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Sample records for 7tm receptor c-terminal

  1. Functionally biased signalling properties of 7TM receptors – opportunities for drug development for the ghrelin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sivertsen, B; Holliday, N; Madsen, A N; Holst, B

    2013-01-01

    The ghrelin receptor is a 7 transmembrane (7TM) receptor involved in a variety of physiological functions including growth hormone secretion, increased food intake and fat accumulation as well as modulation of reward and cognitive functions. Because of its important role in metabolism and energy expenditure, the ghrelin receptor has become an important therapeutic target for drug design and the development of anti-obesity compounds. However, none of the compounds developed so far have been approved for commercial use. Interestingly, the ghrelin receptor is able to signal through several different signalling pathways including Gαq, Gαi/o, Gα12/13 and arrestin recruitment. These multiple signalling pathways allow for functionally biased signalling, where one signalling pathway may be favoured over another either by selective ligands or through mutations in the receptor. In the present review, we have described how ligands and mutations in the 7TM receptor may bias the receptors to favour either one G-protein over another or to promote G-protein independent signalling pathways rather than G–protein-dependent pathways. For the ghrelin receptor, both agonist and inverse agonists have been demonstrated to signal more strongly through the Gαq-coupled pathway than the Gα12/13-coupled pathway. Similarly a ligand that promotes Gαq coupling over Gαi coupling has been described and it has been suggested that several different active conformations of the receptor may exist dependent on the properties of the agonist. Importantly, ligands with such biased signalling properties may allow the development of drugs that selectively modulate only the therapeutically relevant physiological functions, thereby decreasing the risk of side effects. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Neuropeptides. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.170.issue-7 PMID:24032557

  2. Delineating biased ligand efficacy at 7TM receptors from an experimental perspective.

    PubMed

    Galandrin, Ségolène; Onfroy, Lauriane; Poirot, Mathias Charles; Sénard, Jean-Michel; Galés, Céline

    2016-08-01

    During the last 10 years, the concept of "biased agonism" also called "functional selectivity" swamped the pharmacology of 7 transmembrane receptors and paved the way for developing signaling pathway-selective drugs with increased efficacy and less adverse effects. Initially thought to select the activation of only a subset of the signaling pathways by the reference agonist, bias ligands revealed higher complexity as they have been shown to stabilize variable receptor conformations that associate with distinct signaling events from the reference. Today, one major challenge relies on the in vitro determination of the bias and classification of these ligands, as a prerequisite for future in vivo and clinical translation. In this review, current experimental considerations for the bias evaluation related to choice of the cellular model, of the signaling pathway as well as of the assays are presented and discussed. PMID:27107932

  3. Cell surface nucleolin interacts with CXCR4 receptor via the 212 c-terminal portion.

    PubMed

    Niu, Hongxin; Yang, Xiangshan; Xu, Zhongfa; Du, Tong; Wang, Ruogu

    2015-02-01

    Previously, we reported that CXCR4 receptor interacted with cell surface nucleolin, and the synergy of CXCR4 and nucleolin plays an essential role in malignant transformation. Here, we continued to conduct a structure-function analysis of nucleolin to identify which portion can efficaciously bind to CXCR4. In the present study, the expression of CXCR4 and nucleolin in 100 cases of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) samples was investigated through immunohistochemistry (IHC). Subsequently, using nucleolin mutants and pull-down assay, we investigated precise interactions between CXCR4 and nucleolin in HEK-293 cells. A previous study demonstrated CXCR4 and nucleolin co-expressed in cell lines, and the present study further identified that CXCR4 and nucleolin co-expressed in PTC tissues, instead of normal tissues. The nucleolin mutant analysis revealed that nucleolin can efficaciously bind CXCR4 to activate CXCR4 signaling by 212 C-terminal domain. Conversely, N-terminal, RBD and GAR mutants of nucleolin showed no sign of activation of CXCR4 signaling, and differences were statistically insignificant (p > 0.05). In conclusion, these results suggested nucleolin is essential to activate CXCR4 signaling via 212 C-terminal domain, which is required for cell growth, migration, and invasiveness. Furthermore, nucleolin may interact with more G protein-coupled receptors, at least chemokine receptor. Our study will lay a new foundation for cancer therapy by antagonizing nucleolin and CXCR4. PMID:25326811

  4. Effect of C-Terminal S-Palmitoylation on D2 Dopamine Receptor Trafficking and Stability

    PubMed Central

    Ebersole, Brittany; Petko, Jessica; Woll, Matthew; Murakami, Shoko; Sokolina, Kate; Wong, Victoria; Stagljar, Igor; Lüscher, Bernhard; Levenson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We have used bioorthogonal click chemistry (BCC), a sensitive non-isotopic labeling method, to analyze the palmitoylation status of the D2 dopamine receptor (D2R), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) crucial for regulation of processes such as mood, reward, and motor control. By analyzing a series of D2R constructs containing mutations in cysteine residues, we found that palmitoylation of the D2R most likely occurs on the C-terminal cysteine residue (C443) of the polypeptide. D2Rs in which C443 was deleted showed significantly reduced palmitoylation levels, plasma membrane expression, and protein stability compared to wild-type D2Rs. Rather, the C443 deletion mutant appeared to accumulate in the Golgi, indicating that palmitoylation of the D2R is important for cell surface expression of the receptor. Using the full-length D2R as bait in a membrane yeast two-hybrid (MYTH) screen, we identified the palmitoyl acyltransferase (PAT) zDHHC4 as a D2R interacting protein. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that several other PATs, including zDHHC3 and zDHHC8, also interacted with the D2R and that each of the three PATs was capable of affecting the palmitoylation status of the D2R. Finally, biochemical analyses using D2R mutants and the palmitoylation blocker, 2-bromopalmitate indicate that palmitoylation of the receptor plays a role in stability of the D2R. PMID:26535572

  5. Effect of C-Terminal S-Palmitoylation on D2 Dopamine Receptor Trafficking and Stability.

    PubMed

    Ebersole, Brittany; Petko, Jessica; Woll, Matthew; Murakami, Shoko; Sokolina, Kate; Wong, Victoria; Stagljar, Igor; Lüscher, Bernhard; Levenson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We have used bioorthogonal click chemistry (BCC), a sensitive non-isotopic labeling method, to analyze the palmitoylation status of the D2 dopamine receptor (D2R), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) crucial for regulation of processes such as mood, reward, and motor control. By analyzing a series of D2R constructs containing mutations in cysteine residues, we found that palmitoylation of the D2R most likely occurs on the C-terminal cysteine residue (C443) of the polypeptide. D2Rs in which C443 was deleted showed significantly reduced palmitoylation levels, plasma membrane expression, and protein stability compared to wild-type D2Rs. Rather, the C443 deletion mutant appeared to accumulate in the Golgi, indicating that palmitoylation of the D2R is important for cell surface expression of the receptor. Using the full-length D2R as bait in a membrane yeast two-hybrid (MYTH) screen, we identified the palmitoyl acyltransferase (PAT) zDHHC4 as a D2R interacting protein. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that several other PATs, including zDHHC3 and zDHHC8, also interacted with the D2R and that each of the three PATs was capable of affecting the palmitoylation status of the D2R. Finally, biochemical analyses using D2R mutants and the palmitoylation blocker, 2-bromopalmitate indicate that palmitoylation of the receptor plays a role in stability of the D2R. PMID:26535572

  6. Opioid-induced redistribution of 6TM and 7TM μ opioid receptors: A hypothesized mechanistic facilitator model of opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Jin, Xiaoju; Liu, Yusheng; Xu, Shiqin; Lei, Liming; Shen, Xiaofeng; Guo, Xirong; Xia, Xiaoqiong; Wang, Fuzhou

    2016-08-01

    Opioids are still the most popular form of pain treatment, but many unavoidable side effects make opioids a big challenge in effective pain management. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), a paradoxical phenomenon, portrays an increased sensitivity to harmful stimuli caused by opioid exposure. Changes in the neural modulation are considered a major contributor to the development of OIH. Activation of opioid receptors (ORs) and corresponding downstream molecules are the vital composition of functional performance of opioids. Increasing interests were proposed of the interaction between ORs and other neural transmitter systems such as glutamatergic, GABAergic and adrenergic ones to the genesis of OIH. G protein coupled μ-opioid receptor (MOR) was studied comprehensively on its role in the development of OIH. In addition to the relationship between MOR and other neurotransmitter receptors, a new intracellular MOR that has six transmembrane (6TM) domains was identified, and found to perform a pro-nociceptive task in contrast to the counterpart 7TM isoform. A mechanistic model of OIH in which both 6TM and 7TM MORs undergoing membrane redistribution upon opioid exposure is proposed which eventually facilitates the neurons more sensitive to nociceptive stimulation than that of the preceding opioid exposure. PMID:27116700

  7. G-protein-coupled receptors for neurotransmitter amino acids: C-terminal tails, crowded signalosomes.

    PubMed Central

    El Far, Oussama; Betz, Heinrich

    2002-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent a superfamily of highly diverse integral membrane proteins that transduce external signals to different subcellular compartments, including nuclei, via trimeric G-proteins. By differential activation of diffusible G(alpha) and membrane-bound G(beta)gamma subunits, GPCRs might act on both cytoplasmic/intracellular and plasma-membrane-bound effector systems. The coupling efficiency and the plasma membrane localization of GPCRs are regulated by a variety of interacting proteins. In this review, we discuss recently disclosed protein interactions found with the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail regions of two types of presynaptic neurotransmitter receptors, the group III metabotropic glutamate receptors and the gamma-aminobutyric acid type-B receptors (GABA(B)Rs). Calmodulin binding to mGluR7 and other group III mGluRs may provide a Ca(2+)-dependent switch for unidirectional (G(alpha)) versus bidirectional (G(alpha) and G(beta)gamma) signalling to downstream effector proteins. In addition, clustering of mGluR7 by PICK1 (protein interacting with C-kinase 1), a polyspecific PDZ (PSD-95/Dlg1/ZO-1) domain containing synaptic organizer protein, sheds light on how higher-order receptor complexes with regulatory enzymes (or 'signalosomes') could be formed. The interaction of GABA(B)Rs with the adaptor protein 14-3-3 and the transcription factor ATF4 (activating transcription factor 4) suggests novel regulatory pathways for G-protein signalling, cytoskeletal reorganization and nuclear gene expression: processes that may all contribute to synaptic plasticity. PMID:12006104

  8. Effects of Sorafenib on C-Terminally Truncated Androgen Receptor Variants in Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zengerling, Friedemann; Streicher, Wolfgang; Schrader, Andres J.; Schrader, Mark; Nitzsche, Bianca; Cronauer, Marcus V.; Höpfner, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the development of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPCa) is commonly associated with an aberrant, ligand-independent activation of the androgen receptor (AR). A putative mechanism allowing prostate cancer (PCa) cells to grow under low levels of androgens, is the expression of constitutively active, C-terminally truncated AR lacking the AR-ligand binding domain (LBD). Due to the absence of a LBD, these receptors, termed ARΔLBD, are unable to respond to any form of anti-hormonal therapies. In this study we demonstrate that the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib inhibits AR as well as ARΔLBD-signalling in CRPCa cells. This inhibition was paralleled by proteasomal degradation of the AR- and ARΔLBD-molecules. In line with these observations, maximal antiproliferative effects of sorafenib were achieved in AR and ARΔLBD-positive PCa cells. The present findings warrant further investigations on sorafenib as an option for the treatment of advanced AR-positive PCa. PMID:23109869

  9. Effects of sorafenib on C-terminally truncated androgen receptor variants in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zengerling, Friedemann; Streicher, Wolfgang; Schrader, Andres J; Schrader, Mark; Nitzsche, Bianca; Cronauer, Marcus V; Höpfner, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the development of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPCa) is commonly associated with an aberrant, ligand-independent activation of the androgen receptor (AR). A putative mechanism allowing prostate cancer (PCa) cells to grow under low levels of androgens, is the expression of constitutively active, C-terminally truncated AR lacking the AR-ligand binding domain (LBD). Due to the absence of a LBD, these receptors, termed ARΔLBD, are unable to respond to any form of anti-hormonal therapies. In this study we demonstrate that the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib inhibits AR as well as ARΔLBD-signalling in CRPCa cells. This inhibition was paralleled by proteasomal degradation of the AR- and ARΔLBD-molecules. In line with these observations, maximal antiproliferative effects of sorafenib were achieved in AR and ARΔLBD-positive PCa cells. The present findings warrant further investigations on sorafenib as an option for the treatment of advanced AR-positive PCa. PMID:23109869

  10. Structure of metabotropic glutamate receptor C-terminal domains in contact with interacting proteins

    PubMed Central

    Enz, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) regulate intracellular signal pathways that control several physiological tasks, including neuronal excitability, learning, and memory. This is achieved by the formation of synaptic signal complexes, in which mGluRs assemble with functionally related proteins such as enzymes, scaffolds, and cytoskeletal anchor proteins. Thus, mGluR associated proteins actively participate in the regulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission. Importantly, dysfunction of mGluRs and interacting proteins may lead to impaired signal transduction and finally result in neurological disorders, e.g., night blindness, addiction, epilepsy, schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders and Parkinson's disease. In contrast to solved crystal structures of extracellular N-terminal domains of some mGluR types, only a few studies analyzed the conformation of intracellular receptor domains. Intracellular C-termini of most mGluR types are subject to alternative splicing and can be further modified by phosphorylation and SUMOylation. In this way, diverse interaction sites for intracellular proteins that bind to and regulate the glutamate receptors are generated. Indeed, most of the known mGluR binding partners interact with the receptors' C-terminal domains. Within the last years, different laboratories analyzed the structure of these domains and described the geometry of the contact surface between mGluR C-termini and interacting proteins. Here, I will review recent progress in the structure characterization of mGluR C-termini and provide an up-to-date summary of the geometry of these domains in contact with binding partners. PMID:22536173

  11. NMR and computational evidence that high-affinity bradykinin receptor antagonists adopt C-terminal beta-turns.

    PubMed

    Kyle, D J; Blake, P R; Smithwick, D; Green, L M; Martin, J A; Sinsko, J A; Summers, M F

    1993-05-14

    Three tetrapeptides were prepared, each corresponding to the four C-terminal amino acid residues of highly potent, second-generation bradykinin receptor antagonists. The tetrapeptides are (IA) Ser-D-Phe-Oic-Arg, (IIA) Ser-D-Tic-Oic-Arg, and (IIIA) Ser-D-Hype(trans-propyl)-Oic-Arg. Solution conformations for each were determined by incorporating interproton distance restraints, determined by 2D NMR experiments performed in water at neutral pH, into a series of distance geometry/simulated annealing model building calculations. Similarly, systematic conformational analyses were performed for each using molecular mechanics calculations. Both the NMR-derived structures, as well as the calculated structures, are shown to adopt a beta-turn as the primary conformation. Excellent agreement between the predicted structures and the NMR-derived structures is demonstrated. Aside from being the first examples of linear tetrapeptides reported to be ordered in aqueous solvent, the results presented support the hypothesis that high-affinity bradykinin receptor antagonists must adopt C-terminal beta-turn conformations. PMID:8388469

  12. The C-terminal tail of the Hedgehog receptor Patched regulates both localization and turnover

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xingwu; Liu, Songmei; Kornberg, Thomas B.

    2006-01-01

    Patched (Ptc) is a membrane protein whose function in Hedgehog (Hh) signal transduction has been conserved among metazoans and whose malfunction has been implicated in human cancers. Genetic analysis has shown that Ptc negatively regulates Hh signal transduction, but its activity and structure are not known. We investigated the functional and structural properties of Drosophila Ptc and its C-terminal domain (CTD), 183 residues that are predicted to reside in the cytoplasm. Our results show that Ptc, as well as truncated Ptc deleted of its CTD, forms a stable trimer. This observation is consistent with the proposal that Ptc is structurally similar to trimeric transporters. The CTD itself trimerizes and is required for both Ptc internalization and turnover. Two mutant forms of the CTD, one that disrupts trimerization and the other that mutates the target sequence of the Nedd4 ubiquitin ligase, stabilize Ptc but do not prevent internalization and sequestration of Hh. Ptc deleted of its CTD is stable and localizes to the plasma membrane. These data show that degradation of Ptc is regulated at a step subsequent to endocytosis, although endocytosis is a likely prerequisite. We also show that the CTD of mouse Ptc regulates turnover. PMID:16980583

  13. Novel DNA-binding element within the C-terminal extension of the nuclear receptor DNA-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Jakób, Michał; Kołodziejczyk, Robert; Orłowski, Marek; Krzywda, Szymon; Kowalska, Agnieszka; Dutko-Gwóźdź, Joanna; Gwóźdź, Tomasz; Kochman, Marian; Jaskólski, Mariusz; Ożyhar, Andrzej

    2007-01-01

    The heterodimer of the ecdysone receptor (EcR) and ultraspiracle (Usp), members of the nuclear receptors superfamily, is considered as the functional receptor for ecdysteroids initiating molting and metamorphosis in insects. Here we report the 1.95 Å structure of the complex formed by the DNA-binding domains (DBDs) the EcR and the Usp, bound to the natural pseudopalindromic response element. Comparison of the structure with that obtained previously, using an idealized response element, shows how the EcRDBD, which has been previously reported to possess extraordinary flexibility, accommodates DNA-induced structural changes. Part of the C-terminal extension (CTE) of the EcRDBD folds into an α-helix whose location in the minor groove does not match any of the locations previously observed for nuclear receptors. Mutational analyses suggest that the α-helix is a component of EcR-box, a novel element indispensable for DNA-binding and located within the nuclear receptor CTE. This element seems to be a general feature of all known EcRs. PMID:17426125

  14. Structure-Activity Relationship Studies of N- and C-Terminally Modified Secretin Analogs for the Human Secretin Receptor.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kailash; Senthil, Vijayalakshmi; Arokiaraj, Aloysius Wilfred Raj; Leprince, Jérôme; Lefranc, Benjamin; Vaudry, David; Allam, Ahmed A; Ajarem, Jamaan; Chow, Billy K C

    2016-01-01

    The pleiotropic role of human secretin (hSCT) validates its potential use as a therapeutic agent. Nevertheless, the structure of secretin in complex with its receptor is necessary to develop a suitable therapeutic agent. Therefore, in an effort to design a three-dimensional virtual homology model and identify a peptide agonist and/or antagonist for the human secretin receptor (hSR), the significance of the primary sequence of secretin peptides in allosteric binding and activation was elucidated using virtual docking, FRET competitive binding and assessment of the cAMP response. Secretin analogs containing various N- or C-terminal modifications were prepared based on previous findings of the role of these domains in receptor binding and activation. These analogs exhibited very low or no binding affinity in a virtual model, and were found to neither exhibit in vitro binding nor agonistic or antagonistic properties. A parallel analysis of the analogs in the virtual model and in vitro studies revealed instability of these peptide analogs to bind and activate the receptor. PMID:26930505

  15. Structure-Activity Relationship Studies of N- and C-Terminally Modified Secretin Analogs for the Human Secretin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Arokiaraj, Aloysius Wilfred Raj; Leprince, Jérôme; Lefranc, Benjamin; Vaudry, David; Allam, Ahmed A.; Ajarem, Jamaan; Chow, Billy K. C.

    2016-01-01

    The pleiotropic role of human secretin (hSCT) validates its potential use as a therapeutic agent. Nevertheless, the structure of secretin in complex with its receptor is necessary to develop a suitable therapeutic agent. Therefore, in an effort to design a three-dimensional virtual homology model and identify a peptide agonist and/or antagonist for the human secretin receptor (hSR), the significance of the primary sequence of secretin peptides in allosteric binding and activation was elucidated using virtual docking, FRET competitive binding and assessment of the cAMP response. Secretin analogs containing various N- or C-terminal modifications were prepared based on previous findings of the role of these domains in receptor binding and activation. These analogs exhibited very low or no binding affinity in a virtual model, and were found to neither exhibit in vitro binding nor agonistic or antagonistic properties. A parallel analysis of the analogs in the virtual model and in vitro studies revealed instability of these peptide analogs to bind and activate the receptor. PMID:26930505

  16. Selective suppression of the human aryl hydrocarbon receptor function can be mediated through binding interference at the C-terminal half of the receptor.

    PubMed

    Ren, Lina; Thompson, John D; Cheung, Michael; Ngo, Katherine; Sung, Sarah; Leong, Scott; Chan, William K

    2016-05-01

    The human aryl hydrocarbon receptor is a cytosolic signaling molecule which affects immune response and aberrant cell growth. Canonical signaling of the receptor requires the recruitment of coactivators to the promoter region to remodel local chromatin structure. We predicted that interference of this recruitment would block the aryl hydrocarbon receptor function. To prove that, we employed phage display to identify nine peptides of twelve-amino-acid in length which target the C-terminal half of the human aryl hydrocarbon receptor, including the region where coactivators bind. Eight 12mer peptides, in the form of GFP fusion, suppressed the ligand-dependent transcription of six AHR target genes (cyp1a1, cyp1a2, cyp1b1, ugt1a1, nqo1, and ahrr) in different patterns in Hep3B cells, whereas the AHR antagonist CH-223191 suppressed all these target genes similarly. Three of the 12mer peptides (namely 11-3, 1-7, and 7-3) suppressed the 3MC-induced, CYP1A1-dependent EROD activity and the ROS production caused by benzo[a]pyrene. These 12mer peptides suppressed the AHR function synergistically with CH-223191. In conclusion, we provide evidence that targeting the C-terminal half of the human aryl hydrocarbon receptor is a viable, new approach to selectively block the receptor function. PMID:26970402

  17. N- and C-terminal structure-activity study of angiotensin II on the angiotensin AT2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Bouley, R; Pérodin, J; Plante, H; Rihakova, L; Bernier, S G; Maletínská, L; Guillemette, G; Escher, E

    1998-02-19

    ]angiotensin II. Aliphatic residues, especially those of reduced size, caused a significant decrease in affinity especially [Sarcosine1, Gly8]angiotensin II who showed a 30-fold decrease. Introduction of a positive charge (Lys) at position 8 reduced the affinity even further. Stereoisomers in position 8 (L-->D configuration) also induced lower affinities. The angiotensin AT2 receptor display a structure-activity relationship similar to that observed on the AT1 receptor for the C-terminal position of the peptide hormone. Position 1 structure-activity relationships are however fundamentally different between the angiotensin AT1 and AT2 receptor. PMID:9570482

  18. Internalization of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptors (GnRHRs): does arrestin binding to the C-terminal tail target GnRHRs for dynamin-dependent internalization?

    PubMed

    Hislop, James N; Caunt, Christopher J; Sedgley, Kathleen R; Kelly, Eammon; Mundell, Stuart; Green, Lisa D; McArdle, Craig A

    2005-08-01

    Activation of seven-transmembrane receptors is typically followed by desensitization and arrestin-dependent internalization via vesicles that are pinched off by a dynamin collar. Arrestins also scaffold Src, which mediates dynamin-dependent internalization of beta2-adrenergic receptors. Type I mammalian gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptors (GnRHRs) do not rapidly desensitize or internalize (characteristics attributed to their unique lack of C-terminal tails) whereas non-mammalian GnRHRs (that have C-terminal tails) are rapidly internalized and desensitized. Moreover, internalization of Xenopus (X) GnRHRs is dynamin-dependent whereas that of human (h) GnRHRs is not, raising the possibility that binding of arrestin to the C-terminal tails of GnRHRs targets them to the dynamin-dependent internalization pathway. To test this we have compared wild-type GnRHRs with chimeric receptors (XGnRHR C-terminal tail added to the hGnRHR alone (h.XtGnRHR) or with exchange of the third intracellular loops (h.Xl.XtGnRHR)). We show that adding the XGnRHR C-terminal tail facilitates arrestin- and dynamin-dependent internalization as well as arrestin/green fluorescent protein translocation, but Src (or mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular-signal-regulated kinase kinase) inhibition does not slow internalization, and h.XtGnRHR internalization is slower than that of the hGnRHR. Moreover, arrestin expression increased XGnRHR internalization even when dynamin was inhibited and h.Xl.XtGnRHR underwent rapid arrestin-dependent internalization without signaling to G(q/11). Thus, although the C-terminal tail can direct GnRHRs for arrestin- and dynamin-dependent internalization, this effect is not dependent on Src activation and arrestin can also facilitate dynamin-independent internalization. PMID:16087731

  19. Analysis of the Role of the C-Terminal Tail in the Regulation of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Erika; Das, Rahul; Wang, Qi; Collier, Timothy S.; Cantor, Aaron; Huang, Yongjian; Wong, Kathryn; Mirza, Amar; Barros, Tiago; Grob, Patricia; Jura, Natalia; Bose, Ron

    2015-01-01

    The ∼230-residue C-terminal tail of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is phosphorylated upon activation. We examined whether this phosphorylation is affected by deletions within the tail and whether the two tails in the asymmetric active EGFR dimer are phosphorylated differently. We monitored autophosphorylation in cells using flow cytometry and found that the first ∼80 residues of the tail are inhibitory, as demonstrated previously. The entire ∼80-residue span is important for autoinhibition and needs to be released from both kinases that form the dimer. These results are interpreted in terms of crystal structures of the inactive kinase domain, including two new ones presented here. Deletions in the remaining portion of the tail do not affect autophosphorylation, except for a six-residue segment spanning Tyr 1086 that is critical for activation loop phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of the two tails in the dimer is asymmetric, with the activator tail being phosphorylated somewhat more strongly. Unexpectedly, we found that reconstitution of the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of EGFR in vesicles leads to a peculiar phenomenon in which kinase domains appear to be trapped between stacks of lipid bilayers. This artifactual trapping of kinases between membranes enhances an intrinsic functional asymmetry in the two tails in a dimer. PMID:26124280

  20. Analysis of the Role of the C-Terminal Tail in the Regulation of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Erika; Das, Rahul; Wang, Qi; Collier, Timothy S; Cantor, Aaron; Huang, Yongjian; Wong, Kathryn; Mirza, Amar; Barros, Tiago; Grob, Patricia; Jura, Natalia; Bose, Ron; Kuriyan, John

    2015-09-01

    The ∼230-residue C-terminal tail of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is phosphorylated upon activation. We examined whether this phosphorylation is affected by deletions within the tail and whether the two tails in the asymmetric active EGFR dimer are phosphorylated differently. We monitored autophosphorylation in cells using flow cytometry and found that the first ∼80 residues of the tail are inhibitory, as demonstrated previously. The entire ∼80-residue span is important for autoinhibition and needs to be released from both kinases that form the dimer. These results are interpreted in terms of crystal structures of the inactive kinase domain, including two new ones presented here. Deletions in the remaining portion of the tail do not affect autophosphorylation, except for a six-residue segment spanning Tyr 1086 that is critical for activation loop phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of the two tails in the dimer is asymmetric, with the activator tail being phosphorylated somewhat more strongly. Unexpectedly, we found that reconstitution of the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of EGFR in vesicles leads to a peculiar phenomenon in which kinase domains appear to be trapped between stacks of lipid bilayers. This artifactual trapping of kinases between membranes enhances an intrinsic functional asymmetry in the two tails in a dimer. PMID:26124280

  1. Interaction of the C-terminal acidic domain of the insulin receptor with histone modulates the receptor kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Baron, V; Kaliman, P; Alengrin, F; Van Obberghen, E

    1995-04-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of the insulin receptor domain 1270-1280, an acid-rich sequence located in the receptor C-terminus. Antipeptide IgG raised against this sequence were obtained and used to analyze their effect on receptor function. Antipeptide IgG inhibited receptor autophosphorylation at Tyr1146, Tyr1150 and Tyr1151. These sites are known to be key modulators of the receptor activity. Autophosphorylation at other sites may also have been inhibited. The antipeptide antibody decreased the receptor kinase activity measured with poly(Glu80Tyr20) and a synthetic peptide corresponding to the proreceptor sequence 1142-1158. We provide evidence that the effect of the antibody on substrate phosphorylation may result from the control of the phosphorylation level of the receptor. Concerning the action of the antipeptide IgG on the receptor kinase activity, histone did not behave similarly to poly(Glu80Tyr20). The antibody recognizing sequence 1270-1280 competed with histone for an overlapping binding site. Histone also modulated insulin receptor autophosphorylation, supporting the idea that interference with domain 1270-1280 alters the receptor kinase. Our data suggest that the acidic region including residues 1270-1280 of the insulin receptor C-terminus is involved in the following events: (a) receptor binding with histone, an exogenous substrate of the receptor kinase, and (b) the regulation of receptor autophosphorylation and kinase activity. Based on these observations, we would like to propose that this insulin receptor domain could interact with cellular proteins modulating the receptor kinase. PMID:7744039

  2. Identification of a Src kinase SH3 binding site in the C-terminal domain of the human ErbB2 receptor tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Bornet, Olivier; Nouailler, Matthieu; Feracci, Michaël; Sebban-Kreuzer, Corinne; Byrne, Deborah; Halimi, Hubert; Morelli, Xavier; Badache, Ali; Guerlesquin, Françoise

    2014-06-01

    Overexpression of the ErbB2 receptor tyrosine kinase is associated with most aggressive tumors in breast cancer patients and is thus one of the main investigated therapeutic targets. Human ErbB2 C-terminal domain is an unstructured anchor that recruits specific adaptors for signaling cascades resulting in cell growth, differentiation and migration. Herein, we report the presence of a SH3 binding motif in the proline rich unfolded ErbB2 C-terminal region. NMR analysis of this motif supports a PPII helix conformation and the binding to Fyn-SH3 domain. The interaction of a kinase of the Src family with ErbB2 C-terminal domain could contribute to synergistic intracellular signaling and enhanced oncogenesis. PMID:24815698

  3. Surface expression of GluR-D AMPA receptor is dependent on an interaction between its C-terminal domain and a 4.1 protein.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Sarah K; Cai, Chunlin; Mottershead, David G; Haapalahti, Jukka-Pekka; Keinänen, Kari

    2003-02-01

    Dynamic regulation of the number and activity of AMPA receptors is believed to underlie many forms of synaptic plasticity and is presumably mediated by specific protein-protein interactions involving the C-terminal domain of the receptor. Several proteins interacting with the C-terminal tails of the glutamate receptor (GluR)-A and GluR-B subunits have been identified and implicated in the regulation of endocytosis and exocytosis, clustering, and anchoring of AMPA receptors to the cytoskeleton. In contrast, little is known of the molecular interactions of the GluR-D subunit, or of the mechanisms regulating the traffic of GluR-D-containing AMPA receptors. We analyzed the subcellular localization of homomeric GluR-D receptors carrying C-terminal deletions in transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells and in primary neurons by immunofluorescence microscopy and ELISA. A minimal requirement for a 14-residue cytoplasmic segment for the surface expression of homomeric GluR-D receptors was identified. Previously, a similar region in the GluR-A subunit was implicated in an interaction with 4.1 family proteins. Coimmunoprecipitation demonstrated that GluR-D associated with 4.1 protein(s) in both HEK293 cells and rat brain. Moreover, glutathione S-transferase pull-down experiments showed that the same 14-residue segment is critical for 4.1 binding to GluR-A and GluR-D. Point mutations within this segment dramatically decreased the surface expression of GluR-D in HEK293 cells, with a concomitant loss of the 4.1 interaction. Our findings demonstrate a novel molecular interaction for the GluR-D subunit and suggest that the association with the 4.1 family protein(s) plays an essential role in the transport to and stabilization of GluR-D-containing AMPA receptors at the cell surface. PMID:12574408

  4. Development of the sigma-1 receptor in C-terminals of motoneurons and colocalization with the N,N'-dimethyltryptamine forming enzyme, indole-N-methyl transferase.

    PubMed

    Mavlyutov, T A; Epstein, M L; Liu, P; Verbny, Y I; Ziskind-Conhaim, L; Ruoho, A E

    2012-03-29

    The function of the sigma-1 receptor (S1R) has been linked to modulating the activities of ion channels and G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). In the CNS, the S1R is expressed ubiquitously but is enriched in mouse motoneurons (MN), where it is localized to subsurface cisternae of cholinergic postsynaptic densities, also known as C-terminals. We found that S1R is enriched in mouse spinal MN at late stages of embryonic development when it is first visualized in the endoplasmic reticulum. S1Rs appear to concentrate at C-terminals of mouse MN only on the second week of postnatal development. We found that indole-N-methyl transferase (INMT), an enzyme that converts tryptamine into the sigma-1 ligand dimethyltryptamine (DMT), is also localized to postsynaptic sites of C-terminals in close proximity to the S1R. This close association of INMT and S1Rs suggest that DMT is synthesized locally to effectively activate S1R in MN. PMID:22265729

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF THE SIGMA-1 RECEPTOR IN C-TERMINALS OF MOTONEURONS AND COLOCALIZATION WITH THE N,N’-DIMETHYLTRYPTAMINE FORMING ENZYME, INDOLE-N-METHYL TRANSFERASE

    PubMed Central

    Mavlyutov, Timur A.; Epstein, Miles L.; Liu, Patricia; Verbny, Yakov I.; Ziskind-Conhaim, Lea; Ruoho, Arnold E.

    2012-01-01

    The function of the sigma-1 receptor (S1R) has been linked to modulating the activities of ion channels and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR). In the CNS the S1R is expressed ubiquitously but is enriched in mouse motoneurons (MN), where it is localized to subsurface cisternae of cholinergic postsynaptic densities, also known as C-terminals. We found that S1R is enriched in mouse spinal MN at late stages of embryonic development when it is first visualized in the endoplasmic reticulum. S1Rs appear to concentrate at C-terminals of mouse MN only on the second week of postnatal development. We found that Indole-N-methyl transferase (INMT), an enzyme that converts tryptamine into the sigma-1 ligand dimethyltryptamine (DMT), is also localized to postsynaptic sites of C-terminals in close proximity to the S1R. This close association of INMT and SIRs suggest that DMT is synthesized locally to effectively activate S1R in MN. PMID:22265729

  6. Molecular basis for odorant receptor tuning: a short C-terminal sequence is necessary and sufficient for selectivity of mosquito Or8.

    PubMed

    Hill, S R; Majeed, S; Ignell, R

    2015-08-01

    A birth-and-death evolutionary model for odorant receptor gene repertoires presumes the creation of repertoires with the capacity for high-level diversity and rapid ligand specificity change. This changes the recognised odour space, directly affecting fitness-related behaviours and ultimately affecting adaptation to new environments and resources. The proximate molecular mechanisms underlying the tuning of odorant receptor repertoires, and thus peripheral olfaction, are unclear. In the present study, we report a concrete example of this model of odorant receptor evolution leading to rapid changes in receptor tuning that leave the peripheral neuronal circuitry intact. We identified a conserved odorant receptor gene in mosquitoes, Or8, which in Culex quinquefasciatus underwent a duplication and inversion event. The paralogues differ in only minor structural changes manifesting at the C-terminus. We assessed the specificity of the paralogous odorant receptors and receptor neurones. We found that the functional tuning of the receptor was indeed reflected in minor differences in amino acid structure. Specifically, we found that enantiomeric specificity of these mosquito Or8 paralogues relies on eight C-terminal amino acids encoded in the final exon of the gene; thus, the birth of a paralogous odorant receptor can change the tuning of the peripheral olfactory system. PMID:26033210

  7. Downregulation of 5-HT7 Serotonin Receptors by the Atypical Antipsychotics Clozapine and Olanzapine. Role of Motifs in the C-Terminal Domain and Interaction with GASP-1.

    PubMed

    Manfra, Ornella; Van Craenenbroeck, Kathleen; Skieterska, Kamila; Frimurer, Thomas; Schwartz, Thue W; Levy, Finn Olav; Andressen, Kjetil Wessel

    2015-07-15

    The human 5-HT7 serotonin receptor, a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), activates adenylyl cyclase constitutively and upon agonist activation. Biased ligands differentially activate 5-HT7 serotonin receptor desensitization, internalization and degradation in addition to G protein activation. We have previously found that the atypical antipsychotics clozapine and olanzapine inhibited G protein activation and, surprisingly, induced both internalization and lysosomal degradation of 5-HT7 receptors. Here, we aimed to determine the mechanism of clozapine- and olanzapine-mediated degradation of 5-HT7 receptors. In the C-terminus of the 5-HT7 receptor, we identified two YXXΦ motifs, LR residues, and a palmitoylated cysteine anchor as potential sites involved in receptor trafficking to lysosomes followed by receptor degradation. Mutating either of these sites inhibited clozapine- and olanzapine-mediated degradation of 5-HT7 receptors and also interfered with G protein activation. In addition, we tested whether receptor degradation was mediated by the GPCR-associated sorting protein-1 (GASP-1). We show that GASP-1 binds the 5-HT7 receptor and regulates the clozapine-mediated degradation. Mutations of the identified motifs and residues, located in or close to Helix-VIII of the 5-HT7 receptor, modified antipsychotic-stimulated binding of proteins (such as GASP-1), possibly by altering the flexibility of Helix-VIII, and also interfered with G protein activation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that binding of clozapine or olanzapine to the 5-HT7 receptor leads to antagonist-mediated lysosomal degradation by exposing key residues in the C-terminal tail that interact with GASP-1. PMID:25706089

  8. Solution Structure and Sugar-Binding Mechanism of Mouse Latrophilin-1 RBL: a 7TM Receptor-Attached Lectin-Like Domain

    PubMed Central

    Vakonakis, Ioannis; Langenhan, Tobias; Prömel, Simone; Russ, Andreas; Campbell, Iain D.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Latrophilin-1 (Lat-1), a target receptor for α-Latrotoxin, is a putative G protein-coupled receptor implicated in synaptic function. The extracellular portion of Lat-1 contains a rhamnose binding lectin (RBL)-like domain of unknown structure. RBL domains, first isolated from the eggs of marine species, are also found in the ectodomains of other metazoan transmembrane proteins, including a recently discovered coreceptor of the neuronal axon guidance molecule SLT-1/Slit. Here, we describe a structure of this domain from the mouse Lat-1. RBL adopts a unique α/β fold with long structured loops important for monosaccharide recognition, as shown in the structure of a complex with L-rhamnose. Sequence alignments and mutagenesis show that residues important for carbohydrate binding are often absent in other receptor-attached examples of RBL, including the SLT-1/Slit coreceptor. We postulate that this domain class facilitates direct protein-protein interactions in many transmembrane receptors. PMID:18547526

  9. Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor Type 1 (CRHR1) Clustering with MAGUKs Is Mediated via Its C-Terminal PDZ Binding Motif

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Julia; Engeholm, Maik; Ederer, Marion S.; Breu, Johannes; Møller, Thor C.; Michalakis, Stylianos; Rasko, Tamas; Wanker, Erich E.; Biel, Martin; Martinez, Karen L.; Wurst, Wolfgang; Deussing, Jan M.

    2015-01-01

    The corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1 (CRHR1) plays an important role in orchestrating neuroendocrine, behavioral, and autonomic responses to stress. To identify molecules capable of directly modulating CRHR1 signaling, we performed a yeast-two-hybrid screen using the C-terminal intracellular tail of the receptor as bait. We identified several members of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family: postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95), synapse-associated protein 97 (SAP97), SAP102 and membrane associated guanylate kinase, WW and PDZ domain containing 2 (MAGI2). CRHR1 is co-expressed with the identified MAGUKs and with the additionally investigated PSD93 in neurons of the adult mouse brain and in primary hippocampal neurons, supporting the probability of a physiological interaction in vivo. The C-terminal PDZ (PSD-95, discs large, zona occludens 1) binding motif of CRHR1 is essential for its physical interaction with MAGUKs, as revealed by the CRHR1-STAVA mutant, which harbors a functionally impaired PDZ binding motif. The imitation of a phosphorylation at Thr413 within the PDZ binding motif also disrupted the interaction with MAGUKs. In contrast, distinct PDZ domains within the identified MAGUKs are involved in the interactions. Expression of CRHR1 in primary neurons demonstrated its localization throughout the neuronal plasma membrane, including the excitatory post synapse, where the receptor co-localized with PSD95 and SAP97. The co-expression of CRHR1 and respective interacting MAGUKs in HEK293 cells resulted in a clustered subcellular co-localization which required an intact PDZ binding motif. In conclusion, our study characterized the PDZ binding motif-mediated interaction of CRHR1 with multiple MAGUKs, which directly affects receptor function. PMID:26352593

  10. C-terminal tail phosphorylation of N-formyl peptide receptor: differential recognition of two neutrophil chemoattractant receptors by monoclonal antibodies NFPR1 and NFPR2.

    PubMed

    Riesselman, Marcia; Miettinen, Heini M; Gripentrog, Jeannie M; Lord, Connie I; Mumey, Brendan; Dratz, Edward A; Stie, Jamal; Taylor, Ross M; Jesaitis, Algirdas J

    2007-08-15

    The N-formyl peptide receptor (FPR), a G protein-coupled receptor that binds proinflammatory chemoattractant peptides, serves as a model receptor for leukocyte chemotaxis. Recombinant histidine-tagged FPR (rHis-FPR) was purified in lysophosphatidyl glycerol (LPG) by Ni(2+)-NTA agarose chromatography to >95% purity with high yield. MALDI-TOF mass analysis (>36% sequence coverage) and immunoblotting confirmed the identity as FPR. The rHis-FPR served as an immunogen for the production of 2 mAbs, NFPR1 and NFPR2, that epitope map to the FPR C-terminal tail sequences, 305-GQDFRERLI-313 and 337-NSTLPSAEVE-346, respectively. Both mAbs specifically immunoblotted rHis-FPR and recombinant FPR (rFPR) expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. NFPR1 also recognized recombinant FPRL1, specifically expressed in mouse L fibroblasts. In human neutrophil membranes, both Abs labeled a 45-75 kDa species (peak M(r) approximately 60 kDa) localized primarily in the plasma membrane with a minor component in the lactoferrin-enriched intracellular fractions, consistent with FPR size and localization. NFPR1 also recognized a band of M(r) approximately 40 kDa localized, in equal proportions to the plasma membrane and lactoferrin-enriched fractions, consistent with FPRL1 size and localization. Only NFPR2 was capable of immunoprecipitation of rFPR in detergent extracts. The recognition of rFPR by NFPR2 is lost after exposure of cellular rFPR to f-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF) and regained after alkaline phosphatase treatment of rFPR-bearing membranes. In neutrophils, NFPR2 immunofluorescence was lost upon fMLF stimulation. Immunoblotting approximately 60 kDa species, after phosphatase treatment of fMLF-stimulated neutrophil membranes, was also enhanced. We conclude that the region 337-346 of FPR becomes phosphorylated after fMLF activation of rFPR-expressing Chinese hamster ovary cells and neutrophils. PMID:17675514

  11. The role of N-terminal and C-terminal Arg residues from BK on interaction with kinin B2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Filippelli-Silva, Rafael; Martin, Renan P; Rodrigues, Eliete S; Nakaie, Clovis R; Oliveira, Laerte; Pesquero, João B; Shimuta, Suma I

    2016-04-01

    Bradykinin (BK) is a nonapeptide important for several physiological processes such as vasodilatation, increase in vascular permeability and release of inflammatory mediators. BK performs its actions by coupling to and activating the B2 receptor, a family A G-protein coupled receptor. Using a strategy which allows systematical monitoring of BK R1 and R9 residues and B2 receptor acidic residues Glu5.35(226) and Asp6.58(298), our study aims at clarifying the BK interaction profile with the B2 receptor [receptor residue numbers are normalized according to Ballesteros and Weinstein, Methods Neurosci. 25 (1995), pp. 366-428) followed by receptor sequence numbering in brackets]. N- and C-terminal analogs of BK (-A1, -G1, -K1, -E1 and BK-A9) were tested against wild type B2, Glu5.35(226)Ala and Asp6.58(298)Ala B2 mutant receptors for their affinity and capability to elicit responses by mechanical recordings of isolated mice stomach fundus, measuring intracellular calcium mobilization, and competitive fluorimetric binding assays. BK showed 2- and 15-fold decreased potency for Glu5.35(226) and Asp6.58(298) B2 mutant receptors, respectively. In B2-Glu5.35(226)Ala BK analogs showed milder reduction in evaluated parameters. On the other hand, in the B2-Asp6.58(298)Ala mutant, no N-terminal analog was able to elicit any response. However, the BK-A9 analog presented higher affinity parameters than BK in the latter mutant. These findings provide enough support for defining a novel interaction role of BK-R9 and Asp6.58(298) receptor residues. PMID:26584354

  12. Identification of two C-terminal autophosphorylation sites in the PDGF beta-receptor: involvement in the interaction with phospholipase C-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Rönnstrand, L; Mori, S; Arridsson, A K; Eriksson, A; Wernstedt, C; Hellman, U; Claesson-Welsh, L; Heldin, C H

    1992-01-01

    Two novel sites of autophosphorylation were localized to the C-terminal tail of the PDGF beta-receptor. To evaluate the importance of these phosphorylation sites, receptor mutants in which Tyr1009, Tyr1021 or both were replaced with phenylalanine residues, were expressed in porcine aortic endothelial (PAE) cells. These mutants were similar to the wild type receptor with regard to protein tyrosine kinase activity and ability to induce mitogenicity in response to PDGF-BB. However, both the Y1009F and Y1021F mutants showed a decreased ability to mediate association with and the tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C-gamma (PLC-gamma) compared to the wild type PDGF beta-receptor; in the case of the Y1009F/Y1021F double mutant, no association or phosphorylation of PLC-gamma could be detected. These data show that tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-gamma is dependent on autophosphorylation of the PDGF beta-receptor at Tyr1009 and Tyr1021. Images PMID:1396585

  13. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of mouse Elf3 C-terminal DNA-binding domain in complex with type II TGF-[beta] receptor promoter DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Agarkar, Vinod B.; Babayeva, Nigar D.; Rizzino, Angie; Tahirov, Tahir H.

    2010-10-08

    Ets proteins are transcription factors that activate or repress the expression of genes that are involved in various biological processes, including cellular proliferation, differentiation, development, transformation and apoptosis. Like other Ets-family members, Elf3 functions as a sequence-specific DNA-binding transcriptional factor. A mouse Elf3 C-terminal fragment (amino-acid residues 269-371) containing the DNA-binding domain has been crystallized in complex with mouse type II TGF-{beta} receptor promoter (TR-II) DNA. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 42.66, b = 52, c = 99.78 {angstrom}, and diffracted to a resolution of 2.2 {angstrom}.

  14. Crystal Structure of Mouse Elf3 C-terminal DNA-binding Domain in Complex with Type II TGF-[beta] Receptor Promoter DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Agarkar, Vinod B.; Babayeva, Nigar D.; Wilder, Phillip J.; Rizzino, Angie; Tahirov, Tahir H.

    2010-08-18

    The Ets family of transcription factors is composed of more than 30 members. One of its members, Elf3, is expressed in virtually all epithelial cells as well as in many tumors, including breast tumors. Several studies observed that the promoter of the type II TGF-{beta} receptor gene (T{beta}R-II) is strongly stimulated by Elf3 via two adjacent Elf3 binding sites, the A-site and the B-site. Here, we report the 2.2 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a mouse Elf3 C-terminal fragment, containing the DNA-binding Ets domain, in complex with the B-site of mouse type II TGF-{beta} receptor promoter DNA (mT{beta}R-II{sub DNA}). Elf3 contacts the core GGAA motif of the B-site from a major groove similar to that of known Ets proteins. However, unlike other Ets proteins, Elf3 also contacts sequences of the A-site from the minor groove of the DNA. DNA binding experiments and cell-based transcription studies indicate that minor groove interaction by Arg349 located in the Ets domain is important for Elf3 function. Equally interesting, previous studies have shown that the C-terminal region of Elf3, which flanks the Ets domain, is required for Elf3 binding to DNA. In this study, we determined that Elf3 amino acid residues within this flanking region, including Trp361, are important for the structural integrity of the protein as well as for the Efl3 DNA binding and transactivation activity.

  15. Crystal structure of mouse Elf3 C-terminal DNA-binding domain in complex with type II TGF-β receptor promoter DNA

    PubMed Central

    Agarkar, Vinod B.; Babayeva, Nigar D.; Wilder, Phillip J.; Rizzino, Angie; Tahirov, Tahir H.

    2010-01-01

    The Ets family of transcription factors is composed of more than 30 members. One of its members, Elf3, is expressed in virtually all epithelial cells as well as in many tumors, including breast tumors. Several studies observed that the promoter of the type II TGF-β receptor gene (TβR-II) is strongly stimulated by Elf3 via two adjacent Elf3 binding sites, A-site and B-site. Here we report the 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of a mouse Elf3 C-terminal fragment, containing the DNA-binding Ets domain, in complex with the B-site of mouse type II TGF-β receptor promoter DNA (mTβR-IIDNA). Elf3 contacts the core GGAA motif of the B-site from major groove similar to that of known Ets proteins. However, unlike other Ets proteins, Elf3 also contacts sequences of the A-site from the minor groove of the DNA. DNA binding experiments and cell-based transcription studies indicate that minor groove interaction by Arg349 located in the Ets domain is important for Elf3 function. Equally interesting, previous studies have shown that the C-terminal region of Elf3, which flanks the Ets domain, is required for Elf3 binding to DNA. In this study, we determined that Elf3 amino acid residues within this flanking region, including Trp361, are important for the structural integrity of the protein as well as for the Efl3 DNA binding and transactivation activity. PMID:20079749

  16. A C-terminal segment of the V{sub 1}R vasopressin receptor is unstructured in the crystal structure of its chimera with the maltose-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Adikesavan, Nallini Vijayarangan; Mahmood, Syed Saad; Stanley, Nithianantham; Xu, Zhen; Wu, Nan; Thibonnier, Marc; Shoham, Menachem

    2005-04-01

    The 1.8 Å crystal structure of an MBP-fusion protein with the C-terminal cytoplasmic segment of the V1 vasopressin receptor reveals that the receptor segment is unstructured. The V{sub 1} vascular vasopressin receptor (V{sub 1}R) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) involved in the regulation of body-fluid osmolality, blood volume and blood pressure. Signal transduction is mediated by the third intracellular loop of this seven-transmembrane protein as well as by the C-terminal cytoplasmic segment. A chimera of the maltose-binding protein (MBP) and the C-terminal segment of V{sub 1}R has been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 51.10, b = 66.56, c = 115.72 Å, β = 95.99°. The 1.8 Å crystal structure reveals the conformation of MBP and part of the linker region of this chimera, with the C-terminal segment being unstructured. This may reflect a conformational plasticity in the C-terminal segment that may be necessary for proper function of V{sub 1}R.

  17. Unlocking Doors without Keys: Activation of Src by Truncated C-terminal Intracellular Receptor Tyrosine Kinases Lacking Tyrosine Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mezquita, Belén; Mezquita, Pau; Pau, Montserrat; Mezquita, Jovita; Mezquita, Cristóbal

    2014-01-01

    One of the best examples of the renaissance of Src as an open door to cancer has been the demonstration that just five min of Src activation is sufficient for transformation and also for induction and maintenance of cancer stem cells [1]. Many tyrosine kinase receptors, through the binding of their ligands, become the keys that unlock the structure of Src and activate its oncogenic transduction pathways. Furthermore, intracellular isoforms of these receptors, devoid of any tyrosine kinase activity, still retain the ability to unlock Src. This has been shown with a truncated isoform of KIT (tr-KIT) and a truncated isoform of VEGFR-1 (i21-VEGFR-1), which are intracellular and require no ligand binding, but are nonetheless able to activate Src and induce cell migration and invasion of cancer cells. Expression of the i21-VEGFR-1 is upregulated by the Notch signaling pathway and repressed by miR-200c and retinoic acid in breast cancer cells. Both Notch inhibitors and retinoic acid have been proposed as potential therapies for invasive breast cancer. PMID:24709904

  18. Ancient interaction between the teneurin C-terminal associated peptides (TCAP) and latrophilin ligand-receptor coupling: a role in behavior

    PubMed Central

    Woelfle, Rebecca; D'Aquila, Andrea L.; Pavlović, Téa; Husić, Mia; Lovejoy, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Teneurins are multifunctional transmembrane proteins that are found in all multicellular animals and exist as four paralogous forms in vertebrates. They are highly expressed in the central nervous system, where they exert their effects, in part, by high-affinity binding to latrophilin (LPHN), a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) related to the adhesion and secretin GPCR families. The teneurin C-terminal associated peptides (TCAPs) are encoded by the terminal exon of all four teneurins, where TCAPs 1 and 3 are independently transcribed as soluble peptides, and TCAPs 2 and 4 remain tethered to their teneurin proprotein. Synthetic TCAP-1 interacts with LPHN, with an association with β-dystroglycan, to induce a tissue-dependent signal cascade to modulate cytoskeletal dynamics. TCAP-1 reduces stress-induced behaviors associated with anxiety, addiction and depression in a variety of models, in part, by regulating synaptic plasticity. Therefore, the TCAP-1-teneurin-LPHN interaction represents a novel receptor-ligand model and may represent a key mechanism underlying the association of behavior and neurological conditions. PMID:25964737

  19. The p55 tumour necrosis factor receptor TNFR1 contains a trans-Golgi network localization signal in the C-terminal region of its cytoplasmic tail.

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Helen; Stewart, Abigail; Vandenabeele, Peter; Luzio, J Paul

    2002-01-01

    It has been reported in some human cells that, in addition to a plasma membrane localization, members of the tumour necrosis factor receptor superfamily may be localized to the Golgi complex. We have shown by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy that the p55 tumour necrosis factor receptor, TNFR1, is principally localized to the trans-Golgi network in the human breast carcinoma cell line, MCF7. Chimaeras consisting of the extracellular and transmembrane domains of CD8 together with the cytoplasmic tail of TNFR1 were targeted to the trans-Golgi network in stably transfected rat fibroblastic cells. Deletions in the cytoplasmic tails of these chimaeras demonstrated the requirement for the C-terminal sequence of 23 amino acids for this targeting. The 23 amino acid sequence is mostly outside the death domain and contains both an acid patch and a dileucine motif. Interaction of this sequence with membrane traffic adaptor proteins may play an important role in controlling the responses of cells to tumour necrosis factor, since binding of signalling adaptor proteins has only been demonstrated for plasma membrane, and not Golgi-localized, TNFR1. PMID:11985495

  20. Spacing requirements for interactions between the C-terminal domain of the alpha subunit of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase and the cAMP receptor protein.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, G S; Busby, S J; Savery, N J

    1998-01-01

    During transcription initiation at bacterial promoters, the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase alpha subunit (alphaCTD) can interact with DNA-sequence elements (known as UP elements) and with activator proteins. We have constructed a series of semi-synthetic promoters carrying both an UP element and a consensus DNA-binding site for the Escherichia coli cAMP receptor protein (CRP; a factor that activates transcription by making direct contacts with alphaCTD). At these promoters, the UP element was located at a variety of distances upstream of the CRP-binding site, which was fixed at position -41.5 bp upstream of the transcript start. At some positions, the UP element caused enhanced promoter activity whereas, at other positions, it had very little effect. In no case was the CRP-dependence of the promoter relieved. DNase I and hydroxyl-radical footprinting were used to study ternary RNA polymerase-CRP-promoter complexes formed at two of the most active of these promoters, and co-operativity between the binding of CRP and purified alpha subunits was studied. The footprints show that alphaCTD binds to the UP element as it is displaced upstream but that this displacement does not prevent alphaCTD from being contacted by CRP. Models to account for this are discussed. PMID:9461538

  1. C-terminal fragment of tetanus toxin heavy chain activates Akt and MEK/ERK signalling pathways in a Trk receptor-dependent manner in cultured cortical neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Carles; Chaib-Oukadour, Imane; Aguilera, José

    2003-01-01

    Previous publications from our group [Gil, Chaib, Pelliccioni and Aguilera (2000) FEBS Lett. 481, 177-182; Gil, Chaib, Blasi and Aguilera (2001) Biochem. J. 356, 97-103] have reported the activation, in rat brain synaptosomes, of several phosphoproteins, such as neurotrophin tyrosine kinase (Trk) A receptor, phospholipase Cgamma-1, protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms and extracellular-signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK-1/2). In the present study, we examined, by means of phospho-specific antibodies, the activation of the signalling cascades involving neurotrophin Trk receptor, Akt kinase and ERK pathway, in cultured cortical neurons from foetal rat brain, by tetanus toxin (TeTx) as well as by the C-terminal part of its heavy chain (H(C)-TeTx). TeTx and H(C)-TeTx induce fast and transient phosphorylation of Trk receptor at Tyr(674) and Tyr(675), but not at Tyr(490), although the potency of TeTx in this action was higher when compared with H(C)-TeTx action. Moreover, H(C)-TeTx and TeTx also induced phosphorylation of Akt (at Ser(473) and Thr(308)) and of ERK-1/2 (Thr(202)/Tyr(204)), in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The detection of TeTx- and H(C)-TeTx-induced phosphorylation at Ser(9) of glycogen synthase kinase 3beta confirms Akt activation. In the extended analysis of the ERK pathway, phosphorylation of the Raf, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)-1/2 and p90Rsk kinases and phosphorylation of the transcription factor cAMP-response-element-binding protein were detected. The use of tyrphostin AG879, an inhibitor of Trk receptors, demonstrates their necessary participation in the H(C)-TeTx-induced activation of Akt and ERK pathways, as well as in the phosphorylation of phospholipase Cgamma-1. Furthermore, both pathways are totally dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase action, and they are independent of PKC action, as assessed using wortmannin and Ro-31-8220 as inhibitors. The activation of PKC isoforms was determined by their translocation

  2. The Arginine Residue within the C-Terminal Active Core of Bombyx mori Pheromone Biosynthesis-Activating Neuropeptide is Essential for Receptor Binding and Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Takeshi; Lee, Jae Min; Nagata, Koji; Matsumoto, Shogo; Tanokura, Masaru; Nagasawa, Hiromichi

    2012-01-01

    In most lepidopteran insects, the biosynthesis of sex pheromones is regulated by pheromone biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide (PBAN). Bombyx mori PBAN (BomPBAN) consists of 33 amino acid residues and contains a C-terminus FSPRLamide motif as the active core. Among neuropeptides containing the FXPRLamide motif, the arginine (Arg, R) residue at the second position from the C-terminus is highly conserved across several neuropeptides, which can be designated as RXamide peptides. The purpose of this study was to clarify the role of the Arg residue in the BomPBAN active core. We synthesized 10-residue peptides corresponding to the C-terminal part of BomPBAN with a series of replacements at the second position from the C-terminus, termed the C2 position, and measured their efficacy in stimulating Ca2+ influx in insect cells expressing a fluorescent PBAN receptor chimera (PBANR–EGFP) using the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator, Fura Red–AM. The PBAN analogs with the C2 position replaced with alanine (Ala, A), aspartic acid (Asp, D), serine (Ser, S), or l-2-aminooctanoic acid (Aoc) decreased PBAN-like activity. RC2A (SKTRYFSPALamide) and RC2D (SKTRYFSPDLamide) had the lowest activity and could not inhibit the activity of PBAN C10 (SKTRYFSPRLamide). We also prepared Rhodamine Red-labeled peptides of the PBAN analogs and examined their ability to bind PBANR. In contrast to Rhodamine Red-PBAN C10 at 100 nM, none of the synthetic analogs exhibited PBANR binding at the same concentration. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the C2 Arg residue in BomPBAN is essential for PBANR binding and activation. PMID:22654866

  3. A C-terminal motif found in the β2-adrenergic receptor, P2Y1 receptor and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator determines binding to the Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor family of PDZ proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Randy A.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Premont, Richard T.; Blitzer, Jeremy T.; Rahman, Nadeem; Welsh, Michael J.; Lefkowitz, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    The Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor (NHERF) binds to the tail of the β2-adrenergic receptor and plays a role in adrenergic regulation of Na+/H+ exchange. NHERF contains two PDZ domains, the first of which is required for its interaction with the β2 receptor. Mutagenesis studies of the β2 receptor tail revealed that the optimal C-terminal motif for binding to the first PDZ domain of NHERF is D-S/T-x-L, a motif distinct from those recognized by other PDZ domains. The first PDZ domain of NHERF-2, a protein that is 52% identical to NHERF and also known as E3KARP, SIP-1, and TKA-1, exhibits binding preferences very similar to those of the first PDZ domain of NHERF. The delineation of the preferred binding motif for the first PDZ domain of the NHERF family of proteins allows for predictions for other proteins that may interact with NHERF or NHERF-2. For example, as would be predicted from the β2 receptor tail mutagenesis studies, NHERF binds to the tail of the purinergic P2Y1 receptor, a seven-transmembrane receptor with an intracellular C-terminal tail ending in D-T-S-L. NHERF also binds to the tail of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, which ends in D-T-R-L. Because the preferred binding motif of the first PDZ domain of the NHERF family of proteins is found at the C termini of a variety of intracellular proteins, NHERF and NHERF-2 may be multifunctional adaptor proteins involved in many previously unsuspected aspects of intracellular signaling. PMID:9671706

  4. Prolonged activation of phospholipase D in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing platelet-activating-factor receptor lacking cytoplasmic C-terminal tail.

    PubMed

    Liu, B; Nakashima, S; Adachi, T; Ito, Y; Takano, T; Shimizu, T; Nozawa, Y

    1997-10-01

    The mechanism and role of phospholipase D (PLD) activation by platelet-activating factor (PAF) were examined with Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing wild-type PAF receptor (WT-H cells) and truncated PAF receptor lacking the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail (D-H cells). Treatment of D-H cells with PAF resulted in the rapid formation of Ins(1,4,5)P3, which was followed by a sustained phase for more than 10 min. In these cells, PAF-induced PLD activation lasted for more than 20 min. In contrast, PLD activation in WT-H cells was transient. PAF stimulation caused the biphasic formation of 1,2-diacylglycerol (DG) in both types of cell. The first phase was rapid and transient, coinciding with the Ins(1,4,5)P3 peak. The second sustained phase of DG formation was attenuated by butanol, which produces phosphatidylbutanol at the expense of phosphatidic acid (PA) by transphosphatidylation activity of PLD, and by propranolol, a selective inhibitor for PA phosphohydrolase catalysing the conversion of PA into DG. The DG level returned nearly to basal at 20 min after PAF stimulation in WT-H cells, whereas in D-H cells the elevated DG level was sustained for more than 20 min. The profile of translocation of protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) to membrane was similar to that of DG formation. In WT-H cells, PKCalpha was transiently associated with membranes and then returned to the cytosol. However, in D-H cells PKCalpha was rapidly translocated to and remained in membranes for more than 20 min. Butanol suppressed this sustained translocation of PKCalpha. Furthermore the mRNA levels of c-fos and c-jun by PAF in WT-H cells were much lower than those in D-H cells. Propranolol and butanol at concentrations that inhibited the formation of DG suppressed the PAF-induced mRNA expression of c-fos and c-jun. Taken together, the prolonged PLD activation in D-H cells confirmed a primary role for phospholipase C/PKC in PLD activation by PAF. Furthermore the results obtained here suggest that

  5. Tyrosine kinase activity of a chimeric insulin-like-growth-factor-1 receptor containing the insulin receptor C-terminal domain. Comparison with the tyrosine kinase activities of the insulin and insulin-like-growth-factor-1 receptors using a cell-free system.

    PubMed

    Mothe, I; Tartare, S; Kowalski-Chauvel, A; Kaliman, P; Van Obberghen, E; Ballotti, R

    1995-03-15

    In a previous study, we showed that a chimeric insulin-like-growth-factor-1 (IGF-1) receptor, with the beta subunit C-terminal part of the insulin receptor was more efficient in stimulating glycogen synthesis and p44mapk activity compared to the wild-type IFG-1 receptor [Tartare, S., Mothe, I., Kowalski-Chauvel, A., Breittmayer, J.-P., Ballotti, R. & Van Obberghen, E. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 11449-11455]. These data indicate that the receptor C-terminal domain plays an important role in the transmission of biological effects. To understand the molecular basis of the differences in receptor specificity, we studied the characteristics of insulin, IGF-1 and chimeric receptor tyrosine kinase activities in a cell-free system. We found that, compared to wild-type insulin and IGF-1 receptors, the chimeric receptor showed a decrease in (a) autophosphorylation, (b) tyrosine kinase activity towards insulin receptor substrate-1 and the insulin receptor-(1142-1158)-peptide, and (c) the ability to activate phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. However, for all the effects measured in a cell-free system, the chimeric receptor displayed an increased response to IGF-1 compared to the native IGF-1 receptor. Concerning the cation dependence of the tyrosine kinase activity, we showed that, at 10 mM Mg2+, the ligand-stimulated phosphorylation of poly(Glu80Tyr20) by both insulin receptor and chimeric receptor was increased by Mn2+. Conversely at 50 mM Mg2+, the chimeric receptor behaved like the IGF-1 receptor, since the presence of Mn2+ decreased the stimulatory effect of IGF-1 on their kinase activity. Furthermore, the Km of the chimeric receptor for ATP was increased compared to the wild-type receptors. These data demonstrate that the replacement of the C-terminal tail of the IGF-1 receptor by that of the insulin receptor has changed the receptor characteristics studied in a cell-free system. Our findings indicate that the C-terminal domain of the insulin receptor beta subunit plays a

  6. [Beta]-Adrenergic Receptor Activation Rescues Theta Frequency Stimulation-Induced LTP Deficits in Mice Expressing C-Terminally Truncated NMDA Receptor GluN2A Subunits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, Teena D.; Watabe, Ayako M.; Indersmitten, Tim; Komiyama, Noboru H.; Grant, Seth G. N.; O'Dell, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Through protein interactions mediated by their cytoplasmic C termini the GluN2A and GluN2B subunits of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) have a key role in the formation of NMDAR signaling complexes at excitatory synapses. Although these signaling complexes are thought to have a crucial role in NMDAR-dependent forms of synaptic plasticity such as long-term…

  7. The C-terminal portion of the tail fiber protein of bacteriophage lambda is responsible for binding to LamB, its receptor at the surface of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Hofnung, M; Charbit, A

    2000-01-01

    Bacteriophage lambda adsorbs to its Escherichia coli K-12 host by interacting with LamB, its cell-surface receptor. We fused C-terminal portions of J, the tail fiber protein of lambda, to maltose-binding protein. Solid-phase binding assays demonstrated that a purified fusion protein comprising only the last 249 residues of J could bind to LamB trimers and inhibited recognition by anti-LamB antibodies. Electron microscopy further demonstrated that the fusion protein could also bind to LamB at the surface of intact cells. This interaction prevented lambda adsorption but affected only partially maltose uptake. PMID:10629200

  8. A Conserved Motif in the Membrane Proximal C-Terminal Tail of Human Muscarinic M1 Acetylcholine Receptors Affects Plasma Membrane Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ehlert, Frederick J.; Shults, Crystal A.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the functional role of a conserved motif, F(x)6LL, in the membrane proximal C-tail of the human muscarinic M1 (hM1) receptor. By use of site-directed mutagenesis, several different point mutations were introduced into the C-tail sequence 423FRDTFRLLL431. Wild-type and mutant hM1 receptors were transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, and the amount of plasma membrane-expressed receptor was determined by use of intact, whole-cell [3H]N-methylscopolamine binding assays. The plasma membrane expression of hM1 receptors possessing either L430A or L431A or both point mutations was significantly reduced compared with the wild type. The hM1 receptor possessing a L430A/L431A double-point mutation was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and atropine treatment caused the redistribution of the mutant receptor from the ER to the plasma membrane. Atropine treatment also caused an increase in the maximal response and potency of carbachol-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis elicited by the L430A/L431A mutant. The effect of atropine on the L430A/L431A receptor mutant suggests that L430 and L431 play a role in folding hM1 receptors, which is necessary for exit from the ER. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we also identified amino acid residues at the base of transmembrane-spanning domain 1 (TM1), V46 and L47, that, when mutated, reduce the plasma membrane expression of hM1 receptors in an atropine-reversible manner. Overall, these mutagenesis data show that amino acid residues in the membrane-proximal C-tail and base of TM1 are necessary for hM1 receptors to achieve a transport-competent state. PMID:19841475

  9. Galaxy7TM: flexible GPCR-ligand docking by structure refinement.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyu Rie; Seok, Chaok

    2016-07-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play important physiological roles related to signal transduction and form a major group of drug targets. Prediction of GPCR-ligand complex structures has therefore important implications to drug discovery. With previously available servers, it was only possible to first predict GPCR structures by homology modeling and then perform ligand docking on the model structures. However, model structures generated without explicit consideration of specific ligands of interest can be inaccurate because GPCR structures can be affected by ligand binding. The Galaxy7TM server, freely accessible at http://galaxy.seoklab.org/7TM, improves an input GPCR structure by simultaneous ligand docking and flexible structure refinement using GALAXY methods. The server shows better performance in both ligand docking and GPCR structure refinement than commonly used programs AutoDock Vina and Rosetta MPrelax, respectively. PMID:27131365

  10. Galaxy7TM: flexible GPCR–ligand docking by structure refinement

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gyu Rie; Seok, Chaok

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play important physiological roles related to signal transduction and form a major group of drug targets. Prediction of GPCR–ligand complex structures has therefore important implications to drug discovery. With previously available servers, it was only possible to first predict GPCR structures by homology modeling and then perform ligand docking on the model structures. However, model structures generated without explicit consideration of specific ligands of interest can be inaccurate because GPCR structures can be affected by ligand binding. The Galaxy7TM server, freely accessible at http://galaxy.seoklab.org/7TM, improves an input GPCR structure by simultaneous ligand docking and flexible structure refinement using GALAXY methods. The server shows better performance in both ligand docking and GPCR structure refinement than commonly used programs AutoDock Vina and Rosetta MPrelax, respectively. PMID:27131365

  11. The electrostatic interactions of relaxin-3 with receptor RXFP4 and the influence of its B-chain C-terminal conformation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Yi; Guo, Yu-Qi; Zhang, Wei-Jie; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Ya-Li; Xu, Zeng-Guang; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2014-07-01

    Relaxin-3 (also known as insulin-like peptide 7) is an insulin/relaxin-superfamily peptide hormone that can bind and activate three relaxin-family peptide receptors: RXFP3, RXFP4, and RXFP1. Recently, we identified key electrostatic interactions between relaxin-3 and its cognate receptor RXFP3 by using a charge-exchange mutagenesis approach. In the present study, the electrostatic interactions between relaxin-3 and RXFP4 were investigated with the same approach. Mutagenesis of the negatively charged extracellular residues of human RXFP4 identified a conserved EXXXD(100-104) motif that is essential for RXFP4 activation by relaxin-3. Mutagenesis of the conserved positively charged Arg residues of relaxin-3 demonstrated that B12Arg, B16Arg and B26Arg were all involved in the binding and activation of RXFP4, especially B26Arg. The activity complementation between the mutant ligands and the mutant receptors suggested two probable electrostatic interaction pairs: Glu100 of RXFP4 versus B26Arg of relaxin-3, and Asp104 of RXFP4 versus both B12Arg and B16Arg of relaxin-3. For interaction with the essential EXXXD motifs of both RXFP3 and RXFP4, a folding-back conformation of the relaxin-3 B-chain C-terminus seems to be critical, because it brings B26Arg sufficiently close to B12Arg and B16Arg. To test this hypothesis, we replaced the conserved B23Gly-B24Gly dipeptide of relaxin-3 with an Ala-Ser dipeptide that occupied the corresponding position of insulin-like peptide 5 and resulted in an extended helical conformation. The mutant relaxin-3 showed a significant decrease in receptor-activation potency towards both RXFP3 and RXFP4, suggesting that a folding-back conformation of the B-chain C-terminus was important for relaxin-3 to efficiently interact with the EXXXD motifs of both receptors. PMID:24802387

  12. Small C-terminal Domain Phosphatase 3 Dephosphorylates the Linker Sites of Receptor-regulated Smads (R-Smads) to Ensure Transforming Growth Factor β (TGFβ)-mediated Germ Layer Induction in Xenopus Embryos.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guanni; Hu, Zhirui; Min, Zheying; Yan, Xiaohua; Guan, Zhenpo; Su, Hanxia; Fu, Yu; Ma, Xiaopeng; Chen, Ye-Guang; Zhang, Michael Q; Tao, Qinghua; Wu, Wei

    2015-07-10

    Germ layer induction is one of the earliest events shortly after fertilization that initiates body formation of vertebrate embryos. In Xenopus, the maternally deposited transcriptional factor VegT promotes the expression of zygotic Nodal/Activin ligands that further form a morphogen gradient along the vegetal-animal axis and trigger the induction of the three germ layers. Here we found that SCP3 (small C-terminal domain phosphatase 3) is maternally expressed and vegetally enriched in Xenopus embryos and is essential for the timely induction of germ layers. SCP3 is required for the full activation of Nodal/Activin and bone morphogenetic protein signals and functions via dephosphorylation in the linker regions of receptor-regulated Smads. Consistently, the linker regions of receptor-regulated Smads are heavily phosphorylated in fertilized eggs, and this phosphorylation is gradually removed when embryos approach the midblastula transition. Knockdown of maternal SCP3 attenuates these dephosphorylation events and the activation of Nodal/Activin and bone morphogenetic protein signals after midblastula transition. This study thus suggested that the maternal SCP3 serves as a vegetally enriched, intrinsic factor to ensure a prepared status of Smads for their activation by the upcoming ligands during germ layer induction of Xenopus embryos. PMID:26013826

  13. DAP12 Stabilizes the C-terminal Fragment of the Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-2 (TREM2) and Protects against LPS-induced Pro-inflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Li; Chen, Xiao-Fen; Zhang, Zhen-Lian; Wang, Zhe; Shi, Xin-Zhen; Xu, Kai; Zhang, Yun-Wu; Xu, Huaxi; Bu, Guojun

    2015-06-19

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2) is a DAP12-associated receptor expressed in microglia, macrophages, and other myeloid-derived cells. Previous studies have suggested that TREM2/DAP12 signaling pathway reduces inflammatory responses and promotes phagocytosis of apoptotic neurons. Recently, TREM2 has been identified as a risk gene for Alzheimer disease (AD). Here, we show that DAP12 stabilizes the C-terminal fragment of TREM2 (TREM2-CTF), a substrate for γ-secretase. Co-expression of DAP12 with TREM2 selectively increased the level of TREM2-CTF with little effects on that of full-length TREM2. The interaction between DAP12 and TREM2 is essential for TREM2-CTF stabilization as a mutant form of DAP12 with disrupted interaction with TREM2 failed to exhibit such an effect. Silencing of either Trem2 or Dap12 gene significantly exacerbated pro-inflammatory responses induced by lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Importantly, overexpression of either full-length TREM2 or TREM2-CTF reduced LPS-induced inflammatory responses. Taken together, our results support a role of DAP12 in stabilizing TREM2-CTF, thereby protecting against excessive pro-inflammatory responses. PMID:25957402

  14. Potent inhibition of angiotensin AT1 receptor signaling by RGS8: importance of the C-terminal third exon part of its RGS domain.

    PubMed

    Song, Dan; Nishiyama, Mariko; Kimura, Sadao

    2016-10-01

    R4/B subfamily RGS (regulator of G protein signaling) proteins play roles in regulation of many GPCR-mediated responses. Multiple RGS proteins are usually expressed in a cell, and it is difficult to point out which RGS protein species are functionally important in the cell. To evaluate intrinsic potency of these RGS proteins, we compared inhibitory effects of RGS1, RGS2, RGS3, RGS4, RGS5, RGS8 and RGS16 on AT1 receptor signaling. Intracellular Ca(2+) responses to angiotensin II were markedly attenuated by transiently expressed RGS2, RGS3 and RGS8, compared to weak inhibition by RGS1, RGS4, RGS5 and RGS16. N-terminally deleted RGS2 (RGS2 domain) lost this potent inhibitory effect, whereas RGS domains of RGS3 and RGS8 showed strong inhibition similar to those of the full-length proteins. To investigate key determinants that specify the differences in potency, we constructed chimeric domains by replacing one or two of three exon parts of RGS8 domain with the corresponding part of RGS5. The chimeric RGS8 domains containing the first or the second exon part of RGS5 showed strong inhibitory effects similar to that of wild type RGS8, but the chimeric domain with the third exon part of RGS5 lost its activity. On the contrary, replacement of the third exon part of RGS5 with the corresponding residues of RGS8 increased the inhibitory effect. The role of the third exon part of RGS8 domain was further confirmed with the chimeric RGS8/RGS4 domains. These results indicate the potent inhibitory activity of RGS8 among R4/B subfamily proteins and importance of the third exon. PMID:26754208

  15. Measles Virus (MV) Nucleoprotein Binds to a Novel Cell Surface Receptor Distinct from FcγRII via Its C-Terminal Domain: Role in MV-Induced Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Laine, David; Trescol-Biémont, Marie-Claude; Longhi, Sonia; Libeau, Geneviève; Marie, Julien C.; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Azocar, Olga; Diallo, Adama; Canard, Bruno; Rabourdin-Combe, Chantal; Valentin, Hélène

    2003-01-01

    During acute measles virus (MV) infection, an efficient immune response occurs, followed by a transient but profound immunosuppression. MV nucleoprotein (MV-N) has been reported to induce both cellular and humoral immune responses and paradoxically to account for immunosuppression. Thus far, this latter activity has been attributed to MV-N binding to human and murine FcγRII. Here, we show that apoptosis of MV-infected human thymic epithelial cells (TEC) allows the release of MV-N in the extracellular compartment. This extracellular N is then able to bind either to MV-infected or uninfected TEC. We show that recombinant MV-N specifically binds to a membrane protein receptor, different from FcγRII, highly expressed on the cell surface of TEC. This new receptor is referred to as nucleoprotein receptor (NR). In addition, different Ns from other MV-related morbilliviruses can also bind to FcγRII and/or NR. We show that the region of MV-N responsible for binding to NR maps to the C-terminal fragment (NTAIL). Binding of MV-N to NR on TEC triggers sustained calcium influx and inhibits spontaneous cell proliferation by arresting cells in the G0 and G1 phases of the cell cycle. Finally, MV-N binds to both constitutively expressed NR on a large spectrum of cells from different species and to human activated T cells, leading to suppression of their proliferation. These results provide evidence that MV-N, after release in the extracellular compartment, binds to NR and thereby plays a role in MV-induced immunosuppression. PMID:14557619

  16. Sugar-induced endocytosis of plant 7TM-RGS proteins

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Nguyen; Urano, Daisuke; Srba, Miroslav; Fischer, Lukas; Jones, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    Plant cells use sugars mainly as a source or store of energy and carbon skeletons for anabolic reactions and for osmotic regulation. The perception of sugars and their responses are rather complex including the heterotrimeric G protein pathway and a seven-transmembrane RGS molecule. Previously, we found that endocytosis of the 7TM-RGS leads to sustained activation of the G protein pathway in the genetic model Arabidopsis. Here we show that other plants possess similar endocytosis systems of the 7TM-RGS proteins. A phosphorylation site essential for the endocytosis is well conserved in land plant 7TM-RGS proteins. In addition, conifer and tobacco 7TM-RGS proteins are internalized in response to sugar. These results indicate a universal mechanism to activate G signaling by endocytosis in plant cells that have 7TM-RGS proteins. PMID:23154506

  17. Soluble form of complement C3b/C4b receptor (CR1) results from a proteolytic cleavage in the C-terminal region of CR1 transmembrane domain.

    PubMed Central

    Hamer, I; Paccaud, J P; Belin, D; Maeder, C; Carpentier, J L

    1998-01-01

    The complement C3b/C4b receptor (CR1) is an integral protein, anchored in the plasma membrane through a hydrophobic domain of 25 amino acids, but is also found in the plasma in soluble form (sCR1). A recombinant, soluble form of CR1 has been demonstrated to reduce complement-dependent tissue injury in animal models of ischaemia/reperfusion. In view of the important pathophysiological relevance of sCR1, we have investigated the mechanisms governing CR1 release by using various mutated and chimaeric receptors transiently expressed in COS cells. Pulse-chase experiments revealed that (1) sCR1 is produced by a proteolytic process, (2) the cleavage site lies within the C-terminus of CR1 transmembrane domain, (3) the proteolytic process involves a fully glycosylated CR1 form and (4) this process takes place in late secretory vesicles or at the plasma membrane. PMID:9405292

  18. Human Neuropeptide S Receptor Is Activated via a Gαq Protein-biased Signaling Cascade by a Human Neuropeptide S Analog Lacking the C-terminal 10 Residues.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yuan; Lu, Bin; Ma, Qiang; Wu, Gang; Lai, Xiangru; Zang, Jiashu; Shi, Ying; Liu, Dongxiang; Han, Feng; Zhou, Naiming

    2016-04-01

    Human neuropeptide S (NPS) and its cognate receptor regulate important biological functions in the brain and have emerged as a future therapeutic target for treatment of a variety of neurological and psychiatric diseases. The human NPS (hNPS) receptor has been shown to dually couple to Gαs- and Gαq-dependent signaling pathways. The human NPS analog hNPS-(1-10), lacking 10 residues from the C terminus, has been shown to stimulate Ca(2+)mobilization in a manner comparable with full-length hNPSin vitrobut seems to fail to induce biological activityin vivo Here, results derived from a number of cell-based functional assays, including intracellular cAMP-response element (CRE)-driven luciferase activity, Ca(2+)mobilization, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, show that hNPS-(1-10) preferentially activates Gαq-dependent Ca(2+)mobilization while exhibiting less activity in triggering Gαs-dependent CRE-driven luciferase activity. We further demonstrate that both Gαq- and Gαs-coupled signaling pathways contribute to full-length hNPS-mediated activation of ERK1/2, whereas hNPS-(1-10)-promoted ERK1/2 activation is completely inhibited by the Gαqinhibitor UBO-QIC but not by the PKA inhibitor H89. Moreover, the results of Ala-scanning mutagenesis of hNPS-(1-13) indicated that residues Lys(11)and Lys(12)are structurally crucial for the hNPS receptor to couple to Gαs-dependent signaling. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that hNPS-(1-10) is a biased agonist favoring Gαq-dependent signaling. It may represent a valuable chemical probe for further investigation of the therapeutic potential of human NPS receptor-directed signalingin vivo. PMID:26865629

  19. High Affinity Agonists of the Neuropeptide Y (NPY) Y4 Receptor Derived from the C-Terminal Pentapeptide of Human Pancreatic Polypeptide (hPP): Synthesis, Stereochemical Discrimination, and Radiolabeling.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Kilian K; Ertl, Thomas; Dukorn, Stefanie; Keller, Max; Bernhardt, Günther; Reiser, Oliver; Buschauer, Armin

    2016-07-14

    The diastereomeric mixture of d/l-2,7-diaminooctanedioyl-bis(YRLRY-NH2) (BVD-74D, 2) was described in the literature as a high affinity Y4 receptor agonist. Here we report on the synthesis and pharmacological characterization of the pure diastereomers (2R,7R)- and (2S,7S)-2 and a series of homo- and heterodimeric analogues in which octanedioic acid was used as an achiral linker. To investigate the role of the Arg residues, one or two arginines were replaced by Ala. Moreover, N(ω)-(6-aminohexylaminocarbonyl)Arg was introduced as an arginine replacement (17). (2R,7R)-2 was superior to (2S,7S)-2 in binding and functional cellular assays and equipotent with 17. [(3)H]Propionylation of one amino group in the linker of (2R,7R)-2 or at the primary amino group in 17 resulted in high affinity Y4R radioligands ([(3)H]-(2R,7R)-10, [(3)H]18) with subnanomolar Kd values. PMID:27223253

  20. A Novel Signaling Pathway Mediated by the Nuclear Targeting of C-Terminal Fragments of Mammalian Patched 1

    PubMed Central

    Kagawa, Hiroki; Shino, Yuka; Kobayashi, Daigo; Demizu, Syunsuke; Shimada, Masumi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Kawahara, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    Background Patched 1 (Ptc1) is a polytopic receptor protein that is essential for growth and differentiation. Its extracellular domains accept its ligand, Sonic Hedgehog, while the function of its C-terminal intracellular domain is largely obscure. Principal Findings In this study, we stably expressed human Ptc1 protein in HeLa cells and found that it is subjected to proteolytic cleavage at the C-terminus, resulting in the generation of soluble C-terminal fragments. These fragments accumulated in the nucleus, while the N-terminal region of Ptc1 remained in the cytoplasmic membrane fractions. Using an anti-Ptc1 C-terminal domain antibody, we provide conclusive evidence that C-terminal fragments of endogenous Ptc1 accumulate in the nucleus of C3H10T1/2 cells. Similar nuclear accumulation of endogenous C-terminal fragments was observed not only in C3H10T1/2 cells but also in mouse embryonic primary cells. Importantly, the C-terminal fragments of Ptc1 modulate transcriptional activity of Gli1. Conclusions Although Ptc1 protein was originally thought to be restricted to cell membrane fractions, our findings suggest that its C-terminal fragments can function as an alternative signal transducer that is directly transported to the cell nucleus. PMID:21533246

  1. In vitro pharmacological evaluation of the radiolabeled C-terminal substance P analogue Lys-Phe-Phe-Gly-Leu-Met-NH2: Does a specific binding site exist?

    PubMed

    Tomczyszyn, Aleksandra; Csibrany, Balazs; Keresztes, Attila; Mallareddy, Jayapal Reddy; Dyniewicz, Jolanta; Misicka, Aleksandra; Toth, Geza; Lipkowski, Andrzej W

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper, we report the synthesis, radiolabeling and comprehensive pharmacological evaluation of a C-terminally truncated tachykinin derivative, 3H-KFFGLM-NH2. The C-terminal fragments of endogenous tachykinins are pharmacophores responsible for interaction with the tachykinin receptors NK1, NK2 and NK3. The N-terminal fragments are responsible for modulation of receptor selectivity and interactions with other receptor systems. To evaluate and separate the function of an NK-pharmacophore from the activity of its parent neurokinin, KFFGLM-NH2 was synthesized in both tritiated and unlabeled forms. It has been proposed that the obtained NK-binding profiles of specific reference ligands and KFFGLM-NH2 differentiate monomeric and dimeric forms of NK receptors. We hypothesize that dimers of NK receptors could be specific receptor(s) for C-terminal fragments of all neurokinins as well as their C-terminal fragments, including H-KFFGLM-NH2. Dissociation of dimers into monomers opens access to additional allosteric binding sites. Fully elongated undecapeptide substance P interacts with both the "tachykinin pocket" and the "allosteric pocket" on the monomeric NK1 receptor, resulting in high and selective activation. However, C-terminal hexapeptide fragment analogues, recognizing only the "tachykinin pocket", may have less specific interactions with all tachykinin receptors in both monomeric and dimeric forms. PMID:25574743

  2. Design and Synthesis of Peptide YY Analogues with C-terminal Backbone Amide-to-Ester Modifications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Peptide YY (PYY) is a gut hormone that activates the G protein-coupled neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptors, and because of its appetite reducing actions, it is evaluated as an antiobesity drug candidate. The C-terminal tail of PYY is crucial for activation of the NPY receptors. Here, we describe the design and preparation of a series of PYY(3–36) depsipeptide analogues, in which backbone amide-to-ester modifications were systematically introduced in the C-terminal. Functional NPY receptor assays and circular dichroism revealed that the ψ(CONH) bonds at positions 30–31 and 33–34 are particularly important for receptor interaction and that the latter is implicated in Y2 receptor selectivity. PMID:24900634

  3. Reactivity of C-terminal cysteines with HNO.

    PubMed

    Keceli, Gizem; Toscano, John P

    2014-06-10

    Nitroxyl (HNO), a potential heart failure therapeutic, is known to target cysteine residues to form sulfinamides and/or disulfides. Because HNO-derived modifications may depend on their local environment, we have investigated the reactivity of HNO with cysteine derivatives and C-terminal cysteine-containing peptides at physiological pH and temperature. Our findings indicate that the nature of HNO-derived modifications of C-terminal cysteines is affected by the C-terminal carboxylate. Apart from the lack of sulfinamide formation, these studies have revealed the presence of new products, a sulfohydroxamic acid derivative (RS(O)2NHOH) and a thiosulfonate (RS(O)2SR), presumably produced under our experimental conditions via the intermediacy of a cyclic structure that is hydrolyzed to give a sulfenic acid (RSOH). Moreover, these modifications are formed independent of oxygen. PMID:24869490

  4. Dihydromunduletone Is a Small-Molecule Selective Adhesion G Protein-Coupled Receptor Antagonist.

    PubMed

    Stoveken, Hannah M; Bahr, Laura L; Anders, M W; Wojtovich, Andrew P; Smrcka, Alan V; Tall, Gregory G

    2016-09-01

    Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs) have emerging roles in development and tissue maintenance and is the most prevalent GPCR subclass mutated in human cancers, but to date, no drugs have been developed to target them in any disease. aGPCR extracellular domains contain a conserved subdomain that mediates self-cleavage proximal to the start of the 7-transmembrane domain (7TM). The two receptor protomers, extracellular domain and amino terminal fragment (NTF), and the 7TM or C-terminal fragment remain noncovalently bound at the plasma membrane in a low-activity state. We recently demonstrated that NTF dissociation liberates the 7TM N-terminal stalk, which acts as a tethered-peptide agonist permitting receptor-dependent heterotrimeric G protein activation. In many cases, natural aGPCR ligands are extracellular matrix proteins that dissociate the NTF to reveal the tethered agonist. Given the perceived difficulty in modifying extracellular matrix proteins to create aGPCR probes, we developed a serum response element (SRE)-luciferase-based screening approach to identify GPR56/ADGRG1 small-molecule inhibitors. A 2000-compound library comprising known drugs and natural products was screened for GPR56-dependent SRE activation inhibitors that did not inhibit constitutively active Gα13-dependent SRE activation. Dihydromunduletone (DHM), a rotenoid derivative, was validated using cell-free aGPCR/heterotrimeric G protein guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding reconstitution assays. DHM inhibited GPR56 and GPR114/ADGRG5, which have similar tethered agonists, but not the aGPCR GPR110/ADGRF1, M3 muscarinic acetylcholine, or β2 adrenergic GPCRs. DHM inhibited tethered peptide agonist-stimulated and synthetic peptide agonist-stimulated GPR56 but did not inhibit basal activity, demonstrating that it antagonizes the peptide agonist. DHM is a novel aGPCR antagonist and potentially useful chemical probe that may be developed as a future aGPCR therapeutic. PMID:27338081

  5. Akt kinase C-terminal modifications control activation loop dephosphorylation and enhance insulin response

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Tung O.; Zhang, Jin; Tiegs, Brian C.; Blumhof, Brian; Yan, Linda; Keny, Nikhil; Penny, Morgan; Li, Xue; Pascal, John M.; Armen, Roger S.; Rodeck, Ulrich; Penn, Raymond B.

    2015-01-01

    The Akt protein kinase, also known as protein kinase B, plays key roles in insulin receptor signalling and regulates cell growth, survival and metabolism. Recently, we described a mechanism to enhance Akt phosphorylation that restricts access of cellular phosphatases to the Akt activation loop (Thr308 in Akt1 or protein kinase B isoform alpha) in an ATP-dependent manner. In the present paper, we describe a distinct mechanism to control Thr308 dephosphorylation and thus Akt deactivation that depends on intramolecular interactions of Akt C-terminal sequences with its kinase domain. Modifications of amino acids surrounding the Akt1 C-terminal mTORC2 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2) phosphorylation site (Ser473) increased phosphatase resistance of the phosphorylated activation loop (pThr308) and amplified Akt phosphorylation. Furthermore, the phosphatase-resistant Akt was refractory to ceramide-dependent dephosphorylation and amplified insulin-dependent Thr308 phosphorylation in a regulated fashion. Collectively, these results suggest that the Akt C-terminal hydrophobic groove is a target for the development of agents that enhance Akt phosphorylation by insulin. PMID:26201515

  6. The human SNARE protein Ykt6 mediates its own palmitoylation at C-terminal cysteine residues

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The yeast SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptor) protein Ykt6 was shown to mediate palmitoylation of the fusion factor Vac8 in a reaction essential for the fusion of vacuoles. Here I present evidence that hYkt6 (human Ykt6) has self-palmitoylating activity. Incubation of recombinant hYkt6 with [3H]Pal-CoA ([3H]palmitoyl-CoA) leads to covalent attachment of palmitate to C-terminal cysteine residues. The N-terminal domain of human Ykt6 contains a Pal-CoA binding site and is required for the reaction. PMID:15479160

  7. C-Terminal Protein Characterization by Mass Spectrometry: Isolation of C-Terminal Fragments from Cyanogen Bromide-Cleaved Protein

    PubMed Central

    Nika, Heinz; Hawke, David H.; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue

    2014-01-01

    A sample preparation method for protein C-terminal peptide isolation from cyanogen bromide (CNBr) digests has been developed. In this strategy, the analyte was reduced and carboxyamidomethylated, followed by CNBr cleavage in a one-pot reaction scheme. The digest was then adsorbed on ZipTipC18 pipette tips for conjugation of the homoserine lactone-terminated peptides with 2,2′-dithiobis (ethylamine) dihydrochloride, followed by reductive release of 2-aminoethanethiol from the derivatives. The thiol-functionalized internal and N-terminal peptides were scavenged on activated thiol sepharose, leaving the C-terminal peptide in the flow-through fraction. The use of reversed-phase supports as a venue for peptide derivatization enabled facile optimization of the individual reaction steps for throughput and completeness of reaction. Reagents were replaced directly on the support, allowing the reactions to proceed at minimal sample loss. By this sequence of solid-phase reactions, the C-terminal peptide could be recognized uniquely in mass spectra of unfractionated digests by its unaltered mass signature. The use of the sample preparation method was demonstrated with low-level amounts of a whole, intact model protein. The C-terminal fragments were retrieved selectively and efficiently from the affinity support. The use of covalent chromatography for C-terminal peptide purification enabled recovery of the depleted material for further chemical and/or enzymatic manipulation. The sample preparation method provides for robustness and simplicity of operation and is anticipated to be expanded to gel-separated proteins and in a scaled-up format to high-throughput protein profiling in complex biological mixtures. PMID:24688319

  8. C-Terminal Engineering of CXCL12 and CCL5 Chemokines: Functional Characterization by Electrophysiological Recordings

    PubMed Central

    Petit-Hartlein, Isabelle; Sadir, Rabia; Revilloud, Jean; Caro, Lydia; Vivaudou, Michel; Fieschi, Franck; Moreau, Christophe; Vivès, Corinne

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines comprised of 70–100 amino acids. The chemokines CXCL12 and CCL5 are the endogenous ligands of the CXCR4 and CCR5 G protein-coupled receptors that are also HIV co-receptors. Biochemical, structural and functional studies of receptors are ligand-consuming and the cost of commercial chemokines hinders their use in such studies. Here, we describe methods for the expression, refolding, purification, and functional characterization of CXCL12 and CCL5 constructs incorporating C-terminal epitope tags. The model tags used were hexahistidines and Strep-Tag for affinity purification, and the double lanthanoid binding tag for fluorescence imaging and crystal structure resolution. The ability of modified and purified chemokines to bind and activate CXCR4 and CCR5 receptors was tested in Xenopus oocytes expressing the receptors, together with a Kir3 G-protein activated K+ channel that served as a reporter of receptor activation. Results demonstrate that tags greatly influence the biochemical properties of the recombinant chemokines. Besides, despite the absence of any evidence for CXCL12 or CCL5 C-terminus involvement in receptor binding and activation, we demonstrated unpredictable effects of tag insertion on the ligand apparent affinity and efficacy or on the ligand dissociation. These tagged chemokines should constitute useful tools for the selective purification of properly-folded chemokines receptors and the study of their native quaternary structures. PMID:24498095

  9. Solid Phase Synthesis of C-Terminal Boronic Acid Peptides.

    PubMed

    Behnam, Mira A M; Sundermann, Tom R; Klein, Christian D

    2016-05-01

    Peptides and peptidomimetics with a C-terminal boronic acid group have prolific applications in numerous fields of research, but their synthetic accessibility remains problematic. A convenient, high yield synthesis of peptide-boronic acids on a solid support is described here, using commercially available 1-glycerol polystyrene resin. The method is compatible with Fmoc chemistry and offers a versatile approach to aryl and alkyl aminoboronic acids without additional purification steps. PMID:27104613

  10. Crystallization of the C-terminal globular domain of avian reovirus fibre

    SciTech Connect

    Raaij, Mark J. van; Hermo Parrado, X. Lois; Guardado Calvo, Pablo; Fox, Gavin C.; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Costas, Celina; Martínez-Costas, José; Benavente, Javier

    2005-07-01

    Partial proteolysis of the avian reovirus cell-attachment protein σC yields a major homotrimeric C-terminal fragment that presumably contains the receptor-binding domain. This fragment has been crystallized in the presence and absence of zinc sulfate and cadmium sulfate. One of the crystal forms diffracts synchrotron X-rays to 2.2–2.3 Å. Avian reovirus fibre, a homotrimer of the σC protein, is responsible for primary host-cell attachment. Using the protease trypsin, a C-terminal σC fragment containing amino acids 156–326 has been generated which was subsequently purified and crystallized. Two different crystal forms were obtained, one grown in the absence of divalent cations and belonging to space group P6{sub 3}22 (unit-cell parameters a = 75.6, c = 243.1 Å) and one grown in the presence of either zinc or cadmium sulfate and belonging to space group P321 (unit-cell parameters a = 74.7, c = 74.5 Å and a = 73.1, c = 69.9 Å for the Zn{sup II}- and Cd{sup II}-grown crystals, respectively). The first crystal form diffracted synchrotron radiation to 3.0 Å resolution and the second form to 2.2–2.3 Å. Its closest related structure, the C-terminal fragment of mammalian reovirus fibre, has only 18% sequence identity and molecular-replacement attempts were unsuccessful. Therefore, a search is under way for suitable heavy-atom derivatives and attempts are being made to grow protein crystals containing selenomethionine instead of methionine.

  11. Nonlinear dynamics of C-terminal tails in cellular microtubules.

    PubMed

    Sekulic, Dalibor L; Sataric, Bogdan M; Zdravkovic, Slobodan; Bugay, Aleksandr N; Sataric, Miljko V

    2016-07-01

    The mechanical and electrical properties, and information processing capabilities of microtubules are the permanent subject of interest for carrying out experiments in vitro and in silico, as well as for theoretical attempts to elucidate the underlying processes. In this paper, we developed a new model of the mechano-electrical waves elicited in the rows of very flexible C-terminal tails which decorate the outer surface of each microtubule. The fact that C-terminal tails play very diverse roles in many cellular functions, such as recruitment of motor proteins and microtubule-associated proteins, motivated us to consider their collective dynamics as the source of localized waves aimed for communication between microtubule and associated proteins. Our approach is based on the ferroelectric liquid crystal model and it leads to the effective asymmetric double-well potential which brings about the conditions for the appearance of kink-waves conducted by intrinsic electric fields embedded in microtubules. These kinks can serve as the signals for control and regulation of intracellular traffic along microtubules performed by processive motions of motor proteins, primarly from kinesin and dynein families. On the other hand, they can be precursors for initiation of dynamical instability of microtubules by recruiting the proper proteins responsible for the depolymerization process. PMID:27475079

  12. Nonlinear dynamics of C-terminal tails in cellular microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekulic, Dalibor L.; Sataric, Bogdan M.; Zdravkovic, Slobodan; Bugay, Aleksandr N.; Sataric, Miljko V.

    2016-07-01

    The mechanical and electrical properties, and information processing capabilities of microtubules are the permanent subject of interest for carrying out experiments in vitro and in silico, as well as for theoretical attempts to elucidate the underlying processes. In this paper, we developed a new model of the mechano-electrical waves elicited in the rows of very flexible C-terminal tails which decorate the outer surface of each microtubule. The fact that C-terminal tails play very diverse roles in many cellular functions, such as recruitment of motor proteins and microtubule-associated proteins, motivated us to consider their collective dynamics as the source of localized waves aimed for communication between microtubule and associated proteins. Our approach is based on the ferroelectric liquid crystal model and it leads to the effective asymmetric double-well potential which brings about the conditions for the appearance of kink-waves conducted by intrinsic electric fields embedded in microtubules. These kinks can serve as the signals for control and regulation of intracellular traffic along microtubules performed by processive motions of motor proteins, primarly from kinesin and dynein families. On the other hand, they can be precursors for initiation of dynamical instability of microtubules by recruiting the proper proteins responsible for the depolymerization process.

  13. The C-Terminal Region Mesd Peptide Mimics Full-Length Mesd and Acts as an Inhibitor of Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cuihong; Lu, Wenyan; Zhang, Wei; Londoño-Joshi, Angelina I.; Buchsbaum, Donald J.; Bu, Guojun; Li, Yonghe

    2013-01-01

    While Mesd was discovered as a specialized molecular endoplasmic reticulum chaperone for the Wnt co-receptors LRP5 and LRP6, recombinant Mesd protein is able to bind to mature LRP5 and LRP6 on the cell surface and acts as a universal antagonist of LRP5/6 modulators. In our previous study, we found that the C-terminal region of Mesd, which is absent in sequences from invertebrates, is necessary and sufficient for binding to mature LRP6 on the cell surface. In the present studies, we further characterized the interaction between the C-terminal region Mesd peptide and LRP5/6. We found that Mesd C-terminal region-derived peptides block Mesd binding to LRP5 at the cell surface too. We also showed that there are two LRP5/6 binding sites within Mesd C-terminal region which contain several positively charged residues. Moreover, we demonstrated that the Mesd C-terminal region peptide, like the full-length Mesd protein, blocked Wnt 3A- and Rspodin1-induced Wnt/β-catenin signaling in LRP5- and LRP6- expressing cells, suppressed Wnt/β-catenin signaling in human breast HS578T cells and prostate cancer PC-3 cells, and inhibited cancer cell proliferation, although the full-length Mesd protein is more potent than its peptide. Finally, we found that treatment of the full-length Mesd protein and its C-terminal region peptide significantly increased chemotherapy agent Adriamycin-induced cytotoxicity in HS578T and PC-3 cells. Together, our results suggest that Mesd C-terminal region constitutes the major LRP5/6-binding domain, and that Mesd protein and its C-terminal region peptide have a potential therapeutic value in cancer. PMID:23469146

  14. Mutations in the C-terminal region affect subcellular localization of crucian carp herpesvirus (CaHV) GPCR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Gui, Lang; Chen, Zong-Yan; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2016-08-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are known as seven transmembrane domain receptors and consequently can mediate diverse biological functions via regulation of their subcellular localization. Crucian carp herpesvirus (CaHV) was recently isolated from infected fish with acute gill hemorrhage. CaHV GPCR of 349 amino acids (aa) was identified based on amino acid identity. A series of variants with truncation/deletion/substitution mutation in the C-terminal (aa 315-349) were constructed and expressed in fathead minnow (FHM) cells. The roles of three key C-terminal regions in subcellular localization of CaHV GPCR were determined. Lysine-315 (K-315) directed the aggregation of the protein preferentially at the nuclear side. Predicted N-myristoylation site (GGGWTR, aa 335-340) was responsible for punctate distribution in periplasm or throughout the cytoplasm. Predicted phosphorylation site (SSR, aa 327-329) and GGGWTR together determined the punctate distribution in cytoplasm. Detection of organelles localization by specific markers showed that the protein retaining K-315 colocalized with the Golgi apparatus. These experiments provided first evidence that different mutations of CaHV GPCR C-terminals have different affects on the subcellular localization of fish herpesvirus-encoded GPCRs. The study provided valuable information and new insights into the precise interactions between herpesvirus and fish cells, and could also provide useful targets for antiviral agents in aquaculture. PMID:27059239

  15. Expression and purification of the C-terminal fragments of TRPV5/6 channels.

    PubMed

    Kovalevskaya, Nadezda V; Schilderink, Nathalie; Vuister, Geerten W

    2011-11-01

    The transient receptor potential vanniloid 5 and 6 (TRPV5 and TRPV6) Ca(2+)-ion channels are crucial for the regulation of minute-to-minute whole body calcium homeostasis. They act as the gatekeepers of active Ca(2+) reabsorption in kidney and intestine, respectively. In spite of the great progress in the TRP channels characterization, very little is known at the atomic level about their structure and interactions with other proteins. To the major extent it is caused by difficulties in obtaining suitable samples. Here, we report expression and purification of 36 intracellular C-terminal fragments of TRPV5 and TRPV6 channels, for which no structural information is reported thus far. We demonstrate that these proteins contain intrinsically disordered regions and identify fragments suitable for biophysical characterization. By combining bioinformatic predictions and experimental results, we propose several criteria that may aid in designing a scheme for large-scale production of difficult proteins. PMID:21664972

  16. Effect of surface coating of KYb2F7:Tm3+ on optical properties and biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedraza, Francisco J.; Avalos, Julio C.; Yust, Brian G.; Tsin, Andrew; Sardar, Dhiraj K.

    2016-09-01

    This project aims to provide an insight on the effects of biocompatible polymers on the optical properties and the nanoparticle-cell interaction of KYb2F7:Tm3+ nanocrystals that exhibit strong near infrared (NIR) fluorescence. KYb2F7:Tm3+ nanocrystals were synthesized with a diameter of 20–30 nm and surface modified with poly(ethylene glycol), Pluronic® F-127, and poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone), due to the associated advantages. Some of these include biocompatibility and biodistribution in the instance of agglomeration and hydrophobicity as well as the addition of a targeting agent and drug loading by further functionalization. Despite the decrease in fluorescence intensity induced by the surface modification, thulium’s emission fingerprint was easily detected. Moreover, surface modified KYb2F7:Tm3+ nanocrystals failed to induce a toxic response on endothelial cells following a 24 h uptake period up to concentrations of 100 μg ml‑1. In vitro toxicity and confocal imaging have demonstrated the versatility of these NIR fluorescence nanocrystals in biomedical imaging, drug delivery, and photodynamic therapy.

  17. Effect of surface coating of KYb2F7:Tm(3+) on optical properties and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Pedraza, Francisco J; Avalos, Julio C; Yust, Brian G; Tsin, Andrew; Sardar, Dhiraj K

    2016-09-23

    This project aims to provide an insight on the effects of biocompatible polymers on the optical properties and the nanoparticle-cell interaction of KYb2F7:Tm(3+) nanocrystals that exhibit strong near infrared (NIR) fluorescence. KYb2F7:Tm(3+) nanocrystals were synthesized with a diameter of 20-30 nm and surface modified with poly(ethylene glycol), Pluronic(®) F-127, and poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone), due to the associated advantages. Some of these include biocompatibility and biodistribution in the instance of agglomeration and hydrophobicity as well as the addition of a targeting agent and drug loading by further functionalization. Despite the decrease in fluorescence intensity induced by the surface modification, thulium's emission fingerprint was easily detected. Moreover, surface modified KYb2F7:Tm(3+) nanocrystals failed to induce a toxic response on endothelial cells following a 24 h uptake period up to concentrations of 100 μg ml(-1). In vitro toxicity and confocal imaging have demonstrated the versatility of these NIR fluorescence nanocrystals in biomedical imaging, drug delivery, and photodynamic therapy. PMID:27518385

  18. A TRPV4 Channel C-terminal Folding Recognition Domain Critical for Trafficking and Function*

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Lei; Cao, Xu; Yang, Fan; Shi, Di-Jing; Tang, Yi-Quan; Zheng, Jie; Wang, KeWei

    2013-01-01

    The Ca2+-permeable transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 4 (TRPV4) channel mediates crucial physiological functions, such as calcium signaling, temperature sensing, and maintaining cell volume and energy homeostasis. Noticeably, most disease-causing genetic mutations are concentrated in the cytoplasmic domains. In the present study, we focused on the role of the TRPV4 C terminus in modulating protein folding, trafficking, and activity. By examining a series of C-terminal deletions, we identified a 20-amino acid distal region covering residues 838–857 that is critical for channel folding, maturation, and trafficking. Surface biotinylation, confocal imaging, and fluorescence-based calcium influx assay demonstrated that mutant proteins missing this region were trapped in the endoplasmic reticulum and unglycosylated, leading to accelerated degradation and loss of channel activity. Rosetta de novo structural modeling indicated that residues 838–857 assume a defined conformation, with Gly849 and Pro851 located at critical positions. Patch clamp recordings confirmed that lowering the temperature from 37 to 30 °C rescued channel activity of folding-defective mutants. Moreover, biochemical tests demonstrated that, in addition to participating in C-C interaction, the C terminus also interacts with the N terminus. Taken together, our findings indicate that the C-terminal region of TRPV4 is critical for channel protein folding and maturation, and the short distal segment plays an essential role in this process. Therefore, selectively disrupting the folding-sensitive region may present therapeutic potential for treating overactive TRPV4-mediated diseases, such as pain and skeletal dysplasias. PMID:23457335

  19. Structural differences between C-terminal regions of tropomyosin isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Śliwińska, Małgorzata

    2013-01-01

    Tropomyosins are actin-binding regulatory proteins which overlap end-to-end along the filament. High resolution structures of the overlap regions were determined for muscle and non-muscle tropomyosins in the absence of actin. Conformations of the junction regions bound to actin are unknown. In this work, orientation of the overlap on actin alone and on actin–myosin complex was evaluated by measuring FRET distances between a donor (AEDANS) attached to tropomyosin and an acceptor (DABMI) bound to actin’s Cys374. Donor was attached to the Cys residue introduced by site-directed mutagenesis near the C-terminal half of the overlap. The recombinant alpha-tropomyosin isoforms used in this study – skeletal muscle skTM, non-muscle TM2 and TM5a, and chimeric TM1b9a had various amino acid sequences of the N- and C-termini involved in the end-to-end overlap. The donor-acceptor distances calculated for each isoform varied between 36.4 Å and 48.1 Å. Rigor binding of myosin S1 increased the apparent FRET distances of skTM and TM2, but decreased the distances separating TM5a and TM1b9a from actin. The results show that isoform-specific sequences of the end-to-end overlaps determine orientations and dynamics of tropomyosin isoforms on actin. This can be important for specificity of tropomyosin in the regulation of actin filament diverse functions. PMID:24167776

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase cleaves a C-terminal peptide from human thrombin that inhibits host inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    van der Plas, Mariena J. A.; Bhongir, Ravi K. V.; Kjellström, Sven; Siller, Helena; Kasetty, Gopinath; Mörgelin, Matthias; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen known for its immune evasive abilities amongst others by degradation of a large variety of host proteins. Here we show that digestion of thrombin by P. aeruginosa elastase leads to the release of the C-terminal thrombin-derived peptide FYT21, which inhibits pro-inflammatory responses to several pathogen-associated molecular patterns in vitro and in vivo by preventing toll-like receptor dimerization and subsequent activation of down-stream signalling pathways. Thus, P. aeruginosa ‘hijacks' an endogenous anti-inflammatory peptide-based mechanism, thereby enabling modulation and circumvention of host responses. PMID:27181065

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase cleaves a C-terminal peptide from human thrombin that inhibits host inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    van der Plas, Mariena J A; Bhongir, Ravi K V; Kjellström, Sven; Siller, Helena; Kasetty, Gopinath; Mörgelin, Matthias; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen known for its immune evasive abilities amongst others by degradation of a large variety of host proteins. Here we show that digestion of thrombin by P. aeruginosa elastase leads to the release of the C-terminal thrombin-derived peptide FYT21, which inhibits pro-inflammatory responses to several pathogen-associated molecular patterns in vitro and in vivo by preventing toll-like receptor dimerization and subsequent activation of down-stream signalling pathways. Thus, P. aeruginosa 'hijacks' an endogenous anti-inflammatory peptide-based mechanism, thereby enabling modulation and circumvention of host responses. PMID:27181065

  2. Physical association of GPR54 C-terminal with protein phosphatase 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Barry J.; Wang Zixuan; Mobley, La'Tonya; Khosravi, Davood; Fujii, Nobutaka; Navenot, Jean-Marc; Peiper, Stephen C.

    2008-12-26

    KiSS1 was discovered as a metastasis suppressor gene and subsequently found to encode kisspeptins (KP), ligands for a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR), GPR54. This ligand-receptor pair was later shown to play a critical role in the neuro-endocrine regulation of puberty. The C-terminal cytoplasmic (C-ter) domain of GPR54 contains a segment rich in proline and arginine residues that corresponds to the primary structure of four overlapping SH3 binding motifs. Yeast two hybrid experiments identified the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-C) as an interacting protein. Pull-down experiments with GST fusion proteins containing the GPR54 C-ter confirmed binding to PP2A-C in cell lysates and these complexes contained phosphatase activity. The proline arginine rich segment is necessary for these interactions. The GPR54 C-ter bound directly to purified recombinant PP2A-C, indicating the GPR54 C-ter may form complexes involving the catalytic subunit of PP2A that regulate phosphorylation of critical signaling intermediates.

  3. Extrusion of the C-terminal Helix in Navel Orangeworm Moth Pheromone-Binding Protein (AtraPBP1) Controls Pheromone Binding†

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Xu, Xianzhong; Leal, Walter S.; Ames, James B.

    2011-01-01

    The navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Walker), is an agricultural insect pest that can be controlled by disrupting male-female communication with sex pheromones, a technique known as mating disruption. Insect pheromone-binding proteins (PBPs) provide fast transport of hydrophobic pheromones through aqueous sensillar lymph and promote sensitive delivery of pheromones to receptors. Here we present a mutational analysis on a PBP from Amyelois transitella (AtraPBP1) to evaluate how the C-terminal helix in this protein controls pheromone binding as a function of pH. Pheromone binds tightly to AtraPBP1 at neutral pH, but the binding is much weaker at pH below 5. Deletion of the entire C-terminal helix (residues 129–142) causes more than 100-fold increase in pheromone binding affinity at pH 5 and only a 1.5-fold increase at pH 7. A similar pH-dependent increase in pheromone binding is also seen for the H80A/H95A double mutant that promotes extrusion of the C-terminal helix by disabling salt bridges at each end of the helix. The single mutants (H80A and H95A) also exhibit pheromone binding at pH below 5, but with ~2-fold weaker affinity. NMR and circular dichroism data demonstrate a large overall structural change in each of these mutants at pH 4.5, indicating an extrusion of the C-terminal helix that profoundly affects the overall structure of the low pH form. Our results confirm that sequestration of the C-terminal helix at low pH as seen in the recent NMR structure may serve to block pheromone binding. We propose that extrusion of these C-terminal residues at neutral pH (or by the mutations in this study) exposes a hydrophobic cleft that promotes high affinity pheromone binding. PMID:21130734

  4. MAS C-Terminal Tail Interacting Proteins Identified by Mass Spectrometry- Based Proteomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Tirupula, Kalyan C.; Zhang, Dongmei; Osbourne, Appledene; Chatterjee, Arunachal; Desnoyer, Russ; Willard, Belinda; Karnik, Sadashiva S.

    2015-01-01

    Propagation of signals from G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in cells is primarily mediated by protein-protein interactions. MAS is a GPCR that was initially discovered as an oncogene and is now known to play an important role in cardiovascular physiology. Current literature suggests that MAS interacts with common heterotrimeric G-proteins, but MAS interaction with proteins which might mediate G protein-independent or atypical signaling is unknown. In this study we hypothesized that MAS C-terminal tail (Ct) is a major determinant of receptor-scaffold protein interactions mediating MAS signaling. Mass-spectrometry based proteomic analysis was used to comprehensively identify the proteins that interact with MAS Ct comprising the PDZ-binding motif (PDZ-BM). We identified both PDZ and non-PDZ proteins from human embryonic kidney cell line, mouse atrial cardiomyocyte cell line and human heart tissue to interact specifically with MAS Ct. For the first time our study provides a panel of PDZ and other proteins that potentially interact with MAS with high significance. A ‘cardiac-specific finger print’ of MAS interacting PDZ proteins was identified which includes DLG1, MAGI1 and SNTA. Cell based experiments with wild-type and mutant MAS lacking the PDZ-BM validated MAS interaction with PDZ proteins DLG1 and TJP2. Bioinformatics analysis suggested well-known multi-protein scaffold complexes involved in nitric oxide signaling (NOS), cell-cell signaling of neuromuscular junctions, synapses and epithelial cells. Majority of these protein hits were predicted to be part of disease categories comprising cancers and malignant tumors. We propose a ‘MAS-signalosome’ model to stimulate further research in understanding the molecular mechanism of MAS function. Identifying hierarchy of interactions of ‘signalosome’ components with MAS will be a necessary step in future to fully understand the physiological and pathological functions of this enigmatic receptor. PMID

  5. A C-terminal domain of GAP is sufficient to stimulate ras p21 GTPase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, M S; Hill, W S; Ng, A S; Vogel, U S; Schaber, M D; Scolnick, E M; Dixon, R A; Sigal, I S; Gibbs, J B

    1989-01-01

    The cDNA for bovine ras p21 GTPase activating protein (GAP) has been cloned and the 1044 amino acid polypeptide encoded by the clone has been shown to bind the GTP complexes of both normal and oncogenic Harvey (Ha) ras p21. To identify the regions of GAP critical for the catalytic stimulation of ras p21 GTPase activity, a series of truncated forms of GAP protein were expressed in Escherichia coli. The C-terminal 343 amino acids of GAP (residues 702-1044) were observed to bind Ha ras p21-GTP and stimulate Ha ras p21 GTPase activity with the same efficiency (kcat/KM congruent to 1 x 10(6) M-1 s-1 at 24 degrees C) as GAP purified from bovine brain or full-length GAP expressed in E. coli. Deletion of the final 61 amino acid residues of GAP (residues 986-1044) rendered the protein insoluble upon expression in E. coli. These results define a distinct catalytic domain at the C terminus of GAP. In addition, GAP contains amino acid similarity with the B and C box domains conserved among phospholipase C-II, the crk oncogene product, and the non-receptor tyrosine kinase oncogene products. This homologous region is located in the N-terminal half of GAP outside of the catalytic domain that stimulates ras p21 GTPase activity and may constitute a distinct structural or functional domain within the GAP protein. Images PMID:2545441

  6. Solution structure and dynamics of C-terminal regulatory domain of Vibrio vulnificus extracellular metalloprotease

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Ji-Hye; Kim, Heeyoun; Park, Jung Eun; Lee, Jung Sup; Lee, Weontae

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have determined solution structures of vEP C-terminal regulatory domain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer vEP C-ter100 has a compact {beta}-barrel structure with eight anti-parallel {beta}-strands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solution structure of vEP C-ter100 shares its molecular topology with that of the collagen-binding domain of collagenase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Residues in the {beta}3 region of vEP C-ter100 might be important in putative ligand/receptor binding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer vEP C-ter100 interacts strongly with iron ion. -- Abstract: An extracellular metalloprotease (vEP) secreted by Vibrio vulnificus ATCC29307 is a 45-kDa proteolytic enzyme that has prothrombin activation and fibrinolytic activities during bacterial infection. The action of vEP could result in clotting that could serve to protect the bacteria from the host defense machinery. Very recently, we showed that the C-terminal propeptide (C-ter100), which is unique to vEP, is involved in regulation of vEP activity. To understand the structural basis of this function of vEP C-ter100, we have determined the solution structure and backbone dynamics using multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The solution structure shows that vEP C-ter100 is composed of eight anti-parallel {beta}-strands with a unique fold that has a compact {beta}-barrel formation which stabilized by hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding networks. Protein dynamics shows that the overall structure, including loops, is very rigid and stabilized. By structural database analysis, we found that vEP C-ter100 shares its topology with that of the collagen-binding domain of collagenase, despite low sequence homology between the two domains. Fluorescence assay reveals that vEP C-ter100 interacts strongly with iron (Fe{sup 3+}). These findings suggest that vEP protease might recruit substrate molecules, such as collagen, by binding at C-ter100 and that vEP participates

  7. Age-dependent loss of the C-terminal amino acid from alpha crystallin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmons, T.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Antiserum made against the C-terminal region of alpha-A crystallin was used to monitor the purification of a tryptic peptide containing the C-terminus of the molecule from fetal versus adult bovine lenses. Mass spectral analysis of the peptide preparations obtained from these lenses demonstrated the presence of a peptide (T20) containing an intact C-terminus from fetal lenses and the presence of an additional peptide (T20') from older lenses that contained a cleaved C-terminal serine. These results demonstrate an age-dependent processing of alpha-A crystallin in the bovine lens, resulting in removal of the C-terminal amino acid residue.

  8. The activity of protein phosphatase 5 towards native clients is modulated by the middle- and C-terminal domains of Hsp90

    PubMed Central

    Haslbeck, Veronika; Eckl, Julia M.; Drazic, Adrian; Rutz, Daniel A.; Lorenz, Oliver R.; Zimmermann, Kerstin; Kriehuber, Thomas; Lindemann, Claudia; Madl, Tobias; Richter, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 5 is involved in the regulation of kinases and transcription factors. The dephosphorylation activity is modulated by the molecular chaperone Hsp90, which binds to the TPR-domain of protein phosphatase 5. This interaction is dependent on the C-terminal MEEVD motif of Hsp90. We show that C-terminal Hsp90 fragments differ in their regulation of the phosphatase activity hinting to a more complex interaction. Also hydrodynamic parameters from analytical ultracentrifugation and small-angle X-ray scattering data suggest a compact structure for the Hsp90-protein phosphatase 5 complexes. Using crosslinking experiments coupled with mass spectrometric analysis and structural modelling we identify sites, which link the middle/C-terminal domain interface of C. elegans Hsp90 to the phosphatase domain of the corresponding kinase. Studying the relevance of the domains of Hsp90 for turnover of native substrates we find that ternary complexes with the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) are cooperatively formed by full-length Hsp90 and PPH-5. Our data suggest that the direct stimulation of the phosphatase activity by C-terminal Hsp90 fragments leads to increased dephosphorylation rates. These are further modulated by the binding of clients to the N-terminal and middle domain of Hsp90 and their presentation to the phosphatase within the phosphatase-Hsp90 complex. PMID:26593036

  9. Identification of a new scaffold for hsp90 C-terminal inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huiping; Moroni, Elisabetta; Colombo, Giorgio; Blagg, Brian S J

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of Hsp90 C-terminal function is an advantageous therapeutic paradigm for the treatment of cancer. Currently, the majority of Hsp90 C-terminal inhibitors are derived from novobiocin, a natural product traditionally used as an antibiotic. Assisted by molecular docking studies, a scaffold containing a biphenyl moiety in lieu of the coumarin ring system found in novobiocin was identified for development of new Hsp90 C-terminal inhibitors. Initial structure-activity studies led to derivatives that manifest good antiproliferative activity against two breast cancer cell lines through Hsp90 inhibition. This platform serves as a scaffold upon which new Hsp90 C-terminal inhibitors can be readily assembled for further investigation. PMID:24900777

  10. C-Terminal Modification of Fully Unprotected Peptide Hydrazides via in Situ Generation of Isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Alexander A; Simon, Mark D; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2016-03-18

    A method for chemo- and regioselective conjugation of nucleophiles to fully unprotected peptides and proteins via in situ generation of C-terminal isocyanates is reported. Oxidation of C-terminal peptide hydrazides in aqueous media followed by Curtius rearrangement of acyl azides reliably generates isocyanates, which react with a variety of external nucleophiles, such as hydrazines, hydrazides, aromatic thiols, and hydroxylamines. Multiple peptides and a 53 kDa protein hydrazide were conjugated to different nucleophiles using this reaction. PMID:26948719

  11. Contribution of Chitinase A’s C-Terminal Vacuolar Sorting Determinant to the Study of Soluble Protein Compartmentation

    PubMed Central

    Stigliano, Egidio; Di Sansebastiano, Gian-Pietro; Neuhaus, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Plant chitinases have been studied for their importance in the defense of crop plants from pathogen attacks and for their peculiar vacuolar sorting determinants. A peculiarity of the sequence of many family 19 chitinases is the presence of a C-terminal extension that seems to be important for their correct recognition by the vacuole sorting machinery. The 7 amino acids long C-terminal vacuolar sorting determinant (CtVSD) of tobacco chitinase A is necessary and sufficient for the transport to the vacuole. This VSD shares no homology with other CtVSDs such as the phaseolin’s tetrapeptide AFVY (AlaPheValTyr) and it is also sorted by different mechanisms. While a receptor for this signal has not yet been convincingly identified, the research using the chitinase CtVSD has been very informative, leading to the observation of phenomena otherwise difficult to observe such as the presence of separate vacuoles in differentiating cells and the existence of a Golgi-independent route to the vacuole. Thanks to these new insights in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-vacuole transport, GFPChi (Green Fluorescent Protein carrying the chitinase A CtVSD) and other markers based on chitinase signals will continue to help the investigation of vacuolar biogenesis in plants. PMID:24945312

  12. Exploiting conformational dynamics in drug discovery: design of C-terminal inhibitors of Hsp90 with improved activities

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, Elisabetta; Zhao, Huiping; Blagg, Brian S.J.; Colombo, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    The interaction that occurs between molecules is a dynamic process that impacts both structural and conformational properties of the ligand and the ligand binding site. Herein, we investigate the dynamic cross-talk between a protein and the ligand as a source for new opportunities in ligand design. Analysis of the formation/disappearance of protein pockets produced in response to a first-generation inhibitor assisted in the identification of functional groups that could be introduced onto scaffolds to facilitate optimal binding, which allowed for increased binding with previously uncharacterized regions. MD simulations were used to elucidate primary changes that occur in the Hsp90 C-terminal binding pocket in the presence of first-generation ligands. This data was then used to design ligands that adapt to these receptor conformations, which provides access to an energy landscape that is not visible in a static model. The newly synthesized compounds demonstrated anti-proliferative activity at ~150 nanomolar concentration. The method identified herein may be used to design chemical probes that provide additional information on structural variations of Hsp90 C-terminal binding site. PMID:24397468

  13. Multifunctional role of the Pitx2 homeodomain protein C-terminal tail.

    PubMed

    Amendt, B A; Sutherland, L B; Russo, A F

    1999-10-01

    Pitx2 is a newly described bicoid-like homeodomain transcription factor that is defective in Rieger syndrome and shows a striking leftward developmental asymmetry. We have previously shown that Pitx2 (also called Ptx2 and RIEG) transactivates a reporter gene containing a bicoid enhancer and synergistically transactivates the prolactin promoter in the presence of the POU homeodomain protein Pit-1. In this report, we focused on the C-terminal region which is mutated in some Rieger patients and contains a highly conserved 14-amino-acid element. Deletion analysis of Pitx2 revealed that the C-terminal 39-amino-acid tail represses DNA binding activity and is required for Pitx2-Pit-1 interaction and Pit-1 synergism. Pit-1 interaction with the Pitx2 C terminus masks the inhibitory effect and promotes increased DNA binding activity. Interestingly, cotransfection of an expression vector encoding the C-terminal 39 amino acids of Pitx2 specifically inhibits Pitx2 transactivation activity. In contrast, the C-terminal 39-amino-acid peptide interacts with Pitx2 to increase its DNA binding activity. These data suggest that the C-terminal tail intrinsically inhibits the Pitx2 protein and that this inhibition can be overcome by interaction with other transcription factors to allow activation during development. PMID:10490637

  14. Multifunctional Role of the Pitx2 Homeodomain Protein C-Terminal Tail

    PubMed Central

    Amendt, Brad A.; Sutherland, Lillian B.; Russo, Andrew F.

    1999-01-01

    Pitx2 is a newly described bicoid-like homeodomain transcription factor that is defective in Rieger syndrome and shows a striking leftward developmental asymmetry. We have previously shown that Pitx2 (also called Ptx2 and RIEG) transactivates a reporter gene containing a bicoid enhancer and synergistically transactivates the prolactin promoter in the presence of the POU homeodomain protein Pit-1. In this report, we focused on the C-terminal region which is mutated in some Rieger patients and contains a highly conserved 14-amino-acid element. Deletion analysis of Pitx2 revealed that the C-terminal 39-amino-acid tail represses DNA binding activity and is required for Pitx2-Pit-1 interaction and Pit-1 synergism. Pit-1 interaction with the Pitx2 C terminus masks the inhibitory effect and promotes increased DNA binding activity. Interestingly, cotransfection of an expression vector encoding the C-terminal 39 amino acids of Pitx2 specifically inhibits Pitx2 transactivation activity. In contrast, the C-terminal 39-amino-acid peptide interacts with Pitx2 to increase its DNA binding activity. These data suggest that the C-terminal tail intrinsically inhibits the Pitx2 protein and that this inhibition can be overcome by interaction with other transcription factors to allow activation during development. PMID:10490637

  15. Crystal Structure of the C-terminal Region of Streptococcus mutans Antigen I/II and Characterization of Salivary Agglutinin Adherence Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Matthew R.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Crowley, Paula J.; Kelly, Charles; Mitchell, Tim J.; Brady, L. Jeannine; Deivanayagam, Champion

    2012-05-29

    The Streptococcus mutans antigen I/II (AgI/II) is a cell surface-localized protein that adheres to salivary components and extracellular matrix molecules. Here we report the 2.5 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the complete C-terminal region of AgI/II. The C-terminal region is comprised of three major domains: C{sub 1}, C{sub 2}, and C{sub 3}. Each domain adopts a DE-variant IgG fold, with two {beta}-sheets whose A and F strands are linked through an intramolecular isopeptide bond. The adherence of the C-terminal AgI/II fragments to the putative tooth surface receptor salivary agglutinin (SAG), as monitored by surface plasmon resonance, indicated that the minimal region of binding was contained within the first and second DE-variant-IgG domains (C{sub 1} and C{sub 2}) of the C terminus. The minimal C-terminal region that could inhibit S. mutans adherence to SAG was also confirmed to be within the C{sub 1} and C{sub 2} domains. Competition experiments demonstrated that the C- and N-terminal regions of AgI/II adhere to distinct sites on SAG. A cleft formed at the intersection between these C{sub 1} and C{sub 2} domains bound glucose molecules from the cryo-protectant solution, revealing a putative binding site for its highly glycosylated receptor SAG. Finally, electron microscopy images confirmed the elongated structure of AgI/II and enabled building a composite tertiary model that encompasses its two distinct binding regions.

  16. Arrestin2/Clathrin Interaction is Regulated by Key N- and C-terminal Regions in Arrestin2+

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Ronald C.; Kang, Dong Soo; Benovic, Jeffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    The interaction of non-visual arrestins with clathrin is an important step in mediating the endocytosis of cell surface receptors. Previous studies have shown that mutation of the clathrin-binding box in arrestin leads to severe defects in arrestin mediated trafficking. However, little is known about how arrestin/clathrin interaction is regulated. Here we show that both the N- and C-terminal regions of arrestin2 function to inhibit basal interaction with clathrin. Truncation analysis revealed that clathrin binding increases as the C-tail of arrestin2 is shortened while site-directed mutagenesis identified Glu-404, Glu-405, and Glu-406 as being primarily responsible for this inhibition. Mutagenesis also identified Lys-4, Arg-7, Lys-10, and Lys-11 within the N-terminus as playing a key role regulating clathrin binding. Based on similarities with visual arrestin, Lys-10 and Lys-11 likely function as phospho-sensors in arrestin2 to initially discriminate the phosphorylation status of target receptors. Analysis of the arrestin2 structure reveals that Arg-7, Lys-10 and Lys-11 are in close proximity to Glu-389 and Asp-390, suggesting that these residues may form intramolecular interactions. In fact, simultaneous mutation of Glu-389 and Asp-390 also leads to enhanced clathrin binding. These results reveal that multiple intramolecular interactions coordinately regulate arrestin2 interaction with clathrin, highlighting this interaction as a critical step in regulating receptor trafficking. PMID:19555118

  17. 1H NMR sequential assignments and secondary structure analysis of human fibrinogen gamma-chain C-terminal residues 385-411

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, K.H.; Burke, C.; Lindon, J.N.; Kloczewiak, M. )

    1990-04-03

    The human fibrinogen gamma-chain, C-terminal fragment, residues 385-411, i.e., KIIPFNRLTIGEGQQHHLGGAKQAGDV, contains two biologically important functional domains: (1) fibrinogen gamma-chain polymerization center and (2) platelet receptor recognition domain. This peptide was isolated from cyanogen bromide degraded human fibrinogen and was investigated by 1H NMR (500 MHz) spectroscopy. Sequence-specific assignments of NMR resonances were obtained for backbone and side-chain protons via analysis of 2D NMR COSY, double quantum filtered COSY, HOHAHA, and NOESY spectra. The N-terminal segment from residues 385-403 seems to adopt a relatively fixed solution conformation. Strong sequential alpha CH-NH NOESY connectivities and a continuous run of NH-NH NOESY connectivities and several long-lived backbone NH protons strongly suggest the presence of multiple-turn or helix-like structure for residues 390 to about 402. The conformation of residues 403-411 seems to be much less constrained as evidenced by the presence of weaker and sequential alpha CH-NH NOEs, the absence of sequential NH-NH NOEs, and the lack of longer lived amides. Chemical shifts of resonances from backbone and side-chain protons of the C-terminal dodecapeptide, residues 400-411, differ significantly from those of the parent chain, suggesting that some preferred C-terminal conformation does exist.

  18. A C-terminal aldehyde analog of the insect kinins inhibits diuresis in the housefly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The insect kinins are present in a wide variety of insects and function as potent diuretic peptides in flies. A C-terminal aldehyde insect kinin analog, Fmoc-RFFPWG-H (R-LK-CHO), demonstrates stimulation of Malpighian tubule fluid secretion in crickets, but shows inhibition of both in vitro and in v...

  19. Degradation of C-terminal tag sequences on domain antibodies purified from E. coli supernatant

    PubMed Central

    Lykkemark, Simon; Mandrup, Ole Aalund; Friis, Niels Anton; Kristensen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Expression of recombinant proteins often takes advantage of peptide tags expressed in fusion to allow easy detection and purification of the expressed proteins. However, as the fusion peptides most often are flexible appendages at the N- or C-terminal, proteolytic cleavage may result in removal of the tag sequence. Here, we evaluated the functionality and stability of 14 different combinations of commonly used tags for purification and detection of recombinant antibody fragments. The tag sequences were inserted in fusion with the c-terminal end of a domain antibody based on the HEL4 scaffold in a phagemid vector. This particular antibody fragment was able to refold on the membrane after blotting, allowing us to detect c-terminal tag breakdown by use of protein A in combination with detection of the tags in the specific constructs. The degradation of the c-terminal tags suggested specific sites to be particularly prone to proteolytic cleavage, leaving some of the tag combinations partially or completely degraded. This specific work illustrates the importance of tag design with regard to recombinant antibody expression in E. coli, but also aids the more general understanding of protein expression. PMID:25426869

  20. Effect of C-terminal truncation on enzyme properties of recombinant amylopullulanase from Thermoanaerobacter pseudoethanolicus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fu-Pang; Ho, Yi-Hsuan; Lin, Hsu-Yang; Lin, Hui-Ju

    2012-05-01

    The smallest and enzymatically active molecule, TetApuQ818, was localized within the C-terminal Q818 amino acid residue after serial C-terminal truncation analysis of the recombinant amylopullulanase molecule (TetApuM955) from Thermoanaerobacter pseudoethanolicus. Kinetic analyses indicated that the overall catalytic efficiency, k (cat)/K (m), of TetApuQ818 was 8-32% decreased for the pullulan and the soluble starch substrate, respectively. Changes to the substrate affinity, K (m), and the turnover rate, k (cat), were decreased significantly in both enzymatic activities of TetApuQ818. TetApuQ818 exhibited less thermostability than TetApuM955 when the temperature was raised above 85°C, but it had similar substrate-binding ability and hydrolysis products toward various substrates as TetApuM955 did. Both enzymes showed similar spectroscopies of fluorescence and circular dichroism, suggesting the active folding conformation was maintained after this C-terminal Q818 deletion. This study suggested that the binding ability of insoluble starch by TetApuM955 did not rely on the putative C-terminal carbohydrate binding module family 20 (CBM20) and two FnIII regions of TetApu, though the integrity of the AamyC module of TetApuQ818 was required for the enzyme activity. PMID:22392283

  1. MscCG from Corynebacterium glutamicum: functional significance of the C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Becker, Michael; Krämer, Reinhard

    2015-10-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is used in microbial biotechnology for the production of amino acids, e.g., glutamate and lysine. Excretion of glutamate into the surrounding medium under production conditions is mediated by MscCG, an MscS-type mechanosensitive channel. In difference to most other MscS-type channel proteins, MscCG carries, in addition to the N-terminal pore domain, a long C-terminal domain that amounts to about half of the size of the protein and harbors an additional transmembrane segment. Here we study the impact of the C-terminal domain on both functions of MscCG as mechanosensitive channel and as glutamate exporter. Sequential truncations of the C-terminal domain were applied, as well as deletion of particular subdomains, replacement of these segments by other amino acid sequences, and sequence randomization. Several parameters of cell physiology and bioenergetics of the obtained mutants related to both glutamate excretion and response to osmotic stress were quantified. All three subdomains of the C-terminal domain, i.e., the periplasmic loop, the fourth transmembrane segment, and the cytoplasmic loop, proved to be of core significance for MscCG function, in particular for glutamate excretion. PMID:26033538

  2. Degradation of C-terminal tag sequences on domain antibodies purified from E. coli supernatant.

    PubMed

    Lykkemark, Simon; Mandrup, Ole Aalund; Friis, Niels Anton; Kristensen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Expression of recombinant proteins often takes advantage of peptide tags expressed in fusion to allow easy detection and purification of the expressed proteins. However, as the fusion peptides most often are flexible appendages at the N- or C-terminal, proteolytic cleavage may result in removal of the tag sequence. Here, we evaluated the functionality and stability of 14 different combinations of commonly used tags for purification and detection of recombinant antibody fragments. The tag sequences were inserted in fusion with the c-terminal end of a domain antibody based on the HEL4 scaffold in a phagemid vector. This particular antibody fragment was able to refold on the membrane after blotting, allowing us to detect c-terminal tag breakdown by use of protein A in combination with detection of the tags in the specific constructs. The degradation of the c-terminal tags suggested specific sites to be particularly prone to proteolytic cleavage, leaving some of the tag combinations partially or completely degraded. This specific work illustrates the importance of tag design with regard to recombinant antibody expression in E. coli, but also aids the more general understanding of protein expression. PMID:25426869

  3. Defining the Intrinsically Disordered C-Terminal Domain of SSB Reveals DNA-Mediated Compaction.

    PubMed

    Green, Matthew; Hatter, Louise; Brookes, Emre; Soultanas, Panos; Scott, David J

    2016-01-29

    The bacterial single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein SSB is a strictly conserved and essential protein involved in diverse functions of DNA metabolism, including replication and repair. SSB comprises a well-characterized tetrameric core of N-terminal oligonucleotide binding OB folds that bind ssDNA and four intrinsically disordered C-terminal domains of unknown structure that interact with partner proteins. The generally accepted, albeit speculative, mechanistic model in the field postulates that binding of ssDNA to the OB core induces the flexible, undefined C-terminal arms to expand outwards encouraging functional interactions with partner proteins. In this structural study, we show that the opposite is true. Combined small-angle scattering with X-rays and neutrons coupled to coarse-grained modeling reveal that the intrinsically disordered C-terminal arms are relatively collapsed around the tetrameric OB core and collapse further upon ssDNA binding. This implies a mechanism of action, in which the disordered C-terminal domain collapse traps the ssDNA and pulls functional partners onto the ssDNA. PMID:26707201

  4. A summary of staphylococcal C-terminal SH3b_5 cell wall binding domains.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Staphylococcal peptidoglycan hydrolases are a potential new source of antimicrobials. A large subset of these proteins contain a C-terminal SH3b_5 cell wall binding domain that has been shown for some to be essential for accurate cell wall recognition and subsequent staphylolytic activity, propert...

  5. IMPLICATION OF C-TERMINAL DELETION ON THE STRUCTURE AND STABILITY OF BOVINE B-CASEIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The properties of bovine Beta-casein with its C-terminal 20 residues removed by chymosin digestion, 1-192 fragment (f1-192), were examined and compared to the parent protein (Beta-casein). The f1-192 molecule could not form a complex with the hydrophobic probe ANS; this convincingly illustrates that...

  6. Alpha-A crystallin: quantitation of C-terminal modification during lens aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takemoto, L.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the C-terminal region of alpha-A crystallin is susceptible to age-dependent, posttranslational modification. To quantitate the amount of modification, alpha-A crystallin was purified from total proteins of the aging bovine lens, then digested with lys-C endoproteinase. Reverse phase, high pressure liquid chromatography was used to resolve and quantitate the resulting peptides, to determine the amount of C-terminal peptide relative to peptides from other regions of the protein that have not been reported to undergo modification. The results indicate that relative to alpha-A crystallin from newborn lens, posttranslational modification has occurred in approximately 45-55% of the C-terminal region from mature lens. These results demonstrate extensive modification of the C-terminal region of alpha-A crystallin from the mature lens, indicating that during the aging process, posttranslational modifications in this region may make significant contributions to the aggregated state and/or molecular chaperone properties of the molecule.

  7. Predictors of intact and C-terminal fibroblast growth factor 23 in Gambian children

    PubMed Central

    Braithwaite, Vickie; Jones, Kerry S; Assar, Shima; Schoenmakers, Inez; Prentice, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Elevated C-terminal fibroblast growth factor 23 (C-FGF23) concentrations have been reported in Gambian children with and without putative Ca-deficiency rickets. The aims of this study were to investigate whether i) elevated C-FGF23 concentrations in Gambian children persist long term; ii) they are associated with higher intact FGF23 concentrations (I-FGF23), poor iron status and shorter 25-hydroxyvitamin D half-life (25OHD-t1/2); and iii) the persistence and predictors of elevated FGF23 concentrations differ between children with and without a history of rickets. Children (8–16 years, n=64) with a history of rickets and a C-FGF23 concentration >125 RU/ml (bone deformity (BD), n=20) and local community children with a previously measured elevated C-FGF23 concentration (LC+, n=20) or a previously measured C-FGF23 concentration within the normal range (LC−, n=24) participated. BD children had no remaining signs of bone deformities. C-FGF23 concentration had normalised in BD children, but remained elevated in LC+ children. All the children had I-FGF23 concentration within the normal range, but I-FGF23 concentration was higher and iron status poorer in LC+ children. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D was the strongest negative predictor of I-FGF23 concentration (R2=18%; P=0.0006) and soluble transferrin receptor was the strongest positive predictor of C-FGF23 concentration (R2=33%; P≤0.0001). C-FGF23 and I-FGF23 concentrations were poorly correlated with each other (R2=5.3%; P=0.07). 25OHD-t1/2 was shorter in BD children than in LC− children (mean (s.d.): 24.5 (6.1) and 31.5 (11.5) days respectively; P=0.05). This study demonstrated that elevated C-FGF23 concentrations normalised over time in Gambian children with a history of rickets but not in local children, suggesting a different aetiology; that children with resolved rickets had a shorter 25OHD-t1/2, suggesting a long-standing increased expenditure of 25OHD, and that iron deficiency is a predictor of elevated C

  8. Evidence for new C-terminally truncated variants of α- and β-tubulins

    PubMed Central

    Aillaud, Chrystelle; Bosc, Christophe; Saoudi, Yasmina; Denarier, Eric; Peris, Leticia; Sago, Laila; Taulet, Nicolas; Cieren, Adeline; Tort, Olivia; Magiera, Maria M.; Janke, Carsten; Redeker, Virginie; Andrieux, Annie; Moutin, Marie-Jo

    2016-01-01

    Cellular α-tubulin can bear various carboxy-terminal sequences: full-length tubulin arising from gene neosynthesis is tyrosinated, and two truncated variants, corresponding to detyrosinated and Δ2 α‑tubulin, result from the sequential cleavage of one or two C-terminal residues, respectively. Here, by using a novel antibody named 3EG that is highly specific to the –EEEG C-terminal sequence, we demonstrate the occurrence in neuronal tissues of a new αΔ3‑tubulin variant corresponding to α1A/B‑tubulin deleted of its last three residues (EEY). αΔ3‑tubulin has a specific distribution pattern: its quantity in the brain is similar to that of αΔ2-tubulin around birth but is much lower in adult tissue. This truncated α1A/B-tubulin variant can be generated from αΔ2-tubulin by the deglutamylases CCP1, CCP4, CCP5, and CCP6 but not by CCP2 and CCP3. Moreover, using 3EG antibody, we identify a C‑terminally truncated β-tubulin form with the same –EEEG C-terminal sequence. Using mass spectrometry, we demonstrate that β2A/B-tubulin is modified by truncation of the four C-terminal residues (EDEA). We show that this newly identified βΔ4-tubulin is ubiquitously present in cells and tissues and that its level is constant throughout the cell cycle. These new C-terminally truncated α- and β-tubulin variants, both ending with –EEEG sequence, are expected to regulate microtubule physiology. Of interest, the αΔ3-tubulin seems to be related to dynamic microtubules, resembling tyrosinated-tubulin rather than the other truncated variants, and may have critical function(s) in neuronal development. PMID:26739754

  9. Evidence for new C-terminally truncated variants of α- and β-tubulins.

    PubMed

    Aillaud, Chrystelle; Bosc, Christophe; Saoudi, Yasmina; Denarier, Eric; Peris, Leticia; Sago, Laila; Taulet, Nicolas; Cieren, Adeline; Tort, Olivia; Magiera, Maria M; Janke, Carsten; Redeker, Virginie; Andrieux, Annie; Moutin, Marie-Jo

    2016-02-15

    Cellular α-tubulin can bear various carboxy-terminal sequences: full-length tubulin arising from gene neosynthesis is tyrosinated, and two truncated variants, corresponding to detyrosinated and Δ2 α‑tubulin, result from the sequential cleavage of one or two C-terminal residues, respectively. Here, by using a novel antibody named 3EG that is highly specific to the -EEEG C-terminal sequence, we demonstrate the occurrence in neuronal tissues of a new αΔ3‑tubulin variant corresponding to α1A/B‑tubulin deleted of its last three residues (EEY). αΔ3‑tubulin has a specific distribution pattern: its quantity in the brain is similar to that of αΔ2-tubulin around birth but is much lower in adult tissue. This truncated α1A/B-tubulin variant can be generated from αΔ2-tubulin by the deglutamylases CCP1, CCP4, CCP5, and CCP6 but not by CCP2 and CCP3. Moreover, using 3EG antibody, we identify a C‑terminally truncated β-tubulin form with the same -EEEG C-terminal sequence. Using mass spectrometry, we demonstrate that β2A/B-tubulin is modified by truncation of the four C-terminal residues (EDEA). We show that this newly identified βΔ4-tubulin is ubiquitously present in cells and tissues and that its level is constant throughout the cell cycle. These new C-terminally truncated α- and β-tubulin variants, both ending with -EEEG sequence, are expected to regulate microtubule physiology. Of interest, the αΔ3-tubulin seems to be related to dynamic microtubules, resembling tyrosinated-tubulin rather than the other truncated variants, and may have critical function(s) in neuronal development. PMID:26739754

  10. The C-terminal loop of aldehyde reductase determines the substrate and inhibitor specificity.

    PubMed

    Barski, O A; Gabbay, K H; Bohren, K M

    1996-11-12

    Human aldehyde reductase has a preference for carboxyl group-containing negatively charged substrates. It belongs to the NADPH-dependent aldo-keto reductase superfamily whose members are in part distinguished by unique C-terminal loops. To probe the role of the C-terminal loops in determining substrate specificities in these enzymes, two arginine residues, Arg308 and Arg311, located in the C-terminal loop of aldehyde reductase, and not found in any other C-terminal loop, were replaced with alanine residues. The catalytic efficiency of the R311A mutant for aldehydes containing a carboxyl group is reduced 150-250-fold in comparison to that of the wild-type enzyme, while substrates not containing a negative charge are unaffected. The R311A mutant is also significantly less sensitive to inhibition by dicarboxylic acids, indicating that Arg311 interacts with one of the carboxyl groups. The inhibition pattern indicates that the other carboxyl group binds to the anion binding site formed by Tyr49, His112, and the nicotinamide moiety of NADP+. The correlation between inhibitor potency and the length of the dicarboxylic acid molecules suggests a distance of approximately 10 A between the amino group of Arg311 and the anion binding site in the aldehyde reductase molecule. The sensitivity of inhibition of the R311A mutant by several commercially available aldose reductase inhibitors (ARIs) was variable, with tolrestat and zopolrestat becoming more potent inhibitors (30- and 5-fold, respectively), while others remained the same or became less potent. The catalytic properties, substrate specificity, and susceptibility to inhibition of the R308A mutant remained similar to that of the wild-type enzyme. The data provide direct evidence for C-terminal loop participation in determining substrate and inhibitor specificity of aldo-keto reductases and specifically identifies Arg311 as the basis for the carboxyl-containing substrate preference of aldehyde reductase. PMID:8916913

  11. Fmoc solid-phase synthesis of C-terminal modified peptides by formation of a backbone cyclic urethane moiety.

    PubMed

    Elashal, Hader E; Cohen, Ryan D; Raj, Monika

    2016-08-11

    C-terminally modified peptides are of high significance due to the therapeutic properties that accompany various C-terminal functional groups and the ability to manipulate them for further applications. Thus, there is a great necessity for an effective solid phase technique for the synthesis of C-terminally modified peptides. Here, we report a universal solid phase strategy for the synthesis of various C-terminal modified peptides which is independent of the type of resins, linkers, and unnatural moieties typically needed for C-terminal modifications. The technique proceeds by the modification of C-terminal serine to a cyclic urethane moiety which results in the activation of the backbone amide chain for nucleophilic displacement by various nucleophiles to generate C-terminally modified acids, esters, N-aryl amides, and alcohols. This cyclic urethane technique (CUT) also provides a general strategy for synthesis of C-terminal protected peptides that can be used for convergent synthesis of large peptides. The C-terminal protecting groups are cleaved by facile hydrolysis to release the free peptide. PMID:27407005

  12. GBNV encoded movement protein (NSm) remodels ER network via C-terminal coiled coil domain

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Pratibha; Savithri, H.S.

    2015-08-15

    Plant viruses exploit the host machinery for targeting the viral genome–movement protein complex to plasmodesmata (PD). The mechanism by which the non-structural protein m (NSm) of Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV) is targeted to PD was investigated using Agrobacterium mediated transient expression of NSm and its fusion proteins in Nicotiana benthamiana. GFP:NSm formed punctuate structures that colocalized with mCherry:plasmodesmata localized protein 1a (PDLP 1a) confirming that GBNV NSm localizes to PD. Unlike in other movement proteins, the C-terminal coiled coil domain of GBNV NSm was shown to be involved in the localization of NSm to PD, as deletion of this domain resulted in the cytoplasmic localization of NSm. Treatment with Brefeldin A demonstrated the role of ER in targeting GFP NSm to PD. Furthermore, mCherry:NSm co-localized with ER–GFP (endoplasmic reticulum targeting peptide (HDEL peptide fused with GFP). Co-expression of NSm with ER–GFP showed that the ER-network was transformed into vesicles indicating that NSm interacts with ER and remodels it. Mutations in the conserved hydrophobic region of NSm (residues 130–138) did not abolish the formation of vesicles. Additionally, the conserved prolines at positions 140 and 142 were found to be essential for targeting the vesicles to the cell membrane. Further, systematic deletion of amino acid residues from N- and C-terminus demonstrated that N-terminal 203 amino acids are dispensable for the vesicle formation. On the other hand, the C-terminal coiled coil domain when expressed alone could also form vesicles. These results suggest that GBNV NSm remodels the ER network by forming vesicles via its interaction through the C-terminal coiled coil domain. Interestingly, NSm interacts with NP in vitro and coexpression of these two proteins in planta resulted in the relocalization of NP to PD and this relocalization was abolished when the N-terminal unfolded region of NSm was deleted. Thus, the NSm

  13. A C-TERMINAL INSECT KININ ANALOG ENHANCES INHIBITION OF WEIGHT GAIN AND INDUCES SIGNIFICANT MORTALITY IN HELICOVERPA ZEA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The first reported examples of C-terminal aldehyde analogs of an insect neuropeptide are described. They are hexapeptide insect kinin analogs Boc-VFFPWG-H and Fmoc-RFFPWG-H. Activity observed for these modified analogs in an in vitro insect diuretic assay confirms that the C-terminal aldehyde group...

  14. Structure of a C-terminal [alpha]-helix cap in a synthetic peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, H.X.; Kallenbach, N.R. ); Lyu, P.C.; Wemmer, D.E. )

    1994-02-09

    We report here a novel C-terminal capping structure in a peptide helix, in which the NH of the side chain of asparagine forms an H-bond with the helix main chain CO four residues away. The backbone forms a local 3[sub 10] helix at the C-terminus, with the side chain contributing an additional H-bonded loop. This structure reveals formation of H-bonds by the side chain and main chain of a single residue that serve as a fundamental signal at the C-terminus of helices. The structure formed in this way blocks continuation of the [alpha]helix, hence providing a stronger C-termination signal than Pro 19, as seen in the relative CD values. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. The N-terminal to C-terminal motif in protein folding and function.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Mallela M G; Englander, S Walter

    2005-01-25

    Essentially all proteins known to fold kinetically in a two-state manner have their N- and C-terminal secondary structural elements in contact, and the terminal elements often dock as part of the experimentally measurable initial folding step. Conversely, all N-C no-contact proteins studied so far fold by non-two-state kinetics. By comparison, about half of the single domain proteins in the Protein Data Bank have their N- and C-terminal elements in contact, more than expected on a random probability basis but not nearly enough to account for the bias in protein folding. Possible reasons for this bias relate to the mechanisms for initial protein folding, native state stability, and final turnover. PMID:15657118

  16. Crystallization of the C-terminal domain of the bacteriophage T7 fibre protein gp17

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Doval, Carmela; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophage T7 attaches to its host using the C-terminal domains of its six fibres, which are trimers of the gp17 protein. A C-terminal fragment of gp17 consisting of amino acids 371–553 has been expressed, purified and crystallized. Crystals of two forms were obtained, belonging to space group P212121 (unit-cell parameters a = 61.2, b = 86.0, c = 118.4 Å) and space group C2221 (unit-cell parameters a = 68.3, b = 145.6, c = 172.1 Å). They diffracted to 1.9 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively. Both crystals are expected to contain one trimer in the asymmetric unit. Multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing with a mercury derivative is in progress. PMID:22297990

  17. Crystallization of the C-terminal domain of the bacteriophage T7 fibre protein gp17.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Doval, Carmela; van Raaij, Mark J

    2012-02-01

    Bacteriophage T7 attaches to its host using the C-terminal domains of its six fibres, which are trimers of the gp17 protein. A C-terminal fragment of gp17 consisting of amino acids 371-553 has been expressed, purified and crystallized. Crystals of two forms were obtained, belonging to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) (unit-cell parameters a = 61.2, b = 86.0, c = 118.4 Å) and space group C222(1) (unit-cell parameters a = 68.3, b = 145.6, c = 172.1 Å). They diffracted to 1.9 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively. Both crystals are expected to contain one trimer in the asymmetric unit. Multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing with a mercury derivative is in progress. PMID:22297990

  18. Localization of the hydrophilic C terminal part of the ATP synthase subunit 8 of saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Velours, J.; Guerin, B.

    1986-07-16

    The hydrophobic subunit 8 of the yeast ATP synthase was modified using the non-penetrating amino reactive specific reagent: isethionylacetimidate. The polypeptide was modified when using the isolated ATP synthase and sodium bromide-treated submitochondrial particles. It is shown that the only lysine of the protein was modified by the reagent. It is concluded that the hydrophilic C terminal part of the protein containing lysine 47 is located on the inner side of the inner mitochondrial membrane.

  19. Viral suppression function of intracellular antibody against C-terminal domain of rabies virus phosphoprotein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Sun, Lina; Yu, Pengcheng; Li, Aqian; Li, Chuan; Tang, Qing; Li, Dexin; Liang, Mifang

    2015-10-01

    Rabies virus (RV) causes a fatal disease in both human and animals. The disease can be prevented by post-exposure prophylaxis in individuals exposed to RV. However, the neutralization effect is limited after the virus enters into the host cells. So, it is important to identify new targets for rabies therapy. In this study, a human antibody RV1A2 specific to RV phosphoprotein (RV-P) was generated from a human naïve immune antibody library. The antibody recognized all forms of the phosphoproteins including the full length (P1) and short length of the P proteins (P2, P3, P4, and P5). The epitope mapping and the molecular docking of antigen-antibody complex showed that the antibody targets at a conserved epitope of 'VLGWV' ranging from amino acid (aa) 262 to 266 at C-terminal domain of the P protein, which locates at a hydrophobic pocket region in the C-terminal of the RV-P. The aa W265 within the epitope is on the flat surface of the domain, suggesting that it may be a critical amino acid for the functions of the P protein. Our results further showed that intracellular antibody RV1A2 which targets at the C-terminal domain of the P protein could effectively inhibit RV propagation 2-4 days post infection. These results suggest that the conserved C-terminal domain may be used as a new target for drug discovery, which highlights an intracellular inhibition of RV propagation and provides a potential novel way to treat RV infection. PMID:26188200

  20. The C-terminal CGHC motif of protein disulfide isomerase supports thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Junsong; Wu, Yi; Wang, Lu; Rauova, Lubica; Hayes, Vincent M.; Poncz, Mortimer; Essex, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) has two distinct CGHC redox-active sites; however, the contribution of these sites during different physiologic reactions, including thrombosis, is unknown. Here, we evaluated the role of PDI and redox-active sites of PDI in thrombosis by generating mice with blood cells and vessel wall cells lacking PDI (Mx1-Cre Pdifl/fl mice) and transgenic mice harboring PDI that lacks a functional C-terminal CGHC motif [PDI(ss-oo) mice]. Both mouse models showed decreased fibrin deposition and platelet accumulation in laser-induced cremaster arteriole injury, and PDI(ss-oo) mice had attenuated platelet accumulation in FeCl3-induced mesenteric arterial injury. These defects were rescued by infusion of recombinant PDI containing only a functional C-terminal CGHC motif [PDI(oo-ss)]. PDI infusion restored fibrin formation, but not platelet accumulation, in eptifibatide-treated wild-type mice, suggesting a direct role of PDI in coagulation. In vitro aggregation of platelets from PDI(ss-oo) mice and PDI-null platelets was reduced; however, this defect was rescued by recombinant PDI(oo-ss). In human platelets, recombinant PDI(ss-oo) inhibited aggregation, while recombinant PDI(oo-ss) potentiated aggregation. Platelet secretion assays demonstrated that the C-terminal CGHC motif of PDI is important for P-selectin expression and ATP secretion through a non-αIIbβ3 substrate. In summary, our results indicate that the C-terminal CGHC motif of PDI is important for platelet function and coagulation. PMID:26529254

  1. Dual Thermosensitive Hydrogels Assembled from the Conserved C-Terminal Domain of Spider Dragline Silk.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhi-Gang; Zhou, Ming-Liang; Song, Wen-Wen; Xia, Xiao-Xia

    2015-11-01

    Stimuli-responsive hydrogels have great potentials in biomedical and biotechnological applications. Due to the advantages of precise control over molecular weight and being biodegradable, protein-based hydrogels and their applications have been extensively studied. However, protein hydrogels with dual thermosensitive properties are rarely reported. Here we present the first report of dual thermosensitive hydrogels assembled from the conserved C-terminal domain of spider dragline silk. First, we found that recombinant C-terminal domain of major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1) of the spider Nephila clavipes formed hydrogels when cooled to approximately 2 °C or heated to 65 °C. The conformational changes and self-assembly of the recombinant protein were studied to understand the mechanism of the gelation processes using multiple methods. It was proposed that the gelation in the low-temperature regime was dominated by hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interaction between folded protein molecules, whereas the gelation in the high-temperature regime was due to cross-linking of the exposed hydrophobic patches resulting from partial unfolding of the protein upon heating. More interestingly, genetic fusion of the C-terminal domain to a short repetitive region of N. clavipes MaSp1 resulted in a chimeric protein that formed a hydrogel with significantly improved mechanical properties at low temperatures between 2 and 10 °C. Furthermore, the formation of similar hydrogels was observed for the recombinant C-terminal domains of dragline silk of different spider species, thus demonstrating the conserved ability to form dual thermosensitive hydrogels. These findings may be useful in the design and construction of novel protein hydrogels with tunable multiple thermosensitivity for applications in the future. PMID:26457360

  2. Cysteine-rich toxins from Lachesana tarabaevi spider venom with amphiphilic C-terminal segments.

    PubMed

    Kuzmenkov, Alexey I; Fedorova, Irina M; Vassilevski, Alexander A; Grishin, Eugene V

    2013-02-01

    Venom of Lachesana tarabaevi (Zodariidae, "ant spiders") exhibits high insect toxicity and serves a rich source of potential insecticides. Five new peptide toxins active against insects were isolated from the venom by means of liquid chromatography and named latartoxins (LtTx). Complete amino acid sequences of LtTx (60-71 residues) were established by a combination of Edman degradation, mass spectrometry and selective proteolysis. Three toxins have eight cysteine residues that form four intramolecular disulfide bridges, and two other molecules contain an additional cystine; three LtTx are C-terminally amidated. Latartoxins can be allocated to two groups with members similar to CSTX and LSTX toxins from Cupiennius salei (Ctenidae) and Lycosa singoriensis (Lycosidae). The interesting feature of the new toxins is their modular organization: they contain an N-terminal cysteine-rich (knottin or ICK) region as in many neurotoxins from spider venoms and a C-terminal linear part alike some cytolytic peptides. The C-terminal fragment of one of the most abundant toxins LtTx-1a was synthesized and shown to possess membrane-binding activity. It was found to assume amphipathic α-helical conformation in membrane-mimicking environment and exert antimicrobial activity at micromolar concentrations. The tails endow latartoxins with the ability to bind and damage membranes; LtTx show cytolytic activity in fly larvae neuromuscular preparations. We suggest a membrane-dependent mode of action for latartoxins with their C-terminal linear modules acting as anchoring devices. PMID:23088912

  3. The C-terminal tail of protein kinase D2 and protein kinase D3 regulates their intracellular distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Papazyan, Romeo; Rozengurt, Enrique; Rey, Osvaldo . E-mail: orey@mednet.ucla.edu

    2006-04-14

    We generated a set of GFP-tagged chimeras between protein kinase D2 (PKD2) and protein kinase D3 (PKD3) to examine in live cells the contribution of their C-terminal region to their intracellular localization. We found that the catalytic domain of PKD2 and PKD3 can localize to the nucleus when expressed without other kinase domains. However, when the C-terminal tail of PKD2 was added to its catalytic domain, the nuclear localization of the resulting protein was inhibited. In contrast, the nuclear localization of the CD of PKD3 was not inhibited by its C-terminal tail. Furthermore, the exchange of the C-terminal tail of PKD2 and PKD3 in the full-length proteins was sufficient to exchange their intracellular localization. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the short C-terminal tail of these kinases plays a critical role in determining their cytoplasmic/nuclear localization.

  4. Delineation of the core aggregation sequences of TDP-43 C-terminal fragment.

    PubMed

    Saini, Akash; Chauhan, Virander Singh

    2011-11-01

    Ubiquitinated cytoplasmic inclusions of TDP-43 and its C-terminal cleavage products are the pathological hallmarks of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitinated inclusions. The C-terminal fragments (CTFs) of TDP-43 are increasingly considered to play an important role in its aggregation and in disease. Here, we employed a set of synthetic peptides spanning the length of the TDP-43 CTF (220-414) in order to find out its core aggregation domains. Two regions, one in the RRM-2 domain (246-255) and the other in the C-terminal domain (311-320) of TDP-43, stand out as highly aggregation prone. Studies done on recombinant purified TDP-43 CTF and its three mutants, in which these sequences were deleted individually and together, suggested that the 311-320 region has a more crucial role to play than the 246-255 in its aggregation. The study helps in defining specific peptide sequences that might form the core of TDP-43 aggregation. Identification of these sequences could help in designing peptide based inhibitors of TDP-43 aggregation. PMID:21905193

  5. A C-terminal Membrane Anchor Affects the Interactions of Prion Proteins with Lipid Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Nam K.; Shabbir, Waheed; Bove-Fenderson, Erin; Araman, Can; Lemmens-Gruber, Rosa; Harris, David A.; Becker, Christian F. W.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane attachment via a C-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor is critical for conversion of PrPC into pathogenic PrPSc. Therefore the effects of the anchor on PrP structure and function need to be deciphered. Three PrP variants, including full-length PrP (residues 23–231, FL_PrP), N-terminally truncated PrP (residues 90–231, T_PrP), and PrP missing its central hydrophobic region (Δ105–125, ΔCR_PrP), were equipped with a C-terminal membrane anchor via a semisynthesis strategy. Analyses of the interactions of lipidated PrPs with phospholipid membranes demonstrated that C-terminal membrane attachment induces a different binding mode of PrP to membranes, distinct from that of non-lipidated PrPs, and influences the biochemical and conformational properties of PrPs. Additionally, fluorescence-based assays indicated pore formation by lipidated ΔCR_PrP, a variant that is known to be highly neurotoxic in transgenic mice. This finding was supported by using patch clamp electrophysiological measurements of cultured cells. These results provide new evidence for the role of the membrane anchor in PrP-lipid interactions, highlighting the importance of the N-terminal and the central hydrophobic domain in these interactions. PMID:25217642

  6. Conserved C-Terminal Domain of Spider Tubuliform Spidroin 1 Contributes to Extensibility in Synthetic Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Gnesa, Eric; Hsia, Yang; Yarger, Jeffery L.; Weber, Warner; Lin-Cereghino, Joan; Lin-Cereghino, Geoff; Tang, Simon; Agari, Kimiko; Vierra, Craig

    2012-05-24

    Spider silk is renowned for its extraordinary mechanical properties, having a balance of high tensile strength and extensibility. To date, the majority of studies have focused on the production of dragline silks from synthetic spider silk gene products. Here we report the first mechanical analysis of synthetic egg case silk fibers spun from the Latrodectus hesperus tubuliform silk proteins, TuSp1 and ECP-2. We provide evidence that recombinant ECP-2 proteins can be spun into fibers that display mechanical properties similar to other synthetic spider silks. We also demonstrate that silks spun from recombinant thioredoxin-TuSp1 fusion proteins that contain the conserved C-terminal domain exhibit increased extensibility and toughness when compared to the identical fibers spun from fusion proteins lacking the C-terminus. Mechanical analyses reveal that the properties of synthetic tubuliform silks can be modulated by altering the postspin draw ratios of the fibers. Fibers subject to increased draw ratios showed elevated tensile strength and decreased extensibility but maintained constant toughness. Wide-angle X-ray diffraction studies indicate that postdrawn fibers containing the C-terminal domain of TuSp1 have more amorphous content when compared to fibers lacking the C-terminus. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that recombinant tubuliform spidroins that contain the conserved C-terminal domain with embedded protein tags can be effectively spun into fibers, resulting in similar tensile strength but increased extensibility relative to nontagged recombinant dragline silk proteins spun from equivalently sized proteins.

  7. Membrane curvature sensing by the C-terminal domain of complexin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snead, David; Wragg, Rachel T.; Dittman, Jeremy S.; Eliezer, David

    2014-09-01

    Complexin functions at presynaptic nerve terminals to inhibit spontaneous SNARE-mediated synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis, while enhancing stimulated neurotransmitter release. The C-terminal domain (CTD) of complexin is essential for its inhibitory function and has been implicated in localizing complexin to SVs via direct membrane interactions. Here we show that complexin’s CTD is highly sensitive to membrane curvature, which it senses via tandem motifs, a C-terminal motif containing a mix of bulky hydrophobic and positively charged residues, and an adjacent amphipathic region that can bind membranes in either a disordered or a helical conformation. Helix formation requires membrane packing defects found on highly curved membrane surfaces. Mutations that disrupt helix formation without disrupting membrane binding compromise complexin’s inhibitory function in vivo. Thus, this membrane curvature-dependent conformational transition, combined with curvature-sensitive binding by the adjacent C-terminal motif, constitute a novel mechanism for activating complexin’s inhibitory function on the surface of SVs.

  8. Mutagenic Analysis of the C-Terminal Extension of Lsm1

    PubMed Central

    Tharun, Sundaresan

    2016-01-01

    The Sm-like proteins (also known as Lsm proteins) are ubiquitous in nature and exist as hexa or heptameric RNA binding complexes. They are characterized by the presence of the Sm-domain. The Lsm1 through Lsm7 proteins are highly conserved in eukaryotes and they form a hetero-octameric complex together with the protein Pat1. The Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex plays a key role in mRNA decapping and 3’-end protection and therefore is required for normal mRNA decay rates in vivo. Lsm1 is a key subunit that is critical for the unique RNA binding properties of this complex. We showed earlier that unlike most Sm-like proteins, Lsm1 uniquely requires both its Sm domain and its C-terminal extension to contribute to the function of the Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex and that the C-terminal segment can associate with the rest of the complex and support the function even in trans. The studies presented here identify a set of residues at the very C-terminal end of Lsm1 to be functionally important and suggest that these residues support the function of the Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex by facilitating RNA binding either directly or indirectly. PMID:27434131

  9. The structure of the C-terminal domain of the Zaire ebolavirus nucleoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Dziubańska, Paulina J.; Derewenda, Urszula; Ellena, Jeffrey F.; Engel, Daniel A.; Derewenda, Zygmunt S.

    2014-01-01

    Ebolavirus (EBOV) causes severe hemorrhagic fever with a mortality rate of up to 90%. EBOV is a member of the order Mononegavirales and, like other viruses in this taxonomic group, contains a negative-sense single-stranded (ss) RNA. The EBOV ssRNA encodes seven distinct proteins. One of them, the nucleoprotein (NP), is the most abundant viral protein in the infected cell and within the viral nucleocapsid. Like other EBOV proteins, NP is multifunctional. It is tightly associated with the viral genome and is essential for viral transcription, RNA replication, genome packaging and nucleocapsid assembly prior to membrane encapsulation. NP is unusual among the Mononegavirales in that it contains two distinct regions, or putative domains, the C-terminal of which shows no homology to any known proteins and is purported to be a hub for protein–protein interactions within the nucleocapsid. The atomic structure of NP remains unknown. Here, the boundaries of the N- and C-terminal domains of NP from Zaire EBOV are defined, it is shown that they can be expressed as highly stable recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli, and the atomic structure of the C-terminal domain (residues 641–739) derived from analysis of two distinct crystal forms at 1.98 and 1.75 Å resolution is described. The structure reveals a novel tertiary fold that is distantly reminiscent of the β-grasp architecture. PMID:25195755

  10. Molecular Features of Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog (PTEN) Regulation by C-terminal Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zan; Dempsey, Daniel R; Thomas, Stefani N; Hayward, Dawn; Bolduc, David M; Cole, Philip A

    2016-07-01

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor that functions to negatively regulate the PI3K/AKT pathway as the lipid phosphatase for phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate. Phosphorylation of a cluster of Ser/Thr residues (amino acids 380-385) on the C-terminal tail serves to alter the conformational state of PTEN from an open active state to a closed inhibited state, resulting in a reduction of plasma membrane localization and inhibition of enzyme activity. The relative contribution of each phosphorylation site to PTEN autoinhibition and the structural basis for the conformational closure is still unclear. To further the structural understanding of PTEN regulation by C-terminal tail phosphorylation, we used protein semisynthesis to insert stoichiometric and site-specific phospho-Ser/Thr(s) in the C-terminal tail of PTEN. Additionally, we employed photo-cross-linking to map the intramolecular PTEN interactions of the phospho-tail. Systematic evaluation of the PTEN C-tail phospho-cluster showed autoinhibition, and conformational closure was influenced by the aggregate effect of multiple phospho-sites rather than dominated by a single phosphorylation site. Moreover, photo-cross-linking suggested a direct interaction between the PTEN C-tail and a segment in the N-terminal region of the catalytic domain. Mutagenesis experiments provided additional insights into how the PTEN phospho-tail interacts with both the C2 and catalytic domains. PMID:27226612

  11. Structure of the Escherichia coli RNA polymerase α subunit C-terminal domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-González, Samuel; Birktoft, Jens J.; Lawson, Catherine L.

    2010-07-01

    The crystal structure of the dimethyllysine derivative of the E. coli RNA polymerase α subunit C-terminal domain is reported at 2.0 Å resolution. The α subunit C-terminal domain (αCTD) of RNA polymerase (RNAP) is a key element in transcription activation in Escherichia coli, possessing determinants responsible for the interaction of RNAP with DNA and with transcription factors. Here, the crystal structure of E. coli αCTD (α subunit residues 245–329) determined to 2.0 Å resolution is reported. Crystals were obtained after reductive methylation of the recombinantly expressed domain. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1} and possessed both pseudo-translational symmetry and pseudo-merohedral twinning. The refined coordinate model (R factor = 0.193, R{sub free} = 0.236) has improved geometry compared with prior lower resolution determinations of the αCTD structure [Jeon et al. (1995 ▶), Science, 270, 1495–1497; Benoff et al. (2002 ▶), Science, 297, 1562–1566]. An extensive dimerization interface formed primarily by N- and C-terminal residues is also observed. The new coordinates will facilitate the improved modeling of αCTD-containing multi-component complexes visualized at lower resolution using X-ray crystallography and electron-microscopy reconstruction.

  12. The C-terminal domain of the transcriptional corepressor CtBP is intrinsically unstructured.

    PubMed

    Nardini, Marco; Svergun, Dmitri; Konarev, Peter V; Spanò, Stefania; Fasano, Mauro; Bracco, Chiara; Pesce, Alessandra; Donadini, Alessandra; Cericola, Claudia; Secundo, Francesco; Luini, Alberto; Corda, Daniela; Bolognesi, Martino

    2006-05-01

    C-terminal binding proteins (CtBPs) are moonlighting proteins involved in nuclear transcriptional corepression and in Golgi membrane tubule fission. Structural information on CtBPs is available for their substrate-binding domain, responsible for transcriptional repressor recognition/binding, and for the nucleotide-binding domain, involved in NAD(H)-binding and dimerization. On the contrary, little is known about the structure of CtBP C-terminal region ( approximately 90 residues), hosting sites for post-translational modifications. In the present communication we apply a combined approach based on bioinformatics, nuclear magnetic resonance, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering, and we show that the CtBP C-terminal region is intrinsically unstructured in the full-length CtBP and in constructs lacking the substrate- and/or the nucleotide-binding domains. The flexible nature of this protein region, and its structural transitions, may be instrumental for CtBP recognition and binding to diverse molecular partners. PMID:16597837

  13. Dephosphorylation of the linker regions of Smad1 and Smad2/3 by small C-terminal domain phosphatases has distinct outcomes for bone morphogenetic protein and transforming growth factor-beta pathways.

    PubMed

    Sapkota, Gopal; Knockaert, Marie; Alarcón, Claudio; Montalvo, Ermelinda; Brivanlou, Ali H; Massagué, Joan

    2006-12-29

    Smad proteins transduce bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) signals upon phosphorylation of their C-terminal SXS motif by receptor kinases. The activity of Smad1 in the BMP pathway and Smad2/3 in the TGFbeta pathway is restricted by pathway cross-talk and feedback through protein kinases, including MAPK, CDK2/4, p38MAPK, JNK, and others. These kinases phosphorylate Smads 1-3 at the region that links the N-terminal DNA-binding domain and the C-terminal transcriptional domain. Phosphatases that dephosphorylate the linker region are therefore likely to play an integral part in the regulation of Smad activity. We reported previously that small C-terminal domain phosphatases 1, 2, and 3 (SCP1-3) dephosphorylate Smad1 C-terminal tail, thereby attenuating BMP signaling. Here we provide evidence that SCP1-3 also dephosphorylate the linker regions of Smad1 and Smad2/3 in vitro, in mammalian cells and in Xenopus embryos. Overexpression of SCP 1, 2, or 3 decreased linker phosphorylation of Smads 1, 2 and 3. Moreover, RNA interference-mediated knockdown of SCP1/2 increased the BMP-dependent phosphorylation of the Smad1 linker region as well as the C terminus. In contrast, SCP1/2 knockdown increased the TGFbeta-dependent linker phosphorylation of Smad2/3 but not the C-terminal phosphorylation. Consequently, SCP1/2 knockdown inhibited TGFbeta transcriptional responses, but it enhanced BMP transcriptional responses. Thus, by dephosphorylating Smad2/3 at the linker (inhibitory) but not the C-terminal (activating) site, the SCPs enhance TGFbeta signaling, and by dephosphorylating Smad1 at both sites, the SCPs reset Smad1 to the basal unphosphorylated state. PMID:17085434

  14. Probing the Impact of the EchinT C-Terminal Domain on Structure and Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    S Bardaweel; J Pace; T Chou; V Cody; C Wagner

    2011-12-31

    Histidine triad nucleotide binding protein (Hint) is considered as the ancestor of the histidine triad protein superfamily and is highly conserved from bacteria to humans. Prokaryote genomes, including a wide array of both Gram-negative bacteria and Gram-positive bacteria, typically encode one Hint gene. The cellular function of Hint and the rationale for its evolutionary conservation in bacteria have remained a mystery. Despite its ubiquity and high sequence similarity to eukaryote Hint1 [Escherichia coli Hint (echinT) is 48% identical with human Hint1], prokaryote Hint has been reported in only a few studies. Here we report the first conformational information on the full-length N-terminal and C-terminal residues of Hint from the E. coli complex with GMP. Structural analysis of the echinT-GMP complex reveals that it crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1} with four homodimers in the asymmetric unit. Analysis of electron density for both the N-terminal residues and the C-terminal residues of the echinT-GMP complex indicates that the loops in some monomers can adopt more than one conformation. The observation of conformational flexibility in terminal loop regions could explain the presence of multiple homodimers in the asymmetric unit of this structure. To explore the impact of the echinT C-terminus on protein structure and catalysis, we conducted a series of catalytic radiolabeling and kinetic experiments on the C-terminal deletion mutants of echinT. In this study, we show that sequential deletion of the C-terminus likely has no effect on homodimerization and a modest effect on the secondary structure of echinT. However, we observed a significant impact on the folding structure, as reflected by a significant lowering of the T{sub m} value. Kinetic analysis reveals that the C-terminal deletion mutants are within an order of magnitude less efficient in catalysis compared to wild type, while the overall kinetic mechanism that proceeds through a fast step

  15. Recruitment of A20 by the C-terminal domain of NEMO suppresses NF-κB activation and autoinflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Zilberman-Rudenko, Jevgenia; Shawver, Linda Monaco; Wessel, Alex W; Luo, Yongquan; Pelletier, Martin; Tsai, Wanxia Li; Lee, Younglang; Vonortas, Spiridon; Cheng, Laurence; Ashwell, Jonathan D; Orange, Jordan S; Siegel, Richard M; Hanson, Eric P

    2016-02-01

    Receptor-induced NF-κB activation is controlled by NEMO, the NF-κB essential modulator. Hypomorphic NEMO mutations result in X-linked ectodermal dysplasia with anhidrosis and immunodeficiency, also referred to as NEMO syndrome. Here we describe a distinct group of patients with NEMO C-terminal deletion (ΔCT-NEMO) mutations. Individuals harboring these mutations develop inflammatory skin and intestinal disease in addition to ectodermal dysplasia with anhidrosis and immunodeficiency. Both primary cells from these patients, as well as reconstituted cell lines with this deletion, exhibited increased IκB kinase (IKK) activity and production of proinflammatory cytokines. Unlike previously described loss-of-function mutations, ΔCT-NEMO mutants promoted increased NF-κB activation in response to TNF and Toll-like receptor stimulation. Investigation of the underlying mechanisms revealed impaired interactions with A20, a negative regulator of NF-κB activation, leading to prolonged accumulation of K63-ubiquitinated RIP within the TNFR1 signaling complex. Recruitment of A20 to the C-terminal domain of NEMO represents a novel mechanism limiting NF-κB activation by NEMO, and its absence results in autoinflammatory disease. PMID:26802121

  16. The insulin receptor C-terminus is involved in regulation of the receptor kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Kaliman, P; Baron, V; Alengrin, F; Takata, Y; Webster, N J; Olefsky, J M; Van Obberghen, E

    1993-09-21

    During the insulin receptor activation process, ligand binding and autophosphorylation induce two distinct conformational changes in the C-terminal domain of the receptor beta-subunit. To analyze the role of this domain and the involvement of the C-terminal autophosphorylation sites (Tyr1316 and Tyr1322) in receptor activation, we used (i) antipeptide antibodies against three different C-terminal sequences (1270-1281, 1294-1317, and 1309-1326) and (ii) an insulin receptor mutant (Y/F2) where Tyr1316 and Tyr1322 have been replaced by Phe. We show that the autophosphorylation-induced C-terminal conformational change is preserved in the Y/F2 receptor, indicating that this change is not induced by phosphorylation of the C-terminal sites but most likely by phosphorylation of the major sites in the kinase domain (Tyr1146, Tyr1150, and Tyr1151). Binding of antipeptide antibodies to the C-terminal domain modulated (activated or inhibited) both mutant and wild-type receptor-mediated phosphorylation of poly(Glu/Tyr). In contrast to the wild-type receptor, Y/F2 exhibited the same C-terminal configuration before and after insulin binding, evidencing that mutation of Tyr1316 and Tyr1322 introduced conformational changes in the C-terminus. Finally, the mutant receptor was 2-fold more active than the wild-type receptor for poly(Glu/Tyr) phosphorylation. In conclusion, the whole C-terminal region of the insulin receptor beta-subunit is likely to exert a regulatory influence on the receptor kinase activity. Perturbations of the C-terminal region, such as binding of antipeptides or mutation of Tyr1316 and Tyr1322, provoke alterations at the receptor kinase level, leading to activation or inhibition of the enzymic activity. PMID:7690586

  17. Deletion of extra C-terminal segment and its effect on the function and structure of artemin.

    PubMed

    Shirzad, Fatemeh; Sajedi, Reza H; Shahangian, S Shirin; Rasti, Behnam; Mosadegh, Bita; Taghdir, Majid; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2011-10-01

    Artemin acts as a molecular chaperone by protecting Artemia embryos undergoing encystment from damage, caused by heat or other forms of stress. According to the amino acid sequence alignment, although artemin shows a fair amount of homology with ferritin, it also contains an extra C-terminal. Analysis of the C-terminal extension of artemin model in previous studies has shown that there are some favorable interactions between this region and its surrounding cleft. In the current study we tried to investigate the role of this C-terminal in chaperone activity of artemin. This extra C-terminal (39 residues) was deleted and the truncated gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. According to in vivo chaperone-like activity studies, both full-length and C-terminal truncated artemin conferred thermotolerance on transfected E. coli cells. However, bacteria expressing truncated derivative of artemin was less resistant than those producing native artemin against heat. Moreover, the activity recovery on carbonic anhydrase (CA), as protein substrate, was less in the presence of truncated artemin than that of full-length artemin. The results demonstrated that C-terminal deletion decreases the ability of artemin for chaperone-like activity. Theoretical investigations showed that deletion of artemin C-terminal extension makes substantial structural alterations in a way that structural stability and overall integrity of artemin decrease. PMID:21600915

  18. Carboxypeptidase D is the only enzyme responsible for antibody C-terminal lysine cleavage in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhilan; Zhang, Henry; Haley, Benjamin; Macchi, Frank; Yang, Feng; Misaghi, Shahram; Elich, Joseph; Yang, Renee; Tang, Yun; Joly, John C; Snedecor, Bradley R; Shen, Amy

    2016-10-01

    Heterogeneity of C-terminal lysine levels often observed in therapeutic monoclonal antibodies is believed to result from the proteolysis by endogenous carboxypeptidase(s) during cell culture production. Identifying the responsible carboxypeptidase(s) for C-terminal lysine cleavage in CHO cells would provide valuable insights for antibody production cell culture processes development and optimization. In this study, five carboxypeptidases, CpD, CpM, CpN, CpB, and CpE, were studied for message RNA (mRNA) expression by qRT-PCR analysis in two most commonly used blank hosts (DUXB-11 derived DHFR-deficient DP12 host and DHFR-positive CHOK1 host), used for therapeutic antibody production, as well an antibody-expressing cell line derived from each host. Our results showed that CpD had the highest mRNA expression. When CpD mRNA levels were reduced by RNAi (RNA interference) technology, C-terminal lysine levels increased, whereas there was no obvious change in C-terminal lysine levels when a different carboxypeptidase mRNA level was knocked down suggesting that carboxypeptidase D is the main contributor for C-terminal lysine processing. Most importantly, when CpD expression was knocked out by CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) technology, C-terminal lysine cleavage was completely abolished in CpD knockout cells based on mass spectrometry analysis, demonstrating that CpD is the only endogenous carboxypeptidase that cleaves antibody heavy chain C-terminal lysine in CHO cells. Hence, our work showed for the first time that the cleavage of antibody heavy chain C-terminal lysine is solely mediated by the carboxypeptidase D in CHO cells and our finding provides one solution to eliminating C-terminal lysine heterogeneity for therapeutic antibody production by knocking out CpD gene expression. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2100-2106. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26989081

  19. Differential Roles of C-terminal Eps15 Homology Domain Proteins as Vesiculators and Tubulators of Recycling Endosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Bishuang; Giridharan, Sai Srinivas Panapakkam; Zhang, Jing; Saxena, Sugandha; Bahl, Kriti; Schmidt, John A.; Sorgen, Paul L.; Guo, Wei; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Endocytic recycling involves the return of membranes and receptors to the plasma membrane following their internalization into the cell. Recycling generally occurs from a series of vesicular and tubular membranes localized to the perinuclear region, collectively known as the endocytic recycling compartment. Within this compartment, receptors are sorted into tubular extensions that later undergo vesiculation, allowing transport vesicles to move along microtubules and return to the cell surface where they ultimately undergo fusion with the plasma membrane. Recent studies have led to the hypothesis that the C-terminal Eps15 homology domain (EHD) ATPase proteins are involved in the vesiculation process. Here, we address the functional roles of the four EHD proteins. We developed a novel semipermeabilized cell system in which addition of purified EHD proteins to reconstitute vesiculation allows us to assess the ability of each protein to vesiculate MICAL-L1-decorated tubular recycling endosomes (TREs). Using this assay, we show that EHD1 vesiculates membranes, consistent with enhanced TRE generation observed upon EHD1 depletion. EHD4 serves a role similar to that of EHD1 in TRE vesiculation, whereas EHD2, despite being capable of vesiculating TREs in the semipermeabilized cells, fails to do so in vivo. Surprisingly, the addition of EHD3 causes tubulation of endocytic membranes in our semipermeabilized cell system, consistent with the lack of tubulation observed upon EHD3 depletion. Our novel vesiculation assay and in vitro electron microscopy analysis, combined with in vivo data, provide evidence that the functions of both EHD1 and EHD4 are primarily in TRE membrane vesiculation, whereas EHD3 is a membrane-tubulating protein. PMID:24019528

  20. Characterization of peptides cleaved by plasmin from the C-terminal polymerization domain of human fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Southan, C; Thompson, E; Panico, M; Etienne, T; Morris, H R; Lane, D A

    1985-10-25

    The C-terminal region of the fibrinogen gamma chain is known to participate in several functional interactions including fibrin polymerization. This part of the molecule is retained on the gamma chain of fragment D (FgD) when fibrinogen is digested by plasmin in the presence of calcium to produce the fragment D-fragment E (FgD X FgE) complex but is lost if FgD is prepared in the absence of calcium. In an attempt to characterize the C-terminal polymerization domain we have used three techniques to examine this further degradation of FgD following the addition of EDTA and plasmin. Analysis of the digestion by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a progressive cleavage of the gamma chain to two small remnants. The polymerization-inhibitory activity of the whole digest was studied using acid-solubilized fibrin. A progressive loss of inhibitory activity was associated with gamma chain shortening, reaching greater than a 120-fold reduction at the end of digestion. The cleavage of peptides was followed by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography and the release of a characteristic peptide triplet was associated with gamma chain cleavage. Manual sequencing, amino acid analysis, and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry established the three peptides as gamma 303-356, 357-373, and 374-405. These peptides have sequences in common with those peptides recently reported by other investigators to be potent polymerization inhibitors. However, when a mixture of the three peptides was added in a 200-fold molar excess to polymerizing fibrin, no inhibitory activity could be demonstrated. It is concluded that the C-terminal polymerization domain of fibrinogen may be an extended region which includes the sequence gamma 303-405, when this is contiguous with the remainder of the gamma chain. PMID:2932434

  1. Apoptotic Activity of MeCP2 Is Enhanced by C-Terminal Truncating Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Mehler, Vera J.; Mueller, Christina; Vonhoff, Fernando; White, Robin; Duch, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is a widely abundant, multifunctional protein most highly expressed in post-mitotic neurons. Mutations causing Rett syndrome and related neurodevelopmental disorders have been identified along the entire MECP2 locus, but symptoms vary depending on mutation type and location. C-terminal mutations are prevalent, but little is known about the function of the MeCP2 C-terminus. We employ the genetic efficiency of Drosophila to provide evidence that expression of p.Arg294* (more commonly identified as R294X), a human MECP2 E2 mutant allele causing truncation of the C-terminal domains, promotes apoptosis of identified neurons in vivo. We confirm this novel finding in HEK293T cells and then use Drosophila to map the region critical for neuronal apoptosis to a small sequence at the end of the C-terminal domain. In vitro studies in mammalian systems previously indicated a role of the MeCP2 E2 isoform in apoptosis, which is facilitated by phosphorylation at serine 80 (S80) and decreased by interactions with the forkhead protein FoxG1. We confirm the roles of S80 phosphorylation and forkhead domain transcription factors in affecting MeCP2-induced apoptosis in Drosophila in vivo, thus indicating mechanistic conservation between flies and mammalian cells. Our findings are consistent with a model in which C- and N-terminal interactions are required for healthy function of MeCP2. PMID:27442528

  2. BS69/ZMYND11 C-Terminal Domains Bind and Inhibit EBNA2

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chih-Lung; Gonzalez-Hurtado, Elsie; Zhang, Zhi-Min; Xu, Muyu; Martinez, Ernest; Peng, Chih-Wen; Song, Jikui

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2) plays an important role in driving immortalization of EBV-infected B cells through regulating the expression of many viral and cellular genes. We report a structural study of the tumor suppressor BS69/ZMYND11 C-terminal region, comprised of tandem coiled-coil-MYND domains (BS69CC-MYND), in complex with an EBNA2 peptide containing a PXLXP motif. The coiled-coil domain of BS69 self-associates to bring two separate MYND domains in close proximity, thereby enhancing the BS69 MYND-EBNA2 interaction. ITC analysis of BS69CC-MYND with a C-terminal fragment of EBNA2 further suggests that the BS69CC-MYND homodimer synergistically binds to the two EBNA2 PXLXP motifs that are respectively located in the conserved regions CR7 and CR8. Furthermore, we showed that EBNA2 interacts with BS69 and down-regulates its expression at both mRNA and protein levels in EBV-infected B cells. Ectopic BS69CC-MYND is recruited to viral target promoters through interactions with EBNA2, inhibits EBNA2-mediated transcription activation, and impairs proliferation of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). Substitution of critical residues in the MYND domain impairs the BS69-EBNA2 interaction and abolishes the BS69 inhibition of the EBNA2-mediated transactivation and LCL proliferation. This study identifies the BS69 C-terminal domains as an inhibitor of EBNA2, which may have important implications in development of novel therapeutic strategies against EBV infection. PMID:26845565

  3. Apoptotic Activity of MeCP2 Is Enhanced by C-Terminal Truncating Mutations.

    PubMed

    Williams, Alison A; Mehler, Vera J; Mueller, Christina; Vonhoff, Fernando; White, Robin; Duch, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is a widely abundant, multifunctional protein most highly expressed in post-mitotic neurons. Mutations causing Rett syndrome and related neurodevelopmental disorders have been identified along the entire MECP2 locus, but symptoms vary depending on mutation type and location. C-terminal mutations are prevalent, but little is known about the function of the MeCP2 C-terminus. We employ the genetic efficiency of Drosophila to provide evidence that expression of p.Arg294* (more commonly identified as R294X), a human MECP2 E2 mutant allele causing truncation of the C-terminal domains, promotes apoptosis of identified neurons in vivo. We confirm this novel finding in HEK293T cells and then use Drosophila to map the region critical for neuronal apoptosis to a small sequence at the end of the C-terminal domain. In vitro studies in mammalian systems previously indicated a role of the MeCP2 E2 isoform in apoptosis, which is facilitated by phosphorylation at serine 80 (S80) and decreased by interactions with the forkhead protein FoxG1. We confirm the roles of S80 phosphorylation and forkhead domain transcription factors in affecting MeCP2-induced apoptosis in Drosophila in vivo, thus indicating mechanistic conservation between flies and mammalian cells. Our findings are consistent with a model in which C- and N-terminal interactions are required for healthy function of MeCP2. PMID:27442528

  4. Small C-terminal domain phosphatases dephosphorylate the regulatory linker regions of Smad2 and Smad3 to enhance transforming growth factor-beta signaling.

    PubMed

    Wrighton, Katharine H; Willis, Danielle; Long, Jianyin; Liu, Fang; Lin, Xia; Feng, Xin-Hua

    2006-12-15

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) controls a diverse set of cellular processes, and its canonical signaling is mediated via TGF-beta-induced phosphorylation of receptor-activated Smads (2 and 3) at the C-terminal SXS motif. We recently discovered that PPM1A can dephosphorylate Smad2/3 at the C-terminal SXS motif, implicating a critical role for phosphatases in regulating TGF-beta signaling. Smad2/3 activity is also regulated by phosphorylation in the linker region (and N terminus) by a variety of intracellular kinases, making it a critical platform for cross-talk between TGF-beta and other signaling pathways. Using a functional genomic approach, we identified the small C-terminal domain phosphatase 1 (SCP1) as a specific phosphatase for Smad2/3 dephosphorylation in the linker and N terminus. A catalytically inactive SCP1 mutant (dnSCP1) had no effect on Smad2/3 phosphorylation in vitro or in vivo. Of the other FCP/SCP family members SCP2 and SCP3, but not FCP1, could also dephosphorylate Smad2/3 in the linker/N terminus. Depletion of SCP1/2/3 enhanced Smad2/3 linker phosphorylation. SCP1 increased TGF-beta-induced transcriptional activity in agreement with the idea that phosphorylation in the Smad2/3 linker must be removed for a full transcriptional response. SCP1 overexpression also counteracts the inhibitory effect of epidermal growth factor on TGF-beta-induced p15 expression. Taken together, this work identifies the first example of a Smad2/3 linker phosphatase(s) and reveals an important new substrate for SCPs. PMID:17035229

  5. Decreased Adherence of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli to HEp-2 Cells in the Presence of Antibodies That Recognize the C-Terminal Region of Intimin

    PubMed Central

    Gansheroff, Lisa J.; Wachtel, Marian R.; O'Brien, Alison D.

    1999-01-01

    Antiserum raised against intimin from enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 strain 86-24 has been shown previously by our laboratory to inhibit adherence of this strain to HEp-2 cells. In the present study, we sought to identify the region(s) of intimin important for the effect of anti-intimin antisera on EHEC adherence and to determine whether antisera raised against intimin from an O157:H7 strain could reduce adherence of other strains. Compared to preimmune serum controls, polyclonal sera raised against the histidine-tagged intimin protein RIHisEae (intiminO157) or against His-tagged C-terminal fragments of intimin from strain 86-24 reduced adherence of this strain. Furthermore, an antibody fraction purified from the anti-RIHisEae serum that contained antibodies to the C-terminal third of intimin, the putative receptor-binding domain, also reduced adherence of strain 86-24, but a purified fraction containing antibodies to the N-terminal two-thirds of intimin did not inhibit adherence. The polyclonal anti-intiminO157 serum raised against RIHisEae inhibited, to different degrees, the adherence of another O157:H7 strain, an EHEC O55:H7 strain, one of two independent EHEC O111:NM isolates tested, and one of two EHEC O26:H11 strains tested. Adherence of the other O26:H11 and O111:NM strains and an EPEC O127:H6 strain was not reduced. Finally, immunoblot analysis indicated a correlation between the antigenic divergence in the C-terminal third of intimins from different strains and the capacity of anti-intiminO157 antiserum to reduce adherence of heterologous strains. Taken together, these data suggest that intiminO157 could be used as an immunogen to elicit adherence-blocking antibodies against O157:H7 strains and closely-related EHEC. PMID:10569757

  6. Sec1p and Mso1p C-terminal tails cooperate with the SNAREs and Sec4p in polarized exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Aro, Nina; Chernov, Konstantin G.; Nyman, Tuula; Jäntti, Jussi

    2011-01-01

    The Sec1/Munc18 protein family members perform an essential, albeit poorly understood, function in association with soluble n-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor adaptor protein receptor (SNARE) complexes in membrane fusion. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sec1p has a C-terminal tail that is missing in its mammalian homologues. Here we show that deletion of the Sec1p tail (amino acids 658–724) renders cells temperature sensitive for growth, reduces sporulation efficiency, causes a secretion defect, and abolishes Sec1p-SNARE component coimmunoprecipitation. The results show that the Sec1p tail binds preferentially ternary Sso1p-Sec9p-Snc2p complexes and it enhances ternary SNARE complex formation in vitro. The bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay results suggest that, in the SNARE-deficient sso2–1 Δsso1 cells, Mso1p, a Sec1p binding protein, helps to target Sec1p(1–657) lacking the C-terminal tail to the sites of secretion. The results suggest that the Mso1p C terminus is important for Sec1p(1–657) targeting. We show that, in addition to Sec1p, Mso1p can bind the Rab-GTPase Sec4p in vitro. The BiFC results suggest that Mso1p acts in close association with Sec4p on intracellular membranes in the bud. This association depends on the Sec4p guanine nucleotide exchange factor Sec2p. Our results reveal a novel binding mode between the Sec1p C-terminal tail and the SNARE complex, and suggest a role for Mso1p as an effector of Sec4p. PMID:21119007

  7. Sec1p and Mso1p C-terminal tails cooperate with the SNAREs and Sec4p in polarized exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Aro, Nina; Chernov, Konstantin G; Nyman, Tuula; Jäntti, Jussi

    2011-01-15

    The Sec1/Munc18 protein family members perform an essential, albeit poorly understood, function in association with soluble n-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor adaptor protein receptor (SNARE) complexes in membrane fusion. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sec1p has a C-terminal tail that is missing in its mammalian homologues. Here we show that deletion of the Sec1p tail (amino acids 658-724) renders cells temperature sensitive for growth, reduces sporulation efficiency, causes a secretion defect, and abolishes Sec1p-SNARE component coimmunoprecipitation. The results show that the Sec1p tail binds preferentially ternary Sso1p-Sec9p-Snc2p complexes and it enhances ternary SNARE complex formation in vitro. The bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay results suggest that, in the SNARE-deficient sso2-1 Δsso1 cells, Mso1p, a Sec1p binding protein, helps to target Sec1p(1-657) lacking the C-terminal tail to the sites of secretion. The results suggest that the Mso1p C terminus is important for Sec1p(1-657) targeting. We show that, in addition to Sec1p, Mso1p can bind the Rab-GTPase Sec4p in vitro. The BiFC results suggest that Mso1p acts in close association with Sec4p on intracellular membranes in the bud. This association depends on the Sec4p guanine nucleotide exchange factor Sec2p. Our results reveal a novel binding mode between the Sec1p C-terminal tail and the SNARE complex, and suggest a role for Mso1p as an effector of Sec4p. PMID:21119007

  8. Role of the Cationic C-Terminal Segment of Melittin on Membrane Fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Therrien, Alexandre; Fournier, Alain; Lafleur, Michel

    2016-05-01

    The widespread distribution of cationic antimicrobial peptides capable of membrane fragmentation in nature underlines their importance to living organisms. In the present work, we determined the impact of the electrostatic interactions associated with the cationic C-terminal segment of melittin, a 26-amino acid peptide from bee venom (net charge +6), on its binding to model membranes and on the resulting fragmentation. In order to detail the role played by the C-terminal charges, we prepared a melittin analogue for which the four cationic amino acids in positions 21-24 were substituted with the polar residue citrulline, providing a peptide with the same length and amphiphilicity but with a lower net charge (+2). We compared the peptide bilayer affinity and the membrane fragmentation for bilayers prepared from 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC)/1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-l-serine (DPPS) mixtures. It is shown that neutralization of the C-terminal considerably increased melittin affinity for zwitterionic membranes. The unfavorable contribution associated with transferring the cationic C-terminal in a less polar environment was reduced, leaving the hydrophobic interactions, which drive the peptide insertion in bilayers, with limited counterbalancing interactions. The presence of negatively charged lipids (DPPS) in bilayers increased melittin binding by introducing attractive electrostatic interactions, the augmentation being, as expected, greater for native melittin than for its citrullinated analogue. The membrane fragmentation power of the peptide was shown to be controlled by electrostatic interactions and could be modulated by the charge carried by both the membrane and the lytic peptide. The analysis of the lipid composition of the extracted fragments from DPPC/DPPS bilayers revealed no lipid specificity. It is proposed that extended phase separations are more susceptible to lead to the extraction of a lipid species in a specific manner

  9. An inhibitory C-terminal region dictates the specificity of A-adding enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Tretbar, Sandy; Neuenfeldt, Anne; Betat, Heike; Mörl, Mario

    2011-01-01

    For efficient aminoacylation, tRNAs carry the conserved 3′-terminal sequence C-C-A, which is synthesized by highly specific tRNA nucleotidyltransferases (CCA-adding enzymes). In several prokaryotes, this function is accomplished by separate enzymes for CC- and A-addition. As A-adding enzymes carry an N-terminal catalytic core identical to that of CCA-adding enzymes, it is unclear why their activity is restricted. Here, it is shown that C-terminal deletion variants of A-adding enzymes acquire full and precise CCA-incorporating activity. The deleted region seems to be responsible for tRNA primer selection, restricting the enzyme’s specificity to tRNAs ending with CC. The data suggest that A-adding enzymes carry an intrinsic CCA-adding activity that can be reactivated by the introduction of deletions in the C-terminal domain. Furthermore, a unique subtype of CCA-adding enzymes could be identified that evolved out of A-adding enzymes, suggesting that mutations and deletions in nucleotidyltransferases can lead to altered and even more complex activities, as a simple A-incorporation is converted into sequence-specific addition of C and A residues. Such activity-modifying events may have had an important role in the evolution of tRNA nucleotidyltransferases. PMID:22167803

  10. Alzheimer's Amyloid-β Sequesters Caspase-3 in Vitro via Its C-Terminal Tail.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Jen; Linh, Nguyen Hoang; Shih, Yao Hsiang; Yu, Hui-Ming; Li, Mai Suan; Chen, Yun-Ru

    2016-08-17

    Amyloid-β (Aβ), the main constituent in senile plaques found in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), is considered as a causative factor in AD pathogenesis. The clinical examination of the brains of patients with AD has demonstrated that caspase-3 colocalizes with senile plaques. Cellular studies have shown that Aβ can induce neuronal apoptosis via caspase-3 activation. Here, we performed biochemical and in silico studies to investigate possible direct effect of Aβ on caspase-3 to understand the molecular mechanism of the interaction between Aβ and caspase-3. We found that Aβ conformers can specifically and directly sequester caspase-3 activity in which freshly prepared Aβ42 is the most potent. The inhibition is noncompetitive, and the C-terminal region of Aβ plays an important role in sequestration. The binding of Aβ to caspase-3 was examined by cross-linking and proteolysis and by docking and all-atom molecular dynamic simulations. Experimental and in silico results revealed that Aβ42 exhibits a higher binding affinity than Aβ40 and the hydrophobic C-terminal region plays a key role in the caspase-Aβ interaction. Overall, our study describes a novel mechanism demonstrating that Aβ sequesters caspase-3 activity via direct interaction and facilitates future therapeutic development in AD. PMID:27227450

  11. Structure of the C-terminal Domain of Transcription Facto IIB from Trypanosoma brucei

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, B.; Kanneganti, N; Rieckhof, G; Das, A; Laurents, D; Palenchar, J; Bellofatto, V; Wah, D

    2009-01-01

    In trypanosomes, the production of mRNA relies on the synthesis of the spliced leader (SL) RNA. Expression of the SL RNA is initiated at the only known RNA polymerase II promoter in these parasites. In the pathogenic trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, transcription factor IIB (tTFIIB) is essential for SL RNA gene transcription and cell viability, but has a highly divergent primary sequence in comparison to TFIIB in well-studied eukaryotes. Here we describe the 2.3 A resolution structure of the C-terminal domain of tTFIIB (tTFIIBC). The tTFIIBC structure consists of 2 closely packed helical modules followed by a C-terminal extension of 32 aa. Using the structure as a guide, alanine substitutions of basic residues in regions analogous to functionally important regions of the well-studied eukaryotic TFIIB support conservation of a general mechanism of TFIIB function in eukaryotes. Strikingly, tTFIIBC contains additional loops and helices, and, in contrast to the highly basic DNA binding surface of human TFIIB, contains a neutral surface in the corresponding region. These attributes probably mediate trypanosome-specific interactions and have implications for the apparent bidirectional transcription by RNA polymerase II in protein-encoding gene expression in these organisms.

  12. Structure of the C-terminal domain of nsp4 from feline coronavirus

    SciTech Connect

    Manolaridis, Ioannis; Wojdyla, Justyna A.; Panjikar, Santosh; Berglind, Hanna; Nordlund, Pär; Coutard, Bruno; Tucker, Paul A.

    2009-08-01

    The structure of the cytosolic C-terminal domain of nonstructural protein 4 from feline coronavirus has been determined and analyzed. Coronaviruses are a family of positive-stranded RNA viruses that includes important pathogens of humans and other animals. The large coronavirus genome (26–31 kb) encodes 15–16 nonstructural proteins (nsps) that are derived from two replicase polyproteins by autoproteolytic processing. The nsps assemble into the viral replication–transcription complex and nsp3, nsp4 and nsp6 are believed to anchor this enzyme complex to modified intracellular membranes. The largest part of the coronavirus nsp4 subunit is hydrophobic and is predicted to be embedded in the membranes. In this report, a conserved C-terminal domain (∼100 amino-acid residues) has been delineated that is predicted to face the cytoplasm and has been isolated as a soluble domain using library-based construct screening. A prototypical crystal structure at 2.8 Å resolution was obtained using nsp4 from feline coronavirus. Unmodified and SeMet-substituted proteins were crystallized under similar conditions, resulting in tetragonal crystals that belonged to space group P4{sub 3}. The phase problem was initially solved by single isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering (SIRAS), followed by molecular replacement using a SIRAS-derived composite model. The structure consists of a single domain with a predominantly α-helical content displaying a unique fold that could be engaged in protein–protein interactions.

  13. Functional analysis of the C-terminal extension of telomerase reverse transcriptase. A putative "thumb" domain.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Shabbir; Singh, Sunitha; Lue, Neal F

    2002-09-27

    Telomerase is an RNA-protein complex responsible for the extension of one strand of telomere terminal repeats. The catalytic protein subunit of telomerase, known generically as telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), exhibits significant homology to reverse transcriptases (RTs) encoded by retroviruses and retroelements. The mechanisms of telomerase may therefore be similar to those of the conventional reverse transcriptases. In this report, we explore potential similarity between these two classes of proteins in a region with no evident sequence similarity. Previous analysis has implicated a C-terminal domain of retroviral RTs (known as the "thumb" domain) in template-primer binding and in processivity control. The equivalent region of TERTs, although similar to one another, does not exhibit significant sequence homology to retroviral RTs. However, we found that removal of this region of yeast TERT similarly resulted in a decrease in the stability of telomerase-DNA complex and in the processivity of telomerase-mediated nucleotide addition. Moreover, the C-terminal domain of TERT exhibits a nucleic acid binding activity when recombinantly expressed and purified. Finally, amino acid substitutions of conserved residues in this region of TERT were found to impair telomerase activity and processivity. We suggest that mechanistic similarity between telomerase and retroviral RTs may extend beyond the regions with apparent sequence similarity. PMID:12151386

  14. The C-terminal region of OVGP1 remodels the zona pellucida and modifies fertility parameters

    PubMed Central

    Algarra, B.; Han, L.; Soriano-Úbeda, C.; Avilés, M.; Coy, P.; Jovine, L.; Jiménez-Movilla, M.

    2016-01-01

    OVGP1 is the major non-serum glycoprotein in the oviduct fluid at the time of fertilization and early embryo development. Its activity differs among species. Here, we show that the C-terminal region of recombinant OVGP1 regulates its binding to the extracellular zona pellucida and affects its activity during fertilization. While porcine OVGP1 penetrates two-thirds of the thickness of the zona pellucida, shorter OVGP1 glycoproteins, including rabbit OVGP1, are restricted to the outer one-third of the zona matrix. Deletion of the C-terminal region reduces the ability of the glycoprotein to penetrate through the zona pellucida and prevents OVGP1 endocytosis. This affects the structure of the zona matrix and increases its resistance to protease digestion. However, only full-length porcine OVGP1 is able to increase the efficiency rate of in vitro fertilization. Thus, our findings document that the presence or absence of conserved regions in the C-terminus of OVGP1 modify its association with the zona pellucida that affects matrix structure and renders the zona matrix permissive to sperm penetration and OVGP1 endocytosis into the egg. PMID:27601270

  15. Investigating the Roles of the C-Terminal Domain of Plasmodium falciparum GyrA

    PubMed Central

    Nagano, Soshichiro; Seki, Eiko; Lin, Ting-Yu; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Heddle, Jonathan G.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains as one of the most deadly diseases in developing countries. The Plasmodium causative agents of human malaria such as Plasmodium falciparum possess an organelle, the apicoplast, which is the result of secondary endosymbiosis and retains its own circular DNA. A type II topoisomerase, DNA gyrase, is present in the apicoplast. In prokaryotes this enzyme is a proven, effective target for antibacterial agents, and its discovery in P. falciparum opens up the prospect of exploiting it as a drug target. Basic characterisation of P. falciparum gyrase is important because there are significant sequence differences between it and the prokaryotic enzyme. However, it has proved difficult to obtain soluble protein. Here we have predicted a new domain boundary in P. falciparum GyrA that corresponds to the C-terminal domain of prokaryotic GyrA and successfully purified it in a soluble form. Biochemical analyses revealed many similarities between the C-terminal domains of GyrA from E. coli and P. falciparum, suggesting that despite its considerably larger size, the malarial protein carries out a similar DNA wrapping function. Removal of a unique Asn-rich region in the P. falciparum protein did not result in a significant change, suggesting it is dispensable for DNA wrapping. PMID:26566222

  16. Claws, Disorder, and Conformational Dynamics of the C-Terminal Region of Human Desmoplakin.

    PubMed

    McAnany, Charles E; Mura, Cameron

    2016-08-25

    Multicellular organisms consist of cells that interact via elaborate adhesion complexes. Desmosomes are membrane-associated adhesion complexes that mechanically tether the cytoskeletal intermediate filaments (IFs) between two adjacent cells, creating a network of tough connections in tissues such as skin and heart. Desmoplakin (DP) is the key desmosomal protein that binds IFs, and the DP·IF association poses a quandary: desmoplakin must stably and tightly bind IFs to maintain the structural integrity of the desmosome. Yet, newly synthesized DP must traffic along the cytoskeleton to the site of nascent desmosome assembly without "sticking" to the IF network, implying weak or transient DP···IF contacts. Recent work reveals that these contacts are modulated by post-translational modifications (PTMs) in DP's C-terminal tail (DPCTT). Using molecular dynamics simulations, we have elucidated the structural basis of these PTM-induced effects. Our simulations, nearing 2 μs in aggregate, indicate that phosphorylation of S2849 induces an "arginine claw" in desmoplakin's C-terminal tail. If a key arginine, R2834, is methylated, the DPCTT preferentially samples conformations that are geometrically well-suited as substrates for processive phosphorylation by the cognate kinase GSK3. We suggest that DPCTT is a molecular switch that modulates, via its conformational dynamics, DP's overall efficacy as a substrate for GSK3. Finally, we show that the fluctuating DPCTT can contact other parts of DP, suggesting a competitive binding mechanism for the modulation of DP···IF interactions. PMID:27188911

  17. Induction of the C-terminal proteolytic cleavage of AβPP by statins.

    PubMed

    Descamps, Olivier; Zhang, Qiang; John, Varghese; Bredesen, Dale E

    2011-01-01

    Statins are drugs commonly used to inhibit cholesterol synthesis, with the goal of reducing vascular diseases such as myocardial infarction and stroke. Statins have also been suggested as a therapeutic option for Alzheimer's disease (AD), although their benefit in AD remains controversial. We have previously shown that the intracellular C-terminal cleavage of the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) is a major contributor to the neuronal toxicity seen in AD, and that this cleavage can be induced by amyloid-β. We now report that certain brain permeable statins are also able to induce the C-terminal cleavage of AβPP and associated cell death, whereas other statins do not. This statin effect on AβPP exceeded the effects of all other FDA-approved drugs in a library composed of these compounds, suggesting that this effect on AβPP cleavage is unique to a subset of the statins. Furthermore, the greatest effect occurred with cerivastatin, which has previously been shown to be the statin associated with the greatest risk of rhabdomyolysis. These results may have implications for the choice of which statins to evaluate in AD therapeutic trials; furthermore, the results may inform statin choice in individuals who are at high risk for the development of AD, such as those with an apolipoprotein E ε4 allele. PMID:21422530

  18. Regulation of retinal transducin by C-terminal peptides of rhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, D J; Takemoto, L J; Hansen, J; Morrison, D

    1985-01-01

    Transducin is a multi-subunit guanine-nucleotide-binding protein that mediates signal coupling between rhodopsin and cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase in retinal rod outer segments. Whereas the T alpha subunit of transducin binds guanine nucleotides and is the activator of the phosphodiesterase, the T beta gamma subunit may function to link physically T alpha with photolysed rhodopsin. In order to determine the binding sites of rhodopsin to transducin, we have synthesized eight peptides (Rhod-1 etc.) that correspond to the C-terminal regions of rhodopsin and to several external and one internal loop region. These peptides were tested for their inhibition of restored GTPase activity of purified transducin reconstituted into depleted rod-outer-segment disc membranes. A marked inhibition of GTPase activity was observed when transducin was pre-incubated with peptides Rhod-1, Rhod-2 and Rhod-3. These peptides correspond to opsin amino acid residues 332-339, 324-331 and 317-321 respectively. Peptides corresponding to the three external loop regions or to the C-terminal residues 341-348 did not inhibit reconsituted GTPase activity. Likewise, Rhod-8, a peptide corresponding to an internal loop region of rhodopsin, did not inhibit GTPase activity. These findings support the concept that these specific regions of the C-terminus of rhodopsin serve as recognition sites for transducin. PMID:3867351

  19. C-terminal low-complexity sequence repeats of Mycobacterium smegmatis Ku modulate DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Kushwaha, Ambuj K.; Grove, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Ku protein is an integral component of the NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining) pathway of DSB (double-strand break) repair. Both eukaryotic and prokaryotic Ku homologues have been characterized and shown to bind DNA ends. A unique feature of Mycobacterium smegmatis Ku is its basic C-terminal tail that contains several lysine-rich low-complexity PAKKA repeats that are absent from homologues encoded by obligate parasitic mycobacteria. Such PAKKA repeats are also characteristic of mycobacterial Hlp (histone-like protein) for which they have been shown to confer the ability to appose DNA ends. Unexpectedly, removal of the lysine-rich extension enhances DNA-binding affinity, but an interaction between DNA and the PAKKA repeats is indicated by the observation that only full-length Ku forms multiple complexes with a short stem-loop-containing DNA previously designed to accommodate only one Ku dimer. The C-terminal extension promotes DNA end-joining by T4 DNA ligase, suggesting that the PAKKA repeats also contribute to efficient end-joining. We suggest that low-complexity lysine-rich sequences have evolved repeatedly to modulate the function of unrelated DNA-binding proteins. PMID:23167261

  20. Structure of a plant β-galactosidase C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Rimlumduan, Thipwarin; Hua, Yan-Ling; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Ketudat Cairns, James R

    2016-10-01

    Most plant β-galactosidases, which belong to glycoside hydrolase family 35, have a C-terminal domain homologous to animal galactose and rhamnose-binding lectins. To investigate the structure and function of this domain, the C-terminal domain of the rice (Oryza sativa L.) β-galactosidase 1 (OsBGal1 Cter) was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The free OsBGal1 Cter is monomeric with a native molecular weight of 15kDa. NMR spectroscopy indicated that OsBGal1 Cter comprises five β-strands and one α-helix. The structure of this domain is similar to lectin domains from animals, but loops A and C of OsBGal1 Cter are longer than the corresponding loops from related animal lectins with known structures. In addition, loop A of OsBGal1 Cter was not well defined, suggesting it is flexible. Although OsBGal1 Cter was predicted to be a galactose/rhamnose-binding domain, binding with rhamnose, galactose, glucose, β-1,4-d-galactobiose and raffinose could not be observed in NMR experiments. PMID:27451952

  1. Characterization of the C-terminal ER membrane anchor of PTP1B

    SciTech Connect

    Anderie, Ines Schulz, Irene; Schmid, Andreas

    2007-09-10

    The tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B is an important regulator of cell function. In living cells PTP1B activity is restricted to the vicinity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by post-translational C-terminal attachment of PTP1B to the ER membrane network. In our study we investigated the membrane anchor of PTP1B by use of EGFP fusion proteins. We demonstrate that the membrane anchor of PTP1B cannot be narrowed down to a unique amino acid sequence with a defined start and stop point but rather is moveable within several amino acids. Removal of up to seven amino acids from the C-terminus, as well as exchange of single amino acids in the putative transmembrane sequence did not influence subcellular localization of PTP1B. With the method of bimolecular fluorescence complementation we could demonstrate dimerization of PTP1B in vivo. Homodimerization was, in contrast to other tail-anchored proteins, not dependent on the membrane anchor. Our data demonstrate that the C-terminal membrane anchor of PTP1B is formed by a combination of a single stretch transmembrane domain (TMD) followed by a tail. TMD and tail length are variable and there are no sequence-specific features. Our data for PTP1B are consistent with a concept that explains the ER membrane anchor of tail-anchored proteins as a physicochemical structure.

  2. Phosphorylation of a C-terminal auto-inhibitory domain increases SMARCAL1 activity.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Clinton; Bansbach, Carol E; Zhao, Runxiang; Jung, Sung Yun; Qin, Jun; Cortez, David

    2014-01-01

    SMARCAL1 promotes the repair and restart of damaged replication forks. Either overexpression or silencing SMARCAL1 causes the accumulation of replication-associated DNA damage. SMARCAL1 is heavily phosphorylated. Here we identify multiple phosphorylation sites, including S889, which is phosphorylated even in undamaged cells. S889 is highly conserved through evolution and it regulates SMARCAL1 activity. Specifically, S889 phosphorylation increases the DNA-stimulated ATPase activity of SMARCAL1 and increases its ability to catalyze replication fork regression. A phosphomimetic S889 mutant is also hyperactive when expressed in cells, while a non-phosphorylatable mutant is less active. S889 lies within a C-terminal region of the SMARCAL1 protein. Deletion of the C-terminal region also creates a hyperactive SMARCAL1 protein suggesting that S889 phosphorylation relieves an auto-inhibitory function of this SMARCAL1 domain. Thus, S889 phosphorylation is one mechanism by which SMARCAL1 activity is regulated to ensure the proper level of fork remodeling needed to maintain genome integrity during DNA synthesis. PMID:24150942

  3. Structure of the Escherichia coli RNA polymerase a Subunit C-terminal Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Gonzalez, S.; Birktoft, J; Lawson, C

    2010-01-01

    The {alpha} subunit C-terminal domain ({alpha}CTD) of RNA polymerase (RNAP) is a key element in transcription activation in Escherichia coli, possessing determinants responsible for the interaction of RNAP with DNA and with transcription factors. Here, the crystal structure of E. coli {alpha}CTD ({alpha} subunit residues 245-329) determined to 2.0 {angstrom} resolution is reported. Crystals were obtained after reductive methylation of the recombinantly expressed domain. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1} and possessed both pseudo-translational symmetry and pseudo-merohedral twinning. The refined coordinate model (R factor = 0.193, R{sub free} = 0.236) has improved geometry compared with prior lower resolution determinations of the {alpha}CTD structure [Jeon et al. (1995), Science, 270, 1495-1497; Benoff et al. (2002), Science, 297, 1562-1566]. An extensive dimerization interface formed primarily by N- and C-terminal residues is also observed. The new coordinates will facilitate the improved modeling of {alpha}CTD-containing multi-component complexes visualized at lower resolution using X-ray crystallography and electron-microscopy reconstruction.

  4. Amine modification of digested peptide at C-terminal end during protein digestion by protease.

    PubMed

    Ito, Toshiyuki; Sugita, Yoshiaki; Takao, Koichi; Ikeguchi, Yoshihiko; Shirahata, Akira

    2007-10-01

    We recently reported that C-terminal polyamine modification occurs when proteins are digested with trypsin in the presence of polyamine [Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 356, 159-162 (2007)]. In the present study, the characteristics of this C-terminal modification in the presence of protease and amine were investigated. When hemoglobin (HB) was digested with trypsin in the presence of N-(2-pyridyl)-1,4-diaminobutane (Py4), formation of the modified peptide was dependent on time and on HB or Py4 concentration. When synthetic peptide was treated with trypsin in the presence of Py4, ca. 0.1% of the peptide was modified with Py4. When HB or cytochrome C was treated with a range of serine proteases in the presence of various amines (Py4, N-(2-pyridyl)-1,3-diaminopropane, tranexamic acid, isonicotinic acid hydrazide and ampicillin), the modified peptide was detected in all cases tested, thus suggesting that amine modification widely accompanies digestion by proteases. PMID:17917247

  5. Molecular Understanding of USP7 Substrate Recognition and C-Terminal Activation.

    PubMed

    Rougé, Lionel; Bainbridge, Travis W; Kwok, Michael; Tong, Raymond; Di Lello, Paola; Wertz, Ingrid E; Maurer, Till; Ernst, James A; Murray, Jeremy

    2016-08-01

    The deubiquitinating enzyme USP7 has a pivotal role in regulating the stability of proteins involved in fundamental cellular processes of normal biology and disease. Despite the importance of USP7, the mechanisms underlying substrate recognition and catalytic activation are poorly understood. Here we present structural, biochemical, and biophysical analyses elucidating the molecular mechanism by which the C-terminal 19 amino acids of USP7 (residues 1084-1102) enhance the ubiquitin cleavage activity of the deubiquitinase (DUB) domain. Our data demonstrate that the C-terminal peptide binds the activation cleft in the catalytic domain and stabilizes the catalytically competent conformation of USP7. Additional structures of longer fragments of USP7, as well as solution studies, provide insight into full-length USP7, the role of the UBL domains, and demonstrate that both substrate recognition and deubiquitinase activity are highly regulated by the catalytic and noncatalytic domains of USP7, a feature that could be essential for the proper function of multi-domain DUBs. PMID:27452404

  6. Groundnut Bud Necrosis Virus Encoded NSm Associates with Membranes via Its C-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pratibha; Indi, Shantinath S.; Savithri, Handanahal S.

    2014-01-01

    Groundnut Bud Necrosis Virus (GBNV) is a tripartite ambisense RNA plant virus that belongs to serogroup IV of Tospovirus genus. Non-Structural protein-m (NSm), which functions as movement protein in tospoviruses, is encoded by the M RNA. In this communication, we demonstrate that despite the absence of any putative transmembrane domain, GBNV NSm associates with membranes when expressed in E. coli as well as in N. benthamiana. Incubation of refolded NSm with liposomes ranging in size from 200–250 nm resulted in changes in the secondary and tertiary structure of NSm. A similar behaviour was observed in the presence of anionic and zwitterionic detergents. Furthermore, the morphology of the liposomes was found to be modified in the presence of NSm. Deletion of coiled coil domain resulted in the inability of in planta expressed NSm to interact with membranes. Further, when the C-terminal coiled coil domain alone was expressed, it was found to be associated with membrane. These results demonstrate that NSm associates with membranes via the C-terminal coiled coil domain and such an association may be important for movement of viral RNA from cell to cell. PMID:24919116

  7. The distinct C-terminal acidic domains of HMGB proteins are functionally relevant in Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    de Abreu da Silva, Isabel Caetano; Carneiro, Vitor Coutinho; Vicentino, Amanda Roberta Revoredo; Aguilera, Estefania Anahi; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo; Thiengo, Silvana; Fernandez, Monica Ammon; Fantappié, Marcelo Rosado

    2016-04-01

    The Schistosoma mansoni High Mobility Group Box (HMGB) proteins SmHMGB1, SmHMGB2 and SmHMGB3 share highly conserved HMG box DNA binding domains but have significantly different C-terminal acidic tails. Here, we used three full-length and tailless forms of the S. mansoni HMGB proteins to examine the functional roles of their acidic tails. DNA binding assays revealed that the different lengths of the acidic tails among the three SmHMGB proteins significantly and distinctively influenced their DNA transactions. Spectroscopic analyses indicated that the longest acidic tail of SmHMGB3 contributes to the structural stabilisation of this protein. Using immunohistochemical analysis, we showed distinct patterns of SmHMGB1, SmHMGB2 and SmHMGB3 expression in different tissues of adult worms. RNA interference approaches indicated a role for SmHMGB2 and SmHMGB3 in the reproductive system of female worms, whereas for SmHMGB1 no clear phenotype was observed. Schistosome HMGB proteins can be phosphorylated, acetylated and methylated. Importantly, the acetylation and methylation of schistosome HMGBs were greatly enhanced upon removal of the acidic tail. These data support the notion that the C-terminal acidic tails dictate the differences in the structure, expression and function of schistosome HMGB proteins. PMID:26820302

  8. The C-terminal region of OVGP1 remodels the zona pellucida and modifies fertility parameters.

    PubMed

    Algarra, B; Han, L; Soriano-Úbeda, C; Avilés, M; Coy, P; Jovine, L; Jiménez-Movilla, M

    2016-01-01

    OVGP1 is the major non-serum glycoprotein in the oviduct fluid at the time of fertilization and early embryo development. Its activity differs among species. Here, we show that the C-terminal region of recombinant OVGP1 regulates its binding to the extracellular zona pellucida and affects its activity during fertilization. While porcine OVGP1 penetrates two-thirds of the thickness of the zona pellucida, shorter OVGP1 glycoproteins, including rabbit OVGP1, are restricted to the outer one-third of the zona matrix. Deletion of the C-terminal region reduces the ability of the glycoprotein to penetrate through the zona pellucida and prevents OVGP1 endocytosis. This affects the structure of the zona matrix and increases its resistance to protease digestion. However, only full-length porcine OVGP1 is able to increase the efficiency rate of in vitro fertilization. Thus, our findings document that the presence or absence of conserved regions in the C-terminus of OVGP1 modify its association with the zona pellucida that affects matrix structure and renders the zona matrix permissive to sperm penetration and OVGP1 endocytosis into the egg. PMID:27601270

  9. Structure of the Escherichia coli RNA polymerase α subunit C-terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Lara-González, Samuel; Birktoft, Jens J.; Lawson, Catherine L.

    2010-01-01

    The α subunit C-terminal domain (αCTD) of RNA polymerase (RNAP) is a key element in transcription activation in Escherichia coli, possessing determinants responsible for the interaction of RNAP with DNA and with transcription factors. Here, the crystal structure of E. coli αCTD (α subunit residues 245–329) determined to 2.0 Å resolution is reported. Crystals were obtained after reductive methylation of the recombinantly expressed domain. The crystals belonged to space group P21 and possessed both pseudo-translational symmetry and pseudo-merohedral twinning. The refined coordinate model (R factor = 0.193, R free = 0.236) has improved geometry compared with prior lower resolution determinations of the αCTD structure [Jeon et al. (1995 ▶), Science, 270, 1495–1497; Benoff et al. (2002 ▶), Science, 297, 1562–1566]. An extensive dimerization interface formed primarily by N- and C-terminal residues is also observed. The new coordinates will facilitate the improved modeling of αCTD-containing multi-component complexes visualized at lower resolution using X-ray crystallo­graphy and electron-microscopy reconstruction. PMID:20606261

  10. The C-terminal domain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA topoisomerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Caron, P R; Watt, P; Wang, J C

    1994-01-01

    A set of carboxy-terminal deletion mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA topoisomerase II were constructed for studying the functions of the carboxyl domain in vitro and in vivo. The wild-type yeast enzyme is a homodimer with 1,429 amino acid residues in each of the two polypeptides; truncation of the C terminus to Ile-1220 has little effect on the function of the enzyme in vitro or in vivo, whereas truncations extending beyond Gln-1138 yield completely inactive proteins. Several mutant enzymes with C termini in between these two residues were found to be catalytically active but unable to complement a top2-4 temperature-sensitive mutation. Immunomicroscopy results suggest that the removal of a nuclear localization signal in the C-terminal domain is likely to contribute to the physiological dysfunction of these proteins; the ability of these mutant proteins to relax supercoiled DNA in vivo shows, however, that at least some of the mutant proteins are present in the nuclei in a catalytically active form. In contrast to the ability of the catalytically active mutant proteins to relax supercoiled intracellular DNA, all mutants that do not complement the temperature-dependent lethality and high frequency of chromosomal nondisjunction of top2-4 were found to lack decatenation activity in vivo. The plausible roles of the DNA topoisomerase II C-terminal domain, in addition to providing a signal for nuclear localization, are discussed in the light of these results. Images PMID:8164675

  11. Extreme C-terminal sites are posttranslocationally glycosylated by the STT3B isoform of the OST

    PubMed Central

    Shrimal, Shiteshu; Trueman, Steven F.

    2013-01-01

    Metazoan organisms assemble two isoforms of the oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) that have different catalytic subunits (STT3A or STT3B) and partially nonoverlapping roles in asparagine-linked glycosylation. The STT3A isoform of the OST is primarily responsible for co-translational glycosylation of the nascent polypeptide as it enters the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. The C-terminal 65–75 residues of a glycoprotein will not contact the translocation channel–associated STT3A isoform of the OST complex before chain termination. Biosynthetic pulse labeling of five human glycoproteins showed that extreme C-terminal glycosylation sites were modified by an STT3B-dependent posttranslocational mechanism. The boundary for STT3B-dependent glycosylation of C-terminal sites was determined to fall between 50 and 55 residues from the C terminus of a protein. C-terminal NXT sites were glycosylated more rapidly and efficiently than C-terminal NXS sites. Bioinformatics analysis of glycopeptide databases from metazoan organisms revealed a lower density of C-terminal acceptor sites in glycoproteins because of reduced positive selection of NXT sites and negative selection of NXS sites. PMID:23530066

  12. C-terminal Src kinase-mediated EPIYA phosphorylation of Pragmin creates a feed-forward C-terminal Src kinase activation loop that promotes cell motility.

    PubMed

    Senda, Yoshie; Murata-Kamiya, Naoko; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2016-07-01

    Pragmin is one of the few mammalian proteins containing the Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala (EPIYA) tyrosine-phosphorylation motif that was originally discovered in the Helicobacter pylori CagA oncoprotein. Following delivery into gastric epithelial cells by type IV secretion and subsequent tyrosine phosphorylation at the EPIYA motifs, CagA serves as an oncogenic scaffold/adaptor that promiscuously interacts with SH2 domain-containing mammalian proteins such as the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP2) and the C-terminal Src kinase (Csk), a negative regulator of Src family kinases. Like CagA, Pragmin also forms a physical complex with Csk. In the present study, we found that Pragmin directly binds to Csk by the tyrosine-phosphorylated EPIYA motif. The complex formation potentiates kinase activity of Csk, which in turn phosphorylates Pragmin on tyrosine-238 (Y238), Y343, and Y391. As Y391 of Pragmin comprises the EPIYA motif, Pragmin-Csk interaction creates a feed-forward regulatory loop of Csk activation. Together with the finding that Pragmin and Csk are colocalized to focal adhesions, these observations indicate that the Pragmin-Csk interaction, triggered by Pragmin EPIYA phosphorylation, robustly stimulates the kinase activity of Csk at focal adhesions, which direct cell-matrix adhesion that regulates cell morphology and cell motility. As a consequence, expression of Pragmin and/or Csk in epithelial cells induces an elongated cell shape with elevated cell scattering in a manner that is mutually dependent on Pragmin and Csk. Deregulation of the Pragmin-Csk axis may therefore induce aberrant cell migration that contributes to tumor invasion and metastasis. PMID:27116701

  13. Interaction of the Tim44 C-terminal domain with negatively charged phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Marom, Milit; Safonov, Roman; Amram, Shay; Avneon, Yoav; Nachliel, Esther; Gutman, Menachem; Zohary, Keren; Azem, Abdussalam; Tsfadia, Yossi

    2009-12-01

    The translocation of proteins from the cytosol into the mitochondrial matrix is mediated by the coordinated action of the TOM complex in the outer membrane, as well as the TIM23 complex and its associated protein import motor in the inner membrane. The focus of this work is the peripheral inner membrane protein Tim44. Tim44 is a vital component of the mitochondrial protein translocation motor that anchors components of the motor to the TIM23 complex. For this purpose, Tim44 associates with the import channel by direct interaction with the Tim23 protein. Additionally, it was shown in vitro that Tim44 associates with acidic model membranes, in particular those containing cardiolipin. The latter interaction was shown to be mediated by the carboxy-terminal domain of Tim44 [Weiss, C., et al. (1999) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 96, 8890-8894]. The aim of this study was to determine the precise recognition site for negative lipids in the C-terminal domain of Tim44. In particular, we wanted to examine the recently suggested hypothesis that acidic phospholipids associate with Tim44 via a hydrophobic cavity that is observed in the high-resolution structure of the C-terminal domain of the protein [Josyula, R., et al. (2006) J. Mol. Biol. 359, 798-804]. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that (i) the hydrophobic tail of lipids may interact with Tim44 via the latter's hydrophobic cavity and (ii) a region, located in the N-terminal alpha-helix of the C-terminal domain (helices A1 and A2), may serve as a membrane attachment site. To validate this assumption, N-terminal truncations of yeast Tim44 were examined for their ability to bind cardiolipin-containing phospholipid vesicles. The results indicate that removal of the N-terminal alpha-helix (helix A1) abolishes the capacity of Tim44 to associate with cardiolipin-containing liposomes. We suggest that helices A1 and A2, in Tim44, jointly promote the association of the protein with acidic phospholipids. PMID:19863062

  14. Trafficking Dynamics of PCSK9-Induced LDLR Degradation: Focus on Human PCSK9 Mutations and C-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Villeneuve, Louis; Demers, Annie; Mayer, Gaétan

    2016-01-01

    PCSK9 is a secreted ligand and negative post-translational regulator of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) in hepatocytes. Gain-of-function (GOF) or loss-of-function (LOF) mutations in PCSK9 are directly correlated with high or low plasma LDL-cholesterol levels, respectively. Therefore, PCSK9 is a prevailing lipid-lowering target to prevent coronary heart diseases and stroke. Herein, we fused monomeric fluorescent proteins to PCSK9 and LDLR to visualize their intra- and extracellular trafficking dynamics by live confocal microscopy. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) showed that PCSK9 LOF R46L mutant and GOF mutations S127R and D129G, but not the LDLR high-affinity mutant D374Y, significantly accelerate PCSK9 exit from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Quantitative analysis of inverse FRAP revealed that only R46L presented a much slower trafficking from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the plasma membrane and a lower mobile fraction likely suggesting accumulation or delayed exit at the TGN as an underlying mechanism. While not primarily involved in LDLR binding, PCSK9 C-terminal domain (CTD) was found to be essential to induce LDLR degradation both upon its overexpression in cells or via the extracellular pathway. Our data revealed that PCSK9 CTD is required for the localization of PCSK9 at the TGN and increases its LDLR-mediated endocytosis. Interestingly, intracellular lysosomal targeting of PCSK9-ΔCTD was able to rescue its capacity to induce LDLR degradation emphasizing a role of the CTD in the sorting of PCSK9-LDLR complex towards late endocytic compartments. Finally, we validated our dual fluorescence system as a cell based-assay by preventing PCSK9 internalization using a PCSK9-LDLR blocking antibody, which may be expended to identify protein, peptide or small molecule inhibitors of PCSK9. PMID:27280970

  15. Trafficking Dynamics of PCSK9-Induced LDLR Degradation: Focus on Human PCSK9 Mutations and C-Terminal Domain.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Steve; Hamouda, Hocine Ait; Villeneuve, Louis; Demers, Annie; Mayer, Gaétan

    2016-01-01

    PCSK9 is a secreted ligand and negative post-translational regulator of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) in hepatocytes. Gain-of-function (GOF) or loss-of-function (LOF) mutations in PCSK9 are directly correlated with high or low plasma LDL-cholesterol levels, respectively. Therefore, PCSK9 is a prevailing lipid-lowering target to prevent coronary heart diseases and stroke. Herein, we fused monomeric fluorescent proteins to PCSK9 and LDLR to visualize their intra- and extracellular trafficking dynamics by live confocal microscopy. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) showed that PCSK9 LOF R46L mutant and GOF mutations S127R and D129G, but not the LDLR high-affinity mutant D374Y, significantly accelerate PCSK9 exit from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Quantitative analysis of inverse FRAP revealed that only R46L presented a much slower trafficking from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the plasma membrane and a lower mobile fraction likely suggesting accumulation or delayed exit at the TGN as an underlying mechanism. While not primarily involved in LDLR binding, PCSK9 C-terminal domain (CTD) was found to be essential to induce LDLR degradation both upon its overexpression in cells or via the extracellular pathway. Our data revealed that PCSK9 CTD is required for the localization of PCSK9 at the TGN and increases its LDLR-mediated endocytosis. Interestingly, intracellular lysosomal targeting of PCSK9-ΔCTD was able to rescue its capacity to induce LDLR degradation emphasizing a role of the CTD in the sorting of PCSK9-LDLR complex towards late endocytic compartments. Finally, we validated our dual fluorescence system as a cell based-assay by preventing PCSK9 internalization using a PCSK9-LDLR blocking antibody, which may be expended to identify protein, peptide or small molecule inhibitors of PCSK9. PMID:27280970

  16. The GSTM2 C-Terminal Domain Depresses Contractility and Ca2+ Transients in Neonatal Rat Ventricular Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Hewawasam, Ruwani P; Liu, Dan; Casarotto, Marco G; Board, Philip G; Dulhunty, Angela F

    2016-01-01

    The cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) is an intracellular ion channel that regulates Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) during excitation-contraction coupling in the heart. The glutathione transferases (GSTs) are a family of phase II detoxification enzymes with additional functions including the selective inhibition of RyR2, with therapeutic implications. The C-terminal half of GSTM2 (GSTM2C) is essential for RyR2 inhibition, and mutations F157A and Y160A within GSTM2C prevent the inhibitory action. Our objective in this investigation was to determine whether GSTM2C can enter cultured rat neonatal ventricular cardiomyocytes and influence contractility. We show that oregon green-tagged GSTM2C (at 1 μM) is internalized into the myocytes and it reduces spontaneous contraction frequency and myocyte shortening. Field stimulation of myocytes evoked contraction in the same percentage of myocytes treated either with media alone or media plus 15 μM GSTM2C. Myocyte shortening during contraction was significantly reduced by exposure to 15 μM GSTM2C, but not 5 and 10 μM GSTM2C and was unaffected by exposure to 15 μM of the mutants Y160A or F157A. The amplitude of the Ca2+ transient in the 15 μM GSTM2C - treated myocytes was significantly decreased, the rise time was significantly longer and the decay time was significantly shorter than in control myocytes. The Ca2+ transient was not altered by exposure to Y160A or F157A. The results are consistent with GSTM2C entering the myocytes and inhibiting RyR2, in a manner that indicates a possible therapeutic potential for treatment of arrhythmia in the neonatal heart. PMID:27612301

  17. C-terminal Src Kinase Gates Homeostatic Synaptic Plasticity and Regulates Fasciclin II Expression at the Drosophila Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Ashlyn M.; Brusich, Douglas J.; Frank, C. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Forms of homeostatic plasticity stabilize neuronal outputs and promote physiologically favorable synapse function. A well-studied homeostatic system operates at the Drosophila melanogaster larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ). At the NMJ, impairment of postsynaptic glutamate receptor activity is offset by a compensatory increase in presynaptic neurotransmitter release. We aim to elucidate how this process operates on a molecular level and is preserved throughout development. In this study, we identified a tyrosine kinase-driven signaling system that sustains homeostatic control of NMJ function. We identified C-terminal Src Kinase (Csk) as a potential regulator of synaptic homeostasis through an RNAi- and electrophysiology-based genetic screen. We found that Csk loss-of-function mutations impaired the sustained expression of homeostatic plasticity at the NMJ, without drastically altering synapse growth or baseline neurotransmission. Muscle-specific overexpression of Src Family Kinase (SFK) substrates that are negatively regulated by Csk also impaired NMJ homeostasis. Surprisingly, we found that transgenic Csk-YFP can support homeostatic plasticity at the NMJ when expressed either in the muscle or in the nerve. However, only muscle-expressed Csk-YFP was able to localize to NMJ structures. By immunostaining, we found that Csk mutant NMJs had dysregulated expression of the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule homolog Fasciclin II (FasII). By immunoblotting, we found that levels of a specific isoform of FasII were decreased in homeostatically challenged GluRIIA mutant animals–but markedly increased in Csk mutant animals. Additionally, we found that postsynaptic overexpression of FasII from its endogenous locus was sufficient to impair synaptic homeostasis, and genetically reducing FasII levels in Csk mutants fully restored synaptic homeostasis. Based on these data, we propose that Csk and its SFK substrates impinge upon homeostatic control of NMJ function by regulating

  18. Control of cytoplasmic dynein force production and processivity by its C-terminal domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, Matthew P.; Höök, Peter; Brenner, Sibylle; Wynne, Caitlin L.; Vallee, Richard B.; Gennerich, Arne

    2015-02-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a microtubule motor involved in cargo transport, nuclear migration and cell division. Despite structural conservation of the dynein motor domain from yeast to higher eukaryotes, the extensively studied S. cerevisiae dynein behaves distinctly from mammalian dyneins, which produce far less force and travel over shorter distances. However, isolated reports of yeast-like force production by mammalian dynein have called interspecies differences into question. We report that functional differences between yeast and mammalian dynein are real and attributable to a C-terminal motor element absent in yeast, which resembles a ‘cap’ over the central pore of the mammalian dynein motor domain. Removal of this cap increases the force generation of rat dynein from 1 pN to a yeast-like 6 pN and greatly increases its travel distance. Our findings identify the CT-cap as a novel regulator of dynein function.

  19. The C-terminal domain of Cernunnos/XLF is dispensable for DNA repair in vivo.

    PubMed

    Malivert, Laurent; Callebaut, Isabelle; Rivera-Munoz, Paola; Fischer, Alain; Mornon, Jean-Paul; Revy, Patrick; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre

    2009-03-01

    The core nonhomologous end-joining DNA repair pathway is composed of seven factors: Ku70, Ku80, DNA-PKcs, Artemis, XRCC4 (X4), DNA ligase IV (L4), and Cernunnos/XLF (Cernunnos). Although Cernunnos and X4 are structurally related and participate in the same complex together with L4, they have distinct functions during DNA repair. L4 relies on X4 but not on Cernunnos for its stability, and L4 is required for optimal interaction of Cernunnos with X4. We demonstrate here, using in vitro-generated Cernunnos mutants and a series of functional assays in vivo, that the C-terminal region of Cernunnos is dispensable for its activity during DNA repair. PMID:19103754

  20. Conformationally restricted C-terminal peptides of substance P. Synthesis, mass spectral analysis and pharmacological properties.

    PubMed

    Theodoropoulos, D; Poulos, C; Gatos, D; Cordopatis, P; Escher, E; Mizrahi, J; Regoli, D; Dalietos, D; Furst, A; Lee, T D

    1985-10-01

    Four cyclic analogues of the C-terminal hepta- or hexapeptide of substance P were prepared by the solution method. The cyclizations were obtained by substituting with cysteine the residues normally present in positions 5 or 6 or 11 of substance P and by subsequent disulfide bond formation. The final products were identified by ordinary analytical procedures and advanced mass spectroscopy. The biological activities were determined on three bioassays: the guinea pig ileum, the guinea pig trachea and the rabbit mesenteric vein. Results obtained with these assays indicate that all peptides with a disulfide bridgehead in position 11 are inactive and that a cycle between positions 5 and 6 already strongly reduces the biological activity. The acyclic precursors containing thiol protection groups display weak biological activities. These results further underline the importance of the side chain in position 11 of substance P and suggest that optimal biological activities may require a linear peptide sequence. PMID:2413208

  1. C-terminal peptides of rhodopsin. Determination of the optimum sequence for recognition of retinal transducin.

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, D J; Morrison, D; Davis, L C; Takemoto, L J

    1986-01-01

    In vertebrate retinal rod outer segments, transducin, a guanine-nucleotide-binding protein, mediates signal coupling between rhodopsin and cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase. Whereas the T alpha subunit (39 kDa) of transducin binds guanine nucleotides and is the activator of the phosphodiesterase, the T beta gamma subunits (35 and 10 kDa) may function to physically link T alpha with photolysed rhodopsin. We have previously reported that a site of binding of transducin is on the C-terminus of bovine rhodopsin. By using competition with synthetic peptides, the recognition region was localized to bovine opsin amino acid residues 317-339. Further studies are detailed which determine the boundaries of this binding site on rhodopsin, as well as some of the critical amino acids needed for transducin binding. These results suggest that the serine and threonine residues in the rhodopsin C-terminal peptides Rhod-1 and Rhod-3 are critical for reconstitution of transducin GTPase activity. PMID:3461782

  2. Folding of the C-terminal bacterial binding domain in statherin upon adsorption onto hydroxyapatite crystals

    PubMed Central

    Goobes, Gil; Goobes, Rivka; Schueler-Furman, Ora; Baker, David; Stayton, Patrick S.; Drobny, Gary P.

    2006-01-01

    Statherin is an enamel pellicle protein that inhibits hydroxyapatite (HAP) nucleation and growth, lubricates the enamel surface, and is recognized by oral bacteria in periodontal diseases. We report here from solid-state NMR measurements that the protein's C-terminal region folds into an α-helix upon adsorption to HAP crystals. This region contains the binding sites for bacterial fimbriae that mediate bacterial cell adhesion to the surface of the tooth. The helical segment is shown through long-range distance measurements to fold back onto the intermediate region (residues Y16–P28) defining the global fold of the protein. Statherin, previously shown to be unstructured in solution, undergoes conformation selection on its substrate mineral surface. This surface-induced folding of statherin can be related to its functionality in inhibiting HAP crystal growth and can explain how oral pathogens selectively recognize HAP-bound statherin. PMID:17060618

  3. Potential Clinical Utility of Copeptin (C-terminal provasopressin) measurements in clinical medicine.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, K C; Brabant, G

    2016-03-01

    Copeptin is a 39-amino-acids containing glycosylated peptide derived from the C-terminal part of the arginine vasopressin (AVP) precursor. In the process of proteolysis the AVP precursor is processed to AVP, neurophysin II, and copeptin in equimolar amounts. In contrast to AVP, copeptin remains stable for several days at room temperature in serum or plasma. Hence, copeptin serves as a bona fide biomarker of AVP release. We briefly summarise clinical utility of copeptin in the diagnosis of diabetes insipidus. We also discuss potential applications of copeptin measurements in hyponatraemic states, assessment of an anterior pituitary function, as well as a wide range of several acute and chronic medical conditions, such as myocardial infarction, stroke or diabetes mellitus. PMID:27008633

  4. C-terminal phosphorylation is essential for regulation of ethylene synthesizing ACC synthase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Swarup Roy; Roy, Sujit; Sengupta, Dibyendu N

    2013-02-01

    The genetic and molecular biological studies mainly in Arabidopsis and in some other plants have begun to uncover the various components of ripening signaling pathway in plants. Although transcriptional regulation of major ripening genes have been studied in detail, information on role of phosphorylation in regulating the activity and stability of core ripening pathway associated proteins in relation to ethylene biosynthesis during fruit ripening is still limited. Recently we have demonstrated the evidence for post-translational regulation of MA-ACS1 (Musa acuminata ACC synthase 1), the rate limiting step enzyme regulating ripening ethylene production in banana, through phosphorylation at the C-terminal Ser 476 and 479 residues by a 41-kDa Ser/Thr protein kinase. (1) Here we have further discussed role of protein phosphorylation in regulation of stability and activity of ACS enzymes and the mechanistic and evolutionary perspective of phosphorylation pattern of Type I ACC synthase enzymes. PMID:23221778

  5. Requirement for the E1 Helicase C-Terminal Domain in Papillomavirus DNA Replication In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bergvall, Monika; Gagnon, David; Titolo, Steve; Lehoux, Michaël; D'Abramo, Claudia M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The papillomavirus (PV) E1 helicase contains a conserved C-terminal domain (CTD), located next to its ATP-binding site, whose function in vivo is still poorly understood. The CTD is comprised of an alpha helix followed by an acidic region (AR) and a C-terminal extension termed the C-tail. Recent biochemical studies on bovine papillomavirus 1 (BPV1) E1 showed that the AR and C-tail regulate the oligomerization of the protein into a double hexamer at the origin. In this study, we assessed the importance of the CTD of human papillomavirus 11 (HPV11) E1 in vivo, using a cell-based DNA replication assay. Our results indicate that combined deletion of the AR and C-tail drastically reduces DNA replication, by 85%, and that further truncation into the alpha-helical region compromises the structural integrity of the E1 helicase domain and its interaction with E2. Surprisingly, removal of the C-tail alone or mutation of highly conserved residues within the domain still allows significant levels of DNA replication (55%). This is in contrast to the absolute requirement for the C-tail reported for BPV1 E1 in vitro and confirmed here in vivo. Characterization of chimeric proteins in which the AR and C-tail from HPV11 E1 were replaced by those of BPV1 indicated that while the function of the AR is transferable, that of the C-tail is not. Collectively, these findings define the contribution of the three CTD subdomains to the DNA replication activity of E1 in vivo and suggest that the function of the C-tail has evolved in a PV type-specific manner. IMPORTANCE While much is known about hexameric DNA helicases from superfamily 3, the papillomavirus E1 helicase contains a unique C-terminal domain (CTD) adjacent to its ATP-binding site. We show here that this CTD is important for the DNA replication activity of HPV11 E1 in vivo and that it can be divided into three functional subdomains that roughly correspond to the three conserved regions of the CTD: an alpha helix, needed

  6. Dimeric peptides of the C-terminal region of CXCL14 function as CXCL12 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tanegashima, Kosuke; Tsuji, Kohei; Suzuki, Kenji; Shigenaga, Akira; Otaka, Akira; Hara, Takahiko

    2013-11-29

    We recently reported that CXCL14 binds to CXCR4 with high affinity and inhibits CXCL12-mediated chemotaxis. Here we found that the C-terminal 51-77 amino acid residues of CXCL14 are responsible for CXCR4 binding. A disulfide dimer peptide of CXCL14(51-77) bound to CXCR4 with comparable affinity to full length CXCL14, and exhibited CXCL12 inhibitor activity. CXCR4 was efficiently internalized upon binding of dimeric CXCL14(51-77), thereby being reduced on the cell surface. Substitution of 5 amino acid residues in combination with the use of an oxime linker for dimerization increased the solubility and chemical stability of the dimeric CXCL14(51-77). PMID:24161674

  7. C-Terminal-oriented Immobilization of Enzymes Using Sortase A-mediated Technique.

    PubMed

    Hata, Yuto; Matsumoto, Takuya; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-10-01

    In the present study, sortase A-mediated immobilization of enzymes was used for the preparation of immobilized enzymes. Thermobifida fusca YX β-glucosidase (BGL) or Streptococcus bovis 148 α-amylase (AmyA) were produced with C-terminal sortase A recognition sequences. The resulting fusion proteins were successfully immobilized on nanoparticle surfaces using sortase A. Some properties (activity, stability, and reusability) of the immobilized fusion proteins were evaluated. Both immobilized BGL and immobilized AmyA prepared by the sortase A-mediated technique retained their catalytic activity, exhibiting activities 3.0- or 1.5-fold (respectively) of those seen with the same enzymes immobilized by chemical crosslinking. Immobilized enzymes prepared by the sortase A-mediated technique did not undergo dramatic changes in stability compared with the respective free enzymes. Thus, the sortase A-mediated technique provides a promising method for immobilization of active, stable enzymes. PMID:26098063

  8. Chelation of cadmium ions by phytochelatin synthase: role of the cysteine-rich C-terminal.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, Mun'delanji; Matsumoto, Sachiko; Nishikori, Shingo; Shiraki, Kentaro; Hirata, Kazumasa; Takagi, Masahiro

    2008-02-01

    The interactions between Cd(2+) and the C-terminal region of phytochelatin (PC) synthase using recombinant wild-type and mutant PC synthase were studied. We show that site-directed mutagenesis of Cys residues at C(358)C(359)XXXC(363)XXC(366) motif decreases the number of Cd(2+) and other heavy metal ions interacting with the enzyme, and that the motif binds the metals discriminatingly. The optimum binding ratio of PC synthase to Cd(2+) was also determined. The findings indicate that Cys exists as a free SH residue and that it is involved in the regulation of PC enzyme activity by transferring the metals into closer proximity with the catalytic domain. These results are important in understanding heavy metal detoxification mechanisms in higher plants, a step towards phytoremediated-applications. PMID:18270423

  9. Affinity labelling of proteinases with tryptic specificity by peptides with C-terminal lysine chloromethyl ketone

    PubMed Central

    Coggins, John R.; Kray, William; Shaw, Elliott

    1974-01-01

    Methods are described for the synthesis of peptides terminating in Lys-CH2Cl. The products were examined as affinity labels for several enzymes of trypsin-like specificity which are resistant to Tos-Lys-CH2Cl. In part, the inertness of the latter may be due to the sulphonamide group, since Z-Lys-CH2Cl was more effective. However, a number of tripeptides with C-terminal Lys-CH2Cl were superior in their ability to inactivate subtilisin, thrombin and plasma kallikrein. The possibility of developing enzyme-specific reagents selective for members within the trypsin-like group is demonstrated by Ala-Phe-Lys-CH2Cl, which readily inactivates plasma kallikrein but not thrombin. PMID:4422496

  10. 7TM X-ray structures for class C GPCRs as new drug-discovery tools. 1. mGluR5.

    PubMed

    Topiol, Sid; Sabio, Michael

    2016-01-15

    We illustrate, with a focus on mGluR5, how the recently published, first X-ray structures of mGluR 7TM domains, specifically those of mGluR1 and mGluR5 complexed with negative allosteric modulators (NAMs), will begin to influence ligand- (e.g., drug- or sweetener-) discovery efforts involving class C GPCRs. With an extensive docking study allowing full ligand flexibility and full side chain flexibility of all residues in the ligand-binding cavity, we have predicted and analyzed the binding modes of a variety of structurally diverse mGluR5 NAM ligands, showing how the X-ray structures serve to effectively rationalize each ligand's binding characteristics. We demonstrated that the features that are inherent in our earlier overlay model are preserved in the protein structure-based docking models. We identified structurally diverse compounds, which potentially act as mGluR NAMs, and revealed binding-site differences by performing high-throughput docking using a database of approximately six million structures of commercially available compounds and the mGluR1 and mGluR5 X-ray structures. By comparing the 7TM domains of the mGluR5 and mGluR1 X-rays structures, we identified selectivity factors within group I of the mGluRs. Similarly, using homology models that we built for mGluR2 and mGluR4, we have identified the factors leading to the selectivity between group I and groups II and III for ligands occupying the deepest portion of the mGluR5 binding cavity. Finally, we have proposed a structure-based explanation of the pharmacological switching within a set of positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) and their corresponding, very close NAM analogs. PMID:26706173

  11. Properties of the C-terminal domain of 4.1 proteins.

    PubMed

    Scott, C; Phillips, G W; Baines, A J

    2001-07-01

    At the C-terminus of all known 4.1 proteins is a sequence domain unique to these proteins, known as the C-terminal domain (CTD). Mammalian CTDs are associated with a growing number of protein-protein interactions, although such activities have yet to be associated with invertebrate CTDs. Mammalian CTDs are generally defined by sequence alignment as encoded by exons 18-21. Comparison of known vertebrate 4.1 proteins with invertebrate (Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster) 4.1 proteins indicates that mammalian 4.1 exon 19 represents a vertebrate adaptation that extends the sequence of the CTD with a Ser/Thr-rich sequence. The CTD was first described as a 22/24-kDa domain by chymotryptic digestion of erythrocyte 4.1 (4.1R) [Leto, T.L. & Marchesi, V.T. (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 4603-4608]. Here we show that in 4.1R the 22/24-kDa fragment is not stable but rapidly processed to a 15-kDa fragment by chymotrypsin. The 15-kDa fragment is extremely stable, being resistant to overnight digestion in chymotrypsin on ice. Analysis of this fragment indicates that it is derived from residues 709-858 (SwissProt accession no. P48193), and represents the CTD of 4.1R. The fragment behaves as a globular monomer in solution. Secondary-structure predictions indicate that this domain is composed of five or six beta strands with an alpha helix before the most C-terminal of these. Together these data indicate that the CTD probably represents an independent folding structure which has gained function since the divergence of vertebrates from invertebrates. PMID:11432737

  12. The C-Terminal Acidic Region of Calreticulin Mediates Phosphatidylserine Binding and Apoptotic Cell Phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Wijeyesakere, Sanjeeva Joseph; Bedi, Sukhmani Kaur; Huynh, David; Raghavan, Malini

    2016-05-01

    Calreticulin is a calcium-binding chaperone that is normally localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Calreticulin is detectable on the surface of apoptotic cells under some apoptosis-inducing conditions, where it promotes the phagocytosis and immunogenicity of dying cells. However, the precise mechanism by which calreticulin, a soluble protein, localizes to the outer surface of the plasma membrane of dying cells is unknown, as are the molecular mechanisms that are relevant to calreticulin-induced cellular phagocytosis. Calreticulin comprises three distinct structural domains: a globular domain, an extended arm-like P-domain, and a C-terminal acidic region containing multiple low-affinity calcium binding sites. We show that calreticulin, via its C-terminal acidic region, preferentially interacts with phosphatidylserine (PS) compared with other phospholipids and that this interaction is calcium dependent. Additionally, exogenous calreticulin binds apoptotic cells via a higher-affinity calcium-dependent mode that is acidic region dependent. Exogenous calreticulin also binds live cells, including macrophages, via a second, lower-affinity P-domain and globular domain-dependent, but calcium-independent binding mode that likely involves its generic polypeptide binding site. Truncation constructs lacking the acidic region or arm-like P-domain of calreticulin are impaired in their abilities to induce apoptotic cell phagocytosis by murine peritoneal macrophages. Taken together, the results of this investigation provide the first molecular insights into the phospholipid binding site of calreticulin as a key anchor point for the cell surface expression of calreticulin on apoptotic cells. These findings also support a role for calreticulin as a PS-bridging molecule that cooperates with other PS-binding factors to promote the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. PMID:27036911

  13. Structure of the nisin leader peptidase NisP revealing a C-terminal autocleavage activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yueyang; Li, Xin; Li, Ruiqing; Li, Shanshan; Ni, Hongqian; Wang, Hui; Xu, Haijin; Zhou, Weihong; Saris, Per E J; Yang, Wen; Qiao, Mingqiang; Rao, Zihe

    2014-06-01

    Nisin is a widely used antibacterial lantibiotic polypeptide produced by Lactococcus lactis. NisP belongs to the subtilase family and functions in the last step of nisin maturation as the leader-peptide peptidase. Deletion of the nisP gene in LAC71 results in the production of a non-active precursor peptide with the leader peptide unremoved. Here, the 1.1 Å resolution crystal structure of NisP is reported. The structure shows similarity to other subtilases, which can bind varying numbers of Ca atoms. However, no calcium was found in this NisP structure, and the predicted calcium-chelating residues were placed so as to not allow NisP to bind a calcium ion in this conformation. Interestingly, a short peptide corresponding to its own 635-647 sequence was found to bind to the active site of NisP. Biochemical assays and native mass-spectrometric analysis confirmed that NisP possesses an auto-cleavage site between residues Arg647 and Ser648. Further, it was shown that NisP mutated at the auto-cleavage site (R647P/S648P) had full catalytic activity for nisin leader-peptide cleavage, although the C-terminal region of NisP was no longer cleaved. Expressing this mutant in L. lactis LAC71 did not affect the production of nisin but did decrease the proliferation rate of the bacteria, suggesting the biological significance of the C-terminal auto-cleavage of NisP. PMID:24914961

  14. Molecular and functional consequences of Smad4 C-terminal missense mutations in colorectal tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    De Bosscher, Karolien; Hill, Caroline S; Nicolás, Francisco J

    2004-01-01

    Smad4 is an essential signal transducer of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) signalling pathway and has been identified as a tumour suppressor, being mutated in approx. 50% of pancreatic cancers and approx. 15% of colorectal cancers. Two missense mutations in the C-terminal domain of Smad4, D351H (Asp351-->His) and D537Y (Asp537-->Tyr), have been described recently in the human colorectal cancer cell lines CACO-2 and SW948 respectively [Woodford-Richens, Rowan, Gorman, Halford, Bicknell, Wasan, Roylance, Bodmer and Tomlinson (2001) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 98, 9719-9723]. Previous work in vitro suggested that only Asp-351 was required for interaction with Smad2 [Wu, Fairman, Penry and Shi (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 20688-20694]. In the present study, we investigate the functional consequences of these point mutations in vivo. We demonstrate that neither of these colorectal cancer cells undergo growth arrest in response to TGF-beta, which can be explained, at least in part, by their inability to up-regulate cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 (CIP1 ) or p15 ( INK4b) after TGF-beta stimulation. Although the point-mutated Smad4s are expressed at normal levels in these colorectal cancer cells, they cannot interact with either TGF-beta-induced phosphorylated Smad2 or Smad3. As a result, these Smad4 mutants do not accumulate in the nucleus after TGF-beta stimulation, are not recruited to DNA by relevant Smad-binding transcription factors and cannot generate transcriptionally active DNA-bound complexes. Therefore both these colorectal tumour cells completely lack functional Smad4 activity owing to the missense mutations. Given the location of these mutations in the three-dimensional structure of the Smad4 C-terminal domain, the results also give us significant insights into Smad complex formation. PMID:14715079

  15. Temperature dependence of C-terminal carboxylic group IR absorptions in the amide I‧ region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Benjamin A.; Literati, Alex; Ball, Borden; Kubelka, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Studies of structural changes in peptides and proteins using IR spectroscopy often rely on subtle changes in the amide I‧ band as a function of temperature. However, these changes can be obscured by the overlap with other absorptions, namely the side-chain and terminal carboxylic groups. The former were the subject of our previous report (Anderson et al., 2014). In this paper we investigate the IR spectra of the asymmetric stretch of α-carboxylic groups for amino acids representing all major types (Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, Ser, Thr, Asp, Glu, Lys, Asn, His, Trp, Pro) as well as the C-terminal groups of three dipeptides (Gly-Gly, Gly-Ala, Ala-Gly) in D2O at neutral pH. Experimental temperature dependent IR spectra were analyzed by fitting of both symmetric and asymmetric pseudo-Voigt functions. Qualitatively the spectra exhibit shifts to higher frequency, loss in intensity and narrowing with increased temperature, similar to that observed previously for the side-chain carboxylic groups of Asp. The observed dependence of the band parameters (frequency, intensity, width and shape) on temperature is in all cases linear: simple linear regression is therefore used to describe the spectral changes. The spectral parameters vary between individual amino acids and show systematic differences between the free amino acids and dipeptides, particularly in the absolute peak frequencies, but the temperature variations are comparable. The relative variations between the dipeptide spectral parameters are most sensitive to the C-terminal amino acid, and follow the trends observed in the free amino acid spectra. General rules for modeling the α-carboxylic IR absorption bands in peptides and proteins as the function of temperature are proposed.

  16. N- and C-terminal Transactivation Domains of GATA1 Protein Coordinate Hematopoietic Program*

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Eri; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Shimizu, Ritsuko

    2012-01-01

    Transcription factor GATA1 regulates the expression of a cluster of genes important for hematopoietic cell differentiation toward erythroid and megakaryocytic lineages. Three functional domains have been identified in GATA1, a transactivation domain located in the N terminus (N-TAD) and two zinc finger domains located in the middle of the molecule. Although N-TAD is known as a solitary transactivation domain for GATA1, clinical observations in Down syndrome leukemia suggest that there may be additional transactivation domains. In this study, we found in reporter co-transfection assays that transactivation activity of GATA1 was markedly reduced by deletion of the C-terminal 95 amino acids without significant attenuation of the DNA binding activity or self-association potential. We therefore generated transgenic mouse lines that expressed GATA1 lacking the C-terminal region (GATA1-ΔCT). When we crossed these transgenic mouse lines to the Gata1-deficient mouse, we found that the GATA1-ΔCT transgene rescued Gata1-deficient mice from embryonic lethality. The embryos rescued with an almost similar level of GATA1-ΔCT to endogenous GATA1 developed beyond embryonic 13.5 days, showing severe anemia with accumulation of immature erythroid cells, as was the case for the embryos rescued by endogenous levels of GATA1 lacking N-TAD (GATA1-ΔNT). Distinct sets of target genes were affected in the embryos rescued by GATA1-ΔCT and GATA1-ΔNT. We also found attenuated GATA1 function in cell cycle control of immature megakaryocytes in both lines of rescued embryos. These results thus demonstrate that GATA1 has two independent transactivation domains, N-TAD and C-TAD. Both N-TAD and C-TAD retain redundant as well as specific activities for proper hematopoiesis in vivo. PMID:22556427

  17. Autoinhibition of Bacteriophage T4 Mre11 by Its C-terminal Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yang; Nelson, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    Mre11 and Rad50 form a stable complex (MR) and work cooperatively in repairing DNA double strand breaks. In the bacteriophage T4, Rad50 (gene product 46) enhances the nuclease activity of Mre11 (gene product 47), and Mre11 and DNA in combination stimulate the ATPase activity of Rad50. The structural basis for the cross-activation of the MR complex has been elusive. Various crystal structures of the MR complex display limited protein-protein interfaces that mainly exist between the C terminus of Mre11 and the coiled-coil domain of Rad50. To test the role of the C-terminal Rad50 binding domain (RBD) in Mre11 activation, we constructed a series of C-terminal deletions and mutations in bacteriophage T4 Mre11. Deletion of the RBD in Mre11 eliminates Rad50 binding but only has moderate effect on its intrinsic nuclease activity; however, the additional deletion of the highly acidic flexible linker that lies between RBD and the main body of Mre11 increases the nuclease activity of Mre11 by 20-fold. Replacement of the acidic residues in the flexible linker with alanine elevates the Mre11 activity to the level of the MR complex when combined with deletion of RBD. Nuclease activity kinetics indicate that Rad50 association and deletion of the C terminus of Mre11 both enhance DNA substrate binding. Additionally, a short peptide that contains the flexible linker and RBD of Mre11 acts as an inhibitor of Mre11 nuclease activity. These results support a model where the Mre11 RBD and linker domain act as an autoinhibitory domain when not in complex with Rad50. Complex formation with Rad50 alleviates this inhibition due to the tight association of the RBD and the Rad50 coiled-coil. PMID:25077970

  18. An autoinhibitory helix in the C-terminal region of phospholipase C-[beta] mediates G[alpaha subscript q] activation

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, Angeline M.; Tesmer, Valerie M.; Dhamsania, Vishan D.; Thal, David M.; Gutierrez, Joanne; Chowdhury, Shoaib; Suddala, Krishna C.; Northup, John K.; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2012-03-16

    The enzyme phospholipase C-{beta} (PLC{beta}) is a crucial regulator of intracellular calcium levels whose activity is controlled by heptahelical receptors that couple to members of the G{sub q} family of heterotrimeric G proteins. We have determined atomic structures of two invertebrate homologs of PLC{beta} (PLC21) from cephalopod retina and identified a helix from the C-terminal regulatory region that interacts with a conserved surface of the catalytic core of the enzyme. Mutations designed to disrupt the analogous interaction in human PLC{beta}3 considerably increase basal activity and diminish stimulation by G{alpha}{sub q}. G{alpha}{sub q} binding requires displacement of the autoinhibitory helix from the catalytic core, thus providing an allosteric mechanism for activation of PLC{beta}.

  19. YscU/FlhB of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Harbors a C-terminal Type III Secretion Signal.

    PubMed

    Login, Frédéric H; Wolf-Watz, Hans

    2015-10-23

    All type III secretion systems (T3SS) harbor a member of the YscU/FlhB family of proteins that is characterized by an auto-proteolytic process that occurs at a conserved cytoplasmic NPTH motif. We have previously demonstrated that YscUCC, the C-terminal peptide generated by auto-proteolysis of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis YscU, is secreted by the T3SS when bacteria are grown in Ca(2+)-depleted medium at 37 °C. Here, we investigated the secretion of this early T3S-substrate and showed that YscUCC encompasses a specific C-terminal T3S signal within the 15 last residues (U15). U15 promoted C-terminal secretion of reporter proteins like GST and YopE lacking its native secretion signal. Similar to the "classical" N-terminal secretion signal, U15 interacted with the ATPase YscN. Although U15 is critical for YscUCC secretion, deletion of the C-terminal secretion signal of YscUCC did neither affect Yop secretion nor Yop translocation. However, these deletions resulted in increased secretion of YscF, the needle subunit. Thus, these results suggest that YscU via its C-terminal secretion signal is involved in regulation of the YscF secretion. PMID:26338709

  20. The C-terminal helix in subdomain 4 of the regulatory light chain is essential for myosin regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, T; Kendrick-Jones, J

    1993-01-01

    In vertebrate smooth/non-muscle myosins, phosphorylation of the regulatory light chains by a specific calmodulin-activated kinase controls both myosin head interaction with actin and assembly of the myosin into filaments. Previous studies have shown that the C-terminal domain of the regulatory light chain is crucial for the regulation of these myosin functions. To further dissect the role of this region of the light chain in myosin regulation, a series of chicken smooth muscle myosin regulatory light chain mutants has been constructed with successive C-terminal deletions. These mutants were synthesized in Escherichia coli and analysed by their ability to restore Ca2+ regulation to scallop myosin that had been stripped of its native regulatory light chains ('desensitized'). The results show that regulatory light chain mutants with deletions in the C-terminal helix in subdomain 4 were able to reform the regulatory Ca2+ binding site on the scallop myosin head, but had lost the ability to suppress scallop myosin filament assembly and interaction with actin in the absence of Ca2+. Further deletions in the C-terminal domain led to a gradual loss of ability to restore the regulatory Ca2+ binding site. Thus, the regions in the C-terminal half of the regulatory light chain responsible for myosin regulation can be identified. Images PMID:8223496

  1. The C-terminal region of alpha-crystallin: involvement in protection against heat-induced denaturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takemoto, L.; Emmons, T.; Horwitz, J.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the alpha-crystallins can protect other proteins against heat-induced denaturation and aggregation. To determine the possible involvement of the C-terminal region in this activity, the alpha-crystallins were subjected to limited tryptic digestion, and the amount of cleavage from the N-terminal and C-terminal regions of the alpha-A and alpha-B crystallin chains was assessed using antisera specific for these regions. Limited tryptic digestion resulted in cleavage only from the C-terminal region of alpha-A crystallin. This trypsin-treated alpha-A crystallin preparation showed a decreased ability to protect proteins from heat-induced aggregation using an in vitro assay. Together, these results demonstrate that the C-terminal region of alpha-A crystallin is important for its ability to protect against heat-induced aggregation, which is consistent with the hypothesis that post-translational changes that are known to occur at the C-terminal region may have significant effects on the ability of alpha-A crystallin to protect against protein denaturation in vivo.

  2. Crystal structure of yeast Sis1 peptide-binding fragment and Hsp70 Ssa1 C-terminal complex

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingzhi; Wu, Yunkun; Qian, Xinguo; Sha, Bingdong

    2006-01-01

    Heat shock protein (Hsp) 40 facilitates the critical role of Hsp70 in a number of cellular processes such as protein folding, assembly, degradation and translocation in vivo. Hsp40 and Hsp70 stay in close contact to achieve these diverse functions. The conserved C-terminal EEVD motif in Hsp70 has been shown to regulate Hsp40–Hsp70 interaction by an unknown mechanism. Here, we provide a structural basis for this regulation by determining the crystal structure of yeast Hsp40 Sis1 peptide-binding fragment complexed with the Hsp70 Ssa1 C-terminal. The Ssa1 extreme C-terminal eight residues, G634PTVEEVD641, form a β-strand with the domain I of Sis1 peptide-binding fragment. Surprisingly, the Ssa1 C-terminal binds Sis1 at the site where Sis1 interacts with the non-native polypeptides. The negatively charged residues within the EEVD motif in Ssa1 C-terminal form extensive charge–charge interactions with the positively charged residues in Sis1. The structure-based mutagenesis data support the structural observations. PMID:16737444

  3. Relevance of the C-terminal Arg-Phe sequence in γ2-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (γ2-MSH) for inducing cardiovascular effects in conscious rats

    PubMed Central

    Nijsen, M J M A; de Ruiter, G J W; Kasbergen, C M; Hoogerhout, P; de Wildt, D J

    2000-01-01

    The cardiovascular effects by γ2-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (γ2-MSH) are probably not due to any of the well-known melanocortin subtype receptors. We hypothesize that the receptor for Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-amide (FMRFa) or Phe-Leu-Phe-Gln-Pro-Gln-Arg-Phe-amide (neuropeptide FF; NPFFa), other Arg-Phe containing peptides, is the candidate receptor. Therefore, we studied various Arg-Phe containing peptides to compare their haemodynamic profile with that of γ2-MSH(6–12), the most potent fragment of γ2-MSH. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) changes were measured in conscious rats after intravenous administration of γ2-MSH related peptides. Phe-Arg-Trp-Asp-Arg-Phe-Gly (γ2-MSH(6–12)), FMRFa, NPFFa, Met-enkephalin-Arg-Phe-amide (MERFa), Arg-Phe-amide (RFa), acetyl-Phe-norLeu-Arg-Phe-amide (acFnLRFa) and desamino-Tyr-Phe-norLeu-Arg-Phe-amide (daYFnLRFa) caused a dose-dependent increase in MAP and HR. γ2-MSH(6–12) showed the most potent cardiovascular effects (ED50=12 nmol kg−1 for ΔMAP; 7 nmol kg−1 for ΔHR), as compared to the other Arg-Phe containing peptides (ED50=177–292 nmol kg−1 for ΔMAP; 130–260 nmol kg−1 for ΔHR). Peptides, which lack the C-terminal Arg-Phe sequence (Lys-Tyr-Val-Met-Gly-His-Phe-Arg-Trp-Asp-Arg-Pro-Gly (γ2-pro11-MSH), desamino-Tyr-Phe-norLeu-Arg-[L-1,2,3,4 tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid]-amide (daYFnLR[TIC]a) and Met-enkephalin (ME)), were devoid of cardiovascular actions. The results indicate that the baroreceptor reflex-mediated reduction of tonic sympathetic activity due to pressor effects is inhibited by γ2-MSH(6–12) and that its cardiovascular effects are dependent on the presence of a C-terminal Arg-Phe sequence. It is suggested that the FMRFa/NPFFa receptor is the likely candidate receptor, involved in these cardiovascular effects. PMID:11090122

  4. The C-terminal region of Drosophila heat shock factor (HSF) contains a constitutively functional transactivation domain.

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewski, J; Orosz, A; Allada, R; Wu, C

    1996-01-01

    The heat shock transcription factor (HSF) is constitutively expressed in Drosophila cells as an inactive monomer. Upon heat shock HSF undergoes trimerization and acquires high affinity DNA binding ability leading to specific interaction with its cognate elements in heat shock promoters. Here we show that the transactivation function of HSF is conferred by the extreme C-terminal region of the protein. Deletion analysis of HSF fragments fused to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain demonstrates that transactivation is dependent on HSF residues 610-691. This domain is located beyond the C-terminal heptad repeat (leucine zipper 4) whose presence or integrity is dispensable for transactivation. The transactivation domain is functional in the absence of heat shock and can be replaced by the extreme C-terminal region of human HSF1. The Drosophila and human HSF transactivation domains are both rich in hydrophobic and acidic residues and may be structurally conserved, despite limited sequence identity. PMID:8628664

  5. Effects of C-terminal deletions on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator function in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Randak, Christoph; Rokhlina, Tatiana; Karp, Philip; Vermeer, Daniel; Ashbourne Excoffon, Katherine J; Welsh, Michael J

    2003-02-18

    To better understand the function of the conserved C terminus of the cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator, we studied constructs containing deletions in the C-terminal tail. When expressed in well differentiated CF airway epithelia, each construct localized predominantly to the apical membrane and generated transepithelial Cl(-) current. The results suggested that neither the C-terminal PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1 (PDZ)-interacting motif nor other C-terminal sequences were absolutely required for apical expression in airway epithelia. Surprisingly, deleting an acidic cluster near the C terminus reduced both channel opening rate and transepithelial Cl(-) transport, indicating that it influences channel gating. These results may help explain the relative paucity of CF-associated mutations in the C terminus. PMID:12578973

  6. Effects of C-terminal deletions on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator function in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Randak, Christoph; Rokhlina, Tatiana; Karp, Philip; Vermeer, Daniel; Ashbourne Excoffon, Katherine J.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    To better understand the function of the conserved C terminus of the cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator, we studied constructs containing deletions in the C-terminal tail. When expressed in well differentiated CF airway epithelia, each construct localized predominantly to the apical membrane and generated transepithelial Cl− current. The results suggested that neither the C-terminal PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1 (PDZ)-interacting motif nor other C-terminal sequences were absolutely required for apical expression in airway epithelia. Surprisingly, deleting an acidic cluster near the C terminus reduced both channel opening rate and transepithelial Cl− transport, indicating that it influences channel gating. These results may help explain the relative paucity of CF-associated mutations in the C terminus. PMID:12578973

  7. The C-terminal domain of NifL is sufficient to inhibit NifA activity.

    PubMed Central

    Narberhaus, F; Lee, H S; Schmitz, R A; He, L; Kustu, S

    1995-01-01

    In Klebsiella pneumoniae, transcription of all nif (nitrogen fixation) operons except the regulatory nifLA operon itself is regulated by the proteins NifA and NifL. NifA, an enhancer-binding protein, activates transcription by RNA polymerase containing the alternative sigma factor sigma 54. The central catalytic domain of NifA is sufficient for transcriptional activation, which can occur from solution. In vivo, NifL antagonizes the action of NifA in the presence of molecular oxygen or combined nitrogen. Inhibition has also been shown in vitro, but it was not responsive to environmental signals. Assuming a two-domain structure of NifL, we localized inhibition by NifL to its carboxy (C)-terminal domain, which is more soluble than the intact protein. The first line of evidence for this is that internal deletions of NifL containing an intact C-terminal domain were able to inhibit transcriptional activation by NifA in a coupled transcription-translation system. The second line of evidence is that the isolated C-terminal domain of NifL (assayed as a fusion to the soluble maltose-binding protein [MBP]) was sufficient to inhibit transcriptional activation by the central domain of NifA in a purified transcription system. The final line of evidence is that an MBP fusion to the C-terminal domain of NifL inhibited transcriptional activation by NifA in vivo. On the basis of these data, we postulate that the inhibitory function of NifL lies in its C-terminal domain and hence infer that this domain is responsible for interaction with NifA. Gel filtration experiments with MBP-NifL fusion derivatives lacking portions of the N- or C-terminal domain of the protein revealed that the C-terminal domain is the most soluble part of NifL. Up to 50% of two MBP-NifL truncations containing only the C-terminal domain appeared to be in a defined dimeric state. PMID:7665487

  8. Biochemical and virological analysis of the 18-residue C-terminal tail of HIV-1 integrase

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Mohd J; Monel, Blandine; Krishnan, Lavanya; Shun, Ming-Chieh; Di Nunzio, Francesca; Helland, Dag E; Engelman, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Background The 18 residue tail abutting the SH3 fold that comprises the heart of the C-terminal domain is the only part of HIV-1 integrase yet to be visualized by structural biology. To ascertain the role of the tail region in integrase function and HIV-1 replication, a set of deletion mutants that successively lacked three amino acids was constructed and analyzed in a variety of biochemical and virus infection assays. HIV-1/2 chimers, which harbored the analogous 23-mer HIV-2 tail in place of the HIV-1 sequence, were also studied. Because integrase mutations can affect steps in the replication cycle other than integration, defective mutant viruses were tested for integrase protein content and reverse transcription in addition to integration. The F185K core domain mutation, which increases integrase protein solubility, was furthermore analyzed in a subset of mutants. Results Purified proteins were assessed for in vitro levels of 3' processing and DNA strand transfer activities whereas HIV-1 infectivity was measured using luciferase reporter viruses. Deletions lacking up to 9 amino acids (1-285, 1-282, and 1-279) displayed near wild-type activities in vitro and during infection. Further deletion yielded two viruses, HIV-11-276 and HIV-11-273, that displayed approximately two and 5-fold infectivity defects, respectively, due to reduced integrase function. Deletion mutant HIV-11-270 and the HIV-1/2 chimera were non-infectious and displayed approximately 3 to 4-fold reverse transcription in addition to severe integration defects. Removal of four additional residues, which encompassed the C-terminal β strand of the SH3 fold, further compromised integrase incorporation into virions and reverse transcription. Conclusion HIV-11-270, HIV-11-266, and the HIV-1/2 chimera were typed as class II mutant viruses due to their pleiotropic replication defects. We speculate that residues 271-273 might play a role in mediating the known integrase-reverse transcriptase interaction, as

  9. Structural and Functional Significance of the N- and C-Terminal Appendages in Arabidopsis Truncated Hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Mukhi, Nitika; Dhindwal, Sonali; Uppal, Sheetal; Kapoor, Abhijeet; Arya, Richa; Kumar, Pravindra; Kaur, Jagreet; Kundu, Suman

    2016-03-29

    Plant hemoglobins constitute three distinct groups: symbiotic, nonsymbiotic, and truncated hemoglobins. Structural investigation of symbiotic and nonsymbiotic (class I) hemoglobins revealed the presence of a vertebrate-like 3/3 globin fold in these proteins. In contrast, plant truncated hemoglobins are similar to bacterial truncated hemoglobins with a putative 2/2 α-helical globin fold. While multiple structures have been reported for plant hemoglobins of the first two categories, for plant truncated globins only one structure has been reported of late. Here, we report yet another crystal structure of the truncated hemoglobin from Arabidopsis thaliana (AHb3) with two water molecules in the heme pocket, of which one is distinctly coordinated to the heme iron, unlike the only available crystal structure of AHb3 with a hydroxyl ligand. AHb3 was monomeric in its crystallographic asymmetric unit; however, dimer was evident in the crystallographic symmetry, and the globin indeed existed as a stable dimer in solution. The tertiary structure of the protein exhibited a bacterial-like 2/2 α-helical globin fold with an additional N-terminal α-helical extension and disordered C-termini. To address the role of these extended termini in AHb3, which is yet unknown, N- and C-terminal deletion mutants were created and characterized and molecular dynamics simulations performed. The C-terminal deletion had an insignificant effect on most properties but perturbed the dimeric equilibrium of AHb3 and significantly influenced azide binding kinetics in the ferric state. These results along with the disordered nature of the C-terminus indicated its putative role in intramolecular or intermolecular interactions probably regulating protein-ligand and protein-protein interactions. While the N-terminal deletion did not change the overall globin fold, stability, or ligand binding kinetics, it seemed to have influenced coordination at the heme iron, the hydration status of the active site

  10. Export of autotransported proteins proceeds through an oligomeric ring shaped by C-terminal domains.

    PubMed

    Veiga, Esteban; Sugawara, Etsuko; Nikaido, Hiroshi; de Lorenzo, Víctor; Fernández, Luis Angel

    2002-05-01

    An investigation was made into the oligomerization, the ability to form pores and the secretion-related properties of the 45 kDa C-terminal domain of the IgA protease (C-IgAP) from Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This protease is the best studied example of the autotransporters (ATs), a large family of exoproteins from Gram-negative bacteria that includes numerous virulence factors from human pathogens. These proteins contain an N-terminal passenger domain that em bodies the secreted polypeptide, while the C-domain inserts into the outer membrane (OM) and trans locates the linked N-module into the extracellular medium. Here we report that purified C-IgAP forms an oligomeric complex of approximately 500 kDa with a ring-like structure containing a central cavity of approximately 2 nm diameter that is the conduit for the export of the N-domains. These data overcome the previous model for ATs, which postulated the passage of the N-module through the hydrophilic channel of the beta-barrel of each monomeric C-domain. Our results advocate a secretion mechanism not unlike other bacterial export systems, such as the secretins or fimbrial ushers, which rely on multimeric complexes assembled in the OM. PMID:11980709

  11. Cathepsin X Cleaves Profilin 1 C-Terminal Tyr139 and Influences Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Pečar Fonović, Urša; Kos, Janko

    2015-01-01

    Cathepsin X, a cysteine carboxypeptidase, is upregulated in several types of cancer. Its molecular target in tumor cells is profilin 1, a known tumor suppressor and regulator of actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Cathepsin X cleaves off the C-terminal Tyr139 of profilin 1, affecting binding of poly-L-proline ligands and, consequently, tumor cell migration and invasion. Profilin 1 with mutations at the C-terminus, transiently expressed in prostate cancer cells PC-3, showed that Tyr139 is important for proper function of profilin 1 as a tumor suppressor. Cleaving off Tyr139 prevents the binding of clathrin, a poly-L-proline ligand involved in endocytosis. More profilin 1—clathrin complexes were present in PC-3 cells when cathepsin X was inhibited by its specific inhibitor AMS36 or silenced by siRNA. As a consequence, the endocytosis of FITC-labeled dextran and transferrin conjugate was significantly increased. These results constitute the first report of the regulation of clathrin-mediated endocytosis in tumor cells through proteolytic processing of profilin 1. PMID:26325675

  12. Piezo1 ion channel pore properties are dictated by C-terminal region

    PubMed Central

    Coste, Bertrand; Murthy, Swetha E.; Mathur, Jayanti; Schmidt, Manuela; Mechioukhi, Yasmine; Delmas, Patrick; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-01-01

    Piezo1 and Piezo2 encode mechanically activated cation channels that function as mechanotransducers involved in vascular system development and touch sensing, respectively. Structural features of Piezos remain unknown. Mouse Piezo1 is bioinformatically predicted to have 30–40 transmembrane (TM) domains. Here, we find that nine of the putative inter-transmembrane regions are accessible from the extracellular side. We use chimeras between mPiezo1 and dPiezo to show that ion-permeation properties are conferred by C-terminal region. We further identify a glutamate residue within a conserved region adjacent to the last two putative TM domains of the protein, that when mutated, affects unitary conductance and ion selectivity, and modulates pore block. We propose that this amino acid is either in the pore or closely associates with the pore. Our results describe important structural motifs of this channel family and lay the groundwork for a mechanistic understanding of how Piezos are mechanically gated and conduct ions. PMID:26008989

  13. The C-terminal region of Trypanosoma cruzi MASPs is antigenic and secreted via exovesicles.

    PubMed

    De Pablos, Luis Miguel; Díaz Lozano, Isabel María; Jercic, Maria Isabel; Quinzada, Markela; Giménez, Maria José; Calabuig, Eva; Espino, Ana Margarita; Schijman, Alejandro Gabriel; Zulantay, Inés; Apt, Werner; Osuna, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, a neglected and emerging tropical disease, endemic to South America and present in non-endemic regions due to human migration. The MASP multigene family is specific to T. cruzi, accounting for 6% of the parasite's genome and plays a key role in immune evasion. A common feature of MASPs is the presence of two conserved regions: an N-terminal region codifying for signal peptide and a C-terminal (C-term) region, which potentially acts as GPI-addition signal peptide. Our aim was the analysis of the presence of an immune response against the MASP C-term region. We found that this region is highly conserved, released via exovesicles (EVs) and has an associated immune response as revealed by epitope affinity mapping, IFA and inhibition of the complement lysis assays. We also demonstrate the presence of a fast IgM response in Balb/c mice infected with T. cruzi. Our results reveal the presence of non-canonical secreted peptides in EVs, which can subsequently be exposed to the immune system with a potential role in evading immune system targets in the parasite. PMID:27270330

  14. Evolutionary diversification of an ancient gene family (rhs) through C-terminal displacement

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Rhs genes are prominent features of bacterial genomes that have previously been implicated in genomic rearrangements in E. coli. By comparing rhs repertoires across the Enterobacteriaceae, this study provides a robust explanation of rhs diversification and evolution, and a mechanistic model of how rhs diversity is gained and lost. Results Rhs genes are ubiquitous and comprise six structurally distinct lineages within the Enterobacteriaceae. There is considerable intergenomic variation in rhs repertoire; for instance, in Salmonella enterica, rhs are restricted to mobile elements, while in Escherichia coli one rhs lineage has diversified through transposition as older lineages have been deleted. Overall, comparative genomics reveals frequent, independent gene gains and losses, as well as occasional lateral gene transfer, in different genera. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Rhs 'core' domains and variable C-termini are evolutionarily decoupled, and propose that rhs diversity is driven by homologous recombination with circular intermediates. Existing C-termini are displaced by laterally acquired alternatives, creating long arrays of dissociated 'tips' that characterize the appearance of rhs loci. Conclusion Rhs repertoires are highly dynamic among Enterobacterial genomes, due to repeated gene gains and losses. In contrast, the primary structures of Rhs genes are evolutionarily conserved, indicating that rhs sequence diversity is driven, not by rapid mutation, but by the relatively slow evolution of novel core/tip combinations. Hence, we predict that a large pool of dissociated rhs C-terminal tips exists episomally and these are potentially transmitted across taxonomic boundaries. PMID:19968874

  15. The E. coli thioredoxin folding mechanism: the key role of the C-terminal helix.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Diego S; Sánchez, Ignacio E; Garrote, Ana; Sica, Mauricio P; Santos, Javier

    2015-02-01

    In this work, the unfolding mechanism of oxidized Escherichia coli thioredoxin (EcTRX) was investigated experimentally and computationally. We characterized seven point mutants distributed along the C-terminal α-helix (CTH) and the preceding loop. The mutations destabilized the protein against global unfolding while leaving the native structure unchanged. Global analysis of the unfolding kinetics of all variants revealed a linear unfolding route with a high-energy on-pathway intermediate state flanked by two transition state ensembles TSE1 and TSE2. The experiments show that CTH is mainly unfolded in TSE1 and the intermediate and becomes structured in TSE2. Structure-based molecular dynamics are in agreement with these experiments and provide protein-wide structural information on transient states. In our model, EcTRX folding starts with structure formation in the β-sheet, while the protein helices coalesce later. As a whole, our results indicate that the CTH is a critical module in the folding process, restraining a heterogeneous intermediate ensemble into a biologically active native state and providing the native protein with thermodynamic and kinetic stability. PMID:25463044

  16. PrP106-126 peptide disrupts lipid membranes: Influence of C-terminal amidation

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Wenfu; Wang Lijun; Hong Yuankai; Sha Yinlin

    2009-02-06

    PrP106-126 is located within the important domain concerning membrane related conformational conversion of human Prion protein (from cellular isoform PrP{sup C} to scrapie isoform PrP{sup Sc}). Recent advances reveal that the pathological and physicochemical properties of PrP106-126 peptide are very sensitive to its N-terminal amidation, however, the detailed mechanism remains unclear. In this work, we studied the interactions of the PrP106-126 isoforms (PrP106-126{sub CONH2} and PrP106-126{sub COOH}) with the neutral lipid bilayers by atomic force microscopy, surface plasmon resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy. The membrane structures were disturbed by the two isoforms in a similarly stepwise process. The distinct morphological changes of the membrane were characterized by formation of semi-penetrated defects and sigmoidal growth of flat high-rise domains on the supported lipid bilayers. However, PrP106-126{sub COOH} displayed a higher peptide-lipid binding affinity than PrP106-126{sub CONH2} ({approx}2.9 times) and facilitated the peptide-lipid interactions by shortening the lag time. These results indicate that the C-terminal amidation may influence the pathological actions of PrP106-126 by lowering the interaction potentials with lipid membranes.

  17. Amyloid β-Protein C-Terminal Fragments: Formation of Cylindrins and β-Barrels.

    PubMed

    Do, Thanh D; LaPointe, Nichole E; Nelson, Rebecca; Krotee, Pascal; Hayden, Eric Y; Ulrich, Brittany; Quan, Sarah; Feinstein, Stuart C; Teplow, David B; Eisenberg, David; Shea, Joan-Emma; Bowers, Michael T

    2016-01-20

    In order to evaluate potential therapeutic targets for treatment of amyloidoses such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), it is essential to determine the structures of toxic amyloid oligomers. However, for the amyloid β-protein peptide (Aβ), thought to be the seminal neuropathogenetic agent in AD, its fast aggregation kinetics and the rapid equilibrium dynamics among oligomers of different size pose significant experimental challenges. Here we use ion-mobility mass spectrometry, in combination with electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and computational modeling, to test the hypothesis that Aβ peptides can form oligomeric structures resembling cylindrins and β-barrels. These structures are hypothesized to cause neuronal injury and death through perturbation of plasma membrane integrity. We show that hexamers of C-terminal Aβ fragments, including Aβ(24-34), Aβ(25-35) and Aβ(26-36), have collision cross sections similar to those of cylindrins. We also show that linking two identical fragments head-to-tail using diglycine increases the proportion of cylindrin-sized oligomers. In addition, we find that larger oligomers of these fragments may adopt β-barrel structures and that β-barrels can be formed by folding an out-of-register β-sheet, a common type of structure found in amyloid proteins. PMID:26700445

  18. Impedance Analysis of Ovarian Cancer Cells upon Challenge with C-terminal Clostridium Perfringens Enterotoxin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Geoffrey; Lo, Chun-Min

    2007-03-01

    Both in vitro and animal studies in breast, prostate, and ovarian cancers have shown that clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE), which binds to CLDN4, may have an important therapeutic benefit, as it is rapidly cytotoxic in tissues overexpressing CLDN4. This study sought to evaluate the ability of C-terminal clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (C-CPE), a CLDN4-targetting molecule, to disrupt tight junction barrier function. Electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) was used to measure both junctional resistance and average cell-substrate separation of ovarian cancer cell lines after exposure to C-CPE. A total of 14 ovarian cancer cell lines were used, and included cell lines derived from serous, mucinous, and clear cells. Our results showed that junctional resistance increases as CLDN4 expression increases. In addition, C-CPE is non-cytotoxic in ovarian cancer cells expressing CLDN4. However, exposure to C-CPE results in a significant (p<0.05) dose- and CLDN4-dependent decrease in junctional resistance and an increase in cell-substrate separation. Treatment of ovarian cancer cell lines with C-CPE disrupts tight junction barrier function.

  19. Human Frataxin Folds Via an Intermediate State. Role of the C-Terminal Region

    PubMed Central

    Faraj, Santiago E.; González-Lebrero, Rodolfo M.; Roman, Ernesto A.; Santos, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the folding reaction of human frataxin, whose deficiency causes the neurodegenerative disease Friedreich’s Ataxia (FRDA). The characterization of different conformational states would provide knowledge about how frataxin can be stabilized without altering its functionality. Wild-type human frataxin and a set of mutants, including two highly destabilized FRDA-associated variants were studied by urea-induced folding/unfolding in a rapid mixing device and followed by circular dichroism. The analysis clearly indicates the existence of an intermediate state (I) in the folding route with significant secondary structure content but relatively low compactness, compared with the native ensemble. However, at high NaCl concentrations I-state gains substantial compaction, and the unfolding barrier is strongly affected, revealing the importance of electrostatics in the folding mechanism. The role of the C-terminal region (CTR), the key determinant of frataxin stability, was also studied. Simulations consistently with experiments revealed that this stretch is essentially unstructured, in the most compact transition state ensemble (TSE2). The complete truncation of the CTR drastically destabilizes the native state without altering TSE2. Results presented here shed light on the folding mechanism of frataxin, opening the possibility of mutating it to generate hyperstable variants without altering their folding kinetics. PMID:26856628

  20. Structure of the C-terminal domain of nsp4 from feline coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Manolaridis, Ioannis; Wojdyla, Justyna A.; Panjikar, Santosh; Snijder, Eric J.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E.; Berglind, Hanna; Nordlund, Pär; Coutard, Bruno; Tucker, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Coronaviruses are a family of positive-stranded RNA viruses that includes important pathogens of humans and other animals. The large coronavirus genome (26–31 kb) encodes 15–16 nonstructural proteins (nsps) that are derived from two replicase polyproteins by autoproteolytic processing. The nsps assemble into the viral replication–transcription complex and nsp3, nsp4 and nsp6 are believed to anchor this enzyme complex to modified intracellular membranes. The largest part of the coronavirus nsp4 subunit is hydrophobic and is predicted to be embedded in the membranes. In this report, a conserved C-terminal domain (∼100 amino-acid residues) has been delineated that is predicted to face the cytoplasm and has been isolated as a soluble domain using library-based construct screening. A prototypical crystal structure at 2.8 Å resolution was obtained using nsp4 from feline coronavirus. Unmodified and SeMet-substituted proteins were crystallized under similar conditions, resulting in tetragonal crystals that belonged to space group P43. The phase problem was initially solved by single isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering (SIRAS), followed by molecular replacement using a SIRAS-derived composite model. The structure consists of a single domain with a predominantly α-helical content displaying a unique fold that could be engaged in protein–protein interactions. PMID:19622868

  1. C-Terminal Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Peptide: A New Sepsis Biomarker with Immunomodulatory Function

    PubMed Central

    Blaurock, Nancy; Schmerler, Diana; Hünniger, Kerstin; Kurzai, Oliver; Ludewig, Katrin; Baier, Michael; Brunkhorst, Frank Martin; Imhof, Diana; Kiehntopf, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a life threatening condition and the leading cause of death in intensive care units. Although single aspects of pathophysiology have been described in detail, numerous unknown mediators contribute to the progression of this complex disease. The aim of this study was to elucidate the pathophysiological role of CAAP48, a C-terminal alpha-1 antitrypsin fragment, that we found to be elevated in septic patients and to apply this peptide as diagnostic marker for infectious and noninfectious etiologies of SIRS. Incubation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils with synthetic CAAP48, the SNP-variant CAAP47, and several control peptides revealed intense neutrophil activation, induction of neutrophil chemotaxis, reduction of neutrophil viability, and release of cytokines. We determined the abundance of CAAP48 in patients with severe sepsis, severe SIRS of noninfectious origin, and viral infection. CAAP48 levels were 3-4-fold higher in patients with sepsis compared to SIRS of noninfectious origin and allowed discrimination of those patients with high sensitivity and specificity. Our results suggest that CAAP48 is a promising discriminatory sepsis biomarker with immunomodulatory functions, particularly on human neutrophils, supporting its important role in the host response and pathophysiology of sepsis. PMID:27382189

  2. C-Terminal Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin-Mediated Antigen Delivery for Nasal Pneumococcal Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hidehiko; Watari, Akihiro; Hashimoto, Eri; Yonemitsu, Miki; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Yagi, Kiyohito; Kondoh, Masuo; Kunisawa, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Efficient vaccine delivery to mucosal tissues including mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues is essential for the development of mucosal vaccine. We previously reported that claudin-4 was highly expressed on the epithelium of nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT) and thus claudin-4-targeting using C-terminal fragment of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (C-CPE) effectively delivered fused antigen to NALT and consequently induced antigen-specific immune responses. In this study, we applied the C-CPE-based vaccine delivery system to develop a nasal pneumococcal vaccine. We fused C-CPE with pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA), an important antigen for the induction of protective immunity against Streptococcus pneumoniae infection, (PspA-C-CPE). PspA-C-CPE binds to claudin-4 and thus efficiently attaches to NALT epithelium, including antigen-sampling M cells. Nasal immunization with PspA-C-CPE induced PspA-specific IgG in the serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) as well as IgA in the nasal wash and BALF. These immune responses were sufficient to protect against pneumococcal infection. These results suggest that C-CPE is an efficient vaccine delivery system for the development of nasal vaccines against pneumococcal infection. PMID:26018248

  3. Human Frataxin Folds Via an Intermediate State. Role of the C-Terminal Region.

    PubMed

    Faraj, Santiago E; González-Lebrero, Rodolfo M; Roman, Ernesto A; Santos, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the folding reaction of human frataxin, whose deficiency causes the neurodegenerative disease Friedreich's Ataxia (FRDA). The characterization of different conformational states would provide knowledge about how frataxin can be stabilized without altering its functionality. Wild-type human frataxin and a set of mutants, including two highly destabilized FRDA-associated variants were studied by urea-induced folding/unfolding in a rapid mixing device and followed by circular dichroism. The analysis clearly indicates the existence of an intermediate state (I) in the folding route with significant secondary structure content but relatively low compactness, compared with the native ensemble. However, at high NaCl concentrations I-state gains substantial compaction, and the unfolding barrier is strongly affected, revealing the importance of electrostatics in the folding mechanism. The role of the C-terminal region (CTR), the key determinant of frataxin stability, was also studied. Simulations consistently with experiments revealed that this stretch is essentially unstructured, in the most compact transition state ensemble (TSE2). The complete truncation of the CTR drastically destabilizes the native state without altering TSE2. Results presented here shed light on the folding mechanism of frataxin, opening the possibility of mutating it to generate hyperstable variants without altering their folding kinetics. PMID:26856628

  4. C-terminal amino acids are essential for human heat shock protein 70 dimerization.

    PubMed

    Marcion, Guillaume; Seigneuric, Renaud; Chavanne, Evelyne; Artur, Yves; Briand, Loïc; Hadi, Tarik; Gobbo, Jessica; Garrido, Carmen; Neiers, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    The human inducible heat shock protein 70 (hHsp70), which is involved in several major pathologies, including neurodegenerative disorders and cancer, is a key molecular chaperone and contributes to the proper protein folding and maintenance of a large number of protein structures. Despite its role in disease, the current structural knowledge of hHsp70 is almost exclusively based on its Escherichia coli homolog, DnaK, even though these two proteins only share ~50 % amino acid identity. For the first time, we describe a complete heterologous production and purification strategy that allowed us to obtain a large amount of soluble, full-length, and non-tagged hHsp70. The protein displayed both an ATPase and a refolding activity when combined to the human Hsp40. Multi-angle light scattering and bio-layer interferometry analyses demonstrated the ability of hHsp70 to homodimerize. The role of the C-terminal part of hHsp70 was identified and confirmed by a study of a truncated version of hHsp70 that could neither dimerize nor present refolding activity. PMID:25030382

  5. Identification and characterization of the role of c-terminal Src kinase in dengue virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rinki; Agrawal, Tanvi; Khan, Naseem Ahmed; Nakayama, Yuji; Medigeshi, Guruprasad R.

    2016-01-01

    We screened a siRNA library targeting human tyrosine kinases in Huh-7 cells and identified c-terminal Src kinase (Csk) as one of the kinases involved in dengue virus replication. Knock-down of Csk expression by siRNAs or inhibition of Csk by an inhibitor reduced dengue virus RNA levels but did not affect viral entry. Csk partially colocalized with viral replication compartments. Dengue infection was drastically reduced in cells lacking the three ubiquitous src family kinases, Src, Fyn and Yes. Csk knock-down in these cells failed to block dengue virus replication suggesting that the effect of Csk is via regulation of Src family kinases. Csk was found to be hyper-phosphorylated during dengue infection and inhibition of protein kinase A led to a block in Csk phosphorylation and dengue virus replication. Overexpression studies suggest an important role for the kinase and SH3 domains in this process. Our results identified a novel role for Csk as a host tyrosine kinase involved in dengue virus replication and provide further insights into the role of host factors in dengue replication. PMID:27457684

  6. TMAO promotes fibrillization and microtubule assembly activity in the C-terminal repeat region of tau.

    PubMed

    Scaramozzino, Francesca; Peterson, Dylan W; Farmer, Patrick; Gerig, J T; Graves, Donald J; Lew, John

    2006-03-21

    Alzheimer's disease most closely correlates with the appearance of the neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), intracellular fibrous aggregates of the microtubule-associated protein, tau. Under native conditions, tau is an unstructured protein, and its physical characterization has revealed no clues about the three-dimensional structural determinants essential for aggregation or microtubule binding. We have found that the natural osmolyte trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) induces secondary structure in a C-terminal fragment of tau (tau(187)) and greatly promotes both self-aggregation and microtubule (MT) assembly activity. These processes could be distinguished, however, by a single-amino acid substitution (Tyr(310) --> Ala), which severely inhibited aggregation but had no effect on MT assembly activity. The inability of this mutant to aggregate could be completely reversed by TMAO. We propose a model in which TMAO induces partial order in tau(187), resulting in conformers that may correspond to on-pathway intermediates of either aggregation or tau-dependent MT assembly or both. These studies set the stage for future high-resolution structural characterization of these intermediates and the basis by which Tyr(310) may direct pathologic versus normal tau function. PMID:16533051

  7. Peptide library approach to uncover phosphomimetic inhibitors of the BRCA1 C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    White, E Railey; Sun, Luxin; Ma, Zhong; Beckta, Jason M; Danzig, Brittany A; Hacker, David E; Huie, Melissa; Williams, David C; Edwards, Ross A; Valerie, Kristoffer; Glover, J N Mark; Hartman, Matthew C T

    2015-05-15

    Many intracellular protein-protein interactions are mediated by the phosphorylation of serine, and phosphoserine-containing peptides can inhibit these interactions. However, hydrolysis of the phosphate by phosphatases, and the poor cell permeability associated with phosphorylated peptides has limited their utility in cellular and in vivo contexts. Compounding the problem, strategies to replace phosphoserine in peptide inhibitors with easily accessible mimetics (such as Glu or Asp) routinely fail. Here, we present an in vitro selection strategy for replacement of phosphoserine. Using mRNA display, we created a 10 trillion member structurally diverse unnatural peptide library. From this library, we found a peptide that specifically binds to the C-terminal domain (BRCT)2 of breast cancer associated protein 1 (BRCA1) with an affinity comparable to phosphorylated peptides. A crystal structure of the peptide bound reveals that the pSer-x-x-Phe motif normally found in BRCA1 (BRCT)2 binding partners is replaced by a Glu-x-x-4-fluoroPhe and that the peptide picks up additional contacts on the protein surface not observed in cognate phosphopeptide binding. Expression of the peptide in human cells led to defects in DNA repair by homologous recombination, a process BRCA1 is known to coordinate. Overall, this work validates a new in vitro selection approach for the development of inhibitors of protein-protein interactions mediated by serine phosphorylation. PMID:25654734

  8. β-Catenin C-terminal signals suppress p53 and are essential for artery formation.

    PubMed

    Riascos-Bernal, Dario F; Chinnasamy, Prameladevi; Cao, Longyue Lily; Dunaway, Charlene M; Valenta, Tomas; Basler, Konrad; Sibinga, Nicholas E S

    2016-01-01

    Increased activity of the tumour suppressor p53 is incompatible with embryogenesis, but how p53 is controlled is not fully understood. Differential requirements for p53 inhibitors Mdm2 and Mdm4 during development suggest that these control mechanisms are context-dependent. Artery formation requires investment of nascent endothelial tubes by smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Here, we find that embryos lacking SMC β-catenin suffer impaired arterial maturation and die by E12.5, with increased vascular wall p53 activity. β-Catenin-deficient SMCs show no change in p53 levels, but greater p53 acetylation and activity, plus impaired growth and survival. In vivo, SMC p53 inactivation suppresses phenotypes caused by loss of β-catenin. Mechanistically, β-catenin C-terminal interactions inhibit Creb-binding protein-dependent p53 acetylation and p53 transcriptional activity, and are required for artery formation. Thus in SMCs, the β-catenin C-terminus indirectly represses p53, and this function is essential for embryogenesis. These findings have implications for angiogenesis, tissue engineering and vascular disease. PMID:27499244

  9. Identification and characterization of the role of c-terminal Src kinase in dengue virus replication.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rinki; Agrawal, Tanvi; Khan, Naseem Ahmed; Nakayama, Yuji; Medigeshi, Guruprasad R

    2016-01-01

    We screened a siRNA library targeting human tyrosine kinases in Huh-7 cells and identified c-terminal Src kinase (Csk) as one of the kinases involved in dengue virus replication. Knock-down of Csk expression by siRNAs or inhibition of Csk by an inhibitor reduced dengue virus RNA levels but did not affect viral entry. Csk partially colocalized with viral replication compartments. Dengue infection was drastically reduced in cells lacking the three ubiquitous src family kinases, Src, Fyn and Yes. Csk knock-down in these cells failed to block dengue virus replication suggesting that the effect of Csk is via regulation of Src family kinases. Csk was found to be hyper-phosphorylated during dengue infection and inhibition of protein kinase A led to a block in Csk phosphorylation and dengue virus replication. Overexpression studies suggest an important role for the kinase and SH3 domains in this process. Our results identified a novel role for Csk as a host tyrosine kinase involved in dengue virus replication and provide further insights into the role of host factors in dengue replication. PMID:27457684

  10. β-Catenin C-terminal signals suppress p53 and are essential for artery formation

    PubMed Central

    Riascos-Bernal, Dario F.; Chinnasamy, Prameladevi; Cao, Longyue (Lily); Dunaway, Charlene M.; Valenta, Tomas; Basler, Konrad; Sibinga, Nicholas E. S.

    2016-01-01

    Increased activity of the tumour suppressor p53 is incompatible with embryogenesis, but how p53 is controlled is not fully understood. Differential requirements for p53 inhibitors Mdm2 and Mdm4 during development suggest that these control mechanisms are context-dependent. Artery formation requires investment of nascent endothelial tubes by smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Here, we find that embryos lacking SMC β-catenin suffer impaired arterial maturation and die by E12.5, with increased vascular wall p53 activity. β-Catenin-deficient SMCs show no change in p53 levels, but greater p53 acetylation and activity, plus impaired growth and survival. In vivo, SMC p53 inactivation suppresses phenotypes caused by loss of β-catenin. Mechanistically, β-catenin C-terminal interactions inhibit Creb-binding protein-dependent p53 acetylation and p53 transcriptional activity, and are required for artery formation. Thus in SMCs, the β-catenin C-terminus indirectly represses p53, and this function is essential for embryogenesis. These findings have implications for angiogenesis, tissue engineering and vascular disease. PMID:27499244

  11. Peptide Library Approach to Uncover Phosphomimetic Inhibitors of the BRCA1 C-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    White, E. Railey; Sun, Luxin; Ma, Zhong; Beckta, Jason M.; Danzig, Brittany A.; Hacker, David E.; Huie, Melissa; Williams, David C.; Edwards, Ross A.; Valerie, Kristoffer; Mark Glover, J. N.; Hartman, Matthew C. T.

    2015-01-01

    Many intracellular protein–protein interactions are mediated by the phosphorylation of serine, and phosphoserine-containing peptides can inhibit these interactions. However, hydrolysis of the phosphate by phosphatases, and the poor cell permeability associated with phosphorylated peptides has limited their utility in cellular and in vivo contexts. Compounding the problem, strategies to replace phosphoserine in peptide inhibitors with easily accessible mimetics (such as Glu or Asp) routinely fail. Here, we present an in vitro selection strategy for replacement of phosphoserine. Using mRNA display, we created a 10 trillion member structurally diverse unnatural peptide library. From this library, we found a peptide that specifically binds to the C-terminal domain (BRCT)2 of breast cancer associated protein 1 (BRCA1) with an affinity comparable to phosphorylated peptides. A crystal structure of the peptide bound reveals that the pSer-x-x-Phe motif normally found in BRCA1 (BRCT)2 binding partners is replaced by a Glu-x-x-4-fluoroPhe and that the peptide picks up additional contacts on the protein surface not observed in cognate phosphopeptide binding. Expression of the peptide in human cells led to defects in DNA repair by homologous recombination, a process BRCA1 is known to coordinate. Overall, this work validates a new in vitro selection approach for the development of inhibitors of protein–protein interactions mediated by serine phosphorylation. PMID:25654734

  12. Structure and inhibition analysis of the mouse SAD-B C-terminal fragment.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hui; Wu, Jing-Xiang; Wang, Jue; Wang, Zhi-Xin; Wu, Jia-Wei

    2016-10-01

    The SAD (synapses of amphids defective) kinases, including SAD-A and SAD-B, play important roles in the regulation of neuronal development, cell cycle, and energy metabolism. Our recent study of mouse SAD-A identified a unique autoinhibitory sequence (AIS), which binds at the junction of the kinase domain (KD) and the ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain and exerts autoregulation in cooperation with UBA. Here, we report the crystal structure of the mouse SAD-B C-terminal fragment including the AIS and the kinase-associated domain 1 (KA1) at 2.8 Å resolution. The KA1 domain is structurally conserved, while the isolated AIS sequence is highly flexible and solvent-accessible. Our biochemical studies indicated that the SAD-B AIS exerts the same autoinhibitory role as that in SAD-A. We believe that the flexible isolated AIS sequence is readily available for interaction with KD-UBA and thus inhibits SAD-B activity. PMID:27251228

  13. Segmental expression and C-terminal labeling of protein ERp44 through protein trans-splicing.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xudong; Liu, Xiang-Qin; Meng, Qing

    2015-08-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum resident protein 44 (ERp44) is a member of the protein disulfide isomerase family and functions in oxidative protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum. A structurally flexible C-terminal tail (C-tail) of ERp44 plays critical roles in dynamically regulating ERp44's function in protein folding quality control. The structure-function dynamics of ERp44's C-tail may be studied further using fluorescence and other techniques, if methods are found to label the C-tail site-specifically with a fluorescent group or segmentally with other desired labels. Here we have developed such methods, employing split inteins capable of protein trans-splicing, and identifying atypical S1 split inteins able to function efficiently at a suitable split site in the ERp44 sequence. One method demonstrated segmental expression of ERp44 for segmental labeling of the C-tail, another method efficiently added a commercially available fluorescent group to the C-terminus of ERp44, and both methods may also be generally useful for studying other proteins. PMID:25907381

  14. The C-terminal amyloidogenic peptide contributes to self-assembly of Avibirnavirus viral protease

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaojuan; Jia, Lu; Hu, Boli; Sun, Yanting; Zhang, Yina; Gao, Xiangxiang; Deng, Tingjuan; Bao, Shengjun; Xu, Li; Zhou, Jiyong

    2015-01-01

    Unlike other viral protease, Avibirnavirus infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV)-encoded viral protease VP4 forms unusual intracellular tubule-like structures during viral infection. However, the formation mechanism and potential biological functions of intracellular VP4 tubules remain largely elusive. Here, we show that VP4 can assemble into tubules in diverse IBDV-infected cells. Dynamic analysis show that VP4 initiates the assembly at early stage of IBDV infection, and gradually assembles into larger size of fibrils within the cytoplasm and nucleus. Intracellular assembly of VP4 doesn’t involve the host cytoskeleton, other IBDV-encoded viral proteins or vital subcellular organelles. Interestingly, the last C-terminal hydrophobic and amyloidogenic stretch 238YHLAMA243 with two “aggregation-prone” alanine residues was found to be essential for its intracellular self-assembly. The assembled VP4 fibrils show significantly low solubility, subsequently, the deposition of highly assembled VP4 structures ultimately deformed the host cytoskeleton and nucleus, which was potentially associated with IBDV lytic infection. Importantly, the assembly of VP4 significantly reduced the cytotoxicity of protease activity in host cells which potentially prevent the premature cell death and facilitate viral replication. This study provides novel insights into the formation mechanism and biological functions of the Avibirnavirus protease-related fibrils. PMID:26440769

  15. Serpin A1 C-Terminal Peptides as Collagen Turnover Modulators.

    PubMed

    Pascarella, Simona; Tiberi, Caterina; Sabatino, Giuseppina; Nuti, Francesca; Papini, Anna Maria; Giovannelli, Lisa; Rovero, Paolo

    2016-08-19

    The modulation of collagen turnover can be a relevant pharmacological target in the context of treating either pathological or pathophysiological conditions, such as collagen-related diseases and skin aging. Our recent work has focused on the search for short-chain peptides as lead compounds for further development of compounds that enhance the production of type I collagen. In this study we selected and synthesized overlapping peptides of the C-terminal portion of serpin A1 (residues 393-418), the impact of which on collagen production has been reported previously, in order to identify shorter and still active fragments and to provide insight on the mechanisms involved. The biological activity of each fragment was evaluated with cultured normal human dermal fibroblasts, and changes in the amounts of collagen were monitored in collected culture media by a sandwich ELISA technique developed in house. Interestingly, we identified a decapeptide, termed SA1-III (Ac-MGKVVNPTQK-NH2 ), as a promising candidate for our purposes; it is able to induce a significant increase in type I collagen levels in the culture medium of treated cells at micromolar concentrations. PMID:26615979

  16. The C-terminal region of Trypanosoma cruzi MASPs is antigenic and secreted via exovesicles

    PubMed Central

    De Pablos, Luis Miguel; Díaz Lozano, Isabel María; Jercic, Maria Isabel; Quinzada, Markela; Giménez, Maria José; Calabuig, Eva; Espino, Ana Margarita; Schijman, Alejandro Gabriel; Zulantay, Inés; Apt, Werner; Osuna, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, a neglected and emerging tropical disease, endemic to South America and present in non-endemic regions due to human migration. The MASP multigene family is specific to T. cruzi, accounting for 6% of the parasite’s genome and plays a key role in immune evasion. A common feature of MASPs is the presence of two conserved regions: an N-terminal region codifying for signal peptide and a C-terminal (C-term) region, which potentially acts as GPI-addition signal peptide. Our aim was the analysis of the presence of an immune response against the MASP C-term region. We found that this region is highly conserved, released via exovesicles (EVs) and has an associated immune response as revealed by epitope affinity mapping, IFA and inhibition of the complement lysis assays. We also demonstrate the presence of a fast IgM response in Balb/c mice infected with T. cruzi. Our results reveal the presence of non-canonical secreted peptides in EVs, which can subsequently be exposed to the immune system with a potential role in evading immune system targets in the parasite. PMID:27270330

  17. Interaction of chromatin with a histone H1 containing swapped N- and C-terminal domains

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Jordana B.; Cheema, Manjinder S.; Wang, Jason; Missiaen, Krystal; Finn, Ron; Gonzalez Romero, Rodrigo; Th’ng, John P. H.; Hendzel, Michael; Ausió, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Although the details of the structural involvement of histone H1 in the organization of the nucleosome are quite well understood, the sequential events involved in the recognition of its binding site are not as well known. We have used a recombinant human histone H1 (H1.1) in which the N- and C-terminal domains (NTD/CTD) have been swapped and we have reconstituted it on to a 208-bp nucleosome. We have shown that the swapped version of the protein is still able to bind to nucleosomes through its structurally folded wing helix domain (WHD); however, analytical ultracentrifuge analysis demonstrates its ability to properly fold the chromatin fibre is impaired. Furthermore, FRAP analysis shows that the highly dynamic binding association of histone H1 with the chromatin fibre is altered, with a severely decreased half time of residence. All of this suggests that proper binding of histone H1 to chromatin is determined by the simultaneous and synergistic binding of its WHD–CTD to the nucleosome. PMID:26182371

  18. Microtubule C-Terminal Tails Can Change Characteristics of Motor Force Production.

    PubMed

    Shojania Feizabadi, Mitra; Janakaloti Narayanareddy, Babu Reddy; Vadpey, Omid; Jun, Yonggun; Chapman, Dail; Rosenfeld, Steven; Gross, Steven P

    2015-10-01

    Control of intracellular transport is poorly understood, and functional ramifications of tubulin isoform differences between cell types are mostly unexplored. Motors' force production and detachment kinetics are critical for their group function, but how microtubule (MT) details affect these properties--if at all--is unknown. We investigated these questions using both a vesicular transport human kinesin, kinesin-1, and also a mitotic kinesin likely optimized for group function, kinesin-5, moving along either bovine brain or MCF7(breast cancer) MTs. We found that kinesin-1 functioned similarly on the two sets of MTs--in particular, its mean force production was approximately the same, though due to its previously reported decreased processivity, the mean duration of kinesin-1 force production was slightly decreased on MCF7 MTs. In contrast, kinesin-5's function changed dramatically on MCF7 MTs: its average detachment force was reduced and its force-velocity curve was different. In spite of the reduced detachment force, the force-velocity alteration surprisingly improved high-load group function for kinesin-5 on the cancer-cell MTs, potentially contributing to functions such as spindle-mediated chromosome separation. Significant differences were previously reported for C-terminal tubulin tails in MCF7 versus bovine brain tubulin. Consistent with this difference being functionally important, elimination of the tails made transport along the two sets of MTs similar. PMID:26094820

  19. Cathepsin L Mediates the Degradation of Novel APP C-Terminal Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haizhi; Sang, Nianli; Zhang, Can; Raghupathi, Ramesh; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Saunders, Aleister

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the deposition of amyloid β (Aβ), a peptide generated from proteolytic processing of its precursor, amyloid precursor protein (APP). Canonical APP proteolysis occurs via α-, β-, and γ-secretases. APP is also actively degraded by protein degradation systems. By pharmacologically inhibiting protein degradation with ALLN, we observed an accumulation of several novel APP C-terminal fragments (CTFs). The two major novel CTFs migrated around 15 and 25 kDa and can be observed across multiple cell types. The process was independent of cytotoxicity or protein synthesis. We further determine that the accumulation of the novel CTFs is not mediated by proteasome or calpain inhibition, but by cathepsin L inhibition. Moreover, these novel CTFs are not generated by an increased amount of BACE. Here, we name the CTF of 25 kDa as η-CTF (eta-CTF). Our data suggest that under physiological conditions, a subset of APP undergoes alternative processing and the intermediate products, the 15 kDa CTFs, and the η-CTFs aret rapidly degraded and/or processed via the protein degradation machinery, specifically, cathepsin L. PMID:25910068

  20. Human Frataxin Folds Via an Intermediate State. Role of the C-Terminal Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraj, Santiago E.; González-Lebrero, Rodolfo M.; Roman, Ernesto A.; Santos, Javier

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the folding reaction of human frataxin, whose deficiency causes the neurodegenerative disease Friedreich’s Ataxia (FRDA). The characterization of different conformational states would provide knowledge about how frataxin can be stabilized without altering its functionality. Wild-type human frataxin and a set of mutants, including two highly destabilized FRDA-associated variants were studied by urea-induced folding/unfolding in a rapid mixing device and followed by circular dichroism. The analysis clearly indicates the existence of an intermediate state (I) in the folding route with significant secondary structure content but relatively low compactness, compared with the native ensemble. However, at high NaCl concentrations I-state gains substantial compaction, and the unfolding barrier is strongly affected, revealing the importance of electrostatics in the folding mechanism. The role of the C-terminal region (CTR), the key determinant of frataxin stability, was also studied. Simulations consistently with experiments revealed that this stretch is essentially unstructured, in the most compact transition state ensemble (TSE2). The complete truncation of the CTR drastically destabilizes the native state without altering TSE2. Results presented here shed light on the folding mechanism of frataxin, opening the possibility of mutating it to generate hyperstable variants without altering their folding kinetics.

  1. Structural and functional roles of the N- and C-terminal extended modules in channelrhodopsin-1.

    PubMed

    Doi, Satoko; Mori, Arisa; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Reissig, Louisa; Ihara, Kunio; Sudo, Yuki

    2015-09-26

    Channelrhodopsins have become a focus of interest because of their ability to control neural activity by light, used in a technology called optogenetics. The channelrhodopsin in the eukaryote Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrChR-1) is a light-gated cation channel responsible for motility changes upon photo-illumination and a member of the membrane-embedded retinal protein family. Recent crystal structure analysis revealed that CrChR-1 has unique extended modules both at its N- and C-termini compared to other microbial retinal proteins. This study reports the first successful expression of a ChR-1 variant in Escherichia coli as a holoprotein: the ChR-1 variant lacking both the N- and C-termini (CrChR-1_82-308). However, compared to ChR-1 having the extended modules (CrChR-1_1-357), truncation of the termini greatly altered the absorption maximum and photochemical properties, including the pKa values of its charged residues around the chromophore, the reaction rates in the photocycle and the photo-induced ion channeling activity. The results of some experiments regarding ion transport activity suggest that CrChR-1_82-308 has a proton channeling activity even in the dark. On the basis of these results, we discuss the structural and functional roles of the N- and C-terminal extended modules in CrChR-1. PMID:26098533

  2. C-terminal 13-residue truncation induces compact trigger factor conformation and severely impairs its dimerization ability.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yi; Yu, Ling; Kihara, Hiroshi; Zhou, Jun-Mei

    2014-05-01

    Trigger factor (TF) is the first chaperone to interact with nascent chains and facilitate their folding within bacteria. TF possesses a three-state equilibrium in vivo: monomeric TF bound to ribosome, free monomeric, and dimeric TF in cytoplasm. TF consists of an N-terminal ribosome binding domain, a middle peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) domain and a C-terminal domain involved in substrate binding and dimerization. Investigation of the effect of C-terminal 13 region on TF structure and function will help to further the understanding of its mechanism as a chaperone in vitro and in vivo. Here we present TF419, a TF mutant from which the C-terminal 13 residues were deleted to investigate the role of these residues in the structure stability and function of intact molecules. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), fluorescence measurements and limited proteolysis results suggested that TF transitioned to a compact conformation when the Cterminal 13 residues were truncated. Further biochemical results reveal that TF dimerization was decreased as a result of the truncation. These results suggested that the C-terminal 13 residues play an important role in structural stability and chaperone function of TF. PMID:24555433

  3. C-Terminal Protein Characterization by Mass Spectrometry using Combined Micro Scale Liquid and Solid-Phase Derivatization

    PubMed Central

    Nika, Heinz; Nieves, Edward; Hawke, David H.; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue

    2013-01-01

    A sample preparation method for protein C-terminal peptide isolation has been developed. In this strategy, protein carboxylate glycinamidation was preceded by carboxyamidomethylation and optional α- and ϵ-amine acetylation in a one-pot reaction, followed by tryptic digestion of the modified protein. The digest was adsorbed on ZipTipC18 pipette tips for sequential peptide α- and ϵ-amine acetylation and 1-ethyl-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide-mediated carboxylate condensation with ethylenediamine. Amino group-functionalized peptides were scavenged on N-hydroxysuccinimide-activated agarose, leaving the C-terminal peptide in the flow-through fraction. The use of reversed-phase supports as a venue for peptide derivatization enabled facile optimization of the individual reaction steps for throughput and completeness of reaction. Reagents were exchanged directly on the support, eliminating sample transfer between the reaction steps. By this sequence of solid-phase reactions, the C-terminal peptide could be uniquely recognized in mass spectra of unfractionated digests of moderate complexity. The use of the sample preparation method was demonstrated with low-level amounts of a model protein. The C-terminal peptides were selectively retrieved from the affinity support and proved highly suitable for structural characterization by collisionally induced dissociation. The sample preparation method provides for robustness and simplicity of operation using standard equipment readily available in most biological laboratories and is expected to be readily expanded to gel-separated proteins. PMID:23543807

  4. NMR assignments of the C-terminal domain of human polypeptide release factor eRF1.

    PubMed

    Mantsyzov, Alexey B; Ivanova, Elena V; Birdsall, Berry; Kolosov, Petr M; Kisselev, Lev L; Polshakov, Vladimir I

    2007-12-01

    We report NMR assignments of the protein backbone of the C-terminal domain (163 a.a.) of human class 1 translation termination factor eRF1. It was found that several protein loop residues exist in two slowly interconverting conformational states. PMID:19636860

  5. The sea urchin mitochondrial transcription factor A binds and bends DNA efficiently despite its unusually short C-terminal tail.

    PubMed

    Malarkey, Christopher S; Lionetti, Claudia; Deceglie, Stefania; Roberti, Marina; Churchill, Mair E A; Cantatore, Palmiro; Loguercio Polosa, Paola

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is a key component for the protection and transcription of the mitochondrial genome. TFAM belongs to the high mobility group (HMG) box family of DNA binding proteins that are able to bind to and bend DNA. Human TFAM (huTFAM) contains two HMG box domains separated by a linker region, and a 26 amino acid C-terminal tail distal to the second HMG box. Previous studies on huTFAM have shown that requisites for proper DNA bending and specific binding to the mitochondrial genome are specific intercalating residues and the C-terminal tail. We have characterized TFAM from the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus (suTFAM). Differently from human, suTFAM contains a short 9 amino acid C-terminal tail, yet it still has the ability to specifically bind to mtDNA. To provide information on the mode of binding of the protein we used fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assays and found that, in spite of the absence of a canonical C-terminal tail, suTFAM distorts DNA at a great extent and recognizes specific target with high affinity. Site directed mutagenesis showed that the two Phe residues placed in corresponding position of the two intercalating Leu of huTFAM are responsible for the strong bending and the great binding affinity of suTFAM. PMID:27101895

  6. Age-related changes in the content of the C-terminal region of aggrecan in human articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Dudhia, J; Davidson, C M; Wells, T M; Vynios, D H; Hardingham, T E; Bayliss, M T

    1996-01-01

    The content of the C-terminal region of aggrecan was investigated in samples of articular cartilage from individuals ranging in age from newborn to 65 years. This region contains the globular G3 domain which is known to be removed from aggrecan in mature cartilage, probably by proteolytic cleavage, but the age-related changes in its abundance in human cartilage have not been described previously. The analysis was performed by immunosorbant assay using an antiserum (JD5) against recombinant amino acid residues of human aggrecan, on crude extracts of cartilage without further purification of aggrecan. The results showed that the content of the C-terminal region decreased with age relative to the G1 domain content (correlation coefficient = 0.463). This represented a 92% fall in the content of this region of the molecule from newborn to 65 years of age. furthermore, when the G1 content of the cartilage extracts was corrected to only include the G1 attached to aggrecan and to exclude the G1 fragments which accumulate as a by-product of normal aggrecan turnover (free G1), the age-related decrease in the C-terminal region remained very pronounced. Analysis by composite agarose/PAGE showed that the number of subpopulations of aggrecan resolved increased from one in newborn to three in adult cartilage. All of these reacted with an antiserum to the human G1 domain, but only the slowest migrating species reacted with the C-terminal region antiserum (JD5). Similar analysis by SDS/PAGE confirmed the presence of high-molecular-mass (200 kDa) proteins reactive with JD5, but no reactive fragments of lower electrophoretic mobility were detected. In contrast, when probed with the antiserum to the human G1 domain, the immunoblots showed protein species corresponding to the free G1 and G1-G2 fragments, which were present at high concentrations in adult cartilage. The results suggest that the loss of the C-terminal region is not directly part of the process of aggrecan turnover, but

  7. Occurrence of C-Terminal Residue Exclusion in Peptide Fragmentation by ESI and MALDI Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupré, Mathieu; Cantel, Sonia; Martinez, Jean; Enjalbal, Christine

    2012-02-01

    By screening a data set of 392 synthetic peptides MS/MS spectra, we found that a known C-terminal rearrangement was unexpectedly frequently occurring from monoprotonated molecular ions in both ESI and MALDI tandem mass spectrometry upon low and high energy collision activated dissociations with QqTOF and TOF/TOF mass analyzer configuration, respectively. Any residue localized at the C-terminal carboxylic acid end, even a basic one, was lost, provided that a basic amino acid such arginine and to a lesser extent histidine and lysine was present in the sequence leading to a fragment ion, usually depicted as (bn-1 + H2O) ion, corresponding to a shortened non-scrambled peptide chain. Far from being an epiphenomenon, such a residue exclusion from the peptide chain C-terminal extremity gave a fragment ion that was the base peak of the MS/MS spectrum in certain cases. Within the frame of the mobile proton model, the ionizing proton being sequestered onto the basic amino acid side chain, it is known that the charge directed fragmentation mechanism involved the C-terminal carboxylic acid function forming an anhydride intermediate structure. The same mechanism was also demonstrated from cationized peptides. To confirm such assessment, we have prepared some of the peptides that displayed such C-terminal residue exclusion as a C-terminal backbone amide. As expected in this peptide amide series, the production of truncated chains was completely suppressed. Besides, multiply charged molecular ions of all peptides recorded in ESI mass spectrometry did not undergo such fragmentation validating that any mobile ionizing proton will prevent such a competitive C-terminal backbone rearrangement. Among all well-known nondirect sequence fragment ions issued from non specific loss of neutral molecules (mainly H2O and NH3) and multiple backbone amide ruptures (b-type internal ions), the described C-terminal residue exclusion is highly identifiable giving raise to a single fragment ion in

  8. Conformational states of the full-length glucagon receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Linlin; Yang, Dehua; de Graaf, Chris; Moeller, Arne; West, Graham M.; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Wang, Chong; Siu, Fai Y.; Song, Gaojie; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen; Pascal, Bruce D.; Wu, Beili; Potter, Clinton S.; Zhou, Hu; Griffin, Patrick R.; Carragher, Bridget; Yang, Huaiyu; Wang, Ming-Wei; Stevens, Raymond C.; Jiang, Hualiang

    2015-07-01

    Class B G protein-coupled receptors are composed of an extracellular domain (ECD) and a seven-transmembrane (7TM) domain, and their signalling is regulated by peptide hormones. Using a hybrid structural biology approach together with the ECD and 7TM domain crystal structures of the glucagon receptor (GCGR), we examine the relationship between full-length receptor conformation and peptide ligand binding. Molecular dynamics (MD) and disulfide crosslinking studies suggest that apo-GCGR can adopt both an open and closed conformation associated with extensive contacts between the ECD and 7TM domain. The electron microscopy (EM) map of the full-length GCGR shows how a monoclonal antibody stabilizes the ECD and 7TM domain in an elongated conformation. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) studies and MD simulations indicate that an open conformation is also stabilized by peptide ligand binding. The combined studies reveal the open/closed states of GCGR and suggest that glucagon binds to GCGR by a conformational selection mechanism.

  9. Conformational states of the full-length glucagon receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Linlin; Yang, Dehua; de Graaf, Chris; Moeller, Arne; West, Graham M.; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Wang, Chong; Siu, Fai Y.; Song, Gaojie; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen; Pascal, Bruce D.; Wu, Beili; Potter, Clinton S.; Zhou, Hu; Griffin, Patrick R.; Carragher, Bridget; Yang, Huaiyu; Wang, Ming-Wei; Stevens, Raymond C.; Jiang, Hualiang

    2015-01-01

    Class B G protein-coupled receptors are composed of an extracellular domain (ECD) and a seven-transmembrane (7TM) domain, and their signalling is regulated by peptide hormones. Using a hybrid structural biology approach together with the ECD and 7TM domain crystal structures of the glucagon receptor (GCGR), we examine the relationship between full-length receptor conformation and peptide ligand binding. Molecular dynamics (MD) and disulfide crosslinking studies suggest that apo-GCGR can adopt both an open and closed conformation associated with extensive contacts between the ECD and 7TM domain. The electron microscopy (EM) map of the full-length GCGR shows how a monoclonal antibody stabilizes the ECD and 7TM domain in an elongated conformation. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) studies and MD simulations indicate that an open conformation is also stabilized by peptide ligand binding. The combined studies reveal the open/closed states of GCGR and suggest that glucagon binds to GCGR by a conformational selection mechanism. PMID:26227798

  10. Structure Predictions of Two Bauhinia variegata Lectins Reveal Patterns of C-Terminal Properties in Single Chain Legume Lectins

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Gustavo M. S. G.; Conceição, Fabricio R.; McBride, Alan J. A.; Pinto, Luciano da S.

    2013-01-01

    Bauhinia variegata lectins (BVL-I and BVL-II) are single chain lectins isolated from the plant Bauhinia variegata. Single chain lectins undergo post-translational processing on its N-terminal and C-terminal regions, which determines their physiological targeting, carbohydrate binding activity and pattern of quaternary association. These two lectins are isoforms, BVL-I being highly glycosylated, and thus far, it has not been possible to determine their structures. The present study used prediction and validation algorithms to elucidate the likely structures of BVL-I and -II. The program Bhageerath-H was chosen from among three different structure prediction programs due to its better overall reliability. In order to predict the C-terminal region cleavage sites, other lectins known to have this modification were analysed and three rules were created: (1) the first amino acid of the excised peptide is small or hydrophobic; (2) the cleavage occurs after an acid, polar, or hydrophobic residue, but not after a basic one; and (3) the cleavage spot is located 5-8 residues after a conserved Leu amino acid. These rules predicted that BVL-I and –II would have fifteen C-terminal residues cleaved, and this was confirmed experimentally by Edman degradation sequencing of BVL-I. Furthermore, the C-terminal analyses predicted that only BVL-II underwent α-helical folding in this region, similar to that seen in SBA and DBL. Conversely, BVL-I and -II contained four conserved regions of a GS-I association, providing evidence of a previously undescribed X4+unusual oligomerisation between the truncated BVL-I and the intact BVL-II. This is the first report on the structural analysis of lectins from Bauhinia spp. and therefore is important for the characterisation C-terminal cleavage and patterns of quaternary association of single chain lectins. PMID:24260572