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Sample records for 800nm mi-frog measures

  1. Femtosecond Coherent Spectroscopy at 800nm: MI-FROG Measures High-Field Ionization Rates in Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Siders, C.W.; Siders, J.L.W.; Taylor, A.J.

    1999-05-24

    The authors report the first quantitative phase-sensitive measurement of ultrafast ionization rates in gases using Multi-phase Interferometric Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating. Ultrafast probe depletion via frequency mixing in the ionization front is observed.

  2. INITIAL GAIN MEASUREMENTS OF A 800 NM SASE FEL, VISA.

    SciTech Connect

    FRIGOLA,P.; MUROKH,A.; ET AL; BABZIEN,M.; BEN-ZVI,I.; JOHNSON,E.; MALONE,R.

    2000-08-13

    The VISA (Visible to Infrared SASE Amplifier) FEL is designed to obtain high gain at a radiation wavelength of 800nm. The FEL uses the high brightness electron beam of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), with energy of 72MeV. VISA uses a novel, 4 m long, strong focusing undulator with a gap of 6mm and a period of 1.8cm. To obtain large gain the beam and undulator axis have to be aligned to better than 50{micro}m. Results from initial measurements on the alignment, gain, and spectrum will be presented and compared to theoretical calculations and simulations.

  3. Initial Gain Measurements of a 800nm SASE FEL, VISA

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Roger

    2002-08-14

    The VISA (Visible to Infrared SASE Amplifier) FEL is designed to obtain high gain at a radiation wavelength of 800nm. The FEL uses the high brightness electron beam of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), with energy of 72MeV. VISA uses a novel, 4 m long, strong focusing undulator with a gap of 6mm and a period of 1.8cm. To obtain large gain the beam and undulator axis have to be aligned to better than 50{micro}m. Results from initial measurements on the alignment, gain, and spectrum will be presented and compared to theoretical calculations and simulations.

  4. Initial gain measurements of an 800 nm SASE FEL, VISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigola, P.; Murokh, A.; Musumeci, P.; Pellegrini, C.; Reiche, S.; Rosenzweig, J.; Tremaine, A.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Johnson, E.; Malone, R.; Rakowsky, G.; Skaritka, J.; Wang, X. J.; Van Bibber, K. A.; Bertolini, L.; Hill, J. M.; Le Sage, G. P.; Libkind, M.; Toor, A.; Carr, R.; Cornacchia, M.; Klaisner, L.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Ruland, R.; Nguyen, D. C.

    2001-12-01

    The Visible to Infrared SASE Amplifier (VISA) FEL is designed to obtain high gain at a radiation wavelength of 800 nm. The FEL uses the high brightness electron beam of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), with energy of 72 MeV. VISA uses a novel, 4 m long, strong focusing undulator with a gap of 6 mm and a period of 1.8 cm. To obtain large gain the beam and undulator axis have to be aligned to better than 5 μm. Results from initial measurements on the alignment, gain, and spectrum will be presented and compared to theoretical calculations and simulations.

  5. Optical measurement of temperature in biological cells under infrared laser light exposure (λ=800 nm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, David; Lefort, Claire; Leveque, Philippe; O'Connor, Rod P.

    2015-07-01

    Interest in the interaction between laser light and biological samples has gained momentum in recent years, particularly in neurobiology, where there is significant potential to stimulate neurons with infrared laser light. Despite recent reports showing the application of infrared light for neurostimulation, the underlying mechanism is still unknown. The two main hypotheses are based on thermal or electrostatic mechanisms. Here, a novel optical method is presented to make temperature measurements in human neural cells under infrared laser excitation (λ=800nm) using the dye Rhodamine B (RhB). The measurement of temperature is based on the property of RhB, a fluorescent dye whose fluorescence intensity decreases linearly with increases in temperature. We present and detail the setup and measurement procedure that has temporal resolution of few milliseconds, based around a fluorescent live-cell imaging microscope used for cellular microfluorimetry experiments.

  6. Characterization of an 800 nm SASE FEL at Saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter

    2002-11-13

    VISA (Visible to Infrared SASE Amplifier) is an FEL (Free Electron Laser) designed to saturate at a radiation wavelength of 800 nm within a 4-m long, strong focusing undulator. Large gain is achieved by driving the FEL with the 72 MeV, high brightness beam of BNL's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). We present measurements that demonstrate saturation in addition to the frequency spectrum of the FEL radiation. Energy, gain length and spectral characteristics are compared and shown to agree with simulation and theoretical predictions.

  7. High-brightness 800nm fiber-coupled laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, Yuri; Levy, Moshe; Rappaport, Noam; Tessler, Renana; Peleg, Ophir; Shamay, Moshe; Yanson, Dan; Klumel, Genadi; Dahan, Nir; Baskin, Ilya; Shkedi, Lior

    2014-03-01

    Fiber-coupled laser diodes have become essential sources for fiber laser pumping and direct energy applications. Single emitters offer reliable multi-watt output power from a 100 m lateral emission aperture. By their combination and fiber coupling, pump powers up to 100 W can be achieved from a low-NA fiber pigtail. Whilst in the 9xx nm spectral range the single emitter technology is very mature with <10W output per chip, at 800nm the reliable output power from a single emitter is limited to 4 W - 5 W. Consequently, commercially available fiber coupled modules only deliver 5W - 15W at around 800nm, almost an order of magnitude down from the 9xx range pumps. To bridge this gap, we report our advancement in the brightness and reliability of 800nm single emitters. By optimizing the wafer structure, laser cavity and facet passivation process we have demonstrated QCW device operation up to 19W limited by catastrophic optical damage to the 100 μm aperture. In CW operation, the devices reach 14 W output followed by a reversible thermal rollover and a complete device shutdown at high currents, with the performance fully rebounded after cooling. We also report the beam properties of our 800nm single emitters and provide a comparative analysis with the 9xx nm single emitter family. Pump modules integrating several of these emitters with a 105 μm / 0.15 NA delivery fiber reach 35W in CW at 808 nm. We discuss the key opto-mechanical parameters that will enable further brightness scaling of multi-emitter pump modules.

  8. Status and initial commissioning of a high gain 800 nm SASE FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremaine, A.; Frigola, P.; Murokh, A.; Musumeci, P.; Pellegrini, C.; Rosenzweig, J.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Johnson, E.; Malone, R.; Rakowsky, G.; Skaritka, J.; Wang, X. J.; Yu, L. H.; Van Bibber, K. A.; Hill, J. M.; Le Sage, G. P.; Carr, R.; Cornacchia, M.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Ruland, R.; Nguyen, D. C.

    2000-05-01

    We describe the status and initial commissioning of the Visible to Infrared SASE Amplifier (VISA) experiment. VISA uses a strong focusing 4 m undulator, the Brookhaven National Laboratory ATF linac with an energy of 72 MeV, and a photoinjector electron source. The VISA fundamental radiation wavelength is near 800 nm and the power expected at saturation is near 60 MW. Power, angular and spectral measurements are planned for the VISA radiation and these results will be analyzed and compared with SASE FEL theory and computer simulation. In addition, the induced electron beam micro-bunching will be measured using coherent transition radiation.

  9. Nonlinear refraction properties of nickel oxide thin films at 800 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Melo, Ronaldo P.; da Silva, Blenio J. P.; dos Santos, Francisco Eroni P.; Azevedo, A.; de Araújo, Cid B.

    2009-11-01

    Measurements of the nonlinear refractive index, n2, of nickel oxide films prepared by controlled oxidation of nickel films deposited on substrates of soda-lime glass are reported. The structure and morphology of the samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and x-ray diffractometry. Samples of excellent optical quality were prepared. The nonlinear measurements were performed using the thermally managed eclipse Z-scan technique at 800 nm. A large value of n2≈10-12 cm2/W and negligible nonlinear absorption were obtained.

  10. High-Efficiency 800 nm Multi-Layer Dielectric Gratings for High Average Power Laser Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H T; Britten, J A; Patel, D; Brizuela, F; Rocca, J J; Menoni, C S

    2006-06-15

    We report on the design, fabrication, and performance of a 1740 l/mm multilayer dielectric diffraction grating for use with 800 nm light. At an input angle of 8{sup o} from Littrow and a wavelength from 770 to 830 nm, >90% diffraction efficiency is achieved, with peak diffraction efficiency of >97% at 800nm. We will also comment on laser damage threshold and power-handling properties.

  11. Optical and structural characterization of iron oxide and cobalt oxide thin films at 800 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Hans A.; de Melo, Ronaldo P.; Azevedo, Antonio; de Araújo, Cid B.

    2013-05-01

    We report on optical and structural properties of α-Fe2O3 and Co3O4 thin films, grown by direct oxidation of pure metal films deposited on soda-lime glass. Structural characteristics and morphology of the films were investigated by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Linear optical absorption, and linear refraction as well as nonlinear optical properties were investigated. The third-order optical susceptibilities were measured applying the Thermally managed Z- scan technique using a Ti: sapphire laser (150 fs; 800 nm). The results obtained for the Co3O4 film were {Re} χ^{( 3 )} = -(5.7 ± 2.4) ×10-9 esu and {Im} χ^{(3)} = -(1.8 ± 0.2) ×10-8 esu while for the α-Fe2O3 film we determined {Re} χ^{(3)} = +(6.6 ± 2.4) ×10-10 esu and {Im} χ^{(3)} = +(2.2 ± 0.4) ×10-10 esu.

  12. Upconverted luminescence under 800 nm laser diode excitation in Nd 3+-activated fluoroaluminate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koepke, Cz.; Wisniewski, K.; Sikorski, L.; Piatkowski, D.; Kowalska, K.; Naftaly, M.

    2006-01-01

    We report on the upconverted luminescence in neodymium-activated fluoroaluminate glass obtained with 800 nm diode laser excitation. Several anti-Stokes emissions: at 588, 607, 720 and 750 nm are observed and appropriate transitions are assigned. For both latter emissions we observe strong dependence on temperature: the 720 nm emission intensity decreases with temperature, whereas the 750 nm emission increases. Interpretations are presented in terms of the influence of oxygen-affected sites on the radiationless transitions and multiphonon anti-Stokes excitation. The models provide reasonable fits to the experimental data.

  13. Observation of Supercontinuum Generation and Darkening Effect in Bro-Silicate Glass under 800 nm Femtosecond Irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdolahpour, D.; Jamshidi-Ghaleh, K.

    2007-04-01

    In this paper, we report the experimental observations of supercontinuum generation and darkening effect in bro-silicate glasses under 200 femtosecond pulses at wavelength of 800 nm. The spectrum of supercontinuum emission from the sample is recorded in the UV wavelength range. The length of filamentation or white light and darkening are investigated at different incident laser pulse energies. The begging position of the generated white light and darkening moves inside glass bulk with decreasing of incident pulse energy. The pulse energy threshold for supercontinuum generation and the laser-induced darkening in this material has been measured. By controlling of the laser-induced darkening in borosilicate glasses prepares a promising technique for designing optical devices.

  14. Suppression of high-order-harmonic intensities observed in aligned CO2 molecules with 1300-nm and 800-nm pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Kosaku; Minemoto, Shinichirou; Sakai, Hirofumi

    2011-08-01

    High-order-harmonic generation from aligned N2, O2, and CO2 molecules is investigated by 1300-nm and 800-nm pulses. The harmonic intensities of 1300-nm pulses from aligned molecules show harmonic photon energy dependence similar to those of 800-nm pulses. Suppression of harmonic intensity from aligned CO2 molecules is observed for both 1300- and 800-nm pulses over the same harmonic photon energy range. As the dominant mechanism for the harmonic intensity suppression from aligned CO2 molecules, the present results support the two-center interference picture rather than the dynamical interference picture.

  15. High resolution spectroscopy of an Orionid meteor from 700 to 800 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passas, M.; Madiedo, J. M.; Gordillo-Vázquez, F. J.

    2016-03-01

    The emission spectrum of a meteor was recorded by the GRASSP instrument during the observation of transient luminous events (TLEs) on 2014 October 16th. The spectroscopic signal was recorded in the wavelength range from 700 to 800 nm, where the emission from atmospheric oxygen and nitrogen dominated. The good spectral resolution of the spectrum (0.24 nm with 0.07 nm/pixel spectral dispersion) has allowed us to determine the physical conditions in the meteor plasma, to identify several emissions from atmospheric (N I, N II, O I) and meteoroid species (Ti I, Cr I, Fe I, Fe II, Zr I, Pd I, W I) and to estimate the upper limit of the temperature of the gaseous environment surrounding the meteoroid. Images recorded for this meteor from two different sites allowed calculating its atmospheric trajectory and the orbital parameters of the progenitor meteoroid. These data revealed that the particle belonged to the Orionid meteoroid stream.

  16. Quantum counter for correcting fluorescence excitation spectra at 320- to 800-nm wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Nothnagel, E A

    1987-05-15

    A procedure for recording corrected fluorescence excitation spectra to wavelengths as long as 800 nm is described. The procedure involves the use of a commercial spectrofluorometer, which is modified by substituting 1,1',3,3,3',3'-hexamethylindotricarbocyanine perchlorate in place of rhodamine B as the quantum counter dye. This modification is applicable to spectrofluorometers supplied by several different manufacturers and can be accomplished by a user having only modest technical skills. A study of the fluorescence excitation spectrum of bacteriochlorophyll a is presented as an illustration of the use of the procedure. The procedure will be valuable in biological and biochemical studies that involve the use of long-wavelength fluorescent probes of either natural or synthetic origin. PMID:3619023

  17. Fast dispersion encoded full range OCT for retinal imaging at 800 nm and 1060 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, Bernd; Považay, Boris; Unterhuber, Angelika; Wang, Ling; Hermann, Boris; Rey, Sara; Matz, Gerald; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2011-03-01

    The dispersion mismatch between sample and reference arm in frequency-domain OCT can be used to iteratively suppress complex conjugate artifacts and thereby increase the imaging range. We propose a fast dispersion encoded full range (DEFR) algorithm that detects multiple signal components per iteration. The influence of different dispersion levels on the reconstruction quality is analyzed for in vivo retinal tomograms at 800 nm. Best results have been achieved with about 30 mm SF11, with neglectable resolution decrease due to finite resolution of the spectrometer. Our fast DEFR algorithm achieves an average suppression ratio of 55 dB and converges within 5 to 10 iterations. The processing time on non-dedicated hardware was 5 to 10 seconds for tomograms with 512 depth scans and 4096 sampling points per depth scan. Application of DEFR to the more challenging 1060 nm wavelength region is demonstrated by introducing an additional optical fibre in the sample arm.

  18. Optical limiting property of a liquid malononitrile derivative on 800 nm laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Juan; Wang, Liuheng; Xie, Na; Sun, Li; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhao, Yuxia; Wu, Feipeng

    2016-08-01

    A new liquid malononitrile derivative (LBDBP) has been synthesized by incorporating four tetraethylene glycol groups into the prototype scaffold of 2-[Bis-(4‧-diethylamino-biphenyl-4-yl)-methylene]-malononitrile (BDBP). The linear photophysical properties, optical/thermal stabilities and optical limiting behaviors of LBDBP and BDBP have been investigated. The results show that LBDBP has equivalent optical/thermal stability but much better solubility compared with BDBP. Its saturation concentration in DMF is increased to 0.075 M, while the corresponding datum for BDBP is only 0.01 M. The improved solubility of LBDBP insures a very significant optical limiting behavior. The saturated DMF solution of LBDBP can significantly reduce the intensity fluctuation of laser pulses in an 800 nm laser setup.

  19. TCSPC FLIM in the wavelength range from 800 nm to 1700 nm (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Wolfgang; Shcheslavsky, Vladislav

    2016-03-01

    Excitation and detection in the wavelength range above 800nm is a convenient and relatively inexpensive way to increase the penetration depth in optical microscopy. Moreover, detection at long wavelength avoids the problem that tissue autofluorescence contaminates the signals from endogenous fluorescence probes. FLIM at NIR wavelength may therefore be complementary to multiphoton microscopy, especially if the lifetimes of NIR fluorophores report biological parameters of the tissue structures they are bound to. Unfortunately, neither the excitation sources nor the detectors of standard confocal and multiphoton laser scanning systems are directly suitable for excitation and detection of NIR fluorescence. Most of these problems can be solved, however, by using ps diode lasers or Ti:Sapphire lasers at their fundamental wavelength, and NIR-sensitive detectors. With NIR-sensitive PMTs the detection wavelength range can be extended up to 900 nm, with InGaAs SPAD detectors up to 1700 nm. Here, we demonstrate the use of a combination of laser scanning, multi-dimensional TCSPC, and advanced excitation sources and detectors for FLIM at up to 1700 nm. The performance was tested at tissue samples incubated with NIR dyes. The fluorescence lifetimes generally get shorter with increasing absorption and emission wavelengths of the dyes. For the cyanine dye IR1061, absorbing around 1060 nm, the lifetime was found to be as short as 70 ps. Nevertheless the fluorescence decay could still be clearly detected. Almost all dyes showed clear lifetime changes depending on the binding to different tissue constituents.

  20. Experimental demonstration of laser tomographic adaptive optics on a 30-meter telescope at 800 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammons, S., Mark; Johnson, Luke; Kupke, Renate; Gavel, Donald T.; Max, Claire E.

    2010-07-01

    A critical goal in the next decade is to develop techniques that will extend Adaptive Optics correction to visible wavelengths on Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs). We demonstrate in the laboratory the highly accurate atmospheric tomography necessary to defeat the cone effect on ELTs, an essential milestone on the path to this capability. We simulate a high-order Laser Tomographic AO System for a 30-meter telescope with the LTAO/MOAO testbed at UCSC. Eight Sodium Laser Guide Stars (LGSs) are sensed by 99x99 Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors over 75". The AO system is diffraction-limited at a science wavelength of 800 nm (S ~ 6-9%) over a field of regard of 20" diameter. Openloop WFS systematic error is observed to be proportional to the total input atmospheric disturbance and is nearly the dominant error budget term (81 nm RMS), exceeded only by tomographic wavefront estimation error (92 nm RMS). The total residual wavefront error for this experiment is comparable to that expected for wide-field tomographic adaptive optics systems of similar wavefront sensor order and LGS constellation geometry planned for Extremely Large Telescopes.

  1. Fabrication of nanostructures on silicon carbide surface and microgroove sidewall using 800-nm femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khuat, Vanthanh; Chen, Tao; Dao, Vanluu

    2015-07-01

    Nanoripples and nanoparticles have been fabricated on the surface of a silicon carbide sample with the irradiation of an 800-nm femtosecond laser in an underwater environment. When a linearly polarized laser was used, the nanoripples were perpendicular to the polarization direction of the incident laser, and the period of the nanoripples was dependent on the number of pulses. When a circularly polarized laser was used, nanoparticles with a diameter of approximately 80 nm were formed. In addition, we observed two kinds of nanoripples on the sidewall of the silicon carbide microgroove fabricated by femtosecond laser irradiation followed by chemical wet etching. When the polarization direction was aligned perpendicular to the writing direction, ripples parallel to the surface of the sample were formed. We attribute the formation of this kind of ripple to interference of the incident laser and the reflected wave. When the polarization direction was aligned parallel to the writing direction, the ripples are perpendicular to the surface of the sample. We attribute the formation of this kind of ripple to interference of incident laser and bulk electron plasma wave. A scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope was employed to characterize the morphology of the structures.

  2. Supercontinuum generation at 800 nm in all-normal dispersion photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Sukhoivanov, Igor A; Iakushev, Sergii O; Shulika, Oleksiy V; AndradeLucio, Jose Amparao; Díez, Antonio; Andrés, Miguel

    2014-12-01

    We have numerically investigated the supercontinuum generation and pulse compression in a specially designed all-normal dispersion photonic crystal fiber with a flat-top dispersion curve, pumped by typical pulses from state of the art Ti:Sapphire lasers at 800 nm. The optimal combination of pump pulse parameters for a given fiber was found, which provides a wide octave-spanning spectrum with superb spectral flatness (a drop in spectral intensity of ~1.7 dB). With regard to the pulse compression for these spectra, multiple-cycle pulses (~8 fs) can be obtained with the use of a simple quadratic compressor and nearly single-cycle pulses (3.3 fs) can be obtained with the application of full phase compensation. The impact of pump pulse wavelength-shifting relative to the top of the dispersion curve on the generated SC and pulse compression was also investigated. The optimal pump pulse wavelength range was found to be 750 nm < λp < 850 nm, where the distortions of pulse shape are quite small (< -3.3 dB). The influences of realistic fiber fabrication errors on the SC generation and pulse compression were investigated systematically. We propose that the spectral shape distortions generated by fiber fabrication errors can be significantly attenuated by properly manipulating the pump. PMID:25606954

  3. Laser Direct Writing of Long Period Fiber Grating by 800 NM Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Shuangchen; Huang, Yi; Du, Chenlin; Yu, Yongqin

    Femtosecond laser pulses with ultrashort time duration and ultrahigh peak power can cause the refractive index change in transparent materials and micron scale machining precision. Long period fiber gratings (LPFGs) with different periods and different grating lengths in the standard single mode fiber were fabricated, using laser direct writing method, by femtosecond laser pulses with pulse width of 200 fs at a center wavelength of 800 nm in air. The transmission spectra were studied in the range of 1510 nm to 1610 nm. Two LPFGs with period of 400 μm, and 550 μm, respectively fabricated with same irradiation power of 275 mW, were shown. The loss peak of 1552 nm, the transmission loss of 16 dB and the FWHM of 20 nm were obtained when the period of LPFG was 400 μm, while the loss peak of 1588 nm, the transmission loss of 20 dB and the FWHM of 25 nm were achieved when the period of LPFG was 550 μm. According to the theory of mode field coupling for long period grating, it was indicated that the modulation of refractive index Δn was in the level of 10-2.

  4. Self-Q-switched Cr:LiCAF laser near 800 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyatli, Ersen; Sennaroglu, Alphan; Demirbas, Umit

    2013-03-01

    Self-Q-switching (SQS) of lasers enable the generation of Q-switched pulses from simple laser cavities without using any additional saturable absorbers or active modulators. Earlier studies have reported SQS in ruby, Nd:YAG, and Cr:LiSAF lasers. However, these systems were mostly flashlamp pumped and required cooling of the crystal and/or misalignment of the laser cavity for the observation of SQS. In this presentation, for the first time to our knowledge, we report SQS operation of a Cr:LiCAF laser. SQS was achieved in an astigmatically compensated x-cavity containing only a Cr:LiCAF crystal that was end-pumped with a 140-mW continuous-wave (cw) diode at 660 nm. During regular cw operation, the laser produced a diffraction-limited beam with 50 mW of output power and had a spectral width of 0.5 nm near 795 nm. SQS operation of the Cr:LiCAF laser could be initiated by fine adjustment of the separation between the curved mirrors of the cavity and was observed at several mirror separations within the stability range of the resonator. During SQS operation, the laser generated saw-tooth-shaped pulses with 20-30 microsecond duration in the 780-800 nm wavelength range, at repetition rates between 10 and 30 kHz. SQS operation was further accompanied with a decrease in the output power to the 30-45 mW range. In this regime, the output beam became multimode and spectral broadening up to 12.5 nm (FWHM) was observed.

  5. Efficient 800nm upconversion luminescence emission in 1.319μm excited thulium-doped fluorogermanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouveia-Neto, A. S.; Vermelho, M. V. D.; Jacinto, C.; Gouveia, E. A.; Bueno, L. A.

    2016-02-01

    Generation of near-infrared light within the first biological optical window via frequency upconversion in Tm3+-doped PbGeO3-PbF2-CdF2 glass excited within the second biological window at 1.319 μm is reported. The upconversion emission at 800 nm is the sole light signal observed in the entire UV-VIS-NIR spectral region making possible obtaining high contrast imaging. The dependence of the 800 nm signal upon the sample temperature was investigated and results showed an increase by a factor of x2.5 in the 30°C - 280°C range. Generation of detectable 690 nm for temperatures above 100°C in addition to the intense 800 nm main signal was also observed. The proposed excitation mechanism for the 800 nm thulium emitting level is assigned to a multiphonon-assisted excitation from the ground-state 3H6 to the 3H5 excited-state level, a rapid relaxation to the 3F4 level and followed by an excited-state absorption of the pump photons mediated by multiphonons connecting the 3F4 level to the 3H4 emitting level.

  6. 1.319 μm excited intense 800 nm frequency upconversion emission in Tm3+-doped fluorogermanate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouveia-Neto, A. S.; Vermelho, M. V. D.; Gouveia, E. A.; Bueno, L. A.; Jacinto, C.

    2015-11-01

    Generation of near-infrared light within the first biological optical window via frequency upconversion in Tm3+-doped PbGeO3-PbF2-CdF2 glass excited within the second biological window at 1.319 μm is reported. The upconversion emission at 800 nm is the sole light signal observed in the entire ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared spectral region making it possible obtaining high contrast imaging. The dependence of the 800 nm signal upon the sample temperature was investigated and results showed an increase by a factor of ×2.5 in the 30-280 °C range. Generation of detectable 690 nm for temperatures above 100 °C in addition to the intense 800 nm main signal was also observed. The proposed excitation mechanism for the 800 nm thulium emitting level is assigned to a multiphonon-assisted excitation from the ground-state 3H6 to the 3H5 excited-state level, a rapid relaxation to the 3F4 level and followed by an excited-state absorption of the pump photons mediated by multiphonons connecting the 3F4 level to the 3H4 emitting level.

  7. Correlated Two-Electron Momentum Spectra for Strong-Field Nonsequential Double Ionization of He at 800 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Rudenko, A.; Ergler, Th.; Zrost, K.; Feuerstein, B.; Schroeter, C. D.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.; Jesus, V. L. B. de

    2007-12-31

    We report on a kinematically complete experiment on nonsequential double ionization of He by 25 fs 800 nm laser pulses at 1.5 PW/cm{sup 2}. The suppression of the recollision-induced excitation at this high intensity allows us to address in a clean way direct (e,2e) ionization by the recolliding electron. In contrast with earlier experimental results, but in agreement with various theoretical predictions, the two-electron momentum distributions along the laser polarization axis exhibit a pronounced V-shaped structure, which can be explained by the role of Coulomb repulsion and typical (e,2e) kinematics.

  8. Elimination of photon quenching by a transition layer to fabricate a quenching-shield sandwich structure for 800 nm excited upconversion luminescence of Nd3+-sensitized nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yeteng; Tian, Gan; Gu, Zhanjun; Yang, Yijun; Gu, Lin; Zhao, Yuliang; Ma, Ying; Yao, Jiannian

    2014-05-01

    Nd3+-sensitized quenching-shield sandwich-structured upconversion nanoparticles are reported, which exhibit highly efficient upconversion photoluminescence under excitation by an 800 nm continuous-wave laser. The transition-layer structure is essential to bridge energy transfer from the sensitizer to the activator and simultaneously block energy back-transfer from the activator to the sensitizer. These 800 nm-excited upconversion nanoparticles are a key step toward the development of upconversion nanophosphors for biological applications. PMID:24338994

  9. Leaf Level Chlorophyll Fluorescence Emission Spectra: Narrow Band versus Full 650-800 nm Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, E.; Zhang, Q.; Campbell, P. K.; Huemmrich, K. F.; Corp, L.; Cheng, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Recently, chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) retrievals in narrow spectral regions (< 1 nm, between 750-770 nm) of the near infrared (NIR) region of Earth's reflected radiation have been achieved from satellites, including the Japanese GOSAT and the European Space Agency's Sciamachy/Envisat. However, these retrievals sample the total full-spectrum ChlF and are made at non-optimal wavelengths since they are not located at the peak fluorescence emission features. We wish to estimate the total full-spectrum ChlF based on emissions obtained at selected wavelengths. For this, we drew upon leaf emission spectra measured on corn leaves obtained from a USDA experimental cornfield in MD (USA). These emission spectra were determined for the adaxial and abaxial (i.e., top and underside) surfaces of leaves measured throughout the 2008 and 2011 growing seasons (n>400) using a laboratory instrument (Fluorolog-3, Horiba Scientific, USA), recorded in either 1 nm or 5 nm increments with monochromatic excitation wavelengths of either 532 or 420 nm. The total ChlF signal was computed as the area under the continuous spectral emission curves, summing the emission intensities (counts per second) per waveband. The individual narrow (1 or 5 nm) waveband emission intensities were linearly related to full emission values, with variable success across the spectrum. Equations were developed to estimate total ChlF from these individual wavebands. Here, we report the results for the average adaxial/abaxial emissions. Very strong relationships were achieved for the relatively high fluorescence intensities at the red chlorophyll peak, centered at 685 nm (r2= 0.98, RMSE = 5.53 x 107 photons/s) and in the nearby O2-B atmospheric absorption feature centered at 688 nm (r2 = 0.94, RMSE = 4.04 x 107), as well as in the far-red peak centered at 740 nm (r2=0.94, RMSE = 5.98 x107). Very good retrieval success occurred for the O2-A atmospheric absorption feature on the declining NIR shoulder centered at 760

  10. Nd3+ sensitized up/down converting dual-mode nanomaterials for efficient in-vitro and in-vivo bioimaging excited at 800 nm.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaomin; Wang, Rui; Zhang, Fan; Zhou, Lei; Shen, Dengke; Yao, Chi; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2013-01-01

    Core/shell1/shell2/shell3 structured NaGdF4:Nd/NaYF4/NaGdF4:Nd,Yb,Er/NaYF4 nanocrystals were well designed and synthesized, each of the parts assume respective role and work together to achieve dual-mode upconverting (UC) and downconverting (DC) luminescence upon the low heat effect 800-nm excitation. Nd(3+), Yb(3+), Er(3+) tri-doped NaGdF4:Nd,Yb,Er UC layer [NIR (800 nm)-to-Visible (540 nm)] with a constitutional efficient 800 nm excitable property were achieved for the in-vitro bioimaging with low auto-fluorescence and photo-damage effects. Moreover, typical NIR (800 nm)-to-NIR (860-895 nm) DC luminescence of Nd(3+) has also been realized with this designed nanostructure. Due to the low heat effect, high penetration depth of the excitation and the high efficiency of the DC luminescence, the in-vivo high contrast DC imaging of a whole body nude mouse was achieved. We believe that such dual-mode luminescence NCs will open the door to engineering the excitation and emission wavelengths of NCs and will provide a new tool for a wide variety of applications in the fields of bioanalysis and biomedical. PMID:24346622

  11. Generation of 0.19-mJ THz pulses in LiNbO3 driven by 800-nm femtosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Sen-Cheng; Li, Jun; Zhai, Zhao-Hui; Zhu, Li-Guo; Li, Jiang; Zhou, Ping-Wei; Zhao, Jian-Heng; Li, Ze-Ren

    2016-06-27

    A cylindrical lens telescope tilted-pulse-front pumping scheme was proposed for high energy terahertz (THz) pulse generation. This scheme allows higher pump energy to be used with lower saturation effects under high pump fluence, and higher THz generation efficiency was achieved within large range of pump energy. The optimum pump pulse duration and crystal cooling temperature for THz generation in LiNbO3 (LN) crystal were also researched systematically. Excited by 800-nm laser, up to 0.19 mJ THz pulse energy and 0.27% conversion efficiency was demonstrated under 800-nm 400-fs laser excitation with ~100-mJ pulse energy and 150-K LN cooling temperature. PMID:27410634

  12. S100a8/NF-κB signal pathway is involved in the 800-nm diode laser-induced skin collagen remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaolin; Ge, Minggai; Qin, Xiaofeng; Xu, Peng; Zhu, Pingya; Dang, Yongyan; Gu, Jun; Ye, Xiyun

    2016-05-01

    The 800-nm diode laser is widely used for hair removal and also promotes collagen synthesis, but the molecular mechanism by which dermis responses to the thermal damage induced by the 800-nm diode laser is still unclear. Ten 2-month-old mice were irradiated with the 800-nm diode laser at 20, 40, and 60 J/cm(2), respectively. Skin samples were taken for PCR, Western blot analysis, and histological study at day 3 or 30 after laser irradiation. The expression of S100a8 and its two receptors (advanced glycosylation end product-specific receptor, RAGE and toll-like receptor 4, TRL4) was upregulated at day 3 after laser treatments. P-p65 levels were also elevated, causing the increase of cytokine (tumor necrosis factor, TNF-α and interleukin 6, IL-6) and MMPs (MMP1a, MMP9). At day 30, PCR and Western blot analysis showed significant increase of type I and III procollagen in the dermis treated with laser. Importantly, skin structure was markedly improved in the laser-irradiated skin compared with the control. Thus, it seemed that S100a8 upregulation triggered NF-κB signal pathway through RAGE and TLR4, responding to laser-induced dermis wound healing. The involvement of the NF-κB pathway in MMP gene transcription promoted the turnover of collagen in the skin, accelerating new collagen synthesis. PMID:26914682

  13. Enhancement of 800 nm upconversion emission in a thulium doped tellurite microstructured fiber pumped by a 1560 nm femtosecond fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Zhixu; Yao, Chuanfei; Wang, Shunbin; Zheng, Kezhi; Xiong, Liangming; Luo, Jie; Lv, Dajuan; Qin, Guanshi; Ohishi, Yasutake; Qin, Weiping

    2016-04-01

    We report enhanced upconversion (UC) fluorescence in Tm3+ doped tellurite microstructured fibers (TDTMFs) fabricated by using a rod-in-tube method. Under the pumping of a 1560 nm femtosecond fiber laser, ultrabroadband supercontinuum light expanding from ˜1050 to ˜2700 nm was generated in a 4 cm long TDTMF. Simultaneously, intense 800 nm UC emission from the 3H4 → 3H6 transition of Tm3+ was observed in the same TDTMF. Compared to that pumped by a 1560 nm continuous wave fiber laser, the UC emission intensity was enhanced by ˜4.1 times. The enhancement was due to the spectral broadening in the TDTMF under the pumping of the 1560 nm femtosecond fiber laser.

  14. Characterization of terahertz emission from high resistivity iron-doped bulk gallium indium arsenide based photoconducting antennas excited at 800 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Suranjana

    In this dissertation we investigate pulsed terahertz (THz) emission characteristics of semi-large aperture photoconducting (PC) antennas fabricated on Fe-doped bulk Ga0.69In0.31As substrate. The research is aimed at evaluating the impact of physical properties of a semi-large aperture Ga 0.69In0.31As PC antenna upon its THz generation efficiency, and is motivated by the ultimate goal of developing a pulsed THz radiation source with MHz repetition rates, capable of operating at wavelengths between 1--1.5 mum, and having an average output power of 1mW. The bulk Ga0.69In0.31As crystals employed in this dissertation were grown using a hybrid vertical Bridgman and gradient freezing directional solidification process. The crystals were uniformly doped with Fe atoms to obtain high resistivity ˜ 107 O. The carrier lifetimes in bulk Ga0.69In0.31As crystals estimated using transient photoreflectivity measurements is in the subpicosecond range. The ultrafast carrier mobility in this material, estimated from THz emission measurements in about two orders of magnitude higher than that reported in GaxIn1-xAs thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The high ultrafast carrier mobility along with high resistivity and subpicosecond carrier lifetimes make Ga0.69In0.31As an excellent candidate for semi-large aperture PC antenna based THz emitter. Further, the band gap of Ga0.69In0.31As is low enough (˜ 1 eV), thus making it possible to use compact Yb-based multiwatt laser systems operating at 1.1 mum for photoexcitation of Ga0.69In0.31As based PC antennas for high power THz emission. Our simulations based on experimental results of THz emission from Ga 0.69In0.31As PC antenna (photoexcited at 810 nm) predict that an output THz power of 51 muW can be extracted from a semi-large Ga 0.69In0.31As PC antenna with electrode gap spacing of 0.8 mm when it is operated with an external bias voltage of 11.5 kV/cm and photoexcited with 1 W of incident laser power (obtained from a Yb

  15. Generation of spectrally-stable continuous-wave emission and ns pulses at 800 nm and 975 nm with a peak power of 4 W using a distributed Bragg reflector laser and a ridge-waveguide power amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klehr, A.; Wenzel, H.; Fricke, J.; Bugge, F.; Liero, A.; Hoffmann, Th.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G.

    2015-03-01

    Semiconductor based sources which emit high-power spectrally stable nearly diffraction-limited optical pulses in the nanosecond range are ideally suited for a lot of applications, such as free-space communications, metrology, material processing, seed lasers for fiber or solid state lasers, spectroscopy, LIDAR and frequency doubling. Detailed experimental investigations of 975 nm and 800 nm diode lasers based on master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) light sources are presented. The MOPA systems consist of distributed Bragg reflector lasers (DBR) as master oscillators driven by a constant current and ridge waveguide power amplifiers which can be driven DC and by current pulses. In pulse regime the amplifiers modulated with rectangular current pulses of about 5 ns width and a repetition frequency of 200 kHz act as optical gates, converting the continuous wave (CW) input beam emitted by the DBR lasers into a train of short optical pulses which are amplified. With these experimental MOPA arrangements no relaxation oscillations in the pulse power occur. With a seed power of about 5 mW at a wavelength of 973 nm output powers behind the amplifier of about 1 W under DC injection and 4 W under pulsed operation, corresponding to amplification factors of 200 (amplifier gain 23 dB) and 800 (gain 29 dB) respectively, are reached. At 800 nm a CW power of 1 W is obtained for a seed power of 40 mW. The optical spectra of the emission of the amplifiers exhibit a single peak at a constant wavelength with a line width < 10 pm in the whole investigated current ranges. The ratios between laser and ASE levels were > 50 dB. The output beams are nearly diffraction limited with beam propagation ratios M2lat ~ 1.1 and M2ver ~ 1.2 up to 4 W pulse power.

  16. Femtosecond induced transparency and absorption in the extremeultraviolet by coherent coupling of the He 2s2p (1Po) and 2p2 (1Se)double excitation states with 800 nm light

    SciTech Connect

    Loh, Z.-H.; Greene, C.H.; Leone, S.R.

    2007-08-01

    Femtosecond high-order harmonic transient absorption spectroscopy is used to observe electromagnetically induced transparency-like behavior as well as induced absorption in the extreme ultraviolet by laser dressing of the He 2s2p ({sup 1}P{sup 0}) and 2p{sup 2} ({sup 1}S{sup e}) double excitation states with an intense 800 nm field. Probing in the vicinity of the 1s{sup 2} {yields} 2s2p transition at 60.15 eV reveals the formation of an Autler-Townes doublet due to coherent coupling of the double excitation states. Qualitative agreement with the experimental spectra is obtained only when optical field ionization of both double excitation states into the N = 2 continuum is included in the theoretical model. Because the Fano q-parameter of the unperturbed probe transition is finite, the laser-dressed He atom exhibits both enhanced transparency and absorption at negative and positive probe energy detunings, respectively.

  17. Determination of Optical-Field Ionization Dynamics in Plasmas through the Direct Measurement of the Optical Phase Change

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A.J.; Omenetto, G.; Rodriguez, G.; Siders, C.W.; Siders, J.L.W.; Downer, C.

    1999-07-16

    This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The detailed dynamics of an atom in a strong laser field is rich in both interesting physics and potential applications. The goal of this project was to develop a technique for characterizing high-field laser-plasma interactions with femtosecond resolution based on the direct measurement of the phase change of an optical pulse. The authors developed the technique of Multi-pulse Interferometric Frequency Resolved Optical Gating (MI-FROG), which recovers (to all orders) the phase difference between pumped and unpumped probe pulses, enabling the determination of sub-pulsewidth time-resolved phase and frequency shifts impressed by a pump pulse on a weak probe pulse. Using MI-FROG, the authors obtained the first quantitative measurements of high-field ionization rates in noble gases and diatomic molecules. They obtained agreement between the measured ionization rates an d those calculated for the noble gases and diatomic nitrogen and hydrogen using a one-dimensional fluid model and rates derived from tunneling theory. However, much higher rates are measured for diatomic oxygen than predicted by tunneling theory calculations.

  18. Saturation Measurements of a Visible SASE FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Roger

    2002-08-14

    VISA (Visible to Infrared SASE Amplifier) is an FEL designed to obtain high gain at a radiation wavelength of 800 nm. Large gain is achieved by driving the FEL with the 71 MeV, high brightness beam of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) and using a novel, strong focusing, 4 m long undulator with a gap of 6 mm and a period of 1.8 cm. We report measurements of exponential gain, saturation, and spectra of the FEL radiation intensity.

  19. Saturation Measurements of a Visible SASE FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremaine, A.; Frigola, P.; Murokh, A.; Pellegrini, C.; Reiche, S.

    2002-08-01

    VISA (Visible to Infrared SASE Amplifier) is an FEL designed to obtain high gain at a radiation wavelength of 800 nm. Large gain is achieved by driving the FEL with the 71 MeV, high brightness beam of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) and using a novel, strong focusing, 4m long undulator with a gap of 6 mm and a period of 1.8 cm. We report measurements of exponential gain, saturation, and spectra of the FEL radiation intensity.

  20. Super-achromatic microprobe for ultrahigh-resolution endoscopic OCT imaging at 800 nm (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wu; Alemohammad, Milad; Yu, Xiaoyun; Yu, Shaoyong; Li, Xingde

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we report a super-achromatic microprobe made with fiber-optic ball lens to enable ultrahigh-resolution endoscopic OCT imaging. An axial resolution of ~2.4 µm (in air) can be achieved with a 7-fs Ti:Sapphire laser. The microprobe has minimal astigmatism which affords a high transverse resolution of ~5.6 µm. The miniaturized microprobe has an outer diameter of ~520 µm including the encasing metal guard and can be used to image small luminal organs. The performance of the ultrahigh-resolution OCT microprobe was demonstrated by imaging rat esophagus, guinea pig esophagus, and mouse rectum in vivo.

  1. Optical diameters of stars measured with the Mt. Wilson Mark III interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, R. S.; Mozurkewich, D.; Johnston, K. J.; Gaume, Ralph; Hutter, D. J.; Bowers, P. F.; Colavita, M. M.; Shao, M.

    1990-01-01

    Reliable stellar angular diameters can now be determined using the Mark III Optical Interferometer located on Mt. Wilson, California. The Mark III is a Michelson Interferometer capable of measuring the interferometric fringe visibility for stars using interferometer baselines varying from 3 to 31.5 meters in length. Angular diameters measured with the Mark III Optical Interferometer are presented for 12 stars at wavelengths of 450 and 800 nm.

  2. Note: Fiber optic transport probe for Hall measurements under light and magnetic field at low temperatures: Case study of a two dimensional electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Bhadauria, P. P. S.; Gupta, Anurag; Kumar, Pramod; Dogra, Anjana; Budhani, R. C.

    2015-05-15

    A fiber optic based probe is designed and developed for electrical transport measurements in presence of quasi-monochromatic (360–800 nm) light, varying temperature (T = 1.8–300 K), and magnetic field (B = 0–7 T). The probe is tested for the resistivity and Hall measurements performed on a LaAlO{sub 3}–SrTiO{sub 3} heterointerface system with a conducting two dimensional electron gas.

  3. Measurement of birefringence inside a filament

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Shuai; Wang, Tie-Jun; Chin, See Leang; Kosareva, Olga; Panov, Nikolay; Makarov, Vladimir; Zeng Heping

    2011-07-15

    We quantified the ultrafast birefringence induced in the filament in an atomic gas by measuring the filament-induced polarization rotation of a probe pulse. Based on the dephasing of the probe's orthogonal polarization components in argon, the experiment was done at 1 atm by copropagating a linearly polarized 400-nm probe pulse with an 800-nm pump pulse which generated the filament. The probe's elliptical polarization states were shown under various initial pump-probe polarization schemes. These states were verified by comparing the filament-induced probe polarization rotation angle and the ellipticity of the probe polarization.

  4. Initial Gain Measurements of a 800nmm SASE FEL, VISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremaine, A.; Frigola, P.; Murokh, A.; Musumeci, P.; Pellegrini, C.

    2002-08-01

    The VISA (Visible to Infrared SASE Amplifier) FEL is designed to obtain high gain at a radiation wavelength of 800nm. The FEL uses the high brightness electron beam of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), with energy of 72MeV. VISA uses a novel, 4 m long, strong focussing undulator with a gap of 6mm and a period of 1.8cm. To obtain large gain the beam and undulator axis have to be aligned to better than 50mm. Results from initial measurements on the alignment, gain, and spectrum will be presented and compared to theoretical calculations and simulations.

  5. Measuring spatiotemporal intensity-and-phase complexity of multimode fiber output pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guang, Zhe; Rhodes, Michelle; Trebino, Rick

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate ultrashort pulse spatiotemporal field measurement for multimode optical fibers, using a singleframe characterization technique, called Spatially and Temporally Resolved Intensity and Phase Evaluation Device: Full Information from a Single Hologram (STRIPED FISH). We measure STRIPED FISH traces and retrieve the pulse field E(x,y,t) or equivalently E(x,y,ω), to generate movies revealing the field structure induced by propagating modes, due to their differences in field spatial distribution, modal propagation velocity and modal dispersion inside the fiber. We launch femtosecond pulses near 800nm from Ti: Sapphire laser to investigate linearly polarized modes LP01, LP11, LP02 and LP21 in multimode fibers.

  6. Planned Efficiency Measurements of STIRAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Vladislav; McKenna, Casey; Yuan, Deqian; Gasparik, Jessica; Metcalf, Harold

    2015-05-01

    Our measurements of the absolute efficiency of using STIRAP to populate Rydberg states of He have been limited by the Doppler detuning associated with the divergence of the atomic beam that crosses perpendicular to our laser beams. The limitation is exacerbated when both laser beams co-propagate, compounding these Doppler shifts. We plan to have them counter-propagate and thereby ameliorate this effect. He 23S atoms in a LN2 temperature thermal beam are coupled to the 33P state by λ = 389 nm light (blue), and that state is coupled to Rydberg states by ~ 800 nm (red) light. The anti-parallel laser beams are arranged so that the atoms encounter the red light first (counter-intuitive order for STIRAP) partially overlapping with the blue. We have observed interference among the atomic transitions by varying the light polarization, and are planning further studies concerning these internal atomic interferometry phenomena. Supported by ONR and Dept. of Education GAANN.

  7. Microchip for the Measurement of Seebeck Coefficients of Single Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Völklein, F.; Schmitt, M.; Cornelius, T. W.; Picht, O.; Müller, S.; Neumann, R.

    2009-07-01

    Bismuth nanowires were electrochemically grown in ion track-etched polycarbonate membranes. Micromachining and microlithography were employed to realize a newly developed microchip for Seebeck coefficient measurements on individual nanowires. By anisotropic etching of a (100) Si wafer, an 800-nm-thick SiO2/Si3N4 membrane was prepared in the chip center. The low thermal conductivity of the membrane is crucial to obtain the required temperature difference Δ T along the nanowire. The wire is electrically contacted to thin metal pads which are patterned by a new method of microscopic exposure of photoresist and a lift-off process. A Δ T between the two pairs of contact pads, located on the membrane, is established by a thin-film heater. Applying the known Seebeck coefficient of a reference film, the temperature difference at this gap is determined. Using Δ T and the measured Seebeck voltage U of the nanowire, its Seebeck coefficient can be calculated.

  8. Receiver performance of laser ranging measurements between the Lunar Observer and a subsatellite for lunar gravity studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Frederic M.; Sun, Xiaoli

    1992-01-01

    The optimal receiver for a direct detection laser ranging system for slow Doppler frequency shift measurement is shown to consist of a phase tracking loop which can be implemented approximately as a phase lock loop with a 2nd or 3rd order loop filter. The laser transmitter consists of an AlGaAs laser diode at a wavelength of about 800 nm and is intensity modulated by a sinewave. The receiver performance is shown to be limited mainly by the preamplifier thermal noise when a silicon avalanche photodiode is used. A high speed microchannel plate photomultiplier tube is shown to outperform a silicon APD despite its relatively low quantum efficiency at wavelengths near 800 nm. The maximum range between the Lunar Observer and the subsatellite for lunar gravity studies is shown to be about 620 km when using a state-of-the-art silicon APD and about 1000 km when using a microchannel plate photomultiplier tube in order to achieve a relative velocity measurement accuracy of 1 millimeter per second. Other parameters such as the receiver time base jitter and drift also limit performance and have to be considered in the design of an actual system.

  9. Chiral cavity ring down polarimetry: Chirality and magnetometry measurements using signal reversals

    SciTech Connect

    Bougas, Lykourgos; Sofikitis, Dimitris; Katsoprinakis, Georgios E.; Spiliotis, Alexandros K.; Rakitzis, T. Peter; Tzallas, Paraskevas; Loppinet, Benoit

    2015-09-14

    We present the theory and experimental details for chiral-cavity-ring-down polarimetry and magnetometry, based on ring cavities supporting counterpropagating laser beams. The optical-rotation symmetry is broken by the presence of both chiral and Faraday birefringence, giving rise to signal reversals which allow rapid background subtractions. We present the measurement of the specific rotation at 800 nm of vapors of α-pinene, 2-butanol, and α-phellandrene, the measurement of optical rotation of sucrose solutions in a flow cell, the measurement of the Verdet constant of fused silica, and measurements and theoretical treatment of evanescent-wave optical rotation at a prism surface. Therefore, these signal-enhancing and signal-reversing methods open the way for ultrasensitive polarimetry measurements in gases, liquids and solids, and at surfaces.

  10. Chiral cavity ring down polarimetry: Chirality and magnetometry measurements using signal reversals.

    PubMed

    Bougas, Lykourgos; Sofikitis, Dimitris; Katsoprinakis, Georgios E; Spiliotis, Alexandros K; Tzallas, Paraskevas; Loppinet, Benoit; Rakitzis, T Peter

    2015-09-14

    We present the theory and experimental details for chiral-cavity-ring-down polarimetry and magnetometry, based on ring cavities supporting counterpropagating laser beams. The optical-rotation symmetry is broken by the presence of both chiral and Faraday birefringence, giving rise to signal reversals which allow rapid background subtractions. We present the measurement of the specific rotation at 800 nm of vapors of α-pinene, 2-butanol, and α-phellandrene, the measurement of optical rotation of sucrose solutions in a flow cell, the measurement of the Verdet constant of fused silica, and measurements and theoretical treatment of evanescent-wave optical rotation at a prism surface. Therefore, these signal-enhancing and signal-reversing methods open the way for ultrasensitive polarimetry measurements in gases, liquids and solids, and at surfaces. PMID:26374026

  11. Single-particle light-scattering measurement: photochemical aerosols and atmospheric particulates.

    PubMed

    Phillips, D T; Wyatt, P J

    1972-09-01

    The use of single-particle light-scattering measurements to determine the origin of atmospheric hazes has been explored by measurement of laboratory aerosols, field samples, and computer analysis of the light-scattering data. The refractive index of measured spherical particles 800 nm to 1000 nm in diameter was determined within 2%. For particles of diameter less than 500 nm the measurement of absolute scattering intensity is required for complete analysis. Distinctive nonspherical and absorbing particles were observed both in automotive exhaust and atmospheric samples. Electrostatic suspension of atmospheric particulates is demonstrated to provide a practical approach to optical measurement of single particles. The technique may be used to calibrate optical particle counters or identify particles with unique shape or refractive index. PMID:20119285

  12. Measurements of scattering and absorption in mammalian cell suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Mourant, J.R.; Johnson, T.M.; Freyer, J.P.

    1996-03-01

    During the past several years a range of spectroscopies, including fluorescence and elastic-scatter spectroscopy, have been investigated for optically based detection of cancer and other tissue pathologies. Both elastic-scatter and fluorescence signals depend, in part, on scattering and absorption properties of the cells in the tissue. Therefore an understanding of the scattering and absorption properties of cells is a necessary prerequisite for understanding and developing these techniques. Cell suspensions provide a simple model with which to begin studying the absorption and scattering properties of cells. In this study we have made preliminary measurements of the scattering and absorption properties of suspensions of mouse mammary carcinoma cells (EMT6) over a broad wavelength range (380 nm to 800 nm).

  13. A comparison of irradiance responsivity and thermodynamic temperature measurement between PTB and NIM

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, X.; Yuan, Z.; Anhalt, K.; Taubert, R. D.

    2013-09-11

    This paper describes a comparison between PTB and NIM in the field of absolute spectral-band radiometry and thermodynamic temperature measurement. For the comparison a NIM made interference filter radiometer with a centre wavelength of 633 nm was taken to PTB. The filter radiometer was calibrated at NIM and PTB with respect to spectral irradiance responsivity. For the integral value in the band-pass range an agreement of 0.1% was observed in both calibrations. In a next step, the 633 nm filter radiometer was used to measure the temperature of a high-temperature blackbody in comparison to an 800 nm filter radiometer of PTB in the temperature range between 1400 K and 2750 K. The thermodynamic temperature measured by the two filter radiometers agreed to within 0.2 K to 0.5 K with an estimated measurement uncertainty ranging between 0.1 K and 0.4 K (k=1)

  14. A Remote Sensing Technique For Combustion Gas Temperature Measurement In Black Liquor Recovery Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charagundla, S. R.; Semerjian, H. G.

    1986-10-01

    A remote sensing technique, based on the principles of emission spectroscopy, is being developed for temperature measurements in black liquor recovery boilers. Several tests have been carried out, both in the laboratory and at a number of recovery boilers, to characterize the emission spectra in the wavelength range of 300 nm to 800 nm. These tests have pointed out the potential for temperature measurements using the line intensity ratio technique based on a pair of emission lines at 404.4 nm and 766.5 nm observed in the recovery boiler combustion zone; these emission lines are due to potassium, a common constituent found in all the black liquors. Accordingly, a fiber optics based four-color system has been developed. This in-situ, nonintrusive temperature measurement technique, together with some of the more recent results, is described in this paper.

  15. Generation of Terahertz Radiation from Fe-doped InGaAsP Using 800 nm to 1550 nm Pulsed Laser Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatem, O.; Freeman, J. R.; Cunningham, J. E.; Cannard, P. J.; Robertson, M. J.; Linfield, E. H.; Davies, A. G.; Moodie, D. G.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate efficient generation of terahertz (THz) frequency radiation by pulsed excitation, at wavelengths between 800 and 1550 nm, of photoconductive (PC) switches fabricated using Fe-doped InGaAsP wafers, grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Compared to our previous studies of Fe-doped InGaAs wafers, Fe:InGaAsP wafers exhibited five times greater dark resistivity to give a value of 10 kΩ cm, and Fe:InGaAsP PC switches produced five times higher THz power emission. The effect of Fe-doping concentration (between 1E16 and 1.5E17 cm-3) on optical light absorption (between 800 and 1600 nm), on resistivity, and on THz emission is also discussed.

  16. Inversion of irradiance and remote sensing reflectance in shallow water between 400 and 800 nm for calculations of water and bottom properties.

    PubMed

    Albert, Andreas; Gege, Peter

    2006-04-01

    What we believe to be a new inversion procedure for multi- and hyperspectral data in shallow water, represented by the subsurface irradiance and remote sensing reflectance spectra, was developed based on analytical equations by using the method of nonlinear curve fitting. The iteration starts using an automatic determination of the initial values of the fit parameters: concentration of phytoplankton and suspended matter, absorption of gelbstoff, bottom depth, and the fractions of up to six bottom types. Initial values of the bottom depth and suspended matter concentration are estimated analytically. Phytoplankton concentration and gelbstoff absorption are initially calculated by the method of nested intervals. A sensitivity analysis was made to estimate the accuracy of the entire inversion procedure including model error, error propagation, and influence of instrument characteristics such as noise, and radiometric and spectral resolution. The entire inversion technique is included in a public-domain software (WASI) to provide a fast and user-friendly tool of forward and inverse modeling. PMID:16608002

  17. Comparative studies of laser-induced damage threshold measurements in highly reflecting mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melninkaitis, Andrius; Mikšys, Darius; Grigonis, Rimantas; Sirutkaitis, Valdas; Jupé, Marco; Ristau, Detlev

    2008-01-01

    S-on-1 laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) dependence on the pulse duration at two different wavelengths was experimentally investigated in metallic and dielectric laser mirrors. LIDT's of high-reflective dielectric coatings made of alternating λ/4 layers of TiO II/SiO II and Ta IIO 5/SiO II and those of protected metallic Au and Ag coatings were tested at 800 nm and 400 nm wavelengths with Ti:Sapphire laser pulses of 46 fs, 130 fs and 1.8 ps duration. S-on-1 measurements were performed according to international ISO 11254-2 standard using 10000 pulses/per site and compared with 1-on-1 measurements.

  18. In-vivo reflection spectroscopy measurements in pig brain during stereotactic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonsson, Johan; Eriksson, Ola; Wardell, Karin

    2003-07-01

    Radio frequency (RF) lesioning in the human brain is a common surgical therapy for relieving severe pain as well as for movement disorders such as Parkinsonia. During the procedure a small electrode is introduced by stereotactic means towards a target area localized by CT or MRI. An RF-current is applied through the electrode tip when positioned in the target area. The tissue in the proximity of the tip is heated by the current and finally coagulated. The overall aim of this study was to improve the RF-technique and its ability to estimate lesion size by means of optical methods. Therefore, the optical differences between white and gray matter, as well as lesioned and unlesioned tissue were investigated. Reflection spectroscopy measurements in the range of 450-800 nm were conducted on fully anesthetized pigs during stereotactic RF-lesioning (n=6). Light from a tungsten lamp was guided to the electrode tip through optical fibers, inserted along a 2 mm in diameter monopolar RF-electrode. Measurements were performed in steps of 0-10 mm from the target in each hemisphere towards the entry point of the skull. In the central gray of the porcine brain measurements were performed both before and after the creation of a lesion. A total of 55 spectra were collected during this study. Correlation to tissue type was done using post-operative MR-images. The spectral signature for white and gray matter differs significantly for the entire spectral range of 450-800 nm. Pre- and post-lesioning reflection spectroscopy showed the largest differences below 600 and above 620 nm, which implies that lasers within this wavelength range may be useful for in-vivo measurements of tissue optical changes during RF-lesioning.

  19. Method of ultrafast beam rotation for single-shot, time-resolved measurements.

    PubMed

    Spiro, Alex; Lowe, Mary

    2014-09-15

    Ultrafast optical beam rotation is proposed for single-shot, time-resolved measurements. A pump-probe configuration is considered using a diffraction grating and focusing optics to create angular encoding of the time delay between the pump and probe pulses. The characteristic time t(ap) of the grating-lens system is derived as a function of dispersion, NA, and time window T. An analytical equation for time resolution is obtained that incorporates t(ap)laser pulse width, and beam crossing, enabling optimum selection of optical components. For commercial standard gratings with width W≤50 mm, laser λ=800 nm, and NA=.05, a 160 ps time window can be achieved, and t(ap)=23 fs for T=1 ps. PMID:26466272

  20. Optoelectronic measurement of x-ray synchrotron pulses: A proof of concept demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Durbin, Stephen M.; Caffee, Marc; Savikhin, Sergei; Mahmood, Aamer; Dufresne, Eric M.; Wen, Haidan; Li, Yuelin

    2013-02-04

    Optoelectronic detection using photoconductive coplanar stripline devices has been applied to measuring the time profile of x-ray synchrotron pulses, a proof of concept demonstration that may lead to improved time-resolved x-ray studies. Laser sampling of current vs time delay between 12 keV x-ray and 800 nm laser pulses reveal the {approx}50 ps x-ray pulse width convoluted with the {approx}200 ps lifetime of the conduction band carriers. For GaAs implanted with 8 MeV protons, a time profile closer to the x-ray pulse width is observed. The protons create defects over the entire depth sampled by the x-rays, trapping the x-ray excited conduction electrons and minimizing lifetime broadening of the electrical excitation.

  1. Confocal laser scanning microscopy measurement of the morphology of vanadium pentoxide nanorods grown by electron beam irradiation or thermal oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Manil; Hong, Donghyuk; Kim, Taesung; Chu, Minwoo; Kim, Sok Won

    2013-01-01

    In order to observe the morphology of nanostructures at the submicroscale, we use a confocal laser scanning (CLS) microscope built in our laboratory. The theoretical resolution of the hand-made CLS microscope is 150 nm and the performance of the microscope is evaluated by observing a USAF target. Vanadium pentoxide nanorods grown by electron beam irradiation and thermal oxidation methods are used as nanostructures and the morphologies of the nanorods observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) are compared with those obtained by scanning electron microscopy. The magnification and resolution of the CLSM were estimated to be approximately 1500 and 800 nm, respectively. From the results, we confirm that the CLSM can be used to measure nanostructures at the sub-micro-scale without a preconditioning process.

  2. Measuring $\

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Jessica Sarah

    2011-01-01

    The MINOS Experiment consists of two steel-scintillator calorimeters, sampling the long baseline NuMI muon neutrino beam. It was designed to make a precise measurement of the ‘atmospheric’ neutrino mixing parameters, Δm2 atm. and sin2 (2 atm.). The Near Detector measures the initial spectrum of the neutrino beam 1km from the production target, and the Far Detector, at a distance of 735 km, measures the impact of oscillations in the neutrino energy spectrum. Work performed to validate the quality of the data collected by the Near Detector is presented as part of this thesis. This thesis primarily details the results of a vμ disappearance analysis, and presents a new sophisticated fitting software framework, which employs a maximum likelihood method to extract the best fit oscillation parameters. The software is entirely decoupled from the extrapolation procedure between the detectors, and is capable of fitting multiple event samples (defined by the selections applied) in parallel, and any combination of energy dependent and independent sources of systematic error. Two techniques to improve the sensitivity of the oscillation measurement were also developed. The inclusion of information on the energy resolution of the neutrino events results in a significant improvement in the allowed region for the oscillation parameters. The degree to which sin2 (2θ )= 1.0 could be disfavoured with the exposure of the current dataset if the true mixing angle was non-maximal, was also investigated, with an improved neutrino energy reconstruction for very low energy events. The best fit oscillation parameters, obtained by the fitting software and incorporating resolution information were: | Δm2| = 2.32+0.12 -0.08×10-3 eV2 and sin2 (2θ ) > 0.90(90% C.L.). The analysis provides the current world best measurement of the atmospheric neutrino mass

  3. Assessment of Vegetation Stress Using Reflectance or Fluorescence Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, P. K. E.; Middleton, E. M.; McMurtrey, J. E.; Corp, L. A.; Chappelle, E. W.

    2007-01-01

    Current methods for large-scale vegetation monitoring rely on multispectral remote sensing, which has serious limitation for the detection of vegetation stress. To contribute to the establishment of a generalized spectral approach for vegetation stress detection, this study compares the ability of high-spectral resolution reflectance (R) and fluorescence (F) foliar measurements to detect vegetation changes associated with common environmental factors affecting plant growth and productivity. To obtain a spectral dataset from a broad range of species and stress conditions, plant material from three experiments was examined, including (i) corn, nitrogen (N) deficiency/excess; (ii) soybean, elevated carbon dioxide, and ozone levels; and (iii) red maple, augmented ultraviolet irradiation. Fluorescence and R spectra (400-800 nm) were measured on the same foliar samples in conjunction with photosynthetic pigments, carbon, and N content For separation of a wide range of treatment levels, hyperspectral (5-10 nm) R indices were superior compared with F or broadband R indices, with the derivative parameters optimal results. For the detection of changes in vegetation physiology, hyperspectral indices can provide a significant improvement over broadband indices. The relationship of treatment levels to R was linear, whereas that to F was curvilinear. Using reflectance measurements, it was not possible to identify the unstressed vegetation condition, which was accomplished in all three experiments using F indices. Large-scale monitoring of vegetation condition and the detection of vegetation stress could be improved by using hyperspectral R and F information, a possible strategy for future remote sensing missions.

  4. Measurements of the optical properties of tissue in conjunction with photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Annika M. K.; Berg, Roger; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    1995-07-01

    A simple optical dosimeter was used to measure the light intensity in rat liver and muscle in vivo with fibers positioned at different depths to investigate whether the light penetration changed during photodynamic therapy (PDT). The results were then correlated with measurements of the three optical-interaction coefficients mu s, mu a, and g for wavelengths in the range 500-800 nm for PDT-treated and nontreated rat liver and muscle tissue in vitro. A distinct increase in the absorption coefficient was seen immediately after treatment, in agreement with the decreasing light intensity observed during the treatment, as measured with the optical dosimeter. The collimated transmittance was measured with a narrow-beam setup, and an optical integrating sphere was used to measure the diffuse reflectance and total transmittance of the samples. The corresponding optical properties were obtained by spline interpolation of Monte Carlo-simulated data. To ensure that the measured values were correct, we performed calibration measurements with suspensions of polystyrene microspheres and ink.

  5. Optical property measurements of a novel type of upconverting reporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xudong; Herring, Michael E.; Haushalter, Jeanne; Lee, Seonkyung; Kalogerakis, Kostas S.; Faris, Gregory W.

    2003-07-01

    We have recently developed a new type of reporter (upconverting chelate) for biomedical diagnostics. For this reporter, the light is absorbed and emitted by a lanthanide ion, rather than an organic molecule, as is the case for a typical fluorescent dye. These materials do not photobleach and have no autofluorescent background. We focus in this paper on neodymium ions complexed with the familiar chelating agents, EDTA, DPA, DTPA and DOTA. We have performed experimental measurements with one- and two-color laser light excitation for different chelate compounds. The samples are excited using two Nd:YAG-pumped dye laser systems that provide laser light near 587 nm and 800 nm. For one-color excitation, the emitted light depends quadratically on the incident laser power, as expected. Three strongly emitting lines are observed, located near 360 nm, 387 nm, and 417 nm. We observed more efficient upconversion in EDTA although the DPA chelates show comparable ground state absorbance. We have studied the influence of temporal delay between the two laser pulses and obtained the decay lifetime of the first intermediate state in the various chelated compounds.

  6. In situ measurements and analysis of apparent optical properties in the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Surya Prakash; Jones, Burton

    2015-04-01

    Much of the Red Sea is considered as a typical oligotrophic sea. Its optical properties are investigated utilizing the data collected several cruises during 2014. Apparent Optical Property (AOP) profiles were obtained with a Satlantic HyperPro instrument is deployed in free-fall profiler mode to measure upwelling radiance and downwelling irradiance in the spectral range of 350 to 800 nm with simultaneous measurements of conductivity, temperature, depth, salinity, chlorophyll fluorescence, and optical backscattering coefficient in red band. These measurements will be used to describe apparent optical properties in the Red Sea, which is not yet studied. Spectral remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) and diffuse attenuation coefficient (Kd) is derived from our measurements. The Rrs determines how the light is backscattered of the water that can be detected by satellite ocean color sensor and Kd determines an intensity of light penetration into the water column. Thus, the results obtained from these analyses will be exploited to develop specific light models for the Red Sea.

  7. ULTRAFAST MEASUREMENT OF THE OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF SHOCKED NICKEL AND LASER HEATED GOLD

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, D. J.; Reho, J. H.; Moore, David S.; Gahagan, K. A.; Rabie, R. L.; McGrane, S.

    2001-01-01

    We have used high-resolution Frequency Domain Interferometry (FDI) to make the first ultrafast measurement of shock-induced changes in the optical properties of thin nickel ({approx}500 nm) targets. Data taken at several angles of incidence allowed the separation of optical effects from material motion, yielding an effective complex index for the shocked material. In contrast to our previous studies of aluminum, measurements with an 800 nm probe wavelength found a phase shift attributable to optical property changes with the same sign as that due to surface motion, during an 11.5 GPa shock breakout. A similar experiment was attempted with thin gold films ({approx}180 nm) using Ultrafast Spatial Interferometry (USI). However, since the electron-phonon coupling in gold is extremely weak, a shock is observed as it 'forms'. Ballistic electrons and electron-electron equilibrium cause fast heating of the electrons in the entire thickness of the thin film, followed by lattice excitation through electron-phonon coupling, eventually leading to melt and frustrated thermal expansion yielding the observed surface motion. We suggest that these experiments offer a new path for observation of phase changes or for temperature measurements, by allowing a determination of the complex index under dynamic loading conditions and comparing the measured values to those obtained under static conditions.

  8. Application of frequency combs in the measurement of the refractive index of air

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Lu, Z. H.; Menegozzi, B.; Wang, L. J.

    2006-08-15

    We report a new method in the precision measurement of the refractive index of air using a highly unbalanced Michelson interferometer with a femtosecond optical frequency comb as the light source. Standard dry air is filled into a 30 m multipass cell, serving as the long arm of the interferometer, while a short arm acts as the reference path. Both time and frequency domain interferograms are recorded to measure the refractive index of air. The deviation of our experimental results with Edlen's formula is 1.4x10{sup -9} at 800 nm. Our experiment has a standard error of 5.2x10{sup -9} at fixed parameters (pressure and temperature). This is achieved by putting the multipass cell into a temperature-stabilized box, and also by locking the interferometer path length with a He-Ne laser. We achieved a temperature stabilization of 0.8 mK for 25 h. This corresponds to 0.4 {mu}m multipass cell length change. The locking of the He-Ne interferometer enables us to achieve 7 nm path-length change outside the multipass cell. Combined with accurate measurement of temperature and pressure, we were able to achieve an accuracy of 7.7x10{sup -9}.

  9. Absolute measurement of the effective nonlinearities of KTP and BBO crystals by optical parametric amplification.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, D J; Alford, W J; Raymond, T D; Smith, A V

    1996-04-20

    Absolute magnitudes of the effective nonlinearity, deff, were measured for seven KTP and six BBO crystals. The d(eff), were derived from the parametric gain of an 800-nm signal wave in the sample crystals when they were pumped by the frequency-doubled, spatially filtered light from an injectionseeded, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The KTP crystals, all type II phase matched with propagation in the X-Z plane, had d(eff) values ranging from 1.97 to 3.50 pm/V. Measurements of gain as a function of phase velocity mismatch indicate that two of the KTP crystals clearly contain multiple ferroelectric domains. For five type I phase-matched BBO crystals, d(eff) ranged from 1.76 to 1.83 pm/V, and a single type II phase-matched BBO crystal had a d(eff) of 1.56 pm/V. The uncertainty in our measurements of d(eff) values is ±5% for KTP and ±10% for BBO. PMID:21085331

  10. Telecentric system with large-field for surveillance and measuring camera in space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Tian-jin; Tong, Jing-bo

    2014-11-01

    Spacing movable mechanic components are needed not only to move in wide range but also to complete series of actions with high degree of accuracy and stability when processing on orbit. So, visual monitor system including the surveillance and measuring cameras must be equipped to achieve precise spacing location and posture information, and monitor and administer of movable mechanic components can be realized combined with the algorithm. Based on the requirements of the camera and the after algorithm for the center of mass and the distribution of spot on image plane at different object distance, the design peculiarity and difficulties are analyzed, optical design examples are also given at last. The optical system adopted telecentric structure, the relative aperture is 1/3.5, field of view reaches seventy-six degrees, wavelength ranges from 500nm to 800nm, the center of mass of the spot on image plane varies non-obviously, high modulation transfer function, low distortion and high relative illumination are achieved, all of these can wholly satisfied the using demands of the surveillance and measuring camera.

  11. [Remote sensing inversion mode of suspended particles concentration in Hangzhou Bay based on in situ measurement spectrum].

    PubMed

    Wang, Fan; Zhou, Bin; Xu, Jian-Ming; Ling, Zai-Ying

    2008-11-01

    Suspended particles are one of major parameters of coastal water color remote sensing in China. The reflectances spectral of water were measured using an ASD field spectroscope, synchronously the suspended particles concentrations of surface water were acquired in Hangzhou Bay. Two remote sensing inversion models for suspended particles concentrations (SPC) were developed based on t hesimulated reflectance of MODIS & MERIS channels using artificial neural network (ANN) algorithm. Measurement results show that the total SPC of Hangzhou bay is comparatively high where the suspended sediments concentrations (SSC) are far more than chlorophyll concentrations, averagely 705 mg/L and 1.164 mg/m3, reseparately. The SPC in two measurement stations appears spatio-temporal variation, especially the short period change due to tidal cycle. There are two reflectance peaks in the measured spectral curves, one is between 650 nm to 750 nm, and the other is near 800 nm. The first order derivative curves of reflectance spectral indicate that the first reflectance peaks shift to long wavelength according to the increased SSC. The ANN models make full use of the spectral information in different channels which can simulate the pigment and non-pigment particles concentrations at same time. The fitting effects are preferable with R2 more than 0.95 for each model. The ANN mode can be used for satellite remote sensing inversion, especially MERIS data, because of its comparatively high spatial resolution. PMID:19186796

  12. Ultrafast optical measurements of surface waves on a patterned layered nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Brian; Bjornsson, Matteo; Connolly, Aine; Mahat, Sushant; Rachmilowitz, Bryan; Antonelli, George; Myers, Alan; Yoo, Hui-Jae; Singh, Kanwal; King, Sean

    2015-03-01

    We report ultrafast optical pump-probe measurements of 12 - 54 GHz surface acoustic waves (SAWs) on patterned layered nanostructures. These very high frequency SAWs were generated and detected on the following patterned film stack: 25 nm physically vapor deposited TiN / 180 nm porous PECVD-grown a-SiOC:H dielectric / 12 nm non-porous PECVD-grown a-SiOC:H etch-stop / 100 nm CVD-grown a-SiO2 / Si (100) substrate. The TiN layer was dry plasma etched to form lines of rectangular cross section with pitches of 420 nm, 250 nm, 180 nm, and 168 nm and the lines were oriented parallel to the [110] direction on the wafer surface. The absorption of ultrafast pulses from a Ti:sapphire oscillator operating at 800 nm generated SAWs that were detected by time-delayed probe pulses from the same oscillator via a reflectivity change (ΔR) . In each of the four cases the SAW frequency increased with decreasing pitch, but not in a linear way as had been seen in previous experiments of this sort. By comparing the results with mechanical simulations, we present evidence for the detection of different types of SAWs in each case, including Rayleigh-like waves, Sezawa waves, and leaky or radiative waves. This work was supported by NSF Award DMR1206681.

  13. Laser arrival measurement tools for SwissFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csatari Divall, Marta; Romann, Albert; Mutter, Patrick; Hunziker, Stephan; Hauri, Christoph P.

    2015-05-01

    SwissFEL is aiming to produce X-ray pulses from 30 fs down to the attosecond time scale. This requires the compression of the several picosecond long electron bunches produced by a photo-injector to sub-fs level. To achieve this, 40fs accurate injection of the electron bunches into the main linear accelerator is necessary. Therefore high timing accuracy is required from the drive laser of the electron gun. Furthermore fs scan capability is foreseen for the experimental stations of the FEL. The ultra-short pulse pump-probe lasers therefore need to exhibit outstanding, below 10fs short term jitter relative to the X-rays. Timing tools for both the electron gun laser and for the experiments are developed. The former is based on electro-optical modulation of the optical reference at 1560nm by a signal produced from the gun laser at 260nm, a concept similar to beam arrival monitors in the linear accelerator, with an expected resolution below 20fs. The latter will use spectrally resolved cross-correlation technique to determine relative jitter between the optical reference and the laser used at the experiments at 800nm, with fs resolution. These systems will be complemented by electron and X-ray timing tools. In this paper we present the general concept for the laser arrival time measurement and correction, with first results obtained on a Ti:sapphire chirped pulse amplifier system. Shot to shot, short term jitter and long term timing drift measurements are presented, with discussion on the sources of the noise. Plans for the feedback stabilization and the resolution and limitation of the systems are also covered.

  14. Validity Assessment of Pixel Linear Spectral Mixing Through Laboratory Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobasheri, M. R.; Dehnavi, S.; Maghsoudi, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In order to understand the characteristics of the data collected by hyperspectral imaging systems, it is important to discuss the physics behind the scene radiance field incident on the imaging system. A dominant effect in hyperspectral remote sensing is the mixing of radiant energies contributed from different materials present in a given pixel. The basic assumption of mixture modelling is that within a given scene, the surface is covered by a small number of distinct materials that have relatively constant spectral properties. It is most common to assume that the radiance reflected by different materials in a pixel can spectrally combine in a linear additive manner to produce the pixel radiance/reflectance, even when that might not be the case e.g. where the mixing process leads to nonlinear combinations of the radiance and where the linear assumption fails to hold. This can occur where there is significant relative three-dimensional structure within a given pixel. Without detailed knowledge of the dimensional structure, it can be very difficult to correctly ``un-mix'' the contributions of the various materials. This work aims to evaluate the correctness of the linear assumption in the mixture modelling using some laboratory measurements. Study was conducted using some sheets made of cellulose materials of different colours in 400-800 nm spectral range. Experimental results have shown that a correction term must be applied to the gains and offsets in the linear model. The obtained results can be extended to satellite sensors that acquire images in the above mentioned spectral range.

  15. Measuring the coral reef distribution of Kuroshima Island by satellite remote sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Miyazaki, Tadakuni; Harashima, Akira; Nakatani, Yukihiro

    1995-12-31

    Coral reefs are the major sites for photo-synthesis and calcification in the present ocean. Estimating the production rate of calcification by the coral reefs or investigating the sink/source mechanism of CO{sub 2} by the coral reefs in the ocean, the distribution of the coral reefs in the world wide must be identified. Measuring the spectral signatures of underwater coral reefs and mapping of coral reefs by satellite remote sensing are described. The spectral signatures of different species of the coral reefs were measured using a spectroradiometer at off Kuroshima Island, Okinawa, Japan and investigated spectral difference between different species of the coral reefs. As well as the field experiments, laboratory experiments for measuring the spectral signatures of 9 different species of coral reefs were carried out with the same spectroradiometer. The spectral reflectance of each coral reef showed a significant result that a narrow absorption band exists in the spectral region between 660 and 680 nm, and very strong spectral reflectance from about 700 nm towards the longer wavelength range. On the other hand, absorption and the high reflectance region were not observed from the bottom sands or bare rocks underwater. These experiments suggested that there is a significant spectral difference between coral reefs and bottom sands or bare rocks and so the best spectral range for separating the coral reefs from other underwater objects in the ocean would be between 700 and 800 nm. As well as the basic spectral measurement either in the field or at the laboratory, SPOT satellite imageries were used to classify the underwater coral reefs. Classification methods used here were the principal component analysis, and the maximum likelihood. Finally, the evaluation of classification method for extracting the coral reefs was introduced.

  16. Contiguous polarisation spectra of the Earth from 300 to 850 nm measured by GOME-2 onboard MetOp-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilstra, L. G.; Lang, R.; Munro, R.; Aben, I.; Stammes, P.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we present the first contiguous high-resolution spectra of the Earth's polarisation observed by a satellite instrument. The measurements of the Stokes fraction Q/I are performed by the spectrometer GOME-2 onboard the MetOp-A satellite. Polarisation measurements by GOME-2 are performed by onboard polarisation measurement devices (PMDs) and the high-resolution measurements discussed in this paper are taken in the special "PMD RAW" mode of operation. The spectral resolution of these PMD RAW polarisation measurements varies from 3 nm in the ultraviolet (UV) to 35 nm in the near-infrared wavelength range. We first compare measurements of the polarisation from cloud-free scenes with radiative transfer calculations for a number of cases. We find good agreement but also a spectral discrepancy at 800 nm, which we attribute to remaining imperfections in the calibration key data. Secondly, we study the polarisation of scenes with special scattering geometries that normally lead to near-zero Q/I. The GOME-2 polarisation spectra indeed show this behaviour and confirm the existence of the small discrepancy found earlier. Thirdly, we study the Earth polarisation for a variety of scenes. This provides a blueprint of Q/I over land and sea surfaces for various degrees of cloud cover. Fourthly, we compare the spectral dependence of measurements of Q/I in the UV with the generalised distribution function proposed by Schutgens and Stammes (2002) to describe the shape of the UV polarisation spectrum. The GOME-2 data confirm that these functions match the spectral behaviour captured by the GOME-2 PMD RAW mode.

  17. Contiguous polarisation spectra of the Earth from 300-850 nm measured by GOME-2 onboard MetOp-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilstra, L. G.; Lang, R.; Munro, R.; Aben, I.; Stammes, P.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we present the first contiguous high-resolution spectra of the Earth's polarisation observed by a satellite instrument. The measurements of the Stokes fraction Q/I are performed by the spectrometer GOME-2 onboard the MetOp-A satellite. Polarisation measurements by GOME-2 are performed by onboard polarisation measurement devices (PMDs) and the high-resolution measurements discussed in this paper are taken in the special "PMD RAW" mode of operation. The spectral resolution of these PMD RAW polarisation measurements varies from 3 nm in the ultraviolet (UV) to 35 nm in the near-infrared wavelength range. We first compare measurements of the polarisation from cloud-free scenes with radiative transfer calculations for a number of cases. We find good agreement but also a spectral discrepancy at 800 nm, which we attribute to remaining imperfections in the calibration key data. Secondly, we study the polarisation of scenes with special scattering geometries that normally lead to near-zero Q/I. The GOME-2 polarisation spectra indeed show this behaviour and confirm the existence of the small discrepancy found earlier. Thirdly, we study the Earth polarisation for a variety of scenes. This provides a blueprint of Q/I over land and sea surfaces for various degrees of cloud cover. Fourthly, we compare the spectral dependence of measurements of Q/I in the UV with the generalised distribution function that was proposed in the past (Schutgens and Stammes, 2002) to describe the shape of the UV polarisation spectrum. The GOME-2 data confirm that these functions match the spectral behaviour captured by the GOME-2 PMD RAW mode.

  18. Excitation-emission matrices measurements of human cutaneous lesions: tool for fluorescence origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelyazkova, A.; Borisova, E.; Angelova, L.; Pavlova, E.; Keremedchiev, M.

    2013-11-01

    The light induced fluorescence (LIF) technique has the potential of providing real-time diagnosis of malignant and premalignant skin tissue; however, human skin is a multilayered and inhomogeneous organ with different optical properties that complicate the analysis of cutaneous fluorescence spectra. In spite of the difficulties related to the detection and analysis of fluorescent data from skin lesions, this technique is among the most widely applied techniques in laboratorial and pre-clinical investigations for early skin neoplasia diagnosis. The important point is to evaluate all sources of intrinsic fluorescence and find any significant alterations distinguishing the normal skin from a cancerous state of the tissue; this would make the autofluorescence signal obtained useful for the development of a non-invasive diagnostic tool for the dermatological practice. Our investigations presented here were based on ex vivo point-by-point measurements of excitation-emission matrices (EEM) from excised tumor lesions and the surrounding skin taken during the daily clinical practice of Queen Jiovanna- ISUL University Hospital, Sofia, the local Ethical Committee's approval having already been obtained. The fluorescence emission was measured between 300 nm and 800 nm using excitation in the 280-440 nm spectral range. In the process of excitation-emission matrices (EEM) measurements we could establish the origin of the autofluorescence and the compounds related by assigning the excitation and emission maxima obtained during the experiments. The EEM were compared for normal human skin, basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, benign nevi and malignant melanoma lesions to obtain information for the most common skin malignancies and their precursors. The main spectral features and the applicability of the technique of autofluorescent spectroscopy of human skin in general as an initial diagnostic tool are discussed as well.

  19. High-Resolution, Noninvasive, Two-Photon Fluorescence Measurement of Molecular Concentrations in Corneal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Liping; Huxlin, Krystel R.; Xu, Lisen; MacRae, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To perform high-resolution, noninvasive, calibrated measurements of the concentrations and diffusion profiles of fluorescent molecules in the live cornea after topical application to the ocular surface. Methods. An 800-nm femtosecond laser was used to perform two-photon fluorescence (TPF) axial scanning measurements. Calibration solutions consisting of sodium fluorescein (Na-Fl; concentration range, 0.01%–2.5%) and riboflavin (concentration range, 0.0125%–0.1%) were tested in well slides, and TPF signals were assessed. Excised feline eyeballs preserved in corneal storage medium and with either intact or removed corneal epithelia were then treated with Na-Fl, riboflavin, or fluorescein dextran (Fl-d) of different molecular weight (MW) for 30 minutes. Calibrated TPF was then used immediately to measure the concentration of these molecules across the central corneal depth. Results. The axial resolution of our TPF system was 6 μm, and a linear relationship was observed between TPF signal and low concentrations of most fluorophores. Intact corneas treated with Na-Fl or riboflavin exhibited a detectable penetration depth of only approximately 20 μm, compared with approximately 400 to 600 μm when the epithelium was removed before fluorophore application. Peak concentrations for intact corneas were half those attained with epithelial removal. Debrided corneas treated with 2,000,000 MW Fl-d showed a half-maximum penetration depth of 156.7 μm compared with 384 μm for the 3,000 MW dextran. The peak concentration of the high MW dextran was one quarter that of the lower MW dextran. Conclusions. TPF is an effective, high-resolution, noninvasive method of quantifying the diffusion and concentration of fluorescent molecules across the cornea. PMID:21228379

  20. Polarized neutron reflectivity and X-ray scattering measurements as tools to study properties of Pt/Co/Pt ultrathin layers irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szuszkiewicz, Wojciech; Ott, Frédéric; Kisielewski, Jan; Sveklo, Iosif; Dynowska, Elżbieta; Minikayev, Roman; Kurant, Zbigniew; Kuna, Rafał; Jakubowski, Marcin; Wawro, Andrzej; Sobierajski, Ryszard; Maziewski, Andrzej

    2016-04-01

    We have used polarized neutron reflectivity, X-ray diffraction, X-ray reflectivity and magneto-optical Kerr effect in polar configuration to study the properties of ultrathin Pt/Co/Pt films. Structures consisting of a 5-nm thick Pt buffer, 3-nm thick Co layer and 5-nm thick Pt cover layer were deposited onto (0001)-oriented Al2O3 substrate by the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) method. Irreversible modifications of film properties, resulting from its illumination by single femtosecond laser pulses, of duration of 40 fs and wavelength of 800 nm, were observed and analyzed. As prepared films exhibited magnetization in-plane, but after laser irradiation, the direction of magnetization was rotated to out-of-plane state. Formation of Co-Pt alloy phase caused by quasi-uniform film irradiation was demonstrated by the results of X-ray and neutron scattering measurements. Moreover, polarized neutron and X-ray reflectivity data showed that after illumination Co was distributed mostly in the area of nominal Co layer and Pt cover layer and its diffusion into the Pt buffer was less significant.

  1. Laser Remote Measurements of atmospheric pollutants (Las-R-Map): UV-Visible Laser system description and data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, V.; Wyk, H. V.

    Laser radar more popularly known as LIDAR LIght Detection And Ranging is becoming one of the most powerful techniques for active remote sensing of the earth s atmosphere Around the globe several new lidar systems have been developed based on the scientific interest Particularly the DIfferential Absorption Lidar DIAL technique is only one which can provide the better accuracy of measuring atmospheric pollutants Using modern advanced techniques and instrumentation a mobile DIAL system called laser remote measurements of atmospheric pollutants hear after referred as Las-R-Map is designed at National Laser Centre NLC --Pretoria 25 r 45 prime S 28 r 17 prime E Las-R-Map is basically used for measuring atmospheric pollutants applying the principle of absorption by constituents The system designed primarily to focus on the following pollutant measurements such as SO 2 CH 4 CO 2 NO 2 and O 3 In future the system could be used to measure few particulate matter between 2 5 mu m and 10 mu m Benzene Hg 1 3-butadiene H 2 S HF and Volatile Organic Compounds VOC Las-R-map comprises of two different laser sources Alexandrite and CO 2 optical receiver data acquisition and signal processor It uses alexandrite laser in the UV-Visible region from 200 nm to 800 nm and CO 2 laser in the Far-IR region from 9 2 mu m to 10 8 mu m Such two different laser sources make feasibility for studying the wide range of atmospheric pollutants The present paper is focused on technical details

  2. Radiometric Measurement Comparison on the Integrating Sphere Source Used to Calibrate the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+).

    PubMed

    Butler, James J; Brown, Steven W; Saunders, Robert D; Johnson, B Carol; Biggar, Stuart F; Zalewski, Edward F; Markham, Brian L; Gracey, Paul N; Young, James B; Barnes, Robert A

    2003-01-01

    As part of a continuing effort to validate the radiometric scales assigned to integrating sphere sources used in the calibration of Earth Observing System (EOS) instruments, a radiometric measurement comparison was held in May 1998 at Raytheon/Santa Barbara Remote Sensing (SBRS). This comparison was conducted in support of the calibration of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) instruments. The radiometric scale assigned to the Spherical Integrating Source (SIS100) by SBRS was validated through a comparison with radiometric measurements made by a number of stable, well-characterized transfer radiometers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA's GSFC), and the University of Arizona Optical Sciences Center (UA). The measured radiances from the radiometers differed by ±3 % in the visible to near infrared when compared to the SBRS calibration of the sphere, and the overall agreement was within the combined uncertainties of the individual measurements. In general, the transfer radiometers gave higher values than the SBRS calibration in the near infrared and lower values in the blue. The measurements of the radiometers differed by ±4 % from 800 nm to 1800 nm compared to the SBRS calibration of the sphere, and the overall agreement was within the combined uncertainties of the individual measurements for wavelengths less than 2200 nm. The results of the radiometric measurement comparison presented here supplement the results of previous measurement comparisons on the integrating sphere sources used to calibrate the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, CA and the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) at NEC Corporation, Yokohama, Japan. PMID:27413606

  3. Radiometric Measurement Comparison on the Integrating Sphere Source Used to Calibrate the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+)

    PubMed Central

    Butler, James J.; Brown, Steven W.; Saunders, Robert D.; Johnson, B. Carol; Biggar, Stuart F.; Zalewski, Edward F.; Markham, Brian L.; Gracey, Paul N.; Young, James B.; Barnes, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    As part of a continuing effort to validate the radiometric scales assigned to integrating sphere sources used in the calibration of Earth Observing System (EOS) instruments, a radiometric measurement comparison was held in May 1998 at Raytheon/Santa Barbara Remote Sensing (SBRS). This comparison was conducted in support of the calibration of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) instruments. The radiometric scale assigned to the Spherical Integrating Source (SIS100) by SBRS was validated through a comparison with radiometric measurements made by a number of stable, well-characterized transfer radiometers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA’s GSFC), and the University of Arizona Optical Sciences Center (UA). The measured radiances from the radiometers differed by ±3 % in the visible to near infrared when compared to the SBRS calibration of the sphere, and the overall agreement was within the combined uncertainties of the individual measurements. In general, the transfer radiometers gave higher values than the SBRS calibration in the near infrared and lower values in the blue. The measurements of the radiometers differed by ±4 % from 800 nm to 1800 nm compared to the SBRS calibration of the sphere, and the overall agreement was within the combined uncertainties of the individual measurements for wavelengths less than 2200 nm. The results of the radiometric measurement comparison presented here supplement the results of previous measurement comparisons on the integrating sphere sources used to calibrate the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, CA and the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) at NEC Corporation, Yokohama, Japan. PMID:27413606

  4. Optical tomographic image reconstruction from ultrafast time-sliced transmission measurements.

    PubMed

    Cai, W; Gayen, S K; Xu, M; Zevallos, M; Alrubaiee, M; Lax, M; Alfano, R R

    1999-07-01

    Optical imaging and localization of objects inside a highly scattering medium, such as a tumor in the breast, is a challenging problem with many practical applications. Conventional imaging methods generally provide only two-dimensional (2-D) images of limited spatial resolution with little diagnostic ability. Here we present an inversion algorithm that uses time-resolved transillumination measurements in the form of a sequence of picosecond-duration intensity patterns of transmitted ultrashort light pulses to reconstruct three-dimensional (3-D) images of an absorbing object located inside a slab of a highly scattering medium. The experimental arrangement used a 3-mm-diameter collimated beam of 800-nm, 150-fs, 1-kHz repetition rate light pulses from a Ti:sapphire laser and amplifier system to illuminate one side of the slab sample. An ultrafast gated intensified camera system that provides a minimum FWHM gate width of 80 ps recorded the 2-D intensity patterns of the light transmitted through the opposite side of the slab. The gate position was varied in steps of 100 ps over a 5-ns range to obtain a sequence of 2-D transmitted light intensity patterns of both less-scattered and multiple-scattered light for image reconstruction. The inversion algorithm is based on the diffusion approximation of the radiative transfer theory for photon transport in a turbid medium. It uses a Green s function perturbative approach under the Rytov approximation and combines a 2-D matrix inversion with a one-dimensional Fourier-transform inversion to achieve speedy 3-D image reconstruction. In addition to the lateral position, the method provides information about the axial position of the object as well, whereas the 2-D reconstruction methods yield only lateral position. PMID:18323906

  5. Light absorption coefficient measurement of SOA using a UV-Visible spectrometer connected with an integrating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Min; Jang, Myoseon

    2011-08-01

    A method for measuring an aerosol light absorption coefficient ( B a) has been developed using a conventional UV-visible spectrometer equipped with an integrating sphere covering a wide range of wavelengths (280-800 nm). The feasibility of the proposed method was evaluated in both the transmittance mode (TUV-IS) and the reflective mode (RUV-IS) using the reference aerosol known for the cross-sectional area. The aerosol was collected on a conventional filter and measured for B a values. The resulting RUV-IS method was applied to measure light absorption of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). SOA was produced through photooxidation of different precursor hydrocarbons such as toluene, d-limonene and α-pinene in the presence of NO x (60-70 ppb) and inorganic seed aerosol using a 2-m 3 indoor Teflon film chamber. Of the three precursor hydrocarbons, the B a value of toluene SOA (0.574 m 2 g -1 at 350 nm) was the highest compared with B a values for α-pinene SOA (0.029 m 2 g -1) and d-limonene SOA (0.038 m 2 g -1). When d-limonene SOA or toluene SOA was internally mixed with neutral [(NH 4) 2SO 4] or acidic inorganic seed (NH 4HSO 4:H 2SO 4 = 1:1 by mole), the SOA showed 2-3 times greater B a values at 350 nm than the SOA with no seed. Aerosol aging with a light source for this study reduced B a values of SOA (e.g., on average 10% for toluene SOA and 30% for d-limonene SOA within 4 h). Overall, weak absorption appeared for chamber-generated SOA over wavelengths ranging from 280 to 550 nm, which fall into the sunlight spectrum.

  6. Measurement of the lateral diffusion of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine adsorbed on silica beads in the absence and presence of melittin: a 31P two-dimensional exchange solid-state NMR study.

    PubMed Central

    Picard, F; Paquet, M J; Dufourc, E J; Auger, M

    1998-01-01

    31P two-dimensional exchange solid-state NMR spectroscopy was used to measure the lateral diffusion, D(L), in the fluid phase of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) in the presence and absence of melittin. The use of a spherical solid support with a radius of 320 +/- 20 nm, on which lipids and peptides are adsorbed together, and a novel way of analyzing the two-dimensional exchange patterns afforded a narrow distribution of D(L) centered at a value of (8.8 +/- 0.5) x 10(-8) cm2/s for the pure lipid system and a large distribution of D(L) spanning 1 x 10(-8) to 10 x 10(-8) cm2/s for the lipids in the presence of melittin. In addition, the determination of D(L) for nonsupported DPPC multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) suggests that the support does not slow down the lipid diffusion and that the radii of the bilayers vary from 300 to 800 nm. Finally, the DPPC-melittin complex is stabilized at the surface of the silica beads in the gel phase, opening the way to further study of the interaction between melittin and DPPC. PMID:9533697

  7. Use of blue-green and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements for differentiation between nitrogen deficiency and pathogen infection in winter wheat.

    PubMed

    Bürling, Kathrin; Hunsche, Mauricio; Noga, Georg

    2011-09-15

    In recent years, several sensor-based approaches have been established to early detect single plant stresses, but the challenge of discriminating between simultaneously occurring stressors still remains. Earlier studies on wheat plants strongly affected by pathogens and nitrogen deficiency indicated that chlorophyll fluorescence might be suited to distinguish between the two stressors. Nevertheless, there is lack of information on the pre-symptomatic detection of synchronized occurrence of slight N-deficiency and the early stages of pathogen infection. The usefulness of the blue, green, and yellow fluorescence signals in this context has not yet been explored. We hypothesized that differentiation between wheat plants' physiological reaction due to N-deficiency and leaf rust (Puccinia triticina) as well as N-deficiency and powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici) might be accomplished by means of UV laser-induced fluorescence spectral measurements between 370 and 620nm in addition to chlorophyll fluorescence (640-800nm). Plants were provided with either a normal or a modified Hoagland nutrient solution in order to induce a slight N deficit. Pathogen inoculation was carried out on the second fully developed leaf. Four experimental groups were evaluated: (a) N-full-supply [N+]; (b) N-deficiency [N-]; (c) N-full-supply+pathogen [N+/LR] or [N+/PM]; (d) N-deficiency+pathogen [N-/LR] or [N-/PM]. The results revealed that, in addition to the amplitude ratio of R/FR fluorescence, B/G fluorescence also facilitated reliable and robust discrimination among the four experimental groups. The discrimination among the experimental groups was accomplished as early as one and two days after inoculation for powdery mildew and leaf rust infection, respectively. During the 3days evaluation period, the differences among the treatment groups became more evident. Moreover, several other amplitude ratios and half-bandwidth ratios proved to be suited to early detect fungal

  8. Single particles measured by a light scattering module coupled to a time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer onboard the NOAA P-3 aircraft during SENEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, J.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Welti, A.; Sueper, D.; Murphy, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Single particles in the eastern US were characterized by a light scattering module coupled to a time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (LS-ToF-AMS) onboard the NOAA P-3 aircraft during the Southeastern Nexus (SENEX) campaign. Single particle data were collected for 30 seconds every 5 minutes. Aerosols larger than 200-300 nm in vacuum aerodynamic diameter can be optically detected by the 405 nm crystal laser and trigger the saving of single particle mass spectra. The measured single particles are internally-mixed as expected. The single particles were classified as prompt, delayed, and null based on the chemical ion signal arrival time difference between prediction from the light scattering signal and measurement by mass spectrometer and the presence or absence of a mass spectrum. On average the number fraction of particles detected as prompt, delayed, and null (no spectrum) is about 30%, 10%, and 60%. The number fraction of these three particle types varied with aerosol size, chemical composition and the investigation region and will be discussed in detail. For example, the number fraction of prompt particles was significantly higher for the flight to the Pennsylvania natural gas shale region on July 6, 2013, which is probably related to the chemical composition (more acidic) and phase of the ambient particles. These particle types and detection efficiency are related to the bouncing effect on the vaporizer and may provide insight into the non-unit AMS collection efficiency. Moreover, most of the particles larger than 800 nm in vacuum aerodynamic diameter sized with the traditional AMS PToF mode are delayed particles and their mass spectral signals appear to be affected by this process.

  9. Tissue distribution and real-time fluorescence measurement of a tumor-targeted nanodevice by a two photon optical fiber fluorescence probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Thommey P.; Ye, Jing Yong; Yang, Chu-Sheng; Myaing, Monthiri; Majoros, Istvan J.; Kotlyar, Alina; Cao, Zhengyi; Norris, Theodore B.; Baker, James R., Jr.

    2006-02-01

    Real-time fluorescence measurement in deep tumors in live animals (or humans) by conventional methods has significant challenges. We have developed a two-photon optical fiber fluorescence (TPOFF) probe as a minimally invasive technique for quantifying fluorescence in solid tumors in live mice. Here we demonstrate TPOFF for real-time measurements of targeted drug delivery dynamics to tumors in live mice. 50-femtosecond laser pulses at 800 nm were coupled into a single mode optical fiber and delivered into the tumor through a 27-gauge needle. Fluorescence was collected back through the same fiber, filtered, and detected with photon counting. Biocompatible dendrimer-based nanoparticles were used for targeted delivery of fluorescent materials into tumors. Dendrimers with targeting agent folic acid and fluorescent reporter 6-TAMRA (G5-6T-FA) were synthesized. KB cell tumors expressing high levels of FA receptors were developed in SCID mice. We initially demonstrated the specific uptake of the targeted conjugates into tumor, kidney and liver, using the TPOFF probe. The tumor fluorescence was then taken in live mice at 30 min, 2 h and 24 h with the TPOFF probe. G5-6T-FA accumulated in the tumor with maximum mean levels reaching 673 +/- 67 nM at the 2 h time point. In contrast, the levels of a control, non-targeted conjugate (G5-6T) at 2 h reached a level of only 136 +/- 28 nM in tumors, and decrease quickly. This indicates that the TPOFF probe can be used as a minimally invasive detection system for quantifying the specific targeting of a fluorescent nanodevice on a real-time basis.

  10. In-vivo measurements of penetration depth, oxygenation, and drug concentration using broadband absorption spectroscopy in human tissues before and after photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsing-Wen; Zhu, Timothy C.; Solonenko, Michael; Hahn, Stephen M.; Metz, James M.; Dimofte, Andrea; Mile, Jermy; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2003-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) employs a combination of photosensitizing chemical, light, and oxygen Knowledge of tissue optical properties, including absorption (μa) and reduce scattering coefficients (μs"), makes possible to derive blood oxygen saturation, light penetration depth, and drug concentration, which are important to ensure PDT treatment efficacy at the specific wavelengths. We have developed an absorption spectroscopy system to measure μa and μs" in the spectral range 600-800nm using a contact linear probe with a source fiber and multiple source-detector separation distances less than 1 cm. The μa and μs" were recovered based on diffusion approximations of the photon transport equation. We measured tissue optical properties among various organs of patients with intraperitoneal malignancies for an on-going Phase II PDT protocol. The results from 12 patients showed various effective penetration depth from site to site and from organ to organ. The percentage oxygen saturation (%StO2) are similar before and after PDT. Before PDT, meff (mean (standard deviation) (number of patients)) in cm-1 at 630nm are 2.4 (0.2) (12) in small bowel, 2.2(0.4) (9) in large bowel, 4.2(2.7) (7) in tumor, 3.3 (0.3) (10) in peritoneum, 2.7 (0.3) (11) in skin, and 10.1 (0.6) (10) in liver. %StO2 is 60-80% for most organs but 30-40% for tumor.

  11. Optical changes of porcine brain tissue after thermal coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzmaier, Hans-Joachim; Goldbach, Thomas; Yaroslavsky, Ilya V.; Ulrich, Frank; Bettag, Martin; Kahn, Thomas; Kaufmann, Raimund

    1995-05-01

    Porcine brain tissue is a model for human brain structures in laser induced thermo-therapy. However, its optical properties including possible heat-related changes were basically unknown so far. To simulate laser coagulation, 12 specimens (6 grey and 6 white matter) were heated in a saline bath (80°C, 2 hours) and compared to 11 untreated samples (5 grey and 6 white matter). The optical constants were obtained from transmission (total and collimated) and reflection (diffuse) measurements using the inverse Monte-Carlo method. The absorption coefficient ((mu) a) of untreated grey substance decreased from 0.35 +/- 0.06/mm (340 nm) to 0.03 +/- 0.02/mm (800 nm). The scattering coefficient ((mu) s) varied between 20.42 +/- 3.65/mm (340 nm) and 6.85 +/- 2.07/mm (800 nm). The anisotropy factor (g) increased from 0.848 +/- 0.013 (340 nm) to 0.889 +/- 0.009 (800 nm). Coagulation increased (mu) a up to a factor of 2 (340-540 nm; p < 0.05), and (mu) s by a factor up to 3 (340-800 nm, all data p < 0.001) while g was decreased up to 18% (340-560 nm; p < 0.05). White substance exhibited a (mu) a between 0.24 +/- 0.07/mm (340 nm) and 0.04 +/- 0.02/mm (800 nm) while (mu) s varied between 26.72 +/- 9.10/mm (340 nm) and 21.78 +/- 3.88/mm (800 nm). The g-value increased from 0.561 +/- 0.180 (340 nm) to 0.834 +/- 0.068 (800 nm). Coagulation increased (mu) a by a factor up to 2 (340-800 nm; all data p < 0.05) while (mu) s and g remained unchanged. Thermal denaturation changes the absorption and scattering properties of porcine brain significantly.

  12. Particle number emissions of motor traffic derived from street canyon measurements in a Central European city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, S.; Birmili, W.; Voigtländer, J.; Tuch, T.; Wehner, B.; Wiedensohler, A.; Ketzel, M.

    2009-02-01

    A biennial dataset of ambient particle number size distributions (diameter range 4-800 nm) collected in urban air in Leipzig, Germany, was analysed with respect to the influence of traffic emissions. Size distributions were sampled continuously in 2005 and 2006 inside a street canyon trafficked by ca. 10 000 motor vehicles per day, and at a background reference site distant at 1.5 km. Auto-correlation analysis showed that the impact of fresh traffic emissions could be seen most intensely below particle sizes of 60 nm. The traffic-induced concentration increment at roadside was estimated by subtracting the urban background values from the street canyon measurement. To describe the variable dispersion conditions inside the street canyon, micro-meteorological dilution factors were calculated using the Operational Street Pollution Model (OSPM), driven by above-roof wind speed and wind direction observations. The roadside increment concentrations, dilution factor, and real-time traffic counts were used to calculate vehicle emission factors (aerosol source rates) that are representative of the prevailing driving conditions, i.e. stop-and-go traffic including episodes of fluent traffic flow at speeds up to 40 km h-1. The size spectrum of traffic-derived particles was essentially bimodal - with mode diameters around 12 and 100 nm, while statistical analysis suggested that the emitted number concentration varied with time of day, wind direction, particle size and fleet properties. Significantly, the particle number emissions depended on ambient temperature, ranging between 4.8 (±1.8) and 7.8 (±2.9).1014 p. veh-1 km-1 in summer and winter, respectively. A separation of vehicle types according to vehicle length suggested that lorry-like vehicles emit about 80 times more particle number than passenger car-like vehicles. Using nitrogen oxide (NOx) measurements, specific total particle number emissions of 338 p. (pg NOx)-1 were inferred. The calculated traffic emission factors

  13. Measure for measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberger, Peter

    2012-06-01

    The present system of measures for length, weight and capacity (volume) originates from scientific ideas expressed during the French Revolution in 1789. The history of a compatible unit of length, however, turns out to be less of a scientific but rather of a political character. Here reports to the Philosophical Magazine made in the first quarter of the nineteenth century are used to trace the cultural split between meters and inches, and between kilograms and pounds, that can be experienced in many parts of the world.

  14. Measurement Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    New and improved materials, equipment, and techniques in measurement technology, developed by the aerospace industry, are presented for economic development in other industries. The developments are grouped as follows: (1) surface measurement, (2) alignment and orientation of bodies, (3) fluid measurement, (4) linear and angular measurements, and (5) force measurements.

  15. Ideas: Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sovchik, Robert; Meconi, L. J.

    1994-01-01

    Presents measurement activities for K-3, 4-6, 5-6, and 7-8 grade levels. Activities include a measurement scavenger hunt, using a clinometer to measure angles of elevation, estimating the age of trees, measuring the height of a tree, and measuring objects at a distance. Includes reproducible worksheets. (MDH)

  16. Body Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neufeld, K. Allen

    1989-01-01

    Described are activities for measuring the human body. The activities include measurements and calculations, calculating volume and density, problems related to body measurement, and using a nomogram. Several charts, illustrations, and a nomogram are provided. (YP)

  17. Measuring Resilience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neal, Marcia R.

    Locating and selecting an instrument that measures resilience is no simple task. This document provides information about several measures of resilience or hardiness that have been used in recent years. The discussion of each measure includes information about its origins, a description of the measure and its uses, and a discussion of the…

  18. Aerosol size distribution and new particle formation in the western Yangtze River Delta of China: 2 years of measurements at the SORPES station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, X. M.; Ding, A. J.; Nie, W.; Petäjä, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Herrmann, E.; Xie, Y. N.; Zheng, L. F.; Manninen, H.; Aalto, P.; Sun, J. N.; Xu, Z. N.; Chi, X. G.; Huang, X.; Boy, M.; Virkkula, A.; Yang, X.-Q.; Fu, C. B.; Kulmala, M.

    2015-11-01

    Aerosol particles play important roles in regional air quality and global climate change. In this study, we analyzed 2 years (2011-2013) of measurements of submicron particles (6-800 nm) at a suburban site in the western Yangtze River Delta (YRD) of eastern China. The number concentrations (NCs) of particles in the nucleation, Aitken and accumulation modes were 5300 ± 5500, 8000 ± 4400, 5800 ± 3200 cm-3, respectively. The NCs of total particles are comparable to those at urban/suburban sites in other Chinese megacities, such as Beijing, but about 10 times higher than in the remote western China. Long-range and regional transport largely influenced number concentrations and size distributions of submicron particles. The highest and lowest accumulation-mode particle number concentrations were observed in air masses from the YRD and coastal regions, respectively. Continental air masses from inland brought the highest concentrations of nucleation-mode particles. New particle formation (NPF) events, apparent in 44 % of the effective measurement days, occurred frequently in all the seasons except winter. The frequency of NPF in spring, summer and autumn is much higher than other measurement sites in China. Sulfuric acid was found to be the main driver of NPF events. The particle formation rate was the highest in spring (3.6 ± 2.4 cm-3 s-1), whereas the particle growth rate had the highest values in summer (12.8 ± 4.4 nm h-1). The formation rate was typically high in relatively clean air masses, whereas the growth rate tended to be high in the polluted YRD air masses. The frequency of NPF events and the particle growth rates showed a strong year-to-year difference. In the summer of 2013, associated with a multi-week heat wave and strong photochemical processes, NPF events occurred with larger frequency and higher growth rates compared with the same period in 2012. The difference in the location and strength of the subtropical high pressure system, which influences

  19. Aerosol size distribution and new particle formation in western Yangtze River Delta of China: two-year measurement at the SORPES station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, X. M.; Ding, A. J.; Nie, W.; Petäjä, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Herrmann, E.; Xie, Y. N.; Zheng, L. F.; Manninen, H.; Aalto, P.; Sun, J. N.; Xu, Z. N.; Chi, X. G.; Huang, X.; Boy, M.; Virkkula, A.; Yang, X.-Q.; Fu, C. B.; Kulmala, M.

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol particles play important roles in regional air quality and global climate change. In this study, we analyzed two-year (2011-2013) of measurements of submicron particles (6-800 nm) at a suburban site in western Yangtze River delta (YRD) of East China. The number concentrations (NCs) of particles in the nucleation, Aitken and accumulation modes were 5300 ± 5500, 8000 ± 4400, 5800 ± 3200 cm-3, respectively. Number concentrations and size distributions of submicron particles were also influenced by long-range and regional transport of air masses. The highest and lowest accumulation mode particle number concentrations were observed in air masses from YRD and coastal region, respectively. Continental air masses from inland had the highest concentrations of nucleation mode particles. New particle formation (NPF) events, apparent in 44% of the effective measurement days, occurred frequently in all the seasons except winter. Radiation and pre-existing particles were found to be the main factors influencing the occurrence of NPF events. The particle formation rate was the highest in spring (3.6 ± 2.4 cm-3 s-1), whereas the particle growth rate had the highest values in summer (12.8 ± 4.4 nm h-1). The formation rate was typically high in relatively clean air masses, whereas the growth rate tended to be high in the polluted YRD air masses. The frequency of NPF events and the growth rate showed a strong year-to-year difference. In the summer of 2013, associated with a multi-week heat wave and photochemical pollution, NPF events occurred more frequently and the growth rate was much higher than in the same period of 2012. The difference in the location and strength of sub-tropical High, which influences the air mass transport pathways and solar radiation, seems to be the driving cause for year-to-year differences. This study reported the longest continuous measurement records of submicron particles in the East China and gained a comprehensive understanding of the

  20. An Automated System for Measuring Microphysical and Radiative Cloud Characteristics from a Tethered Balloon

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Paul Lawson

    2004-03-15

    OAK-B135 The rate of climate change in polar regions is now felt to be a harbinger of possible global warming. Long-lived, relatively thin stratus clouds play a predominant role in transmitting solar radiation and trapping long wave radiation emitted from open water and melt ponds. In situ measurements of microphysical and radiative properties of Arctic and Antarctic stratus clouds are needed to validate retrievals from remote measurements and simulations using numerical models. While research aircraft can collect comprehensive microphysical and radiative data in clouds, the duration of these aircraft is relatively short (up to about 12 hours). During the course of the Phase II research, a tethered balloon system was developed that supports miniaturized meteorological, microphysical and radiation sensors that can collect data in stratus clouds for days at a time. The tethered balloon system uses a 43 cubic meter balloon to loft a 17 kg sensor package to altitudes u p to 2 km. Power is supplied to the instrument package via two copper conductors in the custom tether. Meteorological, microphysical and radiation data are recorded by the sensor package. Meteorological measurements include pressure, temperature, humidity, wind speed and wind direction. Radiation measurements are made using a 4-pi radiometer that measures actinic flux at 500 and 800 nm. Position is recorded using a GPS receiver. Microphysical data are obtained using a miniaturized version of an airborne cloud particle imager (CPI). The miniaturized CPI measures the size distribution of water drops and ice crystals from 9 microns to 1.4 mm. Data are recorded onboard the sensor package and also telemetered via a 802.11b wireless communications link. Command signals can also be sent to the computer in the sensor package via the wireless link. In the event of a broken tether, a GMRS radio link to the balloon package is used to heat a wire that burns 15 cm opening in the top of the balloon. The balloon and

  1. Effects of inelastic radiative processes on the determination of water-leaving spectral radiance from extrapolation of underwater near-surface measurements.

    PubMed

    Li, Linhai; Stramski, Dariusz; Reynolds, Rick A

    2016-09-01

    Extrapolation of near-surface underwater measurements is the most common method to estimate the water-leaving spectral radiance, Lw(λ) (where λ is the light wavelength in vacuum), and remote-sensing reflectance, Rrs(λ), for validation and vicarious calibration of satellite sensors, as well as for ocean color algorithm development. However, uncertainties in Lw(λ) arising from the extrapolation process have not been investigated in detail with regards to the potential influence of inelastic radiative processes, such as Raman scattering by water molecules and fluorescence by colored dissolved organic matter and chlorophyll-a. Using radiative transfer simulations, we examine high-depth resolution vertical profiles of the upwelling radiance, Lu(λ), and its diffuse attenuation coefficient, KLu (λ), within the top 10 m of the ocean surface layer and assess the uncertainties in extrapolated values of Lw(λ). The inelastic processes generally increase Lu and decrease KLu in the red and near-infrared (NIR) portion of the spectrum. Unlike KLu in the blue and green spectral bands, KLu in the red and NIR is strongly variable within the near-surface layer even in a perfectly homogeneous water column. The assumption of a constant KLu with depth that is typically employed in the extrapolation method can lead to significant errors in the estimate of Lw. These errors approach ∼100% at 900 nm, and the desired threshold of 5% accuracy or less cannot be achieved at wavelengths greater than 650 nm for underwater radiometric systems that typically take measurements at depths below 1 m. These errors can be reduced by measuring Lu within a much shallower surface layer of tens of centimeters thick or even less at near-infrared wavelengths longer than 800 nm, which suggests a

  2. Temperature measurement

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003400.htm Temperature measurement To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The measurement of body temperature can help detect illness. It can also monitor ...

  3. Construction measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    This text/reference on construction measurements contains material concerning electronic surveying and remote sensing. New to this edition is coverage of the GPS satellite positioning system, electronic distance measurement (EDM), laser sweep, calculator techniques, radial surveying and tracking, Loran-C, inertial navigation surveying, 3-point resection, computer software, and electronic fieldbooks. It covers the difference of elevation, angle measurements and directions, coordinate surveying and layout, offshore measurements, and random field and office techniques.

  4. Measuring circuit

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Shan C.; Chaprnka, Anthony G.

    1977-01-11

    An automatic gain control circuit functions to adjust the magnitude of an input signal supplied to a measuring circuit to a level within the dynamic range of the measuring circuit while a log-ratio circuit adjusts the magnitude of the output signal from the measuring circuit to the level of the input signal and optimizes the signal-to-noise ratio performance of the measuring circuit.

  5. Nonlinear optical properties of Bi2O3-GeO2 glass at 800 and 532 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Tâmara R.; Falcão-Filho, Edilson L.; de Araújo, Cid B.; da Silva, Diego S.; Kassab, Luciana R. P.; da Silva, Davinson M.

    2013-08-01

    The nonlinear (NL) optical properties of glassy xBi2O3-(1-x) GeO2 with x = 0.72 and 0.82 were investigated. The experiments were performed with lasers at 800 nm (pulses of 150 fs) and 532 nm (pulses of 80 ps and 250 ns). Using the Kerr gate technique, we observed that the NL response of the samples at 800 nm is faster than 150 fs. NL refraction indices, |n2|≈ 5 × 10-16 cm2/W, and two-photon absorption coefficients, α2, smaller than 0.03 cm/GW, were measured at 800 nm. At 532 nm, we measured the NL transmittance of the samples. From the results obtained, we determined α2 ≈1 cm/GW and excited-state absorption cross-sections of ≈10-22 cm2 due to free-carriers.

  6. First derivative versus absolute spectral reflectance of citrus varieties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazquez, Carlos H.; Nigg, H. N.; Hedley, Lou E.; Ramos, L. E.; Sorrell, R. W.; Simpson, S. E.

    1996-06-01

    Spectral reflectance measurements from 400 to 800 nm were taken from immature and mature leaves of grapefruit ('McCarty' and 'Rio Red'), 'Minneola' tangelo, 'Satsuma' mandarin, 'Dancy' tangerine, 'Nagami' oval kumquat, and 'Valencia' sweet orange, at the Florida Citrus Arboretum, Division of Plant Industry, Winter Haven, Florida. Immature and mature leaves of 'Minneola' tangelo had greater percent reflectance in the 400 to 800 nm range than the other varieties and leaf ages measured. The slope of the citrus spectral curves in the 800 nm range was not as sharp as conventional spectrometers, but had a much higher reflectance value than those obtained with a DK-2 spectrometer. Statistical analyses of absolute spectral data yielded significant differences between mature and immature leaves and between varieties. First derivative data analyses did not yield significant differences between varieties.

  7. Measure Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crissman, Sally

    2011-01-01

    One tool for enhancing students' work with data in the science classroom is the measure line. As a coteacher and curriculum developer for The Inquiry Project, the author has seen how measure lines--a number line in which the numbers refer to units of measure--help students not only represent data but also analyze it in ways that generate…

  8. Measurement fundamentals

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    The need to have accurate petroleum measurement is obvious. Petroleum measurement is the basis of commerce between oil producers, royalty owners, oil transporters, refiners, marketers, the Department of Revenue, and the motoring public. Furthermore, petroleum measurements are often used to detect operational problems or unwanted releases in pipelines, tanks, marine vessels, underground storage tanks, etc. Therefore, consistent, accurate petroleum measurement is an essential part of any operation. While there are several methods and different types of equipment used to perform petroleum measurement, the basic process stays the same. The basic measurement process is the act of comparing an unknown quantity, to a known quantity, in order to establish its magnitude. The process can be seen in a variety of forms; such as measuring for a first-down in a football game, weighing meat and produce at the grocery, or the use of an automobile odometer.

  9. Multilevel Interventions: Measurement and Measures

    PubMed Central

    Charns, Martin P.; Alligood, Elaine C.; Benzer, Justin K.; Burgess, James F.; Mcintosh, Nathalie M.; Burness, Allison; Partin, Melissa R.; Clauser, Steven B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Multilevel intervention research holds the promise of more accurately representing real-life situations and, thus, with proper research design and measurement approaches, facilitating effective and efficient resolution of health-care system challenges. However, taking a multilevel approach to cancer care interventions creates both measurement challenges and opportunities. Methods One-thousand seventy two cancer care articles from 2005 to 2010 were reviewed to examine the state of measurement in the multilevel intervention cancer care literature. Ultimately, 234 multilevel articles, 40 involving cancer care interventions, were identified. Additionally, literature from health services, social psychology, and organizational behavior was reviewed to identify measures that might be useful in multilevel intervention research. Results The vast majority of measures used in multilevel cancer intervention studies were individual level measures. Group-, organization-, and community-level measures were rarely used. Discussion of the independence, validity, and reliability of measures was scant. Discussion Measurement issues may be especially complex when conducting multilevel intervention research. Measurement considerations that are associated with multilevel intervention research include those related to independence, reliability, validity, sample size, and power. Furthermore, multilevel intervention research requires identification of key constructs and measures by level and consideration of interactions within and across levels. Thus, multilevel intervention research benefits from thoughtful theory-driven planning and design, an interdisciplinary approach, and mixed methods measurement and analysis. PMID:22623598

  10. Compliance measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubsey, R. T.; Fisher, D. M.; Jones, M. H.; Srawley, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The uses of compliance measurements in linear fracture mechanics are discussed as a technique for determining the crack-extension force vs load, specimen dimensions, and elastic constants. Some practical examples of application are given, including specimen and transducer descriptions, experimental procedure, instrumentation, calculations, measurement precautions, friction effects, and data reduction. The limitations and advantages of compliance measurements are discussed. It is pointed out that good results can be obtained by the compliance method when its measurement precision is not lower than that required for Young's modulus.

  11. Comparison of measured and calculated collision efficiencies at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagare, B.; Marcolli, C.; Stetzer, O.; Lohmann, U.

    2015-12-01

    Interactions of atmospheric aerosols with clouds influence cloud properties and modify the aerosol life cycle. Aerosol particles act as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nucleating particles or become incorporated into cloud droplets by scavenging. For an accurate description of aerosol scavenging and ice nucleation in contact mode, collision efficiency between droplets and aerosol particles needs to be known. This study derives the collision rate from experimental contact freezing data obtained with the ETH CoLlision Ice Nucleation CHamber (CLINCH). Freely falling 80 μm diameter water droplets are exposed to an aerosol consisting of 200 and 400 nm diameter silver iodide particles of concentrations from 500 to 5000 and 500 to 2000 cm-3, respectively, which act as ice nucleating particles in contact mode. The experimental data used to derive collision efficiency are in a temperature range of 238-245 K, where each collision of silver iodide particles with droplets can be assumed to result in the freezing of the droplet. An upper and lower limit of collision efficiency is also estimated for 800 nm diameter kaolinite particles. The chamber is kept at ice saturation at a temperature range of 236 to 261 K, leading to the slow evaporation of water droplets giving rise to thermophoresis and diffusiophoresis. Droplets and particles bear charges inducing electrophoresis. The experimentally derived collision efficiency values of 0.13, 0.07 and 0.047-0.11 for 200, 400 and 800 nm particles are around 1 order of magnitude higher than theoretical formulations which include Brownian diffusion, impaction, interception, thermophoretic, diffusiophoretic and electric forces. This discrepancy is most probably due to uncertainties and inaccuracies in the description of thermophoretic and diffusiophoretic processes acting together. This is, to the authors' knowledge, the first data set of collision efficiencies acquired below 273 K. More such experiments with different droplet and

  12. Asbestos Measurement

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental engineers are generally concerned with two types of air pollutants, gases and particulate matter (PM). Generally, the mass of PM falling in two size categories is measured, i.e. ≤2.5 µm diameter, and between 2.5 µm and 10 µm diameter. These measurements are taken by...

  13. Rotation Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In aircraft turbine engine research, certain investigations require extremely precise measurement of the position of a rotating part, such as the rotor, a disc-like part of the engine's compressor which revolves around a shaft at extremely high speeds. For example, in studies of airflow velocity within a compressor, researchers need to know-for data correlation the instantaneous position of a given spot on the rotor each time a velocity measurement is made. Earlier methods of measuring rotor shaft angle required a physical connection to the shaft, which limited the velocity of the rotating object.

  14. MEASURING PROJECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Franck, J.V.; Broadhead, P.S.; Skiff, E.W.

    1959-07-14

    A semiautomatic measuring projector particularly adapted for measurement of the coordinates of photographic images of particle tracks as prcduced in a bubble or cloud chamber is presented. A viewing screen aids the operator in selecting a particle track for measurement. After approximate manual alignment, an image scanning system coupled to a servo control provides automatic exact alignment of a track image with a reference point. The apparatus can follow along a track with a continuous motion while recording coordinate data at various selected points along the track. The coordinate data is recorded on punched cards for subsequent computer calculation of particle trajectory, momentum, etc.

  15. An Optical Streaking Method for Measuring Femtosecond Electron Bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yuantao; Bane, Karl L.F.; Huang, Zhirong; /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    are the right direction to achieve a better resolution. For example, by choosing an X-band transverse deflecting cavity, the expected resolution for LCLS beam with 4.3 GeV is about 1 fs rms. Typically the rf breakdown threshold and the power source availability prevent going to even higher voltage and frequency. With the highly-developed laser techniques, we can choose to streak the beam at optical frequencies. By jumping from rf to optical frequency, the wavelength is shortening by 4 to 5 orders. With an electron bunch length shorter than half period of the laser, we can apply the similar rf deflecting or zero-phasing method for e-beam bunch length measurements using a high-power laser. A short wiggler is required to provide interaction between the electron and the laser. For example, to measure the e-beam at the order of 1 m rms length, a laser with its wavelength of 10 {mu}m may be considered. For a typical few GeV e-beam, the wiggler period has to be large to satisfy the resonance condition. Also, if the e-beam is longer than one laser period, the different modulation periods will overlap and we cannot distinguish them. So this method is so far limited by the achievable long-wavelength laser power. To get an effective modulation on an e-beam of 4.3 GeV, the required laser power is about a few tens GW. In this paper we propose to adopt a high-power Ti:Sapphire laser (wavelength of 800 nm), and use the slope in the intensity envelope to distinguish the different modulation periods. First an ultrashort electron beam interacts with the Ti:Sapphire laser in a wiggler, where the electron energy is modulated at the same periods of the laser. If the laser pulse is long and the short electron bunch is overlapped (in time) with the middle part of the laser, such as the setup at LCLS laser heater, the different energy modulation periods on the electron beam will be overlapped on the energy profile. In this conditionwe typically have a double-horn distribution of the energy

  16. MEASURING CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, J.R.

    1963-01-29

    A measuring and balancing arrangement for mass spectrometers permits the ready determination of isotopic ratios and mole and weight percentages by employing a selection of amplifier input resistors to vary sensitivity in a bridge arrangement. (AEC)

  17. Strabismus Measurements

    MedlinePlus

    ... when the other eye is covered. What are prisms? Prisms are clear, triangular shaped objects that bend ... measurements describe theamount of eye misalignment. What is prism and cover testing? Prism and cover testing is ...

  18. Study of Infra Red femtosecond laser induced aerosols using Transmission Electron Microscopy and Low Pressure Impactor: implications for LA-ICP-MS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Abzac, F.; Seydoux-Guillaume, A.; Poitrasson, F.; Freydier, R.; Datas, L.

    2009-12-01

    Processes linked to the creation of laser induced aerosols are not yet fully understood, especially in the Infra Red femtosecond regime. It is of great interest to understand these mechanisms in order to better constrain chemical fractionation observed on LA-ICP-MS signals. A meticulous study of particles produced by IR-fs laser ablation (λ=800nm, τ=60fs, E=0,1-1mJ/pulse, f=5Hz) has been conducted on a wide variety of samples (phosphate, silicates, oxides, glass and metals), using transmission electron microscopy (Bright field TEM and EDS). Afterwards, observations using TEM coupled with focused ion beam (FIB) preparation have been performed on craters, to study the laser induced redeposition structure and chemistry and bring comparison with related aerosols. Finally, quantitative data have been collected using a low pressure impactor (LPI) device. Observed aerosols always consist in amorphous dark beads (30-150nm diameter) and more or less developed clusters (>100nm) of smaller particles (10-15 nm diameter). Their composition differs from each other and from the initial sample. Counting reveals a decreasing density of particle over 10min of ablation, while size distribution appears Gaussian, monomodal and remains centered on 90-100nm. Craters in monazite (phosphate, Moacir, Itembe, Brazil) show two different domains. Strained areas, induced by very high pressure resulting from matter removal, and, on the top, a thin layer (~250nm in the single shot crater for E=0,1mJ/pulse) probably melted then annealed. Qualitative EDS data from the latter shows the same composition as unshocked sample. Data allows an advanced reconstruction of events driving matter from crater digging through plasma and finally into metastable particles. Numerous theoretical[1] and experimental[2,3] reports, focused on each successive stage, help putting forward the hypothesis of a single complex process of condensation/coalescence. Direct qualitative and quantitative measurements on aerosols

  19. Multipulse interferometric frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    Siders, C.W.; Siders, J.L.W.; Omenetto, F.G.; Taylor, A.J.

    1999-04-01

    The authors review multipulse interferometric frequency-resolved optical gating (MI-FROG) as a technique, uniquely suited for pump-probe coherent spectroscopy using amplified visible and near-infrared short-pulse systems and/or emissive targets, for time-resolving ultrafast phase shifts and intensity changes. Application of polarization-gate MI-FROG to the study of ultrafast ionization in gases is presented.

  20. Pressure Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Pressure Systems, Inc.'s DPT 6400 is a system designed to increase productivity in industrial processes where there is a need for making multiple pressure measurements quickly and with high accuracy. It is applicable in controlling industrial processes in plants that are being upgraded to automated status. In order to automate such plants the pressures at the many loops must be measured, converted to digital information and transmitted to the plant's process control computer. The DPT 6400 serves that function. By employing solid-state pressure sensing transducers whose errors are automatically corrected by a microprocessor, it is capable of highly accurate pressure measurements. Basic DPT 6400 has 64 channels, but the system can be expanded to 256 channels by the addition of "slave" units.

  1. Measuring Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    Teachers assess children's learning to understand how to make their instruction more effective. Early childhood assessment must take into account the typically uneven development of children and their cultural contexts. The author assessed what a group of four-year-olds knew about measurement as she talked about how much water had filled a rain…

  2. Measured Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keating, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Many students think custodians are hired to pick up after them. And sometimes adult workers voice similarly negative impressions. What can education institutions do about this negative and improper thinking? Because of heightened concerns about invisible pathogens such as MRSA and swine flu, improved technologies are available to measure bacteria…

  3. Reflectance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    The productivity of spectroreflectometer equipment and operating personnel and the accuracy and sensitivity of the measurements were investigated. Increased optical sensitivity and better design of the data collection and processing scheme to eliminate some of the unnecessary present operations were conducted. Two promising approaches to increased sensitivity were identified, conventional processing with error compensation and detection of random noise modulation.

  4. Measuring Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Holly; Healey, Kaleen; Sporte, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    Moving teacher evaluation systems from measuring teachers' performance to improving their practice requires much greater attention to communication and support. In the fall of 2012, Chicago Public Schools (CPS) instituted a sweeping reform of its teacher evaluation system with the introduction of REACH Students (Recognizing Educators…

  5. Property Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Van is used by Land Inventory Systems to measure and map property for tax assessment purposes. It is adapted from navigation system of the Lunar Rover wheeled vehicle in which moon-exploring astronauts traveled as much as 20 miles from their Lunar Module base. Astronauts had to know their precise position so that in case of emergency they could take the shortest route back. Computerized navigational system kept a highly accurate record of the directional path providing continuous position report. Distance measuring subsystem was a more accurate counterpart of automobile odometer system counts revolutions of wheels and encoders generate electrical pulses for each fractional revolution and the computer analyzed the pulses to determine the distance traveled in a given direction.

  6. Measuring consensus

    SciTech Connect

    Kurstedt, H.A. Jr.; Brubaker, D.M.; Doss, A.R.; Koelling, C.P.

    1989-10-01

    For this paper, I wanted to compare mathematical techniques against group interaction in generating consensus for a ranking decision. I convened a group to come to consensus on ranking items needed for survival on the moon. I chose this problem because NASA has an approved solution. I solicited the group's individual rankings before and after discussion. I used Kendall's coefficient of concordance to measure the level of consensus before and after discussion and compared the results against individual qualitative responses to a questionnaire designed to also measure consensus. The approved solution allowed me to see if group felt more or less in agreement as they moved closer or farther from the approved solution. As background for this experiment, I researched the existing knowledge on measuring consensus. I make a distinction between consensus and successful consensus, define them, and operationalize them for the purposes of this study. I define different levels of consensus which can be reached regardless of the success of the consensus. In this experiment, I determined the interactive discussion produced consensus, but not successful consensus. The mathematical technique produced a ranking closer to the accepted answer than the group discussion did. 15 refs., 1 tab.

  7. Measurement of \

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.A.; Anderson, C.E.; Bazarko, A.O.; Brice, S.J.; Brown, B.C.; Bugel, L.; Cao, J.; Coney, L.; Conrad, J.M.; Cox, D.C.; Curioni, A.; /Yale U. /Columbia U.

    2009-11-01

    MiniBooNE reports the first absolute cross sections for neutral current single {pi}{sup 0} production on CH{sub 2} induced by neutrino and antineutrino interactions measured from the largest sets of NC {pi}{sup 0} events collected to date. The principal result consists of differential cross sections measured as functions of {pi}{sup 0} momentum and {pi}{sup 0} angle averaged over the neutrino flux at MiniBooNE. We find total cross sections of (4.76 {+-} 0.05{sub stat} {+-} 0.40{sub sys}) x 10{sup -40} cm{sup 2}/nucleon at a mean energy of = 808 MeV and (1.48 {+-} 0.05{sub stat} {+-} 0.14{sub sys}) x 10{sup -40} cm{sup 2}/nucleon at a mean energy of = 664 MeV for {nu}{sub {mu}} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} induced production, respectively. In addition, we have included measurements of the neutrino and antineutrino total cross sections for incoherent exclusive NC 1{pi}{sup 0} production corrected for the effects of final state interactions to compare to prior results.

  8. Measurement of $\

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.A.; Anderson, C.E.; Bazarko, A.O.; Brice, S.J.; Brown, B.C.; Bugel, L.; Cao, J.; Coney, L.; Conrad, J.M.; Cox, D.C.; Curioni, A.; /Yale U. /Columbia U.

    2010-10-01

    MiniBooNE reports the first absolute cross sections for neutral current single {pi}{sup 0} production on CH{sub 2} induced by neutrino and antineutrino interactions measured from the largest sets of NC {pi}{sup 0} events collected to date. The principal result consists of differential cross sections measured as functions of {pi}{sup 0} momentum and {pi}{sup 0} angle averaged over the neutrino flux at MiniBooNE. We find total cross sections of (4.76 {+-} 0.05{sub stat} {+-} 0.76{sub sys}) x 10{sup -40} cm{sup 2}/nucleon at a mean energy of E{sub {nu}} = 808 MeV and (1.48 {+-} 0.05{sub stat} {+-} 0.23{sub sys}) x 10{sup -40} cm{sup 2}/nucleon at a mean energy of E{sub {nu}} = 664 MeV for {nu}{sub {mu}} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} induced production, respectively. In addition, we have included measurements of the neutrino and antineutrino total cross sections for incoherent exclusive NC 1{pi}{sup 0} production corrected for the effects of final state interactions to compare to prior results.

  9. Effect of rotational wave packets on the stimulated emission of nitrogen with light filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arissian, Ladan; Kamer, Brian; Rasoulof, Amin

    2016-06-01

    We measure forward emission of the nitrogen ion excited by light filaments at 800 nm. The radiation strongly depends on light polarization and orbital angular momentum. In all cases the rotational distribution of nitrogen molecules plays an essential role in the 428 nm stimulated emission.

  10. Photo-structuring of As(2)S(3) glass by femtosecond irradiation.

    PubMed

    Juodkazis, Saulius; Kondo, Toshiaki; Misawa, Hiroaki; Rode, Andrei; Samoc, Marek; Luther-Davies, Barry

    2006-08-21

    The nonlinear absorption coefficient of As(2)S(3) glass has been measured to be 2.0 cm/GW for femtosecond pulses at 800 nm. Femtosecond laser structuring via two photon absorption in bulk As(2)S(3) glass by erasable and permanent photo-darkening is demonstrated using both holographic and direct multi-beam laser writing. PMID:19529145

  11. Antioxidant measurements.

    PubMed

    Somogyi, Anikó; Rosta, Klára; Pusztai, Péter; Tulassay, Zsolt; Nagy, Géza

    2007-04-01

    Chemical reactions, including oxidation and reduction of molecules, occur in every cell. These reactions can lead to the production of free radicals. Free radicals react with organic substrates such as lipids, proteins, and DNA. Through oxidation free radicals cause damage to these molecules, disturbing their normal function, and may therefore contribute to a variety of diseases. The anti-oxidation system, which consists of enzymatic antioxidants and non-enzymatic antioxidants, defends against oxidative stress. The aim of this review is to summarize general aspects of methods to measure the antioxidant defence system all in one (total antioxidant capacity) and discuss a number of methods which are currently used for detection of antioxidant properties. PMID:17395989

  12. Development of a Tunable Ultra-Broadband Mid IR Pulsed Source for Nonlinear Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Mark; Reynolds, Anthony; Widgren, Heather; Khalil, Munira

    2012-02-01

    We generate ultra- broadband mid-IR pulses tunable from 2.5 -- 8 μm by focusing 800 nm/400 nm pulses into various gas media. The input 800 nm light is doubled to 400 nm in a type I BBO crystal. The two orthogonally polarized φ/2φ pulses encounter a birefringent calcite crystal for time delay compensation and are subsequently focused in various gas media (air, argon, neon and nitrogen) contained within a 1.2 m gas cell using a 1 m focal length silver mirror. The tunability of the broadband mid-IR pulses arises from different gases, pressure of gases and the amount of incident 800 nm/400 nm light focused into the gas cell at a given pressure. We measure IR energies as high as 0.5 μJ/pulse for an input 800 nm energy of 3 mJ/pulse in 900 Torr of Argon. The mid IR pulses exhibit ˜2% long term stability. The ultrabroadband IR pulses have a spectral bandwidth of ˜2000 cm-1 corresponding to a sub-cycle pulse centered at 4.5 μm. We will present our preliminary efforts on using the ultrabroadband IR pulses in nonlinear experiments. The broad spectral content of this novel source affords the possibility of probing multiple vibrations in a coherent manner.

  13. Measurement of the group-delay dispersion of femtosecond optics using white-light interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imran, Tayyab; Hong, Kyung-Han; Yu, Tae Jun; Nam, Chang Hee

    2004-07-01

    A compact and practical white-light cross-correlator suitable for fast evaluation of femtosecond optics, in terms of group-delay dispersion, was developed. A 40-W tungsten-halogen lamp was used as a white-light source and the detector selection was made so as to have adequate spectral sensitivity from 600 to 1050 nm, peaked at 800 nm. Group-delay dispersion was obtained, with femtosecond time resolution, from the Fourier transform of the cross-correlation interferogram. The dispersion characteristics of a borosilicate glass plate, broadband femtosecond mirrors, broadband chirped mirrors, and output couplers of different reflectivity have been determined in the wavelength range of 650 to 1050 nm.

  14. System of measurement of the transmission spectrum of in-vitro corneas for eye banks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Meneses Bispo, Josemilson; Ventura, Liliane; de Carvalho, Carlos R., Jr.; de Sousa, Sidney J. F.; Chiaradia, Caio

    1998-05-01

    The donated cornea transparency is one of the features to be analyzed previously to its indication for the transplant. Hence we have developed a system to evaluate the transmission spectrum of 'In Vitro' corneas in its preservative medium, in the range of 400 - 700 nm, to be implemented in an Eye Bank. The cornea in its preservative medium is illuminated by collimated white light beams which strike a diffraction grid, passes through an optical system and a selecting filter (400 - 800 nm) and then is detected by a linear CCD detector (2048 photodiodes). The data is displayed in a PC monitor via a commercial interface device. A dedicated software has been developed to plot the transmission spectrum profile and provide an objective and standard information about the transparency of the donated cornea.

  15. Man Is the Measure...the Measurer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Mark H.

    1998-01-01

    The science of metrology has moved from man as the measure to man as the measurer. This transformation is documented with examples from the history of metrology. Outcome measures, which rest on the same history of measurement, are units constructed and maintained for their utility, constancy, and generality. (Author/SLD)

  16. Work Measurement as a Generalized Quantum Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roncaglia, Augusto J.; Cerisola, Federico; Paz, Juan Pablo

    2014-12-01

    We present a new method to measure the work w performed on a driven quantum system and to sample its probability distribution P (w ). The method is based on a simple fact that remained unnoticed until now: Work on a quantum system can be measured by performing a generalized quantum measurement at a single time. Such measurement, which technically speaking is denoted as a positive operator valued measure reduces to an ordinary projective measurement on an enlarged system. This observation not only demystifies work measurement but also suggests a new quantum algorithm to efficiently sample the distribution P (w ). This can be used, in combination with fluctuation theorems, to estimate free energies of quantum states on a quantum computer.

  17. Measuring Test Measurement Error: A General Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Donald; Lankford, Hamilton; Loeb, Susanna; Wyckoff, James

    2013-01-01

    Test-based accountability as well as value-added asessments and much experimental and quasi-experimental research in education rely on achievement tests to measure student skills and knowledge. Yet, we know little regarding fundamental properties of these tests, an important example being the extent of measurement error and its implications for…

  18. Measuring the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molyneux, Robert E.; Williams, Robert V.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the literature that measures characteristics of the Internet. Discusses: conclusions about the Internet measurement literature; definition of the Internet from a technical standpoint; history of Internet measurement; nature of the Internet data environment; Internet technical characteristics; information measurement and the Internet;…

  19. Software measurement guidebook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bassman, Mitchell J.; Mcgarry, Frank; Pajerski, Rose

    1994-01-01

    This software Measurement Guidebook presents information on the purpose and importance of measurement. It discusses the specific procedures and activities of a measurement program and the roles of the people involved. The guidebook also clarifies the roles that measurement can and must play in the goal of continual, sustained improvement for all software production and maintenance efforts.

  20. Can Virtue Be Measured?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curren, Randall; Kotzee, Ben

    2014-01-01

    This article explores some general considerations bearing on the question of whether virtue can be measured. What is moral virtue? What are measurement and evaluation, and what do they presuppose about the nature of what is measured or evaluated? What are the prospective contexts of, and purposes for, measuring or evaluating virtue, and how would…

  1. Metrology measurement capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Shroyer, K.

    1997-02-01

    Since 1958, the AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM and T) Metrology Department has developed measurement technology and calibration capability in four major areas of measurement: (1) mechanical; (2) environmental, gas, liquid; (3) electrical (D.C., A.C., RF/Microwave); and (4) optical and radiation. The capabilities developed include unique capabilities in many areas of measurement and engineering expertise to develop measurement techniques and resolve measurement problems in these major areas. A strong audit function has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the calibration programs of the suppliers and internal calibration organizations. This evaluation includes measurement audits and technical surveys. The requirements placed on metrology require traceability of measurements to the National Institute of Standards and Technology or to nationally recognized methods or natural phenomena. A description of Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each of the measurement capabilities is contained in the report.

  2. Temperature Measurements in the Magnetic Measurement Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary

    2010-12-13

    Several key LCLS undulator parameter values depend strongly on temperature primarily because of the permanent magnet material the undulators are constructed with. The undulators will be tuned to have specific parameter values in the Magnetic Measurement Facility (MMF). Consequently, it is necessary for the temperature of the MMF to remain fairly constant. Requirements on undulator temperature have been established. When in use, the undulator temperature will be in the range 20.0 {+-} 0.2 C. In the MMF, the undulator tuning will be done at 20.0 {+-} 0.1 C. For special studies, the MMF temperature set point can be changed to a value between 18 C and 23 C with stability of {+-}0.1 C. In order to ensure that the MMF temperature requirements are met, the MMF must have a system to measure temperatures. The accuracy of the MMF temperature measurement system must be better than the {+-}0.1 C undulator tuning temperature tolerance, and is taken to be {+-}0.01 C. The temperature measurement system for the MMF is under construction. It is similar to a prototype system we built two years ago in the Sector 10 alignment lab at SLAC. At that time, our goal was to measure the lab temperature to {+-}0.1 C. The system has worked well for two years and has maintained its accuracy. For the MMF system, we propose better sensors and a more extensive calibration program to achieve the factor of 10 increase in accuracy. In this note we describe the measurement system under construction. We motivate our choice of system components and give an overview of the system. Most of the software for the system has been written and will be discussed. We discuss error sources in temperature measurements and show how these errors have been dealt with. The calibration system is described in detail. All the LCLS undulators must be tuned in the Magnetic Measurement Facility at the same temperature to within {+-}0.1 C. In order to ensure this, we are building a system to measure the temperature of the

  3. Precision mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gläser, M.; Borys, M.

    2009-12-01

    Mass as a physical quantity and its measurement are described. After some historical remarks, a short summary of the concept of mass in classical and modern physics is given. Principles and methods of mass measurements, for example as energy measurement or as measurement of weight forces and forces caused by acceleration, are discussed. Precision mass measurement by comparing mass standards using balances is described in detail. Measurement of atomic masses related to 12C is briefly reviewed as well as experiments and recent discussions for a future new definition of the kilogram, the SI unit of mass.

  4. Nonlinear optical behaviors in a silver nanoparticle array at different wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ben-Hai; Zhang, Dong-Ling; Li, Ying-Bin; Tang, Qing-Bin

    2013-01-01

    The optical nonlinearities of an Ag nanoparticle array are investigated by performing Z-scan measurements at the selected wavelengths (400, 600, 650, and 800 nm). The nonlinear refraction index in the resonant region (around 400 nm) exhibits a significant enhancement by two orders compared with that in the off-resonant region (around 800 nm)), and exhibits an sign alternation of the resonant nonlinear absorption, which results in a negligible nonlinear absorption at a certain excitation intensity. Moreover, a low degree of nonlinear absorption was measured at the edges of the resonant region (600 and 650 nm), which is attributed to the competition of the saturated absorption and the two-photon absorption processes.

  5. Metrology measurement capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shroyer, K.

    1995-01-01

    During the past 36 years, the Kansas City Division's (KCD) Metrology Department has developed measurement technology and calibration capability in four major areas of measurement: (1) Mechanical; (2) Environmental, Gas, Liquid; Electrical (D.C., A.C., RF/Microwave); and (3) Optical and Radiation. The capabilities developed include unique capabilities in many areas of measurement and engineering expertise to develop measurement techniques and resolve measurement problems in these major areas. KCD Metrology was established in 1958 to provide a measurement base for the Kansas City Plant. The Metrology Engineering Department provides the expertise to develop measurement capabilities for virtually any type of measurement which falls into the broad areas listed above. The engineering staff currently averages almost 19 years of measurement experience. A strong audit function has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the calibration programs of our suppliers and internal calibration organizations. This evaluation includes measurement audits and technical surveys. The requirements placed on Metrology require traceability of measurements to the National Institute of Standards and Technology or to nationally recognized methods or natural phenomena. A description of Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each of the measurement capabilities is contained in the following pages.

  6. Metrology measurement capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, L.M.

    1997-06-01

    Since 1958, the AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM and T) Metrology Department has developed measurement technology and calibration capability in four major areas of measurement: mechanical; environmental, gas, liquid; electrical (D.C., A.C., RF/microwave); and optical and radiation. The capabilities developed include unique capabilities in many areas of measurement and engineering expertise to develop measurement techniques and resolve measurement problems in these major areas. FM and T Metrology was established in 1958 to provide a measurement base for the Department of energy`s Kansas City Plant. The Metrology Engineering Department provides the expertise to develop measurement capabilities for virtually any type of measurement which falls into the broad areas listed above. The engineering staff currently averages almost 16 years of measurement experience. A strong audit function has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the calibration programs of the suppliers and internal calibration organizations. This evaluation includes measurement audits and technical surveys. The requirements placed on Metrology require traceability of measurements to the National Institute of Standards and Technology or to nationally recognized methods or natural phenomena. A description of Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each of the measurement capabilities is contained in this report.

  7. Metrology measurement capability

    SciTech Connect

    Shroyer, K.

    1995-01-01

    During the past 36 years, the Kansas City Division`s (KCD) Metrology Department has developed measurement technology and calibration capability in four major areas of measurement: (1) Mechanical; (2) Environmental, Gas, Liquid; Electrical (D.C., A.C., RF/Microwave); and (3) Optical and Radiation. The capabilities developed include unique capabilities in many areas of measurement and engineering expertise to develop measurement techniques and resolve measurement problems in these major areas. KCD Metrology was established in 1958 to provide a measurement base for the Kansas City Plant. The Metrology Engineering Department provides the expertise to develop measurement capabilities for virtually any type of measurement which falls into the broad areas listed above. The engineering staff currently averages almost 19 years of measurement experience. A strong audit function has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the calibration programs of our suppliers and internal calibration organizations. This evaluation includes measurement audits and technical surveys. The requirements placed on Metrology require traceability of measurements to the National Institute of Standards and Technology or to nationally recognized methods or natural phenomena. A description of Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each of the measurement capabilities is contained in the following pages.

  8. AEROSOL AND GAS MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements provide fundamental information for evaluating and managing the impact of aerosols on air quality. Specific measurements of aerosol concentration and their physical and chemical properties are required by different users to meet different user-community needs. Befo...

  9. Downhole steam quality measurement

    DOEpatents

    Lee, David O.; Montoya, Paul C.; Muir, James F.; Wayland, Jr., J. Robert

    1987-01-01

    An empirical method for the remote sensing of steam quality that can be easily adapted to downhole steam quality measurements by measuring the electrical properties of two-phase flow across electrode grids at low frequencies.

  10. Force-Measuring Clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A precision clamp that accurately measures force over a wide range of conditions is described. Using a full bridge or other strain gage configuration. the elastic deformation of the clamp is measured or detected by the strain gages. Thc strain gages transmit a signal that corresponds to the degree of stress upon the clamp. Thc strain gage signal is converted to a numeric display. Calibration is achieved by ero and span potentiometers which enable accurate measurements by the force-measuring clamp.

  11. Impedance Measurement Box

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-11-20

    The IMB 50V software provides functionality for design of impedance measurement tests or sequences of tests, execution of these tests or sequences, processing measured responses and displaying and saving of the results. The software consists of a Graphical User Interface that allows configuration of measurement parameters and test sequencing, a core engine that controls test sequencing, execution of measurements, processing and storage of results and a hardware/software data acquisition interface with the IMB hardware system.

  12. Electrolyte measurement device and measurement procedure

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, Kevin R.; Scribner, Louie L.

    2010-01-26

    A method and apparatus for measuring the through-thickness resistance or conductance of a thin electrolyte is provided. The method and apparatus includes positioning a first source electrode on a first side of an electrolyte to be tested, positioning a second source electrode on a second side of the electrolyte, positioning a first sense electrode on the second side of the electrolyte, and positioning a second sense electrode on the first side of the electrolyte. current is then passed between the first and second source electrodes and the voltage between the first and second sense electrodes is measured.

  13. Measuring Rural Hospital Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moscovice, Ira; Wholey, Douglas R.; Klingner, Jill; Knott, Astrid

    2004-01-01

    Increased interest in the measurement of hospital quality has been stimulated by accrediting bodies, purchaser coalitions, government agencies, and other entities. This paper examines quality measurement for hospitals in rural settings. We seek to identify rural hospital quality measures that reflect quality in all hospitals and that are sensitive…

  14. Measurement Practice Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College and Career Readiness and Success Center, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This discussion guide is part of a larger practice guide designed to help state education agencies (SEAs) define measurement goals, select college and career readiness measures and indicators designed to support those goals, and use the data gathered with those measures and indicators to make informed decisions about college and career readiness…

  15. Teaching Measurement with Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bintz, William P.; Moore, Sara D.

    2011-01-01

    Measurement is a difficult concept for many children. Trend data from the National Association of Educational Progress (NAEP) indicate that student achievement with measurement is disappointing, given the amount of instructional time it receives in K-grade 5. In an attempt to address the problem of student achievement with measurement, the authors…

  16. Measurement and Research Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on measurement and research tools for human resource development (HRD). "The 'Best Fit' Training: Measure Employee Learning Style Strengths" (Daniel L. Parry) discusses a study of the physiological aspect of sensory intake known as modality, more specifically, modality as measured by the…

  17. MEaSUREs

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-06-26

    Description:  MEaSUREs ( Making Earth Science Data Records for Use in Research ... services driven by NASA’s Earth Science goals. Through the MEaSUREs Program, NASA is continuing its commitment to expand understanding the ... using consistent records. Details:  MEaSUREs Screenshot:  Category:  FTP and ...

  18. The Measurement of Meaning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osgood, Charles E.; And Others

    The problem of measuring meaning viewed strictly as a psychological conception via the application of semantic differential theory is presented in this study. The first half of the book discusses theoretical background, logic of semantic measurement, basic factor analysis research, and a critical scientific evaluation of measuring procedures. The…

  19. Reconsidering Formative Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Roy D.; Breivik, Einar; Wilcox, James B.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between observable responses and the latent constructs they are purported to measure has received considerable attention recently, with particular focus on what has become known as formative measurement. This alternative to reflective measurement in the area of theory-testing research is examined in the context of the potential…

  20. Coordinate measuring system

    DOEpatents

    Carlisle, Keith

    2003-04-08

    An apparatus and method is utilized to measure relative rigid body motion between two bodies by measuring linear motion in the principal axis and linear motion in an orthogonal axis. From such measurements it is possible to obtain displacement, departure from straightness, and angular displacement from the principal axis of a rigid body.

  1. Standards for holdup measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Zucker, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    Holdup measurement, needed for material balance, depend intensively on standards and on interpretation of the calibration procedure. More than other measurements, the calibration procedure using the standard becomes part of the standard. Standards practical for field use and calibration techniques have been developed. While accuracy in holdup measurements is comparatively poor, avoidance of bias is a necessary goal.

  2. Platinum nanostructures formed by femtosecond laser irradiation in water

    SciTech Connect

    Huo Haibin; Shen Mengyan

    2012-11-15

    Platinum nanostructures with various morphologies, such as spike-like, ripple-like and array-like structures, have been fabricated by 400 nm and 800 nm femtosecond laser irradiation in water. Different structures can be formed on the surfaces as a function of the laser wavelength, the fluence and scan methods. The reflectance measurements of these structures show much larger absorption on the irradiated surfaces than untreated platinum surfaces.

  3. Ultra low emittance electron beams from multi-alkali antimonide photocathode operated with infrared light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cultrera, L.; Gulliford, C.; Bartnik, A.; Lee, H.; Bazarov, I.

    2016-03-01

    The intrinsic emittance of electron beams generated from a multi-alkali photocathode operated in a high voltage DC gun is reported. The photocathode showed sensitivity extending to the infrared part of the spectrum up to 830 nm. The measured intrinsic emittances of electron beams generated with light having wavelength longer than 800 nm are approaching the limit imposed by the thermal energy of electrons at room temperature with quantum efficiencies comparable to metallic photocathodes used in operation of modern photoinjectors.

  4. Precision electroweak measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, M.

    1996-11-01

    Recent electroweak precision measurements fro {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup -} and {ital p{anti p}} colliders are presented. Some emphasis is placed on the recent developments in the heavy flavor sector. The measurements are compared to predictions from the Standard Model of electroweak interactions. All results are found to be consistent with the Standard Model. The indirect constraint on the top quark mass from all measurements is in excellent agreement with the direct {ital m{sub t}} measurements. Using the world`s electroweak data in conjunction with the current measurement of the top quark mass, the constraints on the Higgs` mass are discussed.

  5. Measuring Seebeck Coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A high temperature Seebeck coefficient measurement apparatus and method with various features to minimize typical sources of errors is described. Common sources of temperature and voltage measurement errors which may impact accurate measurement are identified and reduced. Applying the identified principles, a high temperature Seebeck measurement apparatus and method employing a uniaxial, four-point geometry is described to operate from room temperature up to 1300K. These techniques for non-destructive Seebeck coefficient measurements are simple to operate, and are suitable for bulk samples with a broad range of physical types and shapes.

  6. Measurement Uncertainty and Probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willink, Robin

    2013-02-01

    Part I. Principles: 1. Introduction; 2. Foundational ideas in measurement; 3. Components of error or uncertainty; 4. Foundational ideas in probability and statistics; 5. The randomization of systematic errors; 6. Beyond the standard confidence interval; Part II. Evaluation of Uncertainty: 7. Final preparation; 8. Evaluation using the linear approximation; 9. Evaluation without the linear approximations; 10. Uncertainty information fit for purpose; Part III. Related Topics: 11. Measurement of vectors and functions; 12. Why take part in a measurement comparison?; 13. Other philosophies; 14. An assessment of objective Bayesian methods; 15. A guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement; 16. Measurement near a limit - an insoluble problem?; References; Index.

  7. Current measurement apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Umans, Stephen D.

    2008-11-11

    Apparatus and methods are provided for a system for measurement of a current in a conductor such that the conductor current may be momentarily directed to a current measurement element in order to maintain proper current without significantly increasing an amount of power dissipation attributable to the current measurement element or adding resistance to assist in current measurement. The apparatus and methods described herein are useful in superconducting circuits where it is necessary to monitor current carried by the superconducting elements while minimizing the effects of power dissipation attributable to the current measurement element.

  8. Portable emittance measurement device

    SciTech Connect

    Liakin, D.; Seleznev, D.; Orlov, A.; Kuibeda, R.; Kropachev, G.; Kulevoy, T.; Yakushin, P.

    2010-02-15

    In Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP) the portable emittance measurements device is developed. It provides emittance measurements both with ''pepper-pot'' and ''two slits'' methods. Depending on the method of measurements, either slits or pepper-pot mask with scintillator are mounted on the two activators and are installed in two standard Balzer's cross chamber with CF-100 flanges. To match the angle resolution for measured beam, the length of the stainless steel pipe between two crosses changes is adjusted. The description of the device and results of emittance measurements at the ITEP ion source test bench are presented.

  9. Consistent quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Robert B.

    2015-11-01

    In response to recent criticisms by Okon and Sudarsky, various aspects of the consistent histories (CH) resolution of the quantum measurement problem(s) are discussed using a simple Stern-Gerlach device, and compared with the alternative approaches to the measurement problem provided by spontaneous localization (GRW), Bohmian mechanics, many worlds, and standard (textbook) quantum mechanics. Among these CH is unique in solving the second measurement problem: inferring from the measurement outcome a property of the measured system at a time before the measurement took place, as is done routinely by experimental physicists. The main respect in which CH differs from other quantum interpretations is in allowing multiple stochastic descriptions of a given measurement situation, from which one (or more) can be selected on the basis of its utility. This requires abandoning a principle (termed unicity), central to classical physics, that at any instant of time there is only a single correct description of the world.

  10. Software Measurement Guidebook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This Software Measurement Guidebook is based on the extensive experience of several organizations that have each developed and applied significant measurement programs over a period of at least 10 years. The lessons derived from those experiences reflect not only successes but also failures. By applying those lessons, an organization can minimize, or at least reduce, the time, effort, and frustration of introducing a software measurement program. The Software Measurement Guidebook is aimed at helping organizations to begin or improve a measurement program. It does not provide guidance for the extensive application of specific measures (such as how to estimate software cost or analyze software complexity) other than by providing examples to clarify points. It does contain advice for establishing and using an effective software measurement program and for understanding some of the key lessons that other organizations have learned. Some of that advice will appear counterintuitive, but it is all based on actual experience. Although all of the information presented in this guidebook is derived from specific experiences of mature measurement programs, the reader must keep in mind that the characteristics of every organization are unique. Some degree of measurement is critical for all software development and maintenance organizations, and most of the key rules captured in this report will be generally applicable. Nevertheless, each organization must strive to understand its own environment so that the measurement program can be tailored to suit its characteristics and needs.

  11. Process measurement assurance program

    SciTech Connect

    Pettit, R.B.

    1996-05-01

    This paper describes a new method for determining, improving, and controlling the measurement process errors (or measurement uncertainty) of a measurement system used to monitor product as it is manufactured. The method is called the Process Measurement Assurance Program (PMAP). It integrates metrology early into the product realization process and is a step beyond statistical process control (SPC), which monitors only the product. In this method, a control standard is used to continuously monitor the status of the measurement system. Analysis of the control standard data allow the determination of the measurement error inherent in the product data and allow one to separate the variability in the manufacturing process from variability in the measurement process. These errors can be then associated with either the measurement equipment, variability of the measurement process, operator bias, or local environmental effects. Another goal of PMAP is to determine appropriate re-calibration intervals for the measurement system, which may be significantly longer or shorter than the interval typically assigned by the calibration organization.

  12. Ultrafast optical nonlinearity and photoacoustic studies on chitosan-boron nitride nanotube composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuthirummal, Narayanan; Philip, Reji; Mohan, Athira; Jenks, Cassidy; Levi-Polyachenko, Nicole

    2016-07-01

    Ultrafast optical nonlinearity in chitosan (CS) films doped with multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes (MWBN) has been investigated using 800 nm, 100 fs laser pulses, employing the open aperture Z-scan technique. Two-photon absorption coefficients (β) of CS-MWBN films have been measured at 800 nm by Z-scan. While chitosan with 0.01% MWBN doping gives a β value of 0.28×10-13 m/W, 1% doping results in a higher β value of 1.43×10-13 m/W, showing nonlinearity enhancement by a factor of 5. These nonlinearity coefficients are comparable to those reported for silver nanoclusters in glass matrix and Pt-PVA nanocomposites, indicating potential photonic applications for MWBN doped chitosan films. Characterization of the synthesized films using Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy (FTIR-PAS) reveals significant interactions between the NH and CO groups of chitosan with boron nitride.

  13. Effect of curvature on the structural and magnetic properties of Ni film deposited on self-assembled nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A.; Tripathi, S.; Gupta, Dileep; Halder, N.; Tripathi, J.

    2016-05-01

    Important experimental findings and their impact on physical properties of Ni thin film are presented with the focus on structural and magnetic property investigations. For this purpose, Ni film (40 nm) was deposited on polystyrene nanospheres (PS, diameter 800 nm) using electron beam evaporation technique simultaneously with a similar reference film on plane Si substrate. The structural properties of the films measured using XRD technique show nanocrystalline growth of Ni on both size PS spheres with an average grain size of ˜ 78 nm, while high crystallinity was observed in the film deposited onto plane Si substrate. A lower coercivity (9 mT) was observed in the Ni/(800 nm) PS as compared to the film deposited on 530 nm PS (23 mT) (our earlier study) and Ni/Si (20 mT). The observed changes in structural and magnetic properties are attributed to the curvature induced modifications at atomic level.

  14. Multi-target photoacoustic molecular imaging of cardiovascular inflammatory biomarkers using bioconjugated gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, S.; Tripathy, S.; Carson, A.; Lavery, L. L.; Zhang, H.; Agarwal, A.; Kotov, N.; Villanueva, F. S.; Kim, K.

    2011-03-01

    Multiple cardiovascular inflammatory biomarkers were simultaneously imaged in vivo using antibody conjugated gold nanorods (GNRs) injected into a mouse model of vascular injury stimulated by a photochemical reaction of Rose Bengal dye to green light. Mixed solutions of ICAM-1 antibody conjugated GNRs (715 nm) and E-selectin antibody conjugated GNRs (800 nm) were injected to bind to their respective inflammatory markers on the luminal surface of the inferior vena cava of a mouse. Photoacoustic intensity was measured by a commercial ultrasound probe synchronized to a pulsed laser (10-18 mJ/cm2) at 715 nm or 800 nm clearly identified the upregulation of targeted biomarkers. Histopathology on the harvested tissues confirmed inflammation. The feasibility of simultaneous photoacoustic molecular imaging of inflammation responses in cardiovascular system using a commercial ultrasound system has been demonstrated in vivo.

  15. Comparison of optical resistance of ion assisted deposition and standard electron beam deposition methods for high reflectance dielectric coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melninkaitis, A.; Maciulevicius, M.; Rakickas, T.; Miksys, D.; Grigonis, R.; Sirutkaitis, V.; Skrebutenas, A.; Buzelis, R.; Drazdys, R.; Abromavicius, G.

    2005-09-01

    The ion assisted thin film deposition (IAD) method has been used extensively for more than two decades, but questions about possibility of improving of the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) by this method compared with the conventional electron-beam evaporation (non-IAD) method are still not fully answered. A more complete understanding of different factors that can influence laser-induced damage threshold is necessary for continued development of multilayer dielectric coatings optimized for high-power laser applications. To clarify these factors we performed comparison of LIDT for IAD and non-IAD coatings in nanosecond and femtosecond pulse ranges. High reflectance mirrors at 800 nm and 532 nm were tested. Mirror coatings were made of ZrO2 and SiO2. Automated LIDT measurements were performed according to the requirements of current ISO 11254-2 standard. Two lasers were used for the measurements: Nd:YAG (λ = 532 nm, τ = 5 ns) and Ti:Sapphire (λ = 800 nm, τ = 130 fs). Measurements at 800 nm and 532 nm were performed at 1-kHz and 10 Hz pulse repetition rate respectively (S-on-1 test). The damage morphology of coatings was characterized by Nomarski microscopy and relation of LIDT with coating parameters was analyzed.

  16. Effect of deposition method and substrate surface quality on laser-induced damage threshold for repetitive 13-ns and 130-fs pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melninkaitis, Andrius; Rakickas, Tomas; Miksys, Darius; Grigonis, Rimantas; Sirutkaitis, Valdas; Skrebutenas, Alfridas; Buzelis, Rytis; Drazdys, Ramutis; Abromavicius, Giedrius; Juskenas, Remigijus; Selskis, Algirdas

    2005-02-01

    A comparison of laser induced damage thresholds (LIDT) of ion assisted deposition (IAD) and standard electron beam deposition dielectric coatings on BK7 glass with different surface roughness was performed. Five types of high reflectance mirrors at 800 nm and two types of high reflectance mirrors at 1064 nm were tested. Mirror coatings were made of ZrO2 and SiO2. Automated LIDT measurements were performed according to the requirements of current ISO 11254-2 standard. Two lasers were used for the measurements: Nd:YAG (l = 1064 nm, t = 13 ns) and Ti:Sapphire (l = 800 nm, t = 130 fs ). All measurements were performed at 1-kHz pulse repetition rate (S-on-1 test). A fixed spot size was used for each laser. For 1064 nm it was ~ 70 um and for 800 nm ~ 500 um. The damage morphology and structure of coatings were characterized by an atomic force microscopy (AFM), Nomarski microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD).

  17. Evaluation of accountability measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Cacic, C.G.

    1988-01-01

    The New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) is programmatically responsible to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Safeguards and Security (OSS) for providing independent review and evaluation of accountability measurement technology in DOE nuclear facilities. This function is addressed in part through the NBL Safegaurds Measurement Evaluation (SME) Program. The SME Program utilizes both on-site review of measurement methods along with material-specific measurement evaluation studies to provide information concerning the adequacy of subject accountability measurements. This paper reviews SME Program activities for the 1986-87 time period, with emphasis on noted improvements in measurement capabilities. Continued evolution of the SME Program to respond to changing safeguards concerns is discussed.

  18. Multivariate Hypergeometric Similarity Measure

    PubMed Central

    Kaddi, Chanchala D.; Parry, R. Mitchell; Wang, May D.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a similarity measure based on the multivariate hypergeometric distribution for the pairwise comparison of images and data vectors. The formulation and performance of the proposed measure are compared with other similarity measures using synthetic data. A method of piecewise approximation is also implemented to facilitate application of the proposed measure to large samples. Example applications of the proposed similarity measure are presented using mass spectrometry imaging data and gene expression microarray data. Results from synthetic and biological data indicate that the proposed measure is capable of providing meaningful discrimination between samples, and that it can be a useful tool for identifying potentially related samples in large-scale biological data sets. PMID:24407308

  19. Geodetic distance measuring apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A mode locked laser system including a laser device and its peripheral components is utilized for deriving two mutually phase locked optical wavelength signals and one phase locked microwave CW signal which respectively traverse the same distance measurement path. Preferably the optical signals are comprised of pulse type signals. Phase comparison of the two optical wavelength pulse signals is used to provide a measure of the dry air density while phase comparison of one of the optical wavelength pulse signals and the microwave CW signal is used to provide a measure of the wet or water vapor density of the air. From these measurements is computed in means of the distance to be measured corrected for the atmospheric dry and water vapor densities in the measurement path.

  20. The necessity of measurement.

    PubMed

    Dudden, Rosalind Farnam

    2008-01-01

    Measurement of library systems and services is a multidimensional management task. New paradigms of library service and the context in which libraries operate have made it necessary for librarians to find new measures while at the same time keeping the old. Factors that can be measured, such as needs, inputs, quality processes, outputs, quality of service, outcomes, and impacts, are described. This bibliographic essay covers the current trends while leading readers to resources where they can learn more. PMID:19042712

  1. Orbital debris measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    What is currently known about the orbital debris flux is from a combination of ground based and in-space measurements. These measurements have revealed an increasing population with decreasing size. A summary of measurements is presented for the following sources: the North American Aerospace Defense Command Catalog, the Perimeter Acquisition and Attack Characterization System Radar, ground based optical telescopes, the Explorer 46 Meteoroid Bumper Experiment, spacecraft windows, and Solar Max surfaces.

  2. Current measuring system

    DOEpatents

    Dahl, David A.; Appelhans, Anthony D.; Olson, John E.

    1997-01-01

    A current measuring system comprising a current measuring device having a first electrode at ground potential, and a second electrode; a current source having an offset potential of at least three hundred volts, the current source having an output electrode; and a capacitor having a first electrode electrically connected to the output electrode of the current source and having a second electrode electrically connected to the second electrode of the current measuring device.

  3. Current measuring system

    DOEpatents

    Dahl, D.A.; Appelhans, A.D.; Olson, J.E.

    1997-09-09

    A current measuring system is disclosed comprising a current measuring device having a first electrode at ground potential, and a second electrode; a current source having an offset potential of at least three hundred volts, the current source having an output electrode; and a capacitor having a first electrode electrically connected to the output electrode of the current source and having a second electrode electrically connected to the second electrode of the current measuring device. 4 figs.

  4. Space Acceleration Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This training video, presented by the Lewis Research Center's Space Experiments Division, gives a background and detailed instructions for preparing the space acceleration measurement system (SAMS) for use. The SAMS measures, conditions, and records forces of low gravity accelerations, and is used to determine the effect of these forces on various experiments performed in microgravity. Inertial sensors are used to measure positive and negative acceleration over a specified frequency range. The video documents the SAMS' uses in different configurations during shuttle missions.

  5. Vega balloon meteorological measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, D.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Hildebrand, C. E.; Preston, R. A.

    1990-01-01

    The Vega balloons obtained in situ measurements of pressure, temperature, vertical winds, cloud density, ambient illumination, and the frequency of lightning during their flights in the Venus middle cloud layer. The Vega measurements were used to develop a comprehensive description of the meteorology of the Venus middle cloud layer. The Vega measurements provide the following picture: large horizontal temperature gradients near the equator, vigorous convection, and weather conditions that can change dramatically on time scales as short as one hour.

  6. "Measurement" of Tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Henry, James A

    2016-09-01

    Chronic tinnitus is the persistent sensation of hearing a sound that exists only inside the head. The prevalence of tinnitus in adults in the United States is estimated at 10 to 15%. For about 20% of these individuals the tinnitus is significantly bothersome. Although myriad therapies for tinnitus are offered (often at significant cost), most are not evidence based. Difficulty in the assessment and further development of interventions for tinnitus stems from the limitations of techniques used to evaluate these interventions. Questionnaires are widely available to "measure" (tinnitus can only be indirectly measured) functional effects of tinnitus, such as difficulty sleeping and concentrating, and negative emotions such as anxiety, depression, and annoyance. Questionnaires have recently been documented for sensitivity to change in response to intervention (i.e., "responsiveness"). All of these questionnaires function well to assess the overall impact of tinnitus. The limitations mentioned pertain primarily to measures of tinnitus perception, which typically include the psychoacoustic measures of tinnitus loudness and pitch matches, tinnitus spectral content, minimum masking levels, and residual inhibition. These measures, which are obtained routinely in many clinics and as part of research studies, have not been validated for being diagnostic, prognostic, discriminative, or responsive. In order for these measures to become clinically meaningful, normative standards are needed, both for baseline measures and for repeated measures of tinnitus perception. Evidence-based intervention for tinnitus requires accurately measuring both the perception of, and reactions to, tinnitus. PMID:27518136

  7. Remote Raman measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, D. A.

    1981-02-01

    The use of laser Raman measurement techniques in remote sensing applications is surveyed. A feasibility index is defined as a means to characterize the practicality of a given remote Raman measurement application. Specific applications of Raman scattering to the measurement of atmospheric water vapor profiles, methane plumes from liquid natural gas spills, and subsurface ocean temperature profiles are described. This paper will survey the use of laser Raman measurement techniques in remote sensing applications using as examples specific systems that the Computer Genetics Corporation (CGC) group has developed and engineered.

  8. Remote Raman measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The use of laser Raman measurement techniques in remote sensing applications is surveyed. A feasibility index is defined as a means to characterize the practicality of a given remote Raman measurement application. Specific applications of Raman scattering to the measurement of atmospheric water vapor profiles, methane plumes from liquid natural gas spills, and subsurface ocean temperature profiles are described. This paper will survey the use of laser Raman measurement techniques in remote sensing applications using as examples specific systems that the Computer Genetics Corporation (CGC) group has developed and engineered.

  9. Remote Raman Measurement Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Donald A.

    1981-02-01

    The use of laser Raman measurement techniques in remote sensing applications is surveyed. A feasibility index is defined as a means to characterize the practicality of a given remote Raman measurement application. Specific applications of Raman scattering to the measurement of atmospheric water vapor profiles, methane plumes from liquid natural gas spills, and subsurface ocean temperature profiles are described. This paper will survey the use of laser Raman measurement techniques in remote sensing applications using as examples specific systems that the Computer Genetics Corporation (CGC) group has developed and engineered.

  10. Parallelized multichannel BSDF measurements.

    PubMed

    von Finck, A; Trost, M; Schröder, S; Duparré, A

    2015-12-28

    The intensity of scattered light is extremely sensitive to even small changes of illumination wavelength, incident angle, polarization states, or even the measurement position. To obtain light scattering distributions with varied parameters, time-consuming sequential measurement procedures are typically employed. Here, we propose a concept for the measurement of multiple properties at the same time. This is achieved by tailoring orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) for light scattering measurement techniques to the required low inter-channel crosstalk performance. The concept is used for a highly-robust roughness and contamination characterization, to derive one-shot roughness information, as well as to characterize color and appearance. PMID:26832014

  11. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOEpatents

    Suchoza, B.P.; Becse, I.

    1988-11-08

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices. 1 fig.

  12. The attribute measurement technique

    SciTech Connect

    Macarthur, Duncan W; Langner, Diana; Smith, Morag; Thron, Jonathan; Razinkov, Sergey; Livke, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Any verification measurement performed on potentially classified nuclear material must satisfy two seemingly contradictory constraints. First and foremost, no classified information can be released. At the same time, the monitoring party must have confidence in the veracity of the measurement. An information barrier (IB) is included in the measurement system to protect the potentially classified information while allowing sufficient information transfer to occur for the monitoring party to gain confidence that the material being measured is consistent with the host's declarations, concerning that material. The attribute measurement technique incorporates an IB and addresses both concerns by measuring several attributes of the nuclear material and displaying unclassified results through green (indicating that the material does possess the specified attribute) and red (indicating that the material does not possess the specified attribute) lights. The attribute measurement technique has been implemented in the AVNG, an attribute measuring system described in other presentations at this conference. In this presentation, we will discuss four techniques used in the AVNG: (1) the 1B, (2) the attribute measurement technique, (3) the use of open and secure modes to increase confidence in the displayed results, and (4) the joint design as a method for addressing both host and monitor needs.

  13. Phonological Distance Measures

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Nathan C; Chin, Steven B

    2010-01-01

    Phonological distance can be measured computationally using formally specified algorithms. This work investigates two such measures, one developed by Nerbonne and Heeringa (1997) based on Levenshtein distance (Levenshtein, 1965) and the other an adaptation of Dunning’s (1994) language classifier that uses maximum likelihood distance. These two measures are compared against naïve transcriptions of the speech of pediatric cochlear implant users. The new measure, maximum likelihood distance, correlates highly with Levenshtein distance and naïve transcriptions; results from this corpus are easier to obtain since cochlear implant speech has a lower intelligibility than the usually high intelligibility of the speech of a different dialect. PMID:20407614

  14. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOEpatents

    Suchoza, Bernard P.; Becse, Imre

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices.

  15. Global Precipitation Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.; Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Kummerow, Christian D.; Shepherd, James Marshall

    2008-01-01

    This chapter begins with a brief history and background of microwave precipitation sensors, with a discussion of the sensitivity of both passive and active instruments, to trace the evolution of satellite-based rainfall techniques from an era of inference to an era of physical measurement. Next, the highly successful Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission will be described, followed by the goals and plans for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission and the status of precipitation retrieval algorithm development. The chapter concludes with a summary of the need for space-based precipitation measurement, current technological capabilities, near-term algorithm advancements and anticipated new sciences and societal benefits in the GPM era.

  16. Why Measure Outcomes?

    PubMed

    Kuhn, John E

    2016-01-01

    The concept of measuring the outcomes of treatment in health care was promoted by Ernest Amory Codman in the early 1900s, but, until recently, his ideas were generally ignored. The forces that have advanced outcome measurement to the forefront of health care include the shift in payers for health care from the patient to large insurance companies or government agencies, the movement toward assessing the care of populations not individuals, and the effort to find value (or cost-effective treatments) amid rising healthcare costs. No ideal method exists to measure outcomes, and the information gathered depends on the reason the outcome information is required. Outcome measures used in research are best able to answer research questions. The methods for assessing physician and hospital performance include process measures, patient-experience measures, structure measures, and measures used to assess the outcomes of treatment. The methods used to assess performance should be validated, be reliable, and reflect a patient's perception of the treatment results. The healthcare industry must measure outcomes to identify which treatments are most effective and provide the most benefit to patients. PMID:27049223

  17. Qualitative interviewing as measurement.

    PubMed

    Paley, John

    2010-04-01

    The attribution of beliefs and other propositional attitudes is best understood as a form of measurement, however counter-intuitive this may seem. Measurement theory does not require that the thing measured should be a magnitude, or that the calibration of the measuring instrument should be numerical. It only requires a homomorphism between the represented domain and the representing domain. On this basis, maps measure parts of the world, usually geographical locations, and 'belief' statements measure other parts of the world, namely people's aptitudes. Having outlined an argument for this view, I deal with an obvious objection to it: that self-attribution of belief cannot be an exercise in measurement, because we are all aware, from introspection, that our beliefs have an intrinsically semantic form. Subsequently, I turn to the philosophical and methodological ramifications of the measurement theoretic view. I argue, first, that it undermines at least one version of constructivism and, second, that it provides an effective alternative to the residually Cartesian philosophy that underpins much qualitative research. Like other anti-Cartesian strategies, belief-attribution-as-measurement implies that the objective world is far more knowable than the subjective one, and that reality is ontologically prior to meaning. I regard this result as both plausible and welcome. PMID:20415963

  18. Systemic risk measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Solange Maria; Silva, Thiago Christiano; Tabak, Benjamin Miranda; de Souza Penaloza, Rodrigo Andrés; de Castro Miranda, Rodrigo César

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present systemic risk measures based on contingent claims approach and banking sector multivariate density. We also apply network measures to analyze bank common risk exposure. The proposed measures aim to capture credit risk stress and its potential to become systemic. These indicators capture not only individual bank vulnerability, but also the stress dependency structure between them. Furthermore, these measures can be quite useful for identifying systemically important banks. The empirical results show that these indicators capture with considerable fidelity the moments of increasing systemic risk in the Brazilian banking sector in recent years.

  19. Precision signal power measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkelstein, R.

    1972-01-01

    Accurate estimation of signal power is an important Deep Space Network (DSN) consideration. Ultimately, spacecraft power and weight is saved if no reserve transmitter power is needed to compensate for inaccurate measurements. Spectral measurement of the received signal has proved to be an effective method of estimating signal power over a wide dynamic range. Furthermore, on-line spectral measurements provide an important diagnostic tool for examining spacecraft anomalies. Prototype equipment installed at a 64-m-diameter antenna site has been successfully used to make measurements of carrier power and sideband symmetry of telemetry signals received from the Mariner Mars 1971 spacecraft.

  20. Photothermal measurements of superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kino, G.S.; Studenmund, W.R.; Fishman, I.M.

    1996-12-31

    A photothermal technique has been used to measure diffusion and critical temperature in high temperature superconductors. The technique is particularly suitable for determining material quality and inhomogeneity.

  1. Optical Fibre Current Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, A. J.

    1983-08-01

    Passive optical devices offer valuable technical and economic advantages for power-system current and voltage measurement. Such devices can also be used to measure a variety of other power-system parameters (e.g. temperature, pressure, strain, etc.). The main advantages of all such devices may be summarized as follows: (i) No powering is required at high voltage points. (ii) There is freedom from saturation effects. (iii) They have large measurement bandwith. (iv) The measurement sensitivity is high. (v) The costs are low and are not strongly dependent on system voltages. (vi) They are readily interfaced with interference-immune communications links.

  2. Measuring deformations with deflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wansong; Huke, Philipp; Burke, Jan; von Kopylow, Christoph; Bergmann, Ralf B.

    2014-07-01

    Phase-measuring deflectometry is a powerful method to measure reflective surfaces. It is relatively easy to extract slope and curvature information from the measured phase maps; however, retrieving shape information depends very sensitively on the calibration of the camera and the geometry of the measurement system. Whereas we have previously demonstrated shape uncertainties below 1 μm, the range below 100 nm is currently inaccessible to deflectometric shape measurement. On the other hand, the astounding sensitivity of deflectometry can be put to good use for deformation measurements. The evaluation of corresponding shape differences rather than absolute shapes is much less susceptible to system calibration errors and its resolution is given mostly by the measurement system's sensitivity. We give an overview of recent progress in difference deflectometry. Firstly we show results from solar mirror substrates under load to detect flaws with high sensitivity. Secondly we present a preliminary simulation study of achievable deformation-measurement uncertainties to assess the feasibility of deflectometric characterisation of actuator performance and gravity sag for the mirror segments of the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). Results for the relevant Zernike terms show reliable detection of Zernike coefficients at the 25 nm level. Random artefacts related to noise in the phase measurements are seen to translate into bogus Zernike terms, and we discuss possible mitigation techniques to enhance the sensitivity and accuracy further.

  3. Viscosity measuring using microcantilevers

    DOEpatents

    Oden, Patrick Ian

    2001-01-01

    A method for the measurement of the viscosity of a fluid uses a micromachined cantilever mounted on a moveable base. As the base is rastered while in contact with the fluid, the deflection of the cantilever is measured and the viscosity determined by comparison with standards.

  4. Basic Measures of Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calkins, Julia; Ling, Thomson; Moore, Eric; Halle, Tamara; Hair, Beth; Moore, Kris; Zaslow, Marty

    This document provides a compilation of measures of progress toward school readiness and three contributing conditions as used in several local, state, and national surveys. The report begins with a legend listing the surveys examined, their acronyms, and contact information. The remainder of the report, in tabular format, lists measures of…

  5. Comparing Measurement Theories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumacker, Randall E.

    In comparing measurement theories, it is evident that the awareness of the concept of measurement error during the time of Galileo has lead to the formulation of observed scores comprising a true score and error (classical theory), universe score and various random error components (generalizability theory), or individual latent ability and error…

  6. Human performance measuring device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J.; Scow, J.

    1970-01-01

    Complex coordinator, consisting of operator control console, recorder, subject display panel, and limb controls, measures human performance by testing perceptual and motor skills. Device measures psychophysiological functions in drug and environmental studies, and is applicable to early detection of psychophysiological body changes.

  7. Measuring software design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    An extensive series of studies of software design measures conducted by the Software Engineering Laboratory is described. Included are the objectives and results of the studies, the method used to perform the studies, and the problems encountered. The document should be useful to researchers planning similar studies as well as to managers and designers concerned with applying quantitative design measures.

  8. Measuring Authoritative Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ertesvag, Sigrun K.

    2011-01-01

    High quality measurements are important to evaluate interventions. The study reports on the development of a measurement to investigate authoritative teaching understood as a two-dimensional construct of warmth and control. Through the application of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and structural equation modelling (SEM) the factor structure…

  9. Undulator Field Integral Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary

    2010-12-07

    The LCLS undulator field integrals must be very small so that the beam trajectory slope and offset stay within tolerance. In order to make accurate measurements of the small field integrals, a long coil will be used. This note describes the design of the coil measurement system.

  10. Exploring Linear Measure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Philip L.

    This material is an instructional unit on measuring and estimating. A variety of activities are used with manipulative devices, worksheets, and discussion questions included. Major topics are estimating lengths, accuracy of measurement, metric system, scale drawings, and conversion between different units. A teacher's guide is also available.…

  11. Lavosier Measures with Polymers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goates, Wayne

    2000-01-01

    Presents a creative, hands-on activity for teaching measurement skills inspired by Antoine Laurent Lavosier and a product called polyacrylamide spikes for students to develop their metric measurement skills and boost their math proficiency as they interpret data and results from their investigations. (ASK)

  12. Managing Multiple Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePascale, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    Regardless of how one might feel about the recent developments in teacher evaluation systems, No Child Left Behind (NCLB) and adequate yearly progress (AYP), or student assessments for high-stakes promotion decisions, educators overwhelmingly agree that use of multiple measures is better than reliance on a single measure such as a large-scale,…

  13. Global Precipitation Measurement Poster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azarbarzin, Art

    2010-01-01

    This poster presents an overview of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) constellation of satellites which are designed to measure the Earth's precipitation. It includes the schedule of launches for the various satellites in the constellation, and the coverage of the constellation, It also reviews the mission capabilities, and the mission science objectives.

  14. Measures of Biochemical Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snell, Joel; Marsh, Mitchell

    2008-01-01

    In a previous article, the authors introduced a new sub field in sociology that we labeled "biochemical sociology." We introduced the definition of a sociology that encompasses sociological measures, psychological measures, and biological indicators Snell & Marsh (2003). In this article, we want to demonstrate a research strategy that would assess…

  15. Measurement of cylindrical parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Paul Douglas, Jr.

    The form of cylindrical parts has been traditionally evaluated using stylus-based mechanical instruments. The Tropel Corporation has developed a grazing incidence interferometer (GII) for the measurement of cylindrical parts. The repeatability of this instrument due to various instrument uncertainties was measured. Differing instrument configurations that produce the same systematic error were determined to produce a zonal calibration method for determining systematic error over the full range of the instrument, given knowledge of the error in a single zone. The effect of the aperture stop on the response of the imaging system to axially sinusoidal artifacts was simulated. Diamond-turned axially sinusoidal artifacts, with amplitude of order1 um and spatial wavelength of order10 mm, were measured to test the axial response of the interferometer. The modulation transfer function of the instrument's imaging system, measured using a knife edge test, predicts the response observed with the sinusoidal artifacts. A diffraction analysis predicts that the measured axial form is modified by a second order envelope function with phase that varies with the relative position of the imaging system focal plane and part position. A compensation method is proposed for this effect. A comparison of roundness measurements by both a traditional stylus-based instrument and the GII was performed demonstrating that the roundness measurements of the two instruments are equivalent when the measurements are properly corrected for the differing effects of surface finish.

  16. NBS: materials measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, J.R.

    1981-06-01

    Measurement of materials properties and thermophysical properties is described. The topics discussed are: surface tensions and their variations with temperature, impurities' convection during unidirectional solidification, measurement of high temperature thermophysical properties of liquid and solid tungsten, thermodynamic properties of refractory materials at high temperatures, and experimental and theoretical studies in wetting and multilayer adsorption.

  17. Gummy Worm Measurements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Priscilla L.; Anshutz, Ramona J.; Wright, Emmett L.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a science activity using gummy worms to help primary students develop the mathematical skills of measurement concepts, units of measure, estimation, and graphing needed for science learning. Groups of two begin by estimating the number of gummy worms in their package and identifying the colors they expect to find. Individual worms are…

  18. Metabolic rate measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koester, K.; Crosier, W.

    1980-01-01

    The Metabolic Rate Measurement System (MRMS) is an uncomplicated and accurate apparatus for measuring oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production of a test subject. From this one can determine the subject's metabolic rate for a variety of conditions, such as resting or light exercise. MRMS utilizes an LSI/11-03 microcomputer to monitor and control the experimental apparatus.

  19. Measuring cosmological parameters

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Wendy L.

    1998-01-01

    In this review, the status of measurements of the matter density (Ωm), the vacuum energy density or cosmological constant (ΩΛ), the Hubble constant (H0), and the ages of the oldest measured objects (t0) are summarized. Three independent types of methods for measuring the Hubble constant are considered: the measurement of time delays in multiply imaged quasars, the Sunyaev–Zel’dovich effect in clusters, and Cepheid-based extragalactic distances. Many recent independent dynamical measurements are yielding a low value for the matter density (Ωm ≈ 0.2–0.3). A wide range of Hubble constant measurements appear to be converging in the range of 60–80 km/sec per megaparsec. Areas where future improvements are likely to be made soon are highlighted—in particular, measurements of anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background. Particular attention is paid to sources of systematic error and the assumptions that underlie many of the measurement methods. PMID:9419315

  20. Comparison of Confirmation Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tentori, K.; Crupi, V.; Bonini, N.; Osherson, D.

    2007-01-01

    Alternative measures of "confirmation" or "evidential support" have been proposed to express the impact of ascertaining one event on the credibility of another. We report an experiment that compares the adequacy of several such measures as descriptions of confirmation judgment in a probabilistic context.

  1. Measuring Thermoelectric Properties Automatically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmielewski, A.; Wood, C.

    1986-01-01

    Microcomputer-controlled system speeds up measurements of Hall voltage, Seebeck coefficient, and thermal diffusivity in semiconductor compounds for thermoelectric-generator applications. With microcomputer system, large data base of these parameters gathered over wide temperature range. Microcomputer increases measurement accuracy, improves operator productivity, and reduces test time.

  2. MEASURING POLLUTION PREVENTION PROGRESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The workshop, "Measuring Pollution Prevention Progress," was held in Salem, MA, March 31 - April 2, 1993. he purpose of this workshop was to present the latest significant research and practical findings related to pollution prevention measurement from ongoing and recently comple...

  3. Mathematics: Measurement Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, James A.

    This course is a laboratory approach to linear measurement, perimeter, circumference, area of square and rectangle, volume of rectangular solids, and fluid measurement. Applications include use of ruler, meter stick, thermometer, beaker, air gauge, geometric solids, and geoboards. After lists of overall goals, overall strategies, specific…

  4. Measuring Curriculum Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huntley, Mary Ann

    2009-01-01

    Using curriculum-specific tools for measuring fidelity of implementation is an essential yet often overlooked aspect of examining relationships among textbooks, teaching, and student learning. This "Brief Report" describes the variety of ways that curriculum implementation is measured and argues that there is an urgent need to develop…

  5. Progression in Measuring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Margaret; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a study by British researchers that attempted to describe progression in learning in terms of a common framework for all students. Elementary school students completed periodic interviews while being taught measurement skills. Results found a wide spread of attainment in measurement in each age range but less clear progression between…

  6. Metrology Measurement Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Glen E. Gronniger

    2007-10-02

    This document contains descriptions of Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each measurement capability. Metrology provides NIST traceable precision measurements or equipment calibration for a wide variety of parameters, ranges, and state-of-the-art uncertainties. Metrology laboratories conform to the requirements of the Department of Energy Development and Production Manual Chapter 13.2, ANSI/ISO/IEC ANSI/ISO/IEC 17025:2005, and ANSI/NCSL Z540-1. FM&T Metrology laboratories are accredited by NVLAP for the parameters, ranges, and uncertainties listed in the specific scope of accreditation under NVLAP Lab code 200108-0. See the Internet at http://ts.nist.gov/Standards/scopes/2001080.pdf. These parameters are summarized. The Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) Metrology Department has developed measurement technology and calibration capability in four major fields of measurement: (1) Mechanical; (2) Environmental, Gas, Liquid; (3) Electrical (DC, AC, RF/Microwave); and (4) Optical and Radiation. Metrology Engineering provides the expertise to develop measurement capabilities for virtually any type of measurement in the fields listed above. A strong audit function has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the calibration programs of our suppliers and internal calibration organizations. Evaluation includes measurement audits and technical surveys.

  7. PERFORMANCE MEASURES OF PHYSICIANS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PRICE, PHILIP B.; AND OTHERS

    CRITERION MEASURES DEVELOPED FOR ON-THE-JOB PERFORMANCE OF PHYSICIANS WILL BE USED IN A SUBSEQUENT STUDY TO DETERMINE HOW MUCH THE PERFORMANCE OF PHYSICIANS CAN BE PREDICTED BY THEIR INDIVIDUAL ACHIEVEMENTS IN MEDICAL AND PREMEDICAL SCHOOL. APPROXIMATELY 29 MEASURES OF THE UNIVERSITY OF UTAH COLLEGE OF MEDICINE AND OTHER PHYSICIANS IN THE UTAH…

  8. Electron measurement in PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Akiba, Y.

    1995-07-15

    Electron Measurement in PHENIX detector at RHIC is discussed. The yield and S/N ratio at vector meson peaks ({phi}, {omega}, {rho}{sup o}, and J/{psi}) are evaluated. The electrons from open charm decay, and its consequence to the di-electron measurements is discussed.

  9. NBS: Materials measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Measurement of materials properties and thermophysical properties is described. The topics discussed are: surface tensions and their variations with temperature and impurities; convection during unidirectional solidification: measurement of high temperature thermophysical properties of tungsten liquid and solid; thermodynamic properties of refractory materials at high temperatures; and experimental and theoretical studies in wetting and multilayer adsorption.

  10. Measuring Relational Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Patricia A.; Dumas, Denis; Grossnickle, Emily M.; List, Alexandra; Firetto, Carla M.

    2016-01-01

    Relational reasoning is the foundational cognitive ability to discern meaningful patterns within an informational stream, but its reliable and valid measurement remains problematic. In this investigation, the measurement of relational reasoning unfolded in three stages. Stage 1 entailed the establishment of a research-based conceptualization of…

  11. Measuring Facial Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekman, Paul; Friesen, Wallace V.

    1976-01-01

    The Facial Action Code (FAC) was derived from an analysis of the anatomical basis of facial movement. The development of the method is explained, contrasting it to other methods of measuring facial behavior. An example of how facial behavior is measured is provided, and ideas about research applications are discussed. (Author)

  12. Measuring News Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maksl, Adam; Ashley, Seth; Craft, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    News media literacy refers to the knowledge and motivations needed to identify and engage with journalism. This study measured levels of news media literacy among 500 teenagers using a new scale measure based on Potter's model of media literacy and adapted to news media specifically. The adapted model posits that news media literate individuals…

  13. Measuring Nasal Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Jarrod; Most, Sam P

    2016-08-01

    The nose and the nasal airway is highly complex with intricate 3-dimensional anatomy, with multiple functions in respiration and filtration of the respired air. Nasal airway obstruction (NAO) is a complex problem with no clearly defined "gold-standard" in measurement. There are 3 tools for the measurement of NAO: patient-derived measurements, physician-observed measurements, and objective measurements. We continue to work towards finding a link between subjective and objective nasal obstruction. The field of evaluation and surgical treatment for NAO has grown tremendously in the past 4-5 decades and will continue to grow as we learn more about the pathophysiology and treatment of nasal obstruction. PMID:27400845

  14. Measurement of academic entitlement.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brian K

    2013-10-01

    Members of Generation Y, or Millennials, have been accused of being lazy, whiny, pampered, and entitled, particularly in the college classroom. Using an equity theory framework, eight items from a measure of work entitlement were adapted to measure academic entitlement in a university setting in three independent samples. In Study 1 (n = 229), confirmatory factor analyses indicated good model fit to a unidimensional structure for the data. In Study 2 (n = 200), the questionnaire predicted unique variance in university satisfaction beyond two more general measures of dispositional entitlement. In Study 3 (n = 161), the measure predicted unique variance in perceptions of grade fairness beyond that which was predicted by another measure of academic entitlement. This analysis provides evidence of discriminant, convergent, incremental, concurrent criterion-related, and construct validity for the Academic Equity Preference Questionnaire. PMID:24597456

  15. Flow measuring structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiten, W.

    1993-11-01

    The use of flow measuring structures is one of the various methods for the continuous measurement of discharges in open channels. In this report a brief summary of these methods is presented to get some insight in the selection of the most appropriate method. Then the distinct functions of water control structures are described. The flow measuring structures are classified according to international rules. The fields of application are dealt with and the definitions of weir flow are given. Much attention is paid to the aspects of how to select the most suitable flow measuring structure. The accuracy in the evaluation of the discharge has been related to the different error sources. A review of international standards on flow measuring structures concludes the report.

  16. [Mid-infrared emission and multiphonon relaxation in Tm3+-doped Ge-Ga-Se glasses].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng-Jun; Dai, Shi-Xun; Le, Fang-Da; Peng, Bo; Xu, Tie-Feng; Nie, Qiu-Hua; Zhang, Xiang-Hua

    2010-06-01

    A series of chalcogenide glasses based on the composition Ge30 Ga5 Se65 (at. %) doped with the different Tm3+ ions were synthesized by melt-quenching technique. The refractive indexes, Raman spectra, absorption spectra, near-and mid-infrared fluorescence, and lifetimes of glass samples under 800 nm laser excitation were measured. The intensity parameters omega(i) (i = 2, 4, 6), transition probabilities, branching ratios and radiative lifetimes have been predicted for Tm3+ ions in samples by using the Judd-Ofelt theory. The near-infrared emission spectra at 1.23, 1.48 and 1.8 microm were observed and their quantum efficiencies were evaluated respectively in glass doped with 1 Wt% Tm(3+)-ions under 800 nm excitation. The mid-infrared fluorescence spectra were investigated with the different Tm3+ ion concentration under 800 nm excitation. The multiphonon relaxation rate of Tm3+ : 3 H5 --> 3F4 by the measured and calculated lifetimes, and the relative parameters of W(0) and a in Ge30 Ga5 Se65 glass were evaluated. Results show that the multiphonon relaxation rates were significantly lower than other glasses due to the lower maximum phonon energy, so the selenide glasses are promising as host materials for doping by rare earth ions and for preparation of mid-infrared optical elements. PMID:20707130

  17. Attosecond probing of state-resolved ionization and superpositions of atoms and molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    Isolated attosecond pulses in the extreme ultraviolet are used to probe strong field ionization and to initiate electronic and vibrational superpositions in atoms and small molecules. Few-cycle 800 nm pulses produce strong-field ionization of Xe atoms, and the attosecond probe is used to measure the risetimes of the two spin orbit states of the ion on the 4d inner shell transitions to the 5p vacancies in the valence shell. Step-like features in the risetimes due to the subcycles of the 800 nm pulse are observed and compared with theory to elucidate the instantaneous and effective hole dynamics. Isolated attosecond pulses create massive superpositions of electronic states in Ar and nitrogen as well as vibrational superpositions among electronic states in nitrogen. An 800 nm pulse manipulates the superpositions, and specific subcycle interferences, level shifting, and quantum beats are imprinted onto the attosecond pulse as a function of time delay. Detailed outcomes are compared to theory for measurements of time-dynamic superpositions by attosecond transient absorption. Supported by DOE, NSF, ARO, AFOSR, and DARPA.

  18. [Sonographic leg length measurement].

    PubMed

    Holst, A; Thomas, W

    1989-03-01

    After brief presentation of the clinical and radiological methods to measure the leg length and the leg length difference the authors outline the new diagnostic method for measuring the leg length and the leg length difference by means of real time sonography. Postmortem tests and clinical examples show that ultrasound is ideal to determine exactly the length of femur and tibia. The joint gaps on the hip, knee and upper ankle joint can be demonstrated by means of a 5 MHz linear scanner. A 1 mm strong metal bar on the skin and under the scanner is placed at right angles to the longitudinal axis of the body so that the bar can be seen in the centre. A measuring device gives the distances of the joint gaps in cm so that the difference correspond to the real length of femur and tibia. This standardised measuring is done by a particularly developed bearing and measuring device. The results of the sonographical measurements on 20 corpses and checking after consecutive dissections showed in 75% of cases a 100% sonographic measuring accuracy of the total leg length. The separately considered results for femur (85%) and tibia (90) were even better. The maximum sonographic measuring fault was 1.0 cm for the femur (in one case) and 0.5 cm for the tibia, respectively. All sonographic measurements were performed with the Sonoline SL-1 of the Siemens Company (Erlangen, W-Germany). Thus, sonographical measuring of the leg length offers a reliable, non-invasive method that can be repeated as often as necessary and is simply executed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2652268

  19. Tomographic multiphase flow measurement.

    PubMed

    Sætre, C; Johansen, G A; Tjugum, S A

    2012-07-01

    Measurement of multiphase flow of gas, oil and water is not at all trivial and in spite of considerable achievements over the past two decades, important challenges remain (Corneliussen et al., 2005). These are related to reducing measurement uncertainties arising from variations in the flow regime, improving long term stability and developing new means for calibration, adjustment and verification of the multiphase flow meters. This work focuses on the first two issues using multi gamma beam (MGB) measurements for identification of the type of flow regime. Further gamma ray tomographic measurements are used for reference of the gas/liquid distribution. For the MGB method one Am-241 source with principal emission at 59.5 keV is used because this relatively low energy enables efficient collimation and thereby shaping of the beams, as well as compact detectors. One detector is placed diametrically opposite the source whereas the second is positioned to the side so that this beam is close to the pipe wall. The principle is then straight forward to compare the measured intensities of these detectors and through that identify the flow pattern, i.e. the instantaneous cross-sectional gas-liquid distribution. The measurement setup also includes Compton scattering measurements, which can provide information about the changes in the water salinity for flow segments with high water liquid ratio and low gas fractions. By measuring the transmitted intensity in short time slots (<100 ms), rapid regime variations are revealed. From this we can select the time sections suitable for salinity measurements. Since the salinity variations change at the time scale of hours, a running average can be performed to increase the accuracy of the measurements. Recent results of this work will be presented here. PMID:22341954

  20. Turbulent Inflow Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Albert R.

    1996-01-01

    In the present research, tilt rotor aeroacoustics have been studied experimentally and computationally. Experimental measurements were made on a 1/12.5 scale model. A dimensional analysis showed that the model was a good aeroacoustic approximation to the full-scale aircraft, and scale factors were derived to extrapolate the model measurements to the full-scale XV-15. The experimental measurements included helium bubble flow visualization, silk tuft flow visualization, 2-component hot wire anemometry, 7-hole pressure probe measurements, vorticity measurements, and outdoor far field acoustic measurements. The hot wire measurements were used to estimate the turbulence statistics of the flow field into the rotors, such as length scales, velocity scales, dissipation, and turbulence intermittency. To date, these flow measurements are the only ones in existence for a hovering tilt rotor. Several different configurations of the model were tested: (1) standard configurations (single isolated rotor, two rotors without the aircraft, standard tilt rotor configuration); (2) flow control devices (the 'plate', the 'diagonal fences'); (3) basic configuration changes (increasing the rotor/rotor spacing, reducing the rotor plane/wing clearance, operating the rotors out of phase). Also, an approximation to Sikorsky's Variable Diameter Tilt Rotor (VDTR) configuration was tested, and some flow measurements were made on a semi-span configuration of the model. Acoustic predictions were made using LOWSON.M, a Mathematica code. This hover prediction code, from HOVER.FOR, used blade element theory for the aerodynamics, and Prandtl's Vortex theory to model the wake, along with empirical formulas for the effects of Reynolds number, Mach number, and stall. Aerodynamic models were developed from 7-hole pressure probe measurements of the mean velocity into the model rotors. LOWSON.M modeled a rotor blade as a single force and source/sink combination separated in the chordwise direction, at an

  1. Performance testing accountability measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Oldham, R.D.; Mitchell, W.G.; Spaletto, M.I.

    1993-12-31

    The New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) provides assessment support to the DOE Operations Offices in the area of Material Control and Accountability (MC and A). During surveys of facilities, the Operations Offices have begun to request from NBL either assistance in providing materials for performance testing of accountability measurements or both materials and personnel to do performance testing. To meet these needs, NBL has developed measurement and measurement control performance test procedures and materials. The present NBL repertoire of performance tests include the following: (1) mass measurement performance testing procedures using calibrated and traceable test weights, (2) uranium elemental concentration (assay) measurement performance tests which use ampulated solutions of normal uranyl nitrate containing approximately 7 milligrams of uranium per gram of solution, and (3) uranium isotopic measurement performance tests which use ampulated uranyl nitrate solutions with enrichments ranging from 4% to 90% U-235. The preparation, characterization, and packaging of the uranium isotopic and assay performance test materials were done in cooperation with the NBL Safeguards Measurements Evaluation Program since these materials can be used for both purposes.

  2. Sensorimotor System Measurement Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Riemann, Bryan L.; Myers, Joseph B.; Lephart, Scott M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To provide an overview of currently available sensorimotor assessment techniques. Data Sources: We drew information from an extensive review of the scientific literature conducted in the areas of proprioception, neuromuscular control, and motor control measurement. Literature searches were conducted using MEDLINE for the years 1965 to 1999 with the key words proprioception, somatosensory evoked potentials, nerve conduction testing, electromyography, muscle dynamometry, isometric, isokinetic, kinetic, kinematic, posture, equilibrium, balance, stiffness, neuromuscular, sensorimotor, and measurement. Additional sources were collected using the reference lists of identified articles. Data Synthesis: Sensorimotor measurement techniques are discussed with reference to the underlying physiologic mechanisms, influential factors and locations of the variable within the system, clinical research questions, limitations of the measurement technique, and directions for future research. Conclusions/Recommendations: The complex interactions and relationships among the individual components of the sensorimotor system make measuring and analyzing specific characteristics and functions difficult. Additionally, the specific assessment techniques used to measure a variable can influence attained results. Optimizing the application of sensorimotor research to clinical settings can, therefore, be best accomplished through the use of common nomenclature to describe underlying physiologic mechanisms and specific measurement techniques. PMID:16558672

  3. Measuring Temperature Reading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    There are two requirements for taking a measurement of something. The first is a tool for taking a measurement. The second is scale for making sense of the numbers of the measurement. For example, a ruler is often used to measure short lengths. It is the tool for measurement. On the ruler are one or more number scales with equally spaced numbers. These numbers can be compared with numbers from any other ruler that is accurately set to the same scale. Measuring length is far simpler than measuring temperature. While there is evidence of tools for measuring length at various times in human history, tools and scales for measuring temperature do not appear until more recent human history. Early thermometers, called thermoscopes, first appear in the 1500's. They were crude instruments that were not at all accurate. Most did not even have a number scale associated with them. This made them useless for most practical purposes. Gabriel Fahrenheit created the first accurate thermometer in 1714, and the Fahrenheit temperature scale followed it in 1724. The thermometer s accuracy was based on its use of mercury, a silver colored substance that remains liquid over a wide range of temperatures but expands or contracts in a standard, predictable way with changes in temperature. To set the scale, Fahrenheit created the coldest temperature that he could. He mixed equal parts of ice, water, and salt, and then used this as the zero point, 0 degrees, of his scale. He intended to make 30 degrees the freezing point of water and 90 degrees the temperature of the human body, but he had to later revise these temperatures to be 32 degrees and 96 degrees. In the final version of the scale, the temperature of the human body became 98.6 degrees. 19th century thermoscope

  4. Mining volume measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph Saul (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In a shaft with a curved or straight primary segment and smaller off-shooting segments, at least one standing wave is generated in the primary segment. The shaft has either an open end or a closed end and approximates a cylindrical waveguide. A frequency of a standing wave that represents the fundamental mode characteristic of the primary segment can be measured. Alternatively, a frequency differential between two successive harmonic modes that are characteristic of the primary segment can be measured. In either event, the measured frequency or frequency differential is characteristic of the length and thus the volume of the shaft based on length times the bore area.

  5. About measuring velocity dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellhauer, M.

    A lot of our knowledge about the dynamics and total masses of pressure dominated stellar systems relies on measuring the internal velocity disper- sion of the system. We assume virial equilibrium and that we are able to measure only the bound stars of the system without any contamination. This article shows how likely it is to measure the correct velocity dispersion in reality. It will show that as long as we have small samples of velocity mea- surements the distribution of possible outcomes can be very large and as soon as we have a source of error the velocity dispersion can wrong by several standard deviations especially in large samples.

  6. Measuring Building Insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, Beth

    2013-03-01

    Currently, the only way for homeowners to learn about the effectiveness of their home insulation is to hire an energy auditor. This difficulty deters homeowners from taking action to improve energy efficiency. In principle, measuring the temperature difference between a wall surface and the interior of a home is sufficient to determine the wall insulation, but in practice, temperature cycles from the heating system make a single measurement unreliable. I will describe a simple and inexpensive thermocouple-based device to measure this temperature difference and report results obtained by monitoring this temperature difference over multiple heating cycles in a range of buildings. Patent application 12/555371

  7. Debuncher Momentum Aperture Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    O'Day, S.

    1991-01-01

    During the November 1990 through January 1991 {bar p} studies period, the momentum aperture of the beam in the debuncher ring was measured. The momentum aperture ({Delta}p/p) was found to be 4.7%. The momentum spread was also measured with beam bunch rotation off. A nearly constant particle population density was observed for particles with {Delta}p/p of less than 4.3%, indicating virtually unobstructed orbits in this region. The population of particles with momenta outside this aperture was found to decrease rapidly. An absolute or 'cut-off' momentum aperture of {Delta}p/p = 5.50% was measured.

  8. CIRCUITS FOR CURRENT MEASUREMENTS

    DOEpatents

    Cox, R.J.

    1958-11-01

    Circuits are presented for measurement of a logarithmic scale of current flowing in a high impedance. In one form of the invention the disclosed circuit is in combination with an ionization chamber to measure lonization current. The particular circuit arrangement lncludes a vacuum tube having at least one grid, an ionization chamber connected in series with a high voltage source and the grid of the vacuum tube, and a d-c amplifier feedback circuit. As the ionization chamber current passes between the grid and cathode of the tube, the feedback circuit acts to stabilize the anode current, and the feedback voltage is a measure of the logaritbm of the ionization current.

  9. Ultrasonic linear measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Scot H. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An ultrasonic linear measurement system uses the travel time of surface waves along the perimeter of a three-dimensional curvilinear body to determine the perimeter of the curvilinear body. The system can also be used piece-wise to measure distances along plane surfaces. The system can be used to measure perimeters where use of laser light, optical means or steel tape would be extremely difficult, time consuming or impossible. It can also be used to determine discontinuities in surfaces of known perimeter or dimension.

  10. Radiometry spot measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Harry H.; Lawn, Stephen J.

    1994-01-01

    The radiometry spot measurement system (RSMS) has been designed for use in the Diffusive And Radiative Transport in Fires (DARTFire) experiment, currently under development at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The RSMS can measure the radiation emitted from a spot of specific size located on the surface of a distant radiation source within a controlled wavelength range. If the spot is located on a blackbody source, its radiation and temperature can be measured directly or indirectly by the RSMS. This report presents computer simulation results used to verify RSMS performance.