Science.gov

Sample records for 6th european symposium

  1. CfDS 2006: the 6th European Dark-Skies Symposium, Portsmouth, 2006 September 15-16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizon, R.

    2006-12-01

    The BAA's Campaign for Dark Skies took its turn in 2006 to stage the 6th European Dark-Skies Symposium, similar events having been held in previous years in Switzerland, Germany, France and Belgium. The event was the best attended to date, with more than 150 delegates from eleven European countries, the USA and even South Africa. Between sessions, delegates were given a tour of the night skies of the world in the South Downs Planetarium, where Dr John Mason simulated the effects of light pollution. This was followed by a visit to the Clanfield Observatory, courtesy of the Hampshire Astronomical Group, later in the evening, where the real night sky and a little real light pollution (!) were observed. The whole event was kindly sponsored by the BAA and Abacus Lighting Ltd. A principal aim of the two-day symposium was to advise planners and other decision-makers, and those who make, choose and install lighting, about the legal and moral issues surrounding light pollution. It is not, of course, the Campaign's intention to ban lighting, but to ensure that where outdoor lighting is required, it is designed and installed correctly, thereby causing little or no nuisance and reducing energy costs. These non-astronomical aspects were very much to the fore on the first day of the conference, which was opened by one of CfDS' best allies in Parliament, Lembit Opik MP. Mr Opik expressed his delight at seeing so many delegates, and confirmed his continuing support for the initiatives CfDS pursues within Parliament: for example its discussions with DEFRA on the subject of the proposed planning directive (PPS 23) on light pollution

  2. 6th International Immunoglobulin Symposium: poster presentations.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Cruz, E; Kaveri, S V; Peter, H-H; Durandy, A; Cantoni, N; Quinti, I; Sorensen, R; Bussel, J B; Danieli, M G; Winkelmann, A; Bayry, J; Käsermann, F; Späth, P; Helbert, M; Salama, A; van Schaik, I N; Yuki, N

    2009-12-01

    The posters presented at the 6th International Immunoglobulin Symposium covered a wide range of fields and included both basic science and clinical research. From the abstracts accepted for poster presentation, 12 abstracts were selected for oral presentations in three parallel sessions on immunodeficiencies, autoimmunity and basic research. The immunodeficiency presentations dealt with novel, rare class-switch recombination (CSR) deficiencies, attenuation of adverse events following IVIg treatment, association of immunoglobulin (Ig)G trough levels and protection against acute infection in patients with X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), and the reduction of class-switched memory B cells in patients with specific antibody deficiency (SAD). The impact of intravenous immunoglobulin on fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, pregnancy and postpartum-related relapses in multiple sclerosis and refractory myositis, as well as experiences with subcutaneous immunoglobulin in patients with multi-focal motor neuropathy, were the topics presented in the autoimmunity session. The interaction of dendritic cell (DC)-SIGN and alpha2,6-sialylated IgG Fc and its impact on human DCs, the enrichment of sialylated IgG in plasma-derived IgG, as wells as prion surveillance and monitoring of anti-measles titres in immunoglobulin products, were covered in the basic science session. In summary, the presentations illustrated the breadth of immunoglobulin therapy usage and highlighted the progress that is being made in diverse areas of basic and clinical research, extending our understanding of the mechanisms of immunoglobulin action and contributing to improved patient care. PMID:19883425

  3. 6th International Immunoglobulin Symposium: Poster presentations

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Cruz, E; Kaveri, S V; Peter, H-H; Durandy, A; Cantoni, N; Quinti, I; Sorensen, R; Bussel, J B; Danieli, M G; Winkelmann, A; Bayry, J; Käsermann, F; Späth, P; Helbert, M; Salama, A; van Schaik, I N; Yuki, N

    2009-01-01

    The posters presented at the 6th International Immunoglobulin Symposium covered a wide range of fields and included both basic science and clinical research. From the abstracts accepted for poster presentation, 12 abstracts were selected for oral presentations in three parallel sessions on immunodeficiencies, autoimmunity and basic research. The immunodeficiency presentations dealt with novel, rare class-switch recombination (CSR) deficiencies, attenuation of adverse events following IVIg treatment, association of immunoglobulin (Ig)G trough levels and protection against acute infection in patients with X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), and the reduction of class-switched memory B cells in patients with specific antibody deficiency (SAD). The impact of intravenous immunoglobulin on fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, pregnancy and postpartum-related relapses in multiple sclerosis and refractory myositis, as well as experiences with subcutaneous immunoglobulin in patients with multi-focal motor neuropathy, were the topics presented in the autoimmunity session. The interaction of dendritic cell (DC)-SIGN and α2,6-sialylated IgG Fc and its impact on human DCs, the enrichment of sialylated IgG in plasma-derived IgG, as wells as prion surveillance and monitoring of anti-measles titres in immunoglobulin products, were covered in the basic science session. In summary, the presentations illustrated the breadth of immunoglobulin therapy usage and highlighted the progress that is being made in diverse areas of basic and clinical research, extending our understanding of the mechanisms of immunoglobulin action and contributing to improved patient care. PMID:19883425

  4. PREFACE: The 6th International Symposium on Measurement Techniques for Multiphase Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Koji; Murai, Yuichi

    2009-02-01

    Research on multi-phase flows is very important for industrial applications, including power stations, vehicles, engines, food processing, and so on. Also, from the environmental viewpoint, multi-phase flows need to be investigated to overcome global warming. Multi-phase flows originally have non-linear features because they are multi-phased. The interaction between the phases plays a very interesting role in the flows. The non-linear interaction causes the multi-phase flows to be very difficult to understand phenomena. The International Symposium on Measurement Techniques for Multi-phase Flows (ISMTMF) is a unique symposium. The target of the symposium is to exchange the state-of-the-art knowledge on the measurement techniques for non-linear multi-phase flows. Measurement technique is the key technology to understanding non-linear phenomena. The ISMTMF began in 1995 in Nanjing, China. The symposium has continuously been held every two or three years. The ISMTMF-2008 was held in Okinawa, Japan as the 6th symposium of ISMTMF on 15-17 December 2008. Okinawa has a long history as the Ryukyus Kingdom. China and Japan have had cultural and economic exchanges through Okinawa for more than 1000 years. Please enjoy Okinawa and experience its history to enhance our international communication. The present symposium was attended by 124 participants, the program included 107 contributions with 5 plenary lectures, 2 keynote lectures, and 100 oral regular paper presentations. The topics include, besides the ordinary measurement techniques for multiphase flows, acoustic and electric sensors, bubbles and microbubbles, computed tomography, gas-liquid interface, laser-imaging and PIV, oil/coal/drop and spray, solid and powder, spectral and multi-physics. This volume includes the presented papers at ISMTMF-2008. In addition to this volume, ten selected papers will be published in a special issue of Measurement Science and Technology. We would like to express special thanks to all

  5. PREFACE: 6th European Thermal Sciences Conference (Eurotherm 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Daniel; Le Niliot, Christophe

    2012-11-01

    About EUROTHERM The aim of the EUROTHERM Committee (www.eurothermcommittee.eu) is to promote and foster European cooperation in Thermal Sciences and Heat Transfer by gathering together scientists and engineers working in specialized areas. The Committee consists of members representing and appointed by national bodies in the EU countries. The current President of EUROTHERM is Professor Anton van Steenhoven from the University of Eindhoven (The Netherlands). The Committee organizes and coordinates European scientific events such as the EUROTHERM Seminars (about 4 per year) and the European Thermal Sciences Conference (every 4 years). About the conference This sixth in the series of European Thermal Sciences Conferences (www.eurotherm2012.com) took place in France, in the Conference Centre of Poitiers, Futuroscope. We address special thanks to the 225 reviewers, coming from different European countries, who have evaluated these papers. We also thank the scientific committee, consisting of some EUROTHERM Committee members together with other internationally recognized experts. Their role has been to manage the evaluation of abstracts and the papers selection process as co-coordinators for specific topics. This conference is the joint effort of two laboratories: the PPRIME Institute in Poitiers and the IUSTI laboratory in Marseille. It could not be organized without the efficient help of our secretaries and our technician for the IT support. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 180 articles presented at the conference. Professor Daniel PETIT Chairman, PPRIME Poitiers, France Institut P'(UPR CNRS 3346) ENSMA 1 av. Clément Ader - BP40109 86961 Futuroscope-Chasseneuil France daniel.petit@ensma.fr Professor Christophe LE NILIOT Co-chairman, IUSTI Marseille, France Laboratoire IUSTI UMR CNRS 6595 Technopôle de Chateau-Gombert 5, rue Enrico Fermi 13 453 MARSEILLE CEDEX 13 France christophe.leniliot@polytech.univ-mrs.fr

  6. Proceedings from the 6th Annual University of Calgary Leaders in Medicine Research Symposium.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jodie I; Beatty, Jennifer K; Peplowski, Michael A; Keough, Michael B; Yipp, Bryan G; Hollenberg, Morley D; Beck, Paul L

    2015-01-01

    On November 14, 2014, the Leaders in Medicine (LIM) program at the Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary hosted its 6th Annual Research Symposium. Dr. Danuta Skowronski, Epidemiology Lead for Influenza and Emerging Respiratory Pathogens at the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC), was the keynote speaker and presented a lecture entitled "Rapid response research during emerging public health crises: influenza and reflections from the five year anniversary of the 2009 pandemic". The LIM symposium provides a forum for both LIM and non-LIM medical students to present their research work, either as an oral or poster presentation. There were a total of six oral presentations and 77 posters presented. 
The oral presentations included: Swathi Damaraju, "The role of cell communication and 3D Cell-Matrix environment in a stem cell-based tissue engineering strategy for bone repair"; Menglin Yang, "The proteolytic activity of Nepenthes pitcher fluid as a therapeutic for the treatment of celiac disease"; Amelia Kellar, "Monitoring pediatric inflammatory bowel disease - a retrospective analysis of transabdominal ultrasound"; Monica M. Faria-Crowder, "The design and application of a molecular profiling strategy to identify polymicrobial acute sepsis infections"; Waleed Rahmani, "Hair follicle dermal stem cells regenerate the dermal sheath, repopulate the dermal papilla and modulate hair type"; and, Laura Palmer, "A novel role for amyloid beta protein during hypoxia/ischemia". 
The article on the University of Calgary Leaders in Medicine Program, "A Prescription that Addresses the Decline of Basic Science Education in Medical School," in a previous issue of CIM (2014 37(5):E292) provides more details on the program. Briefly, the LIM Research Symposium has the following objectives: (1) to showcase the impressive variety of projects undertaken by students in the LIM Program as well as University of Calgary medical students; (2) to encourage medical

  7. European Cosmic Ray Symposium

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    13me Symposium qui se déroule du 27 au 31 juillet pour la première fois au Cern. Brian Pattison ouvre la cérémonie et donne la parole à Dr.Ugland (qui représente le DG C.Rubbia excusé) et d'autres intervenants

  8. Symposium on Literacy and Disabilities (6th, Durham, North Carolina, January 23-24, 1997). Proceedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke Univ., Durham, NC. Medical Center.

    Shortened versions of papers from a symposium on literacy and disabilities are provided. Paper topics include: (1) a literacy bill of rights; (2) balanced instruction for diverse learners; (3) historical trends in vocabulary selection; (4) inclusive/collaborative service delivery for language/learning disabled school-age children; (5) literacy,…

  9. Intermountain Leisure Symposium Proceedings (6th, Logan, UT, November 7, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Howard, Ed.

    Topics covered in this symposium included: (1) a perspective for seeking commercial sponsorships; (2) developing an activity program that perpetuates developmental skills; (3) emerging American lifestyles: implications for park and recreation professionals; (4) clinical hypnosis: a possible adjunct to therapeutic recreation; (5) impact fees for…

  10. 6th Annual Systems Biology Symposium: Systems Biology and the Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Galitski, Timothy, P.

    2007-04-01

    Systems biology recognizes the complex multi-scale organization of biological systems, from molecules to ecosystems. The International Symposium on Systems Biology is an annual two-day event gathering the most influential researchers transforming biology into an integrative discipline investigating complex systems. In recognition of the fundamental similarity between the scientific problems addressed in environmental science and systems biology studies at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels, the 2007 Symposium featured global leaders in “Systems Biology and the Environment.” The objective of the 2007 “Systems Biology and the Environment” International Symposium was to stimulate interdisciplinary thinking and research that spans systems biology and environmental science. This Symposium was well aligned with the DOE’s Genomics:GTL program efforts to achieve scientific objectives for each of the three DOE missions: • Develop biofuels as a major secure energy source for this century, • Develop biological solutions for intractable environmental problems, and • Understand biosystems’ climate impacts and assess sequestration strategies Our scientific program highlighted world-class research exemplifying these priorities. The Symposium featured 45 minute lectures from 12 researchers including: Penny/Sallie Chisholm of MIT gave the keynote address “Tiny Cells, Global Impact: What Prochlorococcus Can Teach Us About Systems Biology”, plus Jim Fredrickson of PNNL, Nitin Baliga of ISB, Steve Briggs of UCSD, David Cox of Perlegen Sciences, Antoine Danchin of Institut Pasteur, John Delaney of the U of Washington, John Groopman of Johns Hopkins, Ben Kerr of the U of Washington, Steve Koonin of BP, Elliott Meyerowitz of Caltech, and Ed Rubin of LBNL. The 2007 Symposium promoted DOE’s three mission areas among scientists from multiple disciplines representing academia, non-profit research institutions, and the private sector. As in all previous

  11. Brick and Click Libraries: Proceedings of an Academic Library Symposium (6th, Maryville, Missouri, November 3, 2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baudino, Frank, Ed.; Ury, Connie Jo, Ed.; Park, Sarah G., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    These proceedings document the sixth year of the "Brick and Click Libraries Symposium," held annually at Northwest Missouri State University in Maryville, Missouri, on November 3, 2006. Thirty-four peer-reviewed papers and abstracts, written by academic librarians, and presented at the symposium are included in this volume. Many of the entries…

  12. 6th Annual Symposium on Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG) Applications and Beyond, April 25–27, 2013, Riga, Latvia

    PubMed Central

    Schlaeger, Christof; Hinzmann, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Abstract International experts in the fields of diabetes, diabetes technology, endocrinology, and pediatrics gathered for the 6th Annual Symposium on Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG) Applications and beyond. The aim of this meeting was to continue setting up a global network of experts in this field and provide an international platform for exchange of ideas to improve life for people with diabetes. The 2013 meeting comprised a comprehensive scientific program, parallel interactive workshops, and two keynote lectures. All these discussions were intended to help identify gaps and areas where further scientific work and clinical studies are warranted. PMID:24074038

  13. Eleventh European Cosmic Ray Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1988-08-01

    The biannual Symposium includes all aspects of cosmic ray research. The scientific program was organized under three main headings: cosmic rays in the heliosphere, cosmic rays in the interstellar and extragalactic space, and properties of high-energy interactions as studied by cosmic rays. Selected short communications out of 114 contributed papers were indexed separately for the INIS database.

  14. [Analysis of the Hungarian participation in the 6th European Union Framework Programme for Research, Technological Development and Demonstration in the thematic priority area of the life sciences].

    PubMed

    Pörzse, Gábor; Temesi, Alfréda

    2007-07-22

    The European Union launched the 6th Framework Programme for Research, Technological Development and Demonstration in 2002. Initially, Hungary participated in the 6th Framework Programme as an associate member, but since 2004 it has taken part as a Member State. Besides mobilizing their own resources, research organizations entering winning bids to framework programme tenders enjoy considerable financial support from the European Union, while participating states also contribute to the costs of the cooperation from their national budgets. Therefore, it is very important to recognize and evaluate the achievements of domestic participation. By collecting, processing and analyzing available data, the authors evaluate the bid activity and the successfulness of Hungarian research organizations in the thematic priority area covering life sciences of the 6th Framework Programme. When judging success, the authors not only consider the level of Community financial contribution, but also the participation of Hungarian researchers in international research networks. The article contains an analysis of the submitted and supported works from various aspects such as by year, calls for bids, research fields etc. for projects in the implementation of which Hungarian partners were also involved. The authors present the cost settlement methodologies applied, and traditional and new project types. They analyse the activity of coordinators and outline European expectations with regard to the participation of small and medium-sized enterprises and women. One of the important objectives of the analysis is to draw conclusions so that participants will be able to adapt them during the 7th Framework Programme, 2007-2013. PMID:17631471

  15. Research, Issues, and Practices. Annual Curriculum and Instruction Research Symposium Conference Proceedings, University of South Dakota (6th, Vermillion, SD, April 24, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Robert W., Ed.; Hoag, Constance L., Ed.; Zalud, Garreth, Ed.

    This report includes papers from a 1998 symposium to promote the professional sharing of current educational issues. The papers are: "A Tapestry of Authors" (Maurine Richardson and Margaret Miller); "Critical Thinking Strategies Across the Curriculum" (Constance L. Hoag and Sharon Andrews); "The Effect of Journal Writing on Teachers' Theory…

  16. PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON FOOD PROCESSING WASTES (6TH), HELD AT MADISON, WISCONSIN ON APRIL 9-11, 1975

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Sixth National Symposium on Food Processing Wastes was co-sponsored with the National Canners Association and the Wisconsin Canners and Freezers Association. The primary purpose of these symposia is the dissemination of the latest research, development and demonstration infor...

  17. Unraveling the genetic underpinnings of myeloproliferative neoplasms and understanding their effect on disease course and response to therapy: Proceedings from the 6th International Post-ASH Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Pardanani, Animesh; Bernard, Olivier; Finazzi, Guido; Crispino, John D.; Gisslinger, Heinz; Kralovics, Robert; Odenike, Olatoyosi; Bhalla, Kapil; Gupta, Vikas; Barosi, Giovanni; Gotlib, Jason; Guglielmelli, Paola; Kiladjian, Jean-Jacques; Noel, Pierre; Cazzola, Mario; Vannucchi, Alessandro M.; Hoffman, Ronald; Barbui, Tiziano; Thiele, Juergen; Van Etten, Richard A.; Mughal, Tariq I.; Tefferi, Ayalew

    2012-01-01

    Immediately after the annual scientific meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH), a select group of clinical and laboratory investigators in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) is summoned to a post-ASH conference on chronic myeloid leukemia and the BCR-ABL1-negative MPN. The 6th such meeting occurred on 13th–14th December 2011, in La Jolla, California, USA, under the direction of its founder, Dr. Tariq Mughal. The current document is the first of two reports on this post-ASH event and summarizes the most recent preclinical and clinical advances in polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis. PMID:22460584

  18. PREFACE: 24th European Cosmic Ray Symposium (ECRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-08-01

    The 24th European Cosmic Ray Symposium (ECRS) took place in Kiel, Germany, at the Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel from September 1 - 5, 2014, The first symposium was held in 1968 in Lodz, Poland (high energy, extensive air showers and astrophysical aspects) and in Bern (solar and heliospheric phenomena) and the two "strands" joined together in 1976 with the meeting in Leeds. The 24th ECRS covered a wide range of scientific issues divided into the following topics: HECR-I Primary cosmic rays I (experiments) HECR-II Primary cosmic rays II (theory) MN Cosmic ray muons and neutrinos GR GeV and TeV gamma astronomy SH Energetic particles in the heliosphere (solar and anomalous CRs and GCR modulation) GEO Cosmic rays and geophysics (energetic particles in the atmosphere and magnetosphere of the Earth) INS Future Instrumentation DM Dark Matter The organizers are very grateful to the Deutsche Forschungs Gemeinschaft for supporting the symposium.

  19. 11th European VLBI Network Symposium & Users Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Bordeaux (LAB) at the University of Bordeaux (France), on behalf of the European VLBI Consortium, hosted the 11th European VLBI Network (EVN) Symposium and EVN Users Meeting on October 9-12, 2012. The Symposium was held at the "Chambre de Commerce et d'Industrie de Bordeaux", located in the "Palais de la Bourse", in the center of Bordeaux. The conference highlighted the latest scientific results and technical developments from VLBI, space VLBI and e-VLBI. All fields of astrophysics were concerned - stellar, galactic and extragalactic - as well as astrometry and planetary science. Presentations addressing synergy between (e-)VLBI and other new or planned radio facilities (ALMA, LOFAR, e-MERLIN,...) or instruments at other wavelengths (Fermi, CTA, Gaia,...) were also an integral part of the program. The scientific program was organized in 11 sessions including 71 oral presentations, with an additional 43 posters available for viewing during the entire length of the conference. An EVN Users Meeting was also held during one of the evening to foster interaction between the EVN users and the EVN organization. The symposium was attended by a total of 122 delegates originating from 47 institutes world-wide, sharing new VLBI science and innovations while also building links with other communities. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement no 283393 (RadioNet3).

  20. European symposium on precision medicine in allergy and airways diseases: report of the European Union parliament symposium (October 14, 2015).

    PubMed

    Muraro, A; Fokkens, W J; Pietikainen, S; Borrelli, D; Agache, I; Bousquet, J; Costigliola, V; Joos, G; Lund, V J; Poulsen, L K; Price, D; Rolland, C; Zuberbier, T; Hellings, P W

    2015-12-01

    On 14 October 2015, the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI), the European Rhinologic Society (ERS) and the European Medical Association (EMA) organized a symposium in the European Parliament in Brussels on Precision Medicine in Allergy and Airways Diseases, hosted by MEP David Borrelli and with active participation of the European Respiratory Society (ERS), the European Federations of Allergy and Airways Diseases Patients Associations (EFA), the Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (Ga2len), Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) and the Respiratory Effectiveness Group (REG). MEP Sirpa Pietikainen, Chair of the European Parliament Interest Group on Allergy and Asthma, underlined the importance of the need for a better diagnostic and therapeutic approach for patients with Allergies and Chronic Airways Diseases, and encouraged a joint initiative to control the epidemic of Allergy and Asthma in Europe. The socio-economic impact of allergies and chronic airways diseases cannot be underestimated, as they represent the most frequently diagnosed chronic non-communicable diseases in the EU. Despite the fact that 30% of the total European population is nowadays suffering from allergies and asthma, more than half of these patients are deprived from adequate diagnosis and treatment. Precision Medicine represents a novel approach in medicine, embracing 4 key features: personalized care based on molecular, immunologic and functional endotyping of the disease, with participation of the patient in the decision making process of therapeutic actions, and taking into account predictive and preventive aspects of the treatment. Implementation of Precision Medicine into clinical practice may help to achieve the arrest of the Epidemic of Allergies and Chronic Airways Diseases. This report summarizes the key messages delivered during the symposium by the speakers, including the EU Commissioner for Health and Food Safety Vitenys Andriukaitis. The

  1. Interdisciplinarity. Papers Presented at the SRHE European Symposium on Interdisciplinary Courses in European Education, 13 September 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Society for Research into Higher Education, Ltd., London (England).

    Papers are presented from the 1975 Society for Research into Higher Education European Symposium on Interdisciplinary (ID) Courses in European Education. Section one of the symposium on "philosophy and background" consists of an introduction by Professor Berger and discussion. Section two on "some ID courses" consists of the following papers: "The…

  2. European Symposium on Precision Medicine in Allergy and Airways Diseases: Report of the European Union Parliament Symposium (October 14, 2015).

    PubMed

    Muraro, A; Fokkens, W J; Pietikainen, S; Borrelli, D; Agache, I; Bousquet, J; Costigliola, V; Joos, G; Lund, V J; Poulsen, L K; Price, D; Rolland, C; Zuberbier, T; Hellings, P W

    2016-05-01

    The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI), the European Rhinologic Society (ERS), and the European Medical Association (EMA) organized, on October 14, 2015, a symposium in the European Parliament in Brussels on Precision Medicine in Allergy and Airways Diseases, hosted by MEP David Borrelli, and with active participation of the EU Commissioner for Health and Food Safety Vytenis Andriukaitis, MEP Sirpa Pietikainen, Chair of the European Parliament Interest Group on Allergy and Asthma, the European Respiratory Society (ERS), the European Federations of Allergy and Airways Diseases Patients Associations (EFA), the Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (Ga2len), Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma (ARIA), and the Respiratory Effectiveness Group (REG). The socioeconomic impact of allergies and chronic airways diseases cannot be underestimated, as they represent the most frequently diagnosed chronic noncommunicable diseases in the EU; 30% of the total European population is suffering from allergies and asthma, and more than half are deprived from adequate diagnosis and treatment. Precision medicine represents a novel approach, embracing four key features: personalized care based on molecular, immunologic, and functional endotyping of the disease, with participation of the patient in the decision-making process of therapeutic actions, and considering predictive and preventive aspects of the treatment. Implementation of precision medicine into clinical practice may help to achieve the arrest of the epidemic of allergies and chronic airways diseases. Participants underscored the need for optimal patient care in Europe, supporting joint action plans for disease prevention, patient empowerment, and cost-effective treatment strategies. PMID:26660289

  3. PREFACE: 6th Liquid Matter Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, Marjolein; van Roij, René; Vroege, Gert Jan; Lekkerkerker, Henk; Frenkel, Daan

    2005-11-01

    This special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter contains the Proceedings of the 6th Liquid Matter Conference held in Utrecht, The Netherlands, 2-6 July 2005. The three-yearly Liquid Matter Conference is organized by the Liquids Section of the Condensed Matter Division of the European Physical Society. This series of meetings began in Lyon in 1990. The most recent meeting was held in 2003 in Konstanz. The aim of the Liquid Matter Conferences is to bring together scientists working on the liquid state of matter. This rapidly growing field includes the physics, chemistry, biology and chemical engineering of liquid matter as well as various applied research areas. In fact, the Utrecht meeting had, for the first time, a special session devoted to Fundamental Challenges in Applied Liquid Physics and Microfluidics. The Utrecht meeting had 760 registered participants from four continents. An important event at this meeting was the award of the First Liquid Matter Prize of the European Physical Society to Professor Jean-Pierre Hansen FRS, of Cambridge University. In addition to a plenary speech by the recipient of the Liquid Matter Prize, the scientific programme consisted of 10 plenary lectures, 117 symposia talks, 25 of which were keynote lectures and some 650 poster contributions. The meeting also hosted a one-day symposium of the Division of Liquids and Interfaces of the Chemical Sciences division of NWO. This special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter contains 61 of the oral communications. Liquid state physics is at the interface of many fields of research. As a consequence, many of the attendants come from adjacent fields and find in the Liquid Matter Conference a forum to meet experts from other areas of research. This aspect of the Liquid Matter Conference makes it an exciting meeting as it not only offers the participants an up-to-date picture of the status of research into the liquid state of matter, but it also allows them to establish new

  4. Patenting biotechnologies: the European Union Directive 98/44/EC of the European parliament and of the council of 6th July 1998 on the legal protection of biotechnological inventions.

    PubMed

    Morelli Gradi, G

    1999-01-01

    Before the Directive 98/44/EC of the European Parliament and the Council of 6th July 1998, notwithstanding some decisions of the European Patent Office (still presently under opposition) and some patents already granted by the Italian Patent Office, the existing legal framework did not allow the patentability of living organisms in the European Community countries. The Directive has dramatically changed the perspectives. It ensures free circulation of patented biotechnological products harmonising the national legal system of each Member State, guaranteeing compliance with the European Patent Convention signed in Munich on 5th October 1973, the Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights agreement of 15th April 1994 and the Rio de Janeiro Convention on Biological Diversity of 5th June 1992. The legal basis of the Directive and the fundamental principles of protection are that discoveries as such are not considered patentable. Plant and animal varieties as such, as well as essentially biological procedures for the production of plants and animals are excluded from protection by patent. On the contrary, the new field of patentability covers plants and parts of animals with new introduced genetic characters. Methods of surgical and therapeutic treatment and diagnostic methods applied to animal bodies are not considered inventions suitable for industrial applications and excluded from protection by patents. Biological materials and material isolated from its natural environment and isolated elements of the human body with technical processes may be patented. Excluded from patentability are inventions that are contrary to law and order or public morality as well as processes for human cloning for reproductive purposes and for modifying the germ-line genetic identity of human beings, as well as the use of human embryos. The processes for modifying the genetic identity of animals without any substantial medical benefit for man (with the exception of studying new

  5. Research in Outdoor Education, Volume 6. A Peer-Reviewed Publication of Scholarship First Presented at the Biennial Research Symposium of the Coalition for Education in the Outdoors (6th, Bradford Woods, Indiana, January 11-13, 2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bialeschki, M. Deborah, Ed.; Henderson, Karla A., Ed.; Young, Anderson B., Ed.; Andrejewski, Robert G., Ed.

    This volume contains peer-reviewed research articles and abstracts based on papers presented at the sixth biennial research symposium of the Coalition for Education in the Outdoors. Introductory materials include the editors' introduction, "Milestones in Outdoor Education" (Anderson B. Young), and a tribute to the founder of the Indiana University…

  6. 6th International Microbeam Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Dr Kevin M. Prise

    2004-01-01

    The extended abstracts which are submitted here present a summary of the proceedings of the 6th International Workshop/12th LH Gray Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at St. Catherine's College, University of Oxford, UK on March, 29th-31st, 2003. In 1993 the 4th LH Gray Workshop entitled ''Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response'' was held at the Gray Cancer Institute in Northwood. This was organized by Prof BD Michael, Dr M. Folkard and Dr KM Prise and brought together 40 participants interested in developing and applying new microbeam technology to problems in radiation biology (1). The workshop was an undoubted success and has spawned a series of subsequent workshops every two years. In the past, these workshops have been highly successful in bringing together groups interested in developing and applying micro-irradiation techniques to the study of cell and tissue damage by ionizing radiations. Following the first microbeam workshop, there has been a rapid growth in the number of centres developing radiobiology microbeams, or planning to do so and there are currently 15-20 worldwide. Much of the recent research using microbeams has used them to study low-dose effects and ''non-targeted'' responses such bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. The goal of the 6th workshop was to build on our knowledge of the development of microbeam approaches and the application to radiation biology in the future with the meeting stretching over a 3 day period. Over 80 participants reviewed the current state of radiobiology microbeam research worldwide and reported on new technological developments both in the fields of physics and biology.

  7. Keynote Address for 6th International Symposium on Digital Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bambacus, Myra

    2009-01-01

    NASA is committed to collaborating with not only our National Partners but also with our International Partners to help make our world a better place. We do this through the sharing of our discoveries and working together so that we can address uncertainties in predictions and forecasts that impact how we live on our home planet. NASA is committed to a Digital Earth as it enables our research to focus on cross disciplinary analysis. The mainstream Information Technologies along with the Digital Earth concepts have allowed this interdisciplinary research that is so critical to societal benefits. The technologies have been discovered and in many cases implemented, but we must forge ahead together to continue to advance all that is possible to fully extend our earth observations for the sake of humankind.

  8. The European Scientist - Symposium on the era and work of Franz Xaver von Zach (1754 - 1832)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balázs, Lajos G.; Brosche, Peter; Duerbeck, Hilmar W.; Zsoldos, Endre

    On June 16, 1754, the birth of the second son of its leading physician was registered in the "Militärmatriken" of the Invalides' Hospital at Pest, Hungary. The father was Joseph Zach from Olmüutz and the mother Clara née Sontag. The son received the names Joannes Franciscus Xaverius Vitus Fridericus, and later became a geodesist and astronomer. For these professions, he acted around 1800 not only as a kind of international information centre, but he moreover stimulated the work of other colleagues and carried out important observations and reductions. He studied and published historical sources, and his journals constitute themselves more an ocean than a source of the history of our science, an ocean which is still to be explored for as yet undetected islands. At the occasion of the 250th birthday of Franz Xaver von Zach, Hungarian colleagues took the initiative to commemorate him by a symposium at the seat of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, which was held on September 15-17, 2004. This book contains contributions that are based on lectures given at the Budapest symposium "The European Scientist". All papers are written English.

  9. PREFACE: 23rd European Cosmic Ray Symposium (and 32nd Russian Cosmic Ray Conference)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlykin, A. D.; Kokoulin, R. P.; Lidvansky, A. S.; Meroshnichenko, L. I.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Panov, A. D.; Wolfendale, A. W.

    2013-02-01

    The 23rd European Cosmic Ray Symposium (ECRS) took place in Moscow at the Lomonosov Moscow State University (3-7 July 2012), and was excellently organized by the Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Lomonosov Moscow State University, with the help of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the Council on the Complex Problem of Cosmic Rays of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The first symposia were held in 1968 in Lodz, Poland (high energy, extensive air showers and astrophysical aspects) and in Bern (solar and heliospheric phenomena) and the two 'strands' joined together in 1976 with the meeting in Leeds. Since then the symposia, which have been very successful, have covered all the major topics with some emphasis on European collaborations and on meeting the demands of young scientists. Initially, a driving force was the need to overcome the divisions caused by the 'Cold War' but the symposia continued even when that threat ceased and they have shown no sign of having outlived their usefulness. 2012 has been an important year in the history of cosmic ray studies, in that it marked the centenary of the discovery of enigmatic particles in the perilous balloon ascents of Victor Hess. A number of conferences have taken place in Western Europe during the year, but this one took place in Moscow as a tribute to the successful efforts of many former USSR and other Eastern European scientists in discovering the secrets of the subject, often under very difficult conditions. The symposium covers a wide range of scientific issues divided into the following topics: PCR-IPrimary cosmic rays I (E < 1015 eV) PCR-IIPrimary cosmic rays II (E > 1015 eV) MNCosmic ray muons and neutrinos GAGeV and TeV gamma astronomy SHEnergetic particles in the heliosphere (solar and anomalous CRs and GCR modulation) GEOCosmic rays and geophysics (energetic particles in the atmosphere and magnetosphere of the Earth) On a personal note, as I step down as co-founder and chairman of the

  10. Introduction to the special issue on the 2011 Joint IEEE International Frequency Control Symposium and European Frequency and Time Forum.

    PubMed

    Burt, Eric; Gill, Patrick

    2012-03-01

    The 8 invited and 17 contributed papers in this special issue focus on the following topical areas covered at the 2011 Joint IEEE International Frequency Control Symposium and European Frequency and Time Forum, held in San Francisco, California: 1) Materials and Resonators; 2) Oscillators, Synthesizers, and Noise; 3) Microwave Frequency Standards; 4) Sensors and Transducers; 5) Timekeeping and Time and Frequency Transfer; and 6) Optical Frequency Standards. PMID:22481765

  11. 6th Amino Acid Assessment Workshop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The focus of the 6th workshop is on lysine, arginine, and related amino acids. Functions, metabolic pathways, clinical uses, and upper tolerance intakes are emphasized in the articles that follow. Lysine is arguably the most deficient amino acid in the food supply of countries where poverty exists, ...

  12. From challenges to solutions. European Bioanalysis Forum 3rd Annual Open Symposium, Hesperia Towers, Barcelona, Spain, 1-3 December 2010.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Richard W; Gordon, Ben; van Amsterdam, Peter; Lausecker, Berthold; Brudny-Kloeppel, Margarete; Smeraglia, John; Romero, Fernando; Globig, Susanne; Golob, Michaela; Knutsson, Magnus; Herling, Christian; Vieser, Eva; Timmerman, Philip

    2011-04-01

    The European Bioanalysis Forum is a bioanalytical nonprofit organization comprised of European pharmaceutical companies (27 members to date) and currently expanding to include CROs as well. The European Bioanalysis Forum provides a broad European bioanalytical network for the discussion of scientific, technological and regulatory topics of bioanalytical interest. The 3rd Annual Open Symposium was again much anticipated after the two previous successful meetings. The symposium included sessions on thinking outside the 'commodity' box, bioanalytical challenges with blood, global harmonization, assay platforms, dried blood spots, immunogenicity, matrix effects, anomalous results, biomarkers and two plenary technology sessions hosted by the Platinum sponsors. Experts and key opinion leaders were invited as guest speakers. A total of 424 delegates registered from 113 companies representing a large percentage of the European bioanalytical community. In addition to 48 oral presentations, 88 posters were presented and there was a vendor exposition of 40 companies. PMID:21510756

  13. 6th International Meshing Roundtable '97

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.

    1997-09-01

    The goal of the 6th International Meshing Roundtable is to bring together researchers and developers from industry, academia, and government labs in a stimulating, open environment for the exchange of technical information related to the meshing process. In the pas~ the Roundtable has enjoyed significant participation born each of these groups from a wide variety of countries. The Roundtable will consist of technical presentations from contributed papers and abstracts, two invited speakers, and two invited panels of experts discussing topics related to the development and use of automatic mesh generation tools. In addition, this year we will feature a "Bring Your Best Mesh" competition and poster session to encourage discussion and participation from a wide variety of mesh generation tool users. The schedule and evening social events are designed to provide numerous opportunities for informal dialog. A proceedings will be published by Sandia National Laboratories and distributed at the Roundtable. In addition, papers of exceptionally high quaIity will be submitted to a special issue of the International Journal of Computational Geometry and Applications. Papers and one page abstracts were sought that present original results on the meshing process. Potential topics include but are got limited to: Unstructured triangular and tetrahedral mesh generation Unstructured quadrilateral and hexahedral mesh generation Automated blocking and structured mesh generation Mixed element meshing Surface mesh generation Geometry decomposition and clean-up techniques Geometry modification techniques related to meshing Adaptive mesh refinement and mesh quality control Mesh visualization Special purpose meshing algorithms for particular applications Theoretical or novel ideas with practical potential Technical presentations from industrial researchers.

  14. PREFACE: 6th EEIGM International Conference on Advanced Materials Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwat, David; Ayadi, Zoubir; Jamart, Brigitte

    2012-02-01

    The 6th EEIGM Conference on Advanced Materials Research (AMR 2011) was held at the European School of Materials Engineering (EEIGM) on the 7-8 November 2011 in Nancy, France. This biennial conference organized by the EEIGM is a wonderful opportunity for all scientists involved in the EEIGM programme, in the 'Erasmus Mundus' Advanced Materials Science and Engineering Master programme (AMASE) and the 'Erasmus Mundus' Doctoral Programme in Materials Science and Engineering (DocMASE), to present their research in the various fields of Materials Science and Engineering. This conference is also open to other universities who have strong links with the EEIGM and provides a forum for the exchange of ideas, co-operation and future orientations by means of regular presentations, posters and a round-table discussion. This edition of the conference included a round-table discussion on composite materials within the Interreg IVA project '+Composite'. Following the publication of the proceedings of AMR 2009 in Volume 5 of this journal, it is with great pleasure that we present this selection of articles to the readers of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. Once again it represents the interdisciplinary nature of Materials Science and Engineering, covering basic and applicative research on organic and composite materials, metallic materials and ceramics, and characterization methods. The editors are indebted to all the reviewers for reviewing the papers at very short notice. Special thanks are offered to the sponsors of the conference including EEIGM-Université de Lorraine, AMASE, DocMASE, Grand Nancy, Ville de Nancy, Region Lorraine, Fédération Jacques Villermaux, Conseil Général de Meurthe et Moselle, Casden and '+Composite'. Zoubir Ayadi, David Horwat and Brigitte Jamart

  15. Meeting report: present state of molecular genetics in clinical laboratories. Report on the VII European Symposium on Clinical Laboratory and In Vitro Diagnostic Industry in Barcelona.

    PubMed

    Padró-Miquel, Ariadna; Candás-Estébanez, Beatriz

    2015-02-01

    The VII European Symposium of the Clinical Laboratory and In Vitro Diagnostic Industry, co-organized between the Catalan Association for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (ACCLC) and the Catalan Society of Biology, was held on May 28th-29th, 2013 in Barcelona (Catalonia, Spain) under the IFCC auspices and the IUPAC sponsorship. The subject of the present Symposium was "Molecular Genetics in the Clinical Laboratory" and began with an opening conference that was a stroll through the history of molecular genetics in the context of the clinical laboratory. The scientific program was structured in several 2-h length roundtables that dealt with the following topics: recent advances in molecular genetics for clinical microbiology, latest evidences and real applicability of pharmacogenetics in the clinical practice, quality assurance of a molecular genetics laboratory, and latest trends in prenatal genetic diagnosis. The aim of the Symposium was the discussion of the transformation that molecular genetics has generated on clinical laboratories in terms of organization, specialization, interpretation of results and fast technical and knowledge evolution. High-qualified professionals from several countries together with in-country experts formed the roundtables. Attendants participated actively in the debates, increasing the overall interest. PMID:25296673

  16. The 6th International Earth Science Olympiad: A Student Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlett, Luke; Cathro, Darcy; Mellow, Maddi; Tate, Clara

    2014-01-01

    In October 2012, two students from the Australian Science and Mathematics School and two from Yankalilla Area School were selected to travel to Olavarria, Argentina in order to compete in the 6th International Earth Science Olympiad (IESO). It was an opportunity for individuals with a passion for Earth science to come together from 17 countries to…

  17. Proceedings of the 6th international offshore mechanics and Arctic engineering symposium, Vol. 4

    SciTech Connect

    Lunardini, V.J.; Sinha, N.K.; Wang, Y.S.; Goff, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on offshore platforms. Topics considered at the conference included spray ice islands, arctic structures and operations, arctic thermal and permafrost engineering, ice properties, offshore drilling, foundations, offshore exploration, crude oil storage facilities, thermosyphons, heat transfer, concretes, wave forces, and soil mechanics.

  18. Slow-release carbohydrates: growing evidence on metabolic responses and public health interest. Summary of the symposium held at the 12th European Nutrition Conference (FENS 2015)

    PubMed Central

    Vinoy, Sophie; Laville, Martine; Feskens, Edith J M

    2016-01-01

    To draw attention to the necessity of considering differences in the digestibility of carbohydrates, and more specifically of starch, a symposium was held at the 12th European Nutrition Conference (FENS), which took place in Berlin from October 20 to 23, 2015. The purpose of this session was to present the consolidated knowledge and recent advances regarding the relationship between slow-release carbohydrates, metabolic responses, and public health issues. Three main topics were presented: 1) the definition of, sources of, and recognised interest in the glycaemic response to slowly digestible starch (SDS); 2) clinical evidence regarding the physiological effects of slow-release carbohydrates from cereal foods; and 3) interest in reducing the postprandial glycaemic response to help prevent metabolic diseases. Foods with the highest SDS content induce the lowest glycaemic responses, as the starch is protected from gelatinisation during processing. In humans, high-SDS food consumption induces slower glucose release, lower postprandial insulinaemia, and stimulation of gut hormones. Moreover, postprandial hyperglycaemia is an independent risk factor for type two diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Therefore, given the plausible aetiologic mechanisms, we argue that postprandial glucose levels are relevant for health and disease and represent a meaningful target for intervention, for example, through dietary factors. This symposium was organised by Mondelez International R&D. PMID:27388153

  19. 6th ESO/OHP Summer School in Astrophysical Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Véron, M.-P.; Meylan, G.

    1998-09-01

    The 6th ESO/OHP Summer School was hosted again at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP) from 15 to 25 July 1998. The school, held only every second years, selects 18 of Europe's most promising young doctoral students in astronomy. Courses of lectures, observations, and analysis form the intellectual menu which is aimed at teaching the process of extracting astrophysically digestible results from the photons harvested at the telescopes, such as the ESO VLT, whose four telescopes will become available to the community in turn during the next few years.

  20. CONFERENCE NOTE: Sixth Symposium on Temperature Scheduled for March 1982

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-07-01

    The call for papers for the 6th Symposium on Temperature, Its Measurement and Control in Science and Industry has been issued. The Symposium is scheduled to take place in Washington, DC, USA during the week of March 14 18, 1982. Like its predecessors held in the years 1919, 1939, 1954, 1961, and 1971, the 6th Symposium will stress advances in the measurement of thermodynamic values of temperature, in temperature reference points, in temperature sensors and instruments for the control of temperature, and in the development and use of temperature scales. For the first time, an exhibit of thermometry will be a part of the Symposium. Manuscripts to be submitted for inclusion in the Symposium should be sent to the 6th Temperature Symposium Program Chairman, National Bureau of Standards, by September 15, 1981. Those papers accepted for the Symposium will be due in camera-ready form by February 15, 1982. Original papers on all of the topics listed above, as well as reviews of the past decade's progress in thermometry and temperature control, are solicited by the Symposium organizers. The Symposium arrangements and registration are in the care of the Instrument Society of America (represented on the Symposium General Committee by Mr C T Glazer, 67 Alexander Drive, PO Box 12277, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, 27709, USA). Questions regarding the instrument exhibits should also be addressed to the ISA. The technical program for the Symposium is the responsibility of a committee headed by Dr J F Schooley, Room B-128 Physics Building, National Bureau of Standards, Washington, DC, 20234, USA. The Symposium proceedings will be published by the American Institute of Physics.

  1. Pfizer-sponsored satellite symposium at the European Haemophilia Consortium (EHC) Congress: changing the policy landscape: haemophilia patient involvement in healthcare decision-making.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, Brian; Kent, Alastair; Aymé, Ségolène

    2014-06-01

    The annual European Haemophilia Consortium (EHC) Conference 2013, held in Bucharest, Romania, 4-5 October, was attended by over 200 patient advocates, policy makers and healthcare professionals from across Europe. Pfizer sponsored a satellite symposium at the conference entitled: 'Changing the policy landscape: haemophilia patient involvement in healthcare decision making', drawing on expertise from a panel specialising in the field of rare disease. The symposium, chaired by Declan Noone (Irish Haemophilia Society) on behalf of Brian O'Mahony (Irish Haemophilia Society), examined the current policy and economic landscape in Europe and how pressures on healthcare budgets are impacting haemophilia care. The symposium also discussed the importance of representing the 'patient voice' in key policy decisions through identification of opportunities for patient advocacy group engagement. Alastair Kent (Genetic Alliance UK) opened the session by highlighting that the downturn in the global economy has refocused decision-making in healthcare, moving cost-effectiveness of healthcare interventions higher up the agenda for decision-makers and payers. In light of this, patient engagement is more important than ever, particularly in healthcare technology assessments (HTAs), to ensure that patient and family opinions are represented. Ségolène Aymé (Orphanet) built upon this in her session discussing the rare disease policy landscape and regional initiatives taking place in Europe, including the EUROPLAN process, for which the participation of the haemophilia community is critical. Finally, Declan Noone provided an example of how the EHC, through its survey of 35 countries, demonstrated not only the considerable differences in the quality of care available for people with haemophilia across Europe, but also how the data from the survey could be used as a powerful advocacy tool to initiate change in countries with lower gross domestic product (GDP) that face healthcare spending

  2. Fundamentals of Physics, 6th Edition Enhanced Problems Version

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2002-04-01

    No other text on the market today can match the success of Halliday, Resnick and Walker's Fundamentals of Physics. This text continues to outperform the competition year after year, and the new edition will be no exception. Intended for Calculus-based Physics courses, the 6th edition of this extraordinary text is a major redesign of the best-selling 5th edition, which still maintains many of the elements that led to its enormous success. Jearl Walker adds his unique style to this edition with the addition of new problems designed to capture, and keep, students' attention. Nearly all changes are based on suggestions from instructors and students using the 5th edition, from reviewer comments, and from research done on the process of learning. The primary goal of this text is to provide students with a solid understanding of fundamental physics concepts, and to help them apply this conceptual understanding to quantitative problem solving. The principal goal of Halliday-Resnick-Walker is to provide instructors with a tool by which they can teach students how to effectively read scientific material and successfully reason through scientific questions. To sharpen this tool, the Enhanced Problems Version of the sixth edition of Fundamentals of Physics contains over 1000 new, high-quality problems that require thought and reasoning rather than simplistic plugging of data into formulas.

  3. 6th Global College of Neuroprotection and Neuroregeneration, annual meeting.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Hari Shanker; Sharma, Aruna

    2009-07-01

    The 6th Global College of Neuroprotection and Neuroregeneration (GCNN) and 5th Society for Study on Neuroplasticity and Neuroregeneration (SSNN) conference was held jointly in the Hilton Hotel, Vienna, Austria, 1-4 March 2009. This was the second annual joint conference of the two societies and it was highly successful from a scientific point of view, as it saw a gathering of the top basic and clinical scientists whose research is currently at the cutting edge of neuroscience. This conference saw 86 invited lectures from carefully selected leading scientists from around the world, along with 56 posters of young scientists researching of a focal theme. Over the 3 days, in 32 sessions, new developments in neuroprotection and new ways to enhance neuroregeneration were discussed intensively among more than 600 delegates. In addition, approximately 40 representatives of drug companies, five representatives from scientific publishers and 14 representatives from scientific instruments and supplies-related industries also actively participated in this huge neuroscience event. The GCNN and SSNN conference achieved a new milestone in scientific success in Vienna and established an excellent new working collaboration among the participants in a pleasant, enriched environment with several social gatherings. PMID:19589044

  4. Highlights from the Student Council Symposium 2011 at the International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology and European Conference on Computational Biology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Student Council (SC) of the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) organized their annual symposium in conjunction with the Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology (ISMB) conference. This meeting report summarizes the scientific content of the Student Council Symposium 2011 as well as other activities organized by the Student Council in the context of ISMB. The symposium was held in Vienna, Austria on July 15th 2011.

  5. PREFACE: The 6th Nordic Meeting on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Løvhøiden, G.; Thorsteinsen, T. F.; Vaagen, J. S.

    1990-01-01

    After an unintended time gap of five years, the series of regular Nordic meetings on nuclear physics was continued with the 6th Nordic Meeting, August 10-15, 1989. The site was Utgarden in the outskirts of Kopervik, the administration center for the Saga island of Karmøy on the west-coast of Norway. Utgarden, a "peoples high-school'' with a kitchen, housing facility and a neighboring modern gymnasium with fine lecture halls, proved to be an inexpensive and adequate site for the meeting. From the time of the Vikings, the sound between Karmøyy and the mainland has been a vital part of the way to the north. Mobility and international orientation is still a signature of an area where today essential parts of Norway's oil- and metal industry are located. The conference program included a session on nuclear physics in industry and society, with contributed talks from a number of companies and technology/research institutions, which also sponsored the meeting. Lunch visits to Hydro's aluminium plant on Karmøy or alternatively to Statoil's gas terminal on the mainland, were included in the program. The scientific program gives a cross section of nuclear physics activities in which researchers from the Nordic countries are involved nowadays. The spectrum is rich, and the emphasis has shifted to higher energies than was the case five years ago. We appreciate the possibility to present this overview in a separate volume of Physica Scripta. The present issue covers nearly all the talks given at the meeting. The order deviates, however, somewhat from that of the conference program. The organizing committee tried to encourage in various ways the participation of young physicists; this effort was truely rewarded. The young participants put their imprint on the activities in the lecture halls and even more on the soccer arena. The meeting was sponsored by The University of Bergen, The Nordic Accelerator Committee, NORDITA, The Norwegian Research Council for Science and the

  6. A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachal, John R.

    2003-01-01

    Uses the framework of a symposium to present an imagined discussion by historical figures about whether and how knowledge might be acquired. Discussants include Democritus, Protagoras, Heraclitus, Socrates, Jesus, Gorgias, Nietzsche, Buddha, and Kierkegaard. (Contains 40 endnotes.) (SK)

  7. 169. GENERAL VIEW DOWN 6TH AVE. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST DOWN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    169. GENERAL VIEW DOWN 6TH AVE. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST DOWN 6TH AVE. SHOWING FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, BUILDING 8 (HOSPITAL) WITH PART OF ONE OF ITS 1-STORY WARD WINGS, AND THE 3 ORIGINAL DORMITORY WINGS OF BUILDING 9 (BOQ). - Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Roger Williams Way, North Kingstown, Washington County, RI

  8. Rapid landscape change in 6th century Jordan: driven by climate or man-made?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucke, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Compared to the rich cities of antiquity, many areas in the Levant appear today degraded. European travel reports of the 19th century and excavations in Jordan created the impression that population numbers were strongly reduced during the Islamic periods, leading to 'empty' lands which were only resettled during the early 20th century. However, our case study near the ancient site Abila of the Decapolis in northern Jordan found that the land was probably never 'empty' and always fertile - but valley fills provide evidence for a rapid and intense landscape change during the Late Byzantine period. This was probably caused by a significant shift to aridity which also triggered socio-economic changes of subsistence strategies from agriculture to pastoralism. The dates of sediments which are available so far indicate that the climatic change seemingly occurred rapidly within approximately 100 years during the late 6th and early 7th century AD, and rubble layers let it seem probable that it was associated with frequent heavy rainfall events. It might have been caused or triggered by a global climate event creating the "year without sun" or 'Mystery Veil' which the Byzantine historian Procopius described in the year 536 AD. If similar events repeat under the current climate change, it will be difficult to mitigate them.

  9. PREFACE: 6th International Workshop on Multi-Rate Processes and Hysteresis (MURPHYS2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimian, Mihai; Rachinskii, Dmitrii

    2015-02-01

    The International Workshop on Multi-Rate Processes and Hysteresis (MURPHYS) conference series focuses on multiple scale systems, singular perturbation problems, phase transitions and hysteresis phenomena occurring in physical, biological, chemical, economical, engineering and information systems. The 6th edition was hosted by Stefan cel Mare University in the city of Suceava located in the beautiful multicultural land of Bukovina, Romania, from May 21 to 24, 2012. This continued the series of biennial multidisciplinary conferences organized in Cork, Ireland from 2002 to 2008 and in Pécs, Hungary in 2010. The MURPHYS 2012 Workshop brought together more than 50 researchers in hysteresis and multi-scale phenomena from the United State of America, the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, Ireland, Czech Republic, Hungary, Greece, Ukraine, and Romania. Participants shared and discussed new developments of analytical techniques and numerical methods along with a variety of their applications in various areas, including material sciences, electrical and electronics engineering, mechanical engineering and civil structures, biological and eco-systems, economics and finance. The Workshop was sponsored by the European Social Fund through Sectoral Operational Program Human Resources 2007-2013 (PRO-DOCT) and Stefan cel Mare University, Suceava. The Organizing Committee was co-chaired by Mihai Dimian from Stefan cel Mare University, Suceava (Romania), Amalia Ivanyi from the University of Pecs (Hungary), and Dmitrii Rachinskii from the University College Cork (Ireland). All papers published in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series have been peer reviewed through processes administered by the Editors. Reviews were conducted by expert referees to the professional and scientific standards expected of a proceedings journal published by IOP Publishing. The Guest Editors wish to place on record their sincere gratitude to Miss Sarah Toms for the assistance she provided

  10. Conclusions of the 6th European American Workshop on reliability of NDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Christina; Bertovic, Marija; Kanzler, Daniel; Ronneteg, Ulf

    2016-02-01

    The principles of Open Space Technology (OST) were again applied to discuss burning issues in the field of NDE reliability. The results of the discussions among NDE professionals concerning new reliability methods, human factors and integrated solutions will be presented.

  11. Sixth Symposium on Chemical Evolution and the Origin and Evolution of Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acevedo, Sara (Editor); DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Editor); Chang, Sherwood (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    The 6th Symposium on Chemical Evolution and the Origin and Evolution of Life was convened at NASA Ames Research Center, November 17-20, 1997. This Symposium is convened every three years under the auspices of NASA's Exobiology Program Office. All Principal Investigators funded by this Program present their most recent research accomplishments at the Symposium. Scientific papers were presented in the following areas: cosmic evolution of the biogenic elements, prebiotic evolution (both planetary and chemical), evolution of early organisms and evolution of organisms in extreme environments, solar system exploration, and star and planet formation. The Symposium was attended by over 200 scientists from NASA centers and Universities nationwide.

  12. 3. BUILDING 522, EAST SIDE, FROM ACROSS 6TH STREET AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. BUILDING 522, EAST SIDE, FROM ACROSS 6TH STREET AT ITS INTERSECTION WITH G STREET, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Oakland Naval Supply Center, Aeronautical Materials Storehouses, Between E & G Streets, between Fourth & Sixth Streets, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  13. Conference summary: 6th International conference on hyperons, charm, and beauty hadrons (BEACH04)

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Joel N.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    The 6th International Conference on Hyperons, Charm, and Beauty Hadrons (BEACH04) treated us to a wonderful array of new results. Here the author attempts to summarize the talks and discuss the conference highlights.

  14. The European Perspective of HRD: A Debate on Selected Issues Put Forward By the EHRD Network. Symposium at ECER (Lisbon, Portugal, September 11-14, 2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Sabine, Ed.

    This document contains 13 presentations/discussion summaries and 10 supporting 'thesis' papers from a symposium on selected issues in human resources development (HRD) in Europe. The following summaries are included: "Introduction" (Sabine Manning); "Developing Flexibility in Pursuit of Competitiveness" (Nick Boreham); "Competence and Learning in…

  15. Symposium Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milner, Richard G.

    2016-02-01

    The Stern-Gerlach experiment and the origin of electron spin are described in historical context. SPIN 2014 occurs on the fortieth anniversary of the first International High Energy Spin Physics Symposium at Argonne in 1974. A brief history of the international spin conference series is presented.

  16. Symposium: Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anson, Chris M.; Perelman, Les; Poe, Mya; Sommers, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article presents four symposium papers on assessment. It includes: (1) "Closed Systems and Standardized Writing Tests" (Chris M. Anson); (2) "Information Illiteracy and Mass Market Writing Assessments" (Les Perelman); (3) "Genre, Testing, and the Constructed Realities of Student Achievement" (Mya Poe); and (4) "The Call of Research: A…

  17. Symposium on Electromagnetic Launch Technology, 6th, Univ. of Texas, Austin, Apr. 28-30, 1992, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosser, Julie K.

    1993-01-01

    The present conference discusses topics in the military and commercial applications of electrical launcher systems, electromagnetic and electrothermal 'railgun' launchers, 'coilguns', armature and launcher designs, power-conditioning and energy storage systems, and launcher materials and structures and their diagnostics. Attention is given to an earth-to-orbit railgun launcher, polyphase and multiphase railguns, hypervelocity projectile design, determining the Lorentz forces in plasma armatures, pulse power generators, advanced compulsator technology, airborne-platform electric launcher applications, magnetic design for structural stiffness, current multipliers, pulse-forming network design, and cannon-caliber electromagnetic launchers.

  18. Climate Symposium 2014: Findings and Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Asrar, Ghassem; Bony, Sandrine; Boucher, Olivier; Busalacchi, Antonio; Cazenave, Anny; Dowell, Mark; Flato, Greg; Hegerl, Gabi; Kallen, Erland; Nakajima, Teruyuki; Ratier, Alain; Saunders, Roger; Slingo, Julia; Sohn, Byung -Ju; Schmetz, Johannes; Stevens, Bjorn; Zhang, Peiqun; Zwiers, Francis

    2015-10-05

    Here, the Climate Symposium 2014, organized by the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) and the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP), with support from the European Commission (EC), European Space Agency (ESA), and other agencies, took place in Darmstadt, Germany, from 13 to 17 October 2014. Around 500 participants from 49 countries attended the event and represented over 200 organizations. Another 500 individuals participated remotely via “live streaming.”

  19. EU-funded malaria research under the 6th and 7th Framework Programmes for research and technological development.

    PubMed

    Holtel, Andreas; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Penas-Jimenez, Inmaculada

    2011-01-01

    While malaria research has traditionally been strong in Europe, targeted and sustained support for cooperative malaria research at EU level, namely through the EU's 6th and 7th Framework Programmes for research and technological development, FP6 (2002-2006) and FP7 (2007-2013), has boosted both impact and visibility of European malaria research. Most of the European malaria research community is now organized under a number of comprehensive and complementary research networks and projects, assembled around four key areas: (1) fundamental research on the malaria parasite and the disease, (2) development of new malaria drugs, (3) research and development of a malaria vaccine, and (4) research to control the malaria-transmitting mosquito vector. Considerable efforts were undertaken to ensure adequate participation of research groups from disease-endemic countries, in particular from Africa, with the long-term aim to strengthen cooperative links and research capacities in these countries. The concept of organizing European research through major strategic projects to form a "European Research Area" (ERA) was originally developed in the preparation of FP6, and ERA formation has now turned into a major EU policy objective explicitly inscribed into the Lisbon Treaty. EU-funded malaria research may serve as a showcase to demonstrate how ERA formation can successfully be implemented in a given area of science when several surrounding parameters converge to support implementation of this strategic concept: timely coincidence of political stimuli, responsive programming, a clearly defined--and well confined--area of research, and the readiness of the targeted research community who is well familiar with transnational cooperation at EU level. Major EU-funded malaria projects have evolved into thematic and organizational platforms that can collaborate with other global players. Europe may thus contribute more, and better, to addressing the global research agenda for malaria

  20. Oral Persuasion: A Saleable Work Skill. Occupation Simulation Packet. Grades 5th-6th.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Dennis W.

    This teacher's guide contains simulated work experiences for 5th and 6th grade students using the isolated skill concept - oral persuasion. Teacher instructions include objectives, evaluation, and sequence of activities. The guide contains pre-tests and post-tests with instructions and answer keys. Two pre-skill activities are suggested, such as…

  1. 10. 'Southern Pacific Company, 6th Crossing of Sacramento River, One ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. 'Southern Pacific Company, 6th Crossing of Sacramento River, One 208'-10-1/2' C. to C. End Pins S. Tr. Thro. Skew Span, Scale 1' = 10', The Phoenix Bridge Co., Phoenixville, Pa., April 12, 1901, Drg. 45' - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 301.85, Milepost 301.85, Pollard Flat, Shasta County, CA

  2. Sneak Preview of Berkeley Lab's Science at the Theatre on June 6th, 2011

    ScienceCinema

    Sanii, Babak

    2013-05-29

    Babak Sanii provides a sneak preview of Berkeley Lab's next Science at the Theater Event: Big Thinking: The Power of Nanoscience. Berkeley Lab scientists reveal how nanoscience will bring us cleaner energy, faster computers, and improved medicine. Berkeley Repertory Theatre on June 6th, 2011

  3. An Analysis of Writing Dispositions of 6th Grade Students in Terms of Different Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabak, Gurkan; Topuzkanamis, Ersoy

    2014-01-01

    This research was conducted with an aim to analyze the writing dispositions of the 6th grade students in terms of different variables. The research was carried out based on the descriptive survey model. The participants of the research are composed of a total of 672 students as 342 male students and 330 female students from Ankara, Balikesir,…

  4. Curriculum Reform Movements and Science Textbooks: A Retrospective Examination of 6th Grade Science Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpaslan, Muhammet Mustafa; Yalvac, Bugrahan; Loving, Cathleen C.

    2015-01-01

    Over 50 years, two major reform efforts in science education took place. The purpose of the present study is to explore how the educational reforms were reflected in nine 6th grade science textbooks published in 1975, in 1985 and in 1997 in terms of (a) the materials used, (b) the contexts to which the electricity concept was related, (c) the type…

  5. Proceedings of the 6th national conference on hazardous wastes and hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This book contained the proceedings of the 6th national Conference on Hazardous wastes and Hazardous materials. Topics covered include: federal and state policy papers, risk assessment, health and endangerment, contaminated groundwater control, treatment, spill control management and tank leakage control.

  6. Community Violence and Young Children: A Survey of Massachusetts 6th Graders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Pamela B.

    This study examined the effects of exposure to violence on young children. A random sample of 236 Massachusetts 6th graders living in urban communities completed a quantitative survey on violence and its effects, including the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children-A (Briere, 1996). It was found that almost 60 percent of the children reported that…

  7. Sneak Preview of Berkeley Lab's Science at the Theatre on June 6th, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Sanii, Babak

    2011-01-01

    Babak Sanii provides a sneak preview of Berkeley Lab's next Science at the Theater Event: Big Thinking: The Power of Nanoscience. Berkeley Lab scientists reveal how nanoscience will bring us cleaner energy, faster computers, and improved medicine. Berkeley Repertory Theatre on June 6th, 2011

  8. Summary of the National Technicians' Conference ASE/NSLC York--5/6th July 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bostock, Julia, Comp.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a summary of the National Technicians' Conference ASE/NSLC York from July 5th to July 6th 2012. Approximately 160 technicians attended the Conference on both days. The programme included workshops and lectures and was repeated on the Friday, so that technicians who stayed for both days were able to take part in a variety of…

  9. FACILITY 209, SINGLESTORY DUPLEX, OBLIQUE VIEW OF REAR FROM 6TH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 209, SINGLE-STORY DUPLEX, OBLIQUE VIEW OF REAR FROM 6TH STREET, FACING NORTH. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Housing Area 1, Single Story Duplex Type, Bounded by Kamehameha Highway, Plantation Drive, South Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  10. 43rd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. Sponsored and organized by the Mechanisms Education Association, responsibility for hosting the AMS is shared by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC). Now in its 43rd symposium, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the U.S. and abroad. The 43rd AMS was held in Santa Clara, California on May 4, 5 and 6, 2016. During these three days, 42 papers were presented. Topics included payload and positioning mechanisms, components such as hinges and motors, CubeSats, tribology, and mechanism testing. Hardware displays during the supplier exhibit gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components. The high quality of this symposium is a result of the work of many people, and their efforts are gratefully acknowledged. This extends to the voluntary members of the symposium organizing committee representing the eight NASA field centers, LMSSC, and the European Space Agency. Appreciation is also extended to the session chairs, the authors, and particularly the personnel at ARC responsible for the symposium arrangements and the publication of these proceedings. A sincere thank you also goes to the symposium executive committee who is responsible for the year-to-year management of the AMS, including paper processing and preparation of the program. The use of trade names of manufacturers in this publication does not constitute an official endorsement of such products or manufacturers, either expressed or implied, by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  11. NATURAL BIODEGRADATION OF NTBE ON A SITE ON LONG ISLAND, NY: SYMPOSIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL-ADA-00170 Kolhatkar, R., Wilson*, J.T., and Hinshalwood, G. "Natural Biodegradation of NTBE on a Site on Long Island, NY." In: 6th Intl. In-Situ and On-Site Symposium on Bioremediation of MTBE, Alcohols, and Ethers, Battelle, The Si...

  12. Prevalence of Elevated Blood Pressure in Hispanic versus Non-Hispanic 6th Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarlton, Patricia A.

    2007-01-01

    Blood pressure screening was conducted on 4,311 (Hispanic n = 763 [17.7%], White n = 2,566 [59.5%], African American n = 610 [14.1%], Asian n = 136 [3.2%], Multiracial n = 231 [5.4%], and Native American n = 5 [0.1%]) 6th-grade students enrolled in Seminole County, Florida, Public Schools from August to December 2005. Prevalence of obesity was 21%…

  13. European Symposium for the Evaluation of Innovative Projects To Integrate Disadvantaged Young People into Work (Trier, Germany, March 10-13, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chome, Gesa, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    Some 180 experts from 10 European countries met at the University of Trier (Germany) to exchange information about youth assistance projects and hear views about the extent of unemployment among disadvantaged youth and development of innovative solutions. "The Failure of Young People to Cope with Life When Unemployed" (Bohnisch) showed how…

  14. Reconstructing the diets of Greek Byzantine populations (6th-15th centuries AD) using carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios.

    PubMed

    Bourbou, Chryssi; Fuller, Benjamin T; Garvie-Lok, Sandra J; Richards, Michael P

    2011-12-01

    Documentary evidence and artistic representations have traditionally served as the primary sources of information about Byzantine diet. According to these sources, Byzantine diet was based on grain (primarily wheat and barley), oil, and wine, supplemented with legumes, dairy products, meat, and marine resources. Here, we synthesize and compare the results of stable isotope ratio analyses of eight Greek Byzantine populations (6th-15th centuries AD) from throughout Greece. The δ(13) C and δ(15) N values are tightly clustered, suggesting that all of these populations likely consumed a broadly similar diet. Both inland and coastal Byzantine populations consumed an essentially land-based C(3) diet, significant amounts of animal protein, and possibly some C(4) plants, while no evidence of a general dependence on low-δ(15) N legumes was observed. One interesting result observed in the isotopic data is the evidence for the consumption of marine protein at both coastal sites (a reasonable expectation given their location) and for some individuals from inland sites. This pattern contrasts with previous isotopic studies mainly on prehistoric Greek populations, which have suggested that marine species contributed little, or not at all, to the diet. The possibility that fasting practices contributed to marine protein consumption in the period is discussed, as are possible parallels with published isotope data from western European medieval sites. PMID:21952735

  15. Improving 6th Grade Climate Literacy using New Media (CLINM) and Teacher Professional Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, G.; Schmidt, C.; Metzger, E. P.; Cordero, E. C.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA-funded project, Improving 6th Grade Climate Literacy using New Media (CLINM), is designed to improve the climate literacy of California's 450,000 6th-grade students through teacher professional development that presents climate change as an engaging context for teaching earth science standards. The project fosters experience-based interaction among learners and encourages expressive creativity and idea-exchange via the web and social media. The heart of the CLINM project is the development of an online educator-friendly experience that provides content expert-reviewed, teacher-tested, standards-based educational resources, classroom activities and lessons that make meaningful connections to NASA data and images as well as new media tools (videos, web, and phone applications) based on the Green Ninja, a climate-action superhero who fights global warming by inspiring personal action (www.greenninja.info). In this session, we will discuss this approach to professional development and share a collection of teacher-tested CLINM resources. CLINM resources are grounded in earth system science; classroom activities and lessons engage students in exploration of connections between natural systems and human systems with a particular focus on how climate change relates to everyone's need for food, water, and energy. CLINM uses a team-based approach to resource development, and partners faculty in San José State University's (SJSU) colleges of Science, Education, and Humanities and the Arts with 6th-grade teachers from local school districts, a scientist from NASA Ames Research Center and climate change education projects at Stanford University, the University of Nebraska at Lincoln, and the University of Idaho. Climate scientists and other content experts identify relevant concepts and work with science educators to develop and/or refine classroom activities to elucidate those concepts; activities are piloted in pre-service science methods courses at SJSU and in

  16. Bone Lose of the Ancient Mediterranean lumbar vertebrae : Iasos, 6th century ad.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Serdar; Solmaz, Ilker; Ilıca, A. Turan; Karaçalıoğlu, Özgür; Damla Yılmaz, Nalan; Başoğlu, Okşan; Kılıc, Selim; Izci, Yusuf

    Evaluation of bone mineral density (BMD) of the ancient peoples has received great interest by anthropologists. The aims of this study are to investigate the lumbar vertebrae of the Iasos people during the Byzantine period, in order to determine the prevalence of bone loss and to interpret dietary conditions of ancient Mediterranean populations. Lumbar vertebrae belonging to twenty eight skeletons of the 6th c AD were analyzed by radiographs and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. The BMD values for each biologic sex and age group were compared. The correlation between the BMD and radiological features was also analyzed. The mean BMD was 0.940 g/cm2. BMD was decreased by aging in both sexes, but it was not significant. Osteopenia was found in 11 (39%) and osteoporosis in 4 (14.3%) out 28 vertebrae. The BMD was normal in 13 (46%) out of 28 vertebrae. Osteopenia was present in 7 (38%) of 18 male vertebrae and 4 (40%) of 10 female vertebrae. The spine score was high in the male group and there was a strong positive correlation between the BMD and spine score for both sexes. This study revealed that the BMD decreased by aging and that osteopenia was a problem in both sexes of the Iasos people during the 6th c AD. There was no correlation between the BMD and radiological features for age groups and biological sexes.

  17. Possible earthquake trigger for 6th century mass wasting deposit at Lake Ohrid (Macedonia/Albania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, B.; Francke, A.; Sulpizio, R.; Zanchetta, G.; Lindhorst, K.; Krastel, S.; Vogel, H.; Rethemeyer, J.; Daut, G.; Grazhdani, A.; Lushaj, B.; Trajanovski, S.

    2012-12-01

    Lake Ohrid shared by the Republics of Albania and Macedonia is formed by a tectonically active graben within the south Balkans and suggested to be the oldest lake in Europe. Several studies have shown that the lake provides a valuable record of climatic and environmental changes and a distal tephrostratigraphic record of volcanic eruptions from Italy. Fault structures identified in seismic data demonstrate that sediments have also the potential to record tectonic activity in the region. Here, we provide an example of linking seismic and sedimentological information with tectonic activity and historical documents. Historical documents indicate that a major earthquake destroyed the city of Lychnidus (today: city of Ohrid) in the early 6th century AD. Multichannel seismic profiles, parametric sediment echosounder profiles, and a 10.08 m long sediment record from the western part of the lake indicate a 2 m thick mass wasting deposit, which is tentatively correlated with this earthquake. The mass wasting deposit is chronologically well constrained, as it directly overlays the AD 472/AD 512 tephra. Moreover, radiocarbon dates and cross correlation with other sediment sequences with similar geochemical characteristics of the Holocene indicate that the mass wasting event took place prior to the onset of the Medieval Warm Period, and is attributed it to one of the known earthquakes in the region in the early 6th century AD.

  18. An integrated exploration model for Council Run field analogs: Regional geology and seismic stratigraphy of Devonian 6th Elk sandstones

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, G.; Johnson, R. )

    1991-08-01

    A geologic study of the Devonian Lock Haven 6th Elk formation along the structural front of Pennsylvania and Maryland suggest that present-day structures were active at the time of deposition. These structures barred deposition to the west and helped to localize sands in a northeast-southwest fairway. The 6th Elk sandstones occur in two major depositional lobes (located in Centre and Somerset counties in Pennsylvania, and Garret County, Maryland) and were deposited on a shallow-marine shelf by turbidity currents and later modified by storm-generated currents. Deposition of 6th Elk sands may also have been influenced by cross-strike discontinuities. A seismic study of the Council Run field aids in subsurface identification of the 6th Elk. A high-amplitude seismic anomaly across the Council Run field is correlated with increasing san thickness. Two dimensional modeling suggests that the seismic response is extremely sensitive to specific acquisition and processing techniques including filter and phase variability. Additional attribute analysis integrates the seismic data with the forward models. This results in a predictive method for potentially identifying 6th Elk sandstone development from seismic data. Applying the results of the seismic modeling at Council Run field to a seismic grid across the previously defined 6th Elk depositional fairway has identified many exploratory prospects in Lycoming and Bradford counties, Pennsylvania. This area coincides with the site of a third, previously documented, Upper Devonian depositional lobe.

  19. Rapid landscape change in 6th century northern Jordan: interdisciplinary geoarchaeological perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucke, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Landscapes of the ancient fertile crescent are considered affected by soil degradation as result of long-term farming since the Neolithic, and impressive ruins of antiquity led to assumptions that their abandonment must have been conntected with reduced agricultural productivity. In this context, a valley fill near the site of Abila of the Decapolis in northern Jordan was apparently deposited largely during the 6th century AD, and provides evidence for a rapid and intense landscape change during the Late Byzantine period. However, an interdisciplinary case study of land use, soil development, and sediments found that the valley fill cannot be connected with large-scale soil erosion in the vicinity of the site. On the one hand, this is indicated by the distribution of soil development and archaeological material as marker of past land use activity in the past, which suggests that the best soils were and still are used intensively. On the other hand, the sediments seem to point to the occurrence of climatic extremes such as heavy floods, the occurrence of soil creep after water saturation, but also a significant shift to aridity which may have triggered socio-economic changes of subsistence strategies from agriculture to pastoralism. The dates of sediments which are available so far indicate that the climatic change seemingly occurred rapidly within approximately 100 years during the late 6th and early 7th century AD, possibly connected with the "year without sun" or 'Mystery Veil' which the Byzantine historian Procopius described in the year 536 AD. Modern analogies of the Pinatubo eruption in 1991 let it seem possible that a volcanic event, perhaps the outbreak of the Ilopango volcano, was connected with these environmental turbulences. Such events cannot be understood by isolated studies: without a broad interdisciplinary framework, single archives are prone to misinterpretation, and our understanding of the environmental history of Abila is still very limited.

  20. PREFACE: Proceedings of the 7th International LISA Symposium, Barcelona, Spain, 16-20 June 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Alberto; Sopuerta, Carlos F.

    2009-07-01

    In June 2006 the LISA International Science Team (LIST) accepted the bid presented by the Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC) to host the 7th International LISA Symposium. This was during its 11th meeting at the University of Maryland, just before the 6th edition of the Symposium started in NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The 7th International LISA Symposium took place at the city of Barcelona, Spain, from 16-20 June 2008, in the premises of CosmoCaixa, a modern Science Museum located in the hills near Tibidabo. Almost 240 delegates registered for the event, a record breaking figure compared to previous editions of the Symposium. Many of the most renowned world experts in LISA, Gravitational Wave Science, and Astronomy, as well as Engineers, attended LISA 7 and produced state-of-the-art presentations, while everybody benefited from the opportunity to have live discussions during the week in a friendly environment. The programme included 31 invited plenary lectures in the mornings, and 8 parallel sessions in the afternoons. These were classified into 7 major areas of research: LISA Technology, LISA PathFinder, LISA PathFinder Data Analysis, LISA Data Analysis, Gravitational Wave sources, Cosmology and Fundamental Physics with LISA and Other Gravitational Wave Detectors. 138 abstracts for communications were received, of which a selection was made by the session convenors which would fit time constraints. Up to 63 posters completed the scientific programme. More details on the programme, including some of the talks, can be found at the Symposium website: http://www.ice.cat/research/LISA_Symposium. There was however a remarkable add-on: Professor Clifford Will delivered a startling presentation to the general public, who completely filled the Auditori—the main Conference Room, 320 seats—and were invited to ask questions to the speaker who had boldly guided them through the daunting world of Black Holes, Waves of Gravity, and other Warped Ideas of

  1. The VLT Opening Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-02-01

    Scientists Meet in Antofagasta to Discuss Front-Line Astrophysics To mark the beginning of the VLT era, the European Southern Observatory is organizing a VLT Opening Symposium which will take place in Antofagasta (Chile) on 1-4 March 1999, just before the start of regular observations with the ESO Very Large Telescope on April 1, 1999. The Symposium occupies four full days and is held on the campus of the Universidad Catolica del Norte. It consists of plenary sessions on "Science in the VLT Era and Beyond" and three parallel Workshops on "Clusters of Galaxies at High Redshift" , "Star-way to the Universe" and "From Extrasolar Planets to Brown Dwarfs" . There will be many presentations of recent work at the major astronomical facilities in the world. The meeting provides a very useful forum to discuss the latest developments and, in this sense, contributes to the planning of future research with the VLT and other large telescopes. The symposium will be opened with a talk by the ESO Director General, Prof. Riccardo Giacconi , on "Paranal - an observatory for the 21st century". It will be followed by reports about the first scientific results from the main astronomical instruments on VLT UT1, FORS1 and ISAAC. The Symposium participants will see the VLT in operation during special visits to the Paranal Observatory. Press conferences are being arranged each afternoon to inform about the highlights of the conference. After the Symposium, there will be an Official Inauguration Ceremony at Paranal on 5 March Contributions from ESO ESO scientists will make several presentations at the Symposium. They include general reviews of various research fields as well as important new data and results from the VLT that show the great potential of this new astronomical facility. Some of the recent work is described in this Press Release, together with images and spectra of a large variety of objects. Note that all of these data will soon become publicly available via the VLT Archive

  2. FOREWORD: 6th International Conference on Pumps and Fans with Compressors and Wind Turbines (ICPF2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yulin; Wang, Zhengwei; Yuan, Shouqi; Shi, Weidong; Liu, Shuhong; Luo, Xingqi; Wang, Fujun

    2013-12-01

    The 6th International Conference on Pumps and Fans with Compressors and Wind Turbines (ICPF 2013) was held in Beijing, China, 19-22 September 2013, which was jointly organized by Tsinghua University and Jiangsu University. The co-organizers were Zhejiang University, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, The State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience and Engineering, The State Key Laboratory of Automotive Safety and Energy and Beijing International Science and Technology Cooperation Base for CO2 Utilization and Reduction. The sponsor of the conference was Concepts NREC. The First International Conference on Pumps and Systems (May 1992), the Second International Conference on Pumps and Fans (October 1995), the Third International Conference on Pumps and Fans (October 1998), and the Fourth International Conference on Pumps and Fans (26-29 August 2002) were all held in Beijing and were organized by the late famous Chinese professor on fluid machinery and engineering, Professor Zuyan Mei of Tsinghua University. The conference was interrupted by the death of Professor Mei in 2003. In order to commemorate Professor Mei, the organizing committee of ICPF decided to continue organizing the conference series. The Fifth Conference on Pumps and Systems (2010 ICPF) took place in Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, China, 18-21 October 2010, and it was jointly organized by Zhejiang University and Tsinghua University. With the development of renewable energy and new energy in China and in the world, some small types of compressor and some types of pump, as well as wind turbines are developing very fast; therefore the ICPF2013 conference included compressors and wind turbines. The theme of the conference was the application of renewable energy of pumps, compressors, fans and blowers. The content of the conference was the basic study, design and experimental study of compressors, fans, blowers and pumps; the CFD application on pumps and fans, their transient behavior, unsteady flows and multi-phase flow

  3. Latina girls' identities-in-practice in 6th grade science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Edna

    Inequalities and achievement gaps in science education among students from different racial and socioeconomic backgrounds as well as between genders in the United States are due to not just access to resources, but also to the incongruence between identities of school science with identities salient to minority students. Minority girls are especially portrayed to be estranged from prototypical school science Discourse, often characterized as white, middle class, and masculine. This dissertation, based on a two-year ethnographic study in an urban middle school in New York City, describes the authoring of novel identities-in-practice of minority girls in a 6th grade science classroom. The findings indicate that minority girls draw from out-of-school identities salient to them to author novel identities-in-practice in the various figured worlds of the 6th grade science classroom. Through taking such authorial stances, minority girls exhibit agency in negotiating for wider boundaries in their school science participation and broker for hybrid spaces of school science where the school science Discourse was destabilized and challenged to be more inclusive of everyday funds of knowledge and Discourses important to the students. The findings also highlight the dialectic relationship between an individual students' learning and participation and the school science community-of-practice and the implications such a relationship has on the learning of both individual students and the collective community-of-practice. From year one findings, curricular adaptations were enacted, with teacher and student input, on lessons centering on food and nutrition. The adapted curriculum specifically solicited for nontraditional funds of knowledge and Discourse from students and were grounded strongly in relevance to students' out of school lives. The hybrid spaces collectively brokered for by the community-of-practice were transformed in three ways: physically, politically, and

  4. 1/6TH SCALE STRIP EFFLUENT FEED TANK-MIXING RESULTS USING MCU SOLVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, E

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this task was to determine if mixing was an issue for the entrainment and dispersion of the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) solvent in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Strip Effluent Feed Tank (SEFT). The MCU strip effluent stream containing the Cs removed during salt processing will be transferred to the DWPF for immobilization in HLW glass. In lab-scale DWPF chemical process cell testing, mixing of the solvent in the dilute nitric acid solution proved problematic, and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to perform scaled SEFT mixing tests to evaluate whether the problem was symptomatic of the lab-scale set-up or of the solvent. The solvent levels tested were 228 and 235 ppm, which represented levels near the estimated DWPF solvent limit of 239 ppm in 0.001M HNO{sub 3} solution. The 239 ppm limit was calculated by Norato in X-CLC-S-00141. The general approach for the mixing investigation was to: (1) Investigate the use of fluorescent dyes to aid in observing the mixing behavior. Evaluate and compare the physical properties of the fluorescent dyed MCU solvents to the baseline Oak Ridge CSSX solvent. Based on the data, use the dyed MCU solvent that best approximates the physical properties. (2) Use approximately a 1/6th linear scale of the SEFT to replicate the internal configuration for DWPF mixing. (3) Determine agitator speed(s) for scaled testing based on the DWPF SEFT mixing speed. (4) Perform mixing tests using the 1/6th SEFT and determine any mixing issues (entrainment/dispersion, accumulation, adhesion) through visual observations and by pulling samples to assess uniformity. The mixing tests used MCU solvent fabricated at SRNL blended with Risk Reactor DFSB-K43 fluorescent dye. This dyed SRNL MCU solvent had equivalent physical properties important to mixing as compared to the Oak Ridge baseline solvent, blended easily with the MCU solvent, and provided an excellent visual aid.

  5. Leather material found on a 6th B.C. Chinese bronze sword: A technical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wugan; Si, Yi; Wang, Hongmin; Qin, Ying; Huang, Fengchun; Wang, Changsui

    2011-09-01

    During July to November, 2006, an important archaeological excavation was conducted in Yun country, Hubei province, southern China. Chinese archaeologists found some remnant of leather materials, covered with red pigments, on a 6th century B.C. Chinese bronze sword. To understand the technology/ies that may have been utilized for manufacturing the leathers, a combined of Raman spectroscopy, FT-IR and XRF was thus applied to the remnant of leather materials. Raman analyses showed that red pigment on the leather was cinnabar (HgS). FT-IR and XRF analyses indicated that the content of some elements, such as Ca (existing as CaCO 3) and Fe (existing as Fe 2O 3), were much higher than those in the surrounding grave soil. The results inferred an application of lime depilation and retting, and the Fe-Al compound salt as tanning agent. And it was furthermore implicated that the Fe-Al salt tanning technique had been developed in the middle and late Spring and Autumn Period of China.

  6. Leather material found on a 6th B.C. Chinese bronze sword: a technical study.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wugan; Si, Yi; Wang, Hongmin; Qin, Ying; Huang, Fengchun; Wang, Changsui

    2011-09-01

    During July to November, 2006, an important archaeological excavation was conducted in Yun country, Hubei province, southern China. Chinese archaeologists found some remnant of leather materials, covered with red pigments, on a 6th century B.C. Chinese bronze sword. To understand the technology/ies that may have been utilized for manufacturing the leathers, a combined of Raman spectroscopy, FT-IR and XRF was thus applied to the remnant of leather materials. Raman analyses showed that red pigment on the leather was cinnabar (HgS). FT-IR and XRF analyses indicated that the content of some elements, such as Ca (existing as CaCO3) and Fe (existing as Fe2O3), were much higher than those in the surrounding grave soil. The results inferred an application of lime depilation and retting, and the Fe-Al compound salt as tanning agent. And it was furthermore implicated that the Fe-Al salt tanning technique had been developed in the middle and late Spring and Autumn Period of China. PMID:21703919

  7. Genetics of multifactorial disorders: proceedings of the 6th Pan Arab Human Genetics Conference.

    PubMed

    Nair, Pratibha; Bizzari, Sami; Rajah, Nirmal; Assaf, Nada; Al-Ali, Mahmoud Taleb; Hamzeh, Abdul Rezzak

    2016-01-01

    The 6th Pan Arab Human Genetics Conference (PAHGC), "Genetics of Multifactorial Disorders" was organized by the Center for Arab Genomic Studies (http://www.cags.org.ae) in Dubai, United Arab Emirates from 21 to 23 January, 2016. The PAHGCs are held biennially to provide a common platform to bring together regional and international geneticists to share their knowledge and to discuss common issues. Over 800 delegates attended the first 2 days of the conference and these came from various medical and scientific backgrounds. They consisted of geneticists, molecular biologists, medical practitioners, postdoctoral researchers, technical staff (e.g., nurses and lab technicians) and medical students from 35 countries around the world. On the 3rd day, a one-day workshop on "Genetic Counseling" was delivered to 26 participants. The conference focused on four major topics, namely, diabetes, genetics of neurodevelopmental disorders, congenital anomalies and cancer genetics. Personalized medicine was a recurrent theme in most of the research presented at the conference, as was the application of novel molecular findings in clinical settings. This report discusses a summary of the presentations from the meeting. PMID:27095177

  8. Synopsis of the 6th Walker's Cay Colloquium on Cancer Vaccines and Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kast, W Martin; Levitsky, Hyam; Marincola, Francesco M

    2004-01-01

    The 6th annual Cancer Vaccines and Immunotherapy Colloquium at Walker's Cay was held under the auspices of the Albert B. Sabin Vaccine Institute on March 10–13, 2004. The Colloquium consisted of a select group of 34 scientists representing academia, biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry. The main goal of this gathering was to promote in a peaceful and comfortable environment exchanges between basic and clinical science. The secondary benefit was to inspire novel bench to bedside ventures and at the same time provide feed back about promising and/or disappointing clinical results that could help re-frame some scientific question or guide the design of future trials. Several topics were covered that included tumor antigen discovery and validation, platforms for vaccine development, tolerance, immune suppression and tumor escape mechanisms, adoptive T cell therapy and dendritic cell-based therapies, clinical trials and assessment of response. Here we report salient points raised by speakers or by the audience during animated discussion that followed each individual presentation. PMID:15212694

  9. Summary of the 6th Annual Bladder Cancer Think Tank: new directions in urologic research.

    PubMed

    Svatek, Robert S; Rosenberg, Jonathan E; Galsky, Matthew D; Lee, Cheryl T; Latini, David M; Bochner, Bernard H; Weizer, Alon Z; Apolo, Andrea B; Sridhar, Srikala S; Kamat, Ashish M; Hansel, Donna; Flaig, Thomas W; Smith, Norm D; Lotan, Yair

    2013-10-01

    The 6th Annual Bladder Cancer Think Tank brought together a multidisciplinary group of clinicians, researchers, and representatives from the National Cancer Institute and Industry in an effort to advance bladder cancer research efforts. This year's meeting comprised panel discussions and research involving 5 separate working groups, including the Survivorship, Clinical Trials, Standardization of Care, Data Mining, and Translational Science working groups. In this manuscript, the accomplishments and objectives of the working groups are summarized. Notable efforts include: (1) the development of a survivorship care plan for early and late-stage bladder cancer; (2) the development of consensus criteria for eligibility and endpoints for bladder cancer clinical trials; (3) an improved understanding of current practice patterns regarding the use of perioperative chemotherapy in an effort to standardize care; (4) creation of a comprehensive handbook to assist researchers with developing bladder cancer databases; and (5) identification of response to therapy of high-grade non muscle invasive disease through a collaborative exchange of expertise and resources. PMID:22300756

  10. Nuclear Science Symposium, 21st, Scintillation and Semiconductor Counter Symposium, 14th, and Nuclear Power Systems Symposium, 6th, Washington, D.C., December 11-13, 1974, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Papers are presented dealing with latest advances in the design of scintillation counters, semiconductor radiation detectors, gas and position sensitive radiation detectors, and the application of these detectors in biomedicine, satellite instrumentation, and environmental and reactor instrumentation. Some of the topics covered include entopistic scintillators, neutron spectrometry by diamond detector for nuclear radiation, the spherical drift chamber for X-ray imaging applications, CdTe detectors in radioimmunoassay analysis, CAMAC and NIM systems in the space program, a closed loop threshold calibrator for pulse height discriminators, an oriented graphite X-ray diffraction telescope, design of a continuous digital-output environmental radon monitor, and the optimization of nanosecond fission ion chambers for reactor physics. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  11. Space Symposium/76

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A symposium dealing with career opportunities in the aerospace program for minorities was conducted and evaluated. The symposium was attended by students from eleven predominantly minority colleges and universities in and around Washington, D. C. and the eastern region, and from high schools in five jurisdictions of the Washington metropolitan area. Speakers included representatives of Howard University, NASA, and private industry. On display during the symposium was a NASA exhibit of moon rocks, space shuttles, a lunar module, command module, pacemaker, LANDSAT, and other items of interest.

  12. PREFACE: 6th International Workshop on Pseudo-Hermitian Hamiltonians in Quantum Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fring, Andreas; Jones, Hugh; Znojil, Miloslav

    2008-06-01

    Attempts to understand the quantum mechanics of non-Hermitian Hamiltonian systems can be traced back to the early days, one example being Heisenberg's endeavour to formulate a consistent model involving an indefinite metric. Over the years non-Hermitian Hamiltonians whose spectra were believed to be real have appeared from time to time in the literature, for instance in the study of strong interactions at high energies via Regge models, in condensed matter physics in the context of the XXZ-spin chain, in interacting boson models in nuclear physics, in integrable quantum field theories as Toda field theories with complex coupling constants, and also very recently in a field theoretical scenario in the quantization procedure of strings on an AdS5 x S5 background. Concrete experimental realizations of these types of systems in the form of optical lattices have been proposed in 2007. In the area of mathematical physics similar non-systematic results appeared sporadically over the years. However, intensive and more systematic investigation of these types of non- Hermitian Hamiltonians with real eigenvalue spectra only began about ten years ago, when the surprising discovery was made that a large class of one-particle systems perturbed by a simple non-Hermitian potential term possesses a real energy spectrum. Since then regular international workshops devoted to this theme have taken place. This special issue is centred around the 6th International Workshop on Pseudo-Hermitian Hamiltonians in Quantum Physics held in July 2007 at City University London. All the contributions contain significant new results or alternatively provide a survey of the state of the art of the subject or a critical assessment of the present understanding of the topic and a discussion of open problems. Original contributions from non-participants were also invited. Meanwhile many interesting results have been obtained and consensus has been reached on various central conceptual issues in the

  13. PREFACE: 6th Workshop on Infrared Spectroscopy and Microscopy with Accelerator-Based Sources (WIRMS11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupi, Stefano; Perucchi, Andrea

    2012-05-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to a subset of papers related to the work presented at the 6th edition of the international Workshop on Infrared Spectroscopy and Microscopy with Accelerator-Based Sources (WIRMS), held in Trieste, Italy, September 4-8 2011. Previous editions of the conference were held in Porquerolles (France), Lake Tahoe (USA), Rathen (Germany), Awaji (Japan), and Banff (Canada). This edition was organized and chaired by Stefano Lupi (Roma La Sapienza) and co-chaired by Andrea Perucchi (Elettra), with the support of the Italian Synchrotron Light Laboratory ELETTRA, which was honored to host the WIRMS workshop in its tenth anniversary. The 6th WIRMS edition addressed several different topics, ranging from biochemistry to strongly correlated materials, from geology to conservation science, and from forensics to the study of cometary dusts. Representatives from the infrared scientific programs at synchrotron light sources and free-electron-laser facilities. This edition was attended by 88 participants, including representatives from the infrared scientific programs at synchrotron light sources and free-electron-laser facilities, who enjoyed the stimulating scientific presentations, several detailed discussions, and the beautiful weather and scenery of the Trieste gulf. Participants came from 16 different nations and four continents, including many young scientists, six of which were supported by the organizers. There were 45 scientific talks divided in 11 sessions: Facilities, Microspectroscopy (I, II, III), Time-Resolved Spectroscopies, Extreme Conditions, Condensed Matter, Near-Field, Imaging, THz Techniques and High-Resolution Spectroscopy. 37 posters were also presented at two very lively evening poster sessions. We would like to use the opportunity of writing this preface to thank all the participants of the workshop for the very high level of their scientific contribution and for the very friendly atmosphere

  14. New archeointensity data from French Early Medieval pottery production (6th-10th century AD). Tracing 1500 years of geomagnetic field intensity variations in Western Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genevey, Agnès; Gallet, Yves; Jesset, Sébastien; Thébault, Erwan; Bouillon, Jérôme; Lefèvre, Annie; Le Goff, Maxime

    2016-08-01

    Nineteen new archeointensity results were obtained from the analysis of groups of French pottery fragments dated to the Early Middle Ages (6th to 10th centuries AD). They are from several medieval ceramic production sites, excavated mainly in Saran (Central France), and their precise dating was established based on typo-chronological characteristics. Intensity measurements were performed using the Triaxe protocol, which takes into account the effects on the intensity determinations of both thermoremanent magnetization anisotropy and cooling rate. Intensity analyses were also carried out on modern pottery produced at Saran during an experimental firing. The results show very good agreement with the geomagnetic field intensity directly measured inside and around the kiln, thus reasserting the reliability of the Triaxe protocol and the relevance of the quality criteria used. They further demonstrate the potential of the Saran pottery production for archeomagnetism. The new archeointensity results allow a precise and coherent description of the geomagnetic field intensity variations in Western Europe during the Early Medieval period, which was until now poorly documented. They show a significant increase in intensity during the 6th century AD, high intensity values from the 7th to the 9th century, with a minimum of small amplitude at the transition between the 7th and the 8th centuries and finally an important decrease until the beginning of the 11th century. Together with published intensity results available within a radius of 700 km around Paris, the new data were used to compute a master curve of the Western European geomagnetic intensity variations over the past 1500 years. This curve clearly exhibits five intensity maxima: at the transition between the 6th and 7th century AD, at the middle of the 9th century, during the 12th century, in the second part of the 14th century and at the very beginning of the 17th century AD. Some of these peaks are smoothed, or

  15. From Cooks to Carpenters: Measuring - A Saleable Work Skill. Occupation Simulation Packet. Grades 5th-6th.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Helena

    This teacher's guide contains simulated work experiences for 5th and 6th grade students using the isolated skill concept - measuring. Teacher instructions include objectives, evaluation, and sequence of activities. The guide contains pre-tests and post-tests with instructions and answer keys. Three pre-skill activities are suggested, such as…

  16. Primary School English Teachers' Perceptions of the English Language Curriculum of 6th, 7th and 8th Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ersen Yanik, Asli

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to investigate how the teachers who have different background characteristics perceive the goals and content of the English language curriculum implemented at the 6th, 7th and 8th grades of public primary schools. The study was conducted during the 2004-2005 school year with 368 English teachers selected from the seven regions of…

  17. Assessment of 6th Grade Elementary School Students, Their Parents' and Branch Teachers' Perspective on Physical Education Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyraz, Sirin; Ozbar, Nurper; Yetgin, Meral Kucuk; Koksalan, Burke

    2015-01-01

    A total of 437 volunteers including 54 teachers, 218 6th grade students and 102 parents from Beykoz Elementary Schools participated in this study to understand the perspectives of students, families and teachers on Physical Education classes. The perspectives of students, families and teachers of other branches are identified by survey method.…

  18. Comparing Science Learning among 4th-, 5th-, and 6th-Grade Students: STS versus Textbook-Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yager, Robert E.; Choi, AeRan; Yager, Stuart O.; Akcay, Hakan

    2009-01-01

    Fifteen 4th-, 5th-, and 6th-grade teachers from five school districts each taught two sections of science--one with a Science-Technology-Society (STS) approach and the other with a more traditional textbook approach in which basic science concepts were the major organizers. Local, current, and personally relevant issues provided the context and…

  19. Story Telling: Research and Action to Improve 6th Grade Students' Views about Certain Aspects of Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahraman, Feray; Karatas, Faik Özgür

    2015-01-01

    This study is a four-week section of ongoing attempts that aim to improve 6th grade students' understandings of the nature of science. The study was carried out in a sixth grade science and technology class at a rural middle school with 15 students on the basis of action research methodology. During the study, four different stories based on the…

  20. Process Evaluation of "Learn Young, Learn Fair": A Stress Management Programme for 5th and 6th Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraag, Gerda; Van Breukelen, Gerard; Lamberts, Petra; Vugts, Odette; Kok, Gerjo; Fekkes, Minne; Abu-Saad, Huda Huijer

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the process evaluation of a stress management program called "Learn Young, Learn Fair" for 5th and 6th graders. Studies, reviews and meta-analyses of prevention programs report that a common limitation in studies is the restricted documentation of process factors that contribute to the success of interventions. Program…

  1. Effectiveness of Interactive Multimedia Environment on Language Acquisition Skills of 6th Grade Students in the United Arab Emirates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almekhlafi, Abdurrahman Ghaleb

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of interactive multimedia (IMM) program on students' acquisition of some English as a second language (ESL) skills. An interactive multimedia CD-ROM was used with ninety 6th grade ESL students in Al-Ain Model School 2, United Arab Emirates. Students were selected and divided into experimental and control groups…

  2. The Effects of a Traditional and Technology-Based After-School Program on 6th Grade Student's Mathematics Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Xiangen; Craig, Scotty D.; Bargagliotti, Anna E.; Graesser, Arthur C.; Okwumabua, Theresa; Anderson, Celia; Cheney, Kyle R.; Sterbinsky, Allan

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of the Assessment and LEarning in Knowledge Spaces (ALEKS) system as a method of strategic intervention in after-school settings to improve the mathematical skills of struggling 6th grade students. Students were randomly assigned to after-school classrooms in which they either worked with ALEKS to improve…

  3. Ninteenth Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The proceedings of the 19th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. Technological areas covered include space lubrication, bearings, aerodynamic devices, spacecraft/Shuttle latches, deployment, positioning, and pointing. Devices for spacecraft docking and manipulator and teleoperator mechanisms are also described.

  4. 1999 Flight Mechanics Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, John P. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This conference publication includes papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics Symposium held on May 18-20, 1999. Sponsored by the Guidance, Navigation and Control Center of Goddard Space Flight Center, this symposium featured technical papers on a wide range of issues related to orbit-attitude prediction, determination, and control; attitude sensor calibration; attitude determination error analysis; attitude dynamics; and orbit decay and maneuver strategy. Government, industry, and the academic community participated in the preparation and presentation of these papers.

  5. ACS Symposium Support

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth D. Jordan

    2010-02-20

    The funds from this DOE grant were used to help cover the travel costs of five students and postdoctoral fellows who attended a symposium on 'Hydration: From Clusters to Aqueous Solutions' held at the Fall 2007 American Chemical Society Meeting in Boston, MA, August 19-23. The Symposium was sponsored by the Physical Chemistry Division, ACS. The technical program for the meeting is available at http://phys-acs.org/fall2007.html.

  6. Why are urban Indian 6th graders using more tobacco than 8th graders? Findings from Project MYTRI

    PubMed Central

    Stigler, M H; Perry, C L; Arora, M

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate why urban Indian 6th graders may be using more tobacco than urban Indian 8th graders. Design Cross‐sectional survey of students conducted in the summer of 2004, as the baseline evaluation tool for a group‐randomised tobacco prevention intervention trial (Project MYTRI). Mixed‐effects regression models were used to (1) examine the relationship between 15 psychosocial risk factors and current use of any tobacco, by grade; and (2) examine differences in psychosocial risk factors, by grade. Setting Thirty‐two private (high socioeconomic status (SES)) and government (low‐mid SES) schools in two large cities in India (Delhi and Chennai). Subjects Students in the 6th and 8th grade in these schools (n  =  11642). Among these, 50.6% resided in Delhi (v Chennai), 61.4% attended a government school (v a private school), 52.9% were enrolled in 6th grade (v 8th), and 54.9% were male (v female). Main outcome measure Current (past 30 day) use of any tobacco, including chewing tobacco (for example, gutkha), bidis, or cigarettes. Result Almost all psychosocial factors were significantly related to tobacco use, for students in both grades. Some of the strongest correlates included social susceptibility to and social norms about use. Exposure to tobacco advertising was a strong correlate of tobacco use for 6th graders, but not for 8th graders. Sixth graders scored lower than 8th graders on almost all factors, indicating higher risk. Conclusions The “risk profile” of 6th graders suggests they would be vulnerable to use and to begin using tobacco, as well as to outside influences that may encourage use. PMID:16723678

  7. Storm Peak Laboratory 5th-6th Grade Climate and Weather Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCubbin, I. B.; Hallar, A. G.

    2008-12-01

    science. At the end of the day each student has a data sheet with measurements recorded from 5 locations of different elevations to take back to the classroom. Following the field trip, SPL scientists and educators visit the school for a follow-up to help children grasp concepts, represent their data set collected in graphical formats, answer questions, and evaluate students" learning. Currently, approximately 250 students annually participate in the SPL 5th and 6th grade climate education program.

  8. EDITORIAL: Proceedings of the 7th International LISA Symposium, Barcelona, Spain, 16-20 June 2008 Proceedings of the 7th International LISA Symposium, Barcelona, Spain, 16-20 June 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Alberto; Sopuerta, Carlos F.

    2009-05-01

    In June 2006 the LISA International Science Team (LIST) accepted the bid presented by the Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC) to host the 7th International LISA Symposium. This was during its 11th meeting at the University of Maryland, just before the 6th edition of the symposium started at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The 7th International LISA Symposium took place in the city of Barcelona, Spain, 16-20 June, 2008, in the premises of CosmoCaixa, a modern science museum located in the hills near Tibidabo. Almost 240 delegates registered for the event, a record breaking figure compared to previous editions of the symposium. Many of the most renowned world experts in LISA, gravitational wave science, and astronomy, as well as engineers, attended LISA #7 and produced state of the art presentations, while everybody benefited from the opportunity to have live discussions during the week in a friendly environment. The programme included 31 invited plenary lectures in the mornings, and eight parallel sessions in the afternoons. These were classified into seven major areas of research: LISA Technology, LISA PathFinder, LISA PathFinder Data Analysis, LISA Data Analysis, Gravitational Wave Sources, Cosmology and Fundamental Physics with LISA and Other Gravitational Wave Detectors. Abstracts for 138 communications were received, from which a selection was made by the session convenors which would fit time constraints. Up to 63 posters completed the scientific programme. More details on the programme, including some of the talks, can be found at the symposium website:http://www.ice.cat/research/LISA_Symposium. There was, however, a remarkable add-on: Professor Clifford Will delivered a startling presentation to the general public, who completely filled the Auditori—the main conference room, 320 seats—and were invited to ask questions to the speaker who boldly guided them through the daunting world of Black Holes, Waves of Gravity, and other Warped Ideas

  9. Space nuclear power systems 1989; Proceedings of the 6th Symposium, Albuquerque, NM, Jan. 8-12, 1989. Vols. 1 & 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S. (Editor); Hoover, Mark D. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The present conference discusses such space nuclear power (SNP) issues as current design trends for SDI applications, ultrahigh heat-flux systems with curved surface subcooled nucleate boiling, design and manufacturing alternatives for low cost production of SNPs, a lightweight radioisotope heater for the Galileo mission, compatible materials for uranium fluoride-based gas core SNPs, Johnson noise thermometry for SNPs, and uranium nitride/rhenium compatibility studies for the SP-100 SNP. Also discussed are system issues in antimatter energy conversion, the thermal design of a heat source for a Brayton cycle radioisotope power system, structural and thermal analyses of an isotope heat source, a novel plant protection strategy for transient reactors, and beryllium toxicity.

  10. 6th International Special Session on Current Trends in Numerical Simulation for Parallel Engineering Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, M; Trinitis, C

    2007-07-09

    In today's world, the use of parallel programming and architectures is essential for simulating practical problems in engineering and related disciplines. Remarkable progress in CPU architecture (multi- and many-core, SMT, transactional memory, virtualization support, etc.), system scalability, and interconnect technology continues to provide new opportunities, as well as new challenges for both system architects and software developers. These trends are paralleled by progress in parallel algorithms, simulation techniques, and software integration from multiple disciplines. In its 6th year ParSim continues to build a bridge between computer science and the application disciplines and to help with fostering cooperations between the different fields. In contrast to traditional conferences, emphasis is put on the presentation of up-to-date results with a shorter turn-around time. This offers the unique opportunity to present new aspects in this dynamic field and discuss them with a wide, interdisciplinary audience. The EuroPVM/MPI conference series, as one of the prime events in parallel computation, serves as an ideal surrounding for ParSim. This combination enables the participants to present and discuss their work within the scope of both the session and the host conference. This year, ten papers with authors in ten countries were submitted to ParSim, and after a quick turn-around, yet thorough review process we decided to accept three of them for publication and presentation during the ParSim session. These three papers show the use of simulation in a range of different application fields including earthquake and turbulence simulation. At the same time, they also address computer science aspects and discuss different parallelization strategies, programming models and environments, as well as scalability. We are confident that this provides an attractive program and that ParSim will yet again be an informal setting for lively discussions and for fostering new

  11. PREFACE: 6th Vacuum and Surface Sciences Conference of Asia and Australia (VASSCAA-6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahsan Bhatti, Javaid; Hussain, Talib; Khan, Wakil

    2013-06-01

    The Vacuum and Surface Sciences Conference of Asia and Australia (VASSCAA) conference series has been organized to create a new forum in Asia and Australia to discuss vacuum, surface and related sciences, techniques and applications. The conference series is officially endorsed by the International Union for Vacuum Science, Technique and Application (IUVSTA). The International Steering Committee of VASSCAA is comprised of Vacuum Societies in seven countries: Australia, China, India, Iran, Japan, South Korea and Pakistan. VASSCAA-1 was organized by the Vacuum Society of Japan in 1999 in Tokyo, Japan. VASSCAA-2 was held in 2002 in Hong Kong, VASSCAA-3 in Singapore in 2005. VASSCAA-4 was held in Matsue, Japan in 2008 and VASSCAA-5 in 2010 in Beijing, China. The 6th Vacuum and Surface Sciences Conference of Asia and Australia (VASSCAA-6) was held from 9-13 October 2012 in the beautiful city of Islamabad, Pakistan. The venue of the conference was the Pak-China Friendship Centre, Islamabad. More than six hundred local delgates and around seventy delegates from different countries participated in this mega event. These delegates included scientists, researchers, engineers, professors, plant operators, designers, vendors, industrialists, businessmen and students from various research organizations, technical institutions, universities, industries and companies from Pakistan and abroad. The focal point of the event was to enhance cooperation between Pakistan and the international community in the fields of vacuum, surface science and other applied technologies. At VASSCAA-6 85 oral presentations were delivered by local and foreign speakers. These were divided into different sessions according to their fields. A poster session was organized at which over 70 researchers and students displayed their posters. The best three posters won prizes. In parallel to the main conference sessions four technical short courses were held. The participants showed keen interest in all these

  12. 32nd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, S. W. (Compiler); Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    The proceedings of the 32nd Aerospace Mechanism Symposium are reported. NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) hosted the symposium that was held at the Hilton Oceanfront Hotel in Cocoa Beach, Florida on May 13-15, 1998. The symposium was cosponsored by Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space and the Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium Committee. During these days, 28 papers were presented. Topics included robotics, deployment mechanisms, bearing, actuators, scanners, boom and antenna release, and test equipment.

  13. The Efficiency of Cluster Method in Improving the Creative Writing Skill of 6th Grade Students of Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahbaz, Namik Kemal; Duran, Gozde

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this research is to search the effect of the cluster method on the creative writing skill of 6th grade students. In this paper, the students of 6-A, studying at Ulas Primary School in 2010-2011 academic year, were divided into two groups as experiment and control. Taking into consideration the various variants, pre-test and last-test…

  14. An asynchronous communication system based on the hyperchaotic system of 6th-order cellular neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingyuan; Xu, Bing; Luo, Chao

    2012-11-01

    This paper proposes a novel asynchronous communication scheme. Based on this scheme, a model using the hyperchaotic system of 6th-order Cellular Neural Network (CNN) is designed. This scheme enhances the security of asynchronous communication compared to the conventional ones. It is noteworthy that the proposed communication scheme does not depend on synchronization, and almost all chaotic systems can be involved in this scheme. Numerical simulations show the effectiveness of this scheme.

  15. The VLT Opening Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, J.

    1999-06-01

    The beginning of the VLT era was marked by two major events: the VLT Official Inauguration Ceremony at Paranal on 5 March 1999, preceded by the VLT Opening Symposium on 1-4 March. ESO is indebted to Professor J.A. Music Tomicic, Rector of the Universidad Católica del Norte, for hosting this symposium. Another major event occurred on the night of 4 March: First light was achieved ahead of schedule at Kueyen, the second 8.2-m VLT unit telescope.

  16. 2001 Flight Mechanics Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, John P. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    This conference publication includes papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics Symposium held on June 19-21, 2001. Sponsored by the Guidance, Navigation and Control Center of Goddard Space Flight Center, this symposium featured technical papers on a wide range of issues related to attitude/orbit determination, prediction and control; attitude simulation; attitude sensor calibration; theoretical foundation of attitude computation; dynamics model improvements; autonomous navigation; constellation design and formation flying; estimation theory and computational techniques; Earth environment mission analysis and design; and, spacecraft re-entry mission design and operations.

  17. PREFACE: 6th International Conference on Inverse Problems in Engineering: Theory and Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, Marc

    2008-07-01

    The 6th International Conference on Inverse Problems in Engineering: Theory and Practice (ICIPE 2008) belongs to a successful series of conferences held up to now following a three-year cycle. Previous conferences took place in Palm Coast, Florida, USA (1993), Le Croisic, France (1996), Port Ludlow, Washington, USA (1999), Angra dos Reis, Brazil (2002), and Cambridge, UK (2005). The conference has its roots on the informal seminars organized by Professor J V Beck at Michigan State University, which were initiated in 1987. The organization of this Conference, which took place in Dourdan (Paris) France, 15-19 June 2008, was made possible through a joint effort by four research departments from four different universities: LEMTA (Laboratoire de Mécanique Théorique et Appliquée, Nancy-Université) LMS (Laboratoire de Mécanique des Solides, Ecole Polytechnique, Paris) LMAC (Laboratoire de Mathématiques Appliquées, UTC Compiègne) LTN (Laboratoire de Thermocinétique, Université de Nantes) It received support from three organizations: SFT (Société Française de Thermique: French Heat Transfer Association) ACSM (Association Calcul de Structures et Simulation : Computational Structural Mechanics Association) GdR Ondes - CNRS (`Waves' Network, French National Center for Scientific Research) The objective of the conference was to provide the opportunity for interaction and cross-fertilization between designers of inverse methods and practitioners. The delegates came from very different fields, such as applied mathematics, heat transfer, solid mechanics, tomography.... Consequently the sessions were organised along mostly methodological topics in order to facilitate interaction among participants who might not meet otherwise. The present proceedings, published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series, gathers the four plenary invited lectures and the full-length versions of 103 presentations. The latter have been reviewed by the scientific committee (see

  18. PREFACE: 6th International Conference on Inverse Problems in Engineering: Theory and Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, Marc

    2008-07-01

    The 6th International Conference on Inverse Problems in Engineering: Theory and Practice (ICIPE 2008) belongs to a successful series of conferences held up to now following a three-year cycle. Previous conferences took place in Palm Coast, Florida, USA (1993), Le Croisic, France (1996), Port Ludlow, Washington, USA (1999), Angra dos Reis, Brazil (2002), and Cambridge, UK (2005). The conference has its roots on the informal seminars organized by Professor J V Beck at Michigan State University, which were initiated in 1987. The organization of this Conference, which took place in Dourdan (Paris) France, 15-19 June 2008, was made possible through a joint effort by four research departments from four different universities: LEMTA (Laboratoire de Mécanique Théorique et Appliquée, Nancy-Université) LMS (Laboratoire de Mécanique des Solides, Ecole Polytechnique, Paris) LMAC (Laboratoire de Mathématiques Appliquées, UTC Compiègne) LTN (Laboratoire de Thermocinétique, Université de Nantes) It received support from three organizations: SFT (Société Française de Thermique: French Heat Transfer Association) ACSM (Association Calcul de Structures et Simulation : Computational Structural Mechanics Association) GdR Ondes - CNRS (`Waves' Network, French National Center for Scientific Research) The objective of the conference was to provide the opportunity for interaction and cross-fertilization between designers of inverse methods and practitioners. The delegates came from very different fields, such as applied mathematics, heat transfer, solid mechanics, tomography.... Consequently the sessions were organised along mostly methodological topics in order to facilitate interaction among participants who might not meet otherwise. The present proceedings, published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series, gathers the four plenary invited lectures and the full-length versions of 103 presentations. The latter have been reviewed by the scientific committee (see

  19. Scientific Respiratory Symposium, Paris June 2010

    PubMed Central

    Dalglish, Gavin; Priestley, Graham

    2011-01-01

    At a 2010 Respiratory Symposium in Paris, chaired by Professors Bousquet and Roche of the University of Paris, recent trends in research, therapy and treatment guidelines for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were reviewed and discussed by a faculty of expert European and US respiratory physicians. This article reviews five key clinical presentations with particular emphasis given to the importance of small airways in the pathology and treatment of asthma and COPD. Further analysis of the economics of treatment in Europe and the US shows a wide variance in direct and indirect costs. PMID:21792320

  20. Technical Entrepreneurship: A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Arnold C., Ed.; Komives, John L., Ed.

    Contained in this document are papers presented at the Symposium on Technical Entrepreneurship at Purdue University by researchers who were then or had previously been engaged in research in the area. Because formal research in this area was in its infancy, there was a particular need to afford investigators in the field opportunities to compare…

  1. Standards and Certification. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on standards and certification in human resource development (HRD). "Implementing Management Standards in the UK" (Jonathan Winterton, Ruth Winterton) reports on a study that explored the implementation of management standards in 16 organizations and identified 36 key themes and strategic issues…

  2. Globalism and HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on globalization and human resource development (HRD). "Challenges and Strategies of Developing Human Resources in the Surge of Globalization: A Case of the People's Republic of China" (De Zhang, Baiyin Yang, Yichi Zhang) analyzes the challenges and strategies of HRD in China and discusses the…

  3. Online Learning. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on online learning that was conducted as part of a conference on human resource development (HRD). "An Instructional Strategy Framework for Online Learning Environments" (Scott D. Johnson, Steven R. Aragon) discusses the pitfalls of modeling online courses after traditional instruction instead…

  4. Fifth Cooley's anemia symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, A.; Anderson, W.F.; Zaino, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses the topics presented at the symposium on the subject of 'Thalassemia'. Sickle cell anemia is also briefly discussed. The aspects discussed are chromosomal defects of anemias particularly globin synthesis, and the role of messenger RNA and other chromosomes.

  5. ASSA Symposium 2012 Abstracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-10-01

    of papers presented at the ASSA Symposium held in Cape Town 12-14 October 2012. Videos are available on You tube. See http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8odLrzpzMkHS-cSEfPFIr3YLPAq4d5MU for a playlist.

  6. Research Symposium I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The proceedings of this symposium consist of abstracts of talks presented by interns at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The interns assisted researchers at GRC in projects which primarily address the following topics: aircraft engines and propulsion, spacecraft propulsion, fuel cells, thin film photovoltaic cells, aerospace materials, computational fluid dynamics, aircraft icing, management, and computerized simulation.

  7. Tools in HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on tools in human resource development (HRD). "Game Theory Methodology in HRD" (Thomas J. Chermack, Richard A. Swanson) explores the utility of game theory in helping the HRD profession address the complexity of integrating multiple theories for disciplinary understanding and fulfilling its…

  8. Recruitment and Training. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on recruitment and training. "College Choice: The State of Marketing and Effective Student Recruitment Strategies" (Fredrick Muyia Nafukho, Michael F. Burnett) reports on a study of the recruitment strategies used by Louisiana State University's admissions office and College of Agriculture that…

  9. Competencies in HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium is comprised of three papers on competencies in human resource development (HRD). "The Development of a Competency Model and Assessment Instrument for Public Sector Leadership and Management Development" (Sharon S. Naquin, Elwood F. Holton III) reports on a streamlined methodology and process used to develop a competency model for…

  10. Quality of Life Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces. New Mexico Environmental Inst.

    Comments, speeches, and questions delivered at the Quality of Life Symposium are compiled in these proceedings. As an exploratory session, the conference objectives were to (1) become better informed about New Mexico--its resource base, the economy, social and cultural base, and the environment; and (2) to evaluate and discuss the role of New…

  11. Values: A Symposium Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, T. A., Ed.

    This publication brings together a set of four papers prepared for a symposium on values at the 1972 annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association. The first paper, by Fred N. Kerlinger, establishes a rationale for values research. The discussion focuses on the definition of values, relationship between values and attitudes,…

  12. Issues of HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on issues of human resource development (HRD). "The Complex Roots of Human Resource Development" (Monica Lee) discusses the roots of HRD within the framework of the following views of management: (1) classic (the view that managers must be able to create appropriate rules and procedures for…

  13. Team Based Work. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on team-based work in human resource development (HRD). "Toward Transformational Learning in Organizations: Effects of Model-II Governing Variables on Perceived Learning in Teams" (Blair K. Carruth) summarizes a study that indicated that, regardless of which Model-II variable (valid information,…

  14. Issues of Gender. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium is comprised of three papers on issues of gender in human resource development (HRD). "The Impact of Awareness and Action on the Implementation of a Women's Network" (Laura L. Bierema) reports on research to examine how gender consciousness emerges through the formation of in-company networks to promote corporate women's status. It…

  15. Europa Uomo: the European Prostate Cancer Coalition.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Tom; Denis, Louis J

    2007-01-01

    facilitate international collaboration. These slides have been listed in Tables 16.3, 16.4 16.5, 16.6, 16.7, 16.8, 16.9, 16.10, 16.11, 16.12, 16.13 and 16.14. It should be noted that membership includes supporting activities for patients and adherence to our 10 objectives listed in the manifest (Tables 16.4-16.6). The bottom line is that the coalition focuses on peer-to-peer support, information and education, as well as partnership with professional associations. We in Europa Uomo hope to see the decrease in over-treatment and mortality of prostate cancer by the clinical activities, trials and research of the professional organizations. We have the great opportunity to be supported and sponsored by the European School of Oncology (ESO) and its director Dr. A. Costa. The European Society of Medical oncology (ESMO), the International Consultation of Urological Diseases (ICUD) and the International Prostate Health Council (IPHC) support our advice on scientific data. It is quite natural that all of our members have joined the European Cancer Patients Coalition (ECPC) to speak for all European patients with one voice. We are a young association but ambitious enough to launch several projects in addition to the Web site, such as the Prostate Passport, a global coalition of patient support organizations, and a series of patient symposia. In this way we are able to show our support and collaboration with all health workers, including nurses, social workers, nutritionists and psychologists. We like to conclude this contribution with a list of questions to the experts from our participation in the 6th International Consultation of Urological Diseases (ICUD) symposium in Paris (Hudson et al. 2006). PMID:17432565

  16. Land Subsidence International Symposium held in Venice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Third International Symposium on Land Subsidence was held March 18-25, 1984, in Venice, Italy. Sponsors were the Ground-Water Commission of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS), the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the Italian National Research Council (CNR), the Italian Regions of Veneto and Emilia-Romagna, the Italian Municipalities of Venice, Ravenna, and Modena, the Venice Province, and the European Research Office. Cosponsors included the International Association of Hydrogeologists (IAH), the International Society for Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering (ISSMFE), and the Association of Geoscientists for International Development (AGID).Organized within the framework of UNESCO's International Hydrological Program, the symposium brought together over 200 international interdisciplinary specialists in the problems of land subsidence due to fluid and mineral withdrawal. Because man's continuing heavy development of groundwater, gas, oil, and minerals is changing the natural regime and thus causing more and more subsiding areas in the world, there had been sufficient new land subsidence occurrence, problems, research, and remedial measures since the 1976 Second International Symposium held in Anaheim, California, to develop a most interesting program of nearly 100 papers from about 30 countries. The program consisted of papers covering case histories of fluid and mineral withdrawal, engineering theory and analysis, karst “sink-hole”-type subsidence, subsidence due to dewatering of organic deposits or due to application of water (hydrocompaction), instrumentation, legal, socioeconomic, and environmental effects of land subsidence, and remedial works.

  17. International Library Cooperation. Essen Symposium (10th, Essen, West Germany, October 19-22, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helal, Ahmed H., Ed.; Weiss, Joachim W., Ed.

    The proceedings of this symposium contain the texts of 21 presentations: (1) "The Alexandriana Library: A New Opportunity in International Library Cooperation" (Stuart Ede); (2) "Conservation, Culture and Curriculum" (Brendan Loughridge); (3) "European Library Cooperation: An EC (European Community) Standpoint" (Ariane Iljon); (4) "Library…

  18. Is the onset of the 6th century 'dark age' in Maya history related to explosive volcanism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nooren, Kees; Hoek, Wim Z.; Van der Plicht, Hans; Sigl, Michael; Galop, Didier; Torrescano-Valle, Nuria; Islebe, Gerald; Huizinga, Annika; Winkels, Tim; Middelkoop, Hans; Van Bergen, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    Maya societies in Southern Mexico, Guatemala and Belize experienced a 'dark age' during the second half of the 6th century. This period, also known as the 'Maya Hiatus', is characterized by cultural downturn, political instability and abandonment of many sites in the Central Maya Lowlands. Many theories have been postulated to explain the occurrence of this 'dark age' in Maya history. A possible key role of a large volcanic eruption in the onset of this 'dark age' will be discussed. Volcanic deposits recovered from the sedimentary archive of lake Tuspán and the Usumacinta-Grijalva delta were studied in detail and the combination of multiple dating techniques allowed the reconstruction of the timing of a large 6th century eruption. Volcanic glass shards were fingerprinted to indicate the source volcano and high resolution pollen records were constructed to indicate the environmental impact of the eruption. Results are compared with available archaeological data and causality with the disruption of Maya civilization will be evaluated.

  19. Substance use and youth violence. A study among 6th to 10th grade Israeli school children.

    PubMed

    Molcho, Michal; Harel, Yossi; Dina, Lache O

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the co-morbidity of substance use and violence among a representative sample of 8,394 6th-10th grade Israeli students. A representative national self report sample of 8,394 students in 6th through 10th grade. Measures included smoking, alcohol consumption, and illicit drug use, predicting involvement in bullying, injury during a fight and weapon-carrying in the past 30 days. We found across all grades, genders and ethnicities, daily smoking, use of hard drugs, history of drunkenness and binge drinking were the best predictors of violent behavior. Involvement in such behaviors put girls in higher risk for violent behaviors compared with boys. We concluded that use of substances immensely increased the odds of involvement in violent behavior, and this association was extremely strong for Arab girls. The study suggested that although girls were less frequently involved in substance use, the girls who did were at much higher risk for involvement in youth violence. PMID:15551841

  20. Examining students' views on the nature of science: Results from Korean 6th, 8th, and 10th graders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sukjin; Scharmann, Lawrence C.; Noh, Taehee

    2005-03-01

    In this study, students' views on the nature of science (NOS) were investigated with the use of a large-scale survey. An empirically derived multiple-choice format questionnaire was administered to 1702 Korean 6th, 8th, and 10th graders. The questionnaire consisted of five items that respectively examined students' views on five constructs concerning the NOS: purpose of science, definition of scientific theory, nature of models, tentativeness of scientific theory, and origin of scientific theory. Students were also asked to respond to an accompanying open-ended section for each item in order to collect information about the rationale(s) for their choices. The results indicated that the majority of Korean students possessed an absolutist/empiricist perspective about the NOS. It was also found that, on the whole, there were no clear differences in the distributions of 6th, 8th, and 10th graders' views on the NOS. In some questions, distinct differences between Korean students and those of Western countries were found. Educational implications are discussed.

  1. Second International Lygus Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Goodell, P. B.; Ellsworth, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    The Second International Lygus Symposium brought together 52 entomologists from six nations and 11 states representing universities, public agencies, and private entities to discuss the latest research on Lygus species and their relatives. Symposium topics included Lygus biology, behavior and ecology, IPM, insecticides and resistance, and biological control. Papers and posters dealt with Lygus as a pest of several crops, including cotton, strawberries, seed alfalfa, canola, dry beans, cucumbers, cereals, peaches, and new crops guayule and lesquerella. Intercrop movement of Lygus2008200820082008 species was another important topic of many presentations. In the capstone session, participants identified needs and priorities for ongoing Lygus research and education (available at http://ag.arizona.edu/apmc/Arid_SWPMC_RAMP.html). The conference was sponsored in part by FMC Corporation, the University of Arizona Arizona Pest Management Center, the University of California Statewide IPM Program, and a grant to Ellsworth et al. (CRIS# 0207436) from the USDA-CSREES, Risk Avoidance and Mitigation Program (RAMP).

  2. Microgravity Fluid Management Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The NASA Microgravity Fluid Management Symposium, held at the NASA Lewis Research Center, September 9 to 10, 1986, focused on future research in the microgravity fluid management field. The symposium allowed researchers and managers to review space applications that require fluid management technology, to present the current status of technology development, and to identify the technology developments required for future missions. The 19 papers covered three major categories: (1) fluid storage, acquisition, and transfer; (2) fluid management applications, i.e., space power and thermal management systems, and environmental control and life support systems; (3) project activities and insights including two descriptions of previous flight experiments and a summary of typical activities required during development of a shuttle flight experiment.

  3. 1979 DOE statistical symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Gardiner, D.A.; Truett T.

    1980-09-01

    The 1979 DOE Statistical Symposium was the fifth in the series of annual symposia designed to bring together statisticians and other interested parties who are actively engaged in helping to solve the nation's energy problems. The program included presentations of technical papers centered around exploration and disposal of nuclear fuel, general energy-related topics, and health-related issues, and workshops on model evaluation, risk analysis, analysis of large data sets, and resource estimation.

  4. Space 2000 Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Space 2000 Symposium is to present the creativity and achievements of key figures of the 20th century. It offers a retrospective discussion on space exploration. It considers the future of the enterprise, and the legacy that will be left for future generations. The symposium includes panel discussions, smaller session meetings with some panelists, exhibits, and displays. The first session entitled "From Science Fiction to Science Facts" commences after a brief overview of the symposium. The panel discussions include talks on space exploration over many decades, and the missions of the millennium to search for life on Mars. The second session, "Risks and Rewards of Human Space Exploration," focuses on the training and health risks that astronauts face on their exploratory mission to space. Session three, "Messages and Messengers Informing and Inspire Space Exploration and the Public," focuses on the use of TV medium by educators and actors to inform and inspire a wide variety of audiences with adventures of space exploration. Session four, "The Legacy of Carl Sagan," discusses the influences made by Sagan to scientific research and the general public. In session five, "Space Exploration for a new Generation," two student speakers and the NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin address the group. Session six, "Destiny or Delusion? -- Humankind's Place in the Cosmos," ends the symposium with issues of space exploration and some thought provoking questions. Some of these issues and questions are: what will be the societal implications if we discover the origin of the universe, stars, or life; what will be the impact if scientists find clear evidence of life outside the domains of the Earth; should there be limits to what humans can or should learn; and what visionary steps should space-faring people take now for future generations.

  5. Eighth particulate control symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    The Eighth Symposium on the Transfer and Utilization of Particulate Control Technology was held in San Diego, California, March 20 through 23, 1990. The symposium proceedings contain 80 papers presented by representatives of utility companies, equipment and process suppliers, university representatives, research and development companies, EPA and other federal and state agency representatives, and EPRI staff members. Electrostatic precipitators and fabric filters were the major topics discussed during the symposium. Papers from this conference are organized by session in two volumes. This Volume (2) contains papers presented in the sessions on: low ratio baghouse O M experience, pulse-jet baghouse experience, particulate control for AFBCs, particulate control for dry SO2 control processes, baghouse design and performance, fundamental baghouse studies, high temperature filtration, and control of emissions from RDF incinerators. Both fabric filters and ESPs are discussed in the AFBC and dry SO2 control papers. The high temperature filtration papers deal with ceramic barrier and granular bed filters. The rest of the papers in Volume 2 are concerned with fabric filters on pulverized-coal-fired boilers. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  6. LHC Nobel Symposium Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekelöf, Tord

    2013-12-01

    In the summer of 2012, a great discovery emerged at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva. A plethora of new precision data had already by then been collected by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at LHC, providing further extensive support for the validity of the Standard Model of particle physics. But what now appeared was the first evidence for what was not only the last unverified prediction of the Standard Model, but also perhaps the most decisive one: the prediction made already in 1964 of a unique scalar boson required by the theory of François Englert and Peter Higgs on how fundamental particles acquire mass. At that moment in 2012, it seemed particularly appropriate to start planning a gathering of world experts in particle physics to take stock of the situation and try to answer the challenging question: what next? By May 2013, when the LHC Nobel Symposium was held at the Krusenberg Mansion outside Uppsala in Sweden, the first signs of a great discovery had already turned into fully convincing experimental evidence for the existence of a scalar boson of mass about 125 GeV, having properties compatible with the 50-year-old prediction. And in October 2013, the evidence was deemed so convincing that the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics to Englert and Higgs for their pioneering work. At the same time the search at the LHC for other particles, beyond those predicted by the Standard Model, with heavier masses up to—and in some cases beyond—1 TeV, had provided no positive result. The triumph of the Standard Model seems resounding, in particular because the mass of the discovered scalar boson is such that, when identified with the Higgs boson, the Standard Model is able to provide predictions at energies as high as the Planck mass, although at the price of accepting that the vacuum would be metastable. However, even if there were some feelings of triumph, the ambience at the LHC Nobel Symposium was more one of

  7. The 30th AAS Goddard Memorial Symposium. World space programs and fiscal reality: Synopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A full proceedings of the symposium will be issued later in the year. This synopsis consists of summations of three sessions by appointed rapporteurs. International figures in space and in politics spoke at the sessions. Themes of international cooperation and fiscal reality pervaded the conference. International speakers from Canada, the European Space Agency, Russia, Japan and China and other countries addressed the topic of the symposium. American representation included Senator Barbara Mikulski, former NASA administrator James Beggs and other speakers.

  8. The 30th AAS Goddard Memorial Symposium. World space programs and fiscal reality: Synopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A full proceedings of the symposium will be issued later in the year. This synopsis consists of summations of three sessions by appointed rapporteurs. International figures in space and in politics spoke at the sessions. Themes of international cooperation and fiscal reality pervaded the conference. International speakers from Canada, the European Space Agency, Russia, Japan and China and other countries addressed the topic of the symposium. American representation included Senator Barbara Mikulski, former NASA administrator James Beggs and other speakers.

  9. IR and py/GC/MS examination of amber relics excavated from 6th century royal tomb in Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jongseo; Yun, Eunyoung; Kang, Hyungtae; Ahn, Jooyoung; Kim, Gyuho

    2016-08-01

    Relics of amber were excavated from King Muryeong's tomb constructed in the 6th century on the Korean peninsula. To estimate the provenance, FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) and py/GC/MS (pyrolysis/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry) analysis were utilized. The reference Baltic amber sample was also analyzed with the same method for comparison. The relics were confirmed to be amber from the FTIR analysis where an absorption band near 1150 cm- 1, characteristic one in Baltic amber, was also observed. In py/GC/MS analysis, pyrolyzed products like butanedioic acid and dehydroabietic acid, known constituents of amber, were observed. In addition, D-fenchyl alcohol, camphor, borneol and butanedioic acid, typical constituents of Baltic amber, were observed in some samples. From this, it appears that some of relics were made from Baltic amber and that Baltic amber was transported to the Korean peninsula in the time of tomb construction.

  10. Publication of Proceedings for the 6th Workshop on High Energy Density and High Power RF (RF 2003)

    SciTech Connect

    Victor L. Granatstein

    2004-08-08

    The 6th Workshop on High Energy Density and High Power RF (RF 2003) was held from June 22 to June 26 at the Coolfont Resort and Conference Center in Berkeley Springs, West Virginia. The Workshop was hosted by the Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics (IREAP) of the University of Maryland, College Park and by the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC. As its name implies this was the sixth in a series of biennial workshops devoted to exchanging information and ideas on high power microwave sources and components. The applications addressed included particle accelerators, radar, HPM, space exploration, neutron sources and plasma heating and current driven in controlled thermonuclear fusion research. This Final Report includes a brief description of the RF 2003 Workshop and the distribution of the published proceedings.

  11. IR and py/GC/MS examination of amber relics excavated from 6th century royal tomb in Korean Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Park, Jongseo; Yun, Eunyoung; Kang, Hyungtae; Ahn, Jooyoung; Kim, Gyuho

    2016-08-01

    Relics of amber were excavated from King Muryeong's tomb constructed in the 6th century on the Korean peninsula. To estimate the provenance, FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) and py/GC/MS (pyrolysis/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry) analysis were utilized. The reference Baltic amber sample was also analyzed with the same method for comparison. The relics were confirmed to be amber from the FTIR analysis where an absorption band near 1150cm(-1), characteristic one in Baltic amber, was also observed. In py/GC/MS analysis, pyrolyzed products like butanedioic acid and dehydroabietic acid, known constituents of amber, were observed. In addition, d-fenchyl alcohol, camphor, borneol and butanedioic acid, typical constituents of Baltic amber, were observed in some samples. From this, it appears that some of relics were made from Baltic amber and that Baltic amber was transported to the Korean peninsula in the time of tomb construction. PMID:27116473

  12. 6th COSTAM/SFRR (ASEAN/Malaysia) International Workshop on Micronutrients, Oxidative Stress, and the Environment.

    PubMed

    Nesaretnam, Kalanithi; Sies, Helmut

    2006-01-01

    The 6(th) COSTAM/SFRR (ASEAN/Malaysia) workshop, "Micronutrients, Oxidative Stress, and the Environment," was held from June 29 to July 2 at Holiday Inn Damai Beach Resort in Kuching, Sarawak. Two hundred twenty participants from 17 countries presented recent advances on natural antioxidants in the area of oxidative stress and molecular aspects of nutrition. Natural products and research are an important program in academic institutions and are experiencing unprecedented interest and growth by the scientific community and public health authorities. Progress is being driven by better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the relation between oxidative stress and micronutrient action. The gathering of scientists from around the world was fruitful, and we hope that future work will be developed by the formal and informal interactions that took place in this beautiful tropical setting. PMID:17034360

  13. Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    These Proceedings contain papers presented at the Eighth International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment, held October 2nd through 6th, 1972, on the campus of the University of Michigan. The symposium was conducted by the Center for Remote Sensing Information and Analysis of the Environmental Research Institute of Michigan (formerly the University of Michigan's Willow Run Laboratories) as a part of a continuing program investigating current activities in the field of remote sensing. Presentations include those on the use of this technology by regional governmental units and by federal governmental agencies, as well as various applications in monitoring and managing the earth's resources and man's global environment. Ground-based, airborne, and spaceborne sensor systems and manual and machine-assisted data analysis and interpretation are included.

  14. 35th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler); Doty, Laura W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The proceedings of the 35th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. Ames Research Center hosted the conference, which was held at the Four Points Sheraton, Sunnyvale, California, on May 9-11, 2001. The symposium was sponsored by the Mechanisms Education Association. Technology areas covered included bearings and tribology; pointing, solar array, and deployment mechanisms; and other mechanisms for spacecraft and large space structures.

  15. 41st Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Editor)

    2012-01-01

    The proceedings of the 41st Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. JPL hosted the conference, which was held in Pasadena Hilton, Pasadena, California on May 16-18, 2012. Lockheed Martin Space Systems cosponsored the symposium. Technology areas covered include gimbals and positioning mechanisms, components such as hinges and motors, CubeSats, tribology, and Mars Science Laboratory mechanisms.

  16. 33rd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler); Litty, Edward C. (Compiler); Sevilla, Donald R. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    The proceedings of the 33rd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. JPL hosted the conference, which was held at the Pasadena Conference and Exhibition Center, Pasadena, California, on May 19-21, 1999. Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space cosponsored the symposium. Technology areas covered include bearings and tribology; pointing, solar array and deployment mechanisms; orbiter/space station; and other mechanisms for spacecraft.

  17. RICIS Symposium 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Integrated Environments for Large, Complex Systems is the theme for the RICIS symposium of 1988. Distinguished professionals from industry, government, and academia have been invited to participate and present their views and experiences regarding research, education, and future directions related to this topic. Within RICIS, more than half of the research being conducted is in the area of Computer Systems and Software Engineering. The focus of this research is on the software development life-cycle for large, complex, distributed systems. Within the education and training component of RICIS, the primary emphasis has been to provide education and training for software professionals.

  18. IAU Symposium 317 Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratton, Raffaele G.

    2016-08-01

    The assembly of the halo yields fundamental information on the formation and evolution of galaxies: this was quite exhaustively discussed at this very important symposium. I present a brief personal summary of the meeting, outlining those points that I found more exciting and suggestive. I also remarked a few areas that were possibly not enough expanded. I found this research field extremely interesting and I think there are great expectations for new developments in the next few years, thanks to the new large spectroscopic surveys and the ESA GAIA satellite.

  19. Teaching for Scientific Literacy: Context, Competency, and Curriculum. Proceedings of the International Utrecht/ICASE Symposium (2nd, October 11-13, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Jong, Onno, Ed.; Savelsbergh, Elwin R., Ed.; Alblas, Art, Ed.

    The second Utrecht/ICASE Symposium brought a variety of European colleagues together to discuss scientific literacy which has played an important role in curriculum development for the past 25 years. This proceedings contains papers presented at the symposium. Papers include: (1) "Teaching for scientific literacy: An introduction" (Elwin…

  20. Radioactive Waste Management - A Priority Thematic Area Within The Euratom 6th Framework Programme (2002-2006)

    SciTech Connect

    Raynal, M.; von Maravic, H.

    2003-02-24

    The European Union's Sixth Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development and the specific EURATOM Framework Programme for Research and Training in Nuclear Energy (2002-2006)-EURATOM FP6--are the major building blocks for the European Commission to strengthen the foundations of the European Research Area, an open market for knowledge and science in Europe. The absence of a broadly agreed approach for radioactive waste management and disposal in the European Union caused the European Commission to raise the issue to a priority key area of research and development within EURATOM FP6. The sub-programme is aimed at looking to a widely agreed approach to waste disposal and will explore also the technical and economic potential of concepts for nuclear energy generation able to make better use of fissile material and generate less waste. To achieve these goals, participating research institutions are invited to invest in durable and structured partnerships by implementing ''new instruments'' for projects--Integrated Projects and Network of Excellence. In 2002 the European Commission consulted the research community on its readiness to prepare actions that use these ''new instruments'' for research topics in the priority area ''management of radioactive waste'' to assist in preparation of the work programme 2002-2006 of the EURATOM FP6. In parallel and under the last call for proposals of EURATOM FP5 the Commission launched two topic-related ''Thematic Networks'' that are bringing European research forces together and will create potential interest for future development within FP6.

  1. Social and moral norm differences among Portuguese 1st and 6th year medical students towards their intention to comply with hand hygiene.

    PubMed

    Roberto, Magda S; Mearns, Kathryn; Silva, Silvia A

    2012-01-01

    This study examines social and moral norms towards the intention to comply with hand hygiene among Portuguese medical students from 1st and 6th years (N = 175; 121 from the 1st year, 54 from the 6th year). The study extended the theory of planned behaviour theoretical principles and hypothesised that both subjective and moral norms will be the best predictors of 1st and 6th year medical students' intention to comply with hand hygiene; however, these predictors ability to explain intention variance will change according to medical students' school year. Results indicated that the subjective norm, whose referent focuses on professors, is a relevant predictor of 1st year medical students' intention, while the subjective norm that emphasises the relevance of colleagues predicts the intentions of medical students from the 6th year. In terms of the moral norm, 6th year students' intention is better predicted by a norm that interferes with compliance; whereas intentions from 1st year students are better predicted by a norm that favours compliance. Implications of the findings highlight the importance of role models and mentors as key factors in teaching hand hygiene in medical undergraduate curricula. PMID:22111788

  2. The first Brazilian Dinosaur Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Anjos Candeiro, Carlos Roberto; da Silva Marinho, Thiago

    2015-08-01

    The 1st Brazilian Dinosaur Symposium gathered paleontologists, geologists, and paleoartists in the city of Ituiutaba, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, from April 21st to 24th, 2013. The Dinosaur Symposium in the Pontal Campus of the Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Minas Gerais State, Brazil provided an opportunity to share many new results of dinosaur research being conducted around the world. The symposium coincided with a new dawn of scientific advances in dinosaur paleontology further expanding its importance, interest and credibility worldwide.

  3. Women's technical and professional symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Budil, K; Mack, L

    1999-10-01

    This is the fourth LLNL-sponsored Women's Technical and Professional Symposium. This year's theme: ''Excellence through the Millennium,'' focuses on the cutting edge work being done at LLNL and the many contributions of women to our science and technology mission. We hope this Symposium gives each person attending a better idea of the broad scope of the Laboratory's mission and their place within the organization. It is easy to lose sight of the fact that we all work in support of science and technology despite the diversity of our experience. This Symposium provides an opportunity to reflect on our past and to begin to plan our future.

  4. Effects of using relaxation breathing training to reduce music performance anxiety in 3rd to 6th graders.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Huei; Luh, Jer-Junn; Chen, Hsin-I; Lin, Chao-Chen; Liao, Miin-Jiun; Chen, Heng-Shuen

    2010-06-01

    The current study examined the effects of applying relaxation breathing training (RBT) as a means to reduce music performance anxiety (MPA) in young, talented musicians. A group of 59 young musicians from 3rd to 6th grade participated in this study, and all of them started RBT twice a week for 2 months prior to the examination. Four tests--2 mos, 1 mos, half an hour and 5 min before the examination--were conducted to examine the level of MPA after the application of RBT. Results show that the degree of MPA 5 min before the trial was lower than the degree of performance anxiety half an hour before the jury (t = -3.683, p < 0.01), which indicated that the RBT was associated with a decrease in MPA. Although a series of RBT exercises was applied, results indicated that when approaching the date of examination, the degree of performance anxiety still increased and reached its maximum half an hour before the jury. The recommendation for future studies is to combine the application of RBT with other methods to expand its effect in reducing MPA. PMID:20795337

  5. A Randomized Controlled Trial on the Effects of Yoga on Stress Reactivity in 6th Grade Students

    PubMed Central

    Hagins, Marshall; Haden, Sara C.; Daly, Leslie A.

    2013-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in developing school programs that improve the ability of children to cope with psychosocial stress. Yoga may be an appropriate intervention as it has demonstrated improvements in the ability of children to manage psychosocial stress. Yoga is thought to improve the control of reactivity to stress via the regulation of the autonomic nervous system. The current study examined the effects of yoga compared to a physical education class on physiological response (blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR)) to behavioral stressor tasks (mental arithmetic and mirror tracing tasks). Data analysis of BP and HR was performed using a 2 × 2 × 4 repeated measures ANOVA (time × group × stressor time points). 30 (17 male) 6th graders participated in the study. Yoga did not provide significant differences in stress reactivity compared to a physical education class (group × time: systolic (F(1,28) = .538, P = .470); diastolic (F(1,28) = .1.061, P = .312); HR (F(1,28) = .401, P = .532)). The lack of significant differences may be due to the yoga intervention failing to focus on stress management and/or the stressor tasks not adequately capturing attenuation of stressor response. PMID:23431341

  6. Bond Strength of 5th, 6th and 7th Generation Bonding Agents to Intracanal Dentin of Primary Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Hossein; Baradaran Nakhjavani, Yahya; Rahro Taban, Sedighe; Baniameri, Zahra; Nahvi, Azam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This in-vitro study sought to assess the push-out bond strength of a total etch and 2 self-etch bonding systems to intracanal dentin of primary anterior teeth (PAT). Materials and Methods: Thirty-six primary anterior teeth were randomly divided into 3 groups of 5th generation (Single Bond 2), 6th generation (Clearfil SE) and 7th generation (Single Bond Universal) bonding agents. The canal orifice was restored with composite resin and the push-out test was carried out to assess the bond strength. After applying the push-out load, specimens were evaluated under a light microscope at 40X magnification. One-way ANOVA and log-rank test on Kaplan-Meier curves were applied for the comparison of bond strength among the 3 groups. Results: The mean± standard deviation (SD) bond strength was 13.6±5.33 MPa for Single Bond 2, 13.85±5.86 MPa for Clearfil SE and 12.28±5.24 MPa for Single Bond Universal. The differences in bond strength among the 3 groups were not statistically significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: All three bonding agents are recommended for use with composite posts in PAT. However, due to high technical sensitivity of the Total Etch system, single or two-step self etch systems may be preferred for uncooperative children. PMID:26056518

  7. Photometric and Spectroscopic Footprint Corrections in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey’s 6th Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Specian, Mike A.; Szalay, Alex S.

    2016-04-01

    We identify and correct numerous errors within the photometric and spectroscopic footprints (SFs) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey’s (SDSS) 6th data release (DR6). Within the SDSS’s boundaries hundreds of millions of objects have been detected. Yet we present evidence that the boundaries themselves contain a significant number of mistakes that are being revealed for the first time within this paper. Left unaddressed, these can introduce systematic biases into galaxy clustering statistics. Using the DR6 Main Galaxy Sample (MGS) targets as tracers, we reveal inconsistencies between the photometric and SF definitions provided in the Catalog Archive Server (CAS), and the measurements of targets therein. First, we find that 19.7 deg2 of the DR6 photometric footprint are devoid of MGS targets. In volumes of radii 7 {h}-1 {Mpc}, this can cause errors in the expected number of galaxies to exceed 60%. Second, we identify seven areas that were erroneously included or excluded from the SF. Moreover, the tiling algorithm that positioned spectroscopic fibers during and between DRs caused many areas along the edge of the SF to be significantly undersampled relative to the footprint’s interior. Through our corrections, we increase the completeness 2.2% by trimming 3.6% of the area from the existing SF. The sum total of these efforts has generated the most accurate description of the SDSS DR6 footprints ever created.

  8. Seismic and sedimentological evidence of an early 6th century AD earthquake at Lake Ohrid (Macedonia/Albania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, B.; Francke, A.; Sulpizio, R.; Zanchetta, G.; Lindhorst, K.; Krastel, S.; Vogel, H.; Daut, G.; Grazhdani, A.; Lushaj, B.; Trajanovski, S.

    2012-09-01

    Lake Ohrid shared by the Republics of Albania and Macedonia is formed by a tectonically active graben within the South Balkan and suggested to be the oldest lake in Europe. Several studies have shown that the lake provides a valuable record of climatic and environmental changes and a distal tephrostratigraphic record of volcanic eruptions from Italy. Fault structures identified in seismic data demonstrate that sediments have also the potential to record tectonic activity in the region. Here, we provide an example of linking tephrostratigraphic information and environmental changes with tectonic activity and anthropogenic impact. Historical documents indicate that a major earthquake destroyed the city of Ohrid in the early 6th century AD. This earthquake is documented in multichannel seismic profiles, in parametric sediment echosounder profiles, and in a ca. 10 m long sediment record from the western part of the lake. The sediment record exhibits a ca. 2 m thick mass wasting deposit, which is chronologically well constrained by the underlying 472 AD/512 AD tephra and cross correlation with other sediment sequences with similar geochemical characteristics of the Holocene.

  9. Associations Between Home Environment and After-School Physical Activity and Sedentary Time Among 6th Grade Children.

    PubMed

    Lau, Erica Y; Barr-Anderson, Daheia J; Dowda, Marsha; Forthofer, Melinda; Saunders, Ruth P; Pate, Russell R

    2015-05-01

    This study examined associations of various elements of the home environment with after-school physical activity and sedentary time in 671 6th-grade children (Mage = 11.49 ± 0.5 years). Children's after-school total physical activity, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, and sedentary time were measured by accelerometry. Parents completed surveys assessing elements of the home social and physical environment. Mixed-model regression analyses were used to examine the associations between each element of the home environment and children's after-school physical activity and sedentary time. Availability of home physical activity resources was associated positively with after-school total physical activity and negatively with after-school sedentary time in boys. Parental support was associated positively with after-school total physical activity and MVPA and negatively with after-school sedentary time in girls. The home physical environment was associated with boys' after-school physical activity and sedentary time, whereas the home social environment was associated with girls' after-school physical activity and sedentary time. PMID:25386734

  10. Research symposium proceedings. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-31

    THE research symposium was organized to present the cutting edge research for PET by individuals from leading institutions throughout the world. The Institute for Clinical PET (ICP) has focused its annual meeting on the clinical applications of PET.

  11. 30th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Obie H., Jr. (Compiler); Rogers, John F. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    The proceedings of the 30th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. NASA Langley Research Center hosted the proceedings held at the Radisson Hotel in Hampton, Virginia on May 15-17, 1996, and Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space Company, Inc. co-sponsored the symposium. Technological areas covered include bearings and tribology; pointing, solar array, and deployment mechanisms; orbiter/space station; and other mechanisms for spacecraft.

  12. European Biospheric Network Takes Off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovkin, Victor; Reick, Christian; van Bodegom, Peter

    2010-04-01

    Opening Symposium of the TERRABITES Network; Hamburg, Germany, 9-11 February 2010; The huge amount of recently acquired information about the functioning of the terrestrial biosphere and the ever increasing spatial resolution of Earth system models call for a new level of integrating efforts among biosphere modelers, developers of ecological theory, and data-gathering communities. Responding to this call, a new European network, Terrestrial Biosphere in the Earth System (TERRABITES), held its opening symposium in Germany. The meeting was organized jointly with another recently founded European network, Advancing the Integrated Monitoring of Trace Gas Exchange Between Biosphere and Atmosphere (ABBA). Almost 100 scientific contributions covered the latest advances in modeling ecophysiological and biogeochemical processes; analyses of model constraints set by measurements of water and carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes, including carbon isotopes; and new perspectives in using remote sensing data for evaluation of global terrestrial biosphere models.

  13. The preparatory phase of the April 6th 2009, Mw 6.3, L’Aquila earthquake: Seismological observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucente, F. P.; de Gori, P.; Margheriti, L.; Piccinini, D.; Dibona, M.; Chiarabba, C.; Piana Agostinetti, N.

    2009-12-01

    Few decades ago, the dilatancy-diffusion hypothesis held great promise as a physical basis for developing earthquakes prediction techniques, but the potential never become reality, as the result of too few observations consistent with the theory. One of the main problems has been the lack of detailed monitoring records of small earthquakes swarms spatio-temporally close to the incoming major earthquakes. In fact, the recognition of dilatancy-related effects requires the use of very dense network of three-component seismographs, which, in turn, implies the a-priori knowledge of major earthquakes location, i.e., actually a paradox. The deterministic prediction of earthquakes remains a long time, hard task to accomplish. Nevertheless, for seismologists, the understanding of the processes that preside over the earthquakes nucleation and the mechanics of faulting represents a big step toward the ability to predict earthquakes. Here we describe a set of seismological observations done on the foreshock sequence that preceded the April 6th 2009, Mw 6.3, L’Aquila earthquake. In this occasion, the dense configuration of the seismic network in the area gave us the unique opportunity for a detailed reconstruction of the preparatory phase of the main shock. We show that measurable precursory effects, as changes of the seismic waves velocity and of the anisotropic parameters in the crust, occurred before the main shock. From our observations we infer that fluids play a key role in the fault failure process, and, most significantly, that the elastic properties of the rock volume surrounding the main shock nucleation area undergo a dramatic change about a week before the main shock occurrence.

  14. Breakfast patterns among low-income, ethnically-diverse 4th-6th grade children in an urban area

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasing school breakfast participation has been advocated as a method to prevent childhood obesity. However, little is known about children’s breakfast patterns outside of school (e.g., home, corner store). Policies that increase school breakfast participation without an understanding of children’s breakfast habits outside of school may result in children consuming multiple breakfasts and may undermine efforts to prevent obesity. The aim of the current study was to describe morning food and drink consumption patterns among low-income, urban children and their associations with relative weight. Methods A cross-sectional analysis was conducted of data obtained from 651 4th-6th graders (51.7% female, 61.2% African American, 10.7 years) in 2012. Students completed surveys at school that included all foods eaten and their locations that morning. Height and weight were measured by trained research staff. Results On the day surveyed, 12.4% of youth reported not eating breakfast, 49.8% reported eating one breakfast, 25.5% reported eating two breakfasts, and 12.3% reported eating three or more breakfasts. The number of breakfasts consumed and BMI percentile showed a significant curvilinear relationship, with higher mean BMI percentiles observed among children who did not consume any breakfast and those who consumed ≥ 3 breakfasts. Sixth graders were significantly less likely to have consumed breakfast compared to younger children. A greater proportion of obese youth had no breakfast (18.0%) compared to healthy weight (10.1%) and overweight youth (10.7%, p = .01). Conclusions When promoting school breakfast, policies will need to be mindful of both over- and under-consumption to effectively address childhood obesity and food insecurity. Clinical trial registration NCT01924130 from http://clinicaltrials.gov/. PMID:24928474

  15. LHC Nobel Symposium Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekelöf, Tord

    2013-12-01

    In the summer of 2012, a great discovery emerged at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva. A plethora of new precision data had already by then been collected by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at LHC, providing further extensive support for the validity of the Standard Model of particle physics. But what now appeared was the first evidence for what was not only the last unverified prediction of the Standard Model, but also perhaps the most decisive one: the prediction made already in 1964 of a unique scalar boson required by the theory of François Englert and Peter Higgs on how fundamental particles acquire mass. At that moment in 2012, it seemed particularly appropriate to start planning a gathering of world experts in particle physics to take stock of the situation and try to answer the challenging question: what next? By May 2013, when the LHC Nobel Symposium was held at the Krusenberg Mansion outside Uppsala in Sweden, the first signs of a great discovery had already turned into fully convincing experimental evidence for the existence of a scalar boson of mass about 125 GeV, having properties compatible with the 50-year-old prediction. And in October 2013, the evidence was deemed so convincing that the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics to Englert and Higgs for their pioneering work. At the same time the search at the LHC for other particles, beyond those predicted by the Standard Model, with heavier masses up to—and in some cases beyond—1 TeV, had provided no positive result. The triumph of the Standard Model seems resounding, in particular because the mass of the discovered scalar boson is such that, when identified with the Higgs boson, the Standard Model is able to provide predictions at energies as high as the Planck mass, although at the price of accepting that the vacuum would be metastable. However, even if there were some feelings of triumph, the ambience at the LHC Nobel Symposium was more one of

  16. Comparing Traditional and Computer Assisted Education in the Teaching of Colour to 6th Grade Students and Determination of Its Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akengin, Gultekin

    2011-01-01

    In this study, informing 6th grade students on the subject of colour was taught using traditional and computer assisted education methods. Colour information was taught by the researcher for 5 weeks in order to specify the influence of both methods on students. The test, which was prepared at the beginning of the study and at the end of five-week…

  17. Research into Higher Education 1970; Papers Presented at the Annual Conference of the Society for Research into Higher Education (6th).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Society for Research into Higher Education, Ltd., London (England).

    This report presents three papers that were prepared for the 6th annual conference of the Society for Research into Higher Education, a London based organization. The 1st paper is "Factors Influencing Choice of Higher Education," by Margaret D. McCreath. She discusses part of an intensive study of the transition between school and higher education…

  18. The Effect of the Van Hiele Model Based Instruction on the Creative Thinking Levels of 6th Grade Primary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdogan, Tolga; Akkaya, Recai; Celebi Akkaya, Sibel

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effect of the Van Hiele model based instruction process on the creative thinking levels of 6th grade primary school students. Pre test-post test matching control group quasi-experimental design was used in the study. Fifty five students enrolled in sixth grades during the 2005-2006 educational year formed…

  19. Trends in Substance Use among 6th-to 10th-Grade Students from 1998 to 2010: Findings from a National Probability Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks-Russell, Ashley; Farhat, Tilda; Haynie, Denise; Simons-Morton, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Of the handful of national studies tracking trends in adolescent substance use in the United States, only the Health Behavior in School-Aged Children (HBSC) study collects data from 6th through 10th graders. The purpose of this study was to examine trends from 1998 to 2010 (four time points) in the prevalence of tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use…

  20. The Hetu'u Global Network: Measuring the Distance to the Sun Using the June 5th/6th Transit of Venus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Rodriguez, David R.; Miller, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    In the spirit of historic astronomical endeavors, we invited school groups across the globe to collaborate in a solar distance measurement using the rare June 5/6th transit of Venus. In total, we recruited 19 school groups spread over 6 continents and 10 countries to participate in our Hetu'u Global Network. Applying the methods of French…

  1. Niobium - Proceedings of the international symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, H.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on niobium. Topics considered at the symposium included niobium mining, ore processing, uses, fabrication, microstructure, mechanical properties, physical properties, corrosion, physical radiation effects, and marketing.

  2. The 1986 Get Away Special Experimenter's Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Lawrence R. (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The 1986 Get Away Special (GAS) Experimenter's Symposium will provide a formal opportunity for GAS Experimenter's to share the results of their projects. The focus of this symposium is on payloads that will be flown in the future.

  3. PREFACE: 10th International LISA Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciani, Giacomo; Conklin, John W.; Mueller, Guido

    2015-05-01

    The LISA Symposia have become a mainstay of the gravitational wave community. Held every two years, they are the prime opportunity for our community to discuss the exciting science, technology, mission designs, and progress of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna. The 8th LISA symposium, held at Stanford University in the summer of 2010 was the largest symposium so far and was dominated by progress and hopes that the LISA mission will soon excel following the expected launch of the LISA pathfinder (LPF), no later than 2012, and the expected prioritization by the Decadal survey which was released 6 weeks later. The following years were challenging. Although the Decadal survey ranked LISA very high, NASA's budget issues, mostly due to the cost increase of the James Webb Space Telescope, and continued delays in LPF put too much stress on the LISA project and it officially ended in 2011. The LISA International Science Team (LIST), the core group of LISA scientists and technologists, was dissolved and the community in the U.S. was struggling to maintain cohesion. In the wake of these events, ESA started a new selection process for their next three large missions, L1, L2, and L3, and the European LISA team developed the New Gravitational wave Observatory (NGO), an evolved LISA concept, as an ESA only L1 candidate. A few weeks before the 9th LISA Symposium, held in Paris in May 2012, ESA announced its decision to select JUICE, a planetary mission to Jupiter and its moons, as its next large science mission (L1). Despite having the highest ranked science case, NGO was not selected due to further delays in LPF and the general feeling outside the GW community that the technology is perhaps too challenging to be pulled off in time for the L1 launch in 2022. Many U.S. members of the LISA community cancelled their travel plans and the mood at that symposium ranged from resignation to defiance. Hope for a somewhat timely launch of a LISA-like mission rested upon L2, the next

  4. Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Harris L.; Beeman, Joseph J.; Barlow, Joel W.; Bourell, David L.; Crawford, Richard H.

    1993-09-01

    This Proceedings of the Fourth Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium, held at The University of Texas in Austin on August 9-11, 1993, reaffirms the dynamic nature of the research area. The interest shown by researchers over the wide range of disciplines and subdisciplines that make up solid freeform fabrication (SFF) highlight this technical symposium. The speakers addressed problems in computer software, in machine design, materials synthesis and processing, and SFF in integrated manufacturing. The exponential growth in the research, application, and development of SFF approaches was readily apparent from the attendees from industrial users, SFF machine manufacturers, universities, and government. This symposium is the first where real progress toward structurally sound samples and parts was demonstrated as SFF moves from 'feelie' to 'nonstructural' to 'structural' real parts over a range of materials. This advancement in the state-of-the-art of SFF will continue to drive the exponential growth of the area. The excitement amongst the symposium participants will continue to serve as the catalyst for the continued growth and the availability of solid freeform fabrication. The symposium organizers look forward to its being a continued source of technical exchange among the growing body of researchers involved in SFF.

  5. Fluids/faults relationships and the earthquake prediction related to the April 6th 2009, L'Aquila Earthquake.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Italiano, Francesco; Martinelli, Giovanni; Bonfanti, Pietro; Lemmi, Margherita; Bovini, Sergio

    2010-05-01

    possible modifications induced by the seismic sequence on the circulating fluids taking also into consideration that large-scale phenomena (crustal deformation, epicentres dislocation etc) might have induced modifications even at sampling sites located far away the area struck by the April 6th, seismic shock. To do this, the origin, the mixings and the possible interactions among fluids from different provenance was investigated. As a result, the geochemical model able to interpret the occurred modifications (including changes in radon activity) and their relationships with the faulting activity and the seismic activity, is here proposed and discussed.

  6. Conference scene: Summary of the 6th Conference of the Romanian Association of Medical Laboratories with international participation.

    PubMed

    Carasevici, Eugen

    2011-10-01

    The Romanian Association of Medical Laboratories (RAML) conferences have acquired a reputation for standing out as the most prominent and efficient meetings in the national community of laboratory medicine, being a landmark of the development in this field in Romania and an active affiliation to international forums. This year, the conference setting was Piatra Neamt, in the northeast part of Romania, which produced a friendly and stimulating professional environment. As in previous years, leading experts in the fields of laboratory medicine attended the event. This year, we enjoyed the opportunity to have such distinguished guests as the members of the executive board of International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC); Graham Beastall, IFCC President; Päivi Hannele Laitinen, IFCC secretary; and Grazyna Sypniewska, IFCC Communication and Publication Division, and editor of the electronic journal of the IFCC. As usual, the conference program included all aspects of clinical laboratory activity, with a special focus on technology development, instrumentation and laboratory management. Fully aware of the fact that the complexity and depth of laboratory practice have undergone an impressive and rapid evolution, the specific goals of the event were to increase knowledge in the fundamentals of new molecular investigation, areas which show the tendency to become routine in our daily activity. In addition, laboratory management and the place of medical laboratories in the process of translational medicine were subjects of focus. The 6th Conference of the Romanian Association of Medical Laboratories was held from Wednesday 1st to Saturday 4th of June 2011. A total of 273 participants from all local branches of the Association attended. The scientific program included seven plenary sessions where 22 lectures and 18 short communications were delivered, and three poster sessions with 44 poster presentations. Session topics covered issues of

  7. Integration of physical activity and technology motion devices within a combined 5th and 6th grade science curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Kevin Eugene

    Background: National recommendations to increase school-based physical activity and promote academic success advise incorporating movement into traditional classroom lessons. Classroom-based physical activities have favorable associations with indicators of cognitive functioning, academic behaviors, and academic achievement. Purpose: This study analyzed the Active Science framework, which incorporated school-based physical activity within interactive science classroom lessons. Specifically, the study measured the effects of the Active Science framework on student physical activity levels in the classroom, student learning of science inquiry skills and content knowledge, and student perceptions of physical activity and science. A secondary purpose was to evaluate the teachers' perceptions on the implementation of the framework. Subjects: Participants were 37 Hispanic girls (age=11.1 +/-0.8 yr) in mixed 5th/6th grade science classes in a private, urban middle school. Methods: Physical activity levels of the students during the Active Science framework were measured using pedometers and heart rate monitors. Pre- and post-tests were used to assess the levels of learning achieved by the students in science inquiry skills and content during the Active Science framework. Student perceptions and attitudes toward science and physical activity were measured during student focus groups and pre-post perception surveys. Lesson plan evaluations completed by the teachers and structured interviews provided data on implementation of the framework. Results: Physical activity results showed heart rate (146 +/-9 bpm); maximal heart rate (196 +/-10.6 bpm); time (35 +/-2.5 mins); steps (3050 +/-402.7); calories (99 +/-8.4 kcal); and distance (1.1 +/-0.2 miles) while performing the activity portion of the science lessons were consistent with national recommendations for accumulating school-based physical activity. Significant increases in science content and skills test scores with a 22

  8. Fast Determination of Moment Tensors and Rupture History: Application to the April 6th 2009, L’Aquila Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scognamiglio, L.; Tinti, E.; Michelini, A.; Dreger, D. S.; Cirella, A.; Cocco, M.; Faenza, L.; Mazza, S.

    2009-12-01

    On April 6th 2009, a magnitude Mw=6.3 earthquake struck the Abruzzi region in central Italy. Despite its moderate size, the earthquake caused 293 fatalities and partially destroyed the city of L’Aquila and many villages in its surroundings. The main shock was preceded by an earthquake swarm, which started at the end of 2008. The largest earthquakes of the swarm occurred on 2009/03/30 (ML=4.1), and on 2009/04/05 (ML=3.9). To date, almost 7,000 aftershocks with ML>1.5 have been recorded by the INGV seismic network and three featured ML larger than 5.0. In this study, we present the results of the fast source parameters determination procedure adopted at the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) using the 2009 L’Aquila earthquake as a case study. The main task of this procedure is the fast calculation of source parameters within the first 24 hours after an earthquake. We apply a time domain moment tensor (TDMT) technique to compute the focal mechanisms of all the ML≥ 3.9 earthquakes by inverting broadband records of the Italian national seismic network. All events show normal faulting in agreement with the tectonic setting of the area. The preferred main shock moment tensor solution inferred is: strike 139°, dip 48°, rake -77° and Mw= 6.1. Using the main shock moment tensor to constrain the fault geometry, we invert the strong motion data provided by the Rete Accelerometrica Nazionale (RAN) and the MedNet station AQU to image the rupture history. The inferred model is representative of a rapid finite-fault solution to be used immediately after an earthquake to get a preliminary interpretation of ground shaking. The proposed rupture history highlights several relevant features. First, we have identified the SW dipping plane as the main shock rupture plane and the existence of rupture directivity associated with both the up-dip and SE along-strike propagation. Second, the inferred rupture velocity, constant all over the fault plane, is

  9. Bone loss during partial weight bearing (1/6th gravity) is mitigated by resistance and aerobic exercise in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudreaux, R. D.; Metzger, C. E.; Macias, B. R.; Shirazi-Fard, Y.; Hogan, H. A.; Bloomfield, S. A.

    2014-06-01

    Astronauts on long duration missions continue to experience bone loss, as much as 1-2% each month, for up to 4.5 years after a mission. Mechanical loading of bone with exercise has been shown to increase bone formation, mass, and geometry. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of two exercise protocols during a period of reduced gravitational loading (1/6th body weight) in mice. Since muscle contractions via resistance exercise impart the largest physiological loads on the skeleton, we hypothesized that resistance training (via vertical tower climbing) would better protect against the deleterious musculoskeletal effects of reduced gravitational weight bearing when compared to endurance exercise (treadmill running). Young adult female BALB/cBYJ mice were randomly assigned to three groups: 1/6 g (G/6; n=6), 1/6 g with treadmill running (G/6+RUN; n=8), or 1/6 g with vertical tower climbing (G/6+CLB; n=9). Exercise was performed five times per week. Reduced weight bearing for 21 days was achieved through a novel harness suspension system. Treadmill velocity (12-20 m/min) and daily run time duration (32-51 min) increased incrementally throughout the study. Bone geometry and volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) at proximal metaphysis and mid-diaphysis tibia were assessed by in vivo peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) on days 0 and 21 and standard dynamic histomorphometry was performed on undemineralized sections of the mid-diaphysis after tissue harvest. G/6 caused a significant decrease (P<0.001) in proximal tibia metaphysis total vBMD (-9.6%). These reductions of tibia metaphyseal vBMD in G/6 mice were mitigated in both G/6+RUN and G/6+CLB groups (P<0.05). After 21 days of G/6, we saw an absolute increase in tibia mid-diaphysis vBMD and in distal metaphysis femur vBMD in both G/6+RUN and G/6+CLB mice (P<0.05). Substantial increases in endocortical and periosteal mineralizing surface (MS/BS) at mid-diaphysis tibia in G/6+CLB demonstrate that

  10. The Schoolwide Symposium: A Model for Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottingham, Walt

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the first schoolwide symposium at Hendersonville High School (North Carolina) in which, for one week, students and faculty were immersed in the culture and history of the Vietnam War era. Explains that because this first symposium was so successful in gaining student enthusiasm, the school organized three more symposiums. (CMK)

  11. Symposium Promotes Technological Literacy through STEM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havice, Bill; Marshall, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a symposium which promotes technological literacy through science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The three-day symposium titled, "The Anderson, Oconee, Pickens Symposium on Teaching and Learning STEM Standards for the 21st Century," was held August 4-6, 2008 at the Tri-County Technical College (TCTC)…

  12. Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    None Available

    1999-06-24

    The Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium was commissioned by the Mountaintop Removal Mining/Valley Fill Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Interagency Steering Committee as an educational forum for the members of the regulatory community who will participate in the development of the EIS. The Steering Committee sought a balanced audience to ensure the input to the regulatory community reflected the range of perspectives on this complicated and emotional issue. The focus of this symposium is on mining and reclamation technology alternatives, which is one of eleven topics scheduled for review to support development of the EIS. Others include hydrologic, environmental, ecological, and socio-economic issues.

  13. Frank N. Bash Symposium 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The University of Texas at Austin Department of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory will be hosting the sixth biennial Frank N. Bash Symposium on the topic of New Horizons in Astronomy, October 18-20, 2015, on The University of Texas at Austin campus. This meeting will bring together young researchers at the cutting edge of astronomy and astrophysics, to promote the exchange of research ideas and visions for the future of astronomy. The symposium will focus on invited review talks, and will include discussions and contributed poster papers from postdocs and students.

  14. LHC Symposium 2003: Summary Talk

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey A. Appel

    2003-08-12

    This summary talk reviews the LHC 2003 Symposium, focusing on expectations as we prepare to leap over the current energy frontier into new territory. We may learn from what happened in the two most recent examples of leaping into new energy territory. Quite different scenarios appeared in those two cases. In addition, they review the status of the machine and experiments as reported at the Symposium. Finally, I suggest an attitude which may be most appropriate as they look forward to the opportunities anticipated for the first data from the LHC.

  15. The Third International Symposium on Space Terahertz Technology: Symposium proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Papers from the symposium are presented that are relevant to the generation, detection, and use of the terahertz spectral region for space astronomy and remote sensing of the Earth's upper atmosphere. The program included thirteen sessions covering a wide variety of topics including solid-state oscillators, power-combining techniques, mixers, harmonic multipliers, antennas and antenna arrays, submillimeter receivers, and measurement techniques.

  16. Future perspectives in melanoma research: meeting report from the "Melanoma Bridge": Napoli, December 3rd-6th 2014.

    PubMed

    Ascierto, Paolo A; Atkins, Michael; Bifulco, Carlo; Botti, Gerardo; Cochran, Alistair; Davies, Michael; Demaria, Sandra; Dummer, Reinhard; Ferrone, Soldano; Formenti, Silvia; Gajewski, Thomas F; Garbe, Claus; Khleif, Samir; Kiessling, Rolf; Lo, Roger; Lorigan, Paul; Arthur, Grant Mc; Masucci, Giuseppe; Melero, Ignacio; Mihm, Martin; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Parmiani, Giorgio; Puzanov, Igor; Romero, Pedro; Schilling, Bastian; Seliger, Barbara; Stroncek, David; Taube, Janis; Tomei, Sara; Zarour, Hassane M; Testori, Alessandro; Wang, Ena; Galon, Jérôme; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Mozzillo, Nicola; Marincola, Francesco M; Thurin, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    The fourth "Melanoma Bridge Meeting" took place in Naples, December 3-6th, 2014. The four topics discussed at this meeting were: Molecular and Immunological Advances, Combination Therapies, News in Immunotherapy, and Tumor Microenvironment and Biomarkers. Until recently systemic therapy for metastatic melanoma patients was ineffective, but recent advances in tumor biology and immunology have led to the development of new targeted and immunotherapeutic agents that prolong progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). New therapies, such as mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway inhibitors as well as other signaling pathway inhibitors, are being tested in patients with metastatic melanoma either as monotherapy or in combination, and all have yielded promising results. These include inhibitors of receptor tyrosine kinases (BRAF, MEK, and VEGFR), the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) pathway [PI3K, AKT, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)], activators of apoptotic pathway, and the cell cycle inhibitors (CDK4/6). Various locoregional interventions including radiotherapy and surgery are still valid approaches in treatment of advanced melanoma that can be integrated with novel therapies. Intrinsic, adaptive and acquired resistance occur with targeted therapy such as BRAF inhibitors, where most responses are short-lived. Given that the reactivation of the MAPK pathway through several distinct mechanisms is responsible for the majority of acquired resistance, it is logical to combine BRAF inhibitors with inhibitors of targets downstream in the MAPK pathway. For example, combination of BRAF/MEK inhibitors (e.g., dabrafenib/trametinib) have been demonstrated to improve survival compared to monotherapy. Application of novel technologies such sequencing have proven useful as a tool for identification of MAPK pathway-alternative resistance mechanism and designing other combinatorial therapies such as those between BRAF and AKT inhibitors. Improved

  17. SB6.0: The 6th International meeting on Synthetic Biology, July 9-11, 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Kahl, Linda J.

    2015-04-23

    The Synthetic Biology conference series (SBx.0) is the preeminent academic meeting in synthetic biology. Organized by the BioBricks Foundation, the SBx.0 conference series brings together leading researchers, students, industry executives, and policy makers from around the world to share, consider, debate, and plan efforts to make biology easier to engineer. Historically held every two years, the SBx.0 conferences are held in alternating locations in the United States, Europe, and Asia to encourage global participation and collaboration so that the ramifications of synthetic biology research and development are most likely to be safe ethical, and beneficial. On 9-11 July 2013, the 6th installment of the synthetic biology conference series (SB6.0) was held on the campus of Imperial College London (http://sb6.biobricks.org). The SB6.0 conference was attended by over 700 people, and many more were able to participate via video digital conference (http://sb6.biobricks.org/digital-conference/). Over the course of three days, the SB6.0 conference agenda included plenary sessions, workshops, and poster presentations covering topics ranging from the infrastructure needs arising when “Systematic Engineering Meets Biological Complexity” and design-led considerations for “Connecting People and Technologies” to discussions on “Engineering Biology for New Materials,” “Assessing Risk and Managing Biocontainment,” and “New Directions for Energy and Sustainability.” The $10,150 grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-SC0010233) to the BioBricks Foundation was used to provide partial reimbursement for the travel expenses of leading researchers from the United States to speak at the SB6.0 conference. A total of $9,450 was used to reimburse U.S. speakers for actual expenses related to the SB6.0 conference, including airfare (economy or coach only), ground transportation, hotel, and registration fees. In addition, $700 of the grant was used to offset

  18. New Simple Torque-Sensorless Torque Control for Quasi-Perfect Compensation of 6th Harmonic Torque Ripple Due to Nonsinusoidal Distribution of Back EMF of PMSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinnaka, Shinji; Kishida, Hideo

    This paper proposes a new torque-sensorless torque control method for permanent-magnet synchronous motors (PMSMs). The proposed method can almost perfectly compensate the 6th harmonic torque ripple that is caused by the nonsinusoidal distributions of the back EMF and rotor magnetic flux of PMSMs. The torque control system is, in principle, constructed on the basis of the vector control, but has two new dedicated speed-varying devices—a harmonic torque observer and current controller. The speed-varying harmonic torque observer can estimate the harmonic component over a wide speed range, even in the case where the produced torque is constant, and generate a suitable compensating signal. The speed-varying current controller shows stable control performance over a wide speed range, it can fully track the compensated current command containing the dc and 6th harmonic components. The effectiveness of the proposed method is examined and verified through extensive numerical experiments.

  19. Black Women in Film Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Barbara

    1974-01-01

    Describes a symposium sponsored in April of last year by the Afro-American and American Studies Departments at Boston University on "Black Image in Films, Stereotyping and Self-Perception"; participants included Susan Batson, Cynthia Belgrave, Ruby Dee, Beah Richards, and Cicely Tyson. (Author/JM)

  20. Technological Change and HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on technological change and human resource development. "New Technologies, Cognitive Demands, and the Implications for Learning Theory" (Richard J. Torraco) identifies four specific characteristics of the tasks involved in using new technologies (contingent versus deterministic tasks, distancing…

  1. Diversity in the Workplace. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    Three papers comprise this symposium on diversity in the workplace. "Factors That Assist and Barriers That Hinder the Success of Diversity Initiatives in Multinational Corporations" (Rose Mary Wentling) reports that factors that assisted in the success were classified under diversity department, human, and work environment; barriers were those of…

  2. 1999 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daelemans, Gerard (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The 1999 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium is a combined symposia of the Get Away Special (GAS), Space Experiment Module (SEM), and Hitchhiker programs, and is proposed to continue as an annual conference. The focus of this conference is to educate potential Space Shuttle Payload Bay users as to the types of carrier systems provided and for current users to share experiment concepts.

  3. Learning on the Job. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains two papers from a symposium on learning on the job. "Professional Crisis Workers: Impact of Repeated Exposure to Human Pain and Destructiveness" (Lynn Atkinson-Tovar) examines the following topics: (1) the secondary and vicarious traumatic stress disorder that affects many professional crisis workers who are repeatedly…

  4. Symposium on Dental Health Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Lawrence W., Ed.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    This document presents papers, critiques, and comments from a symposium which assessed the current status of preventive dental behavior. The field was divided into the following three major areas: (a) mass media programs, (b) school health programs, and (c) effect of the private practitioner. Each author was asked to review the literature, provide…

  5. Learning and Job Satisfaction. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium is comprised of three papers on learning and job satisfaction. "The Relationship Between Workplace Learning and Job Satisfaction in United States Small to Mid-Sized Businesses" (Robert W. Rowden) reports findings that revealed sufficient evidence to conclude that learning is pervasive in the small to mid-sized businesses studied;…

  6. Learning at the Top. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on learning at the top that was conducted as part of a conference on human resource development (HRD). "Learning at the Top: An Investigation of Nonprofit CEOs' (Chief Executive Officers') Learning Experiences" (John J. Sherlock) reports on a study that used Mezirow's theory of adult learning as…

  7. SYMPOSIUM ON PLANT PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION

    SciTech Connect

    JOHN C WALKER

    2011-11-01

    Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation play key roles in many aspects of plant biology, including control of cell division, pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, pattern formation, hormonal responses, and abiotic and biotic responses to environmental signals. A Symposium on Plant Protein Phosphorylation was hosted on the Columbia campus of the University of Missouri from May 26-28, 2010. The symposium provided an interdisciplinary venue at which scholars studying protein modification, as it relates to a broad range of biological questions and using a variety of plant species, presented their research. It also provided a forum where current international challenges in studies related to protein phosphorylation could be examined. The symposium also stimulated research collaborations through interactions and networking among those in the research community and engaged students and early career investigators in studying issues in plant biology from an interdisciplinary perspective. The proposed symposium, which drew 165 researchers from 13 countries and 21 States, facilitated a rapid dissemination of acquired knowledge and technical expertise regarding protein phosphorylation in plants to a broad range of plant biologists worldwide.

  8. Symposium: What Is College English?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Lynn Z.; White, Edward M.; Enoch, Jessica; Hawk, Byron

    2013-01-01

    This symposium explores the role(s) College English has (or has not) had in the scholarly work of four scholars. Lynn Bloom explores the many ways College English influenced her work and the work of others throughout their scholarly lives. Edward M. White examines four articles he has published in College English and draws connections between…

  9. Copyright Law Symposium. No. 23.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers, New York, NY.

    This book presents the five national prizewinning papers in the twenty-third copyright law symposium conducted by the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP). Titles of the papers are "The USSR Joins the Universal Copyright Convention" (first prize), "Copyright Misuse: Thirty Years Waiting for the Other Shoe" (second prize),…

  10. Women and Career Development. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    Three papers comprise this symposium on women and career development. "Enhancing the Career Success of Women Faculty: Mentoring as a Human Resource Development (HRD) Initiative in Higher Education" (Sharon K. Gibson) explores mentoring of women faculty, focusing on the key dimensions of roles and functions, outcomes, gender, and formal and…

  11. Cross-Cultural HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    The first of three papers from this symposium on cross-cultural human resource development (HRD), "Determinants of Supply of Technical Training Opportunities for Human Capital Development in Kenya" (Moses Waithanji Ngware, Fredrick Muyia Nafukho) reports findings from interviews of technical training institute department heads in Kenya who…

  12. Different Ways of Learning. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on different ways of learning. "How Engineers Learn in the Face of Organizational Change" (Robert Reardon) reports on a qualitative study during which nine engineers described how they learned to perform their altered roles after a major reorganization. The study findings supported current…

  13. Foreign Language "Think Tank" Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Kathleen H.

    At the Foreign Language"Think Tank" Symposium of April 1975, the following major problems of community college foreign language teachers were identified: (1) low enrollment; (2) attrition; (3) low achievers; (4) articulation with universities; and (5) lack of interest. Suggested solutions included: (Problem 1) advertisement, a foreign language…

  14. Report of the International Symposium on Phytochemicals in Medicine and Food (ISPMF 2015).

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jianbo

    2016-08-01

    The International Symposium on Phytochemicals in Medicine and Food (ISPMF2015) was held June 26-29, 2015, in Shanghai, China. This is the first time that a PSE meeting has been held in Asia and a PSE-PSA joint symposium provided an opportunity for communication between scientists from European and Asian countries. More than 270 scientists from 48 countries attended this meeting. ISPMF2015 assembled an exciting and diverse programme with 16 sessions, consisting of 12 plenary lectures, 20 invited talks, 55 short oral presentations, and in excess of 130 posters, dedicated to creating a podium for exchanging the latest research results on phytochemicals for food and human health. PMID:26988528

  15. Innovating in the medical device industry - challenges & opportunities ESB 2015 translational research symposium.

    PubMed

    Bayon, Y; Bohner, M; Eglin, D; Procter, P; Richards, R G; Weber, J; Zeugolis, D I

    2016-09-01

    The European Society for Biomaterials 2015 Translational Research Symposium focused on 'Innovating in the Medical Device Industry - Challenges & Opportunities' from different perspectives, i.e., from a non-profit research organisation to a syndicate of small and medium-sized companies and large companies. Lecturers from regulatory consultants, industry and research institutions described the innovation process and regulatory processes (e.g., 510K, PMA, combination product) towards market approval. The aim of the present article is to summarise and explain the main statements made during the symposium, in terms of challenges and opportunities for medical device industries, in a constantly changing customer and regulatory environment. PMID:27552808

  16. Archeomagnetic Intensity Variations During the 6th Millennium BC in the Middle East: New Data from Yarim Tepe II (Northern Iraq)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimova, S.; Gallet, Y.; Amirov, S.

    2015-12-01

    During the seventies, Soviet archeologists conducted in Northern Iraq excavations of several ancient settlements dated from the Pottery Late Neolithic period (7th and 6th millennia BC). A very large collection of artifacts unearthed from these sites, in particular several thousands of well-documented pottery fragments, is now stored at the Archeological Institute in Moscow. We collected a time-sequential series of groups of potsherds from the multilayered settlement called Yarim Tepe II dated to the Halaf period (6th millennium BC). Each group comprises a minimum of 3 potsherds (up to 10) found within a same archeological layer, typically a thickness of about 20 cm. Altogether, the fragment groups encompass the entire 7-m thick stratigraphic sequence of Yarim Tepe II. We will present our first archeointensity results obtained using the experimental protocol developed for the Triaxe magnetometer, taking into account the effects of both the thermoremanent magnetization (TRM) anisotropy and the cooling rate dependence on TRM acquisition. The new data help to better constrain the geomagnetic field intensity variations in the Middle East during the 6th millennium BC. Thanks to the comparison with other datasets from Bulgaria and Syria, the new archeointensity results provide evidence for the occurrence of very rapid geomagnetic field intensity variations around 5500 BC.

  17. Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education. Proceedings of the Annual Conferences (6th, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, May 29-31, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillen, Marie A., Ed.; Burkholder, Avon, Ed.

    These proceedings contain 14 papers and notes from 2 symposia in English and 2 papers in French. Abstracts appear at the beginning of the volume. The following papers are included: "Symposium Notes: What Is the Future of Adult Education in Canada?" (Bernard, MacNeil, Selman); "John Dewey Dialogues with an Adult Educator in 1987" (Barer-Stein);…

  18. The XXVIII International Symposium on Lattice Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattice 2010, the XXVIII International Symposium on Lattice Field Theory, was held from June 14-19, 2010 at the ATAHOTEL Tanka Village Resort, Villasimius, Sardinia, Italy. The scientific programme contained 21 plenary session talks and over 300 parallel session contributions (talks and posters). The conference topics included: algorithms and machines, applications beyond QCD, chiral symmetry, hadron spectroscopy, hadronic structure and interactions, nonzero temperature and density, standard-model parameters and renormalization, theoretical developments, vacuum structure and confinement, weak decays and matrix elements. We would like to thank the members of International Advisory Committee for their help in planning the scientific programme. Thanks also go to all the speakers and delegates who helped to make the conference a big success. We acknowledge financial support from ICTP, INFN, the European Physical Journal, the European Community-Research Infrastructure Activity ``Hadron Physics 2", and the University of Rome ``Tor Vergata".

  19. Report on the 2009 ESO Fellows Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emsellem, Eric; West, Michael; Leibundgut, Bruno

    2009-09-01

    The fourth ESO Fellows Symposium took place in Garching from 8-10 June 2009. This year's symposium brought together 28 ESO Fellows from Chile and Germany to meet their colleagues from across the ocean, discuss their research and provide feedback on ESO's Fellowship programme. This year's symposium also included training workshops to enhance the practical skills of ESO Fellows in today's competitive job market.

  20. XXth Hadron Collider Physics Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In 2009, the Hadron Collider Physics Symposium took place in Evian (France), on the shore of the Geneva Lake, from 16-20 November. It was jointly organised by CERN and the French HEP community (CNRS-IN2P3 and CEA-IRFU). This year's symposium come at an important time for both the Tevatron and LHC communities. It stimulated the completion of analyses for a significant Tevatron data sample, and it allowed an in-depth review of the readiness of the LHC and its detectors just before first collisions. The programme includes sessions on top-quark and electro-weak physics, QCD, B physics, new phenomena, electro-weak symmetry breaking, heavy ions, and the status and commissioning of the LHC machine and its experiments. Conference website : http://hcp2009.in2p3.fr/

  1. The 1975 Ride Quality Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A compilation is presented of papers reported at the 1975 Ride Quality Symposium held in Williamsburg, Virginia, August 11-12, 1975. The symposium, jointly sponsored by NASA and the United States Department of Transportation, was held to provide a forum for determining the current state of the art relative to the technology base of ride quality information applicable to current and proposed transportation systems. Emphasis focused on passenger reactions to ride environment and on implications of these reactions to the design and operation of air, land, and water transportation systems acceptable to the traveling public. Papers are grouped in the following five categories: needs and uses for ride quality technology, vehicle environments and dynamics, investigative approaches and testing procedures, experimental ride quality studies, and ride quality modeling and criteria.

  2. 38th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler)

    2006-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. Organized by the Mechanisms Education Association, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) share the responsibility for hosting the AMS. Now in its 38th symposium, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the U.S. and abroad. The 38th AMs, hosted by the NASA Langley Research Center in Williamsburg, Virginia, was held May 17-19, 2006. During these three days, 34 papers were presented. Topics included gimbals, tribology, actuators, aircraft mechanisms, deployment mechanisms, release mechanisms, and test equipment. Hardware displays during the supplier exhibit gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components.

  3. 37th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler)

    2004-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is reporting problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. Organized by the Mechanisms Education Association, NASA and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) share the responsibility for hosting the AMS. Now in its 37th symposium, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the U.S. and abroad. The 37th AMS, hosted by the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Galveston, Texas, was held May 19, 20 and 21, 2004. During these three days, 34 papers were presented. Topics included deployment mechanisms, tribology, actuators, pointing and optical mechanisms, Space Station and Mars Rover mechanisms, release mechanisms, and test equipment. Hardware displays during the supplier exhibit gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components.

  4. 39th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, E. A. (Compiler)

    2008-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production, and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. Organized by the Mechanisms Education Association, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) share the responsibility for hosting the AMS. Now in its 39th symposium, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the United States and abroad. The 39th AMS was held in Huntsville, Alabama, May 7-9, 2008. During these 3 days, 34 papers were presented. Topics included gimbals and positioning mechanisms, tribology, actuators, deployment mechanisms, release mechanisms, and sensors. Hardware displays during the supplier exhibit gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components.

  5. Ninth international symposium on radiopharmacology

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The goal of this Symposium is to provide a forum for those international scientists involved in applying the principles of pharmacology and radiation biology to the development of agents for the diagnosis and treatment of disease. The program will highlight state-of-the-art progress in the development of those agents used in conjunction with some form of radiation such as radiopharmaceuticals, radiopaques, photo- and radiosensitizing drugs, and neutron capture agents. An underlying pharmacokinetic parameter associated with all these agents is the need for site-specific delivery to an organ or tumor. Therefore, a major goal of the symposium will be to address those pharmacologic principles for targeting molecules to specific tissue sites. Accordingly, session themes will include receptor-mediated processes, membrane transporters, antibody interactions, metabolic trapping, and oligonucleotide-antisense mechanisms.

  6. International Semiconductor Device Research Symposium (ISDRS-93)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, Michael

    1994-04-01

    The goal of this second biannual international meeting was to provide a congenial forum for the exchange of information and new ideas for researchers from university, industry and government laboratories in the field of semiconductor devices and device physics. To this end, we have an unusually short period between the submission of papers and the conference, a speedy publication of the proceedings, poster sessions, panel discussions, and a wide dissemination of the conference proceedings. Our other goal is to make this conference truly international. To achieve this, the symposium has sub-committees in Asia, Europe and the former Soviet Union. This conference is organized in cooperation with the IEEE MTT Society, the European Physical Society, the United States National Committee of URSI and the Russian Physical Society. Generous financial support has been provided by the Army Research Office, the Office of Naval Research, the NASA Ames Research Center and the Soros International Science Foundation. Papers cover a broad range of topics, including novel and ultrasmall devices, photonics and optoelectronics, heterostructure and cryogenic devices, wide band gap semiconductors, thin film transistors, MOSFET technology and devices, carrier transport phenomena, materials and device characterization, simulation and modeling. It is hoped that such a broad range of topics will foster a cross-fertilization of the different fields related to semiconductor materials and devices.

  7. Phased arrays 1985 symposium: Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steyskal, H. P.

    1985-08-01

    The Phased Arrays '85 Symposium, sponsored by the Rome Air Development Center, the MITRE Corporation, and the University of Massachusetts, was held at the MITRE Corporation 15 to 18 October and reviewed the state-of-the-art of phased array antenna systems and of the technology for next generation systems. This report contains the full papers which were presented with clearance for unlimited distribution.

  8. FIRST BH COCHRANE SYMPOSIUM HELD

    PubMed Central

    Mahmic-Kaknjo, Mersiha; Novo, Ahmed; Krleza-Jeric, Karmela

    2016-01-01

    The first BH Cochrane Symposium was held on 12 October 2015 in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina (BH), organized by the Agency for Quality and Accreditation in Healthcare in Federation of BH (AKAZ) and Medical Faculty University of Sarajevo. A group of ten national and international experts presented the Cochrane organization and systematic reviews, as well as the IMPACT Observatory, development of guidelines in BH, and the role of AKAZ. Examples of the development and use of Cochrane reviews in evidence informed decision making in health as well as research integrity were presented and discussed. Major BH decision makers and interested professionals from all over BH participated in a symposium and its lively discussion, especially from the perspective of Cochrane and its activities in BH, and the collaboration with the Croatian Cochrane. It can be expected that this symposium will inspire further growth of participation and use of Cochrane in BH and increase the awareness of various aspects of evidence informed medicine and research integrity. PMID:27047274

  9. 4H-Chromene-based anticancer agents towards multi-drug resistant HL60/MX2 human leukemia: SAR at the 4th and 6th positions.

    PubMed

    Puppala, Manohar; Zhao, Xinghua; Casemore, Denise; Zhou, Bo; Aridoss, Gopalakrishnan; Narayanapillai, Sreekanth; Xing, Chengguo

    2016-03-15

    4H-Chromene-based compounds, for example, CXL017, CXL035, and CXL055, have a unique anticancer potential that they selectively kill multi-drug resistant cancer cells. Reported herein is the extended structure-activity relationship (SAR) study, focusing on the ester functional group at the 4th position and the conformation at the 6th position. Sharp SARs were observed at both positions with respect to cellular cytotoxic potency and selectivity between the parental HL60 and the multi-drug resistant HL60/MX2 cells. These results provide critical guidance for future medicinal optimization. PMID:26867486

  10. Space Transportation Propulsion Technology Symposium. Volume 2: Symposium proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Space Transportation Propulsion Symposium was held to provide a forum for communication within the propulsion technology developer and user communities. Emphasis was placed on propulsion requirements and initiatives to support current, next generation, and future space transportation systems, with the primary objectives of discerning whether proposed designs truly meet future transportation needs and identifying possible technology gaps, overlaps, and other programmatic deficiencies. Key space transportation propulsion issues were addressed through four panels with government, industry, and academia membership. The panels focused on systems engineering and integration; development, manufacturing and certification; operational efficiency; and program development and cultural issues.

  11. The Second Spaceborne Imaging Radar Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Summaries of the papers presented at the Second Spaceborne Imaging Radar Symposium are presented. The purpose of the symposium was to present an overwiew of recent developments in the different scientific and technological fields related to spaceborne imaging radars and to present future international plans.

  12. The 1988 Get Away Special Experimenter's Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Lawrence R. (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The Get Away Special (GAS) Experimenter's Symposium was held to provide a formal opportunity for GAS experimenters to share the results of their projects. The focus of this symposium is on payloads that have been flown on shuttle missions and on GAS payloads that will be flown in the future. Experiment design and payload integration issues are also examined.

  13. The 21st Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    During the symposium technical topics addressed included deployable structures, electromagnetic devices, tribology, actuators, latching devices, positioning mechanisms, robotic manipulators, and automated mechanisms synthesis. A summary of the 20th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium panel discussions is included as an appendix. However, panel discussions on robotics for space and large space structures which were held are not presented herein.

  14. The 1987 Get Away Special Experimenter's Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelme, Neal (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The 1987 Get Away Special (GAS) Experimenter's symposium provides a formal opportunity for GAS Experimenter's to share the results of their projects. The focus of this symposium was on payloads that were flown on Shuttle missions, and on GAS payloads that will be flown in the future.

  15. The 1992 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Lawrence R. (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The 1992 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium is a continuation of the Get Away Special Symposium convened from 1984 through 1988, and is proposed to continue as an annual conference. The focus of this conference is to educate potential Space Shuttle Payload Bay users as to the types of carrier systems provided and for current users to share experiment concepts.

  16. Images in Transition. Proceedings of the Annual Society for the Advancement of Gifted Education (SAGE) Conference (3rd, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, September 24-26, 1992) and the Canadian Symposium on Gifted Education (6th).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calgary Univ. (Alberta). Centre for Gifted Education.

    This document presents the conference proceedings of the primary stakeholders in gifted education in Alberta (Canada): "Activities in Math for the Gifted Student" (Ballheim); "The Self Awareness Growth Experiences Approach" (Balogun); "Computer Simulations: An Integrating Tool" (Bilan); "The Portrayal of Gifted Children in Children's Books"…

  17. Space Station Freedom Evolution Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Richard H.

    1991-01-01

    Information on the Space Station Freedom Evolution Symposium is given in viewgraph form. Topics covered include industry development needs and the Office of Commercial Programs strategy, the three-phase program to develop commercial space, Centers for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS), key provisions of the Joint Endeavor agreement, current commercial flight experiment requirements, the CCDS expendable launch vehicle program, the Commercial Experiment Transporter (COMET) program, commercial launch dates, payload sponsors, the commercial roles of the Space Station Freedom, and a listing of the Office of Commercial Programs Space Station Freedom payloads.

  18. Spring, 1980, DECUS symposium review

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.J.; Duffy, J.M.; McDonald, W.M.; Oppenheimer, J.L.; Brandt, J.J.; Grant, C.W.; O'Brien, D.W.; VanLehn, A.L.

    1980-10-24

    The Digital Equipment Computer Users Society (DECUS) holds biannual symposia where its membership and the host company can exchange ideas, problems, and solutions. This report by the newly formed DECUS Local User Group at LLL collects information gathered at the Spring '80 symposium in Chicago on April 22-25. Information is presented for the following special interest groups (SIGs): RSX/IAS SIG, VAX/VSM SIG, PASCAL (languages) SIG, networks SIG, TECO SIG, LSI-11 SIG, RT-11 SIG, site manager SIG, and database SIG. (RWR)

  19. PREFACE: 10th International LISA Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciani, Giacomo; Conklin, John W.; Mueller, Guido

    2015-05-01

    The LISA Symposia have become a mainstay of the gravitational wave community. Held every two years, they are the prime opportunity for our community to discuss the exciting science, technology, mission designs, and progress of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna. The 8th LISA symposium, held at Stanford University in the summer of 2010 was the largest symposium so far and was dominated by progress and hopes that the LISA mission will soon excel following the expected launch of the LISA pathfinder (LPF), no later than 2012, and the expected prioritization by the Decadal survey which was released 6 weeks later. The following years were challenging. Although the Decadal survey ranked LISA very high, NASA's budget issues, mostly due to the cost increase of the James Webb Space Telescope, and continued delays in LPF put too much stress on the LISA project and it officially ended in 2011. The LISA International Science Team (LIST), the core group of LISA scientists and technologists, was dissolved and the community in the U.S. was struggling to maintain cohesion. In the wake of these events, ESA started a new selection process for their next three large missions, L1, L2, and L3, and the European LISA team developed the New Gravitational wave Observatory (NGO), an evolved LISA concept, as an ESA only L1 candidate. A few weeks before the 9th LISA Symposium, held in Paris in May 2012, ESA announced its decision to select JUICE, a planetary mission to Jupiter and its moons, as its next large science mission (L1). Despite having the highest ranked science case, NGO was not selected due to further delays in LPF and the general feeling outside the GW community that the technology is perhaps too challenging to be pulled off in time for the L1 launch in 2022. Many U.S. members of the LISA community cancelled their travel plans and the mood at that symposium ranged from resignation to defiance. Hope for a somewhat timely launch of a LISA-like mission rested upon L2, the next

  20. Comparison of Values in 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th Grade Primary Education Music Class Students'? Workbooks According to Rokeach?s and Akbas's Value Classifications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çakirer, H. Serdar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to compare the values in the songs of 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th grade primary education music classes students? workbooks according to the value categorizations proposed by Rockeach and Akbas and which values among the categories mentioned are taught to the students in the 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th grade primary education…

  1. Islet cell research brings hope for a diabetes cure: Meeting report from the 6th annual islet society meeting in Stellenbosch, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Tchokonte-Nana, V; Cockburn, I L; Manda, J K; Kotze, P C; Johnson, J D

    2014-01-01

    The International Diabetes Federation predicts that, over the next twenty years, the largest increase in the prevalence of diabetes will be in the Africa region. Recognizing an unmet need for more focus on Africa and engagement with African scholars, the Islet Society held its 6th annual meeting July 20–21, 2014 in Stellenbosch, South Africa. Here, we present a report that covers the presentations and discussion points from that meeting. Work was presented on a variety of topics and included presentations by a significant proportion of Africa diabetes researchers. Overall, it was an excellent conference, with many new international collaborations initiated. We hope that other groups will also respond to the need for more conferences in Africa and focused on Africa. PMID:25437378

  2. The 6(th) international conference on envenomation by Snakebites and Scorpion Stings in Africa: a crucial step for the management of envenomation.

    PubMed

    Chippaux, Jean-Philippe; Akaffou, Marc Hermann; Allali, Bernard Kouadio; Dosso, Mireille; Massougbodji, Achille; Barraviera, Benedito

    2016-01-01

    During the 6(th) International Conference on Envenomation by Snakebites and Scorpion Stings in Africa held in Abidjan, from 1 to 5 June 2015, the measures for the management of envenomation were discussed and new recommendations were adopted by the participants. The high incidence and severity of this affliction were confirmed by several studies conducted in African countries. The poor availability of antivenom, particularly because of the cost, was also highlighted. Some experiences have been reported, mainly those regarding the financial support of antivenom in Burkina Faso (more than 90 %) and Togo (up to 60 %) or the mandatory reporting of cases in Cameroon. Key recommendations concerned: improvement of epidemiological information based on case collection; training of health workers in the management of envenomation; policy to promote the use of effective and safe antivenom; and antivenom funding by sharing its costs with stakeholders in order to improve antivenom accessibility for low-income patients. PMID:26985189

  3. Climate Change and the Water Cycle: A New Southwest Regional Climate Hub Curriculum Unit for 6th-12th Grade Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, E.; Steele, C. M.; Bestelmeyer, S.; Haan-Amato, S.; Deswood, H.; Rango, A.; Havstad, K.

    2015-12-01

    As climate change intensifies, increased temperatures and altered precipitation will make water, a limited resource in the arid southwestern United States, even scarcer in many locations. The USDA Southwest Regional Climate Hub (SWRCH) developed Climate Change and the Water Cycle, an engaging and scientifically rigorous education unit for 6th -12th grade students. The unit is aligned with Common Core State Standards and Next Generation Science Standards. Nine activities can be conducted over 10 instruction hours. Each activity can also stand alone. In partnership with SWRCH, the Asombro Institute for Science Education developed the unit. Each activity was reviewed by an educator for educational practices and by a scientist for scientific accuracy. The unit was pilot tested with 524 students in 2014, and pre- and post-tests were administered. Ninety-one percent of students were able to name a greenhouse gas on the post-test, compared to only 48% on the pre-test. On the post-test, 86% of students identified the relationship between average global temperature and carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere, compared to only 52% on the pre-test. A student commented: "I loved all of the activities! They are fun and help us understand about what goes on in the world." Educators who participated in pilot testing said: "the entire curriculum is great, but I was particularly impressed with the progression of ideas and the variety of lessons," and "students could see the relevance and importance of these real life issues." Anyone interested in using the unit to host workshops for teachers in southwestern states should contact Asombro for more information (information@asombro.org). The Climate Change and the Water Cycle 6th-12th grade curriculum unit is available online: www.swclimatehub.info/education/climate-change-and-water-cycle

  4. Re-Evaluation of 6th Edition of AJCC Staging System for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma and Proposed Improvement Based on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Mao Yanping; Xie Fangyun; Liu Lizhi; Sun Ying; Li Li; Tang Linglong; Liao Xinbiao; Xu Hongyao; Chen Lei; Lai Shuzhen; Lin Aihua; Liu Mengzhong; Ma Jun

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To use magnetic resonance imaging to re-evaluate and improve the 6th edition of the International Union Against Cancer/American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of the data from 924 biopsy-proven nonmetastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma cases. All patients had undergone magnetic resonance imaging examinations and received radiotherapy as their primary treatment. Results: The T classification, N classification, and stage group were independent predictors. No significant differences in the local failure hazards between adjacent T categories were observed between Stage T2b and T1, Stage T2b and T2a, and Stage T2b and T3. Although the disease failure hazards for Stage T1 were similar to those for Stage T2a, those for Stage T2b were similar to those for Stage T3. Survival curves of the different T/N subsets showed a better segregation when Stage T2a was downstaged to T1, T2b and T3 were incorporated into T2, and the nodal greatest dimension was rejected. The disease failure hazard for T3N0-N1 subsets were similar to those of the T1-T2N1 subsets belonging to Stage II; the same result was found for the T4N0-N2 subsets in the sixth American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system. However, the staging system we propose shows more consistent hazards within the same stage group and better survival discrimination among T categories, N categories, and overall stages. Conclusion: Using the 6th American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system produces an acceptable distribution of patient numbers and segregation of survival curves among the different stage groups. The prognostic accuracy of the staging system could be improved by recategorizing the T, N, and group stage criteria.

  5. Prognostic Impact of the 6th and 7th American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM Staging Systems on Esophageal Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Motoo; Shitara, Kohei; Kodaira, Takeshi; Hatooka, Shunzo; Mizota, Ayako; Kondoh, Chihiro; Yokota, Tomoya; Takahari, Daisuke; Ura, Takashi; Muro, Kei

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: The new 7th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM staging system is based on pathologic data from esophageal cancers treated by surgery alone. There is no information available on evaluation of the new staging system with regard to prognosis of patients treated with chemoradiotherapy (CRT). The objective of this study was to evaluate the prognostic impact of the new staging system on esophageal cancer patients treated with CRT. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed on 301 consecutive esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with CRT. Comparisons were made of the prognostic impacts of the 6th and 7th staging systems and the prognostic impacts of stage and prognostic groups, which were newly defined in the 7th edition. Results: There were significant differences between Stages I and III (p < 0.01) according to both editions. However, the 7th edition poorly distinguishes the prognoses of Stages III and IV (p = 0.36 by multivariate analysis) in comparison to the 6th edition (p = 0.08 by multivariate analysis), although these differences were not significant. For all patients, T, M, and gender were independent prognostic factors by multivariate analysis (p < 0.05). For the Stage I and II prognostic groups, survival curves showed a stepwise decrease with increase in stage, except for Stage IIA. However, there were no significant differences seen between each prognostic stage. Conclusions: Our study indicates there are several problems with the 7th TNM staging system regarding prognostic factors in patients undergoing CRT.

  6. New modes of particle acceleration, techniques & sources symposium. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1996-12-31

    A Symposium on {open_quotes}New Modes of Particle Acceleration Technique and Sources{close_quotes} was held August 19-23, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITP) in Santa Barbara. This was the first of the 3 symposia hosted by the ITP and supported by its sponsor the National Science Foundation, as part of our {open_quotes}New Ideas for Particle Accelerators{close_quotes} program. The symposia was organized and chaired by Dr. Zohreh Parsa of ITP/Brookhaven National Laboratory. This Symposium provided a perspective on the future direction of the Advanced Accelerator Research. The experimental study of elementary particles has become concentrated at a few large laboratories throughout the world because of the size and cost of the accelerator facilities needed for this work. For example, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, currently under construction, is 27 km in circumference and is being financed by the European membership of CERN plus contributions from non-member nations. An evolutionary approach to construction of ever higher energy colliders will only continue this trend towards high cost and large size.

  7. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base.

  8. 34th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler)

    2000-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) share the responsibility for organizing the AMS. Now in its 34th year, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the U.S. and abroad. The 34th AMS, hosted by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland, was held May 10, 11 and 12, 2000. During these three days, 34 papers were presented. Topics included deployment mechanisms, bearings, actuators, pointing and optical mechanisms, Space Station mechanisms, release mechanisms, and test equipment. Hardware displays during the vendor fair gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components.

  9. NASA Space Sciences Symposium-1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The primary objective of the symposium was to motivate American Indians and other minority youths and women to select science and engineering as viable career choices, thereby making them available to the technical work force. Other objectives were: (1) to determine how aerospace technology careers and aerospace activities can be made more relevant to minorities and women; (2) to provide an opportunity for key NASA officials to interact with teachers and counselors of the participating schools; (3) to stimulate a greater interest among American Indian organizations and students in NASA's research and development programs; (4) to help NASA's efforts in the recruiting of minorities and women into its work force; and (5) to provide opportunities for minority aerospace scientists and engineers to interact with the minority community, particularly with youths at the junior high school and high school levels.

  10. Proceedings of the drilling technology symposium 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, P.D.; Kastor, R.L. )

    1990-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of a symposium on drilling technology. Topics covered include: Improvement in rock bit performance; Coring the horizontal hole; Drill pipe failures; and Slim drill horizontal workover system.