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Sample records for 93nb solid-state nmr

  1. Theoretical and experimental insights into applicability of solid-state 93Nb NMR in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Papulovskiy, Evgeniy; Shubin, Alexandre A; Terskikh, Victor V; Pickard, Chris J; Lapina, Olga B

    2013-04-14

    Ab initio DFT calculations of (93)Nb NMR parameters using the NMR-CASTEP code were performed for a series of over fifty individual niobates, and a good agreement has been found with experimental NMR parameters. New experimental and calculated (93)Nb NMR data were obtained for several compounds, AlNbO4, VNb9O25, K8Nb6O19 and Cs3NbO8, which are of particular interest for catalysis. Several interesting trends have been identified between (93)Nb NMR parameters and the specifics of niobium site environments in niobates. These trends may serve as useful guidelines in interpreting (93)Nb NMR spectra of complex niobium oxide systems, including amorphous samples and niobium-based multicomponent heterogeneous catalysts. Potential applications of (93)Nb NMR to study solid polyoxoniobates are discussed. PMID:23450163

  2. 93Nb NMR chemical shift scale for niobia systems.

    PubMed

    Lapina, Olga B; Khabibulin, Dzhalil F; Romanenko, Konstantin V; Gan, Zhehong; Zuev, Mikhail G; Krasil'nikov, Vladimir N; Fedorov, Vladimir E

    2005-09-01

    93Nb solid-state NMR spectra of a series of inorganic niobates with Nb in different oxygen coordination environments were measured. For all studied compounds the chemical shielding and quadrupole tensor parameters were determined using conventional and ultrahigh field NMR facilities, ultrahigh speed MAS, DQ STMAS, solid-echo and computer modeling. It has been demonstrated that the 93Nb isotropic chemical shift is sensitive to the coordination number of Nb sites. For the first time the 93Nb NMR chemical shift scale for NbOx polyhedra in solid materials has been proposed: for four-coordinated Nb sites, the isotropic shifts occur from -650 to -950 ppm; five-coordinated Nb sites have the isotropic shifts in the range of -900 to -980 ppm; for six-coordinated Nb sites the isotropic shifts vary from -900 to -1360 ppm; the shifts from -1200 to -1600 ppm are typical for seven-coordinated Nb sites; for eight-coordinated Nb sites the shifts are higher than -1400 ppm. The possible correlation between the value of the isotropic chemical shift and the ionic character of the NbOx-MOy polyhedra association has been suggested. The magnitude of the 93Nb quadrupole coupling constant depends on the local symmetry of Nb sites and may vary from hundreds of kHz to hundreds of MHz. PMID:16216475

  3. Investigation of Local Structure and Cation Ordering in Dielectric Oxide Microwave Ceramics with stoichiometry A(Lix(Nb,Ta)y) O3 Using 7Li and 93Nb solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalfarisi, Rony

    The local structure and cation ordering in dielectric oxide microwave ceramics with stoichiometry A(Lix(Nb,Ta)y) O3 are investigated using 7Li and 93Nb solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For all samples, 7Li MAS NMR spectra show one strong and sharp resonance peak indicating one unique environment which corresponds to local lithium environment of nearest B-site neighbor (nBn) surrounded by 4 LiO6 octahedra and 2 NbO6 octahedra (TaO6 in some samples). In addition to this, 7Li MAS NMR spectrum of (Ca2/3La1/3) (Li1/3Nb2/3) O3 show one additional weak and broad resonance peak which can be assigned to nBn of 3 LiO6 octahedra and 3 NbO6 octahedra. 93Nb MAS NMR spectra of samples with niobium content, show a resonance peak with tail toward the low frequency limit, an evidence to the existence of chemical shifts and quadrupole couplings distributions. Both (Sr2/3La1/3) (Li1/3Nb2/3) O3 and Ca(Li1/4Nb3/4) O3 spectra show one broad resonance peak, which can be interpreted as one NbO6 octahedron nBn with many slight variations through out the sample. While (Ca2/3La1/3) (Li1/3Nb2/3) O3 spectra show four peaks correspond to four distinct NbO6 octahedra local nBn environments with the nBn configuration as: (i) 3 LiO6 and 3 NbO6; (ii) 2 LiO6 and 4 NbO6; (iii) 1 LiO6 and 5 NbO6; (iv) all 6 NbO6

  4. 93 Nb NMR investigation of vortex- glass transition in layered NbSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Douglas; Saraswat, Garima; Shirage, Parasharam; Kuhns, Philip; Hoch, Michael J. R.; Reyes, Arneil

    We report a detailed low temperature investigation of vortex glass transition in layered superconducting compound NbSe2 using 93Nb NMR at fields below Hc2. Preliminary measurements show that spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 demonstrates a classic Korringa behavior 1/T1~ T above the superconducting transition Tc , consistent with previous measurements on this compound. However, for field H perpendicular to the layers, we observed that 1/T1 exhibits an anomalous plateau between Tc (H = 0) and Tc (H) and a suppression of the superconducting enhancement expected below Tc. Instead, a power law behavior, 1/T1 ~T 1 . 2 below Tc down to 360mK was observed which suggests a strong anisotropy in the low energy excitations. However, the possibility of enhancement in 1/T1 due to vortex fluctuations which competes with electronic mechanisms cannot be excluded. The implications of these results with regards to vortex-glass transition will be discussed. This work was performed at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, which is supported by NSF DMR-1157490 and the State of Florida.

  5. Evidence for s-wave superconductivity in noncentrosymmetric Re24Nb5 from 93Nb NMR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, C. S.; Su, T. H.; Liu, H. F.; Young, Ben-Li

    2011-08-01

    We report a 93Nb nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study on the noncentrosymmetric superconductor Re24Nb5. Below the superconducting temperature Tc(H), the spin susceptibility probed by the 93Nb NMR Knight shift gradually decreases with lowering temperature, accompanied by the broadening of the resonance spectrum. Such behavior is commonly observed in the BCS-type superconductors. The 93Nb NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) shows a well-defined coherence peak just below Tc(H), followed by a marked decrease with further decreasing temperature. Moreover, the 1/T1 data in the superconducting state were found to obey a single exponential expression, yielding a nodeless gap Δ/kB=10.3 K. This value gives the ratio of 2Δ/kBTc(H)=3.55, that is almost identical with the value of 3.5 predicted from BCS theory. On these bases, we conclude that the noncentrosymmetric Re24Nb5 compound can be characterized as a weakly coupled BCS-type superconductor.

  6. Solid-state NMR and Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Opella, Stanley J.

    2015-01-01

    The native environment for a membrane protein is a phospholipid bilayer. Because the protein is immobilized on NMR timescales by the interactions within a bilayer membrane, solid-state NMR methods are essential to obtain high-resolution spectra. Approaches have been developed for both unoriented and oriented samples, however, they all rest on the foundation of the most fundamental aspects solid-state NMR, and the chemical shift and homo- and hetero-nuclear dipole-dipole interactions. Solid-state NMR has advanced sufficiently to enable the structures of membrane proteins to be determined under near-native conditions in phospholipid bilayers. PMID:25681966

  7. Scalar operators in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Boqin

    1991-11-01

    Selectivity and resolution of solid-state NMR spectra are determined by dispersion of local magnetic fields originating from relaxation effects and orientation-dependent resonant frequencies of spin nuclei. Theoretically, the orientation-dependent resonant frequencies can be represented by a set of irreducible tensors. Among these tensors, only zero rank tensors (scalar operators) are capable of providing high resolution NMR spectra. This thesis presents a series of new developments in high resolution solid-state NMR concerning the reconstruction of various scalar operators motion in solid C{sub 60} is analyzed.

  8. Multinuclear Solid-State NMR Investigation of Hexaniobate and Hexatantalate Compounds.

    PubMed

    Deblonde, Gauthier J-P; Coelho-Diogo, Cristina; Chagnes, Alexandre; Cote, Gérard; Smith, Mark E; Hanna, John V; Iuga, Dinu; Bonhomme, Christian

    2016-06-20

    This work determines the potential of solid-state NMR techniques to probe proton, alkali, and niobium environments in Lindqvist salts. Na7HNb6O19·15H2O (1), K8Nb6O19·16H2O (2), and Na8Ta6O19·24.5H2O (3) have been studied by solid-state static and magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR at high and ultrahigh magnetic field (16.4 and 19.9 T). (1)H MAS NMR was found to be a convenient and straightforward tool to discriminate between protonated and nonprotonated clusters AxH8-xM6O19·nH2O (A = alkali ion; M = Nb, Ta). (93)Nb MAS NMR studies at different fields and MAS rotation frequencies have been performed on 1. For the first time, the contributions of NbO5Oμ2H sites were clearly distinguished from those assigned to NbO6 sites in the hexaniobate cluster. The strong broadening of the resonances obtained under MAS was interpreted by combining chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) with quadrupolar effects and by using extensive fitting of the line shapes. In order to obtain the highest accuracy for all NMR parameters (CSA and quadrupolar), (93)Nb WURST QCPMG spectra in the static mode were recorded at 16.4 T for sample 1. The (93)Nb NMR spectra were interpreted in connection with the XRD data available in the literature (i.e., fractional occupancies of the NbO5Oμ2H sites). 1D (23)Na MAS and 2D (23)Na 3QMAS NMR studies of 1 revealed several distinct sodium sites. The multiplicity of the sites was again compared to structural details previously obtained by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. The (23)Na MAS NMR study of 3 confirmed the presence of a much larger distribution of sodium sites in accordance with the 10 sodium sites predicted by XRD. Finally, the effect of Nb/Ta substitutions in 1 was also probed by multinuclear MAS NMR ((1)H, (23)Na, and (93)Nb). PMID:27245403

  9. Solid-state NMR for bacterial biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, Courtney; Cegelski, Lynette

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria associate with surfaces and one another by elaborating an extracellular matrix to encapsulate cells, creating communities termed biofilms. Biofilms are beneficial in some ecological niches, but also contribute to the pathogenesis of serious and chronic infectious diseases. New approaches and quantitative measurements are needed to define the composition and architecture of bacterial biofilms to help drive the development of strategies to interfere with biofilm assembly. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is uniquely suited to the examination of insoluble and complex macromolecular and whole-cell systems. This article highlights three examples that implement solid-state NMR to deliver insights into bacterial biofilm composition and changes in cell-wall composition as cells transition to the biofilm lifestyle. Most recently, solid-state NMR measurements provided a total accounting of the protein and polysaccharide components in the extracellular matrix of an Escherichia coli biofilm and transformed our qualitative descriptions of matrix composition into chemical parameters that permit quantitative comparisons among samples. We present additional data for whole biofilm samples (cells plus the extracellular matrix) that complement matrix-only analyses. The study of bacterial biofilms by solid-state NMR is an exciting avenue ripe with many opportunities and we close the article by articulating some outstanding questions and future directions in this area.

  10. Solid-state NMR imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, N.; Dieckman, S.L.; Ellingson, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    An accessory for use with a solid-state NMR spectrometer includes a special imaging probe with linear, high-field strength gradient fields and high-power broadband RF coils using a back projection method for data acquisition and image reconstruction, and a real-time pulse programmer adaptable for use by a conventional computer for complex high speed pulse sequences.

  11. Solid-state NMR imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Dieckman, Stephen L.; Ellingson, William A.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for use with a solid-state NMR spectrometer includes a special imaging probe with linear, high-field strength gradient fields and high-power broadband RF coils using a back projection method for data acquisition and image reconstruction, and a real-time pulse programmer adaptable for use by a conventional computer for complex high speed pulse sequences.

  12. Solid-state NMR studies of supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John M; Forse, Alexander C; Grey, Clare P

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors, or 'supercapacitors' are attracting increasing attention as high-power energy storage devices for a wide range of technological applications. These devices store charge through electrostatic interactions between liquid electrolyte ions and the surfaces of porous carbon electrodes. However, many aspects of the fundamental mechanism of supercapacitance are still not well understood, and there is a lack of experimental techniques which are capable of studying working devices. Recently, solid-state NMR has emerged as a powerful tool for studying the local environments and behaviour of electrolyte ions in supercapacitor electrodes. In this Trends article, we review these recent developments and applications. We first discuss the basic principles underlying the mechanism of supercapacitance, as well as the key NMR observables that are relevant to the study of supercapacitor electrodes. We then review some practical aspects of the study of working devices using ex situ and in situ methodologies and explain the key advances that these techniques have allowed on the study of supercapacitor charging mechanisms. NMR experiments have revealed that the pores of the carbon electrodes contain a significant number of electrolyte ions in the absence of any charging potential. This has important implications for the molecular mechanisms of supercapacitance, as charge can be stored by different ion adsorption/desorption processes. Crucially, we show how in situ NMR experiments can be used to quantitatively study and characterise the charging mechanism, with the experiments providing the most detailed picture of charge storage to date, offering the opportunity to design enhanced devices. Finally, an outlook for future directions for solid-state NMR in supercapacitor research is offered. PMID:26974032

  13. Lithium Polymer Electrolytes and Solid State NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkeley, Emily R.

    2004-01-01

    Research is being done at the Glenn Research Center (GRC) developing new kinds of batteries that do not depend on a solution. Currently, batteries use liquid electrolytes containing lithium. Problems with the liquid electrolyte are (1) solvents used can leak out of the battery, so larger, more restrictive, packages have to be made, inhibiting the diversity of application and decreasing the power density; (2) the liquid is incompatible with the lithium metal anode, so alternative, less efficient, anodes are required. The Materials Department at GRC has been working to synthesize polymer electrolytes that can replace the liquid electrolytes. The advantages are that polymer electrolytes do not have the potential to leak so they can be used for a variety of tasks, small or large, including in the space rover or in space suits. The polymers generated by Dr. Mary Ann Meador's group are in the form of rod -coil structures. The rod aspect gives the polymer structural integrity, while the coil makes it flexible. Lithium ions are used in these polymers because of their high mobility. The coils have repeating units of oxygen which stabilize the positive lithium by donating electron density. This aids in the movement of the lithium within the polymer, which contributes to higher conductivity. In addition to conductivity testing, these polymers are characterized using DSC, TGA, FTIR, and solid state NMR. Solid state NMR is used in classifying materials that are not soluble in solvents, such as polymers. The NMR spins the sample at a magic angle (54.7') allowing the significant peaks to emerge. Although solid state NMR is a helpful technique in determining bonding, the process of preparing the sample and tuning it properly are intricate jobs that require patience; especially since each run takes about six hours. The NMR allows for the advancement of polymer synthesis by showing if the expected results were achieved. Using the NMR, in addition to looking at polymers, allows for

  14. Solid-State NMR Studies of Amyloid Fibril Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tycko, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Current interest in amyloid fibrils stems from their involvement in neurodegenerative and other diseases and from their role as an alternative structural state for many peptides and proteins. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods have the unique capability of providing detailed structural constraints for amyloid fibrils, sufficient for the development of full molecular models. In this article, recent progress in the application of solid-state NMR to fibrils associated with Alzheimer's disease, prion fibrils, and related systems is reviewed, along with relevant developments in solid-state NMR techniques and technology.

  15. Solid State NMR Studies of Amyloid Fibril Structure

    PubMed Central

    Tycko, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Current interest in amyloid fibrils stems from their involvement in neurodegenerative and other diseases and from their role as an alternative structural state for many peptides and proteins. Solid state NMR methods have the unique capability of providing detailed structural constraints for amyloid fibrils, sufficient for the development of full molecular models. In this article, recent progress in the application of solid state NMR to fibrils associated with Alzheimer’s disease, prion fibrils, and related systems is reviewed, along with relevant developments in solid state NMR techniques and technology. PMID:21219138

  16. Functional groups identified by solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal manure is generally high in organic matter intensity so it is well suitable for 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Solid-state 13C NMR techniques used in characterizing organic matter and its components include, but are not limited to, cross-polarization /magic angle spinning (CP...

  17. The development of solid-state NMR of membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Most biological functions are carried out in supramolecular assemblies. As a result of their slow reorientation in solution, these assemblies have been resistant to the widely employed solution NMR approaches. The development of solid-state NMR to first of all overcome the correlation time problem and then obtain informative high-resolution spectra of proteins in supramolecular assemblies, such as virus particles and membranes, is described here. High resolution solid-state NMR is deeply intertwined with the history of NMR, and the seminal paper was published in 1948. Although the general principles were understood by the end of the 1950s, it has taken more than fifty years for instrumentation and experimental methods to become equal to the technical problems presented by the biological assemblies of greatest interest. It is now possible to obtain atomic resolution structures of viral coat proteins in virus particles and membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers by oriented sample solid-state NMR methods. The development of this aspect of the field of solid-state NMR is summarized in this review article. PMID:26069880

  18. Solid State NMR and Protein-Protein Interactions in Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yimin; Cross, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    Solid state NMR spectroscopy has evolved rapidly in recent years into an excellent tool for the characterization of membrane proteins and their complexes. In the past few years it has also become clear that the structure of membrane proteins, especially helical membrane proteins is determined, in part, by the membrane environment. Therefore, the modeling of this environment by a liquid crystalline lipid bilayer for solid state NMR has generated a unique tool for the characterization of native conformational states, local and global dynamics, and high resolution structure for these proteins. Protein-protein interactions can also benefit from this solid state NMR capability to characterize membrane proteins in a native-like environment. These complexes take the form of oligomeric structures and hetero-protein interactions both with water soluble proteins and other membrane proteins. PMID:24034903

  19. Solid state NMR and protein-protein interactions in membranes.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yimin; Cross, Timothy A

    2013-12-01

    Solid state NMR spectroscopy has evolved rapidly in recent years into an excellent tool for the characterization of membrane proteins and their complexes. In the past few years it has also become clear that the structure of membrane proteins, especially helical membrane proteins is determined, in part, by the membrane environment. Therefore, the modeling of this environment by a liquid crystalline lipid bilayer for solid state NMR has generated a unique tool for the characterization of native conformational states, local and global dynamics, and high-resolution structure for these proteins. Protein-protein interactions can also benefit from this solid state NMR capability to characterize membrane proteins in a native-like environment. These complexes take the form of oligomeric structures and hetero-protein interactions both with water-soluble proteins and other membrane proteins. PMID:24034903

  20. Solid-state NMR/NQR and first-principles study of two niobium halide cluster compounds.

    PubMed

    Perić, Berislav; Gautier, Régis; Pickard, Chris J; Bosiočić, Marko; Grbić, Mihael S; Požek, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Two hexanuclear niobium halide cluster compounds with a [Nb6X12](2+) (X=Cl, Br) diamagnetic cluster core, have been studied by a combination of experimental solid-state NMR/NQR techniques and PAW/GIPAW calculations. For niobium sites the NMR parameters were determined by using variable Bo field static broadband NMR measurements and additional NQR measurements. It was found that they possess large positive chemical shifts, contrary to majority of niobium compounds studied so far by solid-state NMR, but in accordance with chemical shifts of (95)Mo nuclei in structurally related compounds containing [Mo6Br8](4+) cluster cores. Experimentally determined δiso((93)Nb) values are in the range from 2,400 to 3,000 ppm. A detailed analysis of geometrical relations between computed electric field gradient (EFG) and chemical shift (CS) tensors with respect to structural features of cluster units was carried out. These tensors on niobium sites are almost axially symmetric with parallel orientation of the largest EFG and the smallest CS principal axes (Vzz and δ33) coinciding with the molecular four-fold axis of the [Nb6X12](2+) unit. Bridging halogen sites are characterized by large asymmetry of EFG and CS tensors, the largest EFG principal axis (Vzz) is perpendicular to the X-Nb bonds, while intermediate EFG principal axis (Vyy) and the largest CS principal axis (δ11) are oriented in the radial direction with respect to the center of the cluster unit. For more symmetrical bromide compound the PAW predictions for EFG parameters are in better correspondence with the NMR/NQR measurements than in the less symmetrical chlorine compound. Theoretically predicted NMR parameters of bridging halogen sites were checked by (79/81)Br NQR and (35)Cl solid-state NMR measurements. PMID:24581866

  1. Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy for the Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnun, Jacob J.; Leftin, Avigdor; Brown, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy finds growing application to inorganic and organic materials, biological samples, polymers, proteins, and cellular membranes. However, this technique is often neither included in laboratory curricula nor typically covered in undergraduate courses. On the other hand, spectroscopy and…

  2. GFT projection NMR spectroscopy for proteins in the solid state

    PubMed Central

    Franks, W. Trent; Atreya, Hanudatta S.; Szyperski, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Recording of four-dimensional (4D) spectra for proteins in the solid state has opened new avenues to obtain virtually complete resonance assignments and three-dimensional (3D) structures of proteins. As in solution state NMR, the sampling of three indirect dimensions leads per se to long minimal measurement time. Furthermore, artifact suppression in solid state NMR relies primarily on radio-frequency pulse phase cycling. For an n-step phase cycle, the minimal measurement times of both 3D and 4D spectra are increased n times. To tackle the associated ‘sampling problem’ and to avoid sampling limited data acquisition, solid state G-Matrix Fourier Transform (SS GFT) projection NMR is introduced to rapidly acquire 3D and 4D spectral information. Specifically, (4,3)D (HA)CANCOCX and (3,2)D (HACA)NCOCX were implemented and recorded for the 6 kDa protein GB1 within about 10% of the time required for acquiring the conventional congeners with the same maximal evolution times and spectral widths in the indirect dimensions. Spectral analysis was complemented by comparative analysis of expected spectral congestion in conventional and GFT NMR experiments, demonstrating that high spectral resolution of the GFT NMR experiments enables one to efficiently obtain nearly complete resonance assignments even for large proteins. PMID:21052779

  3. 15N chemical shift referencing in solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bertani, Philippe; Raya, Jésus; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has much advanced during the last decade and provides a multitude of data that can be used for high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules, polymers, inorganic compounds or macromolecules. In some cases the chemical shift referencing has become a limiting factor to the precision of the structure calculations and we have therefore evaluated a number of methods used in proton-decoupled (15)N solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For (13)C solid-state NMR spectroscopy adamantane is generally accepted as an external standard, but to calibrate the (15)N chemical shift scale several standards are in use. As a consequence the published chemical shift values exhibit considerable differences (up to 22 ppm). In this paper we report the (15)N chemical shift of several commonly used references compounds in order to allow for comparison and recalibration of published data and future work. We show that (15)NH4Cl in its powdered form (at 39.3 ppm with respect to liquid NH3) is a suitable external reference as it produces narrow lines when compared to other reference compounds and at the same time allows for the set-up of cross-polarization NMR experiments. The compound is suitable to calibrate magic angle spinning and static NMR experiments. Finally the temperature variation of (15)NH4Cl chemical shift is reported. PMID:24746715

  4. Structural biology applications of solid state MAS DNP NMR.

    PubMed

    Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has long been an aim for increasing sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, delivering spectra in shorter experiment times or of smaller sample amounts. In recent years, it has been applied in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to a large range of samples, including biological macromolecules and functional materials. New research directions in structural biology can be envisaged by DNP, facilitating investigations on very large complexes or very heterogeneous samples. Here we present a summary of state of the art DNP MAS NMR spectroscopy and its applications to structural biology, discussing the technical challenges and factors affecting DNP performance. PMID:27095695

  5. Structural biology applications of solid state MAS DNP NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has long been an aim for increasing sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, delivering spectra in shorter experiment times or of smaller sample amounts. In recent years, it has been applied in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to a large range of samples, including biological macromolecules and functional materials. New research directions in structural biology can be envisaged by DNP, facilitating investigations on very large complexes or very heterogeneous samples. Here we present a summary of state of the art DNP MAS NMR spectroscopy and its applications to structural biology, discussing the technical challenges and factors affecting DNP performance.

  6. Investigation of Local Structures in Layered Niobates by Solid-state NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ting

    Research on ion-exchangeable layered niobates has attracted great attention due to their unique structures and corresponding variations in properties and applications, such as ion conductors, solid acids, and water splitting catalysts. Families of layered niobates include double-layered or triple-layered Dion-Jacobson type perovskites (ALaNb2O7, A = Cs, Rb, K, H; AM2Nb3O10, A = Rb, K, H; M = Sr, Ca), layered niobates with both edge and corner sharing of NbO6 octahedra (KNb3O8, HNb3O6, Nb 6O17 and H4Nb6O17) and many others. Lately, more developments in the layered niobates through a variety of topochemical manipulations have been achieved. The topochemical reactions include ion exchange, exfoliation, substitution, and etc. As a result, many new materials have been successfully prepared, for example, solid solutions (ALa2NbTi2O10, ACaLaNb2TiO 10 and ACa2Nb3-xTaxO10, etc.), nanosheets (HNb3O8, H4Nb6O17, HLaNb2O7, HCa2Nb3O10, etc., to intercalate with organic molecules such as tetrabutylammonium hydroxide or n-butylamines), and nanoscrolls (from H2K2Nb 6O17). While these structural modifications often induce improvements in properties, the fundamental mechanisms of improvements in properties upon the modifications, especially local structural arrangements are poorly understood, which is often limited by structural characterizations. Particularly, the characterizations of the exfoliated nanosheets can be difficult by conventional X-ray diffraction (XRD) method due to disordered structures. Alternatively, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a useful tool to study local structures in solids. The structural information can be extracted by examining intrinsic interactions, such as quadrupolar, chemical shielding, and dipolar interactions, which are all associated with local environments surrounding a specific nucleus, 1H or 93Nb in layered niobates. The ultimate goal of this dissertation is to understand the relationships between local structures of

  7. On the solid-state NMR spectra of naproxen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czernek, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Two previous measurements of the 13C and 1H NMR isotropic chemical shifts in crystalline naproxen, which is an important pharmaceutical compound, are confronted with the results obtained from several theoretical approaches capable of the proper treatment of solid-phase effects. In the underlying geometrical optimizations, two crystal structures are considered. The agreement between the data sets is quantified, including an evaluation of the similarity between the experimental solid-state NMR spectra. The 13C-1H heteronuclear correlations are analyzed, and their various assignments are discussed employing the statistical treatment of the differences between the measured and theoretical isotropic chemical shifts.

  8. Chemical shift referencing in MAS solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morcombe, Corey R.; Zilm, Kurt W.

    2003-06-01

    Solid state 13C magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra are typically referenced externally using a probe which does not incorporate a field frequency lock. Solution NMR shifts on the other hand are more often determined with respect to an internal reference and using a deuterium based field frequency lock. Further differences arise in solution NMR of proteins and nucleic acids where both 13C and 1H shifts are referenced by recording the frequency of the 1H resonance of DSS (sodium salt of 2,2-dimethyl-2-silapentane-5-sulphonic acid) instead of TMS (tetramethylsilane). In this note we investigate the difficulties in relating shifts measured relative to TMS and DSS by these various approaches in solution and solids NMR, and calibrate adamantane as an external 13C standard for solids NMR. We find that external chemical shift referencing of magic angle spinning spectra is typically quite reproducible and accurate, with better than ±0.03 ppm accuracy being straight forward to achieve. Solid state and liquid phase NMR shifts obtained by magic angle spinning with external referencing agree with those measured using typical solution NMR hardware with the sample tube aligned with the applied field as long as magnetic susceptibility corrections and solvent shifts are taken into account. The DSS and TMS reference scales for 13C and 1H are related accurately using MAS NMR. Large solvent shifts for the 13C resonance in TMS in either deuterochloroform or methanol are observed, being +0.71 ppm and -0.74 ppm from external TMS, respectively. The ratio of the 13C resonance frequencies for the two carbons in solid adamantane to the 1H resonance of TMS is reported.

  9. Chemical shift referencing in MAS solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Morcombe, Corey R; Zilm, Kurt W

    2003-06-01

    Solid state 13C magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra are typically referenced externally using a probe which does not incorporate a field frequency lock. Solution NMR shifts on the other hand are more often determined with respect to an internal reference and using a deuterium based field frequency lock. Further differences arise in solution NMR of proteins and nucleic acids where both 13C and 1H shifts are referenced by recording the frequency of the 1H resonance of DSS (sodium salt of 2,2-dimethyl-2-silapentane-5-sulphonic acid) instead of TMS (tetramethylsilane). In this note we investigate the difficulties in relating shifts measured relative to TMS and DSS by these various approaches in solution and solids NMR, and calibrate adamantane as an external 13C standard for solids NMR. We find that external chemical shift referencing of magic angle spinning spectra is typically quite reproducible and accurate, with better than +/-0.03 ppm accuracy being straight forward to achieve. Solid state and liquid phase NMR shifts obtained by magic angle spinning with external referencing agree with those measured using typical solution NMR hardware with the sample tube aligned with the applied field as long as magnetic susceptibility corrections and solvent shifts are taken into account. The DSS and TMS reference scales for 13C and 1H are related accurately using MAS NMR. Large solvent shifts for the 13C resonance in TMS in either deuterochloroform or methanol are observed, being +0.71 ppm and -0.74 ppm from external TMS, respectively. The ratio of the 13C resonance frequencies for the two carbons in solid adamantane to the 1H resonance of TMS is reported. PMID:12810033

  10. RNA structure determination by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Marchanka, Alexander; Simon, Bernd; Althoff-Ospelt, Gerhard; Carlomagno, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the RNA three-dimensional structure, either in isolation or as part of RNP complexes, is fundamental to understand the mechanism of numerous cellular processes. Because of its flexibility, RNA represents a challenge for crystallization, while the large size of cellular complexes brings solution-state NMR to its limits. Here, we demonstrate an alternative approach on the basis of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. We develop a suite of experiments and RNA labeling schemes and demonstrate for the first time that ssNMR can yield a RNA structure at high-resolution. This methodology allows structural analysis of segmentally labelled RNA stretches in high-molecular weight cellular machines—independent of their ability to crystallize— and opens the way to mechanistic studies of currently difficult-to-access RNA-protein assemblies. PMID:25960310

  11. Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy of Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shangjin; Han, Yun; Paramasivam, Sivakumar; Yan, Si; Siglin, Amanda E.; Williams, John C.; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Polenova, Tatyana

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are vital for many biological processes. These interactions often result in the formation of protein assemblies that are large in size, insoluble and difficult to crystallize, and therefore are challenging to study by structure biology techniques, such as single crystal X-ray diffraction and solution NMR spectroscopy. Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy is emerging as a promising technique for studies of such protein assemblies because it is not limited by molecular size, solubility or lack of long-range order. In the past several years, we have applied magic angle spinning SSNMR based methods to study several protein complexes. In this chapter, we discuss the general solid-state NMR methodologies employed for structural and dynamics analyses of protein complexes with specific examples from our work on thioredoxin reassemblies, HIV-1 capsid protein assemblies and microtubule-associated protein assemblies. We present protocols for sample preparation and characterization, pulse sequences, SSNMR spectra collection and data analysis. PMID:22167681

  12. Microcoils and microsamples in solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kazuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports on microcoils are reviewed. The first part of the review includes a discussion of how the geometries of the sample and coil affect the NMR signal intensity. In addition to derivation of the well-known result that the signal intensity increases as the coil size decreases, the prediction that dilution of a small sample with magnetically inert matter leads to better sensitivity if a tiny coil is not available is given. The second part of the review focuses on the issues specific to solid-state NMR. They include realization of magic-angle spinning (MAS) using a microcoil and harnessing of such strong pulses that are feasible only with a microcoil. Two strategies for microcoil MAS, the piggyback method and magic-angle coil spinning (MACS), are reviewed. In addition, MAS of flat, disk-shaped samples is discussed in the context of solid-state NMR of small-volume samples. Strong RF irradiation, which has been exploited in wide-line spectral excitation, multiple-quantum MAS (MQMAS), and dipolar decoupling experiments, has been accompanied by new challenges regarding the Bloch-Siegert effect, the minimum time resolution of the spectrometer, and the time scale of pulse transient effects. For a possible solution to the latter problem, recent reports on active compensation of pulse transients are described. PMID:23083521

  13. Solid state NMR strategy for characterizing native membrane protein structures.

    PubMed

    Murray, Dylan T; Das, Nabanita; Cross, Timothy A

    2013-09-17

    Unlike water soluble proteins, the structures of helical transmembrane proteins depend on a very complex environment. These proteins sit in the midst of dramatic electrical and chemical gradients and are often subject to variations in the lateral pressure profile, order parameters, dielectric constant, and other properties. Solid state NMR is a collection of tools that can characterize high resolution membrane protein structure in this environment. Indeed, prior work has shown that this complex environment significantly influences transmembrane protein structure. Therefore, it is important to characterize such structures under conditions that closely resemble its native environment. Researchers have used two approaches to gain protein structural restraints via solid state NMR spectroscopy. The more traditional approach uses magic angle sample spinning to generate isotropic chemical shifts, much like solution NMR. As with solution NMR, researchers can analyze the backbone chemical shifts to obtain torsional restraints. They can also examine nuclear spin interactions between nearby atoms to obtain distances between atomic sites. Unfortunately, for membrane proteins in lipid preparations, the spectral resolution is not adequate to obtain complete resonance assignments. Researchers have developed another approach for gaining structural restraints from membrane proteins: the use of uniformly oriented lipid bilayers, which provides a method for obtaining high resolution orientational restraints. When the bilayers are aligned with respect to the magnetic field of the NMR spectrometer, researchers can obtain orientational restraints in which atomic sites in the protein are restrained relative to the alignment axis. However, this approach does not allow researchers to determine the relative packing between helices. By combining the two approaches, we can take advantage of the information acquired from each technique to minimize the challenges and maximize the quality of the

  14. Diamond deposition and defect chemistry studied via solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, Karen K.

    1994-06-01

    Diamond defects were quantified by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). While maintaining the macroscopic integrity of the films, concentrations between 0.001 and 1.0 at.% H were measured, among the lowest ever reported by solid-state 1H NMR. These concentrations were correlated to infrared absorption in the 8 to 10 micron region and to thermal conductivity. Despite the low concentrations, Multiple Quantum NMR reveals a high degree of hydrogen clustering consistent with grain boundary passivation. Most hydrogen is rigidly held, but some, probably in -OCH3 and -NCH3 defects, undergoes rotation at room temperature. Similar results were obtained for hot-filament, microwave-plasma and DC arc-jet films, suggesting a common surface chemistry, but no hydrogen was detected in an as-deposited combustion film. 13C NMR provided the first quantitative determination of non-diamond bonded carbon defects, providing a benchmark for Raman spectroscopy, the primary characterization method for diamond. Selective 13C labeling demonstrated heterogeneous reactions involving carbon occur at the hot-filament. With high-speed magic-angle-spinning 19F NMR, CFx (x=1-3) functionalities were resolved on the surface of plasma-treated diamond powder. Understanding these defects impacts the understanding of film growth mechanisms and structure-property relationships for CVD diamond.

  15. Monitoring Cocrystal Formation via In Situ Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Mandala, Venkata S; Loewus, Sarel J; Mehta, Manish A

    2014-10-01

    A detailed understanding of the mechanism of organic cocrystal formation remains elusive. Techniques that interrogate a reacting system in situ are preferred, though experimentally challenging. We report here the results of a solid-state in situ NMR study of the spontaneous formation of a cocrystal between a pharmaceutical mimic (caffeine) and a coformer (malonic acid). Using (13)C magic angle spinning NMR, we show that the formation of the cocrystal may be tracked in real time. We find no direct evidence for a short-lived, chemical shift-resolved amorphous solid intermediate. However, changes in the line width and line center of the malonic acid methylene resonance, in the course of the reaction, provide subtle clues to the mode of mass transfer that underlies cocrystal formation. PMID:26278442

  16. Solid-State 17O NMR of Paramagnetic Coordination Compounds**

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xianqi; Terskikh, Victor V.; Khade, Rahul L.; Yang, Liu; Rorick, Amber; Zhang, Yong; He, Peng; Huang, Yining; Wu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that high-quality solid-state 17O (I = 5/2) NMR spectra can be successfully obtained for paramagnetic coordination compounds in which oxygen atoms are directly bonded to the paramagnetic metal centers. For complexes containing V(III) (S = 1), Cu(II) (S = 1/2), and Mn(III) (S = 2) metal centers, the 17O isotropic paramagnetic shifts were found to span a range of more than 10000 ppm. In several cases, high-resolution 17O NMR spectra were recorded under very fast magic-angle spinning (MAS) conditions at 21.1 T. Quantum chemical computations using density functional theory (DFT) qualitatively reproduced the experimental 17O hyperfine shift tensors. PMID:25694203

  17. Solid-state NMR characterization of Mowry Formation shales

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.

    1992-04-01

    Solid-state {sup 13}C and {sup 29}Si NMR measurements were carried out on a series of petroleum source rocks from the Mowry Formation of the Powder River Basin in Wyoming. The objectives of this study wereto use CP/MAS {sup 13}C NMR measurements to monitor changes in the carbon structure of the kerogen that result from depth of burial, and to examine the feasibility of {sup 29}Si NMR for studying the thermal alteration of clay minerals during diagenesis. Carbon and silicon NMR measurements were made on a suite of samples covering a present-day depth interval of 3,000 to 11,500 ft.In general, the NMR results endorsed other geochemical analyses that were performed on the source rocks as part of another study to examine pressure compartmentalization in the Mowry Formation. The carbon aromaticity of the kerogen increased with depth of burial, and at depths greater that approximately 10,000 ft the kerogen showed little capacity to generate additional oil because of the small fraction of residual aliphatic carbon. By combining NMR and Rock-Eval measurements, an estimate of the hydrogen budget was obtained. The calculations indicated that approximately 20% of the kerogen was converted to hydrocarbons, and that sufficient hydrogen was liberated from aromatization and condensation reactions to stabilize the generated products. The {sup 29}Si NMR spectra were characterized by a relatively sharp quartz resonance and a broad resonance from the clay minerals. With increasing depth of burial, the clay resonance became broader and shifted slightly downfield. These changes qualitatively support X-ray analysis that shows progressive alteration of illite to smectite with depth of burial.

  18. Solid-state NMR characterization of Mowry Formation shales

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.

    1992-04-01

    Solid-state [sup 13]C and [sup 29]Si NMR measurements were carried out on a series of petroleum source rocks from the Mowry Formation of the Powder River Basin in Wyoming. The objectives of this study wereto use CP/MAS [sup 13]C NMR measurements to monitor changes in the carbon structure of the kerogen that result from depth of burial, and to examine the feasibility of [sup 29]Si NMR for studying the thermal alteration of clay minerals during diagenesis. Carbon and silicon NMR measurements were made on a suite of samples covering a present-day depth interval of 3,000 to 11,500 ft.In general, the NMR results endorsed other geochemical analyses that were performed on the source rocks as part of another study to examine pressure compartmentalization in the Mowry Formation. The carbon aromaticity of the kerogen increased with depth of burial, and at depths greater that approximately 10,000 ft the kerogen showed little capacity to generate additional oil because of the small fraction of residual aliphatic carbon. By combining NMR and Rock-Eval measurements, an estimate of the hydrogen budget was obtained. The calculations indicated that approximately 20% of the kerogen was converted to hydrocarbons, and that sufficient hydrogen was liberated from aromatization and condensation reactions to stabilize the generated products. The [sup 29]Si NMR spectra were characterized by a relatively sharp quartz resonance and a broad resonance from the clay minerals. With increasing depth of burial, the clay resonance became broader and shifted slightly downfield. These changes qualitatively support X-ray analysis that shows progressive alteration of illite to smectite with depth of burial.

  19. Protein structure by solid-state NMR of oriented systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    A method for determining protein backbone structure from angular information obtainable by solid state NMR spectroscopy is presented. Various spin interactions including quadrupole, dipole, and chemical shift interactions and nuclei including /sup 14/N, /sup 15/N, /sup 13/C, and /sup 2/H may be observed. Angularly dependent measurements can be made when the sample has at least one direction of order along the externally applied magnetic field. Several NMR parameters are used to determine the orientation of each peptide plane with respect to the magnetic field vector, B/sub O/, to within a few symmetry related possibilities. The computer program Totlink can then be used to perform the necessary coordinate transformations and to evaluate the possible backbone structures and select for the most chemically reasonable. Experimental /sup 14/N NMR structural studies of the model peptides n-acetyl-d,l-valine, n-acetyl-l-valyl-l-leucine, and l-alanyl-glycyl-glycine and preliminary /sup 14/N NMR results on a large single crystal of orthorhombic lysozyme are presented.

  20. Ultra-wideline solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schurko, Robert W

    2013-09-17

    Although solid-state NMR (SSNMR) provides rich information about molecular structure and dynamics, the small spin population differences between pairs of spin states that give rise to NMR transitions make it an inherently insensitive spectroscopic technique in terms of signal acquisition. Scientists have continuously addressed this issue via improvements in NMR hardware and probes, increases in the strength of the magnetic field, and the development of innovative pulse sequences and acquisition methodologies. As a result, researchers can now study NMR-active nuclides previously thought to be unobservable or too unreceptive for routine examination via SSNMR. Several factors can make it extremely challenging to detect signal or acquire spectra using SSNMR: (i) low gyromagnetic ratios (i.e., low Larmor frequencies), (ii) low natural abundances or dilution of the nuclide of interest (e.g., metal nuclides in proteins or in organometallic catalysts supported on silica), (iii) inconvenient relaxation characteristics (e.g., very long longitudinal or very short transverse relaxation times), and/or (iv) extremely broad powder patterns arising from large anisotropic NMR interactions. Our research group has been particularly interested in efficient acquisition of broad NMR powder patterns for a variety of spin-1/2 and quadrupolar (spin > 1/2) nuclides. Traditionally, researchers have used the term "wideline" NMR to refer to experiments yielding broad (1)H and (2)H SSNMR spectra ranging from tens of kHz to ∼250 kHz in breadth. With modern FT NMR hardware, uniform excitation in these spectral ranges is relatively easy, allowing for the acquisition of high quality spectra. However, spectra that range in breadth from ca. 250 kHz to tens of MHz cannot be uniformly excited with conventional, high-power rectangular pulses. Rather, researchers must apply special methodologies to acquire such spectra, which have inherently low S/N because the signal intensity is spread across such

  1. Solid State NMR Studies of the Aluminum Hydride Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Son-Jong; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Graetz, Jason; Reilly, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    Several solid state NMR techniques including magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and multiple-quantum (MQ) MAS experiments have been used to characterize various AlH3 samples. MAS-NMR spectra for the 1H and 27Al nuclei have been obtained on a variety of AlH3 samples that include the (beta)- and (gamma)- phases as well as the most stable (alpha)-phase. While the dominant components in these NMR spectra correspond to the aluminum hydride phases, other species were found that include Al metal, molecular hydrogen (H2), as well as peaks that can be assigned to Al-O species in different configurations. The occurrence and concentration of these extraneous components are dependent upon the initial AlH3 phase composition and preparation procedures. Both the (beta)-AlH3 and (gamma)-AlH3 phases were found to generate substantial amounts of Al metal when the materials were stored at room temperature while the (alpha)-phase materials do not exhibit these changes.

  2. Fractional deuteration applied to biomolecular solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nand, Deepak; Cukkemane, Abhishek; Becker, Stefan; Baldus, Marc

    2012-02-01

    Solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance can provide detailed insight into structural and dynamical aspects of complex biomolecules. With increasing molecular size, advanced approaches for spectral simplification and the detection of medium to long-range contacts become of critical relevance. We have analyzed the protonation pattern of a membrane-embedded ion channel that was obtained from bacterial expression using protonated precursors and D(2)O medium. We find an overall reduction of 50% in protein protonation. High levels of deuteration at H(α) and H(β) positions reduce spectral congestion in ((1)H,(13)C,(15)N) correlation experiments and generate a transfer profile in longitudinal mixing schemes that can be tuned to specific resonance frequencies. At the same time, residual protons are predominantly found at amino-acid side-chain positions enhancing the prospects for obtaining side-chain resonance assignments and for detecting medium to long-range contacts. Fractional deuteration thus provides a powerful means to aid the structural analysis of complex biomolecules by solid-state NMR. PMID:22105305

  3. A Solid-State NMR Investigation of MQ Silicone Copolymers.

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, Sergey G; Volkov, Vitaly I; Tatarinova, Elena A; Muzafarov, Aziz M

    2013-01-01

    The structure of MQ copolymers of the general chemical formula [(CH3)3SiO0.5]m [SiO2]n was characterized by means of solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The MQ copolymers are highly branched polycyclic compounds (densely cross-linked nanosized networks). MQ copolymers were prepared by hydrolytic polycondensation in active medium. (29)Si NMR spectra were obtained by single pulse excitation (or direct polarization, DP) and cross-polarization (CP) (29)Si{(1)H} techniques in concert with MAS. It was shown that material consist of monofunctional M (≡SiO Si (CH3)3) and two types of tetrafunctional Q units: Q(4) ((≡SiO)4 Si) and Q(3) ((≡SiO)3 SiOH). Spin-lattice relaxation times T 1 measurements of (29)Si nuclei and analysis of (29)Si{(1)H} variable contact time signal intensities allowed us to obtain quantitative data on the relative content of different sites in copolymers. These investigations indicate that MQ copolymers represent dense structure with core and shell. PMID:23914072

  4. Solid-state NMR study of fluorinated steroids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai-Jay; Lin, Su-Ching; Huang, Shing-Jong; Ching, Wei-Min; Hung, Chen-Hsiung; Tzou, Der-Lii M

    2014-02-01

    Solid-state {(1)H}(13)C cross-polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR spectroscopy was performed to analyze two fluorinated steroids, i.e., betamethasone (BMS) and fludrocortisone acetate (FCA), that have fluorine attached to C9, as well as two non-fluorinated analogs, i.e., prednisolone (PRD) and hydrocortisone 21-acetate (HCA). The (13)C signals of BMS revealed multiplet patterns with splittings of 16-215Hz, indicating multiple ring conformations, whereas the (13)C signals of FCA, HCA, and PRD exhibited only singlet patterns, implying a unique conformation. In addition, BMS and FCA exhibited substantial deviation (>3.5ppm) in approximately half of the (13)C signals and significant deviation (>45ppm) in the (13)C9 signal compared to PRD and HCA, respectively. In this study, we demonstrate that fluorinated steroids, such as BMS and FCA, have steroidal ring conformation(s) that are distinct from non-fluorinated analogs, such as PRD and HCA. PMID:24316163

  5. Coherent and stochastic averaging in solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevzorov, Alexander A.

    2014-12-01

    A new approach for calculating solid-state NMR lineshapes of uniaxially rotating membrane proteins under the magic-angle spinning conditions is presented. The use of stochastic Liouville equation (SLE) allows one to account for both coherent sample rotation and stochastic motional averaging of the spherical dipolar powder patterns by uniaxial diffusion of the spin-bearing molecules. The method is illustrated via simulations of the dipolar powder patterns of rigid samples under the MAS conditions, as well as the recent method of rotational alignment in the presence of both MAS and rotational diffusion under the conditions of dipolar recoupling. It has been found that it is computationally more advantageous to employ direct integration over a spherical grid rather than to use a full angular basis set for the SLE solution. Accuracy estimates for the bond angles measured from the recoupled amide 1H-15N dipolar powder patterns have been obtained at various rotational diffusion coefficients. It has been shown that the rotational alignment method is applicable to membrane proteins approximated as cylinders with radii of approximately 20 Å, for which uniaxial rotational diffusion within the bilayer is sufficiently fast and exceeds the rate 2 × 105 s-1.

  6. integrating Solid State NMR and Computations in Membrane Protein Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    Helical membrane protein structures are influenced by their native environment. Therefore the characterization of their structure in an environment that models as closely as possible their native environment is critical for achieving not only structural but functional understanding of these proteins. Solid state NMR spectroscopy in liquid crystalline lipid bilayers provides an excellent tool for such characterizations. Two classes of restraints can be obtained - absolute restraints that constrain the structure to a laboratory frame of reference when using uniformly oriented samples (approximately 1° of mosaic spread) and relative restraints that restrain one part of the structure with respect to another part such as torsional and distance restraints. Here, I will discuss unique restraints derived from uniformly oriented samples and the characterization of initial structures utilizing both restraint types, followed by restrained molecular dynamics refinement in the same lipid bilayer environment as that used for the experimental restraint collection. Protein examples will be taken from Influenza virus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. When available comparisons of structures to those obtained using different membrane mimetic environments will be shown and the causes for structural distortions explained based on an understanding of membrane biophysics and its sophisticated influence on membrane proteins.

  7. Multiple-quantum dynamics in solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, J.; Munowitz, M.; Garroway, A. N.; Pines, A.

    1985-09-01

    Recently developed solid state multiple-quantum NMR methods are applied to extended coupling networks, where direct dipole-dipole interactions can be used to create coherences of very high order (˜100). The progressive development of multiple-quantum coherence over time depends upon the formation of multiple-spin correlations, a phenomenon which also accompanies the normal decay to equilibrium of the free induction signal in a solid. Both the time development and the observed distributions of coherence can be approached statistically, with the spin system described by a time-dependent density operator whose elements are completely uncorrelated at sufficiently long times. With this point of view, we treat the distribution of coherence in a multiple-quantum spectrum as Gaussian, and characterize a spectrum obtained for a given preparation time by its variance. The variance of the distribution is associated roughly with the number of coupled spins effectively interacting, and its steady growth with time reflects the continual expansion of the system under the action of the dipolar interactions. The increase in effective system ``size'' is accounted for by a random walk model for the time development of the density operator. Experimental results are presented for hexamethylbenzene, adamantane, and squaric acid. The formation of coherence in systems containing physically isolated clusters is also investigated, and a simple method for estimating the number of spins involved is demonstrated.

  8. Multiple-quantum dynamics in solid state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, J.; Munowitz, M.; Garroway, A.N.; Pines, A.

    1985-09-01

    Recently developed solid state multiple-quantum NMR methods are applied to extended coupling networks, where direct dipole--dipole interactions can be used to create coherences of very high order (approx. 100). The progressive development of multiple-quantum coherence over time depends upon the formation of multiple-spin correlations, a phenomenon which also accompanies the normal decay to equilibrium of the free induction signal in a solid. Both the time development and the observed distributions of coherence can be approached statistically, with the spin system described by a time-dependent density operator whose elements are completely uncorrelated at sufficiently long times. With this point of view, we treat the distribution of coherence in a multiple-quantum spectrum as Gaussian, and characterize a spectrum obtained for a given preparation time by its variance. The variance of the distribution is associated roughly with the number of coupled spins effectively interacting, and its steady growth with time reflects the continual expansion of the system under the action of the dipolar interactions. The increase in effective system ''size'' is accounted for by a random walk model for the time development of the density operator. Experimental results are presented for hexamethylbenzene, adamantane, and squaric acid. The formation of coherence in systems containing physically isolated clusters is also investigated, and a simple method for estimating the number of spins involved is demonstrated.

  9. Arabidopsis thalianafrom Polarization Transfer Solid-State NMR

    SciTech Connect

    White, Paul B; Wang, Tuo; Park, Yong Bum; Cosgrove, Daniel J; Hong, Mei

    2014-07-23

    Polysaccharide-rich plant cell walls are hydrated under functional conditions, but the molecular interactions between water and polysaccharides in the wall have not been investigated. In this work, we employ polarization transfer solid-state NMR techniques to study the hydration of primary-wall polysaccharides of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. By transferring water 1H polarization to polysaccharides through distance- and mobility-dependent 1H–1H dipolar couplings and detecting it through polysaccharide 13C signals, we obtain information about water proximity to cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins as well as water mobility. Both intact and partially extracted cell wall samples are studied. Our results show that water–pectin polarization transfer is much faster than water–cellulose polarization transfer in all samples, but the extent of extraction has a profound impact on the water–polysaccharide spin diffusion. Removal of calcium ions and the consequent extraction of homogalacturonan (HG) significantly slowed down spin diffusion, while further extraction of matrix polysaccharides restored the spin diffusion rate. These trends are observed in cell walls with similar water content, thus they reflect inherent differences in the mobility and spatial distribution of water. Combined with quantitative analysis of the polysaccharide contents, our results indicate that calcium ions and HG gelation increase the amount of bound water, which facilitates spin diffusion, while calcium removal disrupts the gel and gives rise to highly dynamic water, which slows down spin diffusion. The recovery of spin diffusion rates after more extensive extraction is attributed to increased water-exposed surface areas of the polysaccharides. Water–pectin spin diffusion precedes water–cellulose spin diffusion, lending support to the single-network model of plant primary walls in which a substantial fraction of the cellulose surface is surrounded by pectins.

  10. High resolution 1H solid state NMR studies of polyethyleneterephthalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, T. T. P.; Gerstein, B. C.; Ryan, L. M.; Taylor, R. E.; Dybowski, D. R.

    1980-12-01

    Molecular motions and spatial properties of the solid polymer polyethyleneterephthalate have been investigated using high resolution 1H solid state NMR techniques. The longitudinal spin relaxation time T1ρ of protons (1H) in the rotating frame was measured for a spin locking field ranging from 5 to 20 G. The decay of the 1H magnetization indicated the existence of two distinct T1ρ's and their field dependence shows that they are associated with two mobile phases of the polymer. The 1H magnetization also relaxes under the dipolar narrowed Carr-Purcell (DNCP) multipulse sequence with two dintinct T1y relaxation times. The ratios T1y's and T1ρ's deviate significantly from the expected theoretical values. The combined experiment with magic angle spinning and the DNCP sequence followed by homonuclear dipolar decoupling reveals the individual T1y relaxation of the resolved methylene and aromatic protons. These two species of protons were found to relax with the same T1y's, thus implying that spin diffusion must have taken place under the homonuclear dipolar decoupling multipulse. The qualitative description of spin diffusion under homonuclear decoupling is given. The combined experiment with spin locking and the DNCP sequence yields the correspondence between the two T1ρ's and the two T1y's. The long T1ρ corresponds to the short T1y whereas the short T1ρ corresponds to the long T1y. Communication between the two spatial phases via spin diffusion was also observed in this experiment by monitoring the recovery of the 1H magnitization associated with the short T1ρ after it has been eliminated during the spin locking. The total 1H magnetization is allowed to equilibrate in the laboratory frame for a variable time much shorter than T1 after the spin locking field has been turned off. The spatial relationship between the two phases is discussed.

  11. Preparation of RNA samples with narrow line widths for solid state NMR investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Bardaro, Michael F.; Varani, Gabriele; Drobny, Gary P.

    2012-10-01

    Solid state NMR can provide detailed structural and dynamic information on biological systems that cannot be studied under solution conditions, and can investigate motions which occur with rates that cannot be fully studied by solution NMR. This approach has successfully been used to study proteins, but the application of multidimensional solid state NMR to RNA has been limited because reported line widths have been too broad to execute most multidimensional experiments successfully. A reliable method to generate spectra with narrow line widths is necessary to apply the full range of solid state NMR spectroscopic approaches to RNA. Using the HIV-1 transactivation response (TAR) RNA as a model, we present an approach based on precipitation with polyethylene glycol that improves the line width of 13C signals in TAR from >6 ppm to about 1 ppm, making solid state 2D NMR studies of selectively enriched RNAs feasible at ambient temperature.

  12. Solid-state NMR studies of biomineralization peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Roehrich, Adrienne; Drobny, Gary

    2013-09-17

    unanswered. This is largely due to a lack of methods capable of providing high-resolution structural information for proteins adsorbed to material surfaces under physiologically relevant conditions. In this Account, we highlight recent work that is providing insight into the structure and crystal recognition mechanisms of a salivary protein model system, as well as the structure and interactions of a peptide that catalyzes the formation of biosilica composites. To develop a better understanding of the structure and interactions of proteins in biomaterials, we have used solid-state NMR techniques to determine the molecular structure and dynamics of proteins and peptides adsorbed onto inorganic crystal surfaces and embedded within biomineral composites. This work adds to the understanding of the structure and crystal recognition mechanisms of an acidic human salivary phosphoprotein, statherin. PMID:23932180

  13. A software framework for analysing solid-state MAS NMR data.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Tim J; Fogh, Rasmus H; Boucher, Wayne; Higman, Victoria A; Eisenmenger, Frank; Bardiaux, Benjamin; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Laue, Ernest D

    2011-12-01

    Solid-state magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR of proteins has undergone many rapid methodological developments in recent years, enabling detailed studies of protein structure, function and dynamics. Software development, however, has not kept pace with these advances and data analysis is mostly performed using tools developed for solution NMR which do not directly address solid-state specific issues. Here we present additions to the CcpNmr Analysis software package which enable easier identification of spinning side bands, straightforward analysis of double quantum spectra, automatic consideration of non-uniform labelling schemes, as well as extension of other existing features to the needs of solid-state MAS data. To underpin this, we have updated and extended the CCPN data model and experiment descriptions to include transfer types and nomenclature appropriate for solid-state NMR experiments, as well as a set of experiment prototypes covering the experiments commonly employed by solid-sate MAS protein NMR spectroscopists. This work not only improves solid-state MAS NMR data analysis but provides a platform for anyone who uses the CCPN data model for programming, data transfer, or data archival involving solid-state MAS NMR data. PMID:21953355

  14. Solid State FT-IR and (31)P NMR Spectral Features of Phosphate Compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solid-state spectroscopic techniques, including Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and solid-state 31P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopies, are powerful tools for evaluating metal speciation and transformation mechanisms of P compounds in the environment. Studie...

  15. Optimized multiple quantum MAS lineshape simulations in solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwer, William J.; Davis, Michael C.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2009-10-01

    The majority of nuclei available for study in solid state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance have half-integer spin I>1/2, with corresponding electric quadrupole moment. As such, they may couple with a surrounding electric field gradient. This effect introduces anisotropic line broadening to spectra, arising from distinct chemical species within polycrystalline solids. In Multiple Quantum Magic Angle Spinning (MQMAS) experiments, a second frequency dimension is created, devoid of quadrupolar anisotropy. As a result, the center of gravity of peaks in the high resolution dimension is a function of isotropic second order quadrupole and chemical shift alone. However, for complex materials, these parameters take on a stochastic nature due in turn to structural and chemical disorder. Lineshapes may still overlap in the isotropic dimension, complicating the task of assignment and interpretation. A distributed computational approach is presented here which permits simulation of the two-dimensional MQMAS spectrum, generated by random variates from model distributions of isotropic chemical and quadrupole shifts. Owing to the non-convex nature of the residual sum of squares (RSS) function between experimental and simulated spectra, simulated annealing is used to optimize the simulation parameters. In this manner, local chemical environments for disordered materials may be characterized, and via a re-sampling approach, error estimates for parameters produced. Program summaryProgram title: mqmasOPT Catalogue identifier: AEEC_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEEC_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3650 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 73 853 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C, OCTAVE Computer: UNIX

  16. Solid state NMR: The essential technology for helical membrane protein structural characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Timothy A.; Ekanayake, Vindana; Paulino, Joana; Wright, Anna

    2014-02-01

    NMR spectroscopy of helical membrane proteins has been very challenging on multiple fronts. The expression and purification of these proteins while maintaining functionality has consumed countless graduate student hours. Sample preparations have depended on whether solution or solid-state NMR spectroscopy was to be performed - neither have been easy. In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that membrane mimic environments influence the structural result. Indeed, in these recent years we have rediscovered that Nobel laureate, Christian Anfinsen, did not say that protein structure was exclusively dictated by the amino acid sequence, but rather by the sequence in a given environment (Anfinsen, 1973) [106]. The environment matters, molecular interactions with the membrane environment are significant and many examples of distorted, non-native membrane protein structures have recently been documented in the literature. However, solid-state NMR structures of helical membrane proteins in proteoliposomes and bilayers are proving to be native structures that permit a high resolution characterization of their functional states. Indeed, solid-state NMR is uniquely able to characterize helical membrane protein structures in lipid environments without detergents. Recent progress in expression, purification, reconstitution, sample preparation and in the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of both oriented samples and magic angle spinning samples has demonstrated that helical membrane protein structures can be achieved in a timely fashion. Indeed, this is a spectacular opportunity for the NMR community to have a major impact on biomedical research through the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of these proteins.

  17. Solid state NMR: The essential technology for helical membrane protein structural characterization

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Timothy A.; Ekanayake, Vindana; Paulino, Joana; Wright, Anna

    2014-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy of helical membrane proteins has been very challenging on multiple fronts. The expression and purification of these proteins while maintaining functionality has consumed countless graduate student hours. Sample preparations have depended on whether solution or solid-state NMR spectroscopy was to be performed – neither have been easy. In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that membrane mimic environments influence the structural result. Indeed, in these recent years we have rediscovered that Nobel laureate, Christian Anfinsen, did not say that protein structure was exclusively dictated by the amino acid sequence, but rather by the sequence in a given environment (Anfinsen, 1973) [106]. The environment matters, molecular interactions with the membrane environment are significant and many examples of distorted, non-native membrane protein structures have recently been documented in the literature. However, solid-state NMR structures of helical membrane proteins in proteoliposomes and bilayers are proving to be native structures that permit a high resolution characterization of their functional states. Indeed, solid-state NMR is uniquely able to characterize helical membrane protein structures in lipid environments without detergents. Recent progress in expression, purification, reconstitution, sample preparation and in the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of both oriented samples and magic angle spinning samples has demonstrated that helical membrane protein structures can be achieved in a timely fashion. Indeed, this is a spectacular opportunity for the NMR community to have a major impact on biomedical research through the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of these proteins. PMID:24412099

  18. Solid state NMR: The essential technology for helical membrane protein structural characterization.

    PubMed

    Cross, Timothy A; Ekanayake, Vindana; Paulino, Joana; Wright, Anna

    2014-02-01

    NMR spectroscopy of helical membrane proteins has been very challenging on multiple fronts. The expression and purification of these proteins while maintaining functionality has consumed countless graduate student hours. Sample preparations have depended on whether solution or solid-state NMR spectroscopy was to be performed - neither have been easy. In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that membrane mimic environments influence the structural result. Indeed, in these recent years we have rediscovered that Nobel laureate, Christian Anfinsen, did not say that protein structure was exclusively dictated by the amino acid sequence, but rather by the sequence in a given environment (Anfinsen, 1973) [106]. The environment matters, molecular interactions with the membrane environment are significant and many examples of distorted, non-native membrane protein structures have recently been documented in the literature. However, solid-state NMR structures of helical membrane proteins in proteoliposomes and bilayers are proving to be native structures that permit a high resolution characterization of their functional states. Indeed, solid-state NMR is uniquely able to characterize helical membrane protein structures in lipid environments without detergents. Recent progress in expression, purification, reconstitution, sample preparation and in the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of both oriented samples and magic angle spinning samples has demonstrated that helical membrane protein structures can be achieved in a timely fashion. Indeed, this is a spectacular opportunity for the NMR community to have a major impact on biomedical research through the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of these proteins. PMID:24412099

  19. Parallel β-Sheet Structure of Alanine Tetrapeptide in the Solid State As Studied by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Tetsuo; Horiguchi, Kumiko; Aoki, Akihiro; Tasei, Yugo; Naito, Akira

    2016-09-01

    The structural analysis of alanine oligopeptides is important for understanding the crystalline region in silks from spiders and wild silkworms and also the mechanism of cellular toxicity of human diseases arising from expansion in polyalanine sequences. The atomic-level structures of alanine tripeptide and tetrapeptide with antiparallel β-sheet structures (AP-Ala3 and AP-Ala4, respectively) together with alanine tripeptide with parallel β-sheet structures (P-Ala3) have been determined, but alanine tetrapeptide with a parallel β-sheet structure (P-Ala4) has not been reported yet. In this article, first, we established the preparation protocol of P-Ala4 from more stable AP-Ala4. Second, complete assignments of the (13)C, (15)N, and (1)H solid-state NMR spectra were performed with (13)C- and (15)N-labeled Ala4 samples using several solid-state NMR techniques. Then, the structural constraints were obtained, for example, the amide proton peaks of P-Ala4 in the (1)H double-quantum magic-angle spinning NMR spectrum were heavily overlapped and observed at about 7.4 ppm, which was a much higher field than that of 8.7-9.1 ppm observed for AP-Ala4, indicating that the intermolecular hydrogen-bond lengths across strands (N-H···O═C) were considerably longer for P-Ala4, that is, 2.21-2.34 Å, than those reported for AP-Ala4, that is, 1.8-1.9 Å. The structural model was proposed for P-Ala4 by NMR results and MD calculations. PMID:27482868

  20. A Solid-State NMR Experiment: Analysis of Local Structural Environments in Phosphate Glasses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Stanley E.; Saiki, David; Eckert, Hellmut; Meise-Gresch, Karin

    2004-01-01

    An experiment that can be used to directly study the local chemical environments of phosphorus in solid amorphous materials is demonstrated. The experiment aims at familiarizing the students of chemistry with the principles of solid-state NMR, by having them synthesize a simple phosphate glass, and making them observe the (super 31)P NMR spectrum,…

  1. Instrumentation for solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization with magic angle spinning NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosay, Melanie; Blank, Monica; Engelke, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Advances in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) instrumentation and methodology have been key factors in the recent growth of solid-state DNP NMR applications. We review the current state of the art of solid-state DNP NMR instrumentation primarily based on available commercial platforms. We start with a general system overview, including options for microwave sources and DNP NMR probes, and then focus on specific developments for DNP at 100 K with magic angle spinning (MAS). Gyrotron microwave sources, passive components to transmit microwaves, the DNP MAS probe, a cooling device for low-temperature MAS, and sample preparation procedures including radicals for DNP are considered.

  2. Instrumentation for solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization with magic angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Rosay, Melanie; Blank, Monica; Engelke, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Advances in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) instrumentation and methodology have been key factors in the recent growth of solid-state DNP NMR applications. We review the current state of the art of solid-state DNP NMR instrumentation primarily based on available commercial platforms. We start with a general system overview, including options for microwave sources and DNP NMR probes, and then focus on specific developments for DNP at 100K with magic angle spinning (MAS). Gyrotron microwave sources, passive components to transmit microwaves, the DNP MAS probe, a cooling device for low-temperature MAS, and sample preparation procedures including radicals for DNP are considered. PMID:26920834

  3. Solid state NMR studies of gels derived from low molecular mass gelators.

    PubMed

    Nonappa; Kolehmainen, E

    2016-07-13

    Since its invention more than six decades ago, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has evolved as an inevitable part of chemical as well as structural analysis of small molecules, polymers, biomaterials and hybrid materials. In the solution state, due to the increased viscosity of complex viscoelastic fluids such as gels, liquid crystals and other soft materials, the rate of molecular tumbling is reduced, which in turn affects the chemical shift anisotropy, dipolar and quadrupolar interactions. As a consequence the solution state NMR spectra show broad lines, and therefore, extracting detailed structural information is a challenging task. In this context, solid state (SS) NMR has the ability to distinguish between a minute amount of polymorphic forms, conformational changes, and the number of non-equivalent molecules in an asymmetric unit of a crystal lattice, and to provide both qualitative as well as quantitative analytical data with a short-range order. Therefore, SS NMR has continued to evolve as an indispensable tool for structural analysis and gave birth to a new field called NMR crystallography. Solid state cross polarization (CP) and high resolution (HR) magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has been used to study weak interactions in polymer gels. However, the application of SS NMR spectroscopy to study gels derived from low molecular weight gelators has been limited until recently. In this review, we will focus on the importance of solid state NMR spectroscopy in understanding and elucidating the structure of supramolecular gels derived from low molecular weight gelators with selected examples. PMID:27374054

  4. Is solid-state NMR enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization?

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel; Hediger, Sabine; De Paëpe, Gaël

    2015-01-01

    The recent trend of high-field (~5-20 T), low-temperature (~100 K) ssNMR combined with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) under magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions is analyzed. A brief overview of the current theory of hyperpolarization for so-called MAS-DNP experiments is given, along with various reasons why the DNP-enhancement, the ratio of the NMR signal intensities obtained in the presence and absence of microwave irradiation suitable for hyperpolarization, should not be used alone to gauge the value of performing MAS-DNP experiments relative to conventional ssNMR. This is demonstrated through a dissection of the current conditions required for MAS-DNP with particular attention to resulting absolute sensitivities and spectral resolution. Consequently, sample preparation methods specifically avoiding the surplus of glass-forming solvents so as to improve the absolute sensitivity and resolution are discussed, as are samples that are intrinsically pertinent for MAS-DNP studies (high surface area, amorphous, and porous). Owing to their pertinence, examples of recent applications on these types of samples where chemically-relevant information has been obtained that would have been impossible without the sensitivity increases bestowed by MAS-DNP are also detailed. Additionally, a promising further implementation for MAS-DNP is exampled, whereby the sensitivity improvements shown for (correlation) spectroscopy of nuclei at low natural isotopic abundance, facilitate internuclear distance measurements, especially for long distances (absence of dipolar truncation). Finally, we give some speculative perspectives for MAS-DNP. PMID:25779337

  5. A "special perspectives" issue: Recent achievements and new directions in biomolecular solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tycko, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Twenty years ago, applications of solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods to real problems involving biological systems or biological materials were few and far between. Starting in the 1980s, a small number of research groups had begun to explore the possibility of obtaining structural and dynamical information about peptides, proteins, and other biopolymers from solid state NMR spectra. Progress was initially slow due to the relatively primitive state of solid state NMR probes, spectrometers, sample preparation methods, and pulse sequence techniques, coupled with the small number of people contributing to this research area. By the early 1990s, with the advent of new ideas about pulse sequence techniques such as dipolar recoupling, improvements in techniques for orienting membrane proteins and in technology for magic-angle spinning (MAS), improvements in the capabilities of commercial NMR spectrometers, and general developments in multidimensional spectroscopy, it began to appear that biomolecular solid state NMR might have a viable future. It was not until 1993 that the annual number of publications in this area crept above twenty.

  6. (13)C NMR assignments of regenerated cellulose from solid-state 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Idström, Alexander; Schantz, Staffan; Sundberg, Johan; Chmelka, Bradley F; Gatenholm, Paul; Nordstierna, Lars

    2016-10-20

    From the assignment of the solid-state (13)C NMR signals in the C4 region, distinct types of crystalline cellulose, cellulose at crystalline surfaces, and disordered cellulose can be identified and quantified. For regenerated cellulose, complete (13)C assignments of the other carbon regions have not previously been attainable, due to signal overlap. In this study, two-dimensional (2D) NMR correlation methods were used to resolve and assign (13)C signals for all carbon atoms in regenerated cellulose. (13)C-enriched bacterial nanocellulose was biosynthesized, dissolved, and coagulated as highly crystalline cellulose II. Specifically, four distinct (13)C signals were observed corresponding to conformationally different anhydroglucose units: two signals assigned to crystalline moieties and two signals assigned to non-crystalline species. The C1, C4 and C6 regions for cellulose II were fully examined by global spectral deconvolution, which yielded qualitative trends of the relative populations of the different cellulose moieties, as a function of wetting and drying treatments. PMID:27474592

  7. Weak and Transient Protein Interactions Determined by Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Dannatt, Hugh R W; Felletti, Michele; Jehle, Stefan; Wang, Yao; Emsley, Lyndon; Dixon, Nicholas E; Lesage, Anne; Pintacuda, Guido

    2016-06-01

    Despite their roles in controlling many cellular processes, weak and transient interactions between large structured macromolecules and disordered protein segments cannot currently be characterized at atomic resolution by X-ray crystallography or solution NMR. Solid-state NMR does not suffer from the molecular size limitations affecting solution NMR, and it can be applied to molecules in different aggregation states, including non-crystalline precipitates and sediments. A solid-state NMR approach based on high magnetic fields, fast magic-angle sample spinning, and deuteration provides chemical-shift and relaxation mapping that enabled the characterization of the structure and dynamics of the transient association between two regions in an 80 kDa protein assembly. This led to direct verification of a mechanism of regulation of E. coli DNA metabolism. PMID:27101578

  8. High-Resolution 3D Structure Determination of Kaliotoxin by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Korukottu, Jegannath; Schneider, Robert; Vijayan, Vinesh; Lange, Adam; Pongs, Olaf; Becker, Stefan; Baldus, Marc; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2008-01-01

    High-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy can provide structural information of proteins that cannot be studied by X-ray crystallography or solution NMR spectroscopy. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to determine a protein structure by solid-state NMR to a resolution comparable to that by solution NMR. Using an iterative assignment and structure calculation protocol, a large number of distance restraints was extracted from 1H/1H mixing experiments recorded on a single uniformly labeled sample under magic angle spinning conditions. The calculated structure has a coordinate precision of 0.6 Å and 1.3 Å for the backbone and side chain heavy atoms, respectively, and deviates from the structure observed in solution. The approach is expected to be applicable to larger systems enabling the determination of high-resolution structures of amyloid or membrane proteins. PMID:18523586

  9. CARBON-13 NMR OR SOLID STATE HYDROCARBONS AND RELATED SUBSTANCES-FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, David M.

    2007-08-16

    CARBON-13 NMR OR SOLID STATE HYDROCARBONS AND RELATED SUBSTANCES-FINAL REPORT Abstract: During recent years we have been engaged in SSNMR (Solid State NMR) structural studies of unusual tetracyanoethylene compounds with unusually long bonds between four carbons centered on two electrons. The chemical shift tensors reflect these unusual atomic arrangements. Quantum chemistry predicts the strange tensor shifts. The three dimensional molecular structure may be determined in this manner. Despite significant advances in structural determination from powder diffraction data, NMR shift tensors argument the structural accuracy and also suggest initial trial structures. Mixtures of polymorphs are difficult to analyze with diffraction methods whereas the SSNMR methods are able to characterize such mixtures in one another’s presence. Spectroscopic developments in our laboratory include SSNMR INADEQUATE and FIREMAT methods. We have used these methods to study the 13C and 15N NMR explosive CL-20.

  10. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a new approach to study humic material?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knicker, Heike; Lange, Sascha; van Rossum, Barth; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    Compared to solution NMR spectroscopy, solid-state NMR spectra suffer from broad resonance lines and low resolution. This could be overcome by the use of 2-dimenstional solid-state NMR pulse sequences. Until recently, this approach has been unfeasible as a routine tool in soil chemistry, mainly because of the low NMR sensitivity of the respective samples. A possibility to circumvent those sensitivity problems represents high-field Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR spectroscopy (Barnes et al., 2008), allowing considerable signal enhancements (Akbey et al., 2010). This is achieved by a microwave-driven transfer of polarization from a paramagnetic center to nuclear spins. Application of DNP to MAS spectra of biological systems (frozen solutions) showed enhancements of the factor 40 to 50 (Hall et al., 1997). Enhancements of this magnitude, thus may enable the use of at least some of the 2D solid-state NMR techniques that are presently already applied for pure proteins but are difficult to apply to soil peptides in their complex matrix. After adjusting the required acquisition parameters to the system "soil organic matter", lower but still promising enhancement factors were achieved. Additional optimization was performed and allowed the acquisition of 2D 13C and 15N solid-state NMR spectra of humified 13C and 15N enriched plant residues. Within the present contribution, the first solid-state DNP NMR spectra of humic material are presented. Those data demonstrate the great potential of this approach which certainly opens new doors for a better understanding of biochemical processes in soils, sediments and water. Akbey, Ü., Franks, W.T., Linden, A., Lange, S., Griffin, R.G., van Rossum, B.-J., Oschkinat, H., 2010. Dynamic nuclear polarization of deuterated proteins. Angewandte Chemie International Edition 49, 7803-7806. Barnes, A.B., De Paëpe, G., van der Wel, P.C.A., Hu, K.N., Joo, C.G., Bajaj, V.S., Mak-Jurkauskas, M.L., Sirigiri, J.R., Herzfeld, J

  11. 1H and 13C Solid-state NMR of G. barbadense (Pima) Cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The interaction of water with cellulose and its influence on the nuclear spin dynamics in G. barbadense (Pima) cotton were investigated with 1H and 13C solid-state NMR techniques. 1H spin diffusion results from a Goldman-Shen experiment indicate that the water is multilayered. 1H MAS experiment...

  12. Solid-state NMR and ESR studies of activated carbons produced from pecan shells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activated carbon from pecan shells has shown promise as an adsorbent in water treatment and sugar refining. However, the chemistry of the material is complex and not fully understood. We report here the application of solid state NMR and ESR to study the chemical structure, mobility, and pore volu...

  13. Chemical compositions of dissolved organic matter from various sources as characterized by solid-state NMR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in surface waters plays an important role in biogeochemical and ecological processes. This study used solid-state NMR techniques to explore the molecular signatures of riverine DOM in relation to its point and nonpoint sources. DOM samples were isolated from (1) two st...

  14. Characterization of animal manure using advanced solid-state C-13 NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of chemical structure of animal manure is necessary for its effective utilization. However, characterization of animal manure is challenging since it is a complex mixture and partially soluble. Solid-state C-13 NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy is regarded as the best tool to i...

  15. Chemical structure of soil organic matter in slickspots as investigated by advanced solid-state NMR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Slickspot soils are saline, and knowledge of their humic chemistry would contribute to our limited understanding how salinity affects soil C and N stocks. We characterized humic acids (HAs) from slickspot soils with solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Expanding on previous use of cross...

  16. High-Resolution Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Characterization of Polymorphism in Cimetidine, a Pharmaceutical Compound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacilio, Julia E.; Tokarski, John T.; Quiñones, Rosalynn; Iuliucci, Robbie J.

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy has many advantages as a tool to characterize solid-phase material that finds applications in polymer chemistry, nanotechnology, materials science, biomolecular structure determination, and others, including the pharmaceutical industry. The technology associated with achieving high resolution…

  17. 1H and 13C Solid-state NMR of Gossypium barbadense (Pima) Cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The interaction of water with cellulose and its influence on the nuclear spin dynamics in G. barbadense (Pima) cotton were investigated by 1H and 13C solid-state NMR techniques. 1H spin diffusion results from a Goldman-Shen experiment indicate that the water is multilayered. 1H MAS experiments pro...

  18. Investigation of Moisture Interaction with Cellulose Using Solid-State NMR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The interaction of water with cellulose and its influence on the nuclear spin dynamics in Gossypium barbadense (Pima) cotton were investigated by 1H and 13C solid-state NMR techniques. 1H spin diffusion results indicate that water is present in multiple layers within the cotton fiber, each layer bei...

  19. Structural heterogeneity in microcrystalline ubiquitin studied by solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Fasshuber, Hannes Klaus; Lakomek, Nils-Alexander; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Shi, Chaowei; Giller, Karin; Wolff, Sebastian; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2015-01-01

    By applying [1-13C]- and [2-13C]-glucose labeling schemes to the folded globular protein ubiquitin, a strong reduction of spectral crowding and increase in resolution in solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectra could be achieved. This allowed spectral resonance assignment in a straightforward manner and the collection of a wealth of long-range distance information. A high precision solid-state NMR structure of microcrystalline ubiquitin was calculated with a backbone rmsd of 1.57 to the X-ray structure and 1.32 Å to the solution NMR structure. Interestingly, we can resolve structural heterogeneity as the presence of three slightly different conformations. Structural heterogeneity is most significant for the loop region β1-β2 but also for β-strands β1, β2, β3, and β5 as well as for the loop connecting α1 and β3. This structural polymorphism observed in the solid-state NMR spectra coincides with regions that showed dynamics in solution NMR experiments on different timescales. PMID:25644665

  20. Magic-angle spinning solid-state multinuclear NMR on low-field instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sørensen, Morten K.; Bakharev, Oleg; Jensen, Ole; Jakobsen, Hans J.; Skibsted, Jørgen; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2014-01-01

    Mobile and cost-effective NMR spectroscopy exploiting low-field permanent magnets is a field of tremendous development with obvious applications for arrayed large scale analysis, field work, and industrial screening. So far such demonstrations have concentrated on relaxation measurements and lately high-resolution liquid-state NMR applications. With high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy being increasingly important in a broad variety of applications, we here introduce low-field magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state multinuclear NMR based on a commercial ACT 0.45 T 62 mm bore Halbach magnet along with a homebuilt FPGA digital NMR console, amplifiers, and a modified standard 45 mm wide MAS probe for 7 mm rotors. To illustrate the performance of the instrument and address cases where the low magnetic field may offer complementarity to high-field NMR experiments, we demonstrate applications for 23Na MAS NMR with enhanced second-order quadrupolar coupling effects and 31P MAS NMR where reduced influence from chemical shift anisotropy at low field may facilitate determination of heteronuclear dipole-dipole couplings.

  1. Structure of a protein determined by solid-state magic-angle-spinning NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellani, Federica; van Rossum, Barth; Diehl, Annette; Schubert, Mario; Rehbein, Kristina; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2002-11-01

    The determination of a representative set of protein structures is a chief aim in structural genomics. Solid-state NMR may have a crucial role in structural investigations of those proteins that do not easily form crystals or are not accessible to solution NMR, such as amyloid systems or membrane proteins. Here we present a protein structure determined by solid-state magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR. Almost complete 13C and 15N resonance assignments for a micro-crystalline preparation of the α-spectrin Src-homology 3 (SH3) domain formed the basis for the extraction of a set of distance restraints. These restraints were derived from proton-driven spin diffusion (PDSD) spectra of biosynthetically site-directed, labelled samples obtained from bacteria grown using [1,3-13C]glycerol or [2-13C]glycerol as carbon sources. This allowed the observation of long-range distance correlations up to ~7Å. The calculated global fold of the α-spectrin SH3 domain is based on 286 inter-residue 13C-13C and six 15N-15N restraints, all self-consistently obtained by solid-state MAS NMR. This MAS NMR procedure should be widely applicable to small membrane proteins that can be expressed in bacteria.

  2. The ABC exporter MsbA probed by solid state NMR – challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Hundeep; Lakatos, Andrea; Spadaccini, Roberta; Vogel, Ramona; Hoffmann, Christian; Becker-Baldus, Johanna; Ouari, Olivier; Tordo, Paul; Mchaourab, Hassane; Glaubitz, Clemens

    2015-09-01

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters form a superfamily of integral membrane proteins involved in translocation of substrates across the membrane driven by ATP hydrolysis. Despite available crystal structures and extensive biochemical data, many open questions regarding their transport mechanisms remain. Therefore, there is a need to explore spectroscopic techniques such as solid state NMR in order to bridge the gap between structural and mechanistic data. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of using Escherichia coli MsbA as a model ABC transporter for solid state NMR studies. We show that optimised solubilisation and reconstitution procedures enable preparing stable and homogenous protein samples. Depending on the duration of solubilisation, MsbA can be obtained in either an apo- or in a native lipid A bound form. Building onto these optimisations, the first promising MAS-NMR spectra with narrow lines have been recorded. However, further sensitivity improvements are required so that complex NMR experiments can be recorded within a reasonable amount of time. We therefore demonstrate the usability of paramagnetic doping for rapid data acquisition and explore dynamic nuclear polarisation as a method for general signal enhancement. Our results demonstrate that solid state NMR provides an opportunity to address important biological questions related to complex mechanisms of ABC transporters. PMID:25849794

  3. Solid-state NMR studies of theophylline co-crystals with dicarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Pindelska, Edyta; Sokal, Agnieszka; Szeleszczuk, Lukasz; Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Kolodziejski, Waclaw

    2014-11-01

    In this work, three polycrystalline materials containing co-crystals of theophylline with malonic, maleic, and glutaric acids were studied using (13)C, (15)N and (1)H solid-state NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy. The NMR assignments were supported by gauge including projector augmented waves (GIPAW) calculations of chemical shielding, performed using X-ray determined geometry. The experimental (13)C cross polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR results and the calculated isotropic chemical shifts were in excellent agreement. A rapid and convenient method for theophylline co-crystals crystal structure analysis has been proposed for co-crystals, which are potentially new APIs. PMID:25194346

  4. Solid-State NMR Characterization of Mixed Phosphonic Acid Ligand Binding and Organization on Silica Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Davidowski, Stephen K; Holland, Gregory P

    2016-04-01

    As ligand functionalization of nanomaterials becomes more complex, methods to characterize the organization of multiple ligands on surfaces is required. In an effort to further the understanding of ligand-surface interactions, a combination of multinuclear ((1)H, (29)Si, (31)P) and multidimensional solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques was utilized to characterize the phosphonic acid functionalization of fumed silica nanoparticles using methylphosphonic acid (MPA) and phenylphosphonic acid (PPA). (1)H → (29)Si cross-polarization (CP)-magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR was used to selectively detect silicon atoms near hydrogen atoms (primarily surface species); these results indicate that geminal silanols are preferentially depleted during the functionalization with phosphonic acids. (1)H → (31)P CP-MAS solid-state NMR measurements on the functionalized silica nanoparticles show three distinct resonances shifted upfield (lower ppm) and broadened compared to the resonances of the crystalline ligands. Quantitative (31)P MAS solid-state NMR measurements indicate that ligands favor a monodentate binding mode. When fumed silica nanoparticles were functionalized with an equal molar ratio of MPA and PPA, the MPA bound the nanoparticle surface preferentially. Cross-peaks apparent in the 2D (1)H exchange spectroscopy (EXSY) NMR measurements of the multiligand sample at short mixing times indicate that the MPA and PPA are spatially close (≤5 Å) on the surface of the nanostructure. Furthermore, (1)H-(1)H double quantum-single quantum (DQ-SQ) back-to-back (BABA) 2D NMR spectra further confirmed that MPA and PPA are strongly dipolar coupled with observation of DQ intermolecular contacts between the ligands. DQ experimental buildup curves and simulations indicate that the average distance between MPA and PPA is no further than 4.2 ± 0.2 Å. PMID:26914738

  5. Quantification of protein secondary structure by (13)C solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Fabiana Diuk; Forato, Lucimara Aparecida; Bernardes Filho, Rubens; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution (13)C solid-state NMR stands out as one of the most promising techniques to solve the structure of insoluble proteins featuring biological and technological importance. The simplest nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy method to quantify the secondary structure of proteins uses the areas of carbonyl and alpha carbon peaks. The quantification obtained by fitting procedures depends on the assignment of the peaks to the structure, type of line shape, number of peaks to be used, and other parameters that are set by the operator. In this paper, we demonstrate that the analysis of (13)C NMR spectra by a pattern recognition method-based on the singular value decomposition (SVD) regression, which does not depend on the operator-shows higher correlation coefficients for α-helix and β-sheet (0.96 and 0.91, respectively) than Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) method. Therefore, the use of (13)C solid-state NMR spectra and SVD is a simple and reliable method for quantifying the secondary structures of insoluble proteins in solid-state. PMID:27068694

  6. Protein Folding and Amyloid Formation: Good Questions for Solid State NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tycko, Robert

    2005-03-01

    Recent results from two ongoing projects will be described. These projects illustrate the expanding capability of solid state NMR spectroscopy to provide unique information about the molecular structure of complex biochemical systems that are of current interest in the biophysical and biomedical research communities. Methodological advances that facilitate progress on these projects will be discussed briefly. In the area of protein folding, we are using solid state NMR spectroscopy to characterize the distributions of molecular structures in unfolded and partially folded states of relatively simple model proteins. The measurements are carried out on frozen glassy solutions at low temperatures. Initial results for the chemical denaturation of the 35-residue helical protein HP35 show that unfolding does not occur by a simple two-state process and that local conformational distributions in the unfolded state are remarkably non-uniform. In the area of amyloid fibrils, we are using solid state NMR to develop experimentally-based models for the molecular structure of peptide fibrils associated with Alzheimer's disease and other amyloid diseases, and to develop an understanding of the interactions that stabilize amyloid fibril structures in general. The NMR data also reveal molecular-level polymorphism in amyloid fibrils, with implications for biomedical issues such as the etiological role of fibrils in amyloid diseases and the structural basis for strains in prion diseases.

  7. Solid-state NMR in the analysis of drugs and naturally occurring materials.

    PubMed

    Paradowska, Katarzyna; Wawer, Iwona

    2014-05-01

    This article presents some of the solid-state NMR (SSNMR) techniques used in the pharmaceutical and biomedical research. Solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR provides structural information on powder amorphous solids for which single-crystal diffraction structures cannot be obtained. NMR is non-destructive; the powder sample may be used for further studies. Quantitative results can be obtained, although solid-state NMR spectra are not normally quantitative. As compared with other techniques, MAS NMR is insensitive and requires a significant amount of the powder sample (2-100mg) to fill the 1.3-7 mm ZrO2 rotor. This is its main drawback, since natural compounds isolated from plants, microorganisms or cell cultures are difficult to obtain in quantities higher than a few milligrams. Multinuclear MAS NMR routinely uses (1)H and (13)C nuclei, less frequently (15)N, (19)F, (31)P, (77)Se, (29)Si, (43)Ca or (23)Na. The article focuses on the pharmaceutical applications of SSNMR, the studies were aimed to control over manufacturing processes (e.g. crystallization and milling) investigation of chemical and physical stability of solid forms both as pure drug and in a formulated product. SSNMR is used in combination with some other analytical methods (DSC, XRD, FT-IR) and theoretical calculations of NMR parameters. Biologically active compounds, such as amino acids and small peptides, steroids and flavonoids were studied by SSNMR methods (part 4) providing valuable structural information. The SSNMR experiments performed on biopolymers and large natural products like proteins, cellulose and lipid layers are commented upon briefly in part 5. PMID:24173236

  8. In situ solid-state NMR for heterogeneous catalysis: a joint experimental and theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiping; Xu, Shutao; Han, Xiuwen; Bao, Xinhe

    2012-01-01

    In situ solid-state NMR is a well-established tool for investigations of the structures of the adsorbed reactants, intermediates and products on the surface of solid catalysts. The techniques allow identifications of both the active sites such as acidic sites and reaction processes after introduction of adsorbates and reactants inside an NMR rotor under magic angle spinning (MAS). The in situ solid-state NMR studies of the reactions can be achieved in two ways, i.e. under batch-like or continuous-flow conditions. The former technique is low cost and accessible to the commercial instrument while the latter one is close to the real catalytic reactions on the solids. This critical review describes the research progress on the in situ solid-state NMR techniques and the applications in heterogeneous catalysis under batch-like and continuous-flow conditions in recent years. Some typical probe molecules are summarized here to detect the Brønsted and Lewis acidic sites by MAS NMR. The catalytic reactions discussed in this review include methane aromatization, olefin selective oxidation and olefin metathesis on the metal oxide-containing zeolites. With combining the in situ MAS NMR spectroscopy and the density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations, the intermediates on the catalyst can be identified, and the reaction mechanism is revealed. Reaction kinetic analysis in the nanospace instead of in the bulk state can also be performed by employing laser-enhanced MAS NMR techniques in the in situ flow mode (163 references). PMID:21743940

  9. Characterization of prednisolone in controlled porosity osmotic pump pellets using solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sotthivirat, S; Lubach, J W; Haslam, J L; Munson, E J; Stella, V J

    2007-05-01

    The overall objective of this study was to demonstrate the influence of formulation and processing variables on the physical state of prednisolone (PDL) in formulations consisting of PDL, microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), and sulfobutylether-beta-cyclodextrin (CD). PDL was used as a model drug in controlled porosity osmotic pump pellet (CP-OPP) formulations, and was characterized using solid-state NMR spectroscopy and other complimentary analytical techniques. Dosage forms and the solid-state properties of drugs and excipients in a formulation may be influenced by the processing conditions used. Several processing parameters, such as amount of water used in wet granulation and subsequent drying conditions, were found to affect the solid-state transformation of PDL. In addition, the presence of excipients in the CP-OPP was observed to decrease the degree of PDL crystallinity, presumably by creating an inclusion complex with the CD. A hydrated form of PDL was created when PDL was ground with water alone; however, this form was not observed in formulated products. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy was shown to be a powerful technique for the analysis of drug formulations and investigations of the effects of processing conditions. PMID:17455361

  10. (13)C and (15)N solid-state NMR studies on albendazole and cyclodextrin albendazole complexes.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, M João G; García, A; Leonardi, D; Salomon, Claudio J; Lamas, M Celina; Nunes, Teresa G

    2015-06-01

    (13)C and (15)N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were recorded from albendazole (ABZ) and from ABZ:β-cyclodextrin, ABZ:methyl-β-cyclodextrin, ABZ:hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin and ABZ:citrate-β-cyclodextrin, which were prepared by the spray-drying technique. ABZ signals were typical of a crystalline solid for the pure drug and of an amorphous compound obtained from ABZ:cyclodextrin samples. Relevant spectral differences were correlated with chemical interaction between ABZ and cyclodextrins. The number and type of complexes revealed a strong dependence on the cyclodextrin group substituent. Solid-state NMR data were consistent with the presence of stable inclusion complexes. PMID:25843843

  11. Mechanism of dilute-spin-exchange in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, George J.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-03-28

    In the stationary, aligned samples used in oriented sample (OS) solid-state NMR, {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar couplings are not attenuated as they are in magic angle spinning solid-state NMR; consequently, they are available for participation in dipolar coupling-based spin-exchange processes. Here we describe analytically the pathways of {sup 15}N-{sup 15}N spin-exchange mediated by {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar couplings. The mixed-order proton-relay mechanism can be differentiated from the third spin assisted recoupling mechanism by setting the {sup 1}H to an off-resonance frequency so that it is at the “magic angle” during the spin-exchange interval in the experiment, since the “magic angle” irradiation nearly quenches the former but only slightly attenuates the latter. Experimental spectra from a single crystal of N-acetyl leucine confirm that this proton-relay mechanism plays the dominant role in {sup 15}N-{sup 15}N dilute-spin-exchange in OS solid-state NMR in crystalline samples. Remarkably, the “forbidden” spin-exchange condition under “magic angle” irradiation results in {sup 15}N-{sup 15}N cross-peaks intensities that are comparable to those observed with on-resonance irradiation in applications to proteins. The mechanism of the proton relay in dilute-spin-exchange is crucial for the design of polarization transfer experiments.

  12. Detergent Optimized Membrane Protein Reconstitution in Liposomes for Solid State NMR

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    For small helical membrane proteins, their structures are highly sensitive to their environment, and solid state NMR is a structural technique that can characterize these membrane proteins in native-like lipid bilayers and proteoliposomes. To date, a systematic method by which to evaluate the effect of the solubilizing detergent on proteoliposome preparations for solid state NMR of membrane proteins has not been presented in the literature. A set of experiments are presented aimed at determining the conditions most amenable to dialysis mediated reconstitution sample preparation. A membrane protein from M. tuberculosis is used to illustrate the method. The results show that a detergent that stabilizes the most protein is not always ideal and sometimes cannot be removed by dialysis. By focusing on the lipid and protein binding properties of the detergent, proteoliposome preparations can be readily produced, which provide double the signal-to-noise ratios for both the oriented sample and magic angle spinning solid state NMR. The method will allow more membrane protein drug targets to be structurally characterized in lipid bilayer environments. PMID:24665863

  13. LARGE SCALE PRODUCTION, PURIFICATION, AND 65CU SOLID STATE NMR OF AZURIN

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, A.; Heck, R.W.

    2008-01-01

    This paper details a way to produce azurin with an effi ciency over 10 times greater than previously described and demonstrates the fi rst solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of 65Cu(I) in a metalloprotein. A synthetic gene for azurin based upon the DNA sequence from Pseudomonas aeruginosa including the periplasmic targeting sequence was subcloned into a T7 overexpression vector to create the plasmid pGS-azurin, which was transformed into BL21 (DE3) competent cells. The leader sequence on the expressed protein causes it to be exported to the periplasmic space of Escherichia coli. Bacteria grown in a fermentation unit were induced to overexpress the azurin, which was subsequently purifi ed through an endosmotic shock procedure followed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). 1,500 mg of azurin were purifi ed per liter of culture. 65Cu(II) was added to apo-azurin and then reduced. The 65Cu metal cofactor in azurin was observed with solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to determine any structural variations that accompanied copper reduction. This is the fi rst solid state NMR spectra of a copper(I) metalloprotein. Analysis of the NMR spectra is being used to complement hypotheses set forth by x-ray diffraction and computational calculations of electron transfer mechanisms in azurin.

  14. Benchmarks for the 13C NMR chemical shielding tensors in peptides in the solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czernek, Jiří; Pawlak, Tomasz; Potrzebowski, Marek J.

    2012-02-01

    The benchmark set is proposed, which comprises 126 principal elements of chemical shielding tensors, and the respective isotropic chemical shielding values, of all 42 13C nuclei in crystalline Tyr-D-Ala-Phe and Tyr-Ala-Phe tripeptides with known, but highly dissimilar structures. These data are obtained by both the NMR measurements and the density functional theory in the pseudopotential plane-wave scheme. Using the CASTEP program, several computational strategies are employed, for which the level of agreement between calculations and experiment is established. This set is mainly intended for the validation of methods capable of predicting the 13C NMR parameters in solid-state systems.

  15. Monitoring the Electrochemical Processes in the Lithium-Air Battery by Solid State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Leskes, Michal; Moore, Amy J; Goward, Gillian R; Grey, Clare P

    2013-12-27

    A multi-nuclear solid-state NMR approach is employed to investigate the lithium-air battery, to monitor the evolution of the electrochemical products formed during cycling, and to gain insight into processes affecting capacity fading. While lithium peroxide is identified by (17)O solid state NMR (ssNMR) as the predominant product in the first discharge in 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) based electrolytes, it reacts with the carbon cathode surface to form carbonate during the charging process. (13)C ssNMR provides evidence for carbonate formation on the surface of the carbon cathode, the carbonate being removed at high charging voltages in the first cycle, but accumulating in later cycles. Small amounts of lithium hydroxide and formate are also detected in discharged cathodes and while the hydroxide formation is reversible, the formate persists and accumulates in the cathode upon further cycling. The results indicate that the rechargeability of the battery is limited by both the electrolyte and the carbon cathode stability. The utility of ssNMR spectroscopy in directly detecting product formation and decomposition within the battery is demonstrated, a necessary step in the assessment of new electrolytes, catalysts, and cathode materials for the development of a viable lithium-oxygen battery. PMID:24489976

  16. Monitoring the Electrochemical Processes in the Lithium–Air Battery by Solid State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A multi-nuclear solid-state NMR approach is employed to investigate the lithium–air battery, to monitor the evolution of the electrochemical products formed during cycling, and to gain insight into processes affecting capacity fading. While lithium peroxide is identified by 17O solid state NMR (ssNMR) as the predominant product in the first discharge in 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) based electrolytes, it reacts with the carbon cathode surface to form carbonate during the charging process. 13C ssNMR provides evidence for carbonate formation on the surface of the carbon cathode, the carbonate being removed at high charging voltages in the first cycle, but accumulating in later cycles. Small amounts of lithium hydroxide and formate are also detected in discharged cathodes and while the hydroxide formation is reversible, the formate persists and accumulates in the cathode upon further cycling. The results indicate that the rechargeability of the battery is limited by both the electrolyte and the carbon cathode stability. The utility of ssNMR spectroscopy in directly detecting product formation and decomposition within the battery is demonstrated, a necessary step in the assessment of new electrolytes, catalysts, and cathode materials for the development of a viable lithium–oxygen battery. PMID:24489976

  17. New methods and applications in solid-state NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei.

    PubMed

    Ashbrook, Sharon E; Sneddon, Scott

    2014-11-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has long been established as offering unique atomic-scale and element-specific insight into the structure, disorder, and dynamics of materials. NMR spectra of quadrupolar nuclei (I > (1)/2) are often perceived as being challenging to acquire and to interpret because of the presence of anisotropic broadening arising from the interaction of the electric field gradient and the nuclear electric quadrupole moment, which broadens the spectral lines, often over several megahertz. Despite the vast amount of information contained in the spectral line shapes, the problems with sensitivity and resolution have, until very recently, limited the application of NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei in the solid state. In this Perspective, we provide a brief overview of the quadrupolar interaction, describe some of the basic experimental approaches used for acquiring high-resolution NMR spectra, and discuss the information that these spectra can provide. We then describe some interesting recent examples to showcase some of the more exciting and challenging new applications of NMR spectra of quadrupolar nuclei in the fields of energy materials, microporous materials, Earth sciences, and biomaterials. Finally, we consider the possible directions that this highly informative technique may take in the future. PMID:25296129

  18. Solid-state NMR: An emerging technique in structural biology of self-assemblies.

    PubMed

    Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine

    2016-03-01

    Protein self-assemblies are ubiquitous biological systems involved in many cellular processes, ranging from bacterial and viral infection to the propagation of neurodegenerative disorders. Studying the atomic three-dimensional structures of protein self-assemblies is a particularly demanding task, as these systems are usually insoluble, non-crystalline and of large size. Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) is an emerging method that can provide atomic-level structural data on intact macromolecular assemblies. We here present recent progress in magic-angle spinning ssNMR to study protein assemblies and give an overview on its combination with complementary techniques such as cryo-EM, mass-per-length measurements, SAXS and X-ray diffraction. Applications of ssNMR on its own and in hybrid approaches have revealed precious atomic details and first high-resolution structures of complex biological assemblies, including amyloid fibrils, bacterial filaments, phages or virus capsids. PMID:26234527

  19. Efficient cellular solid-state NMR of membrane proteins by targeted protein labeling.

    PubMed

    Baker, Lindsay A; Daniëls, Mark; van der Cruijsen, Elwin A W; Folkers, Gert E; Baldus, Marc

    2015-06-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy (ssNMR) has made significant progress towards the study of membrane proteins in their native cellular membranes. However, reduced spectroscopic sensitivity and high background signal levels can complicate these experiments. Here, we describe a method for ssNMR to specifically label a single protein by repressing endogenous protein expression with rifampicin. Our results demonstrate that treatment of E. coli with rifampicin during induction of recombinant membrane protein expression reduces background signals for different expression levels and improves sensitivity in cellular membrane samples. Further, the method reduces the amount of time and resources needed to produce membrane protein samples, enabling new strategies for studying challenging membrane proteins by ssNMR. PMID:25956570

  20. Solution- and solid-state NMR studies of GPCRs and their ligands.

    PubMed

    Tapaneeyakorn, Satita; Goddard, Alan D; Oates, Joanne; Willis, Christine L; Watts, Anthony

    2011-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent one of the major targets of new drugs on the market given their roles as key membrane receptors in many cellular signalling pathways. Structure-based drug design has potential to be the most reliable method for novel drug discovery. Unfortunately, GPCR-ligand crystallisation for X-ray diffraction studies is very difficult to achieve. However, solution- and solid-state NMR approaches have been developed and have provided new insights, particularly focussing on the study of protein-ligand interactions which are vital for drug discovery. This review provides an introduction for new investigators of GPCRs/ligand interactions using NMR spectroscopy. The guidelines for choosing a system for efficient isotope labelling of GPCRs and their ligands for NMR studies will be presented, along with an overview of the different sample environments suitable for generation of high resolution structural information from NMR spectra. PMID:20951674

  1. Resonator with reduced sample heating and increased homogeneity for solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krahn, Alexander; Priller, Uwe; Emsley, Lyndon; Engelke, Frank

    2008-03-01

    In the application of solid-state NMR to many systems, the presence of radiofrequency (rf) electric fields inside classical solenoidal coils causes heating of lossy samples. In particular, this is critical for proteins in ionic buffers. Rf sample heating increases proportional to frequency which may result in the need to reduce the rf pulse power to prevent partial or total sample deterioration. In the present paper, we propose a multifrequency-tunable NMR resonator where the sample is electrically shielded from the NMR coil by a conductive sheet that increases the magneto-electric ratio. Expressions for the B1 efficiency as function of magnetic and electric filling factors are derived that allow a direct comparison of different resonators. Rf efficiency, homogeneity, signal-to-noise, and rf sample heating are compared. NMR spectra at 700 MHz on ethylene glycol, glycine, and a model protein were acquired to compare the resonators under realistic experimental conditions.

  2. Structure and dynamics of retinal in rhodopsin elucidated by deuterium solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, Gilmar Fernandes De Jesus

    Rhodopsin is a seven transmembrane helix GPCR found which mediates dim light vision, in which the binding pocket is occupied by the ligand 11- cis-retinal. A site-directed 2H-labeling approach utilizing solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the structure and dynamics of retinal within its binding pocket in the dark state of rhodopsin, and as well the MetaI and MetaII. 11-cis-[5-C 2H3]-, 11-cis-[9-C 2H3]-, and 11-cis-[13-C2H 3]-retinal were used to regenerate bleached rhodopsin. Recombinant membranes comprising purified rhodopsin and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) were prepared (1:50 molar ratio). Solid-state 2H NMR spectra were obtained for the aligned rhodopsin/POPC recombinant membranes at temperatures below the order-disorder phase transition temperature of POPC. The solid-state NMR studies of aligned samples, give the orientations of the 2H nuclear coupling tensor relative to the membrane frame, which involve both the conformation and orientation of the bound retinal chromophore. Theoretical simulations of the experimental 2H NMR spectra employed a new lineshape treatment for a semi-random distribution due to static uniaxial disorder. The analysis gives the orientation of the 2H-labeled C-C2H3 methyl bond axes relative to the membrane plane as well as the extent of three-dimensional alignment disorder (mosaic spread). These results clearly demonstrate the applicability of site-directed 2H NMR methods for investigating conformational changes and dynamics of ligands bound to rhodopsin and other GPCRs in relation to their characteristic mechanisms of action.

  3. Membrane protein structural validation by oriented sample solid-state NMR: diacylglycerol kinase.

    PubMed

    Murray, Dylan T; Li, Conggang; Gao, F Philip; Qin, Huajun; Cross, Timothy A

    2014-04-15

    The validation of protein structures through functional assays has been the norm for many years. Functional assays perform this validation for water-soluble proteins very well, but they need to be performed in the same environment as that used for the structural analysis. This is difficult for membrane proteins that are often structurally characterized in detergent environments, although functional assays for these proteins are most frequently performed in lipid bilayers. Because the structure of membrane proteins is known to be sensitive to the membrane mimetic environment, such functional assays are appropriate for validating the protein construct, but not the membrane protein structure. Here, we compare oriented sample solid-state NMR spectral data of diacylglycerol kinase previously published with predictions of such data from recent structures of this protein. A solution NMR structure of diacylglycerol kinase has been obtained in detergent micelles and three crystal structures have been obtained in a monoolein cubic phase. All of the structures are trimeric with each monomer having three transmembrane and one amphipathic helices. However, the solution NMR structure shows typical perturbations induced by a micelle environment that is reflected in the predicted solid-state NMR resonances from the structural coordinates. The crystal structures show few such perturbations, especially for the wild-type structure and especially for the monomers that do not have significant crystal contacts. For these monomers the predicted and observed data are nearly identical. The thermostabilized constructs do show more perturbations, especially the A41C mutation that introduces a hydrophilic residue into what would be the middle of the lipid bilayer inducing additional hydrogen bonding between trimers. These results demonstrate a general technique for validating membrane protein structures with minimal data obtained from membrane proteins in liquid crystalline lipid bilayers by

  4. Solid-state Ru-99 NMR spectroscopy: a useful tool for characterizing prototypal diamagnetic ruthenium compounds.

    PubMed

    Ooms, Kristopher J; Wasylishen, Roderick E

    2004-09-01

    The feasibility of (99)Ru NMR spectroscopy as a tool to characterize solid compounds is demonstrated. Results of the first solid-state (99)Ru NMR investigation of diamagnetic compounds are presented for Ru(NH(3))(6)Cl(2), K(4)Ru(CN)(6). xH(2)O (x = 0, 3), LaKRu(CN)(6), and Ru(3)(CO)(12). The sensitivity of the ruthenium magnetic shielding tensor to subtle changes in the local structure about the ruthenium nucleus is highlighted by comparing the (99)Ru isotropic chemical shift of Ru(NH(3))(6)Cl(2) in aqueous solutions and in the solid state. The narrow isotropic (99)Ru NMR peak observed for solid Ru(NH(3))(6)Cl(2) indicates that this compound is an ideal secondary reference sample for solid-state (99)Ru NMR studies. The isotropic (99)Ru chemical shift, (99)Ru nuclear quadrupolar coupling constant, C(Q), and quadrupolar asymmetry parameter of K(4)Ru(CN)(6). xH(2)O (x = 0, 3) are shown to be sensitive to x. For Ru(3)(CO)(12), the magnetic shielding tensors of each of the three nonequivalent Ru nuclei have spans of 1300-1400 ppm, and the (99)Ru C(Q) values are also similar, 1.36-1.85 MHz, and are surprisingly small given that (99)Ru has a moderate nuclear quadrupole moment. Information about the relative orientation of the Ru magnetic shielding and electric field gradient tensors has been determined for Ru(3)(CO)(12) from experimental (99)Ru NMR spectra as well as quantum chemical calculations. PMID:15339183

  5. 1H to 13C Energy Transfer in Solid State NMR Spectroscopy of Natural Organic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berns, Anne E.; Conte, Pellegrino

    2010-05-01

    Cross polarization (CP) magic angle spinning (MAS) 13C-NMR spectroscopy is a solid state NMR technique widely used to study chemical composition of organic materials with low or no solubility in the common deuterated solvents used to run liquid state NMR experiments. Based on the magnetization transfer from abundant nuclei (with spin of 1 -2) having a high gyromagnetic ratio (γ), such as protons, to the less abundant 13C nuclei with low γ values, 13C-CPMAS NMR spectroscopy is often applied in environmental chemistry to obtain quantitative information on the chemical composition of natural organic matter (NOM) (Conte et al., 2004), although its quantitative assessment is still matter of heavy debates. Many authors (Baldock et al., 1997; Conte et al., 1997, 2002; Dria et al., 2002; Kiem et al., 2000; Kögel-Knabner, 2000; Preston, 2001), reported that the application of appropriate instrument setup as well as the use of special pulse sequences and correct spectra elaboration may provide signal intensities that are directly proportional to the amount of nuclei creating a NMR signal. However, many other papers dealt with the quantitative unsuitability of 13C-CPMAS NMR spectroscopy. Among those, Mao et al. (2000), Smernik and Oades (2000 a,b), and Preston (2001) reported that cross-polarized NMR techniques may fail in a complete excitation of the 13C nuclei. In fact, the amount of observable carbons via 13C-CPMAS NMR spectroscopy appeared, in many cases, lower than that measured by a direct observation of the 13C nuclei. As a consequence, cross-polarized NMR techniques may provide spectra where signal distribution may not be representative of the quantitative distribution of the different natural organic matter components. Cross-polarization is obtained after application of an initial 90° x pulse on protons and a further spin lock pulse (along the y axis) having a fixed length (contact time) for both nuclei (1H and 13C) once the Hartmann-Hahn condition is matched

  6. Immobilization of soluble protein complexes in MAS solid-state NMR: Sedimentation versus viscosity.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Riddhiman; Mainz, Andi; Busi, Baptiste; Barbet-Massin, Emeline; Kranz, Maximilian; Hofmann, Thomas; Reif, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, MAS solid-state NMR has emerged as a technique for the investigation of soluble protein complexes. It was found that high molecular weight complexes do not need to be crystallized in order to obtain an immobilized sample for solid-state NMR investigations. Sedimentation induced by sample rotation impairs rotational diffusion of proteins and enables efficient dipolar coupling based cross polarization transfers. In addition, viscosity contributes to the immobilization of the molecules in the sample. Natural Deep Eutectic Solvents (NADES) have very high viscosities, and can replace water in living organisms. We observe a considerable amount of cross polarization transfers for NADES solvents, even though their molecular weight is too low to yield significant sedimentation. We discuss how viscosity and sedimentation both affect the quality of the obtained experimental spectra. The FROSTY/sedNMR approach holds the potential to study large protein complexes, which are otherwise not amenable for a structural characterization using NMR. We show that using this method, backbone assignments of the symmetric proteasome activator complex (1.1MDa), and high quality correlation spectra of non-symmetric protein complexes such as the prokaryotic ribosome 50S large subunit binding to trigger factor (1.4MDa) are obtained. PMID:27017576

  7. Application and Reliability of Solid-State NMR in Environmental Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knicker, Heike

    2010-05-01

    For the characterization of soil organic matter, a suite of analytical approaches are available. Chemical degradative methods involve an extraction scheme with which the soluble part of the mixture is isolated and analyzed by colorimetrical or chromatographic means. Macromolecular structures can be subjected to thermolytic or combined thermochemolytic degradation. Because secondary reactions (rearrangement, cracking, hydrogenation and polymerization) in a heterogeneous mixture cannot be excluded, it is obvious that conclusions regarding the original structure in the macromolecular phase have to be drawn with caution. A powerful alternative represents solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, allowing the examination of the bulk sample without major pre-treatment In environmental sciences, this technique mostly involves the isotope 13C to study the chemical composition of organic matter in soils, sediments or compost to study the temporal development of humic material or chemical alterations due to variation in environmental parameters. Due to its low sensibility solid-state 15N NMR studies on such samples are only found occasionally. The emphasis of solid-state NMR spectroscopy is not only to determine the gross chemical composition of the material under study via a chemical shift assignment but also a quantitative correlation between the different signal intensities and the relative contribution of the respective C or N types to the total organic C or N content. However, despite increasing popularity, this approach is still viewed as mysterious techniques, in particular with respect to quantification. Accordingly, the purpose of this review is to give a short overview on the possibilities and limitations of this technique in environmental science and in particular for the study of soil organic matter. In general, solid-state 13C NMR spectra of soil organic matter are obtained with the cross polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) technique. This

  8. Mixed-Symmetry States in ^93Nb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, C. J.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Lesher, S. R.; Mynk, M.; Orce, J.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Yates, S. W.

    2003-10-01

    The neutron-proton version of the interacting boson model predicts the existence of mixed-symmetry collective excitations. In an even-even nucleus the 2^+_ms state has the distinctive signature of a strong M1 transition to the first 2^+ state and a weak E2 transiton to the ground state. Previous investigations of the N=52 isotones ^92Zr, ^94Mo and ^96Ru have have led to the identification of mixed-symmetry states. It is expected that odd-A nuclei will also display states with mixed-symmetry character. Therefore, excitation function and angular distibution measurements have been performed on ^93Nb, the lone stable odd-A N=52 isotone, using the (n,n^'γ) reaction at the University of Kentucky. Lifetimes were determined with the Doppler-shift attenuation method. This work was supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation under grant No. PHY-0098813

  9. Structure determination of helical filaments by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Mumdooh; Spehr, Johannes; König, Renate; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Rand, Ulfert; Lührs, Thorsten; Ritter, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The controlled formation of filamentous protein complexes plays a crucial role in many biological systems and represents an emerging paradigm in signal transduction. The mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) is a central signal transduction hub in innate immunity that is activated by a receptor-induced conversion into helical superstructures (filaments) assembled from its globular caspase activation and recruitment domain. Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy has become one of the most powerful techniques for atomic resolution structures of protein fibrils. However, for helical filaments, the determination of the correct symmetry parameters has remained a significant hurdle for any structural technique and could thus far not be precisely derived from ssNMR data. Here, we solved the atomic resolution structure of helical MAVSCARD filaments exclusively from ssNMR data. We present a generally applicable approach that systematically explores the helical symmetry space by efficient modeling of the helical structure restrained by interprotomer ssNMR distance restraints. Together with classical automated NMR structure calculation, this allowed us to faithfully determine the symmetry that defines the entire assembly. To validate our structure, we probed the protomer arrangement by solvent paramagnetic resonance enhancement, analysis of chemical shift differences relative to the solution NMR structure of the monomer, and mutagenesis. We provide detailed information on the atomic contacts that determine filament stability and describe mechanistic details on the formation of signaling-competent MAVS filaments from inactive monomers. PMID:26733681

  10. Triple Resonance Solid State NMR Experiments with Reduced Dimensionality Evolution Periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astrof, Nathan S.; Lyon, Charles E.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2001-10-01

    Two solid state NMR triple resonance experiments which utilize the simultaneous incrementation of two chemical shift evolution periods to obtain a spectrum with reduced dimensionality are described. The CON CA experiment establishes the correlation of 13Ci-1 to 13Cαi and 15Ni by simultaneously encoding the 13COi-1 and 15Ni chemical shifts. The CAN COCA experiment establishes the correlation 13Cai and 15COi to 13Cαi-1 and 15Ni-1 within a single experiment by simultaneous encoding of the 13Cαi and 15Ni chemical shifts. This experiment establishes sequential amino acid correlations in close analogy to the solution state HNCA experiment. Reduced dimensionality 2D experiments are a practical alternative to recording multiple 3D data sets for the purpose of obtaining sequence-specific resonance assignments of peptides and proteins in the solid state.

  11. Interactions between Nafion resin and protonated dodecylamine modified montmorillonite: a solid state NMR study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Limin; Xu, Jun; Hou, Guangjin; Tang, Huiru; Deng, Feng

    2007-07-01

    A series of nanocomposites have been prepared from perfluorosulfonylfluoride copolymer resin (Nafion) and layered montmorillonite (MMT) modified with protonated dodecylamine by conventional sol-gel intercalation. The structure of these nanocomposite materials have been characterized using FT-IR, elemental analysis, XRD and solid state NMR techniques, including 19F magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR, 19F NMR relaxation time measurements, 29Si MAS, 1H MAS, 1H-13C cross-polarization magic-angle spinning (CPMAS), and 1H-13C heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) 2D NMR. The results showed that thermal stability of Nafion was improved moderately by the addition of dodecylamine modified MMT without intercalation. FT-IR and 29Si MAS NMR results indicated that dodecylamine modification did not result in obvious changes in the MMT lattice structure. The XRD results showed that the protonated dodecylamine has been embedded and intercalated into the MMT interlayers, whereas Nafion was not. Elemental analysis results also suggested that some dodecylamine was adsorbed on the surface of MMT. 1H-13C HETCOR 2D NMR experiment clearly indicated that strong electrostatic interactions were present between the NH+3 group of dodecylamine and the fluorine-containing groups (CF3, OCF2, and SCF2) of Nafion resin. Such electrostatic interactions are probably the major contributors for the improved thermal stability of the resultant composite materials. PMID:17382953

  12. Characterization of Two Distinct Amorphous Forms of Valsartan by Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Skotnicki, Marcin; Apperley, David C; Aguilar, Juan A; Milanowski, Bartłomiej; Pyda, Marek; Hodgkinson, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Valsartan (VAL) is an antihypertensive drug marketed in an amorphous form. Amorphous materials can have different physicochemical properties depending on preparation method, thermal history, etc., but the nature of such materials is difficult to study by diffraction techniques. This study characterizes two different amorphous forms of valsartan (AR and AM) using solid-state NMR (SSNMR) as a primary investigation tool, supported by solution-state NMR, FT-IR, TMDSC, and dissolution tests. The two forms are found to be clearly distinct, with a significantly higher level of structural arrangement in the AR form, as observed in (13)C, (15)N, and (1)H SSNMR. (13)C and (15)N NMR indicates that the fully amorphous material (AM) contains an approximately equal ratio of cis-trans conformers about the amide bond, whereas the AR form exists mainly as one conformer, with minor conformational "defects". (1)H ultrafast MAS NMR shows significant differences in the hydrogen bonding involving the tetrazole and acid hydrogens between the two materials, while (15)N NMR shows that both forms exist as a 1,2,3,4-tetrazole tautomer. NMR relaxation times show subtle differences in local and bulk molecular mobility, which can be connected with the glass transition, the stability of the glassy material, and its response to aging. Counterintuitively the fully amorphous material is found to have a significantly lower dissolution rate than the apparently more ordered AR material. PMID:26602457

  13. Sensitivity and resolution enhancement of oriented solid-state NMR: application to membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, T; Mote, Kaustubh R; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2013-11-01

    Oriented solid-state NMR (O-ssNMR) spectroscopy is a major technique for the high-resolution analysis of the structure and topology of transmembrane proteins in native-like environments. Unlike magic angle spinning (MAS) techniques, O-ssNMR spectroscopy requires membrane protein preparations that are uniformly oriented (mechanically or magnetically) so that anisotropic NMR parameters, such as dipolar and chemical shift interactions, can be measured to determine structure and orientation of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers. Traditional sample preparations involving mechanically aligned lipids often result in short relaxation times which broaden the (15)N resonances and encumber the manipulation of nuclear spin coherences. The introduction of lipid bicelles as membrane mimicking systems has changed this scenario, and the more favorable relaxation properties of membrane protein (15)N and (13)C resonances make it possible to develop new, more elaborate pulse sequences for higher spectral resolution and sensitivity. Here, we describe our recent progress in the optimization of O-ssNMR pulse sequences. We explain the theory behind these experiments, demonstrate their application to small and medium size proteins, and describe the technical details for setting up these new experiments on the new generation of NMR spectrometers. PMID:24160761

  14. A LOW-E MAGIC ANGLE SPINNING PROBE FOR BIOLOGICAL SOLID STATE NMR AT 750 MHz

    PubMed Central

    McNeill, Seth A.; Gor’kov, Peter L.; Shetty, Kiran; Brey, William W.; Long, Joanna R.

    2009-01-01

    Crossed-coil NMR probes are a useful tool for reducing sample heating for biological solid state NMR. In a crossed-coil probe, the higher frequency 1H field, which is the primary source of sample heating in conventional probes, is produced by a separate low-inductance resonator. Because a smaller driving voltage is required, the electric field across the sample and the resultant heating is reduced. In this work we describe the development of a magic angle spinning (MAS) solid state NMR probe utilizing a dual resonator. This dual resonator approach, referred to as “Low-E,” was originally developed to reduce heating in samples of mechanically aligned membranes. The study of inherently dilute systems, such as proteins in lipid bilayers, via MAS techniques requires large sample volumes at high field to obtain spectra with adequate signal-to-noise ratio under physiologically relevant conditions. With the Low-E approach, we are able to obtain homogeneous and sufficiently strong radiofrequency fields for both 1H and 13C frequencies in a 4 mm probe with a 1H frequency of 750 MHz. The performance of the probe using windowless dipolar recoupling sequences is demonstrated on model compounds as well as membrane embedded peptides. PMID:19138870

  15. Solid-State NMR Studies of HIV-1 Capsid Protein Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yun; Ahn, Jinwoo; Concel, Jason; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Yang, Jun; Polenova, Tatyana E.

    2010-02-17

    In mature HIV-1 virions, the 26.6 kDa CA protein is assembled into a characteristic cone-shaped core (capsid) that encloses the RNA viral genome. The assembled capsid structure is best described by a fullerene cone model that is made up from a hexameric lattice containing a variable number of CA pentamers, thus allowing for closure of tubular or conical structures. In this paper, we present a solid-state NMR analysis of the wild-type HIV-1 CA protein, prepared as conical and spherical assemblies that are stable and are not affected by magic angle spinning of the samples at frequencies between 10 and 25 kHz. Multidimensional homo- and heteronuclear correlation spectra of CA assemblies of uniformly 13C,15Nlabeled CA exhibit narrow lines, indicative of the conformational homogeneity of the protein in these assemblies. For the conical assemblies, partial residue-specific resonance assignments were obtained. Analysis of the NMR spectra recorded for the conical and spherical assemblies indicates that the CA protein structure is not significantly different in the different morphologies. The present results demonstrate that the assemblies of CA protein are amenable to detailed structural analysis by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

  16. Computer-intensive simulation of solid-state NMR experiments using SIMPSON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tošner, Zdeněk; Andersen, Rasmus; Stevensson, Baltzar; Edén, Mattias; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Vosegaard, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Conducting large-scale solid-state NMR simulations requires fast computer software potentially in combination with efficient computational resources to complete within a reasonable time frame. Such simulations may involve large spin systems, multiple-parameter fitting of experimental spectra, or multiple-pulse experiment design using parameter scan, non-linear optimization, or optimal control procedures. To efficiently accommodate such simulations, we here present an improved version of the widely distributed open-source SIMPSON NMR simulation software package adapted to contemporary high performance hardware setups. The software is optimized for fast performance on standard stand-alone computers, multi-core processors, and large clusters of identical nodes. We describe the novel features for fast computation including internal matrix manipulations, propagator setups and acquisition strategies. For efficient calculation of powder averages, we implemented interpolation method of Alderman, Solum, and Grant, as well as recently introduced fast Wigner transform interpolation technique. The potential of the optimal control toolbox is greatly enhanced by higher precision gradients in combination with the efficient optimization algorithm known as limited memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno. In addition, advanced parallelization can be used in all types of calculations, providing significant time reductions. SIMPSON is thus reflecting current knowledge in the field of numerical simulations of solid-state NMR experiments. The efficiency and novel features are demonstrated on the representative simulations.

  17. Solid-State NMR/Dynamic Nuclear Polarization of Polypeptides in Planar Supported Lipid Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Salnikov, Evgeniy S; Sarrouj, Hiba; Reiter, Christian; Aisenbrey, Christopher; Purea, Armin; Aussenac, Fabien; Ouari, Olivier; Tordo, Paul; Fedotenko, Illya; Engelke, Frank; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2015-11-19

    Dynamic nuclear polarization has been developed to overcome the limitations of the inherently low signal intensity of NMR spectroscopy. This technique promises to be particularly useful for solid-state NMR spectroscopy where the signals are broadened over a larger frequency range and most investigations rely on recording low gamma nuclei. To extend the range of possible investigations, a triple-resonance flat-coil solid-state NMR probe is presented with microwave irradiation capacities allowing the investigation of static samples at temperatures of 100 K, including supported lipid bilayers. The probe performance allows for two-dimensional separated local field experiments with high-power Lee-Goldberg decoupling and cross-polarization under simultaneous irradiation from a gyrotron microwave generator. Efficient cooling of the sample turned out to be essential for best enhancements and line shape and necessitated the development of a dedicated cooling chamber. Furthermore, a new membrane-anchored biradical is presented, and the geometry of supported membranes was optimized not only for good membrane alignment, handling, stability, and filling factor of the coil but also for heat and microwave dissipation. Enhancement factors of 17-fold were obtained, and a two-dimensional PISEMA spectrum of a transmembrane helical peptide was obtained in less than 2 h. PMID:26487390

  18. 51V solid-state magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy of vanadium chloroperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Pooransingh-Margolis, Neela; Renirie, Rokus; Hasan, Zulfiqar; Wever, Ron; Vega, Alexander J; Polenova, Tatyana

    2006-04-19

    We report 51V solid-state NMR spectroscopy of the 67.5-kDa vanadium chloroperoxidase, at 14.1 T. We demonstrate that, despite the low concentration of vanadium sites in the protein (one per molecule, 1 mumol of vanadium spins in the entire sample), the spinning sideband manifold spanning the central and the satellite transitions is readily detectable. The quadrupolar and chemical shift anisotropy tensors have been determined by numerical simulations of the spinning sideband envelopes and the line shapes of the individual spinning sidebands corresponding to the central transition. The observed quadrupolar coupling constant C(Q) of 10.5 +/- 1.5 MHz and chemical shift anisotropy delta(sigma) of -520 +/- 13 ppm are sensitive reporters of the geometric and electronic structure of the vanadium center. Density functional theory calculations of the NMR spectroscopic observables for an extensive series of active site models indicate that the vanadate cofactor is most likely anionic with one axial hydroxo- group and an equatorial plane consisting of one hydroxo- and two oxo- groups. The work reported in this manuscript is the first example of 51V solid-state NMR spectroscopy applied to probe the vanadium center in a protein directly. This approach yields the detailed coordination environment of the metal unavailable from other experimental measurements and is expected to be generally applicable for studies of diamagnetic vanadium sites in metalloproteins. PMID:16608356

  19. Characterisation of coke from FCC catalysts by solid state {sup 13}C NMR and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, J.M.; McGhee, B.; Snape, C.E.

    1995-12-31

    Coke has been concentrated by demineralisation from deactivated FCC catalysts from both refinery operations with actual feeds and MAT tests using n-hexadecane to facilitate detailed characterisation by solid state {sup 13}C NMR and mass spectrometry. All the catalysts investigated contained about 1% w/w carbon. As for solid fuels, the use of a low-field spectrometer for solid state {sup 13}C NMR in conjunction with the single pulse excitation (SPE or Bloch decay) technique has enabled quantitative carbon skeletal parameters to be obtained for the cokes. Internal standard measurements demonstrated that most of the carbon was observed by SPE and, therefore, NMR-invisible graphitic layers are not thought to be major structural features of the cokes. Differences in feedstock composition were reflected in the structure of the refinery cokes with the aromatic nuclei from a residue feed (5% Conradson carbon) corresponding to 15-20 peri-condensed aromatic rings and being more highly condensed than those from a hydrotreated vacuum gas oil. Mass spectrometry (EI, CI and FIMS) has confirmed that the refinery cokes are highly condensed, but those obtained from n-hexadecane in the MAT tests displayed significant aliphatic character.

  20. Solid-State NMR Studies of HIV-1 Capsid Protein Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yun; Ahn, Jinwoo; Concel, Jason; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Yang, Jun; Polenova, Tatyana

    2010-01-01

    In mature HIV-1 virions, a 26.6 kDa CA protein is assembled into a characteristic cone shaped core (capsid) that encloses the RNA viral genome. The assembled capsid structure is best described by a fullerene cone model that is made up from a hexameric lattice containing a variable number of CA pentamers, thus allowing for closure of tubular or conical structures. In this report, we present a solid-state NMR analysis of the wild type HIV-1 CA protein, prepared as conical and spherical assemblies that are stable and are not affected by magic angle spinning of the samples at frequencies between 10 and 25 kHz. Multidimensional homo- and heteronuclear correlation spectra of CA assemblies of uniformly 13C,15N-labelled CA exhibit narrow lines, indicative of conformational homogeneity of the protein in these assemblies. For the conical assemblies, partial residue-specific resonance assignments were obtained. Analysis of the NMR spectra recorded for the conical and spherical assemblies indicates that the CA protein structure is not significantly different in the different morphologies. The present results demonstrate that the assemblies of CA protein are amenable to detailed structural analysis by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. PMID:20092249

  1. Toxin-induced conformational changes in a potassium channel revealed by solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Adam; Giller, Karin; Hornig, Sönke; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Pongs, Olaf; Becker, Stefan; Baldus, Marc

    2006-04-01

    The active site of potassium (K+) channels catalyses the transport of K+ ions across the plasma membrane-similar to the catalytic function of the active site of an enzyme-and is inhibited by toxins from scorpion venom. On the basis of the conserved structures of K+ pore regions and scorpion toxins, detailed structures for the K+ channel-scorpion toxin binding interface have been proposed. In these models and in previous solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies using detergent-solubilized membrane proteins, scorpion toxins were docked to the extracellular entrance of the K+ channel pore assuming rigid, preformed binding sites. Using high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy, here we show that high-affinity binding of the scorpion toxin kaliotoxin to a chimaeric K+ channel (KcsA-Kv1.3) is associated with significant structural rearrangements in both molecules. Our approach involves a combined analysis of chemical shifts and proton-proton distances and demonstrates that solid-state NMR is a sensitive method for analysing the structure of a membrane protein-inhibitor complex. We propose that structural flexibility of the K+ channel and the toxin represents an important determinant for the high specificity of toxin-K+ channel interactions.

  2. Enlightening the photoactive site of channelrhodopsin-2 by DNP-enhanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Becker-Baldus, Johanna; Bamann, Christian; Saxena, Krishna; Gustmann, Henrik; Brown, Lynda J.; Brown, Richard C. D.; Reiter, Christian; Bamberg, Ernst; Wachtveitl, Josef; Schwalbe, Harald; Glaubitz, Clemens

    2015-01-01

    Channelrhodopsin-2 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a light-gated ion channel. Over recent years, this ion channel has attracted considerable interest because of its unparalleled role in optogenetic applications. However, despite considerable efforts, an understanding of how molecular events during the photocycle, including the retinal trans-cis isomerization and the deprotonation/reprotonation of the Schiff base, are coupled to the channel-opening mechanism remains elusive. To elucidate this question, changes of conformation and configuration of several photocycle and conducting/nonconducting states need to be determined at atomic resolution. Here, we show that such data can be obtained by solid-state NMR enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization applied to 15N-labeled channelrhodopsin-2 carrying 14,15-13C2 retinal reconstituted into lipid bilayers. In its dark state, a pure all-trans retinal conformation with a stretched C14-C15 bond and a significant out-of-plane twist of the H-C14-C15-H dihedral angle could be observed. Using a combination of illumination, freezing, and thermal relaxation procedures, a number of intermediate states was generated and analyzed by DNP-enhanced solid-state NMR. Three distinct intermediates could be analyzed with high structural resolution: the early P1500 K-like state, the slowly decaying late intermediate P4480, and a third intermediate populated only under continuous illumination conditions. Our data provide novel insight into the photoactive site of channelrhodopsin-2 during the photocycle. They further show that DNP-enhanced solid-state NMR fills the gap for challenging membrane proteins between functional studies and X-ray–based structure analysis, which is required for resolving molecular mechanisms. PMID:26216996

  3. Solid-state (19)F-NMR of peptides in native membranes.

    PubMed

    Koch, Katja; Afonin, Sergii; Ieronimo, Marco; Berditsch, Marina; Ulrich, Anne S

    2012-01-01

    To understand how membrane-active peptides (MAPs) function in vivo, it is essential to obtain structural information about them in their membrane-bound state. Most biophysical approaches rely on the use of bilayers prepared from synthetic phospholipids, i.e. artificial model membranes. A particularly successful structural method is solid-state NMR, which makes use of macroscopically oriented lipid bilayers to study selectively isotope-labelled peptides. Native biomembranes, however, have a far more complex lipid composition and a significant non-lipidic content (protein and carbohydrate). Model membranes, therefore, are not really adequate to address questions concerning for example the selectivity of these membranolytic peptides against prokaryotic vs eukaryotic cells, their varying activities against different bacterial strains, or other related biological issues.Here, we discuss a solid-state (19)F-NMR approach that has been developed for structural studies of MAPs in lipid bilayers, and how this can be translated to measurements in native biomembranes. We review the essentials of the methodology and discuss key objectives in the practice of (19)F-labelling of peptides. Furthermore, the preparation of macroscopically oriented biomembranes on solid supports is discussed in the context of other membrane models. Two native biomembrane systems are presented as examples: human erythrocyte ghosts as representatives of eukaryotic cell membranes, and protoplasts from Micrococcus luteus as membranes from Gram-positive bacteria. Based on our latest experimental experience with the antimicrobial peptide gramicidin S, the benefits and some implicit drawbacks of using such supported native membranes in solid-state (19)F-NMR analysis are discussed. PMID:21598096

  4. Interference of homonuclear decoupling and exchange in the solid-state NMR of perfluorocyclohexane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Deborah E.; Hazendonk, Paul; Hodgkinson, Paul

    2003-04-01

    We observe an interference between RF irradiation used for homonuclear decoupling of 19F and conformational exchange in the 13C spectrum of perfluorocyclohexane. We show that these effects can be readily reproduced in simulation, and characterise their dependence on the various NMR and experimental parameters. Their application to observing exchange rates on the kHz timescale is evaluated with respect to T1 ρ measurements and the connections between the two approaches established. The implications for experiments that use homonuclear decoupling of 1H to resolve 1J CH couplings in the solid-state are also evaluated in detail.

  5. Structural modeling of Vpu from HIV-1 based on solid-state NMR observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, SeonJoo; Lim, GyuTae; Nam, Seungyoon; Lee, Jinhyuk

    2014-04-01

    Vpu is one of the accessory proteins of HIV-1, and is involved in viral particle release. Viral particle release is enhanced by two proposed functions of Vpu: (i) tetherin interaction and (ii) membrane polarization. Two Vpu functions in viral particle release are still controversial. Here, we investigated the proposed functions by extensive structural modeling of Vpu based on solid-state NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) observables. We found that Vpu can co-exist in two structural forms: left-handed and right-handed conformation. The co-existence of the two conformations provides a clue to reconcile the controversial issue of its two functions in virus particle release.

  6. On the predictions of the 11B solid state NMR parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czernek, Jiří; Brus, Jiří

    2016-07-01

    The set of boron containing compounds has been subject to the prediction of the 11B solid state NMR spectral parameters using DFT-GIPAW methods properly treating the solid phase effects. The quantification of the differences between measured and theoretical values has been presented, which is directly applicable in structural studies involving 11B nuclei. In particular, a simple scheme has been proposed, which is expected to provide for an estimate of the 11B chemical shift within ±2.0 ppm from the experimental value. The computer program, INFOR, enabling the visualization of concomitant Euler rotations related to the tensorial transformations has been presented.

  7. Solid-state NMR study of geopolymer prepared by sol-gel chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yi-Ling; Hanna, John V.; Lee, Yuan-Ling; Smith, Mark E.; Chan, Jerry C. C.

    2010-12-01

    Geopolymers are a new class of materials formed by the condensation of aluminosilicates and silicates obtained from natural minerals or industrial wastes. In this work, the sol-gel method is used to synthesize precursor materials for the preparation of geopolymers. The geopolymer samples prepared by our synthetic route have been characterized by a series of physical techniques, including Fourier-transform infrared, X-ray diffraction, and multinuclear solid-state NMR. The results are very similar to those obtained for the geopolymers prepared from natural kaolinite. We believe that our synthetic approach can offer a good opportunity for the medical applications of geopolymer.

  8. Observation of solid-state 103Rh NMR by cross-polarization.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Brian L; Houston, Jacqueline R; Feng, Jian; Casey, William H

    2006-03-29

    Using 103Rh[1H] cross-polarization (CP) methods, we have obtained solid-state 103Rh NMR spectra for diamagnetic Rh(III) compounds. The isotropic chemical shift and chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) are reported for a crystalline form of the dihydroxy-bridged Rh(III) dimer and for a salt of the oxo-centered acetate-bridged Rh(III) trimer, from analysis of conventional CP/MAS spectra. Comparison of the CP kinetics of the dimer with new crystal structure data suggests a strategy for predicting 103Rh CP/MAS properties in solids. PMID:16551090

  9. Solid state 77Se NMR investigations on arsenic-selenium glasses and crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureau, Bruno; Troles, Johann; LeFloch, Marie; Smektala, Frédéric; Silly, Gilles; Lucas, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    Some resolved solid state 77Se NMR spectra are presented in the As xSe 1- x glass family at ambient temperature. They exhibit three different kinds of Se environments. A comparison with the parent crystalline phases permits to assign the lines to Se- Se-Se, Se- Se-As and As- Se-As Se atom neighborhoods. The measurements of the relative intensities of the lines prove the validity of the intermediate range order structural model known as the "chains crossing model" which is based on AsSe 3 pyramids homogeneously distributed among the divalent Se atoms network. In particular, any scenario involving a selenium clustering process is refuted.

  10. Characterization of noninnocent metal complexes using solid-state NMR spectroscopy: o-dioxolene vanadium complexes.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Pabitra B; Goncharov-Zapata, Olga; Quinn, Laurence L; Hou, Guangjin; Hamaed, Hiyam; Schurko, Robert W; Polenova, Tatyana; Crans, Debbie C

    2011-10-17

    (51)V solid-state NMR (SSNMR) studies of a series of noninnocent vanadium(V) catechol complexes have been conducted to evaluate the possibility that (51)V NMR observables, quadrupolar and chemical shift anisotropies, and electronic structures of such compounds can be used to characterize these compounds. The vanadium(V) catechol complexes described in these studies have relatively small quadrupolar coupling constants, which cover a surprisingly small range from 3.4 to 4.2 MHz. On the other hand, isotropic (51)V NMR chemical shifts cover a wide range from -200 to 400 ppm in solution and from -219 to 530 ppm in the solid state. A linear correlation of (51)V NMR isotropic solution and solid-state chemical shifts of complexes containing noninnocent ligands is observed. These experimental results provide the information needed for the application of (51)V SSNMR spectroscopy in characterizing the electronic properties of a wide variety of vanadium-containing systems and, in particular, those containing noninnocent ligands and that have chemical shifts outside the populated range of -300 to -700 ppm. The studies presented in this report demonstrate that the small quadrupolar couplings covering a narrow range of values reflect the symmetric electronic charge distribution, which is also similar across these complexes. These quadrupolar interaction parameters alone are not sufficient to capture the rich electronic structure of these complexes. In contrast, the chemical shift anisotropy tensor elements accessible from (51)V SSNMR experiments are a highly sensitive probe of subtle differences in electronic distribution and orbital occupancy in these compounds. Quantum chemical (density functional theory) calculations of NMR parameters for [VO(hshed)(Cat)] yield a (51)V chemical shift anisotropy tensor in reasonable agreement with the experimental results, but surprisingly the calculated quadrupolar coupling constant is significantly greater than the experimental value. The

  11. Solid-state NMR of the Yersinia pestis outer membrane protein Ail in lipid bilayer nanodiscs sedimented by ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yi; Fujimoto, L Miya; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M

    2015-04-01

    Solid-state NMR studies of sedimented soluble proteins has been developed recently as an attractive approach for overcoming the size limitations of solution NMR spectroscopy while bypassing the need for sample crystallization or precipitation (Bertini et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108(26):10396-10399, 2011). Inspired by the potential benefits of this method, we have investigated the ability to sediment lipid bilayer nanodiscs reconstituted with a membrane protein. In this study, we show that nanodiscs containing the outer membrane protein Ail from Yersinia pestis can be sedimented for solid-state NMR structural studies, without the need for precipitation or lyophilization. Optimized preparations of Ail in phospholipid nanodiscs support both the structure and the fibronectin binding activity of the protein. The same sample can be used for solution NMR, solid-state NMR and activity assays, facilitating structure-activity correlation experiments across a wide range of timescales. PMID:25578899

  12. Solid-state NMR of the Yersinia pestis outer membrane protein Ail in lipid bilayer nanodiscs sedimented by ultracentrifugation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yi; Fujimoto, L. Miya; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M.

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state NMR studies of sedimented soluble proteins has been recently developed as an attractive approach for overcoming the size limitations of solution NMR spectroscopy and bypassing the need for sample crystallization or precipitation (Bertini et al. 2011). Inspired by the potential benefits of this method, we have investigated the ability to sediment lipid bilayer nanodiscs reconstituted with a membrane protein. In this study, we show that nanodiscs containing the outer membrane protein Ail from Yersinia pestis can be sedimented for solid-state NMR structural studies, without the need for precipitation or lyophilization. Optimized preparations of Ail in phospholipid nanodiscs support both the structure and the fibronectin binding activity of the protein. The same sample can be used for solution NMR, solid-state NMR and activity assays, facilitating structure-activity correlation experiments across a wide range of timescales. PMID:25578899

  13. Investigations of adsorption sites on oxide surfaces using solid-state NMR and TPD-IGC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golombeck, Rebecca A.

    The number and chemical identity of reactive sites on surfaces of glass affects the processing, reliability, and lifetime of a number of important commercial products. Surface site densities, distributions, and structural identities are closely tied to the formation and processing of the glass surface, and exert a direct influence on strength and coating performance. The surface of a glass sample may vary markedly from the composition and chemistry of the bulk glass. We are taking a physicochemical approach to understanding adsorption sites on pristine multicomponent glass fibers surfaces, directly addressing the effect of processing on surface reactivity. This project aimed to understand the energy distributions of surface adsorption sites, the chemical/structural identity of those sites, and the relationship of these glasses to glass composition, thermal history, and in future work, surface coatings. We have studied the bulk and surface structure as well as the surface reactivity of the glass fibers with solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, inverse gas chromatography (IGC), and computational chemistry methods. These methods, solid-state NMR and IGC, typically require high surface area materials; however, by using probe molecules for NMR experiments or packing a column at high density for IGC measurements, lower surface area materials, such as glass fibers, can be investigated. The glasses used within this study were chosen as representative specimens of fibers with potentially different reactive sites on their surfaces. The two glass compositions were centered around a nominal E-glass, which contains very little alkali cations and mainly alkaline earth cations, and wool glass, which contains an abundance of alkali cations. The concentration of boron was varied from 0 to 8 mole % in both fiber compositions. Fibers were drawn from each composition at a variety of temperatures and draw speeds to provide a range of glass samples with varying

  14. A Solid-State NMR Study of Selenium Substitution into Nanocrystalline Hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Kolmas, Joanna; Kuras, Marzena; Oledzka, Ewa; Sobczak, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    The substitution of selenium oxyanions in the hydroxyapatite structure was examined using multinuclear solid-state resonance spectroscopy (ssNMR). The study was supported by powder X-ray diffractometry (PXRD) and wavelength dispersion X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF). Samples of pure hydroxyapatite (HA300) and selenate (HA300-1.2SeO4) or selenite (HA300-1.2SeO3) substituted hydroxyapatites were synthesized using the standard wet method and heated at 300 °C to remove loosely bonded water. PXRD data showed that all samples are single-phase, nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite. The incorporation of selenite and selenate ions affected the lattice constants. In selenium-containing samples the concentration of Se was very similar and amounted to 9.55% and 9.64%, for HA300-1.2SeO4 and HA300-1.2SeO3, respectively. PXRD and ssNMR data showed that the selenite doping significantly decreases the crystallite size and crystallinity degree. 31P and 1H NMR experiments demonstrated the developed surface hydrated layer in all samples, especially in HA300-1.2SeO3. 1H NMR studies showed the dehydroxylation of HA during the selenium oxyanions substitution and the existence of hydrogen bonding in structural hydroxyl group channels. 1H→77Se cross polarization NMR experiments indicated that selenites and selenates are located in the crystal lattice and on the crystal surface. PMID:25997001

  15. Structural studies of proteins by paramagnetic solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jaroniec, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    Paramagnetism-based nuclear pseudocontact shifts and spin relaxation enhancements contain a wealth of information in solid-state NMR spectra about electron-nucleus distances on the ~20 Å length scale, far beyond that normally probed through measurements of nuclear dipolar couplings. Such data are especially vital in the context of structural studies of proteins and other biological molecules that suffer from a sparse number of experimentally-accessible atomic distances constraining their three-dimensional fold or intermolecular interactions. This perspective provides a brief overview of the recent developments and applications of paramagnetic magic-angle spinning NMR to biological systems, with primary focus on the investigations of metalloproteins and natively diamagnetic proteins modified with covalent paramagnetic tags. PMID:25797004

  16. A solid-state NMR investigation of the structure of mesoporous silica nanoparticle supported rhodium catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, Jennifer; Huang, Yulin; Natella, Michael; Cai, Yang; Lin, Victor S.-Y.; Pruski, Marek

    2009-01-04

    A detailed study of the chemical structure of mesoporous silica catalysts containing rhodium ligands and nanoparticles (RhP-MSN) was carried out by multi-dimensional solid-state NMR techniques. The degree of functionalization of the rhodium-phosphinosilyl complex to the surface of the RhP-MSN channels was determined by {sup 29}Si NMR experiments. The structural assignments of the rhodium-phosphinosilyl complex were unambiguously determined by employing the novel, indirectly detected heteronuclear correlation ({sup 13}C-{sup 1}H and {sup 31}P-{sup 1}H idHETCOR) techniques, which indicated that oxidation of the attached phosphinosilyl groups and detachment of Rh was enhanced upon syngas conversion.

  17. Synthesis and solid state NMR characterization of novel peptide/silica hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Werner, Mayke; Heil, Andreas; Rothermel, Niels; Breitzke, Hergen; Groszewicz, Pedro Braga; Thankamony, Aany Sofia; Gutmann, Torsten; Buntkowsky, Gerd

    2015-11-01

    The successful synthesis and solid state NMR characterization of silica-based organic-inorganic hybrid materials is presented. For this, collagen-like peptides are immobilized on carboxylate functionalized mesoporous silica (COOH/SiOx) materials. A pre-activation of the silica material with TSTU (O-(N-Succinimidyl)-N,N,N',N'-tetramethyluronium tetrafluoroborate) is performed to enable a covalent binding of the peptides to the linker. The success of the covalent immobilization is indicated by the decrease of the (13)C CP-MAS NMR signal of the TSTU moiety. A qualitative distinction between covalently bound and adsorbed peptide is feasible by (15)N CP-MAS Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP). The low-field shift of the (15)N signal of the peptide's N-terminus clearly identifies it as the binding site. The DNP enhancement allows the probing of natural abundance (15)N nuclei, rendering expensive labeling of peptides unnecessary. PMID:26411982

  18. 2H-DNP-enhanced 2H–13C solid-state NMR correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Maly, Thorsten; Andreas, Loren B.; Smith, Albert A.

    2015-01-01

    Perdeuteration of biological macromolecules for magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy can yield high-resolution 2H–13C correlation spectra and the method is therefore of great interest for the structural biology community. Here we demonstrate that the combination of sample deuteration and dynamic nuclear polarization yields resolved 2H–13C correlation spectra with a signal enhancement of ε ≥ 700 compared to a spectrum recorded with microwaves off and otherwise identical conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first time that 2H-DNP has been employed to enhance MAS-NMR spectra of a biologically relevant system. The DNP process is studied using several polarizing agents and the technique is applied to obtain 2H–13C correlation spectra of U-[2H, 13C] proline. PMID:20458422

  19. Structural studies of proteins by paramagnetic solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaroniec, Christopher P.

    2015-04-01

    Paramagnetism-based nuclear pseudocontact shifts and spin relaxation enhancements contain a wealth of information in solid-state NMR spectra about electron-nucleus distances on the ∼20 Å length scale, far beyond that normally probed through measurements of nuclear dipolar couplings. Such data are especially vital in the context of structural studies of proteins and other biological molecules that suffer from a sparse number of experimentally-accessible atomic distances constraining their three-dimensional fold or intermolecular interactions. This perspective provides a brief overview of the recent developments and applications of paramagnetic magic-angle spinning NMR to biological systems, with primary focus on the investigations of metalloproteins and natively diamagnetic proteins modified with covalent paramagnetic tags.

  20. Solid state 13C NMR characterisation study on fourth generation Ziegler-Natta catalysts.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Harri; Liitiä, Tiina; Virkkunen, Ville; Leinonen, Timo; Helaja, Tuulamari; Denifl, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In this study, solid state (13)C NMR spectroscopy was utilised to characterize and identify the metal-ester coordination in active fourth generation (phthalate) Ziegler-Natta catalysts. It is known that different donors affect the active species in ZN catalysts. However, there is still limited data available of detailed molecular information how the donors and the active species are interplaying. One of the main goals of this work was to get better insight into the interactions of donor and active species. Based on the anisotropy tensor values (δ(11), δ(22), δ(33)) from low magic-angle spinning (MAS) (13)C NMR spectra in combination with chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) calculations (δ(aniso) and η), both the coordinative metal (Mg/Ti) and the symmetry of this interaction between metal and the internal donor in the active catalyst (MgCl(2)/TiCl(4)/electron donor) system could be identified. PMID:22425229

  1. Structural studies of proteins by paramagnetic solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jaroniec, Christopher P

    2015-04-01

    Paramagnetism-based nuclear pseudocontact shifts and spin relaxation enhancements contain a wealth of information in solid-state NMR spectra about electron-nucleus distances on the ∼20 Å length scale, far beyond that normally probed through measurements of nuclear dipolar couplings. Such data are especially vital in the context of structural studies of proteins and other biological molecules that suffer from a sparse number of experimentally-accessible atomic distances constraining their three-dimensional fold or intermolecular interactions. This perspective provides a brief overview of the recent developments and applications of paramagnetic magic-angle spinning NMR to biological systems, with primary focus on the investigations of metalloproteins and natively diamagnetic proteins modified with covalent paramagnetic tags. PMID:25797004

  2. Precision and sensitivity optimization of quantitative measurements in solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziarelli, Fabio; Viel, Stéphane; Sanchez, Stéphanie; Cross, David; Caldarelli, Stefano

    2007-10-01

    This work presents a methodology for optimizing the precision, accuracy and sensitivity of quantitative solid state NMR measurements based on the external reference method. It is shown that the sample must be exclusively located within and completely span the coil region where the NMR response is directly proportional to the sample amount. We describe two methods to determine this "quantitative" coil volume, based on whether the probe is equipped or not with a gradient coil. In addition, to improve the sensitivity and the accuracy, an optimum rotor packing design is described, which allows the sample volume of the rotor to be matched to the quantitative coil volume. Experiments conducted on adamantane and NaCl, which are representative of a soft and hard material, respectively, show that one order of magnitude increase in experimental precision can be achieved with this methodology. Interestingly, the precision can be further improved by using the ERETIC™ method in order to compensate for most instrumental instabilities.

  3. Natural abundance high-resolution solid state 2 H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Abil E.; Harris, Kenneth D. M.; Apperley, David C.

    1994-08-01

    We report for the first time an approach for natural abundance solid state 2 H NMR spectroscopy involving magic angle sample spinning (MAS), high-power 1 H decoupling (HPPD) and 1 H- 2 H cross polarization (CP). Taking tetrakis(trimethylsilyl)silane (TTMSS), adamantane, 1-chloroadamantane, hexamethylbenzene (HMB), 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediol (DMPD) and 2-hydroxymethyl-2-methyl-1,3-propanediol (HMPD) as examples, it has been shown that the combination of HPPD and MAS can be applied readily to study rotator phase solids, allowing isotropic peaks arising from chemically inequivalent 2 H nuclei to be resolved. For natural abundance samples of TTMSS and chloroadamantane, it has been shown that 2 H CP/HPPD/MAS NMR experiments, involving polarization transfer from 1 H to 2 H, may provide considerable sensitivity enhancement in comparison with single pulse experiments.

  4. Natural abundance high-resolution solid state 2 H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Abil E.; Harris, Kenneth D. M.; Apperley, David C.

    1994-08-01

    We report for the first time an approach for natural abundance solid state 2H NMR spectroscopy involving magic angle sample spinning (MAS), high-power 1H decoupling (HPPD) and 1H- 2H cross polarization (CP). Taking tetrakis(trimethylsilyl)silane (TTMSS), adamantane, 1-chloroadamantane, hexamethylbenzene (HMB), 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediol (DMPD) and 2-hydroxymethyl-2-methyl-1,3-propanediol (HMPD) as examples, it has been shown that the combination of HPPD and MAS can be applied readily to study rotator phase solids, allowing isotropic peaks arising from chemically inequivalent 2H nuclei to be resolved. For natural abundance samples of TTMSS and chloroadamantane, it has been shown that 2H CP/HPPD/MAS NMR experiments, involving polarization transfer from 1H to 2H, may provide considerable sensitivity enhancement in comparison with single pulse experiments.

  5. A 1H/19F minicoil NMR probe for solid-state NMR: application to 5-fluoroindoles.

    PubMed

    Graether, Steffen P; DeVries, Jeffrey S; McDonald, Robert; Rakovszky, Melissa L; Sykes, Brian D

    2006-01-01

    We show that it is feasible to use a minicoil for solid-state 19F 1H NMR experiments that has short pulse widths, good RF homogeneity, and excellent signal-to-noise for small samples while using low power amplifiers typical to liquid-state NMR. The closely spaced resonant frequencies of 1H and 19F and the ubiquitous use of fluorine in modern plastics and electronic components present two major challenges in the design of a high-sensitivity, high-field 1H/19F probe. Through the selection of specific components, circuit design, and pulse sequence, we were able to build a probe that has low 19F background and excellent separation of 1H and 19F signals. We determine the principle components of the chemical shift anisotropy tensor of 5-fluoroindole-3-acetic acid (5FIAA) and 5-fluorotryptophan. We also solve the crystal structure of 5FIAA, determine the orientation dependence of the chemical shift of a single crystal of 5FIAA, and predict the 19F chemical shift based on the orientation of the fluorine in the crystal. The results show that this 1H/19F probe is suitable for solid-state NMR experiments with low amounts of biological molecules that have been labeled with 19F. PMID:16198131

  6. Quantifying the chemical composition of soil organic carbon with solid-state 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldock, J. A.; Sanderman, J.

    2011-12-01

    The vulnerability of soil organic carbon (SOC) to biological decomposition and mineralisation to CO2 is defined at least partially by its chemical composition. Highly aromatic charcoal-like SOC components are more stable to biological decomposition than other forms of carbon including cellulose. Solid-state 13C NMR has gained wide acceptance as a method capable of defining SOC chemical composition and mathematical fitting processes have been developed to estimate biochemical composition. Obtaining accurate estimates depends on an ability to quantitatively detect all carbon present in a sample. Often little attention has been paid to defining the proportion of organic carbon present in a soil that is observable in solid-state 13C NMR analyses of soil samples. However, if such data is to be used to inform carbon cycling studies, it is critical that quantitative assessments of SOC observability be undertaken. For example, it is now well established that a significant discrimination exists against the detection of the low proton content polyaromatic structures typical of charcoal using cross polarisation 13C NMR analyses. Such discrimination does not exist where direct polarisation analyses are completed. In this study, the chemical composition of SOC as defined by cross polarisation and direct polarisation13C NMR analyses will be compared for Australian soils collected from under a diverse range of agricultural managements and climatic conditions. Results indicate that where significant charcoal C contents exist, it is highly under-represented in the acquired CP spectra. For some soils, a discrimination against alkyl carbon was also evident. The ability to derive correction factors to compensate for such discriminations will be assessed and presented.

  7. Probing Quadrupolar Nuclei by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Recent Advances

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Christian; Pruski, Marek

    2011-06-08

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of quadrupolar nuclei has recently undergone remarkable development of capabilities for obtaining structural and dynamic information at the molecular level. This review summarizes the key achievements attained during the last couple of decades in solid-state NMR of both integer spin and half-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei. We provide a concise description of the first- and second-order quadrupolar interactions, and their effect on the static and magic angle spinning (MAS) spectra. Methods are explained for efficient excitation of single- and multiple-quantum coherences, and acquisition of spectra under low- and high-resolution conditions. Most of all, we present a coherent, comparative description of the high-resolution methods for half-integer quadrupolar nuclei, including double rotation (DOR), dynamic angle spinning (DAS), multiple-quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS), and satellite transition magic angle spinning (STMAS). Also highlighted are methods for processing and analysis of the spectra. Finally, we review methods for probing the heteronuclear and homonuclear correlations between the quadrupolar nuclei and their quadrupolar or spin-1/2 neighbors.

  8. β-Helical architecture of cytoskeletal bactofilin filaments revealed by solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Vasa, Suresh; Lin, Lin; Shi, Chaowei; Habenstein, Birgit; Riedel, Dietmar; Kühn, Juliane; Thanbichler, Martin; Lange, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Bactofilins are a widespread class of bacterial filament-forming proteins, which serve as cytoskeletal scaffolds in various cellular pathways. They are characterized by a conserved architecture, featuring a central conserved domain (DUF583) that is flanked by variable terminal regions. Here, we present a detailed investigation of bactofilin filaments from Caulobacter crescentus by high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy. De novo sequential resonance assignments were obtained for residues Ala39 to Phe137, spanning the conserved DUF583 domain. Analysis of the secondary chemical shifts shows that this core region adopts predominantly β-sheet secondary structure. Mutational studies of conserved hydrophobic residues located in the identified β-strand segments suggest that bactofilin folding and polymerization is mediated by an extensive and redundant network of hydrophobic interactions, consistent with the high intrinsic stability of bactofilin polymers. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a propensity of bactofilin to form filament bundles as well as sheet-like, 2D crystalline assemblies, which may represent the supramolecular arrangement of bactofilin in the native context. Based on the diffraction pattern of these 2D crystalline assemblies, scanning transmission electron microscopy measurements of the mass per length of BacA filaments, and the distribution of β-strand segments identified by solid-state NMR, we propose that the DUF583 domain adopts a β-helical architecture, in which 18 β-strand segments are arranged in six consecutive windings of a β-helix. PMID:25550503

  9. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy of GNNQQNY nanocrystals and amyloid fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Debelouchina, Galia T.; Bayro, Marvin J.; van der Wel, Patrick C. A.; Caporini, Marc A.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Rosay, Melanie; Maas, Werner E.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) utilizes the inherently larger polarization of electrons to enhance the sensitivity of conventional solid-state NMR experiments at low temperature. Recent advances in instrumentation development and sample preparation have transformed this field and have opened up new opportunities for its application to biological systems. Here, we present DNP-enhanced 13C–13C and 15N–13C correlation experiments on GNNQQNY nanocrystals and amyloid fibrils acquired at 9.4 T and 100 K and demonstrate that DNP can be used to obtain assignments and site-specific structural information very efficiently. We investigate the influence of temperature on the resolution, molecular conformation, structural integrity and dynamics in these two systems. In addition, we assess the low-temperature performance of two commonly used solid-state NMR experiments, proton-driven spin diffusion (PDSD) and transferred echo double resonance (TEDOR), and discuss their potential as tools for measurement of structurally relevant distances at low temperature in combination with DNP. PMID:20454733

  10. Structure and dynamics of cationic membrane peptides and proteins: Insights from solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Mei; Su, Yongchao

    2011-01-01

    Many membrane peptides and protein domains contain functionally important cationic Arg and Lys residues, whose insertion into the hydrophobic interior of the lipid bilayer encounters significant energy barriers. To understand how these cationic molecules overcome the free energy barrier to insert into the lipid membrane, we have used solid-state NMR spectroscopy to determine the membrane-bound topology of these peptides. A versatile array of solid-state NMR experiments now readily yields the conformation, dynamics, orientation, depth of insertion, and site-specific protein–lipid interactions of these molecules. We summarize key findings of several Arg-rich membrane peptides, including β-sheet antimicrobial peptides, unstructured cell-penetrating peptides, and the voltage-sensing helix of voltage-gated potassium channels. Our results indicate the central role of guanidinium-phosphate and guanidinium-water interactions in dictating the structural topology of these cationic molecules in the lipid membrane, which in turn account for the mechanisms of this functionally diverse class of membrane peptides. PMID:21344534

  11. Chemical structure and heterogeneity differences of two lignins from loblolly pine as investigated by advanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advanced solid-state NMR was employed to investigate differences in chemical structure and heterogeneity between milled wood lignin (MWL) and residual enzyme lignin (REL). Wiley and conventional milled woods were also studied. The advanced NMR techniques included 13C quantitative direct polarization...

  12. Combining solid-state NMR spectroscopy with first-principles calculations - a guide to NMR crystallography.

    PubMed

    Ashbrook, Sharon E; McKay, David

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in the application of first-principles calculations of NMR parameters to periodic systems have resulted in widespread interest in their use to support experimental measurement. Such calculations often play an important role in the emerging field of "NMR crystallography", where NMR spectroscopy is combined with techniques such as diffraction, to aid structure determination. Here, we discuss the current state-of-the-art for combining experiment and calculation in NMR spectroscopy, considering the basic theory behind the computational approaches and their practical application. We consider the issues associated with geometry optimisation and how the effects of temperature may be included in the calculation. The automated prediction of structural candidates and the treatment of disordered and dynamic solids are discussed. Finally, we consider the areas where further development is needed in this field and its potential future impact. PMID:27117884

  13. Solid-State Ru-99 NMR Spectroscopy: A Useful Tool for Characterizing Prototypal Diamagnetic Ruthenium Compounds Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ooms, Kristopher J.; Wasylishen, Roderick E.

    2004-09-08

    The feasibility of 99Ru NMR spectroscopy as a tool to characterize solid compounds is demonstrated. Results of the first solid-state 99Ru NMR investigation of diamagnetic compounds are presented for Ru(NH3)6Cl2, K4Ru(CN)6 xH2O (x) 0, 3, LaKRu(CN)6, and Ru3(CO)12. The sensitivity of the ruthenium magnetic shielding tensor to subtle changes in the local structure about the ruthenium nucleus is highlighted by comparing the 99Ru isotropic chemical shift of Ru(NH3)6Cl2 in aqueous solutions and in the solid state. The narrow isotropic 99Ru NMR peak observed for solid Ru(NH3)6Cl2 indicates that this compound is an ideal secondary reference sample for solid-state 99Ru NMR studies.

  14. Molecular structure of crude beeswax studied by solid-state 13C NMR

    PubMed Central

    Kameda, Tsunenori

    2004-01-01

    13C Solid-state NMR experiments were performed to investigate the structure of beeswax in the native state (crude beeswax) for the first time. From quantitative direct polarization 13C MAS NMR spectrum, it was found that the fraction of internal-chain methylene (int-(CH2)) component compared to other components of crude beeswax was over 95%. The line shape of the int-(CH2) carbon resonance region was comprehensively analyzed in terms of NMR chemical shift. The 13C broad peak component covering from 31 to 35ppm corresponds to int-(CH2) carbons with trans conformation in crystalline domains, whereas the sharp signal at 30.3 ppm corresponds to gauche conformation in the non-crystalline domain. From peak deconvolution of the aliphatic region, it was found that over 85% of the int-(CH2) has a crystal structure and several kinds of molecular packing for int-(CH2), at least three, exist in the crystalline domain. Abbreviation: NMR nuclear magnetic resonance int-(CH2) internal-chain methylene CP cross-polarization MAS magic angle spinning PMID:15861244

  15. Analysis of atomic scale chemical environments of boron in coal by 11B solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Takafumi; Kashiwakura, Shunsuke; Kanehashi, Koji; Hayashi, Shunichi; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

    2011-02-01

    Atomic scale chemical environments of boron in coal has been studied by solid state NMR spectroscopy including magic angle spinning (MAS), satellite transition magic angle spinning (STMAS), and cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS). The (11)B NMR spectra can be briefly classified according to the degree of coalification. On the (11)B NMR spectra of lignite, bituminous, and sub-bituminous coals (carbon content of 70-90mass%), three sites assigned to four-coordinate boron ([4])B with small quadrupolar coupling constants (≤0.9 MHz) are observed. Two of the ([4])B sites in downfield are considered organoboron complexes with aromatic ligands, while the other in the most upper field is considered inorganic tetragonal boron (BO(4)). By contrast, on the (11)B NMR spectra of blind coal (carbon content >90mass%), the ([4])B which substitutes tetrahedral silicon of Illite is observed as a representative species. It has been considered that the organoboron is decomposed and released from the parent phase with the advance of coal maturation, and then the released boron reacts with the inorganic phase to substitute an element of inorganic minerals. Otherwise boron contained originally in inorganic minerals might remain preserved even under the high temperature condition that is generated during coalification. PMID:21175186

  16. Membrane topology of a 14-mer model amphipathic peptide: a solid-state NMR spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Ouellet, Marise; Doucet, Jean-Daniel; Voyer, Normand; Auger, Michèle

    2007-06-01

    We have investigated the interaction between a synthetic amphipathic 14-mer peptide and model membranes by solid-state NMR. The 14-mer peptide is composed of leucines and phenylalanines modified by the addition of crown ethers and forms a helical amphipathic structure in solution and bound to lipid membranes. To shed light on its membrane topology, 31P, 2H, 15N solid-state NMR experiments have been performed on the 14-mer peptide in interaction with mechanically oriented bilayers of dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC), dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). The 31P, 2H, and 15N NMR results indicate that the 14-mer peptide remains at the surface of the DLPC, DMPC, and DPPC bilayers stacked between glass plates and perturbs the lipid orientation relative to the magnetic field direction. Its membrane topology is similar in DLPC and DMPC bilayers, whereas the peptide seems to be more deeply inserted in DPPC bilayers, as revealed by the greater orientational and motional disorder of the DPPC lipid headgroup and acyl chains. 15N{31P} rotational echo double resonance experiments have also been used to measure the intermolecular dipole-dipole interaction between the 14-mer peptide and the phospholipid headgroup of DMPC multilamellar vesicles, and the results indicate that the 14-mer peptide is in contact with the polar region of the DMPC lipids. On the basis of these studies, the mechanism of membrane perturbation of the 14-mer peptide is associated to the induction of a positive curvature strain induced by the peptide lying on the bilayer surface and seems to be independent of the bilayer hydrophobic thickness. PMID:17487978

  17. Solid-state NMR analysis of membrane proteins and protein aggregates by proton detected spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Berthold, Deborah A.; Comellas, Gemma; Sperling, Lindsay J.; Tang, Ming; Shah, Gautam J.; Brea, Elliott J.; Lemkau, Luisel R.

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state NMR has emerged as an important tool for structural biology and chemistry, capable of solving atomic-resolution structures for proteins in membrane-bound and aggregated states. Proton detection methods have been recently realized under fast magic-angle spinning conditions, providing large sensitivity enhancements for efficient examination of uniformly labeled proteins. The first and often most challenging step of protein structure determination by NMR is the site-specific resonance assignment. Here we demonstrate resonance assignments based on high-sensitivity proton-detected three-dimensional experiments for samples of different physical states, including a fully-protonated small protein (GB1, 6 kDa), a deuterated microcrystalline protein (DsbA, 21 kDa), a membrane protein (DsbB, 20 kDa) prepared in a lipid environment, and the extended core of a fibrillar protein (α-synuclein, 14 kDa). In our implementation of these experiments, including CONH, CO(CA)NH, CANH, CA(CO)NH, CBCANH, and CBCA(CO)NH, dipolar-based polarization transfer methods have been chosen for optimal efficiency for relatively high protonation levels (full protonation or 100 % amide proton), fast magic-angle spinning conditions (40 kHz) and moderate proton decoupling power levels. Each H–N pair correlates exclusively to either intra- or inter-residue carbons, but not both, to maximize spectral resolution. Experiment time can be reduced by at least a factor of 10 by using proton detection in comparison to carbon detection. These high-sensitivity experiments are especially important for membrane proteins, which often have rather low expression yield. Proton-detection based experiments are expected to play an important role in accelerating protein structure elucidation by solid-state NMR with the improved sensitivity and resolution. PMID:22986689

  18. Solid state NMR and LVSEM studies on the hardening of latex modified tile mortar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rottstegge, J.; Arnold, M.; Herschke, L.; Glasser, G.; Wilhelm, M.; Spiess, H.W. . E-mail: spiess@mpip-mainz.mpg.de; Hergeth, W.D.

    2005-12-15

    Construction mortars contain a broad variety of both inorganic and organic additives beside the cement powder. Here we present a study of tile mortar systems based on portland cement, quartz, methyl cellulose and different latex additives. As known, the methyl cellulose stabilizes the freshly prepared cement paste, the latex additive enhances final hydrophobicity, flexibility and adhesion. Measurements were performed by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and low voltage scanning electron microscopy (LVSEM) to probe the influence of the latex additives on the hydration, hardening and the final tile mortar properties. While solid state NMR enables monitoring of the bulk composition, scanning electron microscopy affords visualization of particles and textures with respect to their shape and the distribution of the different phases. Within the alkaline cement paste, the poly(vinyl acetate) (VAc)-based latex dispersions stabilized by poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) were found to be relatively stable against hydrolysis. The influence of the combined organic additives methyl cellulose, poly(vinyl alcohol) and latexes stabilized by poly(vinyl alcohol) on the final silicate structure of the cement hydration products is small. But even small amounts of additives result in an increased ratio of ettringite to monosulfate within the final hydrated tile mortar as monitored by {sup 27}Al NMR. The latex was found to be adsorbed to the inorganic surfaces, acting as glue to the inorganic components. For similar latex water interfaces built up by poly(vinyl alcohol), a variation in the latex polymer composition results in modified organic textures. In addition to the networks of the inorganic cement and of the latex, there is a weak network build up by thin polymer fibers, most probably originating from poly(vinyl alcohol). Besides the weak network, polymer fibers form well-ordered textures covering inorganic crystals such as portlandite.

  19. Solid state NMR study of SEI formation in lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dachun

    Recently, rechargeable lithium ion batteries, which offer high energy density and long cycle life, are in great demand as power sources for our mobile electronic society. The formation of a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) on the surface of electrodes in lithium ion batteries plays an essential role in their performance. This thesis presents solid state NMR and MAS NMR results on the SEI, which contribute to our understanding of SEI formation on both cathodes and anodes. This thesis is organized as following: Chapter 1 surveys the history of batteries and the challenges to further development of the lithium ion battery. Fundamental aspects and SEI formation mechanisms are also included in Chapter l. Chapter 2 deals with the principles and experimental techniques of solid state NMR. Chapter 3 presents studies of SEI formation on anode and cathode in lithium ion batteries using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and NMR. The results provide EIS and NMR evidence that cells containing electrolytes with high EC content display less irreversible capacity after high temperature storage. The irreversible capacity is attributed to SEI growth on electrode surfaces. NMR results on cathodes, on the other hand, imply that the presence of Ni in the cathode may reduce cell performance due to the oxidation of Ni 3+ to Ni4+. Our simulations show that a lower EC/DMC ratio is associated with a smaller SEI intensity for the cathode and higher intensity for the anode. Chapter 4 discusses the effect of temperature on SEI formation on anodes and cathodes. NMR measurements show that MCMB graphite based anodes exhibit high stability no chemical shift is evident over a wide temperature range. On cathodes, however, NMR does reveal changes in SEI intensity as a function of temperature. These changes are believed to be the result of decomposition of the SEI. Evidently, then, changes in the performance of the cell as a factor of temperature are, at least in part, due to changes in

  20. Cellular Solid-State NMR Investigation of a Membrane Protein Using Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Caporini, Marc A.; Im, Sang-Choul; Waskell, Lucy; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-01-01

    While an increasing number of structural biology studies successfully demonstrate the power of high-resolution structures and dynamics of membrane proteins in fully understanding their function, there is considerable interest in developing NMR approaches to obtain such information in a cellular setting. As long as the proteins inside the living cell tumble rapidly in the NMR timescale, recently developed in-cell solution NMR approaches can be applied towards the determination of 3D structural information. However, there are numerous challenges that need to be overcome to study membrane proteins inside a cell. Research in our laboratory is focused on developing a combination of solid-state NMR and biological approaches to overcome these challenges with a specific emphasis on obtaining high-resolution structural insights into electron transfer biological processes mediated by membrane-bound proteins like mammalian cytochrome b5, cytochrome P450 and cytochrome P450 reductase. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of using the signal-enhancement rendered by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy for in-cell studies on a membrane-anchored protein. Our experimental results obtained from 13C-labeled membrane-anchored cytochrome b5 in native Escherichia coli cells show a ~16-fold DNP signal enhancement (ε). Further, results obtained from a 2D 13C/13C chemical shift correlation MAS experiment demonstrates that it is highly possible to suppress the background signals from other cellular contents for high-resolution structural studies on membrane proteins. We believe that this study would pave new avenues for high-resolution 3D structural studies on a variety of membrane-associated proteins and their complexes in the cellular context to fully understand their functional roles in physiological processes. PMID:25017802

  1. Application of Solid-State NMR Relaxometry for Characterization and Formulation Optimization of Grinding-Induced Drug Nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Keisuke; Higashi, Kenjirou; Moribe, Kunikazu

    2016-03-01

    The formation mechanism of drug nanoparticles was investigated using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for the efficient discovery of an optimized nanoparticle formulation. The cogrinding of nifedipine (NIF) with polymers, including hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was performed to prepare the NIF nanoparticle formulations. Then, solid-state NMR relaxometry was used for the nanometer-order characterization of NIF in the polymer matrix. Solid-state NMR measurements revealed that the crystal size of NIF was reduced to several tens of nanometers with amorphization of NIF by cogrinding with HPMC and SDS for 100 min. Similarly, the size of the NIF crystal was reduced to less than 90 nm in the 40 min ground mixture of NIF/PVP/SDS. Furthermore, 100 min grinding of NIF/PVP/SDS induced amorphization of almost all the NIF crystals followed by nanosizing. The hydrogen bond between NIF and PVP led to the efficient amorphization of NIF in the NIF/PVP/SDS system compared with NIF/HPMC/SDS system. The efficient nanosizing of the NIF crystal in the solid state, revealed by the solid-state NMR relaxation time measurements, enabled the formation of large amounts of NIF nanoparticles in water followed by the polymer dissolution. In contrast, excess amorphization of the NIF crystals failed to efficiently prepare the NIF nanoparticles. The solid-state characterization of the crystalline NIF revealed good correlation with the NIF nanoparticles formation during aqueous dispersion. Furthermore, the solid-state NMR measurements including relaxometry successfully elucidated the nanometer-order dispersion state of NIF in polymer matrix, leading to the discovery of optimized conditions for the preparation of suitable drug nanoparticles. PMID:26855230

  2. Improved solid-state NMR quantifications of active principles in pharmaceutical formulations.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Stéphanie; Ziarelli, Fabio; Viel, Stéphane; Delaurent, Corinne; Caldarelli, Stefano

    2008-08-01

    The facility of implementation reached by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) spectroscopy makes this technique increasingly popular in pharmaceutical sciences, and more specifically for the dosage of active principles in pharmaceutical formulations, since about 80% of the formulations currently available on the market are present in the solid form. In this case, analysis by MAS NMR allows faster and simplified protocols, as a solubilization step is not required. However, the specificity of the ssNMR experiments should be explicitly taken into account when designing an accurate measurement procedure. In this work we show that, by using a combination of external concentration referencing and a properly designed sample preparation optimized for quantitative determinations, quantification of active principles in pharmaceutical formulations can be performed with both speed and precision. The method is illustrated by reinvestigating the dosage of Meprobamate, an anxiolytic agent typically prescribed in case of anxiety or muscular soreness, present in a commercial formulation (Equanil). Specifically, with respect to previously proposed analytical protocols, the procedure outlined here allows fast quantification with excellent precision. PMID:18479881

  3. Solid-state NMR applied to photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Anjali; de Groot, Huub J M

    2012-03-01

    This short review describes how solid-state NMR has provided a mechanistic and electronic picture of pigment-protein and pigment-pigment interactions in photosynthetic antenna complexes. NMR results on purple bacterial antenna complexes show how the packing of the protein and the pigments inside the light-harvesting oligomers induces mutual conformational stress. The protein scaffold produces deformation and electrostatic polarization of the BChl macrocycles and leads to a partial electronic charge transfer between the BChls and their coordinating histidines, which can tune the light-harvesting function. In chlorosome antennae assemblies, the NMR template structure reveals how the chromophores can direct their self-assembly into higher macrostructures which, in turn, tune the light-harvesting properties of the individual molecules by controlling their disorder, structural deformation, and electronic polarization without the need for a protein scaffold. These results pave the way for addressing the next challenge, which is to resolve the functional conformational dynamics of the lhc antennae of oxygenic species that allows them to switch between light-emitting and light-energy dissipating states. PMID:21842288

  4. Molecular ordering of mixed surfactants in mesoporous silicas: A solid-state NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Mao, Kanmi; Wang, Shy-Guey; Lin, Victor S.-Y.; Pruski, Marek

    2011-02-17

    The use of mixed surfactants in the synthesis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) is of importance in the context of adjusting pore structures, sizes and morphologies. In the present study, the arrangement of molecules in micelles produced from a mixture of two surfactants, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB) was detailed by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Proximities of methyl protons in the trimethylammonium headgroup of CTAB and protons in the pyridinium headgroup of CPB were observed under fast magic angle spinning (MAS) by {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H double quantum (DQ) MAS NMR and NOESY. This result suggested that CTAB and CPB co-exist in the pores without forming significant monocomponent domain structures. {sup 1}H-{sup 29}Si heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) NMR showed that protons in the headgroups of CTAB are in closer proximity to the silica surface than those in the CPB headgroups. The structural information obtained in this investigation leads to better understanding of the mechanisms of self-assembly and their role in determining the structure and morphology of mesoporous materials.

  5. A Major Intermediate Component in Drawn High-Density Polyethylene Identified by Solid-State NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mowery, Daniel; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2001-03-01

    In a commercial polyethylene (HDPE) highly drawn at 295 K, a distinct morphological component intermediate to the crystalline and the almost isotropic amorphous phases has been identified by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). This intermediate component accounts for nearly 25% of the material bulk, exceeding the amorphous fraction at the highest draw ratios. In the neat isotropic material examined for reference, the NMR-derived composition shows excellent agreement with other techniques. 13C NMR isotropic chemical shifts of the intermediate component, whose signal was selected using an “inverse T1,C filter”, prove chains of nearly all-trans conformations; the line width indicates significant disorder. Reduction of dipolar couplings and the chemical-shift anisotropy show fast rotations of 30 50 deg. amplitude around the chain axes. The degree of orientation of the chain axes is high. Spin diffusion experiments suggest that the intermediate component consists mostly of extended chain bundles closely associated with the amorphous phase (tie-molecule bundles ?).

  6. Methodology for solid state NMR off-resonance study of molecular dynamics in heteronuclear systems.

    PubMed

    Jurga, Kazimierz; Woźniak-Braszak, Aneta; Baranowski, Mikołaj

    2015-10-01

    Methodology for the study of dynamics in heteronuclear systems in the laboratory frame was described in the previous paper [1]. Now the methodology for the study of molecular dynamics in the solid state heteronuclear systems in the rotating frame is presented. The solid state NMR off-resonance experiments were carried out on a homemade pulse spectrometer operating at the frequency of 30.2 MHz for protons. This spectrometer includes a specially designed probe which contains two independently tuned and electrically isolated coils installed in the coaxial position on the dewar. A unique probe design allows working at three slightly differing frequencies off and on resonance for protons and at the frequency of 28.411 MHz for fluorine nuclei with complete absence of their electrical interference. The probe allows simultaneously creating rf magnetic fields at off-resonance frequencies within the range of 30.2-30.6 MHz and at the frequency of 28.411 MHz. Presented heteronuclear cross-relaxation off-resonance experiments in the rotating frame provide information about molecular dynamics. PMID:26272112

  7. Polymorphs of Theophylline Characterized by DNP Enhanced Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Pinon, Arthur C; Rossini, Aaron J; Widdifield, Cory M; Gajan, David; Emsley, Lyndon

    2015-11-01

    We show how dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy can be used to characterize polymorphs and solvates of organic solids. We applied DNP to three polymorphs and one hydrated form of the asthma drug molecule theophylline. For some forms of theophylline, sample grinding and impregnation with the radical-containing solution, which are necessary to prepare the samples for DNP, were found to induce polymorphic transitions or desolvation between some forms. We present protocols for sample preparation for solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) DNP experiments that avoid the polymorphic phase transitions in theophylline. These protocols include cryogrinding, grinding under inert atmosphere, and the appropriate choice of the impregnating liquid. By applying these procedures, we subsequently demonstrate that two-dimensional correlation experiments, such as (1)H-(13)C and (1)H-(15)N HETCOR or (13)C-(13)C INADEQUATE, can be obtained at natural isotopic abundance in reasonable times, thus enabling more advanced structural characterization of polymorphs. PMID:26393368

  8. Polymorphs of Theophylline Characterized by DNP Enhanced Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We show how dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy can be used to characterize polymorphs and solvates of organic solids. We applied DNP to three polymorphs and one hydrated form of the asthma drug molecule theophylline. For some forms of theophylline, sample grinding and impregnation with the radical-containing solution, which are necessary to prepare the samples for DNP, were found to induce polymorphic transitions or desolvation between some forms. We present protocols for sample preparation for solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) DNP experiments that avoid the polymorphic phase transitions in theophylline. These protocols include cryogrinding, grinding under inert atmosphere, and the appropriate choice of the impregnating liquid. By applying these procedures, we subsequently demonstrate that two-dimensional correlation experiments, such as 1H–13C and 1H–15N HETCOR or 13C–13C INADEQUATE, can be obtained at natural isotopic abundance in reasonable times, thus enabling more advanced structural characterization of polymorphs. PMID:26393368

  9. Dipolar recoupling in solid state NMR by phase alternating pulse sequences

    PubMed Central

    Lin, J.; Bayro, M.; Griffin, R. G.; Khaneja, N.

    2009-01-01

    We describe some new developments in the methodology of making heteronuclear and homonuclear recoupling experiments in solid state NMR insensitive to rf-inhomogeneity by phase alternating the irradiation on the spin system every rotor period. By incorporating delays of half rotor periods in the pulse sequences, these phase alternating experiments can be made γ encoded. The proposed methodology is conceptually different from the standard methods of making recoupling experiments robust by the use of ramps and adiabatic pulses in the recoupling periods. We show how the concept of phase alternation can be incorporated in the design of homonuclear recoupling experiments that are both insensitive to chemical-shift dispersion and rf-inhomogeneity. PMID:19157931

  10. Solid-state NMR evidence for inequivalent GvpA subunits in gas vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Sivertsen, Astrid C.; Bayro, Marvin J.; Belenky, Marina; Griffin, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Gas vesicles are organelles that provide buoyancy to the aquatic microorganisms that harbor them. The gas vesicle shell consists almost exclusively of the hydrophobic 70-residue protein GvpA, arranged in an ordered array. Solid-state NMR spectra of intact, collapsed gas vesicles from the cyanobacterium Anabaena flos-aquae show duplication of certain GvpA resonances, indicating that specific sites experience at least two different local environments. Interpretation of these results in terms of an asymmetric dimer repeat unit can reconcile otherwise conflicting features of the primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary structures of the gas vesicle protein. In particular, the asymmetric dimer can explain how the hydrogen bonds in the β–sheet portion of the molecule can be oriented optimally for strength while promoting stabilizing aromatic and electrostatic side-chain interactions among highly conserved residues and creating a large hydrophobic surface suitable for preventing water condensation inside the vesicle. PMID:19232353

  11. Proton decoupling and recoupling under double-nutation irradiation in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Kazuyuki Wakisaka, Asato; Takegoshi, K.

    2014-12-14

    The effect of {sup 1}H decoupling in magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR is studied under radiofrequency irradiation causing simultaneous nutations around a pair of orthogonal axes. Double-nutation with an arbitrary pair of nutation frequencies is implemented through modulation of the amplitude, phase, and frequency of the transmitting pulses. Similarity and difference of double-nutation decoupling and two-pulse phase-modulation decoupling schemes [A. E. Bennett, C. M. Rienstra, M. Auger, K. V. Lakshmi, and R. G. Griffin, J. Chem. Phys. 103, 6951–6958 (1995) and I. Scholz, P. Hodgkinson, B. H. Meier, and M. Ernst, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 114510 (2009)] are discussed. The structure of recoupling bands caused by interference of the {sup 1}H spin nutation with sample spinning is studied by both experiments and numerical simulations.

  12. Proton decoupling and recoupling under double-nutation irradiation in solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Kazuyuki; Wakisaka, Asato; Takegoshi, K.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of 1H decoupling in magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR is studied under radiofrequency irradiation causing simultaneous nutations around a pair of orthogonal axes. Double-nutation with an arbitrary pair of nutation frequencies is implemented through modulation of the amplitude, phase, and frequency of the transmitting pulses. Similarity and difference of double-nutation decoupling and two-pulse phase-modulation decoupling schemes [A. E. Bennett, C. M. Rienstra, M. Auger, K. V. Lakshmi, and R. G. Griffin, J. Chem. Phys. 103, 6951-6958 (1995) and I. Scholz, P. Hodgkinson, B. H. Meier, and M. Ernst, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 114510 (2009)] are discussed. The structure of recoupling bands caused by interference of the 1H spin nutation with sample spinning is studied by both experiments and numerical simulations.

  13. Efficient solid state NMR powder simulations using SMP and MPP parallel computation.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Jørgen Holm; Farnan, Ian

    2003-04-01

    Methods for parallel simulation of solid state NMR powder spectra are presented for both shared and distributed memory parallel supercomputers. For shared memory architectures the performance of simulation programs implementing the OpenMP application programming interface is evaluated. It is demonstrated that the design of correct and efficient shared memory parallel programs is difficult as the performance depends on data locality and cache memory effects. The distributed memory parallel programming model is examined for simulation programs using the MPI message passing interface. The results reveal that both shared and distributed memory parallel computation are very efficient with an almost perfect application speedup and may be applied to the most advanced powder simulations. PMID:12713968

  14. Solid-state NMR studies of proteins immobilized on inorganic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Wendy J.

    2015-09-01

    Solid state NMR is the primary tool for studying the quantitative, site-specific structure, orientation, and dynamics of biomineralization proteins under biologically relevant conditions. Two calcium phosphate proteins, statherin and leucine rich amelogenin protein (LRAP), have been studied in depth and have different features, challenging our ability to extract design principles. More recent studies of the significantly larger full-length amelogenin represent a challenging but necessary step to ultimately investigate the full diversity of biomineralization proteins. Interactions of amino acids and silaffin peptide with silica are also being studied, along with qualitative studies of proteins interacting with calcium carbonate. Dipolar recoupling techniques have formed the core of the quantitative studies, yet, the need for isolated spin pairs makes this approach costly and time intensive. The use of multi-dimensional techniques is advancing, methodology which, despite its challenges with these difficult-to-study proteins, will continue to drive future advancements in this area..

  15. Solid-state NMR studies of proteins immobilized on inorganic surfaces

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shaw, Wendy J.

    2014-10-29

    Solid state NMR is the primary tool for studying the quantitative, site-specific structure, orientation, and dynamics of biomineralization proteins under biologically relevant conditions. Two calcium phosphate proteins, statherin and leucine rich amelogenin protein (LRAP), have been studied in depth and have different features, challenging our ability to extract design principles. More recent studies of the significantly larger full-length amelogenin represent a challenging but necessary step to ultimately investigate the full diversity of biomineralization proteins. Interactions of amino acids and silaffin peptide with silica are also being studied, along with qualitative studies of proteins interacting with calcium carbonate. Dipolar recoupling techniquesmore » have formed the core of the quantitative studies, yet, the need for isolated spin pairs makes this approach costly and time intensive. The use of multi-dimensional techniques is advancing, methodology which, despite its challenges with these difficult-to-study proteins, will continue to drive future advancements in this area.« less

  16. Solid-state NMR studies of proteins immobilized on inorganic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Wendy J.

    2014-10-29

    Solid state NMR is the primary tool for studying the quantitative, site-specific structure, orientation, and dynamics of biomineralization proteins under biologically relevant conditions. Two calcium phosphate proteins, statherin and leucine rich amelogenin protein (LRAP), have been studied in depth and have different features, challenging our ability to extract design principles. More recent studies of the significantly larger full-length amelogenin represent a challenging but necessary step to ultimately investigate the full diversity of biomineralization proteins. Interactions of amino acids and silaffin peptide with silica are also being studied, along with qualitative studies of proteins interacting with calcium carbonate. Dipolar recoupling techniques have formed the core of the quantitative studies, yet, the need for isolated spin pairs makes this approach costly and time intensive. The use of multi-dimensional techniques is advancing, methodology which, despite its challenges with these difficult-to-study proteins, will continue to drive future advancements in this area.

  17. Solid-state NMR study of geopolymer prepared by sol-gel chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Yi-Ling; Hanna, John V.; Lee, Yuan-Ling; Smith, Mark E.; Chan, Jerry C.C.

    2010-12-15

    Geopolymers are a new class of materials formed by the condensation of aluminosilicates and silicates obtained from natural minerals or industrial wastes. In this work, the sol-gel method is used to synthesize precursor materials for the preparation of geopolymers. The geopolymer samples prepared by our synthetic route have been characterized by a series of physical techniques, including Fourier-transform infrared, X-ray diffraction, and multinuclear solid-state NMR. The results are very similar to those obtained for the geopolymers prepared from natural kaolinite. We believe that our synthetic approach can offer a good opportunity for the medical applications of geopolymer. -- Graphical abstract: Geopolymer prepared by the sol-gel route has the same spectroscopic properties as the sample prepared from the natural kaolinite. Display Omitted

  18. NMR Determination of Protein pKa Values in the Solid State

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Heather L. Frericks; Shah, Gautam J.; Sperling, Lindsay J.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2010-01-01

    Charged residues play an important role in defining key mechanistic features in many biomolecules. Determining the pKa values of large, membrane or fibrillar proteins can be challenging with traditional methods. In this study we show how solid-state NMR is used to monitor chemical shift changes during a pH titration for the small soluble β1 immunoglobulin binding domain of protein G. The chemical shifts of all the amino acids with charged side-chains throughout the uniformly-13C,15N-labeled protein were monitored over several samples varying in pH; pKa values were determined from these shifts for E27, D36, and E42, and the bounds for the pKa of other acidic side-chain resonances were determined. Additionally, this study shows how the calculated pKa values give insights into the crystal packing of the protein. PMID:20563223

  19. Solid-State NMR Characterization of Autofluorescent Fibrils Formed by the Elastin-Derived Peptide GVGVAGVG

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The characterization of the molecular structure and physical properties of self-assembling peptides is an important aspect of optimizing their utility as scaffolds for biomaterials and other applications. Here we report the formation of autofluorescent fibrils by an octapeptide (GVGVAGVG) derived via a single amino acid substitution in one of the hydrophobic repeat elements of human elastin. This is the shortest and most well-defined peptide so far reported to exhibit intrinsic fluorescence in the absence of a discrete fluorophore. Structural characterization by FTIR and solid-state NMR reveals a predominantly β-sheet conformation for the peptide in the fibrils, which are likely assembled in an amyloid-like cross-β structure. Investigation of dynamics and the effects of hydration on the peptide are consistent with a rigid, water excluded structure, which has implications for the likely mechanism of intrinsic fibril fluorescence. PMID:21456595

  20. Natural abundance 14N and 15N solid-state NMR of pharmaceuticals and their polymorphs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Veinberg, Stanislav L.; Johnston, Karen E.; Jaroszewicz, Michael J.; Kispal, Brianna M.; Mireault, Christopher R.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek; Schurko, Robert W.

    2016-06-08

    14N ultra-wideline (UW), 1H{15N} indirectly-detected HETCOR (idHETCOR) and 15N dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) experiments, in combination with plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations of 14N EFG tensors, were utilized to characterize a series of nitrogen-containing active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including HCl salts of scopolamine, alprenolol, isoprenaline, acebutolol, dibucaine, nicardipine, and ranitidine. Here, a case study applying these methods for the differentiation of polymorphs of bupivacaine HCl is also presented. All experiments were conducted upon samples with naturally-abundant nitrogen isotopes. For most of the APIs, it was possible to acquire frequency-stepped UW 14N SSNMR spectra of stationarymore » samples, which display powder patterns corresponding to pseudo-tetrahedral (i.e., RR'R"NH+ and RR'NH2+) or other (i.e., RNH2 and RNO2) nitrogen environments.« less

  1. A solid-state NMR method to determine domain sizes in multi-component polymer formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlagnitweit, Judith; Tang, Mingxue; Baias, Maria; Richardson, Sara; Schantz, Staffan; Emsley, Lyndon

    2015-12-01

    Polymer domain sizes are related to many of the physical properties of polymers. Here we present a solid-state NMR experiment that is capable of measuring domain sizes in multi-component mixtures. The method combines selective excitation of carbon magnetization to isolate a specific component with proton spin diffusion to report on domain size. We demonstrate the method in the context of controlled release formulations, which represents one of today's challenges in pharmaceutical science. We show that we can measure domain sizes of interest in the different components of industrial pharmaceutical formulations at natural isotopic abundance containing various (modified) cellulose derivatives, such as microcrystalline cellulose matrixes that are film-coated with a mixture of ethyl cellulose (EC) and hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC).

  2. Formation of Organic Molecular Nanocrystals under Rigid Confinement with Analysis by Solid State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Yang, X.; Ong, T. C.; Michaelis, V. K.; Heng, S.; Huang, J.; Griffin, R. G.; Myerson, A. S.

    2014-01-01

    Crystallization in rigid confinement is a promising method to obtain organic molecular nanocrystals. However, the crystallization behavior and the related characterization methods are not well studied. Here we present a systematic study of the nucleation of organic molecular nanocrystals in rigid pores. Four different compounds were studied, ibuprofen, fenofibrate, griseofulvin, and indomethacin, which range from simple to complex molecules. Solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) was employed to analyse the structure of these compounds inside pores which are difficult to characterize by other analytical methods. We successfully demonstrated the production of nano-crystalline ibuprofen, fenofibrate and griseofulvin in porous silica particles with ~ 40 nm pores. These nanocrystals showed significant enhancement in dissolution rates. These results help advance the fundamental understanding of nucleation under rigid confinement and may lead to potential applications in developing new formulations in the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:25258590

  3. Sensitivity enhancement using paramagnetic relaxation in MAS solid-state NMR of perdeuterated proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linser, Rasmus; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Diehl, Anne; Reif, Bernd

    2007-12-01

    Previously, Ishii et al., could show that chelated paramagnetic ions can be employed to significantly decrease the recycle delay of a MAS solid-state NMR experiment [N.P. Wickramasinghe, M. Kotecha, A. Samoson, J. Past, Y. Ishii, Sensitivity enhancement in C-13 solid-state NMR of protein microcrystals by use of paramagnetic metal ions for optimizing H-1 T-1 relaxation, J. Magn. Reson. 184 (2007) 350-356]. Application of the method is limited to very robust samples, for which sample stability is not compromised by RF induced heating. In addition, probe integrity might be perturbed in standard MAS PRE experiments due to the use of very short duty cycles. We show that these deleterious effects can be avoided if perdeuterated proteins are employed that have been re-crystallized from D 2O:H 2O = 9:1 containing buffer solutions. The experiments are demonstrated using the SH3 domain of chicken α-spectrin as a model system. The labeling scheme allows to record proton detected 1H, 15N correlation spectra with very high resolution in the absence of heteronuclear dipolar decoupling. Cu-edta as a doping reagent yields a reduction of the recycle delay by up to a factor of 15. In particular, we find that the 1H T1 for the bulk H N magnetization is reduced from 4.4 s to 0.3 s if the Cu-edta concentration is increased from 0 mM to 250 mM. Possible perturbations like chemical shift changes or line broadening due to the paramagnetic chelate complex are minimal. No degradation of our samples was observed in the course of the experiments.

  4. Polarization transfer solid-state NMR for studying surfactant phase behavior.

    PubMed

    Nowacka, Agnieszka; Mohr, Parveen Choudhary; Norrman, Jens; Martin, Rachel W; Topgaard, Daniel

    2010-11-16

    The phase behavior of amphiphiles, e.g., lipids and surfactants, at low water content is of great interest for many technical and pharmaceutical applications. When put in contact with air having a moderate relative humidity, amphiphiles often exhibit coexistence between solid and liquid crystalline phases, making their complete characterization difficult. This study describes a (13)C solid-state NMR technique for the investigation of amphiphile phase behavior in the water-poor regime. While the (13)C chemical shift is an indicator of molecular conformation, the (13)C signal intensities obtained with the CP and INEPT polarization transfer schemes yield information on molecular dynamics. A theoretical analysis incorporating the effect of molecular segment reorientation, with the correlation time τ(c) and order parameter S, shows that INEPT is most efficient for mobile segments with τ(c) < 0.01 μs and S < 0.05, while CP yields maximal signal for rigid segments with τ(c) > 10 μs and/or S > 0.5 under typical solid-state NMR experimental conditions. For liquid crystalline phases, where τ(c) < 0.01 μs and 0 < S < 0.3, the observed CP and INEPT intensities serve as a gauge of S. The combination of information on molecular conformation and dynamics permits facile phase diagram determination for systems with solid crystalline, solid amorphous, anisotropic liquid crystalline, and isotropic liquid (crystalline) phases as demonstrated by experiments on a series of reference systems with known phase structure. Three solid phases (anhydrous crystal, dihydrate, gel), two anisotropic liquid crystalline phases (normal hexagonal, lamellar), and two isotropic liquid crystalline phases (micellar cubic, bicontinuous cubic) are identified in the temperature-composition phase diagram of the cetyltrimethylammonium succinate/water system. Replacing the succinate counterion with DNA prevents the formation of phases other than hexagonal and leads to a general increase of τ(c). PMID

  5. Characterization of the Vibrio cholerae Extracellular Matrix: A Top-Down Solid-State NMR Approach

    PubMed Central

    Reichhardt, Courtney; Fong, Jiunn C.N.; Yildiz, Fitnat; Cegelski, Lynette

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are communities of bacterial cells surrounded by a self-secreted extracellular matrix. Biofilm formation by Vibrio cholerae, the human pathogen responsible for cholera, contributes to its environmental survival and infectivity. Important genetic and molecular requirements have been identified for V. cholerae biofilm formation, yet a compositional accounting of these parts in the intact biofilm or extracellular matrix has not been described. As insoluble and non-crystalline assemblies, determinations of biofilm composition pose a challenge to conventional biochemical and biophysical analysis. The V. cholerae extracellular matrix composition is particularly complex with several proteins, complex polysaccharides, and other biomolecules having been identified as matrix parts. We developed a new top-down solid-state NMR approach to spectroscopically assign and quantify the carbon pools of the intact V. cholerae extracellular matrix using 13C CPMAS and 13C{15N}, 15N{31P}, and 13C{31P}REDOR. General sugar, lipid, and amino acid pools were first profiled and then further annotated and quantified as specific carbon types, including carbonyls, amides, glycyl carbons, and anomerics. In addition, 15N profiling revealed a large amine pool relative to amide contributions, reflecting the prevalence of molecular modifications with free amine groups. Our top-down approach could be implemented immediately to examine the extracellular matrix from mutant strains that might alter polysaccharide production or lipid release beyond the cell surface; or to monitor changes that may accompany environmental variations and stressors such as altered nutrient composition, oxidative stress or antibiotics. More generally, our analysis has demonstrated that solid-state NMR is a valuable tool to characterize complex biofilm systems. PMID:24911407

  6. In situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy of electrochemical cells: batteries, supercapacitors, and fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Frédéric; Leskes, Michal; Grey, Clare P

    2013-09-17

    Electrochemical cells, in the form of batteries (or supercapacitors) and fuel cells, are efficient devices for energy storage and conversion. These devices show considerable promise for use in portable and static devices to power electronics and various modes of transport and to produce and store electricity both locally and on the grid. For example, high power and energy density lithium-ion batteries are being developed for use in hybrid electric vehicles where they improve the efficiency of fuel use and help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. To gain insight into the chemical reactions involving the multiple components (electrodes, electrolytes, interfaces) in the electrochemical cells and to determine how cells operate and how they fail, researchers ideally should employ techniques that allow real-time characterization of the behavior of the cells under operating conditions. This Account reviews the recent use of in situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a technique that probes local structure and dynamics, to study these devices. In situ NMR studies of lithium-ion batteries are performed on the entire battery, by using a coin cell design, a flat sealed plastic bag, or a cylindrical cell. The battery is placed inside the NMR coil, leads are connected to a potentiostat, and the NMR spectra are recorded as a function of state of charge. (7)Li is used for many of these experiments because of its high sensitivity, straightforward spectral interpretation, and relevance to these devices. For example, (7)Li spectroscopy was used to detect intermediates formed during electrochemical cycling such as LixC and LiySiz species in batteries with carbon and silicon anodes, respectively. It was also used to observe and quantify the formation and growth of metallic lithium microstructures, which can cause short circuits and battery failure. This approach can be utilized to identify conditions that promote dendrite formation and whether different electrolytes and additives can help

  7. Chemical reactivity of graphene oxide towards amines elucidated by solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacchi, Isabella A.; Spinato, Cinzia; Raya, Jésus; Bianco, Alberto; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia

    2016-07-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is an attractive nanomaterial for many applications. Controlling the functionalization of GO is essential for the design of graphene-based conjugates with novel properties. But, the chemical composition of GO has not been fully elucidated yet. Due to the high reactivity of the oxygenated moieties, mainly epoxy, hydroxyl and carboxyl groups, several derivatization reactions may occur concomitantly. The reactivity of GO with amine derivatives has been exploited in the literature to design graphene-based conjugates, mainly through amidation. However, in this study we undoubtedly demonstrate using magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR that the reaction between GO and amine functions occurs via ring opening of the epoxides, and not by amidation. We also prove that there is a negligible amount of carboxylic acid groups in two GO samples obtained by a different synthesis process, hence eliminating the possibility of amidation reactions with amine derivatives. This work brings additional insights into the chemical reactivity of GO, which is fundamental to control its functionalization, and highlights the major role of MAS NMR spectroscopy for a comprehensive characterization of derivatized GO.Graphene oxide (GO) is an attractive nanomaterial for many applications. Controlling the functionalization of GO is essential for the design of graphene-based conjugates with novel properties. But, the chemical composition of GO has not been fully elucidated yet. Due to the high reactivity of the oxygenated moieties, mainly epoxy, hydroxyl and carboxyl groups, several derivatization reactions may occur concomitantly. The reactivity of GO with amine derivatives has been exploited in the literature to design graphene-based conjugates, mainly through amidation. However, in this study we undoubtedly demonstrate using magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR that the reaction between GO and amine functions occurs via ring opening of the epoxides, and not by

  8. Solid-state NMR identification and quantification of newly formed aluminosilicate phases in weathered kaolinite systems.

    PubMed

    Crosson, Garry S; Choi, Sunkyung; Chorover, Jon; Amistadi, Mary Kay; O'Day, Peggy A; Mueller, Karl T

    2006-01-19

    The weathering of a specimen kaolinite clay was studied over the course of 369 d via solid-state 29Si magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and high-field 27Al MAS NMR. The chosen baseline solution conditions (0.05 mol kg-1 of Al, 2 mol kg-1 of Na+, 1 mol kg-1 of NO3-, 1 mol kg-1 of OH-, and pH approximately 13.8) approximate those of solutions leaking from waste tanks at the Hanford Site in Richland, WA. Nonradioactive Cs and Sr cations were added to this synthetic tank waste leachate (STWL) solution at concentrations of 10(-3), 10(-4), and 10(-5) molal (m) to represent their radionuclide counterparts. The transformations of silicon- and aluminum-containing solid phase species were monitored quantitatively by using NMR spectroscopy, with the resulting spectra directly reporting the influence of the initial Cs and Sr on formation and transformation of the neo-formed solids. At the lowest concentration of Cs and Sr employed (10(-5) m in each cation) peaks consistent with the formation of zeolite-like minerals were detected via 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR as early as 33 d. At concentrations of 10(-3) m in each cation, new silicon species are not detected until 93 d, although neophases containing four-coordinate aluminum were detectable at earlier reaction times via 27Al MAS NMR. At the highest magnetic field strengths employed in this NMR study, deconvolutions of resonances detected in the tetrahedral region of the 27Al MAS spectra yielded multiple components, indicating the existence of at least four new aluminum-containing phases. Two of these phases are identified as sodalite and cancrinite through comparison with diffuse-reflectance infrared (DRIFT) spectra and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) results, while a third phase may correlate with a previously detected aluminum-rich chabazite phase. All measurable solid reaction products have been quantified via their 27Al MAS resonances acquired at high magnetic field strengths (17.6 T), and

  9. Solid-State NMR Identification and Quantification of Newly Formed Aluminosilicate Phases in Weathered Kaolinite Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Crosson, Garry S.; Choi, Sunkyung; Chorover, Jon; Amistadi, Mary K.; O'Day, Peggy A.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2006-01-19

    The weathering of a specimen kaolinite clay was studied over the course of 369 d via solid-state 29Si magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and high-field 27Al MAS NMR. The chosen baseline solution conditions (0.05 mol kg-1 of Al, 2 mol kg-1 of Na+, 1 mol kg-1 of NO3 -, 1 mol kg-1 of OH-, and pH ~13.8) approximate those of solutions leaking from waste tanks at the Hanford Site in Richland, WA. Nonradioactive Cs and Sr cations were added to this synthetic tank waste leachate (STWL) solution at concentrations of 10-3, 10-4, and 10-5 molal (m) to represent their radionuclide counterparts. The transformations of silicon- and aluminum-containing solid phase species were monitored quantitatively by using NMR spectroscopy, with the resulting spectra directly reporting the influence of the initial Cs and Sr on formation and transformation of the neo-formed solids. At the lowest concentration of Cs and Sr employed (10-5 m in each cation) peaks consistent with the formation of zeolite-like minerals were detected via 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR as early as 33 d. At concentrations of 10-3 m in each cation, new silicon species are not detected until 93 d, although neophases containing four-coordinate aluminum were detectable at earlier reaction times via 27Al MAS NMR. At the highest magnetic field strengths employed in this NMR study, deconvolutions of resonances detected in the tetrahedral region of the 27Al MAS spectra yielded multiple components, indicating the existence of at least four new aluminum-containing phases. Two of these phases are identified as sodalite and cancrinite through comparison with diffuse-reflectance infrared (DRIFT) spectra and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) results, while a third phase may correlate with a previously detected aluminum-rich chabazite phase. All measurable solid reaction products have been quantified via their 27Al MAS resonances acquired at high magnetic field strengths (17.6 T), and the quantitative

  10. SIMPSON: A General Simulation Program for Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Mads; Rasmussen, Jimmy T.; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2000-12-01

    A computer program for fast and accurate numerical simulation of solid-state NMR experiments is described. The program is designed to emulate a NMR spectrometer by letting the user specify high-level NMR concepts such as spin systems, nuclear spin interactions, RF irradiation, free precession, phase cycling, coherence-order filtering, and implicit/explicit acquisition. These elements are implemented using the Tcl scripting language to ensure a minimum of programming overhead and direct interpretation without the need for compilation, while maintaining the flexibility of a full-featured programming language. Basicly, there are no intrinsic limitations to the number of spins, types of interactions, sample conditions (static or spinning, powders, uniaxially oriented molecules, single crystals, or solutions), and the complexity or number of spectral dimensions for the pulse sequence. The applicability ranges from simple 1D experiments to advanced multiple-pulse and multiple-dimensional experiments, series of simulations, parameter scans, complex data manipulation/visualization, and iterative fitting of simulated to experimental spectra. A major effort has been devoted to optimizing the computation speed using state-of-the-art algorithms for the time-consuming parts of the calculations implemented in the core of the program using the C programming language. Modification and maintenance of the program are facilitated by releasing the program as open source software (General Public License) currently at http://nmr.imsb.au.dk. The general features of the program are demonstrated by numerical simulations of various aspects for REDOR, rotational resonance, DRAMA, DRAWS, HORROR, C7, TEDOR, POST-C7, CW decoupling, TPPM, F-SLG, SLF, SEMA-CP, PISEMA, RFDR, QCPMG-MAS, and MQ-MAS experiments.

  11. SIMPSON: A general simulation program for solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Mads; Rasmussen, Jimmy T.; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2011-12-01

    A computer program for fast and accurate numerical simulation of solid-state NMR experiments is described. The program is designed to emulate a NMR spectrometer by letting the user specify high-level NMR concepts such as spin systems, nuclear spin interactions, RF irradiation, free precession, phase cycling, coherence-order filtering, and implicit/explicit acquisition. These elements are implemented using the Tel scripting language to ensure a minimum of programming overhead and direct interpretation without the need for compilation, while maintaining the flexibility of a full-featured programming language. Basicly, there are no intrinsic limitations to the number of spins, types of interactions, sample conditions (static or spinning, powders, uniaxially oriented molecules, single crystals, or solutions), and the complexity or number of spectral dimensions for the pulse sequence. The applicability ranges from simple ID experiments to advanced multiple-pulse and multiple-dimensional experiments, series of simulations, parameter scans, complex data manipulation/visualization, and iterative fitting of simulated to experimental spectra. A major effort has been devoted to optimizing the computation speed using state-of-the-art algorithms for the time-consuming parts of the calculations implemented in the core of the program using the C programming language. Modification and maintenance of the program are facilitated by releasing the program as open source software (General Public License) currently at http://nmr.imsb.au.dk. The general features of the program are demonstrated by numerical simulations of various aspects for REDOR, rotational resonance, DRAMA, DRAWS, HORROR, C7, TEDOR, POST-C7, CW decoupling, TPPM, F-SLG, SLF, SEMA-CP, PISEMA, RFDR, QCPMG-MAS, and MQ-MAS experiments.

  12. Quantitative solid-state 13C NMR with signal enhancement by multiple cross polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Robert L.; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2014-02-01

    A simple new method is presented that yields quantitative solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) 13C NMR spectra of organic materials with good signal-to-noise ratios. It achieves long (>10 ms) cross polarization (CP) from 1H without significant magnetization losses due to relaxation and with a moderate duty cycle of the radio-frequency irradiation, by multiple 1-ms CP periods alternating with 1H spin-lattice relaxation periods that repolarize the protons. The new method incorporates previous techniques that yield less distorted CP/MAS spectra, such as a linear variation (“ramp”) of the radio-frequency field strength, and it overcomes their main limitation, which is T1ρ relaxation of the spin-locked 1H magnetization. The ramp of the radio-frequency field strength and the asymptotic limit of cross polarization makes the spectral intensity quite insensitive to the exact field strengths used. The new multiCP pulse sequence is a “drop-in” replacement for previous CP methods and produces no additional data-processing burden. Compared to the only reliable quantitative 13C NMR method for unlabeled solids previously available, namely direct-polarization NMR, the measuring time is reduced by more than a factor of 50, enabling higher-throughput quantitative NMR studies. The new multiCP technique is validated with 14-kHz MAS on amino-acid derivatives, plant matter, a highly aromatic humic acid, and carbon materials made by low-temperature pyrolysis.

  13. Solid state NMR method development and studies of biological and biomimetic nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yanyan

    2011-02-07

    This thesis describes application and development of advanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for complex materials, in particular organic-inorganic nanocomposites and thermoelectric tellurides. The apatite-collagen interface, essential for understanding the biomineralization process in bone and engineering the interface for controlled bio-mimetic synthesis and optimized mechanical properties, is buried within the nanocomposite of bone. We used multinuclear solid-state NMR to study the composition and structure of the interface. Citrate has been identified as the main organic molecule strongly bound to the apatite surface with a density of 1/(2 nm){sup 2}, covering 1/6 of the total surface area in bovine bone. Citrate provides more carboxylate groups, one of the key functional groups found to affect apatite nucleation and growth, than all the non-collagenous proteins all together in bone; thus we propose that citrate stabilizes apatite crystals at a very small thickness of {approx}3 nm (4 unit cells) to increase bone fracture tolerance. The hypothesis has been confirmed in vitro by adding citrate in the bio-mimetic synthesis of polymerhydroxyapatite nanocomposites. The results have shown that the size of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals decreases as increasing citrate concentration. With citrate concentrations comparable to that in body fluids, similar-sized nanocrystals as in bone have been produced. Besides the dimensions of the apatite crystals, the composition of bone also affects its biofunctional and macroscopic mechanical properties; therefore, our team also extended its effort to enhance the inorganic portion in our bio-mimetic synthesis from originally 15 wt% to current 50 wt% compared to 65 wt% in bovine bone, by using Lysine-Leucine hydroxyapatite nucleating diblock co-polypeptide, which forms a gel at very low concentration. In this thesis, various advanced solid state NMR techniques have been employed to characterize nanocomposites

  14. Solid-state NMR approaches to internal dynamics of proteins: from picoseconds to microseconds and seconds.

    PubMed

    Krushelnitsky, Alexey; Reichert, Detlef; Saalwächter, Kay

    2013-09-17

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has matured to the point that it is possible to determine the structure of proteins in immobilized states, such as within microcrystals or embedded in membranes. Currently, researchers continue to develop and apply NMR techniques that can deliver site-resolved dynamic information toward the goal of understanding protein function at the atomic scale. As a widely-used, natural approach, researchers have mostly measured longitudinal (T1) relaxation times, which, like in solution-state NMR, are sensitive to picosecond and nanosecond motions, and motionally averaged dipolar couplings, which provide an integral amplitude of all motions with a correlation time of up to a few microseconds. While overall Brownian tumbling in solution mostly precludes access to slower internal dynamics, dedicated solid-state NMR approaches are now emerging as powerful new options. In this Account, we give an overview of the classes of solid-state NMR experiments that have expanded the accessible range correlation times from microseconds to many milliseconds. The measurement of relaxation times in the rotating frame, T1ρ, now allows researchers to access the microsecond range. Using our recent theoretical work, researchers can now quantitatively analyze this data to distinguish relaxation due to chemical-shift anisotropy (CSA) from that due to dipole-dipole couplings. Off-resonance irradiation allows researchers to extend the frequency range of such experiments. We have built multidimensional analogues of T2-type or line shape experiments using variants of the dipolar-chemical shift correlation (DIPSHIFT) experiment that are particularly suited to extract intermediate time scale motions in the millisecond range. In addition, we have continuously improved variants of exchange experiments, mostly relying on the recoupling of anisotropic interactions to address ultraslow motions in the ms to s ranges. The NH dipolar coupling offers a

  15. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement solid-state NMR studies of heterogeneous catalytic reaction over HY zeolite using natural abundance reactant.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Li, Shenhui; Su, Yongchao; Li, Bojie; Deng, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement solid-state NMR (PRE ssNMR) technique was used to investigate catalytic reaction over zeolite HY. After introducing paramagnetic Cu(II) ions into the zeolite, the enhancement of longitudinal relaxation rates of nearby nuclei, i.e.(29)Si of the framework and (13)C of the absorbents, was measured. It was demonstrated that the PRE ssNMR technique facilitated the fast acquisition of NMR signals to monitor the heterogeneous catalytic reaction (such as acetone to hydrocarbon) using natural abundance reactants. PMID:25616847

  16. Suppressing background signals in solid state NMR via the Electronic Mixing-Mediated Annihilation (EMMA) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollica, Giulia; Ziarelli, Fabio; Tintaru, Aura; Thureau, Pierre; Viel, Stéphane

    2012-05-01

    A simple procedure to effectively suppress background signals arising from various probe head components (e.g. stator, rotors, inserts) in solid state NMR is presented. Similarly to the ERETIC™ method, which uses an electronic signal as an internal standard for quantification, the proposed scheme is based on an electronically generated time-dependent signal that is injected into the receiver coil of the NMR probe head during signal acquisition. More specifically, the line shape, width and frequency of this electronic signal are determined by deconvoluting the background signal in the frequency domain. This deconvoluted signal is then converted into a time-dependent function through inverse Fourier Transform, which is used to generate the shaped pulse that is fed into the receiver coil during the acquisition of the Free Induction Decay. The power of the shaped pulse is adjusted to match the intensity of the background signal, and its phase is shifted by 180° with respect to the receiver reference phase. This so-called Electronic Mixing-Mediated Annihilation (EMMA) methodology is demonstrated here with a 13C Single Pulse Magic Angle Spinning spectrum of an isotopically enriched 13C histidine solid sample recorded under quantitative conditions.

  17. Recoupling in solid state NMR using γ prepared states and phase matching

    PubMed Central

    Lin, James; Griffin, R.G.; Khaneja, Navin

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes two-dimensional solid state NMR experiments that use powdered dephased anti-phase coherence (γ preparation) to encode chemical shifts in the indirect dimension. Both components of this chemical shift encoded gamma-prepared states can be refocused into inphase coherence by a recoupling element. This helps to achieve sensitivity enhancement in 2D NMR experiments by quadrature detection. The powder dependence of the gamma-prepared states allows for manipulating them by suitable insertion of delays in the recoupling periods. This helps to design experiments that suppress diagonal peaks in 2D spectra, leading to improved resolution. We describe some new phase modulated heteronuclear and homonuclear recoupling pulse sequences that simplify the implementation of the described experiments based on γ prepared states. Recoupling in the heteronuclear spin system is achieved by matching the difference in the amplitude of the sine/cosine modulated phase on the two rf-channels to the spinning frequency while maintaining the same power on the two rf-channels. PMID:21889380

  18. Chemical reactivity of graphene oxide towards amines elucidated by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Vacchi, Isabella A; Spinato, Cinzia; Raya, Jésus; Bianco, Alberto; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia

    2016-07-14

    Graphene oxide (GO) is an attractive nanomaterial for many applications. Controlling the functionalization of GO is essential for the design of graphene-based conjugates with novel properties. But, the chemical composition of GO has not been fully elucidated yet. Due to the high reactivity of the oxygenated moieties, mainly epoxy, hydroxyl and carboxyl groups, several derivatization reactions may occur concomitantly. The reactivity of GO with amine derivatives has been exploited in the literature to design graphene-based conjugates, mainly through amidation. However, in this study we undoubtedly demonstrate using magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR that the reaction between GO and amine functions occurs via ring opening of the epoxides, and not by amidation. We also prove that there is a negligible amount of carboxylic acid groups in two GO samples obtained by a different synthesis process, hence eliminating the possibility of amidation reactions with amine derivatives. This work brings additional insights into the chemical reactivity of GO, which is fundamental to control its functionalization, and highlights the major role of MAS NMR spectroscopy for a comprehensive characterization of derivatized GO. PMID:27411370

  19. Comparison among Magnus/Floquet/Fer expansion schemes in solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takegoshi, K.; Miyazawa, Norihiro; Sharma, Kshama; Madhu, P. K.

    2015-04-01

    We here revisit expansion schemes used in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for the calculation of effective Hamiltonians and propagators, namely, Magnus, Floquet, and Fer expansions. While all the expansion schemes are powerful methods there are subtle differences among them. To understand the differences, we performed explicit calculation for heteronuclear dipolar decoupling, cross-polarization, and rotary-resonance experiments in solid-state NMR. As the propagator from the Fer expansion takes the form of a product of sub-propagators, it enables us to appreciate effects of time-evolution under Hamiltonians with different orders separately. While 0th-order average Hamiltonian is the same for the three expansion schemes with the three cases examined, there is a case that the 2nd-order term for the Magnus/Floquet expansion is different from that obtained with the Fer expansion. The difference arises due to the separation of the 0th-order term in the Fer expansion. The separation enables us to appreciate time-evolution under the 0th-order average Hamiltonian, however, for that purpose, we use a so-called left-running Fer expansion. Comparison between the left-running Fer expansion and the Magnus expansion indicates that the sign of the odd orders in Magnus may better be reversed if one would like to consider its effect in order.

  20. Comparison among Magnus/Floquet/Fer expansion schemes in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Takegoshi, K. Miyazawa, Norihiro; Sharma, Kshama; Madhu, P. K.

    2015-04-07

    We here revisit expansion schemes used in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for the calculation of effective Hamiltonians and propagators, namely, Magnus, Floquet, and Fer expansions. While all the expansion schemes are powerful methods there are subtle differences among them. To understand the differences, we performed explicit calculation for heteronuclear dipolar decoupling, cross-polarization, and rotary-resonance experiments in solid-state NMR. As the propagator from the Fer expansion takes the form of a product of sub-propagators, it enables us to appreciate effects of time-evolution under Hamiltonians with different orders separately. While 0th-order average Hamiltonian is the same for the three expansion schemes with the three cases examined, there is a case that the 2nd-order term for the Magnus/Floquet expansion is different from that obtained with the Fer expansion. The difference arises due to the separation of the 0th-order term in the Fer expansion. The separation enables us to appreciate time-evolution under the 0th-order average Hamiltonian, however, for that purpose, we use a so-called left-running Fer expansion. Comparison between the left-running Fer expansion and the Magnus expansion indicates that the sign of the odd orders in Magnus may better be reversed if one would like to consider its effect in order.

  1. Atomic-resolution structure of cytoskeletal bactofilin by solid-state NMR*

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chaowei; Fricke, Pascal; Lin, Lin; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Wegstroth, Melanie; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Thanbichler, Martin; Lange, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Bactofilins are a recently discovered class of cytoskeletal proteins of which no atomic-resolution structure has been reported thus far. The bacterial cytoskeleton plays an essential role in a wide range of processes, including morphogenesis, cell division, and motility. Among the cytoskeletal proteins, the bactofilins are bacteria-specific and do not have a eukaryotic counterpart. The bactofilin BacA of the species Caulobacter crescentus is not amenable to study by x-ray crystallography or solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) because of its inherent noncrystallinity and insolubility. We present the atomic structure of BacA calculated from solid-state NMR–derived distance restraints. We show that the core domain of BacA forms a right-handed β helix with six windings and a triangular hydrophobic core. The BacA structure was determined to 1.0 Å precision (heavy-atom root mean square deviation) on the basis of unambiguous restraints derived from four-dimensional (4D) HN-HN and 2D C-C NMR spectra. PMID:26665178

  2. Heat management strategies for solid-state NMR of functional proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, Daniel J.; Harris, Michael J.; Thompson, Lynmarie K.

    2012-09-01

    Modern solid-state NMR methods can acquire high-resolution protein spectra for structure determination. However, these methods use rapid sample spinning and intense decoupling fields that can heat and denature the protein being studied. Here we present a strategy to avoid destroying valuable samples. We advocate first creating a sacrificial sample, which contains unlabeled protein (or no protein) in buffer conditions similar to the intended sample. This sample is then doped with the chemical shift thermometer Sm2Sn2O7. We introduce a pulse scheme called TCUP (for Temperature Calibration Under Pulseload) that can characterize the heating of this sacrificial sample rapidly, under a variety of experimental conditions, and with high temporal resolution. Sample heating is discussed with respect to different instrumental variables such as spinning speed, decoupling strength and duration, and cooling gas flow rate. The effects of different sample preparation variables are also discussed, including ionic strength, the inclusion of cryoprotectants, and the physical state of the sample (i.e. liquid, solid, or slurry). Lastly, we discuss probe detuning as a measure of sample thawing that does not require retuning the probe or using chemical shift thermometer compounds. Use of detuning tests and chemical shift thermometers with representative sample conditions makes it possible to maximize the efficiency of the NMR experiment while retaining a functional sample.

  3. Solid-State 17O NMR Study of Benzoic Acid Adsorption On Metal Oxide Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hagaman, Edward {Ed} W; Chen, Banghao; Jiao, Jian; Parsons, Williams

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state 17O NMR spectra of 17O-labeled benzoic and anisic acids are reported and benzoic acid is used to probe the surface of metal oxides. Complexes formed when benzoic acid is dry-mixed with mesoporous silica, and nonporous titania and alumina are characterized. Chemical reactions with silica are not observed. The nature of benzoic acid on silica is a function of the water content of the oxide. The acid disperses in the pores of the silica if the silica is in equilibrium with ambient laboratory humidity. The acid displays high mobility as evidenced by a liquid-like, Lorentzian resonance. Excess benzoic acid remains as the crystalline hydrogen-bonded dimer. Benzoic acid reacts with titania and alumina surfaces in equilibrium with laboratory air to form the corresponding titanium and aluminum benzoates. In both materials the oxygen of the 17O-labeled acid is bound to the metal, showing the reaction proceeds by bond formation between oxygen deficient metal sites and the oxygen of the carboxylic acid. 27Al MAS NMR confirms this mechanism for the reaction on alumina. Dry mixing of benzoic acid with alumina rapidly quenches pentacoordinate aluminum sites, excellent evidence that these sites are confined to the surface of the alumina particles.

  4. Sensitivity-enhanced solid-state NMR detection of expansin's target in plant cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tuo; Park, Yong Bum; Caporini, Marc A.; Rosay, Melanie; Zhong, Linghao; Cosgrove, Daniel J.; Hong, Mei

    2013-08-29

    Structure determination of protein binding to noncrystalline macromolecular assemblies such as plant cell walls (CWs) poses a significant structural biology challenge. CWs are loosened during growth by expansin proteins, which weaken the noncovalent network formed by cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins, but the CW target of expansins has remained elusive because of the minute amount of the protein required for activity and the complex nature of the CW. Using solid-state NMR spectroscopy, combined with sensitivity-enhancing dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and differential isotopic labeling of expansin and polysaccharides, we have now determined the functional binding target of expansin in the Arabidopsis thaliana CW. By transferring the electron polarization of a biradical dopant to the nuclei, DNP allowed selective detection of 13C spin diffusion from trace concentrations of 13C, 15N-labeled expansin in the CW to nearby polysaccharides. From the spin diffusion data of wild-type and mutant expansins, we conclude that to loosen the CW, expansin binds highly specific cellulose domains enriched in xyloglucan, whereas more abundant binding to pectins is unrelated to activity. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate short 13C-13C distances of 4–6 Å between a hydrophobic surface of the cellulose microfibril and an aromatic motif on the expansin surface, consistent with the observed NMR signals. DNP-enhanced 2D 13C correlation spectra further reveal that the expansin-bound cellulose has altered conformation and is enriched in xyloglucan, thus providing unique insight into the mechanism of CW loosening. DNP-enhanced NMR provides a powerful, generalizable approach for investigating protein binding to complex macromolecular targets.

  5. On the acidity of saponite materials: a combined HRTEM, FTIR, and solid-state NMR study.

    PubMed

    Bisio, C; Gatti, G; Boccaleri, E; Marchese, L; Bertinetti, L; Coluccia, S

    2008-03-18

    Acid clays were prepared by exchanging a synthetic saponite in HCl solutions of different concentration (0.01 and 1M, respectively). A combined experimental approach (XRD, HRTEM, N2 physisorption, solid-state MAS NMR, and TGA) was used to investigate on the structural, morphological, and textural features of the samples treated under mild and strong acid conditions. FTIR spectroscopy of adsorbed probe molecules with different basicity (e.g., CO and NH3) was used to monitor the surface acid properties and acid site distribution. XRD and SS-MAS NMR indicated that the activation under mild acid conditions does not alter the clay structure, while a deep modification of the saponite framework occurred after ion exchange in 1 M HCl solution. The presence of porous amorphous silica phase after treatment under strong acid conditions was confirmed by TEM inspection augmented by SS-MAS NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. N2 and Ar physisorption measurements suggested that cavitation phenomena occurred in saponite structure. N2 physisorption confirmed that the porosity and surface area of the samples are strongly modified upon strong acid treatment. FTIR spectroscopy of adsorbed NH3 pointed out that the H-exchange in mild conditions increased the number of surface Brønsted acid sites. Conversely, these sites are significantly depleted after treatment under strong acid conditions. The use of CO as a FTIR probe molecule, which is applied for the first time to study synthetic acid clays, allowed to monitor distribution and strength of Brønsted acid sites, whose acidity is similar to that of strong acid zeolites. The Al-OH sites with medium acidity are also found in acid-activated saponites. The distribution of strong and medium acid sites is strictly dependent on the acid conditions adopted. PMID:18251562

  6. Application of solid state NMR for the study of surface bound species and fossil fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Althaus, Stacey

    Recent advances in solid state NMR have been utilized to study a variety of systems. These advancements have allowed for the acquisition of sequences previously only available for solution state detection. The protocol for the measurement of coals and other carbonaceous materials was updated to incorporate the recent advancements in fast magic angle spinning (MAS) and high magnetic fields. Argonne Premium Coals were used to test the sensitivity and resolution of the experiments preformed at high field and fast MAS. The higher field spectra were shown to be slightly less sensitive than the traditional lower field spectra, however, the new high field fast MAS spectra had better resolution. This increased resolution allowed for the separation of a variety of different functional groups, thereby allowing the composition of the coal to be determined. The use of 1 H detection allowed for 2D spectra of coals for the first time. These spectra could be filtered to examine either through-space or through-bond correlations. Indirect detection via 1 H was also pivotal in the detection of natural abundance 15 N spectra. Through-space and through-bond 2D spectra of natural abundance bulk species are shown with a sensitivity increase of 15 fold over traditional detection. This sensitivity enhancement allowed for the detection of natural abundance 15 N surface bound species in 2D, something that could not be acquired via traditional methods. The increased efficiency of the through-space magnetization transfer, Cross polarization, at fast MAS compared to the slower MAS rates is shown. The through-bond magnetization transfer via INEPT was examined and the effect of J-coupling is confirmed. Solid State NMR can be utilized to help improve catalytic interactions. Solid state NMR was used to examine the aldol condensation between p-nitrobenzaldehyde and acetone. The formation of a stable intermediate with p-nitrobenzaldehyde was found on the primary functionalized amine mesoporous

  7. Structural Changes Associated with Transthyretin Misfolding and Amyloid Formation Revealed by Solution and Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kwang Hun; Dasari, Anvesh K R; Hung, Ivan; Gan, Zhehong; Kelly, Jeffery W; Wemmer, David E

    2016-04-01

    Elucidation of structural changes involved in protein misfolding and amyloid formation is crucial for unraveling the molecular basis of amyloid formation. Here we report structural analyses of the amyloidogenic intermediate and amyloid aggregates of transthyretin using solution and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Our solution NMR results show that one of the two main β-sheet structures (CBEF β-sheet) is maintained in the aggregation-competent intermediate, while the other DAGH β-sheet is more flexible on millisecond time scales. Magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR revealed that AB loop regions interacting with strand A in the DAGH β-sheet undergo conformational changes, leading to the destabilized DAGH β-sheet. PMID:26998642

  8. Protein dynamics in the solid state from 2H NMR line shape analysis: a consistent perspective.

    PubMed

    Meirovitch, Eva; Liang, Zhichun; Freed, Jack H

    2015-02-19

    Deuterium line shape analysis of CD3 groups has emerged as a particularly useful tool for studying microsecond-millisecond protein motions in the solid state. The models devised so far consist of several independently conceived simple jump-type motions. They are comprised of physical quantities encoded in their simplest form; improvements are only possible by adding yet another simple motion, thereby changing the model. The various treatments developed are case-specific; hence comparison among the different systems is not possible. Here we develop a new methodology for (2)H NMR line shape analysis free of these limitations. It is based on the microscopic-order-macroscopic-disorder (MOMD) approach. In MOMD motions are described by diffusion tensors, spatial restrictions by potentials/ordering tensors, and geometric features by relative tensor orientations. Jump-type motions are recovered in the limit of large orientational potentials. Model improvement is accomplished by monitoring the magnitude, symmetry, and orientation of the various tensors. The generality of MOMD makes possible comparison among different scenarios. CD3 line shapes from the Chicken Villin Headpiece Subdomain and the Streptomyces Subtilisin Inhibitor are used as experimental examples. All of these spectra are reproduced by using rhombic local potentials constrained for simplicity to be given by the L = 2 spherical harmonics, and by axial diffusion tensors. Potential strength and rhombicity are found to be ca. 2-3 k(B)T. The diffusion tensor is tilted at 120° from the C-CD3 axis. The perpendicular (parallel) correlation times for local motion are 0.1-1.0 ms (3.3-30 μs). Activation energies in the 1.1-8.0 kcal/mol range are estimated. Future prospects include extension to the (2)H relaxation limit, application to the (15)N and (13)C NMR nuclei, and accounting for collective motions and anisotropic media. PMID:25594631

  9. Calcination products of gibbsite studied by X-ray diffraction, XPS and solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Malki, A.; Mekhalif, Z.; Detriche, S.; Fonder, G.; Boumaza, A.; Djelloul, A.

    2014-07-01

    The changes caused by heat treatment of gibbsite powder at 300–1473 K were studied using the X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoemission (XPS) spectra and {sup 27}Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 27}Al MAS NMR). XRD analysis indicates that the transformation sequence involves the formation of κ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as an intermediate phase between χ- and α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The crystallite size of χ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is as small as 10 nm. XPS analysis indicates that the ratio of aluminium atoms to oxygen atoms in χ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and κ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} increases, whereas the expected ratio is observed in α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The percentage of AlO{sub 4} units in the transition aluminas follows the same behaviour as the ratio of Al/O. - Graphical abstract: The percentage of AlO{sub 4} units in transition aluminas follows the same behaviour as the ratio of Al/O. - Highlights: • Calcination products of gibbsite studied by XRD, XPS and solid-state NMR. • The crystallite size of χ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is as small as 10 nm. • The Al/O atomic ratio determined by XPS is larger than 2/3 in χ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and κ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • The percentage of AlO{sub 4} in the aluminas follows the same behaviour as the Al/O atomic ratio.

  10. Protein Dynamics in the Solid-State from 2H NMR Lineshape Analysis: a Consistent Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Meirovitch, Eva; Liang, Zhichun; Freed, Jack H.

    2015-01-01

    Deuterium lineshape analysis of CD3 groups has emerged as a particularly useful tool for studying μs - ms protein motions in the solid-state. The models devised so far consist of several independently conceived simple jump-type motions. They are comprised of physical quantities encoded in their simplest form; improvements are only possible by adding yet another simple motion, thereby changing the model. The various treatments developed are case-specific; hence comparison amongst the different systems is not possible. Here we develop a new methodology for 2H NMR lineshape analysis free of these limitations. It is based on the microscopic-order-macroscopic-disorder (MOMD) approach. In MOMD motions are described by diffusion tensors, spatial restrictions by potentials/ordering tensors, and geometric features by relative tensor orientations. Jump-type motions are recovered in the limit of large orientational potentials. Model-improvement is accomplished by monitoring the magnitude, symmetry and orientation of the various tensors. The generality of MOMD makes possible comparison amongst different scenarios. CD3 lineshapes from the Chicken Villin Headpiece Subdomain, and the Streptomyces Subtilisin Inhibitor, are used as experimental examples. All of these spectra are reproduced by using rhombic local potentials constrained for simplicity to be given by the L = 2 spherical harmonics, and axial diffusion tensors. Potential strength and rhombicity are found to be ca. 2 − 3 [kBT]. The diffusion tensor is tilted at 120° from the C−CD3 axis. The perpendicular (parallel) correlation times for local motion are 0.1 − 1.0 ms (3.3 − 30 μs). Activation energies in the 1.1 − 8.0 kcal/mol range are estimated. Future prospects include extension to the 2H relaxation limit, application to the 15N and 13C NMR nuclei, and accounting for collective motions and anisotropic media. PMID:25594631

  11. High-Resolution NMR of Quadrupolar Nuclei in the Solid State

    SciTech Connect

    Gann, Sheryl Lee

    1995-11-30

    This dissertation describes recent developments in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), for the most part involving the use of dynamic-angle spinning (DAS) NMR to study quadrupolar nuclei. Chapter 1 introduces some of the basic concepts and theory that will be referred to in later chapters, such as the density operator, product operators, rotations, coherence transfer pathways, phase cycling, and the various nuclear spin interactions, including the quadrupolar interaction. Chapter 2 describes the theory behind motional averaging experiments, including DAS, which is a technique where a sample is spun sequentially about two axis oriented at different angles with respect to the external magnetic field such that the chemical shift and quadrupolar anisotropy are averaged to zero. Work done on various rubidium-87 salts is presented as a demonstration of DAS. Chapter 3 explains how to remove sidebands from DAS and magic-angle spinning (MAS) experiments, which result from the time-dependence of the Hamiltonian under sample spinning conditions, using rotor-synchronized {pi}-pulses. Data from these experiments, known as DAH-180 and MAH-180, respectively, are presented for both rubidium and lead salts. In addition, the applicability of this technique to double rotation (DOR) experiments is discussed. Chapter 4 concerns the addition of cross-polarization to DAS (CPDAS). The theory behind spin locking and cross polarizing quadrupolar nuclei is explained and a method of avoiding the resulting problems by performing cross polarization at 0{sup o} (parallel) with respect to the magnetic field is presented. Experimental results are shown for a sodium-23 compound, sodium pyruvate, and for oxygen-17 labeled L-akmine. In Chapter 5, a method for broadening the Hartmann-Hahn matching condition under MAS, called variable effective field cross-polarization (VEFCI?), is presented, along with experimental work on adamantane and polycarbonate.

  12. Testing the limits of sensitivity in a solid-state structural investigation by combined X-ray powder diffraction, solid-state NMR, and molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    Filip, Xenia; Borodi, Gheorghe; Filip, Claudiu

    2011-10-28

    A solid state structural investigation of ethoxzolamide is performed on microcrystalline powder by using a multi-technique approach that combines X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) data analysis based on direct space methods with information from (13)C((15)N) solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SS-NMR) and molecular modeling. Quantum chemical computations of the crystal were employed for geometry optimization and chemical shift calculations based on the Gauge Including Projector Augmented-Wave (GIPAW) method, whereas a systematic search in the conformational space was performed on the isolated molecule using a molecular mechanics (MM) approach. The applied methodology proved useful for: (i) removing ambiguities in the XRPD crystal structure determination process and further refining the derived structure solutions, and (ii) getting important insights into the relationship between the complex network of non-covalent interactions and the induced supra-molecular architectures/crystal packing patterns. It was found that ethoxzolamide provides an ideal case study for testing the accuracy with which this methodology allows to distinguish between various structural features emerging from the analysis of the powder diffraction data. PMID:21931906

  13. Solid state field-cycling NMR relaxometry: instrumental improvements and new applications.

    PubMed

    Fujara, Franz; Kruk, Danuta; Privalov, Alexei F

    2014-10-01

    The paper reviews recent progress in field cycling (FC) NMR instrumentation and its application to solid state physics. Special emphasis is put on our own work during the last 15years on instrumentation, theory and applications. As far as instrumentation is concerned we report on our development of two types of electronical FC relaxometers, a mechanical FC relaxometer and a combination of FC and one-dimensional microimaging. Progress has been achieved with respect to several parameters such as the accessible field and temperature range as well as the incorporation of sample spinning. Since an appropriate analysis of FC data requires a careful consideration of relaxation theory, we include a theory section discussing the most relevant aspects of relaxation in solids which are related to residual dipolar and quadrupolar interactions. The most important limitations of relaxation theory are also discussed. With improved instrumentation and with the help of relaxation theory we get access to interesting new applications such as ionic motion in solid electrolytes, structure determination in molecular crystals, ultraslow polymer dynamics and rotational resonance phenomena. PMID:25444698

  14. Characterization of Stratum Corneum Molecular Dynamics by Natural-Abundance 13C Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Bouwstra, Joke A.; Sparr, Emma; Topgaard, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Despite the enormous potential for pharmaceutical applications, there is still a lack of understanding of the molecular details that can contribute to increased permeability of the stratum corneum (SC). To investigate the influence of hydration and heating on the SC, we record the natural-abundance 13C signal of SC using polarization transfer solid-state NMR methods. Resonance lines from all major SC components are assigned. Comparison of the signal intensities obtained with the INEPT and CP pulse sequences gives information on the molecular dynamics of SC components. The majority of the lipids are rigid at 32°C, and those lipids co-exist with a small pool of mobile lipids. The ratio between mobile and rigid lipids increases with hydration. An abrupt change of keratin filament dynamics occurs at RH = 80–85%, from completely rigid to a structure with rigid backbone and mobile protruding terminals. Heating has a strong effect on the lipid mobility, but only a weak influence on the keratin filaments. The results provide novel molecular insight into how the SC constituents are affected by hydration and heating, and improve the understanding of enhanced SC permeability, which is associated with elevated temperatures and SC hydration. PMID:23626744

  15. Exploring Dynamics and Cage-Guest Interactions in Clathrate Hydrates Using Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Suvrajit; Guo, Jin; Janda, Kenneth C; Martin, Rachel W

    2015-12-17

    Interactions between guest molecules and the water cages in clathrates are dominated by isotropic van der Waals forces at low temperatures because the cage structures satisfy the hydrogen bonding propensity of the water. However, above 200 K the water molecules become more labile and may interact strongly with the guests through hydrogen bonding. In this work we compare the dynamics of tetrahydrofuran (THF) and cyclopentane (CP) guests in the hydrate cages above 200 K. Since THF can form hydrogen bonds while CP cannot, the dynamics provide insight into host-guest hydrogen bonding. We use magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to measure proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) of the guests as a function of temperature and find that the activation barrier to the motion of THF molecules is 4.7 kcal/mol (19.7 kJ/mol) at temperatures above 200 K. This is almost 5 times higher than the barrier at lower temperatures. In contrast, the barrier to guest motion in CP hydrate is found to be about 0.67 kcal/mol (2.8 kJ/mol), which agrees well with data at lower temperatures. These results demonstrate that hydrogen bonding interactions between the THF guest and the clathrate cage are significant above 200 K due to the host lattice mobility. PMID:26583257

  16. First solid-state NMR spectroscopy evaluation of complexes of benznidazole with cyclodextrin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Priotti, Josefina; Ferreira, M João G; Lamas, Maria C; Leonardi, Darío; Salomon, Claudio J; Nunes, Teresa G

    2015-10-20

    Complexation of benznidazole (BZL), a drug of choice for the treatment of Chagas'neglected disease, with cyclodextrin (CD) derivatives was analyzed by solid-state NMR. (13)C cross polarization/magic angle spinning spectra were recorded from BZL and from BZL:β-CD, BZL:methyl β-CD and BZL:hydroxypropyl β-CD complexes, which were obtained by the solvent evaporation technique. No significant evidence was obtained on BZL inclusion complexes involving either β-CD or hydroxypropyl β-CD. Conversely, BZL:methyl β-CD displayed BZL resonances characteristic of an amorphous drug and data analysis confirmed the presence of stable BZL:methyl β-CD inclusion complexes, with benzene encapsulated into the host cavity. Further evidences on complex structure and dynamics were obtained from proton and carbon spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame. These data are consistent with a common guest-host spin reservoir. The BZL interaction with methyl β-CD provided a route to stabilize amorphous BZL. Physical mixtures with identical BZL and CD compositions were also studied for comparison. PMID:26256164

  17. Distinguishing Polymorphs of the Semiconducting Pigment Copper Phthalocyanine by Solid-state NMR and Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shaibat, Medhat A.; Casabianca, Leah B.; Siberio-Pérez, Diana Y.; Matzger, Adam J; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2010-01-01

    Cu(II)(phthalocyanine) (CuPc) is broadly utilized as an archetypal molecular semiconductor and is the most widely used blue printing pigment. CuPc crystallizes in six different forms; the chemical and physical properties are substantially modulated by its molecular packing among these polymorphs. Despite the growing importance of this system, spectroscopic identification of different polymorphs for CuPc has posed difficulties. This study presents the first example of spectroscopic distinction of α- and β-forms of CuPc, the most widely used polymorphs, by solid-state NMR (SSNMR) and Raman spectroscopy. 13C high-resolution SSNMR spectra of α- and β-CuPc using very-fast magic angle spinning (VFMAS) at 20 kHz show that hyperfine shifts sensitively reflect polymorphs of CuPc. The experimental results were confirmed by ab initio chemical shift calculations. 13C and 1H SSNMR relaxation times of α- and β-CuPc under VFMAS also showed marked differences, presumably because of the difference in electronic spin correlation times in the two forms. Raman spectroscopy also provided another reliable method of differentiation between the two polymorphs. PMID:20225842

  18. Membrane Interactions of Phylloseptin-1, -2, and -3 Peptides by Oriented Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Resende, Jarbas M.; Verly, Rodrigo M.; Aisenbrey, Christopher; Cesar, Amary; Bertani, Philippe; Piló-Veloso, Dorila; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Phylloseptin-1, -2, and -3 are three members of the family of linear cationic antimicrobial peptides found in tree frogs. The highly homologous peptides encompass 19 amino acids, and only differ in the amino acid composition and charge at the six most carboxy-terminal residues. Here, we investigated how such subtle changes are reflected in their membrane interactions and how these can be correlated to their biological activities. To this end, the three peptides were labeled with stable isotopes, reconstituted into oriented phospholipid bilayers, and their detailed topology determined by a combined approach using 2H and 15N solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Although phylloseptin-2 and -3 adopt perfect in-plane alignments, the tilt angle of phylloseptin-1 deviates by 8° probably to assure a more water exposed localization of the lysine-17 side chain. Furthermore, different azimuthal angles are observed, positioning the amphipathic helices of all three peptides with the charged residues well exposed to the water phase. Interestingly, our studies also reveal that two orientation-dependent 2H quadrupolar splittings from methyl-deuterated alanines and one 15N amide chemical shift are sufficient to unambiguously determine the topology of phylloseptin-1, where quadrupolar splittings close to the maximum impose the most stringent angular restraints. As a result of these studies, a strategy is proposed where the topology of a peptide structure can be determined accurately from the labeling with 15N and 2H isotopes of only a few amino acid residues. PMID:25140425

  19. Protein fold determined by paramagnetic magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Ishita; Nadaud, Philippe S.; Helmus, Jonathan J.; Schwieters, Charles D.; Jaroniec, Christopher P.

    2012-05-01

    Biomacromolecules that are challenging for the usual structural techniques can be studied with atomic resolution by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. However, the paucity of distance restraints >5 Å, traditionally derived from measurements of magnetic dipole-dipole couplings between protein nuclei, is a major bottleneck that hampers such structure elucidation efforts. Here, we describe a general approach that enables the rapid determination of global protein fold in the solid phase via measurements of nuclear paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs) in several analogues of the protein of interest containing covalently attached paramagnetic tags, without the use of conventional internuclear distance restraints. The method is demonstrated using six cysteine-EDTA-Cu2+ mutants of the 56-residue B1 immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G, for which ~230 longitudinal backbone 15N PREs corresponding to distances of ~10-20 Å were obtained. The mean protein fold determined in this manner agrees with the X-ray structure with a backbone atom root-mean-square deviation of 1.8 Å.

  20. Nutrient-dependent Structural Changes in S. aureus Peptidoglycan Revealed by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoxue; Cegelski, Lynette

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial cell wall is essential to cell survival and is a major target of antibiotics. The main component of the bacterial cell wall is peptidoglycan, a cage-like macromolecule that preserves cellular integrity and maintains cell shape. The insolubility and heterogeneity of peptidoglycan pose a challenge to conventional structural analyses. Here we use solid-state NMR combined with specific isotopic labeling to probe a key structural feature of the Staphylococcus aureus peptidoglycan quantitatively and nondestructively. We observed that both the cell-wall morphology and the peptidoglycan structure are functions of growth stage in S. aureus synthetic medium (SASM). Specifically, S. aureus cells at stationary phase have thicker cell walls with non-uniformly thickened septa compared to cells in exponential phase and, remarkably, 12% (±2%) of the stems in their peptidoglycan do not have pentaglycine bridges attached. Mechanistically, we determined that these observations are triggered by the depletion of glycine in the nutrient medium, which is coincident with the start of the stationary phase, and that the production of the structurally altered peptidoglycan can be prevented by the addition of excess glycine. We also demonstrated that the structural changes primarily arise within newly synthesized peptidoglycan rather than through the modification of previously synthesized peptidoglycan. Collectively, our observations emphasize the plasticity in bacterial cell-wall assembly and the possibility to manipulate peptidoglycan structure with external stimuli. PMID:22974326

  1. Structural constraints for the Crh protein from solid-state NMR experiments

    PubMed Central

    Gardiennet, Carole; Loquet, Antoine; Etzkorn, Manuel; Heise, Henrike; Baldus, Marc

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate that short, medium and long-range constraints can be extracted from proton mediated, rare-spin detected correlation solid-state NMR experiments for the microcrystalline 10.4 × 2 kDa dimeric model protein Crh. Magnetization build-up curves from cross signals in NHHC and CHHC spectra deliver detailed information on side chain conformers and secondary structure for interactions between spin pairs. A large number of medium and long-range correlations can be observed in the spectra, and an analysis of the resolved signals reveals that the constraints cover the entire sequence, also including inter-monomer contacts between the two molecules forming the domain-swapped Crh dimer. Dynamic behavior is shown to have an impact on cross signals intensities, as indicated for mobile residues or regions by contacts predicted from the crystal structure, but absent in the spectra. Our work validates strategies involving proton distance measurements for large and complex proteins as the Crh dimer, and confirms the magnetization transfer properties previously described for small molecules in solid protein samples. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10858-008-9229-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18320329

  2. Protein fold determined by paramagnetic magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Ishita; Nadaud, Philippe S; Helmus, Jonathan J; Schwieters, Charles D; Jaroniec, Christopher P

    2012-05-01

    Biomacromolecules that are challenging for the usual structural techniques can be studied with atomic resolution by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. However, the paucity of distance restraints >5 Å, traditionally derived from measurements of magnetic dipole-dipole couplings between protein nuclei, is a major bottleneck that hampers such structure elucidation efforts. Here, we describe a general approach that enables the rapid determination of global protein fold in the solid phase via measurements of nuclear paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs) in several analogues of the protein of interest containing covalently attached paramagnetic tags, without the use of conventional internuclear distance restraints. The method is demonstrated using six cysteine-EDTA-Cu(2+) mutants of the 56-residue B1 immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G, for which ~230 longitudinal backbone (15)N PREs corresponding to distances of ~10-20 Å were obtained. The mean protein fold determined in this manner agrees with the X-ray structure with a backbone atom root-mean-square deviation of 1.8 Å. PMID:22522262

  3. Solid-state NMR studies of proteins immobilized on inorganic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Wendy J.

    2015-01-01

    Solid state NMR is the primary tool for studying the quantitative, site-specific structure, orientation, and dynamics of biomineralization proteins under biologically relevant conditions. Two calcium phosphate proteins, statherin (43 amino acids) and leucine rich amelogenin protein (LRAP; 59 amino acids), have been studied in depth and have different dynamic properties and 2D- and 3D-structural features. These differences make it difficult to extract design principles used in nature for building materials with properties such as high strength, unusual morphologies, or uncommon phases. Consequently, design principles needed for developing synthetic materials controlled by proteins are not clear. Many biomineralization proteins are much larger than statherin and LRAP, necessitating the study of larger biomineralization proteins. More recent studies of the significantly larger full-length amelogenin (180 residues) represent a significant step forward to ultimately investigate the full diversity of biomineralization proteins. Interactions of amino acids, a silaffin derived peptide, and the model LK peptide with silica are also being studied, along with qualitative studies of the organic matrices interacting with calcium carbonate. Dipolar recoupling techniques have formed the core of the quantitative studies, yet the need for isolated spin pairs makes this approach costly and time intensive. The use of multidimensional techniques to study biomineralization proteins is becoming more common, methodology which, despite its challenges with these difficult-to-study proteins, will continue to drive future advancements in this area. PMID:25466354

  4. Molecular dynamics of neutral polymer bonding agent (NPBA) as revealed by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Su, Yongchao; Zhou, Lei; Pang, Aimin; Cai, Rulin; Ma, Xingang; Li, Shenhui

    2013-01-01

    Neutral polymer bonding agent (NPBA) is one of the most promising polymeric materials, widely used in nitrate ester plasticized polyether (NEPE) propellant as bonding agent. The structure and dynamics of NPBA under different conditions of temperatures and sample processing are comprehensively investigated by solid state NMR (SSNMR). The results indicate that both the main chain and side chain of NPBA are quite rigid below its glass transition temperature (Tg). In contrast, above the Tg, the main chain remains relatively immobilized, while the side chains become highly flexible, which presumably weakens the interaction between bonding agent and the binder or oxidant fillers and in turn destabilizes the high modulus layer formed around the oxidant fillers. In addition, no obvious variation is found for the microstructure of NPBA upon aging treatment or soaking with acetone. These experimental results provide useful insights for understanding the structural properties of NPBA and its interaction with other constituents of solid composite propellants under different processing and working conditions. PMID:24451254

  5. Broadband adiabatic inversion pulses for cross polarization in wideline solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Kristopher J.; Lupulescu, Adonis; Lucier, Bryan E. G.; Frydman, Lucio; Schurko, Robert W.

    2012-11-01

    Efficient acquisition of ultra-wideline solid-state NMR powder patterns is a continuing challenge. In particular, when the breadth of the powder pattern is much larger than the cross-polarization (CP) excitation bandwidth, transfer efficiencies suffer and experimental times are greatly increased. Presented herein is a CP pulse sequence with an excitation bandwidth that is up to ten times greater than that available from a conventional spin-locked CP pulse sequence. The pulse sequence, broadband adiabatic inversion CP (BRAIN-CP), makes use of the broad, uniformly large frequency profiles of chirped inversion pulses, to provide these same characteristics to the polarization transfer process. A detailed theoretical analysis is given, providing insight into the polarization transfer process involved in BRAIN-CP. Experiments on spin-1/2 nuclei including 119Sn, 199Hg and 195Pt nuclei are presented, and the large bandwidth improvements possible with BRAIN-CP are demonstrated. Furthermore, it is shown that BRAIN-CP can be combined with broadband frequency-swept versions of the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill experiment (for instance with WURST-CPMG, or WCPMG for brevity); the combined BRAIN-CP/WCPMG experiment then provides multiplicative signal enhancements of both CP and multiple-echo acquisition over a broad frequency region.

  6. Characterization of tautomeric forms of ranitidine hydrochloride: thermal analysis, solid-state NMR, X-ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirmehrabi, M.; Rohani, S.; Murthy, K. S. K.; Radatus, B.

    2004-01-01

    The molecular structure of ranitidine hydrochloride (RAN-HCl) has an important influence on the growth of individual crystals and consequently the physical properties such as bulk solid density. This paper suggests that the correct structure of the nitroethenediamine moiety in the Form 2 RAN-HCl is a mixture of enamine and nitronic acid tautomers. Thermal analysis showed that the difference between the two forms is configurational rather than conformational. It also showed explosive type of degradation at the melting point of both forms. Solid-state NMR studies suggest that Form 2 contains molecular disorder whereas Form 1 may be more ordered. A single crystal X-ray study confirms the disorder in Form 2 but a similar study on Form 1 could not be performed and its suspected order can only be inferred. It was found that significant amounts of strongly polar solvents such as methanol and water would favour the production of Form 2; while anhydrous less polar or non-polar solvents will result in the production of Form 1. Chloride ion acts as the bridge between the individual molecules of RAN-HCl in the crystal structure of Form 2.

  7. (13) C-TmDOTA as versatile thermometer compound for solid-state NMR of hydrated lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Umegawa, Yuichi; Tanaka, Yuya; Nobuaki, Matsumori; Murata, Michio

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques, such as magic angle spinning and high-power decoupling, have dramatically increased the sensitivity and resolution of NMR. However, these NMR techniques generate extra heat, causing a temperature difference between the sample in the rotor and the variable temperature gas. This extra heating is a particularly crucial problem for hydrated lipid membrane samples. Thus, to develop an NMR thermometer that is suitable for hydrated lipid samples, thulium-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate (TmDOTA) was synthesized and labeled with (13) C (i.e., (13) C-TmDOTA) to increase the NMR sensitivity. The complex was mixed with a hydrated lipid membrane, and the system was subjected to solid-state NMR and differential scanning calorimetric analyses. The physical properties of the lipid bilayer and the quality of the NMR spectra of the membrane were negligibly affected by the presence of (13) C-TmDOTA, and the (13) C chemical shift of the complex exhibited a large-temperature dependence. The results demonstrated that (13) C-TmDOTA could be successfully used as a thermometer to accurately monitor temperature changes induced by (1) H decoupling pulses and/or by magic angle spinning and the temperature distribution of the sample inside the rotor. Thus, (13) C-TmDOTA was shown to be a versatile thermometer for hydrated lipid assemblies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26460094

  8. Solid state NMR and pair distribution function studies of silicon electrodes for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, Baris

    observed in the in situ NMR experiments; this mechanism results in self-discharge, and potentially capacity loss. The rate of this self-discharge process is much slower when CMC (carboxymethylcellulose) is used as the binder. Previous work has shown that the electrochemical performance of nanoparticulate crystalline silicon is different from the bulk. The lithiation and delithiation mechanisms of nano-Si for lithium ion batteries are studied by using ex-situ solid state MAS NMR and PDF analysis. The main differences vs. bulk lithiation and delithiation are identified by characterizing the amorphous phases formed.

  9. Thermal decomposition of t-butylamine borane studied by in situ solid state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Feigerle, J.; Smyrl, N. R.; Morrell, J. S.; Stowe, A. C.

    2010-03-18

    of the amine borane fuel more feasible [22]. In the present study, tert-butylamine borane is investigated by heteronuclear in situ solid state NMR to understand hydrogen release from a hydrocarbon containing amine borane. tbutylamine borane has similar physical properties to amine borane with a melting point of 96 C. A single proton has been replaced with a t-butylamine group resulting in a weakening of the dihydrogen bonding framework. t-butylamine borane has a theoretical gravimetric hydrogen density of 15.1%; however, isobutane can also be evolved rather than hydrogen. If decomposition yields one mole isobutane and two moles hydrogen, 4.5 wt% H2 gas will be evolved. More importantly for the present work, the resulting spent fuel should be comprised of both (BNH)n and (CBNH)n polyimidoboranes.

  10. AssignFit: A program for simultaneous assignment and structure refinement from solid-state NMR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ye; Schwieters, Charles D.; Opella, Stanley J.; Marassi, Francesca M.

    2012-01-01

    AssignFit is a computer program developed within the XPLOR-NIH package for the assignment of dipolar coupling (DC) and chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) restraints derived from the solid-state NMR spectra of protein samples with uniaxial order. The method is based on minimizing the difference between experimentally observed solid-state NMR spectra and the frequencies back calculated from a structural model. Starting with a structural model and a set of DC and CSA restraints grouped only by amino acid type, as would be obtained by selective isotopic labeling, AssignFit generates all of the possible assignment permutations and calculates the corresponding atomic coordinates oriented in the alignment frame, together with the associated set of NMR frequencies, which are then compared with the experimental data for best fit. Incorporation of AssignFit in a simulated annealing refinement cycle provides an approach for simultaneous assignment and structure refinement (SASR) of proteins from solid-state NMR orientation restraints. The methods are demonstrated with data from two integral membrane proteins, one α-helical and one β-barrel, embedded in phospholipid bilayer membranes.

  11. Development of High Resolution Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Neutron Dosimetry Technique with93Nb(n,n')93mNb Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Hideki; Takatsuka, Takaaki; Takamatsu, Takahide; Adachi, Yoshitaka; Furuta, Yujin; Noto, Takuma; Iguchi, Tetsuo; Sonnenschein, Volker; Wendt, Klaus; Ito, Chikara; Maeda, Shigetaka

    2016-02-01

    We have proposed an advanced technique to measure the 93mNb yield precisely by Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry, instead of conventional characteristic X-ray spectroscopy. 93mNb-selective resonance ionization is achievable by distinguishing the hyperfine splitting of the atomic energy levels between 93Nb and 93mNb at high resolution. In advance of 93mNb detection, we could successfully demonstrate high resolution resonant ionization spectroscopy of stable 93Nb using an all solid-state, narrow-band and tunable Ti:Sapphire laser system operated at 1 kHz repetition rate.

  12. Structure of the Dimerization Interface in the Mature HIV-1 Capsid Protein Lattice from Solid State NMR of Tubular Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Bayro, Marvin J; Tycko, Robert

    2016-07-13

    The HIV-1 capsid protein (CA) forms the capsid shell that encloses RNA within a mature HIV-1 virion. Previous studies by electron microscopy have shown that the capsid shell is primarily a triangular lattice of CA hexamers, with variable curvature that destroys the ideal symmetry of a planar lattice. The mature CA lattice depends on CA dimerization, which occurs through interactions between helix 9 segments of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of CA. Several high-resolution structures of the CTD-CTD dimerization interface have been reported, based on X-ray crystallography and multidimensional solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with significant differences in amino acid side chain conformations and helix 9-helix 9 orientations. In a structural model for tubular CA assemblies based on cryogenic electron microscopy (cryoEM) [Zhao et al. Nature, 2013, 497, 643-646], the dimerization interface is substantially disordered. The dimerization interface structure in noncrystalline CA assemblies and the extent to which this interface is structurally ordered within a curved lattice have therefore been unclear. Here we describe solid state NMR measurements on the dimerization interface in tubular CA assemblies, which contain the curved triangular lattice of a mature virion, including quantitative measurements of intermolecular and intramolecular distances using dipolar recoupling techniques, solid state NMR chemical shifts, and long-range side chain-side chain contacts. When combined with restraints on the distance and orientation between helix 9 segments from the cryoEM study, the solid state NMR data lead to a unique high-resolution structure for the dimerization interface in the noncrystalline lattice of CA tubes. These results demonstrate that CA lattice curvature is not dependent on disorder or variability in the dimerization interface. This work also demonstrates the feasibility of local structure determination within large noncrystalline assemblies formed by high

  13. New insights into the bonding arrangements of L- and D-glutamates from solid state 17O NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaitre, V.; Pike, K. J.; Watts, A.; Anupold, T.; Samoson, A.; Smith, M. E.; Dupree, R.

    2003-03-01

    Magic angle spinning (MAS) from L- and D-glutamic acid-HCl at 14.1 T produces highly structured and very similar NMR spectra. Lines from all 4 oxygen sites are readily distinguished and assigned. These 17O NMR spectra are very different from the previously reported 17O spectrum of the D, L-form presumably because that was a racemic crystal. 17O NMR from L-monosodium glutamate-HCl is very different again requiring the application of double angle rotation and 3 quantum MAS NMR to provide resolution of 5 different sites. Hence high resolution 17O solid state NMR techniques offer possible new insight into biochemical bonding processes.

  14. Fine refinement of solid state structure of racemic form of phospho-tyrosine employing NMR Crystallography approach.

    PubMed

    Paluch, Piotr; Pawlak, Tomasz; Oszajca, Marcin; Lasocha, Wieslaw; Potrzebowski, Marek J

    2015-02-01

    We present step by step facets important in NMR Crystallography strategy employing O-phospho-dl-tyrosine as model sample. The significance of three major techniques being components of this approach: solid state NMR (SS NMR), X-ray diffraction of powdered sample (PXRD) and theoretical calculations (Gauge Invariant Projector Augmented Wave; GIPAW) is discussed. Each experimental technique provides different set of structural constraints. From the PXRD measurement the size of the unit cell, space group and roughly refined molecular structure are established. SS NMR provides information about content of crystallographic asymmetric unit, local geometry, molecular motion in the crystal lattice and hydrogen bonding pattern. GIPAW calculations are employed for validation of quality of elucidation and fine refinement of structure. Crystal and molecular structure of O-phospho-dl-tyrosine solved by NMR Crystallography is deposited at Cambridge Crystallographic Data Center under number CCDC 1005924. PMID:25240460

  15. On The Potential of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced Diamonds in Solid-State and Dissolution (13) C NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bretschneider, Christian O; Akbey, Ümit; Aussenac, Fabien; Olsen, Greg L; Feintuch, Akiva; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Frydman, Lucio

    2016-09-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a versatile option to improve the sensitivity of NMR and MRI. This versatility has elicited interest for overcoming potential limitations of these techniques, including the achievement of solid-state polarization enhancement at ambient conditions, and the maximization of (13) C signal lifetimes for performing in vivo MRI scans. This study explores whether diamond's (13) C behavior in nano- and micro-particles could be used to achieve these ends. The characteristics of diamond's DNP enhancement were analyzed for different magnetic fields, grain sizes, and sample environments ranging from cryogenic to ambient temperatures, in both solution and solid-state experiments. It was found that (13) C NMR signals could be boosted by orders of magnitude in either low- or room-temperature solid-state DNP experiments by utilizing naturally occurring paramagnetic P1 substitutional nitrogen defects. We attribute this behavior to the unusually long electronic/nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times characteristic of diamond, coupled with a time-independent cross-effect-like polarization transfer mechanism facilitated by a matching of the nitrogen-related hyperfine coupling and the (13) C Zeeman splitting. The efficiency of this solid-state polarization process, however, is harder to exploit in dissolution DNP-enhanced MRI contexts. The prospects for utilizing polarized diamond approaching nanoscale dimensions for both solid and solution applications are briefly discussed. PMID:27416769

  16. Probing membrane protein structure using water polarization transfer solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jonathan K.; Hong, Mei

    2014-10-01

    Water plays an essential role in the structure and function of proteins, lipid membranes and other biological macromolecules. Solid-state NMR heteronuclear-detected 1H polarization transfer from water to biomolecules is a versatile approach for studying water-protein, water-membrane, and water-carbohydrate interactions in biology. We review radiofrequency pulse sequences for measuring water polarization transfer to biomolecules, the mechanisms of polarization transfer, and the application of this method to various biological systems. Three polarization transfer mechanisms, chemical exchange, spin diffusion and NOE, manifest themselves at different temperatures, magic-angle-spinning frequencies, and pulse irradiations. Chemical exchange is ubiquitous in all systems examined so far, and spin diffusion plays the key role in polarization transfer within the macromolecule. Tightly bound water molecules with long residence times are rare in proteins at ambient temperature. The water polarization-transfer technique has been used to study the hydration of microcrystalline proteins, lipid membranes, and plant cell wall polysaccharides, and to derive atomic-resolution details of the kinetics and mechanism of ion conduction in channels and pumps. Using this approach, we have measured the water polarization transfer to the transmembrane domain of the influenza M2 protein to obtain information on the structure of this tetrameric proton channel. At short mixing times, the polarization transfer rates are site-specific and depend on the pH, labile protons, sidechain conformation, as well as the radial position of the residues in this four-helix bundle. Despite the multiple dependences, the initial transfer rates reflect the periodic nature of the residue positions from the water-filled pore, thus this technique provides a way of gleaning secondary structure information, helix tilt angle, and the oligomeric structure of membrane proteins.

  17. 13C solid-state NMR analysis of heterogeneous structure of beeswax in native state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, Tsunenori

    2005-12-01

    I investigated the molecular structure of natural wax from Japanese bees (Apis cerana japonica) in its native state (neither purified nor recrystallized) by 13C and 1H solid-state NMR. Two strong 13C peaks at 32.9 and 34.0 ppm were attributed to signals from internal-chain methylene carbons [int-(CH2)] in two types of crystal form. The peak at 32.9 ppm was assigned to an orthorhombic crystal form, and that at 34.0 ppm was assigned to a triclinic or monoclinic form. In both crystalline regions, bi-exponential decay of 13C spin-lattice relaxation [T1(C)] for the crystalline peaks due to chain diffusion was observed. 1H spin-lattice relaxation [T1(H)] values for protons of the CH3 group and for int-(CH2) in the crystalline and amorphous regions were identical; this was interpreted as being due to averaging of the T1(H) relaxation rates via spin diffusion. In contrast, although the T_{{1}_{\\rho}}(H) decay curves for protons of the CH3 group and for int-(CH2) in the amorphous and orthorhombic forms were almost identical, those of the triclinic or monoclinic forms were different. This unhomogeneous character of T_{{1}_{\\rho}}(H) was interpreted as resulting from differences in the molecular composition of each crystal form. Moreover, two components with long and short 1H spin-spin relaxation [T2(H)] values, arising from the mobile and rigid phases, respectively, were observed at above about -30 °C.

  18. Probing membrane protein structure using water polarization transfer solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jonathan K; Hong, Mei

    2014-10-01

    Water plays an essential role in the structure and function of proteins, lipid membranes and other biological macromolecules. Solid-state NMR heteronuclear-detected (1)H polarization transfer from water to biomolecules is a versatile approach for studying water-protein, water-membrane, and water-carbohydrate interactions in biology. We review radiofrequency pulse sequences for measuring water polarization transfer to biomolecules, the mechanisms of polarization transfer, and the application of this method to various biological systems. Three polarization transfer mechanisms, chemical exchange, spin diffusion and NOE, manifest themselves at different temperatures, magic-angle-spinning frequencies, and pulse irradiations. Chemical exchange is ubiquitous in all systems examined so far, and spin diffusion plays the key role in polarization transfer within the macromolecule. Tightly bound water molecules with long residence times are rare in proteins at ambient temperature. The water polarization-transfer technique has been used to study the hydration of microcrystalline proteins, lipid membranes, and plant cell wall polysaccharides, and to derive atomic-resolution details of the kinetics and mechanism of ion conduction in channels and pumps. Using this approach, we have measured the water polarization transfer to the transmembrane domain of the influenza M2 protein to obtain information on the structure of this tetrameric proton channel. At short mixing times, the polarization transfer rates are site-specific and depend on the pH, labile protons, sidechain conformation, as well as the radial position of the residues in this four-helix bundle. Despite the multiple dependences, the initial transfer rates reflect the periodic nature of the residue positions from the water-filled pore, thus this technique provides a way of gleaning secondary structure information, helix tilt angle, and the oligomeric structure of membrane proteins. PMID:25228502

  19. Rheological and solid-state NMR assessments of copovidone/clotrimazole model solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fengyuan; Su, Yongchao; Zhu, Lei; Brown, Chad D; Rosen, Lawrence A; Rosenberg, Kenneth J

    2016-03-16

    This study aims to assess several model solid dispersions by using dynamic oscillatory rheology, solid-state NMR and other solid phase characterization techniques, and correlate their viscoelastic responses with processing methods and microstructures. A model active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), clotrimazole, was compounded with copovidone to form solid dispersions via various techniques with different mixing capabilities. Physicochemical characterizations of the resulting solid dispersions demonstrated that simple physical mixing led to a poorly mixed blend manifested by existence of large API crystalline content and heterogeneous distribution. Cryogenic milling significantly improved mixing of two components as a result of reduced particle size and increased contact surface area, but produced limited amorphous content. In contrast, hot melt extrusion (HME) processing resulted in a homogenous amorphous solid dispersion because of its inherent mixing efficiency. Storage modulus and viscosities versus frequency of different solid dispersions indicated that the incorporation of API into the polymer matrix resulted in a plasticizing effect which reduced the viscosity. The crystalline/aggregated forms of API also exhibited more elastic response than its amorphous/dispersed counterpart. Temperature ramps of the physical mixture with high API concentration captured a critical temperature, at which a bump was observed in damping factor. This bump was attributed to the dissolution of crystalline API into the polymer. In addition, heating-cooling cycles of various solid dispersions suggested that cryomilling and HME processing could form a homogeneous solid dispersion at low API content, whereas high drug concentration led to a relatively unstable dispersion due to supersaturation of API in the polymer. PMID:26780122

  20. Probing Membrane Protein Structure Using Water Polarization Transfer Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jonathan K.; Hong, Mei

    2014-01-01

    Water plays an essential role in the structure and function of proteins, lipid membranes and other biological macromolecules. Solid-state NMR heteronuclear-detected 1H polarization transfer from water to biomolecules is a versatile approach for studying water-protein, water-membrane, and water-carbohydrate interactions in biology. We review radiofrequency pulse sequences for measuring water polarization transfer to biomolecules, the mechanisms of polarization transfer, and the application of this method to various biological systems. Three polarization transfer mechanisms, chemical exchange, spin diffusion and NOE, manifest themselves at different temperatures, magic-angle-spinning frequencies, and pulse irradiations. Chemical exchange is ubiquitous in all systems examined so far, and spin diffusion plays the key role in polarization transfer within the macromolecule. Tightly bound water molecules with long residence times are rare in proteins at ambient temperature. The water polarization-transfer technique has been used to study the hydration of microcrystalline proteins, lipid membranes, and plant cell wall polysaccharides, and to derive atomic-resolution details of the kinetics and mechanism of ion conduction in channels and pumps. Using this approach, we have measured the water polarization transfer to the transmembrane peptide of the influenza M2 protein to obtain information on the structure of this tetrameric proton channel. At short mixing times, the polarization transfer rates are site-specific and depend on the pH, labile protons, sidechain conformation, as well as the radial position of the residues in this four-helix bundle. Despite the multiple dependences, the initial transfer rates reflect the periodic nature of the residue positions from the water-filled pore, thus this technique provides a way of gleaning secondary structure information, helix tilt angle, and the oligomeric structure of membrane proteins. PMID:25228502

  1. Natural abundance (14)N and (15)N solid-state NMR of pharmaceuticals and their polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Veinberg, Stanislav L; Johnston, Karen E; Jaroszewicz, Michael J; Kispal, Brianna M; Mireault, Christopher R; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek; Schurko, Robert W

    2016-06-29

    (14)N ultra-wideline (UW), (1)H{(15)N} indirectly-detected HETCOR (idHETCOR) and (15)N dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) experiments, in combination with plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations of (14)N EFG tensors, were utilized to characterize a series of nitrogen-containing active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including HCl salts of scopolamine, alprenolol, isoprenaline, acebutolol, dibucaine, nicardipine, and ranitidine. A case study applying these methods for the differentiation of polymorphs of bupivacaine HCl is also presented. All experiments were conducted upon samples with naturally-abundant nitrogen isotopes. For most of the APIs, it was possible to acquire frequency-stepped UW (14)N SSNMR spectra of stationary samples, which display powder patterns corresponding to pseudo-tetrahedral (i.e., RR'R''NH(+) and RR'NH2(+)) or other (i.e., RNH2 and RNO2) nitrogen environments. Directly-excited (14)N NMR spectra were acquired using the WURST-CPMG pulse sequence, which incorporates WURST (wideband, uniform rate, and smooth truncation) pulses and a CPMG (Carr-Purcell Meiboom-Gill) refocusing protocol. In certain cases, spectra were acquired using (1)H → (14)N broadband cross-polarization, via the BRAIN-CP (broadband adiabatic inversion - cross polarization) pulse sequence. These spectra provide (14)N electric field gradient (EFG) tensor parameters and orientations that are particularly sensitive to variations in local structure and intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions. The (1)H{(15)N} idHETCOR spectra, acquired under conditions of fast magic-angle spinning (MAS), used CP transfers to provide (1)H-(15)N chemical shift correlations for all nitrogen environments, except for two sites in acebutolol and nicardipine. One of these two sites (RR'NH2(+) in acebutolol) was successfully detected using the DNP-enhanced (15)N{(1)H} CP/MAS measurement, and one (RNO2 in nicardipine) remained elusive due to the absence of

  2. Membrane orientation of the Na,K-ATPase regulatory membrane protein CHIF determined by solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Franzin, Carla M.; Teriete, Peter; Marassi, Francesca M.

    2010-01-01

    Corticosteroid hormone-induced factor (CHIF) is a major regulatory subunit of the Na,K-ATPase, and a member of an evolutionarily conserved family of membrane proteins that regulate the function of the enzyme complex in a tissue-specific and physiological-state-specific manner. Here we present the structure of CHIF oriented in the membrane, determined by solid-state NMR orientation-dependent restraints. Because CHIF adopts a similar structure in lipid micelles and bilayers, it is possible to assign the solid-state NMR spectrum measured for 15N-labeled CHIF in oriented bilayers from the structure determined in micelles, to obtain the global orientation of the protein in the membrane. PMID:18098352

  3. Sodium ion effect on silk fibroin conformation characterized by solid-state NMR and generalized 2D NMR NMR correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Qing-Xia; Zhou, Ping

    2008-07-01

    In the present work, we investigated Na + ion effect on the silk fibroin (SF) conformation. Samples are Na +-involved regenerated silk fibroin films. 13C CP-MAS NMR demonstrates that as added [Na +] increases, partial silk fibroin conformation transit from helix-form to β-form at certain Na + ion concentration which is much higher than that in Bombyx mori silkworm gland. The generalized two-dimensional NMR-NMR correlation analysis reveals that silk fibroin undergoes several intermediate states during its conformation transition process as [Na +] increase. The appearance order of the intermediates is followed as: helix and/or random coil → helix-like → β-sheet-like → β-sheet, which is the same as that produced by pH decrease from 6.8 to 4.8 in the resultant regenerated silk fibroin films. The binding sites of Na + to silk fibroin might involve the carbonyl oxygen atom of certain amino acids sequence which could promote the formation of β-sheet conformation. Since the Na +sbnd O bond is weak, the ability of Na + inducing the secondary structure transition is weaker than those of Ca 2+, Cu 2+ and even K +. It is maybe a reason why the sodium content is much lower than potassium in the silkworm gland.

  4. Quantitative determination of lead in mixtures of lead(II) halides using solid-state 207Pb NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Glatfelter, Alicia; Stephenson, Nicole; Bai, Shi; Dybowski, Cecil; Perry, Dale L

    2006-11-01

    We demonstrate a multi-spectrum technique for facile, quantitative determination of lead in solid materials using solid-state (207)Pb NMR that avoids the major problem of uniform excitation across a wide spectral range; the method can be employed without chemical separation or other chemical manipulations and without any prior sample preparation, resulting in a non-destructive analysis, and producing results that are in agreement with gravimetric analyses of mixed samples of the lead halides. PMID:17066187

  5. Solid-state NMR sequential assignments of the N-terminal domain of HpDnaB helicase.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Thomas; Gardiennet, Carole; Ravotti, Francesco; Bazin, Alexandre; Kunert, Britta; Lacabanne, Denis; Cadalbert, Riccardo; Güntert, Peter; Terradot, Laurent; Böckmann, Anja; Meier, Beat H

    2016-04-01

    We present solid-state NMR assignments of the N-terminal domain of the DnaB helicase from Helicobacter pylori (153 residues) in its microcrystalline form. We use a sequential resonance assignment strategy based on three-dimensional NMR experiments. The resonance assignments obtained are compared with automated resonance assignments computed with the ssFLYA algorithm. An analysis of the (13)C secondary chemical shifts determines the position of the secondary structure elements in this α-helical protein. PMID:26280528

  6. Solid-state NMR as an effective method of polymorphic analysis: solid dosage forms of clopidogrel hydrogensulfate.

    PubMed

    Pindelska, Edyta; Szeleszczuk, Lukasz; Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Mazurek, Andrzej; Kolodziejski, Waclaw

    2015-01-01

    Clopidogrel hydrogensulfate (HSCL) is an antiplatelet agent, one of top-selling drugs in the world. In this paper, we have described a rapid and convenient method of verification which polymorph of HSCL is present in its final solid dosage form. Our methodology based on solid-state NMR spectroscopy and ab initio gauge-including projector-augmented wave calculations of NMR shielding constants is appropriate for currently available commercial solid dosage forms of HSCL. Furthermore, such structural characterization can assist with the development of new pharmaceutical products containing HSCL and also be useful in the identification of counterfeit drugs. PMID:25393324

  7. The contribution of solid-state NMR spectroscopy to understanding biomineralization: Atomic and molecular structure of bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duer, Melinda J.

    2015-04-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has had a major impact on our understanding of the structure of mineralized tissues, in particular bone. Bone exemplifies the organic-inorganic composite structure inherent in mineralized tissues. The organic component of the extracellular matrix in bone is primarily composed of ordered fibrils of collagen triple-helical molecules, in which the inorganic component, calcium phosphate particles, composed of stacks of mineral platelets, are arranged around the fibrils. This perspective argues that key factors in our current structural model of bone mineral have come about through NMR spectroscopy and have yielded the primary information on how the mineral particles interface and bind with the underlying organic matrix. The structure of collagen within the organic matrix of bone or any other structural tissue has yet to be determined, but here too, this perspective shows there has been real progress made through application of solid-state NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with other techniques. In particular, NMR spectroscopy has highlighted the fact that even within these structural proteins, there is considerable dynamics, which suggests that one should be cautious when using inherently static structural models, such as those arising from X-ray diffraction analyses, to gain insight into molecular roles. It is clear that the NMR approach is still in its infancy in this area, and that we can expect many more developments in the future, particularly in understanding the molecular mechanisms of bone diseases and ageing.

  8. Lipid bilayer preparations of membrane proteins for oriented and magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR samples

    PubMed Central

    Das, Nabanita; Murray, Dylan T; Cross, Timothy A

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has been used successfully for characterizing the structure and dynamics of membrane proteins as well as their interactions with other proteins in lipid bilayers. such an environment is often necessary for achieving native-like structures. sample preparation is the key to this success. Here we present a detailed description of a robust protocol that results in high-quality membrane protein samples for both magic-angle spinning and oriented-sample solid-state NMR. the procedure is demonstrated using two proteins: CrgA (two transmembrane helices) and rv1861 (three transmembrane helices), both from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. the success of this procedure relies on two points. First, for samples for both types of NMR experiment, the reconstitution of the protein from a detergent environment to an environment in which it is incorporated into liposomes results in ‘complete’ removal of detergent. second, for the oriented samples, proper dehydration followed by rehydration of the proteoliposomes is essential. By using this protocol, proteoliposome samples for magic-angle spinning NMR and uniformly aligned samples (orientational mosaicity of <1°) for oriented-sample NMR can be obtained within 10 d. PMID:24157546

  9. Structural Dynamics and Conformational Equilibria of SERCA Regulatory Proteins in Membranes by Solid-State NMR Restrained Simulations

    PubMed Central

    De Simone, Alfonso; Mote, Kaustubh R.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy is emerging as a powerful approach to determine structure, topology, and conformational dynamics of membrane proteins at the atomic level. Conformational dynamics are often inferred and quantified from the motional averaging of the NMR parameters. However, the nature of these motions is difficult to envision based only on spectroscopic data. Here, we utilized restrained molecular dynamics simulations to probe the structural dynamics, topology and conformational transitions of regulatory membrane proteins of the calcium ATPase SERCA, namely sarcolipin and phospholamban, in explicit lipid bilayers. Specifically, we employed oriented solid-state NMR data, such as dipolar couplings and chemical shift anisotropy measured in lipid bicelles, to refine the conformational ensemble of these proteins in lipid membranes. The samplings accurately reproduced the orientations of transmembrane helices and showed a significant degree of convergence with all of the NMR parameters. Unlike the unrestrained simulations, the resulting sarcolipin structures are in agreement with distances and angles for hydrogen bonds in ideal helices. In the case of phospholamban, the restrained ensemble sampled the conformational interconversion between T (helical) and R (unfolded) states for the cytoplasmic region that could not be observed using standard structural refinements with the same experimental data set. This study underscores the importance of implementing NMR data in molecular dynamics protocols to better describe the conformational landscapes of membrane proteins embedded in realistic lipid membranes. PMID:24940774

  10. Solid-State 2H NMR Shows Equivalence of Dehydration and Osmotic Pressures in Lipid Membrane Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Mallikarjunaiah, K.J.; Leftin, Avigdor; Kinnun, Jacob J.; Justice, Matthew J.; Rogozea, Adriana L.; Petrache, Horia I.; Brown, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Lipid bilayers represent a fascinating class of biomaterials whose properties are altered by changes in pressure or temperature. Functions of cellular membranes can be affected by nonspecific lipid-protein interactions that depend on bilayer material properties. Here we address the changes in lipid bilayer structure induced by external pressure. Solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy of phospholipid bilayers under osmotic stress allows structural fluctuations and deformation of membranes to be investigated. We highlight the results from NMR experiments utilizing pressure-based force techniques that control membrane structure and tension. Our 2H NMR results using both dehydration pressure (low water activity) and osmotic pressure (poly(ethylene glycol) as osmolyte) show that the segmental order parameters (SCD) of DMPC approach very large values of ≈0.35 in the liquid-crystalline state. The two stresses are thermodynamically equivalent, because the change in chemical potential when transferring water from the interlamellar space to the bulk water phase corresponds to the induced pressure. This theoretical equivalence is experimentally revealed by considering the solid-state 2H NMR spectrometer as a virtual osmometer. Moreover, we extend this approach to include the correspondence between osmotic pressure and hydrostatic pressure. Our results establish the magnitude of the pressures that lead to significant bilayer deformation including changes in area per lipid and volumetric bilayer thickness. We find that appreciable bilayer structural changes occur with osmotic pressures in the range of 10−100 atm or lower. This research demonstrates the applicability of solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy together with bilayer stress techniques for investigating the mechanism of pressure sensitivity of membrane proteins. PMID:21190661