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Sample records for 99mtc labeled gnrh

  1. Persistent GnRH receptor activation in pituitary αT3-1 cells analyzed with a label-free technology.

    PubMed

    Nederpelt, I; Vergroesen, R D; IJzerman, A P; Heitman, L H

    2016-05-15

    The gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor is a drug target for certain hormone-dependent diseases such as prostate cancer. In this study, we examined the activation profiles of the endogenous ligand, GnRH and a well-known marketed analog, buserelin using a label-free assay in pituitary αT3-1 cells with endogenous GnRH receptor expression. This whole cell impedance-based technology allows for the real-time measurement of morphological cellular changes. Both agonists dose-dependently decreased the impedance as a result of GnRH receptor activation with potencies of 9.3 ± 0.1 (pEC50 value, buserelin) and 7.8 ± 0.06 (pEC50 value, GnRH). Subsequently, GnRH receptor activation was completely abolished with a selective Gαq inhibitor, thereby confirming the Gαq-coupling of the GnRH receptor in pituitary αT3-1 cells. Additionally, we observed continued responses after agonist stimulation of αT3-1 cells indicating long-lasting cellular effects. Wash-out experiments demonstrated that the long-lasting effects induced by GnRH were most likely caused by rebinding since over 70% of the original response was abolished after wash-out. In contrast, a long receptor residence time was responsible for the prolonged effects caused by buserelin, with over 70% of the original response remaining after wash-out. In summary, we validated that impedance-based label-free technology is suited for studying receptor-mediated activation in cell lines endogenously expressing the target of interest. Moreover, this real-time monitoring allows the examination of binding kinetics and its influence on receptor activation at a cellular level. PMID:26774084

  2. Rapid Direct Action of Estradiol in GnRH Neurons: Findings and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Kenealy, Brian P.; Terasawa, E.

    2011-01-01

    Estradiol plays a pivotal role in the control of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuronal function and female reproduction. While positive and negative feedback actions of estradiol that enhance and suppress release of GnRH and LH are primarily mediated through estrogen receptor alpha located in interneurons, a series of recent studies in our laboratory indicate that rapid excitatory actions of estradiol also directly modify GnRH neuronal activity. We observed this phenomenon in cultured primate GnRH neurons, but similar rapid direct actions of estradiol are also described in cultured GnRH neurons and green fluorescent protein-labeled GnRH neurons of mice. Importantly, rapid direct action of estradiol in GnRH neurons is mediated through membrane or membrane associated receptors, such as GPR30, STX-sensitive receptors, and ERβ. In this review, possible implications of this rapid estradiol action in GnRH neurons are discussed. PMID:22654841

  3. Characterization of GnRH receptors in bovine pituitary membranes.

    PubMed

    Hazum, E; Keinan, D

    1984-05-01

    Bovine pituitary gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptors were characterized and identified utilizing a superactive GnRH analog, Buserelin [( D-Ser(t-Bu)6, des-Gly10-ethylamide]-GnRH), and a photoreactive GnRH analog, [azidobenzoyl-D- Lys6 ]-GnRH. Both analogs bind with high affinity to a single class of receptors, with apparent IC50 values of 0.5 nM and 1 nM, respectively. The binding of 125I-labeled Buserelin to pituitary membranes was inhibited, in a dose-responsive manner, by both trypsin and chymotrypsin, with the former being less effective. Neuraminidase at a concentration up to 100 micrograms/ml did not affect the binding. Lectins, such as concanavalin A and wheat-germ agglutinin, at a concentration range of 20-200 micrograms/ml had no effect on the binding, whereas soybean agglutinin at high concentrations (150 and 200 micrograms/ml) slightly inhibited the specific binding. Photoaffinity labeling of the bovine pituitary GnRH receptors resulted in the identification of two specific bands with apparent molecular weights of 60 K and 30 K daltons. The latter probably represents very low affinity binding sites. Both specific bands were sensitive to trypsin and chymotrypsin treatment but were not affected by neuraminidase treatment. These results suggest a slight difference between rat and bovine pituitary GnRH receptors. PMID:6329848

  4. Metabolic Influences on Reproduction: Adiponectin Attenuates GnRH Neuronal Activity in Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Klenke, Ulrike; Taylor-Burds, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic dysfunctions are often linked to reproductive abnormalities. Adiponectin (ADP), a peripheral hormone secreted by white adipose tissue, is important in energy homeostasis and appetite regulation. GnRH neurons are integral components of the reproductive axis, controlling synthesis, and release of gonadotropins. This report examined whether ADP can directly act on GnRH neurons. Double-label immunofluorescence on brain sections from adult female revealed that a subpopulation of GnRH neurons express ADP receptor (AdipoR)2. GnRH/AdipoR2+ cells were distributed throughout the forebrain. To determine the influence of ADP on GnRH neuronal activity and the signal transduction pathway of AdipoR2, GnRH neurons maintained in explants were assayed using whole-cell patch clamping and calcium imaging. This mouse model system circumvents the dispersed distribution of GnRH neurons within the forebrain, making analysis of large numbers of GnRH cells possible. Single-cell PCR analysis and immunocytochemistry confirmed the presence of AdipoR2 in GnRH neurons in explants. Functional analysis revealed 20% of the total GnRH population responded to ADP, exhibiting hyperpolarization or decreased calcium oscillations. Perturbation studies revealed that ADP activates AMP kinase via the protein kinase Cζ/liver kinase B1 pathway. The modulation of GnRH neuronal activity by ADP demonstrated in this report directly links energy balance to neurons controlling reproduction. PMID:24564393

  5. Serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram inhibits GnRH synthesis and spermatogenesis in the male zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Parvathy; Ogawa, Satoshi; Parhar, Ishwar S

    2015-10-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely used antidepressants for the treatment of depression. However, SSRIs cause sexual side effects such as anorgasmia, erectile dysfunction, and diminished libido that are thought to be mediated through the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) system. In vertebrates, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons play an important role in the control of reproduction. To elucidate the neuroendocrine mechanisms of SSRI-induced reproductive failure, we examined the neuronal association between 5-HT and GnRH (GnRH2 and GnRH3) systems in the male zebrafish. Double-label immunofluorescence and confocal laser microscopy followed by three-dimensional construction analysis showed close associations between 5-HT fibers with GnRH3 fibers and preoptic-GnRH3 cell bodies, but there was no association with GnRH2 cell bodies and fibers. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that short-term treatment (2 wk) with low to medium doses (4 and 40 μg/L, respectively) of citalopram significantly decreased mRNA levels of gnrh3, gonadotropins (lhb and fshb) and 5-HT-related genes (tph2 and sert) in the male zebrafish. In addition, short-term citalopram treatment significantly decreased the fluorescence density of 5-HT and GnRH3 fibers compared with controls. Short-term treatment with low, medium, and high (100 μg/L) citalopram doses had no effects on the profiles of different stages of spermatogenesis, while long-term (1 mo) citalopram treatment with medium and high doses significantly inhibited the different stages of spermatogenesis. These results show morphological and functional associations between the 5-HT and the hypophysiotropic GnHR3 system, which involve SSRI-induced reproductive failures. PMID:26157069

  6. Differential co-localization with choline acetyltransferase in nervus terminalis suggests functional differences for GnRH isoforms in bonnethead sharks (Sphyrna tiburo).

    PubMed

    Moeller, John F; Meredith, Michael

    2010-12-17

    The nervus terminalis (NT) is a vertebrate cranial nerve whose function in adults is unknown. In bonnethead sharks, the nerve is anatomically independent of the olfactory system, with two major cell populations within one or more ganglia along its exposed length. Most cells are immunoreactive for either gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) or RF-amide-like peptides. To define further the cell populations and connectivity, we used double-label immunocytochemistry with antisera to different isoforms of GnRH and to choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). The labeling patterns of two GnRH antisera revealed different populations of GnRH-immunoreactive (ir) cell profiles in the NT ganglion. One antiserum labeled a large group of cells and fibers, which likely contain mammalian GnRH (GnRH-I) as described in previous studies and which were ChAT immunoreactive. The other antiserum labeled large club-like structures, which were anuclear, and a sparse number of fibers, but with no clear labeling of cell bodies in the ganglion. These club structures were choline acetyltrasferase (ChAT)-negative, and preabsorption control tests suggest they may contain chicken-GnRH-II (GnRH-II) or dogfish GnRH. The second major NT ganglion cell-type was immunoreactive for RF-amides, which regulate GnRH release in other vertebrates, and may provide an intraganglionic influence on GnRH release. The immunocytochemical and anatomical differences between the two GnRH-immunoreactive profile types indicate possible functional differences for these isoforms in the NT. The club-like structures may be sites of GnRH release into the general circulation since these structures were observed near blood vessels and resembled structures seen in the median eminence of rats. PMID:20950589

  7. κ-Opioid Receptor Is Colocalized in GnRH and KNDy Cells in the Female Ovine and Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Weems, Peyton W; Witty, Christine F; Amstalden, Marcel; Coolen, Lique M; Goodman, Robert L; Lehman, Michael N

    2016-06-01

    Kisspeptin-neurokinin B-dynorphin (KNDy) cells of the hypothalamus are a key component in the neuroendocrine regulation of GnRH secretion. Evidence in sheep and other species suggests that dynorphin released by KNDy cells inhibits pulsatile GnRH secretion by acting upon κ-opioid receptors (KOR). However, the precise anatomical location and neurochemical phenotype of KOR-expressing cells in sheep remain unknown. To this end, we determined the distribution of KOR mRNA and protein in the brains of luteal phase ewes, using an ovine specific KOR mRNA probe for in situ hybridization and an antibody whose specificity we confirmed by Western blot analyses and blocking peptide controls. KOR cells were observed in a number of regions, including the preoptic area (POA); anterior hypothalamic area; supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei; ventromedial, dorsomedial, and lateral hypothalamus; and arcuate nucleus. Next, we determined whether KOR is colocalized in KNDy and/or GnRH cells. Dual-label immunofluorescence and confocal analysis of the KNDy population showed a high degree of colocalization, with greater than 90% of these neurons containing KOR. Surprisingly, GnRH cells also showed high levels of colocalization in sheep, ranging from 74.4% to 95.4% for GnRH cells in the POA and medial basal hypothalamus, respectively. Similarly, 97.4% of GnRH neurons in the POA of ovariectomized, steroid-primed female rats also contained immunoreactive KOR protein. These findings suggest that the inhibitory effects of dynorphin on pulsatile GnRH secretion may occur either indirectly by actions upon KOR within the KNDy population and/or directly via the activation of KOR on GnRH cells. PMID:27064940

  8. LH response to GnRH blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Luteinizing hormone response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone ... GnRH is a hormone made by the hypothalamus gland. LH is made by the pituitary gland. GnRH causes (stimulates) the pituitary gland to ...

  9. Physiology of the GnRH neuron: Studies from embryonic GnRH neurons

    PubMed Central

    Constantin, S.

    2011-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-secreting neurons are the final output of the central nervous system driving fertility in all mammals. Although it has been known for decades that the efficiency of communication between the hypothalamus and the pituitary depends on the pulsatile profile of GnRH secretion, how GnRH neuronal activity is patterned to generate pulses at the median eminence is unknown. To date, the scattered distribution of the GnRH cell bodies remains the main limitation to assess the cellular events which could lead to pulsatile GnRH secretion. Taking advantage of the unique developmental feature of GnRH neurons, the nasal explant model allows primary GnRH neurons to be maintained within a micro-network where pulsatile secretion is preserved and where individual cellular activity can be monitored simultaneously across the cell population. This article summarizes data from work using this in vitro model, and brings some insights into GnRH cellular physiology. PMID:21443528

  10. Kisspeptin is a component of the pulse generator for GnRH secretion in female sheep but not the pulse generator.

    PubMed

    Ezzat, Ahmed; Pereira, Alda; Clarke, Iain J

    2015-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that kisspeptin cells constitute the "pulse generator" for GnRH secretion. In ewes, we determined whether iv administered kisspeptin elicits a secretory pulse of LH in anaesthetized, sex-steroid suppressed ovariectomized ewes. A response was seen in both anaesthetized and conscious animals, which was not associated with induction of c-Fos labeling in GnRH cells, supporting the notion that kisspeptin acts on the neurosecretory GnRH terminals. Response was lower in the anaesthetized animals, suggesting that some nonkisspeptin elements may be involved in GnRH responses. Microinjection of kisspeptin (100 nmol) into the median eminence of conscious ewes elicited a pulse of LH, indicating that kisspeptin acts at this level to cause GnRH secretion. To determine which cells are activated at the time of GnRH secretion, we blood sampled 18 ewes during the luteal phase of the estrous cycle and harvested brains after 3 hours. Three of these ewes displayed a pulse of LH within 30 minutes of euthanasia. An increase in c-Fos labeling was seen in kisspeptin and glutamate cells of the arcuate nucleus but not in GnRH neurons, preoptic kisspeptin neurons, or preoptic glutamate neurons. Immunohistochemistry in 4 hypothalami showed that 72% of arcuate kisspeptin cells receive glutamatergic input. These data support the concept that the kisspeptin cells of the arcuate nucleus drive pulsatile secretion of GnRH at the level of the median eminence, but this may involve "upstream" input from glutamate cells. We conclude that the pulse generator for GnRH secretion involves more than 1 element. PMID:25710282

  11. Courtship interactions stimulate rapid changes in GnRH synthesis in male ring doves

    PubMed Central

    Mantei, Kristen E.; Ramakrishnan, Selvakumar; Sharp, Peter J.; Buntin, John D.

    2008-01-01

    Many birds and mammals show changes in the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in response to social or sexual interactions between breeding partners. While alterations in GnRH neuronal activity play an important role in stimulating these changes, it remains unclear if acute behaviorally-induced alterations in GnRH release are accompanied by parallel changes in GnRH synthesis. To investigate this relationship, we examined changes in the activity of GnRH neurons in the brains of male ring doves following brief periods of courtship interactions with females. Such interactions have been previously shown to increase plasma LH in courting male doves at 24 h, but not at 1 h, after pairing with females. In the first study, males allowed to court females for 2 h had 60% more cells that showed immunocytochemical labeling for GnRH-I in the preoptic area (POA) of the hypothalamus than did control males that remained isolated from females. To determine whether an increase in GnRH gene expression preceded this increase in GnRH immunoreactivity in the POA, changes in the number of cells with detectable GnRH-I mRNA in the POA were measured by in situ hybridization following a 1 h period of courtship interactions with females. In this second study, courting males exhibited 40% more cells with GnRH-I in this region than did isolated control males. GnRH-immunoreactive neurons in two other diencephalic regions failed to show these courtship-induced changes. Plasma LH was not elevated after 1 or 2 h of courtship. These results demonstrate that the release of GnRH-I in the POA that is presumably responsible for courtship-induced pituitary and gonadal activation is accompanied by a rapid increase in GnRH synthesis that occurs before plasma LH levels increase. We suggest that this increase in GnRH synthesis is necessary to support the extended period of HPG axis activation that is seen in this species during the 5–10 day period of courtship and nest building activity. PMID

  12. A Novel Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone 1 (Gnrh1) Enhancer-Derived Noncoding RNA Regulates Gnrh1 Gene Expression in GnRH Neuronal Cell Models

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Polly P.; Brusman, Liza E.; Iyer, Anita K.; Webster, Nicholas J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), a neuropeptide released from a small population of neurons in the hypothalamus, is the central mediator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and is required for normal reproductive development and function. Evolutionarily conserved regulatory elements in the mouse, rat, and human Gnrh1 gene include three enhancers and the proximal promoter, which confer Gnrh1 gene expression specifically in GnRH neurons. In immortalized mouse hypothalamic GnRH (GT1-7) neurons, which show pulsatile GnRH release in culture, RNA sequencing and RT-qPCR revealed that expression of a novel long noncoding RNA at Gnrh1 enhancer 1 correlates with high levels of GnRH mRNA expression. In GT1-7 neurons, which contain a transgene carrying 3 kb of the rat Gnrh1 regulatory region, both the mouse and rat Gnrh1 enhancer-derived noncoding RNAs (GnRH-E1 RNAs) are expressed. We investigated the characteristics and function of the endogenous mouse GnRH-E1 RNA. Strand-specific RT-PCR analysis of GnRH-E1 RNA in GT1-7 cells revealed GnRH-E1 RNAs that are transcribed in the sense and antisense directions from distinct 5’ start sites, are 3’ polyadenylated, and are over 2 kb in length. These RNAs are localized in the nucleus and have a half-life of over 8 hours. In GT1-7 neurons, siRNA knockdown of mouse GnRH-E1 RNA resulted in a significant decrease in the expression of the Gnrh1 primary transcript and Gnrh1 mRNA. Over-expression of either the sense or antisense mouse GnRH-E1 RNA in immature, migratory GnRH (GN11) neurons, which do not express either GnRH-E1 RNA or GnRH mRNA, induced the transcriptional activity of co-transfected rat Gnrh1 gene regulatory elements, where the induction requires the presence of the rat Gnrh1 promoter. Together, these data indicate that GnRH-E1 RNA is an inducer of Gnrh1 gene expression. GnRH-E1 RNA may play an important role in the development and maturation of GnRH neurons. PMID:27389022

  13. [GnRH analogs in gynecology. Possibilities for therapeutic use].

    PubMed

    Niesert, S

    1990-09-10

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists are synthetic peptide analogues of the natural gonadotropin releasing hormone with a stronger and more prolonged effect than the natural GnRH. Repeated administration of GnRH agonists induces pituitary desensitization followed by a decrease in gonadotropin secretion and estradiol synthesis. Thus reversible hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is produced. Consequently, estrogen-dependent diseases can be treated successfully with GnRH analogues. The therapeutic results obtained in patients with endometriosis, leiomyoma, pubertas praecox, and metastatic breast cancer are discussed. Furthermore the contraceptive properties of GnRH analogues, and combination treatment with HMG to induce ovulation is reviewed. PMID:2262188

  14. Neurokinin B Causes Acute GnRH Secretion and Repression of GnRH Transcription in GT1–7 GnRH Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Glidewell-Kenney, Christine A.; Shao, Paul P.; Iyer, Anita K.; Grove, Anna M. H.; Meadows, Jason D.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic studies in human patients with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) identified mutations in the genes that encode neurokinin B (NKB) and the neurokinin 3 receptor (NK3R). However, determining the mechanism whereby NKB regulates gonadotropin secretion has been difficult because of conflicting results from in vivo studies investigating the luteinizing hormone (LH) response to senktide, a NK3R agonist. NK3R is expressed in a subset of GnRH neurons and in kisspeptin neurons that are known to regulate GnRH secretion. Thus, one potential source of inconsistency is that NKB could produce opposing direct and indirect effects on GnRH secretion. Here, we employ the GT1-7 cell model to elucidate the direct effects of NKB on GnRH neuron function. We find that GT1-7 cells express NK3R and respond to acute senktide treatment with c-Fos induction and increased GnRH secretion. In contrast, long-term senktide treatment decreased GnRH secretion. Next, we focus on the examination of the mechanism underlying the long-term decrease in secretion and determine that senktide treatment represses transcription of GnRH. We further show that this repression of GnRH transcription may involve enhanced c-Fos protein binding at novel activator protein-1 (AP-1) half-sites identified in enhancer 1 and the promoter, as well as chromatin remodeling at the promoter of the GnRH gene. These data indicate that NKB could directly regulate secretion from NK3R-expressing GnRH neurons. Furthermore, whether the response is inhibitory or stimulatory toward GnRH secretion could depend on the history or length of exposure to NKB because of a repressive effect on GnRH transcription. PMID:23393128

  15. Comparison of GnRH Agonist, GnRH Antagonist, and GnRH Antagonist Mild Protocol of Controlled Ovarian Hyperstimulation in Good Prognosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vrtacnik-Bokal, Eda; Pozlep, Barbara; Virant-Klun, Irma

    2015-01-01

    The reports on how to stimulate the ovaries for oocyte retrieval in good prognosis patients are contradictory and often favor one type of controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH). For this reason, we retrospectively analyzed data from IVF/ICSI cycles carried out at our IVF Unit in good prognosis patients (aged <38 years, first and second attempts of IVF/ICSI, more than 3 oocytes retrieved) to elucidate which type of COH is optimal at our condition. The included patients were undergoing COH using GnRH agonist, GnRH antagonist or GnRH antagonist mild protocol in combination with gonadotrophins. We found significant differences in the average number of retrieved oocytes, immature oocytes, fertilized oocytes, embryos, transferred embryos, embryos frozen per cycle, and cycles with embryo freezing between studied COH protocols. Although there were no differences in live birth rate (LBR), miscarriages, and ectopic pregnancies between compared protocols, pregnancy rate was significantly higher in GnRH antagonist mild protocol in comparison with both GnRH antagonist and GnRH agonist protocols and cumulative LBR per cycle was significantly higher in GnRH antagonist mild protocol in comparison to GnRH agonist protocol. Our data show that GnRH antagonist mild protocol of COH could be the best method of choice in good prognosis patients. PMID:25866508

  16. Newborn GnRH neurons in the adult forebrain of the ring dove.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mei-Fang; Alexander, Katherine; Zhou, Shiliang; Bonder, Edward; Chuang, Ling-Shiang

    2011-06-01

    The preoptic area of the hypothalamus is a key area that produces gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH). In birds, the chicken GnRH-I-form neurons are responsible for the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal system, which controls reproduction. In the ring dove, electrolytic lesion in the adult hypothalamus induces neurogenesis. In this study, we determined whether adult neurogenesis is involved in repairing GnRH neurons, specifically by generating newborn cells exhibiting GnRH-I immunoreactive properties. We selectively applied electrolytic lesions to three different regions of the diencephalon, including the preoptic area, which contains GnRH-I neurons, and identified new cells (BrdU-positive cells) that co-labeled with GnRH-I-immunoreactive cells. The BrdU(+)/GnRH(+) double labeled cells were then confirmed with confocal laser analysis. In brains of both male and female ring doves we found new neurons at the lesion site of the preoptic region that were GnRH-I immunoreactive. However, the total number of GnRH neurons in the lesioned brains was less than that of sham-lesioned brains. When two other regions of the diencephalon that contain GnRH-I neurons were damaged, no recruitment of new GnRH-I neurons was detected. The rate of neurogenesis depends on the bird's reproductive phase when the lesion was applied. We found BrdU(+)/GnRH(+) double-labeled cells almost exclusively during the pre-laying phase when birds are engaged in active courtship that leads to egg laying. Our observations suggest that recruitment of GnRH immunoreactive new neurons is restricted to the hypothalamic region and is sensitive to the reproductive stage of the birds. PMID:21443878

  17. Evolution of GnRH ligand precursors and GnRH receptors in protochordate and vertebrate species.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Kevin; Millar, Robert P

    2004-12-01

    Primary structure relationships between GnRH precursors or GnRH receptors have received significant attention recently due to rapid DNA sequence determination of gene fragments and cDNAs from diverse species. Concepts concerning the evolutionary history of the GnRH system and its function in mammals, including humans, are likely to be modified as more complete sequence information becomes available. Current evidence suggests occurrence of fewer GnRH ligand and GnRH receptor genes in mammals compared to protochordates, fish and amphibians. Whilst several sequence-related GnRH decapeptide precursors and 2 or 3 separate GnRH receptors are encoded within the genomes of protochordates, fish and amphibians, only two types of GnRH (GnRH-I and GnRH-II) and two GnRH receptors occur in mammals. In addition, fish and mammalian genomes both retain inactive remnants of GnRH ligand or GnRH receptor genes. The number of distinct GnRH receptor genes in teleosts (at least five complete genes in pufferfish and three in zebrafish) partly reflects whole genome duplication during the evolution of this order of animals. Three GnRH receptor genes occur in certain frog species, consistent with the occurrence of up to three types of prepro-GnRH in amphibians. In contrast, only one functional GnRH receptor gene (the type I GnRH receptor) has been identified in humans and chimpanzees and a gene encoding a second receptor, homologous to a functional monkey receptor (the type II GnRH receptor), is either partially or completely silenced in a range of mammalian species (human, chimpanzee, sheep, cow, rat, and mouse). Further work is required to determine the significance of species-specific differences in the GnRH system to reproductive biology. For instance, recent data show that even species as closely related as humans and chimpanzees exhibit important organisational changes in the genes comprising the GnRH system. PMID:15560865

  18. Kisspeptin Activates Ankrd 26 Gene Expression in Migrating Embryonic GnRH Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Soga, Tomoko; Lim, Wei Ling; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng; Parhar, Ishwar S.

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptin, a newly discovered neuropeptide, regulates gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Kisspeptins are a large RF-amide family of peptides. The kisspeptin coded by KiSS-1 gene is a 145-amino acid protein that is cleaved to C-terminal peptide kisspeptin-10. G-protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) has been identified as a kisspeptin receptor, and it is expressed in GnRH neurons and in a variety of cancer cells. In this study, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) labeled GnRH cells with migratory properties, which express GPR54, served as a model to study the effects of kisspeptin on cell migration. We monitored EGFP–GnRH neuronal migration in brain slide culture of embryonic day 14 transgenic rat by live cell imaging system and studied the effects of kisspeptin-10 (1 nM) treatment for 36 h on GnRH migration. Furthermore, to determine kisspeptin-induced molecular pathways related with apoptosis and cytoskeletal changes during neuronal migration, we studied the expression levels of candidate genes in laser-captured EGFP–GnRH neurons by real-time PCR. We found that there was no change in the expression level of genes related to cell proliferation and apoptosis. The expression of ankyrin repeat domain-containing protein (ankrd) 26 in EGFP–GnRH neurons was upregulated by the exposure to kisspeptin. These studies suggest that ankrd 26 gene plays an unidentified role in regulating neuronal movement mediated by kisspeptin–GPR54 signaling, which could be a potential pathway to suppress cell migration. PMID:26973595

  19. Kisspeptin Activates Ankrd 26 Gene Expression in Migrating Embryonic GnRH Neurons.

    PubMed

    Soga, Tomoko; Lim, Wei Ling; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng; Parhar, Ishwar S

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptin, a newly discovered neuropeptide, regulates gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Kisspeptins are a large RF-amide family of peptides. The kisspeptin coded by KiSS-1 gene is a 145-amino acid protein that is cleaved to C-terminal peptide kisspeptin-10. G-protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) has been identified as a kisspeptin receptor, and it is expressed in GnRH neurons and in a variety of cancer cells. In this study, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) labeled GnRH cells with migratory properties, which express GPR54, served as a model to study the effects of kisspeptin on cell migration. We monitored EGFP-GnRH neuronal migration in brain slide culture of embryonic day 14 transgenic rat by live cell imaging system and studied the effects of kisspeptin-10 (1 nM) treatment for 36 h on GnRH migration. Furthermore, to determine kisspeptin-induced molecular pathways related with apoptosis and cytoskeletal changes during neuronal migration, we studied the expression levels of candidate genes in laser-captured EGFP-GnRH neurons by real-time PCR. We found that there was no change in the expression level of genes related to cell proliferation and apoptosis. The expression of ankyrin repeat domain-containing protein (ankrd) 26 in EGFP-GnRH neurons was upregulated by the exposure to kisspeptin. These studies suggest that ankrd 26 gene plays an unidentified role in regulating neuronal movement mediated by kisspeptin-GPR54 signaling, which could be a potential pathway to suppress cell migration. PMID:26973595

  20. Human GnRH Deficiency: A Unique Disease Model to Unravel the Ontogeny of GnRH Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Ravikumar; Dwyer, Andrew; Seminara, Stephanie B.; Pitteloud, Nelly; Kaiser, Ursula B.; Crowley, William F.

    2010-01-01

    Evolutionary survival of a species is largely a function of its reproductive fitness. In mammals, a sparsely populated and widely dispersed network of hypothalamic neurons, the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons, serve as the pilot light of reproduction via coordinated secretion of GnRH. Since it first description, human GnRH deficiency has been recognized both clinically and genetically as a heterogeneous disease. A spectrum of different reproductive phenotypes comprised of congenital GnRH deficiency with anosmia (Kallmann syndrome), congenital GnRH deficiency with normal olfaction (normosmic idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism), and adult-onset hypogonadotropic hypogonadism has been described. In the last two decades, several genes and pathways which govern GnRH ontogeny have been discovered by studying humans with GnRH deficiency. More importantly, detailed study of these patients has highlighted the emerging theme of oligogenicity and genotypic synergism, and also expanded the phenotypic diversity with the documentation of reversal of GnRH deficiency later in adulthood in some patients. The underlying genetic defect has also helped understand the associated nonreproductive phenotypes seen in some of these patients. These insights now provide practicing clinicians with targeted genetic diagnostic strategies and also impact on clinical management. PMID:20606386

  1. GnRH receptors and peptides: skating backward.

    PubMed

    Roch, Graeme J; Busby, Ellen R; Sherwood, Nancy M

    2014-12-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and its receptor are essential for reproduction in vertebrates. Although there are three major types of GnRH peptides and two major types of receptors in vertebrates, the pattern of distribution is unusual. Evidence is presented from genome mining that type I GnRHRs are not restricted to mammals, but can be found in the lobe-finned and cartilaginous fishes. This implies that this tail-less GnRH receptor emerged early in vertebrate evolution, followed by several independent losses in different lineages. Also, we have identified representatives from the three major GnRH peptide types (mammalian GnRH1, vertebrate GnRH2 and dogfish GnRH3) in a single cartilaginous fish, the little skate. Skate and coelacanth are the only examples of animals with both type I and II GnRH receptors and all three peptide types, suggesting this was the ancestral condition in vertebrates. Our analysis of receptor synteny in combination with phylogeny suggests that there were three GnRH receptor types present before the two rounds of whole genome duplication in early vertebrates. To further understand the origin of the GnRH peptide-receptor system, the relationship of vertebrate and invertebrate homologs was examined. Our evidence supports the hypothesis of a GnRH superfamily with a common ancestor for the vertebrate GnRHs, invertebrate (inv)GnRHs, corazonins and adipokinetic hormones. The invertebrate deuterostomes (echinoderms, hemichordates and amphioxus) have derived GnRH-like peptides, although one amphioxus GnRH with a syntenic relationship to human GnRHs has been shown to be functional. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that gene duplications in the ancestral bilaterian produced two receptor types, one of which became adipokinetic hormone receptor/GnRHR and the other corazonin receptor/invGnRHR. It appears that the ancestral deuterostome had both a GnRHR and invGnRHR, and this is still the case in amphioxus. During the transition to vertebrates both

  2. Cloning and functional analysis of promoters of three GnRH genes in a cichlid

    SciTech Connect

    Kitahashi, Takashi; Sato, Hideki; Sakuma, Yasuo; Parhar, Ishwar S. . E-mail: ishwar@nms.ac.jp

    2005-10-21

    Mechanisms regulating gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) types, a key molecule for reproductive physiology, remain unclear. In the present study, we cloned the promoters of GnRH1, GnRH2, and GnRH3 genes in the tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus; and found putative binding sites for glucocorticoid receptors, Sp1, C/EBP, GATA, and Oct-1, but not for androgen receptors in all three GnRH promoters using computer analysis. The presence of binding sites for progesterone receptors in GnRH1, estrogen receptors in GnRH1 and GnRH2, and thyroid hormone receptors in GnRH1 and GnRH3 suggests direct action of steroid hormones on GnRH types. Our observation of SOX and LINE-like sequences exclusively in GnRH1, COUP in GnRH2, and retinoid X receptors in GnRH3 suggests their role in sexual differentiation, midbrain segmentation, and visual cue integration, respectively. Thus, the characteristic binding sites for nuclear receptors and transcription factors support the notion that each GnRH type is regulated differently and has distinct physiological roles.

  3. Identification and expression of GnRH2 and GnRH3 in the black sea bass (Centropristis striata), a hermaphroditic teleost.

    PubMed

    Morin, Scott J; Decatur, Wayne A; Breton, Timothy S; Marquis, Timothy J; Hayes, Mary K; Berlinsky, David L; Sower, Stacia A

    2015-04-01

    We cloned two cDNAs for two gonadotropin-releasing hormones, GnRH2 (chicken GnRH-II) and GnRH3 (salmon GnRH), respectively, from the black sea bass (Centropristis striata). Black sea bass are protogynous hermaphroditic teleosts that change from females to males between 2 and 5 years of age. Similar to other GnRH precursors, the precursors of black sea bass GnRH2 and GnRH23 consisted of a signal peptide, decapeptide, a downstream processing site, and a GnRH-associated peptide. Our analyses failed to identify GnRH1. GnRH3 precursor transcript was more widely distributed in a variety of tissues compared with GnRH2. Further examination of GnRH expression and gonadal histology was done in black sea bass from three different size groups: small (11.4-44.1 g), medium (179.4-352.2 g) and large (393.8-607.3 g). Interestingly, GnRH3 expression occurred only in the pituitaries of males in the small and medium groups compared with expression of GnRH2. Future functional studies of the sea bass GnRHs will be valuable in elucidating the potential underlying neuroendocrine mechanisms of black sea bass reproduction and may ultimately contribute to management advances in this commercially important fish. PMID:25255937

  4. Cellular localization of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) I and GnRH II in first-trimester human placenta and decidua.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chun-Shan; Beristain, Alexander G; MacCalman, Colin D; Leung, Peter C K

    2004-03-01

    There is increasing evidence to suggest that the classical form of GnRH (GnRH I) and the second mammalian form of this hormone, GnRH II, play regulatory roles in human implantation and placentation. To date, the cellular distribution of these two hormones at the maternal-fetal interface remains poorly characterized. In these studies, we localized GnRH I and GnRH II expression in human placenta and decidua to distinct subpopulations of cells isolated from these tissues and in a chorionic villous/decidual tissue coculture system that mimics many of the cellular events of early placentation. GnRH I and GnRH II mRNA transcripts were detected in first-trimester placenta, whereas only GnRH I was detected in tissues obtained at term. Both hormones were further immunolocalized to the mononucleate villous and distinct subpopulations of extravillous cytotrophoblasts of the placenta in vivo and in vitro. In contrast, GnRH I but not GnRH II was expressed in the outer multinucleated syncytial trophoblast layer of first trimester chorionic villi and in cultures of villous cytotrophoblasts allowed to undergo differentiation and fusion in vitro. GnRH I and GnRH II were also found to be coexpressed in first-trimester decidua and primary cultures of decidual stromal cells. Collectively, these observations demonstrate that GnRH I and GnRH II have both common and discrete cellular distributions in the placenta and decidua and suggest that these two hormones are capable of eliciting their biological actions in an autocrine and/or paracrine manner within and between these maternal and fetal cellular compartments. PMID:15001648

  5. Insulin Receptor Signaling in the GnRH Neuron Plays a Role in the Abnormal GnRH Pulsatility of Obese Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    DiVall, Sara A.; Herrera, Danny; Sklar, Bonnie; Wu, Sheng; Wondisford, Fredric; Radovick, Sally; Wolfe, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Infertility associated with obesity is characterized by abnormal hormone release from reproductive tissues in the hypothalamus, pituitary, and ovary. These tissues maintain insulin sensitivity upon peripheral insulin resistance. Insulin receptor signaling may play a role in the dysregulation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion in obesity, but the interdependence of hormone secretion in the reproductive axis and the multi-hormone and tissue dysfunction in obesity hinders investigations of putative contributing factors to the disrupted GnRH secretion. To determine the role of GnRH insulin receptor signaling in the dysregulation of GnRH secretion in obesity, we created murine models of diet-induced obesity (DIO) with and without intact insulin signaling in the GnRH neuron. Obese control female mice were infertile with higher luteinizing hormone levels and higher GnRH pulse amplitude and total pulsatile secretion compared to lean control mice. In contrast, DIO mice with a GnRH specific knockout of insulin receptor had improved fertility, luteinizing hormone levels approaching lean mice, and GnRH pulse amplitude and total secretion similar to lean mice. Pituitary responsiveness was similar between genotypes. These results suggest that in the obese state, insulin receptor signaling in GnRH neurons increases GnRH pulsatile secretion and consequent LH secretion, contributing to reproductive dysfunction. PMID:25780937

  6. Excitatory effects of the puberty-initiating peptide kisspeptin and group I metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists differentiate two distinct subpopulations of GnRH neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dumalska, Iryna; Wu, Min; Morozova, Elena; Liu, Rongjian; van den Pol, Anthony; Alreja, Meenakshi

    2008-01-01

    Activation of the G protein-coupled receptor, GPR54 by kisspeptins during normal puberty promotes the central release of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) that in turn leads to reproductive maturation. In humans and mice, a loss of function mutations of GPR54 prevents the onset of puberty and leads to hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and infertility. Using electrophysiological, morphological, molecular and retrograde-labeling techniques in brain slices prepared from vGluT2-GFP and GnRH-GFP mice, we demonstrate the existence of two physiologically distinct subpopulations of GnRH neurons. The first subpopulation is comprised of septal GnRH neurons that co-localize vGluT2 and GFP and is insensitive to metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists, but is exquisitely sensitive to kisspeptin which closes potassium channels to dramatically initiate a long-lasting activation in neurons from pre- and post-pubertal mice of both sexes. A second subpopulation is insensitive to kisspeptin but is uniquely activated by group I metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists. These two physiologically distinct classes of GnRH cells may subserve different functions in the central control of reproduction and fertility. PMID:18685025

  7. LH-independent testosterone secretion is mediated by the interaction between GNRH2 and its receptor within porcine testes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unlike the classical gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH1), the second mammalian isoform (GNRH2) is an ineffective stimulant of gonadotropin release. Species that produce GNRH2 may not maintain a functional GNRH2 receptor (GNRHR2) due to coding errors. A full length GNRHR2 gene has been identified ...

  8. R31C GNRH1 Mutation and Congenital Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Maione, Luigi; Albarel, Frederique; Bouchard, Philippe; Gallant, Megan; Flanagan, Colleen A.; Bobe, Regis; Cohen-Tannoudji, Joelle; Pivonello, Rosario; Colao, Annamaria; Brue, Thierry; Millar, Robert P.; Lombes, Marc; Young, Jacques; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Bouligand, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    Normosmic congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (nCHH) is a rare reproductive disease leading to lack of puberty and infertility. Loss-of-function mutations of GNRH1 gene are a very rare cause of autosomal recessive nCHH. R31C GNRH1 is the only missense mutation that affects the conserved GnRH decapeptide sequence. This mutation was identified in a CpG islet in nine nCHH subjects from four unrelated families, giving evidence for a putative “hot spot”. Interestingly, all the nCHH patients carry this mutation in heterozygosis that strikingly contrasts with the recessive inheritance associated with frame shift and non-sense mutations. Therefore, after exclusion of a second genetic event, a comprehensive functional characterization of the mutant R31C GnRH was undertaken. Using different cellular models, we clearly demonstrate a dramatic reduction of the mutant decapeptide capacity to bind GnRH-receptor, to activate MAPK pathway and to trigger inositol phosphate accumulation and intracellular calcium mobilization. In addition it is less able than wild type to induce lh-beta transcription and LH secretion in gonadotrope cells. Finally, the absence of a negative dominance in vitro offers a unique opportunity to discuss the complex in vivo patho-physiology of this form of nCHH. PMID:23936060

  9. The role of GABA in the regulation of GnRH neurons

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Miho; Fukuda, Atsuo; Nabekura, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons form the final common pathway for the central regulation of reproduction. Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) has long been implicated as one of the major players in the regulation of GnRH neurons. Although GABA is typically an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mature adult central nervous system, most mature GnRH neurons show the unusual characteristic of being excited by GABA. While many reports have provided much insight into the contribution of GABA to the activity of GnRH neurons, the precise physiological role of the excitatory action of GABA on GnRH neurons remains elusive. This brief review presents the current knowledge of the role of GABA signaling in GnRH neuronal activity. We also discuss the modulation of GABA signaling by neurotransmitters and neuromodulators and the functional consequence of GABAergic inputs to GnRH neurons in both the physiology and pathology of reproduction. PMID:25506316

  10. Androgen Receptor Repression of GnRH Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Brayman, Melissa J.; Pepa, Patricia A.; Berdy, Sara E.

    2012-01-01

    Alterations in androgen levels lead to reproductive defects in both males and females, including hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, anovulation, and infertility. Androgens have been shown to down-regulate GnRH mRNA levels through an androgen receptor (AR)-dependent mechanism. Here, we investigate how androgen regulates expression from the GnRH regulatory region in the GT1-7 cell line, a model of GnRH neurons. A synthetic androgen, R1881, repressed transcription from the GnRH promoter (GnRH-P) in an AR-dependent manner, and liganded AR associated with the chromatin at the GnRH-P in live GT1-7 cells. The three known octamer-binding transcription factor-1 (Oct-1) binding sites in GnRH-P were required for AR-mediated repression, although other sequences were also involved. Although a multimer of the consensus Oct-1 binding site was not repressed, a multimer of the cluster of Oct-1, Pre-B cell leukemia transcription factor (Pbx)/Prep, and NK2 homeobox 1 (Nkx2.1) binding sites, found at −106/−91 in GnRH-P, was sufficient for repression. In fact, overexpression of any of these factors disrupted the androgen response, indicating that a balance of factors in this tripartite complex is required for AR repression. AR bound to this region in EMSA, indicating a direct interaction of AR with DNA or with other transcription factors bound to GnRH-P at this sequence. Collectively, our data demonstrate that GnRH transcription is repressed by AR via multiple sequences in GnRH-P, including three Oct-1 binding sites, and that this repression requires the complex interaction of several transcription factors. PMID:22074952

  11. Neuronal Gonadotrophin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) and Astrocytic Gonadotrophin Inhibitory Hormone (GnIH) Immunoreactivity in the Adult Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ferris, J K; Tse, M T; Hamson, D K; Taves, M D; Ma, C; McGuire, N; Arckens, L; Bentley, G E; Galea, L A M; Floresco, S B; Soma, K K

    2015-10-01

    Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and gonadotrophin inhibitory hormone (GnIH) are neuropeptides secreted by the hypothalamus that regulate reproduction. GnRH receptors are not only present in the anterior pituitary, but also are abundantly expressed in the hippocampus of rats, suggesting that GnRH regulates hippocampal function. GnIH inhibits pituitary gonadotrophin secretion and is also expressed in the hippocampus of a songbird; its role outside of the reproductive axis is not well established. In the present study, we employed immunohistochemistry to examine three forms of GnRH [mammalian GnRH-I (mGnRH-I), chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II) and lamprey GnRH-III (lGnRH-III)] and GnIH in the adult rat hippocampus. No mGnRH-I and cGnRH-II+ cell bodies were present in the hippocampus. Sparse mGnRH-I and cGnRH-II+ fibres were present within the CA1 and CA3 fields of the hippocampus, along the hippocampal fissure, and within the hilus of the dentate gyrus. No lGnRH-III was present in the rodent hippocampus. GnIH-immunoreactivity was present in the hippocampus in cell bodies that resembled astrocytes. Males had more GnIH+ cells in the hilus of the dentate gyrus than females. To confirm the GnIH+ cell body phenotype, we performed double-label immunofluorescence against GnIH, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and NeuN. Immunofluorescence revealed that all GnIH+ cell bodies in the hippocampus also contained GFAP, a marker of astrocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that GnRH does not reach GnRH receptors in the rat hippocampus primarily via synaptic release. By contrast, GnIH might be synthesised locally in the rat hippocampus by astrocytes. These data shed light on the sites of action and possible functions of GnRH and GnIH outside of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. PMID:26258544

  12. Olfactory ensheathing cells form the microenvironment of migrating GnRH-1 neurons during mouse development.

    PubMed

    Geller, Sarah; Kolasa, Elise; Tillet, Yves; Duittoz, Anne; Vaudin, Pascal

    2013-04-01

    During development, GnRH-1 neurons differentiate extracerebraly from the nasal placode and migrate from the vomeronasal organ to the forebrain along vomeronasal and terminal nerves. Numerous studies have described the influence of different molecules on the migration of GnRH-1 neurons, however, the role of microenvironment cells remains poorly understood. This study used GFAP-GFP transgenic mice to detect glial cells at early developmental stages. Using nasal explant cultures, the comigration of glial cells with GnRH-1 neurons was clearly demonstrated. This in vitro approach showed that glial cells began migrating from the explants before GnRH-1 neurons. They remained ahead of the GnRH-1 migratory front and stopped migrating after the GnRH-1 neurons. The association of these glial cells with the axons combined with gene expression analysis of GFAP-GFP sorted cells enabled them to be identified as olfactory ensheathing cells (OEC). Immunohistochemical analysis revealed the presence of multiple glial cell-type markers showing several OEC subpopulations surrounding GnRH-1 neurons. Moreover, these OEC expressed genes whose products are involved in the migration of GnRH-1 neurons, such as Nelf and Semaphorin 4. In situ data confirmed that the majority of the GnRH-1 neurons were associated with glial cells along the vomeronasal axons in nasal septum and terminal nerves in the nasal forebrain junction as early as E12.5. Overall, these data demonstrate an OEC microenvironment for migrating GnRH-1 neurons during mouse development. The fact that this glial cell type precedes GnRH-1 neurons and encodes for molecules involved in their nasal migration suggests that it participates in the GnRH-1 system ontogenesis. PMID:23404564

  13. Identified lhb-expressing cells from medaka (Oryzias latipes) show similar Ca(2+)-response to all endogenous Gnrh forms, and reveal expression of a novel fourth Gnrh receptor.

    PubMed

    Strandabø, Rønnaug A U; Grønlien, Heidi K; Ager-Wick, Eirill; Nourizadeh-Lillabadi, Rasoul; Hildahl, Jon P; Weltzien, Finn-Arne; Haug, Trude M

    2016-04-01

    We have previously characterized the response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Gnrh) 2 in luteinizing hormone (lhb)-expressing cells from green fluorescent protein (Gfp)-transgenic medaka (Oryzias latipes), with regard to changes in the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration. In the current study we present the corresponding responses to Gnrh1 and Gnrh3. Ca(2+) imaging revealed three response patterns to Gnrh1 and Gnrh3, one monophasic and two types of biphasic patterns. There were few significant differences in the shape of the response patterns between the three Gnrh forms, although the amplitude of the Ca(2+) signal was considerably lower for Gnrh1 and Gnrh3 than for Gnrh2, and the distribution between the two different biphasic patterns differed. The different putative Ca(2+) sources were examined by depleting intracellular Ca(2+) stores with thapsigargin, or preventing influx of extracellular Ca(2+) by either extracellular Ca(2+) depletion or the L-type Ca(2+)-channel blocker verapamil. Both Gnrh1 and 3 relied on Ca(2+) from both intracellular and extracellular sources, with some unexpected differences in the relative contribution. Furthermore, gene expression of Gnrh-receptors (gnrhr) in whole pituitaries was studied during development from juvenile to adult. Only two of the four identified medaka receptors were expressed in the pituitary, gnrhr1b and gnrhr2a, with the newly discovered gnrhr2a showing the highest expression level at all stages as analyzed by quantitative PCR. While both receptors differed in expression level according to developmental stage, only the expression of gnrhr2a showed a clear-cut increase with gonadal maturation. RNA sequencing analysis of FACS-sorted Gfp-positive lhb-cells revealed that both gnrhr1b and gnrhr2a were expressed in lhb-expressing cells, and confirmed the higher expression of gnrhr2a compared to gnrhr1b. These results show that although lhb-expressing gonadotropes in medaka show similar Ca(2+) response patterns to all three

  14. Zebrafish adult-derived hypothalamic neurospheres generate gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Campos, Christian; Letelier, Joaquín; Ceriani, Ricardo; Whitlock, Kathleen E

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a hypothalamic decapeptide essential for fertility in vertebrates. Human male patients lacking GnRH and treated with hormone therapy can remain fertile after cessation of treatment suggesting that new GnRH neurons can be generated during adult life. We used zebrafish to investigate the neurogenic potential of the adult hypothalamus. Previously we have characterized the development of GnRH cells in the zebrafish linking genetic pathways to the differentiation of neuromodulatory and endocrine GnRH cells in specific regions of the brain. Here, we developed a new method to obtain neural progenitors from the adult hypothalamus in vitro. Using this system, we show that neurospheres derived from the adult hypothalamus can be maintained in culture and subsequently differentiate glia and neurons. Importantly, the adult derived progenitors differentiate into neurons containing GnRH and the number of cells is increased through exposure to either testosterone or GnRH, hormones used in therapeutic treatment in humans. Finally, we show in vivo that a neurogenic niche in the hypothalamus contains GnRH positive neurons. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that neurospheres can be derived from the hypothalamus of the adult zebrafish and that these neural progenitors are capable of producing GnRH containing neurons. PMID:26209533

  15. Expression Analysis of Gnrh1 and Gnrhr1 in Spermatogenic Cells of Rat

    PubMed Central

    Ciaramella, Vincenza; Pariante, Paolo; Fasano, Silvia; Pierantoni, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Hypothalamic Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone (GnRH), via GnRH receptor (GnRHR), is the main actor in the control of reproduction, in that it induces the biosynthesis and the release of pituitary gonadotropins, which in turn promote steroidogenesis and gametogenesis in both sexes. Extrabrain functions of GnRH have been extensively described in the past decades and, in males, local GnRH activity promotes the progression of spermatogenesis and sperm functions at several levels. The canonical localization of Gnrh1 and Gnrhr1 mRNA is Sertoli and Leydig cells, respectively, but ligand and receptor are also expressed in germ cells. Here, we analysed the expression rate of Gnrh1 and Gnrhr1 in rat testis (180 days old) by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and by in situ hybridization we localized Gnrh1 and Gnrhr1 mRNA in different spermatogenic cells of adult animals. Our data confirm the testicular expression of Gnrh1 and of Gnrhr1 in somatic cells and provide evidence that their expression in the germinal compartment is restricted to haploid cells. In addition, not only Sertoli cells connected to spermatids in the last steps of maturation but also Leydig and peritubular myoid cells express Gnrh1. PMID:25861269

  16. Zebrafish adult-derived hypothalamic neurospheres generate gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Campos, Christian; Letelier, Joaquín; Ceriani, Ricardo; Whitlock, Kathleen E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a hypothalamic decapeptide essential for fertility in vertebrates. Human male patients lacking GnRH and treated with hormone therapy can remain fertile after cessation of treatment suggesting that new GnRH neurons can be generated during adult life. We used zebrafish to investigate the neurogenic potential of the adult hypothalamus. Previously we have characterized the development of GnRH cells in the zebrafish linking genetic pathways to the differentiation of neuromodulatory and endocrine GnRH cells in specific regions of the brain. Here, we developed a new method to obtain neural progenitors from the adult hypothalamus in vitro. Using this system, we show that neurospheres derived from the adult hypothalamus can be maintained in culture and subsequently differentiate glia and neurons. Importantly, the adult derived progenitors differentiate into neurons containing GnRH and the number of cells is increased through exposure to either testosterone or GnRH, hormones used in therapeutic treatment in humans. Finally, we show in vivo that a neurogenic niche in the hypothalamus contains GnRH positive neurons. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that neurospheres can be derived from the hypothalamus of the adult zebrafish and that these neural progenitors are capable of producing GnRH containing neurons. PMID:26209533

  17. Comprehensive Analysis of GnRH2 Neuronal Projections in Zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wei; Smith, Olivia; Zmora, Nilli; Xu, Shan; Zohar, Yonathan

    2014-01-01

    The presence and conservation of GnRH2 across vertebrate species suggest important biological roles. However, the function of GnRH2 remains unclear. A good research model for GnRH2 functional studies is still lacking largely due to the absence of GnRH2 in the widely used mouse model. Hence, we used the zebrafish, for which powerful genetic tools are available, and developed a transgenic (Tg) line expressing enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP). The high sensitivity of eGFP, which can diffuse throughout the neuron, enables us to document the complete projectome of GnRH2 neurons at different developmental stages. Fine projection structures were observed without sacrificing the fish. Crossed with the GnRH3:tdTomato Tg line, the GnRH2:eGFP Tg line provides us with an opportunity to visualize the entire GnRH system simultaneously in one organism. This work will provide a framework to understand the function of the highly-conserved GnRH2 system.

  18. GnRH agonist for final oocyte maturation in GnRH antagonist co-treated IVF/ICSI treatment cycles: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, M.A.F.; Abdelmoty, Hatem I.; Ahmed, Mohamed A.S.; Elmohamady, Maged

    2015-01-01

    Final oocyte maturation in GnRH antagonist co-treated IVF/ICSI cycles can be triggered with HCG or a GnRH agonist. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the final oocyte maturation trigger in GnRH antagonist co-treated cycles. Outcome measures were ongoing pregnancy rate (OPR) and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) incidence. Searches: were conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Direct, Cochrane Library, and databases of abstracts. There was a statistically significant difference against the GnRH agonist for OPR in fresh autologous cycles (n = 1024) with an odd ratio (OR) of 0.69 (95% CI: 0.52–0.93). In oocyte-donor cycles (n = 342) there was no evidence of a difference (OR: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.59–1.40). There was a statistically significant difference in favour of GnRH agonist regarding the incidence of OHSS in fresh autologous cycles (OR: 0.06; 95% CI: 0.01–0.33) and donor cycles respectively (OR: 0.06; 95% CI: 0.01–0.27). In conclusion GnRH agonist trigger for final oocyte maturation trigger in GnRH antagonist cycles is safer but less efficient than HCG. PMID:26257931

  19. GnRH mRNA levels in male three-spined sticklebacks, Gasterosteus aculeatus, under different reproductive conditions.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yi Ta; Tseng, Yung Che; Chang, Chia-Hao; Yan, Hong Young; Hwang, Pung Pung; Borg, Bertil

    2015-02-01

    In vertebrates, reproduction is regulated by the brain-pituitary-gonad (BPG) axis, where the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is one of the key components. However, very little is known about the possible role of GnRH in the environmental and feedback control of fish reproduction. To investigate this, full-length gnrh2 (chicken GnRH II) and gnrh3 (salmon GnRH) sequences of male three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus), which are clustered with the taxa of the same GnRH type as other Euteleostei, were cloned and annotated. gnrh1 is absent in this species. The mRNA levels of gnrh2 and gnrh3 in the sticklebacks' brain were measured under breeding and post-breeding conditions as well as in castrated and sham-operated breeding fish and castrated/sham-operated fish kept under long-day (LD 16:8) and short-day (LD 8:16) conditions. Fully breeding males had considerably higher mRNA levels of gnrh2 and gnrh3 in the thalamus (Th) and in the telencephalon and preoptic area (T+POA), respectively, than post-breeding males. Sham-operated breeding males have higher gnrh3 mRNA levels than the corresponding castrated males. Moreover, higher gnrh2 mRNA levels in the Th and higher gnrh3 mRNA levels in the T+POA and hypothalamus (HypTh) were also found in long-day sham-operated males than in sham-operated fish kept under an inhibitory short day photoperiod. Nevertheless, gnrh2 and gnrh3 mRNA levels were not up-regulated in castrated males kept under long-day photoperiod, which suggests that positive feedbacks on the brain-pituitary-gonad axis are necessary for this response. PMID:25446939

  20. Targeted Mutagenesis of the Hypophysiotropic Gnrh3 in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Reveals No Effects on Reproductive Performance

    PubMed Central

    Spicer, Olivia Smith; Wong, Ten-Tsao; Zmora, Nilli; Zohar, Yonathan

    2016-01-01

    Gnrh is the major neuropeptide regulator of vertebrate reproduction, triggering a cascade of events in the pituitary-gonadal axis that result in reproductive competence. Previous research in mice and humans has demonstrated that Gnrh/GNRH null mutations result in hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and infertility. The goal of this study was to eliminate gnrh3 (the hypophysiotropic Gnrh form) function in zebrafish (Danio rerio) to determine how ontogeny and reproductive performance are affected, as well as factors downstream of Gnrh3 along the reproductive axis. Using the TALEN technology, we developed a gnrh3-/- zebrafish line that harbors a 62 bp deletion in the gnrh3 gene. Our gnrh3-/- zebrafish line represents the first targeted and heritable mutation of a Gnrh isoform in any organism. Using immunohistochemistry, we verified that gnrh3-/- fish do not possess Gnrh3 peptide in any regions of the brain. However, other than changes in mRNA levels of pituitary gonadotropin genes (fshb, lhb, and cga) during early development, which are corrected by adulthood, there were no changes in ontogeny and reproduction in gnrh3-/- fish. The gnrh3-/- zebrafish are fertile, displaying normal gametogenesis and reproductive performance in males and females. Together with our previous results that Gnrh3 cell ablation causes infertility, these results indicate that a compensatory mechanism is being activated, which is probably primed early on upon Gnrh3 neuron differentiation and possibly confined to Gnrh3 neurons. Potential compensation factors and sensitive windows of time for compensation during development and puberty should be explored. PMID:27355207

  1. BPA Directly Decreases GnRH Neuronal Activity via Noncanonical Pathway.

    PubMed

    Klenke, Ulrike; Constantin, Stephanie; Wray, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral feedback of gonadal estrogen to the hypothalamus is critical for reproduction. Bisphenol A (BPA), an environmental pollutant with estrogenic actions, can disrupt this feedback and lead to infertility in both humans and animals. GnRH neurons are essential for reproduction, serving as an important link between brain, pituitary, and gonads. Because GnRH neurons express several receptors that bind estrogen, they are potential targets for endocrine disruptors. However, to date, direct effects of BPA on GnRH neurons have not been shown. This study investigated the effects of BPA on GnRH neuronal activity using an explant model in which large numbers of primary GnRH neurons are maintained and express many of the receptors found in vivo. Because oscillations in intracellular calcium have been shown to correlate with electrical activity in GnRH neurons, calcium imaging was used to assay the effects of BPA. Exposure to 50μM BPA significantly decreased GnRH calcium activity. Blockage of γ-aminobutyric acid ergic and glutamatergic input did not abrogate the inhibitory BPA effect, suggesting direct regulation of GnRH neurons by BPA. In addition to estrogen receptor-β, single-cell RT-PCR analysis confirmed that GnRH neurons express G protein-coupled receptor 30 (G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1) and estrogen-related receptor-γ, all potential targets for BPA. Perturbation studies of the signaling pathway revealed that the BPA-mediated inhibition of GnRH neuronal activity occurred independent of estrogen receptors, GPER, or estrogen-related receptor-γ, via a noncanonical pathway. These results provide the first evidence of a direct effect of BPA on GnRH neurons. PMID:26934298

  2. Amphioxus: beginning of vertebrate and end of invertebrate type GnRH receptor lineage.

    PubMed

    Tello, Javier A; Sherwood, Nancy M

    2009-06-01

    In vertebrates, activation of the GnRH receptor is necessary to initiate the reproductive cascade. However, little is known about the characteristics of GnRH receptors before the vertebrates evolved. Recently genome sequencing was completed for amphioxus, Branchiostoma floridae. To understand the GnRH receptors (GnRHR) from this most basal chordate, which is also classified as an invertebrate, we cloned and characterized four GnRHR cDNAs encoded in the amphioxus genome. We found that incubation of GnRH1 (mammalian GnRH) and GnRH2 (chicken GnRH II) with COS7 cells heterologously expressing the amphioxus GnRHRs caused potent intracellular inositol phosphate turnover in two of the receptors. One of the two receptors displayed a clear preference for GnRH1 over GnRH2, a characteristic not previously seen outside the type I mammalian GnRHRs. Phylogenetic analysis grouped the four receptors into two paralogous pairs, with one pair grouping basally with the vertebrate GnRH receptors and the other grouping with the octopus GnRHR-like sequence and the related receptor for insect adipokinetic hormone. Pharmacological studies showed that octopus GnRH-like peptide and adipokinetic hormone induced potent inositol phosphate turnover in one of these other two amphioxus receptors. These data demonstrate the functional conservation of two distinct types of GnRH receptors at the base of chordates. We propose that one receptor type led to vertebrate GnRHRs, whereas the other type, related to the mollusk GnRHR-like receptor, was lost in the vertebrate lineage. This is the first report to suggest that distinct invertebrate and vertebrate GnRHRs are present simultaneously in a basal chordate, amphioxus. PMID:19264870

  3. FACTORS AFFECTING OVULATORY FOLLICLE SIZE AND OVULATION SUCCESS TO GNRH-INDUCED OVULATION IN POSTPARTUM BEEF COWS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the present study, the effects of day of the estrous cycle and ovulatory response at the first GnRH injection on size of the dominant follicle at the second GnRH were examined in multi-parous lactating beef cows (n=60). GnRH was administered on day -9 (GnRH1), prostaglandin F2' on day -2, and Gn...

  4. A microRNA switch regulates the rise in hypothalamic GnRH production before puberty.

    PubMed

    Messina, Andrea; Langlet, Fanny; Chachlaki, Konstantina; Roa, Juan; Rasika, Sowmyalakshmi; Jouy, Nathalie; Gallet, Sarah; Gaytan, Francisco; Parkash, Jyoti; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Giacobini, Paolo; Prevot, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    A sparse population of a few hundred primarily hypothalamic neurons forms the hub of a complex neuroglial network that controls reproduction in mammals by secreting the 'master molecule' gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Timely postnatal changes in GnRH expression are essential for puberty and adult fertility. Here we report that a multilayered microRNA-operated switch with built-in feedback governs increased GnRH expression during the infantile-to-juvenile transition and that impairing microRNA synthesis in GnRH neurons leads to hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and infertility in mice. Two essential components of this switch, miR-200 and miR-155, respectively regulate Zeb1, a repressor of Gnrh transcriptional activators and Gnrh itself, and Cebpb, a nitric oxide-mediated repressor of Gnrh that acts both directly and through Zeb1, in GnRH neurons. This alteration in the delicate balance between inductive and repressive signals induces the normal GnRH-fuelled run-up to correct puberty initiation, and interfering with this process disrupts the neuroendocrine control of reproduction. PMID:27135215

  5. EFFECT OF FOLLICLE SIZE AT TIME OF GNRH-INDUCED OVULATION ON LUTEAL FUNCTION AND FERTILITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GnRH in fixed-time AI protocols results in the ovulation of a wide range of follicle sizes. Multiparous beef cows were assigned to one of three treatments: Cyclic or anestrous cows treated with the CO-Synch protocol and anestrous control cows. CO-Synch treated cows received GnRH (100 mcg; im) on d...

  6. Ovarian cysts in dairy cattle--observations of symptoms and milk progesterone values; therapy with GnRH and a combination of GnRH and PG.

    PubMed

    Koppinen, J; Leino, T; Alanko, M

    1984-01-01

    Ovarian cysts of 59 cows were treated with an intramuscular dose of 50 micrograms GnRH analogue. Half of the cows were 9 days later further treated with 0.5 mg cloprostenol. The clinical symptoms were recorded. Whole milk progesterone was monitored on day of the treatment (GnRH) and on day 7. Most of the cows that had a high progesterone level showed no clinical symptoms of the ovarian cysts. The majority of the cows (50/59) had a low progesterone status (less than 10 nmol/l) at the time of the initial treatment. In only 7 cows the level had not risen by day 7. The cows of GnRH + PG group came into heat sooner (P less than 0.01) and conceived rather well; the treatment-conception interval was not, however, significantly shorter than in the GnRH group. PMID:6442407

  7. Cumulus Cells Gene Expression Profiling in Terms of Oocyte Maturity in Controlled Ovarian Hyperstimulation Using GnRH Agonist or GnRH Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Devjak, Rok; Fon Tacer, Klementina; Juvan, Peter; Virant Klun, Irma; Rozman, Damjana; Vrtačnik Bokal, Eda

    2012-01-01

    In in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) is established by gonadotropins in combination with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists or antagonists, to prevent premature luteinizing hormone (LH) surge. The aim of our study was to improve the understanding of gene expression profile of cumulus cells (CC) in terms of ovarian stimulation protocol and oocyte maturity. We applied Affymetrix gene expression profiling in CC of oocytes at different maturation stages using either GnRH agonists or GnRH antagonists. Two analyses were performed: the first involved CC of immature metaphase I (MI) and mature metaphase II (MII) oocytes where 359 genes were differentially expressed, and the second involved the two GnRH analogues where no differentially expressed genes were observed at the entire transcriptome level. A further analysis of 359 differentially genes was performed, focusing on anti-Müllerian hormone receptor 2 (AMHR2), follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR), vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGFC) and serine protease inhibitor E2 (SERPINE2). Among other differentially expressed genes we observed a marked number of new genes connected to cell adhesion and neurotransmitters such as dopamine, glycine and γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA). No differential expression in CC between the two GnRH analogues supports the findings of clinical studies where no significant difference in live birth rates between both GnRH analogues has been proven. PMID:23082142

  8. Changes to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor extracellular loops differentially affect GnRH analog binding and activation: evidence for distinct ligand-stabilized receptor conformations.

    PubMed

    Pfleger, Kevin D G; Pawson, Adam J; Millar, Robert P

    2008-06-01

    GnRH and its structural variants bind to GnRH receptors from different species with different affinities and specificities. By investigating chimeric receptors that combine regions of mammalian and nonmammalian GnRH receptors, a greater understanding of how different domains influence ligand binding and receptor activation can be achieved. Using human-catfish and human-chicken chimeric receptors, we demonstrate the importance of extracellular loop conformation for ligand binding and agonist potency, providing further evidence for GnRH and GnRH II stabilization of distinct active receptor conformations. We demonstrate examples of GnRH receptor gain-of-function mutations that apparently improve agonist potency independently of affinity, implicating a role for extracellular loops in stabilizing the inactive receptor conformation. We also show that entire extracellular loop substitution can overcome the detrimental effects of localized mutations, thereby demonstrating the importance of considering the conformation of entire domains when drawing conclusions from point-mutation studies. Finally, we present evidence implicating the configuration of extracellular loops 2 and 3 in combination differentiating GnRH analog binding modes. Because there are two endogenous forms of GnRH ligand but only one functional form of full-length GnRH receptor in humans, understanding how GnRH and GnRH II can elicit distinct functional effects through the same receptor is likely to provide important insights into how these ligands can have differential effects in both physiological and pathological situations. PMID:18356273

  9. The effect of GnRH on in vitro bovine myometrial activity.

    PubMed

    Giammarino, Angelo; Manera, Maurizio; Robbe, Domenico; Perugini, Monia; Amorena, Michele

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, in vitro, the effects of increasing concentrations of GnRH on spontaneous mechanical activity patterns of uterine smooth muscle preparations of cows during the follicular and the luteal phases of the oestrus cycle. Uterine smooth muscle strips from 14 cows in follicular and 9 in luteal phase were collected immediately after slaughter and processed within 60 min from collection. Two strips of the same uterus were mounted in an isolated organ bath with two chambers to evaluate the role of decapeptide GnRH on spontaneous myometrial contractility. After equilibration period at 20 mN resting tension, the mechanical activity of the uterus was recorded for 10 min and the mean contractile force (MCF) was calculated. Then GnRH antagonist (antide) was added to one chamber at fixed concentration (10(-4)mol) and allowed to diffuse in solution and make contact with the strips. Subsequently, GnRH was added to the two baths at the same time at increasing concentration and MCF was recorded for 10 min. The effect of GnRH on spontaneous myometrial activity was evident only in the strips from subjects in follicular phase. Our results are suggestive of the presence of GnRH receptors in bovine myometrial tissue. The involvement of GnRH on uterine contractions at mating can be postulated. PMID:18579322

  10. Changes in peripheral blood levels and pulse frequencies of GnRH in patients with hypopituitarism.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, M; Takanashi, N; Yaoi, Y

    1998-09-01

    Pituitary dysfunction occasionally results from brain tumors or the surgical resection of brain tumors. The authors examined two patients with hypogonadotropic secondary amenorrhea, who had undergone surgical removal of brain tumors. Changes in immunoreactive gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion are of interest in patients with a gonadotropin and gonadal steroid deficit, because both steroid and pituitary feedback systems are altered by tumors or tumor resection. The authors thus measured GnRH, luteinizing hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone levels every 15 minutes for 4 hours by radioimmunoassay and investigated qualitative and quantitative changes in the pulsatile patterns of these hormones in two hypogonadotropic hypogonadism patients. They also performed similar multiple measurements of GnRH in two normal cycle women in follicular phase and two postmenopausal women. The concentration of plasma GnRH in two hypopituitarism patients was compared with that in two normal cycle women and two postmenopausal women. The study showed that the peripheral blood level of GnRH was significantly lower in two hypopituitarism patients than in both normal cycle and postmenopausal women, and that the pulsatile frequency was not different among these three groups. These findings suggest that alteration of feedback systems results in a decrease in the blood level of GnRH, and that pulses of GnRH maintain normal fluctuation despite the alteration of the hormonal circumstances in two hypogonadotropic hypogonadism patients. PMID:9749566

  11. Microdose Flare-up Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone (GnRH) Agonist Versus GnRH Antagonist Protocols in Poor Ovarian Responders Undergoing Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection

    PubMed Central

    Boza, Aysen; Cakar, Erbil; Boza, Barıs; Api, Murat; Kayatas, Semra; Sofuoglu, Kenan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Microdose flare-up GnRH agonist and GnRH antagonist have become more popular in the management of poor ovarian responders (POR) in recent years; however, the optimal protocol for POR patients undergoing in vitro fertilization has still been a challenge. Methods: In this observational study design, two hundred forty four poor ovarian responders were retrospectively evaluated for their response to GnRH agonist protocol (group-1, n=135) or GnRH antagonist protocol (group-2, n=109). Clinical pregnancy rate was the primary end point and was compared between the groups. Student t-test, Mann Whitney U test and χ2-test were used to compare the groups. The p<0.05 was considered to show a statistically significant result. Results: The mean total gonadotropin doses were 3814±891 IU in group 1 and 3539±877 IU in group 2 (p=0.02). The number of metaphase-II oocytes (3.6±2.4 vs. 2.8±1.9, p=0.005) and implantation rates (27.8% vs. 18.8%, p=0.04) in group 1 and group 2, respectively were significantly different. The fertilization rate in group 1 and group 2 was 73% vs. 68%, respectively (p=0.5) and clinical pregnancy rate was 19.8% vs. 14.4%, respectively (p=0.13). Conclusion: The GnRH agonist microdose flare-up protocol has favorable outcomes with respect to the number of oocytes retrieved and implantation rate; nevertheless, the clinical pregnancy rate was found to be similar in comparison to GnRH antagonist protocol in poor ovarian responders. GnRH antagonist protocol appears to be promising with significantly lower gonadotropin requirement and lower treatment cost in poor ovarian responders. PMID:27478770

  12. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Excites GnRH Neurons in Male and Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Piet, Richard; Dunckley, Henry; Lee, Kiho; Herbison, Allan E

    2016-09-01

    A variety of external and internal factors modulate the activity of GnRH neurons to control fertility in mammals. A direct, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-mediated input to GnRH neurons originating from the suprachiasmatic nucleus is thought to relay circadian information within this network. In the present study, we examined the effects of VIP on GnRH neuron activity in male and female mice at different stages of the estrous cycle. We carried out cell-attached recordings in slices from GnRH-green fluorescent protein mice and calcium imaging in slices from a mouse line expressing the genetically encoded calcium indicator GCaMP3 selectively in GnRH neurons. We show that 50%-80% of GnRH neurons increase their firing rate in response to bath-applied VIP (1nM-1000nM) in both male and female mice and that this is accompanied by a robust increase in intracellular calcium concentrations. This effect is mediated directly at the GnRH neuron likely through activation of high-affinity VIP receptors. Because suprachiasmatic nucleus-derived timing cues trigger the preovulatory surge only on the afternoon of proestrus in female mice, we examined the effects of VIP during the estrous cycle at different times of day. VIP responsiveness in GnRH neurons did not vary significantly in diestrous and proestrous mice before or around the time of the expected preovulatory surge. These results indicate that the majority of GnRH neurons in male and female mice express functional VIP receptors and that the effects of VIP on GnRH neurons do not alter across the estrous cycle. PMID:27501185

  13. Galanin Activates G Protein Gated Inwardly Rectifying Potassium Channels and Suppresses Kisspeptin-10 Activation of GnRH Neurons.

    PubMed

    Constantin, Stephanie; Wray, Susan

    2016-08-01

    GnRH neurons are regulated by hypothalamic kisspeptin neurons. Recently, galanin was identified in a subpopulation of kisspeptin neurons. Although the literature thoroughly describes kisspeptin activation of GnRH neurons, little is known about the effects of galanin on GnRH neurons. This study investigated whether galanin could alter kisspeptin signaling to GnRH neurons. GnRH cells maintained in explants, known to display spontaneous calcium oscillations, and a long-lasting calcium response to kisspeptin-10 (kp-10), were used. First, transcripts for galanin receptors (GalRs) were examined. Only GalR1 was found in GnRH neurons. A series of experiments was then performed to determine the action of galanin on kp-10 activated GnRH neurons. Applied after kp-10 activation, galanin 1-16 (Gal1-16) rapidly suppressed kp-10 activation. Applied with kp-10, Gal1-16 prevented kp-10 activation until its removal. To determine the mechanism by which galanin inhibited kp-10 activation of GnRH neurons, Gal1-16 and galanin were applied to spontaneously active GnRH neurons. Both inhibited GnRH neuronal activity, independent of GnRH neuronal inputs. This inhibition was mimicked by a GalR1 agonist but not by GalR2 or GalR2/3 agonists. Although Gal1-16 inhibition relied on Gi/o signaling, it was independent of cAMP levels but sensitive to blockers of G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels. A newly developed bioassay for GnRH detection showed Gal1-16 decreased the kp-10-evoked GnRH secretion below detection threshold. Together, this study shows that galanin is a potent regulator of GnRH neurons, possibly acting as a physiological break to kisspeptin excitation. PMID:27359210

  14. Ovarian follicular responses in dairy cows treated with GnRH and cloprostenol.

    PubMed Central

    Kastelic, J P; Mapletoft, R J

    1998-01-01

    Lactating, nonpregnant (with a corpus luteum) Holsteins were given 100 ug GnRH (n = 12) or saline (n = 12) and 500 ug cloprostenol 6 d later. Following luteolysis, ovulation occurred 10.1 +/- 0.2 d (range, 9-12 d) after GnRH and 8.6 +/- 1.0 d (range, 3-12 d) after saline (differences between groups: means, P > 0.05; variability, P < 0.001). Treatment with GnRH and cloprostenol resulted in a relatively synchronous ovulation. PMID:10051959

  15. GnRH Effects Outside the Hypothalamo-Pituitary-Reproductive Axis

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Donal C.; Albertson, Asher J; Navratil, Amy; Smith, Arik; Mignot, Mallory; Talbott, Heather; Scanlan-Blake, Niamh

    2009-01-01

    GnRH is a hypothalamic decapeptide with an undisputed role as a primary regulator of gonadal function. It exerts this regulation by controlling the release of gonadotropins. However, it is becoming apparent that GnRH may have a variety of other vital roles in normal physiology. Reconsideration of the potential widespread action that this traditional reproductive hormone exerts may lead to the generation of novel therapies and provide insight into seemingly incongruent outcomes from current treatments using GnRH analogues to combat diseases such as prostate cancer. PMID:19187469

  16. Evidence for changes in numbers of synaptic inpcuts onto KNDy and GnRH neurones during the preovulatory LH surge in the ewe

    PubMed Central

    Merkley, Christina M.; Coolen, Lique M.; Goodman, Robert L.; Lehman, Michael N.

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptin neurones located in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and preoptic area (POA) are critical mediators of gonadal steroid feedback onto GnRH neurones. ARC kisspeptin cells that co-localize neurokinin B (NKB) and dynorphin (Dyn), are collectively referred to as KNDy (Kisspeptin/NKB/Dyn) neurones, and have been shown to also co-express the glutamatergic marker, vGlut2, in mice. The ARC in rodents has long been known as a site of hormone-induced neuroplasticity, and changes in synaptic inputs to ARC neurones in rodents occur over the oestrous cycle. Based on this evidence, the goal of this study was to examine possible changes across the ovine oestrous cycle in synaptic inputs onto kisspeptin cells in the ARC (KNDy) and POA, and inputs onto GnRH neurones. Gonadal-intact breeding season ewes were perfused using 4% paraformaldehyde during either the luteal or follicular phase of the oestrous cycle, the latter group sacrificed at the time of the luteinising (LH) surge. Hypothalamic sections were processed for triple-label immunodetection of kisspeptin/vGlut2/synaptophysin or kisspeptin/vGlut2/GnRH. The total numbers of synaptophysin- and vGlut2-positive inputs to ARC KNDy neurones were significantly increased at the time of the LH surge compared to luteal phase; as these did not contain kisspeptin they do not arise from KNDy neurons. In contrast to the ARC, the total number of synaptophysin-positive inputs onto POA kisspeptin neurones did not differ between luteal phase and surge animals. The total number of kisspeptin and vGlut2 inputs onto GnRH neurones in both the POA and mediobasal hypothalamus was also increased during the LH surge. Taken together, these results provide novel evidence of synaptic plasticity at the level of inputs onto KNDy and GnRH neurones during the ovine oestrous cycle, changes which may contribute to the generation of the preovulatory GnRH/LH surge. PMID:25976424

  17. Effect of GnRH treatment on ovarian activity and reproductive performance of low-prolific Rahmani ewes.

    PubMed

    Hashem, N M; El-Azrak, K M; Nour El-Din, A N M; Taha, T A; Salem, M H

    2015-01-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of GnRH treatment during different times of the reproductive cycle on ovarian activity, progesterone (P4) concentration, and subsequent fertility of low-prolific, subtropical, Rahmani ewes during breeding season. Forty-five ewes were synchronized for estrus using a double injection of 0.5 mL of PGF2α agonist (125-μg cloprostenol), 11 days apart. Ewes showing estrus (Day 0) were treated with 1 mL of GnRH agonist (4-μg buserelin) on the day of estrus (GnRH0, n = 12) or 7 days post-mating (GnRH7, n = 10) or on both days (GnRH0+7, n = 11) or not (control, n = 12). Ovarian response to the treatment and diagnosis of pregnancy were ultrasonographically monitored. Also, serum P4 concentration was determined weekly throughout 28 days post-mating. Results showed that neither total number of follicles nor their populations were changed on Day 0 or 7 days post-mating by the GnRH treatment. GnRH treatment on Day 0 or Day 7 post-mating or both days did not enhance ovulation rate compared with the control. The mean numbers of accessory CL increased (P < 0.05) in the GnRH7 group than those in the control and GnRH0 groups, whereas it was intermediate in the GnRH0+7 group. The greatest (P < 0.05) overall mean of serum P4 concentration was for the GnRH7 and GnRH0+7 groups, followed by the GnRH0 and control groups. Serum P4 concentration increased (P < 0.05) on Day 14 post-mating and continued higher (P < 0.05) until Day 28 post-mating in the GnRH7 and GnRH0+7 groups compared with the control. Regardless of the time of GnRH administration, GnRH treatment reduced (P < 0.05) pregnancy loss from Day 40 post-mating to parturition and tended to enhance (P < 0.20) lambing rate compared with the control. In conclusion, a single dose of GnRH at the time of estrus or 7 days post-mating could be used as an effective protocol to decrease pregnancy loss from Day 40 after mating to parturition in low-prolific Rahmani ewes. PMID:25442386

  18. Clinical use of deslorelin (GnRH agonist) in companion animals: a review.

    PubMed

    Lucas, X

    2014-10-01

    Over the years, many contraceptive medications have been developed for companion animals, but many secondary adverse effects have limited their use. A major advancement was achieved with the use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues, mainly GnRH agonists, which mimic the effects of native GnRH. The development of effective low-dose, slow-release implants with potent agonists such as deslorelin (Suprelorin®, Virbac) have allowed their use to become widespread in recent years, with many potential benefits in companion animals. While the major application of deslorelin was initially male contraception, due to its two differing actions, either the stimulation of oestrus or the sterilization of fertility, its use has been increasing in the bitch as well. The aim of this study is to review the applications of deslorelin GnRH agonist implants in companion animal, such as dogs, cats and some exotic pets. PMID:25277434

  19. Fgf8-Deficient Mice Compensate for Reduced GnRH Neuronal Population and Exhibit Normal Testicular Function

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Johnson, Joshua I.; Tsai, Pei-San

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is critical for the onset and maintenance of reproduction in vertebrates. The development of GnRH neurons is highly dependent on fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) signaling. Mice with a hypomorphic Fgf8 allele (Fgf8 Het) exhibited a ~50% reduction in GnRH neuron number at birth. Female Fgf8 Het mice were fertile but showed significantly delayed puberty. However, it was unclear if these mice suffered additional loss of GnRH neurons after birth, and if male Fgf8 Het mice had normal pubertal transition and testicular function. In this study, we examined postnatal GnRH neuron number and hypothalamic GnRH content in Fgf8 Het mice from birth to 120 days of age. Further, we examined seminal vesicle and testicular growth, testicular histology, and circulating luteinizing hormone (LH) around and after pubertal transition. Our results showed that GnRH neuron numbers were significantly and consistently reduced in Fgf8 Het mice of both sexes in all ages examined, suggesting these animals were born with an inherently defective GnRH system, and no further postnatal loss of GnRH neurons had occurred. Despite an innately compromised GnRH system, male and female Fgf8 mice exhibited normal levels of immunoassayable hypothalamic GnRH peptide at all ages examined except on 60 days of age, suggesting increased GnRH synthesis or reduced turnover as a compensatory mechanism. Fgf8 Het males also had normal seminal vesicle and testicular mass/body mass ratios, testicular histology, and circulating LH. Overall, our data speak to the extraordinary ability of a GnRH system permanently compromised by developmental defect to overcome pre-existing deficiencies to ensure pubertal progression and reproduction. PMID:26441841

  20. GnRH Episodic Secretion Is Altered by Pharmacological Blockade of Gap Junctions: Possible Involvement of Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Pinet-Charvet, Caroline; Geller, Sarah; Desroziers, Elodie; Ottogalli, Monique; Lomet, Didier; Georgelin, Christine; Tillet, Yves; Franceschini, Isabelle; Vaudin, Pascal; Duittoz, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Episodic release of GnRH is essential for reproductive function. In vitro studies have established that this episodic release is an endogenous property of GnRH neurons and that GnRH secretory pulses are associated with synchronization of GnRH neuron activity. The cellular mechanisms by which GnRH neurons synchronize remain largely unknown. There is no clear evidence of physical coupling of GnRH neurons through gap junctions to explain episodic synchronization. However, coupling of glial cells through gap junctions has been shown to regulate neuron activity in their microenvironment. The present study investigated whether glial cell communication through gap junctions plays a role in GnRH neuron activity and secretion in the mouse. Our findings show that Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein-expressing glial cells located in the median eminence in close vicinity to GnRH fibers expressed Gja1 encoding connexin-43. To study the impact of glial-gap junction coupling on GnRH neuron activity, an in vitro model of primary cultures from mouse embryo nasal placodes was used. In this model, GnRH neurons possess a glial microenvironment and were able to release GnRH in an episodic manner. Our findings show that in vitro glial cells forming the microenvironment of GnRH neurons expressed connexin-43 and displayed functional gap junctions. Pharmacological blockade of the gap junctions with 50 μM 18-α-glycyrrhetinic acid decreased GnRH secretion by reducing pulse frequency and amplitude, suppressed neuronal synchronization and drastically reduced spontaneous electrical activity, all these effects were reversed upon 18-α-glycyrrhetinic acid washout. PMID:26562259

  1. Expanding the Phenotype and Genotype of Female GnRH Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Natalie D.; Seminara, Stephanie B.; Welt, Corrine K.; Au, Margaret G.; Plummer, Lacey; Hughes, Virginia A.; Dwyer, Andrew A.; Martin, Kathryn A.; Quinton, Richard; Mericq, Veronica; Merino, Paulina M.; Gusella, James F.; Crowley, William F.; Pitteloud, Nelly

    2011-01-01

    Context: GnRH deficiency is a rare genetic disorder of absent or partial pubertal development. The clinical and genetic characteristics of GnRH-deficient women have not been well-described. Objective: To determine the phenotypic and genotypic spectrum of a large series of GnRH-deficient women. Design, Setting, and Subjects: Retrospective study of 248 females with GnRH deficiency evaluated at an academic medical center between 1980 and 2010. Main Outcome Measures: Clinical presentation, baseline endogenous GnRH secretory activity, and DNA sequence variants in 11 genes associated with GnRH deficiency. Results: Eighty-eight percent had undergone pubarche, 51% had spontaneous thelarche, and 10% had 1–2 menses. Women with spontaneous thelarche were more likely to demonstrate normal pubarche (P = 0.04). In 27% of women, neuroendocrine studies demonstrated evidence of some endogenous GnRH secretory activity. Thirty-six percent (a large excess relative to controls) harbored a rare sequence variant in a gene associated with GnRH deficiency (87% heterozygous and 13% biallelic), with variants in FGFR1 (15%), GNRHR (6.6%), and PROKR2 (6.6%) being most prevalent. One woman had a biallelic variant in the X-linked gene, KAL1, and nine women had heterozygous variants. Conclusions: The clinical presentation of female GnRH deficiency varies from primary amenorrhea and absence of any secondary sexual characteristics to spontaneous breast development and occasional menses. In this cohort, rare sequence variants were present in all of the known genes associated with GnRH deficiency, including the novel identification of GnRH-deficient women with KAL1 variants. The pathogenic mechanism through which KAL1 variants disrupt female reproductive development requires further investigation. PMID:21209029

  2. Kisspeptin and GnRH Neuronal Excitability: Molecular Mechanisms Driven by 17β-Estradiol

    PubMed Central

    Rønnekleiv, Oline K.; Zhang, Chunguang; Bosch, Martha A.; Kelly, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    Kisspeptin is a neuropeptide that signals via a Gαq-coupled receptor, GPR54, in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons and is essential for pubertal maturation and fertility. Kisspeptin depolarizes and excites GnRH neurons primarily through the activation of canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channels and inhibition of K+ channels. The gonadal steroid 17β-estradiol (E2) up-regulates not only kisspeptin (Kiss1) mRNA, but also increases the excitability of the rostral forebrain Kiss1 neurons. In addition, a primary postsynaptic action of E2 on GnRH neurons is to up-regulate the expression of channel transcripts that orchestrate the downstream signaling of kisspeptin in GnRH neurons. These include not only TRPC4 channels, but also low voltage-activated T-type calcium channels and high voltage-activated L-, N- and R-type calcium channel transcripts. Moreover, E2 has direct membrane-initiated actions to alter the excitability of GnRH neurons by enhancing ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel activity, which is critical for maintaining GnRH neurons in a hyperpolarized state for recruitment of T-type calcium channels that are important for burst firing. Therefore, E2 modulates the excitability of GnRH neurons as well as Kiss1 neurons by altering the expression and/or function of ion channels; and kisspeptin provides critical excitatory input to GnRH neurons to facilitate burst firing activity and peptide release. PMID:25612870

  3. Spaying-induced coat changes: the role of gonadotropins, GnRH and GnRH treatment on the hair cycle of female dogs.

    PubMed

    Reichler, Iris Margaret; Welle, Monika; Eckrich, Christine; Sattler, Ursula; Barth, Andrea; Hubler, Madeleine; Nett-Mettler, Claudia S; Jöchle, Wolfgang; Arnold, Susi

    2008-04-01

    Although spaying can result in qualitative hair coat changes in dogs, the influence of spaying on the hair growth cycle has never been described. The study aims were to examine the effect of spaying and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) treatment on canine hair coat, cycle stages of hair follicles, plasma gonadotropin concentrations and mRNA transcription of luteinizing hormone (LH) and GnRH receptors in hair follicles. Fifteen female dogs were examined before and 1 year after spaying and 24 spayed dogs before and after GnRH treatment. Spaying resulted in increased plasma gonadotropin concentrations and increased anagen : telogen ratio of hair follicles, but only 20% of the dogs developed coat changes. No differences were found in mRNA transcription of LH and GnRH receptors. GnRH treatment resulted in reduced plasma gonadotropin concentrations and improvement of coat changes in 79% of patients. This was associated with an increase in catagen hair follicles without changes in the anagen : telogen ratio. The present study demonstrated that spaying had an effect on the anagen : telogen ratio of hair follicles. Spaying-induced coat changes did not correlate with the anagen : telogen ratio. GnRH treatment reduced gonadotropin concentrations and reversed coat changes in some dogs, but had no effect on the hair growth cycle other than increasing the number of catagen hair follicles. A weak positive correlation between the plasma LH concentration and the anagen : telogen ratio was noted; however, our data did not suggest a direct receptor-mediated hormonal effect on the hair follicle. The present study did not identify the pathomechanism of spaying-induced coat changes. PMID:18336424

  4. Comparisons of GnRH Antagonist versus GnRH Agonist Protocol in Supposed Normal Ovarian Responders Undergoing IVF: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jin-song; Su, Cun-mei; Zeng, Xian-tao

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of GnRH antagonist and GnRH agonist in supposed normal ovarian responders undergoing IVF. Methods Data from 6 databases were retrieved for this study. The RCTs of GnRH agonist and GnRH antagonist use during IVF-EF therapy for patients with supposed normal ovarian response were included. A meta-analysis was performed with Revman 5.1software. Results Twenty-three RCTs met the inclusion criteria. The number of stimulation days (mean difference (MD): −0.66, 95% confidence interval (CI): −1.04∼−0.27), Gn amount (MD: −2.92, 95% CI: −5.0∼−0.85), E2 values on the day of HCG (MD: −330.39, 95% CI: −510.51∼−150.26), Number of oocytes retrieved (MD: −1.33, 95% CI: −2.02∼−0.64), clinical pregnancy rate (odds ratio (OR): 0.87, 95% CI: 0.75−1.0), and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) incidence (OR: 0.59, 95% CI: 0.42∼0.82) were significantly lower in GnRH antagonist protocol than GnRH agonist protocol. However, the endometrial thickness on the day of HCG (MD: −0.04, 95% CI: −0.23∼0.14), the ongoing pregnancy rate (OR: 0.87, 95% CI: 0.74∼1.03), live birth rate (OR: 0.89, 95% CI: 0.64∼1.24), miscarriage rate (OR: 1.17, 95% CI: 0.85∼1.61), and cycle cancellation rate (OR: 1.11, 95% CI: 0.90∼1.37) did not significantly differ between the 2 groups. Conclusions During IVF treatment for patients with supposed normal responses, the incidence of OHSS were significantly lower, whereas the ongoing pregnancy and live birth rates were similar in the GnRH antagonist compared with the standard long GnRH agonist protocols. PMID:25216031

  5. Microdose GnRH Agonist Flare-Up versus Ultrashort GnRH Agonist Combined with Fixed GnRH Antagonist in Poor Responders of Assisted Reproductive Techniques Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar, Maryam; Mohammadian, Farnaz; Yousefnejad, Fariba; Khani, Parisa

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study compares the microdose flare-up protocol to the ultrashort gonadotropinreleasing hormone (GnRH) agonist flare combined with the fixed multidose GnRH antagonist protocol in poor responders undergoing ovarian stimulation. Materials and Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 120 women who were candidates for assisted reproductive techniques (ART) and had histories of one or more failed in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles with three or fewer retrieved oocytes were prospectively randomized into two groups. Group I (60 patients) received the microdose flare-up regimen and group II (60 patients) received the ultrashort GnRH agonist combined with fixed GnRH antagonist. Results: There were no significant differences between the groups in the number of used gonadotropin ampoules (p=0.591), duration of stimulation (p=0.610), number of retrieved oocytes (p=0.802), fertilization rate (p=0.456), and the number of transferred embryos (p=0.954). The clinical pregnancy rates were statistically similar in group I (10%) compared with group II (13.3%, p=0.389). Conclusion: According to our results, there is no significant difference between these protocols for improving the ART outcome in poor responders. Additional prospective, randomized studies with more patients is necessary to determine the best protocol (Registration Number: IRCT201105096420N1). PMID:24520450

  6. Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) induced luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion from perifused equine pituitaries.

    PubMed

    Pinaud, M A; Roser, J F; Dybdal, N

    1991-07-01

    In vitro responsiveness of the horse anterior pituitary (AP) gonadotropes to single and multiple GnRH challenges was examined. The pituitaries were collected from reproductively sound mares in estrus (n = 5) and diestrus (n = 5). Uniform 0.5 mm AP slices were subdivided using a 3 mm biopsy punch and then bisected for use in the perifusion chamber. Four bisected sections per chamber were perifused at 0.5 ml/min at 37 C for 560 min in Medium 199 saturated with 95% 0(2)/5% CO2. Ten minute fractions were collected after an initial 2 hr equilibration period. Four different treatment regimes of GnRH (10(-10) M) were evaluated: (A) three consecutive 10 min GnRH pulses separated by 80 and 100 min, respectively; (B) a single 120 min GnRH infusion; (C) a 10 min GnRH pulse followed 80 min later by a 120 min GnRH infusion and (D) two 10 min GnRH pulses separated by 60 min followed 80 min later by a 120 min GnRH infusion. Estimated total pituitary LH content was higher in estrous than diestrus mares (p less than 0.05). The total amount of LH released in response to GnRH tended to be greater in estrus than diestrus (p less than 0.1), whereas the percentage of LH released in estrus and diestrus was similar. An increase in the area under the LH response curve was noted with each successive 10 min pulse of GnRH during both estrus and diestrus (p less than 0.05), demonstrating a self-priming effect of GnRH. In addition, a significant increase in the peak LH amplitude (p less than 0.05) and the slope to peak amplitude (p less than 0.05) were observed for the 120 min GnRH pulse in regime C and D indicating that prior exposure to short-term pulses of GnRH increased the acute LH secretory response. These results suggest that in the cycling mare (1) the responsiveness of the pituitary (amount of LH released as percent of total LH) is similar in both estrus and diestrus, however, the magnitude of the LH response (total microgram amount of LH released) differs with the stage of the estrous

  7. Primary structure of solitary form of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in cichlid pituitary; three forms of GnRH in brain of cichlid and pumpkinseed fish.

    PubMed

    Powell, J F; Fischer, W H; Park, M; Craig, A G; Rivier, J E; White, S A; Francis, R C; Fernald, R D; Licht, P; Warby, C

    1995-05-01

    GnRH is a decapeptide family with at least nine distinct structures. Vertebrates, except for most placental mammals, have more than one of these GnRH forms within the brain. We report chromatographical and immunological evidence that three forms of GnRH are in the brains of both cichlid (Haplochromis burtoni) and pumpkinseed (Lepomis gibbosus) fishes. We argue that the three forms correspond to those previously described as sea bream GnRH (sbGnRH), chicken GnRH-II and salmon GnRH. In contrast, only one GnRH form was present in the pituitary of the cichlid and is identified as sbGnRH by amino acid sequence. This is the first report in which the primary structure of GnRH is determined from pituitary tissue. The N-terminus was identified by monitoring the digestion of the peptide by pyroglutamate aminopeptidase with matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS). The amidation of the C-terminus was established using an esterification procedure for monitoring with MALDI-MS. This report supports the idea that three forms of GnRH within one species is widespread in the order Perciformes. The present study establishes sbGnRH as the third GnRH form in H. burtoni and predicts that sbGnRH is synthesized in preoptic neurons, then transported to the pituitary in the preoptic-hypophyseal axons for the release of one or both gonadotropins. PMID:7644702

  8. Luteal-long GnRH agonist versus flexible-multidose GnRH antagonist protocols for overweight and obese patients who underwent ICSI.

    PubMed

    Esinler, I; Bozdag, G; Esinler, D; Lale, K S; Yarali, H

    2015-04-01

    A total of 413 consecutive infertile patients (572 cycles) with a body mass index (BMI) of ≥ 25 kg/m(2) were enrolled into the study. The luteal-long GnRH agonist group (Group I) constituted 211 patients (300 cycles) and the flexible-multidose GnRH antagonist group (Group II) constituted 202 patients (272 cycles). The duration of stimulation (d) (10.1 ± 2.5 vs. 9.2 ± 2.0; p < 0.01); the total dose of gonadotrophin used (IU) (3,099.4 ± 2,885.0 vs. 2,684.0 ± 1,046.4; p < 0.05) and the E2 level on the day of hCG (pg/ml) (2,375.8 ± 1,554.6 vs. 1,905.6 ± 1,598.8; p < 0.01) were significantly lower in Group II when compared with Group I. However, the ongoing pregnancy per embryo transfer (37.0% vs. 25.7%; p < 0.05) and the implantation rate (25.7% vs. 15.6%; p < 0.01) were significantly lower in Group II when compared with Group I. In conclusion, we noted that the luteal-long GnRH agonist protocol produced higher implantation rates and higher clinical-ongoing pregnancy rates in overweight and obese patients when compared with the flexible-multidose GnRH antagonist protocol. PMID:25244592

  9. Mathematical modeling of perifusion cell culture experiments on GnRH signaling.

    PubMed

    Temamogullari, N Ezgi; Nijhout, H Frederik; C Reed, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The effects of pulsatile GnRH stimulation on anterior pituitary cells are studied using perifusion cell cultures, where constantly moving culture medium over the immobilized cells allows intermittent GnRH delivery. The LH content of the outgoing medium serves as a readout of the GnRH signaling pathway activation in the cells. The challenge lies in relating the LH content of the medium leaving the chamber to the cellular processes producing LH secretion. To investigate this relation we developed and analyzed a mathematical model consisting of coupled partial differential equations describing LH secretion in a perifusion cell culture. We match the mathematical model to three different data sets and give cellular mechanisms that explain the data. Our model illustrates the importance of the negative feedback in the signaling pathway and receptor desensitization. We demonstrate that different LH outcomes in oxytocin and GnRH stimulations might originate from different receptor dynamics and concentration. We analyze the model to understand the influence of parameters, like the velocity of the medium flow or the fraction collection time, on the LH outcomes. We show that slow velocities lead to high LH outcomes. Also, we show that fraction collection times, which do not divide the GnRH pulse period evenly, lead to irregularities in the data. We examine the influence of the rate of binding and dissociation of GnRH on the GnRH movement down the chamber. Our model serves as an important tool that can help in the design of perifusion experiments and the interpretation of results. PMID:27067630

  10. Identification and distribution of three gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) isoforms in the brain of a clupeiform fish, Engraulis japonicus.

    PubMed

    Sukhan, Zahid Parvez; Kitano, Hajime; Selvaraj, Sethu; Yoneda, Michio; Yamaguchi, Akihiko; Matsuyama, Michiya

    2013-12-01

    To gain a better understanding of the reproductive endocrinology of a primitive order clupeiform fish (Japanese anchovy, Engraulis japonicus), cDNAs encoding three gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) isoforms were isolated from the brain, and their distribution was analyzed using insitu hybridization (ISH). The three GnRH isoforms include GnRH1 (herring GnRH), GnRH2 (chicken GnRH-ll) and GnRH3 (salmon GnRH), and their full-length cDNAs encode 88, 86, and 89 deduced amino acids (aa), respectively. Alignment analysis of Japanese anchovy GnRH isoforms showed lower identities with other teleost fish. The major population of GnRH1 neurons was localized in the ventral telencephalon (VT) and nucleus preopticus (NPO) of the preoptic area (POA) with minor population in the anterior olfactory bulb (OB). GnRH2 neurons were restricted to the midbrain tegmentum (MT), specific to the nucleus of the medial longitudinal fasciculus (nMLF). GnRH3 neurons were localized in the olfactory nerve (ON), ventral OB, and transitional area between OB and ON. Interestingly, GnRH1 neurons were also localized in the olfactory bulb, in addition to its major population in the preoptic area. These results indicate the differential distribution of three GnRH isoforms expressed in the brain of the Japanese anchovy. PMID:24320187

  11. ART Outcomes in GnRH Antagonist Protocol (Flexible) and Long GnRH Agonist Protocol during Early Follicular Phase in Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtar, Sara; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Zafardoust, Simin; Badenush, Bita; Fatemi, Farnaz; Nazari, Fattane; Kamali, Koorosh; Mohammadzade, Afsaneh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Since increased LH in the early follicular phase in PCOS patients especially in GnRH antagonist protocol could be associated with reduced oocyte quality and pregnancy and impared implantation. The current study was conducted to determine ART outcomes in GnRH antagonist protocol (flexible) and long GnRH agonist protocol and compare them with adding GnRH antagonist in GnRH antagonist (flexible) protocol during early follicular phase in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome undergoing ICSI. Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 150 patients with polycystic ovary syndrome undergoing ICSI were enrolled from 2012 to 2014 and randomly assigned to receive either GnRH antagonist protocol during early and late follicular phase or GnRH antagonist protocol (flexible) or long GnRH agonist protocol. The clinical and laboratory pregnancy in three groups was determined and compared. In this context, the chi-square and Fisher's exact test and ANOVA were used for data analysis. Statistical significance was defined as p<0.05. Results: There was no statistically significant difference with respect to chemical pregnancy and clinical pregnancy between the three groups. Also, other indices such as number and quality of oocytes and embryos were alike. Conclusion: Totally, according to our results, GnRH antagonist protocol during early and late follicular phase and GnRH antagonist protocol (flexible) and long GnRH agonist protocol in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome undergoing ICSI are similarly effective and use of each one based on patients' condition and physicians' opinion could be considered. PMID:26913233

  12. Pituitary and ovarian responses of post-partum acyclic beef cows to continuous long-term GnRH and GnRH agonist treatment.

    PubMed

    D'Occhio, M J; Gifford, D R; Earl, C R; Weatherly, T; von Rechenberg, W

    1989-03-01

    Post-partum acyclic beef cows received continuous long-term treatment with GnRH (200 or 400 ng/kg body wt/h) or the GnRH agonist buserelin (5.5 or 11 ng/kg body wt/h) using s.c. osmotic minipumps which were designed to remain active for 28 days. All treatments increased circulating LH concentrations whereas FSH remained unchanged. Ovulation and corpus luteum (CL) formation as judged by progesterone concentrations greater than or equal to 1 ng/ml occurred in 0/5 control, 4/5 200 ng GnRH, 4/4 400 ng GnRH, 4/5 5.5 ng buserelin and 3/5 11 ng buserelin cows. The outstanding features of the progesterone profiles were the synchrony, both within and across groups, in values greater than or equal to 1 ng/ml around Day 6, and the fact that most CL were short-lived (4-6 days). Only 3 cows, one each from the 400 ng GnRH, 5.5 ng buserelin and 11 ng buserelin groups, showed evidence of extended CL function. Cows failed to show a second ovulation which was anticipated around Day 10 and this could have been due to insufficient FSH to stimulate early follicular development, or the absence of an endogenously driven LH surge. The highest LH concentrations for the respective groups were observed on Days 2 and 6 and by Day 10 LH was declining, although concentrations did remain higher than in controls up to Day 20.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2495359

  13. GnRH neurons elaborate a long-range projection with shared axonal and dendritic functions.

    PubMed

    Herde, Michel K; Iremonger, Karl J; Constantin, Stephanie; Herbison, Allan E

    2013-07-31

    Information processing by neurons has been traditionally envisioned to occur in discrete neuronal compartments. Specifically, dendrites receive and integrate synaptic inputs while axons initiate and conduct spikes to distal neuronal targets. We report here in mice, using morphological reconstructions and electrophysiology, that the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons that control mammalian fertility do not conform to this stereotype and instead possess a single projection structure that functions simultaneously as an axon and dendrite. Specifically, we show that the GnRH neuron projection to the median eminence to control pituitary hormone secretion possesses a spike initiation site and conducts action potentials while also exhibiting spines and synaptic appositions along its entire length. Classical axonal or dendritic markers are not detectable in the projection process. Activation of ionotropic glutamate and/or GABA receptors along the GnRH neuron projection is capable of depolarizing the membrane potential and initiating action potentials. In addition, focal glutamate application to the projection is able to regulate the width of propagating spikes. These data demonstrate that GnRH neurons elaborate a previously uncharacterized neuronal projection that functions simultaneously as an axon and dendrite. This structure, termed a "dendron," greatly expands the dynamic control of GnRH secretion into the pituitary portal system to regulate fertility. PMID:23904605

  14. GnRH signaling, the gonadotrope and endocrine control of fertility

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, Stuart P.; Navratil, Amy M.; Xie, Jianjun; Roberson, Mark S.

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian reproductive cycles are controlled by an intricate interplay between the hypothalamus, pituitary and gonads. Central to the function of this axis is the ability of the pituitary gonadotrope to appropriately respond to stimulation by gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). This review focuses on the role of cell signaling and in particular, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activities regulated by GnRH that are necessary for normal fertility. Recently, new mouse models making use of conditional gene deletion have shed new light on the relationships between GnRH signaling and fertility in both male and female mice. Within the reproductive axis, GnRH signaling is initiated through discrete membrane compartments in which the receptor resides leading to the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs 1/2). As defined by gonadotrope-derived cellular models, the ERKs appear to play a central role in the regulation of a cohort of immediate early genes that regulate the expression of late genes that, in part, define the differentiated character of the gonadotrope. Recent data would suggest that in vivo, conditional, pituitary-specific disruption of ERK signaling by GnRH leads to a gender-specific perturbation of fertility. Double ERK knockout in the anterior pituitary leads to female infertility due to LH biosynthesis deficiency and a failure in ovulation. In contrast, male mice are modestly LH deficient; however, this does not have an appreciable impact on fertility. PMID:20451543

  15. A mathematical model of adult GnRH neurons in mouse brain and its bifurcation analysis.

    PubMed

    Duan, Wen; Lee, Kiho; Herbison, Allan E; Sneyd, James

    2011-05-01

    GnRH neurons are hypothalamic neurons that secrete gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) which stimulates the release of gonadotropins, one of the crucial hormones for sexual development, fertility and maturation. A mathematical model was built to help elucidate the mechanisms underlying electrical bursting and synchronous [Ca²(+)] transients in GnRH neurons (Lee et al., 2010). The model predicted that bursting in GnRH neurons (at least of the short-bursting type) requires the existence of a [Ca²(+)]-dependent slow after-hyperpolarisation current (sI(AHP-UCL)), and this predicted current was found experimentally. GnRH behaviour under a wide range of conditions (inhibition of Na(+) channels, IP₃ receptors, [Ca²(+)]-dependent K(+) channels, or Ca²(+) pumps, or in the presence of zero extracellular [Ca²(+)]) is successfully reproduced by the model. In this paper, a simplified version of the previous model, with the same qualitative behaviour, is constructed and studied using timescale separation techniques and bifurcation analysis. PMID:21300070

  16. An evaluation of simultaneous GnRH and cloprostenol treatment of dairy cattle with cystic ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Dinsmore, R. Page; White, Maurice E.; English, Paul B.

    1990-01-01

    In a randomized double-blind clinical trial, 75 cows with ovarian cysts were treated with the synthetic gonadotropin releasing hormone, gonadorelin acetate (GnRH). Forty-two of these cows were simultaneously treated with cloprostenol (CP), and the remaining 33 cows received sterile saline. Milk progesterone (P4) was measured at treatment and two days later. Clinical response 30 days after treatment was determined by palpation per rectum, and estrus and breeding dates were recorded up to 90 days after treatment. Cows were examined for pregnancy by palpation per rectum 40 days or more after breeding. Milk progesterone levels two days after treatment were significantly lower and the 30-day clinical response rate was significantly higher in the GnRH + CP group than in the GnRH group. Intervals to first estrus and to conception, proportion in heat by day 21 after treatment, and pregnancy rate by 90 days did not differ significantly between the groups. The same relationships held in a subset of cows with P4≥1 ng/mL at treatment. Fewer cows in the GnRH + CP group became pregnant by day 90 after treatment, but this difference was not significant. These results suggest that simultaneous GnRH and cloprostenol treatment of all cows with cystic ovaries cannot be recommended at this time. PMID:17423558

  17. Effect of GnRH analogs in postnatal domestic cats.

    PubMed

    Carranza, A; Faya, M; Merlo, M Lopez; Batista, P; Gobello, C

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to reproductively assess the clinical and hormonal effects of a GnRH agonist (AG) and an antagonist (AN) administered during the postnatal period in domestic cats. Forty-eight male and female postnatal kittens were randomly assigned to deslorelin acetate 1.6 mg subcutaneous (AG; n = 16), acyline 33 μg/100 g subcutaneous weekly for 3 months (AN; n = 16), or control (CO; n = 16) which remained untreated. The cats were followed up (behavioral observation, physical examination, fecal sexual steroid determinations, mating test, and pregnancy diagnosis) up to puberty. Puberty was delayed (weeks) in the AG animals (62.9 ± 3.5; P < 0.01) but not in the AN (15.5 ± 1.7; P > 0.05) when they were compared with CO kittens (13.4 ± 0.4). Fifteen (15/16) of the AN and CO animals, and only 11 of 16 cats of the AG group were fertile (P > 0.1). No differences were found in body weight (P > 0.1) and measurements (P > 0.1), libido (P > 0.1) and in the appearance of side effects (P > 0.1; except a pyometra in an AG female) among groups. In both AG- and AN-treated males (testosterone; P < 0.01) and females (estradiol-17β; P < 0.01) fecal hormone concentrations were lower than in CO group during the first five postnatal weeks but not later. It is concluded that the neonatal administration of these AG and AN decreased fecal sexual steroids during the first postnatal weeks causing, the agonists but not the antagonist, a significant, reversible delay in puberty appearance. PMID:24725419

  18. Effect of epinephrine, norepinephrine and(or) GnRH on serum LH in prepuberal beef heifers.

    PubMed

    Hardin, D R; Randel, R D

    1983-09-01

    Forty prepuberal Simmental X Brahman-Hereford heifers were utilized to determine the effects of epinephrine (E), norepinephrine (NE), gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) or combinations of GnRH + E and GnRH + NE on serum luteinizing hormone (LH) concentrations. Animals were assigned randomly to one of five treatments with four replicates/treatment. Treatments consisted of I) 100 micrograms GnRH at time 0 (n = 8); II) 50 mg NE at time -15 and 0 (n = 8); III) 50 mg E at time -15 and 0 (n = 8); IV) 100 micrograms GnRH at time 0, plus 50 mg NE at time -15 and 0 (n = 8) and V) 100 micrograms GnRH at time 0, plus 50 mg E at time -15 and 0 (n = 8). All treatment compounds were administered im in 2 ml physiological saline and blood samples were collected via tail vessel puncture at -30, -15, 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 180, 240, 300 and 360 min from GnRH injection. Treatment with NE or E alone had no effect (P greater than .10) on serum LH during the sampling period. The initial LH release to GnRH was altered (P less than .05) by concomitant treatment with NE (treatment IV) or E (treatment V). Magnitude of the LH release was reduced (P less than .01) by treatment V. Area under the LH surge was reduced (P less than .05) by treatment IV (NE) and V (E). PMID:6355042

  19. Cloning, expression, and purification of a highly immunogenic recombinant gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) chimeric peptide.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinshu; Zhu, Zheng; Duan, Peng; Li, Wenjia; Zhang, Yin; Wu, Jie; Hu, Zhuoyi; Roque, Rouel S; Liu, Jingjing

    2006-12-01

    To design an anti-gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) vaccine capable of eliciting strong immunogenicity, a gene fragment encoding a chimeric peptide was constructed using polymerase chain reaction and ligated into a novel expression vector for recombinant expression in a T7 RNA polymerase-based expression system. The chimeric peptide called GnRH3-hinge-MVP contained three linear repeats of GnRH (GnRH3), a fragment of the human IgG1 hinge region, and a T-cell epitope of measles virus protein (MVP). The expression plasmid contained the GnRH3-hinge-MVP construct ligated to its fusion partner (AnsB-C) via an unique acid labile Asp-Pro linker. The recombinant fusion protein was expressed in an inclusion body in Escherichia coli under IPTG or lactose induction and the target peptide was easily purified using washing of urea and ethanol precipitation. The target chimeric peptide was isolated from the fusion partner following acid hydrolysis and purified using DEAE-Sephacel chromatography. The purified GnRH3-hinge-MVP was determined to be highly homogeneous by IEF analysis and the N-terminal sequencing. Further, immunization of female mice with the recombinant chimeric peptide resulted in generation of high-titer antibodies specific for GnRH. The results showed that GnRH3-hinge-MVP could be considered as a candidate anti-GnRH vaccine. PMID:17064933

  20. GnRH, anosmia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism--where are we?

    PubMed

    Forni, Paolo E; Wray, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons originate the nasal placode and migrate into the brain during prenatal development. Once within the brain, these cells become integral components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, essential for reproductive function. Disruption of this system causes hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH). HH associated with anosmia is clinically defined as Kallman syndrome (KS). Recent work examining the developing nasal region has shed new light on cellular composition, cell interactions and molecular cues responsible for the development of this system in different species. This review discusses some developmental aspects, animal models and current advancements in our understanding of pathologies affecting GnRH. In addition we discuss how development of neural crest derivatives such as the glia of the olfactory system and craniofacial structures control GnRH development and reproductive function. PMID:25306902

  1. [Synthesis of GnRH analogs and their application in targeted gene delivery systems].

    PubMed

    Iablokova, T V; Chelushkin, P S; Dorosh, M Iu; Efremov, A M; Orlov, S V; Burov, S V

    2012-01-01

    A set of GnRH analogues containing nuclear localization signal (NLS) of SV-40 virus large T-antigen have been synthesized using solid phase peptide synthesis and chemical ligation technique. Selective chemical ligation was achieved as a result of hydrazone formation in the course of interaction between NLS hydrazide and GnRH analog modified by pyruvic acid. The efficiency of synthesized peptide carriers was demonstrated in experiments with human cancer cells transfected by reporter luciferase and beta-galactosidase genes or suicide HSV-1 thymidine kinase gene. It was shown that selectivity of action on cancer cells can be achieved as a result of peptide/DNA complex penetration through the cell membrane by GnRH receptor-mediated endocytosis pathway. PMID:22792703

  2. Clinical use of GnRH agonists in canine and feline species.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, E; Fontbonne, A

    2011-04-01

    GnRH (gonadotrophin releasing hormone) is a key hormone of reproductive function in mammals; agonist forms have been largely developed, and data concerning their use in small animal reproduction are now abundant. GnRH agonists act by a two-step mechanism. First, their agonist properties on the pituitary will cause marked LH (luteinizing hormone) and FSH (follicle-stimulating hormone) secretion into the bloodstream, accompanied by an increase in the concentrations of sex steroid hormones. Then, in case of constant administration, GnRH agonists will lead to pituitary desensitization, and FSH and LH levels will collapse. These two effects have been widely documented, and these compounds have many potential benefits in a clinical context, capitalizing both on their stimulating and sterilizing effects. PMID:20964727

  3. Recurrence after robotic myomectomy: is it associated with use of GnRH agonist?

    PubMed

    Sangha, Roopina; Katukuri, Vivek; Palmer, Matthew; Khangura, Raminder Kaur

    2016-09-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist therapy is used before myomectomy to decrease the size of the fibroids, but its association with fibroid recurrence postoperatively remains unsettled. We undertook a retrospective study of robotic-assisted myomectomy (RM) patients at our academic medical center to determine symptomatic recurrence and reoperation rates in those who did versus did not receive preoperative GnRH therapy. Only patients, who had their index myomectomy at least 2 years prior to the chart review, were included in this study. Of 118 RM patients identified between January 2005 and December 2009, 17 patients (14.4 %) had symptomatic recurrence as early as 5 months to as late as 30 months postoperatively. The symptomatic recurrence group had significantly higher preoperative GnRH use (35 vs 9 % non-recurrence; p = 0.009). A total of 7.6 % of all patients underwent reoperation. GnRH agonist use was significantly higher in the reoperation group (56 vs 9 % no reoperation; p = 0.002). Cavity entry during the initial surgery was also more frequent in the reoperation group (56 vs 20 %; p = 0.030), whereas the presence of multiple fibroids, size of the largest leiomyoma, and uterine volume were not statistically different between groups. Our study is among the earliest to report RM reoperation rates in patients receiving preoperative GnRH therapy, showing that the role of GnRH agonist therapy to shrink myomas may not be beneficial when measured against risk of disease recurrence. PMID:27072151

  4. Terminal nerve gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurones express multiple GnRH receptors in a teleost, the dwarf gourami (Colisa lalia).

    PubMed

    Hajdú, P; Ikemoto, T; Akazome, Y; Park, M K; Oka, Y

    2007-06-01

    Gonadotophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) peptide released from the terminal nerve (TN)-GnRH neurones of the dwarf gourami primarily modifies the electrical properties of various neurones, including the TN-GnRH neurones themselves. However, our knowledge on the expression of GnRH receptors (GnRHRs) in the TN-GnRH neurones is still limited. Here, we used the single-cell reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction after whole-cell patch-clamp recording to study the distribution of various GnRHR types expressed in the individual TN-GnRH neurones. We found that TN-GnRH neurones express two of the three types of GnRHRs cloned in the dwarf gourami: GnRHR1-2 and -R2, but not -R1-1. Furthermore, in agreement with our previous findings, all TN-GnRH neurones contained mRNAs of salmon GnRH but not chicken GnRH-II. PMID:17504441

  5. Receptor-mediated binding and uptake of GnRH agonist and antagonist by pituitary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jennes, L.; Stumpf, W.E.; Conn, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    The intracellular pathway of an enzyme resistant GnRH agonist (D- Lys6 -GnRH) conjugated to ferritin or to colloidal gold was followed in cultured pituitary cells. After an initial uniform distribution over the cell surface of gonadotropes, the electrondense marker was internalized, either individually or in small groups. After longer incubation times, the marker appeared in the lysosomal compartment and the Golgi apparatus, where it could be found in the vesicular as well as cisternal portion. In addition, the receptor-mediated endocytosis of the GnRH antagonist D-p-Glu1-D-Phe2-D-Trp3-D- Lys6 -GnRH was studied by light and electron microscopic autoradiography after 30 and 60 min of incubation to ensure uptake. At both time points, in in vitro as well as in vivo studies, silver grains were localized over cytoplasmic organelles of castration cells, including dilated endoplasmic reticulum, lysosomes, and clear vesicles. No consistent association with cell nuclei, mitochondria, or secretory vesicles could be observed. The results suggest that both agonist and antagonist are binding selectively to the plasma membrane of gonadotropes and subsequently are taken up via receptor-mediated endocytosis for degradation or possible action on synthetic processes.

  6. A mathematical model of the human menstrual cycle for the administration of GnRH analogues.

    PubMed

    Röblitz, Susanna; Stötzel, Claudia; Deuflhard, Peter; Jones, Hannah M; Azulay, David-Olivier; van der Graaf, Piet H; Martin, Steven W

    2013-03-21

    The paper presents a differential equation model for the feedback mechanisms between gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), development of follicles and corpus luteum, and the production of estradiol (E2), progesterone (P4), inhibin A (IhA), and inhibin B (IhB) during the female menstrual cycle. Compared to earlier human cycle models, there are three important differences: The model presented here (a) does not involve any delay equations, (b) is based on a deterministic modeling of the GnRH pulse pattern, and (c) contains less differential equations and less parameters. These differences allow for a faster simulation and parameter identification. The focus is on modeling GnRH-receptor binding, in particular, by inclusion of a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model for a GnRH agonist, Nafarelin, and a GnRH antagonist, Cetrorelix, into the menstrual cycle model. The final mathematical model describes the hormone profiles (LH, FSH, P4, E2) throughout the menstrual cycle of 12 healthy women. It correctly predicts hormonal changes following single and multiple dose administration of Nafarelin or Cetrorelix at different stages in the cycle. PMID:23206386

  7. Functional Significance of GnRH and Kisspeptin, and Their Cognate Receptors in Teleost Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Gopurappilly, Renjitha; Ogawa, Satoshi; Parhar, Ishwar S.

    2012-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide binding protein (G-protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are eukaryotic transmembrane proteins found in all living organisms. Their versatility and roles in several physiological processes make them the single largest family of drug targets. Comparative genomic studies using various model organisms have provided useful information about target receptors. The similarity of the genetic makeup of teleosts to that of humans and other vertebrates aligns with the study of GPCRs. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) represents a critical step in the reproductive process through its cognate GnRH receptors (GnRHRs). Kisspeptin (Kiss1) and its cognate GPCR, GPR54 (=kisspeptin receptor, Kiss-R), have recently been identified as a critical signaling system in the control of reproduction. The Kiss1/Kiss-R system regulates GnRH release, which is vital to pubertal development and vertebrate reproduction. This review highlights the physiological role of kisspeptin-Kiss-R signaling in the reproductive neuroendocrine axis in teleosts through the modulation of GnRH release. Moreover, we also review the recent developments in GnRHR and Kiss-R with respect to their structural variants, signaling mechanisms, ligand interactions, and functional significance. Finally, we discuss the recent progress in identifying many teleost GnRH-GnRHR and kisspeptin-Kiss-R systems and consider their physiological significance in the control of reproduction. PMID:23482509

  8. Hormonal response of male green anole lizards (Anolis carolinensis) to GnRH challenge.

    PubMed

    Husak, Jerry F; Irschick, Duncan J; Henningsen, Justin P; Kirkbride, Kimberly S; Lailvaux, Simon P; Moore, Ignacio T

    2009-02-01

    Circulating plasma levels of testosterone often differ among social classes of sexually mature males within a population, but the general physiological mechanisms underlying such differences remain unclear. Within sexually mature male green anole lizards (Anolis carolinensis), smaller "lightweight" males have on average relatively smaller heads, lower bite-forces, and lower testosterone levels compared with larger "heavyweight" males. We conducted gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) challenges on lightweight and heavyweight males to determine if lightweight males were capable of producing comparable levels of circulating testosterone to heavyweight males but are socially or physiologically suppressed from doing so. We challenged lightweight and heavyweight males with chicken I and II GnRH and measured their resulting levels of testosterone and corticosterone. Neither lightweights nor heavyweights increased circulating testosterone levels after GnRH challenge, suggesting they are already at maximal production levels, consistent with the Challenge Hypothesis. Instead, testosterone levels tended to decrease and corticosterone levels increased, most likely owing to the stress response associated with handling. Our results are dramatically different from GnRH challenges conducted in bird species, suggesting that more field studies are needed in reptilian systems. PMID:19012286

  9. Effects of background color on GnRH and MCH levels in the barfin flounder brain.

    PubMed

    Amiya, Noriko; Amano, Masafumi; Yamanome, Takeshi; Yamamori, Kunio; Takahashi, Akiyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Effects of background color on gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) levels in the brain of the barfin flounder Verasper moseri were monitored to investigate the interaction of GnRH and MCH in the brain. Fish were reared in white or black tanks from one month after hatching for about 7 months. MCH levels in the brain and pituitary were higher in the white tank fish. In contrast, chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II) levels in the brain were higher in the black tank fish. No significant differences between background colors were observed in the brain concerning salmon GnRH and seabream GnRH levels. Furthermore, six-month-old fish that had been reared in white tank were transferred to another white or black tank. Brain cGnRH-II levels were higher in black tank fish than those in white tank at 2 and 7 days after the transfer. Double-staining immunohistochemistry showed that some cGnRH-II-immunoreactive (ir) fibers were in close contact with MCH-ir cell bodies in the hypothalamus. These results indicate that background color affects not only MCH levels but also cGnRH-II levels in the brain and suggest that cGnRH-II may play a role in the regulation of MCH neural function, food intake, in the brain of the barfin flounder. PMID:17475262

  10. Loss of function mutations of the GnRH receptor: a new cause of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    de Roux, N; Young, J; Misrahi, M; Schaison, G; Milgrom, E

    1999-04-01

    The association of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with anosmia defines Kallmann's syndrome. The gene of the X-linked form of this syndrome has been cloned and several mutations described. However, the relatively small number of hypogonadotropic hypogonadic patients with Kallmann's gene defects supports the hypothesis that other genes may be involved. Idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) is not associated with anosmia. The GnRH gene was excluded as a candidate gene in IHH since no abnormality was found in several patients. The action of the GnRH is mediated through a G-protein coupled receptor present in the cell membrane of gonadotropes. The GnRH receptor was thus another candidate gene. Recently, we described the first patient with partial hypogonadotropic hypogonadism without anosmia caused by loss of function mutations of the GnRH receptor. We compare this first family with a new family presenting complete hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and a variable degree of gonadotrope deficiency in the affected kindred, and discuss genotype-phenotype correlation. PMID:10698591

  11. Social Crowding during Development Causes Changes in GnRH1 DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Blake; Fernald, Russell D.

    2015-01-01

    Gestational and developmental cues have important consequences for long-term health, behavior and adaptation to the environment. In addition, social stressors cause plastic molecular changes in the brain that underlie unique behavioral phenotypes that also modulate fitness. In the adult African cichlid, Astatotilapia burtoni, growth and social status of males are both directly regulated by social interactions in a dynamic social environment, which causes a suite of plastic changes in circuits, cells and gene transcription in the brain. We hypothesized that a possible mechanism underlying some molecular changes might be DNA methylation, a reversible modification made to cytosine nucleotides that is known to regulate gene function. Here we asked whether changes in DNA methylation of the GnRH1 gene, the central regulator of the reproductive axis, were altered during development of A. burtoni. We measured changes in methylation state of the GnRH1 gene during normal development and following the gestational and developmental stress of social crowding. We found differential DNA methylation within developing juveniles between 14-, 28- and 42-day-old. Following gestational crowding of mouth brooding mothers, we saw differential methylation and transcription of GnRH1 in their offspring. Taken together, our data provides evidence for social control of GnRH1 developmental responses to gestational cues through DNA methylation. PMID:26517121

  12. VEGF signalling controls GnRH neuron survival via NRP1 independently of KDR and blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Cariboni, Anna; Davidson, Kathryn; Dozio, Elena; Memi, Fani; Schwarz, Quenten; Stossi, Fabio; Parnavelas, John G; Ruhrberg, Christiana

    2011-09-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons are neuroendocrine cells that are born in the nasal placode during embryonic development and migrate through the nose and forebrain to the hypothalamus, where they regulate reproduction. Many molecular pathways that guide their migration have been identified, but little is known about the factors that control the survival of the migrating GnRH neurons as they negotiate different environments. We previously reported that the class 3 semaphorin SEMA3A signals through its neuropilin receptors, NRP1 and NRP2, to organise the axons that guide migrating GnRH neurons from their birthplace into the brain. By combining analysis of genetically altered mice with in vitro models, we show here that the alternative neuropilin ligand VEGF164 promotes the survival of migrating GnRH neurons by co-activating the ERK and AKT signalling pathways through NRP1. We also demonstrate that survival signalling relies on neuronal, but not endothelial, NRP1 expression and that it occurs independently of KDR, the main VEGF receptor in blood vessels. Therefore, VEGF164 provides survival signals directly to developing GnRH neurons, independently of its role in blood vessels. Finally, we show that the VEGF164-mediated neuronal survival and SEMA3A-mediated axon guidance cooperate to ensure that migrating GnRH neurons reach the brain. Thus, the loss of both neuropilin ligands leads to an almost complete failure to establish the GnRH neuron system. PMID:21828096

  13. Familial idiopathic gonadotropin deficiency not linked to gene for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in Brazilian kindred

    SciTech Connect

    Faraco, J.; Francke, U.; Toledo, S.

    1994-09-01

    Familial idiopathic gonadotropin deficiency (FIGD) is an autosomal recessive disorder which results in failure to develop secondary sexual characteristics. The origin is a hypothalamic defect resulting in insufficient secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone GnRH (also called LHRH, luteinizing hormone releasing hormone) and follicle-stimuating hormone (FSH). FIGD has been determined to be a separate entity from Kallmann syndrome which presents with hypogonadism as well as anosmia. The FIGD phenotype appears to be analogous to the phenotype of the hpg (hypogonadal) mouse. Because the hpg phenotype is the result of a structurally abnormal GnRH gene, we have studied the GnRH gene in individuals from a previously reported Brazilian FIGD family. An informative dimorphic marker in the signal peptide sequence of the GnRH gene allowed assessment of linkage between the disease gene and the GnRH locus in this pedigree. We have concluded that the GnRH locus is not linked to the disease-causing mutation in these hypogonadal individuals. Recent evidence suggests that neuropeptide Y (NPY) may play a role in the initiation of puberty. We hypothesize that mutations in NPY may result in failure to secrete GnRH. We have characterized three diallelic frequent-cutter restriction fragment length polymorphisms within the human NPY locus, and are currently using these markers to determine if the NPY gene is linked to, and possibly the site of the disease mutation in this kindred.

  14. Detection and effects on serum and urine steroid and LH of repeated GnRH analog (leuprolide) stimulation.

    PubMed

    Handelsman, David J; Idan, Amanda; Grainger, Janelle; Goebel, Catrin; Turner, Leo; Conway, Ann J

    2014-05-01

    Non-steroidal drugs that increase endogenous testosterone (T) may be used to exploit ergogenic effects of androgens in power sports. While superactive GnRH analog use is suspected, neither screening nor detection tests are developed. This study aimed to determine if (a) stimulation for 5 days by leuprolide (a superactive GnRH analog) of serum and urine steroids and urine LH is reproducible at a 2 week interval, (b) nandrolone decanoate (ND) co-administration masks responses to leuprolide administration, (c) performance of urine measurement of leuprolide and M1, its major metabolite, as a detection test. Healthy men were randomized into a 4 week parallel group, open label clinical study in which all men had daily sc injections of leuprolide (1mg) for 4 days in the 1st and 3rd weeks with hormone-free 2nd and 4th weeks. In the 3rd week, men were randomized to either ND injections or no extra treatment. Serum steroids were determined by liquid chromatography, tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS), urine steroids by gas chromatography, mass spectrometry (GC-MS), urine leuprolide and M1 by high resolution LC-MS and urine LH by immunoassay. Leuprolide stimulated striking, reproducible increases in serum and urine LH and steroids (serum T, dihydroT (DHT), 3α diol; urine T, epitestosterone (E) and androsterone (A). ND suppressed basal serum T, E2, 3α diol, and urinary E but did not mask or change the magnitude of responses to leuprolide. Urine leuprolide and M1 measurement had 100% sensitivity and specificity in detecting leuprolide administration up to one day after cessation of injections with the detection window between 1 and 3 days after last dose. Screening using urine steroid and LH measurements, optimally by urinary log10(LHxT), correctly classified 82% of urine samples. It is concluded that leuprolide stimulation of endogenous testosterone is reproducible after a 10-day interval, is not masked by ND and is reliably detected by urine leuprolide or M1 measurement for at

  15. The effect of GnRH analogues for pituitary suppression on ovarian response in repeated ovarian stimulation cycles

    PubMed Central

    Cavagna, Mario; Paes de Almeida Ferreira Braga, Daniela; Biaggioni Lopes, Fabio; de Cássia Savio Figueira, Rita; Iaconelli, Assumpto; Borges, Edson

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Ovarian stimulation is employed in assisted reproduction techniques in order to obtain as many oocytes as possible. The early rise in oestradiol levels may lead to the premature end of the respective cycle. In order to avoid such an effect, pituitary suppression has been employed. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether maintenance or replacement of the type of GnRH analogue (i.e., agonist or antagonist) employed for pituitary suppression in the consecutive intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycle would negatively influence oocyte quality and ICSI outcome. Material and methods A retrospective observational study was conducted including 181 women with primary infertility. Patients were divided into four different groups according to the GnRH analogue used for pituitary suppression in the first and consecutive cycle. Results When a GnRH agonist was employed for pituitary suppression in the first cycle, the consecutive cycle showed comparable outcomes when performed with either a GnRH agonist or a GnRH antagonist. When the first cycle was performed with a GnRH antagonist, the use of the GnRH agonist in the successive cycle led to an increased number of oocytes retrieved (7.5% vs. 10.3%, p = 0.032) and the production of a higher number of embryos (4.5% vs. 6.3%, p = 0.036). Conclusions When the first cycle is carried out with a GnRH antagonist, the use of a GnRH agonist in the successive cycle would lead to increased numbers of oocytes collected and embryos produced. PMID:22295031

  16. Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) and gonadotropin inhibitory hormone (GnIH) in the songbird hippocampus: regional and sex differences in adult zebra finches.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Nicolette; Ferris, Jennifer K; Arckens, Lutgarde; Bentley, George E; Soma, Kiran K

    2013-08-01

    Hypothalamic gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) and gonadotropin inhibitory hormone (GnIH) are vital to reproduction in all vertebrates. These neuropeptides are also present outside of the hypothalamus, but the roles of extra-hypothalamic GnRH and GnIH remain enigmatic and widely underappreciated. We used immunohistochemistry and PCR to examine whether multiple forms of GnRH (chicken GnRH-I (GnRH1), chicken GnRH-II (GnRH2) and lamprey GnRH-III (GnRH4)) and GnIH are present in the hippocampus (Hp) of adult zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). Using immunohistochemistry, we provide evidence that GnRH1, GnRH2 and GnRH4 are present in hippocampal cell bodies and/or fibers and that GnIH is present in hippocampal fibers only. There are regional differences in hippocampal GnRH immunoreactivity, and these vary across the different forms of GnRH. There are also sex differences in hippocampal GnRH immunoreactivity, with generally more GnRH1 and GnRH2 in the female Hp. In addition, we used PCR to examine the presence of GnRH1 mRNA and GnIH mRNA in micropunches of Hp. PCR and subsequent product sequencing demonstrated the presence of GnRH1 mRNA and the absence of GnIH mRNA in the Hp, consistent with the pattern of immunohistochemical results. To our knowledge, this is the first study in any species to systematically examine multiple forms of GnRH in the Hp or to quantify sex or regional differences in hippocampal GnRH. Moreover, this is the first demonstration of GnIH in the avian Hp. These data shed light on an important issue: the sites of action and possible functions of GnRH and GnIH outside of the HPG axis. PMID:23727031

  17. Reproductive Status Regulates Expression of Sex Steroid and GnRH Receptors in the Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Fernald, Russell D.

    2010-01-01

    Neuromodulators including gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and sex steroids help integrate an animal's internal physiological state with incoming external cues, and can have profound effects on the processing of behaviorally-relevant information, particularly from the olfactory system. While GnRH and steroid receptors are present in olfactory processing regions across vertebrates, little is known about whether their expression levels change with internal physiological state or external social cues. We used qRT-PCR to measure mRNA levels of two GnRH receptors (GnRH-R1, GnRH-R2), five sex steroid receptors (estrogen receptors: ERα, ERβa, ERβb; androgen receptors: ARα, ARβ), and aromatase in the olfactory bulb of the highly social African cichlid fish Astatotilapia burtoni. We asked whether these receptor levels changed with reproductive condition in females, or with social status, which regulates reproductive capacity in males. Our results reveal that mRNA levels of multiple sex steroid, GnRH receptor subtypes, and aromatase in the olfactory bulb vary with sex, social status in males, and reproductive condition in females, which highlights the potential importance of changing receptor levels in fine-tuning the olfactory system during the reproductive cycle. Further, steroid receptor mRNA levels were positively correlated with circulating steroid levels in males, but negatively correlated in females, suggesting different regulatory control between sexes. These results provide support for the hypothesis that the first-order olfactory relay station is a substrate for both GnRH and sex steroid modulation, and suggest that changes in receptor levels could be an important mechanism for regulating reproductive, social, and seasonal plasticity in olfactory perception observed across vertebrates. PMID:20466023

  18. Successful use of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analog for the treatment of tertiary hypogonadism (GnRH deficiency) in a 5-year-old Belgian Blue bull.

    PubMed

    Contri, Alberto; Gloria, Alessia; Wegher, Laura; Carluccio, Augusto

    2012-01-01

    A bull was referred for a progressive oligoasthenotheratozoospermia that resulted in a unsuitable seminal quality for the cryopreservation. Breeding soundness evaluation results suggested gonadal dysfunction. Because of the lack of normal ranges for these hormones in the bull, in this study, the hypogonadism and the site of the dysfunction (hypothalamus) were diagnosed by the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation test. The evaluation of pituitary and testicular responsiveness by a GnRH stimulating test revealed a responsiveness of the pituitary and testis, thus a secondary hypogonadism (hypothalamic hypogonadism) was postulated and a therapeutic approach based on the subcutaneous administration of GnRH analog was attempted. An increase in semen volume, concentration and sperm characteristics were detected 9 weeks after the start of the treatment, corroborating the hypothalamic origin of the disease and the useful of the GnRH therapy. PMID:22493993

  19. Molecular cloning and characterization, and prokaryotic expression of the GnRH1 gene obtained from Jinghai yellow chicken.

    PubMed

    Zhang, T; Zhang, G X; Han, K P; Tang, Y; Wang, J Y; Fan, Q C; Chen, X S; Wei, Y; Wang, Y J

    2015-01-01

    The gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) plays an important role in the control of reproductive functions. Recent studies have reported the occurrence of GnRH molecular variants in numerous species. In this study, the GnRH1 gene from Jinghai yellow chicken was cloned by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and transformed into BL21 (DE3) competent cells. The GnRH1 gene and amino acid sequences were subjected to bioinformatic analyses. The GnRH1 gene nucleotide sequence was discovered to be 352 bp long, containing a coding, promoter, and section of the 3'-regions. The GnRH1 gene shared 93, 81, 54, 58, 61, 76, 76, 59, 76, and 66% sequence identity with Meleagris gallopavo, Columba livia, Homo sapiens, Bos taurus, swines, Capra hircus, Ovis aries, Pantholops hodgsonii, Equus caballus, and Rattus norvegicus, respectively. The GnRH1 gene showed conserved domains. The GnRH1 protein was a secreted protein comprising 92 amino acids, with a molecular weight of 10205.6 Da and a theoretical pI of 5.67. Most of the amino acid residues were observed to be hydrophilic, indicating water solubility. The predicted secondary structures of proteins included α-helices (h; 23.08%), β-extensions (e; 10.92%), and random coils (c; 66.0%). The successful construction of prokaryotic expression vector pET32a-GnRH1 was confirmed by restriction and sequence analysis. SDS-PAGE analysis showed the successful expression of recombinant plasmid in Escherichia coli BL21 (molecular weight = 25-28 kDa). Larger quantities of protein were expressed in supernatant, indicating greater expression in soluble form. Western blot analysis confirmed the expression of the target protein. PMID:25867433

  20. Molecular cloning and differential expression of three GnRH genes during ovarian maturation of spotted halibut, Verasper variegatus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong-Jiang; Liu, Xue-Zhou; Liao, Mei-Jie; Wang, Han-Ping; Wang, Qing-Yin

    2012-08-01

    In this study, the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) genes in spotted halibut were cloned and sequenced by isolating their cDNAs. The species expressed three molecular forms of GnRH in the brain: chicken-type GnRH-II (cGnRH-II), seabream-type GnRH (sbGnRH), and salmon-type GnRH (sGnRH). Phylogenetic analysis divided the molecular forms of GnRHs into three branches: cGnRH-II branch, sGnRH branch, and fish-specific GnRH branch. The spatial expression showed that they had the highest expression levels in the brain. cGnRH-II was exclusively detected in the brain, while sbGnRH had a global expression pattern in all examined organs. sGnRH was detected in the brain, pituitary, and ovary. The temporal changes of brain GnRH mRNA expression levels were examined during ovarian maturation and postspawning, and the serum steroid hormones and gonadosomatic index (GSI) were recorded. Amounts of sbGnRH mRNA substantially elevated (P < 0.05) during ovarian maturation, which concomitant with considerable elevation of GSI and serum steroids levels. On the contrary, neither sGnRH nor cGnRH-II mRNA levels showed significant changes during ovarian maturation in this study. These results suggested that these three GnRH genes are the important regulators for the differential expression of GnRH in spotted halibut, and would help us better understand the reproductive endocrine mechanism of spotted halibut. PMID:22674773

  1. Observational Study to Assess the Therapeutic Value of Four Ovarian Hyperstimulation Protocols in IVF After Pituitary Suppression with GnRH Antagonists in Normally Responding Women

    PubMed Central

    Ana, Monzó; Vicente, Montañana; María, Rubio José; Trinidad, García-Gimeno; Alberto, Romeu

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical results of four different protocols of COH for IVF-ICSI in normovulatory women, using in all cases pituitary suppression with GnRH antagonists. Materials/methods A single center, open label, parallel-controlled, prospective, post-authorization study under the approved conditions for use where 305 normal responders women who were candidates to COH were assigned to r-FSH +hp-hMG (n = 51, Group I), hp-hMG (n = 61, Group II), fixed-dose r-FSH (n = 118, Group III), and r-FSH with potential dose adjustment (n = 75, Group IV) to subsequently undergo IVF-ICSI. Results During stimulation, Group IV needed significantly more days of stimulation as compared to Group II [8.09 ± 1.25 vs. 7.62 ± 1.17; P < 0.05], but was the group in which more oocytes were recovered [Group I: 9.43 ± 4.99 vs. Group II: 8.96 ± 4.82 vs. Group III: 8.78 ± 3.72 vs. Group IV: 11.62 ± 5.80; P < 0.05]. No significant differences were seen between the groups in terms of clinical and ongoing pregnancy, but among patients in whom two embryos with similar quality parameters (ASEBIR) were transferred, the group treated with hp-hMG alone achieved a significantly greater clinical pregnancy rate as compared to all other groups [Group I: 31.6%, Group II: 56.4%, Group III: 28.7%, Group IV: 32.7%; P < 0.05]. Conclusions Although randomized clinical trials should be conducted to achieve a more reliable conclusion, these observations support the concept that stimulation with hp-hMG could be beneficial in normal responders women undergoing pituitary suppression with GnRH antagonists. PMID:24453506

  2. [GnRH analogues containing SV-40 virus T-antigen nuclear localization sequence].

    PubMed

    Burov, S V; Iablokova, T V; Dorosh, M Iu; Kriviziuk, E V; Efremov, A M; Orlov, S V

    2010-01-01

    To improve the efficiency of anticancer drugs due to their delivery to intracellular targets a set of GnRH analogues containing nuclear localization signal (NLS) of SV-40 virus large T-antigen have been synthesized. NLS was attached to the parent molecule via ε-amino group of D-Lysine in position 1 or 6 of peptide sequence using orthogonal protection strategy. The biological activity studies revealed that incorporation of NLS moiety significantly increases cytotoxic activity of palmitoyl-containing GnRH analogues in vitro. The influence of tested peptides on tumor cells does not accompanied by the destruction of cell membrane, as confirmed in experiments with normal fibroblasts, used as a control. PMID:21063449

  3. GnRH receptors in human granulosa cells: Anatomical localization and characterization by autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Latouche, J.; Crumeyrolle-Arias, M.; Jordan, D.; Kopp, N.; Augendre-Ferrante, B.; Cedard, L.; Haour, F. )

    1989-09-01

    The presence of receptors for GnRH in human ovary has been investigated by quantitative autoradiography. Simultaneous visualization and characterization of specific receptors on frozen sections were obtained on six pairs of human ovaries. Among them only one exhibited a large preovulatory follicle. This dominant follicle exhibited a specific and high affinity binding capacity for {sup 125}I-GnRHa exclusively localized on the granulosa cell layer. Analysis of saturation curve indicates a Kd value of 0.22 nM and Bmax of 9.6 fmol/mg protein. In contrast LH-hCG binding sites were present in all antral follicles. These data demonstrate for the first time the presence of high affinity GnRH receptors in human granulosa cells at a late stage of follicular maturation.

  4. GnRH decreases adiponectin expression in pituitary gonadotropes via the calcium and PKA pathways.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jonathan; Zheng, Weiming; Grafer, Constance; Mann, Merry Lynn; Halvorson, Lisa M

    2013-08-01

    As endocrinologically active cells, adipocytes are capable of secreting various adipocytokines such as leptin, resistin, and adiponectin to impact metabolic function. Although adipocytes remain to be the primary site of synthesis and secretion, there is now growing evidence that supports the presence of adiponectin and its receptors within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, providing a possible link between obesity and abnormal reproductive physiology. It has been demonstrated that adiponectin may reduce gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion from the hypothalamus as well as modulate gonadal steroid hormone production. Furthermore, prior data indicate that adiponectin may play a role in decreasing luteinizing hormone secretion from pituitary gonadotropes. We aimed to identify the hormonal regulators of adiponectin and its receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, in pituitary gonadotropes using immortalized gonadotropic LβT2 cells and primary rat pituitary cells. Our study shows significant alterations in adiponectin expression across the estrous cycle. In addition, we present a novel finding that GnRH suppresses pituitary adiponectin expression via the calcium and protein kinase A intracellular pathways in both cultured rat primary pituitary cells and the LβT2 gonadotrope cell line. The GnRH did not alter expression of the adiponectin receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, in cultured gonadotropes. Expression of the adiponectin receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, was not altered by GnRH in cell culture but in vivo or in vitro. Our data suggest that gonadotrope function may be modulated by GnRH-mediated changes in adiponectin expression. PMID:23239819

  5. Changes in brain seabream GnRH mRNA and pituitary seabream GnRH peptide levels during ovarian maturation in female barfin flounder.

    PubMed

    Amano, Masafumi; Pham, Ky Xuan; Amiya, Noriko; Yamanome, Takeshi; Yamamori, Kunio

    2008-09-01

    The pleuronectid barfin flounder Verasper moseri expresses three forms of gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRHs), i.e., seabream GnRH (sbGnRH), salmon GnRH, and chicken GnRH-II. Among these, sbGnRH is the dominant form in the pituitary, indicating that sbGnRH regulates gonadal maturation. In order to clarify the physiological roles of sbGnRH during ovarian maturation in reared female barfin flounder, the changes in brain sbGnRH mRNA levels and pituitary sbGnRH peptide levels were examined by real-time quantitative PCR and time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay, respectively. The fish hatched in April 2002. The gonadosomatic index remained low until August 2004 and increased thereafter until April 2005 when the fish began to ovulate. The sbGnRH mRNA levels per brain increased significantly from April 2004 to April 2005. Pituitary sbGnRH peptide levels also increased significantly during this period. These results indicate that sbGnRH is involved in ovarian maturation and ovulation in the barfin flounder. PMID:18662692

  6. Bovine ovarian follicular cysts: in vitro effects of lecirelin, a GnRH analogue.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Annalisa; Cosola, Claudia; Mutinati, Maddalena; Spedicato, Massimo; Minoia, Giuseppe; Sciorsci, Raffaele Luigi

    2010-12-01

    This study investigates the mechanisms of action by which a GnRH analogue may modulate the contractility of the bovine ovarian follicular wall. The in vitro evaluation of the spontaneous basal contractility of bovine preovulatory and cystic follicles was performed, followed by testing the effects of lecirelin, a GnRH analogue, on their basal contractility. Strips of tissue in isolated organ bath were employed. In addition, to better investigate the mechanism of action of lecirelin, the study of the effects of cumulative doses of nifedipine (a calcium channel blocker), phentolamine (an α-adrenoceptor antagonist) and reserpine (an inhibitor of the vesicular up-take of catecholamines) alone and, at the highest doses employed, associated to lecirelin, was set up. The results demonstrate that in basal conditions and after the addition of lecirelin, the strips from preovulatory follicles contract significantly more than strips from cysts. Furthermore, among the patterns of contractility evoked by the three drugs employed, the one induced by nifedipine was the only one unaffected by the addition of lecirelin. The data obtained provide the hypothesis that one of the main mechanisms of action of GnRH, could involve calcium channels. PMID:20691467

  7. Dose dependent effect of GnRH analogue on pregnancy rate of repeat breeder crossbred cows.

    PubMed

    Kharche, S D; Srivastava, S K

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of treating repeat breeder dairy crossbred cows with different doses of GnRH analogue through i.m. at the time of artificial insemination, on pregnancy rates from their first service after treatment and overall pregnancy rates. One hundred and thirty seven crossbred dairy cows with a history of repeat breeding and eligible after 6-8 infertile services but clinically free of diseases were selected for the study. The animals were randomly divided into three groups. Group 1 (n = 55) cows were treated intramuscularly with each 20 microg Buserelin-acetate (Receptal, Hoechst Roussel Vet GmbH) at the time of artificial insemination. Group 2 (n = 40) cows were treated intramuscularly with each 10 microg Buserelin-acetate at the time of artificial insemination. Group 3 (n = 42) cows were treated intramuscularly with saline as control at the time of artificial insemination. The first service pregnancy rates in Groups 1-3 were 45, 25 and 17%, respectively. Similarly, the overall conception rates in Groups 1-3 were 87, 58 and 48%, respectively. The results indicated that the pregnancy rate in crossbred cows could be improved by the GnRH treatment. The higher dose of GnRH significantly increased (P < 0.05) the first service as well as overall pregnancy rate in a dose dependent manner in repeat breeder crossbred cow bred previously 6-8 times unsuccessfully. PMID:16787717

  8. Cryopreserved embryo transfer in an artificial cycle: is GnRH agonist down-regulation necessary?

    PubMed

    van de Vijver, A; Polyzos, N P; Van Landuyt, L; De Vos, M; Camus, M; Stoop, D; Tournaye, H; Blockeel, C

    2014-11-01

    The use of GnRH agonist downregulation in artificial endometrium priming cycles for cryopreserved embryo transfer was retrospectively investigated to establish whether higher live birth rates resulted. Six hundred and ninety-nine patients underwent 1129 artificial endometrium priming cycles for the transfer of cryopreserved embryos between 1 July 2009 and 1 June 2012. Hormonal supplementation with (group A, n = 280 cycles) or without (group B, n = 849 cycles) GnRH agonist co-treatment was given. Live birth rates were comparable between the two groups per started cycle (14.9% [41/275] in group A versus 15.1% [127/839] in group B) or per embryo transfer (17.5% [41/234] in group A versus 17.6% [127/723] in group B). After logistic regression analysis, the only variables that were significantly associated with live birth rates were day of embryo transfer (OR 0.69; 95% CI 0.48 to 0.98) for day 3 versus day 5 embryos, the number of embryos transferred (OR 2.13; 95% CI 1.58 to 2.86) for two embryos versus one embryo transferred and the endometrial thickness on the day of embryo transfer (OR 1.15; 95% CI 1.05 to 1.25). Live birth rates after cryopreserved embryo transfer in artificial cycles did not increase when a GnRH agonist was administered. PMID:25281196

  9. Effects of GnRH administered to cows at the onset of estrus on timing of ovulation, endocrine responses, and conception.

    PubMed

    Kaim, M; Bloch, A; Wolfenson, D; Braw-Tal, R; Rosenberg, M; Voet, H; Folman, Y

    2003-06-01

    Two experiments examined effects of GnRH administered within 3 h after onset of estrus (OE) on ovulation and conception in dairy cows. In experiment 1, 46 cows received either saline, 250 microg of GnRH, or 10 microg of the GnRH analogue, Buserelin. Cows were observed for estrus, blood samples were collected, and ovulations were monitored by ultrasound. In controls, 76% of cows had intervals from estrus to ovulation of < or = 30 h and 24% had intervals > 30 h. Treatment with either GnRH or GnRH analogue (data combined) increased magnitude of LH surges and decreased intervals from estrus to LH surge or to ovulation. Treated cows all ovulated < or = 30 h after OE. Among control cows, plasma estradiol concentrations before estrus correlated positively with amplitudes of LH surges. Higher plasma progesterone was observed in the subsequent estrous cycle in GnRH-treated cows compared to control cows with delayed ovulations. Experiment 2 included 152 primiparous and 211 multiparous cows in summer and winter. Injection of GnRH analogue at OE increased conception rates (CR) from 41.3 to 55.5% across seasons. In summer, GnRH treatment increased CR from 35.1 to 51.6%. Across seasons, GnRH increased CR from 36.0 to 61.5% in cows with lower body condition at insemination and GnRH increased CR (63.2 vs. 42.2%) in primiparous cows compared to controls. Use of GnRH eliminated differences in CR for cows inseminated early or late relative to OE and increased CR in cows having postpartum reproductive disorders. In conclusion, GnRH at onset of estrus increased LH surges, prevented delayed ovulation, and may increase subsequent progesterone concentrations. Treatments with GnRH increased conception in primiparous cows, during summer, and in cows with lower body condition. PMID:12836937

  10. Evaluation of the effect of a 3rd GnRH injection administered six days after the 2nd GnRH injection of Ovsynch on the reproductive performance of Japanese black cows

    PubMed Central

    Gaja, Abdurraouf Omar; Hamana, Katsumi; Kojima, Toshiyuki

    2008-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the reproductive performance of Japanese black cows following the 3rd injection of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) analogue administered concurrently with Ovsynch-based treatment on day 6 (day 1 = the day of ovulation). In Experiment 1, 12 cows were allocated into three groups: a control group that was subjected to Ovsynch treatment and then injected with a placebo on day 6; group 1 (Ovsynch + GnRH), which was subjected to Ovsynch treatment and was injected with GnRH analogue on day 6, and group 2 (Ovsynch + controlled internal drug-release (CIDR) + GnRH), which received Ovsynch-CIDR treatment and was injected with GnRH analogue on day 6. Blood collection and ultrasonographic observation of the ovaries were conducted daily. Both treatments induced the formation of an accessory corpus luteum and significantly increased the cross-sectional area of the luteal tissue when compared to the control. However, plasma progesterone (P4) was significantly higher in the treatment groups than in the control group on days 11, 12, 17 and 18 in the group 1 and from day 10 to 21 in the group 2. In Experiment 2, 41 cows were assigned to the same three groups described above and then artificially inseminated on day 1. The pregnancy rates on day 45 did not differ among groups. In conclusion, administration of GnRH analogue on day 6 following Ovsynch-based treatment did not improve the reproductive performance of Japanese black cows, even though the P4 concentration was higher in groups that received the GnRH. PMID:18716447

  11. Basal testosterone concentrations after the application of a slow-release GnRH agonist implant are associated with a loss of response to buserelin, a short-term GnRH agonist, in the tom cat.

    PubMed

    Goericke-Pesch, Sandra; Georgiev, Plamen; Fasulkov, Ivan; Vodenicharov, Angel; Wehrend, Axel

    2013-07-01

    Slow-release GnRH agonist implants are considered an effective, reversible alternative to surgical castration in male tom cats. Individual differences exist regarding the onset of efficacy and might be delayed in some animals. Single measurements of testosterone (T) might result in basal concentrations also in intact male cats. Consequently, GnRH stimulation tests are performed to measure T increase in intact animals and to differentiate castrated from intact male cats. In this study, five tom cats were treated with a 4.7-mg deslorelin implant and GnRH stimulation tests using buserelin were performed before treatment and at 4-week intervals afterward until Week 20. After the last test in Week 20 all animals were castrated. Four of five animals had basal T after 4 weeks and-in contrast to pretreatment-application of buserelin did not result in any further T increase. In one animal, T was low after implant insertion, but not basal; however, a GnRH stimulation test induced a slight increase of T in Week 8 and 16 only and no response in Weeks 4, 12, and 20. Testicular volume was significantly decreased and penile spines disappeared in all cats. Testicular histology showed mixed atrophy, but also fully elongated spermatids in three of five male cats making infertility questionable. Because of the loss of the stimulatory effect of short-term GnRH application (buserelin), it can be assumed that long-term GnRH agonists also act by some mechanisms of downregulation of pituitary GnRH receptors in the tom cat. PMID:23622940

  12. Enhancing follicular growth as a prerequisite for GnRH treatment of true anestrum in buffalo.

    PubMed

    Ramoun, A A; Serur, B H; Fattouh, El-S M; Darweish, S A; Abou El-Ghait, H A

    2012-05-01

    A total of 140 true anestrous buffalo were divided on the basis of receiving short-term (20 days) nutritional supplementation (N, n=80) or not (WN, n=60). The animals in N group were subdivided into NQ (n=40) where the quantity of the offered diet was increased by 20% and NF (n=40) where the offered diet was supplemented by 3% of dry protected fat. Buffaloes in either NQ or NF were equally allotted on the following treatment regimens: Insulin/GnRH (NQi or NFi, n=10 for each); rbST/GnRH (NQr or NFr, n=10 for each); GnRH alone treated (NQG or NFG, n=10 for each) and saline-treated control (NQc or NFc, n=10 for each). Insulin-treated subgroups (NQi or NFi) received s/c injection of insulin at a dose of 0.25 I.U./kg on Days 21, 22 and 23 while rbST-treated subgroups (NQr or NFr) received single IM injection of rbST (500 mg Sometribove) on Day 21. GnRH was injected at a dose of 0.020 mg buserelin (5 ml Receptal(®)) on Day 24 in all subgroups except NQCand NFC where Day 1 was the first day of the short-term nutritional improvement. Buffalo in the WN (n=60) were equally allotted on the same treatment regimens applied in the first group insulin/GnRH (WNi, n=15), rbST/GnRH (WNr, n=15); GnRH alone treated (WNG, n=15) and saline-treated control (WNC, n=15). Ultrasonic scanning of ovaries was conducted on Day 24 to measure largest follicle diameter (LFD). The results showed increases (P<0.05) in the LFD following nutritional supplementation with insulin or rbST. The recorded EIRs for GnRH pre-treated with nutritional improvement - metabolic hormones combinations (9/10 and 8/10 for NQi and NFi or 8/10 for NQr) were greater (P<0.05) than those pre-treated with either metabolic hormone alone (7/15 for WNi and/or WNr) or nutritional improvement alone (6/10 for NQG and/or NFG) and control as well. The greatest CR was recorded in the NQi group. It could be concluded that pre-GnRH nutritional improvement plus administration of insulin or rbST increases LFD in true anestrous buffalo

  13. TTF1, a homeodomain containing transcription factor, contributes to regulating periodic oscillations in GnRH gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Matagne, Valerie; Kim, Jae Geun; Ryu, Byung Jun; Hur, Min Kyu; Kim, Min Sung; Kim, Kyungjin; Park, Byong Seo; Damante, Giuseppe; Smiley, Gregory; Lee, Byung Ju; Ojeda, Sergio R.

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF1), a member of the NK family of transcription factors required for basal forebrain morphogenesis, functions in the postnatal hypothalamus as a transcriptional regulator of genes encoding neuromodulators and hypophysiotrophic peptides. One of these peptides is gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Here we show that Ttf1 mRNA abundance vary in a diurnal and melatonin-dependent fashion in the preoptic area (POA) of the rat, with maximal Ttf1 expression attained during the dark phase of the light/dark cycle, preceding the nocturnal peak in GnRH mRNA content. GnRH promoter activity oscillates in a circadian manner in GT1-7 cells, and this pattern is enhanced by TTF1 and blunted by siRNA-mediated Ttf1 gene silencing. TTF1 trans-activates GnRH transcription by binding to two sites in the GnRH promoter. Rat GnRH neurons in situ contain key proteins components of the positive (BMAL1, CLOCK) and negative (PER1) limbs of the circadian oscillator, and these proteins repress Ttf1 promoter activity in vitro. In contrast, Ttf1 transcription is activated by CRY1, a clock component required for circadian rhythmicity. In turn, TTF1 represses transcription of Rev-erbα, a heme receptor that controls circadian transcription within the positive limb of the circadian oscillator. These findings suggest that TTF1 is a component of the molecular machinery controlling circadian oscillations in GnRH gene transcription. PMID:22356123

  14. Chloride Accumulators NKCC1 and AE2 in Mouse GnRH Neurons: Implications for GABAA Mediated Excitation.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Burds, Carol; Cheng, Paul; Wray, Susan

    2015-01-01

    A developmental "switch" in chloride transporters occurs in most neurons resulting in GABAA mediated hyperpolarization in the adult. However, several neuronal cell subtypes maintain primarily depolarizing responses to GABAA receptor activation. Among this group are gonadotropin-releasing hormone-1 (GnRH) neurons, which control puberty and reproduction. NKCC1 is the primary chloride accumulator in neurons, expressed at high levels early in development and contributes to depolarization after GABAA receptor activation. In contrast, KCC2 is the primary chloride extruder in neurons, expressed at high levels in the adult and contributes to hyperpolarization after GABAA receptor activation. Anion exchangers (AEs) are also potential modulators of responses to GABAA activation since they accumulate chloride and extrude bicarbonate. To evaluate the mechanism(s) underlying GABAA mediated depolarization, GnRH neurons were analyzed for 1) expression of chloride transporters and AEs in embryonic, pre-pubertal, and adult mice 2) responses to GABAA receptor activation in NKCC1-/- mice and 3) function of AEs in these responses. At all ages, GnRH neurons were immunopositive for NKCC1 and AE2 but not KCC2 or AE3. Using explants, calcium imaging and gramicidin perforated patch clamp techniques we found that GnRH neurons from NKCC1-/- mice retained relatively normal responses to the GABAA agonist muscimol. However, acute pharmacological inhibition of NKCC1 with bumetanide eliminated the depolarization/calcium response to muscimol in 40% of GnRH neurons from WT mice. In the remaining GnRH neurons, HCO3- mediated mechanisms accounted for the remaining calcium responses to muscimol. Collectively these data reveal mechanisms responsible for maintaining depolarizing GABAA mediated transmission in GnRH neurons. PMID:26110920

  15. Chloride Accumulators NKCC1 and AE2 in Mouse GnRH Neurons: Implications for GABAA Mediated Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Taylor-Burds, Carol; Cheng, Paul; Wray, Susan

    2015-01-01

    A developmental “switch” in chloride transporters occurs in most neurons resulting in GABAA mediated hyperpolarization in the adult. However, several neuronal cell subtypes maintain primarily depolarizing responses to GABAA receptor activation. Among this group are gonadotropin-releasing hormone-1 (GnRH) neurons, which control puberty and reproduction. NKCC1 is the primary chloride accumulator in neurons, expressed at high levels early in development and contributes to depolarization after GABAA receptor activation. In contrast, KCC2 is the primary chloride extruder in neurons, expressed at high levels in the adult and contributes to hyperpolarization after GABAA receptor activation. Anion exchangers (AEs) are also potential modulators of responses to GABAA activation since they accumulate chloride and extrude bicarbonate. To evaluate the mechanism(s) underlying GABAA mediated depolarization, GnRH neurons were analyzed for 1) expression of chloride transporters and AEs in embryonic, pre-pubertal, and adult mice 2) responses to GABAA receptor activation in NKCC1-/- mice and 3) function of AEs in these responses. At all ages, GnRH neurons were immunopositive for NKCC1 and AE2 but not KCC2 or AE3. Using explants, calcium imaging and gramicidin perforated patch clamp techniques we found that GnRH neurons from NKCC1-/- mice retained relatively normal responses to the GABAA agonist muscimol. However, acute pharmacological inhibition of NKCC1 with bumetanide eliminated the depolarization/calcium response to muscimol in 40% of GnRH neurons from WT mice. In the remaining GnRH neurons, HCO3- mediated mechanisms accounted for the remaining calcium responses to muscimol. Collectively these data reveal mechanisms responsible for maintaining depolarizing GABAA mediated transmission in GnRH neurons. PMID:26110920

  16. Nutrition Labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Lloyd E.

    Nutrition labeling regulations differ in countries around the world. The focus of this chapter is on nutrition labeling regulations in the USA, as specified by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). A major reason for analyzing the chemical components of foods in the USA is nutrition labeling regulations. Nutrition label information is not only legally required in many countries, but also is of increasing importance to consumers as they focus more on health and wellness.

  17. Differential signaling of the GnRH receptor in pituitary gonadotrope cell lines and prostate cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Sviridonov, Ludmila; Dobkin-Bekman, Masha; Shterntal, Boris; Przedecki, Fiorenza; Formishell, Linor; Kravchook, Shani; Navi, Liat Rahamim-Ben; Bar-Lev, Tali Hana; Kazanietz, Marcelo G.; Yao, Zhong; Seger, Rony; Naor, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    The GnRH receptor (GnRHR) mediates the pituitary functions of GnRH, as well as its anti-proliferative effects in sex hormone-dependent cancer cells. Here we compare the signaling of GnRHR in pituitary gonadotrope cell lines vs. prostate cancer cell lines. We first noticed that the expression level of PKCα, PKCβII and PKCε is much higher in αT3-1 and LβT2 gonadotrope cell lines vs. LNCaP and DU-145 cell lines, while the opposite is seen for PKCδ. Activation of PKCα, PKCβII and PKCε by GnRH is relatively transient in αT3-1 and LβT2 gonadotrope cell lines and more prolonged in LNCaP and DU-145 cell lines. On the otherhand, the activation and re-distribution of the above PKCs by PMA was similar for both gonadotrope cell lines and prostate cancer cell lines. Activation of ERK1/2 by GnRH and PMA was robust in the gonadotrope cell lines, with a smaller effect observed in the prostate cancer cell lines. The Ca2+ ionophore A23187 stimulated ERK1/2 in gonadotrope cell lines but not in prostate cancer cell lines. GnRH, PMA and A23187 stimulated JNK activity in gonadotrope cell lines, with a more sustained effect in prostate cancer cell lines. Sustained activation of p38 was observed for PMA and A23187 in Du-145 cells, while p38 activation by GnRH, PMA and A23187 in LβT2 cells was transient. Thus, differential expression and re-distribution of PKCs by GnRH and the transient vs. the more sustained nature of the activation of the PKC-MAPK cascade by GnRH in gonadotrope cell lines vs. prostate cancer cell lines respectively, may provide the mechanistic basis for the cell context-dependent differential biological responses observed in GnRH interaction with pituitary gonadotropes vs. prostate cancer cells. PMID:23380421

  18. The requirement of GnRH at the beginning of the five-day CO-Synch + controlled internal drug release protocol in beef heifers.

    PubMed

    Cruppe, L H; Day, M L; Abreu, F M; Kruse, S; Lake, S L; Biehl, M V; Cipriano, R S; Mussard, M L; Bridges, G A

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if the omission of GnRH at controlled internal drug release device (CIDR) insertion would impact pregnancy rates to timed AI (TAI) in beef heifers enrolled in a 5-d CO-Synch + CIDR protocol that used 1 PGF2α dose given at CIDR removal. Yearling beef heifers in Ohio in 2 consecutive breeding seasons (2011, n = 151, and 2012, n = 143; Angus × Simmental), Utah (2012, n = 265; Angus × Hereford), Idaho (2012, n = 127; Charolais), and Wyoming (2012, n = 137; Angus) were enrolled in the 5-d CO-Synch + CIDR protocol. At CIDR insertion (d -5), heifers were randomly assigned either to receive 100 μg GnRH (GnRH+; n = 408) or not to receive GnRH (GnRH-; n = 415). At CIDR removal (d 0 of the experiment), 25 mg PGF2α was administered to all heifers. All heifers were inseminated by TAI and given 100 μg GnRH 72 h after PGF2α (d 3). In heifers at the Ohio locations (n = 294), presence of a corpus luteum (CL) at CIDR insertion (d -5) was determined via assessment of progesterone concentrations (2011) and ovarian ultrasonography (2012). Subsequently, in both years, ovarian ultrasound was conducted on d 0 to determine the presence of a new CL. In this same subgroup of heifers, blood samples for progesterone analysis were collected on d 3 to assess luteal regression. Pregnancy diagnosis was performed between 32 and 38 d after TAI. At CIDR withdrawal, presence of a new CL was greater (P < 0.05) in the GnRH+ (55.8%, 82/147) than GnRH- (26.5%, 39/147) treatment. Incidence of failed luteal regression did not differ between the GnRH+ (3.4%) and GnRH- (0.7%) treatments. Pregnancy rate to TAI did not differ between the GnRH+ (50.5%) and GnRH- (54.9%) treatments. In conclusion, although the incidence of a new CL at CIDR removal was increased in the GnRH+ treatment, omission of the initial GnRH treatment in the 5-d CO-Synch + CIDR protocol did not influence TAI pregnancy rate in yearling beef heifers. In addition, a single dose of PGF2α at

  19. Epidural vs intramuscular administration of lecirelin, a GnRH analogue, for the resolution of follicular cysts in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Annalisa; Annalisa, Rizzo; Campanile, Debora; Debora, Campanile; Mutinati, Maddalena; Maddalena, Mutinati; Minoia, Giuseppe; Giuseppe, Minoia; Spedicato, Massimo; Massimo, Spedicato; Sciorsci, Raffaele Luigi; Luigi, Sciorsci Raffaele

    2011-06-01

    Bovine follicular cysts are an ovarian disorder of dairy cows associated with abnormal estrous behaviour and infertility. The treatment of choice is intramuscular administration of a GnRH analogue, which acts by triggering pituitary release of LH. However, the presence of GnRH and GnRH receptors on spinal cord and ovary in some species, and the kind of innervation of the ovary, let us hypothesize that GnRH and its analogues may also act when administered by epidural route, as happens for other drugs. Therefore the aim of this study was to compare the effects of epidural vs intramuscular administration of lecirelin (a GnRH analogue) on FC regression, estrus detection and pregnancy outcomes. The study was conducted on 220 Friesian cows affected by follicular cysts, divided among 4 groups: Group L(epid) and Group L(im) received, respectively 50 μg of lecirelin in the epidural space and intramuscular; Group C(epid) and Group C(im) were used as control groups. In Group L(epid), estrus induction and pregnancy rates were significantly higher than in Group L(im). The results of this study show that the epidural administration of lecirelin promoted the remission of follicular cysts and an improvement of reproductive parameters compared to intramuscular administration. Thus, an alternative therapeutical approach is available for FC treatment, in order to obtain an easier restoration of the ovarian activity, especially in those cases refractory to classical therapeutic approaches. PMID:21571459

  20. The effect of GnRH vaccination on performance, carcass, and meat quality and hormonal regulation in boars, barrows, and gilts.

    PubMed

    Van den Broeke, A; Leen, F; Aluwé, M; Ampe, B; Van Meensel, J; Millet, S

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of GnRH vaccination in boars (BO), barrows (BA), and gilts (GI) slaughtered at an average BW of 133 kg. Forty BO, 40 BA, and 40 GI were housed individually, fed ad libitum, and divided into 2 groups of 20 pigs per sex, a control group (CON) and a GnRH vaccinated group (IC). The IC group received 2 injections of GnRH vaccine (Improvac) at 70 and 105 kg. In BA, GnRH vaccination had minor effects on performance. Observed effects in BO and GI are therefore probably not caused by the GnRH vaccination itself but by the subsequent withdrawal of gonadal hormones. In BO, the increased feed intake after GnRH vaccination ( < 0.001), accompanied by a fall in estradiol and testosterone levels, led to faster growth ( = 0.014), increased back fat thickness ( = 0.021), and a tendency for a decreased meat percentage ( = 0.052). GnRH vaccination of BO decreased the boar taint-related sensory attribute scores similar to the levels of BA and GI ( < 0.001). In GI, the increased feed intake after GnRH vaccination ( < 0.001), accompanied by low progesterone levels, led to faster growth ( < 0.001), increased back fat thickness ( = 0.018), decreased meat percentage ( = 0.032), and a decreased shear force ( = 0.002) without significant differences in the sensory profile. PMID:27482668

  1. A unified model for two modes of bursting in GnRH neurons.

    PubMed

    Moran, Spencer; Moenter, Suzanne M; Khadra, Anmar

    2016-06-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons exhibit at least two intrinsic modes of action potential burst firing, referred to as parabolic and irregular bursting. Parabolic bursting is characterized by a slow wave in membrane potential that can underlie periodic clusters of action potentials with increased interspike interval at the beginning and at the end of each cluster. Irregular bursting is characterized by clusters of action potentials that are separated by varying durations of interburst intervals and a relatively stable baseline potential. Based on recent studies of isolated ionic currents, a stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley (HH)-like model for the GnRH neuron is developed to reproduce each mode of burst firing with an appropriate set of conductances. Model outcomes for bursting are in agreement with the experimental recordings in terms of interburst interval, interspike interval, active phase duration, and other quantitative properties specific to each mode of bursting. The model also shows similar outcomes in membrane potential to those seen experimentally when tetrodotoxin (TTX) is used to block action potentials during bursting, and when estradiol transitions cells exhibiting slow oscillations to irregular bursting mode in vitro. Based on the parameter values used to reproduce each mode of bursting, the model suggests that GnRH neurons can switch between the two through changes in the maximum conductance of certain ionic currents, notably the slow inward Ca(2+) current I s, and the Ca(2+) -activated K(+) current I KCa. Bifurcation analysis of the model shows that both modes of bursting are similar from a dynamical systems perspective despite differences in burst characteristics. PMID:26975615

  2. Information Transfer in Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone (GnRH) Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Kathryn L.; Perrett, Rebecca M.; Voliotis, Margaritis; Bowsher, Clive; Pope, George R.; Pham, Thanh; Caunt, Christopher J.; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; McArdle, Craig A.

    2016-01-01

    Cell signaling pathways are noisy communication channels, and statistical measures derived from information theory can be used to quantify the information they transfer. Here we use single cell signaling measures to calculate mutual information as a measure of information transfer via gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptors (GnRHR) to extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) or nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT). This revealed mutual information values <1 bit, implying that individual GnRH-responsive cells cannot unambiguously differentiate even two equally probable input concentrations. Addressing possible mechanisms for mitigation of information loss, we focused on the ERK pathway and developed a stochastic activation model incorporating negative feedback and constitutive activity. Model simulations revealed interplay between fast (min) and slow (min-h) negative feedback loops with maximal information transfer at intermediate feedback levels. Consistent with this, experiments revealed that reducing negative feedback (by expressing catalytically inactive ERK2) and increasing negative feedback (by Egr1-driven expression of dual-specificity phosphatase 5 (DUSP5)) both reduced information transfer from GnRHR to ERK. It was also reduced by blocking protein synthesis (to prevent GnRH from increasing DUSP expression) but did not differ for different GnRHRs that do or do not undergo rapid homologous desensitization. Thus, the first statistical measures of information transfer via these receptors reveals that individual cells are unreliable sensors of GnRH concentration and that this reliability is maximal at intermediate levels of ERK-mediated negative feedback but is not influenced by receptor desensitization. PMID:26644469

  3. Random-start GnRH antagonist for emergency fertility preservation: a self-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Checa, Miguel A; Brassesco, Mario; Sastre, Margalida; Gómez, Manuel; Herrero, Julio; Marque, Laura; Brassesco, Arturo; Espinós, Juan José

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and safety of random-start controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) for emergency fertility preservation, regardless of the phase of the menstrual cycle. A self-controlled pilot clinical trial (NCT01385332) was performed in an acute-care teaching hospital and in two private reproductive centers in Barcelona, Spain. Eleven egg donors participated in the study. Two random-start gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocols were assessed in which ganirelix was initiated on either day 10 (protocol B) or on day 20 (protocol C) of the menstrual cycle and was continued until estradiol levels were below 60 pg/dL. These protocols were compared with a standard protocol (protocol A). The main outcome of interest was the number of metaphase 2 oocytes retrieved. Results from this study show that the number of mature oocytes retrieved was comparable across the different protocols (14.3±4.6 in the standard protocol versus 13.0±9.1 and 13.2±5.2 in protocols B and C, respectively; values expressed as mean ± standard deviation). The mean number of days needed for a GnRH antagonist to lower estradiol levels, as well as the ongoing pregnancy rates, were also similar when protocols B (stimulation in follicular phase) and C (stimulation on luteal phase) were compared with protocol A (standard stimulation). GnRH antagonists can be effectively used for random-start controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with an ovarian response similar to that of standard protocols, and the antagonists appear suitable for emergency fertility preservation in cancer patients. PMID:25709506

  4. Synchronization of ovulation in beef cows (Bos indicus) using GnRH, PGF2alpha and estradiol benzoate.

    PubMed

    Barros, C M; Moreira, M B; Figueiredo, R A; Teixeira, A B; Trinca, L A

    2000-03-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate protocols for synchronizing ovulation in beef cattle. In Experiment 1, Nelore cows (Bos indicus) at random stages of the estrous cycle were assigned to 1 of the following treatments: Group GP controls (nonlactating, n=7) received GnRH agonist (Day 0) and PGF2alpha (Day 7); while Groups GPG (nonlactating, n=8) and GPG-L (lactating, n=9) cows were given GnRH (Day 0), PGF2alpha (Day 7) and GnRH again (Day 8, 30 h after PGF2alpha). A new follicular wave was observed 1.79+/-0.34 d after GnRH in 19/24 cows. After PGF2alpha, ovulation occurred in 19/24 cows (6/7 GP, 6/8 GPG, 7/9 GPG-L). Most cows (83.3%) exhibited a dominant follicle just before PGF2alpha, and 17/19 ovulatory follicles were from a new follicular wave. There was a more precise synchrony of ovulation (within 12 h) in cows that received a second dose of GnRH (GPG and GPG-L) than controls (GP, ovulation within 48 h; P<0.01). In Experiment 2, lactating Nelore cows with a visible corpus luteum (CL) by ultrasonography were allocated to 2 treatments: Group GPE (n=10) received GnRH agonist (Day 0), PGF2alpha (Day 7) and estradiol benzoate (EB; Day 8, 24 h after PGF2alpha); while Group EPE (n=11), received EB (Day 0), PGF2alpha (Day 9) and EB (Day 10, 24 h after PGF2alpha). Emergence of a new follicular wave was observed 1.6+/-0.31 d after GnRH (Group GPE). After EB injection (Day 8) ovulation was observed at 45.38+/-2.03 h in 7/10 cows within 12 h. In Group EPE the emergence of a new follicular wave was observed later (4.36+/-0.31 d) than in Group GEP (1.6+/-0.31 d; P<0.001). After the second EB injection (Day 10) ovulation was observed at 44.16+/-2.21 h within 12 (7/11 cows) or 18 h (8/11 cows). All 3 treatments were effective in synchronizing ovulation in beef cows. However, GPE and, particularly, EPE treatments offer a promising alternative to the GPG protocol in timed artificial insemination of beef cattle, due to the low cost of EB compared with GnRH agonists. PMID

  5. Central effects of camphor on GnRH and sexual hormones in male rat.

    PubMed

    Shahabi, Sima; Jorsaraei, Seyed Gholam Ali; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar; Zabihi, Ebrahim; Aghajanpour, Seyed Mohsen; Mousavi Kani, Seyedeh Narges; Pourbagher, Roghieh; Hosseini, Seyed Ahmad; Esmaili, Mohsen; Yoonesi, Ali Asghar; Zarghami, Amin; Alinezhad, Farid

    2012-01-01

    In Persian traditional medicine is believed that camphor (a crystalline ketone obtained from cinnamomum camphora) is a suppressor of sexual behaviors. This study examined the central effects of camphor on sexual hormones (LH, FSH and testosterone) and GnRH plasma levels in male rat. Male Wistar rats weighing 250-260gr were selected and divided into control (no treatment), sham (ICV injection of EtOH 10%) and treatment (ICV injection of camphor in three doses 4, 20, 40 µg/ 10µl in alcohol) groups. The serum samples were used for assaying of GnRH, LH, FSH and testosterone. There were no significant differences in the levels of hormones between the groups of study. Despite the central administration of camphor in hypothalamus - pituitary - gonad (HPG) axis, no significant differences were seen in sex hormone`s levels compared to the control. With this finding, it can be concluded that camphor may not effectively handle the axis via central pathway. These data recommend further studies of camphor on the HPG axis. PMID:24551777

  6. Central Effects of Camphor on GnRH and Sexual Hormones in Male Rat

    PubMed Central

    Shahabi, Sima; Jorsaraei, Seyed Gholam Ali; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar; Zabihi, Ebrahim; Aghajanpour, Seyed Mohsen; Mousavi Kani, Seyedeh Narges; Pourbagher, Roghieh; Hosseini, Seyed Ahmad; Esmaili, Mohsen; Yoonesi, Ali Asghar; Zarghami, Amin; Alinezhad, Farid

    2012-01-01

    In Persian traditional medicine is believed that camphor (a crystalline ketone obtained from cinnamomum camphora) is a suppressor of sexual behaviors. This study examined the central effects of camphor on sexual hormones (LH, FSH and testosterone) and GnRH plasma levels in male rat. Male Wistar rats weighing 250-260gr were selected and divided into control (no treatment), sham (ICV injection of EtOH 10%) and treatment (ICV injection of camphor in three doses 4, 20, 40 µg/ 10µl in alcohol) groups. The serum samples were used for assaying of GnRH, LH, FSH and testosterone. There were no significant differences in the levels of hormones between the groups of study. Despite the central administration of camphor in hypothalamus - pituitary - gonad (HPG) axis, no significant differences were seen in sex hormone`s levels compared to the control. With this finding, it can be concluded that camphor may not effectively handle the axis via central pathway. These data recommend further studies of camphor on the HPG axis. PMID:24551777

  7. The effects of a slow release GnRH agonist implant on male rabbits.

    PubMed

    Goericke-Pesch, Sandra; Groeger, Gesa; Wehrend, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Surgical castration is done in male pet rabbits for reproduction control, to reduce inter-male aggression and to control hyper-sexuality, territory marking and aggression against humans. Alternatives to surgical castration are requested because of a relatively great anaesthetic risk in rabbits. Long-term application of a GnRH agonist implant results in a fully reversible "hormonal" castration in male dogs, cats, boars and many other species. Therefore, the present study using New Zealand White hybrid and German Giant rabbits aimed to investigate the effects of a 4.7mg deslorelin implant in peripubertal male rabbits (SG; n=10), as a mean of hormonal castration. Blood samples (for testosterone measurements), body weight and testicular volume were taken on days (D) 0, 14 and 90. Surgical castration was performed on D90 for testicular histology. Age-matched animals following the same protocol without implant administration served as adult controls (n=5, CG), animals castrated on D0 served as juvenile controls (n=7, JG). Following treatment, testosterone concentrations were not reduced compared to CG; basal testosterone concentrations were only measured in JG. Spermatogenesis was not affected in SG and not different from CG. Application of a slow release GnRH agonist implant does not induce hormonal castration in male rabbits over a period of 90 days indicating that it is not a suitable alternative to surgical castration in this species. PMID:25466212

  8. Urbilaterian origin of paralogous GnRH and corazonin neuropeptide signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Tian, Shi; Zandawala, Meet; Beets, Isabel; Baytemur, Esra; Slade, Susan E; Scrivens, James H; Elphick, Maurice R

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a key regulator of reproductive maturation in humans and other vertebrates. Homologs of GnRH and its cognate receptor have been identified in invertebrates-for example, the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) and corazonin (CRZ) neuropeptide pathways in arthropods. However, the precise evolutionary relationships and origins of these signalling systems remain unknown. Here we have addressed this issue with the first identification of both GnRH-type and CRZ-type signalling systems in a deuterostome-the echinoderm (starfish) Asterias rubens. We have identified a GnRH-like neuropeptide (pQIHYKNPGWGPG-NH2) that specifically activates an A. rubens GnRH-type receptor and a novel neuropeptide (HNTFTMGGQNRWKAG-NH2) that specifically activates an A. rubens CRZ-type receptor. With the discovery of these ligand-receptor pairs, we demonstrate that the vertebrate/deuterostomian GnRH-type and the protostomian AKH systems are orthologous and the origin of a paralogous CRZ-type signalling system can be traced to the common ancestor of the Bilateria (Urbilateria). PMID:27350121

  9. Urbilaterian origin of paralogous GnRH and corazonin neuropeptide signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Shi; Zandawala, Meet; Beets, Isabel; Baytemur, Esra; Slade, Susan E.; Scrivens, James H.; Elphick, Maurice R.

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a key regulator of reproductive maturation in humans and other vertebrates. Homologs of GnRH and its cognate receptor have been identified in invertebrates–for example, the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) and corazonin (CRZ) neuropeptide pathways in arthropods. However, the precise evolutionary relationships and origins of these signalling systems remain unknown. Here we have addressed this issue with the first identification of both GnRH-type and CRZ-type signalling systems in a deuterostome–the echinoderm (starfish) Asterias rubens. We have identified a GnRH-like neuropeptide (pQIHYKNPGWGPG-NH2) that specifically activates an A. rubens GnRH-type receptor and a novel neuropeptide (HNTFTMGGQNRWKAG-NH2) that specifically activates an A. rubens CRZ-type receptor. With the discovery of these ligand-receptor pairs, we demonstrate that the vertebrate/deuterostomian GnRH-type and the protostomian AKH systems are orthologous and the origin of a paralogous CRZ-type signalling system can be traced to the common ancestor of the Bilateria (Urbilateria). PMID:27350121

  10. Calcium Influx and DREAM Protein Are Required For GnRH Gene Expression Pulse Activity

    PubMed Central

    Leclerc, Gilles M.; Boockfor, Fredric R.

    2007-01-01

    Recent evidence using GT1-7 cells indicates that GnRH pulsatility depends on exocytotic-release and gene transcription events. To determine whether calcium or DREAM may play a role in linking these processes, we used an L-type Ca2+-blocker (nimodipine) and found that not only GnRH gene expression (GnRH-GE) pulse activity was abolished but also that binding of proteins to OCT1BS-a (essential site for GnRH-GE pulses) was reduced. We further found that only EF-hand forms of DREAM were expressed in GT1-7 and that DREAM was part of the complex binding to OCT1BS-a. Finally, microinjection of DREAM antibody into cells abolished GnRH-GE pulses demonstrating its importance in pulsatility. These results reveal that calcium and DREAM may bridge cytoplasmic and nuclear events enabling temporal coordination of intermittent activity. Expression of DREAM in various cell types coupled with the universal role of calcium raise the possibility that these factors may play similar role in other secretory cells. PMID:17241740

  11. Molecular analysis of the koala reproductive hormones and their receptors: gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH), follicle-stimulating hormone β and luteinising hormone β with localisation of GnRH.

    PubMed

    Busby, E R; Soeta, S; Sherwood, N M; Johnston, S D

    2014-12-01

    During evolution, reproductive hormones and their receptors in the brain-pituitary-gonadal axis have been altered by genetic mechanisms. To understand how the neuroendocrine control of reproduction evolved in mammals, it is important to examine marsupials, the closest group to placental mammals. We hypothesised that at least some of the hormones and receptors found in placental mammals would be present in koala, a marsupial. We examined the expression of koala mRNA for the reproductive molecules. Koala cDNAs were cloned from brain for gonadotrophin-releasing hormones (GnRH1 and GnRH2) or from pituitary for GnRH receptors, types I and II, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)β and luteinising hormone (LH)β, and from gonads for FSH and LH receptors. Deduced proteins were compared by sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis with those of other vertebrates. In conclusion, the koala expressed mRNA for these eight putative reproductive molecules, whereas at least one of these molecules is missing in some species in the amniote lineage, including humans. In addition, GnRH1 and 2 are shown by immunohistochemistry to be expressed as proteins in the brain. PMID:25200132

  12. The Central Effect of β-Endorphin and Naloxone on The Biosynthesis of GnRH and GnRH Receptor (GnRHR) in The Hypothalamic-Pituitary Unit of Follicular-Phase Ewes.

    PubMed

    Ciechanowska, M; Łapot, M; Mateusiak, K; Paruszewska, E; Malewski, T; Krawczyńska, A; Przekop, F

    2016-08-01

    The effects of prolonged, intermittent infusion of β-endorphin or naloxone into the third cerebral ventricle of follicular-phase ewes on the expression of genes encoding GnRH and GnRHR in the hypothalamus and GnRHR in the anterior pituitary gland (AP) were examined by an enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay. Activation or blockade of μ-opioid receptors significantly decreased or increased the GnRH concentration and GnRHR abundance in the hypothalamus, respectively, and affected in the same way GnRHR quantity in the AP gland. The changes in the levels of GnRH and GnRHR after treatment with β-endorphin as well as following action of naloxone were reflected in fluctuations of plasma LH concentrations. On the basis of these results, it is suggested that β-endorphinergic system in the hypothalamus of follicular-phase ewes affects directly or via β-endorphin-sensitive interneurons GnRH and GnRHR biosynthesis leading to suppression in secretory activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. PMID:27335238

  13. Novel role for anti-Müllerian hormone in the regulation of GnRH neuron excitability and hormone secretion

    PubMed Central

    Cimino, Irene; Casoni, Filippo; Liu, Xinhuai; Messina, Andrea; Parkash, Jyoti; Jamin, Soazik P.; Catteau-Jonard, Sophie; Collier, Francis; Baroncini, Marc; Dewailly, Didier; Pigny, Pascal; Prescott, Mel; Campbell, Rebecca; Herbison, Allan E.; Prevot, Vincent; Giacobini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) plays crucial roles in sexual differentiation and gonadal functions. However, the possible extragonadal effects of AMH on the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis remain unexplored. Here we demonstrate that a significant subset of GnRH neurons both in mice and humans express the AMH receptor, and that AMH potently activates the GnRH neuron firing in mice. Combining in vivo and in vitro experiments, we show that AMH increases GnRH-dependent LH pulsatility and secretion, supporting a central action of AMH on GnRH neurons. Increased LH pulsatility is an important pathophysiological feature in many cases of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the most common cause of female infertility, in which circulating AMH levels are also often elevated. However, the origin of this dysregulation remains unknown. Our findings raise the intriguing hypothesis that AMH-dependent regulation of GnRH release could be involved in the pathophysiology of fertility and could hold therapeutic potential for treating PCOS. PMID:26753790

  14. GnRH immunodetection in the brain of the holocephalan fish Chimaera monstrosa L.: correlation to oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Masini, Maria Angela; Prato, Paola; Vacchi, Marino; Uva, Bianca Maria

    2008-05-01

    Chimera monstrosa (rabbit fish) like other holocephalans is a rare, delicate deep sea fish. Owing to the difficulty of sampling individuals in good shape, there is a paucity of information available on the morphology and physiology of this species especially concerning reproduction. In holocephalans, a hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis has been postulated and a GnRH molecule identical to cGnRH II has been identified. The aim of the present study was to correlate the presence of steroidogenic enzymes in the ovarian follicles with the presence of GnRH in the hypothalamus. Estrogens, the steroids that trigger the accumulation of yolk (vitellogenesis) in the oocytes are synthesized by the somatic cells of the follicle in the vitellogenic stages via a cascade of steroid dehydrogenases involving 3 beta-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase (3 beta-HSD; in the inner thecal layer) and aromatase cytochrome (P450; granulosa layer). Our results showed that 3 beta-HSD is present concomitant with the presence of cGnRH II in the preoptic area and in the ventral hypothalamus. Another form of immunoreactive GnRH, mGnRH is also present in the brain of C. monstrosa. It is localized in the ventral telencephalon and in the midbrain caudal diencephalon (boundary between ventral thalamus and tegmentum of the mesencephalon). This form of GnRH is probably correlated with sexual behaviour. PMID:18400222

  15. Hysteroscopic myomectomy outcomes after 3-month treatment with either Ulipristal Acetate or GnRH analogues: a retrospective comparative study.

    PubMed

    Sancho, Javier Monleón; Delgado, Verónica Serrano de la Cruz; Valero, Maria José Nuñez; Soteras, Marta Gurrea; Amate, Vicente Payá; Carrascosa, Antonio Abad

    2016-03-01

    Ulipristal Acetate (UPA) modifies the endometrium, as well as fibroids, and therefore it might make hysteroscopic surgery more difficult. To confirm that pre-treatment with UPA is as safe and effective an option as pre-treatment with GnRH analogues, considered the gold standard. We present the first series of 26 hysteroscopic myomectomies after 3 months treatment with UPA and we compare the results with a series of 24 cases pretreated with GnRH analogues. This was a retrospective cohort study between July 2013 and May 2015. We analyszed patients with submucous myomas >2.5 in diameter. Hysteroscopic myomectomy was performed after 3 months of treatment with either UPA (5mg daily) or the GnRH agonist (3.75mg/month). Both groups were similar in age, myoma initial size and classification. There were no significant differences between UPA and GnRHa treated groups in terms of percentage of myomas resected (93% vs 98%), duration of surgery (38 vs 37min), fluid deficit (200 vs 350ml) and complications. In the surgeon's subjective opinion, UPA treatment was associated with an easier resection. Based on our experience, previous treatment with UPA does not difficult Hhysteroscopic myomectomy. Endometrial changes have no impact on surgery. Safety and feasibility are comparable to hysteroscopic myomectomies with previous treatment with GnRH analogues. This allows us to take advantage of the reduction in size of fibroids before surgery with less side effects. PMID:26871272

  16. Novel role for anti-Müllerian hormone in the regulation of GnRH neuron excitability and hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Cimino, Irene; Casoni, Filippo; Liu, Xinhuai; Messina, Andrea; Parkash, Jyoti; Jamin, Soazik P; Catteau-Jonard, Sophie; Collier, Francis; Baroncini, Marc; Dewailly, Didier; Pigny, Pascal; Prescott, Mel; Campbell, Rebecca; Herbison, Allan E; Prevot, Vincent; Giacobini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) plays crucial roles in sexual differentiation and gonadal functions. However, the possible extragonadal effects of AMH on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis remain unexplored. Here we demonstrate that a significant subset of GnRH neurons both in mice and humans express the AMH receptor, and that AMH potently activates the GnRH neuron firing in mice. Combining in vivo and in vitro experiments, we show that AMH increases GnRH-dependent LH pulsatility and secretion, supporting a central action of AMH on GnRH neurons. Increased LH pulsatility is an important pathophysiological feature in many cases of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the most common cause of female infertility, in which circulating AMH levels are also often elevated. However, the origin of this dysregulation remains unknown. Our findings raise the intriguing hypothesis that AMH-dependent regulation of GnRH release could be involved in the pathophysiology of fertility and could hold therapeutic potential for treating PCOS. PMID:26753790

  17. Foliation-Based Parameter Tuning in a Model of the GnRH Pulse and Surge Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, Frederique; Vidal, Alexandre

    2009-01-01

    We investigate a model of the GnRH pulse and surge generator, with the definite aim of constraining the model GnRH output with respect to a physiologically relevant list of specifications. The alternating pulse and surge pattern of secretion results from the interaction between a GnRH secreting system and a regulating system exhibiting slow-fast dynamics. The mechanisms underlying the behavior of the model are reviewed from the study of the Boundary-Layer System according to the dissection method principle. Using singular perturbation theory, we describe the sequence of bifurcations undergone by the regulating (FitzHugh-Nagumo) system, encompassing the rarely investigated case of homoclinic connection. Based on pure dynamical considerations, we restrict the space of parameter search for the regulating system and describe a foliation of this restricted space, whose leaves define constant duration ratios between the surge and the pulsatility phase in the whole system. We propose an algorithm to fix the parameter values also to meet the other prescribed ratios dealing with amplitude and frequency features of the secretion signal. We finally apply these results to illustrate the dynamics of GnRH secretion in the ovine species and the rhesus monkey.

  18. Retrospective comparison of GnRH agonist trigger with HCG trigger in GnRH antagonist cycles in anticipated high-responders.

    PubMed

    Datta, Adrija Kumar; Eapen, Abey; Birch, Heidi; Kurinchi-Selvan, Anitha; Lockwood, Gillian

    2014-11-01

    All IVF-ICSI cycles carried out between October 2009 and October 2012 using GnRH agonist (GnRHa) ovulation trigger (n = 62) followed by a single dose of HCG plus progesterone and oestradiol in the luteal phase because of anticipated ovarian hypertsimulation were retrospectively compared with historic control cycles using HCG trigger (n = 29) and standard luteal phase support. Women's mean age, body mass index, anti-Müllerian hormone, FSH, LH, starting and total stimulation dose, number of follicles, oocytes, embryos, fertilization, implantation, polycystic ovary syndrome, ICSI, live birth and ongoing pregnancy rates per embryo transfer were similar (GnRHa 40.7% versus HCG 35.0%). For each started cycle, GnRHa resulted in 11.4% higher (statistically non-significant) live birth and ongoing pregnancy rate (OR 1.73, CI 0.64 to 4.69), with a similar difference for double-embryo transfers (OR 1.62, CI 0.44 to 6.38) and less need for freezing all embryos (9.7% versus 27.6%; P = 0.04). Incidence of mild-to-moderate OHSS was 16.2% with GnRHa trigger and 31.0% with HCG trigger) and no severe OHSS in the former. The addition of single low-dose HCG in the luteal phase after GnRHa trigger for suspected high-responders reduced the incidence of OHSS with good clinical outcomes, compared with HCG trigger. PMID:25246126

  19. Photoperiodic Condition Is Associated with Region-Specific Expression of GNRH1 mRNA in the Preoptic Area of the Male Starling (Sturnus vulgaris)1

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Tyler J.; Bernard, Daniel J.; Ball, Gregory F.

    2009-01-01

    Many seasonally breeding avian species exhibit marked changes in hypothalamic content of gonadotropin-releasing vhormone 1 (GNRH1) protein that are reflective of breeding condition. We recently cloned the GNRH1 cDNA in European starlings and demonstrated that changes in GNRH1 mRNA levels occur with a time course similar to what has been observed with GNRH1 protein. However, we did not previously resolve whether these differences were attributable to changes in the number of cells expressing the gene. Herein, we investigated photoperiod-induced changes in the number and distribution of GNRH1 mRNA-expressing cells in the preoptic area of male starlings. GNRH1 mRNA-expressing cell number was significantly greater in breeding birds than in nonbreeding birds. Starlings maintained in short nonstimulatory day length (i.e., prebreeding) showed intermediate cell numbers. Detailed analysis of the rostrocaudal and mediolateral distribution revealed that breeding birds had greater numbers of cells expressing GNRH1 mRNA in the medial intermediate, mediocaudal, and lateral intermediate preoptic area compared with prebreeding and nonbreeding birds. These data demonstrate that photoperiodic changes in reproductive state in starlings are associated with region-specific alterations in the number of cells expressing the GNRH1 gene. It remains to be determined whether these changes reflect quantitative differences in gene expression among an otherwise stable population of cells or a phenotypic switch in which cells gain or lose the ability to make GNRH1 mRNA in response to environmental cues. PMID:19516022

  20. Induction of spermatogenesis and fertility in hypogonadotropic azoospermic men by intravenous pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH).

    PubMed

    Blumenfeld, Z; Makler, A; Frisch, L; Brandes, J M

    1988-06-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) has only recently become a helpful tool in the medication of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH). Two azoospermic patients with HH who had previously been treated with hCG/hMG because of delayed puberty and each of whom had fathered a child after previous gonadotropin therapy were referred due to secondary failure of hCG/hMG treatment to induce spermatogenesis and fertility. A pulse study where blood was drawn every 15 minutes for LH, FSH and PRL RIAs was performed in each patient, and afterwards a bolus of i.v. GnRH was injected to assess gonadotropin responsiveness. A portable GnRH pump was connected to each patient so that it administered 5-20 micrograms of GnRH i.v. every 89 minutes. Spermatogenesis was first detected after 42 and 78 days respectively in the 2 treated HH men and 4 1/2 months from the start of treatment their wives became pregnant. No thrombophlebitis or other complications of the i.v. therapy occurred. In the case of the first patient, the semen was washed and concentrated and intra-uterine inseminations were carried out in an attempt to shorten the time needed to achieve fertility. The first pregnancy was successfully terminated at 38 weeks with the delivery of 2 heterozygotic normal male babies. The second pregnancy ended in spontaneous delivery of a healthy female. We conclude that i.v. pulsatile, intermittent GnRH administration is a safe, efficient and highly successful means of treating azoospermic men with HH. PMID:3055820

  1. Hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor neurons fire in synchrony with the female reproductive cycle

    PubMed Central

    Schauer, Christian; Tong, Tong; Petitjean, Hugues; Blum, Thomas; Peron, Sophie; Mai, Oliver; Schmitz, Frank; Boehm, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) controls mammalian reproduction via the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (hpg) axis, acting on gonadotrope cells in the pituitary gland that express the GnRH receptor (GnRHR). Cells expressing the GnRHR have also been identified in the brain. However, the mechanism by which GnRH acts on these potential target cells remains poorly understood due to the difficulty of visualizing and identifying living GnRHR neurons in the central nervous system. We have developed a mouse strain in which GnRHR neurons express a fluorescent marker, enabling the reliable identification of these cells independent of the hormonal status of the animal. In this study, we analyze the GnRHR neurons of the periventricular hypothalamic nucleus in acute brain slices prepared from adult female mice. Strikingly, we find that the action potential firing pattern of these neurons alternates in synchrony with the estrous cycle, with pronounced burst firing during the preovulatory period. We demonstrate that GnRH stimulation is sufficient to trigger the conversion from tonic to burst firing in GnRHR neurons. Furthermore, we show that this switch in the firing pattern is reversed by a potent GnRHR antagonist. These data suggest that endogenous GnRH acts on GnRHR neurons and triggers burst firing in these cells during late proestrus and estrus. Our data have important clinical implications in that they indicate a novel mode of action for GnRHR agonists and antagonists in neurons of the central nervous system that are not part of the classical hpg axis. PMID:26063780

  2. Withania somnifera aqueous extract facilitates the expression and release of GnRH: In vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Kataria, Hardeep; Gupta, Muskan; Lakhman, Sukhwinder; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2015-10-01

    Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) has a long history in traditional medicines as an aphrodisiac. It has been known to influence sexual behaviour in animal models but mechanism of action is still unknown. The present study was aimed to investigate the mechanisms by which Ashwagandha extract exert its gonadotropic activities. Due to the complexity of neuroendocrine pathways, there are limited in vitro models available despite the strong demand for such systems to study and predict neuroendocrine effects of chemicals or natural products. Immortalized rat hypothalamic GnV-3 cell line was investigated as a model to screen for neuroendocrine effects of Ashwagandha extract. GnV-3 cells were cultured under different media conditions and evaluated after treatment with Ashwagandha water extract, for GnRH expression and release by immunostaining and ELISA respectively. These cells acquired differentiated morphology, characteristic shape displayed by preoptic GnRH neurons in vivo. In addition, GnV-3 cells exhibited upregulation of plasticity related polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) and mature dendrite marker microtubule associated protein (MAP2) as well as GnRH expression and release. Chloroform fraction of the extract proved to exhibit all the bioactive properties as it induced differentiation and upregulated GnRH and MAP2 expression in GnV-3 cells, similar to Ashwagandha extract. Withanone and Withaferin A were found to be present in ASH-WEX and chloroform fraction while Withanone came out to be the major constituent of chloroform fraction. The preliminary in vivo studies in adult male animals showed that ASH-WEX was able to upregulate the GnRH levels although non-significantly. Taken together, this data demonstrate significant morphological and physiological changes in GnV-3 cells after treatment with Ashwagandha extract and may suggest the potential beneficial effects of Ashwagandha on reproductive functions in vivo. PMID:26257126

  3. Physiological interactions between the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and spleen in rams actively immunized against GnRH.

    PubMed

    Han, Xingfa; Ren, Xiaohua; Zeng, Yu; Zhou, Yuqin; Song, TianZeng; Cao, Xiaohan; Du, Xiaogang; Meng, Fengyan; Tan, Yao; Liu, Yacheng; Feng, Jing; Chu, Mingxing; Zeng, Xianyin

    2016-09-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is strongly implicated in the regulation of immune system. The objective was to determine the effects of immunocastration on splenic reproduction- and immunity-related gene expressions, and serum cytokine profiles in rams. Forty rams were randomly allocated into three groups: control (n=14); surgically castrated (n=13); or immunized (n=13) against 100μg D-Lys6-GnRH-tandem-dimer peptide conjugated to ovalbumin in Specol adjuvant at 6months of age (with a booster 2months later). Blood samples (for hormone and immune cytokine profiles) were collected at 1-month intervals until rams were slaughtered (10months). Compared to intact controls, anti-GnRH immunization reduced (P<0.05) serum concentrations of LH, FSH, and testosterone. Reduced testosterone abrogated its inhibitor feedback effect on the synthesis of GnRH in spleen, as evidenced by increased (P<0.05) protein content and mRNA expressions of GnRH, and simultaneously decreased (P<0.05) mRNA expressions of androgen receptor in spleen. In parallel with the increased GnRH production in spleen, the mRNA expressions of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) as well as lymphocyte marker CD4, CD8 and CD19 molecules were increased (P<0.05) in spleen. Consistently, serum concentrations of IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, TNF-α were increased (P<0.05) in rams following immunization. Similarly, deprivation of testosterone by surgical castration also increased (P<0.05) GnRH and thus immune cytokine expressions in spleen. Collectively, our data suggested that immunocastration increased GnRH production in spleen by abrogating the inhibitory feedback effects from testosterone, consequently improving the immune markers of spleen and serum immune cytokines in rams. PMID:27322522

  4. Induced ovulation of the first postpartum dominant follicle in beef suckler cows using a GnRH analogue.

    PubMed

    Crowe, M A; Goulding, D; Baguisi, A; Boland, M P; Roche, J F

    1993-11-01

    There is a low incidence of ovulation of the first dominant follicle that develops in the early postpartum period of beef suckler cows, which prolongs the interval from calving to first ovulation. The objective of this study was to determine whether a single injection of a GnRH analogue would ovulate the first postpartum dominant follicle. Limousin x Friesian beef suckler cows were assigned at parturition, over two years (16 cows in year 1; 19 cows in year 2), to one of three treatments: (1) untreated (control; n = 12), (2) GnRH analogue (20 micrograms buserelin i.m.) administered in the growing-plateau phase of the first postpartum dominant follicle (GnRH-G; n = 12) and (3) GnRH analogue administered in the declining phase of the first postpartum dominant follicle (GnRH-D; n = 11). From day 8 or 9 post partum, the ovaries of each cow were examined daily by ultrasound to determine the time of GnRH injection and ovulation. Blood samples were collected daily for progesterone measurement to confirm ovulation and in year 2 to determine the duration of the first oestrous cycle. The mean (+/- SEM) number of days from parturition to development of the first dominant follicle was 11.0 +/- 0.3, 10.3 +/- 0.5 and 10.1 +/- 0.7 for cows assigned to treatments 1-3, respectively (P > 0.05). The proportion of cows ovulating the first dominant follicle was higher (P < 0.05) following GnRH treatment (12 of 12 and 7 of 10; GnRH-G and GnRH-D, respectively) than with controls (2 of 12).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8107039

  5. Follicular and endocrinological turnover associated with GnRH induced follicular wave synchronization in Indian crossbred cows.

    PubMed

    Satheshkumar, S; Subramanian, A; Devanathan, T G; Kathiresan, D; Veerapandian, C; Palanisamy, A

    2012-04-01

    The goal of this study was to record the hormonal and follicular turnover in Jersey crossbred cows when subjected for follicular wave synchronization using GnRH. Six healthy, non-lactating and regularly cycling Jersey crossbred cows (5-6 y) were used for the study. In the control group, the follicular wave pattern was ultrasonographically investigated in 18 cycles (3 cycles/cow). In the treatment group, GnRH analogue (buserelin acetate 10 μg im) was administered on Day 6 of the cycle and follicular wave pattern was studied in 12 cycles (2 cycles/animal). Follicular population was categorized based on their diameter Class I, ≤5 mm; Class II, >5-<9 mm; Class III, ≥9 mm) and the number of follicles in each category was determined on Day 6, Day 8 and Day 10. Plasma FSH and progesterone concentrations were estimated in both control and treatment groups. Out of 18 estrous cycles studied, 14 cycles (77.8%), three cycles (16.7%) and one cycle (5.6%) exhibited three-, two- and four-follicular waves per cycle, respectively. It was evident that the DF of Wave I established its dominance and was in the growing phase by Day 6 of the estrous cycle in all the normally cycling crossbred cows. The DF ovulated in all the animals (100%) in the mean interval of 27.7 ± 0.2 h after GnRH administration. A synchronized homogenous group of follicles emerged two days after GnRH injection (Day of 8.0 ± 0.0) in all the animals (100%). The combination of LH surge induced ovulation of DF (abrupt termination of Wave I) and FSH surge stimulated homogenous recruitment of Class I follicles, led to a synchronized emergence of follicular wave. All the GnRH treated cows had three follicular waves because of early emergence and short period of dominance of Wave II DF. PMID:22192396

  6. New techniques in contraception: gossypol, vaccines and GnRH analogues.

    PubMed

    Aitken, R J

    1983-01-01

    Discussion focuses on 3 of the most promising lines of current contraceptive research -- gossypol, vaccines, and GnRH analogues, considering both the scientific principles behind their development and the ethical implications of their future application. 1) Chinese scientists confirmed the antispermatogenic effects of cotton seed oil in animal experiments; in 1971 the active agent was identifed as gossypol. The 1st clinical trials were initiated in 1972 and thus far more than 8000 volunteers have been treated with a variety of gossypol preparations including native gossypol, gossypol acetic acid, and gossypol formic acid. The conventional contraceptive regime involves a loading dose of 20mg/day for 60-75 days followed by a maintenance dose of 50 mg/week. An undisclosed number of pregnancies have occurred. Reversibility seems to be a major problem since around 10% of men remain infertile after the cessation of gossypol intake. Other hazards of gossypol ingestion include fatigue, gastrointestinal disorders, decreased libido, dizziness, and in 0.75% of cases hypokalaemic paralysis. The question arises as to whether it is right that 8000 Chinese men have been administered gossypol while ignorance concerning the toxicity and effectiveness of this compound prohibits its approval by any other government west of the Himalayas. 2) The development of a contraceptive vaccine would be appropriate to the needs of the Third World, the population of which will have doubled in 34 years to 6.6 billion. The advantages of vaccines are that they can be administered by paramedical personnel, they should provide a long-lasting protection against pregnancy, and they can take advantage of the service infrastructure existing in most developing countries for the administration of vaccines against disease. The zona pellucida and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) are not the only candidates for an antifertility vaccine but they are the most promising. A 3rd but less attractive possibility is

  7. A Computational Model of the Dendron of the GnRH Neuron.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xingjiang; Sneyd, James

    2015-06-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons have two major processes that have properties of both dendrites (they receive synaptic input from other neurons) and axons (they actively propagate action potentials to the synaptic terminal). These processes have thus been termed dendrons. We construct a stochastic spatiotemporal model of the dendron of the GnRH neuron, with the goal of studying how stochastic synaptic input along the length of the dendron affects the initiation and propagation of action potentials. We show (1) that synaptic inputs closer to the soma are effective controllers of action potential initiation and electrical bursting and (2) that although the effects on the amplitude and width of propagating action potentials are critically dependent on the timing and location of synaptic input addition, the effects remain small. We conclude that although stochastic synaptic input along the length of the dendron is likely to be a major determinant of action potential initiation, it is an unlikely mechanism for controlling whether or not action potentials reach the synaptic terminal. Thus, the role of synaptic inputs situated along the dendron a long way from the site of action potential initiation remains unclear. We also show that the actions of kisspeptin can result in significant modulation of the amount of calcium released by an action potential at the synaptic terminal. Furthermore, we show that the actions of kisspeptin are greatest when multiple effects operate together and that a kisspeptin-induced increase in firing rate is, by itself, less effective at increasing Ca2+ release than is a combination of an increased firing rate, an increase in Ca2+ influx, and an increase in inositol trisphosphate (IP3) production. We conclude that the inherent synergies in the various actions of kisspeptin make it a likely candidate for the precise control of Ca2+ transients at the synaptic terminal. PMID:25503424

  8. A comparative therapeutic management of anoestrus in buffaloes using insulin and GnRH

    PubMed Central

    Purkayastha, R. D.; Shukla, S. N.; Shrivastava, O. P.; Kumar, P. R.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Anoestrus is one of the most common functional disorders of the reproductive cycle in buffaloes. In spite of technical advancement, there is no single cure for the management of anoestrus. Therefore, the aim of this study was to find out the efficacy of gonadotropic releasing hormone (GnRH) and metabolic hormone for the management of true anoestrus in buffaloes. Materials and Methods: The experimental animals were selected on the basis of history, gyneco-clinical examinations and progesterone estimation. Deworming was done with Fenbendazole and thereafter mineral mixture was given @ 50 g per animal per day for 10 days in all the selected buffaloes before the start of treatment. The selected buffaloes were randomly divided into four groups (n=25). In Group I, buffaloes were administered 20 µg of buserelin intramuscularly. Buffaloes of Group II were administered long-acting insulin @ 0.25 IU/Kg body weight subcutaneously for 5 consecutive days. In Group III, buffaloes were treated with a combination of insulin and buserelin in the above-mentioned doses whereas buffaloes of Group IV were kept as untreated control. Results: The higher oestrus induction (64% vs. 28%) was found in Group III and differed significantly (p<0.05) as compared to control group. The conception rate (69.23% vs. 66.66%) was also found higher in Group III but did not differ significantly among the treated groups. The mean time taken for the onset of oestrus was recorded significantly shorter in insulin (8.80±0.69) and GnRH (7.60±0.92 days) alone and as compared to other (Group III, 14.43±0.83 and Group IV, 20.57±1.69 days) groups. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated better fertility response using Insulin plus Buserelin in true anoestrus buffaloes under field conditions. PMID:27065651

  9. Treating cattle with progesterone as well as a GnRH analogue affects oestrous cycle length and fertility.

    PubMed

    Lynch, P R; Macmillan, K L; Taufa, V K

    1999-08-16

    Initiating the chronic administration of progesterone to cattle during metoestrus will produce shortened oestrous cycles containing one or two wave-like sequences of ovarian follicle development. Conception rates are reduced to inseminations at the oestrus preceding these shortened cycles. In contrast, a single injection of the GnRH analogue, buserelin, around mid-dioestrus can lengthen the oestrous cycle by increasing the proportion of cycles with three waves of follicular development and may also increase conception rates. A series of trials was conducted to test the hypothesis that the adverse effects of progesterone on oestrous cycle length and conception rate could be prevented with a strategic injection of GnRH. In Trial 1, progesterone was administered per vaginum to heifers for 10 days from Day 2 or 3 (Oestrus = Day 0) and with (n = 42) or without (n = 46) an injection of a GnRH analogue (10 microg buserelin) on Day 12 or 13. Other heifers (n = 44) served as an untreated control group. The average inter-oestrous interval (IOI) for those heifers treated only with progesterone was 17.0 days and was less (p<0.05) than the average intervals for those also receiving GnRH (20.2 days) or in the control group (20.0 days). In Trial 2, 45 heifers were inseminated following a synchronised oestrus. Progesterone was administered as in Trial 1 to 22 of the heifers. Their conception rate was 45.4% and this was less (p<0.05) than the 73.9% obtained with their 23 untreated contemporaries. Trial 3 was completed using 530 cows in commercial dairyherds. The 259 cows receiving progesterone and GnRH (buserelin) after their first inseminations had a conception rate of 68.3% compared to 56.1% for their 271 untreated herdmates (p<0.05%). Heifer calves born to treated cows had heavier birthweights (33.4 vs. 31.1 kg; p<0.05), but birthweights of bull calves were unaffected (35.5 vs. 35.8 kg). Gestation lengths for cows conceiving to first inseminations were similar for treated and

  10. Kisspeptin, neurokinin B, and dynorphin act in the arcuate nucleus to control activity of the GnRH pulse generator in ewes.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Robert L; Hileman, Stanley M; Nestor, Casey C; Porter, Katrina L; Connors, John M; Hardy, Steve L; Millar, Robert P; Cernea, Maria; Coolen, Lique M; Lehman, Michael N

    2013-11-01

    Recent work has led to the hypothesis that kisspeptin/neurokinin B/dynorphin (KNDy) neurons in the arcuate nucleus play a key role in GnRH pulse generation, with kisspeptin driving GnRH release and neurokinin B (NKB) and dynorphin acting as start and stop signals, respectively. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by determining the actions, if any, of four neurotransmitters found in KNDy neurons (kisspeptin, NKB, dynorphin, and glutamate) on episodic LH secretion using local administration of agonists and antagonists to receptors for these transmitters in ovariectomized ewes. We also obtained evidence that GnRH-containing afferents contact KNDy neurons, so we tested the role of two components of these afferents: GnRH and orphanin-FQ. Microimplants of a Kiss1r antagonist briefly inhibited LH pulses and microinjections of 2 nmol of this antagonist produced a modest transitory decrease in LH pulse frequency. An antagonist to the NKB receptor also decreased LH pulse frequency, whereas NKB and an antagonist to the receptor for dynorphin both increased pulse frequency. In contrast, antagonists to GnRH receptors, orphanin-FQ receptors, and the N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor had no effect on episodic LH secretion. We thus conclude that the KNDy neuropeptides act in the arcuate nucleus to control episodic GnRH secretion in the ewe, but afferent input from GnRH neurons to this area does not. These data support the proposed roles for NKB and dynorphin within the KNDy neural network and raise the possibility that kisspeptin contributes to the control of GnRH pulse frequency in addition to its established role as an output signal from KNDy neurons that drives GnRH pulses. PMID:23959940

  11. DISRUPTED FEMALE REPRODUCTIVE PHYSIOLOGY FOLLOWING NEONATAL EXPOSURE TO PHYTOESTROGENS OR ESTROGEN SPECIFIC LIGANDS IS ASSOCIATED WITH DECREASED GNRH ACTIVATION AND KISSPEPTIN FIBER DENSITY IN THE HYPOTHALAMUS

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, Heather L.; Patisaul, Heather B.

    2008-01-01

    It is well established that estrogen administration during neonatal development can advance pubertal onset and prevent the maintenance of regular estrous cycles in female rats. This treatment paradigm also eliminates the preovulatory rise of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH). It remains unclear, however, through which of the two primary forms of the estrogen receptor (ERα or ERβ) this effect is mediated. It is also unclear whether endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) can produce similar effects. Here we compared the effect of neonatal exposure to estradiol benzoate (EB), the ERα specific agonist 1,3,5-tris(4-Hydroxyphenyl)-4-propyl-1H-pyrazole (PPT), the ERβ specific agonist diarylpropionitrile (DPN) and the naturally occurring EDCs genistein (GEN) and equol (EQ) on pubertal onset, estrous cyclicity, GnRH activation, and kisspeptin content in the anteroventral periventricular (AVPV) and arcuate (ARC) nuclei. Vaginal opening was significantly advanced by EB and GEN. By ten weeks post-puberty, irregular estrous cycles were observed in all groups except the control group. GnRH activation, as measured by the percentage of immunopositive GnRH neurons that were also immunopositive for Fos, was significantly lower in all treatment groups except the DPN group compared to the control group. GnRH activation was absent in the PPT group. These data suggest that neonatal exposure to EDCs can suppress GnRH activity in adulthood, and that ERα plays a pivotal role in this process. Kisspeptins (KISS) have recently been characterized to be potent stimulators of GnRH secretion. Therefore we quantified the density of KISS immunolabeled fibers in the AVPV and ARC. In the AVPV, KISS fiber density was significantly lower in the EB and GEN groups compared to the control group but only in the EB and PPT groups in the ARC. The data suggest that decreased stimulation of GnRH neurons by KISS could be a mechanism by which EDCs can impair female reproductive function. PMID:18656497

  12. Sequence analysis, tissue distribution and molecular physiology of the GnRH preprogonadotrophin in the South American plains vizcacha (Lagostomus maximus).

    PubMed

    Charif, Santiago Elías; Inserra, Pablo Ignacio Felipe; Di Giorgio, Noelia Paula; Schmidt, Alejandro Raúl; Lux-Lantos, Victoria; Vitullo, Alfredo Daniel; Dorfman, Verónica Berta

    2016-06-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is the regulator of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal-gonadal (HHG) axis. GnRH and GAP (GnRH-associated protein) are both encoded by a single preprohormone. Different variants of GnRH have been described. In most mammals, GnRH is secreted in a pulsatile manner that stimulates the release of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). The South-American plains vizcacha, Lagostomus maximus, is a rodent with peculiar reproductive features including natural poly-ovulation up to 800 oocytes per estrous cycle, pre-ovulatory follicle formation throughout pregnancy and an ovulatory process which takes place at mid-gestation and adds a considerable number of secondary corpora lutea. Such features should occur under a special modulation of the HHG axis, guided by GnRH. The aim of this study was to sequence hypothalamic GnRH preprogonadotrophin mRNA in the vizcacha, to compare it with evolutionarily related species and to identify its expression, distribution and pulsatile pattern of secretion. The GnRH1variant was detected and showed the highest homology with that of chinchilla, its closest evolutionarily related species. Two isoforms of transcripts were identified, carrying the same coding sequence, but different 5' untranslated regions. This suggests a sensitive equilibrium between RNA stability and translational efficiency. A predominant hypothalamic localization and a pulsatile secretion pattern of one pulse of GnRH every hour were found. The lower homology found for GAP, also among evolutionarily related species, depicts a potentially different bioactivity. PMID:26704854

  13. The effects of exclusion of progesterone or Day 0 GnRH from a GnRH, prostaglandin, GnRH + progesterone program on synchronization of ovulation in pasture-based dairy heifers.

    PubMed

    Sahu, S K; Cockrem, J F; Parkinson, T J; Laven, R A

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluated the effect of removing the GnRH injection on Day 0 or the progesterone (P4) device from a GnRH, PGF2α, GnRH (GPG) + P4 program on follicular dynamics and synchronization of ovulation in dairy heifers. Friesian and Friesian × Jersey heifers, in autumn 2009 (n = 35) and spring 2010 (n = 38), were randomly allocated to one of three estrus synchronization programs. The first group (GPG + P4) received 100 μg GnRH on Day 0, a P4-releasing intravaginal device from Days 0 to 7, 500 μg PGF2α on Day 7, and 100 μg GnRH on Day 9, followed by fixed-time artificial insemination 16 to 20 hours later. The program for group 2 (GPG) was the same as group 1 with the exclusion of the P4 device. Group 3 (P + G + P4) was treated the same as group 1, except for the absence of the GnRH treatment on Day 0. Ultrasonography was performed on Days 0, 1, 2, 3, and 7 and then at 12 hourly intervals on Days 9 to 11. Dominant follicle size was affected by both treatment and day, and there was also a significant interaction (P < 0.02) between treatment and day. Mean dominant follicle size was larger in the heifers treated with P + G + P4 on Days 1 to 3 than those treated with GPG + P4 (P < 0.02) and, on Day 2, than those treated with GPG (P = 0.005). However, on Day 7, mean dominant follicle size was larger in heifers treated with GPG than heifers treated with P + G + P4 (P = 0.03). The emergence of a new follicular wave was later in heifers treated with P + G + P4 than heifers, which received a GnRH injection on Day 0 (4.3 ± 0.7 days, compared with combined GPG + P4 and GPG 3.0 ± 0.3 days; P = 0.03). The proportion of heifers that ovulated within the first 48 hours after the Day 9 injection of GnRH was not affected by treatment (GPG, 81%; GPG + P4, 84%; and P + G + P4, 100% [including early ovulation]; P = 0.11). The timing of the ovulation was not different between treatments (P = 0.97). PMID:25011983

  14. The correlation between follicular fluid pregnancy-associated plasma protein A levels, fertilization, and embryo quality in GnRH agonist and GnRH antagonist protocols in ART cycles

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani Firouzabadi, Razieh; Mohammadian, Farnaz; Mashayekhy, Mehri; Davar, Robab; Eftekhar, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    Background: Determination of oocyte fertilization and embryo quality are one of the most important purposes in ART cycles. Follicular fluid provides an important microenvironment for development of oocytes and some biochemical characteristics of the follicular fluid, such as pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A), may play an important role in prediction of success rate of ART. Objective: This study was performed to evaluate whether there was any difference in follicular fluid PAPP-A, fertilization, and embryo quality between GnRH agonist long protocol and flexible GnRH antagonist multiple-dose protocol in ART cycles. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 women who were candidates for ART were enrolled the study and were divided into two groups, GnRH agonist (GnRHa) long protocol (n=51) and flexible GnRH antagonist (GnRHant) multiple-dose protocol (n=49). Follicular fluid sample was obtained from a single mature follicle and follicular fluid PAPP-A level, fertilization and embryo quality of the same oocyte were evaluated in both groups. Results: There was no significant difference in the mean levels of follicular fluid PAPP-A between the GnRHa protocol and GnRHant protocol (3.5±1.4 vs. 3.8±1.9, respectively). The mean levels of follicular fluid PAPP-A in fertilized oocyte and good quality embryo were comparable in GnRHa and GnRHant protocols. Conclusion: Our data indicated that no differences of follicular fluid PAPP-A levels were observed between cycles using GnRHa long protocol and those of using flexible GnRHant multiple-dose protocol. PMID:25246915

  15. Induction of ovulation with GnRH and PGF(2 alpha) at two different stages during the early postpartum period in dairy cows: ovarian response and changes in hormone concentrations.

    PubMed

    Amaya-Montoya, Carlos; Matsui, Motozumi; Kawashima, Chiho; Hayashi, Ken-Go; Matsuda, Go; Kaneko, Etsushi; Kida, Katsuya; Miyamoto, Akio; Miyake, Yoh-Ichi

    2007-08-01

    The aims of this study were 1) to determine whether dairy cows can be induced to ovulate by the treatment with gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) followed by prostaglandin F(2 alpha) (PGF(2 alpha)) during the early postpartum period and 2) to describe their ovarian and hormonal responses according to ovarian status. Cows were divided in two groups and received 10 microg of buserelin followed by 500 microg of cloprostenol 7 days apart starting from 21 (GnRH21, n=7) or around 37 days postpartum (GnRH37, n=7). The groups were further classified according to presence (-CL) or absence (-NCL) of functional corpora lutea (CL) on the day of GnRH treatment (d 0): GnRH21-NCL (n=4), GnRH21-CL (n=3) and GnRH37-CL (n=7). Ovarian morphology was monitored and the concentrations of P(4), E(2), FSH and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) were measured. All cows ovulated after administration of GnRH. The P(4) levels of the GnRH21-NCL group from d 0 to d 5 were lower than those of the GnRH21-CL (P<0.05) and GnRH37-CL groups (P<0.01). In contrast, the E(2) levels of the GnRH21-NCL group within d 2 to d 6 were higher (P<0.05) than those of the other groups. Compared with the GnRH37-CL group, the GnRH21-NCL group had more small follicles on d 2 (P<0.05), d 3 (P<0.01) and d 4 (P<0.01) and more large follicles on d 5 (P<0.05). The induced CL and new ovulatory follicles were larger in the GnRH21-NCL group compared with the GnRH21-CL (P<0.001 and P<0.01) and GnRH37-CL groups (P<0.001 and P<0.05). IGF-1 did not differ among the groups. The GnRH21-NCL group had higher FSH levels than the GnRH21-CL (P<0.01) and GnRH37-CL groups (P<0.001) on d 0. Low P(4) and high FSH levels may suggest higher gonadotropin support on the enhanced ovarian morphology of the GnRH21-NCL group. PGF(2 alpha) treatment induced CL regression and subsequent ovulation in 3/4 (75%), 3/3 (100%) and 7/7 (100%) cows in the GnRH21-NCL, GnRH21-CL and GnRH37-CL groups, respectively. In conclusion, a 7-day GnRH-PGF(2 alpha

  16. Long-term fertility control in female cats with GonaCon™, a GnRH immunocontraceptive.

    PubMed

    Levy, Julie K; Friary, John A; Miller, Lowell A; Tucker, Sylvia J; Fagerstone, Kathleen A

    2011-11-01

    The uncontrolled reproduction of free-roaming feral cats contributes to overpopulation and associated concerns regarding their welfare and impact on public health and the environment. Nonsurgical fertility control that could be administered to feral cats in the field would be a powerful tool for cat population control. The objective was to test the efficacy and duration of activity of a single-dose GnRH immunocontraceptive vaccine (GonaCon™) on the fertility of adult female laboratory cats. Vaccinated cats (n = 15) received a single injection of vaccine containing a GnRH-KLH conjugate (200 μg) emulsified in a mycobacterial and oil adjuvant on study Day 0. Sham-treated cats (n = 5) received a single injection containing all vaccine components except the GnRH-KLH conjugate. A breeding trial started on study Day 120. Vaccinated cats had a longer time to conception (median 39.7 mo) compared to sham-treated cats (4.4 mo; P < 0.001). A total of 93% of vaccinated cats remained infertile for the first year following vaccination, whereas 73, 53, and 40% were infertile for 2, 3, and 4 y, respectively. At study termination (5 y after a single GnRH vaccine was administered), four cats (27%) remained infertile. The GnRH antibody titers declined more rapidly in short-term responding cats with < 2 y of infertility (n = 4), compared to long-term responding cats that experienced fertility control for >2 y (n = 11) (P < 0.05). Non-painful but persistent late-onset granulomatous injection site masses appeared 2 y after initial vaccination in five cats. We concluded that GnRH immunocontraception is an ideal candidate for further development for feral cat control. PMID:21835455

  17. High-frequency stimulation-induced peptide release synchronizes arcuate kisspeptin neurons and excites GnRH neurons

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jian; Nestor, Casey C; Zhang, Chunguang; Padilla, Stephanie L; Palmiter, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptin (Kiss1) and neurokinin B (NKB) neurocircuits are essential for pubertal development and fertility. Kisspeptin neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Kiss1ARH) co-express Kiss1, NKB, dynorphin and glutamate and are postulated to provide an episodic, excitatory drive to gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH) neurons, the synaptic mechanisms of which are unknown. We characterized the cellular basis for synchronized Kiss1ARH neuronal activity using optogenetics, whole-cell electrophysiology, molecular pharmacology and single cell RT-PCR in mice. High-frequency photostimulation of Kiss1ARH neurons evoked local release of excitatory (NKB) and inhibitory (dynorphin) neuropeptides, which were found to synchronize the Kiss1ARH neuronal firing. The light-evoked synchronous activity caused robust excitation of GnRH neurons by a synaptic mechanism that also involved glutamatergic input to preoptic Kiss1 neurons from Kiss1ARH neurons. We propose that Kiss1ARH neurons play a dual role of driving episodic secretion of GnRH through the differential release of peptide and amino acid neurotransmitters to coordinate reproductive function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16246.001 PMID:27549338

  18. High-frequency stimulation-induced peptide release synchronizes arcuate kisspeptin neurons and excites GnRH neurons.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jian; Nestor, Casey C; Zhang, Chunguang; Padilla, Stephanie L; Palmiter, Richard D; Kelly, Martin J; Rønnekleiv, Oline K

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptin (Kiss1) and neurokinin B (NKB) neurocircuits are essential for pubertal development and fertility. Kisspeptin neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Kiss1(ARH)) co-express Kiss1, NKB, dynorphin and glutamate and are postulated to provide an episodic, excitatory drive to gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH) neurons, the synaptic mechanisms of which are unknown. We characterized the cellular basis for synchronized Kiss1(ARH) neuronal activity using optogenetics, whole-cell electrophysiology, molecular pharmacology and single cell RT-PCR in mice. High-frequency photostimulation of Kiss1(ARH) neurons evoked local release of excitatory (NKB) and inhibitory (dynorphin) neuropeptides, which were found to synchronize the Kiss1(ARH) neuronal firing. The light-evoked synchronous activity caused robust excitation of GnRH neurons by a synaptic mechanism that also involved glutamatergic input to preoptic Kiss1 neurons from Kiss1(ARH) neurons. We propose that Kiss1(ARH) neurons play a dual role of driving episodic secretion of GnRH through the differential release of peptide and amino acid neurotransmitters to coordinate reproductive function. PMID:27549338

  19. Exogenous leptin administered intramuscularly induces sex hormone disorder and Ca loss via downregulation of Gnrh and PI3K expression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lihong; Liu, Wen; Bayaer, Nashun; Gu, Weiwang; Song, Jieli

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a public health problem that increases the risk of metabolic disease, infertility, and other chronic health problems. The present study aimed to develop a new rat model for sex hormone disorder with overweight and Ca loss by intramuscular injection of exogenous leptin (LEP). Thirty female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats (40 days old) were injected thrice intramuscularly with LEP or keyhole limpet hemocyanin immunogen. The following analyses were performed to determine the development of appetite, overweight, reproductive related-hormones, and calcium (Ca)/phosphorus (Pi) in SD rats: measurement of Lee's index, body weight, food intake; serum Ca, Pi, and hormone tests by enzyme-linked immunosorbent analysis; histological analysis of abdominal fat; real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of neuropeptide Y, pro-opiomelanocortin, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Gnrh) mRNA, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (Gnrhr) mRNA expression; and western blotting analysis of enzyme phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K). Rats injected with LEP immunogen displayed significantly increased body weight, food intake, Lee's index, serum LEP, serum cortisol, fat deposition in the abdomen, and decreased hormones including follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, estradiol, cholecystokinin, and Ca. Exogenous LEP administered intramuscularly also downregulate Gnrh and PI3K. In conclusion, exogenous LEP administered intramuscularly is a novel animal model for sex hormones disorder with overweight and Ca loss in SD rats. The downregulation of PI3K and Gnrh may be involved in the development of this animal model. PMID:25048263

  20. Exogenous Leptin Administered Intramuscularly Induces Sex Hormone Disorder and Ca Loss via Downregulation of Gnrh and PI3K Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lihong; Liu, Wen; Bayaer, Nashun; Gu, Weiwang; Song, Jieli

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a public health problem that increases the risk of metabolic disease, infertility, and other chronic health problems. The present study aimed to develop a new rat model for sex hormone disorder with overweight and Ca loss by intramuscular injection of exogenous leptin (LEP). Thirty female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats (40 days old) were injected thrice intramuscularly with LEP or keyhole limpet hemocyanin immunogen. The following analyses were performed to determine the development of appetite, overweight, reproductive related-hormones, and calcium (Ca)/phosphorus (Pi) in SD rats: measurement of Lee’s index, body weight, food intake; serum Ca, Pi, and hormone tests by enzyme-linked immunosorbent analysis; histological analysis of abdominal fat; real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of neuropeptide Y, pro-opiomelanocortin, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Gnrh) mRNA, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (Gnrhr) mRNA expression; and western blotting analysis of enzyme phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K). Rats injected with LEP immunogen displayed significantly increased body weight, food intake, Lee’s index, serum LEP, serum cortisol, fat deposition in the abdomen, and decreased hormones including follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, estradiol, cholecystokinin, and Ca. Exogenous LEP administered intramuscularly also downregulate Gnrh and PI3K. In conclusion, exogenous LEP administered intramuscularly is a novel animal model for sex hormones disorder with overweight and Ca loss in SD rats. The downregulation of PI3K and Gnrh may be involved in the development of this animal model. PMID:25048263

  1. Effects of the GnRH analogue deslorelin implants on reproduction in female domestic cats.

    PubMed

    Toydemir, T S F; Kılıçarslan, M R; Olgaç, V

    2012-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the safety and efficacy of deslorelin, a GnRH agonist, implants in suppressing estrus behavior and matings in a controlled ambient environment in feline queens in the presence of a tomcat. Local and utero-ovarian side effects of deslorelin implants were also investigated. The queens were housed in groups and assigned to one of three treatments: group 1 received 9.5 mg deslorelin implants (N = 14), group 2 received 5 mg megestrol acetate tablets and 9.5 mg deslorelin implants (N = 7), and group 3 were given placebo implants (N = 7). All implants were placed subcutaneously cranial to the interscapular region under xylazine hydrochloride sedation. Ovarian activity was monitored by fecal estradiol (E(2)) analyses. The animals were observed daily and checked individually at three-day intervals for behavioral signs of estrus. After 18.5 mo of trial, queens were ovariohysterectomized, and ovaries and uteri were weighed and evaluated histologically. E(2) levels were significantly lower in group 1 and 2 than in group 3 with an average of 128.48 ± 19.97 ng/g, 90.44 ± 7.16 ng/g and 283.26 ± 39.21 ng/g, respectively, excepting the first week of treatment. After inserting implants an initial estrus-like increase in fecal E(2) concentrations occurred in all treated queens except one female in group 2. Ovarian and uterine weights were significantly different among the groups (P < 0.01), and were lowest in groups 1 and 2. Primordial and primary follicle numbers were significantly higher in groups 1 and 2 than in group 3 (P < 0.001). Endometrial gland, antral follicle, and corpus luteum (CL) numbers were highest in group 3 (P < 0.01, 0.001, and 0.001, respectively) compared with groups 1 and 2. Deslorelin implants successfully suppressed estrus behavior and E(2) secretion in queens for 18.5 mo of the study period. Further investigations are needed to demonstrate the effects of GnRH agonists on ovarian interstitial tissue. PMID

  2. Developmental expression of the G protein-coupled receptor 54 and three GnRH mRNAs in the teleost fish cobia.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, J Shaik; Benninghoff, Abby D; Holt, G Joan; Khan, Izhar A

    2007-02-01

    The cDNAs of the G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) and three prepro-gonadotropin-releasing hormones, GnRH-I (seabream GnRH), GnRH-II (chicken GnRH-II), and GnRH-III (salmon GnRH) were isolated and cloned from the brain of the teleost fish cobia, Rachycentron canadum. The cobia GPR54 cDNA was 95 and 51-56% identical to those of tilapia and mammalian models respectively. The GnRH cDNA sequences of cobia showed strong identities to those of tilapia, Atlantic croaker, red drum, and the seabass and seabream species. The real-time quantitative RT-PCR methods allowed detection of all three GnRH mRNAs on the first day after hatching (DAH). The GnRH-I mRNA levels, which were the lowest among the three GnRHs, increased gradually with two distinct peaks in larvae at 3 and 4 DAH. On the other hand, GnRH-II and GnRH-III mRNAs were significantly higher in larvae at 2 and 6 DAH compared with those on the preceding days. In addition, significant peaks of all the three GnRH mRNAs were observed in the brains of 26-day-old fish. The finding of higher GnRH-I and GnRH-II mRNAs in males than females at 153 DAH may be related to early puberty observed during the first year in laboratory-reared male cobia. Moreover, this study demonstrates for the first time the expression of GPR54 mRNA during larval development in a vertebrate species. The concomitant expression patterns of GPR54 and GnRH mRNAs during different stages of larval and juvenile developments, and during early puberty in male cobia suggest a potential relationship between GPR54 and multiple GnRHs during these stages of development consistent with the role of GPR54 in controlling GnRH release in mammals. The increase in GPR54 and GnRH mRNAs observed during early puberty in cobia is consistent with a similar change reported in pubertal rats. This finding together with the localization of GPR54 mRNAs on GnRH neurons in fish and mammals suggests that the GPR54-GnRH interactions may be conserved in different vertebrate groups

  3. GnRH Neuron-Specific Ablation of Gαq/11 Results in Only Partial Inactivation of the Neuroendocrine-Reproductive Axis in Both Male and Female Mice: In Vivo Evidence for Kiss1r-Coupled Gαq/11-Independent GnRH Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Víctor M.; Ahow, Maryse; Pampillo, Macarena; Nash, Connor; Fayazi, Mehri; Calder, Michele; Elbert, Adrienne; Urbanski, Henryk F.; Wettschureck, Nina; Offermanns, Stefan; Carroll, Rona S.; Bhattacharya, Moshmi; Tobet, Stuart A.; Kaiser, Ursula B.

    2015-01-01

    The gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is the master regulator of fertility and kisspeptin (KP) is a potent trigger of GnRH secretion from GnRH neurons. KP signals via KISS1R, a Gαq/11-coupled receptor, and mice bearing a global deletion of Kiss1r (Kiss1r−/−) or a GnRH neuron-specific deletion of Kiss1r (Kiss1rd/d) display hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and infertility. KISS1R also signals via β-arrestin, and in mice lacking β-arrestin-1 or -2, KP-triggered GnRH secretion is significantly diminished. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that ablation of Gαq/11 in GnRH neurons would diminish but not completely block KP-triggered GnRH secretion and that Gαq/11-independent GnRH secretion would be sufficient to maintain fertility. To test this, Gnaq (encodes Gαq) was selectively inactivated in the GnRH neurons of global Gna11 (encodes Gα11)-null mice by crossing Gnrh-Cre and Gnaqfl/fl;Gna11−/− mice. Experimental Gnaqfl/fl;Gna11−/−;Gnrh-Cre (Gnaqd/d) and control Gnaqfl/fl;Gna11−/− (Gnaqfl/fl) littermate mice were generated and subjected to reproductive profiling. This process revealed that testicular development and spermatogenesis, preputial separation, and anogenital distance in males and day of vaginal opening and of first estrus in females were significantly less affected in Gnaqd/d mice than in previously characterized Kiss1r−/− or Kiss1rd/d mice. Additionally, Gnaqd/d males were subfertile, and although Gnaqd/d females did not ovulate spontaneously, they responded efficiently to a single dose of gonadotropins. Finally, KP stimulation triggered a significant increase in gonadotropins and testosterone levels in Gnaqd/d mice. We therefore conclude that the milder reproductive phenotypes and maintained responsiveness to KP and gonadotropins reflect Gαq/11-independent GnRH secretion and activation of the neuroendocrine-reproductive axis in Gnaqd/d mice. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is the master

  4. Induction of ovulation in the acyclic postpartum ewe following continuous, low-dose subcutaneous infusion of GnRH.

    PubMed

    Fray, M D; Lamming, G E; Haresign, W

    1995-04-15

    Pituitary and ovarian responses to subcutaneous infusion of GnRH were investigated in acyclic, lactating Mule ewes during the breeding season. Thirty postpartum ewes were split into 3 equal groups; Group G received GnRH (250 ng/h) for 96 h; Group P + G was primed with progestagen for 10 d then received GnRH (250 ng/h) for 96 h; and Group P received progestagen priming and saline vehicle only. The infusions were delivered via osmotic minipumps inserted 26.6 +/- 0.45 d post partum (Day 0 of the study). Blood samples were collected for LH analysis every 15 min from 12 h before until 8 h after minipump insertion, then every 2 h for a further 112 h. Daily blood samples were collected for progesterone analysis on Days 1 to 10 following minipump insertion, then every third day for a further 25 d. In addition, the reproductive tract was examined by laparoscopy on Day -5 and Day +7 and estrous behavior was monitored between Day -4 and Day +7. Progestagen priming suppressed (P < 0.05) plasma LH levels (0.27 +/- 0.03 vs 0.46 +/- 0.06 ng/ml) during the preinfusion period, but the GnRH-induced LH release was similar for Group G and Group P + G. The LH surge began significantly (P < 0.05) earlier (32.0 +/- 3.0 vs 56.3 +/- 4.1 h) and was of greater magnitude (32.15 +/- 3.56 vs 18.84 +/- 4.13 ng/ml) in the unprimed than the primed ewes. None of the ewes infused with saline produced a preovulatory LH surge. The GnRH infusion induced ovulation in 10/10 unprimed and 7/9 progestagen-primed ewes, with no significant difference in ovulation rate (1.78 +/- 0.15 and 1.33 +/- 0.21, respectively). Ovulation was followed by normal luteal function in 4/10 Group-G ewes, while the remaining 6 ewes had short luteal phases. In contrast, each of the 7 Group-P + G ewes that ovulated secreted progesterone for at least 10 d, although elevated plasma progesterone levels were maintained in 3/7 unmated ewes for >35 d. Throughout the study only 2 ewes (both from Group P + G) displayed estrus. These data

  5. FXYD1, a modulator of Na+,K+-ATPase activity, facilitates female sexual development by maintaining GnRH neuronal excitability

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rudaz, Cecilia; Deng, Vivianne; Matagne, Valerie; Ronnekleiv, Oline; Bosch, Martha; Han, Victor; Percy, Alan K.; Ojeda, Sergio R.

    2009-01-01

    The excitatory tone to GnRH neurones is a critical component underlying the pubertal increase in GnRH secretion. However, the homeostatic mechanisms modulating the response of GnRH neurones to excitatory inputs remain poorly understood. A basic mechanism of neuronal homeostasis is the Na+, K+-ATPase-dependent restoration of Na+ and K+ transmembrane gradients after neuronal excitation. This activity is reduced in a mouse model of Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder in which expression of FXYD1, a modulator of Na+, K+-ATPase activity, is increased. We now report that the initiation, but not the completion of puberty, is advanced in girls with RTT, and that in rodents FXYD1 may contribute to the neuroendocrine regulation of female puberty by modulating GnRH neuronal excitability. Fxyd1 mRNA abundance reaches maximal levels in the female rat hypothalamus by the fourth postnatal week of life, i.e., around the time when the mode of GnRH secretion acquires an adult pattern of release. Although Fxyd1 mRNA expression is low in the hypothalamus, about 50% of GnRH neurones contain Fxyd1 transcripts. Whole-cell patch recording of GnRH-EGFP neurones revealed that the neurones of Fxyd1-null female mice respond to somatic current injections with a lower number of action potentials than wild-type cells. Both the age at vaginal opening and at first oestrous were delayed in Fxyd1-/- mice, but adult reproductive capacity was normal. These results suggest that FXYD1 contributes to facilitating the advent of puberty by maintaining GnRH neuronal excitability to incoming transsynaptic stimulatory inputs. PMID:19187398

  6. Prenatal Testosterone Treatment Leads to Changes in the Morphology of KNDy Neurons, Their Inputs, and Projections to GnRH Cells in Female Sheep.

    PubMed

    Cernea, Maria; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Goodman, Robert L; Coolen, Lique M; Lehman, Michael N

    2015-09-01

    Prenatal testosterone (T)-treated ewes display a constellation of reproductive defects that closely mirror those seen in PCOS women, including altered hormonal feedback control of GnRH. Kisspeptin/neurokinin B/dynorphin (KNDy) neurons of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) play a key role in steroid feedback control of GnRH secretion, and prenatal T treatment in sheep causes an imbalance of KNDy peptide expression within the ARC. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that prenatal T exposure, in addition to altering KNDy peptides, leads to changes in the morphology and synaptic inputs of this population, kisspeptin cells of the preoptic area (POA), and GnRH cells. Prenatal T treatment significantly increased the size of KNDy cell somas, whereas POA kisspeptin, GnRH, agouti-related peptide, and proopiomelanocortin neurons were each unchanged in size. Prenatal T treatment also significantly reduced the total number of synaptic inputs onto KNDy neurons and POA kisspeptin neurons; for KNDy neurons, the decrease was partly due to a decrease in KNDy-KNDy synapses, whereas KNDy inputs to POA kisspeptin cells were unaltered. Finally, prenatal T reduced the total number of inputs to GnRH cells in both the POA and medial basal hypothalamus, and this change was in part due to a decreased number of inputs from KNDy neurons. The hypertrophy of KNDy cells in prenatal T sheep resembles that seen in ARC kisspeptin cells of postmenopausal women, and together with changes in their synaptic inputs and projections to GnRH neurons, may contribute to defects in steroidal control of GnRH observed in this animal model. PMID:26061725

  7. LACK OF FUNCTIONAL GABAB RECEPTORS ALTERS Kiss1, Gnrh1 AND Gad1 mRNA EXPRESSION IN THE MEDIAL BASAL HYPOTHALAMUS AT POSTNATAL DAY 4

    PubMed Central

    Di Giorgio, Noelia P.; Catalano, Paolo N.; López, Paula V.; González, Betina; Semaan, Sheila J.; López, Gabriela C.; Kauffman, Alexander S.; Rulli, Susana B.; Somoza, Gustavo M.; Bettler, Bernhard; Libertun, Carlos; Lux-Lantos, Victoria A.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Adult mice lacking functional GABAB receptors (GABAB1KO) show altered Gnrh1 and Gad1 expressions in the preoptic area-anterior hypothalamus (POA-AH) and females display disruption of cyclicity and fertility. Here we addressed whether sexual differentiation of the brain and the proper wiring of the GnRH and kisspeptin systems were already disturbed in postnatal day 4 (PND4) GABAB1KO mice. Methods PND4 wild type (WT) and GABAB1KO mice of both sexes were sacrificed; tissues were collected to determine mRNA expression (qPCR), amino acids (HPLC), and hormones (RIA and/or IHC). Results GnRH neuron number (IHC) did not differ among groups in olfactory bulbs or OVLT-POA. Gnrh1 mRNA (qPCR) in POA-AH was similar among groups. Gnrh1 mRNA in medial basal hypothalamus (MBH) was similar in WTs but was increased in GABAB1KO females compared to GABAB1KO males. Hypothalamic GnRH (RIA) was sexually different in WTs (males > females) but this sex difference was lost in GABAB1KOs; the same pattern was observed when analyzing only the MBH, but not in the POA-AH. Arcuate nucleus Kiss1 mRNA (micropunch-qPCR) was higher in WT females than in WT males and GABAB1KO females. Gad1 mRNA in MBH was increased in GABAB1KO females compared to GABAB1KO males. Serum LH and gonadal estradiol content were also increased in GABAB1KOs. Conclusion We demonstrate that GABABRs participate in the sexual differentiation of the ARC/MBH, because sex differences in several reproductive genes, such as Gad1, Kiss1 and Gnrh1, are critically disturbed in GABAB1KO mice at PND4, probably altering the organization and development of neural circuits governing the reproductive axis. PMID:24080944

  8. GnRH agonists and the rapidly increasing use of combined androgen blockade in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Labrie, Fernand

    2014-08-01

    The discovery of medical castration with GnRH agonists in 1979 rapidly replaced surgical castration and high doses of estrogens for the treatment of prostate cancer. Soon afterwards, it was discovered that androgens were made locally in the prostate from the inactive precursor DHEA of adrenal origin, a mechanism called intracrinology. Taking into account these novel facts, combined androgen blockade (CAB) using a pure antiandrogen combined with castration in order to block the two sources of androgens was first published in 1982. CAB was the first treatment shown in randomized and placebo-controlled trials to prolong life in prostate cancer, even at the metastatic stage. Most importantly, the results recently obtained with the novel pure antiandrogen enzalutamide as well as with abiraterone, an inhibitor of 17α-hydroxylase in castration-resistant prostate cancer, has revitalized the CAB concept. The effects of CAB observed on survival of heavily pretreated patients further demonstrates the importance of the androgens made locally in the prostate and are a strong motivation to apply CAB to efficiently block all sources of androgens earlier at start of treatment and, even better, before metastasis occurs. The future of research in this field thus seems to be centered on the development of more potent blockers of androgens formation and action in order to obtain better results at the metastatic stage and, for the localized stage, reduce the duration of treatment required to achieve complete apoptosis and control of prostate cancer proliferation before it reaches the metastatic or noncurable stage. PMID:24825748

  9. Molecular Mechanism of Action of Pharmacoperone Rescue of Misrouted GPCR Mutants: The GnRH Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Janovick, Jo Ann; Patny, Akshay; Mosley, Ralph; Goulet, Mark T.; Altman, Michael D.; Rush, Thomas S.; Cornea, Anda; Conn, P. Michael

    2009-01-01

    The human GnRH receptor (hGnRHR), a G protein-coupled receptor, is a useful model for studying pharmacological chaperones (pharmacoperones), drugs that rescue misfolded and misrouted protein mutants and restore them to function. This technique forms the basis of a therapeutic approach of rescuing mutants associated with human disease and restoring them to function. The present study relies on computational modeling, followed by site-directed mutagenesis, assessment of ligand binding, effector activation, and confocal microscopy. Our results show that two different chemical classes of pharmacoperones act to stabilize hGnRHR mutants by bridging residues D98 and K121. This ligand-mediated bridge serves as a surrogate for a naturally occurring and highly conserved salt bridge (E90–K121) that stabilizes the relation between transmembranes 2 and 3, which is required for passage of the receptor through the cellular quality control system and to the plasma membrane. Our model was used to reveal important pharmacophoric features, and then identify a novel chemical ligand, which was able to rescue a D98 mutant of the hGnRHR that could not be rescued as effectively by previously known pharmacoperones. PMID:19095769

  10. Lipid microparticles as sustained release system for a GnRH antagonist (Antide).

    PubMed

    Del Curto, M D; Chicco, D; D'Antonio, M; Ciolli, V; Dannan, H; D'Urso, S; Neuteboom, B; Pompili, S; Schiesaro, S; Esposito, P

    2003-04-29

    Lipid microparticles (LMs) as a sustained release system for a gonadotropin release hormone (GnRH) antagonist (Antide) were prepared and evaluated. Antide loaded microparticles (Antide-LMs) were obtained by a cryogenic micronization process starting from two different monoglycerides (glyceryl monobehenate and glyceryl monostearate) and using two different incorporation methods (co-melting and solvent evaporation). Antide-LMs, 2% (w/w) loading, were characterized for drug incorporation by RP-HPLC, particle size by laser diffractometry and surface morphology by scanning electron microscopy. In vitro peptide release and in vitro biological activity were also studied. Serum Antide and testosterone levels, as pharmacodynamic marker, were assessed following subcutaneous administration in rats. Antide-LMs showed a mean diameter of approximately 30 micro m and variable Antide release depending on lipid matrix and incorporation method. In vivo experiments demonstrated that detectable Antide plasma levels were present, in the case of Antide-LMs based on Compritol E ATO obtained by co-melting procedure, for at least 30 days after dosing. Testosterone levels were consistent with prolonged pharmacokinetic profiles. In vitro release of Antide from LMs correlated well with the in vivo release. In conclusion, LMs can sustain the release of Antide for at least 1 month. The levels of the initial 'burst' and the extent of the pharmacodynamic effect can be influenced by the lipid characteristics and by process conditions. PMID:12711452

  11. Timed artificial insemination in beef cattle using GnRH agonist, PGF2alpha and estradiol benzoate (EB).

    PubMed

    Fernandes, P; Teixeira, A B; Crocci, A J; Barros, C M

    2001-04-15

    The present work evaluated low-cost protocols for timed artificial insemination (TAI) in beef cattle. In Experiment 1, cycling nonlactating Nelore cows (Bos indicus, n=98) were assigned to the following groups: GnRH-PGF (GP) and GnRH-PGF-GnRH (GPG), whereas cycling (n=328, Experiment 2) or anestrus (n = 225, Experiment 3) lactating (L) cows were divided into 3 groups: GP-L, GPG-L and GnRH-PGF-Estradiol benzoate (GPE-L). In Experiment 4, lactating cows (n=201) were separated into 3 groups: GP-L, GPE-L and G/2PE-L. Animals from Experiment 1, 3 and 4 were treated (Day 0), at random stages of the estrous cycle, with 8 microg of buserelin acetate (GnRH agonist) intramuscularly (i.m.), whereas in Experiment 2 half of the cows received 8 and the other half 12 microg of GnRH (i.m.). Seven days later (D 7) all animals were treated with 25 mg of dinoprost trometamine (PGF2alpha, i.m.) except those cows from the G/2PE-L group which received only 1/2 dose of PGF2alpha (12.5 mg) via intravulvo-submucosa (i.v.s.m.). After PGF2alpha injection the animals from the control groups (GP and GP-L) were observed twice daily to detect estrus and AI was performed 12 h afterwards. The cows from the other groups received a second GnRH injection (D 8 in GPG-L and d9 in GPG groups) or one injection of estradiol benzoate (EB, 1.0 mg, D 8 in GPE-L group). All cows from GPG and GPG-L or GPE-L groups were AI 20 to 24 or 30 to 34 h, respectively, after the last hormonal injection. Pregnancy was determined by ultrasonography or rectal palpation 30 to 50 days after AI. In the control groups (GP and GP-L) percentage of animals detected in heat (44.5 to 70.3%) and pregnancy rate (20 to 42%) varied according to the number of animals with corpus luteum (CL) at the beginning of treatment. The administration of a second dose of GnRH either 24 (Experiment 2) or 48 h (Experiment 1) after PGF2alpha resulted in 47.7 and 44.9% pregnancy rates, respectively, after TAI in cycling animals. However, in anestrus

  12. Dopamine release from interplexiform cells in the retina: effects of GnRH, FMRFamide, bicuculline, and enkephalin on horizontal cell activity.

    PubMed

    Umino, O; Dowling, J E

    1991-10-01

    In teleost fish, dopaminergic interplexiform cells provide an intraretinal centrifugal pathway from the inner to the outer plexiform layer, where they make abundant synapses on cone-related horizontal cells. The interplexiform cells receive all their input in the inner plexiform layer from centrifugal fibers and amacrine cells. In fish, centrifugal fibers contain gonadotropin hormone-releasing hormone (GnRH)-like and FMRFamide-like peptides (Munz et al., 1982; Stell et al., 1984), whereas amacrine cells contain a variety of neuroactive substances, including a number of peptides. In this study, we examined the effects of GnRH, FMRFamide, bicuculline, and enkephalin on horizontal cell activity in the white perch retina in an attempt to understand the synaptic inputs to the interplexiform cells. When the retina was superfused with Ringer's solution containing GnRH, horizontal cells depolarized (approximately 10 mV), and their responses to small spots increased, whereas their responses to full-field lights decreased. Thus, GnRH closely mimicked the effects of dopamine on horizontal cells. The GnRH antagonist [D-Phe2, Pro3, D-Phe6]-GnRH blocked the effects of GnRH, as did haloperidol. GnRH also had no effect on horizontal cells in retinas treated with 6-hydroxydopamine. The results indicate that GnRH acts by stimulating the release of dopamine from interplexiform cells. FMRFamide alone produced no changes on either the membrane potential or light responses of horizontal cells, but it did suppress the effects of GnRH on horizontal cells in some experiments. FRMFamide also reversed the effects of prolonged darkness on horizontal cell responses. When bicuculline was applied to the retina, horizontal cells also depolarized (approximately 10 mV), responses to full-field illumination decreased, and responses to small spots increased. Most of the effects of bicuculline were suppressed by haloperidol, indicating that bicuculline also stimulates the release of dopamine from

  13. Regulation of Lhb and Egr1 Gene Expression by GNRH Pulses in Rat Pituitaries Is Both c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase (JNK)- and Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase (ERK)-Dependent1

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Laura L.; Haisenleder, Daniel J.; Aylor, Kevin W.; Marshall, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Pulsatile GNRH regulates the gonadotropin subunit genes in a differential manner, with faster frequencies favoring Lhb gene expression and slower frequencies favoring Fshb. Early growth response 1 (EGR1) is critical for Lhb gene transcription. We examined GNRH regulation of EGR1 and its two corepressors, Ngfi-A-binding proteins 1 and 2 (NAB1 and NAB2), both in vivo and in cultured rat pituitary cells. In rats, fast GNRH pulses (every 30 min) stably induced Egr1 primary transcript (PT) and mRNA 2-fold (P < 0.05) for 1–24 h. In contrast, slow GNRH pulses (every 240 min) increased Egr1 PT at 24 h (6-fold; P < 0.05) but increased Egr1 mRNA 4- to 5-fold between 4 and 24 h. Both GNRH pulse frequencies increased EGR1 protein 3- to 4-fold. In cultured rat pituitary cells, GNRH pulses (every 60 min) increased Egr1 (PT, 2.5- to 3-fold; mRNA, 1.5- to 2-fold; P < 0.05). GNRH pulses had little effect on Nab1/2 PT/mRNAs either in vivo or in vitro. We also examined specific intracellular signaling cascades activated by GNRH. Inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase 8/9 (MAPK8/9 [also known as JNK]; SP600125) and MAP Kinase Kinase 1 (MAP2K1 [also known as MEK1]; PD98059) either blunted or totally suppressed the GNRH induction of Lhb PT and Egr1 PT/mRNA, whereas the MAPK14 (also known as p38) inhibitor SB203580 did not. In summary, pulsatile GNRH stimulates Egr1 gene expression and protein in vivo but not in a frequency-dependent manner. Additionally, GNRH-induced Egr1 gene expression is mediated by MAPK8/9 and MAPK1/3, and both are critical for Lhb gene transcription. PMID:19710510

  14. Direct Actions of Kisspeptins on GnRH Neurons Permit Attainment of Fertility but are Insufficient to Fully Preserve Gonadotropic Axis Activity

    PubMed Central

    León, Silvia; Barroso, Alexia; Vázquez, María J.; García-Galiano, David; Manfredi-Lozano, María; Ruiz-Pino, Francisco; Heras, Violeta; Romero-Ruiz, Antonio; Roa, Juan; Schutz, Günther; Kirilov, Milen; Gaytan, Francisco; Pinilla, Leonor; Tena-Sempere, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptins, ligands of the receptor, Gpr54, are potent stimulators of puberty and fertility. Yet, whether direct kisspeptin actions on GnRH neurons are sufficient for the whole repertoire of their reproductive effects remains debatable. To dissect out direct vs. indirect effects of kisspeptins on GnRH neurons in vivo, we report herein the detailed reproductive/gonadotropic characterization of a Gpr54 null mouse line with selective re-introduction of Gpr54 expression only in GnRH cells (Gpr54−/−Tg; rescued). Despite preserved fertility, adult rescued mice displayed abnormalities in gonadal microstructure, with signs of precocious ageing in females and elevated LH levels with normal-to-low testosterone secretion in males. Gpr54−/−Tg rescued mice showed also altered gonadotropin responses to negative feedback withdrawal, while luteinizing hormone responses to various gonadotropic regulators were variably affected, with partially blunted relative (but not absolute) responses to kisspeptin-10, NMDA and the agonist of tachykinin receptors, NK2R. Our data confirm that direct effects of kisspeptins on GnRH cells are sufficient to attain fertility. Yet, such direct actions appear to be insufficient to completely preserve proper functionality of gonadotropic axis, suggesting a role of kisspeptin signaling outside GnRH cells. PMID:26755241

  15. Direct Actions of Kisspeptins on GnRH Neurons Permit Attainment of Fertility but are Insufficient to Fully Preserve Gonadotropic Axis Activity.

    PubMed

    León, Silvia; Barroso, Alexia; Vázquez, María J; García-Galiano, David; Manfredi-Lozano, María; Ruiz-Pino, Francisco; Heras, Violeta; Romero-Ruiz, Antonio; Roa, Juan; Schutz, Günther; Kirilov, Milen; Gaytan, Francisco; Pinilla, Leonor; Tena-Sempere, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptins, ligands of the receptor, Gpr54, are potent stimulators of puberty and fertility. Yet, whether direct kisspeptin actions on GnRH neurons are sufficient for the whole repertoire of their reproductive effects remains debatable. To dissect out direct vs. indirect effects of kisspeptins on GnRH neurons in vivo, we report herein the detailed reproductive/gonadotropic characterization of a Gpr54 null mouse line with selective re-introduction of Gpr54 expression only in GnRH cells (Gpr54(-/-)Tg; rescued). Despite preserved fertility, adult rescued mice displayed abnormalities in gonadal microstructure, with signs of precocious ageing in females and elevated LH levels with normal-to-low testosterone secretion in males. Gpr54(-/-)Tg rescued mice showed also altered gonadotropin responses to negative feedback withdrawal, while luteinizing hormone responses to various gonadotropic regulators were variably affected, with partially blunted relative (but not absolute) responses to kisspeptin-10, NMDA and the agonist of tachykinin receptors, NK2R. Our data confirm that direct effects of kisspeptins on GnRH cells are sufficient to attain fertility. Yet, such direct actions appear to be insufficient to completely preserve proper functionality of gonadotropic axis, suggesting a role of kisspeptin signaling outside GnRH cells. PMID:26755241

  16. Scheduling GnRH antagonist cycles by a short course of oral estradiol administration during early follicular phase: a comparative study with non-scheduled cycles.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Kiper; Avci, Berrin; Uncu, Gurkan; Saribal, Seda; Ata, Baris

    2015-06-01

    This hypothesis generating study investigated whether GnRH antagonist cycles can be scheduled by a short course of oral estradiol administration during the follicular phase without impairing treatment outcome. Thirty-five women who underwent follicular phase estrogen scheduling (ES) of GnRH antagonist cycles were retrospectively matched for age and number of prior failed cycles with 35 women who underwent unscheduled GnRH antagonist cycles. ES group was given 6 mg/day estradiol orally from cycle day 2 until (including) one day before the scheduled start of stimulation. Gonadotropins were started on cycle days 2-3 in the control group. Flexible GnRH antagonist protocol was employed in both groups. ES group received estradiol for a median of 5 days. Total gonadotropin consumption was similar but one more GnRH antagonist injection was required in the ES group. Endometrial thickness on the day of hCG injection was increased in the ES group (12 versus 10 mm, p < 0.01). Number of oocytes, metaphase II oocytes and transferred embryos were similar. Embryo implantation rates were 44.8% versus 34.4% (p = 0.3), and clinical pregnancy rates were 48.6% versus 37.1%, (p = 0.33) in the ES and control groups, respectively. All women in the ES group had oocyte retrieval and embryo transfer within the desired period. PMID:25982362

  17. Effect of the first GnRH and two doses of PGF2α in a 5-day progesterone-based CO-Synch protocol on heifer pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kasimanickam, R K; Firth, P; Schuenemann, G M; Whitlock, B K; Gay, J M; Moore, D A; Hall, J B; Whittier, W D

    2014-04-01

    The objectives were (1) to determine the effects of gonadorelin hydrochloride (GnRH) injection at controlled internal drug release (CIDR) insertion on Day 0 and the number of PGF2α doses at CIDR removal on Day 5 in a 5-day CO-Synch + CIDR program on pregnancy rate (PR) to artificial insemination (AI) in heifers; (2) to examine how the effect of systemic concentration of progesterone and size of follicles influenced treatment outcome. Angus cross beef heifers (n = 1018) at eight locations and Holstein dairy heifers (n = 1137) at 15 locations were included in this study. On Day 0, heifers were body condition scored (BCS), and received a CIDR. Within farms, heifers were randomly divided into two groups: at the time of CIDR insertion, the GnRH group received 100 μg of GnRH and No-GnRH group received none. On Day 5, all heifers received 25 mg of PGF2α at the time of CIDR insert removal. The GnRH and No-GnRH groups were further divided into 1PGF and 2PGF groups. The heifers in 2PGF group received a second dose of PGF2α 6 hours after the administration of the first dose. Beef heifers underwent AI at 56 hours and dairy heifers at 72 hours after CIDR removal and received 100 μg of GnRH at the time of AI. Pregnancy was determined approximately at 35 and/or 70 days after AI. Controlling for herd effect (P < 0.06), the treatments had significant effect on AI pregnancy in beef heifers (P = 0.03). The AI-PRs were 50.3%, 50.2%, 59.7%, and 58.3% for No-GnRH + PGF + GnRH, No-GnRH + 2PGF + GnRH, GnRH + PGF + GnRH, and GnRH + 2PGF + GnRH groups, respectively. The AI-PRs were ranged from 50% to 62.4% between herds. Controlling for herd effects (P < 0.01) and for BCS (P < 0.05), the AI pregnancy was not different among the treatment groups in dairy heifers (P > 0.05). The AI-PRs were 51.2%, 51.9%, 53.9%, and 54.5% for No-GnRH + PGF + GnRH, No-GnRH + 2PGF + GnRH, GnRH + PGF + GnRH, and GnRH + 2PGF + GnRH groups, respectively. The AI-PR varied among locations from 48.3% to 75

  18. Behavior of feral horses in response to culling and GnRH immunocontraception

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ransom, Jason I.; Powers, Jenny G.; Garbe, Heidi M.; Oehler, Michael W.; Nett, Terry M.; Baker, Dan L.

    2014-01-01

    Wildlife management actions can alter fundamental behaviors of individuals and groups,which may directly impact their life history parameters in unforeseen ways. This is especially true for highly social animals because changes in one individual’s behavior can cascade throughout its social network. When resources to support populations of social animals are limited and populations become locally overabundant, managers are faced with the daunting challenge of decreasing population size without disrupting core behavioral processes. Increasingly, managers are turning to fertility control technologies to supplement culling in efforts to suppress population growth, but little is quantitatively known about how either of these management tools affects behavior. Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) is a small neuropeptide that performs an obligatory role in mammalian reproduction and has been formulated into the immunocontraceptive GonaCon-BTM. We investigated the influences of this vaccine on behavior of feral horses (Equus caballus) at Theodore Roosevelt National Park, North Dakota, USA, for a year preceding and a year following nonlethal culling and GnRH-vaccine treatment. We observed horses during the breeding season and found only minimal differences in time budget behaviors of free-ranging female feral horses treated with GnRH and those treated with saline. The differences observed were consistent with the metabolic demands of pregnancy and lactation. We observed similar social behaviors between treatment groups, reflecting limited reproductive behavior among control females due to high rates of pregnancy and suppressed reproductive behavior among treated females due to GnRH-inhibited ovarian activity. In the treatment year, band stallion age was the only supported factor influencing herding behavior (P < 0.001), harem-tending behavior (P < 0.001), and agonistic behavior (P = 0.02). There was no difference between the mean body condition of control females (4

  19. Potential Diagnostic Utility of Intermittent Short-Acting GnRH Agonist Administration in Gonadotropin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Carrie A.; Ehrmann, David A; Rosenfield, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The objective was to determine if intermittent, low-dose, short-acting GnRH agonist (GnRHag) administration up-regulates pituitary-gonadal function in gonadotropin deficiency (GnD) sufficiently to be of diagnostic or therapeutic value. Design/Intervention Low-dose leuprolide acetate was administered SC at 4–5 d intervals up to one year. Patients Adult volunteers and GnD patients were studied. Setting The studies were performed in a General Clinical Research Center. Main Outcome Measures LH, FSH, and sex steroid responses were determined. Results In normal men and women, low-dose GnRHag repetitively transiently stimulated gonadotropins in a gender-dimorphic manner. In congenitally GnD deficient men (n=6) and women (n=1), none of whom had a normal LH response to an initial GnRHag test dose, this regimen consistently stimulated LH to the normal baseline range within two weeks. Long-term GnRHag administration to a partially GnD man did not alleviate hypogonadism, however. Women with hypothalamic amenorrhea (n=2) responded normally to a single GnRHag injection; however, repeated dosing did not seem to induce the normal priming effect. Conclusions The subnormal LH response to GnRHag of congenital GnD normalized in response to repetitive intermittent GnRHag, but not sufficiently to improve hypogonadism. Hypothalamic amenorrhea patients lacked the priming response to repeated GnRHag, but otherwise had normal hormonal responses to GnRHag. We conclude that intermittent administration of a short-acting GnRHag is of potential diagnostic value in distinguishing hypothalamic from pituitary causes of GnD. PMID:20553679

  20. Estrus synchronization of lactating dairy cows with GnRH, progesterone, and prostaglandin F2 alpha.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z Z; Burton, L J

    2000-03-01

    The reproductive performance of synchronized cows was compared with that of nonsynchronized cows. In trial 1, cyclic cows in five seasonal herds were randomly divided into two groups. Cows in one group (n = 515) were treated with a GnRH agonist and an intravaginal progesterone device, followed in 7 d by a PGF2 alpha injection, and the device was removed 1 d after PGF2 alpha. Cows in the other group (n = 512) did not receive any treatment and acted as control. In trial 2, the treatments were similar to those used in trial 1 except that the progesterone device was removed at the time of PGF2 alpha injection (synchronized: n = 516; control: n = 512). The estrus synchronization rate was 92.8% in trial 1 and 92.2% in trial 2. Conception rate to first artificial insemination (AI) was lower for synchronized cows than for control cows in trial 1 (56.5 vs. 62.7%), but similar in trial 2 (64.6 vs. 63.3%). Across both trials, the pregnancy rate during the AI breeding period was greater for the synchronized cows (85.6%) than for the control cows (81.2%). The synchronization treatment reduced the interval from start of the breeding season to conception for cows conceiving by AI (8.9 vs. 14.8 d) or by AI or natural mating (14.1 vs. 21.6 d). The synchronization protocol used in trial 2 achieved better conception rate than that used in trial 1, but the precision of estrus was less in trial 2 than in trial 1. PMID:10750104

  1. Neurosecretory neurons of the nucleus preopticus (NPO) express salmon GnRH mRNA and show reproduction phase-related variation in the female Indian major carp, Cirrhinus cirrhosus.

    PubMed

    Sakharkar, Amul J; Mazumdar, Minakshi; Singru, Praful S; Subhedar, Nishikant

    2008-10-01

    We studied the expression of sGnRH mRNA in the neurons of the nucleus preopticus (NPO) of the Indian major carp, Cirrhinus cirrhosus, and their correlation with the reproductive status of the fish. Non-radioisotopic in situ hybridization histochemistry protocol employing biotinylated-oligonucleotide probes complementary to salmon GnRH, cichlid GnRH I, catfish GnRH, chicken GnRH II (from cichlid and catfish), and mammalian GnRH, were applied to the sections through the POA of the female Indian major carp Cirrhinus cirrhosus. Incubation with the probe complimentary to salmon GnRH (sGnRH) mRNA from salmon, produced distinct hybridization signal in the cytosol of several neurosecretory neurons of the magnocellular and parvocellular subdivisions of the NPO of the fish collected during February-April (preparatory phase) and May-June (prespawning phase). However, no signal was detected in the NPO of fish collected during July-August (spawning phase). Application of other antisense probes, or sense probe for salmon GnRH mRNA, produced no signal. We suggest that NPO neurons in C. cirrhosus may express sGnRH mRNA, produce GnRH peptide, and play a role in regulation of pituitary-ovary axis. PMID:18664387

  2. Synthesis, characterization and systematic comparison of FITC-labelled GnRH-I, -II and -III analogues on various tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Murányi, József; Gyulavári, Pál; Varga, Attila; Bökönyi, Györgyi; Tanai, Henriette; Vántus, Tibor; Pap, Domonkos; Ludányi, Krisztina; Mező, Gábor; Kéri, György

    2016-08-01

    Targeted tumour therapy is the focus of recent cancer research. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues are able to deliver anticancer agents selectively into tumour cells, which highly express GnRH receptors. However, the effectiveness of different analogues as targeting moiety in drug delivery systems is rarely compared, and the investigated types of cancer are also limited. Therefore, we prepared selectively labelled, fluorescent derivatives of GnRH-I, -II and -III analogues, which were successfully used for drug targeting. In this manuscript, we investigated these analogues' solubility, stability and passive membrane permeability and compared their cellular uptake by various cancer cells. We found that these labelled GnRH conjugates provide great detectability, without undesired cytotoxicity and passive membrane permeability. The introduced experiments with these conjugates proved their reliable tracking, quantification and comparison. Cellular uptake efficiency was studied on human breast, colon, pancreas and prostate cancer cells (MCF-7, HT-29, BxPC-3, LNCaP) and on dog kidney cells (Madin-Darby canine kidney). Each of the three conjugates was taken up by GnRH-I receptor-expressing cells, but the different cells preferred different analogues. Furthermore, we demonstrated for the first time the high cell surface expression of GnRH-I receptors and the effective cellular uptake of GnRH analogues on human pharynx tumour (Detroit-562) cells. In summary, our presented results detail that the introduced conjugates could be innovative tools for the examination of the GnRH-based drug delivery systems on various cells and offer novel information about these peptides. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27443981

  3. Dynamin Is Required for GnRH Signaling to L-Type Calcium Channels and Activation of ERK.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Brian S; Dang, An K; Murtazina, Dilyara A; Dozier, Melissa G; Whitesell, Jennifer D; Khan, Shaihla A; Cherrington, Brian D; Amberg, Gregory C; Clay, Colin M; Navratil, Amy M

    2016-02-01

    We have shown that GnRH-mediated engagement of the cytoskeleton induces cell movement and is necessary for ERK activation. It also has previously been established that a dominant negative form of the mechano-GTPase dynamin (K44A) attenuates GnRH activation of ERK. At present, it is not clear at what level these cellular events might be linked. To explore this, we used live cell imaging in the gonadotrope-derived αT3-1 cell line to determine that dynamin-green fluorescent protein accumulated in GnRH-induced lamellipodia and plasma membrane protrusions. Coincident with translocation of dynamin-green fluorescent protein to the plasma membrane, we demonstrated that dynamin colocalizes with the actin cytoskeleton and the actin binding protein, cortactin at the leading edge of the plasma membrane. We next wanted to assess the physiological significance of these findings by inhibiting dynamin GTPase activity using dynasore. We find that dynasore suppresses activation of ERK, but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase, after exposure to GnRH agonist. Furthermore, exposure of αT3-1 cells to dynasore inhibited GnRH-induced cyto-architectural rearrangements. Recently it has been discovered that GnRH induced Ca(2+) influx via the L-type Ca(2+) channels requires an intact cytoskeleton to mediate ERK phosphorylation. Interestingly, not only does dynasore attenuate GnRH-mediated actin reorganization, it also suppresses Ca(2+) influx through L-type Ca(2+) channels visualized in living cells using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Collectively, our data suggest that GnRH-induced membrane remodeling events are mediated in part by the association of dynamin and cortactin engaging the actin cytoskeleton, which then regulates Ca(2+) influx via L-type channels to facilitate ERK phosphorylation. PMID:26696122

  4. Reproductive neuropeptides: prevalence of GnRH and KNDy neural signalling components in a model avian, gallus gallus.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Nerine T; Tello, Javier A; Bedecarrats, Gregoy Y; Millar, Robert P

    2013-09-01

    Diverse external and internal environmental factors are integrated in the hypothalamus to regulate the reproductive system. This is mediated through the pulsatile secretion of GnRH into the portal system to stimulate pituitary gonadotrophin secretion, which in turn regulates gonadal function. A single subpopulation of neurones termed 'KNDy neurones' located in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus co-localise kisspeptin (Kiss), neurokinin B (NKB) and dynorphin (Dyn) and are responsive to negative feedback effects of sex steroids. The co-ordinated secretion from KNDy neurones appears to modulate the pulsatile release of GnRH, acting as a proximate pacemaker. This review briefly describes the neuropeptidergic control of reproduction in the avian class, highlighting the status of reproductive neuropeptide signalling systems homologous to those found in mammalian genomes. Genes encoding the GnRH system are complete in the chicken with similar roles to the mammalian counterparts, whereas genes encoding Kiss signalling components appear missing in the avian lineage, indicating a differing set of hypothalamic signals controlling avian reproduction. Gene sequences encoding both NKB and Dyn signalling components are present in the chicken genome, but expression analysis and functional studies remain to be completed. The focus of this article is to describe the avian complement of neuropeptidergic reproductive hormones and provide insights into the putative mechanisms that regulate reproduction in birds. These postulations highlight differences in reproductive strategies of birds in terms of gonadal steroid feedback systems, integration of metabolic signals and seasonality. Also included are propositions of KNDy neuropeptide gene silencing and plasticity in utilisation of these neuropeptides during avian evolution. PMID:23756151

  5. Melatonin-induced changes in kiss/gnrh gene expression patterns in the brain of male sea bass during spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, María Victoria; Carrillo, Manuel; Felip, Alicia

    2015-07-01

    Evidence exists that melatonin may drive the seasonal changes in kisspeptin-expressing cells and GnRH/gonadotropin secretion in mammals, thus modulating their reproductive activity. This study established the influence of long-term melatonin administration (as an implant) on growth performance and reproduction of adult male sea bass. Melatonin reduced the fish weight and condition factor, thus affecting the performance of fish. Melatonin also affected gonadogenesis, as shown by a decrease in the gonadosomatic index after 150 days of treatment and the lower percentage of running males during the spermatogenesis and full spermiation stages of this species. Exogenous melatonin also resulted in lower plasma androgen levels during the reproductive period, and showed a significant decrease in serum Lh and Fsh concentration after 30 and 60 days of treatment, respectively. Thus, melatonin elicited seasonal changes in key reproductive hormones that affected testicular maturity. The hypothalamic expression of kiss1 was significantly higher in melatonin-treated fish than in controls after 30 days of treatment, while a significant increase in kiss2 expression was detected on day 90 of treatment. By contrast, melatonin showed a significant decrease in kisspeptin expression in the dorsal brain on day 150 of treatment and also affected the expression of gnrh-1 and gnrh-3 and gnrhr-II-1a and 2b and the fshβ gene in the pituitary. These results suggest that in this species, melatonin evokes changes in the mRNA levels of kisspeptin and gnrh system genes that appear to mirror disturbances in spermatogenesis. PMID:25810361

  6. GnRH analogue treatment on LH surge day 0 followed by single transvaginal artificial insemination with frozen semen on day 5 in bitches.

    PubMed

    Ohtaki, Tadatoshi; Koga, Yasuna; Ono, Mamiko; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi; Tsumagari, Shigehisa

    2015-01-01

    Reproductive parameters were evaluated in 19 and 14 estrous beagles that received 100 µg of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and saline treatment, respectively, on the day of luteinizing hormone (LH) surge (Day 0; estimated by serial progesterone assay) and balloon catheter-aided single transvaginal artificial insemination of frozen semen on Day 5. Although the conception rate and litter size were similar between the GnRH and saline groups, the concentration of LH peak was significantly higher in GnRH-treated bitches (P<0.01). In addition, the actual LH surge did not occur on the estimated Day 0 in one saline-treated bitch. In clinical practice that daily progesterone assay is difficult, administration of GnRH on estimated Day 0 would be recommended to induce or enhance the LH surge for timely and successful insemination. PMID:25311914

  7. GnRH analogue treatment on LH surge day 0 followed by single transvaginal artificial insemination with frozen semen on day 5 in bitches

    PubMed Central

    OHTAKI, Tadatoshi; KOGA, Yasuna; ONO, Mamiko; WATANABE, Gen; TAYA, Kazuyoshi; TSUMAGARI, Shigehisa

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reproductive parameters were evaluated in 19 and 14 estrous beagles that received 100 µg of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and saline treatment, respectively, on the day of luteinizing hormone (LH) surge (Day 0; estimated by serial progesterone assay) and balloon catheter-aided single transvaginal artificial insemination of frozen semen on Day 5. Although the conception rate and litter size were similar between the GnRH and saline groups, the concentration of LH peak was significantly higher in GnRH-treated bitches (P<0.01). In addition, the actual LH surge did not occur on the estimated Day 0 in one saline-treated bitch. In clinical practice that daily progesterone assay is difficult, administration of GnRH on estimated Day 0 would be recommended to induce or enhance the LH surge for timely and successful insemination. PMID:25311914

  8. Presynchronization of lactating dairy cows with PGF2α and GnRH simultaneously, 7 days before Ovsynch have similar outcomes compared to G6G.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Muhammad Rizwan; Martins, João Paulo N; Ahmad, Nasim; Nobis, Kerry; Pursley, J Richard

    2016-10-01

    The overarching objective of this study was to develop an alternative strategy for first and greater services that will improve fertility in lactating dairy cows for dairy operations limited by labor or other logistical constraints that make it difficult to use Presynch-11, G6G, or Double-Ovsynch. Our overall hypothesis was that simplification of a Presynch program through the combination of PGF2α and GnRH on the same day (PG + G), 7 days before the first GnRH of Ovsynch, would allow for similar ovulation and luteolysis rate and pregnancies per AI (P/AI) compared with G6G. Lactating dairy cows 58 to 64 days in milk (first service; n = 114), and cows diagnosed not pregnant 39 days after previous AI (second + service; n = 122) were blocked by parity and service and randomly assigned to control or PG + G. Control cows received G6G (n = 116) that consisted of PGF2α, 2-day GnRH, 6-day GnRH, 7-day PGF2α, 56-hour GnRH, and 16-hour AI. Treated cows (PG + G; n = 121) received PGF2α and GnRH, 7-day GnRH, 7-day PGF2α, 56-hour GnRH, and 16-hour AI. All cows received a second PGF2α 24 hours after the PGF2α of Ovsynch. First service cows received AI between 76 and 82 days in milk and second + service received AI 57 days after previous AI. Pregnancies/AI (n = 230) were similar in controls compared with treated cows on Day 35 (57 vs. 50%; P = 0.27) and Day 49 (54 vs. 47%; P = 0.33), respectively. Percent of cows ovulating after GnRH of the presynchronization was greater (P = 0.002) for controls vs. treated (80 vs. 58%); however, ovulation after first GnRH of Ovsynch was similar (67 vs. 68%; P = 0.86). Serum concentrations of progesterone were similar (P = 0.78) at the time of first GnRH of Ovsynch for control and treated cows (2.22 vs. 2.14 ng/mL). However, serum progesterone at the time of PGF2α of Ovsynch was greater (P = 0.002) for control cows compared with treated cows (5.75 vs. 4.64 ng/mL). In summary, administering both PGF2α and GnRH on the same

  9. Double-Ovsynch in high-producing dairy cows: effects on progesterone concentrations and ovulation to GnRH treatments.

    PubMed

    Ayres, H; Ferreira, R M; Cunha, A P; Araújo, R R; Wiltbank, M C

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies reported increased fertility using Ovsynch for presynchronization before Ovsynch (Double-Ovsynch), as compared with presynchronization with two prostaglandin F(2α) (PGF(2α)) treatments before Ovsynch (Presynch-Ovsynch). This study compared ovarian follicular dynamics and hormone concentrations during Double-Ovsynch versus Presynch-Ovsynch. Lactating Holstein cows (N = 193) were assigned to one of two treatment groups: (1) Presynch (N = 93), two injections of PGF(2α) 14 days apart, followed by the Ovsynch-timed AI protocol 12 days later; and (2) Double-Ovsynch (N = 100), one injection of GnRH, PGF(2α) 7 days later, and GnRH 3 days later, followed by the Ovsynch-timed AI protocol 7 days later. All cows received the same Ovsynch-timed AI protocol: GnRH (G1) at 68 ± 3 days in milk (mean ± SEM), PGF(2α) 7 days later, and GnRH (G2) 56 hours after PGF(2α). Ultrasonographic evaluations of the ovaries and blood sampling were performed at G1, PGF(2α), G2, and 6 days after the G2 injection of the Ovsynch-timed AI protocol. Double-Ovsynch decreased the percentage of cows with low circulating progesterone (P4) concentrations (<0.50 ng/mL) at G1 (12.0% vs. 30.1%; P = 0.003) and increased the percentage of cows with medium P4 concentrations (0.50 > P4 ≤ 3.0 ng/mL) at G1 (80.0% vs. 57.0%; P < 0.01), and with CL at G1 (94.0% vs. 67.8%; P < 0.01). Double-Ovsynch also increased the percentage of cows with high P4 (>3.0 ng/mL) at PGF(2α) (88.0% vs. 76.3%; P = 0.04) and tended to increase average circulating P4 at PGF(2α) (3.52 ± 0.17 ng/mL vs. 3.09 ± 0.21 ng/mL; P = 0.11). Double-Ovsynch also tended to increase percentage of cows ovulating to G1 (80.0% vs. 69.9%; P = 0.11) and G2 (98.0% vs. 93.5%; P = 0.08). Thus, presynchronization of cows with Double-Ovsynch induced ovulation in noncycling cows and appeared to increase most aspects of synchronization during the Ovsynch protocol. PMID:23122207

  10. Expression profiles of three types of GnRH during sex-change in the protandrous cinnamon clownfish, Amphiprion melanopus: Effects of exogenous GnRHs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Na Na; Shin, Hyun Suk; Habibi, Hamid R; Lee, Jehee; Choi, Cheol Young

    2012-02-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRHs) play pivotal roles in the control of reproduction and gonadal maturation in teleost fish. Fish have multiple GnRH genes that encode structurally distinct peptides. We identified salmon GnRH (sGnRH), seabream GnRH (sbGnRH), and chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II) by cDNA cloning in cinnamon clownfish (Amphiprion melanopus) using reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends-PCR (RACE-PCR). Gene identity was confirmed by sequence alignment and subsequent phylogenetic analyses. We also investigated GnRH mRNA expression in the gonads by quantitative real time-PCR (Q-PCR), and measured plasma estradiol-17β (E(2)) levels in immature fish following treatment with the three molecular forms of GnRHs. The expression levels of sGnRH, sbGnRH, and cGnRH-II mRNA were higher in mature testes and ovaries, as compared to the levels in gonads at earlier stages of maturity. The levels of the three prepro-GnRH mRNA species and the plasma E(2) levels increased after injection of the three GnRH variants. These findings support the hypothesis that GnRH peptides play important roles in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and are probably involved in paracrine control of gonadal development and sex change in cinnamon clownfish. PMID:22036613

  11. Prolonged infusion of estradiol benzoate into the stalk median eminence stimulates release of GnRH and kisspeptin in ovariectomized female rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Kenealy, Brian P; Keen, Kim L; Garcia, James P; Richter, Dustin J; Terasawa, Ei

    2015-05-01

    Our recent study indicates that a brief infusion (20 min) of estradiol (E2) benzoate (EB) into the stalk-median eminence (S-ME) stimulates GnRH release with a latency of approximately 10 minutes. In contrast to the effect induced by a brief infusion of EB, it has previously been shown that systemic EB administration suppresses release of GnRH, kisspeptin, and LH with a latency of several hours, which is known as the negative feedback action of E2. We speculated that the differential results by these 2 modes of EB administration are due to the length of E2 exposure. Therefore, in the present study, the effects of EB infusion for periods of 20 minutes, 4 hours, or 7 hours into the S-ME of ovariectomized female monkeys on the release of GnRH and kisspeptin were examined using a microdialysis method. To assess the effects of the EB infusion on LH release, serum samples were also collected. The results show that similar to the results with 20-minute infusion, both 4- and 7-hour infusions of EB consistently stimulated release of GnRH and kisspeptin from the S-ME accompanied by LH release in the general circulation. In contrast, sc injection of EB suppressed all 3 hormones (GnRH, kisspeptin, and LH) measured. It is concluded that regardless of the exposure period, direct E2 action on GnRH and kisspeptin neurons in the S-ME, where their neuroterminals are present, is stimulatory, and the E2-negative feedback effects do not occur at the S-ME level. PMID:25734362

  12. Hepatitis B Surface Antigen S Gene is an Effective Carrier Molecule for Developing GnRH DNA Immunocastration Vaccine in Mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Y G; Ye, W J; Liu, G Q; Jiang, X P; Ijaz, N; Zhao, J Y; Tesema, B

    2016-06-01

    Relatively molecular mass of GnRH antigens is small and hence needs to couple to a large carrier molecule to enhance its immunogenicity. This study investigated whether hepatitis B surface antigen S (HBsAg-S) gene can be used as an effective carrier molecule for developing GnRH DNA immunocastration vaccine. Two copies of human GnRH gene were fused with HBsAg-S gene for constructing a recombinant plasmid pVAX-HBsAg-S-2GnRH that coded for 27 kDa target fusion protein. Ten male mice were divided into two equal groups, treatment and control. The vaccine (50 μg/mice) prepared in saline solution was injected into male mice at weeks 0, 1, 2, 4 and 7 of the experiment. Vaccine's efficacy was evaluated in terms of GnRH-specific IgG antibody response, plasma testosterone levels, testicular weight and extent of the testicular tissue damage. The specific anti-GnRH antibody titre in vaccinated animals was significantly higher than in controls in only 4th week of immunization (p < 0.05). In addition, vaccinated animals showed lower testicular weight than those of the controls (p < 0.05). Spermatogenesis in seminiferous tubules in vaccinated animals was suppressed. In conclusion, in this study, the engineered plasmid to be used as a GnRH DNA vaccine induced antibody response and suppressed spermatogenesis in mice. This suggests that HBsAg-S gene can be an effective carrier molecule for developing GnRH DNA immunocastration vaccine when relatively molecular mass of the aimed antigens is small. PMID:27157596

  13. Timing of ovulation and conception rate in primiparous and multiparous cows after synchronization of ovulation with GnRH and PGF2alpha.

    PubMed

    Tenhagen, B A; Wittke, M; Drillich, M; Heuwieser, W

    2003-12-01

    Conception rates after Ovsynch have been higher in primiparous than in multiparous cows. The objective of this study was to investigate whether this difference might be due to differences in ovulation rate or follicular size. The experiment was conducted with 136 Holstein Frisian cows from a commercial herd in Brandenburg, Germany. All cows were synchronized using Buserelin (GnRH analogue) at day -10, Tiaprost (PGF2alpha analogue) at day -3 and again GnRH at day -1. Timed artificial insemination (TAI) was carried out 16-20 h after the second dose of GnRH on day 0. Milk samples for analysis of milk progesterone were obtained on days -17, -10, -3 and at TAI. Progesterone concentrations were used to determine the stage of oestrus cycle at the start of the synchronization protocol and to investigate the presence of functional luteal tissue before treatment with PGF2alpha and TAI. All animals were examined by ultrasound at the second treatment with GnRH, at AI, 8 and 24 h after AI. Overall synchronization rate (proportion of cows with an ovulation within 40 h after GnRH) was 86.8% in primiparous and 88.2% in multiparous cows, respectively. Ovulation occurred earlier in primparous than in multiparous cows (p < 0.05) and ovulatory follicles were smaller. Conception rates were numerically higher in primiparous cows but the difference was not significant. Cows that displayed signs of oestrus on day -1 and received an additional AI on this day were more likely to conceive than cows that only received TAI 16 to 20 h after GnRH2. It is concluded that ovulation occurs earlier in primiparous than in multiparous cows after Ovsynch. However, a significant relationship between these differences and the probability of conception could not be established. PMID:14629667

  14. Ghrelin Decreases Firing Activity of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) Neurons in an Estrous Cycle and Endocannabinoid Signaling Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Imre; Vastagh, Csaba; Sárvári, Miklós; Liposits, Zsolt

    2013-01-01

    The orexigenic peptide, ghrelin is known to influence function of GnRH neurons, however, the direct effects of the hormone upon these neurons have not been explored, yet. The present study was undertaken to reveal expression of growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) in GnRH neurons and elucidate the mechanisms of ghrelin actions upon them. Ca2+-imaging revealed a ghrelin-triggered increase of the Ca2+-content in GT1-7 neurons kept in a steroid-free medium, which was abolished by GHS-R-antagonist JMV2959 (10µM) suggesting direct action of ghrelin. Estradiol (1nM) eliminated the ghrelin-evoked rise of Ca2+-content, indicating the estradiol dependency of the process. Expression of GHS-R mRNA was then confirmed in GnRH-GFP neurons of transgenic mice by single cell RT-PCR. Firing rate and burst frequency of GnRH-GFP neurons were lower in metestrous than proestrous mice. Ghrelin (40nM-4μM) administration resulted in a decreased firing rate and burst frequency of GnRH neurons in metestrous, but not in proestrous mice. Ghrelin also decreased the firing rate of GnRH neurons in males. The ghrelin-evoked alterations of the firing parameters were prevented by JMV2959, supporting the receptor-specific actions of ghrelin on GnRH neurons. In metestrous mice, ghrelin decreased the frequency of GABAergic mPSCs in GnRH neurons. Effects of ghrelin were abolished by the cannabinoid receptor type-1 (CB1) antagonist AM251 (1µM) and the intracellularly applied DAG-lipase inhibitor THL (10µM), indicating the involvement of retrograde endocannabinoid signaling. These findings demonstrate that ghrelin exerts direct regulatory effects on GnRH neurons via GHS-R, and modulates the firing of GnRH neurons in an ovarian-cycle and endocannabinoid dependent manner. PMID:24124622

  15. Roles of hCG in Advancing Follicular Growth to Ovulation after Concurrent Injections of PGF2α and GnRH in Postpubertal Holstein Heifers Bearing a CL

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ricky; Bennett, William A.; Cuadra, Evelin J.; Njiti, Victor; Jung, Yoonsung; Mason, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    A study was conducted to test the hypothesis that injecting Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) concurrently with Prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2α) followed by an injection of human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG), would advance follicular growth to ovulation in Holstein heifers bearing a corpus luteum (CL). After manual examination of the CL, group 1 (PGF; n = 12) received an injection of PGF2α (25 mg, im). Group 2 (PGF + GnRH; n = 13) received an injection of GnRH (100 μg, im) immediately after an injection of PGF2α. Group 3 (PGF + GnRH + hCG; n = 12) received concurrent injections of PGF2α and GnRH followed with hCG (1500 IU, im) two days later. Follicular size and day of ovulation were monitored by daily ultrasonographic examination from days 1 to 10. Blood was collected on days-7, 0 (PGF2α administration), 2, and 7. Progesterone was not different (P > .05) on days-7, 0, and 2 between the experimental groups. However, it was higher (P < .005) in the PGF + GnRH + hCG group on day 7 compared to PGF + GnRH heifers, but not significantly higher than the PGF. Additionally, heifers in the PGF + GnRH + hCG group ovulated earlier (P < .05) than heifers in the PGF + GnRH and the PGF group. This data indicates that hCG advances follicular growth to ovulation in spite of high levels of progesterone when injected 48 h after concurrent treatments of GnRH and PGF2α on heifers bearing a CL. PMID:21151654

  16. Effect of betamethasone treatment on luteal lifespan and the LH response to GnRH in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Dobson, H; Alam, M G; Kanchev, L N

    1987-05-01

    Betamethasone (a synthetic glucocorticoid, 15 mg) was administered i.m. twice daily for 10 days to 4 regularly cycling dairy cows, beginning on Day 10 of the oestrous cycle. Luteal function, monitored by plasma progesterone, was extended by 7, 9, 19 and 20 days, respectively. Luteal function in the next cycle was normal. Endogenous cortisol values were suppressed for 14, 13, 34 and 27 days, respectively. Pituitary responsiveness to 20 micrograms GnRH was assessed by LH measurement on Days -1, +3 and +7 relative to the start of betamethasone treatment. There was a progressive decrease in peak LH concentrations after each GnRH challenge compared to control cows. Hourly measurements of PGF-2 alpha metabolite during the expected period of luteolysis failed to reveal normal increases. It is suggested that betamethasone caused prolonged luteal function, either by directly inhibiting PGF-2 alpha release, or by suppressing pituitary stimulation of follicular growth and hence lowering oestradiol concentrations, since it is known that PGF-2 alpha and oestradiol act synergistically to cause luteolysis. PMID:3298644

  17. GnRH Stimulation Test in Precocious Puberty: Single Sample is Adequate for Diagnosis and Dose Adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Kandemir, Nurgün; Özön, Zeynep Alev; Gönç, Nazlı; Alikaşifoğlu, Ayfer

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Gonadotropin stimulation test is the gold standard to document precocious puberty. However, the test is costly, time-consuming and uncomfortable. The aim of this study was to simplify the intravenous gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation test in the diagnosis of precocious puberty and in the assessment of pubertal suppression. Methods: Data pertaining to 584 GnRH stimulation tests (314 testsfor diagnosis and 270 for assessment of pubertal suppression) were analyzed. Results: Forty-minute post-injection samples had the greatest frequency of “peaking luteinizing hormone (LH)” (p<0.001) in the diagnostic tests when the cut-off value was taken as 5 IU/L for LH, 40th minute sample was found to have 98% sensitivity and 100% specificity in the diagnosis of precocious puberty, while the sensitivity and specificity of the 20th minute sample was 100% in the assessment of pubertal suppression. Conclusion: LH level at the 40th minute post-injection in the diagnosis of central precocious puberty and at the 20th minute post-injection in the assessment of pubertal suppression is highly sensitive and specific. A single sample at these time points can be used in the diagnosis of early puberty and in the assessment of pubertal suppression. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:21448328

  18. Developmental Exposure to Ethinylestradiol Affects Reproductive Physiology, the GnRH Neuroendocrine Network and Behaviors in Female Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Derouiche, Lyes; Keller, Matthieu; Martini, Mariangela; Duittoz, Anne H.; Pillon, Delphine

    2015-01-01

    During development, environmental estrogens are able to induce an estrogen mimetic action that may interfere with endocrine and neuroendocrine systems. The present study investigated the effects on the reproductive function in female mice following developmental exposure to pharmaceutical ethinylestradiol (EE2), the most widespread and potent synthetic steroid present in aquatic environments. EE2 was administrated in drinking water at environmentally relevant (ENVIR) or pharmacological (PHARMACO) doses [0.1 and 1 μg/kg (body weight)/day respectively], from embryonic day 10 until postnatal day 40. Our results show that both groups of EE2-exposed females had advanced vaginal opening and shorter estrus cycles, but a normal fertility rate compared to CONTROL females. The hypothalamic population of GnRH neurons was affected by EE2 exposure with a significant increase in the number of perikarya in the preoptic area of the PHARMACO group and a modification in their distribution in the ENVIR group, both associated with a marked decrease in GnRH fibers immunoreactivity in the median eminence. In EE2-exposed females, behavioral tests highlighted a disturbed maternal behavior, a higher lordosis response, a lack of discrimination between gonad-intact and castrated males in sexually experienced females, and an increased anxiety-related behavior. Altogether, these results put emphasis on the high sensitivity of sexually dimorphic behaviors and neuroendocrine circuits to disruptive effects of EDCs. PMID:26696819

  19. Urodynamic parameters and plasma LH/FSH in spayed Beagle bitches before and 8 weeks after GnRH depot analogue treatment.

    PubMed

    Reichler, Iris Margaret; Barth, Andrea; Piché, Claude A; Jöchle, Wolfgang; Roos, Malgorzata; Hubler, Madeleine; Arnold, Susi

    2006-12-01

    The pathophysiology of urinary incontinence due to spaying remains unknown. Incontinent bitches can be treated successfully with depot preparations of GnRH-analogues and there are differences in plasma gonadotropin levels between continent and incontinent spayed bitches. It is therefore assumed that the supraordinated hormones, GnRH, FSH, and/or LH, have an effect on the urodynamic parameters. In this study, the potential influence of these hormones on the lower urinary tract was investigated by measuring urethral pressure profiles and cystometry. Simultaneously, plasma concentrations in 10 spayed Beagle bitches were determined 5 weeks prior to and 8 weeks after treatment with the GnRH analogue leuprolide. Within 1 week of GnRH analogue administration, plasma FSH and LH levels decreased from 72.5 and 7.7 to 7.75 and 0.72ng/mL, respectively. These plasma gonadotropin levels correspond with those of intact bitches during anoestrus. Urethral pressure profiles indicated that the treatment had no significant effect on maximum urethral closure pressure, functional and total length of the urethra, or area of the closure pressure curve. The data obtained by cystometry regarding mean bladder threshold volume showed a significant increase from 109 to 172mL. The improvement in bladder function after the application of GnRH-application is presumably a direct effect of the GnRH as a relationship between the plasma gonadotropin levels and the urodynamic parameters could not demonstrated. PMID:16876857

  20. Testing the synergistic effects of GnRH and testosterone on the reproductive physiology of pre-adult pink salmon Oncorhynchus gorbuscha.

    PubMed

    Crossin, G T; Hinch, S G; Cooke, S J; Patterson, D A; Lotto, A G; Van Der Kraak, G; Zohar, Y; Klenke, U; Farrell, A P

    2010-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that the hypothalmic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and testosterone (T) co-treatment stimulates both the hypothalmo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) and hypothalmo-pituitary-interrenal axes, the reproductive and osmoregulatory responses of pre-adult pink salmon Oncorhynchus gorbuscha were compared after GnRH and T administration either alone or in combination. Relative to controls, neither GnRH nor T treatment resulted in significantly greater ovarian or testicular growth, but co-treatment significantly increased ovarian growth after 5 months. Interestingly, the stimulation was undetectable after 3 months. However, once daily photoperiod began shortening after the summer solstice, c. 2 months before the natural spawning date, GnRH+T-treated females were stimulated to produce larger ovaries. Final fish body length and the size of individual eggs did not differ among treatment groups. GnRH+T eggs, however, showed signs of advanced vitellogenesis relative to GnRH-treated and control eggs, whereas T-treated eggs became atretic. Testis size increased significantly from initial values and most males were spermiating, but this growth and development were independent of hormone treatments. Final plasma ion, metabolite and cortisol concentrations did not differ among treatment groups. It is concluded that GnRH+T co-treatment was effective in stimulating female but not male maturation. GnRH and T treatment, however, presumably had little effect on the hypothalmo-pituitary-interrenal axis as observed by ionoregulatory status. PMID:20738702

  1. Effects of Huang Bai (Phellodendri Cortex) and Three Other Herbs on GnRH and GH Levels in GT1–7 and GH3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun Haeng; Kwak, Sung Chul; Kim, Dong Kwan; Park, Sang Woug; Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Young-Sik; Lee, Donghun; Lee, Ju Won; Lee, Chang Gon; Lee, Hae Kyung; Cho, Sung-Min; Shin, Yu Jeong; Lee, Jin Yong; Kim, Hocheol; Chang, Gyu Tae

    2016-01-01

    The present study was to evaluate the effects of Huang Bai, Zhi Mu, Mai Ya, and Xia Ku Cao on hormone using the GT1–7 and GH3 cells. The GT1–7 and GH3 cell lines were incubated with DW; DMSO; and 30, 100, or 300 μg/mL of one of the four extract solutions in serum-free media for 24 hours. The MTT assay was performed to determine the cytotoxicity of the four herbs. The GT1–7 and GH3 cells were incubated in DW, estradiol (GT1–7 only), or noncytotoxic herb solutions in serum-free medium for 24 hours. A quantitative RT-PCR and western blot were performed to measure the GnRH expression in GT1–7 cells and GH expression in GH3 cells. Huang Bai, Zhi Mu, Xia Ku Cao, and Mai Ya inhibited the GnRH mRNA expression in GT1–7 cells, whereas Huang Bai enhanced GH mRNA expression in GH3 cells. Additionally, Xia Ku Cao inhibited GnRH protein expression in GT1–7 cells and Huang Bai promoted GH protein expression in GH3 cells. The findings suggest that Huang Bai can delay puberty by inhibiting GnRH synthesis in the hypothalamus while also accelerating growth by promoting GH synthesis and secretion in the pituitary. PMID:26925153

  2. Supression of the steroid-primed luteinizing hormone surge in the female rat by sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate: Relationship to hypothalamic catecholamines and GnRH neuronal activation

    EPA Science Inventory

    In female rodents, hypothalamic norepinephrine (NE) has a role in stimulating the secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) that triggers the ovulatory surge of luteinizing hormone (LH). NE synthesis from dopamine requires the presence of dopamine--hydroxylase (DH) an...

  3. Inhibitory effect of pure 31-kilodalton bovine inhibin on gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-induced up-regulation of GnRH binding sites in cultured rat anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q F; Farnworth, P G; Findlay, J K; Burger, H G

    1989-01-01

    Primary cultures of enzymatically dispersed rat anterior pituitary cells were used to examine the effect of pure 31 kilodalton bovine inhibin on GnRH-induced up-regulation of GnRH binding sites. After 2 days in culture, the cells were exposed to stimuli with or without test substances for 10 h, followed by evaluation of GnRH binding sites using iodinated GnRH-A (Buserelin) as tracer. Inhibin suppressed GnRH-induced up-regulation of GnRH binding sites in a dose-dependent manner with an IC50 of 0.13 U/ml (5.5 pM). The inhibin-related peptides transforming growth factor-beta, and Müllerian inhibitory substance had no detectable effect (stimulatory or inhibitory), suggesting that the action is specific to inhibin. In addition, inhibin inhibited the calcium ionophore A23187-induced up-regulation of GnRH binding sites, indicating that this effect of inhibin can occur, at least in part, at a stage subsequent to Ca2+ mobilization. Inhibin did not compete with iodinated GnRH-A for GnRH binding sites. In conclusion, pure 31 kilodalton bovine inhibin suppressed GnRH-induced up-regulation of GnRH binding sites in cultured rat anterior pituitary cells, providing direct evidence that inhibin modulates delayed actions of GnRH. PMID:2535810

  4. Immunological characterization and distribution of three GnRH forms in the brain and pituitary gland of chub mackerel (Scomber japonicus).

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Sethu; Kitano, Hajime; Fujinaga, Yoichiro; Amano, Masafumi; Takahashi, Akiyoshi; Shimizu, Akio; Yoneda, Michio; Yamaguchi, Akihiko; Matsuyama, Michiya

    2009-12-01

    The presence of three gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) forms in the brain of the chub mackerel, Scomber japonicus, namely, salmon GnRH (sGnRH), chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II), and seabream GnRH (sbGnRH), was confirmed by combined high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay (TR-FIA). Immunocytochemical localization of the three GnRH forms in the brain was Investigated by using specific antisera, to elucidate possible roles of each GnRH form in reproduction in this species, and double immunolabeling was used to localize GnRH-ir (immunoreactive) fibers Innervating the pituitary. sGnRH-ir neurons were localized in the ventral olfactory bulb and terminal nerve ganglion region. Further, sGnRH-ir fibers were found in different regions of the brain, with prominent fibers running in parallel in the preoptic area (POA) without entering the pituitary. cGnRH-II-ir cell bodies were observed only in the midbrain tegmentum region, with a wide distribution of fibers, which were dense in the midbrain tegmentum and spinal cord. SbGnRH-ir cell bodies were localized in the nucleus preopticus of the POA, with fibers in the olfactory bulb, POA, and hypothalamus. Among the three GnRH forms, only SbGnRH-ir fibers innervated the pituitary gland from the preoptic-hypothalamic region, targeting follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH)-producing cells in the proximal pars distalis, as demonstrated by double immunocytochemistry. The localization of the GnRH-ir system was similar in male and female fish. These results demonstrate that multiple GnRH forms exist in the brain of the chub mackerel and suggest that they serve different functions, with SbGnRH having a significant role in reproduction in stimulating FSH- and LH-producing cells, and sGnRH and cGnRH-II serving as neurotransmitters or neuromodulators. PMID:19968470

  5. Invasion and increased expression of S100A4 and CYR61 in mesenchymal transformed breast cancer cells is downregulated by GnRH.

    PubMed

    Gründker, Carsten; Bauerschmitz, Gerd; Schubert, Antje; Emons, Günter

    2016-06-01

    S100 calcium binding protein A4 (S100A4) and cysteine-rich angiogenic inducer 61 (CYR61) play important roles in epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT), invasion and metastasis by promoting cancer cell motility. Recently we were able to show that invasion of GnRH receptor-positive breast cancer cells is time- and dose-dependently reduced by GnRH analogs. We have now analyzed whether GnRH treatment affects S100A4 and CYR61 in mesenchymal transformed breast cancer cells. S100A4 and CYR61 expression was analyzed using RT-PCR. Invasion was quantified by assessment of breast cancer cell migration rate through an artificial basement membrane. The role of S100A4 and CYR61 in invasion of breast cancer cells was analyzed by neutralizing their biological activity. Expression of S100A4, CYR61 and GnRH receptor in human breast cancers, normal and other non-malignant breast tissues was analyzed by immuno-histochemistry. Invasion and expression of S100A4 and CYR61 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells were significant higher as compared with MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Invasion and expression of S100A4 and CYR61 were significantly increased in mesenchymal transformed MCF-7 cells (MCF-7-EMT). The increased invasion of MCF-7-EMT cells could be reduced by anti-S100A4 and anti-CYR61 antibodies. In addition, invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells was decreased by anti-S100A4 and anti-CYR61 antibodies. Treatment of MCF-7-EMT and MDA-MB-231 cells with GnRH agonist Triptorelin resulted in a significant decrease of invasion and expression of S100A4 and CYR61. Both, S100A4 and CYR61 were found highly expressed in biopsy specimens of breast hyperplasia and malignant breast cancers. GnRH receptor expression was detectable in approximately 71% of malignant breast cancers. Our findings suggest that S100A4 and CYR61 play major roles in breast cancer invasion. Both, invasion and expression of S100A4 and CYR61 can be inhibited by GnRH treatment. PMID:27098123

  6. Prognostic models for high and low ovarian responses in controlled ovarian stimulation using a GnRH antagonist protocol

    PubMed Central

    Broekmans, Frank J.; Verweij, Pierre J.M.; Eijkemans, Marinus J.C.; Mannaerts, Bernadette M.J.L.; Witjes, Han

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Can predictors of low and high ovarian responses be identified in patients undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) in a GnRH antagonist protocol? SUMMARY ANSWER Common prognostic factors for high and low ovarian responses were female age, antral follicle count (AFC) and basal serum FSH and LH. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Predictors of ovarian response have been identified in GnRH agonist protocols. With the introduction of GnRH antagonists to prevent premature LH rises during COS, and the gradual shift in use of long GnRH agonist to short GnRH antagonist protocols, there is a need for data on the predictability of ovarian response in GnRH antagonist cycles. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION A retrospective analysis of data from the Engage trial and validation with the Xpect trial. Prognostic models were constructed for high (>18 oocytes retrieved) and low (<6 oocytes retrieved) ovarian response. Model building was based on the recombinant FSH (rFSH) arm (n = 747) of the Engage trial. Multivariable logistic regression models were constructed in a stepwise fashion (P < 0.15 for entry). Validation based on calibration was performed in patients with equivalent treatment (n = 199) in the Xpect trial. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Infertile women with an indication for COS prior to IVF. The Engage and Xpect trials included patients of similar ethnic origins from North America and Europe who had regular menstrual cycles. The main causes of infertility were male factor, tubal factor and endometriosis. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE In the Engage trial, 18.3% of patients had a high and 12.7% had a low ovarian response. Age, AFC, serum FSH and serum LH at stimulation Day 1 were prognostic for both high and low ovarian responses. Higher AFC and LH were associated with an increased chance of high ovarian response. Older age and higher FSH correlated with an increased chance of low ovarian response. Region (North America/Europe) and BMI were

  7. Inhibitory action of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone on the signaling pathways induced by kisspeptin and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in GnRH neuronal cell line, GT1-7.

    PubMed

    Son, You Lee; Ubuka, Takayoshi; Soga, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Bentley, George E; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2016-06-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) acts as a negative regulator of reproduction by acting on gonadotropes and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons. Despite its functional significance, the molecular mechanism of GnIH action in the target cells has not been fully elucidated. To expand our previous study on GnIH actions in gonadotropes, we investigated the potential signal transduction pathway that conveys the inhibitory action of GnIH in GnRH neurons by using the GnRH neuronal cell line, GT1-7. We examined whether GnIH inhibits the action of kisspeptin and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), positive regulators of GnRH neurons. Although GnIH significantly suppressed the stimulatory effect of kisspeptin on GnRH release in hypothalamic culture, GnIH had no inhibitory effect on kisspeptin stimulation of serum response element and nuclear factor of activated T-cell response element activities and ERK phosphorylation, indicating that GnIH may not directly inhibit kisspeptin signaling in GnRH neurons. On the contrary, GnIH effectively eliminated the stimulatory effect of VIP on p38 and ERK phosphorylation, c-Fos mRNA expression, and GnRH release. The use of pharmacological modulators strongly demonstrated the specific inhibitory action of GnIH on the adenylate cyclase/cAMP/protein kinase A pathway, suggesting a common inhibitory mechanism of GnIH action in GnRH neurons and gonadotropes.-Son, Y. L., Ubuka, T., Soga, T., Yamamoto, K., Bentley, G. E., Tsutsui, K. Inhibitory action of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone on the signaling pathways induced by kisspeptin and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in GnRH neuronal cell line, GT1-7. PMID:26929433

  8. Interactions between gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and orexin in the regulation of feeding and reproduction in goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Hoskins, Leah J; Xu, Meiyu; Volkoff, Hélène

    2008-08-01

    Links between energy homeostasis and reproduction have been demonstrated in vertebrates. As a general rule, abundant food resources favor reproduction whereas low food availability induces an inhibition of reproductive processes. In both mammals and fish, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and orexin (OX) are hypothalamic neuropeptides that play critical roles in the regulation of sexual behavior and appetite, respectively. In order to assess possible interactions between orexin and GnRH in the control of feeding and reproduction in goldfish, we examined the effects of chicken GnRH (cGnRH-II) intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection on feeding behavior and OX brain mRNA expression as well as the effects of orexin ICV injections on spawning behavior and cGnRH-II brain mRNA expression. Treatment with cGnRH-II at doses that stimulate spawning (0.5 ng/g or 1 ng/g) resulted in a decrease in both food intake and hypothalamic orexin mRNA expression. Treatment with orexin A at doses that stimulate feeding (10 ng/g) induced an inhibition of spawning behavior and a decrease in cGnRH-II expression in the hypothalamus and optic tectum-thalamus. Our results suggest that the anorexigenic actions of cGnRH-II in goldfish might be in part mediated by OX and that orexin inhibits reproductive behavior in part via the inhibition of the GnRH system. Our data suggest the existence of a coordinated control of feeding and reproduction by the orexin and GnRH systems in goldfish. PMID:18544455

  9. Cell death mechanisms in GT1-7 GnRH cells exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls PCB74, PCB118, and PCB153

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, Sarah M.; Guevara, Esperanza; Woller, Michael J.; Gore, Andrea C.

    2009-06-01

    Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) causes functional deficits in neuroendocrine systems. We used an immortalized hypothalamic GT1-7 cell line, which synthesizes the neuroendocrine peptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), to examine the neurotoxic and endocrine disrupting effects of PCBs and their mechanisms of action. Cells were treated for 1, 4, 8, or 24 h with a range of doses of a representative PCB from each of three classes: coplanar (2,4,4',5-tetrachlorobiphenyl: PCB74), dioxin-like coplanar (2',3,4,4',5' pentachlorobiphenyl: PCB118), non-coplanar (2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl: PCB153), or their combination. GnRH peptide concentrations, cell viability, apoptotic and necrotic cell death, and caspase activation were quantified. In general, GnRH peptide levels were suppressed by high doses and longer durations of PCBs, and elevated at low doses and shorter timepoints. The suppression of GnRH peptide levels was partially reversed in cultures co-treated with the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780. All PCBs reduced viability and increased both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Although the effects for the three classes of PCBs were often similar, subtle differences in responses, together with evidence that the combination of PCBs acted slightly different from individual PCBs, suggest that the three tested PCB compounds may act via slightly different or more than one mechanism. These results provide evidence that PCB congeners have endocrine disrupting and/or neurotoxic effects on the hypothalamic GnRH cell line, a finding that has implications for environmental endocrine disruption in animals.

  10. Potential role for GnRH in the synchronization of follicular emergence before the superovulatory Day 0 protocol.

    PubMed

    Balaro, M F A; Fonseca, J F; Barbosa, T G B; Souza-Fabjan, J M G; Figueira, L M; Teixeira, T A; Carvalheira, L R; Brandão, F Z

    2016-01-01

    The ability of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) to synchronize ovulation and new follicular wave emergence before a "superovulatory Day 0" protocol was assessed in Santa Inês ewes. For estrus synchronization, a 60-mg medroxyprogesterone acetate sponge was inserted for 6 d. One day before sponge removal, 37.5-μg d-cloprostenol and 300 IU equine chorionic gonadotropin were injected intramuscularly (i.m.). After sponge removal, ewes were assigned to the following 3 groups: (1) GC-1 mL saline at 12 h (n = 10); (2) G24h-0.025-mg lecirelin (GnRH agonist) i.m. at 24 h (n = 10); or (3) G36h-0.025-mg lecirelin i.m. at 36 h (n = 9). Ovarian ultrasonography was conducted to assess follicular dynamics. Blood was collected to determine plasma concentrations of progesterone and estradiol. Females from G36h and GC had a greater (P < 0.05) estrous response than those from the G24h group (78.0 and 90.0 vs 0.0%, respectively). Ewes from G24h and G36h had earlier (P < 0.05) ovulation (48.0 ± 10.2 and 56.7 ± 5.7 h) compared with those from Gc (64.1 ± 9.7 h). The mean number of ovulations per ewe was greater (P < 0.05) in Gc (1.9 ± 0.6) and G36h (2.0 ± 1.0) than G24h (1.2 ± 0.4). Plasma concentrations of progesterone and estradiol differed over time. Follicular growth during the postovulatory day was affected (P < 0.05) by day of the estrus cycle as well as by the interaction (P < 0.05) of treatment and day of the estrus cycle. There was a larger (P < 0.05) population of medium follicles during the first 24 h after the ovulation in G24h compared with Gc, and there was an absence of large follicles in G36h between 36 and 72 h after ovulation. In conclusion, the use of GnRH agonist at 36 h more efficiently synchronized ovulation and promoted the absence of dominant follicles during early diestrus and may be used at the start of superovulatory treatment at 80 h in Santa Inês ewes. PMID:26343000

  11. Combined gnRH and PGF2alpha application in cows with endometritis puerperalis treated with antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Janowski, T; Zduńczyk, S; Mwaanga, E S

    2001-10-01

    The investigations were carried out on a total of 70 cows with puerperal endometritis. In addition to intrauterine antibiotic treatment, 30 experimental animals were administered 20 microg GnRH analogue, buserelin, between days 10 and 12 post-partum followed by 500 microg PGF2alpha analogue, cloprostenol, 10 days later. Forty control cows were treated only with intrauterine antibiotics. Blood samples for progesterone determination were collected from the tail vein twice weekly until day 70 post-partum. The first rise in progesterone level above 3.18 nmol/l occurred significantly earlier in the experimental than in control cows (21.6 +/- 9.2 versus 27.8 +/- 12.3 days; p < or = 0.05). The duration of the first cycle post-partum was 15.0 +/- 4.3 days in experimental and 19.7 +/- 7.3 days in control animals (p < or = 0.05). However, no significant differences were observed in the occurrence of first oestrus post-partum. The involution of the uterus was improved after hormone treatment. At day 42 post-partum, completion of uterine involution was found in 93.3% of hormone-treated cows and in 82.5% of those treated with antibiotic only (p < or = 0.05). Clinical recovery was 96.6% in the experimental and 82.5% in the control group (p < or = 0.05). First service pregnancy rate was significantly better in hormone-treated than control cows (51.7 versus 36.4%; p < or = 0.05). Total pregnancy rate and insemination index values were not significantly improved following GnRH and PGF2alpha treatment. The average service period was 89.8 +/- 21.2 days in cows after hormone treatment, and 112.6 +/- 24.5 days in control cows. The difference was statistically significant (p < or = 0.05). These results indicate, that the sequential GnRH and PGF2alpha application in cows with puerperal endometritis positively affected ovarian function and uterine involution, resulting in improved fertility performance. PMID:11885741

  12. Hypothalamic KISS1 Expression, GnRH, and Neurotransmitter Innervation Vary with Stress and Sensitivity in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Bethea, Cynthia L.; Kim, Aaron; Reddy, Arubala P.; Chin, Andrea; Weraky, Sarah C.; Cameron, Judy L.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of short-term psychosocial and metabolic stress in a monkey model of Stress-Induced Amenorrhea on the HPG axis. KISS1 expression was determined with ISH in the infundibular arcuate nucleus (INF ARC). Downstream of KISS1, GnRH axons in lateral areas rostral to the infundibular recess, serum LH and serum oestrogen (E) were measured with IHC and RIA. Upstream of KISS1, norepinephrine (NE) axons in the rostral ARC and serotonin axons in the anterior hypothalamus and periaqueductal gray (PAG) were measured with IHC. Female cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) characterized as highly stress resilient (HSR) or stress sensitive (SS) were examined. After characterization of stress sensitivity, monkeys were either not stressed, or mildly stressed for 5 days prior to euthanasia in the early follicular phase. Stress consisted of 5 days of 20% food reduction in a novel room with unfamiliar conspecifics. There was a significant increase in KISS1 expression in HSR and SS animals in the presence versus absence of stress (p=0.005). GnRH axon density increased with stress in HSR and SS animals (p=0.015), while LH showed a gradual, but non-significant increase with stress. E trended higher in the HSR animals and there was no effect of stress (p=0.83). NE axon density (marked with dopamine β-hydroxylase, DBH) increased with stress in both HSR and SS groups (p≤0.002), whereas serotonin axon density was higher in HSR compared to SS animals and there was no effect of stress (p=0.03). The ratio of DBH/E correlated with KISS1 (p=0.052), and GnRH correlated with serum LH (p=0.039). In conclusion, E inhibited KISS1 in the absence of stress, but stress increased NE, which may override E inhibition of KISS1 expression. We speculate that neural pathways transduce stress to KISS1 neurones, which changes their sensitivity to E. PMID:24617839

  13. Effect of GnRH antagonists on clinical pregnancy rates in ovulation induction protocols with gonadotropins and intrauterine insemination

    PubMed Central

    Dansuk, Ramazan; Gonenc, Ali Ihsan; Sudolmus, Sinem; Yucel, Oguz; Sevket, Osman; Köroğlu, Nadiye

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Intrauterine insemination (IUI) after controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) was applied to selected infertile patients to determine the effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists in IUI cycles, in which recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone (rFSH) had been used for COH. METHODS This study was conducted between April 1, 2009 and June 10, 2009, and involved a total of 108 patients. These patients had primary or secondary infertility, which resulted in an indication for IUI, and they each received two cycles of ovarian stimulation treatment with clomiphene citrate. The patients were randomised into two groups – patients in group A received rFSH + GnRH antagonist (n = 45), while those in group B received only rFSH (n = 63). RESULTS The mean age of the patients was 31.84 ± 3.73 years and the mean body mass index (BMI) was 24.40 ± 1.88 kg/m2. The mean age and BMI of the patients in groups A and B were not significantly different. There was no significant difference in the mean total rFSH dose administered (988.33 IU in group A and 871.83 IU in group B). When compared to group B, the mean number of follicles that were > 16 mm on the human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) trigger day was significantly higher in group A (1.58 and 1.86, respectively; p < 0.05). When the two groups were compared, there were no statistically significant differences in the number of cancelled cycles due to premature luteinisation (none in group A vs. two in group B) and the rate of clinical pregnancy (8.9% in group A vs. 7.9% in group B). CONCLUSION No significant improvement in the clinical pregnancy rates was observed when GnRH antagonists were used in COH + IUI cycles, despite the significant increase in the number of follicles that were > 16 mm on HCG trigger day. PMID:25532515

  14. Semiotic labelled deductive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nossum, R.T.

    1996-12-31

    We review the class of Semiotic Models put forward by Pospelov, as well as the Labelled Deductive Systems developed by Gabbay, and construct an embedding of Semiotic Models into Labelled Deductive Systems.

  15. Mental Labels and Tattoos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyatt, I. Ralph

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the ease with which mental labels become imprinted in our system, six basic axioms for maintaining negative mental tattoos, and psychological processes for eliminating mental tattoos and labels. (RK)

  16. Renin and ovarian vascularization in cows with follicular cysts after epidural administration of a GnRH analogue.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, A; Minoia, G; Trisolini, C; Mutinati, M; Spedicato, M; Manca, R; Sciorsci, R L

    2009-12-01

    The ovarian renin-angiotensin system may play an important role in follicular growth and maturation, as well as in the process of ovulation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of administration of a GnRH analogue to cows with ovarian follicular cysts on plasma renin concentrations and ovarian vascularization. This study was performed with 60 Friesian cows, which were diagnosed with follicular cysts, and randomly allocated into two groups: group A (treatment; n=30) received 2ml of lecirelin (Dalmarelin((R)) - Fatro), per head via sacro-coccygeal epidural, and group B (control; n=30) received 2ml saline solution (0.9% NaCl) per head by the same route. Blood samples were immediately collected prior to administration (T0) and then 24h (T1), 48h (T2) and 8 days (T3) after administration of the treatment, for both groups. Ovarian vascularization was evaluated utilizing Power Doppler on these same days in 10 animals from each group. The number of pixels detected by Power Doppler was used as an indicator of the degree of vascularization. Plasma renin concentrations remained relatively constant for the control (group B) animals, but increased as the sampling period progressed (NS) for the treated cows (group A). Similarly, there were no changes in ovarian vascularization (number of pixels) for the control cows, but vascularization increased throughout the sampling period in the treated animals. The number of pixels associated with cysts was significantly higher for treated compared to control cows at 24h after treatment (P<0.001). The epidural administration of a GnRH analogue was determined to be a highly effective therapy for follicular cysts (regression occurred in 82% of treated cows within 8+/-2 days after treatment, but in none of the control cows), which also enhanced ovarian vascularization. PMID:19361938

  17. Effectiveness of the GnRH agonist Deslorelin as a tool to decrease levels of circulating testosterone in zebra finches.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Karagh; Wilson, David A; Burton, Mark; Slaugh, Shayla; Dunning, Jeffery L; Prather, Jonathan F

    2015-10-01

    Songbirds are widely used in studies of the neurobiology underlying learning, memory and performance of the sounds used in vocal communication. Development and activity of neurons in many brain sites implicated in those behaviors are closely related to levels of circulating testosterone. Approaches to understand the effects of testosterone in songbirds are presently limited to testosterone implants, which elevate testosterone levels to supraphysiological values, or castration, which eliminates gonadal production of testosterone. Previous studies in mammals indicate that GnRH agonists may be an effective tool to reduce testosterone within that range of extremes and without invasive surgery. To evaluate the effectiveness of the GnRH agonist Deslorelin as a tool to modulate levels of testosterone in songbirds, we recorded the effects of Deslorelin in adult male zebra finches. We recorded songs, body mass and blood testosterone levels pre-treatment, then we gave each bird a small subcutaneous implant of Deslorelin. We measured blood plasma testosterone levels weekly and recorded song behavior and gross morphology of brain, testes and heart at the end of each experiment. Testosterone levels were reduced at the 5mg/kg dose, and the very slight song changes we observed at that dose were like those reported for castrated zebra finches. As expected, there were no changes in the number of cells in androgen-sensitive brain structures. Suppression of testosterone at the 5mg/kg dose was reversible through implant removal. Thus, Deslorelin is a new tool to transiently suppress testosterone levels without the invasiveness and undesirable aftereffects of surgical castration. PMID:26391838

  18. Stimulation of LH, FSH, and luteal blood flow by GnRH during the luteal phase in mares.

    PubMed

    Castro, T; Oliveira, F A; Siddiqui, M A R; Baldrighi, J M; Wolf, C A; Ginther, O J

    2016-03-01

    A study was performed on the effect of a single dose per mare of 0 (n = 9), 100 (n = 8), or 300 (n = 9) of GnRH on Day 10 (Day 0 = ovulation) on concentrations of LH, FSH, and progesterone (P4) and blood flow to the CL ovary. Hormone concentration and blood flow measurements were performed at hours 0 (hour of treatment), 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6. Blood flow was assessed by spectral Doppler ultrasonography for resistance to blood flow in an ovarian artery before entry into the CL ovary. The percentage of the CL with color Doppler signals of blood flow was estimated from videotapes of real-time color Doppler imaging by an operator who was unaware of mare identity, hour, or treatment dose. Concentrations of LH and FSH increased (P < 0.05) at hour 0.25 and decreased (P < 0.05) over hours 1 to 6; P4 concentration was not altered by treatment. Blood flow resistance decreased between hours 0 and 1, but the decrease was greater (P < 0.05) for the 100-μg dose than for the 300-μg dose. The percentage of CL with blood flow signals increased (P < 0.05) between hours 0 and 1 with no significant difference between the 100- and 300-μg doses. The results supported the hypothesis that GnRH increases LH concentration, vascular perfusion of the CL ovary, and CL blood flow during the luteal phase; however, P4 concentration was not affected. PMID:26600292

  19. Integrated evaluation of scrotal temperature and testosteronemia after GnRH administration in young bulls with low semen production.

    PubMed

    Vencato, J; Cestaro, L; Vazzana, I; Carrer, G; Carlo, E; Dara, S; Stelletta, C

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the suitability of thermographic monitoring of scrotal surface temperature (SST) as a method to monitor testicular function. Yearling bulls (n = 23) with low semen production were selected. Scrotal surface temperature and serum testosterone (T) concentrations were evaluated before and after administration of 10.5 μg buserelin acetate IV. Thermographic images of scrotum were recorded at 0, 15, 30, 45 and 60 min post-GnRH, while blood sampling was only performed at 60 min post-GnRH. Bulls were divided in two groups: LowTemp bulls (n = 10) had a decreased SST at 60 min; HighTemp bulls (n = 13) had an increased SST. After 60 min, LowTemp bulls had higher T concentrations compared to HighTemp bulls: 14.32 ng/ml ± 0.53 vs 10.30 ± 1.37 ng/ml (mean ± SEM; p < 0.05), respectively. Reproductive performances in both groups improved after GnRH administration, resulting in an increased number of inseminating doses from each collection, which was higher in LowTemp bulls. Pearson correlation test showed a negative relationship between T and SST (r = -0.554). In conclusion, a decreased scrotal surface temperature 60 min after GnRH treatment was associated with improved semen production. PMID:24750418

  20. Molecular characterization and expression of three GnRH forms mRNA during gonad sex-change process, and effect of GnRHa on GTH subunits mRNA in the protandrous black porgy (Acanthopagrus schlegeli).

    PubMed

    An, Kwang Wook; Nelson, Erik R; Habibi, Hamid R; Choi, Cheol Young

    2008-10-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) plays a pivotal role in control of reproduction and gonadal maturation in teleost fish. To investigate the action GnRH in black porgy (Acanthopagrus schlegeli), we examined the mRNA expression of GTH subunits (GTHalpha, FSHbeta, and LHbeta) in the pituitary as well as plasma estradiol-17beta (E(2)) level following treatment with a GnRH analog (GnRHa) in immature fish. The expression levels of GTH subunits mRNA and plasma E(2) level were increased after GnRHa injection. We were also able to identify three GnRH forms: salmon GnRH (sGnRH), seabream GnRH (sbGnRH) and chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II) by cDNA cloning in the ovary of the black porgy. Black porgy gonadal development is divided into seven stages, involving sex change from male to female (immature testis, mature testis, testicular portion of mostly testis, ovarian portion of mostly testis, testicular portion of mostly ovary, ovarian portion of mostly ovary, and mature ovary). In the present study, we investigated the expression pattern of three GnRH molecular forms in the black porgy gonads at different stages of gonadal development by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR). The mRNA expressions of sGnRH, sbGnRH and cGnRH-II were found to be higher in mature testis and ovary, compared to gonads at different stages of maturity. The findings support the hypothesis that the three forms of GnRH play important roles in the regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and are likely involved also in gonadal development and sex change in black porgy. PMID:18713632

  1. Bar Code Labels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    American Bar Codes, Inc. developed special bar code labels for inventory control of space shuttle parts and other space system components. ABC labels are made in a company-developed anodizing aluminum process and consecutively marketed with bar code symbology and human readable numbers. They offer extreme abrasion resistance and indefinite resistance to ultraviolet radiation, capable of withstanding 700 degree temperatures without deterioration and up to 1400 degrees with special designs. They offer high resistance to salt spray, cleaning fluids and mild acids. ABC is now producing these bar code labels commercially or industrial customers who also need labels to resist harsh environments.

  2. Effect of different gonadorelin (GnRH) products used for the first or resynchronized timed artificial insemination on pregnancy rates in postpartum dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Poock, S E; Lamberson, W R; Lucy, M C

    2015-09-01

    Different GnRH products are used for timed artificial insemination (AI) in postpartum dairy cows. Previous studies reported greater LH release and increased ovulation percentage for gonadorelin diacetate tetrahydrate compared with gonadorelin hydrochloride but pregnancies per AI (P/AI) were not evaluated. The objective, therefore, was to compare P/AI for cows treated with either gonadorelin hydrochloride or gonadorelin diacetate tetrahydrate before the first timed AI or resynchronized timed AI. Holstein cows (n = 3938) in a confinement dairy in northeast Missouri were assigned to weekly cohorts (n = 22) on the basis of calving date. Cows were treated with "Presynch Ovsynch" (PGF2α, 14 days; PGF2α, 14 days; GnRH, 7 days; PGF2α, 56 hours; GnRH, 16 hours; timed AI) so that the first timed AI was 70 to 76 days postpartum. The PGF2α was Lutalyse (5 mL; 25 mg; Zoetis). The GnRH product was either gonadorelin hydrochloride (2 mL; 100 μg; n = 1945) or gonadorelin diacetate tetrahydrate (2 mL; 100 μg; n = 1993) and alternated weekly for cows assigned to cohorts. There were first timed AI (n = 1790) and resynchronized timed AI (n = 2148) cows within each cohort. The resynchronization began 32 days after timed AI (GnRH, 6 days; ultrasound pregnancy diagnosis, 1 day; and then for nonpregnant cows: PGF2α, 56 hours; GnRH, 16 hours; timed AI). The trial was conducted from January to February 2012 (n = 1203) and July to October 2012 (n = 2735). Cows were fed a total mixed ration, milked thrice daily, and milk tested monthly for volume, somatic cell count (SCC), fat percentage, protein percentage, and milk urea nitrogen. Data were analyzed by fitting the binary response data to a generalized linear mixed model for repeated measures. There was no effect of the GnRH product (treatment) on P/AI (38.4 ± 1.2 vs. 35.7 ± 1.3; gonadorelin diacetate tetrahydrate vs. gonadorelin hydrochloride). Treatment interactions with parity, month of breeding

  3. A regulatory loop between miR-132 and miR-125b involved in gonadotrope cells desensitization to GnRH

    PubMed Central

    Lannes, Jérôme; L’hôte, David; Fernandez-Vega, Ambra; Garrel, Ghislaine; Laverrière, Jean-Noël; Joëlle-Cohen-Tannoudji, J -C -T; Quérat, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The GnRH neurohormone is the main activator of the pituitary gonadotropins, LH and FSH. Here we investigated the contribution of microRNAs in mediating GnRH activation. We first established that miR-125b targets several actors of Gαq/11 signalling pathway, without altering Gαs pathway. We then showed that a Gαs-mediated, PKA-dependent phosphorylation of NSun2 methyltransferase leads to miR-125b methylation and thereby induces its down-regulation. We demonstrated that NSun2 mRNA is a target of miR-132 and that NSun2 may be inactivated by the PP1α phosphatase. Time-course analysis of GnRH treatment revealed an initial NSun2-dependent down-regulation of miR-125b with consecutive up-regulation of LH and FSH expression. Increase of miR-132 and of the catalytic subunit of PP1α then contributed to NSun2 inactivation and to the return of miR-125b to its steady-state level. The Gαq/11-dependent pathway was thus again silenced, provoking the down-regulation of LH, FSH and miR-132. Overall, this study reveals that a regulatory loop that tends to maintain or restore high and low levels of miR-125b and miR-132, respectively, is responsible for gonadotrope cells desensitization to sustained GnRH. A dysregulation of this loop might be responsible for the inverted dynamics of these two miRNAs reported in several neuronal and non-neuronal pathologies. PMID:27539363

  4. Effects of single dose GnRH agonist as luteal support on pregnancy outcome in frozen-thawed embryo transfer cycles: an RCT

    PubMed Central

    Davar, Robab; Farid Mojtahedi, Maryam; Miraj, Sepideh

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is no doubt that luteal phase support is essential to enhance the reproductive outcome in IVF cycles. In addition to progesterone and human chorionic gonadotropin, several studies have described GnRH agonists as luteal phase support to improve implantation rate, pregnancy rate and live birth rate, whereas other studies showed dissimilar conclusions. All of these studies have been done in fresh IVF cycles. Objective: To determine whether an additional GnRH agonist administered at the time of implantation for luteal phase support in frozen-thawed embryo transfer (FET) improves the embryo developmental potential. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective controlled trial study in 200 FET cycles, patients were randomized on the day of embryo transfer into group 1 (n=100) to whom a single dose of GnRH agonist (0.1 mg triptorelin) was administered three days after transfer and group 2 (n=100), who did not receive agonist. Both groups received daily vaginal progesterone suppositories plus estradiol valerate 6 mg daily. Primary outcome measure was clinical pregnancy rate. Secondary outcome measures were implantation rate, chemical, ongoing pregnancy rate and abortion rate. Results: A total of 200 FET cycles were analyzed. Demographic data and embryo quality were comparable between two groups. No statistically significant difference in clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates was observed between the two groups (26% versus 21%, p=0.40 and 21% versus 17%, p=0.37, respectively). Conclusion: Administration of a subcutaneous GnRH agonist at the time of implantation does not increase clinical or ongoing pregnancy. PMID:26568750

  5. A single administration of the GnRH antagonist acyline inhibits basal and GnRH-stimulated serum testosterone concentrations in male dogs.

    PubMed

    García Romero, G; Mattioli, G; Rosa, D; Diaz, J D; Abeyá, M; Gobello, C

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to describe testosterone (T) response to GnRH challenge in antagonist-treated dogs over a 30-day period. Eight mongrel dogs were randomly assigned to either the GnRH antagonist acyline 330 μg/kg sc (ACY; n = 4) or a placebo group (PLA; n = 4). The dogs were serially challenged with the GnRH agonist, buserelin 0.2 μg/kg sc on days -1, 1, 3, 7, 10, 14, 21 and 30. On these days, blood samples for T determinations were collected before (-30 min) and 60, 120 and 180 min after the agonist injection. Basal (-30 min) and post-GnRH agonist stimulation T values were compared by anova for repeated measures. Before treatments (day -1), there were no differences in basal T serum concentrations between groups (p > 0.1). After treatments, basal T showed a significant interaction between treatment and day (p < 0.05). Furthermore, when both groups were analysed independently, basal T varied in the ACY (p < 0.01) but not in the PLA group (p > 0.1). On day -1, before treatments, the stimulation tests had only a time effect (p = 0.05) although on days 1 (p < 0.01), 3 (p < 0.01), 7 (p < 0.01), 10 (p < 0.01) and 14 (p < 0.05), the response to the agonist differed between groups, becoming similar on days 21 (p > 0.05) and 30 (p > 0.05). It was concluded that, in dogs, a single administration of the GnRH antagonist prevented canine gonadal axis to physiologically respond to agonistic challenge during 14 days. PMID:22044671

  6. A new approach for ovarian stimulation in IVF using Corifollitropin Alfa in combination with GnRH analogues to trigger final oocyte maturation. A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Decleer, W.; Osmanagaoglu, K.; Meganck, G.; Devroey, P.

    2014-01-01

    A pilot study of 10 patients undergoing IVF stimulation, using the new combination of Corifollitropin Alfa with highly purified hMG and GnRH antagonists has been performed, whereas final oocyte maturation was induced by GnRH analogues. The hormonal profiles were analyzed, as well as the clinical outcome. All patients were recruited between March 1st 2013 and June 30th 2013. They were all younger than 38 years, had a normal BMI (between 18,0 and 32,0) and did not have more than three previous IVF stimulations. The combination of long acting FSH with hphMG, and under protection of GnRH antagonists against spontaneous LH-surge, provided a normal hormonal profile for estradiol, progesterone, LH, and FSH. The average oocyte quality and embryo quality were excellent, which resulted in four pregnancies out of ten. We conclude that the described combination is a safe, efficient, and patient friendly alternative for the classical IVF stimulation. PMID:25374659

  7. Regulation of pituitary MT1 melatonin receptor expression by gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and early growth response factor-1 (Egr-1): in vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sung-Eun; Wright, Ian K; Wyse, Cathy; Samson-Desvignes, Nathalie; Le Blanc, Pascale; Laroche, Serge; Hazlerigg, David G; Johnston, Jonathan D

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin receptor expression exhibits profound developmental changes through poorly understood mechanisms. In mammals, a current model suggests that pubertal reactivation of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion down-regulates MT1 melatonin receptors in pituitary gonadotroph cells, via the induction of early growth response factor-1 (EGR-1). Here we have examined this model by testing the hypotheses that inhibition of Mt1 expression by GnRH occurs directly in gonadotroph cells, can be reversed in adulthood by blockade of GnRH receptors, and requires EGR-1. We first confirmed the endogenous expression of Mt1 mRNA in the αT3-1 gonadotroph cell line. Stimulation of these cells with a GnRH agonist resulted in a rapid increase of Egr-1 mRNA expression, which peaked after 30-60 minutes, and a more prolonged elevation of nuclear EGR-1 immunoreactivity. Moreover, the GnRH agonist significantly decreased Mt1 mRNA. We then treated adult male rats with the GnRH antagonist cetrorelix or saline. After 4 weeks of daily injections, cetrorelix significantly reduced serum LH concentration and testis weight, with histological analysis confirming absence of spermatogenesis. Despite the successful inhibition of GnRH signalling, pituitary Mt1 expression was unchanged. Next we studied the proximal region of the rat Mt1 promoter. Consistent with previous work, over-expression of the transcription factor PITX-1 increased Mt1-luciferase reporter activity; this effect was dependent on the presence of consensus PITX-1 promoter binding regions. Over-expression of EGR-1 inhibited PITX-1-stimulated activity, even following mutation of the consensus EGR-1 binding site. Finally, we studied Egr1-/- mice and observed no difference in pituitary Mt1 expression between Egr1-/- and wild-type litter mates. This work demonstrates that GnRH receptor activation directly down-regulates Mt1 expression in gonadotroph cells. However, pituitary Mt1 expression in adults is unaltered by blockade of

  8. Labeling and Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Mike S.; Robertson, Craig T.; Gray-Ray, Phyllis; Ray, Melvin C.

    2003-01-01

    Index comprised of six contrasting descriptive adjectives was used to measure incarcerated youths' perceived negative labeling from the perspective of parents, teachers, and peers. Results provided partial support for hypothesis that juveniles who choose a greater number of negative labels will report more frequent delinquent involvement. Labeling…

  9. Label fusion strategy selection.

    PubMed

    Robitaille, Nicolas; Duchesne, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Label fusion is used in medical image segmentation to combine several different labels of the same entity into a single discrete label, potentially more accurate, with respect to the exact, sought segmentation, than the best input element. Using simulated data, we compared three existing label fusion techniques-STAPLE, Voting, and Shape-Based Averaging (SBA)-and observed that none could be considered superior depending on the dissimilarity between the input elements. We thus developed an empirical, hybrid technique called SVS, which selects the most appropriate technique to apply based on this dissimilarity. We evaluated the label fusion strategies on two- and three-dimensional simulated data and showed that SVS is superior to any of the three existing methods examined. On real data, we used SVS to perform fusions of 10 segmentations of the hippocampus and amygdala in 78 subjects from the ICBM dataset. SVS selected SBA in almost all cases, which was the most appropriate method overall. PMID:22518113

  10. OR Specimen Labeling.

    PubMed

    Zervakis Brent, Mary Ann

    2016-02-01

    Mislabeled surgical specimens jeopardize patient safety and quality care. The purpose of this project was to determine whether labeling surgical specimens with two patient identifiers would result in an 80% reduction in specimen labeling errors within six months and a 100% reduction in errors within 12 months. Our failure mode effects analysis found that the lack of two patient identifiers per label was the most unsafe step in our specimen handling process. We piloted and implemented a new process in the OR using the Plan-Do-Check-Act conceptual framework. The audit process included collecting data and making direct observations to determine the sustainability of the process change; however, the leadership team halted the direct observation audit after four months. The total number of surgical specimen labeling errors was reduced by only 60% within six months and 62% within 12 months; therefore, the goal of the project was not met. However, OR specimen labeling errors were reduced. PMID:26849982

  11. Nanovehicles based Bioassay Labels

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Wang, Jun; Wu, Hong; Lin, Ying-Ying; Lin, Yuehe

    2007-04-01

    In this article, we review recent advances of our group in nanoparticle labels based bioassay. Apoferritin and silica nanoparticles have been used as nanovehicles to load large amount of markers for highly sensitive bioassay. Markers loaded apoferritin, apoferritin-templated metallic phosphate nanoparticles, and poly [guanine] coated silica nanoparticles have been prepared, characterized and used as labels for highly sensitive bioassay of protein and DNA. Dissociation and reconstitution characteristics at different pH as well as the special cavity structure of apoferritin nanovehicle provides a simple and convenient route to prepare versatile nanoparticle labels and avoid the complicated and tedious synthesis process of conventional nanoparticle labels. The optical and electrochemical characteristics of the prepared nanoparticle labels are easily controlled by loading different optical or electrochemical markers. Additionally, the use of apoferritin nanovehicle as template for synthesis of metallic phosphate nanoparticle labels offers fast route to prepare uniform-size metallic nanoparticle labels for electrochemical bioassay and avoids the traditional harsh dissolution conditions to dissolve metallic nanoparticle tags (that is, the strong-acid dissolution of quantum dots and gold nanoparticles) during the stripping analysis step. Silica nanoparticle has also been used as nanovehicle to carry thousands of poly [guanine] tracers, which was used to enhance the oxidation current of Ru(bpy)32+, resulting in enhanced sensitivity of electrochemical immunoassay. The new nanovehicle-based labels have been used for highly sensitive electrochemical detection of DNA and protein biomarkers, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a). The high sensitivity and selectivity make these labels a useful addition to the armory of nanoparticle-based bioassay. The new nanovehicles based labels hold great promise for multiplex protein and DNA detection and for enhancing the sensitivity

  12. Pharmacologic application of native GnRH in the winter anovulatory mare, I: frequency of reversion to the anovulatory state following ovulation induction and cessation of treatment.

    PubMed

    Thorson, J F; Allen, C C; Amstalden, M; Williams, G L

    2014-03-01

    The continuous, subcutaneous infusion of native GnRH into seasonally anovulatory mares stimulates the synthesis and secretion of LH without pituitary refractoriness, offering opportunities to markedly accelerate the timing of ovulation within the operational breeding season. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that ovarian cycles induced in winter anovulatory mares using continuous administration of native GnRH for 28 days, beginning in either early February or early March (North America) would not revert to an anovulatory state after treatment withdrawal. Anovulatory mares received sham pumps (control) or native GnRH (100 μg/h) for 28 days beginning from February 2 or 3 (GnRH-Feb) or March 2 or 3 (GnRH-Mar). Mean concentrations of LH were five- to seven-fold greater during February in the GnRH-Feb group compared with control and GnRH-Mar groups through February and ending on March 2 or 3. However, concentrations of LH returned to the winter baseline within 3 to 11 days after pump removal and all GnRH-Feb mares failed to remain cyclic after treatment withdrawal. Correspondingly, during March, concentrations of LH in the GnRH-Mar group were greater (P < 0.001) than in the control and GnRH-Feb groups during the 28-day treatment period. Follicular growth and frequency of ovulation (6/10 GnRH-Feb; 9/10 GnRH-Mar, 1/11 controls, respectively) were greater (P < 0.01) in GnRH-treated mares. Ovulatory cycles continued in five of nine GnRH-Mar mares that ovulated, with interovulatory intervals of 15 to 24 days; whereas, three of nine mares had extended (33-42 days) interovulatory intervals and one of nine mares had a persistent CL after cessation of treatment. In summary, continuous administration of native GnRH for 28 days, beginning in early February or March, elevated circulating LH adequately to stimulate follicular growth and ovulation up to 60 days earlier than in untreated controls. However, if continuous, subcutaneous infusion of GnRH is selected as the only

  13. Effect of Administration of Single Dose GnRH Agonist in Luteal Phase on Outcome of ICSI-ET Cycles in Women with Previous History of IVF/ICSI Failure: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Zafardoust, Simin; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Kamali, Koroush; Mokhtar, Sara; Badehnoosh, Bita; Arjmand-Teymouri, Fatemeh; Fatemi, Farnaz; Mohammadzadeh, Afsaneh

    2015-01-01

    Background GnRH agonist administration in the luteal phase has been suggested to beneficially affect the outcome of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and embryo transfer (ET) cycles. This blind randomized controlled study evaluates the effect of GnRH (Gonadotropine Releasing Hormone) agonist administration on ICSI outcome in GnRH antagonist ovarian stimulation protocol in women with 2 or more previous IVF/ICSI-ET failures. Methods One hundred IVF failure women who underwent ICSI cycles and stimulated with GnRH antagonist ovarian stimulation protocol, were included in the study. Women were randomly assigned to intervention (received a single dose injection of GnRH agonist (0.1 mg of Decapeptil) subcutaneously 6 days after oocyte retrieval) and control (did not receive GnRH agonist) groups. Implantation and clinical pregnancy rates were the primary outcome measures. Results Although the age of women, the number of embryos transferred in the current cycle and the quality of the transferred embryos were similar in the two groups, there was a significantly higher rate of implantation (Mann Whitney test, p = 0.041) and pregnancy (32.6% vs. 12.5%, p = 0.030, OR = 3.3, 95%CI, 1.08 to 10.4) in the intervention group. Conclusion Our results suggested that, in addition to routine luteal phase support using progesterone, administration of 0.1 mg of Decapeptil 6 days after oocyte retrieval in women with previous history of 2 or more IVF/ICSI failures led to a significant improvement in implantation and pregnancy rates after ICSI following ovarian stimulation with GnRH antagonist protocol. PMID:25927026

  14. The spatiotemporal segregation of GAD forms defines distinct GABA signaling functions in the developing mouse olfactory system and provides novel insights into the origin and migration of GnRH neurons.

    PubMed

    Vastagh, Csaba; Schwirtlich, Marija; Kwakowsky, Andrea; Erdélyi, Ferenc; Margolis, Frank L; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Katarova, Zoya; Szabó, Gábor

    2015-03-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has a dual role as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult central nervous system (CNS) and as a signaling molecule exerting largely excitatory actions during development. The rate-limiting step of GABA synthesis is catalyzed by two glutamic acid decarboxylase isoforms GAD65 and GAD67 coexpressed in the GABAergic neurons of the CNS. Here we report that the two GADs show virtually nonoverlapping expression patterns consistent with distinct roles in the developing peripheral olfactory system. GAD65 is expressed exclusively in undifferentiated neuronal progenitors confined to the proliferative zones of the sensory vomeronasal and olfactory epithelia In contrast GAD67 is expressed in a subregion of the nonsensory epithelium/vomeronasal organ epithelium containing the putative Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) progenitors and GnRH neurons migrating from this region through the frontonasal mesenchyme into the basal forebrain. Only GAD67+, but not GAD65+ cells accumulate detectable GABA. We further demonstrate that GAD67 and its embryonic splice variant embryonic GAD (EGAD) concomitant with GnRH are dynamically regulated during GnRH neuronal migration in vivo and in two immortalized cell lines representing migratory (GN11) and postmigratory (GT1-7) stage GnRH neurons, respectively. Analysis of GAD65/67 single and double knock-out embryos revealed that the two GADs play complementary (inhibitory) roles in GnRH migration ultimately modulating the speed and/or direction of GnRH migration. Our results also suggest that GAD65 and GAD67/EGAD characterized by distinct subcellular localization and kinetics have disparate functions during olfactory system development mediating proliferative and migratory responses putatively through specific subcellular GABA pools. PMID:25125027

  15. Protein Disulfide Isomerase Chaperone ERP-57 Decreases Plasma Membrane Expression of the Human GnRH Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yánez, Rodrigo Ayala; Conn, P. Michael

    2012-01-01

    Retention of misfolded proteins by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a quality control mechanism involving the participation of endogenous chaperones such as calnexin (CANX) which interact and restrict plasma membrane expression of gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR), a G protein coupled receptor. CANX also interacts with ERP-57, a thiol oxidoreductase chaperone present in the ER. CANX along with ERP-57, promotes the formation of disulfide bond bridges in nascent proteins. The human GnRH receptor (hGnRHR) is stabilized by two disulfide bond bridges (Cys14-Cys200 and Cys114-Cys196), that, when broken, its expression at plasma membrane decreases. To determine if the presence of chaperones CANX and ERP-57 exert an influence over membrane routing and second messenger activation, we assessed the effect of various mutants including those with broken bridges (Cys→Ala) along with the wild type hGnRHR. The effect of chaperones on mutants was insignificant, whereas the overexpression of ERP-57 led to a wild type hGnRHR retention which was further enhanced by cotransfection with CANX cDNA disclosing receptor retention by ERP-57 augmented by CANX, suggesting a quality control mechanism. PMID:20029959

  16. Comparison Pregnancy Outcomes Between Minimal Stimulation Protocol and Conventional GnRH Antagonist Protocols in Poor Ovarian Responders

    PubMed Central

    Pilehvari, Shamim; ShahrokhTehraninejad, Ensieh; Hosseinrashidi, Batool; Keikhah, Fatemeh; Haghollahi, Fedyeh; Aziminekoo, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the pregnancy outcomes achieved by in vitro fertilization (IVF) between minimal stimulation and conventional antagonist protocols in poor ovarian responders (PORs). Materials and methods: In this randomized controlled trial, 77 PORs undergoing IVF were selected and divided into two groups. First group was the minimal stimulation group (n = 42) receiving 100 mg/day clomiphene citrate on day 2of the cycle for 5 day that was followed by150IU/day human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG) on day 5 of the cycle. Second group was the conventional group (n = 35) receiving at least 300 IU/daygonadotropin on day 2 of the cycle. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocol was applied for both groups according to flexible protocol. Number of retrieved oocytes and chemical pregnancy rate were the main outcomes. Results: There was no difference in number ofretrieved oocyte and pregnancy rate (2.79 ± 1.96 vs. 2.20 ± 1.71 and 5.6% vs. 4.1%; p > 0.05) between both groups. The gonadotropin dose used in the minimal stimulation group was lower than conventional group (1046 ± 596 vs. 2806 ± 583). Conclusion: Minimal stimulation protocol with lower gonadotropin used is likely to be considered as a patient- friendly and cost-effective substitute for PORs. PMID:27385972

  17. How to Read Drug Labels

    MedlinePlus

    ... and alternative medicine Healthy Aging How to read drug labels Printer-friendly version How to Read Drug ... read drug labels How to read a prescription drug label View a text version of this picture. ...

  18. Nutrition Facts: Reading the Label

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Go4Life Get Free Stuff Be a Partner Nutrition Facts: Reading the Label Reading labels can help ... of information on their labels or packaging about nutrition and food safety. Product dates . You might see ...

  19. Noise labeling in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Araujo, Marco A. N.; Massarani, Paulo M.; de Azevedo, Jose A. J.; Gerges, Samir N. Y.

    2002-11-01

    The Brazilian Silence Program, created in 1990 by the Brazilian Ministry of Environment, advocates the production and use of equipment with lower noise level. The subcommittee of Noise Labeling of the Brazilian Committee of Certification is composed of INMETRO acoustic specialists to organize and implement the Brazilian Labeling Program. This subcommittee elaborated the label form and test procedure. The noise-labeling program will first concentrate on the following household devices, both manufactured in Brazil or imported from abroad; mixers, blenders, hairdryers, refrigerators, and vacuum cleaners. The label should contain the sound-power level in dBA. INMETRO or other credited laboratories are responsible for the measurements. The ISO 4871, 3740 (1 to 5), ISO 8960, and IEC 704 (1 to 4) and also the equivalent Brazilian standards are used for the measurements, such as ABNT NBR 13910-1. The main objective of the label is to inform the consumer about the emitted noise level. The label offers the noise parameter to be used by the consumer when comparing devices, considering price, performance, and now also noise. No restriction for noise level was established.

  20. Capacitive label reader

    DOEpatents

    Arlowe, H.D.

    1983-07-15

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label.

  1. Capacitive label reader

    DOEpatents

    Arlowe, H. Duane

    1985-01-01

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label.

  2. Capacitive label reader

    DOEpatents

    Arlowe, H.D.

    1985-11-12

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label. 5 figs.

  3. Like your labels?

    PubMed

    Field, Michele

    2010-01-01

    The descriptive “conventions” used on food labels are always evolving. Today, however, the changes are so complicated (partly driven by legislation requiring disclosures about environmental impacts, health issues, and geographical provenance) that these labels more often baffle buyers than enlighten them. In a light-handed manner, the article points to how sometimes reading label language can be like deciphering runes—and how if we are familiar with the technical terms, we can find a literal meaning, but still not see the implications. The article could be ten times longer because food labels vary according to cultures—but all food-exporting cultures now take advantage of our short attention-span when faced with these texts. The question is whether less is more—and if so, in this contest for our attention, what “contestant” is voted off. PMID:21539053

  4. Response to GnRH on day 6 of the estrous cycle is diminished as the percentage of Bos indicus breeding increases in Angus, Brangus, and Brahman x Angus heifers.

    PubMed

    Portillo, Germán E; Bridges, G Allen; de Araujo, Jennifer W; Shaw, Mary-Karen V; Schrick, F Neal; Thatcher, William W; Yelich, Joel V

    2008-01-15

    Angus (n=6), Brangus (5/8 Angus x 3/8 Brahman, n=6), and Brahman x Angus (3/8 Angus x 5/8 Brahman, n=6) heifers exhibiting estrous cycles at regular intervals were used to determine if the percentage of Bos indicus breeding influenced the secretory patterns of LH in response to a GnRH treatment on Day 6 of the estrous cycle. Heifers were pre-synchronized with a two-injection PGF(2 alpha) protocol (25 mg i.m. Day -14 and 12.5 mg i.m. Day -3 and -2 of experiment). Heifers received 100 microg GnRH i.m. on Day 6 of the subsequent estrous cycle. Blood samples were collected at -60, -30, and -1 min before GnRH and 15, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, 240, 300, 360, 420, and 480 min after GnRH to determine concentrations of serum LH. Estradiol concentrations were determined at -60, -30, and -1 min before GnRH. On Day 6 and 8, ovaries were examined by ultrasonography to determine if ovulation occurred. On Day 13, heifers received 25 mg PGF(2 alpha) i.m. and blood samples were collected daily until either the expression of estrus or Day 20 for heifers not exhibiting estrus to determine progesterone concentrations. There was no effect (P>0.10) of breed on ovulation rate to GnRH as well as size of the largest follicle, mean estradiol, and mean corpus luteum volume at GnRH. Mean LH was greater (P<0.05) for Angus (7.0+/-0.8 ng/mL) compared to Brangus (4.6+/-0.8 ng/mL) and Brahman x Angus (2.9+/-0.8 ng/mL), which were similar (P>0.10). Mean LH peak-height was similar (P>0.10) for Brangus (13.9+/-3.4 ng/mL) compared to Angus (21.9+/-3.4 ng/mL) and Brahman x Angus (8.0+/-3.4 ng/mL), but was greater (P<0.05) for Angus compared to Brahman x Angus. Interval from GnRH to LH peak was similar (P>0.10) between breeds. As the percentage of Bos indicus breeding increased the amount of LH released in response to GnRH on Day 6 of the estrous cycle decreased. PMID:17212980

  5. Comparison of GnRh Agonist Microdose Flare Up and GnRh Antagonist/Letrozole in Treatment of Poor Responder Patients in Intra Cytoplaspic Sperm Injection: Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Nabati, Azar; Peivandi, Sepideh; Khalilian, Alireza; Mirzaeirad, Sina; Hashemi, Seyyed Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds: the prevalence of infertility is up to 10 to 15 % which 9 to 24 % of them are Poor Ovarian Responders (POR). This study was designed to compare two methods of GnRH Agonist Microdose Flareup (MF) and GnRH Antagonist/Letrozole (AL) in treatment of these patients. Methods and Materials: this randomized clinical trial study consisted of 123 patients. In the first step of treatment in both methods FSH, LH, estradiol, anderostandion, testestron in third day of menstruation period and the thickness of endometrium by Transvaginal sonography were evaluated. At the time of HCG injection the thickness of endometrium and follicles which were more than 14mm ware established and hormones were evaluated. Two weeks later serum βhCG and after 6 to 8 weeks Transvaginal sonography were applied to prove the pregnancy. Results: there were 61 patients with mean age of 38.7±4.58 in MF group and 62 patients with mean age of 38.5±4.6 in AL group (P=0.80). At the time of hCG injection there were significant increase in the level of LH, estradiol, thickness of endometrium and follicles more than 14mm in MF patients (P<0.0001). The mean time of ovary stimulation in MF group was 10.72±1.5 and in AL was 8.45±1.2 (P<0.0001). The mean level of gonadotropin which were used was 80.6±20.1 in MF patients and 64.7±16.4 in AL group (P<0.0001). 18 % of MF group and 38.7% in AL group had no normal cycle of ovulation (OR: 2.87, 95% CI: 1.25-6.57, P=0.011). The mean numbers of oocyte and normal fetus in MF was 5.83±3.5 and 3.7±2.5 and in AL was 3±1.69 and 1.4±1.33 (P<0.0001). The number of chemical pregnancy in MF group was 10 (16.4%) and in AL was 3 (4.8%) (OR 3.85, 95% CI: 1.06-14.77, P=0.037). Clinical pregnancy in 10 patients (16.4%) of MF group and 3 (4.8%)in AL was reported. OR 3.85, 95% CI: 1.06-14.77, P=0.037). Conclusion: this study showed that MF method of pregnancy leads to more positive results in pregnancy based on chemical and clinical evaluation in comparison with AL

  6. The Potential Role of GnRH Agonists and Antagonists in Inducing Thyroid Physiopathological Changes During IVF.

    PubMed

    Gizzo, Salvatore; Noventa, Marco; Quaranta, Michela; Vitagliano, Amerigo; Esposito, Federica; Andrisani, Alessandra; Venturella, Roberta; Alviggi, Carlo; Plebani, Mario; Gangemi, Michele; Nardelli, Giovanni Battista; D'Antona, Donato

    2016-04-01

    We conducted an observational cohort study to evaluate whether drugs used for hypothalamic inhibition may impact thyroid function of infertile women scheduled for fresh nondonor in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection treatment. We considered eligible for inclusion in the study only women with normal thyroid function (serum thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH] range: 0.2-4.0 mIU/L, serum thyroxin values: 9-22 pmol/L) and negative personal history for previous thyroid disorders. According to which protocols were implemented to gain hypothalamic inhibition, patients were assigned to group A (70 women treated by long gonadotropin-releasing hormone [GnRH] agonist protocol) or to group B (86 women treated by flexible GnRH antagonist protocol). Before initiating controlled ovarian stimulation (COS), both groups were further stratified into 4 subgroups: A1 (46 of the 70 women) and B1 (61 of the 86 women) in women with a baseline TSH value <2.5 mIU/L, whereas those with a baseline value ≥2.5 mIU/L were assigned to groups A2 (24 of the 70 women) and B2 (25 of the 86 women). Prior to initiating stimulation (T-0), 17-β-estradiol (E(2)) and TSH serum values were dosed in all women and repeated on T-5 (day 5 of COS) and subsequently every 2 days until T-ov-ind (ovulation induction day) and T-pick-up (oocytes retrieval day). In case of detection of TSH levels above the cutoff, patients were screened for thyroxin and thyroid autoantibody serum values. In group A, E(2) at T-ov-ind was significantly increased compared to group B (P < .01), whereas TSH values showed an opposite trend (not significantly modified in group A, whereas significantly increased in group B; P < .001). A total of 64 women were found to have TSH values above the cutoff during COS: 7 in group A (11%) and 57 in group B (89%). Among them, 5 (71.4%) of the 7 in group A displayed hypothyroidism (and 4 of the 5 autoantibody positivity), whereas in group B, 6 (10.5%) of the 57 displayed

  7. Off-Label Drug Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Local Offices Close + - Text Size Off-label Drug Use What is off-label drug use? In the United States new drugs are ... unapproved use of a drug. Is off-label drug use legal? The off-label use of FDA- ...

  8. Medical Castration Using the Investigational Oral GnRH Antagonist TAK-385 (Relugolix): Phase 1 Study in Healthy Males

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hongliang; Faessel, Hélène M.; Saad, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Context: TAK-385 is a highly selective, oral, nonpeptide GnRH antagonist being investigated as a possible prostate cancer treatment. Objective: The objectives were to evaluate safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of TAK-385 on LH and testosterone. Design, Setting, and Participants: This was a three-part, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 1 dose-escalation study in 176 healthy male UK volunteers. Interventions: Part 1, single doses of TAK-385 (0 [placebo], 80, 120, 180, or 360 mg). Part 2, 14-day TAK-385 (0, 20, 40, 80, or 180 mg) daily. Part 3, 28-day TAK-385 (40 [with loading dose], 60, 80, or 160 mg) or placebo daily. Parts 2 and 3 included men aged 40–75 years. Main Outcome Measures: Main outcome measures included plasma concentrations of TAK-385, LH, and testosterone. Results: Oral TAK-385 was readily absorbed, and steady state was reached in ≤14 days. Food reduced TAK-385 systemic exposure by 47–52%. Mean serum testosterone levels declined ≤6 hours after TAK-385 administration. Loading doses up to 360 mg on day 1 or 360 mg on day 1 followed by 240 mg on day 2 reduced the time to achieve castrate testosterone levels from ≥7 to <3 days. TAK-385 doses ≥80 mg/d achieved sustained medical castration and trough TAK-385 concentrations >4 ng/mL. After discontinuation of TAK-385 on day 28, testosterone levels normalized in most subjects in ≤ 28 days. Common adverse events included bradycardia, headache, and hot flush (all grade ≤2). Conclusions: Oral TAK-385 (40–180 mg/d) was well tolerated and effectively lowered testosterone in healthy men. Planned phase 2 doses in men with hormone-sensitive prostate cancer are 80 and 120 mg/d. PMID:26502357

  9. Gonadotrophin subunit and GnRH receptor gene expression in the pars distalis of the equine pituitary.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Julie; Westcott, Karen; Tortonese, Domingo J

    2009-02-01

    In the horse, pronounced changes in fertility occur annually in response to photoperiod. However, the mechanisms regulating gonadotrophin synthesis and release in this species remain unclear. Here, we investigated the expression of gonadotrophin subunits and GnRH receptor (GnRH-R) mRNA in the pituitary glands of Thoroughbred horses during the breeding (BS) and non-breeding (NBS) season. Seasonal effects on the prevalence of gonadotrophs in the pars distalis were also examined. GnRH-R and common alpha-, LHbeta- and FSHbeta-subunit mRNA contents were determined by Northern analysis and the prevalence of LH-gonadotrophs assessed by immunohistochemistry in pituitaries from sexually active females (mares) in the BS, and sexually inactive mares in the NBS. These variables were then measured in castrated male horses (geldings). In mares, pituitary content of FSHbeta mRNA was significantly higher in the NBS (P<0.01). Conversely, the content of common alpha-subunit mRNA was significantly higher during the BS (P<0.05). In contrast, GnRH-R and LHbeta mRNA abundance were unaffected by season. Interestingly, whereas no seasonal effects were apparent on the number of LH-gonadotrophs/field, the proportion of LH cells (in relation to all other cells) was higher in BS than NBS animals (P<0.05); this resulted from an increased number of non-gonadotroph cells during the NBS (P<0.05). In geldings, no significant seasonal effects were detected for any of the variables investigated (P>0.05). These results reveal robust seasonal effects on common alpha-subunit and FSHbeta gene expression in the pituitary of the mare, in the absence of detectable changes in the content of LHbeta or GnRH-R mRNA. PMID:19114046

  10. Effect of acute androgen withdrawal by GnRH antagonist on epididymal sperm motility and morphology in the cynomolgus monkey.

    PubMed

    Yeung, C H; Weinbauer, G F; Cooper, T G

    1999-01-01

    Hormonal male contraception requires an induction phase before azoospermia and contraceptive safety are achieved. The nature of spermatozoa that may be ejaculated during this induction phase was studied in a nonhuman primate. The GnRH antagonist Cetrorelix was administered daily to five cynomolgus monkeys to induce testicular regression, and the vehicle was given to five control animals. Within 16 days, the antagonist reduced androgens by 80% in the serum and by 50% in the epididymis. Sperm were obtained by mincing different epididymal regions and were examined for morphology (subjectively) and motility (objectively) after removal of the organs 16 and 25 days after continuous treatment. Spermatozoa entering the epididymis of monkeys undergoing regression differed from those of vehicle-treated controls in their greater susceptibility to disruption during preparation for morphological staining. The acquisition of motility by sperm in the epididymides attached to regressing testes occurred in the same epididymal region as controls but did not achieve the median velocities attained by sperm in controls during epididymal passage. Values for most sperm motion parameters developed as in the controls, and, during epididymal passage, sperm developed resistance to stresses encountered during preparation for morphological analysis. These observations suggest that spermatozoa ejaculated before spermatogenesis ceases may be potentially fertilizing because epididymal maturation continues in an androgen-deprived organ. From these preclinical studies, it can be concluded that in men, applying hormonal contraception precautions against pregnancy must be recommended before azoospermia is induced, since the epididymis can partially compensate for poor-quality sperm produced by a regressing testis even when levels of circulating androgens and tissue androgens are low. PMID:10100476

  11. Comparison of the GnRH agonist and antagonist protocol on the same patients in assisted reproduction during controlled ovarian stimulation cycles.

    PubMed

    Lai, Qiaohong; Zhang, Hanwang; Zhu, Guijing; Li, Yufeng; Jin, Lei; He, Long; Zhang, Zhijun; Yang, Ping; Yu, Qilin; Zhang, Shu; Xu, Jun-Fa; Wang, Cong-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that both gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist and antagonist protocol are effective in suppressing the incidence of premature luteinizing hormone (LH) surges through reversibly blocking the secretion of pituitary gonadotropins, the exact impact of these two distinctive protocols on the clinical setting of patients for in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET) treatment, however, remained controversial. We thus in the present report conducted a retrospective study to compare the impact of GnRH agonist and antagonist protocol on the same patients during controlled ovarian stimulation cycles. A total of 81 patients undergoing 105 agonist and 88 antagonist protocol were analyzed. We failed to detect a significant difference between two protocols for the difference in duration of ovarian stimulation, number of recombinant FSH (Gonal-F) ampoules used, number of oocytes retrieved, serum levels for estradiol (E2) and progestone (P), thickness of endometrium, and the zygote- and blastocyst-development rate. It is seemly that high quality embryo rate was higher in the antagonist protocol, but the data did not reach a statistical significance. Nevertheless, Implantation rate and clinical pregnancy rate were significantly higher in the antagonist protocol (10.64% and 30.26%, respectively) than that of the agonist protocol (5.26% and 15.82%, respectively). Our data also suggest that the GnRH antagonist protocol is likely to have the advantage for improving the outcome of pregnancy in those patients with a history of multiple failures for the IVF-ET treatment. PMID:24040457

  12. Expression of GnRH genes is elevated in discrete brain loci of chum salmon before initiation of homing behavior and during spawning migration.

    PubMed

    Onuma, Takeshi A; Makino, Keita; Ando, Hironori; Ban, Masatoshi; Fukuwaka, Masa-Aki; Azumaya, Tomonori; Urano, Akihisa

    2010-09-15

    Our previous studies suggested the importance of gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRHs) for initiation of spawning migration of chum salmon, although supporting evidence had been not available from oceanic fish. In farmed masu salmon, the amounts of salmon GnRH (sGnRH) mRNAs in the forebrain increased in the pre-pubertal stage from winter through spring, followed by a decrease toward summer. We thus hypothesized that gene expression for GnRHs in oceanic chum salmon changes similarly, and examined this hypothesis using brain samples from winter chum salmon in the Gulf of Alaska and summer fish in the Bering Sea. They were classified into sexually immature and maturing adults, which had maturing gonads and left the Bering Sea for the natal river by the end of summer. The absolute amounts of GnRH mRNAs were determined by real-time PCRs. The amounts of sGnRH mRNA in the maturing winter adults were significantly larger than those in the maturing summer adults. The amounts of sGnRH and chicken GnRH mRNAs then peaked during upstream migration from the coast to the natal hatchery. Such changes were observed in various brain loci including the olfactory bulb, terminal nerve, ventral telencephalon, nucleus preopticus parvocellularis anterioris, nucleus preopticus magnocellularis and midbrain tegmentum. These results suggest that sGnRH neurons change their activity for gonadal maturation prior to initiation of homing behavior from the Bering Sea. The present study provides the first evidence to support a possible involvement of neuropeptides in the onset of spawning migration. PMID:20470776

  13. Effect of different chronic intermittent stressors and acetyl-l-carnitine on hypothalamic beta-endorphin and GnRH and on plasma testosterone levels in male rats.

    PubMed

    Bidzinska, B; Petraglia, F; Angioni, S; Genazzani, A D; Criscuolo, M; Ficarra, G; Gallinelli, A; Trentini, G P; Genazzani, A R

    1993-06-01

    Chronic stress affects the reproductive function by modifying the neuroendocrine homeostasis. The aim of the present study was to clarify the neuroendocrine and the gonadal changes following chronic intermittent stress in male rats and the action of a neuroactive drug, acetyl-l-carnitine (ALC). The effect of two different stressors, cold water swimming or ether, on central beta-endorphin (beta-EP) and GnRH contents, and on plasma testosterone levels was investigated. In addition, the response to an acute stress in chronically stressed rats, treated or untreated with ALC (10 mg/day/rat p.o.), was evaluated. The stressors were applied twice a day for 10 days, and rats were killed before, during and after the last stress session. Mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) beta-EP and GnRH contents, and plasma testosterone levels were evaluated by radioimmunoassay. The following results were obtained: (1) both chronic swimming and ether stress caused a decrease in hypothalamic beta-EP contents; (2) MBH GnRH contents increased after chronic swimming stress but not after ether stress; (3) chronic swimming stress induced a twofold decrease in plasma testosterone levels, while no changes were observed after ether stress; (4) the treatment with ALC prevented the decrease in plasma testosterone levels after chronic swimming stress, and (5) acute stress in chronically stressed animals caused an increase in MBH-beta-EP. The present data showed that chronic swimming stress reduces the reproductive capacity and impairs the capacity to respond to the acute stress and that ALC modulates the hormonal changes to physical stress and prevents the antireproductive effect of chronic cold swimming. PMID:8232773

  14. Socially regulated reproductive development: analysis of GnRH-1 and kisspeptin neuronal systems in cooperatively breeding naked mole-rats (Heterocephalus glaber).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuzhi; Holmes, Melissa M; Forger, Nancy G; Goldman, Bruce D; Lovern, Matthew B; Caraty, Alain; Kalló, Imre; Faulkes, Christopher G; Coen, Clive W

    2013-09-01

    In naked mole-rat (NMR) colonies, breeding is monopolized by the queen and her consorts. Subordinates experience gonadal development if separated from the queen. To elucidate the neuroendocrine factors underlying reproductive suppression/development in NMRs, we quantified plasma gonadal steroids and GnRH-1- and kisspeptin-immunoreactive (ir) neurons in subordinate adults and in those allowed to develop into breeders, with or without subsequent gonadectomy. In males and females, respectively, plasma testosterone and progesterone are higher in breeders than in subordinates. No such distinction occurs for plasma estradiol; its presence after gonadectomy and its positive correlation with adrenal estradiol suggest an adrenal source. Numbers of GnRH-1-ir cell bodies do not differ between gonad-intact breeders and subordinates within or between the sexes. As in phylogenetically related guinea pigs, kisspeptin-ir processes pervade the internal and external zones of the median eminence. Their distribution is consistent with actions on GnRH-1 neurons at perikaryal and/or terminal levels. In previously investigated species, numbers of kisspeptin-ir cell bodies vary from substantial to negligible according to sex and/or reproductive state. NMRs are exceptional: irrespective of sex, reproductive state, or presence of gonads, substantial numbers of kisspeptin-ir cell bodies are detected in the rostral periventricular region of the third ventricle (RP3V) and in the anterior periventricular (PVa), arcuate, and dorsomedial hypothalamic nuclei. Nevertheless, the greater number in the RP3V/PVa of female breeders compared with female subordinates or male breeders suggests that emergence from a hypogonadotrophic state in females may involve kisspeptin-related mechanisms similar to those underlying puberty or seasonal breeding in other species. PMID:23504961

  15. Individualized Treatment from Theory to Practice: The Private Case of Adding LH during GnRH Antagonist-based Stimulation Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Kol, Shahar

    2014-01-01

    The study evaluated the proportion of patients whose pituitary glands respond with a sharp decrease in luteinizing hormone (LH) levels when exposed to a conventional dose of 0.25 mg gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist in a prospective, single-center, non-randomized, proof-of-concept study. Fifty women eligible for in vitro fertilization (IVF) received recFSH (Gonal-F) from day 2 or 3 of menstrual period. Basal estradiol, progesterone, and LH were measured on the same day and 4–5 days later—immediately before GnRH antagonist 0.25 mg administration, and 24 hours after its administration. Responders were defined as “normal” if 24 hours after the first GnRH antagonist injection, LH level was ≥50% of the pre-injection level and as “over-suppressed” if it was <50% of the pre-injection level. Twelve patients (26% of the total) were “over-suppressed” with a mean LH level of 37% of the level 24 hours earlier. These patients also demonstrated a significant decrease in estradiol rise during the first 24 hours after initial antagonist administration. This effect was reversed for the rest of the stimulation period during which recLH (Luveris, 150 IU/day) was added to the “over-suppressed.” If proven advantageous in terms of pregnancy rate, this approach to individualized treatment would be easy to implement. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials. gov Identifier: NCT01936077. PMID:25452708

  16. Modeling the Male Reproductive Endocrine Axis: Potential Role for a Delay Mechanism in the Inhibitory Action of Gonadal Steroids on GnRH Pulse Frequency.

    PubMed

    Ferasyi, Teuku R; Barrett, P Hugh R; Blache, Dominique; Martin, Graeme B

    2016-05-01

    We developed a compartmental model so we could test mechanistic concepts in the control of the male reproductive endocrine axis. Using SAAM II computer software and a bank of experimental data from male sheep, we began by modeling GnRH-LH feed-forward and LH-T feedback. A key assumption was that the primary control signal comes from a hypothetical neural network (the PULSAR) that emits a digital (pulsatile) signal of variable frequency that drives GnRH secretion in square wave-like pulses. This model produced endocrine profiles that matched experimental observations for the testis-intact animal and for changes in GnRH pulse frequency after castration and T replacement. In the second stage of the model development, we introduced a delay in the negative feedback caused by the aromatization of T to estradiol at the brain level, a concept supported by empirical observations. The simulations showed how changes in the process of aromatization could affect the response of the pulsatile signal to inhibition by steroid feedback. The sensitivity of the PULSAR to estradiol was a critical factor, but the most striking observation was the effect of time delays. With longer delays, there was a reduction in the rate of aromatization and therefore a decrease in local estradiol concentrations, and the outcome was multiple-pulse events in the secretion of GnRH/LH, reflecting experimental observations. In conclusion, our model successfully emulates the GnRH-LH-T-GnRH loop, accommodates a pivotal role for central aromatization in negative feedback, and suggests that time delays in negative feedback are an important aspect of the control of GnRH pulse frequency. PMID:26910309

  17. Corifollitropin alfa followed by hpHMG in GnRH agonist protocols. Two prospective feasibility studies in poor ovarian responders.

    PubMed

    Polyzos, Nikolaos P; Corona, Roberta; Van De Vijver, Arne; Blockeel, Christophe; Drakopoulos, Panagiotis; Vloeberghs, Veerle; De Vos, Michel; Camus, Michel; Humaidan, Peter; Tournaye, Herman

    2015-01-01

    In two prospective uncontrolled feasibility trials, we examined the effect of corifollitropin alfa (CFA) followed by highly purified human menopausal gonadotrophin (hpHMG) in a short flare-up gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist and a long GnRH agonist protocol for women with poor ovarian response. Overall, 45 patients were treated with short flare-up and 47 patients with the long agonist protocol. All patients received a single dose of 150 μg CFA, followed by 300 IU hpHMG 7 days later, triggering with 10 000 IU hCG, CSI and day 3 embryo transfer. Ongoing pregnancy rates (OPRs) did not differ between the short 15.6% and the long 17% agonist protocol (p = 0.85). Among patients treated with the short flare-up protocol, OPRs were 20% for younger patients (<40 years old) and 12% in older women (≥40 years old), p = 0.68. Similarly, in patients treated with the long agonist protocol younger women had an OPR of 26.7% versus 12.5% in older women, p = 0.23. Among patients treated with the short flare-up, live births rate were 15% and 4.3% for younger (<40 years old) and older patients (≥40 years old), respectively, p = 0.32. Similarly, in patients treated with the long agonist protocol, live births rate were 25% and 12.9% for younger (<40 years old) and older patients (≥40 years old), respectively, p = 0.41. None of the patients reported any serious adverse event related to treatment. According to our results, CFA followed by hpHMG in a short flare-up or long GnRH agonist protocol appears to be a feasible option for poor ovarian responders. Large phase III trials are mandatory prior to introduction in clinical practice. PMID:26172925

  18. Direct innervation of GnRH neurons by metabolic- & sexual odorant-sensing leptin receptor neurons in the hypothalamic ventral premammillary nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Leshan, Rebecca L.; Louis, Gwendolyn W.; Jo, Young-Hwan; Rhodes, Christopher J.; Münzberg, Heike; Myers, Martin G.

    2009-01-01

    Leptin acts via its receptor (LepRb) on specific CNS neurons to signal the adequacy of long-term energy stores, thereby permitting the expenditure of resources on energy-intensive processes such as reproduction. The ventral premammillary nucleus of the hypothalamus (PMv), which has been implicated in the stimulation of gonadotropin release by olfactory cues, contains numerous LepRb neurons, suggesting a potential role for LepRb PMv neurons in transmitting both metabolic and odorant signals to the neuroendocrine reproductive system. Indeed, Fos-immunoreactivity (-IR) and electrophysiologic recordings revealed the direct activation of LepRb PMv neurons by leptin, and exposure to odors from mice of the opposite sex promoted Fos-IR in many LepRb PMv neurons. To determine the regions innervated by the LepRb PMv neurons, we utilized two novel cre-activated tract-tracing systems in Leprcre animals; data from these systems and from standard tracing techniques revealed that LepRb PMv neurons project to a subset of the regions, including the preoptic area (POA), that are innervated by the PMv as a whole. Furthermore, the retrograde accumulation in LepRb PMv neurons of a trans-synaptic tracer from GnRH neurons revealed the direct innervation of GnRH neurons by many LepRb PMv neurons. Thus, LepRb PMv neurons sense metabolic and sexual odorant cues and project to the rostral hypothalamus to directly innervate GnRH neurons. These results are consistent with a role for LepRb PMv neurons in regulating the reproductive axis in response to metabolic and odorant stimuli. PMID:19279251

  19. The effect of nutrition on testicular growth in mature Merino rams involves mechanisms that are independent of changes in GnRH pulse frequency.

    PubMed

    Hötzel, M J; Walkden-Brown, S W; Blackberry, M A; Martin, G B

    1995-10-01

    In mature Merino rams, changes in diet to below or above the requirements for maintenance of body weight lead to changes in gonadotrophin secretion and testicular growth. However, the effects on testicular growth persist for much longer than those on LH and FSH secretion so that the gonadal and gonadotrophin responses are poorly correlated over time. This suggests that the gonadal effects may be partly independent of changes in the hypothalamic secretion of GnRH, an hypothesis tested in this study. In a short-term experiment (November, late spring, non-breeding season), we tested whether a high frequency of exogenous GnRH pulses could override the endogenous system and mimic the change in gonadotrophins seen in rams fed a high plane of nutrition. Mature Merino rams (scrotal circumference (mean +/- S.E.M.) 33.6 +/- 0.5 cm, body weight (mean +/- S.E.M.) 59.0 +/- 0.9 kg) were fed 900 g chaff + 1.6 kg lupin grain (High diet) or 360 g chaff + 60 g lupin grain (Low diet) and infused with 8 pulses of GnRH or saline daily for 5 weeks (n = 5/group). Blood was sampled every 20 min for 12 h on days-1 and 14 relative to the start of treatments. Relative to pre-treatment levels, LH pulse frequency and FSH concentrations were decreased on day 14 in saline-infused rams fed the Low diet and increased in saline-infused rams fed the High diet (P < 0.001). In GnRH-infused rams, gonadotrophin secretion was not affected by diet and the patterns of secretion of LH and FSH were similar to those in saline-infused rams fed the High diet. This model was used for a more complete endocrine analysis in a longer experiment designed to test the hypothesis that the effect of nutrition on testicular growth is partly independent of changes in the secretion of GnRH. The same treatments were imposed for 35 days on a different group of similar rams in March (autumn, mid-breeding season). Body weight and scrotal circumference were measured weekly and blood was sampled on days -1 and 14. On days -1 and

  20. Pelvic Ependymoma With Clinical Response to GnRH Analog Therapy: A Case Report With an Overview of Primary Extraneural Ependymomas

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fang; Song, Joon; Mikolaenko, Irina; Rosenblum, Marc; Shukla, Pratibha S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Extraneural ependymomas are rare tumors that occur in sacrococcygeal, pelvic and extra pelvic regions. While sacrococcygeal extraneural ependymomas are equally distributed among males and females, pelvic and extra pelvic ependymomas have been exclusively reported in women, mainly of child bearing age. We present a case of extraneural, pelvic ependymoma that showed clinical response to GnRH therapy with its immunohistochemical and electron microscopic analysis, and an overview of primary extraneural ependymomas based on a review of all such cases published in English literature. PMID:26107559

  1. Spectral Label Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Wachinger, Christian; Golland, Polina

    2012-01-01

    We present a new segmentation approach that combines the strengths of label fusion and spectral clustering. The result is an atlas-based segmentation method guided by contour and texture cues in the test image. This offers advantages for datasets with high variability, making the segmentation less prone to registration errors. We achieve the integration by letting the weights of the graph Laplacian depend on image data, as well as atlas-based label priors. The extracted contours are converted to regions, arranged in a hierarchy depending on the strength of the separating boundary. Finally, we construct the segmentation by a region-wise, instead of voxel-wise, voting, increasing the robustness. Our experiments on cardiac MRI show a clear improvement over majority voting and intensity-weighted label fusion. PMID:23286157

  2. Spin labeling EPR.

    PubMed

    Klare, Johann P; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Site-directed spin labeling in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy has emerged as an efficient tool to elucidate the structure and conformational dynamics of biomolecules under native-like conditions. This article summarizes the basics as well as recent progress of site-directed spin labeling. Continuous wave EPR spectra analyses and pulse EPR techniques are reviewed with special emphasis on applications to the sensory rhodopsin-transducer complex mediating the photophobic response of the halophilic archaeum Natronomonas pharaonis and the photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26. PMID:19728138

  3. Labeling the Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krasner, William

    The report describes research on the effects of labeling children from minority groups as retarded and includes a review of a system of multiculturalistic pluralistic assessment (SOMPA), an instrument for evaluating the abilities and potentialities of children based on different aspects of performance. Listed among findings of the Riverside study,…

  4. A Deceiving Label?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2009-01-01

    The author reports on the growing debate among educators on whether the umbrella Asian Pacific Islander label conceals disparities among Asian American students or provides political power in numbers. Nationally, experts say that support services aimed at not only Southeast Asians, but all Asian Pacific Islander students, remain scarce in higher…

  5. Lhx2-dependent specification of olfactory sensory neurons is required for successful integration of olfactory, vomeronasal, and GnRH neurons.

    PubMed

    Berghard, Anna; Hägglund, Anna-Carin; Bohm, Staffan; Carlsson, Leif

    2012-08-01

    Inactivation of the LIM-homeodomain 2 gene (Lhx2) results in a severe defect in specification of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). However, the ramifications of lack of Lhx2-dependent OSN specification for formation of the primary olfactory pathway have not been addressed, since mutant mice die in utero. We have analyzed prenatal and postnatal consequences of conditionally inactivating Lhx2 selectively in OSNs. A cell-autonomous effect is that OSN axons cannot innervate their target, the olfactory bulb. Moreover, the lack of Lhx2 in OSNs causes unpredicted, non-cell-autonomous phenotypes. First, the olfactory bulb shows pronounced hypoplasia in adults, and the data suggest that innervation by correctly specified OSNs is necessary for adult bulb size and organization. Second, absence of an olfactory nerve in the conditional mutant reveals that the vomeronasal nerve is dependent on olfactory nerve formation. Third, the lack of a proper vomeronasal nerve prevents migration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) cells the whole distance to their final positions in the hypothalamus during embryo development. As adults, the conditional mutants do not pass puberty, and these findings support the view of an exclusive nasal origin of GnRH neurons in the mouse. Thus, Lhx2 in OSNs is required for functional development of three separate systems. PMID:22581782

  6. Msx1 Homeodomain Protein Represses the αGSU and GnRH Receptor Genes During Gonadotrope Development

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Huimin; Cherrington, Brian D.; Meadows, Jason D.; Witham, Emily A.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple homeodomain transcription factors are crucial for pituitary organogenesis and cellular differentiation. A homeodomain repressor, Msx1, is expressed from the ventral aspect of the developing anterior pituitary and implicated in gonadotrope differentiation. Here, we find that Msx1 represses transcription of lineage-specific pituitary genes such as the common α-glycoprotein subunit (αGSU) and GnRH receptor (GnRHR) promoters in the mouse gonadotrope-derived cell lines, αT3-1 and LβT2. Repression of the mouse GnRHR promoter by Msx1 is mediated through a consensus-binding motif in the downstream activin regulatory element (DARE). Truncation and mutation analyses of the human αGSU promoter map Msx1 repression to a site at −114, located at the junctional regulatory element (JRE). Dlx activators are closely related to the Msx repressors, acting through the same elements, and Dlx3 and Dlx2 act as transcriptional activators for GnRHR and αGSU, respectively. Small interfering RNA knockdown of Msx1 in αT3-1 cells increases endogenous αGSU and GnRHR mRNA expression. Msx1 gene expression reaches its maximal expression at the rostral edge at e13.5. The subsequent decline in Msx1 expression specifically coincides with the onset of expression of both αGSU and GnRHR. The expression levels of both αGSU and GnRHR in Msx1-null mice at e18.5 are higher compared with wild type, further confirming a role for Msx1 in the repression of αGSU and GnRHR. In summary, Msx1 functions as a negative regulator early in pituitary development by repressing the gonadotrope-specific αGSU and GnRHR genes, but a temporal decline in Msx1 expression alleviates this repression allowing induction of GnRHR and αGSU, thus serving to time the onset of gonadotrope-specific gene program. PMID:23371388

  7. Synchronization of oestrus and ovulation by short time combined FGA, PGF(2α), GnRH, eCG treatments for natural service or AI fixed-time.

    PubMed

    Martemucci, G; D'Alessandro, A G

    2011-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted in ewes in order to develop an oestrus-ovulation short time synchronization protocol based on combined FGA, PGF(2α), GnRH, eCG treatments, for use in dairy sheep before natural service (Experiment 1) or for fixed-time artificial insemination (Experiment 2), during the breeding season. In Experiment 1 seventy-five non-lactating dairy ewes were subdivided into 5 treatment groups (N=15): (1) Group Fe - control, which received FGA vaginal sponges (14 days)+eCG (Day 14); (2) Group FPe, FGA (5 days)+PGF(2α) (Day 5)+eCG (Day 5); (3) Group PFe, PGF(2α) (Day 0)+FGA (5 days)+eCG (Day 5); (4) Group PFG, PGF(2α) (Day 0)+FGA (5 days)+GnRH (30h after sponge removal, s.r.); (5) Group GPe, GnRH (Day 0)+PGF(2α) (Day 5)+eCG (Day 5). Ewes were checked for oestrus and hand-mated. Time of ovulation was recorded by laparoscopy for 10 animals from each treatment. The percentages of female in oestrus and the interval to oestrus (h after treatment), fertility and prolificacy rate were recorded. There were no treatment differences in the percentage of females in oestrus. The interval to oestrus was earlier in Fe Group and delayed in FPe Group (P<0.01). Ovulation time was earlier in GPe Group compared to FPe Group (P<0.05). Fertility rates were significantly different (P<0.05) between the PFe and the FPeG Groups compared with the PFG Group. No significant differences were observed in prolificacy among the treatments. In Experiment 2, sixty dry ewes were subdivided (N=20) into the following three experimental treatment groups: (1) Group FP, FGA (5 days)+PGF(2α) (Day 5); (2) Group FPG, FGA (5 days)+PGF(2α) (Day 5)+GnRH (30hs.r.); (3) Group FPeG, FGA (5 days)+PGF(2α) (Day 5)+eCG (Day 5)+GnRH (30hs.r.). These were further subdivided into two groups (N=10) corresponding to 52 and 60hs.r. fixed-time insemination. Laparoscopic intrauterine insemination was performed with frozen semen (80×10(6)spermatozoa/dose) and ovulation time was recorded in a subgroup (N

  8. Labeling lake water with tritium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frederick, B.J.

    1963-01-01

    A method of packaging tritiated water in a manner that facilitates safe handling in environmental labeling operations, and procedures followed in labeling a large body of water with a small volume of tritiated water are described. ?? 1963.

  9. 99m tc labeled liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, W.T.; Klipper, R.W.; Timmons, J.H.; Rudolph, A.S.

    1992-10-27

    This patent describes a method of preparing stable gamma-emitting radionuclide-labeled alkyleneamine oxime, the incubating being for a period of time sufficient to form labeled liposome-encapsulated protein.

  10. Decode the Sodium Label Lingo

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Preschooler For Gradeschooler For Teen Decode the Sodium Label Lingo Published January 24, 2013 Print Email Reading food labels can help you slash sodium. Here's how to decipher them. "Sodium free" or " ...

  11. Immunohistochemical localization and quantitative assessment of GnRH-, FSH-, and LH-receptor mRNA Expression in canine skin: a powerful tool to study the pathogenesis of side effects after spaying.

    PubMed

    Welle, Monika M; Reichler, Iris M; Barth, Andrea; Forster, Ursula; Sattler, Ursula; Arnold, Susi

    2006-11-01

    It has been proposed that gonadotropins and/or gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) could be involved in the pathophysiology of the side effects after spaying in bitches, such as urinary incontinence and an increased production of a woolly undercoat. In order to provide tools to investigate the role of these hormones in dogs we developed immunohistochemical techniques and real-time RT-PCR to study whether GnRH-, LH-, and FSH-receptors exist in canine skin and urinary bladder. Tissue samples from the skin of the flank region and the ventral midline of the urinary bladder from euthanised dogs were examined. We were able to quantify mRNA expression of GnRH-, FSH-, and LH-receptors in canine skin and bladder biopsies with a high primer efficacy. Immunohistochemical studies showed that GnRH-, FSH-, and LH-receptors are expressed in vessel walls, the epidermis, the hair follicle and in sebaceous and sweat glands in canine skin and in transitional epithelium, and smooth muscle tissue in the urinary bladder. Our data provide the fundamentals to examine the distribution of FSH-, LH-, and GnRH-receptors in canine skin and urinary bladder and to assess gene activity at the transcriptional level by real-time RT-PCR. PMID:16715322

  12. Learning with imperfectly labeled patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chittineni, C. B.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of learning in pattern recognition using imperfectly labeled patterns is considered. The performance of the Bayes and nearest neighbor classifiers with imperfect labels is discussed using a probabilistic model for the mislabeling of the training patterns. Schemes for training the classifier using both parametric and non parametric techniques are presented. Methods for the correction of imperfect labels were developed. To gain an understanding of the learning process, expressions are derived for success probability as a function of training time for a one dimensional increment error correction classifier with imperfect labels. Feature selection with imperfectly labeled patterns is described.

  13. Cocaine- and Amphetamine-Regulated Transcript Is a Potent Stimulator of GnRH and Kisspeptin Cells and May Contribute to Negative Energy Balance-induced Reproductive Inhibition in Females

    PubMed Central

    True, Cadence; Verma, Saurabh; Grove, Kevin L.

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide implicated in both metabolic and reproductive regulation, raising the possibility that CART plays a role in reproductive inhibition during negative metabolic conditions. The current study characterized CART's regulatory influence on GnRH and kisspeptin (Kiss1) cells and determined the sensitivity of different CART populations to negative energy balance. CART fibers made close appositions to 60% of GnRH cells, with the majority of the fibers (>80%) originating from the arcuate nucleus (ARH) CART/pro-opiomelanocortin population. Electrophysiological recordings in GnRH-green fluorescent protein rats demonstrated that CART postsynaptically depolarizes GnRH cells. CART fibers from the ARH were also observed in close contact with Kiss1 cells in the ARH and anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV). Recordings in Kiss1-GFP mice demonstrated CART also postsynaptically depolarizes ARH Kiss1 cells, suggesting CART may act directly and indirectly, via Kiss1 populations, to stimulate GnRH neurons. CART protein and mRNA levels were analyzed in 2 models of negative energy balance: caloric restriction (CR) and lactation. Both CART mRNA levels and the number of CART-immunoreactive cells were suppressed in the ARH during CR but not during lactation. AVPV CART mRNA was suppressed during CR, but not during lactation when there was a dramatic increase in CART-immunoreactive cells. These data suggest differing regulatory signals of CART between the models. In conclusion, both morphological and electrophysiological methods identify CART as a novel and potent stimulator of Kiss1 and GnRH neurons and suppression of CART expression during negative metabolic conditions could contribute to inhibition of the reproductive axis. PMID:23736294

  14. Effect of a single injection of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) on testicular blood flow measured by color doppler ultrasonography in male Shiba goats.

    PubMed

    Samir, Haney; Sasaki, Kazuaki; Ahmed, Eman; Karen, Aly; Nagaoka, Kentaro; El Sayed, Mohamed; Taya, Kazuyoshi; Watanabe, Gen

    2015-05-01

    Although color Doppler ultrasonography has been used to evaluate testicular blood flow in many species, very little has been done in goat. Eight male Shiba goats were exposed to a single intramuscular injection of either gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH group; 1 µg/kg BW) or human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG group; 25 IU/kg BW). Plasma testosterone (T), estradiol (E2) and inhibin (INH) were measured just before (0 hr) and at different intervals post injection by radioimmunoassay. Testis volume (TV) and Doppler indices, such as resistive index (RI) and pulsatility index (PI) of the supratesticular artery, were measured by B-mode and color Doppler ultrasonography, respectively. The results indicated an increase in testicular blood flow in both groups, as RI and PI decreased significantly (P<0.05), but this increase was significant higher and earlier in hCG group (1 hr) than in the GnRH group (2 hr). A high correlation was found for RI and PI with both T (RI, r= -0.862; PI, r= -0.707) and INH in the GnRH group (RI, r=0.661; PI, r=0.701). However, a significant (P<0.05) correlation was found between E2 and both RI (r= -0.610) and PI (r= -0.763) in hCG group. In addition, TV significantly increased and was highly correlated with RI in both groups (GnRH, r= -0.718; hCG, r= -0.779). In conclusion, hCG and GnRH may improve testicular blood flow and TV in Shiba goats. PMID:25715956

  15. The chicken type III GnRH receptor homologue is predominantly expressed in the pituitary, and exhibits similar ligand selectivity to the type I receptor.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Nerine T; Morgan, Kevin; Sellar, Robin; McBride, Derek; Millar, Robert P; Dunn, Ian C

    2009-07-01

    Two GnRH isoforms (cGnRH-I and GnRH-II) and two GnRH receptor subtypes (cGnRH-R-I and cGnRH-R-III) occur in chickens. Differential roles for these molecules in regulating gonadotrophin secretion or other functions are unclear. To investigate this we cloned cGnRH-R-III from a broiler chicken and compared its structure, expression and pharmacological properties with cGnRH-R-I. The broiler cGnRH-R-III cDNA was 100% identical to the sequence reported in the red jungle fowl and white leghorn breed. Pituitary cGnRH-R-III mRNA was approximately 1400-fold more abundant than cGnRH-R-I mRNA. Northern analysis indicated a single cGnRH-R-III transcript. A pronounced sex and age difference existed, with higher pituitary transcript levels in sexually mature females versus juvenile females. In contrast, higher expression levels occurred in juvenile males versus sexually mature males. Functional studies in COS-7 cells indicated that cGnRH-R-III has a higher binding affinity for GnRH-II than cGnRH-I (K(d): 0.57 vs 19.8 nM) with more potent stimulation of inositol phosphate production (ED(50): 0.8 vs 4.38 nM). Similar results were found for cGnRH-R-I, (K(d): 0.51 vs 10.8 nM) and (ED(50): 0.7 vs 2.8 nM). The initial rate of internalisation was faster for cGnRH-R-III than cGnRH-R-I (26 vs 15.8%/min). Effects of GnRH antagonists were compared at the two receptors. Antagonist #27 distinguished between cGnRH-R-I and cGnRH-R-III (IC(50): 2.3 vs 351 nM). These results suggest that cGnRH-R-III is probably the major mediator of pituitary gonadotroph function, that antagonist #27 may allow delineation of receptor subtype function in vitro and in vivo and that tissue-specific recruitment of cGnRH-R isoforms has occurred during evolution. PMID:19380456

  16. 16 CFR 460.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ....12 Labels. If you are a manufacturer, you must label all packages of your insulation. The labels must...) If installation instructions are included on the label or with the package, add this statement:...

  17. 16 CFR 460.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ....12 Labels. If you are a manufacturer, you must label all packages of your insulation. The labels must...) If installation instructions are included on the label or with the package, add this statement:...

  18. 16 CFR 460.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ....12 Labels. If you are a manufacturer, you must label all packages of your insulation. The labels must...) If installation instructions are included on the label or with the package, add this statement:...

  19. 16 CFR 460.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ....12 Labels. If you are a manufacturer, you must label all packages of your insulation. The labels must...) If installation instructions are included on the label or with the package, add this statement:...

  20. 16 CFR 460.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ....12 Labels. If you are a manufacturer, you must label all packages of your insulation. The labels must...) If installation instructions are included on the label or with the package, add this statement:...

  1. 9 CFR 412.1 - Label approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... Jan. 6, 2014) § 412.1 Label approval. (a) No final label may be used on any product unless the label... for a corporation may submit only one label application for a product produced in other establishments...) The proposed label would not misrepresent the product; (ii) The use of the label would not present...

  2. Prediction of Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome in Patients Treated with Corifollitropin alfa or rFSH in a GnRH Antagonist Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Griesinger, Georg; Verweij, Pierre J. M.; Gates, Davis; Devroey, Paul; Gordon, Keith; Stegmann, Barbara J.; Tarlatzis, Basil C.

    2016-01-01

    Study Question What is the threshold for the prediction of moderate to severe or severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) based on the number of growing follicles ≥ 11 mm and/or estradiol (E2) levels? Summary Answer The optimal threshold of follicles ≥11 mm on the day of hCG to identify those at risk was 19 for both moderate to severe OHSS and for severe OHSS. Estradiol (E2) levels were less prognostic of OHSS than the number of follicles ≥ 11 mm. What Is Known Already In comparison to long gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist protocols, the risk of severe OHSS is reduced by approximately 50% in a GnRH antagonist protocol for ovarian stimulation prior to in vitro fertilisation (IVF), while the two protocols provide equal chances of pregnancy per initiated cycle. Nevertheless, moderate to severe OHSS may still occur in GnRH antagonist protocols if human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is administered to trigger final oocyte maturation, especially in high responder patients. Severe OHSS following hCG trigger may occur with an incidence of 1–2% in a relatively young (aged 18 to 36 years) IVF population treated in a GnRH-antagonist protocol. Study Design, Size, Duration From the Engage, Ensure and Trust trials, in total, 2,433 women who received hCG for oocyte maturation and for whom the number of follicles ≥ 11 mm and the level of E2 on the day of hCG administration were known were included in the analyses. Participants/Materials, Setting, Methods The threshold for OHSS prediction of moderate and severe OHSS was assessed in women treated with corifollitropin alfa or daily recombinant follicle stimulation hormone (rFSH) in a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-antagonist protocol. Receiver operating characteristics curve analyses for moderate to severe OHSS and severe OHSS were performed on the combined dataset and the sensitivity and specificity for the optimal threshold of number of follicles ≥ 11 mm, E2 levels on the day of (hCG), and a

  3. Role of GnRH Neurons and Their Neuronal Afferents as Key Integrators between Food Intake Regulatory Signals and the Control of Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Roa, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Reproductive function is regulated by a plethora of signals that integrate physiological and environmental information. Among others, metabolic factors are key components of this circuit since they inform about the propitious timing for reproduction depending on energy availability. This information is processed mainly at the hypothalamus that, in turn, modulates gonadotropin release from the pituitary and, thereby, gonadal activity. Metabolic hormones, such as leptin, insulin, and ghrelin, act as indicators of the energy status and convey this information to the reproductive axis regulating its activity. In this review, we will analyse the central mechanisms involved in the integration of this metabolic information and their contribution to the control of the reproductive function. Particular attention will be paid to summarize the participation of GnRH, Kiss1, NPY, and POMC neurons in this process and their possible interactions to contribute to the metabolic control of reproduction. PMID:24101924

  4. Role of GnRH Neurons and Their Neuronal Afferents as Key Integrators between Food Intake Regulatory Signals and the Control of Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Reproductive function is regulated by a plethora of signals that integrate physiological and environmental information. Among others, metabolic factors are key components of this circuit since they inform about the propitious timing for reproduction depending on energy availability. This information is processed mainly at the hypothalamus that, in turn, modulates gonadotropin release from the pituitary and, thereby, gonadal activity. Metabolic hormones, such as leptin, insulin, and ghrelin, act as indicators of the energy status and convey this information to the reproductive axis regulating its activity. In this review, we will analyse the central mechanisms involved in the integration of this metabolic information and their contribution to the control of the reproductive function. Particular attention will be paid to summarize the participation of GnRH, Kiss1, NPY, and POMC neurons in this process and their possible interactions to contribute to the metabolic control of reproduction. PMID:24101924

  5. Supplementing National Menu Labeling

    PubMed Central

    White, Lexi C.

    2012-01-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration’s forthcoming national menu labeling regulations are designed to help curb the national obesity epidemic by requiring calorie counts on restaurants’ menus. However, posted calories can be easily ignored or misunderstood by consumers and fail to accurately describe the healthiness of foods. We propose supplemental models that include nutritional information (e.g., fat, salt, sugar) or specific guidance (e.g., “heart-healthy” graphics). The goal is to empower restaurant patrons with better data to make healthier choices, and ultimately to reduce obesity prevalence. PMID:23078494

  6. Supplementing national menu labeling.

    PubMed

    Hodge, James G; White, Lexi C

    2012-12-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration's forthcoming national menu labeling regulations are designed to help curb the national obesity epidemic by requiring calorie counts on restaurants' menus. However, posted calories can be easily ignored or misunderstood by consumers and fail to accurately describe the healthiness of foods. We propose supplemental models that include nutritional information (e.g., fat, salt, sugar) or specific guidance (e.g., "heart-healthy" graphics). The goal is to empower restaurant patrons with better data to make healthier choices, and ultimately to reduce obesity prevalence. PMID:23078494

  7. Reproductive performance of dairy cows with ovarian cysts after synchronizing ovulation using GnRH or hCG during the warm or cool period of the year.

    PubMed

    De Rensis, F; Bottarelli, E; Battioni, F; Capelli, T; Techakumphu, M; García-Ispierto, I; López-Gatius, F

    2008-03-01

    This study was designed to compare the reproductive response to timed AI of lactating dairy cows with cystic ovarian follicles treated with GnRH or hCG to synchronize ovulation. The effectiveness of treatment during the warm or cool period of the year was also compared. Cows were given 12 microg GnRH-agonist i.m. on day 0 of the protocol, 15 mg PGF(2alpha) i.m. on day 7, and either GnRH-agonist (GPG treatment) or 3000 IU hCG i.m. (GPH treatment) on day 9, followed by timed AI. The cows were randomly chronologically assigned to GPG (n=130) or GPH (n=136) group. All cows were inseminated at fixed time 16-22 h after the end of treatment. During the warm period the pregnancy rate to first AI was 12% (7/60) and 21% (14/68) for the GPG and GPH groups, respectively, there being no significant differences between groups; the cumulative pregnancy rate was 22% (13/60) and 21% (14/68) for the GPG and GPH groups, respectively, again with no significant intergroup differences. During the cool period pregnancy rate to first AI was not different between groups: 29% (20/70) for GPG and 32% (22/68) for GPH, respectively; whereas the cumulative pregnancy rate was significantly higher (P<0.05) for the GPH groups than for the GPG group: 56% (39/70) and 78% (53/68), respectively. These findings indicate that during the warm period, the pregnancy rates of the cystic cows were similar whether they received GPG or GPH treatment, during the cool period, there is a beneficial effect to use hCG at day 9 of the ovsynch protocol compared GnRH on cumulative pregnancy rate. PMID:18054378

  8. Clinical efficacy of the GnRH agonist (deslorelin) in dogs affected by benign prostatic hyperplasia and evaluation of prostatic blood flow by Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Polisca, A; Orlandi, R; Troisi, A; Brecchia, G; Zerani, M; Boiti, C; Zelli, R

    2013-08-01

    In six German Shepherds dogs, GnRH agonist implants (Deslorelin) were inserted subcutaneously one month after histological confirmation of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Prostatic volume (PV), characteristics of ejaculate, serum testosterone concentrations and Doppler parameters of prostatic and subcapsular arteries were detected at different time intervals, for 6 month. The prostatic volume showed a significantly reduction starting at day 37. The decrease in sperm concentration, motility and increase in morphological abnormal sperm were observed from day 22 to day 37, when it was no longer possible to obtain the ejaculate. The values of peak systolic velocity and end-diastolic velocity in prostatic and subcapsular arteries showed from day 11 a gradual decrease, significant at day 22 until day 37 and reaching the lowest values at day 52 until the end of observation. The power Doppler pixel intensity of both arteries showed a gradual decrease from day 5 until day 52. In particular, a significant decrease was observed for both arteries from day 11. Testosterone serum concentration decreased to undetectable levels by day 11 until the end of the observations. All these Doppler parameters and testosterone values were positively correlated with the prostatic volume. Furthermore, testosterone values were positively correlated with peak systolic velocity, end diastolic velocity and pixel numbers. The use of implants containing GnRH analogues, even in asymptomatic subjects, is effective for the control of BPH and the application of Doppler exam of prostatic blood flow represent an non-invasive tool for monitoring the response of medical treatment. PMID:23320475

  9. Fixed-time Insemination in Pasture-based Medium-sized Dairy Operations of Northern Germany and an Attempt to Replace GnRH by hCG.

    PubMed

    Marthold, D; Detterer, J; Koenig von Borstel, U; Gauly, M; Holtz, W

    2016-02-01

    A field study was conducted aimed at (i) evaluating the practicability of a fixed-time insemination regime for medium-sized dairy operations of north-western Germany, representative for many regions of Central Europe and (ii) substituting hCG for GnRH as ovulation-inducing agent at the end of a presynch or ovsynch protocol in an attempt to reduce the incidence of premature luteal regression. Cows of two herds synchronized by presynch and two herds synchronized by ovsynch protocol were randomly allotted to three subgroups; in one group ovulation was induced by the GnRH analog buserelin, in another by hCG, whereas a third group remained untreated. The synchronized groups were fixed-time inseminated; the untreated group bred to observed oestrus. Relative to untreated herd mates, pregnancy rate in cows subjected to a presynch protocol with buserelin as ovulation-inducing agent was 74%; for hCG it was 60%. In cows subjected to an ovsynch protocol, the corresponding relative pregnancy rates reached 138% in the case of buserelin and 95% in the case of hCG. Average service interval was shortened by 1 week in the presynch and delayed by 2 weeks in the ovsynch group. It may be concluded that fixed-time insemination of cows synchronized via ovsynch protocol with buserelin as ovulation-inducing agent is practicable and may help improve efficiency and reduce the work load involved with herd management in medium-sized dairy operations. The substitution of hCG for buserelin was found to be not advisable. PMID:26661056

  10. Label and Label-Free Detection Techniques for Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Syahir, Amir; Usui, Kenji; Tomizaki, Kin-ya; Kajikawa, Kotaro; Mihara, Hisakazu

    2015-01-01

    Protein microarray technology has gone through numerous innovative developments in recent decades. In this review, we focus on the development of protein detection methods embedded in the technology. Early microarrays utilized useful chromophores and versatile biochemical techniques dominated by high-throughput illumination. Recently, the realization of label-free techniques has been greatly advanced by the combination of knowledge in material sciences, computational design and nanofabrication. These rapidly advancing techniques aim to provide data without the intervention of label molecules. Here, we present a brief overview of this remarkable innovation from the perspectives of label and label-free techniques in transducing nano-biological events.

  11. Label scrambling during CID of covalently labeled peptide ions.

    PubMed

    Borotto, Nicholas B; Degraan-Weber, Nicholas; Zhou, Yuping; Vachet, Richard W

    2014-10-01

    Covalent labeling along with mass spectrometry is finding more use as a means of studying the higher order structure of proteins and protein complexes. Diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC) is an increasingly used reagent for these labeling experiments because it is capable of modifying multiple residues at the same time. Pinpointing DEPC-labeled sites on proteins is typically needed to obtain more resolved structural information, and tandem mass spectrometry after protein proteolysis is often used for this purpose. In this work, we demonstrate that in certain instances, scrambling of the DEPC label from one residue to another can occur during collision-induced dissociation (CID) of labeled peptide ions, resulting in ambiguity in label site identity. From a preliminary study of over 30 labeled peptides, we find that scrambling occurs in about 25% of the peptides and most commonly occurs when histidine residues are labeled. Moreover, this scrambling appears to occur more readily under non-mobile proton conditions, meaning that low charge-state peptide ions are more prone to this reaction. For all peptides, we find that scrambling does not occur during electron transfer dissociation, which suggests that this dissociation technique is a safe alternative to CID for correct label site identification. PMID:25056863

  12. Co-Labeling for Multi-View Weakly Labeled Learning.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinxing; Li, Wen; Xu, Dong; Tsang, Ivor W

    2016-06-01

    It is often expensive and time consuming to collect labeled training samples in many real-world applications. To reduce human effort on annotating training samples, many machine learning techniques (e.g., semi-supervised learning (SSL), multi-instance learning (MIL), etc.) have been studied to exploit weakly labeled training samples. Meanwhile, when the training data is represented with multiple types of features, many multi-view learning methods have shown that classifiers trained on different views can help each other to better utilize the unlabeled training samples for the SSL task. In this paper, we study a new learning problem called multi-view weakly labeled learning, in which we aim to develop a unified approach to learn robust classifiers by effectively utilizing different types of weakly labeled multi-view data from a broad range of tasks including SSL, MIL and relative outlier detection (ROD). We propose an effective approach called co-labeling to solve the multi-view weakly labeled learning problem. Specifically, we model the learning problem on each view as a weakly labeled learning problem, which aims to learn an optimal classifier from a set of pseudo-label vectors generated by using the classifiers trained from other views. Unlike traditional co-training approaches using a single pseudo-label vector for training each classifier, our co-labeling approach explores different strategies to utilize the predictions from different views, biases and iterations for generating the pseudo-label vectors, making our approach more robust for real-world applications. Moreover, to further improve the weakly labeled learning on each view, we also exploit the inherent group structure in the pseudo-label vectors generated from different strategies, which leads to a new multi-layer multiple kernel learning problem. Promising results for text-based image retrieval on the NUS-WIDE dataset as well as news classification and text categorization on several real-world multi

  13. 76 FR 75809 - Prior Label Approval System: Generic Label Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... limited types of labels (e.g., labels for raw, single ingredient meat and poultry products) (48 FR 11410... poultry products will take effect January 1, 2012 (75 FR 82148, Dec. 29, 2010). These mandatory features... Agency. On March 25, 1992, FSIS published an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) (57 FR...

  14. Laser labeling, a safe technology to label produce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laser labeling of fruits and vegetables is an alternative means to label produce. Low energy CO2 laser beams etch the surface showing the contrasting underlying layer. These etched surfaces can promote water loss and potentially allow for entry of decay organisms. The long-term effects of laser labe...

  15. Laser labeling, a safe technology to label produce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Labeling of the produce has gained marked attention in recent years. Laser labeling technology involves the etching of required information on the surface using a low energy CO2 laser beam. The etching forms alphanumerical characters by pinhole dot matrix depressions. These openings can lead to wat...

  16. 78 FR 66826 - Prior Label Approval System: Generic Label Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... the Agency (76 FR 75809). FSIS also proposed to combine the regulations that provide for the approval... preamble (76 FR 75814), FSIS wrote: . . . statements on labels that are defined in FSIS's regulations or... ``Product Labeling: Definition of the Term ``Natural'' and related materials (71 FR 70503, Dec. 5, 2006)...

  17. Labeled Cocaine Analogs

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shi, Bing Zhi; Keil, Robert N.

    1999-03-30

    Novel methods for positron emission tomography or single photon emission spectroscopy using tracer compounds having the structure: ##STR1## where X in .beta. configuration is phenyl, naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-iodophenyl; 2,3 or 4-(trimethylsilyl)phenyl; 3,4,5 or 6-iodonaphthyl; 3,4,5 or 6-(trimethylsilyl)naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-(trialkylstannyl)phenyl; or 3,4,5 or 6-(trialkylstannyl)napthyl Y in .beta. configuration is 2-fluoroethoxy, 3-fluoropropoxy, 4-fluorobutoxy, 2-fluorocyclopropoxy, 2 or 3-fluorocyclobutoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, R 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, 1',3'-difluoroisopropoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R,S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, or 1',1'-di(fluoromethyl)isobutoxy, The compounds bind dopamine transporter protein and can be labeled with .sup.18 F or .sup.123 I for imaging.

  18. Nutrition Marketing on Food Labels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colby, Sarah E.; Johnson, LuAnn; Scheett, Angela; Hoverson, Bonita

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This research sought to determine how often nutrition marketing is used on labels of foods that are high in saturated fat, sodium, and/or sugar. Design and Setting: All items packaged with food labels (N = 56,900) in all 6 grocery stores in Grand Forks, ND were surveyed. Main Outcome Measure(s): Marketing strategy, nutrient label…

  19. Meat and Poultry Labeling Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Food Standards and Labels: The Facts Labeling and Marketing Information [ Top of Page ] OVEN PREPARED: Product is fully cooked and ready to eat. [ Top of Page ] YOUNG TURKEY: Turkeys of either sex that are less than 8 months of age according to present regulations. [ Top of Page ] Last ...

  20. Split-time artificial insemination in beef cattle: I-Using estrous response to determine the optimal time(s) at which to administer GnRH in beef heifers and postpartum cows.

    PubMed

    Bishop, B E; Thomas, J M; Abel, J M; Poock, S E; Ellersieck, M R; Smith, M F; Patterson, D J

    2016-09-01

    Two experiments evaluated timing of GnRH administration in beef heifers and cows on the basis of estrous status during split-time artificial insemination (AI) after controlled internal drug release (CIDR) based protocols. In experiment 1, estrus was synchronized for 816 pubertal and prepubertal or peripubertal heifers using the 14-day CIDR-PGF2α (PG) protocol, and in experiment 2, estrus was synchronized for 622 lactating cows using the 7-day CO-Synch + CIDR protocol. For both experiments, estrus detection aids (Estrotect) were applied at PG, with estrus recorded at 66 and 90 hours after PG. Treatments were balanced across locations for heifers using reproductive tract score and weight; whereas for cows, treatments were assigned and balanced to treatment according to age, body condition score, and days postpartum. Timing of AI for heifers and cows was on the basis of estrus expression 66 hours after PG. Females in each treatment that exhibited estrus before 66 hours were inseminated at 66 hours, whereas AI was delayed 24 hours until 90 hours after PG for females failing to exhibit estrus before 66 hours. Females in treatment one received GnRH 66 hours after PG irrespective of estrus expression; however, in treatment 2, GnRH was administered coincident with delayed AI only to females not detected in estrus at 66 hours after PG. Among heifers, there was no effect of treatment on overall estrous response (P = 0.49) or AI pregnancy rate (P = 0.54). Pregnancy rate for heifers inseminated at 66 hours was not influenced by GnRH (P = 0.65), and there were no differences between treatments in estrous response during the 24 hours delay period (P = 0.22). Cows in treatment 2 had a greater (P = 0.04) estrous response during the 24-hour delay period resulting in a greater overall estrous response (P = 0.04), but this did not affect AI pregnancy rate at 90 hours (P = 0.51) or total AI pregnancy rate (P = 0.89). Pregnancy rate resulting from AI for

  1. 21 CFR 201.71 - Magnesium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium labeling. 201.71 Section 201.71 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.71 Magnesium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the magnesium...

  2. 21 CFR 201.70 - Calcium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium labeling. 201.70 Section 201.70 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.70 Calcium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the calcium content...

  3. 21 CFR 201.72 - Potassium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium labeling. 201.72 Section 201.72 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.72 Potassium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the potassium...

  4. 21 CFR 201.72 - Potassium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium labeling. 201.72 Section 201.72 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.72 Potassium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the potassium...

  5. 21 CFR 201.72 - Potassium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium labeling. 201.72 Section 201.72 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.72 Potassium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the potassium...

  6. 21 CFR 201.72 - Potassium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium labeling. 201.72 Section 201.72 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.72 Potassium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the potassium...

  7. 21 CFR 201.72 - Potassium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium labeling. 201.72 Section 201.72 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.72 Potassium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the potassium...

  8. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... contains sodium bicarbonate, sodium phosphate, or sodium biphosphate as an active ingredient for oral... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium labeling. 201.64 Section 201.64 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.64 Sodium labeling. (a) The labeling...

  9. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... contains sodium bicarbonate, sodium phosphate, or sodium biphosphate as an active ingredient for oral... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium labeling. 201.64 Section 201.64 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.64 Sodium labeling. (a) The labeling...

  10. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... contains sodium bicarbonate, sodium phosphate, or sodium biphosphate as an active ingredient for oral... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium labeling. 201.64 Section 201.64 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.64 Sodium labeling. (a) The labeling...

  11. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... contains sodium bicarbonate, sodium phosphate, or sodium biphosphate as an active ingredient for oral... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium labeling. 201.64 Section 201.64 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.64 Sodium labeling. (a) The labeling...

  12. Synthesis Of Labeled Metabolites

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Atcher, Robert

    2004-03-23

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, for example, isotopically enriched mustard gas metabolites including: [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylthio); [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1-[[2-(methylsulfinyl)ethyl]sulfonyl]-2-(methylthio); [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylsulfinyl)]; and, 2,2'-sulfinylbis([1,2-.sup.13 C.sub.2 ]ethanol of the general formula ##STR1## where Q.sup.1 is selected from the group consisting of sulfide (--S--), sulfone (--S(O)--), sulfoxide (--S(O.sub.2)--) and oxide (--O--), at least one C* is .sup.13 C, X is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen and deuterium, and Z is selected from the group consisting of hydroxide (--OH), and --Q.sup.2 --R where Q.sup.2 is selected from the group consisting of sulfide (--S--), sulfone(--S(O)--), sulfoxide (--S(O.sub.2)--) and oxide (--O--), and R is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, a C.sub.1 to C.sub.4 lower alkyl, and amino acid moieties, with the proviso that when Z is a hydroxide and Q.sup.1 is a sulfide, then at least one X is deuterium.

  13. Labeled Cocaine Analogs

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shi, Bing Zhi; Keil, Robert N.

    1999-01-26

    Novel compounds having the structure: ##STR1## where X in .beta. configuration is phenyl, naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-iodophenyl; 2,3 or 4-(trimethylsilyl)phenyl; 3,4,5 or 6-iodonaphthyl; 3,4,5 or 6-(trimethylsilyl)naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-(trialkylstannyl)phenyl; or 3,4,5 or 6-(trialkylstannyl)naphthyl Y in .beta. configuration is Y.sub.1 or Y.sub.2, where Y.sub.1 is 2-fluoroethoxy, 3-fluoropropoxy, 4-fluorobutoxy, 2-fluorocyclopropoxy, 2 or 3-fluorocyclobutoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, R 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, 1',3'-difluoroisopropoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R,S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, or 1',1'-di(fluoromethyl)isobutoxy, and Y.sub.2 is 2-methanesulfonyloxy ethoxy, 3-methanesulfonyloxy propoxy, 4-methanesulfonyloxy butoxy, 2-methanesulfonyloxy cyclopropoxy, 2 or 3-methanesulfonyloxy cyclobutoxy, 1'methanesulfonyloxy isopropoxy, 1'-fluoro, 3'-methanesulfonyloxy isopropoxy, 1'-methanesulfonyloxy, 3'-fluoro isopropoxy, 1'-methanesulfonyloxy isobutoxy, or 4'-methanesulfonyloxy isobutoxy bind dopamine transporter protein and can be labeled with .sup.18 F or .sup.123 I for imaging.

  14. 27 CFR 19.517 - Statements required on labels under an exemption from label approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... labels under an exemption from label approval. 19.517 Section 19.517 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... PLANTS Liquor Bottle, Label, and Closure Requirements Labeling Requirements § 19.517 Statements required on labels under an exemption from label approval. If a proprietor bottles spirits for domestic...

  15. 27 CFR 19.517 - Statements required on labels under an exemption from label approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... labels under an exemption from label approval. 19.517 Section 19.517 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... PLANTS Liquor Bottle, Label, and Closure Requirements Labeling Requirements § 19.517 Statements required on labels under an exemption from label approval. If a proprietor bottles spirits for domestic...

  16. 27 CFR 19.517 - Statements required on labels under an exemption from label approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... labels under an exemption from label approval. 19.517 Section 19.517 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... PLANTS Liquor Bottle, Label, and Closure Requirements Labeling Requirements § 19.517 Statements required on labels under an exemption from label approval. If a proprietor bottles spirits for domestic...

  17. 27 CFR 19.517 - Statements required on labels under an exemption from label approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... labels under an exemption from label approval. 19.517 Section 19.517 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... PLANTS Liquor Bottle, Label, and Closure Requirements Labeling Requirements § 19.517 Statements required on labels under an exemption from label approval. If a proprietor bottles spirits for domestic...

  18. Selective chemical labeling of proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Wu, Yao-Wen

    2016-06-28

    Over the years, there have been remarkable efforts in the development of selective protein labeling strategies. In this review, we deliver a comprehensive overview of the currently available bioorthogonal and chemoselective reactions. The ability to introduce bioorthogonal handles to proteins is essential to carry out bioorthogonal reactions for protein labeling in living systems. We therefore summarize the techniques that allow for site-specific "installation" of bioorthogonal handles into proteins. We also highlight the biological applications that have been achieved by selective chemical labeling of proteins. PMID:26940577

  19. How to read food labels

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 serving. You should also pay attention to trans fats on any food label. These fats raise "bad" ... foods and desserts. Many fast food restaurants use trans fats for frying. If a food has these fats, ...

  20. Dietary Supplement Label Database (DSLD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print Report Error T he Dietary Supplement Label Database (DSLD) is a joint project of the National ... participants in the latest survey in the DSLD database (NHANES): The search options: Quick Search, Browse Dietary ...

  1. Food Labels Tell the Story!

    MedlinePlus

    ... Environment Kids Health Topics Environment & Health Healthy Living Pollution Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Science – How It Works The ... Pay close attention to serving sizes. Products labeled "light" or "lite" must have 1/3 fewer calories ...

  2. Effect of vaccination against gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in heavy male pigs for Italian typical dry-cured ham production.

    PubMed

    Pinna, A; Schivazappa, C; Virgili, R; Parolari, G

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate immunocastration (vaccination against GnRH using Improvac® vaccine), as an alternative to surgical castration in heavy male pigs (average live weight 165 ± 10 kg), used in the production of Italian typical dry-cured ham. A total of 60 Landrace × Large White male pigs were assigned to three groups of 20 units, including one group of surgically castrated (SC), and two of immunocastrated pigs, with two (IC2) or three (IC3) vaccine treatments, respectively. The groups were compared for green ham traits, processing weight losses, chemo-physical, and sensory properties of dry-cured hams. While IC3 were not different (P>0.05) from SC group, IC2 hams were found to differ (P<0.05) both from SC and IC3 groups in ham traits, final weight losses, texture and sensory boar taint in finished hams. Therefore, vaccination with three doses could be taken into account to control boar taint in the manufacturing of typical Italian dry-cured ham. PMID:26225931

  3. Oral delivery of oil-based formulation for a novel synthetic cationic peptide of GnRH (gonadotropin-releasing hormone) antagonist for prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guiying; Wang, Tao; Gao, Lijun; Quan, Dongqin

    2013-06-25

    LXT-101, a cationic peptide is a novel antagonist of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) for prostate cancer treatment. However, effective delivery of peptide drugs into the body by the oral route remains a major challenge due to their origin properties with high molecular weights, strong polarity and low stability in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In this study, we have developed a novel oral delivery of oil-based formulation in which therapeutic peptide LXT-101 are solubilized in oils and with this solution as oil phase, an optimum formulation of self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) was developed. The peptide stability with the SMEDDS formulation in artificial gastric and intestinal fluid was tested in vitro. On the other hand, the testosterone level and plasma concentration of LXT-101 in rats after oral administration of the SMEDDS formulation were investigated in vivo. The data in vitro indicated that LXT-101 in the SMEDDS formulation was stable over 8 h in artificial gastric and intestinal fluid. LXT-101 can be absorbed in vivo and suppression of testosterone maintained in castration level within 12 h can be achieved effectively after SMEDDS formulation administered orally at a dose of 3.5 mg/kg. The approach can provide a potential way for delivery peptides by oral. PMID:23623791

  4. Comparison of hCG triggering versus hCG in combination with a GnRH agonist: a prospective randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Decleer, W.; Osmanagaoglu, K.; Seynhave, B.; Kolibianakis, S.; Tarlatzis, B.; Devroey, P.

    2014-01-01

    A prospective randomized controlled trial comparing two groups of ICSI (intra-cytoplasmatic sperm injection) patients with a different form of triggering the final oocyte maturation has been performed. All patients received an ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilisation (IVF) using an antagonist protocol using recombinant-FSH (rec-FSH) and Ganirelix. 120 Patients were randomized into two groups with similar clinical parameters. The first group had triggering with hCG, whereas the second group received a combination of hCG + GnRH agonist (Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone). As the primary endpoint, the number of metaphase II oocytes were analysed, the secondary endpoints were the number of cumulus oocyte complexes (COC), the number of fertilized oocytes, embryo morphology, pregnancy rate and the number of cryopreserved embryos. The mean number of MII oocytes in the hCG triggered group was 9.2 compared with 10.3 in the hCG-GnRH agonist group. There was no statistically significant difference in the number of COCs or pregnancy rates. However, the number of patients who received at least one embryo of excellent quality was significantly higher (p = 0.001) in the group with the combined triggering (45 out of 61 patients or 73.8%) versus the group with hCG triggering alone (28 out of 59 patients or 47.5%). The number of cryopreserved embryos was also higher in this group. PMID:25593695

  5. Neurokinin B-related Peptide Suppresses the Expression of GnRH I, Kiss2 and tac3 in the Brain of Mature Female Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ye Hwa; Park, Jin Woo; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Kwon, Joon Yeong

    2016-01-01

    Neurokinin B (NKB) and neurokinin B related peptide (NKBRP) belong to tachykinin peptide family. Theyact as a neurotransmitter and/or neuromodulator. Mutation of NKB and/or its cognate receptor, NK3R resulted in hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in mammals, implying a strong involvement of NKB/NK3R system in controlling mammalian reproduction. Teleosts possess NKBRP as well as NKB, but their roles in fish reproduction need to be clarified. In this study, NKB and NKBRP coding gene (tac3) was cloned from Nile tilapia and sequenced. Based on the sequence, Nile tilapia NKB and NKBRP peptide were synthesized and their biological potencies were tested in vitro pituitary culture. The synthetic NKBRP showed direct inhibitory effect on the expression of GTH subunits at the pituitary level. This inhibitory effect was confirmed in vivo by means of intraperitoneal (ip) injection of synthetic NKB and NKBRP to mature female tilapia (20 pmol/g body weight [BW]). Both NKB and NKBRP had no effect on the plasma level of sex steroids, E2 and 11-KT. However, NKBRP caused declines of expression level of GnRH I, Kiss2 and tac3 mRNAs in the brain while NKB seemed to have no distinct effect. These results indicate some inhibitory roles of NKBRP in reproduction of mature female Nile tilapia, although their exact functions are not clear at the moment. PMID:27294210

  6. REST levels affect the functional expression of voltage dependent calcium channels and the migratory activity in immortalized GnRH neurons.

    PubMed

    Antoniotti, Susanna; Ruffinatti, Federico Alessandro; Torriano, Simona; Luganini, Anna; D'Alessandro, Rosalba; Lovisolo, Davide

    2016-08-26

    The repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor (REST) has emerged as a key controller of neuronal differentiation and has been shown to play a critical role in the expression of the neuronal phenotype; however, much has still to be learned about its role at specific developmental stages and about the functional targets affected. Among these targets, calcium signaling mechanisms are critically dependent on the developmental stage and their full expression is a hallmark of the mature, functional neuron. We have analyzed the role played by REST in GN11 cells, an immortalized cell line derived from gonadotropin hormone releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons at an early developmental stage, electrically non-excitable and with a strong migratory activity. We show for the first time that functional voltage-dependent calcium channels are expressed in wild type GN11 cells; down-regulation of REST by a silencing approach shifts these cells towards a more differentiated phenotype, increasing the functional expression of P/Q-type channels and reducing their migratory potential. PMID:27349310

  7. The Impact of Pituitary Blockage with GnRH Antagonist and Gonadotrophin Stimulation Length on The Outcome of ICSI Cycles in Women Older than 36 Years

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Rosane; Setti, Amanda Souza; Maldonado, Luiz Guilherme; Valente, Fernanda Montenegro; Iaconelli, Carla; Iaconelli Jr, Assumpto; Jr, Edson Borges

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate whether the length of pituitary blockage with gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists or the stimulation period influence intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) outcomes in patients older than 36 years of age. Materials and Methods In this retrospective study, a total of 138 couples with maternal age >36 years undergoing ICSI with an antagonist protocol were included. The influences of stimulation and suppression length on the response to ovarian stimulation and ICSI outcomes were investigated. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was performed to assess the predictive value of the stimulation period for achievement of implantation and pregnancy. Results The gonadotrophin stimulation length negatively influenced the implantation rate (RC: -4.200; p=0.023). The area under ROC curve (AUC) could distinguish between women with positive and negative implantation (AUC: 0.611; CI: 0.546-0.673) and pregnancy (AUC: 0.593; CI: 0.528-0.656). The threshold value demonstrated a high negative predictive value on likelihood of implantation (p=0.0032, 90% sensitivity) and pregnancy (p=0.0147, 87.1% sensitivity) when patients underwent more than 10 days of stimulation. Conclusion The stimulation period negatively influences the implantation rate in women older than 36 years. A stimulation interval greater than 10 days is associated with a negative predictive value for the chance of implantation and pregnancy. PMID:25083177

  8. Neurokinin B-related Peptide Suppresses the Expression of GnRH I, Kiss2 and tac3 in the Brain of Mature Female Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ye Hwa; Park, Jin Woo; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Kwon, Joon Yeong

    2016-03-01

    Neurokinin B (NKB) and neurokinin B related peptide (NKBRP) belong to tachykinin peptide family. Theyact as a neurotransmitter and/or neuromodulator. Mutation of NKB and/or its cognate receptor, NK3R resulted in hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in mammals, implying a strong involvement of NKB/NK3R system in controlling mammalian reproduction. Teleosts possess NKBRP as well as NKB, but their roles in fish reproduction need to be clarified. In this study, NKB and NKBRP coding gene (tac3) was cloned from Nile tilapia and sequenced. Based on the sequence, Nile tilapia NKB and NKBRP peptide were synthesized and their biological potencies were tested in vitro pituitary culture. The synthetic NKBRP showed direct inhibitory effect on the expression of GTH subunits at the pituitary level. This inhibitory effect was confirmed in vivo by means of intraperitoneal (ip) injection of synthetic NKB and NKBRP to mature female tilapia (20 pmol/g body weight [BW]). Both NKB and NKBRP had no effect on the plasma level of sex steroids, E2 and 11-KT. However, NKBRP caused declines of expression level of GnRH I, Kiss2 and tac3 mRNAs in the brain while NKB seemed to have no distinct effect. These results indicate some inhibitory roles of NKBRP in reproduction of mature female Nile tilapia, although their exact functions are not clear at the moment. PMID:27294210

  9. Morphological analysis of the early development of telencephalic and diencephalic gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuronal systems in enhanced green fluorescent protein-expressing transgenic medaka lines.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Akiko; Islam, M Sadiqul; Abe, Hideki; Okubo, Kataaki; Akazome, Yasuhisa; Kaneko, Takeshi; Hioki, Hiroyuki; Oka, Yoshitaka

    2016-03-01

    Teleosts possess two or three paralogs of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) genes: gnrh1, gnrh2, and gnrh3. Some species have lost the gnrh1 and/or gnrh3 genes, whereas gnrh2 has been completely conserved in the teleost species analyzed to date. In most teleosts that possess gnrh1, GnRH1 peptide is the authentic GnRH that stimulates gonadotropin release, whereas GnRH2 and GnRH3, if present, are neuromodulatory. Progenitors of GnRH1 and GnRH3 neurons originate from olfactory placodes and migrate to their destination during early development. However, because of the relatively low affinity/specificity of generally available antibodies that recognize GnRH1 or GnRH3, labeling of these neurons has only been possible using genetic manipulation. We used a model teleost, medaka, which possesses all three paralogous gnrh genes, to analyze development of forebrain GnRH neurons composed of GnRH1 and GnRH3 neurons. Here, we newly generated transgenic medaka lines that express enhanced green fluorescent protein under the control of promoters for gnrh1 or gnrh3, to detect GnRH neurons and facilitate immunohistochemical analysis of the neuronal morphology. We used a combination of immunohistochemistry and three-dimensional confocal microscopy image reconstructions to improve identification of neurites from GnRH1 or GnRH3 neuronal populations with greater precision. This led us to clearly identify the hypophysiotropic innervation of GnRH1 neurons residing in the ventral preoptic area (vPOA) from as early as 10 days post hatching. Furthermore, these analyses also revealed retinopetal projections of nonhypophysiotropic GnRH1 neurons in vPOA, prominent during early developmental stages, and multiple populations of GnRH3 neurons with different origins and migratory pathways. PMID:26287569

  10. LabeledIn: cataloging labeled indications for human drugs.

    PubMed

    Khare, Ritu; Li, Jiao; Lu, Zhiyong

    2014-12-01

    Drug-disease treatment relationships, i.e., which drug(s) are indicated to treat which disease(s), are among the most frequently sought information in PubMed®. Such information is useful for feeding the Google Knowledge Graph, designing computational methods to predict novel drug indications, and validating clinical information in EMRs. Given the importance and utility of this information, there have been several efforts to create repositories of drugs and their indications. However, existing resources are incomplete. Furthermore, they neither label indications in a structured way nor differentiate them by drug-specific properties such as dosage form, and thus do not support computer processing or semantic interoperability. More recently, several studies have proposed automatic methods to extract structured indications from drug descriptions; however, their performance is limited by natural language challenges in disease named entity recognition and indication selection. In response, we report LabeledIn: a human-reviewed, machine-readable and source-linked catalog of labeled indications for human drugs. More specifically, we describe our semi-automatic approach to derive LabeledIn from drug descriptions through human annotations with aids from automatic methods. As the data source, we use the drug labels (or package inserts) submitted to the FDA by drug manufacturers and made available in DailyMed. Our machine-assisted human annotation workflow comprises: (i) a grouping method to remove redundancy and identify representative drug labels to be used for human annotation, (ii) an automatic method to recognize and normalize mentions of diseases in drug labels as candidate indications, and (iii) a two-round annotation workflow for human experts to judge the pre-computed candidates and deliver the final gold standard. In this study, we focused on 250 highly accessed drugs in PubMed Health, a newly developed public web resource for consumers and clinicians on prevention

  11. Multi-focus cluster labeling.

    PubMed

    Eikvil, Line; Jenssen, Tor-Kristian; Holden, Marit

    2015-06-01

    Document collections resulting from searches in the biomedical literature, for instance, in PubMed, are often so large that some organization of the returned information is necessary. Clustering is an efficient tool for organizing search results. To help the user to decide how to continue the search for relevant documents, the content of each cluster can be characterized by a set of representative keywords or cluster labels. As different users may have different interests, it can be desirable with solutions that make it possible to produce labels from a selection of different topical categories. We therefore introduce the concept of multi-focus cluster labeling to give users the possibility to get an overview of the contents through labels from multiple viewpoints. The concept for multi-focus cluster labeling has been established and has been demonstrated on three different document collections. We illustrate that multi-focus visualizations can give an overview of clusters along axes that general labels are not able to convey. The approach is generic and should be applicable to any biomedical (or other) domain with any selection of foci where appropriate focus vocabularies can be established. A user evaluation also indicates that such a multi-focus concept is useful. PMID:25869415

  12. 49 CFR 172.426 - OXIDIZER label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.426 OXIDIZER label. (a) Except for size and color, the OXIDIZER label must be as follows: EC02MR91.027 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background color on the OXIDIZER label must be yellow....

  13. 49 CFR 172.426 - OXIDIZER label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.426 OXIDIZER label. (a) Except for size and color, the OXIDIZER label must be as follows: EC02MR91.027 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background color on the OXIDIZER label must be yellow....

  14. 49 CFR 172.426 - OXIDIZER label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.426 OXIDIZER label. (a) Except for size and color, the OXIDIZER label must be as follows: EC02MR91.027 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background color on the OXIDIZER label must be yellow....

  15. 49 CFR 172.426 - OXIDIZER label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.426 OXIDIZER label. (a) Except for size and color, the OXIDIZER label must be as follows: EC02MR91.027 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background color on the OXIDIZER label must be yellow....

  16. 21 CFR 610.61 - Package label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.61 Package label. The following items shall appear on the label affixed to each package containing a product: (a) The proper name of the product; (b... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Package label. 610.61 Section 610.61 Food...

  17. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  18. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  19. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  20. 21 CFR 610.61 - Package label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.61 Package label. The following items shall appear on the label affixed to each package containing a product: (a) The proper name of the product; (b... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Package label. 610.61 Section 610.61 Food...

  1. 21 CFR 610.61 - Package label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.61 Package label. The following items shall appear on the label affixed to each package containing a product: (a) The proper name of the product; (b) The... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Package label. 610.61 Section 610.61 Food and...

  2. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  3. 21 CFR 610.61 - Package label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.61 Package label. The following items shall appear on the label affixed to each package containing a product: (a) The proper name of the product; (b... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Package label. 610.61 Section 610.61 Food...

  4. 21 CFR 610.61 - Package label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.61 Package label. The following items shall appear on the label affixed to each package containing a product: (a) The proper name of the product; (b... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Package label. 610.61 Section 610.61 Food...

  5. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  6. 40 CFR 1033.135 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... THAT IT IS REMANUFACTURED, EXCEPT AS ALLOWED BY 40 CFR 1033.750.” (3) Label diesel-fueled locomotives... that contrasts with the background of the label. (iii) The label must include all the following... same engine part. (ii) The label must be lettered in the English language using a color that...

  7. 40 CFR 156.10 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Labeling requirements. 156.10 Section 156.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS LABELING REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES AND DEVICES General Provisions § 156.10 Labeling requirements. (a) General—(1) Contents of the label. Every...

  8. 30 CFR 74.15 - Approval labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Approval labels. 74.15 Section 74.15 Mineral... DUST SAMPLING DEVICES General Requirements for All Devices § 74.15 Approval labels. (a) Certificate of... reproductions of approval labels and a sketch or description of the position of the labels on each...

  9. 16 CFR 306.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Labels. 306.12 Section 306.12 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS AUTOMOTIVE FUEL RATINGS, CERTIFICATION AND POSTING Label Specifications § 306.12 Labels. All labels must meet the following specifications: (a) Layout—(1) For gasoline...

  10. 16 CFR 306.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Labels. 306.12 Section 306.12 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS AUTOMOTIVE FUEL RATINGS, CERTIFICATION AND POSTING Label Specifications § 306.12 Labels. All labels must meet the following specifications: (a) Layout—(1) For gasoline...

  11. Nutrition Labeling Using a Computer Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Lloyd E.

    The 1990 Nutrition Labeling and Education Act mandated nutritional labeling of most foods. As a result, a large portion of food analysis is performed for nutritional labeling purposes. A food labeling guide and links to the complete nutritional labeling regulations are available online at http://vm.cfsan.fda.gov/˜dms/flg-toc.html. However, interpretation of these regulations and the appropriate usage of rounding rules, available nutrient content claims, reference amounts, and serving size can be difficult.

  12. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label...

  13. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label...

  14. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label...

  15. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label...

  16. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label...

  17. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  18. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Joanna S.; MacGregor, Robert R.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Langstrom, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  19. Label-free drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ye

    2014-01-01

    Current drug discovery is dominated by label-dependent molecular approaches, which screen drugs in the context of a predefined and target-based hypothesis in vitro. Given that target-based discovery has not transformed the industry, phenotypic screen that identifies drugs based on a specific phenotype of cells, tissues, or animals has gained renewed interest. However, owing to the intrinsic complexity in drug–target interactions, there is often a significant gap between the phenotype screened and the ultimate molecular mechanism of action sought. This paper presents a label-free strategy for early drug discovery. This strategy combines label-free cell phenotypic profiling with computational approaches, and holds promise to bridge the gap by offering a kinetic and holistic representation of the functional consequences of drugs in disease relevant cells that is amenable to mechanistic deconvolution. PMID:24723889

  20. Metrics for Labeled Markov Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desharnais, Josee; Jagadeesan, Radha; Gupta, Vineet; Panangaden, Prakash

    1999-01-01

    Partial Labeled Markov Chains are simultaneously generalizations of process algebra and of traditional Markov chains. They provide a foundation for interacting discrete probabilistic systems, the interaction being synchronization on labels as in process algebra. Existing notions of process equivalence are too sensitive to the exact probabilities of various transitions. This paper addresses contextual reasoning principles for reasoning about more robust notions of "approximate" equivalence between concurrent interacting probabilistic systems. The present results indicate that:We develop a family of metrics between partial labeled Markov chains to formalize the notion of distance between processes. We show that processes at distance zero are bisimilar. We describe a decision procedure to compute the distance between two processes. We show that reasoning about approximate equivalence can be done compositionally by showing that process combinators do not increase distance. We introduce an asymptotic metric to capture asymptotic properties of Markov chains; and show that parallel composition does not increase asymptotic distance.

  1. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-04-03

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  2. Molecular characterization and transcriptional regulation by GH and GnRH of insulin-like growth factors I and II in white seabream (Diplodus sargus).

    PubMed

    Pérez, Laura; Ortiz-Delgado, Juan Bosco; Manchado, Manuel

    2016-03-10

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGF) I and II are key regulators of development, growth and reproduction in fish. In the present study we have cloned and characterized the cDNA and genomic sequences of IGF-I and IGF-II in the white seabream (Diplodus sargus). The igf1 and igf2 genes were encoded putatively by five and four exons, respectively. Moreover, the 5'-flanking upstream region of the igf1 gene contained highly conserved regulatory elements including HNF-1α, HNF-3β, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) and the TATA box. The full-length cDNAs were 1225 and 1666 nucleotides long for igf1 and igf2, respectively. Sequence analysis identified the A-E domains as well as three spliced forms involving the E domain in exons 3-5. ORF identities were higher than 83% with respect to other fish orthologs. Expression analysis demonstrated that igf1 and its spliced forms were mostly expressed in liver, whereas the igf2 was expressed ubiquitously not detecting significant differences among the ten tissues analyzed. Hormonal treatments using the porcine GH demonstrated a sharply increase of both igf1 and igf2 mRNA levels in liver and gills at 30 min and 1h after injection. In the gonads, igf1 mRNA levels increased steadily with testis and ovary maturation. In contrast, igf2 transcript amounts were higher in immature stages (S1-S2). Hormonal treatments using GH and GnRH demonstrated that igf1 and igf2 expression were upregulated in the gonads. Overall, these data demonstrate that IGF-I and IGF-II are locally expressed in several tissues and regulated by key hormones of the somatotropic and gonadotropic axes. PMID:26706220

  3. Folliculogenesis Is Not Fully Inhibited during GnRH Analogues Treatment in Mice Challenging Their Efficiency to Preserve the Ovarian Reserve during Chemotherapy in This Model

    PubMed Central

    Horicks, Florence; Van Den Steen, Géraldine; Houben, Sarah; Englert, Yvon; Demeestere, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    As many chemotherapy regimens induce follicular depletion, fertility preservation became a major concern in young cancer patients. By maintaining follicles at the resting stage, gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues (GnRHa) were proposed as an ovarian-protective option during chemotherapy. However, their efficacy and mechanisms of action remain to be elucidated. Mice were dosed with cyclophosphamide (Cy, 100–500mg/kg i.p) to quantify follicular depletion and evaluate apoptosis at different times. We observed a dose-dependent depletion of the follicular reserve within 24 hours after Cy injection with a mean follicular loss of 45% at the dose of 200mg/kg. Apoptosis occurs in the granulosa cells of growing follicles within 12 hours after Cy treatment, while no apoptosis was detected in resting follicles suggesting that chemotherapy acutely affects both resting and growing follicles through different mechanisms. We further tested the ability of both GnRH agonist and antagonist to inhibit oestrus cycles, follicular growth and FSH secretion in mice and to protect ovarian reserve against chemotherapy. Although GnRHa were efficient to disrupt oestrus cycles, they failed to inhibit follicular development, irrespective of the doses and injection sites (sc or im). Around 20% of healthy growing follicles were still observed during GnRHa treatment and serum FSH levels were not reduced either by antagonist or agonist. GnRHa had no effect on Cy-induced follicular damages. Thus, we showed that GnRHa were not as efficient at inhibiting the pituitary-gonadal axis in mice as in human. Furthermore, the acute depletion of primordial follicles observed after chemotherapy does not support the hypothesis that the ovary may be protected by gonadotropin suppression. PMID:26325271

  4. Effect of continuous infusion of a GnRH agonist (Buserelin) on ovarian hormone secretion and estrous cycle length in cows.

    PubMed

    Mann, G E; Lamming, G E

    2000-07-15

    The importance of the ovarian steroid hormones estradiol and progesterone in the control of luteolysis in domestic ruminants is well established. However, there is a lack of studies specifically investigating the effect of stimulating "physiological" changes in endogenous estradiol or progesterone secretion on subsequent luteolysis. In this study we have stimulated endogenous ovarian hormone secretion by infusion of the GnRH analogue, Buserelin, and have assessed the effect of these changes on the timing of luteolysis. Concentrations of estradiol and progesterone were monitored in plasma samples collected from 6 mature, cyclic, lactating, Friesian cows during a control cycle and during a cycle in which Buserelin was infused via osmotic minipump (8.6 microg/h) for 28 days starting on Day 2 of the cycle. Buserelin infusion had little effect on progesterone secretion but did result in a marked stimulation of estradiol secretion from Days 6 to 10 of the cycle (treated cycle 4.3+/-0.2 pg/mL; control cycle 1.8+/-0.3 pg/mL; P<0.001). In addition, there was a significant advancement in the timing of luteolysis during the Buserelin -infused cycle (Day 19.3+/-0.3 compared with Day 21.3+/-0.4; P<0.01). In this study, we have found that infusion of buserelin caused both a significant stimulation of estradiol secretion from the first follicle and a significant advancement in the timing of luteolysis. We hypothesise that the increased secretion of estradiol may have been involved in causing this advancement of luteolysis. PMID:11003303

  5. Treatment of noncyclic lactating dairy cows with progesterone and estradiol or with progesterone, GnRH, prostaglandin F2 alpha, and estradiol.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z Z; Burton, L J; McDougall, S; Jolly, P D

    2000-03-01

    The efficacy of two programs for treating noncyclic cows was compared. In trial 1, 478 cows in five herds were randomly divided into two groups. Cows in one group (C group) were treated with an intravaginal progesterone device for 8 d followed in 48 h by 1 mg of estradiol benzoate to cows that had not been detected in estrus since device removal. Those in the other group (CGP group) were treated with progesterone and estradiol as for the C group plus 10 micrograms of a GnRH agonist (buserelin) at device insertion and 25 mg of PGF2 alpha 7 d after device insertion. In trial 2 with 729 cows in nine herds, the treatments were similar to those in trial 1 except that the duration of progesterone treatment was 7 d. No significant difference was found between trials and results from both trials were combined. Compared with C group cows, CGP group cows had a greater estrous response rate (93.2 vs. 89.1%), a greater conception rate to first artificial insemination (AI, 47.1 vs. 29.4%), marginally lower conception rate to second AI (52.9 vs. 59.7%), lower nonpregnancy rate (8.3 vs. 11.1%), and shorter intervals from the start of breeding to conception by AI (9.8 vs. 15.3 d) or by AI or natural mating (21.6 vs. 26.3 d). The treatment protocol used for the CGP group achieved better reproductive performance than that used for the C group. PMID:10750103

  6. Effects of GnRH agonists on the expression of developmental follicular anti-mullerian hormone in varying follicular stages in cyclic mice in vivo

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, JILIANG; WANG, XIAOYAN; LI, ZHILING; MA, RUOWU; XIAO, WANFEN

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists (GnRHa) have been widely used to induce a state of downregulation for in vitro fertilization, and its direct effects on the pituitary are well known. However, the effects of GnRHa on the expression of anti-mullerian hormone (AMH) by follicles in varying stages in vivo remain to be fully elucidated. In the present study 84 cyclic mice were randomly divided equally into four GnRHa groups and three cyclic mice were used as a control group. The expression levels of AMH in follicles of varying stages between days 0 and 7 following GnRHa administration were quantified using immunohistochemistry. The expression of AMH in follicles at various stages revealed dynamic changes during the process of downregulation. AMH in primary follicles initially increased and then decreased gradually. In small and large preantral follicles and in granulosa cells (GCs) surrounding the oocyte of small antral follicles, the expression of AMH began to increase on day 1, was attenuated on day 2, and then increased to a peak. The expression levels of AMH in the GCs surrounding the basement membrane, in contrast to the GCs surrounding the oocyte, were significantly lower and did not increase on day 1. In all stages of follicles, the expression of AMH declined gradually between the peak level and last day of downregulation. On day 7, the varying follicular stages all expressed lower levels of AMH than on day 0. This decrease was more prominent in the higher dose groups, compared with the lower dose groups. In conclusion, GnRHa was observed to induce time-dependent changes in the expression of AMH at varying follicular stages, which occurred in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:26126720

  7. Folliculogenesis Is Not Fully Inhibited during GnRH Analogues Treatment in Mice Challenging Their Efficiency to Preserve the Ovarian Reserve during Chemotherapy in This Model.

    PubMed

    Horicks, Florence; Van Den Steen, Géraldine; Houben, Sarah; Englert, Yvon; Demeestere, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    As many chemotherapy regimens induce follicular depletion, fertility preservation became a major concern in young cancer patients. By maintaining follicles at the resting stage, gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues (GnRHa) were proposed as an ovarian-protective option during chemotherapy. However, their efficacy and mechanisms of action remain to be elucidated. Mice were dosed with cyclophosphamide (Cy, 100-500 mg/kg i.p) to quantify follicular depletion and evaluate apoptosis at different times. We observed a dose-dependent depletion of the follicular reserve within 24 hours after Cy injection with a mean follicular loss of 45% at the dose of 200mg/kg. Apoptosis occurs in the granulosa cells of growing follicles within 12 hours after Cy treatment, while no apoptosis was detected in resting follicles suggesting that chemotherapy acutely affects both resting and growing follicles through different mechanisms. We further tested the ability of both GnRH agonist and antagonist to inhibit oestrus cycles, follicular growth and FSH secretion in mice and to protect ovarian reserve against chemotherapy. Although GnRHa were efficient to disrupt oestrus cycles, they failed to inhibit follicular development, irrespective of the doses and injection sites (sc or im). Around 20% of healthy growing follicles were still observed during GnRHa treatment and serum FSH levels were not reduced either by antagonist or agonist. GnRHa had no effect on Cy-induced follicular damages. Thus, we showed that GnRHa were not as efficient at inhibiting the pituitary-gonadal axis in mice as in human. Furthermore, the acute depletion of primordial follicles observed after chemotherapy does not support the hypothesis that the ovary may be protected by gonadotropin suppression. PMID:26325271

  8. Serum Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulphate Concentration Is Not a Predictive Factor in IVF Outcomes before the First Cycle of GnRH Agonist Administration in Women with Normal Ovarian Reserve

    PubMed Central

    Kunicki, Michał; Łukaszuk, Krzysztof; Jakiel, Grzegorz; Liss, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of our study was to determine whether serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) concentration and the models incorporating it could help clinicians to predict IVF outcomes in women with normal ovarian reserve undergoing their first long protocol. Study Design We performed a retrospective analysis of 459 women undergoing cycles of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) for the first time in a long GnRH agonist protocol. Results Embryo transfer was performed in 407 women (88.7%). The fertilisation rate was 78.6%. The clinical pregnancy rate was 44.8% per started cycle and 50.6% per embryo transfer. Our univariate model revealed that the best predictors of clinical pregnancy were the number of mature oocytes, the number of embryos transferred and the number of good quality embryos, account for the clinical parameters that reflect ovarian reserve the best being AMH level and AFC. DHEAS did not predict clinical pregnancy (OR 1.001, 95% CI, 0.999–1.004). After adjusting for the number of embryos transferred and class of embryos in a multivariate model, the best predictors were age (OR 0.918, 95% CI, 0.867–0.972) and AFC (OR 1.022, 95% CI, 0.992–1.053). Serum DHEAS levels were positively correlated with AFC (r = 0.098, P<0.039) and testosterone levels (r = 0.371, P<0.001), as well as the number of mature oocytes (r = 0.109, P<0.019); serum DHEAS levels were negatively correlated with age (r = -0.220, P<0.001), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), (r = -0.116, P<0.015) and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), (r = -0.193, P<0.001). Conclusions DHEAS concentration (in addition to the known factors of ovarian reserve) does not predict clinical pregnancy in women with normal ovarian reserve who are undergoing ICSI. PMID:25738591

  9. The IVF Outcome Counseling Based on the Model Combining DHEAS and Age in Patients with Low AMH Prior to the First Cycle of GnRH Antagonist Protocol of Ovarian Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Alebić, Miro Šimun; Žuvić-Butorac, Marta

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the endocrine and/or clinical characteristics of women with low anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) that could improve the accuracy of IVF outcome prediction based on the female age alone prior to the first GnRH antagonist IVF cycle. Methods. Medical records of 129 patients with low AMH level (<6.5 pmol/L) who underwent their first GnRH antagonist ovarian stimulation protocol for IVF/ICSI were retrospectively analyzed. The main outcome measure was the area under the ROC curve (AUC-ROC) for the models combining age and other potential predictive factors for the clinical pregnancy. Results. Clinical pregnancy rate (CPR) per initiated cycles was 11.6%. For the prediction of clinical pregnancy, DHEAS and age showed AUC-ROC of 0.726 (95%CI 0.641–0.801) and 0.662 (95%CI 0.573–0.743), respectively (P = 0.522). The predictive accuracy of the model combining age and DHEAS (AUC-ROC 0.796; 95%CI 0.716–0.862) was significantly higher compared to that of age alone (P = 0.013). In patients <37.5 years with DHEAS >5.7 pmol/L, 60% (9/15) of all pregnancies were achieved with CPR of 37.5%. Conclusions. DHEAS appears to be predictive for clinical pregnancy in younger women (<37.5 years) with low AMH after the first GnRH antagonist IVF cycle. Therefore, DHEAS-age model could refine the pretreatment counseling on pregnancy prospects following IVF. PMID:23509455

  10. The Labelling Approach to Deviance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rains, Prudence M.; Kitsuse, John L.; Duster, Troy; Freidson, Eliot

    2003-01-01

    This reprint of one chapter from the 1975 text, "Issues in the Classification of Children" by Nicholas Hobbs and others, addresses the theoretical, methodological, and empirical issues involved in the "labeling" approach to the sociology of deviance. It examines the social process of classification, the use of classification in social agencies,…

  11. Revisiting Labels: "Hearing" or Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoades, Ellen A.

    2010-01-01

    This position paper briefly presents evidence-based findings pertaining to the language of labels for people with hearing loss that relate to stigma, expectation levels, stereotypes, and self-fulfilling prophecies. These constructs are important for auditory-based practitioners, administrators, policymakers, students, families, and persons with…

  12. Labeling: A Dilemma or Solution?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perusin, Adriano

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the pros and cons of labeling within the classroom, including the effects on self-concept and peer relationships. Argues that integration can be successful, if implemented by an effective and prepared instructor and that activities which are accommodating may allow integration to be successful. (Author/CR)

  13. When Diagnostic Labels Mask Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foltz, Robert; Dang, Sidney; Daniels, Brian; Doyle, Hillary; McFee, Scott; Quisenberry, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    A growing body of research shows that many seriously troubled children and adolescents are reacting to adverse life experiences. Yet traditional diagnostic labels are based on checklists of surface symptoms. Distracted by disruptive behavior, the common response is to medicate, punish, or exclude rather than respond to needs of youth who have…

  14. Nutrition Marketing on Food Labels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrition marketing may influence purchasing behavior and thereby be a factor in the obesity epidemic. Very little peer-reviewed research has been published which investigates the relationship between nutrition marketing on food labels and consumer behavior. The purpose of this paper was to give an ...

  15. Psychological effectiveness of carbon labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beattie, Geoffrey

    2012-04-01

    Despite the decision by supermarket-giant Tesco to delay its plan to add carbon-footprint information onto all of its 70,000 products, carbon labelling, if carefully designed, could yet change consumer behaviour. However, it requires a new type of thinking about consumers and much additional work.

  16. The labeling debate in the United States.

    PubMed

    Marchant, Gary E; Cardineau, Guy A

    2013-01-01

    The mandatory labeling of genetically modified (GM) food has become the predominant policy issue concerning biotechnology in the United States. The controversy over GM labeling is being debated at several different levels and branches of government. At the federal level, the Food and Drug Administration, which has primary jurisdiction over food safety and labeling, has steadfastly refused to require labeling of GM foods since 1992 based on its conclusion that GM foods as a category present no unique or higher risks than other foods. Proposed legislation has been repeatedly introduced in the US. Congress over the years to mandate GM labeling, but has made very little progress. With federal labeling requirements apparently stalled, the main activity has switched to the state level, where numerous individual states are considering mandatory GM labeling, either through legislation or proposition. The debate over GM labeling, at both the federal and state levels, has focused on five issues: (1) public opinion; (2) the legality of labeling requirements; (3) the risks and benefits of GM foods; (4) the costs and burdens of GM labeling; and (5) consumer choice. While the pro-labeling forces argue that all of these factors weigh in favor of mandatory GM labeling, a more careful evaluation of the evidence finds that all five factors weigh decisively against mandatory GM labeling requirements. PMID:23982076

  17. 21 CFR 640.94 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.94 Labeling. In addition... package labels shall contain the following information: (a) The osmotic equivalent in terms of plasma,...

  18. 21 CFR 640.94 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.94 Labeling. In addition... package labels shall contain the following information: (a) The osmotic equivalent in terms of plasma,...

  19. 21 CFR 640.94 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.94 Labeling. In addition... package labels shall contain the following information: (a) The osmotic equivalent in terms of plasma,...

  20. 21 CFR 640.94 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.94 Labeling. In addition... package labels shall contain the following information: (a) The osmotic equivalent in terms of plasma,...

  1. 7 CFR 65.400 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... origin declarations can either be in the form of a placard, sign, label, sticker, band, twist tie, pin... declaration of the country of origin (e.g., placard, sign, label, sticker, band, twist tie, pin tag, or...

  2. 27 CFR 19.437 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... affix a label showing the following information: (1) The proprietor's name and plant number; (2) The... paragraph (a) of this section is not required when the sample container bears a label approved under part...

  3. 27 CFR 19.704 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... containers bear an approved label pursuant to 27 CFR Part 5 and subpart S of this part and the sample is... spirits to be withdrawn under the provisions of § 19.701, the proprietor shall affix a label showing...

  4. 27 CFR 19.437 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... affix a label showing the following information: (1) The proprietor's name and plant number; (2) The... paragraph (a) of this section is not required when the sample container bears a label approved under part...

  5. 27 CFR 19.437 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... affix a label showing the following information: (1) The proprietor's name and plant number; (2) The... paragraph (a) of this section is not required when the sample container bears a label approved under part...

  6. 27 CFR 19.437 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... affix a label showing the following information: (1) The proprietor's name and plant number; (2) The... paragraph (a) of this section is not required when the sample container bears a label approved under part...

  7. 21 CFR 640.94 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.94 Labeling. In addition... package labels shall contain the following information: (a) The osmotic equivalent in terms of plasma,...

  8. 40 CFR 1033.135 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... THAT IT IS REMANUFACTURED, EXCEPT AS ALLOWED BY 40 CFR 1033.750.” (3) Label diesel-fueled locomotives... locomotives certified for use with both LSD and ULSD. (c) Engine labels. (1) For engines not...

  9. 40 CFR 1033.135 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... THAT IT IS REMANUFACTURED, EXCEPT AS ALLOWED BY 40 CFR 1033.750.” (3) Label diesel-fueled locomotives... locomotives certified for use with both LSD and ULSD. (c) Engine labels. (1) For engines not...

  10. 40 CFR 1033.135 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... THAT IT IS REMANUFACTURED, EXCEPT AS ALLOWED BY 40 CFR 1033.750.” (3) Label diesel-fueled locomotives... locomotives certified for use with both LSD and ULSD. (c) Engine labels. (1) For engines not...

  11. Ivabradine: A Review of Labeled and Off-Label Uses.

    PubMed

    Oliphant, Carrie S; Owens, Ryan E; Bolorunduro, Oluwaseyi B; Jha, Sunil K

    2016-10-01

    Ivabradine is a unique medication recently approved in the USA for the treatment of select heart failure patients. It was first approved for use in several countries around the world over a decade ago as an anti-anginal agent, with subsequent approval for use in heart failure patients. Since ivabradine has selective activity blocking the I f currents in the sinus node, it can reduce heart rate without appreciable effects on blood pressure. Given this heart-rate-specific effect, it has been investigated in many off-label indications as an alternative to traditional heart-rate-reducing medications such as beta blockers and calcium channel blockers. We conducted searches of PubMed and Google Scholar for ivabradine, heart failure, HFrEF, HFpEF, angina, coronary artery disease, inappropriate sinus tachycardia, postural orthostatic hypotension, coronary computed tomography angiography and atrial fibrillation. We reviewed and included studies, case reports, and case series published between 1980 and June 2016 if they provided information relevant to the practicing clinician. In many cases, larger clinical trials are needed to solidify the benefit of ivabradine, although studies indicate benefit in most therapeutic areas explored to date. The purpose of this paper is to review the current labeled and off-label uses of ivabradine, with a focus on clinical trial data. PMID:27405864

  12. 99mTc: Labeling Chemistry and Labeled Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberto, R.; Abram, U.

    has a focus on coordination and labeling chemistry, but biological results are briefly summarized as well. The last (and shortest) section finally intends to give a (subjective) outlook for the future role of 99mTc-based radiopharmaceuticals. Critical comments are spread over the whole article but are concentrated in this section. Despite the increasing competition of diagnostic radiopharmacy by other commonly applied methods in medicine such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or ultrasound, the authors are convinced that 99mTc will play a key role also in future if novel approaches are added and the requirements from chemistry biology and the market considered in research to a stronger extent.

  13. 21 CFR 660.28 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... panel. Blood grouping reagent Color of label paper Anti-A Blue. Anti-B Yellow. Slide and rapid tube test... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.28 Labeling. In... label—(1) Color coding. The final container label of all Blood Grouping Reagents shall be...

  14. 21 CFR 660.28 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... panel. Blood grouping reagent Color of label paper Anti-A Blue. Anti-B Yellow. Slide and rapid tube test... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.28 Labeling. In... label—(1) Color coding. The final container label of all Blood Grouping Reagents shall be...

  15. 21 CFR 660.28 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... panel. Blood grouping reagent Color of label paper Anti-A Blue. Anti-B Yellow. Slide and rapid tube test... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.28 Labeling. In... label—(1) Color coding. The final container label of all Blood Grouping Reagents shall be...

  16. 30 CFR 47.42 - Label contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Label contents. 47.42 Section 47.42 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.42 Label contents. When an operator...

  17. 30 CFR 47.42 - Label contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Label contents. 47.42 Section 47.42 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.42 Label contents. When an operator...

  18. 30 CFR 47.42 - Label contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Label contents. 47.42 Section 47.42 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.42 Label contents. When an operator...

  19. 30 CFR 47.42 - Label contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Label contents. 47.42 Section 47.42 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.42 Label contents. When an operator...

  20. 30 CFR 47.42 - Label contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Label contents. 47.42 Section 47.42 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.42 Label contents. When an operator...

  1. Learning Words from Labeling and Directive Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callanan, Maureen A.; Akhtar, Nameera; Sussman, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Despite the common intuition that labeling may be the best way to teach a new word to a child, systematic testing is needed of the prediction that children learn words better from labeling utterances than from directive utterances. Two experiments compared toddlers' label learning in the context of hearing words used in directive versus labeling…

  2. China`s environmental labeling program

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J.; Xia, Q.

    1999-09-01

    China`s environmental labeling program was created because the government wanted to improve environmental management, and some Chinese enterprises expected that labeling would help eliminate non-tariff barriers for their exports and allow them to expand their domestic market shares. The labeling program, which is managed by the Chinese government, is a voluntary third-party certification system based on labeling procedures developed in Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development countries. Thus far, China`s labeling program has increased consumer awareness of labeled products and encouraged some enterprises to adopt cleaner technologies in products that have close relationships with consumers` health. However, the effectiveness of the program is very limited because only a small number of product categories are included in the program, consumers` purchasing behavior in China has been influenced by environmental labels for only several types of products, and relatively few enterprises participate in this program. The following measures would improve the effectiveness of the labeling program: enhancing public awareness of environmental labeling and environmental protection, increasing the number of product categories involved in environmental labeling, displaying more information on labels, and integrating the labeling program into China`s efforts to promote cleaner production and to encourage compliance with ISO 14000 standards.

  3. 21 CFR 660.55 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labeling. 660.55 Section 660.55 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Anti-Human Globulin § 660.55 Labeling. In addition to the applicable labeling requirements...

  4. 27 CFR 18.55 - Label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... TREASURY ALCOHOL PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FRUIT-FLAVOR CONCENTRATE Operations § 18.55 Label. Each container of concentrate will have affixed thereto, before transfer, a label identifying the product and... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Label. 18.55 Section...

  5. 47 CFR 15.19 - Labelling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...), and the resulting product is not separately tested: ER09DE03.001 (2) Label text and information should... label on these products shall be permanently affixed to the product and shall be readily visible to the... label shall be located in a conspicuous location on the device and shall contain the...

  6. 21 CFR 610.60 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... following items shall appear on the label affixed to each container of a product capable of bearing a full label: (1) The proper name of the product; (2) The name, address, and license number of manufacturer; (3... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Container label. 610.60 Section 610.60 Food...

  7. 47 CFR 15.19 - Labelling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...), and the resulting product is not separately tested: ER09DE03.001 (2) Label text and information should... label on these products shall be permanently affixed to the product and shall be readily visible to the... label shall be located in a conspicuous location on the device and shall contain the...

  8. 47 CFR 15.19 - Labelling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...), and the resulting product is not separately tested: ER09DE03.001 (2) Label text and information should... label on these products shall be permanently affixed to the product and shall be readily visible to the... label shall be located in a conspicuous location on the device and shall contain the...

  9. 27 CFR 19.604 - Caution label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Caution label. 19.604... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Containers and Marks Marks § 19.604 Caution label... denaturer may be printed on such label, but no other extraneous matter will be permitted thereon without...

  10. 47 CFR 15.19 - Labelling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...), and the resulting product is not separately tested: ER09DE03.001 (2) Label text and information should... label on these products shall be permanently affixed to the product and shall be readily visible to the... label shall be located in a conspicuous location on the device and shall contain the...

  11. 40 CFR 763.171 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... cannot be removed without defacing or destroying them. Product labels shall appear as in paragraph (d)(2... packaging, the label must be attached to the innermost layer adjacent to the product. If the innermost layer... product's innermost layer of product wrapping or packaging, or a label must be attached to the next...

  12. 40 CFR 211.105 - Label format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Label format. 211.105 Section 211.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.105 Label format. (a) Unless specified otherwise in other...

  13. 27 CFR 18.55 - Label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... TREASURY ALCOHOL PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FRUIT-FLAVOR CONCENTRATE Operations § 18.55 Label. Each container of concentrate will have affixed thereto, before transfer, a label identifying the product and... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Label. 18.55 Section...

  14. 21 CFR 610.60 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... following items shall appear on the label affixed to each container of a product capable of bearing a full label: (1) The proper name of the product; (2) The name, address, and license number of manufacturer; (3... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Container label. 610.60 Section 610.60 Food...

  15. 21 CFR 606.121 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Container label. 606.121 Section 606.121 Food and... CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR BLOOD AND BLOOD COMPONENTS Finished Product Control § 606.121 Container label. (a) The container label requirements are designed to facilitate the use of a...

  16. 27 CFR 18.55 - Label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... TREASURY LIQUORS PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FRUIT-FLAVOR CONCENTRATE Operations § 18.55 Label. Each container of concentrate will have affixed thereto, before transfer, a label identifying the product and... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Label. 18.55 Section...

  17. 21 CFR 610.60 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... following items shall appear on the label affixed to each container of a product capable of bearing a full label: (1) The proper name of the product; (2) The name, address, and license number of manufacturer; (3... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Container label. 610.60 Section 610.60 Food...

  18. 9 CFR 116.3 - Label records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... Each label shall be identified as to: (1) Name and product code number as it appears on the product... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Label records. 116.3 Section 116.3..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS RECORDS AND REPORTS § 116.3 Label...

  19. 40 CFR 211.105 - Label format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Label format. 211.105 Section 211.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.105 Label format. (a) Unless specified otherwise in other...

  20. 21 CFR 610.60 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... following items shall appear on the label affixed to each container of a product capable of bearing a full label: (1) The proper name of the product; (2) The name, address, and license number of manufacturer; (3... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Container label. 610.60 Section 610.60 Food...

  1. 47 CFR 15.19 - Labelling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...), and the resulting product is not separately tested: ER09DE03.001 (2) Label text and information should... label on these products shall be permanently affixed to the product and shall be readily visible to the... label shall be located in a conspicuous location on the device and shall contain the...

  2. 40 CFR 211.105 - Label format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Label format. 211.105 Section 211.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.105 Label format. (a) Unless specified otherwise in other...

  3. 9 CFR 116.3 - Label records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... Each label shall be identified as to: (1) Name and product code number as it appears on the product... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Label records. 116.3 Section 116.3..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS RECORDS AND REPORTS § 116.3 Label...

  4. 9 CFR 116.3 - Label records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .... Each label shall be identified as to: (1) Name and product code number as it appears on the product... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Label records. 116.3 Section 116.3..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS RECORDS AND REPORTS § 116.3 Label...

  5. 27 CFR 18.55 - Label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... TREASURY LIQUORS PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FRUIT-FLAVOR CONCENTRATE Operations § 18.55 Label. Each container of concentrate will have affixed thereto, before transfer, a label identifying the product and... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Label. 18.55 Section...

  6. 40 CFR 211.105 - Label format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Label format. 211.105 Section 211.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.105 Label format. (a) Unless specified otherwise in other...

  7. 27 CFR 18.55 - Label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY LIQUORS PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FRUIT-FLAVOR CONCENTRATE Operations § 18.55 Label. Each container of concentrate will have affixed thereto, before transfer, a label identifying the product and... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Label. 18.55 Section...

  8. 21 CFR 610.60 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... following items shall appear on the label affixed to each container of a product capable of bearing a full label: (1) The proper name of the product; (2) The name, address, and license number of manufacturer; (3... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Container label. 610.60 Section 610.60 Food...

  9. 9 CFR 116.3 - Label records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... Each label shall be identified as to: (1) Name and product code number as it appears on the product... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Label records. 116.3 Section 116.3..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS RECORDS AND REPORTS § 116.3 Label...

  10. 40 CFR 763.171 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... cannot be removed without defacing or destroying them. Product labels shall appear as in paragraph (d)(2... packaging, the label must be attached to the innermost layer adjacent to the product. If the innermost layer... product's innermost layer of product wrapping or packaging, or a label must be attached to the next...

  11. 40 CFR 211.105 - Label format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Label format. 211.105 Section 211.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.105 Label format. (a) Unless specified otherwise in other...

  12. 21 CFR 820.120 - Device labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Device labeling. 820.120 Section 820.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Labeling and Packaging Control § 820.120 Device labeling. Each...

  13. 21 CFR 820.120 - Device labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Device labeling. 820.120 Section 820.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Labeling and Packaging Control § 820.120 Device labeling. Each...

  14. 21 CFR 1271.250 - Labeling controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Labeling controls. 1271.250 Section 1271.250 Food..., AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Current Good Tissue Practice § 1271.250 Labeling controls. (a) General. You must establish and maintain procedures to control the labeling of HCT/Ps. You must...

  15. 21 CFR 1271.250 - Labeling controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labeling controls. 1271.250 Section 1271.250 Food..., AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Current Good Tissue Practice § 1271.250 Labeling controls. (a) General. You must establish and maintain procedures to control the labeling of HCT/Ps. You must...

  16. 21 CFR 660.35 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... matrix. (g) The package label or package insert shall state the blood group antigens that have been... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.35 Labeling. In... container label of Group O cells shall state: “FOR USE IN DETECTION OF UNEXPECTED ANTIBODIES” or “FOR USE...

  17. 40 CFR 600.301 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Labeling § 600.301 Labeling... each dealer shall maintain or cause to be maintained on each automobile: (1) A general fuel economy... vehicle for which a specific label is requested which has a combined FTP/HFET-based fuel economy value,...

  18. 21 CFR 820.120 - Device labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Device labeling. 820.120 Section 820.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Labeling and Packaging Control § 820.120 Device labeling. Each...

  19. 10 CFR 431.31 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Labeling requirements. 431.31 Section 431.31 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Electric Motors Labeling § 431.31 Labeling requirements. (a) Electric motor nameplate—(1)...

  20. 10 CFR 431.31 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Labeling requirements. 431.31 Section 431.31 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Electric Motors Labeling § 431.31 Labeling requirements. (a) Electric motor nameplate—(1)...

  1. 10 CFR 431.31 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Labeling requirements. 431.31 Section 431.31 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Electric Motors Labeling § 431.31 Labeling requirements. (a) Electric motor nameplate—(1)...

  2. 10 CFR 431.31 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Labeling requirements. 431.31 Section 431.31 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Electric Motors Labeling § 431.31 Labeling requirements. (a) Electric motor nameplate—(1)...

  3. 10 CFR 431.31 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Labeling requirements. 431.31 Section 431.31 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Electric Motors Labeling § 431.31 Labeling requirements. (a) Electric motor nameplate—(1)...

  4. 21 CFR 1271.250 - Labeling controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling controls. 1271.250 Section 1271.250 Food..., AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Current Good Tissue Practice § 1271.250 Labeling controls. (a) General. You must establish and maintain procedures to control the labeling of HCT/Ps. You must...

  5. 21 CFR 1271.250 - Labeling controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Labeling controls. 1271.250 Section 1271.250 Food..., AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Current Good Tissue Practice § 1271.250 Labeling controls. (a) General. You must establish and maintain procedures to control the labeling of HCT/Ps. You must...

  6. 21 CFR 820.120 - Device labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Device labeling. 820.120 Section 820.120 Food and... QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Labeling and Packaging Control § 820.120 Device labeling. Each manufacturer..., handling instructions, and any additional processing instructions. The release, including the date...

  7. 21 CFR 820.120 - Device labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Device labeling. 820.120 Section 820.120 Food and... QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Labeling and Packaging Control § 820.120 Device labeling. Each manufacturer..., handling instructions, and any additional processing instructions. The release, including the date...

  8. 30 CFR 47.43 - Label alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Label alternatives. 47.43 Section 47.43 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.43 Label alternatives. The operator...

  9. 30 CFR 47.43 - Label alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Label alternatives. 47.43 Section 47.43 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.43 Label alternatives. The operator...

  10. 30 CFR 47.43 - Label alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Label alternatives. 47.43 Section 47.43 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.43 Label alternatives. The operator...

  11. 30 CFR 47.43 - Label alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Label alternatives. 47.43 Section 47.43 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.43 Label alternatives. The operator...

  12. 30 CFR 47.43 - Label alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Label alternatives. 47.43 Section 47.43 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.43 Label alternatives. The operator...

  13. 21 CFR 660.35 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.35 Labeling. In... or end of the label, oustide of the main panel. (2) If washing the cells is required by the manufacturer, the container label shall include appropriate instructions; if the cells should not be...

  14. 21 CFR 660.35 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.35 Labeling. In... or end of the label, oustide of the main panel. (2) If washing the cells is required by the manufacturer, the container label shall include appropriate instructions; if the cells should not be...

  15. 21 CFR 660.35 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.35 Labeling. In... or end of the label, oustide of the main panel. (2) If washing the cells is required by the manufacturer, the container label shall include appropriate instructions; if the cells should not be...

  16. 21 CFR 225.80 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR MEDICATED FEEDS Packaging and Labeling § 225.80 Labeling. (a... adhered to, will assure that the article is safe and effective for its intended purposes. (b)(1) Labels... medicated feed and includes adequate information for the safe and effective use of the medicated feed....

  17. Fluorine-18 labeling of proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbourn, M.R.; Dence, C.S.; Welch, M.J.; Mathias, C.J.

    1987-04-01

    Two fluorine-18-labeled reagents, methyl 3-(/sup 18/F)fluoro-5-nitrobenzimidate and 4-(/sup 18/F)fluorophenacyl bromide, have been prepared for covalent attachment of fluorine-18 to proteins. Both reagents can be prepared in moderate yields (30-50%, EOB) in synthesis times of 50-70 min. Reaction of these reagents with proteins (human serum albumin, human fibrinogen, and human immunoglobulin A) is pH independent, protein concentration dependent, and takes 5-60 min at mild pH (8.0) and temperature (25-37 degrees C), in yields up to 95% (corrected). The /sup 18/F-labeled proteins are purified by size exclusion chromatography.

  18. Automated labeling in document images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongwoo; Le, Daniel X.; Thoma, George R.

    2000-12-01

    The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is developing an automated system to produce bibliographic records for its MEDLINER database. This system, named Medical Article Record System (MARS), employs document image analysis and understanding techniques and optical character recognition (OCR). This paper describes a key module in MARS called the Automated Labeling (AL) module, which labels all zones of interest (title, author, affiliation, and abstract) automatically. The AL algorithm is based on 120 rules that are derived from an analysis of journal page layouts and features extracted from OCR output. Experiments carried out on more than 11,000 articles in over 1,000 biomedical journals show the accuracy of this rule-based algorithm to exceed 96%.

  19. Isotope Labeling in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Arpana; Saxena, Krishna; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Isotope labeling of proteins represents an important and often required tool for the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to investigate the structure and dynamics of proteins. Mammalian expression systems have conventionally been considered to be too weak and inefficient for protein expression. However, recent advances have significantly improved the expression levels of these systems. Here, we provide an overview of some of the recent developments in expression strategies for mammalian expression systems in view of NMR investigations. PMID:22167668

  20. 78 FR 24211 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Safety Considerations for Container Labels and Carton Labeling...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... closure design (December 13, 2012, 77 FR 74196), and the third guidance will focus on minimizing risks... Container Labels and Carton Labeling Design To Minimize Medication Errors; Availability AGENCY: Food and... Labels and Carton Labeling Design to Minimize Medication Errors.'' The draft guidance focuses on...

  1. 40 CFR 168.65 - Pesticide export label and labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... policy. (3) No statements which appear on any of the product labels or labeling add new uses or claims or... paragraph (b) of this section which are not met by the immediate product labels. Supplemental labeling will... CFR 180.910, 180.920, 180.930, and 180.950, and the dye must not be a List 1 inert. (List 1 inerts...

  2. 40 CFR 168.65 - Pesticide export label and labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... policy. (3) No statements which appear on any of the product labels or labeling add new uses or claims or... paragraph (b) of this section which are not met by the immediate product labels. Supplemental labeling will... CFR 180.910, 180.920, 180.930, and 180.950, and the dye must not be a List 1 inert. (List 1 inerts...

  3. 27 CFR 19.642 - Statements required on labels under an exemption from label approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... meaning given, and be stated in the manner provided in 27 CFR part 5. (Sec. 201, Pub. L. 85-859, 72 Stat... labels under an exemption from label approval. 19.642 Section 19.642 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... PLANTS Liquor Bottle and Label Requirements Bottle Label Requirements § 19.642 Statements required...

  4. Ovarian follicular growth suppression by long-term treatment with a GnRH agonist and impact on small follicle number, oocyte yield, and in vitro embryo production in Zebu beef cows.

    PubMed

    Batista, E O S; Vieira, L M; Sá Filho, M F; Dias, E A R; Bayeux, B M; Accorsi, M F; Monteiro, F M; Souza, A H; Baruselli, P S; D'Occhio, M J

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate small follicle number, oocyte yield, and in vitro embryo production (IVEP) in Zebu beef cows treated long term with a GnRH agonist to suppress ovarian follicular growth. Nelore (Bos indicus) cows (n = 20) showing regular estrous cycles were randomly assigned to one of two groups: control (n = 10, placebo ear implant without a GnRH agonist); GnRH agonist (n = 10, GnRH agonist ear implant containing 9.4-mg deslorelin). All cows underwent an ovum pick-up (OPU) session 14 days (Day 14) before the start of treatments (Day 0) followed by seven OPU-IVEP procedures at 30-day intervals (Days 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180). Semen from a single batch of a previously tested bull was used for all the IVEP. Cows treated with agonist reported a decrease over time in the proportion of animals with a (CL; P ≤ 0.05) and large follicles (>10 mm, P ≤ 0.05). These cows had a lesser number of medium + large follicles (>5 mm; 1.74 ± 0.5 vs. 4.13 ± 0.5; P ≤ 0.05), greater number of small follicles (2-5 mm; 44.3 ± 2.8 vs. 30.8 ± 1.8; P ≤ 0.05), greater yield of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs; 21.0 ± 2.3 vs. 15.6 ± 1.9; P ≤ 0.05), greater proportion of COCs cultured (79.2 vs. 73.9%; P ≤ 0.05), COCs cleaved (10.6 ± 1.5 vs. 6.8 ± 1.1, P ≤ 0.05), and cleaved rate (52.8 vs. 44.3%; P ≤ 0.05) compared with control cows. The number (3.4 ± 0.7 vs. 3.0 ± 0.6; P > 0.05) and proportion (16.5 vs. 19.1%; P > 0.05) of blastocysts produced were similar between agonist and control cows, respectively. The study has shown that Zebu beef cows treated long term with a GnRH agonist had follicular growth restricted to small follicles. This did not compromise the ability of oocytes to undergo IVF and embryonic development. PMID:26924682

  5. Effects of GnRH or PGF2α in week 5 postpartum on the incidence of cystic ovarian follicles and persistent corpora lutea and on fertility parameters in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Lüttgenau, J; Kögel, T; Bollwein, H

    2016-03-15

    Resumption of ovulatory activity and the timely lysis of the first CL postpartum (pp) are important determinants for the reproductive performance of dairy cows. Cystic ovarian follicles (COFs) and persistent CLs preclude normal ovarian cyclicity and increase the calving interval. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of GnRH on the incidence of COFs and the effect of PGF2α on the incidence of a prolonged luteal phase (PLP) and on fertility parameters in dairy cows. A total of 476 cows were examined ultrasonographically for the presence of a dominant follicle (12-25 mm, without CL >10 mm; n = 237) or a functional CL (≥20 mm; n = 239) between 28 and 35 days pp and were allocated to one of four groups. Cows with a dominant follicle received 10-μg GnRH (buserelin; group F-T; n = 118) or saline (group F-C; n = 119), and cows with a functional CL received 0.5 mg of a PGF2α analogue (cloprostenol; group CL-T; n = 119) or saline (group CL-C; n = 120) on the day of initial examination, defined as Day 0. Cows were reexamined 7 and 21 days (F-T and F-C) and 3 and 24 days (CL-T and CL-C) later, and COFs were treated immediately after diagnosis in all cows. On the basis of the ovarian findings on Days 21 and 24, cows were treated according to a protocol aimed at timely breeding. The incidence of COFs by Days 7 (F-T vs. F-C; 7.6% vs. 16.8%) and 21 (11.0% vs. 21.8%) decreased (P ≤ 0.03) with GnRH; however, this did not lead to a substantial improvement of calving-to-conception interval (means ± standard error of the mean; 107.91 ± 5.70 vs. 117.94 ± 6.63 days), first-service conception rate (42.3% vs. 41.3%), and number of services per conception (2.06 ± 0.12 vs. 2.31 ± 0.15). Treatment with PGF2α decreased (P < 0.0001) the incidence of PLP by Day 24 (CL-T vs. CL-C; 1.7% vs. 17.5%), decreased calving-to-conception interval(91.28 ± 4.77 vs. 101.75 ± 5.03 days), increased first-service conception rate (63.3% vs. 38.7%), and reduced the number of

  6. Stigma of a label: educational expectations for high school students labeled with learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Shifrer, Dara

    2013-01-01

    Poorer outcomes for youth labeled with learning disabilities (LDs) are often attributed to the student's own deficiencies or cumulative disadvantage; but the more troubling possibility is that special education placement limits rather than expands these students' opportunities. Labeling theory partially attributes the poorer outcomes of labeled persons to stigma related to labels. This study uses data on approximately 11,740 adolescents and their schools from the Education Longitudinal Survey of 2002 to determine if stigma influences teachers' and parents' educational expectations for students labeled with LDs and labeled adolescents' expectations for themselves. Supporting the predictions of labeling theory, teachers and parents are more likely to perceive disabilities in, and hold lower educational expectations for labeled adolescents than for similarly achieving and behaving adolescents not labeled with disabilities. The negative effect of being labeled with LDs on adolescents' educational expectations is partially mechanized through parents' and particularly teachers' lower expectations. PMID:24311756

  7. Use of Symbols in Labeling. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-06-15

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or the Agency) is issuing this final rule revising its medical device and certain biological product labeling regulations to explicitly allow for the optional inclusion of graphical representations of information, or symbols, in labeling (including labels) without adjacent explanatory text (referred to in this document as "stand-alone symbols") if certain requirements are met. The final rule also specifies that the use of symbols, accompanied by adjacent explanatory text continues to be permitted. FDA is also revising its prescription device labeling regulations to allow the use of the symbol statement "Rx only" or "[rx] only" in the labeling for prescription devices. PMID:27311137

  8. Dengue virus growth, purification, and fluorescent labeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Summer; Chan, Kuan Rong; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2014-01-01

    The early events of the dengue virus life cycle involve virus binding, internalization, trafficking, and fusion. Fluorescently labeled viruses can be used to visualize these early processes. As dengue virus has 180 identical copies of the envelope protein attached to the membrane surface and is surrounded by a lipid membrane, amine-reactive (Alexa Fluor) or lipophilic (DiD) dyes can be used for virus labeling. These dyes are highly photostable and are ideal for studies involving cellular uptake and endosomal transport. To improve virus labeling efficiency and minimize the nonspecific labeling of nonviral proteins, virus concentration and purification precede fluorescent labeling of dengue viruses. Besides using these viruses for single-particle tracking, DiD-labeled viruses can also be used to distinguish serotype-specific from cross-neutralizing antibodies. Here the details of virus concentration, purification, virus labeling, applications, and hints of troubleshooting are described. PMID:24696327

  9. Label free redox capacitive biosensing.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Flávio C Bedatty; Góes, Márcio S; Davis, Jason J; Bueno, Paulo R

    2013-12-15

    A surface confined redox group contributes to an interfacial charging (quantifiable by redox capacitance) that can be sensitively probed by impedance derived capacitance spectroscopy. In generating mixed molecular films comprising such redox groups, together with specific recognition elements (here antibodies), this charging signal is able to sensitively transduce the recognition and binding of specific analytes. This novel transduction method, exemplified here with C-reactive protein, an important biomarker of cardiac status and general trauma, is equally applicable to any suitably prepared interfacial combination of redox reporter and receptor. The assays are label free, ultrasensitive, highly specific and accompanied by a good linear range. PMID:23896524

  10. Tritium labeling of detonation nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Girard, Hugues A; El-Kharbachi, Abdelouahab; Garcia-Argote, Sébastien; Petit, Tristan; Bergonzo, Philippe; Rousseau, Bernard; Arnault, Jean-Charles

    2014-03-18

    For the first time, the radioactive labeling of detonation nanodiamonds was efficiently achieved using a tritium microwave plasma. According to our measurements, the total radioactivity reaches 9120 ± 120 μCi mg(-1), with 93% of (3)H atoms tightly bonded to the surface and up to 7% embedded into the diamond core. Such (3)H doping will ensure highly stable radiolabeled nanodiamonds, on which surface functionalization is still allowed. This breakthrough opens the way to biodistribution and pharmacokinetics studies of nanodiamonds, while this approach can be scalable to easily treat bulk quantities of nanodiamonds at low cost. PMID:24492594

  11. Hemoglobin Labeled by Radioactive Lysine

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Bale, W. F.; Yuile, C. L.; DeLaVergne, L.; Miller, L. L.; Whipple, G. H.

    1949-12-08

    This paper reports on the utilization of tagged epsilon carbon of DL-lysine by a dog both anemic and hypoproteinemic due to repeated bleeding plus a diet low in protein. The experiment extended over period of 234 days, a time sufficient to indicate an erythrocyte life span of at least 115 days based upon the rate of replacement of labeled red cell proteins. The proteins of broken down red cells seem not to be used with any great preference for the synthesis of new hemoglobin.

  12. Social determinants of diagnostic labels in depression.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Susan; Armstrong, David

    2006-01-01

    The role of diagnostic labels in medicine is usually that of labelling an illness as a means of communication. Control over labelling processes in medicine is ordinarily imposed via medical schools, textbooks, education or by diagnostic manuals. Diagnostic labels often change following new discoveries in underlying pathology such as 'consumption' being relabelled as 'TB' or 'cancer'. Sub-types of broad diagnostic labels also often emerge from such discoveries e.g. 'lung cancer' or 'throat cancer'. In mental health, underlying pathology is the subject of ongoing debate spanning ideas including the brain as a faulty organ, faulty genetics and environmental problems. With controversy over pathology comes controversy over labels and the idea that labels may be used not just for communication, but as devices of social and professional control, arising out of a social process. This study explores the codification of the diagnostic label 'depression' which emerged in the twentieth-century and has proliferated with numerous sub-types over the last 40 years. The aim is to examine its social determinants and context. Medline is used as a data source for professional label usage. A range of depression sub-type labels in professional use was identified. This exercise revealed many official and 'unofficial' terms in professional use. Citation rate plots by year were then generated for these depression sub-type labels. The rise and fall of different labels are examined in relation to social determinants and context, including publication of diagnostic manuals DSM and ICD, power shifts in psychiatry, the discovery of psychiatric drugs and the shift from inpatient to community care. Exploring the changing use of official and unofficial labels over time in this way provides a novel historical perspective on the concept of depression in the late twentieth-century. PMID:16009477

  13. Label-free molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junqi; Li, Qi; Fu, Rongxin; Wang, Tongzhou; Wang, Ruliang; Huang, Guoliang

    2014-03-01

    Optical microscopy technology has achieved great improvements in the 20th century. The detection limit has reached about twenty nanometers (with near-field optics, STED, PALM and STORM). But in the application areas such as life science, medical science, clinical treatment and especially in vivo dynamic measurement, mutual restrictions still exist between numeric aperture/magnification and working distance, fluorescent dependent, and between resolution and frame rate/field size, etc. This paper explores a hyperspectral scanning super-resolution label free molecules imaging method based on the white light interferometry. The vertical detection resolution was approximate to 1 nm which is the thickness of a single molecular layer and dynamic measuring range of thickness reaches to 10 μm. The spectrum-shifting algorithm is developed for robust restructure of images when the pixels are overlapped. Micro-biochip with protein binding and DNA amplification could be detected by using this spectral scanning super-resolution molecules imaging in label free. This method has several advantages as following: Firstly, the decoding and detecting steps are combined into one step. It makes tests faster and easier. Secondly, we used thickness-coded, minimized chips instead of a large microarray chip to carry the probes. This accelerates the interaction of the biomolecules. Thirdly, since only one kind of probes are attached to our thickness-coded, minimized chip, users can only pick out the probes they are interested in for a test without wasting unnecessary probes and chips.

  14. Label-free photoacoustic nanoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Danielli, Amos; Maslov, Konstantin; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Winkler, Amy M.; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lidai; Chen, Yun; Dorn, Gerald W.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Super-resolution microscopy techniques—capable of overcoming the diffraction limit of light—have opened new opportunities to explore subcellular structures and dynamics not resolvable in conventional far-field microscopy. However, relying on staining with exogenous fluorescent markers, these techniques can sometimes introduce undesired artifacts to the image, mainly due to large tagging agent sizes and insufficient or variable labeling densities. By contrast, the use of endogenous pigments allows imaging of the intrinsic structures of biological samples with unaltered molecular constituents. Here, we report label-free photoacoustic (PA) nanoscopy, which is exquisitely sensitive to optical absorption, with an 88 nm resolution. At each scanning position, multiple PA signals are successively excited with increasing laser pulse energy. Because of optical saturation or nonlinear thermal expansion, the PA amplitude depends on the nonlinear incident optical fluence. The high-order dependence, quantified by polynomial fitting, provides super-resolution imaging with optical sectioning. PA nanoscopy is capable of super-resolution imaging of either fluorescent or nonfluorescent molecules. PMID:25104412

  15. Chemical kin label in seabirds.

    PubMed

    Célérier, Aurélie; Bon, Cécile; Malapert, Aurore; Palmas, Pauline; Bonadonna, Francesco

    2011-12-23

    Chemical signals yield critical socio-ecological information in many animals, such as species, identity, social status or sex, but have been poorly investigated in birds. Recent results showed that chemical signals are used to recognize their nest and partner by some petrel seabirds whose olfactory anatomy is well developed and which possess a life-history propitious to olfactory-mediated behaviours. Here, we investigate whether blue petrels (Halobaena caerulea) produce some chemical labels potentially involved in kin recognition and inbreeding avoidance. To overcome methodological constraints of chemical analysis and field behavioural experiments, we used an indirect behavioural approach, based on mice olfactory abilities in discriminating odours. We showed that mice (i) can detect odour differences between individual petrels, (ii) perceive a high odour similarity between a chick and its parents, and (iii) perceive this similarity only before fledging but not during the nestling developmental stage. Our results confirm the existence of an individual olfactory signature in blue petrels and show for the first time, to our knowledge, that birds may exhibit an olfactory kin label, which may have strong implications for inbreeding avoidance. PMID:21525047

  16. Inulin determination for food labeling.

    PubMed

    Zuleta, A; Sambucetti, M E

    2001-10-01

    Inulin and oligofructose exhibit valuable nutritional and functional attributes, so they are used as supplements as soluble fiber or as macronutrient substitutes. As classic analytical methods for dietary fiber measurement are not effective, several specific methods have been proposed. These methods measure total fructans and are based on one or more enzymatic sample treatments and determination of released sugars. To determine inulin for labeling purposes, we developed an easy and rapid anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method following water extraction of inulin. HPLC conditions included an Aminex HPX- 87C column (Bio-Rad), deionized water at 85 degrees C as the mobile phase and a refractive index detector. The tested foods included tailor-made food products containing known amounts of inulin and commercial products (cookies, milk, ice creams, cheese, and cereal bars). The average recovery was 97%, and the coefficient of variation ranged from 1.1 to 5% in the food matrixes. The obtained results showed that this method provides an easier, faster and cheaper alternative than previous techniques for determining inulin with enough accuracy and precision for routine labeling purposes by direct determination of inulin by HPLC with refractive index detection. PMID:11599989

  17. Label transfer by measuring compactness.

    PubMed

    Varga, Robert; Nedevschi, Sergiu

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a new automatic image annotation algorithm. First, we introduce a new similarity measure between images: compactness. This uses low level visual descriptors for determining the similarity between two images. Compactness shows how close test image features lie to training image feature cluster centers. The measure provides the core for a k-nearest neighbor type image annotation method. Afterward, a formalism for defining different transfer techniques is devised and several label transfer techniques are provided. The method as whole is evaluated on four image annotation benchmarks. The results on these sets validate the accuracy of the approach, which outperforms many state-of-the-art annotation methods. The method presented here requires a simple training process, efficiently combines different feature types and performs better than complex learning algorithms, even in this incipient form. The main contributions of this paper are the usage of compactness as a similarity measure that enables efficient low level feature comparison and an annotation algorithm based on label transfer. PMID:23955754

  18. 16 CFR 309.17 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... is centered. The band at the top of the label contains the name of the fuel. This band should measure 1″ (2.54 cm) deep. Spacing of the fuel name is 1/4″ (.64 cm) from the top of the label and 3/16.... “Helvetica black” type is used throughout. All type is centered. The band at the top of the label...

  19. 75 FR 81943 - Appliance Labeling Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ...The Commission proposes changing the effective date for its new light bulb labeling requirements (published on July 19, 2010, 75 FR 41696) to January 1, 2012, to provide manufacturers with additional time to incorporate the new label on their packaging. The Commission also proposes not requiring the new label for incandescent bulbs (e.g., 75 watt bulbs) that, as of 2013, will not meet federal......

  20. A programmed labeling approach to image interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pore, M. D.; Abotteen, R. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    Manual labeling techniques require the analyst-interpreter to use not only production film converter products but also agricultural and meteorological data and spectral aids in an integrated, judgmental fashion. To control an anticipated high variance in these techniques, a semiautomatic labeling technology was developed. The product of this technology is label identification from statistical tabulation (LIST) which operates from a discriminant basis and has the ability to measure the reliability of the label and to introduce an arbitrary bias. The development of LIST and its properties are described. Numerical results of an application are included and the evaluation of LIST is discussed.

  1. Simultaneous segmentation and statistical label fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asman, Andrew J.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2012-02-01

    Labeling or segmentation of structures of interest in medical imaging plays an essential role in both clinical and scientific understanding. Two of the common techniques to obtain these labels are through either fully automated segmentation or through multi-atlas based segmentation and label fusion. Fully automated techniques often result in highly accurate segmentations but lack the robustness to be viable in many cases. On the other hand, label fusion techniques are often extremely robust, but lack the accuracy of automated algorithms for specific classes of problems. Herein, we propose to perform simultaneous automated segmentation and statistical label fusion through the reformulation of a generative model to include a linkage structure that explicitly estimates the complex global relationships between labels and intensities. These relationships are inferred from the atlas labels and intensities and applied to the target using a non-parametric approach. The novelty of this approach lies in the combination of previously exclusive techniques and attempts to combine the accuracy benefits of automated segmentation with the robustness of a multi-atlas based approach. The accuracy benefits of this simultaneous approach are assessed using a multi-label multi-atlas whole-brain segmentation experiment and the segmentation of the highly variable thyroid on computed tomography images. The results demonstrate that this technique has major benefits for certain types of problems and has the potential to provide a paradigm shift in which the lines between statistical label fusion and automated segmentation are dramatically blurred.

  2. Seasonal changes in plasma concentrations of gonadotropins and in the responsiveness of the pituitary and testis to GnRH in a desert rodent, the sand rat (Psammomys obesus).

    PubMed

    Khammar, F; Brudieux, R

    1991-01-01

    The male sand rat (Psammomys obesus), captured alive in the Sahara desert in the area of Béni-Abbès (Algeria), exhibited seasonal changes in plasma concentrations of LH, characterized by an increase in early summer. Administration of a standard dose of GnRH (200 ng/100 g body weight) failed to elicit significant season-dependent changes in LH release, whereas the increase in plasma testosterone was maximum in June-July and quite small between November and March-April. The present results suggest that the summer seasonal onset of the testicular endocrine activity of the sand rat is due to increases both in LH release and in testis sensitivity to gonadotropin. PMID:1777059

  3. 16 CFR Appendix L to Part 305 - Sample Labels

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Register citations affecting appendix L, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the... Part 305—Sample Labels ER29AU07.122 PROTOTYPE LABEL 1 ER29AU07.123 PROTOTYPE LABEL 2 ER29AU07.124 PROTOTYPE LABEL 3 ER29AU07.125 PROTOTYPE LABEL 4 ER29AU07.126 SAMPLE LABEL 1 ER29AU07.127 SAMPLE LABEL...

  4. The Dlx5 and Foxg1 transcription factors, linked via miRNA-9 and -200, are required for the development of the olfactory and GnRH system

    PubMed Central

    Garaffo, Giulia; Conte, Daniele; Provero, Paolo; Tomaiuolo, Daniela; Luo, Zheng; Pinciroli, Patrizia; Peano, Clelia; D'Atri, Ilaria; Gitton, Yorick; Etzion, Talya; Gothilf, Yoav; Gays, Dafne; Santoro, Massimo M.; Merlo, Giorgio R.

    2015-01-01

    During neuronal development and maturation, microRNAs (miRs) play diverse functions ranging from early patterning, proliferation and commitment to differentiation, survival, homeostasis, activity and plasticity of more mature and adult neurons. The role of miRs in the differentiation of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) is emerging from the conditional inactivation of Dicer in immature ORN, and the depletion of all mature miRs in this system. Here, we identify specific miRs involved in olfactory development, by focusing on mice null for Dlx5, a homeogene essential for both ORN differentiation and axon guidance and connectivity. Analysis of miR expression in Dlx5−/− olfactory epithelium pointed to reduced levels of miR-9, miR-376a and four miRs of the -200 class in the absence of Dlx5. To functionally examine the role of these miRs, we depleted miR-9 and miR-200 class in reporter zebrafish embryos and observed delayed ORN differentiation, altered axonal trajectory/targeting, and altered genesis and position of olfactory-associated GnRH neurons, i.e. a phenotype known as Kallmann syndrome in humans. miR-9 and miR-200-class negatively control Foxg1 mRNA, a fork-head transcription factor essential for development of the olfactory epithelium and of the forebrain, known to maintain progenitors in a stem state. Increased levels of z-foxg1 mRNA resulted in delayed ORN differentiation and altered axon trajectory, in zebrafish embryos. This work describes for the first time the role of specific miR (-9 and -200) in olfactory/GnRH development, and uncovers a Dlx5–Foxg1 regulation whose alteration affects receptor neuron differentiation, axonal targeting, GnRH neuron development, the hallmarks of the Kallmann syndrome. PMID:25937343

  5. Comparative efficacy of E-17β and GnRH administration on day 0 of a controlled internal drug release (CIDR) based protocol on synchrony of wave emergence, ovulation and conception rates in Murrah buffalos (Bubalus bubalis)

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, G. R.; Dhaliwal, G. S.; Ghuman, S.; Honparkhe, M.

    2015-01-01

    The study was undertaken to compare the efficacy of an estradiol-17β + CIDR based protocol with the conventional ovsynch + CIDR based protocol for synchrony of wave emergence and ovulation in Murrah buffalos. In group I (n=25), on day 0 (beginning of experiment), buffaloes were administered a CIDR device (1.38 g P4) and concurrently received 1.5 mg E-17β. On day 9, the CIDR was removed and a prostaglandin (PG) F2α analogue (500 µg) was administered. On day 11, buffaloes were administered a gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) analogue (20 µg) and inseminated twice at 12 h and 24 h following GnRH injections. Group II (n=25) protocol was based on an ovsynch regimen plus CIDR for 7 days followed by double insemination at induced estrus. Group III (n=10) served as control and was not given any hormone on day 0 of the protocol. In groups I, II and III, the duration of new follicular wave emergences were observed on days 4.22 ± 0.12, 3.12 ± 0.33 and 5.14 ± 0.42, respectively. In group I, synchrony of wave emergence was more and the diameter of pre-ovulatory follicles was larger (P<0.05) compared to groups II and III. The first service conception rate (FSCR) was higher (P<0.05) in group I while ovulation rates were not different between groups I and II. In conclusion, more synchrony of wave emergence, larger diameter of dominant follicles and higher first service conception rate was observed following the E-17β + CIDR based protocol in buffalos. PMID:27175151

  6. A Reevaluation of the Question: Is the Pubertal Resurgence in Pulsatile GnRH Release in the Male Rhesus Monkey (Macaca mulatta) Associated With a Gonad-Independent Augmentation of GH Secretion?

    PubMed

    Shahab, M; Trujillo, M Vargas; Plant, T M

    2015-10-01

    A somatic signal has been posited to trigger the pubertal resurgence in pulsatile GnRH secretion that initiates puberty in highly evolved primates. That GH might provide such a signal emerged in 2000 as a result of a study reporting that circulating nocturnal GH concentrations in castrated juvenile male monkeys increased in a 3-week period immediately preceding the pubertal resurgence of LH secretion. The present study was conducted to reexamine this intriguing relationship, again in an agonadal model. Four castrated juvenile male monkeys were implanted with indwelling jugular catheters, housed in remote sampling cages, and subjected to 24 hours of sequential blood sampling (every 30 min) every 2 weeks from 19.5 to 22 months of age. Twenty-four-hour profiles of circulating GH concentrations were analyzed using the pulse detection algorithm, PULSAR, and developmental changes in pulsatile GH release with respect to the initiation of the pubertal rise of LH secretion (week 0; observed between 22.5 and 32 mo of age) were examined for significance by a repeated-measures ANOVA. Changes in the parameters of pulsatile GH secretion, including mean 24-hour GH concentration and GH pulse frequency and pulse amplitude for 3 (n = 4) and 6 (n = 3) months before week 0 were unremarkable and nonsignificant. These findings fail to confirm those of the earlier study and lead us to conclude that the timing of the pubertal resurgence of GnRH release in the male monkey is not dictated by GH. Reasons for the discrepancy between the two studies are unclear. PMID:26181107

  7. Systematic Comparison of Label-Free, Metabolic Labeling, and Isobaric Chemical Labeling for Quantitative Proteomics on LTQ Orbitrap Velos

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhou; Adams, Rachel M; Chourey, Karuna; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Pan, Chongle

    2012-01-01

    A variety of quantitative proteomics methods have been developed, including label-free, metabolic labeling, and isobaric chemical labeling using iTRAQ or TMT. Here, these methods were compared in terms of the depth of proteome coverage, quantification accuracy, precision, and reproducibility using a high-performance hybrid mass spectrometer, LTQ Orbitrap Velos. Our results show that (1) the spectral counting method provides the deepest proteome coverage for identification, but its quantification performance is worse than labeling-based approaches, especially the quantification reproducibility; (2) metabolic labeling and isobaric chemical labeling are capable of accurate, precise, and reproducible quantification and provide deep proteome coverage for quantification. Isobaric chemical labeling surpasses metabolic labeling in terms of quantification precision and reproducibility; (3) iTRAQ and TMT perform similarly in all aspects compared in the current study using a CID-HCD dual scan configuration. Based on the unique advantages of each method, we provide guidance for selection of the appropriate method for a quantitative proteomics study.

  8. F-18 labeled 3-fluorodiazepam

    SciTech Connect

    Luxen, A.; Barrio, J.R.; Bida, G.T.; Satyamurthy, N.; Phelps, M.E.

    1985-05-01

    3-Fluorodiazepam is a new and potent antianxiety agent with prolonged action. The authors found that molecular fluorine (0.5% in Ne) reacts cleanly with diazepam in freon or chloroform at room temperature to produce 3-fluorodiazepam in good yields. Successful syntheses have employed 2:1 to 5:1 molar ratios diazepam: fluorine to minimize the formation of byproducts. (/sup 18/F) 3-Fluorodiazepam, a potential candidate for PET studies, (specific activity 3-5 Ci/mmol) has been synthesized from /sup 18/F-F/sub 2/ using the same procedure, followed by column chromatographic purification (Silicagel, dichloromethane: ethyl acetate, 5:1) with a radiochemical yield of 12-20% (50% maximum) and a chemical and radiochemical purity >99% as judged by reversed-phase high pressure liquid chromatography analysis (Ultrasyl octyl column, 10 ..mu.. m, 4.6 x 250 mm i.d., 60% MeOH 40% water; flow rate, 1.0 ml/min; retention time for (/sup 18/F) fluorodiazepam, 11.4 min; for diazepam, 13.5 min; radioactivity and ultraviolet detectors). Lower radiochemical yields (5-7%), and significant formation of by-products were observed when (/sup 18/F)acetylhypofluorite, prepared in the gasphase, was used as the reagent. Readily accessible routes to /sup 18/F-labeled benzodiazepines of higher specific activity were also investigated. Approaches to the synthesis of high specific activity (>200 Ci/mmol) (/sup 18/F)3-fluorodiazepam involve nucleophilic displacement at carbon-3 (e.g. from 3-chlorodiazepam) with (/sup 18/F)fluoride ion. The results presented here demonstrate the synthetic accessibility of /sup 18/F-labeled benzodiazepines for application in neurotransmitter ligand studies with PET.

  9. Labeled nucleotide phosphate (NP) probes

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2009-02-03

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  10. The reappropriation of stigmatizing labels: the reciprocal relationship between power and self-labeling.

    PubMed

    Galinsky, Adam D; Wang, Cynthia S; Whitson, Jennifer A; Anicich, Eric M; Hugenberg, Kurt; Bodenhausen, Galen V

    2013-10-01

    We present a theoretical model of reappropriation--taking possession of a slur previously used exclusively by dominant groups to reinforce another group's lesser status. Ten experiments tested this model and established a reciprocal relationship between power and self-labeling with a derogatory group term. We first investigated precursors to self-labeling: Group, but not individual, power increased participants' willingness to label themselves with a derogatory term for their group. We then examined the consequences of such self-labeling for both the self and observers. Self-labelers felt more powerful after self-labeling, and observers perceived them and their group as more powerful. Finally, these labels were evaluated less negatively after self-labeling, and this attenuation of stigma was mediated by perceived power. These effects occurred only for derogatory terms (e.g., queer, bitch), and not for descriptive (e.g., woman) or majority-group (e.g., straight) labels. These results suggest that self-labeling with a derogatory label can weaken the label's stigmatizing force. PMID:23955354

  11. To Label or Not to Label: The Special Education Question for African Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Moniqueka E.; Richards, Heraldo

    2012-01-01

    Over the years, the benefits of categorically identifying and labeling students with disabilities have been debated on many grounds, particularly when it comes to labeling African-American children who many argue are over-labeled or disproportionately represented in selected categories such as learning disabilities. In this article, the authors…

  12. 9 CFR 112.2 - Final container label, carton label, and enclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... product and the number of doses in each final container shall be stated on each carton label for all... product is recommended specifically for animals, and not for humans. (e) When label requirements of a... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Final container label, carton...

  13. 9 CFR 112.2 - Final container label, carton label, and enclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... product and the number of doses in each final container shall be stated on each carton label for all... product is recommended specifically for animals, and not for humans. (e) When label requirements of a... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Final container label, carton...

  14. 9 CFR 112.2 - Final container label, carton label, and enclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... product and the number of doses in each final container shall be stated on each carton label for all... product is recommended specifically for animals, and not for humans. (e) When label requirements of a... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Final container label, carton...

  15. 9 CFR 112.2 - Final container label, carton label, and enclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... product and the number of doses in each final container shall be stated on each carton label for all... product is recommended specifically for animals, and not for humans. (e) When label requirements of a... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Final container label, carton...

  16. 40 CFR 60.536 - Permanent label, temporary label, and owner's manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Performance for New Residential Wood Heaters § 60.536 Permanent label, temporary label, and owner's manual. (a... section. (2) Except for wood heaters subject to § 60.530 (e), (f), or (g), the permanent label shall... material expected to last the lifetime of the wood heater, (iv) Present required information in a manner...

  17. 40 CFR 60.536 - Permanent label, temporary label, and owner's manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Performance for New Residential Wood Heaters § 60.536 Permanent label, temporary label, and owner's manual. (a... section. (2) Except for wood heaters subject to § 60.530 (e), (f), or (g), the permanent label shall... material expected to last the lifetime of the wood heater, (iv) Present required information in a manner...

  18. Portion Size Labeling and Intended Soft Drink Consumption: The Impact of Labeling Format and Size Portfolio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermeer, Willemijn M.; Steenhuis, Ingrid H. M.; Leeuwis, Franca H.; Bos, Arjan E. R.; de Boer, Michiel; Seidell, Jacob C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess what portion size labeling "format" is most promising in helping consumers selecting appropriate soft drink sizes, and whether labeling impact depends on the size portfolio. Methods: An experimental study was conducted in fast-food restaurants in which 2 labeling formats (ie, reference portion size and small/medium/large…

  19. 9 CFR 112.2 - Final container label, carton label, and enclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final container label, carton label, and enclosure. 112.2 Section 112.2 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS PACKAGING AND LABELING § 112.2 Final...

  20. 21 CFR 640.70 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.70 Labeling. Link to an amendment published... information shall appear on the label affixed to each container of Source Plasma: (1) The proper name of the... shall follow the proper name in the same size and type of print as the proper name. If the Source...