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Sample records for 90y-sirsphere treatment response

  1. Assessment of treatment response in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rockwood, Neesha; du Bruyn, Elsa; Morris, Thomas; Wilkinson, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    Antibiotic treatment of tuberculosis has a duration of several months. There is significant variability of the host immune response and the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic properties of Mycobacterium tuberculosis sub-populations at the site of disease. A limitation of sputum-based measures of treatment response may be sub-optimal detection and monitoring of Mycobacterium tuberculosis sub-populations. Potential biomarkers and surrogate endpoints should be benchmarked against hard clinical outcomes (failure/relapse/death) and may need tailoring to specific patient populations. Here, we assess the evidence supporting currently utilized and future potential host and pathogen-based models and biomarkers for monitoring treatment response in active and latent tuberculosis. Biomarkers for monitoring treatment response in extrapulmonary, pediatric and drug resistant tuberculosis are research priorities. PMID:27030924

  2. Attraction, Discrepancy and Responses to Psychological Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Michael J.

    The responses of a laboratory subject (S) to a counselor-accomplice and to the psychological treatment situation are examined by manipulating experimentally interpersonal attraction and communication discrepancy. Four treatment conditions were set up: (1) topic similarity and positive attraction for counselor, (2) topic discrepancy and positive…

  3. Improved tumour response by laser light treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graschew, Georgi; Smith, Janice; Rakowsky, Stefan; Roelofs, Theo A.; Schlag, Peter M.; Stein, Ulrike

    2008-04-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) poses a serious barrier to the efficacy of clinical treatment of human cancers with chemotherapeutic drugs. This barrier might be reduced and eventually overcome by the simultaneous application of two or more treatment modalities. This study reports on the synergetic effect of combined application of laser light and cytostatic drugs to induce an improved tumour response in MDR cancer cells. The MDR breast cancer cell line MaTu/ADR, resistant to the drug adriamycin (ADR), was treated with a combination of ADR (125-1000 ng/ml) and laser light (488 nm with a total light dose between 6-18 J/cm2). This combined treatment leads to an additional reduction of the cell vitality by a factor of 2-3 as compared to treatment with ADR alone, suggesting that combined application of laser light and other treatment modalities might constitute a promising strategy for improvements in the tumour response.

  4. Heterogeneity of neural mechanisms of response to pivotal response treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ventola, Pamela; Yang, Daniel Y. J.; Friedman, Hannah E.; Oosting, Devon; Wolf, Julie; Sukhodolsky, Denis G.; Pelphrey, Kevin A.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the mechanisms by which Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT) improves social communication in a case series of 10 preschool-aged children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) identified brain responses during a biological motion perception task conducted prior to and following 16 weeks of PRT treatment. Overall, the neural systems supporting social perception in these 10 children were malleable through implementation of PRT; following treatment, neural responses were more similar to those of typically developing children (TD). However, at baseline, half of the children exhibited hypoactivation, relative to a group of TD children, in the right posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS), and half exhibited hyperactivation in this region. Strikingly, the groups exhibited differential neural responses to treatment: The five children who exhibited hypoactivation at baseline evidenced increased activation in components of the reward system including the ventral striatum and putamen. The five children who exhibited hyperactivation at baseline evidenced decreased activation in subcortical regions critical for regulating the flow of stimulation and conveying signals of salience to the cortex—the thalamus, amygdala, and hippocampus. Our results support further investigation into the differential effects of particular treatment strategies relative to specific neural targets. Identification of treatment strategies that address the patterns of neural vulnerability unique to each patient is consistent with the priority of creating individually tailored interventions customized to the behavioral and neural characteristics of a given person. PMID:25370452

  5. Daily Spiritual Experiences and Adolescent Treatment Response

    PubMed Central

    LEE, MATTHEW T.; VETA, PAIGE S.; JOHNSON, BYRON R.; PAGANO, MARIA E.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore changes in belief orientation during treatment and the impact of increased daily spiritual experiences (DSE) on adolescent treatment response. One-hundred ninety-five adolescents court-referred to a 2-month residential treatment program were assessed at intake and discharge. Forty percent of youth who entered treatment as agnostic or atheist identified themselves as spiritual or religious at discharge. Increased DSE was associated with greater likelihood of abstinence, increased prosocial behaviors, and reduced narcissistic behaviors. Results indicate a shift in DSE that improves youth self-care and care for others that may inform intervention approaches for adolescents with addiction. PMID:25525291

  6. Pharmacogenetics of treatment response in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Jani, Meghna; Barton, Anne; Ho, Pauline

    2015-07-01

    TNF-blocking agents, non-biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (nbDMARDs) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly prescribed treatments in psoriatic arthritis. A large proportion of patients do not respond to these medications, although unfortunately clinically useful biomarkers that predict future response are currently lacking. Several candidate gene polymorphisms have been associated with responses to biologic therapies and nbDMARDs; however, replication and validation of these variants in large prospective psoriatic arthritis cohorts are required before translating these to clinical practice. In this review, we discuss the advances made in pharmacogenetics of treatment response in psoriatic arthritis to date, with focus on biologic therapies approved for use, nbDMARDs and NSAIDs, as well as outline emerging methodologies to obtain data that will help inform a future precision medicine approach in this condition. PMID:25980667

  7. Legionella pneumophila transcriptional response to chlorine treatment.

    PubMed

    Bodet, Charles; Sahr, Tobias; Dupuy, Mathieu; Buchrieser, Carmen; Héchard, Yann

    2012-03-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a ubiquitous environmental microorganism found in freshwater that can cause an acute form of pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. Despite widespread use of chlorine to ensure drinking water quality and awareness that L. pneumophila may escape these treatments, little is known about its effects on L. pneumophila. The aim of this study was to investigate the L. pneumophila transcriptional response induced by chlorine treatment. Transcriptome analysis, using DNA arrays, showed that a sublethal dose of chlorine induces a differential expression of 391 genes involved in stress response, virulence, general metabolism, information pathways and transport. Many of the stress response genes were significantly upregulated, whereas a significant number of virulence genes were repressed. In particular, exposure of L. pneumophila to chlorine induced the expression of cellular antioxidant proteins, stress proteins and transcriptional regulators. In addition, glutathione S-transferase specific activity was enhanced following chlorine treatment. Our results clearly indicate that chlorine induces expression of proteins involved in cellular defence mechanisms against oxidative stress that might be involved in adaptation or resistance to chlorine treatment. PMID:22192759

  8. Human genetic variability and HIV treatment response.

    PubMed

    Haas, David W

    2006-07-01

    Access to potent antiretroviral medications greatly reduces morbidity and mortality due to HIV/AIDS, but drug toxicity limits treatment success in many individuals. The field of pharmacogenomics strives to understand the influence of human genetic variants in response to medications. Investigators have begun to identify associations among human genetic variants, predisposition to HIV drug toxicities, and likelihood of virologic response. These include associations among abacavir hypersensitivity reactions, HLA type, and hsp70-hom genotypes, and among CYP2B6 polymorphisms, efavirenz pharmacokinetics, and central nervous system symptoms. Pharmacogenomics also holds great promise to suggest novel targets for drug development. The discovery that a naturally occurring, nonfunctional variant of the HIV receptor gene CCR5 protected against HIV infection encouraged the development of CCR5 antagonists. Through continued translational and applied research, pharmacogenomics will ultimately benefit persons living with HIV worldwide by identifying new therapeutic targets and through individualized drug prescribing that is informed by human genetic testing. PMID:16608660

  9. Exposure Plus Response-Prevention Treatment of Bulimia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leitenberg, Harold; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Evaluated exposure plus response-prevention treatment of bulimia nervosa among 47 women. Subjects were assigned to either exposure plus response-prevention in one setting, exposure plus response-prevention in multiple settings, cognitive-behavioral therapy, or waiting-list control conditions. Found three treatment groups improved significantly on…

  10. Biosocial processes predicting multisystemic therapy treatment response.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Stacy R; Brennan, Patricia A; Cunningham, Phillippe B; Foster, Sharon L; Brock, Rebecca L; Whitmore, Elizabeth

    2013-02-01

    This study examined biological (testosterone) and social (deviant peer affiliation) factors early in treatment as predictors of treatment outcome among adolescent boys receiving Multisystemic Therapy (MST) in community settings. Outcome variables included changes in youth aggression and delinquency as reported by the primary caregiver. Testosterone and deviant peer affiliation were assessed at treatment onset; and outcome variables (aggression and delinquency) were assessed at treatment onset, mid-treatment and end-of-treatment. Participants were 112 adolescent boys (M age=15.42, SD=1.31) and their caregivers. Growth curve analyses revealed that the combination of high testosterone and high deviant peer affiliation early in treatment were significantly associated with less of a decline in aggression and delinquency over the course of treatment. Results provide novel evidence for the role of testosterone in the prediction of future externalizing behaviors. Clinical and theoretical implications are discussed. PMID:23247043

  11. Metaflammatory responses during obesity: Pathomechanism and treatment.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Monalisa; Agrawal, Shruti; Agrawal, Aruna; Dubey, G P

    2016-01-01

    Obesity induced inflammation acts as a reflex produced due to altered metabolic homeostasis in accordance to the nutrient overload on the metabolic cells. It involves up-regulation of the genes encoding for cytokines, chemokines and other inflammatory mediators through activated transcription factors - nuclear factor-kB, activator protein-1, nuclear factor of activated T cells and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. These execute macromolecular innate immune cell sensor - inflammasome to activate caspase-1 pathway resulting in proteolytic maturation. Secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IL-6, CRP, IL-1β, etc. from the M1 macrophages of white adipose tissue is increased, whereas there occurs a steep decline in the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines like IL-10, IL-Ra, adiponectin. Not only the adipose tissue, but also the immune cells, liver, brain, muscles and pancreas suffers from the inflammatory insult during obese condition and are exaggeratedly affected. The inflammatory kinases like JNK and IKK apart from inhibiting insulin action and glucose uptake, down-regulate transcriptional process resulting in increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Macrophage-like Kupffer cells initiate the inflammatory process in the liver preceding the inflammatory signals produced by the white adipose tissue which may further lead to hepatic-necro-inflammation. The muscle-fibre is affected by the cytokines and therefore results in decreased glycogen synthesis. The triggered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis further affects the expression of inflammatory cytokines thus altering insulin homeostasis and initiating glucose intolerance. Anti-inflammatory treatment so as to curb the severity of inflammatory responses includes administration of synthetic drugs to target the actual inflammatory molecules and various therapeutic interventions. PMID:26614484

  12. Preference for Blocking or Response Redirection during Stereotypy Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Aimee F.; St. Peter, Claire C.; Pence, Sacha T.; Gibson, Alexandra B.

    2012-01-01

    Response redirection and response blocking reduce stereotypy maintained by automatic reinforcement. The current study evaluated the effects of redirection and response blocking on the stereotypic responding of three elementary-age children diagnosed with autism. During the treatment evaluation, redirection and response blocking were evaluated…

  13. Vegetation Response to Western Juniper Slash Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Casey; Miller, Rick; Bates, Jonathan D.

    2013-09-01

    The expansion of piñon-juniper woodlands the past 100 years in the western United States has resulted in large scale efforts to kill trees and recover sagebrush steppe rangelands. It is important to evaluate vegetation recovery following woodland control to develop best management practices. In this study, we compared two fuel reduction treatments and a cut-and-leave (CUT) treatment used to control western juniper ( Juniperus occidentalis spp. occidentalis Hook.) of the northwestern United States. Treatments were; CUT, cut-and-broadcast burn (BURN), and cut-pile-and-burn the pile (PILE). A randomized complete block design was used with five replicates of each treatment located in a curl leaf mahogany ( Cercocarpus ledifolius Nutt. ex Torr. & A. Gray)/mountain big sagebrush ( Artemisia tridentata Nutt. spp. vaseyana (Rydb.) Beetle)/Idaho fescue ( Festuca idahoensis Elmer) association. In 2010, 4 years after tree control the cover of perennial grasses (PG) [Sandberg's bluegrass ( Poa secunda J. Pres) and large bunchgrasses] were about 4 and 5 % less, respectively, in the BURN (7.1 ± 0.6 %) than the PILE (11.4 ± 2.3 %) and CUT (12.4 ± 1.7 %) treatments ( P < 0.0015). In 2010, cover of invasive cheatgrass ( Bromus tectorum L.) was greater in the BURN (6.3 ± 1.0 %) and was 50 and 100 % greater than PILE and CUT treatments, respectively. However, the increase in perennial bunchgrass density and cover, despite cheatgrass in the BURN treatment, mean it unlikely that cheatgrass will persist as a major understory component. In the CUT treatment mahogany cover increased 12.5 % and density increased in from 172 ± 25 to 404 ± 123 trees/ha. Burning, killed most or all of the adult mahogany, and mahogany recovery consisted of 100 and 67 % seedlings in the PILE and BURN treatments, respectively. After treatment, juniper presence from untreated small trees (<1 m tall; PILE and CUT treatments) and seedling emergence (all treatments) represented 25-33 % of pre-treatment tree

  14. Vegetation response to western juniper slash treatments.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Casey; Miller, Rick; Bates, Jonathan D

    2013-09-01

    The expansion of piñon-juniper woodlands the past 100 years in the western United States has resulted in large scale efforts to kill trees and recover sagebrush steppe rangelands. It is important to evaluate vegetation recovery following woodland control to develop best management practices. In this study, we compared two fuel reduction treatments and a cut-and-leave (CUT) treatment used to control western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis spp. occidentalis Hook.) of the northwestern United States. Treatments were; CUT, cut-and-broadcast burn (BURN), and cut-pile-and-burn the pile (PILE). A randomized complete block design was used with five replicates of each treatment located in a curl leaf mahogany (Cercocarpus ledifolius Nutt. ex Torr. & A. Gray)/mountain big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. spp. vaseyana (Rydb.) Beetle)/Idaho fescue (Festuca idahoensis Elmer) association. In 2010, 4 years after tree control the cover of perennial grasses (PG) [Sandberg's bluegrass (Poa secunda J. Pres) and large bunchgrasses] were about 4 and 5 % less, respectively, in the BURN (7.1 ± 0.6 %) than the PILE (11.4 ± 2.3 %) and CUT (12.4 ± 1.7 %) treatments (P < 0.0015). In 2010, cover of invasive cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) was greater in the BURN (6.3 ± 1.0 %) and was 50 and 100 % greater than PILE and CUT treatments, respectively. However, the increase in perennial bunchgrass density and cover, despite cheatgrass in the BURN treatment, mean it unlikely that cheatgrass will persist as a major understory component. In the CUT treatment mahogany cover increased 12.5 % and density increased in from 172 ± 25 to 404 ± 123 trees/ha. Burning, killed most or all of the adult mahogany, and mahogany recovery consisted of 100 and 67 % seedlings in the PILE and BURN treatments, respectively. After treatment, juniper presence from untreated small trees (<1 m tall; PILE and CUT treatments) and seedling emergence (all treatments) represented 25-33 % of

  15. Rapid Response to Treatment for Binge Eating Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grilo, Carlos M.; Masheb, Robin M.; Wilson, Terence G.

    2006-01-01

    The authors examined rapid response among 108 patients with binge eating disorder (BED) who were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 16-week treatments: fluoxetine, placebo, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) plus fluoxetine, or CBT plus placebo. Rapid response, defined as 65% or greater reduction in binge eating by the 4th treatment week, was determined…

  16. Baseline Brain Activity Predicts Response to Neuromodulatory Pain Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mark P.; Sherlin, Leslie H.; Fregni, Felipe; Gianas, Ann; Howe, Jon D.; Hakimian, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to examine the associations between baseline electroencephalogram (EEG)-assessed brain oscillations and subsequent response to four neuromodulatory treatments. Based on available research, we hypothesized that baseline theta oscillations would prospectively predict response to hypnotic analgesia. Analyses involving other oscillations and the other treatments (meditation, neurofeedback, and both active and sham transcranial direct current stimulation) were viewed as exploratory, given the lack of previous research examining brain oscillations as predictors of response to these other treatments. Design Randomized controlled study of single sessions of four neuromodulatory pain treatments and a control procedure. Methods Thirty individuals with spinal cord injury and chronic pain had their EEG recorded before each session of four active treatments (hypnosis, meditation, EEG biofeedback, transcranial direct current stimulation) and a control procedure (sham transcranial direct stimulation). Results As hypothesized, more presession theta power was associated with greater response to hypnotic analgesia. In exploratory analyses, we found that less baseline alpha power predicted pain reduction with meditation. Conclusions The findings support the idea that different patients respond to different pain treatments and that between-person treatment response differences are related to brain states as measured by EEG. The results have implications for the possibility of enhancing pain treatment response by either 1) better patient/treatment matching or 2) influencing brain activity before treatment is initiated in order to prepare patients to respond. Research is needed to replicate and confirm the findings in additional samples of individuals with chronic pain. PMID:25287554

  17. Mobile Emergency Response Water Treatment Technology Results

    EPA Science Inventory

    When natural disasters like hurricanes, floods and earthquakes occur, safe drinking water can be compromised, limited or unavailable. Under such situations, communities have emergency response plans. One of many options for providing safe drinking water during emergency situati...

  18. Vegetation response to western juniper slash treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The expansion of piñon-juniper woodlands the past 100 years in the western United States has resulted in large scale efforts to remove trees and recover sagebrush steppe rangelands. It is important to evaluate vegetation response in order to develop best management practices for controlling expandi...

  19. Chronic benzodiazepine treatment and cortical responses to adenosine and GABA.

    PubMed

    Mally, J; Connick, J H; Stone, T W

    1990-10-22

    The effects of chronic treatment of mice with clonazepam have been examined on the responses of neocortical slices to adenosine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Responses to these agonists were measured as changes in the depolarisation induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). Added to the superfusion medium diazepam blocked responses to adenosine but not 5-HT; this effect was not observed with 2-chloroadenosine or in the presence of 2-hydroxynitrobenzylthioguanosine. GABA was inactive in control slices but chronic treatment with clonazepam induced responses to GABA and enhanced responses to adenosine but not 5-HT. It is suggested that the induction of GABA responses may reflect the up-regulation of GABA receptors, but the increase of adenosine responses by clonazepam implies that there is no simple relationship between adenosine receptor binding and functional responses. PMID:1979931

  20. Paradoxical response to anti-tubercular treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Syed Ahmed; Shenoy, Prithi

    2011-01-01

    We report a 5-year-old boy who developed optic neuritis as a paradoxical reaction to anti-tuberculous therapy. Steroids were re-started in the patient with gradual recovery of his vision. The case emphasizes the importance of recognizing paradoxical reactions in patients on anti-tuberculous therapy. Prompt recognition and treatment of such reactions will reduce the associated morbidity. PMID:21572663

  1. Inflammatory Response Influences Treatment of Localized Aggressive Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Allin, N; Cruz-Almeida, Y; Velsko, I; Vovk, A; Hovemcamp, N; Harrison, P; Huang, H; Aukhil, I; Wallet, S M; Shaddox, L M

    2016-06-01

    We previously reported a systemic hyperinflammatory response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in children with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP). Additionally, different levels of this response were observed within the LAP group. It is unknown whether this hyperinflammatory response influences the clinical response to periodontal treatment in these children. Therefore, the goal of this study was to evaluate the influence of LPS responsiveness present prior to treatment on the clinical response to treatment within the LAP cohort. Prior to treatment, peripheral blood was collected from 60 African American participants aged 5 to 21 y, free of systemic diseases, and diagnosed with LAP. Blood was stimulated with ultrapure LPS from Escherichia coli, and Luminex assays were performed to quantify 14 cytokine/chemokine levels. Principal component and cluster analyses were used to find patterns of cytokine/chemokine expression among participants and subdivide them into clusters. Three distinct clusters emerged among LAP participants: a high responder group (high level of response for INFg, IL6, and IL12p40), a mixed responder group (low for some and high for other cytokines/chemokines), and a low responder group (low overall cytokine/chemokine response). Periodontal clinical parameters were compared among these groups prior to and 3, 6, and 12 mo following treatment with mechanical debridement and systemic antibiotics. High responders presented the lowest reductions in clinical parameters after treatment, whereas the low responders presented the highest reductions. In our LAP participants, distinct patterns of LPS response were significantly predictive of changes in clinical parameters after treatment. Future studies are needed to evaluate the underlying mechanisms predicting the heterogeneity of LAP activity, severity, and response to treatment (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01330719). PMID:26917438

  2. Hepatitis B: treatment choice and monitoring for response and resistance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sze-Hang Kevin; Seto, Wai-Kay; Lai, Ching-Lung; Yuen, Man-Fung

    2016-06-01

    Despite effective preventive primary prevention with vaccination, many people remain infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and suffer from its complications. Effective treatments such as interferon-based regimens and oral nucleoside/nucleotides have been developed over the last 30 years, but they are not perfect. Each of the treatments has its own merits, but none can eradicate HBV from the host. As a result, regular monitoring of the response during treatment and after treatment is required. The choice and monitoring of selected treatments, new potential therapeutic agents, and treatment options for drug resistance are discussed in this review. PMID:26799653

  3. Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Lisa; Song, Katherine; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee

    2008-11-19

    Wastewater treatment is an energy intensive process which, together with water treatment, comprises about three percent of U.S. annual energy use. Yet, since wastewater treatment facilities are often peripheral to major electricity-using industries, they are frequently an overlooked area for automated demand response opportunities. Demand response is a set of actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies or congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, and/or market conditions occur that raise electric supply costs. Demand response programs are designed to improve the reliability of the electric grid and to lower the use of electricity during peak times to reduce the total system costs. Open automated demand response is a set of continuous, open communication signals and systems provided over the Internet to allow facilities to automate their demand response activities without the need for manual actions. Automated demand response strategies can be implemented as an enhanced use of upgraded equipment and facility control strategies installed as energy efficiency measures. Conversely, installation of controls to support automated demand response may result in improved energy efficiency through real-time access to operational data. This paper argues that the implementation of energy efficiency opportunities in wastewater treatment facilities creates a base for achieving successful demand reductions. This paper characterizes energy use and the state of demand response readiness in wastewater treatment facilities and outlines automated demand response opportunities.

  4. Predictors of Treatment Response in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginsburg, Golda S.; Kingery, Julie Newman; Drake, Kelly L.; Grados, Marco A.

    2008-01-01

    The study examines predictors of treatment response in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder, which is a severe mental illness causing distress and impaired functioning. Summarized findings of psychosocial factors and medication interventions are presented.

  5. Toward Optimal Outcome Following Pivotal Response Treatment: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Ventola, Pamela E.; Oosting, Devon R.; Keifer, Cara M.; Friedman, Hannah E.

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing literature on children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who respond favorably to behavioral treatment, which is often termed “optimal outcome.” Rates and definitions of optimal outcome vary widely. The current case series describes an empirically validated behavioral treatment approach called Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT). We present two preschool-aged children who received an intensive course of PRT and seem to be on a trajectory toward potential optimal outcome. Understanding response to treatment and predictors of response is crucial, not necessarily to predict who may succeed, but to individualize medicine and match children with customized treatment programs that will be best tailored to their unique and varied needs. PMID:25745373

  6. Parental marital discord and treatment response in depressed adolescents.

    PubMed

    Amaya, Meredith M; Reinecke, Mark A; Silva, Susan G; March, John S

    2011-04-01

    Evidence suggests that parental marital discord contributes to the development of internalizing and externalizing symptoms in children and adolescents. Few studies, however, have examined the association between parental marital discord and youth's response to treatment. The present study examined the impact of interparental discord on treatment response in a randomized control trial of adolescents with major depression enrolled in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS). Participants were 260 adolescents from two-parent households randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups: fluoxetine (FLX), cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), their combination (COMB), or placebo (PBO). Logistic regressions revealed that parental marital discord interacted with youth gender and co-morbid oppositionality symptoms to predict group differences in treatment response. PMID:20957515

  7. Excessive Biologic Response to IFNβ Is Associated with Poor Treatment Response in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rani, M. R. Sandhya; Xu, Yaomin; Lee, Jar-Chi; Na, Jie; Shrock, Jennifer; Josyula, Anupama; Fisher, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Background Interferon-beta (IFNβ) is used to inhibit disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS), but its mechanisms of action are incompletely understood, individual treatment response varies, and biological markers predicting response to treatment have yet to be identified. Methods The relationship between the molecular response to IFNβ and treatment response was determined in 85 patients using a longitudinal design in which treatment effect was categorized by brain magnetic resonance imaging as good (n = 70) or poor response (n = 15). Molecular response was quantified using a customized cDNA macroarray assay for 166 IFN-regulated genes (IRGs). Results The molecular response to IFNβ differed significantly between patients in the pattern and number of regulated genes. The molecular response was strikingly stable for individuals for as long as 24 months, however, suggesting an individual ‘IFN response fingerprint’. Unexpectedly, patients with poor response showed an exaggerated molecular response. IRG induction ratios demonstrated an exaggerated molecular response at both the first and 6-month IFNβ injections. Conclusion MS patients exhibit individually unique but temporally stable biological responses to IFNβ. Poor treatment response is not explained by the duration of biological effects or the specific genes induced. Rather, individuals with poor treatment response have a generally exaggerated biological response to type 1 IFN injections. We hypothesize that the molecular response to type I IFN identifies a pathogenetically distinct subset of MS patients whose disease is driven in part by innate immunity. The findings suggest a strategy for biologically based, rational use of IFNβ for individual MS patients. PMID:21602934

  8. FDG-PET/CT based response-adapted treatment

    PubMed Central

    Vriens, Dennis; Arens, Anne I.J.; Hutchings, Martin; Oyen, Wim J.G.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract It has been shown that [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) provides robust and reproducible data for early metabolic response assessment in various malignancies. This led to the initiation of several prospective multicenter trials in malignant lymphoma and adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction, in order to investigate whether the use of PET-guided treatment individualization results in a survival benefit. In Hodgkin lymphoma and aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma, several trials are ongoing. Some studies aim to investigate the use of PET in early identification of metabolic non-responders in order to intensify treatment to improve survival. Other studies aim at reducing toxicity without adversely affecting cure rates by safely de-escalating therapy in metabolic responders. In solid tumors the first PET response-adjusted treatment trials have been realized in adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction. These trials showed that patients with an early metabolic response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy benefit from this treatment, whereas metabolic non-responders should switch early to surgery, thus reducing the risk of tumor progression during chemotherapy and the risk of toxic death. The trials provide a model for designing response-guided treatment algorithms in other malignancies. PET-guided treatment algorithms are the promise of the near future; the choice of therapy, its intensity, and its duration will become better adjusted to the biology of the individual patient. Today’s major challenge is to investigate the impact on patient outcome of personalized response-adapted treatment concepts. PMID:23023063

  9. Psoriatic arthritis treatment: biological response modifiers.

    PubMed

    Mease, P J; Antoni, C E

    2005-03-01

    In recent years there has been a surge of interest in the treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders as a result of the development and application of targeted biological therapies. The elucidation of the overlapping cellular and cytokine immunopathology of such diverse conditions as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Crohn's disease, and psoriasis points to specific targets for bioengineered proteins or small molecules. Similar to clinical trials in RA, trials in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) have shown excellent clinical results with the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blockers, etanercept, infliximab, and adalimumab in a variety of domains including the joints, quality of life, function, and slowing of disease progress as evidenced radiologically. In addition, these agents have shown benefit in domains more unique to PsA, such as the skin lesions of psoriasis, enthesitis, and dactylitis, pointing out the similar pathogenesis of the disease in the skin, the tendons, and the synovial membrane. This therapy has been generally safe and well tolerated in clinical trials of PsA. Other logical candidates for targeted therapy in development include other anti-TNF agents, costimulatory blockade agents that affect T cell function, blockers of other cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1, 6, 12, 15, or 18, and B cell modulatory medicines. Also, it will be useful to learn more about the effects of combining traditional disease modifying drugs and the newer biologicals. PMID:15708944

  10. Pivotal Response Treatments for Autism: Communication, Social, and Academic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koegel, Robert L.; Kern Koegel, Lynn

    2006-01-01

    Recognized as one of the top state-of-the-art treatments for autism in the United States, the innovative Pivotal Response Treatment uses natural learning opportunities to target and modify key behaviors in children with autism, leading to widespread positive effects on communication, behavior, and social skills. The product of 20 years of…

  11. Examination of Studies Targeting Social Skills with Pivotal Response Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozkus Genc, Gulden; Vuran, Sezgin

    2013-01-01

    In early education, especially in effective teaching to children with autism spectrum disorders, the teaching methods which are applicable in natural settings like pivotal response treatment (PRT) are commonly used. It is one of the naturalistic intervention models aiming to facilitate the stimulant-response generalization, decrease the dependency…

  12. MRI for evaluation of treatment response in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Blazic, Ivana M; Campbell, Naomi M; Gollub, Marc J

    2016-08-01

    MRI plays an increasingly pivotal role in the clinical staging of rectal cancer in the baseline and post-treatment settings. An accurate evaluation of response to neoadjuvant treatment is crucial because of its major influence on patient management and quality of life. However, evaluation of treatment response is challenging for both imaging and clinical assessments owing to treatment-related inflammation and fibrosis. At one end of the spectrum are clinical yT4 rectal cancers, wherein precise post-treatment MRI evaluation of tumour spread is particularly important for avoiding unnecessary exenterative surgery. At the other extreme, for tumours with clinical near-complete response or clinical complete response to neoadjuvant treatment, less invasive treatment may be suitable instead of the standard surgical approach such as, for example, a "Watch and Wait" approach or perhaps local excision. Ideally, the goal of post-treatment MRI evaluation would be to identify these subgroups of patients so that they might be spared unnecessary surgical intervention. It is known that post-chemoradiation therapy restaging using conventional MR sequences is less accurate than baseline staging, particularly in confirming T0 disease, largely owing to the difficulty in distinguishing fibrosis, oedema and normal mucosa from small foci of residual tumour. However, there is a growing utilization of multiparametric MRI, which has superseded other types of evaluations and requires review and periodic re-evaluation. This commentary discusses the current status of multiparametric MRI in the post-treatment setting and the challenges facing imaging in general in the accurate determination of treatment response. PMID:27331883

  13. Patterns of Response After Preoperative Treatment in Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Gonzalez, Juan A.; Rodriguez, Javier; Hernandez-Lizoain, Jose L.; Ciervide, Raquel; Gaztanaga, Miren; San Miguel, Inigo; Arbea, Leire; Aristu, J. Javier; Chopitea, Ana; Martinez-Regueira, Fernando; Valenti, Victor; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus; Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Sola, Jesus J.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To analyze the rate of pathologic response in patients with locally advanced gastric cancer treated with preoperative chemotherapy with and without chemoradiation at our institution. Methods and Materials: From 2000 to 2007 patients were retrospectively identified who received preoperative treatment for gastric cancer (cT3-4/ N+) with induction chemotherapy (Ch) or with Ch followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy (45 Gy in 5 weeks) (ChRT). Surgery was planned 4-6 weeks after the completion of neoadjuvant treatment. Pathologic assessment was used to investigate the patterns of pathologic response after neoadjuvant treatment. Results: Sixty-one patients were analyzed. Of 61 patients, 58 (95%) underwent surgery. The R0 resection rate was 87%. Pathologic complete response was achieved in 12% of the patients. A major pathologic response (<10% of residual tumor) was observed in 53% of patients, and T downstaging was observed in 75%. Median follow-up was 38.7 months. Median disease-free survival (DFS) was 36.5 months. The only patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factor associated with pathologic response was the use of preoperative ChRT. Patients achieving major pathologic response had a 3-year actuarial DFS rate of 63%. Conclusions: The patterns of pathologic response after preoperative ChRT suggest encouraging intervals of DFS. Such a strategy may be of interest to be explored in gastric cancer.

  14. The Impact of PTSD Treatment on the Cortisol Awakening Response

    PubMed Central

    Pacella, Maria L.; Feeny, Norah; Zoellner, Lori; Delahanty, Douglas L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with abnormal functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis; however, limited research has examined whether cortisol levels change following successful PTSD treatment. The current study examined the impact of successful PTSD treatment on the cortisol awakening response (CAR). Method Twenty-nine adults participating in a treatment trial for chronic PTSD provided saliva samples (upon waking, and 30, 45, and 60-min post-waking) before and after receiving either prolonged exposure therapy or sertraline. PTSD responder status (i.e., loss or retention of a PTSD diagnosis) served as the predictor variable. Outcome measures included area under the curve with respect to ground and increase, reflecting total cortisol output and HPA axis reactivity, respectively. Results A series of hierarchical regressions revealed no significant main effects of PTSD responder status for either CAR outcome. However, a significant gender by treatment response interaction for cortisol reactivity revealed that female treatment non-responders displayed higher cortisol reactivity following treatment than female responders, whereas cortisol reactivity did not change pre- to post-treatment for male responders. Findings remained after controlling for age, trauma history, baseline medication status, baseline PTSD, and baseline depressive symptoms. Conclusion Loss of a PTSD diagnosis may contribute to decreased cortisol reactivity in females. Neuroendocrine changes following treatment may emerge only for specific subgroups, highlighting the importance of exploring treatment moderators. PMID:25327949

  15. Brain connectomics predict response to treatment in social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Whitfield-Gabrieli, S; Ghosh, S S; Nieto-Castanon, A; Saygin, Z; Doehrmann, O; Chai, X J; Reynolds, G O; Hofmann, S G; Pollack, M H; Gabrieli, J D E

    2016-05-01

    We asked whether brain connectomics can predict response to treatment for a neuropsychiatric disorder better than conventional clinical measures. Pre-treatment resting-state brain functional connectivity and diffusion-weighted structural connectivity were measured in 38 patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD) to predict subsequent treatment response to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). We used a priori bilateral anatomical amygdala seed-driven resting connectivity and probabilistic tractography of the right inferior longitudinal fasciculus together with a data-driven multivoxel pattern analysis of whole-brain resting-state connectivity before treatment to predict improvement in social anxiety after CBT. Each connectomic measure improved the prediction of individuals' treatment outcomes significantly better than a clinical measure of initial severity, and combining the multimodal connectomics yielded a fivefold improvement in predicting treatment response. Generalization of the findings was supported by leave-one-out cross-validation. After dividing patients into better or worse responders, logistic regression of connectomic predictors and initial severity combined with leave-one-out cross-validation yielded a categorical prediction of clinical improvement with 81% accuracy, 84% sensitivity and 78% specificity. Connectomics of the human brain, measured by widely available imaging methods, may provide brain-based biomarkers (neuromarkers) supporting precision medicine that better guide patients with neuropsychiatric diseases to optimal available treatments, and thus translate basic neuroimaging into medical practice. PMID:26260493

  16. Mechanisms underlying the antidepressant response and treatment resistance

    PubMed Central

    Levinstein, Marjorie R.; Samuels, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    Depression is a complex and heterogeneous disorder affecting millions of Americans. There are several different medications and other treatments that are available and effective for many patients with depression. However, a substantial percentage of patients fail to achieve remission with these currently available interventions, and relapse rates are high. Therefore, it is necessary to determine both the mechanisms underlying the antidepressant response and the differences between responders and non-responders to treatment. Delineation of these mechanisms largely relies on experiments that utilize animal models. Therefore, this review provides an overview of the various mouse models that are currently used to assess the antidepressant response, such as chronic mild stress, social defeat, and chronic corticosterone. We discuss how these mouse models can be used to advance our understanding of the differences between responders and non-responders to antidepressant treatment. We also provide an overview of experimental treatment modalities that are used for treatment-resistant depression, such as deep brain stimulation and ketamine administration. We will then review the various genetic polymorphisms and transgenic mice that display resistance to antidepressant treatment. Finally, we synthesize the published data to describe a potential neural circuit underlying the antidepressant response and treatment resistance. PMID:25018708

  17. Association between diabetes treatment adherence and parent-child agreement regarding treatment responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Blake Mark; Gadaire, Dana M; Holman, Kathryn; LeBlanc, Linda A

    2015-06-01

    When primary responsibility for Type 1 diabetes (DM1) treatment adherence transfers from parents to adolescents, glycemic control often suffers. Low rates of treatment adherence during this transition are possibly attributable to decreased parental involvement, disagreements between parents and children regarding treatment responsibilities, and increased family conflict. The current investigation assessed the relationships between each of these variables and glycemic control among youth diagnosed with DM1. Parent and child report questionnaires were completed by 64 parent-child dyads (ages 8-18) with a child diagnosed with DM1. HbA1c readings served as measures of glycemic control. Parental involvement in their children's treatment was reported to decline with age, however absolute levels of parent involvement were not significantly correlated with youth HbA1c levels. Parent-child agreement regarding treatment responsibility and reports of diabetes-related conflict were significant predictors of glycemic control. Results support previous findings implicating parent-child agreement regarding treatment responsibilities and family conflict as predictors of treatment adherence among youth with DM1. The current study found this relationship to be significant for a larger population of children for which past research has failed to find such an effect. Taken together, these findings suggest further research is warranted to identify effective methods for transferring treatment responsibilities from parents to children. PMID:25689164

  18. Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in California Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Aghajanzadeh, Arian; Wray, Craig; McKane, Aimee

    2015-08-30

    Previous research over a period of six years has identified wastewater treatment facilities as good candidates for demand response (DR), automated demand response (Auto-­DR), and Energy Efficiency (EE) measures. This report summarizes that work, including the characteristics of wastewater treatment facilities, the nature of the wastewater stream, energy used and demand, as well as details of the wastewater treatment process. It also discusses control systems and automated demand response opportunities. Furthermore, this report summarizes the DR potential of three wastewater treatment facilities. In particular, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has collected data at these facilities from control systems, submetered process equipment, utility electricity demand records, and governmental weather stations. The collected data were then used to generate a summary of wastewater power demand, factors affecting that demand, and demand response capabilities. These case studies show that facilities that have implemented energy efficiency measures and that have centralized control systems are well suited to shed or shift electrical loads in response to financial incentives, utility bill savings, and/or opportunities to enhance reliability of service. In summary, municipal wastewater treatment energy demand in California is large, and energy-­intensive equipment offers significant potential for automated demand response. In particular, large load reductions were achieved by targeting effluent pumps and centrifuges. One of the limiting factors to implementing demand response is the reaction of effluent turbidity to reduced aeration at an earlier stage of the process. Another limiting factor is that cogeneration capabilities of municipal facilities, including existing power purchase agreements and utility receptiveness to purchasing electricity from cogeneration facilities, limit a facility’s potential to participate in other DR activities.

  19. Predicting and Monitoring Cancer Treatment Response with DW-MRI

    PubMed Central

    Thoeny, Harriet C.; Ross, Brian D.

    2010-01-01

    An imaging biomarker that would provide for an early quantitative metric of clinical treatment response in cancer patients would provide for a paradigm shift in cancer care. Currently, non-image based clinical outcome metrics include morphology, clinical and laboratory parameters however, these are obtained relatively late following treatment. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) holds promise for use as a cancer treatment response biomarker as it is sensitive to macromolecular and microstructural changes which can occur at the cellular level earlier than anatomical changes during therapy. Studies have shown that successful treatment of a many tumor types can be detected using DW-MRI as an early increase in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Additionally, low pre-treatment ADC values of various tumors are often predictive of better outcome. These capabilities, once validated, could provide for an important opportunity to individualize therapy thereby minimizing unnecessary systemic toxicity associated with ineffective therapies with the additional advantage of improving overall patient health care and associated costs. In this report, we provide a brief technical overview of DW-MRI acquisition protocols, quantitative image analysis approaches and review studies which have implemented DW-MRI for the purpose of early prediction of cancer treatment response. PMID:20575076

  20. Parental Marital Discord and Treatment Response in Depressed Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amaya, Meredith M.; Reinecke, Mark A.; Silva, Susan G.; March, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that parental marital discord contributes to the development of internalizing and externalizing symptoms in children and adolescents. Few studies, however, have examined the association between parental marital discord and youth's response to treatment. The present study examined the impact of interparental discord on treatment…

  1. Personality, Stressful Life Events, and Treatment Response in Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulmash, Eric; Harkness, Kate L.; Stewart, Jeremy G.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2009-01-01

    The current study examined whether the personality traits of self-criticism or dependency moderated the effect of stressful life events on treatment response. Depressed outpatients (N = 113) were randomized to 16 weeks of cognitive-behavioral therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy, or antidepressant medication (ADM). Stressful life events were…

  2. Rethinking responsibility in offenders with acquired paedophilia: punishment or treatment?

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Frédéric; Focquaert, Farah

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the current neurobiological literature on the aetiology of developmental and acquired paedophilia and examines what the consequences could be in terms of responsibility and treatment for the latter. Addressing the question of responsibility and punishment of offenders with acquired paedophilia from a neurobiological perspective is controversial. Consequently it is essential to avoid hasty conclusions based strictly on neurobiological abnormality justifications. This study establishes a distinction between developmental and acquired paedophilia. The article investigates whether offenders who fulfil the diagnosis of acquired paedophilia should be held fully responsible, particularly in cases where the offender's conduct appears to result from volitionally controlled behaviour that is seemingly incompatible with a neurological cause. Moreover, the article explores how responsibility can be compromised when offenders with acquired paedophilia have (partially) preserved moral knowledge despite their sexual disorder. The article then examines the option of offering mandatory treatment as an alternative to imprisonment for offenders with acquired paedophilia. Furthermore, the article addresses the ethical issues related to offering any form of quasi-coercive treatment as a condition of release. This study concludes that decisions to fully or partially excuse an individual who fulfil the diagnosis of acquired paedophilia should take all relevant information into account, both neurobiological and other environmental evidence, and should proceed on a careful case by case analysis before sentencing or offering treatment. PMID:25725545

  3. Does Temperament Moderate Treatment Response in Adolescent Substance Use Disorders?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burleson, Joseph A.; Kaminer, Yifrah

    2008-01-01

    To assess whether temperament moderates response to treatment for substance use disorders (SUD), n = 88 consecutively referred adolescents with SUD were randomized to cognitive-behavioral (CBT) or psychoeducational (PET) therapies. Principal components analyses reduced the 10-attribute Dimensions of Temperament Revised (DOTS-R) to three factors…

  4. Trajectories of Response to Treatment for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Nathan R.; Dickstein, Benjamin D.; Schuster, Jennifer; Litz, Brett T.; Resick, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Research on the predictors of response to cognitive-behavioral treatments for PTSD has often produced inconsistent or ambiguous results. We argue this is in part due to the use of statistical techniques that explore relationships among the entire sample of participants rather than homogeneous subgroups. Using two large randomized controlled trials of Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT), CPT components, and Prolonged Exposure, we employed growth mixture modeling to identify distinct trajectories of treatment response and to determine the predictors of those trajectories. We determined that the participants' trajectories could be best represented by two latent classes, which we subsequently labeled responders (87% of the sample) and non-responders (13% of the sample). Notably, there was not a separate class for partial responders. Assignment to the non-responder class was associated with receiving the written accounts (WA) component of CPT, a pre-treatment diagnosis of major depression (MDD), and more pre-treatment hyperarousal symptoms. Thus, it appears that some individuals do not benefit from merely writing about their trauma and processing it with the therapist; they may also need to engage in cognitive restructuring to successfully ameliorate their symptoms. Additionally, those who meet criteria for MDD or have high levels of hyperarousal at the onset of treatment might require additional treatment or support. PMID:23046781

  5. Dynamic rendering of the heterogeneous cell response to anticancer treatments.

    PubMed

    Falcetta, Francesca; Lupi, Monica; Colombo, Valentina; Ubezio, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    The antiproliferative response to anticancer treatment is the result of concurrent responses in all cell cycle phases, extending over several cell generations, whose complexity is not captured by current methods. In the proposed experimental/computational approach, the contemporary use of time-lapse live cell microscopy and flow cytometric data supported the computer rendering of the proliferative process through the cell cycle and subsequent generations during/after treatment. The effects of treatments were modelled with modules describing the functional activity of the main pathways causing arrest, repair and cell death in each phase. A framework modelling environment was created, enabling us to apply different types of modules in each phase and test models at the complexity level justified by the available data. We challenged the method with time-course measures taken in parallel with flow cytometry and time-lapse live cell microscopy in X-ray-treated human ovarian cancer cells, spanning a wide range of doses. The most suitable model of the treatment, including the dose-response of each effect, was progressively built, combining modules with a rational strategy and fitting simultaneously all data of different doses and platforms. The final model gave for the first time the complete rendering in silico of the cycling process following X-ray exposure, providing separate and quantitative measures of the dose-dependence of G1, S and G2M checkpoint activities in subsequent generations, reconciling known effects of ionizing radiations and new insights in a unique scenario. PMID:24146610

  6. [Individual response to treatment: from Withering to contemporary medicine].

    PubMed

    Pagliaro, Luigi; Colli, Agostino; Bobbio, Marco

    2015-07-01

    This is an essay dealing with the 1785 cohort study by William Withering (the "account"), in which he reported the results of the treatment with foxglove (Digitalis purpurea) in 163 patients suffering from various forms of hydropsy (water retention). Withering reported the results of all patients, and classified them into responders and non-responders. He identified the responders as suffering from heart failure. In the 18th century, medical treatments were judged as successful if they complied with the criteria a priori of the theory of the four humors, and not on the patient's response to the treatment. Withering was the first not only to compare the patient's conditions before and after treatment, but also to identify the individual clinical characteristics of the patients who responded. In modern medicine, drugs are released on the market and approved for use after what is known as "population-derived clinical research", principally randomized controlled trials, and guidelines. More than 200 years ago, Withering anticipated the current and growing trend towards individual responses to treatment, and personalized medicine. PMID:26228721

  7. Covariate-adjusted response-adaptive designs for longitudinal treatment responses: PEMF trial revisited.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Atanu; Park, Eunsik; Bhattacharya, Rahul

    2012-08-01

    Response-adaptive designs have become popular for allocation of the entering patients among two or more competing treatments in a phase III clinical trial. Although there are a lot of designs for binary treatment responses, the number of designs involving covariates is very small. Sometimes the patients give repeated responses. The only available response-adaptive allocation design for repeated binary responses is the urn design by Biswas and Dewanji [Biswas A and Dewanji AA. Randomized longitudinal play-the-winner design for repeated binary data. ANZJS 2004; 46: 675-684; Biswas A and Dewanji A. Inference for a RPW-type clinical trial with repeated monitoring for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Biometr J 2004; 46: 769-779.], although it does not take care of the covariates of the patients in the allocation design. In this article, a covariate-adjusted response-adaptive randomisation procedure is developed using the log-odds ratio within the Bayesian framework for longitudinal binary responses. The small sample performance of the proposed allocation procedure is assessed through a simulation study. The proposed procedure is illustrated using some real data set. PMID:20974667

  8. Paroxetine treatment and the prolactin response to sumatriptan.

    PubMed

    Wing, Y K; Clifford, E M; Sheehan, B D; Campling, G M; Hockney, R A; Cowen, P J

    1996-04-01

    We studied the effect of the selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI), paroxetine (20 mg daily for 16 days) on the neuroendocrine, cardiovascular, thermic and subjective responses to the 5-HT1D receptor agonist, sumatriptan (6 mg, SC). Compared to placebo injection, sumatriptan lowered plasma prolactin and oral temperature and increased diastolic blood pressure. While paroxetine increased baseline prolactin concentration, it had no effect on any of the responses to sumatriptan. In addition, paroxetine did not alter concentrations of sumatriptan in plasma. No adverse reactions resulted from the combination of sumatriptan and paroxetine. Our findings suggest that combined treatment with sumatriptan and paroxetine in the doses used in this study is not necessarily contra-indicated. In addition, short-term SSRI treatment may not desensitise 5-HT1D autoreceptors in humans. PMID:8739554

  9. Measurement of response to treatment in colorectal liver metastases.

    PubMed Central

    Dworkin, M. J.; Burke, D.; Earlam, S.; Fordy, C.; Allen-Mersh, T. G.

    1995-01-01

    Assessment of tumour response to chemotherapy is important when assessing efficacy of treatment and comparing differing therapeutic regimens. Percentage hepatic replacement (PHR) is commonly used to assess response to treatment of colorectal hepatic metastases. PHR is dependent not only on tumour volume, but also on hepatic parenchymal volume. The effect of tumour growth on hepatic parenchymal volume is unclear but is of importance owing to its effect on PHR. We assessed tumour and hepatic parenchymal weights in an animal tumour model using dissection, and tumour and hepatic parenchymal volumes in patients with colorectal hepatic metastases using CT scanning, in order to establish how hepatic parenchyma varied with change in metastasis size. There was no significant correlation between tumour and liver parenchyma in either the animal model (r = -0.03, P > 0.05) or the patient study (r = 0.3, P < 0.05). This suggests that hepatic parenchymal volume was preserved in the presence of increasing tumour volume. In a further study of computerised tomographic (CT) scans before and after treatment in patients whose tumours either responded to chemotherapy or continued to grow, change in PHR (median proportion of PHR change = 0.40) significantly (P = 0.04) underestimated the change in tumour volume (median proportion of tumour volume change = 0.56), particularly at higher (> 400 ml) volumes. There was good correlation between change in tumour volume and WHO criteria in assigning patients to tumour growth, stable disease or tumour response categories. This study suggests that, in clinical trials comparing colorectal liver metastasis treatments, metastasis volume and not PHR should be used to assess extent of disease and the effect of treatment. PMID:7710957

  10. Treatment Response Evaluation and Follow-up in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Anil; Kumar, Ashish

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the major causes of morbidity, mortality and healthcare expenditure in patients with chronic liver disease. The management of HCC is evolving because of recently introduced novel therapeutic approaches. Optimal outcome requires an early and accurate assessment of tumor response to therapy. Current imaging modalities, such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging; provide reliable and reproducible anatomical data in order to demonstrate tumor burden changes. However, in the setting of novel targeted therapies and liver directed treatments, simple tumor anatomical changes can be less informative and usually appear later than biological changes. There has been a growing interest to monitor the therapeutic response, at an early phase of treatment, by measuring tumor viability and/or perfusion. Therefore the importance of tumor viability assessment is increasingly being recognized. The tumor viability measurement guidelines have recently been amended to include the measurement of only the longest diameter of the enhancing tumors to formally amend RECIST to modified RECIST (mRECIST). Viable tumor should be defined as uptake of contrast agent in the arterial phase. In this review, we discuss criteria of response evaluation in HCC and further follow-up of patients receiving curative and palliative treatment. PMID:25755604

  11. Response of a seagrass fish assemblage to improved wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Ourgaud, M; Ruitton, S; Bell, J D; Letourneur, Y; Harmelin, J G; Harmelin-Vivien, M L

    2015-01-15

    We compared the structure of a seagrass fish assemblage near a sewage outlet before and after improvements to wastewater treatment. To determine whether responses by the fish assemblage were due to changes in water quality or to other factors, comparisons were made with the structure of a fish assemblage from a nearby site unaffected by sewage effluent. Total species richness, density and biomass of fish, decreased at both sites over the 30-year period. An increase in mean trophic level near the sewage outlet following improvements in water quality indicated that wastewater treatment had another important effect. This result is consistent with the reductions in food webs supporting pelagic and benthic fishes that typically accompany decreases in nutrient inputs. Although improvements to wastewater treatment explained much of the variation in the structure of the fish assemblage at PC, our results also suggest that fishing and climate change, at both sites. PMID:25499183

  12. Trajectories of response to treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Stein, Nathan R; Dickstein, Benjamin D; Schuster, Jennifer; Litz, Brett T; Resick, Patricia A

    2012-12-01

    Research on the predictors of response to cognitive-behavioral treatments for PTSD has often produced inconsistent or ambiguous results. We argue this is in part due to the use of statistical techniques that explore relationships among the entire sample of participants rather than homogeneous subgroups. Using 2 large randomized controlled trials of Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT), CPT components, and Prolonged Exposure, we employed growth mixture modeling to identify distinct trajectories of treatment response and to determine the predictors of those trajectories. We determined that the participants' trajectories could be best represented by 2 latent classes, which we subsequently labeled responders (87% of the sample) and nonresponders (13% of the sample). Notably, there was not a separate class for partial responders. Assignment to the nonresponder class was associated with receiving the written accounts (WA) component of CPT, a pretreatment diagnosis of major depression (MDD), and more pretreatment hyperarousal symptoms. Thus, it appears that some individuals do not benefit from merely writing about their trauma and processing it with the therapist; they may also need to engage in cognitive restructuring to successfully ameliorate their symptoms. Additionally, those who meet criteria for MDD or have high levels of hyperarousal at the onset of treatment might require additional treatment or support. PMID:23046781

  13. Large granular lymphocyte leukemia: natural history and response to treatment.

    PubMed

    Fortune, Anne F; Kelly, Kevin; Sargent, Jeremy; O'Brien, David; Quinn, Fiona; Chadwick, Nick; Flynn, Catherine; Conneally, Eibhlin; Browne, Paul; Crotty, Gerard M; Thornton, Patrick; Vandenberghe, Elisabeth

    2010-05-01

    Large granular lymphocyte leukemia (T-LGL) is an indolent T lymphoproliferative disorder that was difficult to diagnose with certainty until clonality testing of the T cell receptor gene became routinely available. We studied the natural history and response to treatment in 25 consecutive patients with T-LGL diagnosed between 2004 and 2008 in which the diagnosis was confirmed by molecular analysis, to define an effective treatment algorithm. The median age at diagnosis was 61 years (range 27-78), with a male to female ratio of 1:1.8 and presenting features of fatigue (n = 13), recurrent infections (n = 9), and/or abnormal blood counts (n = 5). Thirteen patients with symptomatic disease were treated as follows: pentostatin (nine patients), cyclosporine (six patients), methotrexate (three patients), and alemtuzumab in two patients in whom pentostatin was ineffective. Pentostatin was the single most effective therapy, with a response rate of 75% and minimal toxicity. The overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) 37 months from diagnosis were 80% and 52%, respectively. Treatment of T-LGL should be reserved for patients with symptomatic disease, but in this series, pentostatin treatment was less toxic and more effective than cyclosporine or methotrexate. PMID:20367569

  14. Image Registration for Quantitative Parametric Response Mapping of Cancer Treatment Response1

    PubMed Central

    Boes, Jennifer L; Hoff, Benjamin A; Hylton, Nola; Pickles, Martin D; Turnbull, Lindsay W; Schott, Anne F; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Chamberlain, Ryan; Lemasson, Benjamin; Chenevert, Thomas L; Galbán, Craig J; Meyer, Charles R; Ross, Brian D

    2014-01-01

    Imaging biomarkers capable of early quantification of tumor response to therapy would provide an opportunity to individualize patient care. Image registration of longitudinal scans provides a method of detecting treatment associated changes within heterogeneous tumors by monitoring alterations in the quantitative value of individual voxels over time, which is unattainable by traditional volumetric-based histogram methods. The concepts involved in the use of image registration for tracking and quantifying breast cancer treatment response using parametric response mapping (PRM), a voxel-based analysis of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) scans, are presented. Application of PRM to breast tumor response detection is described, wherein robust registration solutions for tracking small changes in water diffusivity in breast tumors during therapy are required. Methodologies that employ simulations are presented for measuring expected statistical accuracy of PRM for response assessment. Test-retest clinical scans are used to yield estimates of system noise to indicate significant changes in voxel-based changes in water diffusivity. Overall, registration-based PRM image analysis provides significant opportunities for voxel-based image analysis to provide the required accuracy for early assessment of response to treatment in breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:24772213

  15. Validating indicators of treatment response: application to trichotillomania.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Samuel O; Rogers, Kate; Rusch, Natalie; McDonough, Lauren; Malloy, Elizabeth J; Falkenstein, Martha J; Banis, Maria; Haaga, David A F

    2014-09-01

    Different studies of the treatment of trichotillomania (TTM) have used varying standards to determine the proportion of patients who obtain clinically meaningful benefits, but there is little information on the similarity of results yielded by these methods or on their comparative validity. Data from a stepped-care (Step 1: Web-based self-help; Step 2: Individual behavior therapy; N = 60) treatment study of TTM were used to evaluate 7 potential standards: complete abstinence, ≥ 25% symptom reduction, recovery of normal functioning, and clinical significance (recovery + statistically reliable change), each of the last 3 being measured by self-report (Massachusetts General Hospital Hairpulling Scale; MGH-HPS) or interview (Psychiatric Institute Trichotillomania Scale). Depending on the metric, response rates ranged from 25 to 68%. All standards were significantly associated with one another, though less strongly for the 25% symptom reduction metrics. Concurrent (with deciding to enter Step 2 treatment) and predictive (with 3-month follow-up treatment satisfaction, TTM-related impairment, quality of life, and diagnosis) validity results were variable but generally strongest for clinical significance as measured via self-report. Routine reporting of the proportion of patients who make clinically significant improvement on the MGH-HPS, supplemented by data on complete abstinence, would bolster the interpretability of TTM treatment outcome findings. PMID:24708079

  16. Clinical Evaluation of Tuberculosis Viability Microscopy for Assessing Treatment Response

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Sumona; Sherman, Jonathan M.; Bravard, Marjory A.; Valencia, Teresa; Gilman, Robert H.; Evans, Carlton A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. It is difficult to determine whether early tuberculosis treatment is effective in reducing the infectiousness of patients' sputum, because culture takes weeks and conventional acid-fast sputum microscopy and molecular tests cannot differentiate live from dead tuberculosis. Methods. To assess treatment response, sputum samples (n = 124) from unselected patients (n = 35) with sputum microscopy–positive tuberculosis were tested pretreatment and after 3, 6, and 9 days of empiric first-line therapy. Tuberculosis quantitative viability microscopy with fluorescein diacetate, quantitative culture, and acid-fast auramine microscopy were all performed in triplicate. Results. Tuberculosis quantitative viability microscopy predicted quantitative culture results such that 76% of results agreed within ±1 logarithm (rS = 0.85; P < .0001). In 31 patients with non-multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis, viability and quantitative culture results approximately halved (both 0.27 log reduction, P < .001) daily. For patients with non-MDR tuberculosis and available data, by treatment day 9 there was a >10-fold reduction in viability in 100% (24/24) of cases and quantitative culture in 95% (19/20) of cases. Four other patients subsequently found to have MDR tuberculosis had no significant changes in viability (P = .4) or quantitative culture (P = .6) results during early treatment. The change in viability and quantitative culture results during early treatment differed significantly between patients with non-MDR tuberculosis and those with MDR tuberculosis (both P < .001). Acid-fast microscopy results changed little during early treatment, and this change was similar for non-MDR tuberculosis vs MDR tuberculosis (P = .6). Conclusions. Tuberculosis quantitative viability microscopy is a simple test that within 1 hour predicted quantitative culture results that became available weeks later, rapidly indicating whether patients were responding to tuberculosis therapy

  17. Novel Approaches to Thyroid Cancer Treatment and Response Assessment.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Ravinder K; Ho, Alan; Schöder, Heiko

    2016-03-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer has been increasing. After total thyroidectomy of well-differentiated thyroid tumors with intermediate- or high-risk features on pathology, radioiodine remains one of the mainstays of therapy for both thyroid remnant ablation as well as for treatment of metastatic disease. SPECT/CT, a relatively new modality, has been shown to play a pivotal role predominantly in the post-therapy setting by changing the risk stratification of patients with thyroid cancer. In the case of radioiodine treatment failure, FDG-PET/CT may provide prognostic information based on extent and intensity of metabolically active metastatic sites as well as serve as an important imaging test for response assessment in patients treated with chemotherapy, targeted therapies, or radiotherapy, thereby affecting patient management in multiple ways. The role of newer redifferentiation drugs has been evaluated with the use of I-124 PET/CT. PMID:26897715

  18. Changes in Anger in Relationship to Responsivity to PTSD Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Galovski, Tara E.; Elwood, Lisa S.; Blain, Leah M.; Resick, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the clinical course of different dimensions of anger and their relationship to change in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a sample of 139 female survivors of interpersonal violence suffering from PTSD. Specifically, this study evaluated differences in the rates of change in anger dimensions by responsivity to treatment status (responders, non-responders, and drop-outs). Responders and non-responders did not differ in rate of change on state anger and anger directed inward, suggesting that treatment led to improvements in these dimensions of anger regardless of final PTSD diagnosis. Responders did evidence statistically significantly more change in trait anger and control over one’s anger than did the non-responders, suggesting that changes in these dimensions of anger may be related to recovery from PTSD. Individuals who terminated therapy prematurely did not experience the same gains in state anger, trait anger, or anger-in as those who completed treatment. Differences in rates of change (linear versus quadratic growth patterns), particularly with respect to continued improvement in anger following treatment completion are discussed. PMID:25045416

  19. Transcriptomic Response to Nitric Oxide Treatment in Larix olgensis Henry

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoqing; Yang, Jingli; Li, Chenghao

    2015-01-01

    Larix olgensis Henry is an important coniferous species found in plantation forests in northeastern China, but it is vulnerable to pathogens. Nitric oxide (NO) is an important molecule involved in plant resistance to pathogens. To study the regulatory role of NO at the transcriptional level, we characterized the transcriptomic response of L. olgensis seedlings to sodium nitroprusside (SNP, NO donor) using Illumina sequencing and de novo transcriptome assembly. A significant number of putative metabolic pathways and functions associated with the unique sequences were identified. Genes related to plant pathogen infection (FLS2, WRKY33, MAPKKK, and PR1) were upregulated with SNP treatment. This report describes the potential contribution of NO to disease resistance in L. olgensis as induced by biotic stress. Our results provide a substantial contribution to the genomic and transcriptomic resources for L. olgensis, as well as expanding our understanding of the involvement of NO in defense responses at the transcriptional level. PMID:26633380

  20. Understanding the neuroinflammatory response following concussion to develop treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Zachary R.; Holahan, Matthew R.

    2012-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) have been associated with long-term cognitive deficits relating to trauma-induced neurodegeneration. These long-term deficits include impaired memory and attention, changes in executive function, emotional instability, and sensorimotor deficits. Furthermore, individuals with concussions show a high co-morbidity with a host of psychiatric illnesses (e.g., depression, anxiety, addiction) and dementia. The neurological damage seen in mTBI patients is the result of the impact forces and mechanical injury, followed by a delayed neuroimmune response that can last hours, days, and even months after the injury. As part of the neuroimmune response, a cascade of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines are released and can be detected at the site of injury as well as subcortical, and often contralateral, regions. It has been suggested that the delayed neuroinflammatory response to concussions is more damaging then the initial impact itself. However, evidence exists for favorable consequences of cytokine production following traumatic brain injuries as well. In some cases, treatments that reduce the inflammatory response will also hinder the brain's intrinsic repair mechanisms. At present, there is no evidence-based pharmacological treatment for concussions in humans. The ability to treat concussions with drug therapy requires an in-depth understanding of the pathophysiological and neuroinflammatory changes that accompany concussive injuries. The use of neurotrophic factors [e.g., nerve growth factor (NGF)] and anti-inflammatory agents as an adjunct for the management of post-concussion symptomology will be explored in this review. PMID:23248582

  1. PET Parametric Response Mapping for Clinical Monitoring and Treatment Response Evaluation in Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Ellingson, Benjamin M; Chen, Wei; Harris, Robert J; Pope, Whitney B; Lai, Albert; Nghiemphu, Phioanh L; Czernin, Johannes; Phelps, Michael E; Cloughesy, Timothy F

    2013-04-01

    PET parametric response maps (PRMs) are a provocative new molecular imaging technique for quantifying brain tumor response to therapy in individual patients. By aligning sequential PET scans over time using anatomic MR imaging information, the voxel-wise change in radiotracer uptake can be quantified and visualized. PET PRMs can be performed before and after a particular therapy to test whether the tumor is responding favorably, or performed relative to a distant time point to monitor changes through the course of a treatment. This article focuses on many of the technical details involved in generating, visualizing, and quantifying PET PRMs, and practical applications and example case studies. PMID:27157948

  2. Predicting Treatment Response for Oppositional Defiant and Conduct Disorder Using Pre-treatment Adrenal and Gonadal Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Shenk, Chad E.; Dorn, Lorah D.; Kolko, David J.; Susman, Elizabeth J.; Noll, Jennie G.; Bukstein, Oscar G.

    2016-01-01

    Variations in adrenal and gonadal hormone profiles have been linked to increased rates of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and conduct disorder (CD). These relationships suggest that certain hormone profiles may be related to how well children respond to psychological treatments for ODD and CD. The current study assessed whether pre-treatment profiles of adrenal and gonadal hormones predicted response to psychological treatment of ODD and CD. One hundred five children, 6 – 11 years old, participating in a randomized, clinical trial provided samples for cortisol, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, and androstenedione. Diagnostic interviews of ODD and CD were administered up to three years post-treatment to track treatment response. Group-based trajectory modeling identified two trajectories of treatment response: 1) a High-response trajectory where children demonstrated lower rates of an ODD or CD diagnosis throughout follow-up, and 2) a Low-response trajectory where children demonstrated higher rates of an ODD or CD diagnosis throughout follow-up. Hierarchical logistic regression predicting treatment response demonstrated that children with higher pre-treatment concentrations of testosterone were four times more likely to be in the Low-response trajectory. No other significant relationship existed between pre-treatment hormone profiles and treatment response. These results suggest that higher concentrations of testosterone are related to how well children diagnosed with ODD or CD respond to psychological treatment over the course of three years.

  3. [Treatment response of depressive patients with comorbid problem drink].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Hiromi; Hashimoto, Eri; Tayama, Masaya; Saito, Toshikazu

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the impact of Problem Drink on depression. Forty participants with depression were divided into 2 groups: non-Problem Drinker (NPD) group (n = 22) and Problem Drinker (PD) group (n = 18) according to Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) score (NPD < 12, PD > or = 12). Depression was assessed by the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview. The effect of medication on depressive symptoms was monitored over 12 weeks using the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D). Significant improvement in HAM-D score was observed at 2 weeks in NPD patients but not until 4 weeks in PD patients. Total HAM-D scores were lower in NPD than in PD patients at the end of the treatment period. Therapeutic doses (dose of antidepressant used was equivalent to greater than 75 mg of imipramine) of antidepressants resulted in significant improvement in HAM-D scores at 2 weeks in NPD patients, but not until 8 weeks in PD patients and brought lower HAM-D scores in NPD than in PD patients at the end of the treatment period. The AUDIT score and total alcohol consumption during the study period were negatively correlated to the improvement in HAM-D score. In NPD patients, the level of education of patients in remission was higher than those by patients not in remission. In contrast, level of education of patients in remission were similar to those in PD patients not in remission. The above results suggest that co-occurrence of alcohol use disorders with depression is associated with a lower response to antidepressants which may reflect not only the result of biological alterations in the brain by chronic ethanol ingestion but also an inhibitory effect of ethanol on antidepressant action in the brain. Drinking-related cognitive dysfunction may also relate to the decreased response to treatment in the depressed patients with comorbid Problem Drinker. PMID:24427900

  4. Heterogeneity Moderates Treatment Response among Patients with Binge Eating Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sysko, Robyn; Hildebrandt, Tom; Wilson, G. Terence; Wilfley, Denise E.; Agras, W. Stewart

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the study was to explore heterogeneity and differential treatment outcome among a sample of patients with binge eating disorder (BED). Method A latent class analysis was conducted with 205 treatment-seeking, overweight or obese individuals with BED randomized to Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT), Behavioral Weight Loss (BWL), or guided self-help based on Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBTgsh). A latent transition analysis tested the predictive validity of the latent class analysis model. Results A 4-class model yielded the best overall fit to the data. Class 1 was characterized by a lower mean body mass index (BMI) and increased physical activity. Individuals in class 2 reported the most binge eating, shape and weight concerns, compensatory behaviors, and negative affect. Class 3 patients reported similar binge eating frequencies to class 2 with lower levels of exercise or compensation. Class 4 was characterized by the highest average BMI, the most overeating episodes, fewer binge episodes, and an absence of compensatory behaviors. Classes 1 and 3 had the highest and lowest percentage of individuals with a past eating disorder diagnosis, respectively. The latent transition analysis found a higher probability of remission from binge eating among those receiving IPT in Class 2 and CBTgsh in Class 3. Conclusions The latent class analysis identified four distinct classes using baseline measures of eating disorder and depressive symptoms, body weight, and physical activity. Implications of the observed differential treatment response are discussed. PMID:20873903

  5. Can quantitative sensory testing predict responses to analgesic treatment?

    PubMed

    Grosen, K; Fischer, I W D; Olesen, A E; Drewes, A M

    2013-10-01

    The role of quantitative sensory testing (QST) in prediction of analgesic effect in humans is scarcely investigated. This updated review assesses the effectiveness in predicting analgesic effects in healthy volunteers, surgical patients and patients with chronic pain. A systematic review of English written, peer-reviewed articles was conducted using PubMed and Embase (1980-2013). Additional studies were identified by chain searching. Search terms included 'quantitative sensory testing', 'sensory testing' and 'analgesics'. Studies on the relationship between QST and response to analgesic treatment in human adults were included. Appraisal of the methodological quality of the included studies was based on evaluative criteria for prognostic studies. Fourteen studies (including 720 individuals) met the inclusion criteria. Significant correlations were observed between responses to analgesics and several QST parameters including (1) heat pain threshold in experimental human pain, (2) electrical and heat pain thresholds, pressure pain tolerance and suprathreshold heat pain in surgical patients, and (3) electrical and heat pain threshold and conditioned pain modulation in patients with chronic pain. Heterogeneity among studies was observed especially with regard to application of QST and type and use of analgesics. Although promising, the current evidence is not sufficiently robust to recommend the use of any specific QST parameter in predicting analgesic response. Future studies should focus on a range of different experimental pain modalities rather than a single static pain stimulation paradigm. PMID:23658120

  6. Excessive Cytolytic Responses Predict Tuberculosis Relapse After Apparently Successful Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cliff, Jacqueline M.; Cho, Jang-Eun; Lee, Ji-Sook; Ronacher, Katharina; King, Elizabeth C.; van Helden, Paul; Walzl, Gerhard; Dockrell, Hazel M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Currently, there are no tools to accurately predict tuberculosis relapse. This study aimed to determine whether patients who experience tuberculosis relapse have different immune responses to mycobacteria in vitro than patients who remain cured for 2 years. Methods. Patients with an initial episode of pulmonary tuberculosis were recruited in South Africa. Diluted blood, collected at diagnosis and after 2 and 4 weeks of treatment, was cultured with live Mycobacterium tuberculosis for 6 days, and cellular RNA was frozen. Gene expression in samples from 10 patients who subsequently experienced relapse, confirmed by strain genotyping, was compared to that in samples from patients who remained cured, using microarrays. Results. At diagnosis, expression of 668 genes was significantly different in samples from patients who experienced relapse, compared with expression in patients who remained successfully cured; these differences persisted for at least 4 weeks. Gene ontology and biological pathways analyses revealed significant upregulation of genes involved in cytotoxic cell-mediated killing. Results were confirmed by real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis in a wider patient cohort. Conclusions. These data show that patients who will subsequently experience relapse exhibit altered immune responses, including excessively robust cytolytic responses to M. tuberculosis in vitro, at the time of diagnosis, compared with patients who will achieve durable cure. Together with microbiological and clinical indices, these differences could be exploited in drug development. PMID:26351358

  7. Voice acoustic measures of depression severity and treatment response collected via interactive voice response (IVR) technology

    PubMed Central

    Mundt, James C.; Snyder, Peter J.; Cannizzaro, Michael S.; Chappie, Kara; Geralts, Dayna S.

    2011-01-01

    Efforts to develop more effective depression treatments are limited by assessment methods that rely on patient-reported or clinician judgments of symptom severity. Depression also affects speech. Research suggests several objective voice acoustic measures affected by depression can be obtained reliably over the telephone. Thirty-five physician-referred patients beginning treatment for depression were assessed weekly, using standard depression severity measures, during a six-week observational study. Speech samples were also obtained over the telephone each week using an IVR system to automate data collection. Several voice acoustic measures correlated significantly with depression severity. Patients responding to treatment had significantly greater pitch variability, paused less while speaking, and spoke faster than at baseline. Patients not responding to treatment did not show similar changes. Telephone standardization for obtaining voice data was identified as a critical factor influencing the reliability and quality of speech data. This study replicates and extends previous research with a larger sample of patients assessing clinical change associated with treatment. The feasibility of obtaining voice acoustic measures reflecting depression severity and response to treatment using computer-automated telephone data collection techniques is also established. Insight and guidance for future research needs are also identified. PMID:21253440

  8. Early treatment response predicted subsequent clinical response in patients with schizophrenia taking paliperidone extended-release.

    PubMed

    Yeh, En-Chi; Huang, Ming-Chyi; Tsai, Chang-Jer; Chen, Chun-Tse; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chiu, Chih-Chiang

    2015-11-30

    This 6-week open-labeled study investigated whether early treatment response in patients receiving paliperidone extended-release (paliperidone ER) can facilitate prediction of responses at Week 6. Patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were administered 9mg/day of paliperidone ER during the first 2 weeks, after which the dose was adjusted clinically. They were assessed on Days 0, 4, 7, 14, 28, and 42 by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). The serum concentrations of 9-hydroxyrisperidone were examined on Days 14 and 42. Among the 41 patients enrolled, 26 were classified as responders (≧50% improvement on total PANSS scores at Week 6). In the receiver-operator curves (ROC) analyses, the changes in total PANSS scores at Week 2 appeared to show more accurate predictability compared to Day 4 and Day 7. At Week 6, no significant correlation was observed between blood 9-hydroxyrisperidone concentration and the total score or changes of PANSS scores. The results suggest that early treatment response to paliperidone ER, particularly at Week 2, can serve as a suitable outcome predictor at Week 6. Using 9mg/day paliperidone ER as an initial dose for schizophrenia treatment exhibited relatively favorable tolerability and feasibility. PMID:26319696

  9. Plasma Biomarkers Can Predict Treatment Response in Tuberculosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Meng-Rui; Tsai, Chia-Jung; Wang, Wei-Jie; Chuang, Tzu-Yi; Yang, Chih-Mann; Chang, Lih-Yu; Lin, Ching-Kai; Wang, Jann-Yuan; Shu, Chin-Chong; Lee, Li-Na; Yu, Chong-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Despite numerous studies, there has been little progress in the use of biomarkers for predicting treatment response in patients with tuberculosis (TB). Patients with culture-confirmed pulmonary TB between 2010 and 2014 were prospectively recruited. Blood samples were taken upon diagnosis and 2 months after the start of standard anti-TB treatment. A pilot study utilizing measurement of TB-antigen-stimulated cytokines was conducted to select potential biomarkers for further testing. Outcome was defined as persistent culture positivity at 2 months into treatment. Of 167 enrolled patients, 26 had persistent culture positivity. RANTES, IL-22, MMP-8, IL-18, MIG, and Granzyme A were selected as potential biomarkers. For predicting persistent culture positivity, receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) analysis showed that initial RANTES (AUC: 0.725 [0.624–0.827]) and 2-month MMP-8 (AUC: 0.632 [0.512–0.713]) had good discriminative ability. Using a logistic regression model, low initial RANTES level (<440 pg/mL), initial smear positivity, and high 2-month MMP-8 level (>3000 pg/mL) were associated with persistent culture positivity. Low initial RANTES level and initial smear positivity had a positive predictive value of 60% (12/20) for persistent culture positivity, compared with 4% (3/75) among patients with high RANTES level and smear negativity upon diagnosis. In the 72 patients with either low RANTES/smear negativity or high RANTES/smear positivity upon diagnosis, the 2-month MMP-8 level had a positive and negative predictive value of 24 and 94%, respectively, for 2-month culture status. Aside from an initial sputum smear status, serum RANTES level at diagnosis and MMP-8 level at 2 months of treatment may be used to stratify risk for culture persistence. PMID:26426648

  10. Molecular response to aromatase inhibitor treatment in primary breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Alan; Urruticoechea, Ander; Dixon, J Michael; Dexter, Tim; Fenwick, Kerry; Ashworth, Alan; Drury, Suzanne; Larionov, Alexey; Young, Oliver; White, Sharon; Miller, William R; Evans, Dean B; Dowsett, Mitch

    2007-01-01

    Background Aromatase inhibitors such as anastrozole and letrozole are highly effective suppressants of estrogen synthesis in postmenopausal women and are the most effective endocrine treatments for hormone receptor positive breast cancer in such women. Little is known of the molecular effects of these agents on human breast carcinomas in vivo. Methods We randomly assigned primary estrogen receptor positive breast cancer patients to treatment with anastrozole or letrozole for 2 weeks before surgery. Expression profiling using cDNA arrays was conducted on pretreatment and post-treatment biopsies. Sample pairs from 34 patients provided sufficient RNA for analysis. Results Profound changes in gene expression were seen with both aromatase inhibitors, including many classical estrogen-dependent genes such as TFF1, CCND1, PDZK1 and AGR2, but also many other genes that are likely to represent secondary responses; decrease in the expression of proliferation-related genes were particularly prominent. Many upregulated genes are involved in extracellular matrix remodelling, including collagens and members of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan family (LUM, DCN, and ASPN). No significant differences were seen between letrozole and anastrozole in terms of molecular effects. The gene changes were integrated into a Global Index of Dependence on Estrogen (GIDE), which enumerates the genes changing by at least twofold with therapy. The GIDE varied markedly between tumours and related significantly to pretreatment levels of HER2 and changes in immunohistochemically detected Ki67. Conclusion Our findings identify the transcriptional signatures associated with aromatase inhibitor treatment of primary breast tumours. Larger datasets using this approach should enable identification of estrogen-dependent molecular changes, which are the determinants of benefit or resistance to endocrine therapy. PMID:17555561

  11. Proteomic response to acupuncture treatment in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xinsheng; Wang, Jiayou; Nabar, Neel R; Pan, Sanqiang; Tang, Chunzhi; Huang, Yong; Hao, Mufeng; Yang, Zhonghua; Ma, Chunmei; Zhang, Jin; Chew, Helen; He, Zhenquan; Yang, Junjun; Su, Baogui; Zhang, Jian; Liang, Jun; Sneed, Kevin B; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Previous animal and clinical studies have shown that acupuncture is an effective alternative treatment in the management of hypertension, but the mechanism is unclear. This study investigated the proteomic response in the nervous system to treatment at the Taichong (LR3) acupoint in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Unanesthetized rats were subject to 5-min daily acupuncture treatment for 7 days. Blood pressure was monitored over 7 days. After euthanasia on the 7(th) day, rat medullas were dissected, homogenized, and subject to 2D gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF analysis. The results indicate that blood pressure stabilized after the 5th day of acupuncture, and compared with non-acupoint treatment, Taichong-acupunctured rat's systolic pressure was reduced significantly (P<0.01), though not enough to bring blood pressure down to normal levels. The different treatment groups also showed differential protein expression: the 2D images revealed 571 ± 15 proteins in normal SD rats' medulla, 576 ± 31 proteins in SHR's medulla, 597 ± 44 proteins in medulla of SHR after acupuncturing Taichong, and 616 ± 18 proteins in medulla of SHR after acupuncturing non-acupoint. In the medulla of Taichong group, compared with non-acupoint group, seven proteins were down-regulated: heat shock protein-90, synapsin-1, pyruvate kinase isozyme, NAD-dependent deacetylase sirtuin-2, protein kinase C inhibitor protein 1, ubiquitin hydrolase isozyme L1, and myelin basic protein. Six proteins were up-regulated: glutamate dehydrogenase 1, aldehyde dehydrogenase 2, glutathione S-transferase M5, Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor 1, DJ-1 protein and superoxide dismutase. The altered expression of several proteins by acupuncture has been confirmed by ELISA, Western blot and qRT-PCR assays. The results indicate an increase in antioxidant enzymes in the medulla of the SHRs subject to acupuncture, which may provide partial explanation for the antihypertensive effect of acupuncture. Further

  12. Salivary Biomarkers of Periodontal Disease in Response to Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, William Michael; Lin, Yushun; Kryscio, Richard J.; Dawson, Dolphus R.; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.; Miller, Craig S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Salivary biomarkers of periodontitis were assessed longitudinally to determine response to therapy. Methods A 6-month case-controlled study of adults with chronic periodontitis was performed, with 33 participants receiving oral hygiene instructions (OHI) alone and 35 with scaling and root planing (SRP) combined with OHI. Saliva samples collected at week 0, 16 and 28 were analyzed for interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-8, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8), osteoprotegerin (OPG) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF)-α. Clinical measures of periodontal disease were recorded at each visit. Results All parameters of periodontal health improved significantly in both groups by week 16 (p<0.0001) with the SRP group demonstrating greater benefit at week 16 and 28. Baseline OPG and TNF-α levels changed significantly at both follow-up visits (p<0.03), regardless of treatment group. IL-1β and MMP-8 levels decreased significantly from baseline (p≤0.04) in the SRP group only. OPG, MMP-8 and MIP-1α were significantly reduced in responders compared with non-responders (p=0.04, 0.01, 0.05 respectively). In receiver operating characteristic analyses, MMP-8 produced the highest area under the curve (≥ 0.7; p=0.01). Conclusion Salivary levels of IL-1β, MMP-8, OPG and MIP-1α reflected disease severity and response to therapy suggesting their potential utility for monitoring periodontal disease status. PMID:21480939

  13. Gender differences in multiple sclerosis epidemiology and treatment response.

    PubMed

    Magyari, Melinda

    2016-03-01

    risk neither in puberty nor in adulthood. The apparent protective effect of childbirth does not appear to reflect postnatal child exposure. The only factor that may show association with a higher MS risk in women is working in agriculture but it was based on very small numbers and cannot contribute quantitatively to the incidence of MS in women. Women are generally more prone to autoimmune diseases than men, but significant increased occurrence of some other autoimmune diseases was only found in male MS cases in the period before clinical onset. None of the investigated autoimmune diseases occurred less frequently in MS patients than in control persons. Treatment response to interferon-β, expressed in relapse rate was independently influenced by gender and the presence of NAbs, but it seems that the presence of NAbs does not affect the treatment effect differently in women and men. The results indicate that men's and women's treatment response to interferon-β is similar. Females had a higher frequency of relapses than males. Our study did not reveal only one reason for the incidence increase, but as MS is multifactorial it is presumed that the incidence increase is caused by more than one factor, because women's lifestyle has undergone tremendous changes in the last half century. Our study contributes to clarification of this issue, with the role of pregnancies on the risk of MS. It is accepted that sex hormones have a clear immunologic involvement in the female predominance in MS, but there is no knowledge yet to explain the changes over time. PMID:26931196

  14. Modulation of Autophagy by Sorafenib: Effects on Treatment Response.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Domínguez, Nestor; Ordóñez, Raquel; Fernández, Anna; García-Palomo, Andres; Muntané, Jordi; González-Gallego, Javier; Mauriz, José L

    2016-01-01

    The multikinase inhibitor sorafenib is, at present, the only drug approved for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), one of the most lethal types of cancer worldwide. However, the increase in the number of sorafenib tumor resistant cells reduces efficiency. A better knowledge of the intracellular mechanism of the drug leading to reduced cell survival could help to improve the benefits of sorafenib therapy. Autophagy is a bulk cellular degradation process activated in a broad range of stress situations, which allows cells to degrade misfolded proteins or dysfunctional organelles. This cellular route can induce survival or death, depending on cell status and media signals. Sorafenib, alone or in combination with other drugs is able to induce autophagy, but cell response to the drug depends on the complex integrative crosstalk of different intracellular signals. In cancerous cells, autophagy can be regulated by different cellular pathways (Akt-related mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibition, 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) induction, dissociation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) family proteins from Beclin-1), or effects of some miRNAs. Inhibition of mTOR signaling by sorafenib and diminished interaction between Beclin-1 and myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1) have been related to induction of autophagy in HCC. Furthermore, changes in some miRNAs, such as miR-30α, are able to modulate autophagy and modify sensitivity in sorafenib-resistant cells. However, although AMPK phosphorylation by sorafenib seems to play a role in the antiproliferative action of the drug, it does not relate with modulation of autophagy. In this review, we present an updated overview of the effects of sorafenib on autophagy and its related activation pathways, analyzing in detail the involvement of autophagy on sorafenib sensitivity and resistance. PMID:27375485

  15. Modulation of Autophagy by Sorafenib: Effects on Treatment Response

    PubMed Central

    Prieto-Domínguez, Nestor; Ordóñez, Raquel; Fernández, Anna; García-Palomo, Andres; Muntané, Jordi; González-Gallego, Javier; Mauriz, José L.

    2016-01-01

    The multikinase inhibitor sorafenib is, at present, the only drug approved for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), one of the most lethal types of cancer worldwide. However, the increase in the number of sorafenib tumor resistant cells reduces efficiency. A better knowledge of the intracellular mechanism of the drug leading to reduced cell survival could help to improve the benefits of sorafenib therapy. Autophagy is a bulk cellular degradation process activated in a broad range of stress situations, which allows cells to degrade misfolded proteins or dysfunctional organelles. This cellular route can induce survival or death, depending on cell status and media signals. Sorafenib, alone or in combination with other drugs is able to induce autophagy, but cell response to the drug depends on the complex integrative crosstalk of different intracellular signals. In cancerous cells, autophagy can be regulated by different cellular pathways (Akt-related mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibition, 5′ AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) induction, dissociation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) family proteins from Beclin-1), or effects of some miRNAs. Inhibition of mTOR signaling by sorafenib and diminished interaction between Beclin-1 and myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1) have been related to induction of autophagy in HCC. Furthermore, changes in some miRNAs, such as miR-30α, are able to modulate autophagy and modify sensitivity in sorafenib-resistant cells. However, although AMPK phosphorylation by sorafenib seems to play a role in the antiproliferative action of the drug, it does not relate with modulation of autophagy. In this review, we present an updated overview of the effects of sorafenib on autophagy and its related activation pathways, analyzing in detail the involvement of autophagy on sorafenib sensitivity and resistance. PMID:27375485

  16. Initial response as a predictor of 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone treatment response in a prescription opioid dependent population

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Katherine A.; Griffin, Margaret L.; Connery, Hilary S.; Hilario, E. Yvette; Fiellin, David A.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.; Weiss, Roger D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Initial medication response has been shown to predict treatment outcome across a variety of substance use disorders, but no studies have examined the predictive power of initial response to buprenorphine-naloxone in the treatment of prescription opioid dependence. We therefore conducted a secondary analysis of data from the Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study to determine whether initial response to buprenorphine-naloxone predicted 12-week treatment outcome in a prescription opioid-dependent population. Method Using data from a multi-site, randomized controlled trial of buprenorphine-naloxone plus counseling for DSM-IV prescription opioid dependence (June 2006–July 2009), we conducted a secondary analysis to investigate the relationship between initial medication response and 12-week treatment outcome to establish how soon the efficacy of buprenorphine-naloxone could be predicted. Outcomes were determined from the Substance Use Report, a self-report measure of substance use, and confirmatory urinalysis. Predictive values were calculated to determine the importance of abstinence vs. use at various time points within the first month of treatment (week 1, weeks 1–2, 1–3, or 1–4) in predicting successful vs. unsuccessful treatment outcome (based on abstinence or near-abstinence from opioids) in the last 4 weeks of buprenorphine-naloxone treatment (weeks 9–12). Results Outcome was best predicted by medication response after two weeks of treatment. Two weeks of initial abstinence was moderately predictive of treatment success (positive predictive value = 71%), while opioid use in both of the first two weeks was strongly predictive of unsuccessful treatment outcome (negative predictive value (NPV) = 84%), especially when successful outcome was defined as total abstinence from opioids in weeks 9–12 (NPV = 94%). Conclusion Evaluating prescription opioid-dependent patients after two weeks of buprenorphine-naloxone treatment may help determine

  17. Income received during treatment does not affect response to contingency management treatments in cocaine-dependent outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Leonardo F.; Petry, Nancy M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prior studies find no effect of baseline income on response to contingency management (CM) interventions. However, income among substance disordered patients is variable, particularly at treatment entry. This study investigated the impact of during-treatment income, a more proximal estimate of economic resources at the time that CM is in effect, on response to standard treatment or the standard treatment plus CM. Method These secondary analyses included 418 cocaine dependent participants initiating community intensive outpatient treatment. We examined whether differences were present in pretreatment and during-treatment overall income, as well as specific income sources. We then conducted a series of regression models to investigate the impact of during-treatment income on treatment outcome. Results Participants’ during-treatment income was significantly lower compared to pretreatment income, and this difference was largely attributable to decreases in earned income, illegal income, and support from friends and family. Neither the main effect of income, nor the interaction of income and treatment condition, was significantly associated with treatment outcome. CM, however, was a significant predictor of improved treatment outcome relative to standard treatment. Income sources and some demographic characteristics were also significant predictors of outcomes; public assistance income was associated with improved outcomes and illegal income was associated with poorer outcomes. Conclusions These results suggest that substance abusers benefit from CM regardless of their income level, and these data add to the growing literature supporting the generalizability of CM across a variety of patient characteristics. PMID:23631869

  18. Delayed reward discounting predicts treatment response for heavy drinkers receiving smoking cessation treatment

    PubMed Central

    MacKillop, James; Kahler, Christopher W.

    2009-01-01

    Delayed reward discounting (DRD) is a behavioral economic index of impulsivity that reflects the extent to which an individual devalues a reward based on its delay in time (i.e., preference for smaller immediate rewards relative to larger delayed rewards). Current smokers exhibit greater DRD compared to non-smokers, but also exhibit greater DRD compared to ex-smokers, suggesting that either DRD is inversely associated with successful smoking cessation or that smoking cessation itself reduces DRD. In a sample of treatment-seeking smokers (n = 57, 61% male, 85% Caucasian) participating in a randomized controlled smoking cessation trial, the current study prospectively examined DRD for money in general and at three magnitudes in relation to time to the participants’ first lapse to smoking. Survival analysis using Cox proportional-hazards regression revealed that DRD predicted days to first lapse (ps < .05-.01) and did so beyond nicotine dependence, sensation-seeking, and income in covariate analyses, with the exception of small magnitude discounting. In addition, dichotomous comparisons revealed significantly more impulsive baseline discounting for individuals who had lapsed by the two week and eight week follow-up visits. These findings indicate that high levels of DRD reflect a risk factor for poor smoking cessation treatment response. Interrelationships among the variables assessed and clinical strategies to improve outcomes for smokers who are high in DRD are discussed. PMID:19570621

  19. The effect of childhood trauma on pharmacological treatment response in depressed inpatients.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Katie M; Porter, Richard J

    2012-12-30

    Childhood trauma and its association with pharmacological treatment response were examined in depressed inpatients. Treatment non-responders (n=31) reported significantly more severe trauma than treatment responders (n=25) and healthy controls (n=49), suggesting that the experience of childhood trauma in those hospitalised with depression can be detrimental to treatment success. PMID:22770764

  20. Cognitive-Behavioral and Response-Prevention Treatments for Bulimia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agras, W. Stewart; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Assessed treatment for bulimia nervosa among 77 female patients assigned to wait-list control, self-monitoring of caloric intake and purging behaviors, cognitive-behavioral treatment, and cognitive-behavioral treatment plus response prevention of vomiting. All treatment groups showed significant improvement; control group did not.…

  1. Treatment of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor–Resistant Depression in Adolescents: Predictors and Moderators of Treatment Response

    PubMed Central

    Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Emslie, Graham; Clarke, Greg; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Spirito, Anthony; Vitiello, Benedetto; Iyengar, Satish; Shamseddeen, Wael; Ritz, Louise; Birmaher, Boris; Ryan, Neal; Kennard, Betsy; Mayes, Taryn; DeBar, Lynn; McCracken, James; Strober, Michael; Suddath, Robert; Leonard, Henrietta; Porta, Giovanna; Keller, Martin; Brent, David

    2009-01-01

    Objective To advance knowledge regarding strategies for treating selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)–resistant depression in adolescents, we conducted a randomized controlled trial evaluating alternative treatment strategies. In primary analyses, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) combined with medication change was associated with higher rates of positive response to short-term (12-week) treatment than medication alone. This study examines predictors and moderators of treatment response, with the goal of informing efforts to match youths to optimal treatment strategies. Method Youths who had not improved during an adequate SSRI trial (N = 334) were randomized to an alternative SSRI, an alternative SSRI plus CBT, venlafaxine, or venlafaxine plus CBT. Analyses examined predictors and moderators of treatment response. Results Less severe depression, less family conflict, and absence of nonsuicidal self-injurious behavior predicted better treatment response status. Significant moderators of response to CBT + medication (combined) treatment were number of comorbid disorders and abuse history; hopelessness was marginally significant. The CBT/combined treatment superiority over medication alone was more evident among youths who had more comorbid disorders (particularly attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and anxiety disorders), no abuse history, and lower hopelessness. Further analyses revealed a stronger effect of combined CBT + medication treatment among youths who were older and white and had no nonsuicidal self-injurious behavior and longer prestudy pharmacotherapy. Conclusions Combined treatment with CBT and antidepressant medication may be more advantageous for adolescents whose depression is comorbid with other disorders. Given the additional costs of adding CBT to medication, consideration of moderators in clinical decision making can contribute to a more personalized and effective approach to treatment. PMID:19182688

  2. Treatment-Resistant Depressed Youth Show a Higher Response Rate If Treatment Ends during Summer School Break

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shamseddeen, Wael; Clarke, Gregory; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Ryan, Neal D.; Birmaher, Boris; Emslie, Graham; Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Porta, Giovanna; Mayes, Taryn; Keller, Martin B.; Brent, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: There is little work on the effect of school on response to treatment of depression, with available research suggesting that children and adolescents with school difficulties are less likely to respond to fluoxetine compared with those with no school difficulties. Method: Depressed adolescents in the Treatment of Resistant Depression in…

  3. Impact of Physical and Sexual Abuse on Treatment Response in the Treatment of Resistant Depression in Adolescent Study (TORDIA)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shamseddeen, Wael; Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Clarke, Gregory; Vitiello, Benedetto; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Birmaher, Boris; Keller, Martin B.; Emslie, Graham; Iyengar, Satish; Ryan, Neal D.; McCracken, James T.; Porta, Giovanna; Mayes, Taryn; Brent, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: We previously reported that a history of abuse was associated with a poorer response to combination treatment in the Treatment of Resistant Depression in Adolescents study (TORDIA). We now report on the nature and correlates of abuse that might explain these findings. Method: Youth who did not benefit from an adequate selective…

  4. Effectiveness of antidepressants and predictors of treatment response for depressed HIV patients in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Victoria K; Wagner, Glenn J; Nakasujja, Noeline; Dickens, Akena; Aunon, Frances; Musisi, Seggane

    2015-12-01

    Antidepressant medication is well established for the treatment of depression but little is known about its effectiveness for HIV populations in sub-Saharan Africa. This study examined the effectiveness of antidepressant treatment and predictors of treatment response among depressed HIV patients in Uganda. Data were obtained from two open-label trials in which 184 HIV patients were diagnosed with depression and started on antidepressants. Data at treatment baseline and month 6 were compared to assess treatment response, and baseline predictors of response were assessed. A total of 154 completed month 6, of whom 122 (79%) had responded to treatment and were no longer depressed (Patient Health Questionnaire-9, score < 5). Bivariate analysis found that education, CD4 count, general health functioning, physical health, pain, quality of life and social support variables were associated with antidepressant treatment response; however, only secondary education and social support independently predicted treatment response in logistic multiple regression analysis. Baseline depression severity was not associated with treatment response. In conclusion, antidepressants are effective in treating both moderate and more severe depression among persons living with HIV in Uganda, and education [OR (95% CI) = 4.33 (1.33-14.11)] and social support [OR (95% CI) = 1.54 (1.03-2.30)] were most predictive of treatment response. PMID:25525053

  5. Heterogeneity Moderates Treatment Response among Patients with Binge Eating Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sysko, Robyn; Hildebrandt, Tom; Wilson, G. Terence; Wilfley, Denise E.; Agras, W. Stewart

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to explore heterogeneity and differential treatment outcome among a sample of patients with binge eating disorder (BED). Method: A latent class analysis was conducted with 205 treatment-seeking, overweight or obese individuals with BED randomized to interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT), behavioral weight loss…

  6. Strongyle infections in ponies. I. Response to intermittent thiabendazole treatments.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, H J

    1976-01-01

    A group of seven ponies naturally infected with large numbers of small strongyles and raised under conditions to minimize reinfection were treated periodically over a three year span with thiabendazole at the rate of 44 mg/kg body weight. Based on the absence of worm eggs in the feces following each treatment, thiabendazole removed the adult strongyles present with a new population subsequently developing by maturation of inhibited larvae. It took as many as four or five treatments to eliminate or reduce significantly the worm burdens present in the ponies under the conditions of this study. Strongyle eggs started to reappear in the feces about six weeks after treatment and following the first treatment the mean egg counts rose to the pretreatment level. On successive treatments the interval for worm eggs to appear in the feces lengthened and mean egg counts never rose quite as high as immediate pretreatment levels. Hematological changes were not marked, although a small steady increase in the mean hemoglobin values and an equivalent small decrease in the mean eosinophil counts occurred in all ponies following each successive treatment. The study supports the rationale of regular anthelmintic treatment of horses in that even in the absence of reinfection, new burdens of adult worms develop following treatment. PMID:1000396

  7. Transcriptional profiling of apple fruits in response to heat treatment: involvement of a defense response during P. expansum infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat treatment of harvested fruit has been demonstrated to be an effective and safe approach for managing postharvest decay. In the present study, the effect of a hot water treatment (HT) (45 degrees C for 10 minutes) on the response of apple to blue mold infection was investigated. HT was applied...

  8. Cortisol Response Following Exposure Treatment for PTSD in Rape Victims.

    PubMed

    Gerardi, Maryrose; Rothbaum, Barbara O; Astin, Millie C; Kelley, Mary

    2010-06-01

    This study examined changes in salivary cortisol levels pre-to-post-treatment in adult female rape victims diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) randomly assigned to be treated with either Prolonged Exposure Therapy or Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing. Salivary cortisol was collected at baseline, session 3, and session 9. A significant decrease in salivary cortisol levels was observed in individuals classified as treatment responders in both treatment conditions. Findings suggest that successful exposure-based treatments for PTSD which result in trauma-related and depressive symptom reduction may impact the action of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis as measured by changes in level of salivary cortisol from pre-to-post-treatment. PMID:20526437

  9. Greater hippocampal volume is associated with PTSD treatment response.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Mikael; Shvil, Erel; Papini, Santiago; Chhetry, Binod T; Helpman, Liat; Markowitz, John C; Mann, J John; Neria, Yuval

    2016-06-30

    Previous research associates smaller hippocampal volume with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It is unclear, however, whether treatment affects hippocampal volume or vice versa. Seventy-six subjects, 40 PTSD patients and 36 matched trauma-exposed healthy resilient controls, underwent clinical assessments and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at baseline, and 10 weeks later, during which PTSD patients completed ten weeks of Prolonged Exposure (PE) treatment. The resilient controls and treatment responders (n=23) had greater baseline hippocampal volume than treatment non-responders (n=17) (p=0.012 and p=0.050, respectively), perhaps due to more robust fear-extinction capacity in both the initial phase after exposure to trauma and during treatment. PMID:27179314

  10. Neural Mechanisms of Improvements in Social Motivation after Pivotal Response Treatment: Two Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voos, Avery C.; Pelphrey, Kevin A.; Tirrell, Jonathan; Bolling, Danielle Z.; Vander Wyk, Brent; Kaiser, Martha D.; McPartland, James C.; Volkmar, Fred R.; Ventola, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Pivotal response treatment (PRT) is an empirically validated behavioral treatment that has widespread positive effects on communication, behavior, and social skills in young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). For the first time, functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to identify the neural correlates of successful response to…

  11. Rapid Response Predicts Treatment Outcomes in Binge Eating Disorder: Implications for Stepped Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masheb, Robin M.; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors examined rapid response in 75 overweight patients with binge eating disorder (BED) who participated in a randomized clinical trial of guided self-help treatments (cognitive-behavioral therapy [CBTgsh] and behavioral weight loss [BWLgsh]). Rapid response, defined as a 65% or greater reduction in binge eating by the 4th treatment week,…

  12. Response of postharvest tree nut lepidopteran pests to vacuum treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Industry concerns over insect resistance, regulatory action, and the needs of organic processors have renewed interest in nonchemical alternative postharvest treatments to fumigants used for California tree nuts. The development of inexpensive polyvinyl chloride containers capable of holding low pre...

  13. Life Stress and Treatment Course of Recurrent Depression: 1. Response during Index Episode.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Scott M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Conducted prospective study of 91 individuals treated for recurrent depression. Specific forms of stress occurring before treatment entry or during first 6 weeks of treatment predicted poor clinical response both after 16 weeks and after more extended intervention period. Severe stress occurring early in treatment predicted loner time to attain…

  14. Brief Parent Training in Pivotal Response Treatment for Preschoolers with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coolican, Jamesie; Smith, Isabel M.; Bryson, Susan E.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Evidence of improved outcomes with early behavioural intervention has placed the early treatment of autism as a health priority. However, long waiting lists for treatment often preclude timely access, raising the question of whether parents could be trained in the interim. Parent training in pivotal response treatment (PRT) has been…

  15. Predictors of Treatment Response for Suicidal Youth Referred for Emergency Psychiatric Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huey, Jr., Stanley J.; Henggeler, Scott W.; Rowland, Melisa D.; Halliday-Boykins, Colleen A.; Cunningham, Phillippe B.; Pickrel, Susan G.

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated factors that predicted poor treatment response for 70 suicidal youth (ages 10 to 17 years; 67% African American) who received either multisystemic therapy (MST) or inpatient psychiatric hospitalization. Following treatment, suicidal youth were classified as either treatment responders or nonresponders based on caregiver or…

  16. Pivotal Response Treatment Parent Training for Autism: Findings from a 3-Month Follow-Up Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gengoux, Grace W.; Berquist, Kari L.; Salzman, Emma; Schapp, Salena; Phillips, Jennifer M.; Frazier, Thomas W.; Minjarez, Mendy B.; Hardan, Antonio Y.

    2015-01-01

    This study's objective was to assess maintenance of treatment effects 3 months after completion of a 12-week Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT) parent education group. Families who completed the active treatment (N = 23) were followed for an additional 12 weeks to measure changes in language and cognitive skills. Results indicated a significant…

  17. Current Approaches, Challenges and Future Directions for Monitoring Treatment Response in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, T.J.; Torre, T.; Grob, M.; Yu, J.; Avital, I.; Brücher, BLDM; Stojadinovic, A.; Man, Y.G.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed non-cutaneous neoplasm in men in the United States and the second leading cause of cancer mortality. One in 7 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during their lifetime. As a result, monitoring treatment response is of vital importance. The cornerstone of current approaches in monitoring treatment response remains the prostate-specific antigen (PSA). However, with the limitations of PSA come challenges in our ability to monitor treatment success. Defining PSA response is different depending on the individual treatment rendered potentially making it difficult for those not trained in urologic oncology to understand. Furthermore, standard treatment response criteria do not apply to prostate cancer further complicating the issue of treatment response. Historically, prostate cancer has been difficult to image and no single modality has been consistently relied upon to measure treatment response. However, with newer imaging modalities and advances in our understanding and utilization of specific biomarkers, the future for monitoring treatment response in prostate cancer looks bright. PMID:24396494

  18. Behavioral activation: a strategy to enhance treatment response.

    PubMed

    Sudak, Donna M; Majeed, Muhammad H; Youngman, Branden

    2014-07-01

    Behavioral activation is an empirically validated treatment for depression pioneered in 1973 by Ferster, based on B.F. Skinner's behavioral principles. After publication of Beck's work on cognitive therapy, the boundaries of behavioral and cognitive therapies were blurred and the two now overlap substantially. Behavioral activation is also used as a stand-alone treatment and can also be effective in conjunction with antidepressant medication. Case conceptualization in behavioral activation entails an assessment of the behaviors that the patient has stopped that produce pleasure or are of importance, as well as behaviors essential to self-care. Activity monitoring, which provides treatment targets and leads to the case conceptualization in behavioral activation, consists of using charts, forms, or other prompts to track the relationship between activities and other variables (e.g., mood, enjoyment). That technique is also used to target rumination, procrastination, and avoidance and may also be helpful for patients with psychosis. PMID:25036582

  19. Spinal cord response to laser treatment of injured peripheral nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Rochkind, S.; Vogler, I.; Barr-Nea, L. )

    1990-01-01

    The authors describe the changes occurring in the spinal cord of rats subjected to crush injury of the sciatic nerve followed by low-power laser irradiation of the injured nerve. Such laser treatment of the crushed peripheral nerve has been found to mitigate the degenerative changes in the corresponding neurons of the spinal cord and induce proliferation of neuroglia both in astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. This suggests a higher metabolism in neurons and a better ability for myelin production under the influence of laser treatment.

  20. Loss of Response to Melatonin Treatment Is Associated with Slow Melatonin Metabolism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braam, W.; van Geijlswijk, I.; Keijzer, Henry; Smits, Marcel G.; Didden, Robert; Curfs, Leopold M. G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: In some of our patients with intellectual disability (ID) and sleep problems, the initial good response to melatonin disappeared within a few weeks after starting treatment, while the good response returned only after considerable dose reduction. The cause for this loss of response to melatonin is yet unknown. We hypothesise that this…

  1. Treatment Response to an Intensive Summer Treatment Program for Adolescents with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Margaret H.; Smith, Bradley H.; Evans, Steven W.; Pelham, William E.; Gnagy, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: There are presently almost no empirically validated treatments for adolescents with ADHD. However, in childhood, behavioral treatments for ADHD typically include behavioral parent training, classroom interventions, and intensive child-directed interventions. Method: The present investigation examines treatment gains following an 8-week…

  2. Amygdala response to explicit sad face stimuli at baseline predicts antidepressant treatment response to scopolamine in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Szczepanik, Joanna; Nugent, Allison C; Drevets, Wayne C; Khanna, Ashish; Zarate, Carlos A; Furey, Maura L

    2016-08-30

    The muscarinic antagonist scopolamine produces rapid antidepressant effects in individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD). In healthy subjects, manipulation of acetyl-cholinergic transmission modulates attention in a stimulus-dependent manner. This study tested the hypothesis that baseline amygdalar activity in response to emotional stimuli correlates with antidepressant treatment response to scopolamine and could thus potentially predict treatment outcome. MDD patients and healthy controls performed an attention shifting task involving emotional faces while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We found that blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal in the amygdala acquired while MDD patients processed sad face stimuli correlated positively with antidepressant response to scopolamine. Amygdalar response to sad faces in MDD patients who did not respond to scopolamine did not differ from that of healthy controls. This suggests that the pre-treatment task elicited amygdalar activity that may constitute a biomarker of antidepressant treatment response to scopolamine. Furthermore, in MDD patients who responded to scopolamine, we observed a post-scopolamine stimulus processing shift towards a pattern demonstrated by healthy controls, indicating a change in stimulus-dependent neural response potentially driven by attenuated cholinergic activity in the amygdala. PMID:27366831

  3. Perceptions of the Causes of Obesity and Responsiveness to Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartigan, Kevin J.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Examined whether obese subjects' causal attributions of their weight problems to ability, effort, task difficulty, and luck affect how much weight they lose as a function of treatment. Results indicated the most powerful predictor of positive weight status was subjects' perception that they had the ability to lose weight. (Author)

  4. White-matter connectivity related to paliperidone treatment response in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Kyoung; Kim, Borah; Lee, Kang Soo; Kim, Chan Mo; Bang, Seong Yun; Choi, Tai Kiu; Lee, Sang-Hyuk

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine whether white-matter (WM) connectivity of patients with schizophrenia at early stage of treatment is related to treatment response after paliperidone extended-release (ER) treatment. Forty-one patients with schizophrenia and 17 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects were included in this study. Brain magnetic resonance scans at 3 Tesla were conducted at early stage of treatment. Voxel-wise statistical analysis of the fractional anisotropy (FA) data was performed using Tract-Based Spatial Statistics. At baseline and eight weeks after paliperidone treatment, patients were assessed using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, the Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms and the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms. Among the patients with schizophrenia, the FA values of the corpus callosum, corona radiata, internal capsule, external capsule, superior longitudinal fasciculus and fronto-temporal WM regions showed significant negative correlations with scores of the treatment response. The current study suggests that the treatment response after paliperidone ER treatment may be associated with the fronto-temporo-limbic WM connectivity at early stage of treatment in patients with schizophrenia, and it could be used as a predictor of treatment response to paliperidone ER treatment after studies with large samples verify these results. PMID:26755544

  5. RAPID ASSAYS OF PLANT RESPONSES TO HERBICIDE TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a search for rapid responses to chemical stress, uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation and photosynthetic inhibitors were tested on nitrite and nitrate assimilation. In addition, three herbicides--Atrazine, 2,4-D and Dinoseb--were tested for their effectiveness on affecting ...

  6. Determinants of Pain Treatment Response and Non-Response: Identification of TMD Patient Subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Litt, Mark D.; Porto, Felipe B.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine if we could identify a specific subtype of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain patients that does not respond to treatment. Patients were 101 men and women with chronic TMD pain recruited from the community and randomly assigned to one of two treatment conditions: a standard conservative care (STD) condition or a standard care plus cognitive-behavioral treatment condition (STD+CBT) in which patients received all elements of STD, but also received cognitive-behavioral coping skills training. Growth mixture modeling, incorporating a series of treatment-related predictors, was used to distinguish several distinct classes of responders or non-responders to treatment based on reported pain over a one-year follow-up period. Results indicated that treatment non-responders accounted for 16% of the sample, and did not differ from treatment responders on demographics or temporomandibular joint pathology, but that they reported more psychiatric symptoms, poorer coping, and higher levels of catastrophizing. Treatment-related predictors of membership in treatment responder groups versus the non-responder group included the addition of CBT to standard treatment, treatment attendance, and decreasing catastrophization. It was concluded that CBT may be made more efficacious for TMD patients by placing further emphasis on decreasing catastrophization and on individualizing care. PMID:24094979

  7. Prolonged treatment response in aggressive natural killer cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Osuji, N; Matutes, E; Morilla, A; Del Giudice, I; Wotherspoon, A; Catovsky, D

    2005-05-01

    We describe a case of natural killer (NK) cell leukemia with acute presentation, systemic symptoms and hepatosplenomegaly. The uniform and aberrant phenotype of NK cells with infiltration of bone marrow and spleen was in keeping with a malignant diagnosis. Aggressive presentation was demonstrated by marked constitutional symptoms and significant tumor burden (liver, spleen, blood, bone marrow). The subsequent clinical course has been indolent, but this may have been influenced by treatment. Treatment consisted sequentially of splenectomy, intravenous pentostatin and the combination of cyclosporine A and recombinant human erythropoietin and has resulted in survival of over 48 months. We discuss the difficulties in the diagnosis of this condition, explore possible causes of cytopenia(s), and highlight the role of immunosuppression in controlling disease manifestations in large granular lymphocyte proliferative disorders. PMID:16019515

  8. Sex offenders' response to treatment and its association with recidivism as a function of psychopathy.

    PubMed

    Langton, Calvin M; Barbaree, Howard E; Harkins, Leigh; Peacock, Edward J

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between recidivism and ratings of response to specialized cognitive behavioral treatment conducted in a prison setting among 418 sex offenders released to the community for an average follow-up period of over 5 years. As well as testing for a main effect for treatment ratings, the potential role of psychopathy assessed using the Psychopathy Checklist--Revised (PCL-R) as a moderator of response to treatment was investigated. Ratings of response to treatment failed to predict either serious (violent including sexual) or sexual recidivism. For the more inclusive outcome of serious recidivism, there was no significant interaction between psychopathy and treatment ratings; however, the ubiquitous effect of psychopathy on recidivism was found to be significant. For sexual recidivism, psychopathy was not significant as a main effect, but a significant interaction between psychopathy and treatment ratings was found. Among sex offenders with PCL-R scores of 25 or higher, those with ratings reflecting a more negative response to treatment recidivated sexually at a faster rate than others. This interaction effect was not significant when treatment noncompleters were removed from the data set. The results were discussed in terms of the methodology involved in the assessment of response to treatment among sex offenders. PMID:16598661

  9. Atypical depressive symptoms as a predictor of treatment response to exercise in Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Rethorst, Chad D; Tu, Jian; Carmody, Thomas J; Greer, Tracy L; Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2016-08-01

    Effective treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) will require the development of alternative treatments and the ability for clinicians to match patients with the treatment likely to produce the greatest effect. We examined atypical depression subtype as a predictor of treatment response to aerobic exercise augmentation in persons with non-remitted MDD. Our results revealed a small-to-moderate effect, particularly in a group assigned to high-dose exercise (semi-partial eta-squared =0.0335, p=0.0735), indicating that those with atypical depression tended to have larger treatment response to exercise. Through this hypothesis-generating analysis, we indicate the need for research to examine depression subtype, along with other demographic, clinical and biological factors as predictors of treatment response to exercise. PMID:27136412

  10. Prefrontal Reactivity to Social Signals of Threat as a Predictor of Treatment Response in Anxious Youth.

    PubMed

    Kujawa, Autumn; Swain, James E; Hanna, Gregory L; Koschmann, Elizabeth; Simpson, David; Connolly, Sucheta; Fitzgerald, Kate D; Monk, Christopher S; Phan, K Luan

    2016-07-01

    Neuroimaging has shown promise as a tool to predict likelihood of treatment response in adult anxiety disorders, with potential implications for clinical decision-making. Despite the relatively high prevalence and emergence of anxiety disorders in youth, very little work has evaluated neural predictors of response to treatment. The goal of the current study was to examine brain function during emotional face processing as a predictor of response to treatment in children and adolescents (age 7-19 years; N=41) with generalized, social, and/or separation anxiety disorder. Prior to beginning treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) sertraline or cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), participants completed an emotional faces matching task during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Whole brain responses to threatening (ie, angry and fearful) and happy faces were examined as predictors of change in anxiety severity following treatment. Greater activation in inferior and superior frontal gyri, including dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, as well as precentral/postcentral gyri during processing of threatening faces predicted greater response to CBT and SSRI treatment. For processing of happy faces, activation in postcentral gyrus was a significant predictor of treatment response. Post-hoc analyses indicated that effects were not significantly moderated by type of treatment. Findings suggest that greater activation in prefrontal regions involved in appraising and regulating responses to social signals of threat predict better response to SSRI and CBT treatment in anxious youth and that neuroimaging may be a useful tool for predicting how youth will respond to treatment. PMID:26708107

  11. Inflammatory response in heroin addicts undergoing methadone maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yuan-Yu; Yang, Szu-Nian; Lin, Jyh-Chyang; Chang, Junn-Liang; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Lo, Wan-Yu

    2015-03-30

    Opioid addiction influences many physiological functions including reactions of the immune system. The objective of this study was to investigate the immune system function in heroin addicted patients undergoing methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) compared to healthy controls. We tested the cytokine production of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α from a group of heroin addicts (n=34) and healthy controls (n=20). The results show that production of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 was significantly higher in the group of methadone-maintained patients than in the healthy control group. Plasma TNF-α and IL-6 levels were significantly correlated with the dairy methadone dosage administered, and the IL-1β level was significantly correlated with the duration of methadone maintenance treatment. These findings suggest that methadone maintenance treatment influences the immune system functions of opioid-dependent patients and may also induce long-term systemic inflammation. PMID:25660662

  12. Rapid response predicts treatment outcomes in binge eating disorder: implications for stepped care.

    PubMed

    Masheb, Robin M; Grilo, Carlos M

    2007-08-01

    The authors examined rapid response in 75 overweight patients with binge eating disorder (BED) who participated in a randomized clinical trial of guided self-help treatments (cognitive-behavioral therapy [CBTgsh] and behavioral weight loss [BWLgsh]). Rapid response, defined as a 65% or greater reduction in binge eating by the 4th treatment week, occurred in 62% of CBTgsh and 47% of BWLgsh participants. Rapid response was unrelated to most patient characteristics except for eating psychopathology and depressive symptoms. Participants with rapid response were more likely to achieve binge remission and had greater improvements in overall eating pathology and depressive symptomatology than participants without rapid response. Rapid response had different prognostic significance for the 2 treatments. In terms of binge eating, participants receiving CBTgsh, but not BWLgsh, did equally well regardless of whether they experienced rapid response. In terms of increasing restraint and weight loss, participants with rapid response receiving BWLgsh had greater restraint and weight loss than participants receiving CBTgsh. Rapid response has utility for predicting outcomes, provides evidence for specificity of treatment effects, and has implications for stepped care treatment models of BED. PMID:17663617

  13. Temporal Treatment of a Thermal Response for Defect Depth Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plotnikov, Y. A.; Winfree, W. P.

    2004-01-01

    Transient thermography, which employs pulse surface heating of an inspected component followed by acquisition of the thermal decay stage, is gaining wider acceptance as a result of its remoteness and rapidness. Flaws in the component s material may induce a thermal contrast in surface thermograms. An important issue in transient thermography is estimating the depth of a subsurface flaw from the thermal response. This improves the quantitative ability of the thermal evaluation: from one scan it is possible to locate regions of anomalies in thickness (caused by corrosion) and estimate the implications of the flaw on the integrity of the structure. Our research focuses on thick composite aircraft components. A long square heating pulse and several minutes observation period are required to receive an adequate thermal response from such a component. Application of various time-related informative parameters of the thermal response for depth estimation is discussed. A three-dimensional finite difference model of heat propagation in solids in Cartesian coordinates is used to simulate the thermographic process. Typical physical properties of polymer graphite composites are assumed for the model.

  14. Perfusion CT imaging of treatment response in oncology.

    PubMed

    Prezzi, Davide; Khan, Aisha; Goh, Vicky

    2015-12-01

    Perfusion CT was first described in the 1970s but has become accepted as a clinical technique in recent years. In oncological practice Perfusion CT allows the downstream effects of therapies on the tumour vasculature to be monitored. From the dynamic changes in tumour and vascular enhancement following intravenous iodinated contrast agent administration, qualitative and quantitative parameters may be derived that reflect tumour perfusion, blood volume, and microcirculatory changes with treatment. This review outlines the mechanisms of action of available therapies and state-of-the-art imaging practice. PMID:25864440

  15. Interpersonal impacts mediate the association between personality and treatment response in major depression.

    PubMed

    Dermody, Sarah S; Quilty, Lena C; Bagby, R Michael

    2016-07-01

    Personality, as characterized by the Five-Factor Model, predicts response to psychotherapy for depression. To explain how personality impacts treatment response, the present study investigated patient and therapist interpersonal processes in treatment sessions as an explanatory pathway. A clinical trial was conducted in which 103 outpatients (mean age: 41.17 years, 65% female) with primary major depressive disorder completed 16-20 weeks of cognitive-behavioral or interpersonal therapy. Before treatment, patients completed the Revised NEO Personality Inventory to assess personality domains (neuroticism, extraversion, openness-to-experience, agreeableness, and conscientiousness). After 3 and 13 weeks, patient interpersonal behavior was rated by the therapist and vice versa to determine levels of patient and therapist communal and agentic behaviors. Depression levels were measured before and after treatment. Structural equation modeling supported that patients' interpersonal behavior during therapy mediated the associations between pretreatment personality and depression treatment outcome. Specifically, extraversion, conscientiousness, and neuroticism (inverse) predicted higher levels of patient communion throughout treatment, which was in turn associated with improved treatment outcomes. Furthermore, patient agreeableness was inversely associated with agency throughout treatment, which was linked to poorer treatment response. Therapist interpersonal behavior was not a significant mediator. Results suggest that patient interpersonal behavior during treatment may be one way that patient personality impacts clinical outcomes in depression. Results underscore the clinical utility of Five-Factor Model domains in treatment process and outcome. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27031606

  16. Peer-Nominated Deviant Talk within Residential Treatment: Individual and Group Influences on Treatment Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zakriski, Audrey L.; Wright, Jack C.; Cardoos, Stephanie L.

    2011-01-01

    This research examined deviant talk during summer residential treatment using peer nominations and extensive field observations. Participants were 239 youth (M age = 12.62, SD = 2.60; 67% male), nested in 26 treatment groups. Deviant talk was present in this setting, showed individual differences, and increased over time, especially for younger…

  17. Impact on allergic immune response after treatment with vitamin A

    PubMed Central

    Matheu, Victor; Berggård, Karin; Barrios, Yvelise; Barrios, Ysamar; Arnau, Maria-Rosa; Zubeldia, Jose M; Baeza, Maria L; Back, Ove; Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh

    2009-01-01

    Background Vitamin A may have some influence on the immune system, but the role in allergy modulation is still unclear. Objective To clarify whether high levels of retinoic acid (RA) affects allergic response in vivo, we used a murine experimental model of airway allergic disease. Methods Ovalbumin (OVA)-immunization/OVA-challenge (OVA/OVA) and house dust mite (HDM)-immunization/HDM-challenge (HDM/HDM) experimental murine models of allergic airway disease, using C57Bl.10/Q groups of mice (n = 10) treated subcutaneously with different concentrations of all-trans RA (0, 50, 500 and 2,500 ug) every 2-days were used to assess the allergic immune response. Results Levels of total and specific-IgE in sera were increased in all groups of RA treated OVA/OVA and HDM/HDM mice. Percentage and total amount of recruited eosinophil in airways by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were significantly enhanced in groups treated with 50, 500 and 2,500 ug of RA compared to non-treated mice. However, the group of mice treated with 2,500 ug had less eosinophil recruitment than the other two groups (50 and 500 ug). In parallel, levels of IL-5 and total IgE in BALF were also significantly diminished in the group treated with 2,500 ug compared to the other 2 groups (50 and 500 ug). Finally, total lung resistance was decreased in group treated with 2,500 ug compared to non-treated mice. Conclusion Our results suggest that retinoic acid directly enhances allergic response in vivo, but in higher doses may produce of immune suppression. PMID:19852821

  18. Upper esophageal sphincter abnormalities are strongly predictive of treatment response in patients with achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Simon C; Ciarleglio, Maria; Chavez, Yamile Haito; Clarke, John O; Stein, Ellen; Chander Roland, Bani

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between upper esophageal sphincter abnormalities achalasia treatment METHODS: We performed a retrospective study of 41 consecutive patients referred for high resolution esophageal manometry with a final manometric diagnosis of achalasia. Patients were sub-divided by presence or absence of Upper esophageal sphincter (UES) abnormality, and clinical and manometric profiles were compared. Correlation between UES abnormality and sub-type (i.e., hypertensive, hypotensive or impaired relaxation) and a number of variables, including qualitative treatment response, achalasia sub-type, co-morbid medical illness, psychiatric illness, surgical history, dominant presenting symptom, treatment type, age and gender were also evaluated. RESULTS: Among all 41 patients, 24 (58.54%) had a UES abnormality present. There were no significant differences between the groups in terms of age, gender or any other clinical or demographic profiles. Among those with UES abnormalities, the majority were either hypertensive (41.67%) or had impaired relaxation (37.5%) as compared to hypotensive (20.83%), although this did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.42). There was no specific association between treatment response and treatment type received; however, there was a significant association between UES abnormalities and treatment response. In patients with achalasia and concomitant UES abnormalities, 87.5% had poor treatment response, while only 12.5% had favorable response. In contrast, in patients with achalasia and no UES abnormalities, the majority (78.57%) had good treatment response, as compared to 21.43% with poor treatment response (P = 0.0001). After controlling for achalasia sub-type, those with UES abnormality had 26 times greater odds of poor treatment response than those with no UES abnormality (P = 0.009). Similarly, after controlling for treatment type, those with UES abnormality had 13.9 times greater odds of poor treatment response

  19. High occupational level is associated with poor response to treatment of depression.

    PubMed

    Mandelli, Laura; Serretti, Alessandro; Souery, Daniel; Mendlewicz, Julien; Kasper, Siegfried; Montgomery, Stuart; Zohar, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    Depression may be complicated by work-related stress and, in turn, depression is a leading cause of disability in workplaces. Though available effective treatments, only one third of patients reach full remission after a first treatment trial and nearly half of the patients are non-responders. Occupational level has been found to be a reliable predictor of health outcome in the general population. In the present study we tested the potential association of occupational level of those in work with response to treatment of depression in a large multinational sample. Major depressive disorder patients (n=654) stratified in three occupational levels (high, middle, low) were considered for the present study. Response to last treatment for current episode and treatment resistant depression, defined as non-response to 2 or more previous adequate treatment trials, were considered the outcome variables. Depressed patients from the high occupational level had a higher level of educational achievement. They showed a significantly poorer response to the last treatment with lower remission rates and more treatment resistance than the other occupational level groups. They were treated less with Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SRIs). Potential confounding factors did not influence the main effect. The present findings indicate that those working at a high occupational level may be a risk factor for poor response to medication for depression and this has potential implications for clinicians and their patients, for future research, for employers and for public policy. PMID:27211903

  20. Psychological response to growth hormone treatment in short normal children.

    PubMed Central

    Downie, A B; Mulligan, J; McCaughey, E S; Stratford, R J; Betts, P R; Voss, L D

    1996-01-01

    This study provides a controlled assessment of the psychological (and physical) effects of growth hormone treatment. Fifteen short 'normal' children (height SD score < -2) have been treated with growth hormone since the age of 7/8 years. They, together with untreated short controls and average controls (10th-90th centiles), were assessed at recruitment, after three years, and after five years. Only the treated group showed a significant height increase (SD score -2.44 to -1.21 over five years). No significant differences were found at recruitment, three years, or five years in IQ, attainment, behaviour, or self esteem. Also at five years, there were no significant differences in locus of control, self perception, or parental perceptions of competence. Both short groups displayed less satisfaction with their height than the controls (p < 0.01), though all groups were optimistic of being tall adults. The treated children were no more unrealistic over final height than the untreated children. To date, no psychological benefits of treatment have been demonstrated; but nor have there been any discernible ill effects for either the treated or the untreated children. PMID:8813867

  1. Suicidal Behavior in Mood Disorders: Response to Pharmacological Treatment.

    PubMed

    Tondo, Leonardo; Baldessarini, Ross J

    2016-09-01

    Suicidal behavior is strongly associated with depression, especially if accompanied by behavioral activation, dysphoria, or agitation. It may respond to some treatments, but the design of scientifically sound, ethical trials to test for therapeutic effects on suicidal behavior is highly challenging. In bipolar disorder, and possibly also unipolar major depression, an underprescribed medical intervention with substantial evidence of preventive effects on suicidal behavior is long-term treatment with lithium. It is unclear whether this effect is specifically antisuicidal or reflects beneficial effects of lithium on depression, mood instability, and perhaps aggression and impulsivity. Antisuicidal effects of anticonvulsant mood stabilizers (carbamazepine, lamotrigine, valproate) appear to be less than with lithium. Further evaluation is needed for potential antisuicidal effects of atypical antipsychotics with growing evidence of efficacy in depression, particularly acute bipolar depression, while generally lacking risk of inducing agitation, mania, or mood instability. Short-term and long-term value and safety of antidepressants are relatively secure for unipolar depression but uncertain and poorly tested for bipolar depression; their effects on suicidal risk in unipolar depression may be age-dependent. Sedative anxiolytics are virtually unstudied as regards suicidal risks. Adequate management of suicidal risks in mood disorder patients requires comprehensive, clinically skillful monitoring and timely interventions. PMID:27542851

  2. A thermo-responsive protein treatment for dry eyes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wan; Jashnani, Aarti; Aluri, Suhaas R.; Gustafson, Joshua A.; Hsueh, Pang-Yu; Yarber, Frances; McKown, Robert L.; Laurie, Gordon W.; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F.; MacKay, J. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Millions of Americans suffer from dry eye disease, and there are few effective therapies capable of treating these patients. A decade ago, an abundant protein component of human tears was discovered and named lacritin(Lacrt). Lacrt has prosecretory activity in the lacrimal gland and mitogenic activity at the corneal epithelium. Similar to other proteins placed on the ocular surface, the durability of its effect is limited by rapid tear turnover. Motivated by the rationale that a thermo-responsive coacervate containing Lacrt would have better retention upon administration, we have constructed and tested the activity of a thermo-responsive Lacrt fused to an Elastin-like polypeptide (ELP). Inspired from the human tropoelastin protein, ELP protein polymers reversibly phase separate into viscous coacervates above a tunable transition temperature. This fusion construct exhibited the prosecretory function of native Lacrt as illustrated by its ability to stimulate β-hexosaminidase secretion from primary rabbit lacrimal gland acinar cells. It also increased tear secretion from non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, a model of autoimmune dacryoadenitis, when administered via intra-lacrimal injection. Lacrt ELP fusion proteins undergo temperature-mediated assembly to form a depot inside the lacrimal gland. We propose that these Lacrt ELP fusion proteins represent a potential therapy for dry eye disease and the strategy of ELP-mediated phase separation may have applicability to other diseases of the ocular surface. PMID:25481446

  3. Pre-treatment waking cortisol response and vulnerability to interferon α induced depression.

    PubMed

    Eccles, Jessica; Lallemant, Camille; Mushtaq, Farrah; Greenwood, Matthew; Keller, Majella; Golding, Bruno; Tibble, Jeremy; Haq, Inam; Whale, Richard

    2012-12-01

    Depressive disorder is a common consequence of interferon α treatment. An understanding of the aetiological processes involved is evolving. HPA axis abnormalities are clearly described in community depressive disorder and represent vulnerability to depression development. We explored whether pre-treatment HPA axis abnormalities influence depression emergence during interferon α treatment. We examined waking HPA axis response via salivary cortisol sampling in 44 non-depressed, chronic hepatitis C infected patients due to commence standard interferon α treatment. Hamilton depression scales and the structured clinical interview for DSM-IV major depressive disorder status were administered monthly during treatment. Major depressive disorder developed in 26 of 44 subjects during interferon-α treatment. The pre-treatment waking cortisol response over 1h was significantly greater in the subsequent switch to depression group (F=4.23, p=0.046). The waking cortisol response pre-treatment with interferon α appears greater in those subsequently switching to depressive disorder during treatment. This waking response may join other vulnerability factors for depression emergence in this group. This model could prove a valuable tool in understanding non-iatrogenic depressive disorder in the general population and notably the role of cytokines. PMID:22571879

  4. Site-Specific Seismic Site Response Model for the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Rohay, Alan C.; Reidel, Steve P.

    2005-02-24

    This interim report documents the collection of site-specific geologic and geophysical data characterizing the Waste Treatment Plant site and the modeling of the site-specific structure response to earthquake ground motions.

  5. [Technical Approaches for Quantitative Treatment Responses Using 18F-FDG PET].

    PubMed

    Miwa, Kenta; Miyaji, Noriaki; Umeda, Takuro; Murata, Taisuke; Wagatsuma, Kei; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of 18F-FDG PET can predict treatment responses or outcomes. Here, I briefly describe some world trends in standardizing PET images for image-based assessments of treatment responses, followed by present and future strategies for defining the optimal acquisition conditions for quantitative PET imaging. Finally, information is provided about new technical approaches to improving the quantitation of semi-quantitative indexes such as point spread function, time-of-flight and respiratory gating. PMID:26753394

  6. The role of p53 in treatment responses of lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Viktorsson, Kristina; Lewensohn, Rolf . E-mail: Rolf.Lewensohn@cck.ki.se

    2005-06-10

    Resistance to radio- and chemotherapy is a major problem in treatment responses of lung cancer. In this disease, biological markers, that can be predictive of response to treatment for guiding clinical practice, still need to be validated. Radiotherapy and most chemotherapeutic agents directly target DNA and in response to such therapies, p53 functions as a coordinator of the DNA repair process, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. In fact, it participates in the main DNA repair systems operative in cells, including NHEJ, HRR, NER, BER, and MMR. Given the high p53 mutation frequency in lung cancer which likely impairs some of the p53-mediated functions, a role of p53 as a predictive marker for treatment responses has been suggested. In this review, we summarize the conflicting results coming from preclinical and clinical studies on the role of p53 as a predictive marker of responses to chemotherapy or radiotherapy in lung cancer.

  7. Identifying sub-optimal responses to ivermectin in the treatment of River Blindness

    PubMed Central

    Churcher, Thomas S.; Pion, Sébastien D. S.; Osei-Atweneboana, Mike Y.; Prichard, Roger K.; Awadzi, Kwablah; Boussinesq, Michel; Collins, Richard C.; Whitworth, James A.; Basáñez, María-Gloria

    2009-01-01

    Identification of drug resistance before it becomes a public health concern requires a clear distinction between what constitutes a normal and a suboptimal treatment response. A novel method of analyzing drug efficacy studies in human helminthiases is proposed and used to investigate recent claims of atypical responses to ivermectin in the treatment of River Blindness. The variability in the rate at which Onchocerca volvulus microfilariae repopulate host's skin following ivermectin treatment is quantified using an individual-based onchocerciasis mathematical model. The model estimates a single skin repopulation rate for every host sampled, allowing reports of suboptimal responses to be statistically compared with responses from populations with no prior exposure to ivermectin. Statistically faster rates of skin repopulation were observed in 3 Ghanaian villages (treated 12–17 times), despite the wide variability in repopulation rates observed in ivermectin-naïve populations. Another village previously thought to have high rates of skin repopulation was shown to be indistinguishable from the normal treatment response. The model is used to generate testable hypotheses to identify whether atypical rates of skin repopulation by microfilariae could result from low treatment coverage alone or provide evidence of decreased ivermectin efficacy. Further work linking phenotypic poor responses to treatment with parasite molecular genetics markers will be required to confirm drug resistance. Limitations of the skin-snipping method for estimating parasite load indicates that changes in the distribution of microfilarial repopulation rates, rather than their absolute values, maybe a more sensitive indicator of emerging ivermectin resistance. PMID:19805362

  8. Impact of Physical and Sexual Abuse on Treatment Response in the Treatment of Resistant Depression in Adolescent Study (TORDIA)

    PubMed Central

    Shamseddeen, Wael; Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Clarke, Gregory; Vitiello, Benedetto; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Birmaher, Boris; Keller, Martin B.; Emslie, Graham; Iyengar, Satish; Ryan, Neal D.; McCracken, James T.; Porta, Giovanna; Mayes, Taryn; Brent, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective We previously reported that a history of abuse was associated with a poorer response to combination treatment in the Treatment of Resistant Depression in Adolescents study (TORDIA). We now report on the nature and correlates of abuse that might explain these findings. Method Youth who did not benefit from an adequate selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI) trial (N=334) were randomized to: an alternative SSRI; an alternative SSRI plus cognitive behavior therapy (CBT); venlafaxine; or venlafaxine plus CBT. Analyses examined the effect of history of abuse on response to the pharmacotherapy and combination therapy. Results Those without a history of physical abuse (PA) or sexual abuse (SA) had a higher 12-week response rate to combination therapy compared to medication mono-therapy (62.8% vs. 37.6%; OR=2.8, 95% CI: 1.6–4.7, p<0.001). Those with a history of SA had similar response rates to combination vs. medication monotherapy (48.3% vs. 42.3%; OR=1.3, 95% CI: 0.4–3.7; p=0.66), while those with history of PA had a much lower rate of response to combination therapy (18.4% vs. 52.4%, OR=0.1; 95% CI: 0.02–0.43). Even after adjusting for other clinical predictors, a history of PA moderated treatment outcome. Conclusion These results should be considered within the limitations of a post-hoc analysis, lack of detailed assessment of abuse and other forms of trauma, and neuropsychological status. Depressed patients with history of abuse, especially PA may require specialized clinical approaches. Further work is needed to understand by what mechanisms a history of abuse affects treatment response. PMID:21334569

  9. Using biomarkers to predict treatment response in major depressive disorder: evidence from past and present studies

    PubMed Central

    Thase, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a heterogeneous condition with a variable response to a wide range of treatments. Despite intensive efforts, no biomarker has been identified to date that can reliably predict response or non-response to any form of treatment, nor has one been identified that can be used to identify those at high risk of developing treatment-resistant depression (ie, non-response to a sequence of treatments delivered for adequate duration and intensity). This manuscript reviews some past areas of research that have proved informative, such as studies using indexes of hypercortisolism or sleep disturbance, and more recent research findings using measures of inflammation and different indicators of regional cortical activation to predict treatment response. It is concluded that, although no method has yet been demonstrated to be sufficiently accurate to be applied in clinical practice, progress has been made. It thus seems likely that—at some point in the not-too-distant future—it will be possible to prospectively identify, at least for some MDD patients, the likelihood of response or non-response to cognitive therapy or various antidepressant medications. PMID:25733957

  10. Inmate responses to prison-based drug treatment: a repeated measures analysis.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Wayne N

    2010-06-01

    Using a sample of 347 prison inmates and general linear modeling (GLM) repeated measures analyses, this paper examined during-treatment responses (e.g., changes in psychological and social functioning) to prison-based TC drug treatment. These effects have rarely been examined in previous studies, and never with a fully multivariate model accounting for within-subjects effects (changes over time), between-subjects effects (e.g., levels of risk and motivation), and within/between-subjects interactions (timexriskxmotivation). The results provide evidence of positive inmate change in response to prison TC treatment, but the patterns of results varied depending upon: (a) specific indicators of psychological and social functioning, motivation, and treatment process; (b) the time periods examined (1, 6, and 12 months during treatment); and (c) baseline levels of risk and motivation. Significant interactions between time and type of inmate suggest important new directions for research, theory, and practice in offender-based substance abuse treatment. PMID:20079979

  11. 21 CFR 1230.15 - Responsibility for labeling directions for treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Responsibility for labeling directions for... directions for treatment. A person who receives from a manufacturer or wholesaler any container which under... shipment directions for treatment in the case of personal injury must place such directions on the label...

  12. 21 CFR 1230.15 - Responsibility for labeling directions for treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Responsibility for labeling directions for... directions for treatment. A person who receives from a manufacturer or wholesaler any container which under... shipment directions for treatment in the case of personal injury must place such directions on the label...

  13. Large Scale Dissemination and Community Implementation of Pivotal Response Treatment: Program Description and Preliminary Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryson, Susan E.; Koegel, Lynn K.; Koegel, Robert L.; Openden, Daniel; Smith, Isabel M.; Nefdt, Nicolette

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a collaborative effort aimed at province-wide dissemination and implementation of pivotal response treatment (PRT) for young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in Nova Scotia, Canada. Three critical components of the associated training model are described: (1) direct training of treatment teams (parents, one-to-one…

  14. Treatment Response in CP/ADHD Children with Callous/Unemotional Traits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Sarah M.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Pelham, William E.; King, Sara; Andrade, Brendan F.; Carrey, Normand J.

    2011-01-01

    The current study examines the role of callous/unemotional (CU) traits in response to treatment among children with conduct problems (CP) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Fifty-four children with CP/ADHD and 16 controls (age = 9.48, SD = 1.58) took part in a summer treatment and research program. Simple correlations showed that…

  15. Thermal treatment for increasing magnetostrictive response of rare earth-iron alloy rods

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, J.D.; McMasters, O.D.

    1989-07-18

    Magnetostrictive rods formed from rare earth-iron alloys are subjected to a short time heat treatment to increase their magnetostrictive response under compression. The heat treatment is preferably carried out at a temperature of from 900 to 1,000 C for 20 minutes to six hours.

  16. Thermal treatment for increasing magnetostrictive response of rare earth-iron alloy rods

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, John D.; McMasters, O. D.

    1989-07-18

    Magnetostrictive rods formed from rare earth-iron alloys are subjected to a short time heat treatment to increase their Magnetostrictive response under compression. The heat treatment is preferably carried out at a temperature of from 900.degree. to 1000.degree. C. for 20 minutes to six hours.

  17. Predicting Response of ADHD Symptoms to Methylphenidate Treatment Based on Comorbid Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blouin, Brittany; Maddeaux, Cindy; Stanley Firestone, Jill; van Stralen, Judy

    2010-01-01

    Objective: In this small pilot study, the association of comorbid anxiety with the treatment of ADHD is studied. Methods: Eighteen volunteers from a pediatric clinic are tested for ADHD and anxiety and assessed for behavioral and cognitive ADHD symptomology. Response to methylphenidate as treatment for ADHD symptoms is measured 2 to 3 weeks, and…

  18. Effectiveness of Community-Based Early Intervention Based on Pivotal Response Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Isabel M.; Flanagan, Helen E.; Garon, Nancy; Bryson, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    Preschoolers (n = 118) with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) participated in this prospective effectiveness study of an early intervention program. Treatment entailed parent training and therapist-implemented components, incorporating Pivotal Response Treatment and Positive Behaviour Support. Standardized ability and behavioural measures were…

  19. Childhood Maltreatment and Differential Treatment Response and Recurrence in Adult Major Depressive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harkness, Kate L.; Bagby, R. Michael; Kennedy, Sidney H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: A substantial number of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) do not respond to treatment, and recurrence rates remain high. The purpose of this study was to examine a history of severe childhood abuse as a moderator of response following a 16-week acute treatment trial, and of recurrence over a 12-month follow-up. Method:…

  20. The PRT Pocket Guide: Pivotal Response Treatment for Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koegel, Robert L.; Koegel, Lynn Kern

    2012-01-01

    What is Pivotal Response Treatment? What's the research behind it, what does it look like in practice, and what are some good examples of how to use it? Now one concise book gives professionals and parents all the basics of the widely used PRT--one of a select group of highly effective, evidence-based treatments for autism. great resource for…

  1. Immediate skin responses to laser and light treatments: Therapeutic endpoints: How to obtain efficacy.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Molly; Sakamoto, Fernanda H; Avram, Mathew M; Chan, Henry H; Alam, Murad; Tannous, Zeina; Anderson, R Rox

    2016-05-01

    Clinical endpoints are immediate or early tissue reactions that occur during laser treatment. They can guide the laser surgeon in delivering safe and effective laser treatment. Some endpoints act as warning signs of injury to the skin; others can indicate a therapeutic response. The first article in this series reviewed undesirable and warning endpoints, and this article focuses on desirable and therapeutic endpoints and their underlying mechanisms in laser surgery. We will also review treatments without clinical endpoints. PMID:27085228

  2. Empirically and Clinically Useful Decision Making in Psychotherapy: Differential Predictions with Treatment Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, Wolfgang; Saunders, Stephen M.; Leon, Scott C.; Martinovich, Zoran; Kosfelder, Joachim; Schulte, Dietmar; Grawe, Klaus; Tholen, Sven

    2006-01-01

    In the delivery of clinical services, outcomes monitoring (i.e., repeated assessments of a patient's response to treatment) can be used to support clinical decision making (i.e., recurrent revisions of outcome expectations on the basis of that response). Outcomes monitoring can be particularly useful in the context of established practice research…

  3. Prediction of Response to Medication and Cognitive Therapy in the Treatment of Moderate to Severe Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fournier, Jay C.; DeRubeis, Robert J.; Shelton, Richard C.; Hollon, Steven D.; Amsterdam, Jay D.; Gallop, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A recent randomized controlled trial found nearly equivalent response rates for antidepressant medications and cognitive therapy in a sample of moderate to severely depressed outpatients. In this article, the authors seek to identify the variables that were associated with response across both treatments as well as variables that predicted…

  4. Periodontitis treatment improves systemic lupus erythematosus response to immunosuppressive therapy.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Cristiana; Fuller, Ricardo; Bonfá, Eloisa; Guedes, Lissiane K N; D'Alleva, Paulo Sergio R; Borba, Eduardo F

    2014-04-01

    Periodontal disease (POD) may affect rheumatic diseases severity, but there are no data regarding the effect of its treatment on disease activity in SLE patients under immunosuppressive therapy. Forty-nine consecutive SLE patients (SLEDAI ≥ 2) with POD and under corticosteroid and cyclophosphamide pulse therapy (IVCYC) were selected. Periodontal assessment included bleeding gingival index (BGI), probing depth (PD), and probing attachment level (PAL). At entry, POD was defined as BGI > 1 and patients were assigned to groups according to the availability of odontological intervention in TREATED (n = 32) and NOT TREATED (n = 17). SLEDAI and POD parameters were determined at entry and after 3 months. Age, female gender, and race were alike among TREATED and NOT TREATED (p > 0.05). Both groups had also comparable disease duration (10.7 ± 6.8 vs. 11.0 ± 6.6, p = 0.83), IVCYC number (5.8 ± 4.8 vs. 4.5 ± 4.8, p = 0.17), and SLEDAI (5.9 ± 4.2 vs. 6.3 ± 4.3, p = 0.73) as well as POD parameters [BGI (40.8 ± 31.0 vs. 40.7 ± 36.2 %, p = 0.89), PD (1.7 ± 1.8 vs. 1.5 ± 0.60 mm, p = 0.80), and PAL (2.5 ± 1.9 vs. 1.9 ± 1.1 mm, p = 0.18)]. At the end of the study, TREATED group had a significant improvement in SLEDAI (5.9 ± 4.2 vs. 3.4 ± 3.3, p = 0.04) with a paralleled reduction in BGI (40.8 ± 31.0 vs. 15.2 ± 17.2 %, p < 0.01), PD (1.7 ± 1.8 vs. 1.1 ± 0.3 mm, p < 0.01), and PAL (2.5 ± 1.9 vs. 1.7 ± 0.9 mm, p < 0.01). In contrast, SLEDAI (6.3 ± 4.3 vs. 6.0 ± 5.5, p = 0.40) and POD parameters [BGI (p = 0.33), PD (p = 0.91), and PAL (p = 0.39)] remained largely unchanged in NOT TREATED group. Periodontal disease treatment seems to have a beneficial effect in controlling disease activity in SLE patients under immunosuppressive therapy. Therefore, management of this modifiable risk factor is

  5. Assessment of treatment response in chronic constipation clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Ervin, Claire M; Fehnel, Sheri E; Baird, Mollie J; Carson, Robyn T; Johnston, Jeffrey M; Shiff, Steven J; Kurtz, Caroline B; Mangel, Allen W

    2014-01-01

    Background While chronic constipation (CC) clinical trials have focused primarily on bowel symptoms (symptoms directly related to bowel movements), abdominal symptoms are also prevalent among patients. The United States Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) guidance on the use of patient-reported outcome measures to support product approvals or labeling claims recommends that endpoints be developed with direct patient input and include all symptoms important to patients. Aim To identify a comprehensive set of CC symptoms that are important to patients for measurement in clinical trials. Methods Following a targeted literature review to identify CC symptoms previously reported by patients, 28 patient interviews were conducted consistent with the FDA’s guidance on patient-reported outcomes. Subsequent to open-ended questions eliciting descriptions of all symptoms, rating and ranking methods were used to identify those of greatest importance to patients. Results All 67 studies reviewed included bowel symptoms; more than half also addressed at least one abdominal symptom. Interview participants reported 62 potentially distinct concepts: 12 bowel symptoms; 21 abdominal symptoms; and 29 additional symptoms/impacts. Patients’ descriptions revealed that many symptom terms were highly related and/or could be considered secondary to CC. The rating and ranking task results suggest that both bowel (for example, stool frequency and consistency) and abdominal symptoms (for example, bloating, abdominal pain) comprise patients’ most important symptoms. Further, improvements in both bowel and abdominal symptoms would constitute an improvement in patients’ CC overall. Conclusion Abdominal symptoms in CC patients are equal in relevance to bowel symptoms and should also be addressed in clinical trials to fully evaluate treatment benefit. PMID:24940076

  6. Auditory brainstem responses in patients under treatment of hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Aspris, Andreas K; Thodi, Chryssoula D; Balatsouras, Dimitrios G; Thodis, Elias D; Vargemezis, Vassilis; Danielides, Vassilis

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of end stage chronic renal failure (CRF) on auditory function and changes in auditory function following a single session of hemodialysis. The experimental group included 31 patients with end-stage renal failure on chronic hemodialysis. The control group consisted of 31 healthy volunteers. The patients were examined prior to and following a session of hemodialysis. Measurements included pure tone audiometry, tympanometry and acoustic reflex measurements, auditory brainstem responses (ABR), and blood now chemistry parameters. Controls underwent the same test battery, with the exception of biochemical and hematological assessment. Prior to hemodialysis sessions, all ABR latencies except interpeak latency I-III were significantly prolonged in the experimental group. A comparison between controls and the experimental group following hemodialysis indicated that wave V absolute latency and interpeak latencies III-V and I-V were significantly prolonged in the slow repetition rate paradigm. In the fast repetition rate, absolute latencies of waves I and V and III-V interpeak latencies were prolonged in the experimental group. Comparison of ABR recordings prior to and following hemodialysis showed overall significant difference between the measures. Post hoc analysis showed a significant improvement in wave I and V latencies in the slow repetition rate and wave V latency in the fast repetition rate. This study showed that neural conduction along the auditory pathway is delayed in patients with end stage CRF as compared to healthy subjects. Dialysis sessions improve overall neural auditory function. However, patients with end stage CRF show delayed conduction even after a session of hemodialysis. PMID:18569911

  7. Diagnosis of response and non-response to dry eye treatment using infrared thermography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, U. Rajendra; Tan, Jen Hong; Vidya, S.; Yeo, Sharon; Too, Cheah Loon; Lim, Wei Jie Eugene; Chua, Kuang Chua; Tong, Louis

    2014-11-01

    The dry eye treatment outcome depends on the assessment of clinical relevance of the treatment effect. The potential approach to assess the clinical relevance of the treatment is to identify the symptoms responders and non-responders to the given treatments using the responder analysis. In our work, we have performed the responder analysis to assess the clinical relevance effect of the dry eye treatments namely, hot towel, EyeGiene®, and Blephasteam® twice daily and 12 min session of Lipiflow®. Thermography is performed at week 0 (baseline), at weeks 4 and 12 after treatment. The clinical parameters such as, change in the clinical irritations scores, tear break up time (TBUT), corneal staining and Schirmer's symptoms tests values are used to obtain the responders and non-responders groups. We have obtained the infrared thermography images of dry eye symptoms responders and non-responders to the three types of warming treatments. The energy, kurtosis, skewness, mean, standard deviation, and various entropies namely Shannon, Renyi and Kapoor are extracted from responders and non-responders thermograms. The extracted features are ranked based on t-values. These ranked features are fed to the various classifiers to get the highest performance using minimum features. We have used decision tree (DT), K nearest neighbour (KNN), Naves Bayesian (NB) and support vector machine (SVM) to classify the features into responder and non-responder classes. We have obtained an average accuracy of 99.88%, sensitivity of 99.7% and specificity of 100% using KNN classifier using ten-fold cross validation.

  8. The impact of transient combination antiretroviral treatment in early HIV infection on viral suppression and immunologic response in later treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pantazis, Nikos; Touloumi, Giota; Meyer, Laurence; Olson, Ashley; Costagliola, Dominique; Kelleher, Anthony D.; Lutsar, Irja; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Fisher, Martin; Moreno, Santiago; Porter, Kholoud

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Effects of transient combination antiretroviral treatment (cART) initiated during early HIV infection (EHI) remain unclear. We investigate whether this intervention affects viral suppression and CD4+ cell count increase following its reinitiation in chronic infection (CHI). Design: Longitudinal observational study. Methods: We identified adult patients from Concerted Action of Seroconversion to AIDS and Death in Europe who seroconverted after 1/1/2000, had a 12 months or less HIV test interval and initiated cART from naive. We classified individuals as ‘pretreated in EHI’ if treated within 6 months of seroconversion, interrupted for at least 12 weeks, and reinitiated during CHI. Statistical analysis was performed using survival analysis methods and mixed models. Results: Pretreated and initiated in CHI groups comprised 202 and 4263 individuals, with median follow-up after CHI treatment 4.5 and 3 years, respectively. Both groups had similar virologic response and relapse rates (P = 0.585 and P = 0.206) but pretreated individuals restarted treatment with higher baseline CD4+ cell count (∼80 cells/μl; P < 0.001) and retained significantly higher CD4+ cell count for more than 3 years after treatment (re)initiation. Assuming common baseline CD4+ cell count, differences in CD4+ cell count slopes were nonsignificant. Immunovirologic response to CHI treatment was not associated with timing or duration of the transient treatment. Conclusion: Although treatment interruptions are not recommended, stopping cART initiated in EHI does not seem to reduce the chance of a successful outcome of treatment in CHI. PMID:26636925

  9. The Reflux Disease Questionnaire: a measure for assessment of treatment response in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Michael; Dent, John; Beebe, Timothy; Junghard, Ola; Wiklund, Ingela; Lind, Tore; Johnsson, Folke

    2008-01-01

    Background Critical needs for treatment trials in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) include assessing response to treatment, evaluating symptom severity, and translation of symptom questionnaires into multiple languages. We evaluated the previously validated Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ) for internal consistency, reliability, responsiveness to change during treatment and the concordance between RDQ and specialty physician assessment of symptom severity, after translation into Swedish and Norwegian. Methods Performance of the RDQ after translation into Swedish and Norwegian was evaluated in 439 patients with presumed GERD in a randomized, double-blind trial of active treatment with a proton pump inhibitor. Results The responsiveness was excellent across three RDQ indicators. Mean change scores in patients on active treatment were large, also reflected in effect sizes that ranged from a low of 1.05 (dyspepsia) to a high of 2.05 (heartburn) and standardized response means 0.99 (dyspepsia) and 1.52 (heartburn). A good positive correlation between physician severity ratings and RDQ scale scores was seen. The internal consistency reliability using alpha coefficients of the scales, regardless of language, ranged from 0.67 to 0.89. Conclusion The results provide strong evidence that the RDQ is amenable to translation and represents a viable instrument for assessing response to treatment, and symptom severity. PMID:18447946

  10. DCE-MRI for Pre-Treatment Prediction and Post-Treatment Assessment of Treatment Response in Sites of Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    King, Ann D.; Chow, Steven Kwok Keung; Yu, Kwok-Hung; Mo, Frankie Kwok Fai; Yeung, David K. W.; Yuan, Jing; Law, Benjamin King Hong; Bhatia, Kunwar S.; Vlantis, Alexander C.; Ahuja, Anil T.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose It is important to identify patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) who fail to respond to chemoradiotherapy so that they can undergo post-treatment salvage surgery while the disease is still operable. This study aimed to determine the diagnostic performance of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI using a pharmacokinetic model for pre-treatment predictive imaging, as well as post-treatment diagnosis, of residual SCC at primary and nodal sites in the head and neck. Material and Methods Forty-nine patients with 83 SCC sites (primary and/or nodal) underwent pre-treatment DCE-MRI, and 43 patients underwent post-treatment DCE-MRI, of which 33 SCC sites had a residual mass amenable to analysis. Pre-treatment, post-treatment and % change in the mean Ktrans, kep, ve and AUGC were obtained from SCC sites. Logistic regression was used to correlate DCE parameters at each SCC site with treatment response at the same site, based on clinical outcome at that site at a minimum of two years. Results None of the pre-treatment DCE-MRI parameters showed significant correlations with SCC site failure (SF) (29/83 sites) or site control (SC) (54/83 sites). Post-treatment residual masses with SF (14/33) had significantly higher kep (p = 0.05), higher AUGC (p = 0.02), and lower % reduction in AUGC (p = 0.02), than residual masses with SC (19/33), with the % change in AUGC remaining significant on multivariate analysis. Conclusion Pre-treatment DCE-MRI did not predict which SCC sites would fail treatment, but post-treatment DCE-MRI showed potential for identifying residual masses that had failed treatment. PMID:26657972

  11. Poor response to tuberculosis treatment with regimens without rifampicin in immunosuppressed AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    O'Donnel, M M; Souza Carvalho, S; Gadelha, A J; Morgado, M G; Galhardo, M C G; Lourenço, M C; Rolla, V C

    2002-12-01

    A prospective study was conducted on 79 advanced immunosuppressed AIDS patients from 1997 to 1999, during which nine cases of tuberculosis (TB) were diagnosed. The main clinical and laboratory characteristics and the response to TB treatment were reviewed. The clinical manifestations of TB were: pulmonary (six cases), extrapulmonary (two cases) and disseminated (one case). These patients were being treated with highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) and were not responding. In three cases an optional regimen without rifampicin (RMP) was indicated to maintain HAART during TB treatment. A clinical response to TB treatment (disappearance of fever) was observed in 6/9 patients during a mean of 73 days (SD = 96). The three unresponsive patients were those treated without RMP. A switch to TB regimens containing RMP was proposed and successful. In our study, though it was limited by a small sample size, the response to TB regimens without rifampin was poor in immunosupressed patients failing HAART. PMID:12585969

  12. Does physiologic response to loud tones change following cognitive-behavioral treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder?

    PubMed

    Griffin, Michael G; Resick, Patricia A; Galovski, Tara E

    2012-02-01

    This study examined responses to loud tones before and after cognitive-behavioral treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Seventy-four women in a PTSD treatment outcome study for rape-related (n = 54) or physical assault-related PTSD (n = 20) were assessed in an auditory loud tone paradigm. Assessments were conducted before and after a 6-week period of cognitive-behavioral therapy. Physiologic responses to loud tones included heart rate (HR), skin conductance (SC), and eye-blink electromyogram (EMG). Groups were formed based upon treatment outcome and included a treatment responder group (no PTSD at posttreatment) and a nonresponder group (PTSD-positive at posttreatment). Treatment was successful for 53 of 74 women (72%) and unsuccessful for 21 women (28%). Responders and nonresponders were not significantly different from each other at pretreatment on the main outcome variables. Treatment responders showed a significant reduction in loud tone-related EMG, HR, and SC responses from pre- to posttreatment (partial η(2) = .24, .31, and .36, respectively; all p < .001) and the EMG and HR responses were significantly smaller than nonresponders at posttreatment (partial η(2) = .11, p = .004 and .19, p < .001, respectively). Successful cognitive-behavioral treatment of PTSD is associated with a quantifiable reduction in physiological responding to loud tones. PMID:22354505

  13. Does Physiologic Response to Loud Tones Change Following Cognitive–Behavioral Treatment for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Michael G.; Resick, Patricia A.; Galovski, Tara E.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined responses to loud tones before and after cognitive–behavioral treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Seventy-four women in a PTSD treatment outcome study for rape-related (n = 54) or physical assault-related PTSD (n = 20) were assessed in an auditory loud tone paradigm. Assessments were conducted before and after a 6-week period of cognitive–behavioral therapy. Physiologic responses to loud tones included heart rate (HR), skin conductance (SC), and eye-blink electromyogram (EMG). Groups were formed based upon treatment outcome and included a treatment responder group (no PTSD at posttreatment) and a nonresponder group (PTSD-positive at posttreatment). Treatment was successful for 53 of 74 women (72%) and unsuccessful for 21 women (28%). Responders and nonresponders were not significantly different from each other at pretreatment on the main outcome variables. Treatment responders showed a significant reduction in loud tone-related EMG, HR, and SC responses from pre- to posttreatment (partial η2 = .243, .308, and .365, respectively; all p < .001) and the EMG and HR responses were significantly smaller than nonresponders at posttreatment (partial η22 = .107, p = .004 and .193, p < .001, respectively). Successful cognitive–behavioral treatment of PTSD is associated with a quantifiable reduction in physiological responding to loud tones. PMID:22354505

  14. Paradoxical response preceding control of Scedosporium apiospermum mycetoma with posaconazole treatment.

    PubMed

    Béraud, Guillaume; Desbois, Nicole; Coyo, Caroline; Quist, Danièle; Rozé, Benoit; Savorit, Luc; Cabié, André

    2015-01-01

    Mycetoma is a chronic granulomatous infection that is difficult to treat, notably when due to fungi such as Scedosporium apiospermum. Recent antifungal agents could be an option, but cases are rarely reported, and none with posaconazole. Paradoxical responses, defined as initial clinical worsening despite appropriate treatment, are common in tuberculosis but rare in deep mycoses in non-immunocompromised hosts. Hence, paradoxical responses in context other than mycobacterial infection in an immunocompromised host could provide insights into the pathophysiology and the optimal strategy for treatment. We report the first case of a mycetoma caused by S. apiospermum with bone involvement treated with posaconazole, and the paradoxical response observed at the beginning of the treatment. As with mycobacterial infections, a paradoxical response in deep mycosis could represent the earliest marker of therapeutic efficacy. PMID:26114987

  15. An examination of the Allocation of Treatment Responsibility scale in adolescents with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Jamie L; Arnett, Alex D; Pai, Ahna L H; Modi, Avani C

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the psychometric properties of the adapted Allocation of Treatment Responsibility (ATR) scale and the distribution of tasks related to oral medication and clinic and laboratory visits in a sample of adolescents with epilepsy. Adolescents with epilepsy (N = 50; ages 13-17 years) and their caregivers completed the adapted ATR and a measure of medication management. Internal consistency for the adapted ATR was strong (total and subscale range: 0.75-0.97). Validity was partially supported by significant correlations between adolescent age and ATR oral medication responsibility for both respondent measures. Allocation of Treatment Responsibility total scores were not associated with adherence to medications and clinic appointments. Initial findings are promising and have important implications for assessing the distribution of treatment responsibility among adolescents with epilepsy and their families. PMID:25269686

  16. Therapygenetics: Using genetic markers to predict response to psychological treatment for mood and anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Considerable variation is evident in response to psychological therapies for mood and anxiety disorders. Genetic factors alongside environmental variables and gene-environment interactions are implicated in the etiology of these disorders and it is plausible that these same factors may also be important in predicting individual differences in response to psychological treatment. In this article, we review the evidence that genetic variation influences psychological treatment outcomes with a primary focus on mood and anxiety disorders. Unlike most past work, which has considered prediction of response to pharmacotherapy, this article reviews recent work in the field of therapygenetics, namely the role of genes in predicting psychological treatment response. As this is a field in its infancy, methodological recommendations are made and opportunities for future research are identified. PMID:23388219

  17. Responsibility Without Blame: Empathy and the Effective Treatment of Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, Hanna

    2011-01-01

    Effective treatment of personality disorder (PD) presents a clinical conundrum. Many of the behaviors constitutive of PD cause harm to self and others. Encouraging service users to take responsibility for this behavior is central to treatment. Blame, in contrast, is detrimental. How is it possible to hold service users responsible for harm to self and others without blaming them? A solution to this problem is part conceptual, part practical. I offer a conceptual framework that clearly distinguishes between ideas of responsibility, blameworthiness, and blame. Within this framework, I distinguish two sorts of blame, which I call ‘detached’ and ‘affective.’ Affective, not detached, blame is detrimental to effective treatment. I suggest that the practical demand to avoid affective blame is largely achieved through attention to PD service users’ past history. Past history does not eliminate responsibility and blameworthiness. Instead, it directly evokes compassion and empathy, which compete with affective blame. PMID:22318087

  18. Immediate skin responses to laser and light treatments: Warning endpoints: How to avoid side effects.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Molly; Sakamoto, Fernanda H; Avram, Mathew M; Anderson, R Rox

    2016-05-01

    Lasers are versatile, commonly used treatment tools in dermatology. While it is tempting to follow manufacturer's guidelines or other "recipes" for laser treatment, this approach alone can be a recipe for disaster. Specific and immediate skin responses or endpoints exist and are clinically useful because they correlate with underlying mechanisms that are either desirable (ie, therapeutic), undesirable (ie, warning signs of injury or side effects), or incidental. The observation of clinical endpoints is a safe and reliable guide for appropriate treatment. This article presents the warning endpoints during specific dermatologic laser treatments, and the accompanying article presents the therapeutic endpoints, their underlying mechanisms, and the utility of these endpoints. PMID:27085227

  19. Oral Appliance Treatment Response and Polysomnographic Phenotypes of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Kate; Takaya, Hisashi; Qian, Jin; Petocz, Peter; Ng, Andrew T.; Cistulli, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Mandibular advancement splints (MAS) are an effective treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA); however, therapeutic response is variable. Younger age, female gender, less obesity, and milder and supine-dependent OSA have variably been associated with treatment success in relatively small samples. Our objective was to utilize a large cohort of MAS treated patients (1) to compare efficacy across patients with different phenotypes of OSA and (2) to assess demographic, anthropometric, and polysomnography variables as treatment response predictors. Methods: Retrospective analysis of MAS-treated patients participating in clinical trials in sleep centers in Sydney, Australia between years 2000–2013. All studies used equivalent customized two-piece MAS devices and treatment protocols. Treatment response was defined as (1) apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) < 5/h, (2) AHI < 10/h and ≥ 50% reduction, and (3) ≥ 50% AHI reduction. Results: A total of 425 patients (109 female) were included (age 51.2 ± 10.9 years, BMI 29.2 ± 5.0 kg/m2). MAS reduced AHI by 50.3% ± 50.7% across the group. Supine-predominant OSA patients had lower treatment response rates than non-positional OSA (e.g., 36% vs. 59% for AHI < 10/h). REM-predominant OSA showed a lower response rate than either NREM or non-stage dependent OSA. In prediction modelling, age, baseline AHI, and anthropometric variables were predictive of MAS treatment outcome but not OSA phenotype. Gender was not associated with treatment outcome. Conclusions: Lower MAS treatment response rates were observed in supine and REM sleep. In a large sample, we confirm that demographic, anthropometric, and polysomnographic data only weakly inform about MAS efficacy, supporting the need for alternative objective prediction methods to reliably select patients for MAS treatment. Citation: Sutherland K, Takaya H, Qian J, Petocz P, Ng AT, Cistulli PA. Oral appliance treatment response and polysomnographic phenotypes of

  20. Treatment Responsiveness in CIDP Patients with Diabetes Is Associated with Higher Degrees of Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Alon; Alabdali, Majed; Qrimli, Mohammad; Albulaihe, Hana; Breiner, Ari; Barnett, Carolina; Katzberg, Hans D.; Lovblom, Leif E.; Perkins, Bruce A.; Bril, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is one of several chronic treatable acquired demyelinating neuropathies. Objectives To explore the association between the degree of demyelination in CIDP, and treatment responsiveness. Methods A retrospective chart review of CIDP subjects assessed between 1997 and 2013 was performed to compare treatment responsiveness using different sets of criteria. Results 99 CIDP patients were included, 34 with diabetes mellitus (DM). Treatment responsiveness was higher in CIDP-DM fulfilling 1 or more EFNS/PNS criteria, (63% vs. 31%, p = 0.03), and in CIDP+DM fulfilling 2 or more criteria (89% vs. 36%, p = 0.01). Nonetheless, treatment responsiveness in CIDP+DM had the highest odds ratio (3.73, p = 0.01). Similar results were also shown in simplified uniform study criteria, with 10% cut off values for CIDP-DM, compared to 30% for CIDP+DM. Conclusion In CIDP+DM, higher degrees of demyelination are associated with treatment responsiveness, implying the need to adjust current criteria in these patients. PMID:26461125

  1. Postpartum and nonpostpartum depression: differences in presentation and response to pharmacologic treatment.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, V; Altshuler, L; Strouse, T; Grosser, S

    2000-01-01

    Following childbirth, major depression (postpartum depression) affects approximately 8-12% of new mothers. However, little is known about the pharmacological management of postpartum depression, and no studies to date have assessed differences in treatment response between women with postpartum and nonpostpartum major depression. The authors reviewed the records of 26 women with postpartum major depression and 25 women with major depression unrelated to childbearing (nonpostpartum depression) who presented to them for treatment over a 4-year period. Compared with the nonpostpartum depressed patients, the postpartum depressed women were significantly more likely to present with anxious features. Also, cases of postpartum depression were more severe than cases of nonpostpartum depression. While the postpartum patients were equally as likely to recover (as defined by a Clinical Global Impression score of 1 or 2) compared to the nonpostpartum-depressed patients, their time to response was significantly longer. By 3 weeks of pharmacotherapy, 75% of the nonpostpartum cases had recovered, in contrast to only 36% of the postpartum cases. Further, postpartum patients were significantly more likely to be receiving more than one antidepressant agent at the time of response to treatment. Length of depression prior to treatment did not explain the difference in treatment response. Presence of depressive symptoms during pregnancy and timing of onset of the depression (before vs. after 4 weeks of delivery) did not affect likelihood of treatment response in this sample. Women with postpartum depression appear to be significantly more likely than the nonpostpartum women to present with anxious features, take longer to respond to pharmacotherapy for depression, and require more antidepressant agents at the time of response to treatment. PMID:10812531

  2. CT contrast predicts pancreatic cancer treatment response to verteporfin-based photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jermyn, Michael; Davis, Scott C.; Dehghani, Hamid; Huggett, Matthew T.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pereira, Stephen P.; Bown, Stephen G.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this study was to determine dominant factors affecting treatment response in pancreatic cancer photodynamic therapy (PDT), based on clinically available information in the VERTPAC-01 trial. This trial investigated the safety and efficacy of verteporfin PDT in 15 patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. CT scans before and after contrast enhancement from the 15 patients in the VERTPAC-01 trial were used to determine venous-phase blood contrast enhancement and this was correlated with necrotic volume determined from post-treatment CT scans, along with estimation of optical absorption in the pancreas for use in light modeling of the PDT treatment. Energy threshold contours yielded estimates for necrotic volume based on this light modeling. Both contrast-derived venous blood content and necrotic volume from light modeling yielded strong correlations with observed necrotic volume (R2 = 0.85 and 0.91, respectively). These correlations were much stronger than those obtained by correlating energy delivered versus necrotic volume in the VERTPAC-01 study and in retrospective analysis from a prior clinical study. This demonstrates that contrast CT can provide key surrogate dosimetry information to assess treatment response. It also implies that light attenuation is likely the dominant factor in the VERTPAC treatment response, as opposed to other factors such as drug distribution. This study is the first to show that contrast CT provides needed surrogate dosimetry information to predict treatment response in a manner which uses standard-of-care clinical images, rather than invasive dosimetry methods.

  3. Inflammation and clinical response to treatment in depression: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Strawbridge, R; Arnone, D; Danese, A; Papadopoulos, A; Herane Vives, A; Cleare, A J

    2015-10-01

    The depressive state has been characterised as one of elevated inflammation, which holds promise for better understanding treatment-resistance in affective disorders as well as for future developments in treatment stratification. Aiming to investigate alterations in the inflammatory profiles of individuals with depression as putative biomarkers for clinical response, we conducted meta-analyses examining data from 35 studies that investigated inflammation before and after treatment in depressed patients together with a measure of clinical response. There were sufficient data to analyse IL-6, TNFα and CRP. Levels of IL-6 decreased with antidepressant treatment regardless of outcome, whereas persistently elevated TNFα was associated with prospectively determined treatment resistance. Treatment non-responders tended to have higher baseline inflammation, using a composite measure of inflammatory markers. Our findings suggest that elevated levels of inflammation are contributory to treatment resistance. Combining inflammatory biomarkers might prove a useful tool to improve diagnosis and detection of treatment refractoriness, and targeting persistent inflammation in treatment-resistant depression may offer a potential target for the development of novel intervention strategies. PMID:26169573

  4. Breeding bird responses to three silvicultural treatments in the Oregon Coast Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chambers, C.L.; McComb, W.C.; Tappeiner, J. C., II

    1999-01-01

    Silvicultural alternatives to clear-cutting have been suggested to promote development, retention, or creation of late-successional features such as large trees, multilayered canopies, snags, and logs. We assessed bird response to three silvicultural alternatives to clear-cutting that retained structural features found in old Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) forests and that imitated natural disturbance regimes more closely than did traditional clear-cutting: (1) small-patch group selection treatment representing a low-intensity disturbance; (2) two-story treatment, representing a moderate to high-intensity disturbance; and (3) modified clear-cut treatment, representing a high-intensity disturbance. We counted diurnal breeding birds 1 yr prior to and 2 yr after harvest to estimate effects of the silvicultural treatments on bird communities compared with uncut controls. The small-patch group selection treatment was most similar in species composition to control stands. The two-story treatment was more similar to the modified clear-cut treatment. Ten bird species remained abundant following the small-patch group selection treatment. They declined in abundance in modified clearcuts and two-story stands. These species included four neotropical migratory species and five species with restricted geographic ranges and habitat associations. Nine species increased in response to moderate and/or high-intensity disturbances. This group included a larger proportion of species that were habitat generalists. Silvicultural treatments imitating low-intensity disturbances were most effective in retaining bird communities associated with mature forest; high-intensity disturbances such as the two-story and modified clear-cut treatments greatly altered bird community composition. Bird responses to the silvicultural treatments that we studied indicate that a variety of stand types is needed to meet needs of all species.

  5. Serial diffusion MRI to monitor and model treatment response of the targeted nanotherapy CRLX101

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Thomas S.C.; Wert, David; Sohi, Hargun; Procissi, Daniel; Colcher, David; Raubitschek, Andrew A.; Jacobs, Russell E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Targeted nanotherapies are being developed to improve tumor drug delivery and enhance therapeutic response. Techniques that can predict response will facilitate clinical translation and may help define optimal treatment strategies. We evaluated the efficacy of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging to monitor early response to CRLX101 nanotherapy (formerly IT-101), and explored its potential as a therapeutic response predictor using a mechanistic model of tumor cell-proliferation. Experimental Design Diffusion MRI was serially performed following CRLX101 administration in a mouse lymphoma model. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) extracted from the data were used as treatment response biomarkers. Animals treated with irinotecan (CPT-11) and saline were imaged for comparison. ADC data were also input into a mathematical model of tumor growth. Histological analysis using cleaved-caspase 3, TUNEL, Ki-67 and H&E were conducted on tumor samples for correlation with imaging results. Results CRLX101 treated tumors at day 2, 4, 7 post-treatment exhibited changes in mean ADC=16 ± 9%, 24 ± 10% 49 ± 17% and size (TV)=−5 ± 3%, −30 ± 4% and −45 ± 13% respectively. Both parameters were statistically greater than controls (p(ADC) ≤ 0.02, and p(TV) ≤ 0.01 at day 4 and 7), and noticeably greater than CPT-11 treated tumors (ADC=5 ± 5%, 14 ± 7% and 18 ± 6%, TV=−15 ± 5%, −22 ± 13% and −26 ± 8%). Model-derived parameters for cell-proliferation obtained using ADC data distinguished CRLX101 treated tumors from controls (p = 0.02). Conclusions Temporal changes in ADC specified early CRLX101 treatment response and could be used to model image-derived cell-proliferation rates following treatment. Comparisons of targeted and non-targeted treatments highlight the utility of non-invasive imaging and modeling to evaluate, monitor and predict responses to targeted nanotherapeutics. PMID:23532891

  6. Prediction of antidepressant treatment response from gray matter volume across diagnostic categories.

    PubMed

    Sämann, Philipp G; Höhn, David; Chechko, Natalya; Kloiber, Stefan; Lucae, Susanne; Ising, Marcus; Holsboer, Florian; Czisch, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Dysfunctional limbic, paralimbic and prefrontal brain circuits represent neural substrates of major depression that are targeted by pharmacotherapy. In a high resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study we investigated the potential of variability of the cortex volume to predict the response to antidepressant treatment among patients with major depression. We enrolled 167 patients participating in the Munich Antidepressant Response Signature (MARS) study and employed voxel based morphometry to investigate covariation of gray matter (GM) maps with changes of depression severity over 5 weeks. Larger left hippocampal and bilateral posterior cingulate GM volumes and lower right temporolateral GM volumes were associated with beneficial treatment response. Subcallosal/orbitofrontal GM volumes were associated with treatment response mainly through gender-by-region interactions. A hippocampal/temporolateral composite marker proved robust in both first episode and recurrent unipolar patients and in bipolar patients. Compared with 92 healthy controls, abnormally low volumes were only detected in the left hippocampal area, particularly in recurrent unipolar patients. These findings indicate that variability of the cortex volume of specific brain areas is associated with different response to antidepressants. In addition, hippocampal findings recursively link together unfavorable treatment response and progressive hippocampal structural changes in recurrent depression. PMID:23920122

  7. Genetic polymorphisms, their allele combinations and IFN-β treatment response in Irish multiple sclerosis patients

    PubMed Central

    O’Doherty, Catherine; Favorov, Alexander; Heggarty, Shirley; Graham, Colin; Favorova, Olga; Ochs, Michael; Hawkins, Stanley; Hutchinson, Michael; O’Rourke, Killian; Vandenbroeck, Koen

    2009-01-01

    Introduction IFN-β is widely used as first-line immunomodulatory treatment for multiple sclerosis. Response to treatment is variable (30–50% of patients are nonresponders) and requires a long treatment duration for accurate assessment to be possible. Information about genetic variations that predict responsiveness would allow appropriate treatment selection early after diagnosis, improve patient care, with time saving consequences and more efficient use of resources. Materials & methods We analyzed 61 SNPs in 34 candidate genes as possible determinants of IFN-β response in Irish multiple sclerosis patients. Particular emphasis was placed on the exploration of combinations of allelic variants associated with response to therapy by means of a Markov chain Monte Carlo-based approach (APSampler). Results The most significant allelic combinations, which differed in frequency between responders and nonresponders, included JAK2–IL10RB–GBP1–PIAS1 (permutation p-value was pperm = 0.0008), followed by JAK2–IL10–CASP3 (pperm = 0.001). Discussion The genetic mechanism of response to IFN-β is complex and as yet poorly understood. Data mining algorithms may help in uncovering hidden allele combinations involved in drug response versus nonresponse. PMID:19604093

  8. Within patient microevolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis correlates with heterogeneous responses to treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingyun; Via, Laura E; Luo, Tao; Liang, Lili; Liu, Xin; Wu, Sufang; Shen, Qingyu; Wei, Wang; Ruan, Xianglin; Yuan, Xing; Zhang, Guolong; Barry, Clifton E; Gao, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Genetic heterogeneity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) within a patient has caused great concern as it might complicate antibiotic treatment and cause treatment failure. But the extent of genetic heterogeneity has not been described in detail nor has its association with heterogeneous treatment response. During treatment of a subject with MDR-TB, serial computed tomography (CT) scans showed this subject had six anatomically discrete lesions and they responded to treatment with disparate kinetics, suggesting heterogeneous MTB population may exist. To investigate this heterogeneity, we applied deep whole genome sequencing of serial sputum isolates and discovered that the MTB population within this patient contained three dominant sub-clones differing by 10 ~ 14 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Differential mutation patterns in known resistance alleles indicated these sub-clones had different drug-resistance patterns, which may explain the heterogeneous treatment responses between lesions. Our results showed clear evidence of branched microevolution of MTB in vivo, which led to a diverse bacterial community. These findings indicated that complex sub-populations of MTB might coexist within patient and contribute to lesions' disparate responses to antibiotic treatment. PMID:26620446

  9. The Promise of Biological Markers for Treatment Response in First-Episode Psychosis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Fond, Guillaume; d’Albis, Marc-Antoine; Jamain, Stéphane; Tamouza, Ryad; Arango, Celso; Fleischhacker, W. Wolfgang; Glenthøj, Birte; Leweke, Markus; Lewis, Shôn; McGuire, Phillip; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Sommer, Iris E.; Winter-van Rossum, Inge; Kapur, Shitij; Kahn, René S.; Rujescu, Dan; Leboyer, Marion

    2015-01-01

    Successful treatment of first-episode psychosis is one of the major factors that impacts long-term prognosis. Currently, there are no satisfactory biological markers (biomarkers) to predict which patients with a first-episode psychosis will respond to which treatment. In addition, a non-negligible rate of patients does not respond to any treatment or may develop side effects that affect adherence to the treatments as well as negatively impact physical health. Thus, there clearly is a pressing need for defining biomarkers that may be helpful to predict response to treatment and sensitivity to side effects in first-episode psychosis. The present systematic review provides (1) trials that assessed biological markers associated with antipsychotic response or side effects in first-episode psychosis and (2) potential biomarkers associated with biological disturbances that may guide the choice of conventional treatments or the prescription of innovative treatments. Trials including first-episode psychoses are few in number. Most of the available data focused on pharmacogenetics markers with so far only preliminary results. To date, these studies yielded—beside markers for metabolism of antipsychotics—no or only a few biomarkers for response or side effects, none of which have been implemented in daily clinical practice. Other biomarkers exploring immunoinflammatory, oxidative, and hormonal disturbances emerged as biomarkers of first-episode psychoses in the last decades, and some of them have been associated with treatment response. In addition to pharmacogenetics, further efforts should focus on the association of emergent biomarkers with conventional treatments or with innovative therapies efficacy, where some preliminary data suggest promising results. PMID:25759473

  10. Whole-genome expression analysis reveals genes associated with treatment response to escitalopram in major depression.

    PubMed

    Pettai, Kristi; Milani, Lili; Tammiste, Anu; Võsa, Urmo; Kolde, Raivo; Eller, Triin; Nutt, David; Metspalu, Andres; Maron, Eduard

    2016-09-01

    The reasons for variability in treatment response in major depressive disorder (MDD) are not fully understood, but there is accumulating evidence suggesting that therapeutic outcomes of antidepressants can be influenced by genetic factors. In the present study we applied the microarray Illumina platform for whole genome expression profiling in depressive patients treated with escitalopram medication in order to identify genes underlying response to antidepressant treatment. The initial study sample consisted of 135 outpatients with major depressive disorder (mean age 31.1±11.6 years, 68% females) treated with escitalopram 10-20mg/day for 12 weeks, from which 87 patients (55 females) were included in gene expression analyzing. The gene expression profiles were measured on peripheral blood cells at baseline, at week 4 and at the end of treatment (week 12) using BeadChips Illumina. The fold change was used to demonstrate rate of changes in average gene expressions between studied groups. Statistical analyses were performed using the false discovery rate (FDR). The most interesting gene, which showed the predictive effect on treatment outcome by delineating low dose responders and treatment-resistant patients at the beginning of medication, was NLGN2, belonging to a family of neuronal cell surface proteins and involving in synapse formation. In addition, the several gene clusters, related to immune response, signal transduction and neurotrophin pathway, have distinguished responders from non-responders at the week 4 of treatment. After 4 weeks of escitalopram treatment (10mg/day), the YWHAZ gene has showed the highest transcriptional change in responders as compared with non-responders. Finally, at the end of the treatment we noticed that at least three genes (NR2C2, ZNF641, FKBP1A) have been strongly associated with resistance to escitalopram. Thus the results of this study support that exploration of peripheral gene expression is a useful tool in the further

  11. Recent advances in the understanding and treatment of anxiety disorders. Resilience: determinants, measurement, and treatment responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Connor, Kathryn M; Zhang, Wei

    2006-10-01

    In human terms, resilience is an ability to cope with stress and varies with context, time, age, gender, and cultural origin. Resilience shifts the focus of psychological investigation onto increasing the positive rather than reducing the negative. Inquiry into resilience has evolved from descriptions of resilient qualities, to discovery of the process to attain resilience, to uncovering the motivation to reintegrate in a resilient manner. Much of the research on resilience has focused on children in settings such as family violence, extreme poverty, war, and natural disasters. A coherent pattern of characteristics associated with successful adaptation has emerged. Salient characteristics include commitment, dynamism, humor in the face of adversity, patience, optimism, faith, and altruism. As such, resilience may represent an important target of treatment in anxiety, depression, and stress reactions. Resilience can be quantified, but available measures need to be validated transculturally. There exist many possible determinants of resilience, including neurobiologic, genetic, temperament, and environmental influences. Resilience is modifiable on individual and cultural levels. Posttraumatic stress disorder is an example of a serious disorder associated with impaired stress coping that can improve with treatment. PMID:17008825

  12. Neural Mechanisms of Improvements in Social Motivation After Pivotal Response Treatment: Two Case Studies

    PubMed Central

    Voos, Avery C.; Pelphrey, Kevin A.; Tirrell, Jonathan; Bolling, Danielle Z.; Vander Wyk, Brent; Kaiser, Martha D.; McPartland, James C.; Volkmar, Fred R.; Ventola, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Pivotal response treatment (PRT) is an empirically validated behavioral treatment that has widespread positive effects on communication, behavior, and social skills in young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). For the first time, functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to identify the neural correlates of successful response to PRT in two young children with ASD. Baseline measures of social communication, adaptive behavior, eye tracking and neural response to social stimuli were taken prior to treatment and after 4 months of PRT. Both children showed striking gains on behavioral measures and also showed increased activation to social stimuli in brain regions utilized by typically developing children. These results suggest that neural systems supporting social perception are malleable through implementation of PRT. PMID:23104615

  13. Dissecting the Heterogeneity of Treatment Response in First-Episode Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Anil K

    2015-11-01

    The Mental Health Centers for Intervention Development and Applied Research (CIDAR) program prioritized research to provide an evidence base for biomarker development. At the Zucker Hillside Hospital (ZHH), our CIDAR grant supported research on a comprehensive investigation of treatment response and outcome in first episode schizophrenia. Results provide evidence that baseline neuroimaging, neurocognitive, and genetic measures are significantly associated with clinical response to treatment, and that our currently available interventions can effectively treat aspects of psychotic illness, as well as potentially reduce comorbidity associated with illness. Future research may include combining modalities to more robustly predict response and identify treatment targets, as well as to further develop more effective intervention strategies for these devastating and disabling disorders. PMID:26333841

  14. Comparative effectiveness of imaging modalities to determine metastatic breast cancer treatment response.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christoph I; Gold, Laura S; Nelson, Heidi D; Chou, Roger; Ramsey, Scott D; Sullivan, Sean D

    2015-02-01

    We performed a systematic review to address the comparative effectiveness of different imaging modalities in evaluating treatment response among metastatic breast cancer patients. We searched seven multidisciplinary electronic databases for relevant publications (January 2003-December 2013) and performed dual abstraction of details and results for all clinical studies that involved stage IV breast cancer patients and evaluated imaging for detecting treatment response. Among 159 citations reviewed, 17 single-institution, non-randomized, observational studies met our inclusion criteria. Several studies demonstrate that changes in PET/CT standard uptake values are associated with changes in tumor volume as determined by bone scan, MRI, and/or CT. However, no studies evaluated comparative test performance between modalities or determined relationships between imaging findings and subsequent clinical decisions. Evidence for imaging's effectiveness in determining treatment response among metastatic breast cancer patients is limited. More rigorous research is needed to address imaging's value in this patient population. PMID:25479913

  15. Progress in the understanding and utilization of biologic response modifiers in the treatment of uveitis.

    PubMed

    Maleki, Arash; Meese, Halea; Sahawneh, Haitham; Foster, C Stephen

    2016-07-01

    Uveitis is the third most common cause of blindness in developed countries. Considering the systemic and local complications of long-term corticosteroid therapy and the intolerance due to side effects and ineffectiveness of conventional chemotherapy, use of biologic response modifiers is a reasonable alternative in the treatment of non-infectious uveitis and persistent uveitic macular edema. The majority of the evidence presented here comes from open uncontrolled analyses. Based on these studies, tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors, especially infliximab and adalimumab, have been shown to be effective in the treatment of non-infectious uveitis in numerous studies. More research is necessary, particularly multi-center randomized clinical trials, to address the choice of biologic response modifier agent and the length of treatment as we employ biologic response modifiers in different types of uveitis and persistent uveitic macular edema. PMID:26972783

  16. Response of Human Prostate Cancer Cells to Mitoxantrone Treatment in Simulated Microgravity Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ye; Wu, Honglu

    2012-07-01

    RESPONSE OF HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER CELLS TO MITOXANTRONE TREATMENT IN SIMULATED MICROGRAVITY ENVIRONMENT Ye Zhang1,2, Christopher Edwards3, and Honglu Wu1 1 NASA-Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 2 Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering Group, Houston, TX 3 Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR This study explores the changes in growth of human prostate cancer cells (LNCaP) and their response to the treatment of an antineoplastic agent, mitoxantrone, under the simulated microgravity condition. In comparison to static 1g, microgravity and simulated microgravity have been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels in various cultured cell models or animals. However, very little is known about the effect of altered gravity on the responses of cells to the treatment of drugs, especially chemotherapy drugs. To test the hypothesis that zero gravity would result in altered regulations of cells in response to antineoplastic agents, we cultured LNCaP cells in either a High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) bioreactor at the rotating condition to model microgravity in space or in the static condition as control, and treated the cells with mitoxantrone. Cell growth, as well as expressions of oxidative stress related genes, were analyzed after the drug treatment. Compared to static 1g controls, the cells cultured in the simulated microgravity environment did not present significant differences in cell viability, growth rate, or cell cycle distribution. However, after mitoxantrone treatment, a significant proportion of bioreactor cultured cells became apoptotic or was arrested in G2. Several oxidative stress related genes also showed a higher expression level post mitoxantrone treatment. Our results indicate that simulated microgravity may alter the response of LNCaP cells to mitoxantrone treatment. Understanding the mechanisms by which cells respond to drugs differently in an altered gravity environment will be useful for the improvement of cancer treatment on

  17. Interaction between SERTPR and stressful life events on response to antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Mandelli, Laura; Marino, Elena; Pirovano, Adele; Calati, Raffaella; Zanardi, Raffaella; Colombo, Cristina; Serretti, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    A polymorphism within the serotonin transporter gene (SERTPR) has been repeatedly associated to mood disorders and response to SSRIs treatment. Recent evidence suggested that influence of genetic effect of SERTPR might be modulated by stress, particularly as regard the development of anxious-depressive symptoms. Nevertheless, there is no information about the role of stressors as potential modulator of SERTPR effects on depressive outcome during pharmacological treatment. In a sample of 159 mood disorder patients treated with fluvoxamine, we found stressors preceding the onset of the illness significantly influencing the genetic effect exerted by SERTPR on response after 6 weeks of treatment. This preliminary finding supports the idea of complex interaction between biological and environmental factors underlying the efficacy of biological treatments, other than liability for mood disorders. Nevertheless, many limitations characterize the present investigation and well-funded studies on larger samples are required. PMID:18815011

  18. Neural Correlates of Treatment in Adolescents with Bipolar Depression During Response Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Segreti, Anna Maria; Ladouceur, Cecile D; Almeida, Jorge RC; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David A; Phillips, Mary L; Pan, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective Abnormal prefrontal and subcortical activity during cognitive control tasks is identified in non-depressed adolescents with bipolar disorder (BD); however, little is known about the neural correlates of bipolar adolescents in a depressed state (BDd). We aimed to investigate baseline versus after-treatment patterns of neural activity underlying motor response and response inhibition in adolescents with BDd. Methods In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, 10 adolescents with BDd relative to 10 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HC) completed a well-validated go/no go block-design cognitive control task at baseline and after 6 weeks of naturalistic treatment. We used whole-brain analysis and controlled our results for multiple comparisons. Results There was significant improvement in depression scores (mean change: 57%±28). There was no behavioral difference in BDd baseline versus HC and after treatment. BDd adolescents relative to HC had higher baseline cortical, but not subcortical, neural activity (e.g., bilateral ventrolateral prefrontal during both the go [motor control] and the no go [response inhibition] conditions, and left superior temporal during the no go condition). However, after-treatment activity relative to baseline neural activity during response inhibition was significantly increased in subcortical (e.g., right hippocampus and left thalamus), but not cortical, regions. In addition, at baseline, lower left thalamus activity was correlated with higher depression scores. Conclusions Adolescents with BDd had baseline prefrontal and temporal hyperactivity underlying motor control and response inhibition that did not change after treatment in contrast to relatively decreased baseline subcortical activity underlying response inhibition associated with the depressive state that was increased after the treatment. PMID:23607410

  19. Discordant Treatment Responses to Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in Rwanda: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kayigamba, Felix R.; Franke, Molly F.; Bakker, Mirjam I.; Rodriguez, Carly A.; Bagiruwigize, Emmanuel; Wit, Ferdinand WNM; Rich, Michael L.; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Some antiretroviral therapy naïve patients starting combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) experience a limited CD4 count rise despite virological suppression, or vice versa. We assessed the prevalence and determinants of discordant treatment responses in a Rwandan cohort. Methods A discordant immunological cART response was defined as an increase of <100 CD4 cells/mm3 at 12 months compared to baseline despite virological suppression (viral load [VL] <40 copies/mL). A discordant virological cART response was defined as detectable VL at 12 months with an increase in CD4 count ≥100 cells/mm3. The prevalence of, and independent predictors for these two types of discordant responses were analysed in two cohorts nested in a 12-month prospective study of cART-naïve HIV patients treated at nine rural health facilities in two regions in Rwanda. Results Among 382 patients with an undetectable VL at 12 months, 112 (29%) had a CD4 rise of <100 cells/mm3. Age ≥35 years and longer travel to the clinic were independent determinants of an immunological discordant response, but sex, baseline CD4 count, body mass index and WHO HIV clinical stage were not. Among 326 patients with a CD4 rise of ≥100 cells/mm3, 56 (17%) had a detectable viral load at 12 months. Male sex was associated with a virological discordant treatment response (P = 0.05), but age, baseline CD4 count, BMI, WHO HIV clinical stage, and travel time to the clinic were not. Conclusions Discordant treatment responses were common in cART-naïve HIV patients in Rwanda. Small CD4 increases could be misinterpreted as a (virological) treatment failure and lead to unnecessary treatment changes. PMID:27438000

  20. Ontology-Driven Hypothesis Generation to Explain Anomalous Patient Responses to Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Laura; Sleeman, Derek; Sim, Malcolm; Booth, Malcolm; Daniel, Malcolm; Donaldson, Lyndsay; Gilhooly, Charlotte; Hughes, Martin; Kinsella, John

    Within the medical domain there are clear expectations as to how a patient should respond to treatments administered. When these responses are not observed it can be challenging for clinicians to understand the anomalous responses. The work reported here describes a tool which can detect anomalous patient responses to treatment and further suggest hypotheses to explain the anomaly. In order to develop this tool, we have undertaken a study to determine how Intensive Care Unit (ICU) clinicians identify anomalous patient responses; we then asked further clinicians to provide potential explanations for such anomalies. The high level reasoning deployed by the clinicians has been captured and generalised to form the procedural component of the ontology-driven tool. An evaluation has shown that the tool successfully reproduced the clinician’s hypotheses in the majority of cases. Finally, the paper concludes by describing planned extensions to this work.

  1. Fibulin-3 as a biomarker of response to treatment in malignant mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Kovac, Viljem; Dodic-Fikfak, Metoda; Arneric, Niko; Dolzan, Vita; Franko, Alenka

    2015-01-01

    Background Fibulin-3 is a new potential biomarker for malignant mesothelioma (MM). This study evaluated the potential applicability of fibulin-3 plasma levels as a biomarker of response to treatment and its prognostic value for progressive disease within 18 months. The potential applicability of fibulin-3 in comparison with or in addition to soluble mesothelin-related peptides (SMRP) was also assessed. Patients and methods. The study included 78 MM patients treated at the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana between 2007 and 2011. Fibulin-3 levels in plasma samples obtained before treatment and in various responses to treatment were measured with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results In patients evaluated before the treatment, fibulin-3 levels were not influenced by histopathological sub-types, tumour stages or the presence of metastatic disease. Significantly higher fibulin-3 levels were found in progressive disease as compared to the levels before treatment (Mann-Whitney [U] test = 472.50, p = 0.003), in complete response to treatment (U = 42.00, p = 0.010), and in stable disease (U = 542.00, p = 0.001). Patients with fibulin-3 levels exceeding 34.25 ng/ml before treatment had more than four times higher probability for developing progressive disease within 18 months (odds ratio [OR] = 4.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.56–12.13). Additionally, patients with fibulin-3 levels above 34.25 ng/ml after treatment with complete response or stable disease had increased odds for progressive disease within 18 months (OR = 6.94, 95% CI 0.99–48.55 and OR = 4.39, 95% CI 1.63–11.81, respectively). Conclusions Our findings suggest that in addition to SMRP fibulin-3 could also be helpful in detecting the progression of MM. PMID:26401134

  2. Dopaminergic synapses in the caudate of subjects with schizophrenia: relationship to treatment response

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Rosalinda C.; Roche, Joy K.; Conley, Robert R.; Lahti, Adrienne C.

    2009-01-01

    The typical symptoms of schizophrenia (SZ) are psychotic symptoms (hallucinations, delusions, disorders of thought or speech, grossly disorganized behavior) as well as cognitive impairments and negative symptoms. Not all patients respond to treatment and in those who do, only psychotic symptoms are usually improved. Imaging studies have shown that SZ subjects with high striatal dopamine release are far more responsive to antipsychotic drugs than those patients who have dopamine levels lower than or comparable to that of normal controls. In the present study we hypothesized that there was a link between psychosis and the number of dopaminergic synapses in the caudate nucleus in SZ. We examined dopaminergic synapses at the electron microscopic level in postmortem caudate from cases obtained from the Maryland Brain Collection. SZ were subdivided based on treatment response or resistance. The tissue was processed for the immunocytochemical localization of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the synthesizing enzyme for dopamine, and prepared for electron microscopy. The density of all TH labeled synapses was 43% greater in treatment responders than in controls and 62% greater in than in treatment resistant SZ. Axodendritic, but not axospinous, TH-labeled synapses showed this increase. TH-labeled axodendritic synapses in treatment responders were elevated in density (1.95±0.093/10μm3) compared to treatment resistant SZ (0.04±0.017/10μm3) and controls (0.11±0.044/10μm3). The results of the present study suggest that one anatomical underpinning of good treatment response may be a higher density of dopaminergic synapses and support a biological basis to treatment response and resistance. Moreover, these data have important implications for linking specific neuropathology with particular symptoms. PMID:19226604

  3. [The duration of untreated depression is associated with a poor treatment response.

    PubMed

    Hjerrild, Simon; Videbech, Poul

    2014-03-01

    According to clinical lore the duration of untreated depression is associated with a poor treatment response. This is in accordance with the kindling hypothesis of depression. It is an important subject, since the duration of untreated depression is a potentially modifiable risk factor. Despite this, relatively few studies addressing the problem exist. While an association between the duration of untreated depression and treatment response generally is found, the uncontrolled and often retrospective nature of these studies makes it difficult to ascertain causality. PMID:25096008

  4. Pharmacogenetics and individual responses to treatment of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Engelbrechtsen, Line; Andersson, Ehm; Roepstorff, Soeren; Hansen, Torben; Vestergaard, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to summarize current knowledge and provide perspectives on the relationships between human genetic variants, type 2 diabetes, antidiabetic treatment, and disease progression. Type 2 diabetes is a complex disease with clear-cut diagnostic criteria and treatment guidelines. Yet, the interindividual response to therapy and slope of disease progression varies markedly among patients with type 2 diabetes. Gene-gene, gene-environment, and gene-treatment interactions may explain some of the variation in disease progression. Several genetic variants have been suggested to be associated with response to antidiabetic drugs. Some are present in drug receptors or drug metabolizers (OCT genes, KCNJ11, ABCC8, and CYP2C9). Numerous type 2 diabetes risk variants have been identified, but genetic risk score models applying these variants have failed to identify 'disease progressors' among patients with diabetes. Although genetic risk scores are based on a few known loci and only explain a fraction of the heritability of type 2 diabetes, it seems that the genes responsible for the development of diabetes may not be the same driving disease progression after the diagnosis has been made. Pharmacogenetic interactions explain some of the interindividual variation in responses to antidiabetic treatment and may provide the foundation for future genotype-based treatment standards. PMID:26181639

  5. Mass spectrometry-based quantification of the cellular response to methyl methanesulfonate treatment in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Aslanian, Aaron; Yates, John R.; Hunter, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Faithful transmission of genetic material is essential for cell viability and organism health. The occurrence of DNA damage, due to either spontaneous events or environmental agents, threatens the integrity of the genome. The consequences of these insults, if allowed to perpetuate and accumulate over time, are mutations that can lead to the development of diseases such as cancer. Alkylation is a relevant DNA lesion produced endogenously as well as by exogenous agents including certain chemotherapeutics. We sought to better understand the cellular response to this form of DNA damage using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. For this purpose, we performed sub-cellular fractionation to monitor the effect of MMS treatment on protein localization to chromatin. The levels of over 500 proteins were increased in the chromatin-enriched nuclear lysate including histone chaperones. Levels of ubiquitin and subunits of the proteasome were also increased within this fraction, suggesting that ubiquitin-mediated degradation by the proteasome has an important role in the chromatin response to MMS treatment. Finally, the levels of some proteins were decreased within the chromatin-enriched lysate including components of the nuclear pore complex. Our spatial proteomics data demonstrate that many proteins that influence chromatin organization are regulated in response to MMS treatment, presumably to open the DNA to allow access by other DNA damage response proteins. To gain further insight into the cellular response to MMS-induced DNA damage, we also performed phosphorylation enrichment on total cell lysates to identify proteins regulated via post-translational modification. Phosphoproteomic analysis demonstrated that many nuclear phosphorylation events were decreased in response to MMS treatment. This reflected changes in protein kinase and/or phosphatase activity in response to DNA damage rather than changes in total protein abundance. Using these two mass spectrometry

  6. Decreased Total Antioxidant Activity in Major Depressive Disorder Patients Non-Responsive to Antidepressant Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Song-Eun; Lee, Gyoung-Ja; Rhee, Chang-Kyu; Rho, Dae-Young; Kim, Do-Hoon; Huh, Sun

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the total antioxidant activity (TAA) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and the effect of antidepressants on TAA using a novel potentiometric method. Methods Twenty-eight patients with MDD and thirty-one healthy controls were enrolled in this study. The control group comprised 31 healthy individuals matched for gender, drinking and smoking status. We assessed symptoms of depression using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). We measured TAA using potentiometry. All measurements were made at baseline and four and eight weeks later. Results There was a significant negative correlation between BDI scores and TAA. TAA was significantly lower in the MDD group than in controls. When the MDD group was subdivided into those who showed clinical response to antidepressant therapy (response group) and those who did not (non-response group), only the non-response group showed lower TAA, while the response group showed no significant difference to controls at baseline. After eight weeks of antidepressant treatment, TAA in both the response and non-response groups was similar, and there was no significant difference among the three groups. Conclusion These results suggest that the response to antidepressant treatment in MDD patients might be predicted by measuring TAA. PMID:27081384

  7. Working memory fMRI activation in cocaine-dependent subjects: association with treatment response.

    PubMed

    Moeller, F Gerard; Steinberg, Joel L; Schmitz, Joy M; Ma, Liangsuo; Liu, Shijing; Kjome, Kimberly L; Rathnayaka, Nuvan; Kramer, Larry A; Narayana, Ponnada A

    2010-03-30

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies of early abstinence cocaine users offer information about the state of the brain when most cocaine users seek treatment. This study examined the relationship between pretreatment brain function and subsequent treatment response in 19 treatment-seeking early abstinence cocaine-dependent (CD) subjects. These subjects and 14 non-drug-using control subjects underwent fMRI while performing a working memory task with three levels of difficulty. CD subjects were then randomized to treatment studies. Results showed CD subjects had significantly lower (random effects, corrected for multiple comparisons) brain activation in caudate, putamen, cingulate gyrus, middle and superior frontal gyri, inferior frontal gyrus pars triangularis and pars opercularis, precentral gyrus, and thalamus compared with non-drug-using controls. Within CD subjects, thalamic activation significantly correlated with treatment response. This study shows CD subjects in early abstinence have alterations of brain function in frontal, striatal, and thalamic brain regions known to be part of a circuit associated with motor control, reward, and cognition. Subjects with pretreatment thalamic deactivation showed the poorest treatment response, possibly related to thalamic involvement in mesocortical and mesolimbic dopamine projections. PMID:20153142

  8. [Treatment outcome using prednisone in corticosteroid-responsive primary nephrotic syndrome in children].

    PubMed

    Brumariu, O; Cucer, Florentina; Munteanu, Mihaela; Haliţchi, Codruţa; Müller, R; Russu, R

    2005-01-01

    In children, the nephrotic syndrome is usually corticoid-responsive; approximately 70% of patients experience relapses, frequently triggered by infections. Our paper presents the results obtained using a 4 month prednisone regimen. This retrospective study included 83 children afflicted with nephrotic syndrome over a 10 year span. We analyzed: age at diagnosis, boys/girls ratio, response to corticoid treatment - after one month of prednisone and at the completion of the treatment course, number of relapses and their frequency, complications of prednisone treatment. The median age at diagnosis was 4.8 years, males predominating M:F = 1.5:1. Complete response after 4 weeks of prednisone therapy was noted in 98.79% of cases. We had 116 episodes of relapses during the first year of follow-up, occurring in 67.4% of children (27.9% were frequent relapsers, 11.62% subsequently became corticoid-dependent). Late relapses, after the first year, occurred in 32.55% of cases. We noted mostly mild adverse effects of the prednisone treatment: occurrence of infections during therapy (16.27%), cushingoid facies (37.2%), hirsutism (4.6%), high blood pressure (4.65%), stretch marks (2.32%). In conclusion, the 4 month prednisone treatment regimen is efficient in inducing and maintaining a remission. The incidence of relapses is 32.55%, comparable to the figure cited in larger studies. Serious adverse effects are significantly lower with this regimen compared to other corticoid treatment schemes. Key wo PMID:16607738

  9. Optical Metabolic Imaging of Treatment Response in Human Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Amy T.; Demory Beckler, Michelle; Walsh, Alex J.; Jones, William P.; Pohlmann, Paula R.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2014-01-01

    Optical metabolic imaging measures fluorescence intensity and lifetimes from metabolic cofactors nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). These molecular level measurements provide unique biomarkers for early cellular responses to cancer treatments. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is an attractive target for optical imaging because of easy access to the site using fiber optic probes. Two HNSCC cell lines, SCC25 and SCC61, were treated with Cetuximab (anti-EGFR antibody), BGT226 (PI3K/mTOR inhibitor), or cisplatin (chemotherapy) for 24 hours. Results show increased redox ratio, NADH α1 (contribution from free NADH), and FAD α1 (contribution from protein-bound FAD) for malignant cells compared with the nonmalignant cell line OKF6 (p<0.05). In SCC25 and SCC61 cells, the redox ratio is unaffected by cetuximab treatment and decreases with BGT226 and cisplatin treatment (p<0.05), and these results agree with standard measurements of proliferation rates after treatment. For SCC25, NADH α1 is reduced with BGT226 and cisplatin treatment. For SCC61, NADH α1 is reduced with cetuximab, BGT226, and cisplatin treatment. Trends in NADH α1 are statistically similar to changes in standard measurements of glycolytic rates after treatment. FAD α1 is reduced with cisplatin treatment (p<0.05). These shifts in optical endpoints reflect early metabolic changes induced by drug treatment. Overall, these results indicate that optical metabolic imaging has potential to detect early response to cancer treatment in HNSCC, enabling optimal treatment regimens and improved patient outcomes. PMID:24595244

  10. Impact of Close Family Members on Older Adults’ Early Response to Depression Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Martire, Lynn M.; Schulz, Richard; Reynolds, Charles F.; Morse, Jennifer Q.; Butters, Meryl A.; Hinrichsen, Gregory A.

    2009-01-01

    This study of 130 depressed older adults and their spouses or adult children examined the impact of caregiver burden specific to patients’ depressive symptoms on patients’ response to antidepressant treatment. Primary care patients completed medical, psychiatric, and neuropsychological assessments prior to treatment, and interviews were conducted with their identified family member. As hypothesized, caregivers’ depression-specific burden predicted greater depression severity for the patient at the 6th week of treatment after accounting for patients’ pretreatment characteristics, caregivers’ depressive symptoms, and caregivers’ relationship satisfaction. Future research may identify family attitudes and behaviors that stem from burden and compromise older adults’ ability to recover from depression. PMID:18573018

  11. Pulmonary langerhans cell histiocytosis: PET/CT for initial workup and treatment response evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Neil J; Hankins, Jordan H

    2015-02-01

    A 40-year-old man underwent pan-endoscopy owing to abdominal pain. Biopsies of the gastrointestinal tract demonstrated diffuse Langerhans cell histiocytosis. PET/CT was done, with CT demonstrating classic pulmonary manifestations of Langerhans cell histiocytosis that had association with intense FDG uptake on PET. Bowel appeared normal. Treatment was initiated with smoking cessation and 6 cycles of cytarabine. Follow-up PET/CT after initial treatment demonstrated improvement of parenchymal abnormalities seen on CT, with resolution of hypermetabolic activity. Maintenance chemotherapy was initiated. PET/CT is increasingly being used for initial staging and treatment response assessment in this rare disorder. PMID:24999688

  12. Hemisphere Asymmetry of Response to Pharmacologic Treatment in an Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Saito, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yumi; Al-Daghri, Nasser M; Ihara, Masafumi; Carare, Roxana O; Garbis, Spiros D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine hemisphere asymmetry of response to pharmacologic treatment in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model using cilostazol as a chemical stimulus. Eight-month-old mice were assigned to vehicle or cilostazol treatment for three months and hemispheres were analyzed using quantitative proteomics. Bioinformatics interpretation showed that following treatment, aggregation of blood platelets significantly decreased in the right hemisphere whereas neurodegeneration significantly decreased and synaptic transmission increased in the left hemisphere only. Our study provides novel evidence on cerebral laterality of pharmacologic activity, with important implications in deciphering regional pharmacodynamic effects of existing drugs thus uncovering novel hemisphere-specific therapeutic targets. PMID:26836196

  13. The Usefulness of Serum CXCR3 Ligands for Evaluating the Early Treatment Response in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Wou Young; Yoon, Dukyong; Lee, Keu Sung; Jung, Yun Jung; Kim, Young Sun; Sheen, Seung Soo; Park, Kwang Joo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cell-mediated immunity plays an important role in the pathobiology of tuberculosis (TB). The ligands for CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3) activate the T-helper type 1 lymphocyte pathway. The CXCR3 ligands are reportedly useful clinical markers for the diagnosis and follow-up of TB. The objective of this study was to assess the utility of CXCR3 ligands for evaluating early treatment responses in TB. We recruited 88 patients who underwent antituberculous chemotherapy. The serum levels of interferon (IFN)-γ and the CXCR3 ligands CXCL9 (monokine induced by IFN-γ [MIG]), CXCL10 (IFN-γ-inducible 10-kDa protein [IP-10]), and CXCL11 (IFN-inducible T-cell α chemoattractant [I-TAC]) were measured before and 2 months after the start of treatment. Treatment responses were divided into “fast” and “slow” based on the clinical, radiological, and bacteriological improvement at 2 months. A change in level of 20% or more at 2 months was defined as “significant.” In patients with treatment success, 58 patients exhibited a fast response and 20 patients exhibited a slow response. Treatment failure occurred in 5 patients, and the diagnoses were changed to non-TB diseases in 5 patients. The levels of all CXCR3 ligands significantly decreased in the fast-response group (P < 0.01) but did not decrease in the other groups. IFN-γ levels showed no significant changes. The ability of significant decreases in marker levels to predict a fast response was evaluated. CXCL9 showed a sensitivity of 83%, and CXCL10 showed a specificity of 100%. Use of various combinations of CXCR3 ligands resulted in improvements in sensitivity (88%–93%), while specificity (92%–96%) was similar to that using single CXCR3 ligands. The decreases in CXCR3 ligand levels were less marked in the 2-month Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture-positive group than in the culture-negative group. There were significant differences in treatment outcomes in terms of 2-month culture positivity (P

  14. S100B Serum Levels Predict Treatment Response in Patients with Melancholic Depression

    PubMed Central

    Bergink, Veerle; Grosse, Laura; Alferink, Judith; Drexhage, Hemmo A.; Rothermundt, Matthias; Arolt, Volker; Birkenhäger, Tom K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is an ongoing search for biomarkers in psychiatry, for example, as diagnostic tools or predictors of treatment response. The neurotrophic factor S100 calcium binding protein B (S100B) has been discussed as a possible predictor of antidepressant response in patients with major depression, but also as a possible biomarker of an acute depressive state. The aim of the present study was to study the association of serum S100B levels with antidepressant treatment response and depression severity in melancholically depressed inpatients. Methods: After a wash-out period of 1 week, 40 inpatients with melancholic depression were treated with either venlafaxine or imipramine. S100B levels and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) scores were assessed at baseline, after 7 weeks of treatment, and after 6 months. Results: Patients with high S100B levels at baseline showed a markedly better treatment response defined as relative reduction in HAM-D scores than those with low baseline S100B levels after 7 weeks (P=.002) and 6 months (P=.003). In linear regression models, S100B was a significant predictor for treatment response at both time points. It is of interest to note that nonresponders were detected with a predictive value of 85% and a false negative rate of 7.5%. S100B levels were not associated with depression severity and did not change with clinical improvement. Conclusions: Low S100B levels predict nonresponse to venlafaxine and imipramine with high precision. Future studies have to show which treatments are effective in patients with low levels of S100B so that this biomarker will help to reduce patients’ burden of nonresponding to frequently used antidepressants. PMID:26364276

  15. Antipyrine clearance and response to interferon treatment in patients with chronic active hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Coverdale, S; Byth, K; Field, J; Liddle, C; Lin, R; Farrell, G C

    1995-10-01

    To determine whether hepatic metabolic function affects the response to interferon treatment, we measured antipyrine clearance (APC) in 85 patients with chronic active hepatitis C and compared the results with treatment outcome. Among 55 patients who responded to interferon by normalization of alanine transaminase (ALT), median APC before treatment was 0.47 (range, 0.12 to 0.98; normal range, 0.34 to 1.02 mL/min/kg body wt), a value that was significantly greater than in 30 nonresponders (0.23; 0.08 to 0.67 mL/min/kg body wt, P < .001). APC was closely associated with response to interferon. The response rate among cases with values > 0.25 mL/min/kg body weight was 79%, the same as in cases without cirrhosis. Cases without cirrhosis and with APC of > 0.25 mL/min/kg body weight had an 85% chance of responding to interferon; this was unlikely a simple reflection of histological activity, because the correlation with Scheuer score was poor in this subgroup (r = -.31, P < .05). A second, independent group of 43 patients was used to test the predictive value of APC (using 0.25 mL/min/kg body wt as a cut-off) for response to interferon treatment. In this group, APC correctly predicted positive response to interferon in 75% of cases. APC was also used to measure the effects of treatment on hepatic metabolic function. Regardless of outcome, there was no change in APC at the end of a 6-month course of interferon treatment. Six months later, however, improvement in APC (14%; P < .05) was evident among responders but not in those who had failed to respond to interferon.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7557852

  16. Treatment response to transcatheter arterial embolization and chemoembolization in primary and metastatic tumors of the liver

    PubMed Central

    Artinyan, Avo; Nelson, Rebecca; Soriano, Perry; Chung, Vincent; Retseck, Janet; Reynolds, Jonathon; Marx, Howard; Kim, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Introduction. Transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) and chemoembolization (TACE) are increasingly used to treat unresectable primary and metastatic liver tumors. The purpose of this study was to determine the objective response to TAE and TACE in unresectable hepatic malignancies and to identify clinicopathologic predictors of response. Materials and methods. Seventy-nine consecutive patients who underwent 119 TAE/TACE procedures between 1998 and 2006 were reviewed. The change in maximal diameter of 121 evaluable lesions in 56 patients was calculated from pre and post-procedure imaging. Response rates were determined using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) guidelines. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to compare survival in responders vs. non-responders and in primary vs. metastatic histologies. Results. TAE and TACE resulted in a mean decrease in lesion size of 10.3%±1.9% (p<0.001). TACE (vs. TAE) and carcinoid tumors were associated with a greater response (p<0.05). Lesion response was not predicted by pre-treatment size, vascularity, or histology. The RECIST partial response (PR) rate was 12.3% and all partial responders were in the TACE group. Neuroendocrine tumors, and specifically carcinoid lesions, had a significantly greater PR rate (p<0.05). Overall survival, however, was not associated with histology or radiologic response. Discussion. TAE and TACE produce a significant objective treatment response by RECIST criteria. Response is greatest in neuroendocrine tumors and is independent of vascularity and lesion size. TACE appears to be superior to TAE. Although an association of response with improved survival was not demonstrated, large cohort studies are necessary to further define this relationship. PMID:19088924

  17. An imaging-based tumour growth and treatment response model: investigating the effect of tumour oxygenation on radiation therapy response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titz, Benjamin; Jeraj, Robert

    2008-09-01

    A multiscale tumour simulation model employing cell-line-specific biological parameters and functional information derived from pre-therapy PET/CT imaging data was developed to investigate effects of different oxygenation levels on the response to radiation therapy. For each tumour voxel, stochastic simulations were performed to model cellular growth and therapeutic response. Model parameters were fitted to published preclinical experiments of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Using the obtained parameters, the model was applied to a human HNSCC case to investigate effects of different uniform and non-uniform oxygenation levels and results were compared for treatment efficacy. Simulations of the preclinical studies showed excellent agreement with published data and underlined the model's ability to quantitatively reproduce tumour behaviour within experimental uncertainties. When using a simplified transformation to derive non-uniform oxygenation levels from molecular imaging data, simulations of the clinical case showed heterogeneous tumour response and variability in radioresistance with decreasing oxygen levels. Once clinically validated, this model could be used to transform patient-specific data into voxel-based biological objectives for treatment planning and to investigate biologically optimized dose prescriptions.

  18. Association between ABCB1 Polymorphisms and Antidepressant Treatment Response in Taiwanese Major Depressive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hui Hua; Chou, Chen-Hsi; Yang, Yen Kuang; Lee, I Hui; Chen, Po See

    2015-01-01

    Objective The multidrug resistance 1 (ABCB1, MDR1) gene, encoding P-glycoprotein, is extensively distributed and expressed in various tissues, such as a blood-brain barrier transporter. P-glycoprotein plays an important role in controlling the passage of substances between the blood and brain. The current study aimed to investigate possible associations of functional ABCB1 polymorphisms (C3435T, G2677T and C1236T) with response to antidepressant treatment and serum cortisol levels in Taiwanese patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods We recruited 112 MDD patients who were randomized to fluoxetine (n=58, mean dose: 21.4±4.5 mg/day) or venlafaxine (n=54, 80.2±34.7 mg/day) treatment for 6 weeks. The 21-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) was administered initially and biweekly after treatment, and cortisol levels were assessed initially and after 6-week antidepressant treatment. Results The initial HDRS scores and the HDRS scores after six weeks of antidepressant treatment were not significantly different among the different genotypes in each polymorphism of ABCB1. The percentage changes of HDRS scores over time were significantly different in the polymorphisms of ABCB1 G2677T (p=0.002). MDD patients with the G/G genotype of ABCB1 G2677T had a worse antidepressant treatment response. However, the polymorphisms of ABCB1 genotypes were not significantly associated with cortisol levels before and after antidepressant treatment in MDD patients. Conclusion The results suggested that the variants of ABCB1 may influence the short-term antidepressant response in MDD patients. Further details of the underlying mechanisms of ABCB1 in antidepressant treatment remain to be clarified. PMID:26598582

  19. Improving Question-Asking Initiations in Young Children with Autism Using Pivotal Response Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koegel, Robert L.; Bradshaw, Jessica L.; Ashbaugh, Kristen; Koegel, Lynn Kern

    2014-01-01

    Social initiations make up a core deficit for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In particular, initiated questions during social interactions are often minimal or absent in this population. In the context of a multiple baseline design, the efficacy of using the motivational procedures of Pivotal Response Treatment to increase social…

  20. Predictors of Treatment Response to Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Depression in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobkin, Roseanne D.; Rubino, Jade Tiu; Allen, Lesley A.; Friedman, Jill; Gara, Michael A.; Mark, Margery H.; Menza, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine predictors of treatment response to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for depression in Parkinson's disease (PD). Method: The sample comprised 80 depressed ("DSM-IV" criteria) adults with PD (60% male) and their caregivers who participated in an National Institutes of Health-sponsored…

  1. The Efficacy of a Response Cost-Based Treatment Package for Managing Aggressive Behavior in Preschoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Larissa Kern; Kelley, Mary Lou

    1997-01-01

    Examined the effectiveness of a response cost treatment package for improving the classroom behavior of four aggressive preschoolers. Teachers removed smiley faces and reprimanded children contingent on aggressive behavior. Results indicate that this method substantially decreased aggressive behavior and was a highly acceptable classroom treatment…

  2. The Effects of Response Effort on Safe Performance by Therapists at an Autism Treatment Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casella, Sarah E.; Wilder, David A.; Neidert, Pamela; Rey, Catalina; Compton, Megan; Chong, Ivy

    2010-01-01

    The effects of response effort on safe behaviors (i.e., glove wearing, hand sanitizing, and electrical outlet replacement) exhibited by therapists at an autism treatment center were examined. Participants were exposed to 2 or 3 levels of effort (i.e., high, medium, low) for each dependent variable. Results showed increased safe performance during…

  3. Habituation of Premonitory Sensations during Exposure and Response Prevention Treatment in Tourette's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verdellen, Cara W. J.; Hoogduin, Cees A. L.; Kato, Bernet S.; Keijsers, Ger P. J.; Cath, Danielle C.; Hoijtink, Herbert B.

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to premonitory sensations and response prevention of tics (ER) has been shown to be a promising new treatment for Tourette's syndrome (TS). The present study tested the hypothesis that habituation to unpleasant premonitory sensations associated with the tic is an underlying mechanism of change in ER. Patients rated the severity of…

  4. Acute Time to Response in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochvil, Christopher; Emslie, Graham; Silva, Susan; McNulty, Steve; Walkup, John; Curry, John; Reinecke, Mark; Vitiello, Benedetto; Rohde, Paul; Feeny, Nora; Casat, Charles; Pathak, Sanjeev; Weller, Elizabeth; May, Diane; Mayes, Taryn; Robins, Michele; March, John

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To examine the time to response for both pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS). Method: Adolescents (N = 439, ages 12 to 17 years) with major depressive disorder were randomized to fluoxetine (FLX), cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), their combination (COMB), or pill placebo…

  5. Pivotal Response Treatment for Children with Autism: Core Principles and Applications for School Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renshaw, Tyler L.; Kuriakose, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    During the past 2 decades, pivotal response treatment (PRT) has emerged as an evidence-based methodology for intervening with the behavioral, communicative, social, and academic impairments of children with autism. Unlike other highly structured behavioral interventions for autism, PRT emphasizes principles over procedures and focuses on enhancing…

  6. Mediation and Moderation of Psychological Pain Treatments: Response Expectancies and Hypnotic Suggestibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milling, Leonard S.; Reardon, John M.; Carosella, Gina M.

    2006-01-01

    The mediator role of response expectancies and the moderator role of hypnotic suggestibility were evaluated in the analogue treatment of pain. Approximately 1,000 participants were assessed for hypnotic suggestibility. Later, as part of a seemingly unrelated experiment, 188 of these individuals were randomly assigned to distraction,…

  7. Dose Response Effects of Lisdexamfetamine Dimesylate Treatment in Adults with ADHD: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faraone, Stephen V.; Spencer, Thomas J.; Kollins, Scott H.; Glatt, Stephen J.; Goodman, David

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore dose-response effects of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX) treatment for ADHD. Method: This was a 4-week, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, forced-dose titration study in adult participants, aged 18 to 55 years, meeting "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., text rev.)…

  8. Pivotal Response Treatment for Infants At-Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner, Amanda Mossman; Gengoux, Grace W.; Klin, Ami; Chawarska, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Presently there is limited research to suggest efficacious interventions for infants at-risk for autism. Pivotal response treatment (PRT) has empirical support for use with preschool children with autism, but there are no reports in the literature utilizing this approach with infants. In the current study, a developmental adaptation of PRT was…

  9. The Effects of a Response Cost Treatment Tactic on Hyperactive Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapport, Mark D.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Tested a response cost procedure, compared with Ritalin treatment, on hyperactive elementary school children to determine effectiveness in reducing hyperactive behavior and in increasing academic performance. The cost program alone and combined with medication were effective in reducing off-task behavior and in increasing academic performance.…

  10. Response to patient-initiated plant extract treatment for atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Nicole; Patel, Gopal; Agim, Nnenna G

    2013-01-01

    Ethnomedical practices are increasing in all parts of the world, including many urban centers. We describe a unique case of a 7-year-old girl with atopic dermatitis who was responsive to parent-initiated treatment with the extract of a plant from the Chenopodium genus. A brief discussion raises awareness of such practices to the practicing dermatologist. PMID:23458206

  11. Peer-Mediated Pivotal Response Treatment for Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreau, Ainsley M.; Corkum, Penny; Meko, Katelyn; Smith, Isabel M.

    2015-01-01

    This review examined the effectiveness of peer-mediated pivotal response treatment (PM-PRT) to increase social-communication skills for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). A systematic review was conducted of all published studies examining PM-PRT in school-aged children with ASD, based on an established rubric. Five PM-PRT studies…

  12. How Attendance and Quality of Participation Affect Treatment Response to Parent Management Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nix, Robert L.; Bierman, Karen L.; McMahon, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined whether attendance and quality of participation in parent management training predicted treatment response. Data were from 445 parents (55% minority, 62% single; almost all of low socioeconomic status) who had 1st-grade children with severe conduct problems. Quality of participation in weekly parent groups was based on group…

  13. Evaluation of genotypic variation of broccoli (brassica oleracea var. italic) in response to selenium treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italic) fortified with selenium (Se) has been promoted as a functional food. Here we evaluated 38 broccoli accessions for their capacity to accumulate Se and for their responses to selenate treatment in terms of nutritional qualities and sulfur gene expression. We fo...

  14. Therapeutic Responses of Psychopathic Sexual Offenders: Treatment Attrition, Therapeutic Change, and Long-Term Recidivism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olver, Mark E.; Wong, Stephen C. P.

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the therapeutic responses of psychopathic sex offenders (greater than or equal to 25 Psychopathy Checklist-Revised; PCL-R) in terms of treatment dropout and therapeutic change, as well as sexual and violent recidivism over a 10-year follow-up among 156 federally incarcerated sex offenders treated in a high-intensity inpatient…

  15. Dissociation predicts treatment response in eye-movement desensitization and reprocessing for posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hwallip; Kim, Daeho; Park, Yong Chon

    2016-01-01

    Using clinical data from a specialized trauma clinic, this study investigated pretreatment clinical factors predicting response to eye-movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) among adult patients diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Participants were evaluated using the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS), the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Dissociative Experiences Scale before treatment and were reassessed using the CAPS after treatment and at 6-month follow-up. A total of 69 patients underwent an average of 4 sessions of EMDR, and 60 (87%) completed the posttreatment evaluation, including 8 participants who terminated treatment prematurely. Intent-to-treat analysis revealed that 39 (65%) of the 60 patients were classified as responders and 21 (35%) as nonresponders when response was defined as more than a 30% decrease in total CAPS score. The nonresponders had higher levels of dissociation (depersonalization and derealization) and numbing symptoms, but other PTSD symptoms, such as avoidance, hyperarousal, and intrusion, were not significantly different. The number of psychiatric comorbidities was also associated with treatment nonresponse. The final logistic regression model yielded 2 significant variables: dissociation (p < .001) and more than 2 comorbidities compared to none (p < .05). These results indicate that complex symptom patterns in PTSD may predict treatment response and support the inclusion of the dissociative subtype of PTSD in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition. PMID:26156867

  16. A response adaptive randomization platform trial for efficient evaluation of Ebola virus treatments: A model for pandemic response.

    PubMed

    Berry, Scott M; Petzold, Elizabeth A; Dull, Peter; Thielman, Nathan M; Cunningham, Coleen K; Corey, G Ralph; McClain, Micah T; Hoover, David L; Russell, James; Griffiss, J McLeod; Woods, Christopher W

    2016-02-01

    The outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa is the largest ever recorded. Numerous treatment alternatives for Ebola have been considered, including widely available repurposed drugs, but initiation of enrollment into clinical trials has been limited. The proposed trial is an adaptive platform design. Multiple agents and combinations will be investigated simultaneously. Additionally, new agents may enter the trial as they become available, and failing agents may be removed. In order to accommodate the many possible agents and combinations, a critical feature of this design is the use of response adaptive randomization to assign treatment regimens. As the trial progresses, the randomization ratio evolves to favor the arms that are performing better, making the design also suitable for all-cause pandemic preparedness planning. The study was approved by US and Sierra Leone ethics committees, and reviewed by the US Food and Drug Administration. Additionally, data management, drug supply lines, and local sites were prepared. However, in response to the declining epidemic seen in February 2015, the trial was not initiated. Sierra Leone remains ready to rapidly activate the protocol as an emergency response trial in the event of a resurgence of Ebola. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02380625.) In summary, we have designed a single controlled trial capable of efficiently identifying highly effective or failing regimens among a rapidly evolving list of proposed therapeutic alternatives for Ebola virus disease and to treat the patients within the trial effectively based on accruing data. Provision of these regimens, if found safe and effective, would have a major impact on future epidemics by providing effective treatment options. PMID:26768569

  17. Oral treatment of chickens with lactobacilli influences elicitation of immune responses.

    PubMed

    Brisbin, Jennifer T; Gong, Joshua; Orouji, Shahriar; Esufali, Jessica; Mallick, Amirul I; Parvizi, Payvand; Shewen, Patricia E; Sharif, Shayan

    2011-09-01

    Commensal microbes in the intestine are in constant interaction with host cells and play a role in shaping the immune system. Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus reuteri, and Lactobacillus salivarius are members of the chicken intestinal microbiota and have been shown to induce different cytokine profiles in mononuclear cells in vitro. The objective of the present study was to examine the effects of these bacteria individually or in combination on the induction of antibody- and cell-mediated immune responses in vivo. The birds received lactobacilli weekly via oral gavage starting on day of hatch and subsequently, at 14 and 21 days, were immunized with sheep red blood cells (SRBC), keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), Newcastle disease virus vaccine, and infectious bursal disease virus vaccine. Antibody responses in serum were measured weekly for 4 weeks beginning on the day of primary immunization. The cell-mediated immune response was evaluated at 21 days postimmunization by measurement of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production in splenocytes stimulated with inactivated vaccine antigens. L. salivarius-treated birds had significantly more serum antibody to SRBC and KLH than birds that were not treated with probiotics. L. salivarius-treated birds also had decreased cell-mediated immune responses to recall antigen stimulation. L. reuteri treatment did not significantly affect the systemic immune response, while L. acidophilus treatment increased the antibody response to KLH. These results indicate that systemic antibody- and cell-mediated immune responses can be modulated by oral treatment with lactobacilli but that these bacteria may vary in their ability to modulate the immune response. PMID:21734067

  18. Whole-genome association analysis of treatment response in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Qin, H; Samuels, J F; Wang, Y; Zhu, Y; Grados, M A; Riddle, M A; Greenberg, B D; Knowles, J A; Fyer, A J; McCracken, J T; Murphy, D L; Rasmussen, S A; Cullen, B A; Piacentini, J; Geller, D; Stewart, S E; Pauls, D; Bienvenu, O J; Goes, F S; Maher, B; Pulver, A E; Valle, D; Lange, C; Mattheisen, M; McLaughlin, N C; Liang, K-Y; Nurmi, E L; Askland, K D; Nestadt, G; Shugart, Y Y

    2016-02-01

    Up to 30% of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) exhibit an inadequate response to serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs). To date, genetic predictors of OCD treatment response have not been systematically investigated using genome-wide association study (GWAS). To identify specific genetic variations potentially influencing SRI response, we conducted a GWAS study in 804 OCD patients with information on SRI response. SRI response was classified as 'response' (n=514) or 'non-response' (n=290), based on self-report. We used the more powerful Quasi-Likelihood Score Test (the MQLS test) to conduct a genome-wide association test correcting for relatedness, and then used an adjusted logistic model to evaluate the effect size of the variants in probands. The top single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was rs17162912 (P=1.76 × 10(-8)), which is near the DISP1 gene on 1q41-q42, a microdeletion region implicated in neurological development. The other six SNPs showing suggestive evidence of association (P<10(-5)) were rs9303380, rs12437601, rs16988159, rs7676822, rs1911877 and rs723815. Among them, two SNPs in strong linkage disequilibrium, rs7676822 and rs1911877, located near the PCDH10 gene, gave P-values of 2.86 × 10(-6) and 8.41 × 10(-6), respectively. The other 35 variations with signals of potential significance (P<10(-4)) involve multiple genes expressed in the brain, including GRIN2B, PCDH10 and GPC6. Our enrichment analysis indicated suggestive roles of genes in the glutamatergic neurotransmission system (false discovery rate (FDR)=0.0097) and the serotonergic system (FDR=0.0213). Although the results presented may provide new insights into genetic mechanisms underlying treatment response in OCD, studies with larger sample sizes and detailed information on drug dosage and treatment duration are needed. PMID:25824302

  19. Effect of nabumetone treatment on vascular responses of the thoracic aorta in rat experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ulker, S; Onal, A; Hatip, F B; Sürücü, A; Alkanat, M; Koşay, S; Evinç, A

    2000-04-01

    Nabumetone is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAI) drug which is known to cause less gastrointestinal damage than other NSAI drugs. This study was performed to evaluate whether nabumetone treatment might alter the vascular aberrations related to inflammation in a rat model of adjuvant-induced arthritis. Nabumetone treatment (120 or 240 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1), orally) was initiated on the 15th day of adjuvant inoculation and continued for 14 days. Arthritic lesions, vascular contractile and relaxant responses and gastroduodenal histopathological preparations were evaluated 29 days after adjuvant inoculation. The contractile responses of aortic rings to phenylephrine and KCl were increased in grade 2 arthritic rats. In grade 3 arthritis only the phenylephrine contractility was decreased. The relaxant responses to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were decreased in grades 2 and 3. In healthy rats, nabumetone did not change the vascular responses. After treatment of arthritic rats with nabumetone, both the contractile and relaxant response of the aortic rings returned to normal, and arthritic score and paw swelling were reduced. Gastroduodenal histopathology did not show erosions or ulcers in any of the groups. In conclusion, nabumetone improved the systemic signs and vascular alterations in experimental arthritis without showing any gastrointestinal side effects. PMID:10754450

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging predictors of treatment response in first-episode schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Szeszko, Philip R; Narr, Katherine L; Phillips, Owen R; McCormack, Joanne; Sevy, Serge; Gunduz-Bruce, Handan; Kane, John M; Bilder, Robert M; Robinson, Delbert G

    2012-05-01

    Identifying neurobiological predictors of response to antipsychotics in patients with schizophrenia is a critical goal of translational psychiatry. Few studies, however, have investigated the relationship between indices of brain structure and treatment response in the context of a controlled clinical trial. In this study, we sought to identify magnetic resonance (MR) imaging measures of the brain that predict treatment response in patients experiencing a first-episode of schizophrenia. Structural MR imaging scans were acquired in 39 patients experiencing a first-episode of schizophrenia with minimal or no prior exposure to antipsychotics participating in a double-blind 16-week clinical trial comparing the efficacy of risperidone vs olanzapine. Twenty-five patients were classified as responders by meeting operationally defined treatment response criteria on 2 consecutive study visits. Fourteen patients never responded to antipsychotic medication at any point during the clinical trial. MR imaging scans were also acquired in 45 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. Cortical pattern matching methods were used to compare cortical thickness and asymmetry measures among groups. Statistical mapping results, confirmed by permutation testing, indicated that responders had greater cortical thickness in occipital regions and greater frontal cortical asymmetry compared with nonresponders. Moreover, among responders, greater thickness in temporal regions was associated with less time to respond. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that plasticity and cortical thickness may be more preserved in responders and that MR imaging may assist in the prediction of antipsychotic drug response in patients experiencing a first-episode of schizophrenia. PMID:21084552

  1. Treatment-induced cell cycle kinetics dictate tumor response to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, Robin M.; Huang, Cheng; Motazedian, Ali; Auf der Mauer, Stefanie; Pond, Gregory R.; Hassell, John A.; Nordon, Robert E.; Draper, Jonathan S.

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy fails to provide durable cure for the majority of cancer patients. To identify mechanisms associated with chemotherapy resistance, we identified genes differentially expressed before and after chemotherapeutic treatment of breast cancer patients. Treatment response resulted in either increased or decreased cell cycle gene expression. Tumors in which cell cycle gene expression was increased by chemotherapy were likely to be chemotherapy sensitive, whereas tumors in which cell cycle gene transcripts were decreased by chemotherapy were resistant to these agents. A gene expression signature that predicted these changes proved to be a robust and novel index that predicted the response of patients with breast, ovarian, and colon tumors to chemotherapy. Investigations in tumor cell lines supported these findings, and linked treatment induced cell cycle changes with p53 signaling and G1/G0 arrest. Hence, chemotherapy resistance, which can be predicted based on dynamics in cell cycle gene expression, is associated with TP53 integrity. PMID:25749523

  2. AMERICAN CUTANEOUS LEISHMANIASIS WITH UNUSUAL CLINICAL PRESENTATION AND RESPONSE TO TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    FERNANDES, Andrea Claudia Bekner Silva; PEDROSO, Raíssa Bocchi; VENAZZI, Eneide Aparecida Sabaini; ZANZARINI, Paulo Donizeti; ARISTIDES, Sandra Mara Alessi; LONARDONI, Maria Valdrinez Campana; SILVEIRA, Thaís Gomes Verzignassi

    2016-01-01

    The clinical manifestations and prognosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) can be influenced by the immune response of the patient and the species of the parasite. A case of atypical clinical presentation of CL, with development of non-characteristic lesions, poor response to therapy, and a long time to resolution is reported. Confirmatory laboratory tests included parasite detection, indirect immunofluorescence, Montenegro skin test, polymerase chain reaction, and parasite identification by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. The parasite was identified as Leishmaniabraziliensis. The lesion was unresponsive to three complete courses of N-methylglucamine antimoniate intramuscular, and to treatment with pentamidine. The patient did not tolerate amphotericin B. The lesion finally receded after treatment with intravenous N-methylglucamine antimoniate. It is essential to ensure the accuracy of diagnosis and the appropriate treatment, which can include the use a second choice drug or a different route of administration. PMID:27007563

  3. Computerized EEG as a predictor of drug response in treatment resistant schizophrenics.

    PubMed

    Itil, T M; Shapiro, D; Schneider, S J; Francis, I B

    1981-10-01

    Thirteen chronic schizophrenics were identified who failed to improve with physician's choice medication and 1 year of systematic treatment with a long acting phenothiazine. These patients were considered to be treatment resistant. Computer analyzed electroencephalogram (CEEG) or these treatment resistant schizophrenics was characterized by a large amount of alpha activity and less fast activity, in comparison with previous results from therapy responsive schizophrenics. The therapy resistant subjects did not display the typical neuroleptic CEEG profile following test dosages of four neuroleptics, and instead displayed CEEG profiles which more closely resembled the typical profile for psychostimulants. These findings may point to an altered metabolism, neurotransmitter defect, or other problem which alters the physiological and clinical response of therapy resistant schizophrenics to neuroleptic medication. PMID:6116742

  4. AMERICAN CUTANEOUS LEISHMANIASIS WITH UNUSUAL CLINICAL PRESENTATION AND RESPONSE TO TREATMENT.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Andrea Claudia Bekner Silva; Pedroso, Raíssa Bocchi; Venazzi, Eneide Aparecida Sabaini; Zanzarini, Paulo Donizeti; Aristides, Sandra Mara Alessi; Lonardoni, Maria Valdrinez Campana; Silveira, Thaís Gomes Verzignassi

    2016-01-01

    The clinical manifestations and prognosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) can be influenced by the immune response of the patient and the species of the parasite. A case of atypical clinical presentation of CL, with development of non-characteristic lesions, poor response to therapy, and a long time to resolution is reported. Confirmatory laboratory tests included parasite detection, indirect immunofluorescence, Montenegro skin test, polymerase chain reaction, and parasite identification by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. The parasite was identified as Leishmaniabraziliensis. The lesion was unresponsive to three complete courses of N-methylglucamine antimoniate intramuscular, and to treatment with pentamidine. The patient did not tolerate amphotericin B. The lesion finally receded after treatment with intravenous N-methylglucamine antimoniate. It is essential to ensure the accuracy of diagnosis and the appropriate treatment, which can include the use a second choice drug or a different route of administration. PMID:27007563

  5. Heterogeneity of Pre-diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes: Implications for Prediction, Prevention and Treatment Responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Faerch, Kristine; Hulmán, Adam; Solomon, Thomas P J

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a heterogeneous disease with large variation in the relative contributions of insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction between subgroups and individuals. Some of these differences are reflected in the way people are diagnosed. However, differences in glucose regulation exist among individuals even in those with comparable diagnostic glucose levels. In this review we address the heterogeneity of pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes with special emphasis on differences in the pathophysiology and treatment responses related to the diagnostic criteria. We also discuss whether novel glycaemic markers of diabetes risk can provide additional information to the established diagnostic criteria. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for elevated fasting versus postprandial glucose concentration, as well as knowledge about the expected responsiveness to treatment in individuals with different clinical characteristics at diagnosis, may contribute to optimising strategies for management of hyperglycaemia in both pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes. PMID:25877695

  6. Expression Profiling of Rectal Tumors Defines Response to Neoadjuvant Treatment Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Muiño, Raquel; Comino, Ana; Bueno, Pablo; Ferrón, J. Antonio; Cuadros, Marta

    2014-01-01

    To date, no effective method exists that predicts the response to preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Nevertheless, identification of patients who have a higher likelihood of responding to preoperative CRT could be crucial in decreasing treatment morbidity and avoiding expensive and time-consuming treatments. The aim of this study was to identify signatures or molecular markers related to response to pre-operative CRT in LARC. We analyzed the gene expression profiles of 26 pre-treatment biopsies of LARC (10 responders and 16 non-responders) without metastasis using Human WG CodeLink microarray platform. Two hundred and fifty seven genes were differentially over-expressed in the responder patient subgroup. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed a significant ratio of differentially expressed genes related to cancer, cellular growth and proliferation pathways, and c-Myc network. We demonstrated that high Gng4, c-Myc, Pola1, and Rrm1 mRNA expression levels was a significant prognostic factor for response to treatment in LARC patients (p<0.05). Using this gene set, we were able to establish a new model for predicting the response to CRT in rectal cancer with a sensitivity of 60% and 100% specificity. Our results reflect the value of gene expression profiling to gain insight about the molecular pathways involved in the response to treatment of LARC patients. These findings could be clinically relevant and support the use of mRNA levels when aiming to identify patients who respond to CRT therapy. PMID:25380052

  7. Differences in maintenance of response upon discontinuation across medication treatments in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Buitelaar, Jan; Asherson, Philip; Soutullo, Cesar; Colla, Michael; Adams, David H; Tanaka, Yoko; Haynes, Virginia S; Escobar, Rodrigo; Upadhyaya, Himanshu

    2015-10-01

    The attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) treatment literature has been focused on onset-of-effect and short-term effect size, with little exploration of ADHD symptoms upon medication discontinuation. The objective of this narrative review and analysis was to better understand the relapse of ADHD symptoms upon discontinuation of medication treatment in children, adolescents, and adults with ADHD who have responded to medication treatment and to explore differences among different medications in maintaining treatment response. Randomized withdrawal studies of dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride (d-MPH), methylphenidate modified-release (MPH-LA), lisdexamphetamine dimesylate (LDX), guanfacine extended-release (GXR), and atomoxetine (ATX) in both children/adolescents and adults with ADHD were reviewed. The percentage of relapse was significantly higher and the time-to-relapse significantly shorter with placebo compared to active treatment in patients who were previously stable on 5 weeks to 1 year of active treatment, suggesting clinically significant benefit with continued long-term pharmacotherapy. However, percentage of relapse at each time point studied after discontinuing stimulants and GXR appears substantially higher than observed when discontinuing ATX, suggesting longer maintenance of response after discontinuing ATX than after stimulants and GXR. Additionally, slope of relapse percentages over time appears to be more rapid with stimulants or GXR than with ATX. These differences in maintenance of response among ATX, GXR, and stimulants may reflect differences in mechanisms of action and persistence of the medication effect. Alternatively, they may be due to methodological differences, including study design and response/relapse definitions. Continued investigation is needed regarding factors that affect risk of symptom relapse upon discontinuation of pharmacotherapy. PMID:26169574

  8. Avian community responses to juniper woodland structure and thinning treatments on the Colorado Plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crow, Claire; van Riper, Charles, III

    2011-01-01

    We also studied responses of breeding birds to mechanical reduction of pinyon-juniper woodlands scattered across sagebrush steppe in 11 control and 9 treatment plots at Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah, in 2005 and 2006. We surveyed birds in 3.1-ha (7.6-acre) plots during the breeding season before and following treatment. Thinning in April 2006 removed a mean of 92 percent (standard error = 6.4 percent) of the live trees from treatment plots. Two of 14 species, Gray Vireo (Vireo vicinior) and Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater), were not detected after thinning. Shrub-nesting birds, including sagebrush specialist Brewer's Sparrow (Spizella breweri), increased in relative abundance in treatment areas compared to controls. However, some species may exhibit a time lag in response, and further changes in community composition and abundance could result. Our findings lend support to the concept that multiple small-scale fuels-reduction treatments, applied over the landscape, may provide the variety of successional stages needed to support a full assemblage of avian species in pinyon-juniper woodlands on the Colorado Plateau. Limiting scale and increasing precision of fuels-reduction projects in pinyon-juniper vegetation communities may maximize the benefits of management to both the pinyon-juniper and sagebrush steppe avian communities. We conclude that small-scale fuels-reduction treatments can benefit many bird species while reducing fire risk and restoring an ecological balance.

  9. Chelation efficacy and erythroid response during deferasirox treatment in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms in fibrotic phase.

    PubMed

    Latagliata, Roberto; Montagna, Chiara; Porrini, Raffaele; Di Veroli, Ambra; Leonetti, Sabrina Crescenzi; Niscola, Pasquale; Ciccone, Fabrizio; Spadea, Antonio; Breccia, Massimo; Maurillo, Luca; Rago, Angela; Spirito, Francesca; Cedrone, Michele; De Muro, Marianna; Montanaro, Marco; Andriani, Alessandro; Bagnato, Antonino; Montefusco, Enrico; Alimena, Giuliana

    2016-06-01

    At present, very few data are available on deferasirox (DFX) in the treatment of patients with Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms in fibrotic phase (FP-MPN) and transfusion dependence. To address this issue, a retrospective analysis of 28 patients (22 male and 6 female) with FP-MPN and iron overload secondary to transfusion dependence was performed, based on patients enrolled in the database of our regional cooperative group who received treatment with DFX. DFX was started after a median interval from diagnosis of 12.8 months (IR 7.1-43.1) with median ferritin values of 1415 ng/mL (IR 1168-1768). Extra-hematological toxicity was reported in 16 of 28 patients (57.1%), but only two patients discontinued treatment due to toxicity. Among 26 patients evaluable for response (≥6 months of treatment), after a median treatment period of 15.4 months (IR 8.1-22.3), 11 patients (42.3%) achieved a stable and consistent reduction in ferritin levels <1000 ng/mL. As for hematological improvement, 6 of 26 patients (23%) showed a persistent (>3 months) rise of Hb levels >1.5 g/dL, with disappearance of transfusion dependence in four cases. Treatment with DFX is feasible and effective in FP-MPN with iron overload. Moreover, in this setting, an erythroid response can occur in a significant proportion of patients. PMID:26277477

  10. Future clinical uses of neurophysiological biomarkers to predict and monitor treatment response for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Light, Gregory A.; Swerdlow, Neal R.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in psychiatric neuroscience have transformed our understanding of impaired and spared brain functions in psychotic illnesses. Despite substantial progress, few if any laboratory tests have graduated to clinics to inform diagnoses, guide treatments, and monitor treatment response. Providers must rely on careful behavioral observation and interview techniques to make inferences about patients’ inner experiences and then secondary deductions about impacted neural systems. Development of more effective treatments has also been hindered by a lack of translational quantitative biomarkers that can span the brain–behavior–treatment knowledge gap. Here, we describe an example of a simple, low-cost, and translatable electroencephalography (EEG) measure that offers promise for improving our understanding and treatment of psychotic illnesses: mismatch negativity (MMN). MMN is sensitive to and/or predicts response to some pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions and accounts for substantial portions of variance in clinical, cognitive, and psychosocial functioning in schizophrenia. This measure has recently been validated for use in large-scale multisite clinical studies of schizophrenia. Lastly, MMN greatly improves our ability to forecast which individuals at high clinical risk actually develop a psychotic illness. These attributes suggest that MMN can contribute to personalized biomarker-guided treatment strategies aimed at ameliorating or even preventing the onset of psychosis. PMID:25752648

  11. Race, Genetic Ancestry and Response to Antidepressant Treatment for Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Eleanor; Hou, Liping; Maher, Brion S; Woldehawariat, Girma; Kassem, Layla; Akula, Nirmala; Laje, Gonzalo; McMahon, Francis J

    2013-01-01

    The Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) Study revealed poorer antidepressant treatment response among black compared with white participants. This racial disparity persisted even after socioeconomic and baseline clinical factors were taken into account. Some studies have suggested genetic contributions to this disparity, but none have attempted to disentangle race and genetic ancestry. Here we used genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data to examine independent contributions of race and genetic ancestry to citalopram response. Secondary data analyses included 1877 STAR*D participants who completed an average of 10 weeks of citalopram treatment and provided DNA samples. Participants reported their race as White (n=1464), black (n=299) or other/mixed (n=114). Genetic ancestry was estimated by multidimensional scaling (MDS) analyses of about 500 000 SNPs. Ancestry proportions were estimated by STRUCTURE. Structural equation modeling was used to examine the direct and indirect effects of observed and latent predictors of response, defined as change in the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS) score from baseline to exit. Socioeconomic and baseline clinical factors, race, and anxiety significantly predicted response, as previously reported. However, direct effects of race disappeared in all models that included genetic ancestry. Genetic African ancestry predicted lower treatment response in all models. Although socioeconomic and baseline clinical factors drive racial differences in antidepressant response, genetic ancestry, rather than self-reported race, explains a significant fraction of the residual differences. Larger samples would be needed to identify the specific genetic mechanisms that may be involved, but these findings underscore the importance of including more African-American patients in drug trials. PMID:23827886

  12. Veteran satisfaction and treatment preferences in response to a posttraumatic stress disorder specialty clinic orientation group.

    PubMed

    Schumm, Jeremiah A; Walter, Kristen H; Bartone, Anne S; Chard, Kathleen M

    2015-06-01

    To maximize accessibility to evidence-based treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has widely disseminated cognitive processing therapy (CPT) and prolonged exposure (PE) therapy to VA clinicians. However, there is a lack of research on veteran preferences when presented with a range of psychotherapy and medication options. This study uses a mixed-method approach to explore veteran satisfaction with a VA PTSD specialty clinic pre-treatment orientation group, which provides education about available PTSD treatment options. This study also tested differences in treatment preference in response to the group. Participants were 183 US veterans. Most were White, male, and referred to the clinic by a VA provider. Results indicated high satisfaction with the group in providing an overview of services and helping to inform treatment choice. Most preferred psychotherapy plus medications (63.4%) or psychotherapy only (30.1%). Participants endorsed a significantly stronger preference for CPT versus other psychotherapies. PE was significantly preferred over nightmare resolution therapy and present-centered therapy, and both PE and cognitive-behavioral conjoint therapy were preferred over virtual reality exposure therapy. Results suggest that by informing consumers about evidence-based treatments for PTSD, pre-treatment educational approaches may increase consumer demand for these treatment options. PMID:25898342

  13. Targeted Proteomics to Assess the Response to Anti-Angiogenic Treatment in Human Glioblastoma (GBM)*

    PubMed Central

    Demeure, Kevin; Fack, Fred; Duriez, Elodie; Tiemann, Katja; Bernard, Amandine; Golebiewska, Anna; Bougnaud, Sébastien; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Domon, Bruno; Niclou, Simone P.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly aggressive primary brain tumor with dismal outcome for affected patients. Because of the significant neo-angiogenesis exhibited by GBMs, anti-angiogenic therapies have been intensively evaluated during the past years. Recent clinical studies were however disappointing, although a subpopulation of patients may benefit from such treatment. We have previously shown that anti-angiogenic targeting in GBM increases hypoxia and leads to a metabolic adaptation toward glycolysis, suggesting that combination treatments also targeting the glycolytic phenotype may be effective in GBM patients. The aim of this study was to identify marker proteins that are altered by treatment and may serve as a short term readout of anti-angiogenic therapy. Ultimately such proteins could be tested as markers of efficacy able to identify patient subpopulations responsive to the treatment. We applied a proteomics approach based on selected reaction monitoring (SRM) to precisely quantify targeted protein candidates, selected from pathways related to metabolism, apoptosis and angiogenesis. The workflow was developed in the context of patient-derived intracranial GBM xenografts developed in rodents and ensured the specific identification of human tumor versus rodent stroma-derived proteins. Quality control experiments were applied to assess sample heterogeneity and reproducibility of SRM assays at different levels. The data demonstrate that tumor specific proteins can be precisely quantified within complex biological samples, reliably identifying small concentration differences induced by the treatment. In line with previous work, we identified decreased levels of TCA cycle enzymes, including isocitrate dehydrogenase, whereas malectin, calnexin, and lactate dehydrogenase A were augmented after treatment. We propose the most responsive proteins of our subset as potential novel biomarkers to assess treatment response after anti-angiogenic therapy that warrant future

  14. Response Prediction and Treatment Tailoring for Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1 Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Lindh, Magnus; Alestig, Erik; Arnholm, Birgitta; Eilard, Anders; Hellstrand, Kristoffer; Lagging, Martin; Wahlberg, Thomas; Wejstål, Rune; Westin, Johan; Norkrans, Gunnar

    2007-01-01

    We monitored early viral response during the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with the aim of identifying predictors of treatment outcome. We studied 53 patients with genotype 1 infection who received 180 μg/week pegylated interferon alfa-2a and 1,000 or 1,200 mg/day ribavirin depending on body weight and serially assessed HCV RNA in serum, using the Cobas TaqMan assay. Thirty-one patients (58%) achieved sustained viral response (SVR). SVR was obtained in 100% (10/10) of patients with pretreatment viremia concentrations below 400,000 IU/ml, in 100% (14/14) of patients with more than 1.5 log reduction of HCV RNA after 4 days of treatment, and in 95% (22/23) of patients with a rate of decline in viremia higher than 0.70 log units/week during the second phase. Non-SVR was seen in all patients with a second-phase decline rate lower than 0.35 log units/week. Patients with slopes between 0.50 and 0.80 log units/week achieved SVR (4/4) unless the treatment dose was modified (3/3). We conclude that the second-phase slope appears to be an accurate and useful predictor of treatment response. On the basis of these findings, we propose a model of tailored treatment which takes into account the second-phase slope and the amount of HCV RNA after 21 days of treatment. PMID:17581934

  15. Pregabalin for the treatment of patients with generalized anxiety disorder with inadequate treatment response to antidepressants and severe depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Olivares, José M; Álvarez, Enrique; Carrasco, José L; Pérez Páramo, María; López-Gómez, Vanessa

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of pregabalin in patients with resistant generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and severe depressive symptoms, we carried out a post-hoc analysis of a multicenter, prospective, and observational 6-month study. We included patients who were at least 18 years old, fulfilled the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed. (DSM-IV) criteria for GAD, showed inadequate responses to previous courses of antidepressant treatment, had Montgomery-Asberg Rating Scale scores of at least 35, had not received pregabalin previously, and were prescribed pregabalin upon entry into this study. We included 1815 patients fulfilling the DSM-IV criteria for GAD, and 133 (7.3%) fulfilled the selection criteria for these analyses. Ninety-seven percent of the patients received pregabalin (mean dose: 222 mg/day) in combination with other psychotropics. The Hamilton Anxiety Scale total score was reduced by a mean of 20.3 points (95% confidence interval, 22.1-18.4) (57.2% reduction) at month 6. Pregabalin also ameliorated comorbid depressive symptoms, with a reduction in the mean score of the Montgomery-Asberg Rating Scale of 22.3 points (95% confidence interval, 24.2-20.4) (56.6% reduction). Our results suggest that pregabalin, as part of a combination regimen with antidepressants and/or benzodiazepines, might be effective for the treatment of patients with GAD who have shown inadequate response to previous antidepressants and have severe depressive symptoms. PMID:26111356

  16. Pivotal Response Treatment Parent Training for Autism: Findings from a 3-Month Follow-Up Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gengoux, Grace W; Berquist, Kari L; Salzman, Emma; Schapp, Salena; Phillips, Jennifer M; Frazier, Thomas W; Minjarez, Mendy B; Hardan, Antonio Y

    2015-09-01

    This study's objective was to assess maintenance of treatment effects 3 months after completion of a 12-week Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT) parent education group. Families who completed the active treatment (N = 23) were followed for an additional 12 weeks to measure changes in language and cognitive skills. Results indicated a significant improvement in frequency of functional utterances, with maintenance at 3-month follow-up [F(2, 21): 5.9, p = .009]. Children also made significant gains on the Vineland Communication Domain Standard Score [F(2, 12):11.74, p = .001] and the Mullen Scales of Early Learning Composite score [F(1, 20) = 5.43, p = .03]. These results suggest that a brief PRT parent group intervention can lead to improvements in language and cognitive functioning that are maintained 12 weeks post treatment. PMID:25911977

  17. Clinical characteristics and treatment response to SSRI in a female pedophile.

    PubMed

    Chow, Eva W C; Choy, Alberto L

    2002-04-01

    Although much investigation has been done with male sex offenders, there have been few studies on female sex offenders. Female sex offenders have been reported as having a high incidence of psychiatric disorders, but female paraphilics were rarely described. The literature on the treatment of female sex offenders is also limited and treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) has not been reported. This paper presents the case of a woman with DSM-IV pedophilia. Her clinical characteristics, her offense history, and her positive response to treatment with sertraline (a SSRI) are described. This case adds to the limited literature on female pedophiles and suggests that SSRIs may be an effective treatment for paraphilic disorders in female sex offenders. PMID:11974646

  18. A responsive evaluation of mental health treatment in Cambodia: Intentionally addressing poverty to increase cultural responsiveness in therapy.

    PubMed

    Seponski, Desiree M; Lewis, Denise C; Megginson, Maegan C

    2014-01-01

    Mental health issues are significant contributors to the global burden of disease with the highest incidence in resource poor countries; 90% of those in need of mental health treatment reside in low resource countries but receive only 10% of the world's resources. Cambodia, the eighth least developed country in the world, serves as one example of the need to address mental health concerns in low-income, resource poor countries. The current study utilises responsive evaluation methodology to explore how poverty-stricken Cambodian clients, therapists and supervisors experience Western models of therapy as culturally responsive to their unique needs. Quantitative and qualitative data were triangulated across multiple stakeholders using numerous methods including a focus group, interviews, surveys, case illustrations and live supervision observation and analysed using constant comparative analysis. Emerging findings suggest that poverty, material needs, therapy location and financial situations greatly impact the daily lives and mental health conditions of Cambodians and hinder clients' therapeutic progress. The local community needs and context of poverty greatly hinder clients' therapeutic progress in therapy treatment and when therapy does not directly address the culture of poverty, clients did not experience therapy as valuable despite some temporary decreases in mental health symptoms. PMID:25204750

  19. FDG-PET/CT in the Assessment of Treatment Response after Oncologic Treatment of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Keski-Säntti, Harri; Mustonen, Timo; Schildt, Jukka; Saarilahti, Kauko; Mäkitie, Antti A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND In many centers, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) is used to monitor treatment response after definitive (chemo)radiotherapy [(C)RT] for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), but its usefulness remains somewhat controversial. We aimed at assessing the accuracy of FDG-PET/CT in detecting residual disease after (C)RT. METHOD All HNSCC patients with FDG-PET/CT performed to assess treatment response 10–18 weeks after definitive (C)RT at our institution during 2008–2010 were included. The patient charts were reviewed for FDG-PET/CT findings, histopathologic findings, and follow-up data. The median follow-up time for FDG-PET/CT negative patients was 26 months. RESULTS Eighty-eight eligible patients were identified. The stage distribution was as follows: I, n = 1; II, n = 15; III, n = 17; IV, n = 55. The negative predictive value, positive predictive value, specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy of FDG-PET/CT in detecting residual disease were 87%, 81%, 94%, 65%, and 85%, respectively. The corresponding specific figures for the primary tumor site were 91%, 71%, 94%, 59%, and 86% and for the neck 93%, 100%, 100%, 75%, and 94%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS In patients who have received definitive (C)RT for HNSCC, post-treatment FDG-PET/CT has good potential to guide clinical decision-making. Patients with negative scan can safely be followed up clinically only, while positive scan necessitates tissue biopsies or a neck dissection to rule out residual disease. PMID:25210484

  20. Pre-treatment prediction of response to peginterferon plus ribavirin in chronic hepatitis C genotype 3

    PubMed Central

    Marciano, Sebastián; Borzi, Silvia M; Dirchwolf, Melisa; Ridruejo, Ezequiel; Mendizabal, Manuel; Bessone, Fernando; Sirotinsky, María E; Giunta, Diego H; Trinks, Julieta; Olivera, Pablo A; Galdame, Omar A; Silva, Marcelo O; Fainboim, Hugo A; Gadano, Adrián C

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate pre-treatment factors associated with sustained virological response (SVR) in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 3 treated with peginterferon and ribavirin (RBV). METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed treatment naive, mono-infected HCV genotype 3 patients treated with peginterferon and RBV. Exclusion criteria included presence of other liver disease, alcohol consumption and African American or Asian ethnicity. The variables collected and compared between patients who achieved an SVR and patients who did not were as follows: gender, age, fibrosis stage, diabetes, body mass index, steatosis, INFL3 polymorphism, pre-treatment HCV-RNA, type of peginterferon, RBV dose and adherence. RESULTS: A total of 107 patients treated between June, 2004 and March, 2013 were included. Mean treatment duration was 25.1 (± 1.8) wk. Overall, 58% (62/107) of the patients achieved an SVR and 42% (45/107) did not. In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, pre-treatment HCV-RNA ≥ 600000 UI/mL (OR = 0.375, 95%CI: 0.153-0.919, P = 0.032) and advanced fibrosis (OR = 0.278, 95%CI: 0.113-0.684, P = 0.005) were significantly associated with low SVR rates. In patients with pre-treatment HCV-RNA ≥ 600000 UI/mL and advanced fibrosis, the probability of achieving an SVR was 29% (95%CI: 13.1-45.2). In patients with pre-treatment HCV-RNA < 600000 UI/mL and mild to moderate fibrosis, the probability of achieving an SVR was 81% (95%CI: 68.8-93.4). CONCLUSION: In patients with HCV genotype 3 infections the presence of advance fibrosis and high pre-treatment viral load might be associated with poor response to peginterferon plus RBV. These patients could benefit the most from new direct antiviral agents-based regimes. PMID:25866607

  1. Prediction of delayed treatment response in pulmonary tuberculosis: use of time to positivity values of Bactec cultures.

    PubMed

    Carroll, N M; Uys, P; Hesseling, A; Lawrence, K; Pheiffer, C; Salker, F; Duncan, K; Beyers, N; van Helden, P D

    2008-11-01

    New drugs that can shorten tuberculosis (TB) treatment and target drug resistant strains are urgently needed. A test which could predict patients at risk of a delayed response to treatment would facilitate clinical trials of new anti-tuberculosis drugs. A widely-used test for the assessment of response to treatment is sputum smear examination. Patients who are smear positive after 2 and 3 months of treatment are said to have delayed and significantly delayed treatment responses respectively. Time to positivity (TTP) values of Bactec cultures, from the first 2 weeks of treatment were used to predict delayed and significantly delayed treatment responses in patients with first time pulmonary tuberculosis. Changes in TTP values early in treatment were transformed to a response ratio (r). Values of r that were less than a threshold value (r(c)) indicated patients who were at risk of having delayed or significantly delayed response to treatment. Accuracy of prediction was sensitive to the timing of sputum sampling and adherence to therapy in the first 2 weeks. Based on TTP data from the first 2 weeks of treatment, significantly delayed treatment response could be predicted with a sensitivity of 75% and a specificity of 62% while the positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) were 14% and 97% respectively. While the high NPV indicates that a large proportion of patients with a satisfactory response to treatment can be reliably identified, the low PPV value underlines the need to use TTP in conjunction with other markers of disease activity to predict unfavourable treatment response in tuberculosis treatment. PMID:18456556

  2. Akt inhibition improves irinotecan treatment and prevents cell emergence by switching the senescence response to apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Vétillard, Alexandra; Jonchère, Barbara; Moreau, Marie; Toutain, Bertrand; Henry, Cécile; Fontanel, Simon; Bernard, Anne-Charlotte; Campone, Mario; Guette, Catherine; Coqueret, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Activated in response to chemotherapy, senescence is a tumor suppressive mechanism that induces a permanent loss of proliferation. However, in response to treatment, it is not really known how cells can escape senescence and how irreversible or incomplete this pathway is. We have recently described that cells that escape senescence are more transformed than non-treated parental cells, they resist anoikis and rely on Mcl-1. In this study, we further characterize this emergence in response to irinotecan, a first line treatment used in colorectal cancer. Our results indicate that Akt was activated as a feedback pathway during the early step of senescence. The inhibition of the kinase prevented cell emergence and improved treatment efficacy, both in vitro and in vivo. This improvement was correlated with senescence inhibition, p21waf1 downregulation and a concomitant activation of apoptosis due to Noxa upregulation and Mcl-1 inactivation. The inactivation of Noxa prevented apoptosis and increased the number of emergent cells. Using either RNA interference or p21waf1-deficient cells, we further confirmed that an intact p53-p21-senescence pathway favored cell emergence and that its downregulation improved treatment efficacy through apoptosis induction. Therefore, although senescence is an efficient suppressive mechanism, it also generates more aggressive cells as a consequence of apoptosis inhibition. We therefore propose that senescence-inducing therapies should be used sequentially with drugs favoring cell death such as Akt inhibitors. This should reduce cell emergence and tumor relapse through a combined induction of senescence and apoptosis. PMID:26485768

  3. Neurobiological markers predicting treatment response in anxiety disorders: A systematic review and implications for clinical application.

    PubMed

    Lueken, Ulrike; Zierhut, Kathrin C; Hahn, Tim; Straube, Benjamin; Kircher, Tilo; Reif, Andreas; Richter, Jan; Hamm, Alfons; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Domschke, Katharina

    2016-07-01

    Anxiety disorders constitute the largest group of mental disorders with a high individual and societal burden. Neurobiological markers of treatment response bear potential to improve response rates by informing stratified medicine approaches. A systematic review was performed on the current evidence of the predictive value of genetic, neuroimaging and other physiological markers for treatment response (pharmacological and/or psychotherapeutic treatment) in anxiety disorders. Studies published until March 2015 were selected through search in PubMed, Web of Science, PsycINFO, Embase, and CENTRAL. Sixty studies were included, among them 27 on genetic, 17 on neuroimaging and 16 on other markers. Preliminary evidence was found for the functional 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 genotypes, anterior cingulate cortex function and cardiovascular flexibility to modulate treatment outcome. Studies varied considerably in methodological quality. Application of more stringent study methodology, predictions on the individual patient level and cross-validation in independent samples are recommended to set the next stage of biomarker research and to avoid flawed conclusions in the emerging field of "Mental Health Predictomics". PMID:27168345

  4. Pathologic response to neoadjuvant treatment in locally advanced rectal cancer and impact on outcome

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Sidney; Mohebbi, Mohammadreza; Sugamaran, Bhuvana; Porter, Ian W.; Bell, Stephen; Warrier, Satish K.; Wale, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Background Downstaging and pathologic complete response (pCR) after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) may improve progression-free survival and overall survival (OS) after curative therapy of locally advanced adenocarcinoma of rectum. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the pathologic response subsequent to neoadjuvant chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma and any impact of response on oncological outcome [disease-free survival (DFS), OS]. Methods A total of 127 patients with histologically-proven rectal adenocarcinoma, locally advanced, were treated with preoperative radiotherapy and concurrent 5-fluorouracil (5 FU), and followed by curative surgery. Pathologic response to neoadjuvant treatment was evaluated by comparing pathologic TN (tumour and nodal) staging (yp) with pre-treatment clinical staging. DFS and OS were compared in patients with: pCR, partial pathologic response and no response to neoadjuvant therapy. Results 14.96% (19 patients) had a pCR, 58.27% [74] showed downstaging and 26.77% [34] had no change in staging. At follow-up (range, 4–9 years, median 6 years 2 months or 74 months), 17.32% [22] showed recurrence: 15.74% [20] distant metastasis, 1.57% [2] pelvic failure. 10.5% [2] of the patients with pCR showed distant metastasis, none showed local recurrence. In the downstaged group, nine developed distant failure and two had local recurrence (14.86%). Distant failure was seen in 26.47% [9] of those with no response to neoadjuvant treatment. DFS and OS rates for all groups were 82.67% and 88.97% respectively. Patients with pCR showed 89.47% DFS and 94.7% OS. In partial responders, DFS was 85.1% and OS was 90.5%. In non-responders, DFS and OS were 73.5% and 82.3% respectively. Patients with pCR had a significantly greater probability of DFS and OS than non-responders. Rectal cancer-related death was 11.02% [14]: one patient (5.26%) with pCR, 9.47% [7] in the downstaged group and 17.64% [6] of non-responders. Conclusions The majority

  5. Subtyping Schizophrenia by Treatment Response: Antipsychotic Development and the Central Role of Positive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jimmy; Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Fervaha, Gagan; Sin, Gwen Li; Foussias, George; Agid, Ofer; Farooq, Saeed; Remington, Gary

    2015-01-01

    We have recently proposed a model for subtyping schizophrenia based on antipsychotic (AP) treatment response. Evidence suggests that APs, both old and new, are comparable in terms of efficacy; however, one AP, clozapine, is uniquely effective in one subgroup of patients (that is, those with treatment-resistant schizophrenia [TRS]). This permits us to subdivide schizophrenia into 3 specific groups: AP responsive, clozapine responsive, and clozapine resistant. Here, we integrate this model with current criteria related to TRS and ultraresistant schizophrenia, the latter referred to in our model as clozapine resistant. We suggest several modifications to existing criteria, in line with current evidence and practice patterns, particularly emphasizing the need to focus on positive symptoms. While APs can favourably impact numerous dimensions related to schizophrenia, it is their effect on positive symptoms that distinguishes them from other psychotropics. Further, it is positive symptoms that are central to AP and clozapine resistance, and it is these people that place the greatest demands on acute and long-term inpatient resources. In moving AP development forward, we advocate specifically focusing on positive symptoms and capitalizing on the evidence we have of 3 subtypes of psychosis (that is, positive symptoms) based on treatment response, implicating 3 distinguishable forms of underlying pathophysiology. Conversely, pooling these groups risks obfuscating potentially identifiable differences. Such a position does not challenge the importance of dopamine D2 receptor blockade, but rather highlights the need to better isolate those other subgroups that require something more or entirely different. PMID:26720509

  6. Glucocorticoid Genes and the Developmental Origins of Asthma Susceptibility and Treatment Response

    PubMed Central

    Kho, Alvin T.; Chhabra, Divya; Qiu, Weiliang; Gaedigk, Roger; Vyhlidal, Carrie A.; Leeder, J. Steven; Barraza-Villarreal, Albino; London, Stephanie J.; Gilliland, Frank; Raby, Benjamin A.; Weiss, Scott T.; Tantisira, Kelan G.

    2015-01-01

    Antenatal corticosteroids enhance lung maturation. However, the importance of glucocorticoid genes on early lung development, asthma susceptibility, and treatment response remains unknown. We investigated whether glucocorticoid genes are important during lung development and their role in asthma susceptibility and treatment response. We identified genes that were differentially expressed by corticosteroids in two of three genomic datasets: lymphoblastoid cell lines of participants in the Childhood Asthma Management Program, a glucocorticoid chromatin immunoprecipitation/RNA sequencing experiment, or a murine model; these genes made up the glucocorticoid gene set (GCGS). Using gene expression profiles from 38 human fetal lungs and C57BL/6J murine fetal lungs, we identified developmental genes that were in the top 5% of genes contributing to the top three principal components (PCs) most highly associated with post-conceptional age. Glucocorticoid genes that were enriched in this set of developmental genes were then included in the developmental glucocorticoid gene set (DGGS). We then investigated whether glucocorticoid genes are important during lung development, and their role in asthma susceptibility and treatment response. A total of 232 genes were included in the GCGS. Analysis of gene expression demonstrated that glucocorticoid genes were enriched in lung development (P = 7.02 × 10−26). The developmental GCGS was enriched for genes that were differentially expressed between subjects with asthma and control subjects (P = 4.26 × 10−3) and were enriched after treatment of subjects with asthma with inhaled corticosteroids (P < 2.72 × 10−4). Our results show that glucocorticoid genes are overrepresented among genes implicated in fetal lung development. These genes influence asthma susceptibility and treatment response, suggesting their involvement in the early ontogeny of asthma. PMID:25192440

  7. Metabolic Imaging to Assess Treatment Response to Cytotoxic and Cytostatic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Serkova, Natalie J.; Eckhardt, S. Gail

    2016-01-01

    For several decades, cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents were considered the basis of anticancer treatment for patients with metastatic tumors. A decrease in tumor burden, assessed by volumetric computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, according to the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST), was considered as a radiological response to cytotoxic chemotherapies. In addition to RECIST-based dimensional measurements, a metabolic response to cytotoxic drugs can be assessed by positron emission tomography (PET) using 18F-fluoro-thymidine (FLT) as a radioactive tracer for drug-disrupted DNA synthesis. The decreased 18FLT-PET uptake is often seen concurrently with increased apparent diffusion coefficients by diffusion-weighted imaging due to chemotherapy-induced changes in tumor cellularity. Recently, the discovery of molecular origins of tumorogenesis led to the introduction of novel signal transduction inhibitors (STIs). STIs are targeted cytostatic agents; their effect is based on a specific biological inhibition with no immediate cell death. As such, tumor size is not anymore a sensitive end point for a treatment response to STIs; novel physiological imaging end points are desirable. For receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors as well as modulators of the downstream signaling pathways, an almost immediate inhibition in glycolytic activity (the Warburg effect) and phospholipid turnover (the Kennedy pathway) has been seen by metabolic imaging in the first 24 h of treatment. The quantitative imaging end points by magnetic resonance spectroscopy and metabolic PET (including 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose, FDG, and total choline) provide an early treatment response to targeted STIs, before a reduction in tumor burden can be seen. PMID:27471678

  8. Circulating tumor DNA to monitor treatment response and detect acquired resistance in patients with metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Gray, Elin S; Rizos, Helen; Reid, Anna L; Boyd, Suzanah C; Pereira, Michelle R; Lo, Johnny; Tembe, Varsha; Freeman, James; Lee, Jenny H J; Scolyer, Richard A; Siew, Kelvin; Lomma, Chris; Cooper, Adam; Khattak, Muhammad A; Meniawy, Tarek M; Long, Georgina V; Carlino, Matteo S; Millward, Michael; Ziman, Melanie

    2015-12-01

    Repeat tumor biopsies to study genomic changes during therapy are difficult, invasive and data are confounded by tumoral heterogeneity. The analysis of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) can provide a non-invasive approach to assess prognosis and the genetic evolution of tumors in response to therapy. Mutation-specific droplet digital PCR was used to measure plasma concentrations of oncogenic BRAF and NRAS variants in 48 patients with advanced metastatic melanoma prior to treatment with targeted therapies (vemurafenib, dabrafenib or dabrafenib/trametinib combination) or immunotherapies (ipilimumab, nivolumab or pembrolizumab). Baseline ctDNA levels were evaluated relative to treatment response and progression-free survival (PFS). Tumor-associated ctDNA was detected in the plasma of 35/48 (73%) patients prior to treatment and lower ctDNA levels at this time point were significantly associated with response to treatment and prolonged PFS, irrespective of therapy type. Levels of ctDNA decreased significantly in patients treated with MAPK inhibitors (p < 0.001) in accordance with response to therapy, but this was not apparent in patients receiving immunotherapies. We show that circulating NRAS mutations, known to confer resistance to BRAF inhibitors, were detected in 3 of 7 (43%) patients progressing on kinase inhibitor therapy. Significantly, ctDNA rebound and circulating mutant NRAS preceded radiological detection of progressive disease. Our data demonstrate that ctDNA is a useful biomarker of response to kinase inhibitor therapy and can be used to monitor tumor evolution and detect the early appearance of resistance effectors. PMID:26524482

  9. Circulating tumor DNA to monitor treatment response and detect acquired resistance in patients with metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Elin S.; Rizos, Helen; Reid, Anna L.; Boyd, Suzanah C.; Pereira, Michelle R.; Lo, Johnny; Tembe, Varsha; Freeman, James; Lee, Jenny H.J.; Scolyer, Richard A.; Siew, Kelvin; Lomma, Chris; Cooper, Adam; Khattak, Muhammad A.; Meniawy, Tarek M.; Long, Georgina V.; Carlino, Matteo S.; Millward, Michael; Ziman, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    Repeat tumor biopsies to study genomic changes during therapy are difficult, invasive and data are confounded by tumoral heterogeneity. The analysis of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) can provide a non-invasive approach to assess prognosis and the genetic evolution of tumors in response to therapy. Mutation-specific droplet digital PCR was used to measure plasma concentrations of oncogenic BRAF and NRAS variants in 48 patients with advanced metastatic melanoma prior to treatment with targeted therapies (vemurafenib, dabrafenib or dabrafenib/trametinib combination) or immunotherapies (ipilimumab, nivolumab or pembrolizumab). Baseline ctDNA levels were evaluated relative to treatment response and progression-free survival (PFS). Tumor-associated ctDNA was detected in the plasma of 35/48 (73%) patients prior to treatment and lower ctDNA levels at this time point were significantly associated with response to treatment and prolonged PFS, irrespective of therapy type. Levels of ctDNA decreased significantly in patients treated with MAPK inhibitors (p < 0.001) in accordance with response to therapy, but this was not apparent in patients receiving immunotherapies. We show that circulating NRAS mutations, known to confer resistance to BRAF inhibitors, were detected in 3 of 7 (43%) patients progressing on kinase inhibitor therapy. Significantly, ctDNA rebound and circulating mutant NRAS preceded radiological detection of progressive disease. Our data demonstrate that ctDNA is a useful biomarker of response to kinase inhibitor therapy and can be used to monitor tumor evolution and detect the early appearance of resistance effectors. PMID:26524482

  10. Photosensitizer dosimetry controlled PDT treatment planning reduces inter-individual variability in response to PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaodong; Pogue, Brian W.; Chen, Bin; Demidenko, Eugene; Joshi, Rohan; Hoopes, Jack; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2006-02-01

    Effective Photodynamic therapy (PDT) treatment depends on the amount of active photosensitizer and the delivered light in the targeting tissue. For the same PDT treatment protocol, variation in photosensitizer uptake between animals induces variation in the treatment response between animals. This variation can be compensated via control of delivered light dose through photodynamic dose escalation based on online dosimetry of photosensitizer in the animal. The subcutaneous MAT-LyLu Dunning prostate tumor model was used in this study. Photosensitizer BPD-MA uptake was quantified by multiple fluorescence micro-probe measurements at 3 hours after verteporfin administration. PDT irradiation was carried out after photosensitizer uptake measurement with a total light dose of 75 J/cm2 and a light dose rate of 50 mW/cm2. Therapeutic response of PDT treatments was evaluated by the tumor regrowth assay. Verteporfin uptake varied considerably among tumors (inter-tumor variation 56% standard deviation) and within a tumor (largest intra-tumor variation 64%). An inverse correlation was found between mean photosensitizer intensity and PDT treatment effectiveness (R2 = 37.3%, p < 0.005). In order to compensate individual PDT treatments, photodynamic doses were calculated on an individual animal basis, by matching the light delivered to provide an equal photosensitizer dose multiplied by light dose. This was completed for the lower-quartile, mean and upper-quartile of the photosensitizer distribution. The coefficient of variance in the surviving fraction decreased from 24.9% in non-compensated PDT (NC-PDT) treatments to 16.0%, 14.0% and 15.9% in groups compensated to the lower-quartile (CL-PDT), the median (CM-PDT) and the upper-quartile (CU-PDT), respectively. In terms of treatment efficacy, the CL-PDT group was significantly less effective compared with NC-PDT, CM-PDT and CU-PDT treatments (p < 0.005). No significant difference in effectiveness was observed between NC-PDT, CM

  11. p66Shc signaling is involved in stress responses elicited by anthracycline treatment of rat cardiomyoblasts.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Susana F; Branco, Ana F; Wojtala, Aleksandra; Vega-Naredo, Ignacio; Wieckowski, Mariusz R; Oliveira, Paulo J

    2016-07-01

    The adaptor protein p66Shc modulates cellular redox status integrating oxidative stress with mitochondrial stress responses. Upon oxidative stress, p66Shc is translocated to mitochondria or mitochondria-associated membranes in a multi-step process, resulting in locally increased reactive oxygen species production. This signaling pathway is believed to be important in the context of drug-induced organ toxicity. The use of anthracyclines as anticancer agents is limited due to a dose-dependent and cumulative toxicity resulting in cardiomyopathy. Treatment with the anthracycline doxorubicin (DOX) results in a dose-dependent and cumulative cardiotoxicity which is mediated, at least in part, by increased oxidative stress. In the present study, we investigated for the first time whether p66Shc signaling is activated during DOX treatment of the rat cardiomyoblast H9c2 cell line. We further tested whether the transcriptional factor FoxO3a, which activates target genes responsible for apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, is also involved in p66Shc-dependent redox signaling pathway. Our results suggest that DOX treatment induces p66Shc protein up-regulation specifically in nuclear fractions. Increased nuclear expression of FoxO3a was also detected in H9c2 cells after DOX treatment. Treatment with the antioxidant and protein kinase C (PKC-β) inhibitor hispidin decreased DOX-induced activation of caspase 9 and p66Shc alterations. Taking together, we hypothesize that p66Shc signaling is involved in the activation of stress/toxicity responses elicited by the treatment of H9c2 cells with DOX. Hence, the selective inhibition of this redox pathway may be a promising therapeutic approach to circumvent DOX cardiotoxicity. PMID:26318906

  12. Serum Metabolomic Response of Myasthenia Gravis Patients to Chronic Prednisone Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Manjistha; Cheema, Amrita; Kaminski, Henry J.; Kusner, Linda L.

    2014-01-01

    Prednisone is often used for the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases but they suffer from variable therapeutic responses and significant adverse effects. Serum biological markers that are modulated by chronic corticosteroid use have not been identified. Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune neuromuscular disorder caused by antibodies directed against proteins present at the post-synaptic surface of neuromuscular junction resulting in weakness. The patients with myasthenia gravis are primarily treated with prednisone. We analyzed the metabolomic profile of serum collected from patients prior to and after 12 weeks of prednisone treatment during a clinical trial. Our aim was to identify metabolites that may be treatment responsive and be evaluated in future studies as potential biomarkers of efficacy or adverse effects. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electro-spray quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry was used to obtain comparative metabolomic and lipidomic profile. Untargeted metabolic profiling of serum showed a clear distinction between pre- and post- treatment groups. Chronic prednisone treatment caused upregulation of membrane associated glycerophospholipids: phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, 1, 2-diacyl-sn glycerol 3 phosphate and 1-Acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. Arachidonic acid (AA) and AA derived pro-inflammatory eicosanoids such as 18-carboxy dinor leukotriene B4 and 15 hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids were reduced. Perturbations in amino acid, carbohydrate, vitamin and lipid metabolism were observed. Chronic prednisone treatment caused increase in membrane associated glycerophospholipids, which may be associated with certain adverse effects. Decrease of AA and AA derived pro-inflammatory eicosanoids demonstrate that immunosuppression by corticosteroid is via suppression of pro-inflammatory pathways. The study identified metabolomic fingerprints that can now be validated as prednisone

  13. Identical Excimer Laser PTK Treatments in Rabbits Result in Two Distinct Haze Responses

    PubMed Central

    McCally, Russell L.; Connolly, Patrick J.; Stark, Walter J.; Jain, Sandeep; Azar, Dimitri T.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. To obtain objective light-scattering measurements to test a hypothesis that identical PTK treatments cause distinct low- and high-level light-scattering responses in rabbit corneas. Methods. An excimer laser was used to produce identical 6-mm diameter phototherapeutic keratectomy treatments (PTK) in 32 pigmented rabbits. Eyes were treated by performing a 40-μm epithelial ablation, followed by a 100-μm stromal PTK. Objective scattering measurements were made before treatment, weekly up to 5 weeks, and then biweekly to 9 weeks. Confocal microscopy was performed on several corneas at 4 and 7 weeks. Results. Mean scattering levels split into distinct low- and high-scattering groups 2 weeks after treatment and remained distinct until week 7 (P < 0.003). Scattering in the low group reached a broad peak that lasted from weeks 2 to 4 at approximately 3 times the pretreatment level. Scattering in the high group peaked at 3 weeks at approximately 12 times the pretreatment level. Scattering levels diminished after reaching their peaks. Confocal images showed a band of highly reflective material in the anterior stroma that extended much deeper in corneas from the high group. The reflective band in the highly scattering corneas obscured the posterior stroma from view for up to 5 weeks. Conclusions. Quantitative scattering data obtained with the scatterometer suggest that identical PTK treatments indeed result in distinct low- and high-level light-scattering responses in rabbits. PMID:17003417

  14. Prominent Clinical Dimension, Duration of Illness and Treatment Response in Schizophrenia: A Naturalistic Study

    PubMed Central

    Caldiroli, Alice; Panza, Gabriele; Altamura, Alfredo Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Objective Preliminary data indicate that predominant positive symptoms are predictive of subsequent treatment response, while negative and cognitive symptoms are associated with poor outcome. Purpose of the present study was to investigate the relation between the predominant clinical dimension, duration of illness and acute antipsychotic response in a sample of schizophrenic inpatients. Methods Fifty-one schizophrenic inpatients, receiving an antipsychotic mono-therapy, were dimensionally assessed at the admission in the Acute Psychiatric Unit of the University of Milan. Treatment response was selected as parameter of outcome and defined as a reduction >50% of baseline total The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) score. Demographic and clinical variables between responders and non-responders were compared using one-way analysis of variance for continuous variables and χ2 test for dichotomous ones. Binary logistic regression was performed to find if dimensional scores and duration of illness were associated with acute antipsychotic response. Results A longer duration of illness was found in non-responders respect to responders (15.61 years vs. 8.28 years)(F=4.98, p=0.03). Higher scores on PANSS positive sub-scale (OR=1.3, p=0.03), lower scores on cognitive PANSS scores (OR=0.75, p=0.05) and shorter duration of illness (OR=0.93, p=0.04) were found to be predictive of acute antipsychotic response. Conclusion These preliminary results show that a long duration of illness as well as a more severe cognitive impairment is predictive of treatment non-response, indicating a worse outcome for chronic patients with predominant cognitive symptoms. PMID:23251199

  15. Agouron and immune response to commercialize remune immune-based treatment.

    PubMed

    James, J S

    1998-06-19

    Agouron Pharmaceuticals agreed in June to collaborate with The Immune Response Corporation on the final development and marketing of an immune-based treatment for HIV. Remune, the vaccine developed by Dr. Jonas Salk, is currently in Phase III randomized trials with 2,500 patients, and the trials are expected to be completed in April 1999. Immune-based treatments have been difficult to test, as there is no surrogate marker, like viral load, to determine if the drug is working. Agouron agreed to participate in the joint venture after reviewing encouraging results from preliminary trials in which remune was taken in combination with highly active antiretroviral drugs. PMID:11365593

  16. Do in-vivo behaviors predict early response in family-based treatment for anorexia nervosa?

    PubMed Central

    Darcy, Alison M; Bryson, Susan W.; Agras, W. Stewart; Fitzpatrick, Kathleen Kara; Le Grange, Daniel; Lock, James

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to explore whether identified parental and patient behaviors observed in the first few sessions of family-based treatment (FBT) predict early response (weight gain of 1.8 kg by session four) to treatment. Therapy film recordings from 21 adolescent participants recruited into the FBT arm of a multi-site randomized clinical trial were coded for the presence of behaviors (length of observed behavior divided by length of session recording) in the first, second and fourth sessions. Behaviors that differed between early responders and non-early responders on univariate analysis were entered into discriminant class analyses. Participants with fewer negative verbal behaviors in the first session and were away from table during the meal session less had the greatest rates of early response. Parents who made fewer critical statements and who did not repeatedly present food during the meal session had children who had the greatest rates of early response. In-vivo behaviors in early sessions of FBT may predict early response to FBT. Adaptations to address participant resistance and to decrease the numbers of critical comments made by parents while encouraging their children to eat might improve early response to FBT. PMID:24091274

  17. Do in-vivo behaviors predict early response in family-based treatment for anorexia nervosa?

    PubMed

    Darcy, Alison M; Bryson, Susan W; Agras, W Stewart; Fitzpatrick, Kathleen Kara; Le Grange, Daniel; Lock, James

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study is to explore whether identified parental and patient behaviors observed in the first few sessions of family-based treatment (FBT) predict early response (weight gain of 1.8 kg by session four) to treatment. Therapy film recordings from 21 adolescent participants recruited into the FBT arm of a multi-site randomized clinical trial were coded for the presence of behaviors (length of observed behavior divided by length of session recording) in the first, second and fourth sessions. Behaviors that differed between early responders and non-early responders on univariate analysis were entered into discriminant class analyses. Participants with fewer negative verbal behaviors in the first session and were away from table during the meal session less had the greatest rates of early response. Parents who made fewer critical statements and who did not repeatedly present food during the meal session had children who had the greatest rates of early response. In-vivo behaviors in early sessions of FBT may predict early response to FBT. Adaptations to address participant resistance and to decrease the numbers of critical comments made by parents while encouraging their children to eat might improve early response to FBT. PMID:24091274

  18. Treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, attenuates the fish hypoxia response.

    PubMed

    Panlilio, Jennifer M; Marin, Sara; Lobl, Marissa B; McDonald, M Danielle

    2016-01-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine (FLX), the active ingredient of the antidepressant drug Prozac, inhibits reuptake of the neurotransmitter, serotonin (5-HT; 5-hydroxytryptamine), into cells by the 5-HT transporter (SERT). Given the role of 5-HT in oxygen detection and the cardiovascular and ventilatory responses of fish to hypoxia, we hypothesized that treatment of the Gulf toadfish, Opsanus beta, with FLX would interfere with their response to hypoxia. Toadfish treated intra-arterially with 3.4 μg.g(-1) FLX under normoxic conditions displayed a transient tachycardia and a biphasic caudal arterial blood pressure (PCA) response that are in direct conflict with the typical hypoxia response. Fish injected intraperitoneally with FLX under normoxia had resting cardiovascular and ventilatory parameters similar to controls. Upon exposure to hypoxia, control toadfish exhibit a significant bradycardia, reduction in PCA and an increase in ventilatory amplitude (VAMP) without any changes in ventilatory frequency (fV). Fish treated IP with 10 μg.g(-1) FLX showed an interference in the cardiovascular and ventilatory response to hypoxia. Interestingly, when treated with 25 μg.g(-1) FLX, the bradycardia and VAMP response to hypoxia were similar to control fish while the PCA response to hypoxia was further inhibited. These results suggest that SERT inhibition by FLX may hinder survival in hypoxia. PMID:27499056

  19. Treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, attenuates the fish hypoxia response

    PubMed Central

    Panlilio, Jennifer M.; Marin, Sara; Lobl, Marissa B.; McDonald, M. Danielle

    2016-01-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine (FLX), the active ingredient of the antidepressant drug Prozac, inhibits reuptake of the neurotransmitter, serotonin (5-HT; 5-hydroxytryptamine), into cells by the 5-HT transporter (SERT). Given the role of 5-HT in oxygen detection and the cardiovascular and ventilatory responses of fish to hypoxia, we hypothesized that treatment of the Gulf toadfish, Opsanus beta, with FLX would interfere with their response to hypoxia. Toadfish treated intra-arterially with 3.4 μg.g−1 FLX under normoxic conditions displayed a transient tachycardia and a biphasic caudal arterial blood pressure (PCA) response that are in direct conflict with the typical hypoxia response. Fish injected intraperitoneally with FLX under normoxia had resting cardiovascular and ventilatory parameters similar to controls. Upon exposure to hypoxia, control toadfish exhibit a significant bradycardia, reduction in PCA and an increase in ventilatory amplitude (VAMP) without any changes in ventilatory frequency (fV). Fish treated IP with 10 μg.g−1 FLX showed an interference in the cardiovascular and ventilatory response to hypoxia. Interestingly, when treated with 25 μg.g−1 FLX, the bradycardia and VAMP response to hypoxia were similar to control fish while the PCA response to hypoxia was further inhibited. These results suggest that SERT inhibition by FLX may hinder survival in hypoxia. PMID:27499056

  20. Opposite metabolic response to fenofibrate treatment in pregnant and virgin rats.

    PubMed

    Soria, Ana; Bocos, Carlos; Herrera, Emilio

    2002-01-01

    The level of maternal circulating triglycerides during late pregnancy has been correlated to newborns' weight in humans. To investigate the response to fenofibrate, a hypotriglyceridemic agent, in pregnant rats, 0, 100, or 200 mg of fenofibrate/kg body weight as oral doses were given twice a day from day 16 of gestation and studied at day 20. Virgin rats were studied in parallel. Liver weight was higher in pregnant than in virgin rats, and either dose of fenofibrate increased this variable in both groups. The highest dose of fenofibrate decreased fetal weight. Although plasma triglycerides decreased during the first 2 days of fenofibrate treatment in pregnant rats, the effect disappeared on day 3, and plasma triglycerides were even enhanced at day 4. In virgin rats, fenofibrate decreased plasma triglycerides throughout the experiment. Plasma cholesterol levels in pregnant rats decreased during the first 3 days of treatment, and the effect disappeared on day 4, whereas in virgin rats, values remained decreased. Changes in plasma triglycerides paralleled those of VLDL triglycerides. In pregnant rats, VLDL cholesterol levels increased while LDL cholesterol decreased with the treatment, whereas in virgin rats, cholesterol levels decreased in all lipoprotein fractions. Only in virgin rats did liver triglyceride concentration increase with fenofibrate treatment. Lumbar adipose tissue LPL was lower in pregnant than in virgin rats, and fenofibrate treatment decreased this variable in both groups. Maternal fenofibrate treatment increased fetal plasma and liver triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations. It is proposed that the opposite effects of fenofibrate treatment in virgin and pregnant rats are a consequence of both the enhanced liver capability for VLDL triglyceride production and a rebound response to the drug in the latter. PMID:11792725

  1. Responses to hexyl 5-aminolevulinate-induced photodynamic treatment in rat bladder cancer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arum, Carl-Jørgen; Gederas, Odrun; Larsen, Eivind; Randeberg, Lise; Zhao, Chun-Mei

    2010-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: In this study, we evaluated histologically the effects of hexyl 5-aminolevulinateinduced photodynamic treatment in the AY-27 tumor cell induced rat bladder cancer model. MATERIAL & METHODS: The animals (fischer-344 female rats) were divided into 2 groups, half of which were orthotopically implanted with 400,000 syngeniec AY-27 urothelia1 rat bladder cancer cells and half sham implanted. 14 days post implantation 6 rats from each group were treated with hexyl 5-aminolevulinate-induced photodynamic treatment (8mM HAL and light fluence of 20 J/cm2). Additional groups of animals were only given HAL instillation, only light treatment, or no treatment. All animals were sacrificed 7 days after the PDT/only HAL/only light or no treatment. Each bladder was removed, embedded in paraffin and stained with hematoxylin, eosin, and saferin for histological evaluation at high magnification for features of tissue damage by a pathologist blinded to the sample source. RESULTS: In all animals that were AY-27 implanted and not given complete PDT treatment, viable tumors were found in the bladder mucosa and wall. In the animals treated with complete HAL-PDT only 3 of 6 animals had viable tumor. In the 3 animals with viable tumor it was significantly reduced in volume compared to the untreated animals. It was also noted that in the PDT treated animals there was a significantly increased inflammatory response (lymphocytic and mononuclear cell infiltration) in the peri-tumor area compared to implanted animals without complete HAL-PDT. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that hexyl 5-aminolevulinate-induced photodynamic treatment in a rat bladder cancer model involves both direct effects on cell death (necrosis and apoptosis) and indirect effects to evoke the host immune-response, together contributing to tumor eradication.

  2. Volume analysis of treatment response of head and neck lesions using 3D level set segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Street, Ethan; Sahiner, Berkman; Gujar, Sachin; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Chan, Heang-Ping; Mukherji, Suresh K.

    2008-03-01

    A computerized system for segmenting lesions in head and neck CT scans was developed to assist radiologists in estimation of the response to treatment of malignant lesions. The system performs 3D segmentations based on a level set model and uses as input an approximate bounding box for the lesion of interest. In this preliminary study, CT scans from a pre-treatment exam and a post one-cycle chemotherapy exam of 13 patients containing head and neck neoplasms were used. A radiologist marked 35 temporal pairs of lesions. 13 pairs were primary site cancers and 22 pairs were metastatic lymph nodes. For all lesions, a radiologist outlined a contour on the best slice on both the pre- and post treatment scans. For the 13 primary lesion pairs, full 3D contours were also extracted by a radiologist. The average pre- and post-treatment areas on the best slices for all lesions were 4.5 and 2.1 cm2, respectively. For the 13 primary site pairs the average pre- and post-treatment primary lesions volumes were 15.4 and 6.7 cm 3 respectively. The correlation between the automatic and manual estimates for the pre-to-post-treatment change in area for all 35 pairs was r=0.97, while the correlation for the percent change in area was r=0.80. The correlation for the change in volume for the 13 primary site pairs was r=0.89, while the correlation for the percent change in volume was r=0.79. The average signed percent error between the automatic and manual areas for all 70 lesions was 11.0+/-20.6%. The average signed percent error between the automatic and manual volumes for all 26 primary lesions was 37.8+/-42.1%. The preliminary results indicate that the automated segmentation system can reliably estimate tumor size change in response to treatment relative to radiologist's hand segmentation.

  3. Incorporating Cancer Stem Cells in Radiation Therapy Treatment Response Modeling and the Implication in Glioblastoma Multiforme Treatment Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Nguyen, Dan; Pajonk, Frank; Kupelian, Patrick; Kaprealian, Tania; Selch, Michael; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To perform a preliminary exploration with a simplistic mathematical cancer stem cell (CSC) interaction model to determine whether the tumor-intrinsic heterogeneity and dynamic equilibrium between CSCs and differentiated cancer cells (DCCs) can better explain radiation therapy treatment response with a dual-compartment linear-quadratic (DLQ) model. Methods and Materials: The radiosensitivity parameters of CSCs and DCCs for cancer cell lines including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), non–small cell lung cancer, melanoma, osteosarcoma, and prostate, cervical, and breast cancer were determined by performing robust least-square fitting using the DLQ model on published clonogenic survival data. Fitting performance was compared with the single-compartment LQ (SLQ) and universal survival curve models. The fitting results were then used in an ordinary differential equation describing the kinetics of DCCs and CSCs in response to 2- to 14.3-Gy fractionated treatments. The total dose to achieve tumor control and the fraction size that achieved the least normal biological equivalent dose were calculated. Results: Smaller cell survival fitting errors were observed using DLQ, with the exception of melanoma, which had a low α/β = 0.16 in SLQ. Ordinary differential equation simulation indicated lower normal tissue biological equivalent dose to achieve the same tumor control with a hypofractionated approach for 4 cell lines for the DLQ model, in contrast to SLQ, which favored 2 Gy per fraction for all cells except melanoma. The DLQ model indicated greater tumor radioresistance than SLQ, but the radioresistance was overcome by hypofractionation, other than the GBM cells, which responded poorly to all fractionations. Conclusion: The distinct radiosensitivity and dynamics between CSCs and DCCs in radiation therapy response could perhaps be one possible explanation for the heterogeneous intertumor response to hypofractionation and in some cases superior outcome from

  4. Rapidly eroding piñon-juniper woodlands in New Mexico: response to slash treatment.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Brian K; Smith, Freeman M; Jacobs, Brian F

    2003-01-01

    The piñon (Pinus edulis Engelm.)-juniper [Juniperus monosperma (Engelm.) Sarg.] woodlands of Bandelier National Monument are experiencing accelerated erosion. Earlier studies suggest that causes of these rapidly eroding woodlands are related to an unprecedented rapid transition of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa C. Lawson) savanna to piñon-juniper woodlands as a result of cumulative historical effects of overgrazing, fire suppression, and severe drought. To study the effectiveness of slash treatment in reducing accelerated erosion, we used sediment check dams to quantify sediment yield from twelve paired microwatersheds (300-1100 m2) within an existing paired water-shed study. Six of the twelve microwatersheds were located in a 41-ha (treatment) watershed with scattered slash treatment, whereas six microwatersheds were located in an adjacent 35-ha untreated (control) watershed. The primary purpose of our research was to quantify the rates of sediment yield between the treated and control microwatersheds. Sediment yield was measured from 15 individual storms during the months of June-September (2000 and 2001). In response to slash treatment, mean seasonal sediment yield for 2000 equaled 2.99 Mg/ha in the control vs. 0.03 Mg/ha in the treatment and 2.07 Mg/ha in the control vs. 0.07 Mg/ha in the treatment in 2001. The practice of slash treatment demonstrates efficacy in reducing erosion in degraded piñon-juniper woodlands by encouraging herbaceous recovery. Our data show that slash treatment increases total ground cover (slash and herbaceous growth) beyond a potential erosion threshold. Restored piñon-juniper woodlands, as the result of slash treatment, provide a forest structure similar to pre-grazing and pre-fire suppression conditions and decrease catastrophic fire hazard. PMID:12931884

  5. Dose-response effects of atropine and HI-6 treatment of organophosphorus poisoning in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Koplovitz, I.; Menton, R.; Matthews, C.; Shutz, M.; Nalls, C.

    1995-12-31

    H1-6 (1-2-hydrnxyiminomethyl-1 pyridino-3-(4-carbameyl- 1--pyddino)-2- oxaprnpane dichioride) has been evaluated as an oxime alternative to pralidoxime, and toxogonin in the treatment of organophosphorus (OP) poisoning. The dose response effects of atropine (ATR) and HI-6 were investigated to more fully explore the interaction of these compounds in the treatment of OP poisoning. ATR, HI-6 and various combinations of the two drugs were evaluated against lethal poisoning by soman (GD) and tabun (GA) in guinea pigs. The effect of adjunctive diazepam treatment on the efficacy of atropine and HI-6 against soman was also investigated. Animals of either sex were challenged s.c. with OP and treated i.m. 1 min later with ATR and/or HI-6. When used, diazepam was injected immediately after ATR+HI6. LD50s of each treatment were calculated from probit models based on 24-hour survival against 5 levels of nerve agent and 6 animals per challenge level. A protective index (PI) was calculated by dividing the nerve agent LD50 in the presence of treatment by the LD50 in the absence of treatment. Treatment with HI-6 alone had little effect on the toxicity of either OP. Treatment with ATR alone was more effective than HI-6 alone and was significantly more effective against soman than against tabun. When used in combination atropine and HI-6 had a strong synergistic effect against both agents. The dose of atropine used with HI-6 was critical in determining the efficacy of HI-6 against either agent. The slopes of the dose-lethality curves were minimally affected by the dose of ATR or HI-6. Adjunctive treatment with diazepam enhanced the efficacy of HI-6 and atropine against soman.

  6. Racial and ethnic differences in response to medicines: towards individualized pharmaceutical treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Burroughs, Valentine J.; Maxey, Randall W.; Levy, Richard A.

    2002-01-01

    It is now well documented that substantial disparities exist in the quality and quantity of medical care received by minority Americans, especially those of African, Asian and Hispanic heritage. In addition, the special needs and responses to pharmaceutical treatment of these groups have been undervalued or ignored. This article reviews the genetic factors that underlie varying responses to medicines observed among different ethnic and racial groups. Pharmacogenetic research in the past few decades has uncovered significant differences among racial and ethnic groups in the metabolism, clinical effectiveness, and side-effect profiles of many clinically important drugs. These differences must be taken into account in the design of cost management policies such as formulary implementation, therapeutic substitution and step-care protocols. These programs should be broad and flexible enough to enable rational choices and individualized treatment for all patients, regardless of race or ethnic origin. Images Figure 3 PMID:12401060

  7. Response of Human Prostate Cancer Cells to Mitoxantrone Treatment in Simulated Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Edwards, Christopher; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the changes in growth of human prostate cancer cells (LNCaP) and their response to the treatment of antineoplastic agent, mitoxantrone, under the simulated microgravity condition. In comparison to static 1g, microgravity and simulated microgravity have been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels in various cultured cell models or animals. However, very little is known about the effect of altered gravity on the responses of cells to drugs, especially chemotherapy drugs. To test the hypothesis that zero gravity would result in altered regulation of cells in response to antineoplastic agents, we cultured LNCaP cells for 96 hr either in a High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) bioreactor at the rotating condition to model microgravity in space or in the static condition as a control. 24 hr after the culture started, mitoxantrone was introduced to the cells at a final concentration of 1 M. The mitoxantrone treatment lasted 72 hr and then the cells were collected for various measurements. Compared to static 1g controls, the cells cultured in the simulated microgravity environment did not show significant differences in cell viability, growth rate, or cell cycle distribution. However, in response to mitoxantrone (1uM), a significant proportion of bioreactor cultured cells (30%) was arrested at G2 phase and a significant number of these cells were apoptotic in comparison to their static controls. The expressions of 84 oxidative stress related genes were analyzed using Qiagen PCR array to identify the possible mechanism underlying the altered responses of bioreactor culture cells to mitoxantrone. Nine out of 84 genes showed higher expression at four hour post mitoxantrone treatment in cells cultured at rotating condition compared to those at static. Taken together, the results reported here indicate that simulated microgravity may alter the responses of LNCaP cells to mitoxantrone treatment. The alteration of oxidative stress pathways

  8. Low Dose Iron Treatments Induce a DNA Damage Response in Human Endothelial Cells within Minutes

    PubMed Central

    Mollet, Inês G.; Giess, Adam; Paschalaki, Koralia; Periyasamy, Manikandan; Lidington, Elaine C.; Mason, Justin C.; Jones, Michael D.; Game, Laurence; Ali, Simak; Shovlin, Claire L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Spontaneous reports from patients able to report vascular sequelae in real time, and recognition that serum non transferrin bound iron may reach or exceed 10μmol/L in the blood stream after iron tablets or infusions, led us to hypothesize that conventional iron treatments may provoke acute vascular injury. This prompted us to examine whether a phenotype could be observed in normal human endothelial cells treated with low dose iron. Methodology Confluent primary human endothelial cells (EC) were treated with filter-sterilized iron (II) citrate or fresh media for RNA sequencing and validation studies. RNA transcript profiles were evaluated using directional RNA sequencing with no pre-specification of target sequences. Alignments were counted for exons and junctions of the gene strand only, blinded to treatment types. Principal Findings Rapid changes in RNA transcript profiles were observed in endothelial cells treated with 10μmol/L iron (II) citrate, compared to media-treated cells. Clustering for Gene Ontology (GO) performed on all differentially expressed genes revealed significant differences in biological process terms between iron and media-treated EC, whereas 10 sets of an equivalent number of randomly selected genes from the respective EC gene datasets showed no significant differences in any GO terms. After 1 hour, differentially expressed genes clustered to vesicle mediated transport, protein catabolism, and cell cycle (Benjamini p = 0.0016, 0.0024 and 0.0032 respectively), and by 6 hours, to cellular response to DNA damage stimulus most significantly through DNA repair genes FANCG, BLM, and H2AFX. Comet assays demonstrated that 10μM iron treatment elicited DNA damage within 1 hour. This was accompanied by a brisk DNA damage response pulse, as ascertained by the development of DNA damage response (DDR) foci, and p53 stabilization. Significance These data suggest that low dose iron treatments are sufficient to modify the vascular endothelium

  9. Improvement of Electrochemical Response of Cocaine Sensors Based on DNA Aptamer by Heat Treatment.

    PubMed

    Arimoto, Satoshi; Shimono, Ken; Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Mizutani, Fumio; Yoshioka, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    We report on a biosensor for cocaine based on the conformation change of DNA aptamer by capturing the cocaine molecules. The oxidation current of ferrocene conjugated on the terminal end of aptamer immobilized on an Au electrode increased with increasing cocaine concentration. The sensor response has been improved by a simple heat treatment after immobilization, since the aggregates of DNA aptamer generated during the immobilization step could be dissociated and rearranged on the electrode. PMID:27063722

  10. Cellular response of the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii to chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine treatments.

    PubMed

    Mogoa, Emerancienne; Bodet, Charles; Morel, Franck; Rodier, Marie-Hélène; Legube, Bernard; Héchard, Yann

    2011-07-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii is a free-living amoebae commonly found in water systems. Free-living amoebae might be pathogenic but are also known to bear phagocytosis-resistant bacteria, protecting these bacteria from water treatments. The mode of action of these treatments is poorly understood, particularly on amoebae. It is important to examine the action of these treatments on amoebae in order to improve them. The cellular response to chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine was tested on A. castellanii trophozoites. Doses of disinfectants leading to up to a 3-log reduction were compared by flow cytometry and electron microscopy. Chlorine treatment led to size reduction, permeabilization, and retraction of pseudopods. In addition, treatment with chlorine dioxide led to a vacuolization of the cytoplasm. Monochloramine had a dose-dependent effect. At the highest doses monochloramine treatment resulted in almost no changes in cell size and permeability, as shown by flow cytometry, but the cell surface became smooth and dense, as seen by electron microscopy. We show that these disinfectants globally induced size reduction, membrane permeabilization, and morphological modifications but that they have a different mode of action on A. castellanii. PMID:21602398

  11. Cellular Response of the Amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii to Chlorine, Chlorine Dioxide, and Monochloramine Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Mogoa, Emerancienne; Bodet, Charles; Morel, Franck; Rodier, Marie-Hélène; Legube, Bernard; Héchard, Yann

    2011-01-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii is a free-living amoebae commonly found in water systems. Free-living amoebae might be pathogenic but are also known to bear phagocytosis-resistant bacteria, protecting these bacteria from water treatments. The mode of action of these treatments is poorly understood, particularly on amoebae. It is important to examine the action of these treatments on amoebae in order to improve them. The cellular response to chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine was tested on A. castellanii trophozoites. Doses of disinfectants leading to up to a 3-log reduction were compared by flow cytometry and electron microscopy. Chlorine treatment led to size reduction, permeabilization, and retraction of pseudopods. In addition, treatment with chlorine dioxide led to a vacuolization of the cytoplasm. Monochloramine had a dose-dependent effect. At the highest doses monochloramine treatment resulted in almost no changes in cell size and permeability, as shown by flow cytometry, but the cell surface became smooth and dense, as seen by electron microscopy. We show that these disinfectants globally induced size reduction, membrane permeabilization, and morphological modifications but that they have a different mode of action on A. castellanii. PMID:21602398

  12. Prediction of treatment response and metastatic disease in soft tissue sarcoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhidzadeh, Hamidreza; Zhou, Mu; Goldgof, Dmitry B.; Hall, Lawrence O.; Raghavan, Meera.; Gatenby, Robert A.

    2014-03-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are a heterogenous group of malignant tumors comprised of more than 50 histologic subtypes. Based on spatial variations of the tumor, predictions of the development of necrosis in response to therapy as well as eventual progression to metastatic disease are made. Optimization of treatment, as well as management of therapy-related side effects, may be improved using progression information earlier in the course of therapy. Multimodality pre- and post-gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance images (MRI) were taken before and after treatment for 30 patients. Regional variations in the tumor bed were measured quantitatively. The voxel values from the tumor region were used as features and a fuzzy clustering algorithm was used to segment the tumor into three spatial regions. The regions were given labels of high, intermediate and low based on the average signal intensity of pixels from the post-contrast T1 modality. These spatially distinct regions were viewed as essential meta-features to predict the response of the tumor to therapy based on necrosis (dead tissue in tumor bed) and metastatic disease (spread of tumor to sites other than primary). The best feature was the difference in the number of pixels in the highest intensity regions of tumors before and after treatment. This enabled prediction of patients with metastatic disease and lack of positive treatment response (i.e. less necrosis). The best accuracy, 73.33%, was achieved by a Support Vector Machine in a leave-one-out cross validation on 30 cases predicting necrosis < 90% post treatment and metastasis.

  13. Predicting 6-week treatment response to escitalopram pharmacotherapy in late-life major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Saghafi, Ramin; Brown, Charlotte; Butters, Meryl A.; Cyranowski, Jill; Dew, Mary Amanda; Frank, Ellen; Gildengers, Ariel; Karp, Jordan F.; Lenze, Eric J.; Lotrich, Francis; Martire, Lynn; Mazumdar, Sati; Miller, Mark D.; Mulsant, Benoit H.; Weber, Elizabeth; Whyte, Ellen; Morse, Jennifer; Stack, Jacqueline; Houck, Patricia R.; Bensasi, Salem; Reynolds, Charles F.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective Approximately half of older patients treated for major depressive disorder (MDD) do not achieve symptomatic remission and functional recovery with first-line pharmacotherapy. This study aims to characterize sociodemographic, clinical, and neuropsychologic correlates of full, partial, and non-response to escitalopram monotherapy of unipolar MDD in later life. Methods One hundred and seventy-five patients aged 60 and older were assessed at baseline on demographic variables, depression severity, hopelessness, anxiety, cognitive functioning, co-existing medical illness burden, social support, and quality of life (disability). Subjects received 10 mg/d of open-label escitalopram and were divided into full (n =55; 31%), partial (n =75; 42.9%), and non-responder (n =45; 25.7%) groups based on Hamilton depression scores at week 6. Univariate followed by multivariate analyses tested for differences between the three groups. Results Non-responders to treatment were found to be more severely depressed and anxious at baseline than both full and partial responders, more disabled, and with lower self-esteem than full responders. In general partial responders resembled full responders more than they resembled non-responders. In multivariate models, more severe anxiety symptoms (both psychological and somatic) and lower self-esteem predicted worse response status at 6 weeks. Conclusion Among treatment-seeking elderly persons with MDD, higher anxiety symptoms and lower self-esteem predict poorer response after six weeks of escitalopram treatment. PMID:17486678

  14. Early response as a predictor of success in guided self-help treatment for bulimic disorders.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Ana R; Conceição, Eva; Machado, Paulo P P

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the number of sessions and time required for a clinical meaningful symptomatic change with a guided self-help treatment and to assess the predictive value of early response and other potential predictors of end-of-treatment clinical status. Participants were 42 patients with a diagnosis of bulimia nervosa or ED not otherwise specified. Survival analyses (Kaplan-Meier) were performed to estimate the median time required to attain a 51% reduction in bulimic symptoms. Logistic regression was used to assess predictors of symptom remission. Results showed that the median time to achieve a 51% reduction in binge and purge frequencies was 3.68 and 3.77, respectively. This change occurred at session 3 for 50% of the participants. Early response was the most significant predictor of binge eating remission. No pretreatment predictors of time to achieve early response were found. These results have implications for allocating treatment resources in a stepped-care intervention model. PMID:24123526

  15. Rad51-mediated replication fork reversal is a global response to genotoxic treatments in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Zellweger, Ralph; Dalcher, Damian; Mutreja, Karun; Berti, Matteo; Schmid, Jonas A.; Herrador, Raquel; Vindigni, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Replication fork reversal protects forks from breakage after poisoning of Topoisomerase 1. We here investigated fork progression and chromosomal breakage in human cells in response to a panel of sublethal genotoxic treatments, using other topoisomerase poisons, DNA synthesis inhibitors, interstrand cross-linking inducers, and base-damaging agents. We used electron microscopy to visualize fork architecture under these conditions and analyzed the association of specific molecular features with checkpoint activation. Our data identify replication fork uncoupling and reversal as global responses to genotoxic treatments. Both events are frequent even after mild treatments that do not affect fork integrity, nor activate checkpoints. Fork reversal was found to be dependent on the central homologous recombination factor RAD51, which is consistently present at replication forks independently of their breakage, and to be antagonized by poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase/RECQ1-regulated restart. Our work establishes remodeling of uncoupled forks as a pivotal RAD51-regulated response to genotoxic stress in human cells and as a promising target to potentiate cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25733714

  16. Effects of androgen treatment on behavioral and physiological responses of heifers to fear-eliciting situations.

    PubMed

    Boissy, A; Bouissou, M F

    1994-03-01

    Sex steroids are known to influence dominance relationships in cattle. This effect seems due to a reduction of fear in response to conspecifics. In order to determine if gonadal steroid can also modulate fear reactions in nonsocial situations, testosterone-treated heifers were exposed to various events reported to elicit fear in cattle. The experimental subjects received daily im injections of testosterone propionate (0.60 mg/kg body wt) for 100 days while controls received the same volume of the vehicle. In a first experiment, the influence of testosterone treatment on behavioral reactions of animals was studied. Treated heifers were much less fearful than controls: they were less reactive to an unfamiliar environment or to a novel object, and they were also less disturbed by a surprising event. In a second experiment, the effects of androgen treatment on cardiac and adrenal responses were evaluated in another group of subjects placed in the same situations. Whereas heart rates after the fear-eliciting events never differed between groups, the increase in cortisol levels was always lower in treated heifers than that in controls in response to human approach, to a surprising event, and to fear conditioning. Furthermore, after stimulation of the adrenal cortex by ACTH administration, the increase in cortisol levels was twice as great in controls than in treated heifers. Thus, prolonged androgen treatment reduces fearfulness in cattle, at least in some situations. Possible mechanisms by which testosterone influences fear-related behaviors are proposed. PMID:8034283

  17. TGFβ Treatment Enhances Glioblastoma Virotherapy by Inhibiting the Innate Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Han, Jianfeng; Chen, Xilin; Chu, Jianhong; Xu, Bo; Meisen, Walter H; Chen, Lichao; Zhang, Lingling; Zhang, Jianying; He, Xiaoming; Wang, Qi-En; Chiocca, E Antonio; Kaur, Balveen; Caligiuri, Michael A; Yu, Jianhua

    2015-12-15

    Oncolytic viruses, including oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV), have produced provocative therapeutic responses in patients with glioblastoma, the most aggressive brain tumor. Paradoxically, innate immune responses mediated by natural killer (NK) cells and macrophages/microglia appear to limit oHSV efficacy. Therefore, we investigated whether pretreatment with an immunosuppressive cytokine, TGFβ, might reverse these effects and thereby potentiate oHSV efficacy. TGFβ treatment of NK cells rendered them less cytolytic against oHSV-infected glioblastoma cells and stem-like cells in vitro. Furthermore, TGFβ treatment of NK cells, macrophages, or microglia increased viral titers of oHSV in cocultures with glioblastoma cells. In a syngeneic mouse model of glioblastoma, administering TGFβ prior to oHSV injection inhibited intracranial infiltration and activation of NK cells and macrophages. Notably, a single administration of TGFβ prior to oHSV therapy was sufficient to phenocopy NK-cell depletion and suppress tumor growth and prolong survival in both xenograft and syngeneic models of glioblastoma. Collectively, our findings show how administering a single dose of TGFβ prior to oncolytic virus treatment of glioblastoma can transiently inhibit innate immune cells that limit efficacy, thereby improving therapeutic responses and survival outcomes. PMID:26631269

  18. Plaques from different individuals yield different microbiota responses to oral-antiseptic treatment.

    PubMed

    Filoche, Sara K; Soma, Dennes; van Bekkum, Margo; Sissons, Chris H

    2008-10-01

    Dental caries is a polymicrobial disease and complicated to treat. Understanding the microbiota responses to treatment from different individuals is a key factor in developing effective treatments. The aim of this study was to investigate the 24-h posttreatment effect of two oral antiseptics (chlorhexidine and Listerine) on species composition of microplate plaque biofilms that had been initiated from the saliva of five different donors and grown in both 0.15% and 0.5% sucrose. Plaque composition was analyzed using checkerboard DNA : DNA hybridization analysis, which comprised of a panel of 40 species associated with oral health and disease. The supernatant pH of the plaques grown in 0.15% sucrose ranged from 4.3 to 6 and in 0.5% sucrose, it ranged from 3.8 to 4. Plaque biomass was largely unaffected by either antiseptic. Each donor had a different salivary microbial profile, differentiating according to the prevalence of either caries or periodontal/anaerobic pathogens. Despite similar plaque microbiota compositions being elicited through the sucrose growth conditions, microbiota responses to chlorhexidine and Listerine differentiated according to the donor. These findings indicate that efficacious caries treatments would depend on the responses of an individual's microbiota, which may differ from person to person. PMID:18647353

  19. Rad51-mediated replication fork reversal is a global response to genotoxic treatments in human cells.

    PubMed

    Zellweger, Ralph; Dalcher, Damian; Mutreja, Karun; Berti, Matteo; Schmid, Jonas A; Herrador, Raquel; Vindigni, Alessandro; Lopes, Massimo

    2015-03-01

    Replication fork reversal protects forks from breakage after poisoning of Topoisomerase 1. We here investigated fork progression and chromosomal breakage in human cells in response to a panel of sublethal genotoxic treatments, using other topoisomerase poisons, DNA synthesis inhibitors, interstrand cross-linking inducers, and base-damaging agents. We used electron microscopy to visualize fork architecture under these conditions and analyzed the association of specific molecular features with checkpoint activation. Our data identify replication fork uncoupling and reversal as global responses to genotoxic treatments. Both events are frequent even after mild treatments that do not affect fork integrity, nor activate checkpoints. Fork reversal was found to be dependent on the central homologous recombination factor RAD51, which is consistently present at replication forks independently of their breakage, and to be antagonized by poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase/RECQ1-regulated restart. Our work establishes remodeling of uncoupled forks as a pivotal RAD51-regulated response to genotoxic stress in human cells and as a promising target to potentiate cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25733714

  20. Response to Microneedling Treatment in Men with Androgenetic Alopecia Who Failed to Respond to Conventional Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dhurat, Rachita; Mathapati, Sukesh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The efficacy of conventional therapy viz. finasteride and minoxidil in androgenetic alopecia (AGA) that is based on both preventing hair loss and promoting new hair growth, varies between 30% and 60%. This has led to a large number of patients unsatisfied who demand for a better cosmetic coverage over the scalp. Microneedling has recently been reported to be promising, effective and a safe treatment modality in the treatment of AGA. This augments the response of conventional therapy. Materials and Methods: Four men with AGA were on finasteride and 5% minoxidil solution since 2 to 5 years. Though there was no worsening in their respective AGA stages with the therapy, they showed no new hair growth. They were subjected to microneedling procedure over a period of 6 months along with their ongoing therapy. Patients were assessed with the use of the standardized 7-point evaluation scale and patients’ subjective hair growth assessment scale. The patients were followed up for 18 months post microneedling procedure to assess the sustainability of the response. Results: All patients showed a response of + 2 to + 3 on standardized 7-point evaluation scale. The response in the form of new hair growth started after 8-10 sessions. The patients’ satisfaction was more than 75% in three patients and more 50% in one patient, on patients’ subjective hair growth assessment scale. The obtained results were sustained post procedure during 18 months follow-up period. Conclusion Treatment with microneedling showed an accelerated response with addition of microneedling procedure leading to significant scalp density. This is the first case series to report the boosting effect of microneedling with respect to new hair follicle stimulation in patients with androgenetic alopecia who were poor responders to conventional therapy. PMID:26120151

  1. Inflammatory mammary carcinoma in 12 dogs: Clinical features, cyclooxygenase-2 expression, and response to piroxicam treatment

    PubMed Central

    de M. Souza, Carlos H.; Toledo-Piza, Evandro; Amorin, Renee; Barboza, Andrigo; Tobias, Karen M.

    2009-01-01

    Canine inflammatory mammary carcinoma (IMC) is a rare, locally aggressive, highly metastatic tumor that is poorly responsive to treatment. The purposes of this study were to retrospectively evaluate the history, signalment, and clinical signs of dogs with IMC; compare the outcome of affected dogs treated with traditional chemotherapy with those treated with piroxicam; evaluate Cox-2 expression of IMC cells; and correlate Cox-2 expression with outcome based on treatment. Strong cyclooxygenase-2 expression was present in all tumors. Improvement in clinical condition and disease stability was achieved in all dogs treated with piroxicam, with mean and median progression-free survival of 171 and 183 days, respectively. Median survival time of 3 dogs treated with doxorubicin-based protocols was 7 days, which was significantly less than that of dogs treated with piroxicam (median, 185 days). In conclusion, piroxicam should be considered as a single agent for the treatment of dogs with inflammatory mammary carcinoma. PMID:19436636

  2. Brief Report: Reduced Restricted and Repetitive Behaviors after Pivotal Response Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ventola, Pamela E; Yang, Daniel; Abdullahi, Sebiha M; Paisley, Courtney A; Braconnier, Megan L; Sukhodolsky, Denis G

    2016-08-01

    Children with ASD show high frequency of restricted and repetitive behaviors (RRBs); however, higher-order RRBs, such as restricted interests, have remained largely resistant to treatment. This study evaluated change in severity of RRBs following a 16-weeks open trial of Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT). Participants included 15 children with ASD ages 4-7 years. RRBs, as measured by the repetitive behavioral scales-revised (RBS-R) and aberrant behaviors checklist, decreased significantly after treatment. These reductions remained significant after controlling for change in social communication skills. PRT shows promise in reducing RRBs; although PRT explicitly addresses pivotal social communication skills, there is a secondary and less direct effect on RRBs. PMID:27230762

  3. Does Cognition Predict Treatment Response and Remission in Psychotherapy for Late-Life Depression?

    PubMed Central

    Beaudreau, Sherry A.; Rideaux, Tiffany; O'Hara, Ruth; Arean, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To identify cognitive predictors of geriatric depression treatment outcome. Method Older participants completed baseline measures of memory and executive function, health, and baseline and posttreatment Hamilton Depression Scales (HAM-D) in a 12-week trial comparing psychotherapies (problem-solving vs. supportive; n = 46). We examined cognitive predictors to identify treatment responders, i.e., HAM-D scores reduced by ≥50%, and remitters, i.e., posttreatment HAM-D score ≤ 10. Results Empirically-derived decision trees identified poorer performance on switching (i.e. Trails B), with a cut-score of ≥82” predicting psychotherapy responders. No other cognitive or health variables predicted psychotherapy outcomes in the decision trees. Conclusions Psychotherapies that support or improve the executive skill of switching may augment treatment response for older patients exhibiting executive dysfunction in depression. If replicated, Trails B has potential as a brief cognitive tool for clinical decision-making in geriatric depression. PMID:25441055

  4. Laboratory recommendations for scoring deep molecular responses following treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cross, N C P; White, H E; Colomer, D; Ehrencrona, H; Foroni, L; Gottardi, E; Lange, T; Lion, T; Machova Polakova, K; Dulucq, S; Martinelli, G; Oppliger Leibundgut, E; Pallisgaard, N; Barbany, G; Sacha, T; Talmaci, R; Izzo, B; Saglio, G; Pane, F; Müller, M C; Hochhaus, A

    2015-05-01

    Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) with tyrosine kinase inhibitors has advanced to a stage where many patients achieve very low or undetectable levels of disease. Remarkably, some of these patients remain in sustained remission when treatment is withdrawn, suggesting that they may be at least operationally cured of their disease. Accurate definition of deep molecular responses (MRs) is therefore increasingly important for optimal patient management and comparison of independent data sets. We previously published proposals for broad standardized definitions of MR at different levels of sensitivity. Here we present detailed laboratory recommendations, developed as part of the European Treatment and Outcome Study for CML (EUTOS), to enable testing laboratories to score MR in a reproducible manner for CML patients expressing the most common BCR-ABL1 variants. PMID:25652737

  5. Histogram-based classification with Gaussian mixture modeling for GBM tumor treatment response using ADC map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Jing; Kim, Hyun J.; Pope, Whitney B.; Okada, Kazunori; Alger, Jeffery R.; Wang, Yang; Goldin, Jonathan G.; Brown, Matthew S.

    2009-02-01

    This study applied a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) to apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histograms to evaluate glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumor treatment response using diffusion weighted (DW) MR images. ADC mapping, calculated from DW images, has been shown to reveal changes in the tumor's microenvironment preceding morphologic tumor changes. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of features that represent changes from pre- and post-treatment tumor ADC histograms to detect treatment response. The main contribution of this work is to model the ADC histogram as the composition of two components, fitted by GMM with expectation maximization (EM) algorithm. For both pre- and post-treatment scans taken 5-7 weeks apart, we obtained the tumor ADC histogram, calculated the two-component features, as well as the other standard histogram-based features, and applied supervised learning for classification. We evaluated our approach with data from 85 patients with GBM under chemotherapy, in which 33 responded and 52 did not respond based on tumor size reduction. We compared AdaBoost and random forests classification algorithms, using ten-fold cross validation, resulting in a best accuracy of 69.41%.

  6. Evolution of testosterone treatment over 25 years: symptom responses, endocrine profiles and cardiovascular changes

    PubMed Central

    Carruthers, Malcolm; Cathcart, Paul; Feneley, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Testosterone treatment has evolved rapidly over the past 25 years as new, more effective and convenient methods have become available. This study reports experience with seven different methods, introduced on the market in the UK. Aim: To establish the symptom response when testosterone treatment was initiated on the basis of clinical features and symptoms of androgen deficiency, and the resulting endocrine, biochemical and physiological responses. Methods: Of 2693 patients attending the 3 Men’s Health Centers – The UK Androgen Study (UKAS), 2247 were treated. Treatments included pellet implants, oral testosterone undecanoate (Testocaps), mesterolone (Proviron), testosterone gel (Testogel), testosterone scrotal cream (Andromen) and scrotal gel (Tostran). Results: There was no correlation between initial testosterone level, initial symptom score or the success of treatment as defined by adequate resolution of symptoms. Despite the diverse endocrine patterns produced, the testosterone preparations appear equally safe over prolonged periods, with either no change or improvement of cardiovascular risk factors, especially in lowering cholesterol and diastolic blood pressure. Conclusions: It is suggested that because of excessive reliance on laboratory measures of androgens and undue safety concerns, many men who could benefit from symptom relief, improvement in related clinical conditions and given preventive medical benefits remain untreated. PMID:26218766

  7. Biomarkers on patient T cells diagnose active tuberculosis and monitor treatment response

    PubMed Central

    Adekambi, Toidi; Ibegbu, Chris C.; Cagle, Stephanie; Kalokhe, Ameeta S.; Wang, Yun F.; Hu, Yijuan; Day, Cheryl L.; Ray, Susan M.; Rengarajan, Jyothi

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The identification and treatment of individuals with tuberculosis (TB) is a global public health priority. Accurate diagnosis of pulmonary active TB (ATB) disease remains challenging and relies on extensive medical evaluation and detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in the patient’s sputum. Further, the response to treatment is monitored by sputum culture conversion, which takes several weeks for results. Here, we sought to identify blood-based host biomarkers associated with ATB and hypothesized that immune activation markers on Mtb-specific CD4+ T cells would be associated with Mtb load in vivo and could thus provide a gauge of Mtb infection. METHODS. Using polychromatic flow cytometry, we evaluated the expression of immune activation markers on Mtb-specific CD4+ T cells from individuals with asymptomatic latent Mtb infection (LTBI) and ATB as well as from ATB patients undergoing anti-TB treatment. RESULTS. Frequencies of Mtb-specific IFN-γ+CD4+ T cells that expressed immune activation markers CD38 and HLA-DR as well as intracellular proliferation marker Ki-67 were substantially higher in subjects with ATB compared with those with LTBI. These markers accurately classified ATB and LTBI status, with cutoff values of 18%, 60%, and 5% for CD38+IFN-γ+, HLA-DR+IFN-γ+, and Ki-67+IFN-γ+, respectively, with 100% specificity and greater than 96% sensitivity. These markers also distinguished individuals with untreated ATB from those who had successfully completed anti-TB treatment and correlated with decreasing mycobacterial loads during treatment. CONCLUSION. We have identified host blood-based biomarkers on Mtb-specific CD4+ T cells that discriminate between ATB and LTBI and provide a set of tools for monitoring treatment response and cure. TRIAL REGISTRATION. Registration is not required for observational studies. FUNDING. This study was funded by Emory University, the NIH, and the Yerkes National Primate Center. PMID:25822019

  8. Treatment response after repeated administration of C1 esterase inhibitor for successive acute hereditary angioedema attacks.

    PubMed

    Craig, Timothy J; Bewtra, Againdra K; Hurewitz, David; Levy, Robyn; Janss, Gerti; Jacobson, Kraig W; Packer, Flint; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Rojavin, Mikhail A; Machnig, Thomas; Keinecke, Heinz-Otto; Wasserman, Richard L

    2012-01-01

    Placebo-controlled studies established the efficacy of replacement therapy with C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) concentrate for treating single acute hereditary angioedema (HAE) attacks, but only limited data from prospective studies are available on repeated treatment of successive HAE attacks. This study evaluates the association between repeated treatments with 20 U/kg of C1-INH concentrate (Berinert; CSL Behring, Marburg, Germany) for HAE attacks at any body location and treatment response. In a post hoc analysis of an open-label extension study (International Multicenter Prospective Angioedema C1-INH Trial [I.M.P.A.C.T.2]), the association between repeated treatment with C1-INH and times to onset of symptom relief and complete resolution of HAE symptoms was assessed in patients who were treated for at least 15 attacks by linear regression on the ordinal attack number. Eighteen patients received C1-INH concentrate for at least 15 HAE attacks over a mean duration of 34 months. Demographic and baseline characteristics of these patients were similar to those of all patients in the study. The distribution of body locations and the intensity of HAE attacks were similar for each of the first 15 attacks and subsequent attacks. The extent of previous use of C1-INH concentrate had no effect on the time to onset of symptom relief, the time to complete resolution of HAE symptoms, or the time between attacks treated with C1-INH concentrate; the median of individual linear regression coefficients was not statistically significantly different from 0. Treatment with 20 U/kg of C1-INH concentrate provided consistent treatment response in patients treated for multiple successive HAE attacks at any body location. (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00292981). PMID:22856636

  9. The tridimensional personality questionnaire as a predictor of response to nefazodone treatment of depression.

    PubMed

    Nelson, E C; Cloninger, C R

    1995-10-01

    Personality traits have emerged as the strongest identified predictors of response to antidepressant treatment of major depressive disorder (Peselow et al., 1992; Joyce et al., 1994). 18 subjects in the midst of a major depressive episode were treated with nefazodone in an open trial. All subjects completed Cloninger's tridimensional personality questionnaire (TPQ) before beginning treatment. A multiple regression analysis was performed in an attempt to replicate Joyce et al.'s (1994) finding that temperament type, as assessed by the TPQ, is a strong predictor of antidepressant response. A model involving TPQ reward dependence and harm avoidance scores, and their interaction, was found to significantly predict the response to nefazodone (r2 = 0.47, P < 0.027). When response was defined as a 50% decrease in HAM-D score at last visit, high reward dependence score alone significantly separated responders from nonresponders (Fisher's exact P = 0.050, df = 1). These results raise the intriguing possibility that TPQ scores may have direct clinical applications. PMID:8557887

  10. Antihypertensive treatment with verapamil and amlodipine. Their effect on the functional autonomic and cardiovascular stress responses.

    PubMed

    Nazzaro, P; Manzari, M; Merlo, M; Triggiani, R; Scarano, A M; Lasciarrea, A; Pirrelli, A

    1995-09-01

    Many biological and psychological factors induce haemodynamic and extra-cardiovascular functional changes mediated by the autonomic nervous system. Pharmacological blood pressure reduction, as a neurovegetative stimulus, can change the arousal of the sympathetic nervous system. We evaluated the effects of two calcium channel blockers, verapamil and amlodipine, both administered as monotherapies, upon the sympathetic stress response in 23 randomized mild-to-moderate essential hypertensives (161 +/- 2/98 +/- 1 mmHg). Patients performed four stress tests (mental arithmetic, colour word Stroop, cold pressor and handgrip) while extracardiovascular and haemodynamic functions were assessed non-invasively at every heart beat, during baseline, stress and recovery phases. The sympathetic response was evaluated by computing the 'area-under-the-curve' (value x time) measured during the psychophysiological session. The session was repeated at run-in, after placebo and during treatment. After one month's treatment, baseline blood pressure was significantly reduced in patients treated with amlodipine (139 +/- 1/84 +/- 1 mmHg; P < 0.001) and verapamil (140 +/- 2/85 +/- 1 mmHg; P < 0.001). The emotional arousal (frontalis muscular contraction, skin conductance) was unchanged, but the cutaneous vascular response was reduced (P < 0.05) in patients treated with verapamil. No changes in systolic or diastolic blood pressure were detectable, but amlodipine increased the heart rate response (P < 0.05). In contrast, verapamil reduced the heart rate (P < 0.05) without depressing the cardiac output response, which was increased with amlodipine (P < 0.05). Total vascular resistance was significantly (P < 0.001) reduced with both the treatments. Consequently, functional cardiac load, expressed by pressure-rate product and cardiac power, was significantly enhanced with amlodipine and reduced with verapamil. In conclusion, the abnormal sympathetic stress response, which characterizes the

  11. FERTILITY TREATMENT RESPONSE: IS IT BETTER TO BE MORE OPTIMISTIC OR LESS PESSIMISTIC?

    PubMed Central

    Bleil, Maria E.; Pasch, Lauri A.; Gregorich, Steven E.; Millstein, Susan G.; Katz, Patricia P.; Adler, Nancy E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the prospective relation between dispositional traits of optimism and pessimism and IVF treatment failure among women seeking medical intervention for infertility. Methods Among 198 women (ages 24-45, M=35.1[4.1]; 77% white), the outcome of each participant’s first IVF treatment cycle was examined. Treatment outcome was classified as being successful (vs. failed) if the woman either delivered a baby or was pregnant as a result of the cycle by the end of the 18-month study period. At baseline, optimism and pessimism were measured as a single bipolar dimension and as separate unipolar dimensions according to the Life Orientation Test (LOT) total score and the optimism and pessimism subscale scores, respectively. Results Optimism/pessimism, measured as a single bipolar dimension, predicted IVF treatment failure initially (B = -.09; p = .02; OR = 0.917; 95% CI = 0.851 – 0.988), but this association attenuated following statistical control for trait negative affect (B = -.06; p = .13; OR = 0.938; 95% CI = 0.863 – 1.020). When examined as separate unipolar dimensions, pessimism (B = .14; p = .04; OR = 1.146; 95% CI = 1.008 – 1.303), but not optimism (B = -.09; p = .12; OR = 0.912; 95% CI = 0.813 – 1.023), predicted IVF treatment failure independently of risk factors for poor IVF treatment response as well as trait negative affect. Conclusions Being pessimistic may be a risk factor for IVF treatment failure. Future research should attempt to delineate the biological and behavioral mechanisms by which pessimism may negatively affect treatment outcomes. PMID:22286845

  12. Extended treatment of charge response kernel comprising the density functional theory and charge regulation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Tateki; Morita, Akihiro

    2006-08-01

    We propose an extended treatment of the charge response kernel (CRK), (∂Qa/∂Vb), which describes the response of partial charges on atomic sites to external electrostatic potential, on the basis of the density functional theory (DFT) via the coupled perturbed Kohn-Sham equations. The present CRK theory incorporates regulation procedures in the definition of partial charges to avoid unphysical large fluctuation of the CRK on "buried" sites. The CRKs of some alcohol and organic molecules, methanol, ethanol, propanol, butanol, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), and tetrahydrofuran (THF) were calculated, demonstrating that the new CRK model at the DFT level has greatly improved the performance of accuracy in comparison with that at the Hartree-Fock level previously proposed. The CRK model was also applied to investigate spatial nonlocality of the charge response through alkyl chain sequences. The CRK model at the DFT level enables us to construct a nonempirical strategy for polarizable molecular modeling, with practical reliability and robustness.

  13. Response of autochthonous microbiota of diesel polluted soils to land-farming treatments.

    PubMed

    Silva-Castro, Gloria Andrea; Uad, Imane; Rodríguez-Calvo, Alfonso; González-López, Jesús; Calvo, Concepción

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the response of autochthonous microorganisms of diesel polluted soils to land-farming treatments. Inorganic NPK (nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium) fertilizer and Ivey surfactant were applied alone or in combination as biostimulating agents. The study was carried out in experimental separated land-farming plots performed with two soils: a sandy clay soil with low biological activity and a sandy clay soil with higher biological activity, contaminated with two concentrations of diesel: 10,000 and 20,000mgkg(-1). Bacterial growth, dehydrogenase activity and CO2 production were the biological parameters evaluated. Non-metric multidimensional scaling analysis proved that moisture content showed a tendency related to microbial growth and that heterotrophic and degrading microorganisms had the best relationship. Initial biological activity of soil influenced the response with 11.1% of variability attributed to this parameter. Soils with low activity had higher degree of response to nutrient addition. PMID:25486545

  14. Immunity after treatment of human schistosomiasis: association between cellular responses and resistance to reinfection.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, M; Butterworth, A E; Kimani, G; Kamau, T; Fulford, A J; Dunne, D W; Ouma, J H; Sturrock, R F

    1993-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the development of an age-dependent resistance to reinfection after chemotherapeutic cure of the helminthic parasite Schistosoma mansoni. Here we report on a longitudinal investigation of cell-mediated responses in infected individuals before and after treatment which was designed to outline those parameters important in mediating a protective response. A well-defined study group of 89 individuals with an age range of 9 to 35 years was selected from an area of high S. mansoni transmission in the Machakos district of Kenya. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation and cytokine production (interleukin-2 [IL-2], gamma interferon IL-5, IL-4, and tumor necrosis factor) in response to different crude life cycle-stage antigens of S. mansoni were assessed longitudinally in vitro before, 3 months after, and 1 year after treatment. Detailed statistical analyses of the results from this study have indicated a clear negative association between the proliferative responses to adult- and schistosomulum-stage antigens and subsequent reinfection intensity in older individuals (14 to 35 years) which was not present in the younger individuals (9 to 13 years). This association was significant even after the effects of age, sex, and exposure had been accounted for in multiple regression analyses. Cytokines were detected predominantly in response to adult worm and egg antigen extracts. An inverse association between the two cytokines gamma interferon and IL-5 was detected in response to all antigens at the three time points investigated, indicating cross-regulation in the production of these two mediators. Differences in antigen-specific cytokine levels between the two age groups were detected, with significantly higher IL-5 levels detected in the older (more resistant) age group. An inverse correlation between this cytokine and reinfection was detected but could not be dissociated from the effects of age and exposure in multiple regression

  15. Reduction of leukocyte count is associated with thalidomide response in treatment of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shang-Yi; Tang, Jih-Luh; Yao, Ming; Ko, Bo-Sheng; Hong, Ruey-Long; Tsai, Woei; Wang, Chiu-Hwa; Tien, Hwei-Fang; Shen, Ming-Ching; Chen, Yao-Chang

    2003-09-01

    Fifty Taiwanese patients with relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma (MM) were treated with thalidomide on a dose-escalation schedule, commencing with 100 mg/d nightly and incremented either to the maximally tolerated dose or 800 mg/d. Twenty-two patients (44%) responded, with 10 (45.5%) classified as partial remission and 12 (54.5%) minimal response (MR). Complete response did not occur. Of the 28 non-responders, 14 were progressive disease and 14 stable. The median time from commencement of thalidomide treatment to initial achievement of MR was 29 days (range, 8~155), and the corresponding thalidomide dose was 200 mg/d (range, 100~500). The median tolerated dose of thalidomide for the entire sample was 400 mg/d (range, 100~800), with only two (4%) able to tolerate 800 mg/d. Comparing responsive and non-responsive patients, statistically significant differences were not demonstrated for any characteristics except for CRP level and percentage cytogenetic change, which was slightly higher in the latter group relative to the former. Of particular interest, 18 of the 22 responders experienced transient reduction of leukocyte count preceding the attainment of significant reduction in M-proteins in comparison to only four of the 28 non-responders (82% vs. 14%; p<0.001). The median time from commencement of thalidomide treatment to attainment of minimal leukocyte count was 28 days (range, 7~150), with a mean of 2.19x10(9)/l (range, 0.96~3.35x10(9)/l). Leukopenia was generally transient, with rapid recovery despite subsequent continuation of thalidomide. Levels of other non-hematologically adverse effects attributed solely to thalidomide were generally acceptable. For 25 patients, thalidomide treatment was supplemented with low-dose dexamethasone (4 mg, every other day). Of these, 11 had relapsed from and 14 were primarily refractory to thalidomide treatment. Nine of the 25 dexamethasone-supplemented patients were responders (36%). Of particular note were the unusual

  16. Methods to assess the biodistribution of radiolabelled somatostatin analogues and treatment response of neuroendocrine tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanasegaran, Gopinath

    Introduction: During the past decade, proof of the principle that somatostatin receptors can be successfully used for in vivo targeting of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) has been provided. These tumours are imaged with 111Indium-pentetreotide and treated with 90Yttrium labeled somatostatin analogues. The aim of this study was to assess (a) the biodistribution and residency of 90Y labelled agents using the brehmsstrahlung imaging technique (b) the tumour response to various treatment modalities using a simplified scintigraphic method [Functional SPECT tumour volume (STV)]. Material and methods: 1) 19 patients with NETs were imaged with 111In-pentetreotide and 14 of them underwent treatment with 90Y-lanreotide. The rest underwent treatment with 90Y-SMT. All the patients were imaged 24 hours post-therapy. Brehmsstrahlung images obtained post therapies were used to assess the 90Y-lanreotide biodistribution in 14 patients and the 5 patients treated with 90Y-SMT, comparing them with 111In-pentetreotide. 2) In 42 patients with NETs a retrospective analysis was performed of the 111In-pentetreotide imaging and CT scan in patients treated with different therapies. A simplified scintigraphic method using 111In-pentetreotide SPECT liver imaging was used to monitor changes in tumour response and to determine how this correlates with CT scan and clinical response. Results: 1) 90Y-lanreotide and 90Y-SMT (with amino acids) have much lower uptake in the kidney (p 0.000 and 0.041 respectively) than 111In-pentetreotide. G Gnanasegaran MD 2 2) 22/42 patients had a good clinical response. A mean fall in total functional STV of 37% was seen in patients with symptomatic relief and a mean increase of 72 % was seen in patients with no symptomatic relief STV predicted the clinical outcome in 34 patients (81%) and CT predicted the outcome in 21 (50%) patients. Conclusion: There was a difference in biodistribution between 111In-pentetreotide and 90Y-lanreotide/ 90Y-SMT, especially in the

  17. Autoimmune response in MRL+/+ mice following treatment with dichloroacetyl chloride or dichloroacetic anhydride

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Ping; Koenig, Rolf; Khan, M. Firoze; Qiu, Suimin; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.; Ansari, G.A.S. . E-mail: sansari@utmb.edu

    2006-10-15

    Dichloroacetyl chloride (DCAC) is formed from trichloroethene (TCE), which is implicated in inducing/accelerating autoimmune response. Due to its potent acylating activity, DCAC may convert proteins to neo-antigens and thus could induce autoimmune responses. Dichloroacetic anhydride (DCAA), which is a similar acylating agent, might also induce autoimmune responses. To evaluate if chloroacylation plays a role in the induction of autoimmunity, we have measured the autoimmune responses following treatment with DCAC or DCAA in autoimmune-prone MRL+/+ mice. Five-week-old female mice were injected intraperitoneally (twice weekly) with 0.2 mmol/kg of DCAC or DCAA in corn oil for 6 weeks. Total serum IgG, IgG1, and IgE levels were significantly increased in DCAC-treated mice as compared to controls. These increases corresponded with increases in DCAC-specific IgG and IgG1 levels. Total serum IgM was decreased in both DCAC- and DCAA-treated mice. Antinuclear antibodies, measured as an indication of systemic autoimmune responses, were increased in both DCAC- and DCAA-treated mice. Of eight Th1/Th2 cytokines measured in the serum, only IL-5 was significantly decreased in both treatment groups. The cytokine secretion patterns of splenic lymphocytes after stimulation with antibodies against CD3 (T cell receptor-mediated signal) and CD28 (costimulatory signal) differed between treatment and control groups. Levels of IL-1, IL-3, IL-6, IFN-{gamma}, G-CSF, and KC were higher in cultures of stimulated splenocytes from either DCAC- or DCAA-treated mice than from controls. The level of IL-17 was only increased in cultures from DCAC-treated mice. Increased lymphocytic populations were found in the red pulp of spleens following treatment with either DCAC or DCAA. In addition, thickening of the alveolar septa in the lungs of DCAC- or DCAA-treated mice was observed. The lung histopathology in exposed mice was consistent with the symptomology observed in welders exposed to DCAC

  18. A local experience of treatment response in chronic hepatitis C infection.

    PubMed

    Bijani, Behzad; Ghanei, Laleh; Kazemifar, Amir Mohammad

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus infection is the major cause of liver cirrhosis. Antiviral treatment can achieve persistent viral clearance to prevent long-term complications of the disease. Despite the introduction of direct acting antivirals (DAAs) as effective therapy in recent years, the standard regimen consisting of interferon and ribavirin which are more accessible and inexpensive is still widely prescribed for the majority of worldwide hepatitis C patients in developing countries. The present study was conducted to demonstrate a local experience of treatment response (with combination therapy; interferon and ribavirin) and outcome in patients with chronic hepatitis C infection. In all, 107 patients from a referral centre for infectious diseases participated in the study from 2007 to 2012. They were evaluated for demographic characteristics, the disease, the presence of metabolic syndrome and its sub-scores, and lab characteristics. The resulting data were analysed with paired T-test, chi-square test, Fisher exact test and logistic regression, according to relevance. The virus eradication rate was 72.9% and 72% at the end of treatment and 6 months later, respectively. Of the patients with HCV chronic hepatitis, 27.96% had concomitant metabolic syndrome. There were statistically significant relationships between response to the treatment and the patient's age and gender, the genotype of the virus, presence of metabolic syndrome, waist circumference, BMI, viral load prior to the treatment and blood pressure (systolic and diastolic). Presence of metabolic syndrome (OR: 20.69, CI: 2.83-151.34, P=0.003) and the genotype of the virus (OR: 6.64, CI: (1.48-29.72), P=0.013) were independent risk factors of failure to achieve sustained virologic response in treatment of chronic hepatitis C with interferon and ribavirin in multivariate logistic regression analysis. According to the current study, HCV infection should be considered a metabolic disease, further to a viral infection

  19. Ictal adipokines are associated with pain severity and treatment response in episodic migraine

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Nu Cindy; Gelaye, Bizu; Tietjen, Gretchen E.; Dash, Paul D.; Gower, Barbara A.; White, Linda W.; Ward, Thomas N.; Scher, Ann I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate ictal adipokine levels in episodic migraineurs and their association with pain severity and treatment response. Methods: This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial evaluating peripheral blood specimens from episodic migraineurs at acute pain onset and 30 to 120 minutes after treatment with sumatriptan/naproxen sodium vs placebo. Total adiponectin (T-ADP), ADP multimers (high molecular weight [HMW], middle molecular weight, and low molecular weight [LMW]), leptin, and resistin levels were evaluated by immunoassays. Results: Thirty-four participants (17 responders, 17 nonresponders) were included. In all participants, pretreatment pain severity increased with every quartile increase in both the HMW:T-ADP ratio (coefficient of variation [CV] 0.51; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.08, 0.93; p = 0.019) and resistin levels (CV 0.58; 95% CI: 0.21, 0.96; p = 0.002), but was not associated with quartile changes in leptin levels. In responders, T-ADP (CV −0.98; 95% CI: −1.88, −0.08; p = 0.031) and resistin (CV −0.95; 95% CI: −1.83, −0.07; p = 0.034) levels decreased 120 minutes after treatment as compared with pretreatment. In addition, in responders, the HMW:T-ADP ratio (CV −0.04; 95% CI: −0.07, −0.01; p = 0.041) decreased and the LMW:T-ADP ratio (CV 0.04; 95% CI: 0.01, 0.07; p = 0.043) increased at 120 minutes after treatment. In nonresponders, the LMW:T-ADP ratio (CV −0.04; 95% CI: −0.07, −0.01; p = 0.018) decreased 120 minutes after treatment. Leptin was not associated with treatment response. Conclusions: Both pretreatment migraine pain severity and treatment response are associated with changes in adipokine levels. Adipokines represent potential novel migraine biomarkers and drug targets. PMID:25746563

  20. Predicting breast tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy with Diffuse Optical Spectroscopic Tomography prior to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shudong; Pogue, Brian W.; Kaufman, Peter A.; Gui, Jiang; Jermyn, Michael; Frazee, Tracy E.; Poplack, Steven P.; DiFlorio-Alexander, Roberta; Wells, Wendy A.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Determine if pre-treatment biomarkers obtained from Diffuse Optical Spectroscopic Tomographic (DOST) imaging predict breast tumor response to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy (NAC), which would have value to potentially eliminate delays in prescribing definitive local regional therapy that may occur from a standard complete 6–8 months course of NAC. Experimental design Nineteen patients undergoing NAC were imaged with DOST before, during and after treatment. The DOST images of total hemoglobin concentration (HbT), tissue oxygen saturation (StO2), and water (H2O) fraction at different time points have been used for testing the abilities of differentiating patients having pathologic complete response (pCR) vs. pathologic incomplete response (pIR). Results Significant differences (P-value<0.001, AUC=1.0) were found between pCR patients vs. pIR in outcome, based on the percentage change in tumor HbT within the first cycle of treatment. In addition, pre-treatment tumor HbT (Pre-TxHbT) relative to the contralateral breast was statistically significant (p-value=0.01, AUC=0.92) in differentiating pCR from pIR. Conclusions This is the first clinical evidence that DOST HbT may differentiate the two groups with predictive significance based on data acquired before NAC even begins. The study also demonstrates the potential of accelerating the validation of optimal NAC regimens through future randomized clinical trials by reducing the number of patients required and the length of time they need to be followed by using a validated imaging surrogate as an outcome measure. PMID:25294916

  1. Evaluation of chemotherapy response in ovarian cancer treatment using quantitative CT image biomarkers: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yuchen; Tan, Maxine; McMeekin, Scott; Thai, Theresa; Moore, Kathleen; Ding, Kai; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify and apply quantitative image biomarkers for early prediction of the tumor response to the chemotherapy among the ovarian cancer patients participated in the clinical trials of testing new drugs. In the experiment, we retrospectively selected 30 cases from the patients who participated in Phase I clinical trials of new drug or drug agents for ovarian cancer treatment. Each case is composed of two sets of CT images acquired pre- and post-treatment (4-6 weeks after starting treatment). A computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme was developed to extract and analyze the quantitative image features of the metastatic tumors previously tracked by the radiologists using the standard Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) guideline. The CAD scheme first segmented 3-D tumor volumes from the background using a hybrid tumor segmentation scheme. Then, for each segmented tumor, CAD computed three quantitative image features including the change of tumor volume, tumor CT number (density) and density variance. The feature changes were calculated between the matched tumors tracked on the CT images acquired pre- and post-treatments. Finally, CAD predicted patient's 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) using a decision-tree based classifier. The performance of the CAD scheme was compared with the RECIST category. The result shows that the CAD scheme achieved a prediction accuracy of 76.7% (23/30 cases) with a Kappa coefficient of 0.493, which is significantly higher than the performance of RECIST prediction with a prediction accuracy and Kappa coefficient of 60% (17/30) and 0.062, respectively. This study demonstrated the feasibility of analyzing quantitative image features to improve the early predicting accuracy of the tumor response to the new testing drugs or therapeutic methods for the ovarian cancer patients.

  2. Crowdsourced assessment of common genetic contribution to predicting anti-TNF treatment response in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sieberts, Solveig K; Zhu, Fan; García-García, Javier; Stahl, Eli; Pratap, Abhishek; Pandey, Gaurav; Pappas, Dimitrios; Aguilar, Daniel; Anton, Bernat; Bonet, Jaume; Eksi, Ridvan; Fornés, Oriol; Guney, Emre; Li, Hongdong; Marín, Manuel Alejandro; Panwar, Bharat; Planas-Iglesias, Joan; Poglayen, Daniel; Cui, Jing; Falcao, Andre O; Suver, Christine; Hoff, Bruce; Balagurusamy, Venkat S K; Dillenberger, Donna; Neto, Elias Chaibub; Norman, Thea; Aittokallio, Tero; Ammad-Ud-Din, Muhammad; Azencott, Chloe-Agathe; Bellón, Víctor; Boeva, Valentina; Bunte, Kerstin; Chheda, Himanshu; Cheng, Lu; Corander, Jukka; Dumontier, Michel; Goldenberg, Anna; Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti; Hajiloo, Mohsen; Hidru, Daniel; Jaiswal, Alok; Kaski, Samuel; Khalfaoui, Beyrem; Khan, Suleiman Ali; Kramer, Eric R; Marttinen, Pekka; Mezlini, Aziz M; Molparia, Bhuvan; Pirinen, Matti; Saarela, Janna; Samwald, Matthias; Stoven, Véronique; Tang, Hao; Tang, Jing; Torkamani, Ali; Vert, Jean-Phillipe; Wang, Bo; Wang, Tao; Wennerberg, Krister; Wineinger, Nathan E; Xiao, Guanghua; Xie, Yang; Yeung, Rae; Zhan, Xiaowei; Zhao, Cheng; Greenberg, Jeff; Kremer, Joel; Michaud, Kaleb; Barton, Anne; Coenen, Marieke; Mariette, Xavier; Miceli, Corinne; Shadick, Nancy; Weinblatt, Michael; de Vries, Niek; Tak, Paul P; Gerlag, Danielle; Huizinga, Tom W J; Kurreeman, Fina; Allaart, Cornelia F; Louis Bridges, S; Criswell, Lindsey; Moreland, Larry; Klareskog, Lars; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K; Friend, Stephen; Plenge, Robert; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Oliva, Baldo; Guan, Yuanfang; Mangravite, Lara M; Bridges, S Louis; Criswell, Lindsey; Moreland, Larry; Klareskog, Lars; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K; Friend, Stephen; Plenge, Robert; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Oliva, Baldo; Guan, Yuanfang; Mangravite, Lara M

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects millions world-wide. While anti-TNF treatment is widely used to reduce disease progression, treatment fails in ∼one-third of patients. No biomarker currently exists that identifies non-responders before treatment. A rigorous community-based assessment of the utility of SNP data for predicting anti-TNF treatment efficacy in RA patients was performed in the context of a DREAM Challenge (http://www.synapse.org/RA_Challenge). An open challenge framework enabled the comparative evaluation of predictions developed by 73 research groups using the most comprehensive available data and covering a wide range of state-of-the-art modelling methodologies. Despite a significant genetic heritability estimate of treatment non-response trait (h(2)=0.18, P value=0.02), no significant genetic contribution to prediction accuracy is observed. Results formally confirm the expectations of the rheumatology community that SNP information does not significantly improve predictive performance relative to standard clinical traits, thereby justifying a refocusing of future efforts on collection of other data. PMID:27549343

  3. Substance Abuse Treatment, HIV/AIDS, and the Continuum of Response for People Who Inject Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Kresina, Thomas F.; Lubran, Robert; Clark, H. Westley; Cheever, Laura W.

    2012-01-01

    The continuum of response (CoR) to HIV/AIDS is a framework for implementation of HIV prevention, care, and treatment programs based on a national strategic plan for HIV/AIDS services. The CoR for people who inject drugs (PWID) is an important extension of the developed CoR to HIV/AIDS. The CoR-PWID employs stakeholders who together plan, develop, pilot, and provide a full range of services that address the various prevention, care/support, and treatment needs of people, families, and communities infected or affected by HIV/AIDS and injection drug use. The CoR-PWID comprises a broad range of services that include but are not limited to the World Health Organization priority interventions for HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment, and care in the health sector and the package of essential interventions for the prevention, treatment, and care of HIV for people who inject drugs. Implementation of these well-defined, essential prevention, care/support, and treatment services, in addition to locally defined needed services, in a coordinated fashion is important to clients, their families, and communities. The CoR-PWID is, therefore, a necessary framework essential for service development for countries that address HIV/AIDS in populations of PWID. PMID:23243517

  4. The Responsive Amygdala: Treatment-induced Alterations in Functional Connectivity in Pediatric Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Simons, LE; Pielech, M; Erpelding, N; Linnman, C; Moulton, E; Sava, S; Lebel, A; Serrano, P; Sethna, N; Berde, C; Becerra, L; Borsook, D

    2014-01-01

    The amygdala is a key brain region with efferent and afferent neural connections that involve complex behaviors such as pain, reward, fear and anxiety. This study evaluated resting state functional connectivity of the amygdala with cortical and subcortical regions in a group of chronic pain patients (pediatric complex regional pain syndrome) with age-gender matched controls before and after intensive physical-biobehavioral pain treatment. Our main findings include (1) enhanced functional connectivity from the amygdala to multiple cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar regions in patients compared to controls, with differences predominantly in the left amygdala in the pre-treated condition (disease state); (2) dampened hyperconnectivity from the left amygdala to the motor cortex, parietal lobe, and cingulate cortex after intensive pain rehabilitation treatment within patients with nominal differences observed among healthy controls from Time 1 to Time 2 (treatment effects); (3) functional connectivity to several regions key to fear circuitry (prefrontal cortex, bilateral middle temporal lobe, bilateral cingulate, hippocampus) correlated with higher pain-related fear scores and (4) decreases in pain-related fear associated with decreased connectivity between the amygdala and the motor and somatosensory cortex, cingulate, and frontal areas. Our data suggest that there are rapid changes in amygdala connectivity following an aggressive treatment program in children with chronic pain and intrinsic amygdala functional connectivity activity serving as a potential indicator of treatment response. PMID:24861582

  5. Serum Strongylus vulgaris-specific antibody responses to anthelmintic treatment in naturally infected horses.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Martin K; Vidyashankar, Anand N; Bellaw, Jennifer; Gravatte, Holli S; Cao, Xin; Rubinson, Emily F; Reinemeyer, Craig R

    2015-02-01

    Strongylus vulgaris is the most pathogenic helminth parasite of horses, causing verminous endarteritis with thromboembolism and infarction. A serum enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has been validated for detection of antibodies to an antigen produced by migrating larvae of this parasite. The aim was to evaluate ELISA responses to anthelmintic treatment in cohorts of naturally infected horses. Fifteen healthy horses harboring patent S. vulgaris infections were turned out for communal grazing in May 2013 (day 0). On day 55, horses were ranked according to ELISA titers and randomly allocated to the following three groups: no treatment followed by placebo pellets daily; ivermectin on day 60 followed by placebo pellets daily; or ivermectin on day 60 followed by daily pyrantel tartrate. Fecal and serum samples were collected at ∼28-day intervals until study termination on day 231. Increased ELISA values were observed for the first 53 days following ivermectin treatment. Titers were significantly reduced 80 days after ivermectin treatment. Horses receiving daily pyrantel tartrate maintained lower ELISA values from 137 days post ivermectin treatment until trial termination. These results illustrate that a positive ELISA result is indicative of either current or prior exposure to larval S. vulgaris infection within the previous 5 months. PMID:25358238

  6. Liquid biopsy and therapeutic response: Circulating tumor cell cultures for evaluation of anticancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Khoo, Bee Luan; Grenci, Gianluca; Jing, Tengyang; Lim, Ying Bena; Lee, Soo Chin; Thiery, Jean Paul; Han, Jongyoon; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-01-01

    The lack of a robust anticancer drug screening system to monitor patients during treatment delays realization of personalized treatment. We demonstrate an efficient approach to evaluate drug response using patient-derived circulating tumor cell (CTC) cultures obtained from liquid biopsy. Custom microfabricated tapered microwells were integrated with microfluidics to allow robust formation of CTC clusters without pre-enrichment and subsequent drug screening in situ. Rapid feedback after 2 weeks promotes immediate intervention upon detection of drug resistance or tolerance. The procedure was clinically validated with blood samples (n = 73) from 55 patients with early-stage, newly diagnosed, locally advanced, or refractory metastatic breast cancer. Twenty-four of these samples were used for drug evaluation. Cluster formation potential correlated inversely with increased drug concentration and therapeutic treatment. This new and robust liquid biopsy technique can potentially evaluate patient prognosis with CTC clusters during treatment and provide a noninvasive and inexpensive assessment that can guide drug discovery development or therapeutic choices for personalized treatment. PMID:27453941

  7. Dendritic cell vaccination for glioblastoma multiforme: review with focus on predictive factors for treatment response

    PubMed Central

    Dejaegher, Joost; Van Gool, Stefaan; De Vleeschouwer, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and most aggressive type of primary brain cancer. Since median overall survival with multimodal standard therapy is only 15 months, there is a clear need for additional effective and long-lasting treatments. Dendritic cell (DC) vaccination is an experimental immunotherapy being tested in several Phase I and Phase II clinical trials. In these trials, safety and feasibility have been proven, and promising clinical results have been reported. On the other hand, it is becoming clear that not every GBM patient will benefit from this highly personalized treatment. Defining the subgroup of patients likely to respond to DC vaccination will position this option correctly amongst other new GBM treatment modalities, and pave the way to incorporation in standard therapy. This review provides an overview of GBM treatment options and focuses on the currently known prognostic and predictive factors for response to DC vaccination. In this way, it will provide the clinician with the theoretical background to refer patients who might benefit from this treatment.

  8. Crowdsourced assessment of common genetic contribution to predicting anti-TNF treatment response in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sieberts, Solveig K.; Zhu, Fan; García-García, Javier; Stahl, Eli; Pratap, Abhishek; Pandey, Gaurav; Pappas, Dimitrios; Aguilar, Daniel; Anton, Bernat; Bonet, Jaume; Eksi, Ridvan; Fornés, Oriol; Guney, Emre; Li, Hongdong; Marín, Manuel Alejandro; Panwar, Bharat; Planas-Iglesias, Joan; Poglayen, Daniel; Cui, Jing; Falcao, Andre O.; Suver, Christine; Hoff, Bruce; Balagurusamy, Venkat S. K.; Dillenberger, Donna; Neto, Elias Chaibub; Norman, Thea; Aittokallio, Tero; Ammad-ud-din, Muhammad; Azencott, Chloe-Agathe; Bellón, Víctor; Boeva, Valentina; Bunte, Kerstin; Chheda, Himanshu; Cheng, Lu; Corander, Jukka; Dumontier, Michel; Goldenberg, Anna; Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti; Hajiloo, Mohsen; Hidru, Daniel; Jaiswal, Alok; Kaski, Samuel; Khalfaoui, Beyrem; Khan, Suleiman Ali; Kramer, Eric R.; Marttinen, Pekka; Mezlini, Aziz M.; Molparia, Bhuvan; Pirinen, Matti; Saarela, Janna; Samwald, Matthias; Stoven, Véronique; Tang, Hao; Tang, Jing; Torkamani, Ali; Vert, Jean-Phillipe; Wang, Bo; Wang, Tao; Wennerberg, Krister; Wineinger, Nathan E.; Xiao, Guanghua; Xie, Yang; Yeung, Rae; Zhan, Xiaowei; Zhao, Cheng; Calaza, Manuel; Elmarakeby, Haitham; Heath, Lenwood S.; Long, Quan; Moore, Jonathan D.; Opiyo, Stephen Obol; Savage, Richard S.; Zhu, Jun; Greenberg, Jeff; Kremer, Joel; Michaud, Kaleb; Barton, Anne; Coenen, Marieke; Mariette, Xavier; Miceli, Corinne; Shadick, Nancy; Weinblatt, Michael; de Vries, Niek; Tak, Paul P.; Gerlag, Danielle; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Kurreeman, Fina; Allaart, Cornelia F.; Louis Bridges Jr., S.; Criswell, Lindsey; Moreland, Larry; Klareskog, Lars; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K.; Friend, Stephen; Plenge, Robert; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Oliva, Baldo; Guan, Yuanfang; Mangravite, Lara M.; Bridges, S. Louis; Criswell, Lindsey; Moreland, Larry; Klareskog, Lars; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K.; Friend, Stephen; Plenge, Robert; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Oliva, Baldo; Guan, Yuanfang; Mangravite, Lara M.

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects millions world-wide. While anti-TNF treatment is widely used to reduce disease progression, treatment fails in ∼one-third of patients. No biomarker currently exists that identifies non-responders before treatment. A rigorous community-based assessment of the utility of SNP data for predicting anti-TNF treatment efficacy in RA patients was performed in the context of a DREAM Challenge (http://www.synapse.org/RA_Challenge). An open challenge framework enabled the comparative evaluation of predictions developed by 73 research groups using the most comprehensive available data and covering a wide range of state-of-the-art modelling methodologies. Despite a significant genetic heritability estimate of treatment non-response trait (h2=0.18, P value=0.02), no significant genetic contribution to prediction accuracy is observed. Results formally confirm the expectations of the rheumatology community that SNP information does not significantly improve predictive performance relative to standard clinical traits, thereby justifying a refocusing of future efforts on collection of other data. PMID:27549343

  9. The responsive amygdala: treatment-induced alterations in functional connectivity in pediatric complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Simons, L E; Pielech, M; Erpelding, N; Linnman, C; Moulton, E; Sava, S; Lebel, A; Serrano, P; Sethna, N; Berde, C; Becerra, L; Borsook, D

    2014-09-01

    The amygdala is a key brain region with efferent and afferent neural connections that involve complex behaviors such as pain, reward, fear, and anxiety. This study evaluated resting state functional connectivity of the amygdala with cortical and subcortical regions in a group of chronic pain patients (pediatric complex regional pain syndrome) with age-sex matched control subjects before and after intensive physical-biobehavioral pain treatment. Our main findings include (1) enhanced functional connectivity from the amygdala to multiple cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar regions in patients compared with control subjects, with differences predominantly in the left amygdala in the pretreated condition (disease state); (2) dampened hyperconnectivity from the left amygdala to the motor cortex, parietal lobe, and cingulate cortex after intensive pain rehabilitation treatment within patients with nominal differences observed among healthy control subjects from time 1 to time 2 (treatment effects); (3) functional connectivity to several regions key to fear circuitry (prefrontal cortex, bilateral middle temporal lobe, bilateral cingulate, hippocampus) correlated with higher pain-related fear scores; and (4) decreases in pain-related fear associated with decreased connectivity between the amygdala and the motor and somatosensory cortex, cingulate, and frontal areas. Our data suggest that there are rapid changes in amygdala connectivity after an aggressive treatment program in children with chronic pain and intrinsic amygdala functional connectivity activity serving as a potential indicator of treatment response. PMID:24861582

  10. Malignant gliomas: current perspectives in diagnosis, treatment, and early response assessment using advanced quantitative imaging methods

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Rafay; Oborski, Matthew J; Hwang, Misun; Lieberman, Frank S; Mountz, James M

    2014-01-01

    Malignant gliomas consist of glioblastomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, anaplastic oligodendrogliomas and anaplastic oligoastrocytomas, and some less common tumors such as anaplastic ependymomas and anaplastic gangliogliomas. Malignant gliomas have high morbidity and mortality. Even with optimal treatment, median survival is only 12–15 months for glioblastomas and 2–5 years for anaplastic gliomas. However, recent advances in imaging and quantitative analysis of image data have led to earlier diagnosis of tumors and tumor response to therapy, providing oncologists with a greater time window for therapy management. In addition, improved understanding of tumor biology, genetics, and resistance mechanisms has enhanced surgical techniques, chemotherapy methods, and radiotherapy administration. After proper diagnosis and institution of appropriate therapy, there is now a vital need for quantitative methods that can sensitively detect malignant glioma response to therapy at early follow-up times, when changes in management of nonresponders can have its greatest effect. Currently, response is largely evaluated by measuring magnetic resonance contrast and size change, but this approach does not take into account the key biologic steps that precede tumor size reduction. Molecular imaging is ideally suited to measuring early response by quantifying cellular metabolism, proliferation, and apoptosis, activities altered early in treatment. We expect that successful integration of quantitative imaging biomarker assessment into the early phase of clinical trials could provide a novel approach for testing new therapies, and importantly, for facilitating patient management, sparing patients from weeks or months of toxicity and ineffective treatment. This review will present an overview of epidemiology, molecular pathogenesis and current advances in diagnoses, and management of malignant gliomas. PMID:24711712

  11. Aptamer-based Proteomic Signature of Intensive Phase Treatment Response in Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Nahid, Payam; Bliven-Sizemore, Erin; Jarlsberg, Leah G.; Mary, A; Groote, De; Johnson, John L.; Muzanyi, Grace; Engle, Melissa; Weiner, Marc; Janjic, Nebojsa; Sterling, David G.; Ochsner, Urs A.

    2014-01-01

    Background New drug regimens of greater efficacy and shorter duration are needed for tuberculosis (TB) treatment. The identification of accurate, quantitative, non-culture based markers of treatment response would improve the efficiency of Phase 2 TB drug testing. Methods In an unbiased biomarker discovery approach, we applied a highly multiplexed, aptamer-based, proteomic technology to analyze serum samples collected at baseline and after 8 weeks of treatment from 39 patients with pulmonary TB from Kampala, Uganda enrolled in a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) TB Trials Consortium Phase 2B treatment trial. Results We identified protein expression differences associated with 8-week culture status, including Coagulation Factor V, SAA, XPNPEP1, PSME1, IL-11 Rα, HSP70, Galectin-8, α2-Antiplasmin, ECM1, YES, IGFBP-1, CATZ, BGN, LYNB, and IL-7. Markers noted to have differential changes between responders and slow-responders included nectin-like protein 2, EphA1 (Ephrin type-A receptor 1), gp130, CNDP1, TGF-b RIII, MRC2, ADAM9, and CDON. A logistic regression model combining markers associated with 8-week culture status revealed an ROC curve with AUC=0.96, sensitivity=0.95 and specificity=0.90. Additional markers showed differential changes between responders and slow-responders (nectin-like protein), or correlated with time-to-culture-conversion (KLRK1). Conclusions Serum proteins involved in the coagulation cascade, neutrophil activity, immunity, inflammation, and tissue remodeling were found to be associated with TB treatment response. A quantitative, non-culture based, five-marker signature predictive of 8-week culture status was identified in this pilot study. PMID:24629635

  12. Favorable Growth Hormone Treatment Response in a Young Boy with Achondroplasia

    PubMed Central

    Krstevska-Konstantinova, Marina; Stamatova, Ana; Gucev, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Background: Achondroplasia is a skeletal dysplasia, the most common cause of rhizomelic dwarfism. Case presentation: This is a ten year old boy who was first diagnosed prenatally. He had a mutation c1138G>A in the gene FGFR3 in a heterozygotic constellation. His IGF1 and IGFBP3 levels were normal. Two stimulation tests for growth hormone were performed with values within the reference range. His psychomotor development was adequate for his age except for speech difficulty. He started with recombinant hGH (r-hGH) at the age of 3.4 years in a dose of 0.06 mg/kg. His mean Height SDS (HtSDS) was -2.2. Results: The growth increased to 10 cm/year in the first year of therapy (HtSDS -1.1). It decreased during the second year to 4 cm (HtSDS -1.7) and again increased during the third year to 8 cm/year (HtSDS–1.3). In the next years the growth was constant (6.5, 2.3, 3.5 cm / year). He is still growing in the 3rd percentile of the growth curve (HtSDS – 1.2) under GH treatment. The body disproportion remained the same. Conclusion: The growth response on GH treatment was satisfactory in the first 4 years of treatment, and the boy still continued to grow. The young age at the start of treatment was also of importance. Our other patients with achondroplasia who started treatment older had a poor response to growth hormone. PMID:27147792

  13. The evaluation of risk factors for failed response to conservative treatment in tubo-ovarian abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Akkurt, Mehmet Özgür; Yalçın, Serenat Eris; Akkurt, İltaç; Tatar, Burak; Yavuz, And; Yalçın, Yakup; Akgül, Mehmet Akif; Kayıkçıoğlu, Fulya

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of our study is to assess the risk factors for medical treatment failure and to predict the patients who will require the surgical therapy as well as to predict the factors affecting treatment success. Material and Methods This was a cross-sectional study including 76 women with tubo-ovarian abscesses (TOA) who were either conservatively or surgically treated and were admitted to two gynecology units over a 4-year period. The demographic characteristics of the patients, gynecologic and obstetric histories, size and localization of abscesses were recorded. Gentamicin plus clindamycin treatment protocol was implemented for all patients. Ampicillin treatment was added in three patients with the positive culture of Actinomyces. Response to treatment was evaluated after 48–72 h. Patients who fail to respond to medical treatment required surgery or percutaneous drainage. We compared clinical and laboratory factors between the groups. Results In surgery group, patients were significantly older than the others (44.9±5.4 versus 39.1±7.6 years). Fifty-six patients (74%) responded to antibiotics and 20 of the patients required surgical intervention. Patients treated with antibiotics were hospitalized for an average of 6.32±2.8 days versus 12.75±5.6 days for those who required surgery (p=0.021). Patients who were surgically treated had a mean size of TOA of 67.9±11.2 mm versus 53.6±9.4 mm for those treated with antibiotics alone (p=0.036). There were no significant differences between groups in laboratory parameters, except for initial white blood cell (WBC) counts. The complications of surgery included in descending order of frequency blood transfusions, surgical wound infections, bowel injury, and bladder injury. Conclusion An increased size of pelvic mass, higher initial WBC counts, advanced age, and smoking were all associated with failed response to conservative treatment. It is important to identify the risk factors to distinguish patients who

  14. Treatment response and long-term dentofacial adaptations to maxillary expansion and protraction.

    PubMed

    Ngan, P W; Hagg, U; Yiu, C; Wei, S H

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to summarize the short-term and long-term results of the authors' clinical prospective study on the treatment of Class III malocclusion using the protraction facemask. An attempt is made to answer questions pertaining to this treatment modality. Twenty patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion were treated consecutively with maxillary expansion and a protraction facemask. A positive overjet was obtained in all cases after 6 to 9 months of treatment. These changes were contributed to by a forward movement of the maxilla, backward and downward rotation of the mandible, proclination of the maxillary incisors, and retroclination of the mandibular incisors. The molar relationship was overcorrected to Class I or Class II dental arch relationship. The overbite was reduced with a significant increase in lower facial height. The treatment was found to be stable 2 years after removal of the appliances. At the end of the 4-year observation period, 15 of the 20 patients maintained a positive overjet or an end-to-end incisal relationship. Patients who reverted back to a negative overjet were found to have excess horizontal mandibular growth that was not compensated by proclination of the maxillary incisors. A review of the literature showed that maxillary expansion in conjunction with protraction produced greater forward movement of the maxilla. Maxillary protraction with a 30 degrees forward and downward force applied at the canine region produced an acceptable clinical response. The reciprocal force from maxillary protraction transmitted to the temporomandibular joint did not increase masticatory muscle pain or activity. Significant soft tissue profile change can be expected with maxillary protraction including straightening of the facial profile and better lip competence and posture. However, one should anticipate individual variations in treatment response and subsequent growth changes. Treatment with the protraction facemask is most

  15. Suppression of bovine lymphocyte responses to mitogens following in vivo and in vitro treatment with dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Oldham, G; Howard, C J

    1992-01-15

    Gnotobiotic calves given intramuscular injections of dexamethasone (DM, 0.5 mg kg-1 day-1) showed marked changes in haematological parameters including a neutrophilia and a lymphopaenia. Not only was there a reduction in the numbers of circulating mononuclear cells, but there was also a significant (P less than 0.01) decrease in the in vitro responsiveness of the remaining circulating peripheral blood lymphocytes to the mitogens, phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (ConA) and pokeweed mitogen (PWM). Responses to all three mitogens were suppressed to a similar degree. Analysis of the circulating mononuclear cell sub-populations before and during DM treatment demonstrated a selective depletion of B cells; the T lymphocyte sub-population that expresses the gamma/delta form of T cell receptor, are CD2-, CD5+, CD8-, CD4- and constitute a major population in peripheral blood of calves. In vitro studies in gnotobiotic and conventional calves confirmed that DM was highly inhibitory for PHA responses but, in contrast to the in vivo findings, showed little effect of DM on ConA responses. Expression of surface antigens after 72 h in vitro culture in the presence of DM were little affected with the exception of BoCD8 and MHC II, which showed increased and decreased expression, respectively. These observations would suggest that distinct mechanisms are involved in glucocorticosteroid suppression of the responses to these two mitogens. PMID:1534431

  16. Nanoparticles responsive to the inflammatory microenvironment for targeted treatment of arterial restenosis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shibin; Hu, Ying; Peng, Song; Han, Songling; Tao, Hui; Zhang, Qixiong; Xu, Xiaoqiu; Zhang, Jianxiang; Hu, Houyuan

    2016-10-01

    Coronary arterial disease (CAD) remains the leading cause of death globally. Percutaneous coronary interventions are frequently used nonsurgical techniques for treating CAD, which may unfortunately lead to arterial restenosis. Currently, there are no effective drugs that can thoroughly prevent restenosis. We hypothesize inflammation-triggerable nanomedicines may function as effective therapeutics for targeted therapy of restenosis, by preferentially releasing their payload at the diseased site. To demonstrate our hypothesis and develop targeted nanotherapies for restenosis, this study was designed to examine effectiveness of nanomedicines responsive to the inflammatory microenvironment with mild acidity and high reactive oxygen species (ROS). To this end, an acetalated β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) material (Ac-bCD) was synthesized as a pH-responsive carrier material, while a ROS-responsive material (Ox-bCD) was produced by hydrophobic functionalization of β-CD with an oxidation-labile group. Based on these two responsive materials, either pH- or ROS-responsive nanoparticles (NPs) were produced by a nanoprecipitation technique and fully characterized. Using rapamycin (RAP) as a candidate drug, responsive nanotherapies were fabricated. In vitro hydrolysis and release studies confirmed these nanovehicles and nanotherapies exhibited desirable responsive behaviors. Both in vitro cell culture and in vivo evaluations revealed their good safety profile. These responsive NPs could be effectively internalized by rat vascular smooth muscle cells, which in turn notably potentiated anti-proliferation and anti-migration activities of RAP. After intravenous (i.v.) injection, NPs may be accumulated at the injured site in the carotid artery of rats subjected to balloon angioplasty injury. Compared with a non-responsive nanotherapy based on poly(lactide-co-glycolide), treatment with either pH- or ROS-responsive nanotherapy by i.v. injection more effectively attenuated neointimal

  17. Global gene expression analysis of early response to chemotherapy treatment in ovarian cancer spheroids

    PubMed Central

    L'Espérance, Sylvain; Bachvarova, Magdalena; Tetu, Bernard; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Bachvarov, Dimcho

    2008-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy (CT) resistance in ovarian cancer (OC) is broad and encompasses diverse unrelated drugs, suggesting more than one mechanism of resistance. To better understand the molecular mechanisms controlling the immediate response of OC cells to CT exposure, we have performed gene expression profiling in spheroid cultures derived from six OC cell lines (OVCAR3, SKOV3, TOV-112, TOV-21, OV-90 and TOV-155), following treatment with 10,0 μM cisplatin, 2,5 μM paclitaxel or 5,0 μM topotecan for 72 hours. Results Exposure of OC spheroids to these CT drugs resulted in differential expression of genes associated with cell growth and proliferation, cellular assembly and organization, cell death, cell cycle control and cell signaling. Genes, functionally involved in DNA repair, DNA replication and cell cycle arrest were mostly overexpressed, while genes implicated in metabolism (especially lipid metabolism), signal transduction, immune and inflammatory response, transport, transcription regulation and protein biosynthesis, were commonly suppressed following all treatments. Cisplatin and topotecan treatments triggered similar alterations in gene and pathway expression patterns, while paclitaxel action was mainly associated with induction of genes and pathways linked to cellular assembly and organization (including numerous tubulin genes), cell death and protein synthesis. The microarray data were further confirmed by pathway and network analyses. Conclusion Most alterations in gene expression were directly related to mechanisms of the cytotoxics actions in OC spheroids. However, the induction of genes linked to mechanisms of DNA replication and repair in cisplatin- and topotecan-treated OC spheroids could be associated with immediate adaptive response to treatment. Similarly, overexpression of different tubulin genes upon exposure to paclitaxel could represent an early compensatory effect to this drug action. Finally, multicellular growth conditions that are

  18. Nanotechnology-based combination therapy improves treatment response in cancer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Prakash; Chang, Sung K.; Mai, Zhiming; Neuman, Daniel; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2009-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PanCa) has a poor prognosis with a 5-year survival rate of only 5%. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has shown promising results in treating PanCa. Mechanism-based combinations with PDT have enhanced treatment outcome. Agents tested with PDT include Avastin, an antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) which is approved for treating various cancers. Simultaneous delivery of drugs in nano-constructs could improve the treatment response of mechanism based combination therapies. Here, we investigate the effect of neutralizing VEGF using nanotechnology for the delivery of Avastin in combination with PDT. For this we used a construct called "nanocells" in which the photosensitizer was trapped inside polymer nanoparticles and these, with Avastin, were then encapsulated inside liposomes. In vitro, nanocells containing Avastin (NCA) significantly enhanced cytotoxicity in PanCa cells. NCA based PDT also significantly improved treatment response in mice that were orthotopically implanted with PanCa. Avastin delivered extracellularly in combination with PDT did not show any improvement. Here we propose a new paradigm for Avastin-based therapy by combining intracellular delivery of the antibody and PDT using nanotechnology for treating PanCa.

  19. BIM expression in treatment naïve cancers predicts responsiveness to kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Faber, Anthony; Corcoran, Ryan B.; Ebi, Hiromichi; Sequist, Lecia V.; Waltman, Belinda A.; Chung, Euiheon; Incio, Joao; Digumarthy, Subba R.; Pollack, Sarah F.; Song, Youngchul; Muzikansky, Alona; Lifshits, Eugene; Roberge, Sylvie; Coffman, Erik J.; Benes, Cyril; Gómez, Henry; Baselga, Jose; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Rivera, Miguel N.; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Jain, Rakesh K.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Cancers with specific genetic mutations are susceptible to selective kinase inhibitors. However, there is wide spectrum of benefit among cancers harboring the same sensitizing genetic mutations. Herein, we measured apoptotic rates among cell lines sharing the same driver oncogene following treatment with the corresponding kinase inhibitor. There was a wide range of kinase inhibitor-induced apoptosis despite comparable inhibition of the target and associated downstream signaling pathways. Surprisingly, pre-treatment RNA levels of the BH3-only pro-apoptotic BIM strongly predicted the capacity of EGFR, HER2, and PI3K inhibitors to induce apoptosis in EGFR mutant, HER2 amplified, and PIK3CA mutant cancers, respectively, but BIM levels did not predict responsiveness to standard chemotherapies. Furthermore, BIM RNA levels in EGFR mutant lung cancer specimens predicted response and duration of clinical benefit from EGFR inhibitors. These findings suggest assessment of BIM levels in treatment naïve tumor biopsies may indicate the degree of benefit from single-agent kinase inhibitors in multiple oncogene-addiction paradigms. PMID:22145099

  20. Digital holographic microscopy for imaging growth and treatment response in 3D tumor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuyu; Petrovic, Ljubica; Celli, Jonathan P.; Yelleswarapu, Chandra S.

    2014-03-01

    While three-dimensional tumor models have emerged as valuable tools in cancer research, the ability to longitudinally visualize the 3D tumor architecture restored by these systems is limited with microscopy techniques that provide only qualitative insight into sample depth, or which require terminal fixation for depth-resolved 3D imaging. Here we report the use of digital holographic microscopy (DHM) as a viable microscopy approach for quantitative, non-destructive longitudinal imaging of in vitro 3D tumor models. Following established methods we prepared 3D cultures of pancreatic cancer cells in overlay geometry on extracellular matrix beds and obtained digital holograms at multiple timepoints throughout the duration of growth. The holograms were digitally processed and the unwrapped phase images were obtained to quantify nodule thickness over time under normal growth, and in cultures subject to chemotherapy treatment. In this manner total nodule volumes are rapidly estimated and demonstrated here to show contrasting time dependent changes during growth and in response to treatment. This work suggests the utility of DHM to quantify changes in 3D structure over time and suggests the further development of this approach for time-lapse monitoring of 3D morphological changes during growth and in response to treatment that would otherwise be impractical to visualize.

  1. Carbon-11-methionine and PET in evaluation of treatment response of breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Huovinen, R.; Leskinen-Kallio, S.; Någren, K.; Lehikoinen, P.; Ruotsalainen, U.; Teräs, M.

    1993-01-01

    Uptake of L-methyl-11C-methionine (11C-methionine) in breast cancer metastases was studied with positron emission tomography (PET). Eight patients with soft tissue metastases were studied twice: before the onset of chemotherapy (4), hormonal therapy (3) or radiotherapy (1) and 3-14 weeks later. The radioactivity concentration of the low molecular weight fraction of venous plasma samples separated by fast gel filtration was used as input function. The input corrected uptake rate of 11C-methionine (Ki) in breast cancer metastases before the treatment ranged between 0.035 and 0.186 1 min-1 and the standardised uptake value (SUV) between 2.0 and 11.4. The uptake of 11C-methionine into the metastases decreased when clinical objective stability or regression of the metastases was later obtained and increased in cases where progressive disease was seen during treatment. We conclude that metabolic changes in the amino acid metabolism detected by PET precede the clinical response, and may be of clinical value in predicting the treatment response. Images Figure 1 PMID:8471437

  2. Associations between substance use, neuropsychological functioning and treatment response in psychosis.

    PubMed

    deVille, Madeleine; Baker, Amanda; Lewin, Terry J; Bucci, Sandra; Loughland, Carmel

    2011-04-30

    Relationships between substance use, severity of psychosis, and neuropsychological functioning were examined, together with their associations with treatment response and retention status. Participants included 477 people with psychosis (354 volunteers registered on a research database, and 123 enrolled in a treatment trial for substance misuse). Variables of primary interest included substance use history, course of psychotic disorder, and neuropsychological functioning on the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS). Specific RBANS deficits were associated with a more chronic illness course. Compared to those with a stable or chronic course, younger people with a single episode of psychosis were more likely to have uncertain diagnoses, higher levels of substance use problems and variable neuropsychological functioning. History of substance use was not associated with additional overall neuropsychological deficits. Likewise, treatment retention and outcome were not associated with neuropsychological functioning. The findings suggest that, among people with co-existing psychotic and substance use disorders, response to cognitive-behaviour therapy is likely to be independent of neuropsychological functioning. Consideration should also be given to the potential use of neuropsychological assessments to assist differentiation of likely substance-associated psychosis from primary psychosis. PMID:20843558

  3. Anatomical differences in response to treatment of port-wine stains by the pulsed dye laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renfro, Lisa; Geronemus, Roy G.

    1992-06-01

    Two-hundred and fifty-seven patients (136 adults and 121 children) with port-wine stains of the head and neck were treated with the flashlamp-pumped pulsed dye laser. The head and neck was subdivided into 8 anatomical regions (forehead/temple, periorbital, medial cheek, nose, upper cutaneous lip, lateral cheek, chin and neck) which were independently evaluated for response. Response to treatment was found to be associated with the anatomical location of the lesion; in both adults and children the mid-facial region (medial cheek, nose and upper cutaneous lip) responded less favorably to treatment than the other regions of the head and neck (periorbital, forehead/temple, lateral cheek, neck and chin). In adults and children, mean percent lesional lightening of the mid-facial regions was 70.7% compared to 82.3% of the other regions of the head and neck with an estimated difference of 11.6% (95% confidence interval: 8.7% - 14.6%). The mean number of treatments for adults was 3.7, while this number in children was 3.9. All side effects were transient, and included cutaneous depressions, hypopigmentation and hyperpigmentation.

  4. Association between Serum Cortisol and DHEA-S Levels and Response to Antipsychotic Treatment in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Babinkostova, Zoja; Stefanovski, Branislav; Janicevic-Ivanovska, Danijela; Samardziska, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies suggested that alterations in serum cortisol and DHEA-S levels may play a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. AIM: To compare serum cortisol and DHEA-S levels between patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls and to evaluate their association with the response to antipsychotic treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this clinical prospective study were included 60 patients with schizophrenia and 40 healthy age and sex matched control subjects. Clinical evaluation of patients was performed using the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale. A questionnaire for socio-demographic and clinical data collection was used. For the purposes of the study, the examined group was divided in two subgroups: responders and nonresponders. Serum cortisol and DHEA-S levels were measured at baseline in all participants and after 3 and 6 weeks of the antipsychotic treatment in patients with schizophrenia. RESULTS: Patients with schizophrenia had significantly higher serum cortisol and DHEA-S levels in comparison to the control group. Responders had significantly higher serum cortisol and DHEA-S levels compared with nonresponders. CONCLUSION: Elevated serum cortisol and DHEA-S levels may play a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and they may be related to positive response to antipsychotic treatment in patients with schizophrenia.

  5. RNA-sequencing reveals transcriptional up-regulation of Trem2 in response to bexarotene treatment.

    PubMed

    Lefterov, Iliya; Schug, Jonathan; Mounier, Anais; Nam, Kyong Nyon; Fitz, Nicholas F; Koldamova, Radosveta

    2015-10-01

    We have recently demonstrated that short term bexarotene treatment of APP/PS1 mice significantly improves their cognitive performance. While there were no changes in plaque load, or insoluble Aβ levels in brain, biochemical analysis strongly suggested improved clearance of soluble Aβ, including Aβ oligomers. To get further insight into molecular mechanisms underlying this therapeutic effect, we explored genome-wide differential gene expression in brain of bexarotene and control treated APP/PS1 mice. We performed high throughput massively parallel sequencing on mRNA libraries generated from cortices of bexarotene or vehicle treated APP/PS1 mice and compared the expression profiles for differential gene expression. Gene Ontology (GO) Biological Process categories with the highest fold enrichment and lowest False Discovery Rate (FDR) are clustered in GO terms immune response, inflammatory response, oxidation-reduction and immunoglobulin mediated immune response. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by ChIP-QPCR, and RT-QPCR expression assays were used to validate select genes, including Trem2, Tyrobp, Apoe and Ttr, differentially expressed in response to Retinoid X Receptor (RXR) activation. We found that bexarotene significantly increased the phagocytosis of soluble and insoluble Aβ in BV2 cells. The results of our study demonstrate that in AD model mice expressing human APP, gene networks up-regulated in response to RXR activation by the specific, small molecule, ligand bexarotene may influence diverse regulatory pathways that are considered critical for cognitive performance, inflammatory response and Aβ clearance, and may provide an explanation of the bexarotene therapeutic effect at the molecular level. This study also confirms that unbiased massive parallel sequencing approaches are useful and highly informative for revealing brain molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying responses to activated nuclear hormone receptors in AD animal models

  6. The effect of doxycycline treatment on the postvaccinal immune response in pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Pomorska-Mól, Małgorzata Kwit, Krzysztof; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Pejsak, Zygmunt

    2014-07-01

    The effect of a seven-day antibiotic therapy with doxycycline was investigated on the postvaccinal humoral and cellular immune response in pigs. The selected parameters of non-specific immunity were also studied. Fifty pigs were used (control not vaccinated (C, n = 10), control vaccinated (CV, n = 20), and experimental — received doxycycline (DOXY, n = 20)). For vaccination live-attenuated vaccine against pseudorabies (PR) was used. From day − 1 to day 5 pigs from DOXY group received doxycycline orally with drinking water, at the recommended dose. Pigs from DOXY and CV groups were vaccinated at 8 and 10 weeks of age. The results of the present study showed that cell-mediated postvaccinal immune response can be modulated by oral treatment with doxycycline. Significantly lower values of stimulation index were observed after PRV restimulation in doxycycline-treated pigs. Moreover, in the DOXY group a significant decrease in IFN-γ production after PRV restimulation was noted. The significantly lower number of CD4+CD8 + cells was also observed in doxy-treated, vaccinated pigs, 2 weeks after final vaccination. Simultaneously, specific humoral response was not disturbed. This study demonstrated the importance of defining the immune modulatory activity of doxycycline because it may alter the immune responses to vaccines. The exact mechanism of T-cell response suppression by doxycycline remains to be elucidated, however the influence of doxycycline on the secretion of various cytokines, including IFN-γ, may be considered as a possible cause. The present observations should prompt further studies on the practical significance of such phenomena in terms of clinical implications. - Highlights: • We examine the postvaccinal immune response in pigs treated with doxycycline. • Doxycycline negatively influenced the specific proliferation after recall stimulation. • Doxycycline negatively influenced secretion of IFN-γ after recall stimulation. • The lower number of

  7. Proteome changes in banana fruit peel tissue in response to ethylene and high-temperature treatments

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lina; Song, Jun; Forney, Charles; Palmer, Leslie Campbell; Fillmore, Sherry; Zhang, ZhaoQi

    2016-01-01

    Banana (Musa AAA group) is one of the most consumed fruits in the world due to its flavor and nutritional value. As a typical climacteric fruit, banana responds to ethylene treatment, which induces rapid changes of color, flavor (aroma and taste), sweetness and nutritional composition. It has also been reported that ripening bananas at temperatures above 24 °C inhibits chlorophyll breakdown and color formation but increases the rate of senescence. To gain fundamental knowledge about the effects of high temperature and ethylene on banana ripening, a quantitative proteomic study employing multiplex peptide stable isotope dimethyl labeling was conducted. In this study, green (immature) untreated banana fruit were subjected to treatment with 10 μL L−1 of ethylene for 24 h. After ethylene treatment, treated and untreated fruit were stored at 20 or 30 °C for 24 h. Fruit peel tissues were then sampled after 0 and 1 day of storage, and peel color and chlorophyll fluorescence were evaluated. Quantitative proteomic analysis was conducted on the fruit peels after 1 day of storage. In total, 413 common proteins were identified and quantified from two biological replicates. Among these proteins, 91 changed significantly in response to ethylene and high-temperature treatments. Cluster analysis on these 91 proteins identified 7 groups of changed proteins. Ethylene treatment and storage at 20 °C induced 40 proteins that are correlated with pathogen resistance, cell wall metabolism, ethylene biosynthesis, allergens and ribosomal proteins, and it repressed 36 proteins that are associated with fatty acid and lipid metabolism, redox–oxidative responses, and protein biosynthesis and modification. Ethylene treatment and storage at 30 °C induced 32 proteins, which were mainly similar to those in group 1 but also included 8 proteins in group 3 (identified as chitinase, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase 1, cysteine synthase, villin-2, leucine-transfer RNA ligase, CP47

  8. Proteome changes in banana fruit peel tissue in response to ethylene and high-temperature treatments.

    PubMed

    Du, Lina; Song, Jun; Forney, Charles; Palmer, Leslie Campbell; Fillmore, Sherry; Zhang, ZhaoQi

    2016-01-01

    Banana (Musa AAA group) is one of the most consumed fruits in the world due to its flavor and nutritional value. As a typical climacteric fruit, banana responds to ethylene treatment, which induces rapid changes of color, flavor (aroma and taste), sweetness and nutritional composition. It has also been reported that ripening bananas at temperatures above 24 °C inhibits chlorophyll breakdown and color formation but increases the rate of senescence. To gain fundamental knowledge about the effects of high temperature and ethylene on banana ripening, a quantitative proteomic study employing multiplex peptide stable isotope dimethyl labeling was conducted. In this study, green (immature) untreated banana fruit were subjected to treatment with 10 μL L(-1) of ethylene for 24 h. After ethylene treatment, treated and untreated fruit were stored at 20 or 30 °C for 24 h. Fruit peel tissues were then sampled after 0 and 1 day of storage, and peel color and chlorophyll fluorescence were evaluated. Quantitative proteomic analysis was conducted on the fruit peels after 1 day of storage. In total, 413 common proteins were identified and quantified from two biological replicates. Among these proteins, 91 changed significantly in response to ethylene and high-temperature treatments. Cluster analysis on these 91 proteins identified 7 groups of changed proteins. Ethylene treatment and storage at 20 °C induced 40 proteins that are correlated with pathogen resistance, cell wall metabolism, ethylene biosynthesis, allergens and ribosomal proteins, and it repressed 36 proteins that are associated with fatty acid and lipid metabolism, redox-oxidative responses, and protein biosynthesis and modification. Ethylene treatment and storage at 30 °C induced 32 proteins, which were mainly similar to those in group 1 but also included 8 proteins in group 3 (identified as chitinase, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase 1, cysteine synthase, villin-2, leucine-transfer RNA ligase, CP47

  9. FacPad: Bayesian sparse factor modeling for the inference of pathways responsive to drug treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Haisu; Zhao, Hongyu

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: It is well recognized that the effects of drugs are far beyond targeting individual proteins, but rather influencing the complex interactions among many relevant biological pathways. Genome-wide expression profiling before and after drug treatment has become a powerful approach for capturing a global snapshot of cellular response to drugs, as well as to understand drugs’ mechanism of action. Therefore, it is of great interest to analyze this type of transcriptomic profiling data for the identification of pathways responsive to different drugs. However, few computational tools exist for this task. Results: We have developed FacPad, a Bayesian sparse factor model, for the inference of pathways responsive to drug treatments. This model represents biological pathways as latent factors and aims to describe the variation among drug-induced gene expression alternations in terms of a much smaller number of latent factors. We applied this model to the Connectivity Map data set (build 02) and demonstrated that FacPad is able to identify many drug–pathway associations, some of which have been validated in the literature. Although this method was originally designed for the analysis of drug-induced transcriptional alternation data, it can be naturally applied to many other settings beyond polypharmacology. Availability and implementation: The R package ‘FacPad’ is publically available at: http://cran.open-source-solution.org/web/packages/FacPad/ Contact: hongyu.zhao@yale.edu Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22923307

  10. Enhancement of gas response of ZnO micro-nano structured films through plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaunay, Jean-Jacques; Yanagisawa, Kazumasa; Nishino, Toshiki; Yamada, Ichiro

    2007-02-01

    Films of ZnO micro-nano structures were deposited on quartz substrates and subsequently plasma treated in O II, N II and CF 4. It was found that exposure to oxygen plasma enhanced gas response to ethanol vapor of the ZnO films by a factor 2. The effect of surface plasma treatments on the gas response of the ZnO films was discussed in reference to surface morphology observed by high-magnification SEM and surface chemical state determined by XPS. SEM observation revealed that O II plasma treatment induced less surface roughening than N II and CF 4 plasmas, in agreement with the view that O II plasma should reduce preferential sputtering. Deconvolution of the O 1s X-ray photoelectron peak indicated an increase in the Zn-O bond surface density relatively to O-H bond density for the O II plasma treated surface, whereas the O-H bond surface density was increased relatively to the Zn-O bond density for the N II and CF 4 plasma treated films. The O II plasma was found to partially clean the surface from hydroxyl groups and to expose more Zn cations, which might have caused the enhancement of sensor response by increasing the density of active sites for oxidation/reduction reactions.

  11. Do β-Cells Generate Peroxynitrite in Response to Cytokine Treatment?*

    PubMed Central

    Broniowska, Katarzyna A.; Mathews, Clayton E.; Corbett, John A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the reactive species that is responsible for cytokine-mediated β-cell death. Inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase prevent this death, and addition of exogenous nitric oxide using donors induces β-cell death. The reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide results in the generation of peroxynitrite, and this powerful oxidant has been suggested to be the mediator of β-cell death in response to cytokine treatment. Recently, coumarin-7-boronate has been developed as a probe for the selective detection of peroxynitrite. Using this reagent, we show that addition of the NADPH oxidase activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate to nitric oxide-producing macrophages results in peroxynitrite generation. Using a similar approach, we demonstrate that cytokines fail to stimulate peroxynitrite generation by rat islets and insulinoma cells, either with or without phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate treatment. When forced to produce superoxide using redox cyclers, this generation is associated with protection from nitric oxide toxicity. These findings indicate that: (i) nitric oxide is the likely mediator of the toxic effects of cytokines, (ii) β-cells do not produce peroxynitrite in response to cytokines, and (iii) when forced to produce superoxide, the scavenging of nitric oxide by superoxide is associated with protection of β-cells from nitric oxide-mediated toxicity. PMID:24194521

  12. Optimization of Electrochemical Treatment Process Conditions for Distillery Effluent Using Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Arulmathi, P.; Elangovan, G.; Begum, A. Farjana

    2015-01-01

    Distillery industry is recognized as one of the most polluting industries in India with a large amount of annual effluent production. In this present study, the optimization of electrochemical treatment process variables was reported to treat the color and COD of distillery spent wash using Ti/Pt as an anode in a batch mode. Process variables such as pH, current density, electrolysis time, and electrolyte dose were selected as operation variables and chemical oxygen demand (COD) and color removal efficiency were considered as response variable for optimization using response surface methodology. Indirect electrochemical-oxidation process variables were optimized using Box-Behnken response surface design (BBD). The results showed that electrochemical treatment process effectively removed the COD (89.5%) and color (95.1%) of the distillery industry spent wash under the optimum conditions: pH of 4.12, current density of 25.02 mA/cm2, electrolysis time of 103.27 min, and electrolyte (NaCl) concentration of 1.67 g/L, respectively. PMID:26491716

  13. Imaging Caspase-3 Activation as a Marker of Apoptosis-Targeted Treatment Response in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Delphine L.; Engle, Jacquelyn T.; Griffin, Elizabeth A.; Miller, J. Philip; Chu, Wenhua; Zhou, Dong; Mach, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We tested whether positron emission tomography (PET) with the caspase-3 targeted isatin analog [18F]WC-4-116 could image caspase-3 activation in response to an apoptosis-inducing anticancer therapy. Procedures [18F]WC-4-116 uptake was determined in etoposide-treated EL4 cells. Biodistribution studies with [18F]WC-4-116 and [18F]ICMT-18, a non-caspase-3-targeted tracer, as well as [18F]WC-4-116 microPET imaging assessed responses in Colo205 tumor bearing mice treated with death receptor 5 (DR5) targeted agonist antibodies. Immunohistochemical staining and enzyme assays confirmed caspase-3 activation. Two-way analysis of variance or Student’s t-test assessed for treatment-related changes in tracer uptake. Results [18F]WC-4-116 increased 8 ± 2-fold in etoposide-treated cells. The [18F]WC-4-116 %ID/g also increased significantly in tumors with high caspase-3 enzyme activity (p < 0.05). [18F]ICMT-18 tumor uptake did not differ in tumors with high or low caspase-3 enzyme activity. Conclusions [18F]WC-4-116 uptake in vivo reflects increased caspase-3 activation and may be useful for detecting caspase-3 mediated apoptosis treatment responses in cancer. PMID:25344147

  14. Monitoring interferon β treatment response with magnetic resonance spectroscopy in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yetkin, Mehmet Fatih; Mirza, Meral; Dönmez, Halil

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the white matter of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with healthy controls and to monitor the response to the treatment with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS).Fifteen healthy controls and 36 recently diagnosed MS patients never treated with interferon β were included in this study. In the patient group, MRS was performed before treatment, at 6th and 12th month after the initiation of treatment and once in control group. Patient group was divided into 3 interferon groups randomly. Physical examination findings were recorded as Expanded Disability Status Scale scores before treatment, at 6th and 12th month of interferon treatment.At the end of 1 year follow up, 26 of 36 patients completed the study. In patients' white matter lesions, N-acetylaspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr) ratios were lower than control group's white matters. NAA/Cr ratios were higher in control group's white matter than patient's normal appearing white matter but this difference was not statistically significant. There was no difference in choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) ratios between 2 groups. In follow-up period, NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr ratios obtained from patients' white matter lesions and normal appearing white matter did not change statistically.This study showed that in MS patients' white matters, especially in white matter lesions, neuron viability is reduced compared with healthy controls' normal white matter; and in the patients treated with interferon β NAA/Cr ratios remained stable. These stable levels of metabolite ratios in the patients who received interferon β therapy can be explained with either the shortness of the follow-up period post-treatment or may reflect a positive effect of the beta interferon therapy on the progress of MS. PMID:27603381

  15. Progression of motor and nonmotor features of Parkinson's disease and their response to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Thuy C.; Nutt, John G.; Holford, Nicholas H. G.

    2012-01-01

    AIMS (i) To describe the progression of the cardinal features of Parkinson's disease (PD); (ii) to investigate whether baseline PD subtypes explain disease progression; and (iii) to quantify the symptomatic and disease-modifying effects of anti-parkinsonian treatments. METHODS Data were available for 795 PD subjects, initially untreated, followed for up to 8 years. Cardinal features [tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and postural instability and gait disorder (PIGD)] were derived from the total unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (total UPDRS), cognitive status from the mini-mental status exam score (MMSE) and depression status from the Hamilton depression scale (HAM-D). Analysis was performed using a nonlinear mixed effects approach with an asymptotic model for natural disease progression. Treatment effects (i.e. symptomatic and disease modifying) were evaluated by describing changes in the natural history model parameters. RESULTS Tremor progressed more slowly (half-time of 3.9 years) than all other motor features (half-time 2–3 years). The MMSE progression was negligible, while HAM-D progressed with a half-time of 5 years. Levodopa had marked symptomatic effects on all features, but low potency for effect on PIGD (ED50 of 1237 mg day−1 compared with 7–24 mg day−1 for other motor and nonmotor features). Other anti-parkinsonian treatments had much smaller symptomatic effects. All treatments had disease-modifying effects on the cardinal features of PD. Baseline PD subtypes only explained small differences in disease progression. CONCLUSIONS This analysis indicates that tremor progresses more slowly than other cardinal features and that PIGD is less treatment responsive in early PD patients. There was no evidence of baseline PD subtypes as a clinically useful predictor of disease progression rate. Anti-parkinsonian treatments have symptomatic and disease-modifying effects on all major features of PD. PMID:22283961

  16. Flexibility in Men's Sexual Practices in Response to Iatrogenic Erectile Dysfunction after Prostate Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dowsett, Gary W; Lyons, Anthony; Duncan, Duane; Wassersug, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    is not erection dependent. Dowsett GW, Lyons A, Duncan D, and Wassersug RJ. Flexibility in men's sexual practices in response to iatrogenic erectile dysfunction after prostate cancer treatment. Sex Med 2014;2:115–120. PMID:25356308

  17. Emerging aspects of molecular biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment response in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Ana; Martín, Javier; Carmona, F David

    2016-06-01

    Important advances have occurred during the last decade in the understanding of the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, we are still far from having a clear picture of the molecular network that predisposes an individual to develop the disease, to worsen the symptoms after that, or to successfully respond to a specific treatment. In this sense, different -omics fields (including transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, genomics and epigenomics) have recently produced promising insights that could definitively help us to sharpen such picture if integrated trough a systems biology approach. In this review we will summarise and discuss the recent progress achieved in those fields and its possible impact on the discovery of suitable biomarkers for RA diagnosis, prognosis and treatment response. PMID:27043155

  18. Early traumatized inpatients high in psychoform and somatoform dissociation: characteristics and treatment response.

    PubMed

    Jepsen, Ellen K K; Langeland, Willie; Heir, Trond

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the clinical relevance of differences in psychoform and somatoform dissociative symptoms in 55 early traumatized inpatients. The high psychoform and somatoform dissociative group (n = 18), somatoform dissociative group (n = 22), and nondissociative group (n = 15) did not differ on abuse severity, depressive symptoms, interpersonal problems, Axis I or II comorbidity, or deterioration rates. Compared to the other 2 groups, the highly dissociative group was characterized by younger age, living alone, higher levels of posttraumatic and general distress, more frequent reports of suicidality, self-mutilation, eating problems, and less favorable treatment response. The results highlight the clinical relevance of using dissociation measures for identifying subgroups of patients with severe psychopathology who may be more treatment resistant. PMID:24983399

  19. Polymorphisms in the drug transporter gene ABCB1 predict antidepressant treatment response in depression.

    PubMed

    Uhr, Manfred; Tontsch, Alina; Namendorf, Christian; Ripke, Stephan; Lucae, Susanne; Ising, Marcus; Dose, Tatjana; Ebinger, Martin; Rosenhagen, Marcus; Kohli, Martin; Kloiber, Stefan; Salyakina, Daria; Bettecken, Thomas; Specht, Michael; Pütz, Benno; Binder, Elisabeth B; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Holsboer, Florian

    2008-01-24

    The clinical efficacy of a systemically administered drug acting on the central nervous system depends on its ability to pass the blood-brain barrier, which is regulated by transporter molecules such as ABCB1 (MDR1). Here we report that polymorphisms in the ABCB1 gene predict the response to antidepressant treatment in those depressed patients receiving drugs that have been identified as substrates of ABCB1 using abcb1ab double-knockout mice. Our results indicate that the combined consideration of both the medication's capacity to act as an ABCB1-transporter substrate and the patient's ABCB1 genotype are strong predictors for achieving a remission. This finding can be viewed as a further step into personalized antidepressant treatment. PMID:18215618

  20. Treatment of tattoos by Q-switched ruby laser. A dose-response study

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.R.; Gange, R.W.; Dover, J.S.; Flotte, T.J.; Gonzalez, E.; Michaud, N.; Anderson, R.R. )

    1990-07-01

    Tattoo treatment with Q-switched ruby laser pulses (694 nm, 40 to 80 nanoseconds) was studied by clinical assessment and light and electron microscopy. Fifty-seven blue-black tattoos or portions thereof (35 amateur and 22 professional) were irradiated with 1.5 to 8.0 J/cm2 at a mean interval of 3 weeks. Substantial lightening or total clearing occurred in 18 (78%) of 23 amateur tattoos and 3 (23%) of 13 professional tattoos in which the protocol was completed. Response was related to exposure dose. Scarring occurred in one case, and persistent confettilike hypopigmentation was frequent. Optimal fluence was 4 to 8 J/cm2. Clinicohistologic correlation was poor. Q-switched ruby laser pulses can provide an effective treatment for tattoos.

  1. Effectiveness of community-based early intervention based on pivotal response treatment.

    PubMed

    Smith, Isabel M; Flanagan, Helen E; Garon, Nancy; Bryson, Susan E

    2015-06-01

    Preschoolers (n = 118) with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) participated in this prospective effectiveness study of an early intervention program. Treatment entailed parent training and therapist-implemented components, incorporating Pivotal Response Treatment and Positive Behaviour Support. Standardized ability and behavioural measures were gathered prior to and following the 1-year intervention. Analyses were conducted for three groups based on baseline IQ: Higher IQ (≥ 70; n = 36), Moderately Low IQ (40-69; n = 40), and Very Low IQ (<40, n = 42). Observed gains in key language and cognitive outcomes were significant for all groups. Baseline cognitive scores significantly predicted 1-year outcomes. Results are encouraging for this relatively low-intensity community-based intervention program. PMID:25563454

  2. A β-Lactamase-Imprinted Responsive Hydrogel for the Treatment of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Dong, Kai; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-07-01

    Antibiotics play important roles in infection treatment and prevention. However, the effectiveness of antibiotics is now threatened by the prevalence of drug-resistant bacteria. Furthermore, antibiotic abuse and residues in the environment cause serious health issues. In this study, a stimuli-responsive imprinted hydrogel was fabricated by using β-lactamase produced by bacteria for deactivating antibiotics as the template molecule. The imprinted hydrogel could initially trap β-lactamase excreted by drug-resistant bacteria, thus making bacteria sensitive to antibiotics. After the bactericidal treatment, the "imprinted sites" on the hydrogel could be reversibly abolished with a temperature stimulus, which resulted in the reactivation of β-lactamase to degrade antibiotic residues. We also present an example of the use of this antibacterial design to treat wound infection. PMID:27159893

  3. Clinical efficacy and determinants of response to treatment with desmopressin in mild hemophilia a.

    PubMed

    Di Perna, Caterina; Riccardi, Federica; Franchini, Massimo; Rivolta, Gianna Franca; Pattacini, Corrado; Tagliaferri, Annarita

    2013-10-01

    Although desmopressin (DDAVP) is considered as the treatment of choice for many patients with mild hemophilia A, several aspects of DDAVP therapy remain unclear, including the rate and type of response and the molecular determinants of its clinical efficacy. To investigate these issues, we retrospectively studied all patients with mild hemophilia A followed up at the Parma Hemophilia Center. A total of 75 patients were enrolled who underwent a DDAVP test, and out of whom, 76% (57/75) had a complete or partial response. Response to DDAVP was significantly correlated to the patients' age (median age of responders and nonresponders: 24 and 18 y, respectively; p = 0.04) and type of mutation (all the 10 patients with mutations in the promoter region were nonresponders). The median basal factor VIII (FVIII):C level was significantly lower in responders than in nonresponders (0.14 vs. 0.19 IU/mL, respectively; p = 0.01); this was mainly due to nonresponders with promoter region mutations who had higher basal FVIII:C levels. During the 12-year follow-up, 82 of 237 (35%) bleeding episodes occurring in 27 responder patients were treated with 246 DDAVP infusions with complete or partial efficacy in 92% (75/82). Overall, 142 events were managed with 253 prophylactic DDAVP infusions, which were hemostatically effective in 96% of cases. No severe adverse reactions to DDAVP administration were recorded during the study period. These results document the safety and efficacy of DDAVP as a treatment or prevention of bleeding in patients with mild hemophilia A, also in the context of home treatment, and encourage the more widespread use of this product. PMID:24030345

  4. Characterisation of hepcidin response to holotransferrin treatment in CHO TRVb-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Kosha; Greenwell, Pamela; Renshaw, Derek; Busbridge, Mark; Garcia, Mitla; Farnaud, Sebastien; Patel, Vinood B

    2015-08-01

    Iron overload coupled with low hepcidin levels are characteristics of hereditary haemochromatosis. To understand the role of transferrin receptor (TFR) and intracellular iron in hepcidin secretion, Chinese hamster ovary transferrin receptor variant (CHO TRVb-1) cells were used that express iron-response-element-depleted human TFRC mRNA (TFRC∆IRE). Results showed that CHO TRVb-1 cells expressed higher basal levels of cell-surface TFR1 than HepG2 cells (2.2-fold; p < 0.01) and following 5 g/L holotransferrin treatment maintained constitutive over-expression at 24h and 48 h, contrasting the HepG2 cells where the receptor levels significantly declined. Despite this, the intracellular iron content was neither higher than HepG2 cells nor increased over time under basal or holotransferrin-treated conditions. Interestingly, hepcidin secretion in CHO TRVb-1 cells exceeded basal levels at all time-points (p < 0.02) and matched levels in HepG2 cells following treatment. While TFRC mRNA expression showed expected elevation (2h, p < 0.03; 4h; p < 0.05), slc40a1 mRNA expression was also elevated (2 h, p < 0.05; 4 h, p < 0.03), unlike the HepG2 cells. In conclusion, the CHO TRVb-1 cells prevented cellular iron-overload by elevating slc40a1 expression, thereby highlighting its significance in the absence of iron-regulated TFRC mRNA. Furthermore, hepcidin response to holotransferrin treatment was similar to HepG2 cells and resembled the human physiological response. PMID:26142326

  5. Quantifying the Stress Responses of Brassica Rapa Genotypes, With Experimental Drought in Two Nitrogen Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickerson, J. L.; Pleban, J. R.; Mackay, D. S.; Aston, T.; Ewers, B. E.; Weinig, C.

    2014-12-01

    In a greenhouse study designed to quantify and compare stress responses of four genotypes of Brassica rapa, broccolette (bro), cabbage (cab), turnip (tur), and oil, leaf water potential and net CO2 assimilations were measured. Individuals from each genotype, grown either with high or low nitrogen, were exposed to experimental drought of the same duration. One hypothesis was that the genotypes would differ significantly in their responses to periodic drought. The other hypothesis was that the nitrogen treatment versus no nitrogen treatment would play a significant role in the stress responses during drought. It would be expected that the nitrogen treated would have greater dry leaf mass. A LI-6400 XT portable photosynthesis system was used to obtain A/Ci curves (net CO2 assimilation rate versus substomatal CO2) for each treatment group. Predawn and midday water potentials were obtained throughout the hydrated and drought periods using a Model 670 pressure chamber. The dry leaf mass was significantly greater among the high nitrogen group versus the low nitrogen group for each genotype. Nitrogen and genotype were both determinants in variation of water potentials and net CO2 assimilation. Bro and cab genotypes with high nitrogen showed the highest net CO2 assimilation rates during hydration, but the assimilation rates dropped to the lowest during droughts. The water potentials for bro and cab were lower than values for tur and oil. Nitrogen treated genotypes had lower water potentials, but higher net CO2 assimilation rates. Bayesian ecophysiological modeling with the TREES model showed significant differences in trait expression, quantified in terms of differences in model parameter posteriors, among the four genotypes.

  6. Three-month treatment response and exacerbation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Su; Rhee, Chin Kook; Yoo, Kwang Ha; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Yoon, Ho Il; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Kim, Woo Jin; Lee, JinHwa; Lim, Seong Yong; Park, Tai Sun; Lee, Jae Seung; Lee, Sei Won; Lee, Sang-Do; Oh, Yeon-Mok

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate relationships between acute exacerbation and Forced Expiratory Volume 1 second (FEV1) improvement after treatment with combined long-acting beta-agonist (LABA) and inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A total of 137 COPD patients were classified as responders or nonresponders according to FEV1 improvement after 3 months of LABA/ICS treatment in fourteen referral hospitals in Korea. Exacerbation occurrence in these two subgroups was compared over a period of 1 yr. Eighty of the 137 COPD patients (58.4%) were classified as responders and 57 (41.6%) as nonresponders. Acute exacerbations occurred in 25 patients (31.3%) in the responder group and in 26 patients (45.6%) in the nonresponder group (P=0.086). FEV1 improvement after LABA/ICS treatment was a significant prognostic factor for fewer acute exacerbations in a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model adjusted for age, sex, FEV1, smoking history, 6 min walk distance, body mass index, exacerbation history in the previous year, and dyspnea scale.Three-month treatment response to LABA/ICS might be a prognostic factor for the occurrence of acute exacerbation in COPD patients. PMID:25552883

  7. Bacillus cereus endospores exhibit a heterogeneous response to heat treatment and low-temperature storage.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Ultan P; Wilkinson, Martin G

    2008-04-01

    Bacillus cereus endospores were challenged by heat treatments simulating typical domestic/industrial cooking regimes and the resulting effects on germination, viability and sub-lethal heat damage determined using differential plate counting on a rich versus selective medium, flow cytometry (FCM), beta-D-glucuronidase (GUD) activity and OD(600) measurement. Additionally, these techniques were used to investigate the effect on endospores of storage in a non-nutrient medium at 4 degrees C for 1 month. Plate counting revealed that heating generated sub-populations of sub-lethally damaged endospores, with the more severe heat treatments generating larger proportions of sub-lethally damaged endospores. These findings were also reflected in FCM analyses, which detected large amounts of heterogeneity among the populations of heat-treated endospores and uncovered differences in the proportions of membrane-damaged endospores and those displaying esterase activity pre- and post-treatment. Plate count data suggested that both the control and heat-treated endospores lost viability during storage, with FCM data indicating that the proportion of membrane-damaged endospores increased and those displaying the esterase activity decreased. The FCM, GUD and OD(600) data suggested that germination rates decreased with the increasing severity of heat treatment. This study demonstrates that a combination of plate counting and FCM can be used to detect heterogeneity in the response of endospores to insults. PMID:18206765

  8. The Role of MicroRNAs in Response to Interferon Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C patients

    PubMed Central

    El-Ahwany, Eman; Nagy, Faten; Zoheiry, Mona; ELGhannam, Maged; Shemis, Mohamed; Aboul-Ezz, Mohamed; Zada, Suher

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Treatment of HCV using a combination of pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin fails in about 40% of the patients with HCV genotype 4 infections, and it is physically and economically demanding. Thus, it is highly important to identify factors that can help to predict the likelihood that a patient will respond to this treatment. Methods In this study, five miRNAs, i.e., miRNA-122, miRNA-199, miRNA-192, miRNA-30, and miRNA-128, were selected according to previous studies that demonstrated their noticeable functions in viral replication, indicating that they potentially could be used by host cells to control viral infections. The five miRNAs were measured using real-time, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions. The data were analyzed using the t-test and chi-squared test. Results We found that the expression level of miRNA-122 was significantly increased in the responders’ group (p < 0.01) over that in the non-responders’ groups before and after treatment; both increased significantly (p < 0.01) compared with the normal control group. Conclusion miR-122 might be a useful predictor for virological responses to treatment with PEG-interferon plus ribavirin therapy in patients with HCV. PMID:27054010

  9. Structural Imaging in Late Life Depression: Association with Mood and Cognitive Responses to Antidepressant Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Marano, Christopher M.; Workman, Clifford I.; Lyman, Christopher H.; Munro, Cynthia A.; Kraut, Michael A.; Smith, Gwenn S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Recent positron emission tomography studies of cerebral glucose metabolism have identified the functional neural circuitry associated with mood and cognitive responses to antidepressant treatment in late life depression (LLD). The structural alterations in these networks are not well understood. The present study used magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to evaluate the association between grey matter volumes and changes in mood symptoms and cognitive function with treatment with the antidepressant citalopram. Design Open label trial with baseline brain MR scan. Mood and cognitive assessments performed at baseline and during citalopram treatment. Setting Outpatient clinics of an academic medical center. Participants 17 previously unmedicated patients age 55 or older with a major depressive episode and 17 non-depressed comparison subjects. Intervention 12 week trial of flexibly dosed citalopram. Measurements Grey matter volumes, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, California Verbal Learning Test, Delis–Kaplan Executive Function System™. Results In LLD, higher grey matter volumes in the cingulate gyrus, superior and middle frontal gyri, middle temporal gyrus and precuneus was associated with greater mood improvement. Higher grey matter volumes in primarily frontal areas were associated with greater improvement in verbal memory and verbal fluency performance. Conclusions Associations with antidepressant induced improvements in mood and cognition were observed in several brain regions previously correlated with normalization of glucose metabolism after citalopram treatment in LLD. Future studies will investigate molecular mechanisms underlying these associations (e.g. beta-amyloid, inflammation, glutamate). PMID:24238925

  10. The effects of genes implicated in cardiovascular disease on blood pressure response to treatment among treatment-naive hypertensive African Americans in the GenHAT study.

    PubMed

    Do, A N; Lynch, A I; Claas, S A; Boerwinkle, E; Davis, B R; Ford, C E; Eckfeldt, J H; Tiwari, H K; Arnett, D K; Irvin, M R

    2016-09-01

    African Americans have the highest prevalence of hypertension in the United States. Blood pressure (BP) control is important to reduce cardiovascular disease-related morbidity and mortality in this ethnic group. Genetic variants have been found to be associated with BP response to treatment. Previous pharmacogenetic studies of BP response to treatment in African Americans suffer limitations of small sample size as well as a limited number of candidate genes, and often focused on one antihypertensive treatment. Using 1131 African-American treatment-naive participants from the Genetics of Hypertension Associated Treatment Study, we examined whether variants in 35 candidate genes might modulate BP response to four different antihypertensive medications, including an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (lisinopril), a calcium channel blocker (amlodipine), and an a-adrenergic blocker (doxazosin) as compared with a thiazide diuretic (chlorthalidone) after 6 months of follow-up. Several suggestive gene by treatment interactions were identified. For example, among participants with two minor alleles of renin rs6681776, diastolic BP response was much improved on doxazosin compared with chlorthalidone (on average -9.49 mm Hg vs -1.70 mm Hg) (P=0.007). Although several suggestive loci were identified, none of the findings passed significance criteria after correction for multiple testing. Given the impact of hypertension and its sequelae in this population, this research highlights the potential for genetic factors to contribute to BP response to treatment. Continued concerted research efforts focused on genetics are needed to improve treatment response in this high-risk group. PMID:26791477

  11. pH-responsive mesoporous silica nanoparticles employed in controlled drug delivery systems for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ke-Ni; Zhang, Chun-Qiu; Wang, Wei; Wang, Paul C.; Zhou, Jian-Ping; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2014-01-01

    In the fight against cancer, controlled drug delivery systems have emerged to enhance the therapeutic efficacy and safety of anti-cancer drugs. Among these systems, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) with a functional surface possess obvious advantages and were thus rapidly developed for cancer treatment. Many stimuli-responsive materials, such as nanoparticles, polymers, and inorganic materials, have been applied as caps and gatekeepers to control drug release from MSNs. This review presents an overview of the recent progress in the production of pH-responsive MSNs based on the pH gradient between normal tissues and the tumor microenvironment. Four main categories of gatekeepers can respond to acidic conditions. These categories will be described in detail. PMID:24738037

  12. Integrated Biomarker Responses of Effluents from Municipal Sewage Treatment Works in Goldfish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, G. H.; Xia, J.; Zhang, H. Z.; Wang, C.

    2010-11-01

    The organic toxicants were extracted from the effluents from municipal sewage treatment works (STWs) in Nanjing (Chengbei, Suojincun and Jiangxinzhou STWs) by using solid phase extraction. AChE, GST, EROD, GPx and Na+/K+-ATPase activities in goldfish (Carassius auratus) were determmed after exposure of the extracted components. The extracts of water samples from the three STWs induced AChE, GST, EROD and Na+/K+-ATPase activities. The responses of enzymatic activities were mostly significant for those exposures of intermediate polar components, weakly polar components and/or nonpolar hexane extracts. Integrated biomarker response (IBR) index were calculated and used to evaluate an integrated impact of organic toxicants from different sampling sites. The order of negative biological effects of the three STWs was Jiangxinzhou>Chengbei>Suojincun.

  13. Suppressed or enhanced antibody responses in vitro after BCG treatment of mice: importance of BCG viability.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, C A; Brown, I N; Sljivić, V S

    1979-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis, BCG, is known to be capable of either enhancing or suppressing various immune responses. Using a standard technique and number of organisms, some of the parameters predetermining whether enhancement or supression will occur have been investigated. Dead BCG given intravenously into mice caused an enhancement of the antibody response in vitro to sheep erythrocytes. In contrast, the same number of viable organisms caused suppression if given intravenously but enhancement if given subcutaneously. The inclusion of 25% or more killed organisms in an intravenous inoculum of fully viable organisms changed suppression to enhancement. Treatment of BCG infected mice with streptomycin lessened the suppression but did not change it to enhancement. The possible causes of suppression are discussed. PMID:391696

  14. Responses of soil buffering capacity to acid treatment in three typical subtropical forests.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun; Wang, Ying-Ping; Yu, Mengxiao; Li, Kun; Shao, Yijing; Yan, Junhua

    2016-09-01

    Elevated anthropogenic acid deposition can significantly affect forest ecosystem functioning by changing soil pH, nutrient balance, and chemical leaching and so on. These effects generally differ among different forests, and the dominant mechanisms for those observed responses often vary, depending on climate, soil conditions and vegetation types. Using soil monoliths (0-40cm) from pine forest (pioneer), coniferous and broadleaved mixed forest (transitional) and broadleaved forest (mature) in southern China, we conducted a leaching experiment with acid treatments at different pH levels (control: pH≈4.5; pH=3.5; pH=2.5). We found that pH3.5 treatment significantly reduced dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in leachate from the pioneer forest soil. pH2.5 treatment significantly increased concentrations of NO3(-), SO4(2-), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Al(3+), Fe(3+) and DOC in leachate from the pioneer forest soil, and also concentrations of NO3(-), SO4(2-), Mg(2+), Al(3+), Fe(3+) and DOC in leachate from the transitional forest soil. All acid treatments had no significant effects on concentrations of these chemicals in leachate from the mature forest soil. The responses can be explained by the changes in soil pH, acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) and concentrations of Al and Fe. Our results showed that acid buffering capacity of the pioneer or transitional forest soil was lower than that of the mature forest soil. Therefore preserving mature forests in southern China is important for reducing the adverse impacts of high acid deposition on stream water quality at present and into the future. PMID:27185346

  15. Macular morphology and response to ranibizumab treatment in patients with wet age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Dervenis, Nikolaos; Younis, Saad

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess whether specific characteristics of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) affect structural and functional outcomes and number of injections needed in ranibizumab (0.05 mL of 10 mg/mL Lucentis solution)-treated wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patients. Patients and methods This retrospective case series included 62 newly diagnosed wet AMD patients treated with three monthly intravitreal ranibizumab injections followed by monthly follow-up and pro re nata retreatment. The presence of dome-shaped pigment epithelial detachment (PED), disruption of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), and subretinal and intraretinal fluid was associated with changes in Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study visual acuity, central macular thickness (CMT), and number of injections needed during the 6-month follow-up. Results The presence of PED was associated with lower values of CMT at presentation (399 μm [±132 μm] vs 310 μm [±51 μm], P=0.005). The presence of RPE disruption was associated with worse visual acuity in month 6 (0.36 [±0.22] vs 0.61 [0.45], P=0.027) and fewer injections (4.23 [±0.92] vs 3.55 [±0.60], P=0.007). The presence of intraretinal fluid at presentation was associated with worse visual acuity outcomes in month 4 (P=0.045) but not in month 6. Conclusion The dome-shaped PED was associated with lower CMT at presentation, but it did not affect response to treatment. RPE disruption was associated with worse functional outcomes with fewer injections. Intraretinal fluid at presentation may suggest delayed response to treatment. Individualized SD-OCT analysis could lead to individualized approach to wet AMD patients. SD-OCT can offer imaging biomarkers to assess the prognosis of anti-VEGF treatment in AMD patients. PMID:27366051

  16. Induction of Response to Psychotropic Medications in Depression and Panic After Concurrent Treatment of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasa, Murthy Vasantmeghna; Pradeep, Bombe Abhijeet; Sadashiv, Lokhande Chetan; Bhagwandas, Shah Nilesh

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of depression with panic disorder, which did not respond to adequate psychiatric interventions over a period of several months. However, it improved completely with the diagnosis and treatment of diabetes mellitus. Hence, we infer that comorbid diabetes mellitus can render depression resistant to psychiatric interventions and must always be ruled out when treating patients who show poor response to adequate interventions for an adequate period of time. The role of antidepressants should also be considered in poor glycemic control. PMID:24860227

  17. Hematologic Response to Vorinostat Treatment in Relapsed Myeloid Leukemia of Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scheer, Carina; Kratz, Christian; Witt, Olaf; Creutzig, Ursula; Reinhardt, Dirk; Klusmann, Jan-Henning

    2016-09-01

    Children with Down syndrome are at high risk to develop myeloid leukemia (ML-DS). Despite their excellent prognosis, children with ML-DS particularly suffer from severe therapy-related toxicities and for relapsed ML-DS the cure rates are very poor. Here we report the clinical course of one child with ML-DS treated with the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid) after second relapse. The child had previously received conventional chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation, yet showed a remarkable clinical and hematologic response. Thus, HDAC inhibitor may represent an effective class of drugs for the treatment of ML-DS. PMID:27191354

  18. Glycolysis inhibition as a cancer treatment and its role in an anti-tumour immune response.

    PubMed

    Gill, Kheshwant S; Fernandes, Philana; O'Donovan, Tracey R; McKenna, Sharon L; Doddakula, Kishore K; Power, Derek G; Soden, Declan M; Forde, Patrick F

    2016-08-01

    Increased glycolysis is the main source of energy supply in cancer cells that use this metabolic pathway for ATP generation. Altered energy metabolism is a biochemical fingerprint of cancer cells that represents one of the "hallmarks of cancer". The immune system can prevent tumour growth by eliminating cancer cells but this editing process ultimately results in poorly immunogenic cells remaining allowing for unchallenged tumour growth. In this review we look at the glycolysis pathway as a target for cancer treatments. We also examine the interplay between the glycolysis modulation and the immune response as an anti-cancer therapy. PMID:27373814

  19. Early response to medical treatment of trigeminal neuralgia in a Nigerian population

    PubMed Central

    Omoregie, Osawe Felix; Okoh, Mercy

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study evaluates the clinical profile of patients suffering from trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and correlates the findings with early response of the patients to medical treatment. Patients and Methods: A 4-year prospective study in which patients diagnosed of TN were treated medically and followed up weekly for 8 weeks to determine early treatment outcome, in the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria. Results: Of the 287 patients seen during the study period, a total of 14 (4.9%) patients were diagnosed of TN. Thirteen (4.5%) of the cases were selected based on compliance to the 8-week follow-up visits, consisting of 8 (61.5%) males and 5 (38.5%) females, giving a ratio of 1.6:1. The mean age of the patients was 50±1.5 years. The mandibular (n = 6, 46.2%) and maxillary (n = 5, 38.5%) divisions of the trigeminal nerve were mostly affected. The lesion was slightly more common on the right side of the face (n = 7, 53.8%) than the left side (n = 6, 46.2%). Talking (n=4, 30.8%) and chewing (n = 3, 23.1%) were the most frequent trigger factors. The patients mostly described the pain as severe, spontaneous, and sharp (n = 5, 38.2%). Most patients became stable on tablets carbamazepine 200 mg 12 hourly, folic acid 5 mg daily, and phenytoin 100 mg daily. Good response was observed in most patients within 2 weeks (n = 6, 46.2%) of medical treatment, especially in patients at the seventh decade of age (n = 3, 23.1%) and those with lesions involving the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve (n = 3, 23.1%). Conclusion: This study shows early response of TN to medical treatment. We recommend combination therapy of carbamazepine and folic acid in the treatment of patients, especially elderly patients with lesions involving the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve. PMID:26903693

  20. Effect of ketoprofen treatment on the uterine inflammatory response after AI of jennies with frozen semen.

    PubMed

    Vilés, K; Rabanal, R; Rodríguez-Prado, M; Miró, J

    2013-04-15

    Artificial insemination (AI) involving the placing of frozen-thawed semen directly into the jenny uterine body is associated with very low pregnancy rates. This might be because of an exacerbation of the acute response of the endometrium to sperm, as seen in mares with persistent induced mating endometritis. Pregnancy rates can be increased in such mares, however, by including anti-inflammatory treatments in the insemination protocol (Bucca S, Carli A, Buckley T, Dolci G, Fogarty U. The use of dexamethasone administered to mares at breeding time in the modulation of persistent mating induced endometritis. Theriogenology 2008;70:1093-100; Rojer H, Aurich C. Treatment of persistent mating-induced endometritis in mares with the non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug vedaprofen. Reprod Domest Anim 2010;45:e458-60). To investigate the endometritis caused by the use of frozen-thawed semen in jennies, and to assess the response to ketoprofen treatment, endometrial cytological samples and biopsies from six healthy jennies were examined in a crossover design experiment. Samples were taken from jennies in estrus (E; control) and at 6 hours after AI with or without ketoprofen (+K and -K, respectively). Ketoprofen was administered iv 24 hours before and for 4 days after insemination (total = 2.2 mg/kg/24 hours for 5 days). All animals showed a severe inflammatory response to semen deposition. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil numbers in the cytological smears and biopsies differed significantly between the +K and E animals. No significant differences were recorded, however, between the +K and -K treatments. Eosinophils were observed in all sample types from all groups; these cells appear to be a feature of the normal jenny endometrium. Slight fibrosis was observed in some biopsies, but no significant relationship with inflammation was found. Intense cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) immunohistochemical labeling was detected in the -K biopsies. Less intense labeling was seen in those of the +K

  1. Association study of four dopamine D1 receptor gene polymorphisms and clozapine treatment response.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Rudi; Shinkai, Takahiro; De Luca, Vincenzo; Ni, Xingqun; Potkin, Steven G; Lieberman, Jeffrey A; Meltzer, Herbert Y; Kennedy, James L

    2007-09-01

    Dopamine D1 receptors (D1) in the prefrontal cortex have been implicated in the modulation of cognitive processes as well as both positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Therefore pharmacologic agents with potent D1 effects such as clozapine may influence the symptoms of schizophrenia (SCZ). Genetic variation in the D1 receptor gene (DRD1) may help to explain some of the variability in patient response to antipsychotics (APs). This study investigates the effect of four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DRD1 on clozapine response in two distinct SCZ populations (Caucasian and African American) refractory or intolerant to conventional APs. This study included 183 Caucasian and 49 African American schizophrenics diagnosed using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (revised third or fourth edition). Genotyping was determined by 5'-exonuclease fluorescence assays. Within each population genotype, allele, allele +/- and haplotype frequencies were compared against dichotomous and quantitative measures of treatment response. Linkage disequilibrium analysis was also performed. In the Caucasian sample, no associations were observed for individual SNP tests. However, a rare three-marker haplotype predicted poor response. In the African American sample, the rs265976 variant and another three-marker haplotype were associated with cLozapine response. Although we did not find an association between the rs4532 SNP (-48 A/G, recognized by a DdeI restriction cut site) and cLozapine response as reported by Potkin et al. (2003), a trend in the same direction was observed as well. Our findings suggest that the rs4532 SNP may have a small effect if any. Further studies in larger, independent samples are required to validate these findings. PMID:17092969

  2. Updated Site Response Analyses for the Waste Treatment Plant, DOE Hanford, Site, Washington.

    SciTech Connect

    Youngs, Robert R.

    2007-06-29

    This document describes the calculations performed to develop updated relative amplification functions for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facility at the DOE Hanford Site, Washington State. The original 2,000-year return period design spectra for the WTP were based on the results of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) performed for the DOE Hanford Site by Geomatrix (1996). Geomatrix (1996) performed the PSHA using empirical soil-site ground motion models based primarily on recordings from California. As part of that study, site response analyses were performed to evaluate ground motions at the Hanford sites and California deep soil sites. As described in Appendix A of Geomatrix (1996), characteristic site profiles and dynamic soil properties representative of conditions at various Hanford sites and California deep soil strong motion recording stations were defined. Relative site responses of the Hanford profiles and California profiles were then compared. Based on the results of those site response analyses, it was concluded that ground motions at the Hanford sites underlain by deep soil deposits are similar in character to those on California deep soil sites and it was judged appropriate to use empirical deep soil site attenuation relationships based primarily on California ground motion data to develop design spectra for the Hanford sites. In a subsequent analysis, Geomatrix (2003) updated the site response analyses of Geomatrix (1996, Appendix A) to incorporate randomization of the California and Hanford profiles. The results of that analysis also led to the conclusion that the response of the Hanford profiles was similar to the response of deep soil sites in California.

  3. Updated Site Response Analyses for the Waste Treatment Plant, DOE Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Youngs RR

    2007-06-01

    This document describes the calculations performed to develop updated relative amplification functions for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facility at the DOE Hanford Site, Washington State. The original 2,000-year return period design spectra for the WTP were based on the results of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) performed for the DOE Hanford Site by Geomatrix (1996). Geomatrix (1996) performed the PSHA using empirical soil-site ground motion models based primarily on recordings from California. As part of that study, site response analyses were performed to evaluate ground motions at the Hanford sites and California deep soil sites. As described in Appendix A of Geomatrix (1996), characteristic site profiles and dynamic soil properties representative of conditions at various Hanford sites and California deep soil strong motion recording stations were defined. Relative site responses of the Hanford profiles and California profiles were then compared. Based on the results of those site response analyses, it was concluded that ground motions at the Hanford sites underlain by deep soil deposits are similar in character to those on California deep soil sites and it was judged appropriate to use empirical deep soil site attenuation relationships based primarily on California ground motion data to develop design spectra for the Hanford sites. In a subsequent analysis, Geomatrix (2003) updated the site response analyses of Geomatrix (1996, Appendix A) to incorporate randomization of the California and Hanford profiles. The results of that analysis also led to the conclusion that the response of the Hanford profiles was similar to the response of deep soil sites in California.

  4. Dual-responsive polymer coated superparamagnetic nanoparticle for targeted drug delivery and hyperthermia treatment.

    PubMed

    Patra, Santanu; Roy, Ekta; Karfa, Paramita; Kumar, Sunil; Madhuri, Rashmi; Sharma, Prashant K

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we have prepared water-soluble superparamgnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) coated with a dual responsive polymer for targeted delivery of anticancer hydrophobic drug (curcumin) and hyperthermia treatment. Herein, superparamagnetic mixed spinel (MnFe2O4) was used as a core material (15-20 nm) and modified with carboxymethyl cellulose (water-soluble component), folic acid (tagging agent), and dual responsive polymer (poly-N isopropylacrylamide-co-poly glutamic acid) by microwave radiation. Lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the thermoresponsive copolymer was observed to be around 40 °C, which is appropriate for drug delivery. The polymer-SPIONs show high drug loading capacity (89%) with efficient and fast drug release at the desired pH (5.5) and temperature (40 °C) conditions. Along with this, the SPIONs show a very fast increase in temperature (45 °C in 2 min) when interacting with an external magnetic field, which is an effective and appropriate temperature for the localized hyperthermia treatment of cancer cells. The cytocompatibility of the curcumin loaded SPIONs was studied by the methyl thiazol tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and cells were imaged by fluorescence microscopy. To explore the targeting behavior of curcumin loaded SPIONs, a simple magnetic capturing system (simulating a blood vessel) was constructed and it was found that ∼99% of the nanoparticle accumulated around the magnet in 2 min by traveling a distance of 30 cm. Along with this, to explore an entirely different aspect of the responsive polymer, its antibacterial activity toward an E. coli strain was also studied. It was found that responsive polymer is not harmful for normal or cancer cells but shows a good antibacterial property. PMID:25893447

  5. Glutathione S-transferase polymorphisms influence chemotherapy response and treatment outcome in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Wang, T; Yin, G-Y; Yang, L; Wang, Z-G; Bu, X-B

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of GSTM1 null/present, GSTT1 null/present, and GSTP1 IIe105Val polymorphisms in the clinical response to chemotherapy and treatment outcome of patients with breast cancer. A total of 262 subjects were randomly selected from among patients with a histologically confirmed breast cancer. The genotypes of GSTM1, GSTT1, and GSTP1 IIe105Val polymorphisms were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Our study found that the null genotype of GSTM1 was associated with a better response to chemo-therapy, and the odds ratio [95% confidence interval (CI)] was 1.78 (1.03-3.08). In the Cox proportional hazard model, the hazard ratio (95%CI) for overall survival (OS) in patients carrying the null genotype of GSTM1 was 0.57 (0.32-0.98) using the non-null genotype as the reference variable. However, we observed no significant association between the GSTT1 and GSTP1 polymorphisms and response to chemotherapy and OS in patients with breast cancer. In conclusion, our study found that the GSTM1 polymorphism plays an important role in influencing the chemotherapy response and OS in patients with breast cancer. PMID:26400343

  6. Surface treatment to improve responsivity of MgZnO UV detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yajun; Jiang, Dayong; Liu, Rusheng; Duan, Qian; Tian, Chunguang; Sun, Long; Gao, Shang; Qin, Jieming; Liang, Qingcheng; Zhao, Jianxun

    2015-09-01

    MgZnO films were grown on quartz substrates by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering technique with a combinatorial target. The structural and optical properties of the sputtering films were characterized. Based on the MgZnO films, planar geometry metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) structured ultraviolet (UV) detectors were fabricated. At 30 V bias, a peak responsivity of 3.5 mA/W was achieved at 285 nm, and the visible rejection was about one order of magnitude with 25 pairs of electrodes. Afterward, in order to improve the responsivity, the surface of the MgZnO-based detector was sputtered ZnO within 20 s. The responsivity was improved significantly from 3.5 to 15.8 mA/W after surface treatment, and the corresponding visible rejection increased to three orders of magnitude. It revealed ZnO particles play a key role in enhancing the responsivity of detector, and the physical mechanism has been explained by a straightforward model.

  7. Differential response profiles in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: treatment with atomoxetine.

    PubMed

    Wietecha, Linda A; Wang, Shufang; Saylor, Keith E; Day, Kathleen A; Wu, Sheng Hu; Kelsey, Doug

    2015-02-01

    Atomoxetine has been shown to be safe and effective in the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The purpose of this post hoc analysis was to examine response trajectories of pediatric patients treated with atomoxetine. Data were pooled from 7 atomoxetine double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials conducted in pediatric patients between November 1998 and June 2004. Growth mixture modeling was applied to the investigator-rated ADHD rating scale (ADHDRS-Inv) and Clinical Global Impressions-ADHD-Severity (CGI-ADHD-S) scores in the randomized acute phase (6-9 weeks) to explore whether there were groups of patients who differed in their response to atomoxetine. Classification and regression tree analyses were performed to identify predictors that can help categorize subjects to different response profiles. Patients (N = 925) were mostly male (73%) and of the combined subtype (74%). Most patients had a response pattern characterized by gradual, modest improvement, while a smaller group experienced early, robust improvement. PMID:25371450

  8. Non-responsiveness to intravitreal aflibercept treatment in neovascular age-related macular degeneration: implications of serous pigment epithelial detachment

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Norihiro; Suzuki, Misa; Uchida, Atsuro; Kurihara, Toshihide; Kamoshita, Mamoru; Minami, Sakiko; Shinoda, Hajime; Tsubota, Kazuo; Ozawa, Yoko

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) has been improved by anti-vascular endothelial growth factor treatments, including intravitreal aflibercept (IVA) treatment. However, many patients remain incurable. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated non-responsiveness to IVA monotherapy at 12 months in 133 eyes of 133 AMD patients. Sixty-two patients were initially treatment-naive, and 71 had received other treatments before IVA (the treatment-switched group). Mean best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was improved in the treatment-naive group but not in the treatment-switched group, although mean central retinal thickness (CRT) decreased in both groups. The respective percentages of non-responders as determined by worsened BCVA in the treatment-naive and treatment-switched groups were 8.1% and 15.5%, and via fundus findings, they were 12.9% and 8.5%. Multivariate analyses adjusted for age, gender, CRT, and greatest linear dimension showed that serous pigment epithelial detachment (PED) at baseline was associated with non-responsiveness in both groups as determined by BCVA and by fundus findings, and fibrovascular PED measurements indicated no response as determined by fundus findings in the treatment-switched group. The results reported herein may assist the formulation of appropriate treatment protocols for AMD patients. PMID:27403807

  9. Polymorphism of the dopamine transporter type 1 gene modifies the treatment response in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Caroline; Meguig, Sayah; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Labreuche, Julien; Vasseur, Francis; Duhamel, Alain; Delval, Arnaud; Bardyn, Thomas; Devedjian, Jean-Christophe; Rouaix, Nathalie; Petyt, Gregory; Brefel-Courbon, Christine; Ory-Magne, Fabienne; Guehl, Dominique; Eusebio, Alexandre; Fraix, Valérie; Saulnier, Pierre-Jean; Lagha-Boukbiza, Ouhaid; Durif, Frank; Faighel, Mirela; Giordana, Caroline; Drapier, Sophie; Maltête, David; Tranchant, Christine; Houeto, Jean-Luc; Debû, Bettina; Azulay, Jean-Philippe; Tison, François; Destée, Alain; Vidailhet, Marie; Rascol, Olivier; Dujardin, Kathy; Defebvre, Luc; Bordet, Régis; Sablonnière, Bernard; Devos, David

    2015-05-01

    After more than 50 years of treating Parkinson's disease with l-DOPA, there are still no guidelines on setting the optimal dose for a given patient. The dopamine transporter type 1, now known as solute carrier family 6 (neurotransmitter transporter), member 3 (SLC6A3) is the most powerful determinant of dopamine neurotransmission and might therefore influence the treatment response. We recently demonstrated that methylphenidate (a dopamine transporter inhibitor) is effective in patients with Parkinson's disease with motor and gait disorders. The objective of the present study was to determine whether genetic variants of the dopamine transporter type 1-encoding gene (SLC6A3) are associated with differences in the response to treatment of motor symptoms and gait disorders with l-DOPA and methylphenidate (with respect to the demographic, the disease and the treatment parameters and the other genes involved in the dopaminergic neurotransmission). This analysis was part of a multicentre, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial of methylphenidate in Parkinson's disease (Protocol ID:2008-005801-20; ClinicalTrials.gov:NCT00914095). We scored the motor Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and the Stand-Walk-Sit Test before and after a standardized acute l-DOPA challenge before randomization and then after 3 months of methylphenidate treatment. Patients were screened for variants of genes involved in dopamine metabolism: rs28363170 and rs3836790 polymorphisms in the SLC6A3 gene, rs921451 and rs3837091 in the DDC gene (encoding the aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase involved in the synthesis of dopamine from l-DOPA), rs1799836 in the MAOB gene (coding for monoamine oxidase B) and rs4680 in the COMT gene (coding for catechol-O-methyltransferase). Investigators and patients were blinded to the genotyping data throughout the study. Eighty-one subjects were genotyped and 61 were analysed for their acute motor response to l-DOPA. The SLC6A3

  10. Liver Stiffness Decreases Rapidly in Response to Successful Hepatitis C Treatment and Then Plateaus

    PubMed Central

    Bichoupan, Kian; Sefcik, Roberta; Doobay, Kamini; Chang, Sanders; DelBello, David; Harty, Alyson; Dieterich, Douglas T.; Perumalswami, Ponni V.; Branch, Andrea D.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim To investigate the impact of a sustained virological response (SVR) to hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment on liver stiffness (LS). Methods LS, measured by transient elastography (FibroScan), demographic and laboratory data of patients treated with interferon (IFN)-containing or IFN-free regimens who had an SVR24 (undetectable HCV viral load 24 weeks after the end of treatment) were analyzed using two-tailed paired t-tests, Mann-Whitney Wilcoxon Signed-rank tests and linear regression. Two time intervals were investigated: pre-treatment to SVR24 and SVR24 to the end of follow-up. LS scores ≥ 12.5 kPa indicated LS-defined cirrhosis. A p-value below 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results The median age of the patients (n = 100) was 60 years [IQR (interquartile range) 54–64); 72% were male; 60% were Caucasian; and 42% had cirrhosis pre-treatment according to the FibroScan measurement. The median LS score dropped from 10.40 kPa (IQR: 7.25–18.60) pre-treatment to 7.60 kPa (IQR: 5.60–12.38) at SVR24, p <0.01. Among the 42 patients with LS-defined cirrhosis pre-treatment, 25 (60%) of patients still had LS scores ≥ 12.5 kPa at SVR24, indicating the persistence of cirrhosis. The median change in LS was similar in patients receiving IFN-containing and IFN-free regimens: -1.95 kPa (IQR: -5.75 –-0.38) versus -2.40 kPa (IQR: -7.70 –-0.23), p = 0.74. Among 56 patients with a post-SVR24 LS measurement, the LS score changed by an additional -0.90 kPa (IQR: -2.98–0.5) during a median follow-up time of 1.17 (IQR: 0.88–1.63) years, which was not a statistically significant decrease (p = 0.99). Conclusions LS decreased from pre-treatment to SVR24, but did not decrease significantly during additional follow-up. Earlier treatment may be needed to reduce the burden of liver disease. PMID:27442255

  11. Delayed neurotrophic treatment preserves nerve survival and electrophysiological responsiveness in neomycin-deafened guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Takahiko; Miller, Josef M; Ulfendahl, Mats; Olivius, N Petri; Altschuler, Richard A; Pyykkö, Ilmari; Bredberg, Göran

    2004-10-01

    Benefits of cochlear prostheses for the deaf are dependent on survival and excitability of the auditory nerve. Degeneration of deafferented auditory nerve fibers is prevented and excitability maintained by immediate replacement therapy with exogenous neurotrophic factors, in vivo. It is important to know whether such interventions are effective after a delay following deafness, typical for the human situation. This study evaluated the efficacy of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and ciliary neurotrophic factor axokine-1 analogue (CNTF Ax1) application, 2 or 6 weeks postdeafening, in preventing further degeneration and a decrease in excitability. Guinea pigs were deafened and implanted with intracochlear stimulating electrodes, a scala tympani cannula-osmotic pump system, and auditory brainstem response (ABR) recording electrodes. Subjects received BDNF + CNTF Ax1 or artificial perilymph (AP) treatment for 27 days, beginning at 2 or 6 weeks following deafening. Electrical (E) ABR thresholds increased following deafening. After 1 week, in the 2-weeks-delayed neurotrophic factor treatment group, EABR thresholds decreased relative to AP controls, which were statistically significant at 2 weeks. In the 6-week delay group, a tendency to enhanced EABR sensitivity began at 2 weeks of treatment and increased thereafter, with a significant difference between neurotrophic factor- and AP-treated groups across the treatment period. A clear, statistically significant, enhanced survival of spiral ganglion cells was seen in both neurotrophic factor treatment groups relative to AP controls. These findings demonstrate that BDNF + CNTF Ax1 can act to delay or possibly even reverse degenerative and, likely apoptotic, processes well after they have been activated. These survival factors can rescue cells from death and enhance electrical excitability, even during the period of degeneration and cell loss when the spiral ganglion cell population is reduced by >50% (6 weeks). It is

  12. Response of infiltration capacity to thinning treatment in Japanese cypress plantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraoka, M.; Onda, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Forest management practice such as thinning treatment changes the physical structure of stands and canopy and ecohydrology in the forest system, resulting in the change of runoff and hydrological processes in watershed scale. Understory vegetation is a major factor controlling infiltration rate in a forested hillslope because it can reduce the raindrop impact to surface soil, trap the litter, and form the macropore in surface soil. In unmanaged Japanese cypress forest, understory vegetation has decreased because of high stand density and low light conditions, resulting in low infiltration due to surface sealing and crusting and overland flow generation. In such forest, improvement of infiltration capacity is expected by the recovery of understory vegetation after a thinning treatment, but the effect of the practice on infiltration has never been evaluated due to the lack of infiltration measurement in situ. The objective of this study is to elucidate the response of infiltration capacity to thinning treatment in Japanese cypress plantation. Rainfall simulation experiments on a plot-scale were conducted on 21 forested hillslopes experienced by various thinning treatments in Japanese cypress plantation in Yamaguchi Prefecture, western Japan. The average values of infiltration capacity in the unthinned and thinned plots were 51 and 152 mm/h, respectively. The relative light intensity of the thinned plots was higher than that of the unthinned plots. The cover percentages and dry weights of understory vegetation and litter of the thinned plots were greater than those of the unthinned plots. The organic matter content, bulk density, and soil particle size distribution of surface soil (4-cm in depth) had little difference between the unthinned and thinned plots, indicating that the physical properties of surface soil were less likely to change after a thinning treatment. These results suggest that above-ground biomass can increase with the light condition of forest floor

  13. Interaction between nanoparticles generated by zinc chloride treatment and oxidative responses in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Azzouz, Inès; Trabelsi, Hamdi; Hanini, Amel; Ferchichi, Soumaya; Tebourbi, Olfa; Sakly, Mohsen; Abdelmelek, Hafedh

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the interaction of zinc chloride (3 mg/kg, intraperitoneally [ip]) in rat liver in terms of the biosynthesis of nanoparticles. Zinc treatment increased zinc content in rat liver. Analysis of fluorescence revealed the presence of red fluorescence in the liver following zinc treatment. Interestingly, the co-exposure to zinc (3 mg/kg, ip) and selenium (0.20 mg/L, per os [by mouth]) led to a higher intensity of red fluorescence compared to zinc-treated rats. In addition, X-ray diffraction measurements carried out on liver fractions of zinc-treated rats point to the biosynthesis of zinc sulfide and/or selenide nanocomplexes at nearly 51.60 nm in size. Moreover, co-exposure led to nanocomplexes of about 72.60 nm in size. The interaction of zinc with other mineral elements (S, Se) generates several nanocomplexes, such as ZnS and/or ZnSe. The nanocomplex ZnX could interact directly with enzyme activity or indirectly by the disruption of mineral elements' bioavailability in cells. Subacute zinc or selenium treatment decreased malondialdehyde levels, indicating a drop in lipid peroxidation. In addition, antioxidant enzyme assays showed that treatment with zinc or co-treatment with zinc and selenium increased the activities of glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase. Consequently, zinc complexation with sulfur and/or selenium at nanoscale level could enhance antioxidative responses, which is correlated to the ratio of number of ZnX nanoparticles (X=sulfur or X=selenium) to malondialdehyde level in rat liver. PMID:24403828

  14. Interaction between nanoparticles generated by zinc chloride treatment and oxidative responses in rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Azzouz, Inès; Trabelsi, Hamdi; Hanini, Amel; Ferchichi, Soumaya; Tebourbi, Olfa; Sakly, Mohsen; Abdelmelek, Hafedh

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the interaction of zinc chloride (3 mg/kg, intraperitoneally [ip]) in rat liver in terms of the biosynthesis of nanoparticles. Zinc treatment increased zinc content in rat liver. Analysis of fluorescence revealed the presence of red fluorescence in the liver following zinc treatment. Interestingly, the co-exposure to zinc (3 mg/kg, ip) and selenium (0.20 mg/L, per os [by mouth]) led to a higher intensity of red fluorescence compared to zinc-treated rats. In addition, X-ray diffraction measurements carried out on liver fractions of zinc-treated rats point to the biosynthesis of zinc sulfide and/or selenide nanocomplexes at nearly 51.60 nm in size. Moreover, co-exposure led to nanocomplexes of about 72.60 nm in size. The interaction of zinc with other mineral elements (S, Se) generates several nanocomplexes, such as ZnS and/or ZnSe. The nanocomplex ZnX could interact directly with enzyme activity or indirectly by the disruption of mineral elements’ bioavailability in cells. Subacute zinc or selenium treatment decreased malondialdehyde levels, indicating a drop in lipid peroxidation. In addition, antioxidant enzyme assays showed that treatment with zinc or co-treatment with zinc and selenium increased the activities of glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase. Consequently, zinc complexation with sulfur and/or selenium at nanoscale level could enhance antioxidative responses, which is correlated to the ratio of number of ZnX nanoparticles (X=sulfur or X=selenium) to malondialdehyde level in rat liver. PMID:24403828

  15. Differential responsiveness to a parenting intervention for mothers in substance abuse treatment.

    PubMed

    Paris, Ruth; Herriott, Anna; Holt, Melissa; Gould, Karen

    2015-12-01

    This study examines the relationship between levels of psychological distress in substance-dependent mothers and their differential response to a dyadic parent-child intervention. A sample of 66 mothers who were receiving treatment for substance abuse, as well as a simultaneous parenting intervention, were interviewed pre and post-treatment on measures of psychological distress, adult and child trauma history, parental reflective functioning, and child social-emotional development. Additionally, clinicians provided assessments of the parent-child relationships. As anticipated, trauma histories for mothers and children, children's social emotional development, and parental reflective functioning were associated with aspects of maternal psychological distress. Kruskal-Wallis and subsequent Wilcoxson signed rank tests revealed that women with highest levels of baseline psychological distress showed significant improvements in psychological functioning post-treatment while women with moderately elevated levels of psychological distress did not. Women who were most distressed at baseline showed increased levels of parental reflective functioning post-treatment while women with moderate and lower levels of baseline psychological distress showed improvements on clinician-rated assessments of parent-child relationships. Chi Square analyses showed that parents who endorsed the highest levels of distress at baseline reported that their children's risk status regarding social-emotional development decreased post-treatment. Despite similarities in substance dependence, mothers in this sample had different needs and outcomes in the context of this parenting intervention due to variation in mental health. Given this variation, parenting interventions for substance-dependent mothers need to account for the individual differences in levels of psychological distress. PMID:26455262

  16. Antibody response in children infected with Giardia intestinalis before and after treatment with Secnidazole.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Juan C; Pinon, Anthony; Dive, Daniel; Capron, Monique; Dei-Cas, Eduardo; Convit, Jacinto

    2009-01-01

    We examined 364 school children for intestinal parasites in a sub-urban zone of Caracas, Venezuela. Giardia intestinalis was the most prevalent parasite in stool samples from 34 children. Levels of IgA and IgG antibodies to G. intestinalis were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blot before and after treatment with secnidazole. All patients were cured with a reduction of IgA antibody levels in 26 of 34 children and a reduction in IgG-specific antibody levels in 18 of 34 children. Serum of infected patients reacted with proteins of 14 kD to 137 kD. Some patients did not show a change in IgA serum reactivity for parasite proteins by Western blot after treatment. Seventeen children showed reduction of the reactivity or disappearance of protein reactivity (mainly the 14-kD, 122-kD, and 137-kD proteins). Antibody response was not related to clinical status, but quantitative and qualitative serum antibody response against G. intestinalis infection could be used to assess levels of new protein markers that decrease or disappear with successful chemotherapy. PMID:19141831

  17. Treatment with Pyranopyran-1, 8-Dione Attenuates Airway Responses in Cockroach Allergen Sensitized Asthma in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Song, Joohyun; Kim, You Ah; Cho, Hi Jae; Min, Byung-Il; Bae, Hyunsu

    2014-01-01

    Chronic allergic asthma is characterized by Th2-typed inflammation, and contributes to airway remodeling and the deterioration of lung function. Viticis Fructus (VF) has long been used in China and Korea as a traditional herbal remedy for treating various inflammatory diseases. Previously, we have isolated a novel phytochemical, pyranopyran-1, 8-dione (PPY), from VF. This study was conducted to evaluate the ability of PPY to prevent airway inflammation and to attenuate airway responses in a cockroach allergen-induced asthma model in mice. The mice sensitized to and challenged with cockroach allergen were treated with oral administration of PPY. The infiltration of total cells, eosinophils and lymphocytes into the BAL fluid was significantly inhibited in cockroach allergen-induced asthma mice treated with PPY (1, 2, or 10 mg/kg). Th2 cytokines and chemokine, such as IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 and eotaxin in BAL fluid were also reduced to normal levels following treatment with PPY. In addition, the levels of IgE were also markedly suppressed after PPY treatment. Histopathological examination demonstrated that PPY substantially inhibited eosinophil infiltration into the airway, goblet cell hyperplasia and smooth muscle hypertrophy. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PPY possesses a potent efficacy on controlling allergic asthma response such as airway inflammation and remodeling. PMID:24489937

  18. Delayed initiation of clozapine may be related to poor response in treatment-resistant schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Üçok, Alp; Çikrikçili, Uğur; Karabulut, Sercan; Salaj, Ada; Öztürk, Meliha; Tabak, Öznur; Durak, Rümeysa

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this retrospective chart-review study was to investigate the relationship between delayed commencement of clozapine and the level of response in treatment-resistant schizophrenia (TRS). We included 162 patients with schizophrenia who used clozapine. The mean delay until starting clozapine after fulfillment of the TRS criteria was 29 months. The delay was shorter in those who gained benefit from clozapine (P=0.04), those who were treated in a specialized psychosis outpatient unit (P=0.01), and in men (P=0.009), and it correlated with age (P<0.001). The delay in starting clozapine and the maximum clozapine dose were independent contributors toward the response to clozapine in the logistic regression analysis. Moreover, of those who gained considerable benefit from clozapine, the patients were younger (P=0.01), the duration of illness before clozapine treatment was shorter (P=0.001), and the numbers of adequate antipsychotic trials before the use of clozapine were fewer (P=0.05). Our findings suggest that efforts aimed at reducing the delay for starting clozapine may increase the effectiveness of clozapine in TRS. PMID:26163875

  19. Treatment with pyranopyran-1, 8-dione attenuates airway responses in cockroach allergen sensitized asthma in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Soojin; Park, Min-Sun; Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Song, Joohyun; Kim, You Ah; Cho, Hi Jae; Min, Byung-Il; Bae, Hyunsu

    2014-01-01

    Chronic allergic asthma is characterized by Th2-typed inflammation, and contributes to airway remodeling and the deterioration of lung function. Viticis Fructus (VF) has long been used in China and Korea as a traditional herbal remedy for treating various inflammatory diseases. Previously, we have isolated a novel phytochemical, pyranopyran-1, 8-dione (PPY), from VF. This study was conducted to evaluate the ability of PPY to prevent airway inflammation and to attenuate airway responses in a cockroach allergen-induced asthma model in mice. The mice sensitized to and challenged with cockroach allergen were treated with oral administration of PPY. The infiltration of total cells, eosinophils and lymphocytes into the BAL fluid was significantly inhibited in cockroach allergen-induced asthma mice treated with PPY (1, 2, or 10 mg/kg). Th2 cytokines and chemokine, such as IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 and eotaxin in BAL fluid were also reduced to normal levels following treatment with PPY. In addition, the levels of IgE were also markedly suppressed after PPY treatment. Histopathological examination demonstrated that PPY substantially inhibited eosinophil infiltration into the airway, goblet cell hyperplasia and smooth muscle hypertrophy. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PPY possesses a potent efficacy on controlling allergic asthma response such as airway inflammation and remodeling. PMID:24489937

  20. Hoarding in Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Anxiety: Incidence, Clinical Correlates, and Behavioral Treatment Response.

    PubMed

    Storch, Eric A; Nadeau, Joshua M; Johnco, Carly; Timpano, Kiara; McBride, Nicole; Jane Mutch, P; Lewin, Adam B; Murphy, Tanya K

    2016-05-01

    This study examined the nature and correlates of hoarding among youth with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Forty children with ASD and a comorbid anxiety disorder were administered a battery of clinician-administered measures assessing presence of psychiatric disorders and anxiety severity. Parents completed questionnaires related to child hoarding behaviors, social responsiveness, internalizing and externalizing behaviors, and functional impairment. We examined the impact of hoarding behaviors on treatment response in a subsample of twenty-six youth who completed a course of personalized cognitive-behavioral therapy targeting anxiety symptoms. Hoarding symptoms were common and occurred in a clinically significant manner in approximately 25 % of cases. Overall hoarding severity was associated with increased internalizing and anxiety/depressive symptoms, externalizing behavior, and attention problems. Discarding items was associated with internalizing and anxious/depressive symptoms, but acquisition was not. Hoarding decreased following cognitive-behavioral therapy but did not differ between treatment responders and non-responders. These data are among the first to examine hoarding among youth with ASD; implications of study findings and future directions are highlighted. PMID:26749256

  1. Plasma genetic and genomic abnormalities predict treatment response and clinical outcome in advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Xia, Shu; Kohli, Manish; Du, Meijun; Dittmar, Rachel L; Lee, Adam; Nandy, Debashis; Yuan, Tiezheng; Guo, Yongchen; Wang, Yuan; Tschannen, Michael R; Worthey, Elizabeth; Jacob, Howard; See, William; Kilari, Deepak; Wang, Xuexia; Hovey, Raymond L; Huang, Chiang-Ching; Wang, Liang

    2015-06-30

    Liquid biopsies, examinations of tumor components in body fluids, have shown promise for predicting clinical outcomes. To evaluate tumor-associated genomic and genetic variations in plasma cell-free DNA (cfDNA) and their associations with treatment response and overall survival, we applied whole genome and targeted sequencing to examine the plasma cfDNAs derived from 20 patients with advanced prostate cancer. Sequencing-based genomic abnormality analysis revealed locus-specific gains or losses that were common in prostate cancer, such as 8q gains, AR amplifications, PTEN losses and TMPRSS2-ERG fusions. To estimate tumor burden in cfDNA, we developed a Plasma Genomic Abnormality (PGA) score by summing the most significant copy number variations. Cox regression analysis showed that PGA scores were significantly associated with overall survival (p < 0.04). After androgen deprivation therapy or chemotherapy, targeted sequencing showed significant mutational profile changes in genes involved in androgen biosynthesis, AR activation, DNA repair, and chemotherapy resistance. These changes may reflect the dynamic evolution of heterozygous tumor populations in response to these treatments. These results strongly support the feasibility of using non-invasive liquid biopsies as potential tools to study biological mechanisms underlying therapy-specific resistance and to predict disease progression in advanced prostate cancer. PMID:25915538

  2. Elevated Vibration Perception Thresholds in CIDP Patients Indicate More Severe Neuropathy and Lower Treatment Response Rates

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Alon; Albulaihe, Hana; Alabdali, Majed; Qrimli, Mohammad; Breiner, Ari; Barnett, Carolina; Katzberg, Hans D.; Lovblom, Leif E.; Perkins, Bruce A.; Bril, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Vibration perception threshold (VPT) examination using a neurothesiometer provides objective, sensitive and specific information, and has been utilized mainly in patients with diabetic polyneropathy. Objectives Explore the utility of VPT examination in CIDP patients. Methods CIDP subjects attending the Neuromuscular clinic between 01/2013 and 12/2014 were evaluated. Demographic data, clinical history, physical examination, VPT values, and electrophysiologic data from their charts were extracted. Results 70 charts were reviewed. 55 CIDP patients had elevated VPT, associated with higher frequency of abnormal sensory testing for various modalities (92.7% vs. 46.7%, p<0.0001), lower sensory and motor amplitudes and reduced conduction velocities on nerve conduction studies, and lower treatment response rates (54% vs. 93%, p = 0.01). Conclusion VPT examination is a simple tool, which is a reliable and sensitive measure not only for diabetic neuropathy, but also for CIDP. Moreover, in CIDP, elevated VPT values are also associated with lower treatment response rates. PMID:26545096

  3. Technical Basis for Radiological Emergency Plan Annex for WTD Emergency Response Plan: West Point Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, Eva E.; Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-08-01

    Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document, Volume 3 of PNNL-15163 is the technical basis for the Annex to the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP) Emergency Response Plan related to responding to a radiological emergency at the WPTP. The plan primarily considers response to radioactive material that has been introduced in the other combined sanitary and storm sewer system from a radiological dispersion device, but is applicable to any accidental or deliberate introduction of materials into the system.

  4. Premorbid functioning in schizophrenia: relation to baseline symptoms, treatment response, and medication side effects.

    PubMed

    Strous, Rael D; Alvir, Jose M J; Robinson, Delbert; Gal, Gilad; Sheitman, Brian; Chakos, Miranda; Lieberman, Jeffrey A

    2004-01-01

    Impaired premorbid functioning prior to the onset of acute psychosis has frequently been noted in schizophrenia. This study examined retrospectively the premorbid status of patients in their first episode of psychosis in order to determine relationships with baseline symptoms, treatment response, and medication side effects. One hundred eleven schizophrenic and schizoaffective patients participating in a large prospective study of first episode schizophrenia were evaluated with the Premorbid Adjustment Scale (PAS). Premorbid functioning in males became progressively worse over time. Deficit state patients exhibited worse premorbid functioning. A third of patients exhibited sustained poor premorbid functioning. At various developmental stages, lower "sociability and withdrawal" scores correlated with increased time to treatment response, more severe negative symptoms, increased drug-induced parkinsonism, and deterioration of premorbid functioning. Various mean PAS scores predicted susceptibility to tardive dyskinesia. Our findings suggest that prior to acute psychosis onset there are certain behavioral precursors reflected in premorbid functioning that may predict subsequent illness manifestations. Measures of premorbid functioning indicate that disease pathogenesis is manifest, albeit more subtly, prior to presentation of first psychotic symptoms. PMID:15279045

  5. A Reactive 1O2 - Responsive Combined Treatment System of Photodynamic and Chemotherapy for Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaojun; Meng, Guoqing; Zhang, Song; Liu, Xinli

    2016-07-01

    The development of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-responsive drug delivery and drug release has gradually attracted much attention in recent years as a promising therapeutic strategy. Singlet oxygen (1O2) as the major ROS species is widely used in photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer. In the present study, we introduce a combined treatment using ROS-sensitive thioketal (TK) linkage as a linker between upconversion nanoparticles (UNs)-based PDT and doxorubicin (DOX)-based chemotherapy. UNs can not only play a role in PDT, but can also be used as a nanocarrier for drug delivery of DOX. Moreover, the products of 1O2 during PDT are able to cleave TK linker inducing the release of DOX which can further achieve the goal of chemotherapy. By using this 1O2-responsive nanocarrier delivery system, DOX can easily reach the tumor site and be accumulated in the nuclei to effectively kill the cancer cells, and therefore decreasing the side effects of chemotherapy on the body. Thus, PDT also has the function of controlling drug release in this combination treatment strategy. Compared with monotherapy, the combination of PDT with chemotherapy also possesses excellent drug loading capability and anticancer efficiency.

  6. Microbial response to single-cell protein production and brewery wastewater treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jackson Z; Logan, Andrew; Terry, Seth; Spear, John R

    2015-01-01

    As global fisheries decline, microbial single-cell protein (SCP) produced from brewery process water has been highlighted as a potential source of protein for sustainable animal feed. However, biotechnological investigation of SCP is difficult because of the natural variation and complexity of microbial ecology in wastewater bioreactors. In this study, we investigate microbial response across a full-scale brewery wastewater treatment plant and a parallel pilot bioreactor modified to produce an SCP product. A pyrosequencing survey of the brewery treatment plant showed that each unit process selected for a unique microbial community. Notably, flow equalization basins were dominated by Prevotella, methanogenesis effluent had the highest levels of diversity, and clarifier wet-well samples were sources of sequences for the candidate bacterial phyla of TM7 and BD1-5. Next, the microbial response of a pilot bioreactor producing SCP was tracked over 1 year, showing that two different production trials produced two different communities originating from the same starting influent. However, SCP production resulted generally in enrichment of several clades of rhizospheric diazotrophs of Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria in the bioreactor and even more so in the final product. These diazotrophs are potentially useful as the basis of a SCP product for commercial feed production. PMID:24837420

  7. Fluoxetine treatment prevents the inflammatory response in a mouse model of posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Kao, Chi-Ya; He, Zhisong; Zannas, Anthony S; Hahn, Oliver; Kühne, Claudia; Reichel, Judith M; Binder, Elisabeth B; Wotjak, Carsten T; Khaitovich, Philipp; Turck, Christoph W

    2016-05-01

    Despite intense research efforts the molecular mechanisms affecting stress-vulnerable brain regions in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) remain elusive. In the current study we have applied global transcriptomic profiling to a PTSD mouse model induced by foot shock fear conditioning. We compared the transcriptomes of prelimbic cortex, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), basolateral amygdala, central nucleus of amygdala, nucleus accumbens (NAc) and CA1 of the dorsal hippocampus between shocked and non-shocked (control) mice, with and without fluoxetine treatment by RNA sequencing. Differentially expressed (DE) genes were identified and clustered for in silico pathway analysis. Findings in relevant brain regions were further validated with immunohistochemistry. DE genes belonging to 11 clusters were identified including increased inflammatory response in ACC in shocked mice. In line with this finding, we noted higher microglial activation in ACC of shocked mice. Chronic fluoxetine treatment initiated in the aftermath of the trauma prevented inflammatory gene expression alterations in ACC and ameliorated PTSD-like symptoms, implying an important role of the immune response in PTSD pathobiology. Our results provide novel insights into molecular mechanisms affected in PTSD and suggest therapeutic applications with anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:26897419

  8. A Reactive (1)O2 - Responsive Combined Treatment System of Photodynamic and Chemotherapy for Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojun; Meng, Guoqing; Zhang, Song; Liu, Xinli

    2016-01-01

    The development of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-responsive drug delivery and drug release has gradually attracted much attention in recent years as a promising therapeutic strategy. Singlet oxygen ((1)O2) as the major ROS species is widely used in photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer. In the present study, we introduce a combined treatment using ROS-sensitive thioketal (TK) linkage as a linker between upconversion nanoparticles (UNs)-based PDT and doxorubicin (DOX)-based chemotherapy. UNs can not only play a role in PDT, but can also be used as a nanocarrier for drug delivery of DOX. Moreover, the products of (1)O2 during PDT are able to cleave TK linker inducing the release of DOX which can further achieve the goal of chemotherapy. By using this (1)O2-responsive nanocarrier delivery system, DOX can easily reach the tumor site and be accumulated in the nuclei to effectively kill the cancer cells, and therefore decreasing the side effects of chemotherapy on the body. Thus, PDT also has the function of controlling drug release in this combination treatment strategy. Compared with monotherapy, the combination of PDT with chemotherapy also possesses excellent drug loading capability and anticancer efficiency. PMID:27443831

  9. Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Diffusion-Weighted MRI: Detection and Evaluation of Treatment Response.

    PubMed

    Gluskin, Jill S; Chegai, Fabrizio; Monti, Serena; Squillaci, Ettore; Mannelli, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Differentiating between cancerous tissue and healthy liver parenchyma could represent a challenge with the only conventional Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging. Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) exploits different tissue characteristics to conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) sequences that enhance hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) detection, characterization, and post-treatment evaluation. Detection of HCC is improved by DWI, infact this technology increases conspicuity of lesions that might otherwise not be identified due to obscuration by adjacent vessels or due to low contrast between the lesion and background liver. It is important to remember that DWI combined with contrast-enhanced MRI has higher sensitivity than DWI alone, and that some patients are not eligible for use of contrast on CT and MRI; in these patients DWI has a prominent role. MRI has advanced beyond structural anatomic imaging to now showing pathophysiologic processes. DWI is a promising way to characterize lesions utilizing the inherent contrast within the liver and has the benefit of not requiring contrast injection. DWI improves detection and characterization of HCC. Proposed clinical uses for DWI include: assessing prognosis, predicting response, monitoring response to therapy, and distinguishing tumor recurrence from treatment effect. Ideally, DWI will help risk stratify patients and will participate in prognostic modeling. PMID:27471573

  10. Microbial response to single-cell protein production and brewery wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jackson Z; Logan, Andrew; Terry, Seth; Spear, John R

    2015-01-01

    As global fisheries decline, microbial single-cell protein (SCP) produced from brewery process water has been highlighted as a potential source of protein for sustainable animal feed. However, biotechnological investigation of SCP is difficult because of the natural variation and complexity of microbial ecology in wastewater bioreactors. In this study, we investigate microbial response across a full-scale brewery wastewater treatment plant and a parallel pilot bioreactor modified to produce an SCP product. A pyrosequencing survey of the brewery treatment plant showed that each unit process selected for a unique microbial community. Notably, flow equalization basins were dominated by Prevotella, methanogenesis effluent had the highest levels of diversity, and clarifier wet-well samples were sources of sequences for the candidate bacterial phyla of TM7 and BD1-5. Next, the microbial response of a pilot bioreactor producing SCP was tracked over 1 year, showing that two different production trials produced two different communities originating from the same starting influent. However, SCP production resulted generally in enrichment of several clades of rhizospheric diazotrophs of Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria in the bioreactor and even more so in the final product. These diazotrophs are potentially useful as the basis of a SCP product for commercial feed production. PMID:24837420

  11. Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Diffusion-Weighted MRI: Detection and Evaluation of Treatment Response

    PubMed Central

    Gluskin, Jill S; Chegai, Fabrizio; Monti, Serena; Squillaci, Ettore; Mannelli, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Differentiating between cancerous tissue and healthy liver parenchyma could represent a challenge with the only conventional Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging. Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) exploits different tissue characteristics to conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) sequences that enhance hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) detection, characterization, and post-treatment evaluation. Detection of HCC is improved by DWI, infact this technology increases conspicuity of lesions that might otherwise not be identified due to obscuration by adjacent vessels or due to low contrast between the lesion and background liver. It is important to remember that DWI combined with contrast-enhanced MRI has higher sensitivity than DWI alone, and that some patients are not eligible for use of contrast on CT and MRI; in these patients DWI has a prominent role. MRI has advanced beyond structural anatomic imaging to now showing pathophysiologic processes. DWI is a promising way to characterize lesions utilizing the inherent contrast within the liver and has the benefit of not requiring contrast injection. DWI improves detection and characterization of HCC. Proposed clinical uses for DWI include: assessing prognosis, predicting response, monitoring response to therapy, and distinguishing tumor recurrence from treatment effect. Ideally, DWI will help risk stratify patients and will participate in prognostic modeling. PMID:27471573

  12. Rapid-response process reduces mortality, facilitates speedy treatment for patients with sepsis.

    PubMed

    2013-08-01

    To reduce mortality and improve the care of patients with sepsis, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, NC, created a new rapid-response protocol aimed at facilitating earlier diagnosis and treatment. In this approach, clinicians who suspect a patient may have sepsis can call a Code Sepsis, which will fast-track the series of tests and evaluations that are needed to confirm the diagnosis and get appropriate patients on IV antibiotics quickly. Administrators say the approach fits in with the culture of the ED, and it has quickly slashed time-to-treatment in this environment. In just one year, the hospital has been able to reduce its risk-adjusted mortality index from 1.8 to less than 1.25. In the ED, where a modified version of the approach has been in place since April 1 of this year, the percentage of patients with sepsis receiving antibiotics within one hour of diagnosis has increased from 25% to 85%. Key to the success of the approach are specially trained rapid-response nurses who are called in on a case whenever a diagnosis of sepsis is suspected and a series of policy changes designed to facilitate needed diagnostic tests to confirm a diagnosis. A mandated online education module helped to bring all clinicians and staff up to speed on the new process quickly. PMID:23923521

  13. Contrast enhanced ultrasonography in assessing the treatment response to transarterial chemoembolization in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sparchez, Zeno; Mocan, Tudor; Radu, Pompilia; Anton, Ofelia; Bolog, Nicolae

    2016-03-01

    The last decades have known continuous development of therapeutic strategies in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Unfortunately the disease it still not diagnosed until it is already at an intermediate or even an advanced disease. In these circumstances transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is considered an effective treatment for HCC. The most important independent prognostic factor of both disease free survival and overall survival is the presence of complete necrosis. Therefore, treatment outcomes are dictated by the proper use of radiological imaging. Current guidelines recommend contrast enhanced computer tomography (CECT) as the standard imaging technique for evaluating the therapeutic response in patients with HCC after TACE. One of the most important disadvantage of CECT is the overestimation of tumor response. As an attempt to overcome this limitation contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has gained particular attention as an imaging modality in HCC patients after TACE. Of all available imaging modalities, CEUS performs better in the early and very early assessment of TACE especially after lipiodol TACE. As any other imaging techniques CEUS has disadvantages especially in hypovascular tumors or in cases of tumor multiplicity. Not far from now the current limitations of CEUS will be overcome by the new CEUS techniques that are already tested in clinical practice such as dynamic CEUS with quantification, three-dimensional CEUS or fusion techniques. PMID:26962561

  14. Plasma genetic and genomic abnormalities predict treatment response and clinical outcome in advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Du, Meijun; Dittmar, Rachel L.; Lee, Adam; Nandy, Debashis; Yuan, Tiezheng; Guo, Yongchen; Wang, Yuan; Tschannen, Michael R.; Worthey, Elizabeth; Jacob, Howard; See, William; Kilari, Deepak; Wang, Xuexia; Hovey, Raymond L.; Huang, Chiang-Ching; Wang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Liquid biopsies, examinations of tumor components in body fluids, have shown promise for predicting clinical outcomes. To evaluate tumor-associated genomic and genetic variations in plasma cell-free DNA (cfDNA) and their associations with treatment response and overall survival, we applied whole genome and targeted sequencing to examine the plasma cfDNAs derived from 20 patients with advanced prostate cancer. Sequencing-based genomic abnormality analysis revealed locus-specific gains or losses that were common in prostate cancer, such as 8q gains, AR amplifications, PTEN losses and TMPRSS2-ERG fusions. To estimate tumor burden in cfDNA, we developed a Plasma Genomic Abnormality (PGA) score by summing the most significant copy number variations. Cox regression analysis showed that PGA scores were significantly associated with overall survival (p < 0.04). After androgen deprivation therapy or chemotherapy, targeted sequencing showed significant mutational profile changes in genes involved in androgen biosynthesis, AR activation, DNA repair, and chemotherapy resistance. These changes may reflect the dynamic evolution of heterozygous tumor populations in response to these treatments. These results strongly support the feasibility of using non-invasive liquid biopsies as potential tools to study biological mechanisms underlying therapy-specific resistance and to predict disease progression in advanced prostate cancer. PMID:25915538

  15. Genetically Determined Response to Artemisinin Treatment in Western Kenyan Plasmodium falciparum Parasites.

    PubMed

    Chebon, Lorna J; Ngalah, Bidii S; Ingasia, Luicer A; Juma, Dennis W; Muiruri, Peninah; Cheruiyot, Jelagat; Opot, Benjamin; Mbuba, Emmanuel; Imbuga, Mabel; Akala, Hoseah M; Bulimo, Wallace; Andagalu, Ben; Kamau, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Genetically determined artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum has been described in Southeast Asia. The relevance of recently described Kelch 13-propeller mutations for artemisinin resistance in Sub-Saharan Africa parasites is still unknown. Southeast Asia parasites have low genetic diversity compared to Sub-Saharan Africa, where parasites are highly genetically diverse. This study attempted to elucidate whether genetics provides a basis for discovering molecular markers in response to artemisinin drug treatment in P. falciparum in Kenya. The genetic diversity of parasites collected pre- and post- introduction of artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) in western Kenya was determined. A panel of 12 microsatellites and 91 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) distributed across the P. falciparum genome were genotyped. Parasite clearance rates were obtained for the post-ACT parasites. The 12 microsatellites were highly polymorphic with post-ACT parasites being significantly more diverse compared to pre-ACT (p < 0.0001). The median clearance half-life was 2.55 hours for the post-ACT parasites. Based on SNP analysis, 15 of 90 post-ACT parasites were single-clone infections. Analysis revealed 3 SNPs that might have some causal association with parasite clearance rates. Further, genetic analysis using Bayesian tree revealed parasites with similar clearance phenotypes were more closely genetically related. With further studies, SNPs described here and genetically determined response to artemisinin treatment might be useful in tracking artemisinin resistance in Kenya. PMID:27611315

  16. Treatment of allergic asthma: Modulation of Th2 cells and their responses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Atopic asthma is a chronic inflammatory pulmonary disease characterised by recurrent episodes of wheezy, laboured breathing with an underlying Th2 cell-mediated inflammatory response in the airways. It is currently treated and, more or less, controlled depending on severity, with bronchodilators e.g. long-acting beta agonists and long-acting muscarinic antagonists or anti-inflammatory drugs such as corticosteroids (inhaled or oral), leukotriene modifiers, theophyline and anti-IgE therapy. Unfortunately, none of these treatments are curative and some asthmatic patients do not respond to intense anti-inflammatory therapies. Additionally, the use of long-term oral steroids has many undesired side effects. For this reason, novel and more effective drugs are needed. In this review, we focus on the CD4+ Th2 cells and their products as targets for the development of new drugs to add to the current armamentarium as adjuncts or as potential stand-alone treatments for allergic asthma. We argue that in early disease, the reduction or elimination of allergen-specific Th2 cells will reduce the consequences of repeated allergic inflammatory responses such as lung remodelling without causing generalised immunosuppression. PMID:21867534

  17. A Reactive 1O2 - Responsive Combined Treatment System of Photodynamic and Chemotherapy for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaojun; Meng, Guoqing; Zhang, Song; Liu, Xinli

    2016-01-01

    The development of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-responsive drug delivery and drug release has gradually attracted much attention in recent years as a promising therapeutic strategy. Singlet oxygen (1O2) as the major ROS species is widely used in photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer. In the present study, we introduce a combined treatment using ROS-sensitive thioketal (TK) linkage as a linker between upconversion nanoparticles (UNs)-based PDT and doxorubicin (DOX)-based chemotherapy. UNs can not only play a role in PDT, but can also be used as a nanocarrier for drug delivery of DOX. Moreover, the products of 1O2 during PDT are able to cleave TK linker inducing the release of DOX which can further achieve the goal of chemotherapy. By using this 1O2-responsive nanocarrier delivery system, DOX can easily reach the tumor site and be accumulated in the nuclei to effectively kill the cancer cells, and therefore decreasing the side effects of chemotherapy on the body. Thus, PDT also has the function of controlling drug release in this combination treatment strategy. Compared with monotherapy, the combination of PDT with chemotherapy also possesses excellent drug loading capability and anticancer efficiency. PMID:27443831

  18. Early responses of human cancer cells upon photodynamic treatment monitored by laser phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelofs, Theo A.; Graschew, Georgi; Perevedentseva, Elena V.; Rakowsky, Stefan; Dressler, Cathrin; Beuthan, Juergen; Schlag, Peter M.

    2001-04-01

    Photodynamic treatment of cancer cells is known to eventually cause cell death in most cases. The precise pathways and the time course seem to vary among different cell types and modes of photodynamic treatment. In this contribution, the focus was put on the responses of human colon carcinoma cells HCT-116 within the first 15 minutes after laser irradiation in the presence of Photofrin« II (PII). To monitor the cell response in this early time period laser phase microscopic imaging was used, a method sensitive to changes in overall cell shape and intracellular structures, mediated by changes in the local refractive index. Laser irradiation of cells loaded with PII induced a significant reduction of the phase shifts, which probably reflects the induced damage to the different cellular membrane structures. The data suggest that even within the first 30 s after the onset of laser illumination, a significant reduction of the phase shifts can be detected. These results underline that laser phase microscopy is a suitable diagnostic tool for cellular research, also in the early time domain.

  19. GSTM1 Gene Expression Correlates to Leiomyoma Volume Regression in Response to Mifepristone Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Engman, Mikael; Varghese, Suby; Lagerstedt Robinson, Kristina; Malmgren, Helena; Hammarsjö, Anna; Byström, Birgitta; L Lalitkumar, Parameswaran Grace; Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    Progesterone receptor modulators, such as mifepristone are useful and well tolerated in reducing leiomyoma volume although with large individual variation. The objective of this study was to investigate the molecular basis for the observed leiomyoma volume reduction, in response to mifepristone treatment and explore a possible molecular marker for the selective usage of mifepristone in leiomyoma patients. Premenopausal women (N = 14) were treated with mifepristone 50 mg, every other day for 12 weeks prior to surgery. Women were arbitrarily sub-grouped as good (N = 4), poor (N = 4) responders to treatment or intermediate respondents (N = 3). Total RNA was extracted from leiomyoma tissue, after surgical removal of the tumour and the differential expression of genes were analysed by microarray. The results were analysed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software. The glutathione pathway was the most significantly altered canonical pathway in which the glutathione-s transferase mu 1 (GSTM1) gene was significantly over expressed (+8.03 folds) among the good responders compared to non responders. This was further confirmed by Real time PCR (p = 0.024). Correlation of immunoreactive scores (IRS) for GSTM1 accumulation in leiomyoma tissue was seen with base line volume change of leiomyoma R = −0.8 (p = 0.011). Furthermore the accumulation of protein GSTM1 analysed by Western Blot correlated significantly with the percentual leiomyoma volume change R = −0.82 (p = 0.004). Deletion of the GSTM1 gene in leiomyoma biopsies was found in 50% of the mifepristone treated cases, with lower presence of the GSTM1 protein. The findings support a significant role for GSTM1 in leiomyoma volume reduction induced by mifepristone and explain the observed individual variation in this response. Furthermore the finding could be useful to further explore GSTM1 as a biomarker for tailoring medical treatment of uterine leiomyomas for optimizing the response

  20. Risk profiles for poor treatment response to internet-delivered CBT in people with social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Tillfors, Maria; Furmark, Tomas; Carlbring, Per; Andersson, Gerhard

    2015-06-01

    In social anxiety disorder (SAD) co-morbid depressive symptoms as well as avoidance behaviors have been shown to predict insufficient treatment response. It is likely that subgroups of individuals with different profiles of risk factors for poor treatment response exist. This study aimed to identify subgroups of social avoidance and depressive symptoms in a clinical sample (N = 167) with SAD before and after guided internet-delivered CBT, and to compare these groups on diagnostic status and social anxiety. We further examined individual movement between subgroups over time. Using cluster analysis we identified four subgroups, including a high-problem cluster at both time-points. Individuals in this cluster showed less remission after treatment, exhibited higher levels of social anxiety at both assessments, and typically remained in the high-problem cluster after treatment. Thus, in individuals with SAD, high levels of social avoidance and depressive symptoms constitute a risk profile for poor treatment response. PMID:26087474

  1. Cortical and subcortical responses to high and low effective placebo treatments.

    PubMed

    Geuter, Stephan; Eippert, Falk; Hindi Attar, Catherine; Büchel, Christian

    2013-02-15

    The effectiveness of placebo treatments depends on the recipient's expectations, which are at least in part shaped by previous experiences. Thus, positive past experience together with an accordant verbal instruction should enhance outcome expectations and subsequently lead to higher placebo efficacy. This should be reflected in subjective valuation reports and in activation of placebo-related brain structures. We tested this hypothesis in a functional magnetic resonance imaging study, where subjects experienced different levels of pain relief and conforming information about price levels for two placebo treatments during a manipulation phase, thereby establishing a weak and a strong placebo. As expected, both placebos led to a significant pain relief and the strong placebo induced better analgesic efficacy. Individual placebo value estimates reflected treatment efficacy, i.e. subjects were willing to pay more money for the strong placebo even though pain stimulation was completed at this time. On the neural level, placebo effects were associated with activation of the rostral anterior cingulate cortex, the anterior insula, and the ventral striatum and deactivations in the thalamus and secondary somatosensory cortex. However, only placebo-related responses in rostral anterior cingulate cortex were consistent across both the anticipation of painful stimuli and their actual administration. Most importantly, rostral anterior cingulate cortex responses were higher for the strong placebo, thus mirroring the behavioral effects. These results directly link placebo analgesia to anticipatory activity in the ventral striatum, a region involved in reward processing, and highlight the role of the rostral anterior cingulate cortex, as its activity consistently scaled with increasing analgesic efficacy. PMID:23201367

  2. Amino Acid PET – An Imaging Option to Identify Treatment Response, Posttherapeutic Effects, and Tumor Recurrence?

    PubMed Central

    Galldiks, Norbert; Langen, Karl-Josef

    2016-01-01

    Routine diagnostics and treatment monitoring in patients with primary and secondary brain tumors is usually based on contrast-enhanced standard MRI. However, the capacity of standard MRI to differentiate neoplastic tissue from non-specific posttreatment effects may be limited particularly after therapeutic interventions such as radio- and/or chemotherapy or newer treatment options, e.g., immune therapy. Metabolic imaging using PET may provide relevant additional information on tumor metabolism, which allows a more accurate diagnosis especially in clinically equivocal situations, particularly when radiolabeled amino acids are used. Amino acid PET allows a sensitive monitoring of a response to various treatment options, the early detection of tumor recurrence, and an improved differentiation of tumor recurrence from posttherapeutic effects. In the past, this method had only limited availability due to the use of PET tracers with a short half-life, e.g., C-11. In recent years, however, novel amino acid PET tracers labeled with positron emitters with a longer half-life (F-18) have been developed and clinically validated, which allow a more efficient and cost-effective application. These developments and the well-documented diagnostic performance of PET using radiolabeled amino acids suggest that its application continues to spread and that this technique may be available as a routine diagnostic tool for several indications in the field of neuro-oncology. PMID:27516754

  3. Predictors of response to a behavioral treatment in patients with chronic gastric motility disorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashed, Hani; Cutts, Teresa; Abell, Thomas; Cowings, Patricia; Toscano, William; El-Gammal, Ahmed; Adl, Dima

    2002-01-01

    Chronic gastric motility disorders have proven intractable to most traditional therapies. Twenty-six patients with chronic nausea and vomiting were treated with a behavioral technique, autonomic training (AT) with directed imagery (verbal instructions), to help facilitate physiological control. After treatment, gastrointestinal symptoms decreased by >30% in 58% of the treated patients. We compared those improved patients to the 43% who did not improve significantly. No significant differences existed in baseline symptoms and autonomic measures between both groups. However, baseline measures of gastric emptying and autonomic function predicted treatment outcome. Patients who improved manifested mild to moderate delay in baseline gastric emptying measures. The percent of liquid gastric emptying at 60 mins and the sympathetic adrenergic measure of percent of change in the foot cutaneous blood flow in response to cold stress test predicted improvement in AT outcome, with clinical diagnostic values of 77% and 71%, respectively. We conclude that AT treatment can be efficacious in some patients with impaired gastric emptying and adrenergic dysfunction. More work is warranted to compare biofeedback therapy with gastric motility patients and controls in population-based studies.

  4. [Neurolymphomatosis: diagnosis of extension and assessment of response to treatment with PET-CT].

    PubMed

    Durán, C; Infante, J R; Serrano, J; Rayo, J I; García, L; Domínguez, M L; Sánchez, R

    2009-01-01

    Neurolymphomatosis is a rare neurological manifestation of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and it may be its first and sole manifestation. Diagnosis is often difficult and nerve biopsy is generally required. However, this it is not always possible to perform or is not conclusive. We present the case of a 66-year-old woman diagnosed with giant B-cell NHL. After 6 cycles of chemotherapy, imaging and molecular biology techniques showed complete remission. At four months after treatment, the patient complained of low back pain of radicular distribution. CT and MRI imaging showed signs of lymphoproliferative activity of L5 and also lesions to thoracic nerve roots. A PET-CT was requested in order to complete the diagnosis and plan the treatment. Imaging confirmed the presence of tumor recurrence with neurolymphomatosis and also indicated lesions on the chest and abdominal level. Thus, it was decided to start a new line of chemotherapy, without performing the histological study through biopsy. This case illustrates the important role played by PET-CT imaging in neurolymphomatosis diagnosis. This technique can help the patient avoid more aggressive procedures, such as a biopsy, and can also be useful in the follow-up and assessment of the treatment response to NHL-diagnosed patients. PMID:19864049

  5. Does Treatment Readiness Enhance the Response of African American Substance Users to Motivational Enhancement Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Burlew, Ann Kathleen; Montgomery, LaTrice; Kosinski, Andrzej S.; Forcehimes, Alyssa A.

    2013-01-01

    The development of effective treatments for African Americans and other ethnic minorities is essential for reducing health disparities in substance use. Despite research suggesting that Motivational Enhancement Therapy (MET) may reduce substance use among African Americans, the findings have been inconsistent. This research examined the extent to which readiness-to-change (RTC) affects response to MET among African American substance users. The study was a secondary analysis of the 194 African American substance users participating in a multisite randomized clinical trial evaluating MET originally conducted within the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network. The participants were randomly assigned to receive either three sessions of MET or Counseling-As-Usual (CAU) followed by the ordinary treatment and other services offered at the five participating outpatient programs. Participants were categorized as either high or lower on RTC based on their scores on the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment. The participants reported their substance use at baseline and throughout the 16 weeks after randomization. Among the high RTC participants, those in MET tended to report fewer days of substance use per week over time than participants in CAU. However, among the lower RTC participants, the CAU group tended to report fewer days of substance use over time than MET participants. In contrast to previous thinking, the findings suggest that MET may be more effective for high than lower RTC African American participants. PMID:23421576

  6. Patient Violence Towards Counselors in Substance Use Disorder Treatment Programs: Prevalence, Predictors, and Responses.

    PubMed

    Bride, Brian E; Choi, Y Joon; Olin, Ilana W; Roman, Paul M

    2015-10-01

    Workplace violence disproportionately impacts healthcare and social service providers. Given that substance use and abuse are documented risk factors for the perpetration of violence, SUD treatment personnel are at risk for patient-initiated violence. However, little research has addressed SUD treatment settings. Using data nationally representative of the U. S., the present study explores SUD counselors' experiences of violent behaviors perpetrated by patients. More than half (53%) of counselors personally experienced violence, 44% witnessed violence, and 61% had knowledge of violence directed at a colleague. Counselors reported that exposure to violence led to an increased concern for personal safety (29%), impacted their treatment of patients (15%), and impaired job performance (12%). In terms of organizational responses to patient violence, 70% of organizations increased training on de-escalation of violent situations, and 58% increased security measures. Exposure to verbal assault was associated with age, minority, tenure, recovery status, 12-step philosophy, training in MI/MET, and higher caseloads of patients with co-occurring disorders. Exposure to physical threats was associated with age gender, minority, tenure, recovery status, and higher caseloads of patients with co-occurring disorders. Exposure to physical assault was associated with age, gender, and sample. Implications of these findings for organizations and individuals are discussed. PMID:26025921

  7. [Responsible gambling: is it an alternative for prevention and treatment of pathological gambling?].

    PubMed

    Echeburua, Enrique; de Corral, Paz

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with the new development of controlled gambling embedded in a harm-reduction context as a viable solution both for primary prevention at school and for treatment of some kinds of problematic gamblers. Pathological gambling significantly improves with psychological therapies, such as stimulus control and in vivo exposure with response prevention or cognitive interventions. In some cases psychopharmacological therapy may complement the benefits of treatment for pathological gambling when patients have comorbid depression or high impulsivity. However, in this mental disorder the goal of treatment (total abstinence or controlled gambling) is currently a controversial issue. Controlled gambling may be a therapeutic option for young gamblers or patients without severe dependence. Furthermore, controlled gambling may be a relevant issue for health education in schools, with a view to teaching teenagers how to cope with actual and virtual exposure to gambling. Likewise, the gambling industry and governments are involved in harm minimization initiatives. Thus, it is necessary to coordinate a program of research that includes the industry, science, and public representatives, based on cooperative research that will permit the introduction of controlled gambling within a global strategic framework. We discuss the relevance of this review for clinical practice and for future research, as well as the unsolved problems in this field. PMID:19115019

  8. A Randomized Experimental Study of Gender-Responsive Substance Abuse Treatment for Women in Prison

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Nena; Grella, Christine E.; Cartier, Jerry; Torres, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    This experimental pilot study compared post-release outcomes for 115 women who participated in prison-based substance abuse treatment. Women were randomized to a gender-responsive treatment (GRT) program using manualized curricula (Helping Women Recover and Beyond Trauma) or a standard prison-based therapeutic community (TC). Data were collected from the participants at prison program entry and 6 and 12 months after release. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted. Results indicate that both groups improved in psychological well-being; however, GRT participants had greater reductions in drug use, were more likely to remain in residential aftercare longer (2.6 months vs. 1.8 months, p < .05), and were less likely to have been reincarcerated within 12 months after parole (31% vs. 45%, respectively; a 67% reduction in odds for the experimental group, p < .05). Findings show the beneficial effects of treatment components oriented toward women's needs and support the integration of GRT in prison programs for women. PMID:20015605

  9. Some aspects of salinity responses in peppermint (Mentha × piperita L.) to NaCl treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Yang, Hetong; Wu, Xiaoqing; Guo, Kai; Li, Jishun

    2015-05-01

    Salinity is a major stress that adversely affects plant growth and crop production. Understanding the cellular responses and molecular mechanisms by which plants perceive and adopt salinity stress is of fundamental importance. In this work, some of the cellular signaling events including cell death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and the behaviors of organelles were analyzed in a salt-tolerant species (Keyuan-1) of peppermint (Mentha × piperita L.) under NaCl treatment. Our results showed that 200 mM NaCl treatment elicited a distinct progress of cell death with chromatin condensation and caspase-3-like activation and a dramatic burst of ROS which was required for the execution of cell death. The major ROS accumulation occurred in the mitochondria and chloroplasts, which were the sources of ROS production under NaCl stress. Moreover, mitochondrial activity and photosynthetic capacity also exhibited the obvious decrease in the ROS-dependent manner under 200 mM NaCl stress. Furthermore, the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase (GR), and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) as well as the contents of ascorbate and glutathione changed in the concentration-dependent manner under NaCl stress. Altogether, our data showed the execution of programmed cell death (PCD), the ROS dynamics, and the behaviors of organelles especially mitochondria and chloroplasts in the cellular responses of peppermint to NaCl stress which can be used for the tolerance screening, and contributed to the understanding of the cellular responses and molecular mechanisms of peppermint to salinity stress, providing the theoretic basis for the further development and utilization of peppermint in saline areas. PMID:25388000

  10. Influence of Study Design on Treatment Response in Anxiety Disorder Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Bret R; Bailey, Veronika S.; Schneier, Franklin R.; Pott, Emily; Brown, Patrick J.; Roose, Steven P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The influence of study design variables and publication year on response to medication and placebo was investigated in clinical trials for social anxiety disorder (SAD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and panic disorder (PD). Method Hierarchical linear modeling determined whether publication year, treatment assignment (medication vs. placebo), study type (placebo-controlled or active comparator), study duration, and the number of study visits affected the mean change associated with medication and placebo. Results In the 66 trials examined, the change associated with both medication and placebo increased over time (t = 4.23, df = 39, P < .001), but average drug–placebo differences decreased over time (t = −2.04, df = 46, P = .047). More severe baseline illness was associated with greater drug–placebo differences for serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs, t = 3.46, df = 106, P = .001) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI, t = 10.37, df = 106, P < .001). Improvement with medication was significantly greater in active-comparator studies compared to placebo-controlled trials (t = 3.41, df = 39, P = .002). A greater number of study visits was associated with greater symptom improvement in PD trials relative to SAD (t = 2.83, df = 39, P = .008) and GAD (t = 2.16, df = 39, P= .037). Conclusions Placebo response is substantial in SAD, GAD, and PD trials, and its rise over time has been associated with diminished drug–placebo differences. Study design features that influence treatment response in anxiety disorder trials include patient expectancy, frequency of follow-up visits, and baseline illness severity. PMID:26437267

  11. Utility of Rectoscopy in the Assessment of Response to Neoadjuvant Treatment for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Lopez, Victor; Abrisqueta, Jesús; Lujan, Juán; Hernández, Quiteria; Ono, Akiko; Parrilla, Pascual

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: The management of locally advanced rectal cancer has changed substantially over the last few decades with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. The aim of the present study is to compare the results between neoadjuvant post-treatment rectoscopy and the anatomopathological findings of the surgical specimen. Patients and Methods: We conducted a prospective study of 67 patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the rectum (stages II and III). Two groups were established: One with complete clinical response (cCR) and one without (non-cCR), based on the findings at rectoscopy. Assessment of tumor regression grade in the surgical specimen was determined using Mandard's tumor regression scale. Results: Seventeen patients showed a cCR. Thirty-five biopsies were negative and 32 were positive for mailgnancy. All the cCR patients had a negative biopsy (P < 0.0001). All 32 positive biopsies revealed the presence of adenocarcinoma, and of the 35 negative biopsies, 18 had no malignancy and 17 were diagnosed with adenocarcinoma (P < 0.0001). Sixteen of the 17 cCR patients showed a complete pathological response and one patient showed the presence of adenocarcinoma. Of the 50 non-cCR patients 48 revealed the presence of adenocarcinoma and two had absence of malignancy. According to the Mandard classification, 16 of the 17 cCR patients were grade I and 1 grade II; 2 non-cCR patients were grade I, 7 grade II, 13 grade III, 19 grade IV, and 9 grade V. Conclusions: Endoscopic and histological findings could be determinants in the assessment of response to neoadjuvant treatment. PMID:26997222

  12. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment produces an antinociceptive response phase and inhibits astrocyte activation and inflammatory response in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bai-Song; Meng, Ling-Xin; Ding, Yuan-Yuan; Cao, Yan-Yan

    2014-06-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment has been proven to be a promising candidate for protection of the nervous system after acute injury in animal models of neuropathic pain. The purposes of this study were to examine the antinociceptive response phase induced by HBO treatment in a model of neuropathic pain and to determine the dependence of the treatment's mechanism of alleviating neuropathic pain on the inhibition of spinal astrocyte activation. Neuropathic pain was induced in rats by chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve. Mechanical threshold and thermal latency were tested preoperatively and for 1 week postoperatively, four times daily at fixed time points. Methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) parameters were used as indices of oxidative stress response and tested before and after the treatment. The inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-10 were assayed in the sciatic nerve were with enzyme-linked immunoassay. Glial fibrillary acidic protein activation in the spinal cord was evaluated immunohistochemically. The rats exhibited temporary allodynia immediately after HBO treatment completion. This transient allodynia was closely associated with changes in MDA and SOD levels. A single HBO treatment caused a short-acting antinociceptive response phase. Repetitive HBO treatment led to a long-acting antinociceptive response phase and inhibited astrocyte activation. These results indicated that HBO treatment played a dual role in the aggravation and alleviation of neuropathic pain, though the aggravated pain effect (transient allodynia) was far less pronounced than the antinociceptive phase. Astrocyte inhibition and anti-inflammation may contribute to the antinociceptive effect of HBO treatment after nerve injury. PMID:24390961

  13. Defining Treatment Response and Remission in Child Anxiety: Signal Detection Analysis Using the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale

    PubMed Central

    Caporino, Nicole E.; Brodman, Douglas M.; Kendall, Philip C.; Albano, Anne Marie; Sherrill, Joel; Piacentini, John; Sakolsky, Dara; Birmaher, Boris; Compton, Scott N.; Ginsburg, Golda; Rynn, Moira; McCracken, James; Gosch, Elizabeth; Keeton, Courtney; March, John; Walkup, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine optimal Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale (PARS) percent reduction and raw score cut-offs for predicting treatment response and remission among children and adolescents with anxiety disorders. Method Data were from a subset of youth (N =438; 7–17 years of age) who participated in the Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study (CAMS), a multi-site, randomized controlled trial that examined the relative efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT; Coping Cat), medication (sertraline [SRT]), their combination, and pill placebo for the treatment of separation anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and social phobia. The clinician-rated PARS was administered pre- and posttreatment (delivered over 12 weeks). Quality receiver operating characteristic methods assessed the performance of various PARS percent reductions and absolute cut-off scores in predicting treatment response and remission, as determined by posttreatment ratings on the Clinical Global Impression scales and the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for DSM-IV. Corresponding change in impairment was evaluated using the Child Anxiety Impact Scale. Results Reductions of 35% and 50% on the six-item PARS optimally predicted treatment response and remission, respectively. Post-treatment PARS raw scores of 8 to 10 optimally predicted remission. Anxiety improved as a function of PARS-defined treatment response and remission. Conclusions Results serve as guidelines for operationalizing treatment response and remission in future research and in making cross-study comparisons. These guidelines can facilitate translation of research findings into clinical practice. PMID:23265634

  14. The systemic immune response to trauma: an overview of pathophysiology and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lord, Janet M; Midwinter, Mark J; Chen, Yen-Fu; Belli, Antonio; Brohi, Karim; Kovacs, Elizabeth J; Koenderman, Leo; Kubes, Paul; Lilford, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Improvements in the control of haemorrhage after trauma have resulted in survival of many people who would otherwise have died from the initial loss of blood. However, the danger is not over once bleeding has been arrested and blood pressure restored. Two-thirds of patients who die following major trauma now do so as a result of causes other than exsanguination. Trauma evokes a systemic reaction that include an acute, non-specific, immune response associated, paradoxically, with reduced resistance to infection. The result is damage to multiple organs caused by the initial cascade of inflammation aggravated by subsequent sepsis to which the body has become susceptible. This Series examines the biological mechanisms and clinical implications of the cascade of events caused by large-scale trauma that leads to multiorgan failure and death, despite the stemming of blood loss. Furthermore, the stark and robust epidemiological finding – namely, that age has a profound influence on the chances of surviving trauma irrespective of the nature and severity of the injury – will be explored. Advances in our understanding of the inflammatory response to trauma, the impact of ageing on this response, and how this information has led to new and emerging treatments aimed at combating immune dysregulation and reduced immunity after injury will also be discussed. PMID:25390327

  15. Sensory Over-Responsivity in a Sample of Children Seeking Treatment for Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Conelea, Christine A.; Carter, Alice C.; Freeman, Jennifer B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Sensory over-responsivity (SOR) refers to an exaggerated, intense, or prolonged behavioral response to ordinary sensory stimuli. The relationship of SOR to psychiatric disorders remains poorly understood. The current study examined the SOR construct within typically developing children with clinically significant anxiety, including the prevalence and course of SOR symptoms and relationship between SOR symptoms, demographic factors, and psychopathology. Method Children presenting at an anxiety specialty clinic (n = 88) completed a psychiatric diagnostic assessment, which included parent-report measures of SOR, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and global behavior and child-report measures of anxiety, depression, and OCD. Results SOR symptoms were very common: 93.2% were bothered by at least one tactile or auditory sensation, and the mean number of bothersome sensations was 9.2 (SD = 7.4). SOR symptoms were reported to be “moderately bothersome” on average and to onset at an early age. Sensory Over-Responsivity Inventory (SensOR) scores did not differ by psychiatric disorder diagnosis, but SensOR scores significantly correlated with measures of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and depression. Higher SensOR scores were associated with greater global impairment. Conclusion A high rate of SOR symptom occurrence was observed in this sample of children seeking anxiety treatment, suggesting that SOR may not be entirely independent of anxiety and may be closely associated with OCD. Future research on the validity and nosology of SOR using psychiatric samples is warranted. PMID:25186122

  16. The systemic immune response to trauma: an overview of pathophysiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Lord, Janet M; Midwinter, Mark J; Chen, Yen-Fu; Belli, Antonio; Brohi, Karim; Kovacs, Elizabeth J; Koenderman, Leo; Kubes, Paul; Lilford, Richard J

    2014-10-18

    Improvements in the control of haemorrhage after trauma have resulted in the survival of many people who would otherwise have died from the initial loss of blood. However, the danger is not over once bleeding has been arrested and blood pressure restored. Two-thirds of patients who die following major trauma now do so as a result of causes other than exsanguination. Trauma evokes a systemic reaction that includes an acute, non-specific, immune response associated, paradoxically, with reduced resistance to infection. The result is damage to multiple organs caused by the initial cascade of inflammation aggravated by subsequent sepsis to which the body has become susceptible. This Series examines the biological mechanisms and clinical implications of the cascade of events caused by large-scale trauma that leads to multiorgan failure and death, despite the stemming of blood loss. Furthermore, the stark and robust epidemiological finding--namely, that age has a profound influence on the chances of surviving trauma irrespective of the nature and severity of the injury--will be explored. Advances in our understanding of the inflammatory response to trauma, the impact of ageing on this response, and how this information has led to new and emerging treatments aimed at combating immune dysregulation and reduced immunity after injury will also be discussed. PMID:25390327

  17. The role of TMPRSS6 polymorphisms in iron deficiency anemia partially responsive to oral iron treatment.

    PubMed

    Poggiali, Erika; Andreozzi, Fabio; Nava, Isabella; Consonni, Dario; Graziadei, Giovanna; Cappellini, Maria Domenica

    2015-04-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) is a rare hereditary disease caused by mutations in TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2, a negative regulator of hepcidin transcription. Up to now, 53 IRIDA patients from 35 families with different ethnic origins have been reported and 41 TMPRSS6 mutations have been identified. TMPRSS6 polymorphisms are more frequent than mutations, and have been associated with variation in iron and hematologic parameters. Our study evaluated their presence in 113 subjects with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) partially responsive to oral iron therapy and in 50 healthy blood donors. Thalassemic trait was diagnosed in 38 patients. Sequencing analysis of TMPRSS6 gene revealed that the frequency of several polymorphisms was markedly different between IDA subjects and controls. In particular, the V736A TMPRSS6 polymorphism was associated to moderately lower hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin levels, and in thalassemia carriers with marked anemia and microcytosis. A new variant-H448R- and two uncommon polymorphisms -A719T and V795I- were also identified. These results indicate that TMPRSS6 polymorphisms are more frequent in subjects with persistent IDA than in healthy controls, and in thalassemia carriers V736A variant may account for lower hemoglobin and MCV levels. Further studies in larger court of patients are necessary to identify potential haplotypes and polymorphisms responsible for low response to oral iron treatment and may be useful for planning a correct iron supplementation. PMID:25557470

  18. Extended treatment of charge response kernel comprising the density functional theory and charge regulation procedures.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Tateki; Morita, Akihiro

    2006-08-21

    We propose an extended treatment of the charge response kernel (CRK), (partial differential Q(a)/partial differential V(b)), which describes the response of partial charges on atomic sites to external electrostatic potential, on the basis of the density functional theory (DFT) via the coupled perturbed Kohn-Sham equations. The present CRK theory incorporates regulation procedures in the definition of partial charges to avoid unphysical large fluctuation of the CRK on "buried" sites. The CRKs of some alcohol and organic molecules, methanol, ethanol, propanol, butanol, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), and tetrahydrofuran (THF) were calculated, demonstrating that the new CRK model at the DFT level has greatly improved the performance of accuracy in comparison with that at the Hartree-Fock level previously proposed. The CRK model was also applied to investigate spatial nonlocality of the charge response through alkyl chain sequences. The CRK model at the DFT level enables us to construct a nonempirical strategy for polarizable molecular modeling, with practical reliability and robustness. PMID:16942327

  19. Baseline Factors Predicting Placebo Response to Treatment in Children and Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    King, Bryan H.; Dukes, Kimberly; Donnelly, Craig L.; Sikich, Linmarie; McCracken, James T.; Scahill, Lawrence; Hollander, Eric; Bregman, Joel D.; Anagnostou, Evdokia; Robinson, Fay; Sullivan, Lisa; Hirtz, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The finding of factors that differentially predict the likelihood of response to placebo over that of an active drug could have a significant impact on study design in this population. OBJECTIVE To identify possible nonspecific, baseline predictors of response to intervention in a large randomized clinical trial of children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Randomized clinical trial of citalopram hydrobromide for children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders and prominent repetitive behavior. Baseline data at study entry were examined with respect to final outcome to determine if response predictors could be identified. A total of 149 children and adolescents 5 to 17 years of age (mean [SD] age, 9.4 [3.1] years) from 6 academic centers were randomly assigned to citalopram (n = 73) or placebo (n = 76). Participants had autistic disorder, Asperger syndrome, or pervasive developmental disorder, not otherwise specified; had illness severity ratings that were moderate or more than moderate on the Clinical Global Impression–Severity scale; and scored moderate or more than moderate on compulsive behaviors measured with the modified Children’s Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale. INTERVENTIONS Twelve weeks of treatment with citalopram (10 mg/5 mL) or placebo. The mean (SD) maximum dose of citalopram was 16.5 (6.5) mg by mouth daily (maximum dose, 20 mg/d). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES A positive response was defined as having a score of at least much improved on the Clinical Global Impression–Improvement scale at week 12. Baseline measures included demographic (sex, age, weight, and pubertal status), clinical, and family measures. Clinical variables included baseline illness severity ratings (the Aberrant Behavior Checklist, the Child and Adolescent Symptom Inventory, the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, the Repetitive Behavior Scale–Revised, and the Children’s Yale-Brown Obsessive

  20. Examining the Relationship Between Parental Anxiety and Treatment Response in Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Reaven, Judy; Washington, Lindsay; Moody, Eric J; Stern, Jessica A; Hepburn, Susan L; Blakeley-Smith, Audrey

    2015-08-01

    In response to the high co-occurrence of anxiety symptoms in youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), several interventions have been developed for this population. In spite of promising findings, some youth with ASD respond only minimally to such interventions. To understand potential factors that may impact treatment response, the current study explores the role of parental anxiety in youth treatment outcome. Thirty-one youth with ASD, ages 7-18, and their parents participated in the study. Parents completed the State/Trait Anxiety Inventory pre- and post-treatment. Contrary to previous research, there was no correlation between parental anxiety and youth anxiety at baseline or post-treatment. However, parental trait anxiety significantly decreased from pre- to post-treatment for parents of treatment responders. The findings are consistent with previous research and suggest a youth-to-parent influence. PMID:25778837

  1. Epidemiological and Clinical Baseline Characteristics as Predictive Biomarkers of Response to Anti-VEGF Treatment in Patients with Neovascular AMD

    PubMed Central

    López-Gálvez, Maria I.; Margaron, Philippe; Lambrou, George N.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To review the current literature investigating patient response to antivascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF) therapy in the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) and to identify baseline characteristics that might predict response. Method. A literature search of the PubMed database was performed, using the keywords: AMD, anti-VEGF, biomarker, optical coherence tomography, treatment outcome, and predictor. The search was limited to articles published from 2006 to date. Exclusion criteria included phase 1 trials, case reports, studies focusing on indications other than nAMD, and oncology. Results. A total of 1467 articles were identified, of which 845 were excluded. Of the 622 remaining references, 47 met all the search criteria and were included in this review. Conclusion. Several baseline characteristics correlated with anti-VEGF treatment response, including best-corrected visual acuity, age, lesion size, and retinal thickness. The majority of factors were associated with disease duration, suggesting that longer disease duration before treatment results in worse treatment outcomes. This highlights the need for early treatment for patients with nAMD to gain optimal treatment outcomes. Many of the identified baseline characteristics are interconnected and cannot be evaluated in isolation; therefore multivariate analyses will be required to determine any specific relationship with treatment response. PMID:27073691

  2. 77 FR 31858 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Pathologic Complete Response in Neoadjuvant Treatment of High-Risk...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-30

    ... in Neoadjuvant Treatment of High-Risk Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Use as an Endpoint To Support... entitled ``Pathologic Complete Response in Neoadjuvant Treatment of High-Risk Early-Stage Breast Cancer... applicants in designing trials to support marketing approval of drugs to treat breast cancer in...

  3. Predictors and Moderators of Response to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Medication for the Treatment of Binge Eating Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grilo, Carlos M.; Masheb, Robin M.; Crosby, Ross D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine predictors and moderators of response to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and medication treatments for binge-eating disorder (BED). Method: 108 BED patients in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial testing CBT and fluoxetine treatments were assessed prior, throughout, and posttreatment. Demographic factors,…

  4. Epidemiological and Clinical Baseline Characteristics as Predictive Biomarkers of Response to Anti-VEGF Treatment in Patients with Neovascular AMD.

    PubMed

    Tsilimbaris, Miltiadis K; López-Gálvez, Maria I; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto; Margaron, Philippe; Lambrou, George N

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To review the current literature investigating patient response to antivascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF) therapy in the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) and to identify baseline characteristics that might predict response. Method. A literature search of the PubMed database was performed, using the keywords: AMD, anti-VEGF, biomarker, optical coherence tomography, treatment outcome, and predictor. The search was limited to articles published from 2006 to date. Exclusion criteria included phase 1 trials, case reports, studies focusing on indications other than nAMD, and oncology. Results. A total of 1467 articles were identified, of which 845 were excluded. Of the 622 remaining references, 47 met all the search criteria and were included in this review. Conclusion. Several baseline characteristics correlated with anti-VEGF treatment response, including best-corrected visual acuity, age, lesion size, and retinal thickness. The majority of factors were associated with disease duration, suggesting that longer disease duration before treatment results in worse treatment outcomes. This highlights the need for early treatment for patients with nAMD to gain optimal treatment outcomes. Many of the identified baseline characteristics are interconnected and cannot be evaluated in isolation; therefore multivariate analyses will be required to determine any specific relationship with treatment response. PMID:27073691

  5. fMRI response to negative words and SSRI treatment outcome in major depressive disorder: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jeffrey Morris; Schneck, Noam; Siegle, Greg J.; Chen, Yakuan; Ogden, R. Todd; Kikuchi, Toshiaki; Oquendo, Maria A.; Mann, J. John; Parsey, Ramin V.

    2013-01-01

    Clinically useful predictors of treatment outcome in major depressive disorder (MDD) remain elusive. We examined associations between functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal during active negative word processing and subsequent selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment outcome in MDD. Unmedicated MDD subjects (n=17) performed an emotional word processing fMRI task, and then received eight weeks of standardized antidepressant treatment with escitalopram. Lower pre-treatment BOLD responses to negative words in midbrain, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, paracingulate, anterior cingulate, thalamus and caudate nuclei correlated significantly with greater improvement following escitalopram treatment. Activation of these regions in response to negative words correlated significantly with reaction time for rating word relevance. Maximally predictive clusters of voxels identified using a cross-validation approach predicted 48% of the variance in response to treatment. This study provides preliminary evidence that SSRIs may be most beneficial in patients who are less able to engage cognitive control networks while processing negative stimuli. Differences between these findings and previous fMRI studies of SSRI treatment outcome may relate to differences in task design. Regional BOLD responses to negative words predictive of SSRI outcome in this study were both overlapping and distinct from those predictive of outcome with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in previous studies using the same task. Future studies may examine prediction of differential outcome across treatments in the context of a randomized controlled trial. PMID:24446548

  6. Interrelated role of cigarette smoking, oxidative stress, and immune response in COPD and corresponding treatments.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Li; He, Feng; Sergakis, Georgianna G; Koozehchian, Majid S; Stimpfl, Julia N; Rong, Yi; Diaz, Philip T; Best, Thomas M

    2014-08-01

    Cigarette smoking (CS) can impact the immune system and induce pulmonary disorders such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which is currently the fourth leading cause of chronic morbidity and mortality worldwide. Accordingly, the most significant risk factor associated with COPD is exposure to cigarette smoke. The purpose of the present study is to provide an updated overview of the literature regarding the effect of CS on the immune system and lungs, the mechanism of CS-induced COPD and oxidative stress, as well as the available and potential treatment options for CS-induced COPD. An extensive literature search was conducted on the PubMed/Medline databases to review current COPD treatment research, available in the English language, dating from 1976 to 2014. Studies have investigated the mechanism by which CS elicits detrimental effects on the immune system and pulmonary function through the use of human and animal subjects. A strong relationship among continued tobacco use, oxidative stress, and exacerbation of COPD symptoms is frequently observed in COPD subjects. In addition, therapeutic approaches emphasizing smoking cessation have been developed, incorporating counseling and nicotine replacement therapy. However, the inability to reverse COPD progression establishes the need for improved preventative and therapeutic strategies, such as a combination of intensive smoking cessation treatment and pharmaceutical therapy, focusing on immune homeostasis and redox balance. CS initiates a complex interplay between oxidative stress and the immune response in COPD. Therefore, multiple approaches such as smoking cessation, counseling, and pharmaceutical therapies targeting inflammation and oxidative stress are recommended for COPD treatment. PMID:24879054

  7. Exercise physiological responses to drug treatments in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Charalampopoulos, Athanasios; Gibbs, J Simon R; Davies, Rachel J; Gin-Sing, Wendy; Murphy, Kevin; Sheares, Karen K; Pepke-Zaba, Joanna; Jenkins, David P; Howard, Luke S

    2016-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) that was deemed to be inoperable were more likely to respond to drugs for treating pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) by using cardiopulmonary exercise (CPX) testing than those with CTEPH that was deemed to be operable. We analyzed CPX testing data of all patients with CTEPH who were treated with PAH drugs and had undergone CPX testing before and after treatment at a single pulmonary hypertension center between February 2009 and March 2013. Suitability for pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) was decided by experts in PEA who were associated with a treatment center. The group with inoperable CTEPH included 16 patients, the operable group included 26 patients. There were no differences in demographics and baseline hemodynamic data between the groups. Unlike patients in the operable group, after drug treatment patients with inoperable CTEPH had a significantly higher peak V̇o2 (P < 0.001), work load (P = 0.002), and oxygen pulse (P < 0.001). In terms of gas exchange, there was an overall net trend toward improved V̇e/V̇co2 in the group with inoperable CTEPH, with an increased PaCO2 (P = 0.01), suggesting reduced hyperventilation. No changes were observed in patients with operable CTEPH. In conclusion, treatment with PAH drug therapy reveals important pathophysiological differences between inoperable and operable CTEPH, with significant pulmonary vascular and cardiac responses in inoperable disease. Drug effects on exercise function observed in inoperable CTEPH cannot be translated to all forms of CTEPH. PMID:27418685

  8. Biomarkers of alopecia areata disease activity and response to corticosteroid treatment.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Duculan, Judilyn; Gulati, Nicholas; Bonifacio, Kathleen M; Kunjravia, Norma; Zheng, Xiuzhong; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Shemer, Avner; Guttman-Yassky, Emma; Krueger, James G

    2016-04-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is a common inflammatory disease targeting the anagen-stage hair follicle. Different cytokines have been implicated in the disease profile, but their pathogenic role is not yet fully determined. We studied biopsies of pretreatment lesional and non-lesional (NL) scalp and post-treatment (intra-lesional steroid injection) lesional scalp of 6 patchy patients with AA using immunohistochemistry and gene expression analysis. Immunohistochemistry showed increases in CD3(+) , CD8(+) T cells, CD11c(+) dendritic cells and CD1a(+) Langerhans cells within and around hair follicles of pretreatment lesional scalp, which decreased upon treatment. qRT-PCR showed in pretreatment lesional scalp (compared to NL) significant increases (P < 0.05) in expression of inflammatory markers (IL-2, IL-2RA, JAK3, IL-15), Th1 (CXCL10 and CXCL9), Th2 (IL-13, CCL17 and CCL18), IL-12/IL-23p40 and IL-32. Among these, we observed significant downregulation with treatment in IL-12/IL-23p40, CCL18 and IL-32. We also observed significant downregulation of several hair keratins in lesional scalp, with significant upregulation of KRT35, KRT75 and KRT86 in post-treatment lesional scalp. This study shows concurrent activation of Th1 and Th2 immune axes as well as IL-23 and IL-32 cytokine pathways in lesional AA scalp and defined a series of response biomarkers to corticosteroid injection. Clinical trials with selective antagonists coupled with cytokine-pathway biomarkers will be necessary to further dissect pathogenic immunity. PMID:26661294

  9. Biologically relevant 3D tumor arrays: treatment response and the importance of stromal partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizvi, Imran; Celli, Jonathan P.; Xu, Feng; Evans, Conor L.; Abu-Yousif, Adnan O.; Muzikansky, Alona; Elrington, Stefan A.; Pogue, Brian W.; Finkelstein, Dianne M.; Demirci, Utkan; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2011-02-01

    The development and translational potential of therapeutic strategies for cancer is limited, in part, by a lack of biological models that capture important aspects of tumor growth and treatment response. It is also becoming increasingly evident that no single treatment will be curative for this complex disease. Rationally-designed combination regimens that impact multiple targets provide the best hope of significantly improving clinical outcomes for cancer patients. Rapidly identifying treatments that cooperatively enhance treatment efficacy from the vast library of candidate interventions is not feasible, however, with current systems. There is a vital, unmet need to create cell-based research platforms that more accurately mimic the complex biology of human tumors than monolayer cultures, while providing the ability to screen therapeutic combinations more rapidly than animal models. We have developed a highly reproducible in vitro three-dimensional (3D) tumor model for micrometastatic ovarian cancer (OvCa), which in conjunction with quantitative image analysis routines to batch-process large datasets, serves as a high throughput reporter to screen rationally-designed combination regimens. We use this system to assess mechanism-based combination regimens with photodynamic therapy (PDT), which sensitizes OvCa to chemo and biologic agents, and has shown promise in clinic trials. We show that PDT synergistically enhances carboplatin efficacy in a sequence dependent manner. In printed heterocellular cultures we demonstrate that proximity of fibroblasts enhances 3D tumor growth and investigate co-cultures with endothelial cells. The principles described here could inform the design and evaluation of mechanism-based therapeutic options for a broad spectrum of metastatic solid tumors.

  10. Responses of microbial communities to single-walled carbon nanotubes in phenol wastewater treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yuanyuan; Ma, Qiao; Deng, Jie; Shen, Wenli; Zhang, Xuwang; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Zhou, Jiti; Zhou, Jizhong

    2015-04-01

    The expanding use of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) raises environmental concerns. Wastewater treatment systems are potential recipients of SWCNTs containing influent, yet the impacts of SWCNTs on these systems are poorly documented. In this study, the microbial responses to SWCNTs in simulated phenol wastewater treatment systems were investigated. The phenol removal rates were improved in all SWCNTs-treated sequencing batch reactors during the first 20 days, but when facing higher phenol concentration (1000 mg/L) after 60 days, reactors with the highest concentration (3.5 g/L) of SWCNTs exhibited a notably decreased phenol removal capacity. Cell viability tests, scanning electron microscopy analysis and DNA leakage data suggested that SWCNTs protected microbes from inactivation, possibly by producing more bound extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which could create a protective barrier for the microbes. Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons revealed that the bacterial diversity did not change significantly except for a minor reduction after the immediate addition of SWCNTs. Bacterial community structure significantly shifted after SWCNTs addition and did not recover afterward. Zoogloea increased significantly upon SWCNTs shocking. At the final stage, Rudaea and Mobilicoccus increased, while Burkholderia, Singulisphaera, Labrys and Mucilaginibacter decreased notably. The shifts of these dominant genera may be associated with altered sludge settling, aromatic degradation and EPS production. This study suggested that SWCNTs exerted protective rather than cytotoxic effects on sludge microbes of phenol wastewater treatment systems and they affected the bacterial community structure and diversity at test concentrations. These findings provide new insights into our understanding of the potential effects of SWCNTs on wastewater treatment processes. PMID:25751159

  11. Examining the Relationship between Parental Anxiety and Treatment Response in Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reaven, Judy; Washington, Lindsay; Moody, Eric J.; Stern, Jessica A.; Hepburn, Susan L.; Blakeley-Smith, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    In response to the high co-occurrence of anxiety symptoms in youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), several interventions have been developed for this population. In spite of promising findings, some youth with ASD respond only minimally to such interventions. To understand potential factors that may impact treatment response, the current…

  12. Antibody Responses After Analytic Treatment Interruption in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1-Infected Individuals on Early Initiated Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Bricault, Christine A.; Shields, Jennifer; Bayne, Madeleine; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Seaman, Michael S.; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2016-01-01

    The examination of antibody responses in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1-infected individuals in the setting of antiretroviral treatment (ART) interruption can provide insight into the evolution of antibody responses during viral rebound. In this study, we assessed antibody responses in 20 subjects in AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5187, wherein subjects were treated with antiretroviral therapy during acute/early HIV-1 infection, underwent analytic treatment interruption, and subsequently demonstrated viral rebound. Our data suggest that early initiation of ART arrests the maturation of HIV-1-specific antibody responses, preventing epitope diversification of antibody binding and the development of functional neutralizing capacity. Antibody responses do not appear permanently blunted, however, because viral rebound triggered the resumption of antibody maturation in our study. We also found that antibody responses measured by these assays did not predict imminent viral rebound. These data have important implications for the HIV-1 vaccine and eradication fields. PMID:27419172

  13. Intrahepatic Transcriptional Signature Associated with Response to Interferon-α Treatment in the Woodchuck Model of Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Simon P.; Chin, Daniel J.; Gruenbaum, Lore; Bitter, Hans; Rasmussen, Erik; Ravindran, Palanikumar; Swinney, David C.; Birzele, Fabian; Schmucki, Roland; Lorenz, Stefan H.; Kopetzki, Erhard; Carter, Jade; Triyatni, Miriam; Thampi, Linta M.; Yang, Junming; AlDeghaither, Dalal; Murredu, Marta G.; Cote, Paul; Menne, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant interferon-alpha (IFN-α) is an approved therapy for chronic hepatitis B (CHB), but the molecular basis of treatment response remains to be determined. The woodchuck model of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection displays many characteristics of human disease and has been extensively used to evaluate antiviral therapeutics. In this study, woodchucks with chronic woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) infection were treated with recombinant woodchuck IFN-α (wIFN-α) or placebo (n = 12/group) for 15 weeks. Treatment with wIFN-α strongly reduced viral markers in the serum and liver in a subset of animals, with viral rebound typically being observed following cessation of treatment. To define the intrahepatic cellular and molecular characteristics of the antiviral response to wIFN-α, we characterized the transcriptional profiles of liver biopsies taken from animals (n = 8–12/group) at various times during the study. Unexpectedly, this revealed that the antiviral response to treatment did not correlate with intrahepatic induction of the majority of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) by wIFN-α. Instead, treatment response was associated with the induction of an NK/T cell signature in the liver, as well as an intrahepatic IFN-γ transcriptional response and elevation of liver injury biomarkers. Collectively, these data suggest that NK/T cell cytolytic and non-cytolytic mechanisms mediate the antiviral response to wIFN-α treatment. In summary, by studying recombinant IFN-α in a fully immunocompetent animal model of CHB, we determined that the immunomodulatory effects, but not the direct antiviral activity, of this pleiotropic cytokine are most closely correlated with treatment response. This has important implications for the rational design of new therapeutics for the treatment of CHB. PMID:26352406

  14. Intrahepatic Transcriptional Signature Associated with Response to Interferon-α Treatment in the Woodchuck Model of Chronic Hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Simon P; Chin, Daniel J; Gruenbaum, Lore; Bitter, Hans; Rasmussen, Erik; Ravindran, Palanikumar; Swinney, David C; Birzele, Fabian; Schmucki, Roland; Lorenz, Stefan H; Kopetzki, Erhard; Carter, Jade; Triyatni, Miriam; Thampi, Linta M; Yang, Junming; AlDeghaither, Dalal; Murreddu, Marta G; Murredu, Marta G; Cote, Paul; Menne, Stephan

    2015-09-01

    Recombinant interferon-alpha (IFN-α) is an approved therapy for chronic hepatitis B (CHB), but the molecular basis of treatment response remains to be determined. The woodchuck model of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection displays many characteristics of human disease and has been extensively used to evaluate antiviral therapeutics. In this study, woodchucks with chronic woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) infection were treated with recombinant woodchuck IFN-α (wIFN-α) or placebo (n = 12/group) for 15 weeks. Treatment with wIFN-α strongly reduced viral markers in the serum and liver in a subset of animals, with viral rebound typically being observed following cessation of treatment. To define the intrahepatic cellular and molecular characteristics of the antiviral response to wIFN-α, we characterized the transcriptional profiles of liver biopsies taken from animals (n = 8-12/group) at various times during the study. Unexpectedly, this revealed that the antiviral response to treatment did not correlate with intrahepatic induction of the majority of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) by wIFN-α. Instead, treatment response was associated with the induction of an NK/T cell signature in the liver, as well as an intrahepatic IFN-γ transcriptional response and elevation of liver injury biomarkers. Collectively, these data suggest that NK/T cell cytolytic and non-cytolytic mechanisms mediate the antiviral response to wIFN-α treatment. In summary, by studying recombinant IFN-α in a fully immunocompetent animal model of CHB, we determined that the immunomodulatory effects, but not the direct antiviral activity, of this pleiotropic cytokine are most closely correlated with treatment response. This has important implications for the rational design of new therapeutics for the treatment of CHB. PMID:26352406

  15. Neonatal exposure to xenoestrogens impairs the ovarian response to gonadotropin treatment in lambs.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Oscar E; Varayoud, Jorgelina; Rodríguez, Horacio A; Santamaría, Clarisa G; Bosquiazzo, Verónica L; Osti, Mario; Belmonte, Norberto M; Muñoz-de-Toro, Mónica; Luque, Enrique H

    2015-06-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) and diethylstilbestrol (DES) are xenoestrogens, which have been associated with altered effects on reproduction. We hypothesized that neonatal xenoestrogen exposure affects the ovarian functionality in lambs. Thus, we evaluated the ovarian response to exogenous ovine FSH (oFSH) administered from postnatal day 30 (PND30) to PND32 in female lambs previously exposed to low doses of DES or BPA (BPA50: 50 μg/kg per day, BPA0.5: 0.5 μg/kg per day) from PND1 to PND14. We determined: i) follicular growth, ii) circulating levels of 17β-estradiol (E2), iii) steroid receptors (estrogen receptor alpha, estrogen receptor beta, and androgen receptor (AR)) and atresia, and iv) mRNA expression levels of the ovarian bone morphogenetic protein (BMPs) system (BMP6, BMP15, BMPR1B, and GDF9) and FSH receptor (FSHR). Lambs neonatally exposed to DES or BPA showed an impaired ovarian response to oFSH with a lower number of follicles ≥2 mm in diameter together with a lower number of atretic follicles and no increase in E2 serum levels in response to oFSH treatment. In addition, AR induction by oFSH was disrupted in granulosa and theca cells of lambs exposed to DES or BPA. An increase in GDF9 mRNA expression levels was observed in oFSH-primed lambs previously treated with DES or BPA50. In contrast, a decrease in BMPR1B was observed in BPA0.5-postnatally exposed lambs. The modifications in AR, GDF9, and BMPR1B may be associated with the altered ovarian function due to neonatal xenoestrogen exposure in response to an exogenous gonadotropin stimulus. These alterations may be the pathophysiological basis of subfertility syndrome in adulthood. PMID:25778539

  16. Global Phosphoproteome Profiling Reveals Unanticipated Networks Responsive to Cisplatin Treatment of Embryonic Stem Cells ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Pines, Alex; Kelstrup, Christian D.; Vrouwe, Mischa G.; Puigvert, Jordi C.; Typas, Dimitris; Misovic, Branislav; de Groot, Anton; von Stechow, Louise; van de Water, Bob; Danen, Erik H. J.; Vrieling, Harry; Mullenders, Leon H. F.; Olsen, Jesper V.

    2011-01-01

    Cellular responses to DNA-damaging agents involve the activation of various DNA damage signaling and transduction pathways. Using quantitative and high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry, we determined global changes in protein level and phosphorylation site profiles following treatment of SILAC (stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture)-labeled murine embryonic stem cells with the anticancer drug cisplatin. Network and pathway analyses indicated that processes related to the DNA damage response and cytoskeleton organization were significantly affected. Although the ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) and ATR (ATM and Rad3-related) consensus sequence (S/T-Q motif) was significantly overrepresented among hyperphosphorylated peptides, about half of the >2-fold-upregulated phosphorylation sites based on the consensus sequence were not direct substrates of ATM and ATR. Eleven protein kinases mainly belonging to the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family were identified as being regulated in their kinase domain activation loop. The biological importance of three of these kinases (cyclin-dependent kinase 7 [CDK7], Plk1, and KPCD1) in the protection against cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity was demonstrated by small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown. Our results indicate that the cellular response to cisplatin involves a variety of kinases and phosphatases not only acting in the nucleus but also regulating cytoplasmic targets, resulting in extensive cytoskeletal rearrangements. Integration of transcriptomic and proteomic data revealed a poor correlation between changes in the relative levels of transcripts and their corresponding proteins, but a large overlap in affected pathways at the levels of mRNA, protein, and phosphoprotein. This study provides an integrated view of pathways activated by genotoxic stress and deciphers kinases that play a pivotal role in regulating cellular processes other than the DNA damage response. PMID:22006019

  17. Long-term treatment with responsive brain stimulation in adults with refractory partial seizures

    PubMed Central

    Bergey, Gregory K.; Mizrahi, Eli M.; Goldman, Alica; King-Stephens, David; Nair, Dileep; Srinivasan, Shraddha; Jobst, Barbara; Gross, Robert E.; Shields, Donald C.; Barkley, Gregory; Salanova, Vicenta; Olejniczak, Piotr; Cole, Andrew; Cash, Sydney S.; Noe, Katherine; Wharen, Robert; Worrell, Gregory; Murro, Anthony M.; Edwards, Jonathan; Duchowny, Michael; Spencer, David; Smith, Michael; Geller, Eric; Gwinn, Ryder; Skidmore, Christopher; Eisenschenk, Stephan; Berg, Michel; Heck, Christianne; Van Ness, Paul; Fountain, Nathan; Rutecki, Paul; Massey, Andrew; O'Donovan, Cormac; Labar, Douglas; Duckrow, Robert B.; Hirsch, Lawrence J.; Courtney, Tracy; Sun, Felice T.; Seale, Cairn G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The long-term efficacy and safety of responsive direct neurostimulation was assessed in adults with medically refractory partial onset seizures. Methods: All participants were treated with a cranially implanted responsive neurostimulator that delivers stimulation to 1 or 2 seizure foci via chronically implanted electrodes when specific electrocorticographic patterns are detected (RNS System). Participants had completed a 2-year primarily open-label safety study (n = 65) or a 2-year randomized blinded controlled safety and efficacy study (n = 191); 230 participants transitioned into an ongoing 7-year study to assess safety and efficacy. Results: The average participant was 34 (±11.4) years old with epilepsy for 19.6 (±11.4) years. The median preimplant frequency of disabling partial or generalized tonic-clonic seizures was 10.2 seizures a month. The median percent seizure reduction in the randomized blinded controlled trial was 44% at 1 year and 53% at 2 years (p < 0.0001, generalized estimating equation) and ranged from 48% to 66% over postimplant years 3 through 6 in the long-term study. Improvements in quality of life were maintained (p < 0.05). The most common serious device-related adverse events over the mean 5.4 years of follow-up were implant site infection (9.0%) involving soft tissue and neurostimulator explantation (4.7%). Conclusions: The RNS System is the first direct brain responsive neurostimulator. Acute and sustained efficacy and safety were demonstrated in adults with medically refractory partial onset seizures arising from 1 or 2 foci over a mean follow-up of 5.4 years. This experience supports the RNS System as a treatment option for refractory partial seizures. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that for adults with medically refractory partial onset seizures, responsive direct cortical stimulation reduces seizures and improves quality of life over a mean follow-up of 5.4 years. PMID:25616485

  18. Human inflammatory and resolving lipid mediator responses to resistance exercise and ibuprofen treatment

    PubMed Central

    Markworth, James F.; Vella, Luke; Lingard, Benjamin S.; Tull, Dedreia L.; Rupasinghe, Thusitha W.; Sinclair, Andrew J.; Maddipati, Krishna Rao

    2013-01-01

    Classical proinflammatory eicosanoids, and more recently discovered lipid mediators with anti-inflammatory and proresolving bioactivity, exert a complex role in the initiation, control, and resolution of inflammation. Using a targeted lipidomics approach, we investigated circulating lipid mediator responses to resistance exercise and treatment with the NSAID ibuprofen. Human subjects undertook a single bout of unaccustomed resistance exercise (80% of one repetition maximum) following oral ingestion of ibuprofen (400 mg) or placebo control. Venous blood was collected during early recovery (0–3 h and 24 h postexercise), and serum lipid mediator composition was analyzed by LC-MS-based targeted lipidomics. Postexercise recovery was characterized by elevated levels of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and 2-derived prostanoids (TXB2, PGE2, PGD2, PGF2α, and PGI2), lipooxygenase (5-LOX, 12-LOX, and 15-LOX)-derived hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), and leukotrienes (e.g., LTB4), and epoxygenase (CYP)-derived epoxy/dihydroxy eicosatrienoic acids (EpETrEs/DiHETrEs). Additionally, we detected elevated levels of bioactive lipid mediators with anti-inflammatory and proresolving properties, including arachidonic acid-derived lipoxins (LXA4 and LXB4), and the EPA (E-series) and DHA (D-series)-derived resolvins (RvD1 and RvE1), and protectins (PD1 isomer 10S, 17S-diHDoHE). Ibuprofen treatment blocked exercise-induced increases in COX-1 and COX-2-derived prostanoids but also resulted in off-target reductions in leukotriene biosynthesis, and a diminished proresolving lipid mediator response. CYP pathway product metabolism was also altered by ibuprofen treatment, as indicated by elevated postexercise serum 5,6-DiHETrE and 8,9-DiHETrE only in those receiving ibuprofen. These findings characterize the blood inflammatory lipid mediator response to unaccustomed resistance exercise in humans and show that acute proinflammatory signals are mechanistically linked to the induction of a

  19. Metaplastic Breast Carcinoma Versus Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: Survival and Response to Treatment.

    PubMed

    Aydiner, Adnan; Sen, Fatma; Tambas, Makbule; Ciftci, Rumeysa; Eralp, Yesim; Saip, Pinar; Karanlik, Hasan; Fayda, Merdan; Kucucuk, Seden; Onder, Semen; Yavuz, Ekrem; Muslumanoglu, Mahmut; Igci, Abdullah

    2015-12-01

    Metaplastic breast carcinoma (MBC) differs from classic invasive ductal carcinomas regarding incidence, pathogenesis, and prognosis. The purpose of this study was to compare patients with MBC with clinicopathologic and treatment-matched patients with triple-negative breast carcinoma (TNBC) in terms of response to treatment, progression, and survival.Fifty-four patients with MBC and 51 with TNBC, who were treated at Istanbul University, Institute of Oncology, between 1993 and 2014, were included in the study. After correctly matching the patients with 1 of the 2 groups, they were compared to determine differences in response to treatment, disease progression, clinical course, and survival.At a median follow-up of 28 months, 18 patients (17.1%) died and 27 (25.5%) had disease progression. Metaplastic histology was significantly correlated with worse 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) (51 ± 9% vs. 82 ± 6%, P = 0.013) and overall survival (OS) (68 ± 8% vs. 94 ± 4%, P = 0.009) compared with TNBC histology. Patients who received taxane-based chemotherapy (CT) regimens or adjuvant radiotherapy had significantly better PFS (P = 0.002 and P < 0.001) and OS (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001) compared with others. In the multivariate analysis, MBC (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.09, P < 0.001), presence of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) (HR: 12.8, P = 0.05), and metastasis development at any time during the clinical course (HR: 38.7, P < 0.001) were significant factors that decreased PFS, whereas metastasis development was the only independent prognostic factor of OS (HR: 23.8, P = 0.009).MBC is significantly correlated with worse PFS and OS compared with TNBC. Patients with MBC are resistant to conventional CT agents, and more efficient treatment regimens are required. PMID:26717372

  20. Personalized Circulating Tumor DNA Biomarkers Dynamically Predict Treatment Response and Survival In Gynecologic Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Sanya; Sebra, Robert; Catalina Camacho, Sandra; Garnar-Wortzel, Leopold; Nair, Navya; Moshier, Erin; Wooten, Melissa; Uzilov, Andrew; Chen, Rong; Prasad-Hayes, Monica; Zakashansky, Konstantin; Beddoe, Ann Marie; Schadt, Eric; Dottino, Peter; Martignetti, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Background High-grade serous ovarian and endometrial cancers are the most lethal female reproductive tract malignancies worldwide. In part, failure to treat these two aggressive cancers successfully centers on the fact that while the majority of patients are diagnosed based on current surveillance strategies as having a complete clinical response to their primary therapy, nearly half will develop disease recurrence within 18 months and the majority will die from disease recurrence within 5 years. Moreover, no currently used biomarkers or imaging studies can predict outcome following initial treatment. Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) represents a theoretically powerful biomarker for detecting otherwise occult disease. We therefore explored the use of personalized ctDNA markers as both a surveillance and prognostic biomarker in gynecologic cancers and compared this to current FDA-approved surveillance tools. Methods and Findings Tumor and serum samples were collected at time of surgery and then throughout treatment course for 44 patients with gynecologic cancers, representing 22 ovarian cancer cases, 17 uterine cancer cases, one peritoneal, three fallopian tube, and one patient with synchronous fallopian tube and uterine cancer. Patient/tumor-specific mutations were identified using whole-exome and targeted gene sequencing and ctDNA levels quantified using droplet digital PCR. CtDNA was detected in 93.8% of patients for whom probes were designed and levels were highly correlated with CA-125 serum and computed tomography (CT) scanning results. In six patients, ctDNA detected the presence of cancer even when CT scanning was negative and, on average, had a predictive lead time of seven months over CT imaging. Most notably, undetectable levels of ctDNA at six months following initial treatment was associated with markedly improved progression free and overall survival. Conclusions Detection of residual disease in gynecologic, and indeed all cancers, represents a diagnostic

  1. Response of garlic (Allium sativum L.) bolting and bulbing to temperature and photoperiod treatments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cuinan; Wang, Mengyi; Cheng, Zhihui; Meng, Huanwen

    2016-01-01

    This research was conducted to evaluate the effect of temperature and photoperiod treatments on the bolting and bulb formation of three local garlic cultivars (cvs) in two consecutive years. Naturally vernalized plants of cvs G107, G025 and G064 were transplanted into growth chambers and subjected to various combinations of temperature [T15/10, 15°C/10°C; T20/15, 20°C/15°C and T25/18, 25°C/18°C (day/night)] and photoperiod (L8, 8 h and L14,14 h) treatments. Plant growth, endogenous phytohormone and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) levels, along with the bolting and yield of garlic were evaluated. The experimental results from two consecutive years indicated that higher temperature (20°C or 25°C) and longer photoperiod (14 h) treatments significantly enhanced the garlic bolting, bulbing and cloving with a shorter growth period and a higher bulb weight. Moreover, the endogenous phytohormone and MeJA levels in the test plants were significantly increased by the higher temperature (25°C for the phytohormone level; 20°C for the MeJA level) and longer photoperiod [14 h, except for abscisic acid (ABA), which had the highest level at 8 h] conditions and were decreased by the lowest test temperature (15°C) and shorter photoperiod (8 h, except for ABA) conditions. This response coincided with that of the bulbing index, bolting rate, growth period and bulb weight. In addition, plants treated under the conditions of 20°C/15°C-14 h and 25°C/18°C-14 h produced the highest phytohormone levels (except for ABA) for cvs G025 and G064, respectively, and showed the best bolting and bulbing behavior. It is reasonable to assume that endogenous phytohormone (especially gibberellic acid) and MeJA levels are highly related to garlic bolting and bulbing, which might lead to the different responses of the three studied cultivars to the combination of temperature and photoperiod treatments. Furthermore, cvs G107 and G025 bolt well and have better bulb formation under 20

  2. Response of garlic (Allium sativum L.) bolting and bulbing to temperature and photoperiod treatments

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cuinan; Wang, Mengyi; Cheng, Zhihui; Meng, Huanwen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This research was conducted to evaluate the effect of temperature and photoperiod treatments on the bolting and bulb formation of three local garlic cultivars (cvs) in two consecutive years. Naturally vernalized plants of cvs G107, G025 and G064 were transplanted into growth chambers and subjected to various combinations of temperature [T15/10, 15°C/10°C; T20/15, 20°C/15°C and T25/18, 25°C/18°C (day/night)] and photoperiod (L8, 8 h and L14,14 h) treatments. Plant growth, endogenous phytohormone and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) levels, along with the bolting and yield of garlic were evaluated. The experimental results from two consecutive years indicated that higher temperature (20°C or 25°C) and longer photoperiod (14 h) treatments significantly enhanced the garlic bolting, bulbing and cloving with a shorter growth period and a higher bulb weight. Moreover, the endogenous phytohormone and MeJA levels in the test plants were significantly increased by the higher temperature (25°C for the phytohormone level; 20°C for the MeJA level) and longer photoperiod [14 h, except for abscisic acid (ABA), which had the highest level at 8 h] conditions and were decreased by the lowest test temperature (15°C) and shorter photoperiod (8 h, except for ABA) conditions. This response coincided with that of the bulbing index, bolting rate, growth period and bulb weight. In addition, plants treated under the conditions of 20°C/15°C–14 h and 25°C/18°C–14 h produced the highest phytohormone levels (except for ABA) for cvs G025 and G064, respectively, and showed the best bolting and bulbing behavior. It is reasonable to assume that endogenous phytohormone (especially gibberellic acid) and MeJA levels are highly related to garlic bolting and bulbing, which might lead to the different responses of the three studied cultivars to the combination of temperature and photoperiod treatments. Furthermore, cvs G107 and G025 bolt well and have better bulb

  3. Interaction between anthelmintic treatment and vaccine responses in ponies naturally infected with cyathostomins.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, M K; Rubinson, E F; Chambers, T M; Horohov, D W; Wagner, B; Betancourt, A; Reedy, S E; Jacobsen, S

    2015-04-15

    Anthelmintics and vaccines are commonly given concurrently in routine equine management, but it is unknown to what extent an interaction between the two exists. Cyathostomins can modulate the local immune response by stimulating a type 2 helper T cell (Th2) response. In addition, anti-inflammatory effects of ivermectin have been found in rodent models. It is unknown whether these anti-inflammatory effects affect the acute phase response elicited by commonly used vaccines. This study evaluated how the acute phase inflammatory response, leukocyte expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and vaccine-specific titers induced by simultaneous injection of three vaccines (West Nile Virus, Equine Herpes Rhinopneumonitis, and Keyhole Limpet Hemocyanin) were modulated by concurrent administration of ivermectin or pyrantel pamoate in ponies naturally infected with cyathostomins. Mixed-breed yearling ponies were blocked by gender and fecal strongyle egg count, then randomly assigned to three treatment groups: ivermectin (n=8), pyrantel pamoate (n=8), and control (n=7). All ponies received vaccinations intramuscularly on days 0 and 29, and anthelmintics were administered on the same days. Whole blood, serum and plasma samples were collected one, three and 14 days after each vaccination. Samples were analyzed for concentrations of acute phase reactants (haptoglobin, serum amyloid A, fibrinogen and iron), mRNA expression levels of cytokines (interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-4, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ) in leukocytes, and vaccine-specific antibody titers. A marked acute-phase response was noted following both vaccinations. In contrast, the pattern of change in cytokine expression was less pronounced and more variable. Statistical differences were observed between groups for haptoglobin, fibrinogen, IL-1β, IL-4, and IL-10, but differences were generally small and none of the vaccine titers were different between the groups. Taken together, the study

  4. The acute phase of inflammatory response involved in the wound-healing process after excimer laser treatment

    PubMed Central

    Resan, Mirko; Vukosavljevic, Miroslav; Vojvodic, Danilo; Pajic-Eggspuehler, Brigitte; Pajic, Bojan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the participation of proinflammatory cytokines in the acute phase of corneal wound-healing response after excimer laser treatment. Methods The study included 68 myopic eyes up to −3.0 diopters divided into two groups: 1) eyes treated with laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) (n=31) and 2) eyes treated with photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) (n=37). Each group was then divided into three subgroups based on tear sampling times: before (0 hours), 1 hour after, and 24 hours after treatment. The tear fluid was sampled from lower lateral tear meniscus using a cellulose microsurgical sponge. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 in tear fluid were determined by flow cytometry method. Results Statistical significance was observed in the concentrations of TNF-α (P=0.0421) and IL-1β (P=0.0225) between samples collected 1 and 24 hours after PRK treatment in favor of samples collected 1 hour after treatment. IL-6 concentration changes showed a significant increase in the PRK group in both time intervals following treatment compared to pretreatment (0 hour/1 hour, P=0.0031; 0 hour/24 hours, P=0.0059). For IL-8 concentrations, significant differences were observed between control and experimental groups in samples collected 1 hour after LASIK and 1 hour after PRK treatment (P<0.001 for both groups), and IL-8 concentrations between control and experimental groups in samples collected 24 hours after LASIK and 24 hours after PRK treatment were greater after PRK treatment (P=0.0005). Comparison of average concentration values of proinflammatory cytokines in all the tested samples between LASIK and PRK groups showed significantly higher levels of IL-1β in the LASIK group 24 hours after treatment (P=0.0134), and of IL-6 in the PRK group 24 hours after treatment (P=0.0031). Conclusion The acute phase of corneal wound healing after excimer laser treatment is defined by an intensive inflammatory response. After PRK

  5. Biologically relevant 3D tumor arrays: imaging-based methods for quantification of reproducible growth and analysis of treatment response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celli, Jonathan P.; Rizvi, Imran; Blanden, Adam R.; Abu-Yousif, Adnan O.; Spring, Bryan Q.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2011-02-01

    Three-dimensional in vitro tumor models have emerged as powerful research tools in cancer biology, though the vast potential of these systems as high-throughput, biologically relevant reporters of treatment response has yet to be adequately explored. Here, building on previous studies, we demonstrate the utility of using 3D models for ovarian and pancreatic cancers in conjunction with quantitative image processing to reveal aspects of growth behavior and treatment response that would not be evident without either modeling or quantitative analysis component. In this report we specifically focus on recent improvements in the imaging component of this integrative research platform and emphasize analysis to establish reproducible growth properties in 3D tumor arrays, a key consideration in establishing the utility of this platform as a reliable reporter of therapeutic response. Building on previous studies using automated segmentation of low magnification image fields containing large numbers of nodules to study size dependent treatment effects, we introduce an improvement to this method using multiresolution decomposition to remove gradient background from transmitted light images for more reliable feature identification. This approach facilitates the development of a new treatment response metric, disruption fraction (Dfrac), which quantifies dose dependent distribution shifts from nodular fragmentation induced by cytotoxic therapies. Using this approach we show that PDT treatment is associated with significant dose-dependent increases in Dfrac, while this is not observed with carboplatin treatment. The ability to quantify this response to therapy could play a key role in design of combination regimens involving these two modalities.

  6. Cluster analysis of cognitive deficits may mark heterogeneity in schizophrenia in terms of outcome and response to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Elsa; Mérette, Chantal; Jomphe, Valérie; Émond, Claudia; Rouleau, Nancie; Bouchard, Roch-Hugo; Roy, Marc-André; Paccalet, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairments are central to schizophrenia, but their clinical utility for tagging heterogeneity in lifetime outcome and response to treatment is not conclusive. By exploiting four cognitive domains consistently showing large deficits in studies, we tested whether cluster analysis would define separate subsets of patients and then whether the disease heterogeneity marked by these clusters would be related to lifetime outcome and response to treatment. A total of 112 schizophrenia patients completed a neuropsychological evaluation. The PANSS, GAF-S and GAF-F were rated at the onset and endpoint of the illness trajectory. A blind judgment of the lifetime response to treatment was made. The first cluster presented near-normal cognitive performance. Two other clusters of severely impaired patients were identified: one generally impaired in the four cognitive domains and another selectively impaired in visual episodic memory and processing speed, each relating to a different lifetime evolution of disease and treatment response. Although the two impaired clusters were clinically indistinguishable in symptom severity and functioning at disease onset, patients with selective cognitive impairments demonstrated better improvement at outcome, whereas the generally impaired patients were more likely to be treatment refractory. The findings have implications for the management of patients and for clinical trials since particular combinations of cognitive deficits in patients would influence their treatment response. PMID:24173295

  7. Response shift due to diagnosis and primary treatment of localized prostate cancer: a then-test and a vignette study

    PubMed Central

    de Koning, Harry J.; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise

    2007-01-01

    Aim Whether a prostate cancer diagnosis induces response shift has not been established so far. Therefore, we assessed response shift in men who were diagnosed with localized prostate cancer. Patients and methods Out of 3,892 men who completed a questionnaire before screening, 82 were subsequently diagnosed with prostate cancer. Response shift was assessed in 52 (response 63%) by the then-test (EuroQol self-rating of health, Short-Form 36 mental health and vitality) and a novel method: rating of vignettes relating to side effects of prostate cancer treatment (urinary, bowel and erectile dysfunction). Three then-tests were conducted: two referencing pre-diagnosis (measured pre- and post-treatment), and one referencing pre-treatment (measured post-treatment). Results Then-test scores of pre-diagnosis health were significantly higher than original scores, indicating a more positive judgement in retrospect. Then-test scores of pre-treatment health were lower than original scores. Especially the vignette on erectile dysfunction was rated less bad after diagnosis versus before (P < 0.001, moderate effect size). Conclusions We found evidence for response shift in men who were diagnosed with prostate cancer. Men evaluated urinary, bowel, and erectile dysfunction as less bad after they had become patients who can expect to experience these side effects. The rating of vignettes is a promising additional technique to assess response shift. PMID:17917793

  8. Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lekov, Alex; Thompson, Lisa; McKane, Aimee; Song, Katherine; Piette, Mary Ann

    2009-04-01

    This report summarizes the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory?s research to date in characterizing energy efficiency and automated demand response opportunities for wastewater treatment facilities in California. The report describes the characteristics of wastewater treatment facilities, the nature of the wastewater stream, energy use and demand, as well as details of the wastewater treatment process. It also discusses control systems and energy efficiency and automated demand response opportunities. In addition, several energy efficiency and load management case studies are provided for wastewater treatment facilities.This study shows that wastewater treatment facilities can be excellent candidates for open automated demand response and that facilities which have implemented energy efficiency measures and have centralized control systems are well-suited to shift or shed electrical loads in response to financial incentives, utility bill savings, and/or opportunities to enhance reliability of service. Control technologies installed for energy efficiency and load management purposes can often be adapted for automated demand response at little additional cost. These improved controls may prepare facilities to be more receptive to open automated demand response due to both increased confidence in the opportunities for controlling energy cost/use and access to the real-time data.

  9. Targeting the microenvironment of pancreatic cancer: overcoming treatment barriers and improving local immune responses.

    PubMed

    Strauss, J; Alewine, C; Figg, W D; Duffy, A

    2016-07-01

    Historically, patients diagnosed with metastatic pancreatic cancer have faced a grim prognosis. The survival benefit seen with systemic chemotherapies and even combinations thereof have been disappointing. However, growing data suggest that the microenvironment of pancreatic cancer may be contributing to this poor prognosis. This microenvironment has a dense fibrotic stroma, and is hypoxic and highly immunosuppressive, all of which pose barriers to treatment. Newer strategies looking to disrupt the fibrotic stroma, target hypoxic areas, and improve local immune responses in the tumor microenvironment are currently undergoing clinical evaluation and seem to offer great promise. In addition to these therapies, preclinical work evaluating novel cytotoxic agents including nanoparticles has also been encouraging. While much research still needs to be done, these strategies offer new hope for patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:26661112

  10. Pivotal Response Treatment for Infants At-Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Gengoux, Grace W.; Klin, Ami; Chawarska, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Presently there is limited research to suggest efficacious interventions for infants at-risk for autism. Pivotal response treatment (PRT) has empirical support for use with preschool children with autism, but there are no reports in the literature utilizing this approach with infants. In the current study, a developmental adaptation of PRT was piloted via a brief parent training model with three infants at-risk for autism. Utilizing a multiple baseline design, the data suggest that the introduction of PRT resulted in increases in the infants’ frequency of functional communication and parents’ fidelity of implementation of PRT procedures. Results provide preliminary support for the feasibility and utility of PRT for very young children at-risk for autism. PMID:22573001

  11. Oromandibular dystonia in yemeni patients with khat chewing: a response to botulinum toxin treatment.

    PubMed

    Shehata, Hatem S; El-Tamawy, Mohamed S; Mohieldin, Nevin; Edrees, Mohammed; Bohlega, Saeed

    2014-04-22

    Khat-(Catha edulis)related oromandibular dystonia is a difficult-to-treat subset of movement disorders that involve masticatory muscles with diverse and incapacitating manifestations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Botulinum toxin-type A therapy in khat chewer Yemeni patients with oromandibular dystonia. This prospective study included 18 khat-chewers Yemeni patients with refractory oromandibular dystonia, who were subjected to Botulinum toxin-A injection and followed up for 3 months thereafter. Primary efficacy outcome was the global impression scale, and secondary outcome measure was the Unified Dystonia Rating Scale. Patients showed improvement of both efficacy measures, maximum satisfactory responses were detected at the forth week after injection. No major adverse events were detected. Botulinum toxin-A is considered an effective and safe treatment option for refractory oromandibular dystonia in khat-chewers. PMID:24987506

  12. How attendance and quality of participation affect treatment response to parent management training.

    PubMed

    Nix, Robert L; Bierman, Karen L; McMahon, Robert J

    2009-06-01

    This study examined whether attendance and quality of participation in parent management training predicted treatment response. Data were from 445 parents (55% minority, 62% single; almost all of low socioeconomic status) who had 1st-grade children with severe conduct problems. Quality of participation in weekly parent groups was based on group leader ratings. Parent outcomes were based on interviewer ratings, behavioral observations, parent reports, and teacher ratings. Results of hierarchical linear models suggested that few family characteristics predicted attendance in this efficacy trial and that attendance was not related to changes in parenting over the year. However, several family characteristics predicted quality of participation in parent management training, and this in turn predicted changes in parental perceptions, warmth, physical punishment, and school involvement. From a clinical perspective, these findings suggest that it is not enough to get parents to attend sessions; it is also necessary to facilitate their active engagement in the therapeutic process. PMID:19485585

  13. Pivotal response treatment prompts a functional rewiring of the brain among individuals with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Archana; Yang, Daniel Y-J; Dvornek, Nicha; Staib, Lawrence H; Duncan, James S; Pelphrey, Kevin A; Ventola, Pamela

    2016-09-28

    Behavioral interventions for autism have gained prominence in recent years; however, the neural-systems-level targets of these interventions remain poorly understood. We use a novel Bayesian framework to extract network-based differences before and after a 16-week pivotal response treatment (PRT) regimen. Our results suggest that the functional changes induced by PRT localize to the posterior cingulate and are marked by a shift in connectivity from the orbitofrontal cortex to the occipital-temporal cortex. Our results illuminate a potential PRT-induced learning mechanism, whereby the neural circuits involved during social perception shift from sensory and attentional systems to higher-level object and face processing areas. PMID:27532879

  14. Response of cutaneous leishmaniasis (chiclero's ulcer) to treatment with meglumine antimoniate in Southeast Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Gonzalez, A; Canto-Lara, S B; Damian-Centeno, A G; Andrade-Narvaez, F J

    1999-12-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis, known as chiclero's ulcer in southeastern Mexico, is characterized by a predominantly single, painless, ulcerated lesion, without lymphangitis or adenopathy. When located on the ear, it tends to become chronic, causing destruction of the pinna and disfigurement. It is caused predominantly by Leishmania (L.) mexicana. Although pentavalent antimonials (Sb5+) are the mainstay of leishmanial therapy and have been used for more than 50 years, dosage regimens have been repeatedly modified and the best one has not been fully identified. The main purpose of the present study was to investigate the response of chiclero's ulcer to treatment with meglumine antimoniate. One hundred five patients were treated with meglumine antimoniate at a daily dose of 1 ampule per day (425 mg of Sb5+) until healing. The lesions healed after a mean of 25 days (range = 5-60 days). PMID:10674678

  15. HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMA IN A NON-CIRRHOTIC PATIENT WITH SUSTAINED VIROLOGICAL RESPONSE AFTER HEPATITIS C TREATMENT.

    PubMed

    Mattos, Angelo Alves de; Marcon, Patrícia dos Santos; Araújo, Fernanda Schild Branco de; Coral, Gabriela Perdomo; Tovo, Cristiane Valle

    2015-12-01

    Chronic infection by hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the main risk factors for the development of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the emergence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in non-cirrhotic HCV patients, especially after sustained virological response (SVR) is an unusual event. Recently, it has been suggested that HCV genotype 3 may have a particular oncogenic mechanism, but the factors involved in these cases as well as the profile of these patients are still not fully understood. Thus, we present the case of a non-cirrhotic fifty-year-old male with HCV infection, genotype 3a, who developed HCC two years after treatment with pegylated-interferon and ribavirin, with SVR, in Brazil. PMID:27049708

  16. Relationships between ovarian blood flow and ovarian response to eCG-treatment of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Honnens, A; Niemann, H; Herzog, K; Paul, V; Meyer, H H D; Bollwein, H

    2009-07-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate ovarian blood flow and ovarian response in cows undergoing a gonadotropin treatment to induce a superovulatory response, using transrectal colour Doppler sonography. Forty-two cows including 19 cross-bred, 14 German Holstein and 9 German Black Pied cows were examined sonographically before hormonal stimulation on Day 10 of the oestrous cycle, three days after administration of eCG (Day 13) and seven days after artificial insemination (Day 7(p.i.)). After each Doppler examination, blood was collected for determination of total oestrogens (E) and progesterone (P4) in peripheral plasma. The blood flow volume (BFV) and pulsatility index (PI), which is a measure for blood flow resistance, were determined in the ovarian artery, and B-mode sonography was used to count dominant follicles and corpora lutea. Important criteria to assess the ovarian response following the hormonal treatment were the number of follicles >5mm in diameter on Day 13 and the number of corpora lutea on Day 7(p.i.) per cow. The number of follicles ranged from 2 to 61 (mean+/-S.E.M.: 17.5+/-1.7) and corpora lutea from 0 to 50 (mean+/-S.E.M.: 17.0+/-1.6). The BFV increased from 28.4 to 45.0 ml/min between Days 10 and 13 and reached a maximum of 108.5 ml/min on Day 7(p.i.) The PI decreased from 6.25 on Day 10 to 4.70 on Day 13 and to 2.10 on Day 7(p.i.) The BFV and PI on Day 13 did not correlate with the number of follicles (P>0.05). However, on Day 7(p.i.) the number of corpora lutea correlated positively with the BFV (r=0.64; P<0.0001), and an inverse relationship was found for the PI (r=-0.51; P=0.0005). There were no correlations (P>0.05) between the BFV and PI on Day 10 and the number of follicles on Day 13 or the number of corpora lutea on Day 7(p.i.) Results of the present study show that in cows, a hormonal treatment to induce a superovulatory response yielded a marked increase in BFV and a marked decrease in PI in the ovarian artery. However

  17. HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMA IN A NON-CIRRHOTIC PATIENT WITH SUSTAINED VIROLOGICAL RESPONSE AFTER HEPATITIS C TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    de MATTOS, Angelo Alves; MARCON, Patrícia dos Santos; de ARAÚJO, Fernanda Schild Branco; CORAL, Gabriela Perdomo; TOVO, Cristiane Valle

    2015-01-01

    Chronic infection by hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the main risk factors for the development of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the emergence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in non-cirrhotic HCV patients, especially after sustained virological response (SVR) is an unusual event. Recently, it has been suggested that HCV genotype 3 may have a particular oncogenic mechanism, but the factors involved in these cases as well as the profile of these patients are still not fully understood. Thus, we present the case of a non-cirrhotic fifty-year-old male with HCV infection, genotype 3a, who developed HCC two years after treatment with pegylated-interferon and ribavirin, with SVR, in Brazil. PMID:27049708

  18. Improving Question-Asking Initiations in Young Children with Autism Using Pivotal Response Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Koegel, Robert; Bradshaw, Jessica; Ashbaugh, Kristen; Koegel, Lynn Kern

    2013-01-01

    Social initiations make up a core deficit for children with autism spectrum disorder. In particular, initiated questions during social interactions are often minimal or absent in this population. In the context of a multiple baseline design, the efficacy of using the motivational procedures of Pivotal Response Treatment to increase social question asking for three young children with autism was assessed. Results indicated that participants initiated a greater number of targeted questions following intervention. Additionally, all children exhibited increases in initiation of untargeted questions during social interaction in novel settings. Furthermore, post intervention data revealed collateral gains in communication and adaptive behavior. Theoretical implications of incorporating motivational strategies into intervention to improve social initiations in young children with ASD are discussed. PMID:24014174

  19. Circulating tumor cells are correlated with disease progression and treatment response in an orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma model.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun; Fan, Zhichao; Wu, Xiufeng; Xu, Min; Jiang, Jiahao; Tan, Changjun; Wu, Weizhong; Wei, Xunbin; Zhou, Jian

    2015-11-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a highly malignant tumor characterized by rapid progression, poor prognosis, and frequent hematogenous metastasis. A minimally invasive diagnostic biomarker that can predict disease progression and treatment response would be of extraordinary benefit. Therefore, we have investigated whether the number of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is correlated with disease progression and treatment response in HCC. Here we report that the number of CTCs, monitored by in vivo flow cytometry (IVFC), is strongly correlated with disease progression and treatment response in a highly metastatic orthotopic nude mouse model of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled HCC. Sorafenib treatment reduces the number of CTCs significantly. The decreased number of CTCs is consistent with low lung metastasis. This study has demonstrated a considerable clinical value of CTCs as a biomarker in predicting disease progression and monitoring therapeutic efficacy in patients with HCC. PMID:26355643

  20. Factors affecting the response to the specific treatment of several forms of clinical anestrus in high producing dairy cows.

    PubMed

    López-Gatius, F; Mirzaei, A; Santolaria, P; Bech-Sàbat, G; Nogareda, C; García-Ispierto, I; Hanzen, Ch; Yániz, J L

    2008-06-01

    This study was designed to examine estrous response rates to the therapeutic treatment of clinical anestrus in high producing dairy cows and to identify the factors that could affect these rates. Cows with silent ovulation (Subestrus group), cystic ovarian disease (Cyst group) or ovarian hypofunction (OH group) were given specific treatment for their disorder. Data were derived from 1764 treatments in cows producing a mean of 45.4 kg of milk upon treatment including: 889 subestrous cows, 367 cystic cows and 508 cows with ovarian hypofunction. Cows showing estrus following treatment exhibited a similar pregnancy rate to cows attaining natural estrus used as reference: 33% (337/1006) and 35% (626/1796), respectively. No significant differences in pregnancy rates were observed among the Subestrus, Cyst and OH groups (34% (196/571), 34% (44/130), 32% (97/305), respectively. Based on the odds ratio, an estrous response for all groups was less likely to occur in cows that had suffered previous anestrus, compared to cows that were anestrous for the first time, whereas the likelihood of an estrous response increased in cows treated after 90 days in milk. Our results indicate that previous anestrus and a late stage of lactation can have a negative and positive effect, respectively, on the estrous response to the specific treatment of clinical anestrus shown by high producing dairy cows. Treatment targeted at each type of clinical anestrus can render similar pregnancy rates to those shown by cows in natural estrus. PMID:18359070

  1. Baseline carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) serum levels predict bevacizumab-based treatment response in metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Prager, Gerald W; Braemswig, Kira H; Martel, Alexandra; Unseld, Matthias; Heinze, Georg; Brodowicz, Thomas; Scheithauer, Werner; Kornek, Gabriela; Zielinski, Christoph C

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) affects tumorigenesis by enhancing tumor cell survival and by inducing tumor angiogenesis. This study aimed to evaluate baseline CEA serum levels to predict bevacizumab-based therapy effect and survival in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Two hundred and ninety eight mCRC patients receiving chemotherapy plus either bevacizumab or cetuximab were analyzed in a retrospective study. Disease control (DC), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival were assessed and related to pretreatment CEA serum levels. Patients with baseline CEA serum levels below the statistical median of 26.8 ng/mL (group I) were compared with patients with higher CEA levels (group II). The cetuximab-based treatment cohort was analyzed for specificity assessment of CEA to predict the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor effect in mCRC. Baseline CEA serum levels inversely correlated with therapeutic response in patients receiving bevacizumab-based treatment (disease control rate, 84% vs 60%), inversely correlated with median PFS leading to a median PFS benefit of 2.1 months for patients in group I when compared with group II, as well as inversely correlated with median overall survival (37.5 months vs 21.4 months). In an independent cohort of 129 patients treated with cetuximab-based therapy, no association of therapeutic response or PFS with CEA serum levels was found. As expected, baseline CEA levels were prognostic for mCRC. These data give first evidence that baseline serum CEA levels might constitute an important predictor for the efficacy of first-line bevacizumab-based therapy in patients with mCRC. Previously, we found that CEA induces angiogenesis independent of VEGF. The data presented here now give first evidence that baseline serum CEA levels in patients might constitute an important predictor for the efficacy of first-line bevacizumab-based therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:24850362

  2. Modulations of the Chicken Cecal Microbiome and Metagenome in Response to Anticoccidial and Growth Promoter Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Danzeisen, Jessica L.; Kim, Hyeun Bum; Isaacson, Richard E.; Tu, Zheng Jin; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    With increasi