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Sample records for 6h-sic homoepitaxial layers

  1. Extended defects in 4H-silicon carbide homoepitaxial layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan

    The purpose of this thesis is to study the structure of extended defects in 4H-SIC homoepitaxial layers, and to identify their nucleation mechanisms. Characteristics of basal plane dislocations in 4H-SiC epilayers were investigated in a comprehensive manner, including their morphologies, Burgers' vectors, positions, and correlation with the extended defects propagating from the substrate. Plan-view transmission x-ray topography was the major characterization technique used in this study. Complementary data was obtained by KOH etching and optical microscopy. Trace of glide was detected on every basal plane dislocation in the entire 3-inch epilayer. In the center area of the epi-wafer, the glide can extend to macroscopic distance and form edge-type dislocations at the epilayer/surface interface. During the motion, dislocation half loop arrays were found to nucleate at the growth front. The magnitude of the resolved shear stress was estimated based on the radius of curvature of the dislocation lines. It surpassed the critical resolved shear stress at the epitaxial growth temperature. The stress was identified to be compressive in the epilayer. Its origin was studied. Nitrogen-doping-difference-induced misfit strain was excluded as the source of the stress. The structures of two morphological defects, 'carrots' and 'arrows', were studied. Cross-section x-ray topography was used to image the structure of carrot defect in whole. The defect was found to nucleate at the epilayer/substrate interface on a threading screw dislocation propagating from the substrate. Its structure was mainly composed of a prismatic stacking fault and a Frank-type basal plane stacking fault. The arrow defect was found to be produced by a spheroid shape inclusion in the volume of the epilayer. Zone axis diffraction pattern under transmission electron microscope identified the nature of the inclusion as 3C-SIC. It was determined to nucleate at the substrate surface contaminations.

  2. Atomic force microscopy studies of homoepitaxial GaN layers grown on GaN template by laser MBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, B. S.; Singh, A.; Tanwar, S.; Tyagi, P. K.; Kumar, M. Senthil; Kushvaha, S. S.

    2016-04-01

    We have grown homoepitaxial GaN films on metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) grown 3.5 µm thick GaN on sapphire (0001) substrate (GaN template) using an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) laser assisted molecular beam epitaxy (LMBE) system. The GaN films were grown by laser ablating a polycrystalline solid GaN target in the presence of active r.f. nitrogen plasma. The influence of laser repetition rates (10-30 Hz) on the surface morphology of homoepitaxial GaN layers have been studied using atomic force microscopy. It was found that GaN layer grown at 10 Hz shows a smooth surface with uniform grain size compared to the rough surface with irregular shape grains obtained at 30 Hz. The variation of surface roughness of the homoepitaxial GaN layer with and without wet chemical etching has been also studied and it was observed that the roughness of the film decreased after wet etching due to the curved structure/rough surface.

  3. Characterization of V-shaped defects in 4H-SiC homoepitaxial layers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Lihua; Su, Dong; Kisslinger, Kim; Stach, Eric; Chung, Gil; Zhang, Jie; Thomas, Bernd; Sanchez, Edward K; Mueller, Stephan G.; Hansen, Darren; et al

    2014-12-04

    Synchrotron white beam x-ray topography images show that faint needle-like surface morphological features observed on the Si-face of 4H-SiC homoepitaxial layers using Nomarski optical microscopy are associated with V shaped stacking faults in the epilayer. KOH etching of the V shaped defect reveals small oval pits connected by a shallow line which corresponding to the surface intersections of two partial dislocations and the stacking fault connecting them. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) specimens from regions containing the V shaped defects were prepared using focused ion beam milling, and stacking sequences of (85), (50) and (63) are observed at the faulted regionmore » with high resolution TEM. In order to study the formation mechanism of V shaped defect, low dislocation density 4H-SiC substrates were chosen for epitaxial growth, and the corresponding regions before and after epitaxy growth are compared in SWBXT images. It is found that no defects in the substrate are directly associated with the formation of the V shaped defect. Simulation results of the contrast from the two partial dislocations associated with V shaped defect in synchrotron monochromatic beam x-ray topography reveals the opposite sign nature of their Burgers vectors. Therefore, a mechanism of 2D nucleation during epitaxy growth is postulated for the formation of the V shaped defect, which requires elimination of non-sequential 1/4[0001] bilayers from the original structure to create the observed faulted stacking sequence.« less

  4. Characterization of V-shaped defects in 4H-SiC homoepitaxial layers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lihua; Su, Dong; Kisslinger, Kim; Stach, Eric; Chung, Gil; Zhang, Jie; Thomas, Bernd; Sanchez, Edward K; Mueller, Stephan G.; Hansen, Darren; Loboda, Mark J.; Wu, Fangzhen; Wang, Huanhuan; Raghothamachar, Balaji; Dudley, Michael

    2014-12-04

    Synchrotron white beam x-ray topography images show that faint needle-like surface morphological features observed on the Si-face of 4H-SiC homoepitaxial layers using Nomarski optical microscopy are associated with V shaped stacking faults in the epilayer. KOH etching of the V shaped defect reveals small oval pits connected by a shallow line which corresponding to the surface intersections of two partial dislocations and the stacking fault connecting them. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) specimens from regions containing the V shaped defects were prepared using focused ion beam milling, and stacking sequences of (85), (50) and (63) are observed at the faulted region with high resolution TEM. In order to study the formation mechanism of V shaped defect, low dislocation density 4H-SiC substrates were chosen for epitaxial growth, and the corresponding regions before and after epitaxy growth are compared in SWBXT images. It is found that no defects in the substrate are directly associated with the formation of the V shaped defect. Simulation results of the contrast from the two partial dislocations associated with V shaped defect in synchrotron monochromatic beam x-ray topography reveals the opposite sign nature of their Burgers vectors. Therefore, a mechanism of 2D nucleation during epitaxy growth is postulated for the formation of the V shaped defect, which requires elimination of non-sequential 1/4[0001] bilayers from the original structure to create the observed faulted stacking sequence.

  5. Suppression of Precipitates in the La2-xSrxCuO4 Films Grown on LaSrAlO4 Substrates by Introducing Homoepitaxial Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bing-Sheng; Sawa, Akihito; Okamoto, Hiroshi

    2011-09-01

    We have investigated impacts of a LaSrAlO4 (LSAO) homoepitaxial layer (HL) on the quality of La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO) films grown on single crystal LSAO (001) substrates by pulsed laser deposition. Introduction of the LSAO HL significantly suppressed the segregation of impurity phases in the LSCO films especially in a higher Sr-doping range (x > 0.20), leading to the improvement of the surface morphology. The suppression of impurity phases also enables us to obtain the desired stoichiometry of the LSCO films, which show the superconducting dome in the x-temperature phase diagram very similar to that of bulk samples.

  6. Studies of the Origins of Half-Loop Arrays and Interfacial Dislocations Observed in Homoepitaxial Layers of 4H-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Dudley, M.; Wu, F.; Yang, Y.; Raghothamachar, B.; Zhang, J.; Chung, G.; Thomas, B.; Sanchez, E. K.; Mueller, S. G.; Hansen, D.; Loboda, M. J.

    2015-05-01

    Synchrotron x-ray topography and KOH etching studies have been carried out on n-type 4H-SiC offcut substrates before and after homoepitaxial growth to study defect replication and strain relaxation processes and identify the nucleation sources of both interfacial dislocations (IDs) and half-loop arrays (HLAs), which are known to have a deleterious effect on device performance. Two cases are reported. In one, they nucleate from short segments of edge-oriented basal plane dislocations (BPDs) in the substrate which are drawn into the epilayer. In the other, they form from segments of half-loops of BPD that are attached to the substrate surface prior to growth which glide into the epilayer. The significance of these findings is: (1) It is demonstrated that it is not necessary for a BPD to intersect the substrate surface in order for it to be replicated into the homoepitaxial layer and take part in nucleation of IDs and HLAs; (2) The conversion of the surface intersections of a substrate BPD half-loop into threading edge dislocations (TEDs) does not prevent it from also becoming involved in nucleation of IDs and HLAs. This means that, while BPD to TED conversion can eliminate most of the BPD transfer into the epilayer, further mitigation may only be possible by continued efforts to reduce the BPD density in substrates by control of temperature-gradient- induced stresses during their physical vapor transport (PVT) growth.

  7. Properties of YBCO on LaMnO3-capped IBAD MgO-templates without Homo-epitaxial MgO layer.

    SciTech Connect

    Aytug, Tolga; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Kim, Kyunghoon; Zhang, Yifei; Cantoni, Claudia; Zuev, Yuri L; Goyal, Amit; Thompson, James R; Christen, David K

    2009-01-01

    Previously, it has been well established that in an IBAD architecture for coated conductors, (1) LaMnO3 (LMO) buffer layers are structurally and chemically compatible with an underlying homo-epitaxial MgO layer and (2) high current density YBCO films can be grown on these LMO templates. In the present work, the homo-epi MgO layer has been successfully eliminated and a LMO cap layer was grown directly on the IBAD (MgO) template. The performance of the LMO/IBAD (MgO) samples has been qualified by depositing 1 m-thick YBCO coatings by pulsed laser deposition. Electrical transport measurements of YBCO films on the standard (with homo-epi MgO) and simplified (without homo-epi MgO) IBAD architectures were carried out. The angular dependencies of critical current density (Jc) are similar for both IBAD architectures. XRD measurements indicate good, c-axis aligned YBCO films. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images reveal that microstructures of YBCO/LMO/IBAD (MgO) and YBCO/LMO/homo-epi MgO/IBAD (MgO) templates are similar. These results demonstrate the strong potential of using LMO as a single cap layer directly on IBAD (MgO) for the development of a simplified IBAD architecture.

  8. Hall-effect measurements of metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy-grown p-type homoepitaxial GaN layers with various Mg concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horita, Masahiro; Takashima, Shinya; Tanaka, Ryo; Matsuyama, Hideaki; Ueno, Katsunori; Edo, Masaharu; Suda, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Mg-doped p-type gallium nitride (GaN) layers with doping concentrations in the range from 6.5 × 1016 cm‑3 (lightly doped) to 3.8 × 1019 cm‑3 (heavily doped) were investigated by Hall-effect measurement for the analysis of hole concentration and mobility. p-GaN was homoepitaxially grown on a GaN free-standing substrate by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy. The threading dislocation density of the p-GaN was 4 × 106 cm‑2 measured by cathodoluminescence mapping. Hall-effect measurements of p-GaN were carried out at a temperature in the range from 160 to 450 K. A low compensation ratio of less than 1% was revealed. We also obtained the depth of the Mg acceptor level of 235 meV considering the lowering effect by the Coulomb potential of ionized acceptors. The hole mobilities of 33 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 at 300 K and 72 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 at 200 K were observed in lightly doped p-GaN.

  9. Strain-compensated AlGaN /GaN/InGaN cladding layers in homoepitaxial nitride devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czernecki, R.; Krukowski, S.; Targowski, G.; Prystawko, P.; Sarzynski, M.; Krysko, M.; Kamler, G.; Grzegory, I.; Leszczynski, M.; Porowski, S.

    2007-12-01

    One of the most important problems in III-nitride violet laser diode technology is the lattice mismatch between the AlGaN cladding layers and the rest of the epitaxial structure. For efficiently working devices, it is necessary to have both a high Al content and thick claddings. This leads, however, to severe sample bowing and even cracking of the upper layer. In this work, we propose a cladding structure of strain-compensated AlGaN /GaN/InGaN superlattice grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy on bulk GaN substrates. Various thicknesses and compositions of the layers were employed. We measured the radius of bowing, lattice mismatches, aluminum and indium contents, and densities of threading dislocations. The proposed cladding structures suppress bowing and cracking, which are the two parasitic effects commonly experienced in laser diodes with bulk AlGaN claddings. The suppression of cracking and bowing is shown to occur due to modified strain energy distribution of the superlattices structure.

  10. Molecular Imaging of Ultrathin Pentacene Films: Evidence for Homoepitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yanfei; Haugstad, Greg; Frisbie, C. Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Ultrathin polycrystalline films of organic semiconductors have received intensive investigations due to the critical role they play in governing the performance of organic thin film transistors. In this work, a variety of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques have been employed to investigate ultrathin polycrystalline films (1-3 nm) of the benchmark organic semiconductor pentacene. By using spatially resolved Friction Force Microscopy (FFM), Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (KFM) and Electrostatic Force Microscopy (EFM), an interesting multi-domain structure is revealed within the second layer of the films, characterized as two distinct friction and surface potential domains correlating with each other. The existence of multiple homoepitaxial modes within the films is thus proposed and examined. By employing lattice-revolved imaging using contact mode SPM, direct molecular evidence for the unusual homoepitaxy is obtained.

  11. Homoepitaxial growth of a-plane GaN layers by reaction between Ga2O vapor and NH3 gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumi, Tomoaki; Taniyama, Yuuki; Takatsu, Hiroaki; Juta, Masami; Kitamoto, Akira; Imade, Mamoru; Yoshimura, Masashi; Isemura, Masashi; Mori, Yusuke

    2015-06-01

    Growth of high-quality a-plane GaN layers was performed by reaction between Ga2O vapor and NH3 gas at a high temperature. Smooth a-plane GaN epitaxial layers were obtained on a-plane GaN seed substrates sliced from thick c-plane GaN crystals. Growth rate increased with increasing Ga2O partial pressure. An a-plane GaN layer with a growth rate of 48 µm/h was obtained. The X-ray rocking curve (XRC) measurement showed that the full widths at half maximum (FWHMs) of GaN(11\\bar{2}0) with the incident beam parallel and perpendicular to the [0001] direction were 29-43 and 29-42 arcsec, respectively. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) measurement revealed that oxygen concentration decreased at a high temperature. These results suggest that growth of a-GaN layers using Ga2O vapor and NH3 gas at a high temperature enables the generation of high-quality crystals.

  12. Growth mechanism of ZnO low-temperature homoepitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S. H.; Minegishi, T.; Lee, H. J.; Chang, J. H.; Yao, T.; Oh, D. C.; Ko, H. J.

    2011-09-01

    The authors report on the growth mechanism of ZnO homoepitaxy at the low-temperature range of 500 deg. C, which is unavailable to obtain high-quality ZnO films in heteroepitaxy. One typical set of ZnO films were grown on (0001) ZnO substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy: a standard structure without buffer and two buffered structures with high-temperature (HT) homobuffer and low-temperature (LT) homobuffer. As a result, the LT homobuffered structure had the outstanding material properties: the surface roughness is 0.9 nm, the full width at half maximum of x-ray rocking curve is 13 arcsec, and the emission linewidth of donor-bound excitons is 2.4 meV. In terms of the theoretical interpretation of the experimentally obtained electron mobilities, it was found that the LT homobuffered structure suffers less from the dislocation scattering and the ionized-impurity scattering compared to the HT homobuffered structure. It is proposed that, in the ZnO low-temperature homoepitaxy, the LT homobuffer plays a key role in inducing the complete termination of dislocations in the homointerface and suppressing the outdiffusion of contaminants and point defects on the ZnO surface, which results in the formation of smooth wetting layer on the homointerface.

  13. Critical impact of Ehrlich-Schwöbel barrier on GaN surface morphology during homoepitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Nils. A. K.; Lahourcade, L.; Hourahine, B.; Martin, D.; Grandjean, N.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the impact of kinetics, and in particular the effect of the Ehrlich-Schwöbel barrier (ESB), on the growth and surface morphology of homoepitaxial GaN layers. The presence of an ESB can lead to various self-assembled surface features, which strongly affect the surface roughness. We present an in-depth study of this phenomenon on GaN homoepitaxial layers grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy and molecular beam epitaxy. We show how a proper tuning of the growth parameters allows for the control of the surface morphology, independent of the growth technique.

  14. Lateral Movement of Screw Dislocations During Homoepitaxial Growth and Devices Yielded Therefrom Free of the Detrimental Effects of Screw Dislocations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G. (Inventor); Powell, J. Anthony (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention is related to a method that enables and improves wide bandgap homoepitaxial layers to be grown on axis single crystal substrates, particularly SiC. The lateral positions of the screw dislocations in epitaxial layers are predetermined instead of random, which allows devices to be reproducibly patterned to avoid performance degrading crystal defects normally created by screw dislocations.

  15. Homoepitaxial graphene tunnel barriers for spin transport (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Adam L.

    2015-09-01

    Tunnel barriers are key elements for both charge-and spin-based electronics, offering devices with reduced power consumption and new paradigms for information processing. Such devices require mating dissimilar materials, raising issues of heteroepitaxy, interface stability, and electronic states that severely complicate fabrication and compromise performance. Graphene is the perfect tunnel barrier. It is an insulator out-of-plane, possesses a defect-free, linear habit, and is impervious to interdiffusion. Nonetheless, true tunneling between two stacked graphene layers is not possible in environmental conditions (magnetic field, temperature, etc.) usable for electronics applications. However, two stacked graphene layers can be decoupled using chemical functionalization. Here, we demonstrate homoepitaxial tunnel barrier devices in which graphene serves as both the tunnel barrier and the high mobility transport channel. Beginning with multilayer graphene, we fluorinate or hydrogenate the top layer to decouple it from the bottom layer, so that it serves as a single monolayer tunnel barrier for both charge and spin injection into the lower graphene transport channel. We demonstrate successful tunneling by measuring non-linear IV curves, and a weakly temperature dependent zero bias resistance. We perform lateral transport of spin currents in non-local spin-valve structures and determine spin lifetimes with the non-local Hanle effect to be commensurate with previous studies (~200 ps). However, we also demonstrate the highest spin polarization efficiencies (~45%) yet measured in graphene-based spin devices [1]. [1] A.L. Friedman, et al., Homoepitaxial tunnel barriers with functionalized graphene-on-graphene for charge and spin transport, Nat. Comm. 5, 3161 (2014).

  16. Optical functions of silicon from reflectance and ellipsometry on silicon-on-insulator and homoepitaxial samples

    SciTech Connect

    Humlíček, J.

    2015-11-21

    The optical properties of silicon have been determined from 0.2 to 6.5 eV at room temperature, using reflectance spectra of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) and ellipsometric spectra of homoepitaxial samples. Optimized Fabry-Perot-type SOI resonators exhibit high finesse even in near ultraviolet. Very high precision values of the real part of the refractive index are obtained in infrared up to a photon energy of 1.3 eV. The spectra of the extinction coefficient, based on observations of light attenuation, extend to 3.2 eV due to measurements on SOI layers as thin as 87 nm. These results allowed us to correct spectroellipsometric data on homoepitaxial samples for the presence of reduced and stabilized surface layers.

  17. Homoepitaxial ZnO Film Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, C-H; Lehoczky, S. L.; Harris, M. T.; Callahan, M. J.; McCarty, P.; George, M. A.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    ZnO films have high potential for many applications, such as surface acoustic wave filters, UV detectors, and light emitting devices due to its structural, electrical, and optical properties. High quality epitaxial films are required for these applications. The Al2O3 substrate is commonly used for ZnO heteroepitaxial growth. Recently, high quality ZnO single crystals are available for grow homoepitaxial films. Epitaxial ZnO films were grown on the two polar surfaces (O-face and Zn-face) of (0001) ZnO single crystal substrates using off-axis magnetron sputtering deposition. As a comparison, films were also deposited on (0001) Al2O3 substrates. It was found that the two polar ZnO surfaces have different photoluminescence (PL) spectrum, surface structure and morphology, which strongly influence the epitaxial film growth. The morphology and structure of homoepitaxial films grown on the ZnO substrates were different from heteroepitaxial films grown on the Al2O3. An interesting result shows that high temperature annealing of ZnO single crystals will improve the surface structure on the O-face surface rather than the opposite surface. The measurements of PL, low-angle incident x-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy of ZnO films indicate that the O-terminated surface is better for ZnO epitaxial film growth.

  18. Lattice parameters of AlN bulk, homoepitaxial and heteroepitaxial material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, D.; Janzén, E.; Kakanakova-Georgieva, A.

    2016-05-01

    Homoepitaxial layers of AlN and heteroepitaxial layers of AlN on 4H-SiC substrates were grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition at high temperatures up to 1400 °C, and with various thicknesses. From high resolution x-ray diffraction measurements of a set of homoepitaxial layers of high structural quality, the following mean value of the lattice constants was determined: a  =  3.111 31  ±  0.000 16 Å, and c  =  4.980 79  ±  0.000 11 Å. The structural quality of the heteroepitaxial layers was demonstrated, for example, by extracting the full width at a half maximum of the (0002) and (10–12) rocking curves of 25 arcsec and 372 arcsec, respectively, associated with a crack-free heteroepitaxial layer with a thickness of 1.3 μm grown at 1240 °C. From measuring a set of AlN heteroepitaxial layers, the following value of the biaxial strain relaxation coefficient was determined: R B  =  ‑0.556.

  19. InAs homoepitaxy and InAs/AlSb/GaSb resonant interband tunneling diodes on InAs substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Wei; Wang, Guowei; Hao, Hongyue; Liao, Yongping; Han, Xi; Zhang, Lichun; Xu, Yingqiang; Ren, Zhengwei; Ni, Haiqiao; He, Zhenhong; Niu, Zhichuan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the optimal conditions for growth of homoepitaxial InAs layer on InAs (001) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy were investigated over wide growth temperatures and As/In flux ratios. The oxide remove process is important and both the As/In flux ratio and growth temperature is in narrow range for InAs homoepitaxy. The high quality homoepitaxy has an RMS surface roughness of 0.26 nm measured by atomic force microscopy. High quality lattice matched InAs/AlSb/GaSb/InAs/AlSb/InAs double barrier resonant interband tunneling diodes was grown on InAs (001) substrate on the optimal condition. It shows high peak-valley current ratios of 105 at 77 K and 15 at room temperature.

  20. Influence of substrate surface defects on the homoepitaxial growth of GaN (0001) by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Kun; Liu, Jianping; Ikeda, Masao; Zhang, Shuming; Li, Deyao; Zhang, Liqun; Zeng, Chang; Yang, Hui

    2015-04-01

    Surface morphology of homoepitaxial GaN (0001) grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy was studied. Selective growth was observed on the homoepitaxial GaN layer grown on as-received GaN substrate and was attributed to the existence of substrate surface defects. The steps were pinned by defects and meandered. Due to the pinning effect, the step pattern developed to a wavy surface with a strip-like feature along the [ 11 2 bar 0] direction during the subsequent growth of a thick n-GaN layer. Because of the surface undulations, the emission of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells grown on the n-GaN layer was inhomogeneous. The surface defects on GaN substrate could be removed by dry etching and the homoepitaxial layer on the etched substrate showed a smooth morphology and straight atomic steps. As a result, the emission of the InGaN/GaN MQWs became homogeneous.

  1. Homoepitaxial tunnel barriers with functionalized graphene-on-graphene for charge and spin transport.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Adam L; van 't Erve, Olaf M J; Li, Connie H; Robinson, Jeremy T; Jonker, Berend T

    2014-01-01

    The coupled imperatives for reduced heat dissipation and power consumption in high-density electronics have rekindled interest in devices based on tunnelling. Such devices require mating dissimilar materials, raising issues of heteroepitaxy, layer uniformity, interface stability and electronic states that severely complicate fabrication and compromise performance. Two-dimensional materials such as graphene obviate these issues and offer a new paradigm for tunnel barriers. Here we demonstrate a homoepitaxial tunnel barrier structure in which graphene serves as both the tunnel barrier and the high-mobility transport channel. We fluorinate the top layer of a graphene bilayer to decouple it from the bottom layer, so that it serves as a single-monolayer tunnel barrier for both charge and spin injection into the lower graphene channel. We demonstrate high spin injection efficiency with a tunnelling spin polarization >60%, lateral transport of spin currents in non-local spin-valve structures and determine spin lifetimes with the Hanle effect. PMID:24445349

  2. Ultra-Low-Temperature Homoepitaxial Growth of Sb-Doped Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blacksberg, Jordana; Hoenk, Michael E.; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2005-01-01

    An ultra-low-temperature process for homoepitaxial growth of high-quality, surface-confined, Sb-doped silicon layers is presented. Non-equilibrium growth by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is used to achieve dopant incorporation in excess of 2x10(exp 14) per sq cm in a thin, surface-confined layer. Sb surface segregation larger than expected from theoretical models was observed, in agreement with other experimental works. Furthermore, this work details an entirely low-temperature process (less than 450 degree C) that can be applied to fully processed and aluminum-metallized silicon devices. One application of this process is the formation of a back-surface electrode for back-illuminated high-purity silicon imaging arrays.

  3. Effect of substrate growth temperatures on H diffusion in hydrogenated Si/Si homoepitaxial structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Lin; Lee, J. K.; Wang, Y. Q.; Nastasi, M.; Thompson, Phillip E.; David Theodore, N.; Alford, T. L.; Mayer, J. W.; Chen, Peng; Lau, S. S.

    2006-06-01

    We have investigated hydrogen diffusion in hydrogenated <100> Si/Si homoepitaxial structures, which were grown by molecular beam epitaxy at various temperatures. The substrate growth temperature can significantly affect the H diffusion behavior, with higher growth temperatures resulting in deeper H diffusion. For the Si/Si structure grown at the highest temperature of 800 °C, H trapping occurs at the epitaxial Si/Si substrate interface, which results in the formation of (100) oriented microcracks at the interface. The mechanism of H trapping and the potential application of these findings for the development of a method of transferring ultrathin Si layers are discussed.

  4. Homoepitaxial graphene tunnel barriers for spin transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Adam

    Tunnel barriers are key elements for both charge-and spin-based electronics, offering devices with reduced power consumption and new paradigms for information processing. Such devices require mating dissimilar materials, raising issues of heteroepitaxy, interface stability, and electronic states that severely complicate fabrication and compromise performance. Graphene is the perfect tunnel barrier. It is an insulator out-of-plane, possesses a defect-free, linear habit, and is impervious to interdiffusion. Nonetheless, true tunneling between two stacked graphene layers is not possible in environmental conditions (magnetic field, temperature, etc.) usable for electronics applications. However, two stacked graphene layers can be decoupled using chemical functionalization. We demonstrate successful tunneling, charge, and spin transport with a fluorinated graphene tunnel barrier on a graphene channel. We show that while spin transport stops short of room temperature, spin polarization efficiency values are the highest of any graphene spin devices. We also demonstrate that hydrogenation of graphene can also be used to create a tunnel barrier. We begin with a four-layer stack of graphene and hydrogenate the top few layers to decouple them from the graphene transport channel beneath. We demonstrate successful tunneling by measuring non-linear IV curves and a weakly temperature dependent zero-bias resistance. We demonstrate lateral transport of spin currents in non-local spin-valve structures and determine spin lifetimes with the non-local Hanle effect to be commensurate with previous studies. The measured spin polarization efficiencies for hydrogenated graphene are higher than most oxide tunnel barriers on graphene, but not as high as with fluorinated graphene tunnel barriers. However, here we show that spin transport persists up to room temperature. Our results for the hydrogenated graphene tunnel barriers are compared with fluorinated tunnel barriers and we discuss the

  5. In Operando GISAXS Studies of Mound Coarsening in Electrochemical Homoepitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruge, Martin; Golks, Frederik; Zegenhagen, Jörg; Magnussen, Olaf M.; Stettner, Jochim

    2014-02-01

    Kinetic roughening during electrodeposition was studied by grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering for the case of Au(001) homoepitaxial growth in Cl- containing electrolytes. The formation and coarsening of an isotropic mound distribution on unreconstructed Au(001) and of [110]-oriented anisotropic mounds on the "hex" reconstructed surface was observed. The lateral mound coarsening is described by a well-defined scaling law. On unreconstructed Au a transition in the coarsening exponent from ≈1/4 to ≈1/3 with increasing potential is found, which can be explained by the pronounced potential dependence of surface transport processes in an electrochemical environment.

  6. In operando GISAXS studies of mound coarsening in electrochemical homoepitaxy.

    PubMed

    Ruge, Martin; Golks, Frederik; Zegenhagen, Jörg; Magnussen, Olaf M; Stettner, Jochim

    2014-02-01

    Kinetic roughening during electrodeposition was studied by grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering for the case of Au(001) homoepitaxial growth in Cl- containing electrolytes. The formation and coarsening of an isotropic mound distribution on unreconstructed Au(001) and of [110]-oriented anisotropic mounds on the "hex" reconstructed surface was observed. The lateral mound coarsening is described by a well-defined scaling law. On unreconstructed Au a transition in the coarsening exponent from ≈1/4 to ≈1/3 with increasing potential is found, which can be explained by the pronounced potential dependence of surface transport processes in an electrochemical environment. PMID:24580610

  7. Homoepitaxial graphene tunnel barriers for spin transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Adam L.; van't Erve, Olaf M. J.; Robinson, Jeremy T.; Whitener, Keith E.; Jonker, Berend T.

    2016-05-01

    Tunnel barriers are key elements for both charge-and spin-based electronics, offering devices with reduced power consumption and new paradigms for information processing. Such devices require mating dissimilar materials, raising issues of heteroepitaxy, interface stability, and electronic states that severely complicate fabrication and compromise performance. Graphene is the perfect tunnel barrier. It is an insulator out-of-plane, possesses a defect-free, linear habit, and is impervious to interdiffusion. Nonetheless, true tunneling between two stacked graphene layers is not possible in environmental conditions usable for electronics applications. However, two stacked graphene layers can be decoupled using chemical functionalization. Here, we demonstrate that hydrogenation or fluorination of graphene can be used to create a tunnel barrier. We demonstrate successful tunneling by measuring non-linear IV curves and a weakly temperature dependent zero-bias resistance. We demonstrate lateral transport of spin currents in non-local spin-valve structures, and determine spin lifetimes with the non-local Hanle effect. We compare the results for hydrogenated and fluorinated tunnel and we discuss the possibility that ferromagnetic moments in the hydrogenated graphene tunnel barrier affect the spin transport of our devices.

  8. Process for the homoepitaxial growth of single-crystal silicon carbide films on silicon carbide wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. Anthony (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The invention is a method for growing homoepitaxial films of SiC on low tilt angle vicinal (0001) SiC wafers. The invention proposes and teaches a new theoretical model for the homoepitaxial growth of SiC films on (0001) SiC substrates. The inventive method consists of preparing the growth surface of SiC wafers slightly off-axis (from less the 0.1 to 6 deg) from the (0001) plane, subjecting the growth surface to a suitable etch, and then growing the homoepitaxial film using conventional SiC growth techniques.

  9. Experimental verification of the model by Klapper for 4H-SiC homoepitaxy on vicinal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallinger, Birgit; Polster, Sebastian; Berwian, Patrick; Friedrich, Jochen; Danilewsky, Andreas N.

    2013-11-01

    4H-SiC homoepitaxial layers free of basal plane dislocations (BPDs) are urgently needed to overcome the so-called bipolar degradation of high-voltage devices. BPDs being present in substrates are able to either propagate to the epilayer or convert to harmless threading edge dislocations (TEDs) in the epilayer. The model by Klapper predicts the conversion of BPDs to TEDs to be more efficient for growth on vicinal substrates with low off-cut angle. This paper aims to verify the model by Klapper by an extensive variation of epitaxial growth parameters and the substrates' off-cut. It is shown that the off-cut angle is the key parameter for growth of BPD-free epilayers. Furthermore, it is shown that the model also describes adequately the behavior of different types of TEDs, i.e., TED II and TED III dislocations, during epitaxial growth. Therefore, the model by Klapper is verified successfully for 4H-SiC homoepitaxial growth on vicinal substrates.

  10. GaN substrate and GaN homo-epitaxy for LEDs: Progress and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jie-Jun; Wang, Kun; Yu, Tong-Jun; Zhang, Guo-Yi

    2015-06-01

    After a brief review on the progresses in GaN substrates by ammonothermal method and Na-flux method and hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) technology, our research results of growing GaN thick layer by a gas flow-modulated HVPE, removing the GaN layer through an efficient self-separation process from sapphire substrate, and modifying the uniformity of multiple wafer growth are presented. The effects of surface morphology and defect behaviors on the GaN homo-epitaxial growth on free standing substrate are also discussed, and followed by the advances of LEDs on GaN substrates and prospects of their applications in solid state lighting. Project supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2014AA032605), the National Key Basic Research and Development Program of China (Grant Nos. 2012CB619304 and 2011CB301904), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61376012, 61474003, and 61327801).

  11. Cathodoluminescence measurements on heavily boron doped homoepitaxial diamond films and their interfaces with their Ib substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, C.; Deneuville, A.; Wade, M.; Jomard, F.; Chevallier, J.

    2006-02-01

    Heavily boron doped 1.8 to 2.4 μm thick homoepitaxial diamond films with 1.5 × 1021 cm-3 [B] 1.75 × 1021 cm-3 have been deposited directly on their (100) Ib substrates at 830 °C. Their cathodoluminescence spectra probe the controlled thicknesses from 0.28 to 2.8 μm, therefore the bulk of the films as well as their interfaces with their substrates. The bulk of these films exhibit a band with shoulders ascribed to BETO (5.036 eV), FETO (5.094 eV) and BENP (5.184 eV) excitons whose energies are downward shifted by about 180 meV in comparison with monocrystalline diamond with low [B] < 5 × 1018 cm-3. This large shift allows the appearance of narrow peaks around 5.216, 5.271 and 5.357 eV ascribed to BETO, FETO and BENP from interfacial layers with low [B]. From their BETO to FETO ratio, their concentration of boron on isolated substitutional sites is significantly lower than their total low [B] content measured by SIMS. A tentative model is proposed to explain the characteristics of these 40 to 160 quasihomogeneous interfacial layers.

  12. Evolution of Mound Morphology in Reversible Homoepitaxy on Cu(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, J.; Wendelken, J.

    1997-04-01

    Evolution of mound morphology in reversible homoepitaxy on Cu(100) was studied via spot-profile-analysis (SPA) LEED and scanning tunneling microscopy. The mound separation shows coarsening vs growth time with L(t){approximately}t{sup 1/4}, in support of theory based on capillarity between mounds. The growth ultimately reaches a steady state characterized by a selected mound angle of {approximately}5.6{degree}. We suggest that this results from a downhill current driven by step edge line tension in balance with an uphill current due to the Schwoebel barrier effect. Also, we have clarified the interpretation for the evolution of the SPA-LEED profile from a ring structure to a single time-invariant peak. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Growth of Homoepitaxial ZnO Semiconducting Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, C.-H.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Harris, M. T.; George, M. A.; McCarty, P.

    1999-01-01

    As a high temperature wide-band-gap (3.3 eV at room temperature) semiconductor, ZnO has been used for many applications such as wave-guides, solar cells, and surface acoustic wave devices, Since ZnO has a 60 meV excitonic binding energy that makes it possible to produce excitonic lasing at room temperature, a recent surge of interest is to synthesize ZnO films for UV/blue/green laser diodes. These applications require films with a smooth surface, good crystal quality, and low defect density. Thus, homoepitaxial film growth is the best choice. Homoepitaxial films have been studied in terms of morphology, crystal structure, and electrical and optical properties. ZnO single crystal substrates grown by the hydrothermal method are mechanically polished and annealed in air for four hours before the films are deposited. The annealing temperature-dependence on ZnO substrate morphology and electrical properties is investigated. Films are synthesized by off-axis reactive sputtering deposition. This produces films that have very smooth surfaces with roughness less than or equal to 5 nm on a 5 microns x 5 microns area. The full width at half maximum of film theta rocking curves measured by the x-ray diffraction is slightly larger than that of the crystal substrate. Films are also characterized by measuring resistivity, optical transmittance, and photoluminescence. The properties of ZnO films grown on (0001) ZnO and (0001) sapphire substrates will also be compared and discussed.

  14. Self-organized homo-epitaxial growth of (001) vanadium assisted by oxygen surface reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrieu, S.; Turban, P.; Kierren, B.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper the effect of oxygen on the vanadium homoepitaxial growth process is analyzed by using Auger spectroscopy, electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy. As the oxygen induced 1 × 5 surface structure got a lattice spacing 6% different from the pure V lattice, relaxation is observed by electron diffraction during the growth. The average in-plane lattice spacing is thus shown to be proportional to the oxygen surface concentration. The surface lattice relaxation is observed to exponentially vary with the number of deposited atomic planes. A kinetic model is proposed and allows us to explain these observations. Furthermore, it helps us to distinguish two regimes depending on growth temperature. At high temperature, the oxygen surface concentration during growth is due to oxygen upward diffusion from the underneath V layer. For lower temperature however, this upward diffusion is not efficient and another source of oxygen contamination is evidenced. When the oxygen surface concentration is sufficient, a spectacular self-organization is observed at the surface by surface microscopy. Ribbons shape islands are observed and are tentatively explained as a consequence of oxygen surface concentration and stress induced by the surface reconstruction.

  15. Homoepitaxial Boron Doped Diamond Anvils as Heating Elements in a Diamond Anvil Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Jeffrey; Samudrala, Gopi; Smith, Spencer; Tsoi, Georgiy; Vohra, Yogesh; Weir, Samuel

    2013-03-01

    Recent advances in designer-diamond technology have allowed for the use of electrically and thermally conducting homoepitaxially-grown layers of boron-doped diamond (grown at 1200 °C with a 2% mixture of CH4 in H, resulting in extremely high doping levels ~ 1020/cm3) to be used as heating elements in a diamond anvil cell (DAC). These diamonds allow for precise control of the temperature inside of the diamond anvil itself, particularly when coupled with a cryostat. Furthermore, the unmatched thermally conducting nature of diamond ensures that no significant lateral gradient in temperature occurs across the culet area. Since a thermocouple can easily be attached anywhere on the diamond surface, we can also measure diamond temperatures directly. With two such heaters, one can raise sample temperatures uniformly, or with any desired gradient along the pressure axis while preserving optical access. In our continuing set of benchmark experiments, we use two newly created matching heater anvils with 500 μm culets to analyze the various fluorescence emission lines of ruby microspheres, which show more complicated behavior than traditional ruby chips. We also report on the temperature dependence of the high-pressure Raman modes of paracetamol (C8H9NO2) up to 20 GPa.

  16. Interface control by homoepitaxial growth in pulsed laser deposited iron chalcogenide thin films

    PubMed Central

    Molatta, Sebastian; Haindl, Silvia; Trommler, Sascha; Schulze, Michael; Wurmehl, Sabine; Hühne, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Thin film growth of iron chalcogenides by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is still a delicate issue in terms of simultaneous control of stoichiometry, texture, substrate/film interface properties, and superconducting properties. The high volatility of the constituents sharply limits optimal deposition temperatures to a narrow window and mainly challenges reproducibility for vacuum based methods. In this work we demonstrate the beneficial introduction of a semiconducting FeSe1−xTex seed layer for subsequent homoepitaxial growth of superconducting FeSe1−xTex thin film on MgO substrates. MgO is one of the most favorable substrates used in superconducting thin film applications, but the controlled growth of iron chalcogenide thin films on MgO has not yet been optimized and is the least understood. The large mismatch between the lattice constants of MgO and FeSe1−xTex of about 11% results in thin films with a mixed texture, that prevents further accurate investigations of a correlation between structural and electrical properties of FeSe1−xTex. Here we present an effective way to significantly improve epitaxial growth of superconducting FeSe1−xTex thin films with reproducible high critical temperatures (≥17 K) at reduced deposition temperatures (200 °C–320 °C) on MgO using PLD. This offers a broad scope of various applications. PMID:26548645

  17. Growth of Homoepitaxial ZnO Semiconducting Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Harris, M. T.; George, Michael A.; McCarty, P.

    1999-01-01

    As a high temperature semiconductor, ZnO has been used for many applications such as wave-guide, solar cells, and surface acoustic wave devices. Since the ZnO material has an energy gap of 3.3 eV at room temperature and an excitonic binding energy (60 meV) that is possible to make excitonic lasering at room temperature a recent surge of interest is to synthesize ZnO films for electro-optical devices. These applications require films with a smooth surface, good crystal quality, and low defect density. Homoepitaxial films have been studied in terms of morphology, crystal structure, and electrical and optical properties. ZnO single crystals are grown by the hydrothermal method. Substrates are mechanically polished and annealed in air for four hours before deposited films. The annealing temperature-dependence of ZnO substrates is studied. Films are synthesized by the off-axis reactive sputtering deposition. The films have very smooth surface with a roughness

  18. Chloride-based fast homoepitaxial growth of 4H-SiC films in a vertical hot-wall CVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guoguo, Yan; Feng, Zhang; Yingxi, Niu; Fei, Yang; Xingfang, Liu; Lei, Wang; Wanshun, Zhao; Guosheng, Sun; Yiping, Zeng

    2016-06-01

    Chloride-based fast homoepitaxial growth of 4H-SiC epilayers was performed on 4° off-axis 4H-SiC substrates in a home-made vertical hot-wall chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system using H2‑SiH4‑C2H4‑HCl. The effect of the SiH4/H2 ratio and reactor pressure on the growth rate of 4H-SiC epilayers has been studied successively. The growth rate increase in proportion to the SiH4/H2 ratio and the influence mechanism of chlorine has been investigated. With the reactor pressure increasing from 40 to 100 Torr, the growth rate increased to 52 μm/hand then decreased to 47 μm/h, which is due to the joint effect of H2 and HCl etching as well as the formation of Si clusters at higher reactor pressure. The surface root mean square (RMS) roughness keeps around 1 nm with the growth rate increasing to 49 μm/h. The scanning electron microscope (SEM), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) demonstrate that 96.7 μm thick 4H-SiC layers of good uniformity in thickness and doping with high crystal quality can be achieved. These results prove that chloride-based fast epitaxy is an advanced growth technique for 4H-SiC homoepitaxy. Project supported by the National High Technology R&D Program of China (No. 2014AA041402), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61474113, 61274007, 61574140), the Beijing Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 4132076, 4132074), the Program of State Grid Smart Grid Research Institute (No. SGRI-WD-71-14-004), and the Youth Innovation Promotion Association of CAS.

  19. Tuning thermal conductivity in homoepitaxial SrTiO{sub 3} films via defects

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Charles M.; Wilson, Richard B.; Cahill, David G.; Schäfer, Anna; Schubert, Jürgen; Mundy, Julia A.; Holtz, Megan E.; Muller, David A.; Schlom, Darrell G.

    2015-08-03

    We demonstrate the ability to tune the thermal conductivity of homoepitaxial SrTiO{sub 3} films deposited by reactive molecular-beam epitaxy by varying growth temperature, oxidation environment, and cation stoichiometry. Both point defects and planar defects decrease the longitudinal thermal conductivity (k{sub 33}), with the greatest decrease in films of the same composition observed for films containing planar defects oriented perpendicular to the direction of heat flow. The longitudinal thermal conductivity can be modified by as much as 80%—from 11.5 W m{sup −1}K{sup −1} for stoichiometric homoepitaxial SrTiO{sub 3} to 2 W m{sup −1}K{sup −1} for strontium-rich homoepitaxial Sr{sub 1+δ}TiO{sub x} films—by incorporating (SrO){sub 2} Ruddlesden-Popper planar defects.

  20. Electrical mechanisms for carrier compensation in homoepitaxial nonpolar m-ZnO doped with nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, A.; Hierro, A.; Lopez-Ponce, M.; Tabares, G.; Chauveau, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    By combining photoluminescence, capacitance-voltage profiling and deep level optical spectroscopy, the optical and electrical signatures of the deep levels induced by N in MBE-grown homoepitaxial m-ZnO layers are identified and correlated to different physical origins. The films are electrically compensated, with carrier concentrations that decrease from ˜1 · 1016 cm-3 to ˜2 · 1015 cm-3 as a result of increasing N incorporation. Regardless of the presence of N, an intrinsic trap is found in all films at EV + 0.25 eV, most likely related to VZn defects. More interestingly, N induces three new deep levels close to the valence band whose bandgap position is electrically observed to be at EV + 0.48 eV, EV + 0.17 eV and EV + 0.12 eV. The deepest trap at EV + 0.48 eV correlates well with a N-induced level observed in previous studies on both ZnMgO and ZnO films. The EV + 0.17 eV trap behaves as a minority (hole) carrier trap, and can be uniquely correlated with the acceptor level involved in the N-induced DAP emission observed in the photoluminescence spectra. Finally, the shallowest level at EV + 0.12 eV shows an electrical signature completely distinguishable from the EV + 0.17 eV level, and dominates the deep level spectra after N-incorporation with a trap concentration of ˜1.2 · 1015 cm-3.

  1. Homoepitaxial branching: an unusual polymorph of zinc oxide derived from seeded solution growth.

    PubMed

    Kozhummal, Rajeevan; Yang, Yang; Güder, Firat; Hartel, Andreas; Lu, Xiaoli; Küçükbayrak, Umut M; Mateo-Alonso, Aurelio; Elwenspoek, Miko; Zacharias, Margit

    2012-08-28

    The development of hydrothermal synthesis has greatly promoted bottom-up nanoscience for the rational growth of diverse zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures. In comparison with normal ZnO nanowires, ZnO nanostructures with a larger surface area, for instance, branched nanowires, are more attractive in the application fields of catalysis, sensing, dye-sensitized solar cells etc. So far the ZnO branched nanowires achieved by either one-step or multistep growth always present a boundary-governed nonepitaxial branch/stem interface. In this report, seeded growth of single-crystalline ZnO hexabranched nanostructures was achieved by selecting polyethylene glycol (PEG) as capping agent based on a low-temperature, laterally epitaxial solution growth strategy. We investigated the generality of this PEG-assisted growth process using different ZnO seed layers including continuous film, patterned dots, and vertically aligned nanowire arrays. It was revealed that PEG is a distinctive c-direction inhibitor responsible for the lateral growth and subsequent branching of ZnO due to its nonionic and nonacidic feature and weak reactivity in the solution system. All the obtained branched nanostructures are of single crystallinity in nature, which is methodologically determined by the homoepitaxial growth mode. This PEG-assisted process is versatile for diameter tuning and branch formation of ZnO nanowires by secondary growth. Our proof-of-concept experiments demonstrated that the ZnO hexabranched nanostructures presented superior photocatalytic efficiency for dye degradation relative to the normal ZnO nanowires. PMID:22849328

  2. Homoepitaxial SrTiO3(111) Film with High Dielectric Performance and Atomically Well-Defined Surface

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yan; Li, Wentao; Zhang, Shuyuan; Lin, Chaojing; Li, Chao; Yao, Yuan; Li, Yongqing; Yang, Hao; Guo, Jiandong

    2015-01-01

    The six-fold symmetry possessed by the (111) surfaces of perovskite oxides allows the epitaxial growth of novel quantum materials such as topological insulators. The dielectric SrTiO3(111) thin film is an ideal buffer layer, providing the readily tunability of charge density in gate-controlled structures. But the high-quality film growth is challenging due to its strong surface polarity as well as the difficulty of obtaining the chemical stoichiometry. Here we show that the layer-by-layer growth of homoepitaxial SrTiO3(111) thin films can be achieved in molecular beam epitaxy method by keeping the growing surface reconstructed. And the cation stoichiometry is optimized precisely with the reflective high energy electron diffraction as the feedback signal that changes sensitively to the variation of metal concentration during growth. With atomically well-defined surfaces, the SrTiO3(111) films show high dielectric performance with the charge density modulated in the range of 2 × 1013/cm2 with the back gate voltage lower than 0.2 V. Methods of further broadening the range are also discussed. PMID:26073468

  3. Microscopic mechanism of the homoepitaxy on Si (111 )7 ×7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Wataru; Sato, Tomoshige; Tochihara, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Very initial stages of the homoepitaxy on the Si (111 )7 ×7 surface are studied at 310, 356, and 366° by in situ continuous observation using high-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (HTSTM) at the atomic scale during Si deposition under a slow rate of 0.02 bilayer (BL ) min-1 . The substrate surface is reconstructed to the well-established dimer-adatom-stacking fault (DAS) structure with the 7 ×7 unit cell consisting of two triangular half unit cells (HUCs): a stacking faulted (F)-HUC and a normally stacked one. It is expected that the complex, large unit cell compels the initial homoepitaxy to proceed in a quite different manner from that on unreconstructed surfaces. Formation and growth of various adsorbed clusters are pursued by the continuous observation of the same narrow areas during the deposition, avoiding the tip-shadow effect. The most anomalous finding is a quasiliquid cluster (QLC) spreading to plural HUCs (spread QLC) on the 7 ×7 DAS substrate. This appears as a result of the difficulty of the F-HUC to be transformed into the normally stacked BL, being essential for the homoepitaxy. After the transformation, the spread QLC undergoes the following structural changes with an increase of the Si deposition: crystallization to a small epitaxial BL → surface reconstruction to the DAS structure. Validity and reasons of the transitional formation of the spread QLC are discussed. The spread QLC mediated homoepitaxy mechanism is concluded and is a new mode in the crystal growth. Real in situ HTSTM observations of the same areas on the nanoscale during Si deposition are indispensable to explore for the dynamic atomistic mechanism of the homoepitaxial growth on the Si (111 )7 ×7 .

  4. Depth-resolved cathodoluminescence of a homoepitaxial AlN thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, E.; Freitas, J. A.; Slack, G. A.; Schowalter, L. J.; Kneissl, M.; Treat, D. W.; Johnson, N. M.

    2005-07-01

    In the present work we will report on the optical properties of an AlN film homoepitaxially grown on a high-quality large bulk AlN single crystal. The latter was grown by a sublimation-recondensation technique, while the film was grown by organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy. Cathodoluminescence measurements were performed using electron beam energies between 2 and 10 keV in order to excite the sample and so to probe different sample depths, making it possible to differentiate between different features which originate in the AlN homoepitaxial film. The penetration depth has been determined through the calculation of the Bohr-Bethe maximum range of excitation using the approximation to the Everhart-Hoff expression for the energy loss within a solid.

  5. Homoepitaxial growth of β-Ga2O3 thin films by low pressure chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafique, Subrina; Han, Lu; Tadjer, Marko J.; Freitas, Jaime A.; Mahadik, Nadeemullah A.; Zhao, Hongping

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the homoepitaxial growth of phase pure (010) β-Ga2O3 thin films on (010) β-Ga2O3 substrate by low pressure chemical vapor deposition. The effects of growth temperature on the surface morphology and crystal quality of the thin films were systematically investigated. The thin films were synthesized using high purity metallic gallium (Ga) and oxygen (O2) as precursors for gallium and oxygen, respectively. The surface morphology and structural properties of the thin films were characterized by atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Material characterization indicates the growth temperature played an important role in controlling both surface morphology and crystal quality of the β-Ga2O3 thin films. The smallest root-mean-square surface roughness of ˜7 nm was for thin films grown at a temperature of 950 °C, whereas the highest growth rate (˜1.3 μm/h) with a fixed oxygen flow rate was obtained for the epitaxial layers grown at 850 °C.

  6. High-quality and high-purity homoepitaxial diamond (100) film growth under high oxygen concentration condition

    SciTech Connect

    Teraji, Tokuyuki

    2015-09-21

    Defect formation during diamond homoepitaxial growth was sufficiently inhibited by adding oxygen simultaneously in the growth ambient with high concentration of 2%. A 30-μm thick diamond films with surface roughness of <2 nm were homoepitaxially deposited on the (100) diamond single crystal substrates with reasonable growth rate of approximately 3 μm h{sup −1} under the conditions of higher methane concentration of 10%, higher substrate temperature of ∼1000 °C, and higher microwave power density condition of >100 W cm{sup −3}. Surface characteristic patterns moved to an identical direction with growth thickness, indicating that lateral growth was dominant growth mode. High chemical purity represented by low nitrogen concentration of less than 1 ppb and the highest {sup 12}C isotopic ratio of 99.998% of the obtained homoepitaxial diamond (100) films suggest that the proposed growth condition has high ability of impurity control.

  7. Homoepitaxy of ZnO and MgZnO Films at 90 °C

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrentraut, Dirk; Goh, Gregory K.L.; Fujii, Katsushi; Ooi, Chin Chun; Quang, Le Hong; Fukuda, Tsuguo; Kano, Masataka; Zhang, Yuantao; Matsuoka, Takashi

    2014-06-01

    The aqueous synthesis of uniform single crystalline homoepitaxial zinc oxide, ZnO, and magnesium zinc oxide, Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}O, films under very low temperature conditions at T=90 °C and ambient pressure has been explored. A maximum Mg content of 1 mol% was recorded by energy dispersive spectroscopy. The growth on the polar (0 0 0 1) and (0 0 0 1¯) faces resulted in films that are strongly different in their structural and optical quality as evidenced by high-resolution X-ray diffraction, secondary electron microscopy, and photoluminescence. This is a result of the chemistry and temperature of the solution dictating the stability range of growth-governing metastable species. The use of trisodium citrate, Na{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O{sub 7}, yielded coalesced, mirror-like homoepitaxial films whereas adding magnesium nitrate hexahydrate, Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O, favors the growth of films with pronounced faceting. - Graphical abstract: Homoepitaxial ZnO films grown from aqueous solution below boiling point of water on a ZnO substrate with off-orientation reveal parallel grooves that are characterized by (1 0 1{sup ¯} 1) facets. Adding trisodium citrate yields closed, single-crystalline ZnO films, which can further be functionalized. Alloying with MgO yields MgZnO films with low Mg content only. - Highlights: • A simple method to synthesize uniform single crystalline homoepitaxial ZnO and MgZnO films. • ZnO growth on (0 0 0 1) and (0 0 0 1{sup ¯}) face resulted in films that are strongly different in their structural and optical quality. • Single crystalline MgZnO film was fabricated under mild conditions (90 °C and ambient pressure). • Mg incorporation of nearly 1 mol% was obtained while maintaining single phase wurtzite structure.

  8. Homoepitaxial meso- and microscale crystal co-orientation and organic matrix network structure in Mytilus edulis nacre and calcite.

    PubMed

    Griesshaber, Erika; Schmahl, Wolfgang W; Ubhi, Harbinder Singh; Huber, Julia; Nindiyasari, Fitriana; Maier, Bernd; Ziegler, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    New developments in high-resolution, low accelaration voltage electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) enable us to resolve and quantify the co-orientation of nanocrystals constituting biological carbonate crystals with a scan step resolution of 125 nm. This allows the investigation of internal structures in carbonate tablets and tower biocrystals in the nacre of mollusc shells, and it provides details on the calcite-aragonite polymorph interface in bivalves. Within the aragonite tablets of Mytilus edulis nacre we find a mesoscale crystallographic mosaic structure with a misorientation distribution of 2° full width at half maximum. Selective etching techniques with critical point drying reveal an organic matrix network inside the nacre tablets. The size scales of the visible aragonite tablet subunits and nanoparticles correspond to those of the open pore system in the organic matrix network. We further observe by EBSD that crystal co-orientation spans over tablet boundaries and forms composite crystal units of up to 20 stacked co-oriented tablets (tower crystals). Statistical evaluation of the misorientation data gives a probability distribution of grain boundary misorientations with two maxima: a dominant peak for very-small-angle grain boundaries and a small maximum near 64°, the latter corresponding to {110} twinning orientations. However, the related twin boundaries are typically the membrane-lined {001} flat faces of the tablets and not {110} twin walls within tablets. We attribute this specific pattern of misorientation distribution to growth by particle accretion and subsequent semicoherent homoepitaxial crystallization. The semicoherent crystallization percolates between the tablets through mineral bridges and across matrix membranes surrounding the tablets. In the "prismatic" calcite layer crystallographic co-orientation of the prisms reaches over more than 50 micrometers. PMID:23896564

  9. Effect of substrate orientation on CdS homoepitaxy by molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, S.; Chavez, J. J.; Zhou, X. W.; Zubia, D.

    2016-05-01

    CdS homoepitaxy growth was performed by molecular dynamics using different substrate orientations and structures in order to analyze the CdS crystallinity. As anticipated from thermodynamics of homoepitaxy, highly crystalline films with only point defects were obtained on substrates with rectangular surface geometries, including [ 11 2 bar ] zinc blende (ZB), [ 10 1 bar 0 ] wurtzite (WZ), [ 11 2 bar 0 ] WZ, [ 110 ] ZB, [ 010 ] ZB, and [1/10 1 1/10 ] ZB. In contrast, films grown on substrates with hexagonal surface geometries, corresponding to the [ 0001 ] WZ and [ 111 ] ZB growth directions, showed structures with a large number of defects including; anti-sites, vacancies, stacking faults, twinning, and polytypism. WZ and ZB transitions and grain boundaries are identified using a lattice identification algorithm and represented graphically in a structural map. A dislocation analysis was performed to detect, identify, and quantify linear defects within the atomistic data. Systematic simulations using different temperatures, deposition rates, and substrate polarities were perform to analyze the trends of dislocation densities on [ 0001 ] WZ direction and showed persistent polytypism. The polytypism observed in the films grown on the substrates with hexagonal surface geometry is attributed to the similar formation energies of the WZ and ZB phases.

  10. Effect of substrate orientation on CdS homoepitaxy by molecular dynamics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Almeida, S.; Chavez, J. J.; Zhou, X. W.; Zubia, D.

    2016-02-10

    CdS homoepitaxy growth was performed by molecular dynamics using different substrate orientations and structures in order to analyze the CdS crystallinity. As anticipated from thermodynamics of homoepitaxy, highly crystalline films with only point defects were obtained on substrates with rectangular surface geometries, including View the MathML source[112¯] zinc blende (ZB), [101¯0] wurtzite (WZ), [112¯0] WZ, [110][110] ZB, [010][010] ZB, and View the MathML source[1101110] ZB. In contrast, films grown on substrates with hexagonal surface geometries, corresponding to the [0001][0001] WZ and [111][111] ZB growth directions, showed structures with a large number of defects including; anti-sites, vacancies, stacking faults, twinning, andmore » polytypism. WZ and ZB transitions and grain boundaries are identified using a lattice identification algorithm and represented graphically in a structural map. A dislocation analysis was performed to detect, identify, and quantify linear defects within the atomistic data. Systematic simulations using different temperatures, deposition rates, and substrate polarities were perform to analyze the trends of dislocation densities on [0001][0001] WZ direction and showed persistent polytypism. As a result, the polytypism observed in the films grown on the substrates with hexagonal surface geometry is attributed to the similar formation energies of the WZ and ZB phases.« less

  11. In situ growth and density-functional-theory study of polarity-dependent homo-epitaxial ZnO microwires

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Rui; Xu, Jun; Gao, Jingyun; Zhang, Jingmin; Zhu, Wenguang; Xu, Hongjun; Sun, Yanghui; Fu, Qiang; Chen, Li; Du, Dapeng

    2012-01-01

    Polarity-dependent homo-epitaxy on (0001)-Zn and (0001)-O surfaces of cleaved ZnO microwires was investigated by in situ growth in ESEMand DFT simulations. ZnO monomers adsorption, adatoms desorption and chemisorption were simulated to understand the explicit mechanism.

  12. Homo-epitaxial growth of CdTe by sublimation under low pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Yasushi; Yoda, Hiroki; Kasuga, Masanobu

    1991-12-01

    A new method to obtain a twin-free single crystal of CdTe on a CdTe substrate by sublimation is described. When CdTe(111)A substrates were employed for the homo-epitaxial growth of CdTe, twin crystals were frequently obtained. The substrate of CdTe(211)A and (211)B, however, gave no twins resulting in single crystals of high quality. The difference may come from the existence of many steps, sufficient to suppress two-dimensional nucleation and to promote step flow mechanism. To obtain twin-free films, therefore, a fairly large tilt angle of the substrate from a singular plane and a fairly low supersaturation are essential.

  13. Thick homoepitaxial (110)-oriented phosphorus-doped n-type diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramaniam, Y.; Pobedinskas, P.; Janssens, S. D.; Sakr, G.; Jomard, F.; Turner, S.; Lu, Y.-G.; Dexters, W.; Soltani, A.; Verbeeck, J.; Barjon, J.; Nesládek, M.; Haenen, K.

    2016-08-01

    The fabrication of n-type diamond is essential for the realization of electronic components for extreme environments. We report on the growth of a 66 μm thick homoepitaxial phosphorus-doped diamond on a (110)-oriented diamond substrate, grown at a very high deposition rate of 33 μm h-1. A pristine diamond lattice is observed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy, which indicates the growth of high quality diamond. About 2.9 × 1016 cm-3 phosphorus atoms are electrically active as substitutional donors, which is 60% of all incorporated dopant atoms. These results indicate that P-doped (110)-oriented diamond films deposited at high growth rates are promising candidates for future use in high-power electronic applications.

  14. Correlation of electrical properties with defects in a homoepitaxial chemical-vapor-deposited diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Han, S.; Rodriguez, G.; Taylor, A.

    1995-12-31

    A high-quality, low-stress 200 {mu}m epitaxial diamond film has been grown on a 400 {mu}m thick high-temperature-high-pressure Ha diamond. X-ray diffraction images of the film indicate that a large region of the film is fairly defect free and individual dislocations have been imaged in this region. Depth-resolved Raman results indicate that the region of the film with a low density of defects also has lower stress than in the higher defect density region. Transient photoconductivity measurements were performed on the high and low line defect density regions of the homoepitaxial diamond film to determine the effects of the stress and defect density on the combined electron-hole mobility and carrier lifetime. The correlation between the electrical properties and the x-ray diffraction imaging suggests that line defects may not be the limiting factor in the carrier transport at the present film quality.

  15. Hydrogenated Graphene as a Homoepitaxial Tunnel Barrier for Spin and Charge Transport in Graphene.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Adam L; van 't Erve, Olaf M J; Robinson, Jeremy T; Whitener, Keith E; Jonker, Berend T

    2015-07-28

    We demonstrate that hydrogenated graphene performs as a homoepitaxial tunnel barrier on a graphene charge/spin channel. We examine the tunneling behavior through measuring the IV curves and zero bias resistance. We also fabricate hydrogenated graphene/graphene nonlocal spin valves and measure the spin lifetimes using the Hanle effect, with spintronic nonlocal spin valve operation demonstrated up to room temperature. We show that while hydrogenated graphene indeed allows for spin transport in graphene and has many advantages over oxide tunnel barriers, it does not perform as well as similar fluorinated graphene/graphene devices, possibly due to the presence of magnetic moments in the hydrogenated graphene that act as spin scatterers. PMID:26047069

  16. Precise control of photoluminescence of silicon-vacancy color centers in homoepitaxial single-crystal diamond: evaluation of efficiency of Si doping from gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralchenko, Victor; Sedov, Vadim; Saraykin, Vladimir; Bolshakov, Andrey; Zavedeev, Evgeny; Ashkinazi, Evgeny; Khomich, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Ability to precisely control the Si-related color center abundance in diamond is important for the use of silicon-vacancy (SiV) defects with bright photoluminescence (PL) in quantum information technologies and optical biomarkers. Here, we evaluated the efficiency of Si incorporation in (100) plane of homoepitaxial diamond layers upon in situ doping by adding silane SiH4 in the course of diamond chemical vapor deposition in microwave plasma using CH4-H2 mixtures. Both the Si concentration in the doped samples, as determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and PL intensity of SiV centers at 738 nm wavelength, measured at excitation wavelength of 473 nm, demonstrate a linear increase with silane content in feed gas in the range. The incorporation efficiency f, defined as the ratio of Si concentration in diamond to that in gas, f = [Si/C]dia/[Si/C]gas is found to be (1.1 ± 0.5) × 10-3 for the silane concentrations explored, [SiH4/CH4] < 0.7 %; thus, the Si atoms are accommodated in (100) diamond face easier than nitrogen and phosphorus, but more difficult than boron. This finding allows a tailoring of the Si content and photoluminescence intensity of SiV centers in in situ doped CVD diamond.

  17. Homoepitaxial AlN thin films deposited on m-plane ( 1 1 ¯ 00) AlN substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Isaac; Bryan, Zachary; Bobea, Milena; Hussey, Lindsay; Kirste, Ronny; Collazo, Ramón; Sitar, Zlatko

    2014-10-01

    AlN homoepitaxial films were grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition on chemo-mechanically polished ( 1 1 ¯ 00)-oriented single crystalline AlN substrates. The dependence of the surface morphology, structural quality, and unintentional impurity concentrations on the growth temperature was studied in order to determine the most appropriate growth conditions for high quality ( 1 1 ¯ 00) AlN epitaxial layers. Optically smooth surfaces (RMS roughness of 0.4 nm) and high crystalline quality, as demonstrated by the presence of FWHM values for ( 10 1 ¯ 0) rocking curves along [ 0001] of less than 25 arc.sec, were achieved for films grown above 1350 °C. Furthermore, sharp and intense near band edge luminescence was observed in these high quality films. A reduction in unintentional oxygen impurity levels was seen with an increase in growth temperature. These high crystalline quality films are suitable for device applications and hold great potential for providing an ideal platform for deep UV emitters with high Al content AlGaN without polarization related effects.

  18. Effect of N2O on high-rate homoepitaxial growth of CVD single crystal diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Y.; Li, H. D.; Cheng, S. H.; Zhang, Q.; Wang, Q. L.; Lv, X. Y.; Zou, G. T.; Pei, X. Q.; Xie, J. G.

    2012-07-01

    Various gases such as N2, O2, and CO2 have been introduced in the typical reaction atmosphere of CH4/H2 and proposed to improve the growth of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) single-crystal diamonds (SCDs). In this paper, we study the influence of a new adding gas nitrous oxide (N2O) on the growth rate, morphology, and optical properties of homoepitaxy (100) CVD SCDs. The reaction pressure (H2/CH4 flow rates) was fixed at 300 Torr (750/90 in sccm) with the addition of a small amount of N2O gas varied at flow rates of 0, 2, 5, 8 and 10 sccm. With the appropriate addition of N2O, the growth rate was increased up to 135 μm/h and the surface roughness was decreased to around 2 nm. Furthermore, adding N2O is favorable for inhibiting the generation of large anti-pyramidal pits on the top surface of SCDs, which generally appeared in the products synthesized in CH4/H2 ambient. The combined effect of the nitrogen- and oxygen-related radicals decomposed from N2O on the growth and properties of the CVD SCDs is discussed. As a result, the addition of N2O provides a new route to realize high-rate growth CVD SCDs instead of the traditional nitrogen.

  19. Hetero- and homo-epitaxial growth of III-nitride based junctions and devices by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampath, Anand Venktesh

    2002-01-01

    nucleation conditions, while Ga-polar films are deposited directly on the latter without the use of buffer layers. GaN films of both polarities were doped p-type using Mg, but Ga-polar material is observed to dope more efficiently than N-polar material under Ga-rich conditions. The n-type doping of AlxGa1-xN alloys containing up to 50% AlN mole fraction has been explored and it is found that up to 50% AlGaN alloys can be doped degenerately to ˜1019 cm -3. A number photodetectors and power electronic devices have been fabricated based on these materials. Schottky diodes have been fabricated based on homoepitaxial growth of GaN by MBE on GaN templates grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) on c-plane sapphire substrates. Photodetectors based on these materials have high quantum efficiency, 70%. GaN pn junctions fabricated by depositing a p-GaN layer on similar GaN templates show reduced leakage current in comparison to heteroepitaxially grown devices. A number of high power rectifiers have been fabricated by depositing n-GaN films on p-type epitaxial SiC. These heterojunctions have a very large breakdown (>830 V) and good ideality. A number of pnpn thyristor structures have been fabricated for application as optically gated switches. These devices show forward breakover voltage of 14V without requiring any rapid thermal annealing. The holding current and voltage for these devices was found to be 11 mA and 2 V.

  20. Step-controlled homoepitaxial growth of 4H-SiC on vicinal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallinger, Birgit; Berwian, Patrick; Friedrich, Jochen; Thomas, Bernd

    2013-10-01

    A comprehensive study on the step-controlled homoepitaxial growth on the (0001)Si-face of vicinal 4H-SiC substrates was performed in order to establish epitaxial growth on 2° towards <112bar0> off-cut substrates and 4° towards <11bar00> off-cut substrates. A standard epitaxial growth process was developed by optimizing the growth temperature T, Si/H ratio and C/Si ratio for growth on 4° towards <112bar0> off-cut substrates. Thereby, step-controlled epitaxial growth was achieved within a broad operating window. The surface roughness of such epilayers varies typically between rms=0.5 nm and rms=2.5 nm and step-controlled growth is conserved even at a growth rate of 27 μm/h. Then, the standard growth process was applied to substrates with different off-cut angles α of 2°, 4° and 8° as well as with different off-cut directions <112bar0> and <11bar00>. The step-controlled growth was achieved also within a wide range of Si/H ratio and C/Si ratio for growth on 8° and 4° off-cut substrates, but the process window narrows strongly for growth on 2° off-cut substrates. The epilayers' surface roughness increases with decreasing off-cut angle of the substrate. Epilayers grown on 4° towards <11bar00> off-cut substrates were significantly smoother than epilayers grown on 4° towards <112bar0> off-cut substrates. No influence of the substrates' off-cut angle and direction on the growth rate was found. The experimental results of this comprehensive study are discussed globally in consideration of other relevant publications.

  1. Improving optical performance of GaN nanowires grown by selective area growth homoepitaxy: Influence of substrate and nanowire dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aseev, P.; Gačević, Ž.; Torres-Pardo, A.; González-Calbet, J. M.; Calleja, E.

    2016-06-01

    Series of GaN nanowires (NW) with controlled diameters (160-500 nm) and heights (420-1100 nm) were homoepitaxially grown on three different templates: GaN/Si(111), GaN/AlN/Si(111), and GaN/sapphire(0001). Transmission electron microscopy reveals a strong influence of the NW diameter on dislocation filtering effect, whereas photoluminescence measurements further relate this effect to the GaN NWs near-bandgap emission efficiency. Although the templates' quality has some effects on the GaN NWs optical and structural properties, the NW diameter reduction drives the dislocation filtering effect to the point where a poor GaN template quality becomes negligible. Thus, by a proper optimization of the homoepitaxial GaN NWs growth, the propagation of dislocations into the NWs can be greatly prevented, leading to an exceptional crystal quality and a total dominance of the near-bandgap emission over sub-bandgap, defect-related lines, such as basal stacking faults and so called unknown exciton (UX) emission. In addition, a correlation between the presence of polarity inversion domain boundaries and the UX emission lines around 3.45 eV is established.

  2. Buffer layer effect on ZnO nanorods growth alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dongxu; Andreazza, Caroline; Andreazza, Pascal; Ma, Jiangang; Liu, Yichun; Shen, Dezhen

    2005-06-01

    Vertical aligned ZnO nanorods array was fabricated on Si with introducing a ZnO thin film as a buffer layer. Two different nucleation mechanisms were found in growth process. With using Au catalyst, Zn vapor could diffuse into Au nanoclusters with forming a solid solution. Then the ZnO nucleation site is mainly on the catalyst by oxidation of Au/Zn alloy. Without catalyst, nucleation could occur directly on the surface of buffer layer by homoepitaxy. The density and the size of ZnO nanorods could be governed by morphological character of catalyst and buffer layer. The nanorods growth is followed by vapor-solid mechanism.

  3. Homoepitaxial and Heteroepitaxial Growth on Step-Free SiC Mesas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Powell, J. Anthony

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the initial discovery and development of new approaches to SiC homoepitaxial and heteroepitaxial growth. These approaches are based upon the previously unanticipated ability to effectively supress two-dimensional nucleation of 3C-SiC on large basal plane terraces that form between growth steps when epitaxy is carried out on 4H- and 6H-SiC nearly on-axis substrates. After subdividing the growth surface into mesa regions, pure stepflow homoeptixay with no terrace nucleation was then used to grow all existing surface steps off the edges of screw-dislocation-free mesas, leaving behind perfectly on-axis (0001) basal plane mesa surfaces completely free of atomic-scale steps. Step-free mesa surfaces as large as 0.4 mm x 0.4 mm were experimentally realized, with the yield and size of step-free mesas being initally limited by substrate screw dislocations. Continued epitaxial growth following step-free surface formation leads to the formation of thin lateral cantilevers that extend the step-free surface area from the top edge of the mesa sidewalls. By selecting a proper pre-growth mesa shape and crystallographic orientation, the rate of cantilever growth can be greatly enhanced in a web growth process that has been used to (1) enlarge step-free surface areas and (2) overgrow and laterally relocate micropipes and screw dislocations. A new growth process, named step-free surface heteroepitaxy, has been developed to achieve 3C-SiC films on 4H- and 6H-SiC substrate mesas completely free of double positioning boundary and stacking fault defects. The process is based upon the controlled terrace nucleation and lateral expansion of a single island of 3C-SiC across a step-free mesa surface. Experimental results indicate that substrateepilayer lattice mismatch is at least partially relieved parallel to the interface without dislocations that undesirably thread through the thickness of the epilayer. These results should enable realization of improved Si

  4. m-Plane Homoepitaxy and Equilibrium Crystal Shapes of Gallium Nitride by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Benjamin Nathaniel

    Nonpolar and semipolar growth of GaN has been shown to offer a promising path for high performance devices. These non-basal plane orientations allow for minimization of the polarization effects seen in c-plane GaN which cause spatial separation of the electron and hole wavefunctions (Quantum Confined Stark Effect). Yet despite the advantages these planes present, there remains consistent problems in both their growth and the lack of substrates. This dissertation focuses on the growth of these nonpolar and semipolar planes, in particular the homoepitaxy of m-plane GaN. The equilibrium crystal shape of GaN and its stable facets were also investigated. It is hoped that with this work, progress is made towards low defect large area nonpolar and semipolar substrates and their improved vapor phase growth. Work was initially done on m-plane regrowth by hydride vapor phase epitaxy. Extended defect generation, in particular basal plane stacking faults (BPSF), and poor morphology control are consistent problems in m-plane growth. These issues have prevented the expansion and multiplication of m-plane GaN substrates. In this work the effects of carrier gas were investigated on m-plane regrowth. Hydrogen carrier gas was shown to create highly faceted 3D nucleation. These islands had exposed N-face facets which lead to BPSF generation. In contrast, nitrogen carrier gas lead to 2D growth and thus minimized BPSF generation. These stacking faults were then characterized by both reciprocal space mapping and cathodolumienscence where type I1 and I2 faults were observed in the regrown GaN. Further work was done in exploring the equilibrium crystal shapes of GaN under varying growth conditions. Selective area growth experiments were done on high quality bulk m-plane GaN substrates where GaN facets were exposed to show the stable polar, semipolar and nonpolar planes. From these facets the kinetic Wulff plots for GaN were constructed. This work highlights the stable growth conditions

  5. Nucleation of c-axis Screw Dislocations at Substrate Surface Damage During 4H-silicon Carbide Homo-epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Dudley, M.; Zhang, N; Zhang, Y; Raghothamachar, B; Sanchez, E

    2010-01-01

    Observations of dislocation nucleation occurring at substrate surface scratches during 4H-SiC CVD homoepitaxial growth are reported. Sub-surface residual damage associated with the scratches is observed to act as nucleation sites for basal plane dislocations (BPDs), threading edge dislocations (TEDs) and threading screw dislocations (TSDs) in the epilayer. TEDs and BPDs replicate from the surface intersections of basal plane dislocation half-loops injected into the substrate surface. A model for the nucleation mechanism of TSDs, which nucleate in opposite sign pairs, is presented which involves overgrowth of surface indentations associated with the scratch during step flow growth. Atomic steps which approach these local surface indentations can collapse creating pairs of opposite sign screw dislocations which have Burgers vector magnitude equal to the magnitude of the step disregistry created during the collapse.

  6. Interplay of point defects, biaxial strain, and thermal conductivity in homoepitaxial SrTiO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedigen, S.; Kramer, T.; Knorr, I.; Nee, N.; Hoffmann, J.; Volkert, C. A.; Jooss, Ch.; Feuchter, M.; Kamlah, M.

    2012-02-06

    Separating out effects of point defects and lattice strain on thermal conductivity is essential for improvement of thermoelectric properties of SrTiO{sub 3}. We study relations between defects generated during deposition, induced lattice strain, and their impact on thermal conductivity {kappa} in homoepitaxial SrTiO{sub 3} films prepared by ion-beam sputtering. Lowering the deposition temperature gives rise to lattice expansion by enhancement of point defect density which increases the hardness of the films. Due to a fully coherent substrate-film interface, the lattice misfit induces a large biaxial strain. However, we can show that the temperature dependence of {kappa} is mainly sensitive on the defect concentration.

  7. Growth of Defect-Free 3C-Sic on 4H- and 6H-SIC Mesas Using Step-Free Surface Heteroepitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Powell, J. Anthony; Trunek, Andrew J.; Huang, Xianrong R.; Dudley, Michael

    2002-01-01

    A new growth process, herein named step-free surface heteroepitaxy, has achieved 3C-SiC films completely free of double positioning boundaries and stacking faults on 4H-SiC and 6H-SiC substrate mesas. The process is based upon the initial 2-dimensional nucleation and lateral expansion of a single island of 3C-SiC on a 4H- or 6H-SiC mesa surface that is completely free of bilayer surface steps. Our experimental results indicate that substrate-epilayer in-plane lattice mismatch (Delta/a = 0.0854% for 3C/4H) is at least partially relieved parallel to the interface in the initial bilayers of the heterofilm, producing an at least partially relaxed 3C-SiC film without dislocations that undesirably thread through the thickness of the epilayer. This result should enable realization of improved 3C-SiC devices.

  8. Seed layer technique for high quality epitaxial manganite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziosi, P.; Gambardella, A.; Calbucci, M.; O'Shea, K.; MacLaren, D. A.; Riminucci, A.; Bergenti, I.; Fugattini, S.; Prezioso, M.; Homonnay, N.; Schmidt, G.; Pullini, D.; Busquets-Mataix, D.; Dediu, V.

    2016-08-01

    We introduce an innovative approach to the simultaneous control of growth mode and magnetotransport properties of manganite thin films, based on an easy-to-implement film/substrate interface engineering. The deposition of a manganite seed layer and the optimization of the substrate temperature allows a persistent bi-dimensional epitaxy and robust ferromagnetic properties at the same time. Structural measurements confirm that in such interface-engineered films, the optimal properties are related to improved epitaxy. A new growth scenario is envisaged, compatible with a shift from heteroepitaxy towards pseudo-homoepitaxy. Relevant growth parameters such as formation energy, roughening temperature, strain profile and chemical states are derived.

  9. Thermal conductivity as a metric for the crystalline quality of SrTiO{sub 3} epitaxial layers

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Dong-Wook; Ravichandran, Jayakanth; Liang, Chen-Wei; Martin, Lane W.; Cahill, David G.; Siemons, Wolter; Jalan, Bharat; Stemmer, Susanne; Brooks, Charles M.; Schlom, Darrell G.; Huijben, Mark; Majumdar, Arun; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy

    2011-05-30

    Measurements of thermal conductivity {Lambda} by time-domain thermoreflectance in the temperature range 100layers of a prototypical oxide, SrTiO{sub 3}. Twenty samples from five institutions using two growth techniques, molecular beam epitaxy and pulsed laser deposition (PLD), were analyzed. Optimized growth conditions produce layers with {Lambda} comparable to bulk single crystals. Many PLD layers, particularly those that use ceramics as the target material, show surprisingly low {Lambda}. For homoepitaxial layers, the decrease in {Lambda} created by point defects correlates well with the expansion of the lattice parameter in the direction normal to the surface.

  10. Thermal conductivity as a metric for the crystalline quality of SrTiO3 epitaxial layers

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Dong-Wook; Ravichandran, Jayakanth; Liang, Chen-Wei; Siemons, Wolter; Jalan, Bharat; Brooks, Charles M.; Huijben, Mark; Schlom, Darrell G.; Stemmer, Susanne; Martin, Lane W.; Majumdar, Arun; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Cahill, David G.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of thermal conductivity Λ by time-domain thermoreflectance in the temperature range 100 < T < 300 K are used to characterize the crystalline quality of epitaxial layers of a prototypical oxide, SrTiO₃. Twenty samples from five institutions using two growth techniques, molecular beam epitaxy and pulsed laser deposition (PLD), were analyzed. Optimized growth conditions produce layers with Λ comparable to bulk single crystals. Many PLD layers, particularly those that use ceramics as the target material, show surprisingly low Λ. For homoepitaxial layers, the decrease in Λ created by point defects correlates well with the expansion of the lattice parameter in the direction normal to the surface.

  11. Growth control of oxygen stoichiometry in homoepitaxial SrTiO3 films by pulsed laser epitaxy in high vacuum

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho Nyung; Ambrose Seo, Sung S.; Choi, Woo Seok; Rouleau, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    In many transition metal oxides, oxygen stoichiometry is one of the most critical parameters that plays a key role in determining the structural, physical, optical, and electrochemical properties of the material. However, controlling the growth to obtain high quality single crystal films having the right oxygen stoichiometry, especially in a high vacuum environment, has been viewed as a challenge. In this work, we show that, through proper control of the plume kinetic energy, stoichiometric crystalline films can be synthesized without generating oxygen defects even in high vacuum. We use a model homoepitaxial system of SrTiO3 (STO) thin films on single crystal STO substrates. Physical property measurements indicate that oxygen vacancy generation in high vacuum is strongly influenced by the energetics of the laser plume, and it can be controlled by proper laser beam delivery. Therefore, our finding not only provides essential insight into oxygen stoichiometry control in high vacuum for understanding the fundamental properties of STO-based thin films and heterostructures, but expands the utility of pulsed laser epitaxy of other materials as well. PMID:26823119

  12. Comparison of morphology evolution of Ge(001) homoepitaxial films grown by pulsed laser deposition and molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Shin Byungha; Leonard, John P.; McCamy, James W.; Aziz, Michael J.

    2005-10-31

    Using a dual molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE)-pulsed laser deposition (PLD) ultrahigh vacuum chamber, we have conducted the first experiments under identical thermal, background, and surface preparation conditions to compare Ge(001) homoepitaxial growth morphology in PLD and MBE. We find that in PLD with low kinetic energy and in MBE the film morphology evolves in a similar fashion: initially irregularly shaped mounds form, followed by pyramidal mounds with edges of the square-base along the <100> directions; the film roughness and mound separation increase with film thickness. In PLD with high kinetic energy, well-defined pyramidal mounds are not observed and the morphology rather resembles that of an ion-etched Ge(001) surface. The areal feature density is higher for PLD films than for MBE films grown at the same average growth rate and temperature. Furthermore, the dependence upon film thickness of roughness and feature separation differ for PLD and MBE. We attribute these differences to the higher yield of defect generation by energetic species in PLD.

  13. Analytic formulations for one-dimensional decay of rectangular homoepitaxial islands during coarsening on anisotropic fcc (110) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chi-Jen; Han, Yong; Walen, Holly; Russell, Selena M.; Thiel, Patricia A.; Evans, James W.

    2013-10-01

    Submonolayer homoepitaxial fcc (110) systems display behavior reflecting strong anisotropy at lower temperatures, including one-dimensional decay during Ostwald ripening of rectangular islands maintaining constant width in the (001) direction. To appropriately describe this behavior, we first develop a refined continuum Burton-Cabrera-Frank formalism, which accounts for a lack of equilibration of island shape and importantly also for inhibited incorporation of adatoms at almost-faceted (1¯10) island edges through effective kinetic coefficients. This formalism is shown to describe accurately the adatom diffusion fluxes between islands and thus island evolution for a complex experimental island configuration, as confirmed by matching results from realistic atomistic simulations for this configuration. This approach also elucidates basic dependencies of flux on island geometry and temperature. Second, a further refinement is presented incorporating separate terrace and edge adatom density fields either in a continuum setting or alternatively in a spatially discrete diffusion equation setting. The second approach allows more flexibility and accuracy in accounting for edge-diffusion kinetics including corner rounding, a lack of equilibration of the edge adatom density at (1¯10) island edges, and the effect of rare kinks on (1¯10) island edges. Finally and significantly, it suggests facile two-way corner rounding at the island periphery during island decay, contrasting the previous picture.

  14. Growth control of oxygen stoichiometry in homoepitaxial SrTiO3 films by pulsed laser epitaxy in high vacuum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lee, Ho Nyung; Ambrose Seo, Sung S.; Choi, Woo Seok; Rouleau, Christopher M.

    2016-01-29

    In many transition metal oxides, oxygen stoichiometry is one of the most critical parameters that plays a key role in determining the structural, physical, optical, and electrochemical properties of the material. However, controlling the growth to obtain high quality single crystal films having the right oxygen stoichiometry, especially in a high vacuum environment, has been viewed as a challenge. In this work, we show that, through proper control of the plume kinetic energy, stoichiometric crystalline films can be synthesized without generating oxygen defects even in high vacuum. We use a model homoepitaxial system of SrTiO3 (STO) thin films on singlemore » crystal STO substrates. Physical property measurements indicate that oxygen vacancy generation in high vacuum is strongly influenced by the energetics of the laser plume, and it can be controlled by proper laser beam delivery. Thus, our finding not only provides essential insight into oxygen stoichiometry control in high vacuum for understanding the fundamental properties of STO-based thin films and heterostructures, but it expands the utility of pulsed laser epitaxy of other materials as well.₃« less

  15. Light polarization sensitive photodetectors with m- and r-plane homoepitaxial ZnO/ZnMgO quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabares, G.; Hierro, A.; Lopez-Ponce, M.; Muñoz, E.; Vinter, B.; Chauveau, J.-M.

    2015-02-01

    Homoepitaxial ZnO/(Zn,Mg)O multiple quantum wells (MQWs) grown with m- and r-plane orientations are used to demonstrate Schottky photodiodes sensitive to the polarization state of light. In both orientations, the spectral photoresponse of the MQW photodiodes shows a sharp excitonic absorption edge at 3.48 eV with a very low Urbach tail, allowing the observation of the absorption from the A, B and C excitonic transitions. The absorption edge energy is shifted by ˜30 and ˜15 meV for the m- and r-plane MQW photodiodes, respectively, in full agreement with the calculated polarization of the A, B, and C excitonic transitions. The best figures of merit are obtained for the m-plane photodiodes, which present a quantum efficiency of ˜11%, and a specific detectivity D* of ˜6.4 × 1010 cm Hz1/2/W. In these photodiodes, the absorption polarization sensitivity contrast between the two orthogonal in-plane axes yields a maximum value of (R⊥/R||)max ˜ 9.9 with a narrow bandwidth of ˜33 meV.

  16. Light polarization sensitive photodetectors with m- and r-plane homoepitaxial ZnO/ZnMgO quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Tabares, G.; Hierro, A. Lopez-Ponce, M.; Muñoz, E.

    2015-02-09

    Homoepitaxial ZnO/(Zn,Mg)O multiple quantum wells (MQWs) grown with m- and r-plane orientations are used to demonstrate Schottky photodiodes sensitive to the polarization state of light. In both orientations, the spectral photoresponse of the MQW photodiodes shows a sharp excitonic absorption edge at 3.48 eV with a very low Urbach tail, allowing the observation of the absorption from the A, B and C excitonic transitions. The absorption edge energy is shifted by ∼30 and ∼15 meV for the m- and r-plane MQW photodiodes, respectively, in full agreement with the calculated polarization of the A, B, and C excitonic transitions. The best figures of merit are obtained for the m-plane photodiodes, which present a quantum efficiency of ∼11%, and a specific detectivity D* of ∼6.4 × 10{sup 10} cm Hz{sup 1/2}/W. In these photodiodes, the absorption polarization sensitivity contrast between the two orthogonal in-plane axes yields a maximum value of (R{sub ⊥}/R{sub ||}){sub max} ∼ 9.9 with a narrow bandwidth of ∼33 meV.

  17. Characterization of homoepitaxial p-type ZnO grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Look, D. C.; Reynolds, D. C.; Litton, C. W.; Jones, R. L.; Eason, D. B.; Cantwell, G.

    2002-09-01

    An N-doped, p-type ZnO layer has been grown by molecular beam epitaxy on an Li-diffused, bulk, semi-insulating ZnO substrate. Hall-effect and conductivity measurements on the layer give: resistivity=4 x101 Omega cm; hole mobility=2 cm2/V s; and hole concentration=9 x1016 cm-3. Photoluminescence measurements in this N-doped layer show a much stronger peak near 3.32 eV (probably due to neutral acceptor bound excitons), than at 3.36 eV (neutral donor bound excitons), whereas the opposite is true in undoped ZnO. Calibrated, secondary-ion mass spectroscopy measurements show an N surface concentration of about 1019 cm-3 in the N-doped sample, but only about 1017 cm-3 in the undoped sample.

  18. Spectroscopic ellipsometry of homoepitaxial diamond multilayers and delta-doped structures

    SciTech Connect

    Bousquet, J.; Chicot, G.; Eon, D.; Bustarret, E.

    2014-01-13

    The optimization of diamond-based unipolar electronic devices such as pseudo-vertical Schottky diodes or delta-doped field effect transistors relies in part on the sequential growth of nominally undoped (p{sup –}) and heavily boron doped (p{sup ++}) layers with well-controlled thicknesses and steep interfaces. Optical ellipsometry offers a swift and contactless method to characterize the thickness, roughness, and electronic properties of semiconducting and metallic diamond layers. We report ellipsometric studies carried out on delta-doped structures and other epitaxial multilayers with various boron concentrations and thicknesses (down to the nanometer range). The results are compared with Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy and transport measurements.

  19. Growth regimes during homoepitaxial growth of GaN by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Corrion, A. L.; Wu, F.; Speck, J. S.

    2012-09-01

    c-plane GaN films were grown by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy on metal-organic chemical vapor deposition templates for a wide range of NH{sub 3}:Ga flux ratios and growth temperatures, and the resulting films were characterized using atomic force microscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Three distinct nitrogen-rich growth regimes - unstable layer-by-layer, quasi-stable step flow, and dislocation-mediated pitting - were identified based on the growth mode and film properties. In addition, step flow growth was observed under conditions of gallium droplet accumulation. The results indicate the existence of two regimes for step-flow growth of GaN by ammonia MBE - both gallium-rich and nitrogen-rich. Growth mode instabilities and mound formation were observed and are discussed in the context of a step-edge energy barrier to adatom diffusion over a terrace.

  20. 4H-SiC homoepitaxy on nearly on-axis substrates using TFS-towards high quality epitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandran, Anusha; Song, Haizheng; Sudarshan, T. S.; Chandrashekhar, M. V. S.

    2016-08-01

    We report high quality homoepitaxial growth on nearly on-axis (± 0.5 °) 4H-SiC substrates by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using Tetrafluorosilane and Propane as Si and C-precursors, respectively. N-type unintentional doping (1017-1014 cm-3) was obtained for 0.62.0, a linear dependence on C-flow is established, with a return to step-mediated growth, shown by the surface morphology (RMS roughness ∼1 nm), and high polytype uniformity from Raman at high Rg- 14 μm/h. These two behaviors were ascribed to a decrease in the etch rate of SiC by SiF4 with increasing C/Si due to C-aided decomposition of SiF4, both of which make available a greater amount of elemental Si at the surface, thereby suppressing spiral growth. Use of on-axis or near on-axis substrates can eliminate/reduce basal plane dislocations which limit the performance of SiC bipolar electronic devices.

  1. Enlargement of Step-Free SiC Surfaces by Homoepitaxial Web-Growth of Thin SiC Cantilevers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Powell, J. Anthony; Beheim, Glenn M.; Benavage, Emye L.; Abel, Phillip B.; Trunek, Andrew J.; Spry, David J.; Dudley, Michael; Vetter, William M.

    2002-01-01

    Lateral homoepitaxial growth of thin cantilevers emanating from mesa patterns that were reactive ion etched into on-axis commercial SiC substrates prior to growth is reported. The thin cantilevers form after pure stepflow growth removes almost all atomic steps from the top surface of a mesa, after which additional adatoms collected by the large step-free surface migrate to the mesa sidewall where they rapidly incorporate into the crystal near the top of the mesa sidewall. The lateral propagation of the step-free cantilevered surface is significantly affected by pregrowth mesa shape and orientation, with the highest lateral expansion rates observed at the inside concave comers of V-shaped pregrowth mesas with arms lengthwise oriented along the {1100} direction. Complete spanning of the interiors of V's and other mesa shapes with concave comers by webbed cantilevers was accomplished. Optical microscopy, synchrotron white beam x-ray topography and atomic force microscopy analysis of webbed regions formed over a micropipe and closed-core screw dislocations show that c-axis propagation of these defects is terminated by the webbing. Despite the nonoptimized process employed in this initial study, webbed surfaces as large as 1.4 x 10(exp -3) square centimeters, more than four times the pregrowth mesa area, were grown. However, the largest webbed surfaces were not completely free of bilayer steps, due to unintentional growth of 3C-SiC that occurred in the nonoptimized process. Further process optimization should enable larger step-free webs to be realized.

  2. Morphological switching in synchrotron-radiation-excited Ge homoepitaxy: Transition from kinetic roughening to smoothing

    SciTech Connect

    Akazawa, Housei

    2005-05-15

    The surface morphology of Ge films during GeH{sub 4}-source molecular beam epitaxy on a Ge(100) substrate is dramatically changed through irradiation with synchrotron radiation (h{nu}>100 eV). At temperatures below 300 deg. C, a two-dimensionally flat film continues to grow with the surface tightly passivated by a GeH{sub x} hydride layer. At temperatures above 350 deg. C, dangling bonds are partially terminated with hydrogen atoms while Ge adatoms are highly mobile, resulting in a nonuniform nucleation that creates the islands. Small islands merge into a few-hundred-nanometer-tall islands surrounded by the (113)-face sidewalls. This kinetic roughening continues until the nucleation on the (001) plane ceases due to the buildup of the GeH{sub x} layer. Once the surface free energy is minimized by the hydrogen termination, flattening of the islands proceeds to reduce the chemical potential of the system. The valleys between the islands are preferentially filled, and the film is eventually converted into a smooth epilayer with no memory of the initial roughening.

  3. Mutual relation among lattice distortion, Hall effect property and band edge cathodoluminescence of heavily-boron-doped microwave-plasma CVD diamond films homoepitaxially grown on vicinal (001) high-pressure/high-temperature-synthesized Ib substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Reona; Maida, Osamu; Ito, Toshimichi

    2015-04-01

    We have investigated properties of heavily-B-doped diamond (HBD) films homoepitaxially grown with boron-to-carbon (B/C) mole ratios ranging from 1000 to 5000 ppm in the source gas mainly by using X-Ray diffraction (XRD), cathodoluminescence (CL), and Hall effect measurements. Each HBD layer was deposited on a vicinal (001) substrate of high-pressure/high-temperature synthesized Ib-type diamond with 5° misorientation angle by means of high-power-density microwave-plasma chemical-vapor-deposition method with a source gas composed of 4% CH4 in H2 and H2-diluted B(CH3)3. XRD data indicated that the lattice constant of the B-doped layer slightly decreased for the B/C ratios≤3000 ppm while slightly increasing for that of 5000 ppm, suggesting that for the latter HBD sample a part of the incorporated B atoms behaved differently from the remaining other B atoms. By contrast the Hall data indicated that all the HBD samples had a degenerate feature only at temperatures well below room temperature (RT), above which a semiconducting feature was evident, and that the density of the degenerate holes steeply increased from 1.3×1019 to 1.2×1021 cm-3 with increases in the incorporated B density, [B], from 1.2×1020 to 5.9×1020 cm-3. This drastic change in the hole density strongly suggested the presence of a [B]-dependent impurity band. Their evident near-band-edge CL spectra taken at RT and 85 K demonstrated that radiative transition features in the HBD layers considerably varied for the B/C ratios studied. The CL peaks were consistently assigned by assuming both the presence of an impurity band and a slight bandgap shrinkage. These observed features are discussed in relation to the energy separation between the low-mobility impurity band assumed and the valence band in the high-quality HBD layer which are not merged in energy.

  4. When is one layer complete? Using simultaneous in-situ RHEED and x-ray reflectivity to map layer-by-layer thin-film oxide growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, M. C.; Ward, M. J.; Joress, H.; Gutierrez-Llorente, A.; White, A. E.; Woll, A.; Brock, J. D.

    2014-03-01

    The most popular tool for characterizing in situ layer-by-layer growth is Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction (RHEED). X-ray reflectivity can also be used to study layer-by-layer growth, as long as the incident angle of the x-rays is far from a Bragg peak. During layer-by-layer homoepitaxial growth, both the RHEED intensity and the reflected x-ray intensity will oscillate, and each complete oscillation indicates the addition of one layer of material. However, it is well documented, but not well understood, that the maxima in the RHEED intensity oscillations do not necessarily occur at the completion of a layer. In contrast, the maxima in the x-ray intensity oscillations do occur at the completion of a layer, thus the RHEED and x-ray oscillations are rarely in phase. We present our results on simultaneous in situ x-ray reflectivity and RHEED during layer-by-layer growth of SrTiO3 and discuss how to determine the completion of a layer for RHEED oscillations independent of the phase of the RHEED oscillation. Supported by DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences Award DE-SC0001086, CHESS is supported by the NSF & NIH/NIGMS via NSF award DMR-0936384.

  5. Kinetics and gas-surface dynamics of GaN homoepitaxial growth using NH 3-seeded supersonic molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinnis, A. J.; Thomson, D.; Davis, R. F.; Chen, E.; Michel, A.; Lamb, H. H.

    2001-11-01

    The kinetics of homoepitaxial growth of GaN thin films on metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)-grown GaN(0 0 0 1)/AlN/6H-SiC substrates was probed using NH 3-seeded supersonic molecular beams. NH 3 was seeded in H 2 and He and antiseeded in N 2 and Ar in order to obtain incident kinetic energies of 0.08-1.8 eV. Nozzle temperatures of 35-600 °C were used to adjust the NH 3 internal energy. Intense NH 3 beams (fluxes >2×10 15 cm-2 s-1 at the substrate) are produced for low seeding percentages (<5%) in the lighter carrier gases, because the heavier species (NH 3) is focused along the centerline of the beam. The NH 3 flux is proportional to the ratio of its molecular weight to the average molecular weight of the binary gas mixture. A steady-state Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics model was used to extract zero-coverage NH 3 sticking coefficient ( αNH 30) values from GaN growth kinetics data. An αNH 30 value of 0.14 at 750 °C was determined using seeded supersonic beams of NH 3 in He with incident kinetic energies of 0.4-0.5 eV. In comparison, GaN growth rates using low-energy NH 3 molecules (0.03 eV) from a leak valve indicate an αNH 30 of 0.29. Growth rate measurements using NH 3 beams with kinetic energies of 0.08-1.8 eV confirmed that αNH 30 generally decreases with increasing incident kinetic energy, leading us to conclude that NH 3 chemisorption on GaN(0 0 0 1) is unactivated and occurs via a precursor-mediated mechanism. Internal energy enhancement of NH 3 chemisorption via a precursor-mediated channel is proposed to explain the effects of nozzle temperature on GaN growth kinetics. The effects of NH 3 incident kinetic energy on film morphology are indirect. Rough, highly faceted films are observed under Ga-limited growth conditions. The surface morphology of films grown under NH 3-limited conditions changes from rough to smooth as the effective V/III ratio is decreased.

  6. Controlling the carrier lifetime of nearly threading-dislocation-free ZnO homoepitaxial films by 3d transition-metal doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chichibu, S. F.; Kojima, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Furusawa, K.; Uedono, A.

    2016-01-01

    Carrier lifetime in nearly threading-dislocation-free ZnO homoepitaxial films was controlled by doping 3d transition-metals (TMs), Ni and Mn. The photoluminescence lifetime of the near-band-edge emission (τPL) was decreased linearly by increasing TM concentration, indicating that such TMs are predominant nonradiative recombination centers (NRCs). From this relationship, exciton capture-cross-section ( σex ) of 2.4 × 10-15 cm2 is obtained. Because σex of native-NRCs (Zn-vacancy complexes) is likely larger than this value, the linear dependence of the internal quantum efficiency on τPL observed in our TM-doped ZnO and unintentionally doped ZnO in literatures indicates that the concentrations of native-NRCs in the latter are "lower than" 1016-1017 cm-3.

  7. Observations of Screw Dislocation Driven Growth and Faceting During CVD Homoepitaxy on 4H-SiC On-Axis Mesa Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Trunek, Andrew J.; Powell, J. Anthony; Picard, Yoosuf N.; Twigg, Mark E.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies of (0001) homoepitaxial growth carried out on arrays of small-area mesas etched into on-axis silicon-face 4H-SiC wafers have demonstrated that spiral growth emanating from at least one screw dislocation threading the mesa is necessary in order for a mesa to grow taller in the <0001> (c-axis vertical) direction while maintaining 4H stacking sequence [1]. However, even amongst mesas containing the screw dislocation step source necessary for vertical c-axis growth, we have observed striking differences in the height and faceting that evolve during prolonged homoepitaxial growths. This paper summarizes Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Electron Channeling Contrast Imaging (ECCI), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and optical microscopy observations of this phenomenon. These observations support our initially proposed model [2] that the observed large variation (for mesas where 3C-SiC nucleation has not occurred) is related to the lateral positioning of a screw dislocation step source within each etched mesa. When the screw dislocation step source is located close enough to the developing edge/sidewall facet of a mesa, the c-axis growth rate and facet angle are affected by the resulting interaction. In particular, the intersection (or near intersection) of the inward-sloping mesa sidewall facet with the screw dislocation appears to impede the rate at which the spiral provides new steps required for c-axis growth. Also, the inward slope of the sidewall facet during growth (relative to other sidewalls of the same mesa not near the screw dislocation) seems to be impeded by the screw dislocation. In contrast, mesas whose screw dislocations are centrally located grow vertically, but inward sloping sidewall facets shrink the area of the top (0001) growth surface almost to the point of vanishing.

  8. Boron concentration profiling by high angle annular dark field-scanning transmission electron microscopy in homoepitaxial δ-doped diamond layers

    SciTech Connect

    Araújo, D.; Alegre, M. P.; Piñero, J. C.; Fiori, A.; Bustarret, E.; Jomard, F.

    2013-07-22

    To develop further diamond related devices, the concentration and spatial location of dopants should be controlled down to the nanometer scale. Scanning transmission electron microscopy using the high angle annular dark field mode is shown to be sensitive to boron doping in diamond epilayers. An analytical procedure is described, whereby local boron concentrations above 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3} were quantitatively derived down to nanometer resolution from the signal dependence on thickness and boron content. Experimental boron local doping profiles measured on diamond p{sup −}/p{sup ++}/p{sup −} multilayers are compared to macroscopic profiles obtained by secondary ion mass spectrometry, avoiding reported artefacts.

  9. Self-organized homo-epitaxial growth in nonlinear optical BaAlBO3F2 crystal crossing lines patterned by laser in glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozaki, K.; Abe, S.; Honma, T.; Komatsu, T.

    2015-11-01

    Crystallization processing of glasses is important as a novel technique for the development of new optical materials, and laser-induced crystallization provides a new challenge in science and technology of materials. Nonlinear optical BaAlBO3F2 crystal lines with crossing, bending, and spiral shapes were patterned at the surface of 2NiO-49BaF2-24.5Al2O3-24.5B2O3 (mol%) and 2.9NiO-48.5BaF2-24.3Al2O3-24.3B2O3 (mol%) glasses by laser irradiation (Yb:YVO4 laser with a wavelength of 1080 nm) and the orientation state of BaAlBO3F2 crystals was examined from birefringence image observations. The birefringence images indicate that the growth of highly c-axis oriented BaAlBO3F2 crystals follows along the laser scanning direction even if the laser scanning direction changes, and in particular the direction of the c-axis of BaAlBO3F2 crystals changes gradually at the crossing and bending points. The model of "self-organized homo-epitaxial growth" is proposed for the crystal orientation at the crossing and bending points, as a new crystal growth science and engineering beyond the wise providence of nature.

  10. Narrow growth window for stoichiometric, layer-by-layer growth of LaAlO3 thin films using pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golalikhani, M.; Lei, Q. Y.; Wolak, M. A.; Davidson, B. A.; Xi, X. X.

    2016-06-01

    We study the structure and surface morphology of the 100 nm homoepitaxial LaAlO3 films grown by pulsed laser deposition in a broad range of growth parameters. We show that there is a narrow window of growth conditions in which the stoichiometric, bulk-like structure is obtained while maintaining a 2-dimensional (2D) layer-by-layer growth mode. In our system, these optimum growth conditions are 100 mTorr background pressure with laser energy density 1.5-2 J/cm2. The sensitivity to growth conditions of the stoichiometry and structure of LaAlO3 films can have a crucial role in the 2-D electron gas formed at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface.

  11. Correlation between Si doping and stacking fault related luminescence in homoepitaxial m-plane GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khromov, S.; Monemar, B.; Avrutin, V.; Morkoç, H.; Hultman, L.; Pozina, G.

    2013-11-01

    Si-doped GaN layers grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy on m-plane GaN substrates were investigated by low-temperature cathodoluminescence (CL). We have observed stacking fault (SF) related emission in the range of 3.29-3.42 eV for samples with moderate doping, while for the layers with high concentration of dopants, no CL lines related to SFs have been noted. Perturbation of the SF potential profile by neighboring impurity atoms can explain localization of excitons at SFs, while this effect would vanish at high doping levels due to screening.

  12. Homoepitaxial growth of ZnO films with reduced impurity concentrations by helicon-wave-excited-plasma sputtering epitaxy using a crystalline ZnO target prepared by hydrothermal technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Kentaro; Nakasawa, Hayato; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Chichibu, Shigefusa F.

    2014-10-01

    Homoepitaxial growth of reduced donor concentration ZnO films exhibiting atomically smooth surface is demonstrated by helicon-wave-excited-plasma sputtering epitaxy. Using a crystalline ZnO target prepared by hydrothermal method, concentrations of B, C, Cr, Li, and Si in the films underran the detection limits of secondary-ion-mass spectrometry. Consequently, low temperature photoluminescence spectra were dominated by sharp emission peaks originating from the recombination of excitons bound to a neutral Al donor, of which concentration was 2 × 1016 cm-3. Nonradiative lifetime dominated the recombination process above 50 K, which is most likely due to the presence of lifetime killers such as Ni and Fe.

  13. Polarized Raman spectroscopy of corrugated MBE grown GaAs (6¯3¯1¯) homoepitaxial films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa-Vega, L. I.; Rodriguez, A. G.; Cruz-Hernandez, E.; Martinez-Veliz, I.; Rojas-Ramirez, J.; Ramirez-Lopez, M.; Nieto-Navarro, J.; Lopez-Lopez, M.; Mendez-Garcia, V. H.

    2013-09-01

    In this work, we present a Raman scattering study of GaAs layers grown on (6¯3¯1¯)-oriented substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. A set of samples whose morphology sustained different corrugation order were grown by MBE by varying the growth parameters such as temperature and As/Ga flux ratio. We employed polarized Raman spectroscopy using the backscattering configurations Z(XX) Z¯, Z(XY) Z¯ and Z(YY)Z¯. According to the calculated dipole selection rules both TO and LO phonons are allowed for backscattering from a perfect GaAs (6¯3¯1¯) crystal, but with the intensity of the TO phonon much larger than that of the LO phonon. However, it is found that the selection rules differ for corrugated samples. Besides, the TO/LO phonon resonances intensity ratio and the LO peak asymmetry depend on the corrugation order of the samples.

  14. Homoepitaxial nonpolar (10-10) ZnO/ZnMgO monolithic microcavities: Towards reduced photonic disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuniga-Perez, J.; Kappei, L.; Deparis, C.; Reveret, F.; Grundmann, M.; de Prado, E.; Jamadi, O.; Leymarie, J.; Chenot, S.; Leroux, M.

    2016-06-01

    Nonpolar ZnO/ZnMgO-based optical microcavities have been grown on (10-10) m-plane ZnO substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Reflectivity measurements indicate an exponential increase of the cavity quality factor with the number of layers in the distributed Bragg reflectors. Most importantly, microreflectivity spectra recorded with a spot size in the order of 2 μm show a negligible photonic disorder (well below 1 meV), leading to local quality factors equivalent to those obtained by macroreflectivity. The anisotropic character of the nonpolar heterostructures manifests itself both in the surface features, elongated parallel to the in-plane c direction, and in the optical spectra, with two cavity modes being observed at different energies for orthogonal polarizations.

  15. Geometric modeling of homoepitaxial CVD diamond growth: I. The {1 0 0}{1 1 1}{1 1 0}{1 1 3} system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, F.; Bonnin, X.; Achard, J.; Brinza, O.; Michau, A.; Gicquel, A.

    2008-01-01

    Plasma-assisted CVD homoepitaxial diamond growth is a process that must satisfy many stringent requirements to meet industrial applications, particularly in high-power electronics. Purity control and crystalline quality of the obtained samples are of paramount importance and their optimization is a subject of active research. In the process of such studies, we have obtained high purity CVD diamond monocrystals with unusual morphologies, namely with apparent {1 1 3} stable faces. This phenomenon has led us to examine the process of CVD diamond growth and build up a 3D geometrical model, presented here, describing the film growth as a function of time. The model has been able to successfully describe the morphology of our obtained crystals and can be used as a predictive tool to predetermine the shape and size of a diamond crystal grown in a given process configuration. This renders accessible control of desirable properties such as largest usable diamond surface area and/or film thickness, before the cutting and polishing manufacture steps take place. The two latter steps are more sensitive to the geometry of the growth sectors, which will be addressed in a companion paper. Our model, applicable to the growth of any cubic lattice material, establishes a complete mapping of the final morphology state of growing diamond, as a function of the growth rates of the crystalline planes considered, namely {1 0 0}, {1 1 1}, {1 1 0}, and {1 1 3} planes, all of which have been observed experimentally in diamond films. The model makes no claim as to the stability of the obtained faces, such as the occurrence of non-epitaxial crystallites or twinning. It is also possible to deduce transient behavior of the crystal morphology as growth time is increased. The model conclusions are presented in the form of a series of diagrams, which trace the existence (and dominance) boundaries of each face type, in presence of the others, and where each boundary crossing represent a topology

  16. Tuning of strain and surface roughness of porous silicon layers for higher-quality seeds for epitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Marwa; Martini, Roberto; Radhakrishnan, Hariharsudan Sivaramakrishnan; van Nieuwenhuysen, Kris; Depauw, Valerie; Ramadan, Wedgan; Gordon, Ivan; Poortmans, Jef

    2014-07-01

    Sintered porous silicon is a well-known seed for homo-epitaxy that enables fabricating transferrable monocrystalline foils. The crystalline quality of these foils depends on the surface roughness and the strain of this porous seed, which should both be minimized. In order to provide guidelines for an optimum foil growth, we present a systematic investigation of the impact of the thickness of this seed and of its sintering time prior to epitaxial growth on strain and surface roughness. Strain and surface roughness were monitored in monolayers and double layers with different porosities as a function of seed thickness and of sintering time by high-resolution X-ray diffraction and profilometry, respectively. Unexpectedly, we found that strain in double and monolayers evolves in opposite ways with respect to layer thickness. This suggests that an interaction between layers in multiple stacks is to be considered. We also found that if higher seed thickness and longer annealing time are to be preferred to minimize the strain in double layers, the opposite is required to achieve smoother layers. The impact of these two parameters may be explained by considering the morphological evolution of the pores upon sintering and, in particular, the disappearance of interconnections between the porous seed and the bulk as well as the enlargement of pores near the surface. An optimum epitaxial growth hence calls for a trade-off in seed thickness and annealing time, between minimum-strained layers and rougher surfaces.

  17. Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loitsianskii. L. G.

    1956-01-01

    The fundamental, practically the most important branch of the modern mechanics of a viscous fluid or a gas, is that branch which concerns itself with the study of the boundary layer. The presence of a boundary layer accounts for the origin of the resistance and lift force, the breakdown of the smooth flow about bodies, and other phenomena that are associated with the motion of a body in a real fluid. The concept of boundary layer was clearly formulated by the founder of aerodynamics, N. E. Joukowsky, in his well-known work "On the Form of Ships" published as early as 1890. In his book "Theoretical Foundations of Air Navigation," Joukowsky gave an account of the most important properties of the boundary layer and pointed out the part played by it in the production of the resistance of bodies to motion. The fundamental differential equations of the motion of a fluid in a laminar boundary layer were given by Prandtl in 1904; the first solutions of these equations date from 1907 to 1910. As regards the turbulent boundary layer, there does not exist even to this day any rigorous formulation of this problem because there is no closed system of equations for the turbulent motion of a fluid. Soviet scientists have done much toward developing a general theory of the boundary layer, and in that branch of the theory which is of greatest practical importance at the present time, namely the study of the boundary layer at large velocities of the body in a compressed gas, the efforts of the scientists of our country have borne fruit in the creation of a new theory which leaves far behind all that has been done previously in this direction. We shall herein enumerate the most important results by Soviet scientists in the development of the theory of the boundary layer.

  18. Growth optimization and applicability of thick on-axis SiC layers using sublimation epitaxy in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokubavicius, Valdas; Sun, Jianwu; Liu, Xinyu; Yazdi, Gholamreza; Ivanov, Ivan. G.; Yakimova, Rositsa; Syväjärvi, Mikael

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate growth of thick SiC layers (100-200 μm) on nominally on-axis hexagonal substrates using sublimation epitaxy in vacuum (10-5 mbar) at temperatures varying from 1700 to 1975 °C with growth rates up to 270 μm/h and 70 μm/h for 6H- and 4H-SiC, respectively. The stability of hexagonal polytypes are related to process growth parameters and temperature profile which can be engineered using different thermal insulation materials and adjustment of the induction coil position with respect to the graphite crucible. We show that there exists a range of growth rates for which single-hexagonal polytype free of foreign polytype inclusions can be maintained. Further on, foreign polytypes like 3C-SiC can be stabilized by moving out of the process window. The applicability of on-axis growth is demonstrated by growing a 200 μm thick homoepitaxial 6H-SiC layer co-doped with nitrogen and boron in a range of 1018 cm-3 at a growth rate of about 270 μm/h. Such layers are of interest as a near UV to visible light converters in a monolithic white light emitting diode concept, where subsequent nitride-stack growth benefits from the on-axis orientation of the SiC layer.

  19. Calibration of an isotopically enriched carbon-13 layer pressure sensor to 156 GPa in a diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu,W.; Baker, P.; Velisavljevic, N.; Vohra, Y.; Weir, S.

    2006-01-01

    An isotopically enriched {sup 13}C homoepitaxial diamond layer of 6{+-}1 {mu}m thickness was grown on top of a brilliant cut diamond anvil by a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition process for application as a pressure sensor. This isotopically enriched diamond tip was then used in conjunction with a natural isotopic abundance diamond anvil to generate high pressure on the sample. We provide a calibration for the {sup 13}C Raman mode of this extremely thin epitaxial layer to 156 GPa using ruby fluorescence and the equation of state of copper as secondary pressure standards. The nonlinear calibration of the {sup 13}C Raman mode pressure sensor is compared with similar calibrations of {sup 12}C Raman edge and a good agreement is obtained. The Raman signal from the {sup 13}C epitaxial layer remained a distinct singlet to 156 GPa, and pressure calibration is independent of sample mechanical strength or the diamond anvil geometry. The use of even thinner layer would allow calibration further into ultrahigh pressure regime where the use of other optical sensors has proven to be difficult.

  20. Spallanzani Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    31 March 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a layered, light-toned mesa among other layered materials exposed in a mound that covers much of the floor of Spallanzani Crater.

    Location near: 58.3oS, 273.9oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  1. Layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, David; Clarke, Simon; Wiley, John; Koumoto, Kunihito

    2014-06-01

    Layered compounds, materials with a large anisotropy to their bonding, electrical and/or magnetic properties, have been important in the development of solid state chemistry, physics and engineering applications. Layered materials were the initial test bed where chemists developed intercalation chemistry that evolved into the field of topochemical reactions where researchers are able to perform sequential steps to arrive at kinetically stable products that cannot be directly prepared by other approaches. Physicists have used layered compounds to discover and understand novel phenomena made more apparent through reduced dimensionality. The discovery of charge and spin density waves and more recently the remarkable discovery in condensed matter physics of the two-dimensional topological insulating state were discovered in two-dimensional materials. The understanding developed in two-dimensional materials enabled subsequent extension of these and other phenomena into three-dimensional materials. Layered compounds have also been used in many technologies as engineers and scientists used their unique properties to solve challenging technical problems (low temperature ion conduction for batteries, easy shear planes for lubrication in vacuum, edge decorated catalyst sites for catalytic removal of sulfur from oil, etc). The articles that are published in this issue provide an excellent overview of the spectrum of activities that are being pursued, as well as an introduction to some of the most established achievements in the field. Clusters of papers discussing thermoelectric properties, electronic structure and transport properties, growth of single two-dimensional layers, intercalation and more extensive topochemical reactions and the interleaving of two structures to form new materials highlight the breadth of current research in this area. These papers will hopefully serve as a useful guideline for the interested reader to different important aspects in this field and

  2. Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02153 Polar Layers

    This image of the south polar region shows layered material. It is not known if the layers are formed yearly or if they form over the period of 10s to 100s of years or more.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -80.3N, Longitude 296.2E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  3. Layered Slope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    28 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a frost-covered slope in the south polar region of Mars. The layered nature of the terrain in the south polar region is evident in a series of irregular, somewhat stair-stepped bands that run across the image.

    Location near: 84.3oS, 27.2oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  4. Tuning of strain and surface roughness of porous silicon layers for higher-quality seeds for epitaxial growth

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sintered porous silicon is a well-known seed for homo-epitaxy that enables fabricating transferrable monocrystalline foils. The crystalline quality of these foils depends on the surface roughness and the strain of this porous seed, which should both be minimized. In order to provide guidelines for an optimum foil growth, we present a systematic investigation of the impact of the thickness of this seed and of its sintering time prior to epitaxial growth on strain and surface roughness. Strain and surface roughness were monitored in monolayers and double layers with different porosities as a function of seed thickness and of sintering time by high-resolution X-ray diffraction and profilometry, respectively. Unexpectedly, we found that strain in double and monolayers evolves in opposite ways with respect to layer thickness. This suggests that an interaction between layers in multiple stacks is to be considered. We also found that if higher seed thickness and longer annealing time are to be preferred to minimize the strain in double layers, the opposite is required to achieve smoother layers. The impact of these two parameters may be explained by considering the morphological evolution of the pores upon sintering and, in particular, the disappearance of interconnections between the porous seed and the bulk as well as the enlargement of pores near the surface. An optimum epitaxial growth hence calls for a trade-off in seed thickness and annealing time, between minimum-strained layers and rougher surfaces. PACS codes 81.40.-z Treatment of materials and its effects on microstructure, nanostructure, and properties; 81.05.Rm Porous materials; granular materials; 82.80.Ej X-ray, Mössbauer and other γ-ray spectroscopic analysis methods PMID:25136277

  5. Double Layers in Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Alton C. (Editor); Moorehead, Tauna W. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: laboratory double layers; ion-acoustic double layers; pumping potential wells; ion phase-space vortices; weak double layers; electric fields and double layers in plasmas; auroral double layers; double layer formation in a plasma; beamed emission from gamma-ray burst source; double layers and extragalactic jets; and electric potential between plasma sheet clouds.

  6. Layered Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03692 Layered Fan

    This beautiful fan deposit is located at the end of a mega-gully that empties into the southern trough of Coprates Chasma.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -14.9N, Longitude 299.8E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  7. High Performance Green LEDs by Homoepitaxial

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, Christian; Schubert, E Fred

    2009-11-22

    This work's objective was the development of processes to double or triple the light output power from green and deep green (525 - 555 nm) AlGaInN light emitting diode (LED) dies within 3 years in reference to the Lumileds Luxeon II. The project paid particular effort to all aspects of the internal generation efficiency of light. LEDs in this spectral region show the highest potential for significant performance boosts and enable the realization of phosphor-free white LEDs comprised by red-green-blue LED modules. Such modules will perform at and outperform the efficacy target projections for white-light LED systems in the Department of Energy's accelerated roadmap of the SSL initiative.

  8. An evaluation of phase separated, self-assembled LaMnO3-MgO nanocomposite films directly on IBAD-MgO as buffer layers for flux pinning enhancements in YBa2YCu3O7-& coated conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Polat, Ozgur; Aytug, Tolga; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Leonard, Keith J; Lupini, Andrew R; Pennycook, Stephen J; Meyer III, Harry M; Kim, Kyunghoon; Qiu, Xiaofeng; Cook, Sylvester W; Thompson, James R; Christen, David K; Goyal, Amit; Selvamanickam, V.; Xiong, X.

    2010-01-01

    Technological applications of high temperature superconductors (HTS) require high critical current density, Jc, under operation at high magnetic field strengths. This requires effective flux pinning by introducing artificial defects through creative processing. In this work, we evaluated the feasibility of mixed-phase LaMnO3:MgO (LMO:MgO) films as a potential cap buffer layer for the epitaxial growth and enhanced performance of YBa2Cu3O7-d (YBCO) films. Such composite films were sputter deposited directly on IBAD-MgO templates (with no additional homo-epitaxial MgO layer) and revealed the formation of two phase-separated, but at the same time vertically aligned, self-assembled composite nanostructures that extend throughout the entire thickness of the film. The YBCO coatings deposited on these nanostructured cap layers showed correlated c-axis pinning and improved in-field Jc performance compared to those of YBCO films fabricated on standard LMO buffers. Microstructural characterization revealed additional extended disorder in the YBCO matrix. The present results demonstrate the feasibility of novel and potentially practical approaches in the pursuit of more efficient, economical, and high performance superconducting devices.

  9. Burning Graphene Layer-by-Layer

    PubMed Central

    Ermakov, Victor A.; Alaferdov, Andrei V.; Vaz, Alfredo R.; Perim, Eric; Autreto, Pedro A. S.; Paupitz, Ricardo; Galvao, Douglas S.; Moshkalev, Stanislav A.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene, in single layer or multi-layer forms, holds great promise for future electronics and high-temperature applications. Resistance to oxidation, an important property for high-temperature applications, has not yet been extensively investigated. Controlled thinning of multi-layer graphene (MLG), e.g., by plasma or laser processing is another challenge, since the existing methods produce non-uniform thinning or introduce undesirable defects in the basal plane. We report here that heating to extremely high temperatures (exceeding 2000 K) and controllable layer-by-layer burning (thinning) can be achieved by low-power laser processing of suspended high-quality MLG in air in “cold-wall” reactor configuration. In contrast, localized laser heating of supported samples results in non-uniform graphene burning at much higher rates. Fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were also performed to reveal details of oxidation mechanisms leading to uniform layer-by-layer graphene gasification. The extraordinary resistance of MLG to oxidation paves the way to novel high-temperature applications as continuum light source or scaffolding material. PMID:26100466

  10. Burning Graphene Layer-by-Layer.

    PubMed

    Ermakov, Victor A; Alaferdov, Andrei V; Vaz, Alfredo R; Perim, Eric; Autreto, Pedro A S; Paupitz, Ricardo; Galvao, Douglas S; Moshkalev, Stanislav A

    2015-01-01

    Graphene, in single layer or multi-layer forms, holds great promise for future electronics and high-temperature applications. Resistance to oxidation, an important property for high-temperature applications, has not yet been extensively investigated. Controlled thinning of multi-layer graphene (MLG), e.g., by plasma or laser processing is another challenge, since the existing methods produce non-uniform thinning or introduce undesirable defects in the basal plane. We report here that heating to extremely high temperatures (exceeding 2000 K) and controllable layer-by-layer burning (thinning) can be achieved by low-power laser processing of suspended high-quality MLG in air in "cold-wall" reactor configuration. In contrast, localized laser heating of supported samples results in non-uniform graphene burning at much higher rates. Fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were also performed to reveal details of oxidation mechanisms leading to uniform layer-by-layer graphene gasification. The extraordinary resistance of MLG to oxidation paves the way to novel high-temperature applications as continuum light source or scaffolding material. PMID:26100466

  11. Modelling Layer parallel stylolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehn, Daniel; Pataki Rood, Daisy; Beaudoin, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    We modeled the geometrical roughening of mainly layer-dominated stylolites in order to understand their structural evolution, to present an advanced classification of stylolite shapes and to relate this classification to chemical compaction and stylolite sealing capabilities. Our simulations show that layer-dominated stylolites can grow in three distinct stages, an initial slow nucleation, a fast layer-pinning phase and a final freezing stage if the layer dissolves completely during growth. Dissolution of the pinning layer and thus destruction of the compaction tracking capabilities is a function of the background noise in the rock and the dissolution rate of the layer itself. Low background noise needs a slower dissolving layer for pinning to be successful but produces flatter teeth than higher background noise. We present an advanced classification based on our simulations and separate stylolites into four classes: rectangular layer type, seismogram pinning type, suture/sharp peak type and simple wave-like type.

  12. Layer-by-layer cell membrane assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matosevic, Sandro; Paegel, Brian M.

    2013-11-01

    Eukaryotic subcellular membrane systems, such as the nuclear envelope or endoplasmic reticulum, present a rich array of architecturally and compositionally complex supramolecular targets that are as yet inaccessible. Here we describe layer-by-layer phospholipid membrane assembly on microfluidic droplets, a route to structures with defined compositional asymmetry and lamellarity. Starting with phospholipid-stabilized water-in-oil droplets trapped in a static droplet array, lipid monolayer deposition proceeds as oil/water-phase boundaries pass over the droplets. Unilamellar vesicles assembled layer-by-layer support functional insertion both of purified and of in situ expressed membrane proteins. Synthesis and chemical probing of asymmetric unilamellar and double-bilayer vesicles demonstrate the programmability of both membrane lamellarity and lipid-leaflet composition during assembly. The immobilized vesicle arrays are a pragmatic experimental platform for biophysical studies of membranes and their associated proteins, particularly complexes that assemble and function in multilamellar contexts in vivo.

  13. Photonic layered media

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2002-01-01

    A new class of structured dielectric media which exhibit significant photonic bandstructure has been invented. The new structures, called photonic layered media, are easy to fabricate using existing layer-by-layer growth techniques, and offer the ability to significantly extend our practical ability to tailor the properties of such optical materials.

  14. Scintillator reflective layer coextrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Jae-Chul; Para, Adam

    2001-01-01

    A polymeric scintillator has a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof. The reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and an adhesive binder. The adhesive binder includes polymeric material from which the scintillator is formed. A method of forming the polymeric scintillator having a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof is also provided. The method includes the steps of (a) extruding an inner core member from a first amount of polymeric scintillator material, and (b) coextruding an outer reflective layer on the exterior surface of the inner core member. The outer reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and a second amount of the polymeric scintillator material.

  15. Layered plasma polymer composite membranes

    DOEpatents

    Babcock, W.C.

    1994-10-11

    Layered plasma polymer composite fluid separation membranes are disclosed, which comprise alternating selective and permeable layers for a total of at least 2n layers, where n is [>=]2 and is the number of selective layers. 2 figs.

  16. Layers and Erosion and more Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 4 November 2003

    This image is located within a set of eroded layered rocks known as the Medusae Fossae Formation. Careful inspection of this image reveals four separate layers. Starting at the bottom of the image, as well as the bottom of the sequence of layers, is a somewhat hilly, cratered plain. Above that is a mud or lava flow with a lobate edge that is characteristic of fluid flow. Above that is a layer with a spectacular rayed crater. This layer shows linear erosional patterns that are probably caused by persistent wind abrasion, typical of rocks in this area. And finally, a more blocky unit lies on top, mostly eroded away.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 3.6, Longitude 218.6 East (141.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  17. The Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennekes, Hendrik

    1974-01-01

    Discusses some important parameters of the boundary layer and effects of turbulence on the circulation and energy dissipation of the atmosphere. Indicates that boundary-layer research plays an important role in long-term forecasting and the study of air-pollution meteorology. (CC)

  18. Multiple density layered insulator

    DOEpatents

    Alger, T.W.

    1994-09-06

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed which provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation. 4 figs.

  19. Multiple density layered insulator

    DOEpatents

    Alger, Terry W.

    1994-01-01

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed wh provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation.

  20. Multiple layer insulation cover

    DOEpatents

    Farrell, James J.; Donohoe, Anthony J.

    1981-11-03

    A multiple layer insulation cover for preventing heat loss in, for example, a greenhouse, is disclosed. The cover is comprised of spaced layers of thin foil covered fabric separated from each other by air spaces. The spacing is accomplished by the inflation of spaced air bladders which are integrally formed in the cover and to which the layers of the cover are secured. The bladders are inflated after the cover has been deployed in its intended use to separate the layers of the foil material. The sizes of the material layers are selected to compensate for sagging across the width of the cover so that the desired spacing is uniformly maintained when the cover has been deployed. The bladders are deflated as the cover is stored thereby expediting the storage process and reducing the amount of storage space required.

  1. Self-assembled growth of multi-layer graphene on planar and nano-structured substrates and its field emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jian-Hua; Yu, Bin; Li, Guo-Zheng; Hou, Xing-Gang; Zhao, Meng-Li; Li, De-Jun; Zheng, Rui-Ting; Cheng, Guo-An

    2013-11-01

    Vertical multi-layer graphenes (MLGs) have been synthesized without a catalyst on planar and nano-structured substrates by using microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The growth of MLGs on non-carbon substrates is quite different from that on carbon-based substrates. It starts with a pre-deposition of a carbon buffer layer to achieve a homo-epitaxial growth. The nucleation and growth of MLGs was found to be strongly influenced by the surface geometry and topography of substrates. Planar substrates suitable for atom diffusion are favorable for growing large-scale MLGs, and defect-rich substrates are beneficial for quick MLG nucleation and thus the growth of densely distributed MLGs. The field emission properties of MLGs grown on planar and nano-structured substrates were studied and are found to be strongly dependent on the nature of substrates. Substrates having good conductivity and large aspect ratios such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have good field emission properties. The best field emission properties of MLG/CNT composites with optimal shapes were observed with a low turn-on electric field of 0.93 V μm-1, a threshold field of 1.56 V μm-1, a maximum emission current density of 60.72 mA cm-2, and excellent stability.Vertical multi-layer graphenes (MLGs) have been synthesized without a catalyst on planar and nano-structured substrates by using microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The growth of MLGs on non-carbon substrates is quite different from that on carbon-based substrates. It starts with a pre-deposition of a carbon buffer layer to achieve a homo-epitaxial growth. The nucleation and growth of MLGs was found to be strongly influenced by the surface geometry and topography of substrates. Planar substrates suitable for atom diffusion are favorable for growing large-scale MLGs, and defect-rich substrates are beneficial for quick MLG nucleation and thus the growth of densely distributed MLGs. The field emission properties of MLGs

  2. Boosting water oxidation layer-by-layer.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-Acosta, Jonnathan C; Scanlon, Micheál D; Méndez, Manuel A; Amstutz, Véronique; Vrubel, Heron; Opallo, Marcin; Girault, Hubert H

    2016-04-01

    Electrocatalysis of water oxidation was achieved using fluorinated tin oxide (FTO) electrodes modified with layer-by-layer deposited films consisting of bilayers of negatively charged citrate-stabilized IrO2 NPs and positively charged poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) polymer. The IrO2 NP surface coverage can be fine-tuned by controlling the number of bilayers. The IrO2 NP films were amorphous, with the NPs therein being well-dispersed and retaining their as-synthesized shape and sizes. UV/vis spectroscopic and spectro-electrochemical studies confirmed that the total surface coverage and electrochemically addressable surface coverage of IrO2 NPs increased linearly with the number of bilayers up to 10 bilayers. The voltammetry of the modified electrode was that of hydrous iridium oxide films (HIROFs) with an observed super-Nernstian pH response of the Ir(III)/Ir(IV) and Ir(IV)-Ir(IV)/Ir(IV)-Ir(V) redox transitions and Nernstian shift of the oxygen evolution onset potential. The overpotential of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) was essentially pH independent, varying only from 0.22 V to 0.28 V (at a current density of 0.1 mA cm(-2)), moving from acidic to alkaline conditions. Bulk electrolysis experiments revealed that the IrO2/PDDA films were stable and adherent under acidic and neutral conditions but degraded in alkaline solutions. Oxygen was evolved with Faradaic efficiencies approaching 100% under acidic (pH 1) and neutral (pH 7) conditions, and 88% in alkaline solutions (pH 13). This layer-by-layer approach forms the basis of future large-scale OER electrode development using ink-jet printing technology. PMID:26977761

  3. Multi-layer coatings

    DOEpatents

    Maghsoodi, Sina; Brophy, Brenor L.; Abrams, Ze'ev R.; Gonsalves, Peter R.

    2016-06-28

    Disclosed herein are coating materials and methods for applying a top-layer coating that is durable, abrasion resistant, highly transparent, hydrophobic, low-friction, moisture-sealing, anti-soiling, and self-cleaning to an existing conventional high temperature anti-reflective coating. The top coat imparts superior durability performance and new properties to the under-laying conventional high temperature anti-reflective coating without reducing the anti-reflectiveness of the coating. Methods and data for optimizing the relative thickness of the under-layer high temperature anti-reflective coating and the top-layer thickness for optimizing optical performance are also disclosed.

  4. Compliant layer chucking surface

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, Kenneth L.; Spence, Paul A.; Thompson, Samuel L.

    2004-12-28

    A method and apparatus are described wherein a thin layer of complaint material is deposited on the surface of a chuck to mitigate the deformation that an entrapped particle might cause in the part, such as a mask or a wafer, that is clamped to the chuck. The harder particle will embed into the softer layer as the clamping pressure is applied. The material composing the thin layer could be a metal or a polymer for vacuum or electrostatic chucks. It may be deposited in various patterns to affect an interrupted surface, such as that of a "pin" chuck, thereby reducing the probability of entrapping a particle.

  5. The Application of Layer Theory to Design: The Control Layer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Andrew S.; Langton, Matthew B.

    2016-01-01

    A theory of design layers proposed by Gibbons ("An Architectural Approach to Instructional Design." Routledge, New York, 2014) asserts that each layer of an instructional design is related to a body of theory closely associated with the concerns of that particular layer. This study focuses on one layer, the control layer, examining…

  6. Terby's Layered Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    14 March 2004 Layered rock outcrops are common all across Mars, and the Mars rover, Opportunity, has recently investigated some layered rocks in Meridiani Planum. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layered sedimentary rocks in northern Terby Crater, located just north of the giant Hellas Basin near 27.5oS, 285.8oW. Hundreds of layers are exposed in a deposit several kilometers thick within Terby. A history of events that shaped the northern Hellas region is recorded in these rocks, just waiting for a person or robot to investigate. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  7. Structured luminescence conversion layer

    DOEpatents

    Berben, Dirk; Antoniadis, Homer; Jermann, Frank; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Von Malm, Norwin; Zachau, Martin

    2012-12-11

    An apparatus device such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer deposited on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains regions such as color-changing and non-color-changing regions with particular shapes arranged in a particular pattern.

  8. Homoepitaxial growth of dense ZnO(0 0 0 1) and ZnO (1 1 2 bar0) films via MOVPE on selected ZnO substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, J. M.; Adekore, B. T.; Davis, R. F.; Stevie, F. A.

    2005-09-01

    Deposition via metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy of a low-temperature (480 °C) layer followed by a high-temperature (800 °C) densification step was employed for the growth of each ∼200 nm thick, contiguous ZnO(0 0 0 1) layer on a ZnO(0 0 0 1)-oriented substrate. Multiple iterations of this process resulted in films as thick as 2 μm. Ultra-high-purity (UHP) O2 served as the principal source of atomic oxygen; however, nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) were also investigated as potential oxygen sources in the pure state as well as in mixtures with oxygen produced in the chamber and for nitrogen doping of the growing (0 0 0 1) films. Carbon and hydrogen, derived from the decomposition of the diethylzinc precursor, and N were incorporated into the films primarily during the low-temperature step. Films grown using N2O+O2 contained an average of 5×1017 cm-3 atomic nitrogen; films using NO2+O2 had an average nitrogen concentration of 9×1019 cm-3. The low-temperature growths on ZnO(0 0 0 1) using O2 and N2O+O2 resulted in the formation of a needle microstructure; a spaghetti-like network microstructure formed when using NO2+O2 at the same temperature. Lateral growth at 800 °C from sites within the needle and network microstructures resulted in dense films containing shallow hexagonal pits that increased in number and depth with an increase in film thickness. Triple-axis XRD measurements indicated that the crystal structure of the films mimic the underlying substrates. Growth on [1 1 2bar 0]-oriented ZnO substrates at the single temperature of 600 °C resulted in a dense film composed of needles oriented in-plane along [0 0 0 1]. Atomic force microscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy revealed an rms value of 5.4 nm and hydrogen of concentration of 6.5×1018 with the carbon concentration below the detection limit of 1.3×1019 atoms/cm3.

  9. Tests on Double Layer Metalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    28 page report describes experiments in fabrication of integrated circuits with double-layer metalization. Double-layer metalization requires much less silicon "real estate" and allows more flexibility in placement of circuit elements than does single-layer metalization.

  10. EDITORIAL: Atomic layer deposition Atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godlewski, Marek

    2012-07-01

    The growth method of atomic layer deposition (ALD) was introduced in Finland by Suntola under the name of atomic layer epitaxy (ALE). The method was originally used for deposition of thin films of sulphides (ZnS, CaS, SrS) activated with manganese or rare-earth ions. Such films were grown for applications in thin-film electroluminescence (TFEL) displays. The ALE mode of growth was also tested in the case of molecular beam epitaxy. Films grown by ALD are commonly polycrystalline or even amorphous. Thus, the name ALE has been replaced by ALD. In the 80s ALD was developed mostly in Finland and neighboring Baltic countries. Deposition of a range of different materials was demonstrated at that time, including II-VI semiconductors (e.g. CdTe, CdS) and III-V (e.g. GaAs, GaN), with possible applications in e.g. photovoltaics. The number of publications on ALD was slowly increasing, approaching about 100 each year. A real boom in interest came with the development of deposition methods of thin films of high-k dielectrics. This research was motivated by a high leakage current in field-effect transistors with SiO2-based gate dielectrics. In 2007 Intel introduced a new generation of integrated circuits (ICs) with thin films of HfO2 used as gate isolating layers. In these and subsequent ICs, films of HfO2 are deposited by the ALD method. This is due to their unique properties. The introduction of ALD to the electronics industry led to a booming interest in the ALD growth method, with the number of publications increasing rapidly to well above 1000 each year. A number of new applications were proposed, as reflected in this special issue of Semiconductor Science and Technology. The included articles cover a wide range of possible applications—in microelectronics, transparent electronics, optoelectronics, photovoltaics and spintronics. Research papers and reviews on the basics of ALD growth are also included, reflecting a growing interest in precursor chemistry and growth

  11. Layered electrode for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Swathirajan, Swathy; Mikhail, Youssef M.

    2001-01-01

    There is provided an electrode structure comprising a current collector sheet and first and second layers of electrode material. Together, the layers improve catalyst utilization and water management.

  12. South Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-516, 17 October 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows eroded, stair-stepped layers in the south polar region of Mars. These layers have been considered, for the past three decades, to consist of a mixture of dust and ice. The Mars Polar Lander (MPL) mission was designed to test this hypothesis. However, sadly, MPL was lost during descent in December 1999. This exposure of south polar layered material is located near 86.3oS, 187.7oW. The image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  13. Layers in Terby Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-407, 30 June 2003

    Whether on Earth or Mars, sedimentary rocks provide a record of past environments. Of course, it is difficult to read that record without being able to visit the site. However, the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) has revealed hundreds of locales on Mars at which sedimentary rocks are exposed at the surface. Terby Crater exhibits hundreds of layers of similar thickness and physical properties--some have speculated these may be the record of an ancient lake or sea. This MOC image shows some of the layer outcrops in Terby Crater. Fans of debris have eroded from the steep, layered slopes in some places. This picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide near 27.5oS, 285.7oW. The image is illuminated from the upper left and was obtained in June 2003.

  14. Layered Systems Engineering Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breidenthal, Julian C.; Overman, Marvin J.

    2009-01-01

    A notation is described for depicting the relationships between multiple, contemporaneous systems engineering efforts undertaken within a multi-layer system-of-systems hierarchy. We combined the concepts of remoteness of activity from the end customer, depiction of activity on a timeline, and data flow to create a new kind of diagram which we call a "Layered Vee Diagram." This notation is an advance over previous notations because it is able to be simultaneously precise about activity, level of granularity, product exchanges, and timing; these advances provide systems engineering managers a significantly improved ability to express and understand the relationships between many systems engineering efforts. Using the new notation, we obtain a key insight into the relationship between project duration and the strategy selected for chaining the systems engineering effort between layers, as well as insights into the costs, opportunities, and risks associated with alternate chaining strategies.

  15. Ridged Layer Outcrop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    15 August 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a strange ridged pattern developed in an eroding layer of material on the floor of a Labyrinthus Noctis depression in the Valles Marineris system. The ridges bear some resemblance to ripple-like dunes seen elsewhere on Mars, but they are linked to the erosion of a specific layer of material--i.e., something in the rock record of Mars. Similar ridged textures are found in eroded dark-toned mantling layers in regions as far away as northern Sinus Meridiani and Mawrth Vallis. The explanation for these landforms is as elusive as this image is evocative. The image is located near 8.2oS, 93.6oW, and covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) across. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  16. East Candor Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-507, 8 October 2003

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) experiment was designed to study the geology and geomorphology of Mars by providing images comparable in resolution to the aerial photographs used by terrestrial geologists in conducting their field work. For over six years, the MOC narrow angle camera has been returning pictures that underscore, time and again, the layered nature of the upper martian crust. It is from layered rock that geologists will one day be able to decipher the history of the red planet. This example of layered rock exposures occurs in eastern Candor Chasma, one of the troughs of the Valles Marineris system. The picture is located near 8.0oS, 67.0oW, and covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. The image is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  17. Boundary layer simulator improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praharaj, Sarat C.; Schmitz, Craig P.; Nouri, Joseph A.

    1989-01-01

    Boundary Layer Integral Matrix Procedure (BLIMPJ) has been identified by the propulsion community as the rigorous boundary layer program in connection with the existing JANNAF reference programs. The improvements made to BLIMPJ and described herein have potential applications in the design of the future Orbit Transfer Vehicle engines. The turbulence model is validated to include the effects of wall roughness and a way is devised to treat multiple smooth-rough surfaces. A prediction of relaminarization regions is examined as is the combined effects of wall cooling and surface roughness on relaminarization. A turbulence model to represent the effects of constant condensed phase loading is given. A procedure is described for thrust decrement calculation in thick boundary layers by coupling the T-D Kinetics Program and BLIMPJ and a way is provided for thrust loss optimization. Potential experimental studies in rocket nozzles are identified along with the required instrumentation to provide accurate measurements in support of the presented new analytical models.

  18. Craters and Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    11 March 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some typical relations between impact craters and light-toned, layered rock on Mars. The larger circular feature at the north (top) end of the image marks the location of a filled, buried crater on intermountain terrain north of Hellas Planitia. The larger crater at the southeast (lower right) corner formed by meteor impact into the layered material in which the buried crater is encased. The layered rock, in this case, has a light tone similar to the sedimentary rocks being explored by the Mars Exploration Rover, Opportunity, thousands of kilometers away in Sinus Meridiani.

    Location near: 24.9oS, 299.3oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  19. Sedimentary Rock Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    27 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layers of sedimentary rock in a crater in western Arabia Terra. Layered rock records the history of a place, but an orbiter image alone cannot tell the entire story. These materials record some past episodes of deposition of fine-grained material in an impact crater that is much larger than the image shown here. The picture is located near 3.4oN, 358.7oW, and covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi.) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  20. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  1. Layers in Melas Chasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger annotated version

    This scene of layered deposits is from Melas Chasma, part of the Valles Marineris valley network. The area consists of a series of plateaus and cliffs that form a step-like terrain similar to the Grand Staircase-Escalante region of southwest Utah. The upper-right half of the image covers the highest plateau, and lower cliffs and plateaus step down in elevation toward the lower left of the image. Dunes of dark sand commonly cover the flat plateaus and distinct layers of bedrock are exposed in the cliffs. The orientations of these layers may help scientists to understand how the layers formed and the kind of environment that the layers formed in. Black rectangles on the left side of the image are areas where the image data was lost during transmission from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter to Earth. This subscene [above] shows a series of boulder tracks on the left side of the image. The boulders fell from the cliffs above and left behind a series of small depressions. Each depression was made as the boulder bounced and rolled along the surface. In many cases, the tracks can be followed to the specific boulder that made them. Also visible in this subscene are cross-sections through the layered bedrock. This bedrock likely formed through settling of sand-sized particles out of the air or out of a body of water that has since drained away. These layers are 'cross-bedded', which means that subsequent layers are not parallel to each other but are instead oriented at an angle to other layers. The fact that these layers are cross-bedded indicates that the sand-sized particles were moved horizontally along the surface as they settled, just like sand dunes or ripples at the bottom of a stream. The size and shape of these cross-beds may help scientists to determine if the layers formed underwater or on land.

    Image PSP_001377_1685 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging

  2. ACOUSTIC COMPACTION LAYER DETECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The depth and strength of compacted layers in fields have been determined traditionally using the ASAE standardized cone penetrometer method. However, an on-the-go method would be much faster and much less labor intensive. The soil measurement system described here attempts to locate the compacted...

  3. Double layers without current

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, F.W.; Sun, Y.C.

    1980-11-01

    The steady-state solution of the nonlinear Vlasov-Poisson equations is reduced to a nonlinear eigenvalue problem for the case of double-layer (potential drop) boundary conditions. Solutions with no relative electron-ion drifts are found. The kinetic stability is discussed. Suggestions for creating these states in experiments and computer simulations are offered.

  4. Martian Meteor Ionization Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Pesnell, W. D.

    1999-01-01

    Small interplanetary grains bombard Mars, like all the solar system planets, and, like all the planets with atmospheres, meteoric ion and atom layers form in the upper atmosphere. We have developed a comprehensive one-dimensional model of the Martian meteoric ionization layer including a full chemical scheme. A persistent layer of magnesium ions should exist around an altitude of 70 km. Unlike the terrestrial case, where the metallic ions are formed via charge-exchange with the ambient ions, Mg(+) in the Martian atmosphere is produced by photoionization. Nevertheless, the predicted metal layer peak densities for Earth and Mars are similar. Diffusion solutions, such as those presented here, should be a good approximation of the metallic ions in regions where the magnetic field is negligible and may provide a significant contribution to the nightside ionosphere. The low ultraviolet absorption of the Martian atmosphere may make Mars an excellent laboratory in which to study meteoric ablation. Resonance lines not seen in the spectra of terrestrial meteors may be visible to a surface observatory in the Martian highlands.

  5. Layer-Cake Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tedford, Rebecca; Warny, Sophie

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors offer a safe, fun, effective way to introduce geology concepts to elementary school children of all ages: "coring" layer cakes. This activity introduces the concepts and challenges that geologists face and at the same time strengthens students' inferential, observational, and problem-solving skills. It also addresses…

  6. Teaching the Double Layer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bockris, J. O'M.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests various methods for teaching the double layer in electrochemistry courses. Topics addressed include measuring change in absolute potential difference (PD) at interphase, conventional electrode potential scale, analyzing absolute PD, metal-metal and overlap electron PDs, accumulation of material at interphase, thermodynamics of electrified…

  7. MITRE sensor layer prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, Francis; McGarry, Donald; Zasada, David; Foote, Scott

    2009-05-01

    The MITRE Sensor Layer Prototype is an initial design effort to enable every sensor to help create new capabilities through collaborative data sharing. By making both upstream (raw) and downstream (processed) sensor data visible, users can access the specific level, type, and quantities of data needed to create new data products that were never anticipated by the original designers of the individual sensors. The major characteristic that sets sensor data services apart from typical enterprise services is the volume (on the order of multiple terabytes) of raw data that can be generated by most sensors. Traditional tightly coupled processing approaches extract pre-determined information from the incoming raw sensor data, format it, and send it to predetermined users. The community is rapidly reaching the conclusion that tightly coupled sensor processing loses too much potentially critical information.1 Hence upstream (raw and partially processed) data must be extracted, rapidly archived, and advertised to the enterprise for unanticipated uses. The authors believe layered sensing net-centric integration can be achieved through a standardize-encapsulate-syndicateaggregate- manipulate-process paradigm. The Sensor Layer Prototype's technical approach focuses on implementing this proof of concept framework to make sensor data visible, accessible and useful to the enterprise. To achieve this, a "raw" data tap between physical transducers associated with sensor arrays and the embedded sensor signal processing hardware and software has been exploited. Second, we encapsulate and expose both raw and partially processed data to the enterprise within the context of a service-oriented architecture. Third, we advertise the presence of multiple types, and multiple layers of data through geographic-enabled Really Simple Syndication (GeoRSS) services. These GeoRSS feeds are aggregated, manipulated, and filtered by a feed aggregator. After filtering these feeds to bring just the type

  8. Boundary layer transition studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H.

    1995-01-01

    A small-scale wind tunnel previously used for turbulent boundary layer experiments was modified for two sets of boundary layer transition studies. The first study concerns a laminar separation/turbulent reattachment. The pressure gradient and unit Reynolds number are the same as the fully turbulent flow of Spalart and Watmuff. Without the trip wire, a laminar layer asymptotes to a Falkner & Skan similarity solution in the FPG. Application of the APG causes the layer to separate and a highly turbulent and approximately 2D mean flow reattachment occurs downstream. In an effort to gain some physical insight into the flow processes a small impulsive disturbance was introduced at the C(sub p) minimum. The facility is totally automated and phase-averaged data are measured on a point-by-point basis using unprecedently large grids. The evolution of the disturbance has been tracked all the way into the reattachment region and beyond into the fully turbulent boundary layer. At first, the amplitude decays exponentially with streamwise distance in the APG region, where the layer remains attached, i.e. the layer is viscously stable. After separation, the rate of decay slows, and a point of minimum amplitude is reached where the contours of the wave packet exhibit dispersive characteristics. From this point, exponential growth of the amplitude of the disturbance is observed in the detached shear layer, i.e. the dominant instability mechanism is inviscid. A group of large-scale 3D vortex loops emerges in the vicinity of the reattachment. Remarkably, the second loop retains its identify far downstream in the turbulent boundary layer. The results provide a level of detail usually associated with CFD. Substantial modifications were made to the facility for the second study concerning disturbances generated by Suction Holes for laminar flow Control (LFC). The test section incorporates suction through interchangeable porous test surfaces. Detailed studies have been made using isolated

  9. Peeling Back the Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this panoramic camera image of the rock target named 'Mazatzal' on sol 77 (March 22, 2004). It is a close-up look at the rock face and the targets that will be brushed and ground by the rock abrasion tool in upcoming sols.

    Mazatzal, like most rocks on Earth and Mars, has layers of material near its surface that provide clues about the history of the rock. Scientists believe that the top layer of Mazatzal is actually a coating of dust and possibly even salts. Under this light coating may be a more solid portion of the rock that has been chemically altered by weathering. Past this layer is the unaltered rock, which may give scientists the best information about how Mazatzal was formed.

    Because each layer reveals information about the formation and subsequent history of Mazatzal, it is important that scientists get a look at each of them. For this reason, they have developed a multi-part strategy to use the rock abrasion tool to systematically peel back Mazatzal's layers and analyze what's underneath with the rover's microscopic imager, and its Moessbauer and alpha particle X-ray spectrometers.

    The strategy began on sol 77 when scientists used the microscopic imager to get a closer look at targets on Mazatzal named 'New York,' 'Illinois' and 'Arizona.' These rock areas were targeted because they posed the best opportunity for successfully using the rock abrasion tool; Arizona also allowed for a close-up look at a range of tones. On sol 78, Spirit's rock abrasion tool will do a light brushing on the Illinois target to preserve some of the surface layers. Then, a brushing of the New York target should remove the top coating of any dust and salts and perhaps reveal the chemically altered rock underneath. Finally, on sol 79, the rock abrasion tool will be commanded to grind into the New York target, which will give scientists the best chance of observing Mazatzal's interior.

    The Mazatzal targets were named

  10. Layered seal for turbomachinery

    DOEpatents

    Sarawate, Neelesh Nandkumar; Morgan, Victor John; Weber, David Wayne

    2015-11-20

    The present application provides seal assemblies for reducing leakages between adjacent components of turbomachinery. The seal assemblies may include outer shims, and at least a portion of the outer shims may be substantially impervious. At least one of the outer shims may be configured for sealing engagement with seal slots of the adjacent components. The seal assemblies may also include at least one of an inner shim and a filler layer positioned between the outer shims. The at least one inner shim may be substantially solid and the at least one filler layer may be relatively porous. The seal assemblies may be sufficiently flexible to account for misalignment between the adjacent components, sufficiently stiff to meet assembly requirements, and sufficiently robust to operating meet requirements associated with turbomachinery.

  11. Crack layer theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chudnovsky, A.

    1987-01-01

    A damage parameter is introduced in addition to conventional parameters of continuum mechanics and consider a crack surrounded by an array of microdefects within the continuum mechanics framework. A system consisting of the main crack and surrounding damage is called crack layer (CL). Crack layer propagation is an irreversible process. The general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes are employed to identify the driving forces (causes) and to derive the constitutive equation of CL propagation, that is, the relationship between the rates of the crack growth and damage dissemination from one side and the conjugated thermodynamic forces from another. The proposed law of CL propagation is in good agreement with the experimental data on fatigue CL propagation in various materials. The theory also elaborates material toughness characterization.

  12. Layered Rocks in Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    19 June 2004 Exposures of layered, sedimentary rock are common on Mars. From the rock outcrops examined by the Mars Exploration Rover, Opportunity, in Meridiani Planum to the sequence in Gale Crater's central mound that is twice the thickness of of the sedimentary rocks exposed by Arizona's Grand Canyon, Mars presents a world of sediment to study. This unusual example, imaged by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), shows eroded layer outcrops in a crater in Terra Tyrrhena near 15.4oS, 270.5oW. Sedimentary rocks provide a record of past climates and events. Perhaps someday the story told by the rocks in this image will be known via careful field work. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the left.

  13. Layered Rock Ahead

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Now that solar conjunction is over so that communication between Earth and Mars is no longer blocked by the Sun, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit is continuing its trek through the 'Columbia Hills' in Gusev Crater. Straight ahead, in the foreground of this image, is a horizontally layered rock dubbed 'Tetl,' which scientists hope to investigate. Layering can be either volcanic or sedimentary in origin; researchers aim to determine which of these processes created this rock. If for some reason this particular rock is not favorably positioned for grinding and examination by the toolbox of instruments on the rover's robotic arm, Spirit will be within short reach of another similar rock, dubbed 'Coba,' just to the right, toward the middle of this image. Spirit took this image with its navigation camera on its 263rd martian day, or sol (Sept. 28, 2004).

  14. Sedimentary Rock Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-348, 2 May 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image acquired in March 2003 shows dozens of repeated layers of sedimentary rock in a western Arabia Terra crater at 8oN, 7oW. Wind has sculpted the layered forms into hills somewhat elongated toward the lower left (southwest). The dark patches at the bottom (south) end of the image are drifts of windblown sand. These sedimentary rocks might indicate that the crater was once the site of a lake--or they may result from deposition by wind in a completely dry, desert environment. Either way, these rocks have something important to say about the geologic history of Mars. The area shown is about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  15. Layered Composite Analysis Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanaswami, R.; Cole, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    Laminated composite material construction is gaining popularity within industry as an attractive alternative to metallic designs where high strength at reduced weights is of prime consideration. This has necessitated the development of an effective analysis capability for the static, dynamic and buckling analyses of structural components constructed of layered composites. Theoretical and user aspects of layered composite analysis and its incorporation into CSA/NASTRAN are discussed. The availability of stress and strain based failure criteria is described which aids the user in reviewing the voluminous output normally produced in such analyses. Simple strategies to obtain minimum weight designs of composite structures are discussed. Several example problems are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and user convenient features of the capability.

  16. Dipping Rock Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    23 May 2004 The central peak of Oudemans Crater, located at the edge of the Labyrinthus Noctis trough system, consists of steeply-dipping rock layers that were uplifted and tilted by the meteor impact that formed the crater. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example. The banded features are layers of light-toned, possibly sedimentary, rock that were brought to the surface and uplifted by the impact process that formed the crater and its central peak. Oudemans Crater's central peak serves as a means for probing the nature of rock that lies beneath the plains cut by the Labyrinthus Noctis troughs, which are part of the vast Valles Marineris system. This March 2004 picture is located near 10.2oS, 92.0oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  17. Crack layer theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chudnovsky, A.

    1984-01-01

    A damage parameter is introduced in addition to conventional parameters of continuum mechanics and consider a crack surrounded by an array of microdefects within the continuum mechanics framework. A system consisting of the main crack and surrounding damage is called crack layer (CL). Crack layer propagation is an irreversible process. The general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes are employed to identify the driving forces (causes) and to derive the constitutive equation of CL propagation, that is, the relationship between the rates of the crack growth and damage dissemination from one side and the conjugated thermodynamic forces from another. The proposed law of CL propagation is in good agreement with the experimental data on fatigue CL propagation in various materials. The theory also elaborates material toughness characterization.

  18. Origins of Igneous Layering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Bruce

    Anyone who has ever seen a photo of a layered intrusion, let alone visited one first hand, or even seen a thin section from one, cannot help but be impressed by the stunning record of crystal growth and deposition. Such bodies stand as majestic monuments of undeniable evidence that intricate magmatic processes exist, processes that couple crystallization, convection, and crystal sorting to form rocks so highly ordered and beautiful that they are a wonder to behold. These are the altars to which petrologists must carry their conceived petrologic processes for approval.Although significant in number, the best layered intrusions seem to be found almost always in remote places. Their names, Bushveld, Muskox, Kiglapait, Stillwater, Duke Island, Skaergaard, Rhum, ring through igneous petrology almost as historic military battles (Saratoga, Antietam, Bull Run, Manassas, Gettysburg) do through American history. People who have worked on such bodies are almost folk heros: Wager, Deer, Brown, Jackson, Hess, Irvine, McBirney, Morse; these names are petrologic household words. Yet with all this fanfare and reverence, layered instrusions are nearly thought of as period pieces, extreme examples of what can happen, but not generally what does. This is now all changing with the increasing realization that these bodies are perhaps highly representative of all magmatic bodies. They are simply more dynamically complete, containing more of the full range of interactions, and of course, exposing a more complete record. They are one end of a spectrum containing lava flows, lava lakes, large sills, plutons, and layered intrusions. This book uniquely covers this range with an abundance of first-hand field observations and a good dose of process conceptualization, magma physics, and crystal growth kinetics.

  19. Boundary layer simulator improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praharaj, S. C.; Schmitz, C.; Frost, C.; Engel, C. D.; Fuller, C. E.; Bender, R. L.; Pond, J.

    1984-01-01

    High chamber pressure expander cycles proposed for orbit transfer vehicles depend primarily on the heat energy transmitted from the combustion products through the thrust wall chamber wall. The heat transfer to the nozzle wall is affected by such variables as wall roughness, relamarization, and the presence of particles in the flow. Motor performance loss for these nozzles with thick boundary layers is inaccurate using the existing procedure coded BLIMPJ. Modifications and innovations to the code are examined. Updated routines are listed.

  20. The atmospheric boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Garratt, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    This book is aimed at researchers in the atmospheric and associated sciences who require a moderately advanced text on the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) in which the many links between turbulence, air-surface transfer, boundary-layer structure and dynamics, and numerical modeling are discussed and elaborated upon. Chapter 1 serves as an introduction, with Chapters 2 and 3 dealing with the development of mean and turbulence equations, and the many scaling laws and theories that are the cornerstone of any serious ABL treatment. Modelling of the ABL is crucially dependent for its realism on the surface boundary conditions, and Chapters 4 and 5 deal with aerodynamic and energy considerations, with attention to both dry and wet land surfaces and the sea. The structure of the clear-sky, thermally stratified ABL is treated in Chapter 6, including the convective and stable cases over homogeneous land, the marine ABL and the internal boundary layer at the coastline. Chapter 7 then extends the discussion to the cloudy ABL. This is seen as particularly relevant since the extensive stratocumulus regions over the sub-tropical oceans and stratus regions over the Arctic are now identified as key players in the climate system. Finally, Chapters 8 and 9 bring much of the book's material together in a discussion of appropriate ABL and surface parameterization schemes for the general circulation models of the atmosphere that are being used for climate simulation.

  1. Multifunctional layered magnetic composites

    PubMed Central

    Siglreitmeier, Maria; Wu, Baohu; Kollmann, Tina; Neubauer, Martin; Nagy, Gergely; Schwahn, Dietmar; Pipich, Vitaliy; Faivre, Damien; Zahn, Dirk; Fery, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Summary A fabrication method of a multifunctional hybrid material is achieved by using the insoluble organic nacre matrix of the Haliotis laevigata shell infiltrated with gelatin as a confined reaction environment. Inside this organic scaffold magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) are synthesized. The amount of MNPs can be controlled through the synthesis protocol therefore mineral loadings starting from 15 wt % up to 65 wt % can be realized. The demineralized organic nacre matrix is characterized by small-angle and very-small-angle neutron scattering (SANS and VSANS) showing an unchanged organic matrix structure after demineralization compared to the original mineralized nacre reference. Light microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy studies of stained samples show the presence of insoluble proteins at the chitin surface but not between the chitin layers. Successful and homogeneous gelatin infiltration in between the chitin layers can be shown. The hybrid material is characterized by TEM and shows a layered structure filled with MNPs with a size of around 10 nm. Magnetic analysis of the material demonstrates superparamagnetic behavior as characteristic for the particle size. Simulation studies show the potential of collagen and chitin to act as nucleators, where there is a slight preference of chitin over collagen as a nucleator for magnetite. Colloidal-probe AFM measurements demonstrate that introduction of a ferrogel into the chitin matrix leads to a certain increase in the stiffness of the composite material. PMID:25671158

  2. Multifunctional layered magnetic composites.

    PubMed

    Siglreitmeier, Maria; Wu, Baohu; Kollmann, Tina; Neubauer, Martin; Nagy, Gergely; Schwahn, Dietmar; Pipich, Vitaliy; Faivre, Damien; Zahn, Dirk; Fery, Andreas; Cölfen, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    A fabrication method of a multifunctional hybrid material is achieved by using the insoluble organic nacre matrix of the Haliotis laevigata shell infiltrated with gelatin as a confined reaction environment. Inside this organic scaffold magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) are synthesized. The amount of MNPs can be controlled through the synthesis protocol therefore mineral loadings starting from 15 wt % up to 65 wt % can be realized. The demineralized organic nacre matrix is characterized by small-angle and very-small-angle neutron scattering (SANS and VSANS) showing an unchanged organic matrix structure after demineralization compared to the original mineralized nacre reference. Light microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy studies of stained samples show the presence of insoluble proteins at the chitin surface but not between the chitin layers. Successful and homogeneous gelatin infiltration in between the chitin layers can be shown. The hybrid material is characterized by TEM and shows a layered structure filled with MNPs with a size of around 10 nm. Magnetic analysis of the material demonstrates superparamagnetic behavior as characteristic for the particle size. Simulation studies show the potential of collagen and chitin to act as nucleators, where there is a slight preference of chitin over collagen as a nucleator for magnetite. Colloidal-probe AFM measurements demonstrate that introduction of a ferrogel into the chitin matrix leads to a certain increase in the stiffness of the composite material. PMID:25671158

  3. Layered Crater Walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    16 September 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an impact crater that is approximately 3.5 kilometers (2.2 miles) in diameter. It is located to the northeast of Olympus Mons, in the Tharsis Region. Layered rock units are visible on the inside of the raised crater rim.

    Location near: 70.7oN, 271.0oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Spring

  4. The Keck keyword layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, A. R.; Lupton, W. F.

    1992-01-01

    Each Keck instrument presents a consistent software view to the user interface programmer. The view consists of a small library of functions, which are identical for all instruments, and a large set of keywords, that vary from instrument to instrument. All knowledge of the underlying task structure is hidden from the application programmer by the keyword layer. Image capture software uses the same function library to collect data for the image header. Because the image capture software and the instrument control software are built on top of the same keyword layer, a given observation can be 'replayed' by extracting keyword-value pairs from the image header and passing them back to the control system. The keyword layer features non-blocking as well as blocking I/O. A non-blocking keyword write operation (such as setting a filter position) specifies a callback to be invoked when the operation is complete. A non-blocking keyword read operation specifies a callback to be invoked whenever the keyword changes state. The keyword-callback style meshes well with the widget-callback style commonly used in X window programs. The first keyword library was built for the two Keck optical instruments. More recently, keyword libraries have been developed for the infrared instruments and for telescope control. Although the underlying mechanisms used for inter-process communication by each of these systems vary widely (Lick MUSIC, Sun RPC, and direct socket I/O, respectively), a basic user interface has been written that can be used with any of these systems. Since the keyword libraries are bound to user interface programs dynamically at run time, only a single set of user interface executables is needed. For example, the same program, 'xshow', can be used to display continuously the telescope's position, the time left in an instrument's exposure, or both values simultaneously. Less generic tools that operate on specific keywords, for example an X display that controls optical

  5. Cooperating systems: Layered MAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochowiak, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    Distributed intelligent systems can be distinguished by the models that they use. The model developed focuses on layered multiagent system conceived of as a bureaucracy in which a distributed data base serves as a central means of communication. The various generic bureaus of such a system is described and a basic vocabulary for such systems is presented. In presenting the bureaus and vocabularies, special attention is given to the sorts of reasonings that are appropriate. A bureaucratic model has a hierarchy of master system and work group that organizes E agents and B agents. The master system provides the administrative services and support facilities for the work groups.

  6. Layered Rocks in Ritchey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    14 May 2004 This March 2004 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light- and dark-toned layered rock outcrops on the floor of Ritchey Crater, located near 28.9oS, 50.8oW. Some or all of these rocks may be sedimentary in origin. Erosion has left a couple of buttes standing on a more erosion-resistant plain. This picture covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  7. Remnant Layered Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    29 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a suite of small yardangs -- wind eroded hills -- on the plains immediately west of Meridiani Planum. These yardangs are the remains of layered, sedimentary rock that once covered this area. The few craters visible in this 3 km (1.9 mi) -wide scene are all exhumed from beneath the rocks that comprise the yardang hills. The image is located near 0.4oS, 7.2oW. Sunlight illuminates the picture from the lower left.

  8. Layered Rocks of Melas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    04 August 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layered sedimentary rock outcrops exposed by erosion in southern Melas Chasma, one of the major Valles Marineris troughs. Such outcrops are common in southern Melas; they resemble the rock outcrops seen in some of the chaotic terrains and other Valles Marineris chasms. This image is located near 11.9oS, 74.6oW, and is about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  9. Atomic layer epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Colin H. L.; Pessa, Markus V.

    1986-08-01

    Atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) is not so much a new technique for the preparation of thin films as a novel modification to existing methods of vapor-phase epitaxy, whether physical [e.g., evaporation, at one limit molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE)] or chemical [e.g., chloride epitaxy or metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)]. It is a self-regulatory process which, in its simplest form, produces one complete molecular layer of a compound per operational cycle, with a greater thickness being obtained by repeated cycling. There is no growth rate in ALE as in other crystal growth processes. So far ALE has been applied to rather few materials, but, in principle, it could have a quite general application. It has been used to prepare single-crystal overlayers of CdTe, (Cd,Mn)Te, GaAs and AlAs, a number of polycrystalline films and highly efficient electroluminescent thin-film displays based on ZnS:Mn. It could also offer particular advantages for the preparation of ultrathin films of precisely controlled thickness in the nanometer range and thus may have a special value for growing low-dimensional structures.

  10. Layered kagome spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamp, James; Dutton, Sian; Mourigal, Martin; Mukherjee, Paromita; Paddison, Joseph; Ong, Harapan; Castelnovo, Claudio

    Spin ice materials provide a rare instance of emergent gauge symmetry and fractionalisation in three dimensions: the effective degrees of freedom of the system are emergent magnetic monopoles, and the extensively many `ice rule' ground states are those devoid of monopole excitations. Two-dimensional (kagome) analogues of spin ice have also been shown to display a similarly rich behaviour. In kagome ice however the ground-state `ice rule' condition implies the presence everywhere of magnetic charges. As temperature is lowered, an Ising transition occurs to a charge-ordered state, which can be mapped to a dimer covering of the dual honeycomb lattice. A second transition, of Kosterlitz-Thouless or three-state Potts type, occurs to a spin-ordered state at yet lower temperatures, due to small residual energy differences between charge-ordered states. Inspired by recent experimental capabilities in growing spin ice samples with selective (layered) substitution of non-magnetic ions, in this work we investigate the fate of the two ordering transitions when individual kagome layers are brought together to form a three-dimensional pyrochlore structure coupled by long range dipolar interactions. We also consider the response to substitutional disorder and applied magnetic fields.

  11. On the kinetic barriers of graphene homo-epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Yu, Xinke; Xie, Ya-Hong; Cahyadi, Erica; Ratsch, Christian

    2014-12-01

    The diffusion processes and kinetic barriers of individual carbon adatoms and clusters on graphene surfaces are investigated to provide fundamental understanding of the physics governing epitaxial growth of multilayer graphene. It is found that individual carbon adatoms form bonds with the underlying graphene whereas the interaction between graphene and carbon clusters, consisting of 6 atoms or more, is very weak being van der Waals in nature. Therefore, small carbon clusters are quite mobile on the graphene surfaces and the diffusion barrier is negligibly small (∼6 meV). This suggests the feasibility of high-quality graphene epitaxial growth at very low growth temperatures with small carbon clusters (e.g., hexagons) as carbon source. We propose that the growth mode is totally different from 3-dimensional bulk materials with the surface mobility of carbon hexagons being the highest over graphene surfaces that gradually decreases with further increase in cluster size.

  12. Homoepitaxial regrowth habits of ZnO nanowire arrays

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic regrowth of ZnO nanowires [NWs] under a similar chemical vapor transport and condensation [CVTC] process can produce abundant ZnO nanostructures which are not possible by a single CVTC step. In this work, we report three different regrowth modes of ZnO NWs: axial growth, radial growth, and both directions. The different growth modes seem to be determined by the properties of initial ZnO NW templates. By varying the growth parameters in the first-step CVTC process, ZnO nanostructures (e.g., nanoantenna) with drastically different morphologies can be obtained with distinct photoluminescence properties. The results have implications in guiding the rational synthesis of various ZnO NW heterostructures. PMID:22151820

  13. Metal deposition using seed layers

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Hsein-Ping; Chen, Gang; Bo, Yu; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Shuo; Poudel, Bed

    2013-11-12

    Methods of forming a conductive metal layers on substrates are disclosed which employ a seed layer to enhance bonding, especially to smooth, low-roughness or hydrophobic substrates. In one aspect of the invention, the seed layer can be formed by applying nanoparticles onto a surface of the substrate; and the metallization is achieved by electroplating an electrically conducting metal onto the seed layer, whereby the nanoparticles serve as nucleation sites for metal deposition. In another approach, the seed layer can be formed by a self-assembling linker material, such as a sulfur-containing silane material.

  14. Buried oxide layer in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2001-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  15. ISDC Data Access Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, D.; Borkowski, J.; Contessi, T.; Lock, T.; Rohlfs, R.; Walter, R.

    The ISDC Data Access Layer (DAL) is an ANSI C and \\fortran 90 compatible library under development in support of the ESA INTEGRAL mission data analysis software. DALs primary purpose is to isolate the analysis software from the specifics of the data formats while at the same time providing new data abstraction and access capabilities. DAL supports the creation and manipulation of hierarchical data sets which may span multiple files and, in theory, multiple computer systems. A number of Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) are supported by DAL that allow software to view and access data at different levels of complexity. DAL also allows data sets to reside on disk, in conventional memory or in shared memory in a way that is transparent to the user/application.

  16. Layer Outcrops and Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-561, 1 December 2003

    This October 2003 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows dark, windblown sand dunes amid outcrops of light-toned, sedimentary rock in a crater in western Arabia Terra. The darkest material in the scene is windblown sand; the steep slopes--the slip faces--of the dunes face toward the southwest (lower left), indicating that wind transport of sand has been from the northeast (upper right). The layered mounds are the remains of sedimentary rock that were once more extensive across this crater floor. The image is located near 8.9oN, 1.2oW, and covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  17. Layers in Crater Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-431, 24 July 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a cluster of old, small impact craters near 36.3oN, 281.9oW. The group of craters was probably formed by secondary impacts following a much larger impact that occurred some distance away; the material that created these craters would have been the ejecta from the larger crater, rather than meteoroids from outer space. The craters cluster is considered to be relatively old because none of the craters have ejecta blankets any more, and each was filled, or partially filled, with layered material that was later eroded to form the terraced mounds found in their floors. This picture is illuminated from the lower left.

  18. Layers, Boulders, and Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-364, 18 May 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows the wall of a trough in the Zephyrus Fossae region, west of the Elysium Rise near 27.9oN, 217.5oW. The trough wall has cut through and exposed layered bedrock, visible near the top of the wall. Talus covers the lower portions of the wall; this debris includes many automobile- and house-sized boulder--most of which are seen as dark dots at the base of the slope. Dust has coated and mantled much of this terrain, including some of the boulders. The dark streak near the center of the picture was formed by landsliding (or avalanching) of some of the dust. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  19. Double layer secure sketch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cai

    2012-09-01

    Secure sketch has been applied successfully in a wide variety of applications like cryptography, biometric authentication systems and so on. All of these secure sketches have properties in common namely error-tolerance and small entropy loss. The former ensures an input set w' can unlock the system if w' is substantially overlapped with a template set w while the latter means it is hard for an adversary to get the information of w even with the knowledge of s, which is produced by w and stored in the system publicly. In their constructions, they all consider w as a set of atomic elements. However, in the real word, it is very likely the elements in the template set are sets as well. In this paper, we propose a double layer secure sketch to address this issue.

  20. Templated, layered manganese phosphate

    DOEpatents

    Thoma, Steven G.; Bonhomme, Francois R.

    2004-08-17

    A new crystalline maganese phosphate composition having an empirical formula: O). The compound was determined to crystallize in the trigonal space group P-3c1 with a=8.8706(4) .ANG., c=26.1580(2) .ANG., and V (volume)=1783 .ANG..sup.3. The structure consists of sheets of corner sharing Mn(II)O.sub.4 and PO.sub.4 tetrahedra with layers of (H.sub.3 NCH.sub.2 CH.sub.2).sub.3 N and water molecules in-between. The pronated (H.sub.3 NCH.sub.2 CH.sub.2).sub.3 N molecules provide charge balancing for the inorganic sheets. A network of hydrogen bonds between water molecules and the inorganic sheets holds the structure together.

  1. Ozone Layer Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPeters, Richard; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been monitoring the ozone layer from space using optical remote sensing techniques since 1970. With concern over catalytic destruction of ozone (mid-1970s) and the development of the Antarctic ozone hole (mid-1980s), long term ozone monitoring has become the primary focus of NASA's series of ozone measuring instruments. A series of TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) and SBUV (Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet) instruments has produced a nearly continuous record of global ozone from 1979 to the present. These instruments infer ozone by measuring sunlight backscattered from the atmosphere in the ultraviolet through differential absorption. These measurements have documented a 15 Dobson Unit drop in global average ozone since 1980, and the declines in ozone in the antarctic each October have been far more dramatic. Instruments that measure the ozone vertical distribution, the SBUV and SAGE (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment) instruments for example, show that the largest changes are occurring in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere. The goal of ozone measurement in the next decades will be to document the predicted recovery of the ozone layer as CFC (chlorofluorocarbon) levels decline. This will require a continuation of global measurements of total column ozone on a global basis, but using data from successor instruments to TOMS. Hyperspectral instruments capable of measuring in the UV will be needed for this purpose. Establishing the relative roles of chemistry and dynamics will require instruments to measure ozone in the troposphere and in the stratosphere with good vertical resolution. Instruments that can measure other chemicals important to ozone formation and destruction will also be needed.

  2. Processes for multi-layer devices utilizing layer transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, Gregory N; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Kim, Bongsang; Cederberg, Jeffrey; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Resnick, Paul J

    2015-02-03

    A method includes forming a release layer over a donor substrate. A plurality of devices made of a first semiconductor material are formed over the release layer. A first dielectric layer is formed over the plurality of devices such that all exposed surfaces of the plurality of devices are covered by the first dielectric layer. The plurality of devices are chemically attached to a receiving device made of a second semiconductor material different than the first semiconductor material, the receiving device having a receiving substrate attached to a surface of the receiving device opposite the plurality of devices. The release layer is etched to release the donor substrate from the plurality of devices. A second dielectric layer is applied over the plurality of devices and the receiving device to mechanically attach the plurality of devices to the receiving device.

  3. Ultrasonic Imaging Of Bond Layers Through Bond Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, E. James

    1992-01-01

    Combination of hardware and software helps ultrasonic C-scan inspection system create images of bond layer in laminated composite material, even when obscured by another bond layer. Produces image of both layers in single scan. Includes ultrasonic transducer, pulser/receiver, mechanical scanner, personal computer as controller, and electronic circuitry that gates first and second peak signals, detects peaks, and feeds resulting amplitude data to computer.

  4. Inter-layer synchronization in multiplex networks of identical layers.

    PubMed

    Sevilla-Escoboza, R; Sendiña-Nadal, I; Leyva, I; Gutiérrez, R; Buldú, J M; Boccaletti, S

    2016-06-01

    Inter-layer synchronization is a distinctive process of multiplex networks whereby each node in a given layer evolves synchronously with all its replicas in other layers, irrespective of whether or not it is synchronized with the other units of the same layer. We analytically derive the necessary conditions for the existence and stability of such a state, and verify numerically the analytical predictions in several cases where such a state emerges. We further inspect its robustness against a progressive de-multiplexing of the network, and provide experimental evidence by means of multiplexes of nonlinear electronic circuits affected by intrinsic noise and parameter mismatch. PMID:27368794

  5. Boundary-Layer & health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costigliola, V.

    2010-09-01

    It has long been known that specific atmospheric processes, such as weather and longer-term climatic fluctuations, affect human health. The biometeorological literature refers to this relationship as meteorotropism, defined as a change in an organism that is correlated with a change in atmospheric conditions. Plenty of (patho)physiological functions are affected by those conditions - like the respiratory diseases - and currently it is difficult to put any limits for pathologies developed in reply. Nowadays the importance of atmospheric boundary layer and health is increasingly recognised. A number of epidemiologic studies have reported associations between ambient concentrations of air pollution, specifically particulate pollution, and adverse health effects, even at the relatively low concentrations of pollution found. Since 1995 there have been over twenty-one studies from four continents that have explicitly examined the association between ambient air pollutant mixes and daily mortality. Statistically significant and positive associations have been reported in data from various locations around the world, all with varying air pollutant concentrations, weather conditions, population characteristics and public health policies. Particular role has been given to atmospheric boundary layer processes, the impact of which for specific patient-cohort is, however, not well understood till now. Assessing and monitoring air quality are thus fundamental to improve Europe's welfare. One of current projects run by the "European Medical Association" - PASODOBLE will develop and demonstrate user-driven downstream information services for the regional and local air quality sectors by combining space-based and in-situ data with models in 4 thematic service lines: - Health community support for hospitals, pharmacies, doctors and people at risk - Public information for regions, cities, tourist industry and sporting event organizers - Compliance monitoring support on particulate

  6. Excited waves in shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechert, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    The generation of instability waves in free shear layers is investigated. The model assumes an infinitesimally thin shear layer shed from a semi-infinite plate which is exposed to sound excitation. The acoustical shear layer excitation by a source further away from the plate edge in the downstream direction is very weak while upstream from the plate edge the excitation is relatively efficient. A special solution is given for the source at the plate edge. The theory is then extended to two streams on both sides of the shear layer having different velocities and densities. Furthermore, the excitation of a shear layer in a channel is calculated. A reference quantity is found for the magnitude of the excited instability waves. For a comparison with measurements, numerical computations of the velocity field outside the shear layer were carried out.

  7. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, Dennis P.; Schmoeckel, Alison K.; Vernstrom, George D.; Atanasoski, Radoslav; Wood, Thomas E.; Yang, Ruizhi; Easton, E. Bradley; Dahn, Jeffrey R.; O'Neill, David G.

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  8. A POROUS, LAYERED HELIOPAUSE

    SciTech Connect

    Swisdak, M.; Drake, J. F.; Opher, M. E-mail: drake@umd.edu

    2013-09-01

    The picture of the heliopause (HP)-the boundary between the domains of the Sun and the local interstellar medium (LISM)-as a pristine interface with a large rotation in the magnetic field fails to describe recent Voyager 1 (V1) data. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the global heliosphere reveal that the rotation angle of the magnetic field across the HP at V1 is small. Particle-in-cell simulations, based on cuts through the MHD model at V1's location, suggest that the sectored region of the heliosheath (HS) produces large-scale magnetic islands that reconnect with the interstellar magnetic field while mixing LISM and HS plasma. Cuts across the simulation reveal multiple, anti-correlated jumps in the number densities of LISM and HS particles, similar to those observed, at the magnetic separatrices. A model is presented, based on both the observations and simulations, of the HP as a porous, multi-layered structure threaded by magnetic fields. This model further suggests that contrary to the conclusions of recent papers, V1 has already crossed the HP.

  9. Outer layer effects in wind-farm boundary layers: Coriolis forces and boundary layer height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaerts, Dries; Meyers, Johan

    2015-11-01

    In LES studies of wind-farm boundary layers, scale separation between the inner and outer region of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is frequently assumed, i.e., wind turbines are presumed to fall within the inner layer and are not affected by outer layer effects. However, modern wind turbine and wind farm design tends towards larger rotor diameters and farm sizes, which means that outer layer effects will become more important. In a prior study, it was already shown for fully-developed wind farms that the ABL height influences the power performance. In this study, we use the in-house LES code SP-Wind to investigate the importance of outer layer effects on wind-farm boundary layers. In a suite of LES cases, the ABL height is varied by imposing a capping inversion with varying inversion strengths. Results indicate the growth of an internal boundary layer (IBL), which is limited in cases with low inversion layers. We further find that flow deceleration combined with Coriolis effects causes a change in wind direction throughout the farm. This effect increases with decreasing boundary layer height, and can result in considerable turbine wake deflection near the end of the farm. The authors are supported by the ERC (ActiveWindFarms, grant no: 306471). Computations were performed on VSC infrastructiure (Flemish Supercomputer Center), funded by the Hercules Foundation and the Flemish Government-department EWI.

  10. Two-layer Tripole Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolovskiy, M. A.; Verron, J.; Yakovenko, O. I.

    Three-vortex filament problem for the case of both zero average circulation and im- pulse in a 2D two-layer incompressible fluid is investigated. In this framework, a model of tripolar structures is constructed with one vortex located in the upper layer and two vortices situated in the lower layer. Two special cases of the intensity dis- tribution were studied: (-2; 1, 1) ­ a strong central vortex is over two week vortices placed in the lower layer; (-1; 2, -1) ­ a strong central vortex is in the lower layer, and the week vortices are located one in the upper, and the second in the lower layers. The results give two types of stationary axially symmetrical configurations in the first case: a) an ordinary roundabout ­ two lower-layer vortices are rotating in the direction in- duced by the central vortex; b) an inversed roundabout ­ the lower-layer vortices are rotating in the direction opposite to the central upper layer vortex because of the in- tralayer interaction prevalence. In the second case, all three vortices form a colinear configuration and always rotate around the common vorticity center in the direction implied by the stronger vortex. Such configuration received the name of eccentric roundabout. Comparison of calcu- lation results for discrete and finite-core vortices is made. Support of RFBR (Grant 01-05-64646) is gratefully acknowledged.

  11. Midlatitude sporadic-E layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. G.; Miller, K. L.

    1981-01-01

    Rocket borne probes and incoherent scatter radar were demonstrated to be effective methods of studying the structure of midlatitude sporadic E layers. Layers are formed when metal ions are converged vertically in a wind shear to produce a local enhancement of electron density. Rocket and radar observations show that the layers may occassionally have complex structure produced by an unstable wind shear. The partial transparency to radio waves of sporadic E layers is shown to be due to localized regions of high electron density.

  12. Superradiance in spherical layered nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goupalov, S. V.

    2016-06-01

    We propose a design of a spherically symmetric nanostructure consisting of alternate concentric semiconductor and dielectric layers. The exciton states in different semiconductor layers of such a structure interact via the common electromagnetic field of light. We show that, if the exciton states in N semiconductor layers are in resonance with one another, then a superradiant state emerges under optical excitation of such a structure. We discuss the conditions under which superradiance can be observed and show that they strongly depend on the valence-band structure of the semiconductor layers.

  13. Secondary polymer layered impregnated tile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K. (Inventor); Rasky, Daniel J. (Inventor); Szalai, Christine E. (Inventor); Carroll, Joseph A. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-ta S. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A low density organic polymer impregnated preformed fibrous ceramic article includes a plurality of layers. A front layer includes ceramic fibers or carbon fibers or combinations of ceramic fibers and carbon fibers, and is impregnated with an effective amount of at least one organic polymer. A middle layer includes polymer impregnated ceramic fibers. A back layer includes ceramic fibers or carbon fibers or combinations of ceramic fibers and carbon fibers, and is impregnated with an effective amount of at least one low temperature pyrolyzing organic polymer capable of decomposing without depositing residues.

  14. Double layers and electrostatic shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hershkowitz, N.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that it is useful to define double layers and shocks so that the ion phase spaces of double layers are the mirror image (about zero ion velocity) of the ion phase spaces for laminar electrostatic shocks. The distinguishing feature is the direction of the free ion velocity. It is also shown that double layers can exist without the presence of trapped ions. The Bohm condition for double layers, that the ion drift velocity on the high potential side must be greater than the ion sound velocity, is shown to be related to a requirement of a lower limit on the Mach number of laminar electrostatic shocks

  15. Multiple-layer Radiation Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Robert M. L.; Baker, Bonnie Sue

    A structure is discussed for absorbing incident radiation, either electromagnetic (EM) or sound. Such a surface structure is needed, for example, in a highly sensitive high-frequency gravitational wave or HFGW detector such as the Li-Baker. The multi-layer absorber, which is discussed, is constructed with metamaterial [MM] layer or layers on top. This MM is configured for a specific EM or sound radiation frequency band, which absorbs incident EM or sound radiation without reflection. Below these top MM layers is a substrate of conventional EM-radiation absorbing or acoustical absorbing reflective material, such as an array of pyramidal foam absorbers. Incident radiation is partially absorbed by the MM layer or layers, and then it is more absorbed by the lower absorbing and reflecting substrate. The remaining reflected radiation is even further absorbed by the MM layers on its "way out_ so that essentially all of the incident radiation is absorbed _ a nearly perfect black-body absorber. In a HFGW detector a substrate, such as foam absorbers, may outgas into a high vacuum and reduce the capability of the vacuum-producing equipment, however, the layers above this lowest substrate will seal the absorbing and reflecting substrate from any external vacuum. The layers also serve to seal the absorbing material against air or water flow past the surfaces of aircraft, watercraft or submarines. Other applications for such a multiple-level radiation absorber include stealth aircraft, missiles and submarines.

  16. Layer-layer competition in multiplex complex networks.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Gardeñes, J; de Domenico, M; Gutiérrez, G; Arenas, A; Gómez, S

    2015-12-13

    The coexistence of multiple types of interactions within social, technological and biological networks has moved the focus of the physics of complex systems towards a multiplex description of the interactions between their constituents. This novel approach has unveiled that the multiplex nature of complex systems has strong influence in the emergence of collective states and their critical properties. Here we address an important issue that is intrinsic to the coexistence of multiple means of interactions within a network: their competition. To this aim, we study a two-layer multiplex in which the activity of users can be localized in each of the layers or shared between them, favouring that neighbouring nodes within a layer focus their activity on the same layer. This framework mimics the coexistence and competition of multiple communication channels, in a way that the prevalence of a particular communication platform emerges as a result of the localization of user activity in one single interaction layer. Our results indicate that there is a transition from localization (use of a preferred layer) to delocalization (combined usage of both layers) and that the prevalence of a particular layer (in the localized state) depends on the structural properties. PMID:26527811

  17. Layer-by-Layer Proteomic Analysis of Mytilus galloprovincialis Shell

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin-xing; Bao, Lin-fei; Fan, Mei-hua; Li, Xiao-min; Wu, Chang-wen; Xia, Shu-wei

    2015-01-01

    Bivalve shell is a biomineralized tissue with various layers/microstructures and excellent mechanical properties. Shell matrix proteins (SMPs) pervade and envelop the mineral crystals and play essential roles in biomineralization. Despite that Mytilus is an economically important bivalve, only few proteomic studies have been performed for the shell, and current knowledge of the SMP set responsible for different shell layers of Mytilus remains largely patchy. In this study, we observed that Mytilus galloprovincialis shell contained three layers, including nacre, fibrous prism, and myostracum that is involved in shell-muscle attachment. A parallel proteomic analysis was performed for these three layers. By combining LC-MS/MS analysis with Mytilus EST database interrogations, a whole set of 113 proteins was identified, and the distribution of these proteins in different shell layers followed a mosaic pattern. For each layer, about a half of identified proteins are unique and the others are shared by two or all of three layers. This is the first description of the protein set exclusive to nacre, myostracum, and fibrous prism in Mytilus shell. Moreover, most of identified proteins in the present study are novel SMPs, which greatly extended biomineralization-related protein data of Mytilus. These results are useful, on one hand, for understanding the roles of SMPs in the deposition of different shell layers. On the other hand, the identified protein set of myostracum provides candidates for further exploring the mechanism of adductor muscle-shell attachment. PMID:26218932

  18. Natural melanin composites by layer-by-layer assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, Taesik; Shim, Bong Sub

    2015-04-01

    Melanin is an electrically conductive and biocompatible material, because their conjugated backbone structures provide conducting pathways from human skin, eyes, brain, and beyond. So there is a potential of using as materials for the neural interfaces and the implantable devices. Extracted from Sepia officinalis ink, our natural melanin was uniformly dispersed in mostly polar solvents such as water and alcohols. Then, the dispersed melanin was further fabricated to nano-thin layered composites by the layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly technique. Combined with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), the melanin nanoparticles behave as an LBL counterpart to from finely tuned nanostructured films. The LBL process can adjust the smart performances of the composites by varying the layering conditions and sandwich thickness. We further demonstrated the melanin loading degree of stacked layers, combination nanostructures, electrical properties, and biocompatibility of the resulting composites by UV-vis spectrophotometer, scanning electron microscope (SEM), multimeter, and in-vitro cell test of PC12, respectively.

  19. Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Enzymes on Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun; Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-06-01

    The use of Layer-by-layer techniques for immobilizing several types of enzymes, e.g. glucose oxidase (GOx), horse radish oxidases(HRP), and choline oxidase(CHO) on carbon nanotubes and their applications for biosenseing are presented. The enzyme is immobilized on the negatively charged CNT surface by alternatively assembling a cationic polydiallyldimethyl-ammonium chloride (PDDA) layer and a enzyme layer. The sandwich-like layer structure (PDDA/enzyme/PDDA/CNT) formed by electrostatic assembling provides a favorable microenvironment to keep the bioactivity of enzyme and to prevent enzyme molecule leakage. The morphologies and electrocatalytic acitivity of the resulted enzyme film were characterized using TEM and electrochemical techniques, respectively. It was found that these enzyme-based biosensors are very sensitive, selective for detection of biomolecules, e.g. glucose, choline.

  20. Glycobiology of surface layer proteins.

    PubMed

    Schäffer, C; Messner, P

    2001-07-01

    Over the last two decades, a significant change of perception has taken place regarding prokaryotic glycoproteins. For many years, protein glycosylation was assumed to be limited to eukaryotes; but now, a wealth of information on structure, function, biosynthesis and molecular biology of prokaryotic glycoproteins has accumulated, with surface layer (S-layer) glycoproteins being one of the best studied examples. With the designation of Archaea as a second prokaryotic domain of life, the occurrence of glycosylated S-layer proteins had been considered a taxonomic criterion for differentiation between Bacteria and Archaea. Extensive structural investigations, however, have demonstrated that S-layer glycoproteins are present in both domains. Among Gram-positive bacteria, S-layer glycoproteins have been identified only in bacilli. In Gram-negative organisms, their presence is still not fully investigated; presently, there is no indication for their existence in this class of bacteria. Extensive biochemical studies of the S-layer glycoprotein from Halobacterium halobium have, at least in part, unravelled the glycosylation pathway in Archaea; molecular biological analyses of these pathways have not been performed, so far. Significant observations concern the occurrence of unusual linkage regions both in archaeal and bacterial S-layer glycoproteins. Regarding S-layer glycoproteins of bacteria, first genetic data have shed some light into the molecular organization of the glycosylation machinery in this domain. In addition to basic S-layer glycoprotein research, the biotechnological application potential of these molecules has been explored. With the development of straightforward molecular biological methods, fascinating possibilities for the expression of prokaryotic glycoproteins will become available. S-layer glycoprotein research has opened up opportunities for the production of recombinant glycosylation enzymes and tailor-made S-layer glycoproteins in large quantities

  1. Advanced double layer capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarangapani, S.; Lessner, P.; Forchione, J.; Laconti, A. B.

    1989-01-01

    There is a need for large amounts of power to be delivered rapidly in a number of airborne and space systems. Conventional, portable power sources, such as batteries, are not suited to delivering high peak power pulses. The charge stored at the electrode-electrolyte double layer is, however, much more assessible on a short time scale. Devices exploiting this concept were fabricated using carbon and metal oxides (Pinnacle Research) as the electrodes and sulfuric acid as the electrolyte. The approach reported, replaces the liquid sulfuric acid electrolyte with a solid ionomer electrolyte. The challenge is to form a solid electrode-solid ionomer electrolyte composite which has a high capacitance per geometric area. The approach to maximize contact between the electrode particles and the ionomer was to impregnate the electrode particles using a liquid ionomer solution and to bond the solvent-free structure to a solid ionomer membrane. Ruthenium dioxide is the electrode material used. Three strategies are being pursued to provide for a high area electrode-ionomer contact: mixing of the RuOx with a small volume of ionomer solution followed by filtration to remove the solvent, and impregnation of the ionomer into an already formed RuOx electrode. RuOx powder and electrodes were examined by non-electrochemical techniques. X-ray diffraction has shown that the material is almost pure RuO2. The electrode structure depends on the processing technique used to introduce the Nafion. Impregnated electrodes have Nafion concentrated near the surface. Electrodes prepared by the evaporation method show large aggregates of crystals surrounded by Nafion.

  2. R2 SDWIS GIS LAYER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) GIS layer represents the locations of public water system (PWS) facilities in NY and NJ; every PWS has one or more facilities. Data for this layer came from the Safe Drinking Water Information System/Federal version (SDWIS/FED)....

  3. Fragmentation of drying paint layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakos, Katinka; Dombi, András; Járai-Szabó, Ferenc; Néda, Zoltán

    2013-11-01

    Fragmentation of thin layers of drying granular materials on a frictional surface are studied both by experiments and computer simulations. Besides a qualitative description of the fragmentation phenomenon, the dependence of the average fragment size as a function of the layer thickness is thoroughly investigated. Experiments are done using a special nail polish, which forms characteristic crack structures during drying. In order to control the layer thickness, we diluted the nail polish in acetone and evaporated in a controlled manner different volumes of this solution on glass surfaces. During the evaporation process we managed to get an instable paint layer, which formed cracks as it dried out. In order to understand the obtained structures a previously developed spring-block model was implemented in a three-dimensional version. The experimental and simulation results proved to be in excellent qualitative and quantitative agreement. An earlier suggested scaling relation between the average fragment size and the layer thickness is reconfirmed.

  4. Midlatitude sporadic-E layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, K. L.; Smith, L. G.

    1976-01-01

    The partially transparent echo from midlatitude sporadic E layers was recorded by ionosondes between the blanketing frequency and the maximum frequency. The theory that the midlatitude sporadic E layers are not uniform in the horizontal plane but contain localized regions of high electron density was evaluated using data obtained by incoherent scatter radar and found to provide a satisfactory explanation. The main features of midlatitude sporadic E layers are consistent with the convergence of metallic ions as described by the wind shear theory applied to gravity waves and tides. The interference of gravity waves with other gravity waves and tides can be recognized in the altitudes of occurrence and the structure of the layers. Small scale horizontal irregularities are attributed in some cases to critical level effects and in others to fluid instabilities. The convergence of a meteor trail can, under some circumstances, account for localized enhancement of the electron density in the layer.

  5. Fingering in Confined Elastic Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggins, John; Mahadevan, L.; Wei, Z.; Saintyves, Baudouin; Bouchaud, Elizabeth

    2015-03-01

    Fingering has recently been observed in soft highly elastic layers that are confined between and bonded to two rigid bodies. In one case an injected fluid invades the layer in finger-like protrusions at the layer's perimeter, a solid analogue of Saffman-Taylor viscous fingering. In a second case, separation of the rigid bodies (with maintained adhesion to the layer) leads air to the formation of similar fingers at the layer's perimeter. In both cases the finger formation is reversible: if the fluid is removed or the separation reduced, the fingers vanish. In this talk I will discuss a theoretical model for such elastic fingers that shows that the origin of the fingers is large-strain geometric non-linearity in the elasticity of soft solids. Our simplified elastic model unifies the two types of fingering and accurately estimates the thresholds and wavelengths of the fingers.

  6. Cation Ordering in Layered Nickelates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson-Cheeseman, Brittany; Zhou, Hua; Cammarata, Antonio; Hoffman, Jason; Balachandran, Prasanna; Rondinelli, James; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2013-03-01

    The single layer Ruddlesden-Popper nickelates present a model system to understand how the effects of digital dopant cation ordering may affect the properties of 2-dimensional conducting sheets. We investigate the effects of aliovalent A-site cation order on LaSrNiO4 films. Using molecular beam epitaxy, we interleave full layers of SrO and LaO in a series of chemically equivalent films, varying the pattern of SrO and LaO layers relative to the NiO2 layers. Through synchrotron surface x-ray diffraction and Coherant Bragg Rod Analysis (COBRA), we directly investigate the A-site cation order and the resulting atomic displacements for each ordering pattern. We correlate these results with theoretical calculations and transport measurements of the layered nickelate films.

  7. Improved CLARAty Functional-Layer/Decision-Layer Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estlin, Tara; Rabideau, Gregg; Gaines, Daniel; Johnston, Mark; Chouinard, Caroline; Nessnas, Issa; Shu, I-Hsiang

    2008-01-01

    Improved interface software for communication between the CLARAty Decision and Functional layers has been developed. [The Coupled Layer Architecture for Robotics Autonomy (CLARAty) was described in Coupled-Layer Robotics Architecture for Autonomy (NPO-21218), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 12 (December 2002), page 48. To recapitulate: the CLARAty architecture was developed to improve the modularity of robotic software while tightening coupling between planning/execution and basic control subsystems. Whereas prior robotic software architectures typically contained three layers, the CLARAty contains two layers: a decision layer (DL) and a functional layer (FL).] Types of communication supported by the present software include sending commands from DL modules to FL modules and sending data updates from FL modules to DL modules. The present software supplants prior interface software that had little error-checking capability, supported data parameters in string form only, supported commanding at only one level of the FL, and supported only limited updates of the state of the robot. The present software offers strong error checking, and supports complex data structures and commanding at multiple levels of the FL, and relative to the prior software, offers a much wider spectrum of state-update capabilities.

  8. Lear jet boundary layer/shear layer laser propagation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, K.

    1980-01-01

    Optical degradations of aircraft turbulent boundary layers with shear layers generated by aerodynamic fences are analyzed. A collimated 2.5 cm diameter helium-neon laser (0.63 microns) traversed the approximate 5 cm thick natural aircraft boundary layer in double pass via a reflective airfoil. In addition, several flights examined shear layer-induced optical degradation. Flight altitudes ranged from 1.5 to 12 km, while Mach numbers were varied from 0.3 to 0.8. Average line spread function (LSF) and Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) data were obtained by averaging a large number of tilt-removed curves. Fourier transforming the resulting average MTF yields an LSF, thus affording a direct comparison of the two optical measurements. Agreement was good for the aerodynamic fence arrangement, but only fair in the case of a turbulent boundary layer. Values of phase variance inferred from the LSF instrument for a single pass through the random flow and corrected for a large aperture ranged from 0.08 to 0.11 waves (lambda = .63 microns) for the boundary layer. Corresponding values for the fence vary from 0.08 to 0.16 waves. Extrapolation of these values to 10.6 microns suggests negligible degradation for a CO2 laser transmitted through a 5 cm thick, subsonic turbulent boundary layer.

  9. Atomic layer-by-layer epitaxy of cuprate superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Bozovic, I.; Eckstein, J.N.; Virshup, G.F.

    1994-03-01

    A technique for atomic layer-by-layer epitaxy of cuprate superconductors and other complex oxides has been developed at Varian. The samples are engineered by stacking molecular layers of different compounds to assemble multilayers and superlattices, by adding or omitting atomic monolayers to create novel compounds, and by doping within specified atomic monolayers. Apart form manufacturing trilayer Josephson junctions with I{sub c}R{sub n}>5 mV, this technique enables one to address fundamental issues such as the dimensionality of HTSC state, existence of long-range proximity effects, occurrence of resonant tunneling etc., as well as to synthesize novel metastable HTSC compounds. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Layered Systems Under Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenšek, Daniel; Brand, Helmut R.

    We discuss and review a generalization of the usual hydrodynamic description of smectic A liquid crystals motivated by the experimentally observed shear-induced destabilization and reorientation of smectic A like systems. We include both the smectic layering (via the layer displacement u and the layer normal hat{p}) and the director hat{n} of the underlying nematic order in our macroscopic hydrodynamic description and allow both directions to differ in non equilibrium situations. In a homeotropically aligned sample the nematic director couples to an applied simple shear, whereas the smectic layering stays unchanged. This difference leads to a finite (but usually small) angle between hat{n} and hat{p}, which we find to be equivalent to an effective dilatation of the layers. This effective dilatation leads, above a certain threshold, to an undulation instability of the layers with a wave vector parallel to the vorticity direction of the shear flow. We include the couplings of the velocity field with the order parameters for orientational and positional order and show how the order parameters interact with the undulation instability. We explore the influence of the magnitude of various material parameters on the instability. Comparing our results to available experimental results and molecular dynamic simulations, we find good qualitative agreement for the first instability. In addition, we discuss pathways to higher instabilities leading to the formation of onions (multilamellar vesicles) via cylindrical structures and/or the break-up of layers via large amplitude undulations.

  11. D0 layer 0 innermost layer of silicon microstrip tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Hanagaki, K.; /Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    A new inner layer silicon strip detector has been built and will be installed in the existing silicon microstrip tracker in D0. They report on the motivation, design, and performance of this new detector.

  12. The role of nonlinear critical layers in boundary layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    Asymptotic methods are used to describe the nonlinear self-interaction between pairs of oblique instability modes that eventually develops when initially linear spatially growing instability waves evolve downstream in nominally two-dimensional laminar boundary layers. The first nonlinear reaction takes place locally within a so-called 'critical layer', with the flow outside this layer consisting of a locally parallel mean flow plus a pair of oblique instability waves - which may or may not be accompanied by an associated plane wave. The amplitudes of these waves, which are completely determined by nonlinear effects within the critical layer, satisfy either a single integro-differential equation or a pair of integro-differential equations with quadratic to quartic-type nonlinearities. The physical implications of these equations are discussed.

  13. Formation of Nanoporous Glass Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoras, Kestutis; Franssila, Sami

    2004-01-01

    Porous layers have been formed in Pyrex glass by reactive ion etching (RIE). Chromium is used as an etch mask. Different etch gases (SF6, CF4/Ar) have been used, and depending on flow ratio, etch time and applied power, a dense array of high aspect ratio glass pillars with submicrometer dimensions was obtained instead of a smooth channel bottom. The pillars were about 500nm tall and 50 100nm in cross-section. The formation of porous layers is explained by the effect of mask material re-deposition during the plasma etching. Porous glass layers could have applications in chromatographic separations or microchemicalsample concentrators.

  14. On Multiple-Layered Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.

    2011-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to find ways to make vortex flow fields decompose more quickly, photographs and observations are presented of vortex flow fields that indicate the presence of multiple layers of fluid rotating about a common axis. A survey of the literature indicates that multiple-layered vortices form in waterspouts, tornadoes and lift-generated vortices of aircraft. An explanation for the appearance of multiple-layered structures in vortices is suggested. The observations and data presented are intended to improve the understanding of the formation and persistence of vortex flow fields.

  15. Ultrasonic classification of thin layers within multi-layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hägglund, F.; Carlson, J. E.; Andersson, T.

    2010-01-01

    Methods for non-destructive inspection of layered materials are becoming more and more popular as a way of assuring product integrity and quality. In this paper, we present a model-based technique using ultrasonic measurements for classification of thin bonding layers within three-layered materials. This could be, for example, an adhesive bond between two thin plates, where the integrity of the bonding layer needs to be evaluated. The method is based on a model of the wave propagation of pulse-echo ultrasound that first reduces the measured data to a few parameters for each measured point. The model parameters are then fed into a statistical classifier that assigns the bonding layer to one of a set of predefined classes. In this paper, two glass plates are bonded together with construction silicone, and the classifiers are trained to determine if the bonding layer is intact or if it contains regions of air or water. Two different classification methods are evaluated: nominal logistic regression and discriminant analysis. The former is slightly more computationally demanding but, as the results show, it performs better when the model parameters cannot be assumed to belong to a multivariate Gaussian distribution. The performance of the classifiers is evaluated using both simulations and real measurements.

  16. On the origin of rhythmic layering in layered gabbros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Zhang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Rhythmic layering of silicates (plagioclase, pyroxene and olivine), ilmenite and magnitite is a common feature in mafic-ultramafic intrusions. The origin of rhythmic layering has been hotly debated in the literatures. Proposed mechanisms include gravity differentiation, double-diffusive convection, oscillatory crystallization of magma, repeated injection and supplement of magma, etc. Here we provide detailed FTIR and EBSD studies on the water content and deformation microstructure of gabbros from the Panzhihua intrusion and experimentally deformed synthetic gabrros and magnetite aggregates with a volume ratio of 6:4. The FTIR analyses revealed a significant amount of hydroxyls in both clinopyroxene (411-775 ppm) and plagioclase (328-716 ppm), suggesting a high water content mantle plume source. The EBSD analyses show similar fabrics in constitutent minerals of natural and experimental specimens: a weak clinopyroxene fabric of (100) parallel to foliation and [001] parallel to lineation; a strong plagioclase fabric of (010) parallel to foliation and [100] parallel to lineation, a weak ilmenite fabric of (001) parallel to foliation and [hk0] parallel to lieantion; and a near random magnitite fabric. There is an obvious rhythmic layering in sheared gabrros and magnetite aggregates similar to natural observations. Our results revealed strong layer-parallel shearing deformation during the formation of the Panxi layered intructions. There is a significant strength contrast between gabbro and Fe-Ti oxides. We propose that the formation of the rhythmic layering in mafic-ultramafic intrusions is caused mainly by rheological stratification of Fe-Ti oxides and gabbros.

  17. Inversion layer MOS solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Fat Duen

    1986-01-01

    Inversion layer (IL) Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) solar cells were fabricated. The fabrication technique and problems are discussed. A plan for modeling IL cells is presented. Future work in this area is addressed.

  18. [Surface layers of methanotrophic bacteria].

    PubMed

    Khmelenina, V N; Suzina, N E; Trotsenko, Iu A

    2013-01-01

    Structural and functional characteristics of the regular glycoprotein layers in prokaryotes are analyzed with a special emphasis on aerobic methanotrophic bacteria. S-layers are present at the surfaces of Methylococcus, Methylothermus, and Methylomicrobium cells. Different Methylomicrobium species either synthesize S-layers with planar (p2, p4) symmetry or form cup-shaped or conicalstructures with hexagonal (p6) symmetry. A unique, copper-binding polypeptide 'CorA'/MopE (27/45 kDa), which is coexpressed with the diheme periplasmic cytochrome c peroxidase 'CorB'/Mca (80 kDa) was found in Methylomicrobium album BG8, Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z, and Methylococcus capsulatus Bath. This tandem of the surface proteins is functionally analogous to a new siderophore, methanobactin. Importantly, no 'CorA'/MopE homologue was found in methanotrophs not forming S-layers. The role of surface proteins in copper metabolism and initial methane oxidation is discussed. PMID:25509389

  19. Boundary Layer Control on Airfoils.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhab, George; Eastlake, Charles

    1991-01-01

    A phenomena, boundary layer control (BLC), produced when visualizing the fluidlike flow of air is described. The use of BLC in modifying aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils, race cars, and boats is discussed. (KR)

  20. Modeling the urban boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A summary and evaluation is given of the Workshop on Modeling the Urban Boundary Layer; held in Las Vegas on May 5, 1975. Edited summaries from each of the session chairpersons are also given. The sessions were: (1) formulation and solution techniques, (2) K-theory versus higher order closure, (3) surface heat and moisture balance, (4) initialization and boundary problems, (5) nocturnal boundary layer, and (6) verification of models.

  1. Removing Boundary Layer by Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackeret, J

    1927-01-01

    Through the utilization of the "Magnus effect" on the Flettner rotor ship, the attention of the public has been directed to the underlying physical principle. It has been found that the Prandtl boundary-layer theory furnishes a satisfactory explanation of the observed phenomena. The present article deals with the prevention of this separation or detachment of the flow by drawing the boundary layer into the inside of a body through a slot or slots in its surface.

  2. Intermetallic Layers in Soldered Joints

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-12-10

    ILAG solves the one-dimensional partial differential equations describing the multiphase, multicomponent, solid-state diffusion-controlled growth of intermetallic layers in soldered joints. This software provides an analysis capability for materials researchers to examine intermetallic growth mechanisms in a wide variety of defense and commercial applications involving both traditional and advanced materials. ILAG calculates the interface positions of the layers, as well as the spatial distribution of constituent mass fractions, and outputs the results at user-prescribed simulation times.

  3. Simulation of auroral double layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, R. F.; Joyce, G.

    1979-01-01

    Some basic properties of plasma double layers are deduced from a particle-in-cell computer simulation and related to parallel electric-field structures above the auroral regions. The simulation results on the processes leading to double-layer formation are examined, particularly in relation to the transient stage and double-layer structure and stability. It is concluded that: (1) a large potential difference applied to a finite-length plasma will be concentrated in a shocklike localized region instead of occurring over the entire length of the system; (2) the initial stage in double-layer formation is dominated by a large-potential pulse propagating in the direction of the induced electrostatic drift; (3) the entire potential is dropped over a specific scale length once the double layer has formed; and (4) this scale length is expected to be of the order of 1 km for a double layer above a discrete auroral arc with a potential of 10 kV and the electric-field vector parallel to the magnetic-field vector.

  4. Electrostatically anchored branched brush layers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Dedinaite, Andra; Rutland, Mark; Thormann, Esben; Visnevskij, Ceslav; Makuska, Ricardas; Claesson, Per M

    2012-11-01

    A novel type of block copolymer has been synthesized. It consists of a linear cationic block and an uncharged bottle-brush block. The nonionic bottle-brush block contains 45 units long poly(ethylene oxide) side chains. This polymer was synthesized with the intention of creating branched brush layers firmly physisorbed to negatively charged surfaces via the cationic block, mimicking the architecture (but not the chemistry) of bottle-brush molecules suggested to be present on the cartilage surface, and contributing to the efficient lubrication of synovial joints. The adsorption properties of the diblock copolymer as well as of the two blocks separately were studied on silica surfaces using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and optical reflectometry. The adsorption kinetics data highlight that the diblock copolymers initially adsorb preferentially parallel to the surface with both the cationic block and the uncharged bottle-brush block in contact with the surface. However, as the adsorption proceeds, a structural change occurs within the layer, and the PEO bottle-brush block extends toward solution, forming a surface-anchored branched brush layer. As the adsorption plateau is reached, the diblock copolymer layer is 46-48 nm thick, and the water content in the layer is above 90 wt %. The combination of strong electrostatic anchoring and highly hydrated branched brush structures provide strong steric repulsion, low friction forces, and high load bearing capacity. The strong electrostatic anchoring also provides high stability of preadsorbed layers under different ionic strength conditions. PMID:23046176

  5. Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xunming; Liao, Xianbo; Du, Wenhui

    2011-02-01

    A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

  6. Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xunming; Liao, Xianbo; Du, Wenhui

    2011-10-04

    A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

  7. Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells

    DOEpatents

    Deng, Xunming

    2010-02-23

    A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

  8. Three step double layers in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Andrew, III; Hershkowitz, Noah

    1988-01-01

    A new class of stationary double layer structure, with three or more distinct steps, is demonstrated in the laboratory. A large monotonic potential increase results from a series of smaller double layers. In many respects, these double layer structures resemble those inferred from satellite measurements of auroral double layers. This new class of double layer appears to depend on turbulence for its existence and to be a hybrid structure, intermediate between anomalous resistivity and BGK double layers.

  9. Layer-by-layer growth of porphyrin supramolecular thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Fumitaka; Yokoyama, Takashi; Kamikado, Toshiya; Yokoyama, Shiyoshi; Mashiko, Shinro

    2006-06-19

    Multilayer thin film growth of carboxyphenyl-substituted porphyrin on Au(111) was investigated by means of low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. The carboxyphenyl-substituted porphyrins are assembled into supramolecular wires on Au(111) by sequential hydrogen bonding between carboxyphenyl groups, and the dense aggregation of the supramolecular wires results in the formation of the first monolayer film. By further molecular deposition, the layer-by-layer growth of the supramolecular wires has been observed, leading to the supramolecular thin film growth.

  10. Stabilization of layer-by-layer engineered multilayered hollow microspheres.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng

    2014-05-01

    Polymer multilayered hollow microspheres prepared by layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly attract more and more interest due to their unique application, especially as drug delivery system (DDS). Unfortunately, the multilayered hollow microspheres assembled via weak linkages could fuse and/or aggregate in high ionic strength media or strong acidic or basic media. This severely restricts the practical applications of the multilayered hollow microspheres as DDS in human physiological medium. In the present work, the progress in stabilization of the multilayered hollow microspheres is reviewed, with emphasis on the assembling process and their crosslinking mechanism. PMID:24321861

  11. Vibration analysis of constrained layered beams with multiple damping layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Min

    2005-07-01

    With an increasing demand for light, continuous, and high strength structures, multi-layered systems with viscoelastic materials have gained major importance over the years. Viscoelastic layered systems provide a simple and flexible solution for damping vibration of sheet metal panels. They also help to effectively eliminate noise from resonant structures and surfaces. There has been a lot of work done on active and passive layered sandwich beams based on the theoretical models proposed by Kerwin (1959) and extended by Ditaranto (1965), Mead and Markus (1969), and other researchers. This work presents an analytical formulation to predict the stiffness and damping of constrained layered beams that have multiple viscoelastic damping layers. The model was derived for symmetrical setups using variational methods. The equations to evaluate the stiffness and damping were derived in closed form and can be evaluated for different boundary conditions. The complex modulus approach was used to model the elastic and shear modulus of the viscoelastic material. The equations of motion for multi-layer system in this research were compared with Mead's three layer beam model. Equations derived in this dissertation match well with Mead's equation for symmetric system. A parametric analysis has been conducted to study the effects of different parameters on the damping and stiffness of the system under simply supported boundary conditions. In addition, another analytical model was developed for the unsymmetrical setups with two different viscoelastic materials adjacent to each other. Experiments were conducted on simply supported three-layered beams at different temperatures to validate theoretical results. The experimental results show good agreement with the modal frequencies estimated by theory. The first four modes were considered in the computation and experiment validation. The multi-objective optimization procedure to obtain optimum structural and material parameters

  12. Hysteresis in layered spring magnets.

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, J. S.; Kaper, H. G.; Leaf, G. K.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2001-01-01

    This article addresses a problem of micromagnetics: the reversal of magnetic moments in layered spring magnets. A one-dimensional model is used of a film consisting of several atomic layers of a soft material on top of several atomic layers of a hard material. Each atomic layer is taken to be uniformly magnetized, and spatial inhomogeneities within an atomic layer are neglected. The state of such a system is described by a chain of magnetic spin vectors. Each spin vector behaves like a spinning top driven locally by the effective magnetic field and subject to damping (Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation). A numerical integration scheme for the LLG equation is presented that is unconditionally stable and preserves the magnitude of the magnetization vector at all times. The results of numerical investigations for a bilayer in a rotating in-plane magnetic field show hysteresis with a basic period of 2{pi} at moderate fields and hysteresis with a basic period of {pi} at strong fields.

  13. Double-diffusive layer formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaussinger, Florian; Kupka, Friedrich; Hücker, Sebastian; Egbers, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Double-diffusive convection plays an important role in geo- and astrophysical applications. The special case, where a destabilising temperature gradient counteracts a stabilising solute gradient leads to layering phenomena under certain conditions. Convectively mixed layers sandwiched in diffusive interfaces form a so-called stack. Well-known double-diffusive systems are observed in rift lakes in Africa and even from the coffee drink Latte Macciatto. Stacks of layers are also predicted to occur inside massive stars and inside giant planets. Their dynamics depend on the thermal, the solute and the momentum diffusivities, as well on the ratio of the gradients of the opposing stratifications. Since the layering process cannot be derived from linear stability analysis, the full nonlinear set of equations has to be investigated. Numerical simulations have become feasible for this task, despite the physical processes operate on a vast range of length and time scales, which is challenging for numerical hydrodynamical modelling. The oceanographically relevant case of fresh and salty water is investigated here in further details. The heat and mass transfer is compared with theoretical results and experimental measurements. Additionally, the initial dynamic of layering, the transient behaviour of a stack and the long time evolution are presented using the example of Lake Kivu and the interior of a giant planet.

  14. Physics of magnetospheric boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    1995-01-01

    This final report was concerned with the ideas that: (1) magnetospheric boundary layers link disparate regions of the magnetosphere-solar wind system together; and (2) global behavior of the magnetosphere can be understood only by understanding its internal linking mechanisms and those with the solar wind. The research project involved simultaneous research on the global-, meso-, and micro-scale physics of the magnetosphere and its boundary layers, which included the bow shock, the magnetosheath, the plasma sheet boundary layer, and the ionosphere. Analytic, numerical, and simulation projects were performed on these subjects, as well as comparisons of theoretical results with observational data. Other related activity included in the research included: (1) prediction of geomagnetic activity; (2) global MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) simulations; (3) Alfven resonance heating; and (4) Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) effect. In the appendixes are list of personnel involved, list of papers published; and reprints or photocopies of papers produced for this report.

  15. 'Blueberry' Layers Indicate Watery Origins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This microscopic image, taken at the outcrop region dubbed 'El Capitan' near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's landing site, reveals millimeter-scale (.04 inch-scale) layers in the lower portion. This same layering is hinted at by the fine notches that run horizontally across the sphere-like grain or 'blueberry' in the center left. The thin layers do not appear to deform around the blueberry, indicating that these geologic features are concretions and not impact spherules or ejected volcanic material called lapilli. Concretions are balls of minerals that form in pre-existing wet sediments. This image was taken by the rover's microscopic imager on the 29th martian day, or sol, of its mission. The observed area is about 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across.

  16. Lidar study of K layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Jing

    2016-07-01

    A double-laser-beam lidar was successfully developed in 2010 to measure the K layer over Yanqing County, Beijing (40.5°N, 116.2°E). Comprehensive statistical analyses of sporadic K (Ks) layer parameters were conducted using two years of lidar data, and the parameters of the Ks layers and their distribution obtained by the analyses are described. The seasonal distribution of Ks occurrence was obtained, with two maxima observed in January and July, respectively. The seasonal distributions of sporadic E (Es) occurrence over Beijing differ from those of Ks occurrence. However, good correlations between Es and Ks in case by case study were found. We also found that four Ks events with peak altitudes lower than 90 km were associated with large and sharp temperature increases in five comparative examples.

  17. Unsteady turbulent boundary layer analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singleton, R. E.; Nash, J. F.; Carl, L. W.; Patel, V. C.

    1973-01-01

    The governing equations for an unsteady turbulent boundary layer on a swept infinite cylinder, composed of a continuity equation, a pair of momentum equations and a pair of turbulent energy equations which include upstream history efforts, are solved numerically. An explicit finite difference analog to the partial differential equations is formulated and developed into a computer program. Calculations were made for a variety of unsteady flows in both two and three dimensions but primarily for two dimensional flow fields in order to first understand some of the fundamental physical aspects of unsteady turbulent boundary layers. Oscillating free stream flows without pressure gradient, oscillating retarded free stream flows and monotonically time-varying flows have all been studied for a wide frequency range. It was found that to the lowest frequency considered, the lower frequency bound being determined by economic considerations (machine time), there were significant unsteady effects on the turbulent boundary layer.

  18. Boundary Layers, Transitions and Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Effects of roughness in boundary layers have to be addressed. Until adverse pressure gradient effects are understood, roughness will not significantly drive design. Mechanisms responsible for separation not understood. Effects on Zero Pressure Gradient boundary layers (shear stress). Effects on separation in pressure gradient (prediction of separation). Effect on scalar transport (heat transfer) not understood. Model for skin friction needed in simulations - first grid point likely to be in buffer layer. Definition of roughness important for useful experiments. A lot of validation experiments will be needed. How to get to ks for roughness of engineering interest? - depends on wavelength height, etc. for engineering interest? Re-discovering the wheel should be avoided: existing knowledge (theoretical and experimental) should find its way into the engineering models. It is a task of the industry to filter out the existing information in the literature for results relevant to its application, being external or internal.

  19. Layered Rocks in 'Columbia Hills'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This black-and-white image shows the first layered rocks scientists have seen close up in Gusev Crater, where NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit landed Jan. 4, 2004. While Spirit's twin rover, Opportunity, reached the stadium-size Endurance Crater on the other side of Mars and began exploring its many layered outcrops in early May, Spirit traveled more than 3.5 kilometers (2.2 miles) to get to this layered bedrock in the 'Columbia Hills.' Scientists are planning to conduct a study of these rocks to determine if they are volcanic or sedimentary in origin, and if they have been chemically altered. Spirit's panoramic camera took this image on sol 217 (Aug. 13, 2004).

  20. Boundary layer control for airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pake, F. A.; Pipitone, S. J.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation is summarized of the aerodynamic principle of boundary layer control for nonrigid LTA craft. The project included a wind tunnel test on a BLC body of revolution at zero angle of attack. Theoretical analysis is shown to be in excellent agreement with the test data. Methods are evolved for predicting the boundary layer development on a body of revolution and the suction pumping and propulsive power requirements. These methods are used to predict the performance characteristics of a full-scale airship. The analysis indicates that propulsive power reductions of 15 to 25 percent and endurance improvements of 20 to 40 percent may be realized in employing boundary-layer control to nonrigid airships.

  1. The entraining moist boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    A unified theory of entrainment into the planetary boundary layer is presented. It is assumed that the rates of buoyant and shear production of turbulence kinetic energy can be determined in terms of the entrainment mass flux. An expression is derived from the conservation law for turbulence kinetic energy, which, with the introduction of an empirical parameter, can be used together with a second relation between turbulence kinetic energy and the turbulence velocity scale to obtain the mass entrainment flux. The theory provides descriptions of storage-limited entrainment, buoyancy-limited entrainment into a clear mixed layer, and shallowing. It has been incorporated into a simulation of Day 33 of the Wangara experiment using a simple mixed layer model.

  2. Biomimetic layer-by-layer templates for calcium phosphate biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Abdelkebir, K; Morin-Grognet, S; Gaudière, F; Coquerel, G; Labat, B; Atmani, H; Ladam, G

    2012-09-01

    Carboxylated, sulfated and/or phosphorylated surfaces are admitted as potential optimal templates for biomimetic deposition of calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings in view of improving implants' osseointegration. Layer-by-layer films were built up consisting of anionic chondroitin sulfate (ChS), a biological carboxylated and sulfated polysaccharide and cationic poly(l-lysine) (PLL). The films were used as soft matrices to immobilize a model phosphoprotein, phosvitin (PhV). The respective roles of ChS, PLL and PhV terminal layers on the heterogeneous nucleation kinetics and the structure of CaP deposits obtained from supersaturated solutions were inspected. Critical supersaturation ratios and induction times preceding heterogeneous nucleation were precisely determined and interpreted within the framework of classical nucleation theory in order to derive the effective interfacial energies of CaP crystals. It was found that the potency of terminal layers toward CaP nucleation increased in the order: PLL

  3. Controlled Layer-by-Layer Etching of MoS₂.

    PubMed

    Lin, TaiZhe; Kang, BaoTao; Jeon, MinHwan; Huffman, Craig; Jeon, JeaHoo; Lee, SungJoo; Han, Wei; Lee, JinYong; Lee, SeHan; Yeom, GeunYoung; Kim, KyongNam

    2015-07-29

    Two-dimensional (2D) metal dichalcogenides like molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) may provide a pathway to high-mobility channel materials that are needed for beyond-complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices. Controlling the thickness of these materials at the atomic level will be a key factor in the future development of MoS2 devices. In this study, we propose a layer-by-layer removal of MoS2 using the atomic layer etching (ALET) that is composed of the cyclic processing of chlorine (Cl)-radical adsorption and argon (Ar)(+) ion-beam desorption. MoS2 etching was not observed with only the Cl-radical adsorption or low-energy (<20 eV) Ar(+) ion-beam desorption steps; however, the use of sequential etching that is composed of the Cl-radical adsorption step and a subsequent Ar(+) ion-beam desorption step resulted in the complete etching of one monolayer of MoS2. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicated the removal of one monolayer of MoS2 with each ALET cycle; therefore, the number of MoS2 layers could be precisely controlled by using this cyclical etch method. In addition, no noticeable damage or etch residue was observed on the exposed MoS2. PMID:26091282

  4. Nonlinear Convection in Mushy Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worster, M. Grae; Anderson, Daniel M.; Schulze, T. P.

    1996-01-01

    When alloys solidify in a gravitational field there are complex interactions between solidification and natural, buoyancy-driven convection that can alter the composition and impair the structure of the solid product. The particular focus of this project has been the compositional convection within mushy layers that occurs in situations where the lighter component of the alloy is rejected into the melt during solidification by cooling from below. The linear stability of such a situation was previously described and has been further elucidated in a number of published articles. Here we describe some recent developments in the study of nonlinear evolution of convection in mushy layers.

  5. Nonparallel stability of boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, Ali H.

    1987-01-01

    The asymptotic formulations of the nonparallel linear stability of incompressible growing boundary layers are critically reviewed. These formulations can be divided into two approaches. The first approach combines a numerical method with either the method of multiple scales, or the method of averaging, of the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation; all these methods yield the same result. The second approach combined a multi-structure theory with the method of multiple scales. The first approach yields results that are in excellent agreement with all available experimental data, including the growth rates as well as the neutral stability curve. The derivation of the linear stability of the incompressible growing boundary layers is explained.

  6. Operating System Abstraction Layer (OSAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yanchik, Nicholas J.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the concept of the Operating System Abstraction Layer (OSAL) and its benefits. The OSAL is A small layer of software that allows programs to run on many different operating systems and hardware platforms It runs independent of the underlying OS & hardware and it is self-contained. The benefits of OSAL are that it removes dependencies from any one operating system, promotes portable, reusable flight software. It allows for Core Flight software (FSW) to be built for multiple processors and operating systems. The presentation discusses the functionality, the various OSAL releases, and describes the specifications.

  7. Step Free Surface Heteroepitaxy of 3C-SiC Layers on Patterned 4H/6H-SiC Mesas and Cantilevers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Powell, J. Anthony; Trunek, Andrew J.; Spry, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Most SiC devices are implemented in homoepitaxial films grown on 4H/6H-SiC wafers with surfaces 3 degrees to 8 degrees off-axis from the (0001) basal plane. This approach has not prevented many substrate crystal defects from propagating into SiC epilayers, and does not permit the realization of SiC heteropolytype devices. This presentation describes recent advances in SiC epitaxial growth that begun to overcome the above shortcomings for arrays of mesas patterned into on-axis 4H/6H-SiC wafers. First, we demonstrated that atomic-scale surface steps can be completely eliminated from 4H/6H-SiC mesas via on-axis homoepitaxial step-flow growth, forming (0001) basal plane surfaces (up to 0.4 mm x 0.4 mm) for larger than previously thought possible. Step-free surface areas were then extended by growth fo thin lateral cantilevers from the mesa tops. These lateral cantilevers enabled substrate defects to be reduced and relocated in homoepitaxial films in a manner not possible with off-axis SiC growth. Finally, growth of vastly improved 3C-SiC heterofilms was achieved on 4H/6H-SiC mesas using the recently develop step-free surface heteroepitaxy process. These epitaxial growth developments should enable improved homojunction and heterojunction silicon carbide prototype devices.

  8. Thin bacteria/Layered Double Hydroxide films using a layer-by-layer approach.

    PubMed

    Halma, Matilte; Khenifi, Aicha; Sancelme, Martine; Besse-Hoggan, Pascale; Bussière, Pierre-Olivier; Prévot, Vanessa; Mousty, Christine

    2016-07-15

    This paper reports the design of thin bacteria/Layered Double Hydroxides (LDH) films in which bacterial cells of Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP were assembled alternatively with Mg2Al-NO3 LDH nanosheets by a layer-by-layer deposition method. The UV-Vis spectroscopy was used to monitor the assembly process, showing a progressive increase in immobilized bacteria amount upon deposited cycles. The {ADP/LDH}n film was characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The metabolic activity of immobilized bacteria was determined using chronoamperometry by measuring the biochemical oxygen demand in presence of glucose using an artificial electron acceptor (Fe(CN)6(3-)) at 0.5V/Ag-AgCl. A steady current of 0.250μAcm(-2) was reached in about 30s after the addition of 5mM glucose. PMID:27124809

  9. Physics of magnetospheric boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, I. H.

    1993-01-01

    The central ideas of this grant are that the magnetospheric boundary layers link disparate regions of the magnetosphere together, and the global behavior of the magnetosphere can be understood only by understanding the linking mechanisms. Accordingly the present grant includes simultaneous research on the global, meso-, and micro-scale physics of the magnetosphere and its boundary layers. These boundary layers include the bow shock, magnetosheath, the plasma sheet boundary layer, and the ionosphere. Analytic, numerical and simulation projects have been performed on these subjects, as well as comparison of theoretical results with observational data. Very good progress has been made, with four papers published or in press and two additional papers submitted for publication during the six month period 1 June - 30 November 1993. At least two projects are currently being written up. In addition, members of the group have given papers at scientific meetings. The further structure of this report is as follows: section two contains brief accounts of research completed during the last six months, while section three describes the research projects intended for the grant's final period.

  10. High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costanzo, Samuel J.

    1984-01-01

    Clarifies where in the scheme of modern chromatography high performance thin layer chromatography (TLC) fits and why in some situations it is a viable alternative to gas and high performance liquid chromatography. New TLC plates, sample applications, plate development, and instrumental techniques are considered. (JN)