33 - Main rotor speed and pitch limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Main rotor speed and pitch limits. 29.33... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 29.33 Main rotor speed and pitch limits. (a) Main rotor speed limits. A range of main rotor speeds must be established that— (1) With power...

  15. 14 CFR 27.33 - Main rotor speed and pitch limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Main rotor speed and pitch limits. 27.33... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 27.33 Main rotor speed and pitch limits. (a) Main rotor speed limits. A range of main rotor speeds must be established that— (1) With power...

  16. 14 CFR 29.33 - Main rotor speed and pitch limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Main rotor speed and pitch limits. 29.33... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 29.33 Main rotor speed and pitch limits. (a) Main rotor speed limits. A range of main rotor speeds must be established that— (1) With power...

  17. Limitations to maximum running speed on flat curves.

    PubMed

    Chang, Young-Hui; Kram, Rodger

    2007-03-01

    Why is maximal running speed reduced on curved paths? The leading explanation proposes that an increase in lateral ground reaction force necessitates a decrease in peak vertical ground reaction force, assuming that maximum leg extension force is the limiting factor. Yet, no studies have directly measured these forces or tested this critical assumption. We measured maximum sprint velocities and ground reaction forces for five male humans sprinting along a straight track and compared them to sprints along circular tracks of 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6 m radii. Circular track sprint trials were performed either with or without a tether that applied centripetal force to the center of mass. Sprinters generated significantly smaller peak resultant ground reaction forces during normal curve sprinting compared to straight sprinting. This provides direct evidence against the idea that maximum leg extension force is always achieved and is the limiting factor. Use of the tether increased sprint speed, but not to expected values. During curve sprinting, the inside leg consistently generated smaller peak forces compared to the outside leg. Several competing biomechanical constraints placed on the stance leg during curve sprinting likely make the inside leg particularly ineffective at generating the ground reaction forces necessary to attain maximum velocities comparable to straight path sprinting. The ability of quadrupeds to redistribute function across multiple stance legs and decouple these multiple constraints may provide a distinct advantage for turning performance. PMID:17337710

  18. Novel Regulator MphX Represses Activation of Phenol Hydroxylase Genes Caused by a XylR/DmpR-Type Regulator MphR in Acinetobacter calcoaceticus

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Yuhua; Wang, Jin; Yan, Yongliang; Chen, Ming; Lu, Wei; Ping, Shuzhen; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Zhonglin; Li, Shuying; Takeo, Masahiro; Lin, Min

    2011-01-01

    Acinetobacter calcoaceticus PHEA-2 utilizes phenol as its sole carbon and energy source and has a multi-component phenol hydroxylase-encoding gene operon (mphKLMNOP) for phenol degradation. Two additional genes, mphR and mphX, were found upstream and downstream of mphKLMNOP, respectively. The mphR gene encodes a XylR/DmpR-type regulator-like protein and is transcribed in the opposite direction to mphKLMNOP. The mphX gene is transcribed in the same direction as mphKLMNOP and encodes a protein with 293 amino acid residues showing weak identity with some unknown proteins encoded in the meta-cleavage pathway gene clusters for aromatic compound degradation. Disruption of mphR by homologous recombination resulted in the loss of phenol degradation while disruption of mphX caused significantly faster phenol degradation than in the wild type strain. Transcriptional assays for mphK, mphR, and mphX revealed that mphR activated mphKLMNOP transcription in the presence of phenol, but mphX partially repressed this activation. Gel mobility-shift assay demonstrated a direct interaction of MphR with the mphK promoter region. These results indicate the involvement of a novel repressor protein MphX in transcriptional regulation of phenol hydroxylase genes caused by a XylR/DmpR-type regulator MphR. PMID:21455294

  19. Evolutionary speed limited by water in arid Australia

    PubMed Central

    Goldie, Xavier; Gillman, Len; Crisp, Mike; Wright, Shane

    2010-01-01

    The covariation of biodiversity with climate is a fundamental pattern in nature. However, despite the ubiquity of this relationship, a consensus on the ultimate cause remains elusive. The evolutionary speed hypothesis posits direct mechanistic links between ambient temperature, the tempo of micro-evolution and, ultimately, species richness. Previous research has demonstrated faster rates of molecular evolution in warmer climates for a broad range of poikilothermic and homeothermic organisms, in both terrestrial and aquatic environments. In terrestrial systems, species richness increases with both temperature and water availability and the interaction of those terms: productivity. However, the influence of water availability as an independent variable on micro-evolutionary processes has not been examined previously. Here, using methodology that limits the potentially confounding role of cladogenetic and demographic processes, we report, to our knowledge, the first evidence that woody plants living in the arid Australian Outback are evolving more slowly than related species growing at similar latitudes in moist habitats on the mesic continental margins. These results support a modified evolutionary speed explanation for the relationship between the water-energy balance and plant diversity patterns. PMID:20410038

  20. 77 FR 53962 - Technical Standard Order (TSO)-C65a, Airborne Doppler Radar Ground Speed and/or Drift Angle...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-04

    ... of TSO-C65a as published in 77 FR 37470, June 21, 2012, produced no comments. Conclusion TSO-C65a is... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Technical Standard Order (TSO)-C65a, Airborne Doppler Radar Ground... Doppler Radar Ground Speed and/or Drift Angle Measuring Equipment (For Air Carrier Aircraft)....

  1. Evolutionary speed limits inferred from the fossil record.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, James W

    2002-01-01

    The dynamics of extinction and diversification determine the long-term effects of extinction episodes. If rapid bursts of extinction are offset by equally rapid bursts of diversification, their biodiversity consequences will be transient. But if diversification rates cannot accelerate rapidly enough, pulses of extinction will lead to long-lasting depletion of biodiversity. Here I use spectral analysis of the fossil record to test whether diversification rates can accelerate as much as extinction rates, over both short and long spans of geological time. I show that although the long-wavelength variability of diversification rates equals or exceeds that of extinctions, diversification rates are markedly less variable than extinction rates at wavelengths shorter than roughly 25 million years. This implies that there are intrinsic speed limits that constrain how rapidly diversification rates can accelerate in response to pulses of extinction. PMID:11780116

  2. Friction Stir Welding in HSLA-65 Steel: Part I. Influence of Weld Speed and Tool Material on Microstructural Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, S. J.; Bhatti, A. R.; Steuwer, A.; Johnson, R.; Altenkirch, J.; Withers, P. J.

    2012-07-01

    A systematic set of single-pass full penetration friction stir bead-on-plate and butt-welds in HSLA-65 steel were produced using a range of different traverse speeds (50 to 500 mm/min) and two tool materials (W-Re and PCBN). Microstructural analysis of the welds was carried out using optical microscopy, and hardness variations were also mapped across the weld-plate cross sections. The maximum and minimum hardnesses were found to be dependent upon both welding traverse speed and tool material. A maximum hardness of 323 Hv(10) was observed in the mixed martensite/bainite/ferrite microstructure of the weld nugget for a welding traverse speed of 200 mm/min using a PCBN tool. A minimum hardness of 179 Hv(10) was found in the outer heat-affected zone (OHAZ) for welding traverse speed of 50 mm/min using a PCBN tool. The distance from the weld centerline to the OHAZ increased with decreasing weld speed due to the greater heat input into the weld. Likewise for similar energy inputs, the size of the transformed zone and the OHAZ increased on moving from a W-Re tool to a PCBN tool probably due to the poorer thermal conductivity of the PCBN tool. The associated residual stresses are reported in Part II of this series of articles.

  3. 49 CFR 213.57 - Curves; elevation and speed limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... operating speed for each curve is determined by the following formula— ER13MR13.007 Where— Vmax = Maximum... to this part is a table of speeds computed in accordance with the formula in paragraph (b) of this... type to operate at the desired curving speeds allowed under the formula in paragraph (b) of...

  4. Scalar speed limits and cosmology: Acceleration from D-cceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverstein, Eva; Tong, David

    2004-11-01

    Causality on the gravity side of the AdS/CFT correspondence restricts motion on the moduli space of the N=4 super Yang-Mills theory by imposing a speed limit on how fast the scalar field may roll. This effect can be traced to higher-derivative operators arising from integrating out light degrees of freedom near the origin. In the strong coupling limit of the theory, the dynamics is well approximated by the Dirac-Born-Infeld Lagrangian for a probe D3-brane moving toward the horizon of the AdS Poincaré patch, combined with an estimate of the (ultimately suppressed) rate of particle and string production in the system. We analyze the motion of a rolling scalar field explicitly in the strong coupling regime of the field theory and extend the analysis to cosmological systems obtained by coupling this type of field theory to four-dimensional gravity. This leads to a mechanism for slow roll inflation for a massive scalar at sub-Planckian vacuum expectation value without need for a flat potential (realizing a version of k inflation in a microphysical framework). It also leads to a variety of novel Friedman-Roberston-Walker cosmologies, some of which are related to those obtained with tachyon matter.

  5. Quantum speed limit and a signal of quantum criticality

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yong-Bo; Zou, Jian; Wang, Zhao-Ming; Shao, Bin

    2016-01-01

    We study the quantum speed limit time (QSLT) of a coupled system consisting of a central spin and its surrounding environment, and the environment is described by a general XY spin-chain model. For initial pure state, we find that the local anomalous enhancement of the QSLT occurs near the critical point. In addition, we investigate the QSLT for arbitrary time-evolution state in the whole dynamics process and find that the QSLT will decay monotonously and rapidly at a large size of environment near the quantum critical point. These anomalous behaviors in the critical vicinity of XY spin-chain environment can be used to indicate the quantum phase transition point. Especially for the XX spin-chain environment, we find that the QSLT displays a sudden transition from discontinuous segmented values to a steady value at the critical point. In this case, the non-Makovianity and the Loschmidt echo are incapable of signaling the critical value of the transverse field, while the QSLT can still witness the quantum phase transition. So, the QSLT provides a further insight and sharper identification of quantum criticality. PMID:26782296

  6. Quantum speed limit and a signal of quantum criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yong-Bo; Zou, Jian; Wang, Zhao-Ming; Shao, Bin

    2016-01-01

    We study the quantum speed limit time (QSLT) of a coupled system consisting of a central spin and its surrounding environment, and the environment is described by a general XY spin-chain model. For initial pure state, we find that the local anomalous enhancement of the QSLT occurs near the critical point. In addition, we investigate the QSLT for arbitrary time-evolution state in the whole dynamics process and find that the QSLT will decay monotonously and rapidly at a large size of environment near the quantum critical point. These anomalous behaviors in the critical vicinity of XY spin-chain environment can be used to indicate the quantum phase transition point. Especially for the XX spin-chain environment, we find that the QSLT displays a sudden transition from discontinuous segmented values to a steady value at the critical point. In this case, the non-Makovianity and the Loschmidt echo are incapable of signaling the critical value of the transverse field, while the QSLT can still witness the quantum phase transition. So, the QSLT provides a further insight and sharper identification of quantum criticality.

  7. Quantum speed limit and a signal of quantum criticality.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yong-Bo; Zou, Jian; Wang, Zhao-Ming; Shao, Bin

    2016-01-01

    We study the quantum speed limit time (QSLT) of a coupled system consisting of a central spin and its surrounding environment, and the environment is described by a general XY spin-chain model. For initial pure state, we find that the local anomalous enhancement of the QSLT occurs near the critical point. In addition, we investigate the QSLT for arbitrary time-evolution state in the whole dynamics process and find that the QSLT will decay monotonously and rapidly at a large size of environment near the quantum critical point. These anomalous behaviors in the critical vicinity of XY spin-chain environment can be used to indicate the quantum phase transition point. Especially for the XX spin-chain environment, we find that the QSLT displays a sudden transition from discontinuous segmented values to a steady value at the critical point. In this case, the non-Makovianity and the Loschmidt echo are incapable of signaling the critical value of the transverse field, while the QSLT can still witness the quantum phase transition. So, the QSLT provides a further insight and sharper identification of quantum criticality. PMID:26782296

  8. Speed limit of the insulator-metal transition in magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, S.; Kukreja, R.; Trabant, C.; Pontius, N.; Chang, C. F.; Kachel, T.; Beye, M.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Back, C. H.; Bräuer, B.; Schlotter, W. F.; Turner, J. J.; Krupin, O.; Doehler, M.; Zhu, D.; Hossain, M. A.; Scherz, A. O.; Fausti, D.; Novelli, F.; Esposito, M.; Lee, W. S.; Chuang, Y. D.; Lu, D. H.; Moore, R. G.; Yi, M.; Trigo, M.; Kirchmann, P.; Pathey, L.; Golden, M. S.; Buchholz, M.; Metcalf, P.; Parmigiani, F.; Wurth, W.; Föhlisch, A.; Schüßler-Langeheine, C.; Dürr, H. A.

    2013-10-01

    As the oldest known magnetic material, magnetite (Fe3O4) has fascinated mankind for millennia. As the first oxide in which a relationship between electrical conductivity and fluctuating/localized electronic order was shown, magnetite represents a model system for understanding correlated oxides in general. Nevertheless, the exact mechanism of the insulator-metal, or Verwey, transition has long remained inaccessible. Recently, three-Fe-site lattice distortions called trimerons were identified as the characteristic building blocks of the low-temperature insulating electronically ordered phase. Here we investigate the Verwey transition with pump-probe X-ray diffraction and optical reflectivity techniques, and show how trimerons become mobile across the insulator-metal transition. We find this to be a two-step process. After an initial 300 fs destruction of individual trimerons, phase separation occurs on a 1.5±0.2 ps timescale to yield residual insulating and metallic regions. This work establishes the speed limit for switching in future oxide electronics.

  9. Concurrent Single-Executable CCSM with MPH Library

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yun; Ding, Chris H.Q.

    2006-05-15

    Community Climate System Model (CCSM) is currently a multi-executable system based on the Multi-Program Multi-Data (MPMD) mechanism. Each component is compiled into a separate executable. MPMD is normally cumbersome in usage and vendor support is sometimes limited or completely unavailable, such as on BlueGene/L. Also smaller groups and institutions would like to run CCSM locally, rather than relying on large computer centers. So, single-executable CCSM is under request. We are developing a multi-executable and single-executable coexisting version of CCSM. In single-executable, each component is organized as a subroutine, which is called from a master program. Different components run simultaneously. This is accomplished by redesigning the top level CCSM structures using the Multi-Program Handshaking (MPH) library.

  10. Materials at 200 mph: Making NASCAR Faster and Safer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie-Pelecky, Diandra

    2008-03-01

    You cannot win a NASCAR race without understanding science.ootnotetextDiandra Leslie-Pelecky, The Physics of NASCAR (Dutton, New York City, 2008). Materials play important roles in improving performance, as well as ensuring safety. On the performance side, NASCAR limits the materials race car scientists and engineers can use to limit ownership costs. `Exotic metals' are not allowed, so controlling microstructure and nanostructure are important tools. Compacted Graphite Iron, a cast iron in which magnesium additions produce interlocking microscale graphite reinforcements, makes engine blocks stronger and lighter. NASCAR's new car design employs a composite called Tegris^TM that has 70 percent of the strength of carbon fiber composites at about 10 percent of the cost. The most important role of materials in racing is safety. Drivers wear firesuits made of polymers that carbonize (providing thermal protection) and expand (reducing oxygen access) when heated. Catalytic materials originally developed for space-based CO2 lasers filter air for drivers during races. Although materials help cars go fast, they also help cars slow down safely---important because the kinetic energy of a race car going 180 mph is nine times greater than that of a passenger car going 60 mph. Energy-absorbing foams in the cars and on the tracks control energy dissipation during accidents. To say that most NASCAR fans (and there are estimated to be 75 million of them) are passionate about their sport is an understatement. NASCAR fans understand that science and engineering are integral to keeping their drivers safe and helping their teams win. Their passion for racing gives us a great opportunity to share our passion for science with them. NASCAR^ is a registered trademark of the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing, Inc. Tegris^TM is a trademark of Milliken & Company.

  11. 49 CFR 213.9 - Classes of track: operating speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Classes of track: operating speed limits. 213.9... speed limits. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section and §§ 213.57(b), 213.59(a), 213.113(a), and 213.137(b) and (c), the following maximum allowable operating speeds apply— Over...

  12. 49 CFR 213.9 - Classes of track: operating speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Classes of track: operating speed limits. 213.9... speed limits. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section and §§ 213.57(b), 213.59(a), 213.113(a), and 213.137(b) and (c), the following maximum allowable operating speeds apply— Over...

  13. 49 CFR 213.9 - Classes of track: operating speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Classes of track: operating speed limits. 213.9... speed limits. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section and §§ 213.57(b), 213.59(a), 213.113(a), and 213.137(b) and (c), the following maximum allowable operating speeds apply— Over...

  14. 49 CFR 213.9 - Classes of track: operating speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Classes of track: operating speed limits. 213.9... speed limits. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section and §§ 213.57(b), 213.59(a), 213.113(a), and 213.137(b) and (c), the following maximum allowable operating speeds apply— Over...

  15. 49 CFR 213.9 - Classes of track: operating speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Classes of track: operating speed limits. 213.9... speed limits. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section and §§ 213.57(b), 213.59(a), 213.113(a), and 213.137(b) and (c), the following maximum allowable operating speeds apply— Over...

  16. Exploring the quantum speed limit with computer games.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Jens Jakob W H; Pedersen, Mads Kock; Munch, Michael; Haikka, Pinja; Jensen, Jesper Halkjær; Planke, Tilo; Andreasen, Morten Ginnerup; Gajdacz, Miroslav; Mølmer, Klaus; Lieberoth, Andreas; Sherson, Jacob F

    2016-04-14

    Humans routinely solve problems of immense computational complexity by intuitively forming simple, low-dimensional heuristic strategies. Citizen science (or crowd sourcing) is a way of exploiting this ability by presenting scientific research problems to non-experts. 'Gamification'--the application of game elements in a non-game context--is an effective tool with which to enable citizen scientists to provide solutions to research problems. The citizen science games Foldit, EteRNA and EyeWire have been used successfully to study protein and RNA folding and neuron mapping, but so far gamification has not been applied to problems in quantum physics. Here we report on Quantum Moves, an online platform gamifying optimization problems in quantum physics. We show that human players are able to find solutions to difficult problems associated with the task of quantum computing. Players succeed where purely numerical optimization fails, and analyses of their solutions provide insights into the problem of optimization of a more profound and general nature. Using player strategies, we have thus developed a few-parameter heuristic optimization method that efficiently outperforms the most prominent established numerical methods. The numerical complexity associated with time-optimal solutions increases for shorter process durations. To understand this better, we produced a low-dimensional rendering of the optimization landscape. This rendering reveals why traditional optimization methods fail near the quantum speed limit (that is, the shortest process duration with perfect fidelity). Combined analyses of optimization landscapes and heuristic solution strategies may benefit wider classes of optimization problems in quantum physics and beyond. PMID:27075097

  17. Exploring the quantum speed limit with computer games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sørensen, Jens Jakob W. H.; Pedersen, Mads Kock; Munch, Michael; Haikka, Pinja; Jensen, Jesper Halkjær; Planke, Tilo; Andreasen, Morten Ginnerup; Gajdacz, Miroslav; Mølmer, Klaus; Lieberoth, Andreas; Sherson, Jacob F.

    2016-04-01

    Humans routinely solve problems of immense computational complexity by intuitively forming simple, low-dimensional heuristic strategies. Citizen science (or crowd sourcing) is a way of exploiting this ability by presenting scientific research problems to non-experts. ‘Gamification’—the application of game elements in a non-game context—is an effective tool with which to enable citizen scientists to provide solutions to research problems. The citizen science games Foldit, EteRNA and EyeWire have been used successfully to study protein and RNA folding and neuron mapping, but so far gamification has not been applied to problems in quantum physics. Here we report on Quantum Moves, an online platform gamifying optimization problems in quantum physics. We show that human players are able to find solutions to difficult problems associated with the task of quantum computing. Players succeed where purely numerical optimization fails, and analyses of their solutions provide insights into the problem of optimization of a more profound and general nature. Using player strategies, we have thus developed a few-parameter heuristic optimization method that efficiently outperforms the most prominent established numerical methods. The numerical complexity associated with time-optimal solutions increases for shorter process durations. To understand this better, we produced a low-dimensional rendering of the optimization landscape. This rendering reveals why traditional optimization methods fail near the quantum speed limit (that is, the shortest process duration with perfect fidelity). Combined analyses of optimization landscapes and heuristic solution strategies may benefit wider classes of optimization problems in quantum physics and beyond.

  18. Incidence of airflow limitation in subjects 65-100 years of age.

    PubMed

    Luoto, Johannes A; Elmståhl, Sölve; Wollmer, Per; Pihlsgård, Mats

    2016-02-01

    The true incidence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is largely unknown, because the few longitudinal studies performed have used diagnostic criteria no longer recommended by either the European Respiratory Society or the American Thoracic Society (ATS).We studied the incidence and significance of airflow limitation in a population-based geriatric sample using both an age-dependent predicted lower limit of normal (LLN) value and a fixed-ratio spirometric criterion.Out of 2025 subjects with acceptable spirometry at baseline, 984 subjects aged 65-100 years completed a 6-year follow-up visit. Smoking habits were registered at baseline. Exclusion criteria were non-acceptable spirometry performance according to ATS criteria and inability to communicate. Airflow limitation was defined both according to forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1)/forced vital capacity ratio <0.7 and limitation per 1000 person-years was 28.2 using a fixed ratio and 11.7 with LLN, corresponding to a 1.41-fold higher incidence rate using a fixed ratio. The incidence increased dramatically with age when using a fixed ratio, but less so when using LLN. In addition, a sex effect was observed with the LLN criterion. LLN airflow limitation was associated with increased 5-year mortality. Presence of fixed-ratio airflow limitation in individuals classified by LLN as non-obstructive was not associated with increased mortality. PMID:26677939

  19. Evaluating the safety impact of increased speed limits on rural highways in British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Tarek; Sacchi, Emanuele

    2016-10-01

    Maximum speed limits are usually set to inform drivers of the highest speed that it is safe and appropriate for ideal traffic, road and weather conditions. Many previous studies were conducted to investigate the relationship between changed speed limits and safety. The results of these studies generally show that relaxing speed limits can negatively affect safety, especially with regard to fatal and injury crashes. Despite these results, several road jurisdictions in North America continue to raise the maximum speed limits. In 2013, the British Columbia Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure initiated a speed limits review. The review found that the 85th percentile speed on many highway segments was 10km/h higher than corresponding posted speed limits and 1300km of rural provincial highway segments were recommended for higher speed limits. Most of the highway segments had 10km/h speed limit increase with a small section having 20km/h speed limit increase. As speed limit changes can have a substantial impact on safety, the main objective of this study is to estimate the effect of the increased speed limits on crash occurrence. A before-after evaluation was undertaken with the full Bayesian technique. Overall, the evaluation showed that changed speed limits led to a statistically significant increase in fatal-plus-injury (severe) crashes of 11.1%. A crash modification function that includes changes in the treatment effect over time showed that the initial increase of the first post-implementation period may slightly decrease over time. PMID:27447060

  20. The Research Forum for MPH students.

    PubMed

    Gofin, Rosa

    2002-01-01

    Over the years, the experience with the Research Forum has shown that the framework is effective in providing the time frame and the academic support for the preparation of the proposals. It provides the students with an additional opportunity for the integration of knowledge gained during the MPH core and elective courses and for developing skills in writing and appraising a proposal or an essay on a public health issue. For the faculty it is another instance in which methodological issues are stressed, public health themes are discussed, and a systematic approach is emphasized. This process helps the students to achieve high academic levels for their proposals, and the final theses or papers are enhanced. This is evidenced by the fact that many of these works are also published in peer-reviewed journals, a sample of which is shown in the references. Students from Countries of Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States have the opportunity to apply to the Soros Foundation Open Society Institute (OSI) for projects on their return to their home institution, which may include a continuation of their research project or master's paper topic. This project is to be carried out during the first year of their return home with financial support up to $5,000. These projects have been presented to Braun SPH faculty at summer seminars held in Russia in 2001 and 2002. PMID:12613710

  1. Empirical analysis of gross vehicle weight and free flow speed and consideration on its relation with differential speed limit.

    PubMed

    Saifizul, Ahmad Abdullah; Yamanaka, Hideo; Karim, Mohamed Rehan

    2011-05-01

    Most highly motorized countries in the world have implemented different speed limits for light weight and heavy weight vehicles. The heavy vehicle speed limit is usually chosen to be lower than that of passenger cars due to the difficulty for the drivers to safely maneuver the heavy vehicle at high speed and greater impact during a crash. However, in many cases, the speed limit for heavy vehicle is set by only considering the vehicle size or category, mostly due to simplicity in enforcement. In this study, traffic and vehicular data for all vehicle types were collected using a weigh-in-motion system installed at Federal Route 54 in Malaysia. The first finding from the data showed that the weight variation for each vehicle category is considerable. Therefore, the effect of gross vehicle weight (GVW) and category of heavy vehicle on free flow speed and their interaction were analyzed using statistical techniques. Empirical analysis results showed that statistically for each type of heavy vehicle, there was a significant relationship between free flow speed of a heavy vehicle and GVW. Specifically, the results suggest that the mean and variance of free flow speed decrease with an increase GVW by the amount unrelated to size and shape for all GVW range. Then, based on the 85th percentile principle, the study proposed a new concept for setting the speed limit for heavy vehicle by incorporating GVW where a different speed limit is imposed to the heavy vehicle, not only based on vehicle classification, but also according to its GVW. PMID:21376903

  2. Single software platform used for high speed data transfer implementation in a 65k pixel camera working in single photon counting mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maj, P.; Kasiński, K.; Gryboś, P.; Szczygieł, R.; Kozioł, A.

    2015-12-01

    Integrated circuits designed for specific applications generally use non-standard communication methods. Hybrid pixel detector readout electronics produces a huge amount of data as a result of number of frames per seconds. The data needs to be transmitted to a higher level system without limiting the ASIC's capabilities. Nowadays, the Camera Link interface is still one of the fastest communication methods, allowing transmission speeds up to 800 MB/s. In order to communicate between a higher level system and the ASIC with a dedicated protocol, an FPGA with dedicated code is required. The configuration data is received from the PC and written to the ASIC. At the same time, the same FPGA should be able to transmit the data from the ASIC to the PC at the very high speed. The camera should be an embedded system enabling autonomous operation and self-monitoring. In the presented solution, at least three different hardware platforms are used—FPGA, microprocessor with real-time operating system and the PC with end-user software. We present the use of a single software platform for high speed data transfer from 65k pixel camera to the personal computer.

  3. LETTERS AND COMMENTS: An elementary first-postulate measurement of the cosmic limit speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Brian

    2004-05-01

    In 1898 Henri Poincaré referred to the speed of light as a probable limit speed but rashly asserted it would never as such be experimentally verifiable. Moving space vehicle measurements of the cosmic limit speed, however, without assuming it equals c, were described by Coleman (2003 Eur. J. Phys. 24 301). A more elementary measurement is also possible, involving two mutually stationary vehicles with a third passing between them. A simple formula gives the limit speed in terms of signal speed c and three time intervals.

  4. Ashley Felix, Ph.D., M.P.H.

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP) alumna, Ashley Felix, Ph.D., M.P.H., details her transition from pre-med student to an epidemiologist who focuses on studying the causes and prevention of disease.

  5. 49 CFR 392.6 - Schedules to conform with speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Schedules to conform with speed limits. 392.6... DRIVING OF COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES General § 392.6 Schedules to conform with speed limits. No motor... points in such period of time as would necessitate the commercial motor vehicle being operated at...

  6. 49 CFR 392.6 - Schedules to conform with speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Schedules to conform with speed limits. 392.6... DRIVING OF COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES General § 392.6 Schedules to conform with speed limits. No motor... points in such period of time as would necessitate the commercial motor vehicle being operated at...

  7. 49 CFR 392.6 - Schedules to conform with speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Schedules to conform with speed limits. 392.6... DRIVING OF COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES General § 392.6 Schedules to conform with speed limits. No motor... points in such period of time as would necessitate the commercial motor vehicle being operated at...

  8. 49 CFR 392.6 - Schedules to conform with speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Schedules to conform with speed limits. 392.6... DRIVING OF COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES General § 392.6 Schedules to conform with speed limits. No motor... points in such period of time as would necessitate the commercial motor vehicle being operated at...

  9. 49 CFR 392.6 - Schedules to conform with speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Schedules to conform with speed limits. 392.6... DRIVING OF COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES General § 392.6 Schedules to conform with speed limits. No motor... points in such period of time as would necessitate the commercial motor vehicle being operated at...

  10. Using business plan development as a capstone project for MPH programs in Canada: validation through the student perspective.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Andrew; Britten, Nicole; Hatcher, Meghan; Rainville, Keira

    2013-10-01

    Master of Public Health (MPH) programs have been developed across Canada as a response to the need for adequately trained individuals to work in the public health sector. Educational institutions that deliver MPH programs have a responsibility to ensure that graduates of their program have the essential knowledge, skills and attitudes to begin a successful career in public health. The Public Health Agency of Canada has created the core competencies for public health to guide the development, delivery and evaluation of MPH programs. In Canada, a capstone project is the recommended method of evaluating the MPH graduate's ability to demonstrate proficiency in the public health core competencies. A business plan that develops the framework for a public health program is an ideal capstone project currently used in practice within the University of Guelph MPH program. This group assignment incorporates all 36 of the public health core competencies while providing students with a real-world public health experience, and should be considered for inclusion within MPH programs across Canada. Business planning provides students the opportunity to engage in practice-based learning, applying theoretical knowledge to practice. Further, the ability to develop realistic but financially feasible public health problems is an invaluable skill for MPH graduates. As the development of programs becomes more restricted and the continuation of other programs are under constant threat, the ability to develop a sound business plan is a required skill for individuals entering the public health sector, and will ensure students are able to maximize outcomes given tight fiscal budgets and limited resources. PMID:23666161

  11. 28 CFR 65.11 - Limitations on fund and other assistance use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... directly and substantially upon criminal justice matters or are inextricably intertwined with criminal..., supervision, or control over any police force or other criminal justice agency of an applicant for Federal law... use. 65.11 Section 65.11 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY...

  12. 28 CFR 65.11 - Limitations on fund and other assistance use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... directly and substantially upon criminal justice matters or are inextricably intertwined with criminal..., supervision, or control over any police force or other criminal justice agency of an applicant for Federal law... use. 65.11 Section 65.11 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY...

  13. 28 CFR 65.11 - Limitations on fund and other assistance use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... directly and substantially upon criminal justice matters or are inextricably intertwined with criminal..., supervision, or control over any police force or other criminal justice agency of an applicant for Federal law... use. 65.11 Section 65.11 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY...

  14. 28 CFR 65.11 - Limitations on fund and other assistance use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... directly and substantially upon criminal justice matters or are inextricably intertwined with criminal..., supervision, or control over any police force or other criminal justice agency of an applicant for Federal law... use. 65.11 Section 65.11 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY...

  15. 37 CFR 10.65 - Limiting business relations with a client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... with a client. 10.65 Section 10.65 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND... a client. A practitioner shall not enter into a business transaction with a client if they have differing interests therein and if the client expects the practitioner to exercise professional...

  16. SPEED LIMIT ON NEPTUNE MIGRATION IMPOSED BY SATURN TILTING

    SciTech Connect

    Boue, Gwenael; Laskar, Jacques; Kuchynka, Petr

    2009-09-01

    In this Letter, we give new constraints on planet migration. They were obtained under the assumption that Saturn's current obliquity is due to a capture in resonance with Neptune's ascending node. If planet migration is too fast, then Saturn crosses the resonance without being captured and it keeps a small obliquity. This scenario thus gives a lower limit on the migration timescale {tau}. We found that this boundary depends strongly on Neptune's initial inclination. For two different migration types, we found that {tau} should be at least greater than 7 Myr. This limit increases rapidly as Neptune's initial inclination decreases from 10 deg. to 1 deg. We also give an algorithm to know if Saturn can be tilted for any migration law.

  17. Raised Speed Limits, Speed Spillover, Case-Fatality Rates, and Road Deaths in Israel: A 5-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Elihu D.; Barach, Paul; Friedman, Lee; Krikler, Samuel; Israeli, Abraham

    2004-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the 5-year, nationwide impact on road deaths of the raise in the speed limit (November 1, 1993) on 3 major interurban highways in Israel from 90 to 100 kph. Methods. We compared before–after trends in deaths as well as case fatality—an outcome independent of exposure (defined as vehicle-kilometers traveled). Results. After the raise, speeds rose by 4.5%–9.1%. Over 5 years, there was a sustained increase in deaths (15%) and case fatality rates (38%) on all interurban roads. Corresponding increases in deaths (13%) and case fatality (24%) on urban roads indicated “speed spillover.” Conclusions. Immediate increases in case fatality predicted and tracked the sustained increase in deaths from increased speeds of impact. Newtonian fourth power models predicted the effects of “small” increases in speed on large rises in case fatality rates. Countermeasures and congestion reduced the impact on deaths and case-fatality rates by more than half. PMID:15054007

  18. Communication at the quantum speed limit along a spin chain

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Michael; Montangero, Simone; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Calarco, Tommaso

    2010-08-15

    Spin chains have long been considered as candidates for quantum channels to facilitate quantum communication. We consider the transfer of a single excitation along a spin-1/2 chain governed by Heisenberg-type interactions. We build on the work of Balachandran and Gong [V. Balachandran and J. Gong, Phys. Rev. A 77, 012303 (2008)] and show that by applying optimal control to an external parabolic magnetic field, one can drastically increase the propagation rate by two orders of magnitude. In particular, we show that the theoretical maximum propagation rate can be reached, where the propagation of the excitation takes the form of a dispersed wave. We conclude that optimal control is not only a useful tool for experimental application, but also for theoretical inquiry into the physical limits and dynamics of many-body quantum systems.

  19. The Speed Limit for Graphene Interstellar Photon Sails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matloff, G. L.

    Graphene, a two-dimensional carbon molecular monolayer, has properties that may render it very useful for application to interstellar solar photon sailing. These include very low areal mass thickness, high melting point, high impermeability to fill gas in a hollow-body sail configuration, and high tensile strength. With appropriate "additives," graphene has a finite reflectance to sunlight and sunlight absorption of 40% or higher. Here, we evaluate the probably unobtainable ultimate performance of this material. It is assumed that absorption can be raised to 95% and reflectance to 5% without increasing areal mass thickness over the graphene value of 7.4 * 10-7 kg/m2. It is also assumed that the only limitations on perihelion distance are thermal; spaceenvironment effects and possible variation of optical properties with temperature are ignored. To evaluate ultimate performance, an initially parabolic solar orbit with a ~0.01 AU perihelion is assumed. A thin-film probe with the payload integrated with the sail can achieve an interstellar cruise velocity of ~0.046c in the highly unlikely event that accelerations of ~6,000g can be tolerated. Regardless of the final velocity, graphene "Starwisps" might see application in interstellar particle-beam propulsion.

  20. Consideration of tip speed limitations in preliminary analysis of minimum COE wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuerva-Tejero, A.; Yeow, T. S.; Lopez-Garcia, O.; Gallego-Castillo, C.

    2014-12-01

    A relation between Cost Of Energy, COE, maximum allowed tip speed, and rated wind speed, is obtained for wind turbines with a given goal rated power. The wind regime is characterised by the corresponding parameters of the probability density function of wind speed. The non-dimensional characteristics of the rotor: number of blades, the blade radial distributions of local solidity, twist, angle, and airfoil type, play the role of parameters in the mentioned relation. The COE is estimated using a cost model commonly used by the designers. This cost model requires basic design data such as the rotor radius and the ratio between the hub height and the rotor radius. Certain design options, DO, related to the technology of the power plant, tower and blades are also required as inputs. The function obtained for the COE can be explored to find those values of rotor radius that give rise to minimum cost of energy for a given wind regime as the tip speed limitation changes. The analysis reveals that iso-COE lines evolve parallel to iso-radius lines for large values of limit tip speed but that this is not the case for small values of the tip speed limits. It is concluded that., as the tip speed limit decreases, the optimum decision for keeping minimum COE values can be: a) reducing the rotor radius for places with high weibull scale parameter or b) increasing the rotor radius for places with low weibull scale parameter.

  1. Rotor aerodynamic power limits at low tip speed ratio using CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkelsen, Robert F.; Sarmast, Sasan; Henningson, Dan; Sørensen, Jens N.

    2014-06-01

    When investigating limits of rotor aerodynamic models, the Betz limit serves as a solid marker of an upper limit which no model should be able to exceed. A century ago Joukowsky (1912) proposed a rotor aerodynamic model utilizing a rotating actuator disc with a constant circulation. This model has since then been the subject of much controversy as it predicts a power performance that for all tip speed ratios exceeds the Betz limit and which goes to infinity when the tip speed ratio goes to zero. Recently, it was demonstrated that the Joukowsky model is fully consistent with the inviscid Euler equations and that the apparent inconsistency partly can be explained by the lack of viscous effects (Sprensen and van Kuik [4]). However, even including a term to account for the effect of viscosity at small tip speed ratios, the model still predicts a power yield that exceeds the Betz limit. In the present work we study in detail, using a CFD actuator line model, the flow behavior for rotors at small tip speed ratios. It is shown that the excessive swirl appearing towards the rotor center at small tip speed ratios generates vortex breakdown, causing a recirculating zone in the wake that limits the power yield of the rotor. The appearance of vortex breakdown has a similar effect on the flow behavior as the vortex ring state that usually appears at higher tip speed ratios. Limits to where vortex breakdown might occur with tip speed ratio and rotor loading as parameter are investigated and presented in the paper. The limits found correspond to well-known criterion for vortex breakdown onset for swirling flows in general. By applying a criterion for vortex breakdown in combination with the general momentum theory, the power performance always stays below the Betz limit.

  2. 65 FR 49227 - Electrolytic Manganese Dioxide From Greece: Notice of Extension of Time Limit for Final Results...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2000-08-11

    ... May 8, 2000, the Department published the preliminary results of review in the Federal Register (65 FR... International Trade Administration Electrolytic Manganese Dioxide From Greece: Notice of Extension of Time Limit... order on electrolytic manganese dioxide from Greece. The period of review is April 1, 1998,...

  3. 14 CFR 65.107 - Repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft): Eligibility, privileges, and limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft... CREWMEMBERS Repairmen § 65.107 Repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft): Eligibility, privileges, and...-sport aircraft) and appropriate rating: To be eligible for You must (1) A repairman certificate...

  4. 14 CFR 65.107 - Repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft): Eligibility, privileges, and limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft... CREWMEMBERS Repairmen § 65.107 Repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft): Eligibility, privileges, and...-sport aircraft) and appropriate rating: To be eligible for You must (1) A repairman certificate...

  5. 14 CFR 65.107 - Repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft): Eligibility, privileges, and limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft... CREWMEMBERS Repairmen § 65.107 Repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft): Eligibility, privileges, and...-sport aircraft) and appropriate rating: To be eligible for You must (1) A repairman certificate...

  6. 14 CFR 65.107 - Repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft): Eligibility, privileges, and limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft... CREWMEMBERS Repairmen § 65.107 Repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft): Eligibility, privileges, and...-sport aircraft) and appropriate rating: To be eligible for You must (1) A repairman certificate...

  7. 14 CFR 65.107 - Repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft): Eligibility, privileges, and limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft... CREWMEMBERS Repairmen § 65.107 Repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft): Eligibility, privileges, and...-sport aircraft) and appropriate rating: To be eligible for You must (1) A repairman certificate...

  8. Dystonia with MPH/Risperidone Combined Therapy for ADHD.

    PubMed

    Millichap, J Gordon; Yee, Michelle M

    2016-01-01

    Investigators from Child Neurology and Pediatrics, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, report extrapyramidal symptoms in a 13-year-old boy with a psychiatric history of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, ADHD, and autism, responsive to combination risperidone, oxcarbazepine, and MPH. PMID:27004141

  9. Towards setting credible speed limits: Identifying factors that affect driver compliance on urban roads.

    PubMed

    Gargoum, Suliman A; El-Basyouny, Karim; Kim, Amy

    2016-10-01

    Road geometry, vehicle characteristics, and weather conditions are all factors that impact a driver's perception of a safe or credible speed and, consequently, the driver's decision on whether or not to comply with the posted speed limit. In fact, the role a road's environment plays in a driver's perception of a credible speed limit is a topic that has attracted the interest of many researchers in recent years. Despite that, not many studies have considered using empirical data to investigate what features of the road environment influence a driver's compliance choice. This paper aims to address this matter by exploring the relationships between features of the road surroundings (geometric, temporal factors, and weather conditions) and driver compliance with speed limits. The paper uses data from almost 600 different urban roads in the city of Edmonton, at which over 35 million vehicle spot speeds were collected. Compliance was represented using a categorical ordered response variable, and mixed-effects-logistic-regression models were fitted. Two different models were built, one for arterials and another for collector roads. In general, the findings show that the more restricted drivers become, particularly on arterials, the more likely drivers are to comply with speed limits; potential restrictions include on-street parking and the absence of lateral shoulders. Furthermore, higher traffic activity during peak hours, and presumably on shoulder weekdays, both increase the likelihood of compliance on arterials. Similarly, posted speed limits and traffic volume are both positively correlated with compliance on both arterial and collector roads. The findings of this research provide evidence of the existence of an empirical relationship between road features and compliance, highlighting the importance of setting credible speed limits on roads and the possibility of achieving higher compliance rates through modifications to the road environment. PMID:27438484

  10. The role of gender in MPH graduates' salaries.

    PubMed

    Bradley, E H; White, W; Anderson, E; Mattocks, K; Pistell, A

    2000-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that workforce roles and salaries differ substantially between men and women in administrative positions within the health care industry. Recent studies of graduates with masters of business administration (MBA) and masters of health administration (MHA) degrees have indicated that women tend to experience lower salaries, given like responsibilities. However, the impact of gender on salary has been less studied among masters of public health (MPH) graduates in the health care field. Our objective was to assess the impact of gender on salary among MPH degree graduates. Using a cross-sectional survey of all graduates from the MPH program at Yale University between 1991-1997 (n = 201, response rate = 51%), we ascertained graduates' reported salary in the first job post-graduation and reported salary in their current position. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to assess the unadjusted and adjusted associations between gender and salary. Salaries in both the first job post-graduation and in the current job differed significantly by gender, with women earning less than men (p-values < .05). Moreover, these differences persisted after controlling for a set of human capital measures including pre-MPH work experience, age at graduation, years since graduation, area of specialization within the MPH degree, and type of work site (governmental or nonprofit versus for-profit). Unlike studies of MBA and MHA graduates, however, this study did not find evidence that the gender-related salary gap widened as the years since graduation increased, although the sample size did not allow comprehensive testing of this trend. PMID:11211353

  11. Modeling Individual Differences in Numerical Reasoning Speed as a Random Effect of Response Time Limits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semmes, Robert; Davison, Mark L.; Close, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    If numerical reasoning items are administered under time limits, will two dimensions be required to account for the responses, a numerical ability dimension and a speed dimension? A total of 182 college students answered 74 numerical reasoning items. Every item was taken with and without time limits by half the students. Three psychometric models…

  12. Investigation of spoiler ailerons for use as speed brakes or glide-path controls on two NACA 65-series wings equipped with full-span slotted flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischel, Jack; Watson, James M

    1951-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation was made to determine the characteristics of spoiler ailerons used as speed brakes or glide-path controls on an NACA 65-210 wing and an NACA 65-215 wing equipped with full-span slotted flaps. Several plug aileron and retractable-aileron configurations were investigated on two wing models with the full-span flaps retracted and deflected. Tests were made at various Mach numbers between 0.13 and 0.71. The results of this investigation have indicated that the use of plug or retractable ailerons, either alone or in conjunction with wing flaps, as speed brakes or glide-path controls is feasible and very effective.

  13. Quantum speed limit for mixed states using an experimentally realizable metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Debasis; Pati, Arun Kumar

    2016-04-01

    Here, we introduce a new metric for non-degenerate density operator evolving along unitary orbit and show that this is experimentally realizable operation dependent metric on the quantum state space. Using this metric, we obtain the geometric uncertainty relation that leads to a new quantum speed limit (QSL). We also obtain a Margolus-Levitin bound and an improved Chau bound for mixed states. We propose how to measure this new distance and speed limit in quantum interferometry. Finally, we also generalize the QSL for completely positive trace preserving evolutions.

  14. MPH: A library for distributed multi-component environment

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Chris H.Q.; He, Yun

    2001-06-01

    Many current large and complex HPC applications are based on semi-independent program components developed by different groups or for different purposes. On distributed memory parallel supercomputers, how to perform component-name registration and initialize communications between independent components are among the first critical steps in establishing a distributed multi-component environment. Here we describe MPH, a multi-component handshaking library that resolves these tasks in a convenient and consistent way. MPH uses MPI for high performance and supports many PVM functionality. It supports two major parallel integration mechanism: multi-component multi-executable (MCME) and multi-component single-executable (MCME). It is a simple, easy-to-use module for developing practical codes, or as basis for larger software tools/frameworks.

  15. MPH: A Library for Distributed Multi-Component Environment

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-05-01

    A growing trend in developing large and complex applications on today's Teraflops compyters is to integrate stand-alone and/or semi-independent program components into a comprehensive simulation package. We develop MPH, a multi-component handshaking library that allows component models recognize and talk to each other in a convenient and consisten way, thus to run multi-component ulti-executable applications effectively on distributed memory architectures. MPH provides the following capabilities: component name registration, resource allocation, inter-component communication, inquiry on themore » multi-component environment, standard in/out redirect. It supports the following four integration mechanisms: Multi-Component Single-Executable (MCSE); Single-Component Multi-Executable (SCME); Multi-Component Multi-Executable (MCME); Multi-instance Multi-Executable (MIME). MPH currently works on IBM SP, SGI Origin, Compaq AlphaSC, Cray T3E, and PC clusters. It is being adopted in NCAR's CCSM and Colorado State University's icosahedra grid coupled model. A joint communicator between any two components could be created. MPI communication between local processors and remote processors are invoked through component names and the local id. More functions are available to inquire the global-id, local-id, number of executales, etc.« less

  16. Friction Stir Welding of HSLA-65 Steel: Part II. The Influence of Weld Speed and Tool Material on the Residual Stress Distribution and Tool Wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steuwer, A.; Barnes, S. J.; Altenkirch, J.; Johnson, R.; Withers, P. J.

    2012-07-01

    A set of single pass full penetration friction stir bead-on-plate and butt welds in HSLA-65 steel were produced using a range of traverse speeds (50 to 500 mm/min) and two tool materials (W-Re and PCBN). Part I described the influence of process and tool parameters on the microstructure in the weld region. This article focuses on the influence of these parameters on residual stress, but the presence of retained austenite evident in the diffraction pattern and X-ray tomographic investigations of tool material depositions are also discussed. The residual stress measurements were made using white beam synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXRD). The residual stresses are affected by the traverse speed as well as the weld tool material. While the peak residual stress at the tool shoulders remained largely unchanged (approximately equal to the nominal yield stress (450 MPa)) irrespective of weld speed or tool type, for the W-Re welds, the width of the tensile section of the residual stress profile decreased with increasing traverse speed (thus decreasing line energy). The effect of increasing traverse speed on the width of the tensile zone was much less pronounced for the PCBN tool material.

  17. 76 FR 78 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard; Engine Control Module Speed Limiter Device

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ... rulemaking activity. \\1\\ 72 FR 3904; January 26, 2007. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration...; Engine Control Module Speed Limiter Device AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, DOT...., Covenant Transport, Inc., and Jet Express, Inc.) to establish a safety standard to require devices...

  18. 49 CFR 213.307 - Class of track: operating speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... hazardous material, as defined at 49 CFR 171.8, except as provided in Column 9A of the Hazardous Materials Table (49 CFR 172.101) for movement in the same train as a passenger-carrying vehicle or in Column 9B of... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Class of track: operating speed limits....

  19. 49 CFR 213.307 - Class of track: operating speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... hazardous material, as defined at 49 CFR 171.8, except as provided in Column 9A of the Hazardous Materials Table (49 CFR 172.101) for movement in the same train as a passenger-carrying vehicle or in Column 9B of... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Class of track: operating speed limits....

  20. 49 CFR 213.307 - Class of track: operating speed limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... hazardous material, as defined at 49 CFR 171.8, except as provided in Column 9A of the Hazardous Materials Table (49 CFR 172.101) for movement in the same train as a passenger-carrying vehicle or in Column 9B of... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class of track: operating speed limits....

  1. Muscle function and hydrodynamics limit power and speed in swimming frogs.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Christofer J; Richards, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Studies of the muscle force-velocity relationship and its derived n-shaped power-velocity curve offer important insights into muscular limits of performance. Given the power is maximal at 1/3 V(max), geometric scaling of muscle force coupled with fluid drag force implies that this optimal muscle-shortening velocity for power cannot be maintained across the natural body-size range. Instead, muscle velocity may decrease with increasing body size, conferring a similar n-shaped power curve with body size. Here we examine swimming speed and muscle function in the aquatic frog Xenopus laevis. Swimming speed shows an n-shaped scaling relationship, peaking at 47.35 g. Further, in vitro muscle function of the ankle extensor plantaris longus also shows an optimal body mass for muscle power output (47.27 g), reflecting that of swimming speed. These findings suggest that in drag-based aquatic systems, muscle-environment interactions vary with body size, limiting both the muscle's potential to produce power and the swimming speed. PMID:24177194

  2. Drag Measurements at Transonic Speeds of NACA 65-009 Airfoils Mounted on a Freely Falling Body to Determine the Effects of Sweepback and Aspect Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, Charles W.; Thompson, Jim Rogers

    1947-01-01

    Drag measurements at transonic speeds on rectangular airfoils and on airfoils swept back 450 are reported. These airfoils, which were mounted on cylindrical test bodies, are part of a series being tested in free drops from high altitude to determine the effect of variation of basic airfoil parameters on airfoil drag characteristics at transonic speeds. These rectangular and swept-back airfoils had the same span, airfoil section (NACA 65-009), and chord perpendicular to the leading edge. The tests were made to compare the drag of rectangular and sweptback airfoils at a higher aspect ratio than had been used in a similar comparison reported previously. The results showed that the drag of the swept-back airfoil was less than 0.15 that of the rectangular airfoil at a Mach number of 1.00 and less than 0.30 that of the rectangular airfoil at a Mach number of 1.17. A comparison of these swept-back airfoils with similar airfoils of lower aspect ratio previously tested by the same method indicated that in the investigated speed range reduction in aspect ratio results in increased drag. In the highest part of the investigated speed range, however, the drag coefficient of the high-aspect-ratio swept-back airfoils showed a tendency to approach that of the lower-aspect-ratio swept-back airfoils. A similar comparison for the rectangular airfoils showed that delay in the drag rise and a reduction in drag at supercritical speeds can be realIzed through reduction in aspect ratio. These results confirm those reported in NACA ACR No. L5J16.

  3. Turbulent Vortex-Flow Simulation Over a 65 deg Sharp and Blunt Leading-Edge Delta Wing at Subsonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffari, Farhad

    2005-01-01

    Turbulent thin-layer, Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solutions, based on a multi-block structured grid, are presented for a 65 deg delta wing having either a sharp leading edge (SLE) or blunt leading edge (BLE) geometry. The primary objective of the study is to assess the prediction capability of the method for simulating the leading-edge flow separation and the ensuing vortex flow characteristics. Computational results are obtained for two angles of attack of approximately 13 and 20 deg, at free-stream Mach number of 0.40 and Reynolds number of 6 million based on the wing mean aerodynamic chord. The effects of two turbulence models of Baldwin-Lomax with Degani-Schiff (BL/DS) and the Spalart-Allmaras (SA) on the numerical results are also discussed. The computations also explore the effects of two numerical flux-splitting schemes, i.e., flux difference splitting (fds) and flux vector splitting (fvs), on the solution development and convergence characteristics. The resulting trends in solution sensitivity to grid resolution for the selected leading-edge geometries, angles of attack, turbulence models and flux splitting schemes are also presented. The validity of the numerical results is evaluated against a unique set of experimental wind-tunnel data that was obtained in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  4. Effects of perinatal methylphenidate (MPH) treatment in male and female Sprague-Dawley offspring.

    PubMed

    Panos, John J; Law, C Delbert; Ferguson, Sherry A

    2014-01-01

    MPH is a common treatment for adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). However, little information exists regarding its safety during pregnancy and thus, women with ADHD face difficult decisions regarding continued use during pregnancy. Here, Sprague-Dawley rats were orally treated 3 ×/day with 0 (control), 6 (low), 18 (mid), or 42 (high) mg MPH/kg/day (i.e., 0, 2, 6, or 14 mg/kg at each treatment time) on gestational days 6-21. On postnatal days (PNDs) 1-21, all offspring/litter were orally treated 2 ×/day with the same dose. Righting reflex (PNDs 3-6) and slant board performance (PNDs 8-11) were assessed. T3, T4, E2, testosterone, LH and corticosterone were measured at PND 22. Separate pregnant dams and resulting litters were used for serum MPH measurements. MPH treatment had mild, but significant, effects on gestational body weight and food intake. Birth weight of high MPH offspring was 5% more than controls (p<0.0500). Relative to same-sex controls on PNDs 1-22, low and mid MPH males weighed more (p<0.0094), low MPH females weighed more (p<0.0001), while high MPH females weighed less (p<0.0397). PND 22 serum E2 levels were significantly decreased (20-25%) in high MPH males and females (p<0.0500). Behavioral performance was unaffected by treatment. Serum MPH levels of the low MPH pregnant dams were within the range produced by therapeutic MPH doses in adults; however, offspring levels in all groups were substantially higher. These results indicate that developmental MPH treatment has mild effects on gestational body weight and food intake and offspring preweaning body weight. Potential functional consequences of decreased serum E2 levels are not clear, but may impact later behavior or physiology. PMID:24444667

  5. Optimal Speed Limits for School Buses on Virginia Highways: A Report to Virginia's Superintendent of Public Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jernigan, Jack D.; Lynn, Cheryl W.

    A study to assess whether the school bus speed limit should be changed in Virginia is described in this report. The relationship between the safety characteristics of Virginia's three-tiered speed limit system and school bus operation is examined to determine the optimal level of safety for school bus travel. Virginia allows the following three…

  6. Limits to high-speed simulations of spiking neural networks using general-purpose computers.

    PubMed

    Zenke, Friedemann; Gerstner, Wulfram

    2014-01-01

    To understand how the central nervous system performs computations using recurrent neuronal circuitry, simulations have become an indispensable tool for theoretical neuroscience. To study neuronal circuits and their ability to self-organize, increasing attention has been directed toward synaptic plasticity. In particular spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) creates specific demands for simulations of spiking neural networks. On the one hand a high temporal resolution is required to capture the millisecond timescale of typical STDP windows. On the other hand network simulations have to evolve over hours up to days, to capture the timescale of long-term plasticity. To do this efficiently, fast simulation speed is the crucial ingredient rather than large neuron numbers. Using different medium-sized network models consisting of several thousands of neurons and off-the-shelf hardware, we compare the simulation speed of the simulators: Brian, NEST and Neuron as well as our own simulator Auryn. Our results show that real-time simulations of different plastic network models are possible in parallel simulations in which numerical precision is not a primary concern. Even so, the speed-up margin of parallelism is limited and boosting simulation speeds beyond one tenth of real-time is difficult. By profiling simulation code we show that the run times of typical plastic network simulations encounter a hard boundary. This limit is partly due to latencies in the inter-process communications and thus cannot be overcome by increased parallelism. Overall, these results show that to study plasticity in medium-sized spiking neural networks, adequate simulation tools are readily available which run efficiently on small clusters. However, to run simulations substantially faster than real-time, special hardware is a prerequisite. PMID:25309418

  7. A limit on the variation of the speed of light arising from quantum gravity effects.

    PubMed

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Asano, K; Atwood, W B; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Bhat, P N; Bissaldi, E; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Bonnell, J; Borgland, A W; Bouvier, A; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Briggs, M S; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burgess, J M; Burnett, T H; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Chaplin, V; Charles, E; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L R; Connaughton, V; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dingus, B L; do Couto E Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Finke, J; Fishman, G; Focke, W B; Foschini, L; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Gibby, L; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Granot, J; Greiner, J; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Grupe, D; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hoversten, E A; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Kippen, R M; Knödlseder, J; Kocevski, D; Kouveliotou, C; Kuehn, F; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Mazziotta, M N; McBreen, S; McEnery, J E; McGlynn, S; Mészáros, P; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Moretti, E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paciesas, W S; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Petrosian, V; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Preece, R; Rainò, S; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Schalk, T L; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Stamatikos, M; Stecker, F W; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Toma, K; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Troja, E; Uchiyama, Y; Uehara, T; Usher, T L; van der Horst, A J; Vasileiou, V; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; von Kienlin, A; Waite, A P; Wang, P; Wilson-Hodge, C; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wu, X F; Yamazaki, R; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2009-11-19

    A cornerstone of Einstein's special relativity is Lorentz invariance-the postulate that all observers measure exactly the same speed of light in vacuum, independent of photon-energy. While special relativity assumes that there is no fundamental length-scale associated with such invariance, there is a fundamental scale (the Planck scale, l(Planck) approximately 1.62 x 10(-33) cm or E(Planck) = M(Planck)c(2) approximately 1.22 x 10(19) GeV), at which quantum effects are expected to strongly affect the nature of space-time. There is great interest in the (not yet validated) idea that Lorentz invariance might break near the Planck scale. A key test of such violation of Lorentz invariance is a possible variation of photon speed with energy. Even a tiny variation in photon speed, when accumulated over cosmological light-travel times, may be revealed by observing sharp features in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light-curves. Here we report the detection of emission up to approximately 31 GeV from the distant and short GRB 090510. We find no evidence for the violation of Lorentz invariance, and place a lower limit of 1.2E(Planck) on the scale of a linear energy dependence (or an inverse wavelength dependence), subject to reasonable assumptions about the emission (equivalently we have an upper limit of l(Planck)/1.2 on the length scale of the effect). Our results disfavour quantum-gravity theories in which the quantum nature of space-time on a very small scale linearly alters the speed of light. PMID:19865083

  8. Driving at the quantum speed limit: optimal control of a two-level system.

    PubMed

    Hegerfeldt, Gerhard C

    2013-12-27

    A remarkably simple result is derived for the minimal time Tmin required to drive a general initial state to a final target state by a Landau-Zener-type Hamiltonian or, equivalently, by time-dependent laser driving. The associated protocol is also derived. A surprise arises for some states when the interaction strength is bounded by a constant c. Then, for large c, the optimal driving is of type bang-off-bang and for increasing c one recovers the unconstrained result. However, for smaller c the optimal driving can suddenly switch to bang-bang type. We discuss the notion of quantum speed limit time. PMID:24483786

  9. Quantum speed limits in open systems: Non-Markovian dynamics without rotating-wave approximation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhe; Liu, Jing; Ma, Jian; Wang, Xiaoguang

    2015-01-01

    We derive an easily computable quantum speed limit (QSL) time bound for open systems whose initial states can be chosen as either pure or mixed states. Moreover, this QSL time is applicable to either Markovian or non-Markovian dynamics. By using of a hierarchy equation method, we numerically study the QSL time bound in a qubit system interacting with a single broadened cavity mode without rotating-wave, Born and Markovian approximation. By comparing with rotating-wave approximation (RWA) results, we show that the counter-rotating terms are helpful to increase evolution speed. The problem of non-Markovianity is also considered. We find that for non-RWA cases, increasing system-bath coupling can not always enhance the non-Markovianity, which is qualitatively different from the results with RWA. When considering the relation between QSL and non-Markovianity, we find that for small broadening widths of the cavity mode, non-Markovianity can increase the evolution speed in either RWA or non-RWA cases, while, for larger broadening widths, it is not true for non-RWA cases. PMID:25676589

  10. Optimization of cold rolling process parameters in order to increasing rolling speed limited by chatter vibrations

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Ali; Forouzan, Mohammad R.

    2012-01-01

    Chatter has been recognized as major restriction for the increase in productivity of cold rolling processes, limiting the rolling speed for thin steel strips. It is shown that chatter has close relation with rolling conditions. So the main aim of this paper is to attain the optimum set points of rolling to achieve maximum rolling speed, preventing chatter to occur. Two combination methods were used for optimization. First method is done in four steps: providing a simulation program for chatter analysis, preparing data from simulation program based on central composite design of experiment, developing a statistical model to relate system tendency to chatter and rolling parameters by response surface methodology, and finally optimizing the process by genetic algorithm. Second method has analogous stages. But central composite design of experiment is replaced by Taguchi method and response surface methodology is replaced by neural network method. Also a study on the influence of the rolling parameters on system stability has been carried out. By using these combination methods, new set points were determined and significant improvement achieved in rolling speed. PMID:25685398

  11. Optimization of cold rolling process parameters in order to increasing rolling speed limited by chatter vibrations.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Ali; Forouzan, Mohammad R

    2013-01-01

    Chatter has been recognized as major restriction for the increase in productivity of cold rolling processes, limiting the rolling speed for thin steel strips. It is shown that chatter has close relation with rolling conditions. So the main aim of this paper is to attain the optimum set points of rolling to achieve maximum rolling speed, preventing chatter to occur. Two combination methods were used for optimization. First method is done in four steps: providing a simulation program for chatter analysis, preparing data from simulation program based on central composite design of experiment, developing a statistical model to relate system tendency to chatter and rolling parameters by response surface methodology, and finally optimizing the process by genetic algorithm. Second method has analogous stages. But central composite design of experiment is replaced by Taguchi method and response surface methodology is replaced by neural network method. Also a study on the influence of the rolling parameters on system stability has been carried out. By using these combination methods, new set points were determined and significant improvement achieved in rolling speed. PMID:25685398

  12. Characteristics and Use of Home Health Care by Men and Women Aged 65 and Over

    MedlinePlus

    ... April 18, 2012 Characteristics and Use of Home Health Care by Men and Women Aged 65 and Over ... and Roberto Valverde, M.P.H., Division of Health Care Statistics Abstract Objective —This report presents national estimates ...

  13. Peer Influence Predicts Speeding Prevalence Among Teenage Drivers

    PubMed Central

    Ouimet, Marie Claude; Chen, Rusan; Klauer, Sheila G.; Lee, Suzanne E.; Wang, Jing; Dingus, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective This research examined the psychosocial and personality predictors of observed speeding among young drivers. Method. Survey and driving data were collected from 42 newly-licensed teenage drivers during the first 18 months of licensure. Speeding (i.e., driving 10 mph over the speed limit; about 16 km/h) was assessed by comparing speed data collected with recording systems installed in participants’ vehicles with posted speed limits. Questionnaire data collected at baseline were used to predict speeding rates using random effects regression analyses. For mediation analysis, data collected at baseline and at 6, 12, and 18 months after licensure were used. Results. Speeding was correlated with elevated g-force event rates, including hard braking and turning (r = 0.335, p < 0.05), but not with crashes and near crashes (r = 0.227; ns). Speeding prevalence increased over time. In univariate analyses speeding was predicted by day vs. night trips, higher sensation seeking, substance use, tolerance of deviance, susceptibility to peer pressure, and number of risky friends. In multivariate analyses the number of risky friends was the only significant predictor of speeding. Perceived risk was a significant mediator of the association between speeding and risky friends. Conclusion. The findings support the contention that social norms may influence teenage speeding behavior and this relationship may operate through perceived risk. PMID:23206513

  14. Pitching Speed and Glenohumeral Adaptation in High School Pitchers.

    PubMed

    Keller, Robert A; Marshall, Nathan E; Mehran, Nima; Moutzouros, Vasilios

    2015-08-01

    Glenohumeral internal rotational deficit and increased glenohumeral external rotation are common findings in baseball pitchers. To the authors' knowledge, no study has focused on the adaptation of glenohumeral internal rotational deficit and increased glenohumeral external rotation in relation to pitching speed. This study evaluated changes in range of motion in the throwing shoulder in high school pitchers to determine whether changes in internal and external rotation directly correlate with pitch velocity. The shoulders of 22 high school varsity pitchers were evaluated. Standard goniometric technique was used to measure passive external and internal glenohumeral range of motion in both arms. Measurements were evaluated for statistically significant differences in range of motion. Demographic features, including height, weight, and age, were assessed. Fifteen consecutive in-game pitch speeds were recorded, and the fastest pitch was used for evaluation. Pitch speeds were correlated to the player's glenohumeral internal rotational deficit, increased glenohumeral external rotation, and physical demographics. Average age was 16.9 years. Average external rotation of the throwing arm was significantly greater than that of the nonthrowing arm (143.00° vs 130.32°, P=.005). Average internal rotation of the throwing arm was significantly less than that of the nonthrowing arm (49.50° vs 65.90°, P=.006). Both shoulders had similar total arc of motion (throwing shoulder, 192.54; nonthrowing shoulder, 196.23; P=.822). Average maximum velocity was 77.7 mph (maximum, 88 mph; minimum, 66 mph). Maximum pitch velocity did not correlate with changes in glenohumeral internal rotational deficit (P=.683) or increased glenohumeral external rotation (P=.241). There was also no evidence of correlation between pitch velocity and player age, height, weight, or dominant hand. The stress of pitching creates adaptations to the throwing shoulder, even in young athletes. There appears to be

  15. MPH program adaptability in a competitive marketplace: the case for continued assessment.

    PubMed

    Caron, Rosemary M; Tutko, Holly

    2010-06-01

    In the last several years, the number of Master of Public Health (MPH) programs has increased rapidly in the US. As such, MPH programs, particularly smaller-sized ones, need to critically examine how their programs are meeting the needs and preferences of local public health practitioners. To assist in this necessity, the University of New Hampshire conducted a comprehensive educational assessment of its effectiveness as a smaller-sized, accredited MPH program. The aim of the assessment was to review the MPH program from the perspective of all stakeholders and then to agree on changes that would contribute to the fulfillment of the program's mission, as well as improve program quality and reach. The program's stakeholders examined the following components: policy development and implementation; target audience; marketing strategies; marketplace position; delivery model; curriculum design; and continuing education. Though assessment activities explored a wide array of program attributes, target audience, curriculum design, and delivery strategy presented significant challenges and opportunities for our smaller MPH Program to remain competitive. The effort put forth into conducting an in-depth assessment of the core components of our program also allowed for a comparison to the increasing number of MPH programs developing regionally. Since public health practice is changing and the education of public health practitioners must be adaptable, we propose that a routine assessment of an institution's MPH program could not only meet this need but also assist with keeping smaller, unbranded MPH programs competitive in a burgeoning marketplace. PMID:20127157

  16. Fundamental High-Speed Limits in Single-Molecule, Single-Cell, and Nanoscale Force Spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Amo, Carlos A; Garcia, Ricardo

    2016-07-26

    Force spectroscopy is enhancing our understanding of single-biomolecule, single-cell, and nanoscale mechanics. Force spectroscopy postulates the proportionality between the interaction force and the instantaneous probe deflection. By studying the probe dynamics, we demonstrate that the total force acting on the probe has three different components: the interaction, the hydrodynamic, and the inertial. The amplitudes of those components depend on the ratio between the resonant frequency and the frequency at which the data are measured. A force-distance curve provides a faithful measurement of the interaction force between two molecules when the inertial and hydrodynamic components are negligible. Otherwise, force spectroscopy measurements will underestimate the value of unbinding forces. Neglecting the above force components requires the use of frequency ratios in the 50-500 range. These ratios will limit the use of high-speed methods in force spectroscopy. The theory is supported by numerical simulations. PMID:27359243

  17. Piecewise Function Feedback Strategy in Intelligent Traffic Systems with a Speed Limit Bottleneck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bokui; Sun, Xiaoyan; Wei, Hua; Dong, Chuanfei; Wang, Binghong

    The road capacity can be greatly improved if an appropriate and effective information feedback strategy is adopted in the traffic system. In this paper, a strategy called piecewise function feedback strategy (PFFS) is introduced and applied into an asymmetrical two-route scenario with a speed limit bottleneck in which the dynamic information can be generated and displayed on the information board to guide road users to make a choice. Meanwhile, the velocity-dependent randomization (VDR) mechanism is adopted which can better reflect the dynamic behavior of vehicles in the system than NS mechanism. Simulation results adopting PFFS have demonstrated high efficiency in controlling spatial distribution of traffic patterns compared with the previous strategies.

  18. Drivers' compliance with speed limits: an application of the theory of planned behavior.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Mark A; Armitage, Christopher J; Baughan, Christopher J

    2003-10-01

    The theory of planned behavior (TPB; I. Ajzen, 1985) was applied to drivers' compliance with speed limits. Questionnaire data were collected for 598 drivers at 2 time points separated by 3 months. TPB variables, demographic information, and self-reported prior behavior were measured at Time 1, and self-reported subsequent behavior was measured at Time 2. In line with the TPB, attitude, subjective norm, and perceived control were positively associated with behavioral intention, and intention and perceived control were positively associated with subsequent behavior. TPB variables mediated the effects of age and gender on behavior. Prior behavior was found to moderate the perceived control-intention and perceived control-subsequent behavior relationships. Practical implications of the findings for road safety and possible avenues for further research are discussed. PMID:14516256

  19. The Impact of a Signalized Crosswalk on Traffic Speed and Street-Crossing Behaviors of Residents in an Underserved Neighborhood.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Courtney L; Sayers, Stephen P; Wilhelm Stanis, Sonja A; Thombs, Lori A; Thomas, Ian M; Canfield, Shannon M

    2015-10-01

    Infrastructure improvements such as pedestrian crosswalks that calm traffic and increase access to physical activity opportunities could alleviate important barriers to active living in underserved communities with outdated built environments. The purpose of this study was to explore how the built environment influences street-crossing behaviors and traffic speeds in a low-income neighborhood with barriers to active living in Columbia, Missouri. In 2013, a signalized pedestrian crosswalk and 400-ft-long median was constructed along a busy 5-lane, high-speed arterial highway linking low-income housing with a park and downtown areas. Data collection occurred prior to June 2012, and after June 2013, completion of the project at the intervention site and control site. Direct observation of street-crossing behaviors was performed at designated intersections/crosswalks or non-designated crossing points. Traffic volume and speed were captured using embedded magnetic traffic detectors. At the intervention site, designated crossings increased at the new crosswalk (p < 0.001), but not at non-designated crossings (p = 0.52) or designated crossings at intersections (p = 0.41). At the control site, there was no change in designated crossings (p = 0.94) or non-designated crossings (p = 0.79). Motor vehicles traveling above the speed limit of 35 mph decreased from 62,056 (46 %) to 46,256 (35 %) (p < 0.001) at the intervention site and increased from 57,891 (49 %) to 65,725 (59 %) (p < 0.001) at the control site. The installation of a signalized crosswalk facilitated an increase in safe street crossings and calmed traffic volume and speed in an underserved neighborhood. We believe these findings have significant public health implications that could be critical to advocacy efforts to improve infrastructure projects in similar communities. PMID:26354602

  20. Mte1 interacts with Mph1 and promotes crossover recombination and telomere maintenance.

    PubMed

    Silva, Sonia; Altmannova, Veronika; Luke-Glaser, Sarah; Henriksen, Peter; Gallina, Irene; Yang, Xuejiao; Choudhary, Chunaram; Luke, Brian; Krejci, Lumir; Lisby, Michael

    2016-03-15

    Mph1 is a member of the conserved FANCM family of DNA motor proteins that play key roles in genome maintenance processes underlying Fanconi anemia, a cancer predisposition syndrome in humans. Here, we identify Mte1 as a novel interactor of the Mph1 helicase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In vitro, Mte1 (Mph1-associated telomere maintenance protein 1) binds directly to DNA with a preference for branched molecules such as D loops and fork structures. In addition, Mte1 stimulates the helicase and fork regression activities of Mph1 while inhibiting the ability of Mph1 to dissociate recombination intermediates. Deletion of MTE1 reduces crossover recombination and suppresses the sensitivity of mph1Δ mutant cells to replication stress. Mph1 and Mte1 interdependently colocalize at DNA damage-induced foci and dysfunctional telomeres, and MTE1 deletion results in elongated telomeres. Taken together, our data indicate that Mte1 plays a role in regulation of crossover recombination, response to replication stress, and telomere maintenance. PMID:26966248

  1. 14 CFR 29.33 - Main rotor speed and pitch limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... fails, there must be a main rotor low speed warning which meets the following requirements: (1) The..., when the speed of a main rotor approaches a value that can jeopardize safe flight. (2) The warning...

  2. 14 CFR 27.33 - Main rotor speed and pitch limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... fails, there must be a main rotor low speed warning which meets the following requirements: (1) The..., when the speed of a main rotor approaches a value that can jeopardize safe flight. (2) The warning...

  3. Wave-speed limitation on expiratory flow-a unifying concept.

    PubMed

    Dawson, S V; Elliott, E A

    1977-09-01

    The mechanism limiting forced expiratory flow is explained on the basis that a local flow velocity reaches the local speed of wave propagation at a point, called the choke point, in intrathoracic airways. This theoretical approach to the "waterfall effect" leads to selection of the analogy of constricted open-channel flow to apply to the elastic network of airway tubes. Quantitative results are derived for the case of negligible friction by use of the Bernoulli principle. Shapes predicted for the maximum-flow static recoil curves depend only upon the nature of the pressure-area curve at the choke point in the case of negligible friction; and the magnitude of the critical rate of flow depends on reference values of cross-sectional area and elastic modulus at the choke point, on gas density, and on the static recoil pressure. The present theoretical results are used to interpret previous experiments, but quantitative applicability is limited because of frictional effects and lack of knowledge of choke point conditions. PMID:914721

  4. Multi Program-Components Handshaking (MPH) Utility Version 3 User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yun; Ding, Chris H.Q.

    2002-06-20

    MPH version 2 combines all features of MPH version 1, unifies the interfaces, and provides more flexible components integration/execution modes. In a distributed multi-component environment, each executable resides on a set of SMP nodes. Components within an executable may overlap on different nodes or processors. MPH Version 2 contains the following functionality: component name registration; resource allocation; multi-component single executable, multi-component multi-executable, etc.; inter-component communication; inquiry on the multi-component environment; and standard in/out redirect.

  5. Quantum speed limits of a qubit system interacting with a nonequilibrium environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhi; Yao, Chun-Mei; Li, Li; Wang, Qiong

    2016-08-01

    The speed of evolution of a qubit undergoing a nonequilibrium environment with spectral density of general ohmic form is investigated. First we reveal non-Markovianity of the model, and find that the non-Markovianity quantified by information backflow of Breuer et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 210401 (2009)] displays a nonmonotonic behavior for different values of the ohmicity parameter s in fixed other parameters and the maximal non-Markovianity can be achieved at a specified value s. We also find that the non-Markovianity displays a nonmonotonic behavior with the change of a phase control parameter. Then we further discuss the relationship between quantum speed limit (QSL) time and non-Markovianity of the open-qubit system for any initial states including pure and mixed states. By investigation, we find that the QSL time of a qubit with any initial states can be expressed by a simple factorization law: the QSL time of a qubit with any qubit-initial states are equal to the product of the coherence of the initial state and the QSL time of maximally coherent states, where the QSL time of the maximally coherent states are jointly determined by the non-Markovianity, decoherence factor and a given driving time. Moreover, we also find that the speed of quantum evolution can be obviously accelerated in the wide range of the ohmicity parameter, i.e., from sub-Ohmic to Ohmic and super-Ohmic cases, which is different from the thermal equilibrium environment case. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 61505053 and 61475045), the Natural Science Foundation of Hunan Province, China(Grant No. 2015JJ3092), the School Foundation from the Hunan University of Arts and Science (Grant No. 14ZD01), the Fund from the Key Laboratory of Photoelectric Information Integration and Optical Manufacturing Technology of Hunan Province, China, and the Construction Program of the Key Discipline in Hunan University of Arts and Science (Optics).

  6. Limiting critical speed response on the SSME Alternate High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (ATD HPFTP) with bearing deadband

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goggin, David G.; Darden, J. M.

    1992-07-01

    Yammamoto (1954) described the influence of bearing deadband on the critical speed response of a rotor-bearing system. Practical application of these concepts to limit critical speed response of turbopump rotors is described. Nonlinear rotordynamic analyses are used to define the effect of bearing deadband and rotor unbalance on the Space Shuttle Main Engine Alternate High Pressure Fuel Turbopump. Analysis results are used with hot fire test data to verify the presence of a lightly damped critical speed within the operating speed range. With the proper control of rotor unbalance and bearing deadband, the response of this critical speed is reduced to acceptable levels without major design modifications or additional sources of damping.

  7. Effect Of Platooning on Fuel Consumption of Class 8 Vehicles Over a Range of Speeds, Following Distances, and Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Lammert, M. P.; Duran, A.; Diez, J.; Burton, K.; Nicholson, A.

    2014-10-01

    This research project evaluates fuel consumption results of two Class 8 tractor-trailer combinations platooned together compared to their standalone fuel consumption. A series of ten modified SAE Type II J1321 fuel consumption track tests were performed to document fuel consumption of two platooned vehicles and a control vehicle at varying steady-state speeds, following distances, and gross vehicle weights (GVWs). The steady-state speeds ranged from 55 mph to 70 mph, the following distances ranged from a 20-ft following distance to a 75-ft following distance, and the GVWs were 65K lbs and 80K lbs. All tractors involved had U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SmartWay-compliant aerodynamics packages installed, and the trailers were equipped with side skirts. Effects of vehicle speed, following distance, and GVW on fuel consumption were observed and analyzed. The platooning demonstration system used in this study consisted of radar systems, Dedicated Short-Range Communication (DSRC) vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications, vehicle braking and torque control interface, cameras and driver displays. The lead tractor consistently demonstrated an improvement in average fuel consumption reduction as following distance decreased, with results showing 2.7% to 5.3% fuel savings at a GVW of 65k. The trailing vehicle achieved fuel consumption savings ranging from 2.8% to 9.7%; tests during which the engine cooling fan did not operate achieved savings of 8.4% to 9.7%. 'Team' fuel savings, considering the platooned vehicles as one, ranged from 3.7% to 6.4%, with the best combined result being for 55 mph, 30-ft following distance, and 65k GVW.

  8. Effects of heterogeneous traffic with speed limit zone on the car accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzoug, R.; Lakouari, N.; Bentaleb, K.; Ez-Zahraouy, H.; Benyoussef, A.

    2016-06-01

    Using the extended Nagel-Schreckenberg (NS) model, we numerically study the impact of the heterogeneity of traffic with speed limit zone (SLZ) on the probability of occurrence of car accidents (Pac). SLZ in the heterogeneous traffic has an important effect, typically in the mixture velocities case. In the deterministic case, SLZ leads to the appearance of car accidents even in the low densities, in this region Pac increases with increasing of fraction of fast vehicles (Ff). In the nondeterministic case, SLZ decreases the effect of braking probability Pb in the low densities. Furthermore, the impact of multi-SLZ on the probability Pac is also studied. In contrast with the homogeneous case [X. Li, H. Kuang, Y. Fan and G. Zhang, Int. J. Mod. Phys. C 25 (2014) 1450036], it is found that in the low densities the probability Pac without SLZ (n = 0) is low than Pac with multi-SLZ (n > 0). However, the existence of multi-SLZ in the road decreases the risk of collision in the congestion phase.

  9. Quantum speed limit for a relativistic electron in a uniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villamizar, D. V.; Duzzioni, E. I.

    2015-10-01

    We analyze the influence of relativistic effects on the minimum evolution time between two orthogonal states of a quantum system. Defining the initial state as a homogeneous superposition between two Hamiltonian eigenstates of an electron in a uniform magnetic field, we obtain a relation between the minimum evolution time and the displacement of the mean radial position of the electron wave packet. The quantum speed limit time is calculated for an electron dynamics described by Dirac and Schrödinger-Pauli equations considering different parameters, such as the strength of magnetic field and the linear momentum of the electron in the axial direction. We highlight that when the electron undergoes a region with extremely strong magnetic field the relativistic and nonrelativistic dynamics differ substantially, so that the description given by the Schrödinger-Pauli equation enables the electron to travel faster than c , which is prohibited by Einstein's theory of relativity. This approach allows a connection between the abstract Hilbert space and the space-time coordinates, besides the identification of the most appropriate quantum dynamics used to describe the electron motion.

  10. Speed limit in internal space of domain walls via all-order effective action of moduli motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eto, Minoru; Hashimoto, Koji

    2016-03-01

    We find that motion in internal moduli spaces of generic domain walls has an upper bound for its velocity. Our finding is based on our generic formula for all-order effective actions of internal moduli parameter of domain wall solitons. It is known that the Nambu-Goldstone mode Z associated with spontaneous breaking of translation symmetry obeys a Nambu-Goto effective Lagrangian √{1 -(∂0Z )2 } detecting the speed of light (|∂0Z |=1 ) in the target spacetime. Solitons can have internal moduli parameters as well, associated with a breaking of internal symmetries such as a phase rotation acting on a field. We obtain, for generic domain walls, an effective Lagrangian of the internal moduli ɛ to all orders in (∂ɛ ). The Lagrangian is given by a function of the Nambu-Goto Lagrangian: L =g (√{1 +(∂μɛ )2 }). This shows generically the existence of an upper bound on ∂0ɛ , i.e., a speed limit in the internal space. The speed limit exists even for solitons in some nonrelativistic field theories, where we find that ɛ is a type I Nambu-Goldstone mode that also obeys a nonlinear dispersion to reach the speed limit. This offers a possibility of detecting the speed limit in condensed matter experiments.

  11. Impact speed and a pedestrian's risk of severe injury or death.

    PubMed

    Tefft, Brian C

    2013-01-01

    This study estimates the risk of severe injury or death for pedestrians struck by vehicles using data from a study of crashes that occurred in the United States in years 1994-1998 and involved a pedestrian struck by a forward-moving car, light truck, van, or sport utility vehicle. The data were weighted to correct for oversampling of pedestrians who were severely injured or killed. Logistic regression was used to adjust for potential confounding related to pedestrian and vehicle characteristics. Risks were standardized to represent the average risk for a pedestrian struck by a car or light truck in the United States in years 2007-2009. Results show that the average risk of a struck pedestrian sustaining an injury of Abbreviated Injury Scale 4 or greater severity reaches 10% at an impact speed of 17.1miles per hour (mph), 25% at 24.9mph, 50% at 33.0mph, 75% at 40.8mph, and 90% at 48.1mph. The average risk of death reaches 10% at an impact speed of 24.1mph, 25% at 32.5mph, 50% at 40.6mph, 75% at 48.0mph, and 90% at 54.6mph. Risks varied by age. For example, the average risk of death for a 70-year-old pedestrian struck at any given speed was similar to the average risk of death for a 30-year-old pedestrian struck at a speed 11.8mph faster. PMID:22935347

  12. Virtual practicums within an MPH program: a career development case study.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on an innovative "virtual" practicum arrangement and provides insight for public health professionals seeking a meaningful practicum experience. The traditional practicum model where a student physically reports to work at the field site with a near full-time commitment has become increasingly challenging and often limiting in terms of field site choices and experiences available to a student depending on the location of a school and the student's area of interest. This is particularly true with students who are enrolled in a distance learning program. The experience obtained from a practicum is more important than ever before as rapid changes occur in health service delivery models as a result of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Career development through a practicum can be vitally important to a mid-career student seeking to remain relevant and in demand within a changing job market. To fulfill these needs, while still obtaining the benefits of a practicum, a virtual practicum arrangement could provide a solution. This case study provides practical tips based on the successful experience of a recent MPH graduate. PMID:25331732

  13. Breaking the speed limit--comparative sprinting performance of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) and brown trout (Salmo trutta)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Castro-Santos, Theodore; Sanz-Ronda, Francisco Javier; Ruiz-Legazpi, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Sprinting behavior of free-ranging fish has long been thought to exceed that of captive fish. Here we present data from wild-caught brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) and brown trout (Salmo trutta), volitionally entering and sprinting against high-velocity flows in an open-channel flume. Performance of the two species was nearly identical, with the species attaining absolute speeds > 25 body lengths·s−1. These speeds far exceed previously published observations for any salmonid species and contribute to the mounting evidence that commonly accepted estimates of swimming performance are low. Brook trout demonstrated two distinct modes in the relationship between swim speed and fatigue time, similar to the shift from prolonged to sprint mode described by other authors, but in this case occurring at speeds > 19 body lengths·s−1. This is the first demonstration of multiple modes of sprint swimming at such high swim speeds. Neither species optimized for distance maximization, however, indicating that physiological limits alone are poor predictors of swimming performance. By combining distributions of volitional swim speeds with endurance, we were able to account for >80% of the variation in distance traversed by both species.

  14. Structure and Function of the Macrolide Biosensor Protein, MphR(A), with and without Erythromycin

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Jianting; Sagar, Vatsala; Smolinsky, Adam; Bourke, Chase; LaRonde-LeBlanc, Nicole; Cropp, T. Ashton

    2009-09-02

    The regulatory protein MphR(A) has recently seen extensive use in synthetic biological applications, such as metabolite sensing and exogenous control of gene expression. This protein negatively regulates the expression of a macrolide 2{prime}-phosphotransferase I resistance gene (mphA) via binding to a 35-bp DNA operator upstream of the start codon and is de-repressed by the presence of erythromycin. Here, we present the refined crystal structure of the MphR(A) protein free of erythromycin and that of the MphR(A) protein with bound erythromycin at 2.00- and 1.76-{angstrom} resolutions, respectively. We also studied the DNA binding properties of the protein and identified mutants of MphR(A) that are defective in gene repression and ligand binding in a cell-based reporter assay. The combination of these two structures illustrates the molecular basis of erythromycin-induced gene expression and provides a framework for additional applied uses of this protein in the isolation and engineered biosynthesis of polyketide natural products.

  15. Accuracy limitations on Brillouin lidar measurements of temperature and sound speed in the ocean.

    PubMed

    Fry, E S; Emery, Y; Quan, X; Katz, J W

    1997-09-20

    There are five mutually dependent variables relevant to Brillouin lidar measurements of temperature and sound speed in the ocean; they are (1) the Brillouin shift, (2) the sound speed, (3) the index of refraction, (4) the temperature, and (5) the salinity. We use three well-known relations to analyze rigorously the interdependence of these five variables. Clearly, a Brillouin shift measurement does not provide a stand-alone determination of temperature or sound speed; one more variable or one more relation must be known. The use of mean values of salinity that have been obtained by an analysis of a large set of historical in situ data is considered for this additional relation. PMID:18259560

  16. Effects of Implementation Intentions on the Self-Reported Frequency of Drivers' Compliance with Speed Limits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Mark A.; Armitage, Christopher J.

    2006-01-01

    This study tested the efficacy of implementation intentions in the context of drivers' speeding behavior. Participants (N = 300) completed self-report measures of goal intention and behavior, and they were randomly assigned to an experimental condition, which required them to specify an implementation intention, or a control condition. One month…

  17. Speed Limits: Orientation and Semantic Context Interactions Constrain Natural Scene Discrimination Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieger, Jochem W.; Kochy, Nick; Schalk, Franziska; Gruschow, Marcus; Heinze, Hans-Jochen

    2008-01-01

    The visual system rapidly extracts information about objects from the cluttered natural environment. In 5 experiments, the authors quantified the influence of orientation and semantics on the classification speed of objects in natural scenes, particularly with regard to object-context interactions. Natural scene photographs were presented in an…

  18. Effects of engine speed, fueling rate, and combustion phasing on the thermal stratification required to limit HCCI knocking intensity.

    SciTech Connect

    SjÞoberg, Magnus; Dec, John E.

    2004-12-01

    Thermal stratification has the potential to reduce pressure-rise rates and allow increased power output for HCCI engines. This paper systematically examines how the amount of thermal stratification of the core of the charge has to be adjusted to avoid excessive knock as the engine speed and fueling rate are increased. This is accomplished by a combination of multi-zone chemical-kinetics modeling and engine experiments, using iso-octane as the fuel. The experiments show that, for a low-residual engine configuration, the pressure traces are self-similar during changes to the engine speed when CA50 is maintained by adjusting the intake temperature. Consequently, the absolute pressure-rise rate measured as bar/ms increases proportionally with the engine speed. As a result, the knocking (ringing) intensity increases drastically with engine speed, unless counteracted by some means. This paper describes how adjustments of the thermal width of the in-cylinder charge can be used to limit the ringing intensity to 5 MW/m2 as both engine speed and fueling are increased. If the thermal width can be tailored without constraints, this enables smooth operation even for combinations of high speed, high load, and combustion phasing close to TDC. Since large alterations of the thermal width of the charge are not always possible, combustion retard is considered to reduce the requirement on the thermal stratification. The results show that combustion retard carries significant potential since it amplifies the benefit of a fixed thermal width. Therefore, the thermal stratification required for operation with an acceptable knocking intensity can be decreased substantially by the use of combustion retard. This enables combinations of high engine speed and high fueling rate even for operation with the naturally occurring thermal stratification. However, very precise control of the combustion phasing will likely be required for such operation.

  19. Effects of perinatal methylphenidate (MPH) treatment on postweaning behaviors of male and female Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Sherry A; Delbert Law, C; Sahin, Leyla; Montenegro, Susan V

    2015-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH) is a common treatment for adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). However, little information exists regarding its safety during pregnancy and thus, women with ADHD face difficult decisions regarding continued use during pregnancy. Thus, Sprague-Dawley rats were orally treated 3×/day with 0 (control), 6 (low), 18 (mid), or 42 (high) mg MPH/kg/day (i.e., 0, 2, 6, or 14mg/kg at each treatment time) on gestational days 6-21. All offspring/litter were orally treated with the same dose their dam had received on postnatal days (PNDs) 1-21. After weaning, offspring were assessed for adolescent play behavior, locomotor activity, motor coordination, Barnes maze performance, acoustic startle response, novel object recognition, residential running wheel activity, flavored solution intake, home cage behavior, water maze performance, elevated plus maze behavior, locomotor response to an MPH challenge, and passive avoidance. At euthanasia, whole brain and striatal weights as well as serum hormone levels were measured. Body weights of the high MPH group were reduced in both sexes. Males of the high MPH group were less active than control males in open field assessments on PNDs 40-42. Latency to maximum acoustic startle was significantly altered in females of the medium and high MPH groups and residential running wheel activity of females of the low and medium MPH groups was lower than control females. Open arm entries in the elevated plus maze were increased in subjects of the medium MPH group. Females of the low MPH group were less sensitive to the locomotor-increasing effects of an acute 5mg/kg MPH challenge. Serum hormone levels and whole brain and striatal weights were not altered by prior MPH treatment. These results indicate that MPH treatment during development has sporadic effects on postweaning behaviors and those effects were generally exhibited by females. PMID:25514582

  20. Design wind speeds for high hazard, moderate hazard, important/low hazard and general use facilities at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    King, H.H.

    1989-09-11

    The design wind speeds for High Hazard, Moderate Hazard, Important/Low Hazard and General Use facilities at the Savannah River Site are developed below using the procedures and site-specific hazards model required by DOE Order 6430.1A. These are less than the previously required Design Wind Speeds and are: (1) High Hazard (Maximum Resistance) Facility, 185 mph; (2) Moderate Hazard (High Resistance) Facility, 37 mph; (3) Important/Low Hazard (Intermediate) Facility, 83 mph; and, (4) General Use (Standard) Facility, 78 mph.

  1. Effects of developmental methylphenidate (MPH) treatment on monoamine neurochemistry of male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Panos, John J; O'Callaghan, James P; Miller, Diane B; Ferguson, Sherry A

    2014-01-01

    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is estimated to affect 4-5% of the adult human population (Kessler et al., 2006; Willcutt, 2012). Often prescribed to attenuate ADHD symptoms (Nair and Moss, 2009), methylphenidate hydrochloride (MPH) can have substantial positive effects. However, there is a paucity of literature regarding its use during pregnancy. Thus, adult women with ADHD face a difficult decision when contemplating pregnancy. In this study, pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were orally treated a total of 0 (water), 6 (low), 18 (medium), or 42 (high) mg MPH/kg body weight/day (divided into three doses) on gestational days 6-21 (i.e., the low dose received 2 mg MPH/kg body weight 3×/day). Offspring were orally treated with the same daily dose as their dam (divided into two doses) on postnatal days (PNDs) 1-21. One offspring/sex/litter was sacrificed at PND 22 or PND 104 (n=6-7/age/sex/treatment group) and the striatum was quickly dissected and frozen. High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) coupled to a Photo Diode Array detector (PDA) was used to analyze monoamine content in the striatum of one side while a sandwich ELISA was used to analyze tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) from the other side. Age significantly affected monoamine and metabolite content as well as turnover ratios (i.e., DA, DOPAC, HVA, DOPAC/DA, HVA/DA, 5-HT and 5-HIAA); however, there were no significant effects of sex. Adult rats of the low MPH group had higher DA levels than control adults (p<0.05). At both ages, subjects of the low MPH group had higher TH levels than controls (p<0.05), although neither effect (i.e., higher DA or TH levels) exhibited an apparent dose-response. PND 22 subjects of the high MPH treatment group had higher ratios of HVA/DA and DOPAC/DA than same-age control subjects (p<0.05). The increased TH levels of the low MPH group may be related to the increased DA levels of adult rats. While developmental MPH treatment appears to have some effects on monoamine

  2. The Effectiveness at High Speeds of a 20-Percent-chord Plain Trailing-edge Flap on the NACA 65-210 Airfoil Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stivers, Louis S., Jr.

    1947-01-01

    An analysis has been made of the lift-control effectiveness of a 20-percent-chord plain trailing-edge flap on the NACA 65-210 airfoil section from section lift-coefficient data obtained at Mach numbers from 0.3 to 0.875. In addition, the effectiveness of the plain flap as a lift-control device has been compared with the corresponding effectiveness of both a spoiler and a dive-recovery flag on the INCA 65-210 airfoil section.

  3. Influence of road markings, lane widths and driver behaviour on proximity and speed of vehicles overtaking cyclists.

    PubMed

    Shackel, Stella C; Parkin, John

    2014-12-01

    The proximity and speed of motor traffic passing cyclists in non-separated conditions may be so close and so great as to cause discomfort. A variety of road design and driver behaviour factors may affect overtaking speeds and distances. The investigation presented in this paper builds on previous research and fills gaps in that research by considering the presence of cycle lanes on 20 mph and 30 mph roads, different lane widths, different lane markings, vehicle type, vehicle platooning and oncoming traffic. Data were collected from a bicycle ridden a distance of one metre from the kerb fitted with an ultrasonic distance detector and forward and sideways facing cameras. Reduced overtaking speeds correlate with narrower lanes, lower speed limits, and the absence of centre-line markings. Drivers passed slower if driving a long vehicle, driving in a platoon, and when approaching vehicles in the opposing carriageway were within five seconds of the passing point. Increased passing distances were found where there were wider or dual lane roads, and in situations where oncoming vehicles were further away and not in a platoon. In mixed traffic conditions, cyclists will be better accommodated by wider cross-sections, lower speed limits and the removal of the centre-line marking. PMID:25195093

  4. Some limitations in applying classical EHD film-thickness formulae to a high-speed bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, J. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1980-01-01

    Elastohydrodynamic film thickness was measured for a 20 mm ball bearing using the capacitance technique. The bearing was thrust loaded to 90, 448, and 778 N. The corresponding maximum stresses on the inner race were 1.28, 2.09, and 2.45 GPa. Test speeds ranged from 400 to 14,000 rpm. Film thickness measurements were taken with four different lubricants: (1) synthetic paraffinic; (2) synthetic paraffinic with additives; (3) neopentylpolyol (tetra) ester; and (4) synthetic cycloaliphatic hydrocarbon traction fluid. The test bearing was mist lubricated. Test temperatures were 300, 338, and 393 K. The measured results were compared to theoretical predictions and are presented.

  5. A low upper limit on the subsurface rise speed of solar active regions.

    PubMed

    Birch, Aaron C; Schunker, Hannah; Braun, Douglas C; Cameron, Robert; Gizon, Laurent; Löptien, Björn; Rempel, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic field emerges at the surface of the Sun as sunspots and active regions. This process generates a poloidal magnetic field from a rising toroidal flux tube; it is a crucial but poorly understood aspect of the solar dynamo. The emergence of magnetic field is also important because it is a key driver of solar activity. We show that measurements of horizontal flows at the solar surface around emerging active regions, in combination with numerical simulations of solar magnetoconvection, can constrain the subsurface rise speed of emerging magnetic flux. The observed flows imply that the rise speed of the magnetic field is no larger than 150 m/s at a depth of 20 Mm, that is, well below the prediction of the (standard) thin flux tube model but in the range expected for convective velocities at this depth. We conclude that convective flows control the dynamics of rising flux tubes in the upper layers of the Sun and cannot be neglected in models of flux emergence. PMID:27453947

  6. A low upper limit on the subsurface rise speed of solar active regions

    PubMed Central

    Birch, Aaron C.; Schunker, Hannah; Braun, Douglas C.; Cameron, Robert; Gizon, Laurent; Löptien, Björn; Rempel, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic field emerges at the surface of the Sun as sunspots and active regions. This process generates a poloidal magnetic field from a rising toroidal flux tube; it is a crucial but poorly understood aspect of the solar dynamo. The emergence of magnetic field is also important because it is a key driver of solar activity. We show that measurements of horizontal flows at the solar surface around emerging active regions, in combination with numerical simulations of solar magnetoconvection, can constrain the subsurface rise speed of emerging magnetic flux. The observed flows imply that the rise speed of the magnetic field is no larger than 150 m/s at a depth of 20 Mm, that is, well below the prediction of the (standard) thin flux tube model but in the range expected for convective velocities at this depth. We conclude that convective flows control the dynamics of rising flux tubes in the upper layers of the Sun and cannot be neglected in models of flux emergence. PMID:27453947

  7. Effect of temperature on leg kinematics in sprinting tarantulas (Aphonopelma hentzi): high speed may limit hydraulic joint actuation

    PubMed Central

    Booster, N. A.; Su, F. Y.; Adolph, S. C.; Ahn, A. N.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tarantulas extend the femur–patella (proximal) and tibia–metatarsal (distal) joints of their legs hydraulically. Because these two hydraulically actuated joints are positioned in series, hemolymph flow within each leg is expected to mechanically couple the movement of the joints. In the current study, we tested two hypotheses: (1) at lower temperatures, movement of the two in-series hydraulic joints within a leg will be less coupled because of increased hemolymph viscosity slowing hemolymph flow; and (2) at higher temperatures, movement of the two in-series hydraulic joints will be less coupled because the higher stride frequencies limit the time available for hemolymph flow. We elicited maximal running speeds at four ecologically relevant temperatures (15, 24, 31 and 40°C) in Texas Brown tarantulas (Aphonopelma hentzi). The spiders increased sprint speed 2.5-fold over the temperature range by changing their stride frequency but not stride length. The coefficient of determination for linear regression (R2) of the proximal and distal joint angles was used as the measure of the degree of coupling between the two joints. This coupling coefficient between the proximal and distal joint angles, for both forelegs and hind­legs, was significantly lowest at the highest temperature at which the animals ran the fastest with the highest stride frequencies. The coordination of multiple, in-series hydraulically actuated joints may be limited by operating speed. PMID:25833132

  8. Effect of temperature on leg kinematics in sprinting tarantulas (Aphonopelma hentzi): high speed may limit hydraulic joint actuation.

    PubMed

    Booster, N A; Su, F Y; Adolph, S C; Ahn, A N

    2015-04-01

    Tarantulas extend the femur-patella (proximal) and tibia-metatarsal (distal) joints of their legs hydraulically. Because these two hydraulically actuated joints are positioned in series, hemolymph flow within each leg is expected to mechanically couple the movement of the joints. In the current study, we tested two hypotheses: (1) at lower temperatures, movement of the two in-series hydraulic joints within a leg will be less coupled because of increased hemolymph viscosity slowing hemolymph flow; and (2) at higher temperatures, movement of the two in-series hydraulic joints will be less coupled because the higher stride frequencies limit the time available for hemolymph flow. We elicited maximal running speeds at four ecologically relevant temperatures (15, 24, 31 and 40°C) in Texas Brown tarantulas (Aphonopelma hentzi). The spiders increased sprint speed 2.5-fold over the temperature range by changing their stride frequency but not stride length. The coefficient of determination for linear regression (R(2)) of the proximal and distal joint angles was used as the measure of the degree of coupling between the two joints. This coupling coefficient between the proximal and distal joint angles, for both forelegs and hind-legs, was significantly lowest at the highest temperature at which the animals ran the fastest with the highest stride frequencies. The coordination of multiple, in-series hydraulically actuated joints may be limited by operating speed. PMID:25833132

  9. Perceptual and Cognitive Factors Imposing "Speed Limits" on Reading Rate: A Study with the Rapid Serial Visual Presentation.

    PubMed

    Primativo, Silvia; Spinelli, Donatella; Zoccolotti, Pierluigi; De Luca, Maria; Martelli, Marialuisa

    2016-01-01

    Adults read at high speed, but estimates of their reading rate vary greatly, i.e., from 100 to 1500 words per minute (wpm). This discrepancy is likely due to different recording methods and to the different perceptual and cognitive processes involved in specific test conditions. The present study investigated the origins of these notable differences in RSVP reading rate (RR). In six experiments we investigated the role of many different perceptual and cognitive variables. The presence of a mask caused a steep decline in reading rate, with an estimated masking cost of about 200 wpm. When the decoding process was isolated, RR approached values of 1200 wpm. When the number of stimuli exceeded the short-term memory span, RR decreased to 800 wpm. The semantic context contributed to reading speed only by a factor of 1.4. Finally, eye movements imposed an upper limit on RR (around 300 wpm). Overall, data indicate a speed limit of 300 wpm, which corresponds to the time needed for eye movement execution, i.e., the most time consuming mechanism. Results reconcile differences in reading rates reported by different laboratories and thus provide suggestions for targeting different components of reading rate. PMID:27088226

  10. Using Variable Speed Limits to Eliminate Wide Moving Jams: a Study Based on Three-Phase Traffic Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yizhi; Zhang, Yi; Hu, Jianming; Li, Li

    2012-09-01

    One frequently observed congested traffic flow pattern is wide moving jam (WMJ), in which the average vehicle speed is very low and the density is very high. In some recent studies, variable speed limits (VSL) were proposed as effective measures to eliminate or abate the influence of jam waves. However, in most of these studies, the stochastic features of driving behaviors and the resulting uncertainty of traffic flow dynamics were not fully considered. In this paper, we use cellular automaton (CA) model-based simulations to test the performances of different VSL control strategies and apply the three-phase traffic theory to further analyze the obtained results. Based on the simulation results, we got two novel findings. Firstly, we observed seven, instead of the previously assumed six, states of traffic flow in the evolution process of WMJ, when VSL were applied. Secondly and more importantly, we found that inappropriate speed limit may induce new WMJ and exaggerate congestions in two ways: one way corresponds to an F → J transition and the other corresponds to an F → S → J transition. Based on these findings, the appropriate lower bound of VSL was finally discussed in this paper.